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Updated on Saturday, April 25 at 07:18 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-winged Snowfinch

25 Apr Hayes Co. 4-25 [Jason Cole ]
24 Apr Chestnut Crescent at National Butterfly Center, 4/24/15 [Dan Jones ]
23 Apr Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk, April 17 2015 [Mike Rickard ]
22 Apr Fwd: Just One Week Until Alex Wild's Webinar! [Mike Quinn ]
21 Apr LIFER ALERT; Yucca Giant Skipper in Wilson County,Tx 4/21/15 [naturalist ]
21 Apr Christmas Mountains, Terlingua Ranch photos - Entoblitz 2015 [Mike Quinn ]
19 Apr Resaca de la Palma State Park - Sunday Butterfly Walk [Sherry Wilson ]
19 Apr LBJ Grasslands 4/18 [Jason Cole ]
16 Apr April 27, 2015 Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting and May 2nd Butterfly Workshop [ABF Announce ]
15 Apr Re: Aberrant Pipevine Swallowtail [Mike Rickard ]
14 Apr West Texas, 4/6-7/15 [Dan Jones ]
13 Apr Resaca de la Palma State Park - Sunday Butterfly Walk [Sherry Wilson ]
10 Apr Estero Butterfly Walk Fri April 10, 2015 [Rick Snider ]
9 Apr RGV Butterflies, Jan-Mar 2015 [Mike Rickard ]
8 Apr Butterflies of the Edinburg Scenic Wetlands [Javier Gonzalez ]
6 Apr Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"? [Tim Jones ]
5 Apr Resaca de la Palma State Park - Sunday Butterfly Walk [Sherry Wilson ]
5 Apr Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"? [Paul Cherubini ]
5 Apr Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"? [Brush Freeman ]
5 Apr Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"? [Joanne Pospisil ]
5 Apr Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"? [Tim Jones ]
4 Apr FWS reference to the I-35 corridor and monarchs [Mike Quinn ]
4 Apr Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"? [Paul Cherubini ]
4 Apr Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"? [Mike Quinn ]
4 Apr Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"? [Mike Quinn ]
3 Apr Estero Butterfly Walk, Apr 3, 2015 [Rick Snider ]
3 Apr Re: anyone have any info on "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"? [Brush Freeman ]
3 Apr anyone have any info on "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"? [Mike Quinn ]
3 Apr Fwd: Glassberg casts doubt on fear of tropical milkweed... [Mike Quinn ]
30 Mar Re: Thanks for the first of the season monarch reports from s. TX [Mitch Heindel ]
29 Mar flying in Falcon Heights [Berry Nall ]
30 Mar Thanks for the first of the season monarch reports from s. TX [Mike Quinn ]
29 Mar Resaca de la Palma State Park - Sunday Butterfly Walk and weekly sightings [Sherry Wilson ]
1 Apr Re: Glassberg casts doubt on fear of tropical milkweed... [Paul Cherubini ]
1 Apr Glassberg casts doubt on fear of tropical milkweed... [Mike Quinn ]
7 Mar Life Cycle of a Guava Skipper has been published ["David T. Dauphin" ]
7 Mar First of Spring Falcate Orangetip [Willie Sekula ]
28 Feb Thanks for Junonia help [Anne Toal ]
27 Feb Differences between two junonia [Anne Toal ]
21 Feb Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
15 Feb Resaca de la Palma State Park - Sunday Butterfly Walk [Sherry Wilson ]
14 Feb Violet-banded Skipper at Resaca de la Palma [Mike Rickard ]
13 Feb Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
13 Feb Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting, February 23, 2015 [ABF Announce ]
8 Feb Resaca de la Palma State Park - Sunday Butterfly Walk [Sherry Wilson ]
6 Feb Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
5 Feb Monsanto Crops Pushing Monarch Butterfly to 'Verge of Extinction' [Tim Jones ]
2 Feb Resaca de la Palma State Park - Sunday Butterfly Walk [Sherry Wilson ]
30 Jan Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
27 Jan Texas Pollinator PowWow @ Austin (LBJWC) - February 28, $25 [Mike Quinn ]
27 Jan monarch overwintering population in Mexico up slightly from last year's record low [Mike Quinn ]
26 Jan Resaca de la Palma SP - Sunday Butterfly Walk & More [Sherry Wilson ]
23 Jan Estero butterfly walk Fri Jan 23, 2015 [Rick Snider ]
19 Jan 2014 Butterflies [Mike Rickard ]
18 Jan Austin Butterfly Forum meeting, January 26 [ABF Announce ]
18 Jan Resaca de la Palma SP - Sunday Butterfly Walk [Sherry Wilson ]
17 Jan Estero butterfly walk [Rick Snider ]
16 Jan Texas A&M Dept Ento 2015 Open House Photos [Mike Quinn ]
31 Dec New life histories [Berry Nall ]
29 Dec Re: Service Initiates Status Review of Monarch Butterfly under the Endangered Species Act [Tim Jones ]
29 Dec Fwd: Service Initiates Status Review of Monarch Butterfly under the Endangered Species Act [Brush Freeman ]
27 Dec Heraclides phylogenetics [Keith Wolfe ]
27 Dec question about Banded Hairstreaks [Shirley Wilkerson ]
26 Dec Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
24 Dec Re: Giant Swallowtail split into E. & W. species roughly along I-35 [Mike Quinn ]
24 Dec Giant Swallowtail split into E. & W. species roughly along I-35 [Mike Quinn ]
23 Dec New Swallowtail species, type locality: Duval Co., Texas... [Mike Quinn ]
21 Dec Resac de la Palma SP - Sunday Butterfly Walk & List for 12/15 - 12/21 [Sherry Wilson ]
19 Dec Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
15 Dec Still flying in Lubbock [Anthony Hewetson ]
14 Dec Resaca de la Palma SP - Sunday Butterfly Walk with 5 metalmarks & Band-celled Sister [Sherry Wilson ]
12 Dec Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
12 Dec TAMU Insect Collection Open House - Jan. 10 [Mike Quinn ]
7 Dec Resaca de la Palma - December Sightings [Sherry Wilson ]
6 Dec November Starr County report [Berry Nall ]
5 Dec Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]

Subject: Hayes Co. 4-25
From: Jason Cole <marioman12 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 19:16:53 -0500
Went down to Austin in hopes of finding streckeri, H. viridis and others. While 
I left somewhat disappointed(no streckeri), it wasn't entirely bad. 


H. viridis(Green Skipper)~25
E. vestris(dun skipper)
C. outis(Outis skipper)-3
P. philetas(desert checkered skipper)
B. exilis(western pygmy blue)
E. isola(reakirt's blue)
S. melinus(gray hairstreak)
C. gryneus(juniper hairstreak)
Painted lady
American Lady
Red admiral
American Snout
Question Mark
Goatweed Leafwing
Phaon crescent
Orange Sulphur
Sleepy orange sulphur
Little yellow sulphur
dainty sulphur
Cloudless sulphur
checkered white
Black swallowtail
Pipevine swallowtail


-Jason Cole

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Chestnut Crescent at National Butterfly Center, 4/24/15
From: Dan Jones <00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 20:04:02 -0400
Saw 44 species today at the National Butterfly Center south of Mission. Best 
was my second ever Chestnut Crescent (Phyciodes argentea) and four Florida 
Whites. Photos and list are on my blog. 




http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2015/04/chestnut-crescent-at-national-butterfly.html 



Dan Jones, Weslaco

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk, April 17 2015
From: Mike Rickard <mikearickard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 20:35:02 -0500
Last Friday Ginny and I led our first Estero butterfly walk of the year, in
the wake of our departed friends Rick & May Snider, who have returned to
their Canadian home for the summer.  Since we'll be leading another walk
tomorrow, it occurred to me that I should post the results from last week!
I shall try to be less forgetful in the future.

We had mostly overcast skies, and lots of humidity, although the sun did
appear near the end of the walk.  We were joined by Jeff from Michigan and
Diane from Arizona, and also had the company of the inimitable Ranger John
Yochum.  We had a great time, and the park was lush due to the continuing
rains, but we saw only 31 species of butterflies.  Many of those were
rather common, though, so we always had something to look at.  Best find
was a Potrillo Skipper back in a secluded area laying eggs.  We saw only
one Mexican Bluewing.

Butterfly walks are at 1:30 PM Fridays, and we try to finish up by 4 PM.
Ginny and I will look forward to seeing some of you tomorrow.
Mike Rickard
Mission TX

Potrillo Skipper (Cabares potrillo)

Mazans Scallopwing (Staphylus mazans)

Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)

Sickle-winged Skipper (Eantis tamenund)

Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)

Turk's-cap White-Skipper (Heliopetes macaira)

Laviana White-Skipper (Heliopetes laviana)

Celia's Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes celia)

Fawn-spotted Skipper (Cymaenes trebius)

Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)

Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)

Whirlabout (Polites vibex)

Southern Broken-Dash (Wallengrenia otho)

Common Mellana (Quasimellana eulogius)

Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)

Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)

Large Orange Sulphur (Phoebis agarithe)

Great Southern White (Ascia monuste)

Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)

Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon istapa)

Red-bordered Metalmark (Caria ino)

Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)

Tawny Emperor (Asterocampa clyton)

Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)

American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)

Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)

Texan Crescent (Anthanassa texana)

Vesta Crescent (Phyciodes graphica)

Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)

Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Fwd: Just One Week Until Alex Wild's Webinar!
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 16:46:15 -0500
I registered and apparently, it's free and open to all... Mike

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Entomological Society of America 
Date: Wed, Apr 22, 2015 at 9:11 AM
Subject: Just One Week Until Alex Wild's Webinar!
To: entomike AT gmail.com


  Register now to learn lifelong lessons...

 If you are having difficulty viewing this message, click here

 

to go to the mobile friendly/web version.
    [image: WebinarSeriesHeader_F1.png]

 *[image: alexwild.jpg]Registration filled up fast, * *but *
 *we've increased our limit so that *
 *you can still * *register now

 

to
participate in * *ESA's next webinar, *

 *"How to Take Better Insect *
 *Photographs with Any Camera" *

 *Alex Wild*, a renowned insect photographer, will discuss how anyone can
utilize any camera (even an iPhone!) to produce great insect photos.
Participants will learn:

   - Why lighting is so important to photographic aesthetics.
   - How to most effectively position your camera and subject.
   - Tips for working with uncooperative insect subjects.

 Entomologists use photographs for papers, presentations, posters, web
pages, grants, social media, teaching, and many other venues. Wherever you
work, Alex's invaluable tips will help you thrive!

 *When: April 29, 2015, 2:00 PM U.S. Eastern Time *
 *(just a week away!)*
  [image: register2.jpg?r=1427742435686]

 

*About Alex*: Professor Wild is a Texas-based biologist who started
photographing insects in 2002 as an aesthetic complement to his scientific
work on ant taxonomy and evolution.

 [image: zoom3.jpg] Alex holds a Ph.D. in Entomology from the University of
California, Davis and is Curator of Entomology at the University of Texas
at Austin. His photographs appear in natural history museums, magazines,
books, television programs, and other media.

 Click here

 

to check out more of Alex's great work!
      *ESA membership allows you to access a full library of valuable
webinars

on 

topics including:*

   - *How to Write a Good Scientific Paper*
   - *Making the Most of Your Statistical Analysis*
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   - *Job Hunting Resources*
   - *Career Development*
   - *Managing the Job Transition *
   - *Citizen Science*
   - *Inside the JIPM*
   - *Communicating with a Non-scientific Community*

  *View these and other webinars whenever and from wherever you want,
and take advantage of many o**ther great members-only benefits

!* 

   *Remember to submit

 

*
 *your own insect photos for *
 *consideration for inclusion in the *
 *2016 World of Insects calendar by *
 *May 15, 2015!*
      *About ESA's Webinar Series *

There's no cost and you'll learn right from your desktop, laptop, tablet,
or smart-phone. These 60-minute webinars are a great investment of your
time. If you are unable to attend, an archive of the presentation

 

will
be available for ESA members only.

Make a list of your pressing questions on the topics, as we'll allow plenty
of time for Q&A after the presentation. You may also send in questions
prior to the webinar.

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing
information about joining the webinar.

*System Requirements*
PC-based attendees: Windows® 8, 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server
Mac®-based attendees: Mac OS® X 10.6 or newer
Mobile attendees: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet
       * Follow us on *


 



 



 



 

        Please click here

 

to
manage your ESA email subscriptions.

Entomological Society of America (ESA), 3 Park Place, Suite 307, Annapolis,
MD 21401-3722
www.entsoc.org

 


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: LIFER ALERT; Yucca Giant Skipper in Wilson County,Tx 4/21/15
From: naturalist <naturalist AT RANCHWIRELESS.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2015 20:33:17 -0500
At 5:00pm I saw my lifer Yucca Giant Skipper at my brother’s property near La 
Vernia in Wilson County,Tx. photo available upon request. There is a big stand 
of blooming Cat Gut(Tephrosia virginica) 

along the state hwy. This is the southwestern most location for this plant in 
the USA. photo available upon request. 


Cheers,
Derek Muschalek
Yorktown,tx

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Christmas Mountains, Terlingua Ranch photos - Entoblitz 2015
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2015 15:59:03 -0500
I trust all Entoblitzers had a great time in Brewster County last weekend!

Quinn's Photos:

https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/108896707105682448113/albums/6140080455135718897 


TAMU Entoblitz Info:
http://entoblitz.tamu.edu/

Terlingua Ranch Lodge
www.terlinguaranch.com/

Christmas Mountains (skeletal website)
http://www.tsus.edu/news/christmas-mountains.html

On September 15, 2011, the Texas General Land Office announced the transfer
of the 9,269-acre Christmas Mountains property to The Texas State
University System. The large tract of land in Brewster County, just north
of Big Bend National Park, will serve as Texas' largest open-air classroom,
allowing students and faculty from the university system's eight component
institutions to study the property's wildlife, flora, rock formations and
other unique attributes.

More Christmas Mtns info here:
Texas State University System Accepts Christmas Mountains
News Release - September 15, 2011
http://www.tsus.edu/news/news-releases/release-091511.html

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma State Park - Sunday Butterfly Walk
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2015 16:56:07 -0500
Clytie Ministreak, Red-bordered Metalmark, and Mexican Bluewing were the
best finds of the afternoon.  Boisduval's Yellow was out in higher numbers,
especially on the first stretch of Bobcat Trail.  There may have actually
been more Pearl than Phaon Crescents.  All the Lyside Sulphurs we've seen
in the last couple weeks have had the 'thumb' mark pattern or been more
heavily marked than we usually see.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Hike *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walk* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walk* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m..
*Night Hike* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

​Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)
Checkered White (Pontia protodice)
Southern Dogface (Colias cesonia)
Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)
Large Orange Sulphur (Phoebis agarithe)
Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Boisduval's Yellow (Eurema boisduvaliana)
Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)
Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon istapa)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Clytie Ministreak (Ministrymon clytie)
Red-bordered Metalmark (Caria ino)
Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)
Zebra Heliconian (Heliconius charithonia)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)
Common Buckeye (Jononia coenia)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
Tawny Emperor (Asterocampa clyton)
Carolina (South Texas) Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)
Mimosa Skipper (Cogia calchas)
Mazans Scallopwing (Staphylus mazans)
Sickle-winged Skipper (Eantis tamenund)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Laviana White-Skipper (Heliopetes laviana)
Fawn-spotted Skipper (Cymaenes odilia)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)
Whirlabout (Polites vibex)
Southern Broken-Dash (Wallengrenia otho)
Common Mellana (Quasimellana eulogius)
Celia's Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes celia)
Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)
​

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: LBJ Grasslands 4/18
From: Jason Cole <marioman12 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2015 13:05:12 -0500
Had a good day yesterday at the LBJ grasslands. The season is a bit early so I 
found a pretty different set of species than I thought I would. 


L. eufala 
A. campestris
H. metea- many still fresh 
A. vialis
T. pylades
E. funeralis
E. horatius
E. juvenalis
A. lyciades
S. melinus
C. gryneus
P. polixenes
P. glaucus
P. cresophantes
B. philenor
Z. cesonia
C. eurytheme
N. iole
A. midea
P. protodice
V. virginensis
V. atlanta
V. cardui
N. antiopa
C. gorgone
P. phaon
P. tharos
M. cymela
28 sp

Thanks,
Jason Cole

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: April 27, 2015 Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting and May 2nd Butterfly Workshop
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 20:23:49 -0500
Hi everyone,



Here is the information for upcoming events and meetings of the Austin
Butterfly Forum. Thanks for helping us to get the word out.



The Austin Butterfly Forum meets at the Zilker Botanical Garden Center
 at 7:00 pm on the 4th Monday of every month
except for December. Most meetings are free and open to the public. *There
will be no meeting on Monday, May 25, 2015, due to the Memorial Day
holiday.*

Each meeting features an educational program, but we like to socialize a
bit beforehand. Sometimes members will bring caterpillars or collections
for display, and sometimes we have special opportunities such as plant
giveaways. The meetings are also a good place to hear special announcements
and learn about new events.  Everyone interested in butterflies and other
invertebrates is welcome! Please come join us!


 ------------------------------

*Apr. 27, 2015, 7 PM Meeting -* *Disturbance, succession, forest cover, and
bee communities: from resources to landscapes **Presented by Robinson Sudan*


"This talk will basically be the results of some data I just finished
analyzing and then some context as those results relate to bee ecology and
the broader questions of landscape ecology that I'm interested in." –
Robinson Sudan

Robinson Sudan is the SW Regional Biologist for the Pollinator Partnership
(P2) and is based in Austin, Texas. He is also completing an MS in
Conservation Biology at the University of New Orleans where he has been
conducting research for P2 for over three years. His research background is
in bee community dynamics and landscape ecology; however, as Regional
Biologist he is also responsible for helping to develop outreach and
education programs, meeting and coordinating with stakeholders, and seeking
out opportunities for collaborative research. Robinson is committed to
expanding P2's role in scientific research and consulting as well as
connecting the public to the science behind pollinator conservation. A
native Texan, Robinson has lived in Austin for over ten years and hopes to
build conservation awareness throughout the state.
 ------------------------------

*May 2, 2015, 10 AM to 4 PM Workshop:* *How to Know and Grow Austin
Butterflies*

Learning to identify common butterflies of our area is only one aspect of
the Austin Butterfly Forum’s Annual Butterfly Workshop, held from 10:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Saturday, May 2 at the Zilker Botanical Garden Center.
Topics will cover caterpillar food plants, how to raise caterpillars, watch
metamorphosis at home, and strategies for caterpillar survival and
identification, as well as books and resources about this rapidly growing
hobby. The workshop will include a light lunch and a walk to identify
butterflies in the Zilker Botanical Garden. Participants will be given
plants to take home to begin attracting butterflies to their own gardens.

To register, please contact Jeff Taylor at 512-255-0368 or
kscjtaylor AT prodigy.net.
Fee for the workshop is $35.00.

*                                 Membership*

All of our normal events are open to the public, but you may want to become
a member of the Austin Butterfly Forum to help support us and our events.
We also treat members to some extra goodies, such as reduced admission to
special programs that have a fee and discounts on purchases made at
meetings. Membership is *$20 annually per household* payable during
meetings or by mail to Doris Hill, ABF Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin,
TX 78723.

For more information, please visit our website: austinbutterflies.org

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Aberrant Pipevine Swallowtail
From: Mike Rickard <mikearickard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 20:46:42 -0500
One striking aberration deserves another.  American Lady today at Santa Ana
NWR, if the link works.


https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10202585069146348.1073741847.1785281533&type=1&l=18da6ef39c 


Mike Rickard
Mission TX

On Mon, Apr 13, 2015 at 11:24 PM, Dan Hardy <
0000006668f8be48-dmarc-request AT listserv.uh.edu> wrote:

> At the recent Zilker Garden Festival Alex Clarke visited the Austin
> Butterfly Forum's table and showed us these photos from her yard.
>
> Picasa Web Albums - Dan - Aberrant Pipe...
> 
 

>
>
> [image: image]
> 
 

>
>
>
>
>
> Picasa Web Albums - Dan - Aberrant Pipe...
> 
 

> Photos by Dan, Mar 22, 2015 - Photos by Alex Clarke. Austin, Texas.
> View on picasa...
> 
 

> Preview by Yahoo
>
>
> Has anyone see this before?   Is this caused by damage in the pupa?
>
> Dan Hardy
>
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> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
>
>

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: West Texas, 4/6-7/15
From: Dan Jones <00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 12:05:35 -0400
I made a quick trip out to the Big Bend area of Texas last week and finally got 
around to updating my blog. Interesting butterflies on 4/6 on Pinto Canyon Road 
in Presidio County included a southwestern Bordered Patch, Acacia Skipper and 
Arizona Powdered Skipper. On 4/7 I walked the lower Pine Canyon Trail to the 
pour off and saw two Sandia Hairstreaks, Golden Banded-Skipper, Sleepy and 
Rocky Mountain Duskywings and Mexican Yellows. A Chisos Skipperling was on the 
wet rocks below the pour off. A half mile down the road from the trailhead was 
a Big Bend Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon solitario) which was later IDed by Chris 
Durden and Martin Reid. Quite a surprise! Photos and list are on my blog. 




http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2015/04/lower-pine-canyon-big-bend-np-4715.html 


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Subject: Resaca de la Palma State Park - Sunday Butterfly Walk
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 18:40:12 -0500
Both summer and winter forms of Clytie Ministreak were seen during the
butterfly walk Sunday.  Dainty Sulphur is also around in both forms.  There
are still good numbers of Walker's Metalmarks.  The best place to look is
any Biden's Tick that is getting good sun.  Lyside Sulphur and Boisduval's
Yellow were fairly easy to find.  Other sulphurs were in very low numbers.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Hike *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walk* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walk* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m..
*Night Hike* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

​Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)
Great Southern White (Ascia monuste)
Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)
Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Boisduval's Yellow (Eurema boisduvaliana)
Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)
Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon istapa)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Clytie Ministreak (Ministrymon clytie)
Red-bordered Metalmark (Caria ino)
Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)
Walker's Metalmark (Apodemia walkeri)
Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)
Zebra Heliconian (Heliconius charithonia)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
Tawny Emperor (Asterocampa clyton)
Carolina Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)
Queen (Danaus gilippus)
Mimosa Skipper (Cogia calchas)
Mazans Scallopwing (Staphylus mazans)
Sickle-winged Skipper (Eantis tamenund)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Laviana White-Skipper (Heliopetes laviana)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)
Whirlabout (Polites vibex)
Southern Broken-Dash (Wallengrenia otho)
Common Mellana (Quasimellana eulogius)
Celia's Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes celia)
Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)
​

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Fri April 10, 2015
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Apr 2015 19:49:27 -0500
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk Friday Apr 10, 2015

It was hot, cloudy bright, with little breeze and the predicted rainfall
didn't happen. 35 species were tallied for the walk, including: Two
Brown-banded Skippers, a Great-Southern White, Mexican Bluewing and Common
Mellana.

Thanks to Mike Rickard and Ginny Musgrave for helping to spot the
butterflies.


Black Swallowtail  Papilio polyxenes
Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Great Southern White  Ascia monuste
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Pearl Crescent  Phyciodes tharos
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton
Monarch  Danaus plexippus
Queen  Danaus gilippus
White-striped Longtail  Chioides catillus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Mazans Scallopwing  Staphylus mazans
Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso
Brown-banded Skipper  Timochares ruptifasciatus
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Common Mellana  Quasimellana eulogius
Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala


Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays, please call ahead for the start time.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: RGV Butterflies, Jan-Mar 2015
From: Mike Rickard <mikearickard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2015 21:12:56 -0500
For the first quarter of 2015 in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, weather was
mostly cloudy and wet with quite a few cold days, though freeze-free.  Of
the 90 days, weather confined my field time to 58 days, and a number of
those were limited both time and species-wise due to the weather.  Having
said all that, I was able to photograph 100 species, and see a couple of
others that escaped the camera.  Additionally, a number of other species
were reported, such as Two-barred Flasher, Potrillo Skipper, Gold-headed
Scallopwing, Violet-patched Skipper, Orange-barred Sulphur, White
Angled-Sulphur, White Scrub-Hairstreak, Cyna Blue, Pale-banded Crescent,
and Mexican Fritillary.  Below are listed the species I photographed plus
the Julia Heliconian and Hoary Skipper that I wasn't quick enough for.
Notable species were a Violet-banded Skipper, normally a fall species, at
Resaca de la Palma SP on Valentine's Day; Chestnut Crescent and Blue-eyed
Sailor at Santa Ana NWR; and numbers of Texas Powdered Skipper, Streaky
Skipper, and Nysa Roadside Skipper at Yturria Brush NWR.

Mike Rickard, Mission TX.

Guava Skipper  (Phocides polybius)

White-striped Longtail (Chioides albofasciatus)

Brown Longtail (Urbanus procne)

Mimosa Skipper (Cogia calchas)

Mazans Scallopwing (Staphylus mazans)

Common Sootywing (Pholisora catullus)

Salt-bush Sootywing (Pholisora alpheus)

Brown-banded Skipper (Timochares ruptifasciata)

White-patched Skipper (Chiomara georgina)

Mournful Duskywing (Erynnis tristis)

Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)

Sickle-winged Skipper (Eantis tamenund)

Hoary Skipper (Carrhenes canescens)

Texas Powdered Skipper (Systasea pulverulenta)

Common Streaky Skipper (Celotes nessus)

White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)

Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)

Desert Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus philetas)

Turk's-cap White-Skipper (Heliopetes macaira)

Laviana White-Skipper (Heliopetes laviana)

East-Mexican White-Skipper (Heliopetes sublinea)

Erichson's White-Skipper (Heliopyrgus domicella)

Southern Skipperling (Copaeodes minima)

Celia's Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes celia)

Nysa Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes nysa)

Julia's Skipper (Nastra julia)

Fawn-spotted Skipper (Cymaenes trebius)

Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)

Pale-rayed Skipper (Vidius perigenes)

Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)

Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)

Whirlabout (Polites vibex)

Southern Broken-Dash (Wallengrenia otho)

Sachem (Atalopedes campestris)

Common Mellana (Quasimellana eulogius)

Violet-banded Skipper (Nyctelius nyctelius)

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)

Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)

Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)

Ruby-spotted Swallowtail (Papilio anchisiades)

Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)

Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)

Boisduval's Yellow (Eurema boisduvaliana)

Mexican Yellow (Eurema mexicana)

Tailed Orange (Pyrisitia proterpia)

Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)

Mimosa Yellow (Pyrisitia nise)

Sleepy Orange (Abaeis nicippe)

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)

Southern Dogface (Zerene cesonia)

Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)

Large Orange Sulphur (Phoebis agarithe)

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)

Great Southern White (Ascia monuste)

Great Purple Hairstreak (Atlides halesus)

Silver-banded Hairstreak (Chlorostrymon simaethis)

Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)

Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)

Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon bazochii)

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon istapa)

Clytie Ministreak (Ministrymon clytie)

Cassius Blue (Leptotes cassius)

Western Pygmy-Blue (Brephidium exilis)

Ceraunus Blue (Hemiargus ceraunus)

Reakirt's Blue (Echinargus isola)

Fatal Metalmark (Calephelis nemesis)

Rounded Metalmark (Calephelis perditalis)

Red-bordered Metalmark (Caria ino)

Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)

Red-bordered Pixie (Melanis pixe)

Walker's Metalmark (Apodemia walkeri)

Curve-winged Metalmark (Emesis emesia)

American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)

Queen (Danaus gilippus)

Soldier (Danaus eresimus)

Band-celled Sister (Adelpha fessonia)

Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)

Julia Heliconian (Dryas iulia)

Zebra Heliconian (Heliconius charithonia)

Empress Leilia (Asterocampa leilia)

Tawny Emperor (Asterocampa clyton)

Blue-eyed Sailor (Dynamine dyonis)

Common Mestra (Mestra amymone)

Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)

American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)

Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)

Question Mark (Polygonia interrogationis)

White Peacock (Anartia jatrophae)

Crimson Patch (Chlosyne janais)

Definite Patch (Chlosyne definita)

Theona Checkerspot (Chlosyne theona)

Bordered Patch (Chlosyne lacinia)

Elada Checkerspot (Texola elada)

Texan Crescent (Anthanassa texana)

Chestnut Crescent (Anthanassa argentea)

Vesta Crescent (Phyciodes graphica)

Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)

Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)

Tropical Leafwing (Anaea aidea)

Hermes Satyr (Hermeuptychia hermes)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Butterflies of the Edinburg Scenic Wetlands
From: Javier Gonzalez <javsterkayak7 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2015 15:20:58 -0500
Hello all,

I've been keeping an eye on the butterflies along the gardens the last
couple of weeks here at the Edinburg Scenic Wetlands and World Birding
Center (Hidalgo Co.) while I attend to my daily work duties. Lots of
flowers are blooming now and the butterfly diversity is increasing!

Here's a list of what's flying (I'm sure I've missed a good amount):

-Giant Swallowtail
-Orange Sulphur
-White Angled-Sulphur (seen flying)
-Large Orange Sulphur
-Little Yellow
-Dainty Sulphur
-Dusky-blue Groundsteak (big recent hatch of these)
-Gray Hairstreak
-Cassius Blue
-Red-bordered Metalmark
-Bordered Patch
-Phaon Crescent
-Painted Lady
-Red Admiral
-Tawny Emperor
-Monarch (saw a few late March, but haven't seen any in the last couple of
weeks)
-Queen
-Guava Skipper
-Brown Longtail
-White Checkered-Skipper
-Tropical Checkered-Skipper
-Turk's Cap White-Skipper
-Fawn-spotted Skipper
-Clouded Skipper
-Fiery Skipper
-Whirlabout
-Southern Broken-Dash
-Celia's Roadside Skipper
-Eufala Skipper

I will try to keep a close eye for anything new and hopefully get another
checklist together in the near future. Enjoy the Spring time!

Naturalist Educator
-Javi Gonzalez

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2015 09:33:59 -0500
Hi Joanne,

Nicest thing a stranger's ever said to me. Thank you for the compliment! 

We have a conservation easement on 150 acres of land in central Texas. Doing 
what we can to bring it back from overgrazing for the previous one hundred and 
fifty years or so. Old stone walls dividing the pasture land were built around 
1847. As they've gone to ruin they've become places where oak and persimmon 
trees have rooted in and look like they've been there forever. 


Hopefully our butterfly gardens will help the locals and the monarch migration 
as well. 


Nice to hear from you. We're praying for rain.

Tim


On Apr 5, 2015, at 10:50 AM, Joanne Pospisil  wrote:

> Wow! I wish there was a way we could implement this! You make me proud to be 
a Texan, Tim! 

> 
>        Joanne Pospisil
> Look for me in the Garden
>   Garden Ideas & Design
>      Carrollton, Texas
>           214-502-4536 
>     gardenideas AT tx.rr.com
>         Sent from my iPad
> 
> On Apr 5, 2015, at 10:22 AM, Tim Jones  wrote:
> 
>> Hi Mike,
>> 
>> That was a tough one. Glad they got a handle on it. Who want's to be 
scraping dead butterflies off the windshield? Thank you for pointing out what 
should be obvious to anyone that drives a car - the idea to intentionally 
establish a butterfly corridor along a highway is a horrible idea. Something 
thought up by someone in the car wash industry, no doubt. 

>> 
>> Butterfly corridors need to be established along the fence lines AWAY from 
highways - un-mowed and un-cultivated pastural corridors through re-established 
prairie habitat. 

>> 
>> As a preface let me say that white-tailed deer are a menace to vegetation in 
our part of the world, second only to goats. (I can't even keep lily pads in a 
pond!) 

>> 
>> Part of a wildlife management plan used for an agricultural tax exemption in 
Texas involves removing old barbed and net wire fences so migratory wildlife 
can pass through, as well as ease the hazards to fawns. 

>> 
>> For a butterfly corridor, consider an old interior fence line once used to 
divide a pasture. One can take a little more than one fourth of a net wire 
fence at each of the fence line and turn it back to form a narrow corridor 
about six to eight feet wide that's half as long as the original fence. One can 
seed the interior of the narrow plot to where the deer can't get to the flowers 
and they don't want to jump in because it's confining. 

>> 
>> We have so many deer I've set up an experiment using tall, parallel fences 
spaced about ten feet apart where we have boxed in a narrow plot about a 
hundred feet long so the deer can't get in and forage forbs. This is a tall 2x4 
fence we salvaged from an old garden. (If/when anything comes up I'll send 
photos.) 

>> 
>> I have seen a few monarchs coming through Wimberley area. One was as pale as 
a glass of iced tea. 

>> 
>> Education of ranchers would help a lot. They're very quick to burn off 
anything that doesn't look like grass in their quest for more lbs of beef. A 
flowered berm enclosed in a doubled up fence row like I'm talking about could 
well serve as an erosion control feature. Thus you will have removed some 
fence, done erosion control, provided supplemental forage and provided habitat 
in one fell swoop. 

>> 
>> Tim Jones
>> Wimberley, Texas
>> 
>> On Apr 4, 2015, at 8:29 PM, Mike Quinn  wrote:
>> 
>>> The McKenna et al. (2001) paper is being brought up on facebook as a reason 
*not* to implement monarch corridors adjacent to hwys... 

>>> 
>>> ABSTRACT. We conducted this study to investigate the magnitude of roadway 
mortality of Lepidoptera in central Illinois.  Based on these data, the 
number of Lepidoptera killed along roadways for the entire state of Illinois 
during one week was estimated at more than 20,000,000 individuals. The number 
of monarch butterflies killed may have exceeded 500,000 individuals. 

>>> 
>>> McKenna D.D., McKenna K.M., Malcolm S.B., & M.R. Berenbaum. 2001. 
Implications of roadway mortality for populations of Lepidoptera in 
east-central Illinois. Journal of the Lepidopterist's Society 55(2): 63-68. 

>>> 
http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/2000s/2001/2001-55(2)63-McKenna.pdf 

>>> 
>>> Mike
>>> 
>>> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
>>> From: Mike Quinn 
>>> Date: Fri, Apr 3, 2015 at 5:53 PM
>>> Subject: anyone have any info on "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
>>> To: TXBL 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 'The planned I-35 monarch corridor' is mentioned in the following article:
>>> 
>>> THE QUIET REVOLUTION TURNING ROADSIDES INTO NATURE RESERVES
>>> BRANDON KEIM - WIRED, SCIENCE - 04.02.15
>>> http://www.wired.com/2015/04/roadside-utility-corridor-habitat/
>>> 
>>> Note, the photo appears to be of Enchanted Rock SP, n. of Fredericksburg, 
TX which is two counties over from I-35. The photo may or may not have anything 
to do with the I-35 monarch corridor. 

>>> 
>>> Any info much appreciated.
>>> 
>>> Thanks,
>>> 
>>> Mike Quinn, Austin
>>> ________________
>>> Texas Entomology
>>> http://texasento.net
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>> 
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma State Park - Sunday Butterfly Walk
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2015 17:06:18 -0500
Favorite sightings today - Clytie Ministreak and Great Southern White.
There were quite a few Walker's, Blue and Red-bordered Metalmarks, plenty
of skippers, but very few sulphurs.  At least five Mexican Bluewing were
relatively cooperative on Ebony Trail (bring the insect repellant).

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Hike *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walk* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walk* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m..
*Night Hike* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

​Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)
Checkered White (Pontia protodice)
Great Southern White (Ascia monuste)
Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Boisduval's Yellow (Eurema boisduvaliana)
Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon istapa)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Clytie Ministreak (Ministrymon clytie)
Ceraunus Blue (Hemiargus ceraunus)
Reakirt's Blue (Hemiargus isola)
Rounded Metalmark (Calephelis perditalis)
Red-bordered Metalmark (Caria ino)
Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)
Walker's Metalmark (Apodemia walkeri)
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)
Zebra Heliconian (Heliconius charithonia)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)
American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta0
Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
Tawny Emperor (Asterocampa clyton)
Gemmed Satyr (Cyllopsis gemma) - south side of the park only
Carolina Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)
Guava Skipper (Phocides polybius) - earlier in the week only
White-striped Longtail (Chioides catillus)
Mimosa Skipper (Cogia calchas)
Mazans Scallopwing (Staphylus mazans)
Sickle-winged Skipper (Eantis tamenund)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Laviana White-Skipper (Heliopetes laviana)
Fawn-spotted Skipper (Cymaenes odilia)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Southern Skipperling (Copaeodes minimus)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)
Whirlabout (Polites vibex)
Sachem (Atalopedes campestris)
Common Mellana (Quasimellana eulogius)
Celia's Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes celia)
Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)

​

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT SABER.NET>
Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2015 09:33:05 -0700
Remember back in the 1990s some monarch
conservationists thought the milkweed plants that grew WITHIN the 
corn and soybean crop fields were unproductive monarch 
breeding habitats because they were presumed to be contaminated 
with pesticides.

Then in the early 2000s studies determined the opposite was
true - that monarch caterpillar abundance was up to 4 times
greater on milkweed plants that were located WITHIN midwestern
corn and soybean crop fields, presumably because populations 
of monarch egg and caterpillar predators and parasites were 
substantially lower within the fields.

Now in 2015, history may be repeating itself as some monarch 
conservationists appear to assume mortality from impacts with 
cars is high without taking into account the possibility that this 
mortality might be low or moderate and more that offset by 
other factors such as lower populations of monarch egg 
and caterpillar predators and parasites.

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2015 11:01:59 -0500
Has anyone really mulled this April Fool's masterpiece over?

**********************************************************************
Brush Freeman
503-551-5150 Cell
120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
http://texasnaturenotes.blogspot.com/
Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas

On Sun, Apr 5, 2015 at 10:50 AM, Joanne Pospisil 
wrote:

> Wow!  I wish there was a way we could implement this!  You make me proud
> to be a Texan, Tim!
>
>        Joanne Pospisil
> Look for me in the Garden
>   Garden Ideas & Design
>      Carrollton, Texas
>           214-502-4536
>     gardenideas AT tx.rr.com
>         Sent from my iPad
>
> On Apr 5, 2015, at 10:22 AM, Tim Jones  wrote:
>
> Hi Mike,
>
> That was a tough one. Glad they got a handle on it. Who want's to be
> scraping dead butterflies off the windshield? Thank you for pointing out
> what should be obvious to anyone that drives a car - the idea to
> intentionally establish a butterfly corridor along a highway is a horrible
> idea. Something thought up by someone in the car wash industry, no doubt.
>
> Butterfly corridors need to be established along the fence lines AWAY from
> highways - un-mowed and un-cultivated pastural corridors through
> re-established prairie habitat.
>
> As a preface let me say that white-tailed deer are a menace to vegetation
> in our part of the world, second only to goats. (I can't even keep lily
> pads in a pond!)
>
> Part of a wildlife management plan used for an agricultural tax exemption
> in Texas involves removing old barbed and net wire fences so migratory
> wildlife can pass through, as well as ease the hazards to fawns.
>
> For a butterfly corridor, consider an old interior fence line once used to
> divide a pasture. One can take a little more than one fourth of a net wire
> fence at each of the fence line and turn it back to form a narrow corridor
> about six to eight feet wide that's half as long as the original fence. One
> can seed the interior of the narrow plot to where the deer can't get to the
> flowers and they don't want to jump in because it's confining.
>
> We have so many deer I've set up an experiment using tall, parallel fences
> spaced about ten feet apart where we have boxed in a narrow plot about a
> hundred feet long so the deer can't get in and forage forbs. This is a tall
> 2x4 fence we salvaged from an old garden. (If/when anything comes up I'll
> send photos.)
>
> I have seen a few monarchs coming through Wimberley area. One was as pale
> as a glass of iced tea.
>
> Education of ranchers would help a lot. They're very quick to burn off
> anything that doesn't look like grass in their quest for more lbs of beef.
> A flowered berm enclosed in a doubled up fence row like I'm talking about
> could well serve as an erosion control feature. Thus you will have removed
> some fence, done erosion control, provided supplemental forage and provided
> habitat in one fell swoop.
>
> Tim Jones
> Wimberley, Texas
>
> On Apr 4, 2015, at 8:29 PM, Mike Quinn  wrote:
>
> The McKenna et al. (2001) paper is being brought up on facebook as a
> reason *not* to implement monarch corridors adjacent to hwys...
>
> ABSTRACT. We conducted this study to investigate the magnitude of roadway
> mortality of Lepidoptera in central Illinois.  Based on these data,
> the number of Lepidoptera killed along roadways for the entire state of
> Illinois during one week was estimated at more than 20,000,000 individuals.
> The number of monarch butterflies killed may have exceeded 500,000
> individuals.
>
> McKenna D.D., McKenna K.M., Malcolm S.B., & M.R. Berenbaum. 2001.
> Implications of roadway mortality for populations of Lepidoptera in
> east-central Illinois. Journal of the Lepidopterist's Society 55(2): 63-68.
>
> http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/2000s/2001/2001-55(2)63-McKenna.pdf
>
> Mike
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Mike Quinn 
> Date: Fri, Apr 3, 2015 at 5:53 PM
> Subject: anyone have any info on "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
> To: TXBL 
>
>
> 'The planned I-35 monarch corridor' is mentioned in the following article:
>
> THE QUIET REVOLUTION TURNING ROADSIDES INTO NATURE RESERVES
> BRANDON KEIM - WIRED, SCIENCE - 04.02.15
> http://www.wired.com/2015/04/roadside-utility-corridor-habitat/
>
> Note, the photo appears to be of Enchanted Rock SP, n. of Fredericksburg,
> TX which is two counties over from I-35. The photo may or may not have
> anything to do with the I-35 monarch corridor.
>
> Any info much appreciated.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Mike Quinn, Austin
> ________________
> Texas Entomology
> http://texasento.net
>
> ======================================
> To unsubscribe, send the message SIGNOFF TX-BUTTERFLY 
toLISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 

> To change to the daily digest, send the message SET TX-BUTTERFLY DIGEST 
toLISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 

> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
>
>
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>
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
From: Joanne Pospisil <gardenideas AT TX.RR.COM>
Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2015 10:50:15 -0500
Wow! I wish there was a way we could implement this! You make me proud to be a 
Texan, Tim! 


       Joanne Pospisil
Look for me in the Garden
  Garden Ideas & Design
     Carrollton, Texas
          214-502-4536 
    gardenideas AT tx.rr.com
        Sent from my iPad

> On Apr 5, 2015, at 10:22 AM, Tim Jones  wrote:
> 
> Hi Mike,
> 
> That was a tough one. Glad they got a handle on it. Who want's to be scraping 
dead butterflies off the windshield? Thank you for pointing out what should be 
obvious to anyone that drives a car - the idea to intentionally establish a 
butterfly corridor along a highway is a horrible idea. Something thought up by 
someone in the car wash industry, no doubt. 

> 
> Butterfly corridors need to be established along the fence lines AWAY from 
highways - un-mowed and un-cultivated pastural corridors through re-established 
prairie habitat. 

> 
> As a preface let me say that white-tailed deer are a menace to vegetation in 
our part of the world, second only to goats. (I can't even keep lily pads in a 
pond!) 

> 
> Part of a wildlife management plan used for an agricultural tax exemption in 
Texas involves removing old barbed and net wire fences so migratory wildlife 
can pass through, as well as ease the hazards to fawns. 

> 
> For a butterfly corridor, consider an old interior fence line once used to 
divide a pasture. One can take a little more than one fourth of a net wire 
fence at each of the fence line and turn it back to form a narrow corridor 
about six to eight feet wide that's half as long as the original fence. One can 
seed the interior of the narrow plot to where the deer can't get to the flowers 
and they don't want to jump in because it's confining. 

> 
> We have so many deer I've set up an experiment using tall, parallel fences 
spaced about ten feet apart where we have boxed in a narrow plot about a 
hundred feet long so the deer can't get in and forage forbs. This is a tall 2x4 
fence we salvaged from an old garden. (If/when anything comes up I'll send 
photos.) 

> 
> I have seen a few monarchs coming through Wimberley area. One was as pale as 
a glass of iced tea. 

> 
> Education of ranchers would help a lot. They're very quick to burn off 
anything that doesn't look like grass in their quest for more lbs of beef. A 
flowered berm enclosed in a doubled up fence row like I'm talking about could 
well serve as an erosion control feature. Thus you will have removed some 
fence, done erosion control, provided supplemental forage and provided habitat 
in one fell swoop. 

> 
> Tim Jones
> Wimberley, Texas
> 
>> On Apr 4, 2015, at 8:29 PM, Mike Quinn  wrote:
>> 
>> The McKenna et al. (2001) paper is being brought up on facebook as a reason 
*not* to implement monarch corridors adjacent to hwys... 

>> 
>> ABSTRACT. We conducted this study to investigate the magnitude of roadway 
mortality of Lepidoptera in central Illinois.  Based on these data, the 
number of Lepidoptera killed along roadways for the entire state of Illinois 
during one week was estimated at more than 20,000,000 individuals. The number 
of monarch butterflies killed may have exceeded 500,000 individuals. 

>> 
>> McKenna D.D., McKenna K.M., Malcolm S.B., & M.R. Berenbaum. 2001. 
Implications of roadway mortality for populations of Lepidoptera in 
east-central Illinois. Journal of the Lepidopterist's Society 55(2): 63-68. 

>> 
http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/2000s/2001/2001-55(2)63-McKenna.pdf 

>> 
>> Mike
>> 
>> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
>> From: Mike Quinn 
>> Date: Fri, Apr 3, 2015 at 5:53 PM
>> Subject: anyone have any info on "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
>> To: TXBL 
>> 
>> 
>> 'The planned I-35 monarch corridor' is mentioned in the following article:
>> 
>> THE QUIET REVOLUTION TURNING ROADSIDES INTO NATURE RESERVES
>> BRANDON KEIM - WIRED, SCIENCE - 04.02.15
>> http://www.wired.com/2015/04/roadside-utility-corridor-habitat/
>> 
>> Note, the photo appears to be of Enchanted Rock SP, n. of Fredericksburg, TX 
which is two counties over from I-35. The photo may or may not have anything to 
do with the I-35 monarch corridor. 

>> 
>> Any info much appreciated.
>> 
>> Thanks,
>> 
>> Mike Quinn, Austin
>> ________________
>> Texas Entomology
>> http://texasento.net
>> ======================================
>> To unsubscribe, send the message SIGNOFF TX-BUTTERFLY to
>> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
>> To change to the daily digest, send the message SET TX-BUTTERFLY DIGEST to
>> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
>> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
> 
> ======================================
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> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2015 10:22:22 -0500
Hi Mike,

That was a tough one. Glad they got a handle on it. Who want's to be scraping 
dead butterflies off the windshield? Thank you for pointing out what should be 
obvious to anyone that drives a car - the idea to intentionally establish a 
butterfly corridor along a highway is a horrible idea. Something thought up by 
someone in the car wash industry, no doubt. 


Butterfly corridors need to be established along the fence lines AWAY from 
highways - un-mowed and un-cultivated pastural corridors through re-established 
prairie habitat. 


As a preface let me say that white-tailed deer are a menace to vegetation in 
our part of the world, second only to goats. (I can't even keep lily pads in a 
pond!) 


Part of a wildlife management plan used for an agricultural tax exemption in 
Texas involves removing old barbed and net wire fences so migratory wildlife 
can pass through, as well as ease the hazards to fawns. 


For a butterfly corridor, consider an old interior fence line once used to 
divide a pasture. One can take a little more than one fourth of a net wire 
fence at each of the fence line and turn it back to form a narrow corridor 
about six to eight feet wide that's half as long as the original fence. One can 
seed the interior of the narrow plot to where the deer can't get to the flowers 
and they don't want to jump in because it's confining. 


We have so many deer I've set up an experiment using tall, parallel fences 
spaced about ten feet apart where we have boxed in a narrow plot about a 
hundred feet long so the deer can't get in and forage forbs. This is a tall 2x4 
fence we salvaged from an old garden. (If/when anything comes up I'll send 
photos.) 


I have seen a few monarchs coming through Wimberley area. One was as pale as a 
glass of iced tea. 


Education of ranchers would help a lot. They're very quick to burn off anything 
that doesn't look like grass in their quest for more lbs of beef. A flowered 
berm enclosed in a doubled up fence row like I'm talking about could well serve 
as an erosion control feature. Thus you will have removed some fence, done 
erosion control, provided supplemental forage and provided habitat in one fell 
swoop. 


Tim Jones
Wimberley, Texas

On Apr 4, 2015, at 8:29 PM, Mike Quinn  wrote:

> The McKenna et al. (2001) paper is being brought up on facebook as a reason 
*not* to implement monarch corridors adjacent to hwys... 

> 
> ABSTRACT. We conducted this study to investigate the magnitude of roadway 
mortality of Lepidoptera in central Illinois.  Based on these data, the 
number of Lepidoptera killed along roadways for the entire state of Illinois 
during one week was estimated at more than 20,000,000 individuals. The number 
of monarch butterflies killed may have exceeded 500,000 individuals. 

> 
> McKenna D.D., McKenna K.M., Malcolm S.B., & M.R. Berenbaum. 2001. 
Implications of roadway mortality for populations of Lepidoptera in 
east-central Illinois. Journal of the Lepidopterist's Society 55(2): 63-68. 

> http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/2000s/2001/2001-55(2)63-McKenna.pdf
> 
> Mike
> 
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Mike Quinn 
> Date: Fri, Apr 3, 2015 at 5:53 PM
> Subject: anyone have any info on "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
> To: TXBL 
> 
> 
> 'The planned I-35 monarch corridor' is mentioned in the following article:
> 
> THE QUIET REVOLUTION TURNING ROADSIDES INTO NATURE RESERVES
> BRANDON KEIM - WIRED, SCIENCE - 04.02.15
> http://www.wired.com/2015/04/roadside-utility-corridor-habitat/
> 
> Note, the photo appears to be of Enchanted Rock SP, n. of Fredericksburg, TX 
which is two counties over from I-35. The photo may or may not have anything to 
do with the I-35 monarch corridor. 

> 
> Any info much appreciated.
> 
> Thanks,
> 
> Mike Quinn, Austin
> ________________
> Texas Entomology
> http://texasento.net
> ======================================
> To unsubscribe, send the message SIGNOFF TX-BUTTERFLY to
> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
> To change to the daily digest, send the message SET TX-BUTTERFLY DIGEST to
> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: FWS reference to the I-35 corridor and monarchs
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Apr 2015 23:56:12 -0500
Press Release
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Teams with Conservation Partners to Launch
Campaign to Save Beleaguered Monarch Butterfly, Engage Millions of Americans

February 9, 2015



"From California to the Corn Belt, the Service will also fund numerous
conservation projects totaling $2 million this year to restore and enhance
more than 200,000 acres of habitat for monarchs while also supporting over
750 schoolyard habitats and pollinator gardens. Many of the projects will
focus on the I-35 corridor from Texas to Minnesota, areas that provide
important spring and summer breeding habitats in the eastern population’s
central flyway."

full text:
http://www.fws.gov/news/ShowNews.cfm?ID=6F984BBC-D85B-FEE8-4C58EF75037F8B59

--------------

so it appears that the phrase, "I-35 monarch corridor" is just something
coined by Wired (http://wrd.cm/1GVaQgO), and not a narrowly-defined
corridor along the lines of the I-35 R-O-W...


Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT SABER.NET>
Date: Sat, 4 Apr 2015 19:45:49 -0700
I am an ardent supporter of protecting and expanding milkweed 
patches that grow along roadsides because I have witnessed
first hand how good monarch reproduction is on those milkweeds.

Here are several short videos Ive shot of newly emerged
monarchs, nectaring monarchs, monarch chrysalids and 
caterpillars as well as honeybees and hairstreak butterflies 
Ive seen along Sierra Nevada foothill roadways in California 
with fast moving traffic:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zS2jtcABI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwz9TBX3RwY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i0KESfAlghg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLgBYvUFSiM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5zVL9pr93A

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DpQOx_tMEo0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qgK9K4m2Ugc

Ive also shot still photos of monarch caterpillars on I-35 
road bank milkweeds in Oklahoma just north of Oklahoma
City in late September.  

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Apr 2015 21:15:42 -0500
related migrant butterfly mortality study from India:

Santhosh, S. and S. Basavarajappa. 2014. Road Mortality of Migrant
Butterflies [Nymphalidae: Danaiane] at National Highway-209 in
Chamarajanagar District of Karnataka, India. Indian Journal of Applied
Research 4(9) 553-557.

http://www.theglobaljournals.com/ijar/file.php?val=September_2014_1409575874__166.pdf 


Mike

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Mike Quinn 
Date: Sat, Apr 4, 2015 at 8:22 PM
Subject: Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
To: Dplex 


The McKenna et al. (2001) paper is being brought up on facebook as a reason
*not* to implement monarch corridors adjacent to hwys...

McKenna D.D., McKenna K.M., Malcolm S.B., & M.R. Berenbaum. 2001.
Implications of roadway mortality for populations of Lepidoptera in
east-central Illinois. Journal of the Lepidopterist's Society 55(2): 63-68.

http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/2000s/2001/2001-55(2)63-McKenna.pdf

ABSTRACT. We conducted this study to investigate the magnitude of roadway
mortality of Lepidoptera in central Illinois.  Based on these data,
the number of Lepidoptera killed along roadways for the entire state of
Illinois during one week was estimated at more than 20,000,000 individuals.
The number of monarch butterflies killed may have exceeded 500,000
individuals.

Mike

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Mike Quinn 
Date: Fri, Apr 3, 2015 at 5:20 PM
Subject: anyone have any info on "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
To: Dplex 


'The planned I-35 monarch corridor' is mentioned in the following article:

THE QUIET REVOLUTION TURNING ROADSIDES INTO NATURE RESERVES
BRANDON KEIM - WIRED, SCIENCE - 04.02.15
http://www.wired.com/2015/04/roadside-utility-corridor-habitat/

Note, the photo appears to be of Enchanted Rock SP, n. of Fredericksburg,
TX which is two counties over from I-35. The photo may or may not have
anything to do with the I-35 monarch corridor.

Any info much appreciated.

Thanks,

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Apr 2015 20:29:30 -0500
The McKenna et al. (2001) paper is being brought up on facebook as a reason
*not* to implement monarch corridors adjacent to hwys...

ABSTRACT. We conducted this study to investigate the magnitude of roadway
mortality of Lepidoptera in central Illinois.  Based on these data,
the number of Lepidoptera killed along roadways for the entire state of
Illinois during one week was estimated at more than 20,000,000 individuals.
The number of monarch butterflies killed may have exceeded 500,000
individuals.

McKenna D.D., McKenna K.M., Malcolm S.B., & M.R. Berenbaum. 2001.
Implications of roadway mortality for populations of Lepidoptera in
east-central Illinois. Journal of the Lepidopterist's Society 55(2): 63-68.
http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/2000s/2001/2001-55(2)63-McKenna.pdf

Mike

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Mike Quinn 
Date: Fri, Apr 3, 2015 at 5:53 PM
Subject: anyone have any info on "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
To: TXBL 


'The planned I-35 monarch corridor' is mentioned in the following article:

THE QUIET REVOLUTION TURNING ROADSIDES INTO NATURE RESERVES
BRANDON KEIM - WIRED, SCIENCE - 04.02.15
http://www.wired.com/2015/04/roadside-utility-corridor-habitat/

Note, the photo appears to be of Enchanted Rock SP, n. of Fredericksburg,
TX which is two counties over from I-35. The photo may or may not have
anything to do with the I-35 monarch corridor.

Any info much appreciated.

Thanks,

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

======================================
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk, Apr 3, 2015
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 3 Apr 2015 19:44:22 -0500
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk Friday Apr 3, 2015

It was hot, sunny, and windy. We found 37 species, almost all on the hike,
a few before. The big surprise was the Hammock Skipper on Crucita back of
the visitor center. Other highlights were the Guava Skipper seen by Ginny
and Mike in the vicinity of the bait log, and Two-Barred Flashers seen just
before the hike began.

We have lots of blooms, our Lantanas are lush, and lots of Tamaulipa azurea
is still fresh.

In the week prior Great Southern White, Olive-clouded Skipper, and Empress
Leilia were spotted.

Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor
Black Swallowtail  Papilio polyxenes
Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Checkered White  Pontia protodice
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Bordered Patch  Chlosyne lacinia
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Guava Skipper  Phocides polybius
Hammock SkipperPolygonus leo
White-striped Longtail  Chioides catillus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator
Mazans Scallopwing  Staphylus mazans
Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Sachem  Atalopedes campestris
Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30PM.
Tuesday plant walks continue at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: anyone have any info on "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 3 Apr 2015 18:20:43 -0500
Have had two on Rusty Blackhaw in Utley...about 4 days ago.

On Friday, April 3, 2015, Mike Quinn  wrote:

> 'The planned I-35 monarch corridor' is mentioned in the following article:
>
> THE QUIET REVOLUTION TURNING ROADSIDES INTO NATURE RESERVES
> BRANDON KEIM - WIRED, SCIENCE - 04.02.15
> http://www.wired.com/2015/04/roadside-utility-corridor-habitat/
>
> Note, the photo appears to be of Enchanted Rock SP, n. of Fredericksburg,
> TX which is two counties over from I-35. The photo may or may not have
> anything to do with the I-35 monarch corridor.
>
> Any info much appreciated.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Mike Quinn, Austin
> ________________
> Texas Entomology
> http://texasento.net
>
> ======================================
> To unsubscribe, send the message SIGNOFF TX-BUTTERFLY 
toLISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
 

> To change to the daily digest, send the message SET TX-BUTTERFLY DIGEST 
toLISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
 

> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
>
>

-- 
**********************************************************************
Brush Freeman
503-551-5150 Cell
120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
http://texasnaturenotes.blogspot.com/
Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: anyone have any info on "The planned I-35 monarch corridor"?
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 3 Apr 2015 17:53:15 -0500
'The planned I-35 monarch corridor' is mentioned in the following article:

THE QUIET REVOLUTION TURNING ROADSIDES INTO NATURE RESERVES
BRANDON KEIM - WIRED, SCIENCE - 04.02.15
http://www.wired.com/2015/04/roadside-utility-corridor-habitat/

Note, the photo appears to be of Enchanted Rock SP, n. of Fredericksburg,
TX which is two counties over from I-35. The photo may or may not have
anything to do with the I-35 monarch corridor.

Any info much appreciated.

Thanks,

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

======================================
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Fwd: Glassberg casts doubt on fear of tropical milkweed...
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 3 Apr 2015 13:41:16 -0500
Thanks to Paul Addington, of Austin, for posting the link to Glassberg's
article:

*Tropical milkweed and the injurious effects of well-meaning people* by
Jeffrey Glassberg

http://nababutterfly.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Tropical-Milkweed.pdf 


Here are working links to two URL's sited in the article that I was not
able to cut-and-paste into my browser:

Maeckle, 2015.

http://texasbutterflyranch.com/2015/02/16/q-a-dr-lincoln-brower-talks-ethics-endangered-species-milkweed-and-monarchs/ 


Monarch Joint Venture. 2015.

http://monarchjointventure.org/news-events/news/2015-population-update-and-estimating-the-number-of-overwintering-monarchs 


Mike

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Mike Quinn 
Date: Wed, Apr 1, 2015 at 2:21 PM
Subject: Glassberg casts doubt on fear of tropical milkweed...
To: TXBL , AustinButterflies <
austinbutterflies AT yahoogroups.com>, Dplex 


In the current issue of American Butterflies, Glassberg cites data
suggesting that OE infection rates are not strongly correlated with
tropical milkweed nor with non-migratory monarch populations.

Glassberg, J. 2015. Tropical milkweed and the injurious effects of
well-meaning people. American Butterflies, 22(4): 4-10.



Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Thanks for the first of the season monarch reports from s. TX
From: Mitch Heindel <mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM>
Date: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 13:02:31 -0700
Hi all,

Just had my first of year Monarch (a big worn pale female)
in front yard about 2:45 p.m. Monday March 30.  Only one
year in prior 10 was a later first of year date than this
years' arrival.

Mitch Heindel
Utopia
99x29  AT  1350'

On 2015-03-30 09:39, Mike Quinn wrote:
> I haven't seen any here locally in c. TX yet, but apparently a few
> have already been spotted up on the Red River:
> 
> Mike Quinn, Austin
> ________________
> Texas Entomology
> http://texasento.net [3]

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: flying in Falcon Heights
From: Berry Nall <lb AT THENALLS.NET>
Date: Sun, 29 Mar 2015 21:58:52 -0500
Hi,
It's been slow, but I saw 2-3 Monarchs today, all apparently headed east or 
north-east. Also a worn White angled-Sulphur. 

Berry Nall

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Thanks for the first of the season monarch reports from s. TX
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 11:39:33 -0500
I haven't seen any here locally in c. TX yet, but apparently a few have
already been spotted up on the Red River:

http://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch_spring2015.html

Here's the link to the sighting data reported to Journey North:

https://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/Sightings_All.html

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma State Park - Sunday Butterfly Walk and weekly sightings
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 Mar 2015 19:26:32 -0500
This lovely sunny, blustery day brought our first Monarch of the season.
There are a few Mimosa Skippers in the garden now.  Everyone out for the
walk was able to see both Walker's and Blue Metalmark.  I'm pretty sure a
Band-celled Sister zipped past me a couple days ago on the last stretch of
the tram road.  This is the only one I have seen in a while.​

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Hike *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walk* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walk* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m..
*Night Hike* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

​Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)
Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Boisduval's Yellow (Eurema boisduvaliana)
Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)
Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon istapa)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Clytie Ministreak (Ministrymon clytie)
Ceraunus Blue (Hemiargus ceraunus)
Reakirt's Blue (Hemiargus isola)
Fatal Metalmark (Calephelis nemesis)
Rounded Metalmark (Calephelis perditalis)
Red-bordered Metalmark (Caria ino)
Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)
Walker's Metalmark (Apodemia walkeri)
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)
Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)
Zebra Heliconian (Heliconius charithonia)
Bordered Patch (Chlosyne lacinia)
Vesta Crescent (Phyciodes vesta)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)​
​American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
Band-celled Sister (Adelpha fessonia)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
Tawny Emperor (Asterocampa clyton)
Gemmed Satyr (Cyllopsis gemma)
Carolina (South Texas) Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)​
Monarch (Danaus plexippus)
Guava Skipper (Phocides polybius)
White-striped Longtail (Chioides catillus)
Brown Longtail (Urbanus procne)
Mimosa Skipper (Cogia calchas)
Mazans Scallopwing (Staphylus mazans)
Sickle-winged Skipper (Eantis tamenund)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Laviana White-Skipper (Heliopetes laviana)
Turk's-cap White-Skipper (Heliopetes macaira)
Fawn-Spotted Skipper (Cymaenes odilia)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Southern Skipperling (Copaeodes minimus)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)
Whirlabout (Polites vibex)
Southern Broken-Dash (Wallengrenia otho)
Common Mellana (Quasimellana eulogius)
Celia's Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes celia)
Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Glassberg casts doubt on fear of tropical milkweed...
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT SABER.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Apr 2015 12:41:15 -0700
The fall monarch migrations in southeastern Australia and on 
the north and south islands of New Zealand are in full swing right 
now and their migrant monarchs look lively and vigorous
http://www.imagegainer.com/images/PaulCherubini/ivynz.jpg
(photo taken at Christchurch, New Zealand within the past
5 days) despite the fact that they breed exclusively on evergreen 
tropical milkweeds (Gomphocarpus physocarpa & fruticosa):

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Glassberg casts doubt on fear of tropical milkweed...
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 1 Apr 2015 14:21:05 -0500
In the current issue of American Butterflies, Glassberg cites data
suggesting that OE infection rates are not strongly correlated with
tropical milkweed nor with non-migratory monarch populations.

Glassberg, J. 2015. Tropical milkweed and the injurious effects of
well-meaning people. American Butterflies, 22(4): 4-10.

Also, if you note, the current northernmost eastern monarchs, ne TX and
coastal SC, both emigrated out of areas of relatively high densities of
tropical milkweed, namely the upper coast of TX and the FL peninsula which
suggests tropical milkweed isn't a "trap" for migratory monarchs. (Not to
mention the monarchs currently crossing the Rio Grande having passed
through the region where tropical milkweed is native.)

Spring 2015 Monarch Migration Map - Journey North
http://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch_spring2015.html

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Life Cycle of a Guava Skipper has been published
From: "David T. Dauphin" <dauphins AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 22:35:43 -0600
Jan has just completed a photo essay on the Life Cycle of a Guava Skipper 
-Phocides polybius lilea. It is quite long, but is probably the most detailed 
of any Guava Skipper life cycle ever published. To view this study, go to 
http://www.thedauphins.net/id123.html . 


David Dauphin
Mission, TX
For Valley wildlife watching info, go to
http://www.thedauphins.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: First of Spring Falcate Orangetip
From: Willie Sekula <wsekula AT COPPER.NET>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 11:59:38 -0600
I saw my FOS Falacate Orangetip a while ago near Fashing in Atascosa County.

Willie Sekula
Falls City

Sent from my iPhone

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Thanks for Junonia help
From: Anne Toal <bwp AT GTOAL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:22:03 -0600
Thanks to everyone who responded to my question about the photo of what
seems to be universally-agreed is a Junonia coenia. I originally recalled
having taken it at South Padre Island, but checking the geotag on the
picture, it appears to have been shot in Edinburg. My only defense is it
was 2007 and the details have dimmed with the passage of time :-)

I have corrected the listing on my Flickr page and will be working with
Wikimedia to get that one taken care of.

Anne Toal
Edinburg

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Differences between two junonia
From: Anne Toal <bwp AT GTOAL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 21:37:35 -0600
One of my butterfly photos got picked up by Wikipedia. The description
reads "Description said *Junonia evarete*, but it looks more like *Junonia
coenia*."

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tropical_buckeye_(Junonia_evarete).jpg

I shot this picture near the South Padre Island Convention Center, and I
remember that day thinking that the white marks were less vivid than the
Buckeyes we have in the Upper Valley, so it would be evarete rather than
coenia. However this Wikimedia page has me second-guessing myself. Could
someone please advise which one it is?

Thanks,
Anne Toal
Edinburg

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 17:36:28 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk Friday Feb 20, 2015



Winds were howling, 30mph, but it was warm. The predicted clouds did not
happen and we had full sun for the afternoon. We stayed in the sheltered
areas with sunny spots and found 26 species on the walk.



Highlights were Mournful Duskywing, Clytie Ministreak, and Celia's Roadside
Skipper.



In the week before there was a Silver-banded Hairstreak photographed.
Today, Saturday, had very nice weather and additional species seen were:
Black and Pipevine Swallowtails, Mexican Bluewings, South Texas Satyrs,
Sickle-winged Skipper, Tropical Leafwing, and Pale-banded Crescent.



Our group was large and I thank Dave Elder, Ginny Musgrave, and Mike
Rickard for their help finding, identifying, and showing butterflies to
folks.

I would also like to thank Ranger John Yochum for delivering cupcakes in
celebration of May Snider's birthday. We have fun on our walks.



Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Pearl Crescent  Phyciodes tharos
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Mazans Scallopwing  Staphylus mazans
Mournful Duskywing  Erynnis tristis
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30PM.
Tuesday plant walk at 10AM - Plants of the Camino de Aves Trail

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma State Park - Sunday Butterfly Walk
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 15 Feb 2015 18:51:30 -0600
This was an excellent day for beginners (not a confusing number of
species)!  We started with some very nice male and female Blue Metalmarks,
found several skipper species, Phaon Crescent, and a few others.  We ended
with a Cloudless Sulphur.  The sulphur was intent on finding the perfect
spot to tuck in and roost until the wind died back.  At one point it
dislodged a second Cloudless Sulphur.  We were all impressed with how well
hidden it instantly became each time it tested a new roost.

Mike Rickard's Violet-banded Skipper from yesterday was not relocated.
Before the walk an interesting very brown Silver-banded Hairstreak was in
the yellow blooms next to a patch of verbena.  It definitely looked worn,
but was still surprisingly brown.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Hike *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walk* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walk* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m..
*Night Hike* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

​Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)
Lyside​ Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Little Yellow (Nathalis iole) - yesterday
Silver-banded hairstreak (Chlorostrymon simaethis)
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Fatal Metalmark (Calephelis nemesis)
Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes texana)
​Question Mark (Polygonia interrogationis) - yesterday
Carolina Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)
*back to Carolina Satyr since this name matches the field guides
Brown Longtail (Urbanus procne)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Fawn-spotted Skipper (Cymaenes odilia)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)
Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Violet-banded Skipper at Resaca de la Palma
From: Mike Rickard <mikearickard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 2015 22:15:41 -0600
Ginny and I photographed a Violet-banded Skipper (Nyctelius nyctelius)
today at Resaca de la Palma SP.  It was visiting verbenas in the butterfly
garden.  This is normally a fall species with almost all records from
Sep-Dec.

Mike Rickard
Mission, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015 21:08:37 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk Friday Feb 13, 2015



The weather was cloudy and cooler, but the sun broke through for a short
time and butterflies flew. We started out strong with 10 species in the
first 15 minutes of the walk, but then the clouds returned. 20 species were
seen for the day.



The highlight was a bright winter form Clytie Ministreak well photographed
by the group.



During the previous week we walked out to the salt flats to see our Western
Pygmy Blues and had a mint fresh male Great Purple Hairstreak along the
way. We also had a Lantana Scrub Hairstreak on a Croton flower during the
plant walk on Tuesday.



Checkered White  Pontia protodice
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

 Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30.
Tuesday Feb 17 plant walk at 10AM - Vines of Estero

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting, February 23, 2015
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015 11:55:40 -0600
Hi everyone,



Here is the information for upcoming events and meetings of the Austin
Butterfly Forum. Thanks for helping us to get the word out.



The Austin Butterfly Forum meets at the Zilker Botanical Garden Center
 at 7:00 pm on the 4th Monday of every month
except for December. Most meetings are free and open to the public.



Each meeting features an educational program, but we like to socialize a
bit beforehand. Sometimes members will bring caterpillars or collections
for display, and sometimes we have special opportunities such as plant
giveaways. The meetings are also a good place to hear special announcements
and learn about new events.  Everyone interested in butterflies and other
invertebrates is welcome! Please come join us!



Zilker Botanical Garden Center, 7 pm; free.



*FEBRUARY 23, 2015, 7 PM *

*How Butterflies Can Teach Us About Natural Selection: presented by Peg
Wallace*



Charles Darwin published his thesis “The Origin of Species by Means of
Natural Selection” in 1859. The idea of “evolution” is familiar to most 
of 

us, but the mechanism proposed by Darwin may not be as familiar. He called
this mechanism “natural selection”, to distinguish it from the type of
changes in species that we can see brought about by human selection.



This discussion will outline the basics of evolution and natural selection
using examples from the world of insects, especially butterflies. Peg
Wallace has a Master’s in Geography from the University of Texas, and
worked as a teaching assistant in genetics for 5 years. She is fascinated
with the topics of genetics, evolution and ecology, and enjoys teaching
these concepts.


FEBRUARY 20, 2015:  LIFETIME LEARNING INSTITUTE CLASS:  INSECT SAFARI (8
Classes; Requires Preregistration)

Join us for an intimate look at the little creatures that rule the world
and meet some of the strangest beasts around. Of all the animal species on
our planet, 4 out of 5 are insects! They are a major component of
terrestrial ecosystems, and include some of the important pollinators,
pests, recyclers, and some of the most fascinating beings on Earth. We will
explore this delightful array of animals through colorful slideshow
presentations, focusing on basic identification, behaviors, lifestyles and
associations. Short field trips near our meeting place. Pith helmets
optional!



Instructor: Valerie Bugh



Course #63; Limit 20.

*Time: *10:00—Noon Fridays, First Class is Feb. 20 (8 total classes)

*Place: *Northwest Recreation Center
2913 Northland Drive (78757)


Valerie Bugh, a longtime member of the Butterfly Forum, is a local
naturalist specializing in the arthropods of the Austin area, with
interests in taxonomy and photography. She runs the Fauna Project at the
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, leads insect discovery walks, teaches
entomology courses, provides insect/spider identifications, gives talks to
local organizations, and has published a pocket guide to "The Butterflies
of Central Texas."

To register for this class, visit the Lifetime Learning Institute website
at www.lliaustin.org
 or call
512-206- 4232 for more information.  Class fees at Lifetime Learning
Institute are $20 for each eight week course.



*FEBRUARY 28, 2015 TEXAS POLLINATOR POWWOW (See www.wildflower.org/events
 for more details)*



*MARCH 23, 2015, AUSTIN BUTTERFLY FORUM  MEETING AT 7 PM: TOPIC TBA*



For more information on the Austin Butterfly Forum, please see our website:
http://www.austinbutterflies.org/



Thanks for your help in publicizing our meetings. Hope to see you there!

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma State Park - Sunday Butterfly Walk
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 8 Feb 2015 17:23:49 -0600
Dusky-blue Groundstreak, Fawn-spotted Skipper, Phaon Crescent (all fresh),
Little Yellow, Blue Metalmark and Cloudness Sulphur are the common species
we found.  The most interesting sighting this afternoon turned out to be a
very worn Great Southern White.  We also found a single Laviana
White-Skipper.  At 20+ mph, wind was a limiting factor, yet we still ended
the day with 22 species.  Mexican Bluewing was reported before the walk
only. A single Zebra Heliconian zipped by the garden mid morning.  Gemmed
Satyr and Mazans Scallopwing were seen by others earlier in the day but are
not included in this number.  For Gemmed Satyr, the back end of the tram
road and the end of Flycatcher Trail are good places to check.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Hike *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walk* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walk* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m..
*Night Hike* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

​Great Southern White (Ascia monuste)
Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)
Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)
Silver-banded Hairstreak (Chlorostrymon simaethis)
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)
Zebra Heliconian (Heliconius charithonia)
Vesta Crescent (Phyciodes vesta)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)
American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis) - Saturday only
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
South Texas Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Laviana White-Skipper (Heliopetes laviana)
Fawn-spotted Skipper (Cymaenes odilia)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)
​

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Feb 2015 19:33:40 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk Friday Feb 6, 2015



A cloudy day in the low 60s, not the best weather, but 10 of us went out
searching for butterflies. We have great Azurea and Lantana flowers and
they may have helped a bit, but the constant colder-than-normal winter days
have taken their toll on butterfly numbers. We found only 8 species.



We couldn't find the Great Purple Hairstreak seen yesterday.



Between butterflies we took time to have great looks at Huisache Girdling
Beetle, and a stunning Tortoise Beetle on the Anacua leaves. We even saw
Western Tanager, Summer Tanager, and Orchard Oriole, uncommon wintering
birds here at the park, so in spite of the shortage of butterflies everyone
had a good time.



Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Queen  Danaus gilippus
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Monsanto Crops Pushing Monarch Butterfly to 'Verge of Extinction'
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 2015 20:54:51 -0600
Likely as not the corn being grown can't even be eaten by human beings but only 
used to make corn ethanol of questionable contribution to climate change at 
all. 

Tim

Monsanto Crops Pushing Monarch Butterfly to 'Verge of Extinction'

http://www.commondreams.org/news/2015/02/05/monsanto-crops-pushing-monarch-butterfly-verge-extinction 

Thursday, February 05, 2015
byCommon Dreams

'The alarming decline of monarchs is driven in large part' by Roundup Ready 
crops, Center for Food Safety finds 

byDeirdre Fulton, staff writer

Herbicide-resistant genetically modified crops have brought the iconic monarch 
butterfly to the brink of extinction, according to a new report presented by 
the Center for Food Safety to Congress on Thursday. 


The report, Monarchs in Peril (pdf), is the most comprehensive look yet at how 
Monsanto's 'Roundup Ready' crops have helped decimate the monarch population, 
which has declined by 90 percent in the past 20 years. 


"This report is a wake-up call. This iconic species is on the verge of 
extinction because of Monsanto's Roundup Ready crop system," said Andrew 
Kimbrell, executive director at Center for Food Safety. "To let the monarch 
butterfly die out in order to allow Monsanto to sell its signature herbicide 
for a few more years is simply shameful." 


[]
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma State Park - Sunday Butterfly Walk
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2015 09:12:24 -0600
American Lady, Zebra Heliconian and Red Admiral were out and showy Sunday
afternoon.  Mexican Bluewing took a little more time and patience.  Elbow
Bush is starting to bloom.  The small, pale flowers attract a variety of
butterflies.  Mistflower is also blooming throughout the park.  Satyrs may
be in edge areas of the garden but are easiest to find on Bobcat and the
last stretch of Flycatcher.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Hike *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walk* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walk* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m..
*Night Hike* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

​Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)
Large Orange Sulphur (Phoebis agarithe)
Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Boisduval's Yellow (Eurema boisduvaliana)
Little Yellow (Pyrisitia Lisa)
Silver-banded Hairstreak (Chlorostrymon simaethis)
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon istapa)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Reakirt's Blue (Hemiargus isola)
Fatal Metalmark (Calephelis nemesis)
Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)
Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)
Zebra Heliconian (Heliconius charithonia)
Vesta Crescent (Phyciodes vesta)
American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
South Texas Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)
Brown Longtail (Urbanus procne)
Mimosa Skipper (Cogia calchas)
Sickle-winged Skipper (Eantis tamenund)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Laviana White-Skipper (Heliopetes laviana)
Fawn-spotted Skipper (Cymaenes odilia)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema odilia)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)
Whirlabout (Polites vibex)
Sachem (Atalopedes campestris)​

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 19:33:48 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Fri Jan 30, 2015



The weather forecast was for clouds, rain and 68 F, but the clouds broke
giving us sun for about half the butterfly walk. Numbers were low but we
managed to tally a surprising 20 species with most being found around our
Taumalipa azurea which is in full bloom. Some, like the Painted Lady, were
very fresh and posed for pictures. Weather during the previous week was
better, with Mexican Bluewing and Great Purple Hairstreak seen by visitors,
but we could not find them during the walk. We got a tram ride out to check
for Western Pygmy Blue and eventually found just one in the usual spot.
Thanks to Mike Rickard, Ginny Musgrave, Dave Elder, and Susan Keefer for
their help with spotting and making sure everyone had good looks at the
butterflies.



Little Yellow  Eurema lisa

Dainty Sulphur  Nathalis iole

Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa

Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon

Western Pygmy-Blue  Brephidium exile

American Snout  Libytheana carinenta

Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon

Painted Lady  Vanessa cardui

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

Queen  Danaus gilippus

White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis

White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Sachem  Atalopedes campestris

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala



Rick Snider - Host volunteer

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Texas Pollinator PowWow @ Austin (LBJWC) - February 28, $25
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 16:00:17 -0600
Texas Pollinator Pow-Wow,
Austin, February 28, $25

Information

http://txpollinatorpowwow-part2.weebly.com/event-information-and-registration.html 


Schedule:
http://txpollinatorpowwow-part2.weebly.com/schedule.html

Eight speakers, two dozen exhibitors, and a hosting facility (the Lady Bird
Johnson Wildflower Center) dedicated to the mission
http://txpollinatorpowwow-part2.weebly.com/speaker-information.html

What:
A pollinator conservation conference for South Central Texas and beyond

When:
Saturday, February 28, 2015; 8:00 am - 5:30 pm

Where:
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
https://www.wildflower.org/architecture/?id=auditorium
4801 La Crosse Avenue
Austin, TX 78739

Why:
To provide information, resources and networking opportunities to natural
resource management professionals and volunteers, and the community at
large, to empower them in conserving our pollinators and their habitats
across the landscape

Registration
Fee:    $25 / person, received no later than February 24th

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: monarch overwintering population in Mexico up slightly from last year's record low
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 15:19:38 -0600
Monarch Population Status
January 27th, 2015 - Chip Taylor, University of Kansas
http://monarchwatch.org/blog/2015/01/27/monarch-population-status-22/

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma SP - Sunday Butterfly Walk & More
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 17:06:59 -0600
Sunday was more overcast than anticipated.  Where was that lovely Saturday
sun?  Back today on Monday, along with an Orange-barred Sulphur and
Band-celled Sister.

On Sunday, despite the clouds, Dusky-blue Groundstreak, Silver-banded
Hairstreak and Blue Metalmark were reliable in the garden, plus we found a
very nice Red Admiral in the lantana.  Mike Rickard and Dick Wilson each
spotted a few individuals not found by all.  Mike walked part of Bobcat
Trail, which can often have some interesting species but was slow on such
an overcast afternoon.

The list below is for the past week and includes a few such as
Orange-barred Sulphur, Sleepy Orange and Zebra Heliconian that were seen
while the sun was out (mainly Saturday) and should be around on sunny days
now.  Species not seen Sunday are marked with *.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Hike *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walk* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walk* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m..
*Night Hike* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

​Cloudless Sulphur​ (Phoebis sennae)*
Orange-barred Sulphur (Phoebis philea)*
Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)
Sleepy Orange (Eurema nicippe)*
Silver-banded Hairstreak (Chlorostrymon simaethis)
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)*
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon istapa)*
Clytie Ministreak (Ministrymon clytie)*
Rounded Metalmark (Calephelis perditalis) - Mike & Ginny found on Bobcat
Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)
Zebra Heliconian (Heliconius charithonia)*
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
White Peacock (Anartia jatrophae)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
South Texas Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)* - Mike & Ginny found on Bobcat
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Fawn-spotted Skipper (Cymaenes odilia)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Southern Skipperling (Copaeodes minimus) - Mike & Ginny found on Bobcat

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero butterfly walk Fri Jan 23, 2015
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 19:02:57 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Fri Jan 23, 2015



Today was in the mid 50s with a strong N wind, not the best butterfly
weather even though the sun was shining. There were 8 of us on the walk. We
started out pessimistic about finding any butterflies, so we were surprised
that 11 species of butterflies, and about twice that number of individuals,
ventured out and were spotted. We had good looks at many, and time to
examine some of the hard-to-see field marks for identification.

We also found a few Ramburs Forktail damselflies.



Checkered White  Pontia protodice

Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae

Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon

Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus



Rick Snider - Host volunteer

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: 2014 Butterflies
From: Mike Rickard <mikearickard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 21:01:30 -0600
For the year 2014, Ginny and I saw 162 species in the RGV, which seems like
a lot but is less than half the species recorded here.  On the one hand,
with Ginny's mobility limited all year due to a stress-fractured foot, I
lost a second pair of eyes that often caught what I overlooked.  On the
other hand, Ginny was able to see some very nice species in our and
neighbor the Dauphin's yards.  Additionally it was an unusual year, with
below normal numbers of some butterflies, especially brushfoots.  Crackers,
Purplewings, Heliconians, Leafwings were generally absent, with the cold
and cloudy weather in December having an impact.   The best species were
spreadwing skippers, and a few hairstreaks.  As is the case when I post
these kinds of lists, others first found some of the species, and I got to
photograph their finds.  I'm aware of some 15-20 species reported that we
did not get to see.

Mike Rickard
Mission TX

Guava Skipper  (Phocides polybius)

Manuel's Skipper (Polygonus savigny)

White-striped Longtail (Chioides albofasciatus)

Zilpa Longtail (Chioides zilpa)

White-crescent Longtail (Codatractus alcaeus)

Long-tailed Skipper (Urbanus proteus)

Dorantes Longtail (Urbanus dorantes)

Brown Longtail (Urbanus procne)

Two-barred Flasher (Astraptes fulgerator)

Green Flasher (Astraptes talus)

Coyote Cloudywing (Achalarus toxeus)

Potrillo Skipper (Cabares potrillo)

Falcate Skipper (Spathilepia clonius)

Mimosa Skipper (Cogia calchas)

Glazed Pelicia (Pelicia arina)

Mazans Scallopwing (Staphylus mazans)

Common Sootywing (Pholisora catullus)

Saltbush Sootywing (Pholisora alpheus)

Brown-banded Skipper (Timochares ruptifasciata)

Common Bluevent (Anastrus sempiternis)

White-patched Skipper (Chiomara georgina)

Horace's Duskywing (Erynnis horatius)

Mournful Duskywing (Erynnis tristis)

Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)

Sickle-winged Skipper (Eantis tamenund)

Hoary Skipper (Carrhenes canescens)

Texas Powdered Skipper (Systasea pulverulenta)

Streaky Skipper (Celotes nessus)

White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)

Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)

Desert Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus philetas)

Erichson's White-Skipper (Heliopyrgus domicella)

East-Mexican White-Skipper (Heliopetes sublinea)

Turk's-cap White-Skipper (Heliopetes macaira)

Laviana White-Skipper (Heliopetes laviana)

Southern Skipperling (Copaeodes minima)

Brazilian Skipper (Calpodes ethlius)

Ocola Skipper (Panoquina ocola)

Purple-washed Skipper (Panoquina lucas)

Hecebolus Skipper (Panoquina hecebolus)

Evans' Skipper (Panoquina evansi)

Obscure Skipper (Panoquina panoquinoides)

Celia's Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes celia)

Nysa Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes nysa)

Pale-rayed Skipper (Vidius perigenes)

Violet-patched Skipper (Monca crispinus)

Julia's Skipper (Nastra julia)

Fawn-spotted Skipper (Cymaenes trebius)

Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)

Olive-clouded Skipper (Lerodea arabus)

Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)

Liris Skipper (Lerema liris)

Double-dotted Skipper (Decinea percosius)

Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)

Whirlabout (Polites vibex)

Southern Broken-Dash (Wallengrenia otho)

Sachem (Atalopedes campestris)

Common Mellana (Quasimellana eulogius)

Violet-banded Skipper (Nyctelius nyctelius)

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)

Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)

Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)

Ornythion Swallowtail (Papilio ornythion)

Ruby-spotted Swallowtail (Papilio anchisiades

Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)

Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)

Boisduval's Yellow (Eurema boisduvaliana)

Mexican Yellow (Eurema mexicana)

Tailed Orange (Pyrisitia proterpia)

Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)

Mimosa Yellow (Pyrisitia nise)

Sleepy Orange (Abaeis nicippe)

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)

Southern Dogface (Zerene cesonia)

White Angled-Sulphur (Anteos clorinde)

Yellow Angled-Sulphur (Anteos maerula)

Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)

Large Orange Sulphur (Phoebis agarithe)

Orange-barred Sulphur (Phoebis philea)

Statira Sulphur (Aphrissa statira)

Florida White (Glutophrissa drusilla)

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)

Great Southern White (Ascia monuste)

Giant White (Ganyra josephina)

Great Purple Hairstreak (Atlides halesus)

Marius Hairstreak (Rekoa marius)

Silver-banded Hairstreak (Chlorostrymon simaethis)

Telea Hairstreak (Chlorostrymon telea)

Tropical Greenstreak (Cyanophrys herodotus)

Clench's Greenstreak (Cyanophrys miserabilis)

Xami Hairstreak (Callophrys xami)

Strophius Hairstreak (Allosmaitia strophius)

Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)

Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)

Red-crescent Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon rufofusca)

White Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon albata)

Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon bazochii)

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon istapa)

Clytie Ministreak (Ministrymon clytie)

Vicroy Ministreak (Ministrymon jane-vicroy)

Cassius Blue (Leptotes cassius)

Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)

Western Pygmy-Blue (Brephidium exilis)

Cyna Blue (Zizula cyna)

Ceraunus Blue (Hemiargus ceraunus)

Reakirt's Blue (Echinargus isola)

Fatal Metalmark (Calephelis nemesis)

Rounded Metalmark (Calephelis perditalis)

Red-bordered Metalmark (Caria ino)

Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)

Red-bordered Pixie (Melanis pixe)

Curve-winged Metalmark (Emesis emesia)

Walker's Metalmark (Apodemia walkeri)

American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)

Queen (Danaus gilippus)

Soldier (Danaus eresimus)

Band-celled Sister (Adelpha fessonia)

Viceroy (Limenitis archippus)

Mexican Silverspot (Dione moneta)

Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)

Julia Heliconian (Dryas iulia)

Zebra Heliconian (Heliconius charithonia)

Banded-orange Heliconian (Dryadula phaetusa)

Erato Heliconian (Heliconius erato)

Variegated Fritillary (Euptoieta claudia)

Mexican Fritillary (Euptoieta hegesia)

Hackberry Emperor (Asterocampa celtis)

Empress Leilia (Asterocampa leilia)

Tawny Emperor (Asterocampa clyton)

Pavon Emperor (Doxocopa pavon)

Silver Emperor (Doxocopa laure)

Red Rim (Biblis hyperia)

Common Mestra (Mestra amymone)

Florida Purplewing (Eunica tatila)

Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)

Four-spotted Sailor (Dynamine postverta)

Ruddy Daggerwing (Marpesia petreus)

American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)

Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)

Question Mark (Polygonia interrogationis)

White Peacock (Anartia jatrophae)

Banded Peacock (Anartia fatima)

Malachite (Siproeta stelenes)

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)

Tropical Buckeye (Junonia evarete)

Mangrove Buckeye (Junonia genoveva)

Crimson Patch (Chlosyne janais)

Definite Patch (Chlosyne definita)

Theona Checkerspot (Chlosyne theona)

Bordered Patch (Chlosyne lacinia)

Elada Checkerspot (Texola elada)

Pale-banded Crescent (Anthanassa tulcis)

Texan Crescent (Anthanassa texana)

Vesta Crescent (Phyciodes graphica)

Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)

Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)

Tropical Leafwing (Anaea aidea)

Goatweed Leafwing (Anaea andria)

Gemmed Satyr (Cyllopsis gemma)

Hermes Satyr (Hermeuptychia hermes)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Austin Butterfly Forum meeting, January 26
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 22:25:50 -0600
Hi everyone,



Here is the information for upcoming events and meetings of the Austin
Butterfly Forum. Thanks for helping us to get the word out.



The Austin Butterfly Forum meets at the Zilker Botanical Garden Center
 at 7:00 pm on the 4th Monday of every month
except for December. Most meetings are free and open to the public.


Each meeting features an educational program, but we like to socialize a
bit beforehand. Sometimes members will bring caterpillars or collections
for display, and sometimes we have special opportunities such as plant
giveaways. The meetings are also a good place to hear special announcements
and learn about new events.

As we start the New Year, this is a good time to become a member of the
Austin Butterfly Forum. Yearly dues are only $20.00 per household. Payments
will be accepted at the meetings; see Doris Hill. Dues help to cover the
costs of out-of-town speakers; on the rare occasions when we charge a small
admission for a speaker, members still get in free.

Everyone interested in butterflies and other invertebrates is welcome!
Please come join us!



*Jan. 26, 2015, 7 PM meeting:* *How Do Butterflies Breathe?*, presented
by Dan Hardy.


How do butterflies breathe? Not like us! They have no lungs. Their skin is
impermeable to air. They have a heart, but lack red blood cells. How do
they pull this off? Dan Hardy will explain!


Dan Hardy enjoys researching topics for club presentations. He has talked
about Wallace and evolution, the butterflies of the Barton Creek Greenbelt,
caterpillars and their food plants, and the biology of butterfly wing
patterns. He is a pathologist and specializes in microbiology.


Zilker Botanical Garden Center, 7 pm; free.



*Upcoming events:*



*Feb. 23, 2015, 7 PM meeting: How butterflies can teach us about Natural
Selection; *presented by Peg Wallace



Charles Darwin published his thesis “The Origin of Species by Means of
Natural Selection” in 1859. The idea of “evolution” is familiar to most 
of 

us, but the mechanism proposed by Darwin may not be as familiar. He called
this mechanism “natural selection”, to distinguish it from the type of
changes in species that we can see brought about by human selection.



This discussion will outline the basics of evolution and natural selection
using examples from the world of insects, especially butterflies. Peg
Wallace has a Master’s in Geography from the University of Texas, and
worked as a teaching assistant in genetics for 5 years. She is fascinated
with the topics of genetics, evolution and ecology, and enjoys teaching
these concepts.



Zilker Botanical Garden Center, 7 pm; free.



*March 23, 2015, 7PM meeting. TBA*



For more information on the Austin Butterfly Forum, please see our website:
http://www.austinbutterflies.org/



Thanks for your help in publicizing our meetings. Hope to see you there!

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma SP - Sunday Butterfly Walk
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 18:30:51 -0600
Sunday afternoon was partly sunny and calm.  We had a surprising variety of
butterflies given how cool and wet it has been recently.  Most species were
only single individuals, but Silver-banded Hairstreak and Dusky-blue
Groundstreak were fairly plentiful.  Four fresh Mexican Bluewings were
found on Ebony Trail and were quite cooperative for photos.  Most
butterflies we found were either severely tattered or very fresh.  Not much
middle ground.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Hike *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walk* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walk* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m..
*Night Hike* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

​Large Orange Sulphur (Phoebis agarithe)
Boisduval's Yellow (Eurema boisduvaliana)  (1 seen early morning only)
Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)
Silver-banded Hairstreak (Chlorostrymon simaethis)
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon istapa)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Fatal Metalmark (Calephelis nemesis)  (1 found along tram road Saturday)
Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui) (seen just after the walk)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
White Peacock (Anartia jatrophae)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Turk's-cap White-Skipper (Heliopetes macaira)
Julia's Skipper (Nastra julia)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phleus)​

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero butterfly walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 2015 20:29:52 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Fri Jan 16, 2015



After cancelling two walks because of cold, clouds, and rain we finally had
a calm 60 F day with sun. We saw 20 species with only one individual of
most of them. The majority were fresh, very beautiful butterflies.
Highlights were: Mexican Bluewing, Zebra Heliconian, male Cloudless
Sulphurs, Sleepy Orange followed almost immediately by Tailed Orange, with
nice views of both. We still have lots of flowers, Lantana at peak bloom,
and Spring Mistflowers beginning to bloom, we just need more butterflies.
Thanks to Mike Rickard, Ginny Musgrave, Dave Elder, and Susan Keefer for
all their help.



Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia

Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae

Tailed Orange  Eurema proterpia

Little Yellow  Eurema lisa

Sleepy Orange  Eurema nicippe

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa

American Snout  Libytheana carinenta

Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae

Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia

Pearl Crescent  Phyciodes tharos

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea

Queen  Danaus gilippus

White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus



Rick Snider - Host volunteer

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Texas A&M Dept Ento 2015 Open House Photos
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2015 13:46:47 -0600
Another great open house. Thanks Ed et al.!

Texas A&M Dept Ento 2015 Open House People Pix
https://plus.google.com/photos/+MikeQuinnEnto/albums/6104980318207561985

Remainder of Texas "Aphodius" (sensu lato) scarab photos not already posted
to BugGuide
https://plus.google.com/photos/108896707105682448113/albums/6103501763803777985

More photos of TAMU's lady beetles - Coccinellidae
https://plus.google.com/photos/108896707105682448113/albums/6103957972738419889


Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: New life histories
From: Berry Nall <lb AT THENALLS.NET>
Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2014 13:57:42 -0600
Hi,
I recorded 34 species in Starr County in December, the most noteworthy being 
Mexican Silverspot and Two-barred Flasher. 

I have added several life histories to the website: Gray, Glaucous, and 
Guatemalan Crackers, Rounded Metalmark, Olive-clouded and Fawn-spotted 
Skippers, and Sachem. The links to these are on my home page, 

http://leps.thenalls.net/index.php
 
A Happy New Year to all,
Berry Nall
Falcon Heights, Starr Co, TX
leps.thenalls.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Service Initiates Status Review of Monarch Butterfly under the Endangered Species Act
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Dec 2014 21:09:47 -0600
My daughter in Houston bred and released quite a few monarchs last Fall. Wild 
monarchs were appearing and laying eggs on tropical milkweed she was growing. 
Considering the rapid decline in occupied habitat at the southern end of the 
migration this appears to be none too soon. 

Tim
On Dec 29, 2014, at 11:41 AM, Brush Freeman  wrote:

> 
> **********************************************************************
> Brush Freeman
> 503-551-5150 Cell
> 120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
> http://texasnaturenotes.blogspot.com/
> Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas
> 
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: FWS News and Information 
> Date: Mon, Dec 29, 2014 at 11:32 AM
> Subject: [fws-news] Service Initiates Status Review of Monarch Butterfly 
under the Endangered Species Act 

> To: fws-news AT lists.fws.gov
> 
> 
> **************************************************************
> This message is from the fws-news listserver. Please DO NOT
> REPLY (it just confuses the computers).
> 
> Subscribers can't reply or send their own messages to the
> fws-news listserver. This listserver is designed mainly as a
> "one way street" for the rapid dissemination of information
> concerning the Service and its activities, rather than for
> gathering feedback.  To contact us, see the explanatory note
> at bottom of the message.
> **************************************************************
> 
> December 29, 2014
> 
> Contact: Vanessa Kauffman, 703-358-2138, vanessa_kauffman AT fws.gov
> 
> Service Initiates Status Review of Monarch Butterfly under the
> Endangered Species Act
> 
> The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced it will be
> conducting a status review of the monarch butterfly under the
> Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service has determined that a
> petition from the Center for Biological Diversity, the Center for Food
> Safety, the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation and Dr.
> Lincoln Brower to list a subspecies of monarch (Danaus plexippus
> plexippus) presents substantial information indicating that listing
> may be warranted.
> 
> Monarch butterflies are found throughout the United States and some
> populations migrate vast distances across multiple generations each
> year. Many monarchs fly between the U.S., Mexico and Canada  a
> journey of over 3,000 miles. This journey has become more perilous for
> many monarchs because of threats along their migratory paths and on
> their breeding and wintering grounds. Threats include habitat loss 
> particularly the loss of milkweed, the monarch caterpillars sole food
> source  and mortality resulting from pesticide use. Monarch
> populations have declined significantly in recent years.
> 
> The Service will now conduct a status review to determine whether
> listing is warranted. To ensure this status review is comprehensive,
> the Service is requesting scientific and commercial data and other
> information through a 60-day public information period. Specifically,
> the Service seeks information including:
> 
>       The subspecies biology, range and population trends, habitat
> requirements, genetics and taxonomy;
> 
>       Historical and current range, including distribution patterns;
> 
>       Historical and current population levels and current and
> projected trends;
> 
>       The life history or behavior of the monarch butterfly that has
> not yet been documented;
> 
>       Thermo-tolerance range and microclimate requirements of the
> monarch butterfly;
> 
>       Past and ongoing conservation measures for the subspecies, its
> habitat or both;  and,
> 
> 
> http://www.fws.gov/news/
> 
> 
>       Factors that are the basis for making a listing determination
> under section 4(a) of the ESA;
> 
> The notice will publish in the Federal Register December 31, 2014, and
> it is requested that information be received by March 2, 2015. To view
> the notice and submit information, visit www.regulations.gov docket
> number FWS-R3-ES-2014-0056.
> 
> For more information on the ESAs petition process, visit
> http://www.fws.gov/endangered/what-we-do/listing-petition-process.html.
> ***************************************************************************
> News releases are also available online at
> http://www.fws.gov/news/
> 
> Questions concerning a particular news release or item of
> information should be directed to the person listed as the
> contact. General comments or observations concerning the
> content of the information should be directed to Malcomb Barsella 
(malcomb_barsella AT fws.gov) in the Office of External Affairs. 

> 
> To unsubscribe from the fws-news listserver, send e-mail to
> fws-news-request AT lists.fws.gov. Enter "unsubscribe" in the subject field.
> 
> ***************************************************************************
> 
> ======================================
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> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Fwd: Service Initiates Status Review of Monarch Butterfly under the Endangered Species Act
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Dec 2014 11:41:56 -0600
**********************************************************************
Brush Freeman
503-551-5150 Cell
120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
http://texasnaturenotes.blogspot.com/
Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: FWS News and Information 
Date: Mon, Dec 29, 2014 at 11:32 AM
Subject: [fws-news] Service Initiates Status Review of Monarch Butterfly
under the Endangered Species Act
To: fws-news AT lists.fws.gov


**************************************************************
This message is from the fws-news listserver. Please DO NOT
REPLY (it just confuses the computers).

Subscribers can't reply or send their own messages to the
fws-news listserver. This listserver is designed mainly as a
"one way street" for the rapid dissemination of information
concerning the Service and its activities, rather than for
gathering feedback.  To contact us, see the explanatory note
at bottom of the message.
**************************************************************

December 29, 2014

Contact: Vanessa Kauffman, 703-358-2138, vanessa_kauffman AT fws.gov

Service Initiates Status Review of Monarch Butterfly under the
Endangered Species Act

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced it will be
conducting a status review of the monarch butterfly under the
Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service has determined that a
petition from the Center for Biological Diversity, the Center for Food
Safety, the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation and Dr.
Lincoln Brower to list a subspecies of monarch (Danaus plexippus
plexippus) presents substantial information indicating that listing
may be warranted.

Monarch butterflies are found throughout the United States and some
populations migrate vast distances across multiple generations each
year. Many monarchs fly between the U.S., Mexico and Canada - a
journey of over 3,000 miles. This journey has become more perilous for
many monarchs because of threats along their migratory paths and on
their breeding and wintering grounds. Threats include habitat loss -
particularly the loss of milkweed, the monarch caterpillar's sole food
source - and mortality resulting from pesticide use. Monarch
populations have declined significantly in recent years.

The Service will now conduct a status review to determine whether
listing is warranted. To ensure this status review is comprehensive,
the Service is requesting scientific and commercial data and other
information through a 60-day public information period. Specifically,
the Service seeks information including:

      The subspecies' biology, range and population trends, habitat
requirements, genetics and taxonomy;

      Historical and current range, including distribution patterns;

      Historical and current population levels and current and
projected trends;

      The life history or behavior of the monarch butterfly that has
not yet been documented;

      Thermo-tolerance range and microclimate requirements of the
monarch butterfly;

      Past and ongoing conservation measures for the subspecies, its
habitat or both;  and,


http://www.fws.gov/news/


      Factors that are the basis for making a listing determination
under section 4(a) of the ESA;

The notice will publish in the Federal Register December 31, 2014, and
it is requested that information be received by March 2, 2015. To view
the notice and submit information, visit www.regulations.gov docket
number FWS-R3-ES-2014-0056.

For more information on the ESA's petition process, visit
http://www.fws.gov/endangered/what-we-do/listing-petition-process.html.
***************************************************************************
News releases are also available online at
http://www.fws.gov/news/

Questions concerning a particular news release or item of
information should be directed to the person listed as the
contact. General comments or observations concerning the
content of the information should be directed to Malcomb Barsella (
malcomb_barsella AT fws.gov) in the Office of External Affairs.

To unsubscribe from the fws-news listserver, send e-mail to
fws-news-request AT lists.fws.gov. Enter "unsubscribe" in the subject field.

***************************************************************************

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Heraclides phylogenetics
From: Keith Wolfe <bflyearlystages AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2014 06:43:23 +0000
For those wanting a deeper understanding of Heraclides and its phylogeny (cited 
in Shiraiwa et al.) . . . 


http://ufdcimages.uflib.ufl.edu/UF/E0/04/13/78/00001/lewis_d.pdf

Best wishes,

Keith

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: question about Banded Hairstreaks
From: Shirley Wilkerson <00000019c3019457-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2014 01:32:47 +0000
 I read with interest the paper on the new Giant Swallowtail, H rumiko, and 
looked at my swallowtail photos to see if I had one of that variety.  

Long story short, that took me on a rabbit trail through my photos, and I 
 have had a photo of a Banded Hairstreak up on my website for some time.  I 
just noticed the gray eyes.  Do Banded Hairstreaks have gray eyes?  This was 
taken years ago, 5-17-11 at the Heard Museum in McKinney, TX.  

The first photo has been up for some time, but the two that follow, I just 
uploaded. Is it a Banded Hairstreak?  



http://www.bluemelon.com/caramia/butterfliesswallowtailstoblues#photo-3651763/T600450 

Thanks,Shirley WilkersonBryan, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2014 19:00:32 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park butterfly walk Fri Dec 26, 2014



Great weather led to a great walk with lots of butterflies and 46 species
seen during the day. Highlights included: male Pavon Emperor, Great Purple
Hairstreak, Mexican Yellow, Potrillo Skipper, Silver-banded Hairstreak,
Red-bordered Pixie, Malachite and many others. Thanks to Mike Rickard and
Ginny Musgrave for all their help with the main group, and Susan Keefer who
introduced 7 kids and their parents to the wonderful world of butterflying.



Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae

Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe

Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside

Mexican Yellow  Eurema mexicana

Tailed Orange  Eurema proterpia

Little Yellow  Eurema lisa

Sleepy Orange  Eurema nicippe

Great Purple Hairstreak  Atlides halesus

Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis

Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa

Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon

Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie

Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius

Reakirt's Blue  Hemiargus isola

Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino

Red-bordered Pixie  Melanis pixe

American Snout  Libytheana carinenta

Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae

Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia

Bordered Patch  Chlosyne lacinia

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae

Malachite  Siproeta stelenes

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea

Pavon Emperor  Doxocopa pavon

Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes

Queen  Danaus gilippus

Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator

Potrillo Skipper  Cabares potrillo

Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso

Brown-banded Skipper  Timochares ruptifasciatus

White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Whirlabout  Polites vibex

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Brazilian Skipper  Calpodes ethlius



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Estero butterfly walks are every Fri at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Giant Swallowtail split into E. & W. species roughly along I-35
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2014 17:35:46 -0600
PS: Here's some photos of the second and third author at the TAMU Insect
Collection Open House last January with their mobile DNA equipment set up:

Qian Cong and Nick Grishin
http://bit.ly/1GYuB5D

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Mike Quinn 
Date: Wed, Dec 24, 2014 at 2:32 PM
Subject: Giant Swallowtail split into E. & W. species roughly along I-35
To: TXBL , TXENTO ,
AustinButterflies 


In looking at photos on BugGuide, the characters of the Western Giant
Swallowtail (Heraclides rumiko Shiraiwa & Grishin) seem less variable than
those of the Eastern Giant Swallowtail (H. cresphontes (Cramer)).

Side-by-side comparison of the two swallowtail species:

http://zookeys.pensoft.net//lib/ajax_srv/article_elements_srv.php?action=zoom_figure&instance_id=15&article_id=4409 


"Due to significant seasonal and individual variation, none of these
characters is fully reliable and exceptions exist. The head-neck-thorax
line vs. spots (Fig. 11a, A) might be the strongest single character. A
combination of characters should be used for reliable identification..."

Their ranges overlap somewhat along I-35.

Distribution Map for Eastern and Western Giant Swallowtails

http://zookeys.pensoft.net//lib/ajax_srv/article_elements_srv.php?action=zoom_figure&instance_id=110&article_id=4409 


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Mike Quinn 
Date: Tue, Dec 23, 2014 at 1:48 PM
Subject: New Swallowtail species, type locality: Duval Co., Texas...
To: TXBL , TXENTO 


A new Heraclides swallowtail (Lepidoptera,Papilionidae) from North America
is recognized by the pattern on its neck
Kojiro Shiraiwa, Qian Cong, Nick V. Grishin - ZooKeys 468: 85-135 (23 Dec
2014)

Abstract (in part)

Heraclides rumiko Shiraiwa & Grishin, sp. n. is described from southwestern
United States, Mexico, and Central America (type locality: USA, Texas,
Duval County). It is closely allied to H. cresphontes (Cramer, 1777) and
the two species are sympatric in central Texas.

http://zookeys.pensoft.net/articles.php?id=4409

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Giant Swallowtail split into E. & W. species roughly along I-35
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2014 14:32:29 -0600
In looking at photos on BugGuide, the characters of the Western Giant
Swallowtail (Heraclides rumiko Shiraiwa & Grishin) seem less variable than
those of the Eastern Giant Swallowtail (H. cresphontes (Cramer)).

Side-by-side comparison of the two swallowtail species:

http://zookeys.pensoft.net//lib/ajax_srv/article_elements_srv.php?action=zoom_figure&instance_id=15&article_id=4409 


"Due to significant seasonal and individual variation, none of these
characters is fully reliable and exceptions exist. The head-neck-thorax
line vs. spots (Fig. 11a, A) might be the strongest single character. A
combination of characters should be used for reliable identification..."

Their ranges overlap somewhat along I-35.

Distribution Map for Eastern and Western Giant Swallowtails

http://zookeys.pensoft.net//lib/ajax_srv/article_elements_srv.php?action=zoom_figure&instance_id=110&article_id=4409 


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Mike Quinn 
Date: Tue, Dec 23, 2014 at 1:48 PM
Subject: New Swallowtail species, type locality: Duval Co., Texas...
To: TXBL , TXENTO 


A new Heraclides swallowtail (Lepidoptera,Papilionidae) from North America
is recognized by the pattern on its neck
Kojiro Shiraiwa, Qian Cong, Nick V. Grishin - ZooKeys 468: 85-135 (23 Dec
2014)

Abstract (in part)

Heraclides rumiko Shiraiwa & Grishin, sp. n. is described from southwestern
United States, Mexico, and Central America (type locality: USA, Texas,
Duval County). It is closely allied to H. cresphontes (Cramer, 1777) and
the two species are sympatric in central Texas.

http://zookeys.pensoft.net/articles.php?id=4409

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: New Swallowtail species, type locality: Duval Co., Texas...
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2014 13:48:10 -0600
A new Heraclides swallowtail (Lepidoptera,Papilionidae) from North America
is recognized by the pattern on its neck
Kojiro Shiraiwa, Qian Cong, Nick V. Grishin - ZooKeys 468: 85-135 (23 Dec
2014)

Abstract

Heraclides rumiko Shiraiwa & Grishin, sp. n. is described from southwestern
United States, Mexico, and Central America (type locality: USA, Texas,
Duval County). It is closely allied to H. cresphontes (Cramer, 1777) and
the two species are sympatric in central Texas.

http://zookeys.pensoft.net/articles.php?id=4409

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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Subject: Resac de la Palma SP - Sunday Butterfly Walk & List for 12/15 - 12/21
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2014 22:27:31 -0600
Sunday butterfly walk highlights:  Four Calleta Silkmoth caterpillars on an
elbowbush, a single Band-celled Sister on the first stretch of Ebony Trail,
several Boisduval's Yellow, Common Mellana, Southern Broken-Dash.  Around 3
PM we went in search of Gemmed Satyr on the last stretch of Flycatcher Loop
and found two.
The list below is for 12/15 - 12/21.  The single Julia Heliconian and
Two-barred Flasher were flying before the cool front, as was the Walker's
Metalmark.  Others are still around.

Link to silkmoth photos:
*http://tinyurl.com/omqyx2r *



Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Hike *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walk* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walk* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m..
*Night Hike* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)
​Boisduval's Yellow (Eurema boisduvaliana)​
Tailed Orange (Eurema proterpia)
Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)
Silver-banded Hairstreak (Chlorostrymon simaethis)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Clytie Ministreak (Ministrymon clytie)
Fatal Metalmark (Calephelis nemesis)
Rounded Metalmark (Calephelis perditalis)
Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)
Walker's Metalmark (Apodemia walkeri)
Juia Heliconian (Dryas iulia)
Zebra Heliconian (Heliconius charithonia)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
White Peacock (Anartia jatrophae)
Band-celled Sister (Adelpha fessonia)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
Common Mestra (Mestra amymone)
Tawny Emperor (Asterocampa clyton)
Gemmed Satyr (Cyllopsis gemma)
Carolina Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)
Brown Longtail (Urbanus procne)
Two-barred Flasher (Astraptes fulgerator)
Mazans Scallopwing (Staphylus mazans)
Sickle-winged Skipper (Eantis tamenund)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus abescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Laviana White-Skipper (Heliopetes laviana)
Fawn-spotted Skipper (Cymaenes odilia)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)
Whirlabout (Polites vibex)
Southern Broken-Dash (Wallengrenia otho)
Common Mellana (Quasimellana eulogius)
​

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 17:42:31 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park butterfly walk Fri Dec 19, 2014



Today was cool and overcast and there were few butterflies. But we did see
some very nice ones: 2 Lantana Scrub-Hairstreaks, a Silver-banded
Hairstreak and a Brazilian Skipper. In all there were 19 species not
including a probable Pearl Crescent which didn't give us a very good look.
We were surprised when a female Black Witch moth suddenly appeared and flew
around quite a bit before landing on the bait log. We have lots of flowers
on Croton, Lantana, Heliotrope, and other plants and in the last week there
was a Giant Swallowtail and Two-barred Flasher on Bougainvillea flowers.

Thanks to Mike Rickard, Ginny Musgrave, and Susan Keefer for helping with
the walk.



Little Yellow  Eurema lisa

Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis

Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii

Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius

Ceraunus Blue  Hemiargus ceraunus

American Snout  Libytheana carinenta

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae

Common Mestra  Mestra amymone

Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Mazans Scallopwing  Staphylus mazans

Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Whirlabout  Polites vibex

Brazilian Skipper  Calpodes ethlius



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Estero butterfly walks are every Fri at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Still flying in Lubbock
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 12:53:25 -0600
Greetings All:

Seen in my Lubbock yard yesterday (14 December 2014); mostly nectaring at
the few remaining pincushion flowers, dandelion, and wild geraniums still
blooming in the yard:

1 Cabbage White
1 Sleepy Orange
2 Dainty Sulphurs
1 Western Pygmy Blue
1 Painted Lady

In my water barrel:

1 fresh-looking and not particularly decomposed Sachem

Anthony 'Fat Tony' Hewetson; Lubbock

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Subject: Resaca de la Palma SP - Sunday Butterfly Walk with 5 metalmarks & Band-celled Sister
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 17:35:07 -0600
For an overcast afternoon there was a very nice variety in the butterfly
garden, with five metalmark species and a variety of skippers.  Two
Band-celled Sisters were flying on the Ebony Trail and we had good looks at
both.  One was had a typical appearance, the other had only white on
brown.  Eric from Austin found the aberrant bug earlier in the day and it
was in the same area when we saw it during the walk.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Hike *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walk* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walk* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m..
*Night Hike* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

​Southern Dogface (Colias cesonia)
Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)
Orange-barred Sulphur (Phoebis philea)
Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Boisduval's Yellow (Eurema boisduvaliana)
Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)
Silver-banded Hairstreak (Chlorostrymon simaethis)
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon istapa)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Clytie Ministreak (Ministrymon clytie)
Ceraunus Blue (Hemiargus ceraunus)
Fatal Metalmark (Calephelis nemesis)
Rounded Metalmark (Calephelis perditalis)
Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)
​Red-bordered Metalmark (Caria ino)
​Walker's Metalmark (Apodemia walkeri)​
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)
Zebra Heliconian (Heliconius charithonia)
Vesta Crescent (Phyciodes vesta)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
White Peacock (Anartia jatrophae)
Band-celled Sister (Adelpha fessonia)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
Common Mestra (Mestra amymone)
Tawny Emperor (Asterocampa clyton)
Carolina Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)
Brown Longtail (Urbanus procne)
Mazans Scallopwing (Staphylus mazans)
Sickle-winged Skipper (Eantis tamenund)
Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Fawn-spotted Skipper (Cymaenes odilia)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Southern Skipperling (Copaeodes minimus)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)
Southern Broken-Dash (Wallengrenia otho)
Common Mellana (Quasimellana eulogius)
Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 19:06:14 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park butterfly walk Fri Dec 12, 2014



Today started out sunny and warm with many butterflies flying. Mexican
Bluewings were spotted this morning. By hike time clouds had rolled in and
numbers dropped. Still we had 33 species for the day. Highlights were
Common Mellana, Two-barred Flasher, Silver-banded Hairstreak and well over
10 Cassius Blues. Flowers attracting the most butterflies were lantana and
heliotrope.



Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae

Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe

Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa

Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius

American Snout  Libytheana carinenta

Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae

Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia

Bordered Patch  Chlosyne lacinia

Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton

Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes

Queen  Danaus gilippus

Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator

Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso

White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Whirlabout  Polites vibex

Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho

Common Mellana  Quasimellana eulogius

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Estero butterfly walks are every Fri at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: TAMU Insect Collection Open House - Jan. 10
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 16:37:51 -0600
Texas A&M University Insect Collection Open House
January 10, 2015

Dear Colleagues:

You are cordially invited to the annual “open house” of the Texas A&M
University Insect Collection to meet with others who share an interest in
the study of Texas insects. This is the 27th consecutive annual meeting,
and we hope to have another excellent gathering this year. Each year our
meeting attracts a diverse group of people – professional and amateur –
with a broad range of interests. There is no formal program, but it will be
a chance to show off new curiosities, and to catch up on the past year’s
news and collecting stories. Please feel free to invite newcomers who share
our interest.

The event will be held on Saturday, January 10th. The entire day will be
spent at the Minnie Belle Heep Building (a.k.a., “the  Heep Center

”). 

Starting time will be ca. 9 AM.  Meeting areas will be available on the 2nd
floor of the atrium adjacent to the TAMU Insect Collection room (Room 216).
Lunch will be on your own. The atrium meeting areas and the Texas A&M
University Insect Collection will be open for the remainder of the
afternoon.

Parking will be available in lot no. 67 on the east side of the building
and no special permit is required for parking on Saturday.
full text

http://entomology.tamu.edu/event/texas-am-university-insect-collection-open-house/ 



============================================================================================= 


Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma - December Sightings
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Dec 2014 20:24:26 -0600
A Malachite zipped by the visitor center a couple days ago but was not
relocated.  Yesterday a very nice male Julia Heliconian was in the garden,
as was a Band-celled Sister.  Both have been around in very low numbers
lately so it was particularly nice to have both very cooperative for
photos.  Today was overcast, but there were still plenty of interesting
butterflies during the Sunday walk.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Hike *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walk* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walk* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m..
*Night Hike* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

​Great Southern White (Ascia monuste)
Southern Dogface (Colias cesonia)
Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)
Orange-barred Sulphur (Phoebis philea)
Large Orange Sulphur (Phoebis agarithe)
​Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Boisduval's Yellow (Eurema boisduvaliana)
Tailed Orange (Eurema proterpia)
Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)
Silver-banded Hairstreak (Chlorostrymon simaethis)
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon istapa)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Clytie Ministreak (Ministrymon clytie)
Western Pygmy-Blue (Brephidium exile)
Ceraunus Blue (Hemiargus ceraunus)
Fatal Metalmark (Calephelis nemesis)
Rounded Metalmark (Calephelis perditalis)
Red-bordered Metalmark (Caria ino)
Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)
Red-bordered Pixie (Melanis pixie)
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)
Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)
Julia Heliconian (Dryas iulia)
Zebra Heliconian (Heliconius charithonia)
Vesta Crescent (Phyciodes vesta)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
White Peacock (Anartia jatrophae)
Malachite (Siproeta stelenes)
Band-celled Sister (Adelpha fessonia)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
Common Mestra (Mestra amymone)
Tawny Emperor (Asterocampa clyton)
Carolina Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)
Queen (Danaus gilippus)
Brown Longtail (Urbanus procne)
Mimosa Skipper (Cogia calchas)
Mazans scallopwing (Staphylus mazans)
Sickle-winged Skipper (Eantis tamenund)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Fawn-spotted Skipper (Cymaenes odilia)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila pphyleus)
Whirlabout (Polites vibex)
Southern Broken-Dash (Wallengrenia otho)
Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: November Starr County report
From: Berry Nall <lb AT THENALLS.NET>
Date: Sat, 6 Dec 2014 13:31:37 -0600
Hi,
I recorded 85 species in Starr County for the month of November; I'm adding 
Telea and White Scrub-Hairstreaks (reported by others) to show this month's 
Lycaenid diversity: 12 species of hairstreaks and 4 of blues. My prize was 
getting to see the Pearly-Gray Hairstreak, also reported by others. Most of the 
sightings were at the beginning of the month; activity never rebounded after 
the first cool front. The entire list is below. 



Berry Nall
leps.thenalls.net

Monthly Sightings Report
(Common Name, Scientific Name, Frequency)
Pipevine Swallowtail, Battus philenor, *
Giant Swallowtail, Papilio cresphontes, 2
Black Swallowtail, Papilio polyxenes, 2
Checkered White, Pontia protodice, *
Giant White, Ganyra josephina, 2
Southern Dogface, Zerene cesonia, *
Sleepy Orange, Abaeis nicippe, *
Mexican Yellow, Eurema mexicana, 2
Little Yellow, Pyrisitia lisa, *
Mimosa Yellow, Pyrisitia nise, *
Tailed Orange, Pyrisitia proterpia, *
Dainty Sulphur, Nathalis iole, *
Lyside Sulphur, Kricogonia lyside, *
Large Orange Sulphur, Phoebis agarithe, *
Cloudless Sulphur, Phoebis sennae, *
Gray Hairstreak, Strymon melinus, *
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak, Strymon istapa, *
Lacey's Scrub-Hairstreak , Strymon alea, 2
Red-crescent Scrub-Hairstreak, Strymon rufofusca, 1
White Scrub-Hairstreak, Strymon albata, 2
Clytie Ministreak, Ministrymon clytie, *
Great Purple Hairstreak, Atlides halesus, *
Dusky-blue Groundstreak, Calycopis isobeon, 1
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak, Strymon bazochii, *
Strophius Hairstreak, Allosmaitia strophius, 1
Pearly-Gray Hairstreak, Siderus tephraeus, 1
Telea Hairstreak, Chlorostrymon telea, 1
Reakirt's Blue, Hemiargus isola, *
Ceraunus Blue, Hemiargus ceraunus, *
Western Pygmy-Blue, Brephidium exile, *
Cassius Blue, Leptotes cassius, 1
Fatal Metalmark, Calephelis nemesis, *
Red-bordered Metalmark, Cario ino, 2
Red-bordered Pixie, Melanis pixe, *
Queen, Danaus gilippus, *
Soldier, Danaus eresimus, 2
Monarch, Danaus plexippus, *
South Texas Satyr, Hermeuptychea hermybius, *
Tropical Leafwing, Anaea aidea, *
Common Mestra, Mestra amymone, *
White Peacock, Anartia jatrophae, *
Malachite, Siproeta stelenes, 1
Common Buckeye, Junonia coenia, 1
Tropical Buckeye, Junonia evarete, 1
Painted Lady , Vanessa cardui, 2
American Lady, Vanessa virginiensis, 2
Red Admiral , Vanessa atalanta, *
Question Mark, Polygonia interrogationis, 1
Tawny Emperor, Asterocampa clyton, *
Hackberry Emperor, Asterocampa celtis, *
Empress Leilia, Asterocampa leilia, *
Snout, Libytheana carinenta, *
Elada Checkerspot, Texola elada, *
Tiny Checkerspot, Dymasia dymas, *
Theona Checkerspot, Thessalia theona, *
Texan Crescent, Anthanassa texana, 1
Phaon Crescent, Phyciodes phaon, *
Vesta Crescent, Phyciodes vesta, *
Bordered Patch, Chlosyne lacinia, *
Variegated Fritillary, Euptoieta claudia, *
Mexican Fritillary, Euptoieta hegesia, 1
Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, *
Zebra Heliconian, Heliconius charithonia, 1
Julia Heliconian, Dryas iulia, 1
Mexican Silverspot, Dione moneta, 2
Coyote Cloudywing, Achalarus toxeus, *
Dorantes Longtail, Urbanus dorantes, 1
Zilpa Longtail, Chioides zilpa, 2
Texas Powdered-Skipper, Systasea pulverulenta, *
Sickle-winged Skipper, Eantis tamenund, *
Two-barred Flasher, Astraptes fulgerator, 1
Funereal Duskywing, Erynnis funeralis, *
Common Checkered-Skipper, Pyrgus communis, *
Desert Checkered-Skipper, Pyrgus oileus, *
Erichson's White-Skipper, Heliopyrgus domicella, 1
Laviana White-Skipper, Heliopetes laviana, *
White-Patched Skipper , Chiomara georgina, 1
Fiery Skipper, Hylephila phyleus, *
Sachem, Atalopedes campestris, *
Whirlabout, Polites vibex, *
Celia's Roadside-Skipper, Amblyscirtes celia, 2
Eufala Skipper, Lerodea eufala, *
Olive-clouded Skipper, Lerodea arabus, *
Southern Skipperling, Copaeodes minima, *
Clouded Skipper, Lerema accius, *
Julia's Skipper, Nastra julia, *
Ocola Skipper, Panoquina ocola, 1

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 2014 20:24:25 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Dec 5, 2014



Another walk with warm and mostly sunny weather. 43 species were seen
before and during hike.

Unusual was a Horace's Duskywing found by Mike Rickard. Other highlights
were Two-barred Flasher, Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak, Red-bordered Pixie, and
several wonderful Zebra Heliconians



Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia

Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae

Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe

Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside

Tailed Orange  Eurema proterpia

Little Yellow  Eurema lisa

Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa

Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii

Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius

Ceraunus Blue  Hemiargus ceraunus

Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis

Red-bordered PixieMelanis pixe

American Snout  Libytheana carinenta

Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae

Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia

Bordered Patch  Chlosyne lacinia

Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta

Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Common Mestra  Mestra amymone

Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton

Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes

Queen  Danaus gilippus

Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus

Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator

Potrillo Skipper  Cabares potrillo

Mazans Scallopwing  Staphylus mazans

Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso

Horace's Duskywing  Erynnis horatius

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Whirlabout  Polites vibex

Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala



Rick Snider - Park Host Volunteer

Estero butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30

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