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Updated on Sunday, October 26 at 01:03 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Swallow-tailed Cotinga,©BirdQuest

26 Oct FW: [obol] FW: broad-billed in Stabler WA? [Stefan Schlick ]
26 Oct Fir Island M Godwits [Gary Bletsch ]
25 Oct TUVU over I-5 in Snohomish Co. today []
25 Oct Great Native Plant Info Resource [Jeff Gibson ]
25 Oct Re: State of the Flower Address ["Wilson Cady" ]
25 Oct Everett STP and Black-Headed Gull [Steve Giles ]
25 Oct Disappearing Woodpeckers [Pamela Myers ]
25 Oct Long-eared Owl near Sequim. [bruce paige ]
25 Oct Olympia turkey vultures [Ed Swan ]
25 Oct (no subject) [Mary LIz Cormier ]
25 Oct 12 TUVUs in Seattle [RODNEY BROWN ]
25 Oct RFI On Speages Pipit [rogermoyer1 AT hotmail.com ]
25 Oct State of the Flower Address [Jeff Gibson ]
25 Oct Union Bay Watch | Out of The Mist [Larry Hubbell ]
25 Oct BirdNote - last week, and the week of Oct. 26, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
25 Oct Rough-legged Hawk and Townsend's Warbler - Snohomish County [Kathleen Snyder ]
25 Oct Tokeland Tropical Kingbird [Tom Mansfield ]
25 Oct rescued grebes in O.Shores [Dianna Moore ]
25 Oct sharing breakfast with a hummingbird [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
24 Oct Re: Surf scoters flying upstream Columbia River Clark Co. wA [Tom McNamara ]
24 Oct pic of Northern Shrike at Nisqually today ["Kelly McAllister" ]
24 Oct Southwest Washington Rare (for location) Woodpeckers - Still Around [Tom Mansfield ]
24 Oct Nisqually Barred owl [Tony ]
24 Oct Battle Ground diurnal migration [Jim Danzenbaker ]
24 Oct Long shot help on a cage bird seen [Bob ]
24 Oct Long shot help on a cage bird seen [Bob ]
24 Oct Little Gull Jensen Access [Evan Houston ]
24 Oct Surf scoters flying upstream Columbia River Clark Co. wA [Bob ]
24 Oct Surf scoters flying upstream Columbia River Clark Co. wA [Bob ]
24 Oct Directions to access Everett sewage ponds ["Jon Purnell and Sherrie Rogers" ]
24 Oct Re: No Wheatear Thursday morning [Mark Ahlness ]
24 Oct American Tree Sparrow, Evening Grosbeak Gardiner Beach Yard [John Gatchet ]
24 Oct American Tree Sparrow, Evening Grosbeak Gardiner Beach Yard [John Gatchet ]
24 Oct Tropical Kingbird in O.Shores [Dianna Moore ]
24 Oct Everett STP Black-Headed Gull - No [Josh Adams ]
24 Oct Re: TUVUs over South Hill [Marv Breece ]
23 Oct possible Tropical Kingbird in Ocean Shores [Dianna Moore ]
23 Oct Re: Edmonds Marsh and Waterfront sightings today [Bill Anderson ]
23 Oct TUVUs over South Hill [Michael Brown ]
23 Oct Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2014-10-23 ["Michael Hobbs" ]
23 Oct Edmonds Marsh and Waterfront sightings today [Jill Gradwohl ]
23 Oct No Wheatear Thursday morning [Matt Bartels ]
23 Oct RE: Wheatear Info? ["Wayne Weber" ]
23 Oct Wheatear Info? [Blair Bernson ]
22 Oct Directions to access Everett sewage ponds ["MT" ]
22 Oct Not a flame in the fireplace but a flicker ["James P. Beneteau" ]
22 Oct eBird Report - Lake Sammamish State Park, Oct 21, 2014 [Sharon Cormier-Aagaard ]
22 Oct Edmonds Bufflehead 10-22-14 [Bill Anderson ]
22 Oct American Kestrels and Black-billed Magpie in Ellensburg ["Gerald Wasser" ]
22 Oct Rail flight ["Paul Hicks" ]
22 Oct Black-headed Gull at Everett STP [Ryan Merrill ]
21 Oct RE: Western Scrub Jay [Malcolm Mano ]
21 Oct Krider's red tailed hawk [Levi Simpson ]
21 Oct Nisqually NWR Western Meadowlarks [Tony ]
21 Oct Age/gender of Northern Wheatear on Vashon Island [George Gerdts ]
21 Oct Common Birds in Action [Hank ]
21 Oct N Wheatear []
20 Oct American Avocet, Clark's Grebe, Brown Pelican Sequim/Dungeness [John Gatchet ]
20 Oct Edmonds marsh and fishing pier birds 10-20-14 [Bill Anderson ]
20 Oct Northern Wheatear continues [Bruce Youngberg ]
20 Oct Emperor Goose correction [Dianna Moore ]
20 Oct Emperor Goose [Dianna Moore ]
20 Oct Northern Wheatear continues [Bruce Youngberg ]
20 Oct re: Late Osprey ["Scott Downes" ]
20 Oct Use patience and the Wheatear will show itself- 10/20 [amy schillinger ]
20 Oct Wheatear photo - Monday [Joe Sweeney ]
20 Oct Lewis's continues at Elochoman Valley Rd. ["washingtonbirder.Ken Knittle" ]
20 Oct RFI - western WA woodpeckers [ ]
20 Oct Wheatear still present at Pt. Robinson ["Ed Swan" ]
20 Oct Edmonds marsh mystery shorebirds 10-19-14 [Bill Anderson ]
20 Oct Northern Wheatear [Tom Mansfield ]
20 Oct Okanogan birding [Tim Brennan ]
20 Oct the most unusual fishing partner anyone has ever had [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
20 Oct RE: PIX --- Re: Ft Vanc Acorn Woodpeckers YES 3:30 ... [Rob Conway ]
19 Oct Neah Bay: Shearwaters [Nigel Ball ]
19 Oct Re: Late Osprey sighting [Bill Anderson ]

Subject: FW: [obol] FW: broad-billed in Stabler WA?
From: Stefan Schlick <greenfant AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 01:32:36 -0400
Forwarding from OBOL ...

From: llsdirons AT msn.com
To: obol AT freelists.org
Subject: [obol] FW: broad-billed in Stabler WA?
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 05:23:39 +0000




Greetings All,
Earlier today, I got a message from Bob Hansen who lives up in south-central 
Washington, telling me about a possible Broad-billed Hummingbird near Stabler, 
Skamania County, Washington. I exchanged some messages with the person who 
photographed it (Matt Schroeder) and based on the photo and what he describes 
seeing, I believe that he indeed had an immature Broad-billed Hummer in his 
yard. He saw and photographed the bird at 8AM today (Saturday) and I learned 
about it in the mid-afternoon. I followed up asking if he was willing to have 
folks up to look for the bird. Several hours passed and I had not heard back 
from him and then I got involved in other things. I just checked my email for 
the first time in several hours and found the response below from Matt. 
Obviously, I cannot share the images of the bird here, but Matt's photo shows 
an light-bellied immature hummer with a fairly obvious orangish-red base to the 
bill and some curvature to the bill. Matt confirmed to me that these are not 
photo artifacts and indeed the bill curved downward and the base of it was 
reddish. 

To my knowledge the bird has not been seen since this morning, but Matt put up 
a hummer feeder in hopes of keeping it around. If you chase this bird, please 
report back on your findings. Matt has provided directions to his place and a 
contact number. Note that cell service in his area is non-existent. I birded up 
that way late this summer and early this fall and I can confirm this being the 
case. The location is roughly and hour and a half drive from Portland. 

Dave IronsPortland, OR

Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 20:17:35 -0700
Subject: Re: broad-billed in Stabler WA?
From: matt.j.schroeder AT gmail.com
To: llsdirons AT msn.com

Hello Dave- 

I want to share. Please post the message for me. Folks are welcome to come by 
Sunday the 26th. 


81 Wind Crest Road, Carson, WA.  

10.2 miles North of Carson on the Wind River Hwy
Turn Left on Sadie (private drive)
Stay Left on Wind Crest, 81 is on the left.

Feel free to give me a call 509-427-8543. There is no cell phone service north 
of Carson. 


Cheers

Matt Schroeder





Hello Dave

This bird was outside my house this morning at 8 am. My wife and I both had 
long looks with the binoculars. We confirmed the curved bill with orange base. 
It was visiting the flower beds and eating flies. We first saw this bird one 
week ago, but thought it was an Anna's. Today was the first day we got a good 
look. 


I put a feeder out in hopes of getting a better photo. 

ms



On Sat, Oct 25, 2014 at 12:23 PM, David Irons  wrote:



Matt,

Did you notice the reddish-orange at the base of the bill when you saw this 
bird in the field? Also, was it someplace where it might be chaseable? I am 
always leery of single out-of-focus images taken in low light situations. At 
higher ISO settings, my camera occasionally introduces false color noise into 
images. If you saw the reddish-orange and the photo is accurately representing 
the bill pattern, I would say this bird is likely a Broad-billed Hummingbird. 
Where and when was it seen? From the looks of the leaves, it appears recently. 
The location should be shared on Tweeters in hopes that someone can relocate it 
and get better photos. 


Dave Irons
Portland, OR 

Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 12:00:27 -0700
Subject: Re: broad-billed in Stabler WA?
From: matt.j.schroeder AT gmail.com
To: llsdirons AT msn.com
CC: bobhansen AT gorge.net; johnstonstuartf AT hotmail.com

Here it is, with a comparison too.

Thanks!

On Sat, Oct 25, 2014 at 11:55 AM, David Irons  wrote:



Bob et al.,

Is there a jpg image of this bird? I did not receive any photo of the bird.

Dave Irons


> Subject: Re: broad-billed in Stabler WA?
> From: bobhansen AT gorge.net
> Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 11:31:11 -0700
> CC: llsdirons AT msn.com; johnstonstuartf AT hotmail.com
> To: matt.j.schroeder AT gmail.com
> 
> Matt,
> 
> I am passing this on to David Irons and Stuart Johnston for their input and 
thoughts... 

> 
> Bob 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> > On Oct 25, 2014, at 11:12 AM, Matt Schroeder  
wrote: 

> > 
> > Hello Bob
> > 
> > Could this be a broad billed?
> > 
> > Thanks
> > 
> > MattSchroeder
> > 
 		 	   		  

 		 	   		  

 		 	   		  

 		 	   		   		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Fir Island M Godwits
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 03:20:27 +0000 (UTC)
 Dear Tweeters,
Today (25 October 2014) I tried for the Little Gull and Franklin's Gulls that 
had been seen on Fir Island yesterday, with no luck. However, at Jensen Access, 
several other birders and I got to see a flock of 14 Marbled Godwits. That's by 
far the largest flock of MAGO's I have ever seen in Skagit County. 

Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: TUVU over I-5 in Snohomish Co. today
From: birdmarymoor AT gmail.com
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 19:37:54 -0700
Tweets – adding to the annals of unseasonably late TURKEY VULTURES, there 
were 4 over I-5 near Smokey Point north of Marysville today a little before 
noon. 


My wife and I made a brief stop at the Jenson Access on Fir Island, where other 
birders had been searching for over an hour for signs of the Little Gull, 
without finding it. There were small flocks of Bonaparte’s moving around, so 
it might just take getting lucky. Quite a few SNOW GEESE were back, and there 
were more on the Samish Flats. 


Working from a tip by Fanter Lane and his dad, we zoomed up to the West 90, 
where there was a large flock of DUNLIN and BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER in the field 
just NE of the parking area. Amongst them was at least one PACIFIC 
GOLDEN-PLOVER. We also glimpsed what looked like about 5 SWANS, but they went 
“poof” and disappeared. 


== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor AT frontier.com
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Subject: Great Native Plant Info Resource
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 17:15:00 -0700
Along with hosting Tweeters at the UW, there is another great resource that the 
Burke Museum offers - the WTU Herbarium Image Collection. 

I've been using the thing for years, having stumbled upon it somehow in my 
internet searches, but I thought I'd let Tweeters know about it, just for the 
record. In case you didn't know. 

The site is a very well organized collection of photos and information 
(taxonomic details, range info, etc.) about Washington State native plants. 
While not exactly a field guide, if you know your plants in general, it is a 
great resource to confirm ID and get more info on your vegetable of interest, 
including Lichens. You can search with common names, or them fancy scientific 
names by genus or family. Easy to use. Oh sure, I can use a key, but I like 
lookin' at photos too. 

For those of you who just can't live without them, they also got a new app for 
your portable gizmo, the "Washington Wildflower App" with 870 flowering plants 
on it. I find such things irritating and hard to see in daylight glare, but you 
might love it. You can confirm that, yes, that Purple Finch was eating Pacific 
Crabapples (Malus fusca). Or whatever. 

Just Sayin'Jeff Gibson 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Re: State of the Flower Address
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 23:08:32 GMT
The Pacific Rhododendron is such a common species on Mt. Hood that there is 
town named Rhododendron there. But this plant is absent on the north side of 
the Columbia River in Washington in similar habitat on Mt. Adams. Kind of like 
Acorn Woodpeckers until a few decades ago. Wilson Cady 

Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Jeff Gibson 
To: tweeters 
Subject: [Tweeters] State of the Flower Address
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 12:47:08 -0700


My fellow Washingtoonians. This is my first State of the Flower Address, so 
bear with me. Washington's State Flower is the Pacific, or Coast, Rhododendron 
(Rhododendron macrophyllum). Way back in 1892 the 'Women's Congress' of 
Washington put together a vote for deciding on a State Flower. Women couldn't 
vote for laws and stuff like that back then, but were allowed to vote for 
flowers apparently. So the showy Rhody was chosen. I guess that choice sort of 
leaves Washington dry-siders in the dust, since R. macrophllum is a wet-side 
species. Maybe sagebrusher's and Ponderosa piner's , should join up with Idaho 
with their more appropriate flower of Syringa (mock-orange). If it was up to 
biologists I suppose Eastern Washington could be renamed Western Idaho. Just 
sayin'. Back to Rhodyland. This vegetable does have a somewhat interesting 
range in our state. It is most common in 'rain-shadow' areas. While apparently 
once found in Seattle (native or planted?) it is only common to the west, in 
the 'shadow' of the Olympic mountains. The Eastern Olympics, much of the Kitsap 
Peninsula, Whidbey Island, etc., has what Rhody's like. There is an isolated 
population in the upper Skagit valley just into Canada - in the mini rainshadow 
of the Picket Range and other tall peaks of the Western North Cascades. 
However, the relative dryness of our local rainshadows, doesn't count for 
everything. Rhodies do fine in places like the Big Quilcene valley up in the 
foothills, and down in Oregon the plant is quite abundant in various areas of 
the Cascades with plenty of rain. A place I know well, the Tahuya Peninsula, 
(inside the hook of Hood Canal) is loaded with Rhody's - and the area gets 
about 60 inches of rain a year. Maybe it's the "soil" : at Wildberry Lake, in 
the area, I can tell you that the "soil" is a great depth of coarse alluvium, 
having dug several outhouse pits in the stuff which renders a shovel useless - 
one needs a six-foot steel rockbar and a bucket to dig a hole there. It is 
exceedingly well drained however, which the Rhodies don't seem to mind. I 
suppose the Rhody's, along with Madrone and Manzanita which also do well in 
similar conditions, are remnants of warmer, dryer times when they crept up from 
California, or whatever. Anyway, it's interesting that our Rhody's are where 
they are, adapted to summer droughts, fires, and cutting. This all came up 
again for me this year, camped out at Alzheimers Acre, here in Port Townsend, 
eastern Jefferson County, where the Rhody's add their charm to the coniferous 
forests. Port Townsend even has it's annual Rhododendron Festival in May, and 
you could maybe be crowned Rhody Queen! Gotta be a girl though, evidently. When 
in bloom (April May, or June, depending on locale) it's easy to see why the 
plant got the State Flower vote - it's wonderful. Even bumblebee's think so. 
Even out of bloom, the broad evergreen foliage adds a unique vibe to the 
forest's in which it's found. Jeff GibsonRhodyville Wa 
_______________________________________________
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Subject: Everett STP and Black-Headed Gull
From: Steve Giles <giles.steve AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:11:33 -0700
Hello Tweeters,

Jon Purnell and Sherrie Rogers requested directions to the Everett STP so here 
goes. Travel N on I-5 through Everett and exit on Marine View Drive. Turn left 
and wind several miles to a left turn which is the entrance to hwy 529 going 
North. Take the first exit on the right signed Langus Riverfront Park. Quickly 
you will turn right heading South-follow the signs to the park and then to the 
STP. 


 

Drive past the Treatment Plant buildings on your right to a small parking area 
on the right(no fee required). From the parking lot you can survey aerating 
ponds to the South. Walk several hundred yards East to a locked gate which is a 
good vantage point to survey the ponds looking North. You can continue E a 
short distance and then walk North about a quarter of a mile along the East 
side of the ponds. 


 

Friday afternoon Grace and Ollie Oliver and I spent four hours surveying the 
birds in the area. We focussed on the Gulls, especially keen on finding the 
Black-Headed Gull photographed last Sunday. We did find a likely candidate all 
the way at the North end of the ponds. It was sitting on the far bank near a 
Bonny-was larger and appeared to have two semi-circular black stripes on the 
head but the distance was great and it flew before we could confirm the ID. 


 

There are thousands of waterfowl and gulls using the ponds now. They attract 
raptors and when the tide is high shorebirds use the area. I had 44 species 
during my time there. 


 

Good birding

Steve Giles

Seattle
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Subject: Disappearing Woodpeckers
From: Pamela Myers <pamelapiwo6813 AT aol.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 18:51:07 -0400
In the past 4 months I have only seen a Downy Woodpecker once at my suet, and 
no HAWO. In years past, DOWO and HAWO were every day visitors. During this time 
period, my yard has been invaded by European Starlings. I'm wondering if they 
took over the nest holes and drove the woodpeckers out. I have lots of Northern 
Flickers and even an occasional Pileated Woodpecker, but something has happened 
to the smaller birds. Has anyone else had a similar experience or is their 
research on this subject? 


Thanks,
Pam Myers
Marysville_______________________________________________
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Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Long-eared Owl near Sequim.
From: bruce paige <BBPaige AT nikola.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 15:27:57 -0700
Last night, at 7 PM we heard a Long-eared Owl from our yard, which is located 
just to the east of the Geirin Creek woodlands that runs across Port Williams 
and Holland Roads. The calls consisted of single, low "whoo"s repeated a few 
seconds apart. The calls continued for about 5 minutes as the owl worked 
through the woods towards the north. This is only the second time I have heard 
this species in 6 years in this area, which is particularly good for owls, 
including Barred, Great-horned, Northern Saw-whet, Barn, Western Screech, and 
rarely Northern Pygmys. 


If I hear this individual again, I'll repost here in case others wish to listen 
for it. 


Bruce Paige
Sequim, WA

spruceak AT yahoo.com
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Subject: Olympia turkey vultures
From: Ed Swan <ewswan1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 15:21:08 -0700
On Thursday late afternoon I saw a kettle of 8 - 12 turkey vultures just
north of the on ramp from down town Olympia on I-5. Traffic was heavy so an
exact count was not possible.


Ed Swan
of Olympia_______________________________________________
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Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: (no subject)
From: Mary LIz Cormier <cormiermaryliz AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 15:13:24 -0700
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: 12 TUVUs in Seattle
From: RODNEY BROWN <rodneylbrownjr AT mac.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 20:14:36 +0000 (GMT)
I glanced up at the large conifer across the street from our home in Magnolia, 
and saw 12 crows sitting in the top branches. Except they were too big for 
crows. And they looked too awkward trying to sit on the swaying branches. A 
closer look showed them to be 12 TUVUs. They sat for another 5 or 10 minutes, 
and then flew away, showing their two-toned wings. Not a typical yard bird for 
us. 



Rod Brown
Seattle, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: RFI On Speages Pipit
From: rogermoyer1 AT hotmail.com <rogermoyer1@hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 19:51:30 +0000
Can someone who is familiar with this bird contact me off list. I have a couple 
questions. 


Roger Moyer
las Cruces NM.

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Tablet_______________________________________________
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Subject: State of the Flower Address
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 12:47:08 -0700


My fellow Washingtoonians.
This is my first State of the Flower Address, so bear with me. 
Washington's State Flower is the Pacific, or Coast, Rhododendron (Rhododendron 
macrophyllum). Way back in 1892 the 'Women's Congress' of Washington put 
together a vote for deciding on a State Flower. Women couldn't vote for laws 
and stuff like that back then, but were allowed to vote for flowers apparently. 
So the showy Rhody was chosen. 

I guess that choice sort of leaves Washington dry-siders in the dust, since R. 
macrophllum is a wet-side species. Maybe sagebrusher's and Ponderosa piner's , 
should join up with Idaho with their more appropriate flower of Syringa 
(mock-orange). If it was up to biologists I suppose Eastern Washington could be 
renamed Western Idaho. Just sayin'. 

Back to Rhodyland. This vegetable does have a somewhat interesting range in our 
state. It is most common in 'rain-shadow' areas. While apparently once found in 
Seattle (native or planted?) it is only common to the west, in the 'shadow' of 
the Olympic mountains. The Eastern Olympics, much of the Kitsap Peninsula, 
Whidbey Island, etc., has what Rhody's like. There is an isolated population in 
the upper Skagit valley just into Canada - in the mini rainshadow of the Picket 
Range and other tall peaks of the Western North Cascades. 

However, the relative dryness of our local rainshadows, doesn't count for 
everything. Rhodies do fine in places like the Big Quilcene valley up in the 
foothills, and down in Oregon the plant is quite abundant in various areas of 
the Cascades with plenty of rain. 

A place I know well, the Tahuya Peninsula, (inside the hook of Hood Canal) is 
loaded with Rhody's - and the area gets about 60 inches of rain a year. Maybe 
it's the "soil" : at Wildberry Lake, in the area, I can tell you that the 
"soil" is a great depth of coarse alluvium, having dug several outhouse pits in 
the stuff which renders a shovel useless - one needs a six-foot steel rockbar 
and a bucket to dig a hole there. It is exceedingly well drained however, which 
the Rhodies don't seem to mind. I suppose the Rhody's, along with Madrone and 
Manzanita which also do well in similar conditions, are remnants of warmer, 
dryer times when they crept up from California, or whatever. 

Anyway, it's interesting that our Rhody's are where they are, adapted to summer 
droughts, fires, and cutting. 

This all came up again for me this year, camped out at Alzheimers Acre, here in 
Port Townsend, eastern Jefferson County, where the Rhody's add their charm to 
the coniferous forests. Port Townsend even has it's annual Rhododendron 
Festival in May, and you could maybe be crowned Rhody Queen! Gotta be a girl 
though, evidently. 

 When in bloom (April May, or June, depending on locale) it's easy to see why 
the plant got the State Flower vote - it's wonderful. Even bumblebee's think 
so. Even out of bloom, the broad evergreen foliage adds a unique vibe to the 
forest's in which it's found. 

Jeff GibsonRhodyville Wa
 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Union Bay Watch | Out of The Mist
From: Larry Hubbell <ldhubbell AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 12:34:28 -0700
Tweeters,

This week's post covers an apparent territorial dispute between two mature. 
male great blue herons. In all the time I have spent watching birds around 
Union Bay, I have never seen two heron's behaving in this way. It is surprising 
to me that this incident should happen while visiting family in Vancouver. I 
hope you enjoy the post. 


http://www.unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2014/10/out-of-mist.html

Have a great day on Union Baywhere nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net_______________________________________________
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Subject: BirdNote - last week, and the week of Oct. 26, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123imagine.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 12:04:03 -0700
Hey, Tweets!


Check out the 2015 Birds of BirdNote calendar, featuring the photos of Gerrit 
Vyn: http://bit.ly/1xlUmqA 

---------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Waterfowl Migration in Flux - A function of climate change?
http://bit.ly/1nDoT3r

* Black-footed Albatross, Graceful Giant
http://bit.ly/SVI6HM

* Geese in V-formation
http://bit.ly/UJxmU3

* Cape May in October
http://bit.ly/UJxmU3

* Pileated Apple-peckers
http://bit.ly/T6GRWz

* Gull Identification - Who's Who?
http://bit.ly/1wqQaXt

* Raven, Dog, Bone  - Those crafty ravens!
http://bit.ly/12uuXC9
------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1rtx2mw
------------------------------------------------------------
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Thanks for listening!
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Subject: Rough-legged Hawk and Townsend's Warbler - Snohomish County
From: Kathleen Snyder <ksnyder75 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 11:59:43 -0700
Hi Tweeters,

This morning on a Pilchuck Audubon field trip, we found a juvenile
Rough-legged Hawk perched in a small tree at the Marysville Water Treatment
ponds.  Then when I got home to Everett, I saw my first Townsend's Warbler
(male) of the winter at my feeder.  Good day!

Kathleen Snyder_______________________________________________
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Subject: Tokeland Tropical Kingbird
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 14:57:47 -0400
As of the time of this post there is a TRKI sheltering from the stormy weather 
in the pines and on the utility line at 3265 Kindred Street just before the 
marina in Tokeland. 


Tom Mansfield headed north 

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Subject: rescued grebes in O.Shores
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 09:40:59 -0700
To the gentleman with whom I spoke while looking at the Tropical
Kingbird....I have forgotten your name. But thanks for telling me about the
grebes at the jetty; I was able to rescue six of the seven I saw. That
seventh bird outran me and headed straight into the surf of the fast-rising
tide.

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
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Subject: sharing breakfast with a hummingbird
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 11:32:22 +0100
hello everyone,

this sweet amateur video might cheer you up (those who need cheering, that
is). In this video, an elderly man takes pleasure in the small things, by
sharing his kitchen with a hungry hummingbird in Brasil:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/oct/25/a-hummingbird-and-his-man 



-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Surf scoters flying upstream Columbia River Clark Co. wA
From: Tom McNamara <tmcmac67 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 23:40:09 -0700
Yep,  I had 8 of them at Columbia Pt.  on Hayden Isl.  last Saturday along
w/ both scaup sp. & 70+ Western grebes & and several Horned & Pied- billeds.
Tom
On Oct 24, 2014 1:05 PM, "Bob"  wrote:

> 5 birds flying seen from the end of Lower River Rd.
>
> Also worth mention a Clark's grebe and barn swallow at Vancouver Lake.
>
> Bob Flores
> Ridgefield, WA
> *Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID*
>
Subject: pic of Northern Shrike at Nisqually today
From: "Kelly McAllister" <mcallisters4 AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 21:00:41 -0700
I'm getting some good pictures with my relatively new 300mm Nikon lens.
Today, I visited Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge to walk off the oatmeal
cookies my wife forced me to make. I took some pictures of the first shrike
I've seen this fall:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/29002564 AT N08/15433314118/

 

Lots of tree frogs calling today. Bullfrogs are still puddling around at the
surface. 

 

Kelly McAllister

Olympia, Washington
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Subject: Southwest Washington Rare (for location) Woodpeckers - Still Around
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 20:09:44 -0400
Hi Tweets - Although figuring success was a long shot, I made a quick run south 
today hoping for the Code 5 woodpeckers reported last week: Acorn in Clark 
County and Lewis' in Wahkiakum County. Got them both! I'd never been to Fort 
Vancouver but it was easy enough to find and right off I-5 at the E. Mill Plain 
exit. I parked at Fort Vancouver Way and McClellan Road and immediately heard 
ACWO calls from an oak "forest" to the east beyond the small war memorial. 
Walked through it but couldn't find the woodpecker. But I spotted the white 
gazebo some distance away where the ACWO had been first reported. So I drove 
down to E. 5th and started up the access road to the gazebo. An ACWO flew 
across the access road ahead of me and into a giant oak. I only saw one ACWO 
but it was quite mobile working the "forest" between McClellan and the gazebo 
area. After a few photos, I was on the way to Cathlamet. On Elochoman Valley 
Road, just north of town and east off SR 4, the small white house with mailbox 
257A was easy to find but parking was miserable on the shoulderless 2-lane 
road. When I drove up to the house, I spotted a bird in the top of the tallest 
snag and in the bins, it was the rather drab-looking LEWO. I continued east to 
the Grange to turn around and look for a parking place so I could get out for 
photos. But when I got back to the house, I couldn't find the bird on any of 
the many snags behind 257A. I did find a pseudo parking place, though, next to 
a Foreclosure For Sale sign and steep gravel driveway west and opposite of 257A 
Elochoman. After a few minutes of watching, the LEWO came back up to the snag 
but in a flash shimmied around out of sight. And stayed that way for 20 minutes 
until I left, photoless. But glad to have seen them both so if you need 
something to chase this weekend, may still be Code 5 woodpecker opportunity in 
the Southwest. 


Tom Mansfield in Kelso waiting for darkness and small owls..._______________________________________________
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Subject: Nisqually Barred owl
From: Tony <tvarela AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 17:03:06 -0700
The Barred owl that has been observed off and on for the last month or so at 
Nisqually was quite active today spending part of the morning near the Riparian 
forest overlook. There were several naturalists, birders and photographers 
enjoying this beautiful owl. It’s the first Barred owl I’ve seen at 
Nisqually and I’ve been an occasional visitor for several years. 


https://flic.kr/p/pvNYv5 




 - Regards

Tony Varela
South Puget Sound, WA
tvarela at hotmail dot com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tony-v 

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Subject: Battle Ground diurnal migration
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 16:31:33 -0700
Tweeters,

Since there was finally a rain free morning here in Battle Ground, Clark
County, I decided to do a big sit for about 4 hours from my deck.  The
birds were taking advantage of the calm before the storm and were flying
overhead and south:

American Robin: 438
Band-tailed Pigeon: 26 (two flocks)
Violet-green Swallow : 20 (one flock)
Pine Siskin: 92 (probably many more since I heard and didn't see quite a
few flocks)
American Pipit: 15
Purple Finch: 8
Lesser Goldfinch: 3
American Goldfinch: 12
Evening Grosbeak: 12
Yellow-rumped Warbler: 10
Cedar Waxwing: 8
Varied Thrush: 12
gull sp: 6

Bald Eagle: 1
Northern Harrier: 1
Sharp-shinned Hawk: 1

American Crow: 80 (presumably all locals leaving the neighborhood roost)
Scads of Cackling type Geese.

The rain has now returned.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward!

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: Long shot help on a cage bird seen
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 15:30:25 -0700
I only got quick looks at two birds along Old Lower River Rd about 1/4 mile 
north of the farm house. Size was like a kinglet and a fire red color dominated 
the head and shoulder area. The bill was seedeater type. The birds were very 
active moving all the time one buried itself into the rose/blackberry bush the 
other offered glimpses as it moved about. Unfortunately that occurred on the 
far side of the bush from my vantage point. One thing though the red is so 
bright the bird was easy to spot. 


I have attempted to locate a ID online but have not found anything that I am 
certain of. If you think you have a suggestion i would like to hear from you. I 
am curious as to what they are. Respond directly to me and we will avoid 
unnecessary email traffic on tweeters and obol. 


Thanks
Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA
rflores_2 AT msn.com

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Subject: Long shot help on a cage bird seen
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 15:30:25 -0700
I only got quick looks at two birds along Old Lower River Rd about 1/4 mile 
north of the farm house. Size was like a kinglet and a fire red color dominated 
the head and shoulder area. The bill was seedeater type. The birds were very 
active moving all the time one buried itself into the rose/blackberry bush the 
other offered glimpses as it moved about. Unfortunately that occurred on the 
far side of the bush from my vantage point. One thing though the red is so 
bright the bird was easy to spot. 


I have attempted to locate a ID online but have not found anything that I am 
certain of. If you think you have a suggestion i would like to hear from you. I 
am curious as to what they are. Respond directly to me and we will avoid 
unnecessary email traffic on tweeters and obol. 


Thanks
Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA
rflores_2 AT msn.com

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Subject: Little Gull Jensen Access
From: Evan Houston <evanghouston AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 13:54:30 -0700
Ryan Merrill and I are looking at an adult Little Gull that he spotted among 
the many Bonapartes Gulls. Friday 1:50 PM. Feeding near water's edge and giving 
good looks in flight. 


Good birding,
Evan Houston
Seattle, WA

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Subject: Surf scoters flying upstream Columbia River Clark Co. wA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 13:04:58 -0700
5 birds flying seen from the end of Lower River Rd. 

Also worth mention a Clark's grebe and barn swallow at Vancouver Lake.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA
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Subject: Surf scoters flying upstream Columbia River Clark Co. wA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 13:04:58 -0700
5 birds flying seen from the end of Lower River Rd. 

Also worth mention a Clark's grebe and barn swallow at Vancouver Lake.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA
Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
Subject: Directions to access Everett sewage ponds
From: "Jon Purnell and Sherrie Rogers" <jonnsher AT wavecable.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 12:22:49 -0700
Hi Tweeters

I noticed that someone was asking for directions to the Everette Sewage
Ponds.  We too would enjoy directions to  the places that all of you bird.
So those of us on the other side of "the Pond" can check them out when we
are in the area.  So.if occasionally you would give directions and or
respond to these direction questions on tweeters there are many of us who
would  appreciate.  Sometimes I can locate the directions online or in my
birding trails maps but other times they are "local information" that we
don't have.

Thanks in advance

Sherrie and Jon

Jonandsheratwavecable.com 
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Subject: Re: No Wheatear Thursday morning
From: Mark Ahlness <mahlness AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 11:09:43 -0700
And no Wheatear Thursday afternoon, either... from about 3:30 - 4:30. Did
get an exciting storm pass-over, though... dropping half inch hail, ouch.
The bird got a nice mention on the ABA blog this morning:
http://blog.aba.org/2014/10/rare-bird-alert-october-24-2014.html

Mark Ahlness
Seattle, WA

On Thu, Oct 23, 2014 at 11:55 AM, Matt Bartels 
wrote:

> Hi all -
> Just following up to say several of us were out this morning hoping for a
> reappearance of the Northern Wheatear -- I left around 10:00am, having seen
> no wheatear. Still hopeful it might yet pop up, but no sign of it yet.
>
> Matt Bartels
> Seattle, WA
>
> On Oct 23, 2014, at 7:31 AM, Wayne Weber wrote:
>
> > Blair et al.
> >
> > I looked for the N. Wheatear yesterday afternoon in steady rain, as did
> Shep
> > Thorp and at least a couple of other birders. As far as I know, no one
> > reported it yesterday. However, that doesn't necessarily mean it isn't
> still
> > in the area; maybe it just means that the bird didn't feel like feeding
> on
> > the beach during that very inclement weather.
> >
> > All the best,
> >
> > Wayne C. Weber
> > Delta, BC
> > contopus AT telus.net
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
> > [mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Blair
> > Bernson
> > Sent: October-23-14 1:57 AM
> > To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> > Subject: [Tweeters] Wheatear Info?
> >
> > Greetings all...
> > We returned from a great ABA-Rockjumper tour to South Africa late
> yesterday
> > - VERY jet lagged after more than 20 hours of flying.  We were not able
> to
> > stay up with emails and internet so tried to catch up yesterday.  Hard to
> > miss the fabulous reports of the Northern Wheatear at Robinson
> > Lighthouse.   We did have Mountain Wheatear in
> > South Africa but it sure would be nice to see the Northern on home
> turf.  I
> > have not seen any reports after the 21st and with all the rain things
> have
> > probably changed.  I would appreciate any updated info on successes or
> > failures yesterday - here or offline direct. Thanks.  More on South
> Africa
> > later.  Thanks
> >
> > --
> > Blair Bernson
> > Edmonds
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Tweeters mailing list
> > Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Tweeters mailing list
> > Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>



-- 
Mark Ahlness
mahlness AT gmail.com
Seattle, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: American Tree Sparrow, Evening Grosbeak Gardiner Beach Yard
From: John Gatchet <jfgatchet AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 09:36:03 -0700
Yesterday I was eating some lunch shortly after 1:00 pm when I noted a
sparrow in the Raspberry patch and garden area right next to our trailer.
The bird left the patch four times and was out on the lawn for easy viewing
10-15 feet from our sliding glass doors.  This allowed for great views of a
first year AMERICAN TREE SPARROW still showing juvenile plumage.  This was
an unexpected yard bird.  I have never had such great looks at a first year
tree sparrow showing some rusty coloration on the crown, sides, scapulars
and tertials.  It was a very beautiful sparrow.  It flew when I went for my
camera.

I have had one to four EVENING GROSBEAK in the yard the last several days.
Over 200 high flying CACKLING GEESE flew over the trailer this morning.
Yesterday there was a minima CACKLING GOOSE on Discovery Bay just below our
back yard.  A PILEATED WOODPECKER landed in a tree right next to me
yesterday for some great views.

John F. Gatchet
Gardiner, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: American Tree Sparrow, Evening Grosbeak Gardiner Beach Yard
From: John Gatchet <jfgatchet AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 09:35:01 -0700
Yesterday I was eating some lunch shortly after 1:00 pm when I noted a
sparrow in the Raspberry patch and garden area right next to our trailer.
The bird left the patch four times and was out on the lawn for easy viewing
10-15 feet from our sliding glass doors.  This allowed for great views of a
first year AMERICAN TREE SPARROW still showing juvenile plumage.  This was
an unexpected yard bird.  I have never had such great looks at a first year
tree sparrow showing some rusty coloration on the crown, sides, scapulars
and tertials.  It was a very beautiful sparrow.  It flew when I went for my
camera.

I have had one to four EVENING GROSBEAK in the yard the last several days.
Over 200 high flying CACKLING GEESE flew over the trailer this morning.
Yesterday there was a minima CACKLING GOOSE on Discovery Bay just below our
back yard.  A PILEATED WOODPECKER landed in a tree right next to me
yesterday for some great views.

John F. Gatchet
Gardiner, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Tropical Kingbird in O.Shores
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 08:14:42 -0700
Hey Tweets...I did a late check of e-Bird and found this bird had already
been spotted and so noted. Good job!

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
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Subject: Everett STP Black-Headed Gull - No
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 00:25:42 -0700
Hello Tweets,
I spent 90 minutes or so at the Everett Sewage Treatment Plant this
afternoon searching in vain for the Black-Headed Gull that was photographed
on Sunday. I know several other birders were there today and yesterday as
well and had similar results. The fact that there are several hundred
Bonaparte's Gull's there makes the searching a bit tedious. I had two
Franklin's Gulls present this PM, but I heard there were five this morning
so presumably birds are moving around in the area. The BHGU could still
definitely be present. Also present were a variety of shorebirds riding out
today's extremely high tide along the western concrete wall. Most were two
far to ID, but at points Greater Yellowlegs, Dunlin, and Least Sandpipers
landed near enough to ID.

Josh Adams
Lynnwood_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: TUVUs over South Hill
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece AT q.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 02:27:39 -0400 (EDT)
I also had a TURKEY VULTURE (possibly 2) early this afternoon in Renton/Tukwila 
at the intersection of I5 and I405. This is the latest TUVU for me in Wash 
state. 



Marv Breece 
Tukwila, WA 
marvbreece AT q.com 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Michael Brown"  
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu 
Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 8:57:49 PM 
Subject: [Tweeters] TUVUs over South Hill 



Driving my son home from his piano lesson I saw two Turkey Vultures where 94th 
crosses over Hwy. 512 on South Hill, just west of South Hill Mall. They were 
very low, no more than 30 feet over the road as they moved towards the west. 



I don't think I've personally seen TUVUs this late here. 


Michael Brown 
Puyallup, WA 
michael at flycatcherfile dot com 


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Subject: possible Tropical Kingbird in Ocean Shores
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 21:58:57 -0700
Hi Tweets...Trying to re-find the Emperor Goose out by the marina and found
what I believe to be a Tropical Kingbird instead. It was very active in the
Scotch Broom across from the Coastal Interpretive Center and around the
marina wood fencing. It often flew up to the power line and even across the
street to perch on the chain link fencing around the outflow area at the
base of the fresh-water canal.

I was able to get a few photos, but they are back-lit and my camera is not
much better than a smartphone...well, maybe a bit more distance. If you
would like to weigh in with your opinion, you can see it at my Flickr site:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/7991978 AT N08/15587994786/lightbox/

Couldn't find the goose, but it was windy and heavy rain showers off and on
(again).

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Edmonds Marsh and Waterfront sightings today
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 21:11:07 -0700
I too was at the Edmonds marsh Thursday (10/23/14) and got some photos of what 
I believe were the same mystery sandpipers that Jill saw. They look like the 
same species I have seen for the past week that have been identified by some 
Tweetsters as dunlin. 



You can see Thursday's photos by scrolling down page 62. Go back to page 61 for 
photos of the sandpipers from earlier in the week. 



Wldlife of Edmonds, WA. 2014 - Page 62

  
             
Wldlife of Edmonds, WA. 2014 - Page 62
At 62 pages, the original Edmonds wildlife thread was getting a bit cumbersome, 
so I am starting a new one for 2014. This will also help me in the year ahea... 

View on www.pnwphotos.com Preview by Yahoo  
  
 
 
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Subject: TUVUs over South Hill
From: Michael Brown <michael AT flycatcherfile.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 20:57:49 -0700
Driving my son home from his piano lesson I saw two Turkey Vultures where 94th 
crosses over Hwy. 512 on South Hill, just west of South Hill Mall. They were 
very low, no more than 30 feet over the road as they moved towards the west. 


I don't think I've personally seen TUVUs this late here.

Michael Brown
Puyallup,  WA
michael at flycatcherfile dot com

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Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2014-10-23
From: "Michael Hobbs" <birdmarymoor AT frontier.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:55:20 -0700
It was another one of those days that convinces me of the wisdom of going 
birding despite “the weather”. Yeah, it rained all night, and it was 
blowing bits of rain from 7:00 until maybe 8:00, but the rest of the morning 
was actually pretty nice, with only a few sprinkles and showers. As for birds, 
nothing dramatic, but there are almost always some notable sightings, and today 
was no exception. 


Highlights:

Turkey Vulture            Two after the walk – latest ever for Marymoor
Sharp-shinned Hawk   One at the south end of the Dog Meadow
Killdeer                       15-20 in one flock, NE corner of park
Band-tailed Pigeon    Sharon saw a few
BARN OWL                 Flew around from 7:05-7:27 or later!!!
Northern Flicker         Many, including a pure-looking “Yellow-shafted”
Merlin                        West of the slough
Northern Shrike         Juvenile, East Meadow
Common Raven         Sharon saw/heard one over the Rowing Club
- swallow sp. -           Sharon saw one over the slough near the windmill
Bushtit                       Sharon saw a few, East Meadow, first in 5 weeks
American Pipit          ~5, looking to land, NE corner of park
Or.-cr. Warbler          One along west edge of East Meadow
W. MEADOWLARK    12-13, NE corner of park
Pine Siskin                 Several large flocks, one very large flock

The BARN OWL was out way too late, giving us startlingly good looks in dim 
daylight. You could see every feather. The crows slept in, but still... 


Today’s was the first time we’ve noted a pure “YELLOW-SHAFTED” FLICKER 
at Marymoor! Today we had a female with a tan face, a red crescent on the gray 
nape, and bright yellow feathers on wings and tail. There were ALSO 1-2 
intergrade males with red malars AND red on the nape. A juvenile that was with 
the YSFL also may have been an intergrade. We’ve noted intergrades a handful 
of times before, though we don’t usually scrutinize flickers that closely, 
and we’ve probably missed many. There were quite a few flickers today (10+), 
so there must have been some kind of passage of them through the park. 


After the walk, I went back to the East Meadow, trying to scare up either a 
Savannah Sparrow or a Common Yellowthroat. Savannah’s might still be around, 
but I couldn’t find any. Common Yellowthroat should be gone by now, but both 
Sharon and I had independently thought we’d heard a call or two along the 
East Meadow grassy trail. I couldn’t turn one up on my return however. The 
two TURKEY VULTURES were my consolation prize; they appeared to the NE and came 
south across the park. Last week’s 3 TUVUs were the latest fall sightings on 
record for the park, but they didn’t keep that record long! 


For the day, we managed 58 species, though it was definitely the kind of day 
where not everybody sees everything! 


== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor AT frontier.com_______________________________________________
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Subject: Edmonds Marsh and Waterfront sightings today
From: Jill Gradwohl <jillgradwohl AT live.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 15:38:46 -0700
Spotted several sandpipers at the Edmonds Marsh today, but having trouble 
pin-pointing the exact species. They look like spotted or solitary sandpipers 
to me. I’ve ruled out Dunlin’s (these are bigger) and any of the 
yellow-legs (the ones at the marsh have plumper bodies and shorter legs). Can 
anyone confirm the species? They are a little bigger than the killdeers, are 
white below and grey/brown above. They have a dark bill that looks longer than 
their heads, they have short necks and plump bodies, they probe the mudflats 
and the water. 


Also saw a Murrelet from the Edmonds pier today. It’s likely a marbled, but 
the beak looks longer and has a black eyeline off the back of the eye. 


I will be posting picks on my Flickr page later today.  

Other sightings: 

Marsh: 
10 – Great Blue Herons 
20 – Canadian Geese fly-over 
7 – Gadwall
50 – Mallard fly-over 
2 – Northern Shoveler
2 – Green winged Teal 
2 – Killdeer 
6 – Sandpiper – species?
2 – Gulls 
6 – American/NW crows

Waterfront: 
11 – cormorants 
120 – Gulls -  Gathered on the rock break at the marina entrance 
1 – Murrelet
5 – Western Grebes
2 – Hermann’s Gulls 
30 – surf scooters near the ferry dock 
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Subject: No Wheatear Thursday morning
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 11:55:21 -0700
Hi all -
Just following up to say several of us were out this morning hoping for a 
reappearance of the Northern Wheatear -- I left around 10:00am, having seen no 
wheatear. Still hopeful it might yet pop up, but no sign of it yet. 


Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA

On Oct 23, 2014, at 7:31 AM, Wayne Weber wrote:

> Blair et al.
> 
> I looked for the N. Wheatear yesterday afternoon in steady rain, as did Shep
> Thorp and at least a couple of other birders. As far as I know, no one
> reported it yesterday. However, that doesn't necessarily mean it isn't still
> in the area; maybe it just means that the bird didn't feel like feeding on
> the beach during that very inclement weather.
> 
> All the best,
> 
> Wayne C. Weber
> Delta, BC
> contopus AT telus.net
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
> [mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Blair
> Bernson
> Sent: October-23-14 1:57 AM
> To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> Subject: [Tweeters] Wheatear Info?
> 
> Greetings all...
> We returned from a great ABA-Rockjumper tour to South Africa late yesterday
> - VERY jet lagged after more than 20 hours of flying.  We were not able to
> stay up with emails and internet so tried to catch up yesterday.  Hard to
> miss the fabulous reports of the Northern Wheatear at Robinson 
> Lighthouse.   We did have Mountain Wheatear in 
> South Africa but it sure would be nice to see the Northern on home turf.  I
> have not seen any reports after the 21st and with all the rain things have
> probably changed.  I would appreciate any updated info on successes or
> failures yesterday - here or offline direct. Thanks.  More on South Africa
> later.  Thanks
> 
> --
> Blair Bernson
> Edmonds
> 
> _______________________________________________
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> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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Subject: RE: Wheatear Info?
From: "Wayne Weber" <contopus AT telus.net>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 07:31:25 -0700
Blair et al.

I looked for the N. Wheatear yesterday afternoon in steady rain, as did Shep
Thorp and at least a couple of other birders. As far as I know, no one
reported it yesterday. However, that doesn't necessarily mean it isn't still
in the area; maybe it just means that the bird didn't feel like feeding on
the beach during that very inclement weather.

All the best,

Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC
contopus AT telus.net



-----Original Message-----
From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Blair
Bernson
Sent: October-23-14 1:57 AM
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Wheatear Info?

Greetings all...
We returned from a great ABA-Rockjumper tour to South Africa late yesterday
- VERY jet lagged after more than 20 hours of flying.  We were not able to
stay up with emails and internet so tried to catch up yesterday.  Hard to
miss the fabulous reports of the Northern Wheatear at Robinson 
Lighthouse.   We did have Mountain Wheatear in 
South Africa but it sure would be nice to see the Northern on home turf.  I
have not seen any reports after the 21st and with all the rain things have
probably changed.  I would appreciate any updated info on successes or
failures yesterday - here or offline direct. Thanks.  More on South Africa
later.  Thanks

--
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

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Subject: Wheatear Info?
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 01:56:41 -0700
Greetings all...
We returned from a great ABA-Rockjumper tour to 
South Africa late yesterday - VERY jet lagged 
after more than 20 hours of flying.  We were not 
able to stay up with emails and internet so tried  
to catch up yesterday.  Hard to miss the fabulous 
reports of the Northern Wheatear at Robinson 
Lighthouse.   We did have Mountain Wheatear in 
South Africa but it sure would be nice to see the 
Northern on home turf.  I have not seen any 
reports after the 21st and with all the rain 
things have probably changed.  I would appreciate 
any updated info on successes or failures 
yesterday - here or offline direct. Thanks.  More 
on South Africa later.  Thanks

-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

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Subject: Directions to access Everett sewage ponds
From: "MT" <Tomboulian AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 18:25:31 -0700
Hello everyone

I’d like to try my hand at seeing some of the rare gulls recently reported at 
Everett sewage ponds, but my recollection is that public access is only from 
the trail to Spencer Island on the south side of the main lagoon and you would 
have to view through a fence. 


Any better directions from recent visitors would be appreciated

Mark Tomboulian

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Subject: Not a flame in the fireplace but a flicker
From: "James P. Beneteau" <beneteau AT wavecable.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 16:45:03 -0700
Heard some noises from the chimney this morning and wondered 
initially if it was just the rain. Later, heard distinct rattling in 
the wood stove insert (rarely used) in the fireplace.  I shown a 
flashlight through the smokey glass and there was a northern flicker 
staring back at me.
After much dithering (and no real advice from Department of Wildlife 
or wildlife rescue organization), we rigged a large semi-transparent 
storage container, minus the lid, around the stove doors, draped old 
coats around the edges, carefully opened the stove door a 
bit.  Nothing for about a 1/2 hour then a thunk as he dropped into 
the container.
We worked one coat across the open end of the container (bird jumping 
about the whole time) and got it covered. Got him/her to the back 
yard and away he/she went to the top of the Douglas fir behind our yard.
Hope the bird isn't so traumatized that it won't go into other 
cavities.  (And I've been assigned the task  of putting screening 
around the chimney openning.)

Jim Beneteau
Arlington, Wa 

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Subject: eBird Report - Lake Sammamish State Park, Oct 21, 2014
From: Sharon Cormier-Aagaard <scormieraa001 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 15:42:36 -0700
Hi Tweets,
 
Here's my monthly report for those interested in the birds being seen/heard at 
Lake Sammamish State Park. 

 
Sharon Aagaard
Bellevue, WA
scormieraa001 AT hotmail.com

Lake Sammamish State Park, King, US-WA
Oct 21, 2014 8:05 AM - 12:31 PM
Protocol: Traveling
4.0 mile(s)
Comments: Sharon Aagaard and Stan Wood birded with 8 others at Eastside 
Audubon's monthly bird walk at Lake Sammamish State Park on Oct 21, 2014, from 
8:00 am to 12:25 pm. We began with dark, threatening clouds and enjoyed sunny 
skies for the duration of the walk, 53-61F, 0-4 mph. HIGHLIGHTS : the CACKLING 
GEESE are back feeding on the grassy areas; a COOPER'S HAWK; 3 BAND-TAILED 
PIGEONS flew over; a RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER was tending sapwells; a female 
HAIRY WOODPECKER; 11 VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOWS over the east meadows; 21 AMERICAN 
PIPITS--a large group was feeding in the SW ball field and several flyovers 
were making contact calls; 22 CEDAR WAXWINGS; 3 TOWNSEND'S WARBLERS in a mixed 
flock with YELLOW-RUMPS and chickadees; a flock of RED CROSSBILLS flew overhead 
making contact calls; and several flocks of PINE SISKINS totaling approximately 
47 birds. 53 species for the day; and still at 129 species for the year. 
Critters: a bunny; a mother deer with two young; two tree frogs near puddles 
and others were chirping; and 5 wooly bear caterpillars (the orange and black 
ones). The next bird walk is NOVEMBER 18. No pre-registration, just show up 
depending on your mood or the weather. Since this is a state park, a Discover 
Pass is necessary to park ($10 daily, $30 annual). We meet in the large parking 
lot to the left just inside the main park entrance, now signed as the Costco 
Parking lot, but we meet at the far end towards the lake (not the boat launch 
entrance).Submitted from BirdLog NA for Android v1.9. 

53 species (+3 other taxa)

> Cackling Goose  64
> Canada Goose  42
> Gadwall  11
> American Wigeon  8
> Mallard  96
> Northern Shoveler  1
> Green-winged Teal (American)  2
> Bufflehead  2
> Pied-billed Grebe  7
> Horned Grebe  1
> Western Grebe  17
> Double-crested Cormorant  9
> Great Blue Heron  5
> Cooper's Hawk  1
> Red-tailed Hawk (Western)  3
> American Coot  378
> Killdeer  1
> Mew Gull  1
> Ring-billed Gull  2
> California Gull  3
> Glaucous-winged Gull  15
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  2
> Band-tailed Pigeon  3
> Anna's Hummingbird  3
> Belted Kingfisher  2     male
> Red-breasted Sapsucker  1
> Hairy Woodpecker  1     female
> Northern Flicker  3     heard only but likely red shafted
> Northern Flicker (Red-shafted)  2     saw red undertail and red under wings
> American Crow  31
> Violet-green Swallow  11     white underside, dark above, white saddlebags
> Black-capped Chickadee  24
> Chestnut-backed Chickadee  2
> Bushtit (Pacific)  14
> Brown Creeper  1
> Pacific Wren  2
> Bewick's Wren  4
> Golden-crowned Kinglet  25
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  5
> American Robin  55
> European Starling  2
> American Pipit  21     SW ball field and also heard/saw fly overs
> Cedar Waxwing  22
> Yellow-rumped Warbler  12     heard only
> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  3     white throats and smile line
> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's)  12     yellow throats
> Townsend's Warbler  3
> Spotted Towhee (Pacific)  6
> Song Sparrow  10
> Dark-eyed Junco (Oregon)  8
> Red-winged Blackbird  15
> House Finch  7
> Purple Finch (Western)  8     2 purplish makes
> Red Crossbill  10
> Pine Siskin  47
> American Goldfinch  4
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20308710 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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Subject: Edmonds Bufflehead 10-22-14
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 12:42:28 -0700
I saw my first of the season bufflehead off Sunset Ave. around 11:00am 
Wednesday. 


 
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA_______________________________________________
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Subject: American Kestrels and Black-billed Magpie in Ellensburg
From: "Gerald Wasser" <wasser1 AT raincity.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 12:21:47 -0700
Tweeters:

 

It was a gorgeous day in Ellensburg yesterday.  Two American Kestrels were
spotted on power lines along Dollarway about a mile east of Old Thorp
Highway.  Also, a Black-billed Magpie was seen at the Union 76 station near
the intersection of Dollarway and Old Thorp Highway.  Pretty birds!

 

Cheers,

 

Jerry

 

 
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Subject: Rail flight
From: "Paul Hicks" <phicks AT accessgrace.org>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 12:11:24 -0700
Tweets, A first for me this week: I saw a Virginia Rail fly across the main
highway (Old Hwy 99 just north of Tenino, from a small pond on a wooded
hillside - also a first). It looked like it was barely going to make it
across. So how in the world do these critters migrate? Oiseaux-birds.com
says: "Virginia Rail rarely flies, only for migration. It has weak short
wings and its flight is not graceful. It has to drop to the ground after
short flights. However, Virginia Rail can migrate immense distances."
-- Paul Hicks / Tenino, s Thurston Co / phicks AT accessgrace DOT org
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Subject: Black-headed Gull at Everett STP
From: Ryan Merrill <rjm284 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 10:35:56 -0400
Brian Linn found and photographed a young Black-headed Gull at Everett
STP on October 19th.  You can see a photo here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/exploring_imagery/14973418004/

Good birding,
Ryan Merrill
Kirkland
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Subject: RE: Western Scrub Jay
From: Malcolm Mano <manomalcolm AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 22:36:40 -0700

> Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 12:03:19 -0700
> From: tweeters-request AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
> Subject: Tweeters Digest, Vol 122, Issue 16
> To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> 
Hi Tweeters,
Today a single Western Scrub Jay came to my birdfeeders- first at the sunflower 
tray, then to the suet feeder and then took a drink from the birdbath. He kept 
going around and around the various feeders then into the fir trees.... Guess I 
should have had peanuts out :-) This is only the 3rd time in 5 years that I 
have seen this species in Everett. 


Ruth Mano
Everett, WA


> 
> Message: 4
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 18:52:12 -0400
> From: Pamela Myers 
> Subject: [Tweeters] Western Srub Jay
> To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> Message-ID: <8D1B6E1CA902F30-12B0-211D2 AT webmail-va209.sysops.aol.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
> 
> The Western Scrub Jay was back at my feeder just now. They cannot resist 
peanuts! 

> 
> Pam Myers
> Marysville



*************
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Subject: Krider's red tailed hawk
From: Levi Simpson <levs55 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 17:07:07 -0700
Hey, Bud and Tweeters
A lady at my work who enjoys watching birds with her husband said they spotted 
a Krider's Red Tailed Hawk last Sunday in In Bay View. 

Off of Farm To Market Rd, Between Josh Wilson Rd. and Rector Rd.
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Subject: Nisqually NWR Western Meadowlarks
From: Tony <tvarela AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 16:52:55 -0700
There have been several Western Meadowlarks at Nisqually recently, always a 
treat to see and hear these Icterids. Today there were four actively singing 
and moving about near the dike trail. 



https://flic.kr/p/ptGUY7    
https://flic.kr/p/ptJsm5 





 - Regards

Tony Varela
South Puget Sound, WA
tvarela at hotmail dot com
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Subject: Age/gender of Northern Wheatear on Vashon Island
From: George Gerdts <geopandion AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 11:43:06 -0700
Tweeters,

Jamie Acker and I made the journey (almost an odyssey) yesterday (Oct.
20th) from Bainbridge Island to Vashon Island to try for the Northern
Wheatear that had been found and photographed over the weekend.  We took
the Southworth ferry, but had to go all the way across to Fauntleroy and
back to Vashon...  Art Yang was at the Point Robinson Lighthouse when we
arrived, and had just seen the bird.  Sure enough, a few minutes later the
little waif put in an extended 15 minute display, allowing close studies of
its plumage through Jamie's Kowa scope.  After looking at a few photos and
consulting "Birds of Europe" by Killian Mullarney and Dan Zetterstrom, it
seems to me that this bird is either a female in basic or a juvenile molted
to "1st Winter Plumage".

The lore area was buff, the back was gray/beige, the median wing coverts
have dark centers, the cheeks are buffy, and the tertials have buffy
edges.  All the feathers look new and fresh!  In any regard, a very nice
bird, and one who is a long way off course, if Africa is where it was
headed.

Any other possibilities as to its age/gender?

George Gerdts
geopandion AT gmail.com
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Subject: Common Birds in Action
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 09:51:47 -0700
> 
> Great Blue Heron does the shimmy to cleanse at Juanita Bay:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15383530560/
> 
> Red-breasted Sapsucker peels some bark from a birch while feeding at Lake 
Joy: 

> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15365828728/
> 
> Hundreds of American Coots, some American Wigeons plus a Canada Goose in 
motion at Juanita Bay: 

> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15383530610/
> 
> Two Great Blue Herons flew into Wylie Slough together and then preformed what 
I have been told are territorial displays. The video shows one heron displaying 
followed by another heron with almost identical displays. 

> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15291048991/

Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, WA
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Subject: N Wheatear
From: n3zims AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:05:49 +0000 (UTC)
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Subject: American Avocet, Clark's Grebe, Brown Pelican Sequim/Dungeness
From: John Gatchet <jfgatchet AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 23:00:02 -0700
This morning I was able to locate the previously reported AMERICAN
AVOCET at Three Crabs.  It was with 16 MARBLED GODWIT.  There was a
KILLDEER, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, 7 BLACK TURNSTONE and a single GREATER
YELLOWLEGS there as well.

In the afternoon I birded at the Dungeness Recreation Area Park and
observed from the overlook parking area a lone CLARK'S GREBE among the
100's of RED-NECKED GREBE.  Two sets of two BROWN PELICAN flew by and it
will be interesting to see if they make it into the Puget Sound area from
the straits.  There were three BLACK SCOTER and a group of SHORT-BILLED
DOWITCHER. (flew by)

At Cline Spit there were DUNLIN.  More DUNLIN were at Dungeness Landing as
was a LEAST SANDPIPER.  *(A total of 9 shorebirds for the day)*

John F. Gatchet
Gardiner, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Edmonds marsh and fishing pier birds 10-20-14
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 22:26:18 -0700
Thanks to all who responded to my ID request for the two mystery sandpipers I 
saw Sunday at the marsh. So far the majority of votes are for dunlin in winter 
plumage. 


The two sandpipers returned Monday for a brief period before they were scared 
off by what I thought was a merlin. A lesser(?) yellowlegs was present as well. 


A trip to the marina revealed a rhinocerous auklet and two common murres 
swimming very close to the fishing pier. 


Scroll down page 61 for photos and narrative:


http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?9587-Wldlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2014/page61 


  

 
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Subject: Northern Wheatear continues
From: Bruce Youngberg <brizy01 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 21:56:07 -0700
The Northern Wheatear continues to be easily seen along the Point Robinson 
shoreline on Vashon Island through the early evening, ~5:30 pm. 


A wonderfully amiable and beautiful bird that seems quite satisfied with its 
plentiful supply of sand fleas and other insects. 


Bruce Youngberg
Poulsbo, WA
brizy01 at yahoo dot com
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Subject: Emperor Goose correction
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 19:35:10 -0700
I sent the photo to Bob K and he says this is not an adult but a juvenile
with a lot of speckling on its head. I was not considering the gradual
changing from a black head to the speckling, to the white head. sigh....

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
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Subject: Emperor Goose
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 18:42:22 -0700
Hi Tweets....After a few weeks of on and off searching for this goose,
today I found it by accident while rescuing beached Western Grebes.

Our local wildlife rescue folks are overwhelmed by the reports of grebes
unable to fish in the rough seas; they beach themselves and most slowly
die, as COASST participants know only too well. The advice is if we can
catch them and transport them over to the sheltered marina, they will
probably be able to make it.

Today when I walked my dog there were six WEGR huddled on the high sand
being buffeted by the wind and half-covered in sand. So I dropped the dog
off at home, grabbed my net and a big box, ignored the wails of protest
from the birds, and dumped them into the marina.

While watching their preening and bathing antics I spotted the adult goose
on the inside northern wall of the jetty enclosing the marina. It was
standing on the rocks at the base of the wall and spent most of the time
preening in the sunshine. It doesn't appear to be impaired in any way, but
I didn't get to see it swim or fly.

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
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Subject: Northern Wheatear continues
From: Bruce Youngberg <brizy01 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 18:14:11 -0700
The Northern Wheatear continues to be easily seen along the Point Robinson 
shoreline on Vashon Island through the early evening, ~5:30 pm. 


A wonderfully amiable and beautiful bird that seems quite satisfied with its 
plentiful supply of sand fleas and other insects. 


Bruce Youngberg
Poulsbo, WA
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Subject: re: Late Osprey
From: "Scott Downes" <downess AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 17:28:31 -0700
There have been quite a few October Osprey sightings (including birds through 
last weekend) in Washington State this fall. I made a quick eBird query of 
sightings for October 2014 sightings in Washington State and the link is below. 
In my opinion, eBird is a great tool for such queries and you don’t have to 
have an account or submit data to use it for such (though it is great if you 
do!): 
http://ebird.org/ebird/map/osprey?neg=true&env.minX=-128.76080459999997&env.minY=44.69041279611456&env.maxX=-112.94049209999997&env.maxY=49.79392870602008&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=on&bmo=10&emo=10&yr=cur 


Scott Downes
downess AT charter.net
Yakima WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Use patience and the Wheatear will show itself- 10/20
From: amy schillinger <schillingera AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 17:06:13 -0700
Penny Rose, Patty North, and I got to Point Robinson at first light today. We 
got on the bird within 10 minutes of being there. As others have noted it likes 
to hang out in the driftwood in front of the quarters. The birds preferred 
location (today anyway) was on a large log with a bent over metal spike in it 
and the large root mass to the left of it. Even as other birders and a 
photographer arrived and walked up and down the beach to chase the bird as it 
flew, we waited patiently for it to come back to it's favorite spot. We never 
had to move and we didn't have to harass the bird by chasing it or calling for 
it. 

 
We met a very nice lodging manager that let us walk through the second house 
and told us that we could rent it out. They looked pretty comfy. The manager 
told us of a few other nice spots to bird before we left. 

 
Glad we got there before the bigger groups. One lady we met on the ferry said 
that there were 10 or more people looking for it later in the morning. 

 
Cheers,

Amy Powell
Renton, WA
schillingera AT Hotmail.com
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Subject: Wheatear photo - Monday
From: Joe Sweeney <sweeneyfit AT mac.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:47:36 -0700
I viewed the Northern Wheatear at Point Robinson Monday morning, 10/20/14, from 
9:30 to 11:15, along with several other birders. 


Thanks to Tom Mansfield for locating the bird, about two minutes before I 
showed up. 


Most of the time, the bird was on the driftwood in front of the two Caretaker 
residences. When I left at 11:15am, it was on the beach and driftwood about 50 
-75 yards southwest of the residences. 


To view a photo, go to:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/sweeneyfit/15563797926/

Joe Sweeney
NE Seattle
sweeneyfit at mac dot com

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Subject: Lewis's continues at Elochoman Valley Rd.
From: "washingtonbirder.Ken Knittle" <washingtonbirder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:08:57 -0700

Monday at 11:15 am the Lewis's Woodpecker was near the dead snags at 257 
Elochoman Valley Road. It flew close to the road in an apple tree before flying 
back to the dead snags. We (Les Carlson, Laurie & Ken Knittle) saw it before we 
could even get stopped. Likes the top of the dead snags. 




Ken
 Knittle

Vancouver WA 
98665 mailto:washingtonbirder AT hotmail.com
Washington Birder online 



http://www.wabirder.com/
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Subject: RFI - western WA woodpeckers
From: "Lorenz, Teresa (lore5748 AT vandals.uidaho.edu)" <lore5748@vandals.uidaho.edu>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 20:21:31 +0000
?Hi Tweeters,


I'm looking information on the dates that woodpeckers start their springtime 
nesting cycle in western Washington. If any of you have found woodpecker nests 
in past years and recorded the date, would you email me the date that you 
observed nesting, the nesting stage (excavation, incubation, or nestling), and 
the species? I'm mostly interested in the dates that hairy woodpeckers and 
northern flickers begin incubating their clutches, but info on any species 
would be great to get me started. 



Thanks so much for any help,

Teresa



Teresa Lorenz

Rimrock, WA

lore5748 AT vandals.uidaho.edu
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Subject: Wheatear still present at Pt. Robinson
From: "Ed Swan" <edswan AT centurytel.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 10:35:11 -0700
The Northern Wheatear is still being seen.  Bob Hawkins and others are
currently seeing in the same location by the light keeper houses.

Ed

 

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

Check out the new The Birds of Vashon Island at:

www.theswancompany.com  

edswan AT centurytel.net  

206.463.7976

 
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Subject: Edmonds marsh mystery shorebirds 10-19-14
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:53:35 -0700
Sunday afternoon (10/19) two mystery shorebirds were present at the Edmonds 
marsh. 


Due to their long bills, I thought they were dowitchers while I was 
photographing them. I 

changed my mind when I got home and studied the photos on the computer. The end 
of their bills looked to be the wrong shape for a dowitcher and their legs 

appeared black, although that may have been mud. 

Distinctive features were the long bills, black legs and white 
undersides.  I thought the bills looked too long for dunlin and 
western sandpipers.

Your thoughts are welcome. Photos and further narrative can be seen by 
scrolling down page 61. 



http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?9587-Wldlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2014/page61 

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Subject: Northern Wheatear
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 12:26:03 -0400
As of the time of this post the NOWH is perched up nicely in front of the light 
keeper cottage at Point Robinsion. 


Tom Mansfield on Vashin

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Subject: Okanogan birding
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 07:08:37 -0700
Hey Tweets!

I got back last night from a weekend in Okanogan County with Khanh Tran and 
Kevin Black. We had snow-free driving on all of the high elevation roads (up to 
7000 feet), and some good looks and listens of some great birds. 


I met Khanh in Ellensburg at the Bar 14 pond where I saw a pair of Western 
Grebes, my 150th year bird for Kittitas (which was the goal for the year, and 
came on my last trip through the county for the year!). We drove up to Omak 
with a stop in Ephrata for dinner and got to bed early. 


Our Saturday was mostly spent on roads above (west of) Sinkahekin road, where 
we started the morning with two life birds for me: American Three-toed 
Woodpecker and Spruce Grouse. The Spruce Grouse family (8 total - seven females 
and a subadult male) were very easy company, walking alongside us on the path. 
While watching them we heard one of two flyovers of Pine Grosbeak for the trip, 
although we never got a visual on any birds. More hunting on this beautiful but 
surprisingly quiet day gave us some Boreal Chickadees, also unseen but calling 
distinctively in a mixed flock with Mountain Chickadees. 


It was a good day for grouse overall, as we had a Dusky Grouse in the road 
early in the morning, and a Ruffed Grouse giving us amazing looks in the 
evening in the Okanogan Highlands. We went in search of Great Grey Owl, and all 
heard faint calls for Great Grey and Long-eared, although the closest owl was 
an agitated Northern Saw-whet Owl. 


Fog on Slate Peak on Sunday may have been the reason we dipped on Ptarmigan and 
Gray-crowned Rosy-finches, but we had Spruce Grouse and Sooty Grouse on the 
road on the way up. A side trip into Whatcom County from Harts Pass gave us 
some great looks at Golden Eagles as well. 


Overall it was a great trip, and my first serious trip up to high elevation in 
Eastern Washington. Khanh and Kevin were awesome companions on the trip, and I 
learned a lot about the birds, their habits and their habitat. 


Happy birding!

-Tim Brennan
Renton

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Subject: the most unusual fishing partner anyone has ever had
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:19:09 +0100
hey tweeters,

here's a video (that includes lots of thumb shots) of a lone fisherman near
Nanoose BC who was discovered by a juvenile bald eagle, "swimming" far from
land. the video is interesting and the bird, although malnourished, is
doing well at the last report:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qiOaqs9qnt8&feature=youtu.be

cheers,

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
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Subject: RE: PIX --- Re: Ft Vanc Acorn Woodpeckers YES 3:30 ...
From: Rob Conway <robin_birder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 07:35:34 +0000
As soon as I saw the post I rushed over and found the bird about 4:15. I think 
there may be more than one as I am sure I heard a second bird calling while I 
was observing the first. A state first for me and a real upbeat bird as it 
reminded me of the thousands of these clowns we had everywhere while I was 
growing up in the Sierra Nevada foothills and going to school at Stanford where 
there was a 30+ year study of the birds and their social behavior (they lived 
in and used as granaries the thousands of palm trees on the campus. 


Rob Conway 
Camas, WA
45.58N 122.44W - elevation 310 ft.
robin_birder AT hotmail.com

 



> Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 19:04:15 -0700
> To: pointers AT pacifier.com; portland-area-birds AT googlegroups.com; 
tweeters AT u.washington.edu 

> From: pointers AT pacifier.com
> CC: 
> Subject: [Tweeters] PIX --- Re: Ft Vanc Acorn Woodpeckers YES 3:30 ...
> 
> 
> hi ... pix from my Sony superzoom ... enjoy, Lyn
> 
> my best shot ... this may be a different bird than the next two images ...
> 
http://northwestbirding.com/Images14Oct/vancouver_acorn_woodpecker_10-16-14.jpg 

> 
> side view of the head ... same bird as image below ...
> 
http://northwestbirding.com/Images14Oct/vancouver_acorn_woodpecker_head_10-16-14.jpg 

> 
> front of head ... a juvenile ??? ... male or female ??? ... wondering 
> because of the red spotting between the red top of head and the white 
> front of head ... Ryan Abe got much better pictures of the head 
> markings ... this was my only shot ...
> 
http://northwestbirding.com/Images14Oct/vancouver_acorn_woodpecker_head_10-16-14_B.jpg 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> At 04:47 PM 10/16/2014, Lyn Topinka wrote:
> >hi all ... the two Acorn Woodpeckers were still at Fort Vancouver at 
> >3:30 ... however we had to wait for over an hour for them to fly 
> >back into the area ... there is a big oak a bit south and slightly 
> >west of the Gazebo ... they seem to like that ... we also saw them 
> >in the pines by the barracks and the smaller oaks south of the big 
> >oak ... Jen S who was there before we arrived also saw them in the 
> >area of the big pines east of this big oak/gazebo area ... thanks 
> >Cindy Mc for finding them ... I didn't have my good camera gear with 
> >me but I still got respectible shots with my superzoom ... MUCH 
> >better shots snyways than my previous digiscoped attempts at the 
> >granary tree in Lyle (grin) ...
> >
> >Lyn
> >
> >p.s. ... and thanks to Gene who first spotted the woodpeckers flying 
> >back in and came RUNNING over to the rest of us who were slowly 
> >ambling around checking trees waaayyyy to the east ...
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >Lyn Topinka
> >Vancouver, Wa,
> >NorthwestJourney.com
> >NorthwestBirding.com
> >ColumbiaRiverImages.com
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Lyn Topinka,
> NorthwestJourney.com
> NorthwestBirding.com
> ColumbiaRiverImages.com
> 
> _______________________________________________
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> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Neah Bay: Shearwaters
From: Nigel Ball <nigelj.ball AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 22:05:20 -0700
Hi
Well, we hit Cape Flattery when there were strong winds from the Pacific (
I lost my Islay cap .

But on the positive side, there were several hundred SOOTY/ SORT-TAILED
SHEARWATERS of which I was confident that three were Sooty and perhaps one
was Short-tailed (an identification rate of under 1%...), nine +
PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATERS (with varying degrees of duskiness to underwing, a
feature that I had not thought about before) and 1 possible MANX - looked
great for that species (blackish above, clearly smaller than sooty,
reasonably gleaming white below, and very shearwatery flight with
occasional more rapid wing beats. But distant and late in the year...

Many hundreds HEERMAN'S GULLS of which none had white wing patches. Back in
the day, large gulls and especially darker ones such as Heerman's had about
a 0.5% incidence of white patches. It occurred to me that it is many years
since I've seen such a bird. Do they still exist, or am I less observant?

A very obliging  PALM WARBLER just outside the restaurant and yet another
PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER (but no Sooties) from the Gray Whale (3) observation
place just east of the Nation boundary.

Cheers,
Nigel
-- 
Nigel Ball
nigelj.ball AT gmail.com
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Subject: Re: Late Osprey sighting
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 21:43:56 -0700
I have not seen any osprey recently. Is migration by osprey and other birds 
driven by temperature or the ratio of daylight to darkness hours? 


 
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA


On Sunday, October 19, 2014 9:33 PM, Mark  wrote:
 


 
Tweeters -
While coming into Seattle early afternoon on Friday 10/10, i was shocked to see 
an Osprey just north of the West Seattle bridge while on 99. Has anyone else 
seen Osprey around this late in the year? I guess, considering the 
record-breaking warmth we had this year might be a factor. I was clearly 
expecting that all Ospreys would be either already south, or at least on their 
way. 


Regards,
--Mark
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