Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
Virginia Birding

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Friday, February 24 at 04:46 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-throated Robin,©BirdQuest

24 Feb Eagles -Waterfowl: Mason Neck SP; Pohick Bay [Donald Sweig ]
24 Feb Re: Saw-whet Owls, Shenandoah Nat. Park [Diane L via va-bird ]
24 Feb Clay-colored Sparrow in James City County [Brian Taber via va-bird ]
23 Feb Lynchburg Baltimore oriole still here!! New record?? [Ashley Lohr ]
23 Feb The best way to reply to a thread? [Howard Wu ]
24 Feb Woodcocks calling at Difficult Creek Natural Area Preserve [Eric Harrold via va-bird ]
23 Feb Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list. [Dixie Sommers via va-bird ]
23 Feb Florida Trip Part III - Sweetwater Wetlands Gainesville ["Rowe, Richard A, 'Dick'" ]
23 Feb Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list. [Scott Jackson-Ricketts ]
23 Feb Yard Birds - Purple Finch and Fox Sparriw [Gerco H ]
23 Feb Shenandoah National Park [Herbert Larner via va-bird ]
22 Feb Re: Where the Alcids be? [Karen Kearney via va-bird ]
22 Feb Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list. [Bill Hohenstein ]
22 Feb Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list. [Ashley Lohr ]
22 Feb Where the Alcids be? [Lee Atwood via va-bird ]
22 Feb Florida Trip Part II - Tarpon Springs Area ["Rowe, Richard A, 'Dick'" ]
22 Feb eBird -- Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve -- Feb 22, 2017 [Thomas Nardone ]
22 Feb Clay-colored Sparrow in James City County [Brian Taber via va-bird ]
22 Feb Painted Bunting adult male [David Gibson ]
22 Feb Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list. [Daniel Joslyn ]
21 Feb Re: Razorbills & Dovekies off Cape Henry / N Va Beach [Tom Thomas ]
21 Feb good spot for woodcocks and stars [Fred Atwood ]
21 Feb Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list. [Jim G ]
21 Feb Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list. [Jim G ]
21 Feb Grackle with White Head [Rick Jones ]
21 Feb Florida Birding - St Pete and Fort De Soto ["Rowe, Richard A, 'Dick'" ]
21 Feb Chincoteague NWR Shorebird/Survey Feb 20 [Joelle Buffa ]
21 Feb Re: Poss. Pacific Loon. Kiptopeke - NO []
21 Feb Atlasing after Dark... [Ashley Peele ]
21 Feb Early Pine Warbler Nelson County [Allen Hale ]
21 Feb The Bobolink Project, including the website [Fred Atwood ]
21 Feb Fw: Bobolink Project 2017 - Farmer Applications Are Live! [Frederick Atwood via va-bird ]
20 Feb Pohick Bay-Eagles / Mason Neck Park-Ducks [Donald Sweig ]
20 Feb Re: Osprey at Dyke Marsh ["Larry Cartwright" ]
20 Feb E Jack Jouett Rd. Cranes and Owls [Shea Tiller ]
20 Feb Re: Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk. ["Walter L. Barrows" ]
20 Feb Osprey at Dyke Marsh [Quinn Emmering ]
20 Feb College Creek Hawkwatch Best Feb Day [Brian Taber via va-bird ]
20 Feb College Creek Hawkwatch Best Feb Day and Laughing Gull [Brian Taber via va-bird ]
20 Feb Tree Swallow [David White ]
20 Feb Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk. [Harry Glasgow via va-bird ]
20 Feb Re: Chukar in Alexandria [Vineeta Anand ]
20 Feb Chukar in Alexandria [Thomas Nardone ]
20 Feb Poss. Pacific Loon. Kiptopeke [Apple via va-bird ]
20 Feb Razorbills & Dovekies off Cape Henry / N Va Beach [Lee Atwood via va-bird ]
20 Feb Tree swallow, Aquia Landing [Marc Ribaudo ]
20 Feb Red-Shouldered Hawk (?) nest building in Springfield/Burke [Jonathan Clough ]
20 Feb Red-headed woodpecker, Luria Park, Falls Church [Larry Golfer ]
20 Feb Princess Anne WMA Dike Construction & Virginia Beach General Observations [Rob Bielawski ]
19 Feb Tree swallow and harrier at Huntley Meadows today [Pam and Ben via va-bird ]
19 Feb 28 species of birds observed on Feb 18 Field Trip to CBBT islands 2, 3, 4 [Shirley Devan ]
19 Feb Chincoteague NWR: Marbled Godwit and Eurasian Wigeon [Elizabeth Fedorko ]
20 Feb Woodcocks at Huntley Meadow Hike and Bike Trail [Bill Hohenstein ]
19 Feb Short-eared Owls, Ravens in VA, and extralimital Black-backed Oriole [Daniel Lebbin ]
19 Feb Occoquan Bay NWR, Feb 19, 2017 [Phillip Kenny ]
19 Feb Test ["Paul Woodward" ]
19 Feb Weekend Observations [Allen Bryan via va-bird ]
19 Feb Fw: eBird Report - Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve, Feb 19, 2017 ["Marc Ribaudo" ]
19 Feb Great Falls NP Bird Walk 02/19/17 Fairfax County [Dendroica--- via va-bird ]
19 Feb Combined Rockbridge-Augusta Bird Club's Field Trip - February 18, 2017 [Herbert Larner via va-bird ]
19 Feb Fwd: Virginia eBirding the Appalachian Trail [Wendy Ealding ]
19 Feb Great Bridge Battlefield & Waterways Historic Park, Feb 19, 2017 [G B Harris ]
19 Feb Re: va-bird Digest, Vol 118, Issue 19 [Cliff and Ellen Pitts ]
18 Feb Re: Spring is just around the corner!!!!!! Geese migrating; ticks []
18 Feb Sully Woodlands [Howard Wu ]
18 Feb Spring is just around the corner!!!!!! Geese migrating; ticks [MARLENECONDON--- via va-bird ]
17 Feb White-fronted Geese / Clarke Co. ["Jon Little" ]
17 Feb Providence Rec Center Trl. Falls Church [Stuart via va-bird ]
17 Feb Rusty Blackbirds [Stephen Williams ]
17 Feb Re: Luria Park Red-headed Woodpeckers [Daniel Joslyn ]
17 Feb Re: Sandhill Cranes at the Abrams Creek Wetland []
17 Feb Sandhill Cranes at the Abrams Creek Wetland ["Carr, David E. (dec5z)" ]
16 Feb Under the Double Eagle ["Ed and Helen Morgan" ]
16 Feb short eared owl sight in Highland Co. [Patti Reum ]
16 Feb Assateague Question [Robert Perkins ]
15 Feb VA Breeding Bird Atlas Surveying! ["Robyn A. Puffenbarger" ]

Subject: Eagles -Waterfowl: Mason Neck SP; Pohick Bay
From: Donald Sweig <skybirds.d AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 16:29:12 -0500
 I arrived at Mason Neck State Park about 8:30 this morning, hoping to get some 
photographs of the Tundra Swans I had seen last Friday, last Saturday, and last 
Monday. Regrettably, I found none. I assume that they had left on there 
northward migration. I did see several large skeins of Canada Geese flying 
north, as well as one group of Tundra Swans headed in the same direction. 

 
 Scoping the bay, I found that more than 50%, perhaps as many as 60% or 70%, of 
the thousands of ducks that I saw when I was last there, I could not find 
today. What I did find was a lot of Bald Eagles. Standing by the visitor center 
at Mason Neck State Park, 

 I scoped the trees on the other side of the bay from as far up near Keanes 
Creek as I could see, all the way down and across the mouth of the Occoquan, 
all of the trees on the Occoquan refuge, and continued up the trees on the same 
side of the bay where I was standing: I counted 42 perched Bald Eagles and 5 or 
6 flying around as well. I did not see any fishing activity. 


 On the way out, I stopped at the Pohick Bay Regional Park. From the boat 
launch at the end of the parking lot , I scoped as much of the far side of 
Pohick Bay as I could see. I found only five perched Bald Eagles ( last year on 
this date the count was at least 60). 

 As I was leaving I heard a bunch of "eagle chatter" down the bay, and finally 
discovered what appeared to be 6 or 8 Bald Eagles In a couple of trees on the 
point at the very extreme edge of the park, down past the children's play area 
and where they rent canoes. Because of the sun angle I could only get 
silhouettes of the birds, but they did all appear to be eagles, and there was 
lots of Eagle chatter coming from those trees. 

   Donald Sweig
   Falls Church, Virginia

Sent from my iPad
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Saw-whet Owls, Shenandoah Nat. Park
From: Diane L via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 14:49:10 +0000 (UTC)
It's great to have a record of the Saw-whets in the Park.  

Food for thought for anyone not aware of, or not considering, the possible risk 
to Saw-whets: Barred Owls, common in the SNP, prey on Saw-whets. So in exposing 
a Saw-whet's location or playing a call, we might well be calling in both 
predator and prey...offering up an unintended dining experience! 


Diane Lepkowski
Harrisonburg
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Clay-colored Sparrow in James City County
From: Brian Taber via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 07:14:55 -0500
After a few brief appearances over the past 5 weeks, the Clay-colored Sparrow 
was at my feeder all afternoon yesterday and was there first thing today. If 
I'm not home, feel free to walk around the right side of the house, where you 
can see the feeder. 



Brian Taber
103 Exeter Court  Williamsburg
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Lynchburg Baltimore oriole still here!! New record??
From: Ashley Lohr <aklohr AT vt.edu>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 21:42:01 -0500
The Lynchburg adult male Baltimore oriole is still hangin' around at a
private residence! Today potentially marks a new record for overwintering
Baltimore orioles in this area. The longest documented Lynchburg area
oriole previously was 12-15-07 to 2-22-08, so this oriole beat it by # of
days and has set the new late-date for the winter (please correct me if I'm
wrong on this!). We're pretty excited :)

Ashley Lohr
Loudoun County/Lynchburg/Athens, GA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: The best way to reply to a thread?
From: Howard Wu <howiewu1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 20:47:09 -0500
Hi,

I am subscribed to this mailing list, but I opted to not receive emails.
Instead, I use the following links to browse:

http://digest.sialia.com/?rm=one_list;id=144 (this does not even require
log-in; I booked marked it so I can easily browse)

http://digest.sialia.com/?rm=one_list;id=144 (this requires log-in and it
allows me to browse older emails)

They worked fine .. except when I want to reply to an email thread. Since I
don't receive the emails, I cannot reply, and these sites do not allow me
to do that either.

Given my situation, what's the best way to reply to a thread?

BTW, the MD list is a Google group, so that is easier to reply (not trying
to imply anything, just stating a fact).

Howard Wu
Herndon, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Woodcocks calling at Difficult Creek Natural Area Preserve
From: Eric Harrold via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 01:43:10 +0000 (UTC)
Had 3-4 woodcocks peenting as we finished up our prescribed burn on Tuesday 
evening. They were calling from the pine thicket on the opposite side of the 
gas line at the entrance to the preserve units. There is parking space where we 
stage our equipment for prescribed burns.  

Eric HarroldHays, NC
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
From: Dixie Sommers via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 20:14:01 -0500
While we are on bird literature, I'll make a pitch for The Genius of Birds
by Jennifer Ackerman. This book is all about birds' incredible cognitive
abilities, from finches to the amazing crow family. 

	"There's a kind of bird that creates colorful designs out of
berries, bits of glass, and blossoms to attract females, and another kind
that hides up to thirty-three thousand seeds scattered over dozens of square
miles and remembers where it put them months later. There's a species that
solves a classic puzzle at nearly the same pace as a five-year old child,
and one that's an expert at picking locks. There are birds that can count
and do simple math, make their own tools, move to the beat of music,
comprehend basic principles of physics, remember the past, and plan for the
future."

You can come meet Jennifer Ackerman at the Audubon Society of Northern
Virginia's Audubon Afternoon:
	Sunday, March 5, 3:00pm  -  5:00pm,
	National Wildlife Federation building, 
	11100 Wildlife Center Drive
	Reston, VA

http://audubonva.org/asnv-events/2017/1/24/the-genius-of-birds-with-jennifer
-ackerman 

And it is free! 

See you there

Dixie Sommers

-----Original Message-----
From: va-bird [mailto:va-bird-bounces+dixiesommers=cs.com AT listserve.com] On
Behalf Of Scott Jackson-Ricketts
Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2017 6:10 PM
To: Bill Hohenstein 
Cc: VA-Bird 
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.

Bernd Heinrich should be known to all nature readers, especially regarding
his work on ravens. His new book, *One Wild Bird at a Time*, is rich and
worth every minute.

Love this conversation.................

Scott Jackson-Ricketts

On Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 6:16 PM, Bill Hohenstein  wrote:

> Any DC area birder should seek out a book by Louis Halle called 
> "Spring in Washington".  It was published in 1947 and chronicles the 
> emergence of spring from a birders perspective.  He starts in the dead 
> of winter and notes the movement of birds through the DC region, with 
> special sections on the Potomac, Dyke Marsh, Rock Creek, and the GW 
> Parkway.  It is an amazing book and this is the perfect time to pick it
up.
>
> Many of his observations will be familiar to local birders, 
> Bonaparte's Gulls on the Potomac and the sounds of thrushes in the 
> woods.  Others have become too infrequent... marsh wrens at Dyke Marsh 
> and Kentucky Warblers inside the beltway.  A very cool book and a must 
> read for those counting the days until spring.
>
> Bill
>
> ________________________________
> From: va-bird  on 
> behalf of Ashley Lohr 
> Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 5:22 PM
> To: Jim G
> Cc: VA-Bird
> Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
>
> While we're on this wonderful topic, I would recommend "Illumination 
> in the
> Flatwoods: A Season with the Wild Turkey" by Joe Hutto. It's about a 
> man who raises ~14 orphaned, human-imprinted wild turkeys until 
> they're old enough to leave their "mom." They remain wild, but he 
> observes and records a plethora of turkey behaviors and personalities. 
> It's an eye-opening and thought-provoking book. I just finished 
> reading it since I'm studying wild turkeys for my Master's research 
> project, and I couldn't believe how absorbed I became in his world! I 
> feel like I have a better understanding of my study species now.
>
> There's also a documentary based on the book entitled "My Life as a
Turkey"
> that's apparently on Netflix. It's next on my list. :)
>
> Cheers,
> Ashley Lohr
> Loudoun County/Lynchburg/Athens, GA
>
> Ashley Lohr
> Virginia Tech Class of 2015
> Wildlife Conservation major / Entomology minor aklohr AT vt.edu
>
> On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 7:44 PM, Jim G  wrote:
>
> > Good Evening Birders,
> >
> > With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough 
> > time to go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly 
> > satisfy my insatiable birding desires.
> >
> > Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must 
> > read Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman.  Considering this was 
> > published in
> 1997,
> > some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an 
> > entertaining, educational and even emotional read for this 31 year 
> > novice birder.  In fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up 
> > unfamiliar birds mentioned
> by
> > Kenn, made the book so much more enjoyable. I recommend that approach.
> >
> > Other books on my list include:
> >
> > The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman The Thing With Feathers - 
> > Noah Strycker Snapper - Brian Kimberling
> >
> > Have fun,
> >
> > Jim Gould
> > Southern Shores, NC
> >
> > Born and raised and still bird in Hopewell, VA.
> > *** You are subscribed to va-bird as aklohr AT vt.edu. If you wish to 
> > unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
> > http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
> VA-bird Info Page - ListServe.com listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird>
> mailman.listserve.com
> Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia.
> It is a service of the Virginia Society of Ornithology. Va-bird is a 
> forum for reporting ...
>
>
>
> >
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as elliety AT msn.com. If you wish to 
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** VA-bird 
> Info Page - ListServe.com listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird>
> mailman.listserve.com
> Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia.
> It is a service of the Virginia Society of Ornithology. Va-bird is a 
> forum for reporting ...
>
>
>
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as scottjr AT ls.net. If you wish to 
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as dixiesommers AT cs.com. If you wish to
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Florida Trip Part III - Sweetwater Wetlands Gainesville
From: "Rowe, Richard A, 'Dick'" <RoweRA AT vmi.edu>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 23:44:44 +0000
All - On our way down to St. Pete's we happened to stop at Sweetwater Wetlands 
Preserve in Gainesville. It was pure luck that we stopped there, and I'll say 
that it is a fantastic birding spot. Sweetwater was developed as a natural 
water filtering system and the main in-flow is Sweetwater Creek which runs 
through Paynes Prairie. The Preserve was built about 3-4 years ago with 
numerous impoundments and a series of dykes with walking paths. They have 
planted native wetland plants, so the area looks very natural - plus it has 
several very large alligators. At Sweetwater we saw Sandhill Cranes (perhaps 
saw 150, heard many - the count was 1200 by the park ranger), Common Gallinules 
(lots), Coots (lots), perhaps 20 Wood Storks, 20-30 White Ibis, 10 Glossy Ibis, 
a few Great Blue, Little Blue, and Louisiana Herons, Great and Snowy Egrets, 
and best of all - 2 American Bitterns, a Sora in the open and at close range, 
Limpkins (12-14) at close range, and about 40-50 Black-bellied Whi 

 stling Tree Ducks. If you are passing through that area, I really recommend 
stopping. I would think during migration the area is full of birds. The Ranger 
said that in January they had about 900 Whistling Tree Ducks along with other 
ducks. 


I've posted some, actually quite a few, photos from Sweetwater. Almost all of 
the photos I took were excellent and it was hard to reduce the number. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/vmibiology/

Dick Rowe
VMI Biology
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
From: Scott Jackson-Ricketts <scottjr AT ls.net>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 18:09:31 -0500
Bernd Heinrich should be known to all nature readers, especially regarding
his work on ravens. His new book, *One Wild Bird at a Time*, is rich and
worth every minute.

Love this conversation.................

Scott Jackson-Ricketts

On Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 6:16 PM, Bill Hohenstein  wrote:

> Any DC area birder should seek out a book by Louis Halle called "Spring in
> Washington".  It was published in 1947 and chronicles the emergence of
> spring from a birders perspective.  He starts in the dead of winter and
> notes the movement of birds through the DC region, with special sections on
> the Potomac, Dyke Marsh, Rock Creek, and the GW Parkway.  It is an amazing
> book and this is the perfect time to pick it up.
>
> Many of his observations will be familiar to local birders, Bonaparte's
> Gulls on the Potomac and the sounds of thrushes in the woods.  Others have
> become too infrequent... marsh wrens at Dyke Marsh and Kentucky Warblers
> inside the beltway.  A very cool book and a must read for those counting
> the days until spring.
>
> Bill
>
> ________________________________
> From: va-bird  on behalf
> of Ashley Lohr 
> Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 5:22 PM
> To: Jim G
> Cc: VA-Bird
> Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
>
> While we're on this wonderful topic, I would recommend "Illumination in the
> Flatwoods: A Season with the Wild Turkey" by Joe Hutto. It's about a man
> who raises ~14 orphaned, human-imprinted wild turkeys until they're old
> enough to leave their "mom." They remain wild, but he observes and records
> a plethora of turkey behaviors and personalities. It's an eye-opening and
> thought-provoking book. I just finished reading it since I'm studying wild
> turkeys for my Master's research project, and I couldn't believe how
> absorbed I became in his world! I feel like I have a better understanding
> of my study species now.
>
> There's also a documentary based on the book entitled "My Life as a Turkey"
> that's apparently on Netflix. It's next on my list. :)
>
> Cheers,
> Ashley Lohr
> Loudoun County/Lynchburg/Athens, GA
>
> Ashley Lohr
> Virginia Tech Class of 2015
> Wildlife Conservation major / Entomology minor
> aklohr AT vt.edu
>
> On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 7:44 PM, Jim G  wrote:
>
> > Good Evening Birders,
> >
> > With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough time to
> > go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly satisfy my
> > insatiable birding desires.
> >
> > Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must read
> > Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman.  Considering this was published in
> 1997,
> > some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an entertaining,
> > educational and even emotional read for this 31 year novice birder.  In
> > fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up unfamiliar birds mentioned
> by
> > Kenn, made the book so much more enjoyable. I recommend that approach.
> >
> > Other books on my list include:
> >
> > The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
> > The Thing With Feathers - Noah Strycker
> > Snapper - Brian Kimberling
> >
> > Have fun,
> >
> > Jim Gould
> > Southern Shores, NC
> >
> > Born and raised and still bird in Hopewell, VA.
> > *** You are subscribed to va-bird as aklohr AT vt.edu. If you wish to
> > unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> > http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
> VA-bird Info Page - ListServe.com listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird>
> mailman.listserve.com
> Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia.
> It is a service of the Virginia Society of Ornithology. Va-bird is a forum
> for reporting ...
>
>
>
> >
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as elliety AT msn.com. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
> VA-bird Info Page - ListServe.com listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird>
> mailman.listserve.com
> Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia.
> It is a service of the Virginia Society of Ornithology. Va-bird is a forum
> for reporting ...
>
>
>
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as scottjr AT ls.net. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Yard Birds - Purple Finch and Fox Sparriw
From: Gerco H <drgerco AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 16:01:24 +0000
This morning, the bird show at the feeder was interesting with a few notable 
visitors, including 



Red-winged Blackbird - This is a very irregular visitor

Purple Finch - A lone male is still hanging out

Fox Sparrow - Unexpected nice surprise.


The number of American Goldfinch seems to fluctuate these days. Down to 6 this 
morning We had 29 a few days ago. 



Happy birding!


Gerco

Leesburg
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Shenandoah National Park
From: Herbert Larner via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 02:46:49 +0000 (UTC)
Hello all 

this evening Elaine Carwile , Penny Warren & I made a trek first up to the 
Humpback Rocks parking area & here we got two American Woodcock's calling . 
From there we traveled up to the Shenandoah National Park to see if we can 
locate the Northern Saw - whet Owl that was found up there in mid January by 
Gabriel Mapel . Once we got to the Beagle Gap parking area at mile marker 99.5 
& when we stepped out of the vehicle we were surprised to hear at least 6 
Woodcock calling with at least 3 of the 6 displaying . We left the Parkway by 
following the trail in the open field . By staying on the path we started to 
play the Saw -whet tape sparingly . At first with no response we played it for 
the last time & got a response to the alarm call . At one point the Saw - whet 
called & it was followed by a Barred Owl . On our way out we saw a Barred Owl 
in a low tree along side the road . All in all a good evening of night birding 
. 


 On another note I am going back in March to see if the Saw -whet is still 
there so instead of having a field trip up to Hump Back Rocks Blue Ridge 
Parkway for the Woodcocks . I am changing it to the parking area of Beagle Gap 
on the Shenandoah National Park at mile marker 99.5 for the Woodcocks & just by 
luck we may be in for an extra treat by the Saw - whet Owl . My dates for this 
is March 9th a Thursday evening & if the weather is bad for the 9th then March 
11th a Saturday evening as a make up date . We will meet about half hour before 
sunset . All are welcome to this event . 


Allen Larner
Staunton     
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Where the Alcids be?
From: Karen Kearney via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 19:10:58 -0500
I checked Rudee Inlet, made a very quick stop at Ft Story, and walked the beach 
at First Landing S.P. this morning. The only Alcids I saw were four Razorbills 
at Rudee Inlet and two at Ft Story. Nothing else of interest, but hundreds of 
RB Mergansers at First Landing. No Western Grebe. 


Karen Kearney

Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 22, 2017, at 4:38 PM, Lee Atwood via va-bird  
wrote: 

> 
> Just finished a run from Ft Story to Rudee and not an alcid in sight.OBX?
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as birdingva AT yahoo.com. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 


*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
From: Bill Hohenstein <elliety AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 23:16:03 +0000
Any DC area birder should seek out a book by Louis Halle called "Spring in 
Washington". It was published in 1947 and chronicles the emergence of spring 
from a birders perspective. He starts in the dead of winter and notes the 
movement of birds through the DC region, with special sections on the Potomac, 
Dyke Marsh, Rock Creek, and the GW Parkway. It is an amazing book and this is 
the perfect time to pick it up. 


Many of his observations will be familiar to local birders, Bonaparte's Gulls 
on the Potomac and the sounds of thrushes in the woods. Others have become too 
infrequent... marsh wrens at Dyke Marsh and Kentucky Warblers inside the 
beltway. A very cool book and a must read for those counting the days until 
spring. 


Bill

________________________________
From: va-bird  on behalf of 
Ashley Lohr  

Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 5:22 PM
To: Jim G
Cc: VA-Bird
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.

While we're on this wonderful topic, I would recommend "Illumination in the
Flatwoods: A Season with the Wild Turkey" by Joe Hutto. It's about a man
who raises ~14 orphaned, human-imprinted wild turkeys until they're old
enough to leave their "mom." They remain wild, but he observes and records
a plethora of turkey behaviors and personalities. It's an eye-opening and
thought-provoking book. I just finished reading it since I'm studying wild
turkeys for my Master's research project, and I couldn't believe how
absorbed I became in his world! I feel like I have a better understanding
of my study species now.

There's also a documentary based on the book entitled "My Life as a Turkey"
that's apparently on Netflix. It's next on my list. :)

Cheers,
Ashley Lohr
Loudoun County/Lynchburg/Athens, GA

Ashley Lohr
Virginia Tech Class of 2015
Wildlife Conservation major / Entomology minor
aklohr AT vt.edu

On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 7:44 PM, Jim G  wrote:

> Good Evening Birders,
>
> With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough time to
> go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly satisfy my
> insatiable birding desires.
>
> Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must read
> Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman.  Considering this was published in 1997,
> some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an entertaining,
> educational and even emotional read for this 31 year novice birder.  In
> fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up unfamiliar birds mentioned by
> Kenn, made the book so much more enjoyable. I recommend that approach.
>
> Other books on my list include:
>
> The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
> The Thing With Feathers - Noah Strycker
> Snapper - Brian Kimberling
>
> Have fun,
>
> Jim Gould
> Southern Shores, NC
>
> Born and raised and still bird in Hopewell, VA.
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as aklohr AT vt.edu. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
VA-bird Info Page - 
ListServe.com 

mailman.listserve.com
Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia. It is 
a service of the Virginia Society of Ornithology. Va-bird is a forum for 
reporting ... 




>
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as elliety AT msn.com. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

VA-bird Info Page - 
ListServe.com 

mailman.listserve.com
Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia. It is 
a service of the Virginia Society of Ornithology. Va-bird is a forum for 
reporting ... 




*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
From: Ashley Lohr <aklohr AT vt.edu>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 17:22:33 -0500
While we're on this wonderful topic, I would recommend "Illumination in the
Flatwoods: A Season with the Wild Turkey" by Joe Hutto. It's about a man
who raises ~14 orphaned, human-imprinted wild turkeys until they're old
enough to leave their "mom." They remain wild, but he observes and records
a plethora of turkey behaviors and personalities. It's an eye-opening and
thought-provoking book. I just finished reading it since I'm studying wild
turkeys for my Master's research project, and I couldn't believe how
absorbed I became in his world! I feel like I have a better understanding
of my study species now.

There's also a documentary based on the book entitled "My Life as a Turkey"
that's apparently on Netflix. It's next on my list. :)

Cheers,
Ashley Lohr
Loudoun County/Lynchburg/Athens, GA

Ashley Lohr
Virginia Tech Class of 2015
Wildlife Conservation major / Entomology minor
aklohr AT vt.edu

On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 7:44 PM, Jim G  wrote:

> Good Evening Birders,
>
> With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough time to
> go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly satisfy my
> insatiable birding desires.
>
> Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must read
> Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman.  Considering this was published in 1997,
> some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an entertaining,
> educational and even emotional read for this 31 year novice birder.  In
> fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up unfamiliar birds mentioned by
> Kenn, made the book so much more enjoyable. I recommend that approach.
>
> Other books on my list include:
>
> The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
> The Thing With Feathers - Noah Strycker
> Snapper - Brian Kimberling
>
> Have fun,
>
> Jim Gould
> Southern Shores, NC
>
> Born and raised and still bird in Hopewell, VA.
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as aklohr AT vt.edu. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Where the Alcids be?
From: Lee Atwood via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 21:38:20 +0000 (UTC)
Just finished a run from Ft Story to Rudee and not an alcid in sight.OBX?
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Florida Trip Part II - Tarpon Springs Area
From: "Rowe, Richard A, 'Dick'" <RoweRA AT vmi.edu>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 21:13:46 +0000
I was able to bird a few of the local parks in the Tarpon Springs area. There 
must be 10 local parks and State Parks within about 30 minutes of where we were 
staying and all have the potential to be good birding spots. Two of the parks, 
Honeymoon Island and Fred Howard are islands in the Gulf with connecting 
causeways. Honeymoon Island is a eBird hotspot, but we didn't see much the day 
we were there. I can see how it would be a great birding spot and worth 
visiting. There are a number of trails that would allow easy birding if you 
were looking for song birds. There was one large inlet/bay that had a few 
shorebirds and a Reddish Egret. Access was limited and I slogged through a lot 
of oozy mangrove stuff to get some of the shots. Fred Howard St. Park is in 
Tarpon Springs and really is just an small island with parking lot and a 
causeway. Along the beach there was a cluster of larger shorebirds that were 
rather tame (used to people). I was able to walk right up to the 

 birds for photography. There were about 10 Marbled Godwits, Willets, Laughing 
Gulls, a single Black-bellied Plover, a few Least SP, and 2 Whimbrels. I've 
worked hard to get Whimbrel photos at Chincoteague, so to have them at about 
20ft and not moving was fun. On our way to Fred Howard park we drove past the 
water treatment plant - there must have been 1000 Redheads on one of the ponds. 
I've never seen so many in one place. 


We visited Phillipe Park on Safety Harbor (north end of the Tampa Bay complex) 
in search of spoonbills. No luck with the spoonbills, but there were lots of 
Wh. Ibis, Little Blue and Louisiana Herons, and a Great Horned Owl on a nest. 
The owl nest was in a lovely, huge live oak with Spanish moss - quintessential 
southern sprawling live-oak tree. The tree was literally in one of the parking 
lots at Phillipe and photos were easy to get. We went to the other side of 
Safety Harbor - to Mobbly Point/Park to look for a Brown Booby that had been 
reported hanging out on the high tension towers - there could have been one 
there but I have no evidence other than a sort of suggestive photograph. 


Tarpon Springs is known for the sponge docks (it is a major sponge harvesting 
port) and for manatees. There is a park in town with an inlet from the Gulf 
that the manatees frequent in cold weather. It wasn't cold that day but we did 
see 3 manatees - I took some photos but really they just look like blobs of 
grey flesh in the water. 


I've post some photos from the Tarpon Springs area on Flickr if you are 
interested: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/vmibiology/

Dick Rowe
VMI Biology
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: eBird -- Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve -- Feb 22, 2017
From: Thomas Nardone <nardonet AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 13:45:21 -0500
Seven people participated in the Northern Virginia Bird Club walk at Dyke Marsh 
Wildlife Preserve this morning. We had a good outing; the highlight was a 
Merlin seen preening on a snag across the inlet near footbridge on Hull road. 
The complete list is shown below. 



Feb 22, 2017
8:30 AM
Traveling
2.50 miles
206 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.4.2 Build 114

500 Canada Goose
3 American Wigeon
50 Mallard
3 Northern Shoveler
4 Ring-necked Duck
300 Lesser Scaup
5 Bufflehead
9 Common Merganser
5 Red-breasted Merganser
25 Double-crested Cormorant
9 Great Blue Heron
2 Turkey Vulture
1 Cooper's Hawk
4 Bald Eagle
250 Ring-billed Gull
1 Herring Gull
2 Great Black-backed Gull
4 Mourning Dove
6 Red-bellied Woodpecker
6 Downy Woodpecker
1 Northern Flicker
1 Pileated Woodpecker
1 Merlin
12 Blue Jay
17 American Crow
17 Fish Crow
12 Carolina Chickadee
6 Tufted Titmouse
1 Brown Creeper
1 Winter Wren
9 Carolina Wren
1 Golden-crowned Kinglet
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
25 American Robin
1 Northern Mockingbird
7 European Starling
6 White-throated Sparrow
3 Song Sparrow
1 Swamp Sparrow
4 Northern Cardinal
8 Red-winged Blackbird
22 Common Grackle
2 Brown-headed Cowbird
1 American Goldfinch

Number of Taxa: 44


Sent from my iPhone
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Clay-colored Sparrow in James City County
From: Brian Taber via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 13:43:03 -0500
The Clay-colored Sparrow was again at my feeder today. If anyone has an 
interest in more details, feel free to email me directly. 


Brian Taber
CVWO
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Painted Bunting adult male
From: David Gibson <20cabot AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 10:13:52 -0500
Hi all, We were fortunate (the right place at the right time) to look out
our living room window this a.m. to discover a yellow-rumped and the
bunting both bathing in our front yard bird bath. The bunting then flew off
to the back of a hedge to preen. I was able to get some so-so photos (sharp
photos of the hedge, not so much the bird). Hopefully the bird will stick
around. Dave Gibson, Chesapeake
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
From: Daniel Joslyn <djoslyn48 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 09:29:15 -0500
I just finished and would recommend Life List by Olivia Gentile, which is a
biography of Phoebe Snetsinger, the woman who was given a year to live with
cancer and decided to go birding around the world and ended up breaking the
all-time record for most species.

Sincerely,
Daniel Joslyn
Arlington, VA

On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 7:44 PM, Jim G  wrote:

> Good Evening Birders,
>
> With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough time to
> go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly satisfy my
> insatiable birding desires.
>
> Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must read
> Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman.  Considering this was published in 1997,
> some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an entertaining,
> educational and even emotional read for this 31 year novice birder.  In
> fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up unfamiliar birds mentioned by
> Kenn, made the book so much more enjoyable. I recommend that approach.
>
> Other books on my list include:
>
> The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
> The Thing With Feathers - Noah Strycker
> Snapper - Brian Kimberling
>
> Have fun,
>
> Jim Gould
> Southern Shores, NC
>
> Born and raised and still bird in Hopewell, VA.
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as djoslyn48 AT gmail.com. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Razorbills & Dovekies off Cape Henry / N Va Beach
From: Tom Thomas <tomtom218 AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 23:22:56 -0500
  Are these birds close enough to be identified with bins or a scope, or 
are they being identified from afar by size, shape etc?

Would be 2 lifers for me, but for a lifer would want a no-doubt (in my 
mind) look.

Also, is time of day important for viewing?

Thanks

Tom Thomas  (near Richmond)


*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: good spot for woodcocks and stars
From: Fred Atwood <fatwood AT flinthill.org>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 21:17:30 -0500
Dear VA-Birders
I would like to bring my students out to watch the woodcocks and then do
some stargazing.  Do you know of any good places in Fairfax, Loudoun, or
Fauquier county (or maybe even Clarke) where there is very little light
pollution and is a reliable spot for woodcocks?

I know Huntley Meadows is a reliable woodcock spot, and the sky is a darker
than most places in Fairfax County, but please let me know if you know of
other places.

Thanks
Fred Atwood
Flint Hill School, Oakton, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
From: Jim G <jgouldoz AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 19:44:08 -0500
Good Evening Birders,

With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough time to
go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly satisfy my
insatiable birding desires.

Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must read
Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman.  Considering this was published in 1997,
some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an entertaining,
educational and even emotional read for this 31 year novice birder.  In
fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up unfamiliar birds mentioned by
Kenn, made the book so much more enjoyable. I recommend that approach.

Other books on my list include:

The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
The Thing With Feathers - Noah Strycker
Snapper - Brian Kimberling

Have fun,

Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC

Born and raised and still bird in Hopewell, VA.
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
From: Jim G <jgouldoz AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 19:44:08 -0500
Good Evening Birders,

With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough time to
go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly satisfy my
insatiable birding desires.

Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must read
Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman.  Considering this was published in 1997,
some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an entertaining,
educational and even emotional read for this 31 year novice birder.  In
fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up unfamiliar birds mentioned by
Kenn, made the book so much more enjoyable. I recommend that approach.

Other books on my list include:

The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
The Thing With Feathers - Noah Strycker
Snapper - Brian Kimberling

Have fun,

Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC

Born and raised and still bird in Hopewell, VA.
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Grackle with White Head
From: Rick Jones <rgjones23 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 18:17:36 -0500
A flock of Common Grackles visited our back yard (in Fairfax County) this
afternoon. One of them had a white head.
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Florida Birding - St Pete and Fort De Soto
From: "Rowe, Richard A, 'Dick'" <RoweRA AT vmi.edu>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 21:14:12 +0000
All - I just returned from a trip to Florida that involved some birding in a 
few specific locations around St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs, and Gainesville. 
Unfortunately due to time constraints, I was not able to visit places such as 
the Everglades or Ding Darling. On the way down to Florida I stopped at Jekyll 
Island, Ga, and did a little birding there. As we were passing through 
Gainesville, we got lucky and decided to visit Sweetwater Wetlands Preserve 
(this is a new area, perhaps 3-4 years old, next to Paynes Prairie, and a 
fantastic birding spot). Around St. Pete I was able to visit Fort De Soto State 
Park and around Tarpon Springs we visited several of the small State parks. On 
our return home, we visited Sweetwater Preserve a second time - it's really 
that good of a place. 


St Pete and Fort De Soto - I didn't bird very much in the St. Pete area (way 
too many people and cars), but the visit to Fort De Soto, which is at the 
southern tip of St. Pete's beach area and at the opening to Tampa Bay, was well 
worth it. For my Florida trip I had a few target species: Roseate Spoonbill, 
White Pelican, Reddish Egret, and Sandwich Terns. At Fort De Soto, I found 2 
Roseate Spoonbills but they were at a distance so I only have one photograph. I 
did find about 50 White Pelicans and a group of Sandwich Terns that were very 
approachable. I was fascinated by the number of Loggerhead Shrikes on the 
island. My friend, Kerry Kilday who used to live in FL, said that in the winter 
they are everywhere - he's right. I counted 12 shrikes in a 4 mile stretch. 
Most were in pairs, so I suspect they are part of a breeding population. I did 
encounter a pair of shrikes that were very upset with a Kestrel that had landed 
in their territory (I put a photo on Flickr of thi 

 s encounter).


If you are interested, I've up-loaded some photos from Jekyll Island and Fort 
De Soto Park. In the next few days, I'll up-load photos from the Tarpon Springs 
area and Sweetwater. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/vmibiology/

Dick Rowe
VMI Biology
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Chincoteague NWR Shorebird/Survey Feb 20
From: Joelle Buffa <clyde_joelle AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 21:03:55 +0000 (UTC)
 Below are the results of our weekly shorebird/gull survey conducted at 
Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge on Monday Feb. 20, 2017All water areas 
(impoundments and beach areas) were covered in the 6 hour survey. All 
individuals are counted for the target species; other birds seen or heard on 
the survey are followed by a dash.  

It was a warm and lovely day to be doing the shorebird survey at the 
Chincoteague NWR. We counted 1,737 individual shorebirds of 11 species. Dunlin 
was the most common by far with 1,330 most of which were feeding at low tide on 
the mudflats and oyster shell mounds in Assateague Channel as seen from the 
Refuge's Service Road. This was followed by Willet 165, Sanderling 88, 
Black-bellied Plover 78 and Marbled Godwit 56. The most surprising shorebird of 
the day was one American Avocet on South Wash Flats. We had been seeing an 
American Avocet using the northern impoundments late into the fall but have not 
seen it for at least the past month. 

Other species of interest were the continuing Eurasian Wigeon on Swan's Cove 
which also had 5 Bonaparte's Gulls but no Black-headed Gull that we could find. 
Two Merlin on the Hook along with the first American Oystercatchers of the 
season using a Refuge beach. Maybe they thought the warm weather meant spring 
was here. 56 Marbled Godwit is a high number for this year on the Refuge. 

Our next survey will be Monday, March 6th.
Clyde Morris and Joelle Buffa


| Snow Goose | -- |
| Canada Goose | -- |
| Tundra Swan | -- |
| Gadwall | -- |
| Eurasian Wigeon | -- |
| American Wigeon | -- |
| American Black Duck | -- |
| Mallard | -- |
| Northern Shoveler | -- |
| Northern Pintail | -- |
| Green-winged Teal | -- |
| Surf Scoter | -- |
| Black Scoter | -- |
| Long-tailed Duck | -- |
| Bufflehead | -- |
| Hooded Merganser | -- |
| Red-breasted Merganser | -- |
| Wild Turkey | -- |
| Red-throated Loon | 7 |
| Common Loon | 16 |
| Pied-billed Grebe | 1 |
| Horned Grebe | 71 |
| Northern Gannet | 19 |
| Great Blue Heron | -- |
| Great Egret | -- |
| Black Vulture | -- |
| Turkey Vulture | -- |
| Northern Harrier | 1 |
| Bald Eagle | 6 |
| Clapper Rail | -- |
| American Avocet | 1 |
| American Oystercatcher | 16 |
| Black-bellied Plover | 78 |
| Semipalmated Plover | 3 |
| Killdeer | 1 |
| Marbled Godwit | 56 |
| Ruddy Turnstone | 7 |
| Sanderling | 88 |
| Dunlin | 1,330 |
| Greater Yellowlegs | 4 |
| Willet | 165 |
| shorebird sp. | 5 |
| Bonaparte's Gull | 5 |
| Ring-billed Gull | 278 |
| Herring Gull | 259 |
| Lesser Black-backed Gull | 26 |
| Great Black-backed Gull | 22 |
| Forster's Tern | 2 |
| Mourning Dove | -- |
| Belted Kingfisher | -- |
| Red-bellied Woodpecker | -- |
| Northern Flicker | -- |
| American Kestrel | 1 |
| Merlin | 2 |
| American Crow | -- |
| Carolina Chickadee | -- |
| Brown-headed Nuthatch | -- |
| Carolina Wren | -- |
| Northern Mockingbird | -- |
| European Starling | -- |
| Yellow-rumped Warbler | -- |
| White-throated Sparrow | -- |
| Savannah Sparrow | 2 |
| Song Sparrow | -- |
| Eastern Towhee | -- |
| Northern Cardinal | -- |
| Red-winged Blackbird | -- |
| Common Grackle | -- |
| Boat-tailed Grackle | -- |
| Brown-headed Cowbird | -- |



*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Re: Poss. Pacific Loon. Kiptopeke - NO
From: david.boltz4 AT gmail.com
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 14:11:48 -0500
I’ve attached a few pics to my e-bird list at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34613332. I think all features are very 
consistent with a juvenile RTLoon as shown on p. 23 of Sibley Guide. Back 
pattern, head shape, no strong neck pattern, head slightly peaked at rear, etc. 
So, after further review, the ruling in the field is overturned. 


Dave Boltz

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 20, 2017, at 2:33 PM, Apple via va-bird  wrote:

Daves got some pics on his camera. Won't be on computer until tomorrow. Bill 
looks thinner than Common. White comes up to eye. Not around. Gray on head down 
back of neck pretty uniform. Was swimming pretty close to fishing pier. 


Dave Boltz
Rich Rieger
Phil Silas
On the eastern shore. 

Sent from my iPhone
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as david.boltz4 AT gmail.com. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Atlasing after Dark...
From: Ashley Peele <ashpeele AT vt.edu>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 11:23:11 -0500
Nocturnal species of birds can be a mystery to many.  However, hunters and 
fishermen who head out in the wee hours of the morning are likely familiar with 
the lonely hoots of the Great-Horned Owl or plaintive whinny of the Eastern 
Screech Owl.  The Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas is seeking information on where 
these nocturnal species are being observed.  Late winter is breeding time for 
many owl species, so check out this article (link below) from the VABBA2 for 
more information about how you can help document these mysterious nighttime 
hunters. 


 


http://ebird.org/content/atlasva/news/atlasing-after-dark-an-introduction-to-nocturnal-surveys/ 


 

 

Ashley Peele, PhD  

Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Coordinator 

www.vabba2.org  |  ebird.org/atlasva         

www.facebook.com/vabba2  

---

Conservation Management Institute, Virginia Tech

1900 Kraft Drive, Suite 250

Blacksburg, VA 24061

(540) 231-9182 office   

(540) 231-7019 fax

ashpeele AT vt.edu

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Early Pine Warbler Nelson County
From: Allen Hale <super AT buteobooks.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 10:03:48 -0500
  On Sunday, February 19th I heard a Pine Warbler singing in Nelson 
County. FOS in the past has been March 10th.

Allen

-- 
Allen Hale
East District Supervisor
Nelson County
3130 Laurel Road
Shipman, VA 22971 USA
434-263-4842 (H)

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: The Bobolink Project, including the website
From: Fred Atwood <fatwood AT flinthill.org>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 06:48:46 -0500
Dear Virginia Birders
Sorry about the messed up previous post.  Apparently all the images and
links were stripped from it automatically.  Here is another try with just
the link included here.

http://www.bobolinkproject.com

Many thanks to the VSO board, who have allowed me to send this message.

Though The Bobolink Project is presently in New England only, it protects
grassland birds that migrate through here. Those of you who have visited
the bobolink breeding areas in Virginia, such as in Highland County, know
the wonderful sound and sight of a meadow full of singing bobolinks.  This
program works with hay farmers and pays them to delay their hay harvest
until after the Bobolink young have fledged. It is a "win-win" situation in
which both birds and farmers benefit.

All the best
Fred Atwood
Oakton, Fairfax Co, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Fw: Bobolink Project 2017 - Farmer Applications Are Live!
From: Frederick Atwood via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 11:42:51 +0000 (UTC)
Dear Virginia BirdersMany thanks to the VSO board, who have allowed me to send 
this message. 

Though The Bobolink Project is presently in New England only, it protects 
grassland birds that migrate through here. Those of you who have visited the 
bobolink breeding areas in Virginia, such as in Highland County, know the 
wonderful sound and sight of a meadow full of singing bobolinks.  This program 
works with hay farmers and pays them to delay their hay harvest until after the 
Bobolink young have fledged. It is a "win-win" situation in which both birds 
and farmers benefit. 

All the bestFred AtwoodOakton, Fairfax Co, VA


----- Forwarded Message -----
 From: The Bobolink Project 
 To: Frederick Atwood  
 Sent: Friday, February 3, 2017 7:04 AM
 Subject: Bobolink Project 2017 - Farmer Applications Are Live!
   
 Mass Audubon
| 
|  |
| 
| 
|   |
| The Start Of The 2017 Season Is Here
| 
| Visit the website > |

 | 
| Make a donation > |

 |
|   |   |

 |
| 
| 
Female Bobolink © Marie Pelletier |

We are pleased to announce that we have finished updating our website for the 
coming 2017 Bobolink Project season. The application for farmers is live and 
donations are now being accepted (and are very welcome).We are accepting farmer 
applications until March 20. Please note that we have changed some of the 
criteria for eligible farms and clarified a few other things. We highly 
recommend that you read through all of the information on the For Farmers 
page.We also encourage donors to donate before April 1 when we will begin 
selecting farms for the program. Only donations received before April 1 will be 
applied to the 2017 season. This is because the number of farms (and which 
farms) we accept into the program depends wholly on the total amount of 
donations we have accumulated as of the date we start creating the contracts. 
Any donations that come in after April 1 will be saved for the following 2018 
season.Contact us at bobolinkproject AT massaudubon.org if you have any 
questions.We are looking forward to a new season of The Bobolink 
Project!Cheers,Jon Atwood, MA State Coordinator 

Director of Bird Conservation
Mass Audubon |

 |
| 
| The Bobolink Project
208 South Great Road, Lincoln, MA 017737

      |
| View this email in a web browser   Unsubscribe
 |

 |

 |


|  |

 |

 

   
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Pohick Bay-Eagles / Mason Neck Park-Ducks
From: Donald Sweig <skybirds.d AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 22:39:29 -0500
 What a difference a year makes. On this very date one year ago, I counted at 
least 60 Bald Eagles perching, soaring, flying, fishing, and interacting, from 
the shore of Pohick Bay Regional Park. 

 Hoping to find a large number of eagles again, I was there this morning, last 
Saturday morning, and last Friday afternoon. But, I could find more than four 
or five Eagles on any day . 

 I understand that there were more birds there last weekend and early last 
week, but nothing like the 60 or 80 we had the year before. 


 So, finding nothing at Pohick Bay, on all three occasions that I was there, I 
went on over to Mason Neck park to check on the ducks. 

 There were a lot of ducks, thousands, but quite far out on Belmont Bay, 
necessitating a big scope to see them. Mostly there were Scaup, at least 1500 
maybe 2000 birds spread all over the bay. I also found lots of Coots, Widgeon, 
Ruddy Ducks, Redhead, Gadwall, some Canvasbacks, and, this morning, a couple of 
Northern Shovelers. There were also a large number of ducks so far over on the 
bay that I couldn't determine what they were. 


 Saturday morning I also discovered 30 or 35 picturesque Tundra Swans swimming 
quietly, but "cooing," softly, very close to the visitor center. I was busy 
getting some photo images of these when suddenly they all took off giving me 
the opportunity to get some lovely flight shots. They really are such 
photogenic birds. If it's stays this warm, I assume they will soon be leaving 
on migration back to the Arctic. 

  Donald Sweig
   Falls Church, Virginia

Sent from my iPad
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Osprey at Dyke Marsh
From: "Larry Cartwright" <prowarbler AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 21:51:05 -0500
Very interesting Quinn.  If it is one of the marina nest breeding pair, the
bird is about 10 days early.   It usually shows up between March 3 and March
6 according to our breeding bird survey records.  

Larry Cartwright

-----Original Message-----
From: va-bird [mailto:va-bird-bounces+prowarbler=verizon.net AT listserve.com]
On Behalf Of Quinn Emmering
Sent: Monday, February 20, 2017 8:32 PM
To: va-bird AT listserve.com
Subject: [Va-bird] Osprey at Dyke Marsh

An early osprey appeared at Dyke Marsh at about 11:45 am on Monday, Feb 20.
It was being chased by several fish crows around the marina and eventually
perched on a tree near the marina office.

Cheers,

Quinn Emmering
Alexandria, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as prowarbler AT verizon.net. If you wish to
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: E Jack Jouett Rd. Cranes and Owls
From: Shea Tiller <sheagordontiller AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 21:12:21 -0500
Hello, all. I went looking for the Louisa County cranes Sunday afternoon
(from 4:30 to 6:00) and didn't find them, even though I scanned all of the
fields along this road carefully. Could anyone who has been there and found
the cranes tell me where they usually are and what time of day is best to
look for them?

Regarding the owls, a local resident told me that birders usually scan for
them from near the barn that is not too far along the road after the
intersection with route 15. I stopped there and scanned from 5:15 to a
little after 6:00 with no sign of them; however, the resident harriers were
still hunting as I left--later than I expected. Is it typical for the owls
here to not be out hunting by 6:00, and is this even the right place to
look for them?

Thank you.
Shea
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk.
From: "Walter L. Barrows" <wbarrows AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 20:35:14 -0500
From this morning's birdwalk I've added a handful of photos to my Huntley
Meadows gallery.

https://wlb3.smugmug.com/Virginia-Parks/Huntley-Meadows-Park/

Thanks, Harry, as always.

Cheers

*Walt*



On Mon, Feb 20, 2017 at 4:54 PM, Harry Glasgow 
wrote:

> It was another of the overpowering Monday holiday convocations of birders
> for the Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk.  More than 40 birders
> spread out through the Park and tallied 46 species.  Our highlight of the
> day were a pair of FOS Tree Swallows swooping around the central wetland.
> This show was seen by more than a dozen of the group.  Other highlights
> include a huge flock of Common Grackles that could be heard throughout the
> Park as it rummaged in the woods.  When they eventually took off, obeying
> some unheard signal, the Whoosh! was awe inspiring.  Our great thanks to
> Joel and Linda Goldman for hosting the customary after birding breakfast in
> their delightful home high above downtown Alexandria.
>
> Canada Goose  300
> Wood Duck  4
> American Black Duck  2
> Mallard  100
> Northern Shoveler  7
> Northern Pintail  12
> Ring-necked Duck  2
> Hooded Merganser  4
> Great Blue Heron  6
> Black Vulture  3
> Turkey Vulture  6
> Cooper's Hawk  1
> Red-shouldered Hawk  5
> Red-tailed Hawk  2
> American Coot  5
> Ring-billed Gull  42
> Mourning Dove  4
> Red-headed Woodpecker  5
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  9
> Downy Woodpecker  6
> Hairy Woodpecker  1
> Northern Flicker  2
> Pileated Woodpecker  1
> Blue Jay  3
> American Crow  15
> Fish Crow  10
> Tree Swallow  1    FOS  No pictures, but several in our group watched as
> they soared around the wetland.
> Carolina Chickadee  12
> Tufted Titmouse  5
> White-breasted Nuthatch  6
> Brown Creeper  2
> Winter Wren  1
> Carolina Wren  5
> Golden-crowned Kinglet  3
> Eastern Bluebird  6
> Hermit Thrush  1
> American Robin  4
> White-throated Sparrow  24
> Song Sparrow  2
> Swamp Sparrow  6
> Eastern Towhee  3
> Northern Cardinal  5
> Red-winged Blackbird  25
> Rusty Blackbird  11
> Common Grackle  1000
> American Goldfinch  1
>
> The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows
> since 1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during
> electrical storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 8AM (7AM from March
>  through November), is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is open
> to all. Birders meet in the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701
> Lockheed Blvd, Alexandria, VA. Questions should be directed to Park staff
> during normal business hours at (703)768-2525 <(703)%20768-2525>.
>
> Harry Glasgow
> Friends of Huntley Meadows Park
>
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Osprey at Dyke Marsh
From: Quinn Emmering <qemmering AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 20:31:32 -0500
An early osprey appeared at Dyke Marsh at about 11:45 am on Monday, Feb 20. It 
was being chased by several fish crows around the marina and eventually perched 
on a tree near the marina office. 


Cheers,

Quinn Emmering
Alexandria, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: College Creek Hawkwatch Best Feb Day
From: Brian Taber via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 19:29:49 -0500
My earlier post should have said we haven't recorded a 100+ bird day before for 
the month of February, until today. 



Brian Taber
CVWO
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: College Creek Hawkwatch Best Feb Day and Laughing Gull
From: Brian Taber via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 18:30:09 -0500
In our 21 seasons, College Creek Hawkwatch, on the James River near 
Williamsburg, hasn't recorded a 100+ bird day until today when we recorded 127. 
As usual for the early season, Turkey Vultures dominated, but we also saw Black 
Vultures, Bald Eagles, Red-tailed Hawks and a Sharp-shinned Hawk. The warm 
temperatures also produced Tree Swallows and a very early Laughing Gull, among 
5 Lesser Black-backed Gulls. 


We also saw waterfowl that we don't usually see, including Redheads and 
American Wigeons. 


Brian Taber
Coastal VA Wildlife Observatory
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Tree Swallow
From: David White <dizoo AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 16:52:06 -0500
Saw my FOS Tree Swallow today near Monticello High School in Charlottesville.  

On Saturday morning (2/18) saw a pair of Red-shouldered Hawks mating in the 
same general area. Am pretty sure they weren't students. 


David I. White Jr. | 505 Park Plaza, Charlottesville VA | H: 434-296-4272 | C: 
434-466-3636 | dizoo AT comcast.net 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk.
From: Harry Glasgow via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 21:54:36 +0000 (UTC)
It was another of the overpowering Monday holiday convocations of birders for 
the Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk.  More than 40 birders spread out 
through the Park and tallied 46 species.  Our highlight of the day were a pair 
of FOS Tree Swallows swooping around the central wetland.  This show was seen 
by more than a dozen of the group.  Other highlights include a huge flock of 
Common Grackles that could be heard throughout the Park as it rummaged in the 
woods.  When they eventually took off, obeying some unheard signal, the 
Whoosh! was awe inspiring.  Our great thanks to Joel and Linda Goldman for 
hosting the customary after birding breakfast in their delightful home high 
above downtown Alexandria. 

Canada Goose  300
Wood Duck  4
American Black Duck  2
Mallard  100
Northern Shoveler  7
Northern Pintail  12
Ring-necked Duck  2
Hooded Merganser  4
Great Blue Heron  6
Black Vulture  3
Turkey Vulture  6
Cooper's Hawk  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  5
Red-tailed Hawk  2
American Coot  5
Ring-billed Gull  42
Mourning Dove  4
Red-headed Woodpecker  5
Red-bellied Woodpecker  9
Downy Woodpecker  6
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Blue Jay  3
American Crow  15
Fish Crow  10
Tree Swallow  1    FOS  No pictures, but several in our group watched as 
they soared around the wetland. 

Carolina Chickadee  12
Tufted Titmouse  5
White-breasted Nuthatch  6
Brown Creeper  2
Winter Wren  1
Carolina Wren  5
Golden-crowned Kinglet  3
Eastern Bluebird  6
Hermit Thrush  1
American Robin  4
White-throated Sparrow  24
Song Sparrow  2
Swamp Sparrow  6
Eastern Towhee  3
Northern Cardinal  5
Red-winged Blackbird  25
Rusty Blackbird  11
Common Grackle  1000
American Goldfinch  1

The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows since 
1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during electrical 
storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 8AM (7AM from March  through 
November), is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is open to all. 
Birders meet in the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701 Lockheed Blvd, 
Alexandria, VA. Questions should be directed to Park staff during normal 
business hours at (703)768-2525. 


Harry GlasgowFriends of Huntley Meadows Park
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Re: Chukar in Alexandria
From: Vineeta Anand <vineetaa AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 16:11:49 -0500
It's been around for a while. It was first spotted here last summer. Vineeta 
Anand 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 20, 2017, at 3:58 PM, Thomas Nardone  wrote:
> 
> My wife saw and photographed a chukar in the Del Ray section of Alexandria 
this afternoon. I assume it's is an escapee. 

> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as vineetaa AT gmail.com. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Chukar in Alexandria
From: Thomas Nardone <nardonet AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 15:58:02 -0500
My wife saw and photographed a chukar in the Del Ray section of Alexandria this 
afternoon. I assume it's is an escapee. 


Sent from my iPhone
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Poss. Pacific Loon. Kiptopeke
From: Apple via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 14:33:03 -0500
Daves got some pics on his camera. Won't be on computer until tomorrow. Bill 
looks thinner than Common. White comes up to eye. Not around. Gray on head down 
back of neck pretty uniform. Was swimming pretty close to fishing pier. 


Dave Boltz
Rich Rieger
Phil Silas
On the eastern shore. 

Sent from my iPhone
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Razorbills & Dovekies off Cape Henry / N Va Beach
From: Lee Atwood via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 17:23:03 +0000 (UTC)
Yesterday (19 Feb) I had 3 Razorbills near the closest pound net stakes at 
First Landing SP.Then 63 were to the NE of the beach overlook platform at Ft 
Story with 3 Dovekies. Furtherdown the oceanfront as far as 57th ST, were 34 
more Razorbills and 2 more Dovekies. 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Tree swallow, Aquia Landing
From: Marc Ribaudo <moribaudo AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 11:41:53 -0500
I saw a single tree swallow at Aquia Landing parking in Brooke this morning.

Marc Ribaudo

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Droid
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Red-Shouldered Hawk (?) nest building in Springfield/Burke
From: Jonathan Clough <cloughj AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 15:57:29 +0000
I spotted what appears to be a pair of Red-Shouldered Hawks in the process of 
constructing a nest in the common-area woodlands behind my house in 
Springfield. I don't have a good digiscope setup, so forgive the poor quality 
of the photo and video linked below, the results of handheld point & shoot 
through the viewfinder. I'm not confident in my identification, as we've had 
Cooper's Hawks visit the yard with some frequency. So, I'd welcome corrections 
if I've misidentified this hawk. 



Jonathan Clough

Springfield, VA


Brief video:  https://youtu.be/Ga07axKv_Os

Photo:  https://1drv.ms/a/s!AnIJfTaPYo7ajSi_IcxZ45C9DGwJ



[https://6sovqq.dm2302.livefilestore.com/y3mA65yUE7rrepAYslFz8eJCMgh5QoUFm8u3oZ4q4ChrqVOsgYAsqx4x6YfFZUXaGj1dw3V5hUCHI7ZGPfz4KEwPcMEiBYzTC7Nor-YbEyaw3qrASNumr4gjQYXxqHMUB8w] 
 


[https://6sovqq.dm2302.livefilestore.com/y3mA65yUE7rrepAYslFz8eJCMgh5QoUFm8u3oZ4q4ChrqVOsgYAsqx4x6YfFZUXaGj1dw3V5hUCHI7ZGPfz4KEwPcMEiBYzTC7Nor-YbEyaw3qrASNumr4gjQYXxqHMUB8w] 



*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Red-headed woodpecker, Luria Park, Falls Church
From: Larry Golfer <lgolfer2 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 09:35:10 -0500
I went out to see if I could photograph red-headed woodpeckers at
Luria Park and I was not disappointed. Even located a nest. See photos
here: https://flickr.com/photos/77111801 AT N00/sets/72157677052749573

Also saw red-bellies, hairy, and downies.

Larry Golfer
Lake Barcroft VA


-- 
J. Larry Golfer
6513 Jay Miller Drive
Falls Church, VA 22041
Phone: 703-626-0801
Email: lgolfer2 AT gmail.com
Blog: jlarrygolferphotography.blogspot.com
Web: jlarrygolferphotography.com
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Princess Anne WMA Dike Construction & Virginia Beach General Observations
From: Rob Bielawski <robbielawski AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 07:50:44 -0500
Fellow Birders,

With warm weather taking hold of the region over the weekend, and with
Sunday being the only day Princess Anne WMA in Virginia Beach is open to
the public through April, I decided to see if anything interesting might be
hanging around. Notably in the Whitehurst Tract, a pair of Blue-winged Teal
was observed associating with a group of 7 Green-winged Teal on the
southern set of impoundments. Also, a sizable flock of Northern Pintail was
seen as well, which makes this my first outing of 2017 that provided
somewhat good numbers of waterfowl at the park.

CONSTRUCTION: On the Beasley Tract side of Munden Road, I thought perhaps
more teal would be present on the large northern impoundment that proved to
be excellent for waterfowl last winter, as well as a haven for shorebirds
when spring rolled around. Unfortunately, this impoundment appears to have
grown up into a vegetated field with water filling only the ditch that
encircles it, rather than being flooded all the way across. This doesn't
bode well for the waterfowl situation, and it likely is going to hinder any
shorebird . A pair of Hooded Mergansers was the only duck species seen on
the water here. White Ibis seem to love it though, as a group of 16 was
feeding on crayfish here, and a larger flock of around 70 was seen earlier
on the Whitehurst Tract. The Beasley Tract is basically two large
impoundments, with a central ditch laid out east to west between them.
There are trails along the dikes that separate the ditch from the
impoundments on either side, making a north dike and south dike. It appears
that the area is undergoing a renovation though, as the southern dike is
now disconnected roughly at the center, and becomes a dead end, which now
opens up the ditch and connects it to the southern impoundment. If you're
wanting to walk without having to turn around, make sure to walk only the
northern dike, between the north impoundment and the ditch where the Purple
Gallinule was observed last spring.

Excellent finds and re-finds have been abundant recently across Virginia
Beach, and it appears Sherwood Lakes is again being visited by a ROSS'S
GOOSE, with reports of 2 CACKLING GEESE also showing up recently;
additionally, the continuing COMMON MERGANSERS have been reported off and
on over the past few weeks. BREWER'S BLACKBIRDS continue to be seen on West
Gibbs Road in a cattle/horse pasture/feed lot. A EURASIAN WIGEON continues
to be reported at Pleasure House Point NA, and it seems no one observed a
WESTERN GREBE this weekend though we had reports of one at First Landing
State Park (ph. Lisa Rose) and the continuing individual at Back Bay NWR as
recent as last weekend. Back Bay NWR seems to have quieted down
significantly from the massive alcid movement that spurred folks into
finding other great birds like MANX & GREAT SHEARWATER (first obs. Ned
Brinkley & Bob Ake, with several other reports following including a great
photograph of a Manx by Linda Chittum), MAGNIFICENT FRIGATEBIRD & LITTLE
GULL (ph. West Teets & Abby Walter), and of course, a first state record
ANCIENT MURRELET (obs. Ned Brinkley & Bob Ake). A list of all the Virginia
Beach-specific reports is compiled on my website here for folks visiting
the area, this is kept up-to-date as best I can and lists birds in order of
most recent sighting with some background provided & links to eBird reports
if further research is of interest. If you're coming to the area to follow
up on sightings, this is a good place to start:

http://www.beachbirding.com/distribution/noteworthy-observations/

Best Birding,

Rob Bielawski
Virginia Beach, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Tree swallow and harrier at Huntley Meadows today
From: Pam and Ben via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 22:45:42 -0500
The tree swallow was flying over the first meadow on the Hike/Bike Trail.
Spring is here.  The harrier was flying over the woods by the maintenance
area.  Looked like a Cooper's hawk, but flight style completely
different-slow, heavy wingbeats, a little like a huge, rounded-winged
nighthawk.  I don't often see one that is not hunting over a field.

 

There was also a THRASHER at the platform.

 

Ben Jesup

Alexandria

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: 28 species of birds observed on Feb 18 Field Trip to CBBT islands 2, 3, 4
From: Shirley Devan <sedevan52 AT cox.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 20:33:52 -0500
GReetings, The Williamsburg Bird Club ventured to Islands 2, 3, 4 of CBBT 
Saturday. Mild (warm!) temperatures and calm water made for an enjoyable 
morning. 


Brain Taber of Williamsburg Bird Club and President of Coastal VA Wildlife 
Observatory, led the trip and 22 others were glad to go with him. 


Below are the numbers and species as reported to eBird.

Thanks to the good folks of the Hampton Roads Bird Club who were also on the 
islands an hour ahead of us. They alerted us to the eiders at Island 4. Sure 
enough we found 4 eiders, 1 King Eider and 3 Common Eiders. 


As for mammals, no whales, but there were about two dozen seals and a playful 
dolphin at island 3. 


Shirley Devan, Field Trip Coordinator
Williamsburg Bird Club
www.williamsburgbirdclub.org/

Cell Ph: 757.813.1322
Look for me on Facebook ...

> 
> 
> Across the three islands we had a total of 28 species for the morning. 
Amusing interaction with the Beth, the security guard, who led us around. At 
the end, she said she was surprised that we had stayed the full three hours. 
She said some of the trips she’s escorted, folks stayed 20-30 minutes and 
then were ready to go! I assured her that this group could have stayed the rest 
of the day! 

> 
> Here are the birds we saw at each island. If we’ve missed a species, please 
let us know. 

> 
> 
> CBBT--North Thimble Island (#2), Virginia Beach, Virginia, US
> Feb 18, 2017 9:10 AM - 10:00 AM
> Protocol: Stationary
> Comments:     Williamsburg Bird Club field Trip led by Brian Taber
> 15 species (+1 other taxa)
> 
> Brant  6
> scoter sp.  20
> Long-tailed Duck  2
> Bufflehead  16
> Red-breasted Merganser  4
> Northern Gannet  63
> Great Cormorant  1
> Double-crested Cormorant  135     estimate
> Brown Pelican  6
> Ruddy Turnstone  10
> Purple Sandpiper  2
> Ring-billed Gull  1
> Herring Gull  250     estimate
> Lesser Black-backed Gull  7
> Great Black-backed Gull  2
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  12
> 
> 
> 
> CBBT--South Chesapeake Island (#3), Northampton, Virginia, US
> Feb 18, 2017 10:13 AM - 11:13 AM
> Protocol: Stationary
> Comments:     Williamsburg Bird Club Field Trip led by Brian Taber
> 17 species
> 
> Brant  2
> Surf Scoter  17
> Black Scoter  1
> Long-tailed Duck  4
> Red-breasted Merganser  14
> Red-throated Loon  7
> Common Loon  8
> Horned Grebe  10
> Red-necked Grebe  1
> Northern Gannet  22
> Great Cormorant  1
> Purple Sandpiper  3
> Razorbill  6
> Bonaparte's Gull  1
> Herring Gull  8
> Lesser Black-backed Gull  4
> Great Black-backed Gull  4
> 
> 
> 
> CBBT--North Chesapeake Island (#4), Northampton, Virginia, US
> Feb 18, 2017 11:20 AM - 12:00 PM
> Protocol: Stationary
> Comments:     Williamsburg Bird Club Field Trip led by Brian Taber
> 15 species
> 
> Greater Scaup  3
> King Eider 1 not unusual for this location. Observed with 3 Common Eiders 

> Common Eider  3
> Surf Scoter  4
> Long-tailed Duck  14
> Bufflehead  2
> Common Goldeneye  2
> Red-breasted Merganser  6
> Red-throated Loon  5
> Common Loon  2
> Horned Grebe  10
> Northern Gannet  24
> Great Cormorant  7
> Lesser Black-backed Gull  6
> Great Black-backed Gull  3
> 
> 
> Shirley Devan, Field Trip Coordinator
> Williamsburg Bird Club
> www.williamsburgbirdclub.org/ 
> 
> Cell Ph: 757.813.1322
> Look for me on Facebook ...
> 
> 
> 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Chincoteague NWR: Marbled Godwit and Eurasian Wigeon
From: Elizabeth Fedorko <elizabethholcombefedorko AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 20:27:52 -0500
Hello!

For the first time we birded CNWR. Wonderful weekend! We saw the Eurasian
Wigeon on Fri/Sat/Sun as well as a Marbled Godwit on Saturday, but not on
Sunday. Lots of Snow Geese, several American Oystercatchers, and more. Also
saw Ruddy Turnstone on the CBBT on Friday. I posted photos on my Pintrest
page: https://www.pinterest.com/dimestorechic/birds-weve-seen/

Added lots of birds to our life list and can't wait to return!

Cheers and Happy Birding!
Dan and Beth Fedorko
Falls Church, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Woodcocks at Huntley Meadow Hike and Bike Trail
From: Bill Hohenstein <elliety AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 01:07:21 +0000
I was able to catch an early show of Woodcocks on their display grounds along 
the hike and bike trail. I showed up just before dusk and there were at least 4 
birds peenting. I was able to see several display flights and heard several 
more. From other e-bird reports, it looks like they have been displaying for 
the last 10 days or so. 



Bill


https://www.flickr.com/photos/73831614 AT N00/32620851500/in/dateposted-public/



[X]Woodcock Display at Huntley 
Meadows 


[https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3889/32620851500_a2635c09c9_b.jpg] 
 

[https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3889/32620851500_a2635c09c9_b.jpg]




*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Short-eared Owls, Ravens in VA, and extralimital Black-backed Oriole
From: Daniel Lebbin <djlebbin AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 19:09:51 -0500
Friday evening near The Plains, *Harrison Road* pond had a variety of
waterfowl including* Hooded Merganser, American Wigeon, Ring-necked Duck,
Gadwall, Canada Goose*, whereas the fields hosted 3 *Short-eared
Owl*s, 2 *Northern
Harrier*s, 2 *Red-tailed Hawk*s, and several singing *Eastern Meadowlark*.

Saturday, a *Common Raven* was perched on a tall tower supporting
electrical lines near the Whole Foods in the middle of *Vienna*. I have
seen them at Tyson's Corner and in Oakton, but not in Vienna until this
weekend.

*Extralimital:* Today, I made the predawn trek to Indiana Ave. near *Reading,
Pennsylvania* for the *Black-backed Oriole*, a Mexican species related to
Bullock's Oriole, visiting yard feeders up there. It made several
appearances for a crowd of birders between 7:18 and 8:54am. See eBird,
Pennsylvania's birding listserve and ABA postings for more details on this
bird that has been there for the last couple weeks.

Good birding,
Dan Lebbin
Vienna, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Occoquan Bay NWR, Feb 19, 2017
From: Phillip Kenny <philkenny AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 18:55:14 -0500
Russ Taylor & I birded Occoquan Bay NWR this morning. We found 61 species 
total, walking from the parking lot to Turtle Pond and then to Deep Hole Point 
and back to the car. The highlights being the continuing Lincoln’s Sparrow (5 
weeks!), Red-headed Wood Peckers (6 and a half species of woodpeckers: I 
thought I heard a Pileated, but not well enough to call it.), and a pair of 
Bald Eagles that grabbed each other’s talons and cartwheeled towards the 
ground. I wonder if this is a male & female bonding or 2 males fighting? It was 
very cool to see!!! The full list is below and some documentation photos are on 
the eBird site. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34528725 


Cheers,
Phil

Phillip Kenny
1731 Killarney Court
Vienna, VA 22182-2133
703-255-5423
philkenny AT verizon.net



> Begin forwarded message:
> 
> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Subject: eBird Report - Occoquan Bay NWR, Feb 19, 2017
> Date: February 19, 2017 at 6:41:37 PM EST
> To: philkenny AT verizon.net
> 
> Occoquan Bay NWR, Prince William, Virginia, US
> Feb 19, 2017 7:00 AM - 11:30 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 4.0 mile(s)
> 61 species
> 
> Canada Goose  162
> Tundra Swan  2
> Wood Duck  2
> American Black Duck  23
> Mallard  141
> Northern Shoveler  2
> Green-winged Teal  8
> Ring-necked Duck  1
> Lesser Scaup  2802
> Bufflehead  20
> Hooded Merganser  10
> Ruddy Duck  7
> Wild Turkey  2
> Pied-billed Grebe  1
> Double-crested Cormorant  10
> Great Blue Heron  3
> Black Vulture  5
> Turkey Vulture  7
> Cooper's Hawk  1
> Bald Eagle  6
> Red-shouldered Hawk  1
> American Coot  2
> Killdeer  5
> Ring-billed Gull  500
> Herring Gull  35
> Great Black-backed Gull  3
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  3
> Mourning Dove  7
> Belted Kingfisher  2
> Red-headed Woodpecker  2
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  5
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
> Downy Woodpecker  3
> Hairy Woodpecker  1
> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  6
> Blue Jay  6
> American Crow  5
> Fish Crow  30
> Carolina Chickadee  3
> Tufted Titmouse  4
> Winter Wren  3
> Carolina Wren  15
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
> Eastern Bluebird  1
> American Robin  1
> Northern Mockingbird  2
> European Starling  3
> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  1
> Fox Sparrow (Red)  3
> Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  3
> White-throated Sparrow  20
> Song Sparrow  27
> Lincoln's Sparrow  1     Continuing bird at Deephole Point.
> Swamp Sparrow  2
> Eastern Towhee  6
> Northern Cardinal  9
> Red-winged Blackbird  127
> Common Grackle  18
> Brown-headed Cowbird  10
> House Finch  3
> House Sparrow  2
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34528725
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Test
From: "Paul Woodward" <grackling AT att.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 17:02:41 -0500
I haven't received any messages the past few days

__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature 
database 14962 (20170219) __________ 


The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com



*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Weekend Observations
From: Allen Bryan via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 20:56:49 +0000 (UTC)
I visited the Fort Monroe area on Saturday and areas east of Richmond today.The 
following link is to photographs of Razorbill, Orange-crowned Warbler, 
Red-tailed Hawk (albieticola) and unfortunately a dead adult Bald Eagle found 
in Prince George County. 

February 2017 | VisitingNature

  
|  
|   
|   
|   |    |

   |

  |
|  
|   |  
February 2017 | VisitingNature
   |   |

  |

  |

 



www.visitingnature/February 2017 | VisitingNature/

Allen Allen Bryan Richmond, Va. www.visitingnature.com
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Fw: eBird Report - Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve, Feb 19, 2017
From: "Marc Ribaudo" <moribaudo AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 15:07:02 -0500
The weekly walk at Dyke Marsh, Alexandria, sponsored by the Friends of Dyke 
Marsh, enjoyed great weather and a decent list of birds.  We spotted 51 
species in all.  Waterfowl put on a good show, with nice diverse flocks off 
the picnic area and from the boardwalk.  The trail itself was not real birdy 
but we did see a ruby-crowned kinglet and rusty blackbirds, and heard a 
singing winter wren.

]The walk is held weekly and is open to all.  It starts at 8am in the Belle 
Haven picnic area.

Marc Ribaudo

-----Original Message----- 
From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
Sent: Sunday, February 19, 2017 2:57 PM
To: moribaudo AT verizon.net
Subject: eBird Report - Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve, Feb 19, 2017

Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve, Fairfax, Virginia, US
Feb 19, 2017 7:11 AM - 10:56 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.5 mile(s)
51 species

Canada Goose  900
American Wigeon  14
American Black Duck  10
Mallard  50
Northern Shoveler  18
Northern Pintail  2
Ring-necked Duck  30
Greater Scaup  3
Lesser Scaup  90
Bufflehead  5
Hooded Merganser  14
Common Merganser  18
Pied-billed Grebe  1
Horned Grebe  1
Double-crested Cormorant  12
Great Blue Heron  7
Bald Eagle  4
Red-shouldered Hawk  2
American Coot  7
Ring-billed Gull  200
Herring Gull  25
Great Black-backed Gull  2
Mourning Dove  8
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  8
Downy Woodpecker  4
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  3
Pileated Woodpecker  2
Blue Jay  6
American Crow  2
Fish Crow  8
Carolina Chickadee  8
Tufted Titmouse  3
White-breasted Nuthatch  2
Winter Wren  1
Carolina Wren  10
Golden-crowned Kinglet  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
American Robin  11
Northern Mockingbird  1
European Starling  6
White-throated Sparrow  8
Song Sparrow  7
Northern Cardinal  6
Red-winged Blackbird  75
Rusty Blackbird  4
Common Grackle  1
House Finch  4
American Goldfinch  1
House Sparrow  5

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34510697

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Great Falls NP Bird Walk 02/19/17 Fairfax County
From: Dendroica--- via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 14:31:06 -0500
Our group of ten tallied 28 species with some hints that  spring migration 
is on the way.  We meet at the visitors center parking lot  every Sunday at 
8 AM weather permitting.  All birders are welcome to  join us.  Ralph Wall 
 
The list:
 
Canada Goose  25
American Black Duck  10
Mallard   8
Ring-necked Duck  30
Bufflehead  30
Common Merganser   5
Great Blue Heron  6
Black Vulture  12
Turkey Vulture   6
Bald Eagle  4
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Ring-billed Gull   40
Mourning Dove  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Downy  Woodpecker  2
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker   2
American Crow  20
Carolina Chickadee  6
Tufted  Titmouse  20
White-breasted Nuthatch  4
Winter Wren   1
Carolina Wren  4
Eastern Bluebird  10
Dark-eyed Junco   6
White-throated Sparrow  4
Song Sparrow  1
Red-winged  Blackbird  12

View this checklist online at  
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34517745

This report was generated  automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Combined Rockbridge-Augusta Bird Club's Field Trip - February 18, 2017
From: Herbert Larner via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 18:15:04 +0000 (UTC)

> 
> Date:
> February 18, 2017
> From: Wendy Richards,
> Field Trip Coordinator of the Rockbridge Bird Club
> Subject: Combined Rockbridge-Augusta Bird
> Club's Field Trip - February 18, 2017
> > 
> > There were 15 of us
> and with Allen Larner as our guide we had a great morning
> visiting some of his favorite birding spots in western
> Augusta County. The weather was relatively warm and there
> wasn't a wind (Yay!). We travelled in a caravan to the
> Swoope area, with stops at several ponds. The Bald Eagles
> were a no show at the nest site but we did get a great view
> of a pair of Northern Harriers and a distant view of Rudy
> Ducks as we walked along a lovely wetland area where the
> eagles usually hang out. Allen went back to the eagle nest
> after the field trip and lo and behold an eagle was at the
> nest. That figures!
> > 
> > At a pond at Camp Shenandoah (Boy Scout
> camp) we saw Ring-necked Ducks hanging out in one area of
> the distant bank and a large flock of Canada Geese spread
> out across the rest of it with a Mallard cornered between
> the Geese. Walking on the Augusta Wetland trail we added the
> following to our list of species: Eastern Phoebe, Hairy
> Woodpecker and most exciting of all - Brown Creeper and a
> pair of Hooded Mergansers.
> > 
> > In between these spots we travelled along
> many scenic, back roads where we got great views of Red-tail
> Hawks, American Kestrels and singing Eastern Meadowlarks.
> The trip offered a chance for participants from the 2 clubs
> as well as a newcomer and a visitor from California to get
> to know each other and share birding knowledge. We decided
> to do this again soon!
> > 
> > Below is our complete list of 30
> species:
> > Canada Goose  59
> > Mallard  11
> >
> Ring-necked Duck  3
> > Hooded Merganser 
> 2
> > Ruddy Duck  5
> >
> Black Vulture  2
> > Turkey Vulture  4
> > Northern Harrier  2
> >
> Red-tailed Hawk  3
> > Mourning Dove 
> 5
> > Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
> > Downy Woodpecker  3
> >
> Hairy Woodpecker  2
> > Pileated
> Woodpecker  1
> > American Kestrel  2
> > Eastern Phoebe  1
> >
> Blue Jay  1
> > American Crow  6
> > Common Raven  1
> >
> Carolina Chickadee  4
> > Tufted
> Titmouse  1
> > White-breasted Nuthatch 
> 2
> > Brown Creeper  1
> > Carolina Wren  3
> >
> Eastern Bluebird  3
> > European
> Starling  11
> > White-throated Sparrow 
> 8
> > Song Sparrow  2
> >
> Northern Cardinal  3
> > Eastern
> Meadowlark  10
> > 
> >
> 
> > 
> >
> 
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Fwd: Virginia eBirding the Appalachian Trail
From: Wendy Ealding <wendy.ealding AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 12:13:36 -0500
I'm forwarding this message that I received from Diana Doyle.  Those of you
who are ABA members will be familiar with her Tools of the Trade articles
in Birding magazine.

If you can help with suggestions, please respond directly to Diana at
diana AT semi-local.com.

Wendy Ealding
Secretary, Virginia Avian Records Committee

-----Original Message-----
From: Diana Doyle 
To: Wendy Ealding 
Sent: Sat, Feb 18, 2017 10:13 am
Subject: Virginia eBirding the Appalachian Trail

Hi Wendy,

I’ll be returning to Virginia this summer — but this time by land rather
than at sea! I’m emailing you as a state expert for some help with
questions of Virginia bird distribution.

My husband and I are planning a section-hike of the Appalachian Trail
through Virginia — my goal is to “eBird the Appalachian Trail” — a
continuous transect surveying the birds though this unique high-elevation
habitat that is likely to be affected by climate change. In Virginia alone,
the Appalachians hosts eleven species on the 2016 State of the Birds Watch
List, with about 30 “northern” species that extend their range far
southward along this high-elevation chain.

I’m trying to read up as much as I can before we start in April, but I’ll
never be able to match decades of local knowledge of bird distribution. In
addition to logging eBird checklists (and keeping an eye out for the usual
eBird-flagged notables), what should be on my radar?

For example:

*- Documentation of any particular “expected” species, but that are seldom
reported? (e.g., Long-eared Owl? Chuck-will’s-widow or Whip-poor-will?)*

*- Precise lat-long of any focal species? (e.g., Cerulean Warbler for
Cornell’s Cerulean Warbler Atlas Project?)*

*- Dawn surveys needed at any particular dates or locations? (similar to
the Vermont Center for Ecostudies Mountain Birdwatch citizen science
project)*

*- Recordings of any particular species?*

*- Breeding codes or evidence for any particular species?*

*- Questions of range expansion of any particular species — either by
latitude or by elevation?*

*- Any other habitat/species/range issues along Virginia's Appalachian
chain that I should be aware of?*


I’m out there anyway—day and night listening and logging. But I can’t log
“everything”! So it's most helpful if I know in advance which observations,
recordings, etc have the most value.

Thanks for providing any expert local knowledge advice! I’m also sending
this email to Bob Ake and Ned Brinkley. And feel free to pass this email on
if there is someone who may benefit from a volunteer “birder-hiker of
opportunity.”

Best,

Diana
Currently Austin, Texas


____________________________________________
Diana Doyle
Department Editor, Tools of the Trade
*Birding* Magazine
American Birding Association
www.aba.org

Founder, Birding Aboard Project
www.birdingaboard.org

diana AT birdingaboard.org
612-859-0000 <(612)%20859-0000>




-- 
Wendy Ealding
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Great Bridge Battlefield & Waterways Historic Park, Feb 19, 2017
From: G B Harris <gbhrlh AT cox.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 11:50:52 -0500
Va Birders,

Nice stroll around the old Locks Park in Chesapeake. Did not expect to find FOX 
SPARROWS . Pine Warblers and Brown-headed Nuthatches 

singing all over park. 


George & Rosemarie Harris
> 
> Great Bridge Battlefield & Waterways Historic Park, Chesapeake, Virginia, US
> Feb 19, 2017 8:15 AM - 9:40 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.5 mile(s)
> Comments:     GBH-RLH.
> 32 species
> 
> Canada Goose  15
> Wood Duck  2
> Mallard  16
> Pied-billed Grebe  1
> Double-crested Cormorant  24
> Great Blue Heron  2
> Turkey Vulture  1
> Osprey  1
> Bald Eagle  2
> Red-tailed Hawk  1
> Spotted Sandpiper 1 On mud across from boat ramp. teetering: brownish above, 
whitish below, hash mark on shoulder, white stripe on wing, flew short distance 
with stiff wingbneats. 

> Ring-billed Gull  21
> Herring Gull  2
> Belted Kingfisher  1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
> Blue Jay  2
> American Crow  2
> Fish Crow  7
> Carolina Chickadee  8
> Brown-headed Nuthatch  13
> Carolina Wren  3
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
> Eastern Bluebird  3
> Northern Mockingbird  1
> Pine Warbler  12
> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  5
> Fox Sparrow  4     Entering park , first picnic table on right
> Song Sparrow  1
> Eastern Towhee  4
> Northern Cardinal  7
> Red-winged Blackbird  6
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34510739
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/VA)

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: va-bird Digest, Vol 118, Issue 19
From: Cliff and Ellen Pitts <cnep AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 09:02:01 -0500 (EST)
Ticks in winter,
 Yes we have and research indicates it is common. Walked our dog along the road 
to beverly mill(Bull Run Mountain) in late December. We found ourselves picking 
off ticks for hours on our return. I did not think they would be active, but my 
wife went online and found that they will come out all winter during thaws. It 
was 45-50 that day, but after several days of solid frozen ground. Guess we 
have to be careful all year! 


Cliff Pitts


> On February 19, 2017 at 8:50 AM va-bird-request AT listserve.com wrote:
> 
> 
> Send va-bird mailing list submissions to
> 	va-bird AT listserve.com
> 
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
> 	http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
> 	va-bird-request AT listserve.com
> 
> You can reach the person managing the list at
> 	va-bird-owner AT listserve.com
> 
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of va-bird digest..."
> 
> 
> Today's Topics:
> 
>    1. Spring is just around the corner!!!!!!  Geese migrating;
>       ticks (MARLENECONDON AT aol.com)
>    2. Sully Woodlands (Howard Wu)
>    3. Re: Spring is just around the corner!!!!!! Geese	migrating;
>       ticks (nanjyoung AT juno.com)
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Message: 1
> Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 11:16:26 -0500
> From: MARLENECONDON AT aol.com
> To: va-bird AT listserve.com
> Subject: [Va-bird] Spring is just around the corner!!!!!!  Geese
> 	migrating;	ticks
> Message-ID: <10d5329.440eb252.45d9cd5a AT aol.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
> 
> Saw about 65 Canada Geese migrating back north this morning just  before 7 
> AM.  They were a noisy bunch--I couldn't help thinking they  sounded 
> happy!!!!! Although I take their appearance as a sign of spring (along with a 

> male phoebe that chipped briefly near the porch this morning), I  should 
> mention that a male Purple Finch was at my feeder when I started writing 
this, 

> and a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker visited our Photinia a few times to tap on the 

> trunks earlier this morning. 
>  
> A NOTE ABOUT TICKS:  It could be a very problematic year  tick-wise.  The 
> winter has been so warm that I saw my first--EVER!!!!--  tick in winter-time 
> on Jan. 15.  And it wasn't even on a particularly warm  day--the high at my 
> house was 41.5 degrees that day.  My hubby was bitten  following just a 
> quick walk into the woods north of our house.
>  
> Has anyone out there ever seen a tick during the winter?  I'd be  
> interested in knowing.  Thanks! 
>  
> Sincerely,
> Marlene 
>  
>  
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 2
> Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 16:33:37 +0000
> From: Howard Wu 
> To: "va-bird AT listserve.com" 
> Subject: [Va-bird] Sully Woodlands
> Message-ID:
> 	
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
> 
> I was surprised that on this beautiful morning I was the only one at Sully
> Woodlands (8:25 - 9:30). I spotted the Northern Shrike again, in the burned
> fields west of the barn. It's really much easier to spot now with all the
> grasses and shrubs burned off. I also noticed that the Northern Flickers
> like to forage in the charred grounds. Later I spotted an Eastern
> Meadowlark too.
> 
> My partial eBird list is here:
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34455067
> 
> Cheers,
> Howard Wu
> Herndon, VA
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 3
> Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 12:38:59 -0500
> From: 
> To: 
> Cc: va-bird AT listserve.com
> Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Spring is just around the corner!!!!!! Geese
> 	migrating; ticks
> Message-ID: <54A42CA7151A4F5E9252A44378A3BF1A AT NancyPC>
> Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
> 	reply-type=original
> 
> Hi Marlene.
> Ticks in winter - yes, indeed! I found a tiny one on my leg in January 2010 
> after a walk along the Blue Ridge Parkway. And I'm quite sure I had one in 
> January in another year after a walk in the woods. I think they wake up 
> whenever it warms up. I guess the rule should be - check for ticks whenever 
> you've been out where there are trees or bushes. Which reminds me - I have 
> two little granddaughters here today and they have run all over the place 
> for hours. I will need to check them for ticks. Thanks for mentioning it!
> 
> Nancy Young
> Troutville, VA
> 
> -----Original Message----- 
> From: MARLENECONDON--- via va-bird
> Sent: Saturday, February 18, 2017 11:16 AM
> To: va-bird AT listserve.com
> Subject: [Va-bird] Spring is just around the corner!!!!!! Geese 
> migrating;ticks
> 
> Saw about 65 Canada Geese migrating back north this morning just  before 7
> AM.  They were a noisy bunch--I couldn't help thinking they  sounded
> happy!!!!!  Although I take their appearance as a sign of spring  (along 
> with a
> male phoebe that chipped briefly near the porch this morning), I  should
> mention that a male Purple Finch was at my feeder when I started writing 
> this,
> and a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker visited our Photinia a few times to  tap on 
> the
> trunks earlier this morning.
> 
> A NOTE ABOUT TICKS:  It could be a very problematic year  tick-wise.  The
> winter has been so warm that I saw my first--EVER!!!!--  tick in winter-time
> on Jan. 15.  And it wasn't even on a particularly warm  day--the high at my
> house was 41.5 degrees that day.  My hubby was bitten  following just a
> quick walk into the woods north of our house.
> 
> Has anyone out there ever seen a tick during the winter?  I'd be
> interested in knowing.  Thanks!
> 
> Sincerely,
> Marlene
> 
> 
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as nanjyoung AT juno.com. If you wish to 
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Subject: Digest Footer
> 
> _______________________________________________
> va-bird mailing list
> va-bird AT listserve.com
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of va-bird Digest, Vol 118, Issue 19
> ****************************************
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Spring is just around the corner!!!!!! Geese migrating; ticks
From: <nanjyoung AT juno.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 12:38:59 -0500
Hi Marlene.
Ticks in winter - yes, indeed! I found a tiny one on my leg in January 2010 
after a walk along the Blue Ridge Parkway. And I'm quite sure I had one in 
January in another year after a walk in the woods. I think they wake up 
whenever it warms up. I guess the rule should be - check for ticks whenever 
you've been out where there are trees or bushes. Which reminds me - I have 
two little granddaughters here today and they have run all over the place 
for hours. I will need to check them for ticks. Thanks for mentioning it!

Nancy Young
Troutville, VA

-----Original Message----- 
From: MARLENECONDON--- via va-bird
Sent: Saturday, February 18, 2017 11:16 AM
To: va-bird AT listserve.com
Subject: [Va-bird] Spring is just around the corner!!!!!! Geese 
migrating;ticks

Saw about 65 Canada Geese migrating back north this morning just  before 7
AM.  They were a noisy bunch--I couldn't help thinking they  sounded
happy!!!!!  Although I take their appearance as a sign of spring  (along 
with a
male phoebe that chipped briefly near the porch this morning), I  should
mention that a male Purple Finch was at my feeder when I started writing 
this,
and a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker visited our Photinia a few times to  tap on 
the
trunks earlier this morning.

A NOTE ABOUT TICKS:  It could be a very problematic year  tick-wise.  The
winter has been so warm that I saw my first--EVER!!!!--  tick in winter-time
on Jan. 15.  And it wasn't even on a particularly warm  day--the high at my
house was 41.5 degrees that day.  My hubby was bitten  following just a
quick walk into the woods north of our house.

Has anyone out there ever seen a tick during the winter?  I'd be
interested in knowing.  Thanks!

Sincerely,
Marlene


*** You are subscribed to va-bird as nanjyoung AT juno.com. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Sully Woodlands
From: Howard Wu <howiewu1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 16:33:37 +0000
I was surprised that on this beautiful morning I was the only one at Sully
Woodlands (8:25 - 9:30). I spotted the Northern Shrike again, in the burned
fields west of the barn. It's really much easier to spot now with all the
grasses and shrubs burned off. I also noticed that the Northern Flickers
like to forage in the charred grounds. Later I spotted an Eastern
Meadowlark too.

My partial eBird list is here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34455067

Cheers,
Howard Wu
Herndon, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Spring is just around the corner!!!!!! Geese migrating; ticks
From: MARLENECONDON--- via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 11:16:26 -0500
Saw about 65 Canada Geese migrating back north this morning just  before 7 
AM.  They were a noisy bunch--I couldn't help thinking they  sounded 
happy!!!!! Although I take their appearance as a sign of spring (along with a 

male phoebe that chipped briefly near the porch this morning), I  should 
mention that a male Purple Finch was at my feeder when I started writing this, 

and a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker visited our Photinia a few times to  tap on the 
trunks earlier this morning. 
 
A NOTE ABOUT TICKS:  It could be a very problematic year  tick-wise.  The 
winter has been so warm that I saw my first--EVER!!!!--  tick in winter-time 
on Jan. 15.  And it wasn't even on a particularly warm  day--the high at my 
house was 41.5 degrees that day.  My hubby was bitten  following just a 
quick walk into the woods north of our house.
 
Has anyone out there ever seen a tick during the winter?  I'd be  
interested in knowing.  Thanks! 
 
Sincerely,
Marlene 
 
 
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: White-fronted Geese / Clarke Co.
From: "Jon Little" <littlejon48 AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2017 17:20:27 -0500
While birding Cool Spring Battlefield today, we came upon a group of 3 GWFG.
They were in the river, across from the north trail, about 1 mile from the
parking lot. They acted extremely nervous, so after I approached for a pic
from about 100 yards away, they flushed and flew downriver. When I found
them a second time near the shore, they flew south above the river and
disappeared. We never saw them again. A few pics and report are on e-Bird.

 

After seeing Dave Carr's Sandhill 3 Cranes this morning in Winchester, and
this in the afternoon, like they say, "It don't get any better than this!"

 

Jon & BJ Little

Winchester

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Providence Rec Center Trl. Falls Church
From: Stuart via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2017 14:16:35 -0500
The trail is much improved for birders, pedestrians and the wheelchair 
bound   -- as it has been graded and nicely paved. 


Still very slow, and no sign of the red-headed woodpecker yet.

Good birding all,

Stuart Merrell
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Rusty Blackbirds
From: Stephen Williams <stvwllms65 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2017 10:55:11 -0500
This morning I had a mixed flock of Rusty BBs, starlings, cowbirds and
grackles in my front yard.  The flock of about 50 appeared to be roughly
half Rusty BBs and half starlings with just a couple of cowbirds and one or
two grackles.

Steve Williams

-- 

Alexandria, Va
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Luria Park Red-headed Woodpeckers
From: Daniel Joslyn <djoslyn48 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2017 15:40:16 +0000
Thanks to this list serve for letting me know about this spot, got very
good looks at both Red-Headed and Pileated Woodpeckers this morning, along
with a bunch of other cool birds. It's very nice, will definitely head back
soon!

-Dan Joslyn
Arlington, VA
On Tue, Feb 14, 2017 at 5:16 PM Donald Sweig  wrote:

Larry,

  I discovered Luria  park about six months ago.  Ironically, it's only
about 2 miles from the house I have lived in for 25 years.  I have seen the
two redheaded woodpeckers, along with yellow-bellied sapsuckers and the
other expected species there several times this winter.   I hope to start
going regularly this Spring, since it is so close to my house, because I
understand it's a good place for migrants.

  Donald Sweig

Falls Church, Va.



Sent from my iPad



> On Feb 14, 2017, at 4:08 PM, "Larry Cartwright" 
wrote:

>

> I made my first trip ever to Luria Park off Gallows Road in Falls Church
for

> the Red-headed Woodpeckers and was not disappointed. Got six woodpecker

> species, including two Red-headed, all quite active and vocal.  The

> Red-headed Woodpeckers were easily heard and seen from the little

> boardwalk/bridge that crosses the stream.  There seems to be many new

> plantings and restoration work underway. Quite a nice place for an urban

> park.  Thanks to Janet Anderson for yesterday's report that prompted me to

> go find these birds.

>

>

>

> Luria Park, Fairfax, Virginia, US

>

> Feb 14, 2017 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

>

> Protocol: Traveling

>

> 0.25 mile(s)

>

> 19 species

>

>

>

> Red-headed Woodpecker  2

>

> Red-bellied Woodpecker  5

>

> Downy Woodpecker  2

>

> Hairy Woodpecker  1

>

> Northern Flicker  2

>

> Pileated Woodpecker  1

>

> Blue Jay  10

>

> Tufted Titmouse  5

>

> White-breasted Nuthatch  1

>

> Carolina Wren  4

>

> American Robin  30

>

> European Starling  30

>

> Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  15

>

> White-throated Sparrow  18

>

> Song Sparrow  2

>

> Northern Cardinal  1

>

> Common Grackle (Purple)  70

>

> House Finch  1

>

> House Sparrow  50

>

>

>

> View this checklist online at

> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34367704

>

>

>

> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

>

>

>

> Larry Cartwright

>

> prowarbler AT verizon.net 

>

>

>

> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as skybirds.d AT gmail.com. If you wish to
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as djoslyn48 AT gmail.com. If you wish to
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Sandhill Cranes at the Abrams Creek Wetland
From: david.boltz4 AT gmail.com
Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2017 10:20:09 -0500
They were still present just before 10:00. They are just before the short 
boardwalk at the edge of the creek resting/hiding in the Cattails. Very easy to 
miss, especially with the somewhat harsh sunlight on that side. Thanks to Jon 
and BJ Little, who called me on my cell phone to let me know that I went too 
far. 


Dave Boltz

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 17, 2017, at 8:57 AM, Carr, David E. (dec5z) 
 wrote: 


At about 8:20 this morning 3 Sandhill Cranes flew in from the south and landed 
at the Abrams Creek Wetland (Frederick County) near Winchester, VA. When I last 
saw them, they were standing in the creek itself near the east end of the 
wetland area. 


Other birds in that area included American Black Ducks (2), Green-winged Teal 
(7), Ring-necked Ducks (about 50), and a Winter Wren. 


David Carr
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as david.boltz4 AT gmail.com. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Sandhill Cranes at the Abrams Creek Wetland
From: "Carr, David E. (dec5z)" <dec5z AT eservices.virginia.edu>
Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2017 13:57:55 +0000
At about 8:20 this morning 3 Sandhill Cranes flew in from the south and landed 
at the Abrams Creek Wetland (Frederick County) near Winchester, VA. When I last 
saw them, they were standing in the creek itself near the east end of the 
wetland area. 


Other birds in that area included American Black Ducks (2), Green-winged Teal 
(7), Ring-necked Ducks (about 50), and a Winter Wren. 


David Carr
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Under the Double Eagle
From: "Ed and Helen Morgan" <edandhelenmorgan AT embarqmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2017 21:55:06 -0500
This afternoon I was driving on state route 80 in Russell County Virginia
between Honaker and Rosedale when I saw two large soaring birds that I
thought might be eagles.  The two birds were interacting and seemed to be
playing a game of "chicken".  I stopped the car and got out my binoculars.
I had the good fortune to see that I was viewing both a bald and golden
eagle.  The two birds came within fifty yards of me before we all parted
company.  It doesn't get much better than that but today was somewhat over
the top.  Saw six deer in downtown Abingdon not far from Main Street (not
necessarily a good thing) and then had the opportunity to hear Lutheran
pastor, Nadia Bolz-Weber,  give an uplifting talk at Central Presbyterian
Church in Bristol, Virginia.  A memorable day.  Ed Morgan, Abingdon, VA

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: short eared owl sight in Highland Co.
From: Patti Reum <pareum AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2017 10:42:56 -0500
I believe Clark Olsen saw this bird.  I will be back home this weekend, so
if you read this Clark, could you give me more specific location?


-- 
Patti Reum
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Assateague Question
From: Robert Perkins <perkybear AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2017 09:16:26 -0500
I’m thinking about a trip to Chincoteague and Assateague in late April or 
early May. Will migratory birds be passing through? What nesting species should 
I look for? 

————————
Bob Perkins
General Outdoorsman




*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: VA Breeding Bird Atlas Surveying!
From: "Robyn A. Puffenbarger" <rpuffenb AT bridgewater.edu>
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2017 19:54:23 +0000
Dear VA ListServ -
 
As you know, we are starting year #2 of the second Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas 
in 2017. You might have blocks and are in preparation for working them in 
spring and summer. There are still many blocks and priority blocks that need 
attention, especially in SW and rural areas of Virginia. Take a look at 
http://amjv.org/index.php/vabba2/submit-data to see the priority blocks that 
still need coverage. 

 
Please do not forget that a number of owl species, Great Horned, Barred Owl, 
and Bald Eagle are already calling, nesting, and in some warmer eastern areas 
of the state, might have eggs or nestlings already! The VABBA2 does not want to 
miss these breeding birds that use alternative times of year, so if you have 
some time to owl in these early 2017 months, please remember to enter your owl 
data and breeding codes into the VABBA2 eBird site: 
http://ebird.org/content/atlasva/ . I was out with a student in my ornithology 
class Monday Feb. 13th and we heard both great horned owl(s) calling, and at a 
second location about 2 miles away, two eastern screech owls doing what 
iBirdPro app calls the trill calls. It was thrilling to hear and now we have to 
submit our data! 

 
Thanks for your time and efforts to survey the breeding birds of Virginia, 
including the owls! 

Cheers - Robyn Puffenbarger, Ph.D.
Biology, Bridgewater College
VABBA2 Volunteer
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***