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Updated on Monday, September 26 at 07:49 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Black Bazas,©BirdQuest

26 Sep Winter Wren, Rogers County, OK [Ken or Carol Williams ]
25 Sep Photos added to website [Jim Arterburn ]
23 Sep Chimney Swift [EUGENE YOUNG ]
23 Sep Thursday at Hackberry Flat [Matthew Jung ]
22 Sep Re: ruddy shelduck in Tulsa area [Larry Mays ]
22 Sep ruddy shelduck in Tulsa area ["Curtis, Tom" ]
21 Sep Rogers County yard migrants. [Ken or Carol Williams ]
21 Sep Cimarron County Birds [Bill Carrell ]
21 Sep common nighthawk migration ["VanWinkle, Tony N." ]
20 Sep Re: Hefner LB Curlew, SB Dowitcher, others [Matthew Jung ]
20 Sep Fwd: eBird Report - Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Sep 20, 2016 [Louis Truex ]
20 Sep Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 20 [David Arbour ]
20 Sep Fw: Louisiana Waterthrush defends nest against snake [Jerry Davis ]
18 Sep OKC Audbon meeting Monday [William Diffin ]
17 Sep Hackberry Flat LB Curlews [Matthew Jung ]
16 Sep Inca Dove in Rogers County, OK [Ken or Carol Williams ]
15 Sep Call for Abstracts - OkNRC Conference ["Crawford, Priscilla H." ]
15 Sep OOS Crane Chase Event! [Doug Wood ]
15 Sep Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 14 [David Arbour ]
15 Sep birds and dragonflies moving [JOS GRZYBOWSKI ]
14 Sep upcoming events - Payne County Audubon Society ["O Connell, Tim" ]
14 Sep Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline [Jerry Davis ]
12 Sep Swallow-tailed Kite, Wichita Mts WR [John Ault ]
12 Sep Swallow-tailed Kite [Louis Truex ]
12 Sep Re: Oklahoma BIrds - The Washington Post: Caught on radar: Thousands of birds took flight minutes before an Okla. earthquake [Mike Brewer ]
12 Sep FW: eBird Report - Spavinaw Creek, Sep 11, 2016 [Laura Stanfill ]
10 Sep FW: eBird Report - Spavinaw Lake--Tag Hollow, Sep 10, 2016 [Laura Stanfill ]
10 Sep Second Common Tern at Hefner apperantly [John Hurd ]
9 Sep Wood Storks - Clarita [Doug Wood ]
9 Sep Oklahoma BIrds - The Washington Post: Caught on radar: Thousands of birds took flight minutes before an Okla. earthquake [Jerry Davis ]
8 Sep Hefner LB Curlew, SB Dowitcher, others [William Diffin ]
8 Sep Tulsa Birders [Jo ]
7 Sep Re: Northern Bobwhite Management Video [Jerry Davis ]
7 Sep Re: Northern Bobwhite Management Video ["O Connell, Tim" ]
7 Sep Northern Bobwhite Management Video [Jerry Davis ]
7 Sep Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 6 [David Arbour ]
6 Sep Re: The Panhandle from September 2-5, 2016. [Melinda Droege ]
6 Sep The Panhandle from September 2-5, 2016. [Mary Peterson ]
6 Sep Re: A few Migrants....And an Armchair Lifer ["Curtis, Tom" ]
6 Sep A few Migrants....And an Armchair Lifer [Bill Carrell ]
6 Sep Re: Swallow-tailed Kite in Duncan [Bill Adams ]
5 Sep Re: Swallow-tailed Kite in Duncan [Bill Adams ]
5 Sep Swallow-tailed Kite in Duncan [Bill Adams ]
4 Sep Cimarron County Sep 2-3 [JOS GRZYBOWSKI ]
4 Sep FW: eBird Report - Choleta Bottoms, Sep 4, 2016 [Laura Stanfill ]
2 Sep Re: Appropriately named night herons [Sharon Henthorn ]
1 Sep Appropriately named night herons [rgunn1 ]
1 Sep DEQ Public Forum [Linda Adams ]
1 Sep Migrants in Rogers County today [Ken or Carol Williams ]
1 Sep Lk Hefner Merlin, Overholser Pelicans [William Diffin ]
1 Sep September Migration Report (2 of 2) [Patricia Velte ]
1 Sep September Migration Report (1 of 2) [Patricia Velte ]
31 Aug Red Slough Bird Survey - August 31 [David Arbour ]
31 Aug Re: ODWC survey of BIRDERS in Oklahoma! [Doug Wood ]
31 Aug ODWC survey of BIRDERS in Oklahoma! ["O Connell, Tim" ]
31 Aug Re: The artist's approach to birding? [Ellie Womack ]
31 Aug The artist's approach to birding? [Matthew Jung ]
29 Aug Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK [Patricia Seibert ]
29 Aug Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK [Bill Carrell ]
29 Aug Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK [Pete Janzen ]
29 Aug Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK [Joe Grzybowski ]
29 Aug Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK [Bill Carrell ]
29 Aug Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK [Ken or Carol Williams ]
29 Aug Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK ["Ingold, James" ]
29 Aug Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK [Patricia Seibert ]
29 Aug Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK [Ken or Carol Williams ]
29 Aug Tulsa Area [Terry Mitchell ]
28 Aug Probable Black-headed Grosbeak - Stillwater [Scott Loss ]
28 Aug Fish Crows in Enid? ["bill ." ]
27 Aug Payne County Audubon events this week ["O Connell, Tim" ]
26 Aug The Partners In Flight Landbird Conservation Plan [Jerry Davis ]
23 Aug Red Slough Bird Survey - August 23 [David Arbour ]
23 Aug Hefner, canal inlet [William Diffin ]
19 Aug Re: tern at shawnee reservoir [Ian Brandenburg ]
18 Aug Re: tern at shawnee reservoir [William Diffin ]
16 Aug Red Slough Bird Survey - August 16 [David Arbour ]

Subject: Winter Wren, Rogers County, OK
From: Ken or Carol Williams <kcwilliams AT TULSACONNECT.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 19:45:26 -0500
Fellow Birders,

Our Rogers County yard migrants today were Winter Wren and Common 
Yellowthroat.  Pictures of the Winter Wren can be seen in my 2016 Folder 
at http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/image/164167647

Happy Birding,

Ken Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots

Subject: Photos added to website
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 25 Sep 2016 14:38:33 -0500
OKBirds,

 

I have added the last of my photos from this spring shorebird migration from
around Tulsa County, along with photos of a couple of Western Sandpipers and
a Killdeer from Wagoner County in mid July. For those interested see the
link below.

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

Cheers,

 

Jim

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Chimney Swift
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2016 18:09:41 +0000
Had not seen any Chimney Swifts in Tonkawa for a couple of weeks...they all 
disappeared with the last big cold front. Had one flying over campus a few 
minutes ago. Additionally, White-winged Doves are in Tonkawa (about a dozen). 


Gene

Eugene A. Young


Agriculture, Science & Engineering
Northern Oklahoma College
1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310
Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310
Phone: 580-628-6482
Fax: 580-628-6209
E-Mail: Eugene.Young AT noc.edu
Website: www.noc.edu


Subject: Thursday at Hackberry Flat
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2016 12:40:16 -0500
A friend and I made a photo journey to Hackberry Flat Thursday
morning.  Our target was the Long-billed Curlew, a 'lifer' for Lonnie
and they were present.

Other notable birds were three Black-bellied Plovers along with one
American Golden Plover sharing the same spit of sand bar as the
Long-billed Curlews in the Weir Unit.

On top of one of the clumps of reeds in the named unit stood an
American Bittern observing our every move, how cool it that?

We saw at least 10 (or more) Swainson's Hawks and American Kestrels.

Matt Jung, OKC
Subject: Re: ruddy shelduck in Tulsa area
From: Larry Mays <larrymays1949 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 22 Sep 2016 15:22:34 -0500
  On the ebird home page today is a report entitled "Hurricane Newton:
Tubenoses in the desert" about the aftermath of that named hurricane coming
ashore, dropping to tropical storm status, and tracking across southern
Arizona.  Very much worth a read.  I couldn't stop giggling.  How would YOU
like a shearwater to fly across YOUR driveway?  Ebird.org to check it out.
  Larry Mays

On Thu, Sep 22, 2016 at 10:29 AM, Curtis, Tom 
wrote:

> There is a ruddy shelduck associating with a flock of Canada geese along
> highway 51 across the river from Sand Springs. This flock of geese has
> regularly been grazing for the past week or so in the pasture created by
> the Tulsa Boys Home about a year ago.  I’m pretty sure of the ID, but did
> not have any optics with me.  It’s probably an escapee, but it actually is
> more wary of people than are the geese.
>
>
> Anyway, I thought I’d put it out there if anyone is interested, since
> there may be at least one record of a true vagrancy for this species
> (mentioned in Birds and Birding at Cape May: What to See and When and
> Where to Go, and discussed, but placed into origin hypothetical by ABA –
> 2003 checklist committee).
>
>
>
> Have fun,
>
> Tom Curtis
>
Subject: ruddy shelduck in Tulsa area
From: "Curtis, Tom" <tom.curtis AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Thu, 22 Sep 2016 15:29:07 +0000
There is a ruddy shelduck associating with a flock of Canada geese along 
highway 51 across the river from Sand Springs. This flock of geese has 
regularly been grazing for the past week or so in the pasture created by the 
Tulsa Boys Home about a year ago. I'm pretty sure of the ID, but did not have 
any optics with me. It's probably an escapee, but it actually is more wary of 
people than are the geese. 


Anyway, I thought I'd put it out there if anyone is interested, since there may 
be at least one record of a true vagrancy for this species (mentioned in Birds 
and Birding at Cape May: What to See and When and Where to Go, and discussed, 
but placed into origin hypothetical by ABA - 2003 checklist committee). 


Have fun,
Tom Curtis
Subject: Rogers County yard migrants.
From: Ken or Carol Williams <kcwilliams AT TULSACONNECT.COM>
Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2016 19:47:45 -0500
Fellow Birders,

We have been having a few more moving through our yard in the last few 
days.  Late Monday we had a Summer Tanager, yesterday a Black & White 
Warbler, a Yellow Warbler and an unidentified warbler with a large eye 
ring and yellowish belly.  Today, I went to Oxley with Jim Arterburn and 
we had a good look at a Canada Warbler and several Yellow Warblers.  
While I was gone Carol saw a Northern Waterthrush and  an unidentified 
Vireo.  Tonight the Waterthrush came back three times and I finally got 
a picture about dark.  We also had a Yellow Warbler and a Wilson's 
Warbler. All of the birds except the Waterthrush were only in the yard a 
few minutes and never came back.

A picture of the Northern Waterthrush is located in my 2016 Picture 
Folder at the front of the pictures. 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_2016_pictures

Happy Birding,

Ken & Carol Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots
Subject: Cimarron County Birds
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2016 09:15:57 -0500
Hello All,

Made a couple of stops in Cimarron County Monday afternoon/Tuesday morning
on the way home from CA, AZ and NM.

The Felt picnic area was fairly busy on Monday despite the heat. Primarily
of interest was a vireo, which I think is a Cassin's (photo analysis
pending).

In Black Mesa State Park on Tuesday morning, saw a Black Phoebe below the
dam at Lake Etling.

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: common nighthawk migration
From: "VanWinkle, Tony N." <tvanwin1 AT OU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2016 12:43:33 +0000
We've seen flocks of nighthawks on several consecutive evenings now from our 
place near Coyle. Anyone else noticed them? 


Subject: Re: Hefner LB Curlew, SB Dowitcher, others
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 23:34:22 -0500
Bill; Long-billed Curlews at Hackberry Flat.  See on my flickr page:
www.flickr.com/photos/mpjinokc/

That place is magical, my opinion.

Matt

On 9/8/16, William Diffin  wrote:
> Juvenile Long-billed Curlew flew in to pond at south end of canal inlet.
> Stayed for about 10 minutes and flew off to next inlet east near middle of
> golf course. Down-curved bill, almost as short as Whimbrel, shorter than on
> adult LB Curlew. Orange wing linings and upperwing inner primaries and
> secondaries, dark outer primaries and primary coverts. Pale gray legs,
> longer legs and longer neck than Whimbrel. Loud call reminiscent of large
> gull made frequently in flight. Standing bird has golden base color on
> wings and body.
>
> Juvenile Short-billed Dowitcher was foraging for a time in neck between
> canal inlet and pond. Tiger-striped tertials (orange bars on black
> background), orange edges on scapulars. Light yellow-orange wash on lower
> breast.
>
> Juvenile Common Tern on *west* side of canal inlet near large bolted pipe,
> roosting with 48 Forster's Terns. Common Tern has black carpal bar,
> slightly brownish back and tertials, subterminal dark crescents on tertials
> and inner greater coverts, black bill with small area of red-orange at
> base, folded primaries uniformly gray with no molt contrasts.
>
> Also 19 dark ibis on south shore of pond, 23 American Avocets in canal
> inlet and western bay of Prairie Dog Point, 11 Stilt Sandpipers, 2 Western
> Sandpipers, 4 N Shovelers, 14 Blue-winged Teal. Other continuing birds as
> expected.
>
> Bill Diffin, OKC
>
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Sep 20, 2016
From: Louis Truex <ml2x1954 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 23:17:48 -0500
I did a Hackberry Flat survey with Kurt Meisenzahl today.  We had a nice
Blue-headed Vireo and 12 shorebird species.
A nice size group got away from us on the N end of the
lake....grrrrrr.....but the LBCU's were nice and close in the Weir
Unit......that and the lake are the only two locations for water at
present.  They are going to start moving water again
around Oct. 15.

Goodest Birding,

Mary and Lou Truex
ml2x1954 AT  gmail.com

Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
Sep 20, 2016 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
11.0 mile(s)
Comments:     with Kurt Meisenzahl
55 species (+7 other taxa)

Gadwall  2
American Wigeon  2
Mallard  37
Blue-winged Teal  350
Northern Shoveler  6
Northern Pintail  2
Green-winged Teal  3
Redhead  77
Ruddy Duck  140
Pied-billed Grebe  43
Eared Grebe  21
Double-crested Cormorant  11
American Bittern  1
Great Blue Heron  2
Great Egret  2
Snowy Egret  1
Little Blue Heron  1
Cattle Egret  9
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  5
Glossy/White-faced Ibis  21
Turkey Vulture  1
Northern Harrier  4
Swainson's Hawk  11
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Common Gallinule  6     all juveniles
American Coot  800
Black-necked Stilt  204     88 sub adults 26 75% 90 adults
American Avocet  76
American Golden-Plover  1
Killdeer  9
Long-billed Curlew  22
Marbled Godwit  1
Stilt Sandpiper  34
Least Sandpiper  17
peep sp.  50
Long-billed Dowitcher  375
Solitary Sandpiper  1
Greater Yellowlegs  8
Lesser Yellowlegs  16
Mourning Dove  10
Common Nighthawk  1
Downy/Hairy Woodpecker  1
American Kestrel  7
Peregrine Falcon  1     juvenile
Least Flycatcher  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Eastern Kingbird  1
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  26
Loggerhead Shrike  1
Blue-headed Vireo  1
Barn Swallow  3
Cliff Swallow  50
Cliff/Cave Swallow  100     juvenile swallows gathering on the power lines
Yellow Warbler  3
Spizella sp.  4
Lark Sparrow  3
Dickcissel  1
Red-winged Blackbird  100
Western/Eastern Meadowlark  7
Yellow-headed Blackbird  125
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
Bullock's/Baltimore Oriole  1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/
checklist/S31684730

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 20
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 22:27:50 -0500
It was partly cloudy, and miserably hot on the survey today.  Very unusual
weather for this time of year.  This whole month as been unusually hot and
wet.  45 species were found.  Most of our summer birds are leaving early and
very few migrants are coming through.  No swallows were found.  Heres my
list for today:

 

Wood Duck - 110

Blue-winged Teal - 100

Northern Shoveler - 5

Pied-billed Grebe - 50

Neotropic Cormorant - 3

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Great-blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 12

Snowy Egret - 4

Little-blue Heron - 41

Cattle Egret - 110

Green Heron - 1

White Ibis - 10

Turkey Vulture - 20

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Merlin - 1 imm.

Purple Gallinule - 2

Common Gallinule - 34

American Coot - 18

Killdeer - 2

Rock Pigeon - 6

Mourning Dove - 5

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 4

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 3

Hairy Woodpecker - 2

Northern Flicker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 3

Eastern Phoebe - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 11 (many still singing)

Yellow-throated Vireo - 2 (one still singing)

Blue Jay - 11

American Crow - 10

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Carolina Wren - 10

Brown Thrasher - 1

European Starling - 3

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Wilson's Warbler - 1 adult male

Hooded Warbler - 1 adult male

Summer Tanager - 3

Northern Cardinal - 8

Indigo Bunting - 1

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Eastern Pondhawk

Twelve-spotted Skimmer

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

"Red/Carolina" Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Little Brown skink

Southern Leopard Frog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Fw: Louisiana Waterthrush defends nest against snake
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 16:32:24 -0500

From: Lee Bryant 
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 3:26 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Louisiana Waterthrush defends nest against snake

Hello all! My name is Lee Bryant and I am a graduate student at Arkansas State 
University. I am working with Dr. Than Boves on my MS thesis studying Louisiana 
Waterthrush and the possible impacts of eastern hemlock decline on the species' 
fitness and habitat use. Though my field sites are in Great Smoky Mountains 
National Park in Tennessee, waterthrush do breed along streams and rivers in 
Arkansas. 



While filming provisioning behavior this breeding season, I recorded a near 
depredation of a Louisiana Waterthrush nest by a juvenile ratsnake. The male 
waterthrush arrived back at the nest just in the nick of time to fend off the 
snake. Check it out at the link below: 


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3HdVWtuGKo


Empirical evidence of successful parental nest defense is lacking in scientific 
literature. This video provides an opportunity to observe rarely seen behavior 
and test theories of optimal nest defense. And, it's pretty cool to watch! 

 

This project is funded in part by the Arkansas Audubon Society.


-- 

Lee Bryant

Graduate student, M.S. in Biology
Department of Biological Sciences 

Arkansas State University
Jonesboro, AR 72401
Subject: OKC Audbon meeting Monday
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 18 Sep 2016 21:59:18 -0500
Our first meeting of the fall is tomorrow, Monday, September 19. The
meeting starts at the usual time, 7 pm, but we are at a different venue
in Will Rogers Park due to renovation of our traditional meeting place in
the Garden Exhibition Hall. For detailed directions to the new meeting
place, see the box at the bottom of the home page at the following link,
www.okc-audubon.org. The rest of the page describes the guest speaker and
her unusual  and fascinating research focus. While you are on the website,
you could take a quick scan through the newsletter for anything that looks
interesting. Always a favorite is the Recorder's Report where the first
sighting of a species each month is reported. The Bird of the Month
article is on the Rufous Hummingbird and features a spectacular color
photo. A couple of conservation topics are discussed this month in the
Perspective article on wind power and in another article on a proposed
federal law, the Saving America's Pollinators Act. A link to the current
newsletter is at the top of the newsletter archive under the Membership tab.

Bill Diffin
OKC Audubon President
Subject: Hackberry Flat LB Curlews
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 20:50:15 -0500
Well folks, I drove to HF again this Saturday morning just to see who
showed up since my last visit 8/26 and I'm pleased to post that a nice
flock of 27 Long-billed Curlews were in the Weir Unit along with a
single Marbled Godwit.

Saw FOS Northern Harriers (2), six A. Kestrels, 4 RT Hawks, 2
Swainson's Hawks and one GH Owl.

There is a sprinkling of shorebirds present but not yet in large
quantity and flushed no bitterns.  American Coots are ubiquitous!!

Matt Jung, OKC
Subject: Inca Dove in Rogers County, OK
From: Ken or Carol Williams <kcwilliams AT TULSACONNECT.COM>
Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2016 16:06:24 -0500
Fellow Birders,

We had an Inca Dove stop by our yard today for a snack on the ground 
below the feeder, then it flew up and preened on for a while before 
moving on.  Pictures are posted on my website in at the top of my 2016 
Folder http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_2016_pictures

You just never know what might show up in the yard.

Ken Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots
Subject: Call for Abstracts - OkNRC Conference
From: "Crawford, Priscilla H." <prill AT OU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 15:12:37 +0000
Hello Birders!

The Oklahoma Natural Resources Conference is calling for abstracts for the 2017 
Conference on February 22-24 in Tulsa. Suitable presentations include 
scientific research, land management techniques, restoration reports, 
observational studies, and much more! We encourage both students and 
professionals to submit their work. 


The meeting is hosted by the Oklahoma Chapters of The Wildlife Society, 
American Fisheries Society, Society for Range Management, Oklahoma Invasive 
Plant Council, Prescribed Fire Council, the Soil and Water Conservation 
Society, Oklahoma Ornithological Society, Oklahoma Division of Society of 
American Foresters, and the Oklahoma Game Warden Association. Last year we had 
nearly 300 attendees from across the state, representing several universities, 
state and federal agencies, and non-profit organizations. The conference is an 
excellent chance to hear about research and management projects specific to 
Oklahoma. Of course, there are many bird related talks, as well as a diversity 
of presentations on other wildlife and habitats. 


Please find the guidelines for submission at: 
http://www.oknrc.com/home/call-for-abstracts/ 


Thanks!
Priscilla

Priscilla Crawford
Conservation Specialist
Oklahoma Biological Survey
prill AT ou.edu
priscillacrawford.com
Subject: OOS Crane Chase Event!
From: Doug Wood <DWood AT SE.EDU>
Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 14:47:27 +0000
CRANE CHASE!!!
Who?                    You!
What? The Oklahoma Ornithological Society is hosting a 1-day Crane Chase to 
look for Whooping Cranes on their fall migration. This event consists of field 
trip to look for Whooping Cranes and Sandhill Cranes. We will drive around the 
Refuge and surrounding areas to find the cranes and observe their behavior. 
Participants will also take part in a discussion about their migration behavior 
and management with ornithologists/wildlife biologists. 

Where?                Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge
When? Sunday, November 20, 2016. This is a date when the cranes have been 
present on fall migration in recent years. The event length will depend on when 
we find the cranes. We will scout ahead of time to get an idea of where they 
will be, but some driving will be required. 

Why?                    Because cranes are awesome.
How? We will meet at the Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge 
Headquarters/Visitor Center. Directions to the HQ/VC can be found at this link 
https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Salt_Plains/visit/plan_your_visit.html . The meeting 
time is 8 AM on Sunday November 20. 

 Field trip leaders will include Doug Wood and Jimmy Woodard. The Refuge 
Biologist is planning to attend as well. 

 We will carpool/caravan as much as possible. Standard field gear. Recommend 
that you bring pack lunch/snacks as there is not much in the way of eating 
establishments in that area. 

RSVP: Please send an email to Doug Wood (dwood AT se.edu) if 
you plan to attend, so we have an idea of who will be attending/headcount. Hope 
to see you there. 




Douglas R. Wood, Ph.D.
Professor of Biological Sciences
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
PMB 4068
1405 N. 4th Ave
Durant, OK 74701-0609
dwood AT se.edu
580-745-2272

Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 14
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 08:39:21 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot on the survey today.  51 species were found.
Things are still very slow.  The biggest highlight of the day was running
into a large flock of mixed swallows sitting on power lines from which I was
able to scope and find numerous Cave Swallows, many of which were in adult
plumage.  There were probably more Caves in the group but about half the
birds were in the air flying around at any given time and they kept
switching places on the wires so it was hard to get an exact count, but I
was able to see 14 Caves at one time on the wires.  Here is my list for
today:

 

Wood Duck - 41

Mallard - 1

Blue-winged Teal - 104

Pied-billed Grebe - 34

Neotropic Cormorant - 3

Anhinga - 1

Great-blue Heron - 15

Great Egret - 3

Snowy Egret - 2

Little-blue Heron - 25

Cattle Egret - 145

Green Heron - 1

White Ibis - 6

"dark" Ibis (Plegadis sp.) - 1

Black Vulture - 2

Turkey Vulture - 89

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 3

Common Gallinule - 35

American Coot - 13

Killdeer - 1

Mourning Dove - 4

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 5

Red-headed Woodpecker - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Least Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 17 (many still singing)

Yellow-throated Vireo - 1 (still singing)

Blue Jay - 6

American Crow - 20

Tree Swallow - 30

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 2

Cliff Swallow - 7

Cave Swallow - 14 (including numerous adult plumaged birds.)

Barn Swallow - 2

Carolina Chickadee - 7

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 1

European Starling - 6

Common Yellowthroat - 2

Summer Tanager - 6

Northern Cardinal - 9

Indigo Bunting - 3

American Goldfinch - 1

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Common Green Darner

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Twelve-spotted Skimmer

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: birds and dragonflies moving
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 00:30:22 +0000
Stepped out of the house this evening (Norman, OK), and noticed a hawk way up 
high.  When I got binocs on it, there was actually a small kettle of 
Swainson's hawks.  I watched about half hour, and over 100 Mississippi kites, 
almost 100 nighthawks, Chimney Swifts and odd passerines including an Orchard 
Oriole and probable Great Crested Flycatcher.  

Also dozens of dragonflies, lot of them pondhawks, but several other species.
FYI.  Still light.

CHEERS,                            JOE Grzybowski
Subject: upcoming events - Payne County Audubon Society
From: "O Connell, Tim" <tim.oconnell AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 20:35:06 +0000
Dear Friends and Supporters of the Payne County Audubon Society,

We hope you’ll join us for events in October that will be here before we know 
it. First, the PCAS will host Mr. Cory Suddarth of Suddarth Optical Repair in 
Shawnee for a presentation on Thursday, Oct. 6, 7:00 pm in the Education Center 
of the Botanic Garden at OSU. Cory can help answer all your questions about 
binoculars and telescopes, and his visit will be a great opportunity to arrange 
a repair of those old, beat-up optics. 


The real advance planning for next month, however, concerns our weekend camping 
field trip to the Great Salt Plains, Oct. 14–16! For this one it is important 
to contact our trip organizer, Les Imboden 
(quailrancher AT yahoo.com - 405-533-1532), so he 
can reserve camping sites and other accommodations ahead of time. This should 
be a great trip for birding and other nature enjoyment and a great time for a 
campout. The trip is a joint offering between the PCAS and the Cimarron Group 
of the Sierra Club. You’ll find full details here: 
https://paynecountyaudubonsociety.com/whats-new/. 


Otherwise, I hope you’re enjoying the wonders that fall migration has to 
offer. The last of our Mississippi Kites are now slipping southward, but 
we’ve still got hummingbirds for a few more weeks and our scissortails will 
stick with us until late October. By then, it might really start to feel like 
fall! 


Good birding,
~Tim O’Connell
PCAS President


Subject: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 10:40:32 -0500
Plant blindness even with the best of birders prohibits the recovery of our 
declining birds. Native plants produce native insects which fuel the world and 
feed birds, other wildlife and people. Many see a wall of green and consider 
that what they see is habitat. We have 625 million acres in the US dedicated to 
exotic and non-native plants which are of little value to native insects or 
birds. Our grassland birds are in significant decline and people drive the 
highways seeing millions of acres of exotic grasslands and think that is bird 
habitat. If you are driving these areas in the spring and summer and do not see 
meadowlarks, Dickcissels, and other grassland birds perched on a post or wire 
you can bet that it is not habitat. Those interested in bird recovery need to 
discard the myopic filters that prevents them from seeing what is native plant 
habitat and what is exotic plants occupying space needed for native plants, 
birds and other wildlife. 

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

http://conservationmagazine.org/2016/08/plant-blindness/
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite, Wichita Mts WR
From: John Ault <jwault742 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 12 Sep 2016 18:47:58 -0500
First located and identified by Steve Hodge (refuge staff) about 11 a.m.
(Monday, 9-12-16).  Seen by he and I about 11:30 a.m., extreme SE corner of
Antelope Flat (0.25 mile west of West Cache Creek), about 0.5 mile west of
the entrance to the Corrals and 0.25 mile north of SR 49.

Distinctive "swallow tail", leading edge of underside of wings and body -
white; tips and trailing edge of wings - black; underside of tail - black.
Larger than the numerous nearby Mississippi Kites.  Soaring/circling over
grasslands.  Photograph.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/99006596 AT N08/29532072222/in/datetaken-public/

-- 
John Ault
Lawton, OK
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite
From: Louis Truex <ml2x1954 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 12 Sep 2016 16:18:38 -0500
Hello Everyone,

Steve Hodge called this morning and told us he had a STKI at the Wichita
Mountain National Wildlife Refuge.  The bird was located just west of the
cattle pens closest to the Refuge HQ almost to the sunset cutoff.

Goodest Birding,

Mary and Lou Truex
ml2x1954 AT gmail.com
Subject: Re: Oklahoma BIrds - The Washington Post: Caught on radar: Thousands of birds took flight minutes before an Okla. earthquake
From: Mike Brewer <mike.brewer AT ATT.NET>
Date: Mon, 12 Sep 2016 13:54:31 -0500
This is amazing !!!  

Thank You Barry

 

Mike Brewer

  Mike.brewer AT suddenlink.net

  Mike.brewer AT att.net

“Keep in Touch with Your Dreams”

 

 

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Friday, September 9, 2016 10:23 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Oklahoma BIrds - The Washington Post: Caught on radar: Thousands of 
birds took flight minutes before an Okla. earthquake 


 

From: Barry Haas   

Sent: Tuesday, September 06, 2016 5:00 PM

To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU   

Subject: The Washington Post: Caught on radar: Thousands of birds took flight 
minutes before an Okla. earthquake 


 

Looks like having a bird brain is not a bad thing!

 

Barry Haas

 

Caught on radar: Thousands of birds took flight minutes before an Okla. 
earthquake 

The Washington Post

Scientists are keen to learn if and why animals can sense impending earthquakes 
minutes or hours before they occur. Read the full story 
 


 

 
Subject: FW: eBird Report - Spavinaw Creek, Sep 11, 2016
From: Laura Stanfill <laurastanfill AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Mon, 12 Sep 2016 15:49:37 +0000



From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
Sent: Sunday, September 11, 2016 7:51 PM
To: laurastanfill AT live.com
Subject: eBird Report - Spavinaw Creek, Sep 11, 2016



Spavinaw Creek, Mayes, Oklahoma, US
Sep 11, 2016 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
Comments:     By kayak from Spavinaw SP to Spring Park
33 species (+1 other taxa)

Wood Duck  3
Great Blue Heron  3
Great Egret  4
Green Heron  1
Turkey Vulture  5
Osprey  2
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  2
Red-tailed Hawk (borealis)  1
Ring-billed Gull  2
Mourning Dove  2
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-headed Woodpecker  6
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Downy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Least Flycatcher  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  1
Fish Crow  3
Tree Swallow  4
Carolina Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  1
Bewick's Wren  1
Gray Catbird  1
Northern Mockingbird  1
Prothonotary Warbler 1 Saw all yellow head and chest first and thought it was a 
yellow warbler. Then saw grey back and wings. Seen from 12' with good 
binoculars. 

Common Yellowthroat  1
American Redstart  1
Northern Parula  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler 1 Dull grey above, light underneath, pale yellow wash on 
sides. Did not get a look at yellow rump but looked like yellow-rumped have 
seen may times before. Seen from 20' with good binoculars. 

Northern Cardinal  1
American Goldfinch  3

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31537497

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: FW: eBird Report - Spavinaw Lake--Tag Hollow, Sep 10, 2016
From: Laura Stanfill <LauraStanfill AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sat, 10 Sep 2016 17:46:07 +0000



From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
Sent: Saturday, September 10, 2016 12:40 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Spavinaw Lake--Tag Hollow, Sep 10, 2016



Spavinaw Lake--Tag Hollow, Mayes, Oklahoma, US
Sep 10, 2016 9:40 AM - 11:10 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Primarily area around the boat houses
26 species

Great Blue Heron  1
Turkey Vulture  1
Osprey  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Belted Kingfisher  2
Red-headed Woodpecker  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
Downy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Eastern Kingbird  2
White-eyed Vireo  3
Bell's Vireo (Eastern)  1
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  1
Carolina Chickadee  1
Tufted Titmouse  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Carolina Wren  1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  1
Black-and-white Warbler  1
Northern Parula  1
Wilson's Warbler  1
Northern Cardinal  1
American Goldfinch  3

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31511148

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Second Common Tern at Hefner apperantly
From: John Hurd <jackhurd AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sat, 10 Sep 2016 11:23:18 -0500
In addition to Five Caspian Terns, and Hundreds of Blue-winged teal, the cold 
front seems to have brought in a companion Common tern for our first.Both have 
dark carpel bar, shorter legs more extensive black caps, slightly darker 
mantles, than the Forster's Terns they are standing with. 

I hope we get more eyes on them to confirm/deny the ID and just to enjoy the 
fine day! 


Jack HurdOKC 		 	   		  
Subject: Wood Storks - Clarita
From: Doug Wood <DWood AT SE.EDU>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 21:11:35 +0000
Hi All. A former student of mine, Brian Evans, sent me photo this morning of 
Wood Storks on a farm pond southeast of Clarita. He counted 20-25. I drove up 
there this afternoon and relocated two flocks of them. A group of 9 was soaring 
with a couple Turkey Vultures over the intersection of E1780 and CR 3730. I 
drove up and found 8 more foraging in a pond on the south side of E 1750; 
approximately 1.5 miles east of the highway just south of the bend in the 
highway by Clarita turn. The storks are on post-breeding dispersal. They might 
show up at Tishomingo NWR or other similar habitats. Doug. 

Subject: Oklahoma BIrds - The Washington Post: Caught on radar: Thousands of birds took flight minutes before an Okla. earthquake
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 10:23:20 -0500
From: Barry Haas 
Sent: Tuesday, September 06, 2016 5:00 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: The Washington Post: Caught on radar: Thousands of birds took flight 
minutes before an Okla. earthquake 


Looks like having a bird brain is not a bad thing!

Barry Haas


Caught on radar: Thousands of birds took flight minutes before an Okla. 
earthquake 

The Washington Post

Scientists are keen to learn if and why animals can sense impending earthquakes 
minutes or hours before they occur. Read the full story 




Subject: Hefner LB Curlew, SB Dowitcher, others
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 8 Sep 2016 18:03:00 -0500
Juvenile Long-billed Curlew flew in to pond at south end of canal inlet.
Stayed for about 10 minutes and flew off to next inlet east near middle of
golf course. Down-curved bill, almost as short as Whimbrel, shorter than on
adult LB Curlew. Orange wing linings and upperwing inner primaries and
secondaries, dark outer primaries and primary coverts. Pale gray legs,
longer legs and longer neck than Whimbrel. Loud call reminiscent of large
gull made frequently in flight. Standing bird has golden base color on
wings and body.

Juvenile Short-billed Dowitcher was foraging for a time in neck between
canal inlet and pond. Tiger-striped tertials (orange bars on black
background), orange edges on scapulars. Light yellow-orange wash on lower
breast.

Juvenile Common Tern on *west* side of canal inlet near large bolted pipe,
roosting with 48 Forster's Terns. Common Tern has black carpal bar,
slightly brownish back and tertials, subterminal dark crescents on tertials
and inner greater coverts, black bill with small area of red-orange at
base, folded primaries uniformly gray with no molt contrasts.

Also 19 dark ibis on south shore of pond, 23 American Avocets in canal
inlet and western bay of Prairie Dog Point, 11 Stilt Sandpipers, 2 Western
Sandpipers, 4 N Shovelers, 14 Blue-winged Teal. Other continuing birds as
expected.

Bill Diffin, OKC
Subject: Tulsa Birders
From: Jo <jo.loyd AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 8 Sep 2016 11:24:44 -0500
The Tuesday Morning Birders will begin meeting at 8 a.m. beginning Tuesday,
September 13.  We will still meet at our usual location in the LaFortune
Park lot off Yale near the traffic lights and the golf course entrance.

If you need additional information, please contact me offline.

 

Jo Loyd

jo.loyd AT sbcglobal.net
Subject: Re: Northern Bobwhite Management Video
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2016 14:45:08 -0500
Thank you. The video is light on management needs and what to do is somewhat 
difficult to sort out. Such videos should also cover the things “not to 
do”. There are landowners managing millions of acres that are doing things 
thinking they are helping the Northern Bobwhite and the efforts are counter 
productive. 


Yes, the Northern Bobwhite is a quail and can be called a quail. The point I am 
making is that quail is not part of the Bobwhite name and it seems to me if 
professionals are putting out a video on the Northern Bobwhite they should get 
the title correct otherwise it continues to perpetuate misinformation. 


Jerry 

From: O Connell, Tim 
Sent: Wednesday, September 07, 2016 2:21 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Northern Bobwhite Management Video

A little light on detail, but yes a nice little presentation on management for 
quail. Thanks for sharing it, Jerry! 

~tim

PS: We who work with Northern Bobwhite call them “quail” all the time, and 
it’s accurate to do so. “Northern Bobwhite” is just the accepted English 
common name established by the American Ornithologists’ Union’s committee 
on nomenclature. I’ve met very few hunters and ranchers who pay much heed to 
the AOU's recommendations for names of things they already know! 




  On Sep 7, 2016, at 11:39 AM, Jerry Davis  wrote:

 A good Northern Bobwhite management video! People recognize the problem but 
are not willing to change management practices and habitat needed to make a 
change in the downward spiral. The habitat needs of the Northern Bobwhite is 
also needed by over 40 other bird species. We still have people calling the 
Northern Bobwhite a bobwhite quail. Quail is not part of the Bobwhite’s name. 

   
   
  https://vimeo.com/album/4086985/video/178249017

  Jerry W. Davis
  Hot Springs, AR
Subject: Re: Northern Bobwhite Management Video
From: "O Connell, Tim" <tim.oconnell AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2016 19:21:05 +0000
A little light on detail, but yes a nice little presentation on management for 
quail. Thanks for sharing it, Jerry! 

~tim

PS: We who work with Northern Bobwhite call them “quail” all the time, and 
it’s accurate to do so. “Northern Bobwhite” is just the accepted English 
common name established by the American Ornithologists’ Union’s committee 
on nomenclature. I’ve met very few hunters and ranchers who pay much heed to 
the AOU's recommendations for names of things they already know! 




On Sep 7, 2016, at 11:39 AM, Jerry Davis 
> wrote: 


A good Northern Bobwhite management video! People recognize the problem but are 
not willing to change management practices and habitat needed to make a change 
in the downward spiral. The habitat needs of the Northern Bobwhite is also 
needed by over 40 other bird species. We still have people calling the Northern 
Bobwhite a bobwhite quail. Quail is not part of the Bobwhite’s name. 



https://vimeo.com/album/4086985/video/178249017

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR

Subject: Northern Bobwhite Management Video
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2016 11:39:07 -0500
A good Northern Bobwhite management video! People recognize the problem but are 
not willing to change management practices and habitat needed to make a change 
in the downward spiral. The habitat needs of the Northern Bobwhite is also 
needed by over 40 other bird species. We still have people calling the Northern 
Bobwhite a bobwhite quail. Quail is not part of the Bobwhite’s name. 


 

 

https://vimeo.com/album/4086985/video/178249017


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 6
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2016 08:46:32 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot on the bird survey yesterday.  50 species were
found.  It was even worse than last week for surveying.  Birds were very
quiet and scarce.  Be glad when the cold front comes in next week and brings
some migrants.  Here is my list for yesterday:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 3

Wood Duck - 89

Mallard - 8

Blue-winged Teal - 32

Pied-billed Grebe - 29

Neotropic Cormorant - 3

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 9

Great-blue Heron - 8

Great Egret - 8

Snowy Egret - 1

Little-blue Heron - 7

Cattle Egret - 475

Green Heron - 5

White Ibis - 21

Black Vulture - 5

Turkey Vulture - 15

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 5

Common Gallinule - 40 adults & full sized juveniles (also several small
young.)

American Coot - 10

Killdeer - 2

Rock Pigeon - 2

Mourning Dove - 7

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Alder Flycatcher - 1

Least Flycatcher - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 11

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 13

Fish Crow - 1

Tree Swallow - 1

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 8

Cliff Swallow - 1

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Carolina Wren - 6

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Yellow-breasted Chat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 12

Indigo Bunting - 13

Painted Bunting - 2

Red-winged Blackbird - 10

American Goldfinch - 1

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Twelve-spotted Skimmer

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Western Cottonmouth

Little Brown Skink

Leopard Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: The Panhandle from September 2-5, 2016.
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2016 18:16:03 -0500
Looks like you had a better list than Joe....except for the Hepatic.  Are
you and Jim close to 300?

Went to PP today and it was the quietest ever...highlights were catbird,
thrasher and yellow-throated vireo if that gives you a clue.....

Hope to check out Bois dark someday soon....

On Tue, Sep 6, 2016 at 4:10 PM, Mary Peterson 
wrote:

> Hello All,
>
>       Jim Deming, Mary and I went out to the Panhandle this past weekend.
> The weather was good, except for the gusty winds at times. We looked at a
> couple places at the Salt Plains on the way out. The water is still high
> below the dam and at Sand Creek Bay. All birds listed were from west of
> Boise City,  unless otherwise mentioned.  Highlights included:
>
>
> Scaled Quail-20+
>
> Golden Eagle-1
>
> Marbled Godwit-3 at Sand Creek Bay
>
> Western Sandpiper-2 at Sandpiper Trail
>
> Red-necked Phalarope-5 at a pond at the junction of Texas County 4 mile
> road and highway 64/412.
>
> Barn owl-1
>
> Western Screech Owl-1
>
> Burrowing Owl-10+
>
> Roadrunner-1
>
> Black-chinned Hummingbird-10+
>
> Ladder-backed Woodpecker-2
>
> Vermilion Flycatcher-4---2 at the state park and 2 in Kenton
>
> Olive-sided Flycatcher-1
>
> Western Wood-Pewee-5+
>
> Say's Phoebe-10+
>
> Cassin's Kingbird-Several at the state park
>
> Scrub Jay-1
>
> Black-billed Magpie-6+
>
> Common Raven-Many west of Boise City
>
> Juniper Titmouse-1
>
> Bushtit-20+
>
> Rock Wren-1
>
> Bewick's Wren-Several
>
> Canyon Wren-Several
>
> Curve-billed Thrasher-10+
>
> Western Tanager-1
>
> Canyon Towhee-10+
>
> Rufous-crowned Sparrow-1
>
> Brewer's Sparrow-Several
>
> Lark Bunting-100+
>
> Yellow-headed Blackbird-10+
>
>
> Mark Peterson
>
> Bartlesville
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: The Panhandle from September 2-5, 2016.
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2016 21:10:53 +0000
Hello All,

 Jim Deming, Mary and I went out to the Panhandle this past weekend. The 
weather was good, except for the gusty winds at times. We looked at a couple 
places at the Salt Plains on the way out. The water is still high below the dam 
and at Sand Creek Bay. All birds listed were from west of Boise City, unless 
otherwise mentioned. Highlights included: 



Scaled Quail-20+

Golden Eagle-1

Marbled Godwit-3 at Sand Creek Bay

Western Sandpiper-2 at Sandpiper Trail

Red-necked Phalarope-5 at a pond at the junction of Texas County 4 mile road 
and highway 64/412. 


Barn owl-1

Western Screech Owl-1

Burrowing Owl-10+

Roadrunner-1

Black-chinned Hummingbird-10+

Ladder-backed Woodpecker-2

Vermilion Flycatcher-4---2 at the state park and 2 in Kenton

Olive-sided Flycatcher-1

Western Wood-Pewee-5+

Say's Phoebe-10+

Cassin's Kingbird-Several at the state park

Scrub Jay-1

Black-billed Magpie-6+

Common Raven-Many west of Boise City

Juniper Titmouse-1

Bushtit-20+

Rock Wren-1

Bewick's Wren-Several

Canyon Wren-Several

Curve-billed Thrasher-10+

Western Tanager-1

Canyon Towhee-10+

Rufous-crowned Sparrow-1

Brewer's Sparrow-Several

Lark Bunting-100+

Yellow-headed Blackbird-10+


Mark Peterson

Bartlesville


Subject: Re: A few Migrants....And an Armchair Lifer
From: "Curtis, Tom" <tom.curtis AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2016 21:03:47 +0000
I love it when the splitters are dominant. I got Black-crested titmouse that 
way. Even better was the towhee split (2 new spp). There’s a downside though. 
It probably won’t long until the crossbills are split into 6-8 spp, and we 
will be recording them all as crossbill sp. 


Have fun,
Tom Curtis

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Bill Carrell
Sent: Tuesday, September 06, 2016 2:55 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: A few Migrants....And an Armchair Lifer

Hello All,

Still a little slow, but a few migrants over the weekend. At Oxley on Saturday, 
one Mourning Warbler. Also saw a couple of Prothonatary Warblers at the marsh, 
don't often see them in September. Also saw an Osprey at Lake Yahola. 

Sunday, two Wilson's Warblers at Oxley. Amazingly, these were the first for the 
year in Oklahoma for me, did hear two or three in the spring (and saw one in 
South Texas in February). 

Monday, one Black-Throated Green Warbler at the Keystone mountain bike trails.

Finally, the AOU has split the coastal and interior Western Scrub-Jays into two 
species. Of note for Oklahoma is a name change, Woodhouse's Scrub-Jay ( the 
coastal species is called California Scrub-Jay). 


Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

Subject: A few Migrants....And an Armchair Lifer
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2016 14:55:14 -0500
Hello All,

Still a little slow, but a few migrants over the weekend. At Oxley on
Saturday, one Mourning Warbler. Also saw a couple of Prothonatary Warblers
at the marsh, don't often see them in September. Also saw an Osprey at Lake
Yahola.
Sunday, two Wilson's Warblers at Oxley. Amazingly, these were the first for
the year in Oklahoma for me, did hear two or three in the spring (and saw
one in South Texas in February).
Monday, one Black-Throated Green Warbler at the Keystone mountain bike
trails.

Finally, the AOU has split the coastal and interior Western Scrub-Jays into
two species. Of note for Oklahoma is a name change, Woodhouse's Scrub-Jay (
the coastal species is called California Scrub-Jay).

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Re: Swallow-tailed Kite in Duncan
From: Bill Adams <ba1980 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2016 03:18:30 +0000
I went back around sunset and didn't find any kites.  If i can get up in the 
morning, I'll check before work. 

Bill

      From: John Ault 
 To: Bill Adams ; "OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU" 
 

 Sent: Monday, September 5, 2016 6:57 PM
 Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Swallow-tailed Kite in Duncan
   
I searched the area from 3-4 p.m. (Monday) but was not able to find the 
Swallow-tailed Kite. John AultLawton, OK 


 On Monday, September 5, 2016 10:20 AM, Bill Adams  
wrote: 

 
 

 We relocated it in a dead tree behind Mark Twain School.
Picture can be seen here:SouthernOK Photography - Timeline | Facebook

Bill AdamsDuncan, OK

      From: Bill Adams 
 To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
 Sent: Monday, September 5, 2016 7:36 AM
 Subject: [OKBIRDS] Swallow-tailed Kite in Duncan
  
We just had a Swallow-tailed Kite fly over my mom's house in Duncan!
Bill Adams

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

   

 
   

   
Subject: Re: Swallow-tailed Kite in Duncan
From: Bill Adams <ba1980 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 15:15:54 +0000
We relocated it in a dead tree behind Mark Twain School.
Picture can be seen here:SouthernOK Photography - Timeline | Facebook

Bill AdamsDuncan, OK

      From: Bill Adams 
 To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
 Sent: Monday, September 5, 2016 7:36 AM
 Subject: [OKBIRDS] Swallow-tailed Kite in Duncan
   
We just had a Swallow-tailed Kite fly over my mom's house in Duncan!
Bill Adams

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

   
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite in Duncan
From: Bill Adams <ba1980 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 12:36:09 +0000
We just had a Swallow-tailed Kite fly over my mom's house in Duncan!
Bill Adams

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
Subject: Cimarron County Sep 2-3
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2016 18:11:44 +0000
Hello,   Spent 2 days in Cimarron County (first this year--think I had 
"Cimarron County-withdrawal" syndrome to cure).  With the rain they have been 
having out there, was a good trip for birding--112 trip species, 103 in 
Cimarron County. 

  The best find was a bird I believe is a Hepatic Tanager in the mesa 
country.  Posted photos to the OOS Facebook page.  Beside the all blackish to 
gray bill, and dark loral line, gave "chup" calls rather than the "hic-up-up" 
calls of Summer.  Call matches that of Hepatic, and think that clinches it. 
[Did find one Summer Tanager at Black Mesa State Park.] 


   Had a fair number of Wilson's Warblers, and a sprinklng of Yellow.  The 
oddball warblers were one Orange-crowned, a few American Redstarts, and a 
first-winter Chestnut-sided Warbler--latter may be a county record.  Worked 
spots in the mesa and small abandoned ranch yards on the plains. 


   Among other noteworthy birds:  Had a imm. Peregrine at Lake Etling that 
insisted in giving us a show, stooping on just about anything--Great Blue 
Herons, Turkey Vultures etc.  Had another adult out in a field with a lot of 
Horned Larks in eastern Texas County (Road O) coming back late yesterday 
afternoon.  


  There were playas with water, although some on the maps were dry (shows how 
spotty the rain they do get out there can be; Castor "Lake," for example was 
dry).  Just the expected duck species; odd shorebirds included single 
Black-bellied Plover, Marbled Godwit, Black-necked Stilt, Long-billed Curlew 
(latter at playa at Hiway 3 and Mile 4 in Texas County).  14 shorebird species 
total.   


   Among other more eastern birds out there.  More Dickcissels than 
normal.  One Great Crested Flycatcher and one Scissor-tailed Flycatcher.  
There was nice push of Swainson's Hawks, lot of the immatures made for pretty 
views against blue sky--some dark morphs also. 

   Had some panhandle expecteds such as Ferruginous Hawk, Prairie Falcon, 
Burrowing Owl, Cassin's Kingbirds, Western Wood-Pewee one Lazuli Bunting, 
etc.  Also had misses, but my coverage was spotty.  No unusual 
hummingbirds--just Black-chinneds.  Not many Empidonax, but all were either 
Least or Willow.  No vireos. 


FYI.

CHEERS,                                       
JOE Grzybowski 
Subject: FW: eBird Report - Choleta Bottoms, Sep 4, 2016
From: Laura Stanfill <LauraStanfill AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2016 15:56:59 +0000



Sent from Mail for Windows 10



From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
Sent: Sunday, September 4, 2016 10:55 AM
To: laurastanfill AT live.com
Subject: eBird Report - Choleta Bottoms, Sep 4, 2016



Choleta Bottoms, Delaware, Oklahoma, US
Sep 4, 2016 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
31 species

Wood Duck  2
Great Blue Heron  2
Great Egret  1
Green Heron  1
Turkey Vulture  2
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
Pileated Woodpecker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
White-eyed Vireo  2
Red-eyed Vireo  2
American Crow  2
Fish Crow  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1
Carolina Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Carolina Wren  1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  1
Eastern Bluebird  2
Gray Catbird  1
Northern Parula  2
Chipping Sparrow  2
Summer Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  1
Indigo Bunting  1
Baltimore Oriole  1
American Goldfinch  4

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31413291

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Re: Appropriately named night herons
From: Sharon Henthorn <shenthorn205 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Fri, 2 Sep 2016 17:00:16 -0500
Dick, in my old neighborhood in OKC there is a creek that often harbors two to 
three yellow-crowned night herons each summer. At twilight they would be seen 
running uphill on the grass chasing and eating fireflies. The creek is no 
longer accessible for viewing, and I never tried to watch for them later at 
night. Sharon 


-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of rgunn1
Sent: Thursday, September 01, 2016 10:32 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Appropriately named night herons

I have never thought about it much because I am not where night herons hang out 
very often after dark, but the name "night heron" has always intrigued me. All 
the night herons I have seen have been in the day time doing regular heron 
stuff. However the last couple of evenings, walking along Chautauqua along the 
west side of the OU campus between 9 and 10, I have seen an immature 
Yellow-crowned foraging (I guess,I never saw it eat anything) on the sidewalk 
beneath in one of the street lights along the sidewalk there. It was relatively 
fearless and barely stepped aside as I passed by and came right back as I moved 
on. It was still there 15 minutes later when I came back by. The books say they 
do feed all day and night but this is the first time I have ever seen one 
actually live up to its name. After a good rain, there is a ditch there that 
drains that part of the campus but it is powder dry right now. 


Please address any comments to me personally as I still can't get OKBIRDS.

D.
Subject: Appropriately named night herons
From: rgunn1 <rgunn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2016 22:32:26 -0500
I have never thought about it much because I am not where night herons 
hang out very often after dark, but the name "night heron" has always 
intrigued me. All the night herons I have seen have been in the day time 
doing regular heron stuff. However the last couple of evenings, walking 
along Chautauqua along the west side of the OU campus between 9 and 10, 
I have seen an immature Yellow-crowned foraging (I guess,I never saw it 
eat anything)  on the sidewalk beneath in one of the street lights along 
the sidewalk there. It was relatively fearless and barely stepped aside 
as I passed by and came right back as I moved on. It was still there 15 
minutes later when I came back by. The books say they do feed all day 
and night but this is the first time I have ever seen one actually live 
up to its name. After a good rain, there is a ditch there that drains 
that part of the campus but it is powder dry right now.

Please address any comments to me personally as I still can't get OKBIRDS.

D.
Subject: DEQ Public Forum
From: Linda Adams <lindafay AT CABLEONE.NET>
Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2016 20:27:42 -0500
The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality sent the OOS a notice of a
public forum.  Bill is going to scan the flyer and try to get it up on the
OOS website this weekend, but in the meantime, I will give you the
highlights here.  I can send a scanned copy of the actual flyer to anyone
individually who would like it.  Just let me know at lindafay AT cableone.net

 

Linda Adams

 

 

 

The public forum is our opportunity to comment and let them know if they are
meeting our needs and providing timely response to environmental issues.
The Environmental Quality Board Members will meet on Tuesday, September 13,
2016 at 9:30 am at 201 ConocoPhillips OSU Alumni Center, Stillwater, OK
74078-7043.  Sign up for the forum register when you come to the Board
meeting.  You will be allocated time to speak to the Board.

 

If you are unable to attend, but would like to submit comments about
environmental issues, please contact Quiana Fields at the Oklahoma
Department of Environmental Quality, P O Box 1677, Oklahoma City, OK
73101-1677, Fax 405-702-7101, Phone 405-702-7152.
Subject: Migrants in Rogers County today
From: Ken or Carol Williams <kcwilliams AT TULSACONNECT.COM>
Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2016 20:14:57 -0500
Fellow Birders,

Thanks to the front yesterday, migrants were on the move again today in 
our Rogers County back yard, we had at least 3 Wilson's Warblers, 2 
Least Flycatchers, 1 Mourning Warbler, 2 Blue-gray Gnatcatchers & 1 
Yellow Warbler.  As usual they didn't spend much time in our yard, but 
were welcome when they did show up.

Happy Birding,

Ken Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots
Subject: Lk Hefner Merlin, Overholser Pelicans
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2016 17:30:42 -0500
Was counting peeps at the canal inlet when a Merlin flew in low and fast
from behind (west) and made a pass over the birds on the east side of the
inlet. Along the way it made a couple of desultory attempts to flush peeps
and then turned east over the golf course. All dark little raptor with
black upper tail, a prominent white terminal tail band and three or
four other very thin white tail bands.

60 American White Pelicans at the Hefner canal inlet and 100 at Lake
Overholser mud flats. Least, Semipalmated and Stilt Sandpipers and one
Spotted Sandpiper at Lake Hefner, and Least Sandpipers at Lake Overholser.
House Wren in shrubbery near Overholser cofferdam gate.

Bill Diffin, OKC
Subject: September Migration Report (2 of 2)
From: Patricia Velte <pvelte AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2016 14:06:26 -0500
September Departures

 

Mottled Duck                          September 6 - Rare in S. McCurtain Co.
only

Least Bittern                            September 29 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE,
SE

Tricolored Heron                     September 27 - Rare in Alfalfa Co. only
in NW, Rare in Canadian and Oklahoma Cos, only in C, Rare in Johnston Co.
only in SC, Rare in Bryan, Choctaw and S. McCurtain Cos. Only in SE

White Ibis                                September 16 - C, SC

Wood Stork                             September 27 - Johnston and Marshall
Cos. Only in SC; Bryan, Choctaw and S. McCurtain Cos. Only in SE

Mississippi Kite                        September 30 - ALL - East to
Washington, Rogers, Wagoner and Muskogee Cos. Only

Spotted Sandpiper                  September 27 - PAN

Willet                                       September 12 - ALL

Upland Sandpiper                   September 10 - PAN and September 28 - NW,
SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Long-billed Curlew                  September 10 - PAN Cimarron and Texas
Cos. Only

Marbled Godwit                      September 20 - PAN, NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Ruddy Turnstone                    September 28 - NW west to Alfalfa, Major
and Blaine Cos. Only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman Cos. Only, C,
SC, NE, SE           

Common Gallinule                  September 15 - NW rare in Major Co only,
SW Rare in Tillman Co. only, C, SC

Black-necked Stilt                   September 16 - PAN, C, SC, SE rare in
S. McCurtain Co only

Piping Plover                           September 28 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Least Tern                               September 21 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE,
SE

Buff-breasted Sandpiper        September 24 - NW west to Woods, Woodward,
Dewey and Custer cos only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman cos only,
C, SC, NE, SE          

Short-billed Dowitcher            September 16 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE     

Chuck-will's-widow                 September 12 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Black-chinned Hummingbird  September 15 - PAN Cimarron Co only and September
20 - NW north to Blaine, Dewey and Roger Mills cos, SW, C east to Logan,
Oklahoma and Cleveland Cos, SC rare in Stephens and Jefferson cos only

Black-billed Cuckoo                September 20 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Common Nighthawk               September 28 - PAN

Olive-sided Flycatcher            September 30 - ALL

Western Wood-Pewee            September 26 - PAN Cimarron Co only

Eastern Wood-Pewee             September 30 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher        September 25 - SW west to Caddo, Comanche
and Cotton cos only, C, SC, NE, SE

Acadian Flycatcher                 September 1 - SC Pontotoc, Johnston and
Marshall cos only, NE, SE

Alder Flycatcher                     September 16 - C, SC, NE, SE

Willow Flycatcher                   September 25 - ALL

Hammond's Flycatcher          September 26 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only

Dusky Flycatcher                   September 26 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co
only

Vermilion Flycatcher               September 15 - PAN rare in northwestern
Cimarron Co only

Ash-throated Flycatcher         September 2 - PAN Cimarron co and rare in
Texas and Beaver cos; NW rare in Blaine Co only, SW west to Comanche and
Tillman cos only           

Great Crested Flycatcher       September 17 - PAN Texas and Beaver Cos only
and September 25 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Cassin's Kingbird                    September 28 - PAN northwestern
Cimarron Co only

Western Kingbird                    September 29 - PAN  

Eastern Kingbird                     September 15 - PAN and September 21 -
NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Bell's Vireo                              September 26 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE,
SE

Black-capped Vireo                September 28 - Comanche Co only

Yellow-throated Vireo             September 29 - C west to Payne, Oklahoma
and Cleveland cos only, SC Pontotoc and Johnston cos only, NE, SE

Plumbeous Vireo                    September 21 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co
only

Cassin's Vireo                         September 7  - PAN rare in Cimarron
Co only

Warbling Vireo                        September 30 - ALL

Purple Martin                          September 12 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Tree Swallow                          September 20 - PAN, NW

Northern Rough-winged Swallow       September 20 - PAN

Bank Swallow                         September 27 - ALL

Cliff Swallow                           September 6 - PAN and September 28 -
NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Cave Swallow                         September 10 - SW rare in Comanche and
Kiowa cos only and September 10 - SE rare in south McCurtain co only

Swainson's Thrush                  September 30 - ALL

Northern Waterthrush             September 21 - ALL

Black-and-white Warbler        September 27 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Prothonotary Warbler             September 10 - NW Alfalfa and Major cos
only, C, SC, NE, SE

Swainson's Warbler                September 4 - SE rare in McCurtain co only

Virginia's Warbler                    September 15 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co
only

MacGillivray's Warbler           September 20 - PAN Cimarron Co only

Kentucky Warbler                   September 26 - C west to Logan, Oklahoma
and Cleveland cos only, SC Johnston and Pontotoc cos only, NE, SE

Common Yellowthroat            September 26 - PAN

Hooded Warbler                      September 28 - SE Latimer, LeFlore,
Pushmataha and McCurtain cos only

American Redstart                  September 28 - ALL

Bay-breasted Warbler           September 27 - NE, SE

Yellow Warbler                        September 12 - PAN and September 25 -
NW, C, NE and September 20 - SW and September 30 - SE

Chestnut-sided Warbler          September 27 - SW rare in Comanche Co, C,
SC, NE, SE

Yellow-throated Warbler         September 25 - C west to Payne, Lincoln and
Cleveland Cos only, SC west to Pontotoc, Murray, Johnston and Love cos only,
NE, SE

Townsend's Warbler               September 21 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only

Canada Warbler                      September 23 - C, SC, NE, SE

Yellow-breasted Chat             September 9 - PAN and September 19 - NW,
SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Green-tailed Towhee              September 29 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only

Cassin's Sparrow                    September 2 - PAN, NW west to Alfalfa
and Major cos only, SW, C rare in Canadian Co only, SC rare in Jefferson and
Carter cos only

Lark Sparrow                          September 22 - PAN

Black-throated Sparrow          September 16 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only

Grasshopper Sparrow            September 24 - PAN

Western Tanager                    September 25 - PAN 

Black-headed Grosbeak         September 21 - PAN

Lazuli Bunting                          September 25 - PAN

Painted Bunting                       September 23 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Bobolink                                  September 27 - NW, C, SC, NE, SE

Orchard Oriole                        September 11 - ALL

Bullock's Oriole                       September 11 - PAN, NW Harper, Ellis
and Roger Mills cos only, SW all counties except Caddo, east Comanche and
Cotton cos.

Baltimore Oriole                      September 25 - NW, SW all counties
except Harmon, Greer and Jackson cos, C, SC, NE, SE

Red Knot                                 September 20 - NW rare in Alfalfa
Co only, C, NE

 

 

Pat Velte

pvelte AT cox.net

Oklahoma City, OK

 
Subject: September Migration Report (1 of 2)
From: Patricia Velte <pvelte AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2016 14:05:44 -0500
Dear OKBirders,

 

The arrival and departure lists are long this month so I'm sending them in
separate messages.

 

September Arrivals

 

Northern Pintail                                   September 1 - C, SC, NE,
SE

Lesser Scaup                                      September 25 - ALL

Cinnamon Teal                                   September 7 - PAN, NW, SW

Eared Grebe                                       September 4 - ALL

Virginia Rail                                         September 2 - ALL

Sharp-shinned Hawk                          September 12 - ALL

Sabine's Gull                                       September 6 - PAN, NW,
C, SC, NE

Common Poorwill                               September 19 - C, SC, NE rare
east to Osage, Tulsa and Creek cos

Red-naped Sapsucker                        September 21 - PAN rare in
Cimarron Co only

Merlin                                                  September 2 - ALL

Prairie Falcon                                      September 24 - ALL

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher                    September 3 - SW west to Caddo,
Comanche and Cotton cos only, C, SC, NE, SE

Plumbeous Vireo                                September 2 - PAN rare in
Cimarron Co only

Blue-headed Vireo                              September 1 - NW, SW, C, SC,
NE, SE

Philadelphia  Vireo                              September 12 - C, SC, NE,
SE

Mountain Chickadee                           September 20 - ALL

Red-breasted Nuthatch                      September 10 - ALL

House Wren                                        September 16 - SC, SE

Marsh Wren                                        September 26 - ALL

Sedge Wren                                        September 27 - C, SC

Ruby-crowned Kinglet                        September 10 - ALL

Mountain Bluebird                               September 27 - PAN

Townsend's Solitaire                           September 17 - PAN

Swainson's Thrush                              September 7 - PAN and
September 11 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Hermit Thrush                                     September 22 - PAN

Sage Thrasher                                    September 1 - PAN Cimarron
Co only

American Pipit                                    September 25 - PAN and
September 29 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Cedar Waxwing                                  September 9 - PAN and
September 24 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Ovenbird                                             September 5 - NW, SW,
C, SC, NE, SE

Tennessee Warbler                             September 13 - NW, SW, C, SC,
NE, SE

Orange-crowned Warbler                   September 4 - PAN and September 22
- NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Nashville Warbler                                September 3 - ALL

Bay-breasted Warbler                         September 10 - NE, SE

Chestnut-sided Warbler                      September 6 - SW rare in
Comanche Co, C, SC, NE, SE

Palm Warbler                                      September 29 - NE, SE

Yellow-rumped Warbler                      September 8 - PAN and September
29 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Townsend's Warbler                           September 1 - PAN rare in
Cimarron Co only

Green-tailed Towhee                          September 7 - PAN rare in
Cimarron Co only

Spotted Towhee                                  September 25 - ALL

Eastern Towhee                                  September 30 - SW rare in
Comanche co only, C rare west to Payne, Lincoln and Seminole Cos only, SC
Pontotoc, Johnston and Marshall cos rare in rest of SC, NE west to
Washington, Tulsa, Okmulgee and Okfuskee cos only, SE

Clay-colored Sparrow                         September 2 - NW, SW, C, SC,
NE, SE       

Vesper Sparrow                                  September 1 - PAN and
September 27 - NW, C, NE and September 27 - SW, SC, SE

Savannah Sparrow                             September 6 - PAN and September
14 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Nelson's Sparrow                                September 21 - NE, SE

Song Sparrow                                     September 15 - PAN

Lincoln's Sparrow                               September 15 - PAN and
September 22 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

White-crowned Sparrow                     September 23 - PAN

Dark-eyed Junco                                September 27 - ALL

Western Tanager                                September 2 - PAN Cimarron Co
only

Rose-breasted Grosbeak                   September 17 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE,
SE

Bobolink                                              September 1 - NW, C,
SC, NE, SE

Western Meadowlark                          September 16 - SC, NE, SE

Brewer's Blackbird                              September 17 - NW, SW, C,
SC, NE, SE

 

 

The information presented here comes from The Oklahoma Bird Records
Committee of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society, which publishes a Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma. This booklet divides Oklahoma
into 7 geographic regions, and lists the normal dates of occurrence for each
Oklahoma bird species within each region. Observers are urged to report
unusual species, or birds out of date or out of normal range in Oklahoma,
based on the information given in this publication.

 

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society and Oklahoma Bird Records Committee web
site, http://www.okbirds.org/, includes ordering information for the Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma, information on documenting
significant records, documentation forms, instructions, and a searchable
database for Oklahoma bird migration information. Birders are cordially
invited to join the Oklahoma Ornithological Society.

 

Happy birding!

Pat Velte

pvelte AT cox.net

Oklahoma City, OK

 

 

 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - August 31
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2016 22:00:06 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot on the survey today.  A very slow day for
birds.  57 species were found.  The only birds singing were White-eyed
Vireos and Mourning Doves.  A lot of common birds could not be found today
such as Barn Swallows.   Surprises were Red Slough's 4th record of
Blue-winged Warbler and a family group of newly hatched Black-bellied
Whistling Ducks.  Managed to find a few shorebirds today feeding in rain
puddles as there is too much water for them in our wetlands due to all the
rain this month.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 4 adults (1 with brood of 15 newly hatched
young.)

Wood Duck - 45

Mallard - 4

Blue-winged Teal - 76

Northern Pintail - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 25

Neotropic Cormorant - 6

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 11

Great-blue Heron - 15

Great Egret - 8

Snowy Egret - 1

Little-blue Heron - 16

Cattle Egret - 36

Green Heron - 2

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 1

White Ibis - 14

Turkey Vulture - 9

Mississippi Kite - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 3

Common Gallinule - 31 adults & full sized juveniles (also several small
young.)

American Coot - 11

Killdeer - 7

Solitary Sandpiper - 2

Least Sandpiper - 2 

Rock Pigeon - 4

Mourning Dove - 4

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 4

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Willow Flycatcher - 1

Least Flycatcher - 4

Eastern Kingbird - 5

White-eyed Vireo - 14

Bell's Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 11

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Carolina Chickadee - 1

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren - 8

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2

Blue-winged Warbler - 1 adult male

Common Yellowthroat - 2

Yellow-breasted Chat - 4

Summer Tanager - 3

Eastern Towhee - 2

Northern Cardinal - 19

Indigo Bunting - 8

Painted Bunting - 2

Red-winged Blackbird - 6

American Goldfinch - 1

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Spot-winged Glider

Striped Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Leopard Frog

Bullfrog

 

Also:  Bobcat & Nutria.

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 
Subject: Re: ODWC survey of BIRDERS in Oklahoma!
From: Doug Wood <DWood AT SE.EDU>
Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2016 18:13:55 +0000
Just want to thank Tim for posting this! I hope as many birders as possible 
fill out this survey for Jeff/ODWC. Great opportunity to have input. Doug. 



From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of O Connell, Tim
Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2016 1:09 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] ODWC survey of BIRDERS in Oklahoma!

Dear OKbirders,

We have a practically unique opportunity at the moment to engage our state 
agency responsible for the management of Oklahoma’s birds, and I hope 
you’ll take advantage of it. Some basic information from us birders about our 
motivations and actions and limitations can go a long way toward opportunities 
for us to protect and enjoy those birds, specifically (right now) in terms of 
providing more great places for birding. Jeff Tibbits explains below; please 
drop what your doing and follow the link to the survey, and THANKS! 

~Tim O’Connell
Stillwater





From Jeff Tibbits:

Hello all!
Please take a few minutes to take the ODWC Oklahoma Birder Survey:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ODWCBirderSurvey
Please feel free to share the link, the more input we get, the better!
The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation received federal funds from 
the Farm Bill to create a voluntary public access program, The Oklahoma Land 
Access Program (OLAP). The OLAP's goals are to lease private land to allow 
public access for hunting, fishing, and wildlife-viewing. We are interested in 
learning more about the awareness, demographics, and activities of birders in 
Oklahoma. Your responses will help us consider the concerns and interests of 
Oklahoma birders and incorporate these insights into the OLAP. The anonymous 
survey results will be presented on 8 October 2016 at the fall Oklahoma 
Ornithological Society meeting during a round-table discussion concerning 
Oklahoma birders and the OLAP. All responses are confidential and participation 
is voluntary. 





Subject: ODWC survey of BIRDERS in Oklahoma!
From: "O Connell, Tim" <tim.oconnell AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2016 18:08:40 +0000
Dear OKbirders,

We have a practically unique opportunity at the moment to engage our state 
agency responsible for the management of Oklahoma’s birds, and I hope 
you’ll take advantage of it. Some basic information from us birders about our 
motivations and actions and limitations can go a long way toward opportunities 
for us to protect and enjoy those birds, specifically (right now) in terms of 
providing more great places for birding. Jeff Tibbits explains below; please 
drop what your doing and follow the link to the survey, and THANKS! 

~Tim O’Connell
Stillwater





From Jeff Tibbits:


Hello all!
Please take a few minutes to take the ODWC Oklahoma Birder Survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ODWCBirderSurvey

Please feel free to share the link, the more input we get, the better!

The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation received federal funds from 
the Farm Bill to create a voluntary public access program, The Oklahoma Land 
Access Program (OLAP). The OLAP's goals are to lease private land to allow 
public access for hunting, fishing, and wildlife-viewing. We are interested in 
learning more about the awareness, demographics, and activities of birders in 
Oklahoma. Your responses will help us consider the concerns and interests of 
Oklahoma birders and incorporate these insights into the OLAP. The anonymous 
survey results will be presented on 8 October 2016 at the fall Oklahoma 
Ornithological Society meeting during a round-table discussion concerning 
Oklahoma birders and the OLAP. All responses are confidential and participation 
is voluntary. 





Subject: Re: The artist's approach to birding?
From: Ellie Womack <e-womack AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2016 09:25:42 -0500
Thanks!  Probably won't order Ornithology, but enjoyed reading about it.

Ellie Womack, Grove

-----Original Message----- 
From: Matthew Jung
Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2016 8:48 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] The artist's approach to birding?

My Fine Arts Instructor daughter sent me this link and I found it
interesting - and humorous.

Matt Jung, OKC


http://hyperallergic.com/316907/an-alternative-encyclopedia-of-birds-categorized-by-poop-art-history-and-more/?ref=featured 



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Subject: The artist's approach to birding?
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2016 08:48:47 -0500
My Fine Arts Instructor daughter sent me this link and I found it
interesting - and humorous.

Matt Jung, OKC


http://hyperallergic.com/316907/an-alternative-encyclopedia-of-birds-categorized-by-poop-art-history-and-more/?ref=featured 

Subject: Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK
From: Patricia Seibert <plseibert AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 20:15:20 -0500
No, according to Jon Dunn & Kimball Garrett "Warblers" ONLY first fall female 
Townsend's have NO spots on on the back, all the other plumages show spots on 
back, both male & female. 


P. Seibert


> On Aug 29, 2016, at 7:59 PM, Bill Carrell  
wrote: 

> 
> Hello All,
> 
> A couple of other points about this bird: In the first picture, notice the 
dark smudge across the breast, not something you would see on a Blackburnian. 
Also, Blackburnians have pale streaks on the back, this bird is unstreaked. I 
wonder if this might be a first-fall male rather than a female? 

> 
> Bill
> 
> 
>> On Aug 29, 2016 4:18 PM, "Ken or Carol Williams" 
 wrote: 

>> Fellow Birders,
>> 
>> Migrants are on the move, we had a few stop by our yard this morning. Most 
notable was a female Townsend's Warbler (see pictures at 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures). We also saw a Warbling 
Vireo, juvenile Blue-headed Vireo (see pictures at 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures), Yellow Warbler, & small 
flycatcher, probably Least Flycatcher. We did not get a good look at the 
flycatcher, but we have had several Least Flycatchers stop by our yard this 
year. 

>> 
>> I did not get real good pictures of the Blue-headed Vireo, but it had 2 wing 
bars, and eye ring and a faint hood. 

>> 
>> All the migrants were only in the yard a very short time this morning and 
have not been seen since, so probably moved on. Carol is out on the patio right 
now, hoping they return this evening for a drink & bath before heading south. 

>> 
>> Ken & Carol  Williams
>> Owasso, OK
>> http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots
Subject: Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 19:59:39 -0500
Hello All,

A couple of other points about this bird: In the first picture, notice the
dark smudge across the breast, not something you would see on a
Blackburnian. Also, Blackburnians have pale streaks on the back, this bird
is unstreaked. I wonder if this might be a first-fall male rather than a
female?

Bill

On Aug 29, 2016 4:18 PM, "Ken or Carol Williams" <
kcwilliams AT tulsaconnect.com> wrote:

> Fellow Birders,
>
> Migrants are on the move, we had a few stop by our yard this morning.
> Most notable was a female Townsend's Warbler (see pictures at
> http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures).   We also saw a
> Warbling Vireo, juvenile Blue-headed Vireo (see pictures at
> http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures), Yellow Warbler, &
> small flycatcher, probably Least Flycatcher.  We did not get a good look at
> the flycatcher, but we have had several Least Flycatchers stop by our yard
> this year.
>
> I did not get real good pictures of the Blue-headed Vireo, but it had 2
> wing bars, and eye ring and a faint hood.
>
> All the migrants were only in the yard a very short time this morning and
> have not been seen since, so probably moved on.  Carol is out on the patio
> right now, hoping they return this evening for a drink & bath before
> heading south.
>
> Ken & Carol  Williams
> Owasso, OK
> http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots
>
Subject: Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK
From: Pete Janzen <pete.janzen AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 17:21:30 -0500
Without access to reference material I remember the plumage on the back is one 
point of differentiation. Really quite similar overall 


Pete Janzen

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 29, 2016, at 4:30 PM, Patricia Seibert  
wrote: 

> 
> Nice pictures, I would have called this a female Blackburnian Warbler, 
probably because of range, when I looked in field guides, I could not tell the 
difference. Would you please share what to look for & how to tell the 
difference between female Townsend's and female Blackburnian? 

> Thanks !
> Patricia Seibert
> Tulsa, OK
> 
>> On Aug 29, 2016, at 4:17 PM, Ken or Carol Williams 
 wrote: 

>> 
>> Fellow Birders,
>> 
>> Migrants are on the move, we had a few stop by our yard this morning. Most 
notable was a female Townsend's Warbler (see pictures at 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures). We also saw a Warbling 
Vireo, juvenile Blue-headed Vireo (see pictures at 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures), Yellow Warbler, & small 
flycatcher, probably Least Flycatcher. We did not get a good look at the 
flycatcher, but we have had several Least Flycatchers stop by our yard this 
year. 

>> 
>> I did not get real good pictures of the Blue-headed Vireo, but it had 2 wing 
bars, and eye ring and a faint hood. 

>> 
>> All the migrants were only in the yard a very short time this morning and 
have not been seen since, so probably moved on. Carol is out on the patio right 
now, hoping they return this evening for a drink & bath before heading south. 

>> 
>> Ken & Carol  Williams
>> Owasso, OK
>> http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots
Subject: Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK
From: Joe Grzybowski <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 17:18:30 -0500
On vireo,  how about Bell's?
CHEERS,  JOE Grzybowski

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 29, 2016, at 4:32 PM, Ingold, James  wrote:
> 
> I think your blue-headed maybe a Warbling Vireo
>  
> Jim Ingold
> Shreveport
> From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of Patricia Seibert 
[plseibert AT SBCGLOBAL.NET] 

> Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 4:30 PM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK
> 
> Nice pictures, I would have called this a female Blackburnian Warbler, 
probably because of range, when I looked in field guides, I could not tell the 
difference. Would you please share what to look for & how to tell the 
difference between female Townsend's and female Blackburnian? 

> Thanks !
> Patricia Seibert
> Tulsa, OK
> 
> On Aug 29, 2016, at 4:17 PM, Ken or Carol Williams 
 wrote: 

> 
>> Fellow Birders,
>> Migrants are on the move, we had a few stop by our yard this morning. Most 
notable was a female Townsend's Warbler (see pictures at 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures). We also saw a Warbling 
Vireo, juvenile Blue-headed Vireo (see pictures at 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures), Yellow Warbler, & small 
flycatcher, probably Least Flycatcher. We did not get a good look at the 
flycatcher, but we have had several Least Flycatchers stop by our yard this 
year. 

>> I did not get real good pictures of the Blue-headed Vireo, but it had 2 wing 
bars, and eye ring and a faint hood. 

>> All the migrants were only in the yard a very short time this morning and 
have not been seen since, so probably moved on. Carol is out on the patio right 
now, hoping they return this evening for a drink & bath before heading south. 

>> Ken & Carol  Williams
>> Owasso, OK
>> http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots
Subject: Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 17:10:31 -0500
I think this may be a Townsend's. On Blackburnian, the black in front of
the eye doesn't appear to be as extensive as on this bird, but consistent
with Townsend's. Also on Blackburnian, the dark area behind the eye extends
downward towards the breast, which it doesn't on this one.

Bill

On Mon, Aug 29, 2016 at 4:45 PM, Ken or Carol Williams <
kcwilliams AT tulsaconnect.com> wrote:

> Warbling Vireo's would not have wing bars which my bad pictures may not
> show as noticeably as were on the bird.  But this bird had bright wing bars
> and an eye ring.  Look at the 3rd picture of the vireo.  We did have a
> Warbling Vireo about 20 minutes before this bird showed up.
>
>
> Ken Williams
> Owasso, OK
> http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots
>
>
>
> On 8/29/2016 4:32 PM, Ingold, James wrote:
>
> I think your blue-headed maybe a Warbling Vireo
>
>
>
> Jim Ingold
>
> Shreveport
> ------------------------------
> *From:* okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of Patricia Seibert [
> plseibert AT SBCGLOBAL.NET]
> *Sent:* Monday, August 29, 2016 4:30 PM
> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK
>
> Nice pictures, I would have called this a female Blackburnian Warbler,
> probably because of range, when I looked in field guides, I could not tell
> the difference. Would you please share what to look for & how to tell the
> difference between female Townsend's and female Blackburnian?
> Thanks !
> Patricia Seibert
> Tulsa, OK
>
> On Aug 29, 2016, at 4:17 PM, Ken or Carol Williams <
> kcwilliams AT TULSACONNECT.COM > wrote:
>
> Fellow Birders,
>
> Migrants are on the move, we had a few stop by our yard this morning.
> Most notable was a female Townsend's Warbler (see pictures at
> http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures).   We also saw a
> Warbling Vireo, juvenile Blue-headed Vireo (see pictures at
> http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures), Yellow Warbler, &
> small flycatcher, probably Least Flycatcher.  We did not get a good look at
> the flycatcher, but we have had several Least Flycatchers stop by our yard
> this year.
>
> I did not get real good pictures of the Blue-headed Vireo, but it had 2
> wing bars, and eye ring and a faint hood.
>
> All the migrants were only in the yard a very short time this morning and
> have not been seen since, so probably moved on.  Carol is out on the patio
> right now, hoping they return this evening for a drink & bath before
> heading south.
>
> Ken & Carol  Williams
> Owasso, OK
> http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK
From: Ken or Carol Williams <kcwilliams AT TULSACONNECT.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 16:45:14 -0500
Warbling Vireo's would not have wing bars which my bad pictures may not 
show as noticeably as were on the bird.  But this bird had bright wing 
bars and an eye ring.  Look at the 3rd picture of the vireo.  We did 
have a Warbling Vireo about 20 minutes before this bird showed up.


Ken Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots



On 8/29/2016 4:32 PM, Ingold, James wrote:
>
> I think your blue-headed maybe a Warbling Vireo
>
> Jim Ingold
>
> Shreveport
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of Patricia Seibert 
> [plseibert AT SBCGLOBAL.NET]
> *Sent:* Monday, August 29, 2016 4:30 PM
> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK
>
> Nice pictures, I would have called this a female Blackburnian Warbler, 
> probably because of range, when I looked in field guides, I could not 
> tell the difference. Would you please share what to look for & how to 
> tell the difference between female Townsend's and female Blackburnian?
> Thanks !
> Patricia Seibert
> Tulsa, OK
>
> On Aug 29, 2016, at 4:17 PM, Ken or Carol Williams 
> > wrote:
>
>> Fellow Birders,
>>
>> Migrants are on the move, we had a few stop by our yard this 
>> morning.  Most notable was a female Townsend's Warbler (see pictures 
>> at http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures).   We also 
>> saw a Warbling Vireo, juvenile Blue-headed Vireo(see pictures at 
>> http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures), Yellow Warbler, 
>> & small flycatcher, probably Least Flycatcher.  We did not get a good 
>> look at the flycatcher, but we have had several Least Flycatchers 
>> stop by our yard this year.
>>
>> I did not get real good pictures of the Blue-headed Vireo, but it had 
>> 2 wing bars, and eye ring and a faint hood.
>>
>> All the migrants were only in the yard a very short time this morning 
>> and have not been seen since, so probably moved on.  Carol is out on 
>> the patio right now, hoping they return this evening for a drink & 
>> bath before heading south.
>>
>> Ken & Carol  Williams
>> Owasso, OK
>> http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots
>>
Subject: Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK
From: "Ingold, James" <James.Ingold AT LSUS.EDU>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 21:32:58 +0000
I think your blue-headed maybe a Warbling Vireo



Jim Ingold

Shreveport

________________________________
From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of Patricia Seibert 
[plseibert AT SBCGLOBAL.NET] 

Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 4:30 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK

Nice pictures, I would have called this a female Blackburnian Warbler, probably 
because of range, when I looked in field guides, I could not tell the 
difference. Would you please share what to look for & how to tell the 
difference between female Townsend's and female Blackburnian? 

Thanks !
Patricia Seibert
Tulsa, OK

On Aug 29, 2016, at 4:17 PM, Ken or Carol Williams 
> wrote: 



Fellow Birders,

Migrants are on the move, we had a few stop by our yard this morning. Most 
notable was a female Townsend's Warbler (see pictures at 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures). We also saw a Warbling 
Vireo, juvenile Blue-headed Vireo (see pictures at 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures), Yellow Warbler, & small 
flycatcher, probably Least Flycatcher. We did not get a good look at the 
flycatcher, but we have had several Least Flycatchers stop by our yard this 
year. 


I did not get real good pictures of the Blue-headed Vireo, but it had 2 wing 
bars, and eye ring and a faint hood. 


All the migrants were only in the yard a very short time this morning and have 
not been seen since, so probably moved on. Carol is out on the patio right now, 
hoping they return this evening for a drink & bath before heading south. 


Ken & Carol  Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots
Subject: Re: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK
From: Patricia Seibert <plseibert AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 16:30:23 -0500
Nice pictures, I would have called this a female Blackburnian Warbler, probably 
because of range, when I looked in field guides, I could not tell the 
difference. Would you please share what to look for & how to tell the 
difference between female Townsend's and female Blackburnian? 

Thanks !
Patricia Seibert
Tulsa, OK

> On Aug 29, 2016, at 4:17 PM, Ken or Carol Williams 
 wrote: 

> 
> Fellow Birders,
> 
> Migrants are on the move, we had a few stop by our yard this morning. Most 
notable was a female Townsend's Warbler (see pictures at 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures). We also saw a Warbling 
Vireo, juvenile Blue-headed Vireo (see pictures at 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures), Yellow Warbler, & small 
flycatcher, probably Least Flycatcher. We did not get a good look at the 
flycatcher, but we have had several Least Flycatchers stop by our yard this 
year. 

> 
> I did not get real good pictures of the Blue-headed Vireo, but it had 2 wing 
bars, and eye ring and a faint hood. 

> 
> All the migrants were only in the yard a very short time this morning and 
have not been seen since, so probably moved on. Carol is out on the patio right 
now, hoping they return this evening for a drink & bath before heading south. 

> 
> Ken & Carol  Williams
> Owasso, OK
> http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots
Subject: Townsend's Warbler in Rogers County, OK
From: Ken or Carol Williams <kcwilliams AT TULSACONNECT.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 16:17:57 -0500
Fellow Birders,

Migrants are on the move, we had a few stop by our yard this morning.  
Most notable was a female Townsend's Warbler (see pictures at 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures).   We also saw a 
Warbling Vireo, juvenile Blue-headed Vireo(see pictures at 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures), Yellow Warbler, & 
small flycatcher, probably Least Flycatcher.  We did not get a good look 
at the flycatcher, but we have had several Least Flycatchers stop by our 
yard this year.

I did not get real good pictures of the Blue-headed Vireo, but it had 2 
wing bars, and eye ring and a faint hood.

All the migrants were only in the yard a very short time this morning 
and have not been seen since, so probably moved on.  Carol is out on the 
patio right now, hoping they return this evening for a drink & bath 
before heading south.

Ken & Carol  Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots
Subject: Tulsa Area
From: Terry Mitchell <terry AT PECOT.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 08:45:21 -0500
Saturday morning at Oxley Nature Center in Tulsa I had a Connecticut
Warbler. Here’s a link to a not very sharp photo I managed to snap if you
care to look. Thanks Terry.



http://www.pbase.com/ttownvstrom/image/163964087



Terry Mitchell

Plastic Engineering

918-622-9660
Subject: Probable Black-headed Grosbeak - Stillwater
From: Scott Loss <scottrloss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 10:36:25 -0500
We had a lot of good fall migrants in our yard this morning, including 2
singing/calling Willow Flycatchers (174th yard species), multiple Blue-gray
Gnatcatchers, a couple of Baltimore Orioles, and a "brown" grosbeak that
I've concluded was a BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK (175th yard species; ID details
below).

Regarding the grosbeak ID, the bird looked intermediate between the adult
female Black-headed Grosbeak and 1st winter male Rose-breasted Grosbeak
shown in Sibley (old version), but further research suggests that plumage
is unreliable for separating non-males individuals of these species at this
time of year (both can have pretty buffy chests like the bird I saw).

However in the 30 seconds that the grosbeak stopped in the top of our
tallest tree before heading further south, it repeatedly gave its metallic
chip note which was very hard, sharp, and not as squeaky as the softer,
squeakier Rose-breasted Grosbeak alarm calls I've heard hundreds of times.
In fact, before I saw the bird, I thought the call sounded more like the
first note of a Dickcissel's song (which is sometimes given by that species
as a call note). When I saw that it was a grosbeak giving the call, I
immediately thought that it sounded different than any Rose-breasted
Grosbeak I've heard.

At least a couple of online sources (and recordings on Xenocanto) support
that the difference in call notes can be used to separate the two species.
But, I'd also appreciate any insight on this from folks who have a lot of
experience with both species (I'm less familiar with Black-headed). GIven
its range, I'm actually surprised we don't get a few more Black-headed
Grosbeak reports in central Oklahoma.

Scott Loss
Stillwater
Subject: Fish Crows in Enid?
From: "bill ." <billwx AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 10:34:31 +0000
Hi all,


The evening of 8/21 i was photographing insects at Govt Springs Pk-South in 
Enid. I heard low, nasal "gronk" calls and looked around expecting a duck or 
maybe a frog. Two black crow-like birds flew off southward along the creek and 
i heard the sound no more. Photos were useless. In my haste i thought 
"Raven?!", but with no way to prove it i filed the info away and moved on. 



Yesterday, 8/27 i was at the east end of Meadowlake Pk in Enid, heard the same 
calls, and saw one bird a bit smaller than i would expect for an American Crow. 
The sound matches my Audubon app for Fish Crow call very nicely. It does not 
match the juvie nasal immature American Crow nearly so well. I still haven't 
gotten that OOS date guide, but the range maps show none in my area and, more 
importantly, neither does ebird. I was able to get a few photos, the best of 
which is linked below. Click once to enlarge. Comments appreciated. 


peace

-bill

enid garfield ok



https://www.flickr.com/photos/critters101_william/28662458044/in/album-72157634889801650/ 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/critters101_william/29206378711/in/album-72157634889801650/ 
Subject: Payne County Audubon events this week
From: "O Connell, Tim" <tim.oconnell AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 02:51:58 +0000
Dear Friends and Supporters of the Payne County Audubon Society,

Birds are on the move and we’re excited to begin Autumn 2016 programming to 
help you get the most out of migration season. 


Unless you’re checking our website 
(https://paynecountyaudubonsociety.com/whats-new/) regularly then this is late 
notice, but there is a field trip tomorrow morning, SATURDAY, 8/27 at Babcock 
Park in Stillwater. To join in, meet trip leader John Polo in the parking lot 
under the pines and past the soccer fields, along the creek at 8:00 am. 


Our next field trip after that will be Saturday Sep. 10 to Hackberry Flat WMA 
in southeastern Oklahoma. That trip will surely be a shorebird extravaganza! 



Our first Thursday evening program will be our annual potluck dinner and 
meet-n-greet, Sep. 1, at 6:00 pm, in the Education Center of the Botanic Garden 
at OSU. This is a casual gathering designed to discuss our upcoming activities 
for 2016 and 2017 and hear your great suggestions for things you would like to 
do. 


Instructions - please 1) attend, 2) bring with you a dish to share (savory, 
sweet, drinks - anything!), and 3) bring a friend. 


No dish? No problem! We’d rather have you there then make you worry about 
preparing the dish. 



Finally - we need you. (Yep, you.) The Payne County Audubon Society is a both a 
volunteer-run community non-profit and a local arm of the National Audubon 
Society. We are always open to folks who think they might want to contribute in 
some way to our programming. For example, there are many wonderful local 
activities in which we could engage to promote various conservation and 
education initiatives of the National Audubon Society, but our local board 
members are generally stretched too thin to scratch the surface of implementing 
any of these here in Payne County. With a little more help we could, so please 
don’t be shy if you think you’d like to help! We do have openings on the 
board, too. If you’re interested, please let me know. 


That’s all for now. If I miss you in the field tomorrow morning, I’ll look 
forward to seeing you at our potluck meet-n-greet on Thursday. Good birding, 

~Tim O’Connell
PCAS President

https://paynecountyaudubonsociety.com/

Subject: The Partners In Flight Landbird Conservation Plan
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 12:34:55 -0500
Information and Reading for all interested in Birds. Its condense form helps 
you to note the species in your area that need help and what you can do for 
them. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR

http://www.partnersinflight.org/plans/landbird-conservation-plan/downloads/
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - August 23
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 22:08:10 -0500
It was mild and overcast in the morning turning mostly sunny and hot and in
the afternoon and windy all day.  70 species were found today.  Passerines
were tough today and I had to work hard to get what I did as they were
mostly silent and the wind had them in deep cover.  I was on the Pintail
Lake observation platform this morning when I heard a Common Gallinule give
an alarm call fairly close to me.  I looked just in time to see a juvenile
Cooper's Hawk flying across the levee and into a dense patch of American
Lotus in Pintail Lake.  He was followed by a very agitated adult Common
Gallinule who went into the lotus after him after following the hawk across
open water from the levee.  I heard a lot of commotion and gallinules
calling from the lotus patch.  I figured the hawk had to have ended up in
the water and probably had caught a gallinule chick.  I waited for several
minutes but the hawk never came out.  So I started walking down the levee to
get closer.  Suddenly the hawk came swimming out of the Lotus into the edge
of the open water followed closely by two adult gallinules.  As I got closer
the hawk suddenly flushed from the water as easily as a duck and flew off
with empty talons.  Apparently what I thought was a water logged hawk trying
to make it to shore was really a hawk chasing after its prey on the swim.  I
knew they would run on the ground through brush chasing down prey but
swimming after prey was a new one.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 19

Wood Duck - 21

Mallard - 9

Blue-winged Teal - 9

Northern Shoveler - 2

Northern Pintail - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 21

Neotropic Cormorant - 2

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 11

Great-blue Heron - 10

Great Egret - 24

Snowy Egret - 1

Little-blue Heron - 14

Cattle Egret - 136

Green Heron - 1

White Ibis - 49

Black Vulture - 10

Turkey Vulture - 48

Mississippi Kite - 7

Cooper's Hawk - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 3

Purple Gallinule - 4

Common Gallinule - 32 (also several broods.)

American Coot - 11

Killdeer - 1

Least Sandpiper - 1 

Rock Pigeon - 4

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 3

Mourning Dove - 17

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 3

Chimney Swift - 3

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 10

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 5

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Alder Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 1

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 7

Bell's Vireo - 3 (adult feeding fledglings.)

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 71

Purple Martin - 2

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 30

Bank Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 35

Barn Swallow - 3

Cave Swallow - 1 juvenile 

Carolina Chickadee - 7

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 11

Yellow Warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Yellow-breasted Chat - 2

Summer Tanager - 2

Eastern Towhee - 2

Lark Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 14

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 16

Painted Bunting - 1

Red-winged Blackbird - 4

Oriole species - 1 (juvenile in bad light at a distance.)

House Sparrow - 1

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Red/Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Western Cottonmouth

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Hefner, canal inlet
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 15:59:44 -0500
A mud flat has emerged on the golf course side, and shorebirds are starting
to use it. Today saw Least (27), Semipalmated (10), Pectoral (1) and Stilt
(1) Sandpipers and Killdeer (10). Also RB Gull (102), Forster's Tern (22),
Am White Pelican (2), Great Egret (26), Great Blue Heron (9). Waterfowl
were Blue-winged Teal (15), Mallard (8) and some domestic mallards, geese
and muscovies.

Bill Diffin, OKC
Subject: Re: tern at shawnee reservoir
From: Ian Brandenburg <brandenburgi AT STAUGUSTINEACADEMY.ORG>
Date: Fri, 19 Aug 2016 03:31:38 -0500
Will,

On your first picture shown when I followed the link, if you look closely
at the bill of the bird, it's more suggestive towards a Forster's Tern.
It's very very difficult to see, and there is a chance my eyes are
deceiving me, but it seem that about halfway down the bill, the color
changes from the yellow/orange color to a black color. This is more seen on
Forster's Terns rather than Least Terns. In edition, Lesst Terns are
drastically smaller than most other terns. I would relate them to the size
of a Mourning Dove. From a distance this can be difficult to decipher, but
closer up it should be more identifiable. So I am more convinced that it is
a Forster's Tern. I hope this helps! Also, the others make great points
about this.

-Ian

On Thursday, August 18, 2016, William Diffin  wrote:

> Photos of Least and Forster's can be compared at the following
> site. Andrew makes some good points about the precise pattern of black and
> white on the head and wings. A third thing to look at is the length and
> shape of the tail.
> https://nationalzoo.si.edu/scbi/migratorybirds/featured_
> photo/bird.cfm?pix=Least+Tern
>
> Bill
>
> On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 12:06 PM, Feldt, Andrew N.  > wrote:
>
>> Will,
>>
>> You should also note that it is the tips of the primaries which are dark
>> rather than the leading edge of the wings.  This suggests a Forster’s Tern
>> with the light head indicating the beginning of the change to winter
>> plumage.  The only oddity then is that the bill looks a bit yellow rather
>> somewhat more orange color one would expect.
>>
>> Andy
>>
>> On Aug 16, 2016, at 11:00 AM, Doughty, Russell B. > > wrote:
>>
>> If it has white there on the forehead, than Interior Least Tern.
>> ------------------------------
>> *From:* okbirds > > on behalf of
>> Will Foster > >
>> *Sent:* Tuesday, August 16, 2016 9:03:09 AM
>> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
>> 
>> *Subject:* [OKBIRDS] tern at shawnee reservoir
>>
>> Hello everyone,
>>
>> I spotted this tern at Shawnee Reservoir yesterday while fishing and was
>> hoping someone could help me make a positive ID. I'm sorry for the low
>> quality pictures; I was working with my cell phone from a canoe.
>>
>> Here is a link to the photos: http://imgur.com/a/zwUvB.
>>
>> Thank you in advance,
>> Will Foster
>>
>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: tern at shawnee reservoir
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2016 05:32:28 -0500
Photos of Least and Forster's can be compared at the following site. Andrew
makes some good points about the precise pattern of black and white on the
head and wings. A third thing to look at is the length and shape of the
tail.

https://nationalzoo.si.edu/scbi/migratorybirds/featured_photo/bird.cfm?pix=Least+Tern 


Bill

On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 12:06 PM, Feldt, Andrew N.  wrote:

> Will,
>
> You should also note that it is the tips of the primaries which are dark
> rather than the leading edge of the wings.  This suggests a Forster’s Tern
> with the light head indicating the beginning of the change to winter
> plumage.  The only oddity then is that the bill looks a bit yellow rather
> somewhat more orange color one would expect.
>
> Andy
>
> On Aug 16, 2016, at 11:00 AM, Doughty, Russell B.  > wrote:
>
> If it has white there on the forehead, than Interior Least Tern.
> ------------------------------
> *From:* okbirds > on behalf
> of Will Foster >
> *Sent:* Tuesday, August 16, 2016 9:03:09 AM
> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
> *Subject:* [OKBIRDS] tern at shawnee reservoir
>
> Hello everyone,
>
> I spotted this tern at Shawnee Reservoir yesterday while fishing and was
> hoping someone could help me make a positive ID. I'm sorry for the low
> quality pictures; I was working with my cell phone from a canoe.
>
> Here is a link to the photos: http://imgur.com/a/zwUvB.
>
> Thank you in advance,
> Will Foster
>
>
>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - August 16
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 23:08:40 -0500
It was overcast & mild with sporadic light rain on the survey today.  69
species were found.  We just received 4 inches of rain and it was too wet to
drive the grass covered levees to a lot of the locations I usually visit.
Had to stick to graveled roads and levees and walking in to certain areas.
The extra rainfall we have received this summer has resulted in water levels
in the wetland units to be still fairly deep which means we have no
shorebird habitat this year and is undoubtedly why no storks or spoonbills
have showed up yet, since they require drying up wetlands for feeding in.
The first fall migrant ducks and warblers showed up today.  Also had the
opportunity to watch a family of Common Gallinules with 2 newly hatched
chicks (their 2nd brood) and also 2 full-sized juveniles from their first
brood.  The adults as well as the juveniles helped with the feeding of the
chicks.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 7

Wood Duck - 48

Mallard - 7

Blue-winged Teal - 3

Northern Shoveler - 2

Pied-billed Grebe - 29

Neotropic Cormorant - 12

Double-crested Cormorant - 3

Anhinga - 22

Great-blue Heron - 9

Great Egret - 22

Snowy Egret - 4

Little-blue Heron - 14

Cattle Egret - 181

Green Heron - 5

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 4

White Ibis - 80

Black Vulture - 18

Turkey Vulture - 10

Mississippi Kite - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 6

Common Gallinule - 37 (also 2 small chicks.)

American Coot - 9

Sandpiper species - 1 (heard briefly at a distance; either Spotted or
Solitary)

Rock Pigeon - 6

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 3

Mourning Dove - 13

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 4

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 7

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 2

Alder Flycatcher - 3

Least Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 4

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

Bell's Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 13

Purple Martin - 1

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Bank Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 43

Barn Swallow - 10

Cave Swallow - 2 juveniles 

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Yellow Warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 2

Yellow-breasted Chat - 1

Summer Tanager - 2

Eastern Towhee - 4

Northern Cardinal - 13

Blue Grosbeak - 1

Indigo Bunting - 17

Painted Bunting - 3

Dickcissel - 1

Red-winged Blackbird - 6

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Prince Baskettail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Red/Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR