Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
The Tweeters List

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Friday, September 19 at 01:30 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Lazuli Bunting,©Mimi Hoppe Wolf

18 Sep Hoquaim STP Sharp-tailed Sandpiper continues [Brad Waggoner ]
18 Sep re: Owls on the Offensive [Dianna Moore ]
18 Sep Owls on the offensive [Jack Stephens ]
19 Sep Re: getting late for lingering Rufous Hummingbirds? ["Wilson Cady" ]
18 Sep Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2014-09-18 ["Michael Hobbs" ]
18 Sep A smart Steller's Jay at Lake Joy [Hank ]
18 Sep Adult female peregrine, Island Girl, Heading South Again [Bud Anderson ]
18 Sep getting late for lingering Rufous Hummingbirds? []
18 Sep Juvenile Black Oystercatcher being fed at Semiahmoo [Hank ]
18 Sep Re: Bad Photo ID Help [Bob ]
18 Sep Re: What to do with a dead bird? [Dennis Paulson ]
18 Sep Re: What to do with a dead bird [Jeffrey Bryant ]
18 Sep Bad Photo ID Help []
18 Sep RFI - Woodpecker & Ptarmigan [Ted ]
18 Sep Great-horned and Barred Owls calling at Lake Joy [Crockett/Gibbins ]
18 Sep Skagit Ruff Continues [Carol Riddell ]
17 Sep The Ides of September [Jeff Gibson ]
17 Sep Re: What to do with a dead bird? [Kelly Cassidy ]
16 Aug birding the BIG SKY MONTANA ["Ruth Sullivan" ]
24 Aug birding the BIG SKY MONTANA ["Ruth Sullivan" ]
17 Sep RE: What to do with a dead bird? ["McComb Gardens" ]
17 Sep Re: What to do with a dead bird? ["Robert C. Faucett" ]
17 Sep RE: What to do with a dead bird? [Steve Compton scompton1251 ]
17 Sep Red-hot birding Skagit County Sept 14-16: strange cowbird posted to flickr [Scott ]
17 Sep What to do with a dead bird? [Daniel Mroz ]
17 Sep Coastal Birding Monday-Tuesday ["Michael Hobbs" ]
17 Sep Sootys abound / Caryn / Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler ]
16 Sep Ruff (Skagit Co.) and American Avocet (Island Co.) still there on Sept. 15 ["Wayne Weber" ]
16 Sep Ruff relocated Wylie Slough ["Charles Desilets" ]
16 Sep Brown Booby [Sue Connell ]
16 Sep Hoquiam STP Sharp-tailed Sandpiper [Brad Waggoner ]
16 Sep re: Brown Booby [Dianna Moore ]
16 Sep BROWN BOOBY seen and photographed off Fraser River mouth, September 13 ["Wayne Weber" ]
16 Sep Clams CAN take revenge ! they can strike Back rickswan@telus.net Delta BC ["rickswan" ]
16 Sep angel burn update [ ]
16 Sep Chestnut-sided Warbler [blabar ]
15 Sep Report from Reifel Refuge and Iona, BC ["Rachel Lawson" ]
15 Sep Potholes Semi-Pelagic results ["Mike & MerryLynn" ]
15 Sep Baffling - Sooty Shearwaters/ Long Beach / Caryn/Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler ]
15 Sep berries to bugs in Battle Ground [Jim Danzenbaker ]
15 Sep Chestnut-sided Warbler near Yakima-15 September ["Andy Stepniewski" ]
15 Sep Re: Wylie Game Range Ruff continuing [AnnMarie Wood ]
15 Sep Olympia-area buddy wanted to go see Sooty Shearwaters at Ocean City or Ocean Shores ["Wendy Tanowitz" ]
15 Sep Wylie Game Range Ruff continuing [Karen Wosilait ]
15 Sep For Yakima birders- interesting warbler seen late Saturday afternoon near brush piles between Arboretum and river [william boyington ]
15 Sep White-headed and Black-backed Woodpecker search []
15 Sep Frenchman's Bar Co Park, Clark Co, WA [Bob ]
15 Sep Frenchman's Bar Co Park, Clark Co, WA [Bob ]
15 Sep Vaux's Swift migration [Larry Schwitters ]
15 Sep Gray's Harbor bonanza, Townsend's Solitaire, Cassin's Auklet, other special birds ["barry " ]
15 Sep Re: I quit [Nigel Ball ]
14 Sep Whidbey Island American Avocet [Rick Taylor ]
14 Sep RE: Sooty Shearwaters migrating off the coast [Diane Yorgason-Quinn ]
14 Sep Tenino FOF sparrows ["Paul Hicks" ]
14 Sep Game Range birds Skagit [Gary Bletsch ]
14 Sep Ocean Shores this weekend [Jeffrey Bryant ]
14 Sep Wylie Game Range - No Little Blue but Ruff and Lewis WP Consolation [Blair Bernson ]
14 Sep Sooty Shearwaters is consensus [Caryn Schutzler ]
14 Sep Sooty Shearwaters migrating off the coast ["Wendy Tanowitz" ]
14 Sep Wylie Game Range Little Blue Heron and Ruff ["Doug Schurman" ]
14 Sep bewick's wren [Jennifer DeSelle ]
14 Sep Swift Night Out ["Diann MacRae" ]
14 Sep Long Beach / Amazing Streaming of Birds (Caryn/Wedgwood) [Caryn Schutzler ]
13 Sep Re: I quit [Joel Haas ]
13 Sep I quit ["Pete Fahey" ]
14 Sep coast birding [Marv Breece ]
13 Sep Skagit sparrows [Gary Bletsch ]
13 Sep Stilt Sandpiper Hoquiam [Pamela Girres ]
13 Sep Re: Nisqually NWR Green Herons [Jason Hernandez ]
13 Sep Skagit birds today [Scott ]
13 Sep Skagit Co birds [Steve Giles ]
13 Sep Summer of the Sapsucker | Union Bay Watch | [Larry Hubbell ]
13 Sep BirdNote - last week, and the week of Sept. 14, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
13 Sep B&W warbler still at Washtucna ["Randy Hill" ]
13 Sep Common Loon Feeding at Birch Bay State Park ["Hank.Heiberg" ]
12 Sep Re: Nisqually NWR Green Herons [Bill Anderson ]

Subject: Hoquaim STP Sharp-tailed Sandpiper continues
From: Brad Waggoner <wagtail24 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 23:02:13 -0700
Hi All,

The lovely Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at Hoquiam STP continued this 
afternoon. The Stilt Sandpiper was still there along with a Pectoral 
Sandpiper, one juv. Short-billed Dowitcher and two juv. Long-billed 
Dowitcher - all in the nw. corner of the east pond near the "mallard 
roost".

Cheers and good birding,
Brad Waggoner
Bainbridge Island, Washington
mailto:wagtail24 AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: re: Owls on the Offensive
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 22:46:35 -0700
>From Seattle Audubon's Bird Web:

"Great Horned Owls are early nesters and begin calling in courtship in
early winter."
and
"Both parents feed and tend the young for several months, often as late as
September or October."
and
"Barred Owls are monogamous and form long-term pair bonds. These bonds are
maintained throughout the year, and pairs may defend their territories
year-round...."

So the GHO's are still tending their young...and Barred Owls defend their
territory year-round.

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Owls on the offensive
From: Jack Stephens <jstephens62 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 21:32:14 -0700
I have had two non-birders ask me why owls are diving at, and 
occasionally hitting, people walking through woodland areas. These are 
two different locations, on Whidbey Island and in Mukilteo. I am not 
sure what species, by report they are large so that would imply either 
Barred or Great Horned. What puzzles me is that it is happening at this 
time of year. Nest defense seems the obvious reason, but why would this 
be occurring now, long after the young have presumably fledged? Could it 
be they were inspired by late-night Hitchcock reruns? Could this be ARAB 
(Autumnal Recrudescence of Amatory Behavior)? Any information is welcome.

Jack Stephens
Edmonds, WA
jstephens62 AT comcast.net
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Re: getting late for lingering Rufous Hummingbirds?
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 03:59:34 GMT
Our last Rufous Hummingbirds, in western Skamania County, were two juvenile 
males on Sept. 14th. Wilson Cady 

Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Pterodroma AT aol.com
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] getting late for lingering Rufous Hummingbirds?
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 19:50:31 -0400


One immature male Rufous Hummingbird is still hanging on and doesn't seem to 
show any signs of leaving anytime soon. It likes to perch on the top of the 
tallest crocosomia now dried seed head which is a perfect perch actually from 
which to fend off the Anna's and defend it's favorite little feeder only about 
3 feet away and just hangs out there all day long, day after day after day. 
It's getting late for Rufous and I haven't had one this late into September for 
a long long time although the latest date ever over here (Bellevue-Eastgate) 
was October 4 several years ago, so it will be fun to see how long this guy 
might last. The last time I saw an adult male here was way waay back on June 
28, but way more female/immature types persisted in much larger numbers than 
usual for this location through mid-August after which just the occasional 
sighting and this one immature male which first showed up a couple weeks ago. 
Anyone else still seeing Rufous Hummingbirds around? Richard RowlettBellevue 
(Eastgate), WA 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2014-09-18
From: "Michael Hobbs" <birdmarymoor AT frontier.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 20:24:16 -0700
Tweets – It was dark and misty this morning, though we didn’t get rain or 
even drizzle, really. But it was dark, and it was QUIET, especially for the 
first couple of hours. Also rather steamy and moist, with temps in the 60’s, 
and humidity that you could practically wring out of the air. 


The big highlight were 3 JAEGERS that flew past the Lake Platform heading 
north. This wasn’t a total surprise, since we had a Jaeger fly north on the 
very same day of September, back in 2008. Our consensus was that today’s 
birds were LONG-TAILED JAEGERS, for they looked slim and had very long tails. 
Last year, we had a Long-tailed Jaeger on August 29th for our only other Jaeger 
sighting at the park. 


Other highlights:

Common Loon            One WELL out on the lake – First of fall
Osprey                        Still 2 over the lake
Bald Eagle                  Adult at lake, after 2 week summer vacation
Wilson’s Snipe           Again, 2 below weir
American Kestrel       1 over mansion area, 11:20 – First of fall
Merlin                        1 perched near mansion, 11:20 – First of fall
Willow Flycatcher      Last of the year? 1-2
Bl.-thr. Gray Warbler Grace saw 1, south end of Dog Meadow
HOUSE SPARROW      One at Compost Piles – First for 2014

In the last two years, we’ve had as many sightings of Jaegers (2) as House 
Sparrows :) 


For the day, 58 species. Misses today included Green Heron, Vaux’s Swift, 
Barn Swallow, and Yellow-rumped Warbler. 


I believe we’re up to 152 species for the year.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor AT frontier.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: A smart Steller's Jay at Lake Joy
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 18:28:20 -0700
There is a Steller's Jay in our yard that has discovered that if it sits on a 
particular forsythia branch, the branch lowers to the feeder providing a nice 
perch. It has done this several times. (Since I can't tell one Steller's Jay 
from the others, I suppose that more than one jay could be doing this.) 


> Video:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15260109496/
> 
Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, WA
hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
> 
> Sent from my iPad
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Adult female peregrine, Island Girl, Heading South Again
From: Bud Anderson <falconresearch AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 17:58:30 -0700
She left her nesting area on Baffin Island yesterday, once again heading
for Chile to hopefully complete the southbound leg of her sixth
transcontinental migration with a GPS satellite transmitter.

You can follow her on this journey at www.frg.org. Select maps and Island
Girl to see her position three times a day during the next 6-8 weeks via
Google Earth.

Enjoy...

Bud Anderson
Falcon Research Group
Box 248
Bow, WA 98232
(360) 757-1911
falconresearch AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: getting late for lingering Rufous Hummingbirds?
From: Pterodroma AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 19:50:31 -0400
 
One immature male Rufous Hummingbird is still hanging on and  doesn't seem 
to show any signs of leaving anytime soon.  It likes to perch  on the top of 
the tallest crocosomia now dried seed head which is a  perfect perch 
actually from which to fend off the Anna's and defend it's favorite little 
feeder 

only about 3 feet away and just hangs out there all day  long, day after 
day after day.  It's getting late for Rufous and I haven't  had one this late 
into September for a long long time although the latest date  ever over here 
(Bellevue-Eastgate) was October 4 several years ago, so it  will be fun to 
see how long this guy might last.  The last time I saw an  adult male here 
was way waay back on June 28, but way more female/immature types  persisted 
in much larger numbers than usual for this  location through mid-August after 
which just the occasional sighting  and this one immature male which first 
showed up a couple weeks ago.   Anyone else still seeing Rufous Hummingbirds 
around?
 
Richard Rowlett
Bellevue (Eastgate), WA_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Juvenile Black Oystercatcher being fed at Semiahmoo
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 16:30:56 -0700
Video:
> 
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15222083875/
> 
> 
> On a personal note I had cataract surgery in my left eye yesterday and I went 
from not being able to read the big E in the eye chart with my left eye to 
20/15 vision. Now I can actually see birds without using binoculars rather than 
just seeing blobs. I can't imagine what it will be like when down the road I 
get my right eye done. 


Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, WA
hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Re: Bad Photo ID Help
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 15:07:35 -0700
Horned lark

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my iPad

> On Sep 18, 2014, at 12:47, jacknolan62 AT comcast.net wrote:
> 
> Hey Folks,
> Just curious if anyone can confirm this bird for me. I've seen it twice this 
week over at Fir Crest Hospital in Shoreline. Fairly certain it is a female or 
immature Horned Lark. 

> If you know your Larks, here is a bad photo.  What do you think?
> https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B53RG2aM8iIMcFF6SExrZnRvRk0/edit?usp=sharing
> Thanks in advance.
> Jack Nolan
> Shoreline, WA.
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Re: What to do with a dead bird?
From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 13:38:58 -0700
I just wanted to point out that anywhere from tens of thousands to hundreds of 
thousands of birds die in Washington state every year, so there is no lack of 
material for decomposers. In other words, hopefully not too many bacteria or 
fungi will be robbed of a meal if a specimen is picked up and labeled and 
bagged and frozen. Each specimen of a bird (or any other animal or plant), no 
matter how common the species, furnishes data that can be used in many 
different kinds of studies, some of them benefitting conservation, so we in the 
museum world are very grateful when people salvage these specimens and save 
them for us. 


Dennis Paulson, Emeritus Director
Slater Museum of Natural History
University of Puget Sound
Tacoma, WA 98416
http://www.pugetsound.edu/academics/academic-resources/slater-museum/


On Sep 18, 2014, at 12:00 PM, tweeters-request AT mailman1.u.washington.edu wrote:

> Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 15:29:28 -0700
> From: Kelly Cassidy 
> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] What to do with a dead bird?
> To: tweeters 
> Message-ID: <63788D6A-C919-4999-992F-E38CC45FC177 AT icloud.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
> 
> Ideally, if you plan to take it to a museum, double bag it in tightly-closed 
Zip-loc Freezer bags (to help prevent dehydration in a frost-free freezer). 
Between the 1st and 2nd bag, put a clearly written label with date found, 
specific location, county, state, and collector name. 

> 
> If you're not going to take it to a museum, toss it under a bush or something 
and let it be recycled. 

> 
> Kelly Cassidy
> Pullman, WA
> 
>> On Sep 17, 2014, at 3:09 PM, McComb Gardens  wrote:
>> 
>> And stick it in the freezer?
>> 
>> Wings,
>> Jane
>> 
>> 
>> Neil W. Burkhardt
>> Jane Stewart
>> 121 Solar Lane
>> Sequim, WA  98382-8324
>> info AT mccombgardens.com
>> 360-681-2827
>> 
>> 
>> From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Robert C. 
Faucett 

>> Sent: Wednesday, September 17, 2014 2:55 PM
>> To: Steve Compton scompton1251
>> Cc: TWEETERS; Daniel Mroz; Robert C. Faucett
>> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] What to do with a dead bird?
>> 
>> Put it in a ziploc bag along with a note about when & where you found it. 
Then take it to a museum! 

>> 
>> 
>> --
>> Robert C. Faucett
>> Collections Manager
>> Ornithology
>> Burke Museum
>> Box 353010
>> University of Washington
>> Seattle, WA 98195-3010
>> Office: 206-543-1668
>> Cell: 206-619-5569
>> Fax: 206-685-3039
>> rfaucett AT uw.edu
>> www.washington.edu/burkemuseum
>> http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/collections/ornithology/index.php
>> http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/collections/genetic/index.php
>> 
>> On Sep 17, 2014, at 2:52 PM, Steve Compton scompton1251 
 wrote: 

>> 
>> 
>> Daniel,
>> 
>> Natural, remove if necessary. Possession is technically illegal. Just leave 
it or put it under a bush. 

>> 
>> Steve Compton
>> Visiting Seattle from Greenville, SC
>> 
>> 
>> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -------- Original message --------
>> From: Daniel Mroz  
>> Date: 09/17/2014 2:38 PM (GMT-08:00) 
>> To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu 
>> Subject: [Tweeters] What to do with a dead bird? 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> What is the appropriate way to take care of a dead bird? Leave it for other 
animals and insects? Throw it away? Call a vet? 

>> 
>> Thanks




_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Re: What to do with a dead bird
From: Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 14:43:49 -0700
While dropping off a Swainson's Thrush to Rob Faucett at the Burke today, I got 
another little helpful hint: when you jot down the time and exact location 
where the dead bird was found, it's best to do it in pencil. Apparently, ink is 
not so predictable in the freeze-and-thaw process as graphite! 


jeff Bryant
seattle
jbryant_68 AT yahoo_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Bad Photo ID Help
From: jacknolan62 AT comcast.net
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 19:46:23 +0000 (UTC)
Hey Folks,

Just curious if anyone can confirm this bird for me. I've seen it twice this 
week over at Fir Crest Hospital in Shoreline. Fairly certain it is a female or 
immature Horned Lark. 


If you know your Larks, here is a bad photo.  What do you think?

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B53RG2aM8iIMcFF6SExrZnRvRk0/edit?usp=sharing

Thanks in advance.

Jack Nolan
Shoreline, WA._______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: RFI - Woodpecker & Ptarmigan
From: Ted <tgkenefick AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 11:39:07 -0700
Hi Tweeters,
 
I am headed up to Okanogan County this weekend with several target species 
including White-headed Woodpecker and White-tailed Ptarmigan. It has been a 
number of years since I have crossed paths with either of these characters. 

 
On the drive up, I plan on stopping by Sleeping Lady Resort and would so 
appreciate any information on specific locations to look for woodpeckers on the 
property there (I have searched before with no luck). 

 
I will be in the Cameron Lake area as well and I recall that there is a 
population towards the northern end of Cameron Lake road. I would be most 
grateful for any specific locations here. 

 
I plan on finishing up the weekend at Harts Pass/Slate Peak and will be 
looking to photograph White-tailed Ptarmigan. Any specific areas here or is it 
the usual program for ptarm of just hiking and searching? 

 
I am on Tweeters digest so please reply directly.
 
Many, many thanks in advance!
 
Cheers and Good Birding,
Ted Kenefick
Maple Leaf, Seattle
tgkenefick AT msn.com 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Great-horned and Barred Owls calling at Lake Joy
From: Crockett/Gibbins <binary_star85 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 10:04:22 -0700
Hi Tweets,
At 3:45 this morning, I heard the loud hooting of a Great-horned Owl. I opened 
the window to listen. The sound seemed to be coming from the Northwest, across 
the lake. After a few minutes, I heard a Barred Owl calling from the North. 
That bird sounded more distant. 


I've lived here seventeen months and haven't heard an owl, so I was excited! 
Then the skeptic in me began to wonder if someone might be getting an early 
start (Big Day, perhaps) and using playback, such that one of the owls was an 
imposter. Was anyone out here this morning? If so, which owl was real? Or maybe 
I just got lucky! 


Thanks,
Paula Crockett
Carnation, WA_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Skagit Ruff Continues
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 07:20:48 -0700
A number of birders watched the juvenile male Ruff yesterday, late morning, at 
the Wylie Slough Skagit WMA, from the dike along the boat launch parking lot. A 
Sora was in the cattails just behind the Ruff and its companion yellowlegs. The 
Sora would come in and out, offering good views. So today is still likely for 
Ruff viewing. 


Carol Riddell
Edmonds, Wa_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: The Ides of September
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 17:08:28 -0700
I spent the Ides of September on a day trip to Sequim. 
For somebody like me, who hasn't traveled too far too often in the past several 
decades, going to weird ol' Sequim was a real thrill. I haven't been anywhere 
west of Port Townsend for about 10 years! Tempus fugit, and all that. 

Yup, Sequim is sort of weird - a dry spot in a wet area (in the rainshadow of 
the Olympics). A real change of scene for a Puget Sounder - with the big views 
of the Strait, and the different perspective of the dry-ish northern Olympics 
splayed out to the south - real interesting. 

After doing an errand in Sequim, I bopped out to Dungeness Spit to check out 
the scene. It was almost hot, and nearly dead calm, sort of unusual for such a 
windswept place - the evidence of that nicely shown by wind sculpted spruce and 
fir on the headlands. Lots of Olympic-sized driftwood laying around. What ever 
water birds there were to be seen - not many- could be spotted from a long way 
off because the Strait was like a bathtub. Few gulls (Heerman's and 
Glaucous-winged), some ducks too far out to ID. It was nice to see two Common 
Loons up close to shore, and a few Red-necked Grebes. 

I was gladdened to see Oregon Tiger Beetles all over the beach because I find 
the zippy things beautiful and interesting. Since they don't allow a close 
approach, generally, close-focusing binoculars are handy for getting closer 
looks at their iridescent colors. Tiger beetles are often noted as an 
"indicator species" for various reasons, one being their penchant for specific 
habitats - these are bugs with standards. A place with Tiger beetles is usually 
an interesting place for a naturalist, or so I've found. 

One thing that has puzzled me all spring and summer, is the dearth of Tiger 
Beetles on the dunes and sandy shores of Pt. Wilson in Port Townsend - I've 
been looking for them for months now in that seemingly great Tiger Beetle 
habitat. Nada. Wonder what that indicates? Another nature mystery. 

Walking the beach west of the spit, for the first time, I reveled in the quiet 
loons, zippy beetles, and zippy geology. The secret to the spit's success (it 
is pretty big as spit's go) is a long stretch of highly unstable sandy/gravelly 
bluffs nearly as long as the spit itself. This was geology on the move. Geology 
for the impatient. 

Walking down the beach below these bluffs for about a half mile, I was 
entertained by many mini landslides in process - dust clouds wafting from 
active falling sediments, and steadily building alluvial fans and cones - like 
watching a series of hourglasses measuring geologic time in a hurry. It was 
pretty cool - watching the whole slope in the process of hitting the beach. 

Ain't nature grand: here was a totally elemental mining operation - no 
explosives, trucks, machinery - just weather, gravity, and a conveyor belt of 
nearshore currents to create a wonderful spit. 

Only a real bird-brain would walk closely under these decaying slopes - and one 
did, a brightly plumaged Savannah Sparrow that was nabbing bugs in the shadows 
of a steep crumbling spot. "Better be careful buddy" I thought, "geological 
time is flying!" 

Driving back through Sequim I kept my eyes peeled for Garry Oaks, as I'd heard 
there were some around here - and I did spot a nice grove of 'em right near 
downtown, along with a few single specimens. Always nice to see a native oak 
around. Sometime I'll come back for a better look. 

Jeff GibsonIn the Rainshadow,Sequim Wa 
  		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Re: What to do with a dead bird?
From: Kelly Cassidy <highsteppe AT icloud.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 15:29:28 -0700
Ideally, if you plan to take it to a museum, double bag it in tightly-closed 
Zip-loc Freezer bags (to help prevent dehydration in a frost-free freezer). 
Between the 1st and 2nd bag, put a clearly written label with date found, 
specific location, county, state, and collector name. 


If you're not going to take it to a museum, toss it under a bush or something 
and let it be recycled. 


Kelly Cassidy
Pullman, WA

> On Sep 17, 2014, at 3:09 PM, McComb Gardens  wrote:
> 
> And stick it in the freezer?
>  
> Wings,
> Jane
>  
>  
> Neil W. Burkhardt
> Jane Stewart
> 121 Solar Lane
> Sequim, WA  98382-8324
> info AT mccombgardens.com
> 360-681-2827
>  
>  
> From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Robert C. 
Faucett 

> Sent: Wednesday, September 17, 2014 2:55 PM
> To: Steve Compton scompton1251
> Cc: TWEETERS; Daniel Mroz; Robert C. Faucett
> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] What to do with a dead bird?
>  
> Put it in a ziploc bag along with a note about when & where you found it. 
Then take it to a museum! 

>  
>  
> --
> Robert C. Faucett
> Collections Manager
> Ornithology
> Burke Museum
> Box 353010
> University of Washington
> Seattle, WA 98195-3010
> Office: 206-543-1668
> Cell: 206-619-5569
> Fax: 206-685-3039
> rfaucett AT uw.edu
> www.washington.edu/burkemuseum
> http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/collections/ornithology/index.php
> http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/collections/genetic/index.php
>  
> On Sep 17, 2014, at 2:52 PM, Steve Compton scompton1251 
 wrote: 

> 
> 
> Daniel,
>  
> Natural, remove if necessary. Possession is technically illegal. Just leave 
it or put it under a bush. 

>  
> Steve Compton
> Visiting Seattle from Greenville, SC
>  
>  
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
> 
> 
> 
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Daniel Mroz  
> Date: 09/17/2014 2:38 PM (GMT-08:00) 
> To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu 
> Subject: [Tweeters] What to do with a dead bird? 
> 
> 
> 
> What is the appropriate way to take care of a dead bird? Leave it for other 
animals and insects? Throw it away? Call a vet? 

> 
> Thanks
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>  
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: birding the BIG SKY MONTANA
From: "Ruth Sullivan" <godwit513 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 18:22:48 -0700
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: birding the BIG SKY MONTANA
From: "Ruth Sullivan" <godwit513 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 18:27:11 -0700
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: RE: What to do with a dead bird?
From: "McComb Gardens" <info AT mccombgardens.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 15:09:57 -0700
And stick it in the freezer?

 

Wings,

Jane

 

 

Neil W. Burkhardt

Jane Stewart

121 Solar Lane

Sequim, WA  98382-8324

  info AT mccombgardens.com

360-681-2827

 

 

From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Robert C.
Faucett
Sent: Wednesday, September 17, 2014 2:55 PM
To: Steve Compton scompton1251
Cc: TWEETERS; Daniel Mroz; Robert C. Faucett
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] What to do with a dead bird?

 

Put it in a ziploc bag along with a note about when & where you found it.
Then take it to a museum! 

 

 

--

Robert C. Faucett

Collections Manager

Ornithology

Burke Museum

Box 353010

University of Washington

Seattle, WA 98195-3010

Office: 206-543-1668

Cell: 206-619-5569

Fax: 206-685-3039

rfaucett AT uw.edu  

www.washington.edu/burkemuseum  

http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/collections/ornithology/index.php

http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/collections/genetic/index.php

 

On Sep 17, 2014, at 2:52 PM, Steve Compton scompton1251
 > wrote:





Daniel,

 

Natural, remove if necessary. Possession is technically illegal. Just leave
it or put it under a bush.

 

Steve Compton

Visiting Seattle from Greenville, SC

 

 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone




-------- Original message --------
From: Daniel Mroz  > 
Date: 09/17/2014 2:38 PM (GMT-08:00) 
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu   
Subject: [Tweeters] What to do with a dead bird? 




What is the appropriate way to take care of a dead bird? Leave it for other
animals and insects? Throw it away? Call a vet?

Thanks

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu  
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Re: What to do with a dead bird?
From: "Robert C. Faucett" <rfaucett AT uw.edu>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 21:55:13 +0000
Put it in a ziploc bag along with a note about when & where you found it. Then 
take it to a museum! 



--
Robert C. Faucett
Collections Manager
Ornithology
Burke Museum
Box 353010
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-3010
Office: 206-543-1668
Cell: 206-619-5569
Fax: 206-685-3039
rfaucett AT uw.edu
www.washington.edu/burkemuseum
http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/collections/ornithology/index.php
http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/collections/genetic/index.php

On Sep 17, 2014, at 2:52 PM, Steve Compton scompton1251 
> wrote: 


Daniel,

Natural, remove if necessary. Possession is technically illegal. Just leave it 
or put it under a bush. 


Steve Compton
Visiting Seattle from Greenville, SC


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone



-------- Original message --------
From: Daniel Mroz 
> 

Date: 09/17/2014 2:38 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] What to do with a dead bird?



What is the appropriate way to take care of a dead bird? Leave it for other 
animals and insects? Throw it away? Call a vet? 


Thanks

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: RE: What to do with a dead bird?
From: Steve Compton scompton1251 <scompton1251 AT charter.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:52:58 -0700
Daniel,

Natural, remove if necessary. Possession is technically illegal. Just leave it 
or put it under a bush. 


Steve Compton
Visiting Seattle from Greenville, SC


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Daniel Mroz  
Date: 09/17/2014  2:38 PM  (GMT-08:00) 
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu 
Subject: [Tweeters] What to do with a dead bird? 
 

What is the appropriate way to take care of a dead bird? Leave it for other 
animals and insects? Throw it away? Call a vet? 


Thanks_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Red-hot birding Skagit County Sept 14-16: strange cowbird posted to flickr
From: Scott <scottratkinson AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:53:05 -0700





Tweeters:
 
It's no secret that Fir Island has been great for birding lately. I went both 
yesterday and the 15th in search of the LITTLE BLUE HERON but had no luck. But 
on the 15th, about 3 pm, I had great looks at the juv. GRUFF (RUFF) before a N. 
HARRIER flew through. VIRGINIA RAILS seem uncommonly vocal throughout the 
marsh; on the 15th, I clearly heard a SORA give the whinny call as well. Less 
expected but also heard-only was a single EASTERN KINGBIRD call, out to the 
east of the south dike fork--in the vast sea of dead tree snags, and at the 
time there were no blackbird-starling conglomerations out there, believe it or 
not. On the 14th, after the previously-reported goodies were found at the 
Skagit WMA, I had a VESPER SPARROW and a late LAZULI BUNTING at the Bryson Rd. 
access of the Sauk Valley Rd, north of Arlington, and two N. PYGMY OWLS were 
heard about a mile up the Suiattle River Rd. nearby. 

 
On the 16th, I was able to photograph a male YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD well down 
the south dike from the main dike, and posted 

it to https://www.flickr.com/photos/14115261 AT N05/15084437340/in/photostream/. 
Amazingly, this was a singing bird, giving the very harsh, drawn-out "craw" 
note that is slightly downslurred. A ran into a couple that said they had 
counted three YELLOW-HEADEDS out there. I had another (a female) right along 
the main road close to the Hayton Preserve. Most of us have encountered the 
single YELLOW-HEADED west of the Cascades once or more, but has anyone ever had 
a singing bird in fall? A BANK SWALLOW was over Maupin Rd also, and other 
highlight was a high of 47 CINNAMON TEAL (all female/imm) at the Skagit Game 
Range. Judging from Tweeters and Ebird, I feel like we've never had so many 
BANK SWALLOWS reported in fall migration. 

 
But (possibly) the most interesting of all birds was an odd juv./imm. female 
COWBIRD that was very accommodating last night near the Jensen Access. This was 
a grubby bird with the countenance of an rat in the company of mice (HOUSE 
SPARROWS). Now, let it be said that there are plenty of BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS 
around, including a flock of 60+ near the north end of Wylie Rd. nearby 
yesterday. But this lone bird was with a small group of House Sparrows. Right 
at the 90-degree turn in the main road, where one goes straight to get to 
Jensen, there is a barn and a sign for the "Uff Da Shoppe" in Stanwood. The 
COWBIRD was on the ground here when I flushed it. When it flew I instantly 
thought "cowbird," but somehow something seemed a little off, and I found 
myself seeking photos... 

 
I am eager to hear from any of you in Tweeterland with an opinion about this 
bird. I have never seen a more thick-billed cowbird than this--added to which 
it seemed much larger than the House Sparrows it was with, on the order of 
Red-winged or even Brewer's Blackbird size. As shown on flickr (0060, 0063, 
0064): 

 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14115261 AT N05/15084437340/in/photostream/
 
this bird had a heavy build and the throat/neck area seemed ruff-like, but your 
opinion is encouraged. In flight the bird seemed cowbird-like but a bit heavier 
perhaps than with Brown-headed: 

 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14115261 AT N05/15084437340/in/photostream/
 I also intentionally lightened one photo to highlight what appeared to be a 
slightly paler supercilium. All are encouraged to comment. Scott AtkinsonLake 
Stevensmail to: scottratkinson AT hotmail.com 

 
 


 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: What to do with a dead bird?
From: Daniel Mroz <simplymrozthejew AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:38:15 -0700
What is the appropriate way to take care of a dead bird? Leave it for other
animals and insects? Throw it away? Call a vet?

Thanks_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Coastal Birding Monday-Tuesday
From: "Michael Hobbs" <birdmarymoor AT frontier.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:50:24 -0700
Tweets – I went out to Ocean Shores, Westport, and down to Tokeland over the 
last two days, chasing some of the birds reported recently. I was able to find 
many, but by no means all, of the goodies. Best birds were the ELEGANT TERNS in 
Westport. 


Monday, at the Hoquiam STP, I was unable to find the STILT SANDPIPER on my 
morning visit, but found it in the afternoon. 


At the Point Brown Jetty in Ocean Shores, there were still three WANDERING 
TATLERS on the rocks, as well as a single RUDDY TURNSTONE and two 
SANDERLINGS(!) amongst the many BLACK TURNSTONES well out on the jetty. 


At the Game Range, the RED-NECKED PHALAROPE was still present in the morning, 
though I did not see it when I returned in the afternoon. I struck out on 
Buff-breasted Sandpiper and Golden-Plovers. There were a huge number of 
AMERICAN PIPITS – probably a couple of hundred, as well as 1 or more LAPLAND 
LONGSPURS. In my afternoon visit, the number of SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS was 
astonishingly high – 75? 


I walked extensively at Damon Point, turning up little. Best bird was a 
breeding-plumage RED-THROATED LOON in close. 


Tuesday, I started at the Westport Marina, where there was a large roost of 
MARBLED GODWITS. On the wooden breakwater just behind the godwits, I found 
three ELEGANT TERNS. On the rock groins nearest Fisherman’s Wharf there were 
2-4 WANDERING TATLERS. 


At Bottle Beach, I heard a PACIFIC GOLDEN-PLOVER calling, but could not spot it 
amongst the hundreds of BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS. 


Off Grayland Beach, there were thousands of SOOTY SHEARWATERS. For miles and 
miles, they were sitting on the water a hundred yards off shore, and there was 
a steady stream of them moving south at a rate of several per second. I also 
had dozens of PACIFIC LOONS flying south mixed in. A lone WHIMBREL was a 
surprise addition to the stream. A few COMMON TERNS were flying around above. 


At Midway Beach, I flushed an AMERICAN BITTERN near the ponds. There were a 
handful of PECTORAL SANDPIPERS but I could not find a Sharp-tailed amongst 
them. AMERICAN PIPITS were also especially numerous, but that could be said 
about almost every location I visited. Probably 1000 pipits for the two days! 


Tokeland was fairly quiet at lowish tide, though I did have a LONG-BILLED 
CURLEW and ten WILLETS. 


In amongst the huge numbers of CALIFORNIA and HEERMAN’S GULLS at North Cove, 
I was able to find a HERRING GULL. 


== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor AT frontier.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Sootys abound / Caryn / Wedgwood
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 AT seanet.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 09:52:40 -0700
Tweeters - 

The morning fog has cleared and now seeing the Sooty's going in both directions 
in huge numbers!! Will miss watching this amazing phenomenon. It looks like 
bats coming out of a cave - birds everywhere. Now it looks as if a huge mass of 
them have settled down on the water. And now just nearly a black wall of birds 
in constant motion. 


Glad to have seen a few peeps last evening. Oysterville/Nachotta had many Blue 
Herons and a few peeps. The Beach Loop at Ledbetter Pt. (did not have our scope 
sadly) had heron, a few peeps and a huge flotilla of "ducks" (unidentified) - 
any idea what they might have been?? 


The Sooty's were such a great show. The "shear" numbers were as satisfying as 
seeing a hundred species (well, almost). 


Looking forward to seeing my hummers and towhees, etc.

Caryn / Wedgwood (via Long Beach)

Thanks again to all who gave me information on this most interesting species!! 
Near and far...;-)_______________________________________________ 

Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Ruff (Skagit Co.) and American Avocet (Island Co.) still there on Sept. 15
From: "Wayne Weber" <contopus AT telus.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 22:07:59 -0700
Tweeters,

 

Yesterday just after lunch, I decided to try for some of the rare birds
recently reported at the Skagit Wildlife Area near Conway. I arrived at
about 1 PM, and quickly met Rick Taylor and MaryFrances Mathis, who assured
me they had just seen the RUFF perched with yellowlegs on logs in the water,
near the second (boat launch) parking area. I drove over there in short
order, only to find that as I was driving, a PEREGRINE FALCON had attacked
and driven off nearly all the shorebirds. The falcon was still perched in a
dead tree nearby, and the only shorebirds I could see were a couple of
distant yellowlegs. The falcon remained at least 10 minutes before finally
flying off. Drat, I thought, I've missed the Ruff by a hair!  Apparently, no
one had seen the LEWIS'S WOODPECKER and LITTLE BLUE HERON that were there on
Saturday.

 

I decided to walk down the remaining dyke (west dyke), and it soon became
apparent that most of the shorebirds had resettled in several groups along
the water's edge farther south, although not all of them were easily
visible. The first couple of groups of yellowlegs and dowitchers did not
include the Ruff. However, a third group of shorebirds was perched on logs
and stumps just south of the junction of the main dyke and the new
(east-west) dyke, and careful scanning revealed the Ruff in the middle of
this group. After looking for a better viewing position farther down the
dyke, I got close and prolonged views of the Ruff, as did Michelle Barr of
Bellingham and Jim and Betsy Walker of Anacortes, who were also looking for
it. The $ AT !!*$#  Peregrine came back a couple of times, but did not flush
this group of birds, which stayed put close to the dyke. I also met a group
of about 8 birders including Dave Hutchinson and Marcus Roening, who also
got to see the Ruff. So it took awhile to track down the Ruff, but it was
there.

 

I am starting to get quite familiar with the looks of juvenile Ruffs. This
is the third one I have seen in 2 weeks, including one the previous day (!)
at Iona Island near Vancouver, and one in early September at the Reifel Bird
Sanctuary. Together with the Ruff(s?) at Ocean Shores, this has been a good
fall for Ruffs so far.

 

I then decided to head for Crockett Lake on Whidbey Island to see if I could
find the AMERICAN AVOCET found by Rick Taylor the previous day. Shortly
after I got to the east end of the lake, there it was, feeding by itself a
long way out in the shallow water, although it took a scope to get a good
view of the bird. I watched it from about 5:40 to 6 PM, and looked for but
did not see any other rare birds in the area.

 

Being a dedicated county lister, I was very pleased to find both the Ruff,
which was new for my Skagit County list, and the Avocet, new for my Island
County list. I am now closing in on 250 species lifetime in Skagit County
and 200 in Island County, although each new one gets harder.

 

Now, if they would just move Asotin County a bit closer to Vancouver, BC so
that I can augment my Asotin County list more easily!

 

Many thanks to everyone who reports their rare bird sightings on TWEETERS--
please keep those reports coming!

 

Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

contopus AT telus.net

 

 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Ruff relocated Wylie Slough
From: "Charles Desilets" <csdesilets AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 22:06:52 -0700
The Ruff previously reported being at the Main pond at Wylie Slough amongst
numerous Yellowlegs and Dowitchers  was relocated this morning about 10 AM,
Tuesday 9/16.  Good looks were seen for at least 30 minutes.  Pictures taken
but were of low quality due to the distance from the bird and sunlight
directly behind the bird.

 

Charles Desilets

Mukilteo
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Brown Booby
From: Sue Connell <sueconnell5 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 19:01:30 -0700
The booby that escaped WAS from Woodland Park Zoo.  He was never recovered.
 Wouldn't it be great if the recent sighting is the same bird?  If so, he
is obviously surviving well!!!_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Hoquiam STP Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
From: Brad Waggoner <wagtail24 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 18:46:49 -0700
Hi all,

This afternoon in the northwest corner of the east pond of the Hoquiam STP,
there was a Sharp-tailed Sandpiper in close proximity to the continuing
Stilt Sandpiper

Cheers and good birding,
Brad Waggoner
Bainbridge Island, Washington
Mailto:wagtail24 AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: re: Brown Booby
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 11:21:03 -0700
I remember there was an escapee from the zoo (not sure which one...Point
Defiance or Woodland Park)...was it ever recaptured, does anyone know? It
was the booby that landed on a fishing vessel in Willapa Bay and rode it
home to Westport, wound up with the rehabber in Aberdeen/Hoquiam, starred
at the shorebird festival that year, then went to the zoo.

If this is the same bird, what a story it has to tell!

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: BROWN BOOBY seen and photographed off Fraser River mouth, September 13
From: "Wayne Weber" <contopus AT telus.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 11:04:26 -0700
Birders,

 

I've just learned, through Jude Grass, that an adult BROWN BOOBY was seen
and photographed as it briefly perched in a fishing vessel just off the
Fraser River mouth on Saturday, September 13. We don't have permission to
post the photo anywhere yet, but it's a very good photo of an adult Brown
Booby. The photographer was Tom Forge, who was engaged in commercial fishing
when this bird flew in and landed on his boat!

 

This may be the same Brown Booby that was photographed on September 9th by
Gary Shugart from the Point Defiance-Tahlequah ferry just off Tacoma. Or
perhaps there are 2 or 3 Brown Boobies cruising the Salish Sea and vicinity?

 

Anyway, everyone in the area should be on the alert for more sightings of
boobies in the next few days!

 

Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

contopus AT telus.net

 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Clams CAN take revenge ! they can strike Back rickswan@telus.net Delta BC
From: "rickswan" <rickswan AT telus.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 09:22:34 -0700
 Clams CAN take revenge ! They can strike Back     rickswan AT telus.net Delta BC 

Sept.16th 2014 . Yesterday, Monday while at the NE corner of the Roberts bank 
Coal Port Causeway / Westshore Container Terminal , Delta BC . Not the Best 
place for Birders [ Lots of Heavy Truck Traffic ] but a good location to 
observe Caspian Tern Re Site Leg Bands . After a Peregrine swept the shoreline 
on the rising tide attempting to trap a few shorebirds [ Bairds,Pectorals, 
Westerns and Killdeer ] against the Rip Rap wall . The large flock of Gulls and 
a few terns took to the air . 

 But one smaller Ring Bill / Mute Gull caught my eye immediately !! It had 
Labored flight and ONE DROOPING LEG with of course a Clam Attached to the 
webbing . I grabbed my camera quickly turning it on as the Gull circled just 
overhead to capture My Forth such occurrence of CLAMS REVENGE !! BUT I had not 
changed the setting from the Previous Night and My camera was useless with a 
Night time Exposure time . 

 I watched as the hampered gull circled high enough to BARELY crest over the 
Electrical cables that Line the Length of the causeway to disappear to the West 
side of the causeway . Yet another victim of those crafty clams. I do have 
photographs of some of the Previous Occurrences but they are Buried in the 
computer somewhere 


April 30th 2011 Sat. 
This morning in front of the Pump House at Boundary Bay Metro Park the Beach 
Grove Lagoon area Tsawwassen Delta , B.C. . I saw a Bald Eagle in full pursuit 
of a shorebird ? Now this intrigued me to no end as the small shorebird was 
more then able to evade the Eagle by a succession of quick turns but the Eagle 
persisted ? Are what turned out to be a dunlin tired the Eagle and fortuitously 
the shore bird flew closer to the dyke and almost directly at me. I was able to 
see rapidly that something was suspended by one leg a large object that turned 
out to be a CLAM shell !!! 

This is the THIRD time I've seen birds trapped and maimed by Clams ! The other 
times involved seagulls! Being as both Seagulls and Shorebirds have Clams of 
various types on the menu These almost stationary bivalves can strike back ! 
Somehow the Dunlin tangled one leg in the opened clam shell. I did hope to get 
closer to the Dunlin but it was still very mobile . And as one of the attached 
photographs show . I did almost get a photo of it taking off . I HOPE you can 
make out the hyper extended leg! 

After taking flight it was set upon by two seagulls . But like the Bald eagle 
they failed to grab it. This Dunlin had the wherewithal to turn and out 
maneuver the gulls in spite of it's heavy burden ! I did loose sight of the 
bird though 

Yours Richard Swanston Delta B.C. Canada _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: angel burn update
From: "Lorenz, Teresa (lore5748 AT vandals.uidaho.edu)" <lore5748@vandals.uidaho.edu>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 15:48:31 +0000
Hi Tweeters,



We were in the Angel Burn (Wenatchee National Forest, Yakima County) yesterday 
for a quick check on the woodpecker situation. The Forest Service has reignited 
parts of the burn so be prepared for smoke if you visit in the near future 




We saw a black-backed woodpecker and three hairy woodpeckers within minutes of 
leaving the car, but our radio-tagged white-headed woodpecker has left the 
area. We also did not see other white-headeds. Our visit was very short (<10 
minutes), but we were wondering if the woodpeckers are starting to thin-out. 
Nevertheless, it is still a good spot to see black-backs. 


Teresa





Teresa Lorenz

Rimrock, WA

lore5748 AT vandals.uidaho.edu



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Chestnut-sided Warbler
From: blabar <blabar AT harbornet.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 08:41:18 -0700
Still present this morning. Use Andy's information from yesterday to make 
contact with Debi in Moxie. Excellent views. 



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Smartphone_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Report from Reifel Refuge and Iona, BC
From: "Rachel Lawson" <rwlawson AT q.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 20:40:32 -0700
Some friends of mine from Minnesota, led by Kim Eckert, are on a birding
tour of Washington and British Columbia.  Here is a brief report from Lynn
Glesne for today, 9/15:

This AM we looked for the Ash-throated Flycatcher but didn't see it, but did
find the beautiful juvenile Ruff at Iona!
Then we went to Reifel Refuge & saw the Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, Pacific
Golden-Plover & Hudsonian Godwit.
They were all this afternoon!
Great birding!

This group also was lucky enough to see the Little Blue Heron in flight
yesterday morning, 9/14, at Wiley Slough, Skagit WLR.  I am most envious.

Rachel Lawson
Seattle



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Potholes Semi-Pelagic results
From: "Mike & MerryLynn" <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 19:21:29 -0700
Hello all,
Sunday was beautiful with temps from 42 - 80, clear and not too windy. Many 
birds on the reservoir - hundreds of American White Pelicans, Double-crested 
Cormorants, Western Grebes, Ruddy Ducks, Ring-billed and California Gulls, 
lesser numbers of Clarks, Red-necked, Eared, Horned and Pied-billed Grebes. 

Common and Forster's Terns were scattered around the lake with over 30 near the 
state park boat launch feeding with 29 Bonaparte's Gulls - these would fly up 
the waterway coming in and float down picking all the way. 

Two SABINE'S GULLS allowed close approach and great photos. A PARASITIC JAEGER 
chased a gull right over the boat and across the dam. Coot was lunch for a 
PEREGRINE FALCON close enough for photos. 21 SANDERLINGS were not the high 
count for this annual trip. Other shorebirds were scarce. 


MerryLynn birded Potholes State Park at the same time - and found a few unusual 
birds: 

RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER - did not notice any sign of hybrid.
SWAINSON'S THRUSH - responded with call to spishing - when I used playback it 
showed up along with a GRAY CATBIRD. 

While checking out RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES, PINE SISKINS, and warblers near the 
boat launch a WESTERN KINGBIRD flew over - getting late. 

Townsend's Solitaire's called and chased each other around in the campground 
and just as I was leaving a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW jumped up to spishing. 

Good numbers of Wcrown Sparrows, Yrumps and Ocrown Warblers - and a few 
Warbling Vireos as well. 



White-throated Sparrows are everywhere - had one on the island at Lyon's Ferry 
on Sat. and another at Washtucna. This morning at Rook's Park in Walla Walla I 
found 3! 


Good Birding, M&ML


*******************************************************
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the beautiful Walla Walla Valley

"If you haven't birded, you haven't lived"_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Baffling - Sooty Shearwaters/ Long Beach / Caryn/Wedgwood
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 AT seanet.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:29:45 -0700
He

Hello again Tweeters -

This morning there were not Sooty's. But now this evening (and the other 
evening) after flying north, they now are streaming south! 


When visiting Fort Canby State Park, near Cape Disappointment where the jetty 
protrudes, I was wondering how their path might have followed the coast when it 
cut in at the cove near Waikiki Beach since they seam to be following the 
coast. 


Thanks to all who posted interesting encounters and information. Tweeters is 
great!! 


Caryn / in Beach Mode


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: berries to bugs in Battle Ground
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:42:23 -0700
Tweeters,

After several mornings watching the local Cedar Waxwings gorge themselves
on berries around my Battle Ground, Clark County yard, I enjoyed their
change of feeding behavior as they hawked insects that must have hatched
this morning.  Everywhere I looked there were waxwings vaulting upwards and
etching crooked lines in the sky as they chased unseen insects.

At the water feature were Western Tanager, Black-throated Gray and Yellow
Warblers, Swainson's Thrush, Willow Flycatcher and Warbling Vireo.  I
expect the Willow Flycatcher to leave pretty soon.  The second Black-headed
Grosbeak left several days ago.

On the raptor front, a Peregrine was circling overhead before continuing
south, several apparent migrant Red-tails and a fairly steady stream of
Barn and Violet-Green Swallows.

Nothing to report regarding nocturnal migration - too tired to listen.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward!

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Chestnut-sided Warbler near Yakima-15 September
From: "Andy Stepniewski" <steppie AT nwinfo.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 14:49:51 -0700
Debie and Ron Brown have a female-plumaged Chestnut-sided Warbler at their home 
on Konnowac Pass. Their number is 509-248-3878. For those who know Debie, her 
yard list is apparently #2 in WA, lying just below Konnowac Pass and well 
situated along a migration corridor. A week or so ago, American Redstart 
fattened up for two days in her maple trees. Several years ago, there was a 
Great-tailed Grackle by the pasture edge there. 

Please call Debie if you wish to look for this little beauty.

Andy Stepniewski
Wapato WA
steppie AT nwinfo.net


---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Re: Wylie Game Range Ruff continuing
From: AnnMarie Wood <amw.5737 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 13:04:55 -0700
Karen:

Yesterday afternoon the Lewis's WP was on the crossbar of Telephone pole
near the office and easy to see with bins from the parking lot to the right
if the entrance road.

Good luck!
Ann Marie Wood
Mountlake Terrace

On Monday, September 15, 2014, Karen Wosilait 
wrote:

> Visible from parking lot with permanent toilets. Thanks to Marcus from
> Tacoma for confirming ID.
>
> Still oodles of Yellowlegs too, mainly Greater.
>
> Haven't heard any reports of sightings of Lewis's Woodpeckers although
> people have been looking.
>
> Karen Wosilait
> Seattle
> Kwseattle  AT  clearwire.net
>
> Sent from my iPhone_______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu 
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Olympia-area buddy wanted to go see Sooty Shearwaters at Ocean City or Ocean Shores
From: "Wendy Tanowitz" <green-girl AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 13:02:54 -0700
I'd love to drive out to Ocean City (where my friend saw huge numbers of
Sooty Shearwaters only 300 feet from the shore on Sunday) or Ocean Shores to
see the migration of shearwaters. I could go on Tuesday or Friday -- or by
arrangement. Is there anyone out there who lives near Olympia and would like
to make the trek with me?

wendy



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Wylie Game Range Ruff continuing
From: Karen Wosilait <kwseattle AT clearwire.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 12:41:50 -0700
Visible from parking lot with permanent toilets. Thanks to Marcus from Tacoma 
for confirming ID. 


Still oodles of Yellowlegs too, mainly Greater. 

Haven't heard any reports of sightings of Lewis's Woodpeckers although people 
have been looking. 


Karen Wosilait
Seattle
Kwseattle  AT  clearwire.net

Sent from my iPhone_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: For Yakima birders- interesting warbler seen late Saturday afternoon near brush piles between Arboretum and river
From: william boyington <wrboyington AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 11:21:28 -0700
Hello Tweeters,

I don't subscribe to the Yak bird list, so am posting here. I was in the Yakima 
area over the weekend and went to the arboretum around 3:30 pm. on Saturday. It 
was really birdy near the brushpiles between the arboretum and the river from 
3:45 until I left around 5:00 pm. What a nice spot - Yellow-rumps seem to like 
to hang out there, as do other likely common birds , and others which were 
probably passing through. I especially admired a male Spotted Towhee with far 
more white spots than I'm used to seeing on the west side. Also I had great 
long looks at a Townsend's Solitaire. There was also an empid flycatcher; I'm 
not expert enough to determine which empid, (silent, of course), I was seeing, 
though it looked grayish to me and did not do the tail lowering one sees with 
the Gray Flycatcher. Short wing projections, I thought, and prominent eye ring. 


A most interesting bird, passing through in the trees, headed south, was a 
warbler, dull yellow in color on head and underside, dark eye with no eye ring, 
though some hint of an eye line, as it did not have that "blank" look, as that 
of a Yellow Warbler. The wing was dark, and that is not dark olive, but a 
black, though not as much as an Am. Goldfinch. There were two very prominent 
white wing bars. I'm stuck between first year female Blackpoll or Bay-breasted. 
I thought the yellowish color on the underside extended to under the tail, 
which does not conform to Blackpoll. My two good looks were unfortunately too 
brief to get more detail, but I did not see any faint streaking to the flanks. 
If anyone saw something like this over the weekend, I'd like to know their 
opinion or impressions. Unfortunately, I was not under any impression that it 
was hanging around. 


Good birding,

Bill Boyington
Shoreline, WA


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: White-headed and Black-backed Woodpecker search
From: scompton1251 AT charter.net
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 14:16:56 -0400 (EDT)
Tweeters,

Thx to all who have provided tips on finding these two elusive 
woodpeckers, the last two breeding woodpeckers for my ABA lifelist. 
Since I have a large group (5-7) of family members, most of whom are 
very fit hikers but not birders, I have made a trip plan that I hope 
will work and be enjoyable for all.

We plan to leave Seattle early (0700), drive through Renton to 
Eumenclaw, state road 410 past the Sunrise Visitor's Center road at 
Ranier NP, then down to Nile and Rattlesnake Creek area on our way to 
the Angel Lake burn area. I hope we can find both the White-headed and 
Black-backed there in about 2 hours of work, then return to Sunrise to 
join the rest of our party. Our target area is reached by FR 1500, then 
1503, then up a short spur 665. Thanks to Scott Ramos, Teresa Lorenz, 
and Larry Schwitters for details.

Thanks to the rest who offered other possible sites. maybe I'll visit 
the rest another time.

I lived in coastal South Carolina for 30 years and could offer help if 
anyone needs to see our endangered Red-cockaded Woodpecker, endemic to 
the SE pine forests.

I'll post a report on our results.

If any of you are planning to be out there on Monday, September 22 let 
me know, love to have the help.

Steve Compton
Greenville, SC
843.709.2554_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Frenchman's Bar Co Park, Clark Co, WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 10:28:12 -0700
Bit slow today awesome day with no wind.  Highlights.

American white pelican  85 two diff flocks.
Black-throated gray warbler  17
Orange-crowned warbler  1
Yellow warbler  5
Varied thrush  1
Willow flycatcher  1
Lincoln's sparrow  1

Also returned home to find two western tanagers in the yard.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my iPad
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Frenchman's Bar Co Park, Clark Co, WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 10:28:12 -0700
Bit slow today awesome day with no wind.  Highlights.

American white pelican  85 two diff flocks.
Black-throated gray warbler  17
Orange-crowned warbler  1
Yellow warbler  5
Varied thrush  1
Willow flycatcher  1
Lincoln's sparrow  1

Also returned home to find two western tanagers in the yard.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my iPad


OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Vaux's Swift migration
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters AT me.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 09:52:11 -0700
Dear Tweeters,

I don't suppose anyone saw when the swifts left Wagner this morning? It was 
empty at 8:30. 


It's looking like the Vaux's migration is significantly early this year.

In probably 2008 or 2009 maybe even 2010, one from tweeterdom sent me an email 
description of a very large number of swifts working their way down the 
Klickitat River. I saved it but changed computers and can not come up with it. 
Knock knock. Was that you? 


Larry Schwitters
Issaquah_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Gray's Harbor bonanza, Townsend's Solitaire, Cassin's Auklet, other special birds
From: "barry " <levineb AT fastmail.fm>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 08:37:41 -0700
Tweeters,
A trip to the coast this weekend with Jack Stephens, Janelle Richardson,
Etta Cosey, Jane Lester, Claire Waltman and myself produced splendid
results.  A great group effort produced a very good number of rare and
sought after species. Etta was able to find us a Cassin's Auklet
swimming in the marina at Westport. We were able to see it at a distance
of about 3 feet away after it was refound by Claire. The bird was seen
in the harbor across the street from the large American flag. Janelle
spotted a Stilt Sandpiper at the sewage treatment ponds in Hoquium, and
a Red-necked Phalarope, along with a possible Lapland Longspur at the
game range. Jack got us on about 600 Marbled Godwits off of the
breakwater by Pier 21 in Westport.  I found the group a Buff-breasted
Sandpiper at the game range and a Townsend's Solitaire at the entrance
on Tonquin at Ocean Shore. According to Jack, the Solitaire is the first
record in over 35 years in Gray's Harbor County. Jane was instrumental
in getting us on many birds during the trip.
Other highlights:
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper- first spotted at Midway Beach by Marv Breece,
who then helped us to get great looks at the bird.
2nd winter Glaucous Gull- on the roof of a building across from Pier 21
in Gray's Harbor marina.
Red Crossbills at Bill's Spit in Ocean Shores
Thanks to Jack for putting together such a nice group. Great birds along
with great comradery. Can't ask for more than that. 
All the best

-- 
  barry levine
  Seattle
  levineb AT fastmail.fm

-- 
http://www.fastmail.fm - Same, same, but different...

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Re: I quit
From: Nigel Ball <nigelj.ball AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 07:40:43 -0700
Hi,
A few other perspectives:
1. Both communities would be poorer by your absence. Our loss.
2. Records evaluation is still in its infancy. Collateral damage occurs and
is painful/ shameful for the submitter. It would help if we moved,
officially and otherwise, to 'not sufficiently documented' rather than
'rejected'. In other words, "it probably was a Cassin's based on the
observer, but this is a species which can be hastily assumed, and based on
timing and/or location I'd feel more comfortable with more specific details
before adding the record to the books".
3. All birders I have ever birded with have made mistakes; in fact, some of
the best have made some (unacknowledged) howlers. Personally, I've been
grateful for a couple of 'rejections' on birds where I didn't document the
'obvious' because in the cold light of dawn I wondered whether I'd been
overenthusiastic.
4. How will you live without ebird???? And if you use its data, will you
really stop contributing?
5. (Sorry - I have to acknowledge the effort and skills of the recorders
with gratitude. In spite of instances like this. And would they have time
to communicate with everyone? And do we want a completely unvetted record
set?)
6. Please reconsider.

Nigel Ball
Seattle
nigelj.ball AT gmail.com

PS I'm not a recorder.
 On Sep 13, 2014 10:39 PM, "Pete Fahey"  wrote:

> Hi Folks:
>
>
>
> Today, Officially I am resigning from both Tweeters and e-bird!  In the
> past, I have reported birds, and on at least two occasions, they have been
> rejected by a group of individuals who have neither the courage or
> Intellectual honesty to pursue the truth.  I reported a Cassin’s Auklet in
> the spring seen from the Fauntleroy Ferry Terminal, but it was never
> accepted by the “powers that be”  in e-bird.  I again reported it when
> those same “POWERS” asked for a Spring report for “American Birds.” 
It 

> did not appear there either.  I am not an expert as these folks purport to
> be, but I am not given to given to false reporting.  I make mistakes;
> anyone who birds makes mistakes.  But when I do report a bird, there is a
> very reasonable certainty that I am correct.  I have been birding for forty
> years and have never lied to anyone, and am bewildered that no one ever
> even bother to call or e-mail to question me about my sighting.  If e-bird
> is going to be worth anything to anybody, the reviewers at least ought to
> have the decency to question reporters to verify the legitimacy of the
> bird.
>
>
>
> Pete Fahey
>
> Snoqualmie, WA
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>    
>
> This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus
>  protection is active.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Whidbey Island American Avocet
From: Rick Taylor <taylorrl AT outlook.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 23:06:08 -0700
Tweeters,

 

Tina and I enjoyed a day of birding on Whidbey Island.  The highlight was an
American Avocet (Island County code 4) in non-breeding plumage in the
southeastern portion of Crockett Lake viewed from US-20.  

 

Enjoy!

 

Rick

 

Rick Taylor

Everett, WA

 

 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: RE: Sooty Shearwaters migrating off the coast
From: Diane Yorgason-Quinn <avosetta AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 23:03:38 -0700
I too have seen Sooty Shearwaters in great numbers going NORTH in the fall. Are 
they going to make a u-turn at some point and head south or what? 


Diane Yorgason-Quinn
Avosetta AT hotmail.com
Wauna, WA

> From: green-girl AT comcast.net
> To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 13:23:17 -0700
> Subject: [Tweeters] Sooty Shearwaters migrating off the coast
> 
> It's highly likely that Caryn Schutzler's sightings off the coast of the
> Long Island peninsula the other day were Sooty Shearwaters. They are
> migrating now in huge numbers and are an amazing natural phenomenon.
> 
> wendy
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Tenino FOF sparrows
From: "Paul Hicks" <phicks AT accessgrace.org>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 23:05:27 -0400
Tweets, At sunset Sunday pm I observed my first-of-fall Sooty Fox and Lincoln's 
Sparrows at the Mull St marsh E of Tenino. Judging from the "seep" calls coming 
from the grasses there were more sparrows present. Good birding! 

Paul Hicks / Tenino, s Thurston Co / phicks AT accessgrace DOT org

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Game Range birds Skagit
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 18:52:21 -0700
Dear Tweeters,

Doug Schurman had it summed up pretty definitively in his post about the Fir 
Island Game Range birds today (14 September 2014). It is worth adding that 
there was a good movement of passerines there. A small flock of Steller's Jays 
appeared to be migrants--something I have noted there at that location only 
once or twice before. 


I also saw a Red-breasted Nuthatch, right about the same time that the jays 
showed up, and did not think much beyond, "Oh, I can't remember the last time I 
saw a nuthatch here." When I got home, I noticed that I'd never seen one there 
before! 


Out at the end of the old dike trail, near the final bench, there was a small 
flock of Pine Siskins as well. I also saw one Bank Swallow in a big flock of 
Barn Swallows. 


I spent over four hours there at the Game Range today, having arrived minutes 
after the Little Blue Heron. I walked every inch of the place, and scoped all 
the distant trees, but no luck on the heron. Even so, I was able to ID over 
fifty species there. 


A group of birders from Minnesota was there when I arrived; their leader, Kim 
Eckerdt (sp?), said he saw a Solitary Sandpiper, but no none else was able to 
get on the bird. 


Later in the day, at Samish Island Public Beach, I saw what will probably be my 
last Willow Flycatcher of the year, plus a Western Grebe. 


All in all, it was a much better day for Washington birding than for 
Washington's pro football and baseball teams! 


Yours truly,

Gary_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Ocean Shores this weekend
From: Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 16:47:45 -0700
Just the highlights from limited birding stops during an anniversary getaway:

Sat AM at the Ocean Shores Jetty: twenty-something Black Turnstones, three 
Wandering Tattlers, dozens of Heermann's Gulls, and a lone Whimbrel north along 
the beach, well above the wrack line, and oblivious to passing 
people/dogs/vehicles. An odd assortment of landbirds well out on the jetty, 
including an Orange-crowned Warbler about two-thirds of the way out, and a Fox 
Sparrow not much further in, plus the usual Savannah Sparrows and a Common 
Yellowthroat. 


Sat PM at Oyhut Game Range: About 200 peeps, including three Semipalmated 
Sandpipers. Most of the rest were Leasts. Also twenty-plus Semipalmated 
Plovers, actually outnumbering Killdeer (!) and 5 Baird's Sandpipers, 
dissociated from the smaller peeps. Hordes of American Pipits, with a few 
Horned Larks peppered in. On the base of Damon Point, while watching 
fruitlessly from midnight to one for aurora, we heard GH Owl calling 


Sun AM at Game Range: 3 Greater Yellowlegs, 4 Baird's Sandpipers, 2 Red-necked 
Phalaropes, a few Leasts and Westerns, about 15 Killdeer, 3 Pacific 
Golden-plovers. Searched in vain for Americans... Best in show goes to the 
three River Otters splashing around in the shallow pond, very near the Tonquin 
Access. 


Sun noonish at the jetty and north: Two Lapland Longspurs rattling overhead 
right by the parking area. Also a steady stream of 1000's of southbound Sooty 
Shearwaters and one PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER going in the opposite direction. 


Sun PM at Hoquiam:  Stilt Sandpiper still present

jeff Bryant
seattle
jbryant_68 AT yahoo_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Wylie Game Range - No Little Blue but Ruff and Lewis WP Consolation
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 15:22:53 -0700
Doug Schurman called me this a.m. after he and 
Mochael Hobbs saw the Little Blue Heron.  I got up 
there around 12:30 and met Gary Bletsch and others 
who had been there for some time.  The Little Blue 
Heron was not seen again but we were able to watch 
the Ruff on logs with Yellowlegs and the Lewis's 
Woodpecker which continued to fly catch from the 
telephone poles at the Headquarters parking lot.  
Nice consolation prizes,

-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Sooty Shearwaters is consensus
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 AT seanet.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 15:19:39 -0700
Hello you wonderful Tweeters!!

Seems to be the definite consensus that it's the Sooty Shearwaters streaming by 
- still - during the Seahawk game!! (That is from 7am to 3pm so far!!). 


I was amazed to read they only lay a single egg!! Wonder what the success is to 
their massive numbers!! Crazy to think that this is a life bird for us (not 
knowing if we'd seen it before). To see it in such massive numbers confirms we 
have actually seen it! Though difficult to see it not in motion. Wondering what 
give it such successful numbers compared to others? 


Thanks to all who replied, including Jeff, Dianna, and Carol Riddell from Oslo 
among others so quickly and definitively. 


Caryn / Temporary Beach Bum

Now, what about the ones flying south (black w/ yellow bill - not cormorants!? 
:))) 









_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Sooty Shearwaters migrating off the coast
From: "Wendy Tanowitz" <green-girl AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 13:23:17 -0700
It's highly likely that Caryn Schutzler's sightings off the coast of the
Long Island peninsula the other day were Sooty Shearwaters. They are
migrating now in huge numbers and are an amazing natural phenomenon.

wendy



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Wylie Game Range Little Blue Heron and Ruff
From: "Doug Schurman" <doug AT bodyresults.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 13:08:33 -0700
This morning at just before 9am Michael Hobbs and I were walking down the
path just 100 yards past the pedestrian gate when a white Egret looking bird
flew in. We could see it was wasn't right for a Great Egret. Then Michael
recognized it was a Juvenile Little Blue Heron. We watched it from 50 yards
or so for about 7-8 minutes before it flew off. We were unable to relocate
it. It looks like there have only been 2 or 3 recorded sightings of this
bird in the state.

 

Here are a couple quick photos I posted

https://www.flickr.com/photos/seattlebirdman/15239327835/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/seattlebirdman/15236246191/

 

Then later we ran in to Gary Bletsch and were describing the great bird we
saw. Right at that time he pointed out there was a Ruff on a log just 30
yards in front of us. The main pond area had lots of Yellowlegs standing on
logs. Some of the logs were floating on the water and as the tide was rising
it was pushing the logs toward the parking lot area.

 

Here's a photo of the Ruff

https://www.flickr.com/photos/seattlebirdman/15236248451/

 

Also, at the parking lot near the gate to the headquarters was a Lewis's
Woodpecker that was fly catching as was seen yesterday. I saw it was eating
some Yellow Jackets.

 

Quite a day at the game range.

 

Happy birding!

 

Doug Schurman

Seattle
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: bewick's wren
From: Jennifer DeSelle <jendeselle AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 10:20:42 -0700
Hello all!

Can anyone explain why our Bewick's wren, who is relatively quiet and secretive 
most of the year, has been singing his head off for the past couple of weeks? 
Is he confused? Or is this normal behavior? 


--Jen_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Swift Night Out
From: "Diann MacRae" <tvulture AT gmx.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 19:08:25 +0200
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Long Beach / Amazing Streaming of Birds (Caryn/Wedgwood)
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 AT seanet.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 07:55:01 -0700
Good morning Tweeters from Long Beach Peninsula -

Just looked out at the shore, just above the dunes and there are birds (which 
we also saw last evening in giant flock - hovering over the water) streaming 
north just over the water. There are thousands streaming by - this has been 
going on for the last five-ten minutes I happened to look out. Can't quite id 
them - peeps of some sort. Incredible. Any idea what/where they might be going? 
I'm so entrance I can't identify them. Is this a migration of some sort - 
north??? 


As of this posting they are still streaming.  Any idea what 

By the way - it's a spectacular morning here. The dunes look like they're right 
out of a Wyeth painting. 


Caryn / Wedgwood (streaming from Long Beach)

At sunset last nite at the beach the birds were hovering over the water, not 
coming to the beach (tide was out) . I expected them to come to the beach to 
roost but didn't see this happen. 



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Re: I quit
From: Joel Haas <haas.joel AT mindspring.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 22:45:34 -0700
Pete,

Good for you!  I sympathize.   But please stay on Tweeters. I enjoy your 
posts.

Joel E. Haas
Redmond, WA

haasdotjoelatmindspringdotcom
   

On 9/13/2014 10:38 PM, Pete Fahey wrote:
>
> Hi Folks:
>
> Today, Officially I am resigning from both Tweeters and e-bird!  In 
> the past, I have reported birds, and on at least two occasions, they 
> have been rejected by a group of individuals who have neither the 
> courage or Intellectual honesty to pursue the truth.  I reported a 
> Cassin's Auklet in the spring seen from the Fauntleroy Ferry Terminal, 
> but it was never accepted by the "powers that be"  in e-bird.  I again 
> reported it when those same "POWERS" asked for a Spring report for 
> "American Birds."   It did not appear there either.  I am not an 
> expert as these folks purport to be, but I am not given to given to 
> false reporting.  I make mistakes; anyone who birds makes mistakes.  
> But when I do report a bird, there is a very reasonable certainty that 
> I am correct.  I have been birding for forty years and have never lied 
> to anyone, and am bewildered that no one ever even bother to call or 
> e-mail to question me about my sighting.  If e-bird is going to be 
> worth anything to anybody, the reviewers at least ought to have the 
> decency to question reporters to verify the legitimacy of the bird.
>
> Pete Fahey
>
> Snoqualmie, WA
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>  	
>
> This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus 
>  protection is active.
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: I quit
From: "Pete Fahey" <peterfahey AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 22:38:28 -0700
Hi Folks:

 

Today, Officially I am resigning from both Tweeters and e-bird!  In the
past, I have reported birds, and on at least two occasions, they have been
rejected by a group of individuals who have neither the courage or
Intellectual honesty to pursue the truth.  I reported a Cassin's Auklet in
the spring seen from the Fauntleroy Ferry Terminal, but it was never
accepted by the "powers that be"  in e-bird.  I again reported it when those
same "POWERS" asked for a Spring report for "American Birds."   It did not
appear there either.  I am not an expert as these folks purport to be, but I
am not given to given to false reporting.  I make mistakes; anyone who birds
makes mistakes.  But when I do report a bird, there is a very reasonable
certainty that I am correct.  I have been birding for forty years and have
never lied to anyone, and am bewildered that no one ever even bother to call
or e-mail to question me about my sighting.  If e-bird is going to be worth
anything to anybody, the reviewers at least ought to have the decency to
question reporters to verify the legitimacy of the bird. 

 

Pete Fahey

Snoqualmie, WA

 

 



---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: coast birding
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece AT q.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 00:41:43 -0400 (EDT)
Today I birded the coast, looking for shorebirds. 


Some highlights: 


Ocean Shores Game Range 
Buff-breasted Sandpiper -1 
Baird's Sandpiper -1 
Pectoral Sandpiper - 2 
Greater Yellowlegs - 2 
Least Sandpiper - 1 (the only peep) 
Semipalmated Plover - 1 
Lapland Longspur - 2 heard 
Vaux's Swift - 1 


Hoquiam STP 
Stilt Sandpiper - 1 
LB Dowitcher - 1 juv 
Spotted Sandpiper - 2 


Westport 
Marbled Godwit - many by the Coast Guard Station 


Tokeland 
Willet - 7 at Marina 
LB Curlew - 2 at Graveyard Spit 
Marbled Godwit - a few on the breakwater 


Midway Beach 
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper - 1 
LB Dowitcher - 1 

It was a good day. 



Marv Breece 
Tukwila, WA 
marvbreece AT q.com 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Skagit sparrows
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 21:11:57 -0700
Dear Tweeters,

Today (13 September 2014) was a good day in the upper Skagit for birding. Lots 
of migrants were present, at least until the heat got going around 1030. 


At South Cascade River Road were two juvenile Clay-colored Sparrows and a 
Vesper Sparrow. 


At Howard Miller Steelhead Park, a Northern Pygmy Owl came in when I was doing 
my imitation of its call. 


Cassin's Vireos showed up in a few places, as did Hammond's Flycatcher and 
Ruffed Grouse. 


Yours truly,

Gary Bletsch_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Stilt Sandpiper Hoquiam
From: Pamela Girres <girresp AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 21:02:55 -0700
Stilt Sandpiper seen today remaining at Hoquiam sewage treatment. Seen
through afternoon at northwest corner of eastern most pond_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Re: Nisqually NWR Green Herons
From: Jason Hernandez <jason.hernandez74 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 19:33:55 -0700
The prey is a larval-stage salamander: note the tadpole-like tail and the small 
legs, and the body more elongated than a tadpole. At that size, it could very 
well be the Pacific Giant Salamander, or perhaps Cope's Giant Salamander, a 
form which remains in larval form all its life. 




https://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images;_ylt=AwrTcXm._RRU6u4Ar3iJzbkF;_ylu=X3oDMTBsZ29xY3ZzBHNlYwNzZWFyY2gEc2xrA2J1dHRvbg--;_ylc=X1MDOTYwNjI4NTcEX3IDMgRiY2sDNnVpN25mZDludGl0dSUyNmIlM0Q0JTI2ZCUzRDF5X3FnUEZwWUVLVUNxZ0Q5TlZJVFdGRC4waEwwOHd1Um1NYWNRLS0lMjZzJTNEcHYlMjZpJTNEZHVsX21wWUhNaTNtT1NHTV9EZnMEZnIDeXRmZjEteWZmMjUEZ3ByaWQDQkNiRE9qeVJRRktoQVpWelM3THhMQQRtdGVzdGlkA251bGwEbl9zdWdnAzAEb3JpZ2luA2ltYWdlcy5zZWFyY2gueWFob28uY29tBHBvcwMwBHBxc3RyAwRwcXN0cmwDBHFzdHJsAzMwBHF1ZXJ5A3BhY2lmaWMgZ2lhbnQgc2FsYW1hbmRlciBsYXJ2YQR0X3N0bXADMTQxMDY2MTg0NQR2dGVzdGlkA251bGw-?gprid=BCbDOjyRQFKhAZVzS7LxLA&pvid=6MpkGTIwNi5vSPd7U37LvgWNNzMuNAAAAABMzmR0&p=pacific+giant+salamander+larva&fr=ytff1-yff25&fr2=sb-top-images.search.yahoo.com&ei=UTF-8&n=60&x=wrt 




Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 20:38:22 -0700l
From: "Teresa Michelsen" 
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Green Herons
To: "'Tony'" , 
Message-ID: <018201cfcf04$2b3b5040$81b1f0c0$ AT avocetconsulting.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Very nice photos. Yes, I saw three there the other day as well, all right
out in the open in the morning. Two were smaller and may have been younger
ones, along the boardwalk, while the one near the visitor center looks like
the one you have captured in your (much better than my) photos. I don't know
about the prey though - interested as well.



Teresa Michelsen

Olympia



From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Tony
Sent: Friday, September 12, 2014 8:24 PM
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Green Herons



The Green Herons at Nisqually seem unusually abundant and visible this year.
I saw three today near the visitor center and on the Twin Barns boardwalk.
Always a joy to observe.  



Anyone have an idea of what the prey is in this shot? 



https://flic.kr/p/oUz5Nm



Here's a good example of what I've seen routinely there recently.  



https://flic.kr/p/oUxM1G





- Regards



Tony Varela

South Puget Sound, WA

tvarela at hotmail dot com

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tony-v_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Skagit birds today
From: Scott <scottratkinson AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 16:49:15 -0700
Tweeters:
 
To augment Steve's report, the juv. LEWIS' WOODPECKER was very cooperative 
today flycatching between the telephone poles off the north side of the parking 
area for the Skagit WMA Headquarters off Wylie Rd. This is Dallas Wylie's 
property. It was there at about 8 a.m. and still available and seen by several 
past 10 a.m. I was fortunate to also enjoy Steve's RED KNOT as he located it, 
viewing it through his scope. 

 
Far down the trail heading south from the main dike trail, I flushed a 
first-of-season WHITE-THROATED SPARROW in the company of many GOLDEN-CROWNS. 
Then, within 50 yards of the end of the trail (where the last stand of Red 
Alder and other deciduous growth gives way to open salt marsh), I distinctly 
heard, quite a number of times, a GRAY CATBIRD. Alas, I was unable to bring the 
bird into view as it called from Red-Osier Dogwood/Twinberry thickets here. 
There are at least three Sept-early Oct. records from the the Skagit WMA, but 
this is my first county bird in quite a long time. 

 
Scott Atkinson
Lake Stevens
mail to:  scottratkinson AT hotmail.com
 
 
 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Skagit Co birds
From: Steve Giles <giles.steve AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 16:03:42 -0700
Tweeters:

This morning at the Skagit Headquarters at the end of Wylie Rd there were some 
good birds. 


 

A juvenile Red Knot was in with the still large numbers of both Yellowlegs and 
Dowitchers. These birds were roosting at high tide on the snags in the large 
pond next to the boat launch parking. The bird puzzled me at first because it 
seemed so out of place perched on a log and not on a mud flat or ocean beach. 
We were able to view it for half an hour and had good looks at its short 
straight bill, short, blue-gray legs, prominent supercilium and clear gray 
mantle feathers and tertials edged white. 


 

Later I was able to re-find the juvenile Lewis's Woodpecker found earlier by 
Scott Atkinson. This bird was flycatching around the main parking area West of 
the boat launch parking. 


 

Scott also had a Gray Catbird and a White-throated Sparrow in the area which I 
could not re-locate. I'm sure he will have more details later. 


 

Good birding,

Steve Giles

Seattle

 

 
 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Summer of the Sapsucker | Union Bay Watch |
From: Larry Hubbell <ldhubbell AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 09:57:33 -1000
Tweeters,

A friend contributed this weeks post about sapsuckers growing up on Whidbey 
Island. I have yet to see a sapsucker around Union Bay. If you happen to know 
of a tree in the area that they like I would love to know about it for next 
year. You can read this week's post at: 


http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2014/09/summer-of-sapsucker.html

Have a great day on Union Baywhere nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net._______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: BirdNote - last week, and the week of Sept. 14, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123imagine.net>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 12:04:02 -0700
Hey, Tweets,

Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Cedar Waxwings - Sleek and Handsome
http://bit.ly/WY47yF

* Snowy Egrets - Killer Hats
http://bit.ly/19IXt09

* Pale Male - New York City's Famous Red-tail
http://bit.ly/Un7Yzv

* Counting Millions of Raptors Over Veracruz
-- With Scott Weidensaul
http://bit.ly/1dyIUPz

* Swifts Roost in Chimneys
http://bit.ly/WY4xFs

* Northern Gannets Plunge-Dive
http://bit.ly/1wjLPEN

* The Greatest Bird Rescue Ever - The 2000 MV Treasure spill
http://bit.ly/15RiH8S
------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/YGfOMh
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a show, 
plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related resources on the 
website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+ episodes and more than 500 
videos in the archive. 


Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: B&W warbler still at Washtucna
From: "Randy Hill" <re_hill AT q.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 08:25:52 -0700
Seen now. Redstart present yesterday after sunset.
Sent via randy's smartphone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Common Loon Feeding at Birch Bay State Park
From: "Hank.Heiberg" <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 07:34:45 -0700
> 
> Several times the loon dropped the fish that it was eating and dove for it.
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15035599578/
>  
> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Re: Nisqually NWR Green Herons
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 22:15:03 -0700
The prey the green heron is eating is a bullfrog tadpole. I once took a series 
of photos of a green heron hunting, capturing, and eating a bullfrog tadpole at 
Scriber Creek Park in Lynnwood. 


Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA


On Friday, September 12, 2014 8:37 PM, Teresa Michelsen 
 wrote: 

 


Very nice photos. Yes, I saw three there the other day as well, all right out 
in the open in the morning. Two were smaller and may have been younger ones, 
along the boardwalk, while the one near the visitor center looks like the one 
you have captured in your (much better than my) photos. I don’t know about 
the prey though – interested as well. 

 
Teresa Michelsen
Olympia
 
From:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Tony 

Sent: Friday, September 12, 2014 8:24 PM
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Green Herons
 
The Green Herons at Nisqually seem unusually abundant and visible this year. I 
saw three today near the visitor center and on the Twin Barns boardwalk. Always 
a joy to observe. 

 
Anyone have an idea of what the prey is in this shot? 
 
https://flic.kr/p/oUz5Nm
 
Here's a good example of what I've seen routinely there recently.  
 
https://flic.kr/p/oUxM1G
 
 
- Regards
 
Tony Varela
South Puget Sound, WA
tvarela at hotmail dot com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tony-v
 
 

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters