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Updated on Thursday, November 17 at 07:13 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Eared Quetzal,©Sophie Webb

17 Nov Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina website is now back online! ["Harry LeGrand" (via carolinaleps Mailing List) ]
12 Mar Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina -- new PDF version is now completed [Harry LeGrand ]
1 Mar File - rules and suggestions []
1 Mar File - Mail help and suggestions. []
28 Feb New version (22nd) of the "Butterflies of North Carolina" is now online ["'Legrand, Harry' harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov [se-odonata]" ]
1 Feb File - rules and suggestions []
1 Feb File - Mail help and suggestions. []
31 Jan Dragonflies and Damselflies of NC -- new approximation now online ["'Legrand, Harry' harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov [se-odonata]" ]
31 Jan Fwd: Request for specimen ["Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [TexOdes]" ]
31 Jan Fwd: Request for specimen ["Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" ]
31 Jan Fwd: Request for specimen ["Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [CalOdes]" ]
24 Jan DSA Annual Meeting In State College, PA ["'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" ]
15 Jan Re: Photos from Recent Florida Trip ["Alex Netherton anetherton AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" ]
14 Jan FW: Photos from Recent Florida Trip ["'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" ]
14 Jan FW: Photos from Recent Florida Trip ["'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" ]
14 Jan Re: Photos from Recent Florida Trip ["walter chadwick mrcnaturally AT optonline.net [se-odonata]" ]
14 Jan Photos from Recent Florida Trip ["'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" ]
12 Jan Antillean Spreadwings not in the Fakahatchee ["Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" ]
11 Jan Recent Florida Trip ["Michael Moore mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" ]
6 Jan Re: South Florida December Odonata ["jevoy AT bio.miami.edu [se-odonata]" ]
5 Jan South Florida December Odonata ["'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" ]
1 Jan File - Mail help and suggestions. []
1 Jan File - rules and suggestions []
1 Jan LUCIFER SWAMPDAMSEL at Fakahatchee 12/30 ["Troy Hibbitts alterna2627 AT att.net [se-odonata]" ]
29 Dec Re: Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo ["Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" ]
29 Dec RE: Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo ["'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" ]
28 Dec Re: Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo ["Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" ]
28 Dec Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo [1 Attachment] ["'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" ]
28 Dec RE: Leptobasis lucifer contact info? ["'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" ]
16 Dec Re: Leptobasis lucifer contact info? ["Bill Mauffray iodonata AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" ]
16 Dec Leptobasis lucifer contact info? ["Troy Hibbitts alterna2627 AT att.net [se-odonata]" ]
10 Dec Dragonflies on the hunt display complex choreography ["Tim Martin tf_martn AT bellsouth.net [se-odonata]" ]
7 Dec Florida November Observations ["'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" ]
07 Dec New file uploaded to se-odonata []
4 Dec Re: Re: File - yahoo mail help.odt ["Alex Netherton anetherton AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" ]
1 Dec Re: File - yahoo mail help.odt ["Thomas W Donnelly tdonelly AT binghamton.edu [se-odonata]" ]
1 Dec File - yahoo mail help.odt []
1 Dec File - rules and suggestions []
10 Nov middle TN Nov. odes ["richard connors didymops07 AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" ]
5 Nov NC rare animal list temporarily down ["'Legrand, Harry' harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov [se-odonata]" ]
5 Nov Natural Heritage Progrm List of the Rare Animal Species of North Carolina - 2014 is now available ["'Legrand, Harry' harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov [se-odonata]" ]
3 Nov Big bluets & others survive light frost - N GA [1 Attachment] ["Vicki Deloach VLDELOACH AT aol.com [se-odonata]" ]
1 Nov File - rules and suggestions []
1 Nov File - yahoo mail help.odt []
30 Oct South and Central Florida October Odonata ["'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" ]
28 Oct Re: Big Bluets in middle Tenn - and GA [2 Attachments] ["Vicki Deloach VLDELOACH AT aol.com [se-odonata]" ]
28 Oct Big Bluets in middle Tenn [1 Attachment] ["richard connors didymops07 AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" ]
27 Oct resurgence of odes in warm temps ["Vicki Deloach VLDELOACH AT aol.com [se-odonata]" ]
26 Oct Re: Spiders and Dragonflies, Oh, My! ["Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" ]
26 Oct Re: Spiders and Dragonflies, Oh, My! ["walter chadwick mrcnaturally AT optonline.net [se-odonata]" ]
26 Oct Spiders and Dragonflies, Oh, My! ["Don Culberson dculberson AT shc.edu [se-odonata]" ]
22 Oct Season winding down. ["spreadwing AT mac.com [se-odonata]" ]
21 Oct Big bluets in North Georgia - now [3 Attachments] ["Vicki Deloach VLDELOACH AT aol.com [se-odonata]" ]
21 Oct FW: Central Florida 10/16-19 ["'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" ]
20 Oct Re: Central Florida 10/16-19 ["Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" ]
20 Oct Central Florida 10/16-19 ["'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" ]
20 Oct migrant green darners - Florida ["Vicki Deloach VLDELOACH AT aol.com [se-odonata]" ]
15 Oct Re: [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis [Bill Mauffray ]
15 Oct RE: [Odonata-l] [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis ["'Bill Mauffray' iodonata AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
15 Oct RE: [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis ["'Bill Mauffray' iodonata AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" ]
15 Oct RE: [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis ["'Bill Mauffray' iodonata AT gmail.com [TexOdes]" ]
14 Oct Fall odes Carter Co TN ["richard connors didymops07 AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" ]
14 Oct Re: Fossilized dragonfly larvae ["walter chadwick mrcnaturally AT optonline.net [se-odonata]" ]
12 Oct Fossilized dragonfly larvae [1 Attachment] ["Tim Martin tf_martn AT bellsouth.net [se-odonata]" ]
10 Oct Re: [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis [Ethan Bright ]
10 Oct Re: [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis [Marion Dobbs ]
10 Oct Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis [Dennis Paulson ]
10 Oct Re: New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis ["Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" ]
10 Oct Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis ["Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [TexOdes]" ]
10 Oct Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis [Dennis Paulson ]
10 Oct Re: New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis ["Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" ]
10 Oct Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis ["Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [TexOdes]" ]
10 Oct Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis ["Ed Lam azurebluet AT aol.com [NEodes]" ]
10 Oct Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis [Ed Lam ]
10 Oct Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis ["Ed Lam azurebluet AT aol.com [TexOdes]" ]
10 Oct Re: New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis ["Ed Lam azurebluet AT aol.com [se-odonata]" ]

Subject: Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina website is now back online!
From: "Harry LeGrand" (via carolinaleps Mailing List) <carolinaleps AT duke.edu>
Date: Thu, 17 Nov 2016 19:06:18 -0500
 Fellow biologists:
The Dragonflies and Damselflies (i.e., Odonates) of North Carolina website
is now back online!


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.dpr.ncparks.gov_odes_a_accounts.php&d=CwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=AW6ynNwqMRYOC5_V-OXupeOzu1c7t6wxY89gEYYgxa4&m=tggU0wxSzexUqcCZ6iLasHhCDq0r5dyrRVQ_an4o2DU&s=pImaUd-49gqX6FBdheC6bz-XXZYcIlnyVRvVgCISHsA&e= 


To see what has been changed since it went offline in September 2015, go to
“Show Recent Occurrence Entries” and then click “30 days”. You will see 

that Tom Howard (the website administrator) has batch uploaded 2357
records, nearly all from Mark Shields and John Petranka. Most do not have
photos online, but they are slowly adding photos (where “Photo” is in blue
font) to the most significant records; photos must be uploaded singly and
cannot be batch uploaded.

I (website species accounts author) have revised about 15 species accounts,
generally rare species for which we have new data.  Because this website
automatically updates the range maps and flight charts with each new
record, you will see many new county records on the maps, as well as some
new photos.  Highly important records and/or photos have been added for
Black-tipped Darner, Gray-green Clubtail, Zebra Clubtail, Spine-crowned
Clubtail, Red Saddlebags, and Carolina Spreadwing, among others. Several of
these accounts have first photos known for NC.

Later this fall or winter, Tom and I will update and spruce up the home
page, perhaps with a photo or two, and add John Petranka to our names as
“record/photo reviewer”.  In addition, the range maps have too many legend
categories, and thus we plan to reword and simplify the legends.

Many of you certainly have records accumulated over the past 14 months and
have been unable to enter the records.  Some of you already have a login
account such that you can now enter your own records. If you don’t have an
account, contact Tom  for an account if you have a
decent number of records that you want to enter. However, those of you with
or without an account and with more than perhaps 20 records, contact Tom
about sending an Excel file for a batch upload; it is too time-consuming
for any of you to enter 50 to 200 records!

As usual, over the winter I will edit species accounts that need revision
based on newly added records. And, we will create a new PDF (the Eighth
Approximation).  Remember that the Seventh Approximation, from March 2016,
is available on the website; click on “Files to Download”, and then
“Complete 7th Approximation”.

Enjoy the website again, and let’s get many back-logged records added
daily. We have thousands of records among us that need to be entered!

If you run into any glitches, let us know. Enjoy the website!

Harry LeGrand 
Subject: Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina -- new PDF version is now completed
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Mar 2016 12:42:48 -0500
Odonate fans:

Tom Howard and I have completed edits  for the annual update of the PDF
version of the *Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina*; this is now
the Seventh Approximation. As you probably know, the website was shut down
in September 2015 due to a security breach of another State Park website;
it is hoped that it will be back online later in March, and certainly by
April. (Ditto for the butterfly and mammal websites.)  Because the website
is still down, you will need to save this PDF (below) to your computer, for
reference, and of course for printing if you wish. The PDF consists of
single pages each for the 187 species in the state, plus intro material and
appendices -- a total of 205 pages.

Because the website accepts records (including photos) uploaded by folks,
the fact that it was shut down in September means that nearly all of the
observations and photos you may have for late 2015 were not able to
be submitted. (Tom was able to add a few key records, however.)  Most
likely, this isn't a real factor for most species, as relatively few
notable records are made in September, October, or November.  However, *please
make sure you have these "not yet uploaded" records in a notebook or on
your computer, such as in an Excel file, so that when the site becomes
active again, you can upload your records*. Remember that the PDF pages
show flight charts for each species, and thus each and every observation
you make and enter builds these flight charts and makes then better and
more meaningful. Also we list daily high counts for species, and of course
the county dot maps are automatically updated when a first county record is
added.

Tom will keep you posted as to when the odonate website comes back online.
Because of the security breach, there almost certainly will be a new URL
address for it.

Here is the URL address for the new version (Seventh) of the* Dragonflies
and Damselflies of North Carolina. * Enjoy, and let Tom know if you run
into any problems downloading or printing it or other glitches/errors.

  http://nature123.net/odes/7th.pdf

Good odonating in 2016!

Harry LeGrand and Tom Howard
Subject: File - rules and suggestions
From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Date: 1 Mar 2015 12:12:15 -0000
Welcome to SE-Odonata, a group for lovers of Damselflies and Dragonflies of the 
Southeastern US. My name is Alex Netherton, the founder and owner of the group. 
I am a Biologist and Field Naturalist, and have had an interest in Odonates 
since a boy. The group was founded because a few college professors and Ode 
enthusiasts were trying to make a mailing list, and the list got too unwieldy 
for peoples e-mail programs, so I offered to start it on a list server that has 
since gone out of business. It ended up on Yahoo around 2001. 



We have never had any problems until some controversy about "Creation Science" 
came up, which I (and a number of other members) feel to be religious based, 
and has no place in a scientific group. Arguing with Biologists about how the 
earth was created is not only rude, but is religious proselytizing, and I will 
not tolerate it. If the concept of evolution offends you, I suggest you find 
another group, because it will be discussed here from time to time. This is not 
to say that we are not spiritual or religious; to the contrary. However, this 
group is not for religious discussion. 


Occasionally, a person has a long signature, sometimes advertizing a religious 
or political point of view. I respectfully suggest that signature files on this 
group are kept to four lines, and contain: 

1.) Your name and title (if any, such as PhD if you wish)
2.) Your locality; not your address, but the general area in which you happen 
to reside. 

3.) Your affiliation, if any, with any educational institution, eg. "N.C. State 
University professor". This will help us understand your credentials. 

4. Perhaps, years Dragonfly and Damselfly hunting?
None of this is set in stone (as it is, as a matter of fact, on Carolinabirds, 
where you MUST sign with name, email, and locality), but PLEASE, numbers 1 and 
2, just so we have an idea. 


I have realized that I can edit posts, and those who have a signature or a 
portion of the post that is possibly offensive may find themselves moderated 
and their posts edited. Please understand; if someone puts up a rambling 
signature from Al Quran or The Bhagavad Gita or even Buddhavacana that offends 
you, you might complain, right? Think about it. I have strong religious and 
Spiritual views too, but you have to ask me about them, and I still might not 
share; my Spiritual life is mine. 


Political sigs are also not cool; I have seen some sigs putting words in 
Founder's mouths, seeming to say that religion is important to America; I refer 
you to the First Amendment. I also (not on this group, yet)seen signatures or 
messages attacking our President or politicians. Come on... 



Flaming and bullying will not be tolerated, whether in the group, or directly 
to another member. If I find out about it, you are gone. No discussion, no 
First Amendment. Sorry, but I am the list owner, and I can make the rules; the 
First Amendment does not apply here. Anybody not allow profanity in the house? 
Same here. You can cuss and swear and threaten out in the street, but if you 
come in my yard doing it, I will throw you out. This group is the collective 
yard of all of us; we treat each other with respect. 

I have made it difficult to become a member, requiring people to tell me about 
themselves and tell me why they wish to be members of this group; this is to 
stop the spammers who populate unregulated Yahoo groups. Spam once and you are 
gone. 


Just remember that this group is about the pursuit of Dragonflies, Damselflies, 
and good days in the field! 


The final rule is, ENJOY YOURSELF and share your Odonate sightings!


------------------------------------

------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/se-odonata/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/se-odonata/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    se-odonata-digest AT yahoogroups.com 
    se-odonata-fullfeatured AT yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    se-odonata-unsubscribe AT yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
    https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/
Subject: File - Mail help and suggestions.
From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Date: 1 Mar 2015 12:12:15 -0000
In the last few years Yahoo has become a playground for hackers, crackers, and 
account thieves. They love to get into accounts of people who belong to large 
groups (like this one) and have weak account protection, then use that account 
to spew out SPAM messages that look like they came from a trusted member (a 
common one is "I am stuck in - a foreign land - and someone stole my wallet, 
etc. etc.", hoping someone will wire some money without talking to the real 
person.), often with a "phishing" scheme, or a link that is usually a link to a 
website that will hijack your computer and turn it into a "zombie". Really. 
These zombie computers are a scourge of the Internet, spewing out millions of 
SPAM messages per hour, and making life miserable for many people. 


Also, when they hack your account, they get your address book and any personal 
information you have on Yahoo.In many cases, your account is gone forever, and 
you cannot get it back. Yahoo, being free, is not too terribly helpful, as they 
really cannot provide strong customer service. Bad juju all around. 


To stop this foolishness, the best thing is to have a strong password for your 
account. A really bad password is your birthday, a pet's name, a loved one's 
name, any of which can be guessed by looking you up on a social site like 
Facebook, and guessing. A strong password is one that is both letters and 
numbers, with one or more letter capitalized, at least 8 characters, and 
preferably 12. The use of a good password manager (I use Lastpass, 
http://www.lastpass.com) and strong passwords will stop this from happening, or 
at least make it more difficult. I doubt anything is completely hacker proof if 
they really want something, but if it is too much trouble, they hopefully will 
go somewhere else. 


Have fun, and practice safe Internet!

The group owner, Alex Netherton.


------------------------------------

------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/se-odonata/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/se-odonata/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    se-odonata-digest AT yahoogroups.com 
    se-odonata-fullfeatured AT yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    se-odonata-unsubscribe AT yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
    https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/
Subject: New version (22nd) of the "Butterflies of North Carolina" is now online
From: "'Legrand, Harry' harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:44:28 +0000
For those of you who also do butterflying:

Tom Howard and I have finished our annual updating of the "Butterflies of North 
Carolina" on that website: 


http://www.dpr.ncparks.gov/nbnc/index.html

To see the full PDF of all 177 species, click on "22nd Approximation" on the 
left. The PDF is slightly over 200 pages, but some of you like to print out a 
new version each year. 


Or, you can click on this link to go directly to the new PDF:


 http://ncparks.gov/butterfly/22nd.pdf


We have two new features on the website and PDF this year!!

1. Once you are on a species account on the website (by clicking the first 
letter of the common name or scientific name, and then clicking View next to 
the species name) -- you can now click on a colored county, and see all of the 
records for the species for that county. Thus, on the Byssus Skipper map, if 
you click on Scotland County, you will see 3 records listed, for example. 


2. On the PDF page for a species (not on the website species account), we now 
have the # of records and # of individuals of that species seen I[n NC] in 
2014. This is located just to the right of the range map. This will be of use 
to many of you, and you might wonder -- how many records were there in 2014 for 
Zebra Longwing (sadly, none) or Painted Lady (a whopping 85 records). You can 
get to the PDF from a species account by clicking on "View PDF", located next 
to the top photo of the species, above the range map. Thus, if you are in the 
Byssus Skipper account, when you click on View PDF, you see that there were 9 
records totaling 18 individuals reported in 2014. 


I hope you enjoy the PDF and the new species accounts.

Good butterflying in 2015 -- once we get winter out of the way (one of these 
weeks)! 


Harry LeGrand and Tom Howard

Harry LeGrand, Vertebrate Zoologist
North Carolina Natural Heritage Program
NCDENR Office of Land and Water Stewardship
1601 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC  27699-1601
Office: (919) 707-8603
harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov
www.ncnhp.org

E-mail correspondence to and from this address may be subject to the North 
Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties. 


Subject: File - rules and suggestions
From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Date: 1 Feb 2015 14:02:18 -0000
Welcome to SE-Odonata, a group for lovers of Damselflies and Dragonflies of the 
Southeastern US. My name is Alex Netherton, the founder and owner of the group. 
I am a Biologist and Field Naturalist, and have had an interest in Odonates 
since a boy. The group was founded because a few college professors and Ode 
enthusiasts were trying to make a mailing list, and the list got too unwieldy 
for peoples e-mail programs, so I offered to start it on a list server that has 
since gone out of business. It ended up on Yahoo around 2001. 



We have never had any problems until some controversy about "Creation Science" 
came up, which I (and a number of other members) feel to be religious based, 
and has no place in a scientific group. Arguing with Biologists about how the 
earth was created is not only rude, but is religious proselytizing, and I will 
not tolerate it. If the concept of evolution offends you, I suggest you find 
another group, because it will be discussed here from time to time. This is not 
to say that we are not spiritual or religious; to the contrary. However, this 
group is not for religious discussion. 


Occasionally, a person has a long signature, sometimes advertizing a religious 
or political point of view. I respectfully suggest that signature files on this 
group are kept to four lines, and contain: 

1.) Your name and title (if any, such as PhD if you wish)
2.) Your locality; not your address, but the general area in which you happen 
to reside. 

3.) Your affiliation, if any, with any educational institution, eg. "N.C. State 
University professor". This will help us understand your credentials. 

4. Perhaps, years Dragonfly and Damselfly hunting?
None of this is set in stone (as it is, as a matter of fact, on Carolinabirds, 
where you MUST sign with name, email, and locality), but PLEASE, numbers 1 and 
2, just so we have an idea. 


I have realized that I can edit posts, and those who have a signature or a 
portion of the post that is possibly offensive may find themselves moderated 
and their posts edited. Please understand; if someone puts up a rambling 
signature from Al Quran or The Bhagavad Gita or even Buddhavacana that offends 
you, you might complain, right? Think about it. I have strong religious and 
Spiritual views too, but you have to ask me about them, and I still might not 
share; my Spiritual life is mine. 


Political sigs are also not cool; I have seen some sigs putting words in 
Founder's mouths, seeming to say that religion is important to America; I refer 
you to the First Amendment. I also (not on this group, yet)seen signatures or 
messages attacking our President or politicians. Come on... 



Flaming and bullying will not be tolerated, whether in the group, or directly 
to another member. If I find out about it, you are gone. No discussion, no 
First Amendment. Sorry, but I am the list owner, and I can make the rules; the 
First Amendment does not apply here. Anybody not allow profanity in the house? 
Same here. You can cuss and swear and threaten out in the street, but if you 
come in my yard doing it, I will throw you out. This group is the collective 
yard of all of us; we treat each other with respect. 

I have made it difficult to become a member, requiring people to tell me about 
themselves and tell me why they wish to be members of this group; this is to 
stop the spammers who populate unregulated Yahoo groups. Spam once and you are 
gone. 


Just remember that this group is about the pursuit of Dragonflies, Damselflies, 
and good days in the field! 


The final rule is, ENJOY YOURSELF and share your Odonate sightings!


------------------------------------

------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/se-odonata/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/se-odonata/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    se-odonata-digest AT yahoogroups.com 
    se-odonata-fullfeatured AT yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    se-odonata-unsubscribe AT yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
    https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/
Subject: File - Mail help and suggestions.
From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Date: 1 Feb 2015 14:02:18 -0000
In the last few years Yahoo has become a playground for hackers, crackers, and 
account thieves. They love to get into accounts of people who belong to large 
groups (like this one) and have weak account protection, then use that account 
to spew out SPAM messages that look like they came from a trusted member (a 
common one is "I am stuck in - a foreign land - and someone stole my wallet, 
etc. etc.", hoping someone will wire some money without talking to the real 
person.), often with a "phishing" scheme, or a link that is usually a link to a 
website that will hijack your computer and turn it into a "zombie". Really. 
These zombie computers are a scourge of the Internet, spewing out millions of 
SPAM messages per hour, and making life miserable for many people. 


Also, when they hack your account, they get your address book and any personal 
information you have on Yahoo.In many cases, your account is gone forever, and 
you cannot get it back. Yahoo, being free, is not too terribly helpful, as they 
really cannot provide strong customer service. Bad juju all around. 


To stop this foolishness, the best thing is to have a strong password for your 
account. A really bad password is your birthday, a pet's name, a loved one's 
name, any of which can be guessed by looking you up on a social site like 
Facebook, and guessing. A strong password is one that is both letters and 
numbers, with one or more letter capitalized, at least 8 characters, and 
preferably 12. The use of a good password manager (I use Lastpass, 
http://www.lastpass.com) and strong passwords will stop this from happening, or 
at least make it more difficult. I doubt anything is completely hacker proof if 
they really want something, but if it is too much trouble, they hopefully will 
go somewhere else. 


Have fun, and practice safe Internet!

The group owner, Alex Netherton.


------------------------------------

------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: Dragonflies and Damselflies of NC -- new approximation now online
From: "'Legrand, Harry' harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 20:25:48 +0000
The annual update of "The Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina" is now 
online: 


http://www.dpr.ncparks.gov/odes/a/accounts.php

The 6th Approximation (February 2015 version) is ready for viewing and 
downloading. Click on the dropdown at "Files to Download" and then click 
"Complete 6th Approximation". At the dropdown, you will also see the "Checklist 
for North Carolina", which is a handy 2-page listing of the species, and their 
statuses and general locations (provinces). 


There was one new species added to the state list in 2014 - Flag-tailed 
Spinyleg (Dromogomphus spoliatus); Owen McConnell photographed one in Graham 
County, not too far from TN, so a very slight eastward range extension. There 
is now considerable concern about the native status of Little Bluet (Enallagma 
minusculum) in the state; it may well have been introduced. 


If you have downloaded previous versions, you will note that the range maps for 
South Carolina are now missing from the PDF species accounts (though they have 
never been present on the website maps). Though we have populated new county 
records for SC when we hear about them, we have gotten few such data in recent 
years; thus, the comparison between the heavily populated county maps for NC 
versus the poorly populated county maps for SC was bothersome and not visually 
appealing. We may include SC on the PDF maps with the next approximation, 
pending release of county-level data from other websites/data sources. 


We hope you enjoy the version. And, we hope that many of you continue to input 
your odonate records on the website. (The website has a data input function, 
though the user must have a username and password for data entry. Please 
contact Tom Howard - tom.howard AT ncparks.gov - if 
you have odonate records from North Carolina that you wish to enter, and he 
will provide you with information about logging in to the website for data 
entry.) Note that the website automatically is updated every time records are 
entered (e.g., a new county record will show up on the range maps immediately, 
and the flight charts as visible on the PDF for a species will change). Please 
keep this in mind if you print out the full PDF approximation; it won't be 
updated until a year from now. Nonetheless, some or many of you may want to 
print out the full PDF now, before the odonate season starts. 


Harry LeGrand and Tom Howard

Harry LeGrand, Vertebrate Zoologist
North Carolina Natural Heritage Program
NCDENR Office of Land and Water Stewardship
1601 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC  27699-1601
Office: (919) 707-8603
harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov
www.ncnhp.org

E-mail correspondence to and from this address may be subject to the North 
Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties. 


Subject: Fwd: Request for specimen
From: "Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [TexOdes]" <TexOdes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 10:06:26 -0800
Please contact Mike Averill (mike.averill AT blueyonder.co.uk) directly if you are 
willing to furnish one or more specimens. Thanks, and I assume you will be 
thanked in the film credits as well. My guess is that it would be best to send 
several. 


Begin forwarded message:

> Andy Holt, who made the short dragonfly film which won Best Documentary at 
the BIAFF Film Festival, has been contacted by a UK based film company who are 
making a documentary about dragonflies (It focuses on the large ancient species 
of dragonflies). In addition to looking for footage of modern dragonflies, they 
have asked Andy about sourcing an adult specimen for the purpose of x-ray 
filming to document the tracheal system. 

> 
> They have a tight filming schedule, so they can't wait for the UK season to 
start producing adults. So basically they are looking for a contact who would 
be able to capture and preserve a specimen for them and ship it to the UK. 

> As a commercial production they would pay expenses.
> 
> If anyone is in a location where they could legally collect a specimen in the 
near future, could they contact me at 

> mike.averill AT blueyonder.co.uk

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net



Subject: Fwd: Request for specimen
From: "Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 10:06:26 -0800
Please contact Mike Averill (mike.averill AT blueyonder.co.uk) directly if you are 
willing to furnish one or more specimens. Thanks, and I assume you will be 
thanked in the film credits as well. My guess is that it would be best to send 
several. 


Begin forwarded message:

> Andy Holt, who made the short dragonfly film which won Best Documentary at 
the BIAFF Film Festival, has been contacted by a UK based film company who are 
making a documentary about dragonflies (It focuses on the large ancient species 
of dragonflies). In addition to looking for footage of modern dragonflies, they 
have asked Andy about sourcing an adult specimen for the purpose of x-ray 
filming to document the tracheal system. 

> 
> They have a tight filming schedule, so they can't wait for the UK season to 
start producing adults. So basically they are looking for a contact who would 
be able to capture and preserve a specimen for them and ship it to the UK. 

> As a commercial production they would pay expenses.
> 
> If anyone is in a location where they could legally collect a specimen in the 
near future, could they contact me at 

> mike.averill AT blueyonder.co.uk

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net



Subject: Fwd: Request for specimen
From: "Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [CalOdes]" <CalOdes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 10:06:26 -0800
Please contact Mike Averill (mike.averill AT blueyonder.co.uk) directly if you are 
willing to furnish one or more specimens. Thanks, and I assume you will be 
thanked in the film credits as well. My guess is that it would be best to send 
several. 


Begin forwarded message:

> Andy Holt, who made the short dragonfly film which won Best Documentary at 
the BIAFF Film Festival, has been contacted by a UK based film company who are 
making a documentary about dragonflies (It focuses on the large ancient species 
of dragonflies). In addition to looking for footage of modern dragonflies, they 
have asked Andy about sourcing an adult specimen for the purpose of x-ray 
filming to document the tracheal system. 

> 
> They have a tight filming schedule, so they can't wait for the UK season to 
start producing adults. So basically they are looking for a contact who would 
be able to capture and preserve a specimen for them and ship it to the UK. 

> As a commercial production they would pay expenses.
> 
> If anyone is in a location where they could legally collect a specimen in the 
near future, could they contact me at 

> mike.averill AT blueyonder.co.uk

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net



Subject: DSA Annual Meeting In State College, PA
From: "'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 11:38:40 -0500
Announcing that the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Dragonfly Society of the
Americas (DSA) will be held in State College, PA on 25-28 June. 

The meeting website is now live and can be accessed here:

https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/nedsa/home/2015 

The meeting will combine local field trips with one day of talks (Saturday)
and lots of opportunity to socialize.  Pre-meeting and post-meeting 2-day
field trips are also being planned.  Anyone with an interest in Odonates is
welcome and encouraged to attend.  

 

Mike Moore

Newark, DE

  Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com

 

Websites:

 
Delmarva Dragonflies and Damselflies
(https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/)

  Voices of Delaware Birds
(https://sites.google.com/site/delawarebirdsongs/)

  Birds of the
Gilbert Water Ranch
(https://sites.google.com/site/birdsofthegilbertwaterranch/)

  AZFO Rare Bird
Photos (http://www.azfo.org/gallery/1main/photos_recent.html)

 

 
Subject: Re: Photos from Recent Florida Trip
From: "Alex Netherton anetherton AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 16:16:02 -0500
Michael, I set up this group so we can post photos in the email, so if you
have anything of special interest, you can put them on as an attachment, or
place them inline.I know a lot of moderators do not like HTML mail, but I
feel that this is the 21's Century...
Alex

Alex Netherton
http://blueridgediscovery.org
Please help at Gofundme.com 
Amateur Radio call W5ALX (Vanity Call)

On Wed, Jan 14, 2015 at 12:01 PM, 'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com
[se-odonata]  wrote:

>
>
> Greetings
>
>
>
> If you would like to see photos from my recent Florida trip, you can find
> them here:
>
>
>
> http://mcmoore.smugmug.com/Odonates/Florida-2015/Florida-2015
>
>
>
>
>
> Mike Moore
>
> Newark, DE
>
> Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com
>
>
>
> Websites:
>
> Delmarva Dragonflies and Damselflies
>  (
> https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/)
>
> Voices of Delaware Birds
>  (
> https://sites.google.com/site/delawarebirdsongs/)
>
> Birds of the Gilbert Water Ranch
>  (
> https://sites.google.com/site/birdsofthegilbertwaterranch/)
>
> AZFO Rare Bird Photos
>  (
> http://www.azfo.org/gallery/1main/photos_recent.html)
>
>
>
>
>
>  
>
Subject: FW: Photos from Recent Florida Trip
From: "'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2015 19:40:44 -0500
 

 

From: bryant roberts [mailto:bryantbroberts AT att.net] 
Sent: Wednesday, January 14, 2015 5:31 PM
To: 'se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com'
Subject: RE: [se-odonata] Photos from Recent Florida Trip

 

Great photos! The Checkered Skipper species (#40) is a Tropical
Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus) which is common all year in this area.
The most similar possibility, Common Checkered-Skipper (P. communis) which
lacks the blue hairs on its back and a couple of distinguishing wing spots
is only a summer stray.

 

Bryant Roberts

Davie, Florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of 'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [se-odonata]
Sent: Wednesday, January 14, 2015 12:01 PM
To: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [se-odonata] Photos from Recent Florida Trip

 

  

Greetings

 

If you would like to see photos from my recent Florida trip, you can find
them here:

 

http://mcmoore.smugmug.com/Odonates/Florida-2015/Florida-2015 

 

 

Mike Moore

Newark, DE

Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com

 

Websites:

Delmarva Dragonflies and Damselflies

(https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/)

Voices of Delaware Birds 
(https://sites.google.com/site/delawarebirdsongs/)

Birds of the Gilbert Water Ranch

(https://sites.google.com/site/birdsofthegilbertwaterranch/)

AZFO Rare Bird Photos 
(http://www.azfo.org/gallery/1main/photos_recent.html)

 

 


Subject: FW: Photos from Recent Florida Trip
From: "'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2015 17:56:57 -0500
 

 

Bryant Roberts

Davie, Florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: bryant roberts [mailto:bryantbroberts AT att.net] 
Sent: Wednesday, January 14, 2015 5:31 PM
To: 'se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com'
Subject: RE: [se-odonata] Photos from Recent Florida Trip

 

Great photos! The Checkered Skipper species (#40) is a Tropical
Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus) which is common all year in this area.
The most similar possibility, Common Checkered-Skipper (P. communis) which
lacks the blue hairs on its back and a couple of distinguishing upper
forewing spots is only a summer stray.

 

Bryant Roberts

Davie, Florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of 'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [se-odonata]
Sent: Wednesday, January 14, 2015 12:01 PM
To: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [se-odonata] Photos from Recent Florida Trip

 

  

Greetings

 

If you would like to see photos from my recent Florida trip, you can find
them here:

 

http://mcmoore.smugmug.com/Odonates/Florida-2015/Florida-2015 

 

 

Mike Moore

Newark, DE

Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com

 

Websites:

Delmarva Dragonflies and Damselflies

(https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/)

Voices of Delaware Birds 
(https://sites.google.com/site/delawarebirdsongs/)

Birds of the Gilbert Water Ranch

(https://sites.google.com/site/birdsofthegilbertwaterranch/)

AZFO Rare Bird Photos 
(http://www.azfo.org/gallery/1main/photos_recent.html)

 

 


Subject: Re: Photos from Recent Florida Trip
From: "walter chadwick mrcnaturally AT optonline.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2015 15:43:36 -0500
Fantastic.

From: mailto:se-odonata-noreply AT yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Wednesday, January 14, 2015 12:01 PM
To: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com 
Subject: [se-odonata] Photos from Recent Florida Trip

  

Greetings


If you would like to see photos from my recent Florida trip, you can find them 
here: 



http://mcmoore.smugmug.com/Odonates/Florida-2015/Florida-2015 



Mike Moore

Newark, DE

Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com


Websites:

Delmarva Dragonflies and Damselflies 
(https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/) 


Voices of Delaware Birds (https://sites.google.com/site/delawarebirdsongs/)

Birds of the Gilbert Water Ranch 
(https://sites.google.com/site/birdsofthegilbertwaterranch/) 


AZFO Rare Bird Photos (http://www.azfo.org/gallery/1main/photos_recent.html)


Subject: Photos from Recent Florida Trip
From: "'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2015 12:01:10 -0500
Greetings

 

If you would like to see photos from my recent Florida trip, you can find
them here:

 

http://mcmoore.smugmug.com/Odonates/Florida-2015/Florida-2015 

 

 

Mike Moore

Newark, DE

  Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com

 

Websites:

 
Delmarva Dragonflies and Damselflies
(https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/)

  Voices of Delaware Birds
(https://sites.google.com/site/delawarebirdsongs/)

  Birds of the
Gilbert Water Ranch
(https://sites.google.com/site/birdsofthegilbertwaterranch/)

  AZFO Rare Bird
Photos (http://www.azfo.org/gallery/1main/photos_recent.html)

 

 
Subject: Antillean Spreadwings not in the Fakahatchee
From: "Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 18:38:03 -0800
Hello, all.

I just identified photos by Pierre Deviche from the Fakahatchee Swamp in 
southwest Florida as Antillean Spreadwings, Lestes spumarius. But now, after 
seeing additional photos by Bryant Roberts, I realize I made a boo-boo, and the 
two arent as easy to distinguish as I thought. So all photos so far have been 
Blue-striped Spreadwings, Lestes tenuatus, the species we knew occurred there. 


Dennis
-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net



Subject: Recent Florida Trip
From: "Michael Moore mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2015 14:39:26 -0500
Hi 

Pierre Deviche and I spent three days in the field in South Florida from 6-9 
January. Due to extensive help from Bryant Roberts, Dennis Paulson and Troy 
Hibbits (thanks all!), we were astounded to find 30 species. Highlights for us 
included Lucifer Swampdamsel, Metallic and Tawny Pennants, Furtive Forktail and 
the first record of Antillean Spreadwing north of the Keys (confirmed by 
Dennis). Complete lists for each locale below. 


Mike Moore
Newark, DE
https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/


01/06/15

Dreher Park ponds, W. Palm Beach, 11 AM -1:15 AM
Partly sunny, calm, ~75 F

Florida Bluet, Enallagma pollutum: 10
Rambur's Forktail, Ischnura ramburii: 40
Citrine Forktail, Ischnura hastata: 1 M
Florida Baskettail, Epitheca stella: 4
Tawny Pennant, Brachymesia herbida: 1
Marl Pennant, Macrodiplax balteata: 1
Metallic Pennant, Idiataphe cubensis: 1
Blue Dasher, Pachydiplax longipennis 30
Spot-tailed Dasher, Micrathyria aequalis: 3
Scarlet Skimmer, Crocothemis servilla: 25
Little Blue Dragonlet, Erythrodiplax minuscula: 4
Band-winged Dragonlet, Erythrodiplax umbrata: 15
Eastern Pondhawk, Erythemis simplicicollis: 5
Pin-tailed Pondhawk, Erythemis plebeja: 12
Antillean Saddlebags, Tramea insularis: 10
Red Saddlebags, Tramea onusta: 1 M
Eastern Amberwing, Perithemis tenera: 10

01/07/15

Loxahatchee NWR, 10 AM – 12:15 PM
Partly sunny, calm, 70 F

Fragile Forktail, Ischnura posita: 3
Lillypad Forktail, Ischnura kellicotti: 3
Rambur’s Forktail, Ischnura ramburii: 15
Twilight Darner, Gynacantha nervosa: 1 flying briefly in forest
Cyrano Darner, Nasiaeschna pentacantha: 1 at small pond along road
Roseate Skimmer, Orthemis ferruginea: 20
Scarlet Skimmer, Crocothemis sevilla: 20
Florida Baskettail, Epitheca stella: 7
Eastern Pondhawk, Erythemis simplicicollis: 1
Pin-tailed Pondhawk, Erythemis plebeja: 8
Wandering Glider, Pantala flavescens: 15
Hyacinth Glider, Myathyria marcella: 10
Blue Dasher, Pachydiplax longipennis: 5
Band-winged Dragonlet, Erythrodiplax umbrata: 20
Little Blue Dragonlet, Erythrodiplax minuscula: 1
Eastern Amberwing, Perithemis: 1
Red Saddlebags, Tramea onusta: 1
Halloween Pennant, Celithemis eponina: 1

Snake Warrior Park, Broward County, 2 PM – 3 PM

Rambur’s Forktail: 15
Fragile Forktail: 3
Florida Bluet: 2
Blue-faced Darner, Coryphaeschna adnexa: 1 in flight over pond
Roseate Skimmer: 3
Blue Dasher: 5
Spot-winged Dasher: 4
Metallic Pennant, Idiataphe cubensis: 6
Tawny Pennant: 2
Wandering Glider: 5
Hyacinth Glider: 2
Pin-tailed Pondhawk: 1
Eastern Pondhawk: 1
Eastern Amberwing: 5
Florida Baskettail: 1
Antillean Saddlebags: 7

Hugh Taylor Birch SP, Broward County, 4 PM – 4:30 PM

Rambur’s Forktail: 5
Lillypad Forktail: 1
Florida Bluet: 5
Band-winged Dragonlet: 4
Spot-tailed Dasher: 1


01/08/15

Everglades NP
Breezy, mostly sunny, 70 F

Rambur’s Forktail: 15
Florida Forktail: 12
Twilight Darner: 1 along Snake Bight Trail
Blue Dasher: 1
Band-winged Dragonlet: 10
Great Pondhawk, Erythemis vesiculosa: 1, along Bear Lake Rd
Halloween Pennant: 1
Eastern Amberwing: 2

01/09/15

Fakahatchee Strand Preserve SP – Jones Grade Road
11 AM – 1 PM; partly sunny, calm, 70 F

Rambur’s Forktail: 15
Fragile Forktail: 4
Furtive Forktail, Ischnura prognata: 2 M
Citrine Forktail: 5
Antillean Spreadwing, Lestes spumarius: 2 F
Lucifer Swampdamsel, Leptobasis lucifer: 6
Twilight Darner: 4
Band-winged Dragonlet: 6
Wandering Glider (at Collier Seminole SP): 1


Subject: Re: South Florida December Odonata
From: "jevoy AT bio.miami.edu [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2015 05:47:34 -0500
In Desoto County near the  Peace River, the number of species seen has
dropped a lot during the past month.  We are still seeing band-winged
dragonlets and roseate skimmers, but not many other dragonflies. 
Recently, we saw citrine forktails in all stages in a shallow marsh. Small
birds were having a field day scooping up the tenerals. There were also a
few  Rambur's and fragile forktails. In December we saw some purple bluets
and ebony jewelwings, but they seem to be gone now.
Jean Evoy
Arcadia, FL



> A few late winter/early spring species have appeared during December in
> south Florida but despite unseasonably warm temperatures after a cold snap
> early in the month variety has dropped slightly and numbers have generally
> declined more significantly. The newly appearing odes are Florida Bluet,
> Lucifer Swampdamsel, and Florida Baskettail.  Rambur's Forktail was the
> most
> common and widespread of the Odonata and Band-Winged Dragonlet was the
> most
> common dragonfly and Twilight Darner was the most common and widespread
> darner. Variety and numbers have been higher in Broward and Palm Beach
> counties than in the southern section of the region. Here is a list of the
> Odonata species observed during December in Broward, Dade, Palm Beach,
> Hendry, Collier, and mainland Monroe Counties:
>
>
> Florida Bluet (Enallagma pollutum)
> Citrine Forktail (Ischnura hastata)
> Lilypad Forktail (Ischnura kellicotti)
> Rambur's Forktail (Ischnura ramburii)
> Duckweed Firetail (Telebasis byersi)
> Lucifer Swampdamsel (Leptobasis lucifer)
>
> Common Green Darner (Anax junius)
> Regal Darner (Coryphaeschna ingens)
> Twilight Darner (Gynacantha nervosa)
> Cyrano Darner (Nasiaeschna pentacantha)
> Phantom Darner (Triacanthagyna trifida)
> Florida Baskettail (Epitheca stella)
> Four-spotted Pennant (Brachymesia gravida)
> Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina)
> Scarlet Skimmer (Crocothemis servilia)
> Pin-tailed Pondhawk (Erythemis plebeja)
> Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis)
> Great Pondhawk (Erythemis vesiculosa)
> Little Blue Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax minuscula)
> Band-winged Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax umbrata)
> Metallic Pennant (Idiataphe cubensis)
> Needham's Skimmer (Libellula needhami)
> Marl Pennant (Macrodiplax balteata)
> Hyacinth Glider (Miathyria marcella)
> Spot-tailed Dasher (Micrathyria aequalis)
> Three-striped Dasher (Micrathyria didyma)
> Roseate Skimmer (Orthemis ferruginea)
> Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis)
> Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens)
> Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera)
> Vermilion Saddlebags (Tramea abdominalis)
>
> Bryant Roberts
> Davie, Florida
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>




------------------------------------
Posted by: jevoy AT bio.miami.edu
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: South Florida December Odonata
From: "'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2015 16:54:02 -0500
A few late winter/early spring species have appeared during December in
south Florida but despite unseasonably warm temperatures after a cold snap
early in the month variety has dropped slightly and numbers have generally
declined more significantly. The newly appearing odes are Florida Bluet,
Lucifer Swampdamsel, and Florida Baskettail.  Rambur's Forktail was the most
common and widespread of the Odonata and Band-Winged Dragonlet was the most
common dragonfly and Twilight Darner was the most common and widespread
darner. Variety and numbers have been higher in Broward and Palm Beach
counties than in the southern section of the region. Here is a list of the
Odonata species observed during December in Broward, Dade, Palm Beach,
Hendry, Collier, and mainland Monroe Counties:


Florida Bluet (Enallagma pollutum)
Citrine Forktail (Ischnura hastata)
Lilypad Forktail (Ischnura kellicotti)
Rambur's Forktail (Ischnura ramburii)
Duckweed Firetail (Telebasis byersi)
Lucifer Swampdamsel (Leptobasis lucifer)

Common Green Darner (Anax junius)
Regal Darner (Coryphaeschna ingens)
Twilight Darner (Gynacantha nervosa)
Cyrano Darner (Nasiaeschna pentacantha)
Phantom Darner (Triacanthagyna trifida)
Florida Baskettail (Epitheca stella)
Four-spotted Pennant (Brachymesia gravida)
Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina)
Scarlet Skimmer (Crocothemis servilia)
Pin-tailed Pondhawk (Erythemis plebeja)
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis)
Great Pondhawk (Erythemis vesiculosa)
Little Blue Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax minuscula)
Band-winged Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax umbrata)
Metallic Pennant (Idiataphe cubensis)
Needham's Skimmer (Libellula needhami)
Marl Pennant (Macrodiplax balteata)
Hyacinth Glider (Miathyria marcella)
Spot-tailed Dasher (Micrathyria aequalis)
Three-striped Dasher (Micrathyria didyma)
Roseate Skimmer (Orthemis ferruginea)
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis)
Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens)
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera)
Vermilion Saddlebags (Tramea abdominalis)

Bryant Roberts
Davie, Florida














------------------------------------
Posted by: "bryant roberts" 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: File - Mail help and suggestions.
From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Date: 1 Jan 2015 13:03:59 -0000
In the last few years Yahoo has become a playground for hackers, crackers, and 
account thieves. They love to get into accounts of people who belong to large 
groups (like this one) and have weak account protection, then use that account 
to spew out SPAM messages that look like they came from a trusted member (a 
common one is "I am stuck in - a foreign land - and someone stole my wallet, 
etc. etc.", hoping someone will wire some money without talking to the real 
person.), often with a "phishing" scheme, or a link that is usually a link to a 
website that will hijack your computer and turn it into a "zombie". Really. 
These zombie computers are a scourge of the Internet, spewing out millions of 
SPAM messages per hour, and making life miserable for many people. 


Also, when they hack your account, they get your address book and any personal 
information you have on Yahoo.In many cases, your account is gone forever, and 
you cannot get it back. Yahoo, being free, is not too terribly helpful, as they 
really cannot provide strong customer service. Bad juju all around. 


To stop this foolishness, the best thing is to have a strong password for your 
account. A really bad password is your birthday, a pet's name, a loved one's 
name, any of which can be guessed by looking you up on a social site like 
Facebook, and guessing. A strong password is one that is both letters and 
numbers, with one or more letter capitalized, at least 8 characters, and 
preferably 12. The use of a good password manager (I use Lastpass, 
http://www.lastpass.com) and strong passwords will stop this from happening, or 
at least make it more difficult. I doubt anything is completely hacker proof if 
they really want something, but if it is too much trouble, they hopefully will 
go somewhere else. 


Have fun, and practice safe Internet!

The group owner, Alex Netherton.


------------------------------------

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Subject: File - rules and suggestions
From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Date: 1 Jan 2015 13:03:59 -0000
Welcome to SE-Odonata, a group for lovers of Damselflies and Dragonflies of the 
Southeastern US. My name is Alex Netherton, the founder and owner of the group. 
I am a Biologist and Field Naturalist, and have had an interest in Odonates 
since a boy. The group was founded because a few college professors and Ode 
enthusiasts were trying to make a mailing list, and the list got too unwieldy 
for peoples e-mail programs, so I offered to start it on a list server that has 
since gone out of business. It ended up on Yahoo around 2001. 



We have never had any problems until some controversy about "Creation Science" 
came up, which I (and a number of other members) feel to be religious based, 
and has no place in a scientific group. Arguing with Biologists about how the 
earth was created is not only rude, but is religious proselytizing, and I will 
not tolerate it. If the concept of evolution offends you, I suggest you find 
another group, because it will be discussed here from time to time. This is not 
to say that we are not spiritual or religious; to the contrary. However, this 
group is not for religious discussion. 


Occasionally, a person has a long signature, sometimes advertizing a religious 
or political point of view. I respectfully suggest that signature files on this 
group are kept to four lines, and contain: 

1.) Your name and title (if any, such as PhD if you wish)
2.) Your locality; not your address, but the general area in which you happen 
to reside. 

3.) Your affiliation, if any, with any educational institution, eg. "N.C. State 
University professor". This will help us understand your credentials. 

4. Perhaps, years Dragonfly and Damselfly hunting?
None of this is set in stone (as it is, as a matter of fact, on Carolinabirds, 
where you MUST sign with name, email, and locality), but PLEASE, numbers 1 and 
2, just so we have an idea. 


I have realized that I can edit posts, and those who have a signature or a 
portion of the post that is possibly offensive may find themselves moderated 
and their posts edited. Please understand; if someone puts up a rambling 
signature from Al Quran or The Bhagavad Gita or even Buddhavacana that offends 
you, you might complain, right? Think about it. I have strong religious and 
Spiritual views too, but you have to ask me about them, and I still might not 
share; my Spiritual life is mine. 


Political sigs are also not cool; I have seen some sigs putting words in 
Founder's mouths, seeming to say that religion is important to America; I refer 
you to the First Amendment. I also (not on this group, yet)seen signatures or 
messages attacking our President or politicians. Come on... 



Flaming and bullying will not be tolerated, whether in the group, or directly 
to another member. If I find out about it, you are gone. No discussion, no 
First Amendment. Sorry, but I am the list owner, and I can make the rules; the 
First Amendment does not apply here. Anybody not allow profanity in the house? 
Same here. You can cuss and swear and threaten out in the street, but if you 
come in my yard doing it, I will throw you out. This group is the collective 
yard of all of us; we treat each other with respect. 

I have made it difficult to become a member, requiring people to tell me about 
themselves and tell me why they wish to be members of this group; this is to 
stop the spammers who populate unregulated Yahoo groups. Spam once and you are 
gone. 


Just remember that this group is about the pursuit of Dragonflies, Damselflies, 
and good days in the field! 


The final rule is, ENJOY YOURSELF and share your Odonate sightings!


------------------------------------

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------------------------------------

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Subject: LUCIFER SWAMPDAMSEL at Fakahatchee 12/30
From: "Troy Hibbitts alterna2627 AT att.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2015 04:17:56 -0800

For those of you who don't follow SE ODES on Facebook, I had 4 male LUCIFER 
SWAMPDAMSEL at Fakahatchee near Dennis Paulson's original discovery site on 
12/30/14. I'll post pictures when I return to Texas. 


Troy Hibbitts
currently at Collier Seminole SP
(Brackettville,  TX) 


------------------------------
On Tue, Dec 30, 2014 4:40 AM CST se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com wrote:

>
>Dragonflies and Damselflies of the Southeastern US   Group  
>2  
>Messages              
>Digest #2107      
>1a 
>Re: Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo 
>by 
>"bryant roberts"
>robertsbryant             
>1b 
>Re: Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo 
>by 
>"Dennis Paulson"
>dennisrpaulson             
>Messages          
>1a  
>Re: Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo        
>Mon Dec 29, 2014 1:45 pm        (PST)        . Posted by:      
>"bryant roberts"         robertsbryant         
>The location where the photo was taken is about 21 miles southeast of 
>Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary.  On 12/28 I also saw what looked like a female 
>about a mile north of the south end of the East Main Tram about eight miles 
>south of Jones Grade.  In an earlier posting on this species mention was 
>made of a Fakahatchee Strand report but it is not on Odonata Central so I 
>will submit this record. 
>Bryant Roberts 
>Davie, Florida 
>From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On 
>Behalf Of Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata] 
>Sent: Monday, December 29, 2014 12:31 AM 
>To: se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com 
>Cc: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com 
>Subject: Re: [se-odonata] Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo 
>I'm glad you found them in the Fakahatchee, Bryant, as I hoped they were 
>well established there. They are probably widespread in those extensive 
>cypress swamps. 
>Dennis 
>On Dec 28, 2014, at 4:59 PM, 'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net 
>[se-odonata]  wrote: 
>Not quite show quality but here is a photo of my "lifer" Lucifer Swampdamsel 
>taken on Christmas day. 
>Bryant Roberts 
>Davie, Florida 
> 
>Reply to sender            
>. 
>Reply to group            
>. 
>Reply  via Web Post
>. 
>All Messages	   (4)
>. 
>Top ^
>1b  
>Re: Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo        
>Mon Dec 29, 2014 2:17 pm        (PST)        . Posted by:      
>"Dennis Paulson"         dennisrpaulson         
>I think the only records from Fakahatchee Strand were what I thought was my 
original specimen from 10 Jan 2000 and then one I discovered had been 
photographed there by Geraldo Ihssen on 15 March 1991. All subsequent records 
have been from in and around Corkscrew. 

>Dennis Paulson 
>On Dec 29, 2014, at 1:45 PM, 'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net 
[se-odonata]  wrote: 

>> 
>> The location where the photo was taken is about 21 miles southeast of 
Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary. On 12/28 I also saw what looked like a female about 
a mile north of the south end of the East Main Tram about eight miles south of 
Jones Grade. In an earlier posting on this species mention was made of a 
Fakahatchee Strand report but it is not on Odonata Central so I will submit 
this record. 

>> 
>>  
>> 
>> Bryant Roberts 
>> 
>> Davie, Florida 
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On 
Behalf Of Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata] 

>> Sent: Monday, December 29, 2014 12:31 AM 
>> To: se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com 
>> Cc: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com 
>> Subject: Re: [se-odonata] Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo 
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> I知 glad you found them in the Fakahatchee, Bryant, as I hoped they were 
well established there. They are probably widespread in those extensive cypress 
swamps. 

>> 
>>  
>> 
>> Dennis 
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> On Dec 28, 2014, at 4:59 PM, 'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net 
[se-odonata]  wrote: 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Not quite show quality but here is a photo of my "lifer" Lucifer Swampdamsel 

>> taken on Christmas day. 
>> 
>> Bryant Roberts 
>> Davie, Florida 
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> <~WRD000.jpg> 
>----- 
>Dennis Paulson 
>1724 NE 98 St. 
>Seattle, WA 98115 
>206-528-1382 
>dennispaulson AT comcast.net 
>Reply to sender            
>. 
>Reply to group            
>. 
>Reply  via Web Post
>. 
>All Messages	   (4)
>. 
>Top ^
>Visit Your Group 
>• Privacy • Unsubscribe • Terms of Use 


------------------------------
On Tue, Dec 30, 2014 4:40 AM CST se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com wrote:

>
>Dragonflies and Damselflies of the Southeastern US   Group  
>2  
>Messages              
>Digest #2107      
>1a 
>Re: Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo 
>by 
>"bryant roberts"
>robertsbryant             
>1b 
>Re: Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo 
>by 
>"Dennis Paulson"
>dennisrpaulson             
>Messages          
>1a  
>Re: Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo        
>Mon Dec 29, 2014 1:45 pm        (PST)        . Posted by:      
>"bryant roberts"         robertsbryant         
>The location where the photo was taken is about 21 miles southeast of 
>Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary.  On 12/28 I also saw what looked like a female 
>about a mile north of the south end of the East Main Tram about eight miles 
>south of Jones Grade.  In an earlier posting on this species mention was 
>made of a Fakahatchee Strand report but it is not on Odonata Central so I 
>will submit this record. 
>Bryant Roberts 
>Davie, Florida 
>From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On 
>Behalf Of Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata] 
>Sent: Monday, December 29, 2014 12:31 AM 
>To: se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com 
>Cc: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com 
>Subject: Re: [se-odonata] Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo 
>I'm glad you found them in the Fakahatchee, Bryant, as I hoped they were 
>well established there. They are probably widespread in those extensive 
>cypress swamps. 
>Dennis 
>On Dec 28, 2014, at 4:59 PM, 'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net 
>[se-odonata]  wrote: 
>Not quite show quality but here is a photo of my "lifer" Lucifer Swampdamsel 
>taken on Christmas day. 
>Bryant Roberts 
>Davie, Florida 
> 
>Reply to sender            
>. 
>Reply to group            
>. 
>Reply  via Web Post
>. 
>All Messages	   (4)
>. 
>Top ^
>1b  
>Re: Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo        
>Mon Dec 29, 2014 2:17 pm        (PST)        . Posted by:      
>"Dennis Paulson"         dennisrpaulson         
>I think the only records from Fakahatchee Strand were what I thought was my 
original specimen from 10 Jan 2000 and then one I discovered had been 
photographed there by Geraldo Ihssen on 15 March 1991. All subsequent records 
have been from in and around Corkscrew. 

>Dennis Paulson 
>On Dec 29, 2014, at 1:45 PM, 'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net 
[se-odonata]  wrote: 

>> 
>> The location where the photo was taken is about 21 miles southeast of 
Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary. On 12/28 I also saw what looked like a female about 
a mile north of the south end of the East Main Tram about eight miles south of 
Jones Grade. In an earlier posting on this species mention was made of a 
Fakahatchee Strand report but it is not on Odonata Central so I will submit 
this record. 

>> 
>>  
>> 
>> Bryant Roberts 
>> 
>> Davie, Florida 
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On 
Behalf Of Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata] 

>> Sent: Monday, December 29, 2014 12:31 AM 
>> To: se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com 
>> Cc: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com 
>> Subject: Re: [se-odonata] Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo 
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> I知 glad you found them in the Fakahatchee, Bryant, as I hoped they were 
well established there. They are probably widespread in those extensive cypress 
swamps. 

>> 
>>  
>> 
>> Dennis 
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> On Dec 28, 2014, at 4:59 PM, 'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net 
[se-odonata]  wrote: 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Not quite show quality but here is a photo of my "lifer" Lucifer Swampdamsel 

>> taken on Christmas day. 
>> 
>> Bryant Roberts 
>> Davie, Florida 
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> <~WRD000.jpg> 
>----- 
>Dennis Paulson 
>1724 NE 98 St. 
>Seattle, WA 98115 
>206-528-1382 
>dennispaulson AT comcast.net 
>Reply to sender            
>. 
>Reply to group            
>. 
>Reply  via Web Post
>. 
>All Messages	   (4)
>. 
>Top ^
>Visit Your Group 
>• Privacy • Unsubscribe • Terms of Use 



------------------------------------
Posted by: Troy Hibbitts 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo
From: "Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Dec 2014 14:17:53 -0800
I think the only records from Fakahatchee Strand were what I thought was my 
original specimen from 10 Jan 2000 and then one I discovered had been 
photographed there by Geraldo Ihssen on 15 March 1991. All subsequent records 
have been from in and around Corkscrew. 


Dennis Paulson

On Dec 29, 2014, at 1:45 PM, 'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net 
[se-odonata]  wrote: 


> 
> The location where the photo was taken is about 21 miles southeast of 
Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary. On 12/28 I also saw what looked like a female about 
a mile north of the south end of the East Main Tram about eight miles south of 
Jones Grade. In an earlier posting on this species mention was made of a 
Fakahatchee Strand report but it is not on Odonata Central so I will submit 
this record. 

> 
>  
> 
> Bryant Roberts
> 
> Davie, Florida
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On 
Behalf Of Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata] 

> Sent: Monday, December 29, 2014 12:31 AM
> To: se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com
> Cc: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
> Subject: Re: [se-odonata] Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> Im glad you found them in the Fakahatchee, Bryant, as I hoped they were well 
established there. They are probably widespread in those extensive cypress 
swamps. 

> 
>  
> 
> Dennis
> 
>  
> 
> On Dec 28, 2014, at 4:59 PM, 'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net 
[se-odonata]  wrote: 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> Not quite show quality but here is a photo of my "lifer" Lucifer Swampdamsel
> taken on Christmas day.
> 
> Bryant Roberts
> Davie, Florida
> 
> 
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> <~WRD000.jpg>

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net



Subject: RE: Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo
From: "'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Dec 2014 16:45:16 -0500
The location where the photo was taken is about 21 miles southeast of
Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary.  On 12/28 I also saw what looked like a female
about a mile north of the south end of the East Main Tram about eight miles
south of Jones Grade.  In an earlier posting on this species mention was
made of a Fakahatchee Strand report but it is not on Odonata Central so I
will submit this record.

 

Bryant Roberts

Davie, Florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]
Sent: Monday, December 29, 2014 12:31 AM
To: se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com
Cc: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [se-odonata] Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo

 

  

I'm glad you found them in the Fakahatchee, Bryant, as I hoped they were
well established there. They are probably widespread in those extensive
cypress swamps.

 

Dennis

 

On Dec 28, 2014, at 4:59 PM, 'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net
[se-odonata]  wrote:





Not quite show quality but here is a photo of my "lifer" Lucifer Swampdamsel
taken on Christmas day.

Bryant Roberts
Davie, Florida



 

 

 


Subject: Re: Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo
From: "Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2014 21:31:20 -0800
Im glad you found them in the Fakahatchee, Bryant, as I hoped they were well 
established there. They are probably widespread in those extensive cypress 
swamps. 


Dennis

On Dec 28, 2014, at 4:59 PM, 'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net 
[se-odonata]  wrote: 


> Not quite show quality but here is a photo of my "lifer" Lucifer Swampdamsel
> taken on Christmas day.
> 
> Bryant Roberts
> Davie, Florida
> 
> 
> 
> 


Subject: Lucifer Swampdamsel Photo [1 Attachment]
From: "'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2014 19:59:51 -0500
Not quite show quality but here is a photo of my "lifer" Lucifer Swampdamsel
taken on Christmas day.

Bryant Roberts
Davie, Florida












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Posted by: "bryant roberts" 
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Subject: RE: Leptobasis lucifer contact info?
From: "'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2014 18:31:23 -0500
On December 25th seven Lucifer Swampdamsels four of which were adult males
were seen on Jones Grade in the northeastern corner of Fakahatchee Strand
Preserve State Park.  They were found along the second half of the two mile
section of trail between the entrance gate and the East Main Tram
intersection.

 

Bryant Roberts

Davie, Florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Troy Hibbitts alterna2627 AT att.net [se-odonata]
Sent: Tuesday, December 16, 2014 9:12 AM
To: se-odonata
Subject: [se-odonata] Leptobasis lucifer contact info?

 

  

I know that this species has been seen at both Fakahatchee SP and Corkscrew
Swamp Sanctuary.  I plan to search for it (to photo) when I'm in FL after
Christmas - tentatively on 1/31.  Any specific info would be appreciated -
also, at DSA this past June, I was told that there was a contact person at
Corkscrew who could help with specifics?  If so, please fwd such info to me.

 

Troy Hibbitts

Brackettville, TX


Subject: Re: Leptobasis lucifer contact info?
From: "Bill Mauffray iodonata AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 09:26:36 -0500
Jerrell daigle has the contact but he is not on fbook. Phone # 8508788787
 On Dec 16, 2014 8:11 AM, "Troy Hibbitts alterna2627 AT att.net [se-odonata]" <
se-odonata-noreply AT yahoogroups.com> wrote:

>
>
> I know that this species has been seen at both Fakahatchee SP and
> Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary.  I plan to search for it (to photo) when I'm in
> FL after Christmas - tentatively on 1/31.  Any specific info would be
> appreciated - also, at DSA this past June, I was told that there was a
> contact person at Corkscrew who could help with specifics?  If so, please
> fwd such info to me.
>
> Troy Hibbitts
> Brackettville, TX
>  
>
Subject: Leptobasis lucifer contact info?
From: "Troy Hibbitts alterna2627 AT att.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 06:11:55 -0800
I know that this species has been seen at both Fakahatchee SP and Corkscrew 
Swamp Sanctuary. I plan to search for it (to photo) when I'm in FL after 
Christmas - tentatively on 1/31. Any specific info would be appreciated - also, 
at DSA this past June, I was told that there was a contact person at Corkscrew 
who could help with specifics? If so, please fwd such info to me. 


Troy Hibbitts
Brackettville, TX
Subject: Dragonflies on the hunt display complex choreography
From: "Tim Martin tf_martn AT bellsouth.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2014 12:41:11 -0600
http://phys.org/news/2014-12-dragonflies-complex-choreography.html

Excerpt

The dragonfly is a swift and efficient hunter. Once it spots its prey, it takes 
about half a second to swoop beneath an unsuspecting insect and snatch it from 
the air. Scientists at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research 
Campus have used motion-capture techniques to track the details of that chase, 
and found that a dragonfly's movement is guided by internal models of its own 
body and the anticipated movement of its prey. Similar internal models are used 
to guide behavior in humans. 


"This highlights the role that internal models play in letting these creatures 
construct such a complex behavior," says Janelia group leader Anthony Leonardo, 
who led the study. "It starts to reshape our view of the neural underpinnings 
of this behavior." Leonardo, postdoctoral fellows Matteo Mischiati and Huai-Ti 
Lin, and their colleagues published the findings in the December 11, 2014, 
issue of the journal Nature. 


"Until now, this type of complex control, which incorporates both prediction 
and reaction, had been demonstrated only in vertebrates," writes Harvard 
University biologist Stacey A. Combes in an accompanying News & Views 
perspective in Nature. "However, Mischiati et al. show that dragonflies on the 
hunt perform internal calculations every bit as complex as those of a ballet 
dancer." 


Neuroscientists have learned a lot about how the nervous system triggers 
actions in response to sensory information by studying simple reflexive 
behaviors, such as how an animal escapes a predator. Leonardo has been studying 
prey capture in dragonflies because he wants to know whether the same 
stimulus-response loops that researchers have uncovered in those systems also 
underlie more complex behaviors. 


In humans, the simple act of reaching for an object demands sophisticated 
information processing, Leonardo says. Just to pick up a cup of coffee, the 
brain calls on a number of internal models. "You have an internal model of how 
your arm works, how the joints are articulated, of the cup and its mass. If the 
cup is filled with coffee, you incorporate that," he explains. "Articulating a 
body and moving it through space is a very complicated problem." 





 

Three-dimensional flight trajectory of dragonfly capturing prey, showing 
in-flight head and body orientation. The dragonflys steering strategy is to 
align its body axis to the preys direction of motion, while keeping the prey 
directly overhead. During these maneuvers, the head is rotated continuously to 
hold the prey steady on the eye. Analysis of these data reveal that the 
dragonfly uses predictive internal models and reactive control to build an 
interception trajectory that complies with biomechanical constraints. Credit: 
Anthony Leonardo, Janelia Research Campus, HHMI 

Scientists had so far thought of prey capture by insects as a straightforward 
system in which a predator's movement is guided solely by the position its 
prey. "The idea was the dragonfly roughly knows where the prey is relative to 
him, and he tries to hold this angle constant as he moves toward the 
interception point. This is the way guided missiles work and how people catch 
footballs," Leonardo says. But there was reason to believe prey capture was 
more complicated. 


"You don't need a spectacularly complicated model to guess where the prey will 
be a short time in the future," he says. "But how do you maneuver your body to 
reach the point of contact?" 


In search of a more complete picture, Leonardo and his team spent several years 
devising a system that allows them to track a dragonfly's body movements as it 
intercepts its prey. Their strategy is based on the same motion-capture 
technology used to translate actors' movements into computer animation: 
reflective markers are placed on different body parts - in this case, the head, 
body, and wings - and a high-speed video camera records flashes of light 
reflected from each marker as the insect moves. Using the position of each 
flash of light, the scientists can reconstruct an outline of the dragonfly as 
it flies (the accuracy of the outline depends on the number of markers attached 
to the dragonfly). 


Leonardo and his colleagues recorded dragonflies' movements as they chased 
after either a fruit fly or an artificial prey - a bead maneuvered by a pulley 
system - whose movements the scientists could precisely control. They focused 
on following the orientation of the dragonfly's head and body. "That tells us 
what the dragonfly sees and how its body moves," he explains. 
Subject: Florida November Observations
From: "'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 7 Dec 2014 21:03:29 -0500
I began and ended November in Everglades National Park and during the month
travelled as far south as Big Pine Key and as far north as the Gainesville
area.  While the numbers of most Odonata species has fallen substantially
the variety has held up reasonably well.  The numbers of Pale Green Darners
observed along Snake Bight Road fell to about three near the end of November
from about ten the day before a cold front sent temperatures in Miami to a
record low of 52 degrees on 11/2. A day trip to the keys on 11/8 turned up
Caribbean Yellowface, Antillean Skimmer, and Red-tailed Pennant on Big Pine
Key.  The highlight of my visit to the northern part of the state was my
"life" Dragonhunter near the headspring at Wekiwa Springs State Park
northeast of Orlando on 11/16.

Here is my list of Odonata identified during November. With the travelling I
did I had only one weekend day to check my usual local sites and it rained
most of that day so some common species were missed.  Species not on the
list that I observed in October and have already seen this month include:
Duckweed Firetail, Lilypad Forktail, Cyrano Darner, Regal Darner, Needham's
Skimmer, Little Blue Dragonlet, Spot-tailed Dasher, Three-striped Dasher,
and Vermilion Saddlebags.  Species marked with an asterisk were seen in
Central Florida only.


*Smoky Rubyspot (Hetaerina titia)
*Variable Dancer (Argia fumipennis)
*Blue-ringed Dancer (Argia sedula)
*Purple Bluet (Enallagma coecum)
*Atlantic Bluet (Enallagma doubledayi)
*Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum)
Citrine Forktail (Ischnura hastata)
Rambur's Forktail (Ischnura ramburii)
Caribbean Yellowface (Neoerythromma cultellatum)
Common Green Darner (Anax junius)
Twilight Darner (Gynacantha nervosa)
Pale-green Darner (Triacanthagyna septima)
Phantom Darner (Triacanthagyna trifida)
*Dragonhunter (Hagenius brevistylus)
Red-tailed Pennant (Brachymesia furcata)
Four-spotted Pennant (Brachymesia gravida)
Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina)
Scarlet Skimmer (Crocothemis servilia)
Pin-tailed Pondhawk (Erythemis plebeja)
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis)
Great Pondhawk (Erythemis vesiculosa)
Seaside Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax berenice)
Band-winged Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax umbrata)
Metallic Pennant (Idiataphe cubensis)
Marl Pennant (Macrodiplax balteata)
Hyacinth Glider (Miathyria marcella)
Antillean Skimmer (Orthemis cf. schmidti)
Roseate Skimmer (Orthemis ferruginea)
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis)
Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens)
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera)
Carolina Saddlebags (Tramea carolina)
Black Saddlebags (Tramea lacerata)


Bryant Roberts
Davie, Florida














------------------------------------
Posted by: "bryant roberts" 
------------------------------------


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Subject: New file uploaded to se-odonata
From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Date: 07 Dec 2014 14:33:50 -0800
Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the se-odonata
group.


  File        : /Mail help and suggestions.
  Uploaded by : danetherton2000 
  Description : A few things to keep you safe.


You can access this file at the URL:

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/se-odonata/files/Mail%20help%20and%20suggestions. 



To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:

https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398 



Regards,


danetherton2000 


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Subject: Re: Re: File - yahoo mail help.odt
From: "Alex Netherton anetherton AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2014 11:12:42 -0500
I do hope you are joking. I know I need to redo that file, but if you feel
the group messages are spam, please let me know.
Alex

Alex Netherton
http://blueridgediscovery.org
Please help at Gofundme.com 
Amateur Radio call W5ALX (Vanity Call)

On Mon, Dec 1, 2014 at 11:30 PM, Thomas W Donnelly tdonelly AT binghamton.edu
[se-odonata]  wrote:

>
>
> The most bothersome spam I receive is from somebody called SE Odonata
>
>  
>
Subject: Re: File - yahoo mail help.odt
From: "Thomas W Donnelly tdonelly AT binghamton.edu [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Dec 2014 23:30:48 -0500
The most bothersome spam I receive is from somebody called SE Odonata
Subject: File - yahoo mail help.odt
From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Date: 1 Dec 2014 13:05:29 -0000

File        : yahoo mail help.odt 
Description : Yahoo Mail Spam IMPORTANT!!! 

 


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Subject: File - rules and suggestions
From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Date: 1 Dec 2014 13:05:29 -0000
Welcome to SE-Odonata, a group for lovers of Damselflies and Dragonflies of the 
Southeastern US. My name is Alex Netherton, the founder and owner of the group. 
I am a Biologist and Field Naturalist, and have had an interest in Odonates 
since a boy. The group was founded because a few college professors and Ode 
enthusiasts were trying to make a mailing list, and the list got too unwieldy 
for peoples e-mail programs, so I offered to start it on a list server that has 
since gone out of business. It ended up on Yahoo around 2001. 



We have never had any problems until some controversy about "Creation Science" 
came up, which I (and a number of other members) feel to be religious based, 
and has no place in a scientific group. Arguing with Biologists about how the 
earth was created is not only rude, but is religious proselytizing, and I will 
not tolerate it. If the concept of evolution offends you, I suggest you find 
another group, because it will be discussed here from time to time. This is not 
to say that we are not spiritual or religious; to the contrary. However, this 
group is not for religious discussion. 


Occasionally, a person has a long signature, sometimes advertizing a religious 
or political point of view. I respectfully suggest that signature files on this 
group are kept to four lines, and contain: 

1.) Your name and title (if any, such as PhD if you wish)
2.) Your locality; not your address, but the general area in which you happen 
to reside. 

3.) Your affiliation, if any, with any educational institution, eg. "N.C. State 
University professor". This will help us understand your credentials. 

4. Perhaps, years Dragonfly and Damselfly hunting?
None of this is set in stone (as it is, as a matter of fact, on Carolinabirds, 
where you MUST sign with name, email, and locality), but PLEASE, numbers 1 and 
2, just so we have an idea. 


I have realized that I can edit posts, and those who have a signature or a 
portion of the post that is possibly offensive may find themselves moderated 
and their posts edited. Please understand; if someone puts up a rambling 
signature from Al Quran or The Bhagavad Gita or even Buddhavacana that offends 
you, you might complain, right? Think about it. I have strong religious and 
Spiritual views too, but you have to ask me about them, and I still might not 
share; my Spiritual life is mine. 


Political sigs are also not cool; I have seen some sigs putting words in 
Founder's mouths, seeming to say that religion is important to America; I refer 
you to the First Amendment. I also (not on this group, yet)seen signatures or 
messages attacking our President or politicians. Come on... 



Flaming and bullying will not be tolerated, whether in the group, or directly 
to another member. If I find out about it, you are gone. No discussion, no 
First Amendment. Sorry, but I am the list owner, and I can make the rules; the 
First Amendment does not apply here. Anybody not allow profanity in the house? 
Same here. You can cuss and swear and threaten out in the street, but if you 
come in my yard doing it, I will throw you out. This group is the collective 
yard of all of us; we treat each other with respect. 

I have made it difficult to become a member, requiring people to tell me about 
themselves and tell me why they wish to be members of this group; this is to 
stop the spammers who populate unregulated Yahoo groups. Spam once and you are 
gone. 


Just remember that this group is about the pursuit of Dragonflies, Damselflies, 
and good days in the field! 


The final rule is, ENJOY YOURSELF and share your Odonate sightings!


------------------------------------

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Subject: middle TN Nov. odes
From: "richard connors didymops07 AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2014 20:34:54 -0600
11/10/2014
Davidson Co. TN

Taking advantage of a 70-degree November day I made a quick check of a
couple of sites to see if anything was still flying. First stop Mill Creek
Greenway. With a chilly wade in the creek to a sunny patch of water willow,
I found several American Rubyspots busy (in a hurry?) mating and competing
for mates.

At a Percy Priest lake backwater the floating vegetation that was there 2
weeks ago had disappeared, evidently killed by the light frosts since then.
But I found a few odes in an open wet area next to the lake: Fragile
Forktail, Citrine Forktail females busy egg-laying, and one male Big Bluet.

I won't expect much to survive the colder weather due here later in the
week.

Richard Connors
Nashville
Subject: NC rare animal list temporarily down
From: "'Legrand, Harry' harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 5 Nov 2014 23:53:07 +0000
Folks:

The NC Natural Heritage Program took the PDF of the animal list off our website 
this afternoon when someone notified us of a correction that was needed.. So, 
we are in the process of making this correction. So, currently it says "Rare 
Animal List (available soon)". (It was online for 1-2 hours early this 
afternoon). The corrected rare animal list should be back up and revised 
tomorrow morning, at least by midday. 


Harry LeGrand

Harry LeGrand, Vertebrate Zoologist
North Carolina Natural Heritage Program
NCDENR Office of Land and Water Stewardship
1601 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC  27699-1601
Office: (919) 707-8603
harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov
www.ncnhp.org

E-mail correspondence to and from this address may be subject to the North 
Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties. 


Subject: Natural Heritage Progrm List of the Rare Animal Species of North Carolina - 2014 is now available
From: "'Legrand, Harry' harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 5 Nov 2014 19:25:07 +0000
Folks:

The North Carolina Natural Heritage Program's List of the Rare Animal Species 
of North Carolina - 2014 is now completed. It is found online on our website at 
this link: 
http://portal.ncdenr.org/web/nhp/nhp-publications#rare-plant-and-animal-list 


You can view or print the PDF of the 2014 list, without charge.
Or, you may order a bound paper copy for an estimated $6.00 (which includes 
mailing). 


To help us determine how many bound copies to order from the printer, we are 
requesting that people reply back to me 
(harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov) before November 15 
if you would like to purchase a bound copy of the 2014 list. 


The exact price will depend somewhat on the number of copies we order, so 
please do not send a check yet. We'll send out another announcement with the 
exact price and order details when the bound publications are available. 


Sincerely,

Harry LeGrand

Harry LeGrand
NC Natural Heritage Program
DENR Office of Land and Water Stewardship
1601 MSC
Raleigh, NC 27699-1601
(919) 707-8603 (work)
e-mail: harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov

** E-mail correspondence to and from this address may be subject to the N.C. 
Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.** 

Subject: Big bluets & others survive light frost - N GA [1 Attachment]
From: "Vicki Deloach VLDELOACH AT aol.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2014 16:28:51 -0500
 After two nights of 34o and 32o respectively, the damsels still fly. A quick 
check this afternoon in 65o & sunny: 


Rambur's forktails, 2 males 
Orange bluet, male
Big bluet, female 

Should be new regional late date for E. signatum, approaching current regional 
late date for ramburii, and we'll see how long the durum fly. 


Vicki DeLoach
Cherokee Co. GA

this afternoon:







 


Subject: File - rules and suggestions
From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Date: 1 Nov 2014 12:00:23 -0000
Welcome to SE-Odonata, a group for lovers of Damselflies and Dragonflies of the 
Southeastern US. My name is Alex Netherton, the founder and owner of the group. 
I am a Biologist and Field Naturalist, and have had an interest in Odonates 
since a boy. The group was founded because a few college professors and Ode 
enthusiasts were trying to make a mailing list, and the list got too unwieldy 
for peoples e-mail programs, so I offered to start it on a list server that has 
since gone out of business. It ended up on Yahoo around 2001. 



We have never had any problems until some controversy about "Creation Science" 
came up, which I (and a number of other members) feel to be religious based, 
and has no place in a scientific group. Arguing with Biologists about how the 
earth was created is not only rude, but is religious proselytizing, and I will 
not tolerate it. If the concept of evolution offends you, I suggest you find 
another group, because it will be discussed here from time to time. This is not 
to say that we are not spiritual or religious; to the contrary. However, this 
group is not for religious discussion. 


Occasionally, a person has a long signature, sometimes advertizing a religious 
or political point of view. I respectfully suggest that signature files on this 
group are kept to four lines, and contain: 

1.) Your name and title (if any, such as PhD if you wish)
2.) Your locality; not your address, but the general area in which you happen 
to reside. 

3.) Your affiliation, if any, with any educational institution, eg. "N.C. State 
University professor". This will help us understand your credentials. 

4. Perhaps, years Dragonfly and Damselfly hunting?
None of this is set in stone (as it is, as a matter of fact, on Carolinabirds, 
where you MUST sign with name, email, and locality), but PLEASE, numbers 1 and 
2, just so we have an idea. 


I have realized that I can edit posts, and those who have a signature or a 
portion of the post that is possibly offensive may find themselves moderated 
and their posts edited. Please understand; if someone puts up a rambling 
signature from Al Quran or The Bhagavad Gita or even Buddhavacana that offends 
you, you might complain, right? Think about it. I have strong religious and 
Spiritual views too, but you have to ask me about them, and I still might not 
share; my Spiritual life is mine. 


Political sigs are also not cool; I have seen some sigs putting words in 
Founder's mouths, seeming to say that religion is important to America; I refer 
you to the First Amendment. I also (not on this group, yet)seen signatures or 
messages attacking our President or politicians. Come on... 



Flaming and bullying will not be tolerated, whether in the group, or directly 
to another member. If I find out about it, you are gone. No discussion, no 
First Amendment. Sorry, but I am the list owner, and I can make the rules; the 
First Amendment does not apply here. Anybody not allow profanity in the house? 
Same here. You can cuss and swear and threaten out in the street, but if you 
come in my yard doing it, I will throw you out. This group is the collective 
yard of all of us; we treat each other with respect. 

I have made it difficult to become a member, requiring people to tell me about 
themselves and tell me why they wish to be members of this group; this is to 
stop the spammers who populate unregulated Yahoo groups. Spam once and you are 
gone. 


Just remember that this group is about the pursuit of Dragonflies, Damselflies, 
and good days in the field! 


The final rule is, ENJOY YOURSELF and share your Odonate sightings!


------------------------------------

------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/se-odonata/

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Subject: File - yahoo mail help.odt
From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Date: 1 Nov 2014 12:00:23 -0000

File        : yahoo mail help.odt 
Description : Yahoo Mail Spam IMPORTANT!!! 

 


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Subject: South and Central Florida October Odonata
From: "'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 22:53:19 -0400
October brought a hint of fall to south Florida with a few nights dropping
down to around 60 degrees and the weather getting a little drier.
Damselflies are becoming a more common and Halloween Pennants, Eastern
Pondhawks, Band-winged Dragonlets, and Blue Dashers are beginning to become
locally abundant but so far Four-spotted Pennant numbers have been holding
steady at moderate levels.  Great Pondhawk is a species I pay special
attention to this time of the year but except for a few coastal locations
where I might see five or ten in a day all I have seen in the last couple of
months is an occasional individual.

Here is my list of Odonata identified in south and central Florida during
October 2014; the species followed by an asterisk were seen in central
Florida only. (North of State Road 70)

Smoky Rubyspot (Hetaerina titia)*
Blue-striped Spreadwing (Lestes tenuatus)
Carolina Spreadwing (Lestes vidua)
Swamp Spreadwing (Lestes vigilax)*
Variable Dancer (Argia fumipennis)*
Blue-ringed Dancer (Argia sedula)*
Purple Bluet (Enallagma coecum)*
Atlantic Bluet (Enallagma doubledayi)*
Florida Bluet (Enallagma pollutum)
Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum)*
Citrine Forktail (Ischnura hastata)
Lilypad Forktail (Ischnura kellicotti)
Everglades Sprite (Nehalennia pallidula)
Rambur's Forktail (Ischnura ramburii)
Duckweed Firetail (Telebasis byersi)
Common Green Darner (Anax junius)
Comet Darner (Anax longipes)
Blue-faced Darner (Coryphaeschna adnexa)
Regal Darner (Coryphaeschna ingens)
Twilight Darner (Gynacantha nervosa)
Cyrano Darner (Nasiaeschna pentacantha)
Pale-green Darner (Triacanthagyna septima)
Phantom Darner (Triacanthagyna trifida)
Four-spotted Pennant (Brachymesia gravida)
Amanda's Pennant (Celithemis amanda)*
Red-veined Pennant (Celithemis bertha)*
Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina)
Scarlet Skimmer (Crocothemis servilia)
Pin-tailed Pondhawk (Erythemis plebeja)
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis)
Great Pondhawk (Erythemis vesiculosa)
Seaside Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax berenice)
Little Blue Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax minuscula)
Band-winged Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax umbrata)
Metallic Pennant (Idiataphe cubensis)
Golden-winged Skimmer (Libellula auripennis)*
Purple Skimmer (Libellula jesseana)*
Needham's Skimmer (Libellula needhami)
Marl Pennant (Macrodiplax balteata)
Hyacinth Glider (Miathyria marcella)
Spot-tailed Dasher (Micrathyria aequalis)
Three-striped Dasher (Micrathyria didyma)
Roseate Skimmer (Orthemis ferruginea)
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis)
Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens)
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera)
Vermilion Saddlebags (Tramea abdominalis)
Carolina Saddlebags (Tramea carolina)
Black Saddlebags (Tramea lacerata)


Bryant Roberts
Davie, Florida














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Subject: Re: Big Bluets in middle Tenn - and GA [2 Attachments]
From: "Vicki Deloach VLDELOACH AT aol.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 20:27:08 -0400
 
 Congrats on finding this species again Richard! Mine were missing the last two 
days but re-appeared today along with the first Blue dasher I've seen in weeks. 
And the Prince baskettail again patrolled by. It's been a very interesting week 
and a half here. I've checked a number of nearby ponds for e. durum - to no 
avail. Their lake is not very close to any other large bodies of water - or 
rivers. Here's what they were flying with today: 


Big bluets (e. durum) - at least a male & female
Double-striped bluets - males chasing or being chased by durum - making for an 
interesting size comparison 

Orange bluets
Rambur's forktails 
Blue dasher - old male - the first in weeks
Prince baskettail - continues

Very little at the wetlands:
Familiar bluets 
one fleeing darner

We have a change in weather coming so the fun may end soon.

Vicki DeLoach
Cherokee Co.

e. durum 10-28-14









 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: richard connors didymops07 AT gmail.com [se-odonata] 
 

To: se-odonata ; tn-dragonflies 
 

Sent: Tue, Oct 28, 2014 7:16 pm
Subject: [se-odonata] Big Bluets in middle Tenn [1 Attachment]


 
  
    
                  

Oct. 27, 2014 J. Percy Priest Lake, Davidson Co.TN


Vicki's recent find of Big Bluets (Enallagma durum) in north Georgia reminded 
me to get out and look for them here. Having found them along the Tennessee 
River (western section) a few years ago I suspected that if they made it that 
far from previously known range, that they would eventually find their way even 
further and show up here via the Cumberland River. I have looked before but 
this is the first year I have found here. One male out on the point of a 
peninsula, and more males and females back in a cove with water plants. 



My theory is they traveled up from the Gulf via the Tennessee- Tombigbe 
waterway, a connection that was not there until recent years, and aided their 
evident range expansion into Tennessee. I'm not sure what waterway would easily 
lead them up to north Georgia. Since they are "big" and robust and seem to be 
dominant in their niche, I guess there is not much to stop them entering a new 
territory. They do seem to be a Fall flying species, so this could mean they 
could move up from the south every year and re-colonize, like some of the 
butterfly species like Cloudless Sulfur and Gulf Fritillary. But they usually 
look fresh, even teneral fresh, so some at least emerged here. 



Anyway, it was good to be out on what was probably our last good day for Odes 
this year. I found one other new county species I have been expecting - 
Rambur's Forktail (Ischnura ramburii). See list below of the few others seen, 
the only species abundant was Orange Bluet. 



Richard Connors
Nashville TN


Blue-fronted Dancer (Argia apicalis) 1
Dusky Dancer (A. translata)
Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum)
Big Bluet (E. durum) 10
Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita)
Rambur's Forktail (I. ramburii) 1 male
Com. Green Darner (Anax junius) 2
Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens) few, but fresh looking

    
             

  

Subject: Big Bluets in middle Tenn [1 Attachment]
From: "richard connors didymops07 AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 18:15:56 -0500
Oct. 27, 2014 J. Percy Priest Lake, Davidson Co.TN

Vicki's recent find of Big Bluets (Enallagma durum) in north Georgia
reminded me to get out and look for them here. Having found them along the
Tennessee River (western section) a few years ago I suspected that if they
made it that far from previously known range, that they would eventually
find their way even further and show up here via the Cumberland River. I
have looked before but this is the first year I have found here. One male
out on the point of a peninsula, and more males and females back in a cove
with water plants.

My theory is they traveled up from the Gulf via the Tennessee- Tombigbe
waterway, a connection that was not there until recent years, and aided
their evident range expansion into Tennessee. I'm not sure what waterway
would easily lead them up to north Georgia. Since they are "big" and robust
and seem to be dominant in their niche, I guess there is not much to stop
them entering a new territory. They do seem to be a Fall flying species, so
this could mean they could move up from the south every year and
re-colonize, like some of the butterfly species like Cloudless Sulfur and
Gulf Fritillary. But they usually look fresh, even teneral fresh, so some
at least emerged here.

Anyway, it was good to be out on what was probably our last good day for
Odes this year. I found one other new county species I have been expecting
- Rambur's Forktail (Ischnura ramburii). See list below of the few others
seen, the only species abundant was Orange Bluet.

Richard Connors
Nashville TN

Blue-fronted Dancer (Argia apicalis) 1
Dusky Dancer (A. translata)
Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum)
Big Bluet (E. durum) 10
Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita)
Rambur's Forktail (I. ramburii) 1 male
Com. Green Darner (Anax junius) 2
Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens) few, but fresh looking
Subject: resurgence of odes in warm temps
From: "Vicki Deloach VLDELOACH AT aol.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:05:08 -0400
 I encourage anyone who's still thinking about an ode season to go double-check 
their favorite spots. After finding the Big bluets last week, I've been 
checking some additional locations without a great deal of luck. But today, 
with temps back up to 80o, I'm surprised at what's flying. Here's what I've had 
in the last two days: 


at the Big bluet lake:

Prince baskettail (not seen in a month - which was already late)
Banded pennant (not seen since 10-9 - a late record itself)
e. amberwing (not seen since 10-6)
Rambur's forktails
Orange bluets
Vesper bluets
Skimming bluet (a newcomer today)
no Big bluets

at the wetlands - more seasonal:

Familiar bluets - a mini-explosion yesterday with mating pairs
Fragile & Citrine forktails
Shadow darners - 2
Green darners - 2
Wandering glider (and others were emerging last week)


Vicki DeLoach
Cherokee Co. GA








Subject: Re: Spiders and Dragonflies, Oh, My!
From: "Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 10:33:56 -0700
That is a really big jumping spider!

Dennis Paulson
Seattle, WA

On Oct 26, 2014, at 6:53 AM, Don Culberson dculberson AT shc.edu [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 


> 
> My daughter took this photo at Gulf Shores, Alabama on Oct 11. Apparently the 
Green Darner was dining on a butterfly, probably a Gulf Fritillary, and the 
spider sneaked up and took advantage of the dragonfly's distraction. She said 
it was an all day meal. 

> 
> 
> ​Cheers!
> Don Culberson
> Spring Hill College
> Mobile, Alabama
> 
> 
> Posted by: Don Culberson 
> Reply via web post • Reply to sender • Reply to group • Start a New 
Topic • Messages in this topic (1) 

> VISIT YOUR GROUP
> • Privacy • Unsubscribe • Terms of Use
> 
Subject: Re: Spiders and Dragonflies, Oh, My!
From: "walter chadwick mrcnaturally AT optonline.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 12:48:22 -0400
Great behavioral shot.


From: mailto:se-odonata-noreply AT yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Sunday, October 26, 2014 9:53 AM
To: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com 
Subject: [se-odonata] Spiders and Dragonflies, Oh, My!

  

My daughter took this photo at Gulf Shores, Alabama on Oct 11. Apparently the 
Green Darner was dining on a butterfly, probably a Gulf Fritillary, and the 
spider sneaked up and took advantage of the dragonfly's distraction. She said 
it was an all day meal. 




​Cheers!

Don Culberson

Spring Hill College

Mobile, Alabama
Subject: Spiders and Dragonflies, Oh, My!
From: "Don Culberson dculberson AT shc.edu [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 08:53:22 -0500
My daughter took this photo at Gulf Shores, Alabama on Oct 11. Apparently
the Green Darner was dining on a butterfly, probably a Gulf Fritillary, and
the spider sneaked up and took advantage of the dragonfly's distraction.
She said it was an all day meal.


​Cheers!
Don Culberson
Spring Hill College
Mobile, Alabama
Subject: Season winding down.
From: "spreadwing AT mac.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 12:14:00 -0400
We;ve had chilly to cold nights for a few days and warmer, sunny days. I spent 
an hour or two at my old fish hatchery site in Floyd Co. in NW GA, a couple of 
days ago and had seven species, not terrible for the time of year. 


Slender Spreadwing (Lestes rectangularis) - several I'm still puzzling over one 
coupling between a possible male Southern Spreadwing and a female Slender 

Familiar Bluet (Enallagma civile) - 5 (all male)
Citrine Forktail (Ischnura hastata) - 3 (1 m, 2f)
Common Green Darner (Anax junius) - 2
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) - 2 (m)
Blue-faced Meadowhawk (Sympetrum ambiguum) - 60+, majority m, several mated 
pairs 

Autumn Meadowhawk (Sympetrum vicinum) - 10ish, mostly m

And a Fawn Darner (Boyeria vinosa) at a nearby stream


Marion Dobbs
Rome (Floyd Co.) GA
ecurlew AT mac.com
http://www.mamomi.net
http://www.mariondobbs.net

"Opportunity looks a lot like work."_Ashton Kutcher







------------------------------------
Posted by: spreadwing AT mac.com
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Subject: Big bluets in North Georgia - now [3 Attachments]
From: "Vicki Deloach VLDELOACH AT aol.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 16:22:58 -0400
 
Many thanks to Giff for coming up today to confirm a population of Big bluets 
(Enallagma durum) that I discovered at a lake near my house on 10-19-14. He had 
seen photos of males & females I sent him on Sunday. 


I had been returning to the dam to relocate Vesper bluets after spotting a male 
there recently - a new location for that species. On Sunday I not only found 
several more Vesper's, but also a male Rambur's forktail - a rare damsel for me 
in our area. And a new bluet was flying - a very large bluet. Bright blue males 
were zipping along the water and perching, while large females slowly floated 
around me in vegetation. They were big even in comparison to normally-large 
Vesper & Orange bluets flying with them. I checked photos at home and the large 
bluets matched Big Bluet in every way ... but why would they be here in the 
upper Piedmont of Georgia? in late October?? 


I believe Giff's count on the Big bluets today was 8 males and 2 females, 
including mating pairs. We also saw several Rambur's forktails but only one 
Orange bluet - whose numbers have quickly dwindled. We'll see how long the Big 
bluets fly. 


Vicki DeLoach
Cherokee Co. GA




comparison shot - with Orange bluet:











Subject: FW: Central Florida 10/16-19
From: "'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 05:34:30 -0400
 

From: bryant roberts [mailto:bryantbroberts AT att.net] 
Sent: Monday, October 20, 2014 11:19 PM
To: 'se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com'
Subject: RE: [se-odonata] Central Florida 10/16-19

 

Unfortunately my digital slr camera is down for repairs and my little point
and shoot is nearly useless on Odonata so I did not get more than some site
shots and a few wildflowers this trip.  I could have been mistaken on the
Familiar Bluet identification, the abdominal appendages looked long enough
from a few feet away through close focus binoculars but without a specimen
(probably impossible in a state park) or a very good photo I cannot be
certain.  The Purple Skimmer is another matter, there is no mistaking the
males.  These, the bluets, the Red-veined Pennants, and most of the Amanda's
Pennants and Comet Darners were at the same pond, the coordinates are:
27.980072 N and 81.496739 W.  The spelling autocorrect was acting on its
own, it still doesn't like Tramea carolina.  I did a double take on Tramea "
lacerate"  and I should have checked it against the original list that was
generated from the Odonata directory in Avisys.

 

Bryant Roberts

Davie, Florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]
Sent: Monday, October 20, 2014 10:15 PM
To: se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com
Cc: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [se-odonata] Central Florida 10/16-19

 

  

Bryant,

 

That is a significant discovery of Purple Skimmers, the first for Polk
County as far as I know. The species has disappeared from some of its former
haunts in the Orlando area, and it is considered one of the rarer of North
American Odonata. I wrote the Red List account for it
(http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/11929/0) in 2007, and it was classified
as Vulnerable. There is an old specimen from Palm Beach County, but that has
never been confirmed.

 

We have found a pretty good population around some lakes in Lake County
since the Red List assessment was written, and more localities in Bay and
Washington counties in the Panhandle have been found, so it's surely in
better shape than we thought in 2007, but a Polk County record is great! Did
you get photos? That would be a good record to put in Odonata Central. You
might have some late dates for Florida there too, not sure about that.

 

It cracks me up that your autocorrection leads to Celithemis Amanda and
Tramea lacerate. I never stop being frustrated by autocorrection, which they
seem to build into everything now and furnishes a great source of amusement
on the internet.

 

And finally, were you certain the bluets at Catfish Creek were Familiar and
not Atlantic? The latter is much more common in peninsular Florida and is a
typical species at ponds supporting Purple Skimmers, Comet Darners, and
Red-veined and Amanda's Pennants.

 

Dennis

 

 

 

On Oct 20, 2014, at 6:29 PM, 'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net
[se-odonata]  wrote:

 

I ventured out from my usual south Florida haunts last weekend to visit the
north Lake Wales Ridge area south of Orlando making my base at Lake
Kissimmee State Park. The high point of the trip was the visit to Catfish
Creek State Park east of Dundee where I found four "lifer" damselflies and
several spectacular male Purple Skimmers. This site is mostly oak scrub
with several medium to small ponds each with its own mix of species.
Another productive site was Paynes Creek State Park at the confluence of
Paynes Creek and the Peace River where I found a nice variety of
damselflies. Here is the list of species identified with the "life" species
marked with an asterisk.

Catfish Creek State Park - Polk County 10/18

*Swamp Spreadwing (Lestes vigilax)
*Variable Dancer (Argia fumipennis)
*Blue-ringed Dancer (Argia sedula)
*Familiar Bluet (Enallagma civile)
Citrine Forktail (Ischnura hastata)
Rambur's Forktail (Ischnura ramburii)
Common Green Darner (Anax junius)
Comet Darner (Anax longipes)
Regal Darner (Coryphaeschna ingens)
Amanda's Pennant (Celithemis Amanda)
Red-veined Pennant (Celithemis bertha)
Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina)
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis)
Little Blue Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax minuscula)
*Purple Skimmer (Libellula jesseana)
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis)
Carolina Saddlebags (Tramea carolina)

Additional species that were identified over the weekend at various sites:

Lake Kissimmee State Park - Polk County 10/16-19

Twilight Darner (Gynacantha nervosa)
Phantom Darner (Triacanthgyna trifida)
Hyacinth Glider (Miathyria marcella)
Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens)
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera)
Black Saddlebags (Tramea lacerate)

Polk County 10/17

Blue-faced Darner (Coryphaeschna adnexa)
Four-spotted Pennant (Brachymesia gravida)
Scarlet Skimmer (Crocothemis servilia)

Paynes Creek State Park - Hardee County 10/19

Smoky Rubyspot (Hetaerina titia)
Purple Bluet (Enallagma coecum)
*Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum)
Roseate Skimmer (Orthemis ferruginea)

Bryant Roberts
Davie, Florida

 

-----

Dennis Paulson

1724 NE 98 St.

Seattle, WA 98115

206-528-1382

dennispaulson AT comcast.net

 

 

 


Subject: Re: Central Florida 10/16-19
From: "Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 19:14:57 -0700
Bryant,

That is a significant discovery of Purple Skimmers, the first for Polk County 
as far as I know. The species has disappeared from some of its former haunts in 
the Orlando area, and it is considered one of the rarer of North American 
Odonata. I wrote the Red List account for it 
(http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/11929/0) in 2007, and it was classified as 
Vulnerable. There is an old specimen from Palm Beach County, but that has never 
been confirmed. 


We have found a pretty good population around some lakes in Lake County since 
the Red List assessment was written, and more localities in Bay and Washington 
counties in the Panhandle have been found, so its surely in better shape than 
we thought in 2007, but a Polk County record is great! Did you get photos? That 
would be a good record to put in Odonata Central. You might have some late 
dates for Florida there too, not sure about that. 


It cracks me up that your autocorrection leads to Celithemis Amanda and Tramea 
lacerate. I never stop being frustrated by autocorrection, which they seem to 
build into everything now and furnishes a great source of amusement on the 
internet. 


And finally, were you certain the bluets at Catfish Creek were Familiar and not 
Atlantic? The latter is much more common in peninsular Florida and is a typical 
species at ponds supporting Purple Skimmers, Comet Darners, and Red-veined and 
Amandas Pennants. 


Dennis



On Oct 20, 2014, at 6:29 PM, 'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net 
[se-odonata]  wrote: 


> I ventured out from my usual south Florida haunts last weekend to visit the
> north Lake Wales Ridge area south of Orlando making my base at Lake
> Kissimmee State Park. The high point of the trip was the visit to Catfish
> Creek State Park east of Dundee where I found four "lifer" damselflies and
> several spectacular male Purple Skimmers. This site is mostly oak scrub
> with several medium to small ponds each with its own mix of species.
> Another productive site was Paynes Creek State Park at the confluence of
> Paynes Creek and the Peace River where I found a nice variety of
> damselflies. Here is the list of species identified with the "life" species
> marked with an asterisk.
> 
> Catfish Creek State Park - Polk County 10/18
> 
> *Swamp Spreadwing (Lestes vigilax)
> *Variable Dancer (Argia fumipennis)
> *Blue-ringed Dancer (Argia sedula)
> *Familiar Bluet (Enallagma civile)
> Citrine Forktail (Ischnura hastata)
> Rambur's Forktail (Ischnura ramburii)
> Common Green Darner (Anax junius)
> Comet Darner (Anax longipes)
> Regal Darner (Coryphaeschna ingens)
> Amanda's Pennant (Celithemis Amanda)
> Red-veined Pennant (Celithemis bertha)
> Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina)
> Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis	simplicicollis)
> Little Blue Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax minuscula)
> *Purple Skimmer (Libellula jesseana)
> Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis)
> Carolina Saddlebags (Tramea carolina)
> 
> Additional species that were identified over the weekend at various sites:
> 
> Lake Kissimmee State Park - Polk County 10/16-19
> 
> Twilight Darner (Gynacantha nervosa)
> Phantom Darner (Triacanthgyna trifida)
> Hyacinth Glider	(Miathyria marcella)
> Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens)
> Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera)
> Black Saddlebags (Tramea lacerate)
> 
> Polk County 10/17
> 
> Blue-faced Darner (Coryphaeschna adnexa)
> Four-spotted Pennant (Brachymesia gravida)
> Scarlet Skimmer (Crocothemis servilia)
> 
> Paynes Creek State Park - Hardee County 10/19
> 
> Smoky Rubyspot (Hetaerina titia)
> Purple Bluet (Enallagma coecum)
> *Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum)
> Roseate Skimmer (Orthemis ferruginea)
> 
> Bryant Roberts
> Davie, Florida
> 
> 
> 

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net



Subject: Central Florida 10/16-19
From: "'bryant roberts' bryantbroberts AT att.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 21:29:23 -0400
I ventured out from my usual south Florida haunts last weekend to visit the
north Lake Wales Ridge area south of Orlando making my base at Lake
Kissimmee State Park.  The high point of the trip was the visit to Catfish
Creek State Park east of Dundee where I found four "lifer" damselflies and
several spectacular male Purple Skimmers.  This site is mostly oak scrub
with several medium to small ponds each with its own mix of species.
Another productive site was Paynes Creek State Park at the confluence of
Paynes Creek and the Peace River where I found a nice variety of
damselflies.  Here is the list of species identified with the "life" species
marked with an asterisk.

Catfish Creek State Park - Polk County 	10/18

*Swamp Spreadwing (Lestes vigilax)
*Variable Dancer (Argia fumipennis)
*Blue-ringed Dancer (Argia sedula)
*Familiar Bluet (Enallagma civile)
Citrine Forktail (Ischnura hastata)
Rambur's Forktail (Ischnura ramburii)
Common Green Darner (Anax junius)
Comet Darner (Anax longipes)
Regal Darner (Coryphaeschna ingens)
Amanda's Pennant (Celithemis Amanda)
Red-veined Pennant (Celithemis bertha)
Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina)
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis	simplicicollis)
Little Blue Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax minuscula)
*Purple Skimmer (Libellula jesseana)
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis)
Carolina Saddlebags (Tramea carolina)

Additional species that were identified over the weekend at various sites:

Lake Kissimmee State Park - Polk County   10/16-19

Twilight Darner (Gynacantha nervosa)
Phantom Darner (Triacanthgyna trifida)
Hyacinth Glider	(Miathyria marcella)
Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens)
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera)
Black Saddlebags (Tramea lacerate)

Polk County 	10/17

Blue-faced Darner (Coryphaeschna adnexa)
Four-spotted Pennant (Brachymesia gravida)
Scarlet Skimmer (Crocothemis servilia)

Paynes Creek State Park - Hardee County   10/19

Smoky Rubyspot   (Hetaerina titia)
Purple Bluet (Enallagma coecum)
*Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum)
Roseate Skimmer (Orthemis ferruginea)



Bryant Roberts
Davie, Florida














------------------------------------
Posted by: "bryant roberts" 
------------------------------------


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Subject: migrant green darners - Florida
From: "Vicki Deloach VLDELOACH AT aol.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 18:55:05 -0400
Before getting into the Florida odes - I wanted to mention that it looks like 
I've found a population of Big Bluets (Enallagma durum) near my house. I'll 
post more info on those and other damsels they're flying with tomorrow. My 
husband just returned last night from a visit with friends in Sandestin, and he 
reports that Green darners were everywhere - zillions. Not heading in any 
direction but hunting in swarms. He also saw some saddlebags in the mix. Plus 
lots of Monarchs, all heading westward. We've had a good number of Monarchs 
passing through here at home. 


Vicki DeLoach
Cherokee Co. GA


Subject: Re: [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: Bill Mauffray <iodonata AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 21:16:43 -0400
Yes Nick!  

I echo that.  Net the Damm Thing!!! Voucher Specimens are needed.

 

Bill Mauffray

International Odonata Research Institute

4525 NW 53RD LN

Gainesville FL 32653

352-219-3141 cell

  iodonata AT gmail.com

  http://www.iodonata.net

 

From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf 
Of Thomas W Donnelly tdonelly AT binghamton.edu [se-odonata] 

Sent: Tuesday, October 14, 2014 9:12 PM
To: Dennis Paulson
Cc: Larry Little; Jerrell Daigle; Ethan Bright; Southeast Odes; Odonata-l; 
Texas Odes; Marion Dobbs; se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com; NEOdes 

Subject: Re: [Odonata-l] [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis 


 

  

OK, you have figured out that it is NOT luisi or danieli. I often ponder what 
would have happened what would have happened if I had not netted Gomphus 
apomyius. I could have made a good case for a range extension of G. parvidens 
from a photo. 


 

The problem here is that there are several little known Phyllogomphoides in 
Pacific-slope Mexico. Maybe there is one more - but we'll never know. 


 

Net the damn thing.

 

Nick Donnelly

 

On Fri, Oct 10, 2014 at 8:08 PM, Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net 
[TexOdes]  wrote: 


  

Larry, the list at the beginning of the dragonfly manual has West Mexican 
Leaftail as the common name of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis. Elsewhere in the 
book, Clear-faced is used for that species but in error; the change was made 
last-minute, and author and editor missed that it had to be changed in several 
places. 


 

Recent records of several species from the northernmost Mexican states were not 
known to Mike May at the time of producing the third edition so didn’t make 
it into the book. P. pacificus and P. apiculatus are two of those species. A 
fine book on the Odonata of Arizona and Sonora that will include these species 
is in press, and we are all looking forward to its publication. 


 

Dennis Paulson

 

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 4:36 PM, Larry Little  wrote:

 

I see no reference to Phyllogomphoides pacificus or to “West Mexican 
Leaftail” in my third edition. Are there, indeed, two versions in the wind? 


 

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 1:25 PM, jdaigle AT nettally.com wrote:

 

Aloha, Compadres!

 

My Phyllogomphoides pacificus look like the specimen in the photo, even to the 
yellowish tinge on the thoracic stripes. Are we 100% positive on the ID? I 
think we need voucher specimens to be sure. Talk to me later, everyone! 


 

Aloha nui!

Jerrell

 

From:   Ethan Bright

Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 12:29 PM

To:  'Marion Dobbs' ; 
 se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com 


Cc:  'NEOdes' ;  
texodes AT yahoogroups.com ;  
se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com ;  'Odonata-l 
list Server' 


Subject: Re: [Odonata-l] [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis 


 

Which is why the scientific name makes more sense in communication: stability 
across all languages, and gives an indication of its phylogenetic placement. 


 

From:  
odonata-l-bounces AT listhost.ups.edu [ 
 
mailto:odonata-l-bounces AT listhost.ups.edu] On Behalf Of Marion Dobbs 

Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 12:24 PM
To:   se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com
Cc:  texodes AT yahoogroups.com; NEOdes; 
 se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com List; Odonata-l 
list Server 

Subject: Re: [Odonata-l] [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis 


 

My third edition also uses Clear-faced Leaftail, mentioning in the description 
that it is similar in appearance toP. suasas but can be distinguished from it 
in the field by its pale costa and "mostly pale labrum." Perhaps that's the 
basis for this common name. 


 

Marion Dobbs

Rome (Floyd Co.) GA

ecurlew AT   mac.com

  http://www.mamomi.net

  http://mariondobbs.smugmug.com

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 11:57 AM, Chris Hill  
chill AT coastal.edu [se-odonata] <  
se-odonata-noreply AT yahoogroups.com> wrote: 


 

Curiouser and curiouser - my third edition, like Ed’s, has Clear-faced 
Leaftail for Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis Belle. Apparently there was more 
than one version of the Third Edition (Green Cover) in circulation? 


 

Chris

 

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 11:23 AM, Dennis Paulson  
dennispaulson AT comcast.net [TexOdes] <  
TexOdes-noreply AT yahoogroups.com> wrote: 


 

 

This is a second sending. There seems to be no problem, as the Third Edition of 
Needham, Westfall & May in fact uses West Mexican Leaftail for this species! 
Did you have a manuscript copy of that book before it was published, Ed? 


 

Dennis

 

 

************************************************************************

Christopher E. Hill

Biology Department

Coastal Carolina University

Conway, SC 29528-1954

843-349-2567

chill AT   coastal.edu

  
http://ww2.coastal.edu/chill/chill.htm 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  _____  


_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
  Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
  
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l 


_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
  Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
  
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l 


 

_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l

 

-----

Dennis Paulson

1724 NE 98 St.

Seattle, WA 98115

206-528-1382

dennispaulson AT comcast.net

 

 

 

 

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Posted by: Thomas W Donnelly  

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Subject: RE: [Odonata-l] [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: "'Bill Mauffray' iodonata AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 21:16:43 -0400
Yes Nick!  

I echo that.  Net the Damm Thing!!! Voucher Specimens are needed.

 

Bill Mauffray

International Odonata Research Institute

4525 NW 53RD LN

Gainesville FL 32653

352-219-3141 cell

  iodonata AT gmail.com

  http://www.iodonata.net

 

From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf 
Of Thomas W Donnelly tdonelly AT binghamton.edu [se-odonata] 

Sent: Tuesday, October 14, 2014 9:12 PM
To: Dennis Paulson
Cc: Larry Little; Jerrell Daigle; Ethan Bright; Southeast Odes; Odonata-l; 
Texas Odes; Marion Dobbs; se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com; NEOdes 

Subject: Re: [Odonata-l] [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis 


 

  

OK, you have figured out that it is NOT luisi or danieli. I often ponder what 
would have happened what would have happened if I had not netted Gomphus 
apomyius. I could have made a good case for a range extension of G. parvidens 
from a photo. 


 

The problem here is that there are several little known Phyllogomphoides in 
Pacific-slope Mexico. Maybe there is one more - but we'll never know. 


 

Net the damn thing.

 

Nick Donnelly

 

On Fri, Oct 10, 2014 at 8:08 PM, Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net 
[TexOdes]  wrote: 


  

Larry, the list at the beginning of the dragonfly manual has West Mexican 
Leaftail as the common name of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis. Elsewhere in the 
book, Clear-faced is used for that species but in error; the change was made 
last-minute, and author and editor missed that it had to be changed in several 
places. 


 

Recent records of several species from the northernmost Mexican states were not 
known to Mike May at the time of producing the third edition so didn’t make 
it into the book. P. pacificus and P. apiculatus are two of those species. A 
fine book on the Odonata of Arizona and Sonora that will include these species 
is in press, and we are all looking forward to its publication. 


 

Dennis Paulson

 

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 4:36 PM, Larry Little  wrote:

 

I see no reference to Phyllogomphoides pacificus or to “West Mexican 
Leaftail” in my third edition. Are there, indeed, two versions in the wind? 


 

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 1:25 PM, jdaigle AT nettally.com wrote:

 

Aloha, Compadres!

 

My Phyllogomphoides pacificus look like the specimen in the photo, even to the 
yellowish tinge on the thoracic stripes. Are we 100% positive on the ID? I 
think we need voucher specimens to be sure. Talk to me later, everyone! 


 

Aloha nui!

Jerrell

 

From:   Ethan Bright

Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 12:29 PM

To:  'Marion Dobbs' ; 
 se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com 


Cc:  'NEOdes' ;  
texodes AT yahoogroups.com ;  
se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com ;  'Odonata-l 
list Server' 


Subject: Re: [Odonata-l] [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis 


 

Which is why the scientific name makes more sense in communication: stability 
across all languages, and gives an indication of its phylogenetic placement. 


 

From:  
odonata-l-bounces AT listhost.ups.edu [ 
 
mailto:odonata-l-bounces AT listhost.ups.edu] On Behalf Of Marion Dobbs 

Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 12:24 PM
To:   se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com
Cc:  texodes AT yahoogroups.com; NEOdes; 
 se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com List; Odonata-l 
list Server 

Subject: Re: [Odonata-l] [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis 


 

My third edition also uses Clear-faced Leaftail, mentioning in the description 
that it is similar in appearance toP. suasas but can be distinguished from it 
in the field by its pale costa and "mostly pale labrum." Perhaps that's the 
basis for this common name. 


 

Marion Dobbs

Rome (Floyd Co.) GA

ecurlew AT   mac.com

  http://www.mamomi.net

  http://mariondobbs.smugmug.com

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 11:57 AM, Chris Hill  
chill AT coastal.edu [se-odonata] <  
se-odonata-noreply AT yahoogroups.com> wrote: 


 

Curiouser and curiouser - my third edition, like Ed’s, has Clear-faced 
Leaftail for Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis Belle. Apparently there was more 
than one version of the Third Edition (Green Cover) in circulation? 


 

Chris

 

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 11:23 AM, Dennis Paulson  
dennispaulson AT comcast.net [TexOdes] <  
TexOdes-noreply AT yahoogroups.com> wrote: 


 

 

This is a second sending. There seems to be no problem, as the Third Edition of 
Needham, Westfall & May in fact uses West Mexican Leaftail for this species! 
Did you have a manuscript copy of that book before it was published, Ed? 


 

Dennis

 

 

************************************************************************

Christopher E. Hill

Biology Department

Coastal Carolina University

Conway, SC 29528-1954

843-349-2567

chill AT   coastal.edu

  
http://ww2.coastal.edu/chill/chill.htm 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  _____  


_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
  Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
  
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l 


_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
  Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
  
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l 


 

_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l

 

-----

Dennis Paulson

1724 NE 98 St.

Seattle, WA 98115

206-528-1382

dennispaulson AT comcast.net

 

 

 

 


Subject: RE: [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: "'Bill Mauffray' iodonata AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 21:16:43 -0400
Yes Nick!  

I echo that.  Net the Damm Thing!!! Voucher Specimens are needed.

 

Bill Mauffray

International Odonata Research Institute

4525 NW 53RD LN

Gainesville FL 32653

352-219-3141 cell

  iodonata AT gmail.com

  http://www.iodonata.net

 

From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf 
Of Thomas W Donnelly tdonelly AT binghamton.edu [se-odonata] 

Sent: Tuesday, October 14, 2014 9:12 PM
To: Dennis Paulson
Cc: Larry Little; Jerrell Daigle; Ethan Bright; Southeast Odes; Odonata-l; 
Texas Odes; Marion Dobbs; se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com; NEOdes 

Subject: Re: [Odonata-l] [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis 


 

  

OK, you have figured out that it is NOT luisi or danieli. I often ponder what 
would have happened what would have happened if I had not netted Gomphus 
apomyius. I could have made a good case for a range extension of G. parvidens 
from a photo. 


 

The problem here is that there are several little known Phyllogomphoides in 
Pacific-slope Mexico. Maybe there is one more - but we'll never know. 


 

Net the damn thing.

 

Nick Donnelly

 

On Fri, Oct 10, 2014 at 8:08 PM, Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net 
[TexOdes]  wrote: 


  

Larry, the list at the beginning of the dragonfly manual has West Mexican 
Leaftail as the common name of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis. Elsewhere in the 
book, Clear-faced is used for that species but in error; the change was made 
last-minute, and author and editor missed that it had to be changed in several 
places. 


 

Recent records of several species from the northernmost Mexican states were not 
known to Mike May at the time of producing the third edition so didn’t make 
it into the book. P. pacificus and P. apiculatus are two of those species. A 
fine book on the Odonata of Arizona and Sonora that will include these species 
is in press, and we are all looking forward to its publication. 


 

Dennis Paulson

 

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 4:36 PM, Larry Little  wrote:

 

I see no reference to Phyllogomphoides pacificus or to “West Mexican 
Leaftail” in my third edition. Are there, indeed, two versions in the wind? 


 

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 1:25 PM, jdaigle AT nettally.com wrote:

 

Aloha, Compadres!

 

My Phyllogomphoides pacificus look like the specimen in the photo, even to the 
yellowish tinge on the thoracic stripes. Are we 100% positive on the ID? I 
think we need voucher specimens to be sure. Talk to me later, everyone! 


 

Aloha nui!

Jerrell

 

From:   Ethan Bright

Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 12:29 PM

To:  'Marion Dobbs' ; 
 se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com 


Cc:  'NEOdes' ;  
texodes AT yahoogroups.com ;  
se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com ;  'Odonata-l 
list Server' 


Subject: Re: [Odonata-l] [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis 


 

Which is why the scientific name makes more sense in communication: stability 
across all languages, and gives an indication of its phylogenetic placement. 


 

From:  
odonata-l-bounces AT listhost.ups.edu [ 
 
mailto:odonata-l-bounces AT listhost.ups.edu] On Behalf Of Marion Dobbs 

Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 12:24 PM
To:   se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com
Cc:  texodes AT yahoogroups.com; NEOdes; 
 se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com List; Odonata-l 
list Server 

Subject: Re: [Odonata-l] [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis 


 

My third edition also uses Clear-faced Leaftail, mentioning in the description 
that it is similar in appearance toP. suasas but can be distinguished from it 
in the field by its pale costa and "mostly pale labrum." Perhaps that's the 
basis for this common name. 


 

Marion Dobbs

Rome (Floyd Co.) GA

ecurlew AT   mac.com

  http://www.mamomi.net

  http://mariondobbs.smugmug.com

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 11:57 AM, Chris Hill  
chill AT coastal.edu [se-odonata] <  
se-odonata-noreply AT yahoogroups.com> wrote: 


 

Curiouser and curiouser - my third edition, like Ed’s, has Clear-faced 
Leaftail for Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis Belle. Apparently there was more 
than one version of the Third Edition (Green Cover) in circulation? 


 

Chris

 

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 11:23 AM, Dennis Paulson  
dennispaulson AT comcast.net [TexOdes] <  
TexOdes-noreply AT yahoogroups.com> wrote: 


 

 

This is a second sending. There seems to be no problem, as the Third Edition of 
Needham, Westfall & May in fact uses West Mexican Leaftail for this species! 
Did you have a manuscript copy of that book before it was published, Ed? 


 

Dennis

 

 

************************************************************************

Christopher E. Hill

Biology Department

Coastal Carolina University

Conway, SC 29528-1954

843-349-2567

chill AT   coastal.edu

  
http://ww2.coastal.edu/chill/chill.htm 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  _____  


_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
  Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
  
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l 


_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
  Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
  
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l 


 

_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l

 

-----

Dennis Paulson

1724 NE 98 St.

Seattle, WA 98115

206-528-1382

dennispaulson AT comcast.net

 

 

 

 


Subject: RE: [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: "'Bill Mauffray' iodonata AT gmail.com [TexOdes]" <TexOdes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 21:16:43 -0400
Yes Nick!  

I echo that.  Net the Damm Thing!!! Voucher Specimens are needed.

 

Bill Mauffray

International Odonata Research Institute

4525 NW 53RD LN

Gainesville FL 32653

352-219-3141 cell

  iodonata AT gmail.com

  http://www.iodonata.net

 

From: se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf 
Of Thomas W Donnelly tdonelly AT binghamton.edu [se-odonata] 

Sent: Tuesday, October 14, 2014 9:12 PM
To: Dennis Paulson
Cc: Larry Little; Jerrell Daigle; Ethan Bright; Southeast Odes; Odonata-l; 
Texas Odes; Marion Dobbs; se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com; NEOdes 

Subject: Re: [Odonata-l] [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis 


 

  

OK, you have figured out that it is NOT luisi or danieli. I often ponder what 
would have happened what would have happened if I had not netted Gomphus 
apomyius. I could have made a good case for a range extension of G. parvidens 
from a photo. 


 

The problem here is that there are several little known Phyllogomphoides in 
Pacific-slope Mexico. Maybe there is one more - but we'll never know. 


 

Net the damn thing.

 

Nick Donnelly

 

On Fri, Oct 10, 2014 at 8:08 PM, Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net 
[TexOdes]  wrote: 


  

Larry, the list at the beginning of the dragonfly manual has West Mexican 
Leaftail as the common name of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis. Elsewhere in the 
book, Clear-faced is used for that species but in error; the change was made 
last-minute, and author and editor missed that it had to be changed in several 
places. 


 

Recent records of several species from the northernmost Mexican states were not 
known to Mike May at the time of producing the third edition so didn’t make 
it into the book. P. pacificus and P. apiculatus are two of those species. A 
fine book on the Odonata of Arizona and Sonora that will include these species 
is in press, and we are all looking forward to its publication. 


 

Dennis Paulson

 

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 4:36 PM, Larry Little  wrote:

 

I see no reference to Phyllogomphoides pacificus or to “West Mexican 
Leaftail” in my third edition. Are there, indeed, two versions in the wind? 


 

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 1:25 PM, jdaigle AT nettally.com wrote:

 

Aloha, Compadres!

 

My Phyllogomphoides pacificus look like the specimen in the photo, even to the 
yellowish tinge on the thoracic stripes. Are we 100% positive on the ID? I 
think we need voucher specimens to be sure. Talk to me later, everyone! 


 

Aloha nui!

Jerrell

 

From:   Ethan Bright

Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 12:29 PM

To:  'Marion Dobbs' ; 
 se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com 


Cc:  'NEOdes' ;  
texodes AT yahoogroups.com ;  
se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com ;  'Odonata-l 
list Server' 


Subject: Re: [Odonata-l] [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US recordof 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis 


 

Which is why the scientific name makes more sense in communication: stability 
across all languages, and gives an indication of its phylogenetic placement. 


 

From:  
odonata-l-bounces AT listhost.ups.edu [ 
 
mailto:odonata-l-bounces AT listhost.ups.edu] On Behalf Of Marion Dobbs 

Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 12:24 PM
To:   se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com
Cc:  texodes AT yahoogroups.com; NEOdes; 
 se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com List; Odonata-l 
list Server 

Subject: Re: [Odonata-l] [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis 


 

My third edition also uses Clear-faced Leaftail, mentioning in the description 
that it is similar in appearance toP. suasas but can be distinguished from it 
in the field by its pale costa and "mostly pale labrum." Perhaps that's the 
basis for this common name. 


 

Marion Dobbs

Rome (Floyd Co.) GA

ecurlew AT   mac.com

  http://www.mamomi.net

  http://mariondobbs.smugmug.com

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 11:57 AM, Chris Hill  
chill AT coastal.edu [se-odonata] <  
se-odonata-noreply AT yahoogroups.com> wrote: 


 

Curiouser and curiouser - my third edition, like Ed’s, has Clear-faced 
Leaftail for Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis Belle. Apparently there was more 
than one version of the Third Edition (Green Cover) in circulation? 


 

Chris

 

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 11:23 AM, Dennis Paulson  
dennispaulson AT comcast.net [TexOdes] <  
TexOdes-noreply AT yahoogroups.com> wrote: 


 

 

This is a second sending. There seems to be no problem, as the Third Edition of 
Needham, Westfall & May in fact uses West Mexican Leaftail for this species! 
Did you have a manuscript copy of that book before it was published, Ed? 


 

Dennis

 

 

************************************************************************

Christopher E. Hill

Biology Department

Coastal Carolina University

Conway, SC 29528-1954

843-349-2567

chill AT   coastal.edu

  
http://ww2.coastal.edu/chill/chill.htm 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  _____  


_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
  Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
  
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l 


_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
  Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
  
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l 


 

_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l

 

-----

Dennis Paulson

1724 NE 98 St.

Seattle, WA 98115

206-528-1382

dennispaulson AT comcast.net

 

 

 

 


Subject: Fall odes Carter Co TN
From: "richard connors didymops07 AT gmail.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 19:42:11 -0500
 Visiting Carter County in upper-east TN last week I found the Odes down
to the late-season regulars. The Big 3 were Shadow Darner, Autumn
Meadowhawk, and Great Spreadwing, with anything else in low numbers. Just
checked a few of my usual sites, with the rain keeping my field time
limited. Overcast and light rain does not seem to bother the Shadow
Darners, they are out early and late, and seem to thrive in cooler
conditions. One late-season target species I had hoped to see, Spotted
Spreadwing (L. congener), did not show up. See short list below.

Richard Connors
Nashville


Great Spreadwing (Archilestes grandis)  - one to several present at most
sites
Slender Spreadwing (Lestes rectangularis) -  at Roan Mt SP Visitor Cntr.
pond
Familiar Bluet (E. civile) - 1
Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita) - 1
Shadow Darner (Aeshna umbrosa) - common and dominating at most sites
Fawn Darner (Boyera vinosa)- 1  (Unicoi Co)
Autumn Meadowhawk (Sympetrum vicinum) - com. to abundant most sites
red-type saddlebags (Tramea sp.) - 1 over meadow at Roan Mt. SP
Subject: Re: Fossilized dragonfly larvae
From: "walter chadwick mrcnaturally AT optonline.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 10:29:20 -0400
Neat.

From: mailto:se-odonata-noreply AT yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Sunday, October 12, 2014 5:31 PM
To: Southeast Odonata 
Subject: [se-odonata] Fossilized dragonfly larvae [1 Attachment]

  



Saw this at a rock and mineral show today in Huntsville, Alabama.

Tim
Subject: Fossilized dragonfly larvae [1 Attachment]
From: "Tim Martin tf_martn AT bellsouth.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 16:31:59 -0500
 

Saw this at a rock and mineral show today in Huntsville, Alabama.

Tim
Subject: Re: [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: Ethan Bright <ethanbr AT umich.edu>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 12:29:47 -0400
Which is why the scientific name makes more sense in communication:
stability across all languages, and gives an indication of its phylogenetic
placement. 

 

From: odonata-l-bounces AT listhost.ups.edu
[mailto:odonata-l-bounces AT listhost.ups.edu] On Behalf Of Marion Dobbs
Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 12:24 PM
To: se-odonata-owner AT yahoogroups.com
Cc: texodes AT yahoogroups.com; NEOdes; se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com List;
Odonata-l list Server
Subject: Re: [Odonata-l] [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record
of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis

 

My third edition also uses Clear-faced Leaftail, mentioning in the
description that it is similar in appearance to P. suasas but can be
distinguished from it in the field by its pale costa and "mostly pale
labrum." Perhaps that's the basis for this common name. 

 

Marion Dobbs

Rome (Floyd Co.) GA

ecurlew AT mac.com  

http://www.mamomi.net

http://mariondobbs.smugmug.com

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 11:57 AM, Chris Hill chill AT coastal.edu
  [se-odonata]  > wrote:





Curiouser and curiouser - my third edition, like Ed's, has Clear-faced
Leaftail for Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis Belle.  Apparently there was more
than one version of the Third Edition (Green Cover) in circulation?

 

Chris

 

 

On Oct 10, 2014, at 11:23 AM, Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net
  [TexOdes]
 >
wrote:





 

This is a second sending. There seems to be no problem, as the Third Edition
of Needham, Westfall & May in fact uses West Mexican Leaftail for this
species! Did you have a manuscript copy of that book before it was
published, Ed?

 

Dennis

 

 

************************************************************************

Christopher E. Hill

Biology Department

Coastal Carolina University

Conway, SC 29528-1954

843-349-2567

chill AT coastal.edu  

http://ww2.coastal.edu/chill/chill.htm

 

 

 

 

 

__._,_.___


  _____  


Posted by: Chris Hill  >


  _____  


 
 Reply via web post

.

 
 Reply to sender

.

 
 Reply to group

.

 
 Start a New Topic

.

 
 Messages in this topic (7)

 
 VISIT YOUR GROUP

 
 

.   Privacy .

Unsubscribe .   Terms of
Use

 

.

 
  
 
 

__,_._,___

 
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Subject: Re: [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: Marion Dobbs <ecurlew AT mac.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 12:24:27 -0400
My third edition also uses Clear-faced Leaftail, mentioning in the description 
that it is similar in appearance to P. suasas but can be distinguished from it 
in the field by its pale costa and "mostly pale labrum." Perhaps that's the 
basis for this common name. 


Marion Dobbs
Rome (Floyd Co.) GA
ecurlew AT mac.com
http://www.mamomi.net
http://mariondobbs.smugmug.com

On Oct 10, 2014, at 11:57 AM, Chris Hill chill AT coastal.edu [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 


> Curiouser and curiouser - my third edition, like Eds, has Clear-faced 
Leaftail for Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis Belle. Apparently there was more 
than one version of the Third Edition (Green Cover) in circulation? 

> 
> 
> Chris
> 
> 
> On Oct 10, 2014, at 11:23 AM, Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net 
[TexOdes]  wrote: 

> 
>> 
>> 
>> This is a second sending. There seems to be no problem, as the Third Edition 
of Needham, Westfall & May in fact uses West Mexican Leaftail for this species! 
Did you have a manuscript copy of that book before it was published, Ed? 

>> 
>> Dennis
>> 
> 
> ************************************************************************
> Christopher E. Hill
> Biology Department
> Coastal Carolina University
> Conway, SC 29528-1954
> 843-349-2567
> chill AT coastal.edu
> http://ww2.coastal.edu/chill/chill.htm
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> __._,_.___
> Posted by: Chris Hill 
> Reply via web post  Reply to sender  Reply to group  Start a New Topic  
Messages in this topic (7) 

> VISIT YOUR GROUP
>  Privacy  Unsubscribe  Terms of Use
> 
> .
>  
> 
> __,_._,___
_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l
Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 08:23:31 -0700
This is a second sending. There seems to be no problem, as the Third Edition of 
Needham, Westfall & May in fact uses West Mexican Leaftail for this species! 
Did you have a manuscript copy of that book before it was published, Ed? 


Dennis

---------------

Ah yes, I should have figured that out. Its a quite inappropriate name, 
actually, if you look at the photo, and I hope the Checklist Committee will 
choose the alternate, which is about to be published in the Arizona-Sonora 
book. 


Dennis


On Oct 9, 2014, at 9:48 PM, Ed Lam azurebluet AT aol.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 


> 
> The name is from the latest edition of Needham, Westfall, & May. We'll have 
to ask Mike May where the name came from. 

> 
> Best,
> Ed Lam
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata] 
 

> To: se-odonata-owner 
> Cc: Odonata-l ; TexOdes 
; Southeast Odonata ; 
neodes  

> Sent: Thu, Oct 9, 2014 9:48 pm
> Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides 
nayaritensis 

> 
>  
> Actually, it doesnt have an official English name yet. The DSA Checklist 
Committee hasnt had a chance to examine the record. The gentlemen working on a 
book on Arizona/Sonora odonates have named it West Mexican Leaftail, and that 
is much more appropriate. Where did you get that name, Josh? 

> 
> Dennis Paulson
> Seattle, WA
> 
> On Oct 9, 2014, at 12:04 PM, Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 

> 
>> Hey all,
>> 
>> Ed Lam shared on FaceBook that a dragonfly species never before found in the 
USA has apparently been photographed in New Mexico. The species is 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis, whose official English name is apparently 
Clear-faced Leaftail. Photo, precise location, details and discussion are on 
Odonata Central at 

>> 
>> 
http://www.odonatacentral.org/index.php/SubmissionAction.get/submission_id/427381 

>> 
>> Cheers,
>> 
>> Josh
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
>> Amherst, MA
>> http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
>> http://www.facebook.com/opihi
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> Yahoo Groups Links
>> 
>> <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
>>    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/se-odonata/
>> 
>> <*> Your email settings:
>>    Individual Email | Traditional
>> 
>> <*> To change settings online go to:
>>    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/se-odonata/join
>>    (Yahoo! ID required)
>> 
>> <*> To change settings via email:
>>    se-odonata-digest AT yahoogroups.com 
>>    se-odonata-fullfeatured AT yahoogroups.com
>> 
>> <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
>>    se-odonata-unsubscribe AT yahoogroups.com
>> 
>> <*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
>>    https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/
>> 
> 
> -----
> Dennis Paulson
> 1724 NE 98 St.
> Seattle, WA 98115
> 206-528-1382
> dennispaulson AT comcast.net
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> __._,_.___
> Posted by: Ed Lam 
> Reply via web post  Reply to sender  Reply to group  Start a New Topic  
Messages in this topic (4) 

> VISIT YOUR GROUP
>  Privacy  Unsubscribe  Terms of Use
> 
> .
>  
> 
> __,_._,___

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net



_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l
Subject: Re: New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: "Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 08:23:31 -0700
This is a second sending. There seems to be no problem, as the Third Edition of 
Needham, Westfall & May in fact uses West Mexican Leaftail for this species! 
Did you have a manuscript copy of that book before it was published, Ed? 


Dennis

---------------

Ah yes, I should have figured that out. Its a quite inappropriate name, 
actually, if you look at the photo, and I hope the Checklist Committee will 
choose the alternate, which is about to be published in the Arizona-Sonora 
book. 


Dennis


On Oct 9, 2014, at 9:48 PM, Ed Lam azurebluet AT aol.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 


> 
> The name is from the latest edition of Needham, Westfall, & May. We'll have 
to ask Mike May where the name came from. 

> 
> Best,
> Ed Lam
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata] 
 

> To: se-odonata-owner 
> Cc: Odonata-l ; TexOdes 
; Southeast Odonata ; 
neodes  

> Sent: Thu, Oct 9, 2014 9:48 pm
> Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides 
nayaritensis 

> 
>  
> Actually, it doesnt have an official English name yet. The DSA Checklist 
Committee hasnt had a chance to examine the record. The gentlemen working on a 
book on Arizona/Sonora odonates have named it West Mexican Leaftail, and that 
is much more appropriate. Where did you get that name, Josh? 

> 
> Dennis Paulson
> Seattle, WA
> 
> On Oct 9, 2014, at 12:04 PM, Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 

> 
>> Hey all,
>> 
>> Ed Lam shared on FaceBook that a dragonfly species never before found in the 
USA has apparently been photographed in New Mexico. The species is 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis, whose official English name is apparently 
Clear-faced Leaftail. Photo, precise location, details and discussion are on 
Odonata Central at 

>> 
>> 
http://www.odonatacentral.org/index.php/SubmissionAction.get/submission_id/427381 

>> 
>> Cheers,
>> 
>> Josh
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
>> Amherst, MA
>> http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
>> http://www.facebook.com/opihi
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> Yahoo Groups Links
>> 
>> 
>> 
> 
> -----
> Dennis Paulson
> 1724 NE 98 St.
> Seattle, WA 98115
> 206-528-1382
> dennispaulson AT comcast.net
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net



Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: "Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [TexOdes]" <TexOdes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 08:23:31 -0700
This is a second sending. There seems to be no problem, as the Third Edition of 
Needham, Westfall & May in fact uses West Mexican Leaftail for this species! 
Did you have a manuscript copy of that book before it was published, Ed? 


Dennis

---------------

Ah yes, I should have figured that out. Its a quite inappropriate name, 
actually, if you look at the photo, and I hope the Checklist Committee will 
choose the alternate, which is about to be published in the Arizona-Sonora 
book. 


Dennis


On Oct 9, 2014, at 9:48 PM, Ed Lam azurebluet AT aol.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 


> 
> The name is from the latest edition of Needham, Westfall, & May. We'll have 
to ask Mike May where the name came from. 

> 
> Best,
> Ed Lam
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata] 
 

> To: se-odonata-owner 
> Cc: Odonata-l ; TexOdes 
; Southeast Odonata ; 
neodes  

> Sent: Thu, Oct 9, 2014 9:48 pm
> Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides 
nayaritensis 

> 
>  
> Actually, it doesnt have an official English name yet. The DSA Checklist 
Committee hasnt had a chance to examine the record. The gentlemen working on a 
book on Arizona/Sonora odonates have named it West Mexican Leaftail, and that 
is much more appropriate. Where did you get that name, Josh? 

> 
> Dennis Paulson
> Seattle, WA
> 
> On Oct 9, 2014, at 12:04 PM, Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 

> 
>> Hey all,
>> 
>> Ed Lam shared on FaceBook that a dragonfly species never before found in the 
USA has apparently been photographed in New Mexico. The species is 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis, whose official English name is apparently 
Clear-faced Leaftail. Photo, precise location, details and discussion are on 
Odonata Central at 

>> 
>> 
http://www.odonatacentral.org/index.php/SubmissionAction.get/submission_id/427381 

>> 
>> Cheers,
>> 
>> Josh
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
>> Amherst, MA
>> http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
>> http://www.facebook.com/opihi
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> Yahoo Groups Links
>> 
>> 
>> 
> 
> -----
> Dennis Paulson
> 1724 NE 98 St.
> Seattle, WA 98115
> 206-528-1382
> dennispaulson AT comcast.net
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net



Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 06:52:35 -0700
Ah yes, I should have figured that out. Its a quite inappropriate name, 
actually, if you look at the photo, and I hope the Checklist Committee will 
choose the alternate, which is about to be published in the Arizona-Sonora 
book. 


Dennis


On Oct 9, 2014, at 9:48 PM, Ed Lam azurebluet AT aol.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 


> 
> The name is from the latest edition of Needham, Westfall, & May. We'll have 
to ask Mike May where the name came from. 

> 
> Best,
> Ed Lam
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata] 
 

> To: se-odonata-owner 
> Cc: Odonata-l ; TexOdes 
; Southeast Odonata ; 
neodes  

> Sent: Thu, Oct 9, 2014 9:48 pm
> Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides 
nayaritensis 

> 
>  
> Actually, it doesnt have an official English name yet. The DSA Checklist 
Committee hasnt had a chance to examine the record. The gentlemen working on a 
book on Arizona/Sonora odonates have named it West Mexican Leaftail, and that 
is much more appropriate. Where did you get that name, Josh? 

> 
> Dennis Paulson
> Seattle, WA
> 
> On Oct 9, 2014, at 12:04 PM, Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 

> 
>> Hey all,
>> 
>> Ed Lam shared on FaceBook that a dragonfly species never before found in the 
USA has apparently been photographed in New Mexico. The species is 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis, whose official English name is apparently 
Clear-faced Leaftail. Photo, precise location, details and discussion are on 
Odonata Central at 

>> 
>> 
http://www.odonatacentral.org/index.php/SubmissionAction.get/submission_id/427381 

>> 
>> Cheers,
>> 
>> Josh
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
>> Amherst, MA
>> http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
>> http://www.facebook.com/opihi
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> Yahoo Groups Links
>> 
>> <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
>>    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/se-odonata/
>> 
>> <*> Your email settings:
>>    Individual Email | Traditional
>> 
>> <*> To change settings online go to:
>>    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/se-odonata/join
>>    (Yahoo! ID required)
>> 
>> <*> To change settings via email:
>>    se-odonata-digest AT yahoogroups.com 
>>    se-odonata-fullfeatured AT yahoogroups.com
>> 
>> <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
>>    se-odonata-unsubscribe AT yahoogroups.com
>> 
>> <*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
>>    https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/
>> 
> 
> -----
> Dennis Paulson
> 1724 NE 98 St.
> Seattle, WA 98115
> 206-528-1382
> dennispaulson AT comcast.net
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> __._,_.___
> Posted by: Ed Lam 
> Reply via web post  Reply to sender  Reply to group  Start a New Topic  
Messages in this topic (4) 

> VISIT YOUR GROUP
>  Privacy  Unsubscribe  Terms of Use
> 
> .
>  
> 
> __,_._,___

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net



_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l
Subject: Re: New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: "Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 06:52:35 -0700
Ah yes, I should have figured that out. Its a quite inappropriate name, 
actually, if you look at the photo, and I hope the Checklist Committee will 
choose the alternate, which is about to be published in the Arizona-Sonora 
book. 


Dennis


On Oct 9, 2014, at 9:48 PM, Ed Lam azurebluet AT aol.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 


> 
> The name is from the latest edition of Needham, Westfall, & May. We'll have 
to ask Mike May where the name came from. 

> 
> Best,
> Ed Lam
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata] 
 

> To: se-odonata-owner 
> Cc: Odonata-l ; TexOdes 
; Southeast Odonata ; 
neodes  

> Sent: Thu, Oct 9, 2014 9:48 pm
> Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides 
nayaritensis 

> 
>  
> Actually, it doesnt have an official English name yet. The DSA Checklist 
Committee hasnt had a chance to examine the record. The gentlemen working on a 
book on Arizona/Sonora odonates have named it West Mexican Leaftail, and that 
is much more appropriate. Where did you get that name, Josh? 

> 
> Dennis Paulson
> Seattle, WA
> 
> On Oct 9, 2014, at 12:04 PM, Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 

> 
>> Hey all,
>> 
>> Ed Lam shared on FaceBook that a dragonfly species never before found in the 
USA has apparently been photographed in New Mexico. The species is 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis, whose official English name is apparently 
Clear-faced Leaftail. Photo, precise location, details and discussion are on 
Odonata Central at 

>> 
>> 
http://www.odonatacentral.org/index.php/SubmissionAction.get/submission_id/427381 

>> 
>> Cheers,
>> 
>> Josh
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
>> Amherst, MA
>> http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
>> http://www.facebook.com/opihi
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> Yahoo Groups Links
>> 
>> 
>> 
> 
> -----
> Dennis Paulson
> 1724 NE 98 St.
> Seattle, WA 98115
> 206-528-1382
> dennispaulson AT comcast.net
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net



Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: "Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [TexOdes]" <TexOdes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 06:52:35 -0700
Ah yes, I should have figured that out. Its a quite inappropriate name, 
actually, if you look at the photo, and I hope the Checklist Committee will 
choose the alternate, which is about to be published in the Arizona-Sonora 
book. 


Dennis


On Oct 9, 2014, at 9:48 PM, Ed Lam azurebluet AT aol.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 


> 
> The name is from the latest edition of Needham, Westfall, & May. We'll have 
to ask Mike May where the name came from. 

> 
> Best,
> Ed Lam
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata] 
 

> To: se-odonata-owner 
> Cc: Odonata-l ; TexOdes 
; Southeast Odonata ; 
neodes  

> Sent: Thu, Oct 9, 2014 9:48 pm
> Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides 
nayaritensis 

> 
>  
> Actually, it doesnt have an official English name yet. The DSA Checklist 
Committee hasnt had a chance to examine the record. The gentlemen working on a 
book on Arizona/Sonora odonates have named it West Mexican Leaftail, and that 
is much more appropriate. Where did you get that name, Josh? 

> 
> Dennis Paulson
> Seattle, WA
> 
> On Oct 9, 2014, at 12:04 PM, Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 

> 
>> Hey all,
>> 
>> Ed Lam shared on FaceBook that a dragonfly species never before found in the 
USA has apparently been photographed in New Mexico. The species is 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis, whose official English name is apparently 
Clear-faced Leaftail. Photo, precise location, details and discussion are on 
Odonata Central at 

>> 
>> 
http://www.odonatacentral.org/index.php/SubmissionAction.get/submission_id/427381 

>> 
>> Cheers,
>> 
>> Josh
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
>> Amherst, MA
>> http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
>> http://www.facebook.com/opihi
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------------
>> 
>> Yahoo Groups Links
>> 
>> 
>> 
> 
> -----
> Dennis Paulson
> 1724 NE 98 St.
> Seattle, WA 98115
> 206-528-1382
> dennispaulson AT comcast.net
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net



Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: "Ed Lam azurebluet AT aol.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 00:48:24 -0400
 The name is from the latest edition of Needham, Westfall, & May. We'll have to 
ask Mike May where the name came from. 


Best,
Ed Lam



 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata] 
 

To: se-odonata-owner 
Cc: Odonata-l ; TexOdes ; 
Southeast Odonata ; neodes  

Sent: Thu, Oct 9, 2014 9:48 pm
Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides 
nayaritensis 



 
  
    
                  
Actually, it doesn’t have an official English name yet. The DSA Checklist 
Committee hasn’t had a chance to examine the record. The gentlemen working on 
a book on Arizona/Sonora odonates have named it West Mexican Leaftail, and that 
is much more appropriate. Where did you get that name, Josh? 



Dennis Paulson
Seattle, WA


On Oct 9, 2014, at 12:04 PM, Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 



Hey all,

Ed Lam shared on FaceBook that a dragonfly species never before found in the 
USA has apparently been photographed in New Mexico. The species is 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis, whose official English name is apparently 
“Clear-faced Leaftail”. Photo, precise location, details and discussion are 
on Odonata Central at 



http://www.odonatacentral.org/index.php/SubmissionAction.get/submission_id/427381 


Cheers,

Josh



Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
http://www.facebook.com/opihi




------------------------------------

------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links






-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net








    
             

  
Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: Ed Lam <azurebluet AT aol.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 00:48:24 -0400
 The name is from the latest edition of Needham, Westfall, & May. We'll have to 
ask Mike May where the name came from. 


Best,
Ed Lam



 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata] 
 

To: se-odonata-owner 
Cc: Odonata-l ; TexOdes ; 
Southeast Odonata ; neodes  

Sent: Thu, Oct 9, 2014 9:48 pm
Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides 
nayaritensis 



 
  
    
                  
Actually, it doesn’t have an official English name yet. The DSA Checklist 
Committee hasn’t had a chance to examine the record. The gentlemen working on 
a book on Arizona/Sonora odonates have named it West Mexican Leaftail, and that 
is much more appropriate. Where did you get that name, Josh? 



Dennis Paulson
Seattle, WA


On Oct 9, 2014, at 12:04 PM, Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 



Hey all,

Ed Lam shared on FaceBook that a dragonfly species never before found in the 
USA has apparently been photographed in New Mexico. The species is 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis, whose official English name is apparently 
“Clear-faced Leaftail”. Photo, precise location, details and discussion are 
on Odonata Central at 



http://www.odonatacentral.org/index.php/SubmissionAction.get/submission_id/427381 


Cheers,

Josh



Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
http://www.facebook.com/opihi




------------------------------------

------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net








    
             
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Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: "Ed Lam azurebluet AT aol.com [TexOdes]" <TexOdes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 00:48:24 -0400
 The name is from the latest edition of Needham, Westfall, & May. We'll have to 
ask Mike May where the name came from. 


Best,
Ed Lam



 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata] 
 

To: se-odonata-owner 
Cc: Odonata-l ; TexOdes ; 
Southeast Odonata ; neodes  

Sent: Thu, Oct 9, 2014 9:48 pm
Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides 
nayaritensis 



 
  
    
                  
Actually, it doesn’t have an official English name yet. The DSA Checklist 
Committee hasn’t had a chance to examine the record. The gentlemen working on 
a book on Arizona/Sonora odonates have named it West Mexican Leaftail, and that 
is much more appropriate. Where did you get that name, Josh? 



Dennis Paulson
Seattle, WA


On Oct 9, 2014, at 12:04 PM, Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 



Hey all,

Ed Lam shared on FaceBook that a dragonfly species never before found in the 
USA has apparently been photographed in New Mexico. The species is 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis, whose official English name is apparently 
“Clear-faced Leaftail”. Photo, precise location, details and discussion are 
on Odonata Central at 



http://www.odonatacentral.org/index.php/SubmissionAction.get/submission_id/427381 


Cheers,

Josh



Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
http://www.facebook.com/opihi




------------------------------------

------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links






-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net








    
             

  
Subject: Re: New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: "Ed Lam azurebluet AT aol.com [se-odonata]" <se-odonata-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 00:48:24 -0400
 The name is from the latest edition of Needham, Westfall, & May. We'll have to 
ask Mike May where the name came from. 


Best,
Ed Lam



 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net [se-odonata] 
 

To: se-odonata-owner 
Cc: Odonata-l ; TexOdes ; 
Southeast Odonata ; neodes  

Sent: Thu, Oct 9, 2014 9:48 pm
Subject: Re: [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides 
nayaritensis 



 
  
    
                  
Actually, it doesn’t have an official English name yet. The DSA Checklist 
Committee hasn’t had a chance to examine the record. The gentlemen working on 
a book on Arizona/Sonora odonates have named it West Mexican Leaftail, and that 
is much more appropriate. Where did you get that name, Josh? 



Dennis Paulson
Seattle, WA


On Oct 9, 2014, at 12:04 PM, Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [se-odonata] 
 wrote: 



Hey all,

Ed Lam shared on FaceBook that a dragonfly species never before found in the 
USA has apparently been photographed in New Mexico. The species is 
Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis, whose official English name is apparently 
“Clear-faced Leaftail”. Photo, precise location, details and discussion are 
on Odonata Central at 



http://www.odonatacentral.org/index.php/SubmissionAction.get/submission_id/427381 


Cheers,

Josh



Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
http://www.facebook.com/opihi




------------------------------------

------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links






-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net