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Updated on Friday, November 28 at 08:36 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Bay-breasted Warbler

28 Nov Lake Stanley Draper_Brewer's Sparrow ["okcbirder AT gmail.com" ]
27 Nov Lake Hefner Wednesday and Tuesday [William Diffin ]
27 Nov Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 26 [William Diffin ]
26 Nov Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 26 [David Arbour ]
26 Nov Re: Possible Arctic Tern at Lake Thunderbird [Paul Ribitzki ]
26 Nov Nickel Preserve today [Josh Engelbert ]
26 Nov Re: Lewis's Woodpecker Take 2 [John Sterling ]
26 Nov Re: Lewis's Woodpecker Take 2 [Ellie Womack ]
26 Nov Lewis's Woodpecker Take 2 [Warren Williams ]
26 Nov Swainson's Hawk at CNRA [Dorothy ]
25 Nov Lewis Woodpecker pic [Warren Williams ]
25 Nov Re: Arctic Tern ["Feldt, Andrew N." ]
25 Nov Re: Idling [JOS GRZYBOWSKI ]
25 Nov Idling [John Sterling ]
25 Nov Re: Terns [Larry Mays ]
25 Nov Re: Terns [Foundation Subscriber ]
24 Nov Front [John Sterling ]
24 Nov Arctic Tern [Cameron Carver ]
24 Nov Purple Finches, Rough-legged Hawk and Merlin [Patti Muzny ]
24 Nov Re: Terns [Foundation Subscriber ]
24 Nov Re: Terns [John Sterling ]
24 Nov Terns [larrymays1949 ]
24 Nov Tern [John Sterling ]
24 Nov Re: Possible Arctic Tern at Lake Thunderbird [JOS GRZYBOWSKI ]
23 Nov Lewis's Woodpecker - still present 11/23/14 [Deanne McKinney ]
23 Nov Lake Hefner Sunday [William Diffin ]
23 Nov Barrow's Goldeneye [Bill Carrell ]
23 Nov Snowy Owl report, Ottawa County, OK [Evelyn Houck ]
23 Nov Possible Arctic Tern at Lake Thunderbird [JOS GRZYBOWSKI ]
23 Nov Odd Tern at Lake Thunderbird [Jim Arterburn ]
22 Nov Fwd: Kenton (Black Mesa) CBC [John Sterling ]
22 Nov Re: Lewis' Woodpecker [John Kennington ]
22 Nov Lewis' Woodpecker [Bill Carrell ]
22 Nov Re: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker [Cindy ]
22 Nov Re: Eldon Lyon Park [David McNeely ]
22 Nov Re: Eldon Lyon Park [Jimmy Woodard ]
21 Nov Re: Eldon Lyon Park [Foundation Subscriber ]
21 Nov Eldon Lyon Park [Matthew Jung ]
21 Nov Snow geese ["David F. Evans" ]
21 Nov Re: PCAS - Sooner Lake Field Trip canceled [Bill Carrell ]
21 Nov Western Grebe, Again [Bill Carrell ]
21 Nov Sooner Lake field trip cancelled [John Polo ]
20 Nov Re: Lewis's woodpecker [james jorgensen ]
20 Nov Cedar Waxwings [Jana Singletary ]
20 Nov Lewis's woodpecker [Jonah Padberg ]
20 Nov Rails [Henthorn1 ]
20 Nov Re: Red Slough Rock Wren photo [Foundation Subscriber ]
20 Nov Wear some orange ["Bostian, Kelly" ]
20 Nov Re: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker [Timothy O'Connell ]
20 Nov Red Slough Rock Wren photo [David Arbour ]
19 Nov Re: Wigeons and loons [Foundation Subscriber ]
19 Nov Wigeons and loons [Steve Davis ]
19 Nov Re: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker [Jim Jorgensen ]
19 Nov Re: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker [Lewis Pond ]
19 Nov Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker [Jim Jorgensen ]
18 Nov Re: Lewis's Woodpecker - Lake Carl Blackwell [John Polo ]
18 Nov Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 18 ...7 wren day! [David Arbour ]
18 Nov Re: Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count Date: Tuesday, December 23 [John Sterling ]
18 Nov Lewis's Woodpecker - Lake Carl Blackwell [Scott Loss ]
18 Nov Lewis's Woodpecker, Payne County [John Polo ]
18 Nov Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count Date: Tuesday, December 23 [Mia Revels ]
18 Nov Late Lark Sparrow - Boomer Lake, Stillwater [Scott Loss ]
18 Nov Re: FW: Snowy Owl [EUGENE YOUNG ]
17 Nov Re: Birder needs advice [John Kennington ]
17 Nov Birder needs advice [David Arbour ]
17 Nov Re: FW: Snowy Owl [John Fisher ]
17 Nov Re: FW: Snowy Owl [Dan Reinking ]
17 Nov Re: FW: Snowy Owl [David McNeely ]
17 Nov Re: Smith's Longspurs - Stillwater [john bates ]
17 Nov Re: FW: Snowy Owl [John Shackford ]
16 Nov Re: FW: Snowy Owl [JOS GRZYBOWSKI ]
16 Nov Re: Snowy Owl Deceased [John Bates ]
16 Nov Re: Snowy Owl Deceased [John Bates ]
16 Nov Re: Snowy Owl Deceased [Jana Singletary ]
16 Nov Re: Snowy Owl Deceased [John Bates ]
16 Nov Smith's Longspurs - Stillwater [Scott Loss ]

Subject: Lake Stanley Draper_Brewer's Sparrow
From: "okcbirder AT gmail.com" <okcbirder@GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2014 07:08:16 -0600
Thanksgiving Day we spotted a few birds on the north side of Lake Stanley 
Draper the most interesting to us was a probable Brewer's Sparrow -- we know it 
to be out of it range and have only seen a Brewer's Sparrow one other time out 
West. We were parked near the end of Point 6 road watching Blue Jays, two 
Mallards and listening to a Red-bellied Woodpecker. Sue spotted this small 
sparrow all alone in the ditch right beside our car and it remained there 
busily eating seeds allowing us both to observe it for a several minutes. 
Unfortunately I didn't have my camera, so no pictures. The key marks were it's 
total eye ring, pink bill and legs, plain breast, light brown crown, gray 
eyebrow, two slight wing bars and slight barring on its rump. 


Other birds observed were the usual when we stopped near the "horse parking 
area" included: 

Blue Jays, Am Crows, Chickadees, Dark-eyed Juncos, Eastern Bluebirds, two No. 
Flickers and a probable Red-headed Woodpecker. 


Dave & Sue Woodson
OKC_Birders 
Subject: Lake Hefner Wednesday and Tuesday
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 13:37:51 -0600
A flock of 40 Smith's Longspurs flew by on the east side of Prairie Dog
Point about 5 pm Wednesday. They were headed from the golf course to the
northwest, recognized by yellowish color, rattle call, flock spacing and
motion, and small size relative to four Red-winged Blackbirds. In that same
area 300 Canada Geese, 7 Cackling Geese, 30 Northern Pintails, 20 Mallards,
20 Bonaparte's Gulls, 30 Ringbilled Gulls, 1 Greater Yellowlegs, 6 Killdeer
and 1 Great Blue Heron. In the brush along the west side of the point were
15 Harris's Sparrows. In the lake were 400 Red-breasted Mergansers,at least
20 Bufflehead and 1 Common Loon. A group of 30 diving Red-breasted
Mergansers was being harrassed by gulls including 12 Herring Gulls.
On the peninsulas and flats around Stars and Stripes Park on Tuesday
evening were 25 Herring Gulls, 1670 Ring-billed Gulls and 40 Mallards.
Bill Diffin, OKC
Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 26
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 04:27:10 -0600
That Cooper's was having its Thanksgiving feast a day early.

On Wed, Nov 26, 2014 at 10:13 PM, David Arbour 
wrote:

>    It was partly cloudy, cold, and windy on the bird survey today.  60
> species were found.  The winds made the passerines scarce.  Here is my list
> for today:
>
>
>
> Wood Duck - 9
>
> Gadwall – 1,180
>
> American Wigeon - 1
>
> Mallard – 1,145
>
> Northern Shoveler - 38
>
> Northern Pintail - 40
>
> Green-winged Teal - 236
>
> Ring-necked Duck – 105
>
> Hooded Merganser - 10
>
> Ruddy Duck - 8
>
> Pied-billed Grebe - 25
>
> Double-crested Cormorant - 8
>
> Great Blue Heron – 15
>
> Black Vulture - 4
>
> Turkey Vulture – 19
>
> Bald Eagle – 1 adult
>
> Northern Harrier - 7
>
> Cooper’s Hawk – 1 (eating a coot.)
>
> Red-shouldered Hawk - 1
>
> Red-tailed Hawk – 3
>
> American Kestrel – 1
>
> American Coot - 164
>
> Killdeer – 375
>
> Wilson's Snipe – 1
>
> Ring-billed Gull - 1
>
> Mourning Dove - 5
>
> Belted Kingfisher - 3
>
> Red-bellied Woodpecker – 2
>
> Downy Woodpecker - 2
>
> Hairy Woodpecker - 1
>
> Northern Flicker – 6
>
> Pileated Woodpecker - 2
>
> Eastern Phoebe – 13
>
> Loggerhead Shrike - 3
>
> Blue Jay - 1
>
> American Crow - 140
>
> Fish Crow – 29
>
> Carolina Chickadee - 3
>
> Carolina Wren - 8
>
> Winter Wren - 1
>
> Sedge Wren - 3
>
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet – 4
>
> Eastern Bluebird – 1
>
> Northern Mockingbird – 4
>
> Yellow-rumped Warbler – 16
>
> Common Yellowthroat - 1
>
> Eastern Towhee – 2
>
> Savannah Sparrow – 9
>
> Fox Sparrow - 1
>
> Song Sparrow – 15
>
> Lincoln’s Sparrow - 1
>
> Swamp Sparrow – 12
>
> White-throated Sparrow - 3
>
> White-crowned Sparrow – 2
>
> Dark-eyed Junco - 2
>
> Northern Cardinal - 5
>
> Red-winged Blackbird - 410
>
> Eastern Meadowlark – 10
>
> *Rusty Blackbird* – 15
>
> American Goldfinch – 10
>
>
>
> Good birding!
>
>
>
> David Arbour
>
> De Queen, AR
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 26
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 22:13:46 -0600
It was partly cloudy, cold, and windy on the bird survey today.  60 species
were found.  The winds made the passerines scarce.  Here is my list for
today:

 

Wood Duck - 9

Gadwall - 1,180

American Wigeon - 1

Mallard - 1,145

Northern Shoveler - 38

Northern Pintail - 40

Green-winged Teal - 236

Ring-necked Duck - 105

Hooded Merganser - 10

Ruddy Duck - 8

Pied-billed Grebe - 25

Double-crested Cormorant - 8

Great Blue Heron - 15

Black Vulture - 4

Turkey Vulture - 19

Bald Eagle - 1 adult

Northern Harrier - 7

Cooper's Hawk - 1 (eating a coot.)

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 3

American Kestrel - 1

American Coot - 164

Killdeer - 375

Wilson's Snipe - 1

Ring-billed Gull - 1

Mourning Dove - 5

Belted Kingfisher - 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 6

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 13

Loggerhead Shrike - 3

Blue Jay - 1

American Crow - 140

Fish Crow - 29

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Carolina Wren - 8

Winter Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 3

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 4

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 4

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 16

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Savannah Sparrow - 9

Fox Sparrow - 1

Song Sparrow - 15

Lincoln's Sparrow - 1

Swamp Sparrow - 12

White-throated Sparrow - 3

White-crowned Sparrow - 2

Dark-eyed Junco - 2

Northern Cardinal - 5

Red-winged Blackbird - 410

Eastern Meadowlark - 10

Rusty Blackbird - 15

American Goldfinch - 10

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Re: Possible Arctic Tern at Lake Thunderbird
From: Paul Ribitzki <lribitzki AT CIMTEL.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 19:11:37 -0600
I searched for the Arctic Tern for several hours today in the area around
the Alameda twin bridges, but did not find it.  I did find one Franklin's
Gull amongst the Ring-bills and Bonaparte's about 3:00 pm that got my
attention for a few minutes.  If anyone finds the Arctic Tern I would
appreciate that it be posted.  Thanks.

 

Paul Ribitzki

 

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of JOS GRZYBOWSKI
Sent: Monday, November 24, 2014 9:25 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Possible Arctic Tern at Lake Thunderbird

 

John Tharp and Rachel Wrenn found the Arctic Tern this morning.  Concensus
for Arctic on the ID still seems to be holding.

FYI.

CHEERS,                                JOE Grzybowski

 

On Sunday, November 23, 2014 5:06 PM, JOS GRZYBOWSKI
 wrote:

 

Hello,   At least one birder went out and found the bird this afternoon.

 

            I should add that there were only two terns present, a Forster's
in winter plumage and this bird, but they were not with each other.   

            On the sand bar, the apparent Arctic would appear to be similar
to a winter-plumaged Common Tern, with dark patagial bar, and black around
eye wrapping broadly around most of crown and nape.  The primaries of the
folded wing would appear gray to almost sooty depending on angle of
reflectance.  The bill is small, but hard to judge in real size without
comparison.

    In flight, look at the secondaries from above that are essentially
white.  At a distance this morning, it gave a white wedge look at the back
of the wing, as in Sabine's Gull, but with less contrast (grays and white).
The dark area on the leading edge of the patagium fades as it smudges back.
The underwing is white except for a narrow edge of gray at the end of the
primaries.  These are characteristic of first-winter Arctics.  There are
other features, but more subtle.

 

     It stood out to me this morning when I first saw it flying in part
because of jizz.  Tern, didn't shape out quite right. Why I called it in
through Jim Arterburn.  Saw the almost half-hooded head, and washed Sabine's
type pattern on upper wing.  All I could see on underwing from distance was
white--could not make out the narrow gray trailing edge at that time.
Picked it out with binoculars at first, but had it in scope flying for a bit
before it moved out of sight.

 

     At least one person to whom I forwarded pictures agrees it is an Arctic
Tern, my call on it right now also, unless someone comes up with a better
argument.  

 

CHEERS,                                  JOE Grzybowski

 

On Sunday, November 23, 2014 1:50 PM, JOS GRZYBOWSKI
 wrote:

 

Howdy,

   I had Jim Arterburn place a post this morning about a possible Arctic
Tern at the Twin Bridges area of Lake Thunderbird.  I was able to run it
down further, and take some distant photos.

  I will have the photos checked out by others, but am still inclined to
believe that this is an Arctic Tern.

 Posted a subset to my pBase site:

 

http://www.pbase.com/joe_grzybowski/documentation_file

 

It was mostly in the area north of the Alameda St bridges, sometimes sitting
on the sand bars alone, or among the 200 or so Bonaparte's Gulls (and some
Ring-billed) there.  It flew across the road twice to the south part of the
Lake, including the last time I saw it (about 10:15 this morning).

 

CHEERS,                    JOE Grzybowski

 

 

 
Subject: Nickel Preserve today
From: Josh Engelbert <birdingokie AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 17:26:11 -0600
I was at the preserve for a few hours today and had a pleasant surprise. At 
12:45 and about a mile west of the headquarters I had an immature Golden Eagle 
fly over and give me one of the best views I've ever had. A short while later 
there was an adult and 2 juvenile bald eagles just east of HQ. 


Josh Engelbert
Copan, OK & Tulsa Zoo
Subject: Re: Lewis's Woodpecker Take 2
From: John Sterling <prairie AT ITLNET.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 11:50:43 -0600
Great photo!!!

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 26, 2014, at 11:32 AM, Warren Williams  wrote:
> 
> One more photo of the Lewis’s Woodpecker at Lake Carl Blackwell.
>  
> http://www.pbase.com/image/158357602
>  
> Warren Williams
> Sand Springs
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  Txt
Subject: Re: Lewis's Woodpecker Take 2
From: Ellie Womack <e-womack AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 11:49:35 -0600
Love it!
Ellie Womack
Grove

From: Warren Williams
Sent: Wednesday, November 26, 2014 11:32 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Lewis's Woodpecker Take 2

One more photo of the Lewis’s Woodpecker at Lake Carl Blackwell.



http://www.pbase.com/image/158357602



Warren Williams

Sand Springs












---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com
Subject: Lewis's Woodpecker Take 2
From: Warren Williams <wwphoto3 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 11:32:57 -0600
One more photo of the Lewis's Woodpecker at Lake Carl Blackwell.

 

http://www.pbase.com/image/158357602

 

Warren Williams

Sand Springs

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Swainson's Hawk at CNRA
From: Dorothy <deb0126 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 08:27:28 -0600
I  hope this works.
 
Yesterday near the Buckhorn area of the Chickasaw National Recreation a 
Swainson's Hawk flew right over me after I got out of my car. According to the 
Date Guide it was more than a month later than usual (October 19). 

 		 	   		  
Subject: Lewis Woodpecker pic
From: Warren Williams <wwphoto3 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 18:15:37 -0600
Hello All,

 

Made a run to Lake Carl Blackwell. Found the bird in less than five minutes.
Best photo is here:

 

http://www.pbase.com/image/158352270

 

Warren Williams

Sand Springs

 

 

  Photography Home Page

  Amazon Author Page

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Arctic Tern
From: "Feldt, Andrew N." <afeldt AT OU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 14:44:38 -0600
I went to the Twin Bridges area at Lake Thunderbird this morning but was unable 
to locate the Arctic Tern. Has anyone seen it since yesterday? 

Subject: Re: Idling
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 10:15:29 -0800
OKBirds needs a "like" button.
:-)
Thanks John.
CHEERS,          JOE  


On Tuesday, November 25, 2014 11:22 AM, John Sterling  
wrote: 

  


Yes, Joe's talk on idling was very interesting. Has improved my life greatly. 
But, his presentation on IDing birds was on the spot. I realized I wasn't 
taking time to carefully nail done all the individuals. Closer observation of 
even common birds can produce some interesting results. 


Sent from my iPad
Subject: Idling
From: John Sterling <prairie AT ITLNET.NET>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 11:21:42 -0600
Yes, Joe's talk on idling was very interesting. Has improved my life greatly. 
But, his presentation on IDing birds was on the spot. I realized I wasn't 
taking time to carefully nail done all the individuals. Closer observation of 
even common birds can produce some interesting results. 


Sent from my iPad
Subject: Re: Terns
From: Larry Mays <larrymays1949 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 08:21:27 -0600
   Hal;
   I may be drooling a bit over the towhee.
   Sounds like you're close to one of the best places in the country to see
Golden-winged Warbler in the late spring.  I tried a couple years ago a
little east and south in North Carolina,  but dipped,  so I will surely
find myself back in that area before long,  seeking that bird.
   Have a great Thanksgiving,  and hurry back here so I can get reliable
Mitch Park reports.
   Larry

On Tue, Nov 25, 2014 at 7:38 AM, Foundation Subscriber 
wrote:

> Larry,
> Glad to hear that you are adding to the big year OK list.
> It won't help a bit , but I am in NE Tenn ( Bristol ) for Thanksgiving  .
> My stepson and grandkids live hear. The first bird u seen out their kitchen
> window is an EASTERN Towhee on the ground under the feeders.
> Also here : c wren , lighter morph song sparrow, lighter gray titmouse .
> Hal
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Nov 24, 2014, at 12:04 PM, larrymays1949 
> wrote:
>
>
> I'm sure there are none of you interested in seeing an extraordinarily
> rare bird for Oklahoma,  but it appears the Arctic Tern may still be
> around, and viewable from North Sentinel.  Jack Hurd and I have been
> chasing, and trying to get some decent shots of the "candidate" for a
> couple hours now.  Prospects are promising.
>
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note® II, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
>
>
Subject: Re: Terns
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 08:38:20 -0500
Larry,
Glad to hear that you are adding to the big year OK list. 
It won't help a bit , but I am in NE Tenn ( Bristol ) for Thanksgiving . My 
stepson and grandkids live hear. The first bird u seen out their kitchen window 
is an EASTERN Towhee on the ground under the feeders. 

Also here : c wren , lighter morph song sparrow, lighter gray titmouse . 
Hal

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 24, 2014, at 12:04 PM, larrymays1949  wrote:
> 
> 
> I'm sure there are none of you interested in seeing an extraordinarily rare 
bird for Oklahoma, but it appears the Arctic Tern may still be around, and 
viewable from North Sentinel. Jack Hurd and I have been chasing, and trying to 
get some decent shots of the "candidate" for a couple hours now. Prospects are 
promising. 

> 
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note® II, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Front
From: John Sterling <prairie AT ITLNET.NET>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 23:03:40 -0600
Looks like the cold front moved some good birds down our way. The Washita River 
flats east of Pauls Valley had five Bald Eagles at a small pond, three Adults 
and two imm. Wonder if any of them were from the nest about two miles to the 
east. 


Some of the fields had hundreds of ducks in them. Mostly Mallards with a few 
Pintails, Wigeons, and Gadwalls. 


Spotted a Ferruginous Hawk soaring over the fields today. One usually shows up 
in winter, but this is early. 


Saturday in Purcell I spotted a group of birds several hundred feet above the 
town. They were flying in a tight ball. Finally spotted an accipiter off to one 
side. A check showed the birds were pigeons not blackbirds. The hawk was larger 
and my first thought was Goshawk. But remembering the fine talk Joe Grzybowski 
gave at the OOS meeting about idling, I check several other point and decided 
it was a very large Coopers Hawk. The tail was long and the leading edge of the 
wing was straight. 


John

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Arctic Tern
From: Cameron Carver <c.o.carver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 16:42:26 -0600
Greetings,

Caleb Frome and I were able to easily find the Arctic Tern today at Lake
Thunderbird. We walked out to a spit and were able to get clear,
digi-scoped photos and regular photos showing all the key characteristics
representative of Arctic.

If anyone would like to see these photos, I will gladly email them to you.

Cameron Carver
Lubbock, TX - Currently in OKC
Subject: Purple Finches, Rough-legged Hawk and Merlin
From: Patti Muzny <patti.muzny AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 14:31:03 -0600
On November 9, 2014, we saw at least two Malel Purple Finches at our property 
near Byars, OK. 


 

On November 2, 2014, Brian Muzny saw a dark-phase Rough-legged Hawk near I-240 
and Sooner Road. 


 

On October 26, 2014, Brian found a pair of Merlins at Resthaven Cemetery at SW 
104th and Western. 


 

Patti Muzny

SW Oklahoma City 

Byars, OK

 
Subject: Re: Terns
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 14:45:27 -0500
Larry , I hope you find that tern . 
OBTW we had 2 female purple finches at a feeder in Mitch Park on Fri. It was 
the feeder with the windmill near the bridge. ( just to the west of the bridge 
) . I have been there on Friday PM and Sunday morning with no luck. In past 
years I have seen them there. Hal 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 24, 2014, at 12:04 PM, larrymays1949  wrote:
> 
> 
> I'm sure there are none of you interested in seeing an extraordinarily rare 
bird for Oklahoma, but it appears the Arctic Tern may still be around, and 
viewable from North Sentinel. Jack Hurd and I have been chasing, and trying to 
get some decent shots of the "candidate" for a couple hours now. Prospects are 
promising. 

> 
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note® II, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Re: Terns
From: John Sterling <prairie AT ITLNET.NET>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 12:23:56 -0600
Larry, I got my best view from the parking lot on the east side.  Good luck.

John

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 24, 2014, at 11:04 AM, larrymays1949  wrote:
> 
> 
> I'm sure there are none of you interested in seeing an extraordinarily rare 
bird for Oklahoma, but it appears the Arctic Tern may still be around, and 
viewable from North Sentinel. Jack Hurd and I have been chasing, and trying to 
get some decent shots of the "candidate" for a couple hours now. Prospects are 
promising. 

> 
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note® II, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Terns
From: larrymays1949 <larrymays1949 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 11:04:50 -0600
I'm sure there are none of you interested in seeing an extraordinarily rare 
bird for Oklahoma,  but it appears the Arctic Tern may still be around, and 
viewable from North Sentinel.  Jack Hurd and I have been chasing, and trying 
to get some decent shots of the "candidate" for a couple hours now.  Prospects 
are promising. 


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note® II, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Tern
From: John Sterling <prairie AT ITLNET.NET>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 09:46:04 -0600
Joe, I went out Sunday afternoon and located the tern. It was setting on the 
sand bar north of the bridges. It flew, but vanished almost at once. Glad you 
got some photos and other ID data. Will be looking forward to the results. 


John

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Re: Possible Arctic Tern at Lake Thunderbird
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 07:25:24 -0800
John Tharp and Rachel Wrenn found the Arctic Tern this morning. Concensus for 
Arctic on the ID still seems to be holding. 

FYI.
CHEERS,                                JOE Grzybowski 


On Sunday, November 23, 2014 5:06 PM, JOS GRZYBOWSKI 
 wrote: 

  


Hello,   At least one birder went out and found the bird this afternoon.

 I should add that there were only two terns present, a Forster's in winter 
plumage and this bird, but they were not with each other. 


 On the sand bar, the apparent Arctic would appear to be similar to a 
winter-plumaged Common Tern, with dark patagial bar, and black around eye 
wrapping broadly around most of crown and nape. The primaries of the folded 
wing would appear gray to almost sooty depending on angle of reflectance. The 
bill is small, but hard to judge in real size without comparison. 

 In flight, look at the secondaries from above that are essentially white. At a 
distance this morning, it gave a white wedge look at the back of the wing, as 
in Sabine's Gull, but with less contrast (grays and white). The dark area on 
the leading edge of the patagium fades as it smudges back. The underwing is 
white except for a narrow edge of gray at the end of the primaries. These are 
characteristic of first-winter Arctics. There are other features, but more 
subtle. 



 It stood out to me this morning when I first saw it flying in part because of 
jizz. Tern, didn't shape out quite right. Why I called it in through Jim 
Arterburn. Saw the almost half-hooded head, and washed Sabine's type pattern on 
upper wing. All I could see on underwing from distance was white--could not 
make out the narrow gray trailing edge at that time. Picked it out with 
binoculars at first, but had it in scope flying for a bit before it moved out 
of sight. 



 At least one person to whom I forwarded pictures agrees it is an Arctic Tern, 
my call on it right now also, unless someone comes up with a better argument. 



CHEERS,                                  JOE Grzybowski
 


On Sunday, November 23, 2014 1:50 PM, JOS GRZYBOWSKI 
 wrote: 

  


Howdy,
 I had Jim Arterburn place a post this morning about a possible Arctic Tern at 
the Twin Bridges area of Lake Thunderbird. I was able to run it down further, 
and take some distant photos. 

 I will have the photos checked out by others, but am still inclined to believe 
that this is an Arctic Tern. 

 Posted a subset to my pBase site:

http://www.pbase.com/joe_grzybowski/documentation_file

It was mostly in the area north of the Alameda St bridges, sometimes sitting on 
the sand bars alone, or among the 200 or so Bonaparte's Gulls (and some 
Ring-billed) there. It flew across the road twice to the south part of the 
Lake, including the last time I saw it (about 10:15 this morning). 


CHEERS,                    JOE Grzybowski
Subject: Lewis's Woodpecker - still present 11/23/14
From: Deanne McKinney <trialsz63 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 21:19:44 -0600
This afternoon I paid a visit to the Lewis's Woodpecker at Lake Carl
Blackwell. It was in the same spot as reported earlier and very easy to
find. It was actively feeding, and flying to and from several trees but
seemed to prefer the large, dead tree where it has been seen by others. I
watched it gather acorns from a nearby oak tree, and also saw it with a
beetle in its beak once. It didn't seem to mind sharing the tree with a few
starlings but wasn't happy with a RH Woodpecker that wanted to sit there.
It displayed the same aggressive behavior that has been reported by others
who have seen this Lewis's Woodpecker in action.

Other birds were seen in the area around the lake but none as special as
the Lewis's. However, there was a Greater Roadrunner and an American
Kestrel.

eBird report here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20653131

Deanne
Subject: Lake Hefner Sunday
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 19:51:05 -0600
Made a complete drive around the lake from 2:30-4:45 starting at West
Britton Rd and ending at Prairie Dog Pt. Highlights were a big raft of
Red-breasted Mergansers, lots of Bonaparte's Gulls, nine Common Loons and a
Lesser Black-backed Gull east of the lake patrol building where I also saw
the Herring Gulls. By the time I got to PDPt, it was too dark in the storm
to distinguish gull species.
Common Loon - 9
Horned Grebe - 25
Pied-Billed Grebe - 12
Am White Pelican - 150
DC Cormorant - 300
Great Blue Heron - 4
Canada Goose - 30
Mallard - 40
Gadwall - 90
Green-winged Teal - 2
Canvasback - 1
Redhead - 10
Ring-necked - 2
Lesser Scaup - 30
Common Goldeneye - 1
Bufflehead - 20
Ruddy Duck - 2
Red-breasted Merganser - 370
Hooded Merganser - 2
American Coot - 40
Killdeer - 2
Bonaparte's Gull - 65
Ring-billed Gull - 500
Herring Gull - 18
Lesser Black-backed Gull - 1 adult
Forster's Tern - 2
European Starling - 10
Great-tailed Grackle - 20
Bill Diffin, OKC
Subject: Barrow's Goldeneye
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 18:42:05 -0600
Hello All,

             Saturday evening, saw an adult male Barrow's Goldeneye on Lake
Yahola. It was still present Sunday morning, along with the Western Grebe.
Also saw FOS Common Mergansers.

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Snowy Owl report, Ottawa County, OK
From: Evelyn Houck <efhouck727 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 13:55:03 -0600
Ed Saunders who lives in the Miami area in Ottawa County, reports his
sighting of a Snowy Owl yesterday evening (Saturday) along the road near
his home.  Before church this morning, he checked the area again but did
not see the bird.  This is an area north of High Winds casino, so those
in/near that area might want to be on the look out.

Thanks, Ed, for this report!

Evelyn Houck
Grand Lake Audubon Society
Delaware County Oklahoma
N.E. corner of the state
Subject: Possible Arctic Tern at Lake Thunderbird
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 11:50:12 -0800
Howdy,
 I had Jim Arterburn place a post this morning about a possible Arctic Tern at 
the Twin Bridges area of Lake Thunderbird. I was able to run it down further, 
and take some distant photos. 

 I will have the photos checked out by others, but am still inclined to believe 
that this is an Arctic Tern. 

 Posted a subset to my pBase site:

http://www.pbase.com/joe_grzybowski/documentation_file

It was mostly in the area north of the Alameda St bridges, sometimes sitting on 
the sand bars alone, or among the 200 or so Bonaparte's Gulls (and some 
Ring-billed) there. It flew across the road twice to the south part of the 
Lake, including the last time I saw it (about 10:15 this morning). 


CHEERS,                    JOE Grzybowski
Subject: Odd Tern at Lake Thunderbird
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 08:11:01 -0600
OKBirds,

 

Joe Grzybowski just called and he is at the twin bridges area on Lake
Thunderbird and has been looking at a tern that might possibly be a
first-winter Arctic Tern. He is trying to relocate the bird to get some
better looks and hopefully some photographs. He is also hoping that some
birders will come to help relocate the bird. 

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Fwd: Kenton (Black Mesa) CBC
From: John Sterling <prairie AT ITLNET.NET>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 16:43:26 -0600

Sent from my iPad

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Sebastian 
> Date: November 22, 2014 at 4:07:43 PM CST
> To: John Sterling 
> Subject: FW: Kenton (Black Mesa) CBC
> 
> Hey, John . . . cam you forward this to the List-serve??
>  
> I am blocked for some reason. . . thanks . . .
> 
> sebastianpatti AT hotmail.com 
> Sebastian T. Patti 
> (Lincoln Park) 
> Chicago, ILLINOIS 60614-3354 
> PHONE: 312/325-9555 (o) 773/248-0570 (h) 
> CELL: 773/304-7488
> FAX: 312/325-9017(o)
> 
>  
> From: sebastianpatti AT hotmail.com
> To: okbirds AT lists.ou.edu
> Subject: FW: Kenton (Black Mesa) CBC
> Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 12:48:57 -0600
> 
> 
> Subject: FW: Kenton (Black Mesa) CBC
> Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 08:45:16 -0600
> 
> 
> 
> The Kenton (Black Mesa) CBC will be conducted on SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2014. 
Participants 

> will meet in downtown Kenton at 9:00AM CST for circle assignments.
>  
> I will most likely be Unable to attend this year and I'd like to get a sense 
of those who might be interested 

> in participating. Please e-mail me back channel if you have interest in 
attending this fun count. 

>  
> Thanks, and Happy Turkey Day this week.  Gobble, gobble! 
> 
> sebastianpatti AT hotmail.com 
> Sebastian T. Patti 
> (Lincoln Park) 
> Chicago, ILLINOIS 60614-3354 
> PHONE: 312/325-9555 (o) 773/248-0570 (h) 
> CELL: 773/304-7488
> FAX: 312/325-9017(o)
> 
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
Subject: Re: Lewis' Woodpecker
From: John Kennington <johnkennington AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 15:11:43 -0600
Just for fun hit the OKBird archives, below is the full message from March
21, 1999. It was mentioned on several emails, the last being April 29,
1999.

-  RBA
* OKLAHOMA
* Statewide
* March 21, 1999
* OKST9903.21

- Birds Mentioned
Yellow-billed Loon
Lewis' Woodpecker
Pyrrhuloxia

- Locations Mentioned
Lake Hefner, Oklahoma County
Residence, Rogers County
Residence, Oklahoma County

-  Transcript
Hotline:  Oklahoma Rare Bird Alert
Date:   March 21, 1999
Number:  918-669-6646
To Report:  918-669-6646
Coverage:  Statewide
Compiler:  Patricia Seibert and Jo Loyd
Transcribers:  Martha B. Kamp  and Jo Loyd
 wrote:

> Hello All,
>
>              Just a follow-up, got home and checked my notes, I'm pretty
> sure that 1999 was the year that the Lewis' Woodpecker was seen in Rogers
> County.
>
> Bill
>
Subject: Lewis' Woodpecker
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 14:51:59 -0600
Hello All,

             Just a follow-up, got home and checked my notes, I'm pretty
sure that 1999 was the year that the Lewis' Woodpecker was seen in Rogers
County.

Bill
Subject: Re: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker
From: Cindy <cynthiaoder AT 4GRC.COM>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 13:09:58 -0600
The Lewis Woodpecker is still at Lake Carl Blackwell.
Subject: Re: Eldon Lyon Park
From: David McNeely <mcneely4 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 10:52:46 -0600
And yet, though even a small crow is comparable in size to a Cooper's Hawk, I 
have seen a Cooper's feeding on (I did not see it capture) a crow. It was at 
the Oklahoma City campus of OSU, near the farmer's market, which struck me as 
not the usual place for a Cooper's Hawk at the time, but there it was. A woman 
riding an all terrain vehicle doing some work for the market road right up 
toward the hawk as it was feeding and it flew away to a tree, and then further. 
I mentioned to her that she frightened the hawk from its meal, but she didn't 
see that as important. I assume that the hawk captured the crow (I've not known 
them to feed on carrion). If so, that was a major energy expenditure, and it 
needed to get it back. 


Like you, I have seen crows and Cooper's Hawks ignore each other. More often, I 
have seen crows mob the hawks. 


David

---- Jimmy Woodard  wrote: 
> Matt and all, we have a Cooper's Hawk that visits the Midwest City yard from 
time to time. Last week, there were 

> three crows in the yard when a Cooper's came flying thru at low levels. None 
of the crows even flinched. The Coopers 

> sat in a tree near the house before flying back down thru the yard. as it 
flew near the crows, it veered slightly 

> toward one. The crow just hopped over a few steps and let the Cooper's go by. 

> I think the crows knew they weren't on the menu and the Cooper's knew the 
crow was too big to tangle with so there 

> 	was no real interaction.
> 
> 	Jimmy Woodard
> 	Midwest City, OK
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Matthew Jung
> Sent: Friday, November 21, 2014 8:30 PM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Eldon Lyon Park
> 
> While walking at the park yesterday morning I observed a Sharp-shinned Hawk 
harassing one of the local crows, perhaps a juvenile. It took just a few 
seconds for back up to arrive and the hawk was dispatched to a different place. 
What I found odd that the hawk did not bother any of the (many) squirrels 
running around. Matt Jung, OKC 


--
David McNeely
Subject: Re: Eldon Lyon Park
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 10:32:12 -0600
 Matt and all, we have a Cooper's Hawk that visits the Midwest City yard from 
time to time. Last week, there were 

 three crows in the yard when a Cooper's came flying thru at low levels. None 
of the crows even flinched. The Coopers 

 sat in a tree near the house before flying back down thru the yard. as it flew 
near the crows, it veered slightly 

	toward one. The crow just hopped over a few steps and let the Cooper's go by.	
 I think the crows knew they weren't on the menu and the Cooper's knew the crow 
was too big to tangle with so there 

	was no real interaction.

	Jimmy Woodard
	Midwest City, OK

-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Matthew Jung
Sent: Friday, November 21, 2014 8:30 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Eldon Lyon Park

While walking at the park yesterday morning I observed a Sharp-shinned Hawk 
harassing one of the local crows, perhaps a juvenile. It took just a few 
seconds for back up to arrive and the hawk was dispatched to a different place. 
What I found odd that the hawk did not bother any of the (many) squirrels 
running around. Matt Jung, OKC 

Subject: Re: Eldon Lyon Park
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 21:08:16 -0600
Sharp shinned hawks favorite food is mostly all other birds, not mammals. I 
have watched thd one that visits my yard get many different birds- m . Dove, 
downy woodpecker, c. Wren, cardinal, mockingbirds, etc. I have watched the 
squirrels run around in the yard and even go right up to a SS hawk that was 
sitting in s tree. 

They are A la Carte for birds but usually ignore mammals . Hal Yocum

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 21, 2014, at 8:30 PM, Matthew Jung  wrote:
> 
> While walking at the park yesterday morning I observed a Sharp-shinned
> Hawk harassing one of the local crows, perhaps a juvenile.  It took
> just a few seconds for back up to arrive and the hawk was dispatched
> to a different place.  What I found odd that the hawk did not bother
> any of the (many) squirrels running around.  Matt Jung, OKC
Subject: Eldon Lyon Park
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 20:30:21 -0600
While walking at the park yesterday morning I observed a Sharp-shinned
Hawk harassing one of the local crows, perhaps a juvenile.  It took
just a few seconds for back up to arrive and the hawk was dispatched
to a different place.  What I found odd that the hawk did not bother
any of the (many) squirrels running around.  Matt Jung, OKC
Subject: Snow geese
From: "David F. Evans" <davefbirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 19:07:35 -0600
Today Jim Erb and I joined biologist Dustin Taylor for the biweekly
waterfowl survey at Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge.  Lots and lots and
lots of birds but the highlight was over 17,000 snow and Ross' geese.
There may have been more because they were moving back and forth between
the river and feeding fields but we had an estimated 17,500 in one area.
There were also thousands of ducks, mostly mallards.
Also had two pairs of eagles in nest trees that had been used in previous
years. Unfortunately neither tree was the one near the entrance with the
camera.

Dave Evans
Black Gum
Subject: Re: PCAS - Sooner Lake Field Trip canceled
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 15:16:37 -0600
There was a Lewis' Woodpecker in Rogers County near Oologah, probably more
than ten years ago. Don't remember the exact year, maybe someone out there
can come up with it.

Bill

On Fri, Nov 21, 2014 at 2:01 PM, Timothy O'Connell  wrote:

> Dear Friends and Supporters of the Payne County Audubon Society,
>
> Given tomorrow's forecast for steady rain and thunderstorms, Field Trip
> Coordinator John Polo has decided to *cancel tomorrow's field trip to
> Sooner Lake*.  We hate to do that, but viewing conditions sound like they
> will be pretty awful.
>
> If you were planning to attend tomorrow's trip and looking to find a rare
> bird that you might be able to see more clearly, you might check out *Lake
> Carl Blackwell where a LEWIS'S WOODPECKER* has made an appearance this
> week.  Lewis's Woodpecker is a Rocky Mountain species that has wandered as
> far east as the Canadian Maritimes, but this Payne County record appears to
> be the easternmost recorded for our state.  The bird has apparently been
> easily spotted in a grove of large, dead trees just to the south and east
> of the parking lot at the Lake Carl Blackwell store.
>
> Our next event will be *Thursday, Dec. 4th *at the *Windrock Clubhouse on
> North Star Drive *when we will gather to plan our* upcoming Christmas
> Bird Counts.  *The counts will be* Saturday Dec. 20 (Stillwater) *and *Monday
> Dec. 22 (Sooner Lake).*
>
>
> *Please check our new website paynecountyaudubonsociety.wordpress.com
> .  I know the name is
> clunky; please bear with us as we make this transition.  At some point we
> will likely purchase our old domain name but for now please update your
> links to the wordpress site, check it out, and let me know what you think.
> Many facets of the site are still under construction, including the
> all-important donations feature, so please direct all purchases in the
> meantime the old-fashioned way:  checks made out to "PCAS" and addressed to
> P.O. Box 82, Stillwater, OK 74076.Again, thank you for your support and
> encouragement and participation in programming of the Payne County Audubon
> Society.  Wishing you good birding,~Tim O'ConnellPCAS President*
>
Subject: Western Grebe, Again
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 12:31:02 -0600
Hello All,

           Saw the Western Grebe at Lake Yahola again this morning.

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Sooner Lake field trip cancelled
From: John Polo <jpolo AT MAIL.USF.EDU>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 08:01:13 -0600
Hi Birders,
There's a good chance of thunderstorms, so I'm calling off the Payne County 
Audubon Society's planned trip to Sooner Lake tomorrow. Hope that didn't ruin 
too many people's plan. 


john polo
Stillwater
Subject: Re: Lewis's woodpecker
From: james jorgensen <hpah AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 17:21:41 -0600
Speculation: The Red headed juvenile may have been born in that tree and the
Lewis's Woodpecker recently "moved in" because of the abundance of food in
the tree. The LW appeared to do most of the foraging on two locations in the
tree. The juvenile may simply be attempting to extract it's meals from that
tree with the resistance of the LW abruptly disturbing his efforts.
I wonder if anyone had seen the Red Headeds in that tree this past Spring
and Summer? If there were noted there this may simply be a migratory
(wintering) effort on the part of the LW. Either way it is interesting to
observe their intense maneuvers. The Little Red Headed has the advantage in
speed and maneuvering. Hopefully the LW doesn't catch up. 
Best wishes,
JJ

-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jonah Padberg
Sent: Thursday, November 20, 2014 4:22 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Lewis's woodpecker

The Lewis's woodpecker is still there as of 4:00 this evening. He gave me
some very good in flight looks, and seems to be at home there.  

--Jonah
Subject: Cedar Waxwings
From: Jana Singletary <jssingletary AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 16:29:30 -0600
I just had a flock of 21 Cedar Waxwings in my yard. They were my first of the 
season. 

Jana Singletary
Tulsa


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Lewis's woodpecker
From: Jonah Padberg <jonah.padberg AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 16:22:08 -0600
The Lewis's woodpecker is still there as of 4:00 this evening. He gave me some 
very good in flight looks, and seems to be at home there. 


--Jonah
Subject: Rails
From: Henthorn1 <henthorn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 11:57:15 -0600
Foundation subscriber asked about the yellow rails. They witness Virginia rails 
on the Arnett, OK CBC most years. Details of the upcoming CBC will be 
forthcoming, scheduled for final week of December. Eddie Stegall will notify us 
soon. 

Sharon Henthorn

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Red Slough Rock Wren photo
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 11:27:37 -0600
Dave, 
Any sign of the "great photos" of the yellow rail that the man from Dallas said 
he would send to you ? I really hope to see those . 

Hal Yocum 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 20, 2014, at 8:00 AM, David Arbour  wrote:
> 
> I posted a photo of the Red Slough Rock Wren on our Red Slough Photo Gallery 
site. You can see it here: 

>  
> http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma/recent_photos
>  
> I forgot to mention that while I was following the bird around while it was 
feeding, trying to get photos, it would fly into the cover of tall grass and 
brush that was growing along the mowed levee and at one point it sat up in a 
willow tree. I finally lost it and as I walked back down the levee to return to 
my truck I spied the bird feeding on the ground underneath my truck. Then it 
flew up inside the under carriage of the truck. I shook the truck before I got 
in it to leave to make sure he got out before I started moving. I drove a 
little ways down the levee then stopped and looked back with my binos and he 
was already back out feeding on the ground. I looked for the wren yesterday but 
it was gone. Apparently, it left overnight to find a more suitable habitat with 
a lot of rocks. 

>  
> David Arbour
> De Queen, AR
Subject: Wear some orange
From: "Bostian, Kelly" <Kelly.Bostian AT TULSAWORLD.COM>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 15:53:33 +0000
A note to birders who might not know, rifle season for deer begins Saturday 
(Nov. 22 - Dec. 7) 


The great majority of hunters are careful and safe, but rifle bullets carry 
long distances and a hunter focused on a deer might not see a person in plain 
clothes in the background. More than 190,000 people bought rifle tags last 
year. All it takes is one person to make one mistake. All deer hunters are 
required by law to wear hunter orange at all times while in the field during 
this season and it is wise for anyone in the woods to at least wear a hunter 
orange ball cap or stocking hat. 


I recommend wearing orange whether you believe you are in a deer hunting area 
or not. Again, while the great majority of deer hunters are law-abiding it only 
takes one who is not to make a fatal mistake. 


Be good and safe out there.


Kelly Bostian
Outdoors Writer
Tulsa World Media Company
www.tulsaworld.com
office | 918 581 8357
mobile | 918 231 1385
fax | 918 581 8353
315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
twitter |  AT kellybostian
blog |tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian
email | kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com
Subject: Re: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker
From: Timothy O'Connell <tim.oconnell AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 09:28:41 -0600
For a bit of perspective, the Red-headed Woodpeckers are unusual at Lake Carl 
Blackwell, too. I've birded that place pretty heavily for the past 10 years, 
including continuous breeding season surveys, Christmas Bird Counts, GBBC. 
During that time, I might have found a Red-headed on something like 1/10 of my 
trips. I was really surprised to see so many of them zipping about the park 
during our OOS field trip there last month, and glad to hear that they're 
sticking around. That is, of course, unless that meaniehead Lewis's succeeds in 
chasing them all off! 

~tim





On Nov 19, 2014, at 5:49 PM, Jim Jorgensen wrote:

> It was interesting watching them this morning. He ran off the juvenile 
> Red Headed Woodpecker and would sometimes see it in distant trees to the west 
going out after it (RHW juvi). There was another mature RHW which would stay in 
the trees to the east. It didn't seem to get into the conflict at all. There 
were Starlings in the favored tree which the LW did not bother at all. There 
were also two hairy or downys in the tree and the LW would leave alone as well. 
I considered that the LW would tire out but I think it expended much more enery 
than it took in while I was there. It was well worth the trip watching the 
"dog-fights" going on between the two birds.....the bonus was seeing the 
superior combatant...(aggressor)! 

> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Nov 19, 2014, at 5:10 PM, Lewis Pond  wrote:
>> 
>> The Lewis' Woodpecker was still on the same tree as of 2:30 today - 
11/19/14. Also, got a great look at a Prairie Falcon. Good trip! 

Subject: Red Slough Rock Wren photo
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 08:00:10 -0600
I posted a photo of the Red Slough Rock Wren on our Red Slough Photo Gallery
site.  You can see it here:

 

http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma/recent_photos 

 

I forgot to mention that while I was following the bird around while it was
feeding, trying to get photos, it would fly into the cover of tall grass and
brush that was growing along the mowed levee and at one point it sat up in a
willow tree.  I finally lost it and as I walked back down the levee to
return to my truck I spied the bird feeding on the ground underneath my
truck.  Then it flew up inside the under carriage of the truck.  I shook the
truck before I got in it to leave to make sure he got out before I started
moving.  I drove a little ways down the levee then stopped and looked back
with my binos and he was already back out feeding on the ground.  I looked
for the wren yesterday but it was gone.  Apparently, it left overnight to
find a more suitable habitat with a lot of rocks.

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR
Subject: Re: Wigeons and loons
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 22:33:24 -0500
Steve,
I likewise drove the Lake Hefner Dam at about 4:45-5:20. Many coots, p.b. 
grebe, few horned grebe, both gulls( ring bill and Bonaparte's) and , to the 
east of the fishing pier, one lone loon that at close observation I feel was a 
yellow billed loon. Indeed there was yellowness to the bill, generally held it 
pointing "up", had a prominent forehead bump and smaller backhead one, had the 
large pale neck markings . We got photos ( a friend) . I plan to get my friend 
to email the 2-3 best photos or two to some better experts for their opinion. 
Distance 30-40 yards out. Easily viewed with my scope. My total species for the 
day was 51. 

This morning at Hefner Park I sighted a very tan and white junco and we got 
excellent photos of that as well. Likewise I will share that through my friend. 

Nine sparrows for the day as well- I think all likely ones now except savannah.
Hal
---- Steve Davis  wrote: 
> Mary and I found at least a dozen male and female wigeons, along with a
> variety of other waterfowl, at the little pond at Canterbury retirement
> center off NW 122nd this afternoon.
> 
> Then we drove around the dam at Lake Hefner, seeing 5 Common Loons, 8-10
> Horned Grebes, about a 100 white pelicans, nearly as many DC Cormorants,
> and a dozen or more Bonaparte's Gulls in a frenzy in a cove on on the east
> end of the dam.
Subject: Wigeons and loons
From: Steve Davis <spd8109 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 19:46:18 -0600
Mary and I found at least a dozen male and female wigeons, along with a
variety of other waterfowl, at the little pond at Canterbury retirement
center off NW 122nd this afternoon.

Then we drove around the dam at Lake Hefner, seeing 5 Common Loons, 8-10
Horned Grebes, about a 100 white pelicans, nearly as many DC Cormorants,
and a dozen or more Bonaparte's Gulls in a frenzy in a cove on on the east
end of the dam.
Subject: Re: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker
From: Jim Jorgensen <hpah AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 17:49:13 -0600
It was interesting watching them this morning. He ran off the juvenile 
Red Headed Woodpecker and would sometimes see it in distant trees to the west 
going out after it (RHW juvi). There was another mature RHW which would stay in 
the trees to the east. It didn't seem to get into the conflict at all. There 
were Starlings in the favored tree which the LW did not bother at all. There 
were also two hairy or downys in the tree and the LW would leave alone as well. 
I considered that the LW would tire out but I think it expended much more enery 
than it took in while I was there. It was well worth the trip watching the 
"dog-fights" going on between the two birds.....the bonus was seeing the 
superior combatant...(aggressor)! 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 19, 2014, at 5:10 PM, Lewis Pond  wrote:
> 
> The Lewis' Woodpecker was still on the same tree as of 2:30 today - 11/19/14. 
Also, got a great look at a Prairie Falcon. Good trip! 

Subject: Re: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker
From: Lewis Pond <breaker57 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 15:10:42 -0800
The Lewis' Woodpecker was still on the same tree as of 2:30 today - 11/19/14. 
Also, got a great look at a Prairie Falcon. Good trip! 

Subject: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker
From: Jim Jorgensen <hpah AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 11:15:21 -0600
As described! A first for me and a fierce show of territorial instincts. 11:12 
am..just leaving. 

Lewis's woodpecker.

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Lewis's Woodpecker - Lake Carl Blackwell
From: John Polo <jpolo AT MAIL.USF.EDU>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 22:16:02 -0600
Hi Birders,
Brandy and i went out after work to look for the Lewis's. As we walked around 
in the area where Scott said he found it, we heard a Red-headed Woodpecker 
grunting and then it flew to the snag the Scott described. There it was met by 
the Lewis's, which chased it off. The Red-headed Woodpecker made two more tries 
at the tree and the Lewis's rebuffed it both times. I tried to get a photo, but 
the late sun didn't provide me with good enough light for decent photos, but as 
Scott indicated, clear looks made the bird unmistakeable. As we watched the 
bird, it flew over to another nearby snag, eyed an existing woodpecker hole, 
then returned to the large snag, where it remained as we departed. 


good birding,
john polo
Stillwater
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 18 ...7 wren day!
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 20:28:19 -0600
It was cold, clear, and windy on the bird survey today.  66 species were
found.  Temps dropped down to 17 degrees last night and there was some ice
around on the lakes and wetlands.  Highlight of the day was finding a Rock
Wren feeding on the ground on a mowed levee.  I was able to get some decent
pics and will post them later.  After finding this bird I realized I only
needed 3 more wren species to make it a 7 wren day; so I made a little extra
effort and easily found the 3 wrens I needed.  I regularly find 6 wren
species at Red Slough in the fall and winter but usually only find all six
on the same day once or twice a year, so it was a fun accomplishment to get
7 species today.   Also had the adult Golden Eagle soaring over the
reservoirs again today.  This second cold front that came through Sunday
night apparently pushed a bunch of our ducks further south as well as a lot
of our passerines.  Here is my list for today:

 

Wood Duck - 91

Gadwall - 407

Mallard - 974

Blue-winged Teal - 1

Northern Shoveler - 34

Northern Pintail - 29

Green-winged Teal - 330

Ring-necked Duck - 97

Hooded Merganser - 75

Ruddy Duck - 3

Pied-billed Grebe - 15

Double-crested Cormorant - 78

Great Blue Heron - 19

Black Vulture - 5

Turkey Vulture - 7

Bald Eagle - 3 (2 adults & 1 imm.)

Northern Harrier - 6

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 5

Golden Eagle - 1 adult

American Kestrel - 1

American Coot - 125

Wilson's Snipe - 6

Bonaparte's Gull - 6

Ring-billed Gull - 10

Mourning Dove - 6

Belted Kingfisher - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 7

Eastern Phoebe - 8

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 10

Fish Crow - 3

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Carolina Wren - 2

Bewick's Wren - 1

House Wren - 2

Winter Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 1

Marsh Wren - 1

Rock Wren - 1 (New species for RS!)

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 4

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

American Pipit - 2

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 24

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Chipping Sparrow - 1

Field Sparrow - 3

Savannah Sparrow - 9

LeConte's Sparrow - 1

Fox Sparrow - 2

Song Sparrow - 15

Swamp Sparrow - 12

White-throated Sparrow - 4

White-crowned Sparrow - 5

Dark-eyed Junco - 5

Northern Cardinal - 3

Red-winged Blackbird - 140

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 380

American Goldfinch - 3

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour 

 

 
Subject: Re: Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count Date: Tuesday, December 23
From: John Sterling <prairie AT ITLNET.NET>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 17:28:23 -0600
I will be there.  Should be staying with Berlin.

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 18, 2014, at 12:28 PM, Mia Revels  wrote:
> 
> Greetings OK-Birders!
> 
> The Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count will be on Tuesday, December 23 this 
year. 

> 
> On the evening of Monday, December 22, we will meet at Papa Poblano's 
Restaurant just north of the traffic light east of Idabel. I have made 
reservations for 7:00 pm, which will allow time to eat and afterwards, to form 
groups, and to hand out checklists and other info for the count. I will provide 
maps showing the various units and we will determine who covers which. 

> 
> On the count day we will meet for lunch at Steven's Gap Restaurant at 1:00 
PM. This Restaurant is on the west side of Hwy 259 in Hochatown, just south of 
the road that goes into Steven's Gap. After lunch we will conduct a preliminary 
species tally and see what we have missed. Those who are staying will then go 
back out, ending at sundown in Unit 2 of the Little River National Wildlife 
Refuge where we will watch the waterfowl come to roost and hope for a Woodcock. 

> 
> I know this count is a long way from anywhere, but it is a lovely part of 
Oklahoma that you may not get to very often. Please consider joining us for a 
fun birding trip! Contact Mia at: Cell (479) 444-9492 or revels AT nsuok.edu 

> 
> -- 
> Mia Revels, Ph.D.
> Professor of Biology
> Northeastern State University
> 611 Grand Ave. 
> Tahlequah, Oklahoma
> (918) 444-3824
> revels AT nsuok.edu
> 
> 
> **CONFIDENTIALITY** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain 
confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized 
disclosure or use of this information is prohibited. 
Subject: Lewis's Woodpecker - Lake Carl Blackwell
From: Scott Loss <scottrloss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 16:57:23 -0600
Thanks to Torre Hovick and John Polo for getting the word out on the
Lewis's Woodpecker. I'll add a few more words.

I spotted the bird around 2:15 pm today while teaching my applied ecology
and conservation class. Within the Lake Carl Blackwell park area, it is
hanging pretty tight to a giant dead tree southwest across the road from
the park's general store, park office, and gas station. To get there, enter
the park off of highway 51 west of Stillwater (self-pay required - $5 or $6
to get in). Follow the main road straight north almost all the way to the
lake (first you will cross a causeway across a small arm of the lake). When
you get to the vicinity of the store/office the road starts to curve east.
As you curve you will see the big dead tree ahead of you on the east side
of the road.

The bird is actively chasing all woodpeckers away from this tree (including
Red-headed and Red-bellied) so perhaps it is thinking of setting up a
territory at least for awhile. In fact it did nothing but chase a juvenile
Red-headed Woodpecker for a good 10 minutes at one point. Otherwise, it
frequently sallied on fly-catching forays between that tree and some of the
living oaks around it. I checked on it four times over the course of 2
hours and it was always in the same dead tree.

I managed to leave my camera in the coat in my office, so I do not have
photo documentation. I will be back teaching there tomorrow afternoon, so I
will attempt to get a photo at that point. My summary is that it is
unmistakable and was clearly seen. One of my students, Alex James (a
skilled local birder) was also able to see and confirm the ID.

Scott Loss
Stillwater
Subject: Lewis's Woodpecker, Payne County
From: John Polo <jpolo AT MAIL.USF.EDU>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 15:04:46 -0600
Birders,
This report is 2nd hand from Torre Hovick. Scott Loss found a Lewis's 
Woodpecker in a tree across the street from the gas station at Lake Carl 
Blackwell. Not sure of the time frame, but within the last 30 minutes, I 
believe. Scott asked to get the word out quickly for anyone who wants to go 
see. Nice find, Scott! 


While I'm posting, Payne County Audubon Society is planning a trip to Sooner 
Lake this Saturday. Meet at Bill's Corner at 8:30a. You'll need a state-issued 
ID to get in. Bill's Corner is at the corner of HWY 177 and HWY 64. Right now 
the forecast has a high chance for thunderstorms. If that holds, the trip will 
probably be cancelled. The best place to check the status of the trip is PCAS' 
new website, at the current URL: 

http://paynecountyaudubonsociety.wordpress.com/

good birding,
john polo
Stillwater
Subject: Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count Date: Tuesday, December 23
From: Mia Revels <revels AT NSUOK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 12:28:06 -0600
Greetings OK-Birders!

The Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count will be on Tuesday, December 23 this
year.

On the evening of Monday, December 22, we will meet at Papa Poblano's
Restaurant just north of the traffic light east of Idabel.  I have made
reservations for 7:00 pm, which will allow time to eat and afterwards, to
form groups, and to hand out checklists and other info for the count.  I
will provide maps showing the various units and we will determine who
covers which.

On the count day we will meet for lunch at Steven's Gap Restaurant at 1:00
PM. This Restaurant is on the west side of Hwy 259 in Hochatown, just south
of the road that goes into Steven's Gap. After lunch we will conduct a
preliminary species tally and see what we have missed. Those who are
staying will then go back out, ending at sundown in Unit 2 of the Little
River National Wildlife Refuge where we will watch the waterfowl come to
roost and hope for a Woodcock.

I know this count is a long way from anywhere, but it is a lovely part of
Oklahoma that you may not get to very often. Please consider joining us for
a fun birding trip!  Contact Mia at: Cell (479) 444-9492 or revels AT nsuok.edu

-- 
Mia Revels, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Northeastern State University
611 Grand Ave.
Tahlequah, Oklahoma
(918) 444-3824
revels AT nsuok.edu


***CONFIDENTIALITY*** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain
confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized
disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.
Subject: Late Lark Sparrow - Boomer Lake, Stillwater
From: Scott Loss <scottrloss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 09:48:37 -0600
I stopped to scan the numerous waterfowl on Boomer Lake this morning. The
best bird turned out to be a LARK SPARROW on the point off the south
parking lot on the east side. Didn't think this was a notable bird until I
ran an eBird query and saw that this is one of the latest ever records for
this latitude in the interior US.

The lake itself was loaded with waterfowl (it always seems to be on
mornings when at least some ice is present) - 11 duck species with hundreds
of individuals, plus 2 Horned Grebes, 1 Common Loon, Least Sandpipers, etc.

Also, I'm continuing to have good birds flying over our north Stillwater
yard around and shortly after sunrise. Today was the 3rd straight day with
flyover Smith's Longspurs; also had one that sounded more Lapland
Longspur-like (but leaving unidentified), plus several Pine Siskins, pipit,
hundreds of Red-winged Blackbirds and Robins, dozens of Brewer's
Blackbirds, etc.

Scott Loss
Stillwater
Subject: Re: FW: Snowy Owl
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 04:23:04 +0000
FYI, in case you are interested:

Kerlinger, Lein, and Boxall (see below) conducted work in the 80s and more or 
less concluded the following: irrruptions were not actually as common as once 
thought, but were actually incursions into "normal" wintering ranges, in part 
by examining areas near Calgary (Alberta Canada) and the winter distribution 
using specimens and CBCs, etc. In fact, the northern plains, at least through 
KS is part of their normal winter range (Kerlinger et al. 1985 and Parmelee 
1992). It can occur in most years in KS, although it's rare and somewhat 
irregular (Thompson et al. 2011 Birds of KS). OK is considered a location for 
vagrancy, especially during irruptive years. 


Most birds observed during irruptions are young birds (the Bartlesville bird 
looked to be a young female), both males and females (supporting the high 
success during breeding, which would be tied to high lemming populations, and 
subsequent dispersal). Within their normal wintering areas, birds are healthy. 
A bird observed not too far from the OK state-line, in Sumner County KS, was 
observed for several weeks, and pellet contents indicated it had enough food 
based on the small sample size (Subramaniam et al. 2011). The irruption of 
2011-2012, Robbins and Otte (2013) tallied up total observations from KS and 
MO, and for KS there were 154 reports, a majority were HY birds, and a majority 
of salvaged birds were emaciated, supporting the idea that many young birds 
die. 


Here is some of the literature referenced above and early history info (if I 
didn't put title, it's because you can search in that journal via SORA and/or 
online , or the KOS web page, or you can access in libraries): 


Boxall and Lein 1982. Feeding ecology of Snowy Owls wintering in southern 
Alberta. Arctic 35(2):282-290 


_____.  1989.  JFO 60(1):20-29

Gross. 1944. Auk 61(1):1-18

Holt et al. 1999.  Family Strigidae in Handbook of Birds of the World, Vol 5.

Kerlinger and Lein 1986. Differences in winter ranges among age-sex classes of 
Snowy Owl in NA. Ornis Scandinavica 17:1-7. 


_____. 1988. JFO 59(1):7-12.

Kerlinger, Lein and Sevick. 1985. Distribution and population fluctuations of 
wintering Snowy Owls. Can. J. Zoology 63(8):1829-1834. 


Parmelee.  1992. Snowy Owl.  BNA account.

Robbins and Otte. 2013. KOS Bull. 64(4):41-44

Shelford. 1945. Auk 62(4):592-596.

Subrmaniam et al. 2011.  KOS Bull. 62(4):42-45

A good web site: http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/gotsnowies2013/

Personally, I think habitat is critical to survival for birds this far south. 
If birds have habitat with enough prey, they survive. Wetland habitats and 
reservoirs might provide better habitat (great at capturing birds, even over 
open water) with greater diversity of prey than agriculture fields and 
grasslands, especially if snow covered. I think birds that have been around for 
3-4 weeks, likely make it back north...if some anthropogenic factor doesn't 
kill them first (shootings, power line collision, electrocution, road kill, 
etc.). 


Interestingly, concerning site fidelity as indicated by message below: I've 
heard of winter site fidelity, but ironically, for breeding it's not really 
important. The owls go where the food is abundant...thus, nesting site fidelity 
isn't strong at all (see web page above and look at Sat. studies near the end). 
As a kid, at my aunt and uncles home I can remember seeing Snowy Owls in the 
Neshaminy/Lower South Hampton suburbs of Philly (PA) just about every winter. 
The Marland owl a couple of years ago in OK, I was told by a land owner (she 
works here) the bird was present the year before. I've heard similar stories in 
KS, birds showing up for a couple of yrs in a row. 


Gene


Eugene A. Young


Agriculture, Science & Engineering
1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310
Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310
Phone: 580-628-6482
Fax: 580-628-6209
E-Mail: Eugene.Young AT noc.edu
Website: www.noc.edu

-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of John Fisher
Sent: Monday, November 17, 2014 12:00 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] FW: Snowy Owl

John,

In 1971 an adult snowy stayed in a hay field south of the Arkansas River about 
4 miles west of Sand Springs. The farmer that owned the field said it had been 
there before and he was glad to see it since it always made a serious dent in 
the cotton rats. The first time I saw it was in late October - early November. 
I think it left sometime in March but.... It appeared to be healthy - at least 
there were lots of pellets next to its favorite hay bale in the middle of the 
field and didn't seem to be having any trouble catching prey. In following 
years, I saw it or another a couple of times in that same field. 


John

---- John Shackford  wrote: 
> Dear James,
> 
> A good question about early Snowy Owls which took me a bit to chase 
> down an acceptable answer.  In 1975 I did a summary paper in the OOS 
> Bulletin (December Issue) entitled "The Snowy Owl in Oklahoma."  The 
> impetus for this paper was an invasion of Snowy Owls in Oklahoma 
> during the winter of 1974-5. We had at least 20 Snowies show up that winter! 

> 
> In this summary paper there was one Snowy Owl "seen repeatedly from 
> 'early November' to 7 December" 1963 "near Lake Carl Blackwell, Payne 
> County, north-central Oklahoma by various observers" including Fred 
> and Marguerite Baumgartner. This is the earliest record I am aware of for OK. 

> 
> Additionally, perhaps of interest, Dr. George Sutton wondered if these 
> Snowies that made it this far south were the result of lemming crashes 
> to the far north.  These lemming crashes remove the Owls food supply 
> resulting in the Owls moving further south than usual in search of a food 
supply. 

> Doc therefore felt that many of these early winter birds likely 
> starved and this was one possible reason most records were in early 
> winter.  Somewhat refuting this in one instance, at least, was a Snowy 
> seen NW of OK City from 6January-14 February [1975] that possibly survived 
the winter. 

> 
> I hope this helps.
> 
> John Shackford
> Edmond, OK
> 
> On Sun, Nov 16, 2014 at 11:09 AM, Ingold, James 
> 
> wrote:
> 
> >  *From:* Ingold, James
> > *Sent:* Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:08 AM
> > *To:* 'okbirds'
> > *Subject:* Snowy Owl
> >
> >
> >
> > Can anyone tell me if this is the earliest record for a Snowy Owl in 
> > Oklahoma?
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > *James L. Ingold, Ph.D.*
> >
> > *Professor – Department of Biological Sciences*
> >
> > *Director – Museum of Life Sciences*
> >
> > *Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor – Museum of Life 
> > Sciences*
> >
> > *Louisiana State University in Shreveport*
> >
> >
> >
> > Office: (318) 797-5236
> >
> > Fax: (318) 797-5222
> >
> > james.ingold AT lsus.edu  www.lsus.edu
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
Subject: Re: Birder needs advice
From: John Kennington <johnkennington AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 14:01:46 -0600
I've cc'd Karyn directly, but also sending to OKBirds.

Here are a few resources.

Tulsa Audubon has an online state-wide "Guide to Birding in Oklahoma"
describing birding spots around the state. Areas are grouped by region, and
also on a Google map. See:

http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/birding-guide.htm

The OKC Audubon Society has some excellent descriptions of birding hotspots
in the OKC area. See:

http://okc-audubon.org/category/birding-hot-spots/

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society publishes a Date Guide to the birds of
Oklahoma, broken down by region of the state, so you can see what to expect
in difference seasons. A new version was just published this year and can
be purchased at:

http://okbirds.org/publications.htm

Good Birding!,
John Kennington
Tulsa Audubon





On Mon, Nov 17, 2014 at 1:49 PM, David Arbour  wrote:

>       Can someone help her?  I’m not familiar with the area.  See message
> below:
>
>
>
> David Arbour
>
> De Queen, AR
>
>
>  ------------------------------
>
> *From:* Karyn Dillard [mailto:kjdillard AT sbcglobal.net]
> *Sent:* Monday, November 17, 2014 12:22 PM
> *To:* David Arbour
> *Subject:*
>
>
>
> I will be spending a few days in Oklahoma right after Txsgv at the
> Greenleaf State Park. I like to bird when possible. Any suggestions on
> what to look for? How do I get on OK Birding list? Thank you for your help.
>
> Karyn Dillard
>
> Little Rock
>
>
>
>
>   ------------------------------
>
Subject: Birder needs advice
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 13:49:39 -0600
Can someone help her?  I'm not familiar with the area.  See message below:

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

  _____  

From: Karyn Dillard [mailto:kjdillard AT sbcglobal.net] 
Sent: Monday, November 17, 2014 12:22 PM
To: David Arbour
Subject: 

 


I will be spending a few days in Oklahoma right after Txsgv at the Greenleaf
State Park. I like to bird when possible. Any suggestions on what to look
for? How do I get on OK Birding list? Thank you for your help.

Karyn Dillard 

Little Rock

 

 

  _____  
Subject: Re: FW: Snowy Owl
From: John Fisher <rgs455 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 13:00:27 -0500
John,

In 1971 an adult snowy stayed in a hay field south of the Arkansas River about 
4 miles west of Sand Springs. The farmer that owned the field said it had been 
there before and he was glad to see it since it always made a serious dent in 
the cotton rats. The first time I saw it was in late October - early November. 
I think it left sometime in March but.... It appeared to be healthy - at least 
there were lots of pellets next to its favorite hay bale in the middle of the 
field and didn't seem to be having any trouble catching prey. In following 
years, I saw it or another a couple of times in that same field. 


John

---- John Shackford  wrote: 
> Dear James,
> 
> A good question about early Snowy Owls which took me a bit to chase down an
> acceptable answer.  In 1975 I did a summary paper in the OOS Bulletin
> (December Issue) entitled "The Snowy Owl in Oklahoma."  The impetus for
> this paper was an invasion of Snowy Owls in Oklahoma during the winter of
> 1974-5.  We had at least 20 Snowies show up that winter!
> 
> In this summary paper there was one Snowy Owl "seen repeatedly from 'early
> November' to 7 December" 1963 "near Lake Carl Blackwell, Payne County,
> north-central Oklahoma by various observers" including Fred and Marguerite
> Baumgartner. This is the earliest record I am aware of for OK.
> 
> Additionally, perhaps of interest, Dr. George Sutton wondered if these
> Snowies that made it this far south were the result of lemming crashes to
> the far north.  These lemming crashes remove the Owls food supply resulting
> in the Owls moving further south than usual in search of a food supply.
> Doc therefore felt that many of these early winter birds likely starved and
> this was one possible reason most records were in early winter.  Somewhat
> refuting this in one instance, at least, was a Snowy seen NW of OK City
> from 6January-14 February [1975] that possibly survived the winter.
> 
> I hope this helps.
> 
> John Shackford
> Edmond, OK
> 
> On Sun, Nov 16, 2014 at 11:09 AM, Ingold, James 
> wrote:
> 
> >  *From:* Ingold, James
> > *Sent:* Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:08 AM
> > *To:* 'okbirds'
> > *Subject:* Snowy Owl
> >
> >
> >
> > Can anyone tell me if this is the earliest record for a Snowy Owl in
> > Oklahoma?
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > *James L. Ingold, Ph.D.*
> >
> > *Professor – Department of Biological Sciences*
> >
> > *Director – Museum of Life Sciences*
> >
> > *Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor – Museum of Life Sciences*
> >
> > *Louisiana State University in Shreveport*
> >
> >
> >
> > Office: (318) 797-5236
> >
> > Fax: (318) 797-5222
> >
> > james.ingold AT lsus.edu  www.lsus.edu
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
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Subject: Re: FW: Snowy Owl
From: Dan Reinking <dreinking AT OU.EDU>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 08:18:28 -0600
I just received a call from someone who used to work in wildlife refuges who 
saw the owl on Friday the 14th. He described it well and saw it fly down into 
the center median of the highway; he turned around, and went back for a better 
look at it. 


Dan

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of JOS GRZYBOWSKI
Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2014 10:07 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] FW: Snowy Owl

 

Tie. Earliest was Nov 15, 1976 at the Will Rogers International Airport in OKC. 
Discovered by Wes Issacs. Noted there for over 3 months. 


CHEERS,                             JOE Grzybowski

 

On Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:09 AM, "Ingold, James"  
wrote: 


 

From: Ingold, James 
Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:08 AM
To: 'okbirds'
Subject: Snowy Owl

 

Can anyone tell me if this is the earliest record for a Snowy Owl in Oklahoma?

 

 

James L. Ingold, Ph.D.

Professor – Department of Biological Sciences

Director – Museum of Life Sciences

Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor – Museum of Life Sciences

Louisiana State University in Shreveport

 

Office: (318) 797-5236

Fax: (318) 797-5222

  james.ingold AT lsus.edu  
www.lsus.edu 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: FW: Snowy Owl
From: David McNeely <mcneely4 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 07:29:05 -0600
John, The Snowy Owl southern incursions in recent years have been attributed 
not to lemming crashes, but rather the opposite. In years with lemming 
irruptions, the young owls (Snowy Owls produce rather prodigious clutches for a 
bird of prey) survive exceptionally well due to the abundant lemmings. The more 
owls in the north, the more there are that move south in winter, and the 
further south they end up. Owls captured during these irruptions have actually 
been in pretty good condition. I will search for references concerning this, 
but it has been rather widely reported. 


David McNeely

---- John Shackford  wrote: 
> Dear James,
> 
> A good question about early Snowy Owls which took me a bit to chase down an
> acceptable answer.  In 1975 I did a summary paper in the OOS Bulletin
> (December Issue) entitled "The Snowy Owl in Oklahoma."  The impetus for
> this paper was an invasion of Snowy Owls in Oklahoma during the winter of
> 1974-5.  We had at least 20 Snowies show up that winter!
> 
> In this summary paper there was one Snowy Owl "seen repeatedly from 'early
> November' to 7 December" 1963 "near Lake Carl Blackwell, Payne County,
> north-central Oklahoma by various observers" including Fred and Marguerite
> Baumgartner. This is the earliest record I am aware of for OK.
> 
> Additionally, perhaps of interest, Dr. George Sutton wondered if these
> Snowies that made it this far south were the result of lemming crashes to
> the far north.  These lemming crashes remove the Owls food supply resulting
> in the Owls moving further south than usual in search of a food supply.
> Doc therefore felt that many of these early winter birds likely starved and
> this was one possible reason most records were in early winter.  Somewhat
> refuting this in one instance, at least, was a Snowy seen NW of OK City
> from 6January-14 February [1975] that possibly survived the winter.
> 
> I hope this helps.
> 
> John Shackford
> Edmond, OK
> 
> On Sun, Nov 16, 2014 at 11:09 AM, Ingold, James 
> wrote:
> 
> >  *From:* Ingold, James
> > *Sent:* Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:08 AM
> > *To:* 'okbirds'
> > *Subject:* Snowy Owl
> >
> >
> >
> > Can anyone tell me if this is the earliest record for a Snowy Owl in
> > Oklahoma?
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > *James L. Ingold, Ph.D.*
> >
> > *Professor – Department of Biological Sciences*
> >
> > *Director – Museum of Life Sciences*
> >
> > *Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor – Museum of Life Sciences*
> >
> > *Louisiana State University in Shreveport*
> >
> >
> >
> > Office: (318) 797-5236
> >
> > Fax: (318) 797-5222
> >
> > james.ingold AT lsus.edu  www.lsus.edu
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >

--
David McNeely
Subject: Re: Smith's Longspurs - Stillwater
From: john bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 05:14:54 -0800
Right on!


On Sunday, November 16, 2014 2:48 PM, Scott Loss  wrote:
 


Working in the driveway as the sun came out in Stillwater this afternoon after 
the snow, I was excited to hear the dry rattle calls of Smith's Longspurs 
overhead. Looked up and had around 75 flying over toward the southwest. My 
first longspurs of the season and our 148th yard species.. 


Scott Loss
Stillwater
Subject: Re: FW: Snowy Owl
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 01:01:45 -0600
Dear James,

A good question about early Snowy Owls which took me a bit to chase down an
acceptable answer.  In 1975 I did a summary paper in the OOS Bulletin
(December Issue) entitled "The Snowy Owl in Oklahoma."  The impetus for
this paper was an invasion of Snowy Owls in Oklahoma during the winter of
1974-5.  We had at least 20 Snowies show up that winter!

In this summary paper there was one Snowy Owl "seen repeatedly from 'early
November' to 7 December" 1963 "near Lake Carl Blackwell, Payne County,
north-central Oklahoma by various observers" including Fred and Marguerite
Baumgartner. This is the earliest record I am aware of for OK.

Additionally, perhaps of interest, Dr. George Sutton wondered if these
Snowies that made it this far south were the result of lemming crashes to
the far north.  These lemming crashes remove the Owls food supply resulting
in the Owls moving further south than usual in search of a food supply.
Doc therefore felt that many of these early winter birds likely starved and
this was one possible reason most records were in early winter.  Somewhat
refuting this in one instance, at least, was a Snowy seen NW of OK City
from 6January-14 February [1975] that possibly survived the winter.

I hope this helps.

John Shackford
Edmond, OK

On Sun, Nov 16, 2014 at 11:09 AM, Ingold, James 
wrote:

>  *From:* Ingold, James
> *Sent:* Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:08 AM
> *To:* 'okbirds'
> *Subject:* Snowy Owl
>
>
>
> Can anyone tell me if this is the earliest record for a Snowy Owl in
> Oklahoma?
>
>
>
>
>
> *James L. Ingold, Ph.D.*
>
> *Professor – Department of Biological Sciences*
>
> *Director – Museum of Life Sciences*
>
> *Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor – Museum of Life Sciences*
>
> *Louisiana State University in Shreveport*
>
>
>
> Office: (318) 797-5236
>
> Fax: (318) 797-5222
>
> james.ingold AT lsus.edu  www.lsus.edu
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: FW: Snowy Owl
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 20:07:02 -0800
Tie. Earliest was Nov 15, 1976 at the Will Rogers International Airport in OKC. 
Discovered by Wes Issacs. Noted there for over 3 months. 

CHEERS,                             JOE Grzybowski



On Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:09 AM, "Ingold, James"  
wrote: 

 


 
From:Ingold, James 
Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:08 AM
To: 'okbirds'
Subject: Snowy Owl
 
Can anyone tell me if this is the earliest record for a Snowy Owl in Oklahoma?
 
 
James L. Ingold, Ph.D.
Professor – Department of Biological Sciences
Director – Museum of Life Sciences
Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor – Museum of Life Sciences
Louisiana State University in Shreveport
 
Office: (318) 797-5236
Fax: (318) 797-5222
james.ingold AT lsus.edu  www.lsus.edu
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased
From: John Bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 19:11:23 -0600
I seems coming to Okla. is a death sentence.
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased
From: John Bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 18:11:21 -0600
Thank you for restoring my faith.
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased
From: Jana Singletary <jssingletary AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 17:02:25 -0600
If you are speaking of the owl near Bowring, OK several years ago, then you are 
definitely mistaken. I, for one, called to report the injured owl. A local 
rehabber went to the area and trapped the bird, but sadly the wound was 
infected and the bird did not survive. 

Jana Singletary
Tulsa

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 16, 2014, at 4:43 PM, John Bates  wrote:
> 
> Reminds me of the last time a snowy owl was sighted near Tulsa. On the third 
day, my father and I drove to see it. To our dismay the bird was on the ground 
and had been shot. We saw many people there looking. It might have been 
recently inflicted and we thought surely somebody had called Wildcares or 
something. Upon returning to Okla. city, we called and learned nobody had done 
so. The no good reprobates. My estimation of Tulsan birdwatchers was diminished 
substantially. This does not speak for all birdwatchers, but seriously. 

Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased
From: John Bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 16:43:05 -0600
Reminds me of the last time a snowy owl was sighted near Tulsa. On the third 
day, my father and I drove to see it. To our dismay the bird was on the ground 
and had been shot. We saw many people there looking. It might have been 
recently inflicted and we thought surely somebody had called Wildcares or 
something. Upon returning to Okla. city, we called and learned nobody had done 
so. The no good reprobates. My estimation of Tulsan birdwatchers was diminished 
substantially. This does not speak for all birdwatchers, but seriously. 

Subject: Smith's Longspurs - Stillwater
From: Scott Loss <scottrloss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 14:48:28 -0600
Working in the driveway as the sun came out in Stillwater this afternoon
after the snow, I was excited to hear the dry rattle calls of Smith's
Longspurs overhead. Looked up and had around 75 flying over toward the
southwest. My first longspurs of the season and our 148th yard species..

Scott Loss
Stillwater