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Updated on Friday, January 30 at 12:16 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Chocolate-vented Tyrant,©Sophie Webb

29 Jan Re: Owl roost site visits ["mmelius AT hcinet.net [sd-birds]" ]
28 Jan RE: Owl roost site visits ["christian artuso chartuso AT hotmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
28 Jan Re: Owl roost site visits ["tlsohl AT alliancecom.net [sd-birds]" ]
28 Jan Owl roost site visits ["'Dowd Stukel, Eileen' eileen.dowdstukel AT state.sd.us [sd-birds]" ]
28 Jan Duel County Snowy Owl ["'Jensen, Kent' kent.jensen AT sdstate.edu [sd-birds]" ]
28 Jan Snowy owl near summit ["Barry Parkin nun2brite2002 AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
27 Jan Four Saw-whet Day - Newton Hills (Photos and Video) ["'Terry Sohl' tlsohl AT alliancecom.net [sd-birds]" ]
27 Jan Snowy Owls ["Cheryl Vellenga killdeer54 AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" ]
27 Jan snowy owl ["'Dowd Stukel, Eileen' eileen.dowdstukel AT state.sd.us [sd-birds]" ]
27 Jan Re: Saw whey ["Terry Sohl tlsohl AT alliancecom.net [sd-birds]" ]
27 Jan Saw whey ["Terry Sohl tlsohl AT alliancecom.net [sd-birds]" ]
26 Jan Continuing Snowy Owl (Pennington County) ["Richard Latuchie rlatuchie AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
26 Jan Canyon Lake Park, Rapid City ["'Jocelyn Baker' osprey AT midco.net [sd-birds]" ]
26 Jan Northern Hills Bird Club Meeting on Feb. 5th, 2015 ["'Brunko' ebab AT midco.net [sd-birds]" ]
26 Jan Possible Gyrfalcon, Faulk Co. ["mmelius AT hcinet.net [sd-birds]" ]
25 Jan Re: PENNINGTON CTY.: Snowy Owl south of New Underwood ["Becky Leas rrleas AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" ]
25 Jan PENNINGTON CTY.: Snowy Owl south of New Underwood ["'Jocelyn Baker' osprey AT midco.net [sd-birds]" ]
25 Jan Northern Hills Bird Club Field Trip Report ["'Brunko' ebab AT midco.net [sd-birds]" ]
24 Jan Re: Newton Hills owls, Goshawk ["jdco2pock AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" ]
24 Jan Newton Hills owls, Goshawk ["'Chris Anderson' canderson1 AT sio.midco.net [sd-birds]" ]
24 Jan Saturday ["'Ricky Olson' tatanka40 AT pie.midco.net [sd-birds]" ]
23 Jan Re: snowy owl south of New Underwood ["Nancy Drilling nancy.drilling AT rmbo.org [sd-birds]" ]
23 Jan snowy owl south of New Underwood ["'Maggie Engler' birdwoman AT q.com [sd-birds]" ]
23 Jan Brookings Pine Warbler ["'Jensen, Kent' kent.jensen AT sdstate.edu [sd-birds]" ]
22 Jan Bald Eagle Days - Yankton, SD ["'Preheim, Kelly' Kelly.Preheim AT k12.sd.us [sd-birds]" ]
20 Jan Custer Co. birds ["mmelius AT hcinet.net [sd-birds]" ]
20 Jan weekend Snowy Owls - northeast ["Nancy Drilling nancy.drilling AT rmbo.org [sd-birds]" ]
20 Jan Fort Pierre ["'Ricky Olson' tatanka40 AT pie.midco.net [sd-birds]" ]
19 Jan pipeline ["mick zerr zerrmick AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" ]
18 Jan Presho/Kennebec area raptors ["'Terry Sohl' tlsohl AT alliancecom.net [sd-birds]" ]
19 Jan Ft. Randall Dam - Charles Mix ["'Preheim, Kelly' Kelly.Preheim AT k12.sd.us [sd-birds]" ]
18 Jan Snowy Owl - Douglas county ["'Preheim, Kelly' Kelly.Preheim AT k12.sd.us [sd-birds]" ]
17 Jan SFBC field trip results ["Chris Anderson canderson1 AT sio.midco.net [sd-birds]" ]
17 Jan bald eagles ["David Carpentr dak.carpenter AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" ]
15 Jan Blackbird location ["nun2brite2002 AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
15 Jan Blackbirds ["nun2brite2002 AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
14 Jan Northern Hills Bird Club - Field Trip on Jan. 24th ["'Brunko' ebab AT midco.net [sd-birds]" ]
13 Jan Glaucous Gull ["'R&M Mabie' rmmabie AT hcinet.net [sd-birds]" ]
12 Jan Sage grouse ["Elizabeth Krueger ekrueger AT rushmore.com [sd-birds]" ]
12 Jan Hoodies ["mick zerr zerrmick AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" ]
12 Jan Re: SD membership renewals ["linda JhnsnLn AT aol.com [sd-birds]" ]
11 Jan Spring? ["darin.newton AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
11 Jan White-crowned Sparrow ["nun2brite2002 AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
11 Jan harbingers of spring ["George Prisbe-Przybysz przybysz AT hughes.net [sd-birds]" ]
11 Jan Snowys ["nun2brite2002 AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
11 Jan 2 Buffleheads ["'Preheim, Kelly' Kelly.Preheim AT k12.sd.us [sd-birds]" ]
10 Jan meadowlarks ["petermhill AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" ]
10 Jan NHBC Field Trip Report ["treasurecreek AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
10 Jan Fox Sparrow -Charles Mix county ["'Preheim, Kelly' Kelly.Preheim AT k12.sd.us [sd-birds]" ]
9 Jan Ruby-crowned Kinglet ["Kenny Miller littlebend AT q.com [sd-birds]" ]
9 Jan Ivory Gull Chase ["Brad McDonald brad AT erstaff.com [sd-birds]" ]
8 Jan FW: [NHBC] CANCELLATION OF MEETING TONIGHT - 1/8/15 ["'Gene ' gene AT neopaleo.net [sd-birds]" ]
8 Jan CANCELLATION OF MEETING TONIGHT - 1/8/15 ["'Brunko' ebab AT midco.net [sd-birds]" ]
8 Jan Pierre ["'Ricky Olson' tatanka40 AT pie.midco.net [sd-birds]" ]
8 Jan 2005 record of Eurasian Tree Sparrow ["'dan&erika' danerika AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
8 Jan First nest record for 2015? ["mmelius AT hcinet.net [sd-birds]" ]
07 Jan Yard Birds-Belle Fourche ["darin.newton AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
7 Jan Re: Eurasian Tree Sparrow Update ["Paul Roisen roisenp1950 AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
6 Jan Re: Eurasian Tree Sparrow Update ["'Rob Parsons' parsons8 AT mymts.net [sd-birds]" ]
6 Jan Mitchell CBC results ["'Jeff Hansen' hanjd AT cox.net [sd-birds]" ]
6 Jan Eurasian Tree Sparrow Update ["'Jeff Hansen' hanjd AT cox.net [sd-birds]" ]
6 Jan REdpolls ["mick zerr zerrmick AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" ]
6 Jan dakota midday ["Shari Kosel jskosel AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
5 Jan SD List Totals ["'Palmer, Jeff' Jeff.Palmer AT dsu.edu [sd-birds]" ]
04 Jan Longspurs & Larks, Fall River Co. ["petermhill AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" ]
4 Jan CBC ["mick zerr zerrmick AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" ]
4 Jan FOY Cooper's Hawk ["'brdfsd AT sio.midco.net' brdfsd@sio.midco.net [sd-birds]" ]
4 Jan Snowey Owls ["'Ricky Olson' tatanka40 AT pie.midco.net [sd-birds]" ]
3 Jan NHBC Field trip 1-10-2015 ["treasurecreek AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
2 Jan Eurasian Tree Sparrows ["'Jeff Hansen' hanjd AT cox.net [sd-birds]" ]
3 Jan Ft. Randall Birding ["'Preheim, Kelly' Kelly.Preheim AT k12.sd.us [sd-birds]" ]
2 Jan Short-eared Owl (Pennington) ["Dick Latuchie rlatuchie AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
02 Jan Winter white-crowned and Harris's sparrows ["darin.newton AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" ]
2 Jan James River Bald Eagles ["Brian Kringen bkringen AT abe.midco.net [sd-birds]" ]
2 Jan Pennington County: Clark's Nutcrackers and Pygmy Nuthatches ["Jennifer Fowler waterfowlerlover AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" ]
1 Jan Custer Co. Birds ["mmelius AT hcinet.net [sd-birds]" ]

Subject: Re: Owl roost site visits
From: "mmelius AT hcinet.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 23:46:45 -0500 (EST)
Thanks for bringing these concerns to the fore, Eileen. It's
especially timely for me as I just had such an encounter with a Great
Horned Owl today. Visiting a friend in Minneapolis, I went for a walk
in a riverside park this morning, saw some whitewash in a blue spruce,
then large owl pellets on the ground below. I looked in the spruce
awhile, then stepped back and walked around the tree for a better
look. Next thing I know there's an owl in the cottonwoods by the
river, being mobbed by crows. Lots of crows. I assume it came from
that spruce, although I never actually saw it do so.

I can try to rationalize away any harm I did with that encounter, but
the truth is that my search for that bird was not necessary or
important, and nothing good came from it. It would have been better to
be satisfied with a little mystery, and with knowing, from the signs,
that an owl is surviving in such an urban setting.

With this and other owls, the best way to experience it for bird and
humans alike is to hear it calling from a non-intrusive distance,
without having played a recording. We and other people roaming
outdoors are going to encounter and disturb owls inadvertently. For us
to set an example in "viewing wildlife in way that does not threaten",
we should be trying to minimize those inadvertent disturbances, and we
should be ending the deliberate ones such as what I created here this
morning.

Michael Melius

---- Original message ----

  Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 22:17:03 +0000
  From: "'Dowd Stukel, Eileen' eileen.dowdstukel AT state.sd.us
  [sd-birds]" 
  Subject: [sd-birds] Owl roost site visits
  To: "'SD Birds'" 

   

  This winter appears to be a “good owl year” and there’s been a
  lot of list-serve talk about wintering owl roost sites. While it’s
  great that birders are able to see new and sometimes rare species,
  we’ve become increasingly concerned about the safety and long-term
  effects of some activities.

   

  As we all know, many owl species are nocturnal. They select sites
  for daytime roosting that provide a place to rest and protection
  from the elements, predators and disturbance. When they are
  repeatedly visited at roost sites, especially up-close and personal,
  they are using valuable energy from the stress caused by the
  disturbance. They may be disturbed to the point of flushing, which
  not only uses even more energy, but exposes them to potential
  predators during the day, a time when they are more vulnerable.
  Repeatedly playing calls at sites night after night can also cause
  unnecessary stress and related loss of energy reserves.

   

  The idea that the northern saw-whet owl is tame or curious about you
  because you can approach it easily at its daytime roost is wrong.
  This behavior is a survival strategy - the owl freezes in place when
  predators approach in the hope it won’t be detected.

   

  Agencies often caution against disturbing bald eagles at their
  daytime winter roosts for the reasons we’ve listed, and the same
  cautions (and common sense) apply here. In our opinion, birders
  should set the example for viewing wildlife in a way that does not
  threaten or jeopardize the health and safety of the animals they are
  viewing.

   

  Here are some tips to help you responsibly enjoy these incredible
  birds:

   

  1.    Watch for signs that the owl is becoming stressed with
  your presence. A disturbed owl will elongate, raising the crown
  feathers above its widened eyes and will often try to conceal itself
  behind a hunched shoulder. If the disturbance continues, the owl
  will begin to act excited, bobbing its head and shifting its feet
  before flying to a new perch.

  2.    If you flushed an owl from a roost, do not continue
  searching for it.

  3.    Be content with observing the owl and getting a photograph
  from a distance. Just because you can get close to an owl doesn’t
  mean it isn’t bothered by your presence.

   

  The American Bird Association has a code of ethics that we as
  birders should strive to meet:
  (http://www.aba.org/about/abaethics.pdf). The first section is
  included here:

   

  1. Promote the welfare of birds and their environment.

  1(a) Support the protection of important bird habitat.

  1(b) To avoid stressing birds or exposing them to danger, exercise
  restraint and caution during observation, photography, sound
  recording, or filming. Limit the use of recordings and other methods
  of attracting birds, and never use such methods in heavily birded
  areas or for attracting any species that is Threatened, Endangered,
  or of Special Concern, or is rare in your local area. Keep well back
  from nests and nesting colonies, roosts, display areas, and
  important feeding sites. In such sensitive areas, if there is a need
  for extended observation, photography, filming, or recording, try to
  use a blind or hide, and take advantage of natural cover. Use
  artificial light sparingly for filming or photography, especially
  for close-ups.

  1(c) Before advertising the presence of a rare bird, evaluate the
  potential for disturbance to the bird, its surroundings, and other
  people in the area, and proceed only if access can be controlled,
  disturbance can be minimized, and permission has been obtained from
  private land-owners. The sites of rare nesting birds should be
  divulged only to the proper conservation authorities.

  1(d) Stay on roads, trails, and paths where they exist; otherwise
  keep habitat disturbance to a minimum.

   

  Thanks for reading.

   

  Eileen Dowd Stukel and Casey Heimerl

  SDGFP, Pierre

   

  
Subject: RE: Owl roost site visits
From: "christian artuso chartuso AT hotmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 23:01:26 +0000
This topic has created a lot of discussion in the Owls of the World group that 
I run on Facebook. That prompted me to compose this photo essay on detecting 
signs of stress in owls that some people may be interested in reading: 


http://artusobirds.blogspot.ca/2014/12/signs-of-stress-in-owls.html 

Christian Artuso (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada)

 - - -
Christian Artuso, Ph.D.
Bird Studies Canada - Manitoba Program Manager
Box 24-200 Saulteaux Cr, Winnipeg, MB R3J 3W3
Tel: 204-945-6816               Fax: 204-945-3077
cartuso AT birdscanada.org


To: sd-birds AT yahoogroups.com
From: sd-birds-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 22:17:03 +0000
Subject: [sd-birds] Owl roost site visits








        




















This winter appears to be a good owl year and theres been a lot of 
list-serve talk about wintering owl roost sites. While its great that birders 
are able to see new and sometimes rare species, weve become increasingly 
concerned about 

 the safety and long-term effects of some activities.
 
As we all know, many owl species are nocturnal. They select sites for daytime 
roosting that provide a place to rest and protection from the elements, 
predators and disturbance. When they are repeatedly visited at roost sites, 
especially 

 up-close and personal, they are using valuable energy from the stress caused 
by the disturbance. They may be disturbed to the point of flushing, which not 
only uses even more energy, but exposes them to potential predators during the 
day, a time when they 

 are more vulnerable. Repeatedly playing calls at sites night after night can 
also cause unnecessary stress and related loss of energy reserves. 

 
The idea that the northern saw-whet owl is tame or curious about you because 
you can approach it easily at its daytime roost is wrong. This behavior is a 
survival strategy - the owl freezes in place when predators approach in the 
hope it 

 wont be detected. 
 
Agencies often caution against disturbing bald eagles at their daytime winter 
roosts for the reasons weve listed, and the same cautions (and common sense) 
apply here. In our opinion, birders should set the example for viewing wildlife 

 in a way that does not threaten or jeopardize the health and safety of the 
animals they are viewing. 


 
Here are some tips to help you responsibly enjoy these incredible birds:
 

1.    
Watch for signs that the owl is becoming stressed with your presence. A 
disturbed owl will elongate, raising the crown feathers above its widened eyes 
and will often try to conceal itself behind a hunched shoulder. If the 
disturbance 

 continues, the owl will begin to act excited, bobbing its head and shifting 
its feet before flying to a new perch. 


2.    
If you flushed an owl from a roost, do not continue searching for it.

3.    
Be content with observing the owl and getting a photograph from a distance. 
Just because you can get close to an owl doesnt mean it isnt bothered by your 
presence. 

 
The American Bird Association has a code of ethics that we as birders should 
strive to meet: (http://www.aba.org/about/abaethics.pdf). The first section is 
included here: 

 
1. Promote the welfare of birds and their environment. 

1(a) Support the protection of important bird habitat. 

1(b) To avoid stressing birds or exposing them to danger, exercise restraint 
and caution during observation, photography, sound recording, or filming. Limit 
the use of recordings and other methods of attracting birds, and never use such 

 methods in heavily birded areas or for attracting any species that is 
Threatened, Endangered, or of Special Concern, or is rare in your local area. 
Keep well back from nests and nesting colonies, roosts, display areas, and 
important feeding sites. In such 

 sensitive areas, if there is a need for extended observation, photography, 
filming, or recording, try to use a blind or hide, and take advantage of 
natural cover. Use artificial light sparingly for filming or photography, 
especially for close-ups. 


1(c) Before advertising the presence of a rare bird, evaluate the potential for 
disturbance to the bird, its surroundings, and other people in the area, and 
proceed only if access can be controlled, disturbance can be minimized, and 
permission 

 has been obtained from private land-owners. The sites of rare nesting birds 
should be divulged only to the proper conservation authorities. 


1(d) Stay on roads, trails, and paths where they exist; otherwise keep habitat 
disturbance to a minimum. 

 
Thanks for reading.
 
Eileen Dowd Stukel and Casey Heimerl
SDGFP, Pierre
 

















 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Owl roost site visits
From: "tlsohl AT alliancecom.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 17:00:09 -0600
I obviously agree that care should be taken.  But I don't think  
responsibly viewing Saw-whets is a huge threat.  I've seen one  
saw-whet flush, which was my own stupidity (yesterday) for not seeing  
him until I was upon him, and then clumsily tripping as I tried to  
back away.  As for the others?  I haven't ever seen the behavior  
discussed in the email.  The behavior I saw yesterday...they open  
their eyes and watch you a while, and then they tend to slowly blink  
slower and slower, and even fall back to sleep...a pretty good  
indication they're not stressed to the point of endangering  
themselves. And I never stayed with any one bird for more than 5  
minutes.

Also note the stress on saw-whets on the whole is likely to be  
extremely minimal, given that VERY few people are going to go to the  
trouble of bush-wacking through cedars to find them.  It's not easy to  
see a Saw-whet, period...god knows I've learned that this winter, and  
in winters past.  I can't see many folks going to the effort to try to  
find one, given the time investment and the very low return on that  
investment.  Of the Owls I found yesterday, I truly doubt 95% of folks  
will go where 2 of them were found.

With that said, I did hesitate to post locations of the owls I saw  
yesterday, particularly since 2 were relatively easy to access.  I  
decided to do so, because I believe the benefit of publicizing these  
birds outweighs any potential negative impacts (which, as I said, I  
believe are small).  I was absolutely mesmerized and delighted beyond  
belief yesterday, each and every time I saw one.  Every time upon  
finding one, I had to do a double-take, as they just don't even seem  
real!!  If more people saw them in person, if more people KNEW such a  
gorgeous, magical little creature was living around them, I think the  
benefits of that awareness outweigh any minor, temporary disturbance.

I was baptized as a birder in 2000, with the spark taking hold for  
good when Doug Backlund helped me find and see a Gyrfalcon that  
winter, south of Pierre. Before becoming a birder that year, I didn't  
even realize such a creature existed, much less was something you  
could see on rare occasion in South Dakota.  Seeing that first  
Gyrfalcon (the famed "Pheasant Farm Gyr") brought such delight and  
turned my birding "spark" into a full-fledged flame.  What went  
through my mind as I watched the saw-whets yesterday? I wished my son  
was with me, because seeing such a gorgeous little creature, yes,  
sometimes at close range, could easily ignite that birding spark in  
folks who are lucky enough to experience it.

Sorry, had to say something, given how I bird, how I value the  
resource, and how I photograph birds, especially given the (not  
coincidental) timing of this with my post yesterday.

Terry Sohl
Brandon


Quoting "'Dowd Stukel, Eileen' eileen.dowdstukel AT state.sd.us  
[sd-birds]" :

> This winter appears to be a "good owl year" and there's been a lot  
> of list-serve talk about wintering owl roost sites. While it's great  
> that birders are able to see new and sometimes rare species, we've  
> become increasingly concerned about the safety and long-term effects  
> of some activities.
>
> As we all know, many owl species are nocturnal. They select sites  
> for daytime roosting that provide a place to rest and protection  
> from the elements, predators and disturbance. When they are  
> repeatedly visited at roost sites, especially up-close and personal,  
> they are using valuable energy from the stress caused by the  
> disturbance. They may be disturbed to the point of flushing, which  
> not only uses even more energy, but exposes them to potential  
> predators during the day, a time when they are more vulnerable.  
> Repeatedly playing calls at sites night after night can also cause  
> unnecessary stress and related loss of energy reserves.
>
> The idea that the northern saw-whet owl is tame or curious about you  
> because you can approach it easily at its daytime roost is wrong.  
> This behavior is a survival strategy - the owl freezes in place when  
> predators approach in the hope it won't be detected.
>
> Agencies often caution against disturbing bald eagles at their  
> daytime winter roosts for the reasons we've listed, and the same  
> cautions (and common sense) apply here. In our opinion, birders  
> should set the example for viewing wildlife in a way that does not  
> threaten or jeopardize the health and safety of the animals they are  
> viewing.
>
> Here are some tips to help you responsibly enjoy these incredible birds:
>
> 1.     Watch for signs that the owl is becoming stressed with your  
> presence. A disturbed owl will elongate, raising the crown feathers  
> above its widened eyes and will often try to conceal itself behind a  
> hunched shoulder. If the disturbance continues, the owl will begin  
> to act excited, bobbing its head and shifting its feet before flying  
> to a new perch.
> 2.     If you flushed an owl from a roost, do not continue searching for it.
> 3.     Be content with observing the owl and getting a photograph  
> from a distance. Just because you can get close to an owl doesn't  
> mean it isn't bothered by your presence.
>
> The American Bird Association has a code of ethics that we as  
> birders should strive to meet:  
> (http://www.aba.org/about/abaethics.pdf). The first section is  
> included here:
>
> 1. Promote the welfare of birds and their environment.
> 1(a) Support the protection of important bird habitat.
> 1(b) To avoid stressing birds or exposing them to danger, exercise  
> restraint and caution during observation, photography, sound  
> recording, or filming. Limit the use of recordings and other methods  
> of attracting birds, and never use such methods in heavily birded  
> areas or for attracting any species that is Threatened, Endangered,  
> or of Special Concern, or is rare in your local area. Keep well back  
> from nests and nesting colonies, roosts, display areas, and  
> important feeding sites. In such sensitive areas, if there is a need  
> for extended observation, photography, filming, or recording, try to  
> use a blind or hide, and take advantage of natural cover. Use  
> artificial light sparingly for filming or photography, especially  
> for close-ups.
> 1(c) Before advertising the presence of a rare bird, evaluate the  
> potential for disturbance to the bird, its surroundings, and other  
> people in the area, and proceed only if access can be controlled,  
> disturbance can be minimized, and permission has been obtained from  
> private land-owners. The sites of rare nesting birds should be  
> divulged only to the proper conservation authorities.
> 1(d) Stay on roads, trails, and paths where they exist; otherwise  
> keep habitat disturbance to a minimum.
>
> Thanks for reading.
>
> Eileen Dowd Stukel and Casey Heimerl
> SDGFP, Pierre
>
>




------------------------------------
Posted by: tlsohl AT alliancecom.net
------------------------------------


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Subject: Owl roost site visits
From: "'Dowd Stukel, Eileen' eileen.dowdstukel AT state.sd.us [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 22:17:03 +0000
This winter appears to be a "good owl year" and there's been a lot of 
list-serve talk about wintering owl roost sites. While it's great that birders 
are able to see new and sometimes rare species, we've become increasingly 
concerned about the safety and long-term effects of some activities. 


As we all know, many owl species are nocturnal. They select sites for daytime 
roosting that provide a place to rest and protection from the elements, 
predators and disturbance. When they are repeatedly visited at roost sites, 
especially up-close and personal, they are using valuable energy from the 
stress caused by the disturbance. They may be disturbed to the point of 
flushing, which not only uses even more energy, but exposes them to potential 
predators during the day, a time when they are more vulnerable. Repeatedly 
playing calls at sites night after night can also cause unnecessary stress and 
related loss of energy reserves. 


The idea that the northern saw-whet owl is tame or curious about you because 
you can approach it easily at its daytime roost is wrong. This behavior is a 
survival strategy - the owl freezes in place when predators approach in the 
hope it won't be detected. 


Agencies often caution against disturbing bald eagles at their daytime winter 
roosts for the reasons we've listed, and the same cautions (and common sense) 
apply here. In our opinion, birders should set the example for viewing wildlife 
in a way that does not threaten or jeopardize the health and safety of the 
animals they are viewing. 


Here are some tips to help you responsibly enjoy these incredible birds:

1. Watch for signs that the owl is becoming stressed with your presence. A 
disturbed owl will elongate, raising the crown feathers above its widened eyes 
and will often try to conceal itself behind a hunched shoulder. If the 
disturbance continues, the owl will begin to act excited, bobbing its head and 
shifting its feet before flying to a new perch. 

2.     If you flushed an owl from a roost, do not continue searching for it.
3. Be content with observing the owl and getting a photograph from a distance. 
Just because you can get close to an owl doesn't mean it isn't bothered by your 
presence. 


The American Bird Association has a code of ethics that we as birders should 
strive to meet: (http://www.aba.org/about/abaethics.pdf). The first section is 
included here: 


1. Promote the welfare of birds and their environment.
1(a) Support the protection of important bird habitat.
1(b) To avoid stressing birds or exposing them to danger, exercise restraint 
and caution during observation, photography, sound recording, or filming. Limit 
the use of recordings and other methods of attracting birds, and never use such 
methods in heavily birded areas or for attracting any species that is 
Threatened, Endangered, or of Special Concern, or is rare in your local area. 
Keep well back from nests and nesting colonies, roosts, display areas, and 
important feeding sites. In such sensitive areas, if there is a need for 
extended observation, photography, filming, or recording, try to use a blind or 
hide, and take advantage of natural cover. Use artificial light sparingly for 
filming or photography, especially for close-ups. 

1(c) Before advertising the presence of a rare bird, evaluate the potential for 
disturbance to the bird, its surroundings, and other people in the area, and 
proceed only if access can be controlled, disturbance can be minimized, and 
permission has been obtained from private land-owners. The sites of rare 
nesting birds should be divulged only to the proper conservation authorities. 

1(d) Stay on roads, trails, and paths where they exist; otherwise keep habitat 
disturbance to a minimum. 


Thanks for reading.

Eileen Dowd Stukel and Casey Heimerl
SDGFP, Pierre
Subject: Duel County Snowy Owl
From: "'Jensen, Kent' kent.jensen AT sdstate.edu [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 20:21:54 +0000
A former student called to inform me of a snowy owl adjacent to Hwy 15, about 5 
miles south of Clear Lake, SD. 


K. C. Jensen, Ph.D.
Department of Natural Resource Management
SPB 138D, Box 2140B
South Dakota State University
Brookings, SD  57007
(605)688-4781 (office)
(605)690-6104 (cell)
(605)688-4515 (FAX)
wfs.sdstate.edu/wfsdept/faculty/kcjensen.htm
100% of the shots you don't take don't go in - Wayne Gretzky
Subject: Snowy owl near summit
From: "Barry Parkin nun2brite2002 AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 10:02:36 -0600
I have been seeing a fairly white female snowy 2 miles west of summit on US 12 
if anyone is passing through that area. Still seeing the all white male in 
Edmunds county a mile or so north of US 12 on the Wetonka road 


Barry Parkin

“The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant, "What 
good is it?" If the land mechanism as a whole is good, then every part is good, 
whether we understand it or not. If the biota, in the course of aeons, has 
built something we like but do not understand, then who but a fool would 
discard seemingly useless parts? To keep every cog and wheel is the first 
precaution of intelligent tinkering.” 

― Aldo Leopold




------------------------------------
Posted by: Barry Parkin 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Four Saw-whet Day - Newton Hills (Photos and Video)
From: "'Terry Sohl' tlsohl AT alliancecom.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 21:16:44 -0600
What a fantastic day!  The day started with me swearing like a sailor, after
three hours of bush-wacking through cedars at Newton Hills yielded nothing
but hints of owls.  I've spent a LOT of hours looking this winter, but
hadn't seen a Saw-whet yet.  That ended today!! Soon came Saw-whet #1, then
3 more followed, all four right in and around Newton Hills.

 

2 were found near the Horse camp, 2 were found around Lake Lakota.  Note I
made a page with directions and maps for people who might want to try to
find them.  That page is here:

 

http://sdakotabirds.com/sawwhet_2015_NHills/sawwhets_2015_NewtonHills.htm

 

Of the 4, 2 are easy to find, 2 are tougher.  One is ridiculously easy
(Saw-whet #3 on the page above), right by the parking lot at Lake Lakota.
Of the four, one actually flushed (first flushing saw-whet I've had, in
admittedly limited experience), but the other 3 were as cooperative and
unconcerned as they usually are.  I managed to get some very nice photos of
one, and for a change, also tried video.  Note I don't know how to embed
video on my website, so for now, if you click on the link and download the
file you can look at about a minute-long video of a live blinking saw-whet.


Photos and video of the different owls.  Note the top 2 really good photos
are Sawwhet #3, the "easy" one:

 

http://sdakotabirds.com/species_photos/northern_sawwhet_owl_7.htm

 

http://sdakotabirds.com/species_photos/northern_sawwhet_owl_8.htm

 

http://sdakotabirds.com/species_photos/northern_sawwhet_owl_9.htm

 

http://sdakotabirds.com/species_photos/northern_sawwhet_owl_10.htm

 

http://sdakotabirds.com/species_photos/northern_sawwhet_owl_11.htm

 

http://sdakotabirds.com/sawwhet_2015_NHills/Sawwhet_Owl_Newton_Hills.mp4
(This is the video file of a Saw-whet)

 

 

Terry Sohl

Brandon

 

 
Subject: Snowy Owls
From: "Cheryl Vellenga killdeer54 AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 18:05:22 +0000 (UTC)
After weeks of fruitless searching, I have finally seen 2 Snowy Owls in the 
hills west of Sisseton during the past few days thanks to reports from 
non-birders.  Both are along Drywood Lake Rd and a few miles apart.  One of 
the owls I saw today was near the intersection of SD Hwy 10 and Drywood Lake Rd 
(as it is known south of the i'section) and 451st Ave (as it is known north of 
the i'section).  At first, this owl was on the north side along SD Hwy 10 on 
the 5th utility pole west of 451st.  It flew NE to the 5th util pole north 
from Hwy 10 on the east side of 451st Ave.  When I returned an hour later, it 
had moved farther north to the 15th util pole up 451st.  This owl was reported 
to me likely to be spotted along the 1st mile south of SD Hwy 10 on Drywood 
Lake Rd along with a possible 2nd Snowy in that area. 

Another Snowy Owl that seems to consistent is the one I first viewed on Jan 22, 
then Jan 26 and again today.  It is on Drywood Lake Rd from 123rd St south 
about 3/4 mile, and on 123rd St to the west 1/4 mile.  Again, perched on top 
of utility poles.  Non-birder reports are that these owls have been in these 
locations for quite some time. 


Snow Buntings continue to abound around the area.  They are mostly in smaller 
flocks of 25 to 75, but the largest flock I've seen had 360 Snow Buntings (no 
other species were found mixed in).  This was east of Sica Hollow on 112th St, 
about 1/2 mile east of 451st Ave.  This is a late report on that flock and it 
was not there when I returned. Cheryl Vellenga 

Sisseton, SD
Subject: snowy owl
From: "'Dowd Stukel, Eileen' eileen.dowdstukel AT state.sd.us [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 17:18:01 +0000
One of our staff observed a snowy owl twice on January 22, 2015 two miles east 
of Holabird (Hyde County) along Highway 14. 


Eileen Dowd Stukel
SD Game, Fish and Parks
Pierre, SD
Subject: Re: Saw whey
From: "Terry Sohl tlsohl AT alliancecom.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 10:42:39 -0600
Btw will be around here most of day if anyone wants me to lead you to the one 
sitting still. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 27, 2015, at 10:32 AM, Terry Sohl  wrote:
> 
> Found!! Two I just wanted to finally see a sawwhet this winter. Found two 
near horse camp at Newton Hills as described by Chris and Joe this weekend. So 
far have seen two, bad photos of one. 

> 
> Terry Sohl
> 
> Sent from my iPhone


------------------------------------
Posted by: Terry Sohl 
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Subject: Saw whey
From: "Terry Sohl tlsohl AT alliancecom.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 10:32:28 -0600
Found!! Two I just wanted to finally see a sawwhet this winter. Found two near 
horse camp at Newton Hills as described by Chris and Joe this weekend. So far 
have seen two, bad photos of one. 


Terry Sohl

Sent from my iPhone

------------------------------------
Posted by: Terry Sohl 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Continuing Snowy Owl (Pennington County)
From: "Richard Latuchie rlatuchie AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 20:36:02 -0700
I saw my County Snowy Owl at 5:15 in generally the same location reported by 
Nancy Drilling and Jocie Baker - 160th St., about 2.7 miles north of SD44. No 
work required on my part, it had already been located by Bob and Cathy Druckrey 
and Jonalyn Yancy. We had good looks at the Owl on several perches, and in a 
field. Very nice. 


Dick Latuchie
Rapid City

visit my website, Birding in South Dakota
http://ebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/SD-Birding+in+South+Dakota 
 

Subject: Canyon Lake Park, Rapid City
From: "'Jocelyn Baker' osprey AT midco.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 19:49:07 -0700
We continue to survey the birds at Canyon Lake Park weekly.  Total number of
species, especially waterfowl, is lower than other years.  The only bird of
note for many weeks has been the Pied-billed Grebe which managed to survive
a huge ice jam break-up a few weeks ago west of the Chapel Lane bridge.  An
adult Bald Eagle (or two) is being seen as well as an occasional buteo.  If
we observe a species which is unusual we will post that immediately.
Otherwise, we will only post sightings every now-and-then. The spillway and
dredging of the lake is scheduled to be complete in June, 2015.

Ingrid Arlton, Jocelyn Baker, Gene Hess, Larry Putnam -  Rapid City
Subject: Northern Hills Bird Club Meeting on Feb. 5th, 2015
From: "'Brunko' ebab AT midco.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 18:00:07 -0700
There will be a meeting of the Northern Hills Bird Club on Feb.5th at 7:oo pm 
at the Sturgis Library. Nancy Drilling will give a refresher course on owls in 
preparation for the upcoming NHBC Owl Prowl. Non-members are welcome and 
refreshments will be served. 


In case of inclement weather the meeting will be cancelled and the announcement 
will be posted on this website by 4:00 pm the day of the meeting. For further 
information call the number below. 


Ardys Brunko, Pres. NHBC
Ph# 605-791-2832
Subject: Possible Gyrfalcon, Faulk Co.
From: "mmelius AT hcinet.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 10:23:31 -0500 (EST)
I heard a new bird call this morning, at the family farmstead
northeast of Faulkton. I'd opened the door to let the dog out and
heard a series of about 15 calls from our trees. It was just after 7
am, too dark to see much. They were loud, raspy sounds, reminiscent of
a Mallard's quack but screechy. By the time I got coat and binocs, it
had moved to trees on the other side of our yard, called again about
ten times, then seemed to fly away to the south. Some of the recorded
Gyrfalcon calls I've listened to online sound much like what I heard.
I'll keep an eye out today to try to find it for sure.

Michael Melius
Subject: Re: PENNINGTON CTY.: Snowy Owl south of New Underwood
From: "Becky Leas rrleas AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 20:59:34 -0700
We went out yesterday at 4:30 and couldn't find it

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 25, 2015, at 8:03 PM, 'Jocelyn Baker' osprey AT midco.net [sd-birds] 
 wrote: 

> 
> At 5:15 p.m. today, January 25, in semi-darkness, Nancy Drilling and I 
relocated the Snowy Owl that she observed on Friday, January 23 on the New 
Underwood Road (160th St.). Near the location where Nancy observed it on 
Friday, it was approximately 2 ¾ - 3 miles north of the intersection of 
Highway #44 and 160th Street. It was perched on a road sign on the east side of 
the road. 

> 
> Jocelyn Lee Baker, Rapid City
> 
> From: sd-birds AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:sd-birds AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Nancy Drilling nancy.drilling AT rmbo.org [sd-birds] 

> Sent: Friday, January 23, 2015 6:40 PM
> To: sd-birds AT yahoogroups.com; NHBC AT yahoogroups.com
> Subject: [sd-birds] Re: snowy owl south of New Underwood
> 
> This evening I relocated the snowy owl south of New Underwood in Pennington 
County. It was about 8 miles south of New Underwood on the blacktop, or 3 1/4 
miles north of Hwy 44 on 160 St. Technically it was on Baseline Rd - it was 
just east of the curve where Baseline Rd (which is an east-west road) turns 
south and becomes 160 St. It was on top of a telephone pole next to the road. 

> 
> Nancy Drilling
> 
> -----
> Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory
> Rapid City, SD 
> 
> www.rmbo.org  
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
> 
> 
Subject: PENNINGTON CTY.: Snowy Owl south of New Underwood
From: "'Jocelyn Baker' osprey AT midco.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 20:03:32 -0700
At 5:15 p.m. today, January 25, in semi-darkness, Nancy Drilling and I 
relocated the Snowy Owl that she observed on Friday, January 23 on the New 
Underwood Road (160th St.). Near the location where Nancy observed it on 
Friday, it was approximately 2 ¾ - 3 miles north of the intersection of 
Highway #44 and 160th Street. It was perched on a road sign on the east side of 
the road. 


Jocelyn Lee Baker, Rapid City

 

From: sd-birds AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:sd-birds AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Nancy Drilling nancy.drilling AT rmbo.org [sd-birds] 

Sent: Friday, January 23, 2015 6:40 PM
To: sd-birds AT yahoogroups.com; NHBC AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sd-birds] Re: snowy owl south of New Underwood

 

  

This evening I relocated the snowy owl south of New Underwood in Pennington 
County. It was about 8 miles south of New Underwood on the blacktop, or 3 1/4 
miles north of Hwy 44 on 160 St. Technically it was on Baseline Rd - it was 
just east of the curve where Baseline Rd (which is an east-west road) turns 
south and becomes 160 St. It was on top of a telephone pole next to the road. 


Nancy Drilling


-----
Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory
Rapid City, SD 

www.rmbo.org  





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------
Posted by: "Jocelyn Baker" 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Northern Hills Bird Club Field Trip Report
From: "'Brunko' ebab AT midco.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 17:07:57 -0700
Seven members and five guests participated in a Field Trip in the Spearfish, 
Red Water and Crow Peak area on Sat. Jan. 24th. The trip leader was George 
Opitz. It was a warm day but very windy with intermitent rain. 



 Species observed were: Canada Geese 400, Common Goldeneye 2, Mallards 20, 
Golden Eagle 3, Ferruginous Hawk 1, Northern Harrier 5, Rough-legged Hawk 2, 
Red-tailed Hawk 3, Sharp Tail Grouse 3, Turkeys 35, Rock Dove 11, EC Dove 40, 
Downy Woodpecker 1, Northern Flicker 1, American Crow 7, Magpie 1, Black-capped 
Chicadee 3, European Starling 120. 


Highlights of the trip were the many flocks of Canada Geese and two Red Tailed 
Hawks that were together and while we watched, one went and sat on a nest for a 
short while. 


The next event of the NHBC will be the meeting on Feb. 5th at the Sturgis 
Library. 


Ardys Brunko, Pres. NHBC
Ph# 605-791-2832
Subject: Re: Newton Hills owls, Goshawk
From: "jdco2pock AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 24 Jan 2015 17:26:33 -0800
A handful of photos from today: https://www.flickr.com/photos/111697331 AT N02/ 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/111697331 AT N02/ 


 

 Joe C
 Sioux Falls
  

Subject: Newton Hills owls, Goshawk
From: "'Chris Anderson' canderson1 AT sio.midco.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 18:57:00 -0600
Very early this morning Joe Coppock and I went down to Newton Hills SP to
look/listen for owls.  Between 5:30 and 7:00 a.m., we managed to find (hear,
mostly) five species, pretty much duplicating what the group found at the
Canton CBC a few weeks ago.

2 Northern Saw-whets calling at the horse camp, on the hillside north of the
parking lot
2 more Saw-whets calling from various spots north and south at Lake Lakota
2 Long-eared Owls calling at Lake Lakota, north of the beach parking lot
6 Great Horned Owls in numerous spots, mostly in pairs
1 Eastern Screech-Owl calling near the canoe launch on the Big Sioux River
1 Barred Owl perched in a tree along the road just south of the Boy Scout
camp

To top off a great two-hour period, we found a raptor in silhouette against
the sunrise near the Lake Lakota boat launch entrance.  After waiting for
the light to improve, it proved to be a Northern Goshawk, which then
proceeded to fly directly over the car and on northward.

Eventually we ended up hiking around Lake Herman SP near Madison.  The
feeders at the park were productive, with several Red-breasted Nuthatches,
Pine Siskins, and Purple Finches among a lot of Goldfinches.  We also found
another Great Horned Owl, Brown Creepers, and at least one Northern Shrike.
On the way back to SF we found a Fox Sparrow at Wall Lake.


Chris Anderson
Sioux Falls, SD





------------------------------------
Posted by: "Chris Anderson" 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Saturday
From: "'Ricky Olson' tatanka40 AT pie.midco.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 18:22:18 -0600
Birded Ft Pierre  and North today

 

Highlights

 

Stanley Co-Gulls-Glaucous-3, Iceland, Thayer's, Herring, Ring-billed,
California

 

Sully Co- Common Redpoll flock

 

Walworth (lake Hiddenwood SP)- Bohemian Waxwing, Townsend's Solitaire,
Goshawk

 

 

Sharing is half the fun of Birding

 

Ricky D. Olson

Ft  Pierre SD

 
Subject: Re: snowy owl south of New Underwood
From: "Nancy Drilling nancy.drilling AT rmbo.org [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 18:40:10 -0700
This evening I relocated the snowy owl south of New Underwood in Pennington
County. It was about 8 miles south of New Underwood on the blacktop, or 3
1/4 miles north of Hwy 44 on 160 St. Technically it was on Baseline Rd - it
was just east of the curve where Baseline Rd (which is an east-west road)
turns south and becomes 160 St. It was on top of a telephone pole next to
the road.

Nancy Drilling

-----
Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory
Rapid City, SD

*www.rmbo.org *
Subject: snowy owl south of New Underwood
From: "'Maggie Engler' birdwoman AT q.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 13:06:35 -0700
Tom Krafka reported to me that he observed a snowy owl between 5 and 6 miles
south of New Underwood along the main black top road on Thursday Jan 22. He
is going back this afternoon, Jan 23,  to try and see it a second time.

 

Maggie Engler

Rapid City SD
Subject: Brookings Pine Warbler
From: "'Jensen, Kent' kent.jensen AT sdstate.edu [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 19:04:24 +0000
I've just been made aware of a Brookings resident who has had a pine warbler 
frequenting his suet feeder this winter. I've posted photos to the SDOU 
Facebook Page. Unfortunately, he hasn't seen the bird in over a week now. The 
photos were taken in late December, 2014. If it reappears, I'll notify folks. 


KC

K. C. Jensen, Ph.D.
Department of Natural Resource Management
SPB 138D, Box 2140B
South Dakota State University
Brookings, SD  57007
(605)688-4781 (office)
(605)690-6104 (cell)
(605)688-4515 (FAX)
wfs.sdstate.edu/wfsdept/faculty/kcjensen.htm
100% of the shots you don't take don't go in - Wayne Gretzky
Subject: Bald Eagle Days - Yankton, SD
From: "'Preheim, Kelly' Kelly.Preheim AT k12.sd.us [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 18:28:47 +0000
I have not attended this event yet, but I thought people may want to know about 
Bald Eagle Days this weekend, Jan. 24th -25th near Yankton, SD. It is a free 
event that teaches people more about Bald Eagles and raptors. Please let folks 
know who have children because it is really important to get the children to 
love nature and birds as we do. I am sure the kids would love the live raptor 
show! Follow the link below for more information. 


http://www.nwo.usace.army.mil/Media/NewsReleases/tabid/1835/Article/559100/bald-eagle-days-returns-to-gavins-point-dam.aspx 




Kelly

https://www.flickr.com/photos/rookiebirder/


"Wilderness is not a luxury, but a necessity of the human spirit..." ~ Edward 
Abbey 



"Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent, if no birds sang 
except those that sang best." ~ Henry Van Dyke 
Subject: Custer Co. birds
From: "mmelius AT hcinet.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 20:39:55 -0500 (EST)
This morning I heard a Sharp-tailed Grouse clucking from a lek site
about a mile west of my place in NE Custer Co. I drove over to the
county road for a closer look & listen,within a half mile of the
lek.I saw one grouse sticking its head out of the grass, which may
have been the onlyone there. That's early for lek activity.

Sound does travel well in calm air here in the broadSpring Creek
valley. A couple nights ago I heard a E. Screech Owl calling, probably
from the trees along the creek, a good 1.5 miles away.

There was a Short-eared Owl here on Jan 9, but not many other raptors
to report lately.

The local flock of Gray Partridge is down to eight members.

A Northern Shrike has been a regular visitor here, mornings and near
sunset usually. This morning it was singing almost sweetly. It looks
like the same one that was here in December. I haven't seen it catch a
bird, though it tries. I did find the guts of a small rodent hanging
in the plum thicket, with fur on the snow below, probablya credit to
the shrike.

Onthe morning ofJan. 17 Ifound some Lapland Longspurs scattered
over the prairie in the Folsom School Section. Nice to find them in
natural habitat for a change instead of a roadside or stubble field!

Michael Melius
Folsom
Subject: weekend Snowy Owls - northeast
From: "Nancy Drilling nancy.drilling AT rmbo.org [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 08:26:57 -0700
Sunday and Monday I journeyed to the northeast part of the state for
birding. Snowy Owls were the highlight - I saw six different individuals:
- southeastern McPherson County - two south of Wetonka on Wetonka Rd
(reported previously by other people)
- eastern Edmunds County - one roosting on (literally) 133 St. just west of
Wetonka Rd; one along Hwy 45 1/2 mi south of McPherson County line
- western Faulk County - one along Hwy 212 just west of Hwy 47
- central Walworth County -one  along Hwy 247 north of 129 St.

Other highlights: a small flock of Common Grackles in Eagle Butte, Dewey
County; a Great Horned Owl calling at Lake Faulkton at 1 in the afternoon;
Richmond Lake flock of 20+ Purple Finches as well as a Brown Creeper and a
Northern Cardinal.

Nancy Drilling

-----
Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory
Rapid City, SD

*www.rmbo.org *
Subject: Fort Pierre
From: "'Ricky Olson' tatanka40 AT pie.midco.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 08:54:17 -0600
Not much different here.

 

Gulls- 2-3 Glaucous, 1-Iceland, 2-3 Thayer's, 1-California,  up to 90
Herring Gulls at times.

 

The Ring-billed Gulls -(7-10) they never left this year when it got real
cold, normally they leave for 3-5 weeks during the coldest part of winter.. 

 

Lots of Geese.

 

I could not relocate some uncommon winter songbirds or owls this weekend.

 

Raptors very local, I did see 1 Gyrfalcon and 1 Prairie Falcon this 3 day
weekend.

 

 

Sharing is half the fun of Birding

 

Ricky D. Olson

Ft  Pierre SD

 
Subject: pipeline
From: "mick zerr zerrmick AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 16:01:40 +0000 (UTC)
Some birders were asking about the new oil pipeline that will cross many bird 
related areas.  Here is some info.   The Dakota Access Pipline hearings are 
as follows: Two more PUC meetings would be held Jan. 22 in Iroquois at the 
school gymnasium from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and in Sioux Falls at the Ramkota 
Hotel and Conference Center’s Roosevelt room from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.The 
Argus article   Blog discussion is here: Madville Times (this has a 
connection to the map route also). 

MickSFBC



|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Madville TimesFrom Madison to Spearfish, political news and commentary for 
all of the great state of South Dakota | 

|  |
| View on madvilletimes.com | Preview by Yahoo |
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|   |

 
Subject: Presho/Kennebec area raptors
From: "'Terry Sohl' tlsohl AT alliancecom.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 21:29:30 -0600
I went to the central part of the state to get my raptor fix today, getting
to the Presho area around dawn and birding most of the day.  Most of my day
was spent around Kennebec-Presho-Murdo corridor near I-90, but I also zipped
up to Pierre and the dam by mid-morning.  As has been the case for the last
few years, the Grasslands themselves are pretty darn quiet compared to
further south.

 

Nothing too exciting for the day, but certainly a lot of the usual suspects,
and a wonderful variety of raptors.  No owls (including searching for
Saw-whets for a bit.again.at Billy Goat Jump), but most of the expected
buteos and falcons.  At least 40 Rough-legged Hawks throughout the day (was
keeping track for a while on eBird, but haven't looked to tally them up),
with good numbers of Red-tailed Hawks as well.  In the Presho area where I
spent most of the day, there were at least half a dozen each of Bald and
Golden Eagles, as well as a number of harriers.  I came across yet another
Bald Eagle nest in the area that I hadn't seen before.  Only one Prairie
Falcon (in Jones County) for the day, also a couple of Northern Shrikes, and
one Merlin who looked like she had just caught a Starling (near Kennebec).  

 

5 miles west of Presho was the lightest colored Red-tailed Hawks I've seen,
so white I had something else in mind when I first saw it.  I guess I've
never seen a true Krider's like that before.  There were also scattered
Western Meadowlarks around the area.

 

I didn't spend much time up around Pierre, just enough to pick up a couple
of Ring-billed Gulls hanging with the Herring Gulls, a handful of (Common)
Goldeneyes and Mergansers, and some Robins at Billy Goat Jump.  I also swear
Eurasian Collared-Doves have just exploded in the last year or two, as every
small town seemed to have dozens and dozens.


Oh, one more thing, something that made the day MUCH more enjoyable!  After
15 years, yes, I finally have a nice pair of binoculars!  I therefore am the
last birder on the planet to actually use binoculars when birding, rather
than relying solely on my camera.  

 

Some photos from the day:

 

http://sdakotabirds.com/species_photos/merlin_12.htm

 

http://sdakotabirds.com/species_photos/raptors/red_tailed_hawk_25.htm

 

http://sdakotabirds.com/species_photos/raptors/ferruginous_hawk_25.htm

 

http://sdakotabirds.com/species_photos/prairie_falcon_26.htm

 

http://sdakotabirds.com/species_photos/raptors/bald_eagle_26.htm

 

http://sdakotabirds.com/species_photos/golden_eagle_13.htm

 

http://sdakotabirds.com/species_photos/raptors/rough_legged_hawk_32.htm

 

Terry Sohl
Brandon
Subject: Ft. Randall Dam - Charles Mix
From: "'Preheim, Kelly' Kelly.Preheim AT k12.sd.us [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 02:18:29 +0000
Ron and I met up with Sioux Falls birders Nancy and Lynne at the Ft. Randall 
Dam. There was a huge difference in waterfowl numbers compared to last week and 
they were all cleared out of the tailrace. The Bald Eagle numbers were way down 
too, but there were still 50+. Other birds of note were: Red-breasted and 
Common Mergansers, Common Goldeneye, many Mallards, Pied-billed Grebes, one 
American White Pelican, Long-tailed Duck, American Kestrel, Northern Shrike, a 
Yellow-rumped Warbler, 200 American Crows, a nice flock of Cedar Waxwings. I 
also saw a Rough-legged Hawk at the refuge on the way there. 


I showed them the Snowy Owl before they headed east and it was still there at 
5:00 PM, but it was very far off. It was a very weather for winter birding! 


Images from today on my Flickr site: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rookiebirder/ 


Kelly Preheim

Armour, SD

http://birdteach.blogspot.com/


"Wilderness is not a luxury, but a necessity of the human spirit..." ~ Edward 
Abbey 


"Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent, if no birds sang 
except those that sang best." ~ Henry Van Dyke 
Subject: Snowy Owl - Douglas county
From: "'Preheim, Kelly' Kelly.Preheim AT k12.sd.us [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 16:43:26 +0000
A farmer friend of mine texted this morning that he saw a Snowy Owl sitting on 
a fence post east of town, so I went to check it out. It didn't take long until 
I saw what looks like a small snowman out in the field. That Snowy Owl was a 
great sight to see! I haven't seen one it quite awhile. It sat for 15 minutes 
or so and then flew farther off and sat for awhile longer. The location is Hwy 
44 and 398th Ave. It was 1.5 miles south of that intersection on a gravel road. 
It is a wide road and it is clear of snow. I will post photos this evening, but 
for now I need to get out and enjoy this beautiful January weather! 



Kelly Preheim

Armour, SD

"Wilderness is not a luxury, but a necessity of the human spirit..." ~ Edward 
Abbey 


"Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent, if no birds sang 
except those that sang best." ~ Henry Van Dyke 
Subject: SFBC field trip results
From: "Chris Anderson canderson1 AT sio.midco.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 2015 21:36:32 -0600
Today five birders met and checked out a number of spots in and around Sioux 
Falls. It was pretty windy but we managed to find 23 species. There was a good 
amount of waterfowl at the Big Sioux River spillway and in the fields along 
Redwood Blvd. Raptors were fairly abundant along Bahnson/Sycamore Avenues in 
the northeast part of town, and two out of three Bald Eagle nests in that area 
were occupied. We also found a flock of about 15 Red Crossbills hanging out at 
Mount Pleasant Cemetery. 


Full species list:
Canada Goose
Cackling Goose
Mallard
Common Goldeneye
Wild Turkey
Ring-necked Pheasant
Bald Eagle
Red-tailed Hawk
Rough-legged Hawk
Rock Pigeon
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
American Crow
Black-capped Chickadee
White-breasted Nuthatch
American Robin
European Starling
Northern Cardinal
Dark-eyed Junco
Red-winged Blackbird
Red Crossbill
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

Chris Anderson
Sioux Falls, SD




------------------------------------
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Subject: bald eagles
From: "David Carpentr dak.carpenter AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 2015 04:24:13 +0000 (UTC)
We were looking for snowy owls or sage grouse, but found 9 bald eagles in a 
field north of Highway 212 east of Orman Dam, near Riley Rd. 

dave
Subject: Blackbird location
From: "nun2brite2002 AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 17:57:38 -0600
Gonna get scolded if I don't put that I am from Aberdeen. The blackbirds were 
1.3 miles south of the humane society 


Barry Parkin

“The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant, "What 
good is it?" If the land mechanism as a whole is good, then every part is good, 
whether we understand it or not. If the biota, in the course of aeons, has 
built something we like but do not understand, then who but a fool would 
discard seemingly useless parts? To keep every cog and wheel is the first 
precaution of intelligent tinkering.” 

― Aldo Leopold




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Subject: Blackbirds
From: "nun2brite2002 AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 17:51:48 -0600
Came upon a flock of blackbirds this evening. When I first saw them they 
flushed and the flock flew right over me. There was an adult male red-winged 
and an adult male yellow-headed in the flock. Got a look at a portion of the 
flock through a spotting scope and saw only red-wingeds 


Barry Parkin

“The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant, "What 
good is it?" If the land mechanism as a whole is good, then every part is good, 
whether we understand it or not. If the biota, in the course of aeons, has 
built something we like but do not understand, then who but a fool would 
discard seemingly useless parts? To keep every cog and wheel is the first 
precaution of intelligent tinkering.” 

― Aldo Leopold




------------------------------------
Posted by: nun2brite2002 AT gmail.com
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Subject: Northern Hills Bird Club - Field Trip on Jan. 24th
From: "'Brunko' ebab AT midco.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2015 16:25:49 -0700
 The Northern Hills Bird club will conduct a field trip in the Spearfish - 
Belle Fourche area on Sat. Jan.24th. Meet at the Spearfish McDonald's at 7:30 
am for an 8:00 am departure. This will be a half day trip. Participants are 
asked to bring their personal radios to stay in communication with the group. 
For further information contact George Opitz at 605-642-5325. 


Ardys Brunko, Pres. NHBC
Ph# 605-791-2832
Subject: Glaucous Gull
From: "'R&M Mabie' rmmabie AT hcinet.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2015 17:35:25 -0600
Observed a Glaucous Gull below Ft Randall Dam earlier this afternoon. This was 
the only gull seen. 


Ron Mabie
Pickstown, SD
Subject: Sage grouse
From: "Elizabeth Krueger ekrueger AT rushmore.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 20:47:04 -0700
Yesterday at Orman Dam in Butte County my dog pointed a patch of thick 
grass and out flew two sage grouse. Bit of a surprise since I was 
expecting something more the size of partridge, and because the closest 
to Orman we've previously seen sage grouse is about 20 miles NW. After 
watching them fly off, I turned around and here's one of Darin's 
short-eared owls doing a flyby. Cool, and unexpected.

Elizabeth Krueger
Spearfish, SD

Subject: Hoodies
From: "mick zerr zerrmick AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 23:05:19 +0000 (UTC)
As you might know, SFBC maintains a neat bird feeding complex at   Good 
Earth at Blood Run State Park, and a wildlife blind at the Dewey  Gevik 
 Outdooor Learning Area just west of Wall Lake. We go through 25 pounds of 
sunflower seed a week ($21 for 50 pounds), and two blocks of suet per week at 
75 cents each. To fund these ongoing projects, SFBC is offering nice warm 
hooded SFBC sweatshirts for a $25 donation. See info at: Donation Center 

The hooded Sweatshirts are Hanes 50/50 made in Latin America, and are forest 
green.  Sizes are M-L-XL-XXL You can order on the SFBC website using PayPal, 
and have the option to pick the shirt up  ($25) -can be picked up at Mick's or 
at the OC by arrangement. If you wish, we can have your's ready at next 
month's evening meeting at the Outdoor Campus, or they can be mailed.  With 
postage, they will be $32.   

Mick
|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Donation CenterSioux Falls Bird Club    Green Hooded Sweatshirts $25 
donation Profit goes to maintain Good Earth State Park feeder complex, and 
Dewey Gevik Outdoor L... | 

|  |
| View on www.siouxfallsbirdcl... | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|  
 |


|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| SD GFP | State Parks | Directory | Good EarthGood Earth State Park southeast 
of Sioux Falls is an important cultural and historical site as well as 
a unique nature retreat  adjacent to the most developed... | 

|  |
| View on gfp.sd.gov | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |

  
|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Gevik SiteLOCALLY LED SUCCESS The Dewey C. Gevik Outdoor Conservation 
Learning Area has been developed as an interpretive educational experience open 
to th... | 

|  |
| View on minnehahacd.org | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |


 To fund these ongoing projects, SFBC is offering nice warm hooded SFBC 
sweatshirts for a $25 donation. See info at: Donation Center 

The hooded Sweatshirts are Hanes 50/50 made in Latin America, and are forest 
green.  Sizes are M-L-XL-XXL You can order on the SFBC website using PayPal, 
and have the option to pick the shirt up  ($25) -can be picked up at Mick's or 
at the OC, by arrangement. If you wish, we can have your's ready at next 
month's evening meeting at the Outdoor Campus, or they can be mailed.  With 
postage, they will be $32.   

Mick
|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Donation CenterSioux Falls Bird Club    Green Hooded Sweatshirts $25 
donation Profit goes to maintain Good Earth State Park feeder complex, and 
Dewey Gevik Outdoor L... | 

|  |
| View on www.siouxfallsbirdcl... | Preview by Yahoo |
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Subject: Re: SD membership renewals
From: "linda JhnsnLn AT aol.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 15:37:19 -0500
Greetings birders,

It's that time of year again! Please send your SDOU membership renewals to 
Treasurer Rosemary Draeger at 2520 E. Whisper Trail, Sioux Falls, SD 57108. 


If you have questions about your membership status, you may email me at 
jhnsnln AT aol.com. Your status is noted on the mailing jacket of your SD Bird 
Notes 


We appreciate your continued support:)

Great birding,

Linda Johnson
Membership Chair
Subject: Spring?
From: "darin.newton AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 11 Jan 2015 20:20:32 -0800
Today, we had a Harris's Sparrow at our feeders that was very much in vibrant 
breeding plumage (was striking compared to the others that we've been seeing), 
and a few days ago had a White-crowned Sparrow singing its heart out. I wonder 
if they know something we don't? Also, we had a single Redpoll at our feeders 
for 1 day, the first we've seen for a few months. 


 Forgot to post this earlier, but I saw 2 Short-eared Owls at Orman on Friday. 
They were flying around the first shelter belt you come to off of Susie Peak 
Rd. As always I saw a Great-horned in that shelter belt, along with a few 
sharpies and robins. On the way out I saw a female Harrier, the first one I've 
seen a quite a while. 

 

 Darin Newton
 Belle Fourche
Subject: White-crowned Sparrow
From: "nun2brite2002 AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 11 Jan 2015 14:09:58 -0800
Positively IDed a juvenile White-crowned Sparrow today at the feeders at 
Richmond Lake (Forest Drive) It was very tame and allowed Dan Streifel plenty 
of opportunities to photograph it 

 Barry Parkin
 Aberdeen
Subject: harbingers of spring
From: "George Prisbe-Przybysz przybysz AT hughes.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2015 11:44:33 -0500 (EST)
following up on peter's "harbingers of spring" and elizabeth's recent post - on 
yesterday's snowshoe i came upon two american three-toed woodpeckers drumming 
madly. i heard three-toed drumming a couple of weeks ago, too. what's up with 
that? 



two days ago - while out shoveling - a common raven sauntered by. 


george prisbe 
hanna, lawrence county 
5700' 





"Life is not a paragraph and death i think no parenthesis." e e cummings 

"All my life, I always wanted to be somebody. Now, I realize that I should have 
been more specific." Jane Wagner 


"Reality only reveals itself when it is illuminated by a ray of poetry." 
Georges Braque 


"Reality is poetry, if read in a clear voice." Kenny Putnam 

"I can handle reality in small doses, but as a lifestyle, I find it too 
confining." Jane Wagner 


"Strange as it may seem, my life is based on a true story." Ashleigh Brilliant 
Subject: Snowys
From: "nun2brite2002 AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2015 08:57:58 -0600
Took my usual route from richmond to mina and found two snowys including the 
one 2 miles west of Mina Lake SP. It was on Edmunds County 23 at 132nd street. 
Also Brad McDonald found one just west of Andover and since I was only 7 miles 
behind him at the time I got to see it too 


Barry

“We abuse land because we see it as a commodity belonging to us. When we see 
land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and 
respect.” 

― Aldo Leopoldo

------------------------------------
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Subject: 2 Buffleheads
From: "'Preheim, Kelly' Kelly.Preheim AT k12.sd.us [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2015 03:43:21 +0000
Sorry...I made a mistake typing.  I saw 2 Buffleheads and not 12.


Kelly Preheim

Armour, SD

http://birdteach.blogspot.com/


"Wilderness is not a luxury, but a necessity of the human spirit..." ~ Edward 
Abbey 



"Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent, if no birds sang 
except those that sang best." ~ Henry Van Dyke 
Subject: meadowlarks
From: "petermhill AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 10 Jan 2015 18:43:38 -0800
Despite this not being a particularly warm winter so far, I have seen more 
wintering meadowlarks during the past few weeks than I can remember from any 
year prior. Saw 16 or 17 in Bennett County today, including one flock of nearly 
a dozen. I would love to think they are a harbinger of spring, but I know that 
is not the case, unfortunately. 

 Drove through LaCreek NWR but didn't have much spare time to look around. A 
fair amount of open water, with hundreds of Canada Geese and Mallards, and 
smaller numbers of Co. Merganser and Co. Goldeneye. 10+ eagles (both species, 
all ages) was a highlight of the day. Common as they are, one never tires of 
seeing their massive forms, whether perched or flying. 


 

 Peter Hill
 Pine Ridge
 Oglala Lakota Co.
Subject: NHBC Field Trip Report
From: "treasurecreek AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2015 18:30:41 -0700
Eleven members of the Northern Hills Birds Club (NHBC) participated in a feeder 
tour field trip out of Whitewood, SD on Saturday January 10, 2015. The group 
visited feeders at three homes in the Whitewood area and one feeder in the 
Spearfish area. Twenty-two species were observed at the feeders or en route. In 
addition coffee and snacks were served to observers at two of the homes. 
Highlights of the trip included 33 Evening Grosbeaks at the Fondy feeders, 50 
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finches, Sharp-tailed Grouse, and American Tree Sparrows at 
the Auer feeders, and Lewiss Woodpecker at the Opitz feeders. 


Species observed were: Rough-legged and Red-tailed Hawk, Bald Eagle, 
Sharp-tailed Grouse, Northern Bobwhite (caged), Eurasian-collared Dove, Rock 
Pigeon, Lewiss Woodpecker, Downy and Hairy Woodpecker, Blue Jay, American 
Crow, Black-capped Chickadee, White and Red-breasted Nuthatch, European 
Starling, House Sparrow, Evening Grosbeak, Gray-crowned Rosy-finch, Pine 
Siskin, House Finch, Dark-eyed Junco, and American Tree Sparrow. 


The next event for the NHBC will be the monthly meeting on February 5, 2015 at 
the Sturgis library. 


Photos of todays group can be seen at: 
https://www.flickr.com/groups/1543103 AT N20/?added=2 


Vic Fondy-NHBC
605-269-2553
Subject: Fox Sparrow -Charles Mix county
From: "'Preheim, Kelly' Kelly.Preheim AT k12.sd.us [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2015 22:09:07 +0000
I birded at the Lake Andes NWR and the Ft. Randall Dam in Charles Mix county 
this morning. Interesting birds at the refuge were the Western Meadowlark, 
Northern Shrike, 42 Ring-necked Pheasants, American Tree Sparrows, a 
Sharp-shinned Hawk, and others. 


At the dam I found the 2 Pied-billed Grebes in the same place along with a new 
fellow - a very cold-looking American Coot. I saw one Snow Goose flying over 
with one of many skeins of Canada Geese. There was a lot of waterfowl again 
today, but not as much as last week. Other species I saw: 2 male Long-tailed 
Ducks, 1 Ring-necked Duck, 12 Buffleheads, many Mallards, Common Goldeneye 
{some males seemed to be displaying}, Common Mergansers, American Crows and 
there still were many Bald Eagles with 243 counted. If you like watching Bald 
Eagles, this is a great place to view them! They are so interesting to watch. I 
have new photos on my Flickr site.https://www.flickr.com/photos/rookiebirder/ 


Other birds of note were Dark-eyed Juncos, Hairy, Downy and Red-bellied 
Woodpecker as well as a Northern Flickr. I saw a few Red-tailed Hawks, 
Sharp-shinned Hawk, and a Merlin in Ravinia. I found my second flock of 
Northern Cardinals and Black-capped Chickadees. While I was watching them I 
noticed a rounder, quiet bird behind them. It was a Fox Sparrow. I rarely ever 
see them, so that was a surprise! I got a blurry photo of it, so that was a 
bummer. It was a pretty bird! 


Winter would sure be better, if there were Snowy Owls here.  Just sayin'  :)


Kelly Preheim

Armour, SD

http://birdteach.blogspot.com/


"Wilderness is not a luxury, but a necessity of the human spirit..." ~ Edward 
Abbey 



"Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent, if no birds sang 
except those that sang best." ~ Henry Van Dyke 
Subject: Ruby-crowned Kinglet
From: "Kenny Miller littlebend AT q.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2015 17:00:30 -0500 (EST)
Had a ruby-crowned kinglet in the cedar tree outside our window this afternoon. 
I've never had a ruby- crowned this late into the winter before. 


Kenny Miller
Pierre
Subject: Ivory Gull Chase
From: "Brad McDonald brad AT erstaff.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2015 14:57:19 +0000
SD birders, after I give a talk to the NESD/ Aberdeen Bird club on Saturday, I 
am planning to drive to Quincy IL to chase the Ivory Gull to see it on Sunday, 
thinking of heading south midnight? Still fluid thinking about it……yea, it 
is what we do….chase birds…. 

this will be based on two things, one, no incoming blizzard, and 2, sightings 
of the gull tomorrow, 


The Ivory Gull is only a code 3 bird and this will be a long day but if anyone 
has inclination for a crazy bird chase and wants to meet along I-29 in the 
middle of the night, let me know…….I’m driving my XC60, which is best for 
long distance treks, but if there is an upswell of interest (but maybe everyone 
saw the Oahe Dam bird a few years ago?), I could upgrade to something bigger 
from my fleet 


PS: I know the Packers are playing and as a packer “owner” this is not 
optimal but a guy just has to make choices and sacrifices have to be made 


Brad McDonald
Milbank
605-949-0982

Sent from Windows Mail

Subject: FW: [NHBC] CANCELLATION OF MEETING TONIGHT - 1/8/15
From: "'Gene ' gene AT neopaleo.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2015 16:21:34 -0700
 

 

From: NHBC AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:NHBC AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
'Brunko' ebab AT midco.net [NHBC]
Sent: Thursday, 08 January, 2015 3:32 PM
To: SDOU; Northern Hills Bird Club
Subject: [NHBC] CANCELLATION OF MEETING TONIGHT - 1/8/15

 

  

 

DUE TO THE INCLEMENT WEATHER TONIGHT'S MEETING OF THE NORTHERN HILLS BIRD
CLUB IS CANCELLED.  Our next meeting will be Feb. 5th, 2015 at the Sturgis
Library.

 

Please call the number below with any questions.

 

Ardys Brunko, Pres. NHBC

Ph# 605-791-2832





---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com
Subject: CANCELLATION OF MEETING TONIGHT - 1/8/15
From: "'Brunko' ebab AT midco.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2015 15:31:52 -0700
DUE TO THE INCLEMENT WEATHER TONIGHT'S MEETING OF THE NORTHERN HILLS BIRD CLUB 
IS CANCELLED. Our next meeting will be Feb. 5th, 2015 at the Sturgis Library. 


Please call the number below with any questions.

Ardys Brunko, Pres. NHBC
Ph# 605-791-2832
Subject: Pierre
From: "'Ricky Olson' tatanka40 AT pie.midco.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2015 10:38:19 -0600
 

Today's gulls:

 

Glaucous- 2 immature

Iceland - 1

Thayer's -3  (2 adult, 1 Immature)

California- 1 adult

Herring- almost all adult

Ring-billed - almost all adult

 

 

 

Common Goldeneye  wintering numbers the lowest I have seen. I would be hard
pressed to find 10 individuals.

 

.

 

Sharing is half the fun of Birding

 

Ricky D. Olson

Ft  Pierre SD

 
Subject: 2005 record of Eurasian Tree Sparrow
From: "'dan&erika' danerika AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2015 08:30:25 -0600
Hi All—

There is a record of an Eurasian Tree Sparrow from Huron, South Dakota.
Brief details are in one of my recent blogs:

http://dantallmansbirdblog.blogspot.com/2014/12/eurasian-tree-sparrow.html

The blog also has photos of the sparrow currently visiting a feeder near
Hastings, Minnesota.

dan

-- 
Dan or Erika Tallman
Northfield, Minnesota
danerika AT gmail.com

http://dantallmansbirdblog.blogspot.com

".... the best shod travel with wet feet...Beware of all enterprises that
require new clothes ....”—H. D. Thoreau
Subject: First nest record for 2015?
From: "mmelius AT hcinet.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2015 00:05:28 -0500 (EST)
I saw a pair ofGolden Eagles soaring together north of Hwy 40 while
I drove eastfrom Hermosa today, a cold windy day. Then I saw a large
flock (30-ish) of what mayhave been ST Grouse flying south across
Battle Creek valley, so I found a place to park my vehicle to try to
get a look at them. There was afine herd of pronghorn north of the
road there, and while I took all this in,one of theeagles came
carrying nest material to the old nest that's in the big cottonwood
tree along the creek.

Michael Melius
Folsom
Subject: Yard Birds-Belle Fourche
From: "darin.newton AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 07 Jan 2015 13:30:56 -0800
I pulled into our driveway after running some errands around town and noticed 
quite a bit of activity at our feeders. I decided to stay in the car for a bit 
and ended up seeing 13 species in about 10 minutes: 3 Harris's sparrows, a 
handful of white-crowned sparrows, a few juvenile tree sparrows (of the 
American kind!), house sparrows, house finches, 1 American goldfinch, juncos, 
white-breasted nuthatch, hairy woodpecker, flicker, blue jays, starlings, and a 
collared-dove. That's the most activity we've had at our feeders for quite a 
while! 
Subject: Re: Eurasian Tree Sparrow Update
From: "Paul Roisen roisenp1950 AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2015 10:47:40 -0600
Jeff and all,
  Eurasian Tree Sparrows seem to be quite a tough bird.  Report of them in
Minnesota and Wisconsin this winter.  They seem to be expanding quite
rapidly (mostly right up the Mississippi but also westward.  At one point
there were a few in eastern Iowa along the lower Mississippi but now that
are all up and down the river and about 3/4 of the way west across Iowa.
There further west of the Mississippi the less common but they are
obviously growing in numbers and expanding west and north.

  Would love to see one in SD so thanks for posting.

God Bless,

*Paul O. Roisen*
*Woodbury County, IA*
*Mobile 712-301-2817*

On Tue, Jan 6, 2015 at 8:10 PM, 'Jeff Hansen' hanjd AT cox.net [sd-birds] <
sd-birds-noreply AT yahoogroups.com> wrote:

>
>
> All,
>
> I talked to my friend who had seen the Eurasian Tree Sparrows in Sioux
> Falls.  She did not see them over the weekend.
>
>
>
> This is what she recalled from the first time she saw them.   It was the
> middle of October and she was visiting her daughter who lives about a mile
> south of 41st in Sioux Falls.  There were about half a dozen birds
> hanging out in some bushes right outside the window of the house.  She knew
> they were a bird she had never seen before.  She has been watching birds
> her whole life, so this was very special to see something new.  She jotted
> down a description of the bird’s characteristics.   She noted the black
> bibb, brown cap, buff breast, and ear patches.  When she got home, she
> looked in her book and said they matched the E. Tree Sparrow.  For what
> it’s worth, the habitat around her daughter is hilly with many trees.
>
>
>
> She visited right before Halloween and saw the same birds again.  I was
> wrong before when I said it was at Thanksgiving.
>
>
>
> I wonder how cold hardy  of a bird they are.
>
>
>
> Jeff Hansen
>
>
>
>
>
>  
>
Subject: Re: Eurasian Tree Sparrow Update
From: "'Rob Parsons' parsons8 AT mymts.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2015 20:30:21 -0600
Jeff, and SD-birders,

There is one here in Winnipeg, Manitoba right now. Seems to be doing just fine 
and a previous Manitoba record involved a bird that not only showed and 
survived its first winter here, survived 3 more and was working on another 
before it finally disappeared. So they are hardy. 


Closer to your part of the world, there were two sightings in extreme western 
Minnesota last year (2014). So this seems like a totally plausible sighting and 
worth a follow up if you’re in that general area. 


Cheers,

Rob Parsons
Winnipeg, MB
CANADA
parsons8 AT mts.net


From: mailto:sd-birds-noreply AT yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2015 8:10 PM
To: sd-birds AT yahoogroups.com 
Subject: [sd-birds] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Update




All,

I talked to my friend who had seen the Eurasian Tree Sparrows in Sioux Falls. 
She did not see them over the weekend. 


 

This is what she recalled from the first time she saw them. It was the middle 
of October and she was visiting her daughter who lives about a mile south of 
41st in Sioux Falls. There were about half a dozen birds hanging out in some 
bushes right outside the window of the house. She knew they were a bird she had 
never seen before. She has been watching birds her whole life, so this was very 
special to see something new. She jotted down a description of the bird’s 
characteristics. She noted the black bibb, brown cap, buff breast, and ear 
patches. When she got home, she looked in her book and said they matched the E. 
Tree Sparrow. For what it’s worth, the habitat around her daughter is hilly 
with many trees. 


 

She visited right before Halloween and saw the same birds again. I was wrong 
before when I said it was at Thanksgiving. 


 

I wonder how cold hardy  of a bird they are.

 

Jeff Hansen

 

 



Subject: Mitchell CBC results
From: "'Jeff Hansen' hanjd AT cox.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2015 20:24:57 -0600
Finally.results from the Mitchell CBC.

 

For me, reinitiating the Mitchell CBC had been about finding birds.  But I
think my favorite outcome has been meeting the people that helped. I have
really been impressed with the knowledge, sincerity, and enthusiasm of the
participants. 

 

Mitchell has no organized birding community, but restarting the CBC is
bringing people together. Most of the participants did not know each other
when we did the count in 2013.   We only spent a couple of hours together
during the meetings.  In 2014, again we only spent time together as a group
for a few hours but it felt like we were a cohesive group. Hopefully the
group will get together again before the next CBC.

 

As far as the CBC, it surpassed my expectations again.  It took place on Dec
27 and we had clear skies and little wind.  Temperatures ranged from a low
of 6 to a high of 21 degrees.  It snowed the night before and there were a
few inches of snow on the ground.  There was very little open water. We had
6 groups of people who birded in the field and 5 groups that watched their
feeders.  I was especially pleased to hear that entire families were
involved watching their feeders.

 

We had a total of 3,561 birds counted composed of 49 species with no count
week species. The most abundantly seen bird was the Red-winged blackbird.
There were a number of species where we only had one or two birds.  All of
which were good birds to see.  Probably the best were the common ravens,
kingfisher, snowy owl and long-eared owl. 

 

The misses included short-eared owl, northern harrier, and Harris's sparrow.

 

I've composed two tables.  One are counts for this year and the other
displays data from all count years.

 

The following table contains counts for 2014 and is ordered by most abundant
to least abundant.

 


Red-winged Blackbird

597


Rock Pigeon

495


Wild Turkey

294


House Sparrow

292


European Starling

286


Horned Lark

255


Mallard

225


Ring-necked Pheasant

137


Lapland Longspur

133


Dark-eyed Junco

96


Eurasian Collared Dove

95


American Goldfinch

57


American Crow

54


Cedar Waxwing

52


American Tree Sparrow

52


Canada Goose

50


Common Redpoll

45


Black-capped Chickadee

39


American Robin

39


Blue Jay

37


House Finch

33


Downy Woodpecker

30


Northern Cardinal

29


Red-tailed Hawk

24


Hairy Woodpecker

17


White-breasted Nuthatch

17


Pine Siskin

16


Great Horned Owl

10


Red-bellied Woodpecker

9


Northern Flicker

8


Brown Creeper

7


Bald Eagle

3


Rough-legged Hawk

3


Northern Shrike

3


Red-breasted Nuthatch

3


Song Sparrow

3


Sharp-shinned Hawk

2


Common Raven

2


White-crowned Sparrow

2


Cooper's Hawk

1


Mourning Dove

1


Eastern Screech Owl

1


Snowy Owl

1


Long-eared Owl

1


Belted Kingfisher

1


American Kestrel

1


Golden-crowned Kinglet

1


Snow Bunting

1


Common Grackle

1


 

3561

 

I think it's interesting to compare this year to previous years. Total
numbers were down from last year mainly due to the fact that the red cedar
berry crop was low. Zero denotes count week species.

 


Tax

Species

1957

1966

1967

2013

2014


6

Canada Goose

 

 

 

0

50


11

Mallard

802

 

43

 

225


13

Northern Pintail

6

 

 

 

 


22

Common Merganser

1

 

 

 

 


27

Ring-necked Pheasant

26

37

3

194

137


29

Greater Prairie Chicken

 

 

 

10

 


30

Wild Turkey

 

 

 

104

294


35

Northern Harrier

1

 

 

1

 


36

Sharp-shinned Hawk

 

 

 

5

2


37

Cooper's Hawk

 

 

 

2

1


38

Northern Goshawk

 

 

 

3

 


39

Bald Eagle

 

 

 

8

3


40

Red-tailed Hawk

 

 

 

15

24


41

Rough-legged Hawk

 

 

1

16

3


48

Rock Pigeon

 

 

 

112

495


49

Eurasian Collared Dove

 

 

 

68

95


50

Mourning Dove

 

 

 

9

1


52

Eastern Screech Owl

 

 

 

4

1


53

Great Horned Owl

2

 

3

4

10


54

Snowy Owl

 

 

 

 

1


55

Long-eared Owl

 

 

 

 

1


56

Short-eared Owl

 

1

 

 

 


58

Belted Kingfisher

 

 

 

 

1


59

Red-bellied Woodpecker

 

 

 

5

9


60

Downy Woodpecker

6

11

2

19

30


61

Hairy Woodpecker

1

 

 

5

17


62

Northern Flicker

6

 

1

21

8


64

American Kestrel

 

 

 

3

1


65

Merlin

 

 

 

2

 


68

Northern Shrike

 

2

 

8

3


69

Blue Jay

12

 

1

59

37


70

American Crow

21

12

90

12

54


71

Common Raven

 

 

 

 

1


72

Horned Lark

30

27

100

43

255


73

Black-capped Chickadee

7

11

6

32

39


74

Red-breasted Nuthatch

4

 

 

3

3


75

White-breasted Nuthatch

2

 

1

10

17


76

Brown Creeper

4

1

 

8

7


79

Golden-crowned Kinglet

5

1

 

2

1


82

American Robin

1

14

 

1746

39


84

European Starling

14

48

130

1339

286


86

Cedar Waxwing

 

 

 

174

52


87

Lapland Longspur

 

1

1200

46

133


88

Snow Bunting

 

 

 

5

1


89

Yellow-rumped Warbler

 

 

 

3

 


90

American Tree Sparrow

106

230

220

67

52


91

Song Sparrow

 

 

 

2

3


93

Harris's Sparrow

 

4

14

 

 


94

White-crowned Sparrow

 

 

 

 

2


95

Dark-eyed Junco

62

18

47

278

96


98

Northern Cardinal

2

1

4

14

29


99

Red-winged Blackbird

 

 

 

5720

597


100

Western Meadowlark

 

 

 

4

 


103

Common Grackle

 

 

13

3

1


104

Brown-headed Cowbird

 

 

 

1

 


106

House Finch

 

1

 

61

33


110

Common Redpoll

14

 

 

 

45


111

Pine Siskin

42

11

 

0

16


112

American Goldfinch

 

7

6

29

57


114

House Sparrow

200

25

1000

360

292


Total

 

1377

463

2885

10639

3560

 

Thanks to everyone who helped with the count and if you know anyone who
would like to help with the count next year, send me their contact
information so they can be included in all communications.

 

Jeff

hanjd AT cox.net

 
Subject: Eurasian Tree Sparrow Update
From: "'Jeff Hansen' hanjd AT cox.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2015 20:10:09 -0600
All,

I talked to my friend who had seen the Eurasian Tree Sparrows in Sioux
Falls.  She did not see them over the weekend.

 

This is what she recalled from the first time she saw them.   It was the
middle of October and she was visiting her daughter who lives about a mile
south of 41st in Sioux Falls.  There were about half a dozen birds hanging
out in some bushes right outside the window of the house.  She knew they
were a bird she had never seen before.  She has been watching birds her
whole life, so this was very special to see something new.  She jotted down
a description of the bird's characteristics.   She noted the black bibb,
brown cap, buff breast, and ear patches.  When she got home, she looked in
her book and said they matched the E. Tree Sparrow.  For what it's worth,
the habitat around her daughter is hilly with many trees.

 

She visited right before Halloween and saw the same birds again.  I was
wrong before when I said it was at Thanksgiving.

 

I wonder how cold hardy  of a bird they are.

 

Jeff Hansen

 

 
Subject: REdpolls
From: "mick zerr zerrmick AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2015 16:40:50 +0000 (UTC)
Note to keep an eye out for Redpolls after this nasty storm.  350+ were seen 
in the Sand Lake CBC, so maybe they will be heading south.  Also, to all you 
folks who are seeing the Snowy Owls, please send a few to the SE area of the 
state, remember sharing is half the fun. 

Have a great Birding New Year
MickSFBC
Subject: dakota midday
From: "Shari Kosel jskosel AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2015 07:15:40 -0700
On Dakota Midday, host Karl Gehrke talks with University of South Dakota 
biology professor David Swanson about how birds who winter or live year-round 
in South Dakota prepare for the season. Dr. Swanson is a contributing author to 
Birds of South Dakota and secretary of the South Dakota Ornithologists' Union. 
He has spent more than 25 years studying birds. He’ll talk about the 
physical, physiological and behavioral changes birds undergo in preparation for 
the cold. Dakota Midday airs weekdays at noon CT, 11 MT on SDPB radio. SDPB.org 
‪#‎birds‬ ‪#‎ornithology‬‪#‎southdakota‬ ‪#‎science‬ 
‪#‎nature‬ ‪#‎dakotamidday‬ 


Shari Kosel
Sent from my iPad
Subject: SD List Totals
From: "'Palmer, Jeff' Jeff.Palmer AT dsu.edu [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2015 15:48:20 +0000
Happy New Year,

If you have not already done so, this would be an excellent time to send me 
your updates SD State and County list totals for inclusion on the Birding 
Records page of the SDOU web site :) 


Jeffrey S. Palmer
College of Arts & Sciences
Dakota State University
Madison, SD 57042

(605) 256-5190
jeff.palmer AT dsu.edu
http://www.homepages.dsu.edu/palmer/

sola fide, sola gratia, sola scriptura
Subject: Longspurs & Larks, Fall River Co.
From: "petermhill AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 04 Jan 2015 17:03:33 -0800
Observed a flock of close to 1,000 Horned Larks and Lapland Longspurs from Hwy. 
18 west of Hot Springs, about a mile east of Minnekahta Junction. Happy New 
Year to all. 

 

 Peter Hill
 Pine Ridge
 Oglala Lakota Co.
Subject: CBC
From: "mick zerr zerrmick AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2015 21:52:46 +0000 (UTC)
A few photos from tne NW area of the Canton SD CBC.  Photobucket - Photo and 
image hosting, free photo galleries, photo editing. 

Photos by Bob Bork and Mick Zerr
|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Photobucket - Photo and image hosting, free photo galler...Get free image 
hosting, easy photo sharing, and photo editing. Upload pictures and videos, 
create with the online photo editor, or browse a photo gallery or... | 

|  |
| View on s169.photobucket.com | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |

 
Subject: FOY Cooper's Hawk
From: "'brdfsd AT sio.midco.net' brdfsd@sio.midco.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2015 14:14:03 -0600
Had to go to the mall today to see my first bird of the year, finally, a 
Cooper’s Hawk sitting in a tree along the east side of Macy’s in the sun 
and out of the wind. 

 There has been not a creature stirring around our house, except a couple of 
bunnies eating the roses. 

Happy New Year! 
See good birds!
Rosemary Draeger
Sioux Falls
brdfsd AT sio.midco.net















------------------------------------
Posted by: "brdfsd AT sio.midco.net" 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Snowey Owls
From: "'Ricky Olson' tatanka40 AT pie.midco.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2015 13:58:37 -0600
This morning there were 3 Snowy Owls  2-3  east of the Okoboji Point turnoff
( one sign says 194th  the other end says 195th)  on Hwy 1804 in Sully
County. They were on the south side of the road on irrigation pivots or on
the ground.

 

 

 

Sharing is half the fun of Birding

 

Ricky D. Olson

Ft  Pierre SD

 
Subject: NHBC Field trip 1-10-2015
From: "treasurecreek AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2015 11:24:14 -0700
The Northern Hills Bird Club (NHBC) will conduct a field trip out of Whitewood, 
SD on Saturday January 10, 2015. Participants will meet at the Hideaway Caf in 
Whitewood at 7:30 AM and will depart at 8 AM. The Hideaway is the first 
business on the right side of the road as you enter into Whitewood. (Come early 
for breakfast if you would like. Prices are reasonable and they have a good 
menu). 


We are planning visiting local feeders in the area but this may change if the 
roads are too icy as some of the locations are on steep roads. The trip is 
planned for half day. Please advise me by phone or email if you plan to attend 
or even think you might attend in case weather becomes a problem. 


Birders of all levels are welcome and there is no charge for participating. 
Participants are requested to bring their personal radios for communication. 
For further information contact Vic Fondy at 605-269-2553. 


Vic Fondy-NHBC 
605-269-2553
Subject: Eurasian Tree Sparrows
From: "'Jeff Hansen' hanjd AT cox.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2015 22:05:51 -0600
I was talking to a birding friend who was telling me about seeing Eurasian
Tree Sparrows at her daughter's place in Sioux Falls.  She plans to visit
her daughter over the weekend and would look for them.

 

Are they  known from Sioux Falls?  I believe she said there were 6 of them
when she saw them back in November.

 

She said she call me with a report next week.

 

Jeff
Subject: Ft. Randall Birding
From: "'Preheim, Kelly' Kelly.Preheim AT k12.sd.us [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2015 01:25:18 +0000
I had a really good birding day today with 39 species seen. Some unexpected 
birds were the American White Pelican, two Yellow-rumped Warblers, and two 
Pied-billed Grebes. There were more waterfowl and American Crows below the dam 
than I've ever seen there before, as well as over 100 Bald Eagles. You can see 
the birds catching small fish, so it is definitely the place to be. 


Two Long-tailed Ducks were still around, but there were so many birds to look 
through that I may have missed the other LTDU. Early in the morning the sky and 
water seemed to be filled with birds and it was loud with all of the Canada 
Geese honking and the American Crows cawing loudly. I did not hear the Northern 
Saw-whet Owl today, but I may not have gotten there early enough although I did 
hear an Eastern Screech-Owl. I only noticed one gull and that was a Ring-billed 
Gull. I also saw an adult dark morph Rough-legged Hawkon the Gregory side of 
the river that was really beautiful. I have some photos from today as well as a 
few from the Mitchell Christmas Bird Count on my Flickr site: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rookiebirder/ 



Kelly Preheim

Armour, SD

http://birdteach.blogspot.com/




"Wilderness is not a luxury, but a necessity of the human spirit..." ~ Edward 
Abbey 



"Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent, if no birds sang 
except those that sang best." ~ Henry Van Dyke 
Subject: Short-eared Owl (Pennington)
From: "Dick Latuchie rlatuchie AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2015 18:04:34 -0700
Late this afternoon, I observed a Short-eared Owl, about ¼ of a mile East of 
the spot described by Mike Melius in a recent post (thanks, Mike). It sat on a 
fence post opposite my car for a good 20 minutes, and was still there as I 
left. Got great views, and a few phone pics. When I got home, and checked my 
records, was delighted to see that this was only the second SEOW I've seen, the 
first being in Canada. Nice way to start the year. 


Yesterday, Karen and I drove out to Presho, and stopped in the grasslands. Had 
a Prairie Falcon, and a Ferruginous Hawk, but no matter how hard I tried, I 
couldn't turn any of the 150 Lapland Longspurs we saw into a Snow Bunting. 


Dick Latuchie
Rapid City

Sent from my iPad

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Posted by: Dick Latuchie 
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Subject: Winter white-crowned and Harris's sparrows
From: "darin.newton AT gmail.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 02 Jan 2015 14:32:12 -0800
We have consistently had 2 white-crowned sparrows (juveniles) and a few 
Harris's sparrows at our place in Belle Fourche. Is it common for a few 
stragglers to overwinter in SD? 

 

 Darin Newton
 Belle Fourche, SD
Subject: James River Bald Eagles
From: "Brian Kringen bkringen AT abe.midco.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2015 15:59:11 -0600
As proof that Bald Eagles are becoming such a common site nowadays, I just 
observed a pair of adult eagles on the established nest site along the James 
River (just north of Highway 12, between Aberdeen and Groton). Not a speck of 
open water to be found for miles around…. One eagle was perched on a branch 
just above the nest, and the other bird was in/on the nest itself. Could they 
already be preparing the nest for breeding? Do they use established nests as 
winter roosts? I would appreciate someone’s comments. 


Brian Kringen
Aberdeen
Subject: Pennington County: Clark's Nutcrackers and Pygmy Nuthatches
From: "Jennifer Fowler waterfowlerlover AT yahoo.com [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2015 19:37:50 +0000 (UTC)
Happy New Year, everyone!  
While out for a stroll with the pup, my husband and I had 6 Clark's Nutcrackers 
and at least that many Pygmy Nuthatches in the Pactola Lake Campground area. 
 The Clark's were moving around but were centered around campsite #29 and were 
rather vocal and feeding on pine seeds.  The Pygmy Nuthatches were heard and 
seen in each of the campground loops including the closed one heading to the 
Osprey Trail.  I have visited that campground and Osprey Trail for a dozen 
years and never had Clark's Nutcrackers until now.  Sunny skies and 42 degrees 
make for a great day!    

~Jen FowlerPactola Lake, SD
Subject: Custer Co. Birds
From: "mmelius AT hcinet.net [sd-birds]" <sd-birds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2015 21:56:02 -0500 (EST)
My bird list for the first day of 2015, seen or heard from my yard, in
order of appearance:

Great Horned Owl
A. Tree Sparrow
N. Shrike
Horned Lark
Golden Eagle
E. Starling
Sharp-tailed Grouse
House Sparrow
A. Crow
Downy Woodpecker
Gray Partridge (13 birds, some chasing each other courtship-style)
Common Redpoll
U. Falcon (Unknown Falcon, probably Merlin)

My first ten species of the year sometimes has been half birds of
prey. Not this year, even counting the shrike, which scared all the
sparrows away when it returned in mid-afternoon.

Michael Melius
Folsom