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Updated on Wednesday, November 26 at 04:28 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Brant

26 Nov Hawk owl [devonc78 ]
26 Nov A Snow(y) BIG DAY Quintuplet Really Was a Possibility [Blair Bernson ]
26 Nov Edmonds Snowy Owl - NO [Joe Sweeney ]
26 Nov RE: Any updated on the White Pelican or Snowy Owl? ["Doug Schurman" ]
26 Nov Any updated on the White Pelican or Snowy Owl? [rohan kamath ]
26 Nov Need hummingbird ID help []
26 Nov Vancouver Lake Area 11-25 [Ray ]
26 Nov RE: Birding the Lummi Flats ["Wayne Weber" ]
26 Nov OT: missing the unexpected [Hank ]
26 Nov "Subirdia" Book Review [Bill Anderson ]
26 Nov Three Kinds of Birds [Jeff Gibson ]
26 Nov Re: Ridgefield [Bill Anderson ]
25 Nov Ridgefield []
25 Nov dd []
25 Nov Birding the Lummi Flats ["Jim Duemmel" ]
26 Nov Edmonds marsh dunlin 11-25-14 [Bill Anderson ]
25 Nov Vashon Northern Shrike ["Ed Swan" ]
25 Nov American kestrel in Carnation [Tracey Cummings ]
25 Nov Admiralty Audubon Society CBC Dec 20, 2014 [Paula Vanderheul ]
25 Nov Snowy Owl Edmonds Marina []
25 Nov American white pelican [Rick Forsman ]
25 Nov Edmunds Snowy Owl still there today (Tues. 11/25) [George Gerdts ]
25 Nov Kitsap Christmas Bird Count - Saturday December 20, 2014 [Gene Bullock ]
25 Nov Lummi Flats [Blair Bernson ]
25 Nov vancouver/post office lake this morning [Ray ]
25 Nov vancouver/post office lake this morning [Ray ]
25 Nov swan hotline now open ["Martha Jordan" ]
25 Nov Re: Re: Photos and Video of Edmonds SNOWY OWL [Bill Anderson ]
25 Nov Re: Re: Photos and Video of Edmonds SNOWY OWL [Paul Bannick ]
25 Nov RE: Re: Photos and Video of Edmonds SNOWY OWL [Roger Moyer ]
25 Nov Re: Photos and Video of Edmonds SNOWY OWL [rohan kamath ]
25 Nov Photos and Video of Edmonds SNOWY OWL [rohan kamath ]
25 Nov Mystery hawk [Greg Pluth ]
24 Nov Snowy & Scoters from Edmonds Fishing Pier - 11/24/14 [Barbara Deihl ]
24 Nov WOS Program - Monday December 1st - Dennis Paulson on the Birds of Newfoundland and Nova Scotia [Blair Bernson ]
24 Nov Edmonds Snowy Owl flight photos [Joe Sweeney ]
24 Nov Snowy Egret [Russ Koppendrayer ]
24 Nov Edmonds Snowy Owl Still on the Breakwater [Carol Riddell ]
24 Nov Edmonds Snowy Owl ["Dan Reiff, PhD" ]
24 Nov Re: Edmonds Snowy Owl [Bill Anderson ]
24 Nov Seattle Christmas Bird Count [Toby Ross ]
24 Nov Dec 11th: Vashon Audubon Present Paul Bannick's "Woodpeckers of North America" [Michael Tracy ]
24 Nov Edmonds Snowy Owl [Blair Bernson ]
23 Nov Re: Mourning Dove []
23 Nov Post Office Lake Snowy Egret continues (Clark Co) [Stefan Schlick ]
23 Nov Mourning Dove ["Diane W" ]
23 Nov Whatcom County Yellow-billed Loon [Carol Riddell ]
24 Nov Skagtit Valley birds [Gary Bletsch ]
23 Nov CBC's in North Central Washington ["Teri J Pieper" ]
24 Nov Acorn Woodpeckers in Thurston County still present [Gary Wiles ]
23 Nov Fwd: camera [Patricia Quyle Grainger ]
23 Nov Vashon CBC Sunday January 4 ["Ed Swan" ]
23 Nov Marbled Murrelet in PTownsend harbor [Bruce Youngberg ]
23 Nov Snowy Owl in Edmonds [Sherman Page ]
23 Nov Townsend's Solitaire, Martha Washington Park, Seattle [Jeffrey Bryant ]
23 Nov Perplexing Pelagics-Seattle [Paul Randall ]
23 Nov Edmonds Snowy Owl [Ian Paulsen ]
23 Nov Martha lk WA Solitair [Qinglin Ma ]
23 Nov BirdNote - last week, and the week of Nov. 23, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
23 Nov Edmonds 11/22/14 (No Snowy Owl, but 2 scoter videos) [Hank ]
23 Nov Late Fall trifecta at Sequ [Suzanne Staples ]
22 Nov Video clip: Flock of birds cause tree to sneeze? ["Dan Reiff, PhD" ]
22 Nov solitaire continues in Seattle [pan ]
23 Nov Seattle CBC [Neil and Carleen Zimmerman ]
23 Nov First of Fall Eurasian Wigeons, and a question [Jason Hernandez ]
22 Nov Brewster Flats Northern Hawk Owl continues 11/22 [Stefan Schlick ]
22 Nov Grays Harbor CBC [Dianna Moore ]
22 Nov Seattle Shearwater Question [Paul Randall ]
22 Nov Union Bay Watch | Winter's Cache [Larry Hubbell ]
22 Nov Yellow-billed Loon Whatcom county [Fanter Lane ]
22 Nov CBC information ["Grace and Ollie" ]
22 Nov Kitsap Christmas Bird Count [Chazz Hesselein ]
22 Nov Re: Accipiter ID Assistance [Tony ]
22 Nov Fwd: Northern Hawk Owl Pics [Loren Mooney ]
21 Nov Northern Hawk Owl Pics [Loren Mooney ]
22 Nov TUNDRA BEAN GOOSE [D Richardson ]

Subject: Hawk owl
From: devonc78 <devonc78 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 12:58:02 -0800
I haven't seen anything about the hawk owl in a few days. I have a friend who 
was hoping to see it this week. Any recent sightings?  


Thanks
Devon
Wenatchee


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Subject: A Snow(y) BIG DAY Quintuplet Really Was a Possibility
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 12:28:24 -0800
After the surprising find of a flock of Snow 
Buntings in Lummi Land, I drove back home with a 
stop at Wylie Slough where hundreds of Snow Geese 
flew overhead and then concluded with a brief 
visit to the Edmonds waterfront where the Snowy 
Owl was holding court.  Later the thought occurred 
to me that with a LOT of planning and even more 
LUCK, it actually would have been possible to have 
a Snow(y) Quintuplet and see those three "snow" 
species plus Snowy Plover by continuing south to 
Grayland and then the Snowy Egret that has been a 
regular at Post Office Lake down near Vancouver.  
Granted that does not include the Himalayan 
Snowcock (which has always seemed a stretch to me 
despite the ABA inclusion), but without it I thin 
those are all of the "snow species" possible.  I 
am sure that all of those species have been seen 
at one time or another in Oregon and California 
but I wonder if they have ever been present and at 
least possibly viewable in a single day in any 
other state.

That got me to thinking about other 
interesting/fun combinations of groups of birds.  
One for sure is that Denny had all four 
Zonotrichia sparrows on his feeder at the same 
time in Sequim earlier this year (I missed the 
White Throated but did see White Crowned, Golden 
Crowned and Harris's at the same time there).  We 
wondered if that had happened elsewhere.

What other interesting and possibly unique combo's 
in Washington come to mind...

-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

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Subject: Edmonds Snowy Owl - NO
From: Joe Sweeney <sweeneyfit AT mac.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 11:42:53 -0800
Snowy owl has NOT been seen at the breakwater in Edmonds this morning, between 
8:30 and 11:30. 


Joe Sweeney
sweeneyfit at mac dot com
NE Seattle

Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 26, 2014, at 11:04 AM, rohan kamath  wrote:

> Hi,
> Has anyone seen the Pelican at lake Sammamish today or the Snowy Owl at 
Edmonds? 

> A friend wants to see them so was hoping for an update.
> Thanks a lot.
> 
> -Regards,
> Rohan Kamath
> Software Development Engineer
> Amazon.com, Seattle, WA.
> ___________________________________________________
> Conservation begins at HOME... We CAN make a difference...
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters_______________________________________________
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Subject: RE: Any updated on the White Pelican or Snowy Owl?
From: "Doug Schurman" <doug AT bodyresults.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 11:11:16 -0800
There was an ebird report from 7:30am this morning where a person saw the Snowy 
Owl in same spot it has been since Sunday. 


 

Here are the comments on the sighting

"Seen from fuel dock. Bird was perched at NE end of south breakwater (entrance 
to the marina)." 


 

Doug Schurman

Seattle WA

 

 

From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of rohan kamath 

Sent: Wednesday, November 26, 2014 11:05 AM
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Any updated on the White Pelican or Snowy Owl?

 

Hi,
Has anyone seen the Pelican at lake Sammamish today or the Snowy Owl at 
Edmonds? 


A friend wants to see them so was hoping for an update.

Thanks a lot.


 

-Regards,

Rohan Kamath

Software Development Engineer
Amazon.com, Seattle, WA.

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Subject: Any updated on the White Pelican or Snowy Owl?
From: rohan kamath <rohankamath88 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 11:04:30 -0800
Hi,
Has anyone seen the Pelican at lake Sammamish today or the Snowy Owl at
Edmonds?
A friend wants to see them so was hoping for an update.
Thanks a lot.

-Regards,
Rohan Kamath
Software Development Engineer
Amazon.com, Seattle, WA.
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Subject: Need hummingbird ID help
From: joanna AT isomedia.com
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 09:45:53 -0800
Hello,

I was directed to this list by someone from birdweb.org after I emailed
about a possible Black-chinned hummingbird at my feeder. I'm about 15
miles NE of Bellingham, near Everson, WA in a rural area with berry farms,
gravel pits, pasture, scrub woods, and a few houses.

I'm trying to get some clear pictures, but he is very spooky. Last winter
we noticed our first over-wintering hummers after getting buzzed in
January. We rushed to get the feeder out, but didn't really try to ID the
birds, assuming they were Anna's.

This year we kept the feeders going after most of the hummers left for the
year, and noticed 2 males and 1 female stayed. One male is very much an
Anna's, as I got a view from about 1 foot from my face as he flashed me
while I was replacing a feeder. The female I assumed was an Anna's, but
after trying to ID the other male, I'm not sure. I don't notice any
obvious color spots on her throat, just pale grey.

The other male looks like a Black-chinned. Much darker head & throat with
a clear delineation between gorget and breast colors. He isn't as bold as
the Anna's, but I noticed the wing tips are as long as the tail when he
settled enough to feed.

I don't have the fastest camera, and have to try for pictures through my
open kitchen window. He spooks when he hears the camera fire up, since the
feeders are hanging from the edge of my back porch roof, just about 6 feet
from the window.

Any tips on taking better pictures, or ways to definitively ID him?

Thanks,
Joanna



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Subject: Vancouver Lake Area 11-25
From: Ray <rkorpi AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 08:54:04 -0800
Resending this post as it did not make it through in line with requests for 
Ridgefield-Vancouver sightings to be posted on both lists 

RK

Made a fast trip out to Post Office and Vancouver Lake this morning. 
Best bird was  a female RED-BREASTED MERGANSER at Vancouver Lake in 
among the large flock of Cormorants, gulls, and Common Mergs.  Only 
egret I saw at PO Lake was a Great, but there are scads of Canvasbacks 
as reported.  There were a couple of nice blackbird flocks on the way 
out there as well--someone else was out this morning scoping those.  The
 one brief look I got did not reveal much.

I suspect the Snowy Egret will be around still--the west side of PO Lake is 
very hard to see from the end of the road. 

RK


Ray Korpi

rkorpi AT hotmail.com

Vancouver WA
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Subject: RE: Birding the Lummi Flats
From: "Wayne Weber" <contopus AT telus.net>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 08:41:08 -0800
Tweeters,

 

One of the problems may be that the “Lummi Aquaculture Dike” is shown as a 
hotspot in eBird, even though there are no checklists shown from that locality. 
Since hotspots are almost always locations accessible to the public, this may 
lead some birders to believe that the aquaculture dike is open to the public, 
which it is not. 


 

I would strongly recommend to the Hotspot Editor for the area that this 
locality be removed as a hotspot, which should be easy to do as there are no 
data from there. 


 

Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

contopus AT telus.net

 

 

 

From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Jim Duemmel 

Sent: November-25-14 9:20 PM
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Birding the Lummi Flats

 

There have been several recent reports of a Yellow-billed Loon seen from the 
base of the aquaculture dike on the Lummi Reservation – the “Lummi 
Flats”. This is private-tribal land and birding off paved roads is allowed 
only with a “Letter of Permission” which can be obtained during office 
hours from the Lummi Planning Department located in the new tribal headquarters 
on the south side of Kwina Road east of Haxton Way. 


Entry onto the “aquaculture dike” is explicitly prohibited even to bearers 
of a Letter of Permission. The aquaculture dike is the dike that goes out into 
Lummi Bay from the gravel portion of Kwina Road which extends westward from the 
intersection of Kwina and Hillaire Roads. Pavement ends at that intersection. 


Years ago birders had much less constrained access to this area. That ended due 
to the selfish actions of one person. Even further restrictions could result 
from unauthorized entry into this area by birders. Several times in the near 
past this has been mentioned on Tweeters. The tribe has requested that the 
revision of A Birder’s Guide to Washington explicitly state that the Lummi 
Flats off paved roads is a restricted area and the aquaculture dike is totally 
off limits. 


Jim Duemmel
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Subject: OT: missing the unexpected
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 08:34:12 -0800
> 
> 
>> 
>> The video link at the end of this message was sent to us by a birding friend 
to demonstrate how easy it is to miss seeing the unexpected bird. 

>> 
>> Happy Thanksgiving.
>> 
>> Hank and Karen Heiberg
>> Lake Joy
>> Carnation, WA
>> 
>>>  
>>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ahg6qcgoay4
>>> 
>>> _______________________________________________
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Subject: "Subirdia" Book Review
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 15:30:22 +0000 (UTC)
A review of Don Marzluff's new book and an interview of the author. 'Subirdia' 
author urges appreciation of birds that co-exist where we work, live, play 
 Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA 
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Subject: Three Kinds of Birds
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 04:53:12 -0800
Still here at my parents home in Port Townsend , where we all continue to watch 
birds - in our own different ways. 

A few days ago, while sitting at the kitchen table Dad noted, "Oh there's Mom's 
duck", as a big Glaucous-winged Gull landed on the deck rail just outside the 
window. 

Now, a visiting Social Worker, or somebody who only knows Dad as someone with 
dementia, might chalk up this statement as another 'Alzheimer's moment", but 
they would be wrong about that. It's just another example of Dad's "Three Kinds 
of Birds" theory. It's really more of a proposal, guess. 

You see, about 40 years ago Dad came up with his classification system, 
possibly as an antidote to hearing too many overbearing bird reports from his 
bratty bird- know-it-all son (me)." Nobody likes a know-it-all" was an oft-used 
phrase in our family, since we all have forms of that particular behavioral 
dysfunction. 

"Well" Dad would state, in his droll way, "you know, there's three kinds of 
Birds - sparrows, ducks, and hawks." And Dad was always able, somehow, to fit 
any visible bird into one of those categories. Small birds were sparrows; many 
waterbirds, like a gull, could be put in the duck section; and eagles, ospreys, 
owls,etc could be hawks. You can see the logic, or whatever, of his idea, 
maybe. Dad did adjust his list occasionally, like substituting robins for 
sparrows etc. - but there could only be three birds at a time. 

Usually the duck category stayed there, as a nod to Mom, the duck freak. Mom 
has a pretty nice collection of decades worth of wooden, metal, ceramic, and 
stone, ducks that cover many of the the available horizontal surfaces here in 
their home. 

Back to the big Gull on the deckrail. "Oh, that's my little buddy!" Mom 
chirped, and went looking for some more goodies to give it. The gull is so well 
trained (it doesn't take much), that now it is often stalking us down the 
deckrail as we walk past the view windows in the living room, around into the 
kitchen - the deckrail gives a great interior view of the house for the 
feathery ,spying, Pooparazzi. 

Particularly well lit in the afternoon sun, the big gull was leaking an 
inordinate amount of nasal drip (draining the gland they have that desalinates 
sea water) - shaking it's head and spraying the stuff all over. While intently 
mooching at us through the window, the gull was briefly distracted by three 
yellowjackets that were trying to land on it's big pink foot. It was sort of 
doing 'the two-step' trying to shake off the bugs, until finally, the bird 
nabbed a wasp right out of the air and swallowed it. "Hey, he just ate a bug!", 
Dad noted. An Anna's hummingbird slurping at the feeder - about two feet away- 
seemed to be ignoring the whole scene. 

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Subject: Re: Ridgefield
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 07:07:05 +0000 (UTC)
I recently visited Ridgefield NWR.  My photos and narrative of my trip plus 
some suggestions for touring the site can be found on this link: 

 http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?11328-Ridgefield-NWR-11-15-14 
 Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA 


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Subject: Ridgefield
From: <mlfrey AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 22:28:17 -0800
Tweeters,

I’m travelling to Vancouver, WA to deliver a quilt to my great-niece (I have 
several interests besides birding). I’m going to Ridgefield to bird but 
I’ve never birded from the car before. 

I really need hints on techniques & locations on doing this. My target bird is 
the White-breasted Nuthatch. Can this be seen from the car? Any suggestions 
would 

really be appreciated!

Thanks so much,

Mary Frey
Covington, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: dd
From: <mlfrey AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 22:22:27 -0800
sss_______________________________________________
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Subject: Birding the Lummi Flats
From: "Jim Duemmel" <jimduemmel AT q.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 21:20:19 -0800
There have been several recent reports of a Yellow-billed Loon seen from the 
base of the aquaculture dike on the Lummi Reservation – the “Lummi 
Flats”. This is private-tribal land and birding off paved roads is allowed 
only with a “Letter of Permission” which can be obtained during office 
hours from the Lummi Planning Department located in the new tribal headquarters 
on the south side of Kwina Road east of Haxton Way. 


Entry onto the “aquaculture dike” is explicitly prohibited even to bearers 
of a Letter of Permission. The aquaculture dike is the dike that goes out into 
Lummi Bay from the gravel portion of Kwina Road which extends westward from the 
intersection of Kwina and Hillaire Roads. Pavement ends at that intersection. 


Years ago birders had much less constrained access to this area. That ended due 
to the selfish actions of one person. Even further restrictions could result 
from unauthorized entry into this area by birders. Several times in the near 
past this has been mentioned on Tweeters. The tribe has requested that the 
revision of A Birder’s Guide to Washington explicitly state that the Lummi 
Flats off paved roads is a restricted area and the aquaculture dike is totally 
off limits. 


Jim Duemmel_______________________________________________
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Subject: Edmonds marsh dunlin 11-25-14
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 01:34:35 +0000 (UTC)
While the snowy owl at the marina has gotten recent attention, I saw a dunlin 
at the marsh Tuesday afternoon.  I cannot remember a continued presence of 
dunlin at the marsh in past years.  Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA 
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Subject: Vashon Northern Shrike
From: "Ed Swan" <edswan AT centurytel.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:25:34 -0800
Today on a Pilchuck Audubon visiting field trip to Vashon we found a
juvenile Northern Shrike at the Wax Orchards airstrip on 232nd.  This area
is appropriate habitat for shrikes but what is funny is that this is only
the second record for Vashon, the last was from 1987.  While two-thirds of
the Island is forested, there are still quite a few open and farm areas with
good habitat for shrikes but we just don't seem to get them.  Any ideas why?
Is the water crossing a deterrent?

 

Despite the constant drizzle we racked up quite a few good birds during the
day with a nice perched Peregrine watching Quartermaster Harbor where we
also had some Red-throated Loons, Virginia Rail, Marsh Wren and Lincoln
Sparrow on Monument Road (where some wood workers in a nearby barn were
somehow making a sound remarkably like a Sandhill Crane) and Wilson's Snipe
at Fisher Pond.

 

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

www.theswancompany.com  

edswan AT centurytel.net  

206.463.7976

 
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Subject: American kestrel in Carnation
From: Tracey Cummings <teecummings AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 15:40:03 -0800
Hello Tweets
Last Saturday I was headed into Carnation on Highway 203 and noticed a
smallish figure on the telephone wire near Harvold's Berry Farm. A closer
look revealed an American kestrel on the lookout for his/her next snack.

-- 
Tracey Cummings
Carnation WA
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Subject: Admiralty Audubon Society CBC Dec 20, 2014
From: Paula Vanderheul <pvanderheul AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 14:37:18 -0800
The East Jefferson County Admiralty Audubon Society CBC will be December
20, 2014.

The count circle includes Marrowstone Island, little Oak Bay and Mats Mats
Bay in Port Ludlow, Port Hadlock-Irondale Chimacum area, Anderson Lake and
all the east side of Discovery Bay from 101  up to McCurdy Point, all of
the strait bordering Ft Worden,
all of Port Townsend and PT Bay.  We need volunteers to help with walking
and or biking the 7.5 Larry Scott Trail; Cape George, Ft Worden, Oak
Bay-Mats Mats Bay, and fill in with other team to help spot, count and
tally. All levels of birding experience are appreciated. We have a boat
party to count in the open bays if the weather permits.

For more information contact compiler Dan Waggoner danwags57 AT gmail.com

Paula Vanderheul
pvanderheul AT gmail.com
Port Hadlock WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Snowy Owl Edmonds Marina
From: n3zims AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 21:15:48 +0000 (UTC)
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Subject: American white pelican
From: Rick Forsman <rjforsman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 12:52:03 -0800
So I hadn't heard anything about the white pelican down at the Sammamish boat 
launch off E. Lake Sammamish Pkwy. in Issaquah so I stopped by to see if it was 
still around during my lunch and sure enough there it is if anybody hasn't seen 
it's to the left side of the launch back along the trees about 200 yards 
preening himself on a log out there. 


Bird On !!!

Rick forsman
RjforsmanAThotmailDOTcom
Fall city Wa._______________________________________________
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Subject: Edmunds Snowy Owl still there today (Tues. 11/25)
From: George Gerdts <geopandion AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 11:57:05 -0800
Mary Anne Rossing and I took the 07:05 ferry from Kingston to Edmunds this
morning in the hope that the Snowy Owl reported on the waterfront would
still be there.  It was!!  As the ferry docked at the Edmunds Terminal at
07:30, there was just light enough to scan the shore. From the car deck on
the ferry, we were able to spot the roosting Snowy on the breakwater behind
the Fishing Pier.  A short drive (1/4 mi) from the ferry to Dayton St.
where there was parking, took just a few minutes.  The Fishing Pier is
clearly marked and easily accessible.  We walked to the very end of the
Fishing Pier.  The Snowy was on the rock jetty, behind (east) of the
Fishing Pier.  A very nice way to start the morning! (-:

George Gerdts
geopanidion AT gmail.com
Bainbridge Island_______________________________________________
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Subject: Kitsap Christmas Bird Count - Saturday December 20, 2014
From: Gene Bullock <genebullock AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 18:12:46 +0000 (UTC)
The Kitsap Christmas Bird Count will be held Saturday, December 20, 2014. To 
sign up, contact the area team leader directly.  For a contact list of Kitsap 
County's nine area team leaders, visit www.KitsapAudubon.org   For other 
questions, contact Gene Bullock at  genebullock AT comcast.net or call him at 
360-394-5635.  
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Subject: Lummi Flats
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 09:52:58 -0800
Yellow Billed Loon, 20 Snow Buntings and a Horned Lark on Dike at Mummies Flats 
this a.m. 



Blair Bernson
Edmonds_______________________________________________
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Subject: vancouver/post office lake this morning
From: Ray <rkorpi AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 09:24:12 -0800
Made a fast trip out to Post Office and Vancouver Lake this morning. Best bird 
was a female RED-BREASTED MERGANSER at Vancouver Lake in among the large flock 
of Cormorants, gulls, and Common Mergs. Only egret I saw at PO Lake was a 
Great, but there are scads of Canvasbacks as reported. There were a couple of 
nice blackbird flocks on the way out there as well--someone else was out this 
morning scoping those. The one brief look I got did not reveal much. 


I suspect the Snowy Egret will be around still--the west side of PO Lake is 
very hard to see from the end of the road. 

RK

Ray Korpi

rkorpi AT hotmail.com

Vancouver WA
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Subject: vancouver/post office lake this morning
From: Ray <rkorpi AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 09:24:12 -0800
Made a fast trip out to Post Office and Vancouver Lake this morning. Best bird 
was a female RED-BREASTED MERGANSER at Vancouver Lake in among the large flock 
of Cormorants, gulls, and Common Mergs. Only egret I saw at PO Lake was a 
Great, but there are scads of Canvasbacks as reported. There were a couple of 
nice blackbird flocks on the way out there as well--someone else was out this 
morning scoping those. The one brief look I got did not reveal much. 


I suspect the Snowy Egret will be around still--the west side of PO Lake is 
very hard to see from the end of the road. 

RK

Ray Korpi

rkorpi AT hotmail.com

Vancouver WA
 		 	   		  
Subject: swan hotline now open
From: "Martha Jordan" <mj.cygnus AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 08:35:34 -0800
WDFW just released this years swan hotline information as a press release: I 
have put that information below. 

This said, if you find swans in trouble from Everett south, please call 
425-787-0258. 


PRESS RELEASE:

Hotline to report dead, sick or injured swans available 

OLYMPIA - The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has 
re-established a hotline to report dead, sick or injured swans in three 
northwest Washington counties as part of its ongoing effort to assess the 
impact of lead poisoning on trumpeter swans. 


People can call (360) 466-4345, ext. 266 , to report dead, sick or injured 
swans in Whatcom, Skagit and Snohomish counties. Callers should be prepared to 
leave a message including their name and phone number, and the location and 
condition of the swans. 


The hotline is available 24 hours a day through the end of March. 

Some trumpeter swans in those three counties, and in southwestern British 
Columbia, die each winter from lead poisoning after ingesting lead shot in 
areas where they feed. 


Lead shot has been banned for waterfowl hunting in Washington for more than two 
decades. But swans can still pick up and ingest lead shot while foraging in 
shallow underwater areas in fields and roosts where lead shot is still present. 


People who observe dead, sick or injured swans are advised not to handle or 
collect the birds, said Paul DeBruyn, WDFW wildlife biologist for Skagit and 
Whatcom counties. 


Instead, people should call the hotline, he said. WDFW and Puget Sound Energy 
employees, as well as volunteers from the Trumpeter Swan Society, will pick up 
the birds. 


WDFW and other agencies and organizations have been working since 2001 to 
locate sources of toxic lead. 




Martha Jordan

Everett, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Re: Photos and Video of Edmonds SNOWY OWL
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:31:10 +0000 (UTC)
Nice photos and videos.  I hope the snowy spends this winter at the marina, 
where it can make a dent in the local Norway rat population. Bill Anderson; 
Edmonds, WA. USA 

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Subject: Re: Re: Photos and Video of Edmonds SNOWY OWL
From: Paul Bannick <paul.bannick AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 08:20:48 -0800
Hi Roger,

Snowy Owls up North typically nest near water and all (10+) of the nests i
have seen have been less than 10 miles from salt water.  After successful
reproductive years, when we see the owls, they stay where they find food.
The food is often either rodents or seabirds.

Regards,

Paul

On Tue, Nov 25, 2014 at 8:14 AM, Roger Moyer 
wrote:

> Nice video. Has anyone theorized why the birds in this area seem to be
> drawn to the coast when they nest in the interior up north?
>
> Roger Moyer
> Las Cruces, NM
>
> ------------------------------
> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 08:08:12 -0800
> From: rohankamath88 AT gmail.com
> To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Photos and Video of Edmonds SNOWY OWL
>
> Reposting because earlier links got messed up
>
> Hi Guys,
> Here are my images and a short video of the SNOWY OWL at Edmonds from 23rd
> Nov, 2014.
>
> We were very fortunate to first spot her small white head from the fishing
> pier in the scope, then head over to the boat parking for better views and
> run into Rob and Kelly who were the nicest people on the planet and agreed
> to take us out on their boat so that we could get a closer look at the owl.
> The Snowy has been the #1 bird on my wish-list for over a decade. And now
> finally I got to see her.
>
> Hope you enjoy the photos and the video. Do notice how she looks up at the
> plane flying over-head and the ferry coming in.
>
> Cheers.
>
> Photos:
>
>
>
> http://goo.gl/Iuw3VQ
> http://goo.gl/4D8ZiX
> http://goo.gl/KrDUYE
> http://goo.gl/D6Drbv
>
>
>
> Video:
> http://youtu.be/cpkxLx0d8ck
>
> -Regards,
> Rohan Kamath
> Software Development Engineer
> Amazon.com, Seattle, WA.
> ___________________________________________________
> Conservation begins at HOME... We CAN make a difference...
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________ Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>


-- 
Paul L. Bannick
Nature and Bird Photography
www.paulbannick.com
206-940-7835_______________________________________________
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Subject: RE: Re: Photos and Video of Edmonds SNOWY OWL
From: Roger Moyer <rogermoyer1 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 08:14:16 -0800
Nice video. Has anyone theorized why the birds in this area seem to be drawn to 
the coast when they nest in the interior up north? 


Roger Moyer
Las Cruces, NM

Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 08:08:12 -0800
From: rohankamath88 AT gmail.com
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Photos and Video of Edmonds SNOWY OWL

Reposting because earlier links got messed up Hi Guys,
Here are my images and a short video of the SNOWY OWL at Edmonds from 23rd Nov, 
2014. 


We were very fortunate to first spot her small white head from the fishing pier 
in the scope, then head over to the boat parking for better views and run into 
Rob and Kelly who were the nicest people on the planet and agreed to take us 
out on their boat so that we could get a closer look at the owl.The Snowy has 
been the #1 bird on my wish-list for over a decade. And now finally I got to 
see her. 

Hope you enjoy the photos and the video. Do notice how she looks up at the 
plane flying over-head and the ferry coming in. 

Cheers.
Photos:  http://goo.gl/Iuw3VQhttp://goo.gl/4D8ZiX
http://goo.gl/KrDUYE
http://goo.gl/D6Drbv Video:http://youtu.be/cpkxLx0d8ck
-Regards,Rohan Kamath
Software Development Engineer
Amazon.com, Seattle, WA.
___________________________________________________Conservation begins at 
HOME... We CAN make a difference... 










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Subject: Re: Photos and Video of Edmonds SNOWY OWL
From: rohan kamath <rohankamath88 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 08:08:12 -0800
Reposting because earlier links got messed up

> Hi Guys,
> Here are my images and a short video of the SNOWY OWL at Edmonds from 23rd
> Nov, 2014.
>
> We were very fortunate to first spot her small white head from the fishing
> pier in the scope, then head over to the boat parking for better views and
> run into Rob and Kelly who were the nicest people on the planet and agreed
> to take us out on their boat so that we could get a closer look at the owl.
> The Snowy has been the #1 bird on my wish-list for over a decade. And now
> finally I got to see her.
>
> Hope you enjoy the photos and the video. Do notice how she looks up at the
> plane flying over-head and the ferry coming in.
>
> Cheers.
>
> Photos:
>

>
http://goo.gl/Iuw3VQ
> http://goo.gl/4D8ZiX
> http://goo.gl/KrDUYE
> http://goo.gl/D6Drbv
>


> Video:
> http://youtu.be/cpkxLx0d8ck
>
> -Regards,
> Rohan Kamath
> Software Development Engineer
> Amazon.com, Seattle, WA.
> ___________________________________________________
> Conservation begins at HOME... We CAN make a difference...
>
>
>
>_______________________________________________
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Subject: Photos and Video of Edmonds SNOWY OWL
From: rohan kamath <rohankamath88 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 07:54:34 -0800
Hi Guys,
Here are my images and a short video of the SNOWY OWL at Edmonds from 23rd
Nov, 2014.

We were very fortunate to first spot her small white head from the fishing
pier in the scope, then head over to the boat parking for better views and
run into Rob and Kelly who were the nicest people on the planet and agreed
to take us out on their boat so that we could get a closer look at the owl.
The Snowy has been the #1 bird on my wish-list for over a decade. And now
finally I got to see her.

Hope you enjoy the photos and the video. Do notice how she looks up at the
plane flying over-head and the ferry coming in.

Cheers.

Photos:
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10155012474175105&l=afb9390f0f

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10155012474230105&l=de96f20f9c

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10155016566660105&l=535d6598ca

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10155018303115105&l=20f2d019db

Video:
http://youtu.be/cpkxLx0d8ck

-Regards,
Rohan Kamath
Software Development Engineer
Amazon.com, Seattle, WA.
___________________________________________________
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Subject: Mystery hawk
From: Greg Pluth <gjpluth AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 00:39:08 -0800
Sunday afternoon I was birding various back roads roughly east of La
Conner. I noted a perched hawk on a roadside pole and pulled over as close
as I dare to keep it from flying. I assumed it was just another Red-Tail
but was surprised by what I saw in my binoculars. The bird allowed me one
picture before leaving. The best I can figure is a light-morph juvenile
Swainson's. Can I get some ID help from the Tweeters community?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/73779366 AT N04/sets/72157647127556944/

Much appreciated,
Greg Pluth
University Place_______________________________________________
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Subject: Snowy & Scoters from Edmonds Fishing Pier - 11/24/14
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 19:38:50 -0800
Minor rain stopped as a few of us headed out to the end of the fishing pier in 
mid-afternoon to have a look at the Snowy Owl that had been reported on the 
breakwater for the past 24 hrs. The owl had obviously been successful at 
obtaining food, as evidenced by the fairly fresh blood stains on its feet. The 
bird seemed to be having having a bit of difficulty nodding off though, perhaps 
due to the extra-enthusiastic and elevated human voices of some of us bird 
enthusiasts out on the pier - it succeeded in keeping me from dozing off, 
that's for sure. :-/ 


I also noticed a flock of light-brown, sandpiper-sized birds that twice started 
to land on the boulders below the Snowy, but ended up moving on - did the 
Snowy's presence change their plan ? :-) 


My photos can be seen in this Flickr album:      https://flic.kr/s/aHsk5MC9oH 

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: WOS Program - Monday December 1st - Dennis Paulson on the Birds of Newfoundland and Nova Scotia
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 18:17:56 -0800
The WOS Program in December will be presented by a 
WOS (and everyone else's) favorite - Dennis 
Paulson who will share his summer's experience in 
Nova Scotia and Newfoundland.  I have seen a 
preview of some his photographs and can assure all 
that we are in for a treat.

The meeting is Monday December 1st at the Urban 
Horticulture Center (Montlake) of the UW.  Social 
meeting at 7:00 and the program begins at 7:30.  
All are invited.  Happy Thanksgiving.

-- 
Blair Bernson - Program Chair
Edmonds

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Subject: Edmonds Snowy Owl flight photos
From: Joe Sweeney <sweeneyfit AT mac.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 17:15:29 -0800
To see 2 flight photos of the Edmonds Snowy Owl from this morning, click on:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sweeneyfit/

Joe Sweeney
NE Seattle
sweeneyfit at mac dot com

sweeneyfit.wordpress.com

http://joe-sweeney.fineartamerica.com


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Subject: Snowy Egret
From: Russ Koppendrayer <russkope AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 16:40:54 -0800
Hi Tweeters,

Late this morning (11/24/14) the SNOWY EGRET being seen at Post Office Lake
near Vancouver was at the north end of the lake.

On my way home there were 2 ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS in the Woodland Bottoms for
my FOS.

Russ Koppendrayer
Longview, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Edmonds Snowy Owl Still on the Breakwater
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 14:32:36 -0800
The Snowy Owl is continuing to hang out this afternoon on the south end of the 
north breakwater. Best seen from the south end of the public pier. If you enter 
Edmonds via SR 104 ( the route to the ferry), turn left at the traffic light at 
Dayton, which is just before the ferry toll booths. Drive west, cross the 
railroad tracks and then turn into the parking lot on your right. Short walk 
out the pier. 


Carol Riddell
Edmonds, Wa_______________________________________________
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Subject: Edmonds Snowy Owl
From: "Dan Reiff, PhD" <notcalm AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 14:25:30 -0800
Tweeters,
The owl is currently on the breakwater riprap. View from the end of public 
pier. 

Likely a first year male, but would like a clear view of tail.
Dan Reiff
MI

Sent from my iPhone_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Edmonds Snowy Owl
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 20:32:14 +0000 (UTC)
Still there as of 11:30am.    Walk to the south end of the fishing pier and 
look SE towards the marina breakwater.   A common murre, Pacific loon, 
rhinocerous auklet, and flotilla of surf scoters provided further 
entertainment. 

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
      From: Blair Bernson 
 To: Tweeters  
 Sent: Monday, November 24, 2014 8:24 AM
 Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds Snowy Owl
   

Joe Sweeney just asked me to report that the Snowy. Owl is on the Edmonds 
breakwater as of 8.20. 

Blair BernsonEdmonds
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Subject: Seattle Christmas Bird Count
From: Toby Ross <TobyR AT seattleaudubon.org>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 19:13:49 +0000
Dear Tweets,

I'm writing to let you all know that the Seattle CBC will take place on 
Saturday, December 27. If you would like to take part please sign-up by 
December 15 on the registration website. We are 
promoting Feeder Watching this year, so if spending a full day birding is not 
your cup of tea, contribute to the Count from the comforts and warmth of your 
home (Feeder Watchers still need to sign-up through the registration page). For 
more information on the Count including a Feeder Watch Guide, explore the 
Seattle Audubon CBC 
webpage. 
If you have any questions please do not hesitate to ask. 


Warm Regards,

Toby

Toby Ross
Science Manager
Seattle Audubon Society
8050 35th Ave NE Seattle, WA  98115
(206) 523-8243 ext. 21
Seattle Audubon cultivates and leads a community that
values and protects birds and the natural environment.
www.seattleaudubon.org
[FB Icon 
Outlook][Twitter 
Icon Outlook] [IG Icon Outlook] 
 

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Subject: Dec 11th: Vashon Audubon Present Paul Bannick's "Woodpeckers of North America"
From: Michael Tracy <mltracy AT me.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 19:10:09 +0000 (GMT)
On Thursday, December 11thOn Thursday, December 11thVashon-Maury Audubon 
Society presentsWoodpeckers of North America, A Naturalists Guidewith Paul 
Bannick. This free program starts at 7pm at the Land Trust Building on Bank 
Road 


Paul Bannick,co-author and photographer for the new book,Woodpeckersof North 
America, A Naturalist's Guidewill examine each of the North 
Americanwoodpeckerspecies through award winning images, intimate sounds and 
stories and observations from the field. Paul's presentation will help you 
distinguish between species by behavior, habitat and field markings.He will 
also touch upon races of woodpeckers, adaptations to specific habitats, 
morphology and cultural ties. 


Copies of Pauls new book and others will be available for purchase  a perfect 
holiday gift this season. 


Paul Bannick is an award-winning wildlife photographer couples his love of the 
outdoors with his skill as a photographer, creating images that foster an 
intimacy between the viewer and subject 


In June of 2012, Paul was awarded the Canon prize in the International 
Conservation Photography Awards for the photo that best exemplifies the mission 
of the ICP Awards. In 2011, Paul took first place among professionals in the 
Birds and Their Habitat category in Audubon Magazine's prestigious annual 
photography contest. Paul's first book,The Owl and the Woodpeckerwas a 
finalist for the Washington State Book Award for general non-fiction. 


Paul currently is Director of Development for Conservation Northwest, an 
organization protecting and connecting wild areas from the Pacific Coast to the 
Canadian Rockies., A Naturalists Guidewith Paul Bannick. This free program 
starts at 7pm at the Land Trust Building on Bank Road 


Paul Bannick,co-author and photographer for the new book,Woodpeckersof North 
America, A Naturalist's Guidewill examine each of the North 
Americanwoodpeckerspecies through award winning images, intimate sounds and 
stories and observations from the field. Paul's presentation will help you 
distinguish between species by behavior, habitat and field markings.He will 
also touch upon races of woodpeckers, adaptations to specific habitats, 
morphology and cultural ties. 


Copies of Pauls new book and others will be available for purchase  a perfect 
holiday gift this season. More details: vashonaudubon.org 
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Subject: Edmonds Snowy Owl
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 08:24:33 -0800
Joe Sweeney just asked me to report that the Snowy. Owl is on the Edmonds 
breakwater as of 8.20. 


Blair Bernson
Edmonds_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Mourning Dove
From: yekramw AT gmail.com
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 22:59:41 -0800
For the last few years we have had 20 to 30 Mourning Doves over-winter here. 
They filled the feeder tonight at dusk, falling off all sides. Fun to watch. 


Will Markey
East of Auburn on Soos Creek
Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 23, 2014, at 19:34, "Diane W"  wrote:
> 
> I had a Mourning Dove that spent the day in my yard a few days ago. Every few 
years or so, one will show up and stay for a while. 

>  
> Earlier this year I had my first Eurasian Collard-Dove.
>  
> Diane Weinstein
> Issaquah
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Subject: Post Office Lake Snowy Egret continues (Clark Co)
From: Stefan Schlick <greenfant AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 23:57:31 -0500
Stopped by Post Office Lake (my second attempt) this afternoon and had decent 
looks of the continuing Snowy Egret on the north end of the lake. The lake is 
plastered with waterfowl right now. I heard a repeatedly calling Eurasian 
Wigeon, but did not see it. Large numbers of Canvasback and a few Redhead 
continue as well. 

I walked north along the defunct road, but had to walk around the washed out 
portions. I was certainly wondering if I was trespassing ... 

Stefan SchlickHillsboro, OR 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: Mourning Dove
From: "Diane W" <diane_weinstein AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 19:34:35 -0800
I had a Mourning Dove that spent the day in my yard a few days ago. Every few 
years or so, one will show up and stay for a while. 


Earlier this year I had my first Eurasian Collard-Dove.

Diane Weinstein
Issaquah_______________________________________________
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Subject: Whatcom County Yellow-billed Loon
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 18:57:22 -0800
I followed up on Fanter Lane's recent post and went looking for his  
three interesting species this afternoon. The only one I found was the  
Yellow-billed Loon, which made it worth the trip. Photos are attached  
to this ebird checklist:
ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20653456 .

Carol Riddell
Edmonds
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Subject: Skagtit Valley birds
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 02:53:27 +0000 (UTC)
 Dear Tweeters,
Yesterday, 22 November 2014, I went upriver, despite bad weather. Birding was 
slow, but there were a few good finds. Along SR 20 near the Swamp Creek 
pullout (milepost 153.9 or so), there was a Clark's Nutcracker eying a Common 
Raven that flew down the highway corridor, no doubt looking for carrion. 

A Thunder Lake was a small flock of Buffleheads and two Hooded Mergansers. When 
I tried whistling like a Northern Pygmy Owl, out came three Grey Jays! 

On the other hand, I spent some time at both the Hardy Burn gravel area and the 
Easy Pass trailhead, and found zero vertebrates there, although it was fun 
walking in a winter wonderland. 

Today, 23 November 2014, I was surprised to find a PRAIRIE FALCON on Fir 
Island, in the fields by Jensen Access. Later, at the Game Range, I walked 
right up on an American Bittern, not eight yards from me. At dusk here, at 
least 250 American Robins and 30 Cedar Waxwings gathered near the boat-launch 
parking area. They took off together, just as a Great Horned Owl started 
hooting. 

Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch_______________________________________________
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Subject: CBC's in North Central Washington
From: "Teri J Pieper" <tjpieper AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 18:41:35 -0800
NCW Audubon has six CBCs in its territory. 

 

The Twisp CBC is December 14. Juliet Rhodes is the contact person. rhodesj99
at gmail.com. The tentative meeting spot is Cinnamon Twisp Bakery, 116 North
Glover Street in Twisp at 6:30 am, with registration at 7 am. A potluck will
follow.

 

The Bridgeport CBC is December 20. Meredith Spencer is the contact person.
merdave at homenetnw.net. Meet at the Brewster McDonalds on Highway 97 at
7:00 am. At potluck dinner will be held at the WDFW building on Moe Road
near Bridgeport.

 

The Leavenworth CBC is December 21. Gretchen Rohde is the contact. design at
thedesignranch.com

 

The Chelan CBC is December 27. Steve Easley is the contact person. seasley
at nwi.net. Meet at 7 am at the Apple Cup Caf in Chelan. Regroup at 4:30 pm
at the Chelan Methodist Church on Johnson Avenue (kitty corner from the Post
Office). There will be soup and salad while the counts are tallied. 

 

The Wenatchee CBC is January 3. Dan Stephens is the contact. dstephens at
wvc.edu

 

The Okanogan CBC is January 3. Heather Findlay is the contact person.
heather at eaglesun.net. 

 

Lots to choose from! Happy counting.

teri

 

http://myeverydayphotos.wordpress.com/

 

 

 
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Subject: Acorn Woodpeckers in Thurston County still present
From: Gary Wiles <wilesharkey AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 01:37:43 +0000 (UTC)
 Tweeters,
I had distant views of the Acorn Woodpeckers near Weir Prairie in Thurston 
County this afternoon between 2:15 to 3:30 pm.  For anyone without base 
access, directions to the viewpoint are to take Rainier Rd southeast from 
Lacey, then turn left (northeast) on to Military Rd which becomes 123rd 
Avenue.  Go a short distance along 123rd, park along Moes Road, and then walk 
75-100 yds further east along 123rd.  The main snag used by the birds and 
noted in Bill Tweit's eBird posting lies directly to the north about half a 
mile, so be sure to bring a scope along.  I saw the birds on both the main 
snag (which is a thick-trunked tree with a broken-off top) and on the bare tops 
of a couple of trees 50-75 yds to left (west).  The birds disappeared for 
about 45 minutes before returning, so have some patience when looking for them. 

Gary WilesOlympia, WAwilesharkey AT yahoo.com_______________________________________________
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Subject: Fwd: camera
From: Patricia Quyle Grainger <paq AT olypen.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 17:26:16 -0800
My husband has a Nikon D300s for sale, details below. If interested, contact 
Dave at dgrainger AT graingerandco.com. 


Pat Grainger
Port Townsend
Paq AT olypen.com

> 
> NIKON D300s SLR BODY ONLY with manual, battery & charger. Used primarily for 
bird and wildlife photography. Sold new $2300.00. DX format, accepts DX and FX 
lenses. 

> Asking  $600.00 ( firm. )
> 
> Also available: NIKKOR AF VR 80-400mm 1:4.5-5.6 D lens  $300.00 (firm)
> 
> Due to advanced processor, this camera produces less digital noise than 
predecessor models, and can be used at high ISO and high shutter speeds making 
it easy to hand-hold long telephoto shots of moving birds. 

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Subject: Vashon CBC Sunday January 4
From: "Ed Swan" <edswan AT centurytel.net>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 16:41:45 -0800
The Vashon Christmas Bird Count is Sunday January 4.  If you like counting
aquatic birds in a variety of habitats, this is the count for you.  Count
from the shore, from the ferry, from a private boat, from your own kayak in
this rich island habitat in Puget Sound.  The count circle covers all of
Vashon-Maury Island and also area in North Pierce County and South Kitsap
County along Colvos Passage, part of Blake Island and Three Tree Point in
the Burien area.  How many count circles have a bit of three counties?

 

Every year we see some good birds such as last year's Yellow-billed Loon.  I
just received a report of one near Pt. Robinson this afternoon just north of
where the Northern Wheatear was seen last month.

 

I'll be the coordinator again this year.  If you would like to join one of
the groups hitting Vashon's hot spots contact me so that I can connect you
in with the appropriate team leader.

Ed

 

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

www.theswancompany.com  

edswan AT centurytel.net  

206.463.7976

 
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Subject: Marbled Murrelet in PTownsend harbor
From: Bruce Youngberg <brizy01 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 16:22:42 -0800
An approachable Marbled Murrelet in Port Townsend's Port Hudson harbor. Seen 
just at sunset, it is feeding amongst the piers in the middle of the harbor. I 
have pics and phone video thru binocs...email me if you're interested. 


Bruce Youngberg 
Poulsbo, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Snowy Owl in Edmonds
From: Sherman Page <sherman.g.page AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 15:55:28 -0800
Just got back from the Edmonds Marina where the snowy owl is visible on the
breakwater north of the marina entrance. It is visible from the fishing
pier.  3:30 pm Sunday.

Sherman Page
Edmonds, WA
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Subject: Townsend's Solitaire, Martha Washington Park, Seattle
From: Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 22:07:04 +0000 (UTC)
Bird first seen Friday in the park (in a hawthorn with robins) was relocated 
this morning around 10:30 on the east side of 57th Ave S, which forms the 
eastern border of the park.  It was feeding alone in a privet visible between 
(and behind) 6609 & 6539 57th Ave. S. On a return trip early this afternoon, I 
saw the silhouette of what may well have been the bird flying into (and 
disappearing into) a very fruit- and bird-ful holly tree on the south side of 
Morgan St, just east of 57th. 

jeff bryantseattlejbryant_68 AT yahoo _______________________________________________
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Subject: Perplexing Pelagics-Seattle
From: Paul Randall <paul.ecclesia AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 13:36:06 -0800
After my post the other day about a Seattle shearwater, I got a couple 
responses which led me to believe that the bird I saw was really unusual and 
way out of range. So I do not feel comfortable making an ID. I am disappointed 
that I did not have the presence of mind to take a pic with my phone when it 
was just outside the window where I was sitting. 


This morning, my last in Seattle, I took a walk in the rain along the 
waterfront, composing this email in my head--when I saw another one! Same one? 
Maybe. This time I was at Myrtle Edwards Park, about 1/4 mi from the hotel 
where I saw the first one. I got a better view with binoculars for about 30 
secs before it flew. This one did not dive, but I saw it pretty well and then 
quickly consulted my Sibley when it flew. I'm pretty sure it was a Pink-footed 
Shearwater. I clearly saw a light bill and light on the sides as it bobbed in 
the waves. Then clear whitish underneath as it flew away to the south. I am not 
familiar with the flight of Pelagics, but this one seemed labored. It looked 
like it took 3 attempts to get off the water. My excuse for no pic this time is 
the distance (10yds offshore, maybe 20yds from me), rain & bobbing waves. I 
don't think my iPhone would have gotten anything helpful. 


I'd love any comments from those who know the area better than me. 
Grateful for the birding community,
Paul Randall
Houston, TX
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Subject: Edmonds Snowy Owl
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker AT zipcon.net>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 12:58:42 -0800 (PST)
HI ALL:
  Just saw a photographic report of a Snowy Owl near the Edmonds Ferry 
terminal.

sincerely
-- 

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
http://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Subject: Martha lk WA Solitair
From: Qinglin Ma <qinglineric AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 12:16:22 -0800
I saw the Solitair this morning at about 9:30am. Thank Jeff to relocate it
and the other bird who pointEd it out to me.it was in a dense tree between
the houses 6609 and 6539. Got photo for id, not great.

Qinglin Ms
Kirkland WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: BirdNote - last week, and the week of Nov. 23, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123imagine.net>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 12:04:02 -0800
Hello, Tweeters,Artist and naturalist, Barry Kent MacKay, shared this blog 
about Willets and Sanderlings: 
http://bit.ly/1p9xOu8 ---------------------------------------------Last week, 
BirdNote aired:* Endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper, With Gerrit 
Vynhttp://bit.ly/RWBTvK* Rough-legged Hawkhttp://bit.ly/1p9uM9f* Common 
Redpollhttp://bit.ly/QGH8ks* Falcons and Blueberrieshttp://bit.ly/153UMdj* The 
Eagle Eyehttp://bit.ly/1zMRuVP* Birding with Grandpa - Dick Ashford of Klamath 
Bird Observatoryhttp://bit.ly/TgrAq4* Great Horned Owls 
Callinghttp://bit.ly/1tc7rjL--------------------------------------------------------------WIN 
A TRIP FOR TWO! What do you think of BirdNote? Share your thoughts, and you 
could win a trip for two with Victor Emanuel Nature Tours. 
http://bit.ly/1zZs2iF--------------------------------------------------------------Check 
out next week's shows & photos: 
http://bit.ly/1zPbM0X--------------------------------------------------------------Find 
us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for 
birdnoteradio=========================================You can listen to the 
mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly 
mail or the podcast, and find related resources on the website. 
http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+ episodes and more than 500 videos in 
the archive.Thanks for listening!Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote 
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Subject: Edmonds 11/22/14 (No Snowy Owl, but 2 scoter videos)
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 11:23:27 -0800
> 
> Yesterday Karen and I failed to find the Snowy Owl in Edmonds, but saw three 
species of Scoter at the waterfront. A birder approached us and asked if we 
could identify a bird that was just south of the ferry terminal. She was 
pleased when we told her that it was a White-winged Scoter. Hopefully we were 
correct! Here is a video of the White-winged Scoter that includes Surf Scoters 
moving through late in the video. 

> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15671353037/
> 
> Later Bill Anderson told us of Black Scoters close to shore along Sunset 
Avenue. Here is a video of them vocalizing. 

> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15671078897/
> 
> Thank you Bill.
> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom_______________________________________________
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Subject: Late Fall trifecta at Sequ
From: Suzanne Staples <marshwren AT pondhouse.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 08:38:54 -0800
Great day in the rain shadow Saturday in Sequim. Small flock of long tailed
ducks off of 3 Crabs Road lookout, Barrow's goldeneyes loafing at John
Wayne Marina and a pair of harlequin ducks at Marlyn Nelson County Park.

-- 

Suzanne Staples
Marshwren AT pondhouse.com

"Never, never be afraid to do what's right, especially if the well being of
a person or animal is at stake. Society's punishments are small compared to
the wounds we inflict on our souls when we look away."
Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr._______________________________________________
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Subject: Video clip: Flock of birds cause tree to sneeze?
From: "Dan Reiff, PhD" <notcalm AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 23:50:07 -0800
Hello Tweeters,
A friend sent this video clip to me: 
 
http://www.liftbump.com/2014/11/26544-watch-tree-isnt-appears-birds-perched-branches-decide-fly-away/ 


Hope you enjoy it as much as I did.
Best regards,
Dan Reiff
Mercer Island

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Subject: solitaire continues in Seattle
From: pan <panmail AT fastmail.fm>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 20:53:52 -0800
Hello, all,

The Townsend's Solitaire reported in an ebird checklist yesterday at
Martha Washington Park in Seattle was still there this evening around
4:15.  ("Evening" because the sun was setting.)  The flock of a couple
dozen robins was just west of the park on Holly St., and the solitaire
was there, too, though not foraging on the ground with the robins.  I
didn't see it go to roost with the robins (in tall thick rhododendrons),
but it did disappear quietly.  You may wish to know before visiting that
the park, though with at least two signs threatening $500 fines, is
apparently used mostly as an off-leash dog area.

22 Nov., 2014,

Alan Grenon
Seattle  
-- 
  pan
  panmail AT fastmail.fm

-- 
http://www.fastmail.com - Access all of your messages and folders
                          wherever you are

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Subject: Seattle CBC
From: Neil and Carleen Zimmerman <n3zims AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 04:32:25 +0000 (UTC)
Hello Tweeters, 
The Seattle CBC will take place on Dec 27th. 
I also happen to know the San Juan CBC is on Jan 3rd 
The Edmonds count is Dec 20th 
The Skagit is on Jan 1 
I know this because I plan on doing all of them. Come and help out. 

Neil Zimmerman 
Brier, WA _______________________________________________
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Subject: First of Fall Eurasian Wigeons, and a question
From: Jason Hernandez <jason.hernandez74 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 04:19:58 +0000 (UTC)
Saw the first Eurasian Wigeons today: Evergreen Rotary Park, Bremerton, in the 
little cove at the south end, in a flock of American Wigeons.  There was one 
definite male Eurasian, and I am fairly confident that there was a female, too 
-- she was noticeably redder than the female Americans, and she stayed close to 
the male Eurasian. 

Since I had a similar sighting at the same locality late last winter, I wonder: 
is there any research into whether the same individual Eurasian Wigeons come to 
America year after year -- perhaps they imprint on a location? 

Jason HernandezBremertonjason.hernandez74 AT yahoo.com_______________________________________________
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Subject: Brewster Flats Northern Hawk Owl continues 11/22
From: Stefan Schlick <greenfant AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 22:24:54 -0500
I didn't any other postings, so here it is ... The subject bird was again seen 
this morning between 8:30-10:30am in the orchard on the south side of N Star 
Rd, maybe 250yrs east of Blossom Ln. 

Conconully was uneventful except for 20 some Barrow's Goldeneye in the 
half-open reservoir. A single Bohemian Waxwing was perched up along Riverside 
Cutoff Rd, hopefully a sign that plenty more are going to show up soon. There 
was less snow on the ground than I had hoped for, so I failed to find any 
Sharp-tailed Grouse at Scotch Creek WA. 

Stefan SchlickHillsboro, OR 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: Grays Harbor CBC
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 17:39:29 -0800
Hey Tweets...I already sent my date into both the WOS site and the National
Audubon site, but wanted to post it here also.

The date for the 2014 Grays Harbor CBC will be Saturday, January 3rd, 2015.

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
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Subject: Seattle Shearwater Question
From: Paul Randall <paul.ecclesia AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 16:10:48 -0800
Friends,
I am a Texas birder staying in Seattle this week. Yesterday I saw a single 
brown Shearwater as I ate lunch at the 6-7 Restaurant at the Edgewater hotel. 
Can anyone advise as to the likelihood of Short-Tailed vs Sooty? 

I saw it briefly close up, without binoculars (my gut says Short-Tailed) & then 
it dove and resurfaced much further out. 

Thanks,
Paul Randall

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Subject: Union Bay Watch | Winter's Cache
From: Larry Hubbell <ldhubbell AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 15:10:32 -0800
Tweeters, 

This week's post focuses on the amazing physical (and mental) capabilities of a 
Red-breasted Nuthatch. Read the story and see the photos at: 


http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2014/11/winters-cache.html

Have a great day on Union Baywhere nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
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Subject: Yellow-billed Loon Whatcom county
From: Fanter Lane <fanterlane AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 14:48:50 -0800
Hi Tweeters,
Today around 11am my dad and I found a YBLO at Lummi Flats in the bay
viewed from the end of Kwina rd. When we first saw it close in but then
moved along the aquifer dike into the bay.

REMINDER: This area is closed to the public unless you get a pass from the
lummi nation headquarters. Even then DO NOT walk out the dike that extends
out into the bay (the aquifer dike). Please be respectful of closed areas
as it would be a shame if they close the whole area off.

Other birds in the past week:
1 maybe 2 A-tree sparrows- Red river road 11/18/14
Late Osprey- lummi bay 11/14/14
Ancient Murrelets- sandy point 11/22/14
2 snow buntings- sandy point 11/14/14
1 Bohimian Waxwing- mt baker 11/15/14
17 Pine Grosbeaks mt baker 11/15/14

Good birding,
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Subject: CBC information
From: "Grace and Ollie" <grace.ollie AT frontier.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 13:22:10 -0800
Tweeters,

Please would all WA (and surrounding areas) CBC organizers send your date
and contact information to WOS web manager, so all the information can be in
one location.  It helps those of us who want to plan where we can help
organize our dates.  I noticed Chazz's call for help for Kitsap and that
Kitsap dates were not on WOS web site J  Check out wos . org and contacts
for the email address of webmaster.  

Thanks!

Grace Oliver

Redmond, WA
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Subject: Kitsap Christmas Bird Count
From: Chazz Hesselein <chazz AT hesselein.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 12:15:49 -0800
Dear Tweets,

This year's Kitsap Christmas Bird Count will be held Saturday, Dec. 20.  
I am the coordinator for the Port Orchard portion of the count and would 
happily accept any CBC volunteers.  My phone number is 360-633-0486 or 
you can send me an e-mail: chazz AT hesselein.com.  If you would like to 
find out more opportunities for this count (though, I can't imagine why 
;-)) see the Kitsap Audubon Society's Christmas Bird Count information 
in the November newsletter:

http://www.kitsapaudubon.org/KingfisherNov14.pdf

Hope to see you on the 20th.

Chazz Hesselein
Port Orchard, WA

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Subject: Re: Accipiter ID Assistance
From: Tony <tvarela AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 12:10:47 -0800
Thanks for your response Joyce. And thanks to the many tweets that shared their 
knowledge. There were several advanced birders and experts that agreed with 
your COHA suggestions. 




- Regards

Tony Varela
South Puget Sound, WA
tvarela at hotmail dot com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tony-v



> On Nov 22, 2014, at 12:00 PM,Joyce Volmut  wrote:
> 
> 
> Message: 6
> Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 17:47:04 -0800
> From: Joyce Volmut 
> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Accipiter ID Assistance
> To: Tony 
> Cc: "tweeters AT u.washington.edu" 
> Message-ID: 
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
> 
> Cooper's hawk, Larger flatfish head, rounded tail feathers also streaking 
gradually fades to white. immature sharpies more heavily streaked that 
continues through the belly atea 

> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Nov 20, 2014, at 4:08 PM, Tony  wrote:
>> 
>> Greetings Tweets, I saw this raptor this morning at Nisqually NWR and am 
looking for confirmation of ID. Thanks. 

>> 
>> 
>> https://flic.kr/p/q8rx6P
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> - Regards
>> 
>> Tony Varela
>> South Puget Sound, WA
>> tvarela at hotmail dot com
>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/tony-v
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
>> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 7
> Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 21:36:41 -0500
> From: "Terry Little" 
> Subject: [Tweeters] N Hawk Owl - Brewster
> To: "Tweeters" 
> Message-ID: <2f47cd70$13e285b0$1936ecea$ AT com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
> 
> Hello,
> 
> I must confess I have a weakness for N Hawk Owls.So I made the trek to 
> Brewster today to see one of my favorite birds. Along the way, there were a 
> few nice birds as well.
> 
> At Steamboat Rock on Banks Lake was a flock of 26 RED BREASTED MERGANSERS 
> mixed in with the larger flocks of Common and Hooded Mergansers. A gorgeous 
> GOLDEN EAGLE circled overhead.
> 
> I arrived in the Hawk Owl area a little after noon and quickly found a 
> Merlin perched on a pole. After making a few loops around N Star and 
> Blossom Rds, I ran into Barry McKenzie from Oregon. Just a few minutes 
> later, the owl showed up on a power pole in front of one of the houses on 
> Blossom Rd. We got great looks through the snow and even heard the owl 
> vocalize a few times, a first for me. Soon, our friend flew to a tree 
> behind the house and hung out there for nearly 45 minutes. Sometimes, it 
> could be pretty hidden in the tree.
> 
> A few minutes later, Michael Hobbs showed up and we continued to watch the 
> owl in the same tree behind the house. It was attacked three times by a 
> Northern Shrike. After Michael left, the snow picked up and the owl 
> relocated to the orchard across the road and hunted from pole to pole till 
> I left at 2pm. Got to watch the N Hawk Owl for nearly an hour and a half. 
> 
> On my way home, a Prairie Falcon flew across the highway near Creston. At 
> dusk, there were 5 Great Horned Owls and one Short eared Owl between 
> Davenport and Reardan. 
> 
> So, two eagles, a harrier, 2 buteos, 3 owls, and 3 falcons. Fun day.
> 
> Blessings
> Terry Little
> Mead, Wa
> 
> 
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 8
> Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 19:11:19 -0800
> From: Blair Bernson 
> Subject: [Tweeters] Back from the Okanogan - Bird and Snow Reports
> To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> Message-ID: <546FFED7.6060206 AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
> 
> This adds to the report of the Northern Hawk Owl 
> on the Brewster Flats yesterday including birds 
> from today and our trip home over a VERY snowy 
> Highway 2.
> 
> First yesterday's Hawk Owl.  As reported we saw 
> this bird after a call from Tom Mansfield who 
> located it after maybe an hour of searching.  It 
> was on a telephone pole on N. Star Road not far 
> from the intersection with Blossom Lane - west of 
> Old Highway 97.  We spent more than 5 hours 
> looking thoroughly through the entire area before 
> this success.  Our efforts included at least 6 
> visits to the exact spot Tom found the bird.  I 
> see that Terry Little had the bird again today - 
> so hopefully it remains and many others will see 
> it as well.  We did not see it early this morning 
> on a return to the area after a night in Pateros.  
> We did however find Michael Hobbs and that proved 
> a valuable find as well.
> 
> The weather yesterday was cool but beautiful.  
> Today not so much - early clearing turned to 
> clouds then ice rain then snow with temperatures 
> getting into the mid 20's.  We birded Bridgeport 
> State Park - no Saw Whet Owls but a lovely young 
> Merlin.  Then to the Wells Wildlife area on 
> Bridgeport Hill Road.  No Sharp Tailed Grouse but 
> a number of Rough Legged Hawks.  Timing is 
> everything.  We spent at least 20 minutes at the 
> turnoff that goes down to a Quail feeding station 
> and a stream reclamation project.  Some hawks, a 
> Flicker, starlings and some house finches were 
> it.  30 minutes later I got a text from Michael 
> that he had two flocks of Goldfinches there which 
> each included at least one Common Redpoll.  We 
> returned and quickly found one of the flocks.  
> VERY jumpy but at least one CORE included.
> 
> In steadily declining weather we then birded on 
> the Waterville Plateau hoping especially for 
> Hungarian Partridge and maybe some early 
> arrivals.  No such luck - again lots of both Red 
> Tailed and Rough Legged Hawks and Kestrels.  
> Another text from Michael who had an American Tree 
> Sparrow respond to a recording at a small woodlot 
> at 13th and Heritage Roads (L Street) about 5 
> miles from Mansfield. We had elected to go to 
> Withrow instead of the Mansfield area so did a 
> u-turn and found the woodlot with further coaching 
> from Michael. Whereas his recording immediately 
> produced the ATSP, ours produced a large flock of 
> House FInches.  We found the sparrow in the flock 
> but could not get a photo at distance - it did not 
> come out at all - and then the flock dispersed.  
> We remained and tried a number of times in vain to 
> get the bird to respond.  We then went away for 10 
> minutes and returning we tried again and it came 
> in close for a good photo op.  At least good under 
> the now pretty awful weather conditions - colder 
> and heavier snow fall.
> 
> We decided it was time to head home and being very 
> low on gas changed route to go back to 97 instead 
> of carrying on to Waterville.  Now the snow was 
> falling fairly hard making birding a challenge.  
> Again lots of hawks and perhaps as a precursor to 
> the weeks ahead - many flocks of Horned Larks - at 
> least 75 birds in all maybe more.
> 
> The drive back on Hwy and especially over the pass 
> was daunting. Chains (or all wheel drive) 
> required.  Heavy snow - poor visibility and timid 
> and/or poor drivers were challenges.  There were a 
> number of spin outs and cars in ditches off the 
> side of the road.  I finally passed everyone and 
> then had clear sailing with no issues (I have all 
> wheel drive).  Snow turned to rain about 10 miles 
> down from the summit but the summit really did 
> require attention and care.
> 
> We are planning a trip back to the Okanogan for 
> several days in Late December.  It would be nice 
> if some more of the "winter" birds arrived ... and 
> if Tom and Michael are up there as well.
> 
> -- 
> Blair Bernson
> Edmonds
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 9
> Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 04:12:51 +0000 (UTC)
> From: D Richardson 
> Subject: [Tweeters] TUNDRA BEAN GOOSE
> To: "Tweeters AT u.washington.edu" 
> Message-ID:
> 	<180312240.3906121.1416629571478.JavaMail.yahoo AT jws10681.mail.bf1.yahoo.com>
> 	
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> The TUNDRA BEAN GOOSE flew into the Nestuuca NWR this morning Friday 11/21, 
about 8:00 AM. I located it grazing in the field below the covered overlook at 
the refuge which is on hwy 101 about 6 miles south of Pacific City, OR. Drive 
into the refuge and wind up the short way to the top where there is a parking 
lot and viewing point. Through the rain and wind I scoped the 400 + Canada and 
Cackling Geese and there it was about 100 yards from the entrance road, bright 
orange legs, dark head, a bill that is dark at the base, orange in the middle 
and dark at the tip. Except that it lacks the white at the bill base its body 
coloration is quite like the White-fronted Goose. The white flank line seemed 
more noticeable as well as the white under the rump. The leucistic goose was 
also nearby. I initially thought it was a swan signet, its entire body white 
and head and neck gray. But I saw the white chin patch and realized it was a 
Canada/Cackler goose. I think it a Cackler but I ! 

> wonder if it is truly leucistic or instead a Cackler hybrid/white domestic 
cross? 

> Good luck, Dave Richardson
> 
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 10
> Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 21:42:36 -0800
> From: Loren Mooney 
> Subject: [Tweeters] Northern Hawk Owl Pics
> To: "Tweeters AT u.washington.edu" 
> Message-ID:
> 	
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> Here's some pics of the N. Hawk Owl from today.
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/loren-mooney/
> 
> On Fri, Nov 21, 2014 at 4:13 PM, Loren Mooney 
> wrote:
> 
>> Wow.  Just spent the last hour watching him in the orchard across from the
>> house in Brewster.   Amazing bird.  Watched him hunt, catch and eat a
>> mouse/rat? He basically ignored me the whole time.  About 10 mins ago he
>> flew right toward me and past me at knee level.   If I had lifted my right
>> hand six inches I would have touched him.   Definitely not afraid of
>> people.  He's working that field across from the house.
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Loren Mooney
> Seattle, Washington
> Mooney Images 
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 11
> Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 08:05:07 -0800
> From: Loren Mooney 
> Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: Northern Hawk Owl Pics
> To: "Tweeters AT u.washington.edu" 
> Message-ID:
> 	
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> Hi tweets,
> 
> I shared this with another reader but I think several folks are going to go
> see the owl, so I thought I should share it with everyone...
> 
> I was lucky enough to see him right by the road when I first drove up.
> He's using those rows as a runway and the braces as unobstructed perches.
> As long as there's still food there, he's found Hawk Owl heaven.   The
> trick is to look at which direction he's looking and then walk to the end
> of that row in front of him.  He'll come to you.  If he hops over to
> another row, he'll generally keep working that next row in the same
> direction, so just change rows.
> 
> When he moves down the row he'll drop down to knee level and fly several
> feet near the ground, then swoop up to another brace.   He'll generally
> move about 6 -12 braces, so if you want pictures you can position yourself
> and just wait for the shot he gives you.    He may also hop over to the
> orchard, but he quickly goes back to the braces.   He's hunting, so he'll
> perch and look around for 5-10 mins, then move.   He'll move quicker than
> that in the orchard.
> 
> I was alone, quiet and slow, so that may have helped.  (If you're with a
> group, you'll probably just want to stand back by the road).   Leave the
> bright clothes at home.  I was in camo pants with a drab green rain coat
> and my camera gear is in a camo rain cover and big enough to hide my face.
> With my coat's hood, the camera on a tripod and my drab clothes I probably
> just looked like something non-human.  He checked me out once after he
> finished his meal (the tilted head shot) and after that he ignored me the
> rest of the hour.  Basically treated me like a deer or bush.  He
> practically landed on me two times and almost touched me once as he flew
> by.   He is definitely not shy.
> 
> After I got some insurance shots I rang the bell at the house across the
> street and asked for permission to go onto the property to take pics.  He
> said he didn't own it, but it was no problem to walk the property for bird
> pics and he's really nice.  He's got feeders set up at his house so he's
> attracting a lot of birds there. I saw a large flock of quail so the owl
> may be feeding on more than just rodents, and that may be why he's also
> spending time in that tree over by the house, although not while I was
> there.
> 
> The home owner didn't know the owl was there.  I showed him the owl, told
> him how rare it is and got him excited about it.    I did have one other
> neighbor come up to me and check me out.  He thought I was a hunter with
> the camo, but then was okay when he saw I had a camera, not a gun.  (It's a
> big lens).   I showed him some pictures on the camera and got him excited
> about the owl a little too, hopefully.   I think there's going to be quite
> a few people over there in coming days and the locals may get annoyed
> soon.  Hopefully at least those two locals will have some patience.
> 
> I still have more pics to post when I have a chance.  I went a little nuts
> with the shutter.  :)  Have fun if you trek over there.  If you do go, send
> me a note and let me know how it goes.  It's warming up today and the snow
> is melting, so the roads are probably going to be good soon.
> 
> Loren
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Loren Mooney 
> Date: Fri, Nov 21, 2014 at 9:42 PM
> Subject: Northern Hawk Owl Pics
> To: "Tweeters AT u.washington.edu" 
> 
> 
> Here's some pics of the N. Hawk Owl from today.
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/loren-mooney/
> 
> On Fri, Nov 21, 2014 at 4:13 PM, Loren Mooney 
> wrote:
> 
>> Wow.  Just spent the last hour watching him in the orchard across from the
>> house in Brewster.   Amazing bird.  Watched him hunt, catch and eat a
>> mouse/rat? He basically ignored me the whole time.  About 10 mins ago he
>> flew right toward me and past me at knee level.   If I had lifted my right
>> hand six inches I would have touched him.   Definitely not afraid of
>> people.  He's working that field across from the house.
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Loren Mooney
> Seattle, Washington
> Mooney Images 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Loren Mooney
> Seattle, Washington
> Mooney Images 
> -------------- next part --------------
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> 
> End of Tweeters Digest, Vol 123, Issue 22
> *****************************************

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Fwd: Northern Hawk Owl Pics
From: Loren Mooney <loren.mooney AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 08:05:07 -0800
Hi tweets,

I shared this with another reader but I think several folks are going to go
see the owl, so I thought I should share it with everyone...

I was lucky enough to see him right by the road when I first drove up.
He's using those rows as a runway and the braces as unobstructed perches.
As long as there's still food there, he's found Hawk Owl heaven.   The
trick is to look at which direction he's looking and then walk to the end
of that row in front of him.  He'll come to you.  If he hops over to
another row, he'll generally keep working that next row in the same
direction, so just change rows.

When he moves down the row he'll drop down to knee level and fly several
feet near the ground, then swoop up to another brace.   He'll generally
move about 6 -12 braces, so if you want pictures you can position yourself
and just wait for the shot he gives you.    He may also hop over to the
orchard, but he quickly goes back to the braces.   He's hunting, so he'll
perch and look around for 5-10 mins, then move.   He'll move quicker than
that in the orchard.

I was alone, quiet and slow, so that may have helped.  (If you're with a
group, you'll probably just want to stand back by the road).   Leave the
bright clothes at home.  I was in camo pants with a drab green rain coat
and my camera gear is in a camo rain cover and big enough to hide my face.
With my coat's hood, the camera on a tripod and my drab clothes I probably
just looked like something non-human.  He checked me out once after he
finished his meal (the tilted head shot) and after that he ignored me the
rest of the hour.  Basically treated me like a deer or bush.  He
practically landed on me two times and almost touched me once as he flew
by.   He is definitely not shy.

After I got some insurance shots I rang the bell at the house across the
street and asked for permission to go onto the property to take pics.  He
said he didn't own it, but it was no problem to walk the property for bird
pics and he's really nice.  He's got feeders set up at his house so he's
attracting a lot of birds there. I saw a large flock of quail so the owl
may be feeding on more than just rodents, and that may be why he's also
spending time in that tree over by the house, although not while I was
there.

The home owner didn't know the owl was there.  I showed him the owl, told
him how rare it is and got him excited about it.    I did have one other
neighbor come up to me and check me out.  He thought I was a hunter with
the camo, but then was okay when he saw I had a camera, not a gun.  (It's a
big lens).   I showed him some pictures on the camera and got him excited
about the owl a little too, hopefully.   I think there's going to be quite
a few people over there in coming days and the locals may get annoyed
soon.  Hopefully at least those two locals will have some patience.

I still have more pics to post when I have a chance.  I went a little nuts
with the shutter.  :)  Have fun if you trek over there.  If you do go, send
me a note and let me know how it goes.  It's warming up today and the snow
is melting, so the roads are probably going to be good soon.

Loren




---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Loren Mooney 
Date: Fri, Nov 21, 2014 at 9:42 PM
Subject: Northern Hawk Owl Pics
To: "Tweeters AT u.washington.edu" 


Here's some pics of the N. Hawk Owl from today.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/loren-mooney/

On Fri, Nov 21, 2014 at 4:13 PM, Loren Mooney 
wrote:

> Wow.  Just spent the last hour watching him in the orchard across from the
> house in Brewster.   Amazing bird.  Watched him hunt, catch and eat a
> mouse/rat? He basically ignored me the whole time.  About 10 mins ago he
> flew right toward me and past me at knee level.   If I had lifted my right
> hand six inches I would have touched him.   Definitely not afraid of
> people.  He's working that field across from the house.
>
> Sent from my iPhone




-- 
Loren Mooney
Seattle, Washington
Mooney Images 



-- 
Loren Mooney
Seattle, Washington
Mooney Images _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Northern Hawk Owl Pics
From: Loren Mooney <loren.mooney AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 21:42:36 -0800
Here's some pics of the N. Hawk Owl from today.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/loren-mooney/

On Fri, Nov 21, 2014 at 4:13 PM, Loren Mooney 
wrote:

> Wow.  Just spent the last hour watching him in the orchard across from the
> house in Brewster.   Amazing bird.  Watched him hunt, catch and eat a
> mouse/rat? He basically ignored me the whole time.  About 10 mins ago he
> flew right toward me and past me at knee level.   If I had lifted my right
> hand six inches I would have touched him.   Definitely not afraid of
> people.  He's working that field across from the house.
>
> Sent from my iPhone




-- 
Loren Mooney
Seattle, Washington
Mooney Images _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: TUNDRA BEAN GOOSE
From: D Richardson <d.lrichardson AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 04:12:51 +0000 (UTC)
The TUNDRA BEAN GOOSE flew into the Nestuuca NWR this morning Friday 11/21, 
about 8:00 AM. I located it grazing in the field below the covered overlook at 
the refuge which is on hwy 101 about 6 miles south of Pacific City, OR. Drive 
into the refuge and wind up the short way to the top where there is a parking 
lot and viewing point. Through the rain and wind I scoped the 400 + Canada and 
Cackling Geese and there it was about 100 yards from the entrance road, bright 
orange legs, dark head, a bill that is dark at the base, orange in the middle 
and dark at the tip. Except that it lacks the white at the bill base its body 
coloration is quite like the White-fronted Goose.  The white flank line seemed 
more noticeable as well as the white under the rump.  The leucistic goose was 
also nearby.  I initially thought it was a swan signet, its entire body white 
and head and neck gray. But I saw the white chin patch and realized it was a 
Canada/Cackler goose. I think it a Cackler but I wonder if it is truly 
leucistic or instead a Cackler hybrid/white domestic cross? 

Good luck, Dave Richardson
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