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Updated on Monday, July 28 at 07:56 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Black Rosy Finch,©Shawneen Finnegan

29 Jul Skamania County Shorebirds ["Wilson Cady" ]
28 Jul Re: Pine Siskins present at higher elevation [Jim Danzenbaker ]
28 Jul Re: Pine Siskins present at higher elevation [Michael Brown ]
28 Jul Pine Siskins present at higher elevation [Bob Sundstrom ]
28 Jul Pine Siskins [Jana Henderson ]
28 Jul From the Fill [Connie Sidles ]
28 Jul Note from Roy - Pine Siskins [Denis DeSilvis ]
28 Jul Edmonds marsh 7-27-14 [Bill Anderson ]
27 Jul Piling sand birds question [Linda Talman ]
27 Jul Re highway 2 birding. ["James P. Beneteau" ]
27 Jul Pine Siskins! ["James P. Beneteau" ]
27 Jul Eide Road Apology [Blair Bernson ]
27 Jul Re: Eide Road Help - More Info than You Probably Wanted (and thanks to Michael Willison in absentia) [Blair Bernson ]
27 Jul Eide Rd help (Mitchell Von Rotz) [Mitch ]
27 Jul Around Othello (Adams, also some Grant Co) [Stefan Schlick ]
27 Jul Where are all the ducks/grebes? [Michelle LaMoustique ]
27 Jul Shorebirds on 26 July 2014 ["B&PBell" ]
27 Jul Edmonds marsh yellowlegs and dowitcher 7-26-14 [Bill Anderson ]
27 Jul Ruddy Duck at the Fill [Alexandra MacKenzie ]
26 Jul Geolocator Study of Semipalmated Sandpiper - video [Barbara Deihl ]
26 Jul Duckling Dreams | Union Bay Watch [Larry Hubbell ]
26 Jul BirdNote - last week, and the week of July 27, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
26 Jul Re: []
26 Jul Bandtails nesting / Caryn / Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler ]
26 Jul Bald Eagle nest collapse in Kent - branchers OK - video by Ralph Meier [Barbara Deihl ]
26 Jul Fill needs your help [Connie Sidles ]
26 Jul Cedar Waxwing vocalizing at Totem Lake, Kirkland [Hank ]
26 Jul truly concerning bird news! [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
25 Jul Stanwood shorebirds [Scott Ramos ]
25 Jul Edmonds marsh merlin 7-25-14 [Bill Anderson ]
25 Jul ideas for birding along highway 2 [tredick christina ]
25 Jul photos with a definite connection to birds, but not of birds ! [Barbara Deihl ]
25 Jul Eastern Kingbird [Bill Brynteson ]
25 Jul Ocean Shores weekend [Dianna Moore ]
25 Jul From the Fill today [Connie Sidles ]
25 Jul Eaglets [Connie Sidles ]
25 Jul RE: One more on Mountain Beaver fleas (I promise, no more) [Rob Conway ]
25 Jul Migrants Clark and Skamania County ["Wilson Cady" ]
24 Jul Birds moving around, Tiny's Land, n. Lake Stevens [Scott ]
24 Jul RE: July 24 shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR - Wilson's Phalarope ["Randy Hill" ]
24 Jul Nisqually NWR Wednesday walk, July 23rd. [Shep Thorp ]
24 Jul Good Godwit! [Jeff Gibson ]
24 Jul Eaglets [Connie Sidles ]
24 Jul From the Fill [Connie Sidles ]
24 Jul Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2014-07-24 ["Michael Hobbs" ]
24 Jul Re: [obol] Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River [Jim Danzenbaker ]
24 Jul July 24 shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR - Wilson's Phalarope [Jim Danzenbaker ]
24 Jul July 24 shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR - Wilson's Phalarope [Jim Danzenbaker ]
24 Jul The owl who liked sitting on caesar [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
24 Jul Mountain Beavers/food [Megan Lyden ]
23 Jul Red Crossbills feeding young [Joy Kosola Johnson ]
23 Jul Re: Eastern Kingbird with Pacific Tree Frog at Wylie Slough [James Karr ]
23 Jul Re: Eastern Kingbird with Pacific Tree Frog at Wylie Slough ["Wilson Cady" ]
23 Jul Eastern Kingbird with Pacific Tree Frog at Wylie Slough [Blair Bernson ]
23 Jul Re: Bird pile [Larry Schwitters ]
23 Jul Pine Siskins ["A & S Hill" ]
23 Jul Local birder raising money for trip to do research in Australia. [Chris Warlow ]
23 Jul July 23 Ridgefield shorebirds [Jim Danzenbaker ]
23 Jul July 23 Ridgefield shorebirds [Jim Danzenbaker ]
23 Jul Bird pile [Larry Schwitters ]
23 Jul One more on Mountain Beaver fleas (I promise, no more) [Jerry Broadus ]
23 Jul More Mountain Beaver trivia: fleas [Jerry Broadus ]
23 Jul RE: Mountain Beavers: Aplodontia rufa rufa - foods [Rob Conway ]
22 Jul Nectar wars, a finch and a plucked Sparrow ["A & S Hill" ]
22 Jul Nectar wars, a finch and a plucked Sparrow ["A & S Hill" ]
22 Jul RE: Mountain Beavers [Michael Donahue ]
22 Jul Battle Ground RED-EYED VIREO [Jim Danzenbaker ]
22 Jul Mountain Beavers: Aplodontia rufa rufa - foods [Doug Will ]
22 Jul Merlin with dragonfly @ Edmonds marsh (re: Bill A's post) [Barbara Deihl ]
22 Jul Birding Skagway and Juneau [Ted Goshulak ]
22 Jul Edmonds marsh merlin? [Bill Anderson ]
22 Jul Kent Branching Eaglet video by Ralph Meier - 7/21/14 [Barbara Deihl ]
22 Jul Ridgefield NWR (Clark County) shorebirds [Jim Danzenbaker ]
22 Jul 2014 PSBO Bird Bander Training – August Weekend Workshop [Cynthia Easterson ]
22 Jul Edmonds marsh 7-21-14 [Bill Anderson ]
22 Jul post-nesting yard visitors ["Paul Hicks" ]

Subject: Skamania County Shorebirds
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 00:27:07 GMT
Today, Eric Bjorkman, George Mayfield and I spent the day searching for 
shorebirds in Skamania County, where they are very tough to find. At the 
Doetsch Unit of Beacon Rock State park (accessed from Skamania Landing Rd.) we 
didn't even bother to check the pond when we noticed a crew of workers spraying 
weeds in the plantings around the new pond. This should be a good spot for a 
couple of seasons or until the vegetation covers the exposed mud that is there 
now. We found no waders at the Bonneville Hot Springs Resort pond but did have 
a MERLIN flyover while searching for Chats under the power line beyond the 
resort. At the mouth of Rock Creek, in Stevenson, we had 1 KILLDEER, 5 SPOTTED 
SANDPIPERS, 3 LEAST SANDPIPERS AND 2 LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS. This is only about 
the fourth or fifth record of dowitchers in the county and they were there both 
in the morning and again in the afternoon when we checked on our way back home. 
We checked the boat launch area at the mouth of the Wind River and found 1 
eclipse plumaged male BARROW'S GOLDENEYE and a male PURPLE MARTIN, but no 
shorebirds. One more SPOTTED SANDPIPER was found at Home Valley Park and then 
headed for the Klickitat County line to check the newly created mudflats and 
sandbars that were created when the dam was removed on the White Salmon River, 
we found no other shorebirds. This spot looks good but I don't think that there 
has been enough time to build up a population of insects etc. in the mud to 
attract shorebirds yet Wilson Cady 

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Subject: Re: Pine Siskins present at higher elevation
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:07:53 -0700
Hi Tweeters,

I had flyover Pine Siskin(s) from the yard (Battle Ground, Clark County)
yesterday as well as on July 23rd.  I also had a flyover at Ridgefield NWR
on July 25th while looking at the shorebirds.  Haven't had any at the
feeders yet.  They're back!

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim in Battle Ground


On Mon, Jul 28, 2014 at 3:57 PM, Michael Brown 
wrote:

> I saw two this morning on South Hill outside Puyallup, near the woods
> south of Ballou Junior High. They were flushed by a man running his dogs on
> the fields.
>
> *Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID*
>
>
> Bob Sundstrom  wrote:
>
> Have led trips in latter July to both Chinook Pass and Hurricane Ridge.
> Siskins were conspicuous at both of these areas in conifers, among the most
> often seen birds.
>
> Good birding, Bob
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 27, 2014, at 8:48 PM, "James P. Beneteau" 
> wrote:
>
> > Saw a pair of pine siskins at my feeders north of Arlington this
> morning!  First ones I've seen (other than a couple at Stevens Pass) since
> last September.
> >
> > Jim Beneteau
> > Arlington, Wa
> > _______________________________________________
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> _______________________________________________
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>
> _______________________________________________
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>
>


-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: Re: Pine Siskins present at higher elevation
From: Michael Brown <michael AT flycatcherfile.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 15:57:42 -0700
I saw two this morning on South Hill outside Puyallup, near the woods south of 
Ballou Junior High. They were flushed by a man running his dogs on the fields. 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bob Sundstrom  wrote:

>Have led trips in latter July to both Chinook Pass and Hurricane Ridge. 
Siskins were conspicuous at both of these areas in conifers, among the most 
often seen birds. 

>
>Good birding, Bob
>
>Sent from my iPhone
>
>On Jul 27, 2014, at 8:48 PM, "James P. Beneteau"  
wrote: 

>
>> Saw a pair of pine siskins at my feeders north of Arlington this morning! 
First ones I've seen (other than a couple at Stevens Pass) since last 
September. 

>> 
>> Jim Beneteau
>> Arlington, Wa 
>> _______________________________________________
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>> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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>_______________________________________________
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Subject: Pine Siskins present at higher elevation
From: Bob Sundstrom <ixoreus AT scattercreek.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 15:31:47 -0700
Have led trips in latter July to both Chinook Pass and Hurricane Ridge. Siskins 
were conspicuous at both of these areas in conifers, among the most often seen 
birds. 


Good birding, Bob

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 27, 2014, at 8:48 PM, "James P. Beneteau"  
wrote: 


> Saw a pair of pine siskins at my feeders north of Arlington this morning! 
First ones I've seen (other than a couple at Stevens Pass) since last 
September. 

> 
> Jim Beneteau
> Arlington, Wa 
> _______________________________________________
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Subject: Pine Siskins
From: Jana Henderson <janahen95 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 12:31:21 -0700
Re: Pine Siskins

Good for you Jim.  Still none seen here in Puyallup for this season.
I can tell the heat has had an effect on the woodpeckers a lot too.
Usually by this time would be the time of year when the Daddy Pileated
Woodpecker starts to bring the new baby and feed it mouth to mouth,
still has not happened yet.  That is usually mid-late July to early
August each year.  I have not been seeing the Downy, Hairy, Pileated's
or too many Flickers either.  Just one or two Flickers and a couple
Nuthatches, couple Goldfinches, couple Juncos, but quite a few
Chickadees.  I just looked at the journal and looks like I have not
seen a Pileated since 7/15 and it was a male and appeared to look
younger but it was eating on it's own and on 7/21 I only just heard
one call that evening but never did it come to eat.  Out of all the
birds I would say the Chickadees and Red-breasted Nuthatch have
appeared to not be bothered the most by the hot weather, besides
hummingbirds.  The hummers love the Bee Balm.  Hope you continue to
get to see them.  I have for sure missed them this season.

Jana Henderson,
Puyallup, WA
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Subject: From the Fill
From: Connie Sidles <constancesidles AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 11:20:02 -0700
Hey tweets, Alex MacKenzie's RUDDY DUCK (male in breeding plumage) is still 
present today, diving among the lily pads of Water Lily Cove, a sunrise of 
color in the dawn of a blue-sky day. Also in the lilies, a family of young WOOD 
DUCKS - it's always nice to see that such hole-breeders found the proper-sized 
hole in urban Seattle. 


The Wood Ducks remind me that this is the time of year when you can see how 
well the breeders have done. American Robins seem to have exploded. I see 
numerous juveniles with spotted breasts mixed in with the abundant adults. 
Marsh Wrens did well, too, and Song Sparrows. The Pied-billed Grebes had some 
success, but nothing like we've seen in some past years. Ditto for the 
Gadwalls, Mallards, and Cinnamon Teals. A few juvenile Crows have taken to 
following their parents around, begging for food in a voice that is even more 
annoying than I remember my toddlers using for similar requests. The two 
Talaris juvenile eagles are perching in random snags around the Fill, waiting 
for Ma and Pa to appear with food. When they aren't working hard to provide, 
the parent eagles seem to be trying to skulk off and hide. How well I remember 
those days in my own family. 


The summer breeders are starting to head out, and you can almost feel the 
seasons turning as the Earth ponderously tilts away from the Sun and the days 
get shorter. Red-winged Blackbirds have grown more scarce, as have Tree and 
Cliff Swallows, Savannah Sparrows, and Common Yellowthroats. I'm always a bit 
sad to find them gone. On the plus side, the gulls are coming back, and the 
flocking birds are flocking up, including clouds of Bushtits. I love to watch a 
Bushtit flock, don't you? especially as the birds fly from bush to bush, like 
leaves blown in the wind. 


New grass is already sprouting abundantly in the burned field, and I think the 
blackberry will be intimadated for a good while. They say fire is good for 
prairies, and I can certainly see that here, though a grass fire in the city is 
nothing to wish for, exactly. 


Just a quick reminder that tomorrow from 11 to noon is Fill Walk-About Time, 
when we try to impress the WashDOT and UWBG people with our commitment to this 
place and show our respect for the wildlife here so everyone can see it's not 
just worth preserving, it's worth enhancing. If you can make it and say hi to 
us as we walk around, that would be so helpful. 


Here is a poem for you today:

They leave silently in the night, 
our sometime summer birds. 
No goodbyes, no fanfare. 
Just here one day, missing the next. 
Oh, sad missing.

- Connie, Seattle

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Subject: Note from Roy - Pine Siskins
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 10:58:50 -0700
Two on Saturday - didn't see them Sunday, but here's hoping.

May all your birds be identified,
Denis DeSilvis 
avnacrs4birds at outlook dot com 

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Subject: Edmonds marsh 7-27-14
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 00:36:05 -0700
I believe I spotted four lesser yellowlegs and a short-billed dowitcher at the 
Edmonds marsh late afternoon/early evening Sunday (7/27) .  I am not an expert 
on shorebirds.  Feel free to check out my photos at the top of page 44 to see 
if you concur/disagree with my identifications. 




http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?9587-Wldlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2014/page44 


 

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Subject: Piling sand birds question
From: Linda Talman <linda.talman AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 21:27:03 -0700
I live in La Conner where we have a nice new board walk - and are in the 
process of adding stage two of it. Turns out that new pilings that are exposed 
are metal and have an inverted cone top - thus reducing a perching opportunity 
for birds. 


Does anyone have knowledge of an entity enhancing bird habitat in a project of 
this nature? 


Thanks, 

Linda

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Subject: Re highway 2 birding.
From: "James P. Beneteau" <beneteau AT wavecable.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 20:55:31 -0700
One of the best spots I've been to is the Iron Goat rest area/ 
trailhead.  The parking lot area has lots of activity, though the 
last time we had difficulty actually seeing the birds. Sure could 
hear them though. The ski area is pretty good too.

Jim Beneteau
Arlington, Wa 

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Subject: Pine Siskins!
From: "James P. Beneteau" <beneteau AT wavecable.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 20:48:20 -0700
Saw a pair of pine siskins at my feeders north of Arlington this 
morning!  First ones I've seen (other than a couple at Stevens Pass) 
since last September.

Jim Beneteau
Arlington, Wa 

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Subject: Eide Road Apology
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 20:43:55 -0700
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Subject: Re: Eide Road Help - More Info than You Probably Wanted (and thanks to Michael Willison in absentia)
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 20:20:31 -0700
Legue Island and Eide Road areas are the same.  
Yes we are talking about the Island just before 
coming to Camano Island from Stanwood. It is SOUTH 
of the Bridge and is a little difficult to get to 
(legally).

Here is a link with good info: 
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lands/wildlife_areas/skagit/Leque%20Island/

I generally cross the bridge from Stanwood to 
Camano (going west) and after passing Eide Road 
itself (illegal to make a direct left turn on to 
it) turn into a crude small pull out (near some ok 
habitat) - check that area out and then turn left 
back onto that same road - getting more difficult 
with traffic) and then make the legal right turn 
onto Eide Road itself.  While the area is often 
birdy immediately, especially now I just head to 
the parking areas and then to the ponds.  A WDFG 
Pass is required.

Go down Eide Road until it turns to the right and 
then follow it (along the dike) past the first 
parking area and park in the second one (western 
most).  I then walk west down the road and turn 
north (right) once I hit the black covered 
concrete dyke barrier and head into the grass 
towards the ponds which should by then be 
visible.  I always wear high boots as it is muddy 
and wet and they are a big help to move to 
different areas.

There are three ponds although sometimes the 
Eastern most one can be dry.  All are affected 
somewhat by tides.  I generally just go in as 
above and that takes me directly to the western 
end of the central pond - the largest.  From there 
I can also see some of the third (western most 
pond).  While there are generally more birds on 
the central pond, there can be many birds and some 
good species) on either of the other ponds as well.

It is possible to get to a vantage point for the 
first pond from the point above but it takes some 
slogging and bushwhacking.  That pond can also be 
accessed directly from the aforementioned road - 
on a crude path through the grass before you get 
to the covered concrete dyke.  That first 
path/trail leads to a crude blind used by hunters 
right at the first pond.  The problem there is 
that it is somewhat difficult to get to the second 
pond from there (again slogging/bushwhacking).

This may be TMI for some - hope it helps others.  
There are birds in the area other than in the 
ponds but right now at least - the ponds are the 
star attractions.

Have fun.

Feel free to contact me offline for anything else.

-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

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Subject: Eide Rd help (Mitchell Von Rotz)
From: Mitch <biglou22 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 19:39:13 -0700
Hello tweeters, I've read a few emails about shorebirds on Eide Rd. Am I
right in that it's on the little "island" between Stanwood and Camano? And
if so, what are the ponds you all are referring to? I have a feeling I am
being Mr Magoo. Thanks in advance! You can also answer me directly if you
prefer

Mitch Von Rotz
Woodinville, wa
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Subject: Around Othello (Adams, also some Grant Co)
From: Stefan Schlick <greenfant AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 21:16:34 -0400
At neither Perch Point nor Lind Coulee (water levels are way too high there) 
south of Moses Lake I was able to find shorebirds today (but note, I am not 
able to walk much; they may be there), but Forster's Tern and Clark's Grebe 
were easy to see. 

7 Burrowing Owls were along Lemaster Rd (between Cunningham and Lee) east of 
Othello. 

There was however a good selection of shorebirds at Para Ponds NW of Othello: 3 
Baird's, 2 Semipalmated, 1 Least, 2 Western and 1 Spotted Sandpiper, a pair of 
Black-necked Stilts, 1 Greater Yellowlegs, 2 Red-necked and 8 Wilson's 
Phalaropes, and lots of Long-billed Dowitchers. A few Tricolored Blackbirds 
were feeding in the mud as well. Of the 12 Caspian Terns, 1 was a begging 
juvenile. Some 30 White Pelicans overhead. 

Stefan SchlickHillsboro, OR 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: Where are all the ducks/grebes?
From: Michelle LaMoustique <lamoustique AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 17:05:48 -0700
Someone posted recently about the low count of shorebirds. I am new to the area 
(Vancouver, WA), but I have come here the last three summers.  In 2011 I saw a 
lot of ducks and pied-billed grebes at Ridgefield NWR, as well as in 2012.  
Yes, they were mostly mallards, but there were also Ruddy Ducks and Wood 
Ducks.  This year I have not seen any Ruddy Ducks. I have seen some Wood Ducks 
and some Mallards, but far fewer than previously.  I saw no grebes at all.  The 
first time I went to Ridgefield two weeks ago I saw no ducks at all, and only 
ONE Wilson's Snipe.  This in an area where last year the sound of winnowing was 
everywhere.  If this is climate change, I don't like it! 

Oh, yes, last summer I did see a Great-tailed Grackle perched on a utility pole 
in Salmon Creek ( I reported to e-bird but I think I did so incorrectly because 
the report never showed up).  If they are moving this far north, you can bet 
there is some serious climate disruption in the making. I can remember when 
they first started moving into the area I lived in in California, people were 
excited. Now they are common and they are breeding in areas they never did 
before. 


Michelle Maani
lamoustique AT yahoo.com
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Subject: Shorebirds on 26 July 2014
From: "B&PBell" <bellasoc AT isomedia.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 12:33:02 -0700
Yesterday morning, Andy McCormick and I arrived at Eide Road just after 6 AM
for shorebirding. The first pond we stopped at had many GREATER and one
LESSER YELLLOWLEGS and one WILSON'S PHALAROPE. Something caused them all to
flush down to a nearby, larger pond. We worked our way down to that one and
had very nice looks at LONG-BILLED and at least one SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER,
WESTERN (many), LEAST (one), and PECTORAL SANDPIPERs and a KILLDEER. Some of
the yellowlegs were working the far side of the pond. A NORTHERN HARRIER
flew over and everybody flushed and scattered. Many of them came back and we
got really nice close looks at the Dowitchers under ideal sunny lighting.
Several MARCH WRENs were singing around us. 

 

A RED-TAILED HAWK was perched in the distance, a BALD EAGLE flew over, a few
RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDs were around. A single female MALLARD came into the
pond. BARN and VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOWs were overhead. We could hear CASPIAN
TERNs in the distance. Several GREAT BLUE HERONs were present. Along the
road were many SAVANNAH and SONG SPARROWs (including one feeding a young
BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD), HOUSE SPARROWs, HOUSE FINCH, and AMERICAN GOLDFINCH.

 

When we initially turned onto Eide Road there were a couple of MOURNING
DOVEs on the wires. Just east of the bridge toward Stanwood there was an
AMERICAN KESTREL.

 

At the Stanwood Treatment Ponds there were MALLARDs, RING-NECKED DUCKs, a
few GADWALL, a few RUDDY DUCKs, lots of PIED-BILLED GREBEs, an AMERICAN
COOT, and a single female BUFFLEHEAD.

 

Along Boe Road there were many perched BARN, VIOLET-GREEN, CLIFF and a few
TREE SWALLOWs, a RED-TAILED HAWK, MARSH WRENs and SONG SPARROWs. 

 

At Thomle Road there were EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVEs, EUROPEAN STARLINGs, a
BELTED KINGFISHER, an AMERICAN KESTREL,

 

At the Skagit Game Range there were EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVEs, CEDAR WAXWINGs,
AMERICAN ROBIN, HOUSE FINCH, SONG SPARROW (also feeding a BROWN-HEADED
COWBIRD), at least two WESTERN WOOD-PEWEEs, a WILLOW FLYCATCHER and several
YELLOW WARBLERs including juveniles.

 

At the Hayton Preserve there was a KILLDEER, a few LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERs, a
GREATER YELLOWLEGS, a NORTHERN HARRIER, some CLIFF SWALLOWs, several GREAT
BLUE HERONs, a MARSH WREN, a COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, some SAVANNAH SPARROWs and
AMERICAN GOLDFINCH.

 

It was a nice day out with some great looks at shorebirds.

 

Good Birding

 

Brian H. Bell

Woodinville WA

Mail to bell asoc a t iso media dot com
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Subject: Edmonds marsh yellowlegs and dowitcher 7-26-14
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 10:09:57 -0700
Saturday evening, about an hour before sunset, I photographed a yellowlegs and 
a dowitcher at the Edmonds marsh.  You can view my photos of the two birds by 
scrolling down page 43 to make the greater/lesser and long-billed/short-billed 
determinations. 




http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?9587-Wldlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2014/page43 


 
 
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Subject: Ruddy Duck at the Fill
From: Alexandra MacKenzie <mizmak AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 09:29:08 -0700
I was surprised to see a Ruddy Duck at the Montlake Fill (AKA Union
Bay Natural Area, Seattle) this morning, out on the lake between the
Turtle Logs and East Point.  Two blurry photos may be found at:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mizmak/14571908197/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mizmak/14571908197/

The Fill has been lovely this weekend, with lots of youngsters about
-- in two mornings I saw a juvenile Song Sparrow, RWBB, Cedar Waxwing,
AMGO, and a Violet-Green Swallow, the latter being fed -- see much
better photos of the swallow feeding at:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mizmak/14564400039/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mizmak/14750742562/

Also had a Northern Harrier fly-over Saturday morning, and the adult
eagles have been quite active.  Plus young Marsh Wrens taking dirt
baths in the paths -- really quite a fabulous place to be of late.

Alex (Alexandra) MacKenzie
Seattle
mizmak AT gmail.com
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Subject: Geolocator Study of Semipalmated Sandpiper - video
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 16:55:35 -0700
A nice calm little video - good for those who might be a bit unsure and in the 
dark about some aspects of banding. Found it after looking at Scott Ramos' 
videos in his and Evan Houston's Tweeters' post in today's digest - great 
finds, guys ! Thanks for the report. 


from 2 wks ago - filmed at Hudson Bay - featuring Shorebird Research Scientist, 
Brad Winn, of TheManumetCenter - nice simple explanation of what was done to 
gain info from one sandpiper's 10,000 mi. migratory trip - shows the tiny bird 
and it's release, once the geolocator was removed, plus a line of data 
retrieved from the chip. 


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DG_93Sy9xfE


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net


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Subject: Duckling Dreams | Union Bay Watch
From: Larry Hubbell <ldhubbell AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 12:53:31 -0700
Tweeters,

Have you noticed which type of young duckling is most common on Union Bay these 
days? The mallards seem to have been pushed out of first place at least for the 
last week or so. Although I am sure the mallards have long since secured their 
1st place position for annual reproduction. You can see more at: 


http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2014/07/duckling-dreams.html

Have a great day on Union Bay…where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net

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Subject: BirdNote - last week, and the week of July 27, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123imagine.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 12:04:06 -0700
Hey, Tweets,A Peregrine Falcon eats on the wing... on the fly, so to speak. 
Check out Gregg Thompson's photos! 
http://bit.ly/1rHEorX-----------------------------------------Last week, 
BirdNote aired:* Chuck Pettis & Whidbey's Earth Sanctuary, With a Plan for the 
Next 500 Yearshttp://bit.ly/1piyXfy* Night Singers - Who's Out 
There?http://bit.ly/OWxLgN* Fruit as a Bribehttp://bit.ly/1nHiIsK* Killdeer, 
Master of Distraction - The Ol' Broken Wing Acthttp://bit.ly/1piz2A7* Sanctuary 
and Bird Sound, With Gold Star Mother, Patti McLeadhttp://bit.ly/WUF3sY* Gray 
Jay, Picnic Bird - Hang On to Your Sandwich!http://bit.ly/1zfrWjX* Birds That 
Say Their Own 
Nameshttp://bit.ly/P9K9eA------------------------------------------------------------View 
the photos and links for next week's shows: 
http://bit.ly/1AjlCJG------------------------------------------------------------Find 
us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for 
birdnoteradio=========================================You can listen to the 
mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly 
mail or the podcast, and find related resources on the website. 
http://www.birdnote.org You'll find nearly 1200 episodes in the archive.Thanks 
for listening!Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote 
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Subject: Re:
From: chaco1936 AT aol.com
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 15:06:53 -0400 (EDT)
http://productosdeocasion.es/add3.php?utuxivjte232


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Subject: Bandtails nesting / Caryn / Wedgwood
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 AT seanet.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 10:49:12 -0700
Tweeters -

Guess the nesting season is not over yet - just spotted the Bandtailed nest I 
thought might be there. Can see heads in the nest and parents going to it. I 
had seen an adult "scuffle" earlier nearby. The nest is in a cedar tree right 
near the birch I'd seen them holding twigs. 


I must go study my find now. Not that easy to see, but nonetheless exciting 
since the hummers are gone - yet many feeding happily here. 


Any behavior I should watch for? It will be fun to see the young.

Just hope those merlins a few streets over don't find them...

Caryn / Wedgwood (the nesting year 
continues...)_______________________________________________ 

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Subject: Bald Eagle nest collapse in Kent - branchers OK - video by Ralph Meier
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 10:35:41 -0700
Any other collapsed nests seen after "The Great Soaking" this past week ?

07/25/14 RHM Bald Eagles Nest Collapsed (11 Wk Old Eaglets Ok & Branching) HD


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: Fill needs your help
From: Connie Sidles <constancesidles AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 08:27:08 -0700
Hey tweets, On Tuesday, July 29, WashDOT and UWBG representatives will be 
walking with me, Dennis Paulson, and members of Seattle Audubon's Conservation 
Committee around the Fill to discuss WashDOT's mitigation plans for Montlake 
Fill. 


FYI, WashDOT plans to spend $2 million at the Fill to mitigate the destruction 
of wetlands around Foster Island by the expansion of the 520 bridge. If you 
want to see a copy of their plan, email me privately. 


To summarize the plan, they will convert the Dime Lot (E-5) and entry road into 
new wetlands. That's great, except the wetlands will be the kind that attract 
waterfowl, not shorebirds. Further, they plan to plant impenetrable buffers 
around all the ponds of the Fill, to keep out people and dogs. This is 
supposedly to control the problems of off-leash dogs, and of people making 
social trails. 


I am opposed to buffers of any kind. We don't have a big problem with people or 
dogs disrespecting the rules. What problems we do have, I believe could be 
controlled by social pressure and signage. 


I am trying to get WashDOT and UWBG to modify their draft plan to do two 
things: 

1. Build shorebird habitat anew, or else restore Main Pond to its former 
treeless, bush-less state so that shorebirds will use it again (we have 
suffered a catastrophic loss of shorebird migrants in the last five years). 


2. Delete all plans for buffers around the ponds.

You can help.

I would very much like to have tons of birders show up on Tuesday (from 11 a.m. 
to noon) to just walk around and bird, staying on the gravel paths. I would 
also like to see tons of dogs on leashes. The idea would be to graphically 
demonstrate to WashDOT and UWBG that we are a large, caring community who love 
this place and respect it. 


Can you come? Can you spread the word? 

I will try to find out from WashDOT the name of the person you can write to, if 
you want to email your thoughts. Right now, I don't know who that is. - Connie, 
Seattle 


constancesidles AT gmail.com
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Subject: Cedar Waxwing vocalizing at Totem Lake, Kirkland
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 06:46:02 -0700
> 
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/14558773128/
> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
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Subject: truly concerning bird news!
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 09:02:25 +0100
hey everyone,

ian paulson just sent me the link to this Seattle Times story by the
brilliant Seattle Times environmental journalist, Craig Welch:

http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2024155783_birddeclinesxml.html

i am stunned, especially as we as a nation now are nearly face-to-face the
dreaded centennial of the extinction of the passenger pigeon (and other
iconic north american wildlife, such as the carolina parakeet and Rocky
Mountain locust, just to name a few).

i would be most interested to know what your reactions are, whether any of
you have or are participating in these bird surveys, and whether these
dramatic declines represent shifting baselines for you? i certainly
remember huge flocks of western grebes and large numbers of seaducks and
fairly large numbers of loons ... but it appears my personal memories are
not only distant in space, but also in time, and that i may be in for a
heartbreaking shock if i return.

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
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Subject: Stanwood shorebirds
From: Scott Ramos <lsr AT ramoslink.info>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 18:48:25 -0700
Reports of shorebirds passing through stimulated a visit to some hotspots in 
Snohomish and Skagit counties where Evan Houston and I had success finding some 
fun birds. 


Eide Rd - we had 10 species of shorebird, including Long- and Short-billed 
Dowitcher, Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, Least, Western, Pectoral and 
Semipalmated Sandpipers, Killdeer, and Wilson’s Phalarope. Also present were 6 
species of swallow and many dozens of Savannah Sparrow. 

Port Susan Bay - here we had 5 species of shorebird, including Killdeer, Least, 
Pectoral and Western Sandpiper, and Long-billed Dowitcher. The PESA flew into a 
mud patch right in front of us, giving great looks. At the entrance to Boe Rd, 
a couple of juvenile Bullock’s Orioles were chatting away, with the parents 
calling nearby, as was a Black-headed Grosbeak. 

Wiley Slough - shorebirds were harder to come by here, with just Killdeer and 
Least Sandpiper, although a Spotted Sandpiper gave a brief appearance. Hooded 
Mergansers and Cinnamon Teal were present as well. Yellow Warblers were 
everywhere, a couple of Swainson’s Thrush were whitting, a Cooper’s Hawk made a 
fly-by, and a juvenile Peregrine Falcon flew across the ponds to land in a tree 
not 20 m from us, but seemed pretty unstable in flight and on perch, like it 
was on training wheels. The best was to come at the end: we heard, then saw an 
Eastern Kingbird, then another, and finally, Evan’s persistence located a nest 
with two nestlings still present. The adults took turns feeding the chicks 
while we watched! 


Videos
Semipalmated Sandpiper: http://youtu.be/IKjNJb7Ozy8
Bullock’s Oriole: http://youtu.be/6ahIaHT__Ig

Checklists
Eide Rd: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19217603 (SESA photo)
Port Susan Bay: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19214904 (PESA 
photo) 

Wiley Slough: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19217763 (EAKI 
photo) 


For the day, 70 species.
Scott Ramos
Seattle_______________________________________________
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Subject: Edmonds marsh merlin 7-25-14
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 17:43:47 -0700
Friday afternoon (7/25/14) I once again saw the merlin at the Edmonds marsh.  
Scroll down page 43 for photos: 



 http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?9587-Wldlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2014/page43 

 
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Subject: ideas for birding along highway 2
From: tredick christina <cjt37 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 14:59:36 -0700
Hi everyone, I am looking for good birding spots along highway 2
Any ideas?
 
Chris
Woodinville WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: photos with a definite connection to birds, but not of birds !
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 11:05:41 -0700
After seeing a BirdNote segment by David Sibley, on a similar subject (see next 
Tues.'s piece), I decided to post a link here that seems to be of a related 
'nature': 




http://themindunleashed.org/2014/07/30-magical-photos-children-playing-around-world.html 


No birds, but lots of 'nature - al' joy!

Barb Deihl
MatthewsBeach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: Eastern Kingbird
From: Bill Brynteson <wnbrynteson AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 10:47:32 -0700
Thought it was interesting to see an Easter Kingbird on the eastern side of the 
Boeing pond in Kent yesterday afternoon. A King County first for me! 


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Subject: Ocean Shores weekend
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:16:20 -0700
Hi Tweets: Just a word to those who may want to come out to see what the
shorebird situation is this weekend in Ocean Shores...this is the weekend
of the Harley's. Not only is the town full of people, but the sounds of
nature are not noticeable due to the rumble of the hogs.

Whether you love them or hate them....they ARE a presence to be reckoned
with for the next several days...many take the whole week off to come enjoy
what promises to be a decent weather break.

Just a heads-up!

Dianna Moore (waiting for Tuesday)
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Subject: From the Fill today
From: Connie Sidles <constancesidles AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:24:22 -0700
Hey tweets, I couldn't resist an early-morning jaunt to the Fill, despite the 
fact that I'm supposed to take my daughter in for eye surgery today. I figured 
I could just about make it half-way around the Loop Trail in the two hours of 
daylight I got this morning before I simply had to be back home. 


I'm so glad I went! On Main Pond was a Western Sandpiper still in breeding 
plumage. I came upon this bird just as the sun came out from behind the clouds 
and lit up its feathers like glowing embers. Overhead, a troupe of Violet-green 
Swallows were joined by two BLACK SWIFTS. Whenever I see these birds at the 
Fill, they always seem to pop up out of an invisible black hole, not here one 
second, then poof! here. They drifted with the swallows until a Merlin came 
rocketing through, then they floated off east, perhaps back to the foothills. 


Meanwhile, the Merlin took itself off to Foster Island, and all the other birds 
came out of hiding. There are hordes of finches, large numbers of Cedar 
Waxwings (with juveniles), and Common Yellowthroats still singing, though the 
males look pretty raggedy. A glorious morning. 


Here is a poem for you today:

Tiny traveler from the tundra, 
you look so weak, 
but your russet wings are strong. 
They will carry you far, 
far away where I cannot follow.

--Connie, Seattle

constancesidles AT gmail.com
www.constancypress.com

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Subject: Eaglets
From: Connie Sidles <constancesidles AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 02:58:31 -0700
Hey tweets, one of the Talaris neighbors who keeps an eye on our local eagles 
and their progeny reports that the eaglets are doing really great this year. 
They are learning to fly sooner than usual and have been out and about in the 
trees nearby. So all is well. They have become quite vocal, demanding food from 
their hard-working parents. It's the human equivalent of the teenage years, I 
guess. Unlike human parents, though, the adult eagles will soon be saying 
enough is enough, you're on your own, kiddo. No moving back in with the folks. 
Stony, but effective. We are about to fledge one somewhat elderly child 
ourselves, but two more will be wanting fish on the table soon. We have been 
wondering about the possibility of moving to Mars and changing our names. On 
the other hand, then all we would hear would be the ticking of the clocks, a 
very loud sound in an empty nest. 


Here is a poem for you today:

Cries fill the uncaring sky. 
It is a young eagle calling his parents. 
"Bring fish!" 
They do not come. 
He is old enough to catch his own now.

--Connie, Seattle

constancesidles AT gmail.com
www.constancypress.com


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Subject: RE: One more on Mountain Beaver fleas (I promise, no more)
From: Rob Conway <robin_birder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 07:12:19 +0000
I have seen these fleas - so large I thought they were beatles at first, then I 
saw them hop. They were in a MB burrow that I had "deconstructed". I wish I had 
collected a specimen - they were about 1/2" long. 


Rob Conway 
Camas, WA
45.58°N 122.44°W - elevation 310 ft.
robin_birder AT hotmail.com

 


 
From: jbroadus AT seanet.com
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:50:23 -0700
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] One more on Mountain Beaver fleas (I promise, no more)

>From Flea News Vol. 49:
The host is the mountain beaver, Aplodontia rufa, a primitive rodent with a 
restricted range from northern Califonia to extreme southwestern British 
Columbia. According to the literature, ten species of fleas have been reported 
from this host. Five of these are obviously strays from other hosts, or at 
least accidental associations. ... 

Hystrichopsylla schefferi has the distinction of being the largest, 
non-neosomic flea in the entire order, and females may exceed one centimeter in 
length. All members of the genus are considered primitive by most students of 
the order and the most plesiomorphic taxa seem mostly associated with 
insectivores, although host specificity is not particularly strong in this 
genus. That the largest and one of the most primitive species is associated 
with such a primitive host suggests a fascinating evolutionary complex of taxa 
that has been lost to us through extinction of their hosts. Lewis & Lewis 
(1994) discuss this species in more details. 


Seems the evolutionary progenitor of the Mountain Beaver supported some mighty 
big fleas. 


Jerry BroadusPuyallup, WA
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Subject: Migrants Clark and Skamania County
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 04:29:25 GMT
 I did a quick stop at the Steigerwald Lake NWR, near Washougal, Clark County 
where I found two BLACK SWIFTS flying low over the fields near the parking lot. 
At home, on Mt. Pleasant, Skamania County we had a nice male WILSON'S WARBLER 
moving through our shrubbery. Wilson Cady 

Columbia River Gorge, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Birds moving around, Tiny's Land, n. Lake Stevens
From: Scott <scottratkinson AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 20:38:39 -0700
Tweeters:
 
With the weather change the last few days, a few of our local nesters have been 
moving around. Last Sunday, July 20th, an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was along the 
edge of the little pond by the Marysville YMCA--clearly a local migrant as they 
don't nest here. Today, we had a YELLOW WARBLER in the yard--not a breeder 
here, and normally only around in fall (rare in spring too). We also had a high 
of four RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRDS here today, busily attending the showy Policeman's 
Helmet (Impatiens glandulifera) at the yard's edge. For about a week now, we've 
had 1-2 PINE SISKINS, the first I've had in a long while here. Lots of evidence 
of breeders (PAC-SLOPE FLY, HUTTON'S VIREO, W. TANAGER) in the yard also 
lately. 

 
Scott Atkinson
Lake Stevens
mail to:  scottratkinson AT hotmail.com
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Subject: RE: July 24 shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR - Wilson's Phalarope
From: "Randy Hill" <re_hill AT q.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:15:51 -0700
Shortly after Jim departed a Spotted Sandpiper wandered into view as well, at 
the east end by stop #12. 


 

Randy Hill

Ridgefield

 

From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Jim 
Danzenbaker 

Sent: Thursday, July 24, 2014 10:39 AM
To: tweeters tweeters; OBOL
Subject: [Tweeters] July 24 shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR - Wilson's Phalarope

 

Hi Tweeters and OBOLers,

 

For the third consecutive morning, I visited Ridgefield NWR, Clark County, WA 
to find out how shorebird diversity and quantity have changed over the last 
several days. This morning's shorebird tally on S. Big Lake (on the right side 
of the auto tour loop on the south end of Rest Lake - between markers 11 and 
12) follows (Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday): 


 

Killdeer: 15-15-10

Semipalmated Plover: 1-1-3

Greater Yellowlegs: 15-18-28

Lesser Yellowlegs: 1-1-1

Least Sandpiper: 40-25-49

Western Sandpiper: 12-0-6

BAIRD'S SANDPIPER: 1-0-0

SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER 0-0-1

Pectoral Sandpiper: 5-4-1

Long-billed Dowitcher: 10-15-45

Wilson's Snipe: 6-12-8

SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 0-1-0

WILSON'S PHALAROPE: 0-0-1

 

Shorebird enthusiasts who are planning to visit the refuge should consult the 
local tide table. High tide or the rising tide is best (closest to Vancouver 
tides:http://www.ezfshn.com/Tides/USA/Washington/Vancouver). Mornings also seem 
best. 


 

Daily sightings of River Otter continue.  

 

The southwest corner of Rest Lake is beginning to attract shorebirds including 
Long-billed Dowitcher (15) and Greater Yellowlegs (5) this morning. 


 

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

 

Jim

-- 

Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com
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Subject: Nisqually NWR Wednesday walk, July 23rd.
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:31:48 -0700
Hi Tweets,

ten of us actually enjoyed a fairly birdy day at the Refuge with first of
year MCGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER, lots of other warbler action, and great looks
at VIRGINIA RAIL, SORA, WILSON'S SNIPE, LONG-BILLED/SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER,
and BANK SWALLOW.  The weather was intermittent rain with temperatures in
the 50's degrees Fahrenheit.  Fortunately we did not have any
thunderstorms.  We observed many frogs on the old Nisqually River Dike, and
saw at least three different species including Bullfrog, Red-legged Frog
and Pacific Chorus Frog.

At 8 am at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook we observed the GREAT BLUE
HERON, described previously by Jerry Broadus on Tweeters last week, with
white primaries (5th-10th on left wing, approximately 5th-6th on right
wing), and patchy yellow skin on legs.  Many BARN SWALLOW, CLIFF SWALLOW
and TREE SWALLOW surround the area, but nesting seems over.  WOOD DUCK,
CEDAR WAXWING, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, WESTERN TANAGER, and AMERICAN
GOLDFINCH were also seen.

SPOTTED TOWHEE and BEWICK'S WREN was observed at the east entrance to the
Twin Barns Loop Trail.  Many  BROWN CREEPER were seen feeding along the
Riparian Forest Overlook with lots of vocalization.  Nathanael discovered a
WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE nest with two juveniles on the inside of the loop trail
75 feet north of the Riparian Forest Overlook cut-off approximately 75 feet
high in a Maple Tree.  The adults were actively feeding.

Along the east branch of the loop trail we saw many birds.  At the south
overlook we observed are FOY MCGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER.  As well we saw a pair
of WILSON'S WARBLER feeding a BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD juvenile, several YELLOW
WARBLER, DOWNY WOODPECKER, RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER, SWAINSON'S THRUSH, and
CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE.  Further down the trail we picked up BALD EAGLE,
and PACIFIC SLOPE FLYCATCHER.

At the Nisqually River cut-off, there were dozens of plain green frogs
jumping around on the old Nisqually River Dike.  There were faint spots on
the topside of the rear legs, and white undersides.  Initially we thought
they were Red-legged Frogs, but after some research I think they may have
been immature Bullfrogs.  Ken found a Red-legged Frog later on near the
Twin Barns.  Several Pacific Chorus Frogs were also observed.

At the Nisqually River Overlook, we were treated to three BELTED
KINGFISHERS.  Another BEKI was seen at the Twin Barns Overlook, as well
NORTHERN HARRIER, VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW, WARBLING VIREO, and a SONG SPARROW
feeding a Brown-headed Cowbird.

Out on the Nisqually Estuary Trail, we enjoyed scoping the mudflats on the
salt water side and the marsh on the freshwater side.  The mudflats of the
tidal estuary were actively foraged by hundreds of swallows.  We observed
approximately 100 peeps in the distance with the low tide, most likely
LEAST SANDPIPER and WESTERN SANDPIPER.  Several RING-BILLED GULL were
feeding.  Two GREATER YELLOWLEGS were observed feeding in Leschi Slough.
 An adult DOWNY WOODPECKER male was seen feeding a juvenile on dead
Elderberry bush and Cattail leaves.  Many SAVANNAH SPARROW, COMMON
YELLOWTHROAT, and MARSH WREN were seen.  On the fresh water side, we had
great views of VIRGINIA RAIL, SORA, WILSON'S SNIPE and LONG-BILLED
DOWITCHER.  There were two black cotton ball like Virginia Rail chicks with
one of the adults.  We closely examined the Dowitchers (22) to find two
with spotting on the sides of the breast, light bellies, and broader white
barring on the tail to convince us we had two SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS in
the group.  Picking through the waterfowl which is predominantly MALLARD,
we also observed GADWALL, CINNAMON TEAL, HOODED MERGANSER, and AMERICAN
COOT.  Although unconfirmed from our photo on eBird last week, we had great
looks at a BANK SWALLOW foraging over the fresh water marsh.  The BANS was
smaller then the surrounding immature Tree Swallows, with a brown back,
lighter brown lower back, thinner wings, white throat, and distinct dark
brown neck tie across the breast.  We also had a fly over of 5 PURPLE
MARTIN, many CANADA GOOSE, and BALD EAGLE.

On our return, we observed WILLOW FLYCATCHER.  We also saw a Common
Yellowthroat feeding another Brown-headed Cowbird.

59 Species for the day, and 166 species for the year.  Not a bad day
considering the rain showers.

Mammals seen Muskrat and immature Long-tailed Weasel or Mink.  Frogs seen
Bullfrog, Red-legged Frog, and Pacific Chorus Frog.

Until next week when we meet again at 8 am.

Good birding,
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
sthorp AT theaec.com
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Subject: Good Godwit!
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:14:09 -0700
Some of my favorite items to read are written descriptions of unknown birds, 
especially by beginning birdwatchers. The best ones are long detailed 
descriptions including more features than are exhibited by any living bird. 
Sometimes it takes a little mental detection work to pick out the facts from 
the whatever's. Sort of fun. 

But sometimes one will see a very unusual bird, doing unusual things, in 
unusual places. Or maybe not, really. 

Last week I was checking out the eelgrass beds at Fort Worden in Port Townsend, 
and standing quietly on the sandy beach, when I caught some bird movement out 
of the corner of my eye. I turned quickly to see a brownish bird fly up from 
the sand, and instantly spotted the diagnostic long, upturned bill of a Godwit! 
"Cool" I thought, particularly since I am rarely in the same place as a Godwit, 
as far as I've noticed. 

But then the Godwit made an seemingly un- godwit -like move - it flew up under 
pilings of the Marine Science Center pier and disappeared up there. This all 
happened fairly quickly. 

"Hey, wait a minute!" I thought, and barely had to, since the bird soon came 
out and flew back down to the beach. Remarkably it's long beak had fallen off! 

Well not really, because, you see, this bird was actually a brown-colored Rock 
Dove. Another Rock Dove flying up under the pier with a long strand of nesting 
material trailing from its bill made me realize that what I'd seen was the 
brown Rock Dove with a curved twig sticking forward from it's bill. 

"Good Godwit, buddy!" I called over to the impersonating pigeon, who was 
picking up more nest stuff. It was a pretty entertaining show. 

For the record it was bright and a bit misty - and hey, the sun might possibly 
have been in my eyes. 


Jeff GibsonWhatever Wa  		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: Eaglets
From: Connie Sidles <constancesidles AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 13:21:24 -0700
Hey tweets, My husband John just called to say he thinks the Talaris eaglets 
may be on the ground. He couldn't see them for sure, because McCaw (the new 
owner) has put up a spite fence around the property and No Trespassing signs 
and surveillance cameras and vigilant guards to shoo people away. But John says 
he heard eaglet cries that seemed to be coming from ground level. If you find 
out more, please post. - Connie, Seattle 


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Subject: From the Fill
From: Connie Sidles <constancesidles AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 13:19:19 -0700
Hey tweets, Great day at the Fill after the stormy weather of yesterday. Most 
notable bird: a SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER in the cattails along the lakeshore near 
K-2 (the Green's bench), identified by call and in flight. It looked to be 
almost completely in winter plumage. 


Also present: a WESTERN KINGBIRD hawking for insects from the triple tree in 
Hunn Meadow East. 


Other notables: a SPOTTED SANDPIPER foraging on the lily pads of Water Lily 
Cove; a Red-tailed Hawk flyover; American Coots are back; a Scaup (sp) was out 
on the lake; juvenile HOODED MERGANSER on Main Pond; a Ring-billed Gull on the 
lake. 


As you know, I love the rare birds that I see at the Fill, so I am walking on 
air about the kingbird and dowitcher. But you can't live on air alone. The real 
bread-and-butter experiences of everyday life are what must sustain you, and 
this is what the Fill *always* grants. Today, for example, I watched a Bald 
Eagle hunting two Mallards on Water Lily Cove. The eagle was an experienced 
hunter and kited itself over the water waiting for the poor ducks to dive 
themselves into exhaustion, Mallards not being known for their underwater 
skills. But these two Mallards were savvy beyond belief. Instead of surfacing 
their whole bodies, they would stick only their heads up out of their dive, a 
target too small for the eagle to attack (Mallards not having Brainiac-sized 
beans). Eventually, it was the eagle who became exhausted and staggered off to 
recover, while the Mallards popped up none the worse for wear and commenced 
flapping their wings in victory. 


The Great Blue Heron who has parked itself on Main Pond was there again today, 
capturing goldfish-sized fish by the dozen. I timed its hunt: the heron was 
swallowing at least five fish per minute. That's about as fast as I can eat a 
healthy snack of kale chips, prepared by my health-food-conscious daughter who 
is trying to woo me away from Doritos. At this rate, I get full of kale chips 
after about 10 minutes. The heron, however, kept cramming down fish for more 
than 45 minutes. I had to take my hat off to it. 


I don't know if I told you, but we recently had another fire at the Fill, 
probaby caused by fireworks. This fire didn't get very far, burning up the 
field along the east side of the Loop Trail. New grass has already sprouted, 
and the burned seeds are beginning to attract large numbers of finches. Most of 
the finches are really nondescript, so it's fun to try to pick them out against 
a backdrop even more nondescript. 


Finally, we hosted a large flock of migrating Violet-green Swallows today, 
though few of them were actually green, or violet for that matter. The birds 
have molted into new plumage, which at this time of year looks drably brown. 


Here is a poem for you today:

Now comes the time of obscurity, 
when the migrants of spring shed their bright plumage 
and every songbird becomes dull.

- Connie, Seattle

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Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2014-07-24
From: "Michael Hobbs" <birdmarymoor AT frontier.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 13:08:01 -0700
Tweets – “Don’t Know Why / It’s November in July / Stormy Weather”. 
Actually, today wasn’t *nearly* as bad as yesterday. We had nothing much more 
than drizzle, and even were free of that for about half the morning. However, 
it was dark and damp, and none too warm. The park was full of birds, but not a 
lot of surprises; it was filled with juveniles of common, ordinary birds for 
the most part. Identifications were the difficult part. 


Highlights:

Canada Goose Dozens (50+ birds?); first large numbers since winter 

Common Merganser      One below weir
Pied-billed Grebe          Large juvenile at lake; first since April
Great Blue Heron          At least 1 bird still on a nest
Spotted Sandpiper         One at weir
Glaucous-winged Gull   Several to many
~20 immature large-looking gulls in a flock
Barn Owl                        Matt had two sightings pre-dawn
BLACK SWIFT                 4-5 over lake
Purple Martin                 Active at nest gourds, and over lake
-Swallows- Many juveniles, and a higher-than-usual count of Cliffs 

Y.-rumped Warbler        At least 1 NE of mansion
Bl.-thr. Gray Warbler      2+ at south end of Dog Meadow
- Sparrows -                    Many juveniles of all 5 breeding species
Western Tanager           One heard, south end of Dog Meadow
Lazuli Bunting                Male along west edge of East Meadow

We also had a LONG-TAILED WEASEL at the south end of the Dog Meadow again this 
week, and a couple of RIVER OTTERS at the lake. 


For the day, 61 species.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor AT frontier.com


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Subject: Re: [obol] Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 11:53:58 -0700
Tweeters,

Forwarding a message regarding a possible Long-tailed Jaeger seen along the
Columbia River just west of where highway 97 intersects with highway 14.

Jim in Battle Ground, WA


On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 11:27 AM, Shawneen 
wrote:

> For anyone birding near the Deschutes River.  I received several text
> messages from Suzy Murphy about a bird seen while driving 65 MPH.
>
>
> " Just saw at mouth of Deschutes river fly over to the columbia at 65
> miles per hour. What looked like a sea bird. Long thin wings black and
> white pattern light underbelly, with longish white streamiing tail
> feathers. Can't stop hauling a camper. If someone close maybe they can
> check it out.
>
> Thanks,Suzy Murphy"
>
>
> "It's was the tail feathers. I'm no seabird expert, but those were the
> longest streamers I have seen , like LT Jaeger. Got a 2 second look. My
> impression was the wings had sharp contrast b/w, much more black, like
> whole trailing edge."
>
>
> She has been driving a long time and NOW, I have been driving for 8 days
> and no references to check at present.
>
>
> lt was flying north across the Columbia River towards Washington.
>
>
> Shawneen Finnegan
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>



-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: July 24 shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR - Wilson's Phalarope
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 10:38:39 -0700
Hi Tweeters and OBOLers,

For the third consecutive morning, I visited Ridgefield NWR, Clark County,
WA  to find out how shorebird diversity and quantity have changed over the
last several days.  This morning's shorebird tally on S. Big Lake (on the
right side of the auto tour loop on the south end of Rest Lake - between
markers 11 and 12) follows (Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday):

Killdeer: 15-15-10
Semipalmated Plover: 1-1-3
Greater Yellowlegs: 15-18-28
Lesser Yellowlegs: 1-1-1
Least Sandpiper: 40-25-49
Western Sandpiper: 12-0-6
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER: 1-0-0
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER 0-0-1
Pectoral Sandpiper: 5-4-1
Long-billed Dowitcher: 10-15-45
Wilson's Snipe: 6-12-8
SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 0-1-0
WILSON'S PHALAROPE: 0-0-1

Shorebird enthusiasts who are planning to visit the refuge should consult
the local tide table.  High tide or the rising tide is best (closest to
Vancouver tides:http://www.ezfshn.com/Tides/USA/Washington/Vancouver).
 Mornings also seem best.

Daily sightings of River Otter continue.

The southwest corner of Rest Lake is beginning to attract shorebirds
including Long-billed Dowitcher (15) and Greater Yellowlegs (5) this
morning.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: July 24 shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR - Wilson's Phalarope
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 10:38:39 -0700
Hi Tweeters and OBOLers,

For the third consecutive morning, I visited Ridgefield NWR, Clark County,
WA  to find out how shorebird diversity and quantity have changed over the
last several days.  This morning's shorebird tally on S. Big Lake (on the
right side of the auto tour loop on the south end of Rest Lake - between
markers 11 and 12) follows (Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday):

Killdeer: 15-15-10
Semipalmated Plover: 1-1-3
Greater Yellowlegs: 15-18-28
Lesser Yellowlegs: 1-1-1
Least Sandpiper: 40-25-49
Western Sandpiper: 12-0-6
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER: 1-0-0
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER 0-0-1
Pectoral Sandpiper: 5-4-1
Long-billed Dowitcher: 10-15-45
Wilson's Snipe: 6-12-8
SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 0-1-0
WILSON'S PHALAROPE: 0-0-1

Shorebird enthusiasts who are planning to visit the refuge should consult
the local tide table.  High tide or the rising tide is best (closest to
Vancouver tides:http://www.ezfshn.com/Tides/USA/Washington/Vancouver).
 Mornings also seem best.

Daily sightings of River Otter continue.

The southwest corner of Rest Lake is beginning to attract shorebirds
including Long-billed Dowitcher (15) and Greater Yellowlegs (5) this
morning.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com
Subject: The owl who liked sitting on caesar
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:04:02 +0100
hello everyone,

i just published my review of a witty and educational memoir about a man
who shared his london home with a tawny owl. This interesting book will
delight adults and young people on summer holidays and may also be an early
addition to one's christmas shopping list:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/jul/24/owl-who-liked-sitting-on-caesar-martin-windrow-book-review 


cheers,

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]_______________________________________________
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Subject: Mountain Beavers/food
From: Megan Lyden <meganlyden AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 00:05:40 -0700
Hi Tweets,

Mountain Beavers are not picky eaters, that is for sure.

One day in June, I noticed one of my heucheras was essentially gone....I
thought maybe I hadn't watered it and it had withered awau.  I was rather
surprised, but didn't give it too much thought.  I went out four hours later
to water the other heucheras and noticed that another heuchera was gone.  I
had no idea what was going on....except that one of my music students had
told me earlier that week that she had looked out my window and seen a
"strange animal with pink feet" run across my lawn with a piece of greenery
in its mouth.  By the next day, my one of my perennial geraniums
disappeared, as did some crocosmia and some woody herbs...and several sword
ferns were missing a substantial number of fronds. The next time that
student came for her lesson, I showed her a photo of a mountain beaver and
asked her if that was what she saw.  She said "yes."

The Mountain Beaver was stealing my plants and pulling them under the fence
(I went out one day and must have surprised it; a 6-foot tall shrubby plant
was half-way under the fence). I explored the greenbelt behind my house;
there must be a dozen large burrows...the ground so excavated that it
literally caved in as I walked over it.  I've got to hand it to this
mountain beaver....he/she has good taste.  My beautiful blue geraniums were
arranged around the opening of one of the burrows.

The greenbelt behind my house is a virtual ivy desert.  I read that Mountain
Beavers like to eat ferns, and I wondered if it is having difficulty finding
edible plants with all the ivy that has taken over the greenbelt.

Before we fortified the fence, I saw the little gal/fellow myself; he went
running out from under one of my geraniums, shot across the yard, scared the
hell out of the dog, went under my garden shed and out through a hole in the
fence. In broad daylight (I thought Mountain Beavers were mainly nocturnal).

Megan Lyden
Bellevue, Wa

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Subject: Red Crossbills feeding young
From: Joy Kosola Johnson <joyofwriting AT whidbey.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:25:25 -0700
Hi Tweets,

Here are two links to a new short video Craig put together featuring Red 
Crossbills, which have been feasting on an abundant crop of Douglas Fir cones 
in our yard this year. 

These videos are designed to engage people with birds, both new and experienced 
birders. 

Please feel free to share.


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=745146438883514&set=vb.168478993216931&type=2&theater 


http://vimeo.com/101261702

Enjoy!

Joy & Craig Johnson

www.pugetsoundbackyardbirds.com
joyofwriting AT whidbey.com
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Subject: Re: Eastern Kingbird with Pacific Tree Frog at Wylie Slough
From: James Karr <jrkarr AT olypen.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 16:54:03 -0700
 I have a photo of a Great Kiskadee with a frog taken one of the members of my 
group. Photo taken during a March trip this year in Costa Rica. The bird spent 
several minutes beating the frog on its perch before feeding on all but the 
hind legs. The legs were discarded. 


Jim 






/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Mail and express delivery address:
     James R. Karr
     102 Galaxy View Court
     Sequim, WA  98382
E-mail:  jrkarr at olypen dot com
Telephone: 360-681-3163
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

On Jul 23, 2014, at 12:44 PM, Blair Bernson  
wrote: 


> Steve Pink and I braved the weather this morning and birded Eide Road and 
Wylie Slough among some other spots. We actually were quite lucky and remained 
mostly dry for almost an hour at Eide Road and similarly at Wylie. Shorebirds 
were good at the former - 2 Pectoral Sandpipers, 40+ LBDO and a similar number 
of Western Sandpipers, a scattering of Leasts, 2 Greater Yellowlegs and a 
Wilson's Phalarope. No luck with Semipalmated Sandpiper or Baird's. 

> 
> Wylie Slough was another story altogether - not a single shorebird - not even 
a Killdeer. BUT it produced both the bird and highlight of the day. We had an 
Eastern Kingbird fly in and perch on a snag very closed by - agreed as the bird 
of the day. THEN - maybe 20 minutes later we had the same/another Eastern 
Kingbird fly into a tree nearby in the open. At first we thought it had nesting 
material in its bill. A closer look however disclosed that it was carrying a 
fairly large Pacific Tree Frog - wriggling in its grasp. I was not able to get 
the camera on it quickly enough for what would have been a really cool shot - 
as it flew off with the frog still in its mouth. As a "fly" catcher I guess the 
EAKI is a "meateater" but this seemed pretty extreme. We wondered if it was 
going to take it back to a nest and have food for a week. 

> 
> Neither of us had ever seen anything like this.  Anyone else?
> 
> -- 
> Blair Bernson
> Edmonds
> 
> _______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Eastern Kingbird with Pacific Tree Frog at Wylie Slough
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 23:23:59 GMT
Roger Windemuth got a fantastic shot of an American Robin with a tree frog in 
it's beak at the Ridgefield NWR, and I have seen Robins doing the same at the 
Steigerwald Lake WR. Wilson Cady 

Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Blair Bernson 
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Cc: Sam Iam , "masterbirder2013 AT seattleaudubon.org" 
 

Subject: [Tweeters] Eastern Kingbird with Pacific Tree Frog at Wylie Slough
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 12:44:17 -0700

Steve Pink and I braved the weather this morning 
and birded Eide Road and Wylie Slough among some 
other spots.  We actually were quite lucky and 
remained mostly dry for almost an hour at Eide 
Road and similarly at Wylie.  Shorebirds were good 
at the former - 2 Pectoral Sandpipers, 40+ LBDO 
and a similar number of Western Sandpipers, a 
scattering of Leasts, 2 Greater Yellowlegs and a 
Wilson's Phalarope.  No luck with Semipalmated 
Sandpiper or Baird's.

Wylie Slough was another story altogether - not a 
single shorebird - not even a Killdeer.  BUT it 
produced both the bird and highlight of the day.  
We had an Eastern Kingbird fly in and perch on a 
snag very closed by - agreed as the bird of the 
day.  THEN - maybe 20 minutes later we had the 
same/another Eastern Kingbird fly into a tree 
nearby in the open.  At first we thought it had 
nesting material in its bill.  A closer look 
however disclosed that it was carrying a fairly 
large Pacific Tree Frog - wriggling in its grasp.  
I was not able to get the camera on it quickly 
enough for what would have been a really cool shot 
- as it flew off with the frog still in its 
mouth.  As a "fly" catcher I guess the EAKI is a 
"meateater" but this seemed pretty extreme.  We 
wondered if it was going to take it back to a nest 
and have food for a week.

Neither of us had ever seen anything like this.  
Anyone else?

-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

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Subject: Eastern Kingbird with Pacific Tree Frog at Wylie Slough
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 12:44:17 -0700
Steve Pink and I braved the weather this morning 
and birded Eide Road and Wylie Slough among some 
other spots.  We actually were quite lucky and 
remained mostly dry for almost an hour at Eide 
Road and similarly at Wylie.  Shorebirds were good 
at the former - 2 Pectoral Sandpipers, 40+ LBDO 
and a similar number of Western Sandpipers, a 
scattering of Leasts, 2 Greater Yellowlegs and a 
Wilson's Phalarope.  No luck with Semipalmated 
Sandpiper or Baird's.

Wylie Slough was another story altogether - not a 
single shorebird - not even a Killdeer.  BUT it 
produced both the bird and highlight of the day.  
We had an Eastern Kingbird fly in and perch on a 
snag very closed by - agreed as the bird of the 
day.  THEN - maybe 20 minutes later we had the 
same/another Eastern Kingbird fly into a tree 
nearby in the open.  At first we thought it had 
nesting material in its bill.  A closer look 
however disclosed that it was carrying a fairly 
large Pacific Tree Frog - wriggling in its grasp.  
I was not able to get the camera on it quickly 
enough for what would have been a really cool shot 
- as it flew off with the frog still in its 
mouth.  As a "fly" catcher I guess the EAKI is a 
"meateater" but this seemed pretty extreme.  We 
wondered if it was going to take it back to a nest 
and have food for a week.

Neither of us had ever seen anything like this.  
Anyone else?

-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

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Subject: Re: Bird pile
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters AT me.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 13:39:36 -0700
The pile grows. Watched 100 plus more come in at 1:30. I think they've been 
coming in all day. Theres enough of them that their hot little bodies are 
fogging up the camera. Hope someone gets a count as.....oops another 50 just 
came in.......they exit. I would bet theres pushing 500 swifts in that pile. 


Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
http://wildearth.tv/cam/vauxs-swifts
On Jul 23, 2014, at 9:30 AM, Larry Schwitters wrote:

> Theres a pile of Vaux's Swifts 15-20 feet down the Monroe Wagner roost site 
in the SE corner. http://wildearth.tv/cam/vauxs-swifts Why are these swifts not 
out hunting bugs at 9:30 this morning? Why are they in a pile? Why aren't they 
piled up in the NW corner? How many are there? Who will be the Tweeters arm 
chair hero that counts them as they leave? 

> 
> Larry Schwitters
> Issaquah
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Pine Siskins
From: "A & S Hill" <60stops2home AT kalama.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 13:36:02 -0700
We just had two PINE SISKINS on our seed feeder. These are the first ones
we've seen here in 2014.

 

Amy Hill

Kalama, Washington

628 feet up in Cowlitz County

60stops 2 home at kalama dot com

Artlessfun at yahoo dot com

 
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Subject: Local birder raising money for trip to do research in Australia.
From: Chris Warlow <christopherwarlow AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 12:19:24 -0700
I'm not sure that this is ok to post, but since I don't benefit I feel it's ok. 


Micheal Warren, a recent graduate of Evergreen State College, has been offered 
an opportunity to go to Australia to help a PhD study. The study is on the 
predation of cuckoos on Yellow-Rumped Thornbills nests (Cowbird style). 


He is also a great artist and has put together a t-shirt of one of his 
peregrine pictures to raise money. The link is- 


https://www.booster.com/yellow-rumped-thornbill

Chris Warlow
Olympia_______________________________________________
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Subject: July 23 Ridgefield shorebirds
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 13:08:50 -0700
Hi Tweeters and OBOLers,

I visited Ridgefield NWR, Clark County, WA again this morning to find out
how shorebird diversity and quantity had changed since yesterday morning.
 This morning's shorebird tally on S. Big Lake (on the right side of the
auto tour loop on the south end of Rest Lake - between markers 11 and 12)
compared to yesterday (yesterday-today):

Killdeer: 15-15
Semipalmated Plover: 1-1
Greater Yellowlegs: 15-18
Lesser Yellowlegs: 1-1
Least Sandpiper: 40-25
Western Sandpiper: 12-0
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER: 1-0
Pectoral Sandpiper: 5-4
Long-billed Dowitcher: 10-15
Wilson's Snipe: 6-12
SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 0-1

There was one flock of about 25 peeps flying around that I couldn't see
well enough to confirm ids (these were not the same 25 Least Sandpipers
included above).

Shorebird enthusiasts who are planning to visit the refuge should consult
the local tide table.  High tide or the rising tide is best (closest to
Vancouver tides: http://www.ezfshn.com/Tides/USA/Washington/Vancouver).

Again, there were two very cute River Otters near stop 12 quite audibly
enjoying their morning breakfast.

Currently, the water level on Rest Lake is still too high to attract
shorebirds although there were three Long-billed Dowitchers and two Greater
Yellowlegs on the southwest edge of the lake this morning.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: July 23 Ridgefield shorebirds
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 13:08:50 -0700
Hi Tweeters and OBOLers,

I visited Ridgefield NWR, Clark County, WA again this morning to find out
how shorebird diversity and quantity had changed since yesterday morning.
 This morning's shorebird tally on S. Big Lake (on the right side of the
auto tour loop on the south end of Rest Lake - between markers 11 and 12)
compared to yesterday (yesterday-today):

Killdeer: 15-15
Semipalmated Plover: 1-1
Greater Yellowlegs: 15-18
Lesser Yellowlegs: 1-1
Least Sandpiper: 40-25
Western Sandpiper: 12-0
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER: 1-0
Pectoral Sandpiper: 5-4
Long-billed Dowitcher: 10-15
Wilson's Snipe: 6-12
SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 0-1

There was one flock of about 25 peeps flying around that I couldn't see
well enough to confirm ids (these were not the same 25 Least Sandpipers
included above).

Shorebird enthusiasts who are planning to visit the refuge should consult
the local tide table.  High tide or the rising tide is best (closest to
Vancouver tides: http://www.ezfshn.com/Tides/USA/Washington/Vancouver).

Again, there were two very cute River Otters near stop 12 quite audibly
enjoying their morning breakfast.

Currently, the water level on Rest Lake is still too high to attract
shorebirds although there were three Long-billed Dowitchers and two Greater
Yellowlegs on the southwest edge of the lake this morning.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com
Subject: Bird pile
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters AT me.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 09:30:00 -0700
Theres a pile of Vaux's Swifts 15-20 feet down the Monroe Wagner roost site in 
the SE corner. http://wildearth.tv/cam/vauxs-swifts Why are these swifts not 
out hunting bugs at 9:30 this morning? Why are they in a pile? Why aren't they 
piled up in the NW corner? How many are there? Who will be the Tweeters arm 
chair hero that counts them as they leave? 


Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
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Subject: One more on Mountain Beaver fleas (I promise, no more)
From: Jerry Broadus <jbroadus AT seanet.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:50:23 -0700
From Flea News Vol. 49:

The host is the mountain beaver, Aplodontia rufa, a primitive rodent with a 
restricted range from northern Califonia to extreme southwestern British 
Columbia. According to the literature, ten species of fleas have been reported 
from this host. Five of these are obviously strays from other hosts, or at 
least accidental associations. 

...

Hystrichopsylla schefferi has the distinction of being the largest, 
non-neosomic flea in the entire order, and females may exceed one centimeter in 
length. All members of the genus are considered primitive by most students of 
the order and the most plesiomorphic taxa seem mostly associated with 
insectivores, although host specificity is not particularly strong in this 
genus. That the largest and one of the most primitive species is associated 
with such a primitive host suggests a fascinating evolutionary complex of taxa 
that has been lost to us through extinction of their hosts. Lewis & Lewis 
(1994) discuss this species in more details. 



Seems the evolutionary progenitor of the Mountain Beaver supported some mighty 
big fleas. 



Jerry Broadus
Puyallup, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: More Mountain Beaver trivia: fleas
From: Jerry Broadus <jbroadus AT seanet.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:28:37 -0700
Several sources (probably copying the Guiness Record account) trace the world's 
largest flea to a Mountain Beaver nest in Puyallup (1913). One quote: 


Elsewhere in the world, the largest known flea is the Hystrichopsylla schefferi 
— a flea found in the nest of a mountain beaver in Washington State, USA. It 
can grow up to 8mm long and has been known to bite a man's arm off at the 
shoulder blade (Ed's note: OK, there's a certain amount of poetic licence there 
— but they do grow to 8mm). 

And then there is this, for you collectors:


http://deadinsects.net/Giant-mountain-beaver-flea-Hystrichopsylla-schefferi-Siphonaptera02.htm 



Jerry Broadus
Puyallup, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: RE: Mountain Beavers: Aplodontia rufa rufa - foods
From: Rob Conway <robin_birder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 06:54:07 +0000
Mountain Beavers will trim almost any plant they can reach whether they eat it 
or not. Their burrows can be hundreds of feet long and up to 4 feet underground 
and are often lined with plant material for eating and nesting. In the Index to 
California Vertebrates the following describes feeding habits - the most 
surprising is that they climb quite high in trees and bushes to forage: 

 
Feed on vegetative parts of plants, mostly thimbleberry, salmonberry, 
blackberry, dogwood, salal, ferns, lupines, willows, and grasses. Voth (1968) 
found, in western Oregon, males and nonpregnant females fed on ferns (85%), 
deciduous trees (5%), and conifers (3%); lactating females (April through June) 

fed on ferns (45%), conifers (34%). grasses (18%), and forbs (3%). 
Coprophagous. 

Voth (1968) found changes in diet related to protein content of available 
vegetation. Forage underground, on ground, under snow, on surface of snow, and 
up to 4.5 m (15 ft) in trees and bushes. Vegetation is stored near a burrow 
entrance or in underground chambers (Maser et al. 1981). 
 
When I lived in Newcastle and in Preston (both east King Co.) they were the 
yard terrorists. A small colony burrowed under my 12" buried chicken wire and 
6' above ground cedar fence in Newcastle and in one night literally wiped out 
$2000 worth of landscape plants including rhodies, ferns, hostas, dwarf 
conifers, BAMBOO, rhubarb, and every flowering plant in the yard. All of the 
plants could be seen sticking out of dozens of burrow entrances outside the 
fence on a steep hillside leading down to China Creek. In Preston I finally had 
to go on a burrow busting campaign literally using a crowbar stuck down the 
burrows and lifted up to remove their hiding places. This is how the owners of 
tree plantations handle them except by using large plowing tools to break up 
the burrows. 

 
Fascinating but destructive creatures indeed.
Rob

Rob Conway 
Camas, WA
45.58°N 122.44°W - elevation 310 ft.
robin_birder AT hotmail.com

 


 
> Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 17:44:10 -0700
> From: diwill AT uw.edu
> To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> Subject: [Tweeters] Mountain Beavers: Aplodontia rufa rufa - foods
> 
> Tweeters,
> 
> One additional favorite food of Aplodontia in the PNW is rhododendrons,
> both native and ornamental. Last week I found half a dozen 2 foot rhodie
> branch ends (the most tender) arrayed with their cut ends at one burrow
> entrance with their leafy ends fanned out.
> 
> Doug Will
> UW and Lake Forest Park
> diwill at uw dot edu
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
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Subject: Nectar wars, a finch and a plucked Sparrow
From: "A & S Hill" <60stops2home AT kalama.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 22:22:29 -0700
Hello Tweeters and OBOL-ites!

 

After a short trip out of town over the Fourth of July holiday, I thought
our male RUFOUS and ANNA'S Hummingbirds may have departed. A few days with
the trailcam aimed at the feeder, though, proved me wrong.

 

All the male Anna's we are seeing now are immature. We do see an occasional
very brilliantly-feathered male Rufous visiting as well. Activity on our two
feeders has recently increased again, so I decided to keep track of
consumption with the trailcam. I posted an 11-shot sequence of feeder
traffic that covers about 43 hours - and 60 ounces of nectar - on my flickr
photostream starting with this picture: https://flic.kr/p/o9uU7x 

 

The link at the end of this sentence will take you to a less blurry image of
an immature male Anna's Hummingbird: https://flic.kr/p/o9vwpe  who visited
the front-porch nectar feeder.

 

We also have been visited by a pair of HOUSE FINCHES this week. I managed a
few blurry shots of the male seen through the slats on the front porch.
https://flic.kr/p/osKWki   He was eating the seeds of wild Forget-me-not
flowers growing in our yard.

 

Today (Tuesday) I noticed a SONG SPARROW clumsily hopping about under the
seed feeder and eventually perching on the fence near the feeder. Upon
closer inspection with the telephoto lens, it appears the little songster
may have had a recent lucky escape from a wandering cat or other predator.
There is no tail at all on this bird: https://flic.kr/p/oqHiew  Click
through from the previous link to see a second shot of the bird.

 

And while you're on my photostream, I invite you to enjoy some photos of wet
plants from our yard and also non-bird images from our recent trip to
Washington, D.C.

 

Happy Birding!

 

 

Amy Hill

Kalama, Washington

628 feet up in Cowlitz County

60stops 2 home at kalama dot com

Artlessfun at yahoo dot com

 
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Subject: Nectar wars, a finch and a plucked Sparrow
From: "A & S Hill" <60stops2home AT kalama.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 22:22:29 -0700
Hello Tweeters and OBOL-ites!

 

After a short trip out of town over the Fourth of July holiday, I thought
our male RUFOUS and ANNA'S Hummingbirds may have departed. A few days with
the trailcam aimed at the feeder, though, proved me wrong.

 

All the male Anna's we are seeing now are immature. We do see an occasional
very brilliantly-feathered male Rufous visiting as well. Activity on our two
feeders has recently increased again, so I decided to keep track of
consumption with the trailcam. I posted an 11-shot sequence of feeder
traffic that covers about 43 hours - and 60 ounces of nectar - on my flickr
photostream starting with this picture: https://flic.kr/p/o9uU7x 

 

The link at the end of this sentence will take you to a less blurry image of
an immature male Anna's Hummingbird: https://flic.kr/p/o9vwpe  who visited
the front-porch nectar feeder.

 

We also have been visited by a pair of HOUSE FINCHES this week. I managed a
few blurry shots of the male seen through the slats on the front porch.
https://flic.kr/p/osKWki   He was eating the seeds of wild Forget-me-not
flowers growing in our yard.

 

Today (Tuesday) I noticed a SONG SPARROW clumsily hopping about under the
seed feeder and eventually perching on the fence near the feeder. Upon
closer inspection with the telephoto lens, it appears the little songster
may have had a recent lucky escape from a wandering cat or other predator.
There is no tail at all on this bird: https://flic.kr/p/oqHiew  Click
through from the previous link to see a second shot of the bird.

 

And while you're on my photostream, I invite you to enjoy some photos of wet
plants from our yard and also non-bird images from our recent trip to
Washington, D.C.

 

Happy Birding!

 

 

Amy Hill

Kalama, Washington

628 feet up in Cowlitz County

60stops 2 home at kalama dot com

Artlessfun at yahoo dot com

 
Subject: RE: Mountain Beavers
From: Michael Donahue <bfalbatross AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 22:00:26 -0700
Great write up on this curious, secretive, but apparently very common
animal!

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Subject: Battle Ground RED-EYED VIREO
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:48:54 -0700
Tweeters,

I was surprised to hear another Red-eyed Vireo while I was standing in the
backyard of my Battle Ground, Clark County home.  This is the 3rd one this
year although, like before, I couldn't lure it into view.  I also saw two
Black-throated Gray Warblers which must have bred nearby.  The vegetation
has really grown beyond my tiny little yard and I can now best describe my
yard as bordering a greenway which I don't think would have been the way
that I would have classified it when I moved here 9 years ago.  Things
change!

Keep your eyes and ears skyward!

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: Mountain Beavers: Aplodontia rufa rufa - foods
From: Doug Will <diwill AT uw.edu>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 17:44:10 -0700
Tweeters,

One additional favorite food of Aplodontia in the PNW is rhododendrons,
both native and ornamental. Last week I found half a dozen 2 foot rhodie
branch ends (the most tender) arrayed with their cut ends at one burrow
entrance with their leafy ends fanned out.

Doug Will
UW and Lake Forest Park
diwill at uw dot edu
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Subject: Merlin with dragonfly @ Edmonds marsh (re: Bill A's post)
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 12:33:18 -0700
Yessirree, Bill and Joe and others interested in what some juvenile Merlins are 
up to - this is the first I've seen/heard of a young Merlin out going for 
dragonflies so far this year - great spot, pics and call ! 


Caught my attention, and just as I was ready to lie low for a bit and give 
myself and the local Merlins a rest, I now see that it could be worth jumping 
back up again to head to the wetlands :-) 


Last year there was almost daily Merlin activity at Magnuson Pk. at the 
wetlands between (to my records) July 31 and Aug. 18. Guess we have a few early 
birds catching the flies !!! 


Thanks for the posts and pics, Bill and Joe - if only I had another one of 
those battery-operated garden dragonflies - I'd surely award it to the both of 
you. 


I'd appreciate hearing if any of you Tweets also spot the same or similar 
combination of bird and prey anywhere around the Sound :-) 


Kee kee tee hee  :-)


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: Birding Skagway and Juneau
From: Ted Goshulak <tgosh AT twu.ca>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 19:11:16 +0000
We will be in Skagway in early August (taking the Fjord Express to Juneau for 
the day). Has anyone else take this ferry? Birds? 


Thanks.

TED GOSHULAK
Langley, BC, CANADA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Edmonds marsh merlin?
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:51:50 -0700
Yesterday I posted that Monday evening (7/21)  I had seen a falcon at the 
Edmonds march and posted a link to my photos.  Joe Meche looked at my photos 
and thought that it was a merlin, not a peregrine falcon. 



I have enlarged and lightened three of my otherwise poor photos and posted them 
on the website if anyone cares to take another look.  Scroll down page 42 for 
the photos and additional comments. 




http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?9587-Wldlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2014/page42 


 
 
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Subject: Kent Branching Eaglet video by Ralph Meier - 7/21/14
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:22:35 -0700
07/21/14 RHM Bald Eaglets (Brancher Now) End Of James St  AT  Kent, Wa HD

posted by Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: Ridgefield NWR (Clark County) shorebirds
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:21:15 -0700
Tweeters,

Since it was raining down here in Clark County this morning and since Randy
Hill found a Semipalmated Sandpiper at Ridgefield yesterday, I decided to
visit the refuge this morning and try my luck.  Shorebirds are definitely
arriving and any visit to the refuge specifically to look for shorebirds
should be planned based on the tides.  High Tide or the rising tide is
best.  This morning's shorebird tally on S. Big Lake (on the right side of
the auto tour loop on the south end of Rest Lake - between markers 11 and
12):

Killdeer: 15
Greater Yellowlegs: 15
Lesser Yellowlegs: 1
Least Sandpiper: 40
Western Sandpiper: 12
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER: 1 (first of season - adult)
Pectoral Sandpiper: 5+ (first of season - presumably all adults - 2
observed on the mud and nearby vegetation and a flock of four flying off to
nearby Campbell Lake)
Long-billed Dowitcher: 10
Wilson's Snipe: 6

I wasn't able to locate the Semipalmated Sandpiper.

There were two very cute River Otters near stop 12 quite audibly enjoying
their morning breakfast.

Currently, the water level on Rest Lake is still too high to attract
shorebirds although there was one lone Long-billed Dowitcher on the edge of
it this morning.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
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Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: 2014 PSBO Bird Bander Training – August Weekend Workshop
From: Cynthia Easterson <eastersonfamily AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 08:08:54 -0700

Registration
is Open and there are a few spots left in the Puget sound bird observatory bird 
bander training! Save your spot today by using our secure 

PayPal option at http://pugetsoundbirds.org/training/bander-training-program/

Here is
your chance to learn bird banding techniques at two spectacular Northwest
setting, both convenient to lodging and food. The training follows North
American Banding Council (NABC) guidelines and includes 5 days of classroom and
field instruction in riparian, mixed forest habitat. 

We are now taking
registrations for the 3rd season of our Weekend Bird Bander Training. The first
weekend will be held at The Northwest Stream Center in South Everett,
Washington on the following dates (participants must be present all dates):

Friday, August 22, 2014   
               
8 am – 4:30 pm

Saturday, August 23, 2014
             8 am –
4:30 pm

Sunday, August 24,
2014
               
7 am – 3:00 pm

The second weekend
will be held at the Green River Natural Area, about 7 miles east of Auburn,
Washington along State Route 164.


Saturday, August 30, 2014
             8 am –
4:30 pm

Sunday, August 31,
2014
               
7 am – 3:00 pm

No birding or banding
experience is required. Participants must be minimum 16 years of age.

FEES: $450 +$50 materials
fee for PSBO members, $500 +$50 materials fee for non-members.

For additional
information email contact AT pugetsoundbirds.com





Cindy Easterson
Secretary | Volunteer Engagement
PUGET SOUND BIRD OBSERVATORY
Sound Science - Scientific Information - Informed Public

Phone: 425.876.1055
"Sight is a faculty; seeing, an art." ~ George Perkins Marsh (1887 - 1948) 
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Subject: Edmonds marsh 7-21-14
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 01:03:12 -0700
Monday (7/21) I photographed what I believe were a long-billed dowitcher and a 
peregrine  falcon at the Edmonds marsh.  Scroll down page 42 for (lousy) 
photos.  



http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?9587-Wldlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2014/page42 


 
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA_______________________________________________
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Subject: post-nesting yard visitors
From: "Paul Hicks" <phicks AT accessgrace.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 01:45:58 -0400
Tweets, Monday mid-morning I had some first-of-season visitors in my yard 
in Tenino: a pair of Black-throated Gray Warblers feeding two begging 
young, and a male Bullock's Oriole feeding two young. This is only the 
third sighting of oriole in my yard, the last one was a brief visit on July 
6. Good birding!
-- Paul Hicks / Tenino, s Thurston Co / phicks AT accessgrace DOT org

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