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Updated on Thursday, July 24 at 08:50 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Caspian Plover,©BirdQuest

24 Jul Red Headed Woodpecker hammering on concrete statue Off Topic [bill drolsbaugh ]
24 Jul Lebanon County Birds [Windstream Mail ]
24 Jul Re: Shorebirds, Cumberland County [Dave Kerr ]
24 Jul Correction Semipalmated Plover Duck Hollow Allegheny [ ]
24 Jul Re: Automated analysis of bird calls [Dave Kruel ]
24 Jul Franklin Co Short-billed Dowitcher [Bill Oyler ]
24 Jul Re: Shorebirds, Cumberland County [pabirder ]
24 Jul Semipalmated Sandpiper & others Duck Hollow Allegheny County [ ]
24 Jul Great Egret - lehigh gap nature center (carbon county) [Jon ]
24 Jul Re: Automated analysis of bird calls [Kerry A Grim ]
23 Jul Re: Shorebirds, Cumberland County [pwbjr88 ]
23 Jul Extralimital Piping Plover Conneaut Harbor Ohio [Shawn Collins ]
23 Jul Dauphin County, SGL 246 - Blue-winged and Hooded Warblers [Sue Hannon ]
23 Jul Kiwanis Lake York [Alan Wells ]
23 Jul Re: Shorebirds, Cumberland County [pabirder ]
23 Jul Re: Automated analysis of bird calls ["Kate St.John" ]
23 Jul Re: Shorebirds, Cumberland County [Dave Kerr ]
23 Jul PSO field trip to Alleghany Front in November [Chad Kauffman ]
23 Jul Central PA Birdline for 7.24.2014 [Mark Mcconaughy ]
23 Jul Re: Automated analysis of bird calls [Ryan Tomazin ]
23 Jul Automated analysis of bird calls [Patrick Millar ]
23 Jul Lebanon County, Fox and Prescott Rd, Western Sandpiper [Tim Becker ]
23 Jul Fw: The Meadowlands Blog [Herb Flavell ]
23 Jul Re: Interesting egret at Heinz refuge [Ryan Tomazin ]
23 Jul RBA western Pennsylvania, 21 July 2014 [Amy Taracido ]
23 Jul Interesting egret at Heinz refuge [Martin Dellwo ]
23 Jul Shorebirds, Cumberland County [Dave Kerr ]
23 Jul Photo Study Of Birds At E. B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 7/22/14 ["Howard B. Eskin," ]
22 Jul OFF TOPIC--Bat Roost at my home in New Cumberland, PA [Kathy Clark ]
22 Jul SGL-95; Butler County; 07/22/2014 [Richard Nugent ]
22 Jul Grackle kill [Cindy Ahern ]
22 Jul Westmorland County Birds [Michael Fialkovich ]
22 Jul Franklin Co Short-billed Dowitcher [Bill Oyler ]
22 Jul Chester County - Grackle flocks starting to grow [Patrick Millar ]
22 Jul Re: Photo Study Of A 1st Year Peregrine Falcon In Rehab At Carbon County Environmental, 7/21/14 [Sue Hannon ]
22 Jul Question on heron movement [Dave Kruel ]
22 Jul Cliff Swallows interesting behavior), Berks County [Kerry A Grim ]
21 Jul Re: Photo Study Of A 1st Year Peregrine Falcon In Rehab At Carbon County Environmental, 7/21/14 [Kathy ]
21 Jul black-bellied plover, Dauphin Co [Ed Bernot ]
21 Jul Green Herons, Bradford Co. [Trudy Gerlach ]
21 Jul Red Tail Hawk Levittown, Bucks County [Linda Rowan ]
21 Jul Re: Photo Study Of A 1st Year Peregrine Falcon In Rehab At Carbon County Environmental, 7/21/14 [Linda Rowan ]
21 Jul Re: Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh [Kathy Clark ]
21 Jul Re: Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh [Cathy Brown ]
21 Jul Photo Study Of A 1st Year Peregrine Falcon In Rehab At Carbon County Environmental, 7/21/14 ["Howard B. Eskin," ]
21 Jul Re: Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh [Herb Flavell ]
21 Jul Re: Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh [Michael Fialkovich ]
21 Jul SGL-150; Lawrence County; 07/21/2014 [Richard Nugent ]
21 Jul Re: Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh ["Kate St.John" ]
21 Jul Stilt Sandpiper @ Green Pond, Northampton County [Dave DeReamus ]
21 Jul Lebanon County Birds [Windstream Mail ]
21 Jul Re: hummer behavior [Barbara Malt ]
21 Jul Re: Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh [Hayley Kile ]
21 Jul Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh [Hayley Kile ]
20 Jul Great Egret, Monastery Road, Blair Co [Michael David ]
20 Jul Fulton Co by proxy - Bobwhite [Amy Evans ]
20 Jul Erie County bird sightings [Jerry McWilliams ]
20 Jul Re: hummer behavior [DAVID KOCH ]
20 Jul Little Tern ["Stringer, Randy C." ]
20 Jul dickcissels, berks [Rudolph Keller ]
20 Jul Extralimital: European Golden Plover - New Jersey ["Hopkins,Jeffrey A." ]
20 Jul Re: recovered leg band, Clearfield Co. [Dan Richards ]
20 Jul Re: Merlin Fledgling, recovered songbird leg band, Clearfield Co. [Rob Blye ]
19 Jul hummer behavior [Barbara Malt ]
19 Jul Sandhill Cranes & Shorebirds - Crawford Co. [ ]
19 Jul Merlin Fledgling, recovered songbird leg band, Clearfield Co. [Dan Richards ]
19 Jul Short-billed Dowitchers & Wilson's Snipe - Crawford Co. [ ]
19 Jul Lebanon County Birds [Windstream Mail ]
19 Jul Erie County Least Tern [Jerry McWilliams ]
18 Jul Fwd: Can't identify yardbird [Georgia Kagle ]
18 Jul A few migrant shorebirds - Shenango Lake, Mercer Co [Steve Sanford ]
18 Jul Birding the east side of Wildwood Lake from the N. Boardwalk ( Dauphin County ) [Richard Price ]
18 Jul Willow Flycatcher, 9Mi Run Trail, Frick Park, Allegheny [ ]
18 Jul Re: Can't identify yardbird [Ann Pettigrew ]
18 Jul Wildwood Park [Alan Wells ]
18 Jul Can't identify yardbird [Georgia Kagle ]
18 Jul Re: woodpecker at hummingbird feeder ? [DAVID KOCH ]

Subject: Red Headed Woodpecker hammering on concrete statue Off Topic
From: bill drolsbaugh <00000046cda72c3b-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 18:21:42 -0700
 While up in Ashtabula Oh visiting my friend parents lake frt home I was showed 
where a R H woodpecker has been hammering away at his concrete lawn jockey for 
months now. Could it be that this bird is sharpening its beak ???? Does anyone 
know anything of this kind of behavior ???? Bill Drolsbaugh Mercer Pa 

Subject: Lebanon County Birds
From: Windstream Mail <randyc11 AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 18:47:09 -0400
I was at the Reistville pond along Fox Road when Barry Blust pulled up on
Prescott Road.

Barry had a window mount  and I was looking from Fox Road.

Today's high lights are most of the birds.

Killdeer - about 7

Semipalmated Sandpiper- 4 adults

Western Sandpiper- 1- long black  downward curved bill

Black  legs, the wings appeared both gray like they had molted

We watched the bird from about 3:15 to 3:45.

This is the same one as yesterday.

Least Sandpiper- 18

Barry was checking other areas with no luck.

We did not see the Western after about 3:45 but may have been in the grass.

Randy C. Miller

Lancaster County 

 
Subject: Re: Shorebirds, Cumberland County
From: Dave Kerr <dsktc AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:46:29 -0400
At the CEFC pond today, the second trench (they are

latitudinal not longitudinal, by the way) is dug and

was being filled with stone when I arrived at 1551.

 

The excavated clay/mud was being spread on the slim

area of remaining mudflats.

 

I saw a single Killdeer.

 

Sadly, it is pretty clear that the value of the pond

as a layover for migrating shorebirds is shot. 

 

 

Dave Kerr

Carlisle

 

 

 

From: Dave Kerr [mailto:dsktc AT comcast.net] 
Sent: Wednesday, July 23, 2014 7:21 PM
To: 'PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG'
Subject: RE: Shorebirds, Cumberland County

 

I was back at the CEFC pond at 1642.

 

There were:

 

22 Killdeer

5 Least Sandpipers

2 Solitary Sandpipers

 

A trench has been dug, longitudinally, across the northern half

of the pond and filled with stone.  Flanking the trench is exposed

clay/mud removed during the excavation.  I saw a few Killdeer standing

on the stone and excavated earth.

 

Most of the birds were on the remaining mud flats or in the limited pools

of water that still exist on the southern side of the pond.  Unfortunately,

digging will resume tomorrow, weather permitting, on the southern half.

 

The consequence is severely degraded if not destroyed habitat for shorebirds

for the rest of the summer, here at the CEFC retention pond.

 

 

Dave  

 

 

 

From: Dave Kerr [mailto:dsktc AT comcast.net] 
Sent: Wednesday, July 23, 2014 10:54 AM
To: 'PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG'
Cc: 'Vernon Gauthier'; 'pwbjr88'
Subject: Shorebirds, Cumberland County

 

I arrived at the retention pond at the Carlisle

Evangelical Free Church before 0800 this morning.

 

I found these Shorebirds:

Killdeer (20)

Spotted Sandpiper (2)

Solitary Sandpiper (5)

Least Sandpiper (7)

 

Within the next 30 minutes, a dump truck hauling a small bulldozer and

an excavator arrived and parked at the west end of the pond.

 

I then learned from one of the pastors that the church was beginning

a township-mandated project to improve the drainage in the pond.

As I watched, the dozer and digger successively entered the pond and began

scraping the surface mud and digging a trench.  By then, the majority of

the birds had left.   I watched them circle the area a couple of times.

 

The project will change the structure and appearance of the pond; how

this affects the migrating shorebirds is unknown at this time.

 

 

Dave Kerr

Carlisle 

  
Subject: Correction Semipalmated Plover Duck Hollow Allegheny
From: Matthew Juskowich <0000000ca4f4ccd1-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 11:33:31 -0700
In my previous post i had posted about semipalmated sandpiper. I did not see 
that and instead it was a Semipalmated Plover 

This Morning i had:
(3) Common Mergansers
(1) Solitary Sandpiper
(1) Semipalmated Plover
(2) Spotted Sandpiper
(x) Killdeer

matthew Juskowich
Allegheny County
Subject: Re: Automated analysis of bird calls
From: Dave Kruel <dkruel300 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 13:51:28 -0400
I like the posts on this topic, including the initial one from Patrick 
mentioning about the technology in the first place. But Kerry’s & Ryan’s I 
think are really good. I can envision in the future....someone looking for a 
species in field. Then hearing a song, not recognizining it……turning on 
their birdsong gizmo, which automatically hears the song & tells them its 
species A. And then it goes down on their list as species A. 


Kerry’s ground-truthing point is awesome & should be a necessity. I think it 
applies much to habitat & species populations. I think its always good to 
question items that dont make sense.......pertaining to birds, this may be 
where some research group says Species A is doing really well (maybe based on 
some techno thing), but we can hardly find that species anywhere….. it needs 
the ground-truthing. 


Along the lines of dumbing us down, but not exactly the same……I often hear 
stats like PA is 60% forested…..which I’m sure folks have that data 
correct. But most often there is little explanation to go along with that 
number. It would be great for our wildlife if we & buildings & roads occupied 
one square box equaling 40% of the land, and they had a big box of 60%. I think 
folks hear that 60% forested and think why are some people worried about saving 
forest. Most often the discussion on ‘big woods’, edges, fragmentation, and 
habitat requirements for species never follows that “60% forested” bullet 
item. 


Dave Kruel
Pottsville
Schuylkill County




On Thu, 24 Jul 2014 07:58:08 -0400, Kerry A Grim  
wrote: 


>I think there is probably nothing wrong with automated bird call 
identification or even carrying an app with you for identification. 

>
>However, I do agree with Ryan, it is dumming-down the learning.
>
>Having spent most of my time from the beginning of birding in the mountains, 
learning the calls was essential. If I were to go out west in an area of birds 
that I did not know by song, trying to pre-lean from recordings does not work 
well with me. Yes, I would learn some. But in order for the call to really 
stick in my memory, I have to hear it in the field. If I miss a few species 
because I do not recognize the call, so what? Nothing at all wrong with 
carrying a smart phone and app and verifying the call on the spot and I don�t 
mean to put that down in any way. Just that I prefer to carry one of the new 
high-tech flip phones that does not accept apps. Remember those? It is turned 
off, carried fro emergencies only, or perhaps to call others if I do find a 
rare bird. 

>
>
>
>Two analogies, regarding amazing technology, but clearly there is still a need 
for �the old fashioned way�: 

>We can turn on the computers and view satellite data and tell just how much 
rain fell. Amazing technology. However, it takes individual observers checking 
their rain gauges for ground-truthing. A storm could dump 5 inches of rain on a 
town and cause flash flooding while a few miles away there is no rain. 

>Radar can detect rotation in storm clouds and NOAA can and does issue tornado 
warnings, saving many lives. However, it is the storm chaser on the ground that 
can verify whether a tornado is forming or not. More ground-truthing. 

>
>I love this new technology, but let us not forget the old methods�they still 
have their place! 

>
>Kerry Grim
>Hamburg, PA
Subject: Franklin Co Short-billed Dowitcher
From: Bill Oyler <oylerbill AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:12:29 -0400
The bird still present at Kriner Rd retention ponds Chambersburg for 3rd day.

Bill Oyler

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Shorebirds, Cumberland County
From: pabirder <pabirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:16:11 -0400
Way to take one for the team!




Sent with the Samsung Galaxy Exhilarate™, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone.pwbjr88 
 wrote:I go to church there so maybe I can handcuff myself 
to something to stop the bulldozers! 



Sent from smart phone.


-------- Original message --------
From: pabirder  
Date: 07/23/2014 8:41 PM (GMT-05:00) 
To: Dave Kerr ,PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG 
Cc: 'pwbjr88'  
Subject: RE: Shorebirds, Cumberland County 


Probably not for the good!




Sent with the Samsung Galaxy Exhilarate™, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone.

Dave Kerr  wrote:
I arrived at the retention pond at the Carlisle

Evangelical Free Church before 0800 this morning.

 

I found these Shorebirds:


Killdeer (20)

Spotted Sandpiper (2)

Solitary Sandpiper (5)

Least Sandpiper (7)

 

Within the next 30 minutes, a dump truck hauling a small bulldozer and

an excavator arrived and parked at the west end of the pond.

 

I then learned from one of the pastors that the church was beginning

a township-mandated project to improve the drainage in the pond.

As I watched, the dozer and digger successively entered the pond and began

scraping the surface mud and digging a trench.  By then, the majority of

the birds had left.   I watched them circle the area a couple of times.

 

The project will change the structure and appearance of the pond; how

this affects the migrating shorebirds is unknown at this time.

 

 

Dave Kerr

Carlisle

 
Subject: Semipalmated Sandpiper & others Duck Hollow Allegheny County
From: Matthew Juskowich <0000000ca4f4ccd1-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 05:41:29 -0700
This Morning i had:
(3) Common Mergansers
(1) Solitary Sandpiper
(1) Semipalmated Sandpiper
(2) Spotted Sandpiper
(x) Killdeer



Matthew Juskowich
Allegheny County
Subject: Great Egret - lehigh gap nature center (carbon county)
From: Jon <jonjmular16 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 08:09:46 -0400
A great egret was flying along the lehigh river at the lehigh gap nature center 
in carbon county just now 


Good birding,

Jon Mularczyk
Lower Nazareth, PA
http://www.broadwingedphotography.com

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Automated analysis of bird calls
From: Kerry A Grim <mountainbirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 07:58:08 -0400
I think there is probably nothing wrong with automated bird call identification 
or even carrying an app with you for identification. 


However, I do agree with Ryan, it is dumming-down the learning.

Having spent most of my time from the beginning of birding in the mountains, 
learning the calls was essential. If I were to go out west in an area of birds 
that I did not know by song, trying to pre-lean from recordings does not work 
well with me. Yes, I would learn some. But in order for the call to really 
stick in my memory, I have to hear it in the field. If I miss a few species 
because I do not recognize the call, so what? Nothing at all wrong with 
carrying a smart phone and app and verifying the call on the spot and I dont 
mean to put that down in any way. Just that I prefer to carry one of the new 
high-tech flip phones that does not accept apps. Remember those? It is turned 
off, carried fro emergencies only, or perhaps to call others if I do find a 
rare bird. 




Two analogies, regarding amazing technology, but clearly there is still a need 
for the old fashioned way: 

We can turn on the computers and view satellite data and tell just how much 
rain fell. Amazing technology. However, it takes individual observers checking 
their rain gauges for ground-truthing. A storm could dump 5 inches of rain on a 
town and cause flash flooding while a few miles away there is no rain. 

Radar can detect rotation in storm clouds and NOAA can and does issue tornado 
warnings, saving many lives. However, it is the storm chaser on the ground that 
can verify whether a tornado is forming or not. More ground-truthing. 


I love this new technology, but let us not forget the old methodsthey still 
have their place! 


Kerry Grim
Hamburg, PA
Subject: Re: Shorebirds, Cumberland County
From: pwbjr88 <pwbjr88 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:20:14 -0400
I go to church there so maybe I can handcuff myself to something to stop the 
bulldozers! 



Sent from smart phone.

-------- Original message --------
From: pabirder  
Date: 07/23/2014  8:41 PM  (GMT-05:00) 
To: Dave Kerr ,PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG 
Cc: 'pwbjr88'  
Subject: RE: Shorebirds, Cumberland County 
 
Probably not for the good!




Sent with the Samsung Galaxy Exhilarate™, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone.

Dave Kerr  wrote:
I arrived at the retention pond at the Carlisle

Evangelical Free Church before 0800 this morning.

 

I found these Shorebirds:


Killdeer (20)

Spotted Sandpiper (2)

Solitary Sandpiper (5)

Least Sandpiper (7)

 

Within the next 30 minutes, a dump truck hauling a small bulldozer and

an excavator arrived and parked at the west end of the pond.

 

I then learned from one of the pastors that the church was beginning

a township-mandated project to improve the drainage in the pond.

As I watched, the dozer and digger successively entered the pond and began

scraping the surface mud and digging a trench.  By then, the majority of

the birds had left.   I watched them circle the area a couple of times.

 

The project will change the structure and appearance of the pond; how

this affects the migrating shorebirds is unknown at this time.

 

 

Dave Kerr

Carlisle

 
Subject: Extralimital Piping Plover Conneaut Harbor Ohio
From: Shawn Collins <pabirder1974 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:13:07 -0400
The Piping Plover that was found by Chris Swan earlier today was present at
6pm tonight.  Bad weather conditions tonight, may keep the bird here
overnight...just a quick drive from Erie/Crawford Counties.

The bird was last seen at the swimming beach Left of the breakwall.

Photos
www.flickr.com/photos/pghdjshawn/

Shawn Collins
Crawford County
Subject: Dauphin County, SGL 246 - Blue-winged and Hooded Warblers
From: Sue Hannon <sbhannon AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:08:17 -0400
I birded SGL 246 this afternoon, and despite being there at the worst time
of day for much activity, we had a good afternoon. Highlights were a
blue-winged warbler and a singing hooded warbler (which I could only get a
glimpse of in silhouette, but identified by its song) The foliage is very
full, so we heard a lot more than we saw. I discovered when I went to take
a shot of the blue-winged that I accidentally left my memory card in the
computer yesterday, so no photos were taken.

-- 
Sue Hannon
Middletown
Dauphin County, PA
Subject: Kiwanis Lake York
From: Alan Wells <alanwells505 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 20:43:14 -0400
Made a quick stop at Kiwanis Lake in York. Most of the adult Black-crowned 
Herons are gone. I saw 5 while I was there. There are a lot of Juveniles 
hanging around the lake and in the tree. I saw about a dozen but there may have 
been a few more. 


The Egret rookery is still fairly populated with about 14 birds that I saw. I 
saw two still in there nest and the rest of the Juveniles were in the trees. 


There were the large array of geese and Mallards around as well. 

Uploaded a few shots....

https://www.flickr.com/photos/awellsphoto/ 

Alan Wells 
Subject: Re: Shorebirds, Cumberland County
From: pabirder <pabirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 20:34:38 -0400
Probably not for the good!




Sent with the Samsung Galaxy Exhilarate™, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone.Dave Kerr 
 wrote:I arrived at the retention pond at the Carlisle 

Evangelical Free Church before 0800 this morning.
 
I found these Shorebirds:

Killdeer (20)
Spotted Sandpiper (2)
Solitary Sandpiper (5)
Least Sandpiper (7)
 
Within the next 30 minutes, a dump truck hauling a small bulldozer and
an excavator arrived and parked at the west end of the pond.
 
I then learned from one of the pastors that the church was beginning
a township-mandated project to improve the drainage in the pond.
As I watched, the dozer and digger successively entered the pond and began
scraping the surface mud and digging a trench.  By then, the majority of
the birds had left.   I watched them circle the area a couple of times.
 
The project will change the structure and appearance of the pond; how
this affects the migrating shorebirds is unknown at this time.
 
 
Dave Kerr
Carlisle
 
Subject: Re: Automated analysis of bird calls
From: "Kate St.John" <0000000f59b962a9-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:21:14 -0700
I wonder how the computer deals with mockingbirds ;)


Kate St. John, Pittsburgh
Visit my bird/nature blog at www.wqed.org/birdblog/
Subject: Re: Shorebirds, Cumberland County
From: Dave Kerr <dsktc AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 19:20:56 -0400
I was back at the CEFC pond at 1642.

 

There were:

 

22 Killdeer

5 Least Sandpipers

2 Solitary Sandpipers

 

A trench has been dug, longitudinally, across the northern half

of the pond and filled with stone.  Flanking the trench is exposed

clay/mud removed during the excavation.  I saw a few Killdeer standing

on the stone and excavated earth.

 

Most of the birds were on the remaining mud flats or in the limited pools

of water that still exist on the southern side of the pond.  Unfortunately,

digging will resume tomorrow, weather permitting, on the southern half.

 

The consequence is severely degraded if not destroyed habitat for shorebirds

for the rest of the summer, here at the CEFC retention pond.

 

 

Dave  

 

 

 

From: Dave Kerr [mailto:dsktc AT comcast.net] 
Sent: Wednesday, July 23, 2014 10:54 AM
To: 'PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG'
Cc: 'Vernon Gauthier'; 'pwbjr88'
Subject: Shorebirds, Cumberland County

 

I arrived at the retention pond at the Carlisle

Evangelical Free Church before 0800 this morning.

 

I found these Shorebirds:

Killdeer (20)

Spotted Sandpiper (2)

Solitary Sandpiper (5)

Least Sandpiper (7)

 

Within the next 30 minutes, a dump truck hauling a small bulldozer and

an excavator arrived and parked at the west end of the pond.

 

I then learned from one of the pastors that the church was beginning

a township-mandated project to improve the drainage in the pond.

As I watched, the dozer and digger successively entered the pond and began

scraping the surface mud and digging a trench.  By then, the majority of

the birds had left.   I watched them circle the area a couple of times.

 

The project will change the structure and appearance of the pond; how

this affects the migrating shorebirds is unknown at this time.

 

 

Dave Kerr

Carlisle 

  
Subject: PSO field trip to Alleghany Front in November
From: Chad Kauffman <chadkauffman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:53:38 -0400
hello all, here is the last of the field trip series to hawkwatchs in 
the fall.  We are picking the 2nd weekend of November for the 8th and 9th.

This year will be the 3rd year for this event in the hopes of golden 
eagles in Nov. Last year the winds didn't cooperate and we missed the 
big numbers by a day or 2. We are having the field trip go 2 days in the 
hopes of having better chances of winds and weather. We will be doing 
some birding in surrounding areas as well.

This watch is located on the Somerset / Bedford Co. line 4 miles east of 
Central City. With an elevation of 2700 feet, this may be the highest 
watch in PA. Expect great views of Golden Eagles this time of year if 
the wind is right. Winds out of the east, southeast and south produce 
the best flights, with raptors often eye level!! For those from the 
west, you can meet at 9am in the parking lot at the corner of route 160 
and Route 30 across from the Subway (near Central City, PA) and then 
take 160 north which is Rock Cut Rd, turn right on Lambert St, to 
Shaffer Mt Rd then turn right onto Lambert Mt Rd, turning on 2nd right 
at the gate opening for the hawkwatch.. For those coming from the east, 
take route 30 past Schellsburg and turn right on Helixville rd TR4012 
and turn left up on Lambert Mt Rd. Go to top of mt and turn first left 
at gate to parking area for hawkwatch.

For directions contact us (or replace a starting point at this link 
http://goo.gl/maps/LjNBS ). Here is the official link for the hawkwatch 
- http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=111 


Please contact Mike Lanzone mlanzone AT gmail.com or Chad Kauffman 
chadkauffman AT earthlink.netto sign-up. There is no charge for this field 
trip. PSO members and anyone can come to this field trip. Field Trip 
leaders will be there around 10am and will probably stay for most of the 
afternoon.

For the facebook invite link 
https://www.facebook.com/events/873337299360344/

chad kauffman
mifflintown, pa
-- 
***Check us out on facebook - 
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kauffman-Insurance-Agency-LLC/137699586265352 
***Visit our website www.JuniataCounty.Com or 
http://www.MotorcycleInsuranceMifflintown.Com/ ***Call us 717-436-8257 
or email us ChadKauffman AT Earthlink.Net
Subject: Central PA Birdline for 7.24.2014
From: Mark Mcconaughy <timetraveler50 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:00:02 +0000
- RBA
 * Pennsylvania
 * Central Pennsylvania
 * July 24, 2014
 * PACE1407.24
 Bird Highlights
 AMERICAN AVOCET (Lancaster Co.)
 MARSH WREN (Tioga Co.)
 DICKCISSEL (Franklin Co.)
 - Transcript
 Hotline: Central Pennsylvania Birdline
 July 24, 2014
 To Report: TimeTraveler50 AT comcast.net 
 Compiler: Mark A. McConaughy 
 Coverage: Central Pennsylvania, Susquehanna River Drainage System
 Transcriber: Mark A. McConaughy

 Welcome to Pennsylvania Audubon's Birdline. This Birdline covers sightings 
made the week prior to Thursday, July 24, 2014. 


 DAUPHIN COUNTY:
 One BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER was seen on July 21 along Waltonville Road near 
Hummelstown (EB). 


 FRANKLIN COUNTY:
 One DICKCISSEL was seen on July 19 calling from a wire along Wenger Road near 
Chambersburg (BO). 


 A SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER was observed on July 22 at the Kriner Road retention 
pond (CG, BO). 


 JUNIATA COUNTY:
 One SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER was seen on July 22 at Parsons Ponds in Port Royal 
(CK). 


 LANCASTER COUNTY:
 One AMERICAN AVOCET was seen on July 17 at Conejohela Flats (ML, LB, ME).

 LANCASTER/LEBANON COUNTIES:

 LEBANON COUNTY:
 Up to 2 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, 1 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER and 5 LEAST SANDPIPERS 
were seen on July 19 AND 21 at the Reistville Ponds (RM). 


 LUZERNE COUNTY:
 One immature LITTLE BLUE HERON, 2 GREATER YELLOWLEGS and 15 LEAST SANDPIPERS 
were seen on July 19 at Plymouth Flats (JD). 


 One RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was observed on July 23 at Beech Mountain Lakes 
(JD). 


 TIOGA COUNTY:
 One MARSH WREN was seen on July 18 at Marsh Creek in The Muck (LS).

 CLOSING ANNOUNCEMENTS:
 If you miss the usual Thursday postings of the Central PA Birdline on BIRDEAST 
and PABIRDS, I will also be posting it on my page web site at: 

 http://people.delphiforums.com/MCCONAUGHY/currentbl.htm 

 *PORC = Pennsylvania Ornithological Record Committee. Rare bird sightings 
should be documented with written descriptions and photographs whenever 
possible and sent to PORC for review. To submit a report to PORC go to this 
link: 

 http://www.pabirds.org/records/

 The following people have contributed to this report: Larry Bernhardt (LB), Ed 
Bernot (EB), Jonathan DeBalko (JD), Mike Epler (ME), Carl Garner (CG), Chad 
Kauffman (CK), Meredith Lombard (ML), Randy Miller (RM), Bill Oyler (BO), Lisa 
Sumner (LS). I apologize if I have misspelled their names and I will also 
refrain from naming that person on request. 

-End Transcript
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 Mark A. McConaughy      TimeTraveler50 AT comcast.net 
 Bushy Run Battlefield 
 P.O. Box 486 
 Harrison City, PA 15636-0468      (724) 527-5585 x103
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Subject: Re: Automated analysis of bird calls
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 16:56:24 -0400
Interesting, but I beg to differ on it being a boon for researchers (no 
offenses to Patrick). I have worked in the field with out of town and local 
researchers, and basically in many cases that I've encountered, people get 
hired based on their research ability, not their knowledge of what their 
researching. Giving people a "tool" such as this will be just one more "app" in 
an arsenal that is completely dumbing down people. Part of the challenge is 
identification. If you don't know your research subject, how can you honestly 
research it? And what if you are hard of hearing? Then you have an app that 
tells you what is there, even if you can't identify it. But then again, it is 
only a tiny jump from birdsong decoding to human voice decoding, though that 
probably has already been going on for ages. 


It is almost as if "they" don't want us to use our brains anymore. Personally, 
I'd rather trust my brain, my ears and my intuition than a computer program. 
Otherwise, how do we learn? 


Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA

(and then the ****storm ensued...)   ;)

> Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 22:30:48 +0200
> From: patrick.millar AT GMX.COM
> Subject: [PABIRDS] Automated analysis of bird calls
> To: PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG
> 
> I thought some might be interested in this article - "Birdsongs automatically 
decoded by computer scientists": 

> http://www.qmul.ac.uk/media/news/items/se/136151.html
> 
> Quote:
> "The classification system created by the authors performed well in a public 
contest using a set of thousands of recordings with over 500 bird species from 
Brazil. The system was regarded as the best-performing audio only classifier, 
and placed second overall out of entries from 10 research groups in the 
competition." 

> 
> Maybe an app in a few years?  This could also be a huge boon for researchers.
> 
> Best wishes,
> 
> Patrick Millar
> Chester County
 		 	   		  
Subject: Automated analysis of bird calls
From: Patrick Millar <patrick.millar AT GMX.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 22:30:48 +0200
I thought some might be interested in this article - "Birdsongs automatically 
decoded by computer scientists": 

http://www.qmul.ac.uk/media/news/items/se/136151.html

Quote:
"The classification system created by the authors performed well in a public 
contest using a set of thousands of recordings with over 500 bird species from 
Brazil. The system was regarded as the best-performing audio only classifier, 
and placed second overall out of entries from 10 research groups in the 
competition." 


Maybe an app in a few years?  This could also be a huge boon for researchers.

Best wishes,

Patrick Millar
Chester County
Subject: Lebanon County, Fox and Prescott Rd, Western Sandpiper
From: Tim Becker <0000001cfb2aa731-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 16:12:13 -0400
Randy Miller just called to report that a Western Sandpiper is down in the pond 
at the northwest corner of Fox and Prescott Roads. It is with 9 Least 
Sandpipers. 


Tim Becker

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Fw: The Meadowlands Blog
From: Herb Flavell <herb1013 AT EPIX.NET>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 14:49:00 -0400
The Meadowlands Nature BlogI know the pictures in this email wont work. I’m 
posting this for those PABirders that like to chase. There is an American White 
Pelican at the NJ Meadowlands at DeKorte Park.There is also a bunch of 
Semipalmated Sandpipers at the River Barge Park. If anyone wants a copy to see 
the pictures, just email me. 

Herb Flavell, Gods Knob, Milk Can Corners, Susquehanna County

From: The Meadowlands Nature Blog 
Sent: Wednesday, July 23, 2014 2:28 PM
To: herb1013 AT epix.net 
Subject: The Meadowlands Blog

      The Meadowlands Blog   


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

  a.. Am. White Pelican Still at DeKorte 
  b.. Special Butterfly Day Raffle Prize 
  c.. Semipalmated Sandpipers Are Back 
  d.. Moth Night: NY Times Coverage 
  e.. Butterfly Report 072214 
      Am. White Pelican Still at DeKorte 

      Posted: 23 Jul 2014 06:27 AM PDT

      On the Sawmill Creek mudflats. Spotting scope a good idea.

       
     
      Special Butterfly Day Raffle Prize 

      Posted: 23 Jul 2014 05:04 AM PDT

 Nature photographer Regina Geoghan is donating her framed photo of a Common 
Buckeye from the NJMC’s coffee-table book “The Nature of the Meadowlands” 
as the grand raffle prize at Sunday’s fifth annual Butterday at DeKorte Park. 


 Just fill out a raffle ticket when you sign in at the MEC on Sunday. The 
winner will be announced at 1 p.m., but you don’t have to be here to win it. 


 Other prizes, announced every hour on the hour, will be NJMC pontoon-boat 
cruises for two. 


 You can see Regina’s photograph on display in the MEC’s Flyway Gallery 
through Sunday, as well as 59 other wonderful photographs, illustrations, and 
archival images from the book. 


      The Star Ledger’s review of the book is here.

       
     
      Semipalmated Sandpipers Are Back 

      Posted: 23 Jul 2014 04:55 AM PDT

 Dennis Cheeseman took this shot at River Barge Park at 8 a.m. on Monday. We 
are guessing that it wasn’t far from high tide. (Thanks, Dennis!) 


       
     
      Moth Night: NY Times Coverage 

      Posted: 22 Jul 2014 08:14 PM PDT

       
 Searching for moths at the Meadowlands Environment Center in Lyndhurst, N.J., 
on Monday night. Credit Ben Solomon for The New York Times. 


 Lisa Forderaro of The New York Times wrote a nifty story about our 3rd annual 
Moth Night and National Moth Week. 


      The link is here.

       
     
      Butterfly Report 072214 

      Posted: 22 Jul 2014 12:57 PM PDT

      Regina Geoghan reports:

 Yesterday along Disposal Road: Black Swallowtail, Tiger Swallowtail, Viceroy, 
Skippers. 


 Today Disposal Road: American Lady, Skippers, one Monarch that flew over. 


 Today DeKorte: Silver-spotted Skippers, Comma, E.Tiger Swallowtail, Monarch, 
Red Admirals, 


       
     
      You are subscribed to email updates from The Meadowlands Nature Blog 
 To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now. Email delivery 
powered by Google 

      Google Inc., 20 West Kinzie, Chicago IL USA 60610 
Subject: Re: Interesting egret at Heinz refuge
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 13:48:56 -0400
Would the 4th bird be an immature LBHE? Sounds like it.

Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA


> Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 11:00:03 -0400
> From: phlblader AT EARTHLINK.NET
> Subject: [PABIRDS] Interesting egret at Heinz refuge
> To: PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG
> 
> Frank Windfelder is at John Heinz NWR at Tinicum and reports 3 Little Blue 
Herons and a fourth heron that is 'interesting'. Not a Little Blue, more like a 
Snowy. However the bill is straight and all black with no yellow at all in the 
lores. Legs all black, I believe he said. 

> 
> These were seen at the buttonwood island, near where the eagles nest and 
visible from the dike road. 

> 
> Martin Dellwo
> phlblader AT earthlink.net
> http://phlblader.smugmug.com
 		 	   		  
Subject: RBA western Pennsylvania, 21 July 2014
From: Amy Taracido <amytaracido AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 11:35:30 -0400
RBA
*Pennsylvania
*Pittsburgh and western Pennsylvania
*PAWE07.21.14

Highlights:
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON (Mercer County)
LEAST TERN (Erie County)
CASPIAN TERN
WILLET (Erie County)
MARBLED GODWIT (Erie County)
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER (Crawford and Erie Counties)
WHIMBREL (Erie County)
AMERICAN AVOCET (Erie County)
WILLOW FLYCATCHER

Contributors: Shawn Collins, Gigi Gerben, Jerry McWilliams, Richard Nugent, 
Kate St. John, Steve Sanford, Jack Solomon, Shannon Thompson, Mark Vass. 


Compiler: Amy Taracido

Sunday, 13 July 2014 through Monday, 21 July 2014

**This report is distributed by e-mail only. Compiler is not responsible for 
errors on websites who reproduce/reprint these reports. If you would like to 
receive western PA RBAs, contact AMYTARACIDO AT  YAHOO.COM 


Transcript-

PLEASE NOTE: LEAST SANDPIPER, SOLITARY SANDPIPER, RING-NECKED DUCK, GREEN 
HERON, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT continue to be reported. 


ALLEGHENY COUNTY:

On 7/13 along the Nine Mile Run Trail just upstream from Duck Hollow, WILLOW 
FLYCATCHER, SAVANNAH SPARROW (KSJ); on 7/18, WILLOW FLYCATCHERS (JS). 


At Wingfield Pines through 7/14, WILLOW FLYCATCHER (reported to ST).


CRAWFORD COUNTY:

In Meadville this week through 7/15, 1 MERLIN (SC).

On 7/19 at Miller's Ponds in Pymatuning, 7 SHORT-BILLED DOWTICHERS, 2 GREATER 
YELLOWLEGS, 2 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, 6 SANDHILL CRANES (MVas). 



ERIE COUNTY:

At Presque Isle State Park on 7/15, 3 AMERICAN AVOCETS; on 7/16, 2 WHIMBRELS 
(JM); on 7/19, 1 LEAST TERN, CASPIAN TERNS, 1 WILLET, 1 MARBLED GODWIT, 26 
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS (reported to JM by Ruth Swaney); on 7/20, 3 AMERICAN 
AVOCETS (JM). 



MERCER COUNTY:

At Shenango Lake on 7/16, 2 BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS and others; on 7/18, 1 
GREATER YELLOWLEGS (SS). 



VENANGO COUNTY:

On 7/17 at the Kennerdell Tract in Clear Creek State Forest, sightings included 
WINTER WREN, OVENBIRD (RN). 



WASHINGTON COUNTY:

On 7/16 in an unspecified backyard location, 2 COMMON RAVENS (GG).

Amy Taracido
Washington Co., PA

To send in reports:
AMYTARACIDO AT  YAHOO.COM

Thank you to all the contributors. 		 	   		  
Subject: Interesting egret at Heinz refuge
From: Martin Dellwo <phlblader AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 11:00:03 -0400
Frank Windfelder is at John Heinz NWR at Tinicum and reports 3 Little Blue 
Herons and a fourth heron that is 'interesting'. Not a Little Blue, more like a 
Snowy. However the bill is straight and all black with no yellow at all in the 
lores. Legs all black, I believe he said. 


These were seen at the buttonwood island, near where the eagles nest and 
visible from the dike road. 


Martin Dellwo
phlblader AT earthlink.net
http://phlblader.smugmug.com
Subject: Shorebirds, Cumberland County
From: Dave Kerr <dsktc AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 10:53:47 -0400
I arrived at the retention pond at the Carlisle

Evangelical Free Church before 0800 this morning.

 

I found these Shorebirds:



Killdeer (20)

Spotted Sandpiper (2)

Solitary Sandpiper (5)

Least Sandpiper (7)

 

Within the next 30 minutes, a dump truck hauling a small bulldozer and

an excavator arrived and parked at the west end of the pond.

 

I then learned from one of the pastors that the church was beginning

a township-mandated project to improve the drainage in the pond.

As I watched, the dozer and digger successively entered the pond and began

scraping the surface mud and digging a trench.  By then, the majority of

the birds had left.   I watched them circle the area a couple of times.

 

The project will change the structure and appearance of the pond; how

this affects the migrating shorebirds is unknown at this time.

 

 

Dave Kerr

Carlisle 

  
Subject: Photo Study Of Birds At E. B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 7/22/14
From: "Howard B. Eskin," <hbeskin AT VOICENET.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 09:29:05 -0500
The Saltmarsh Greenhead Flies were in peak numbers at Brig yesterday but
the birds, low tide and bright sunshine more than made up for the
discomfort. There were well over 200 Great Egrets, 50-60 Snowies and lots
of newly fledged Ospreys at the Refuge. To see the Photo Study and a list
of the species seen, please click on the following link:

http://www.howardsview.com/BrigJuly22_14/BrigJuly22_14.html

Regards,
Howard

Howard B Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
Harleysville (Montco), PA
Subject: OFF TOPIC--Bat Roost at my home in New Cumberland, PA
From: Kathy Clark <0000001dc30ca77c-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 23:14:14 -0400
Hope this is okay for me to share that this season for the bats was very 
successful. Last year's final count was 21 and started out initially with 25. 
It started out as very normal with 25 bats in the spring. Then they all 
disappeared for about a week, and only 4 were seen. Then there was 11, and I'm 
proud to say my final count tonight was 47!!! Yeah!! They are awesome to watch 
emerging. I've never watched them return at dawn but I should do that. I heard 
it is awesome and they look like bees swarming a hive to get back in. 

 
Just wanted to share.  
 
Kathy Clark, New Cumberland, PA
Subject: SGL-95; Butler County; 07/22/2014
From: Richard Nugent <rmnugent AT EXCITE.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 19:51:33 -0400
 This morning I birded at State Game Lands 95 in northern Butler County near 
Hilliards. The morning started warm and humid progressing to hot and humid. A 
light breeze helped. Besides the birds, I found a patch of Purple Bergamot in 
bloom including one that was a very deep purple color. My list of bird 
highlights is below: 


  Wood Thrush (3)
  Common Yellowthroat (7)
  Scarlet Tanager (4)
  Cedar waxwing (7)
  Field Sparrow (1)
  Hooded Merganser (1)
  Ovenbird (1)
  American Redstart (1)
  Blue-headed Vireo (1)
  Swamp Sparrow (10)
  Belted Kingfisher (2)
  Veery (2)
  Hooded Warbler (1)
  Yellow-billed Cuckoo (1)
  Green Heron (1)
  Rose-breasted Grosbeak (1)

        Best Regards ......... Richard Nugent
        Hampton Township, Allegheny County
  
Subject: Grackle kill
From: Cindy Ahern <songbird5212 AT MSN.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:58:17 -0400
Grackles commonly take House Sparrows at my feeders. While ugly to watch, the 
Grackle is native and the House Sparrow is not. I have seen them go after House 
Finches as well. They seem to go for the eyes, pecking aggressively. Blue Jays 
do this, too, although I think more people are aware that this behavior is 
expected in Blue Jays. 

Sent from my iPhone 
Cindy Ahern
Montgomery Co.
Subject: Westmorland County Birds
From: Michael Fialkovich <mpfial AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:31:04 -0400
Hi,

Today at work in New Stanton a Willow Flycatcher and a White-eyed Vireo were 
singing. I haven't heard the local Wood Thrush this week so they are going 
quiet. Eastern Towhee and Song Sparrows were still singing away. 


Mike Fialkovich
Pittsburgh Area, Allegheny County
Subject: Franklin Co Short-billed Dowitcher
From: Bill Oyler <oylerbill AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:00:26 -0400
Carl Garner found it late morning at Kriner Rd retention pond. Currently it is 
resting on the east side in the grass about 20 feet off the water. 


Bill Oyler
Chambersburg

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Chester County - Grackle flocks starting to grow
From: Patrick Millar <patrick.millar AT GMX.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 19:02:09 +0200
Since there were some Grackle mentions yesterday, I thought I would post this. 
I am starting to see the Grackle flocks appear in the area - this weekend we 
had flocks of around 1,000 birds fly out towards Lancaster County in the 
morning and back towards Maryland in the evening. This suggests that the winter 
pattern starts early. Although this is only 0.1% of a large winter flock, I 
expect the numbers to grow steadily. 


On a separate and only remotely related note, curiosity got the better of me 
and I looked up the last name "Grackle" online. Apparently there are very few 
people with this last name (the same applies to Cowbird, another species that 
likes large flocks). On the other hand, I was surprised to see a relatively 
large number of people seem to have the last name of "Hummingbird" and a 
menagerie of other more attractive birds e.g. Oriole. I wonder if there are 
historic roots to these names (e.g. Native American?), or if this is people 
getting bored with common last names and changing them. 


Patrick Millar
Chester County
Subject: Re: Photo Study Of A 1st Year Peregrine Falcon In Rehab At Carbon County Environmental, 7/21/14
From: Sue Hannon <sbhannon AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:45:42 -0400
Wonderful photos, Howard! Good job all around on the rescue and rehab of
this beautiful bird. Peggy Hentz has done tremendous work with the juvenile
peregrines that she has worked with. I'm very glad that Red is on her way
to full recovery, and look forward to hearing when she is returned to the
wild!

Sue


On Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 7:08 PM, Howard B. Eskin, 
wrote:

> Mick Jeitner rescued a young Peregrine Falcon that flew into some
> razor-wire under the NJ/PA Turnpike Bridge on June 10th. This bird was one
> of five Peregrine chicks banded by Dr. Art McMorris and his team on May
> 15th. I brought the injured fledgling to the Red Creek Wildlife Center in
> Schuykill Haven. The Director, Peggy Hentz, cared for Red for many weeks
> and then realized that it was time for the falcon to begin flight
> excercise. She transferred Red to the Carbon County Environmental Center
> in (CCEEC has a 100 foot Flight Cage) in Summit Hill, PA. I visited today
> and took some photographs of this beautiful Peregrine Falcon. To see the
> Photo Study, please click on the following link:
>
>
> 
http://www.howardsview.com/PeregrineRehabJuly21_14/PeregrineRehabJuly21_14.html 

>
> Regards,
> Howard
>
>
> Howard B. Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
> Harleysville (Montco), PA
>



-- 
Sue Hannon
Middletown
Dauphin County, PA
Subject: Question on heron movement
From: Dave Kruel <dkruel300 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 12:18:18 +0000
Hi All, 
Someone mentioned to me that one day in the past week or so, they saw a group 
of herons & egrets take off from a spot in a forested area along the Second 
Mountain in Schuylkill County. First a group of 5 Great Blue Herons took off 
together, then a group of 3 Great Egrets together, followed by 8 more single 
Great Blues (not in one group). The entire process may have taken 15 minutes or 
so. I'm not sure if they all headed the same direction or not. 


Just wanted to ask for any thoughts as to what this may have been. Do 
herons/egrets roost near each other in spots during summer after dispersing 
from nest sites ? 


Thanks much. 

Dave Kruel 
Pottsville 
Schuylkill County 
Subject: Cliff Swallows interesting behavior), Berks County
From: Kerry A Grim <mountainbirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 07:42:52 -0400
Cliff Swallows bread under a bridge in Hamburg, above the Schuylkill River. The 
bridge was rebuilt a few years ago and the swallows returned. Parallel to the 
river are utility wires. On July 2, I counted 40 on the wires, so they were 
very likely done breeding and this was most of the population that included 
adults and young. 


I had not seen the swallows after July 2, so I assumed they departed the area.

Yesterday, July 21, from another bridge ⅛ mile to the north I was surprised 
to see approximately 20 Cliff Swallows flying near the bridge. They would fly 
together and occasionally go under the bridge near their nests. Normally, 
swallows fly randomly, hawking insects. However, these swallows moved in a 
group more starling-like than swallows. Even when flying under the bridge to 
the nests, it was in a group, not scattered. I have no clue why they flew in 
formation or whether they were feeding on insects like that. Has anyone else 
seen behavior like this? 


Although it is not the best time to be birding, there were a number of records 
yesterday for Kernsville Dam Recreation Area: high count of Belted Kingfisher 
(4), Cliff Swallow (20…the count of 40 was taken from outside the area), and 
two late Louisiana Waterthrushes were found. 


Kerry Grim
Hamburg, PA
Subject: Re: Photo Study Of A 1st Year Peregrine Falcon In Rehab At Carbon County Environmental, 7/21/14
From: Kathy <pabirder AT PTD.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:23:16 -0400
Very nice!! What a great service to this young bird. 
Kathy Stagl 

> On Jul 21, 2014, at 8:55 PM, Linda Rowan  wrote:
> 
> Howard Eskin deserves credit for assisting with the rescue of Red from the 
razor wire and being her chauffeur to Red Creek Wildlife Center. This was quite 
a drive and it was late at night when they arrived at the center, and even 
later when Howard finally returned home. Thanks Howard for all you have done 
and the beautiful photos of Red. 

> 
> Linda Rowan
> 
> -----Original Message----- From: Howard B. Eskin,
> Sent: Monday, July 21, 2014 7:08 PM
> To: PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG
> Subject: [PABIRDS] Photo Study Of A 1st Year Peregrine Falcon In Rehab At 
Carbon County Environmental, 7/21/14 

> 
> Mick Jeitner rescued a young Peregrine Falcon that flew into some
> razor-wire under the NJ/PA Turnpike Bridge on June 10th. This bird was one
> of five Peregrine chicks banded by Dr. Art McMorris and his team on May
> 15th. I brought the injured fledgling to the Red Creek Wildlife Center in
> Schuykill Haven. The Director, Peggy Hentz, cared for Red for many weeks
> and then realized that it was time for the falcon to begin flight
> excercise. She transferred Red to the Carbon County Environmental Center
> in (CCEEC has a 100 foot Flight Cage) in Summit Hill, PA. I visited today
> and took some photographs of this beautiful Peregrine Falcon. To see the
> Photo Study, please click on the following link:
> 
> 
http://www.howardsview.com/PeregrineRehabJuly21_14/PeregrineRehabJuly21_14.html 

> 
> Regards,
> Howard
> 
> 
> Howard B. Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
> Harleysville (Montco), PA 
Subject: black-bellied plover, Dauphin Co
From: Ed Bernot <warbler4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 21:52:31 -0400
A black bellied plover was observed along Waltonville Road near Hummelstown
this afternoon.

Ed Bernot
Harrisburg, PA
Subject: Green Herons, Bradford Co.
From: Trudy Gerlach <tgswoods AT EPIX.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 21:44:46 -0400
Saw two Green Herons flying over my field near one of the beaver ponds at dusk 
this evening, a beautiful sight. Near New Era. 

Trudy Gerlach
Bradford Co.
tgswoods AT epix.net
Subject: Red Tail Hawk Levittown, Bucks County
From: Linda Rowan <lrowan1 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 21:06:54 -0400
Tonight was a great night to eat dinner on my screened porch. As I went onto 
the porch I saw a Kingbird sitting on the fence, looking over the greenbelt and 
the edge of the creek. In a minute it flew off to catch an insect. After that 
we caught glimpses of it as it seemed to prefer perching out of view on the 
other side of my shed. 


Shortly after that I saw a big bird fly low from between the houses heading 
toward the creek. It was a Red-Tail Hawk. It went by so fast, I could not tell 
if it was an adult or a juvenile, though it appeared to be a pale bird. It had 
a few small birds chasing it. The last few days we have had a juvenile Red-Tail 
calling from the power line towers behind our houses. Mick Jeitner went to see 
if the bird had perched up on the tower, but it was nowhere to be seen. 


We did see a humming bird at the feeder, but no other excitement.

Linda Rowan
Subject: Re: Photo Study Of A 1st Year Peregrine Falcon In Rehab At Carbon County Environmental, 7/21/14
From: Linda Rowan <lrowan1 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 20:55:19 -0400
Howard Eskin deserves credit for assisting with the rescue of Red from the 
razor wire and being her chauffeur to Red Creek Wildlife Center.  This was 
quite a drive and it was late at night when they arrived at the center, and 
even later when Howard finally returned home.  Thanks Howard for all you 
have done and the beautiful photos of Red.

Linda Rowan

-----Original Message----- 
From: Howard B. Eskin,
Sent: Monday, July 21, 2014 7:08 PM
To: PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG
Subject: [PABIRDS] Photo Study Of A 1st Year Peregrine Falcon In Rehab At 
Carbon County Environmental, 7/21/14

Mick Jeitner rescued a young Peregrine Falcon that flew into some
razor-wire under the NJ/PA Turnpike Bridge on June 10th. This bird was one
of five Peregrine chicks banded by Dr. Art McMorris and his team on May
15th. I brought the injured fledgling to the Red Creek Wildlife Center in
Schuykill Haven. The Director, Peggy Hentz, cared for Red for many weeks
and then realized that it was time for the falcon to begin flight
excercise. She transferred Red to the Carbon County Environmental Center
in (CCEEC has a 100 foot Flight Cage) in Summit Hill, PA. I visited today
and took some photographs of this beautiful Peregrine Falcon. To see the
Photo Study, please click on the following link:

http://www.howardsview.com/PeregrineRehabJuly21_14/PeregrineRehabJuly21_14.html

Regards,
Howard


Howard B. Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
Harleysville (Montco), PA 
Subject: Re: Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh
From: Kathy Clark <0000001dc30ca77c-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 20:28:10 -0400
Not sure if this is true, but I have heard it in the past. Not to put down 
grackles. Do they behead other birds? That's what I heard. Is it true? 

 
Kathy Clark
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Cathy Brown 
To: PABIRDS 
Sent: Mon, Jul 21, 2014 7:21 pm
Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh


I like Grackles too, Mike. I think they are beautiful. I only ever have a few 

at my home, so maybe they are easier to appreciate.  
Cathy Brown, Burgettstown, Washington County

> Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:18:35 -0400
> From: mpfial AT VERIZON.NET
> Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh
> To: PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG
> 
> I've read accounts of grackles killing House Sparrows.
> 
> Many years ago at my previous residence I saw a Common Grackle attack a 
> House Sparrow on the ground.  I also saw a grackle attacking a sparrow while 
> in flight, or perhaps it was carrying off its struggling victim.
> 
> It was a nice example of a native species controlling a non-native.
> 
> I'm probably one of the few people who like grackles.
> 
> Mike Fialkovich
> Pittsburgh Area, Allegheny County
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Hayley Kile" <0000003585d127de-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
> To: 
> Sent: Monday, July 21, 2014 8:55 AM
> Subject: [PABIRDS] Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh
> 
> 
> > Proxy reporting for Jennifer Horovitz...after a wonderful morning spent 
> > with Bob Mulvihill and volunteer Todd banding birds for Neighborhood 
> > Nestwatch at our house in East Pittsburgh, relaxing on the back porch 
> > enjoying the millions of birds now at the feeder, a grackle took a 
> > songbird at the feeder and proceeded to eat it 5 feet from the feeder. We 
> > first noticed a single grackle on Saturday, sitting on the garden fence in 
> > the rain and showing some interest in the feeder.
> > Opinions on whether we should just let nature run its course? Stop feeding 
> > for a couple of days?
> > Hayley 
 		 	   		  

 
Subject: Re: Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh
From: Cathy Brown <blueapis AT MSN.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 19:21:34 -0400
I like Grackles too, Mike. I think they are beautiful. I only ever have a few 
at my home, so maybe they are easier to appreciate. 

Cathy Brown, Burgettstown, Washington County

> Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:18:35 -0400
> From: mpfial AT VERIZON.NET
> Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh
> To: PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG
> 
> I've read accounts of grackles killing House Sparrows.
> 
> Many years ago at my previous residence I saw a Common Grackle attack a 
> House Sparrow on the ground.  I also saw a grackle attacking a sparrow while 
> in flight, or perhaps it was carrying off its struggling victim.
> 
> It was a nice example of a native species controlling a non-native.
> 
> I'm probably one of the few people who like grackles.
> 
> Mike Fialkovich
> Pittsburgh Area, Allegheny County
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Hayley Kile" <0000003585d127de-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
> To: 
> Sent: Monday, July 21, 2014 8:55 AM
> Subject: [PABIRDS] Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh
> 
> 
> > Proxy reporting for Jennifer Horovitz...after a wonderful morning spent 
> > with Bob Mulvihill and volunteer Todd banding birds for Neighborhood 
> > Nestwatch at our house in East Pittsburgh, relaxing on the back porch 
> > enjoying the millions of birds now at the feeder, a grackle took a 
> > songbird at the feeder and proceeded to eat it 5 feet from the feeder. We 
> > first noticed a single grackle on Saturday, sitting on the garden fence in 
> > the rain and showing some interest in the feeder.
> > Opinions on whether we should just let nature run its course? Stop feeding 
> > for a couple of days?
> > Hayley 
 		 	   		  
Subject: Photo Study Of A 1st Year Peregrine Falcon In Rehab At Carbon County Environmental, 7/21/14
From: "Howard B. Eskin," <hbeskin AT VOICENET.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:08:35 -0500
Mick Jeitner rescued a young Peregrine Falcon that flew into some
razor-wire under the NJ/PA Turnpike Bridge on June 10th. This bird was one
of five Peregrine chicks banded by Dr. Art McMorris and his team on May
15th. I brought the injured fledgling to the Red Creek Wildlife Center in
Schuykill Haven. The Director, Peggy Hentz, cared for Red for many weeks
and then realized that it was time for the falcon to begin flight
excercise. She transferred Red to the Carbon County Environmental Center
in (CCEEC has a 100 foot Flight Cage) in Summit Hill, PA. I visited today
and took some photographs of this beautiful Peregrine Falcon. To see the
Photo Study, please click on the following link:

http://www.howardsview.com/PeregrineRehabJuly21_14/PeregrineRehabJuly21_14.html

Regards,
Howard


Howard B. Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
Harleysville (Montco), PA
Subject: Re: Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh
From: Herb Flavell <herb1013 AT EPIX.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:24:19 -0400
That maybe why I have mostly large birds at my 2 flat feeders on the front 
porch. I go through a Folgers coffee can of mixed seed,cracked corn and BO 
Sunflower seed in each feeder every day. I also throw 20 unshelled peanuts 
out for Chippie the Chipmunk. 2 minutes later they are gone because he hides 
them under the porch. Blue Jays also rob nests by stealing eggs and eating 
babies. I might as well mention that if the Mourning Doves here are as 
abundant in other yards, then Collared Doves will never drive them out. Back 
before I retired from the USPS there were a pair of Collared Doves that I 
saw daily. They hung out between Pulaski and Noel Drive in North Arlington 
N.J. The back yards on both streets were perfect for them because there were 
high tension wires that supplied electric to the west shore cities along the 
Hudson river. I have hundreds of Doves here.  There are always 25 or 30 
sitting in the trees waiting their turn at the 2 feeders. Most of my feeder 
birds are Doves,Grackles,RW Blackbirds, Blue Jays, Tree sparrows, Cardinals 
and some big Crows. My owl nest fledged 2 young Sparrow Hawks. They now hunt 
from the big dead tree by the road with their parents. Mom and Dad crow 
fledged 3 young and fed them from seeds on the front feeders. They now feed 
them selves. Both black PVC nests fledged House Wrens. All the Tree swallows 
that fledged here have abandoned me for the beaver pond 1/2 mile north. I 
guess there are more bugs there than her. That’s ok by me because there are 
at least 2 bats flying around here at night. I hope they are using one of my 
2 bat houses.
Herb Flavell, Gods Knob, for Gods creatures, Milk Can Corners, Susquehanna 
County.

-----Original Message----- 
From: Kate St.John
Sent: Monday, July 21, 2014 4:43 PM
To: PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG
Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh

Grackles eat eggs and nestlings so I'm not surprised they prey on weak/young 
songbirds too.

Tom Fegely wrote this in The Morning Call in 1997:
"Although it's only natural, grackles are often scorned because they're 
known to raid other birds nests, stealing eggs or young. Recently a coworker 
who lives near the Jordan Creek in Whitehall told me of watching a grackle 
capture and kill, by incessant pecking, what he believed was a young house 
finch.   ..."
Read more at the link: Common Grackle Is A Blackbird Of Uncommon Behavior * 
One Grackle Killed 39 Songbirds, Two Dozen Of Them In Three Days.


Common Grackle Is A Blackbird Of Uncommon Behavior * One Grackle Killed 39 
Songbirds, Two D...
Among the predictable subjects of calls to this desk each spring and fall 
are complaints that someone's bird feeder is being "raided" or "taken over" 
by grackles.Many feeder-operators don't take...
View on articles.mcall.com Preview by Yahoo




Kate St. John, Pittsburgh
Visit my bird/nature blog at www.wqed.org/birdblog/ 
Subject: Re: Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh
From: Michael Fialkovich <mpfial AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:18:35 -0400
I've read accounts of grackles killing House Sparrows.

Many years ago at my previous residence I saw a Common Grackle attack a 
House Sparrow on the ground.  I also saw a grackle attacking a sparrow while 
in flight, or perhaps it was carrying off its struggling victim.

It was a nice example of a native species controlling a non-native.

I'm probably one of the few people who like grackles.

Mike Fialkovich
Pittsburgh Area, Allegheny County


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Hayley Kile" <0000003585d127de-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
To: 
Sent: Monday, July 21, 2014 8:55 AM
Subject: [PABIRDS] Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh


> Proxy reporting for Jennifer Horovitz...after a wonderful morning spent 
> with Bob Mulvihill and volunteer Todd banding birds for Neighborhood 
> Nestwatch at our house in East Pittsburgh, relaxing on the back porch 
> enjoying the millions of birds now at the feeder, a grackle took a 
> songbird at the feeder and proceeded to eat it 5 feet from the feeder. We 
> first noticed a single grackle on Saturday, sitting on the garden fence in 
> the rain and showing some interest in the feeder.
> Opinions on whether we should just let nature run its course? Stop feeding 
> for a couple of days?
> Hayley 
Subject: SGL-150; Lawrence County; 07/21/2014
From: Richard Nugent <rmnugent AT EXCITE.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:13:51 -0400
 This morning I birded and explored State Game Lands 150 near Pulaski in 
Lawrence County. The temperatures were in the low 70s with lots of sunshine and 
swarms of mosquitoes. Some of the mosquitoes were about 1/2 the size of normal 
mosquitoes and were especially ferocious. On a positive note there were lots of 
birds and I saw Wild Bergamot and Turk's Cap Lily in bloom. My list of bird 
highlights is below: 


  Red-shouldered Hawk (1; very vocal)
  Wood Thrush (3)
  Yellow-throated Vireo (1)
  Belted Kingfisher (1)
  Baltimore Oriole (1)
  Scarlet Tanager (1)
  Acadian Flycatcher (1)
  Common Yellowthroat (1)
  Hooded warbler (1)
  Warbling Vireo (1)
  Cedar waxwing (3)

     Best Regards ......... Richard Nugent
     Hampton Township, Allegheny County 
Subject: Re: Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh
From: "Kate St.John" <0000000f59b962a9-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 13:43:03 -0700
Grackles eat eggs and nestlings so I'm not surprised they prey on weak/young 
songbirds too. 


Tom Fegely wrote this in The Morning Call in 1997:
"Although it's only natural, grackles are often scorned because they're known 
to raid other birds nests, stealing eggs or young. Recently a coworker who 
lives near the Jordan Creek in Whitehall told me of watching a grackle capture 
and kill, by incessant pecking, what he believed was a young house finch. 
..." 

Read more at the link: Common Grackle Is A Blackbird Of Uncommon Behavior * One 
Grackle Killed 39 Songbirds, Two Dozen Of Them In Three Days. 

 
     
Common Grackle Is A Blackbird Of Uncommon Behavior * One Grackle Killed 39 
Songbirds, Two D... 

Among the predictable subjects of calls to this desk each spring and fall are 
complaints that someone's bird feeder is being "raided" or "taken over" by 
grackles.Many feeder-operators don't take... 

View on articles.mcall.com Preview by Yahoo  
 



Kate St. John, Pittsburgh
Visit my bird/nature blog at www.wqed.org/birdblog/
Subject: Stilt Sandpiper @ Green Pond, Northampton County
From: Dave DeReamus <becard AT RCN.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 13:26:31 -0400
A stop at the flooded fields by Green Pond yielded the following:

Great Blue Herons (5)
Green Herons (3)
Stilt Sandpiper (1; still with a good amount of barring underneath)
Solitary Sandpipers (several)
Semipalmated Sandpiper (1)
Least Sandpipers (~20)
plus
Eastern Kingbirds
Bank Swallow
Cedar Waxwings.

Documentation photos of the Stilt and Semipalmated Sandpipers are at: 
http://picasaweb.google.com/becard57/LocalNotables2014# . 


Good birding,
Dave DeReamus
Palmer Township, PA
becard -at- rcn.com
Blog: http://becard.blogspot.com/
PicasaWeb Photo Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/becard57
Eastern PA Birding: http://users.rcn.com/becard/home.html
Subject: Lebanon County Birds
From: Windstream Mail <randyc11 AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 12:11:50 -0400
I was at the Reistville ponds today and had almost all the shorebirds were
along Fox Road.

These were all the shorebirds.

Killdeer- 4- 1 young almost as big as the adult.

Lesser Yellowlegs-2

Least Sandpiper-5

Also many ,about 50, Canada Geese chasing the shorebirds around.

Randy C. Miller

Lancaster County

 
Subject: Re: hummer behavior
From: Barbara Malt <bcm0 AT LEHIGH.EDU>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 11:57:32 -0400
Thanks, Arlene.  Last year I had a chance to see a female hummer actually
feed a youngster - they happened to land within easy view of me. That was a
treat.

B


On Sun, Jul 20, 2014 at 3:59 PM, DAVID KOCH  wrote:

>  Barbara,
>
> This behavior is quite normal. I hear it here often when I'm sitting on
> the front porch near a row of feeders and flowers, and it often comes from
> adults, not young. They chatter when what they perceive to be their
> territory has something unusual, usually a human or other bird, in it. And,
> for them, their territory is wherever they happen to be. As for the
> begging, well, young hummers are out and completely on their own a few
> weeks after they fledge. By then the female adult is no longer taking care
> of them. Hummingbirds are not like robins or other species that stay with
> the young after they're out of the nest. They live their lives in
> overdrive, doing everything quicker and sooner than other species because
> they have to.
>
> Arlene Koch
> Easton, PA
> Northampton County
> davilene AT verizon.net
>
>
>   On Sunday, July 20, 2014 12:14 AM, Barbara Malt  wrote:
>
>
> Today I was sitting on my porch, which has a roof but open sides, and twice
> a hummingbird flew in and buzzed around my head, chattering animatedly.
>
> What do you make of this behavior?  Territorial?  On the plus side of that
> interpretation, there is trumpet honeysuckle blooming along the porch rail,
> and pink impatients in hanging baskets, both of which hummers feed from. On
> the negative side, I have had those growing there, and hummers feeding from
> them, and myself sitting on the porch while they are in bloom, for the past
> 10 years and have never had this happen before.
>
> Here's an alternative that crossed my mind.  Juvenile begging to be fed?
> Not long before that, I had seen two hummers flying around the yard, one
> following the other, which I think means mother and kid.  And the face
> pattern of this one that buzzed me seemed a little fuzzy, suggesting
> juvenile.  While it may seem a little crazy to suggest that a juv would
> approach a human to beg, earlier this summer, Linda Freedman and I saw a
> recently-fledged Robin that seemed to do exactly that. It was on the ground
> and it approached us fearlessly and in a very intentional way, cheeping
> persistently.  A few minutes later, an adult dropped down and fed it. So,
> it seemed like it was doing a begging behavior directed at us.
>
> (reminds me of that children's book in which a fledgling bird approaches
> all sorts of creatures asking "Are you my mother?")
>
> Barbara Malt
> Allentown
>
>
>


-- 
Barbara Malt
Department of Psychology
17 Memorial Drive East
Lehigh University
Bethlehem, PA 18015
(610) 758-4797
http://www.lehigh.edu/~bcm0/bcm0/
Subject: Re: Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh
From: Hayley Kile <0000003585d127de-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 11:24:11 -0400
She said the grackle dive-bombed the feeder birds and caught one in mid-air and 
then we watched as it ate it a few feet away from the feeder leaving a pile of 
feathers. Is this really uncommon? The grackle came back several times last 
night and we clapped loudly. I saw it eating seed from the feeder this morning. 

 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: bill drolsbaugh 
To: pezolut 
Sent: Mon, Jul 21, 2014 11:06 am
Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh



A grackle killed a songbird and ate it ??  Wow 
 



 
 
 
 On Monday, July 21, 2014 8:55 AM, Hayley Kile 
<0000003585d127de-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG> wrote: 

  
  

 
Proxy reporting for Jennifer Horovitz...after a wonderful morning spent with 
Bob Mulvihill and volunteer Todd banding birds for Neighborhood Nestwatch at 
our house in East Pittsburgh, relaxing on the back porch enjoying the millions 
of birds now at the feeder, a grackle took a songbird at the feeder and 
proceeded to eat it 5 feet from the feeder. We first noticed a single grackle 
on Saturday, sitting on the garden fence in the rain and showing some interest 
in the feeder. 

Opinions on whether we should just let nature run its course? Stop feeding for 
a couple of days? 

Hayley


  
 
  
 
Subject: Grackle Kill at Feeder - Pittsburgh
From: Hayley Kile <0000003585d127de-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 08:55:09 -0400
Proxy reporting for Jennifer Horovitz...after a wonderful morning spent with 
Bob Mulvihill and volunteer Todd banding birds for Neighborhood Nestwatch at 
our house in East Pittsburgh, relaxing on the back porch enjoying the millions 
of birds now at the feeder, a grackle took a songbird at the feeder and 
proceeded to eat it 5 feet from the feeder. We first noticed a single grackle 
on Saturday, sitting on the garden fence in the rain and showing some interest 
in the feeder. 

Opinions on whether we should just let nature run its course? Stop feeding for 
a couple of days? 

Hayley
Subject: Great Egret, Monastery Road, Blair Co
From: Michael David <michaeltdavid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 23:17:50 -0400
Hi All,

A Great Egret was present at Monastery Road today, in the near pond visible
from the road. It's been an excellent year for them here, this is my 7th
sighting, at least 6 of which were likely different individuals. In the
surrounding fields, Bobolinks in their fall colors are starting to flock
up. Here's my checklist with photos of the Great Egret:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19167459

Also, I was at State Game Lands 147 earlier in the afternoon. Here's that
checklist:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19167413

Best,

Michael David
Blair Co.
Subject: Fulton Co by proxy - Bobwhite
From: Amy Evans <needmore.pa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 20:26:58 -0400
My Mom told me today that she had a bobwhite quail at her yard feeders off
and on for several hours this morning.  This is a new yard bird for her.
 She was afraid it wasn't feeling well, but it seemed to go about its
business later in the day.

Amy Evans
Columbia, PA
Subject: Erie County bird sightings
From: Jerry McWilliams <0000001b5c226889-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 16:59:26 -0400
The following birds of note were reported from Gull Point at Presque Isle S.P. 
this past week. 



American Avocet  3; July 15
                             3; July 20

Willet  1; July 19

Whimbrel  2; July 16

Marbled Godwit--1; July 19

Apparently the Least Tern reported yesterday was not seen again today.


Jerry McWilliams
Erie, Erie County, Pa.
jerrymcw AT aol.com
                         
Subject: Re: hummer behavior
From: DAVID KOCH <davilene AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 12:59:12 -0700
Barbara, 

This behavior is quite normal. I hear it here often when I'm sitting on the 
front porch near a row of feeders and flowers, and it often comes from adults, 
not young.They chatter when what they perceive to be their territory has 
something unusual, usually a human or other bird, in it. And, for them, their 
territory is wherever they happen to be.As for the begging, well, young 
hummers are out and completelyon their own a few weeks after they fledge. By 
then thefemale adult is no longer taking care of them.Hummingbirds are not 
like robins or other species that stay with the young after they're out of the 
nest.They live their lives in overdrive, doing everything quicker and sooner 
than other species because they have to. 


Arlene Koch
Easton, PA
Northampton County
davilene AT verizon.net 


On Sunday, July 20, 2014 12:14 AM, Barbara Malt  wrote:
  


Today I was sitting on my porch, which has a roof but open sides, and twice
a hummingbird flew in and buzzed around my head, chattering animatedly.

What do you make of this behavior? Territorial? On the plus side of that
interpretation, there is trumpet honeysuckle blooming along the porch rail,
and pink impatients in hanging baskets, both of which hummers feed from. On
the negative side, I have had those growing there, and hummers feeding from
them, and myself sitting on the porch while they are in bloom, for the past
10 years and have never had this happen before.

Here's an alternative that crossed my mind. Juvenile begging to be fed?
Not long before that, I had seen two hummers flying around the yard, one
following the other, which I think means mother and kid. And the face
pattern of this one that buzzed me seemed a little fuzzy, suggesting
juvenile. While it may seem a little crazy to suggest that a juv would
approach a human to beg, earlier this summer, Linda Freedman and I saw a
recently-fledged Robin that seemed to do exactly that. It was on the ground
and it approached us fearlessly and in a very intentional way, cheeping
persistently. A few minutes later, an adult dropped down and fed it. So,
it seemed like it was doing a begging behavior directed at us.

(reminds me of that children's book in which a fledgling bird approaches
all sorts of creatures asking "Are you my mother?")

Barbara Malt
Allentown
Subject: Little Tern
From: "Stringer, Randy C." <RCStringer AT GCC.EDU>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 15:58:05 +0000
Any update on the Little Tern at Presque Isle?  Randy Stringer

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: dickcissels, berks
From: Rudolph Keller <rckeller AT DEJAZZD.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 11:48:01 -0400
This morning at Virginville Rd., two Dickcissels sang only intermittently 
from hidden perches in the grass. The hayfields used by most of the 
grassland birds have matured at about two feet and most of the usual species 
were present, including the singing Blue Grosbeak. Red-headed Woodpeckers 
appeared to be feeding young in one of the cavities in their favorite snag. 
The hayfields across the road have been cut a second time, and I expect the 
same to happen on the other side of the road. At Haas/Leiby Rds., all the 
hay but a tiny wet patch along the road has now been cut, the last of it 
awaiting baling. I found no Dickcissels at that site.
Rudy Keller
Boyertown, PA
Berks County 
Subject: Extralimital: European Golden Plover - New Jersey
From: "Hopkins,Jeffrey A." <HOPKINJA AT AIRPRODUCTS.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 14:40:25 +0000
I haven't seen any info posted on PABIRDS about it, but a European Golden 
Plover was found yesterday afternoon at a sod farm in Hunterdon County, New 
Jersey. It was there again this morning until about 9:00 when it flew off to 
the west (it did the same thing yesterday afternoon, so it's possible it's 
still around). Also a warning, the farmer who owns the field is reported to be 
"not birder friendly" so the thought was get there before the bird is 
permanently scared off. 


For more details and directions, check out the Jerseybirds listserve.

Jeff Hopkins
Whitehall
Subject: Re: recovered leg band, Clearfield Co.
From: Dan Richards <drichards7 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 09:03:26 -0400
I reported my finding to the BBL and the band number is valid; however, the 
bander has yet to submit their data to the USGS. 

I will post as soon as I find out what songbird became Merlin fodder.

Dan Richards
Treasure Lake
Subject: Re: Merlin Fledgling, recovered songbird leg band, Clearfield Co.
From: Rob Blye <rwblye AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 11:30:28 +0000
report the band to USFWS, Patuxent bird banding lab 


Rob Blye 
East Coventry Township 
Chester County, Pennsylvania 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dan Richards"  
To: PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG 
Sent: Saturday, July 19, 2014 3:20:05 PM 
Subject: [PABIRDS] Merlin Fledgling, recovered songbird leg band, Clearfield 
Co. 


A friend of mine asked me to identify a fledgling bird of prey perched in an 
evergreen in his mother's yard in northwest Clearfield County. I stopped by 
this morning and was pleased to discover the young bird was a Merlin, and the 
nest was likely in a stand of Norway Spruce along her driveway. One of the 
adults cruised in with a morsel of food for the youngster as I watched. 

Additionally, the entire driveway was littered with various discarded songbird 
parts (mostly legs). One of the severed legs was from a songbird of unknown 
origin that had a band around it. 


Dan Richards 
Treasure Lake 
Subject: hummer behavior
From: Barbara Malt <bcm0 AT LEHIGH.EDU>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 21:13:53 -0400
Today I was sitting on my porch, which has a roof but open sides, and twice
a hummingbird flew in and buzzed around my head, chattering animatedly.

What do you make of this behavior?  Territorial?  On the plus side of that
interpretation, there is trumpet honeysuckle blooming along the porch rail,
and pink impatients in hanging baskets, both of which hummers feed from. On
the negative side, I have had those growing there, and hummers feeding from
them, and myself sitting on the porch while they are in bloom, for the past
10 years and have never had this happen before.

Here's an alternative that crossed my mind.  Juvenile begging to be fed?
Not long before that, I had seen two hummers flying around the yard, one
following the other, which I think means mother and kid.  And the face
pattern of this one that buzzed me seemed a little fuzzy, suggesting
juvenile.  While it may seem a little crazy to suggest that a juv would
approach a human to beg, earlier this summer, Linda Freedman and I saw a
recently-fledged Robin that seemed to do exactly that. It was on the ground
and it approached us fearlessly and in a very intentional way, cheeping
persistently.  A few minutes later, an adult dropped down and fed it. So,
it seemed like it was doing a begging behavior directed at us.

(reminds me of that children's book in which a fledgling bird approaches
all sorts of creatures asking "Are you my mother?")

Barbara Malt
Allentown
Subject: Sandhill Cranes & Shorebirds - Crawford Co.
From: mvas1200 AT yahoo.com <000000085d53fe48-dmarc-request@LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 20:19:10 -0400
Here is my shorebird list that I had at Miller's Ponds this afternoon

58 Killdeer
1 Solitary Sandpiper
2 Greater Yellowlegs
2 Lesser Yellowlegs
5 Least Sandpiper
7 Short-billed Dowitcher
3 Wilson's Snipe

also a flock of six Sandhill Cranes were present here

Mark Vass
Beaver Co.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless Phone
Subject: Merlin Fledgling, recovered songbird leg band, Clearfield Co.
From: Dan Richards <drichards7 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 15:20:05 -0400
A friend of mine asked me to identify a fledgling bird of prey perched in an 
evergreen in his mother's yard in northwest Clearfield County. I stopped by 
this morning and was pleased to discover the young bird was a Merlin, and the 
nest was likely in a stand of Norway Spruce along her driveway. One of the 
adults cruised in with a morsel of food for the youngster as I watched. 

Additionally, the entire driveway was littered with various discarded songbird 
parts (mostly legs). One of the severed legs was from a songbird of unknown 
origin that had a band around it. 


Dan Richards
Treasure Lake
Subject: Short-billed Dowitchers & Wilson's Snipe - Crawford Co.
From: mvas1200 AT yahoo.com <000000085d53fe48-dmarc-request@LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 15:06:47 -0400
I just arrived at Pymatunings Miller's Ponds and there are 7 Short-billed 
Dowitchers and a Wilson's Snipe here 

I will post a full shorebird report later 

Mark Vass
Beaver Co.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless Phone
Subject: Lebanon County Birds
From: Windstream Mail <randyc11 AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 13:09:07 -0400
I was at Reistville ponds and had all but a few Killdeer at Fox Road.

These are most of the birds.

Killdeer -7

Semipalmated Sandpiper-1 adult

Least Sanpiper-3

The grass was just mowed.

Randy C. Miller

Lancaster County 
Subject: Erie County Least Tern
From: Jerry McWilliams <0000001b5c226889-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 11:40:26 -0400
Ruth Swaney reports an immature Least Tern at Gull Point about mid-morning 
today. She said it was still there sitting on a sandbar near some Caspian Terns 
when she left. She also reported a Willet, a Marbled Godwit, and 26 
Short-billed Dowitchers. 


Jerry McWilliams
Erie, Erie County, Pa.
jerrymcw AT aol.com
Subject: Fwd: Can't identify yardbird
From: Georgia Kagle <jazzy523 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 21:08:28 -0400
Thanks for all the towhee suggestions! I found some pictures on the web and do 
think it is an immature Eastern Towhee. 



Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Georgia Kagle 
> Date: July 18, 2014 at 11:44:50 AM EDT
> To: Bird discussion list for Pennsylvania 
> Subject: Can't identify yardbird
> 
> From a distance the bird was acting and had the appearance of a cardinal. On 
the ground eating sunflower. Closer up it was Large sparrow size. Thick bill. 
Scratching like sparrows do with both legs scratching backwards. Back brown 
with very small white patches at tip of wings. Outside tail feathers also 
white. You could barely see the white when on the ground but definitely 
noticeable when flying-like on a junco. Streaked upper breast then solid light 
grey below. Long legs slightly orangish. Hops on both legs when moving. Not as 
afraid of humans as most birds. 

> 
> Thanks for your help.
> Georgia Kagle
> Carroll Twp/York county
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: A few migrant shorebirds - Shenango Lake, Mercer Co
From: Steve Sanford <bwredbird AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 20:24:07 -0400
This morning I finally saw a smattering of real migrants at the propagation 
area on W Lake Rd: 

Least Sandpiper 1
Solitary Sandpiper 1
Greater Yellowlegs 1
The flats are about the same as the other day: a moderate amount showing along 
the south side of the big island and hints that some of the closer mud islands 
are emerging. 

Steve Sanford
Sharon PA
Subject: Birding the east side of Wildwood Lake from the N. Boardwalk ( Dauphin County )
From: Richard Price <rprice210 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 17:22:51 -0400
Peggy and I birded the east side of Wildwood Lake (Dauphin County) from the N. 
Boardwalk late this AM. Birding was better than anticipated for mid July, 
possibly due to mild weather over the past few days. The three breeding species 
of warblers : redstarts, yellow and common yellowthroats, were all in stages of 
moulting, as was one of the tufted titmice we saw. The yellows and the common 
yellowthroats were still singing. 


Other notables seen were a warbling vireo, a wood thrush, cardinals, a great 
egret, four great blue herons, several black ducks, Canada geese, a house 
finch, a goldfinch, an unidentified flycatcher (willow?), an American crow, a 
mourning dove, red winged blackbirds, tree swallows, N. rough winged swallows, 
several song sparrows and many, many gray catbirds. The American lotus were in 
bloom limiting waterfowl viewing from the blinds, hence no wood ducks or 
mallards were visible from our perspective. Strangely enough we saw no 
woodpeckers, wrens, hummingbirds or phoebes. 


We did have two personal first time sightings for Wildwood Park: 1) a blue 
winged warbler not far from the first blind and 2) three young robins ( still 
spotted ) sunning themselves on the boardwalk with wings spread. The sunning 
behavior was the first we have seen anywhere in robins. Perhaps they had just 
bathed and were drying. It reminded us of drying vultures, cormorants, or 
anhingas. 


It was a productive walk for July.

Rick and Peggy Price
Subject: Willow Flycatcher, 9Mi Run Trail, Frick Park, Allegheny
From: "Jack E. Solomon" <00000003433c95af-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 12:10:45 -0700
Mike Fialkovich and Kate St. John both reported Willow Flycatchers at teh 9 Mi. 
Run Trail along the restored slag heaps. Today, Sue Solomon and I checked them 
out and heard more than one. We also (as did Mike) saw a female Orchard Oriole 
there -- ours was on its nest, near Old Brown's Hill Rd. 


FYI, a sign near the foot bridge over 9 Mile Run proclaims the trail's name to 
be the *Summerset at Frick Park Trail.* Apparently named after the new housing 
development installed at the top of the slag. 


The Common Mergansers were still at the mouth of Nine mile Run. 3 males and a 
female. 

Jack Solomon
Allegheny County
Subject: Re: Can't identify yardbird
From: Ann Pettigrew <rook185 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 12:01:06 -0400
Could it have been an Eastern towhee, Georgia?

Ann

Ann C. Pettigrew, V.M.D.
York, PA
rook185 AT comcast.net

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 18, 2014, at 11:44 AM, Georgia Kagle  wrote:
> 
> From a distance the bird was acting and had the appearance of a cardinal. On 
the ground eating sunflower. Closer up it was Large sparrow size. Thick bill. 
Scratching like sparrows do with both legs scratching backwards. Back brown 
with very small white patches at tip of wings. Outside tail feathers also 
white. You could barely see the white when on the ground but definitely 
noticeable when flying-like on a junco. Streaked upper breast then solid light 
grey below. Long legs slightly orangish. Hops on both legs when moving. Not as 
afraid of humans as most birds. 

> 
> Thanks for your help.
> Georgia Kagle
> Carroll Twp/York county
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Wildwood Park
From: Alan Wells <alanwells505 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 11:55:20 -0400
Stopped by Wildwood Park to see if there was any activity. Along the canal I 
saw 4 Egrets, 3 Blue Herons, 3 Female Wood Ducks with their young and one 
Belted Kingfisher. On the lake along the parking lot there were 10-12 Juvenile 
Wood Ducks. And of course a large amount of Redwings, Tree Swallows, Catbirds, 
Robins etc. 


The Egrets and Herons were all out looking for a meal and I managed to get a 
couple pictures of their fishing expertise. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/awellsphoto/

Alan Wells
Subject: Can't identify yardbird
From: Georgia Kagle <jazzy523 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 11:44:50 -0400
From a distance the bird was acting and had the appearance of a cardinal. On 
the ground eating sunflower. Closer up it was Large sparrow size. Thick bill. 
Scratching like sparrows do with both legs scratching backwards. Back brown 
with very small white patches at tip of wings. Outside tail feathers also 
white. You could barely see the white when on the ground but definitely 
noticeable when flying-like on a junco. Streaked upper breast then solid light 
grey below. Long legs slightly orangish. Hops on both legs when moving. Not as 
afraid of humans as most birds. 


Thanks for your help.
Georgia Kagle
Carroll Twp/York county

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: woodpecker at hummingbird feeder ?
From: DAVID KOCH <davilene AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 06:07:21 -0700
Happens regularly. 

Arlene Koch
Easton, PA
Northampton County
davilene AT verizon.net 


On Thursday, July 17, 2014 10:16 PM, Linda Trader  wrote:
  


The last few days, I've had a red bellied woodpecker drinking from my 
hummingbird feeder. Never saw this before? There are seed feeders hanging there 
too, he drinks the hummingbird nectar and then jumps over and works on the 
seed. Is this common? 



Linda Trader
AKC Breeder of Merit
NDGAA Nat'l Cert. Master Groomer