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Updated on Sunday, January 25 at 11:58 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-browed Robin-Chat,©Barry Kent Mackay

25 Jan Re: Barrow's Goldeneye Communal Roost on Green Lake, Seattle [Hal Michael ]
25 Jan RE: Barrow's Goldeneye Communal Roost on Green Lake, Seattle ["Kelly McAllister" ]
25 Jan N Pygmy Owl present at Chinook Bend today [Ed Newbold ]
24 Jan Re: Pierce County, Black Phoebe [Michael Brown ]
24 Jan Pantanal (Brazil) Wildlife - a video by Ray H [Barbara Deihl ]
24 Jan Ridgefield NWR ["Dave Hayden" ]
24 Jan The long and the short of it. Eide-Edmonds ["barry " ]
24 Jan RE: Barrow's Goldeneye Communal Roost on Green Lake, Seattle ["Wayne Weber" ]
24 Jan Pierce County, Black Phoebe ["Bruce LaBar" ]
24 Jan Townsend's Solitaire at Dash Point [Shep Thorp ]
24 Jan Barrow's Goldeneye Coomunal Roost on Green Lake, Seattle [Martin Muller ]
24 Jan owl book title correction [Barbara Deihl ]
24 Jan Marked crow ["andie777" ]
24 Jan Union Bay Watch | The Point of No Return [Larry Hubbell ]
24 Jan BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 25, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
24 Jan Eide Road Short-eared Owls ["Mike McAuliffe" ]
24 Jan RFI American Robin communal roosts [Nigel Ball ]
24 Jan Dennis Paulson on Sapsuckers [Peter H Wimberger ]
23 Jan North Mason County birding 1/23 [Tim Brennan ]
24 Jan Unusually golden plumage on Anna's Hummingbird ["Tucker, Trileigh" ]
24 Jan Am. Dipper in Kenmore [Linda Phillips ]
23 Jan Red-naped YES ["MT" ]
23 Jan Re: Where is Chinook Bend? [Todd Sahl ]
23 Jan Re: Where is Chinook Bend? ["lsr AT ramoslink.info" ]
23 Jan Semi-OT: Teanaway Community Forest ["Michael Hobbs" ]
23 Jan Re: Where is Chinook Bend? [Todd Sahl ]
23 Jan Where is Chinook Bend? ["Wayne Weber" ]
23 Jan Kayu Kayu Ac Park in Shoreline [Michael Fleming ]
23 Jan great book on owls of the west - 1/23/15 [Barbara Deihl ]
23 Jan Hummer activity continues / Caryn / Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler ]
23 Jan Re: Big Barn Theory [Beth Thompson ]
23 Jan Re: Kingfisher Belts and Swallows Fish at Edmonds Marina [Bill Anderson ]
22 Jan RTH Beak Deformity [Sammy Catiis ]
23 Jan RE: KKK Day Today [Jon Houghton ]
23 Jan KKK Day Today [Jon Houghton ]
22 Jan Kingfisher Belts and Swallows Fish at Edmonds Marina [Hank ]
22 Jan RE: Big Barn Theory ["Jeff Kozma" ]
23 Jan Re: Clark Co - red-tailed or rough-legged? ["Wilson Cady" ]
22 Jan Clark Co - red-tailed or rough-legged? [Luke Hanes ]
22 Jan Clark Co - is this a Red-tailed or...? [Luke Hanes ]
22 Jan Correction: Swans on Capitol Lake ["Wendy Tanowitz" ]
22 Jan Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2015-01-22 [Michael & Janka Hobbs ]
22 Jan Northern Pygmy Owl at Chinook Bend---Yes. ["Marvin Hoekstra" ]
22 Jan correction: Pair of Mute Swans and yearling MIDDLE BASIN Capitol Lake, Olympia ["Wendy Tanowitz" ]
22 Jan Pair of Mute Swans and yearling middle basin Capitol Lake, Olympia ["Wendy Tanowitz" ]
22 Jan Am Dipper(#113) Clark Co, WA [Bob ]
22 Jan Am Dipper(#113) Clark Co, WA [Bob ]
22 Jan Gray jay(#110) and sooty grouse (#111) Clark Co., WA [Bob ]
22 Jan Gray jay(#110) and sooty grouse (#111) Clark Co., WA [Bob ]
22 Jan NIsqually NWR 1/21/15 []
22 Jan re: GHOW nest [Dianna Moore ]
22 Jan SORRY Tweeters ... Re: PIX --- B-W Warbler [Lyn Topinka ]
22 Jan Red-throated loon continues Marine Park, Clark Co, WA [Bob ]
22 Jan Red-throated loon continues Marine Park, Clark Co, WA [Bob ]
22 Jan Great Horned Owl Nest live []
21 Jan yellow-shafted flicker ["MT" ]
21 Jan 2 NOPO day at Chinook Bend [Hank ]
21 Jan RE: Ill House Finch? []
21 Jan Magnuson Park, 21 January 2015 [Scott Ramos ]
21 Jan Barn Swallows again today in Marysville [stan Kostka lynn Schmidt ]
21 Jan RFI: Birding Registration sites [amy schillinger ]
21 Jan North Cascades Audubon monthly meeting Jan 27 at 7 PM Whatcom Museum [Twink Coffman ]
21 Jan Pygmy Owls at Chinook Bend [Blair Bernson ]
21 Jan Re: Ill House Finch? ["Candace C. Plant" ]
21 Jan Ill House Finch? []
21 Jan Cameras ["McComb Gardens" ]
21 Jan In High- beam Country [Jeff Gibson ]
22 Jan OCWA in Olympia [Jennifer DeSelle ]
21 Jan A shrike, strikes ["Rob Sandelin" ]
21 Jan Port Angeles waterfront Tuesday @2:15pm ["McComb Gardens" ]
21 Jan Longear Goes A'Hunting - 1/20/15 [Barbara Deihl ]
21 Jan (Clark Co) Red-throated Loon & Tufted at Marine Park [Luke Hanes ]
21 Jan pine siskins in NE Olympia [Jennifer DeSelle ]
21 Jan Midway Atoll Albatross Count [Bill Anderson ]
20 Jan Fwd: Bird nest ID? [Hank ]
20 Jan Bird nest ID? [Hank ]

Subject: Re: Barrow's Goldeneye Communal Roost on Green Lake, Seattle
From: Hal Michael <ucd880 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 16:23:48 +0000 (UTC)
Is there any idea if there are fewer Barrow's, if climate change has moved 
them, or if the continued development of Oly has pushed them out? 




Hal Michael 
Olympia WA 
360-459-4005 (H) 
360-791-7702 (C) 
ucd880 AT comcast.net 

----- Original Message -----



I remember the exciting sound of whistling wings when crossing the 5th Ave 
bridge in the waning light of November afternoons during the early 1970s. 
Flock after flock of Barrow's Goldeneyes would pass on their way into 
Capitol Lake. Scott Richardson, in his book, "East Bay Bird Guide", actually 
captured a bit of detail (thankfully) about a phenomenon that appears to be 
completely a thing of the past: 

Referring to a line graph of goldeneye counts, Scott writes: 

"One line (closed circles) shows maximum counts of goldeneyes flying over 
the 5th Avenue bridge between 15:30 and 17:00 on November afternoons. Glen 
and Wanda Hoge made these counts after finding that Budd Inlet had a 
goldeneye glut in November, with most migrants roosting on Capitol Lake at 
night. " 

The caption to the graph reads, "The Hoges typically tallied 1200 to 1500 
between 1973 and 1984". 

I remember at least attempt I made, probably around 2000, to see if any 
goldeneyes still flew into Capitol Lake on November afternoons, with 
disappointing results. 

Kelly McAllister 
Olympia, Washington 



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Subject: RE: Barrow's Goldeneye Communal Roost on Green Lake, Seattle
From: "Kelly McAllister" <mcallisters4 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 07:40:56 -0800

I remember the exciting sound of whistling wings when crossing the 5th Ave
bridge in the waning light of November afternoons during the early 1970s.
Flock after flock of Barrow's Goldeneyes would pass on their way into
Capitol Lake. Scott Richardson, in his book, "East Bay Bird Guide", actually
captured a bit of detail (thankfully) about a phenomenon that appears to be
completely a thing of the past:

Referring to a line graph of goldeneye counts, Scott writes:

"One line (closed circles) shows maximum counts of goldeneyes flying over
the 5th Avenue bridge between 15:30 and 17:00 on November afternoons. Glen
and Wanda Hoge made these counts after finding that Budd Inlet had a
goldeneye glut in November, with most migrants roosting on Capitol Lake at
night. "

The caption to the graph reads, "The Hoges typically tallied 1200 to 1500
between 1973 and 1984".

I remember at least attempt I made, probably around 2000, to see if any
goldeneyes still flew into Capitol Lake on November afternoons, with
disappointing results.

Kelly McAllister
Olympia, Washington



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Subject: N Pygmy Owl present at Chinook Bend today
From: Ed Newbold <ednewbold1 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 06:13:32 +0000 (UTC)
 Hi all,
Just letting folks know the Northern Pygmy Owl was indeed present at Chinook 
Bend  (previous tweeter posts give link to a map of where this along 
Carnation Farm Road) today.  It's always reassuring when you get to the 
destination and all the scopes are pointed in the same direction. 

Late in the aft it got interested in something and dropped faster than a 
rock onto the ground about 10 feet straight down.  

At nearby Sykes Lake just past Carnation Farm one of the Golden Eagles was seen 
this aft. (we missed it) 

Best
Ed Newbold

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Subject: Re: Pierce County, Black Phoebe
From: Michael Brown <michael AT flycatcherfile.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 21:16:17 -0800
This area described is actually the oxbow located in the center of the 
development known as Radiance. Sha Dadx is a little farther west, between 54th 
and Frank Albert Road. Sha Dadx is surrounded by a ring dike, and is managed by 
the Puyallup Tribe. 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bruce LaBar  wrote:

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Subject: Pantanal (Brazil) Wildlife - a video by Ray H
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 19:46:28 -0800
from a recent trip to this large wetland in Brazil, Ray & Dory H put together 
this video: 


Just google:  Chasing Jaguars by Ray H and it should come up  - 


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: Ridgefield NWR
From: "Dave Hayden" <dtvhm AT nwrain.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 19:36:37 -0800
Sherry and I visited the River S unit of Ridgefield NWR. finding 41 species. 
There were lots of waterfowl as usual. Over a hundred TUNDRA SWANS were seen on 
Rest Lake, along with RUDDY DUCKS, NORTHERN PINTAILS, GREEN-WINGED TEAL, and 
other waterfowl. The raptors were out and about with 3 NORTHERN HARRIERS, 9 
RED-TAILED HAWKS, 3 AMERICAN KESTRELS, and 4 BALD EAGLES. The pair of GREAT 
HORNED OWLS were in their snag tree. In a wet muddy section, we had at least 35 
WILSON’S SNIPE accompanied with 13 KILLDEER. We picked up a WHITE-BREASTED 
NUTHATCH working the Oregon Ash on the way to the blind. We had a cooperative 
AMERICAN BITTERN working the waters edge in the canal on the south end of the 
refuge. Five GREAT EGRETS were seen throughout, and we had 9 YELLOW-RUMPED 
WARBLERS, 3 MARSH WRENS, and a BELTED KINGFISHER. In the far south east corner 
of the refuge we spotted 3 Columbian White-tailed Deer. 


Dave Hayden
dtvhm at nwrain.com
Centralia, WA



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Subject: The long and the short of it. Eide-Edmonds
From: "barry " <levineb AT fastmail.fm>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 19:13:02 -0800
Tweeters,
A group of 5 of us had quite an exceptional day of birding from Stanwood
to Fir Island, to Valentine Rd and finishing in Edmonds.
We were able to find both of the roosting Long-eared Owls and most of
the rest of the birds that others have recently seen along Eide Rd.
>From there we went to the Game Range on Fir Island and saw a House Wren
along with a large group of other birds along Wiley Slough just out of
the west parking lot. 
The group of about 6000 Snow Geese with one Blue morph were close by to
the game range. 
At Randy and Wendy's feeders the usual suspects all seemed to be there. 
Finished up at Edmonds. A Brandt's Cormorant near the fishing pier was a
nice find. We also watched at close range as a Double crested caught a
good sized rockfish.
It then proceeded to skillfully get it turned around before swallowing
it. It then swam away in spastic movements as it seemed the big fish was
reaping havoc inside the bird.
Also observed as a first for all in the group was a Horned Grebe with a
fish in its bill getting chased by a Common Merganser. Both birds ran
across the water with wings flapping for about 80 yards
until the grebe decided to release it's catch. 
Temperatures near 60, great company and excellent birds. Who could ask
for more in the Pacific Northwest in late January?
All the best
-- 
  barry 
  levineb AT fastmail.fm

-- 
http://www.fastmail.com - A no graphics, no pop-ups email service

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Subject: RE: Barrow's Goldeneye Communal Roost on Green Lake, Seattle
From: "Wayne Weber" <contopus AT telus.net>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 19:07:59 -0800
Martin and Tweeters,

I enjoyed reading your account of the Barrow's Goldeneye roost on Green
Lake. The same thing happens on Lost Lagoon in Vancouver's Stanley Park. (I
covered this area for many years on Vancouver's Christmas Bird Count,
although I have not done so recently.) Lost Lagoon is a shallow freshwater
lake in Stanley Park. Barrow's Goldeneyes are not seen there during the
daytime; they feed on nearby rocky saltwater shorelines, often in mixed
flocks with Surf Scoters.

Vancouver has much higher numbers of Barrow's Goldeneyes than Seattle; we
average about 2000 of them, and usually have the highest count in the world
on the Christmas Bird Count. Not all of them spend the night on Lost Lagoon;
there are usually several hundred there, although I don't recall the highest
count offhand. Large numbers of Common Goldeneyes roost in Lost Lagoon at
night as well, although unlike the Barrow's, small numbers of them can
usually be found there during the day as well.

It sounds like all your attempts to count Barrow's Goldeneyes at Green Lake
have been in the early morning. My experience is that it is easier to count
them in the late afternoon; they usually come into Lost Lagoon to roost when
it is lighter out than when most of them leave in the morning.

I'd be interested in hearing from people in Olympia, which also usually has
large numbers of wintering Barrow's Goldeneyes. Do the Barrow's Goldeneyes
there spend the day on salt water and roost at night on Capitol Lake?  This
may in fact be a widespread pattern, not just something that happens on
Green Lake.

Good luck and good birding,

Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC
contopus AT telus.net
 


-----Original Message-----
From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Martin
Muller
Sent: January-24-15 3:09 PM
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Barrow's Goldeneye Coomunal Roost on Green Lake, Seattle

Tweeters,

For many years I have known (and occasionally reported on) wintering
Barrow's Goldeneyes forgoing their customary salt water hangout to fly to
freshwater Green Lake to roost. Their numbers vary between 30 and 60 during
the winter months. One has to get to the area they favor on the lake (the
south corner near the Aqua Theater) before sunrise. A scope helps.

I expect to find the birds in this location during the CBC in late-December.
Usually we start the CBC in this area (because of the Barrow's presence
there). Starting at around 07:25 - 07:30  the birds leave the lake in
(initially) small groups of 3 - 10, but the last group, right around 8 AM
may be a single flock of all remaining birds (up to 25). Then the rest of
the day one may find only one or two Common Goldeneyes on the lake.

This past (2014) CBC, to my surprise, I didn't find any Barrow's Goldeneyes
at Green Lake when I arrived at 07:30. Did I miss them or had they changed
their behavior?

Today, January 24 2015, I got my answer. I was supposed to meet with a group
of birders to walk the lake, and decided to go early and check on the
goldeneyes. I arrived at 07:22 (sunrise at 07:45) near the Aqua Theater and
initially had difficulty making out any birds out on the water. Within five
minutes my eyes had acclimated enough (and the sky was "brightening" despite
the cloudy conditions) that I could make out a raft of birds about 200 feet
offshore. Using my scope I could make out 246 Barrow's Goldeneyes & 30
Common Goldeneyes. I was so surprised by the numbers (the highest counts for
either species during many visits to the lake since November 1983) I counted
the Barrow's three times. Just to make sure. I did not attempt to get a sex
ratio, since it would be difficult/impossible to distinguish sub-adult males
from females under the low light conditions.

Soon after I completed the third count (still 246; I like it when the birds
string out in almost a single line.) the first small groups started to
depart. It's always fun to watch the first small groups try and overcome the
flock mentality. They take off, flying east, then circle up out over the
water, then head straight west for salt water. But as they start to head
west they fly over the remainder of the flock still paddling, preening,
jockeying for position, displaying around the lake, and invariably, the
flock pulls one or two of the flying birds back down. As hunters know so
well: a swimming/roosting/feeding flock is practically irresistible to birds
of a feather. Those birds not quite sure whether they should go or stay,
will take the tumble, rapidly descending towards the flock, most of the time
instinctively followed by the others in their early-commuter group. They
usually don't land, but then head back east, only to gain altitude out over
the lake again, before, once again, heading west.

Later departing groups appear to have less and less difficulty overcoming
the remaining floating flock's attraction, and may even depart on their
first attempt.

Shortly before 8 AM, waiting at the meeting place near the Bathhouse
Theater, while investigating a trail of Glaucous-winged feathers strewn
along the lawn (trying to see if I could find a partially eaten carcass that
would shed light on how the gull had met its demise, and possibly who had
contributed/caused said demise) my attention was drawn to the island, where
some 200 crows had gathered on their way from their communal roost to their
respective daytime hangouts. A daily ritual in winter. However, this morning
it was interrupted by an adult peregrine repeatedly stirring up the flock of
crows (all of them taking flight while cawing, dodging the falcon, and then
re-alighting in the tops of the trees on the island). I watched the falcon,
during three different bouts, circle around (and through) the cloud of crows
some twenty times. She made some feigns in their directions, but to me she
didn't appear intent on nailing a crow. It was quite the spectacle, though.
Never did get a good look at the falcon, since she landed on the far side of
the island.

Right around 8 the morning commuter flight of (200+) Mew Gulls arrived,
flying in from the northwest (do they spend the night out on salt water?),
streaming in past the island, dispersing over the lake for their morning
routine of bathing, preening, and looking for breakfast.

All under the watchful eyes of the pair of Bald Eagles perched in a nearby
tree.

Always fun to visit Green Lake.

Cheers,
Martin Muller, Seattle
martinmuller AT msn.com  

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Subject: Pierce County, Black Phoebe
From: "Bruce LaBar" <blabar AT harbornet.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 16:54:05 -0800
I relocated a Black Phoebe that Hans Feddern had seen at a connecting pond 
earlier in the week. It was calling for 15 minutes and gave excellent views 
going from one snag to another. 

Directions: Same Housing complex that the Great-tailed Grackle visited last 
year. Get on Levy Rd. near Puyallup. Turn onto 61st street into the housing 
area. Turn right on 39th. Follow to the end where it curves to the right. The 
pond is right there. Many coots, Hooded Mergansers, American Wigeon and other 
waterfowl. Listen for it calling and check all the snags. Hans had it at the 
end of 41st street where there is another larger pond. These are a series of 
ponds that are part of the Sha Dex mitigation group. 

Bruce LaBar_______________________________________________
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Subject: Townsend's Solitaire at Dash Point
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 15:56:52 -0800
Hi Tweets,

Hans Feddern informed me that he observed a Townsend's Solitaire at Dash
Point yesterday, hopefully it sticks around until I can check it out
tomorrow.

I observed two Black Phoebe's at Hawks Prairie or Hogum Bay Settling Ponds
on Thursday afternoon, as well the Slaty-backed Gull roosting on the light
brown building roof north of 11th street and west of Portland Ave from the
11th Street Bridge over the Puyallup River.

Nathanael Swecker and I observed a Harlan's Hawk on the tribe site between
Mount's Road and the Nisqually River on our USGS Survey of the tribe site
on Thursday morning.

Good birding,
Shep

-- 
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
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Subject: Barrow's Goldeneye Coomunal Roost on Green Lake, Seattle
From: Martin Muller <martinmuller AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 15:09:01 -0800
Tweeters,

For many years I have known (and occasionally reported on) wintering Barrows 
Goldeneyes forgoing their customary salt water hangout to fly to freshwater 
Green Lake to roost. Their numbers vary between 30 and 60 during the winter 
months. One has to get to the area they favor on the lake (the south corner 
near the Aqua Theater) before sunrise. A scope helps. 


I expect to find the birds in this location during the CBC in late-December. 
Usually we start the CBC in this area (because of the Barrows presence there). 
Starting at around 07:25 - 07:30 the birds leave the lake in (initially) small 
groups of 3 - 10, but the last group, right around 8 AM may be a single flock 
of all remaining birds (up to 25). Then the rest of the day one may find only 
one or two Common Goldeneyes on the lake. 


This past (2014) CBC, to my surprise, I didnt find any Barrows Goldeneyes at 
Green Lake when I arrived at 07:30. Did I miss them or had they changed their 
behavior? 


Today, January 24 2015, I got my answer. I was supposed to meet with a group of 
birders to walk the lake, and decided to go early and check on the goldeneyes. 
I arrived at 07:22 (sunrise at 07:45) near the Aqua Theater and initially had 
difficulty making out any birds out on the water. Within five minutes my eyes 
had acclimated enough (and the sky was brightening despite the cloudy 
conditions) that I could make out a raft of birds about 200 feet offshore. 
Using my scope I could make out 246 Barrows Goldeneyes & 30 Common Goldeneyes. 
I was so surprised by the numbers (the highest counts for either species during 
many visits to the lake since November 1983) I counted the Barrows three 
times. Just to make sure. I did not attempt to get a sex ratio, since it would 
be difficult/impossible to distinguish sub-adult males from females under the 
low light conditions. 


Soon after I completed the third count (still 246; I like it when the birds 
string out in almost a single line) the first small groups started to depart. 
Its always fun to watch the first small groups try and overcome the flock 
mentality. They take off, flying east, then circle up out over the water, then 
head straight west for salt water. But as they start to head west they fly over 
the remainder of the flock still paddling, preening, jockeying for position, 
displaying around the lake, and invariably, the flock pulls one or two of the 
flying birds back down. As hunters know so well: a swimming/roosting/feeding 
flock is practically irresistible to birds of a feather. Those birds not quite 
sure whether they should go or stay, will take the tumble, rapidly descending 
towards the flock, most of the time instinctively followed by the others in 
their early-commuter group. They usually dont land, but then head back east, 
only to gain altitude out over the lake again, before, once again, heading 
west. 


Later departing groups appear to have less and less difficulty overcoming the 
remaining floating flocks attraction, and may even depart on their first 
attempt. 


Shortly before 8 AM, waiting at the meeting place near the Bathhouse Theater, 
while investigating a trail of Glaucous-winged feathers strewn along the lawn 
(trying to see if I could find a partially eaten carcass that would shed light 
on how the gull had met its demise, and possibly who had contributed/caused 
said demise) my attention was drawn to the island, where some 200 crows had 
gathered on their way from their communal roost to their respective daytime 
hangouts. A daily ritual in winter. However, this morning it was interrupted by 
an adult peregrine repeatedly stirring up the flock of crows (all of them 
taking flight while cawing, dodging the falcon, and then re-alighting in the 
tops of the trees on the island). I watched the falcon, during three different 
bouts, circle around (and through) the cloud of crows some twenty times. She 
made some feigns in their directions, but to me she didnt appear intent on 
nailing a crow. It was quite the spectacle, though. Never did get a good look 
at the falcon, since she landed on the far side of the island. 


Right around 8 the morning commuter flight of (200+) Mew Gulls arrived, flying 
in from the northwest (do they spend the night out on salt water?), streaming 
in past the island, dispersing over the lake for their morning routine of 
bathing, preening, and looking for breakfast. 


All under the watchful eyes of the pair of Bald Eagles perched in a nearby 
tree. 


Always fun to visit Green Lake.

Cheers,
Martin Muller, Seattle
martinmuller AT msn.com  

  _______________________________________________
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Subject: owl book title correction
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 13:59:03 -0800
Make that "Field Guide to OWLS of CA and The West"   !!!     Thanks, Caryn :-)

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: Marked crow
From: "andie777" <andie777 AT isomedia.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 12:39:30 -0800
At 11:30AM today there was two crows flying over 32nd & “D” Ave in 
Anacortes. The one crow had a white tag attached to it’s right wing. It was 
too high up to see any numbers or id it might have. Anyone out there marking 
crows?? 


Cleo Andreasen
andie777 AT isomedia.com
Anacortes, WA

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Subject: Union Bay Watch | The Point of No Return
From: Larry Hubbell <ldhubbell AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 12:33:32 -0800
Tweeters,

This week the waxwings found the berries and I was lucky enough to find the 
waxwings. The post has lots of photos and it answers the question, What do 
waxwings have to do with the-point-of-no-return? 


http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2015/01/the-point-of-no-return.html

I hope you enjoy the post!

Have a great day on Union Baywhere nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 25, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123imagine.net>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 12:03:03 -0800
Hello, Tweets,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Migration Routes Evolve, w/Scott Weidensaul
http://bit.ly/XB0KNf
* Blackbird, by Paul McCartney
- In celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day
http://bit.ly/WSY2Mw
* How Evolution Reshaped the Woodcock's Brain
http://bit.ly/1xMV7J5
* Sparrows Kick, Robins Pick
http://bit.ly/15ywZ5s
* Laysan Albatrosses Nest at Midway Atoll
http://bit.ly/VyuKDn
* The Early Bird?
http://bit.ly/VWrqpK
* Tale of a Rascal Corvid
http://bit.ly/V8MvLD
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1CM6fJc
-- Including a video of a Reddish Egret, not to be missed.
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a 
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related 
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+ 
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote


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Subject: Eide Road Short-eared Owls
From: "Mike McAuliffe" <mcmike0605 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 11:53:13 -0800
Happy Saturday!  A few recent shots of Short-eared Owls from Eide Road.


http://mcmikephoto.com/2015/01/winter-short-eared-owl-season-in-western-wash
ington/

http://mcmikephoto.com/2015/01/short-eared-owl-stare-down/

https://www.facebook.com/mcmikephoto


Mike McAuliffe
Edmonds, WA
mcmike0605 AT gmail.com

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Subject: RFI American Robin communal roosts
From: Nigel Ball <nigelj.ball AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 11:14:21 -0800
Hi,
I see a reasonable pre- and post- flight of American Robins over 1st and
2nd hills in Seattle. If someone could tell me where the roost sites are, I
would be very grateful.
Thanks
Nigel

Nigel Ball
Seattle
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Subject: Dennis Paulson on Sapsuckers
From: Peter H Wimberger <pwimberger AT pugetsound.edu>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 07:13:22 +0000
Hi Tweets,
Check out Dennis Paulson getting all sappy about sapsuckers at Northwest Nature 
Notes! 

http://slatermuseum.blogspot.com/2015/01/a-community-of-sapsuckers.html
Enjoy.

Peter Wimberger
Slater Museum of Natural History and University of Puget Sound
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Subject: North Mason County birding 1/23
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 22:08:06 -0800
Hey Tweets!

I had an unexpected free day today, and took the morning and early afternoon to 
bird from Belfair to Tahuya and back. 


I started off at Belfair state park, where I added Red Crossbill and Marbled 
Godwit to my Mason yearlist. The godwit appears to have come back for a third 
winter and was picked up a week or so back by the Denny's. 


In a clear-cut near Wildberry Lake, I found at least a dozen Wilson's Snipe 
enjoying some of the soggy spots. Driving back along the shore road, there were 
Red-throated and Common Loons, Western, Horned and Red-necked Grebes, both 
Goldeneyes, Greater Scaup, Surf and White-winged Scoters, Double-crested and 
Pelagic cormorants, and a pair of Harlequin Ducks. 


Theler was my last stop, where I found a Hutton's Vireo to make it 83 for the 
county year list! 


Happy birding!

Tim Brennan
Renton

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Subject: Unusually golden plumage on Anna's Hummingbird
From: "Tucker, Trileigh" <TRI AT seattleu.edu>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 02:29:25 +0000
Hi Tweets,

As I was walking past a densely overgrown wetland on this gray afternoon, a 
movement caught my eye, and for several minutes I watched a golden hummingbird 
foraging in the shrubbery. I have to conclude it was an Annas because, well, 
its January in Seattle. But I was pretty surprised how consistently golden it 
looked. Ive seen that gold plumage tone occasionally and briefly on sunny days 
when the sun angle was just right or when I was using a flash. But today was a 
gray day here, and the bird was deep in a shady shrubby area, and the light 
coming behind me was brighter but still gray, and I wasnt using a flash. He or 
she stayed golden-looking the entire time, never looked green, even when it was 
under a leaf. Maybe a juvenile? 


Photos are pretty uniformly poor because of the poor light and the 
photographers limited skill in making appropriate adjustments, but you can 
still see what I mean by golden; take a look if you like: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/trileigh/

Thanks to Jim Danzenbaker, as usual, for his thoughtful reflections on the 
sighting. 


Good birding to all,
Trileigh

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Trileigh Tucker
Lincoln Park, West Seattle
Natural history website: Naturalpresencearts.com
Photography: Flickr.com/photos/trileigh

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Subject: Am. Dipper in Kenmore
From: Linda Phillips <linda_phillips1252 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 01:23:31 +0000
Wednesday afternoon while doing my daily walk through Wallace Swamp Creek Park 
I heard a dipper calling. I turned just in time to see a single bird whiz by 
headed up stream. 


Over the years I have become acquainted with where Dippers like to feed when 
they visit the park. I diligently checked each of their favorite riffles and 
found nothing. 


Another birder relocated the Dipper on Thursday.

Today (Friday) I found the bird foraging about 20’ downstream from the foot 
bridge. 



The single male Bufflehead who has been hanging around on the sediment pond for 
the past week was not present today. 



Wallace Swamp Creek Park is 1 mile north of Bothell Way on 73rd Ave NE.


Linda Phillips

Kenmore, WA






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Subject: Red-naped YES
From: "MT" <Tomboulian AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 15:45:05 -0800
Finally, after grousing about a dozen attempts on this bird this year, the 13th 
try was the charm. In the arboretum at the same tree as described and staked 
out before, at 845 am. The new set of sap wells is out in plain view from the 
trail just a few feet off the ground, not on the back side or up in the 
branches. She was unperturbed by 2 red-breasted sapsuckers and two squirrels 
and allowed approach within 5 feet without seeming annoyed. 


FYI to my knowledge the Red-naped has only been seen on this Spanish fir, not 
on the white fir down the trail, although the red-breasted go to both. 


Mark Tomboulian

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Subject: Re: Where is Chinook Bend?
From: Todd Sahl <toddsahl AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 23:17:02 +0000 (UTC)
Also, looking at that map you might think you could drive along the river on 
the road shown, but that is just a trail now.  There's a parking lot north of 
the beaver pond off Carnation Farm Road. 


 On Friday, January 23, 2015 3:10 PM, "lsr AT ramoslink.info"  
wrote: 

   

 You can also use eBird to help you:Explore Data > Explore Hotspots > Enter 
Hotspot Name... Scott RamosSeattle  From: "Todd Sahl"  

Sent: Friday, January 23, 2015 2:20 PM
To: "Wayne Weber" , "TWEETERS" 
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Where is Chinook Bend? Here's a link to a 
map: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Chinook+Bend+Natural+Area/ AT 47.670158,-121.923708,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x549074309f85bbc3:0x20d4a210e978aaba  

 On Friday, January 23, 2015 2:16 PM, Wayne Weber  
wrote: #yiv6955697862 #yiv6955697862 -- filtered {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 
4;}#yiv6955697862 filtered {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 
4;}#yiv6955697862 p.yiv6955697862MsoNormal, #yiv6955697862 
li.yiv6955697862MsoNormal, #yiv6955697862 div.yiv6955697862MsoNormal 
{margin:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:11.0pt;}#yiv6955697862 a:link, 
#yiv6955697862 span.yiv6955697862MsoHyperlink 
{color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv6955697862 a:visited, #yiv6955697862 
span.yiv6955697862MsoHyperlinkFollowed 
{color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv6955697862 
span.yiv6955697862EmailStyle17 {color:windowtext;}#yiv6955697862 
.yiv6955697862MsoChpDefault {}#yiv6955697862 filtered {margin:72.0pt 72.0pt 
72.0pt 72.0pt;}#yiv6955697862 div.yiv6955697862WordSection1 {}#yiv6955697862 
Tweeters, I have seen several references to “Chinook Bend” in the last few 
days, but I have no idea where this locality is. It obviously is not a 
settlement, because it cannot be found on Wikipedia. Could someone please 
explain, for the benefit of the many Tweeters who don’t know, where Chinook 
Bend is located? Thank you. Wayne C. WeberDelta, BCcontopus AT telus.net  

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Subject: Re: Where is Chinook Bend?
From: "lsr AT ramoslink.info" <lsr@ramoslink.info>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 16:10:22 -0700
You can also use eBird to help you:
 Explore Data > Explore Hotspots > Enter Hotspot Name...

 Scott Ramos
 Seattle



----------------------------------------
 From: "Todd Sahl" 
Sent: Friday, January 23, 2015 2:20 PM
To: "Wayne Weber" , "TWEETERS" 
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Where is Chinook Bend?
  Here's a link to a map:

 
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Chinook+Bend+Natural+Area/ AT 47.670158,-121.923708,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x549074309f85bbc3:0x20d4a210e978aaba 




 On Friday, January 23, 2015 2:16 PM, Wayne Weber  wrote: 

        Tweeters,

 I have seen several references to "Chinook Bend" in the last few days, but I 
have no idea where this locality is. It obviously is not a settlement, because 
it cannot be found on Wikipedia. Could someone please explain, for the benefit 
of the many Tweeters who don't know, where Chinook Bend is located? Thank you. 


 Wayne C. Weber
 Delta, BC
 contopus AT telus.net


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Subject: Semi-OT: Teanaway Community Forest
From: "Michael Hobbs" <birdmarymoor AT frontier.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 14:34:11 -0800
I usually try to keep Tweeters free from this sort of thing, but since I’m 
the founder of the Cle Elum CBC, which encompasses a large portion of the 
Teanaway Community Forest, I feel compelled to post. 


Recently, the State acquired pretty much all of the forest lands along the 
Teanaway Road near Cle Elum from a private timber company. Virtually everything 
that was not homes and farmsteads, and not National Forest lands, is now in 
state hands. Currently, there is a committee convened to make recommendations 
on how to manage the Teanaway Community Forest into the future. 


Previously, most of this land was not accessible to the public. That will be 
changing. While increased access will mean new areas for birdwatching, it could 
also mean ORV, dirt bike, snowmobile, and other such usage, potentially over 
all or part of the Forest. For me, this is a concern. Regardless of your 
opinions about ORVs, however, it would be great if you all could send some 
comments about how YOU would like to see this new public forest managed. 


You can submit comments via their web form, 
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/K82Q3RP 


More information about this topic can be found here: 
http://www.dnr.wa.gov/BusinessPermits/Topics/OtherLandTransactions/Pages/amp_teanaway.aspx 


In actual birding news, I’ve had both VARIED THRUSH and RED CROSSBILLS at our 
house today (we’re just NE of Bridletrails State Park at the juncture of 
Redmond, Kirkland, and Bellevue); that’s two species here that we haven’t 
yet had at Marymoor Park in 2015. 


== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor AT frontier.com_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Where is Chinook Bend?
From: Todd Sahl <toddsahl AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 22:18:43 +0000 (UTC)
Here's a link to a map:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Chinook+Bend+Natural+Area/ AT 47.670158,-121.923708,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x549074309f85bbc3:0x20d4a210e978aaba 

   

 On Friday, January 23, 2015 2:16 PM, Wayne Weber  wrote: 

   

 [an error occurred while processing this directive]

Subject: Where is Chinook Bend?
From: "Wayne Weber" <contopus AT telus.net>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 14:13:23 -0800
Tweeters,

 

I have seen several references to "Chinook Bend" in the last few days, but I
have no idea where this locality is. It obviously is not a settlement,
because it cannot be found on Wikipedia. Could someone please explain, for
the benefit of the many Tweeters who don't know, where Chinook Bend is
located? Thank you.

 

Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

contopus AT telus.net

 
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Subject: Kayu Kayu Ac Park in Shoreline
From: Michael Fleming <michaelfleming01 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 13:47:53 -0800
   On my way to Edmonds this morning I stopped by a very small park
(Kayu Kayu Ac) in Shoreline to search for Black Scoter.  Grace & Ollie
Oliver had mentioned this park as a good spot to see them in the past.
Unfortunately there were no Black Scoters present during my visit but
I did happen to see HARLEQUIN DUCK and RED-THROATED LOON as very nice
consolations.
   Edmonds was quiet on the birding front although I did have a FOX
SPARROW at the Marsh; COMMON MURRE, RHINOCEROS AUKLET, and PIGEON
GUILLEMOT at the fish pier and all three Cormorants at Brackett's
Landing Park..

Cheers and Good Birding;

Michael Fleming
Ballard, Washington
michaelfleming01 AT gmail.com
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Subject: great book on owls of the west - 1/23/15
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 12:27:07 -0800
Do you know that Log-eared Owls are smaller than Short-eared or that some 
Longears in Germany, during a time of deep snow, learned to line up on fence 
posts and wait for a tray of mice that would be brought to them? Or, do you 
know that Short-eared Owl roost sites can be on the ground, in trees, gravel 
pits or cars at a wrecking yard ? Or that their young walk around before they 
fly? 


Fascinating information and research data, as well as humorous anecdotes and 
wordage make the book "Field Guide to OWLS of the West" (2007) by Hans Peeters, 
a great read. And the illustrations and photos, also by the author, add to the 
delightfulness of this book. Very comprehensive species accounts, sections on 
Owls and Humans, Hunting and Eating, Owl field marks, Owl photography and a 
nice bit at the end, about the author, all combine to make this book one you 
might wish to take a look at or acquire. There is one place I know of in the 
Seattle area that has a copy right now - most others can order it for you or 
you can check out online possibilities. 


Perfect for the uptick of owl interest and activity this winter around the 
NW... 


Bookin' it near Matthews Beach.

Barb Deihl
NE Seattle
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Subject: Hummer activity continues / Caryn / Wedgwood
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 AT seanet.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 11:15:56 -0800
Hi Tweeters -

This morning around 8am I saw the Anna's gathering fluff (FYI - it's a fluff 
ball from Wild Bird - they love it. I leave it out all year so it's there when 
they're ready. I have it hanging in a tree under a plastic dome. They also love 
the fluff from plant material such as Japanese Anemones (which FYI can be 
invasive depending on form). For several years I would see the hummers 
collecting this fluff but off they would go to the neighbors gardens. But the 
last year and now this year with the ample food supply - provided by feeders 
and many plants blooming in all seasons (now blooming sarcococca (smells 
amazing this time of year and the Robins and Towhees enjoy their berries) and 
Viburnum bodnantense 'Dawn', which also blooms late in the year (still blooming 
from November) and is also very sweet smelling) the Anna's seem to feel at home 
here. 


So many people have had hummers nest right beneath a window with great viewing 
possibilities. Wish I knew how they select their nest sites. In Tucson at 
Tahono Chul park - I got a photo of a hummer nesting in the base of three 
prongs of a cactus. Talk about perfect protection! It was under the roof of one 
of the buildings too. Quite content. 


Hopefully, we'll be able to see where this bird is nesting. It's such a 
fascinating thing to observe. 


Caryn / Wedgwood

"My heart is like a singing bird..." C. 
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Subject: Re: Big Barn Theory
From: Beth Thompson <calliopehb AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 09:36:11 -0800
Had anyone considered our mild winter and a possible abundance of food? That 
would be my guess. 

Regards..
Beth Thompson
Arlington WA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 22, 2015, at 8:31 PM, "Jeff Kozma"  wrote:
> 
> We had one last year on the Yakima CBC right about the time they were being 
reported on the west side. 

>  
> Jeff Kozma
>  
> Yakima
>  
> J c r underscore 5105 at charter dot net
>  
> From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Jeff Gibson 

> Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 7:17 PM
> To: tweeters
> Subject: [Tweeters] Big Barn Theory
>  
> Like others on tweeters, I find the sporadic appearance of Barn Swallows in 
our area in winter really interesting. I have noted in the past few winters, 
that when one tweeter sees Barn Swallows this time of year, many other tweeters 
also do, in many other sites in our region. Last year I saw a Barn Swallow in 
Port Townsend - December, I think - and at the same time other tweeters were 
also seeing them in various spots around our region. Just like what's happening 
now. 

>  
> My theory is that there is a really Big Barn out there somewhere, and 
somebody (God? Mother Nature?) occasionally forgets to close the Barn doors, 
and the swallows get out when they're not supposed to. Thats my theory, and I'm 
sticking to it, until some more intelligent tweeter comes forth with some real 
facts! 

>  
> Jeff Gibson
> Whatever Wa
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Subject: Re: Kingfisher Belts and Swallows Fish at Edmonds Marina
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 09:28:12 +0000 (UTC)
Hank: 

Good video of our resident female belted kingfisher doing her famous move, 
which I call the "sumo slam."    As the official mascot of the Puget Sound 
Bird Fest at Edmonds, she is quite the local celebrity. 

 http://www.pugetsoundbirdfest.com/   Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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Subject: RTH Beak Deformity
From: Sammy Catiis <hikersammy AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 23:30:07 -0800
Hiya, First posting! Wanted to send you a link to the RTH on Norman Road taken 
Wednesday with the beak deformity. It looks like in this case, it is working to 
it's advantage. What a hook. 
http://www.sammyclickit.com/Wildlife/Birds/Red-Tailed-Hawks/i-jR3ZWM6/A 

 
Thought you would enjoy seeing this and being on the look out in 
Stanwood/Silvanna area. 

 
Sammy Catiis
Arlington,WA
hikersammy AT msn.com
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Subject: RE: KKK Day Today
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton AT hartcrowser.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 05:48:09 +0000
Hi Tweets - I apologize for all the crap at the beginning and end of this KKK 
tweet - the price of using the company email without proper purging, I guess. - 
Jon Houghton, Edmonds 

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Subject: KKK Day Today
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton AT hartcrowser.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 05:30:57 +0000
King Kounty Kleanup, that is. Today I decided to play hooky from work one more 
time to try and track down (klean up?) some of those "King Kounty (almost like) 
endemics: the Yellow-billed Loon, Palm Warbler, and Red-naped Sapsucker (go 
figure what they're doing here!). En route the Vashon ferry, I stopped along 
Alki to pick up the reliable Surf Bird to be sure my trip was a success. Well, 
there were none, and no Black Turnstones to be seen along the riprap either 
side of Luna Park. Undeterred, I headed for the ferry, arriving at Tramp Harbor 
around 11 am. From the pier, I could see 2 loons well to the south, one of 
which looked like a promising YBLO candidate, but the distance was too great to 
be sure. I drove along the shore to where the road turns up the hill (notable 
for the array of used treadmills inexplicably located along the shore). From 
there, I had a closer view and better light for comparison (at 60x) and 
convinced myself that one was indeed the 'resident' Yellow-billed - it was a 
bit larger and had a more substantial and paler bill held upright from the 
level, compared to a nearby Common Loon. Back on the ferry, I called Blair 
Bernson, who was at the Cedar River Mouth searching with Carol Ridell for the 
Palm Warbler without success. I headed there anyway, arriving after they had 
left, but encountering Bill ?? who I recognized from the TBMU quest in Port 
Angeles on Tuesday. Neither of us found any warblers in the trees or scrub 
along the river mouth, but we did find Steve Giles. Steve and I had about given 
up and were walking back to our cars in the parking lot at the north end of 
Nishiwaki Lane, when Steve heard a little 'twit' and caught a glimpse of 
movement in the top of one of the last (northernmost) pines, inside the oval of 
the parking area. We both saw a bit of yellow, got excited, and quickly found 
the Palm Warbler (Steve reported on ebird). From the tree, it flew north and 
fed around the well-trimmed low laurel shrubs at the north end of the parking 
lot, hopping in and out of the chain link fence behind. Happy with that , I 
heading up 405, and called Blair again - he and Carol were in the UW Arboretum 
at the sap well tree and Carol had seen and photo-ed the Rednaped Sapsucker 
(see their ebird posts). When I arrived about 3, they were both there, looking 
into the dense dark branches where the RNSA was quietly lapping up the sap of 
it's work (easiest bird of the day!). An Anna's Hummer was working some lower 
holes, and Blair allowed as how a Red-breasted Sapsucker (FOY #4) was sharing 
the tree, visible up through the branches on the west side of the tree, almost 
directly opposite the Red-napped!. Anyway - great day of birding alone, and 
with the help of some very knowledgeable old, and new friends!! When you're 
looking for a single bird in a funny place, it certainly helps to have the 
support and guidance of really competent birders. Thank you all!! - Jon 


Jon Houghton, Ph.D.
Principal; Senior Marine/Fishery Biologist
Jon.Houghton AT HartCrowser.com

[40th_logo_email_signature]
New Address
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206.601.0773 (cell)

Environmental - Geotechnical - Natural Resources
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Subject: Kingfisher Belts and Swallows Fish at Edmonds Marina
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 20:47:54 -0800
> 
> Video:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/16319347356/

Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, WA
hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom _______________________________________________
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Subject: RE: Big Barn Theory
From: "Jeff Kozma" <jcr_5105 AT charter.net>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 20:31:05 -0800
We had one last year on the Yakima CBC right about the time they were being
reported on the west side.

 

Jeff Kozma

 

Yakima

 

J c r underscore 5105 at charter dot net

 

From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Jeff Gibson
Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 7:17 PM
To: tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Big Barn Theory

 

Like others on tweeters, I find the sporadic appearance of Barn Swallows in
our area in winter really interesting. I have noted in the past few winters,
that when one tweeter sees Barn Swallows this time of year, many other
tweeters also do, in many other sites in our region. Last year I saw a Barn
Swallow in Port Townsend - December, I think - and at the same time other
tweeters were also seeing them in various spots around our region. Just like
what's happening now.

 

My theory is that there is a really Big Barn out there somewhere, and
somebody (God? Mother Nature?) occasionally  forgets to close the Barn
doors, and the swallows get out when they're not supposed to. Thats my
theory, and I'm sticking to it, until some more intelligent tweeter comes
forth with some real facts!

 

Jeff Gibson

Whatever Wa
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Subject: Re: Clark Co - red-tailed or rough-legged?
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 04:12:25 GMT
Let's try this again, if a Buteo has a banded belly like it is wearing a cumber 
bun think Red-tailed. I real good approach with an Buteo in Washington is to 
ask why isn't this a Red-tailed. Wilson Cady 

Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Luke Hanes 
To: "Tweeters AT u.washington.edu" 
Cc: 
Subject: [Tweeters] Clark Co - red-tailed or rough-legged?
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 19:41:29 -0800

Sorry about that last post. Obviously I realize it's not a "rough-tailed" :) 
I'm more tired than I thought 

 http://flic.kr/p/qUgFCq 

-- 
Luke Hanes
Vancouver, WA (Felida)
lukeandharmony1997 AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
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Subject: Clark Co - red-tailed or rough-legged?
From: Luke Hanes <lukeandharmony1997 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 19:41:29 -0800
Sorry about that last post. Obviously I realize it's not a "rough-tailed"
:) I'm more tired than I thought

http://flic.kr/p/qUgFCq



-- 
Luke Hanes
Vancouver, WA (Felida)
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Subject: Clark Co - is this a Red-tailed or...?
From: Luke Hanes <lukeandharmony1997 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 19:21:11 -0800
http://flic.kr/p/qUgFCq

I haven't successfully ID'd a rough-tailed yet so I am hoping this is it,
but I doubt it.



-- 
Luke Hanes
Vancouver, WA (Felida)
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Subject: Correction: Swans on Capitol Lake
From: "Wendy Tanowitz" <green-girl AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 19:05:06 -0800
From: qworgle AT gmail.com [mailto:qworgle AT gmail.com] 

Hi, just a quick note to mention the swans are an adult pair of Trumpeters and 
a young Tundra. I was there when the Tundra joined the other two on the lake a 
few weeks ago… it was a very sweet moment. 

Keith

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Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2015-01-22
From: Michael & Janka Hobbs <MJCT_Hobbs AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 16:56:12 -0800
Tweets – A bit disappointing to have clouds and mist (and rain by 10:30) 
after the gorgeous day yesterday. Not the nicest welcome back for me after my 
vacation. But it was nice to see friends and to see many of the regular birds 
of Marymoor. We managed a tiny increase in our species count to 58, after 3 
straight weeks of 56 species, plus we added a few new birds for the year (FOY). 
But these winter walks are often fairly predictable in terms of the species 
list, and today was no exception. 


Highlights:

Cackling Goose            Hundreds flew over at 8:15, but didn’t land
American Wigeon        One male in slough well north of the weir
Green-winged Teal      20+ in slough well north of the weir
Northern Pintail           One male in sough well north of the weir – FOY
Horned Grebe              3 far out on the lake
Great Blue Heron        Many sitting near or on nests, some pairs
Wilson’s Snipe            Early crew heard some – FOY 
California Gull             One in smallish gull flock – FOY
Barn Owl                     Sounds and glimpses early
N. SAW-WHET OWL    Matt had great looks, 5:45a.m., just east of boardwalk
PEREGRINE FALCON   One cruised by south of East Meadow
Bushtit                        One large flock, Dog Meadow edge – FOY
Dark-eyed Junco         Notably large flocks

The nice mixed flock of DUCKS in the slough at the north end of the 
“Transition Zone” (the area they mow north of the weir) was a highlight, as 
was a mixed flock of woodpeckers in a tree far across the slough, which yielded 
terrible looks at Downy, Hairy, Flicker, and PILEATED WOODPECKER. The rest of 
the morning was q u i e t. 


For the year, I believe we’re up to 72 species.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor AT frontier.com_______________________________________________
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Subject: Northern Pygmy Owl at Chinook Bend---Yes.
From: "Marvin Hoekstra" <marvin.hoekstra AT frontier.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 16:53:07 -0800
Tweeters,

 

The Northern Pygmy Owl was present at Chinook Bend as of 3 pm today, quite
near the parking lot.

 

Marvin S. Hoekstra
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Subject: correction: Pair of Mute Swans and yearling MIDDLE BASIN Capitol Lake, Olympia
From: "Wendy Tanowitz" <green-girl AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 12:29:33 -0800
A pair of mute swans and their yearling have been seen consistently in the
southern part of the MIDDLE BASIN of Capitol Lake in Olympia. They are
generally seen on the east side of the lake, furthest from Deschutes River
Parkway and are with their yearling! This is interesting because the last
two years, as far as I know, only one bird has made an appearance at the
lake, whereas I had seen the pair together for the previous two years.
Wendy Tanowitz
Olympia, WA

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Subject: Pair of Mute Swans and yearling middle basin Capitol Lake, Olympia
From: "Wendy Tanowitz" <green-girl AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 12:22:59 -0800
A pair of mute swans and their yearling have been seen consistently in the
southern part of the middle basis of Capitol Lake. They are generally seen
on the east side of the lake, furthest from Deschutes River Parkway and are
with their yearling! This is interesting because the last two years, as far
as I know, only one bird has made an appearance at the lake, whereas I had
seen the pair together for the previous two years.
Wendy Tanowitz
Olympia, WA

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Subject: Am Dipper(#113) Clark Co, WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 11:18:59 -0800
Found about five miles from (north) the correctional center on NE Dole valley 
Rd. Look downstream from the ONE LANE bridge. 


 Bob Flores 

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Subject: Am Dipper(#113) Clark Co, WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 11:18:59 -0800
Found about five miles from (north) the correctional center on NE Dole valley 
Rd. Look downstream from the ONE LANE bridge. 


 Bob Flores 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
Subject: Gray jay(#110) and sooty grouse (#111) Clark Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 10:19:58 -0800
Had a single along the road from Hockinson .2 miles from the intersection and 
beginning of road L-1500 to Larch Mt. 


Had the grouse past the white gate on L-1500 it was on the top of z cut bank 
along the road flying over my head! 


Bob Flores 

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Subject: Gray jay(#110) and sooty grouse (#111) Clark Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 10:19:58 -0800
Had a single along the road from Hockinson .2 miles from the intersection and 
beginning of road L-1500 to Larch Mt. 


Had the grouse past the white gate on L-1500 it was on the top of z cut bank 
along the road flying over my head! 


Bob Flores 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
Subject: NIsqually NWR 1/21/15
From: scrubjay323 AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 13:10:39 -0500
Tweets,

Yesterday 36 of us survived a cold, damp day at Nisqually. The chill went right 
through us, but it was still a good day. We had a 6.1 low tide at 12:20 PM so 
there was lots of mud in the reclamation area. 


The highlight of the day was finding a GREAT HORNED OWL sitting on the old nest 
tree from several years ago. It (she?) was sitting by the nest hole about 9:15 
when we arrived but had disappeared at 11:30 when we returned to the area. This 
is the tree with the three broken branches shaped like an inverted tripod 
inside the boardwalk between the twin barns and the Nisqually side. Hopefully 
in the next couple of weeks we will find the young owlets. 


Raptor activity was abundant with several BALD EAGLES, NORTHERN HARRIERS, and 
RED-TAILED HAWKS throughout the refuge. We also had a COOPER'S HAWK in the 
vicinity of the twin barns. 


I got to the refuge a bit after seven to try and spot the BARN OWL that has 
been roosting overnight near the visitor center but was too late. About 7:00 
one was seen near the orchard and another was seen moving from one of the twin 
barns to the other. 


Other notable sightings included a WESTERN MEADOWLARK and 2 LESSER SCAUP inside 
the new dike and a PILIATED WOODPECKER working a snag near the GREAT HORNED OWL 
nest site. 


A notable miss was the SNOW GOOSE of recent weeks. We saw the 8 GREATER 
WHITE-FRONTED GEESE it had been hanging out with, but no SNOW GOOSE. 


For the day I had 46 species and now have 68 for the year.

The only mammal I saw was a couple of GRAY SQUIRRELS near the twin barns.

FYI, hunting season closes Sunday so the estuary boardwalk will be open to the 
end starting Monday. 


Until next week......

Phil Kelley
scrubjay323 AT aol.com
Lacey, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: re: GHOW nest
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 09:11:58 -0800
....and if you can stand the traffic noise, another nest in a planter box
on a balcony in Oklahoma City; fourth year for this one. I turn the sound
down during daylight hours as most of the good stuff happens after 9pm our
time anyway....including lots of "conversation" between the pair.

http://www.ustream.tv/okcowlcam

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
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Subject: SORRY Tweeters ... Re: PIX --- B-W Warbler
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 08:34:28 -0800
oops ... sorry, Tweeters ... I'd forgotten I had included Tweeters on 
my email and since the Black-and-white Warbler has been on the Oregon 
and Portland posts so often I just forgot to include its location in 
my last two emails ... the bird is in Milwaukie (Portland), Oregon 
... us folks who live in Vancouver or Portland often send out to both 
states only we have to be really good at mentioning the city/state 
... I just messed up ... hope you enjoyed the images anyways, even if 
you didn't know where the bird had been seen ...

happy birding,
Lyn






Lyn Topinka,
NorthwestJourney.com
NorthwestBirding.com
ColumbiaRiverImages.com

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Subject: Red-throated loon continues Marine Park, Clark Co, WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 05:57:30 -0800
Seen about 0850 adjacent to the Washington shoreline near the parking area at 
the tower. #109 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Red-throated loon continues Marine Park, Clark Co, WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 05:57:30 -0800
Seen about 0850 adjacent to the Washington shoreline near the parking area at 
the tower. #109 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Great Horned Owl Nest live
From: notcalm AT comcast.net
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 09:53:39 +0000 (UTC)
Tweeters, 

Check out this live feed of a Great Horned owl nest from the Cornell group, 
night owls: 



http://cams.allaboutbirds.org/channel/46/Great_Horned_Owls/?utm_source=Cornell+Lab+eNews&utm_campaign=7c83a8f034-Cornell_Lab_eNews_2015_01_21&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_47588b5758-7c83a8f034-305540613. 


Enjoy, 
Dan Reiff 
Mercer Island _______________________________________________
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Subject: yellow-shafted flicker
From: "MT" <Tomboulian AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 23:04:51 -0800
In case anyone is tracking flicker intergrades etc., there was a pure 
yellow-shafted in The Highlands gated community of Shoreline today. 


I say “was” because what I found was just the wings of a carcass out on the 
main lawn of the Boeing mansion. 


Mark Tomboulian  _______________________________________________
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Subject: 2 NOPO day at Chinook Bend
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 20:52:04 -0800

> 
> Thanks to Vickie Scales and Greg "Cobalt_creek" Hensen for alerting us to 
where they had seen a Northern Pygmy-Owl at Chinook Bend this afternoon, Paul 
Bannick, Blair Bernson, Karen and I were able to see the bird with Paul being 
the one who spotted it. Later I spotted a second Pygmy-Owl near the parking lot 
which Blair, Karen and I were able to observe for an extended period while Paul 
was still observing the first bird. Then Blair, Karen and I went to Sikes Lake 
and saw a Golden Eagle on the snag at the west end of the lake. 

> 
> Photo of Northern Pygmy-Owl #1:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/16152351647/
> 
> Photo of Northern Pygmy-Owl #2:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/16152351657/
> 
> Videos of Pygmy-Owl #2:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/16152351687/
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/16152351707/

On top of all this Blair alerted us to a Eurasian Wigeon in the pond at Chinook 
Bend, a first for Karen and me at that location. 

> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom_______________________________________________
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Subject: RE: Ill House Finch?
From: <tina AT songbirdphoto.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 20:51:05 -0800
Thank you so much, Candace!!!

I’ll pass on the info right away.

 

Tina

 

From: Candace C. Plant [mailto:plantcan AT msn.com] 
Sent: Wednesday, January 21, 2015 5:51 PM
To: tina AT songbirdphoto.com
Cc: tweeters
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Ill House Finch?

 

Definitely a sick bird and most likely infected with salmonella. You see it 
every winter & spring and infects pine siskins, finches. They become very 
lethargic at the feeders and get infected from feces of infected birds. 


Take down feeders and disinfect with 10% bleach water. Also disinfect bird 
baths. Keep feeders down 2 weeks so birds disburse. 


If rehab center in area catch sick bird to transport. Bird is dying slow death 
left outdoors and is not able to stay warm. That is why fluffed up. 


 

I volunteer at Portland Audubon rehab center and we see it.

 

Candy Plant

Wilsonville, Or

 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID



tina AT songbirdphoto.com wrote:

Hi,

A friend asked me today if it’s normal for a House Finch to perch and nap at 
her feeder during the day. 


I don’t know. But I’m thinking this might be a sick bird, in which case she 
should probably remove her feeder for a while. 


 

Can any of you who know whether this is the behavior of a normal or sick bird 
please let me know? 


 

Thanks!

Tina Blade

Duvall, WA
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Subject: Magnuson Park, 21 January 2015
From: Scott Ramos <lsr AT ramoslink.info>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 20:24:59 -0800
A frosty start to a fine morning, even the fog moved over to the east side of 
the lake. The ground was either crunchy or muddy depending on exposure which 
made navigating the meadows a challenge. The surprise this morning was a Barred 
Owl calling from Promontory Point, about 6:30. It has been nearly 3 years since 
I last had a Barred Owl in the park, even though there are occasional reports 
from the surrounding neighborhoods. Otherwise, a fairly typical winter day. 


Eurasian Wigeon - 1 with the 100+ flock of American Wigeon
Green-winged Teal - couple dozen, though the Common Teal of last week didn’t 
show up; most of them were resting on the flanks of the beaver lodge 

Common Merganser - about 20, mostly male
Red-breasted Merganser - 5 in Pontiac Bay
California Quail - clucking in the wetlands
Horned and Red-necked Grebe (3) - far off the swim beach
Cooper’s Hawk - 2 adults: 1 male, 1 female
Red-tailed Hawk - 1 adult, 1 juvenile
Spotted Sandpiper - 1 in Sail Lagoon
Wilson’s Snipe - about 4, very vocal and active in the meadows before dawn
Herring Gull - on the swim platform
Belted Kingfisher - 1 calling near the boat launch, another fishing off the 
sail marina 

Purple Finch - 3, all non-adult-male
Pine Siskin - well over 100, in several flocks

For the day, 61 species.
Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21484008 
 

Scott Ramos
Seattle_______________________________________________
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Subject: Barn Swallows again today in Marysville
From: stan Kostka lynn Schmidt <lynnandstan AT earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 19:48:47 -0800
This frosty morning, before sunrise, I observed four Barn Swallows, perched 
motionless, on a building where I observed them yesterday. Moments after 
sunrise they began taking short flights around the immediate area and returning 
to their perch. Shortly, more than four birds were present, indicating others 
had been roosting somewhere nearby. Today one of the birds was clearly an After 
Second Year individual, by plumage, and I can say with reasonable certainty 
this bird was not present among the eight individuals observed yesterday. 


I could not locate any really Big Barns in the area, from whence they may have 
escaped, but did discover that the Marysville sewage lagoon is immediately west 
of the site, which most likely has been attracting these winter swallows, a 
phenomenon noted in Birds of Washington. 


Stan Kostka
lynnandstan at earthlink.net
Arlington_______________________________________________
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Subject: RFI: Birding Registration sites
From: amy schillinger <schillingera AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 19:47:02 -0800
 Tweeters,
 
I'm interested in feedback from those of you that have registered in the past 
for birding conferences, events, and festivals through birding organizations. 
Of the birding events you have attended, which birding organizations did you 
find had the most intuitive and responsive registrations, including ease of use 
and real time updating? For example, someone mentioned to me that Morro Bay's 
Birding Festival had easy to use registration for its event. 

 
Please reply to me privately, thank you!
 
Cheers,
 
Amy Powell
Renton, WA
schillingera AT Hotmail.com
 
 
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Subject: North Cascades Audubon monthly meeting Jan 27 at 7 PM Whatcom Museum
From: Twink Coffman <wilber4818 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 19:17:37 -0800
Join Mitch Friedman, Executive Director of Conservation Northwest, as he
presents an overview of population status and trends, recovery efforts and
legal protection levels for gray wolves, grizzly bears, lynx, fishers and
wolverines in Washington State. The Washington State populations of these
carnivores were all drastically reduced or eliminated during the past 150
years. Mitch will discuss what is being done to bring back these animals.
Mitch will also talk about the Gray Wolf Conservation and Management Plan
for Washington and the key role Conservation Northwest is playing investing
in conflict avoidance efforts to build increased social tolerance for
wolves.

Mitch Friedman founded Conservation Northwest in 1988. He has a degree in
zoology from the University of Washington and has received conservation
awards from Sunset Magazine, Society for Conservation Biology, The
Wilderness Society, and others. At Conservation Northwest Mitch has led the
effort to infuse land- scape scale conservation biology into advocacy
strategies. The success of this approach is evident in great gains
protecting habitat connectivity between the North Cascades Ecosystem and
wild areas to the south (Central Cascades), east (the Rockies), and
northwest (B.C. Coast and Chilcotin Ranges), as well as recovery of native
carnivores including gray wolves, fishers, lynx and wolverines.

Always on the 4th Tuesday of the month:
January 27, 7pm to 9 pm at the Whatcom Museum
(in the Rotunda Room of the Old City Hall building) free & open to the
public!
  northcascadesaudubonsociety.org


-- 
happy birding
Twink
wilber4818 AT gmail.com
Ferndale, WA
in Whatcom County
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Subject: Pygmy Owls at Chinook Bend
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 18:46:48 -0800
With guidance and fun company from Hank and Karen Heiberg and Paul Bannick two 
Northern Pygmy Owls were located and photographed at Chinook Bend.  I also 
found a Eurasian Wigeon.  Later the Heibergs toik me to Sikes Lake where the 
Golden Eagle perched on its snag and the Swan Goose grazed. 



Blair Bernson
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Subject: Re: Ill House Finch?
From: "Candace C. Plant" <plantcan AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 17:50:50 -0800
Definitely a sick bird and most likely infected with salmonella. You see it 
every winter & spring and infects pine siskins, finches. They become very 
lethargic at the feeders and get infected from feces of infected birds. 

Take down feeders and disinfect with 10% bleach water. Also disinfect bird 
baths. Keep feeders down 2 weeks so birds disburse. 

If rehab center in area catch sick bird to transport. Bird is dying slow death 
left outdoors and is not able to stay warm. That is why fluffed up. 


I volunteer at Portland Audubon rehab center and we see it.

Candy Plant
Wilsonville, Or

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

tina AT songbirdphoto.com wrote:

Hi,

A friend asked me today if it’s normal for a House Finch to perch and nap at 
her feeder during the day. 


I don’t know. But I’m thinking this might be a sick bird, in which case she 
should probably remove her feeder for a while. 




Can any of you who know whether this is the behavior of a normal or sick bird 
please let me know? 




Thanks!

Tina Blade

Duvall, WA
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Subject: Ill House Finch?
From: <tina AT songbirdphoto.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 17:38:52 -0800
Hi,

A friend asked me today if it’s normal for a House Finch to perch and nap at 
her feeder during the day. 


I don’t know. But I’m thinking this might be a sick bird, in which case she 
should probably remove her feeder for a while. 


 

Can any of you who know whether this is the behavior of a normal or sick bird 
please let me know? 


 

Thanks!

Tina Blade

Duvall, WA
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Subject: Cameras
From: "McComb Gardens" <info AT mccombgardens.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 17:28:18 -0800
I think when you have your camera ready, you see differently.

 

Not good or bad, just different,

Jane

 

 

Neil W. Burkhardt

Jane Stewart

121 Solar Lane

Sequim, WA  98382-8324

  info AT mccombgardens.com

360-681-2827

 

 
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Subject: In High- beam Country
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 16:51:56 -0800


After my early morning drive today - Port Townsend to Everett - I realized, 
once again, how much I've been missing the High-beam Country. 

What the heck is "High-beam Country" anyway. My definition (just invented early 
this morning, at O' dark O' clock) - is driving through areas where you can 
drive at night in your car, or in my case, truck, with your high -beam 
headlights on with no worries. 

This mornings drive from Port Townsend to Kingston at 6am was sort of a 
compromise, but did remind me of past days of High - beam glory. Because, as a 
naturalist , when you're in High-beam Country, that's a good thing. High-beam 
can be a Good Habitat Indicator. For various reasons. 

One reason is that, if you don't have to dim your High - beams too much 
(assuming you have some highway manners towards oncoming beamers) that means 
there's not an overabundance of your fellow hominids around. Hey, I like 
people, just not too many at once. You know, like traffic. 

My dear daughter, now a tall beautiful blond, was once a short beautiful twerp, 
if not a Tweeter. Way back when she was around 4 or 5 years old she was trying 
to wrap her head around the concept of traffic. As a young learner she was 
wanting to understand what traffic meant - probably after hearing my unkind 
diatribes about the issue as we drove on I-5. On one particularly crappy 
traffic day she asked " is this traffic?". 

"Yes Dear, this is traffic, and lot's of it". I replied.
But in High- beam Country, where you can drive for long periods without dimming 
your high-beams, you can see all sorts of interesting things. That's the second 
benefit of High -beam reality - you can see lots of critters. I guess it's 
kinda rude blaring your High-beams in the face of wildlife, but hey, they run 
across the road and out of sight. Some slower than others, so brake for 
salamanders, etc. 

Birders could see all sorts of cool stuff. Poor-wills, Pauraque's, various 
owls, etc. Naturalist's might see Kangaroo Rats, or various wild Cats. Maybe a 
Mouse or Moose. Snakes. Salamanders. Toad migrations. Whatever. It just depends 
on where you're driving at night. But to paraphrase the late great Edward Abbey 
- get out of your vehicle if you really wanna see something. 

Due to ongoing life changes, I'm hoping to spend more time in High-beam 
country. Haven't see one of them Sage bushes lately - they show up real good in 
those High-beams. 

Jeff Gibsonbeaming up fromPlanet Earth
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Subject: OCWA in Olympia
From: Jennifer DeSelle <jendeselle AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 00:34:54 +0000 (UTC)
This morning while walking around Capitol Lake I got a special  treat--  I 
got to observe 2 orange-crowned warblers foraging in the low brush!  I spotted 
the pair near the Marathon Park parking lot.  They first caught my eye when 
they were in bushes near the railroad tracks.  After hawking some bugs they 
flew over into the brush right alongside the lake and trail.  One of the 
individuals was very cooperative and I was able to watch it from a few feet 
away while it gleaned insects from among the dead leaves stuck in the bushes. 
 Of course I didn't have my camera!  At any rate it was fun to be able to so 
closely observe these beautiful little birds-- they may be considered "drab", 
but I thin they're lovely.   

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Subject: A shrike, strikes
From: "Rob Sandelin" <nwnature1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 15:21:29 -0800
Wandered slowly in the sunshine out to the river bar at Bob Heirman Park
yesterday. It was very quiet, a few Common Mergansers on the river, the
usual crows in the later afternoon. Got a nice look at a Shrike as it
perched on a small cottonwood at Riverside. It moved along but I kept
running into it here and there, or maybe there was more than one. On the way
back I was sitting on a sunny log marveling that it was actually January
when the Shrike landed nearby, paused for just a  moment then swooped down
to the ground, all predator-like. It came up and landed on the same log I
was sitting on (it was a big log)  with a good sized beetle which it pecked
into bite sized pieces. 

 

This completely cemented my view that whenever I want a close wildlife
encounter all I have to do is leave my camera at home. This kind of stuff
NEVER happens when I have a camera handy.

 

Rob Sandelin

Naturalist, mostly retired teacher, slowly going feral

Snohomish County
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Subject: Port Angeles waterfront Tuesday @2:15pm
From: "McComb Gardens" <info AT mccombgardens.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 14:05:48 -0800
We saw a pair of Red-breasted Mergansers, and 2 Pelagic Cormorants among the
expected birds at the West end of the Port Angeles waterfront promenade.

 

I think the City has done a good job; it is a dependable place for good
sightings.

 

Wings,

Jane

 

Neil W. Burkhardt

Jane Stewart

121 Solar Lane

Sequim, WA  98382-8324

info AT mccombgardens.com  

360-681-2827

 

 
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Subject: Longear Goes A'Hunting - 1/20/15
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 12:17:42 -0800
Besides Shortears, harriers, yellowlegs and Dunlin, there were more cars and 
people than I had seen to-date out at Eide Rd. And there was one Longear 
(male?) nicely hidden in that original bramble for much of the afternoon - no 
amount of complaining or coaxing by the visitors had the viewers' desired 
effect. Many finally gave up. 


But for those with patience and some knowledge of the daily 'routine' of these 
owls, a real treat was in store. Somewhere around 4, I was told the owl hopped 
out, took one look at the crowd and hopped back in. When it was good and ready 
to emerge to hunt, it flew out and around the fields (mostly to the north of 
the road) and was followed by panting photographers. The owl stopped now and 
again to dive for prey or do a perch&search. I just plodded along the road, 
unable to keep up with the masses, but it paid off - suddenly the owl, with a 
large vole in its talons, was flying right toward me - natch, instead of 
catching a prize-winning flight shot, I just dropped my jaw and watched it head 
to a nearby tree and stop for awhile - quite awhile, actually. By that time I 
had gotten my camera ready and was able to get some nice shots of it and the 
tree, bathed in that wonderful golden light just before sunset. Ah, heaven ! 


The cameras clicked, people inched closer and the owl looked nervous (a glaring 
stare and raised ear tufts), and kept looking from side to side and up and 
down. Then someone noticed him doing something with the vole - not eating it, 
but tucking it into a crevice in the broken-off branch area. The owl did seem 
hesitant to stay and finish the poking and flew out and around the close 
vicinity of the tree a couple times, swinging by to see if the meal was still 
'hidden', and, once confident that it was, he flew again into farther reaches 
of the fields, like the Pied Piper, leading the human 'rats' on another chase. 
But the sun was setting and darkness caused the photographers to start packing 
it in, their ISO's already maxed out. There remained smiles and happy faces in 
abundance (don't know if the owl was as smiley). Someone got an iPhone pic of 
the vole in the crack, to certify that it was still there. 


There were some final grumblings about this and that amongst us 'followers' as 
we walked back to our cars, but we pretty much agreed that it had been a 
splendid watch and birder behavior was good, for the most part, maybe an A- 
Bird behavior was rated A+ . 


A couple of us stayed until almost dark and were treated to "Whooshes" of 
shorebirds flying right over our heads and down into the pond beyond. How lucky 
we were to be able to go to such a great spot for our birding recreation. 


link to Flickr album: Longear Goes A'Hunting:   https://flic.kr/s/aHsk7RS1ng

Wonder how the meeting went last night in Stanwood, re: "To flood or not to 
flood" (that was the question) ? Sure hope we and the hunters don't lose the 
Eide Rd. venue... 


Catching my breath here near Matthews Beach,

Barb Deihl
barbdeihl AT comcast.net


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Subject: (Clark Co) Red-throated Loon & Tufted at Marine Park
From: Luke Hanes <lukeandharmony1997 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 10:04:39 -0800
Both were just west of the boat docks (at approx 9am).
The Red-throated moved around a bit (south & east of the dock)

Luke Hanes
Vancouver, WA (Felida)
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Subject: pine siskins in NE Olympia
From: Jennifer DeSelle <jendeselle AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 16:44:09 +0000 (UTC)
A few weeks ago I had one lone pine siskin join my regular flock of house 
finches. A few days later there were two.  By the end of the week there were a 
half dozen.  By the next week they had doubled, and soon there were 30. 
 Yesterday I counted 60 pine siskins, and only one female house finch willing 
to brave the hordes. They have taken over the neighborhood and eating me out of 
house and home!   

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Subject: Midway Atoll Albatross Count
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 07:39:35 +0000 (UTC)
In this season of annual bird counts, here is a very interesting one:
Midway Atoll albatross count: 1.39 million - GrindTV.com
|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Midway Atoll albatross count: 1.39 million - GrindTV.comAlbatross tally is 
the highest ever at spec-of-a-place Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, 
which boasts the world's largest albatross population. | 

|  |
| View on www.grindtv.com | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |

   Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Fwd: Bird nest ID?
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 21:41:36 -0800
The majority of the responses suggested Bullock's Oriole with Bushtit as 
another possibility. Having seen the nest in context and looking at photos of 
each of these possibilities, I think that it a Bullock's Oriole nest. Thanks 
for the assistance. 


Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy 
Carnation, Wa

> Subject: Bird nest ID?
> 
>> 
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/16320679481/
>> 
>> The above link leads to a photo of a nest that Karen and I saw at Chinook 
Bend. We were curious as to what species of bird made the nest. Thank you. 

> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
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Subject: Bird nest ID?
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 21:09:31 -0800
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/16320679481/
> 
> The above link leads to a photo of a nest that Karen and I saw at Chinook 
Bend. We were curious as to what species of bird made the nest. Thank you. 


Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, WA
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