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Updated on Friday, February 5 at 09:34 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Snowy plover,©Shawneen Finnegan

5 Feb Estero Butterfly Walk Fri Feb 5, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
5 Feb Butterflies at Nat. Butterfly Center Jan 30th [Shirley Wilkerson ]
5 Feb Four cases of Zika in Nuevo León - Feb 4 [Mike Quinn ]
4 Feb Re: Consumer Reports rates mosquito repellents... [Tim Jones ]
4 Feb Consumer Reports rates mosquito repellents... [Mike Quinn ]
31 Jan Query [Brush Freeman ]
31 Jan Cyna Blue at National Butterfly Center [Shirley Wilkerson ]
31 Jan Cyna Blue at NBC Saturday [Shirley Wilkerson ]
29 Jan Butterfly Walk Fri Jan 29, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
22 Jan Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 22, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
17 Jan January 25, 2016 Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting and Presentation [ABF Announce ]
15 Jan Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 15, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
8 Jan Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 8, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
22 Dec National Butterfly Center and Santa Ana , 12/22/15 [Dan Jones ]
18 Dec Estero Butterfly Walk - species error - no Delaware Skipper [Rick Snider ]
18 Dec Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
14 Dec Hairstreaks at National Butterfly Center, 12/13/15 [Mike Rickard ]
12 Dec Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
10 Dec CDC issues Watch - Level 1, travel warning for Mexico due to Zika virus - Dec. 10 [Mike Quinn ]
8 Dec Zika arbo-virus apparently spread from Brazil to Nuevo Leon, MX within one year [Mike Quinn ]
7 Dec Fwd: TAMU Insect Collection Open House, 2016 [Mike Quinn ]
4 Dec Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
4 Dec Dwarfed Common Buckeye in Lubbock [Anthony Hewetson ]
27 Nov Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
23 Nov Fwd: Monarch & pollinator conservation workshop @ Hornsby Bend (e. Austin) - Dec. 19 - 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. [Mike Quinn ]
15 Nov November 23, 2015 Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting [ABF Announce ]
14 Nov Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
13 Nov Re: Yellow-tipped Flasher at National Butterfly Certer, 11/11/15 [Tim Jones ]
11 Nov Yellow-tipped Flasher at National Butterfly Certer, 11/11/15 [Dan Jones ]
8 Nov Fwd: Comanche County Butterflies Sat 11-7-15 [Shirley Wilkerson ]
7 Nov Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk Friday Nov 6, 2015 [Rick Snider ]
5 Nov Conchylodes salamisalis 5291 in Kinney Co [Troy Hibbitts ]
5 Nov Re: Identification of cocoon [Mike Rickard ]
4 Nov Re: New Hairstreak Record For The US [Mike Quinn ]
2 Nov New Hairstreak Record For The US [Mike Rickard ]
1 Nov National Butterfly Center Gardens [Shirley Wilkerson ]
31 Oct Pale-banded Crescents [Shirley Wilkerson ]
31 Oct Re: Apache Skipper [Brush Freeman ]
31 Oct Apache Skipper [Brush Freeman ]
31 Oct RFI: Best butterfly at Edinburg? [Shirley Wilkerson ]
29 Oct Texas now has a pollinator conservation plan [Mike Quinn ]
28 Oct Resaca de la Palma State Park, 10/28/15 [Dan Jones ]
27 Oct Minor Monarch flight today Bee County [Robert Benson ]
26 Oct Introduction [Sandy Carter ]
24 Oct Re: Patricia/Monarchs, appears highest winds (>75 mph) mostly hit w. Jalisco, MX [Paul Cherubini ]
24 Oct Re: Patricia/Monarchs, appears highest winds (>75 mph) mostly hit w. Jalisco, MX [Mike Quinn ]
24 Oct 2 new life histories [Berry Nall ]
23 Oct Re: Hurricane Patricia projected to pass thru monarch migration [Mike Quinn ]
23 Oct Hurricane Patricia projected to pass thru monarch migration [Mike Quinn ]
19 Oct sale of N.M. moth name on eBay, current bid: $6,000 [Mike Quinn ]
19 Oct sale of N.M. moth name on eBay, current bid: $6,000 [Mike Quinn ]
19 Oct Re: Monarch migration appearance in West Texas affected by differential precipitation [Brush Freeman ]
19 Oct Re: Balcones Canyonlands NWR - Sunday, 10/18 [Tim Jones ]
18 Oct Monarch migration appearance in West Texas affected by differential precipitation [Steven Schafersman ]
18 Oct Balcones Canyonlands NWR - Sunday, 10/18 [Chuck Sexton ]
17 Oct Re: any monarchs in Comanche/Gustine area? [Paul Cherubini ]
17 Oct Re: any monarchs in Comanche/Gustine area? [Steven Schafersman ]
16 Oct Apache Skippers, Burnet Co. [Roger Shaw ]
15 Oct Austin Butterfly Forum October 26, 2015 Meeting & November 7, 2015 Field Trip [ABF Announce ]
14 Oct Re: Mimosa Yellow confirmed in n.w. Austin [Tim Jones ]
14 Oct Mimosa Yellow confirmed in n.w. Austin [Chuck Sexton ]
14 Oct Mimosa Yellow observed briefly in Austin [Chuck Sexton ]
13 Oct Re: migrant Monarchs in Utopia [Mitch Heindel ]
13 Oct Re: migrant Monarchs in Utopia [Mitch Heindel ]
13 Oct migrant Monrachs in Utopia [Mitch Heindel ]
10 Oct Records Set at Brazos Bend’s 20th Annual Butterfly Count [Richard Jespersen ]
28 Sep flying in Falcon Heights [Berry Nall ]
28 Sep Brazos Bend Butterfly Count - October 4 [Richard Jespersen ]
27 Sep Texas Blister Beetles [Mike Quinn ]
19 Sep September 28, 2015 Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting [ABF Announce ]
15 Sep Re: migrant Monrachs in Utopia [Paul Cherubini ]
14 Sep Re: migrant Monarchs in Utopia [Mitch Heindel ]
14 Sep migrant Monrachs in Utopia [Mitch Heindel ]
9 Sep Pollinating Beetles of Texas [Mike Quinn ]
4 Sep Frosted Flasher at Old Hidalgo Pumphouse, 9/3/15 [Dan Jones ]
2 Sep n. TX hackberry defoliating larva has been identified... [Mike Quinn ]

Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Fri Feb 5, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 20:31:21 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Feb 5, 2016

The temperature was in the 60s with total cloud and 10 mph SE wind. 6 of us
braved the non butterfly friendly weather and headed out to see what we
could find. We were surprised to see 13 species.

There were 17 Red Admirals on the butterfly food around noon just before
the heavy cloud rolled in. During the walk the food also attracted a
Question Mark and Mexican Bluewing.

Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Question Mark  Polygonia interrogationis
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30
Plant walks are Thursdays at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Butterflies at Nat. Butterfly Center Jan 30th
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 18:46:23 -0600
Other butterflies (other than the Cyna Blue) seen at the NBC on Jan 30th
 can be seen here  (saw about 22 species and photographed about 20):

http://www.bluemelon.com/caramia/januarylrgvbutterflies2016#page-0

Shirley Wilkerson
Bryan, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Four cases of Zika in Nuevo León - Feb 4
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 09:02:43 -0600
Cuatro casos de zika en Nuevo León, confirman autoridades
04 / Febrero / 2016

El Secretario de Salud en Nuevo León, Manuel de la O Cavazos, confirmó
cuatro casos de zika en la entidad, pero dijo que durante la temporada de
calor, que ya se aproxima, el número de pacientes podría dispararse.

The Secretary of Health in Nuevo Leon, Manuel de la O Cavazos confirmed
four cases of Zika in the state, but said that during the hot season, which
is approaching, the number of patients could skyrocket.

full:

http://www.imagen.com.mx/cuatro-casos-de-zika-en-nuevo-leon-confirman-autoridades 


================================================

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Consumer Reports rates mosquito repellents...
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 19:03:52 -0600
Perhaps we should be broadcasting Mosquito Dunks in populated areas for awhile.
http://www.planetnatural.com/product/mosquito-dunks/ 
 


Looks like Texas is in for another drought. 



> On Feb 4, 2016, at 5:53 PM, Mike Quinn  wrote:
> 
> Consumer Reports is releasing free to the public its exclusive test results 
and Ratings of mosquito repellents—including those that will protect you best 
against Aedes mosquitoes, the type that carry Zika. 

> 
> Discussion and test results:
> 
> 
http://www.consumerreports.org/insect-repellents/mosquito-repellents-that-best-protect-against-zika 
 

> 
> or: http://bit.ly/1R7AWmz 
> 
> =========================================
> 
> One Page PDF of Test Results
> 
> 
http://www.consumerreports.org/content/dam/cro/news_articles/health/Consumer-Reports-Insect-Repellent-Ratings-February-2016.pdf 
 

> 
> or: http://bit.ly/1NT3YQd 
> 
> =========================================
> 
> Mike Quinn, Austin
> ________________
> Texas Entomology
> http://texasento.net 
> ======================================
> To unsubscribe, send the message SIGNOFF TX-BUTTERFLY to
> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
> To change to the daily digest, send the message SET TX-BUTTERFLY DIGEST to
> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Consumer Reports rates mosquito repellents...
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 17:53:40 -0600
Consumer Reports is releasing free to the public its exclusive test results
and Ratings of mosquito repellents—including those that will protect you
best against Aedes mosquitoes, the type that carry Zika.

Discussion and test results:


http://www.consumerreports.org/insect-repellents/mosquito-repellents-that-best-protect-against-zika 


or: http://bit.ly/1R7AWmz

=========================================

One Page PDF of Test Results


http://www.consumerreports.org/content/dam/cro/news_articles/health/Consumer-Reports-Insect-Repellent-Ratings-February-2016.pdf 


or: http://bit.ly/1NT3YQd

=========================================

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Query
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 22:22:22 -0600
.
.Did this forum die on the vine or am I just somehow disengaged?

**********************************************************************
Brush Freeman
Senior Wildlife Biologist/Partner. Bio-Spatial Services Inc, TXESA,
Independent consulting.
www.biospatialservices.com 
503-551-5150 Cell
120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Cyna Blue at National Butterfly Center
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 09:43:03 -0600
Here is a photo of one from yesterday afternoon at the NBC in south Texas.

Shirley Wilkerson
visiting the LRGV

http://www.bluemelon.com/caramia/recentimages#photo-5733189/T1200800

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Cyna Blue at NBC Saturday
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 08:33:43 -0600
Had one yesterday (sort if in the middle of the gardens) nearest the
river.  Will post a photo shortly.

Shirley Wilkerson
Visiting McAllen

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Butterfly Walk Fri Jan 29, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 2016 19:05:58 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Jan 29, 2016

The weather was great, temperature in the mid 70s with almost full sun and
light wind from the SE.  21 participated, with many experienced butterfly
enthusiasts. We recorded 33 species during the 2 h walk.

Highlights were: Turk's Cap White Skipper and Red-bordered Metalmark both
firsts for our winter outings, several Silver-banded Hairstreaks, a
Soldier, and a Mexican Bluewing at the butterfly station.

Thanks to Mike and Ginny and Jan for their assistance with finding new
species and helping with identifications.

Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Dainty Sulphur  Nathalis iole
Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Turk's-cap White-Skipper  Heliopetes macaira
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30
Plant walks are Thursdays at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 22, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 19:23:22 -0600
 Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Jan 22, 2016

The temperature was in the high 60s with full sun and medium wind from the
NW.  15 of us participated. Even with the cooler temperature 30 species
were reported including those seen before the hike.

There were more butterflies on the wing than in the previous two walks.
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak and Silver-banded Hairstreaks were highights.

The group stopped to admire two male Roseate Skimmer dragonflies.
Thanks to Mike and Ginny for their assistance with identifications.

Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Reakirt's Blue  Hemiargus isola
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30
Plant walks are Thursdays at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: January 25, 2016 Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting and Presentation
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Jan 2016 18:27:04 -0600
Greetings and Happy 2016,



Following is the information for the January 25, 2016 meeting of the Austin
Butterfly Forum.  Thank you for continuing to help us spread the word.



*The Austin Butterfly Forum meets at **Zilker Botanical Garden Center
** at 7:00 pm on the 4th Monday of every
month* *except for December*. Most meetings are free and open to the
public. Each meeting features an educational program, but we like to
socialize a bit beforehand. Sometimes members will bring caterpillars or
collections for display, and sometimes we have special opportunities such
as plant giveaways. The meetings are also a good place to hear special
announcements and learn about new events.  Everyone interested in
butterflies and other invertebrates is welcome! Please come join us!



*Monday, January 25, 7 PM – Zilker Botanical Garden Center*



*Butterfly Farming: Following a Dream (or living a nightmare):*  *a
somewhat lighthearted look at the joys and frustrations of day-to-day
operations of a butterfly farm**.  Presented by Dale Clark*

Feeding thousands of hungry mouths every day is not for the fainthearted.  But,
despite the sometimes seemingly overwhelming odds of hunger, disease,
drought and/or floods, the life of a butterfly farmer can occasionally
unearth some interesting facts about the lives of the native butterflies
and moths flying around Texas.
Fascinated by butterflies and moths since he was a child, Dale Clark turned
a lifelong passion into a livelihood. In 1995 he quit his full-time ‘real
job’ and created Butterflies Unlimited, a butterfly farm south of Dallas,
Texas.  Here he began raising Texas native butterflies to sell to live
butterfly exhibits at zoos across the country, offering more than 50
species. That same year, he co-founded the Dallas County Lepidopterists’
Society.  It is a local organization which allows people of the Dallas-Fort
Worth area who share an interest in butterflies and moths to have an
opportunity to meet and go on monthly field trips. And, as if wrangling
thousands of caterpillars on ‘the ranch’ wasn’t enough, Dale became the
editor of The News of the Lepidopterists' Society.  Established in 1947,
The News is the international magazine of one of the oldest organizations
devoted to the study of butterflies and moths.

*Austin Butterfly Forum Membership*

All of our normal events are free and open to the public, but you may want
to become a member of the Austin Butterfly Forum to help support us and our
events. We also treat members to some extra goodies, such as reduced
admission to special programs that have a fee and discounts on purchases
made at meetings.  Membership is $20 annually per household, payable during
meetings or by mail to:  Doris Hill, ABF Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin,
TX 78723.

For more information, please visit our website: austinbutterflies.org






*Austin Butterfly Forum Membership*

All of our normal events are free and open to the public, but you may want
to become a member of the Austin Butterfly Forum to help support us and our
events. We also treat members to some extra goodies, such as reduced
admission to special programs that have a fee and discounts on purchases
made at meetings. Membership is $20 annually per household, payable during
meetings or by mail to Doris Hill, ABF Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin,
TX 78723.

For more information, please visit our website: austinbutterflies.org

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 15, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 2016 22:22:12 -0600
 Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Jan 15, 201

Perfect weather, hot and sunny with a slight breeze.  16 of us participated
and a total of 26 species were seen during the day.

The Orange-barred Sulphur and Silver-banded Hairstreak were highlights.
Mexican Bluewings were still flying in the afternoon. The last butterfly
seen, after the hike was over, was a Long-tailed Skipper.
Thanks to Mike, Ginny, and Jan for their excellent assistance.

Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Orange-barred Sulphur  Phoebis philea
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30
Plant walks are Thursdays at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 8, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Jan 2016 19:27:57 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Jan 8, 2016
The weather was warm with some sun to start with then cloudy. 17 of us
participated and a total of 24 species were reported for the day, before
and during the hike.

Numbers were down with singles of most species. The Orange-barred Sulphur
was a fly-over before the hike started. Mexican Bluewings were the most
numerous butterfly with 10 observed flying near the bait at the warmest
time of the day, around noon. They had disappeared by hike time.

Thanks to Mike, Ginny, and Jan for helping us find many of the species and
assisting with the hike.

Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Orange-barred Sulphur  Phoebis philea
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: National Butterfly Center and Santa Ana , 12/22/15
From: Dan Jones <00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Tue, 22 Dec 2015 23:06:45 -0500
Today there was a Blue-eyed Sailor and Red Rim at Santa Ana and an amazing 
eleven species of hairstreaks at the National Butterfly Center including Telea, 
Ruddy and Strophius Hairstreaks and Vicroy's Minstreak. Photos are on my blog. 




http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2015/12/wild-day-part-ii-hairstreak-o-mania.html 




http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2015/12/wild-day-part-i-santa-ana-nwr-122215.html 



Dan Jones, Weslaco, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk - species error - no Delaware Skipper
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Dec 2015 22:38:59 -0600
No Delaware Skipper. 31 species.
(I'm awake now, not in Ontario)

Thanks Mike Rickard for catching the error.

Apologies
Rick Snider

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Dec 2015 20:55:16 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Dec 18, 2015
It was cool with sun, cloud, and a touch of breeze from the north.

Nine of us walked about and saw 32 species. A few were seen before the hike
began.

The Two-barred Flasher was enjoyed by all. The Mexican Bluewings were only
flying in the sunniest warmest time, at noon before the walk.

Thanks again to Mike and Ginny for helping us find many of the species and
assisting with the hike.

Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii
Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Reakirt's Blue  Hemiargus isola
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
American Lady  Vanessa virginiensis
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator
Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Delaware Skipper  Anatrytone logan
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30

Plant walks are Thursdays at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Hairstreaks at National Butterfly Center, 12/13/15
From: Mike Rickard <mikearickard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 2015 08:55:46 -0600
On Sunday afternoon, Dec. 13, I found a Black Hairstreak (Ocaria ocrisia)
at the National Butterfly Center in Mission.  This was a Lifer for me.  I
also photographed a Pearly-gray Hairstreak (Strephonota tephraeus), and a
probable Aquamarine Hairstreak (Oenomaus ortygnus) was photographed by a
friend - photos not definitive.  Altogether there were 10 hairstreak
species among the 50+ species on the wing.  The previous day had seen
overcast skies with very strong southerly winds, giving way Sunday morning
to north winds and clearing skies.

Mike Rickard
Mission TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Dec 2015 15:30:41 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Dec 11, 2015

The day was hot, mostly clouds with only a few sunny breaks, and very windy
out of the SE. On the walk and earlier in the day we saw a total of 36
species.

Highlights were Malachite, Guava Skipper, Red-bordered Pixie, and
Two-barred Flasher.

We were all hoping that the Spot-celled Sister from yesterday would
reappear but no luck.

Thanks to Mike and Ginny for helping us find many of the species and
assisting with the hike.

Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Tailed Orange  Eurema proterpia
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Red-bordered Pixie  Melanis pixe
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Malachite  Siproeta stelenes
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Hackberry EmperorAsterocampa celtis
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Monarch  Danaus plexippus
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Guava Skipper  Phocides polybius
Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator
Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso
Mournful Duskywing  Erynnis tristis
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala
Brazilian Skipper  Calpodes ethlius
Ocola Skipper  Panoquina ocola

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30

Plant walks are Thursdays at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: CDC issues Watch - Level 1, travel warning for Mexico due to Zika virus - Dec. 10
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 2015 21:26:26 -0600
FYI, Mike Quinn, Austin

Zika Virus in Mexico
Watch - Level 1, Practice Usual Precautions
What is the current situation?

In November 2015, Mexico reported two locally transmitted cases of Zika
 virus infection. These are the first
cases of Zika virus in Mexico. Local transmission means that mosquitoes in
Mexico have been infected with Zika virus, causing it to spread to humans.

CDC recommends that travelers to Mexico
 protect
themselves from mosquito bites
. The Ministry of Health
of Brazil is concerned about a possible association between the Zika virus
outbreak and increased numbers of babies born with birth defects. For this
reason, pregnant women should take extra precautions to avoid mosquito
bites.
What can travelers do to prevent Zika virus infection?

There is no vaccine or medicine to prevent Zika virus infection. Travelers
can protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites.

Full Text of travel warning:
http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices/watch/zika-virus-mexico

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Zika arbo-virus apparently spread from Brazil to Nuevo Leon, MX within one year
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 8 Dec 2015 10:04:45 -0600
Given it's rate of spread, it's seems likely to be in south Texas by next
year... Mike Quinn, Austin

Zika Virus outbreak in the Americas: data as of Dec 04 per  AT ECDC_Outbreaks
https://twitter.com/thelonevirologi/status/673217004669640704

-------------------

Factsheet for health professionals - European Centre for Disease Prevention
and Control (ECDC)

http://ecdc.europa.eu/en/healthtopics/zika_virus_infection/factsheet-health-professionals/Pages/factsheet_health_professionals.aspx 

OR: http://bit.ly/1NCiXCw

INTRODUCTION

Zika virus disease is a mosquito-borne disease caused by Zika virus (ZIKV)
which causes in general a mild febrile illness with maculo-papular rash.
Aedes mosquitoes are considered as main vectors. Before 2007, viral
circulation and a few outbreaks were documented in tropical Africa and in
some areas in Southeast Asia. Since 2007, several islands of the Pacific
region have experienced outbreaks. In 2015, ZIKV disease outbreaks were
reported in South America for the first time. ZIKV disease is now
considered as an emerging infectious disease.

A significant increase of patients with Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) was
reported during the 2014 outbreak in French Polynesia. A similar increase
along with an unusual increase of congenital microcephaly was observed in
some regions in north eastern Brazil in 2015. Causal relationships are
currently under investigation.

There is no prophylaxis, treatment or vaccine to protect against ZIKV
infection. Therefore, preventive personal measures are recommended to avoid
mosquito bites during the daytime

------------------

Zika virus infection – Mexico

WHO Disease Outbreak News - 3 December 2015

On 26 November 2015, national health authorities in Mexico notified
PAHO/WHO of 3 cases of Zika virus infection, including two autochthonous
cases (residents of Nuevo León and Chiapas)

http://www.who.int/csr/don/03-december-2015-zika-mexico/en/

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Fwd: TAMU Insect Collection Open House, 2016
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 7 Dec 2015 16:03:54 -0600
FYI, Mike

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Edward Riley 
Date: Fri, Dec 4, 2015 at 2:43 PM
Subject: TAMU Insect Collection Open House, 2016
To: TX-ENTO AT listserv.uh.edu


RE: TAMU Insect Collection open house, January 9, 2016

Dear Colleagues:

You are cordially invited to the annual "open house" of the Texas A&M
University Insect Collection to meet with others who share an interest in
the study of Texas insects. This is the 27th consecutive annual meeting,
and we hope to have another excellent gathering this year. Each year our
meeting attracts a diverse group of people - professional and amateur -
with a broad range of interests. There is no formal program, but it will be
a chance to show off new curiosities and catch up on the past year's news
and collecting stories. Please feel free to invite newcomers who share our
interest.

The event will be held on Saturday, January 9th. As in recent years, the
entire day will be spent at the Minnie Belle Heep Building (a.k.a., “*the
Heep Center*

”). 

Starting time will be around 9 to 10 AM.  Meeting areas will be available
on the 2nd floor of the atrium adjacent to the TAMU Insect Collection room
(Room 216). Lunch will be on your own. The atrium meeting areas and the
Texas A&M University Insect Collection will be open for the remainder of
the afternoon.

Parking will be available in lot no. 67 on the east side of the building
and no special permit is required for parking on Saturday.

All collections will be open for browsing as usual. If any of you would
like uninterrupted "quality time" working in the collections, I suggest you
arrive a day early or stay a day late. Please let me know in advance, and I
will make arrangements for collection access on Friday evening and/or the
following Sunday morning.

Spread the word. Hope to see you on January 9th!

Sincerely,
Edward G. Riley
Research Assistant
office: (979) 845-5935
e-mail: *egrchryso AT tamu.edu* 
*Map*

 


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 2015 18:30:49 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Dec 4, 2015



The day started out sunny and 70 but then was mixed sun and clouds for the
walk. We saw 29 species, most on the walk, a few earlier in the day.



Highlights were Lantana Scrub Hairstreak, Potrillo Skipper, and the last
butterfly seen, a Two-barred Flasher, wings flat in the last sun of the
afternoon. We also had a prolonged close look at what we call the signature
butterfly of the Rio Grande Valley, the Mexican Bluewing, basking in sun.
No photo taken can do justice to its beauty.



Thanks to Mike and Ginny for helping us find many of the species and
assisting with the hike.



Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae

Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa

Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii

Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie

Western Pygmy-Blue  Brephidium exile

Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius

Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino

American Snout  Libytheana carinenta

Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae

Bordered Patch  Chlosyne lacinia

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Queen  Danaus gilippus

Soldier  Danaus eresimus

Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus

Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator

Potrillo Skipper  Cabares potrillo

Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Ocola Skipper  Panoquina ocola



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30

Plant walks will be Thursdays at 10AM starting Dec 10.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Dwarfed Common Buckeye in Lubbock
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 2015 10:32:26 -0600
Greetings All:

I spotted a Common Buckeye at the Lubbock Cemetery yesterday afternoon.
The bug was notable for a couple of reasons.  Firstly, this is a bit late
in the year to encounter one in our region.  Second, it was dwarfed - the
last Common Buckeye I saw in November (at another site) was also dwarfed -
both bugs approximately 2/3rds the size of a typical Common Buckeye.

Anthony 'Fat Tony' Hewetson; Lubbock

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Nov 2015 19:36:23 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Nov 27, 2015



The weather was cloudy, humid, breezy, and warm for our butterfly walk. It
was pretty slow with only 20 species seen in the first hour, then rain
started and the butterflies took cover for the rest of the afternoon.



We did see a Silver-banded Hairstreak and Cassius Blue before the rain and
Mexican Bluewing later in the afternoon. We searched in vain for one of our
park specialties, the Potrillo Skipper, which was seen the two previous
days. Also in the previous few days were Two-barred Flashers, Guava
Skipper, Falcate Skipper (now very worn) and Brazilian Skippers.



A few participants were interested in odes and we looked at Thornbush
Dasher, male Eastern Pondhawk, Rainpool Spreadwings, a probable Familiar
Bluet (stuck to Plumbago but freed by a participant), and a darker than
normal Blue-ringed Dancer.



When the rain started we took shelter in the tram and toured our "Tropical
Zone" looking at a few of the many exotic plants present.



Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton

Queen  Danaus gilippus

Soldier  Danaus eresimus

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator

Mazans Scallopwing  Staphylus mazans

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30

Plant walks will be Thursdays at 10AM starting Dec 10.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Fwd: Monarch & pollinator conservation workshop @ Hornsby Bend (e. Austin) - Dec. 19 - 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Nov 2015 15:39:32 -0600
Native Prairies Association of Texas is co-hosting a workshop on insect
conservation next month in east Austin.

Similar workshops are apparently planned for future months across Texas...

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Jane F Tillman jtillman AT utexas.edu [NPSOT-Austin-announce] <
NPSOT-Austin-announce-noreply AT yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, Nov 23, 2015 at 12:36 PM
Subject: [NPSOT-Austin-announce] Upcoming Workshop offered by NPAT
To: NPSOT group 

The Native Prairies Association of Texas is doing great work identifying,
saving and restoring prairies across Texas. I hope some of you can attend this
event.

*For those of you not familiar with Hornsby Bend it is in East Austin. If
you are on Hwy 71 going east past the airport, turn left (north) on to FM
973 and go north for about a mile. (If you get to TX 130 you have gone too
far.) Turn left (west) across the road construction into the Austin Water
Center for Environmental Research. You will pass through a guard station
and turn right into the CER parking lot.*

Best wishes for a Happy Thanksgiving.
Jane Tillman

*MONARCH CONSERVATION AND HABITAT RESTORATION*
Hosted by Native Prairies Association of Texas and Monarch Gateway

When: *Saturday December 19*, from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Location: *Center for Environmental Research* at Hornsby Bend, 2210 F.M.
973, Austin 78725
Registration fee: *$15* due at the door (includes lunch)
*RSVP* to: Kirsti Harms at kirsti_harms AT texasprairie.org, 512-296-9160

Topics include:

*Monarch Host Cities Partnership Project:*
How grow and establish healthy milkweed colonies for monarchs
By Barbara Willy, Director of Monarch Gateway

*Our Native Bee Pollinators:*
How to protect and support our native bees, including providing bee boxes
By Michael Warriner, Texas Parks & Wildlife, Wildlife Diversity Program

*Monarch & Pollinator Conservation:*
How to include as part of a 1-d-1 Wildlife Management Exemption Plan
By a Texas Parks & Wildlife biologist

*Conservation Easements: *
A panel discussion on what they are and how they can preserve pollinator
habitat
Melanie Pavlas: Pines & Prairies Land Trust, Executive Director
David Bezanson: The Nature Conservancy of Texas, Land Protection and
Easement Manager
Pat Merkord: Native Prairies Association of Texas, Executive Director

*STAY TUNED in 2016*! More monthly Monarch Workshops are planned throughout
the state.

__._,_.___
__,_._,___

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: November 23, 2015 Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 15 Nov 2015 14:07:21 -0600
Greetings Everyone



Here is the information for our upcoming meeting of the Austin Butterfly
Forum for November 2015. Thank you for helping us to get the word out.



The Austin Butterfly Forum meets at the *Zilker Botanical Garden Center
* *at 7:00 pm on the 4th Monday of every
month* except for December. Most meetings are free and open to the public.
Each meeting features an educational program, but we like to socialize a
bit beforehand. Sometimes members will bring caterpillars or collections
for display, and sometimes we have special opportunities such as plant
giveaways. The meetings are also a good place to hear special announcements
and learn about new events.  Everyone interested in butterflies and other
invertebrates is welcome! Please come join us!



*Monday, November 23, 2015, 7 PM Meeting*: *Austin Butterfly Forum Members’
Show and Tell*

This is a fun meeting that we have every year. Members will have 5-10
minutes to show their favorite photos of the year or to tell about a trip
or butterfly experience. Each presenter is responsible for bringing their
flash drive with photos. A projector and laptop will be available. Members
planning to participate should contact Dan Hardy  prior
to the meeting.





*Austin Butterfly Forum Membership*

All of our normal events are open to the public, but you may want to become
a member of the Austin Butterfly Forum to help support us and our events.
We also treat members to some extra goodies, such as reduced admission to
special programs that have a fee and discounts on purchases made at
meetings. Membership is $20 annually per household, payable during meetings
or by mail to Doris Hill, ABF Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin, TX 78723.

For more information, please visit our website: austinbutterflies.org

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Nov 2015 10:14:00 -0500
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Fri Nov 13, 2015



Before the walk we were giving thought to cancelling the butterfly walk
because of the cool cloudy weather. But at the end there were a surprising
32 species seen by the 8 participants.



It was a day for dark skippers, almost all Fawn-spotted, but two Brazilian
Skippers made an appearance, one in the parking lot garden and one at the
Parauque Hall garden. A Purple-washed Skipper was on Crucita along the
maintenance road. It is always nice to see Soldiers at any time but unusual
when Soldiers outnumber Queens as they did today.



We have a good flight of Rainpool Spreadwings at the moment.

Deb Marsh took a great photo of a blue colored Passiflora foetida flower.
This native passion vine, Corona de Cristo, is common in the valley but
less so at Estero.



Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes

Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe

Little Yellow  Eurema lisa

Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa

American Snout  Libytheana carinenta

Bordered Patch  Chlosyne lacinia

White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae

Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes

Monarch  Danaus plexippus

Queen  Danaus gilippus

Soldier  Danaus eresimus

Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Whirlabout  Polites vibex

Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Brazilian Skipper  Calpodes ethlius

Ocola Skipper  Panoquina ocola

Purple-washed Skipper  Panoquina sylvicola



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Yellow-tipped Flasher at National Butterfly Certer, 11/11/15
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Nov 2015 12:44:10 -0600
These are fine shots. Congratulations!
Tim

On Nov 11, 2015, at 9:28 PM, Dan Jones 
<00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU> wrote: 


> The south winds ahead of the approaching front blew up some good stuff today. 
Best butterflies were Yellow-tipped Flasher, White Scrub-Hairstreak, Red Rim, 
Malachite, Silver Emperor, Purple-washed and Violet-banded Skippers. Photos but 
no list are on my blog. 

> 
> 
http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2015/11/yellow-tipped-flasher-at-nbc-111115.html 

> 
> Dan Jones, Weslaco
> 
> 
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> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Yellow-tipped Flasher at National Butterfly Certer, 11/11/15
From: Dan Jones <00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Wed, 11 Nov 2015 22:28:36 -0500
The south winds ahead of the approaching front blew up some good stuff today. 
Best butterflies were Yellow-tipped Flasher, White Scrub-Hairstreak, Red Rim, 
Malachite, Silver Emperor, Purple-washed and Violet-banded Skippers. Photos but 
no list are on my blog. 




http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2015/11/yellow-tipped-flasher-at-nbc-111115.html 



Dan Jones, Weslaco






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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Fwd: Comanche County Butterflies Sat 11-7-15
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 8 Nov 2015 15:49:56 -0600
Things are winding down in this north Texas county with the rains and
cooler temps.

Desert Checkered-skipper
Common/White Checkered-skipper
Phaon Crescent
Gulf Fritillary
Eufala Skipper
Fiery Skipper
Sachem
Orange Sulphur
Clouded Sulphur
Buckeye
Sleepy Orange
Red Admiral

Shirley Wilkerson
Comanche, TX (usually Bryan)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk Friday Nov 6, 2015
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Nov 2015 19:56:07 -0500
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Nov 6, 2015



While it rained west of us we got lucky and had warm sunny weather for the
whole afternoon outing. About 16 visitors attended, many friends from past
walks. Thanks to Mike Rickard and Ginny Musgrave for their expert help.



We had 30 species during the walk. On Thursday Brazilian Skipper and
Celia's Roadside Skipper were spotted.This morning Nov 7, 3 Two-barred
Flashers, a Guava Skipper, Falcate Skipper and Giant White made a brief
appearance on the White Plumbago in the Trellis Garden.



The list of 38 species includes a few seen the day before the walk and the
morning after.



Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes

Great Southern White  Ascia monuste

Giant White  Ganyra josephina

Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae

Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe

Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside

Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa

Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis

Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis

Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino

Bordered Patch  Chlosyne lacinia

American Lady  Vanessa virginiensis

White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton

Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes

Monarch  Danaus plexippus

Queen  Danaus gilippus

Soldier  Danaus eresimus

Guava Skipper  Phocides polybius

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator

Falcate Skipper  Spathilepia clonius

Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Whirlabout  Polites vibex

Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho

Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Brazilian Skipper  Calpodes ethlius

Ocola Skipper  Panoquina ocola





Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Conchylodes salamisalis 5291 in Kinney Co
From: Troy Hibbitts <alterna2627 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Nov 2015 15:35:20 +0000
This morning I was surprised to see a Blush Conchylodes (C.salamisalis 5291) on 
my building here at Brackett HS in Brackettville.  In 3 years of watching 
moths here, this is the first specimen that I've seen here (having seen the 
species previously in the LRGV).  Cool moth. 


Conchylodes salamisalis, adult, Kinney County, Texas - Conchylodes salamisalis 
- BugGuide.Net 


|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Conchylodes salamisalis, adult, Kinney County, Texas - C...An online resource 
devoted to North American insects, spiders and their kin, offering 
identification, images, and information. | 

|  |
| View on bugguide.net | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |


Troy HibbittsBrackettville, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Identification of cocoon
From: Mike Rickard <mikearickard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Nov 2015 07:24:27 -0600
Dan, yes those are Forbes' Silkmoth cocoons.  They can be found also on
Colima, Brazilian Pepper, and other hosts.
Mike

On Wed, Nov 4, 2015 at 10:52 PM, Dan Hardy  wrote:

> Several cocoons were found on Willow and Ash along Willow Lake at Santa
> Ana.    I've raised Calleta Silkmoths that made cocoons like these it was
> on Cenizo.  There was no Cenizo around.  Are they Rothchild's SilkMoth?
>
>
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/dhh787/CocoonsOnWillowAndAshSantaAnaRefugeNovember12015?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCLTf476g3b2N4QE&feat=directlink 

>
> --Dan Hardy
>

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: New Hairstreak Record For The US
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Nov 2015 10:06:06 -0600
Great bug!

BOA info:
http://butterfliesofamerica.com/michaelus_ira.htm

apparently, not much known about it except that it ranges s. to S.
America...

Mike Quinn, Austin

On Mon, Nov 2, 2015 at 8:19 AM, Mike Rickard  wrote:

> While leading a Texas Butterfly Festival field trip in Harlingen's Hugh
> Ramsey Park yesterday (11/01/15), I photographed a hairstreak I tentatively
> identified as a Shadowed Hairstreak (Michaelus ira).  It was visiting
> Crucita blossoms on the Indigo Trail, and observed by all trip
> participants.  This is the first record of this species for the US.  ID has
> been confirmed by Andy Warren of the McGuire Center.
>
> Mike Rickard
> Mission TX
>

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: New Hairstreak Record For The US
From: Mike Rickard <mikearickard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Nov 2015 08:19:25 -0600
While leading a Texas Butterfly Festival field trip in Harlingen's Hugh
Ramsey Park yesterday (11/01/15), I photographed a hairstreak I tentatively
identified as a Shadowed Hairstreak (Michaelus ira).  It was visiting
Crucita blossoms on the Indigo Trail, and observed by all trip
participants.  This is the first record of this species for the US.  ID has
been confirmed by Andy Warren of the McGuire Center.

Mike Rickard
Mission TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: National Butterfly Center Gardens
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Nov 2015 20:54:46 -0600
A few highlights for me today:

Ruddy Daggerwing -1
Two-barred Flasher - 2
Coyote Cloudywing - 1

Shirley Wilkerson
Bryan, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Pale-banded Crescents
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Oct 2015 22:22:16 -0500
Lots of them at Edinburgh this afternoon, and one Guava Skipoer.  Others
reported the Two-barred Flasher earlier.

Shirley Wilkerson
Bryan

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Apache Skipper
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Oct 2015 17:01:29 -0500
,

Never mind on my previous post...Just got a link posted by my friend Chuck
Sexton on the Apache Skipper.  Same bird and apparently somewhat common in
the immediate area. Like I said these LBJs are not my forte'

**********************************************************************
Brush Freeman
Senior Wildlife Biologist/Partner. Bio-Spatial Services Inc, TXESA,
Independent consulting.
www.biospatialservices.com 
503-551-5150 Cell
120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas

On Sat, Oct 31, 2015 at 4:33 PM, Brush Freeman 
wrote:

> .
> This AM I had a what I am almost positive was an Apache Skipper nectaring
> on fall aster (Hedge) at Devine Lk. near Leander in Williamson Co.  From
> what few checks I did online this would be way out of range but I am having
> a hard time making it into another species..I don't spend much time on
> skippers so may be wrong on my ID.
> **********************************************************************
> Brush Freeman
> Senior Wildlife Biologist/Partner. Bio-Spatial Services Inc, TXESA,
> Independent consulting.
> www.biospatialservices.com 
> 503-551-5150 Cell
> 120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
> Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas
>

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Apache Skipper
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Oct 2015 16:33:21 -0500
.
This AM I had a what I am almost positive was an Apache Skipper nectaring
on fall aster (Hedge) at Devine Lk. near Leander in Williamson Co.  From
what few checks I did online this would be way out of range but I am having
a hard time making it into another species..I don't spend much time on
skippers so may be wrong on my ID.
**********************************************************************
Brush Freeman
Senior Wildlife Biologist/Partner. Bio-Spatial Services Inc, TXESA,
Independent consulting.
www.biospatialservices.com 
503-551-5150 Cell
120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: RFI: Best butterfly at Edinburg?
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Oct 2015 13:46:00 -0500
Is it still Giant White?  Trying to decide where to rush to so late in the
day.

Thanks,

Shirley Wilkerson

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Texas now has a pollinator conservation plan
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Oct 2015 14:29:02 -0500
Texas Monarch and Native Pollinator Conservation Plan - OCTOBER 2015
http://tpwd.texas.gov/publications/pwdpubs/media/pwd_rp_w7000_2070.pdf

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Significant decline in the population of eastern North American migrating
monarchs has led to widespread concern in Canada, the United States, and
Mexico. Texas will play a critical role in conservation efforts aimed at
monarch conservation given its strategic position along the species
migratory pathway. In addition, 30 native pollinator/flower-visiting
species (bees, butterflies, and moths) are designated as Species of
Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) in Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s
(TPWD) Texas Conservation Action Plan. These SGCN and the monarch are
dependent upon similar landscape level habitat features (open natural
community types hosting floral resources and host plants).

The Texas Monarch/Native Pollinator Conservation Plan acknowledges Texas’
unique contribution to the long-term persistence of the North American
monarch migration and TPWD’s leading role in the conservation of SGCN in
Texas. This plan outlines actions in Texas that will contribute to monarch
and overall native pollinator conservation in Texas by highlighting four
broad categories of monarch and native pollinator conservation: habitat
conservation, education and outreach, research and monitoring, and
partnerships. This conservation plan details specific actions associated
with each of these categories by TPWD and other stakeholders. TPWD will
continue to develop this plan as new stakeholders are identified and become
engaged in this collaboration

see link for full text:
http://tpwd.texas.gov/publications/pwdpubs/media/pwd_rp_w7000_2070.pdf

===============================================

Seems some of the Texas plant organizations are already involved, but none
of the butterfly clubs were included...

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma State Park, 10/28/15
From: Dan Jones <00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Wed, 28 Oct 2015 23:17:06 -0400
Lots of blooming crucita at Resaca de la Palma State Park with lots of 
butterflies. Good stuff included Evan's Skipper, four Violet-banded Skippers, 
lots of Blue Metalmarks, Walker's Metalmark, Boisduval's Yellow, Orange-barred 
Sulphur, Julia Heliconian and more. Yesterday the National Butterfly Center had 
Glazed Pellicia, Evan's Skipper, Ornythion Swallowtail and Polydamas 
Swallowtail. Photos and list are on my blog. 




http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2015/10/resaca-de-la-palma-state-park-102815.html 


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Minor Monarch flight today Bee County
From: Robert Benson <benson.farm AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 27 Oct 2015 18:08:45 -0500
Hi everyone,

I've been a member of this listserv for years, but I've never posted before. 
I'm a retired college professor living on a small farm 12 miles north of 
Beeville, Texas. The habitat here is typical south Texas brush with live oaks 
sprinkled in. Soil is mostly caliche. 


While having lunch today at a cafe in downtown Beeville, my wife Karen and I 
noticed a Monarch flying across the street at the top of a stand of bamboo. 
Monarchs are not common here, so that got my attention. This afternoon (back at 
the farm) we had a limited flight of Monarchs, maybe six to eight per hour over 
our yard of about an acre. There were lots of Gregg's Mistflowers blooming and 
the Queens were all over it, but the Monarchs were keeping an altitude of about 
15 to 20 feet above ground and moving from east to west. Once I saw a pair down 
on a Esperanza bush, but that was the only time they took a break from flying 
over. 


Because Karen is a Texas Master Naturalist, she insisted that I report this 
even though it's a minor sighting -- so I have done so. I do really enjoy 
reading the various posts on the listserv and appreciate the civil tone of the 
group. 


All the best,  Robert

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Introduction
From: Sandy Carter <crowdedcat AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Oct 2015 11:52:17 -0500
Hello!
I'm just introducing myself. I live in the Houston Tx area in the
Woodlands.
I have been raising Monarch butterflies for about 3 years, Waystation #8609.
I have a background in biology and wildlife rehabilitation. And I am a
nurse by day.

This year was unusual in that I had no Monarch action until May despite
good success growing
a few varieties of milkweed.
Last week I was considering cutting down my milkweed, but was waiting for
it to flower then go to seed.
Then I had a well weathered female spend about 2 days nectaring and
ovipositing on my milkweed. So now I have a few eggs.

Last year I had a batch of about 23 in DECEMBER!

Anyway, thanks for having me here.

Sandy Carter
crowdedcat AT gmail.com


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Patricia/Monarchs, appears highest winds (>75 mph) mostly hit w. Jalisco, MX
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT SABER.NET>
Date: Sat, 24 Oct 2015 12:44:54 -0700
According to weather.com no severe weather is forecast for the 
monarch migration regions (cities of Torreon, Saltillo, Monterrey, 
San Luis Potosi, Ciudad Victoria).

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Patricia/Monarchs, appears highest winds (>75 mph) mostly hit w. Jalisco, MX
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Oct 2015 13:23:04 -0500
FYI,

looks like the highest winds (>75 mph) mostly hit western Jalisco...

see map of wind impact area at bottom of this link:

http://politico.mx/en-la-politica/localidades-impactadas-por-el-huracan-patricia 


The monarch overwintering grounds are in far eastern Michoacan, MX

Mike Quinn, Austin

On Fri, Oct 23, 2015 at 2:42 PM, Mike Quinn  wrote:

> As it stands, it looks like Hurricane Patricia, or what's left of it, will
> pass though the monarch's migration route before they reach their
> overwintering grounds in central Mexico.
>
> Indigo dots indicate most recently reported monarch sightings to Journey
> North
> http://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch.html
>
> NOAA projected path of Hurricane Patricia as of Friday, Oct. 23
>
> 
http://static4.techinsider.io/image/562a2d129dd7cc1e008c4234-895-716/hurricane-patricia-path-mexico.gif 

> shorter: http://bit.ly/1KuD4MS
>
> Mike Quinn, Austin
> ________________
> Texas Entomology
> http://texasento.net
>

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: 2 new life histories
From: Berry Nall <lb AT THENALLS.NET>
Date: Sat, 24 Oct 2015 12:16:39 -0500
Hi,
Some much-needed rain in south TX is allowing me to work on the website. I've 
added life histories for South Texas Satyr and Tropical Checkered-Skipper. 

http://leps.thenalls.net/index.php

Berry Nall
Falcon Heights, Starr Co, TX
leps.thenalls.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Hurricane Patricia projected to pass thru monarch migration
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Oct 2015 16:52:39 -0500
but see this wind map which shows relatively light winds in the interior of
Mexico:


http://fires.globalforestwatch.org/#v=map&x=-104.07&y=18.14&l=6&lyrs=Active_Fires%3AWind_Direction&b=Dark%20Gray%20Canvas&dirty=true 


shorter URL: http://bit.ly/1Ls4wP4

Mike Quinn, not a meteorologist...


On Fri, Oct 23, 2015 at 2:42 PM, Mike Quinn  wrote:

> As it stands, it looks like Hurricane Patricia, or what's left of it, will
> pass though the monarch's migration route before they reach their
> overwintering grounds in central Mexico.
>
> Indigo dots indicate most recently reported monarch sightings to Journey
> North
> http://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch.html
>
> NOAA projected path of Hurricane Patricia as of Friday, Oct. 23
>
> 
http://static4.techinsider.io/image/562a2d129dd7cc1e008c4234-895-716/hurricane-patricia-path-mexico.gif 

> shorter: http://bit.ly/1KuD4MS
>
> Mike Quinn, Austin
> ________________
> Texas Entomology
> http://texasento.net
>

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Hurricane Patricia projected to pass thru monarch migration
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Oct 2015 14:42:53 -0500
As it stands, it looks like Hurricane Patricia, or what's left of it, will
pass though the monarch's migration route before they reach their
overwintering grounds in central Mexico.

Indigo dots indicate most recently reported monarch sightings to Journey
North
http://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch.html

NOAA projected path of Hurricane Patricia as of Friday, Oct. 23

http://static4.techinsider.io/image/562a2d129dd7cc1e008c4234-895-716/hurricane-patricia-path-mexico.gif 

shorter: http://bit.ly/1KuD4MS

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: sale of N.M. moth name on eBay, current bid: $6,000
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2015 13:26:47 -0500
Public has chance to name moth species discovered in N.M.
Sunday, October 18, 2015
By Astrid Galvan
AP writer

TUCSON, Ariz. — An auction on eBay allows the public to make a different
kind of purchase as they peruse the used clothing, electronics and war
relics on the site. Up for sale: naming rights to a new insect.

A moth that weighs less than an ounce and measures about an inch was
discovered eight years ago at White Sands National Monument in New Mexico
by entomologist Eric H. Metzler.

full text:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.santafenewmexican.com_news_public-2Dhas-2Dchance-2Dto-2Dname-2Dmoth-2Dspecies-2Ddiscovered-2Din-2Dn_article-5F7d249bfa-2Df743-2D54c0-2Db25b-2D64c9f668e8fc.html&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=y8rhOvidDs9Csb1MmLyB8ZA6g0QgOsE1pfq0V-Avk3M&s=0mwhpzBEk6FoAeES7bYvwMadH8X5LEq49o1-R6JZrPM&e= 

or: 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_1NkzucP&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=y8rhOvidDs9Csb1MmLyB8ZA6g0QgOsE1pfq0V-Avk3M&s=cI6X-scLaV_vx2xbGhmaWS_9UMH5vsOZJQboNH_KZvk&e= 


-----------------------------------------------------

current bidding on eBay:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__offer.ebay.com_ws_eBayISAPI.dll-3FViewBids-26item-3D281812249261-26rt-3Dnc-26-5Ftrksid-3Dp2047675.l2565&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=y8rhOvidDs9Csb1MmLyB8ZA6g0QgOsE1pfq0V-Avk3M&s=-y8GpVMOXV_yQ5oaH5JyhYesW12KUyuiwbsgR9eFEAY&e= 

or: 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebay.to_1Nkzqts&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=y8rhOvidDs9Csb1MmLyB8ZA6g0QgOsE1pfq0V-Avk3M&s=vtLwBlnQC9O7eAvQQxZGx3QBlksf6SEVdyHW_Ykn9r0&e= 


-----------------------------------------------------

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__texasento.net&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=y8rhOvidDs9Csb1MmLyB8ZA6g0QgOsE1pfq0V-Avk3M&s=Vu3SuHNJ6da_yJ9ZWD3484AYZxTCF-m6d05L4vN3hks&e= 
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
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Subject: sale of N.M. moth name on eBay, current bid: $6,000
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2015 13:26:47 -0500
Public has chance to name moth species discovered in N.M.
Sunday, October 18, 2015
By Astrid Galvan
AP writer

TUCSON, Ariz. — An auction on eBay allows the public to make a different
kind of purchase as they peruse the used clothing, electronics and war
relics on the site. Up for sale: naming rights to a new insect.

A moth that weighs less than an ounce and measures about an inch was
discovered eight years ago at White Sands National Monument in New Mexico
by entomologist Eric H. Metzler.

full text:

http://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/public-has-chance-to-name-moth-species-discovered-in-n/article_7d249bfa-f743-54c0-b25b-64c9f668e8fc.html 

or: http://bit.ly/1NkzucP

-----------------------------------------------------

current bidding on eBay:

http://offer.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewBids&item=281812249261&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2565 

or: http://ebay.to/1Nkzqts

-----------------------------------------------------

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Monarch migration appearance in West Texas affected by differential precipitation
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2015 07:11:00 -0500
We have been seeing an avg. of 5-6 per day in Cedar Park, they are feeding
on wife's Mist Flower along with some mimics.  Another place we have been
seeing on some days is at a small Leander Lk. working Baccaris
blooms.....Over in Bastrop Co. they were coming over, sometimes low,
sometimes very high but there is nothing for them to nectar on and not sure
how the fires and smoke affected them.  At our house there, there has been
no rain in 112+ day (since June 26)...Have seen a few trying to work fading
and wilted Turk's Cap....The map might be helpful

http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home/StateDroughtMonitor.aspx?TX


**********************************************************************
Brush Freeman
Senior Wildlife Biologist/Partner. Bio-Spatial Services Inc, TXESA,
Independent consulting.
www.biospatialsevices.com
503-551-5150 Cell
120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas

On Sun, Oct 18, 2015 at 11:29 PM, Steven Schafersman  wrote:

> It is true that the drought was especially severe in West Texas in 2011,
> the first and worst year of a very bad 4-year drought. We saw the many
> thousands of Monarchs in cities and gardens that were all under irrigation.
> Here's a link to photos of one such garden in Midland, TX:
> http://llanoestacado.org/photos/photos/water_wise_2011oct6/index.html
> Even though this Permian Basin Master Gardeners' garden is a water-wise
> garden, it is irrigated with Netafim drip lines fed by rainwater collected
> by water harvesting methods and stored in tanks. I personally saw many
> thousands of Monarchs hanging from trees all over Midland that early
> October and so did many other observers.
>
> In my brief report yesterday I didn't suggest that the 2011 shift should
> be attributed to West Texas Fall rains but perhaps I should have. My
> hypothesis for the 2015 westward migration route shift is that it is due to
> drought in Central Texas and wet Sept-Oct conditions in West Texas. The
> migration route had previously shifted westward in 2011 (
> https://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch_peak_fall2011.html). Because
> of Paul Cherubini's reply today I was motivated to examine the historical
> meteorological data for my West Texas area and found that fully half of
> 2011's small total precipitation fell in Aug-Oct (
> 
http://midgewater.twdb.texas.gov/evaporation/quadrangle/605/precipitation-tabular.txt). 

> This wetter Fall 2011 trend is similar in adjacent quadrangles in West
> Texas (although the greater differential precipitation volume is small due
> to the state-wide drought conditions that year). This positive result
> supports the "westward Monarch Texas migration shift due to
> increased westward precipitation" hypothesis and merits further study.
>
> Steven Schafersman
> Midland, Texas
>
> On Sun, Oct 18, 2015 at 12:57 AM, Paul Cherubini 
> wrote:
>
>> Steven Schafersman  wrote:
>>
>> > The primary Monarch route--usually through Central Texas—shifted
>> > westward this year, probably due to the drought in Central Texas and
>> > the abundant rains in late September in West Texas. The last westward
>> > shift of the route was in 2011 when similar large concentrations were
>> > observed.
>>
>> But in 2011 the drought was especially severe in west Texas and yet
>> there were heavy concentrations of monarchs in that area anyway.
>> And they didn’t appear starved for water or nectar.
>>
>> Example: Sonora, TX Oct. 4, 2011:
>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVmB04qbSmw
>>
>> Paul Cherubini
>> El Dorado, Calif.
>>
>> ======================================
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Subject: Re: Balcones Canyonlands NWR - Sunday, 10/18
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2015 01:02:37 -0500
A few monarchs have passed through the property in western Hays County the last 
few days. A patch of frostweed I planted, sort of so I could photograph 
butterflies without climbing down to the river is spent out here too, fading 
out completely just as the monarchs arrived. I’ll have to check another patch 
we have in the morning. There wasn’t much to that one a week or so ago when 
we were trying to wrap our heads around oak wilt reappearing on a corner of the 
property. With the drought as horrible as it is it is moving slow. But it’s 
relentless, right up the the edge of the trench we cut through the countryside. 
At least the drought’s good for something. 


I guess the fronts the monarchs ride are coming later this year. Is this so? 
The uplands above the Blanco River are virtually devoid of wildflowers. We’ve 
had less than an inch of rain since early June. 

 
A monarch was attracted to where I was hand watering vegetation, resting on a 
blade grass for awhile. Another monarch, maybe the same one dodged through a 
circular irrigation spray I'd set up in a small plot of wild grasses I’m 
trying to keep alive until it rains again. It almost flew in the window of 
Jenny’s daughter’s car as she drove down a gravel driveway this afternoon. 
I was amazed at how agile it was. 


I suppose I should do a study on what butterflies survive the drought out here. 
I don’t think there’d be much to it. 


Tim Jones
Wimberley


> On Oct 18, 2015, at 10:45 PM, Chuck Sexton  wrote:
> 
> TX Butterfliers,
> 
> Following up on Friday’s observations out at Balcones Canyonlands NWR, I 
hiked up Post Oak Creek on the Refuge today primarily to do some butterfly 
watching. It was an OK day for butterflies, although not as diverse or populous 
as we have come to expect for mid-October there. A saw not a single Monarch. 
The extreme drought conditions are seriously affecting floral resources. 
However, there was still much gayfeather blooming along with patches of plateau 
goldeneye, palafoxia, and gray goldenrod; most frostweed was past blooming and 
no shrubby boneset had started blooming yet. I concentrated primarily on grass 
skippers as I tried to refind and document any Apache Skippers which might be 
flying. It is clearly a good flight year for that species; I encountered at 
least 6 individuals and photographed several of them. Below is a complete list 
for my 2-1/2 hr visit from noon to 2:30 p.m. Conditions were clear, 80F, winds 
SE 5 to 10. Images of several species will be uploaded to iNaturalist.org later 
this evening. 

> 
> Chuck Sexton
> Austin
> 
> * * * * * *
> Balcones Canyonlands NWR
> Post Oak Creek (restricted access)
> Oct. 18, 2015
> 
> Pipevine Swallowtail - 8
> Orange Sulphur - 1
> Little Yellow - 3
> Dainty Sulphur - 1
> Gray Hairstreak - 2
> * Eastern Tailed Blue - 2
> Snout Butterfly - 1
> * Gulf Fritillary - 6
> Variegated Fritilllary - 1
> Pearl Crescent - 1
> Red Admiral - 1
> Common Buckeye - 3
> Common Mestra - 2
> Common Wood Nymph - 1 (late?)
> Queen - 2
> * N. Cloudywing - 1
> * Duskywing sp. - 1 (worn)
> * Orange Skipperling - 2+
> * S. Broken Dash - 2
> Sachem - 1
> * Dun Skipper - 6+
> * Eufala Skipper - 2+
> * Long-winged (Ocola) Sk. - 1
> * Apache Skipper - 6
> 
> Species marked with (*) were photographed.
> 
> ======================================
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Subject: Monarch migration appearance in West Texas affected by differential precipitation
From: Steven Schafersman <sschafersman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 18 Oct 2015 23:29:23 -0500
It is true that the drought was especially severe in West Texas in 2011,
the first and worst year of a very bad 4-year drought. We saw the many
thousands of Monarchs in cities and gardens that were all under irrigation.
Here's a link to photos of one such garden in Midland, TX:
http://llanoestacado.org/photos/photos/water_wise_2011oct6/index.html
Even though this Permian Basin Master Gardeners' garden is a water-wise
garden, it is irrigated with Netafim drip lines fed by rainwater collected
by water harvesting methods and stored in tanks. I personally saw many
thousands of Monarchs hanging from trees all over Midland that early
October and so did many other observers.

In my brief report yesterday I didn't suggest that the 2011 shift should be
attributed to West Texas Fall rains but perhaps I should have. My
hypothesis for the 2015 westward migration route shift is that it is due to
drought in Central Texas and wet Sept-Oct conditions in West Texas. The
migration route had previously shifted westward in 2011 (
https://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch_peak_fall2011.html). Because of
Paul Cherubini's reply today I was motivated to examine the historical
meteorological data for my West Texas area and found that fully half of
2011's small total precipitation fell in Aug-Oct (

http://midgewater.twdb.texas.gov/evaporation/quadrangle/605/precipitation-tabular.txt). 

This wetter Fall 2011 trend is similar in adjacent quadrangles in West
Texas (although the greater differential precipitation volume is small due
to the state-wide drought conditions that year). This positive result
supports the "westward Monarch Texas migration shift due to
increased westward precipitation" hypothesis and merits further study.

Steven Schafersman
Midland, Texas

On Sun, Oct 18, 2015 at 12:57 AM, Paul Cherubini  wrote:

> Steven Schafersman  wrote:
>
> > The primary Monarch route--usually through Central Texas—shifted
> > westward this year, probably due to the drought in Central Texas and
> > the abundant rains in late September in West Texas. The last westward
> > shift of the route was in 2011 when similar large concentrations were
> > observed.
>
> But in 2011 the drought was especially severe in west Texas and yet
> there were heavy concentrations of monarchs in that area anyway.
> And they didn’t appear starved for water or nectar.
>
> Example: Sonora, TX Oct. 4, 2011:
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVmB04qbSmw
>
> Paul Cherubini
> El Dorado, Calif.
>
>

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Balcones Canyonlands NWR - Sunday, 10/18
From: Chuck Sexton <gcwarbler AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Sun, 18 Oct 2015 22:45:38 -0500
TX Butterfliers,

Following up on Friday’s observations out at Balcones Canyonlands NWR, I 
hiked up Post Oak Creek on the Refuge today primarily to do some butterfly 
watching. It was an OK day for butterflies, although not as diverse or populous 
as we have come to expect for mid-October there. A saw not a single Monarch. 
The extreme drought conditions are seriously affecting floral resources. 
However, there was still much gayfeather blooming along with patches of plateau 
goldeneye, palafoxia, and gray goldenrod; most frostweed was past blooming and 
no shrubby boneset had started blooming yet. I concentrated primarily on grass 
skippers as I tried to refind and document any Apache Skippers which might be 
flying. It is clearly a good flight year for that species; I encountered at 
least 6 individuals and photographed several of them. Below is a complete list 
for my 2-1/2 hr visit from noon to 2:30 p.m. Conditions were clear, 80F, winds 
SE 5 to 10. Images of several species will be uploaded to iNaturalist.org later 
this evening. 


Chuck Sexton
Austin

* * * * * *
Balcones Canyonlands NWR
Post Oak Creek (restricted access)
Oct. 18, 2015

Pipevine Swallowtail - 8
Orange Sulphur - 1
Little Yellow - 3
Dainty Sulphur - 1
Gray Hairstreak - 2
* Eastern Tailed Blue - 2
Snout Butterfly - 1
* Gulf Fritillary - 6
Variegated Fritilllary - 1
Pearl Crescent - 1
Red Admiral - 1
Common Buckeye - 3
Common Mestra - 2
Common Wood Nymph - 1 (late?)
Queen - 2
* N. Cloudywing - 1
* Duskywing sp. - 1 (worn)
* Orange Skipperling - 2+
* S. Broken Dash - 2
Sachem - 1
* Dun Skipper - 6+
* Eufala Skipper - 2+
* Long-winged (Ocola) Sk. - 1
* Apache Skipper - 6

Species marked with (*) were photographed.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: any monarchs in Comanche/Gustine area?
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT SABER.NET>
Date: Sat, 17 Oct 2015 22:57:37 -0700
Steven Schafersman  wrote:

> The primary Monarch route--usually through Central Texasshifted
> westward this year, probably due to the drought in Central Texas and
> the abundant rains in late September in West Texas. The last westward
> shift of the route was in 2011 when similar large concentrations were
> observed.

But in 2011 the drought was especially severe in west Texas and yet
there were heavy concentrations of monarchs in that area anyway.
And they didnt appear starved for water or nectar.

Example: Sonora, TX Oct. 4, 2011:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVmB04qbSmw

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: any monarchs in Comanche/Gustine area?
From: Steven Schafersman <sschafersman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Oct 2015 14:45:40 -0500
Over the past two weeks we have had tens--probably hundreds--of thousands
of migrating Monarchs pass through Midland and Odessa in West Texas. I have
had over a dozen Monarchs in my small butterfly garden every day during
this time; they are there right now. A group of roosting Monarchs in south
Midland County was estimated to contain 20,000-25,000 individuals. Several
experienced butterfly counters observed this concentration. The Monarchs
were watched as they took off in great clouds when the temperature warmed.
We have seen flocks of Monarchs in the sky passing overhead and large
clusters of Monarchs hanging from trees in the evening. Many Monarchs have
also been seen in Lubbock and even Amarillo which is unusual. The primary
Monarch route--usually through Central Texas--shifted westward this year,
probably due to the drought in Central Texas and the abundant rains in late
September in West Texas. The Monarch Butterfly Peak Migration Fall 2015 map
at http://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch_peak_fall2015.html confirms
the shift. The last westward shift of the route was in 2011 when similar
large concentrations were observed.

Steven Schafersman
Midland, Texas

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Apache Skippers, Burnet Co.
From: Roger Shaw <roger.w.shaw AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 16 Oct 2015 18:34:12 -0500
Hey all,

I've had no luck finding Apache Skippers (*Hesperia woodgatei*) in Travis
Co., despite extensive searching around good habitat. So last week I
decided to expand my search, and finally found an individual at the
Balcones Canyonlands NWR, Doeskin Ranch Unit, Burnet Co.. but it was only a
fleeting glimpse (11 Oct).

Ian Wright and I returned to the spot today (16 Oct), and found another
individual at the same spot. This time we got much better looks, and photos.

Photos and location here:
http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/2146572

The field guides all show only an isolated population in Travis Co., but
this and other recent records indicate that it's likely much more
widespread throughout the Hill Country, but only in very patchy and local
habitats during its very short flight period.

I'm somewhat surprised that the species appears to be sympatric with Green
Skipper (*Hesperia viridis*), which was also flying here.

It's also good to know that the species persists on federally-protected and
publicly-accessible land, though of course no collecting is permitted.


Cheers,
...
Roger Shaw
roger.w.shaw AT gmail.com
Austin, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Austin Butterfly Forum October 26, 2015 Meeting & November 7, 2015 Field Trip
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2015 20:08:49 -0500
Greetings Everyone,



Here is the information for an upcoming meeting and a field trip of the
Austin Butterfly Forum for October and early November 2015. Thank you for
helping us to get the word out.

The Austin Butterfly Forum meets at the Zilker Botanical Garden Center
 at 7:00 pm on the 4th Monday of every month
except for December. Most meetings are free and open to the public. Each
meeting features an educational program, but we like to socialize a bit
beforehand. Sometimes members will bring caterpillars or collections for
display, and sometimes we have special opportunities such as plant
giveaways. The meetings are also a good place to hear special announcements
and learn about new events.  Everyone interested in butterflies and other
invertebrates is welcome!  Please come join us!

*Monday, October 26, 2015, 7 PM Meeting*: *How to Photograph Army Ants**,
presented by Alex Wild*

Army ants are among the most spectacular animals in warmer regions
worldwide (including central Texas!) This talk will focus on how
photographers can make use of the ants' natural history to create unique,
compelling images.

Alex Wild is a professional photographer and Curator of Entomology at the
University of Texas/Austin. Alex holds a Ph.D. in Entomology from the
University of California/Davis and has photographed insects as an aesthetic
complement to his scientific work for over a decade. His research concerns
ant taxonomy and evolution, and his photographs appear in numerous natural
history museums, magazines, books, television programs, and other media.

*Saturday, November 7, 2015, 9 AM Field Trip: Hunt for Wild Silk Moth
Caterpillars, led by Jeff Keverline*

The Austin Butterfly Forum is sponsoring a field trip to hunt for Wild Silk
Moth caterpillars on Saturday, November 7 beginning at 9 AM at St. Edward’s
Park and continuing at Barton Greenbelt.

The wild silk moths (Saturniidae) represent many of the largest and most
spectacular Lepidoptera on the planet. We are fortunate to have several
species representing this genus here in central Texas.  Despite their large
size and spectacular colors, these moths and their caterpillars are rarely
seen unless one knows how to find them, as they are very good at blending
in with their surroundings.  With knowledge of their habitats, behaviors,
and seasons, one can easily locate the caterpillar stage of Saturniid moths
right here in Austin!

We will begin Saturday morning, November 7, at 9 am in St. Edwards
Park.  The hike will loop around the park and, for the most part, be quite
easy.  Around noon we will head to a local restaurant for lunch. Afterward,
we will meet at 1:30 PM at the Camp Craft Road Trailhead off of 360 and
hike down to the Barton Creek Greenbelt.  This will be a more strenuous
hike as there is quite a hill heading down to Barton Creek.  We should be
able to find mature caterpillars of Luna Moths, Polyphemus Moths and
Imperial Moths. If inclement weather threatens, we will postpone the hike
one day and meet on Sunday.




*Austin Butterfly Forum Membership*

All of our normal events are open to the public, but you may want to become
a member of the Austin Butterfly Forum to help support us and our events.
We also treat members to some extra goodies, such as reduced admission to
special programs that have a fee and discounts on purchases made at
meetings. Membership is $20 annually per household, payable during meetings
or by mail to Doris Hill, ABF Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin, TX 78723.

For more information, please visit our website: austinbutterflies.org

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Mimosa Yellow confirmed in n.w. Austin
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2015 22:41:11 -0500
Hi Chuck,

Congratulations on your butterfly. I'll look out for these critters.

A couple of days ago I was watching a hummingbird moth (I think a white lined) 
nectar on a prairie tea plant, dove weed, when out of nowhere what looked like 
a bee attacked it. 

The moth flopped around on the ground struggling with its adversary and 
suddenly flew away and out of sight. What had looked like a bee turned out to 
be a southern yellow jacket. It flew around the area of the encounter looking 
for its victim, which was long gone, apparently un-stung enough to be killed 
right off, if at all. I hovered my foot above the wasp and it gave up on the 
search and flew away too. It was a big moth for a little wasp. 


It could be your butterfly encountered some sort of predator and escaped only 
to succumb later on. 


Tim Jones
Wimberley, Texas

On Oct 14, 2015, at 10:15 PM, Chuck Sexton  wrote:

> By a stroke of luck (good for me, bad for the butterfly), I happened to 
refind the Mimosa Yellow at about 6:30 p.m. and about 10 ft from where Id 
previously studied it. I thought it was going to roost but it was flopping 
around, on its last breath for unknown reasons. I photographed it on the leaf 
litter, then collected the butterfly and was later able to photograph the 
upperwings. Mimosa Yellow, no doubt. Images will be posted soon to BugGuide and 
iNaturalist. 

> 
> Chuck Sexton
> Austin, TX
> 
> ======================================
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Mimosa Yellow confirmed in n.w. Austin
From: Chuck Sexton <gcwarbler AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2015 22:15:28 -0500
By a stroke of luck (good for me, bad for the butterfly), I happened to refind 
the Mimosa Yellow at about 6:30 p.m. and about 10 ft from where I’d 
previously studied it. I thought it was going to roost but it was flopping 
around, on its last breath for unknown reasons. I photographed it on the leaf 
litter, then collected the butterfly and was later able to photograph the 
upperwings. Mimosa Yellow, no doubt. Images will be posted soon to BugGuide and 
iNaturalist. 


Chuck Sexton
Austin, TX

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Subject: Mimosa Yellow observed briefly in Austin
From: Chuck Sexton <gcwarbler AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2015 16:45:06 -0500
TX-Butterfliers,

I was spending a few moments in the backyard (NW Austin) at about 4:20 p.m. 
when a small yellow danced *through* some low vegetation and landed within 5 ft 
of me. That behavior immediately raised my suspicions so I leaned in (and 
happened to have my reading glasses but not my camera) and studied the 
butterfly for 10 to 15 seconds at 1.5 ft away. It showed ALL of the characters 
I know to ID a male Mimosa Yellow (Eurema nise): 


1.  Narrow black margin on the apex of the FW (shadow visible through wing).
2.  Lack of any hint of orange/dark dot at apex of HW.
3.  Lack of two small black dots at base of HW (very carefully noted).
4. Flight behavior of low slow irregular path *through* low forbs and grasses 
(never got over 1 ft from ground). 


The buttefly appeared fresh and unworn. Of course, the buttefly was gone when I 
returned with my camera about 30 seconds later. This was my first solid 
sighting in the Austin area and I wish I could have documented it better. 


Be on the lookout!

Chuck Sexton
Austin, TX
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: migrant Monarchs in Utopia
From: Mitch Heindel <mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM>
Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2015 07:48:42 -0700
Update: 9:25-9:40 a.m. over 200 Monarch going south
to SSW.  Most centered over Cypress trees of Sabinal
river corridor.  Many quite high up already, requiring
binocs to see, but some still going by low as well.
Single field-of-view counts of 5, 10 and 20.

Mitch Heindel
Utopia, Texas

On 2015-10-13 07:23, mitch AT utopianature.com wrote:
Some migrant Monarch lift-off this morning at Utopia.
All gaining altitude heading SSW.

10 in 3 minutes just prior to 9 a.m.
30 in 5 minutes around 9:10 a.m.

Going back out to see whaddup.

Yesterday at least 3 went through yard SSW bound
whilst in pre-frontal trough.

Front arrived last night late, north flow now.

Mitch Heindel
Utopia, Texas

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: migrant Monarchs in Utopia
From: Mitch Heindel <mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM>
Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2015 07:25:11 -0700
Apologies for the subject line typo, again!  Fixed now here.

On 2015-10-13 07:23, mitch AT utopianature.com wrote:
> Some migrant Monarch lift-off this morning at Utopia.
> All gaining altitude heading SSW.
> 
> 10 in 3 minutes just prior to 9 a.m.
> 30 in 5 minutes around 9:10 a.m.
> 
> Going back out to see whaddup.
> 
> Yesterday at least 3 went through yard SSW bound
> whilst in pre-frontal trough.
> 
> Front arrived last night late, north flow now.
> 
> Mitch Heindel
> Utopia, Texas

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: migrant Monrachs in Utopia
From: Mitch Heindel <mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM>
Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2015 07:23:52 -0700
Some migrant Monarch lift-off this morning at Utopia.
All gaining altitude heading SSW.

10 in 3 minutes just prior to 9 a.m.
30 in 5 minutes around 9:10 a.m.

Going back out to see whaddup.

Yesterday at least 3 went through yard SSW bound
whilst in pre-frontal trough.

Front arrived last night late, north flow now.

Mitch Heindel
Utopia, Texas

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Records Set at Brazos Bend’s 20th Annual Butterfly Count
From: Richard Jespersen <richj AT CONSOLIDATED.NET>
Date: Sat, 10 Oct 2015 11:08:38 -0500
A sunny day with mild temperatures in a park bursting with nectar-rich 
wildflowers resulted in a record-setting butterfly count. The first record fell 
even before we began, when 65 enthusiastic observers arrived. The previous 
record of 46 observers was set just last year, beating the old record of 33. 
There were Brazos Bend Volunteers, Master Naturalists, Girl Scouts, families 
with children and other enthusiasts. About 25 were newcomers. 


The flooding of 60 percent of the Park in June did not seem to diminish 
butterfly numbers, but 6 weeks of drought in July and August may be the cause 
of small numbers in the prairies that were not reached by the flood. 


We divided into 7 parties and searched varied habitats within the park. By 
lunch time 38 species had been recorded. Most remarkable was the first-ever 
sighting at Brazos Bend of Eastern Tailed-Blue, which becomes the 101st species 
on the Park Checklist. It was seen in 3 different locations. Several observers 
scouted other areas in the afternoon, finding 4 additional species. A 
remarkable 317 Phaon Crescents far exceeded its previous high of 28 on our 10 
fall counts. Two similar eruptions of Phaon Crescents were recorded in earlier 
June counts. Other species seen in record numbers for fall counts were Pearl 
Crescent, Tropical Checkered-Skipper and Little Glassywing, which has been seen 
only in the fall. Notable for its absence was the White-striped Longtail, which 
was missed for just the second time since its first appearance in 1999. 


SWALLOWTAILS
    1	Black Swallowtail
    1	Giant Swallowtail

WHITES & SULPHURS
    2	Clouded Sulphur
    1	Orange Sulphur
  21	Cloudless Sulphur
164	Little Yellow
    1	Dainty sulphur

HAIRSTREAKS
  27	Gray Hairstreak
    3	Red-banded Hairstreak
  21	Dusky-blue Groundstreak

BLUES
    2	Ceraunus Blue
    4	Eastern Tailed-Blue

BRUSHFOOTS
    1	American Snout 
  89	Gulf Fritillary
    3	Variegated Fritillary
317	Phaon Crescent
  83	Pearl Crescent
    1	Crescent species
    1	Question Mark
    8	Red Admiral
 24	Common Buckeye
    4	Viceroy
  20	Hackberry Emperor
  13	Tawny Emperor
    2	Emperor species
    1	Gemmed Satyr
106	Carolina Satyr
  12	Satyr Species
    6	Monarch
  13	Queen

SKIPPERS
  3	Long-tailed Skipper
  6	Horace’s Duskywing
  1	Funereal Duskywing
33	Common Checkered-skipper
83	Tropical Checkered-skipper
  9	Checkered-skipper species
28	Clouded Skipper
  3	Least Skipper
  7	Southern Skipperling
 11	Fiery Skipper
   1	Whirlabout
   3	Southern Broken-Dash
 12	Little Glassywing
   3	Broad-winged Skipper
  11	Dun Skipper
   2	Ocola Skipper
   8	Skipper species
   5	unknown butterfly

Total 1181 individuals / 42 species

Thanks to observers Steve Abbey, Michelle Acosta, Hector Acosta, Bryce Acosta, 
Chris Anastas, Ann Anderson, Anara Aturaliye, Deva Aturaliye, Shiomi Aturaliye, 
Wesley Brown, Leah Schlater-Brown, Karl Baumgartner, Amanda Carey, Chris Carey, 
Janet Clemenson, Emma Connally, Beth Cooper, Julie d’Ablaing, Chuck Duplant, 
Jerry Eppner, Carolyn Fitzgerald, Linda Heinicke, Jade Hems, Sandy Henderson, 
Laura Hodges, Kierra Hull, Karleigh Hull, Mairin Jacobson, Rich Jespersen, 
Sandy Jespersen, Cassidy Johnson, Maxime Labesse, Jane Lindsey, Julie Morgan 
Lock, Mary Mack, Preston Mack, Jane Minard, Gary Moore, Kathy Moore, Robin 
Murtishaw, Akiko Noma, Hiromichi Noma, Vicki Poorman, Wayne Poorman, Warren 
Pruess, Benjamin Rogers, Ethan Rogers, Mia Rogers, Diane Russell, Sabrina 
Sacks, Robert Schwartz, Kelly Shield, Polly Shouse, Nina Sitra, James L. Smith, 
Michelle Sneck, Pam Tatge, Lynn Tienta, Barb Tucker, Debra Walker, Janaki 
Wallooppillai, Mary Waters, Pat Welsh, Amanda Willis and Rosie Zamora. 


The next count will be held on October 2, 2016.

Rich Jespersen, Compiler
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: flying in Falcon Heights
From: Berry Nall <lb AT THENALLS.NET>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2015 17:28:41 -0500
Hi,
In the past week or so I have seen a number of interesting butterflies, 
including Double-dotted Skipper (D. percosius), Tailed Aguna (A. metophis), and 
Gray Cracker, Ornythian Swallowtail, and Mexican Bluewing. In addition, a fair 
number of Red Admirals and Questionmarks have migrated into the area. So, it 
seems, fall is finally in the air. 

Overall, however, the variety of butterflies is still extremely limited. In 
(admittedly very little) time outside, I have seen fewer than 40 species, well 
below the average for this month. We have been missed by most of the rains that 
have fallen in the rest of the valley, so hopefully conditions are better 
further east. 

Visitors to this area may want to know that the Roma Wild Birding Center is 
closed (and the gardens locked up). There was a very large wildfire at Salineno 
2-3 weeks ago. It started at the road to the river, and spread upstream (away 
from the birding park, fortunately). So much of the accessible Salineno habitat 
is, for the moment, destroyed. On the bright side, a lot of the invasive reeds 
and overgrowth were cleared out, perhaps making room for more of the 
wildflowers that were disappearing under the brush. 


Berry Nall
Falcon Heights, Starr Co, TX
leps.thenalls.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Brazos Bend Butterfly Count - October 4
From: Richard Jespersen <richj AT CONSOLIDATED.NET>
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2015 10:30:12 -0500
The 20th annual Brazos Bend Butterfly Count will be Sunday, October 4. We 
welcome participants of all skill levels to join us. 


We will meet at the 40-acre Lake parking lot at 9:00 am and divide into groups 
to patrol areas within the park. We will gather at the Elm Lake picnic ground 
at 12:30 to tally our preliminary results and eat our sack lunches. Those who 
wish to count in the afternoon, will patrol other areas inside and outside the 
park within the official 15-mile count circle and email their results to me. 

 
Bring lunch, drinking water, mosquito repellant, sun protection, and (if you 
have them) butterfly field guides and close-focusing binoculars. Cameras are 
also helpful to assist in identification. There is a $3.00 per person North 
American Butterfly Association fee to participate. The Park entry fee will be 
waived. 


Our first count in 1995 tallied 392 butterflies of 30 species. The record count 
of 2001 found 5340 butterflies of 57 species. Last year, a Julia Heliconian and 
a Clouded Sulphur, both uncommon for our count, were among the 678 individuals 
of 40 species reported. 


If you have any questions you can email me (richj AT consolidated.net 
). It is not necessary to register ahead of 
time. I hope to see you there. 


Rich Jespersen, compiler
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Texas Blister Beetles
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 27 Sep 2015 14:11:28 -0500
first attempt at:

Meloidae of Texas
http://texasento.net/TXMeloidae.html

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: September 28, 2015 Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Sep 2015 09:52:13 -0500
Greetings everyone,



Here is the information for upcoming events and meetings of the Austin
Butterfly Forum. Thanks for helping us to get the word out.



The Austin Butterfly Forum meets at the Zilker Botanical Garden Center
 at 7:00 pm on the 4th Monday of every month
except for December. Most meetings are free and open to the public. Each
meeting features an educational program, but we like to socialize a bit
beforehand. Sometimes members will bring caterpillars or collections for
display, and sometimes we have special opportunities such as plant
giveaways. The meetings are also a good place to hear special announcements
and learn about new events.  Everyone interested in butterflies and other
invertebrates is welcome! Please come join us!



*September 28, 2015, 7 PM meeting:* *Land Snails of Texas: Diversity and
Conservation*, *presented by Ben Hutchins.*


Texas is home to approximately 200 species of terrestrial snails with a
fascinating diversity of shell shapes, ecological requirements, and
biogeography. However, as a group, snails are largely overlooked by the
naturalist community because of their small size, cryptic habits,
inaccessible habitats, and a lack of resources for identification.  Because
of their wide distribution across the state and the long-term persistence
of shells on the landscape, terrestrial snails can be an excellent subject
for naturalists. Traditionally, identification of snails by naturalists has
been hindered by a lack of accessible field guides. Texas Parks and
Wildlife is currently working on development of an online resource to aid
naturalists in identification and documentation of land snails in Texas.

Conservation of terrestrial snails is hindered by a lack of basic
distributional data, as a consequence of cryptic life habits, incomplete
sampling, and taxonomic uncertainty. Despite this lack of data, several
Texas species are likely critically imperiled due to habitat loss, invasive
species, and climate change. Citizens can play a role in documenting the
distribution of Texas land snails, particularly non-native species that are
frequently encountered around urban centers.

Ben Hutchins was born in Kentucky where he received his B.S. in Biology
from Western Kentucky University. He received his M.S. in Biology from
American University, Washington DC, studying the phylogeography of
groundwater invertebrates in the Shenandoah Valley. After volunteering with
the Peace Corps in Morocco, he moved to San Marcos, TX in 2009. He received
a PhD in Aquatic Resources from Texas State University in 2013, studying
food web structure in groundwater communities in the Edwards Aquifer. Ben
is currently employed by Texas Parks and Wildlife as the State Invertebrate
Biologist for the Nongame and Rare Species Program where he gained an
interest in the state’s terrestrial snail fauna.



*Austin Butterfly Forum Membership*

All of our normal events are open to the public, but you may want to become
a member of the Austin Butterfly Forum to help support us and our events.
We also treat members to some extra goodies, such as reduced admission to
special programs that have a fee and discounts on purchases made at
meetings. Membership is $20 annually per household, payable during meetings
or by mail to Doris Hill, ABF Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin, TX 78723.

For more information, please visit our website: austinbutterflies.org

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: migrant Monrachs in Utopia
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT SABER.NET>
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 2015 20:57:03 -0700
On Sep 14, 2015, at 2:32 PM, Mitch Heindel  wrote:

> These poor harbingers are seemingly designated as
> lowly *pre-migrant* migrants, which are migrants nevertheless.

Youre seeing reproductive monarchs in Utopia that will not 
migrate to the overwintering sites in central Mexico.  Thats
why they are designated as "pre-migrant* migrants.

The true migrant monarchs that are in reproductive diapause
are still up in Kansas.  

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: migrant Monarchs in Utopia
From: Mitch Heindel <mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Sep 2015 14:34:57 -0700
Sorry about the subject line type, it is now fixed, so
perhaps best to reply to this one?

Sorry!  Thanks!

Mitch

On 2015-09-14 14:32, Mitch Heindel wrote:
> Hi all,
> 
> These are some notes I made yesterday, Sunday, Sept. 13.
> 
> The most interesting movement of the day though was Monarchs.
> I have not seen one in months, as usual in summer here.  There
> are no Monarchs in Utopia in the summer.  Twelve years of
> observation have convinced me all Monarchs in Utopia are
> migrants.  A northbound wave in early spring and in late
> spring, their hatches.  Then a southbound wave in fall.  Or
> better, a series of waves, since some are clearly defined
> with fronts before and after the main peak flight days.
> 
> At 29.5-6 deg. North we had the first weak front of fall
> Thursday (10th), sweeping down out of the Great Plains,
> lots of areas got some rain (we didn't), but the heat
> broke and the season changed.  Then two days after the weak
> front, Saturday (12th) a second stronger re-enforcing front
> arrived with 10-15 mph north to northeasterlies for much of
> the day.  Temps actually dropped and gave us dry N-NE flow.
> 
> Then Sunday Sept. 13, the first day after the real substantial
> (double) front hit, and after very unsettled four days of
> frontal passages, there are Monarchs.  The first one was
> resting on Frostweed in the river riparian habitat corridor,
> two out of focus but identifiable photos were obtained.  Then
> a very dull worn one crossed the yard early afternoon, followed
> by a bright one in good condition an hour later.  Three between
> 11 and 4 p.m.  There have been none in months.
> 
> We (Kathy & I) went for a peak-heat swim from 4:30 to 5:30.
> Two additional Monarchs passed overhead making great time on
> the freeway, flying downriver about 25' over it.  Shootin'
> the tube in the cleared flight path between the rows of huge
> cypresses on either side of the Sabinal River which meet over
> the river about 30+' up.  Shaded, obstacle-free, wind-sheltered,
> great flight path choice if one wants to make time unimpeded.
> I have only seen migrant Monarchs shoot the cypress tube
> southbound at full speed ahead.  They know they will hit
> frostweed patches and have sugary pecan leaves for roosting if
> they stick to the river.  So a total of FIVE Monarchs were seen
> well today.  Plus the big floppy orange butterfly in the corral
> by those pecans after 6:30 p.m. that was surely a sixth individual.
> 
> After months without one, this is the first wave of what are
> migrant Monarchs on the first real (double) front of fall,
> in mid-September, as has happened before.  Roughly a month
> ahead of the big peak main wave(s) of 'official' Monarch
> migration.  These poor harbingers are seemingly designated as
> lowly *pre-migrant* migrants, which are migrants nevertheless.
> Due to the frontal passage their arrival this year was very
> well-demarcated by extended prior absence.  Locally in a day,
> they went from zero-for-months to 6-in-a-day, at one small
> observation spot along the Sabinal River below Utopia.
> Fascinating.
> 
> Mitch Heindel
> Utopia, Texas
> 99.5-6 x 29.5-6
> www.utopianature.com
> 
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> to
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> 

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: migrant Monrachs in Utopia
From: Mitch Heindel <mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Sep 2015 14:32:49 -0700
Hi all,

These are some notes I made yesterday, Sunday, Sept. 13.

The most interesting movement of the day though was Monarchs.
I have not seen one in months, as usual in summer here.  There
are no Monarchs in Utopia in the summer.  Twelve years of
observation have convinced me all Monarchs in Utopia are
migrants.  A northbound wave in early spring and in late
spring, their hatches.  Then a southbound wave in fall.  Or
better, a series of waves, since some are clearly defined
with fronts before and after the main peak flight days.

At 29.5-6 deg. North we had the first weak front of fall
Thursday (10th), sweeping down out of the Great Plains,
lots of areas got some rain (we didn't), but the heat
broke and the season changed.  Then two days after the weak
front, Saturday (12th) a second stronger re-enforcing front
arrived with 10-15 mph north to northeasterlies for much of
the day.  Temps actually dropped and gave us dry N-NE flow.

Then Sunday Sept. 13, the first day after the real substantial
(double) front hit, and after very unsettled four days of
frontal passages, there are Monarchs.  The first one was
resting on Frostweed in the river riparian habitat corridor,
two out of focus but identifiable photos were obtained.  Then
a very dull worn one crossed the yard early afternoon, followed
by a bright one in good condition an hour later.  Three between
11 and 4 p.m.  There have been none in months.

We (Kathy & I) went for a peak-heat swim from 4:30 to 5:30.
Two additional Monarchs passed overhead making great time on
the freeway, flying downriver about 25' over it.  Shootin'
the tube in the cleared flight path between the rows of huge
cypresses on either side of the Sabinal River which meet over
the river about 30+' up.  Shaded, obstacle-free, wind-sheltered,
great flight path choice if one wants to make time unimpeded.
I have only seen migrant Monarchs shoot the cypress tube
southbound at full speed ahead.  They know they will hit
frostweed patches and have sugary pecan leaves for roosting if
they stick to the river.  So a total of FIVE Monarchs were seen
well today.  Plus the big floppy orange butterfly in the corral
by those pecans after 6:30 p.m. that was surely a sixth individual.

After months without one, this is the first wave of what are
migrant Monarchs on the first real (double) front of fall,
in mid-September, as has happened before.  Roughly a month
ahead of the big peak main wave(s) of 'official' Monarch
migration.  These poor harbingers are seemingly designated as
lowly *pre-migrant* migrants, which are migrants nevertheless.
Due to the frontal passage their arrival this year was very
well-demarcated by extended prior absence.  Locally in a day,
they went from zero-for-months to 6-in-a-day, at one small
observation spot along the Sabinal River below Utopia.
Fascinating.

Mitch Heindel
Utopia, Texas
99.5-6 x 29.5-6
www.utopianature.com

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Pollinating Beetles of Texas
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 9 Sep 2015 14:41:54 -0500
here's some Texas beetles you might see sharing the flowers with your
butterflies...

http://texasento.net/TX_Pollinators.html

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Frosted Flasher at Old Hidalgo Pumphouse, 9/3/15
From: Dan Jones <00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Fri, 4 Sep 2015 21:54:41 -0400
Yesterday Troy Zurovec found a Frosted Flasher at the Old Hidalgo Pumphouse. I 
went over today hoping for better photos and failed to see it but found a 
Tailed Aguna. So things are started to look up after a long hot dry spell that 
has knocked out about 90% of the butterflies. Photos and list are on my blog. 




http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2015/09/frosted-flasher-tailed-aguna-at-old.html 



Dan Jones, Weslaco

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: n. TX hackberry defoliating larva has been identified...
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2015 17:48:28 -0500
Mike Merchant has cracked this nut, so to speak...

Hackberry Leafrooler - *Sciota celtidella* (Hulst)
http://citybugs.tamu.edu/2015/08/28/hackberry-defoliator-in-north-dallas-area/
http://bugguide.net/node/view/102618
http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/species.php?hodges=5799

http://www.nbcdfw.com/video/#!/news/local/New-Caterpillar-Infestation-Damages-North-Texas-Trees/323787311 


Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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