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Updated on Tuesday, September 2 at 07:27 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Stygian Owl,©Barry Kent Mackay

2 Sep errol fuller's newly-published book about passenger pigeons [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
1 Sep Whale carcass at Midway Beach [Denny Granstrand ]
1 Sep Ruff, Stilt Sandpiper photos [Denny Granstrand ]
2 Sep Skamania County Migrants ["Wilson Cady" ]
1 Sep My "Homeland" eBird Checklist ["Andy Stepniewski" ]
1 Sep Great Egret still present at Emerald Downs [Auburn, King Co] [Matt Bartels ]
1 Sep Seattle Turkey Vulture [Joan Miller ]
1 Sep Birding Semiahmoo on 9/6 at 9 AM to Noon [Twink Coffman ]
1 Sep Sha-dax Wetlands []
1 Sep American Goldfinch flock to lavender at Lake Joy [Hank ]
1 Sep Westport Pelagic Trip, Aug. 30, Laysan Albatross, Flesh-footed Shearwater ["Bruce LaBar" ]
01 Sep Fife Black Phoebe [Mike Charest ]
1 Sep Bird id - LBlkB (UBO) / Caryn / Whidwood [Caryn Schutzler ]
01 Sep Vaux's Happening on Labor Day [Larry Schwitters ]
1 Sep Finally, a siskin. []
1 Sep SeabIrd Wreck Point Roberts Washington Richard Swanston Delta BC ["rickswan" ]
1 Sep Foster Island, King - Yellow-headed Blackbird [Nigel Ball ]
1 Sep A feathered river across the sky [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
31 Aug RE: Juvenile shorebird help - solved! ["Teresa Michelsen" ]
31 Aug Juvenile shorebird help ["Teresa Michelsen" ]
31 Aug Black Headed confirmation/ Bullock's O. possible? Caryn / Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler ]
31 Aug Ocean Shores Game Range-Ruff [Scott Downes ]
31 Aug WOS Elections ["Ramblin' Rose Birding Adventures" ]
31 Aug RFI - Slaty-backed Gull? [James Cleaver ]
30 Aug Edmonds Roundup [Carol Riddell ]
30 Aug Immature Rufous in Lake Forest Park [Brien Meilleur ]
30 Aug FW: Migration Link - Second Try ["Dick Porter" ]
30 Aug FW: Researchers Untangle Secrets of Bird Migration | Birds | ReWild | KCET ["Dick Porter" ]
30 Aug A Honeysuckle Summer | Union Bay Watch [Larry Hubbell ]
30 Aug BirdNote - last week, and the week of Aug. 31, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
30 Aug A Gnawing Question [Jeff Gibson ]
30 Aug Indoor birding [Larry Schwitters ]
30 Aug About Martha (passenger pigeon) [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
29 Aug Yard Red-necked Phalarope, Diamond Point Tufted Puffin and Bald Eagle Plucks Murrelett [John Gatchet ]
29 Aug 2014 Klickitat County Fall North American Migration Count… September 20th and results of 2014 Spring Count… [Bob Hansen ]
29 Aug Re: Missing species [Jeffrey Baker ]
29 Aug Stilt Sandpiper on Jetty Island [Steve Pink ]
29 Aug Missing species []
29 Aug A swift afternoon [Larry Schwitters ]
29 Aug Injured grosbeak ["Tucker, Trileigh" ]
29 Aug A Covey! [Jeff Gibson ]
29 Aug RFI Grouse ID Franklin Cty [judy mullally ]
29 Aug Secrets of animal camouflage research (video) [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
29 Aug 8/28 Tokeland to Ocean Shores [Sam G Terry ]
28 Aug Migrating Swallows, Shorebirds and Ducks [John Gatchet ]
28 Aug Douglas Squirrel Attacks Band-tailed Pigeon [John Gatchet ]
28 Aug Battle Ground Night Flight and yard birds [Jim Danzenbaker ]
28 Aug Battle Ground Night Flight and yard birds [Jim Danzenbaker ]
28 Aug Eurasian Collared-Dove near the Sand Point Country Club, northeast Seattle [Ellen Blackstone ]
28 Aug Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2014-08-28 [Matt Bartels ]
28 Aug Trumpeter Swan + beaver action at Heirman Wildlife Preserve [Hank ]
28 Aug Moving Through [Paul Bannick ]
28 Aug birding Sinlahekin Wildlife Area.. [Twink Coffman ]
28 Aug Edmonds Barn Swallows 8-27-14 [Bill Anderson ]
28 Aug migrating Greater White-fronted Geese ["Ed Swan" ]
28 Aug Potholes Semi-pelagic birding trip [Mike & MerryLynn ]
28 Aug The Eek! Factor [Jeff Gibson ]
28 Aug Re: Ravens in town [Elizabeth Hope Sims-Day ]
28 Aug NIsqually NWR 8/27/14 []
27 Aug N. Cascades 8/23-25 (Skagit Co) posted to flickr, no luck on Ebird [Scott ]
27 Aug My Highest Bird [Jeff Gibson ]
27 Aug ARGENTINA BIRDING TRIP ["Sarah Knudsen" ]
27 Aug sad news [Jim Danzenbaker ]
27 Aug early Eared Grebe and Solitary Sandpiper on Vashon ["Ed Swan" ]
27 Aug Battle Ground, Washington LEAST FLYCATCHER [Jim Danzenbaker ]
27 Aug Battle Ground, Washington LEAST FLYCATCHER [Jim Danzenbaker ]
27 Aug Sky High [Jeff Gibson ]
27 Aug Stilt Sandpiper continues at Eide Road [Steve Pink ]
27 Aug A birding video game you'll love [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
27 Aug Re: Ravens in town [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
26 Aug Parasitic Jaeger at Luhr Beach, Nisqually. [Chris Warlow ]
26 Aug Wren cleansing in gravel at Wylie Slough [Hank ]
26 Aug Owls? []
26 Aug Re: Fwd: [inland-NW-birders] Buff-breasted Sandpiper - Dodd Rd. Blood Ponds, Walla Walla County [Russ Koppendrayer ]
26 Aug Swainson's Thrush yard bird !!!! [Lyn Topinka ]
26 Aug Extreme (northeast) Skagit County birding: Part I (August 22 eve, August 23) [Scott ]

Subject: errol fuller's newly-published book about passenger pigeons
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 12:59:14 +0100
hello everyone,

here's my review of another book about the passenger pigeon. this book, by
artist Errol Fuller, is quite different to historian Joel Greenberg's book
i told you about yesterday; Fuller's book is a photographic memorial that
provides historical context and of course, powerful emotional impacts that
come with visual images


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/sep/02/the-passenger-pigeon-by-errol-fuller-review 


or tiny URL:

http://gu.com/p/4x7q2/tw

cheers,

-- 
GrrlScientist
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]_______________________________________________
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Subject: Whale carcass at Midway Beach
From: Denny Granstrand <dgranstrand AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 21:43:19 -0700
Hi Tweeters,

Saturday afternoon I walked into Midway Beach and went north from the
access trail. About 200 yards north of the trail there is a whale carcass,
which I think is a Humpback, on the beach. Two pieces of baleen and the
tail are separated from the carcass. Photos can be seen at:

http://www.granstrand.net/gallery/newphotos?&page=1

Six Turkey Vultures were nearby, waiting for the gulls to get done picking
at the carcass.

Denny Granstrand


*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *
Denny Granstrand
Yakima, WA
dgranstrand AT gmail.com
Denny Granstrand's bird photos can be seen at:

www.granstrand.net/gallery/_______________________________________________
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Subject: Ruff, Stilt Sandpiper photos
From: Denny Granstrand <dgranstrand AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 21:40:01 -0700
Hi Tweeters,

After spending my birthday Saturday getting drenched, then skunked at many
stops, I got quite lucky Sunday at Ocean Shores. As I was walking in at the
treatment plant access to the Oyhut Game Range, I ran into a birder who
told me there are mega-rarities ahead. I quickened my pace and soon was
looking at a Ruff and two Stilt Sandpipers. I got a couple of quick
digiscoped photos of the Ruff before a Peregrine Falcon cruised over and
scattered the shorebirds. One Stilt Sandpiper stayed for photos but the
other Stilt and the Ruff disappeared.

I hurried back to my car and went in the Tonquin Ave. entrance, where I
found the same guy leaving who said a Ruff was being scrutinized by a group
of birders who were wondering if there weren't two Ruffs in the area. I
soon found the birders, the Ruff and one Stilt Sandpiper. The Ruff was very
cooperative and approached quite closely for photos.

I have been comparing the photos I took of the the Ruff at the two
locations and I think there were two different Ruffs on the Oyhut Game
Range. The digiscoped photos taken of the Ruff at the west pond (treatment
plant access) aren't as sharp as the photos I got of the Ruff at the east
pond (Tonquin Ave. access) but they are good enough to make a comparison.

I am interested in hearing from anyone who has time to check out the photos:

http://www.granstrand.net/gallery/newphotos?&page=1

Denny Granstrand

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *
Denny Granstrand
Yakima, WA
dgranstrand AT gmail.com
Denny Granstrand's bird photos can be seen at:

www.granstrand.net/gallery/_______________________________________________
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Subject: Skamania County Migrants
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 04:34:46 GMT
After a rather disappointing migration at our place, in western Skamania 
County, with only a few small flocks of birds moving through during late 
August, today the birds arrived with the return of sunshine. As usual Susan and 
I started our morning with our coffee and breakfast on the deck. I knew it was 
going to be a good day when I spotted four WARBLING VIREOS and 5 BLACK-THROATED 
GRAY WARBLERS In the flowering plum across the driveway before I even sat down. 
During the two and a half hours of observation we saw 4 TURKEY VULTURES, 
RED-TAILED HAWK, 13 BAND-TAILED PIGEONS, 10 MOURNING DOVES, 9 BLACK SWIFTS, 5 
RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRDS, 1 DOWNY WOODPECKER, NORTHERN FLICKERS, 1 PILEATED 
WOODPECKER, 1 WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE, 3 PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHERS, 4 CASSIN'S 
VIREOS, 16 WARBLING VIREOS, 8 STELLER'S JAYS, 24 AMERICAN CROWS, 1 COMMON 
RAVEN, 8 VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOWS, 6 BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES, 4 CHESTNUT-BACKED 
CHICKADEES, 3 RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES, 4 SWAINSON'S THRUSH, 1 HERMIT THRUSH, 7 
AMERICAN ROBINS, 3O CEDAR WAXWING, 2 ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS, 2 YELLOW 
WARBLERS, 30 BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLERS, 3 TOWNSEND'S WARBLERS, 2 HERMIT 
WARBLERS, 4 SPOTTED TOWHEES, 6 SONG SPARROWS, 12 DARK-EYED JUNCOS, 5 WESTERN 
TANAGERS 8 HOUSE FINCH, 2 RED CROSSBILL, 1O AMERICAN GOLDFINCH and 6 EVENING 
GROSBEAK. We a looking forward to tomorrow morning and hopefully another good 
day of migration. Wilson Cady 

Columbia River Gorge, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: My "Homeland" eBird Checklist
From: "Andy Stepniewski" <steppie AT nwinfo.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 21:18:20 -0700
Hi Tweeters.

I apologize for any undue excitement caused by my submission of Checklist 
checklist-subID=S19641800. Ellen and I birded Tokeland the afternoon of 1 
September. I was entering our sightings on my Birdlog app as she was driving 
east from Raymond, I guess somewhere in Lewis County. I didn’t notice the app 
spellcheck changed my Tokeland to Homeland. Thus, we did NOT SEE any of the 
mega rarities for Lewis County noted in that checklist: Brown Pelican, Willet, 
Whimbrel, Long-billed Curlew, Marbled Godwit, Heermann’s Gull, and Common 
Tern. I truly hope the Rare Bird Alert sent out by eBird did not cause too many 
birders a late afternoon stampede from the far corners of WA to Homeland this 
afternoon to search for these Code 5 (more or less) Lewis County birds. 


Andy Stepniewski
Wapato WA
steppie AT nwinfo.net






---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com_______________________________________________
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Subject: Great Egret still present at Emerald Downs [Auburn, King Co]
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 19:29:46 -0700
Hi Tweets -
I made a short afternoon trip to Renton & Auburn today, hoping to see a couple 
King Co year birds. 

My first stop - Waterworks park in Renton, failed to turn up the Black Phoebe 
that has been reported since the 18th or 19th -- possible it is still around 
though, so I'd bet it is worth others visiting. 


Next up, I headed to Emerald Downs -- On Aug 24, Russ K reported seeing a Great 
Egret hanging out on the infield at Emerald Downs. Dave Slager, figured out 
that you can see much of the infield w/o entering -- I followed his directions 
from ebird, and indeed it was easy to scope a King Co Great Egret, still 
hanging out in the infield [near the pond] -- the trick: View from the railroad 
overpass on 15th St. NW - this is just east of the M St. turn-off that is the 
usual place to look for ducks & shorebirds in the spring. You can park on M St. 
right at the intersection [there's a pulloff on the west side] and from there 
it is just a couple minute walk east on 15th to the overpass. Sure enough, 
Great Egret visible. 


Good distant birding!

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA

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Subject: Seattle Turkey Vulture
From: Joan Miller <jemskink AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 18:54:47 -0700
Hi Tweets,

Late this afternoon, to my surprise, I saw a turkey vulture gliding over
West Seattle. I've never seen one here before. It was fairly low, so I
don't know if it was migrating.

Joan Miller
West Seattle
jemskink at gmail dot com_______________________________________________
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Subject: Birding Semiahmoo on 9/6 at 9 AM to Noon
From: Twink Coffman <wilber4818 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 18:26:54 -0700
BIRDING / Field Trip at Semiahmoo Park \
September 6 at 9:00 AM to Noon
Organizer
Lynne Givler & Steven Harper
No registration required.

-- 
happy birding
Twink
wilber4818 AT gmail.com
Ferndale, WA
in Whatcom County
out on the beach_______________________________________________
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Subject: Sha-dax Wetlands
From: mcharest AT wamail.net
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 18:26:19 -0700 (PDT)
I have received quite a few requests for directions and questions on where
the Sha-dax Wetlands in Fife are, and others saying that they drive around
the neighborhoods looking for a viewing spot and can't find any access.
The hotspot point on Ebird is a little deceptive and can throw you off.

Here are the best directions that I can come up with:

I go on North Levee road to 70th street, turn onto 70th. From 70th take a
left on 43rd, 43rd jogs hard to the left then right, here there is a bus
stop. Park here,the trail head is here on the right along the fence
obscured a bit by bushes, walk down the trail about 150 yards to a big
scratch mark in the gravel on the trail. At the scratch mark Turn right
and walk through the trees to the pond viewing.

This is by no means a big birding destination, but it continues to produce
harder to find Pierce County birds and is a good stop if in the area.

Mike Charest
Tacoma, Washington
mcharest AT wamail.net

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Subject: American Goldfinch flock to lavender at Lake Joy
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 17:44:45 -0700
> 
> When a flock of American Goldfinch arrived in our yard today, most of them 
settled on the lavender rather than the various feeders, including two thistle 
feeders. 

> 
> Video:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15109204991/
> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
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Subject: Westport Pelagic Trip, Aug. 30, Laysan Albatross, Flesh-footed Shearwater
From: "Bruce LaBar" <blabar AT harbornet.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 16:02:15 -0700
Waking up to a steady rain wasn’t what we wanted and we hoped it would lessen 
as we departed. In our morning introductions, Captain Phil Anderson said that 
as we got farther out to sea, we would hopefully leave the rain behind us. 
After being huddled up in the cabin entrance for an hour or so, the rain 
lightened and not too much longer -- as forecasted -- we had wonderfully calm 
seas, gray sky turning to blue and a unbelievable great pelagic trip! 


Most of our pelagic participants were from Washington, with only a few from 
other states and Canada. Several had never been on a pelagic or one out of 
Westport. They were in for a tremendous day which included thousands of birds 
behind shrimp boats, rare species sightings and close encounters with Humpback 
Whales. The highlights included one first-of-the year sighting of a Laysan 
Albatross coming close to the boat, turning and heading back out to sea. Phil 
gunned the engines for a chase but the Laysan continued too far out to catch. 
Within the thousands of California Gulls, Pink-footed Shearwaters and Sooty 
Shearwaters behind the shrimpers, Bill Tweit and Gene Revelas at the same time 
found our first of 2 Flesh-footed Shearwaters (our first of the year also). 
Seven Buller’s Shearwaters wowed birders with their beautiful plumage and 
lazy flight behavior. Adult Sabine’s Gulls are always a highlight with their 
colorful markings . We encountered 26 of these Arctic breeders heading south. 
Because of the calm waters, 161 Cassin’s Auklets and 41 Red Phalaropes were 
easily viewed out in deeper waters. A lost Yellow Warbler tested our optics as 
it kept circling the boat giving only quick views. 


Mammal highlights included several Humpback Whales feeding close to the boat. 
An Elephant Seal’s head poking out of the water is always a good sighting as 
one stayed up for all to view. 

Other notes of interest were thousands of Valalla jellyfish and good numbers of 
another jelly that we haven’t keyed out. Many tuna fish jumping out of the 
water was a treat. Mola mola (ocean sunfish) and blue shark entertained us at 
the chum spot. 

Leaders for this trip were Gene Revelas, Bill Tweit and myself. Phil Anderson 
and Chris Anderson also added their expertise. 


This is our busiest time of the year for pelagic trips. If interested in 
upcoming trips please go to our website, www.westportseabirds, for reservations 
or other information. 


Bird List
Mallard (in large flying flock of Northern Pintails)
Northern Pintail
Green-winged Teal (also in the pintail flocks)
Surf Scoter
White-winged Scoter
LAYSAN ALBATROSS
Black-footed Albatross
Northern Fulmar
Pink-footed Shearwater
Sooty Shearwater
Flesh-footed Shearwater
Buller’s Shearwater
Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel
Brandt’s Cormorant
Double-crested Cormorant
Pelagic Cormorant
Brown Pelican
Wandering Tattler-3, on rocks at jetty
Marbled Godwit-400, by coast guard station at the marina.
Ruddy Turnstone-1, on rocks at jetty
Black Turnstone-2, same
Surfbird-1, same
Red-necked Phalarope
Red Phalarope
Sabine’s Gull
Heermann’s Gull
Western Gull
California Gull
Glaucous-winged Gull
Common Tern-10, coming in, near jetty
Arctic Tern-1, seen by a few, far from boat
Pomarine Jaeger-1
Parasitic Jaeger-3, one at our chum sight, giving all close views
Pigeon Guillemot-1, only one seen, far out at sea
Common Murre
Cassin’s Auklet
Rhinoceros Auklet
Tufted Puffin-3
Yellow Warbler-1

Mammals
Humpback Whale
Harbor Porpoise
Dall’ Porpoise
Northern Fur Seal
California Sea-Lion
Steller’ Sea-Lion
Harbor Seal
Northern Elephant Seal

For complete species numbers, check our website or Facebook page in coming 
days. 


Bruce LaBar
Tacoma, WA

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Subject: Fife Black Phoebe
From: Mike Charest <mcharest AT wamail.net>
Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 15:09:04 -0700
I just got back from camping in eastern Washington and decided to go check the 
local spots and I am currently watching a black Phoebe fly catching at Sha-dax 
Wetlands in Fife 

.

Have a great day.

Mike Charest
Tacoma. WA
Mcharest AT wamail.net

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone_______________________________________________
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Subject: Bird id - LBlkB (UBO) / Caryn / Whidwood
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 AT seanet.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 09:45:45 -0700
Hello Tweeters -

So, my friends call me this am from Whidbey (where I soon will be going - thus 
the Whidwood) to id a bird... 


A little black bird (approx 5") with a white belly and ring around its neck. 
Two hawks were taunting it and did not catch it. I sure can't come up with a 
bird for them. They did have a book with them but could not id it. But I can't 
either. Have never birded without seeing the bird - wait, guess that's what 
birding by ear is but think it would have been screeching in the throes of 
those two hawks - which were also ufo'd). But, guess that is what many of the 
Tweeter's do - guess at descriptions. (see below) 


Any ideas? Thanks.

Caryn / Wedgwood 

Jim Danzenbaker correctly helped me id the bird we had yesterday as a female 
Western Tanager. Thanks, Jim!!!_______________________________________________ 

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Subject: Vaux's Happening on Labor Day
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters AT me.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 09:08:42 -0700
Lots of swifts in the Monroe Wagner Roost site at 9:08 this morning. The sun 
comes out and they will be gone, gone, gone. 
http://wildearth.tv/cam/vauxs-swifts 


Larry Schwitters
Issaquah_______________________________________________
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Subject: Finally, a siskin.
From: jeffandsuekm AT comcast.net
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 16:06:07 +0000 (UTC)
Haven't seen one in over a year at our feeder. One showed up this morning, 
mixed in with 15 or so Goldfinches. 


Jeff Mills 
Mount Vernon _______________________________________________
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Subject: SeabIrd Wreck Point Roberts Washington Richard Swanston Delta BC
From: "rickswan" <rickswan AT telus.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 07:47:32 -0700
Boundary Bay and Point Roberts have become a carnal house of Dead Birds that 
allegedly have been captured in Commercial Fish Nets 

Just heard that 45 More seabirds were counted in Boundary Bay on the Canadian 
Side Most were Murre 

5 Murre were counted Most were East of the Beach Front Houses I strongly 
Believe that residents are Burying In the Area Between the Marina to the Beach 
Cabins East of South Beach Road. Many Families Use the Beach It's sandy on the 
LOW Tide for the Most part Beach Toys Litter the High water area . Of COURSE 
Parents would Not want a Lot of DEAD Carcasses Near their Children's Play area 
! 

There was great concentrations of Eel Grass Wreck Rolled up on the Beach along 
with algae deeply laid up on the High Water Mark Smaller Birds such as Rhino 
and Pigeon Guillemots and Murre could easily get rolled up in the Material 
thrown up by waves Although Other Years or Later in the season the situation be 
worse My count should be conservative 

August 31,2014. I went against my better judgment and walked the Beaches at 
Point Roberts Washington! I walked from the Cannery Pilings At Watcom County 
Park Lilly Point Pt. Roberts Wash. to the Boat Ramp at Light House Park 29 
Murre 3 Rhino 2 Loons 1 Western Grebe 4 Cormorants 1 Grebe Sp. Head Missing [ 
Horned or Eared 1] Possibly 2 Seals 2 Desiccated Most Murre 21 were West of the 
Marina Total Count 

 
11:18 Just West of the Marina Point Roberts Washington Started the Trip Heading 
Towards Light House Park In the third leg of the walk where most of the Dead 
Animals were located . This is a Rocky / more pebble beach not as well used by 
families as the Beaches East of the Marina . With the exception of Light House 
Park Area 

21 Murre [ One appeared to be an Imm. ] 1 Harbour Seal 1 Grebe Species [ Horned 
or Eared head Missing ? ] 1 Western Grebe 

1 Pelagic Cormorant 
1 Guillemot Injured on the beach 

One section of Seine Net and a Net Light 
Several sections of Long thick Poly Line and numerous types of Garbage were 
seen along the Shoreline 

12:10 Reached the Boat ramp 
None of the birds were sampled as I'm a Canadian And cannot take anything 
through the border . Also no birds were marked . I did this as a Volunteer But 
could still run into problems with US Immigration if they saw my count as being 
WORK . So I have to be very Limited in doing this . I'm also mindful;; that in 
doing this I'm trespassing on Private Beaches So it's a little precarious 
walking the tidal areas in Washington State 

Yours Richard Swanston Delta_______________________________________________
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Subject: Foster Island, King - Yellow-headed Blackbird
From: Nigel Ball <nigelj.ball AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 06:17:48 -0700
Hi
Yesterday (31st) there was a single YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD to the east of
the point at Foster Island. Also a few Orange-crowned Warblers moving
through, including one clearly seen grey-headed.
Cheers
Nigel

-- 
Nigel Ball
Seattle, Wa
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Subject: A feathered river across the sky
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 10:03:47 +0100
hello everyone,

you probably know that today is a most inauspicious day: it is the
centenary of the extinction of the passenger pigeon, which was likely the
most numerous single bird species on the planet. this extinction was due
entirely to humans.

i wrote a review of joel greenberg's new book, A feathered river across the
sky, that you may wish to read. my book review is the opening salvo in a
series of opinion pieces and book reviews that i plan to publish this week
about the passenger pigeon. although this is a book review, i think it
reads like a stand alone essay because it provides the context that i will
build upon this week, and deserves some attention.


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/sep/01/a-feathered-river-across-the-sky-by-joel-greenberg-review 


or tiny URL:

http://gu.com/p/4x6t2/tw

-- 
GrrlScientist
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

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Subject: RE: Juvenile shorebird help - solved!
From: "Teresa Michelsen" <teresa AT avocetconsulting.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 19:03:55 -0700
Wow, fast help, you all :)
Consensus is juvenile Baird's Sandpiper. Now for me to go off and study the
books - at least that was one of two I was considering and it didn't turn
out to be a Western after all :D  I appreciate the tips, which had to do
with the overall coloring (one of the things I noticed), the scaly-looking
back, and the long projection of the primaries.

Thank you, Grace, Jim, Pat, Larry, and Evan - Teresa

-----Original Message-----
From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Teresa
Michelsen
Sent: Sunday, August 31, 2014 6:12 PM
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Juvenile shorebird help

Hi all,
Visited Nisqually today with the Tacoma Mountaineers - was a tad less birdy
than usual, but nevertheless enjoyed the trip. We were watching a small
group of juvenile shorebirds on the mudflats near the beginning of the
boardwalk, one of which was clearly a juvenile Least Sandpiper. I have a
couple of photos up of another one that's puzzling me. I initially assumed
they were juvenile Westerns, being just a bit larger and black-legged, with
a slightly droopy bill. However, looking at the photos I'm not so sure. The
neck and breast seem much too streaky and dingy and there is no rufous
anywhere. I'm relying on Sibley and photos on the internet, but wanted to
get some input from those in the know... Here are the urls on Facebook, this
is set to public so hopefully you can see it. I'd like to hazard a guess but
I'm afraid to :D

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10204148093201131&set=pcb.1020414810
2601366&type=1&theater
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10204148094281158&set=pcb.1020414810
2601366&type=1&theater

Thanks in advance! - Teresa Michelsen, Olympia

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Subject: Juvenile shorebird help
From: "Teresa Michelsen" <teresa AT avocetconsulting.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 18:12:12 -0700
Hi all,
Visited Nisqually today with the Tacoma Mountaineers - was a tad less birdy
than usual, but nevertheless enjoyed the trip. We were watching a small
group of juvenile shorebirds on the mudflats near the beginning of the
boardwalk, one of which was clearly a juvenile Least Sandpiper. I have a
couple of photos up of another one that's puzzling me. I initially assumed
they were juvenile Westerns, being just a bit larger and black-legged, with
a slightly droopy bill. However, looking at the photos I'm not so sure. The
neck and breast seem much too streaky and dingy and there is no rufous
anywhere. I'm relying on Sibley and photos on the internet, but wanted to
get some input from those in the know... Here are the urls on Facebook, this
is set to public so hopefully you can see it. I'd like to hazard a guess but
I'm afraid to :D

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10204148093201131&set=pcb.1020414810
2601366&type=1&theater
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10204148094281158&set=pcb.1020414810
2601366&type=1&theater

Thanks in advance! - Teresa Michelsen, Olympia

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Subject: Black Headed confirmation/ Bullock's O. possible? Caryn / Wedgwood
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 AT seanet.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 17:38:05 -0700
Hi Tweeters -

While making peach pie we looked out and spotted a more recognizably marked 
Black Headed Grosbeak. But while he was here, we noticed two what seemed to be 
Bullock's Oriole females. Has anyone else been seeing these? Too large for 
finches or pine siskins. White wingbars and very yellow breast and rump. 


Back to baking and cooking. Headed to Whidbey on T/W so will report if I see 
anything cool up there. 


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Subject: Ocean Shores Game Range-Ruff
From: Scott Downes <downess AT charter.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 13:34:07 -0700
Tweets,
The ruff at the Ocean Shores game range that was found yesterday by Eric Heisey 
was present this morning and was still present when I left just now. 


Other notable birds were:
2 Stilt Sandpiper
Mix of Golden Plovers including at least one Pacific
1 Lapland Longspur

Scott Downes
Downess AT charter.net
Yakima Wa_______________________________________________
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Subject: WOS Elections
From: "Ramblin' Rose Birding Adventures" <rosebirding AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 11:30:37 -0700
 
The Washington Ornithological Society elections for Board Positions are now 
open. Members of WOS are encouraged to vote by going to the WOS 
websitehttp://www.wos.org/ . Elections are being held for President – Dan 
Stephens, Vice-President – Amy Powell, Treasurer – Barbara Webster, 
Secretary – Dina Roberts and Director (Board member at large) Jim 
Danzenbaker. The election will close on October 30, 2014. 

 
 
Penny Rose
Ballard, WA
 
Get Outside – Go Birding_______________________________________________
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Subject: RFI - Slaty-backed Gull?
From: James Cleaver <james.d.cleaver AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 06:59:53 -0700
Hi all,
I'm in the Seattle area this weekend and will have time tomorrow, Mon.
Sept. 1, and I hope to go look for the Slaty-backed Gull in Tacoma. Is it
still around? Recommendations on where to look?

Thank you,

James Cleaver
Richland, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Edmonds Roundup
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 19:20:27 -0700
With respect to shorebirds, Edmonds marsh has been producing primarily  
Least and Western Sandpipers, with a smattering of Semipalmated  
Plovers. There was one day of a couple of Baird's Sandpipers (code 3)  
a week ago and there were several Pectoral Sandpipers (code 3) last  
Sunday. The resident swallows have already headed south and we are now  
seeing pulses of more northern birds moving through. A flock of 30  
Barn Swallows spent about five days this week flycatching over the  
marsh before moving on. Duck species have picked up with sightings of  
Northern Shoveler, Green-winged Teal, Gadwall, Hooded Merganser,  
American Wigeon, and the ever-present Mallard.

Passerine wavelets have been rolling through the Edmonds Bowl. We have  
been seeing Common Yellowthroat, Black-throated Gray Warbler, Wilson's  
Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, and Townsend's  
Warbler. Some Western Tanagers, Warbling Vireos, and at least one  
Hammond's Flycatcher have been sighted. The Barn Owl (code 5) has been  
seen twice in August that we know of.

On the waterfront, we watched the Heermann's Gulls explode off the  
breakwater a few days ago and two of us independently counted about  
500. We might expect to see higher numbers as fall progresses and more  
of them gather for a southbound push. Fall numbers suggest that  
Edmonds is a staging area for this species. The California Gulls  
continue to use the roof of the former Waterfront Antique Mall for  
rest. They can number between 150 - 200 birds. I have been checking  
both sides of the roof from different angles in the parking lot.  
Occasionally they are joined by a few Caspian Terns or Glaucous-winged  
Gulls, but this is primarily a California Gull gathering. Small  
numbers of Marbled Murrelets have been around on occasion and there  
was a recent report of an early Ancient Murrelet seen by scope. Other  
than that, the waterfront is still pretty quiet.

We are at 168 species for the year.

Carol Riddell
Edmonds, WA
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Subject: Immature Rufous in Lake Forest Park
From: Brien Meilleur <brienm AT live.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 16:01:07 -0700
Hi Tweets,
I was surprised just now to see an immature male Rufous hummingbird at my 
feeder in Lake Forest Park. It's the latest I've had one at the house. The last 
time I saw one this year was mid-June. 

Brien Meilleur
Lake Forest Park, WA
brienm AT live.com 
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Subject: FW: Migration Link - Second Try
From: "Dick Porter" <dick AT dkporter.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 13:35:36 -0700
Ooops!  Try this:

http://www.kcet.org/news/redefine/rewild/



-----Original Message-----
From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Dick Porter
Sent: Saturday, August 30, 2014 1:27 PM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] FW: Researchers Untangle Secrets of Bird Migration |
Birds | ReWild | KCET

Interesting article about Migration in Wilson Warblers from a Southern
California Bird Group



________________________________
Subject: Researchers Untangle Secrets of Bird Migration | Birds | ReWild |
KCET


http://www.kcet.org/news/redefine/rewild/birds-1/researchers-untangle-secret
s-of-bird-migration.html#.U__dFKBx5a0.mailto


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Subject: FW: Researchers Untangle Secrets of Bird Migration | Birds | ReWild | KCET
From: "Dick Porter" <dick AT dkporter.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 13:26:58 -0700
Interesting article about Migration in Wilson Warblers from a Southern
California Bird Group



________________________________
Subject: Researchers Untangle Secrets of Bird Migration | Birds | ReWild |
KCET


http://www.kcet.org/news/redefine/rewild/birds-1/researchers-untangle-secret
s-of-bird-migration.html#.U__dFKBx5a0.mailto


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Subject: A Honeysuckle Summer | Union Bay Watch
From: Larry Hubbell <ldhubbell AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 12:22:19 -0700
Tweeter's

This week's post starts out with hummingbirds in a honeysuckle bush and ends 
with a more seldom seen juvenile bird on a kingfisher's perch. It all happens 
on the edge of Duck Bay just southwest of Foster Island. Check it out at: 


http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2014/08/a-honeysuckle-summer.html

Pif you have time please double check that I have identified the birds 
correctly. In particular there is one small bird in a willow tree that I do not 
remember having photographed before. 


Thank you!

Have a great day on Union Bay…where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubell at comcast dot net
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Subject: BirdNote - last week, and the week of Aug. 31, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123imagine.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 12:04:02 -0700
Hey, Tweets,The last few days of summer vacation, and people are catching some 
rays. Birds, too!Check out this photo blog of birds sunbathing: 
http://bit.ly/1n6EXFe-------------------------------------------------Last 
week, BirdNote aired:* Texas Hill Country Conservation - Paul Davis manages his 
land to protect the Golden-cheeked Warbler and the Black-capped 
Vireohttp://bit.ly/NkKm9q* A Vast Unseen Migration 
Offshorehttp://bit.ly/1ots8V8* California Condorhttp://bit.ly/1tLuPYv* 
Burrowing Owl Hisses Like a Rattlesnake!http://bit.ly/1rFjkTN* Grassland 
Meander in Saskatchewanhttp://bit.ly/17TcJXo* Wilson's Warbler Near Summer's 
Endhttp://bit.ly/1nKrmDK* Birds and 
Navigationhttp://bit.ly/Z1flnN------------------------------------------------------------View 
the photos and links for next week's shows: 
http://bit.ly/1vVBfDL------------------------------------------------------------Travel 
to Cuba with BirdNote and Earthbound Expeditions, October 18th - 26th, 2014. 
Join us on a unique trip to experience the culture, history, and birds of this 
vibrant island.  
http://bit.ly/1sOyNyW-----------------------------------------------------------Find 
us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for 
birdnoteradio=========================================You can listen to the 
mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly 
mail or the podcast, and find related resources on the website. 
http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+ episodes in the archive.Thanks for 
listening!Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote 
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Subject: A Gnawing Question
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 10:11:59 -0700


No, this is not a question about one of our many growing environmental 
problems. It's just about gnawing. 

Walking through the fine forest at Fort Townsend State Park (just south of Port 
Townsend), I stopped along the trail when I heard a gnawing sound. "Aha!" I 
thought " a Chickaree!" because there were plenty of Douglas Squirrels around, 
maybe one was chewing on something. 

 There was no squirrel, no mountain beaver, no nothing. The forest was very 
still and quiet so I could hear this gnawing sound clearly - about as loud as a 
rat chewing through a wood wall (a sound, for better or worse, I have heard 
before). I looked and looked - nothing. But the sound was right there! A bit 
difficult to pinpoint. A genuine forest mystery. 

A couple of days later I was checking out David George Haskill's blog "Ramble" 
which is a great nature blog by the excellent author of "The Forest Unseen" and 
interestingly enough the last entry was about hearing beetle larvae (he assumed 
them to be some sort of Long-horned beetle) gnawing in a dead pine tree - loud 
enough to be heard from 12 ft away. I'm sure thinking maybe that's what I 
heard. 

While Mr. Haskill writes from Tennessee mostly, there are some big Long-horned 
beetles here in the Pacific Northwest. Years ago, working in Stehekin , in the 
North Cascades, I was reading one hot summer night in my cabin, when I heard a 
strange sound by the screen door. It turned out to be a couple dozen giant 
long-horn beetles crawling on the screen - these big beautiful red- brown 
beetles were two inches long or a bit more, with big gnarly antennae making 
them look even larger. 

What I had heard was the sort of eerie sound they were making, a strange 
squeaking - it could have made a good soundtrack for one of those horror movies 
where normal sized insects are soaked in gamma rays or something and, growing 
ever larger, decide humans are now their favorite food - starting first with 
the lone guy in the last cabin in town of course. 

Those beetles, which I hadn't seen before ( or since) were the California Root 
Borer, which has really large wood-eatin' grubs. The related Ponderous Borer, 
also has a big larvae, which according to beetle lore, has jaws that were the 
inspiration for the design of chainsaw teeth. 

Well, don't know for sure if that is what I heard, beetle larva or what. Have 
any of you naturalist's around here heard such a thing in our local forests? 
That's my gnawing question. 

I went back, after reading Mr. Haskill's account, to check that spot in the 
forest - didn't hear any gnawing going on. 

Jeff Gibsonreporting fromPort Townsend Wa
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Subject: Indoor birding
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters AT me.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 09:30:03 -0700
If you don't want to venture outside this morning why not count the swifts in 
the Wagner roost. There's a bunch. Let me know what you get for a total and how 
you got it. You also may want to see how many times you can see one swift bite 
another. http://wildearth.tv/cam/vauxs-swifts 


Larry Schwitters
Issaquah_______________________________________________
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Subject: About Martha (passenger pigeon)
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 10:58:45 +0100
hello everyone,

I just published a "caturday" piece that features a couple videos that
provide a look at martha, a captive-bred female passenger pigeon whose
death on 1 september 1914 marked the extinction of the most numerous bird
species on earth:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/aug/30/about-martha-passenger-pigeon-video 


tiny URL:

http://gu.com/p/4x4vv/tw

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]_______________________________________________
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Subject: Yard Red-necked Phalarope, Diamond Point Tufted Puffin and Bald Eagle Plucks Murrelett
From: John Gatchet <jfgatchet AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 21:16:06 -0700
This morning I scoped calm waters on Discovery Bay from my yard and counted
29 RED-NECKED PHALAROPE.  In the evening I saw two RED-NECKED PHALAROPE at
the Panorama Vista County Park that can be accessed from East Sequim Bay
Road.  A lone PACIFIC LOON flew by the park.

Later this evening at Diamond Point there was a lone TUFTED PUFFIN and a
COMMON LOON.  As I searched in vain for Red-necked Phalarope I spotted a
single MARBLED MURRELETT a species not common this time of year there.  As
I watched the bird through my scope a BALD EAGLE plucked it off the surface
of the water.  I thought to myself of all the birds to take why this little
one.  The Eagle flew to a docking post, plucked the bird and ate it.

John F. Gatchet
Gardiner, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: 2014 Klickitat County Fall North American Migration Count… September 20th and results of 2014 Spring Count…
From: Bob Hansen <bobhansen AT gorge.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 15:51:04 -0700
Folks,

The 2014 Klickitat County Fall North American Migration Count is scheduled for 
Saturday, September 20th. Please let me know if you are interested in helping. 
We have a variety of habitats in Klickitat County, from the Douglas Fir 
subalpine forests near Trout Lake and Mt Adams, to the sage steppe at the 
western edge of the Columbia Basin, and in between, a beautiful Oak-Pine 
woodland habitat. 


Over the past 15 Fall counts ( 
http://birdingwashington.info/Klickitat/FallNAMC.htm ), we have averaged 127 
count day species with the help of 21 observers. 


For the results of our 2014 Spring Count --> 
http://birdingwashington.info/Klickitat/Spring2014.htm 


To see all the Klickitat data, both spring and fall, click --> 
http://birdingwashington.info/Klickitat/ 


Thanks to Randy Robinson for compiling this data and thanks also to the 
participants, of varying skill levels, who have helped us capture this snapshot 
of Klickitat County bird life over these years. 


If you have any interest in helping, or in starting such counts in your county, 
please let me know. Recruiting observers is an ongoing, year around activity. 


Happy Birding,
Bob Hansen
503 881 5889
bobhansen AT gorge.net

"ask not what your eco system can do for you,
"ask what you can do for your eco system." OWS graffiti













Bob 

"ask not what your eco system can do for you,
"ask what you can do for your eco system." OWS graffiti







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Subject: Re: Missing species
From: Jeffrey Baker <jeffrey158 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 15:40:45 -0700 (GMT-07:00)
For the first time since moving into my current home in 2002, I had Juncos 
breed and spend the entire Summer months in my yard. There were many immature 
ones which points to local breeding. I have no feeders due to neighborhood cats 
and the illnesses that feeders can pass on. Just a wide variety of natives on a 
regular city lot. Go figure? 


Jeff Baker
West Seattle

-----Original Message-----
>From: drsybert AT northtown.org
>Sent: Aug 29, 2014 2:41 PM
>To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
>Subject: [Tweeters] Missing species
>
>Here in the middle of Lewis County (Salkum/Cinebar area), several of us 
>who have bird feeders  have missed some species in the past several 
>weeks--species that are usually here year round, such as Song Sparrows, 
>Juncos, and Spotted Towhees.  And the hummingbirds have been few and far 
>between.
>
>We are wondering if others in the area have had the same experience and 
>if anyone has any idea why.
>
>(In addition, some species that usually stay much longer left early--at 
>about the same time the others disappeared--namely Purple Finch and 
>Black-headed Grosbeak.  Since the Evening Grosbeak and Varied Thrush did 
>not even show up this summer, that leaves our feeders to the now-nesting 
>Goldfinch, Jays, and Doves mostly.)
>
>Darlene Sybert
>Cinebar
>_______________________________________________
>Tweeters mailing list
>Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Stilt Sandpiper on Jetty Island
From: Steve Pink <pirangas AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 15:07:15 -0700
Hi,
Visited Jetty Island off Everett today. The first ferry not until 10:00 and 
high tide was about 8 am - so the tide was falling as we arrived. 

There were c150 sandpipers - mostly Western, a few Least plus c40 Semipalmated 
Plovers. We noticed a larger shorebird with a drooping bill - a juvenile Stilt 
Sandpiper. Prominent white supercillium and brown scaly back. Unfortunately it 
departed very soon after we set our scopes up. Most of the shorebirds departed 
in the next hour. 

The ferry stops running on Labor Day.
Cheers,  Steve 

Steve Pink
Edmonds, WA
mailto: pirangas AT hotmail.com
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Subject: Missing species
From: drsybert AT northtown.org
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 17:41:32 -0400
Here in the middle of Lewis County (Salkum/Cinebar area), several of us 
who have bird feeders  have missed some species in the past several 
weeks--species that are usually here year round, such as Song Sparrows, 
Juncos, and Spotted Towhees.  And the hummingbirds have been few and far 
between.

We are wondering if others in the area have had the same experience and 
if anyone has any idea why.

(In addition, some species that usually stay much longer left early--at 
about the same time the others disappeared--namely Purple Finch and 
Black-headed Grosbeak.  Since the Evening Grosbeak and Varied Thrush did 
not even show up this summer, that leaves our feeders to the now-nesting 
Goldfinch, Jays, and Doves mostly.)

Darlene Sybert
Cinebar
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Subject: A swift afternoon
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters AT me.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 13:33:55 -0700
Cool with some light rain and the Vaux's are back in the Monroe Wagner roost 
site at 1:30. http://wildearth.tv/cam/vauxs-swifts 


Larry Schwitters
Issaquah  _______________________________________________
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Subject: Injured grosbeak
From: "Tucker, Trileigh" <TRI AT seattleu.edu>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 18:29:55 +0000
Hi Tweets,

Being almost finished with our move into a new home in West Seattle, I was 
thrilled this morning to see a female Black-headed Grosbeak arrive at the lilac 
bushes, then descend to the suet feeder. But on examining my photos, I was 
anguished to see that she is severely injured, with her upper mandible 
apparently torn off. The injury seems recent but not immediately fresh, and she 
seems to be flying fine. (I am willing to share photos if anyone’s interested, 
but am not posting them for obvious reasons.) 


Is there any type of food I can provide for her to help her in this state? 
There is fresh water provided nearby. I am thinking that she simply cannot 
survive with this injury, but if there’s something I can do to ease her way, 
I’d like to. 


Thanks much,
Trileigh

~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Trileigh Tucker
Lincoln Park, West Seattle
Natural history website: naturalpresencearts.com
Photography: flickr.com/photos/trileigh
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Subject: A Covey!
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 08:28:44 -0700
Just watched as a covey of 17 California Quail took a dust bath just outside my 
bedroom window here in dry ol' Port Townsend. Pretty cool. 

You see, normally living in Mudville (Everett), I've been quail deprived for 
years because Mudville ain't Quail Country as far as I know. I heard one - once 
- at the edge of town. 

Here in drier and more rural Port Townsend, I've seen a few pairs around town 
the last 6 months. But a whole Covey - Wow! I haven't seen a covey of Quail for 
seven years, and that was winter in New Mexico. 

Jeff Gibsonin dustyPort Townsend Wa 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: RFI Grouse ID Franklin Cty
From: judy mullally <judyemull AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 08:18:14 -0700
Driving from ID to Port Angeles on Wednesday, I tried to pick up a few county 
birds along the way. One of my stops was west of HW 17 where it meets HW 260 
west of Connell . I drove about 2 miles west on what I believe is called 
Hendricks Rd- the west extension across HW 260. I pulled into a small pond 
access on the left, parked and started walking. In so doing, I flushed a group 
of 15-20 grouse like birds which quickly went from that grassy verge to the top 
of the rocks and disappeared. I scaled the rocks but found no trace. 


The impression was limited- no time to even get my binoculars up, but the 
coloring of the backs as they flew away was definitely a rusty red-orange. They 
were generally the size of CaQuail or possibly slightly larger. I thought the 
head was "peaky" but perhaps that was more expectation than observation. 


I checked my Sibley against my assumptions and figured they were Ruffed grouse 
- until I got home and saw they were categorized as a "5" for Franklin county. 
Now I'm totally clueless. Any help would be appreciated. 


Also, I saw a flock of turkey on a lawn across the river from Hooper. Again the 
county list shows these as unlikely for the county ( Adams on that side of the 
river), so I'm wondering whether they are just feral domestics. Anyone know 
anything about these? 


Judy Mullally judyemull AT yahoo.com Port Angeles WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Secrets of animal camouflage research (video)
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 12:30:51 +0100
hello everyone,

here's a fun and informative little video that you may enjoy, shot in
Africa. as a bonus, especially for harry potter fans, it includes footage
of a live boomslang:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/aug/29/secrets-of-animal-camouflage-research?view=mobile#opt-in-message 


tiny URL:

http://gu.com/p/4x5ej/tw

cheers,

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
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Subject: 8/28 Tokeland to Ocean Shores
From: Sam G Terry <sgt3 AT uw.edu>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 00:09:19 -0700
Hi All,

Spent the day (Thursday 8/28/14) birding from Tokeland to Ocean Shores and
found some nice birds. Notable stuff listed below:

Tokeland - At the 90 degree turn on Fisher Ave/7th St with a flock of
Caspian Terns
11 Elegant Tern
1 Common Tern
1 juv Pacific Golden-Plover (on Empire Spit)

Ocean Shores Game Range - Walked out about 45 min before high tide - not
huge numbers overall but good variety of birds.
1 Buff-breasted Sandpiper
1 juv American Golden Plover
1 Baird's Sandpiper
2-3 Red Knot

Good birding,

Sam Terry
Seattle_______________________________________________
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Subject: Migrating Swallows, Shorebirds and Ducks
From: John Gatchet <jfgatchet AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 22:53:40 -0700
Hundreds of swallows were migrating through my yard here on Discovery Bay
today.  They were mostly VIOLET-GREEN AND BARN SWALLOW.  Two AMERICAN
WIGEON were at the end of Discovery Bay as well as 76 WESTERN and 16 LEAST
SANDPIPER.  There were 18 GREEN-WINGED TEAL at Jimmy-Come-Lately Estuary on
Sequim Bay today.

John F. Gatchet
Gardiner, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Douglas Squirrel Attacks Band-tailed Pigeon
From: John Gatchet <jfgatchet AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 22:37:14 -0700
The Douglas Squirrels that clean up under my bird feeders are quite
territorial.  They often charge the CALIFORNIA QUAIL and chase them from
their area under the feeders.  A BAND-TAILED PIGEON was eating seed from
the ground under the feeders and was charged by a Douglas Squirrel several
times.  The pigeon ignored the squirrel.  I continued to watch and the
Band-tailed got into the squirrel's prime area under a feeder with hulled
sun flower seed.  When the pigeon turned his back and continued to feed the
squirrel ran at it and jumped on it's back.  The startled Pigeon took to
the air and the squirrel slid off.  The BAND-TAILED PIGEON did not return.

John F. Gatchet
Gardiner, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Battle Ground Night Flight and yard birds
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 18:51:29 -0700
Tweeters and OBOL,

It was an interesting night at my Battle Ground, Clark County, WA yard in
the wee hours of this morning:

Swainson's Thrushes were moving from about 1:15-3:15 and probably longer
but I fell asleep as it was going on.  A single Savannah Sparrow flew over
during this time.  My highly anticipated Western Screech Owl started
calling at about 1:30 - the first I've heard this year.  In addition, a
single Barn Owl called twice while the local pack of coyotes conversed in
the background.

At about 8:00 this morning, there was a young Red-eyed Vireo in with a
flock of 4 Warbling Vireos and 2 Wilson's Warblers.  Yesterday's Least
Flycatcher was replaced with several Willow Flycatchers - probably the
local breeders which have been terrorizing everything in the yard from
House Finches to BC Chickadees to American Goldfinches to Bewick's Wrens.
 Quite fascinating to watch all the activity!

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: Battle Ground Night Flight and yard birds
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 18:51:29 -0700
Tweeters and OBOL,

It was an interesting night at my Battle Ground, Clark County, WA yard in
the wee hours of this morning:

Swainson's Thrushes were moving from about 1:15-3:15 and probably longer
but I fell asleep as it was going on.  A single Savannah Sparrow flew over
during this time.  My highly anticipated Western Screech Owl started
calling at about 1:30 - the first I've heard this year.  In addition, a
single Barn Owl called twice while the local pack of coyotes conversed in
the background.

At about 8:00 this morning, there was a young Red-eyed Vireo in with a
flock of 4 Warbling Vireos and 2 Wilson's Warblers.  Yesterday's Least
Flycatcher was replaced with several Willow Flycatchers - probably the
local breeders which have been terrorizing everything in the yard from
House Finches to BC Chickadees to American Goldfinches to Bewick's Wrens.
 Quite fascinating to watch all the activity!

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com
Subject: Eurasian Collared-Dove near the Sand Point Country Club, northeast Seattle
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123imagine.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 17:10:35 -0700
Hey, Tweets,

We may be past the point of even reporting these, but just in case...

A Eurasian Collared-Dove showed up today in the back yard of a friend 
who lives near the Sand Point Country Club, in northeast Seattle.

New yard bird for her. And she has a long list, because she just turned 91!

Good birding,
Ellen Blackstone
ellen AT 123imagine DOT NET_______________________________________________
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Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2014-08-28
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 15:35:32 -0700
Tweets -
All the stars were aligned for a great day -- this has been historically one of 
the best weeks for surprises at Marymoor, with things in the past showing up 
this week including: Smith's Longspur [2006], Buff-breasted Sandpiper [2005], 
Long-tailed Jaeger [2013], Black Tern [2004], Clay-colored Sparrow [2011], 
Eastern Kingbird [2008] , Red-naped Sapsucker [2009]..... Add to that the karma 
of Michael being gone this week, and we were almost guaranteed to have 
surprises. Alas, if birding were only so predictable.... 


It turned out to be a pleasant but remarkably slow day for the birds, with only 
a couple spots where the birding picked up. Weather was great and cool, with a 
beautiful sunrise and no wind. 15 of us convened to see what was around. 


Highlights:
Green Heron We had brief looks at one juvie along the slough a couple times, 
then great looks at 2 at the Rowing Club pond. 

Spotted Sandpiper	One early at the slough, before the formal walk began
Barn Owl 		The early crew had one over the east meadow
Black Swift		2 gave a few people looks
empid. sp		2, both of which gave frustratingly brief looks 
Orange-crowned Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, Yellow Warbler, and Black-throated 
Gray Warbler all turned up, all but the COYE in small #s. 

Golden-crowned Kinglet Near the windmill, we came across one with an almost 
entirely white head - really popped out! 


Missing and low #s for the following:
Western Wood-Pewee -- only one holding on
no definitive Willow Flycatchers [maybe the empid sp.]
We only saw one Swainson's Thrush - a young one -- but several were flying by 
in the pre-dawn migrant push 

no Black-headed Grosbeaks
only 1 Flicker for our entire woodpecker count!
 
For the day, I only come up with 49 species for the day

A final note - last week, not on our walk day but a day later [can't these 
birds read calendars??], birders spotted a Solitary Sandpiper at Marymoor [only 
about the 5th for the park] and a NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH from the lake viewing 
platform. NOWA is a new bird for Marymoor's list, park bird #225. I believe 
those 2 birds bring the park year list to 147. 


Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA

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Subject: Trumpeter Swan + beaver action at Heirman Wildlife Preserve
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 13:51:08 -0700
> 
> This morning Karen and I saw and heard a Trumpeter Swan at Heirman Wildlife 
Preserve. 


Photo:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/14879776778/
>  
> 
> While birding along the Snohomish River, also at Heirman, we heard several 
loud splashes which turned out to be two beaver in the river slapping their 
tails on the water. 

> 
> Video:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/14879777078/
>  
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheiberrgatgmaildotcom_______________________________________________
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Subject: Moving Through
From: Paul Bannick <paul.bannick AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 10:13:30 -0700
Western Tanagers and Black-headed Grosbeaks began moving through my yard in
Magnolia.  This is the first time i have seen either species since May.

-- 
Paul L. Bannick
Nature and Bird Photography
www.paulbannick.com
206-940-7835_______________________________________________
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Subject: birding Sinlahekin Wildlife Area..
From: Twink Coffman <wilber4818 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 10:02:45 -0700
A half-day field trip to find and identify birds throughout the Sinlahekin
Wildlife Area in northcentral Okanogan County starts at 7 a.m. Saturday,
Sept. 6, led by Penny Rose, president of the Washington Ornithological
Society, and local birder Scott Hoskin.

The field trip is part of the fifth and final weekend in the summer-long
“Explore the Sinlahekin – Past and Present” series that continues the
celebration of the 75th anniversary of Washington’s FIRST wildlife area.
That celebration kicked off June 7 with a gathering that included USFWS
Director Dan Ashe from Washington, D.C. and WDFW director Phil Anderson
from Olympia, along with a birding “Big Day” for which Penny made a
mid-day count status report to the crowd just before lunch. As Penny said
then, places like the Sinlahekin “feed our souls.”

All are welcome to join Penny & Scott on this field trip, which starts at
Sinlahekin headquarters. More details about the Sinlahekin (including
directions) and this series are at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lands/wildlife_areas/sinlahekin/75thanniversary.php.
 
75th Anniversary -SinlahekinWildlife Area | Washington Department of Fish &
Wildlife
wdfw.wa.gov
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is celebrating the
75th anniversary of the Sinlahekin – the state’s...



-- 
happy birding
Twink
wilber4818 AT gmail.com
Ferndale, WA
in Whatcom County
out on the beach_______________________________________________
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Subject: Edmonds Barn Swallows 8-27-14
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 09:42:42 -0700
Wednesday afternoon (8/27) a flock of 30-40 barn swallows 
gathered on the telephone lines at the west end of the marsh and a 
nearby building under construction across the railroad tracks. I 
had never before seen such a large flock of swallows and assumed they 
were in the process of migrating south for the winter.

Scroll down page 51 for photos.


http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?9587-Wldlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2014/page51 

 Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA_______________________________________________
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Subject: migrating Greater White-fronted Geese
From: "Ed Swan" <edswan AT centurytel.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 09:38:43 -0700
I was working out in the yard yesterday when I heard strange sound coming
through the surrounding trees.  I couldn't quite place what it was and it
kept shifting direction.  I had just about given up on it when high over our
clearing I saw about a score of the Greater White-fronted Geese which chose
to give a longer set of vocalizations.  They quickly spiraled out of sight
heading generally toward Colvos Passage.  Seems kind of early.  A new yard
bird for me.

 

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

Check out the new second edition "The Birds of Vashon Island" at           

www.theswancompany.com  

edswan AT centurytel.net  

206.463.7976

 
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Subject: Potholes Semi-pelagic birding trip
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 09:14:12 -0700
Good Morning All,

Just a reminder that this years Potholes Semi-pelagic trip is now open 
to all WOS members. This is a boat birding trip on Potholes Res. in 
central Washington state. We will be leaving from Mardon Resort at 6:30 
am on 14 Sept.. This trip will leave right at 6:30 am and will return at 
1:30 pm to Mardon Resort. All funds are payable to the boat skipper on 
arrival. The cost is 75.00 per person. Please bring a hat, water, lunch, 
sunglasses, bins and good humor. This is a fun trip and almost anything 
could be seen. We will be looking for Sabines Gull, Parasitic Jaeger, 
Long-tailed Jaeger, many shorebirds and migrant passerines. This a great 
trip and well worth the time and energy to bird this area. THANK-YOU for 
supporting WOS and this fieldtrip. Deadline for sign up is 10 Sept. All 
sign-ups are on a first come first serve basis. Hope to see you there. I 
will be back to this computer on 1 Sept. Thank-you Mike Denny

-- 
MIKE & MERRYLYNN DENNY
BIRDING THE BEAUTIFUL WALLA WALLA VALLEY
IF YOU HAVEN'T GONE BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED

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Subject: The Eek! Factor
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 08:46:32 -0700
Typically not a squeamish or nervous naturalist, sometimes some creature will 
do something that really "pushes my button" and I have my little eek! moment. 
Just a temporary freak -out. 

Hey maybe you've had an eek moment too, like "eek, a bear!", "eek, a bee!", or 
"eek, a spider!" I sure have. I even had an eek moment with a bird. 

That was many moons ago, in the North Cascades, when I came across two full - 
grown Spotted Owl youngsters. It was really cool watching these two amusing 
creatures at close range as they ducked and bobbed their heads in and out and 
around in circular motions, keeping a real good eye on me. 

After a lengthy time with the owls, it was time to go. I had walked about 50 ft 
when my sixth sense kicked in, and I turned around just in time to avoid one of 
the owls about to land, or whatever, on my head! My "Eek, owl talons!" button 
just had been pushed (until then I didn't even know I had one). I then watched 
the second bird glide silently over to it's sibling perched nearby above me. 
The curious owls both kept following me down the trail and I had to look 
backward a lot. 

One creature that is really good at pushing my eek button is the big hairy 
European House Spider, as far as I know the largest spider around these parts. 
I grew up in a big drafty old house in West Seattle that was full of the 
things. It's not the size, or that they're spiders - spiders are cool - it's 
the uncanny speed at which they can run across a room and disappear, like maybe 
not just under your couch but ,you imagine, up your pant leg ... eek!- spiders 
moving at speeds beyond our control! If they would just slow down it would be 
OK. 

Yes, it's best to be calm. Once, when I was around 12 years old or so, a friend 
and I were exploring "our" vacant lot in our neighborhood, when we found a big 
TV box that somebody had dumped there. Naturally the first thing us boys did 
was give the box a kick, which was not a good move - it turned out the box was 
harboring a swarm of honeybees, and out they came. They got to me first, and I 
knew I just needed to be calm. The bees completely covered my head - I couldn't 
see. 

I don't know how long I could have stood there, because I was saved by my 
friend's big eek! moment as he , horrified by seeing his buddy's head covered 
with bee's, ran away as fast as he could. Like a cartoon bee cloud, the bee's 
on my head all went after him. I didn't get a single sting - my friend got 
quite a few. 

I'm writing this because I just had an exciting eek moment yesterday here in 
Port Townsend. I was painting my parents house, and precariously perched 24 ft 
up a steep extension ladder at the very peak of the roof, painting the fascia 
board, when a huge wasp flew up near my head, then tried to land on my back! 
EEK! This couldn't be happening at a worse time! Luckily I had the good sense 
to have tied a rope off to the chimney to give me some balance security at 
least as I tried feebly, and very carefully, to wave this monster wasp off my 
back. 

Anyway, the wasp then landed on the roof about 2 ft from my face, giving me an 
excellent view of it's exceptionally large (eek!) "stinger". When I say huge 
wasp, I mean about 2 inches long and hefty - the largest wasp I've seen 
anywhere. It was a very beautiful bug - the big abdomen and body all jet black, 
the legs strikingly banded by yellow, the eyes and antennae yellow also. The 
wings were a dark amber, and with its twitchy wasp movements reminded me of a 
Pepsis wasp - which have a nasty sting. Can you say eek? 

S-l-o-w-l-y crawling back down the long ladder, I rushed to the computer and 
went to Bugguide.net to check out this humongous hymenoptera, which turned out 
to be a type of Sciricid Woodwasp (Urocerus californicus) which uses it's long 
ovipositor (not a stinger) to lay eggs in rotten wood rather than stinging 
innocent house painters. 

You can see photos of this bug online - non of the photos really do justice to 
the gorgeous wasp I saw. What an eek moment that was. 

Jeff Gibsonnow calm, inPort Townsend Wa 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Ravens in town
From: Elizabeth Hope Sims-Day <elizah AT uw.edu>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 08:14:54 -0700
I'm a student at Bastyr University's Kenmore Campus near Juanita and I can
confirm that there are definitely resident ravens living in the forest land
that's shared between Bastyr and St. Edward State Park. The crows are
always trying to discourage them from what they feel to be their own
territory, but there is no mistake that the ravens are here to stay! I know
that for a fact that the Bastyr ravens have fledged at least one batch of
offspring this season.

In fact, I just saw one of the lovely ravens just yesterday during one of
my trail walks. I've been noticing them for the last couple of years, maybe
as early as the fall of 2012...but most definitely from Spring 2013 to date.

The ravens often perch in the treetops near the student village in
proximity of the herb garden. I hear their persistent raucous calling
frequently coming from that vicinity and I have spied them several times
through my binoculars. I love them!

Cheers!

Elizabeth H. Sims-Day, Lake Forest Park_______________________________________________
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Subject: NIsqually NWR 8/27/14
From: scrubjay323 AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 10:38:52 -0400 (EDT)
Tweets,

Wednesday over 40 of us enjoyed a beautiful day ay Nisqually. Is started out 
cool and sunny and progressively warmed up. We had a 1.6 low tide at 1:27 PM so 
we saw lots of mud in the reclamation area and not much else. 

It was mostly quiet but with some highlights.

The first highlight occurred on arrival at the visitor center at 7:30. There 
was a GREEN HERON roosting on a small stump over the pond. It offered great 
views and was still there when we started the walk 45 minutes later. the first 
of the year for me. 


The next highlight was several SORA foraging along the edge of the cattails out 
near the start of the estuary boardwalk. As one group was watching a pair 
another group was watching a different paid about 50 yards away. Again, great 
views for everybody. 


Also, the GREAT EGRET was seen out along the estuary boardwalk being eyed 
suspiciously by a GREAT BLUE HERON. No battle ensued that we saw. 


Other notable sighting included OSPREY, several NORTHERN HARRIER, and a couple 
of TURKEY VULTURES along the Nisqually River. Again, the TVs were FOY for me. 


For the day I had 34 species and now have 126 for the year.

There was a MUSKRAT at the visitor center pond and lots of FROGS and GARTER 
SNAKES were seen. 


Until next week when we will have a better tide....

Phil Kelley
scrubjay323 AT aol.com
Lacey, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: N. Cascades 8/23-25 (Skagit Co) posted to flickr, no luck on Ebird
From: Scott <scottratkinson AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 20:34:00 -0700
Tweeters:
 
I just posted nine photos to flickr 
(https://www.flickr.com/photos/14115261 AT N05) from the two-part report made 
yesterday from extreme n.e. Skagit Co. Don't get your hopes up of great 
photography--I gambled on a Nikon and mostly lost. I zoomed the PINE GROSBEAK 
some and it seems to help a bit, but the DUSKY FLY can really only be made out 
as an Empid. Ebird on the other hand was a total bust for some reason, guess it 
doesn't like observers to use the "Add Species" feature. 

 
Scott Atkinson
Lake Stevens
mail to:  scottratkinson AT hotmail.com
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Subject: My Highest Bird
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 15:16:25 -0700
Sitting on a rooftop high on a Port Townsend hill, I got to thinking - "what's 
the highest bird I've seen in Washington state?". I mean highest in the air, 
not high on fermented fruit or something. 

Well, the answer was pretty easy really - a Golden Eagle. I was on top of 
Sourdough Ridge just above Sunrise, at 7000', when alerted by whistling 
Marmots, watched a Golden Eagle on a power glide over a stretch of subalpine 
meadows. It didn't nail a marmot, but I kept on watching it as it caught a 
thermal and went soaring up. And up, and up, straight overhead. 

After awhile it disappeared from naked eye view, so, laying on my back , I 
watched with 7x binoculars, as it continued up in the clear blue sky so far it 
disappeared from view again! Remarkable. 

How high is that? Well, I can see people with my current 8x binocs on the spit 
over at Fort Flagler from here - thats two and a half miles away thru dense sea 
level air - not the clear ether of 7000'. So a bird with a six and a half foot 
wingspan, should be visible for.... a long way up. 

Second to that, I've seen Ravens at about 11'000 on climbs of Rainier. Those 
darn Ravens get around. 

I'll have to admit to Eagle envy a few times climbing in the North Cascades: a 
soaring Golden Eagle can cover a remarkable distance on a single glide, in 
short order. The distance it took an Eagle minutes to cover represented days of 
hard cross country travel for a mere hominid on foot, far from the nearest cold 
beer. 

Jeff Gibsonon the roof of Port Townsend Wa 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: ARGENTINA BIRDING TRIP
From: "Sarah Knudsen" <sarah.knudsen AT pacificbio.org>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 12:22:25 -0700
Pacific Biodiversity Institute invites avid birders to join a research
expedition December 2 - 14, 2014, in the provinces of Salta and Jujuy in
northwestern Argentina. These provinces are renowned for their rich
biodiversity and beautiful landscapes. They are ecologically diverse, with
imposing mountains, extensive sub-tropical and tropical forests, rivers,
canyons, deserts, salt flats and high lakes. The area is extremely rich in
bird life, and other wild fauna and flora. Salta and Jujuy also contain some
of the most colorful and vibrant culture in Argentina. Evidence of Inca and
pre-Inca civilizations are found throughout the landscape. These provinces
contain some of the most important unprotected wildlands in Argentina.

 

The purpose of the expedition is twofold: 1) to gather more information
about this region to aid in its further protection, 2) to introduce new
people to this area of incredible contrasts, immense biodiversity,
spectacular beauty and great conservation opportunity. Those interested in
joining this trip may contact PBI at expeditions AT pacificbio.org. Further
details can be found here:

http://www.pacificbio.org/expeditions/salta_jujuy2014.html

 

Sarah Knudsen

Pacific Biodiversity Institute

Winthrop, WA

www.pacificbio.org

office phone: 509.996.2490

 
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Subject: sad news
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 12:21:39 -0700
Hi Tweeters,

Many of you may have already heard through Facebook or e-mail that Lilly
Irons, daughter of Portland birder Dave Irons, died in a car accident last
Saturday near Lava Beds National Monument in northern California.  Since
Dave's reputation and influence in the birding world extends far beyond
Oregon and many of you have met Dave out in the field or at different
birding events, I thought you should know.  Condolences should be sent to
Dave Irons (and Shawneen Finnegan), 6555 SW Old Scholls Ferry Rd.  Apt 8,
Portland, Oregon 97223.  This is heart breaking news and I hate to be the
bearer of such bad news.

In lieu of flowers, please make a donation to Planned Parenthood, an
organization ardently support by Lilly.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: early Eared Grebe and Solitary Sandpiper on Vashon
From: "Ed Swan" <edswan AT centurytel.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 11:31:49 -0700
This morning I saw a couple of Eared Grebes still partially in breeding
plumage in Tramp Harbor on Vashon Island.  This was at the exercise bikes at
Portage, the most reliable location.  It's the earliest fall sighting for
Vashon.  Quite a few groups of 5-10 Red-necked and Horned Grebes also
appeared to be mostly loafing rather than feeding there this morning.  There
have been no Common Loon sightings yet which is really unusual.  One group
of three non-breeders spent the summer off the NE tip of the Island but no
other reports have yet to come in.

 

At Fisher Pond, a Solitary Sandpiper moved slowly in the mud along one of
the small water patches still left.  There are also a lot of Killdeer here
and often some peeps and sometimes dowitchers but except for the Killdeer,
many of the shorebirds prove hard to find in the mud.  Just saw the single
Solitary and the Killdeer today.

 

Ed

 

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

Check out the new seccond edition "The Birds of Vashon Island" at


www.theswancompany.com  

edswan AT centurytel.net  

206.463.7976

 
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Subject: Battle Ground, Washington LEAST FLYCATCHER
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 10:50:07 -0700
Tweeters,

At 10:30 this morning, I went out onto the back deck in my Battle Ground,
Clark County, WA yard and immediately saw a LEAST FLYCATCHER.  It was
perfect - complete prominent white eye ring, very round, uncrested head,
prominent contrasty wing bars, and short mostly pale bill.

My second for the yard in nine years.

By the way, some Swainson's Thrushes moving at around 5-5:30 this morning
although not yet the numbers that I expect in a week or so.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward!

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: Battle Ground, Washington LEAST FLYCATCHER
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 10:50:07 -0700
Tweeters,

At 10:30 this morning, I went out onto the back deck in my Battle Ground,
Clark County, WA yard and immediately saw a LEAST FLYCATCHER.  It was
perfect - complete prominent white eye ring, very round, uncrested head,
prominent contrasty wing bars, and short mostly pale bill.

My second for the yard in nine years.

By the way, some Swainson's Thrushes moving at around 5-5:30 this morning
although not yet the numbers that I expect in a week or so.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward!

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com
Subject: Sky High
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 09:43:33 -0700


Yup, it's that time of year again - the Termite Flight.
I guess everyday is termite time underground, or in a rotten log, but now in 
late Summer is when winged male and female Dampwood Termites launch off to go 
where no termite has gone before - maybe - and start new colonies. The past few 
days I've been seeing them fly around - potential dragonfly and bird food. 

Yesterday, while working near the sky atop Mount Gibson (the roof of my parents 
house), I enjoyed listening to the loud gurgling song of Purple Martins 
overhead, a regular phenomenon here this sunny summer. I think of them as the 
"Blue Sky Bird", because on these warm clear days the loud martins are often 
heard, but up so high, hard to see. It seems as if the sky itself is singing. 

 For some strange reason Gibson's tend to live next door to hospitals and have 
martins calling overhead in summer- my folks here in Port Townsend and the 
Jefferson Co. hospital; and me in Everett , in the shadow of Snohomish County's 
tallest building, Providence hospital - not far from the Everett waterfront 
martins. Kind of funny. 

Anyway, yesterday afternoon all of a sudden a fair number of Starlings appeared 
in the sky overhead and circled around for quite awhile - flycatching. One was 
low enough to see it get a termite, but most were up over 100',- and all were 
nabbing something. Then off they went. 

At dusk I was putting away some ladders in the garage, when I noticed movement 
by the base of a retaining wall - dozens of winged termites pouring out of the 
ground and immediately taking flight. It was like the earth was leaking 
termites into the sky. 

I thought it was pretty sneaky,termites getting out under the cover of 
darkness, to avoid the birds - but then what about the bats. Maybe, lacking 
sunglasses, it was easier on the eyes of these subterranean's in transition. I 
don't know. 

Jeff Gibsonbugging you again fromPort Townsend Wa
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Subject: Stilt Sandpiper continues at Eide Road
From: Steve Pink <pirangas AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 07:26:42 -0700
Hi,
The Stilt Sandpiper flew in yesterday evening about 7:15 pm, shortly after high 
tide. Both Yellowlegs and a single Dowitcher also around, plus c20 peeps made 
brief stops. 

A Merlin was hanging around. Perhaps causing the birds to be a little 
unsettled. 


Cheers,  Steve
Steve Pink
Edmonds, WA
mailto: pirangas AT hotmail.com
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Subject: A birding video game you'll love
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 11:28:41 +0100
hey everyone,

i just published this piece about a fun little citizen science/birding game
where the viewer is challenged to spot camouflaged nightjar eggs. the
research project that gave rise to this game is studying animal vision and
the evolution of camouflage, and how camouflage affects survival. the best
part is that you don't need to be a birder to enjoy this game, so share it
with your friends, neighbours and co-workers!


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/aug/27/eggcellent-citizen-science-evolution-of-camouflage-in-bird-eggs 


or tiny URL:

http://gu.com/p/4x39x

cheers,

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Ravens in town
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 08:22:21 +0100
interesting. ravens seem to be adapting (a bit) to human presence.
recently, it was reported that a pair of ravens have taken up residence
(and possibly produced one youngster) in manhattan, in the chelsea area:

http://nyti.ms/VQkAod

i wonder if these few pioneers might be the beginning of a bigger trend?



On Wed, Aug 27, 2014 at 12:10 AM, Philip McCrain  wrote:

> Yesterday I heard the “grok” of ravens from my backyard in the Kingsgate
> area of Kirkland. I don’t recall ever hearing them here before. Flyovers
> confirmed two separate birds. Heard at least one again this afternoon.
>
> Phil McCrain
> Kingsgate, Kirkland, Washington.
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
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> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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>



-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
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Subject: Parasitic Jaeger at Luhr Beach, Nisqually.
From: Chris Warlow <christopherwarlow AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 22:10:17 -0700
Just a note to say that there's a Parasitic Jaeger hanging out at the Nisqually 
Reach, visible from Luhr Beach. 


First reported by Chris Strode last night, I was able to relocate it before 
work this morning. Although identifiable it was at full scoping distance at the 
mouth of the Nisqually River. But later Nathanael Swecker got stunningly close 
views of it interacting first with a Caspian Tern and then a Peregrine! I was 
sad to miss that! 


For those unfamiliar with Luhr Beach, it is not at Nisqually NWR. It is a boat 
launch that overlooks the Nisqually Reach from the Thurston County side. My 
phone's GPS calls it 4949 D Milluhr Dr NE 

Olympia, WA 98516. A scope is very useful here. For a reason I can't explain to 
myself, it is also great for Red Crossbills, often very low. I've even seen 
Crossbills seen them in the mud of the beach. 


Nisqually NWR has also been great recently. I had Pectoral Sandpiper, Baird's 
Sandpiper, Green Heron, Sora, Virginia Rail and two early Greater White-Fronted 
Geese without moving at the "Magic Pond" on the inside of the new dike. 


Chris Warlow 
Olympia _______________________________________________
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Subject: Wren cleansing in gravel at Wylie Slough
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 21:59:03 -0700
> 
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/14863471477/
> 
> The quality of this video is poor because it was taken on a hot day into the 
sun, but the behavior of the wren is interesting. 

> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildot-com
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
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Subject: Owls?
From: <tina AT songbirdphoto.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 21:35:25 -0700
 

Hi Tweets, 

Does anyone know whether, where, when and which owls might be found in and
around the Snoqualmie River/Duvall/Stillwater/Carnation area?

Just moved here and am hoping there may be owls.

 

Thanks,

Tina Blade

Duvall, WA
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Subject: Re: Fwd: [inland-NW-birders] Buff-breasted Sandpiper - Dodd Rd. Blood Ponds, Walla Walla County
From: Russ Koppendrayer <russkope AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 18:39:15 -0700
Hi MerryLynn and Tweeters,

It took me about 15 minutes to find it, but then the BUFF-BREASTED
SANDPIPER remained obvious for the balance of my stay. I watched this bird
from about 5:15 to 5:30 PM.

Slightly smaller than nearby PECTORAL SANDPIPER. Had a short black bill,
plain buffy head, neck and breast goining onto the belly. Yellow legs and
"scaly" back. Very erect posture when not feeding.

Thanks to James Cleaver.

Russ Koppendrayer
Longview, WA


On Tue, Aug 26, 2014 at 1:14 PM, Mike & MerryLynn 
wrote:

>  Hello all - just noticed this - have asked for confirmation! This is in
> western WWCo. This species has been seen there before.
> MerryLynn
>
>
> -------- Original Message --------  Subject: [inland-NW-birders]
> Buff-breasted Sandpiper - Dodd Rd. Blood Ponds, Walla Walla County Date: Tue, 

> 26 Aug 2014 12:00:34 -0700  From: James Cleaver
>    To: LCBirds2
>  ,
> "Inland-nw-birders AT uidaho.edu" 
>  
>
> I have been watching a Buff-breasted Sandpiper at the blood ponds for the
> past half hour. It's still here, as of noon.
>
> James Cleaver
> Richland, WA
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
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Subject: Swainson's Thrush yard bird !!!!
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 17:39:23 -0700
hi all ... today I heard and spotted a Swainson's Thrush in the yard 
... that's 2 weeks earlier than one was spotted in the yard last year 
... couldn't get any pictures tho ...

Lyn
Vancouver, Washington






Lyn Topinka,
NorthwestJourney.com
NorthwestBirding.com
ColumbiaRiverImages.com

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Subject: Extreme (northeast) Skagit County birding: Part I (August 22 eve, August 23)
From: Scott <scottratkinson AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 17:30:56 -0700





Tweeters:
 
Although the full bird list will be posted to Ebird in two segments, just 
thought I would share a remarkable 3 days--August 23-25--spent in the high 
North Cascades. It had not been since the Mt. Hardy scramble (up into, and 
beyond the burn to the peak) that I had experienced such an adventure. Like Mt. 
Hardy, this one required all the stamina I could muster, as I overnighted at 
6800' Cutthroat Pass (5 miles from Rainy Pass) and ventured north from there, 
to 6300' Granite Pass, and most of the way to Methow Pass. I went looking 
especially for the northern goodies like Franklin's Spruce Grouse, WT 
Ptarmigan, Boreal Chickadee and Wolverine. I did not find any of these, but 
managed 55 bird species (this included birding along Hwy 20 as at the Mt. Hardy 
parking site). 

 
Arriving just before dusk on August 22, I spotted a PYGMY NUTHATCH at the 
parking area for Mt. Hardy in a mixed flock of migrant warblers and RB 
Nuthatches. Amazingly, it or another was heard only at the Rainy Pass 
trailhead/parking area the next morning. This is my 2nd encounter for the 
species in this area, but for Skagit County as a whole, there are just now four 
records/reports, 3 from this area, plus a potential 5th if one report at 
Larrabee SP referred to the Skagit part of that park. 

 
Warblers were much in evidence the morning of the 23rd, mostly between the Mt. 
Hardy burn and Rainy Pass. I had about 140 individuals of 7 species, with 
YELLOW-RUMPED (92) and TOWNSEND'S (31) being most numerous, while 2 NASHVILLES 
were also found near the Easy Pass trailhead. Along the way to Cutthroat Pass, 
it was clear that locally-breeding RUBY-CROWNED KINGLETS were around, with 4 
birds counted. At the pass itself, and a early warning of things to come, there 
were lots of migrants right along the ridge--a flock of 14 CHIPPING SPARROWS 
was joined by two VESPERS, a SAVANNAH, and two Spizella, sp, one of which was 
probably a BREWER'S. A PRAIRIE FALCON and two ROSY FINCHES came southbound over 
the pass about 5 pm. My first ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was of the east-side 
orestera form here, and a flock of 45 BLUEBIRD, sp flew over also. 

 
Just about midnight, in the northernmost stand of spruces and larches at the 
pass, I was awakened by the sound of two BOREAL OWLS, giving the irritation 
call (as opposed to the "skiew" type) right above the tent! Another (or one of 
the same two) bird(s) was heard further down into the valley on the 25th 
pre-dawn, this bird giving the more-familiar tooting series. 

 
Scott AtkinsonLake Stevensmail to:  scottratkinson AT hotmail.com
 
 
 
 
 


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