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Updated on Monday, April 14 at 12:50 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Prothonotary Warbler,©Barry Kent Mackay

14 Apr April 28 meeting, Austin Butterfly Forum [ABF Announce ]
13 Apr Resaca de la Palma SP - Sunday Walk & Weekly Sightings [Sherry Wilson ]
12 Apr Monarch seen in north Dallas [Mary Ludwick ]
4 Apr Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
3 Apr Just a proteus? [Dan Jones ]
31 Mar Resaca de la Palma SP - Weekly Sightings [Sherry Wilson ]
29 Mar Monarch Sighting ["Lisa M. Reid" ]
29 Mar Monarch Sighting [Tim Jones ]
29 Mar Oculea Silkmoth / Antheraea oculea, Brewster Co [Heidi Trudell ]
28 Mar Estero butterfly walk [Rick Snider ]
28 Mar Re: Monarchs [Rex Stanford ]
28 Mar Re: Monarchs [Holly Reinhard ]
28 Mar Re: Monarchs [Barbara Ribble ]
28 Mar Monarchs [Sherry Wilson ]
24 Mar Re: Monarch life cycle photo study has been published [Tim Jones ]
24 Mar Re: Monarch life cycle photo study has been published [Paul Cherubini ]
24 Mar Monarch life cycle photo study has been published ["David T. Dauphin" ]
23 Mar Resaca de la Palma State Park - Recent Sightings [Sherry Wilson ]
23 Mar Monarchs reach central Texas + ABF field trip photos [Mike Quinn ]
23 Mar Re: Photo Workshop at the Chihuhuan Desert Research Institute [John Abbott ]
23 Mar RE: Photo Workshop at the Chihuhuan Desert Research Institute [John Abbott ]
21 Mar Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
18 Mar National Butterfly Center, 3/18/14 [Dan Jones ]
18 Mar Fwd: Seats still available for both Monarch programs at Wildflower Center - March 23-24 [Mike Quinn ]
17 Mar Re: Calleta Silkmoth - Pleasanton, TX [Maury Heiman ]
16 Mar Calleta Silkmoth - Pleasanton, TX [Chuck Sexton ]
16 Mar Resaca de la Palma SP - Butterfly Walk and weekly sightings [Sherry Wilson ]
14 Mar Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
14 Mar ABF will hold 2 Monarch lectures at Wildflower Center and 3rd at Zilker [Mike Quinn ]
14 Mar beetle question [Tamela Baker ]
14 Mar Resaca de la Palma SP - Walker's Metalmark seen today. [Sherry Wilson ]
10 Mar Mourning Cloak [Brush Freeman ]
9 Mar Resaca de la Palma SP - Weekly Sightings [Sherry Wilson ]
6 Mar Re: Photo Workshop Opportunities [John Abbott ]
4 Mar March 1, 2014 before the last front [Terry Hibbitts ]
3 Mar Fwd: ABF to host monarch overwintering ground discoverers - March 22, 24-25 [Mike Quinn ]
2 Mar Resaca de la Palma SP - Butterfly Walk with Blue Metalmark, Gemmed Satyr [Sherry Wilson ]
2 Mar Re: Orange Sulfur [Pete ]
2 Mar Orange Sulfur [Tim Jones ]
2 Mar Re: Butterfly ID [Mike Rickard ]
1 Mar Butterfly ID [Tim Jones ]
1 Mar Estero butterfly walk [Rick Snider ]
28 Feb Re: So what are the big-eyed Hermeuptychia in the RGV? [Nick Grishin ]
28 Feb Re: So what are the big-eyed Hermeuptychia in the RGV? [Nick Grishin ]
28 Feb Re: Texas Satyr question [Nick Grishin ]
28 Feb Live asian butterflies on exhibit - opens March 1 in Ft. Worth [Mike Quinn ]
28 Feb ABF to host monarch overwintering ground discoverers - March 22, 24-25 [Mike Quinn ]
27 Feb Question Mark, Brazos County [Shirley Wilkerson ]
26 Feb Limits sought on weed killer glyphosate to help monarch butterflies [Tim Jones ]
26 Feb Re: So what are the big-eyed Hermeuptychia in the RGV? [Dan Jones ]
25 Feb So what are the big-eyed Hermeuptychia in the RGV? [Dan Jones ]
25 Feb Texas Satyr question [Graham Floyd ]
24 Feb Re: Monsanto Publishes Monarch Article Today [Tim Jones ]
24 Feb Re: Monsanto Publishes Monarch Article Today [Brush Freeman ]
24 Feb Monsanto Publishes Monarch Article Today [Paul Cherubini ]
24 Feb Two new butterfly speices [Brush Freeman ]
24 Feb Juniper Hairstreak and Hays County drought count [Tim Jones ]
24 Feb Resaca de la Palma SP - Sunday Butterfly Walk & Weekly Sightings [Sherry Wilson ]
24 Feb Falcate Orange-Tips in San Jacinto Co. [Wanda Smith ]
23 Feb Falcate Orangetip male/Brazos County/Kurten today [Shirley Wilkerson ]
23 Feb Falcate Orangetip [Willie Sekula ]
21 Feb Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
16 Feb Re: New paper on Satyrs found in LRGV [Keith Wolfe ]
14 Feb New paper on Satyrs found in LRGV ["David T. Dauphin" ]
14 Feb Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
11 Feb Austin Butterfly Forum meeting; February 24 [ABF Announce ]
10 Feb Texas Powdered Skipper, Brewster Co [Heidi Trudell ]
9 Feb Resaca de la Palma SP - Sunday Butterfly Walk [Sherry Wilson ]
2 Feb Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk, Fri Jan 31, 2014 [Rick Snider ]
2 Feb Re: Monarch Migration May Become Extinct [Tim Jones ]
2 Feb Re: Monarch Migration May Become Extinct [John ]
1 Feb Re: Monarch Migration May Become Extinct [Tim Jones ]
31 Jan Re: Monarch Migration May Become Extinct [Brush Freeman ]
31 Jan Monarch Migration May Become Extinct [Tim Jones ]
30 Jan Study: excess nitrogen causes reduced growth of monarch caterpillars on tropical milkweed [Mike Quinn ]
29 Jan NYT: This winter's overwintering monarchs occupy a bare 1.65 acres -- the equivalent of about one and a quarter football fields. [Mike Quinn ]

Subject: April 28 meeting, Austin Butterfly Forum
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 00:27:23 -0500
Hi everyone,



Here is the information for upcoming events and meetings of the Austin
Butterfly Forum. Thanks for helping us to get the word out.

The Austin Butterfly Forum meets at the Zilker Botanical Garden
Centerat 7:00 pm on the 4th Monday of
every month except for December. Most
meetings are free and open to the public.

Each meeting features an educational program, but we like to socialize a
bit beforehand. Sometimes members will bring caterpillars or collections
for display, and sometimes we have special opportunities such as plant
giveaways. The meetings are also a good place to hear special announcements
and learn about new events.

Everyone interested in butterflies and other invertebrates is welcome!
Please come join us!

*Apr. 28, 2014, 7 PM meeting:* *Camera Workshop*, presented by Ian Wright.



In this talk and workshop we will cover the basics and some advanced
techniques of macrophotography. We'll start with a broad discussion about
basic camera operation and equipment and then specifically focus on macro
work. I will cover various types of macrophotography and the equipment
involved in getting macro shots. I'll cover options for everything from
cell phones to point and shoots to SLRs. My goal is to help you use your
current equipment to get better shots! So bring your cameras! The second
part of the talk will be a hands-on workshop with live insects. We'll get
together in groups and practice some of the techniques discussed in the
talk. Finally I'll discuss some post-processing work (including some
advanced techniques like focus-stacking) and some ways you can share your
amazing macro images! Zilker Botanical Garden Center, 7 pm.; free.



*May 26, 2014, 7 PM meeting:* *Butterflies of Spain: Picos de Europa*,
presented by Ron Martin.


The New World may have the Monarch but Spain has the Queen of Spain and
Duke of Burgundy fritillaries in addition to Cleopatra.  There are also
Peacocks, Cardinals and Brimestone, with a Gatekeeper.     Club members,
Ron and Susan Martin, have made several trips to Spain for casual birding
and butterflying.  Ron will report some of their finds and experiences in
the Picos de Europa in Northern Spain. Zilker Botanical Garden Center, 7
pm.; free.



For more information on the Austin Butterfly Forum, please see our new
website: http://www.austinbutterflies.org/index.html



Please contact Mike Quinn at entomike AT gmail.com if you need more
information.



Thanks for your help in publicizing our meetings. Hope to see you there!

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma SP - Sunday Walk & Weekly Sightings
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 18:22:50 -0500
More species were flying this week, including a single Band-celled Sister
along the sidewalk, and a single Mimosa Skipper this morning.  This
afternoon the wind was gusty.  We started with very few sightings, but as
the wind subsided our list increased dramatically.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Walks *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walks* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walks* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
*Night Hikes* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small
fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)
Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)
Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)
Checkered White (Pontia protodice)
Great Southern White (Ascia monuste)
Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)
Large Orange Sulphur (Phoebis agarithe)
Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)
Sleepy Orange (Eurema nicippe)
Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon istapa)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Red-bordered Metalmark (Caria ino)
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)
Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)
Elada Checkerespot (Texola elada)
Texan Crescent (Phyciodes texana)
Vesta Crescent (Phyciodes vesta)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
White Peacock (Anartia jatrophae)
Band-celled Sister (Adelpha fessonia)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
Tawny Emperor (Asterocampa clyton)
Gemmed Satyr (Cyllopsis gemma)
Queen (Danaus gilippus)
White-striped Longtail (Chioides catillus)
Brown Longtail (Urbanus procne)
Mimosa Skipper (Cogia calchas)
Sickle-winged Skipper (Eantis tamenund)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Laviana White-Skipper (Heliopetes laviana)
Turk's-cap White-Skipper (Heliopetes macaira)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)
Whirlabout (Polites vibex)
Southern Broken-Dash (Wallengrenia otho)
Common Mellana (Quasimellana eulogius)
Celia's Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes celia)
Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Monarch seen in north Dallas
From: Mary Ludwick <ludwickm AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 19:51:48 -0500
We saw a monarch in our yard today, but we have only bluebonnets in bloom.

A tiger swallowtail was in the yard also.
The swallowtail went to our hummingbird feeder and drank for a long time.

ludwickm AT hotmail.com
Dallas, Texas
 		 	   		  
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2014 21:04:39 -0500
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Apr 4, 2014



Today started sunny but clouds rolled in for the afternoon and kept numbers
down. It was warm and breezy. We recorded a few species in the morning
before the walk and ended with 34 for the day.



Noteworthy were 6 Celia's Roadside Skippers. We also saw one monarch.



Dragonfly numbers are increasing and we saw Wandering Glider, Red
Saddlebags, Roseate Skimmer, Common Pondhawk, Blue Dasher, and Band-winged
Dragonlet.



Checkered White  Pontia protodice

Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe

Little Yellow  Eurema lisa

Dainty Sulphur  Nathalis iole

Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus

Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon

Western Pygmy-Blue  Brephidium exile

Reakirt's Blue  Hemiargus isola

Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae

Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana

Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta

Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea

Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes

Monarch  Danaus plexippus

Queen  Danaus gilippus

White-striped Longtail  Chioides catillus

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso

Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis

White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Whirlabout  Polites vibex

Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho

Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Just a proteus?
From: Dan Jones <antshrike1 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Thu, 3 Apr 2014 11:39:19 -0400
I photographed this Urbanus species yesterday at the National Butterfly Center. 
Would be nice to get some opinions from more experienced people. Thanks. 



https://flic.kr/p/mJcQfh


https://flic.kr/p/mJaZbD


https://flic.kr/p/mJb3o8


Dan Jones, Weslaco

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Subject: Resaca de la Palma SP - Weekly Sightings
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2014 09:46:26 -0500
Great Southern White was the most interesting find Sunday afternoon.  With
42 species for the week, diversity is increasing, although we aren't seeing
many blues or metalmarks.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Walks *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walks* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walks* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
*Night Hikes* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small
fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)
Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)
Checkered White (Pontia protodice)
Great Southern White (Ascia monuste)
Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)
Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)
Orange-barred Sulphur (Phoebis philea)
Large Orange Sulphur (Phoebis agarithe)
Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Boisduval's Yellow (Eurema boisduvaliana)
Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)
Sleepy Orange (Eurema nicippe)
Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)
Dusky-blue Hairstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Reakirt's Blue (Hemiargus isola)
Red-bordered Metalmark (Caria ino)
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)
Bordered Patch (Chlosyne lacinia)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)
American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
Tawny Emperor (Asterocampa clyton)
Gemmed Satyr (Cyllopsis gemma)
Carolina Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)
Monarch (Danaus plexippus)
Queen (Danaus gilippus)
Mazans scallopwing (Staphylus mazans)
Sickle-winged Skipper (Eantis tamenund)
Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Turk's-cap White-Skipper (Heliopetes macaira)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)
Whirlabout (Polites vibex)
Southern Broken-Dash (Wallengrenia otho)
Common Mellana (Quasimellana eulogius)
Celia's Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes celia)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Monarch Sighting
From: "Lisa M. Reid" <lmreid71 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Mar 2014 16:39:27 -0500
I was out photographing Bluebonnets yesterday along Blanco Rd. Just north of 
Bullis Co. Park, San Antonio and saw 1 Monarch. 



Lisa M. Reid
http://www.facebook.com/FocusedOnCreationPhotography
Subject: Monarch Sighting
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Mar 2014 16:13:45 -0500
Hello,

My wife may have seen one yesterday. Today it was nectaring on a 
Mexican Buckeye in the front yard in western Hays County near 
Wimberley, Texas.

http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_1DX7043_W.jpg

March 29, 2014
Hays County, Texas
Tim Jones

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Oculea Silkmoth / Antheraea oculea, Brewster Co
From: Heidi Trudell <h.trudell AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Mar 2014 12:16:01 -0500
This morning I was quite surprised to see that our 'rescue' cocoon had
hatched and had a suitor! Cocoon was from the NW corner of
Marathon/Brewster Co - we hatched it out on the SW side. Photos:
http://www.bigbendnature.com/2014/03/march-moth-madness.html

-h

Heidi Trudell
Marathon, TX


-- 
Civilization is the limitless multiplication of unnecessary
necessities. - Mark Twain
Big Bend Birds & Nature - http://www.bigbendnature.com

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero butterfly walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2014 22:13:16 -0500
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday March 28, 2014



Today was hot, sunny, and calm, perfect for butterflies and we tallied 40
species.



The best find was a Pale-rayed Skipper out in the salt flat area where the
Western Pygmy Blues are regular. We do have a large planting of the grass
host plant, Sporobolus wrightii, Big Sacaton.



Also of interest were 8 Monarchs. They were not streaming through heading
north, but flying throughout the park in the areas we visited. One laid
several eggs on Tropical Milkweed, Asclepias curassavica.



Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor

Black Swallowtail  Papilio polyxenes

Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes

Checkered White  Pontia protodice

Orange Sulphur  Colias eurytheme

Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia

Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae

Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe

Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside

Little Yellow  Eurema lisa

Sleepy Orange  Eurema nicippe

Dainty Sulphur  Nathalis iole

Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus

Western Pygmy-Blue  Brephidium exile

Reakirt's Blue  Hemiargus isola

Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis

Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae

Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana

Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta

Pearl Crescent  Phyciodes tharos

American Lady  Vanessa virginiensis

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea

Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton

Monarch  Danaus plexippus

Queen  Danaus gilippus

White-striped Longtail  Chioides catillus

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis

White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Pale-rayed Skipper  Vidius perigenes

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Whirlabout  Polites vibex

Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho

Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala





Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Monarchs
From: Rex Stanford <calidris AT MINDSPRING.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2014 19:56:40 -0500
Yesterday (03/27/14) afternoon my wife, Birgit, and I saw two Monarchs in the 
gardens beside the South Padre Island (SPI) Convention Center and another at 
the SPI Sheepshead Street property (South Padre Island Migratory Bird 
Sanctuary) of the Valley Land Fund. 


Rex Stanford
McAllen, TX
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Holly Reinhard 
  To: TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
  Sent: Friday, March 28, 2014 3:30 PM
  Subject: Re: Monarchs


  I saw one here at Lake Casa Blanca State Park in Laredo this morning, too!

   

   

   

  Holly Reinhard

  Park Interpreter, Lake Casa Blanca International State Park 

  Laredo, TX 78044

  (956) 725-3826

  Holly.Reinhard AT tpwd.texas.gov

   

   

 From: Butterfly and Lepidoptery for the state of Texas 
[mailto:TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU] On Behalf Of Barbara Ribble 

  Sent: Friday, March 28, 2014 2:42 PM
  To: TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
  Subject: Re: Monarchs

   

  Our first Monarch of the season came through our yard here in Austin today.

  Barbara Ribble
  Austin

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Monarchs
From: Holly Reinhard <Holly.Reinhard AT TPWD.TEXAS.GOV>
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2014 20:30:33 +0000
I saw one here at Lake Casa Blanca State Park in Laredo this morning, too!



Holly Reinhard
Park Interpreter, Lake Casa Blanca International State Park
Laredo, TX 78044
(956) 725-3826
Holly.Reinhard AT tpwd.texas.gov


From: Butterfly and Lepidoptery for the state of Texas 
[mailto:TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU] On Behalf Of Barbara Ribble 

Sent: Friday, March 28, 2014 2:42 PM
To: TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
Subject: Re: Monarchs

Our first Monarch of the season came through our yard here in Austin today.

Barbara Ribble
Austin



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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Monarchs
From: Barbara Ribble <TUFTEDS AT AOL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2014 15:42:14 -0400
Our first Monarch of the season came through our yard here in Austin today.

Barbara Ribble
Austin

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Monarchs
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2014 14:33:03 -0500
One Monarch is in the garden this afternoon, another passed overhead.  Hope
we'll see more!

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Walks *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walks* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walks* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
*Night Hikes* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small
fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Monarch life cycle photo study has been published
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2014 21:56:56 -0500
Hi Jan,

Your patience has really paid off with this exceptional series of photos of the 
metamorphosis. Your studies are real additions to the literature. Do you use 
time lapse photography? 


It's interesting to see how much of the abdomen goes into pumping up the wings 
after it breaks out of the chrysalis. 


Tim Jones
Austin, Texas


At 11:38 AM -0500 3/24/14, David T. Dauphin wrote:
>I have completed another life cycle study, this one on the Monarch butterfly. 
To view the photo study, go to http://www.thedauphins.net/id120.html . 

>
>Jan Dauphin
>Mission, TX
>For Valley wildlife watching info, go to
>http://www.thedauphins.net
>
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Subject: Re: Monarch life cycle photo study has been published
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT SABER.NET>
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2014 09:49:11 -0700
> I have completed another life cycle study, this one on the Monarch butterfly. 

> To view the photo study, go to  http://www.thedauphins.net/id120.html   .
> Jan Dauphin

Excellent documentation, Jan.  What do you think happens to these newly
emerging adults in March and April in the LRGV?  Do they appear to
migrate north like the remigrants from the overwintering sites in
Michoacan do?  Or do they appear to remain locally and produce
another generation?  Or do they do some of both?  Thanks.

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.

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Subject: Monarch life cycle photo study has been published
From: "David T. Dauphin" <dauphins AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2014 11:38:35 -0500
I have completed another life cycle study, this one on the Monarch butterfly. 
To view the photo study, go to http://www.thedauphins.net/id120.html . 


Jan Dauphin
Mission, TX
For Valley wildlife watching info, go to
http://www.thedauphins.net

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Subject: Resaca de la Palma State Park - Recent Sightings
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2014 18:05:17 -0500
With solid rain this afternoon and light drizzle through the morning, not
much was flying today.  All species reported are from earlier in the week.
A single Boisduval's Yellow was flying along the Ebony boardwalk Friday.
Band-celled Sister was also a single individual, seen along the last
quarter mile of the tram road several days ago.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Walks *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walks* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walks* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
*Night Hikes* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small
fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)
Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)
Checkered White (Pontia protodice)
Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)
Boisduval's Yellow (Eurema boisduvaliana)
Little Yellow (Pyrisitia lisa)
Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Reakirt's Blue (Hemiargus isola)
Fatal Metalmark (Calephelis nemesis)
Red-bordered Metalmark (Caria ino)
Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)
Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)
Vesta Crescent (Phyciodes vesta)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)
Common Buckeye (Junonia genoveva)
Band-celled Sister (Adelpha fessonia)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
Gemmed Satyr (Cyllopsis gemma)
Mazan's Scallowing (Staphylus mazans)
Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Turk's-cap White-Skipper (Heliopetes macaira)
Fawn-spotted Skipper (Cymaenes odilia)
Clouded Skipper (Leema accius)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)
Celia's Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes celia)
Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Monarchs reach central Texas + ABF field trip photos
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2014 10:26:59 -0500
The leading edge of the monarch migration has now reached across central
Texas:
http://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch_spring2014.html - JNorth map

Milkweed is emerging as far north as the Red River:
http://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/milkweed_spring2014.html - JNorth map

Austin Butterfly Forum held a field trip yesterday in the Barton Creek
Greenbelt just upstream from the Barton Springs Pool.

https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/108896707105682448113/albums/5993741997674352225 


As we were walking out, someone spotted what was a first-of-the-year
monarch for most of us.

The sighting was confirmed by Catalina Aguado.

We also saw a Juniper and a Great Purple Hairstreak among other sightings.

We still have plenty of room for all the monarch programs the next three
days, March 23-25
Details: http://www.austinbutterflies.org/

Mike
___________________
Mike Quinn, president
Austin Butterfly Forum
ABF.Monarch AT gmail.com
http://www.austinbutterflies.org/

_____________________________
Texas Monarch Watch, est 1993
http://www.texasento.net/dplex.htm

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Photo Workshop at the Chihuhuan Desert Research Institute
From: John Abbott <jcabbott13 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2014 10:07:20 -0500
There are a few more slots left for the photo workshop at the Chihuahuan Desert 
Research Institute in Fort Davis, Texas, from May 3-4. 


John and Kendra Abbott of Abbott Nature Photography are pleased to announce an 
upcoming Macro Photography Workshop. The event will be held at the Chihuahuan 
Desert Nature Center. We will explore different macro photographic techniques 
used to make the best images of insects, spiders, flowers, leaves, lizards, 
frogs, snakes and more. We will also learn a variety of post-processing 
techniques using Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Lightroom, iPhoto and other programs. 
There will be a variety of different equipment at the workshop for you to try 
and you will have the opportunity to photograph an assortment of live subjects. 
This workshop will also focus on capturing pollinating insects and bats in 
flight and nighttime photography. This workshop is designed for all levels of 
photographers, but to get the most out of the workshop, you should own a 
digital SLR. For a tentative itinerary, click here. The workshop includes 
breakfast and lunch. 


Details and Registration, 
http://abbottnaturephotography.ticketleap.com/macro-photography-workshop/details 

-- 

John C. Abbott 
http://www.abbottnaturephotography.com
http://www.flickr.com/abbottnaturephotography
http://www.facebook.com/AbbottNaturePhotography
http://jcabbottnaturephotography.blogspot.com/
http://www.odonatacentral.org 


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: RE: Photo Workshop at the Chihuhuan Desert Research Institute
From: John Abbott <jcabbott13 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2014 10:07:20 -0500
There are a few more slots left for the photo workshop at the Chihuahuan Desert 
Research Institute in Fort Davis, Texas, from May 3-4. 


John and Kendra Abbott of Abbott Nature Photography are pleased to announce an 
upcoming Macro Photography Workshop. The event will be held at the Chihuahuan 
Desert Nature Center. We will explore different macro photographic techniques 
used to make the best images of insects, spiders, flowers, leaves, lizards, 
frogs, snakes and more. We will also learn a variety of post-processing 
techniques using Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Lightroom, iPhoto and other programs. 
There will be a variety of different equipment at the workshop for you to try 
and you will have the opportunity to photograph an assortment of live subjects. 
This workshop will also focus on capturing pollinating insects and bats in 
flight and nighttime photography. This workshop is designed for all levels of 
photographers, but to get the most out of the workshop, you should own a 
digital SLR. For a tentative itinerary, click here. The workshop includes 
breakfast and lunch. 


Details and Registration, 
http://abbottnaturephotography.ticketleap.com/macro-photography-workshop/details 

-- 

John C. Abbott 
http://www.abbottnaturephotography.com
http://www.flickr.com/abbottnaturephotography
http://www.facebook.com/AbbottNaturePhotography
http://jcabbottnaturephotography.blogspot.com/
http://www.odonatacentral.org 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2014 20:19:23 -0500
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, March 21, 2014



Today was warm but clouds kept butterfly numbers down. We still managed to
find 31 species through the day. Highlights were Celia's Roadside Skipper,
Mazan's Scallopwing, and White-striped Longtail.



Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor

Black Swallowtail  Papilio polyxenes

Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes

Checkered White  Pontia protodice

Dainty Sulphur  Nathalis iole

Western Pygmy-Blue  Brephidium exile

Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius

Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae

Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana

Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta

Pearl Crescent  Phyciodes tharos

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea

Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes

Monarch  Danaus plexippus

Queen  Danaus gilippus

White-striped Longtail  Chioides catillus

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Mazans Scallopwing  Staphylus mazans

Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis

White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Whirlabout  Polites vibex

Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho

Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: National Butterfly Center, 3/18/14
From: Dan Jones <antshrike1 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2014 22:14:51 -0400
I saw 42 species of butterflies today at the National Butterfly Center south of 
Mission. Good stuff included Cyna Blue, Florida White and Crimson Patch. Some 
photos are on my blog. 



http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2014/03/national-butterfly-center-31814.html


Dan Jones, Weslaco

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Fwd: Seats still available for both Monarch programs at Wildflower Center - March 23-24
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2014 17:22:25 -0500
Dear ABF Members and Member Wannabes,

The Austin Butterfly Forum still has seats for both Lincoln Brower's
lecture on the history of Monarch research as well as for the *first-ever*
gathering of people involved in the discovery of the Monarch's
overwintering grounds in central Mexico!

Details on topics, times, dates, locations, and speaker bios:
http://www.austinbutterflies.org/

The Grand Saga of the Monarch Butterfly Research by Lincoln Brower
Sunday 7:30 pm, March 23, 2014
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Discovery of the Monarch's Mexican Overwintering Refugia by Catalina
Aguado, John Christian, Bill Calvert and Lincoln Brower
Monday 7:00 pm, March 24, 2014
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Please RSVP to ABF.Monarch AT gmail.com so that we can maintain a head could.

Both events are free for current ABF members.
Non-members: $10 per person, $5 for children.

Thank you all for your continued interest in and support of Monarch
conservation!

Thanks again, Mike

__________________________
Mike Quinn, president
Austin Butterfly Forum
ABF.Monarch AT gmail.com
http://www.austinbutterflies.org/

_____________________________
Texas Monarch Watch, est 1993
http://www.texasento.net/dplex.htm

__________________________________
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
University of Texas at Austin
4801 La Crosse Avenue, Austin, TX 78739
http://www.wildflower.org/

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Calleta Silkmoth - Pleasanton, TX
From: Maury Heiman <maury.heiman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2014 00:42:04 -0500
Always a treat to see them!
Earliest the past few years for Eupackardia calleta  here in Medina County.
March 19, 2010
March 17-2011
Feb 22, 2012
Need to look for 2013


Maury Heiman
Medina County

Bug Guide 

Moth Photographers
Group




On Sun, Mar 16, 2014 at 11:30 PM, Chuck Sexton wrote:

> I haven't had much enthusiasm for moth study over the past droughty year
> which has reduced diversity at my home porch lights to a shadow of its
> former self.  Nonetheless, a nice moth here and there still catches my eye.
>
> On Friday morning, March 14, in the parking lot of the Atascosa Cowboy Rec
> Center (golf course) in Pleasanton, TX, I found a dying Calleta silkmoth
> (Eupackardia calleta - Hodges #7763), a new critter for me.  Photos of the
> moth will be uploaded to BugGuide shortly.  Given the location, the
> likelihood is that it was a roadkill off the grill of one of the vehicles
> in that parking lot, which puts its precise geographic origin in question,
> but since most of the golf traffic at that site is presumed to be
> relatively local, I'd say the odds of it having originated in or near
> Pleasanton are high.
>
> Chuck Sexton,
> Austin, TX
>
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Calleta Silkmoth - Pleasanton, TX
From: Chuck Sexton <gcwarbler AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2014 23:30:34 -0500
I haven’t had much enthusiasm for moth study over the past droughty year which 
has reduced diversity at my home porch lights to a shadow of its former self. 
Nonetheless, a nice moth here and there still catches my eye. 


On Friday morning, March 14, in the parking lot of the Atascosa Cowboy Rec 
Center (golf course) in Pleasanton, TX, I found a dying Calleta silkmoth 
(Eupackardia calleta - Hodges #7763), a new critter for me. Photos of the moth 
will be uploaded to BugGuide shortly. Given the location, the likelihood is 
that it was a roadkill off the grill of one of the vehicles in that parking 
lot, which puts its precise geographic origin in question, but since most of 
the golf traffic at that site is presumed to be relatively local, I’d say the 
odds of it having originated in or near Pleasanton are high. 


Chuck Sexton,
Austin, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma SP - Butterfly Walk and weekly sightings
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2014 20:21:41 -0500
Common Sootywing was new this week and could be found around the gardens
most days.  A single Boisduval's Yellow was photographed yesterday and a
single Walker's Metalmark was seen earlier in the week.  During the walk
this afternoon a single Blue Metalmark male was found in mistflower near
the start of Ebony Trail.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Walks *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walks* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walks* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
*Night Hikes* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small
fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)
Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)
Checkered White (Pontia protodice)
Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)
Large Orange Sulphur (Phoebis agarithe)
Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Boisduval's Yellow (Eurema boisduvaliana)
Sleepy Orange (Eurema nicippe)
Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon istapa)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Reakirt's Blue (Hemiargus isola)
Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)
Walker's Metalmark (Apodemia walkeri)
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)
Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)
Bordered Patch (Chlosyne lacinia)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)
White Peacock (Anartia jatrophae)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
Tropical Leafwing (Anaea aidea)
Gemmed Satyr (Cyllopsis gemma)
Carolina Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)
Brown Longtail (Urbanus procne)
Sickle-winged Skipper (Eantis tamenund)
Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Turk's-cap White-Skipper (Heliopetes macaira)
Common Sootywing (Pholisora catulius)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)
Whirlabout (Polites vibex)
Celia's Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes celia)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2014 22:01:09 -0500
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, March 14, 2014



Today was warm, sunny with a few clouds and breezy. Before the walk Dave
Elder had photographed a White Angled-Sulphur nectaring on heliotrope
beside the visitor center but it was gone when the walk started. Everyone
saw the Celia's Roadside Skipper along the walkway. We had a chance to
photograph and compare fresh Vesta, Phaon, and Pearl Crescents. There are
still good numbers of Tropical Leafwings.



A total of 32 species were seen during the day:



Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor

Black Swallowtail  Papilio polyxenes

Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes

Checkered White  Pontia protodice

White Angled-Sulphur  Anteos clorinde

Little Yellow  Eurema lisa

Dainty Sulphur  Nathalis iole

Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus

Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon

Western Pygmy-Blue  Brephidium exile

American Snout  Libytheana carinenta

Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae

Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana

Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta

Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon

Pearl Crescent  Phyciodes tharos

Question Mark  Polygonia interrogationis

American Lady  Vanessa virginiensis

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea

Queen  Danaus gilippus

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis

White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: ABF will hold 2 Monarch lectures at Wildflower Center and 3rd at Zilker
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2014 16:45:41 -0500
Dear Austin Butterfly Forum Members, All,

Due to the continued demand for the two Monarch programs we are holding
March 24th and 25th, Lincoln Brower has agreed to repeat his March 25th
lecture on the 23rd.

So this is the new lineup:

The Grand Saga of the Monarch Butterfly Research by Lincoln Brower
Sunday 7:30 pm, March 23, 2014
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
4801 La Crosse Avenue, Austin, TX 78739 - http://www.wildflower.org/

Discovery of the Monarch's Mexican Overwintering Refugia by Catalina
Aguado, John Christian, Bill Calvert and Lincoln Brower
Monday 7:00 pm, March 24, 2014
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
4801 La Crosse Avenue, Austin, TX 78739 - http://www.wildflower.org/

The Grand Saga of the Monarch Butterfly Research by Lincoln Brower
Tuesday, 7:00 pm, March 25, 2014
Zilker Garden Center
2220 Barton Springs Rd., Austin, TX, 78746 - http://www.zilkergarden.org/

The first two lectures will be held at the Wildflower Center which is a
larger venue than is Zilker.

Anyone wanting to change their reservation from Lincoln's Tuesday lecture
to his Sunday lecture, just send me any email at ABF.Monarch AT gmail.com

Note, we also still have room on both the field trips as well as room in
all the lectures, especially Sunday's.

Finally, Catalina Aguado updated her bio to mention an award she received
for "eminent services provided to México and humanity."

To read about Catalina's award and to get information on the venue changes,
please see our website: http://www.austinbutterflies.org/

To reserve a seat or a spot, please mail to Doris Hill, ABF Treasurer, 1605
Broadmoor, Austin, TX 78723.

Thanks for everyone's patience, flexibility and understanding.

Mike
__________________________
Mike Quinn, president
Austin Butterfly Forum
ABF.Monarch AT gmail.com
http://www.austinbutterflies.org/

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: beetle question
From: Tamela Baker <tamela AT PRISMNET.COM>
Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2014 14:25:12 -0500
A huge number of these beetles came in with some turkey litter which was
given to us.  As near as I can tell, this is a Darkling Beetle and isn't
going to be a problem in the Walburg, Texas area.  Supposedly, this critter
and it's millions of buddies come in from parts unknown with wood chips
provided by Tyson to their chicken and turkey subcontractors.  

 

I'd greatly appreciate it if someone could tell me what it is and whether or
not I should spread this turkey litter in potential garden sites.  If not,
how do I get rid of these things?

 

Thanks,

Tamela/Tami Baker

Walburg, Texas


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma SP - Walker's Metalmark seen today.
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2014 12:28:39 -0500
A fresh male Walker's Metalmark was just found in the Desert Lantana
section of the garden.

Happy hunting!

 Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Walks *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walks* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walks* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
*Night Hikes* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small
fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Mourning Cloak
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2014 11:47:26 -0500
  Have a pretty freah one , if not completely fresh hunting around the
place this morning.   Also 6-7  Falcate Orange-tips
**********************************************************************
Brush Freeman
503-551-5150 Cell
120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
http://texasnaturenotes.blogspot.com/
Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma SP - Weekly Sightings
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 9 Mar 2014 17:55:06 -0500
Twenty species are on this week's list.  Gemmed Satyr and Dusky-blue
Groundstreak were present in good numbers.

Today, not a butterfly was in sight and most park visitors were checking on
the Black-headed Grosbeak (still here), so there was no butterfly walk.

The Master Naturalist plant relocation project continued this morning in
very light drizzle, with the addition of another Vasey Adelia and
Crucillo.  Mistflower (including three White Mistflower plants), Pearl
Milkweed Vine, and other recent transplants are doing well and appreciate
this cool, damp weather.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Walks *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walks* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walks* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
*Night Hikes* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small
fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)
Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)
Dusk-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Rounded Metalmark (Calephelis perditalis)
Bordered Patch (Chlosyne lacinia)
Elada Checkerspot (Texola elada)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
Gemmed Satyr (Cyllopsis gemma)
Brown Longtail (Urbanus procne)
Mazans Scallopwing (Staphylus mazans)
Sickle-winged Skipper (Eantis tamenund)
Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)
White Checkered-Skipper 9Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Turk's-cap White-Skipper (Heliopetes macaira)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)
Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Photo Workshop Opportunities
From: John Abbott <jcabbott13 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2014 21:34:15 -0600
I wanted to alert folks to the following photography workshops and 
opportunities. There is something here for everyone (all levels). If you have 
any questions, please don't hesitate to inquire. Hope to see you at one of 
these fun workshops. 


Cheers,
John
-- 

John C. Abbott 
http://www.abbottnaturephotography.com
http://www.flickr.com/abbottnaturephotography
http://www.facebook.com/AbbottNaturePhotography
http://jcabbottnaturephotography.blogspot.com/
http://www.odonatacentral.org 



MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP - CHIHUAHUAN DESERT NATURE CENTER (May 3-4, 2014)
Abbott Nature Photography is conducting this workshop which will introduce you 
to a variety of macro photography techniques. Learn great techniques for 
photographing butterflies, dragonflies, other insects, snakes, lizards, small 
mammals, plants and more. In particular, we will be demonstrating techniques 
for photographing flying insects and bats at this workshop. We will have a 
number of different live subjects for you to practice techniques on. 
Additionally, you will have the opportunity to try out different types of 
equipment to better help you decide what works for you. 

Details and registration - 
http://abbottnaturephotography.ticketleap.com/macro-photography-workshop/ 



BUGSHOT 2014 - SAPELO ISLAND, GA (MAY 22-25, 2014)
Join professional photographers John Abbott, Piotr Naskrecki, and Alex Wild for 
a 3-day workshop exploring arthropod photography on coastal Georgia’s beautiful 
Sapelo Island! Topics include: 

Macro & microphotography equipment
Composition
Lighting & flash
Working with live insects
Special techniques: focus-stacking, high-speed flash
Field sessions in forest, meadow, and aquatic habitats
Evening photo-sharing presentations
and more!
Details and registration - http://bugshot.net/events/
MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP - BALCONES CANYONLANDS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, 
MARBLE FALLS, TX (June 21-22, 2014) 

Abbott Nature Photography is conducting this workshop which will introduce you 
to a variety of macro photography techniques. Learn great techniques for 
photographing butterflies, dragonflies, other insects, snakes, lizards, small 
mammals, plants and more. We will have a number of different live subjects for 
you to practice techniques on. Additionally, you will have the opportunity to 
try out different types of equipment to better help you decide what works for 
you. 

Details and registration - 
http://abbottnaturephotography.ticketleap.com/bcnwr-workshop/ 



BUGSHOT 2014 - Belize (Sept. 7-14, 2014)
Join an all-star cast of professional photographers on an 8-day, 7-night 
tropical insect safari in Belize! 

Venue: We are lucky to be hosted by Caves Branch Lodge, one of Belize’s oldest 
and best appointed jungle lodges. Caves Branch Lodge sits on 50,000 acres along 
the “Hummingbird Highway” and provides ready access to high quality tropical 
habitat, including forests, rivers, caves, and a botanical garden that holds 
the country’s largest orchid collection. You will also enjoy the lodge’s 
comfortable accommodation and excellent food. We have included an open day in 
the schedule if you wish to tour local Mayan ruins or partake in some of the 
lodge’s cave adventures. 

Details and registration - http://bugshot.net/events/


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: March 1, 2014 before the last front
From: Terry Hibbitts <thibb AT SWTEXAS.NET>
Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2014 09:23:43 -0600
Edwards County, Camp Wood Hills, 5 miles west of Camp Wood, March 1, 2014

 

FOS Henry's Elfin (Callophrys henrici) 2  (They were hanging out in the
Juniper trees)

 

Have seen a few butterflies nectaring on Agarita blooms last week (February
26 - March 1)

Libytheana carinenta, Nathalis iole, Zerene cesonia, Abaeis nicippe, Strymon
melinus, and Callophrys gryne.  Not many but a few.  A few others around but
didn't look at them closely.

 

Terry Hibbitts

Camp Wood Hills

www.thehibbitts.net  

 

 


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Fwd: ABF to host monarch overwintering ground discoverers - March 22, 24-25
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2014 18:15:33 -0600
UPDATE:

As we are getting requests for seats from as far away as Dallas, Abilene,
and the RGV, we are now asking folks to please mail a check to Doris Hill,
ABF Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin, TX 78723 for all events they wish to
attend. All events are still open, but the field trips have the fewest
openings, just 25.

full details here:
http://www.austinbutterflies.org/

Thanks,

Mike Quinn, ABF pres.
512-577-0250
entomike AT gmail.com
http://www.austinbutterflies.org/



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Mike Quinn 
Date: Fri, Feb 28, 2014 at 10:54 AM
Subject: ABF to host monarch overwintering ground discoverers - March 22,
24-25
To: Austin Butterfly 


Dear Listers,

Austin Butterfly Forum would like to announce a pair of back-to-back
stellar meetings and field trips next month!

For the first time ever, all the remaining principal folks involved in the
discovery of the monarch's overwintering grounds, Catalina Aguado, John
Christian, Bill Calvert and Lincoln Brower, will get together to discuss
their extraordinary experiences of events that unfolded over the course of
several winters in the mid-1970's.

Lincoln Brower will give a second lecture the following evening on "The
Grand Saga of the Monarch Butterfly Research."

We will also have two butterfly field trips to meet the speakers in
informal settings.

Mark your calendars!

More details here: http://www.austinbutterflies.org/

All events will be held at, or start at, the Zilker Botanical Gardens, 2200
Barton Spring Road.
All events are free to ABF members. Non-members will be charged $5 for
field trips and $10 for meetings. Parking fees also apply to all for field
trips.

ABF membership is $20 annually per household payable to Doris Hill, ABF
Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin, TX 78723

Thanks,

Mike Quinn, president
Austin Butterfly Forum
512-577-0250
entomike AT gmail.com

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma SP - Butterfly Walk with Blue Metalmark, Gemmed Satyr
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2014 18:03:53 -0600
Blue Metalmark is flying again.  Two females, one in the garden, the other
on mistflower a short distance down Ebony Trail (left side), turned up mid
afternoon.  A very nice couple from Ithica, NY joined me for the walk.
Once the first Blue Metalmark turned up we continued the search until
nearly 4 PM but found no males.

Gemmed Satyr and Celia's Roadside-Skipper, discovered by Tom, were other
nice finds during the walk.  Mazan's Scallopwing was seen yesterday.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Walks *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walks* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walks* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
*Night Hikes* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small
fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
 

Seen this week:
Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)
Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Sleepy Orange (Eurema nicippe)
Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak (Calycopis isobeon)
Fatal Metalmark (Calephelis nemesis)
Blue Metalmark (Lasaia sula)
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)
Bordered Patch (Chlosyne lacinia)
Elada Checkerspot (Texola elada)
Texan Crescent (Phyciodes texana)
Vesta Crescent (Phyciodes vesta)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
White Peacock (Anartia jatrophae)
Mexican Bluewing (Byscelia ethusa)
Tropical Leafwing (Anaea aidea)
Gemmed Satyr (Cyllopsis gemma)
Carolina Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)
Mazan's Scallopwing (Staphylus mazans)
Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Laviana White-Skipper (Heliopetes laviana)
Turk's-cap White-Skipper (Heliopetes macaira)
Julia's Skipper (Nastra julia)
Fawn-spotted Skipper (Cymaenes odilia)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)
Celia's Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes celia)
Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Orange Sulfur
From: Pete <petedarlingii AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2014 16:46:03 -0500
Hello All,
Don't know about down your way but up here in Maine they hybridize. You might 
not have either sps but a hybrid. 

-Pete

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 2, 2014, at 4:19 PM, Tim Jones  wrote:
> 
> Dear Bill and Mike,
> 
> Thank you. I appreciate your help in having accurate names since some of 
these photos are destined for the web. 

> 
> Last November I caught the same species on the same flowering rosemary bush 
near the house. It may be that the shots below are not all of the same 
butterfly since there were three or four flitting about the bush. 

> 
> http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_LXZ3858_W.jpg
> &
> http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_LXZ3859_W.jpg
> 
> http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_LXZ3868_W.jpg
> 
> http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_LXZ3869_W.jpg
> 
> http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_LXZ3872OrangeSulfur_W.jpg
> 
> These were shot on 17 November 2013. The last three should give a general 
idea of what the upper wings look like. 

> 
> 
> One day I'll try using a circular polarizer for this. There are drawbacks to 
losing up to 2 Ÿ stops of exposure when it comes to shutter speed and depth of 
field though I usually force my exposures with flash. One has to rotate a 
polarizing filter to cut reflections no matter what. At some times of day it's 
less than useless. Sometimes it can oversaturate parts of a photo making an 
unnatural looking sky, for instance. Skillfully used it cam make for great 
photography. 

> 
> For a single purpose like this one could just orient the polarizer and hold 
it in front of a point and shoot camera by hand. You might be able to adapt to 
different angles of light better this way than by attaching the thing to the 
lens. 

> 
> All said, I'll use Colias eurytheme with more confidence it's down right.
> 
> Tim Jones
> Austin, Texas
> 
> At 9:55 AM -0600 3/2/14, Bill and Pam Dempwolf wrote:
>> Tim,
>> In my opinion it's pretty tough to get a handle on C. philodice vs C. 
eurytheme. I have two specimens I have labeled philodice that were caught 
(relatively) near here - one from Llano County in April and another from 
Oklahoma on the TX / OK border, also caught in April. The only "sure-fire" way 
I'm aware of is to photograph the upperside with a UV filter - apparently 
philodice and eurytheme look different. I've seen photos on the web, but don't 
have the equipment to take photographs of my specimens. That is on my "I've go 
to do it some day" list, but I think I would need to purchase an expensive SLR 
camera to be able to use filters. Maybe after I win the lottery. 

>> 
>> The BOA website shows some photos that suggest the relative position of the 
black dots on the under side and the black margin on the upper side is not a 
positive field mark. See this photo, which is identified as eurytheme: 
http://butterfliesofamerica.com/imagehtmls/Pieridae/Colias_eurytheme_M_Hannagen_Meadow_Area_11-VII-07_2_i.htm 

>> 
>> I looked at my specimens. Most of what I have identified as eurytheme have 
the black dots on the under side of the forewing approximately in line with the 
edge of the black margin on the upper side. But some, especially those caught 
early in the season (which are more yellow than orange on the upper side), have 
the black spots well to the inside of the upper side black margin. Likewise, a 
number of the philodice specimens have the black spots along the edge of the 
upper side black band. Of course I likely have specimens that are not correctly 
identified. 

>> 
>> With all that said, I would identify the butterfly in your photo as C. 
eurytheme (orange sulphur) - but tentatively. Clouded sulphurs generally have 
more uniform yellow coloring (which I think should show up on the underside in 
a photo such as yours), while early season orange sulphurs have lighter yellow 
color towards the outside of the wings and darker yellow towards the inside of 
the wings. That's what I think I see in your photo. 

>> 
>> Bill Dempwolf
> 
> At 9:15 AM -0800 3/2/14, Mike Rickard wrote:
>> Tim,
>> The orange on the forewing underside alone says Orange Sulphur. Clouded 
Sulphur's range in Texas is limited to extreme northern and western areas of 
the state. 

>> Mike Rickard
>> Mission TX
>> 
>>> On 3/1/2014 9:59 PM, Tim Jones wrote:
>>> Butterfly ID
>>> I thought I had a handle on these guys but not I'm not so sure.
>>> Randy Emmit comments that the margin extends past the row
>>> of black dots. It doesn't do that here.
>>> 
>>> Orange Sulfur (/Colias eurytheme/ )
>>> http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_LXZ4557_2W2.jpg
>>> Hays County, 03-01-14
>>> 
>>> It's not a clouded sulfur, is it?
> Tim Jones
> Austin, Texas
> 
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Orange Sulfur
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2014 15:19:31 -0600
Dear Bill and Mike,

Thank you. I appreciate your help in having accurate names since some of these 
photos are destined for the web. 


Last November I caught the same species on the same flowering rosemary bush 
near the house. It may be that the shots below are not all of the same 
butterfly since there were three or four flitting about the bush. 


http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_LXZ3858_W.jpg
&
http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_LXZ3859_W.jpg

http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_LXZ3868_W.jpg

http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_LXZ3869_W.jpg

http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_LXZ3872OrangeSulfur_W.jpg

These were shot on 17 November 2013. The last three should give a general idea 
of what the upper wings look like. 



One day I'll try using a circular polarizer for this. There are drawbacks to 
losing up to 2 Ÿ stops of exposure when it comes to shutter speed and depth of 
field though I usually force my exposures with flash. One has to rotate a 
polarizing filter to cut reflections no matter what. At some times of day it's 
less than useless. Sometimes it can oversaturate parts of a photo making an 
unnatural looking sky, for instance. Skillfully used it cam make for great 
photography. 


For a single purpose like this one could just orient the polarizer and hold it 
in front of a point and shoot camera by hand. You might be able to adapt to 
different angles of light better this way than by attaching the thing to the 
lens. 


All said, I'll use Colias eurytheme with more confidence it's down right.

Tim Jones
Austin, Texas

At 9:55 AM -0600 3/2/14, Bill and Pam Dempwolf wrote:
>Tim,
>In my opinion it's pretty tough to get a handle on C. philodice vs C. 
eurytheme. I have two specimens I have labeled philodice that were caught 
(relatively) near here - one from Llano County in April and another from 
Oklahoma on the TX / OK border, also caught in April. The only "sure-fire" way 
I'm aware of is to photograph the upperside with a UV filter - apparently 
philodice and eurytheme look different. I've seen photos on the web, but don't 
have the equipment to take photographs of my specimens. That is on my "I've go 
to do it some day" list, but I think I would need to purchase an expensive SLR 
camera to be able to use filters. Maybe after I win the lottery. 

>
>The BOA website shows some photos that suggest the relative position of the 
black dots on the under side and the black margin on the upper side is not a 
positive field mark. See this photo, which is identified as eurytheme: 
http://butterfliesofamerica.com/imagehtmls/Pieridae/Colias_eurytheme_M_Hannagen_Meadow_Area_11-VII-07_2_i.htm 

>
>I looked at my specimens. Most of what I have identified as eurytheme have the 
black dots on the under side of the forewing approximately in line with the 
edge of the black margin on the upper side. But some, especially those caught 
early in the season (which are more yellow than orange on the upper side), have 
the black spots well to the inside of the upper side black margin. Likewise, a 
number of the philodice specimens have the black spots along the edge of the 
upper side black band. Of course I likely have specimens that are not correctly 
identified. 

>
>With all that said, I would identify the butterfly in your photo as C. 
eurytheme (orange sulphur) - but tentatively. Clouded sulphurs generally have 
more uniform yellow coloring (which I think should show up on the underside in 
a photo such as yours), while early season orange sulphurs have lighter yellow 
color towards the outside of the wings and darker yellow towards the inside of 
the wings. That's what I think I see in your photo. 

>
>Bill Dempwolf

At 9:15 AM -0800 3/2/14, Mike Rickard wrote:
>Tim,
>The orange on the forewing underside alone says Orange Sulphur. Clouded 
Sulphur's range in Texas is limited to extreme northern and western areas of 
the state. 

>Mike Rickard
>Mission TX
>
>On 3/1/2014 9:59 PM, Tim Jones wrote:
>>Butterfly ID
>>I thought I had a handle on these guys but not I'm not so sure.
>>Randy Emmit comments that the margin extends past the row
>>of black dots. It doesn't do that here.
>>
>>Orange Sulfur (/Colias eurytheme/ )
>>http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_LXZ4557_2W2.jpg
>>Hays County, 03-01-14
>>
>>It's not a clouded sulfur, is it?
Tim Jones
Austin, Texas

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Butterfly ID
From: Mike Rickard <folksinger4 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2014 09:15:02 -0800

Tim,
The orange on the forewing underside alone says Orange Sulphur.  Clouded 
Sulphur's range in Texas is limited to extreme northern and western areas of 
the state. 

Mike Rickard
Mission TX


________________________________
 From: Tim Jones 
To: TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
Sent: Saturday, March 1, 2014 9:59 PM
Subject: Butterfly ID
 


I thought I had a handle on these guys but not I'm not so
sure.
Randy Emmit comments that the margin extends past the row
of black dots. It doesn't do that here.

Orange Sulfur (Colias
eurytheme )
http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_LXZ4557_2W2.jpg
Hays County, 03-01-14

It's not a clouded sulfur, is it?
Tim Jones
Austin, Texas
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Butterfly ID
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Sat, 1 Mar 2014 21:59:06 -0600
I thought I had a handle on these guys but not I'm not so sure.
Randy Emmit comments that the margin extends past the row
of black dots. It doesn't do that here.

Orange Sulfur (Colias eurytheme )
http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_LXZ4557_2W2.jpg
Hays County, 03-01-14

It's not a clouded sulfur, is it?
Tim Jones
Austin, Texas

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Subject: Estero butterfly walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 1 Mar 2014 09:36:39 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Fri Feb 28, 2014

Last Sunday and Tues a Yellow Angled Sulphur was seen around the visitor
center and our "tropical zone". It was nowhere to be found on the walk.

Our walk day was in the 80s and sunny with a brisk wind. Highlights were
Mournful Duskywing, Mexican Bluewings, and many Tropical Leafwings. We saw
6 Tropical Leafwings clustered together taking sap from a opening in a
Baccharis shrub, and at one point there were 12 together along a 10 inch
stretch of the bait log. We went out to see the Western Pygmy Blues and got
Dainty Sulphur and Monarch there as well.

We ended with 34 species for the day.

Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor

Black Swallowtail  Papilio polyxenes

Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes

Great Southern White  Ascia monuste

Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia

Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe

Little Yellow  Eurema lisa

Dainty Sulphur  Nathalis iole

Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus

Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon

Western Pygmy-Blue  Brephidium exile

Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius

Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis

American Snout  Libytheana carinenta

Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae

Bordered Patch  Chlosyne lacinia

Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana

Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta

Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon

Question Mark  Polygonia interrogationis

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea

Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes

Monarch  Danaus plexippus

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Mournful Duskywing  Erynnis tristis

Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis

White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: So what are the big-eyed Hermeuptychia in the RGV?
From: Nick Grishin <grishin AT CHOP.SWMED.EDU>
Date: Fri, 28 Feb 2014 22:08:51 -0600
> My little brain read Nick Grishin's Hermeutychia paper again and I 
> answered my question.  His findings are that all of the RGV Hermeutychia 
> are hermybius and that hermybius is allopatric (so far) with respect to 
> intricata and sosybius.  Our South Texas Satyrs have extremely variable 
> eyespots but in general they are smaller than less uniform in size than 
> than those of intricata and sosybius.  Herybius has wavier lines on the 
> hindwings.  A very interesting paper.  Now to find some satyrs in the no 
> man's land north of the Valley.

Dan, thanks, would be great to study possible "border zone" between South 
Texas and Carolina Satyrs, if such zone exists. Either somehwere around 
Crystal City, or along the coast. Maybe there are areas where these two 
species fly together, maybe not.

These zones could be quite fun to explore. The most remarkable fun example 
is probably this one:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/12/111223091453.htm
http://www.pensoft.net/journals/zookeys/article/1893/abstract/

Quite unbelievable actually, n

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: So what are the big-eyed Hermeuptychia in the RGV?
From: Nick Grishin <grishin AT CHOP.SWMED.EDU>
Date: Fri, 28 Feb 2014 22:00:28 -0600
Dan:

> I read some of Grishin's Hermeuptychia paper and my small brain came 
> away with the question: Why weren't large eyed "Hermes Satyrs"  from the 
> Rio Grande Valley included in the study.  Seems weird to name a new 
> species without examining specimens of the very similar sympatric 
> "taxon".  I posted some photos on the RGV Butterflies Facebook page. 
> https://www.facebook.com/groups/269176076541487/
> Any commnets?

Unfortunately, I can't see any pictures when I go to that link (it asks me 
to login somewhere I'm pretty sure I don't belong), but all specimens we 
examined from the valley (101 of them, from all 5 border counties, we 
couldn't find these bugs farther than Laredo) were South Texas Satyrs. 
Their eyespots are very variable in size. It does not mean that other 
species cannot show up around! Maybe they are there, we simply didn't 
stumble upon them, n

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Texas Satyr question
From: Nick Grishin <grishin AT CHOP.SWMED.EDU>
Date: Fri, 28 Feb 2014 21:52:38 -0600
Graham, thanks for your great questions!

> I've been confused by the Carolina Satyr in Texas the past few months.

Me too, for the past 15 years. But I think it makes more sense to me now. 
It looks like we have 3 species, both in TX and the US.


> After reading the article about the two new Satyr species being 
> described, I have a few questions you all may be better equipped to 
> answer. Can the Intricate Satyr be ID'd through field marks?

We failed to find very confident wing pattern differences. But our sample 
was quite small. We have seen only 22 Intricate Satyrs. Good enough to 
figure out that they are a new species, but not enough to suggest great 
fieldmarks.

So, it does not mean fieldmarks don't exist. I suspect that they might 
exist, because Intricate Satyrs and Carolina Satyrs are not very closely 
related at all. They are from different species groups. Maybe we are 
simply bad at figuring them out. Almost all specimens we examined (i.e. 
obtained DNA sequences and inspected genitalia) are illustrated in the 
paper here:

http://www.pensoft.net/journals/zookeys/article/6394/
http://www.pensoft.net/J_FILES/1/articles/6394/6394-G-3-layout.pdf

(large files, probably slow loading, but lots of pictures of all kind)

Please look at these pictures we have in there, and see what you can 
figure out! Would be great to find solid field marks.

We discuss some possible fieldmarks in the paper, but it is not very clear 
to me that they would work in most cases. I think I can almost tell which 
satyr is which, and sometime quite confidently, but may make a mistake 
here and there.


> What is the global range of the Carolina Satyr?

Eastern US: from New Jersey to FL, southeastern Kansas and central TX.
We have not seen specimens of it south of the border.


> And it's range inside  Texas?

East "half" of TX south to Corpus Cristi, west to Uvalde.


> What is the range of the South Texas Satyr?

Along the Rio Grande, from Laredo to Brownsville in the US
and down to (at least) Veracruz in Mexico.


> Did this study include DNA from Hermes/Carolina Satyrs in Central or 
> South America?

Yes. We included DNA analysis of all named species, and that covers 
Central and South America. It was very important to include these, because 
we needed to make sure that our US species are not the ones named from 
specimens south of the border.

E.g., *H. hermes* is a South American species. However, there are some 
*hermes*-like butterflies (by genitalia and DNA, by wings they all look 
quite similar) in Central America. But they don't make it all the way up 
to US, it seems.

Fun bugs! n

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Live asian butterflies on exhibit - opens March 1 in Ft. Worth
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Feb 2014 12:46:29 -0600
ICYMI, Mike Quinn, Austin




*Subject: Live asian butterflies on exhibit*



*Fort Worth / Tarrant County*


 See the largest exhibit of live butterflies in North Central Texas at
"Butterflies in the Garden," opening March 1 in the Fort Worth Botanic
Garden's Conservatory.



During the five-week long exhibit, approximately 12,000 beautiful, exotic
butterflies of every hue and size will be released in the conservatory.



Both the Fort Worth Botanic Garden and the Botanical Research Institute of
Texas (BRIT) will offer programs and exhibits during the exhibit days.



This year's theme - "Butterflies of Asia" -- features such butterflies as
the Archduke, Paper Kite, Scarlet Mormon, and Striped Blue Crow, all from
Malaysia.



Hours are daily, including Sundays, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.



Purchase tickets for timed entrance at www.fwbg.org, or call 817-392-5510.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: ABF to host monarch overwintering ground discoverers - March 22, 24-25
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Feb 2014 10:54:20 -0600
Dear Listers,

Austin Butterfly Forum would like to announce a pair of back-to-back
stellar meetings and field trips next month!

For the first time ever, all the remaining principal folks involved in the
discovery of the monarch's overwintering grounds, Catalina Aguado, John
Christian, Bill Calvert and Lincoln Brower, will get together to discuss
their extraordinary experiences of events that unfolded over the course of
several winters in the mid-1970's.

Lincoln Brower will give a second lecture the following evening on "The
Grand Saga of the Monarch Butterfly Research."

We will also have two butterfly field trips to meet the speakers in
informal settings.

Mark your calendars!

More details here: http://www.austinbutterflies.org/

All events will be held at, or start at, the Zilker Botanical Gardens, 2200
Barton Spring Road.
All events are free to ABF members. Non-members will be charged $5 for
field trips and $10 for meetings. Parking fees also apply to all for field
trips.

ABF membership is $20 annually per household payable to Doris Hill, ABF
Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin, TX 78723

Thanks,

Mike Quinn, president
Austin Butterfly Forum
512-577-0250
entomike AT gmail.com

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Question Mark, Brazos County
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirleyywilkerson AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Thu, 27 Feb 2014 21:00:19 -0800
Had one today here in Kurten, and several American Ladies this past week.  Lots 
of  (American Ladies in Comanche County this past weekend as well.) 



Shirley Wilkerson
Brazos County


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Limits sought on weed killer glyphosate to help monarch butterflies
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Feb 2014 16:54:41 -0600
Limits sought on weed killer glyphosate to help monarch butterflies

http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-monarch-butterfly-roundup-20140224,0,1342942.story#ixzz2uTGQIhmx 

By Louis Sahagun
February 25, 2014, 8:04 a.m.

With monarch butterfly populations rapidly dwindling, a conservation 
organization on Monday asked the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 
to implement tougher rules for the weed killer glyphosate - first 
marketed under the brand name Roundup - to save America's most 
beloved insect from further decline.

In a petition, the Natural Resources Defense Council argued that 
current uses of glyphosate are wiping out milkweed, the only plant 
upon which monarch caterpillars feed. The loss of milkweed is having 
a devastating effect on the life cycles of the large, fragile 
orange-and-black butterflies, which migrate through the United 
States, Canada and Mexico.

It takes several generations of the insect scientists know as Danaus 
plexippus to make the round trip because each monarch lives only a 
few weeks in the summer.

Since federal glyphosate rules were last updated a decade ago, its 
use has spiked tenfold to 182 million pounds a year, largely due to 
the introduction and popularity of corn and soybeans genetically 
modified to resist the herbicide, the petition says.

"The tenfold increase in the amount of glyphosate being used 
corresponds with huge losses of milkweed and the staggering decline 
of the monarch," Sylvia Fallon, an NRDC senior scientist, said in an 
interview. "We are seeking new safeguards desperately needed to allow 
enough milkweed to grow."

California's monarch population has fallen an estimated 80% over the 
last 15 years due to urbanization, drought, weed abatement programs 
and pesticides, according to the nonprofit Xerces Society, a 
Portland, Ore.-based organization dedicated to conservation of 
invertebrates.

The caterpillars are about 2 3/4 inches long, with a pair of black 
antennae-like appendages at either end of a body ringed with black, 
yellow and white stripes. They spend most of their three weeks of 
existence munching on milkweed leaves.

The EPA is scheduled to complete a new review of glyphosate rules in 
2015. But "given the rapid decline in monarch numbers, the EPA should 
take immediate steps to review and restrict glyphosate's uses," the 
petition says.

The petition asks the EPA to consider preventing the use of 
glyphosate and other weed killers along highways and utility rights 
of way where milkweed could grow freely without interfering with 
maintenance or emergency crews.

It also asks that farmers be required to establish herbicide-free 
safety zones in or around their fields, and urges the EPA to ensure 
that any new safeguards on glyphosate don't lead simply to more use 
of other weed killers that would be equally bad for monarchs and may 
pose health risks.

"The good news is that butterflies are resilient and can rebound 
quickly," Fallon said. "All they need is milkweed on which to lay 
their eggs."

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: So what are the big-eyed Hermeuptychia in the RGV?
From: Dan Jones <antshrike1 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Feb 2014 11:31:45 -0500
My little brain read Nick Grishin's Hermeutychia paper again and I answered my 
question. His findings are that all of the RGV Hermeutychia are hermybius and 
that hermybius is allopatric (so far) with respect to intricata and sosybius. 
Our South Texas Satyrs have extremely variable eyespots but in general they are 
smaller than less uniform in size than than those of intricata and sosybius. 
Herybius has wavier lines on the hindwings. A very interesting paper. Now to 
find some satyrs in the no man's land north of the Valley. 



Dan Jones, Weslaco

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: So what are the big-eyed Hermeuptychia in the RGV?
From: Dan Jones <antshrike1 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Feb 2014 20:48:59 -0500
I read some of Grishin's Hermeuptychia paper and my small brain came away with 
the question: Why weren't large eyed "Hermes Satyrs" from the Rio Grande Valley 
included in the study. Seems weird to name a new species without examining 
specimens of the very similar sympatric "taxon". I posted some photos on the 
RGV Butterflies Facebook page. 



https://www.facebook.com/groups/269176076541487/


Any commnets?


Dan Jones, Weslaco





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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Texas Satyr question
From: Graham Floyd <spcgraham.floyd AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Feb 2014 16:33:13 -0600
I've been confused by the Carolina Satyr in Texas the past few months. After 
reading the article about the two new Satyr species being described, I have a 
few questions you all may be better equipped to answer. 


Can the Intricate Satyr be ID'd through field marks?

What is the global range of the Carolina Satyr?  And it's range inside Texas?

What is the range of the South Texas Satyr?

Did this study include DNA from Hermes/Carolina Satyrs in Central or South 
America? 


V/R,
Graham Floyd,
San Antonio,
budding butterfly enthusiast

Sent from my iPhone

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Monsanto Publishes Monarch Article Today
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Feb 2014 23:23:51 -0600
The new face of greenwashing. It’s their soul’s pushing doorstops under the 
gates of hell. But, good luck with this. 

Tim

On Feb 24, 2014, at 10:45 PM, Brush Freeman  wrote:

> Fox News...But thanks anyway...B
> 
> **********************************************************************
> Brush Freeman
> 503-551-5150 Cell
> 120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
> http://texasnaturenotes.blogspot.com/
> Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas
> 
> 
> On Mon, Feb 24, 2014 at 10:00 PM, Paul Cherubini  wrote:
> http://monsantoblog.com/2014/02/24/the-monarch-butterfly/
> 
> Excerpt:
> 
> "We’re talking with scientists about what might be done to
> help the monarchs rebound.  And we’re eager to join efforts to help
> rebuild monarch habitat along the migration path by joining with
> conservationists, agronomists, weed scientists, crop associations
> and farmers to look at ways to increase milkweed populations on
> the agricultural landscape."
> 
> Paul Cherubini
> El Dorado, Calif.
> 
> ======================================
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Monsanto Publishes Monarch Article Today
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Feb 2014 22:45:48 -0600
Fox News...But thanks anyway...B

**********************************************************************
Brush Freeman
503-551-5150 Cell
120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
http://texasnaturenotes.blogspot.com/
Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas


On Mon, Feb 24, 2014 at 10:00 PM, Paul Cherubini  wrote:

> http://monsantoblog.com/2014/02/24/the-monarch-butterfly/
>
> Excerpt:
>
> "We're talking with scientists about what might be done to
> help the monarchs rebound.  And we're eager to join efforts to help
> rebuild monarch habitat along the migration path by joining with
> conservationists, agronomists, weed scientists, crop associations
> and farmers to look at ways to increase milkweed populations on
> the agricultural landscape."
>
> Paul Cherubini
> El Dorado, Calif.
>
> ======================================
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> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
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> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
>

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Monsanto Publishes Monarch Article Today
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT SABER.NET>
Date: Mon, 24 Feb 2014 20:00:23 -0800
http://monsantoblog.com/2014/02/24/the-monarch-butterfly/

Excerpt: 

"We’re talking with scientists about what might be done to 
help the monarchs rebound.  And we’re eager to join efforts to help 
rebuild monarch habitat along the migration path by joining with 
conservationists, agronomists, weed scientists, crop associations 
and farmers to look at ways to increase milkweed populations on 
the agricultural landscape."

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Two new butterfly speices
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Feb 2014 20:45:21 -0600
This provided by David Dauphin via FB


http://earthsky.org/earth/discovery-of-one-new-butterfly-species-leads-to-another 



**********************************************************************
Brush Freeman
503-551-5150 Cell
120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
http://texasnaturenotes.blogspot.com/
Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Juniper Hairstreak and Hays County drought count
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Feb 2014 19:40:04 -0600
Hello,
One of our rosemary bushes in hays County was covered 
in butterflies and bees on the 23rd. 
In  bright sunshine late in the afternoon we observed:
5 large dogfaces, 
2 checkered whites, 
6 sleepy oranges, 
1 checkered skipper, 
1 juniper hairstreak, 
1 fresh black swallowtail,
5 or more orange sulfurs.
Photo:
Juniper Hairstreak & Honeybee on a Rosemary Bush
http://earthlightimagery.com/storage/_TJ12755_3WL.jpg
February 23, 2014
Hays County, Texas
Tim Jones
Austin, Texas





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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma SP - Sunday Butterfly Walk & Weekly Sightings
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Feb 2014 14:39:25 -0600
Favorite from the butterfly walk - a gorgeous Black Swallowtail.  A single
very fresh Mimosa Skipper was also in the garden with a Bordered Patch.
This week we found 27 species.  Gray Hairstreak, Dusky-blue Groundstreak
and Funereal Duskywing are fairly common.  Many plants, from Elbow Bush to
mistflower and Red Sage are abundant and in bloom right now.  If the wind
is low and the clouds not too thick, there should be plenty of interesting
butterflies, so come on over for a visit.

 Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Walks *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walks* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walks* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
*Night Hikes* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small
fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)
Checkered White (Pontia protodice)
Southern Dogface (Colias cesonia)
Cloudless Sulphur (PPhoebis sennae)
Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside)
Sleepy Orange (Eurema nicippe)
Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon meilinus)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak)
Fatal Metalmark (Calephelis nemesis)
American Snout (LLibytheana carinenta)
Bordered Patch (Chlosyme lacinia)
Vesta Crescent (Phyciodes vesta)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
Common Mestra (Mestra amymone)
Tropical Leafwing (Anaea aidea)
Carolina Satyr (Hermeuptychia sosybius)
Brown Longtail (Urbanus procne)
Mimosa Skipper (Cogia calchas)
Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)
Fawn-spotted Skipper (Cymaenes odilia)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)

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Subject: Falcate Orange-Tips in San Jacinto Co.
From: Wanda Smith <wsmith0709 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Feb 2014 08:52:51 -0800
Since people are reporting Falcate Orange-tips, several of us saw 3 males and 
one female in San Jacinto County this past Saturday, Feb. 22.  The only other 
butterflies I saw that day were two Question Marks. 


Wanda Smith


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Subject: Falcate Orangetip male/Brazos County/Kurten today
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirleyywilkerson AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Feb 2014 15:12:40 -0800
Had my first one of the season as well here in Brazos County.  Got a good photo 
of him. 


Shirley Wilkerson
Kurten/Brazos County


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Falcate Orangetip
From: Willie Sekula <wsekula AT COPPER.NET>
Date: Sun, 23 Feb 2014 13:40:12 -0600
While going to my vehicle to get my birding gear I just saw my first of
spring Falcate Orangetip.  I live on the Wilson/Karnes County line.  

Willie Sekula
7 mi N.E. of Falls City

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 21 Feb 2014 20:16:07 -0600
 Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Fri Feb 21, 2014

 Today was in the mid 70s and sunny, great weather, and 25 folks
participated in the butterfly walk. Highlights were Great Purple
Hairstreak, Silver-banded Hairstreak, Mexican Bluewings, and a dozen or
more Tropical Leafwings. We studied the Leafwings carefully looking for
other species but to no avail.

 We ended with 33 species for our two hour walk. If we had gone out to see
the Western Pygmy Blues that, without a doubt, would have been around their
host plants, it would have added one more to our total.

 Black Swallowtail  Papilio polyxenes

Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes

Checkered White  Pontia protodice

Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia

Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside

Little Yellow  Eurema lisa

Great Purple Hairstreak  Atlides halesus

Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis

Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa

Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon

Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius

American Snout  Libytheana carinenta

Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae

Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana

Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta

Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea

Queen  Danaus gilippus

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis

White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Sachem  Atalopedes campestris
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

 Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: New paper on Satyrs found in LRGV
From: Keith Wolfe <bflyearlystages AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Feb 2014 07:34:04 +0000
Excellent! I exchanged emails and LRGV Hermeuptychia "sosybius" immatures with 
euptychiine authority Debra Murray who was interested in using DNA to review 
the H. hermes species complex back in 2002, but haven't heard from her or 
anyone else on the subject since. 


Best wishes,

Keith Wolfe

From: dauphins AT SBCGLOBAL.NET
To: TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
Sent: Sat, 15 Feb 2014 04:20:10 -0000 (UTC)
Subject: New paper on Satyrs found in LRGV

I encourage everyone to read the paper by Cong and Grishin, found at 
http://www.pensoft.net/J_FILES/1/articles/6394/6394-G-3-layout.pdf . It is 
extremely interesting. 


David Dauphin
Mission, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: New paper on Satyrs found in LRGV
From: "David T. Dauphin" <dauphins AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 14 Feb 2014 22:20:10 -0600
I encourage everyone to read the paper by Cong and Grishin, found at 
http://www.pensoft.net/J_FILES/1/articles/6394/6394-G-3-layout.pdf . It is 
extremely interesting. 


David Dauphin
Mission, TX
For Valley wildlife watching info, go to
http://www.thedauphins.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 14 Feb 2014 20:18:49 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Fri Feb 14, 2014

 Last Fri Feb 7 walk was cancelled due to inclement weather, and this last
week we had 2 nights and a day in the mid 30s, not the best weather for
butterflies. Today, however, was in the 80s and sunny.

 20 visitors came for the butterfly walk. There were singles of most
species but our total for the day was a surprising 24 species.

Highlights included Mexican Bluewing and Tropical Leafwing at the bait
station.

 At the end of the walk we boarded the tram and rode out to the Winged Sea
Purslane plants. There we found a few Western Pygmy Blues and a Checkered
White.

 Checkered White  Pontia protodice
Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Sleepy Orange  Eurema nicippe
Dainty Sulphur  Nathalis iole
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Western Pygmy-Blue  Brephidium exile
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

 Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Austin Butterfly Forum meeting; February 24
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2014 12:47:16 -0600
Hi everyone,



Here is the information for upcoming events and meetings of the Austin
Butterfly Forum. Thanks for helping us to get the word out.

The Austin Butterfly Forum meets at the Zilker Botanical Garden
Centerat 7:00 pm on the 4th Monday of
every month except for December. Most
meetings are free and open to the public.

Each meeting features an educational program, but we like to socialize a
bit beforehand. Sometimes members will bring caterpillars or collections
for display, and sometimes we have special opportunities such as plant
giveaways. The meetings are also a good place to hear special announcements
and learn about new events.

Everyone interested in butterflies and other invertebrates is welcome!
Please come join us!

*February 24 meeting:* Wallace and Evolution by *Dan Hardy. *Zilker
Botanical Garden Center. 7 pm.


Alfred Russel Wallace and Charles Darwin independently discovered the
mechanism of evolution - Wallace on a collecting trip to the Dutch East
Indies, Darwin at home in London. Darwin's detailed notebooks show what he
was reading and thinking about during the development of his theory. We
have far less from Wallace and his story requires some detective work.
Recent scholarship suggests that insects were crucial to his breakthrough
moment.


ABF member Dan Hardy is an engaging speaker, and has studied many of
Wallace's publications. This will be a fascinating presentation. Please
come join us!


Zilker Botanical Garden Center, 7 pm.; free.


*Upcoming events:*



*March 24 meeting: TBA. *Zilker Botanical Garden Center. 7pm.



*April 28 meeting: TBA*. Zilker Botanical Garden Center. 7pm.



For more information on the Austin Butterfly Forum, please see our new
website: http://www.austinbutterflies.org/index.html



Please contact Mike Quinn at entomike AT gmail.com if you need more
information.



Thanks for your help in publicizing our meetings. Hope to see you there!


Peg Wallace

ABF Publicity

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Texas Powdered Skipper, Brewster Co
From: Heidi Trudell <h.trudell AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2014 16:05:15 -0600
This year I've barely seen a few Sleepy Oranges and a smattering of
not much else; a Variegated Fritillary and Red Admiral are about the
only other non-moth leps so far (one day-flying possible six-spotted
hawkmoth threw me for a loop the other day at Post Park, otherwise
it's quiet on the moth front).

This afternoon, however, I managed two really horrible photos of what
is likely a Texas Powdered Skipper in the yard (Marathon, TX) before
it headed SW.

Glad that the year is starting out right!
-h

-- 
Civilization is the limitless multiplication of unnecessary
necessities. - Mark Twain
Big Bend Birds & Nature - http://www.bigbendnature.com

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma SP - Sunday Butterfly Walk
From: Sherry Wilson <rollingsoles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 9 Feb 2014 16:45:56 -0600
This morning was the first time in a week we have seen butterflies in the
park.  Heavy clouds with light scattered sprinkles didn't help, but there
were scattered patches of sun and seven of us had a nice walk.  All adults
used our new loaner Pentax Papilio butterfly binoculars.  They are not in
the binocular rental pool but are available at no cost to butterfly walk
participants.

Dick Wilson was scouting ahead of the group and led us to a mating pair of
Indigo Snakes.

Sherry Wilson
Resident Park Host
Resaca de la Palma State Park
956-350-2920

*Nature Walks *Friday:  9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Bird Walks* Saturday:  8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
*Butterfly Walks* Sunday:  1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
*Night Hikes* last Friday of the month (RSVP by 5:00 p.m. Thurs)  - small
fee
*Nature Tram Rides*:  Wednesday thru Sunday
(Visitor Center closed Mon/Tues)
http://www.facebook.com/resacadelapalma

2/9/2014:
Checkered White (Pontia protodice)
Southern Dogface (Colias cesonia)
Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)
Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)
Western Pygmy-Blue (Brephidium exile)
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)
Mexican Bluewing (Myscelia ethusa)
Brown Longtail (Urbanus procne)
White Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk, Fri Jan 31, 2014
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 2 Feb 2014 17:59:36 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Fri Jan 31, 2014



Last week on Fri Jan 24 it was so cold that the butterfly walk was
cancelled for that day. However, 2 days later it was warmer and butterflies
were on the wing with Great Purple Hairstreak , Blomfild's Beauty, 5
Tropical Leafwings, and many Mexican Bluewings being seen.



Then we had sleet on Tues night and on Wed morning many plants were coated
with ice. It wasn't a hard freeze and the flowers survived.



Friday was the first warm day and we didn't know what to expect butterfly
wise. It was warm and windy. 14 people showed up for the walk. We were
pleasantly surprised to find 17 species with the best being Blomfild's
Beauty on the bait and a winter form Clytie Minstreak on an azurea flower.



Checkered White  Pontia protodice

Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia

Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe

Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside

Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus

Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie

Western Pygmy-Blue  Brephidium exile

American Snout  Libytheana carinenta

Bordered Patch  Chlosyne lacinia

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

Blomfild's Beauty  Smyrna blomfildia

Queen  Danaus gilippus

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Monarch Migration May Become Extinct
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Sun, 2 Feb 2014 14:12:36 -0600
We do have the Convention on Migratory Species. Of course, just as we have with 
climate change or evolution there will be plenty out there (and here) to deny 
the collapse of the migration is happening. 

But there’s some hope.

Convention On migratory Species
http://www.cms.int/publications/pdf/Convention_brochure.pdf
see page 26 for specific mention of the Monarch Butterfly

United Nations Scientific Advisory Board Meets for First Time in Berlin
http://www.cms.int/
Bonn, 31 January 2014 – A new UN Scientific Advisory Board consisting of 26 
leading scientists and experts from all continents held their first meeting in 
Berlin from 30 – 31 January 2014. The meeting was opened by UN 
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and hosted and organized by the German Federal 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the German Commission for UNESCO. 


“The Advisory Board is composed of some of the world’s leading scientists from 
a wide range of disciplines. While the Board’s fields of expertise and remit go 
far beyond conservation and migratory species, its composition means that it 
can be expected to provide advice on the important role that biodiversity plays 
in the Sustainable Development Goals”, said Bradnee Chambers, Executive 
Secretary of the Convention on Migratory Species, who attended the inaugural 
meeting on behalf of the Convention and the United Nations Environment 
Programme (UNEP). 


See also:
http://news.sciencemag.org/europe/2013/10/u.n.-names-new-science-advisory-board

It would be a noble thing to do to push for some sort of treaty, wouldn’t it?

Tim Jones
Austin, Texas


On Feb 2, 2014, at 1:27 PM, John  wrote:

> I am not a lawyer nor do I play one on TV....... 
> 
> The Endangered Species Act is focused upon species and their habitat. The 
Migratory Bird Treaty is focused upon Birds. The Monarch is neither in danger 
or extinction, nor is it a bird. I fear there is little chance of passing new 
law in the current political climate. Hence, I think it will take a creative 
application of existing law to protect the phenomenon of the migration. Any 
creative lawyer types out there? 

> 
> About 40% of domestic corn production goes to produce ethanol. This is by 
government mandate and subsidy. The mandate and/or subsidy could change. 
However, the Iowa caucuses are the first stop along the road to the presidency. 
A presidential candidate must either pander to corn or cede the first contest. 

> 
> "ADM is certainly the nation's most arrogant welfare recipient. And it is one 
of the few welfare recipients that spend millions of dollars each year 
advertising on Sunday morning television shows populated and watched by 
politicians." http://www.cato.org/pubs/pas/pa-241.html 

> 
> So, figure out how to counter-act that behemoth......
> 
> All in all, I fear the Monarch Butterfly will go the way of most other 
monarchies...... to the graveyard of history. 

> 
> john in Austin
> 
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Monarch Migration May Become Extinct
From: John <jmbarr AT ACADEMICPLANET.COM>
Date: Sun, 2 Feb 2014 13:27:29 -0600
I am not a lawyer nor do I play one on TV....... 

The Endangered Species Act is focused upon species and their habitat. The 
Migratory Bird Treaty is focused upon Birds. The Monarch is neither in danger 
or extinction, nor is it a bird. I fear there is little chance of passing new 
law in the current political climate. Hence, I think it will take a creative 
application of existing law to protect the phenomenon of the migration. Any 
creative lawyer types out there? 


About 40% of domestic corn production goes to produce ethanol. This is by 
government mandate and subsidy. The mandate and/or subsidy could change. 
However, the Iowa caucuses are the first stop along the road to the presidency. 
A presidential candidate must either pander to corn or cede the first contest. 


"ADM is certainly the nation's most arrogant welfare recipient. And it is one 
of the few welfare recipients that spend millions of dollars each year 
advertising on Sunday morning television shows populated and watched by 
politicians." http://www.cato.org/pubs/pas/pa-241.html 


So, figure out how to counter-act that behemoth......

All in all, I fear the Monarch Butterfly will go the way of most other 
monarchies...... to the graveyard of history. 


john in Austin

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Monarch Migration May Become Extinct
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Sat, 1 Feb 2014 02:57:45 -0600
> "The main culprit," he write in an email, is now genetically modified 
"herbicide-resistant corn and soybean crops and herbicides in the U.S.," which 
"leads to the wholesale killing of the monarch's principal food plant, common 
milkweed." 


WE knew this. We've known it all along. 

We need to get a little kid to start up a foundation to buy farmland. A few 
million dollars to retire ge cornfields from cultivation for ethanol corn in 
strips a mile wide, north-south through the best of the migration. It could be 
a life’s work. 


Though they mention it I think perhaps they underestimated the severity of the 
droughts. I had acres of milkweeds, antelope horn but few other supportive 
nectaring plants in Hays County. No Monarchs. It’s been hard on everybody. 
Climate change is also taking a toll. 


We may have a subspecies of Monarchs that require federal protection.

Early morning thoughts.
Tim

On Jan 31, 2014, at 11:38 PM, Brush Freeman  wrote:

> Your turn to walk the coals :-)....B
> 
> **********************************************************************
> Brush Freeman
> 503-551-5150 Cell
> 120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
> http://texasnaturenotes.blogspot.com/
> Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas
> 
> 
> On Fri, Jan 31, 2014 at 11:21 PM, Tim Jones  wrote:
> Monarch Migration May Become Extinct
> 
http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/monarch-migration-may-become-extinct 

> Thu, 01/30/2014 - 12:09pm
> Associated Press, Mark Stevenson
> Get daily news for laboratory professionals - Sign up now!
> 
> In this March 13, 2005 file photo, Monarch butterflies gather on a tree at 
the El Rosario Butterfly Sanctuary near Angangueo, Mexico. The number of 
Monarch butterflies wintering in Mexico has plunged to its lowest level since 
studies began in 1993. 

> Image: AP Photo, Kirsten Luce, File
> 
> The stunning and little-understood annual migration of millions of Monarch 
butterflies to spend the winter in Mexico is in danger of disappearing, experts 
say, after numbers dropped to their lowest level since record-keeping began in 
1993. 

> 
> Their report blamed the displacement of the milkweed the species feeds on by 
genetically modified crops and urban sprawl in the U.S., extreme weather trends 
and the dramatic reduction of the butterflies' habitat in Mexico due to illegal 
logging of the trees they depend on for shelter. 

> 
> After steep and steady declines in the previous three years, the 
black-and-orange butterflies now cover only 1.65 acres (0.67 hectares) in the 
pine and fir forests west of Mexico City, compared to 2.93 acres (1.19 
hectares) last year, says the report released by the World Wildlife Fund, 
Mexico's Environment Department and the Natural Protected Areas Commission. 
They covered more than 44.5 acres (18 hectares) at their recorded peak in 1996. 

> 
> Because the butterflies clump together by the thousands in trees, they are 
counted by the area they cover. 

> 
> While the Monarch is not in danger of extinction, the decline in their 
population now marks a statistical long-term trend and can no longer be seen as 
a combination of yearly or seasonal events, experts said. 

> 
> The announcement followed on the heels of the 20th anniversary of the North 
American Free Trade Agreement, which saw the U.S., Mexico and Canada sign 
environmental accords to protect migratory species such as the Monarch. At the 
time, the butterfly was adopted as the symbol of trilateral cooperation. 

> 
> "Twenty years after the signing of NAFTA, the Monarch migration, the symbol 
of the three countries' cooperation, is at serious risk of disappearing," says 
Omar Vidal, the World Wildlife Fund director in Mexico. 

> 
> Lincoln Brower, a leading entomologist at Sweet Briar College in Virginia, 
says that "the migration is definitely proving to be an endangered biological 
phenomenon." 

> 
> "The main culprit," he write in an email, is now genetically modified 
"herbicide-resistant corn and soybean crops and herbicides in the U.S.," which 
"leads to the wholesale killing of the monarch's principal food plant, common 
milkweed." 

> 
> While Mexico has made headway in reducing logging in the officially protected 
winter reserve, that alone cannot save the migration, writes Karen Oberhauser, 
a professor at the Univ. of Minnesota. She notes that studies indicate that the 
U.S. Midwest is where most of the butterflies migrate from. 

> 
> "A large part of their reproductive habitat in that region has been lost due 
to changes in agricultural practices, mainly the explosive growth in the use of 
herbicide-tolerant crops," Oberhauser says. 

> 
> Extreme weather — severe cold snaps, unusually heavy rains or droughts in all 
three countries — have also apparently played a role in the decline. 

> 
> But the milkweed issue now places the spotlight firmly on the U.S. and 
President Barack Obama, who is scheduled to visit Mexico on Feb. 19, with 
events scheduled for Toluca, a city a few dozen miles from the butterfly 
reserve. 

> 
> "I think President Obama should take some step to support the survival of the 
Monarch butterflies," says writer and environmentalist Homero Aridjis. "The 
governments of the U.S. and Canada have washed their hands of the problem, and 
left it all to Mexico." 

> 
> It's unclear what would happen to the Monarchs if they no longer made the 
annual trek to Mexico, the world's biggest migration of Monarch butterflies and 
the second-largest insect migration, after a species of dragonfly in Africa. 

> 
> There are Monarchs in many parts of the world, so they would not go extinct. 
The butterflies can apparently survive year-round in warmer climates, but 
populations in the northern U.S. and Canada would have to find some place to 
spend the bitter winters. There is also another smaller migration route that 
takes butterflies from the west to the coast of California, but that has 
registered even steeper declines. 

> 
> Oberhauser notes that some Monarchs now appear to be wintering along the U.S. 
Gulf coast, and there has been a movement in the U.S. among gardeners and home 
owners to plant milkweed to replace some of the lost habitat. But activists say 
large stands of milkweed are needed along the migratory route, comparable to 
what once grew there. They also want local authorities in the U.S. and Canada 
to alter mowing schedules in parks and public spaces, to avoid cutting down 
milkweed during breeding seasons. 

> 
> The migration is an inherited trait. No butterfly lives to make the full 
round-trip, and it is unclear how they remember the route back to the same 
patch of forest each year, a journey of thousands of miles to a forest reserve 
that covers 193,000 acres (56,259-hectares) in central Mexico. Some scientists 
think the huge masses of migrating butterflies may release chemicals that mark 
the migratory path and that if their numbers fall low enough, not enough 
chemical traces would remain and the route-marking might no longer work. 

> 
> The human inhabitants of the reserve had already noted a historic change, as 
early as the Nov. 1-2 Day of the Dead holiday, when the butterflies usually 
arrive. 

> 
> "They were part of the landscape of the Day of the Dead, when you could see 
them flitting around the graveyards," says Gloria Tavera, the director of the 
reserve. "This year was the first time in memory that they weren't there." 

> 
> Losing the butterflies would be a blow for people like Adolfo Rivera, a 
55-year-old farmer from the town of Los Saucos who works as a guide for 
tourists in the Piedra Herrada wintering ground. He says the butterflies came 
later and in smaller numbers this year, a fact he attributes to a rainy winter. 
"This is a source of pride for us, and income," Rivera says. 

> 
> Butterfly guide Emilio Velazquez Moreno, 39, and other farmers in the village 
of Macheros, located inside the reserve, have been planting small plots of 
milkweed in a bid to provide food for the Monarchs if they decide to stay in 
Mexico year-round, which he says some do. 

> 
> While sitting beside a mountainside patch of firs where the butterflies were 
clumping on the branches, Velazquez Moreno, a second-generation guide who has 
been visiting the butterflies since he was a boy, said, "We have to protect 
this. This comes first, this is our heritage.” 

> 
> Tim Jones
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Monarch Migration May Become Extinct
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2014 23:38:38 -0600
Your turn to walk the coals :-)....B

**********************************************************************
Brush Freeman
503-551-5150 Cell
120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
http://texasnaturenotes.blogspot.com/
Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas


On Fri, Jan 31, 2014 at 11:21 PM, Tim Jones  wrote:

> Monarch Migration May Become Extinct
>
> 
http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/monarch-migration-may-become-extinct 

> Thu, 01/30/2014 - 12:09pm
> Associated Press, Mark Stevenson
> Get daily news for laboratory professionals - Sign up now!
> [image: In this March 13, 2005 file photo, Monarch butterflies gather on a
> tree at the El Rosario Butterfly Sanctuary near Angangueo, Mexico. The
> number of Monarch butterflies wintering in Mexico has plunged to its lowest
> level since studies began in 1993. Image: AP Photo, Kirsten Luce, File]
> In this March 13, 2005 file photo, Monarch butterflies gather on a tree at
> the El Rosario Butterfly Sanctuary near Angangueo, Mexico. The number of
> Monarch butterflies wintering in Mexico has plunged to its lowest level
> since studies began in 1993.
> Image: AP Photo, Kirsten Luce, File
>
> The stunning and little-understood annual migration of millions of Monarch
> butterflies to spend the winter in Mexico is in danger of disappearing,
> experts say, after numbers dropped to their lowest level since
> record-keeping began in 1993.
>
> Their report blamed the displacement of the milkweed the species feeds on
> by genetically modified crops and urban sprawl in the U.S., extreme weather
> trends and the dramatic reduction of the butterflies' habitat in Mexico
> due to illegal logging of the trees they depend on for shelter.
>
> After steep and steady declines in the previous three years, the
> black-and-orange butterflies now cover only 1.65 acres (0.67 hectares) in
> the pine and fir forests west of Mexico City, compared to 2.93 acres (1.19
> hectares) last year, says the report released by the World Wildlife
> Fund, Mexico's Environment Department and the Natural Protected Areas
> Commission. They covered more than 44.5 acres (18 hectares) at their
> recorded peak in 1996.
>
> Because the butterflies clump together by the thousands in trees, they are
> counted by the area they cover.
>
> While the Monarch is not in danger of extinction, the decline in their
> population now marks a statistical long-term trend and can no longer be
> seen as a combination of yearly or seasonal events, experts said.
>
> The announcement followed on the heels of the 20th anniversary of the
> North American Free Trade Agreement, which saw the U.S., Mexico and Canada
> sign environmental accords to protect migratory species such as the
> Monarch. At the time, the butterfly was adopted as the symbol of trilateral
> cooperation.
>
> "Twenty years after the signing of NAFTA, the Monarch migration, the
> symbol of the three countries' cooperation, is at serious risk of
> disappearing," says Omar Vidal, the World Wildlife Fund director in Mexico.
>
> Lincoln Brower, a leading entomologist at Sweet Briar College in Virginia,
> says that "the migration is definitely proving to be an endangered
> biological phenomenon."
>
> "The main culprit," he write in an email, is now genetically modified
> "herbicide-resistant corn and soybean crops and herbicides in the U.S.,"
> which "leads to the wholesale killing of the monarch's principal food
> plant, common milkweed."
>
> While Mexico has made headway in reducing logging in the officially
> protected winter reserve, that alone cannot save the migration, writes
> Karen Oberhauser, a professor at the Univ. of Minnesota. She notes that
> studies indicate that the U.S. Midwest is where most of the butterflies
> migrate from.
>
> "A large part of their reproductive habitat in that region has been lost
> due to changes in agricultural practices, mainly the explosive growth in
> the use of herbicide-tolerant crops," Oberhauser says.
>
> Extreme weather -- severe cold snaps, unusually heavy rains or droughts in
> all three countries -- have also apparently played a role in the decline.
>
> But the milkweed issue now places the spotlight firmly on the U.S. and
> President Barack Obama, who is scheduled to visit Mexico on Feb. 19, with
> events scheduled for Toluca, a city a few dozen miles from the butterfly
> reserve.
>
> "I think President Obama should take some step to support the survival of
> the Monarch butterflies," says writer and environmentalist Homero Aridjis.
> "The governments of the U.S. and Canada have washed their hands of the
> problem, and left it all to Mexico."
>
> It's unclear what would happen to the Monarchs if they no longer made the
> annual trek to Mexico, the world's biggest migration of Monarch butterflies
> and the second-largest insect migration, after a species of dragonfly in
> Africa.
>
> There are Monarchs in many parts of the world, so they would not go
> extinct. The butterflies can apparently survive year-round in warmer
> climates, but populations in the northern U.S. and Canada would have to
> find some place to spend the bitter winters. There is also another smaller
> migration route that takes butterflies from the west to the coast of
> California, but that has registered even steeper declines.
>
> Oberhauser notes that some Monarchs now appear to be wintering along the
> U.S. Gulf coast, and there has been a movement in the U.S. among gardeners
> and home owners to plant milkweed to replace some of the lost habitat. But
> activists say large stands of milkweed are needed along the migratory
> route, comparable to what once grew there. They also want local authorities
> in the U.S. and Canada to alter mowing schedules in parks and public
> spaces, to avoid cutting down milkweed during breeding seasons.
>
> The migration is an inherited trait. No butterfly lives to make the full
> round-trip, and it is unclear how they remember the route back to the same
> patch of forest each year, a journey of thousands of miles to a forest
> reserve that covers 193,000 acres (56,259-hectares) in central Mexico. Some
> scientists think the huge masses of migrating butterflies may release
> chemicals that mark the migratory path and that if their numbers fall low
> enough, not enough chemical traces would remain and the route-marking might
> no longer work.
>
> The human inhabitants of the reserve had already noted a historic change,
> as early as the Nov. 1-2 Day of the Dead holiday, when the butterflies
> usually arrive.
>
> "They were part of the landscape of the Day of the Dead, when you could
> see them flitting around the graveyards," says Gloria Tavera, the director
> of the reserve. "This year was the first time in memory that they weren't
> there."
>
> Losing the butterflies would be a blow for people like Adolfo Rivera, a
> 55-year-old farmer from the town of Los Saucos who works as a guide for
> tourists in the Piedra Herrada wintering ground. He says the butterflies
> came later and in smaller numbers this year, a fact he attributes to a
> rainy winter. "This is a source of pride for us, and income," Rivera says.
>
> Butterfly guide Emilio Velazquez Moreno, 39, and other farmers in the
> village of Macheros, located inside the reserve, have been planting small
> plots of milkweed in a bid to provide food for the Monarchs if they decide
> to stay in Mexico year-round, which he says some do.
>
> While sitting beside a mountainside patch of firs where the butterflies
> were clumping on the branches, Velazquez Moreno, a second-generation guide
> who has been visiting the butterflies since he was a boy, said, "We have to
> protect this. This comes first, this is our heritage."
>
> Tim Jones
>
> 
>
>
>
> ======================================
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toLISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 

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toLISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 

> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
>
>

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Monarch Migration May Become Extinct
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2014 23:21:15 -0600
Monarch Migration May Become Extinct

http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/monarch-migration-may-become-extinct 

Thu, 01/30/2014 - 12:09pm
Associated Press, Mark Stevenson
Get daily news for laboratory professionals - Sign up now!

In this March 13, 2005 file photo, Monarch butterflies gather on a tree at the 
El Rosario Butterfly Sanctuary near Angangueo, Mexico. The number of Monarch 
butterflies wintering in Mexico has plunged to its lowest level since studies 
began in 1993. 

Image: AP Photo, Kirsten Luce, File

The stunning and little-understood annual migration of millions of Monarch 
butterflies to spend the winter in Mexico is in danger of disappearing, experts 
say, after numbers dropped to their lowest level since record-keeping began in 
1993. 


Their report blamed the displacement of the milkweed the species feeds on by 
genetically modified crops and urban sprawl in the U.S., extreme weather trends 
and the dramatic reduction of the butterflies' habitat in Mexico due to illegal 
logging of the trees they depend on for shelter. 


After steep and steady declines in the previous three years, the 
black-and-orange butterflies now cover only 1.65 acres (0.67 hectares) in the 
pine and fir forests west of Mexico City, compared to 2.93 acres (1.19 
hectares) last year, says the report released by the World Wildlife Fund, 
Mexico's Environment Department and the Natural Protected Areas Commission. 
They covered more than 44.5 acres (18 hectares) at their recorded peak in 1996. 


Because the butterflies clump together by the thousands in trees, they are 
counted by the area they cover. 


While the Monarch is not in danger of extinction, the decline in their 
population now marks a statistical long-term trend and can no longer be seen as 
a combination of yearly or seasonal events, experts said. 


The announcement followed on the heels of the 20th anniversary of the North 
American Free Trade Agreement, which saw the U.S., Mexico and Canada sign 
environmental accords to protect migratory species such as the Monarch. At the 
time, the butterfly was adopted as the symbol of trilateral cooperation. 


"Twenty years after the signing of NAFTA, the Monarch migration, the symbol of 
the three countries' cooperation, is at serious risk of disappearing," says 
Omar Vidal, the World Wildlife Fund director in Mexico. 


Lincoln Brower, a leading entomologist at Sweet Briar College in Virginia, says 
that "the migration is definitely proving to be an endangered biological 
phenomenon." 


"The main culprit," he write in an email, is now genetically modified 
"herbicide-resistant corn and soybean crops and herbicides in the U.S.," which 
"leads to the wholesale killing of the monarch's principal food plant, common 
milkweed." 


While Mexico has made headway in reducing logging in the officially protected 
winter reserve, that alone cannot save the migration, writes Karen Oberhauser, 
a professor at the Univ. of Minnesota. She notes that studies indicate that the 
U.S. Midwest is where most of the butterflies migrate from. 


"A large part of their reproductive habitat in that region has been lost due to 
changes in agricultural practices, mainly the explosive growth in the use of 
herbicide-tolerant crops," Oberhauser says. 


Extreme weather — severe cold snaps, unusually heavy rains or droughts in all 
three countries — have also apparently played a role in the decline. 


But the milkweed issue now places the spotlight firmly on the U.S. and 
President Barack Obama, who is scheduled to visit Mexico on Feb. 19, with 
events scheduled for Toluca, a city a few dozen miles from the butterfly 
reserve. 


"I think President Obama should take some step to support the survival of the 
Monarch butterflies," says writer and environmentalist Homero Aridjis. "The 
governments of the U.S. and Canada have washed their hands of the problem, and 
left it all to Mexico." 


It's unclear what would happen to the Monarchs if they no longer made the 
annual trek to Mexico, the world's biggest migration of Monarch butterflies and 
the second-largest insect migration, after a species of dragonfly in Africa. 


There are Monarchs in many parts of the world, so they would not go extinct. 
The butterflies can apparently survive year-round in warmer climates, but 
populations in the northern U.S. and Canada would have to find some place to 
spend the bitter winters. There is also another smaller migration route that 
takes butterflies from the west to the coast of California, but that has 
registered even steeper declines. 


Oberhauser notes that some Monarchs now appear to be wintering along the U.S. 
Gulf coast, and there has been a movement in the U.S. among gardeners and home 
owners to plant milkweed to replace some of the lost habitat. But activists say 
large stands of milkweed are needed along the migratory route, comparable to 
what once grew there. They also want local authorities in the U.S. and Canada 
to alter mowing schedules in parks and public spaces, to avoid cutting down 
milkweed during breeding seasons. 


The migration is an inherited trait. No butterfly lives to make the full 
round-trip, and it is unclear how they remember the route back to the same 
patch of forest each year, a journey of thousands of miles to a forest reserve 
that covers 193,000 acres (56,259-hectares) in central Mexico. Some scientists 
think the huge masses of migrating butterflies may release chemicals that mark 
the migratory path and that if their numbers fall low enough, not enough 
chemical traces would remain and the route-marking might no longer work. 


The human inhabitants of the reserve had already noted a historic change, as 
early as the Nov. 1-2 Day of the Dead holiday, when the butterflies usually 
arrive. 


"They were part of the landscape of the Day of the Dead, when you could see 
them flitting around the graveyards," says Gloria Tavera, the director of the 
reserve. "This year was the first time in memory that they weren't there." 


Losing the butterflies would be a blow for people like Adolfo Rivera, a 
55-year-old farmer from the town of Los Saucos who works as a guide for 
tourists in the Piedra Herrada wintering ground. He says the butterflies came 
later and in smaller numbers this year, a fact he attributes to a rainy winter. 
"This is a source of pride for us, and income," Rivera says. 


Butterfly guide Emilio Velazquez Moreno, 39, and other farmers in the village 
of Macheros, located inside the reserve, have been planting small plots of 
milkweed in a bid to provide food for the Monarchs if they decide to stay in 
Mexico year-round, which he says some do. 


While sitting beside a mountainside patch of firs where the butterflies were 
clumping on the branches, Velazquez Moreno, a second-generation guide who has 
been visiting the butterflies since he was a boy, said, "We have to protect 
this. This comes first, this is our heritage.” 


Tim Jones






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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Study: excess nitrogen causes reduced growth of monarch caterpillars on tropical milkweed
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2014 09:47:39 -0600
Hey folks,

This looks like it might be another reason (in addition to systemic
insecticides) that purchasing store-bought tropical milkweed might not be a
good thing...

I'm not a horticulturalist, but if you do purchase tropical milkweed, it
would probably be best to remove any fertilizer granuals on the pot's
surface and give the soil a good drenching.

======================================

abstract excerpt:

"...we investigated the responses of the monarch caterpillar Danaus
plexippus to natural and experimental variation in N and P concentrations
of three species of milkweed plants (Asclepias syriaca, Asclepias
curassavicaand Asclepias incarnata) that also varied in their foliar toxin
concentrations.

We found that high foliar N concentrations in milkweed were associated with
decreases in the growth rate of D. plexippus larvae. However, such negative
effects of N were only found when larvae were feeding on A. curassavica..."

Tao, L., Berns, A.R., Hunter, M.D. 2014. Why does a good thing become too
much? Interactions between foliar nutrients and toxins determine
performance of an insect herbivore. Functional Ecology, 28(1): 190-196.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2435.12163/full

======================================

Mike Quinn, Austin
_____________________________
Texas Monarch Watch, est. 1993
http://www.texasento.net/dplex.htm

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: NYT: This winter's overwintering monarchs occupy a bare 1.65 acres -- the equivalent of about one and a quarter football fields.
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2014 15:07:23 -0600
Monarch Butterflies Falter Under Extreme Weather

MICHAEL WINESJAN. 29, 2014 - The New York Times

Faltering under extreme weather and vanishing habitats, the yearly winter
migration of monarch butterflies to a handful of forested Mexican mountains
dwindled precipitously in December, continuing what scientists said was an
increasingly alarming decline.

The migrating population has become so small -- perhaps 35 million, experts
guess -- that the prospects of its rebounding to levels seen even five years
ago are diminishing. At worst, scientists said, a migration widely called
one of the world's great natural spectacles is in danger of effectively
vanishing.

The Mexican government and the World Wildlife Fund said at a news
conference on Wednesday that the span of forest inhabited by the
overwintering monarchs shrank last month to a bare 1.65 acres -- the
equivalent of about one and a quarter football fields. Not only was that a
record low, but it was just 56 percent of last year's total, which was
itself a record low.

At their peak in 1996, the monarchs occupied nearly 45 acres of forest.

full text:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/30/us/monarch-butterflies-falter-under-extreme-weather.html?_r=0 

or: http://nyti.ms/1cvCLVX

================================================================

Monarch Watch Blog

Monarch Population Status
Wednesday, January 29th, 2014 at 12:10 pm by Chip Taylor
http://monarchwatch.org/blog/2014/01/monarch-population-status-20/

================================================================

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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