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Great Grey Owl,©BirdQuest

13 Sep Free checklists for major world areas []
6 Jul Avian Conservation and Ecology - New Issue Announcement: Volume 6 Issue 1 [Jennifer Miner ]
22 Jun Western Bird Banding Association Grants - call for proposals [Tom Gardali ]
15 Jun Opportunity for data for Continental Divide [Gregg Treinish ]
9 Jun Call for papers: 2011 Western Field Ornithologists conference [Ted Floyd ]
29 May Hilton Pond 05/15/11 (American Goldfinches) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
19 May Education Director []
19 May Collection Manager Corrected []
18 May Collection Manager Position []
15 May Hilton Pond 05/02/11 (Appalachian Spring) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
12 May Hilton Pond 04/22/11 (Book, Bluebirds, Baby) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
11 May Re: Grasshopper Sparrow management [Jack Clinton Eitniear ]
11 May Grasshopper Sparrow management [Anthony Zemba ]
2 May PhD course in Lund, Sweden: Ecology of Animal Migration, 18 - 28 October 2011 [Keith Larson ]
28 Apr Number of migratory passerines? [Tom Gardali ]
25 Apr Position at ABC: Beach-Nesting Bird Conservation Project Officer [George Wallace ]
25 Apr Hilton Pond 04/11/11 (More Middle Spring Wonders) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
12 Apr Hilton Pond 04/10/11 (Signs Of Middle Spring) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
4 Apr Hilton Pond 03/13/11 (Downy Woodpecker) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
3 Apr Re: determining sex from excrement [Jack Clinton Eitniear ]
3 Apr Re: determining sex from excrement [Jack Clinton Eitniear ]
3 Apr determining sex from excrement [Ellen Paul ]
3 Apr Re: determining sex from excrement [stan moore ]
2 Apr Re: determining sex from excrement [Jack Clinton Eitniear ]
2 Apr Re: determining sex from excrement [Jack Clinton Eitniear ]
2 Apr determining sex from excrement [Randy Lauff ]
1 Apr Wisconsin Kirtland's Warbler Monitor Needed [Joel Trick ]
1 Apr CMS Thesis Award on Migratory Species [Klaus Riede ]
29 Mar AN IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR ORNITH-L and OC-NET MEMBERS [Ellen Paul ]
27 Mar Field Ornithology course, Appledore Island, Maine [Robin Hadlock Seeley ]
17 Mar Hilton Pond 02/19/11 (Guatemala Hummingbirds) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
16 Mar automatic visit counter of nest boxes [SJ Park ]
9 Mar job ad. - please post [David Flaspohler ]
9 Mar Longevity of booted eagles [Salvador Herrando-Perez ]
2 Mar Hilton Pond 02/15/11 (Chayote Hummingbirds?) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
2 Mar Re: Dwernychuk´s name? - Ecological traps [Salvador Herrando-Perez ]
1 Mar Free checklists for major world areas []
1 Mar Fw: Dwernychuk´s name? - Ecological traps [alan sieradzki ]
1 Mar Re: Dwernychuk´s name? - Ecological traps [Jack Clinton Eitniear ]
1 Mar Dwernychuk´s name? - Ecological traps [Ellen Paul ]
1 Mar Dwernychuk´s name? - Ecological traps [Salvador Herrando-Perez ]
28 Feb help producing maps for a book [ngaio richards ]
17 Feb Forgot the Costa Rica Link! ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
17 Feb Hilton Pond 01/26/11 (Costa Rica Hummingbirds) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
15 Feb Photo of Passer domesticus for Spanish magazine [Salvador Herrando-Perez ]
12 Feb Territory Mapping Aplication for Smart Phone ? [ąÚĽşÁř ]
11 Feb USDA Wildlife Services Advisory Committee seeking new members [Ellen Paul ]
10 Feb Re: Passing of Bradley Livezey [Dan Brooks ]
10 Feb Re: Passing of Bradley Livezey ["Rogers, Steve" ]
10 Feb Passing of Bradley Livezey [Gary Kaiser ]
10 Feb Bradley Livezey died in crash [Paul Hess ]
8 Feb Job Opening -- Program Manager (Seabird Conservation), National Fish & Wildlife Foundation [Ellen Paul ]
1 Feb Re: Department of the Interior releases new policy to help ensure the integrity of scientific and scholarly activities [Michael Halpern ]
1 Feb Department of the Interior releases new policy to help ensure the integrity of scientific and scholarly activities [Ellen Paul ]
31 Jan Opening: USFWS Division of Bird Habitat Conservation, Chief, Branch of Science and Planning [Ellen Paul ]
27 Jan Intro Conservation GIS Course offered by Smithsonian [NZP-GISCourse ]
27 Jan Advanced Conservation GIS and Remote Sensing Course offered by Smithsonian [NZP-GISCourse ]
18 Jan A question about stains [Susan Hengeveld ]
17 Jan Hilton Pond 01/08/11 (#500: Perfect Snowstorm) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
12 Jan Re: answer to previous question on USA species descriptions [Joseph Morlan ]
12 Jan answer to previous question on USA species descriptions ["Dunning, John B" ]
10 Jan Avian Conservation and Ecology - New Issue Announcement: Volume 5 Issue 2 [Jennifer Miner ]
7 Jan Speaking of blackbirds... remember the Rusty Blitz and tell a friend ["antbird AT imap.mail.rcn.net" ]
10 Jan Re: question on new species described in USA [Jack Clinton Eitniear ]
10 Jan question on new species described in USA ["Dunning, John B" ]
9 Jan Hilton Pond 01/10/11 (York-Rock Hill Christmas Bird Count) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
5 Jan Re: More dead birds fall from sky in US [stan moore ]
5 Jan FW: More dead birds fall from sky in US [Dan Brooks ]
5 Jan Hilton Pond 12/29/10 (2010 Banding Report) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
29 Dec Hilton Pond 12/22/10 (House Finch Follow-ups) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
28 Dec Irene Pepperberg to star on NOVA [Ellen Paul ]
27 Dec Hilton Pond 12/12/10 (House Finch Migration) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
18 Dec Contents of Colorado Birds, vol. 44, no. 4 (2010) [Ted Floyd ]
17 Dec White House Christmas present to government scientists [Ellen Paul ]
15 Dec Be a part of Michigan's Bird Conservation Initiative [Kara Haas ]
12 Dec Hilton Pond 12/01/10 (Winter Water) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]

Subject: Free checklists for major world areas
From: SBSP AT AOL.COM
Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2011 14:47:22 -0400
We have authoritative and up to date checklists,
with endemics labeled,  for every nation in the
world, almost all of the world's major islands  or
island groups, and each US State or Canadian
province. We will send you  one as a text file
attached to an e-mail in reply to an e-mail from
you  telling us which one you want. There is no
charge

SANTA BARBARA  SOFTWARE PRODUCTS
Our world birding software is demonstrated at
Web site:  birdbase.com
E-mail: sbsp AT aol.com
Subject: Avian Conservation and Ecology - New Issue Announcement: Volume 6 Issue 1
From: Jennifer Miner <jminer07 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 Jul 2011 12:48:44 -0400
Avian Conservation and Ecology - New Issue Announcement

Volume 6, Issue 1| June 2011

Editors-in-Chief Marc-André Villard and Tom Nudds are pleased to announce the 
publication of Volume 6, Issue 1 (http://www.ace-eco.org/vol6/iss1/) of Avian 
Conservation and Ecology (http://www.ace-eco.org). With articles reporting 
research ranging in focus from the Conservation of Common Goldeneye and 
Bufflehead in Alberta, to the Demography of Greater Prairie-Chickens in Kansas, 
and the Population Dynamics of Common House-Martin and Common Swift Breeding in 
Northern Italy. 


This issue sees the closure of the Special Feature "Conservation of Grassland 
Birds: Causes and Consequences of Population Declines" 
(http://www.ace-eco.org/issues/view.php?sf=2) edited by Nicola Koper and Tom 
Nudds. The Editors of ACE continue to invite new manuscript submissions to the 
special feature "Aerial Insectivores" 
(http://www.ace-eco.org/issues/view.php?sf=3) edited by Philip Taylor and Jon 
McCracken. See the Call for Papers 
(http://www.ace-eco.org/docs/callforpapers/call_for_papers_aerial.pdf) for 
details. 


We are also pleased to announce that we have joined with The Publishers 
International Linking Association to include Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) 
in the citation of our articles. 


See below to view the table of contents. To read the full text of the articles 
please visit http://www.ace-eco.org/. 


editorial-----------------------------------------------  	
 	
Learning Together
Apprendre ensemble
	   HTML  
 	
  	Thomas D. Nudds and Marc-André Villard

guest editorial---------------------------------------
  	
 (sf)	
Progress in Research on Grassland Bird Conservation and Ecology
Progrès dans la conservation et l'écologie des oiseaux de prairie
	   HTML  
 	
  	Nicola Koper and Thomas D. Nudds

research papers------------------------------------  	
 	
Nest Boxes Facilitate Local-Scale Conservation of Common Goldeneye (Bucephala 
clangula) and Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola) in Alberta, Canada 

Les nichoirs favorisent la conservation à l’échelle locale du Garrot à 
œil d’or (Bucephala clangula) et du Petit Garrot (Bucephala albeola) en 
Alberta, Canada 

	   HTML      
 	
  	Robert M. Corrigan, Garry J. Scrimgeour, and Cynthia Paszkowski

 (sf)	
Demography of Female Greater Prairie-Chickens in Unfragmented Grasslands in 
Kansas 

DĂ©mographie de femelles TĂ©tras des prairies dans des prairies non 
fragmentées du Kansas 

	   HTML      
 	
  	Jacqueline K. Augustine and Brett K. Sandercock

 (sf)	
Identification of Putative Wintering Areas and Ecological Determinants of 
Population Dynamics of Common House-Martin (Delichon urbicum) and Common Swift 
(Apus apus) Breeding in Northern Italy 

Aires d’hivernage présumées et variables écologiques influençant la 
dynamique des populations nicheuses d’Hirondelle de fenêtre (Delichon 
urbicum) et de Martinet noir (Apus apus) du nord de l’Italie 

	   HTML      
 	
  	Roberto Ambrosini, Valerio Orioli, Dario Massimino, and Luciano Bani
 	
Modeling Habitat Associations for the Common Loon (Gavia immer) at Multiple 
Scales in Northeastern North America 

Modélisation des relations du Plongeon huard (Gavia immer) avec l’habitat à 
différentes échelles dans le nord-est de l’Amérique du Nord 

	   HTML      
 	
 Anne Kuhn, Jane Copeland, John Cooley, Harry Vogel, Kate Taylor, Diane Nacci, 
and Peter August 


 (sf)	
Risk of Agricultural Practices and Habitat Change to Farmland Birds
Risque des pratiques agricoles et des changements au plan de l’habitat sur 
les oiseaux des paysages agricoles 

	   HTML      
 	
  	David Anthony Kirk, Kathryn E. Lindsay, and Rodney W. Brook

 (sf)	
Effects of Disturbance Associated with Natural Gas Extraction on the Occurrence 
of Three Grassland Songbirds 

Effet du dérangement associé à l’extraction de gaz naturel sur 
l’occurrence de trois oiseaux de prairie 

	   HTML      
 	
  	Laura E. Hamilton, Brenda C. Dale, and Cynthia A. Paszkowski
Subject: Western Bird Banding Association Grants - call for proposals
From: Tom Gardali <tgardali AT PRBO.ORG>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2011 09:18:09 -0700
Western Bird Banding Association Grants:
WBBA offers up to two $1000 grants each year, one for research and the other 
for monitoring, for individuals and/or organizations engaged in projects in the 
New World using marked birds. The research grant should help test a hypothesis, 
while the monitoring grant is intended to help individuals or institutions 
establish or continue monitoring programs that investigate changes in bird 
populations. Students (including undergraduates) and organizational interns are 
encouraged to apply. 


Grant awardees will be asked to submit results of their grant projects for 
publication in future issues of North American Bird Bander as well as present 
results at future WBBA annual meetings. 


Applicants for these grants should submit a project proposal and two letters of 
reference attesting to the qualifications of the applicant. Proposals must 
include a description of the research or monitoring program that includes 
objectives, methods, and a budget detailing how requested funds will be used. 
Applicants may increase their chances by having smaller project budgets or 
detailing the use of requested funds for larger projects. The proposal 
constitutes the application and should be limited to no more than three typed 
pages, including full contact information. No additional forms are required; no 
information packets are available from WBBA. 


Applicants for these annual grants should submit the information described 
above by August 1, 2011 to: 


Geoffrey Geupel (ggeupel AT prbo.org) and Renée Cormier 
(rcormier AT prbo.org) 

WBBA Awards,
PRBO Conservation Science,
PO Box 1157
Bolinas CA 94924 USA.

Announcement of successful applicants will be made at the WBBA annual meeting 
in mid-August and funds will be available from the treasurer soon after. 


Thomas Gardali, Director
Pacific Coast and Central Valley Group
PRBO Conservation Science
Palomarin Field Station, P.O. Box 1157, Bolinas, CA 94924
415.868.0655 ext.381
www.prbo.org | Please follow PRBO on 
Facebook 

PRBO conserves birds, other wildlife, and ecosystems through innovative 
scientific research and outreach. 


Subject: Opportunity for data for Continental Divide
From: Gregg Treinish <gregg AT ADVENTUREANDSCIENCE.ORG>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2011 11:34:58 -0600
Dear Ornithology World,

I am writing to inquire about intrest in data collected along the 3000
mile Continental Divide Trail this summer. We are an organization
dedicated to increasing the availability of scientific knowledge
through partnerships between adventure athletes and scientists.

We currently have an athlete who will be leaving on June 28th to trek
from Canada to Mexico.  She is a biologist who is interested in
ornithology and would love to collect samples or record observations
for you while on her trek.  She is particularly interested in the
White Tailed Ptarmigan, but would also be happy to study other
species.

For centuries there has been a natural connection between explorers
and scientists. Our organization fosters the relationship between
people that are visiting natural places everyday, and the people who
need information from these locations.

We look forward to hearing what your interest.  Please pass this along
to anyone including members who may be interested.

Looking forward to talking soon,

-- 
Gregg Treinish
Executive Director
Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation
2008 National Geographic Adventurer of the Year
406.579.9702
www.adventureandscience.org
Subject: Call for papers: 2011 Western Field Ornithologists conference
From: Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 12:35:37 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters.

Just a quick note here to let you know that the deadline for the call for 
papers for the 2011 Western Field Ornithologists conference has been extended 
from June 10 to July 1. 


Get details on the conference (including the full Call for Papers), which will 
surely be excellent, here: 


http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/conference.php

-------------------------------

Ted Floyd 
Editor, Birding 

Blog: http://tinyurl.com/4n6qswt 

Twitter: http://tinyurl.com/2ejzlzv 

Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/2wkvwxs

------------------------------- 		 	   		  
Subject: Hilton Pond 05/15/11 (American Goldfinches)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2011 10:45:24 -0400
When you look at birds at your backyard feeder, you usually can't tell one 
individual from the next. If those birds are banded, however, and get 
recaptured we can learn a lot about longevity and site fidelity--and even about 
where those birds come from and go to. Such is the case "This Week at Hilton 
Pond" when we revisit the topic of American Goldfinches and talk about a couple 
of banded AMGO that have been around a while or have shown up elsewhere. To 
view our black-and-yellow photo essay for 15-22 May 2011, please see 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek110515.html 


While there, don't forget to scroll down for a list of all birds banded and 
recaptured during the period, as well as some miscellaneous nature notes and an 
acknowledgement of this week's supporter of our education, research, and 
conservation endeavors. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================
Subject: Education Director
From: efinck AT FHSU.EDU
Date: Thu, 19 May 2011 10:59:32 -0500
Sternberg Museum of Natural History Education Director

Position Description:  Full time 12-month, nontenure-track educator with 
specialization a following field: paleontology, zoology, botany, geology, 
ecology, environmental education, informal science education, museum 
studies or other related area of expertise. 

Responsibilities:  This position will require developing, planning, and 
coordinating educational programs for diverse audiences, including 
children, teachers, community groups, the public, and those with 
disabilities or special needs.  The education director must be able to 
work closely and cooperatively with private and state school systems in 
scheduling tours and programs.  Programs may include but are not limited 
to general and subject-specific museum tours, touch carts, talks, films, 
come-and-go public events, classes, field trips, outreach booths, and 
teacher in-service training.  The educator will apply sound educational 
theory and conduct formative evaluation to maximize educational 
effectiveness of programs.  All school-targeted programs will reinforce 
Kansas curriculum standards.  The education director will also be 
responsible for developing supplemental educational resources (both online 
podcasting and print) for use by teachers and/or the general public.  The 
educator will oversee the museum docent program, including initial and 
ongoing training in both accurate scientific content and effective 
presentation techniques. The education director is responsible for working 
closely with the biology, geology, and education departments in developing 
and overseeing a museum education intern program.  The education director 
may also teach one course per year and supervise interns in informal 
science education as a part of a proposed museum studies certificate. The 
education director works with the exhibits director in developing tours 
and educational programs around the exhibits and in developing new 
exhibits with built in educational programming. Programs are expected to 
be self-sustaining with respect to all non-salary costs for these 
programs.
The Discovery Room at the Sternberg Museum is a vital component of its 
educational mission. 


Qualifications:  Qualifications include an earned Master’s degree in 
informal science education, and/or a biological or geological discipline 
that relates to natural history.    Other necessary qualifications include 
strong communication skills and the ability to interact with diverse 
constituents.  Preferred qualifications include a Master of Science degree 
and teaching experience in formal and informal settings.

Starting Date:  Negotiable
July1, 2011 to September 1, 2011

To Apply:  Contact Dr. Reese Barrick, Director, Sternberg Museum of 
Natural History, 3000 Sternberg Drive, Hays, KS 67601.  Phone: 
1-877-332-1165. E-mail: rebarrick AT fhsu.edu



Preference will be given to applications postmarked by June 1, 2011. 
Electronic applications are encouraged.  Applications must include at 
minimum:
1.  Letter of application 
2.  Curriculum vita
3.  Photocopies of all post-secondary transcripts
4.  Statement of professional interests
5.  Names, addresses, and telephone numbers of four references
Please do NOT request letters of recommendation.


The Sternberg Museum of Natural History occupies a completely renovated 
(completed in 1999), unique building adjacent to Interstate-70 Highway in 
Hays, Kansas.  Its 101,000 square feet of floor space accommodates both 
public areas and collection management space.  The collection space houses 
extensive research collections representing the disciplines of mammalogy, 
ornithology, herpetology, ichthyology, entomology, botany, vertebrate 
paleontology, and paleobotany.  The total number of specimens in these 
collections is in excess of 3 million, and the Museum thus serves as a 
major research resource for the academic departments of Biological 
Sciences and Geosciences.  Public exhibits of the Museum are 
internationally known and focus on animals of the Cretaceous time period. 
These are supplemented with a program of temporary exhibitions, both 
leased and prepared in-house, relating to a broad spectrum of natural 
history topics.  Educational programming for adults and especially for 
children is designed to instill a fascination for plants and animals in 
their environment.

Notice of Non-discrimination - Fort Hays State University does not 
discriminate on the basis of gender, race, religion, national origin, age, 
disability, Vietnam era veteran status, or special disabled veteran status 
in its programs and activities.  The University employs only United States 
citizens and aliens who are lawfully authorized to work in the United 
States.   The director of affirmative action, coordinator of Title IX, 
Title VI, Section 504, and ADA regulations, may be contacted at 600 Park 
Street, Hays, KS  67601, 785-628-4033.  FHSU is committed to the cultural 
enrichment of its student body and work force through Affirmative Action 
and Equal Education/Employment Opportunity.  Finalists will have consented 
to and successfully completed a criminal background check.  Members of 
historically underrepresented social groups in higher education, women, 
and persons with disability or veteran status are encouraged to apply.



Saludos y nos vemos más tarde, EJF

Elmer J. Finck
Professor and Chair
Department of Biological Sciences
Fort Hays State University
600 Park Street
Hays, KS  67601-4099
e-mail: efinck AT fhsu.edu
webpage: http://www.fhsu.edu/biology/efinck/
phone: (785) 628-4214
fax: (785) 628-4153
home: (785) 625-9727
cell: (785) 650-1057

Coming together is a beginning.  Keeping together is a process.  Working 
together is success. 
Subject: Collection Manager Corrected
From: efinck AT FHSU.EDU
Date: Thu, 19 May 2011 10:36:16 -0500
I was just informed that the starting year was wrong on the last add. This 
is a corrected copy.  Saludos y nos vemos más tarde, EJF

Elmer J. Finck
Professor and Chair
Department of Biological Sciences
Fort Hays State University
600 Park Street
Hays, KS  67601-4099
e-mail: efinck AT fhsu.edu
webpage: http://www.fhsu.edu/biology/efinck/
phone: (785) 628-4214
fax: (785) 628-4153
home: (785) 625-9727
cell: (785) 650-1057

Coming together is a beginning.  Keeping together is a process.  Working 
together is success. 

Collections Manager Position
 
Overview:
Sternberg Museum of Natural History seeks a full-time non-tenure track 
zoological collections manager to oversee the care and management of its 
extensive and growing zoological collections including:  Herpetology 
(16,000+ specimens), Mammalogy (40,000+ specimens plus 2 holotypes), 
Ichthyology (700,000 specimens), Ornithology (4500 specimens), and 
Entomology (100,000+ insects).   Collections consist of fluid-preserved 
specimens, skins, dry skeletons, histological and frozen tissues.  The 
collections focus on Great Plains of U.S.  Experience in identifying 
herps, mammals, fish, birds, or arthropods.

Essential Duties:
1.      Supervise collections access, handling, and care
2.      Initiate, develop and implement collections grants
3.      Acquisition and collection development
4.      Museum operational service
5.      Maintain external partnerships with collaborative institutions
6.      Supervision of Graduate Curatorial Assistants, students and 
volunteers
7.      Collections database management (Specify)
8.      Implement Integrated pest Management
9.      Teach a course on Collections Management
10.     Oversee museum library collections
11.     Work collaboratively with museum Education Director and Exhibits 
Director on museum programs and exhibits
12.     Other duties as assigned by the Director


Qualifications:
1.      Masters degree in zoology or museum studies with specialty in 
zoology
2.      Expertise with taxonomy and identification of more than one taxa 
3.      Field experience in collection
4.      Experience in preparing and conserving specimens
5.      Familiarity with collection based databases and web based 
applications
6.      Demonstrated skills in public speaking, writing, interpersonal and 
communication skills
7.      Knowledge of museum collection practices and standards.


Starting Date:  Negotiable
August 1, 2011 to September 1, 2011

To Apply:  Contact Dr. Reese Barrick, Director, Sternberg Museum of 
Natural History, 3000 Sternberg Drive, Hays, KS 67601.  Phone: 
1-877-332-1165. E-mail: rebarrick AT fhsu.edu



Preference will be given to applications postmarked by June 11, 2011. 
Electronic applications are encouraged.  Applications must include at 
minimum:
1.  Letter of application 
2.  Curriculum vita
3.  Photocopies of all post-secondary transcripts
4.  Statement of professional interests
5.  Names, addresses, and telephone numbers of four references
Please do NOT request letters of recommendation.


The Sternberg Museum of Natural History occupies a completely renovated 
(completed in 1999), unique building adjacent to Interstate-70 Highway in 
Hays, Kansas.  Its 101,000 square feet of floor space accommodates both 
public areas and collection management space.  The collection space houses 
extensive research collections representing the disciplines of mammalogy, 
ornithology, herpetology, ichthyology, entomology, botany, vertebrate 
paleontology, and paleobotany.  The total number of specimens in these 
collections is in excess of 3 million, and the Museum thus serves as a 
major research resource for the academic departments of Biological 
Sciences and Geosciences.  Public exhibits of the museum are 
internationally known and focus on animals of the Cretaceous time period. 
These are supplemented with a program of temporary exhibitions, both 
leased and prepared in-house, relating to a broad spectrum of natural 
history topics.  Educational programming for adults and especially for 
children is designed to instill a fascination for plants and animals in 
their environment.

Notice of Non-discrimination - Fort Hays State University does not 
discriminate on the basis of gender, race, religion, national origin, age, 
disability, Vietnam era veteran status, or special disabled veteran status 
in its programs and activities.  The University employs only United States 
citizens and aliens who are lawfully authorized to work in the United 
States.   The director of affirmative action, coordinator of Title IX, 
Title VI, Section 504, and ADA regulations, may be contacted at 600 Park 
Street, Hays, KS  67601, 785-628-4033.  FHSU is committed to the cultural 
enrichment of its student body and work force through Affirmative
Subject: Collection Manager Position
From: efinck AT FHSU.EDU
Date: Wed, 18 May 2011 20:22:00 -0500
Collections Manager Position
 
Overview:
Sternberg Museum of Natural History seeks a full-time non-tenure track 
zoological collections manager to oversee the care and management of its 
extensive and growing zoological collections including:  Herpetology 
(16,000+ specimens), Mammalogy (40,000+ specimens plus 2 holotypes), 
Ichthyology (700,000 specimens), Ornithology (4500 specimens), and 
Entomology (100,000+ insects).   Collections consist of fluid-preserved 
specimens, skins, dry skeletons, histological and frozen tissues.  The 
collections focus on Great Plains of U.S.  Experience in identifying 
herps, mammals, fish, birds, or arthropods.

Essential Duties:
1.      Supervise collections access, handling, and care
2.      Initiate, develop and implement collections grants
3.      Acquisition and collection development
4.      Museum operational service
5.      Maintain external partnerships with collaborative institutions
6.      Supervision of Graduate Curatorial Assistants, students and 
volunteers
7.      Collections database management (Specify)
8.      Implement Integrated pest Management
9.      Teach a course on Collections Management
10.     Oversee museum library collections
11.     Work collaboratively with museum Education Director and Exhibits 
Director on museum programs and exhibits
12.     Other duties as assigned by the Director


Qualifications:
1.      Masters degree in zoology or museum studies with specialty in 
zoology
2.      Expertise with taxonomy and identification of more than one taxa 
3.      Field experience in collection
4.      Experience in preparing and conserving specimens
5.      Familiarity with collection based databases and web based 
applications
6.      Demonstrated skills in public speaking, writing, interpersonal and 
communication skills
7.      Knowledge of museum collection practices and standards.


Starting Date:  Negotiable
August 1, 2010 to September 1, 2010

To Apply:  Contact Dr. Reese Barrick, Director, Sternberg Museum of 
Natural History, 3000 Sternberg Drive, Hays, KS 67601.  Phone: 
1-877-332-1165. E-mail: rebarrick AT fhsu.edu



Preference will be given to applications postmarked by June 11, 2011. 
Electronic applications are encouraged.  Applications must include at 
minimum:
1.  Letter of application 
2.  Curriculum vita
3.  Photocopies of all post-secondary transcripts
4.  Statement of professional interests
5.  Names, addresses, and telephone numbers of four references
Please do NOT request letters of recommendation.


The Sternberg Museum of Natural History occupies a completely renovated 
(completed in 1999), unique building adjacent to Interstate-70 Highway in 
Hays, Kansas.  Its 101,000 square feet of floor space accommodates both 
public areas and collection management space.  The collection space houses 
extensive research collections representing the disciplines of mammalogy, 
ornithology, herpetology, ichthyology, entomology, botany, vertebrate 
paleontology, and paleobotany.  The total number of specimens in these 
collections is in excess of 3 million, and the Museum thus serves as a 
major research resource for the academic departments of Biological 
Sciences and Geosciences.  Public exhibits of the museum are 
internationally known and focus on animals of the Cretaceous time period. 
These are supplemented with a program of temporary exhibitions, both 
leased and prepared in-house, relating to a broad spectrum of natural 
history topics.  Educational programming for adults and especially for 
children is designed to instill a fascination for plants and animals in 
their environment.

Notice of Non-discrimination - Fort Hays State University does not 
discriminate on the basis of gender, race, religion, national origin, age, 
disability, Vietnam era veteran status, or special disabled veteran status 
in its programs and activities.  The University employs only United States 
citizens and aliens who are lawfully authorized to work in the United 
States.   The director of affirmative action, coordinator of Title IX, 
Title VI, Section 504, and ADA regulations, may be contacted at 600 Park 
Street, Hays, KS  67601, 785-628-4033.  FHSU is committed to the cultural 
enrichment of its student body and work force through Affirmative

Saludos y nos vemos más tarde, EJF

Elmer J. Finck
Professor and Chair
Department of Biological Sciences
Fort Hays State University
600 Park Street
Hays, KS  67601-4099
e-mail: efinck AT fhsu.edu
webpage: http://www.fhsu.edu/biology/efinck/
phone: (785) 628-4214
fax: (785) 628-4153
home: (785) 625-9727
cell: (785) 650-1057

Coming together is a beginning.  Keeping together is a process.  Working 
together is success. 
Subject: Hilton Pond 05/02/11 (Appalachian Spring)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Sun, 15 May 2011 18:56:56 -0400
We recently returned from lecturing and banding at the annual New River Birding 
& Nature Festival in Fayette County WV. As always, we were impressed and amazed 
by the diversity of flora and fauna that abound in the Mountain 
State--especially during "Appalachian Spring." For our latest photo 
essay--which includes wild orchids, moths, a tiny snake, ferns, acorn sprouts, 
flowering shrubs and--of course--birds (one with an amazing record)--check out 
the 2-10 May 2011 installment of "This Week at Hilton Pond" at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek110502.html 


While there, please scroll down for info about next year's Festival and a list 
of folks who recently helped support our education, research, and conservation 
efforts. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================
Subject: Hilton Pond 04/22/11 (Book, Bluebirds, Baby)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Thu, 12 May 2011 03:15:17 -0400
"This Week at Hilton Pond" we offer a trio of exciting announcements about a 
book, bluebirds, and a baby. To view the photo essay for 22 April thru 1 May 
2011, please visithttp://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek110422.html 


While there don't forget to scroll down to view a list of all birds banded and 
recaptured during the period, plus some miscellaneous nature notes. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================
Subject: Re: Grasshopper Sparrow management
From: Jack Clinton Eitniear <jce AT CSTBINC.ORG>
Date: Wed, 11 May 2011 10:11:26 -0700
Try Peter D. Vickery, Ph.D., University of Maine, Orono as I know he has 
worked with the Florida Grasshopper Sparrow. Jack 
Eitniearjce AT cstbinc.orgwww.cstbinc.org 


"We will be known forever by the tracks we leave" Dakota Indian Saying

--- On Wed, 5/11/11, Anthony Zemba  wrote:

From: Anthony Zemba 
Subject: Grasshopper Sparrow management
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
Date: Wednesday, May 11, 2011, 11:28 AM



 




 

Hi All,
I was wondering if anyone out there is actively involved in Grasshopper Sparrow 
habitat management and if so would be willing to answer 2-3 quick questions 
about your experiences? Thank  You, 

Regards,
Anthony
 
Anthony  J. Zemba CHMM
Senior Environmental Specialist
Sr. Ecologist / Professional Soil Scientist
GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.
 
We’ve Moved! Our new Connecticut Valley Operations office contact addresses 
are: 


 
655 Winding Brook Drive
Suite 402
Glastonbury, CT 06033
Office Phone: 860-286-8900
Office Fax: 860-652-8590
 
ONE FINANCIAL PLAZA
1350 Main Street
Suite 1400
Springfield, MA 01103
Office Phone: 413-726-2100
Direct: 413-726-2127
Office Fax: 413-732-1249
 
Cell: 860-966-5888
 

 
 
 




This electronic message is intended to be viewed only by the individual or 
entity to which it is addressed and may 


contain privileged and/or confidential information intended for the exclusive 
use of the addressee(s). If you are 


not the intended recipient, please be aware that any disclosure, printing, 
copying, distribution or use of this 


information is prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please 
notify the sender immediately and 


destroy this message and its attachments from your system.



For information about GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. and its services, please visit 
our website at 

www.gza.com.
 
Subject: Grasshopper Sparrow management
From: Anthony Zemba <Anthony.Zemba AT GZA.COM>
Date: Wed, 11 May 2011 16:28:59 +0000
Hi All,
I was wondering if anyone out there is actively involved in Grasshopper Sparrow 
habitat management and if so would be willing to answer 2-3 quick questions 
about your experiences? Thank You, 

Regards,
Anthony

Anthony  J. Zemba CHMM
Senior Environmental Specialist
Sr. Ecologist / Professional Soil Scientist
GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.

We've Moved! Our new Connecticut Valley Operations office contact addresses 
are: 


655 Winding Brook Drive
Suite 402
Glastonbury, CT 06033
Office Phone: 860-286-8900
Office Fax: 860-652-8590

ONE FINANCIAL PLAZA
1350 Main Street
Suite 1400
Springfield, MA 01103
Office Phone: 413-726-2100
Direct: 413-726-2127
Office Fax: 413-732-1249

Cell: 860-966-5888

[cid:image001.gif AT 01CC0FD6.3AE054A0]



________________________________
This electronic message is intended to be viewed only by the individual or 
entity to which it is addressed and may 

contain privileged and/or confidential information intended for the exclusive 
use of the addressee(s). If you are 

not the intended recipient, please be aware that any disclosure, printing, 
copying, distribution or use of this 

information is prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please 
notify the sender immediately and 

destroy this message and its attachments from your system.
________________________________
For information about GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. and its services, please visit 
our website at www.gza.com. 
Subject: PhD course in Lund, Sweden: Ecology of Animal Migration, 18 - 28 October 2011
From: Keith Larson <keith.larson AT BIOL.LU.SE>
Date: Mon, 2 May 2011 10:55:18 +0200
**** Please do not contact me about this course ****

*Ecology of Animal Migration*

International PhD-student course
Centre for Animal Movement Research,
Lund University

*18 - 28 October 2011*

Animals move across different spatial and temporal scales either as part of
their daily life or as part of seasonal migrations to exploit resources in
the environment. Well known examples are the global scale seasonal
migrations in birds, sea turtles, fish and mammals, such as whales and
wildebeests. Also movements at smaller scales occur, such as the vertical
movements in plankton, the dispersal in soil collembolans and movements of
pollinating insects. But what are the ecological causes and evolutionary
consequences of animal movements?

During this two-week course you will get insight in a number of different
methods and approaches to study the migration of birds, insects, fish,
amphibians and mammals, ranging from experimental studies in the laboratory
to tracking long-distance migration in wild animals. Lectures will be given
by international authorities in the field as well as by researchers in the
CAnMove Group at Lund University covering the following areas:

*       Locomotion
*       Bird Ringing
*       Migration & Dispersal
*       Orientation & Navigation
*       Ecophysiology
*       Genetics of Migration
*       Migration & Population Ecology
*       Evolution & Patterns of Migration
*       Migration & Conservation
*       Ecophysiology
*       Modelling Migration

In addition to lectures, there will be time for own projects, an excursion
to the bird migration station at Falsterbo, demonstrations of bird ringing
and orientation experiments as well as tracking and radar techniques and a
tour to the wind tunnel. During the time of the course we will also have
literature seminars, and you will have ample opportunities for discussion
and further gain experience in presenting your research to fellow students.

*Application deadline 31 August 2011
Maximum enrollment 40 persons
The course fee: 3000 SEK
*
Find the program and online application at: http://canmove.lu.se/node/537

**** Please do not contact me about this course ****
Subject: Number of migratory passerines?
From: Tom Gardali <tgardali AT PRBO.ORG>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2011 11:35:33 -0700
Can anyone point me to a citation that gives the number and/or percent of 
passerines that are migratory? 


Thanks in advance.

Tom

Thomas Gardali, Director
Pacific Coast and Central Valley Group
PRBO Conservation Science
Palomarin Field Station, P.O. Box 1157, Bolinas, CA 94924
415.868.0655 ext.381
www.prbo.org | Please follow PRBO on 
Facebook 

PRBO conserves birds, other wildlife, and ecosystems through innovative 
scientific research and outreach. 

Subject: Position at ABC: Beach-Nesting Bird Conservation Project Officer
From: George Wallace <gwallace AT ABCBIRDS.ORG>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2011 11:04:33 -0700
Beach-Nesting Bird Conservation Project Officer
Begin date: Spring 2011, End date: Late Fall 2012

This is a full-time, 18 month position with American Bird Conservancy (ABC), at 
a location to be determined within the Gulf Coast region (Texas to Florida). 
The Beach-Nesting Bird Conservation Officer (hereafter Conservation Officer) is 
responsible for the successful implementation of conservation program to 
protect large colony sites for beach-nesting seabirds (primarily Least Terns 
and Black Skimmers) along the Gulf Coast, and implement colony protection 
measures such as signage and fencing with help from local volunteers. These 
direct protection measures will be supported by a public awareness campaign 
designed to encourage beach-goers to respect and avoid sensitive areas. This 
program aims to provide protection of birds that have been adversely impacted 
by the BP oil spill, with funding provided by the National Fish and Wildlife 
Foundation's Recovered Oil Fund for Wildlife. 


This position requires an understanding of ABC's mission, programs, and 
structure, as well as a thorough understanding of beach-nesting bird colonies. 
Demonstrated success in organizing and working with volunteers and community 
groups is a strongly desired. There will be a great deal of contact with others 
within and outside the organization, through public presentations, in person, 
by telephone, and through e-mail and other correspondence. The work requires 
initiative, ability to work independently, flexibility, attention to detail, 
and an outgoing personality. Substantial travel is envisioned to successfully 
carry out this project. The position reports to the Chief Conservation Officer. 
A college degree and at least three years' work experience in a related 
position, or other appropriate combination of education and experience. 


PLEASE SEND COVER LETTER AND RESUME TO:

Merrie S. Morrison
Vice President for Operations
American Bird Conservancy
PO Box 249
The Plains, VA  20198
HR AT ABCBIRDS.ORG

Subject: Hilton Pond 04/11/11 (More Middle Spring Wonders)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2011 09:35:50 -0400
The wonders of Middle Spring continue to appear at Hilton Pond Center, from 
Wood Ducks to Cricket Frogs and Sourgrass to Cinquefoils. To view some vernal 
flora and fauna in our latest photo essay for 11-21 April 2011, please visit 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek110411.html 


While there, don't forget to scroll down for a list of the multitude of birds 
banded and recaptured during the period, as well as miscellaneous nature notes 
and acknowledgement of a recent gift in support of our work. 


Happy (Spring) Nature Watching!

BILL

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================
Subject: Hilton Pond 04/10/11 (Signs Of Middle Spring)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 21:46:16 -0400
"This Week at Hilton Pond" we're so far into vernal occurrences we decided to 
call the season "middle spring," and there was plenty of floral and faunal 
activity to indicate winter is definitely over. Blackbirds and blacksnakes, 
goldfinches and siskins, honeysuckle and cornflower--there's something for 
everyone in our photo essay for 1-10 April 2011. 


To view the current installment, please visit 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek110401.html 


While there, don't forget to scroll down for a list of birds banded and 
recaptured, plus a couple of interesting weather notes. 


It appears heavy storms may have interfered with your viewing of last week's 
installment about Downy Woodpeckers. If so, it's still accessible at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek110313.html 


Happy (Middle Spring) Nature Watching!

BILL

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================
Subject: Hilton Pond 03/13/11 (Downy Woodpecker)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Mon, 4 Apr 2011 15:35:45 -0400
Spring is fast upon us "This Week at Hilton Pond" and now that we're back from 
the Neotropics we're hard at work banding local birds, including one in formal 
attire. We're speaking here not of a penguin in a tuxedo but a Downy Woodpecker 
with black and white plumage--plus a dash of color on his nape. 


To view our photo essay all about Downy Woodpeckers, please visit the 
installment for 13-31 March 2011 at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek110313.html 


While there don't forget to scroll down for a list of all birds banded or 
recaptured during the period, plus some nature notes about spring happenings 
around Hilton Pond. We also acknowledge folks who have been benefactors of the 
Center the past few weeks. 


Happy (Spring) Nature Watching!

BILL

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================
Subject: Re: determining sex from excrement
From: Jack Clinton Eitniear <jce AT CSTBINC.ORG>
Date: Sun, 3 Apr 2011 14:41:16 -0700
Of course that last posting should have read "body fluids"....jce

"We will be known forever by the tracks we leave" Dakota Indian Saying

--- On Sun, 4/3/11, Jack Clinton Eitniear  wrote:

From: Jack Clinton Eitniear 
Subject: Re: determining sex from excrement
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
Date: Sunday, April 3, 2011, 4:38 PM

Avian Biotech can determine Sex from a swab you wipe around the mouth or 
cloaca. So if the pellet was "wet" it should work. One consideration however if 
using a US based lab the various wildlife laws state ....or parts thereof. 
 Bold fluids are considered parts thereof" and blood is a hazardous material 
(last time I checked). Even a feather might require a permit so work with a lab 
in your country or be prepared to take a crash course in wildlife law!   

Jack Eitniear

"We will be known forever by the tracks we leave" Dakota Indian Saying

--- On Sun, 4/3/11, Ellen Paul  wrote:

From: Ellen Paul
 
Subject: determining sex from excrement
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
Date: Sunday, April 3, 2011, 4:29 PM



  

    
  
  
    Now this is just the kind
      of discussion that the Methods/Ethics forum on OrnithologyExchange
      is designed for....so why not take a moment to sign up?

      

      ornithologyexchange.org (registration link is in upper-right-hand
      corner)

      

      Ellen

      

      PS - Lots of people are signing up but then failing to click on
      their welcome message to activate their accounts. After you
      register on the website, you will get an e-mail with a link to
      click to validate your account. Please click on it!

      

      PS, the Sequel: Once you are validated, take a look around. If
      there are forum topics that interest you, click on those forums
      and then click on WATCH FORUM. You can then chose how often you
      want to be notified of new posts on that subject. You can even
      chose to watch only specific topics!

      

      PS, the Re-make: OrnithologyExchange is a community-based site.
      Every member can post content, be it a post in the forum, an
      article, a blog, a resource....

      

      Keep in mind that the forums and articles are restricted to
      members of one of the sponsoring societies. HINT: Join a society.
      This is a benefit of membership! 

    
    
    

    On 4/3/11 5:22 PM, stan moore wrote:
    
      
      Just a thought, Randy --

       

      I don't know for sure if vultures cast pellets in addition to
      muting their excrement.   I do know that I have witness various
      diurnal raptors and owls casting fresh pellets and recovered
      pellets from time to time.  They tend to be very moist when fresh,
      and the question in my mind would be if any of that moisture would
      contain DNA.   I believe that with mammals sometimes DNA can be
      obtained from saliva, blood, semen, etc.    So, maybe if you could
      obtain a very fresh pellet and send it off for testing, you
      could get a gender determination.   I think that gender testing
      for birds via recovered DNA is pretty routine now.

       

      Stan Moore

      San Geronimo, CA

       

      > Date: Sat, 2 Apr 2011 13:34:33 -0300

      > From: rlauff AT STFX.CA

      > Subject: determining sex from excrement

      > To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU

      > 

      > All,

      > 

      > I'm up here in Nova Scotia, and through the winter, I feed
      the scavengers carcasses acquired from trappers. For the last two
      weeks, I've had a Black Vulture
      (http://people.stfx.ca/rlauff/photos/vulture035.jpg). A reporter
      will do a story for our local paper, and she will undoubtedly ask
      about the sex. I don't think BLVU are sexable by external features
      (correct me if I'm wrong here)...how many labs across Canada or NA
      in general can take the excrement and analyse it for gender? (I'm
      not looking for an exact number...is it none, few or basically any
      molecular lab?) How much does this cost?

      > 

      > Thanks,

      > Randy

      > 

      > RF Lauff

      > Department of Biology

      > St. Francis Xavier University

      > Antigonish, NS B2G 2W5

    
  
Subject: Re: determining sex from excrement
From: Jack Clinton Eitniear <jce AT CSTBINC.ORG>
Date: Sun, 3 Apr 2011 14:38:08 -0700
Avian Biotech can determine Sex from a swab you wipe around the mouth or 
cloaca. So if the pellet was "wet" it should work. One consideration however if 
using a US based lab the various wildlife laws state ....or parts thereof. 
 Bold fluids are considered parts thereof" and blood is a hazardous material 
(last time I checked). Even a feather might require a permit so work with a lab 
in your country or be prepared to take a crash course in wildlife law!   

Jack Eitniear

"We will be known forever by the tracks we leave" Dakota Indian Saying

--- On Sun, 4/3/11, Ellen Paul  wrote:

From: Ellen Paul 
Subject: determining sex from excrement
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
Date: Sunday, April 3, 2011, 4:29 PM



  

    
  
  
    Now this is just the kind
      of discussion that the Methods/Ethics forum on OrnithologyExchange
      is designed for....so why not take a moment to sign up?

      

      ornithologyexchange.org (registration link is in upper-right-hand
      corner)

      

      Ellen

      

      PS - Lots of people are signing up but then failing to click on
      their welcome message to activate their accounts. After you
      register on the website, you will get an e-mail with a link to
      click to validate your account. Please click on it!

      

      PS, the Sequel: Once you are validated, take a look around. If
      there are forum topics that interest you, click on those forums
      and then click on WATCH FORUM. You can then chose how often you
      want to be notified of new posts on that subject. You can even
      chose to watch only specific topics!

      

      PS, the Re-make: OrnithologyExchange is a community-based site.
      Every member can post content, be it a post in the forum, an
      article, a blog, a resource....

      

      Keep in mind that the forums and articles are restricted to
      members of one of the sponsoring societies. HINT: Join a society.
      This is a benefit of membership! 

    
    
    

    On 4/3/11 5:22 PM, stan moore wrote:
    
      
      Just a thought, Randy --

       

      I don't know for sure if vultures cast pellets in addition to
      muting their excrement.   I do know that I have witness various
      diurnal raptors and owls casting fresh pellets and recovered
      pellets from time to time.  They tend to be very moist when fresh,
      and the question in my mind would be if any of that moisture would
      contain DNA.   I believe that with mammals sometimes DNA can be
      obtained from saliva, blood, semen, etc.    So, maybe if you could
      obtain a very fresh pellet and send it off for testing, you
      could get a gender determination.   I think that gender testing
      for birds via recovered DNA is pretty routine now.

       

      Stan Moore

      San Geronimo, CA

       

      > Date: Sat, 2 Apr 2011 13:34:33 -0300

      > From: rlauff AT STFX.CA

      > Subject: determining sex from excrement

      > To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU

      > 

      > All,

      > 

      > I'm up here in Nova Scotia, and through the winter, I feed
      the scavengers carcasses acquired from trappers. For the last two
      weeks, I've had a Black Vulture
      (http://people.stfx.ca/rlauff/photos/vulture035.jpg). A reporter
      will do a story for our local paper, and she will undoubtedly ask
      about the sex. I don't think BLVU are sexable by external features
      (correct me if I'm wrong here)...how many labs across Canada or NA
      in general can take the excrement and analyse it for gender? (I'm
      not looking for an exact number...is it none, few or basically any
      molecular lab?) How much does this cost?

      > 

      > Thanks,

      > Randy

      > 

      > RF Lauff

      > Department of Biology

      > St. Francis Xavier University

      > Antigonish, NS B2G 2W5

    
  
Subject: determining sex from excrement
From: Ellen Paul <ellen.paul AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 3 Apr 2011 17:29:42 -0400




Subject: Re: determining sex from excrement
From: stan moore <hawkman11 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 3 Apr 2011 21:22:16 +0000
Just a thought, Randy --
 
I don't know for sure if vultures cast pellets in addition to muting their 
excrement. I do know that I have witness various diurnal raptors and owls 
casting fresh pellets and recovered pellets from time to time. They tend to be 
very moist when fresh, and the question in my mind would be if any of that 
moisture would contain DNA. I believe that with mammals sometimes DNA can be 
obtained from saliva, blood, semen, etc. So, maybe if you could obtain a very 
fresh pellet and send it off for testing, you could get a gender determination. 
I think that gender testing for birds via recovered DNA is pretty routine now. 

 
Stan Moore
San Geronimo, CA
 
> Date: Sat, 2 Apr 2011 13:34:33 -0300
> From: rlauff AT STFX.CA
> Subject: determining sex from excrement
> To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
> 
> All,
> 
> I'm up here in Nova Scotia, and through the winter, I feed the scavengers 
carcasses acquired from trappers. For the last two weeks, I've had a Black 
Vulture (http://people.stfx.ca/rlauff/photos/vulture035.jpg). A reporter will 
do a story for our local paper, and she will undoubtedly ask about the sex. I 
don't think BLVU are sexable by external features (correct me if I'm wrong 
here)...how many labs across Canada or NA in general can take the excrement and 
analyse it for gender? (I'm not looking for an exact number...is it none, few 
or basically any molecular lab?) How much does this cost? 

> 
> Thanks,
> Randy
> 
> RF Lauff
> Department of Biology
> St. Francis Xavier University
> Antigonish, NS B2G 2W5
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: determining sex from excrement
From: Jack Clinton Eitniear <jce AT CSTBINC.ORG>
Date: Sat, 2 Apr 2011 20:21:52 -0700
Avian Bio tech is a branch of Animal Genetics. Jack 

"We will be known forever by the tracks we leave" Dakota Indian Saying


--- On Sat, 4/2/11, Erdman, Thomas C  wrote:

> From: Erdman, Thomas C 
> Subject: RE: determining sex from excrement

> Another very good one at about the
> same price is http://www.avianbiotech.com/index.htm
> 
> Tom Erdman
> UW-Green Bay 
> 

> Subject: Re: determining sex from excrement
> 
> It's about $20.00USD to have birds sexed by feather, blood
> or a swab samples. Do not know if they can do vultures or
> from fecal material. 
> I would contact the people at http://www.animalgenetics.us/
> 
> Jack Eitniear
> San Antonio, Texas
> "We will be known forever by the tracks we leave" Dakota
> Indian Saying
> 
> 
> --- On Sat, 4/2/11, Randy Lauff 
> wrote:
> 
> > From: Randy Lauff 
> > Subject: determining sex from excrement
> > To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
> > Date: Saturday, April 2, 2011, 11:34 AM
> > All,
> > 
> > I'm up here in Nova Scotia, and through the winter, I
> feed
> > the scavengers carcasses acquired from trappers. For
> the
> > last two weeks, I've had a Black Vulture 
(http://people.stfx.ca/rlauff/photos/vulture035.jpg). A 

> > reporter will do a story for our local paper, and she
> will
> > undoubtedly ask about the sex. I don't think BLVU are
> > sexable by external features (correct me if I'm wrong
> > here)...how many labs across Canada or NA in general
> can
> > take the excrement and analyse it for gender? (I'm
> not
> > looking for an exact number...is it none, few or
> basically
> > any molecular lab?)  How much does this cost?
> > 
> > Thanks,
> > Randy
> > 
> > RF Lauff
> > Department of Biology
> > St. Francis Xavier University
> > Antigonish, NS  B2G 2W5
> 
>
Subject: Re: determining sex from excrement
From: Jack Clinton Eitniear <jce AT CSTBINC.ORG>
Date: Sat, 2 Apr 2011 09:50:22 -0700
It's about $20.00USD to have birds sexed by feather, blood or a swab samples. 
Do not know if they can do vultures or from fecal material. 

I would contact the people at http://www.animalgenetics.us/

Jack Eitniear
San Antonio, Texas
"We will be known forever by the tracks we leave" Dakota Indian Saying


--- On Sat, 4/2/11, Randy Lauff  wrote:

> From: Randy Lauff 
> Subject: determining sex from excrement
> To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
> Date: Saturday, April 2, 2011, 11:34 AM
> All,
> 
> I'm up here in Nova Scotia, and through the winter, I feed
> the scavengers carcasses acquired from trappers. For the
> last two weeks, I've had a Black Vulture 
(http://people.stfx.ca/rlauff/photos/vulture035.jpg). A 

> reporter will do a story for our local paper, and she will
> undoubtedly ask about the sex. I don't think BLVU are
> sexable by external features (correct me if I'm wrong
> here)...how many labs across Canada or NA in general can
> take the excrement and analyse it for gender? (I'm not
> looking for an exact number...is it none, few or basically
> any molecular lab?)  How much does this cost?
> 
> Thanks,
> Randy
> 
> RF Lauff
> Department of Biology
> St. Francis Xavier University
> Antigonish, NS  B2G 2W5

Subject: determining sex from excrement
From: Randy Lauff <rlauff AT STFX.CA>
Date: Sat, 2 Apr 2011 13:34:33 -0300
All,

I'm up here in Nova Scotia, and through the winter, I feed the scavengers 
carcasses acquired from trappers. For the last two weeks, I've had a Black 
Vulture (http://people.stfx.ca/rlauff/photos/vulture035.jpg). A reporter will 
do a story for our local paper, and she will undoubtedly ask about the sex. I 
don't think BLVU are sexable by external features (correct me if I'm wrong 
here)...how many labs across Canada or NA in general can take the excrement and 
analyse it for gender? (I'm not looking for an exact number...is it none, few 
or basically any molecular lab?) How much does this cost? 


Thanks,
Randy

RF Lauff
Department of Biology
St. Francis Xavier University
Antigonish, NS  B2G 2W5
Subject: Wisconsin Kirtland's Warbler Monitor Needed
From: Joel Trick <joel_trick AT FWS.GOV>
Date: Fri, 1 Apr 2011 16:45:44 -0400
Opportunity for Endangered Species Field Research -- Extended Deadline

The Wisconsin Kirtland's Warbler Project is seeking a qualified nest monitor 
for the 2011 breeding season. A lead nest monitor at Wisconsin's main breeding 
site has been secured, but we are still in need of a second nest monitor, who 
will travel to sites in central and northern Wisconsin and assist the lead nest 
monitor when needed. Work will begin around June 1 and continue through early 
to mid August. 


Nest monitor duties will include the following: 1) observe and document adult 
territorial, courtship, and nesting behaviors of the endangered Kirtland's 
warbler; 2) record nest phenology and results; 3) keep daily log of activities 
at assigned breeding site(s); 3) participate with mist netting and banding 
activities; 4) assist with cowbird trapping; 5) assist with and/or lead guided 
tours of site; 6) produce interim and final reports; 7) conduct other project 
related duties as assigned. In addition, the second nest monitor will survey 
for Kirtland's warblers at assigned sites in Wisconsin. 


Candidates must have completed or be enrolled in a bachelor's degree program in 
wildlife biology, conservation, natural resources or related field. Must be 
able to identify Wisconsin's shrubland birds by sight and sound. Previous 
experience with Kirtland's warblers is not necessary. Preference will be given 
to those with previous forest songbird nest monitoring experience. Must have 
own transportation. Housing will be provided in addition to pay. If interested, 
send a resume and cover letter to Kim Grveles of the Wisconsin Dept. of Natural 
Resources at kim.grveles AT wisconsin.gov. For more information, contact Kim at 
the email above (phone: 608-843-5729) or Joel Trick of the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service at Joel_Trick AT fws.gov (phone: 920-866-1737). 

Subject: CMS Thesis Award on Migratory Species
From: Klaus Riede <k.riede.zfmk AT UNI-BONN.DE>
Date: Fri, 1 Apr 2011 14:08:19 +0200
Dear Listmembers,
most of you probably already heard about the
CMS Thesis Award on Migratory Species, rewarding the best 
thesis of conservation relevance for migratory species 
with
    - 10,000 Euros
(for details, see
http://www.cms.int/news/PRESS/nwPR2010/07_jul/nw_120710_CMS_Thesis_Award.htm
)
So please apologize for bothering you again, but time is 
running, because the deadline for application is 15th of 
April 2011!  In addition, we had several requests of 
extending the conditions for the acception period of the 
thesis to 4 years, which means that theses finished 
between May 2007 until April 2011 are eligible, to give 
those who (nearly) missed the last contest a chance.

Please help us to spread the word, by forwarding our link, 
or by putting up a printed version of the announcement 
poster, which you can enlarge by a simple mouseclick, at 
your university or research station.
Note that application is open for everybody and not bound 
to CMS member states citizens!
Good luck, and hoping to hear from you,
yours sincerely Klaus Riede

PD Dr. Klaus Riede
Global Register of Migratory Species - www.groms.de
Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig
Adenauerallee 160
53113 Bonn
GERMANY - phone +49-(0)228-9122234
Subject: AN IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR ORNITH-L and OC-NET MEMBERS
From: Ellen Paul <ellen.paul AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2011 09:09:45 -0400




Subject: Field Ornithology course, Appledore Island, Maine
From: Robin Hadlock Seeley <rhadlockseeley AT CORNELL.EDU>
Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2011 12:29:02 -0400
Greetings!

Shoals Marine Laboratory (Cornell University and the Univ. of New Hampshire)
located on Appledore Island, Maine, still has a few spaces in:

FIELD ORNITHOLOGY   (BioSM 3740/MEFB 510)
dates:               MAY 23 - JUNE 6, 2011
credit hours:    3 semester credits

total cost: $5,646 (includes room, board, tuition and boat transportation)

SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE

Course topics include avian diversity, anatomy, ecology, physiology, and 
behavior. Field techniques include field identification, bird banding, and 
various census methods. 


Course description: Leave the classroom behind, get outside, and immerse 
yourself in the amazing world of birds. This field-based course uses the 
diverse and abundant birds of the Isles of Shoals as your primary lab material 
as you gain an understanding of avian ecology. Live among nesting eiders, 
Herring Gulls, and Great Black-backed Gulls. Travel to neighboring islands to 
see tern and cormorant nesting colonies (and see some baby seals along the 
way). Scan the horizon for diving gannets and soaring shearwaters and fulmars 
while on a whale watch off the Islands. Explore the differences between island 
and mainland birds during a field trip to the coast. 



Faculty:

Dr. David Bonter, Cornell Laboratory 
of 
Ornithology 


READ Dr. Bonter's 
article 
about his time spent on Appledore teaching in summer 2007. 


________________________
Robin Hadlock Seeley, Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Academic Advising & Senior Research Associate
Shoals Marine Laboratory

106A Kennedy Hall/Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853 (winter)
Shoals Marine Lab website: 
www.sml.cornell.edu 


Subject: Hilton Pond 02/19/11 (Guatemala Hummingbirds)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Thu, 17 Mar 2011 20:50:11 -0400
Now that I'm back from this year's Neotropical hummingbird expeditions, I 
finally had time to finish my on-line account of last month's first-ever group 
trip to Guatemala. It was quite an experience--some good, some not so good--as 
I describe in words and pictures in our "This Week at Hilton Pond" installment 
for 19-28 February 2011. 


If you like looking at exotic hummingbirds and reading about international 
adventure, I think you'll enjoy this latest photo essay at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek110219.html 


By the way, it's an image-rich travelog and banding report, so please be 
patient if it takes a while to load! 


Happy (Neotropical) Nature Watching!

BILL

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================
Subject: automatic visit counter of nest boxes
From: SJ Park <apodemus AT NAVER.COM>
Date: Wed, 16 Mar 2011 18:39:31 +0900
Dear Ornithologists,
 
I am looking for website, paper, or book related to automatic visit counter of 
nest boxes. 

(How many times nest hole birds visit their nests each hour / day during 
breeding season) 

 
If you have any information, please inform me.
 
Best Regards,
 
SJ Park
Department of Forest Sciences, CALS
Seoul Nat'l University,
Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 151-921
Subject: job ad. - please post
From: David Flaspohler <djflaspo AT MTU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 9 Mar 2011 11:42:28 -1000
Hello:
	Could you please post the following position asap?   Mahalo!

David. 




HAWAII BIRD FIELD ASSISTANT needed for 4 months (April 1 - July 31, 2011). We 
are seeking a committed, enthusiastic, and hard working field technician to 
work with native birds on the Big Island of Hawaii. The technician will assist 
with forest passerine nest searching and monitoring, mist-netting and banding 
birds, and resighting color-banded birds. Field work will take place in 
mid-elevation native Hawaiian forest patches. Desirable qualifications include 
experience finding and monitoring passerine nests in a forest setting, taking 
birds out of mist-nets, and banding. The assistant must have their own 
binoculars and have excellent observation skills. Further, field assistnats 
should possess good record-keeping skills, a solid work ethic, and be in good 
physical condition because field work will take place in a rugged, often wet, 
and sometimes cool landscape. The position requires carrying steel mist-netting 
poles far distances across rugged lava. Work begins between 5 and 7 am and ends 
between 3 and 5 pm, five days/week. In addition to the above desirable skills, 
we are seeking individuals who work well with others under difficult field 
conditions; the technician will work as part of a field crew and will live in a 
common apartment with three others. Amenities include working with one of the 
most unique and imperiled bird communities in the world. This is a full-time 
temporary position. The field assistant is responsible for airfare to Hilo, HI 
and will receive a stipend of $400/mo. Housing will be provided in Hilo, HI. 
Send a cover letter, resume, and a list of three references via email (please 
put: Kipuka Field Assistant in subject line) to DAVID FLASPOHLER 
(djflaspo AT mtu.edu). We will begin reviewing applications as soon as they arrive 
so please apply asap. 



David Flaspohler; on sabbatical till June 2011
Inst. Pacific Island Forestry, Hilo, HI
Professor, School of Forest Resources and
Environmental Science
Michigan Technological University
Houghton, MI 49931
C: 906-370-1122
djflaspo AT mtu.edu

Subject: Longevity of booted eagles
From: Salvador Herrando-Perez <salvador.herrando-perez AT ADELAIDE.EDU.AU>
Date: Wed, 9 Mar 2011 09:48:52 +1030
Dear colleagues,

 

I am collecting broad longevity estimates (maximum age attained in the wild)
for a range of bird species, as part of a meta-analysis on density
dependence metrics.

 

After much search online and in available publications, I have been unable
to find a longevity value for booted eagles *Hieraaetus pennatus*. I would
appreciate if you could point me to a data source where these data might be
available. Please find below databases I have already explored.

 

Thanks for your time to attend my request.

 

Kind regards, Salvador

 


http://www.bto.org/about-birds/birdfacts


http://www.demogr.mpg.de/longevityrecords/


  http://www.theanimalfiles.com/


http://genomics.senescence.info/species


 
http://globalspecies.org/ntaxa/901539

 

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------- 

Salvador Herrando-Pérez

> School of Earth and Environmental Science, Mawson Building (room G39) 

> University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia

> 

> Phone: +61 8 8303 5254

> Fax: +61 8 8303 4347

> Email: salvador.herrando-perez AT adelaide.edu.au 

> https://www.adelaide.edu.au/directory/salvador.herrando-perez

 
Subject: Hilton Pond 02/15/11 (Chayote Hummingbirds?)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Wed, 2 Mar 2011 11:26:16 -0600
As described in the previous installment, our January 2011 hummingbird 
expedition to Costa Rica had mixed results, with 105 Ruby-throated Hummingbirds 
(RTHU) banded despite the loss of our iPhone and an entire Aloe Vera study site 
we had used since 2004. While in Costa Rica we also had a chance to investigate 
a previously unreported concentration of RTHU in the Central Valley--far from 
Guanacaste Province where we usually work. 


As a result of this new discovery, "This Week at Hilton Pond" we're announcing 
our first-ever autumn expedition to the Neotropics so citizen scientists can 
join us in studying ruby-throats in the commercially important chayote fields 
east of San Jose at Ujarrás. 


For a photo essay about this unique opportunity and how to participate this 
coming November, please visit our 15-18 February 2011 installment at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek110215.html 


=========

When we returned from Costa Rica we had a few days to band at Hilton Pond 
before going off to Guatemala, so this week's installment also includes the 
usual list of birds banded and recaptured at York SC during the period. (Pine 
Siskins? Oh, yes.) There are also a few nature notes and an acknowledgement of 
the Center's most recent supporters. 


Happy (Neotropical) Nature Watching!

BILL

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================
Subject: Re: Dwernychuk´s name? - Ecological traps
From: Salvador Herrando-Perez <salvador.herrando-perez AT ADELAIDE.EDU.AU>
Date: Wed, 2 Mar 2011 09:34:17 +1030
Dear Listers, thanks to all for your support.

 

I have found L. Wayne Dwernychuk myself, but since he appeared to work not
longer on birds but on orange agent!, I had assumed that was a mere
coincidence. I guess the next step is to contact the Hatfield consultant and
check that out. 

 

Please notice that my query was not about standard citation practice in
primary literature. I publish a monthly column/article in a Spanish magazine
(www.quercus.es) where I bring scientific enquiry and discovery down to an
accessible language for both scientists across disciplines and lay-people
with no scientific background. I often do homage to the scientists who first
described a given phenomenon by mentioning their full names and surnames,
and sometimes a bit of their biographies. 

 

Kind regards, Salva

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------- 

Salvador Herrando-Pérez

> School of Earth and Environmental Science, Mawson Building (room G39) 

> University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia

> 

> Phone: +61 8 8303 5254

> Fax: +61 8 8303 4347

> Email: salvador.herrando-perez AT adelaide.edu.au 

> https://www.adelaide.edu.au/directory/salvador.herrando-perez

 
Subject: Free checklists for major world areas
From: SBSP AT AOL.COM
Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2011 13:54:42 -0500
We have authoritative and up to date checklists,
with endemics labeled, for every nation in the
world, almost all of the world's major islands or
island groups, and each U.S. state or Canadian
province. We will send you one as a text file
attached to an e-mail in reply to an e-mail from
you telling us which one you want. There is no
charge.
 
SANTA BARBARA SOFTWARE PRODUCTS
Our world birding software is demonstrated at
Web site: birdbase.com
E-mail: _sbsp AT aol.com_ (mailto:sbsp AT aol.com) 
Subject: Fw: Dwernychuk´s name? - Ecological traps
From: alan sieradzki <naturalistuk AT YAHOO.CO.UK>
Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2011 17:04:51 +0000



Salvador,

I don't know what the 'L' stands for, but Dr. L. W. Dwernychuk always goes by 
either L. Wayne Dwernychuk or just plain Wayne Dwernychuk.
 
Hope this helps.
 
Best,
 
Alan




________________________________
From: Jack Clinton Eitniear 
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
Sent: Tue, 1 March, 2011 13:42:52
Subject: Re: Dwernychuk´s name? - Ecological traps


Salvador,  
If you desire his complete name I would look for a current e-mail address and 
get in direct contact. Most journals only use abbreviations (which can be 
frustrating sometimes). last 
contact information I could locate is: 

Dwernychuk LW. Hatfield Consultants Ltd., 201-1571 Bellevue Ave., West 
Vancouver, BC, Canada V7V 1A6.
E-mail: wdwernychuk AT hatfieldgroup.com.

I bet if you contact someone at Hatfield they would know even if he is no 
longer 

employed there. 
Good luck, 
Jack Clinton Eitniear

"We will be known forever by the tracks we leave" Dakota Indian Saying

--- On Tue, 3/1/11, Ellen Paul  wrote:


>From: Ellen Paul 
>Subject: Dwernychuk´s name? - Ecological traps
>To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
>Date: Tuesday, March 1, 2011, 6:12 AM
>
>
>It is perfectly fine to use the citation with the initials. In fact, one 
>ordinarily cites the paper in the format suggested by the journal in which it 
>was published. Are you trying to standardize your citations by converting all 
>initials to first names? That really isn't necessary.
>
>Ellen
>
>On 3/1/11 1:49 AM, Salvador Herrando-Perez wrote: 
>Dear colleagues, 
>>I am citing the paper below in a paper of mine as the first record of an 
>>ecological trap, and would like to cite the authors by their names.
>>I have been able to track _David_ Boag at the University of Alberta, but was 
not 

>>so lucky for the other author - Dwernychuk´s names is not reported in his/her 

>>publication record and I could not find them online either  (only initials 
>>available).
>>Thanks in advance for your help.
>>Best regards, Salvador
>> 
>>Dwernychuk, L. W. and Boag, D. A. (1972). "DUCKS NESTING IN ASSOCIATION WITH 
>>GULLS - ECOLOGICAL TRAP." Canadian Journal of Zoology 50(5): 559-563.
>> 
>> 

>>----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

>> 
>>Salvador Herrando-Pérez
>>> School of Earth and Environmental Science, Mawson Building (room G39) 
>>> University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia
>>>  
>>> Phone: +61 8 8303 5254
>>> Fax: +61 8 8303 4347
>>> Email: salvador.herrando-perez AT adelaide.edu.au 
>>>https://www.adelaide.edu.au/directory/salvador.herrando-perez
>>  



      
Subject: Re: Dwernychuk´s name? - Ecological traps
From: Jack Clinton Eitniear <jce AT CSTBINC.ORG>
Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2011 05:42:52 -0800
Salvador, If you desire his complete name I would look for a current e-mail 
address and get in direct contact. Most journals only use abbreviations (which 
can be frustrating sometimes). last contact information I could locate is:  

Dwernychuk LW. Hatfield Consultants Ltd., 201-1571 Bellevue Ave., West 
Vancouver, BC, Canada V7V 1A6. 

E-mail: wdwernychuk AT hatfieldgroup.com.
I bet if you contact someone at Hatfield they would know even if he is no 
longer employed there. Good luck, Jack Clinton Eitniear 

"We will be known forever by the tracks we leave" Dakota Indian Saying

--- On Tue, 3/1/11, Ellen Paul  wrote:

From: Ellen Paul 
Subject: Dwernychuk´s name? - Ecological traps
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
Date: Tuesday, March 1, 2011, 6:12 AM



  

    
    
  
  
    It is perfectly fine to
      use the citation with the initials. In fact, one ordinarily cites
      the paper in the format suggested by the journal in which it was
      published. Are you trying to standardize your citations by
      converting all initials to first names? That really isn't
      necessary.

      

      Ellen

    
    
    

    On 3/1/11 1:49 AM, Salvador Herrando-Perez wrote:
    
      
      
      


      
        Dear
            colleagues,  
        I
            am citing the paper below in a paper of mine as the first
            record of an
            ecological trap, and would like to cite the authors by their
            names. 
        I
            have been able to track _David_ Boag at the
            University of Alberta, but
            was not so lucky for the other author - Dwernychuk´s names
            is not reported in his/her
            publication record and I could not find them online either
             (only initials
            available). 
        Thanks
            in advance for your help. 
        Best
            regards, Salvador 
           
        Dwernychuk,
            L. W. and Boag, D. A. (1972). "DUCKS NESTING IN ASSOCIATION
            WITH GULLS -
            ECOLOGICAL TRAP." Canadian Journal of Zoology 50(5):
            559-563. 
           
           
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

             
        Salvador Herrando-Pérez 
        > School of Earth and
            Environmental Science, Mawson Building
            (room G39)  
        > University of
            Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia 
        >   
        > Phone: +61 8 8303
            5254 
        > Fax: +61 8 8303 4347 
        > Email: salvador.herrando-perez AT adelaide.edu.au
             
        > https://www.adelaide.edu.au/directory/salvador.herrando-perez 
           
      
    
  
Subject: Dwernychuk´s name? - Ecological traps
From: Ellen Paul <ellen.paul AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2011 07:12:54 -0500




Subject: Dwernychuk´s name? - Ecological traps
From: Salvador Herrando-Perez <salvador.herrando-perez AT ADELAIDE.EDU.AU>
Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2011 17:19:03 +1030
Dear colleagues, 

I am citing the paper below in a paper of mine as the first record of an
ecological trap, and would like to cite the authors by their names.

I have been able to track _David_ Boag at the University of Alberta, but was
not so lucky for the other author - Dwernychuk´s names is not reported in
his/her publication record and I could not find them online either  (only
initials available).

Thanks in advance for your help.

Best regards, Salvador

 

Dwernychuk, L. W. and Boag, D. A. (1972). "DUCKS NESTING IN ASSOCIATION WITH
GULLS - ECOLOGICAL TRAP." Canadian Journal of Zoology 50(5): 559-563.

 

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------- 

Salvador Herrando-Pérez

> School of Earth and Environmental Science, Mawson Building (room G39) 

> University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia

> 

> Phone: +61 8 8303 5254

> Fax: +61 8 8303 4347

> Email: salvador.herrando-perez AT adelaide.edu.au 

> https://www.adelaide.edu.au/directory/salvador.herrando-perez

 
Subject: help producing maps for a book
From: ngaio richards <ngaio_richards AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2011 21:41:49 +0000
Dear all,

I have to produce several simple maps showing a number of locations in Kenya 
and Europe for a book I'm editing on the global repercussions of a pesticide to 
wildlife populations. This is well outside my capabilites, so I'd be very 
grateful for any help. My deadline is end of March. I'm afraid I can't offer 
any financial compensaton, but I can certainly provide a hefty acknowledgement 
in the book. If interested, please contact me privately, off list. 


Best wishes,

Ngaio Richards, PhD
Department of Forensic Science and Chemistry
Anglia Ruskin University
East Road
Cambridge CB1 1PT
United Kingdom 


 		 	   		  
Subject: Forgot the Costa Rica Link!
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Thu, 17 Feb 2011 21:23:24 -0500
Sorry to forget the link. Must be jetlag.  :-)

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek110126.html

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================
Subject: Hilton Pond 01/26/11 (Costa Rica Hummingbirds)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Thu, 17 Feb 2011 21:03:07 -0500
I've just returned from our 11th Operation RubyThroat hummingbird expedition to 
Costa Rica and have posted a detailed report as the latest "This Week at Hilton 
Pond" photo essay. 


The trip was fraught with unexpected happenings--hence the title "Things Go 
Awry"--but we still banded and observed lots of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds and 
some other Neotropical species. 


The installment includes something for everyone: From exotic birds to orchids, 
from monkeys to petroglyphs, from big lizards to atmospheric phenomena. There 
are lots of images to accompany the narrative and the page may take a little 
while to load, so thanks in advance for your patience. 


We banded no birds at Hilton Pond during the period, but please scroll down at 
the end of the photo essay for a list of recent supporters who help make 
possible our our education, research, and conservation activities--including 
the Neotropical hummingbird trips. 


By the way, we still have a couple of spaces on our nine-day trip to Belize 
that begins 3 March, and there's still time to sign up! 


Happy (Neotropical) Nature Watching!

BILL

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================
Subject: Photo of Passer domesticus for Spanish magazine
From: Salvador Herrando-Perez <salvador.herrando-perez AT ADELAIDE.EDU.AU>
Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2011 09:49:36 +1030
Dear listers,

I am a Spanish researcher at the University of Adelaide – Australia.

Over 2011, I have started making monthly contributions (700 words+1picture)
on key conservation issues to the most reputable Spanish magazine
(www.quercus.es) bringing scientific and conservation research along to
lay-people.

For the May 2011 issue, I have written an article on "Farmland bird
declines" and would like to present a high-resolution photo of a Passer
domesticus. I would appreciate if you could possibly share one of your
pictures of this species.

I will certainly send you an original copy of the journal issue where my
article will be published and give full photo-authorship credits in it.

Thanks a lot for your time to attend my request.

Sincerely, Salvador

 

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------- 

Salvador Herrando-Pérez

> School of Earth and Environmental Science, Mawson Building (room G39) 

> University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia

> 

> Phone: +61 8 8303 5254

> Fax: +61 8 8303 4347

> Email: salvador.herrando-perez AT adelaide.edu.au 

> https://www.adelaide.edu.au/directory/salvador.herrando-perez

 
Subject: Territory Mapping Aplication for Smart Phone ?
From: ąÚĽşÁř <apodemus AT NAVER.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2011 14:27:37 +0900
Do you know any softwares or applications for facilitating territory mapping 
field work? (SmartPhone, Laptop) 

 
SJ Park
Department of Forest Sciences, CALS
Seoul Nat'l University,
Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 151-921
Subject: USDA Wildlife Services Advisory Committee seeking new members
From: Ellen Paul <ellen.paul AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2011 16:43:43 -0500




Subject: Re: Passing of Bradley Livezey
From: Dan Brooks <dbrooks AT HMNS.ORG>
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2011 10:47:54 -0600
Probably my earliest memory of hearing Brad's name was in connection
with the new species of steamer duck he described with Humphrey when in
Grad school at Kansas.  I remember being really excited, as the news
made our local paper in Houston, and as a bird-dude in my late teens I
was really interested in waterfowl at the time.  The discovery prompted
me to take some time off from work in the Paraguayan Chaco in the late
80s to seek out the new steamer duck in Argentina.  So unbeknownst to
him, Brad inspired me that way to go see the duck he discovered.  When I
pointed this out to him in a later visit (see below) he sort of modestly
shrugged it off.

 

When I visited Brad at CMNH a few years ago (I was examining some of
their potoo specimens for on ongoing project).  I went into Brad's 'Lab'
to visit with him.  He was surrounded by the tables Steve shows in the
video below.  On the surface of the tables were acid-free specimen
boxes, each containing the pelvis of a bird.  The amazing thing to me
was not only that every avian family was represented in that collection
of pelvic bones, but the number of characters he was able to pull from
the pelvic bones (my memory stinks, but I want to say at least 50
characters give or take).  Controversial or not, Brad was truly one hell
of a Scientist.  Here was an Ornitholgist that literally surrounded
himself with his research, in every since of the word.  

 

Very sad and tragic indeed.  Rest in peace Brad...

 

 

 

Daniel M. Brooks, Ph.D.
Curator of Vertebrate Zoology 

Cracid Specialist Group Chair

dbrooks AT hmns.org      (713) 639-4776    Fax (713) 639-4767
theHoustonMuseumofnaturalscience
5555 Hermann Park Drive, Houston, TX  77030-1799   

 

Biography:
www.hmns.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=301&Itemid=71

Building the African Wildlife Hall:
www.drdantime.netfirms.com/index.html

Cracid Specialist Group: www.cracids.org

 

Please help reduce carbon footprints by not printing email unless it is
necessary...

________________________________

From: ORNITH-L: the scientific discussion of Ornithology
[mailto:ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU] On Behalf Of Rogers, Steve
Sent: Thursday, February 10, 2011 9:46 AM
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
Subject: Re: Passing of Bradley Livezey

 

The two Pittsburgh Papers have articles on Dr. Livezey

 

http://www.postgazette.com/pg/11041/1124369-122.stm

 

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/pittsburgh/s_722202.
html

 

And there has been a piece on a local television station

 

http://www.wtae.com/video/26809660/detail.html

 

Stephen P. Rogers (Mr.)

Collection Manager of Section of Birds

and Section of Amphibians and Reptiles

Carnegie Museum of Natural History

4400 Forbes Avenue

Pittsburgh PA 15213-4080

Phone: 412-622-3255 or 3258

Email: rogerss AT CarnegieMNH.org

http://www.carnegiemnh.org/birds/index.html

http://www.carnegiemnh.org/herps/index.htm

***************************************************

The views, opinions, and judgments expressed in this message 

are solely those of the author. The message contents have not 

been reviewed or approved by Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh

***************************************************

________________________________

From: ORNITH-L: the scientific discussion of Ornithology
[mailto:ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU] On Behalf Of Gary Kaiser
Sent: Thursday, February 10, 2011 10:09 AM
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
Subject: Passing of Bradley Livezey

 

Darren Naish has posted a blog outlining the career of Brad Livezey who
died in a car accident, Tuesday 8 Feb:

 

http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2011/02/brad_livezey_rip_2011.ph
p#more

 

Gary Kaiser

 

 

 

________________________________

From: ORNITH-L: the scientific discussion of Ornithology
[mailto:ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU] On Behalf Of Paul Hess
Sent: Thursday, February 10, 2011 9:10 AM
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
Subject: Bradley Livezey died in crash

 

Hello all,

 

Some of you may not have heard the news that Bradley C. Livesey, Curator
of Birds at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, was
killed in an auto crash near Pittsburgh this week.His publications on
evolutionary relationships among waterfowl and shorebirds are, of
course, classics of meticulous research. He was 56 years old.

 

Paul Hess

Natrona Heights, PA

 


The information contained in this message and/or attachments is intended
only for the person or entity to which it is addressed and may contain
confidential and/or privileged material. Any review, retransmission,
dissemination or other use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon,
this information by persons or entities other than the intended
recipient is prohibited. If you received this in error, please contact
the sender and delete the material from any system and destroy any
copies. Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual
sender.   --  
Subject: Re: Passing of Bradley Livezey
From: "Rogers, Steve" <RogersS AT CARNEGIEMNH.ORG>
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2011 10:45:37 -0500
The two Pittsburgh Papers have articles on Dr. Livezey

 

http://www.postgazette.com/pg/11041/1124369-122.stm

 

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/pittsburgh/s_722202.
html

 

And there has been a piece on a local television station

 

http://www.wtae.com/video/26809660/detail.html

 

Stephen P. Rogers (Mr.)

Collection Manager of Section of Birds

and Section of Amphibians and Reptiles

Carnegie Museum of Natural History

4400 Forbes Avenue

Pittsburgh PA 15213-4080

Phone: 412-622-3255 or 3258

Email: rogerss AT CarnegieMNH.org

http://www.carnegiemnh.org/birds/index.html

http://www.carnegiemnh.org/herps/index.htm

***************************************************

The views, opinions, and judgments expressed in this message 

are solely those of the author. The message contents have not 

been reviewed or approved by Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh

***************************************************

________________________________

From: ORNITH-L: the scientific discussion of Ornithology
[mailto:ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU] On Behalf Of Gary Kaiser
Sent: Thursday, February 10, 2011 10:09 AM
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
Subject: Passing of Bradley Livezey

 

Darren Naish has posted a blog outlining the career of Brad Livezey who
died in a car accident, Tuesday 8 Feb:

 

http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2011/02/brad_livezey_rip_2011.ph
p#more

 

Gary Kaiser

 

 

 

________________________________

From: ORNITH-L: the scientific discussion of Ornithology
[mailto:ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU] On Behalf Of Paul Hess
Sent: Thursday, February 10, 2011 9:10 AM
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
Subject: Bradley Livezey died in crash

 

Hello all,

 

Some of you may not have heard the news that Bradley C. Livesey, Curator
of Birds at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, was
killed in an auto crash near Pittsburgh this week.His publications on
evolutionary relationships among waterfowl and shorebirds are, of
course, classics of meticulous research. He was 56 years old.

 

Paul Hess

Natrona Heights, PA

 


The information contained in this message and/or attachments is intended only 
for the person or entity to which it is addressed and may contain confidential 
and/or privileged material. Any review, retransmission, dissemination or other 
use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon, this information by persons 
or entities other than the intended recipient is prohibited. If you received 
this in error, please contact the sender and delete the material from any 
system and destroy any copies. Any views expressed in this message are those of 
the individual sender. 
Subject: Passing of Bradley Livezey
From: Gary Kaiser <gansus AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2011 07:09:20 -0800
Darren Naish has posted a blog outlining the career of Brad Livezey who died in 
a car accident, Tuesday 8 Feb: 


http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2011/02/brad_livezey_rip_2011.php#more

Gary Kaiser
Subject: Bradley Livezey died in crash
From: Paul Hess <phess AT SALSGIVER.COM>
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2011 09:09:34 -0500
Hello all,

Some of you may not have heard the news that Bradley C. Livesey, Curator of 
Birds at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, was killed in an 
auto crash near Pittsburgh this week.His publications on evolutionary 
relationships among waterfowl and shorebirds are, of course, classics of 
meticulous research. He was 56 years old. 


Paul Hess
Natrona Heights, PA
Subject: Job Opening -- Program Manager (Seabird Conservation), National Fish & Wildlife Foundation
From: Ellen Paul <ellen.paul AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 14:57:34 -0500




Subject: Re: Department of the Interior releases new policy to help ensure the integrity of scientific and scholarly activities
From: Michael Halpern <MHalpern AT UCSUSA.ORG>
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2011 19:05:08 +0000

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Elliott Negin, 202-331-5439, enegin AT ucsusa.org



INTERIOR DEPARTMENT'S NEW SCIENTIFIC INTEGRITY POLICY MUST TRIGGER SIGNIFICANT 
CHANGES TO BE EFFECTIVE, SCIENCE GROUP SAYS 




STATEMENT BY FRANCESCA GRIFO, UNION OF CONCERNED SCIENTISTS



WASHINGTON (February 1, 2011) -The policy released today by the Department of 
the Interior takes steps to establish strong scientific integrity standards at 
an agency that has been plagued by political interference in science in recent 
years, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS). But for the policy 
to be effective, the group said, it must trigger additional changes in agency 
procedure and practice. 




UCS urged the agency to use this new policy to establish guidelines that 
encourage the free flow of information from the agency, create a whistleblower 
policy that protects staff who report political interference in science, and 
strengthen rules that disclose and prevent conflicts of interest at the agency. 




Below is a statement by Francesca Grifo, director of UCS's Scientific Integrity 
Program. 




"It's impressive that the Interior Department, which has allowed serious lapses 
in scientific integrity in recent years, is the first out of the gate with a 
scientific integrity plan. The new policy clearly reaffirms the president's 
principles, and signals the department's intent to establish strong scientific 
integrity standards not just for scientists but for political appointees, 
career employees and contractors as well. 




"But no matter how well intentioned the new Interior policy may be, it is 
sorely lacking in detail and public accountability. While it's a good starting 
place, I encourage other agencies and departments to be more specific in their 
own scientific integrity plans. 




"We can only hope that the new policy will trigger several significant and 
necessary changes that enable the public to hold the department more 
accountable for its decisions. This is essential, because many loopholes still 
remain. Scientists at Interior still lack sufficient guidance to feel 
comfortable sharing their research and scientific analysis with the public and 
the press. The policy does not protect them from retribution when they report 
political interference in science. Conflicts of interest within the department, 
which have been rife, may still go unreported. And the public can still remain 
in the dark when it comes to what science the department considers when making 
policy decisions. 




"This new policy will help the department address some of its biggest problems, 
but by itself, it is insufficient. For example, it's troubling that the new 
process for evaluating allegations of wrongdoing lacks transparency. Likewise, 
the department is not required to publicly disclose or confirm cases of 
misconduct, making accountability nearly impossible. 




"We will be monitoring progress to see to what extent the department eliminates 
these loopholes. While I applaud their lofty goals, I would still give the 
department a grade of incomplete. The department's scientists deserve -- and 
need -- more." 




###



The Union of Concerned Scientists is the leading U.S. science-based nonprofit 
organization working for a healthy environment and a safer world. Founded in 
1969, UCS is headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and also has offices in 
Berkeley, Chicago and Washington, D.C. For more information, go to 
www.ucsusa.org. 





Michael Halpern
Scientific Integrity Program Manager
Union of Concerned Scientists
1825 K Street NW, Ste 800
Washington, DC 20006
202.378.8618

Founded in 1969, the Union of Concerned Scientists is an independent, 
science-based nonprofit 

working for a healthy environment and a safer world.

www.ucsusa.org
Join our citizen action 
network or expert 
network. 

Support our 
work. 

Follow us on Twitter and 
Facebook. 


Please only print this if you need to.

From: ORNITH-L: the scientific discussion of Ornithology 
[mailto:ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU] On Behalf Of Ellen Paul 

Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2011 11:27 AM
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
Subject: Department of the Interior releases new policy to help ensure the 
integrity of scientific and scholarly activities 


[Note: because this is not regulatory, the public has no right to/opportunity 
for input, though there is nothing preventing individuals and organizations 
from expressing their views]. 




Today the new Policy on Integrity of Scientific and Scholarly Activities of the 
Department of the Interior (DOI) was officially announced. To review the 
policy, please visit the DOI Departmental Manual here: 
http://elips.doi.gov/app_dm/ and look for Part 305: Chapter 3, or try this: 
http://elips.doi.gov/app_dm/act_getfiles.cfm?relnum=3889 


This policy reaffirms Interior's commitment maintaining integrity in DOI 
scientific and scholarly activities because scientific and scholarly 
information considered in DOI decision making must be robust, of the highest 
quality, and the result of as rigorous scientific and scholarly processes as 
can be achieved. Of particular interest to professional associations, the 
policy provides clear guidance for federal employees who wish to engage with 
the communities of practice represented by professional societies. 


This new policy covers all Department employees, including political 
appointees, when they engage in, supervise, manage, or influence scientific and 
scholarly activities, or communicate information about the Department's 
scientific and scholarly activities, or utilize scientific and scholarly 
information in making agency policy, management, or regulatory decisions. The 
policy also covers all volunteers, contractors, cooperators, partners, 
permittees, leasees, and grantees who assist with developing or applying the 
results of scientific and scholarly activities. 


Roll out of this policy will begin immediately and training for employees and 
others who are covered by this policy is under development. 




Background:

President Obama and Dr. Holdren, Director of the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy, directed federal agencies to implement policies on 
scientific integrity (see Presidential Memorandum on Scientific Integrity dated 
March 9, 2009, 
http://www.whitehouse.gov/the_press_office/Memorandum-for-the-Heads-of-Executive-Departments-and-Agencies-3-9-09/ 
and the Office of Science and Technology Policy December 2010 guidance 
memorandum on scientific integrity 
http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/scientific-integrity-memo-12172010.pdf 
). Interior initially responded to these documents on September 29, 2010 with 
Secretarial Order No. 3305, Ensuring Scientific Integrity within the Department 
of the Interior (http://elips.doi.gov/app_SO/act_getfiles.cfm?order_number=3305 
). This Secretarial Order required publication of a Departmental Manual Chapter 
that codifies principles of scientific and scholarly integrity and clarifies 
the roles and responsibilities of all Department employees in upholding these 
principles. The policy released today is the implementation of the Secretary's 
directive and responds to the principles set forth by the President and Dr. 
Holdren. 


 emre.gov

Subject: Department of the Interior releases new policy to help ensure the integrity of scientific and scholarly activities
From: Ellen Paul <ellen.paul AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2011 11:26:37 -0500




Subject: Opening: USFWS Division of Bird Habitat Conservation, Chief, Branch of Science and Planning
From: Ellen Paul <ellen.paul AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2011 15:52:40 -0500




Subject: Intro Conservation GIS Course offered by Smithsonian
From: NZP-GISCourse <GISCourse AT SI.EDU>
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2011 14:31:33 -0500
 [Apologies for cross-posting]

The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute is offering the following 
course: 



An Introduction to the use of ArcGIS in Conservation and Wildlife Management

May 16-20

Increasingly, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing – the 
mapping of features using imagery acquired either from an aircraft or a 
satellite - have become important tools for decision-making and the applied 
management of natural resources. Many federal agencies and NGO's rely on GIS 
and satellite data for their work and are starting to produce their own spatial 
databases. However, there are few training opportunities for wildlife managers 
to learn the application of GIS in everyday management situations. We are 
offering a course for wildlife managers that will provide hands-on experience 
for the collection of data, GIS analysis of the data, and map-making using the 
latest ESRI (ArcGIS) and ERDAS software. 


This one-week course will provide conservation professionals with a working 
knowledge of the application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote 
Sensing to the monitoring and management of wildlife and forest vegetation. 
Exercises in establishing locations with a Global Positioning System (GPS), 
data input into a GIS, and spatial analysis techniques for GIS will provide 
hands-on and real world experience during the course. Based on examples about 
habitat selection in songbirds and white-tailed deer, course participants will 
learn how to: 


* Collect GIS data in the field using survey techniques and GPS
* Differentially correct GPS data
* Input GPS data into GIS
* Input field data into GIS
* Use GIS for management of large data sets from multiple sources
* Design and perform analysis using GIS data and spatial analysis techniques
* Integrate data with ancillary data, such as satellite imagery, aerial 
photography, and State Agency databases 


Visit the following web address for more details and registration information:

http://nationalzoo.si.edu/ConservationAndScience/ConservationGIS/GIS_training/introduction/ 


To contact us directly:
GIS Course Coordinator
giscourse AT si.edu
1500 Remount Road
Front Royal, VA 22630
540-635-6535 (GIS Lab)
540-635-6506 (FAX)

**Note: An Advanced Course is offered during the following week, May 23-27**

For more information on any of our other courses please see:
http://nationalzoo.si.edu/ConservationAndScience/ConservationGIS/GIS_training/

Subject: Advanced Conservation GIS and Remote Sensing Course offered by Smithsonian
From: NZP-GISCourse <GISCourse AT SI.EDU>
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2011 14:32:14 -0500
[Apologies for cross-posting]

The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute is offering the following 
course: 



Advanced Course for GIS in Conservation and Wildlife Management:



Measuring Landcover Change

and its Impact on Endangered Species

May 23 - 27

This one-week advanced GIS and remote sensing course provides conservationists 
with an opportunity to learn how GIS and remote sensing can 

be used to assess the conservation status of endangered species. Each
participant will be provided with their own desktop computer for all lab
exercises. During the hands-on exercises participants will use the Internet,
ArcGIS, ERDAS Imagine, Fragstats, and other spatial analysis programs. 
Instructors will lead participants step-by-step through the process of: 


* conducting a regional conservation assessment using GIS to determine critical 
conservation areas for an endangered species 


* acquiring multi-date satellite imagery to quantify land cover change and to 
map the extent of the remaining habitat 


* using landscape analysis to determine optimal landscape configurations for 
conserving the endangered species. 


Visit our website for more details and registration information:

http://nationalzoo.si.edu/ConservationAndScience/ConservationGIS/GIS_training/advanced_GIS 


To contact us directly:
GIS Course Coordinator
giscourse AT si.edu
1500 Remount Road
Front Royal, VA 22630
540-635-6535 (GIS Lab)
540-635-6506 (FAX)

**Note: An introductory course will be offered the previous week, May 16-20**

For more information on any of our other courses please see:
http://nationalzoo.si.edu/ConservationAndScience/ConservationGIS/GIS_training/

Subject: A question about stains
From: Susan Hengeveld <shengeve AT INDIANA.EDU>
Date: Tue, 18 Jan 2011 18:55:14 -0500
Greetings all -

Does anyone know the answer about dyes in the question below?  Outside  
my area by a longshot.  I would appreciate any feedback I might pass on.

thank you.....susan

Begin forwarded message:

> Dear Dr. Hengevelt,
>
> I wonder if you might help me with answering this question. What  
> sort of dye should I use to stain the nuclei of bird blood cells?  
> Maybe you might also suggest where on the internet this is bought  
> cheapest?
>
>
> I thank you for your time,
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Morris A. Gevirtz

____________________________________
Dr. Susan Hengeveld
1001 E. 3rd Street
Department of Biology
Indiana University
Bloomington, IN 47405

shengeve AT indiana.edu
office -- Morrison Hall 203
office phone -- 812-855-5239
Subject: Hilton Pond 01/08/11 (#500: Perfect Snowstorm)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Mon, 17 Jan 2011 16:20:24 -0500
We were all set to celebrate our current installment of "This Week at Hilton 
Pond"--our 500th!--as a retrospective of the past 11 years of on-line photo 
essays. Then we had an amazing snowfall that yielded all sorts of interesting 
phenomena, from record numbers of banded birds to TWO new yard species to an 
unexpected midwinter amphibian. As a result we'll save the reminiscing until 
NEXT week and devote the 8-16 January 2011 installment to an account of what 
we're calling "A Perfect January Snowstorm." 


To view the 500th photo essay please visit 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek110108.html 


While there don't forget to scroll down for complete lists of birds banded and 
recaptured during the period--including an ancient and venerable Purple Finch; 
we also include miscellaneous notes about other nature observations and 
acknowledge those folks kind enough to make recent contributions in support of 
Hilton Pond Center's education, research, and conservation efforts. 


Happy (Snow) Nature Watching!

BILL

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================
Subject: Re: answer to previous question on USA species descriptions
From: Joseph Morlan <jmorlan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2011 08:38:06 -0800
On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 11:07:31 -0500, "Dunning, John B" 
wrote:

>I also didn't count a number of things that have not been accepted yet such as 
Kenyon's Shag or species that may only occasionally wander into our area (such 
as Murphy's Petrel). 


I think Murphy's Petrel should be the winner. Murphy's Petrel is far more
common in the U.S. than Bermuda Petrel or even Tamaulipas Crow which are on
your list.

Murphy's is a routine visitor sometimes numbering in the hundreds,
particularly mid April through June offshore in California near the
interface between warm waters of the North Pacific Gyre and cold waters of
the California Current.

Bailey, S.F. et al. 1989. Am. Birds 43:400-415.
CBRC. 2007. Rare Birds of California. WFO, Camarillo, CA. 

-- 
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA        jmorlan (at) ccsf.edu 
SF Birding Classes start Feb 8     http://fog.ccsf.edu/jmorlan/
California Bird Records Committee  http://www.californiabirds.org/
Western Field Ornithologists       http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/
Subject: answer to previous question on USA species descriptions
From: "Dunning, John B" <jdunning AT PURDUE.EDU>
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2011 11:07:31 -0500
Thank you to ORNITH-L subscribers who responded to my earlier post, in which I 
asked for the most recent bird species from the continental USA to be formally 
described prior to Gunnison's Sage-Grouse in 2000 (not the early 1990s as my 
earlier email stated). People gave me a number of good suggestions for figuring 
out the answer and offered some candidates. Last night I took the simple if 
clunky route of flipping through the AOU Check-List and looking at the dates 
listed for the description of each species. This morning I confirmed the answer 
generated that way by comparing it to a list of worldwide taxa from BirdLife 
International. 


Before revealing the answer, let me explain a few things. My Advanced 
Ornithology class is looking at issues of taxonomy and systematics. I have 
assigned a few papers (including the original description of Gunnison's 
Sage-Grouse) in which a new form was described for the first time and was 
accepted by the AOU as a valid species. Next time we will deal with cases where 
previously described taxa were elevated from subspecies and the whole issue of 
lumping versus splitting over time. I want to express to the class how 
surprising it was that a new species such as the sage-grouse would be described 
in an area as well studied as the USA. That is why I limited the search for the 
previously newest taxon in the continental USA (excluding Hawaii and Mexico, 
for instance). I also didn't count a number of things that have not been 
accepted yet such as Kenyon's Shag or species that may only occasionally wander 
into our area (such as Murphy's Petrel). 


Unless I missed something, the winner is .... Dusky Flycatcher, described by 
Alan Phillips in 1939. 


Consolation prizes to:
Tamaulipas Crow, 1929 (barely got into the USA for a while, and spent some time 
lumped with Sinaloan Crow) 

Bermuda Petrel, 1916    (occasionally recorded off the USA Atlantic coast)
Thayer's Gull, 1915

The students are also reading papers on the Nechisar Nightjar (described from 
one wing of a rotten roadkill) and the delightfully named Bulo Burti Boubou 
(described from one individual that lived an exciting life but was eventually 
released alive back in Somalia). The latter has now been determined not to be a 
valid species. 


Thanks to all who responded with this and with links to sage-grouse lekking 
displays. 


Barny Dunning
jdunning AT purdue.edu
Subject: Avian Conservation and Ecology - New Issue Announcement: Volume 5 Issue 2
From: Jennifer Miner <jminer07 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2011 10:57:33 -0500
Avian Conservation and Ecology - New Issue Announcement

Volume 5, Issue 2| December 2010

http://www.ace-eco.org

Editors-in-Chief Marc-André Villard and Tom Nudds are pleased to announce the 
publication of Volume 5, Issue 2 (http://www.ace-eco.org/vol5/iss2/) of Avian 
Conservation and Ecology (http://www.ace-eco.org). With articles reporting 
research ranging in focus from the Breeding Biology of Grassland Birds, to the 
Reproductive Success of Piping Plovers, and Citizen Science and Effective 
Monitoring. This issue also sees the publication of the first two papers in the 
Special Feature "Aerial Insectivores" 
(http://www.ace-eco.org/issues/view.php?sf=3) edited by Philip Taylor and Jon 
McCracken. The Editors of ACE-ÉCO continue to invite new manuscript 
submissions to this special feature. See the Call for Papers 
(http://www.ace-eco.org/docs/callforpapers/call_for_papers_aerial.pdf) for 
details. 


To read the full text of the articles or to access all other articles published 
in this issue, please visit http://www.ace-eco.org/. 



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 


Table of Contents

EDITORIAL
 	Clubs, Carrots, and Conservation
 
Bâtons, carottes et conservation 	   
 	
  	Marc-André Villard and Thomas D. Nudds

RESEARCH PAPERS   	
 (sf) Declines of Aerial Insectivores in North America Follow a Geographic 
Gradient 

 
Présence d’un gradient géographique dans le déclin des insectivores 
aériens 

 	
  	Silke Nebel, Alex Mills, Jon D. McCracken, and Philip D. Taylor

 Do the Golden-winged Warbler and Blue-winged Warbler Exhibit Species-specific 
Differences in their Breeding Habitat Use? 

 
La Paruline à ailes dorées et la Paruline à ailes bleues montrent-elles des 
différences propres à l'espèce dans l'utilisation de leur habitat de 
reproduction? 

 	
 Laura L. Patton, David S. Maehr, Joseph E. Duchamp, Songlin Fei, Jonathan W. 
Gassett, and Jeffery L. Larkin 


 (sf) Breeding Biology of Grassland Birds in Western New York: Conservation and 
Management Implications 

 
Biologie de la reproduction des oiseaux de prairies dans l'ouest de l'Ă©tat de 
New York : répercussions en matière de conservation et de gestion 

 	
  	Christopher J. Norment, Michael C. Runge, and Michael R. Morgan

 Reproductive Consequences of Nest Site Use in Fork-tailed Storm-Petrels in the 
Aleutian Islands, Alaska: Potential Lasting Effects of an Introduced Predator 

 
Conséquences de l’utilisation des sites de nidification sur la reproduction 
de l’Océanite à queue fourchue dans les îles Aléoutiennes, Alaska : 
effets potentiels à long terme d’un prédateur introduit 

 	
  	Brie A. Drummond and Marty L. Leonard

 	Potential Sensitivity of Québec's Breeding Birds to Climate Change
 
Sensibilité potentielle des oiseaux nicheurs du Québec aux changements 
climatiques 

 	
  	Jean-Luc DesGranges and François Morneau

 Predator Exclosures Enhance Reproductive Success but Increase Adult Mortality 
of Piping Plovers (Charadrius melodus) 

 
Utilisation d’exclos chez le Pluvier siffleur (Charadrius melodus): succès 
de reproduction plus élevé, mais mortalité accrue chez les adultes 

 	
  	Colleen Barber, Astrid Nowak, Kirby Tulk, and Linda Thomas

 Linking Canadian Harvested Juvenile American Black Ducks to Their Natal Areas 
Using Stable Isotope (δD, δ13C, and δ15N) Methods 

 
Établissement de liens entre les Canards noirs juvéniles pris au Canada et 
leurs régions natales à l’aide des méthodes fondées sur les isotopes 
stables (δD, δ13C et δ15N) 

 	
 Paul Ashley, Keith A. Hobson, Steven L. Van Wilgenburg, Norm North, and Scott 
A. Petrie 


 The Importance of Agriculture-Dominated Landscapes and Lack of Field Border 
Effect for Early-Succession Songbird Nest Success 

 
Importance des paysages dominés par l’agriculture et absence d’effet des 
lisières sur le succès de nidification de passereaux de début de succession 

 	
  	Jason D. Riddle and Christopher E. Moorman

 (sf) Habitat Use Patterns of Bobolinks and Savannah Sparrows in the 
Northeastern United States 

 
Utilisation de l’habitat par le Goglu des prés et le Bruant des prés dans 
le Nord-est des États-Unis 

 	
  	Daniel P. Shustack, Allan M. Strong, and Therese M. Donovan
 Modeling and Mapping Golden-winged Warbler Abundance to Improve Regional 
Conservation Strategies 

 
Modélisation et cartographie de l’abondance en tant qu’outils de 
perfectionnement des stratégies régionales de conservation chez la Paruline 
à ailes dorées 

 	
  	Wayne E. Thogmartin

ESSAY  	
 Toward Conservation of Canada’s Boreal Forest Avifauna: Design and 
Application of Ecological Models at Continental Extents 

 
Conservation de l’avifaune de la forêt boréale au Canada : élaboration et 
application de modèles écologiques à l’échelle continentale 

 	
 Steven G. Cumming, Kara L. Lefevre, Erin Bayne, Trish Fontaine, Fiona K.A. 
Schmiegelow, and Samantha J. Song 


 (sf) Scientific and Cost Effective Monitoring: The Case of an Aerial 
Insectivore, the Chimney Swift 

 
Programme de suivi scientifiquement rigoureux et à faible coût : le cas 
d’un insectivore aérien, le Martinet ramoneur 

 	
  	Sébastien Rioux, Jean-Pierre L. Savard, and François Shaffer

 	Birding 2.0: Citizen Science and Effective Monitoring in the Web 2.0 World
 
Ornithologie 2.0: la science citoyenne et les programmes de suivi à l’ère 
d’internet 2.0 

 	
  	Yolanda F. Wiersma
Subject: Speaking of blackbirds... remember the Rusty Blitz and tell a friend
From: "antbird AT imap.mail.rcn.net" <antbird@IMAP.MAIL.RCN.NET>
Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2011 08:56:42 -0500
A lot of press about some dead Red-winged Blackbirds in Arkansas and
Lousiana

As sad and mysterious and sad as it is, I will tell

you what is infinitely sadder and enigmatic. And it involves blackbirds in
Arkansas, Louisiana and a lot more states and provinces.

The Rusty Blackbird may have declined by over 90% in the last 40 years.
That is a lot of dead blackbirds.

We still don't know exactly why.

We need to locate remaining strongholds of the winter distribution,
particularly in the Southeast.

You can't bring back the dead Red-winged Blackbirds, but you can help 

restore the Rusty Blackbird to some of its former glory

PLEASE CONSIDER PARTICIPATING IN THE RUSTY BLACKBIRD HOTPOTS BLITZ

In 2009 and 2010, birders scoured the countryside for wintering Rusty
Blackbirds to increase understanding of their distribution and find
important local concentrations (hotspots). Much was learned from the last
two year’s efforts. Already, the information gained is being used to
implement research and conservation efforts! However, there is still more
to learn. The Rusty Blackbird Hotspot Blitz will be repeated for the last
time in 2011 to locate more hotspots and determine how stable known
hotspots are from year to year. Don’t miss your chance to contribute to
this monumental survey effort for this declining species! Mark your
calendar now!

http://nationalzoo.si.edu/scbi/migratorybirds/research/rusty_blackbird/blitz
.cfm

Information and instructions will also be available soon on Cornell
Laboratory of Ornithology's e-Bird site:
http://ebird.org/







Original Message:
-----------------
From: stan moore hawkman11 AT HOTMAIL.COM
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2011 15:56:11 +0000
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
Subject: Re: More dead birds fall from sky in US



Dan --

I think that one report on the airwaves tends to attract others of similar
kills.  My feeling is that these kills are not a population threat to the
species and are generally insignificant.  By comparison, the US Department
of Agriculture APHIS program deliberately kills perhaps millions of
blackbirds and starlings as agricultural pests.  These small kills of
dozens or even hundreds of birds is sad from an individual perspective, but
not likely to attract the attention of agencies who know that hundreds of
millions of birds are killed by collisions with glass-fronted buildings,
more hundreds of millions by domestic cats, etc.

Good to hear from Houston, my natal area.  I remember as a kid my mother
taking me and my brothers to Herman Park Zoo and one brother was bit that
day by a gray squirrel.  :)

Stan Moore
now of San Geronimo, CA

Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2011 09:44:54 -0600
From: dbrooks AT HMNS.ORG
Subject: FW: More dead birds fall from sky in US
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
























http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-12118589

 

 

Have ya’ll heard about this?  We have
a small series of 10 brown-headed cowbirds from a local bank that were
poisoned
a few yrs ago.  I’m guessing there were at least a couple of hundred dead
birds.  I called the authorities and they were rather apathetic, as they
said
it was hard to prove birds were illegally ‘slaughtered’.

 

dan

 

 

 





Daniel M. Brooks, Ph.D.

Curator of Vertebrate Zoology 

Cracid Specialist Group
Chair

dbrooks AT hmns.org      (713)
639-4776    Fax (713) 639-4767

theHoustonMuseumofnaturalscience

5555 Hermann Park Drive, Houston, TX  77030-1799   

 

Biography:
www.hmns.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=301&Itemid=71

Building the African
Wildlife Hall: www.drdantime.netfirms.com/index.html

Cracid Specialist Group: www.cracids.org

 

Please help reduce carbon footprints by not printing email
unless it is necessary...





 		 	   		  

--------------------------------------------------------------------
myhosting.com - Premium Microsoft® Windows® and Linux web and application
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Subject: Re: question on new species described in USA
From: Jack Clinton Eitniear <jce AT CSTBINC.ORG>
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2011 06:30:56 -0800
Yellow-footed Gull (Larus livens) Dwight 1919 or Thayer's Gull (L. thayeri) 
Brooks 1915Anyone have one since then? Jack EitniearE-mail: 
jce AT cstbinc.orgWebpage: www.cstbinc.org 


"We will be known forever by the tracks we leave" Dakota Indian Saying

--- On Mon, 1/10/11, Dunning, John B  wrote:

From: Dunning, John B 
Subject: question on new species described in USA
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
Date: Monday, January 10, 2011, 7:59 AM

As far as I know, the last completely new species to be described in the 
continental USA (not counting forms previously described but raised to the 
species level by a taxonomic revision), was Gunnison’s Sage-Grouse in the 
early 1990s.   Does anyone know what bird had been the latest bird from the 
continental USA to be described before that?   I am having my Advanced 
Ornithology class read a series of papers describing new species (as part of a 
set of lectures on “what is a species?”) and the question always comes up. 
 I am also interested in showing video of the two sage-grouse species  on the 
lekking ground.  Does anyone know of a YouTube site or other place where I can 
find them?  Thanks,  Barny DunningPurdue Universityjdunning AT purdue.edu 
Subject: question on new species described in USA
From: "Dunning, John B" <jdunning AT PURDUE.EDU>
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2011 08:59:01 -0500
As far as I know, the last completely new species to be described in the 
continental USA (not counting forms previously described but raised to the 
species level by a taxonomic revision), was Gunnison's Sage-Grouse in the early 
1990s. Does anyone know what bird had been the latest bird from the continental 
USA to be described before that? I am having my Advanced Ornithology class read 
a series of papers describing new species (as part of a set of lectures on 
"what is a species?") and the question always comes up. 


I am also interested in showing video of the two sage-grouse species on the 
lekking ground. Does anyone know of a YouTube site or other place where I can 
find them? 


Thanks,

Barny Dunning
Purdue University
jdunning AT purdue.edu
Subject: Hilton Pond 01/10/11 (York-Rock Hill Christmas Bird Count)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Sun, 9 Jan 2011 21:16:19 -0500
When we had to move the York/Rock Hill Christmas Bird Count from mid-December 
to the first week in January, we figured it might give time for even more 
winter migrants to move in and swell our numbers, but that apparently wasn't 
the case. nonetheless, we did get a NEW SPECIES for the count. For a photo 
essay about this year's survey efforts--along with complete tabulations for 
numbers and species seen--please visit "This Week at Hilton Pond" for 1-7 
January 2011 at http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek110101.html 


While there don't forget to scroll down for an account of all birds banded or 
recaptured at Hilton Pond during the period, along with miscellaneous nature 
notes and a thank you for folks kind enough to start off the year with 
donations in support of our education, research, and conservation efforts. 


And if you're really getting tired of the cold, snow, and nasty weather, we 
still have a few slots left for our upcoming nine-day mid-winter hummingbird 
expeditions to Costa Rica (Jan-Feb), Guatemala (Feb), and Belize (Mar). We 
promise you won't get frostbite in the Neotropics! 


Happy (New Year) Nature Watching!

BILL

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================
Subject: Re: More dead birds fall from sky in US
From: stan moore <hawkman11 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2011 15:56:11 +0000
Dan --

I think that one report on the airwaves tends to attract others of similar 
kills. My feeling is that these kills are not a population threat to the 
species and are generally insignificant. By comparison, the US Department of 
Agriculture APHIS program deliberately kills perhaps millions of blackbirds and 
starlings as agricultural pests. These small kills of dozens or even hundreds 
of birds is sad from an individual perspective, but not likely to attract the 
attention of agencies who know that hundreds of millions of birds are killed by 
collisions with glass-fronted buildings, more hundreds of millions by domestic 
cats, etc. 


Good to hear from Houston, my natal area. I remember as a kid my mother taking 
me and my brothers to Herman Park Zoo and one brother was bit that day by a 
gray squirrel. :) 


Stan Moore
now of San Geronimo, CA

Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2011 09:44:54 -0600
From: dbrooks AT HMNS.ORG
Subject: FW: More dead birds fall from sky in US
To: ORNITH-L AT SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
























http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-12118589

 

 

Have ya’ll heard about this?  We have
a small series of 10 brown-headed cowbirds from a local bank that were poisoned
a few yrs ago.  I’m guessing there were at least a couple of hundred dead
birds.  I called the authorities and they were rather apathetic, as they said
it was hard to prove birds were illegally ‘slaughtered’.

 

dan

 

 

 





Daniel M. Brooks, Ph.D.

Curator of Vertebrate Zoology 

Cracid Specialist Group
Chair

dbrooks AT hmns.org      (713)
639-4776    Fax (713) 639-4767

theHoustonMuseumofnaturalscience

5555 Hermann Park Drive, Houston, TX  77030-1799   

 

Biography: 
www.hmns.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=301&Itemid=71 


Building the African
Wildlife Hall: www.drdantime.netfirms.com/index.html

Cracid Specialist Group: www.cracids.org

 

Please help reduce carbon footprints by not printing email
unless it is necessary...





 		 	   		  
Subject: FW: More dead birds fall from sky in US
From: Dan Brooks <dbrooks AT HMNS.ORG>
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2011 09:44:54 -0600
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-12118589

 

 

Have ya'll heard about this?  We have a small series of 10 brown-headed
cowbirds from a local bank that were poisoned a few yrs ago.  I'm
guessing there were at least a couple of hundred dead birds.  I called
the authorities and they were rather apathetic, as they said it was hard
to prove birds were illegally 'slaughtered'.

 

dan

 

 

 

Daniel M. Brooks, Ph.D.
Curator of Vertebrate Zoology 

Cracid Specialist Group Chair

dbrooks AT hmns.org      (713) 639-4776    Fax (713) 639-4767
theHoustonMuseumofnaturalscience
5555 Hermann Park Drive, Houston, TX  77030-1799   

 

Biography:
www.hmns.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=301&Itemid=71

Building the African Wildlife Hall:
www.drdantime.netfirms.com/index.html

Cracid Specialist Group: www.cracids.org

 

Please help reduce carbon footprints by not printing email unless it is
necessary...
Subject: Hilton Pond 12/29/10 (2010 Banding Report)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2011 07:45:50 -0500
Up-close bird photos? Charts? Tables? Archival images of Hilton Pond Center? 
Info about hummingbirds? If you like any or all of these you'll likely enjoy 
the latest installment of "This Week at Hilton Pond"; it's our annual summary 
of bird banding activities here in the Carolina Piedmont. Among other things, 
we discuss possible causes for what ended up as a slow banding year. To access 
our latest photo essay for 29-31 December 2010, please visit 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek101229.html 


While there don't forget to scroll down for our usual list of birds banded and 
recaptured during the period, plus a heartfelt acknowledgement to folks who 
made end-of-year tax-deductible contributions in support of our education, 
research, and conservation activities. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================
Subject: Hilton Pond 12/22/10 (House Finch Follow-ups)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Wed, 29 Dec 2010 23:07:21 -0500
After our photo essay last week about possible diminished migration in eastern 
House Finch populations, we got some great questions and comments from visitors 
to our Web site. As a result, "This Week at Hilton Pond" we're revisiting the 
finch topic with some follow-up information about conjunctivitis, banding 
effort, foreign recaptures, and our sure-fire method for differentiating Purple 
Finches from House Finches. To view the latest installment for 22-28 December 
2010, please see http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek101222.html 


While there don't forget to scroll down for our usual list of birds banded and 
recaptured, a couple of miscellaneous notes about still-frigid weather, an 
obligatory photo of Christmas snow at Hilton Pond, and a shout out to some 
folks who made tax-deductible contributions this week in support of our 
education, research, and conservation activities--including on-line publication 
of "This Week at Hilton Pond." 


Happy (End of Year) Nature Watching!

BILL

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================
Subject: Irene Pepperberg to star on NOVA
From: Ellen Paul <ellen.paul AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Dec 2010 16:22:46 -0500




Subject: Hilton Pond 12/12/10 (House Finch Migration)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Mon, 27 Dec 2010 13:46:35 -0500
We know it's the holiday season but still hope you'll have time to visit our 
"This Week at Hilton Pond" photo essay for 12-21 December 2010 and help answer 
the question: "So What's Up With House Finches?" The installment is at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek101212.html 


While there don't forget to scroll down for our usual list of birds banded and 
recaptured, a couple of miscellaneous notes about frigid weather and hawks, and 
a thank you to folks who made contributions this week in support of our 
education, research, and conservation activities. 


Happy (Holiday) Nature Watching!

BILL

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================
Subject: Contents of Colorado Birds, vol. 44, no. 4 (2010)
From: Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2010 10:21:58 -0800
Hello, Ornithologists.

Here is a summary of the contents of vol. 44, no. 4 (2010), of the quarterly 
journal Colorado Birds, published by Colorado Field Ornithologists (CFO). 


* PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE. 
* by JIM BEATTY. 
* pp. 212-213. 
* Member opinion is sought regarding proposed changes to the bylaws of the 
Colorado Bird Records Committee, and birders with electronic expertise are 
encouraged to assist CFO as the association continues to expand member services 
in the digital era. 


* CFO BOARD MEETING MINUTES. 
* by LARRY MODESITT. 
* pp. 213-217. 
* Major topics of discussion at the 21 August 2010 quarterly meeting of the CFO 
board included review of the 2010 convention and proposed changes to the bylaws 
of the Colorado Bird Records Committee. New items of business included planning 
for the 2011 convention and support by CFO for an Ornithology Fellow at the 
Denver Museum of Nature and Science. 


* ACROSS THE BOARD: JOE ROLLER. 
* by JIM BEATTY. 
* pp. 217-220. 
* CFO board member Joe Roller is many things: a victim of neotaxophilia (read 
the article!) and the purveyor of many a (deliberate) malapropism; a trombone 
player and a gastroenterologist; an Atlas neophyte and an old Eagle Scout; and, 
above all, an incurably enthusiastic birder. 


* RON RYDER AWARD RECIPIENT: ALEXANDER CRUZ. 
* by BILL KAEMPFER. 
* pp. 220-221. 
* Alexander Cruz, recipient of the 2010 Ronald A. Ryder Award for Distinguished 
Service to Colorado Field Ornithology and Professor of Ecology & Evolution 
Biology at the University of Colorado, is especially notable for having trained 
a great many of today's prominent ecologists and other biologists. 


* BOOK REVIEW: BIRDS OF WYOMING. 
* by ROBERT RIGHTER. 
* pp. 222-224. 
* This review of Douglas W. Faulkner's major new ornithological reference 
praises the work for its illuminating introductory materials, detailed and 
innovative species accounts, and extensive references. 


* REMEMBERING MONA HILL. 
* by BILL PRATHER and INEZ PRATHER. 
* pp. 225-226. 
* Mona Hill, former CFO board member and Editor of Colorado Birds, died 24 May 
2010; she is remembered for her enthusiasm for finding rare birds--and for 
helping others to find rare birds! 


* BIRD DIVERSITY IN THE COLORADO SUBALPINE. 
* by Erin E. Posthumus, Alexander Cruz, and Jameson Chace 
* pp. 227-237. 
* In a 2004 field study, avian diversity was higher in quaking aspen and 
spruce-fir forests than in lodgepole pine forests; habitat change and fire 
suppression may result in future declines in bird species diversity in 
subalpine forest habitats in Colorado. 


* FIELD NOTE: CORDILLERAN FLYCATCHER NESTLING DEATH. 
* by Dave Leatherman 
* pp. 238-239. 
* A pair of Cordilleran Flycatchers in Larimer County suddenly stopped tending 
their four nestlings on 9 July 2010; investigation of the matter revealed that 
the nest had been overrun by the bloodsucking mite Ornithonyssus sylviarum. 


* The 56TH REPORT OF THE CBRC. 
* by Lawrence S. Semo and Doug Faulkner 
* pp. 240-254. 
* This report summarizes the Colorado Bird Record's Committees evaluations of 
43 reports of 35 occurrences of 19 species; highlights include Colorado's 
second Anhinga and the recent "splits" of the whip-poor-will and winter wren 
species-complexes, resulting in a net addition of two species to the Colorado 
list. 


* THE HUNGRY BIRD: GIZZARD SHAD. 
* by Dave Leatherman 
* pp. 254-257. 
* Birders should get to know the gizzard shad--bringer of Mew and Glaucous 
gulls, Neotropic cormorant, rare loons, jaegers, multitudinous grebes, immense 
throngs of mergansers, and even raptors. This small round, pale, silvery, 
non-native fish is sometimes abundant in Colorado's reservoirs. 


* THE HUNGRY BIRDER: SALIDA. 
* by Sherrie York 
* pp. 258-261. 
* Birders visiting Salida, Chaffee County, are encouraged to get away from the 
Highway 50 strip for such dining delights as the Boat House Cantina (with good 
viewing of American Dippers), The Simmering Cup (for a taste of Boulder), 
Moonlight Pizza (said to have super-powers), and...no fast food! Highway 50 
options include Los Girasoles (Mexican), Manjati's (Italian), and, ahem, fast 
food. 


* NEWS FROM THE FIELD: SPRING 2010. 
* by Joel and Marcel Such 
* pp. 262-281. 
* Colorado birding highlights from the spring (March-May) of 2010 included 
Eurasian Wigeon (3 reports), Mexican Duck (2 reports), Hudsonian Godwit, 
Laughing Gull, Eastern Wood-Pewee (5 reports), Alder Flycatcher (6 reports), 
Yellow-throated Vireo (11 reports), Philadelphia Vireo (3 reports), 
Gray-cheeked Thrush (8 reports), Wood Thrush (4 reports), Swainson's Warbler, 
Connecticut Warbler (3 reports), Scarlet Tanager (2 reports), and Eastern 
Meadowlark. 


* IN THE SCOPE: WINTER AND PACIFIC WRENS. 
* by Tony Leukering and Nathan Pieplow 
* pp. 281-286. 
* Both species of "stub-tailed wrens" (eastern Winter Wren and western Pacific 
Wren) have occurred in Colorado, but their status and distribution in the state 
are unclear; differences in plumages and especially call notes, discussed in 
detail in this article, are important for field separation of the two species. 


For more information on the journal Colorado Birds, please visit the Colorado 
Birds webpage of the CFO website: http://tiny.cc/SkCNN. For more information on 
CFO, please visit the CFO homepage: http://tiny.cc/xySmh. 


------------------------------- 

Ted Floyd 
Editor, Birding 

Blog: http://tinyurl.com/2g2staq 

Twitter: http://tinyurl.com/2ejzlzv 

Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/2wkvwxs 

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Subject: White House Christmas present to government scientists
From: Ellen Paul <ellen.paul AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 17 Dec 2010 16:48:33 -0500
No pay raise, but a lump of integrity (18 months overdue)


http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2010/12/17/scientific-integrity-fueling-innovation-building-public-trust 


Press release from Union of Concerned Scientists, below.

-- 
Ellen Paul
Executive Director
The Ornithological Council
Email: ellen.paul AT verizon.net
"Providing Scientific Information about Birds"
http://www.nmnh.si.edu/BIRDNET"



***
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: David Kohn, 202-331-5427,dkohn AT ucsusa.org

SCIENTIFIC INTEGRITY DIRECTIVE "ARTICULATES A BROAD VISION FOR DEFENDING 
SCIENCE FROM POLITICAL INTERFERENCE" 


WASHINGTON (December 17, 2010) - The scientific integrity directive released by 
the White House today articulates a broad vision for defending science from 
political interference. It requires federal agencies and departments to develop 
meaningful and specific plans to protect scientists from political pressure by 
special interests, and ensure that the government makes decisions that protect 
this country's health and environment. For years, interference from industry 
and government officials has prevented government scientists from doing their 
jobs, and has led to flawed policy decisions on a wide range of issues, 
including prescription drug safety and childhood lead poisoning. 


If the agencies fully carry out the directive, the public will have more access 
to the science considered in making policy decisions and government scientists' 
will finally be able to share their research and scientific analyses with the 
public and the press. In addition, the directive clearly removes roadblocks 
that kept scientists from staying current on the latest research. 


The following is a statement by Francesca Grifo, senior scientist and director 
of the UCS Scientific Integrity Program. 


"This is a rough but promising blueprint for honesty and accountability in the 
use of science in government decisions. If the details are fully articulated by 
federal agencies and departments, the directive will help keep politics in its 
place and allow government scientists to do their jobs. 


"At the same time, I'm worried that the directive leaves an enormous amount of 
discretion to the agencies. We will be watching them every step of the way. 


"Everyone wants to have science on their side. But twisting scientific data to 
fit preconceived opinions or political needs does not serve the public good. 
For years, politicians and government officials have manipulated science and 
censored scientists, and in the process put the public's health and safety at 
risk. 


"The directive has the potential to stop special interests from spinning 
science at the expense of the American people. And it could enable government 
officials to take on the complex scientific challenges facing our country, from 
the safety of our medicines to the quality of our air. 


"The directive also encourages agencies to make science more transparent. 
Whether the issue is offshore oil drilling or levels of toxic chemicals in 
children's toys, the public has a right to know how the government has used 
science in making policy. 


"Now, agencies and departments must dive into the details. Those creating these 
policies should be open and collaborative and should include input from those 
inside and outside government. In addition, the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy should hold agencies accountable for developing effective 
plans. 


"We hope the road from directive to implementation is short and straight. The 
administration should put the pedal to the metal and create a government where 
decisions are informed by the best available science." 


###

The Union of Concerned Scientists is the leading U.S. science-based nonprofit 
organization working for a healthy environment and a safer world. Founded in 
1969, UCS is headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and also has offices in 
Berkeley, Chicago and Washington, D.C. For more information, go 
towww.ucsusa.org. 



Michael Halpern
Scientific Integrity Program Manager
Union of Concerned Scientists
1825 K Street NW, Ste 800
Washington, DC 20006
202.378.8618

Founded in 1969, the Union of Concerned Scientists is an independent, 
science-based nonprofit 

working for a healthy environment and a safer world.

www.ucsusa.org
Join our citizen action network or expert network.
Support our work.
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.
Subject: Be a part of Michigan's Bird Conservation Initiative
From: Kara Haas <karahaas AT KBS.MSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2010 09:54:48 -0500
Call for Papers and Scholarship Opportunities!  Register today!
www.mibci.org 

Don't miss the 5th Annual Michigan Bird Conservation Initiative's
Ornithological Congress.  Scholarships and excellent professional
development opportunities available for Michigan students!

Students, professionals and the public interested in bird conservation are
invited to attend and be a part of the 5th annual Michigan Bird Conservation
Initiative Ornithological Congress.  The meeting will take place April 6-9,
2011 at North Central Michigan College in Petoskey, MI.  

Many interesting topics will be covered during this year's congress,
including climate change, threatened and endangered species management,
Kalamazoo River Oil Spill update, how to use Social Media, Coordinated Bird
Monitoring efforts and several citizen scientist projects including the Owl
and Marsh Bird monitoring.

Students are invited to share their research during an evening poster
session on Thursday, April 7.  There are generous scholarships available for
students that cover the cost of registration with a stipend to be used on
lodging expenses.  Applications (attached) for both are due by Jan. 14, 2011
and details can be found at www.mibci.org.  

About Michigan Bird Conservation Initiative

The Michigan Bird Conservation Initiative (MiBCI) is a coalition of
agencies, organizations, universities, and individuals working together to
better understand and conserve Michigan's birds. MiBCI's primary purpose is
to work together as a partnership to conserve, restore, and protect bird
populations. While the individual missions and goals of members may be
varied, all members recognize that they may be a powerful force for
conservation if unified in working toward common objectives. Furthermore,
open avenues of communication enable collaboration, a sense of community,
and mutual respect in advancement of our shared vision.  

The Congress is open to anyone interested in helping to further bird
conservation. For details and registration visit www.mibci.org
 . 

This year's Ornithological Congress will also be meeting jointly with the
Michigan Chapter of the American Fisheries Society and the Michigan Chapter
of The Wildlife Society. Participants will enjoy attending any symposia,
workshops, talks, and events hosted by each organization.

Help make a difference for bird conservation in Michigan, join us for the
5th annual Ornithological Congress!  Thank you, the Planning Committee

Karen Cleveland, MI DNRE

Tom Funke, Michigan Audubon

Joelle Gehring, MNFI

Kara Haas, MSU's Kellogg Bird Sanctuary

Keith Harrison, MAS

Katie Koch, USFWS

Ray Rustem, MI DNRE

Lori Sargent, MI DNRE

Torrey Wenger, Kalamazoo Nature Center

Dick Wolinski, MDOT

Questions?  Visit www.mibci.org or e-mail ocpapers AT micbci.org 
Subject: Hilton Pond 12/01/10 (Winter Water)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Sun, 12 Dec 2010 22:11:03 -0500
The Carolina Piedmont just survived a period of record-setting lows that had 
birds and animals scrambling to find unfrozen water as the mercury dipped into 
the 'teens. "This Week at Hilton Pond" these creatures benefitted from a small 
water garden and a recirculating pump that kept at least some water from 
freezing and available for drinking and bathing. With another arctic blast 
forecast for next week, we devote our current installment to images of birds 
and mammals that visited the water garden--all in the hope you, too, will be 
able to offer water when the temperatures drop. To view the photo essay for 1-- 
Nov 2010, please see http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek101201.html 


Don't forget to scroll down for our usual list of birds banded, a couple of 
miscellaneous notes, and a tip of the hat to folks kind enough to make 
contributions this week in support of our education, research, and conservation 
activities. 


Happy (Frigid) Nature Watching!

BILL

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR. Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852
fax (803) 684-0255

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================