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Updated on Thursday, April 17 at 01:55 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Annas Hummingbird,©Barry Kent Mackay

17 Apr Re: Bremerton (Kitsap county; urban) bird ID help? [Marc Hoffman ]
17 Apr Bremerton (Kitsap county; urban) bird ID help? ["antoniadg1 AT juno.com" ]
17 Apr Bills [Jeff Gibson ]
17 Apr Townsend's Solitaire at English Boom [Anne Kahle ]
16 Apr Arden & Sherry Hagen on World Birdng ["Sherry Hagen" ]
16 Apr Vaux's Swifts [Mike & MerryLynn ]
16 Apr Ridgefield NWR Closures Next Week [Scott Carpenter ]
16 Apr White-tailed Kites in WA since 2013 ["Grace and Ollie" ]
16 Apr Chipping Sparrow, Sequim. [bruce paige ]
16 Apr Avian Love class [Connie Sidles ]
16 Apr Flammulated Owl in Olympia???? ["Allen E. Smith" ]
16 Apr Yellow headed blackbird (male) [Rick Forsman ]
15 Apr We have swifts [Larry Schwitters ]
16 Apr Skamania County Warblers ["Wilson Cady" ]
15 Apr Active Bushtit nest [Tony ]
15 Apr Battle Ground, Clark County diurnal migration [Jim Danzenbaker ]
15 Apr Yellow-rumped warbler movement +, Clark Co, WA [Bob ]
15 Apr Getting My "Fill" of Song [Blair ]
15 Apr Displaying Cowbird [Noah Sanday ]
15 Apr Marbled Murrelets & Osprey @ West Point Lighthouse [Michael Fleming ]
15 Apr RFI: for birds in Ecuador, Peru and Columbia [Georgia Conti ]
15 Apr Fun bird competion event May 3rd [Christine Southwick ]
15 Apr Skamania Sandhill Cranes ["Wilson Cady" ]
14 Apr On the Lone Prairie [Jeff Gibson ]
14 Apr Seeking New Hampshire advice [Linda Phillips ]
14 Apr Another nest...?/ Caryn / Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler ]
14 Apr Empidonax Flycatcher, Hammond's?, Sequim. [bruce paige ]
14 Apr Barn swallows arrived in numbers [Noah Sanday ]
14 Apr Orange-crowned Warbler Jefferson Co [Paula Vanderheul ]
14 Apr Re: Issues with Yahoo.com email addresses and birding listservs [Hank ]
14 Apr Issues with Yahoo.com email addresses and birding listservs [Josh Adams ]
14 Apr From the Fill [Connie Sidles ]
14 Apr Bluebird Weekend [Rick Taylor ]
14 Apr Townsend Solitaire at English Boom [Andrew McCormick ]
14 Apr Townsend's Solitaires moving through Vashon ["Ed Swan" ]
14 Apr New bird for me [Carolyn Eagan ]
14 Apr bouncing notices from Tweeters [Bill Anderson ]
14 Apr a pair of peregrines ["Martha Jordan" ]
14 Apr Goldfinches arrived ["Lynn Tjerne" ]
14 Apr RE: RFI: Banded Brant Goose [Mark Sullivan ]
14 Apr American Bitterns @ Stillwater WMA [Michael Fleming ]
14 Apr RFI: Banded Brant Goose [Clare McLean ]
14 Apr trying again yb loon message [Gary Bletsch ]
14 Apr Weekend birding in Garfield & Asotin counties [Matt Bartels ]
14 Apr Weekend birding in Garfield & Asotin counties [Matt Bartels ]
13 Apr Killdeer's Diversionary Display/Mason County [Hank ]
13 Apr No Skagit Ross's, but Y-B Loon [Gary Bletsch ]
13 Apr Early Arriving Migrants and a Plea for Caution [Jason Hernandez ]
13 Apr Puzzling male Rufous behavior [Sarah Schmidt ]
13 Apr RFI: Costa Rica ["Dick Porter" ]
13 Apr Kumlien's Gull fading from Skagit Co 4/6 [Scott ]
13 Apr Gold Finches arrived today. [L Baxter ]
13 Apr Wilson's snipe, brown-headed cowbird and Savannah's sparrows at Union Bay [Gabe Garms ]
13 Apr Violet-greens have arrived [Bob ]
13 Apr RFI Birding Mexico City [Richard Anderson ]
13 Apr Census Count: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, Washington on April 13, 2014 []
13 Apr Cle Elum Rail Road Ponds Saturday [Loren Mooney ]
13 Apr a peregrine double] ["Martha Jordan" ]
13 Apr From the Fill [Connie Sidles ]
13 Apr Interlaken and Beyond [Larry Hubbell ]
13 Apr Sandhilll Cranes near Othello ["Sharon" ]
13 Apr Common yellowthroat at Spencer Island [Gabe Garms ]
13 Apr Merlins starting up again in area - 4/13/14 [Barbara Deihl ]
13 Apr RE: The Port Townsend's(?) Mole -- and how I became a birder ["Gary Smith" ]
13 Apr Grays Harbor Shorebird Festival [Jim Danzenbaker ]
13 Apr some Cle Elum and E-burg finds - last Mon. 4/7/14 [Barbara Deihl ]
13 Apr A Cautionary Tale on Nest Boxes [ck park ]
13 Apr Hummer Withdrawal / Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler ]
13 Apr e-mail problems (part two) [Bill Anderson ]
13 Apr Wahkiakum County birding ["washingtonbirder.Ken Knittle" ]
13 Apr The Port Townsend's(?) Mole [Jeff Gibson ]
13 Apr e-mail problems? [Bill Anderson ]
12 Apr test message [Bill Anderson ]
12 Apr Mountain Quail (yes) at Mary Hrudkaj's home in Mason County 4/12/14 [Hank ]
12 Apr FOY Avian chick and it's a ....... [Tony ]
12 Apr Mountain bluebird at Magnuson Park [Brian Pendleton ]

Subject: Re: Bremerton (Kitsap county; urban) bird ID help?
From: Marc Hoffman <tweeters AT dartfrogmedia.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 11:28:15 -0700
Could have been a Flicker. They often show white on the rump just 
above the tail. Neck is not short but could be tucked in. Tell-tale 
would be the black bar under the neck and a light breast specked with 
black dots.

Let us know if that seems likely.

Also: I always Google the bird and search images. You'll get a lot 
more variety of views than from just a couple of sites or books.

Marc Hoffman
Kirkland, WA
tweeters AT dartfrogmedia.com
www.songbirdphoto.com

At 10:14 AM 4/17/2014, antoniadg1 AT juno.com wrote:


>Saw a crow chasing away something this morning; about same size as 
>crow, wings a pretty gold/bronze from below,short neck,  and white 
>on base of tail.  It hid in a tree.   Can someone help me narrow it 
>down, or suggest a great ID site?   The three sites I tried were a 
>waste of time.
>Love this list, especially when you have site obvious at 
>start.  Birding less than 1 year._______________________________________________
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Subject: Bremerton (Kitsap county; urban) bird ID help?
From: "antoniadg1 AT juno.com" <antoniadg1@juno.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 17:14:42 GMT
Saw a crow chasing away something this morning; about same size as crow, wings 
a pretty gold/bronze from below,short neck, and white on base of tail. It hid 
in a tree. Can someone help me narrow it down, or suggest a great ID site? The 
three sites I tried were a waste of time. 

Love this list, especially when you have site obvious at start. Birding less 
than 1 year. 


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Subject: Bills
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 08:40:29 -0700
Sitting here this morning at my temporary desk in Port Townsend, I'm watching a 
pair of Black-capped Chickadees gathering nest material - this has been going 
on for two days now. 


 

Their material of choice right now seems to be the thin papery bark of that 
fabulous Chilean shrub, Fuchsia magellancia, which does excedingly well here. 
Anyway, the chickadees are peeling off strips of the bark, stuffing it into 
their beaks, and then repeating this till they have a big beakful, and then fly 
off to the nest spot next door. 


 

I kinda reminds me of seeing Rhinocerous Auklets, or Puffins with a bill full 
of 10 or so fish clamped sideways in their mouth. How do they catch another 
without dropping the rest, I've always wondered. I guess I've always had some 
sorta naive notion that bird bills were pretty much ridgid and clack together 
like castenets or salad tongs or something, which could'nt be quite true given 
what birds can do with bills. Besides salad tongs don't got tongues. 


 

So I just googled around a bit and found out in the case of Puffins, they have 
ridges in their upper beak, and when the Puffin nabs a fish they, using their 
tongue, push the fish toward the rear the bill where the serrations hold them 
while the Puffin is nabbing another fish. How the chickadee holds all that 
paper I dont know exactly, and even short billed towhees and sparrows here have 
bills just full of nesting stuff, which they pile on without dropping. 


 

Down on Kah Tai lagoon, just downhill from where I am, I've been watching the 
Ruddy Ducks turning bright ruddy, and their bills that bright blue! Amazing. 
May the Bluebill of Happiness land on your pond. 


 

Jeff Gibson

reporting from

Port Townsend Wa

 

P.S The main migrants in the yard this week have been Orange-crowned Warblers, 
and Gold- crowned Sparrows - both all over the place. 

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Subject: Townsend's Solitaire at English Boom
From: Anne Kahle <wanderingalb AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 07:29:48 -0700
The Solitaire was still there yesterday afternoon. I first looked at 1 pm with 
no luck, but on returning at 3 pm, it was right on the beach by the parking 
spot, perched up on a piece of wood. (Then I got to drive home through 
Seattle's rush hour traffic so didn't get home in time to report last night.) 

Anne Kahle
Castle Rock
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Subject: Arden & Sherry Hagen on World Birdng
From: "Sherry Hagen" <littlebirder AT pacifier.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 21:03:07 -0700
Just for Fun

Arden and I taped a show for Oregon Comcast TV in March on our International 
Birding, then Arden immediately taped a second show on our travels to 
Queensland, Australia. 


Elly Sriro, the producer, turned them into YouTube videos as listed below if 
you would like to watch them. They each run 30 minutes. 


We ran out of time on the International Birding one and had to rush at the end 
thus not really completing it. 

Funny thing is they left the mic on after the credits (and same with the next 
one). 


Please excuse the errors

Elly Sriro 

producer of

The Nature Here TV Show




INTERNATIONAL BIRDING - EPISODE 13 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGqNw1UFSmk




Birds and animals in Queensland, Australia - EPISODE 14 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X4c6NTMcv00


Sherry Hagen
Vancouver, WA
littlebirder AT comcast.net
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Subject: Vaux's Swifts
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 20:30:18 -0700
Hello all,
Our local Vaux's Swifts came back this evening - 150 of them went down 
the chimney in College Place. This is a week earlier than last year. 
County yearbird #165.
Our first Calliope Hummingbird showed up yesterday morning and a couple 
Bank Swallows were over Bennington Lake .
Happy Spring birding, MerryLynn_______________________________________________
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Subject: Ridgefield NWR Closures Next Week
From: Scott Carpenter <slcarpenter AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 18:15:51 -0700
CARTY AND RIVER 'S' UNITS CLOSED APRIL 21 & 24

The Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge will be closed on Monday, April
21st and Thursday, April 24th for road improvements. These repairs will
impact both the River 'S' and Carty Units for both days. The closures will
allow crews to improve the junctions of the public roads with the Refuge
entrance roads. Asphalt will be extended down the entrance roads to address
persistent potholes caused by cars merging between these roadways.

The refuge web site is http://www.fws.gov/ridgefieldrefuges/ridgefield/

-- 
Scott Carpenter
Portland, Oregon
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Subject: White-tailed Kites in WA since 2013
From: "Grace and Ollie" <grace.ollie AT frontier.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 17:15:21 -0700
Tweeters,

Checking ebird database; there are no records for White-tailed Kite for 2013
and 2014.  Even West Oregon appears to have fewer in the north part of state
in last year.  

Are there sightings that are not getting recorded?  

Thanks,

Grace Oliver

Redmond
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Subject: Chipping Sparrow, Sequim.
From: bruce paige <BBPaige AT nikola.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 16:28:51 -0700
Each spring birding day may bring a new bird for the year, and today was 
brightened by two. Within the usual flock of dunlins, sanderlings, and plovers 
at Three Crabs were 6 Western Sandpipers. They've been very scarce in the 
county this year, so it was nice to find them. 


Also, a Chipping Sparrow turned up at our feeders located in the farmlands near 
Graysmarsh Farm. An individual has been reported in at least two other yards 
near Dungeness. They usually occur annually in very small numbers. 


What's coming tomorrow?

Bruce Paige
Sequim

spruceak AT yahoo.com
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Subject: Avian Love class
From: Connie Sidles <constancesidles AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 14:18:00 -0700
Hey tweets, I’m giving a slideshow lecture/class on avian love on April 26 at 
CUH. If you’re interested in signing up, please email me privately off-line and 
I will send you the information. 


The Fill today was windy, rainy, and unbirdy. All the Yellow-rumps seem to have 
left in a body, though perhaps they were just hunkered down to escape the rain. 


Cinnamon Teal pairs are on every pond, seemingly, so it looks to be a great 
year for them; babies will soon be on the way. The only other ducks present in 
numbers were Ring-necked, Lesser Scaups, Buffleheads, and the omnipresent 
Mallards and Gadwalls. A lone American Wigeon was grazing on the grass in the 
helipad field, where more than a *dozen* Brewer’s Blackbirds have decided to 
pair off amongst the bushes. 


We may very well be witnessing the establishment of a permanent, year-round 
population of Brewer’s at the Fill, as they seem to have discovered the wonders 
of the QFC parking lot nearby. I saw several parading around there the other 
day. I have never been able to figure out why parking lots attract these birds, 
but I have to confess I’ve always been jealous of the Ross’s parking lot up on 
Aurora for its winter blackbird appeal. Why Ross’s and not U Village? Aren’t we 
good enough? My perennial puzzlement may now be moot. 


Here is a poem for you today:

Eyes glowing 
like twin lamps against the ebon night, 
the Brewer's Blackbird pointed his bill skyward 
and ogled his ladylove. 
She reflected.

—Connie, Seattle

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Subject: Flammulated Owl in Olympia????
From: "Allen E. Smith" <snoshuak AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 13:33:58 -0700
For the last couple of weeks we have been hearing what sounds like a
Flammulated Owl near our home out here on Cooper Point in Olympia.  When we
consult Sibley for range maps and go to the e-birds map of recent sightings,
however, the nearest sightings are in Vancouver , BC and east of the
Cascades.  Is it possible that a Flammulated Owl could be here in Olympia?
We cannot seem to find any other bird that fits that sound.  Is this
possible?  Help!!!

 

Allen Smith

Olympia

 
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Subject: Yellow headed blackbird (male)
From: Rick Forsman <rjforsman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 11:35:23 -0700
I'd say fairly rare for the west side!

 Fellow birder just called me and said he just saw a yellow headed blackbird 
with a couple of red wings at 830 this morning at Corner of Bay Rd and Seashell 
Way, Birch Bay, WA. 

So any of you up there birding ... Good luck 

Bird On !!!

Rick forsman
RjforsmanAThotmailDOTcom
Fall city Wa._______________________________________________
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Subject: We have swifts
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters AT me.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 22:46:34 -0700
Mike and Jodi Walker documented 15 Vaux's Swift going into the JBLM communal 
roost site on 4/14. This beats a sighting at Monroe Wagner on 4/16/2008 for our 
Vaux's Happening earliest Wa State northbound migration flock roosting. 


Larry
Larry Schwitters Issaquah
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Subject: Skamania County Warblers
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 03:29:53 GMT
We had a pretty good movement of YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS today on Mt. Pleasant, 
Skamania County, starting at about 8am. Among the at least 100 Y.R. Warblers 
and Ruby-crowned Kinglets that came through we saw two BLACK-THROATED GRAY 
WARBLERS and six ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS. Wilson Cady 

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Subject: Active Bushtit nest
From: Tony <tvarela AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 19:20:12 -0700
Came across a Bushtit nest recently and managed to get a few images:

https://flic.kr/p/n9EEnp

https://flic.kr/p/n9EKY2

- Regards

Tony Varela
South Puget Sound, WA
tvarela at hotmail dot com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tony-v
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Subject: Battle Ground, Clark County diurnal migration
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 19:06:20 -0700
Hi Tweeters,

I had some time to stand in my backyard for several hours this morning and
had a good passage of northbound Yellow-rumped Warblers - ~133 in all -
roughly half of them between 8am-9am and about 70 between 9am-11am. None
appeared to descend and perch until about 9:45 or so.  I also saw my
FOY-yard Vaux's Swift (2), Townsend's Warbler (FOY-y), and Barn Swallow
(FOY-y.

The weather was perfect for observing diurnal migrants - partly to mostly
cloudy with presumably most of the Cascade foothills enveloped in some
amount of cloud which may kick the birds out of those foothills and over to
my tiny yard.  Don't know what tomorrow's rainy forecast will bring.

Did anybody else notice a fairly good migration of Yellow-rumps today?

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-723-0345
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Subject: Yellow-rumped warbler movement +, Clark Co, WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 18:55:53 -0700
Sitting in the back yard the last 1.5 hrs had 51 yellow-rumped and 2 Townsend's 
warblers come through. Also of note two evening grosbeaks 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Getting My "Fill" of Song
From: Blair <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 18:29:33 -0700
Ok a horrible pun, but there was almost constantly a song in the air at the 
Fill today. Songsters included Song, White Crowned and Savannah (many) 
Sparrows, Yellow Rumped Warblers (many of both Myrtle and Audubon's forms), 
Common Yellowthroats (at least 3), American Goldfinches, House Finches, Marsh 
and Bewick's Wrens, Virginia Rails, Spotted Towhees, Anna's Hummingbirds, Red 
Winged Blackbirds, Black Capped Chickadees, Bushtits and Tree Swallows (is 
their chattering a song?). 


I had visited hoping for a photo of a Cinnamon Teal. I have seen several 
Cinnamon's but had not been able to get a shot this Spring. I was about to give 
up when a beautiful drake and two hens swam out of cover in the SW corner of 
Southwest pond and posed briefly in the sunshine for a lovely photo shoot and 
did some bobbing courtship display before all 3 swam back into cover and...well 
I don't know what. 

No Pipits but a beautiful afternoon filled with song.

-- Blair Bernson

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Subject: Displaying Cowbird
From: Noah Sanday <puffleshatchery AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 15:51:30 -0700
The brown headed cowbirds have shown up today there is a beautiful male 
displaying on the rail road tracts on Maleng rd in acme. 

Noah sanday 
puffleshatchery AT gmail.com

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Subject: Marbled Murrelets & Osprey @ West Point Lighthouse
From: Michael Fleming <michaelfleming01 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 13:46:05 -0700
   This morning I birded both the north and south beach areas near the
West Point Lighthouse at Discovery Park and the birding was good.
Last week Jordan Gunn mentioned to me that he had seen a pair of
MARBLED MURRELETS along the south beach so I kept my eye pealed for
them.
   I started out quite early spending some time at the point near the
Lighthouse and had 4 alcid species including RHINOCEROS AUKLETS, a few
COMMON MURRES, a single PIGEON GUILLEMOT, and then a pair of MARBLED
MURRELETS in breeding plumage foraging right off the end of the point.
 There were 5 WESTERN GREBES along the south shoreline and several
RED-NECKED and HORNED GREBES in breeding plumage still lingering in
the area.
   The breeding plumage PELAGIC CORMORANT was still hanging around the
north shoreline and an OSPREY was working the waters off both
shorelines.  A COMMON LOON in breeding plumage as well as a few
BONAPARTE'S GULLS were noted in the area.
   Around the visitor's center both ORANGE-CROWNED and YELLOW-RUMPED
WARBLERS (Audubon's) were seen and also CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEES
going in and out of a nest hole in a small snag and a BUSHTIT nest in
a nearby Douglas Fir tree.
   I expected the day to be somewhat rainy but was pleasantly
surprised by the great weather.  Birding in the very early morning was
good although the winds picked up a bit later on at West Point.

Cheers and Good Birding;

Michael Fleming
Ballard, Washington
michaelfleming01 AT gmail.com
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Subject: RFI: for birds in Ecuador, Peru and Columbia
From: Georgia Conti <antep12 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 14:50:58 -0500
A British friend is looking for recommendations for field guides and tips
for good birding locations in these three countries.  I am not much help
because I've not visited any of them.  Any info would be appreciated.

Georgia Conti
(antep12ATgmailDOTcom)
Lake Patzcuaro, Michoacán, Mexico_______________________________________________
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Subject: Fun bird competion event May 3rd
From: Christine Southwick <clsouth AT u.washington.edu>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 09:47:05 -0700 (PDT)
JOIN US FOR BIRD QUEST– Saturday, May 3, 2014

Greater Seattle Metropolitan Area

Bird Quest is a one day AMAZING RACE-style birding adventure where participants 
can race against time, or simply collect points at their own pace by: 

 enjoying one of 16 birding challenge trips;
 solving any or all of the 25 bird-themed puzzles;
 and discovering up to 75 bird-themed special places while winging across the 
Greater Seattle Metropolitan area. 


The event is not about speed and stamina, but relies on strategy to collect as 
many points as possible. 

 
Points earned could win you one of several great prizes, including:

• Two nights stay at The Heron Inn in La Connor with a birding trip from 
Pacific NW Float Trips 

• Pelagic trip for 2 from Westport Seabirds
• Gift Certificates to local birding stores

Bird Quest is a fund-raising event to support the programs and projects of 
Puget Sound Bird Observatory. 

There is a participant fee of $35.00 and $5.00 for an “end of Bird Quest 
day” spaghetti feed dinner. 

There is more information at our website: 
http://pugetsoundbirds.org/bird-quest-may-3rd-2014/ 


Register today at: http://goo.gl/tyMHUh

Christine Southwick
N Seattle/Shoreline
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Subject: Skamania Sandhill Cranes
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 05:52:46 GMT
Tonight we had two SANDHILL CRANES circle low over our property on Mt. 
Pleasant, Skamania County just after sunset, they were heading west and may 
have set down at the Steigerwald Lake NWR in Clark County. Wilson Cady 

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Subject: On the Lone Prairie
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 21:36:19 -0700
" I took the ferry to the lone prairie,

   I was looking blue and the Camas was too"

                             - Hank Williams Gibson 

 ( to the tune of 'Don't bury me on the lone prairie') 


 

Yessiree, I was needin' a break from herdin' the elderly (my parents) here in 
Port Townsend today when I hopped in my (mostly) trusty truck and headed to the 
prairie.( Of course I had to put ol' trusty on a ferry to get here first, from 
home across the sound in Mudville, and trusty has been hitched up out in the 
driveway here for a few days, watching gravel). 


 

Yup, we went to the lone prairie right here in ol' Port Townsend. Hell, I 
didn't even know there was one till I read all about it on the Washington 
Native Plant Society's Olympic chapter website. 


 

You see, due to our squirrely topography around the general "Puget Sound 
Lowlands" area, we got rain shadows and such, and add a bunch of funky glacial 
deposits from the latest ice age, and the combined effects of all that conspire 
to allow the formation of prairies in the region between the soggy Olympic and 
Cascade Mnts. Small prairies. 


 

Habitat afficianado's might already know of the "Tacoma Praries", and other 
South Sound prairies, with their Garry Oaks. Well there is some of that habitat 
North too, around Victoria BC, some of the San Juan Islands, ect. A short Orca 
swim from Port Townsend across Admiralty inlet to Whidbey Island, are remnants 
of the fairly large Ebey Prairie. 


 

We should thank the "First People" (AKA Native Americans, Indians, etc.) for 
alot of what's left of our present prairies, because those people were 
pyrophilias,( I just made that word up), by which I mean they liked to use fire 
as a tool to improve their own environment. By the occasional set grass fire 
they kept the Conifer forests from taking over the little prairies. That way 
they got to harvest yummy (with preparation) oak acorns, but even more so, a 
number of edible bulbs which were important to their diet, Camas being maybe 
the most well known. 


 

Anyhoo, I'd heard about and visited many of the above mentioned little 
prairies, but I'd never heard about Port Townsends, which was historically much 
more extensive than at present. A little remnant of it (nurtured by the WNPS 
folks) is located in the SE corner of the PT Golf Course. While puny, it is 
pretty cool I think. What right now initially looks to be an unmown section of 
lawn full of dandelions and escaped grape hyacinths, turns out on closer 
inspection, to be a nice selection of native flowers, the yellow being Lomatium 
and the blue Camas. The Camas is just getting started. A few Chocolate Lilies 
just beginning too. 


 

 The evidence is there that this ground really wants to be a Snowberry and 
Nootka Rose patch, followed by firs, but the native plant folks are keeping it 
open. They even (with fire dept. help), set it on fire at least once, which 
helped the flowers and kept them pesky shrubs and trees out. 


 

Aiming, I guess, toward creating a bit of Oak- savannah, the folks have even 
planted a few young Garry Oaks. A single Savannah Sparrow singing on a rock in 
the prairie was giving it's blessing. Lots of different birds like prairies! 


 

Jeff Gibson

Reporting from the prairies of 
Port Townsend Wa

 

P.S  Wish I could sing like Hank.
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Subject: Seeking New Hampshire advice
From: Linda Phillips <linda_phillips1252 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 20:01:10 -0700
Hi Tweeters- 

 

I'm going to visit friends in Rochester NH in May.

Do any of you have suggestions of where I could go birding while I'm there?

 


Any tips or advice is very welcome,

 

Linda Phillips 

linda_phillips1252 AT msn.com

 


 

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Subject: Another nest...?/ Caryn / Wedgwood
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 AT seanet.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 18:57:14 -0700
Hello Tweeters! It's me again!!

...yes, another Anna's is nesting higher up in the pine tree (not visible), 
BUT... 


...in the hemlock next to the pine tree where the Anna's nested, I looked up 
when I heard a robin scolding a crow and sure enough, there's a robin building 
a nest (still in progress) right next door!! I watched the robin collect 
grasses near a birdbath and put the final layers inside, molding the nest cup 
with her body. It's those lucky moments when something directs our eye to the 
right spot to discover nature - sitting right there in front of us (well, 
almost). It's in the listening and observing (especially when things slow us 
down enough to have the time) that we can find the things happening - sometimes 
closer than we expect. 


This reminds me of our Snag Condo from several years ago. We had left a snag 
after needing to take down the dying/dead wood of another hemlock (next to the 
one the robin is nesting in now) - and ended up having both flickers and 
nuthatches nest in the same "condo snag". (I think I may have been posting on 
Tweeters back then...) 


We have been so very "lucky" with nests in our yard (we've been here since 
1981) - Robins, Bushtits (3-4 nests), Bewick's Wrens (under our deck, several 
houses), Chickadees (they're looking at the same house again this year). Last 
year seemed quite empty - our souls sad after losing our dog. This year, the 
gifts of nature are extra sweet. I don't think there is anything more magical 
than to see a bird creating a nest - especially in your own "neck of the 
woods". This year was especially sweet with the Anna's and now the Robins (ok, 
they might be "common", but they are still fun to watch) - our new neighbors, 
moving right in - into our hearts. 


Caryn / Wedgwood "Airbnb" 

PS. The Anna's chicks are still around - and think I saw one at the feeder 
today. Will be looking forward to the next brood. 



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Subject: Empidonax Flycatcher, Hammond's?, Sequim.
From: bruce paige <BBPaige AT nikola.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 15:23:33 -0700
While walking the Dike Trail near Dungeness this morning, I came upon the 
year's first Empidonax flycatcher high in the deciduous trees. It was some 
distance away and a camera challenge, but I did get some pics. I suspect it was 
an adult Hammond's from the overall grey upper parts, notched tail, lack of 
yellow on the lower mandible, incomplete eye-ring, and other characteristics. 
It was calling, but maddeningly the sound was drowned out by model airplanes 
being flown nearby. There's nothing like a Empidonax to put one in their place 
now and then! 


Bruce Paige
Sequim

spruceak AT yahoo.com
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Subject: Barn swallows arrived in numbers
From: Noah Sanday <puffleshatchery AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 15:01:24 -0700
Today several barn swallows have appeared in acme
Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Orange-crowned Warbler Jefferson Co
From: Paula Vanderheul <pvanderheul AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 14:58:01 -0700
Hello Birders,

I just saw my first of year backyard beautiful Orange-crowned Warbler.
The Violet-green swallows are checking out my nest box that  they have
occupied
the last three years. Lots of spring songs.

Paula Vanderheul
Port Hadlock WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Issues with Yahoo.com email addresses and birding listservs
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 14:37:36 -0700
I was having problems with Tweeters due to Yahoo's policies so I switched to 
gmail. 


Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, WA
hank.heibergatgmaildotcom

Sent from my iPad

> On Apr 14, 2014, at 1:22 PM, Josh Adams  wrote:
> 
> Hello Tweets,
> I noticed the below email got sent out to the "ID Frontiers" email listserv 
about a problem and realized it's the same issue the Bill Anderson, and 
certainly others, are having. Apparently Yahoo broke changed something on the 
settings to try to cut down on spam sent from their accounts and in the process 
essentially broke listservs. I've posted a link to an article about the issue 
below, although it's very technical. I've also included portions of the email 
sent to ID Frontiers which give workarounds and suggestions on feedback that 
can be given to Yahoo to get this resolved. 

> 
> http://goo.gl/Y1mYdC
> 
> Josh Adams
> Lynnwood, WA
> 
> > Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 12:49:58 -0500
> > From: cotte AT KSU.EDU
> > Subject: [BIRDWG01] ADMIN: BirdWG01 list problems
> > To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> > 
> > Good day BIRDWG01!
> > 
> > There are several announcements about the list. Please read and save for 
> > future use.
> > 
> > Overnight 278 subscribers were removed from BIRDWG01 by the ListServ 
> > computer because of onging issues with recent changes by Yahoo and the 
> > way that they handle email (more on that in a second.) A few of you have 
> > added yourselves back on, I just now added the rest of you back. The fact 
> > that you are receiving this message indicates that you have been added back 

> > to the BIRDWG01 list.
> > 
> > Problems with e-mail addresses from Yahoo are continuing today. Yahoo´s 
> > policy change last week is also causing problems that affect e-mail 
> > addresses from other domains, such as Comcast, ATT, Hotmail, and MSN. 
> > You can read a technical explanation of why this occurs at:
> > 
> > http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9247512/Yahoo_email_anti_spoofing
> > _policy_breaks_mailing_lists?pageNumber=1
> > 
> > Because the problem occurs _every time_ a message from a Yahoo.com 
> > address is posted to the list, our mail administrators have advised us to 
set 

> > all subscriptions with Yahoo.com to NOPOST. [Redacted since it doesn't 
apply to Tweeters] 

> > 
> > Other providers have "honored" Yahoo´s policy although they have not set 
> > the same restrictive policy; they should stop seeing rejections once we 
> > remove the Yahoo posts. These include Comcast, ATT, MSN, and Hotmail. 
> > 
> > If you have a Yahoo address, I encourage you to contact Yahoo.com support 
> > and tell them "I have been inconvenienced because I am unable to 
> > participate in Listserv mailing lists because of Yahoo's DMARC policy." I 
also 

> > suggest that you may want to get a different e-mail provider for your 
listserv 

> > subscriptions (and maybe for all your e-mail). While I cannot and do not
> > recommend any particular provider, I can inform you that two large 
providers 

> > which have had no problems are Google (Gmail.com) and Apple 
> > (iCloud.com, me.com, mac.com). There have also been no problems with 
> > any .org, .gov, or .edu address as far as I know right now. 
> > 
> > To repeat, if you are subscribed to the list with a Yahoo address your 
> > subscription will be set to "nopost" - if you are a Yahoo
> > user, you will be able to read messages but not post to the list. 
> > 
> > As always don´t hesitate to contact the list owners if you have questions, 
but 

> > please be considerate at this busy time, and try to write us only if you 
have 

> > tried to solve your problem first and gotten stuck. The address to write 
is: 

> > 
> > [Rest of the email redacted since it doesn't apply to Tweeters]
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters_______________________________________________
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Subject: Issues with Yahoo.com email addresses and birding listservs
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 13:22:12 -0700
Hello Tweets,
I noticed the below email got sent out to the "ID Frontiers" email listserv
about a problem and realized it's the same issue the Bill Anderson, and
certainly others, are having. Apparently Yahoo broke changed something on
the settings to try to cut down on spam sent from their accounts and in the
process essentially broke listservs. I've posted a link to an article about
the issue below, although it's very technical. I've also included portions
of the email sent to ID Frontiers which give workarounds and suggestions on
feedback that can be given to Yahoo to get this resolved.

http://goo.gl/Y1mYdC

Josh Adams
Lynnwood, WA

> Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 12:49:58 -0500
> From: cotte AT KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDWG01] ADMIN: BirdWG01 list problems
> To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>
> Good day BIRDWG01!
>
> There are several announcements about the list. Please read and save for
> future use.
>
> Overnight 278 subscribers were removed from BIRDWG01 by the ListServ
> computer because of onging issues with recent changes by Yahoo and the
> way that they handle email (more on that in a second.) A few of you have
> added yourselves back on, I just now added the rest of you back. The fact
> that you are receiving this message indicates that you have been added
back
> to the BIRDWG01 list.
>
> Problems with e-mail addresses from Yahoo are continuing today. Yahoo´s
> policy change last week is also causing problems that affect e-mail
> addresses from other domains, such as Comcast, ATT, Hotmail, and MSN.
> You can read a technical explanation of why this occurs at:
>
> http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9247512/Yahoo_email_anti_spoofing
> _policy_breaks_mailing_lists?pageNumber=1
>
> Because the problem occurs _every time_ a message from a Yahoo.com
> address is posted to the list, our mail administrators have advised us to
set
> all subscriptions with Yahoo.com to NOPOST. [Redacted since it doesn't
apply to Tweeters]
>
> Other providers have "honored" Yahoo´s policy although they have not set
> the same restrictive policy; they should stop seeing rejections once we
> remove the Yahoo posts. These include Comcast, ATT, MSN, and Hotmail.
>
> If you have a Yahoo address, I encourage you to contact Yahoo.com support
> and tell them "I have been inconvenienced because I am unable to
> participate in Listserv mailing lists because of Yahoo's DMARC policy." I
also
> suggest that you may want to get a different e-mail provider for your
listserv
> subscriptions (and maybe for all your e-mail). While I cannot and do not
> recommend any particular provider, I can inform you that two large
providers
> which have had no problems are Google (Gmail.com) and Apple
> (iCloud.com, me.com, mac.com). There have also been no problems with
> any .org, .gov, or .edu address as far as I know right now.
>
> To repeat, if you are subscribed to the list with a Yahoo address your
> subscription will be set to "nopost" - if you are a Yahoo
> user, you will be able to read messages but not post to the list.
>
> As always don´t hesitate to contact the list owners if you have
questions, but
> please be considerate at this busy time, and try to write us only if you
have
> tried to solve your problem first and gotten stuck. The address to write
is:
>
> [Rest of the email redacted since it doesn't apply to Tweeters]_______________________________________________
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Subject: From the Fill
From: Connie Sidles <constancesidles AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 13:13:15 -0700
Hey tweets, more PIPITS at the Fill today - I think about eight, though it was 
hard to count them all. They flew up from Hunn Meadow East and disappeared 
north. They have far to go and did not tarry. More CINNAMON TEALS arrived in 
the night - there are at least four colorful males on various ponds now. 
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS are singing hard-to-hear grace notes amid the louder 
symphony of Yellow-rumped Warbler songs. 


The great thing about migration is just the sheer effort all these individuals 
put into traveling so far, so fast, all for the chance to nest successfully. 
Imagine the strength of the drive that these birds must feel. We have nothing 
like it - not even my craving for chocolate can compare. Here is a poem for you 
today: 


Before we built jets, birds flew 
the fastest, 
the highest, 
the farthest. 
Amid our engineered lives, 
do not forget 
the wonder of wild things. - Connie, Seattle

constancesidles AT gmail.com
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Subject: Bluebird Weekend
From: Rick Taylor <taylorrl AT outlook.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 12:48:06 -0700
Tweeters,
 
On Saturday, Tina and I made the run down to Mima Mounds in Thurston County to 
see if the bluebirds were still hanging around. We had a couple of Western 
Bluebirds at different points on the south loop and finally found a single male 
Mountain Bluebird perched on an old white sign at the end of the gun club. We 
spent about three hours walking the trails to find these guys. A surprise bonus 
was a hooting sooty grouse in the doug fir forest from the south end of the 
paved trail. 

 
On Sunday, we headed north to chase things in Whatcom county. We dipped on our 
target Greater White-fronted Goose; but, had a surprise find of 4 male and 2 
female Mountain Bluebirds near the corner of Douglas and Lake Terrell Roads. 
There was a flock of American Pipits in the same field. 

 
At Neptune Beach, we found two Rhino Auklets. These are harder to find in 
Whatcom than one would think. After a nice lunch at the re-opened Inn at 
Semihamo, we headed over to the Blaine Marine Park and caught the Marbled 
Godwit on the incoming tide. 11 Whimbrel were in the same area. We got good 
views of the Godwit and Whimbrel from a little point just beyond the Orca 
statue. 

 
Good Birding,
 
Rick

Rick Taylor
Everett, WA


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Subject: Townsend Solitaire at English Boom
From: Andrew McCormick <andy_mcc AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 09:44:49 -0700
Hello Tweets,
Late on Sunday Carol and I decided to look for some shorebirds around the 
Stanwood area and were very surprised to see a Townsend's Solitaire busily 
foraging around the beach at the English Boom Park on Camano Island. It was 
actively feeding and moved from one perch to another around the boardwalk at 
the parking area. It's sure to be in migration and may not be there for long. 


We had stopped first at Eide Road and found two Greater Yellowlegs along with 
many Green-winged Teal and Northern Shovelers. Savannah Sparrows were singing 
and a Northern Harrier made an early evening appearance. From the English Boom 
we drove to the end of Thomle Road and found a flock of about 45 Black-bellied 
Plovers in the field by the dike. It's good to see them in breeding plumage. 
Two Short-eared Owls were flying in the area. At Bow Road a flock of about 
4,000 Snow Geese were gathered in a field until a coyote running among them got 
them all up in the air. The coyote looked a bit dazed and not sure what to do 
with his own success. 


It's good to be able to bird in the evening again.

Andy McComick
Bellevue, WA


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Subject: Townsend's Solitaires moving through Vashon
From: "Ed Swan" <edswan AT centurytel.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 09:39:47 -0700
I received two reports of Townsend's Solitaires moving through yards on
north Vashon Island yesterday.  The two households live a few blocks apart,
so there might be some overlap or it could be two different sets of birds.
Alan and Amy Huggins had two doing some flycatching in their yard and
Kathryn True had 5-6 visiting her pear trees, sampling the blossoms.

 

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

www.theswancompany.com  

edswan AT centurytel.net  

206.463.7976

 
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Subject: New bird for me
From: Carolyn Eagan <carolyn.a.eagan AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 09:32:52 -0700
Hi Tweeters,

This morning a Marbled Godwit landed on our beach.   It was a new bird for
our yard/beach list.   We live at the very north part of Hood Canal on
Squamish Harbor, in a community called Shine.

Carolyn Eagan_______________________________________________
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Subject: bouncing notices from Tweeters
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 09:21:15 -0700 (PDT)
I have previously mentioned that I am not receiving copies of my own posts to 
Tweeters.  For the second time in about two weeks I have received a "bounce" 
notice from Tweeters Central.   According to the e-mail, the fact that I 
received and read the notice indicates my account is OK.  



Apparently I am receiving some messages, but some (including ones sent by me) 
are getting bounced. Did anyone else get bounce notices? 


In answer to some who have replied to my previous e-mails, my lost Tweeters 
posts are not showing up in my spam folder.  



Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA_______________________________________________
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Subject: a pair of peregrines
From: "Martha Jordan" <swanlady AT drizzle.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 09:00:33 -0700
While out visiting a private hunt club between Snohomish and Monroe the
group I was with were surprised by a peregrine falcon coming in low and
taking a duck off the pond. The bird landed on the ground and was likely
contemplating its next action when an adult bald eagle flew into the area
followed by a few crows.  Soon a peregrine was seen flying toward the eagle
and then flying along with the eagle in circles and straight flight into the
next field. The crows were gone once the peregrine and eagle flew together. 

 

I turned back and realized that there was a peregrine sitting on the power
line crossing the field. We realized it was a pair of falcons and a bald
eagle. Truly a great sighting for the day.

 

I hope to find these falcons again in the valley. Has anyone else seen them?

 

As we began to discuss the wildlife habitat value of this acreage, I also
learned that the land owner was very displeased about the ill manners of
some birders regarding the visit of the gyr falcon in the area earlier this
year. He had to ask several trespassers on more than one occassion to leave,
including people on foot or in cars (driving on private roads). As most of
you are aware, once you leave the road right of way in most areas, you are
on private property. If you do not have written permission to be there or
are not with the land owner, please respect private property. Just because
it is not posted does not give anyone the right or privilege to trespass. 

 

Martha Jordan

Everett, WA

 

 
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Subject: Goldfinches arrived
From: "Lynn Tjerne" <lynnt-wa AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 08:34:31 -0700
Goldfinches arrived at my feeders in Puyallup yesterday OMG I was so glad to
hear that wonderful sound.  :-)  Spring is truly here 

 

 

Lynn Tjerne

South Hill - Puyallup WA

Backyard Wildlife Habitat No. 37145

 
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Subject: RE: RFI: Banded Brant Goose
From: Mark Sullivan <msullivan212 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 08:20:58 -0700 (PDT)
Report banded birds at www.reportband.gov. 

Mark Sullivan
msullivan212 AT yahoo.com
Seattle

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Subject: American Bitterns @ Stillwater WMA
From: Michael Fleming <michaelfleming01 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 08:21:28 -0700
   Yesterday I drove over to the Stillwater WMA near Carnation to do
some birding and happened to run into Grace & Ollie Oliver.  The three
of us spent the morning until about 1:00 pm casually birding the area.
 Undoubtedly the highlight of the trip was a pair of mating AMERICAN
BITTERNS with the male putting on a very fine display.  We also
observed a RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER busy excavating a nest hole and some
BUSHTITS attending a nest right next to the trail.  Very nice looks at
a  pair of PURPLE FINCH were also obtained.
   COMMON YELLOWTHROAT and YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS were the only
warbler species that we had.  I ended up with a total of 37 species
and a nice outing with friends.

Cheers and Good Birding;

Michael Fleming
Ballard, Washington
michaelfleming01 AT gmail.com
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Subject: RFI: Banded Brant Goose
From: Clare McLean <clareishere AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 07:23:13 -0700
Hi,

There were about 2-3 dozen Brant Geese at Carkeek Park beach Sunday morning, 
one of which was banded on both feet. I was able to discern most of the 
numbers. 


If you have suggestions about who to contact with this info, please let me 
know. 


Thanks,

Clare McLean
clareishere AT hotmail.com
Seattle, WA

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Subject: trying again yb loon message
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 07:06:26 -0700 (PDT)
Dear Tweeters,

The message below might not have gotten through yesterday, so I will try again.

....

Today, 13 April 2014, there was a Yellow-billed Loon at Samish Island Public 
Beach, also called the Day Use Area or DNR Park. I watched it through the scope 
from 1720-1735, but then it swam off. This was a big loon with thick neck, pale 
head, big whitish-yellow bill with straight and pale culmen, angular shape to 
bill, and so forth. 


At the Wood Sandpiper spot on the Samish Flats were some lovely 
breeding-plumage Dunlin and Black-bellied Plover, but I soon left them to spend 
80 minutes staring into the sun, with nary a Ross's Goose in sight. There were 
about 3500 Snow Geese in the flock, coming closer and closer to my car, and I 
kept seeing certain individuals over again--but no little guys. The flock was 
at the place that people called the Dunlin Fields a few years ago, south of the 
Wood Sandpiper spot, but north of the west end of Darcy Road. 


Also on Samish Flats were a couple of Barn Swallows and a Cliff Swallow.

In the morning, up at Bacon Creek, I heard a Blue Grouse and saw a Ruffed 
Grouse. At Corkindale was a single Townsend's Solitaire, but I was not able to 
find any bluebirds or phoebes upriver today. 


At two upriver locations, I thought I might have heard a Pine Siskin, but 
wasn't sure. I still haven't seen one this year. 


Yours truly,

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Subject: Weekend birding in Garfield & Asotin counties
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 05:54:42 -0700
I enjoyed a sunny spring weekend over in the SE Corner of the state along the 
Snake River, mostly in Asotin & Garfield Counties. 

Water level along the Snake is low enough to expose some shoreline, so I 
wouldn't be surprised if shorebirds show up in the coming weeks in better than 
usual numbers for Garfield & Columbia. 


Saturday 4/12
My day began in Garfield County at the Meadow Creek / Deadman Creek mouths at 
Central Ferry -- at the mouth of Meadow Creek a BLACK-NECKED STILT [code 5 for 
Garfield] was working the mudflats. 

At Rice Bar HMU, a CINNAMON TEAL [code 4] was hanging out well east of the lot. 
A pair of Turkey Vultures [code 4, especially good for lowland Garfield], was 
perched along the shoreline. The shore at Illia Dunes WA looks promising, but 
was mostly empty this weekend. 


Moving into Asotin County, I saw 4 Greater Yellowlegs and a Snow Goose at 
Swallows Park [Clarkston]. Uphill on SR 129 at Savage Rd., another Cinnamon 
Teal was hanging out. A pale brown Richardson's-looking Merlin was in the field 
along Savage Rd. beyond the ponds. Down by Clarkston on the cliffs just 
west/north of town, I watched one of the nesting Peregrine Falcons for a bit. 


Am. White Pelicans have eluded me in Asotin county despite being pretty regular 
in the summer now -- This weekend, I 'outsmarted' them by scanning the Snake 
from the Whitman side -- on the back side of the islands by Chief Timothy SP, a 
group of about 15 pelicans were sitting on the shore. 


Sunday 4/13
The day began at the mouth of Alpowa Creek where 8 AMERICAN AVOCET flew in just 
before I gave up on finding any shorebirds. From there, I worked my way along 
Wawawai Rd. scanning across the river into Garfield Co hoping for shorebirds -- 
no luck, but definitely worth keeping an eye on in the coming weeks. Back in 
Garfield at Illia Dunes, a flock of 40 Northern Shovellers also included 2 more 
Cinnamon Teal. Along Hastings Hill Rd., at the little marshy area on the south 
side of the road just beyond where the gravel begins, I got great looks at a 
very vocal VIRGINIA RAIL [code 4, and my 39th county for seeing VIRA] -- A 
return to the Meadow Creek mouth turned up 2 BLACK-NECKED STILT where yesterday 
there was one. 


The rest of the weekend was mostly spent reconnecting with returning birds -- 
Osprey were back in force, Am. White Pelicans, Caspian Terns, and bright gulls 
were thick along the Snake, Violet-green, Cliff & N.Rough-winged Swallows were 
back in good numbers ---A single Western Kingbird outside Othello and a handful 
of Says Phoebes were my only flycatchers. No warblers or hummers yet, but they 
must be getting close. 



Matt Bartels
Seattle WA



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Subject: Weekend birding in Garfield & Asotin counties
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 05:54:42 -0700
I enjoyed a sunny spring weekend over in the SE Corner of the state along the 
Snake River, mostly in Asotin & Garfield Counties. 

Water level along the Snake is low enough to expose some shoreline, so I 
wouldn't be surprised if shorebirds show up in the coming weeks in better than 
usual numbers for Garfield & Columbia. 


Saturday 4/12
My day began in Garfield County at the Meadow Creek / Deadman Creek mouths at 
Central Ferry -- at the mouth of Meadow Creek a BLACK-NECKED STILT [code 5 for 
Garfield] was working the mudflats. 

At Rice Bar HMU, a CINNAMON TEAL [code 4] was hanging out well east of the lot. 
A pair of Turkey Vultures [code 4, especially good for lowland Garfield], was 
perched along the shoreline. The shore at Illia Dunes WA looks promising, but 
was mostly empty this weekend. 


Moving into Asotin County, I saw 4 Greater Yellowlegs and a Snow Goose at 
Swallows Park [Clarkston]. Uphill on SR 129 at Savage Rd., another Cinnamon 
Teal was hanging out. A pale brown Richardson's-looking Merlin was in the field 
along Savage Rd. beyond the ponds. Down by Clarkston on the cliffs just 
west/north of town, I watched one of the nesting Peregrine Falcons for a bit. 


Am. White Pelicans have eluded me in Asotin county despite being pretty regular 
in the summer now -- This weekend, I 'outsmarted' them by scanning the Snake 
from the Whitman side -- on the back side of the islands by Chief Timothy SP, a 
group of about 15 pelicans were sitting on the shore. 


Sunday 4/13
The day began at the mouth of Alpowa Creek where 8 AMERICAN AVOCET flew in just 
before I gave up on finding any shorebirds. From there, I worked my way along 
Wawawai Rd. scanning across the river into Garfield Co hoping for shorebirds -- 
no luck, but definitely worth keeping an eye on in the coming weeks. Back in 
Garfield at Illia Dunes, a flock of 40 Northern Shovellers also included 2 more 
Cinnamon Teal. Along Hastings Hill Rd., at the little marshy area on the south 
side of the road just beyond where the gravel begins, I got great looks at a 
very vocal VIRGINIA RAIL [code 4, and my 39th county for seeing VIRA] -- A 
return to the Meadow Creek mouth turned up 2 BLACK-NECKED STILT where yesterday 
there was one. 


The rest of the weekend was mostly spent reconnecting with returning birds -- 
Osprey were back in force, Am. White Pelicans, Caspian Terns, and bright gulls 
were thick along the Snake, Violet-green, Cliff & N.Rough-winged Swallows were 
back in good numbers ---A single Western Kingbird outside Othello and a handful 
of Says Phoebes were my only flycatchers. No warblers or hummers yet, but they 
must be getting close. 



Matt Bartels
Seattle WA



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Subject: Killdeer's Diversionary Display/Mason County
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 21:41:38 -0700
On Friday Karen and I came across a pair of Killdeer that had created a nest 
close to a path in Menard's Landing Park that was busy with human and dog 
traffic. We have seen the broken wing act of Killdeer in our yard at Lake Joy 
and elsewhere, but have never seen the display that we came across on Friday as 
shown in this video. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/13789879325/

Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, WA
hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
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Subject: No Skagit Ross's, but Y-B Loon
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 21:34:12 -0700 (PDT)
Dear Tweeters,

Today, 13 April 2014, there was a Yellow-billed Loon at Samish Island Public 
Beach, also called the Day Use Area or DNR Park. I watched it through the scope 
from 1720-1735, but then it swam off. This was a big loon with thick neck, pale 
head, big whitish-yellow bill with straight and pale culmen, angular shape to 
bill, and so forth. 


At the Wood Sandpiper spot on the Samish Flats were some lovely 
breeding-plumage Dunlin and Black-bellied Plover, but I soon left them to spend 
80 minutes staring into the sun, with nary a Ross's Goose in sight. There were 
about 3500 Snow Geese in the flock, coming closer and closer to my car, and I 
kept seeing certain individuals over again--but no little guys. The flock was 
at the place that people called the Dunlin Fields a few years ago, south of the 
Wood Sandpiper spot, but north of the west end of Darcy Road. 


Also on Samish Flats were a couple of Barn Swallows and a Cliff Swallow.

In the morning, up at Bacon Creek, I heard a Blue Grouse and saw a Ruffed 
Grouse. At Corkindale was a single Townsend's Solitaire, but I was not able to 
find any bluebirds or phoebes upriver today. 


At two upriver locations, I thought I might have heard a Pine Siskin, but 
wasn't sure. I still haven't seen one this year. 


Yours truly,

Gary Bletsch_______________________________________________
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Subject: Early Arriving Migrants and a Plea for Caution
From: Jason Hernandez <jason.hernandez74 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 21:05:01 -0700 (PDT)
Well, your point is well taken, but what if I thought the song was a bird that 
should be here, but then I saw it and it wasn't?  A few weeks ago, Stephenson 
Canyon, Bremerton.  Lots of Spotted Towhee songs, nothing unusual about that.  
But then I actually saw one of the birds singing, and it was no towhee!  It 
looked like a Red-Eyed Vireo, except that they are not supposed to have a song 
like a towhee's.  That one confused me, and now I don't know what to call it. 


Jason Hernandez
Bremerton
jason.hernandez74 AT yahoo.com



Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 15:49:07 -0700
From: Brad Waggoner 
Subject: [Tweeters] Early Arriving Migrants and a Plea for Caution
To: tweeters 
Message-ID: <5349C2E3.9060600 AT sounddsl.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Hello All,

I'm not sure how this will come across, and I really have no intent here 
on picking on anyone for tweeters post about arriving migrants and 
breeders. Posts on heard-only birds are especially concerning to those 
of us that attempt to track records in the state of Washington. Ain't 
spring wonderful, especially with glorious days like this with returning 
swallows about, and Common Yellowthroats setting up territory in our 
local marshes, and Orange-crowned Warbler trilling in shrubby riparian 
areas. But, there are a number of species, despite such a nice batch of 
weather, that really do not show until the latter part of the month of 
April or into May. I would encourage all to take a look at bar graphs in 
A Birders Guide to Washington, or for those that really are keen on 
status and distribution here, take a look at Birds of Washington. Take a 
look at when some species normally arrive, and maybe use it as a 
reference source for making calls on certain species. Be careful not to 
interpret rare or casual lines in these graphs as the time they arrive. 
I find that a bit deceiving and arrivals in those dates need superb 
documentation.

Specifically, be very careful of flycatchers, especially a few of our 
empids, pewees, and Olive-sided Flycatchers. Yes, things like Hammond's 
and Pacific-sloped Flycatchers arrive in late April (early to mid April 
could use documentation), but Willow Flycatchers do not arrive until 
mid-May. Pewees and Olive-sided Flycatcher are early May arriving birds, 
but a few might be found in the waning days of April. Warbling and 
Cassin's Vireo do not arrive until later in the month despite a few rare 
or casual marks earlier in April. Red-eyed Vireos, and I will throw in 
American Redstarts, do not show until mid May. Some of are thrushes are 
early migrants including the bluebirds, solitaires, and Hermit Thrush, 
but Veery (a west-side rarity anyway) and Swainson's Thrushes are both 
May arriving birds. A few Swainson's Thrushes may actually show in the 
last few days of April, but I can almost guarantee you will get a "whit" 
vocalization at that time, and not an actual song. They just don't sing 
until they get strongly territorial until after the first week in May. 
Warblers such as Nashville, Black-throated Gray, Wilson's and Macs will 
indeed show quite soon, but Yellow Warbler will not be on the scene 
until early May. Bright Orange-crowned Warblers in March and April can 
be the likely source of early reported Yellows. Western Tanagers, 
Black-headed Grosbeaks, and Lazuli Buntings are late April/first of May 
arriving birds. And chats too arrive in May. Oh yeah, and nighthawks 
don't arrive until late May early June.

Thanks and good birding,

Brad Waggoner
Bainbridge Island, Washington
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Subject: Puzzling male Rufous behavior
From: Sarah Schmidt <4bats AT ixoreus.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 20:52:06 -0700
For the past two days, a male Rufous Hummingbird has been in near 
constant attendance by one of our hummingbird feeders. Of course it's no 
surprise to find a male being territorial at a feeder and chasing away 
other hummers! What I've never seen before is that when he is perched on 
a nearby fence or twig, /his wings are a constant whir/.

When he sits on the feeder drinking, he rests them at his sides. When he 
zips off in chase of another hummer, obviously they whir. But between 
these periodic behaviors, he perches with his wings in constant motion, 
vibrating invisibly fast just as when flying.

I first noticed him doing this at 9:30 yesterday morning. I checked 
frequently throughout the day, and he never stopped whirring his wings 
when he perched.  Hour after hour after hour. Today he's perching in the 
same spots, and although twice we glimpsed him with wings briefly at 
rest, very soon they were whirring again.

Can anyone give me insights into this behavior?

-- 
^o^    ^o^    ^o^    ^o^
Sarah Schmidt
4bats AT ixoreus.com
^o^    ^o^    ^o^    ^o^
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Subject: RFI: Costa Rica
From: "Dick Porter" <dick AT dkporter.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 20:41:20 -0700
Anyone have any experience with Elemento Natural, eco-tourism guides in
Costa Rica?

 

How about Field Guides to Birds for Costa Rica - recommendations??

 

Please contact me directly.  

 

Thanks,

Dick Porter

dick AT dkporter.net
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Subject: Kumlien's Gull fading from Skagit Co 4/6
From: Scott <scottratkinson AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 20:33:32 -0700


Tweeters:
 
FYI two very experienced experts have come back to state that they feel my 
purported Kumlien's was just a washed-out 1st winter GW Gull. Feel free to 
comment if you have not seen the four photos on my flickr site, but both these 
folks have more experience than I with the species, which I've encountered just 
4 other times. 

 
Hot birds up in Skagit County this weekend included a RED-NAPED SAPSUCKER along 
Starbird Rd (on a telephone pole and in an orchard right off the south side, 
1/2 mile from I-5, 4/12) and a TUFTED PUFFIN seen in flight close to the county 
line (with San Juan Co) off Green Pt. today (4/13). Records of the puffin are 
very few (like 4-5) in Skagit Co., and downslope RN Sapsuckers are very few 
also. Several of the usual migrants inbound, including four TURKEY VULTURES 
over n. Texas Rd. near March Pt 4/12 and another low over Arlington (Snohomish 
Co) the same day. Scott AtkinsonLake Stevensmail to: scottratkinson AT hotmail.com 

 

 
 

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Subject: Gold Finches arrived today.
From: L Baxter <mthiker57 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 20:05:50 -0700
Gold Finches arrived at my feeders on Camano Island today.  Black-headed
Grosbeaks should be coming any day now.

Yea!!!!!!!!!!!  Life is good!!!!!

Larry Baxter

mthiker57_at_gmail_dot_com
Camano Island_______________________________________________
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Subject: Wilson's snipe, brown-headed cowbird and Savannah's sparrows at Union Bay
From: Gabe Garms <gabegarms AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 19:33:09 -0700
I put a write-up together of these and all my species encounters in my blog
post at:

http://pnwbirdlanguage.blogspot.com/2014/04/april-12-2014.html_______________________________________________
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Subject: Violet-greens have arrived
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 18:43:05 -0700
Today I had a pair of vgsw buzzing around the yard and checking the nestboxes 
out. First sighting of the year for me. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: RFI Birding Mexico City
From: Richard Anderson <richardanderson59 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 17:31:10 -0700 (PDT)
I'll be in Mexico City the final week in May and I'm hoping for any first-hand 
information regarding birding in that region 


-Safety (possibly without a guide)
- Reliable guides/nature tours
-Locations

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Subject: Census Count: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, Washington on April 13, 2014
From: ErikKnight05 AT gmail.com
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 22:26:03 GMT
This report was mailed for Erik Knight by http://birdnotes.net



Date: April 13, 2014

Location: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, Washington



Low temperature: 54 degrees fahrenheit High temperature: 70 degrees fahrenheit

Wind direction: Variable

Prevailing wind speed: < 1 km/h gusting to: 6-11 km/h

Percentage of sky covered by clouds: 0%

Precipitation: none



from 10:35AM to 4:02PM.



Birds seen (in taxonomic order):



Greater White-fronted Goose        50 [1] 

Canada Goose                      150

Cackling Goose                    302 [2] 

Wood Duck                          11

Gadwall                           450

American Wigeon                    50

Mallard                            60

Blue-winged Teal                    4 [3] 

Cinnamon Teal                      18

Northern Shoveler                 240

Northern Pintail                  100

Green-Winged Teal                 280

Canvasback                          1 [4] 

Ring-necked Duck                   45

Lesser Scaup                       15

Bufflehead                         50

Hooded Merganser                    2

Ruddy Duck                          1

Pied-billed Grebe                  16

Double-crested Cormorant            2

Great Blue Heron                   10

Great Egret                         5

Turkey Vulture                      1

Osprey                              2

Bald Eagle                          7 [5] 

Unidentified Accipiter              1

Red-shouldered Hawk                 2 [6] 

Red-tailed Hawk                     4

American Kestrel                    1

Virginia Rail                       2

American Coot                     500

Sandhill Crane

Greater Yellowlegs                 12

Dunlin                             15

Long-billed Dowitcher               9

Common Snipe                        1

Mourning Dove                       1

Anna's Hummingbird                  1

Rufous Hummingbird                  1

Red-breasted Sapsucker              1

Downy Woodpecker                    1

Northern Flicker                    3

Pileated Woodpecker                 1

Hutton's Vireo                      2

Steller's Jay                       4

Western Scrub-Jay                   7

American Crow                       1

Tree Swallow                      100

Violet-green Swallow                5

Black-capped Chickadee              6

Bushtit                             6

Red-breasted Nuthatch               2

White-breasted Nuthatch             4

Brown Creeper                       1

Bewick's Wren                       7

Winter Wren                         2

Marsh Wren                         10

Ruby-crowned Kinglet                3

American Robin                      8

European Starling                  20

Orange-crowned Warbler              3

Yellow-rumped Warbler              20

Common Yellowthroat                30

Spotted Towhee                      9

Savannah Sparrow                    3

Song Sparrow                       30

Lincoln's Sparrow                   1

Golden-crowned Sparrow              4

Red-winged Blackbird               30

Yellow-headed Blackbird             2

Purple Finch                        3

House Finch                         2

American Goldfinch                  2



Footnotes:



[1]  Carty Lake

[2]  Cackling pair seen near blind parking area

[3]  ad pairs seen on Ruddy & Rest lakes

[4]  male, Rest Lake

[5]  adult pair & juveniles

[6]  seen over Carty Unit



Total number of species seen: 73



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Subject: Cle Elum Rail Road Ponds Saturday
From: Loren Mooney <loren.mooney AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 16:50:57 -0700
I had a couple hours in the morning in Cle Elum, Saturday so I stopped by
the Rail Road Ponds and got a few shots in the good morning light.
Highlights were a Barrow's Goldeneye, and on the way out I spotted a
yellow-bellied marmot in the rocks by the stop light that I hadn't seen
before.  Picks here:  http://mooneyimages.smugmug.com/Galleries/Recent/

-- 
Loren Mooney
Seattle, Washington
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Subject: a peregrine double]
From: "Martha Jordan" <swanlady AT drizzle.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 15:14:16 -0700


While out visiting a private hunt club between Snohomish and Monroe
the

group I was with were surprised by a peregrine falcon coming in low and

taking a duck off the pond. The bird landed on the ground and was
likely

contemplating its next action when an adult bald eagle flew into the
area

followed by a few crows. Soon a peregrine was seen flying toward the
eagle

and then flying along with the eagle in circles and straight flight into
the

next field. The crows were gone once the peregrine and eagle flew
together.



I turned back and realized that there was a peregrine sitting on the
power

line crossing the field. We realized it was a pair of falcons and a
bald

eagle. Truly a great sighting for the day.



I hope to find these falcons again in the valley. Has anyone else seen

them?



As we began to discuss the wildlife habitat value of this acreage, I
also

learned that the land owner was very displeased about the ill manners
of

some birders regarding the visit of the gyr falcon in the area earlier
this

year. He had to ask several trespassers on more than one occassion to
leave,

including people on foot or in cars (driving on private roads). As most
of

you are aware, once you leave the road right of way in most areas, you
are

on private property. If you do not have written permission to be there
or

are not with the land owner, please respect private property. Just
because

it is not posted does not give anyone the right or privilege to
trespass.



Martha Jordan

Everett, WA

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Subject: From the Fill
From: Connie Sidles <constancesidles AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 14:48:10 -0700
Hey tweets, a lovely spring day at the Fill was made even lovelier by the 
presence of some 40 AMERICAN PIPITS, who were foraging in the area around 
Shoveler’s Pond and the Lone Pine Tree. I have never seen so many before. The 
UWBG students have been working on this area for the past couple of growing 
seasons, experimenting with various soils and mulches to see how prairie plants 
might grow. Much of the terrain is gravelly soil and grasses, roped off with 
twine strung between metal posts. One of the pipits decided the twine would 
make a fine perch, not realizing that the twine was pretty bendy. The bird got 
on and began to swing wildly back and forth, at which point, it raised its 
wings and tried sawing the air, like a slack-wire artist about to fall off, but 
no luck. Eventually, it had to let go with its toes and fluttered to the 
ground, adding some evidence that the origins of flight might very well have 
been from the top down, not the ground up. 


Also on view today: 10,000 walkers for MS, a pair of Cinnamon Teals on 
Shoveler’s Pond, and hordes of Yellow-rumped Warblers in beautiful breeding 
plumage getting ready to head out for Alaska. A few Lincoln’s Sparrows and 
Ruby-crowned Kinglets are hanging around just a little while longer too. 


Here is a poem for you today:

Pipits touched down briefly, 
ate a seed or two, then took flight 
into the empty blue sky, 
one haunting pipeet fading behind
in the wind. 

- Connie, Seattle

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Subject: Interlaken and Beyond
From: Larry Hubbell <ldhubbell AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 13:37:33 -0700
Tweeters,

This weeks post is a bit of a potpourri. We have a few shots of the Franklin's 
Gull from Magnuson, a wren and a mystery bird photo from Interlaken and an 
update related to the Barred Owls. 


http://www.unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2014/04/interlaken-and-beyond.html

I hope you find something you enjoy!

Have a great day of Union Bay…where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
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Subject: Sandhilll Cranes near Othello
From: "Sharon" <selizabethbrown AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 13:22:48 -0700
Hi ,

We're wondering if the sandhill cranes are still in the Columbia Wildlife 
Refuge and area around Othello. Any information about their presence there? 
Thanks, Sharon 
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Subject: Common yellowthroat at Spencer Island
From: Gabe Garms <gabegarms AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 13:00:23 -0700
Walk the trails through the wetland area and you'll see a few just off the 
trails in the thickets. 

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Subject: Merlins starting up again in area - 4/13/14
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 12:56:51 -0700
The local Merlin pairs near NE Seattle are putting up "No Vacancy" signs on 
crow nests (and maybe hawk nests) in various tall conifersusually mostly 
Douglas firs). Time to listen for the "kee-kee-kees" and watch for fast-flying 
and divebombing dark shapes. If you are noticing new loud calls that you don't 
recognize and think may be this raptor, call Seattle Audubon Nature Shop, Wild 
Birds Unltd. in Lake Forest Park, or email me - we all are glad to answer your 
questions and point you in a helpful direction. 

Nest sites for these falcons will not be publicized broadly, in deference to 
both the falcons and the neighborhood residents, but general info and locations 
will be shared gradually by word-of-mouth and once each nest and young falcons 
are a certainty. 

Maybe a pair of Merlins will choose your neighborhood to nest in - if so, it'll 
be a delight (well, not for EVERYONE) for you to watch and listen-to all of the 
action between now and August. 

Enjoy this local opportunity. I will update Tweets occasionally throughout the 
season. 


Barb Deihl
North Matthews Beach - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net


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Subject: RE: The Port Townsend's(?) Mole -- and how I became a birder
From: "Gary Smith" <gsmith AT smithandstark.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 12:33:38 -0700
I, too, appreciate Jeff's essays.  This one got me to thinking about how
moles led me to birding, sort of.  I've always had that naming compulsion
that most birders share - what's that plant?  What's that rock?  What's that
bird?

 

When I took up fly-fishing in the 1970s, that led me to learning about
aquatic insects, which led me to thinking about how fishing flies are
invented and constructed, which led me to learning to tie flies, which led
me to thinking about the materials people over the centuries have
inventively applied to hooks in hopes of fooling a fish, which led me to
acquiring my own store of skins and feathers.  (At the peak of my obsession,
I would slam on the brakes to examine the potential value of road kill.  The
rather flattened porcupine I took home didn't turn out to have a lot of
fishing applications.) 

 

In any case, I taught myself to detach and preserve the skins of many dead
critters.  A friend gave me several prized dead animals, such as a Stellar's
Jay and a mole.  As Jeff says, the fur of a mole (sorry Jeff, I have no idea
the species) is wondrously soft, a really luxurious material.  When you spin
it on waxed thread and wind it on a hook, it beautifully mimics the thorax
of certain caddis larvae.)  Most of the materials that fly tiers have used,
of course, started out adorning a bird.  The recipes for flies referred both
to birds and to kinds of feathers I had no idea existed, so you can see
where that would lead.  I was just stunned at the variety and beauty of
feathers.  I was equally amazed at how different feathers serve different
purposes for the bird, and how inventively those characteristics had been
applied to fishing.  I was hooked, so to speak, on an entirely new passion,
and have been an avid birder ever since.

 

This pathway took root in my nephew, too.  When he was a little 9 year-old
living in Chicago, he visited me that summer at my home on Bainbridge
Island.  I pulled a large bird out of my freezer someone had given me.  We
thawed it and spread newspaper on the kitchen floor and skinned the bird.  I
showed him how each part of the bird had different kinds of feathers and
why, and then how the individual parts of the feathers had names, and how
they seemed to work, such as the way that the wing feathers have barbs and
the barbs have barbules and the barbules have little hooks and lock to each
other so the wing gives lift, and how you can zip and unzip those together,
and how in the old days, fly tiers would zip together sections of flight
feathers from different birds to get multiple colors in the wing of an
Atlantic Salmon fly.  And how some of the birds sought in those days are no
longer with us because sometimes humans treat wild creatures unwisely.  We
examined my store of other dead things.  

 

Years later I sat one spring afternoon at the Burke Museum and watched him
deliver his oral defense of his Ph.D. dissertation.  He had observed that
while over the decades many scientists had studied and compared the
characteristics of flight feathers and had developed common terms for
evaluating them, the body feathers of songbirds were comparatively
under-studied and science had not yet arrived at an agreed way of comparing
them.  So he launched just such a comparison and proposed for science a
standard method and 'language' to do this.  I remembered our day on the
kitchen floor.  Nowadays, I bird a lot more than I fish.

 

--g

 

Gary Smith

Alki Point, Seattle

 

From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Jeff Gibson
Sent: Sunday, April 13, 2014 4:27 AM
To: tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] The Port Townsend's(?) Mole

 

Still camped out here in Port Townsend, where I've discovered a mole.
 
Now this is not the Russian mole of spy novels (which my dads bookshelves
are full of), because what would a Russian spy do here in Port Townsend?
Possibly looking for the next Crimea? I mean Port Townsend is a seaport,
with a naval weapons depot, and the town is no doubt full of pinko commie
sympathizers ("better pink than fink"), Marxist philosophers (Karl had some
great ideas, but I kinda like the other Marx brothers), forest radicals,
etc. And Port Townsend has a suspiciously good food co-op for the size of
the town - a sure sign of creeping socialism.
 
The problem with this theory is that Russia aint really communist, or even
pinko anymore - just another sorry-pants oligarchy, which are quite popular
these days around the world. With the oligarchs that is. I don't imagine
Port Townsend being up with that.
 
Moving right along, the mole I found (the burrowing animal ) was really more
interesting, although dead. All the moles I've ever seen (except one big
honkin' Townsend's Mole) have been dead, but all pretty fresh. They have
remarkable velvety fur ( favorite mole band?; The Velvet Underground).
 
Well my mole find the other day was'nt so fuzzy. In fact it was pretty much
a flattened skeleton, with just enough dried parchment- like skin to hold
the bones together. I found it under a woodpile that my dad was moving. The
only way I knew it even was a mole was because it still had one front paw
sticking out - the broad palmed dirt paddle, with 5 claws, looking
remarkably like a human hand .
 
On closer inspection, I saw a very strange looking bone, which turned out to
be the lower jaw bone, fringed with fine teeth. I got out my old 10x hand
lens to examine the teeth. Unlike the dreaded plant chomping Gopher, and
other rodents, the mole doesnt have plant nipping incisors, and plant
crushing molars; the mole is an Insectivore and has a jaw full of sharp
teeth. It really reminded me of another skull I'd seen a picture of - that
of a toothed whale. In another exciting episode of Parallel Evolution ('form
follows function' and all that), the mole and whales need sharp teeth to
grab and tear the slippery fish, squid, or in the moles case, worms, that
they eat. Even the moles molars are sharp.
 
Now that whole Townsend's thing. For sort of literary kinda reasons, I would
like my mole to be a Townsend's Mole. But it could be the similar, but
smaller Coast (or Pacific) Mole. Aparently you cant tell by the skull
details, and this specimen is only about 4 inches long, so could be a
youngster of either type, both found around here.
 
Port Townsend was not named for the Townsend's Mole, or vice versa. Port
Townsend was named in 1792 by Captain George Vancouver for his buddy and
fellow royal military nerd, the Marqui of Townshend.
 
John Kirk Townsend , a name that should be familiar to northwest
naturalists, was an American naturalist and ornithologist who explored the
northwest in the 1830's and has a fairly long list of creatures with his
name attatched to 'em, from moles, to bats, voles etc.
 
Since this is Tweeters, I should  note the man's name is also associated
with two birds, as  you probably know - The Townsends Warbler, that
wonderfuly colorful bird of the conifers, and the Townsends Solitaire, which
in my opinion is one of the most charismatic nondescript birds one could
hope for. You can see both of these in Port Townsend. If your'e lucky.

 

Jeff Gibson

NSI ( Natural Scene Investigator)

snooping in, 

Port Townsend Wa
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Subject: Grays Harbor Shorebird Festival
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 12:06:21 -0700
Tweeters,

As you may already know, the Grays Harbor Shorebird Festival (
http://www.shorebirdfestival.com) is rapidly approaching - April 25-27.  I
attended this festival last year and found it to be quite worth my time.
 Where else are you going to find tens of thousands of shorebirds staging
for their next northward leg to coastal Alaska before their final push to
the high arctic and experts to interpret what you are seeing!  If you are
concerned about only seeing shorebirds (what?) and want more, one visit to
the Pt. Brown Jetty in Ocean Shores to witness the northbound migration of
seabirds is spectacle enough.  Here's a message that I posted last year:


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Tweeters,

As Bill Shelmerdine mentioned, it was a good day of seawatching at Pt.
Brown Jetty at Ocean Shores, Gray Harbor County yesterday morning and this
morning.  I was there for about 4.5 hours yesterday - 7:30-noonish with the
following results:

(some type of ) Cackling Goose: 16,450 (many, many flocks with an average
flock size of 450)
Bonaparte's Gull: 3,000 - probably conservative, large numbers everywhere
Pacific Loon: 1,200
Red-throated Loon: 300
Common Loon: 150
Surf Scoter: 525
White-winged Scoter: 65
Green-winged Teal: 150 - many small groups and scattered in with scoter
flocks
BLUE-WINGED TEAL: 2 (in scoter flock)
Northern Shoveller: 18
Greater Scaup: 2
Harelequin Duck: 5
Black Brant: 38
Brandt's Cormorant: 10
Pelagic Cormorant: 45
Surfbird: 15
Black Turnstone: 25
Ruddy Turnstone: 1
Rock Sandpiper: 2 (alternate plumage - the first I've ever seen in
this plumage!)
Black Oystercatcher: 3
Red-necked Phalarope: 450
Sanderling: 800 (on beach)
Dunlin: 300 (on beach)
Western Sandpiper: 2800 (on beach)
Semiplamated Plover : 15 (on beach)
Marbled Godwit: 250 (on beach at different times)
Whimbrel: 20
Black-bellied Plover: 10
Rhinoceros Auklet: 45
Pigeon Guillemot: 10
Marbled Murrelet: 2
Common Murre: 20
Red-necked Grebe: 1
Western Grebe: 2
Eared Grebe: 1
Horned Grebe: 1
Sooty Shearwater: 15
Pink-footed Shearwater: 1
ARCTIC TERN: 2 (very gray and no necked profile)
many gulls that went ignored and unidentified
ZERO Greater White-fronted Goose

mammals included:

Grey Whale: at least 8
Harbor Porpoise: at least 25 - seemingly everywhere between the jetties
including breaching, spy-hopping, etc.  Quite a few young ones
Harbor Seal: 5
Steller's Sea Lion: 3 (I think I have this identification correct)

probably other species that I've forgotten or didn;t bother to list.

This morning, I watched from about 7am until 8:30 when the rain started:  I
set the scope in one spot and counted birds flying through the field of
view.  It was very difficult to get actual numbers since large numbers of
birds were flying north at all distances.  From the beginning, I knew it
was a big loon day:

7am-8am:
Pacific Loon: 11,890 (450/minute for 20 minutes and then lesser pulses)
Red-throated Loon: 45
Common Loon: 196 (many flying behind me or fairly high overhead)
Cackling Goose: 1,560
Black Brant: 102
Bonaparte's Gull: 800 (large flock milling around offshore)
COMMON TERN: 6 (with Bonaparte's Gull flock - profile indicated Common)
Surf Scoter: 630
White-winged Scoter: 150 (many small flocks)
Sooty Shearwater - 100s
Harlequin Duck: 2
Rhinoceros Auklet: 65
Common Murre: 400

8-8:30 (stream of closer birds slowed considerably and went further out so
identification was much more difficult - however, birds filled the horizon):

Pacific Loon: 335
Common Loon: 30
Red-throated Loon: 53
Surf Scoter: 116
White-winged Scoter: 12
Rhinoceros Auklet: 45
Common Murre: many
Western Grebe: 1

It was a very enjoyable two partial days of seawatching - made me wish I
lived on the coast!

Keep your eyes....seaward.....


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 


Speakers and photographers will be there to help you hone your artistic and
photographic eye.  Of course, a third prong of your visit to the Grays
Harbor/Ocean Shores area for the festival is to visit the local vendors -
talented artists and photographers and also have your bird feeding and bird
observation (aka optics as well as optics 101 to advanced information,
cleaning, and adjustments) needs met.

Hope to see you there!

Keep your eyes and ears witnessing migration!

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-723-0345
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Subject: some Cle Elum and E-burg finds - last Mon. 4/7/14
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 11:57:39 -0700
Almost forgot to post about a few highlights of my trip EOM (east of the mts.) 
last Mon. 


I want to go back to check on the Hairy Woodpecker nest and the Pygmy Nuthatch 
nest that I saw in the making on 2 different bleached snags along the RR Ponds 
road, near Spring Chinook Wy. that goes across the bridge to the hatchery. 


Found lots of occupied raptor nests, all with Red-tailed Hawks in them or 
standing guard nearby. Many unoccupied ones, too and many I couldn't stop to 
look because I either had no place to pull over or I was already making a 
beeline for some place else. 


Didn't make it to Yakima Canyon, but hope to this week.

I ended the day on Umptanum Rd. with a Great Horned Owl up on a utility pole 
down in the farm area. 


You can see my hit-and-mostly-miss photos at:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsjWGc2i9


Barb Deihl
North Matthews Beach - NE Seattle
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Subject: A Cautionary Tale on Nest Boxes
From: ck park <travelgirl.fics AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 11:33:37 -0700
this message was originally posted to inlandcountybirds (southern
california).  re-posted here with author's permission:

 1   Prado Basin update, and a cautionary tale on nest-boxes

 

  Sat Apr 12, 2014 11:42 am (PDT) . Posted by:   "jpike44" vireos44

 




Lastly, a RIV CO group, wanting to replicate the Prado Basin Tree Swallow
nest-box program, had a volunteer build 30 nest-boxes that were then placed
around some ponds. Unfortunately, the boxes weren't constructed to-plan,
with the absence of doors being a notable oversight. My offer to replace
the boxes that appeared to already be occupied by swallows with our surplus
boxes was accepted, and I began knocking the roofs off the boxes a couple
weeks ago. On completion, I had found no nest-initiation, but instead found
twenty dead adult swallows (with some boxes housing two to three dead
birds), and three live swallows. An examination revealed that a
lower-than-normal floor (below the bottom of the walls, rather than within
them) contributed to an entrance-hole that was 1.5 - 2 inches higher than
boxes used in the Basin. That greater depth, combined with the slick inner
surfaces of never-been-used boxes, created a trap from which the
weak-legged swallows couldn't escape. A nest-box will never seem quite so
simple a device to me again.

Jim Pike
Prado Basin/HB

===

00 caren
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Subject: Hummer Withdrawal / Wedgwood
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 AT seanet.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 11:26:16 -0700
Hi Tweeters -

Another gorgeous day in Seattle and both last weekend and this weekend, I've 
been fortunate to see the little chicks (one or the other / North or South) in 
various shrubs waiting to be fed, doing wing trials, and keeping Caryn from 
doing any gardening (photography is way easier on the foot anyway). I could sit 
and watch these little chicks for hours. Yesterday, one lit and on a branch 
right in front of me - too close to move! What a taunt that was! 


So, guess I'm heading out for another day of birding in the backyard. Luckily, 
there's a flicker nest going in across the street so I'll have something to 
take my mind off my empty nest. But there are still so many more hummers here 
this year. I think we've got pretty good habitat to settle down in. 


For my hummer friends - please be patient...photos will be "out soon". :)

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Subject: e-mail problems (part two)
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 09:54:05 -0700 (PDT)
Thanks to all who responded.  Apparently my e-mails are making it through to 
Tweetsters even though the e-mails may not be making it back to me. 


 
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Wahkiakum County birding
From: "washingtonbirder.Ken Knittle" <washingtonbirder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 09:52:11 -0700
Saturday 4-12-14 Tom Mansfield and I birded Wahkiakum County. Places visited 
were: scoping from Hwy 4 over to White's Island where we had 1 Eared Grebe nw 
of the island. Then we hit Puget Island with nothing super good, but some year 
birds for us. The sewer ponds in Cathlamet were pretty dead bird wise. 


Heading west we planned to bird the Julia Butler Hansen NWR, but found signs on 
both ends closed to entry. Don't know how long it will be closed. Along Brooks 
Slough Road which was open we had a late Sooty Fox Sparrow. We then headed to 
Altoona to catch the tide coming in for best scoping only to find the tide 
already was in once we got there. Still lots of Greater Scaup with 12 Horned 
Grebes, 4 Red-throated Loons, 1 Common Loon, a few Common Goldeneye, 2 Surf 
Scoters, and 3 Ruddy Ducks. 

 
With the tide high we checked out the west side of Deep River and found 5 
Lesser Yellowlegs, 3 Short-billed Dowitchers, and 2 Dunlin sitting on logs 
close to shore. A Northern Rough-winged Swallow was near the end of the road. 

 
Heading back east we ate lunch up the West Valley Road surrounded by 
clear-cuts. 2 Western Bluebirds, 1 Hutton's Vireo, Gray Jays calling along with 
1 Sooty Grouse were nice. 


Our last main stop was on top of Beaver Creek Road. Still pretty quiet, but did 
have 1 varied Thrush calling and 2 Sooty Grouse vocalizing. The total birds 
seen in Wahkiakum County was 80. 





Ken
 Knittle

Vancouver WA 
98665 mailto:washingtonbirder AT hotmail.com
Washington Birder online 



http://www.wabirder.com/
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Subject: The Port Townsend's(?) Mole
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 04:26:44 -0700
Still camped out here in Port Townsend, where I've discovered a mole.
 
Now this is not the Russian mole of spy novels (which my dads bookshelves are 
full of), because what would a Russian spy do here in Port Townsend? Possibly 
looking for the next Crimea? I mean Port Townsend is a seaport, with a naval 
weapons depot, and the town is no doubt full of pinko commie sympathizers 
("better pink than fink"), Marxist philosophers (Karl had some great ideas, but 
I kinda like the other Marx brothers), forest radicals, etc. And Port Townsend 
has a suspiciously good food co-op for the size of the town - a sure sign of 
creeping socialism. 

 
The problem with this theory is that Russia aint really communist, or even 
pinko anymore - just another sorry-pants oligarchy, which are quite popular 
these days around the world. With the oligarchs that is. I don't imagine Port 
Townsend being up with that. 

 
Moving right along, the mole I found (the burrowing animal ) was really more 
interesting, although dead. All the moles I've ever seen (except one big 
honkin' Townsend's Mole) have been dead, but all pretty fresh. They have 
remarkable velvety fur ( favorite mole band?; The Velvet Underground). 

 
Well my mole find the other day was'nt so fuzzy. In fact it was pretty much a 
flattened skeleton, with just enough dried parchment- like skin to hold the 
bones together. I found it under a woodpile that my dad was moving. The only 
way I knew it even was a mole was because it still had one front paw sticking 
out - the broad palmed dirt paddle, with 5 claws, looking remarkably like a 
human hand . 

 
On closer inspection, I saw a very strange looking bone, which turned out to be 
the lower jaw bone, fringed with fine teeth. I got out my old 10x hand lens to 
examine the teeth. Unlike the dreaded plant chomping Gopher, and other rodents, 
the mole doesnt have plant nipping incisors, and plant crushing molars; the 
mole is an Insectivore and has a jaw full of sharp teeth. It really reminded me 
of another skull I'd seen a picture of - that of a toothed whale. In another 
exciting episode of Parallel Evolution ('form follows function' and all that), 
the mole and whales need sharp teeth to grab and tear the slippery fish, squid, 
or in the moles case, worms, that they eat. Even the moles molars are sharp. 

 
Now that whole Townsend's thing. For sort of literary kinda reasons, I would 
like my mole to be a Townsend's Mole. But it could be the similar, but smaller 
Coast (or Pacific) Mole. Aparently you cant tell by the skull details, and this 
specimen is only about 4 inches long, so could be a youngster of either type, 
both found around here. 

 
Port Townsend was not named for the Townsend's Mole, or vice versa. Port 
Townsend was named in 1792 by Captain George Vancouver for his buddy and fellow 
royal military nerd, the Marqui of Townshend. 

 
John Kirk Townsend , a name that should be familiar to northwest naturalists, 
was an American naturalist and ornithologist who explored the northwest in the 
1830's and has a fairly long list of creatures with his name attatched to 'em, 
from moles, to bats, voles etc. 

 
Since this is Tweeters, I should note the man's name is also associated with 
two birds, as you probably know - The Townsends Warbler, that wonderfuly 
colorful bird of the conifers, and the Townsends Solitaire, which in my opinion 
is one of the most charismatic nondescript birds one could hope for. You can 
see both of these in Port Townsend. If your'e lucky. 

 
Jeff Gibson
NSI ( Natural Scene Investigator)
snooping in, 
Port Townsend Wa
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Subject: e-mail problems?
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 01:53:16 -0700 (PDT)
I recently received an e-mail from Tweeters stating that Tweeters' posts were 
bouncing off my e-mail address.  The e-mail went on to say that if I had 
received that particular  e-mail,  everything was OK with my Tweeters account. 



While I continue to receive Tweeters' posts made by others, the last two posts 
I have made to Tweeters have not shown up in my e-mail inbox.  



If you have received this post, please send me a direct personal reply stating 
as such.  

 
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA_______________________________________________
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Subject: test message
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 23:29:27 -0700 (PDT)
this is a test

 
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Subject: Mountain Quail (yes) at Mary Hrudkaj's home in Mason County 4/12/14
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 20:40:23 -0700
Karen and I had the pleasure of meeting Mary who was a very gracious host by 
allowing us to sit in her home for two consecutive mornings until we saw two 
Mountain Quail. She also shared her extensive knowledge of birding including 
printing maps that helped us find some excellent birding locations in Mason 
County. Thank you Mary! 


On the second morning we got several good looks at the quail, but they were 
difficult to photograph due to their skittishness and speed. 

> 
> Video:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/13811387713/
>  
> Photos:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/13811387693/
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/13811386753/

Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, Wa
hankdotheibergatyahoodotcom
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Subject: FOY Avian chick and it's a .......
From: Tony <tvarela AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 20:05:31 -0700
While out for a walk near Swantown Marina in Olympia we observed three young 
Killdeer and parents. The first avian young of the year for me. 


What is your first sighting of young this Spring? 

https://flic.kr/p/n3ukKR


- Regards

Tony Varela
South Puget Sound, WA
tvarela at hotmail dot com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tony-v

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Subject: Mountain bluebird at Magnuson Park
From: Brian Pendleton <kc7wpd AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 19:52:57 -0700
A female Mountain Bluebird was fly catching around the been at the NW corner of 
the boat launch parking area this evening at 7:30PM. 

No gulls on the swim platform.
Brian Pendleton
253-350-1651
Seattle, WA_______________________________________________
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