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Updated on Friday, April 29 at 05:31 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Painted Storks,©BirdQuest

29 Apr Elm Sawfly larvae common in Austin but locally? *Abundant* in Denton Co. [Mike Quinn ]
28 Apr Butterfly Walks at Edinburg Scenic Wetlands [Javier Gonzalez ]
14 Apr Seabrooke Leckie's Speaking, Walking and Blacklighting ABF Events - April 23-26 [Mike Quinn ]
13 Apr AUSTIN BUTTERFLY FORUM APRIL 25 MEETING AND MAY 7 WORKSHOP [ABF Announce ]
8 Apr Banded Patch at National Butterfly Center, 4/8/16 [Dan Jones ]
8 Apr US Record Skipper in Bentsen SP [Mike Rickard ]
8 Apr Plebeian Sphinx Moth? [Shirley Wilkerson ]
6 Apr Re: interesting blog/paper on the *rapid* rise of citizen science related publications... ["Robert J. \"Bob\" Nuelle, Jr." ]
5 Apr interesting blog/paper on the *rapid* rise of citizen science related publications... [Mike Quinn ]
16 Mar Fwd: AUSTIN BUTTERFLY FORUM MEETINGS AND PROGRAMS IN MARCH AND APRIL [ABF Announce ]
6 Mar Duskywing Question [Anthony Hewetson ]
4 Mar 2016 Entoblitz will be in Medina Co. (CenTex) - April 22-24 [Mike Quinn ]
2 Mar National Butterfly Center, 3/2/16 [Dan Jones ]
27 Feb Estero Butterfly Walk, Fri Feb 26, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
21 Feb Flying in Hockley County [Anthony Hewetson ]
20 Feb Falcate Orangetips - Comanche, TX [Shirley Wilkerson ]
19 Feb Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk, Fri Feb 19, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
17 Feb CORRECTED AUSTIN BUTTERFLY FORUM FEBRUARY 22, 2016 PROGRAM [ABF Announce ]
15 Feb CHANGE TO AUSTIN BUTTERFLY FORUM PROGRAM ON FEBRUARY 22, 2016 [ABF Announce ]
14 Feb February 22, 2016 Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting [ABF Announce ]
12 Feb Estero Butterfly Walk Friday Feb 12, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
5 Feb Estero Butterfly Walk Fri Feb 5, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
5 Feb Butterflies at Nat. Butterfly Center Jan 30th [Shirley Wilkerson ]
5 Feb Four cases of Zika in Nuevo León - Feb 4 [Mike Quinn ]
4 Feb Re: Consumer Reports rates mosquito repellents... [Tim Jones ]
4 Feb Consumer Reports rates mosquito repellents... [Mike Quinn ]
31 Jan Query [Brush Freeman ]
31 Jan Cyna Blue at National Butterfly Center [Shirley Wilkerson ]
31 Jan Cyna Blue at NBC Saturday [Shirley Wilkerson ]
29 Jan Butterfly Walk Fri Jan 29, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
22 Jan Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 22, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
17 Jan January 25, 2016 Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting and Presentation [ABF Announce ]
15 Jan Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 15, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
8 Jan Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 8, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
22 Dec National Butterfly Center and Santa Ana , 12/22/15 [Dan Jones ]
18 Dec Estero Butterfly Walk - species error - no Delaware Skipper [Rick Snider ]
18 Dec Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
14 Dec Hairstreaks at National Butterfly Center, 12/13/15 [Mike Rickard ]
12 Dec Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
10 Dec CDC issues Watch - Level 1, travel warning for Mexico due to Zika virus - Dec. 10 [Mike Quinn ]
8 Dec Zika arbo-virus apparently spread from Brazil to Nuevo Leon, MX within one year [Mike Quinn ]
7 Dec Fwd: TAMU Insect Collection Open House, 2016 [Mike Quinn ]
4 Dec Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
4 Dec Dwarfed Common Buckeye in Lubbock [Anthony Hewetson ]
27 Nov Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
23 Nov Fwd: Monarch & pollinator conservation workshop @ Hornsby Bend (e. Austin) - Dec. 19 - 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. [Mike Quinn ]
15 Nov November 23, 2015 Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting [ABF Announce ]
14 Nov Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
13 Nov Re: Yellow-tipped Flasher at National Butterfly Certer, 11/11/15 [Tim Jones ]
11 Nov Yellow-tipped Flasher at National Butterfly Certer, 11/11/15 [Dan Jones ]
8 Nov Fwd: Comanche County Butterflies Sat 11-7-15 [Shirley Wilkerson ]
7 Nov Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk Friday Nov 6, 2015 [Rick Snider ]
5 Nov Conchylodes salamisalis 5291 in Kinney Co [Troy Hibbitts ]
5 Nov Re: Identification of cocoon [Mike Rickard ]
4 Nov Re: New Hairstreak Record For The US [Mike Quinn ]
2 Nov New Hairstreak Record For The US [Mike Rickard ]
1 Nov National Butterfly Center Gardens [Shirley Wilkerson ]
31 Oct Pale-banded Crescents [Shirley Wilkerson ]
31 Oct Re: Apache Skipper [Brush Freeman ]
31 Oct Apache Skipper [Brush Freeman ]
31 Oct RFI: Best butterfly at Edinburg? [Shirley Wilkerson ]
29 Oct Texas now has a pollinator conservation plan [Mike Quinn ]
28 Oct Resaca de la Palma State Park, 10/28/15 [Dan Jones ]
27 Oct Minor Monarch flight today Bee County [Robert Benson ]
26 Oct Introduction [Sandy Carter ]
24 Oct Re: Patricia/Monarchs, appears highest winds (>75 mph) mostly hit w. Jalisco, MX [Paul Cherubini ]
24 Oct Re: Patricia/Monarchs, appears highest winds (>75 mph) mostly hit w. Jalisco, MX [Mike Quinn ]
24 Oct 2 new life histories [Berry Nall ]
23 Oct Re: Hurricane Patricia projected to pass thru monarch migration [Mike Quinn ]
23 Oct Hurricane Patricia projected to pass thru monarch migration [Mike Quinn ]
19 Oct sale of N.M. moth name on eBay, current bid: $6,000 [Mike Quinn ]
19 Oct sale of N.M. moth name on eBay, current bid: $6,000 [Mike Quinn ]
19 Oct Re: Monarch migration appearance in West Texas affected by differential precipitation [Brush Freeman ]
19 Oct Re: Balcones Canyonlands NWR - Sunday, 10/18 [Tim Jones ]
18 Oct Monarch migration appearance in West Texas affected by differential precipitation [Steven Schafersman ]
18 Oct Balcones Canyonlands NWR - Sunday, 10/18 [Chuck Sexton ]

Subject: Elm Sawfly larvae common in Austin but locally? *Abundant* in Denton Co.
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 17:27:04 -0500
walking a mile up upstream from Barton Springs Pool, we saw a half dozen
elm sawfly larvae last weekend in Austin.

But Linda reports "Hundreds of them at base of these 2 trees that have
peeling bark. Leaves appear to be small but mostly eaten so hard to tell!
Denton County."


https://www.facebook.com/entomike/posts/10208045949738036?comment_id=10208046443510380¬if_t=feed_comment¬if_id=1461968042800603 

shorter: http://bit.ly/21kcFwa


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=752746304862272&set=p.752746304862272&type=3&theater 

shorter: http://bit.ly/23ePItG

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Elm Sawfly - Cimbex americana - BugGuide Page
http://bugguide.net/node/view/37878

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Butterfly Walks at Edinburg Scenic Wetlands
From: Javier Gonzalez <javsterkayak7 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 15:45:14 -0500
Hello butterflyers,

Butterfly walks are coming back to the Edinburg Scenic Wetlands (Edinburg,
Hidalgo co.) beginning next week (5/3)! Walks will go on every Tuesday from
10:00am-11:30am through the summer.

The EWBC gardens are looking good for the opening walk next week with a
nice variety of nectar plants starting to bloom! Butterfly diversity is on
the rise as well!

The EWBC gardens and trails (3.5 acres) are easy to get around in with very
little walking involved. In the garden you'll find a great diversity of
native host and nectar plants that attract a growing diversity of butterfly
species. This is a great place to get some inspiration if you plan to build
a butterfly garden at your home. We lend binoculars (with a valid driver's
license) that focus close enough to get good looks at the butterflies we'll
encounter.

Butterfly Walks are free with paid admission to the park: $3 adults and $2
seniors and students.

We are excited about the walks and we're looking forward to seeing what we
find in the gardens this Spring/Summer.

Edinburg Scenic Wetlands & WBC (956)381-9922
Edinburg, Hidalgo county
Naturalist Educator
Javi Gonzalez

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Seabrooke Leckie's Speaking, Walking and Blacklighting ABF Events - April 23-26
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Apr 2016 16:43:42 -0500
The Austin Butterfly Forum is pleased to welcome Seabrooke Leckie to Austin
(from Perth, Ontario) for a series of events including her speaking to our
group on her experiences with the creation of the Peterson Field Guide to
Moths of Northeastern North America, from idea to contract to publication.
She will also offer numerous moth identification tips she learned through
experience.

*Behind the Scenes of the Peterson Moth Guides* by Seabrooke Leckie - Apr.
25, 2016, ABF meeting at Zilker Botanical Gardens, 2220 Barton Springs Rd.
http://austinbutterflies.org/calendar.html

*Saturday* -  23 APR

evening blacklighting at Austin Nature & Science Center, at 7:30 -9:30 pm
(park under the MoPac overpass at 2389 Stratford Drive)
this event will be open everyone for free.
bring a flashlight

The following events free and open to ABF members.
non-members can attend Seabrooke's Monday night program for $10 (or join
ABF for $20 per household and attend all activities!)

*Sunday *-  24 APR

morning walk at Austin Nature & Science Center starting at 9 am (park under
the MoPac overpass at 2389 Stratford Drive)
lunch at The Shady Grove, 1624 Barton Springs Rd
afternoon walk at Brackenridge Field Lab (BFL) 2907 Lake Austin Blvd and/or
tour of the UT insect Collection 3001 Lake Austin Blvd
dinner at Maudie's Tex-Mex Restaurant - 2608 W 7th St, Austin, TX (walking
distance from BFL)
evening blacklight at BFL - Bring a flashlight. We hope to set up lights
near the BFL classrooms and another set down by the river.  (BFL activities
also open to BFL/UT Volunteers)

*Monday *-  25 APR

morning walk at Barton Creek Greenbelt, (Barton Springs Pool trail head)
starting at 9 am.
lunch at Chuy's Tex-Mex 1728 Barton Springs Rd (or Green Mesquite BBQ 1400
Barton Springs Rd)
afternoon walk at Barton Creek Greenbelt (Hwy 360 entrance)
evening ABF Program at Zilker: Behind the Scenes of the Peterson Moth
Guides. Doors open ~6:30 pm. http://austinbutterflies.org/calendar.html

*Tuesday *-  26 APR

morning walk at LBJWC, meet in the central courtyard at 9 am (LBJWC
entrance fees apply)
+Note, Seabrooke will have to leave at 11 am to catch her plane


Thanks,

Mike Quinn, vice president
Austin Butterfly Forum
entomike AT gmail.com
512-577-0250 - cell (call or text)
(I'll be on the road all next week, but you should be able to reach me
primarily via my cell number)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: AUSTIN BUTTERFLY FORUM APRIL 25 MEETING AND MAY 7 WORKSHOP
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 Apr 2016 07:37:17 -0500
*Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting*



*Behind the Scenes of the Peterson Moth Guides *

*by Seabrooke Leckie *

*Monday, April 25, 2016 at 7:00 p.m.*


How many field guides do you own?  Have you ever wondered what goes into
making one? Seabrooke Leckie will share her experiences with the creation
of the Peterson Field Guide to Moths of Northeastern North America, from
idea to contract to publication, and compare the unique challenges
presented by the follow-up guide to moths of the southeast. She'll also
offer tips, drawn from lessons learned while working on the books, on how
to improve your expertise on moth identification
(or any other group).

Seabrooke Leckie is a freelance biologist and writer, co-author of the
Peterson Field Guide to Moths of Northeastern North America. She lives in
eastern Ontario, Canada, at a country house where she can enjoy nature just
by stepping into her backyard. Her current undertakings include a new
Peterson moth guide for the southeast (target release date: late 2017),
pursuing publication of her novels and a toddler. This program is free for
Austin Butterfly Forum members, but there is a *$10 admission for
non-members**.*



*How to Know and Grow Austin Butterflies Workshop*

*Zilker Botanical Garden Center*


*Saturday, May 7, 2016 10 am to 4 pm*

Learning to identify common butterflies of our area is only one aspect of
the Austin Butterfly Forum’s Annual Butterfly Workshop, held from 10:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Saturday, May 7 at the Zilker Botanical Garden Center.
Topics will cover caterpillar food plants, how to raise caterpillars, watch
metamorphosis at home, and strategies for caterpillar survival and
identification, as well as books and resources about this rapidly growing
hobby. The workshop will include a light lunch and a walk to identify
butterflies in the Zilker Botanical Garden. Participants will be given
plants to take home to begin attracting butterflies to their own gardens.

To register, please contact Jeff Taylor at 512-255-0368 or
kscjtaylor AT prodigy.net .

Fee for the workshop is *$35.00* with a *light lunch provided*.

*Membership*

All of our normal events are free and open to the public, but you may want
to become a member of the Austin Butterfly Forum to help support us and our
events. We also treat members to some extra goodies, such as reduced
admission to special programs that have a fee and discounts on purchases
made at meetings. Membership is $20 annually per household, payable during
meetings or by mail to Doris Hill, ABF Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin,
TX 78723.



For more information, please visit our website: austinbutterflies.org.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Banded Patch at National Butterfly Center, 4/8/16
From: Dan Jones <00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2016 21:49:03 -0400
A Banded Patch was among 57 species of butterflies seen today at the National 
Butterfly Center. Photos and list are on my blog. 



http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2016/04/banded-patch-at-nbc-4816.html


Dan Jones, Weslaco, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: US Record Skipper in Bentsen SP
From: Mike Rickard <mikearickard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2016 10:32:20 -0500
A Nikko Skipper (Niconiades nikko) was found by John Rosford on 4/06/16,
near the Visitor Center of Bentsen SP in Mission.  John was shooting video
at the time and was able to get 90 seconds of the skipper before it flew.
Subsequent searching that day and on 4/07/16 have failed to relocate it.
Nikko is a familiar skipper in NE Mexico and southward.

Mike Rickard
Mission, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Plebeian Sphinx Moth?
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2016 00:34:04 -0500
Is this correct?  Kurten TX 4-7-16

http://www.bluemelon.com/caramia/moths#page-0

Thanks,
Shirley Wilkerson
Kurten, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: interesting blog/paper on the *rapid* rise of citizen science related publications...
From: "Robert J. \"Bob\" Nuelle, Jr." <bob.nuelle.jr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2016 10:05:49 -0500
We have been in this movement for a while now. Professionally mentored Citizen 
Science is extremely important. This is the future - along with crowd funding 
for scientific research - Investigate thsi site http://www.experiment.com 

Our successful project: 
(https://experiment.com/projects/how-has-a-hemileuca-moth-evolved-to-live-in-a-unique-coastal-texas-ecosystem) 


About Citizen Science:
I speak from my own personal experience because, even though my son Robert and 
I are now Research Associates at Sam Houston State University, our 11 year 
research project into the coastal population of Hemileuca in Texas and our 
research efforts since December 2005 were initially conducted independent of 
our recent appointment at SHSU. The association with SHSU helped us to finish 
the project, and that is the mentoring part that is so important. 


We have actually published 2 papers in peer reviewed scientific journals and 
these papers have been well received. In order for Citizen Science to be 
valuable there must be oversight and assistance provided from credentialed 
individual or mentors. We had the assistance of several amazing professionals 
(Dr. Will Godwin, Dr., Richard Peigler, among many - see our acknowledgements 
in teh linked published articles.) Citizen Science social media inspired 
mega-projects like iNaturalist (http://www.inaturalist.org) will be the way 
that science expands in the face of a scarcity of funds and de-emphasis on 
funding natural history collections. 


We believe that our contributions have enormous value and we continue to 
tirelessly work on active research. We are working to help preserve and build 
Natural History collections, however, we can. The future looks bright for those 
of us in science -- building a strong mentoring relationship with intelligent 
people (Dr. Peigler at Incarnate Word, Dr. Godwin & Jerry Cook at SHSU - John 
Karges at TNC and of course Ben Hutchins, Cliff Shackleford, Jason Singhurst et 
al at TPWD) leads to research opportunities - access to research areas and if 
the individuals are committed and well mentored - valuable science. But IT MUST 
BE PUBLISHED in a peer reviewed journal and enter the mainstream according to 
the accepted and time honored processes established by Academics. 


Our latest Efforts:

Biogeography of a disjunct population of Hemileuca peigleri (Lepidoptera: 
Saturniidae) in the coastal bend of Texas 

http://www.entomoljournal.com/archives/2016/vol4issue1/PartH/4-1-27.pdf

Practical advice on the rearing of Saturniid caterpillars with notes on 
specimen preservation and parasitoid research 

http://www.entomoljournal.com/vol3Issue4/pdf/3-1-49.1.pdf

iNaturalist Projects

Davis Mountains - Mount Livermore (Long Term Distributional Study - 203 Species 
observed) 

http://www.inaturalist.org/projects/livermore-ranch

Powderhorn Ranch Conservation Area (Long Term Distributional Study- 90 Species 
observed) 

http://www.inaturalist.org/projects/powderhorn-ranch-conservation-project

Sincerely,

Robert J./ "Bob" Nuelle, Jr. AICEZS
Research Associate Sam Houston State Natural History Collections
Curator East Texas Natural History Collection

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: interesting blog/paper on the *rapid* rise of citizen science related publications...
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2016 09:12:09 -0500
*Examining new trends in citizen science*
February 2, 2016 by Jennifer Grigg, Plos Blogs
[image: Examining new trends in citizen science]
Figure showing the growth of published peer reviewed articles on citizen
science, from 1997 to 2014. Figure from Follet and Strezov, PLOS ONE.


In total, 1127 unique articles were reviewed, from these 239 were excluded
for not being directly related to citizen science (as above).

Follet and Strezov reported that the first citizen science article was
published in 1997. In the years following, few articles were published
until 2007 during which 6 papers were presented at the Ecological Society
of America Meeting. After this, the number of peer-reviewed citizen science
articles increased substantially.

The most widely published topic where citizen science contributed to the
project was biology, with 72% of articles falling into this category.
Biology-related citizen science articles also experienced a rapid growth in
the number of publications, at a faster rate than all other scientific
fields. The most common objectives among the biology-related articles was
to assess the diversity and distribution of species, in particular birds.

The findings of Follet and Strezov's study is supported by the results of a
recent meta-analysis published in *PLOS ONE*, which identified biology,
conservation and ecology as the primary fields utilising citizen science.
The study also reported the highest scientific output is generated in the
fields of ornithology, astronomy, meteorology and microbiology.

A caveat of publishing research generated in part from citizen scientists
is that many of these volunteers received no formal training, bringing the
quality and reliability of the data into question. However, these issues
can be addressed. Researchers can design standardised monitoring protocols
to identify unreliable data, or prevent the collection of poor quality
data, by using tools such as data entry forms with automated error checking
capabilities. In their study Follet and Strezov found that an increasing
number of publications were centred on addressing the methodologies and
validation techniques researchers can use to detect errors in data and
reduce the occurrence of these errors and eliminate bias.

Overall, the study reported the number of citizen science publications are
increasing. But, according to another recent study
 reviewing
the contributions of citizen science projects, only 12% of bio-diversity
related citizen science projects contributed data that resulted in
peer-reviewed scientific articles. So as it seems, there is still room to
increase the acceptance of citizen science.

*What does the future hold for citizen science?*

Citizen science is becoming ever more popular and is rapidly enabling
non-experts to contribute to the growing field of scientific knowledge. One
of the major benefits of citizen science is that it allows researchers to
utilise resources to analyse large volumes of data quickly, often with
lower financial cost. Furthermore, data can be collected from a wider
demographic of participants over a much larger spatial scale that
researchers would not necessarily have the time or resources to monitor
otherwise.

The growing role of citizen scientists in research is now being recognised
around the globe. In 2015 professional citizen science organisations were
created in Europe, Australia and the United States, and the first Citizen
Science Association Conference was held, with another one is planned for
February 2017. In the US the Crowdsourcing and Citizen Science Act of 2015
was introduced to encourage the use of citizen science within the federal
government. As technology develops and more people have access to the
resources available over the internet, this increases opportunities to
engage wider audiences in a diverse range of projects. Based on current
trends, this should mean that more of the journal articles published in
2016 will celebrate the contribution of the citizen scientists around the
world.
full text: http://phys.org/news/2016-02-trends-citizen-science.html#jCp

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ria Follett. Vladimir Strezovl. 2015. An Analysis of Citizen Science Based
Research: Usage and Publication Patterns, *PLOS ONE*. DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0143687


=====================================

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Fwd: AUSTIN BUTTERFLY FORUM MEETINGS AND PROGRAMS IN MARCH AND APRIL
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 16 Mar 2016 19:48:38 -0500
*AUSTIN BUTTERFLY FORUM MEETING*

*MONDAY, MARCH 28, 7 PM – ZILKER BOTANICAL GARDEN CENTER*


**** **HOW TO GROW NATIVE MILKWEED FOR MONARCH BUTTERFLIES by BARBARA
KELLER-WILLY*

*[image: Inline image 1]*

*Monarch Butterfly on native Swamp Milkweed* *(photo by Val Bugh)*


A former corporate continuous improvement executive with Siemens
Corporation, Barbara Keller-Willy, is now Founder and Director of a Fort
Bend County non-profit, Monarch Gateway. Monarch Gateway seeks to create
contiguous pollinator habitat across the coastal and central flyways of
Texas. She is a lead partner with the Field Museum in Chicago and US Fish
and Wildlife in the creation of a multi-city Urban Monarch Conservation
Plan, President-elect of the land conservancy, "Native Prairies Association
of Texas", and serves in various roles in other community service
organizations.  A certified Texas Master Naturalist with Fort Bend's
Coastal Prairie Texas Master Naturalist chapter, she has long been a
champion of our dwindling coastal prairie habitat and its inhabitants.
Willy is caretaker and owner of a blackland prairie family homestead in
Milam County. She is also committed to educating the children of our
communities because they will be the future caretakers of our land.

Her interest in native prairie restoration led her on an eight-year quest
to develop a propagation method for the finicky native milkweeds of Texas.
Last year Willy donated 7000 native milkweed plants to pollinator projects
across Texas. More than two years ago, in her role as Founder and Director
of Monarch Gateway, she began working with cities in Fort Bend County to
create an Urban Pollinator/Monarch Conservation Model with the hope of
expanding along the central and coastal flyways and other communities in
Texas. City employees from surrounding municipalities, especially Sugar
Land, helped develop a plan that would deliver meaningful results and be
sustainable long-term.

**** This program is free for Austin Butterfly Forum members, but there is
a $5 admission fee for non-member*



*UPCOMING BUTTERFLY FORUM MEETINGS AND OTHER EVENTS*


*APRIL 22-24, 2016: THE TEXAS POLLINATOR POW-WOW *

The Texas Pollinator Pow-Wow, a pollinator conservation conference for
Texas and beyond, will be held at the Museum of Texas Tech University, in
Lubbock, Texas, and the Tahoka Lake Pasture. For more information regarding
speakers, fees, etc., please see the Pollinator Pow-Wow 2016 website at
www.texaspollinatorpowwow.org

*APRIL 25, 2016: AUSTIN BUTTERFLY FORUM MEETING AND PROGRAM*

***** BEHIND THE SCENES OF THE PETERSON MOTH GUIDES by SEABROOKE LECKIE *

*[image: Inline image 2]*


How many field guides do you own? Have you ever wondered what goes into
making one?  Seabrooke Leckie will share her experiences with the creation
of the Peterson Field Guide to Moths of Northeastern North America, from
idea to contract to publication, and will compare the unique challenges
presented by the follow-up guide to moths of the southeast.  She'll also
offer tips drawn from lessons learned while working on the books and on how
to improve your expertise on moth identification (or any other group).



Seabrooke Leckie is a freelance biologist and writer and co-author of the
Peterson Field Guide to Moths of Northeastern North America. She lives in
eastern Ontario, Canada, at a country house where she can enjoy nature just
by stepping into her backyard. Her current undertakings include finishing a
new Peterson moth guide for the southeast (target release date: late 2017),
pursuing publication of her novels, and keeping up with a toddler.

***** This special program is free for Austin Butterfly Forum members, but
there is a $10 admission fee for non-members.*

------------------------------

*MEMBERSHIP*

All of our regular events are free and open to the public, but you may want
to become a member of the Austin Butterfly Forum to help support us and our
events. We also treat members to some extra goodies, such as reduced
admission to special programs that have a fee and discounts on purchases
made at meetings. Membership is $20 annually per household, payable during
meetings or by mail to Doris Hill, ABF Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin,
TX 78723.

For more information, please visit our website: www.austinbutterflies.org

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Duskywing Question
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 6 Mar 2016 16:56:51 -0600
Greetings All:

I photographed a duskywing at Sundown City Park, Hockley County, early this
afternoon and am at a bit of a loss regarding an identification.  Most
duskywings flying this early in my area are Sleepy Duskywings which this is
not.  It most resembles, to my eye, Rocky Mountain Duskywing - which would
be both out of range and early.

If anybody wants to take a whack at this identification, e-mail me at
fattonybirds AT gmail.com and I will send my best photograph.

Thanks, in advance, for any help.

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: 2016 Entoblitz will be in Medina Co. (CenTex) - April 22-24
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Mar 2016 14:10:46 -0600
This year's Texas Ento-Blitz will be held just w. of San Antonio, TX (nr.
Hondo, Medina Co.) - April 22nd-24th

Entoblitz 2016 Planning Page
http://entoblitz.tamu.edu/2016/index.php

Eagle Bluff Ranch is a private piece of land in Medina County owned by Dr.
William Calvert who has graciously allowed us to collect invertebrates on
it.

There are 2 cabins on the property with the main one (see map below) acting
as our central meeting location. This cabin and the one by the river are
also where we suggest people camp (outside the cabins only).

Entoblitz 2016 - one page PDF flyer
http://entoblitz.tamu.edu/2016/2016%20Flyer.pdf

Lodging: primitive camping on-site (two toilets) – bring your own tents or
book a hotel reservation in near-by Hondo or Bandera (suggestions on
website)

Supplies and food: you’re on your own except for Sat. night dinner and Sun.
morning breakfast – included for a fee (TBD). Campfires can be made and
please bring out what you bring in.

RSVP:

We need to know who is going and how many to expect, so please RSVP by
e-mailing Derek A. Woller (asilid AT gmail.com) with:

1) Full names of all in your party
2) Affiliation (if applicable: e.g. TAMU)
3) If you’re interested in the planned dinner/breakfast (not a full
commitment, just gauging interest to
    decide pricing)

Organizers:

-The Texas A&M University Insect Collection (TAMUIC): Ed Riley
-TAMU Entomology Graduate Student Organization (EGSO): Derek A. Woller
-TAMU Undergraduate Entomology Student Organization (UESO): Shelby
Kilpatrick and Ryan Selking


Texas Entoblitz Homepage
http://entoblitz.tamu.edu/

==========================================

Mike Quinn, Austin

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: National Butterfly Center, 3/2/16
From: Dan Jones <00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Wed, 2 Mar 2016 22:54:55 -0500
Lots of butterflies at the National Butterfly Center today including Banded 
Peacock, two Glazed Pellicias and at least three Double-dotted Skippers. Photos 
and list are on my blog. 
http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2016/03/national-butterfly-center-3216.html 



Dan Jones, Weslaco

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk, Fri Feb 26, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 27 Feb 2016 14:09:40 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Feb 26, 2016

In the low 70s, mostly sun, and calm, very nice weather for butterflies.

14 participants started and saw a total of 46 species just before and
during the walk.

Mimosa Yellow was found for the first time this winter.

Thanks to Mike Rickard, Ginny Musgrave, and Dave Elder who helped locate,
identify, and show butterflies to participants.

Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor
Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Great Southern White  Ascia monuste
Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Mimosa Yellow  Eurema nise
Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Reakirt's Blue  Hemiargus isola
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Bordered Patch  Chlosyne lacinia
Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana
Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
American Lady  Vanessa virginiensis
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Monarch  Danaus plexippus
Queen  Danaus gilippus
White-striped Longtail  Chioides catillus
Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Mournful Duskywing  Erynnis tristis
Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Turk's-cap White-Skipper  Heliopetes macaira
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala
Ocola Skipper  Panoquina ocola

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30
Plant walks are Thursdays at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Flying in Hockley County
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Feb 2016 12:59:01 -0600
Greetings All:

With incredibly warm weather we are seeing a fair amount of early blooming
wildlfowers and attendant butterflies.

I am not super with wildflowers but blooming wildflowers I saw in Hockley
County yesterday included Henbit (a mint), Wild Geranium, Dandelion, a
mustard with small yellow flowers, a mustard with small white flowers, and
some pincushion flower at an abandoned homestead.  Abandoned lilacs at
homesteads appear to be one, maybe two, weeks from blooming.

Butterflies seen in Hockley County yesterday - with about 75 miles of road
covered - included almost a dozen Checkered Whites, more than a dozen
Orange Sulphurs, more than a dozen Dainty Sulphurs, two Reakirt's Blues,
one very worn Variegated Fritillary, and one very fresh American Lady.
This is quite a lot of butterfly activity for so early in the year.

Anthony 'Fat Tony' Hewetson; Lubbock

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Falcate Orangetips - Comanche, TX
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Feb 2016 22:52:09 -0600
They were flying all over our farm in Comanche, TX today.

also:

Sleepy Orange
Orange Sulphur
American Lady
Common/White Checkered-Skipper
Black Swallowtail
Red Admiral


Shirley Wilkerson

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk, Fri Feb 19, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2016 18:52:22 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Feb 19, 2016

80 degrees, sun, and fairly strong wind from the south that made it
difficult at times to get looks and photos of butterflies on mistflowers
waving in the wind.

12 participants found 40 species just before and during the walk, the
highest species count so far for this winter.

Highlights were Silver-banded Hairstreak, White-patched Skipper, and Ocola
Skipper.

We did not find the Guava Skipper, Black Swallowtail, Olive-clouded
Skipper, Mournful Duskywing, and Texan Crescent seen in the past week.

Thanks to Mike Rickard, Ginny Musgrave, and Dave Elder who helped locate,
identify, and show butterflies to participants.

Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Great Southern White  Ascia monuste
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Pearl Crescent  Phyciodes tharos
Question Mark  Polygonia interrogationis
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Sachem  Atalopedes campestris
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala
Ocola Skipper  Panoquina ocola

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30
Plant walks are Thursdays at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: CORRECTED AUSTIN BUTTERFLY FORUM FEBRUARY 22, 2016 PROGRAM
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2016 09:15:30 -0600
*Corrected Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting Program*



*Monday, February 22, 2016 7 PM – Zilker Botanical Garden Center*




*Giant Skippers:  Fascinating Butterflies - presented by Bill Dempwolf *
Texas is in the middle of the world-wide range for Giant Skippers, which
range from Costa Rica in the south to North Dakota in the north.  Bill
Dempwolf will discuss the fascinating life of Giant Skippers.  Mounted
specimens and yucca roots with immatures forming tents will be available
for examination.

Bill Dempwolf is an engineer by education and an enthusiastic amateur
lepidopterist.  He first became interested in butterflies as a youth, due
to his father's interest.  School and starting a career interfered with
butterflies until about 10 years ago.  Over the past 10 years Bill has
taken many butterfly trips, including to Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, and
Kentucky, as well as yearly trips to the Rio Grande Valley.

Thank you for continuing to help us to get the word out.



*The Austin Butterfly Forum meets at **Zilker Botanical Garden Center*
* at 7:00 pm on the 4th Monday of every
month* *except
for December*. Most meetings are free and open to the public. Each meeting
features an educational program, but we like to socialize a bit beforehand.
Sometimes members will bring caterpillars or collections for display, and
sometimes we have special opportunities such as plant giveaways. The
meetings are also a good place to hear special announcements and learn
about new events.  Everyone interested in butterflies and other
invertebrates is welcome! Please come join us!



*Membership*

All of our normal events are free and open to the public, but you may want
to become a member of the Austin Butterfly Forum to help support us and our
events. We also treat members to some extra goodies, such as reduced
admission to special programs that have a fee and discounts on purchases
made at meetings. Membership is $20 annually per household, payable during
meetings or by mail to Doris Hill, ABF Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin,
TX 78723.


*For more information, please visit our website: austinbutterflies.org
*

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: CHANGE TO AUSTIN BUTTERFLY FORUM PROGRAM ON FEBRUARY 22, 2016
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Feb 2016 20:43:29 -0600
There has been a change to the program on February 22, 2016.  We hope to
get the specific details to you as soon as possible.  If you haven't
publicized the event, please wait until we have provided you with the
correct information.

We apologize for the inconvenience and thank you for your assistance in
this matter.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: February 22, 2016 Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Feb 2016 18:21:24 -0600
*Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting*



*Monday, February 22, 7 PM – Zilker Botanical Garden Center*



*Coevolution of Plants and the Pollinating Beetles of Texas* - *Presented
by Mike Quinn*



Mike Quinn will discuss the evolution of plants and the association of
flower shapes to insect pollination while focusing on beetles which
represent the greatest diversity among all pollinators.

Former Austin Butterfly Forum President Mike Quinn earned degrees in
Entomology and Wildlife from Texas A&M University. He has worked on
ornithological, botanical and entomological projects for local, state and
federal agencies and was the first statewide invertebrate biologist for
Texas Parks and Wildlife. He is currently photographing the beetles of
Texas.

Thank you for continuing to help us to get the word out.



*The Austin Butterfly Forum meets at **Zilker Botanical Garden Center*
* at 7:00 pm on the 4th Monday of every
month* *except
for December*. Most meetings are free and open to the public. Each meeting
features an educational program, but we like to socialize a bit beforehand.
Sometimes members will bring caterpillars or collections for display, and
sometimes we have special opportunities such as plant giveaways. The
meetings are also a good place to hear special announcements and learn
about new events.  Everyone interested in butterflies and other
invertebrates is welcome! Please come join us!



*Membership*

All of our normal events are free and open to the public, but you may want
to become a member of the Austin Butterfly Forum to help support us and our
events. We also treat members to some extra goodies, such as reduced
admission to special programs that have a fee and discounts on purchases
made at meetings. Membership is $20 annually per household, payable during
meetings or by mail to Doris Hill, ABF Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin,
TX 78723.



For more information, please visit our website: austinbutterflies.org.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Friday Feb 12, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 18:59:40 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Feb 12, 2016

80 degrees, full sun, and light breeze from the south, perfect. 22
participants found 34 species just before and during the walk.

A lucky few found a Guava Skipper in the parking lot on azureum just before
the walk. Other highlights were Silver-banded Hairstreak, White-patched
Skipper, and a Mexican Bluewing opening and closing its wings on a tree
trunk far away from the bait station.

Thanks to those who took photos that helped greatly with some
identifications. Thanks also to Mike Rickard, Ginny Musgrave, and Dave
Elder who helped locate, identify, and show butterflies to participants.

Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Guava Skipper  Phocides polybius
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Sachem  Atalopedes campestris
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30
Plant walks are Thursdays at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Fri Feb 5, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 20:31:21 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Feb 5, 2016

The temperature was in the 60s with total cloud and 10 mph SE wind. 6 of us
braved the non butterfly friendly weather and headed out to see what we
could find. We were surprised to see 13 species.

There were 17 Red Admirals on the butterfly food around noon just before
the heavy cloud rolled in. During the walk the food also attracted a
Question Mark and Mexican Bluewing.

Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Question Mark  Polygonia interrogationis
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30
Plant walks are Thursdays at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Butterflies at Nat. Butterfly Center Jan 30th
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 18:46:23 -0600
Other butterflies (other than the Cyna Blue) seen at the NBC on Jan 30th
 can be seen here  (saw about 22 species and photographed about 20):

http://www.bluemelon.com/caramia/januarylrgvbutterflies2016#page-0

Shirley Wilkerson
Bryan, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Four cases of Zika in Nuevo León - Feb 4
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 09:02:43 -0600
Cuatro casos de zika en Nuevo León, confirman autoridades
04 / Febrero / 2016

El Secretario de Salud en Nuevo León, Manuel de la O Cavazos, confirmó
cuatro casos de zika en la entidad, pero dijo que durante la temporada de
calor, que ya se aproxima, el número de pacientes podría dispararse.

The Secretary of Health in Nuevo Leon, Manuel de la O Cavazos confirmed
four cases of Zika in the state, but said that during the hot season, which
is approaching, the number of patients could skyrocket.

full:

http://www.imagen.com.mx/cuatro-casos-de-zika-en-nuevo-leon-confirman-autoridades 


================================================

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Consumer Reports rates mosquito repellents...
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 19:03:52 -0600
Perhaps we should be broadcasting Mosquito Dunks in populated areas for awhile.
http://www.planetnatural.com/product/mosquito-dunks/ 
 


Looks like Texas is in for another drought. 



> On Feb 4, 2016, at 5:53 PM, Mike Quinn  wrote:
> 
> Consumer Reports is releasing free to the public its exclusive test results 
and Ratings of mosquito repellents—including those that will protect you best 
against Aedes mosquitoes, the type that carry Zika. 

> 
> Discussion and test results:
> 
> 
http://www.consumerreports.org/insect-repellents/mosquito-repellents-that-best-protect-against-zika 
 

> 
> or: http://bit.ly/1R7AWmz 
> 
> =========================================
> 
> One Page PDF of Test Results
> 
> 
http://www.consumerreports.org/content/dam/cro/news_articles/health/Consumer-Reports-Insect-Repellent-Ratings-February-2016.pdf 
 

> 
> or: http://bit.ly/1NT3YQd 
> 
> =========================================
> 
> Mike Quinn, Austin
> ________________
> Texas Entomology
> http://texasento.net 
> ======================================
> To unsubscribe, send the message SIGNOFF TX-BUTTERFLY to
> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
> To change to the daily digest, send the message SET TX-BUTTERFLY DIGEST to
> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Consumer Reports rates mosquito repellents...
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 17:53:40 -0600
Consumer Reports is releasing free to the public its exclusive test results
and Ratings of mosquito repellents—including those that will protect you
best against Aedes mosquitoes, the type that carry Zika.

Discussion and test results:


http://www.consumerreports.org/insect-repellents/mosquito-repellents-that-best-protect-against-zika 


or: http://bit.ly/1R7AWmz

=========================================

One Page PDF of Test Results


http://www.consumerreports.org/content/dam/cro/news_articles/health/Consumer-Reports-Insect-Repellent-Ratings-February-2016.pdf 


or: http://bit.ly/1NT3YQd

=========================================

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Query
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 22:22:22 -0600
.
.Did this forum die on the vine or am I just somehow disengaged?

**********************************************************************
Brush Freeman
Senior Wildlife Biologist/Partner. Bio-Spatial Services Inc, TXESA,
Independent consulting.
www.biospatialservices.com 
503-551-5150 Cell
120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Cyna Blue at National Butterfly Center
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 09:43:03 -0600
Here is a photo of one from yesterday afternoon at the NBC in south Texas.

Shirley Wilkerson
visiting the LRGV

http://www.bluemelon.com/caramia/recentimages#photo-5733189/T1200800

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Cyna Blue at NBC Saturday
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 08:33:43 -0600
Had one yesterday (sort if in the middle of the gardens) nearest the
river.  Will post a photo shortly.

Shirley Wilkerson
Visiting McAllen

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Butterfly Walk Fri Jan 29, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 2016 19:05:58 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Jan 29, 2016

The weather was great, temperature in the mid 70s with almost full sun and
light wind from the SE.  21 participated, with many experienced butterfly
enthusiasts. We recorded 33 species during the 2 h walk.

Highlights were: Turk's Cap White Skipper and Red-bordered Metalmark both
firsts for our winter outings, several Silver-banded Hairstreaks, a
Soldier, and a Mexican Bluewing at the butterfly station.

Thanks to Mike and Ginny and Jan for their assistance with finding new
species and helping with identifications.

Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Dainty Sulphur  Nathalis iole
Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Turk's-cap White-Skipper  Heliopetes macaira
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30
Plant walks are Thursdays at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 22, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 19:23:22 -0600
 Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Jan 22, 2016

The temperature was in the high 60s with full sun and medium wind from the
NW.  15 of us participated. Even with the cooler temperature 30 species
were reported including those seen before the hike.

There were more butterflies on the wing than in the previous two walks.
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak and Silver-banded Hairstreaks were highights.

The group stopped to admire two male Roseate Skimmer dragonflies.
Thanks to Mike and Ginny for their assistance with identifications.

Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Reakirt's Blue  Hemiargus isola
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30
Plant walks are Thursdays at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: January 25, 2016 Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting and Presentation
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Jan 2016 18:27:04 -0600
Greetings and Happy 2016,



Following is the information for the January 25, 2016 meeting of the Austin
Butterfly Forum.  Thank you for continuing to help us spread the word.



*The Austin Butterfly Forum meets at **Zilker Botanical Garden Center
** at 7:00 pm on the 4th Monday of every
month* *except for December*. Most meetings are free and open to the
public. Each meeting features an educational program, but we like to
socialize a bit beforehand. Sometimes members will bring caterpillars or
collections for display, and sometimes we have special opportunities such
as plant giveaways. The meetings are also a good place to hear special
announcements and learn about new events.  Everyone interested in
butterflies and other invertebrates is welcome! Please come join us!



*Monday, January 25, 7 PM – Zilker Botanical Garden Center*



*Butterfly Farming: Following a Dream (or living a nightmare):*  *a
somewhat lighthearted look at the joys and frustrations of day-to-day
operations of a butterfly farm**.  Presented by Dale Clark*

Feeding thousands of hungry mouths every day is not for the fainthearted.  But,
despite the sometimes seemingly overwhelming odds of hunger, disease,
drought and/or floods, the life of a butterfly farmer can occasionally
unearth some interesting facts about the lives of the native butterflies
and moths flying around Texas.
Fascinated by butterflies and moths since he was a child, Dale Clark turned
a lifelong passion into a livelihood. In 1995 he quit his full-time ‘real
job’ and created Butterflies Unlimited, a butterfly farm south of Dallas,
Texas.  Here he began raising Texas native butterflies to sell to live
butterfly exhibits at zoos across the country, offering more than 50
species. That same year, he co-founded the Dallas County Lepidopterists’
Society.  It is a local organization which allows people of the Dallas-Fort
Worth area who share an interest in butterflies and moths to have an
opportunity to meet and go on monthly field trips. And, as if wrangling
thousands of caterpillars on ‘the ranch’ wasn’t enough, Dale became the
editor of The News of the Lepidopterists' Society.  Established in 1947,
The News is the international magazine of one of the oldest organizations
devoted to the study of butterflies and moths.

*Austin Butterfly Forum Membership*

All of our normal events are free and open to the public, but you may want
to become a member of the Austin Butterfly Forum to help support us and our
events. We also treat members to some extra goodies, such as reduced
admission to special programs that have a fee and discounts on purchases
made at meetings.  Membership is $20 annually per household, payable during
meetings or by mail to:  Doris Hill, ABF Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin,
TX 78723.

For more information, please visit our website: austinbutterflies.org






*Austin Butterfly Forum Membership*

All of our normal events are free and open to the public, but you may want
to become a member of the Austin Butterfly Forum to help support us and our
events. We also treat members to some extra goodies, such as reduced
admission to special programs that have a fee and discounts on purchases
made at meetings. Membership is $20 annually per household, payable during
meetings or by mail to Doris Hill, ABF Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin,
TX 78723.

For more information, please visit our website: austinbutterflies.org

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 15, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 2016 22:22:12 -0600
 Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Jan 15, 201

Perfect weather, hot and sunny with a slight breeze.  16 of us participated
and a total of 26 species were seen during the day.

The Orange-barred Sulphur and Silver-banded Hairstreak were highlights.
Mexican Bluewings were still flying in the afternoon. The last butterfly
seen, after the hike was over, was a Long-tailed Skipper.
Thanks to Mike, Ginny, and Jan for their excellent assistance.

Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Orange-barred Sulphur  Phoebis philea
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30
Plant walks are Thursdays at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 8, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Jan 2016 19:27:57 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Jan 8, 2016
The weather was warm with some sun to start with then cloudy. 17 of us
participated and a total of 24 species were reported for the day, before
and during the hike.

Numbers were down with singles of most species. The Orange-barred Sulphur
was a fly-over before the hike started. Mexican Bluewings were the most
numerous butterfly with 10 observed flying near the bait at the warmest
time of the day, around noon. They had disappeared by hike time.

Thanks to Mike, Ginny, and Jan for helping us find many of the species and
assisting with the hike.

Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Orange-barred Sulphur  Phoebis philea
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer
Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: National Butterfly Center and Santa Ana , 12/22/15
From: Dan Jones <00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Tue, 22 Dec 2015 23:06:45 -0500
Today there was a Blue-eyed Sailor and Red Rim at Santa Ana and an amazing 
eleven species of hairstreaks at the National Butterfly Center including Telea, 
Ruddy and Strophius Hairstreaks and Vicroy's Minstreak. Photos are on my blog. 




http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2015/12/wild-day-part-ii-hairstreak-o-mania.html 




http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2015/12/wild-day-part-i-santa-ana-nwr-122215.html 



Dan Jones, Weslaco, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk - species error - no Delaware Skipper
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Dec 2015 22:38:59 -0600
No Delaware Skipper. 31 species.
(I'm awake now, not in Ontario)

Thanks Mike Rickard for catching the error.

Apologies
Rick Snider

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Dec 2015 20:55:16 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Dec 18, 2015
It was cool with sun, cloud, and a touch of breeze from the north.

Nine of us walked about and saw 32 species. A few were seen before the hike
began.

The Two-barred Flasher was enjoyed by all. The Mexican Bluewings were only
flying in the sunniest warmest time, at noon before the walk.

Thanks again to Mike and Ginny for helping us find many of the species and
assisting with the hike.

Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii
Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Reakirt's Blue  Hemiargus isola
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
American Lady  Vanessa virginiensis
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator
Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Delaware Skipper  Anatrytone logan
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30

Plant walks are Thursdays at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Hairstreaks at National Butterfly Center, 12/13/15
From: Mike Rickard <mikearickard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 2015 08:55:46 -0600
On Sunday afternoon, Dec. 13, I found a Black Hairstreak (Ocaria ocrisia)
at the National Butterfly Center in Mission.  This was a Lifer for me.  I
also photographed a Pearly-gray Hairstreak (Strephonota tephraeus), and a
probable Aquamarine Hairstreak (Oenomaus ortygnus) was photographed by a
friend - photos not definitive.  Altogether there were 10 hairstreak
species among the 50+ species on the wing.  The previous day had seen
overcast skies with very strong southerly winds, giving way Sunday morning
to north winds and clearing skies.

Mike Rickard
Mission TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Dec 2015 15:30:41 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Dec 11, 2015

The day was hot, mostly clouds with only a few sunny breaks, and very windy
out of the SE. On the walk and earlier in the day we saw a total of 36
species.

Highlights were Malachite, Guava Skipper, Red-bordered Pixie, and
Two-barred Flasher.

We were all hoping that the Spot-celled Sister from yesterday would
reappear but no luck.

Thanks to Mike and Ginny for helping us find many of the species and
assisting with the hike.

Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Tailed Orange  Eurema proterpia
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Red-bordered Pixie  Melanis pixe
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Malachite  Siproeta stelenes
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Hackberry EmperorAsterocampa celtis
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Monarch  Danaus plexippus
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Guava Skipper  Phocides polybius
Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator
Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso
Mournful Duskywing  Erynnis tristis
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala
Brazilian Skipper  Calpodes ethlius
Ocola Skipper  Panoquina ocola

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30

Plant walks are Thursdays at 10AM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: CDC issues Watch - Level 1, travel warning for Mexico due to Zika virus - Dec. 10
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 2015 21:26:26 -0600
FYI, Mike Quinn, Austin

Zika Virus in Mexico
Watch - Level 1, Practice Usual Precautions
What is the current situation?

In November 2015, Mexico reported two locally transmitted cases of Zika
 virus infection. These are the first
cases of Zika virus in Mexico. Local transmission means that mosquitoes in
Mexico have been infected with Zika virus, causing it to spread to humans.

CDC recommends that travelers to Mexico
 protect
themselves from mosquito bites
. The Ministry of Health
of Brazil is concerned about a possible association between the Zika virus
outbreak and increased numbers of babies born with birth defects. For this
reason, pregnant women should take extra precautions to avoid mosquito
bites.
What can travelers do to prevent Zika virus infection?

There is no vaccine or medicine to prevent Zika virus infection. Travelers
can protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites.

Full Text of travel warning:
http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices/watch/zika-virus-mexico

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Zika arbo-virus apparently spread from Brazil to Nuevo Leon, MX within one year
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 8 Dec 2015 10:04:45 -0600
Given it's rate of spread, it's seems likely to be in south Texas by next
year... Mike Quinn, Austin

Zika Virus outbreak in the Americas: data as of Dec 04 per  AT ECDC_Outbreaks
https://twitter.com/thelonevirologi/status/673217004669640704

-------------------

Factsheet for health professionals - European Centre for Disease Prevention
and Control (ECDC)

http://ecdc.europa.eu/en/healthtopics/zika_virus_infection/factsheet-health-professionals/Pages/factsheet_health_professionals.aspx 

OR: http://bit.ly/1NCiXCw

INTRODUCTION

Zika virus disease is a mosquito-borne disease caused by Zika virus (ZIKV)
which causes in general a mild febrile illness with maculo-papular rash.
Aedes mosquitoes are considered as main vectors. Before 2007, viral
circulation and a few outbreaks were documented in tropical Africa and in
some areas in Southeast Asia. Since 2007, several islands of the Pacific
region have experienced outbreaks. In 2015, ZIKV disease outbreaks were
reported in South America for the first time. ZIKV disease is now
considered as an emerging infectious disease.

A significant increase of patients with Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) was
reported during the 2014 outbreak in French Polynesia. A similar increase
along with an unusual increase of congenital microcephaly was observed in
some regions in north eastern Brazil in 2015. Causal relationships are
currently under investigation.

There is no prophylaxis, treatment or vaccine to protect against ZIKV
infection. Therefore, preventive personal measures are recommended to avoid
mosquito bites during the daytime

------------------

Zika virus infection – Mexico

WHO Disease Outbreak News - 3 December 2015

On 26 November 2015, national health authorities in Mexico notified
PAHO/WHO of 3 cases of Zika virus infection, including two autochthonous
cases (residents of Nuevo León and Chiapas)

http://www.who.int/csr/don/03-december-2015-zika-mexico/en/

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Fwd: TAMU Insect Collection Open House, 2016
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 7 Dec 2015 16:03:54 -0600
FYI, Mike

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Edward Riley 
Date: Fri, Dec 4, 2015 at 2:43 PM
Subject: TAMU Insect Collection Open House, 2016
To: TX-ENTO AT listserv.uh.edu


RE: TAMU Insect Collection open house, January 9, 2016

Dear Colleagues:

You are cordially invited to the annual "open house" of the Texas A&M
University Insect Collection to meet with others who share an interest in
the study of Texas insects. This is the 27th consecutive annual meeting,
and we hope to have another excellent gathering this year. Each year our
meeting attracts a diverse group of people - professional and amateur -
with a broad range of interests. There is no formal program, but it will be
a chance to show off new curiosities and catch up on the past year's news
and collecting stories. Please feel free to invite newcomers who share our
interest.

The event will be held on Saturday, January 9th. As in recent years, the
entire day will be spent at the Minnie Belle Heep Building (a.k.a., “*the
Heep Center*

”). 

Starting time will be around 9 to 10 AM.  Meeting areas will be available
on the 2nd floor of the atrium adjacent to the TAMU Insect Collection room
(Room 216). Lunch will be on your own. The atrium meeting areas and the
Texas A&M University Insect Collection will be open for the remainder of
the afternoon.

Parking will be available in lot no. 67 on the east side of the building
and no special permit is required for parking on Saturday.

All collections will be open for browsing as usual. If any of you would
like uninterrupted "quality time" working in the collections, I suggest you
arrive a day early or stay a day late. Please let me know in advance, and I
will make arrangements for collection access on Friday evening and/or the
following Sunday morning.

Spread the word. Hope to see you on January 9th!

Sincerely,
Edward G. Riley
Research Assistant
office: (979) 845-5935
e-mail: *egrchryso AT tamu.edu* 
*Map*

 


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 2015 18:30:49 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Dec 4, 2015



The day started out sunny and 70 but then was mixed sun and clouds for the
walk. We saw 29 species, most on the walk, a few earlier in the day.



Highlights were Lantana Scrub Hairstreak, Potrillo Skipper, and the last
butterfly seen, a Two-barred Flasher, wings flat in the last sun of the
afternoon. We also had a prolonged close look at what we call the signature
butterfly of the Rio Grande Valley, the Mexican Bluewing, basking in sun.
No photo taken can do justice to its beauty.



Thanks to Mike and Ginny for helping us find many of the species and
assisting with the hike.



Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae

Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa

Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii

Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie

Western Pygmy-Blue  Brephidium exile

Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius

Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino

American Snout  Libytheana carinenta

Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae

Bordered Patch  Chlosyne lacinia

Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Queen  Danaus gilippus

Soldier  Danaus eresimus

Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus

Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator

Potrillo Skipper  Cabares potrillo

Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Ocola Skipper  Panoquina ocola



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30

Plant walks will be Thursdays at 10AM starting Dec 10.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Dwarfed Common Buckeye in Lubbock
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 2015 10:32:26 -0600
Greetings All:

I spotted a Common Buckeye at the Lubbock Cemetery yesterday afternoon.
The bug was notable for a couple of reasons.  Firstly, this is a bit late
in the year to encounter one in our region.  Second, it was dwarfed - the
last Common Buckeye I saw in November (at another site) was also dwarfed -
both bugs approximately 2/3rds the size of a typical Common Buckeye.

Anthony 'Fat Tony' Hewetson; Lubbock

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Nov 2015 19:36:23 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Nov 27, 2015



The weather was cloudy, humid, breezy, and warm for our butterfly walk. It
was pretty slow with only 20 species seen in the first hour, then rain
started and the butterflies took cover for the rest of the afternoon.



We did see a Silver-banded Hairstreak and Cassius Blue before the rain and
Mexican Bluewing later in the afternoon. We searched in vain for one of our
park specialties, the Potrillo Skipper, which was seen the two previous
days. Also in the previous few days were Two-barred Flashers, Guava
Skipper, Falcate Skipper (now very worn) and Brazilian Skippers.



A few participants were interested in odes and we looked at Thornbush
Dasher, male Eastern Pondhawk, Rainpool Spreadwings, a probable Familiar
Bluet (stuck to Plumbago but freed by a participant), and a darker than
normal Blue-ringed Dancer.



When the rain started we took shelter in the tram and toured our "Tropical
Zone" looking at a few of the many exotic plants present.



Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta

White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton

Queen  Danaus gilippus

Soldier  Danaus eresimus

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator

Mazans Scallopwing  Staphylus mazans

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30

Plant walks will be Thursdays at 10AM starting Dec 10.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Fwd: Monarch & pollinator conservation workshop @ Hornsby Bend (e. Austin) - Dec. 19 - 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Nov 2015 15:39:32 -0600
Native Prairies Association of Texas is co-hosting a workshop on insect
conservation next month in east Austin.

Similar workshops are apparently planned for future months across Texas...

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Jane F Tillman jtillman AT utexas.edu [NPSOT-Austin-announce] <
NPSOT-Austin-announce-noreply AT yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, Nov 23, 2015 at 12:36 PM
Subject: [NPSOT-Austin-announce] Upcoming Workshop offered by NPAT
To: NPSOT group 

The Native Prairies Association of Texas is doing great work identifying,
saving and restoring prairies across Texas. I hope some of you can attend this
event.

*For those of you not familiar with Hornsby Bend it is in East Austin. If
you are on Hwy 71 going east past the airport, turn left (north) on to FM
973 and go north for about a mile. (If you get to TX 130 you have gone too
far.) Turn left (west) across the road construction into the Austin Water
Center for Environmental Research. You will pass through a guard station
and turn right into the CER parking lot.*

Best wishes for a Happy Thanksgiving.
Jane Tillman

*MONARCH CONSERVATION AND HABITAT RESTORATION*
Hosted by Native Prairies Association of Texas and Monarch Gateway

When: *Saturday December 19*, from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Location: *Center for Environmental Research* at Hornsby Bend, 2210 F.M.
973, Austin 78725
Registration fee: *$15* due at the door (includes lunch)
*RSVP* to: Kirsti Harms at kirsti_harms AT texasprairie.org, 512-296-9160

Topics include:

*Monarch Host Cities Partnership Project:*
How grow and establish healthy milkweed colonies for monarchs
By Barbara Willy, Director of Monarch Gateway

*Our Native Bee Pollinators:*
How to protect and support our native bees, including providing bee boxes
By Michael Warriner, Texas Parks & Wildlife, Wildlife Diversity Program

*Monarch & Pollinator Conservation:*
How to include as part of a 1-d-1 Wildlife Management Exemption Plan
By a Texas Parks & Wildlife biologist

*Conservation Easements: *
A panel discussion on what they are and how they can preserve pollinator
habitat
Melanie Pavlas: Pines & Prairies Land Trust, Executive Director
David Bezanson: The Nature Conservancy of Texas, Land Protection and
Easement Manager
Pat Merkord: Native Prairies Association of Texas, Executive Director

*STAY TUNED in 2016*! More monthly Monarch Workshops are planned throughout
the state.

__._,_.___
__,_._,___

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: November 23, 2015 Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 15 Nov 2015 14:07:21 -0600
Greetings Everyone



Here is the information for our upcoming meeting of the Austin Butterfly
Forum for November 2015. Thank you for helping us to get the word out.



The Austin Butterfly Forum meets at the *Zilker Botanical Garden Center
* *at 7:00 pm on the 4th Monday of every
month* except for December. Most meetings are free and open to the public.
Each meeting features an educational program, but we like to socialize a
bit beforehand. Sometimes members will bring caterpillars or collections
for display, and sometimes we have special opportunities such as plant
giveaways. The meetings are also a good place to hear special announcements
and learn about new events.  Everyone interested in butterflies and other
invertebrates is welcome! Please come join us!



*Monday, November 23, 2015, 7 PM Meeting*: *Austin Butterfly Forum Members’
Show and Tell*

This is a fun meeting that we have every year. Members will have 5-10
minutes to show their favorite photos of the year or to tell about a trip
or butterfly experience. Each presenter is responsible for bringing their
flash drive with photos. A projector and laptop will be available. Members
planning to participate should contact Dan Hardy  prior
to the meeting.





*Austin Butterfly Forum Membership*

All of our normal events are open to the public, but you may want to become
a member of the Austin Butterfly Forum to help support us and our events.
We also treat members to some extra goodies, such as reduced admission to
special programs that have a fee and discounts on purchases made at
meetings. Membership is $20 annually per household, payable during meetings
or by mail to Doris Hill, ABF Treasurer, 1605 Broadmoor, Austin, TX 78723.

For more information, please visit our website: austinbutterflies.org

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Nov 2015 10:14:00 -0500
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Fri Nov 13, 2015



Before the walk we were giving thought to cancelling the butterfly walk
because of the cool cloudy weather. But at the end there were a surprising
32 species seen by the 8 participants.



It was a day for dark skippers, almost all Fawn-spotted, but two Brazilian
Skippers made an appearance, one in the parking lot garden and one at the
Parauque Hall garden. A Purple-washed Skipper was on Crucita along the
maintenance road. It is always nice to see Soldiers at any time but unusual
when Soldiers outnumber Queens as they did today.



We have a good flight of Rainpool Spreadwings at the moment.

Deb Marsh took a great photo of a blue colored Passiflora foetida flower.
This native passion vine, Corona de Cristo, is common in the valley but
less so at Estero.



Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes

Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe

Little Yellow  Eurema lisa

Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa

American Snout  Libytheana carinenta

Bordered Patch  Chlosyne lacinia

White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae

Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes

Monarch  Danaus plexippus

Queen  Danaus gilippus

Soldier  Danaus eresimus

Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Whirlabout  Polites vibex

Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Brazilian Skipper  Calpodes ethlius

Ocola Skipper  Panoquina ocola

Purple-washed Skipper  Panoquina sylvicola



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Yellow-tipped Flasher at National Butterfly Certer, 11/11/15
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Nov 2015 12:44:10 -0600
These are fine shots. Congratulations!
Tim

On Nov 11, 2015, at 9:28 PM, Dan Jones 
<00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU> wrote: 


> The south winds ahead of the approaching front blew up some good stuff today. 
Best butterflies were Yellow-tipped Flasher, White Scrub-Hairstreak, Red Rim, 
Malachite, Silver Emperor, Purple-washed and Violet-banded Skippers. Photos but 
no list are on my blog. 

> 
> 
http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2015/11/yellow-tipped-flasher-at-nbc-111115.html 

> 
> Dan Jones, Weslaco
> 
> 
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Yellow-tipped Flasher at National Butterfly Certer, 11/11/15
From: Dan Jones <00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Wed, 11 Nov 2015 22:28:36 -0500
The south winds ahead of the approaching front blew up some good stuff today. 
Best butterflies were Yellow-tipped Flasher, White Scrub-Hairstreak, Red Rim, 
Malachite, Silver Emperor, Purple-washed and Violet-banded Skippers. Photos but 
no list are on my blog. 




http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2015/11/yellow-tipped-flasher-at-nbc-111115.html 



Dan Jones, Weslaco






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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Fwd: Comanche County Butterflies Sat 11-7-15
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 8 Nov 2015 15:49:56 -0600
Things are winding down in this north Texas county with the rains and
cooler temps.

Desert Checkered-skipper
Common/White Checkered-skipper
Phaon Crescent
Gulf Fritillary
Eufala Skipper
Fiery Skipper
Sachem
Orange Sulphur
Clouded Sulphur
Buckeye
Sleepy Orange
Red Admiral

Shirley Wilkerson
Comanche, TX (usually Bryan)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk Friday Nov 6, 2015
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Nov 2015 19:56:07 -0500
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Nov 6, 2015



While it rained west of us we got lucky and had warm sunny weather for the
whole afternoon outing. About 16 visitors attended, many friends from past
walks. Thanks to Mike Rickard and Ginny Musgrave for their expert help.



We had 30 species during the walk. On Thursday Brazilian Skipper and
Celia's Roadside Skipper were spotted.This morning Nov 7, 3 Two-barred
Flashers, a Guava Skipper, Falcate Skipper and Giant White made a brief
appearance on the White Plumbago in the Trellis Garden.



The list of 38 species includes a few seen the day before the walk and the
morning after.



Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes

Great Southern White  Ascia monuste

Giant White  Ganyra josephina

Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae

Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe

Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside

Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa

Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis

Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis

Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino

Bordered Patch  Chlosyne lacinia

American Lady  Vanessa virginiensis

White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae

Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa

Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton

Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes

Monarch  Danaus plexippus

Queen  Danaus gilippus

Soldier  Danaus eresimus

Guava Skipper  Phocides polybius

Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne

Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator

Falcate Skipper  Spathilepia clonius

Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso

Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus

Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana

Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia

Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia

Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius

Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus

Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus

Whirlabout  Polites vibex

Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho

Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Brazilian Skipper  Calpodes ethlius

Ocola Skipper  Panoquina ocola





Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks at Estero are Fridays at 1:30

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Conchylodes salamisalis 5291 in Kinney Co
From: Troy Hibbitts <alterna2627 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Nov 2015 15:35:20 +0000
This morning I was surprised to see a Blush Conchylodes (C.salamisalis 5291) on 
my building here at Brackett HS in Brackettville.  In 3 years of watching 
moths here, this is the first specimen that I've seen here (having seen the 
species previously in the LRGV).  Cool moth. 


Conchylodes salamisalis, adult, Kinney County, Texas - Conchylodes salamisalis 
- BugGuide.Net 


|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Conchylodes salamisalis, adult, Kinney County, Texas - C...An online resource 
devoted to North American insects, spiders and their kin, offering 
identification, images, and information. | 

|  |
| View on bugguide.net | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |


Troy HibbittsBrackettville, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Identification of cocoon
From: Mike Rickard <mikearickard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Nov 2015 07:24:27 -0600
Dan, yes those are Forbes' Silkmoth cocoons.  They can be found also on
Colima, Brazilian Pepper, and other hosts.
Mike

On Wed, Nov 4, 2015 at 10:52 PM, Dan Hardy  wrote:

> Several cocoons were found on Willow and Ash along Willow Lake at Santa
> Ana.    I've raised Calleta Silkmoths that made cocoons like these it was
> on Cenizo.  There was no Cenizo around.  Are they Rothchild's SilkMoth?
>
>
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/dhh787/CocoonsOnWillowAndAshSantaAnaRefugeNovember12015?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCLTf476g3b2N4QE&feat=directlink 

>
> --Dan Hardy
>

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: New Hairstreak Record For The US
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Nov 2015 10:06:06 -0600
Great bug!

BOA info:
http://butterfliesofamerica.com/michaelus_ira.htm

apparently, not much known about it except that it ranges s. to S.
America...

Mike Quinn, Austin

On Mon, Nov 2, 2015 at 8:19 AM, Mike Rickard  wrote:

> While leading a Texas Butterfly Festival field trip in Harlingen's Hugh
> Ramsey Park yesterday (11/01/15), I photographed a hairstreak I tentatively
> identified as a Shadowed Hairstreak (Michaelus ira).  It was visiting
> Crucita blossoms on the Indigo Trail, and observed by all trip
> participants.  This is the first record of this species for the US.  ID has
> been confirmed by Andy Warren of the McGuire Center.
>
> Mike Rickard
> Mission TX
>

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: New Hairstreak Record For The US
From: Mike Rickard <mikearickard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Nov 2015 08:19:25 -0600
While leading a Texas Butterfly Festival field trip in Harlingen's Hugh
Ramsey Park yesterday (11/01/15), I photographed a hairstreak I tentatively
identified as a Shadowed Hairstreak (Michaelus ira).  It was visiting
Crucita blossoms on the Indigo Trail, and observed by all trip
participants.  This is the first record of this species for the US.  ID has
been confirmed by Andy Warren of the McGuire Center.

Mike Rickard
Mission TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: National Butterfly Center Gardens
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Nov 2015 20:54:46 -0600
A few highlights for me today:

Ruddy Daggerwing -1
Two-barred Flasher - 2
Coyote Cloudywing - 1

Shirley Wilkerson
Bryan, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Pale-banded Crescents
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Oct 2015 22:22:16 -0500
Lots of them at Edinburgh this afternoon, and one Guava Skipoer.  Others
reported the Two-barred Flasher earlier.

Shirley Wilkerson
Bryan

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Apache Skipper
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Oct 2015 17:01:29 -0500
,

Never mind on my previous post...Just got a link posted by my friend Chuck
Sexton on the Apache Skipper.  Same bird and apparently somewhat common in
the immediate area. Like I said these LBJs are not my forte'

**********************************************************************
Brush Freeman
Senior Wildlife Biologist/Partner. Bio-Spatial Services Inc, TXESA,
Independent consulting.
www.biospatialservices.com 
503-551-5150 Cell
120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas

On Sat, Oct 31, 2015 at 4:33 PM, Brush Freeman 
wrote:

> .
> This AM I had a what I am almost positive was an Apache Skipper nectaring
> on fall aster (Hedge) at Devine Lk. near Leander in Williamson Co.  From
> what few checks I did online this would be way out of range but I am having
> a hard time making it into another species..I don't spend much time on
> skippers so may be wrong on my ID.
> **********************************************************************
> Brush Freeman
> Senior Wildlife Biologist/Partner. Bio-Spatial Services Inc, TXESA,
> Independent consulting.
> www.biospatialservices.com 
> 503-551-5150 Cell
> 120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
> Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas
>

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Apache Skipper
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Oct 2015 16:33:21 -0500
.
This AM I had a what I am almost positive was an Apache Skipper nectaring
on fall aster (Hedge) at Devine Lk. near Leander in Williamson Co.  From
what few checks I did online this would be way out of range but I am having
a hard time making it into another species..I don't spend much time on
skippers so may be wrong on my ID.
**********************************************************************
Brush Freeman
Senior Wildlife Biologist/Partner. Bio-Spatial Services Inc, TXESA,
Independent consulting.
www.biospatialservices.com 
503-551-5150 Cell
120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: RFI: Best butterfly at Edinburg?
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Oct 2015 13:46:00 -0500
Is it still Giant White?  Trying to decide where to rush to so late in the
day.

Thanks,

Shirley Wilkerson

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Texas now has a pollinator conservation plan
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Oct 2015 14:29:02 -0500
Texas Monarch and Native Pollinator Conservation Plan - OCTOBER 2015
http://tpwd.texas.gov/publications/pwdpubs/media/pwd_rp_w7000_2070.pdf

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Significant decline in the population of eastern North American migrating
monarchs has led to widespread concern in Canada, the United States, and
Mexico. Texas will play a critical role in conservation efforts aimed at
monarch conservation given its strategic position along the species
migratory pathway. In addition, 30 native pollinator/flower-visiting
species (bees, butterflies, and moths) are designated as Species of
Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) in Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s
(TPWD) Texas Conservation Action Plan. These SGCN and the monarch are
dependent upon similar landscape level habitat features (open natural
community types hosting floral resources and host plants).

The Texas Monarch/Native Pollinator Conservation Plan acknowledges Texas’
unique contribution to the long-term persistence of the North American
monarch migration and TPWD’s leading role in the conservation of SGCN in
Texas. This plan outlines actions in Texas that will contribute to monarch
and overall native pollinator conservation in Texas by highlighting four
broad categories of monarch and native pollinator conservation: habitat
conservation, education and outreach, research and monitoring, and
partnerships. This conservation plan details specific actions associated
with each of these categories by TPWD and other stakeholders. TPWD will
continue to develop this plan as new stakeholders are identified and become
engaged in this collaboration

see link for full text:
http://tpwd.texas.gov/publications/pwdpubs/media/pwd_rp_w7000_2070.pdf

===============================================

Seems some of the Texas plant organizations are already involved, but none
of the butterfly clubs were included...

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Resaca de la Palma State Park, 10/28/15
From: Dan Jones <00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Wed, 28 Oct 2015 23:17:06 -0400
Lots of blooming crucita at Resaca de la Palma State Park with lots of 
butterflies. Good stuff included Evan's Skipper, four Violet-banded Skippers, 
lots of Blue Metalmarks, Walker's Metalmark, Boisduval's Yellow, Orange-barred 
Sulphur, Julia Heliconian and more. Yesterday the National Butterfly Center had 
Glazed Pellicia, Evan's Skipper, Ornythion Swallowtail and Polydamas 
Swallowtail. Photos and list are on my blog. 




http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2015/10/resaca-de-la-palma-state-park-102815.html 


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Minor Monarch flight today Bee County
From: Robert Benson <benson.farm AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 27 Oct 2015 18:08:45 -0500
Hi everyone,

I've been a member of this listserv for years, but I've never posted before. 
I'm a retired college professor living on a small farm 12 miles north of 
Beeville, Texas. The habitat here is typical south Texas brush with live oaks 
sprinkled in. Soil is mostly caliche. 


While having lunch today at a cafe in downtown Beeville, my wife Karen and I 
noticed a Monarch flying across the street at the top of a stand of bamboo. 
Monarchs are not common here, so that got my attention. This afternoon (back at 
the farm) we had a limited flight of Monarchs, maybe six to eight per hour over 
our yard of about an acre. There were lots of Gregg's Mistflowers blooming and 
the Queens were all over it, but the Monarchs were keeping an altitude of about 
15 to 20 feet above ground and moving from east to west. Once I saw a pair down 
on a Esperanza bush, but that was the only time they took a break from flying 
over. 


Because Karen is a Texas Master Naturalist, she insisted that I report this 
even though it's a minor sighting -- so I have done so. I do really enjoy 
reading the various posts on the listserv and appreciate the civil tone of the 
group. 


All the best,  Robert

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Introduction
From: Sandy Carter <crowdedcat AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Oct 2015 11:52:17 -0500
Hello!
I'm just introducing myself. I live in the Houston Tx area in the
Woodlands.
I have been raising Monarch butterflies for about 3 years, Waystation #8609.
I have a background in biology and wildlife rehabilitation. And I am a
nurse by day.

This year was unusual in that I had no Monarch action until May despite
good success growing
a few varieties of milkweed.
Last week I was considering cutting down my milkweed, but was waiting for
it to flower then go to seed.
Then I had a well weathered female spend about 2 days nectaring and
ovipositing on my milkweed. So now I have a few eggs.

Last year I had a batch of about 23 in DECEMBER!

Anyway, thanks for having me here.

Sandy Carter
crowdedcat AT gmail.com


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Patricia/Monarchs, appears highest winds (>75 mph) mostly hit w. Jalisco, MX
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT SABER.NET>
Date: Sat, 24 Oct 2015 12:44:54 -0700
According to weather.com no severe weather is forecast for the 
monarch migration regions (cities of Torreon, Saltillo, Monterrey, 
San Luis Potosi, Ciudad Victoria).

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Patricia/Monarchs, appears highest winds (>75 mph) mostly hit w. Jalisco, MX
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Oct 2015 13:23:04 -0500
FYI,

looks like the highest winds (>75 mph) mostly hit western Jalisco...

see map of wind impact area at bottom of this link:

http://politico.mx/en-la-politica/localidades-impactadas-por-el-huracan-patricia 


The monarch overwintering grounds are in far eastern Michoacan, MX

Mike Quinn, Austin

On Fri, Oct 23, 2015 at 2:42 PM, Mike Quinn  wrote:

> As it stands, it looks like Hurricane Patricia, or what's left of it, will
> pass though the monarch's migration route before they reach their
> overwintering grounds in central Mexico.
>
> Indigo dots indicate most recently reported monarch sightings to Journey
> North
> http://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch.html
>
> NOAA projected path of Hurricane Patricia as of Friday, Oct. 23
>
> 
http://static4.techinsider.io/image/562a2d129dd7cc1e008c4234-895-716/hurricane-patricia-path-mexico.gif 

> shorter: http://bit.ly/1KuD4MS
>
> Mike Quinn, Austin
> ________________
> Texas Entomology
> http://texasento.net
>

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: 2 new life histories
From: Berry Nall <lb AT THENALLS.NET>
Date: Sat, 24 Oct 2015 12:16:39 -0500
Hi,
Some much-needed rain in south TX is allowing me to work on the website. I've 
added life histories for South Texas Satyr and Tropical Checkered-Skipper. 

http://leps.thenalls.net/index.php

Berry Nall
Falcon Heights, Starr Co, TX
leps.thenalls.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Hurricane Patricia projected to pass thru monarch migration
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Oct 2015 16:52:39 -0500
but see this wind map which shows relatively light winds in the interior of
Mexico:


http://fires.globalforestwatch.org/#v=map&x=-104.07&y=18.14&l=6&lyrs=Active_Fires%3AWind_Direction&b=Dark%20Gray%20Canvas&dirty=true 


shorter URL: http://bit.ly/1Ls4wP4

Mike Quinn, not a meteorologist...


On Fri, Oct 23, 2015 at 2:42 PM, Mike Quinn  wrote:

> As it stands, it looks like Hurricane Patricia, or what's left of it, will
> pass though the monarch's migration route before they reach their
> overwintering grounds in central Mexico.
>
> Indigo dots indicate most recently reported monarch sightings to Journey
> North
> http://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch.html
>
> NOAA projected path of Hurricane Patricia as of Friday, Oct. 23
>
> 
http://static4.techinsider.io/image/562a2d129dd7cc1e008c4234-895-716/hurricane-patricia-path-mexico.gif 

> shorter: http://bit.ly/1KuD4MS
>
> Mike Quinn, Austin
> ________________
> Texas Entomology
> http://texasento.net
>

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Hurricane Patricia projected to pass thru monarch migration
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Oct 2015 14:42:53 -0500
As it stands, it looks like Hurricane Patricia, or what's left of it, will
pass though the monarch's migration route before they reach their
overwintering grounds in central Mexico.

Indigo dots indicate most recently reported monarch sightings to Journey
North
http://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch.html

NOAA projected path of Hurricane Patricia as of Friday, Oct. 23

http://static4.techinsider.io/image/562a2d129dd7cc1e008c4234-895-716/hurricane-patricia-path-mexico.gif 

shorter: http://bit.ly/1KuD4MS

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: sale of N.M. moth name on eBay, current bid: $6,000
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2015 13:26:47 -0500
Public has chance to name moth species discovered in N.M.
Sunday, October 18, 2015
By Astrid Galvan
AP writer

TUCSON, Ariz. — An auction on eBay allows the public to make a different
kind of purchase as they peruse the used clothing, electronics and war
relics on the site. Up for sale: naming rights to a new insect.

A moth that weighs less than an ounce and measures about an inch was
discovered eight years ago at White Sands National Monument in New Mexico
by entomologist Eric H. Metzler.

full text:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.santafenewmexican.com_news_public-2Dhas-2Dchance-2Dto-2Dname-2Dmoth-2Dspecies-2Ddiscovered-2Din-2Dn_article-5F7d249bfa-2Df743-2D54c0-2Db25b-2D64c9f668e8fc.html&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=y8rhOvidDs9Csb1MmLyB8ZA6g0QgOsE1pfq0V-Avk3M&s=0mwhpzBEk6FoAeES7bYvwMadH8X5LEq49o1-R6JZrPM&e= 

or: 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_1NkzucP&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=y8rhOvidDs9Csb1MmLyB8ZA6g0QgOsE1pfq0V-Avk3M&s=cI6X-scLaV_vx2xbGhmaWS_9UMH5vsOZJQboNH_KZvk&e= 


-----------------------------------------------------

current bidding on eBay:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__offer.ebay.com_ws_eBayISAPI.dll-3FViewBids-26item-3D281812249261-26rt-3Dnc-26-5Ftrksid-3Dp2047675.l2565&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=y8rhOvidDs9Csb1MmLyB8ZA6g0QgOsE1pfq0V-Avk3M&s=-y8GpVMOXV_yQ5oaH5JyhYesW12KUyuiwbsgR9eFEAY&e= 

or: 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebay.to_1Nkzqts&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=y8rhOvidDs9Csb1MmLyB8ZA6g0QgOsE1pfq0V-Avk3M&s=vtLwBlnQC9O7eAvQQxZGx3QBlksf6SEVdyHW_Ykn9r0&e= 


-----------------------------------------------------

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__texasento.net&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=y8rhOvidDs9Csb1MmLyB8ZA6g0QgOsE1pfq0V-Avk3M&s=Vu3SuHNJ6da_yJ9ZWD3484AYZxTCF-m6d05L4vN3hks&e= 
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: sale of N.M. moth name on eBay, current bid: $6,000
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2015 13:26:47 -0500
Public has chance to name moth species discovered in N.M.
Sunday, October 18, 2015
By Astrid Galvan
AP writer

TUCSON, Ariz. — An auction on eBay allows the public to make a different
kind of purchase as they peruse the used clothing, electronics and war
relics on the site. Up for sale: naming rights to a new insect.

A moth that weighs less than an ounce and measures about an inch was
discovered eight years ago at White Sands National Monument in New Mexico
by entomologist Eric H. Metzler.

full text:

http://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/public-has-chance-to-name-moth-species-discovered-in-n/article_7d249bfa-f743-54c0-b25b-64c9f668e8fc.html 

or: http://bit.ly/1NkzucP

-----------------------------------------------------

current bidding on eBay:

http://offer.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewBids&item=281812249261&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2565 

or: http://ebay.to/1Nkzqts

-----------------------------------------------------

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Monarch migration appearance in West Texas affected by differential precipitation
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2015 07:11:00 -0500
We have been seeing an avg. of 5-6 per day in Cedar Park, they are feeding
on wife's Mist Flower along with some mimics.  Another place we have been
seeing on some days is at a small Leander Lk. working Baccaris
blooms.....Over in Bastrop Co. they were coming over, sometimes low,
sometimes very high but there is nothing for them to nectar on and not sure
how the fires and smoke affected them.  At our house there, there has been
no rain in 112+ day (since June 26)...Have seen a few trying to work fading
and wilted Turk's Cap....The map might be helpful

http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home/StateDroughtMonitor.aspx?TX


**********************************************************************
Brush Freeman
Senior Wildlife Biologist/Partner. Bio-Spatial Services Inc, TXESA,
Independent consulting.
www.biospatialsevices.com
503-551-5150 Cell
120 N. Red Bud Trail. Elgin, Tx. 78621
Finca Alacranes., Utley,Texas

On Sun, Oct 18, 2015 at 11:29 PM, Steven Schafersman  wrote:

> It is true that the drought was especially severe in West Texas in 2011,
> the first and worst year of a very bad 4-year drought. We saw the many
> thousands of Monarchs in cities and gardens that were all under irrigation.
> Here's a link to photos of one such garden in Midland, TX:
> http://llanoestacado.org/photos/photos/water_wise_2011oct6/index.html
> Even though this Permian Basin Master Gardeners' garden is a water-wise
> garden, it is irrigated with Netafim drip lines fed by rainwater collected
> by water harvesting methods and stored in tanks. I personally saw many
> thousands of Monarchs hanging from trees all over Midland that early
> October and so did many other observers.
>
> In my brief report yesterday I didn't suggest that the 2011 shift should
> be attributed to West Texas Fall rains but perhaps I should have. My
> hypothesis for the 2015 westward migration route shift is that it is due to
> drought in Central Texas and wet Sept-Oct conditions in West Texas. The
> migration route had previously shifted westward in 2011 (
> https://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch_peak_fall2011.html). Because
> of Paul Cherubini's reply today I was motivated to examine the historical
> meteorological data for my West Texas area and found that fully half of
> 2011's small total precipitation fell in Aug-Oct (
> 
http://midgewater.twdb.texas.gov/evaporation/quadrangle/605/precipitation-tabular.txt). 

> This wetter Fall 2011 trend is similar in adjacent quadrangles in West
> Texas (although the greater differential precipitation volume is small due
> to the state-wide drought conditions that year). This positive result
> supports the "westward Monarch Texas migration shift due to
> increased westward precipitation" hypothesis and merits further study.
>
> Steven Schafersman
> Midland, Texas
>
> On Sun, Oct 18, 2015 at 12:57 AM, Paul Cherubini 
> wrote:
>
>> Steven Schafersman  wrote:
>>
>> > The primary Monarch route--usually through Central Texas—shifted
>> > westward this year, probably due to the drought in Central Texas and
>> > the abundant rains in late September in West Texas. The last westward
>> > shift of the route was in 2011 when similar large concentrations were
>> > observed.
>>
>> But in 2011 the drought was especially severe in west Texas and yet
>> there were heavy concentrations of monarchs in that area anyway.
>> And they didn’t appear starved for water or nectar.
>>
>> Example: Sonora, TX Oct. 4, 2011:
>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVmB04qbSmw
>>
>> Paul Cherubini
>> El Dorado, Calif.
>>
>> ======================================
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Balcones Canyonlands NWR - Sunday, 10/18
From: Tim Jones <deforest AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2015 01:02:37 -0500
A few monarchs have passed through the property in western Hays County the last 
few days. A patch of frostweed I planted, sort of so I could photograph 
butterflies without climbing down to the river is spent out here too, fading 
out completely just as the monarchs arrived. I’ll have to check another patch 
we have in the morning. There wasn’t much to that one a week or so ago when 
we were trying to wrap our heads around oak wilt reappearing on a corner of the 
property. With the drought as horrible as it is it is moving slow. But it’s 
relentless, right up the the edge of the trench we cut through the countryside. 
At least the drought’s good for something. 


I guess the fronts the monarchs ride are coming later this year. Is this so? 
The uplands above the Blanco River are virtually devoid of wildflowers. We’ve 
had less than an inch of rain since early June. 

 
A monarch was attracted to where I was hand watering vegetation, resting on a 
blade grass for awhile. Another monarch, maybe the same one dodged through a 
circular irrigation spray I'd set up in a small plot of wild grasses I’m 
trying to keep alive until it rains again. It almost flew in the window of 
Jenny’s daughter’s car as she drove down a gravel driveway this afternoon. 
I was amazed at how agile it was. 


I suppose I should do a study on what butterflies survive the drought out here. 
I don’t think there’d be much to it. 


Tim Jones
Wimberley


> On Oct 18, 2015, at 10:45 PM, Chuck Sexton  wrote:
> 
> TX Butterfliers,
> 
> Following up on Friday’s observations out at Balcones Canyonlands NWR, I 
hiked up Post Oak Creek on the Refuge today primarily to do some butterfly 
watching. It was an OK day for butterflies, although not as diverse or populous 
as we have come to expect for mid-October there. A saw not a single Monarch. 
The extreme drought conditions are seriously affecting floral resources. 
However, there was still much gayfeather blooming along with patches of plateau 
goldeneye, palafoxia, and gray goldenrod; most frostweed was past blooming and 
no shrubby boneset had started blooming yet. I concentrated primarily on grass 
skippers as I tried to refind and document any Apache Skippers which might be 
flying. It is clearly a good flight year for that species; I encountered at 
least 6 individuals and photographed several of them. Below is a complete list 
for my 2-1/2 hr visit from noon to 2:30 p.m. Conditions were clear, 80F, winds 
SE 5 to 10. Images of several species will be uploaded to iNaturalist.org later 
this evening. 

> 
> Chuck Sexton
> Austin
> 
> * * * * * *
> Balcones Canyonlands NWR
> Post Oak Creek (restricted access)
> Oct. 18, 2015
> 
> Pipevine Swallowtail - 8
> Orange Sulphur - 1
> Little Yellow - 3
> Dainty Sulphur - 1
> Gray Hairstreak - 2
> * Eastern Tailed Blue - 2
> Snout Butterfly - 1
> * Gulf Fritillary - 6
> Variegated Fritilllary - 1
> Pearl Crescent - 1
> Red Admiral - 1
> Common Buckeye - 3
> Common Mestra - 2
> Common Wood Nymph - 1 (late?)
> Queen - 2
> * N. Cloudywing - 1
> * Duskywing sp. - 1 (worn)
> * Orange Skipperling - 2+
> * S. Broken Dash - 2
> Sachem - 1
> * Dun Skipper - 6+
> * Eufala Skipper - 2+
> * Long-winged (Ocola) Sk. - 1
> * Apache Skipper - 6
> 
> Species marked with (*) were photographed.
> 
> ======================================
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Monarch migration appearance in West Texas affected by differential precipitation
From: Steven Schafersman <sschafersman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 18 Oct 2015 23:29:23 -0500
It is true that the drought was especially severe in West Texas in 2011,
the first and worst year of a very bad 4-year drought. We saw the many
thousands of Monarchs in cities and gardens that were all under irrigation.
Here's a link to photos of one such garden in Midland, TX:
http://llanoestacado.org/photos/photos/water_wise_2011oct6/index.html
Even though this Permian Basin Master Gardeners' garden is a water-wise
garden, it is irrigated with Netafim drip lines fed by rainwater collected
by water harvesting methods and stored in tanks. I personally saw many
thousands of Monarchs hanging from trees all over Midland that early
October and so did many other observers.

In my brief report yesterday I didn't suggest that the 2011 shift should be
attributed to West Texas Fall rains but perhaps I should have. My
hypothesis for the 2015 westward migration route shift is that it is due to
drought in Central Texas and wet Sept-Oct conditions in West Texas. The
migration route had previously shifted westward in 2011 (
https://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch_peak_fall2011.html). Because of
Paul Cherubini's reply today I was motivated to examine the historical
meteorological data for my West Texas area and found that fully half of
2011's small total precipitation fell in Aug-Oct (

http://midgewater.twdb.texas.gov/evaporation/quadrangle/605/precipitation-tabular.txt). 

This wetter Fall 2011 trend is similar in adjacent quadrangles in West
Texas (although the greater differential precipitation volume is small due
to the state-wide drought conditions that year). This positive result
supports the "westward Monarch Texas migration shift due to
increased westward precipitation" hypothesis and merits further study.

Steven Schafersman
Midland, Texas

On Sun, Oct 18, 2015 at 12:57 AM, Paul Cherubini  wrote:

> Steven Schafersman  wrote:
>
> > The primary Monarch route--usually through Central Texas—shifted
> > westward this year, probably due to the drought in Central Texas and
> > the abundant rains in late September in West Texas. The last westward
> > shift of the route was in 2011 when similar large concentrations were
> > observed.
>
> But in 2011 the drought was especially severe in west Texas and yet
> there were heavy concentrations of monarchs in that area anyway.
> And they didn’t appear starved for water or nectar.
>
> Example: Sonora, TX Oct. 4, 2011:
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVmB04qbSmw
>
> Paul Cherubini
> El Dorado, Calif.
>
>

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Subject: Balcones Canyonlands NWR - Sunday, 10/18
From: Chuck Sexton <gcwarbler AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Sun, 18 Oct 2015 22:45:38 -0500
TX Butterfliers,

Following up on Friday’s observations out at Balcones Canyonlands NWR, I 
hiked up Post Oak Creek on the Refuge today primarily to do some butterfly 
watching. It was an OK day for butterflies, although not as diverse or populous 
as we have come to expect for mid-October there. A saw not a single Monarch. 
The extreme drought conditions are seriously affecting floral resources. 
However, there was still much gayfeather blooming along with patches of plateau 
goldeneye, palafoxia, and gray goldenrod; most frostweed was past blooming and 
no shrubby boneset had started blooming yet. I concentrated primarily on grass 
skippers as I tried to refind and document any Apache Skippers which might be 
flying. It is clearly a good flight year for that species; I encountered at 
least 6 individuals and photographed several of them. Below is a complete list 
for my 2-1/2 hr visit from noon to 2:30 p.m. Conditions were clear, 80F, winds 
SE 5 to 10. Images of several species will be uploaded to iNaturalist.org later 
this evening. 


Chuck Sexton
Austin

* * * * * *
Balcones Canyonlands NWR
Post Oak Creek (restricted access)
Oct. 18, 2015

Pipevine Swallowtail - 8
Orange Sulphur - 1
Little Yellow - 3
Dainty Sulphur - 1
Gray Hairstreak - 2
* Eastern Tailed Blue - 2
Snout Butterfly - 1
* Gulf Fritillary - 6
Variegated Fritilllary - 1
Pearl Crescent - 1
Red Admiral - 1
Common Buckeye - 3
Common Mestra - 2
Common Wood Nymph - 1 (late?)
Queen - 2
* N. Cloudywing - 1
* Duskywing sp. - 1 (worn)
* Orange Skipperling - 2+
* S. Broken Dash - 2
Sachem - 1
* Dun Skipper - 6+
* Eufala Skipper - 2+
* Long-winged (Ocola) Sk. - 1
* Apache Skipper - 6

Species marked with (*) were photographed.

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