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Updated on Thursday, October 30 at 01:38 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Kingbird

30 Oct Fwd: BRAM [Tom Mansfield ]
30 Oct Neah Bay Bramblimg [Tom Mansfield ]
30 Oct Re: Hobby finding tips [Tom Mansfield ]
30 Oct Hobby finding tips [Cara Borre ]
30 Oct Report of Brown Pelican, Alki, West Seattle ["Tucker, Trileigh" ]
30 Oct Anybody interested in sharing ride to Neah Bay for birding? [Mason Flint ]
30 Oct RE: I tried to share my "Hobby" with you... [Tom Mansfield ]
30 Oct pa: (3) []
29 Oct Ridgefield NWR "S" Unit today [Cindy McCormack ]
29 Oct I tried to share my "Hobby" with you... [Cara Borre ]
29 Oct Nisqually NWR 10/29/14 []
29 Oct Oct. 28 - Stilliguamish to Samish ["Bob Sundstrom" ]
29 Oct Posible juv. Broad-winged Hawk Everett ["Charles Desilets" ]
29 Oct Neah Bay Eurasian Hobby [Tom Mansfield ]
29 Oct Steigerwald NWR: A very "enraptored" day [Michelle LaMoustique ]
29 Oct Hobby this afternoon [Ryan Merrill ]
29 Oct Re: Black-headed gull in South Bend, Pacific Co., WA [Bob ]
29 Oct Re: [Tweeters] Black-headed gull in South Bend, Pacific Co., WA [Bob ]
29 Oct Re: Black-headed gull in South Bend, Pacific Co., WA [Bob ]
29 Oct White-winged Scoters at Seahurst Park ["zuckerbond" ]
29 Oct Re: [Tweeters] Black-headed gull in South Bend, Pacific Co., WA [Bob ]
29 Oct Black-headed gull in South Bend, Pacific Co., WA [Bob ]
29 Oct Black-headed gull in South Bend, Pacific Co., WA [Bob ]
29 Oct Rwd throated Pipit at Lake Selmac. [rogermoyer1 AT hotmail.com ]
29 Oct Let's try this again!!! :-) [William Brynteson ]
29 Oct re: Re: RNEP above Magnuson ["lsr AT ramoslink.info" ]
29 Oct Olympia Terns [Chris Warlow ]
29 Oct Fwd: Pacific Co., WA- Black-headed Gull [Jim Danzenbaker ]
29 Oct Re: Partial Albino Northern Shoveler at Everett Water Treatment Plant---Fwd: Imperfect albino Shoveler, Franklin's @ Ev Sewage []
29 Oct Partial Albino Northern Shoveler at Everett Water Treatment Plant---Fwd: Imperfect albino Shoveler, Franklin's @ Ev Sewage []
28 Oct FW: WA: Eurasian Hobby - Go Fish [Russ Namitz ]
28 Oct Rose Breasted Grosbeak in Clallam Bay [Bill Shelmerdine ]
28 Oct Chasing the Noddy [William Brynteson ]
28 Oct Chasing the Noddy!! [William Brynteson ]
28 Oct Sandhill Crane in central Thurston Co ["Paul Hicks" ]
28 Oct Chickens 1, Hawks 0 ["Rob Sandelin" ]
28 Oct Eurasian Hobby ["Bruce LaBar" ]
28 Oct Western Scrub Jays Seattle Central District [Jill Freidberg ]
28 Oct Pine siskins []
28 Oct Pipit info [Roger Moyer ]
28 Oct NCAS monthly meeting Oct 28 7 PM [Twink Coffman ]
28 Oct field trip Semiahmoo Nov 1 Sat 9 AM [Twink Coffman ]
28 Oct A book about passenger pigeons [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
28 Oct Neah Bay Rarities Monday []
28 Oct Oregon Red-throated Pipit [Roger Moyer ]
28 Oct Edmonds marsh dunlin [Bill Anderson ]
27 Oct Re: RNEP above Magnuson [Robert Cleland ]
27 Oct 26 October from Neah Bay to Cape Flattery [Steven Mlodinow ]
27 Oct Neah Bay [blabar ]
27 Oct watch for a Sky Lark in Wa'atch River Valley [Charlie Wright ]
27 Oct No Broad-billed in Skamania County [Matt Schroeder ]
27 Oct RE: Eurasian Hobby Photos? [Rick Taylor ]
27 Oct Eurasian Hobby Photos? [Vincent Lucas ]
27 Oct Skamania Heermans - nope ... Swans YES !!! [Lyn Topinka ]
27 Oct Skamania Hummer - NO ["Wilson Cady" ]
27 Oct Two hobbies at Mt Baker ["Randy Hill" ]
27 Oct Re: Hobby [Bob ]
27 Oct Hobby [blabar ]
27 Oct Black Turnstone at Vashon ferry dock ["Tucker, Trileigh" ]
27 Oct Mystery Grosbeak... []
27 Oct Washington Bird Records Committee recent decisions (Oct 25, 2014 meeting) [Matt Bartels ]
27 Oct Washington Bird Records Committee recent decisions (Oct 25, 2014 meeting) [Matt Bartels ]
27 Oct a fun suggestion from the Cornell Lab of O [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
26 Oct Seattle Parasitc Jaeger, Ancient Murrlets [Sam G Terry ]
26 Oct Cle Elum Area Plus - late afternoon 10/24/14 [Barbara Deihl ]
27 Oct Samish Pacific Golden Plover [Gary Bletsch ]
26 Oct Re: corrected email address for A Birder's Guide to Washington [Jane Hadley ]
26 Oct Woodland Bottoms - Red Phalarope [Russ Koppendrayer ]
26 Oct Four Turkey Vultures migrating over Commencement Bay today [Rob McNair-Huff ]
26 Oct Call for volunteers for A Birder's Guide to Washington [Jane Hadley ]
26 Oct Franklin's Gull at Gene Coulon Park - Renton [Marie and Craig ]
26 Oct Broad-billed Hummer & Heerman's Gull [Matt Bartels ]
26 Oct getting to sikes lake [Dave Templeton ]
26 Oct western grebes at sikes lake (east king county [Dave Templeton ]
27 Oct No Skamania Hummer but still a successful day ["Wilson Cady" ]
26 Oct a new book with scientific research-based "HOPE" for many bird species... [Barbara Deihl ]

Subject: Fwd: BRAM
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 14:09:04 -0400
Whoops on river. Whatever flows into bay next to senior center. Feeding in 
shoreline weeds. Steve Pink, Blair B, Bruce Barrett from San Jose on it now so 
out of here. 


Tom Mansfield

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

From: Ryan Merrill >
Date: October 30, 2014 at 10:55:02 AM PDT
To: Tom Mansfield >
Subject: BRAM

Awesome find!!!

That's not the Wa'atch River though (that's at the north end of Hobuck Beach).

Ryan
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Subject: Neah Bay Bramblimg
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 13:40:14 -0400
The odyssey continues. I just stopped for one last check of gulls at the Waatch 
River mouth next to the Senior Center in Neah Bay and found a BRAM with Clay 
Colored Sparrows and Golden Crowns. Photos. 


Tom Mansfield needing to get home

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Subject: Re: Hobby finding tips
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 12:56:45 -0400
Tweets I checked the past 2 hours without any sign of the EUHO but it has been 
pouring steadily. More to pinpoint the good views Cara mentions from yesterday 
afternoon: the bird was perched and hunting opposite the 4th utility pole east 
(toward Neah Bay) from where paved Hoebuck Beach Road and the gravel road (not 
signed but alternately called Makah Passage and Crown Z Haul Road by GPS) 
intersect. Pole number 3315 on yellow tag. 


Persistent Tom Nansfield now headed home to Seattle

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 30, 2014, at 8:39 AM, Cara Borre 
> wrote: 


When we arrived at Neah Bay we went straight to the transfer station/sewage 
ponds where the Hobby had been reported. We found several people already 
looking up at the quarry rock walls and more arrived as the day went on. We 
remained there for a bit but wandered over to Makah Passage road just to bird 
in general. 


People continued to stake out the quarry throughout the day, no cigar. We 
wanted to see the Orchard Oriole so we headed back into town and while Asta was 
photographing that, I saw what looked like a small tern on the beach so I 
started off that way. 


The beach was great and I should have taken the time to bring my scope out of 
the car. With binos I discovered a Common Tern, Black-legged Kittiwake, the 
original hobbists: Brad, Charlie and Ryan M, who helped me confirm a few gulls, 
Black Oystercatchers, Black Turnstones and 1 Semipalmated Plover. Seabirds were 
also good and I was able to see many without the scope (but please take out 
your scope for maximum enjoyment). 


We were in contact with our friends who were staking out the quarry and birding 
Makah Passage. They met us at the beach and we exchanged sightings. Doug showed 
me a great pic of a Swamp Sparrow and they raved about the views they had of 
this bird I can normally just get to chip at me for ID. I wanted the Swamp 
Sparrow! Our entire group took a detour for Clay-colored Sparrow (dip) and 
those that didn't bird the beach in town did that while Asta and I went for the 
Swamp Sparrow. We hit our first brief rain of the day while driving and once it 
subsided I started playing for Swamp Sparrow. Here's the approximate location: 



https://www.google.com/maps/ AT 48.3465072,-124.6404693,14z?hl=en

(You are on Makah Passage (road), the Swamp Sparrow was in bushes (about 4' 
tall) within tall, thick bladed grasses. The quarry should be at your back as 
you look into a field for these bushes/grasses and in the distance a line of 
trees (woods). The Hobby hunted in the field between the road and the woods and 
would land in deciduous trees (about 30' feet tall draped in light green 
mosses).) 


For about 30 mins the Swamp Sparrow and I exchange chips but only one of us got 
to see the other, you will see no SWSP pics from me. While Asta was still 
trying to work on the Swamp Sparrow I happened to look up and I spotted a small 
falcon flying. I exclaimed that's our bird, simply based on hope and size as 
the bird was very backlit, but it did land at the top of a tall snag. Once 
again very backlit, I was able to make out the features I needed to confirm it 
was the Hobby! We called our friends, I yelled to the folks at the quarry, I 
sent a bounced back post to Tweeters, and we all enjoyed a hunting show for 
about an hour. I am sorry I failed to call Nate whom I had exchanged cell 
numbers with, but fortunately they found out and so did the ever persistent Tom 
Mansfield. 


I think weather was key to finding the bird. It is eating primarily insects, 
although we saw it chasing a Sanderling which was awesome (for everyone but the 
Sanderling). If the rain is keeping the insects down, I think our bird will be 
hunkered down as well. Don't just stake an area out. Enjoy all the birds of 
Neah Bay but return often, especially if the weather is nice, to Makah Passage. 
Scan the trees and fields for the perched Hobby. Once it flies, it's 
unmistakable. We only had 1 male Kestrel in this area and he is easily 
distinguished from our bird, he only wishes he had that speed and of course, he 
hovers. The only Peregrine of the day was at the beach in town. If it's 
raining, try Hobuck Beach. Before I saw the Hobby I did see a Sanderling flying 
through that field. That struck me as weird at the time, but then later we see 
it being chased by the Hobby. Does the Hobby also hunt at Hobuck Beach? Perhaps 
in times of rain when the insects are less plentiful? 


Hope this helps your Hobby Hunting

Cara Borre
Gig Harbor
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Subject: Hobby finding tips
From: Cara Borre <cmborre1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 08:31:12 -0700
When we arrived at Neah Bay we went straight to the transfer station/sewage
ponds where the Hobby had been reported.  We found several people already
looking up at the quarry rock walls and more arrived as the day went on.
We remained there for a bit but wandered over to Makah Passage road just to
bird in general.

People continued to stake out the quarry throughout the day, no cigar.  We
wanted to see the Orchard Oriole so we headed back into town and while Asta
was photographing that, I saw what looked like a small tern on the beach so
I started off that way.

The beach was great and I should have taken the time to bring my scope out
of the car.  With binos I discovered a Common Tern, Black-legged Kittiwake,
the original hobbists: Brad, Charlie and Ryan M, who helped me confirm a
few gulls, Black Oystercatchers, Black Turnstones and 1 Semipalmated
Plover.  Seabirds were also good and I was able to see many without the
scope (but please take out your scope for maximum enjoyment).

We were in contact with our friends who were staking out the quarry and
birding Makah Passage.  They met us at the beach and we exchanged
sightings.  Doug showed me a great pic of a Swamp Sparrow and they raved
about the views they had of this bird I can normally just get to chip at me
for ID.  I wanted the Swamp Sparrow!  Our entire group took a detour for
Clay-colored Sparrow (dip) and those that didn't bird the beach in town did
that while Asta and I went for the Swamp Sparrow.  We hit our first brief
rain of the day while driving and once it subsided I started playing for
Swamp Sparrow.  Here's the approximate location:


https://www.google.com/maps/ AT 48.3465072,-124.6404693,14z?hl=en

(You are on Makah Passage (road), the Swamp Sparrow was in bushes (about 4'
tall) within tall, thick bladed grasses.  The quarry should be at your back
as you look into a field for these bushes/grasses and in the distance a
line of trees (woods).  The Hobby hunted in the field between the road and
the woods and would land in deciduous trees (about 30' feet tall draped in
light green mosses).)

For about 30 mins the Swamp Sparrow and I exchange chips but only one of us
got to see the other, you will see no SWSP pics from me.  While Asta was
still trying to work on the Swamp Sparrow I happened to look up and I
spotted a small falcon flying.  I exclaimed that's our bird, simply based
on hope and size as the bird was very backlit, but it did land at the top
of a tall snag.  Once again very backlit, I was able to make out the
features I needed to confirm it was the Hobby!  We called our friends,  I
yelled to the folks at the quarry, I sent a bounced back post to Tweeters,
and we all enjoyed a hunting show for about an hour.  I am sorry I failed
to call Nate whom I had exchanged cell numbers with, but fortunately they
found out and so did the ever persistent Tom Mansfield.

I think weather was key to finding the bird.  It is eating primarily
insects, although we saw it chasing a Sanderling which was awesome (for
everyone but the Sanderling).  If the rain is keeping the insects down, I
think our bird will be hunkered down as well.  Don't just stake an area
out.  Enjoy all the birds of Neah Bay but return often, especially if the
weather is nice, to Makah Passage.  Scan the trees and fields for the
perched Hobby.  Once it flies, it's unmistakable.  We only had 1 male
Kestrel in this area and he is easily distinguished from our bird, he only
wishes he had that speed and of course, he hovers.  The only Peregrine of
the day was at the beach in town.  If it's raining, try Hobuck Beach.
Before I saw the Hobby I did see a Sanderling flying through that field.
That struck me as weird at the time, but then later we see it being chased
by the Hobby.  Does the Hobby also hunt at Hobuck Beach?  Perhaps in times
of rain when the insects are less plentiful?

Hope this helps your Hobby Hunting

Cara Borre
Gig Harbor_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Report of Brown Pelican, Alki, West Seattle
From: "Tucker, Trileigh" <TRI AT seattleu.edu>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 14:54:57 +0000
Good morning Tweets,

This morning’s West Seattle Blog includes a report of a Brown Pelican spotted 
off Alki in West 
Seattle. 
I haven’t seen the bird myself but will head out later to look for it. 



http://westseattleblog.com/2014/10/west-seattle-birdwatching-brown-pelican-seen-off-alki/ 


Good birding luck to all!
Trileigh

~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Trileigh Tucker
Lincoln Park, West Seattle
Natural history blog: 
naturalpresencearts.com 

Photography: flickr.com/photos/trileigh_______________________________________________
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Subject: Anybody interested in sharing ride to Neah Bay for birding?
From: Mason Flint <masonflint AT outlook.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 06:30:27 -0700
I'm thinking about heading out today, spending the night and returning tomorrow 
or possibly leave early Friday am. 


I'm happy to drive from Bellevue or meet someone at Seattle or Edmonds ferry.

LMK if anyone is interested and we can discuss timing and logistics.

Regards,

Mason Flint
Bellevue _______________________________________________
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Subject: RE: I tried to share my "Hobby" with you...
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 08:48:44 -0400
Many thanks to Cara for refinding the EUHO yesterday afternoon. For any making 
the long haul to Neah Bay it’s best to plan ahead. In addition to Butler’s, 
there is a tremendous accommodation option (and sorry if this sounds like an ad 
but you can’t find much on the internet) in The Cape Motel – (Frank 
360-645-2250). The cabins are spotless and new, cedar-lined with tile bath, 
micro/refer/flat screen TV/good Wi-Fi, right downtown across from the marina 
and only restaurant (which closes at 7 p.m.) and next to the only grocery store 
(which is open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.). With a queen bed and adjoining room with 2 
bunk beds, a good value at $88/night. Alas, there is no taxidermy. 


Tom Mansfield still in Neah Bay where it is pouring.

From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Cara Borre 

Sent: Wednesday, October 29, 2014 7:52 PM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] I tried to share my "Hobby" with you...

But my tweeters post from the field got bounced back to me, hopefully this 
won't happen again, but I see "fellow hobbist" Ryan Merrill was able to post 
that the Neah Bay Hobby was seen again today. Really incredible viewing 
experience for many for about an hour starting at about 1:45pm. 


Here's a couple pics on flickr: 
https://flic.kr/p/oVjSq2 


Also got some video, which I'll need to edit, but will share this in some form 
in the future. 


I do hope this incredible find sticks around for awhile so others up for making 
the long journey are equally rewarded. If you can spend the night and not do an 
8 hour drive coupled with intense birding all in one day, so much the better. 


One local caught us near the Orchard Oriole and plugged her establishment as a 
nature lover friendly room for the night. Butler's Motel boasts 10 acres on 
wetlands at $55/night and a museum with various exhibits of taxidermy. Maybe 
it's just me but could you really get a good night's sleep and take a peaceful 
shower in a motel featuring taxidermy? Not sure that should be a selling 
point... but she was a nice lady so I'm giving her business a shout. 


Hope this makes it through to tweeterdom.   Happy Hobby Hunting!

Cara Borre
Gig Harbor
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Subject: pa: (3)
From: rekrause AT comcast.net
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 06:04:11 +0000 (UTC)

http://kreatekom.com/1b5j6k7sq9wye2h3g4.php





























Luise Hacher
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Subject: Ridgefield NWR "S" Unit today
From: Cindy McCormack <nwbirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 20:27:58 -0700
Hi everybody!

I spent a very relaxing day driving the loop at Ridgefield.  I really
intended to do a quick look along the loop, then planned on heading over to
Carty Unit.  I got lost in bird-time and never made it out to visit Carty!
So much going on to just sit back and watch...

A few interesting sightings--a single late Turkey Vulture, and a small
flock of bluebirds.  The Virginia Rail were a little vocal for the time of
year--prompted by all the goose noise?  The Marsh Wrens were particularly
active--singing, calling, foraging near the road.

:)  Cindy

Ridgefield NWR--River 'S' Unit, Clark, US-WA
Oct 29, 2014 9:30 AM - 3:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
4.0 mile(s)
81 species (+4 other taxa)

Cackling Goose  1238
Canada Goose  71
Cackling/Canada Goose  1000
Wood Duck  2
Gadwall  75
Eurasian Wigeon  1     Male. May be hybrid.  Head appeared as normal EUWI,
but sides had some "pink" in the gray.
American Wigeon  390
Mallard  522
Cinnamon Teal  26
Northern Shoveler  215
Northern Pintail  550
Green-winged Teal  266
Ring-necked Duck  5
Lesser Scaup  3
Greater/Lesser Scaup  1
Bufflehead  5
Hooded Merganser  21
Ruddy Duck  3
Pied-billed Grebe  24
Double-crested Cormorant  1
American Bittern  2
Great Blue Heron  17
Great Egret  14
Turkey Vulture  1     single bird, flying low (tree top level) over between
markers 6 & 7.  Single broken outer secondary on right wing (secondary at
perpendicular to wing (pointing up), appeared to be bent mid-shaft).
Northern Harrier  8
Bald Eagle  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  2
Red-tailed Hawk  8
Virginia Rail  4
American Coot  311
Sandhill Crane  92
Killdeer  3
Greater Yellowlegs  4
peep sp.  9     flying over far end of S. Big Lk
Wilson's Snipe  94
Ring-billed Gull  1
California Gull  1
Glaucous-winged Gull  1
gull sp.  6
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  3
Eurasian Collared-Dove  1
Mourning Dove  2
Great Horned Owl  4
Anna's Hummingbird  2
Belted Kingfisher  4
Red-breasted Sapsucker  2
Downy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  6
Pileated Woodpecker  1
American Kestrel  3
Peregrine Falcon  1
Steller's Jay  2
Western Scrub-Jay  8
American Crow  3
Common Raven  2
Black-capped Chickadee  37
Chestnut-backed Chickadee  4     entry road
White-breasted Nuthatch  6
Brown Creeper  7
Pacific Wren  2
Marsh Wren  14
Bewick's Wren  11
Golden-crowned Kinglet  27
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  6
Western Bluebird  11     flying low, calling.  Small flock seen just over
road between markers 9 & 10, just above tree top level.
American Robin  29
Varied Thrush  3
European Starling  190
American Pipit  54
Cedar Waxwing  6
Common Yellowthroat  1     Located by call, pished into the open--HY male
(mask not entirely black yet).
Yellow-rumped Warbler  3
Spotted Towhee  9
Savannah Sparrow  8
Fox Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  28
White-crowned Sparrow  9
Golden-crowned Sparrow  31
Dark-eyed Junco  6
Red-winged Blackbird  262
Brown-headed Cowbird  3
House Finch  4
Pine Siskin  14
Lesser Goldfinch  2
American Goldfinch  39

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20376642


-- 



*_________________Cindy McCormackVancouver, WAnwbirderatgmailcom*_______________________________________________
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Subject: I tried to share my "Hobby" with you...
From: Cara Borre <cmborre1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 19:51:56 -0700
But my tweeters post from the field got bounced back to me, hopefully this
won't happen again, but I see "fellow hobbist" Ryan Merrill was able to
post that the Neah Bay Hobby was seen again today. Really incredible
viewing experience for many for about an hour starting at about 1:45pm.

Here's a couple pics on flickr: https://flic.kr/p/oVjSq2


Also got some video, which I'll need to edit, but will share this in some
form in the future.

I do hope this incredible find sticks around for awhile so others up for
making the long journey are equally rewarded.  If you can spend the night
and not do an 8 hour drive coupled with intense birding all in one day, so
much the better.

One local caught us near the Orchard Oriole and plugged her establishment
as a nature lover friendly room for the night.  Butler's Motel boasts 10
acres on wetlands at $55/night and a museum with various exhibits of
taxidermy.  Maybe it's just me but could you really get a good night's
sleep and take a peaceful shower in a motel featuring taxidermy?  Not sure
that should be a selling point... but she was a nice lady so I'm giving her
business a shout.

Hope this makes it through to tweeterdom.   Happy Hobby Hunting!

Cara Borre
Gig Harbor_______________________________________________
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Subject: Nisqually NWR 10/29/14
From: scrubjay323 AT aol.com
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 21:37:31 -0400
Tweets,


Today 22 of us enjoyed a great day at Nisqually! We had great weather and the 
birds were very active between storms. It was the best day we had in a long 
time. We had bright sunshine part of the day that highlighted some birds and a 
13.6 high tide at 10;51 AM that pushed the shorebirds close to the dike. 


Highlights included watching a KESTREL capture and eat a vole, good looks at 
BLACK BELLIED PLOVER, several mixed flocks of actively feeding passerines, and 
lots of waterfowl. 


There was nothing to note at the visitor center at the start of the walk but we 
hit our first small mixed flock between the visitor center and the orchard. We 
had both KINGLETS, both CHICKADEES, YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS, SONG and 
GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROWS, and DOWNEY WOODPECKER. Later we added WILSON'S 
WARBLER, ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER, CEDAR WAXWINGS, BROWN CREEPER, and HUTTON'S 
VIREO, my first of the year. 


For raptors we saw RED-TAILED HAWKS, BALD EAGLES, NORTHERN HARRIERS, an 
AMERICAN KESTREL, PEREGRINE FALCONS, and a couple of NORTHERN SHRIKE, one 
hawking dragonflies. 


Waterfowl included MALLARD, NORTHERN PINTAIL, NORTHERN SHOVLERS, GREEN WINGED 
TEAL, AMERICAN and EURASIAN WIGEON, CANADA, CACKLING, and GREATER WHITE-FRONTED 
GEESE, and GADWALL and HOODED MERGANSER. Water level on the ponds is rising but 
there is still lots of vegetation obscuring views. 


No one went out on the estuary boardwalk today as we had plenty to observe on 
the rest of the refuge. 


For the day I had 58 species and I know of a few I missed. The HUTTON'S VIREO 
was new for the year for me. I now have 141 species for the year. 


We had a couple of sightings of BLACK-TAILED DEER as our only mammals.

Until next week....

Phil Kelley
scrubjay323 AT aol.com
Lacey, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Oct. 28 - Stilliguamish to Samish
From: "Bob Sundstrom" <ixoreus AT scattercreek.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 17:17:54 -0700
Tweeters,

 

12 of us saw some nice birds yesterday, although nothing remotely as rare as
the Neah Bay hobby.  The Pacific Golden-Plover was again present at the
Samish T, in the ploughed field across the road from the parking area.
Along Sunset Rd., there was an adult "Blue" Snow Goose and three very dusky
"Blue" immatures in a flock of 150 or so Snow Geese.  Small numbers of
Trumpeter Swans now in the area too, and a flock of Tundra Swans near
Conway.  4-5 Yellow-headed Blackbirds in the huge blackbird flock along
Norman Rd. (Exit 210) at the dairy farm about halfway between I-5 and Pt.
Susan Bay.

 

Good birding, Bob

 

Bob Sundstrom

Tenino, WA

ixoreus at scattercreek.com

 
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Subject: Posible juv. Broad-winged Hawk Everett
From: "Charles Desilets" <csdesilets AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 16:51:50 -0700
While playing golf Monday at the Legion Memorial course on Marine View Drive
in north Everett, I observed a flyover of a small Buteo pursued by 6-7
crows. The bird was smaller than any RTHA I've seen with stubbier wings in
proportion to its' body length than other Buteos, and underparts white with
little markings I could observe by eyesight. The bird flew north over the
11th fairway just west of the golf course entrance about 3 PM and headed
down towards the estuary and out-of-sight.

 

Charles Desilets

Mukilteo
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Subject: Neah Bay Eurasian Hobby
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 19:50:20 -0400
As of the time of this post the EUHO continues on the gravel Crown Z Haul Road 
(per my GPS) a city block east (toward Neah Bay) of the bridge and road to 
Hoebuck Beach. Many thanks to Tina and Nate who flagged me down in Port Angeles 
as I was headed home. Wow what a bird! 


Tom Mansfield in the Waatch Valley

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Subject: Steigerwald NWR: A very "enraptored" day
From: Michelle LaMoustique <lamoustique AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:58:54 -0700
It must have been fate because I started the day by looking out my window and 
seeing a bald eagle. 

I decided to take advantage of the afternoon break in the rain and drive to 
Steigerwald NWR. As I entered I saw a Red-tailed Hawk on the poles where the 
purple martin apartments are in summer. Not far down the path I saw a Merlin in 
a tree. Past the two bridges I saw a Northern Harrier on a post eating a vole. 
After she finished her meal she decided to dive bomb some ducks to see if they 
used Depends or not. The highlight of my little journey I saw a juvenile 
Peregrine Falcon in a tree. It was pretty badly backlit so it took a lot of 
camera adjustments to make out precisely what kind of bird it was. I posted one 
shot on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11815777 AT N07/15663073852/ 

As I walked back I could hear the falcon's hunting cries and some worried peeps 
from Steller's jays. I also saw a Great Blue Heron, three Hooded Mergansers, 
two American Wigeons and several mallards. Other birds I saw included Song 
Sparrows (of course), yellow-crowned sparrows, Northern Flickers, Scrub Jays 
(3), and two Pileated Woodpeckers. 


My return to the parking lot revealed an American Kestrel where the Red-tailed 
Hawk was before. 


Michelle Maani
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Subject: Hobby this afternoon
From: Ryan Merrill <rjm284 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:51:29 -0700
The Eurasian Hobby is perched giving great views along the old road in the
Wa'atch Valley near the Hobuck end of the road! Apparently found by others
a couple hours ago and hanging out in the area.

Also 2nd cycle Slaty-backed Gull continues at mouth of the Wa'atch, 7
Tropical kingbirds, 1 CC Sparrow, Common Tern and the Orchard Oriole
continues.

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Subject: Re: Black-headed gull in South Bend, Pacific Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:24:27 -0700
The gull is at the roost next to Jolly Rogers Espresso hut.  Pictures taken.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bob  wrote:

The bird is flying around a possible water treatment ponds across the river 
with 4 bogu's. 


Bob Flores

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bob  wrote:

Watching the gull now with Jim Danzenbaker and Ryan Abe. Same location it was 
reported yesterday it is across the river flycatching right now. Black 
underwing primaries easy to see. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Black-headed gull in South Bend, Pacific Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:24:27 -0700
The gull is at the roost next to Jolly Rogers Espresso hut.  Pictures taken.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bob  wrote:

The bird is flying around a possible water treatment ponds across the river 
with 4 bogu's. 


Bob Flores

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bob  wrote:

Watching the gull now with Jim Danzenbaker and Ryan Abe. Same location it was 
reported yesterday it is across the river flycatching right now. Black 
underwing primaries easy to see. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Re: Black-headed gull in South Bend, Pacific Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:40:29 -0700
The bird is flying around a possible water treatment ponds across the river 
with 4 bogu's. 


Bob Flores

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bob  wrote:

Watching the gull now with Jim Danzenbaker and Ryan Abe. Same location it was 
reported yesterday it is across the river flycatching right now. Black 
underwing primaries easy to see. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: White-winged Scoters at Seahurst Park
From: "zuckerbond" <zuckerbond AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:40:04 -0700
Tweeters: I visited Ed Munro Seahurst Park in Burien today between 12:30 and
1:45 pm. Good numbers (6-20 individuals each) of the following: Red-necked
Grebe, Horned Grebe, Common Loon, Surf Scoter, Goldeneye sp., Bufflehead,
Red-breasted Merganser.  Plus one pair of White-winged Scoters seen close-in
off the south end of the beach.

If you haven't been to see the newly restored waterfront here, I would
recommend it!
http://envsciencecenter.org/seahurst-park-shoreline-restoration/

The September lecture series by some of the principal scientists, landscape
architects, and engineers on the project was excellent, and there are more
events scheduled: http://envsciencecenter.org/upcoming-events/

Mary Bond

Seattle, WA
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Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Black-headed gull in South Bend, Pacific Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:40:29 -0700
The bird is flying around a possible water treatment ponds across the river 
with 4 bogu's. 


Bob Flores

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bob  wrote:

Watching the gull now with Jim Danzenbaker and Ryan Abe. Same location it was 
reported yesterday it is across the river flycatching right now. Black 
underwing primaries easy to see. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Black-headed gull in South Bend, Pacific Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:26:07 -0700
Watching the gull now with Jim Danzenbaker and Ryan Abe. Same location it was 
reported yesterday it is across the river flycatching right now. Black 
underwing primaries easy to see. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Black-headed gull in South Bend, Pacific Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:26:07 -0700
Watching the gull now with Jim Danzenbaker and Ryan Abe. Same location it was 
reported yesterday it is across the river flycatching right now. Black 
underwing primaries easy to see. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
Subject: Rwd throated Pipit at Lake Selmac.
From: rogermoyer1 AT hotmail.com <rogermoyer1@hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 18:34:51 +0000
After thoroughly scouring the lake shoreline and surrounding grasslands I 
didn't find a single pipit, American or Red Throated. Slight showers but nice 
weather. I guess I will have to detour a little and try for the one that was 
just reported in Moss Landing, CA 


Roger Moyer.
Las Cruces
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Subject: Let's try this again!!! :-)
From: William Brynteson <billb0986 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 10:40:07 -0700
Hey Tweeters

I am looking for a seat with someone heading out to Neah Bay for a chance
to see the Eurasian HOBBY on Saturday, (cannot get away any sooner), so if
you are going and need someone to help with the costs, please let me know
by personal Email and we can then exchange phone numbers and make it
happen.  I can be reached at wnbrynteson at yahoo dot com!


A Noddy would be fun also, but we should probably wait for one to show
up!!! :-)

Thanks
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Subject: re: Re: RNEP above Magnuson
From: "lsr AT ramoslink.info" <lsr@ramoslink.info>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 09:25:16 -0700
There have been a few sightings of pheasants within and in neighborhoods 
surrounding Magnuson Park in the last few months. Some suspect an 
intentional release, though this has not yet been documented.
  
 Scott Ramos
 Seattle
  
  

----------------------------------------
 From: "Robert Cleland" 
Sent: Monday, October 27, 2014 7:16 PM
To: "Tweeters" 
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: RNEP above Magnuson   
I was surprised this morning, as I descended our hill (NE 77th) across
from Magnuson to encounter 3 female/juvenile Ring-necked Pheasants along
the side of the road. I stopped and observed them for 5 minutes as they
strolled along. I had forgotten how big they are!
It has been at least 10 years since I last saw of RNEP in the
Sandpoint/Magnuson area. 40 years ago we had families of them on the bank
below us. I am hopeful that this is a sign that they may be making a
comeback in this area. Have others seen them at Magnuson recently?

************************
Robert Cleland
 
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Subject: Olympia Terns
From: Chris Warlow <christopherwarlow AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 08:39:54 -0700
This morning in a rush to get to work I had four mid sized to large terns fly 
over me. I was on I5 above Capitol Lake. 


I wasn't able to stop and id them and would love to know if anyone else in that 
area had seen them. 


Thanks 

Chris Warlow
Olympia 


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Subject: Fwd: Pacific Co., WA- Black-headed Gull
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 05:40:35 -0700
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: ed mcv 
Date: Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 10:06 PM
Subject: Pacific Co., WA- Black-headed Gull
To: jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com


Hi Jim,

I'm not able to get subscribed to Tweeters tonight.  Would you please
forward this message to Tweeters in case someone wants to find this gull
tomorrow.

Thanks,
Ed

A Black-headed Gull was present today in South Bend about 2:30 p.m.   It
was in a grassy open space between highway and river near the coffee hut
south of the seafood market.  Photos:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/10665268 AT N04/

A Bonaparte's and Black-legged Kittiwake were fly-bys.  South of town along
the highway a few miles along a stretch of road through a clearcut was the
body of a jaeger (long-tailed, I think.)

Ed McVicker
Portland (visiting Long Beach)




-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: Re: Partial Albino Northern Shoveler at Everett Water Treatment Plant---Fwd: Imperfect albino Shoveler, Franklin's @ Ev Sewage
From: notcalm AT comcast.net
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 10:04:09 +0000 (UTC)
Hello again, 

I just reviewed my video from last evening. Additions to my observations: 
1. the scapulars are very light gray in low light 
2. the undertail coverts are light gray in low light 
This bird is so near white, that observing or recording very fine gradations 
between white and gray-near white can only be seen under heavy overcast or 
after sunset conditions. 


Dan Reiff 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Dan Reiff, PhD"  
To: "Tweeters" , "barry"  
Sent: Wednesday, October 29, 2014 2:16:49 AM 
Subject: Partial Albino Northern Shoveler at Everett Water Treatment 
Plant---Fwd: [Tweeters] Imperfect albino Shoveler, Franklin's  AT  Ev Sewage 


Hello Barry and the Tweeters community, 

I would like to thank Barry for finding and sharing the location of the Partial 
Albino Northern Shoveler at The Everett water Treatment Plant. 

I have been able to "film" (1080p video) this bird twice at close range, 
including yesterday, Tuesday, in and out of the water, preening, feeding alone 
and feeding with a large group of shovelers at that location. 


This beauty appears to be a Partial Albino Northern Shoveler or perhaps less 
likely, a Pekin X Northern Shoveler hybrid. 


Some observations: 
1. there are a few gray feathers on the mantle and scapulars that have recently 
appeared black, which I assume means that white feathers, were until recently, 
covering Black in the process of molting 

2. there are several gray feathers near the belly 
3. the Tarsus and Toes are the same color as the bill, bright Orange. 
4. the bill length appears to be at the lower end of the range for a Northern 
Shoveler. When swimming near other males and females the bill appears to be 
15-20% shorter than most in the group. 

5. the feeding behaviors are identical to other Northern Shovelers and it feeds 
very near or within the shoveler groups (3- 80 Birds feeding in very close 
proximity). 


If you have had difficulty with the "Where's Waldo" illustrations, try 
observing this great bird within the large shoveler groups. 


Below are links for discussions of the terms: albino, partial albino and 
leucistic that I found helpful. 




http://www.birds.cornell.edu/ivory/pastsearches/2005_2006/stories_reports_0506/leucism 



http://www.sibleyguides.com/2011/08/abnormal-coloration-in-birds-melanin-reduction/ 


and page xii in The 2014 Sibley Guide to Birds (Second Edition). 

Thanks again for all of you contributing to Tweeters. 

Dan Reiff 
Mercer Island 


----- Original Message -----

From: "barry"  
To: "Tweeters"  
Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 4:00:48 PM 
Subject: [Tweeters] Imperfect albino Shoveler, Franklin's  AT  Ev Sewage 

Tweeters, 
A beautiful day was punctuated by one of the most beautiful birds I've 
ever seen. A pure white duck with a very brightly colored orange 
shoveler's bill. Could not see the feet. The eye was golden, not pink. 
Size wise could easily fit into the range of a shoveler. Smaller than 
the Mallard's nearby. The bird was seen in the large pond to the north. 
Best to go to the opening along the fence line about 1/3 way down from 
the parking lot as you walk toward Spencer Island. Look back to the west 
in the outside channel closest to where you would be standing. Given 
that we just don't see many of these birds, I would welcome any comments 
about possible hybrids, albinos versus leucistic birds, etc. Hope that 
someone gets to photograph this bird. 
Also of note was at least one Franklin's Gull sitting along the wall 
farther to the west of where the duck was seen. On the pond was at least 
one Eared Grebe. 
Access into the ponds is not allowed due to work that is being done. The 
worker I spoke to was knowledgeable about birds and sounded optimistic 
that access could be granted in the future. He also said that he thought 
that the work being done will create more habitat for the birds. 
All the best 
-- 
barry 
Seattle 
levineb AT fastmail.fm 

-- 
http://www.fastmail.fm - Or how I learned to stop worrying and 
love email again 

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Subject: Partial Albino Northern Shoveler at Everett Water Treatment Plant---Fwd: Imperfect albino Shoveler, Franklin's @ Ev Sewage
From: notcalm AT comcast.net
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 09:16:49 +0000 (UTC)
Hello Barry and the Tweeters community, 

I would like to thank Barry for finding and sharing the location of the Partial 
Albino Northern Shoveler at The Everett water Treatment Plant. 

I have been able to "film" (1080p video) this bird twice at close range, 
including yesterday, Tuesday, in and out of the water, preening, feeding alone 
and feeding with a large group of shovelers at that location. 


This beauty appears to be a Partial Albino Northern Shoveler or perhaps less 
likely, a Pekin X Northern Shoveler hybrid. 


Some observations: 
1. there are a few gray feathers on the mantle and scapulars that have recently 
appeared black, which I assume means that white feathers, were until recently, 
covering Black in the process of molting 

2. there are several gray feathers near the belly 
3. the Tarsus and Toes are the same color as the bill, bright Orange. 
4. the bill length appears to be at the lower end of the range for a Northern 
Shoveler. When swimming near other males and females the bill appears to be 
15-20% shorter than most in the group. 

5. the feeding behaviors are identical to other Northern Shovelers and it feeds 
very near or within the shoveler groups (3- 80 Birds feeding in very close 
proximity). 


If you have had difficulty with the "Where's Waldo" illustrations, try 
observing this great bird within the large shoveler groups. 


Below are links for discussions of the terms: albino, partial albino and 
leucistic that I found helpful. 




http://www.birds.cornell.edu/ivory/pastsearches/2005_2006/stories_reports_0506/leucism 



http://www.sibleyguides.com/2011/08/abnormal-coloration-in-birds-melanin-reduction/ 


and page xii in The 2014 Sibley Guide to Birds (Second Edition). 

Thanks again for all of you contributing to Tweeters. 

Dan Reiff 
Mercer Island 


----- Original Message -----

From: "barry"  
To: "Tweeters"  
Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 4:00:48 PM 
Subject: [Tweeters] Imperfect albino Shoveler, Franklin's  AT  Ev Sewage 

Tweeters, 
A beautiful day was punctuated by one of the most beautiful birds I've 
ever seen. A pure white duck with a very brightly colored orange 
shoveler's bill. Could not see the feet. The eye was golden, not pink. 
Size wise could easily fit into the range of a shoveler. Smaller than 
the Mallard's nearby. The bird was seen in the large pond to the north. 
Best to go to the opening along the fence line about 1/3 way down from 
the parking lot as you walk toward Spencer Island. Look back to the west 
in the outside channel closest to where you would be standing. Given 
that we just don't see many of these birds, I would welcome any comments 
about possible hybrids, albinos versus leucistic birds, etc. Hope that 
someone gets to photograph this bird. 
Also of note was at least one Franklin's Gull sitting along the wall 
farther to the west of where the duck was seen. On the pond was at least 
one Eared Grebe. 
Access into the ponds is not allowed due to work that is being done. The 
worker I spoke to was knowledgeable about birds and sounded optimistic 
that access could be granted in the future. He also said that he thought 
that the work being done will create more habitat for the birds. 
All the best 
-- 
barry 
Seattle 
levineb AT fastmail.fm 

-- 
http://www.fastmail.fm - Or how I learned to stop worrying and 
love email again 

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Subject: FW: WA: Eurasian Hobby - Go Fish
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 23:13:20 -0700
I would like to add that views of falcons are often distant and fleeting. We 
saw at least 3 Peregrines (maybe 4), a Merlin & male American Kestrel. Raptor 
ID skills are to be tested, so be prepared. 


From: namitzr AT hotmail.com
To: obol AT freelists.org
Subject: WA: Eurasian Hobby - Go Fish
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 23:03:30 -0700




Tim Shelmerdine and I waited from 10am to 330pm for the bird to make an 
appearance, but were disappointed. We kept ourselves busy meeting WA birders 
and seeing some of the other local rarities like ORCHARD ORIOLE, TROPICAL 
KINGBIRD & COMMON TERN. 


There was a reported sighting before we arrived, but I believe the verdict was 
still out pending review of photos. 


Good birding,
Russ Namitz
Medford, OR
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Rose Breasted Grosbeak in Clallam Bay
From: Bill Shelmerdine <georn1 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 21:01:35 -0700
After departing Neah Bay, Gene Revelas and I had a Tropical Kingbird (5th of 
day) in Clallam Bay. We followed it into Clallam Bay Park at corner next to 
bay. We encountered a large flock of Passerines which ultimately included a 
female type Rose Breasted Grosbeak. Great views in scope and probably decent 
digi- scoped photos. Birds feeding along bay in alders a shrubs with berries 
about 4:00 PM. 

Good birding
Bill Shelmerdine

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Subject: Chasing the Noddy
From: William Brynteson <billb0986 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 19:36:48 -0700
Hey Tweeters

I am looking for a seat with someone heading out to Neah Bay for a chance
to see the Noddy on Saturday, (cannot get away any sooner), so if you are
going and need someone to help with the cost, please let me know by
personal Email and we can then exchange phone numbers and make it happen.
I can be reached at wnbrynteson at yahoo dot com!

Thanks
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Subject: Chasing the Noddy!!
From: William Brynteson <billb0986 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 19:34:24 -0700
Hey Tweeters

I am looking for a seat with someone heading out to Neah Bay for a chance
to see the Noddy on Saturday, (cannot get away any sooner), so if you are
going and need someone to help with the cost, please let me know by
personal Email and we can then exchange phone numbers and make it happen.
I can be reached at wnbrynteson at yahoo dot com!

Thanks
BillB_______________________________________________
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Subject: Sandhill Crane in central Thurston Co
From: "Paul Hicks" <phicks AT accessgrace.org>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 18:45:32 -0700
Tweets, Monday a single juvenile Sandhill Crane hung out in a resident's
yard located in the Evergreen Valley area between Tumwater and Yelm. It did
not seem to be injured but was never observed flying. It was not relocated
in the vicinity Tuesday. Perhaps it got blown in/down by the storm. Good
birding!
Paul Hicks / Tenino / phicks AT accessgrace DOT org
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Subject: Chickens 1, Hawks 0
From: "Rob Sandelin" <nwnature1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:54:21 -0700
No that's not a football score. Today while returning home from the
neighborhood woods mushroom survey (yum, chantrelles for dinner!) there was
a disturbance in the old chicken coop. As I approached from the woods side
there was thrashing in the bird netting over the back chicken yard. To my
dismay, there was a Coopers Hawk thoroughly entangled in the net. 

Now what?

 

I approached the unhappy bird and it struggled more but it was clearly not
getting loose without help. I went into the house got an old throw blanket
and some kitchen shears. As I entered the chicken yard the chickens all
followed behind me and as I got under the hawk, they started talking some
serious trash. The hawk thrashed and got more agitated so I figured the
operation would go smoother without them so I locked them up in the coop and
returned to cut out the hawk. 

 

At my close approach the hawk really started squirming and got one leg loose
and took a swipe at me with those talons. Yikes, armed and dangerous. I
finally cut the hawk down but it was still covered with net so I covered it
with the throw  blanket, gingerly grabbed its wings and found myself lacking
a hand to remove the rest of the netting. I oh-so-carefully tucked the now
still bird under one arm and cut away the netting as best I could. I finally
got most of it  off and I set the hawk down on the ground and removed the
blanket. It was then I realized my mistake. We were still in the chicken
yard. The hawk tried to fly into the woods and bonked into the net from the
inside. Hoping that the hawk not get retangled,  I opened the front "gate"
and using the blanket as a shield I eventually after several tries, flapped
the hawk out of the coop. The bird flew away apparently none the worse for
its unusual day.

 

Rob Sandelin

Naturalist, Writer and mostly retired teacher

Snohomish County

 

 

 
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Subject: Eurasian Hobby
From: "Bruce LaBar" <blabar AT harbornet.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 14:39:02 -0700
For those who don’t follow E-Bird, Dan Waggoner reported seeing the hobby 
today at 8:39 a.m. for several minutes. He might be out of range to post on 
Tweeters, so thought I would give a heads up for any who want to chase 
tomorrow. 

Bruce_______________________________________________
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Subject: Western Scrub Jays Seattle Central District
From: Jill Freidberg <JFreidberg AT uwb.edu>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 19:05:31 +0000
For those of you tracking the appearances of Western Scrub Jays in Western WA, 
I've got a pair hanging out in the Port Orford Cedar behind my home in 
Seattle's Central District (98122). 


Jill

________________________________

Part-Time Lecturer
School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
University of Washington Bothell
18115 Campus Way NE
Bothell, WA 98011
425-352-5270

Documentary Filmmaker / Editor
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Subject: Pine siskins
From: cohenellenr AT yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 12:02:47 -0700
Finally! Large flock of siskins mixed with goldfinches in North End Tacoma

Sent from my iPad
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Subject: Pipit info
From: Roger Moyer <rogermoyer1 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:29:59 -0600
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Subject: NCAS monthly meeting Oct 28 7 PM
From: Twink Coffman <wilber4818 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 10:28:38 -0700
Everyone welcome at North Cascades Audubon Society monthly meeting held at
Whatcom Museum OCT 28.. Tuesday at 7 PM to 9 PM

General Membership Meeting with Craig and Joy Johnson
Presenting Their Film: “Birds, Backyard Habitat and Beyond”

Puget Sound area watercolor artist and photographer, Craig Johnson with his
wife and writer Joy Johnson, have created a remarkable DVD that beautifully
illustrates what can happen when native habitat is allowed to flourish,
even in as small a space as a suburban backyard.  The Johnsons illustrate
the delights possible by recording the birds and other creatures that visit
their backyard.  This remarkable film provides a window to behaviors never
before recorded. Watch and wonder as this panoply of creatures forage for
food, raise young, maintain their plumage, battle for territory and much
more. Using Craig’s animations, graphics and photographs the Johnsons offer
some simple suggestions to increase the variety of birds visiting your yard.

Craig and Joy Johnson have created and published four books containing
colorful, close-up photographs of birds (most found in the Puget Sound
area). Their latest photo book is titled, Our Pacific Northwest Birds &
Habitat. They have also published two children’s books which Craig
illustrated in watercolor, most recently Harry the Woodpecker’s Search for
a Home, released in December 2013.

Since becoming disabled by a neurological disorder, Craig has traded a
larger camera for a pocket-sized video camera that he uses primarily while
on a mobility scooter in their yard. Together the Johnsons study
ornithology and have spent many years observing and photographing birds.
They use Craig’s photos, videos, animations and graphics to share their
passion for birds and hope to inspire others to protect birds and wildlife
habitat.
Check out their website:  www.pugetsoundbackyardbirds.com


-- 
happy birding
Twink
wilber4818 AT gmail.com
Ferndale, WA
in Whatcom County
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Subject: field trip Semiahmoo Nov 1 Sat 9 AM
From: Twink Coffman <wilber4818 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 10:24:12 -0700
   FIELD TRIP Nov 1...SAT 9:00 A.M. to Noon   at Semiahmoo Spit Park... no
registration required..   sponsored by North Cascades Audubon Society and
Whatcom County Parks & Recreation... all birding skill levels welcome.

-- 
happy birding
Twink
wilber4818 AT gmail.com
Ferndale, WA
in Whatcom County
out on the beach_______________________________________________
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Subject: A book about passenger pigeons
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 16:17:05 +0000
hello everyone,

after lots of travel & illness, i'm catching up with my book reviews. only
3 to go!

This absorbing book is an engaging and wistful, yet measured, chronicle
about the tragic loss of one very special, iconic, species, the passenger
pigeon.


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/oct/28/a-message-from-martha-by-mark-avery-review 


this would be a superb gift book as well.

cheers,

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
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Subject: Neah Bay Rarities Monday
From: mcharest AT wamail.net
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 07:42:30 -0700 (PDT)
Yesterday I was fortunate enough to accompany Bill Twiet, Bruce Labar, and
Whittier Johnson to chase some of the rarities reported in Neah Bay on
Sunday.

We started the day in town and quickly found the ORCHARD ORIOLE coming to
the hummingbird feeders. The very friendly homeowner came out and said
that the bird has been seen for about a week and a half. A walk through
town produced a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW. Driving just outside of town toward
the Waatch Valley, we came across a very vividly colored NASHVILLE
WARBLER.

TOWN: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20358439

Carefully working our way through Waatch Valley, we made our way over to
the sewage treatment plant. While at the base of the old quarry we watched
the ridge line as several Bald Eagles, a Sharp-shinned Hawk, and a
Peregrine Falcon rode the thermals over the ridge top. The EURASIAN HOBBY
appeared suddenly over the ridge and allowed us looks for about 25-30
seconds before disappearing into the canyon to the right of our vantage
point. Some cheering was heard echoing through the quarry moments later.
Another group of patient birders were able to get a similar quick look at
the Hobby in the same spot several hours later.

SEWAGE PLANT: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20357757

Returning to town we were able to find a jaw dropping 4 TROPICAL
KINGBIRDS, 3 in the same tree at one point. We later found one more
Kingbird near Hobuck Beach making 5 for the day.

TOWN 2: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20357953
HOBUCK: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20357960

We had a very successful chase with a few more minor rarities. It was
great to ride with and learn from this group such knowledgeable birders.



Have a great day,

Michael Charest
Tacoma, Washington
mcharest AT wamail.net



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Subject: Oregon Red-throated Pipit
From: Roger Moyer <rogermoyer1 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 01:26:40 -0700
Can someone who has seen the bird give a better description of the location 
around Lake Selmac where the bird has been seen. Everyone on Ebird just posts a 
spot in the middle of the lake. I am going to be passing through this area 
later this week and would like to look for it. 


Roger Moyer
Las Cruces, NM
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Subject: Edmonds marsh dunlin
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 00:45:18 -0700
A small flock of seven dunlin continue to show up at the Edmonds marsh. My most 
recent photos of them can be seen here: 


http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?9587-Wldlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2014/page63 


While I am not good at identifying shore birds, I don't recall ever seeing 
dunlin at the marsh. I associate them with salt water, for in years past I have 
seen them hunkering down a few blocks away from the marsh on the breakwater of 
the Edmonds marina. 


 
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: RNEP above Magnuson
From: Robert Cleland <cleland AT u.washington.edu>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 19:12:31 -0700 (PDT)
I was surprised this morning, as I descended our hill (NE 77th) across 
from Magnuson to encounter 3 female/juvenile Ring-necked Pheasants along 
the side of the road.  I stopped and observed them for 5 minutes as they 
strolled along.  I had forgotten how big they are!
 	It has been at least 10 years since I last saw of RNEP in the 
Sandpoint/Magnuson area. 40 years ago we had families of them on the bank 
below us.  I am hopeful that this is a sign that they may be making a 
comeback in this area.  Have others seen them at Magnuson recently?

    		************************
    Robert Cleland

    Professor, Botany Dept. Box 355325
    Univ. of Washington
    Seattle, WA 98195-5325
    Phone (206) 543-6105;  FAX (206) 685-1728

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Subject: 26 October from Neah Bay to Cape Flattery
From: Steven Mlodinow <sgmlod AT aol.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 21:42:03 -0400
Greetings All


Thanks to Washington for the warm welcome back.
Some of the Hobby Day Highlights can be found at 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/36088296 AT N08/ 



Thanks to Brad, the Ryans, and Charlie for finding all of the smacking 
rarities. The key strategy to finding rarities is finding the right companions 



Best Wishes
Steven Mlodinow
Now, Longmont CO
Formerly, Everett, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Neah Bay
From: blabar <blabar AT harbornet.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 14:02:45 -0700
Also present are 4 Tropical Kingbird, 1 Orchard Oriole and Clay-colored 
sparrow. Oriole at 950 Bayview. Kingbirds in field at Lincoln and First street 
and sparrow across from mini mart 



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Smartphone_______________________________________________
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Subject: watch for a Sky Lark in Wa'atch River Valley
From: Charlie Wright <cwright770 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:57:26 -0700
Hello All,
I wanted to let people know that another very unusual bird was seen and
marginally photographed flying through the valley yesterday, just before
the Eurasian Hobby was discovered. The bird gave a unique impression that
seems to jive only with a Sky Lark. Unfortunately, the bird could not
relocated by us and only seen for a 45 second period. However, anyone in
the area looking for a certain falcon may do well to be on the lookout. The
bird was flying over the open fields south of the bridge on the "old" Neah
Bay to Cape Flattery Road.
Cheers,
Charlie Wright
Seattle, Washington
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Subject: No Broad-billed in Skamania County
From: Matt Schroeder <matt.j.schroeder AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:23:34 -0700
Hello Tweeters

The Broad-billed hummingbird was not observed today.

Last observation was Sunday the 26th at 0930.

I am still open to hosting if anyone is interested._______________________________________________
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Subject: RE: Eurasian Hobby Photos?
From: Rick Taylor <taylorrl AT outlook.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:08:26 -0700
They are imbedded in the eBird checklist at: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20349057 

 
Rick 

Rick Taylor
Everett, WA
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:56:47 -0700
From: vincentlucas5 AT gmail.com
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Eurasian Hobby Photos?

Does anyone know where the photos that were supposedly taken of the Eurasian 
Hobby in Neah Bay are located on the web? Thanks. 

-- 
Vincent LucasPort Angeles, WAvincentlucas5 AT gmail.com


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Subject: Eurasian Hobby Photos?
From: Vincent Lucas <vincentlucas5 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:56:47 -0700
Does anyone know where the photos that were supposedly taken of the
Eurasian Hobby in Neah Bay are located on the web? Thanks.

-- 
Vincent Lucas
Port Angeles, WA
vincentlucas5 AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
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Subject: Skamania Heermans - nope ... Swans YES !!!
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:08:27 -0700
hi all ... Gene and I went to Franz Lake and Bonneville Dam to see ANYTHING 
reported yesterday by Wilson C ...  


we first spent a couple of hours roaming the Bonneville Dam area ... LOTS of 
Gulls but we saw no Heermans ... however there was a flock of 60+ Bonapartes 
which made for entertaining viewing ... and probably a hundred Double-crested 
Cormorants ...  


a brief stop at Franz Lake  had views of a large flock of Gadwalls and Wigeons 
... if there was a Redhead in there we didn't spot him ... we did find a flock 
of 5 peeps but were scoping into the sun so I'm not sure what they were ...  


and Franz Lake had 8 sleeping Swans !!!! ... 

came home with 3 new County birds for my list and some nice pictures of some 
tweeties, so it was a good trip ... 


Lyn








Lyn Topinka
Vancouver, Wa,
NorthwestJourney.com
NorthwestBirding.com
ColumbiaRiverImages.com_______________________________________________
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Subject: Skamania Hummer - NO
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 22:15:50 GMT
Today, starting at 7:45am, Les Carlson and I spent 3 hours hoping for the 
Broad-billed Hummingbird without and luck. Wilson Cady 

Columbia River Gorge, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Two hobbies at Mt Baker
From: "Randy Hill" <re_hill AT q.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 14:23:10 -0700
Let me clarify after Ryan's post. Hiking and birding. Unfortunately the birding 
part was a little slow. From the gate at mp55 to Artists Point and over to 
Ptarmigan Ridge I saw 5 birds. 3 were ravens, plus a redtail and what was 
probably an eagle. Snow is 6-12" and I made the first tracks across most of it. 
No ptarmigan or tracks of any birds. Did hear Pine Grosbeaks in 2 spots, a 
probable Gray Jay, and a gc kinglet. But the sun was trying to break through. 
That probably won't last. The breeze from the east was trying to hold off the 
dark clouds to the west. 


Randy Hill
Ridgefield
Sent via randy's smartphone
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Subject: Re: Hobby
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 13:52:31 -0700
The hobby was seen at 1:45 pm same location Bruce had reported.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

blabar  wrote:

The Eurasian Hobby was spotted at the sewage ponds at 11:15 by our group at 
Neah Bay. Flying along the quarry cliffs. 



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Subject: Hobby
From: blabar <blabar AT harbornet.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 11:33:10 -0700
The Eurasian Hobby was spotted at the sewage ponds at 11:15 by our group at 
Neah Bay. Flying along the quarry cliffs.  



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Subject: Black Turnstone at Vashon ferry dock
From: "Tucker, Trileigh" <TRI AT seattleu.edu>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 18:02:29 +0000
Hi Tweets,

I photographed what I believe was a Black Turnstone at the Vashon ferry dock on 
Saturday morning 10/25. Shorebirds are one of my weakest ID areas, but in any 
case, as always, I would welcome correction. Two photos are at 
 
flickr.com/photos/trileigh (along with 
a kind of nice one of a TuVu from back in NY). 


Anyone seeing any interesting avian fallouts from the windstorm?

Good birding to you,
Trileigh

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Trileigh Tucker
Lincoln Park, West Seattle
Natural history website: Naturalpresence.wordpress.com
Photography: Flickr.com/photos/trileigh
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Subject: Mystery Grosbeak...
From: merdave AT homenetnw.net
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 08:10:23 -0700 (PDT)
Good Morning, fellow birders.  I took photos of a Grosbeak that has been
coming to a feeder in our yard, and I'm hoping it is NOT a Black-headed. 
I live in Bridgeport, Wash.  If you'd like to see a photo email me, and I
can forward one to you.  We have not yet caught it flying to be able to
see under its wings.  Thanks so much.  Meredith Spencer

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Subject: Washington Bird Records Committee recent decisions (Oct 25, 2014 meeting)
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 07:56:16 -0700 (GMT-07:00)
Hi Tweeters & Inland NW Birders -


Saturday,October 25, 2014, the Washington Bird Records Committee met at the 
Slater Museum for its annual meeting. 


 

42 reports were accepted as valid records

17 reports were not accepted

 1 decision was tabled for further research

 2 reports were categorized as 'historic, unreviewable' 

 

The WBRC reviewed and accepted a 2002 report of "Woodhouse's" Western 
Scrub-Jay, a new subspecies for the state (a likely soon to become a full 
species in its own right). 


 

In addition, the WBRC reviewed the two earlier state records of Shy Albatross. 
In the wake of the recent spit of Shy Albatross into three species, both 
Washington records were accepted as belonging in the White-capped Albatross 
group. 


 

Scripps's Murrelet was removed from the WBRC review list, having shown 
themselves to be regular visitors off-shore in the state. 


 

Cattle Egret was placed back onto the WBRC review list given the few reports 
over the past decade. 


 

The results of this round's votes can be found at the following link on the WOS 
website: 


http://wos.org/wbrcfall2014.html


In other WBRC news, Bill Tweit rotated off the committee at the conclusion of 
this meeting. Dave Slager has joined the WBRC as a new member. 


Updates to the state list, review list and master checklist on line will be 
completed before long and posted. 


 

I welcome any questions about the status of past decisions or any new report 
submissions, 


Matt Bartels 
Secretary, WBRC 
Seattle, WA 
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Subject: Washington Bird Records Committee recent decisions (Oct 25, 2014 meeting)
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 06:38:38 -0700
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Subject: a fun suggestion from the Cornell Lab of O
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 07:39:32 +0000
hello everyone,

since Halloween is fast approaching, i thought i'd share a suggestion from
Cornell's Lab of Ornithology for what to do with all those pumpkins:

http://bit.ly/10qD5mg

cheers,

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
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Subject: Seattle Parasitc Jaeger, Ancient Murrlets
From: Sam G Terry <sgt3 AT uw.edu>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 21:48:29 -0700
Hi All -

This afternoon (10/26/14) from 2:30-4:00pm I scoped from Alki Point in West
Seattle. Nothing too unusual but I did see five Ancient Murrelets and one
juvenile Parasitic Jaeger.

Good birding,

Sam Terry
Seattle_______________________________________________
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Subject: Cle Elum Area Plus - late afternoon 10/24/14
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 21:43:29 -0700
Even though the weather was not predicted to be sunny or dry, nor had there 
been many bird reports recently from that area, I was very ready to head east 
last Friday, just to see what I could find and to note changes in air, sky, 
water, flora as well as fauna. And to relax a bit. I had an increasingly 
stress-melting drive over, made moreso than usual by not seeing lots of birds 
as I drove! But there were differences in the numbers and kinds of birds I did 
see (compared with 2 weeks previous). This time, I saw a Peregrine Falcon fly 
across the highway near exit 27 (in Snoqualmie area), Black-billed Magpie 
sightings started sooner than usual and were more frequent, Red-tailed Hawks 
were more common along the highway (on poles and one dead on the side of the 
road), I saw no Turkey Vultures, did see a few Common Ravens, saw no birdlife 
except 2 crows at Rattlesnake Lake, several Bald Eagles on trees or taking 
flight, between Cle Elum and Ellensburg, despite increasing darkness and the 
beginning scattered spatters of rain (around 5:30). I decided that, since 
darkness was taking over for the cloudy light of the afternoon, I would, right 
after getting to Ellensburg, head out on Umptanum Rd., just because I hadn't 
been out there since the summer. But the draw of a fairly empty parking lot 
around the Roadside Grill at the start of Ump Rd., and the desire to have a 
good meal, pre-empted the goal of the Ump unknowns. Besides it was getting very 
dark very fast and I realized the rain was now getting serious about pelting my 
windshield. Time to look at the menu and relax in a dry, warm environment 
before heading back to Seattle. But this wasn't the best part of the trip - 
I've saved the best for second-to-last. 


Once again, the Cle Elum RR pond area provided a few nice birds, and they even 
stayed put on perches long enough for me to pull over and try for a photo or 2. 
A Black-billed Magpie was shouting from the snag on which, 2 wks ago, Sue and I 
found a dragonfly-eating Merlin and a Belted Kingfisher. Down that road at the 
intersection of Spring Creek and Charter Rds, where the bridge leads to the 
fish hatchery, were 2 Belted Kingfishers chattering. I found one on a distant 
snag again, and tried for a shot or 2. For documentation only... :-) The 
goldening cottonwoods were a nice background along the ponds, and that was 
worth a few shots, too. 


Then, I went to the Cle Elum Bakery on the main drag - they were still open, 
but out of anything that would have tempted me to feed my sugar demon, so I 
went back out to the car. Caught a quick-moving dark, pointy-winged shape up in 
the sky, flying east, in a big hurry, just behind the bakery - maybe that 
Merlin also had just missed something 'sweet' for its dinner and was off for a 
last-chance take in someone's backyard in town ? A Merlin - now that was much 
better than a sweet bun, that's for sure ! 


As for the trip back to Seattle (the last item in my report), the rain was 
intense, but traffic minimal and everyone behaved well on the road. So, with my 
Starbuck's Carmel Macchiato keeping me warm and wired, I crooned along with 
Bonnie Raitt and Sting and managed to really enjoy my trip back. The Amber 
Alert signs along the road, starting at Easton, were a bit unnerving, but the 
last one I saw near the 520-bridge turn-off suddenly turned off (no message), 
so at least one of the worrisome happenings of the day must have turned out 
OK... 


So, here are my 13 photos for the trip (from 1:30 p.m. - 9 p.m.), including a 
few of the magpie and the kingfisher from the RR Ponds Rd. - not a big day for 
either birds or good bird photos, but it was still a very worthwhile trip... 
:-) 


https://flic.kr/s/aHsk5EMrZw 

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net

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Subject: Samish Pacific Golden Plover
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 04:21:19 +0000 (UTC)
 Dear Tweeters,
The Pacific Golden Plover that was found by Ken Lane and party yesterday, near 
the Samish West Ninety, was still there today, October 26, 2014. It was right 
in the corner nearest the West Ninety, in the muddy potato field kitty-corner 
form the W90 parking area. It was with at least 185 Black-bellied Plover, plus 
quite a few Dunlin, a few Long-billed Dowitchers, and a wet, sad-looking 
Greater Yellowlegs. Interestingly, the Golden kept close to the yellowlegs the 
whole time I watched it. 

March Point was fun, with close to a hundred Common Loons, a Pacific Loon, and 
over thirty Oldsquaws. Greater Scaup are in, too. 

A flock of Dunlin at Hayton Preserve included fifteen or so Western Sandpipers. 
Among the geese there were two White-fronts and two Cacklers. There were close 
to twenty Tundra Swans out on the bay. 

The weather lately has been horrid--but the sun-breaks in between have been 
glorious. The Fir Island Game Range was that way this evening, with lots of 
passerines here and there, including Audubon's Warblers, Cedar Waxwings, and 
Golden-crowned Kinglets. 

Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Subject: Re: corrected email address for A Birder's Guide to Washington
From: Jane Hadley <jhadle AT clearwire.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 21:14:28 -0700
Dear Tweetsters,

For reasons I won't bother to explain, I gave the incorrect email 
address at which to contact me regarding volunteering to ground-truth 
routes for the revision of A Birder's Guide to Washington:

The correct address is:  jhadle AT clearwire.net

Jane Hadley_______________________________________________
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Subject: Woodland Bottoms - Red Phalarope
From: Russ Koppendrayer <russkope AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 21:05:57 -0700
Hi Tweeters,

I watched a RED PHALAROPE swimming and foraging in the Columbia River for
15-20 minutes around 2:30 this afternoon (10/26/14). The bird was within 5
feet of shore when I arrived just north of the RV Park along Dike Rd. and
slowly worked it's way north and a little farther out. It was about 50 feet
out and nearing Martin's Bar when last seen. A quick stop at 4:30 was
unsuccessful in relocating what I believe is a second record for Cowlitz
County.

Russ Koppendrayer
Longview, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Four Turkey Vultures migrating over Commencement Bay today
From: Rob McNair-Huff <rob.mcnairhuff AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 21:00:13 -0700
I watched a small kettle of four Turkey Vultures heading south into the
wind over Commencement Bay in Tacoma this afternoon around 4 p.m. I saw the
birds while wrapping up my afternoon run, and a number of walkers along
Ruston Way we're watching the TVs as well.

Happy birding!

Rob McNair-Huff
Tacoma, Wash.



-- 
Rob McNair-Huff ---------- Tacoma, WA
Author of Washington Disasters (Globe Pequot, 2006), Birding Washington
(Falcon Publishing, 2004) and Insider's Guide to the Olympic Peninsula
(Globe Pequot, 2001)
www.whiterabbits.com_______________________________________________
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Subject: Call for volunteers for A Birder's Guide to Washington
From: Jane Hadley <jhadle AT clearwire.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 20:53:15 -0700
Dear Tweetsters,

As some of you may be aware, the Washington Ornithological Society is in 
the process of revising and updating A Birder's Guide to Washington, the 
state's main bird-finding guide published in 2003. The guide has been 
hugely successful, selling out of all printed copies a while back. (A 
second printing is available on a print-on-demand basis at Buteo Books, 
Amazon.com, and Seattle Audubon Society's Nature Shop.)

There are some 30+ authors involved in updating and revising the guide. 
In some cases, this has meant just making sure that the original 
information is still current and accurate and correcting it when it is 
not. In other cases, it has meant eliminating some destinations or  
adding new ones. Ryan Merrill is updating the valuable bar graphs of 
seasonal abundance, and Matt Bartels is updating the equally valuable 
annotated checklist.

The American Birding Association, the publisher of the guide, asks that 
someone other than the author "ground truths" the material submitted. 
This basically involves driving or hiking to the locations mentioned and 
checking that the directions and descriptions make sense and are accurate.

I am now asking for volunteers from the Washington birding community to 
step forward and take responsibility for one or more of the 60+ sections 
in the guide. (I will list them below.) Please select an area and 
contact me at jhadle AT clearwire.com to indicate your availability and 
your territory preference. I would like the ground-truthing to be done 
by the end of the year, but I do understand that in some cases there are 
hurdles, such as snow in the mountains or hunting closures and the like.

When you are assigned a territory, I will email you a copy of the 
author's submission that you will be ground-truthing.

Do not hesitate to contact me if you have questions.

Thanks, Jane Hadley

Chapter 1
Port Townsend and Vicinity
Discovery Bay to Port Angeles
The High Olympics
Elwha River to the Pacific Coast
Outer Olympic Coast
South Coast

Chapter 2
Whidbey Island
Fidalgo Island
San Juan Islands
Skagit Flats
Samish Flats
North Cascades Highway
Mount Baker Highway

Chapter 3
Seattle and Vicinity
Snoqualmie Valley to Everett
Stanwood and Camano Island
Across the Sound (Kitsap County)
Tacoma and Vicinity
Hood Canal and East Olympics
Mount Rainier

Chapter 4
Mount Saint Helens
Vancouver and Vicinity
Western Columbia Gorge
Mount Adams

Chapter 5
Snoqualmie Pass and Vicinity
Cle Elum and Vicinity
Teanaway River and Swauk Creek
Kittitas Valley
Columbia Slope: Vantage to Sentinel Gap
Taneum and Manastash Creeks
Wenas Creek Loop
 From Yakima to Ellensburg
Yakima Training Center
Yakima and Vicinity
Chinook Pass Highway
White Pass Highway
Eastern Cojlumbia Gorge and Klickitat River
Rock Creek and Lake Umatilla
Tri-Cities and Vicinity

Chapter 6
The Potholes and Moses Lake
Lower Crab Creek and Othello
Southern Columbia Basin
Beezley Hills and Moses Coulee
Waterville Plateau and Bridgeport
Grand Coulee
Northeastern Columbia Basin

Chapter 7
Stevens Pass to Wenatchee
Entiat Mountains to Lake Chelan
Methow Valley
Okanogan Valley
Okanogan Cascades
Okanogan Highlands

Chapter 8
Kettle Range
 From the Columbia to the Pend Oreille
Spokane and Vicinity

Chapter 9
Western Lowlands
Blue Mountains
Snake and Grande Ronde River Canyons
The Palouse_______________________________________________
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Subject: Franklin's Gull at Gene Coulon Park - Renton
From: Marie and Craig <crgrie123 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 18:29:42 -0700
Tweeters:

Sunday 10-26, My husband and I were walking around Gene Coulon Park when we 
came across this different gull. Small size, black legs, small black bill, and 
different from all the other gulls. Looks like a Franklin's adult nonbreeding. 
Here are the photos: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/birdergirl123/?details=1

I love to share the world with birds!!

Marie
Highlands of Renton, just up from Lake Washington_______________________________________________
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Subject: Broad-billed Hummer & Heerman's Gull
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 18:22:36 -0700
Hi Tweeters -
As Matt Schroeder reported, the Broad-billed Hummingbird was around for a bit 
this morning -- I was able to get great views [and terrible photos/video] 
around 9:15-9:30 as it buzzed around the Schroeder's house. A bit after 9:30 it 
took off over the house and hadn't returned by 11:00 when I moved on -- great 
bird, and friendly place to visit. Thanks hosts! Good looks at the red 
underside of the lower bill, overall greenish [and somewhat yellowish] back, 
black across the tail, white stripe from the eye, and glimpses of some 
darkness/blue on the throat. 


A tip for visitors: Park on the roadside and walk in the driveway - it would 
get tight fast if people pulled in. 


On the way home, as Wilson Cady also noted, 2 Heerman's Gulls, another Skamania 
County first, were hanging out at Bonneville Dam 


For a showery day, not bad at all!

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA


On Oct 26, 2014, at 9:57 AM, Matt Schroeder wrote:

> Hello Tweeters
> 
> The Broad-billed hummingbird returned at 0930 to visit flowers and perch for 
a few minutes. 

> 
> It did not visit the feeder I put out, but we had a nice opportunity to view 
it feeding at the flowers. 

> 
> The bird was observed once yesterday at 0800 and was not seen again until 
today. 

> 
> We are hosting visitors.  Feel free to come by.
> 
> 81 Wind Crest Rd. 
> Carson, WA 
> 
> Cheers
> 
> Matt Schroeder
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: getting to sikes lake
From: Dave Templeton <crazydave65 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 18:15:36 -0700
i forgot to mention king county is still working on the bridge across the
river at chinook bend.  that means getting to sikes lake requires going
down 203 to the 124th roundabout in going in the back way.  another
alternative is to take ames lake road off 202 or novelty hill road if
coming down avondale road.  repairs/modifications should be done in another
couple weeks.     or so they say.

regards,

t

-- 
dave templeton
fall city, wa

crazydave65atgmaildaughtcom

"Don't worry about the world coming to an end today; it's already tomorrow
in Australia."  Charles Schultz_______________________________________________
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Subject: western grebes at sikes lake (east king county
From: Dave Templeton <crazydave65 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 18:11:47 -0700
hi:

saw several western grebes on sikes lake this mid afternoon.  did not
appear to be any clark's.

also note the big snag tree at the far northwest end of the lake seems to
have been a victim of the past few windy days (or the flower farmer's chain
saw.  that was the tree the golden eagle hung out in off and on winter
before last.  the snag tree population has diminished markedly in the new
century.  i also note a trip to sikes no longer yields numerous views of
red tailed hawks nor the slightly more than occasional bald eagle.

the large gatherings of cackling geese are now evident in the field across
from the old nestle training center.  did not have time to scope the flock
to see if there were greater white fronted geese in the mix or canadas
either.

regards,

t

-- 
dave templeton
fall city, wa

crazydave65atgmaildaughtcom

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Subject: No Skamania Hummer but still a successful day
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 00:36:09 GMT
Les Carlson, Ken Knittle and I tried for the reported Broad-billed Hummingbird 
in Skamania County, but were there about an hour after the bird was there this 
morning. On the way home we stopped at Bonneville Dam where we found two 
HEERMAN'S GULLS at the fish passage at the tip of the island between the 
sections of the dam, a County first. A stop at the Franz Lake NWR overlook 
produced a male EURASIAN WIGEON and eight DUNLIN, which are a County Code 5 
bird. Wilson Cady 

Columbia River Gorge, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: a new book with scientific research-based "HOPE" for many bird species...
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 17:19:58 -0700
John Marzluff will be giving a presentation about his new book this coming Wed. 
eve. at 7 p.m. at Third Place Books in Lake Forest Park Towne Center. It is 
open to one and all. 


You can read about the book in today's Seattle Times:

http://seattletimes.com/html/books/2024845737_marzluffsubirdiaxml.html  

The book is called "Welcome to Subirdia: Sharing Our Neighborhoods with Wrens, 
Robins, Woodpeckers, and Other Wildlife " and is NOT a doomsday chronicling of 
all the habitats we humans are taking away from birds. Instead he tells of the 
successfully adapting species from around the world (including many from in and 
around the Seattle area), which have been adapting to the by-products of human 
society or active attempts by us to provide some of the life basics that these 
birds need. For 12 years John and his team have studied various birds and their 
levels of adaptive ability and have come up with a hopeful outlook for the 
species who adapt well or somewhat to us and our development. But he reminds us 
that there are things we have to do and keep in mind if we hope to slow down 
the degradation of wildlife habitats and ultimately the loss of species within 
them. 


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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