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Updated on Friday, August 26 at 09:54 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Stygian Owl,©Barry Kent Mackay

27 Aug Payne County Audubon events this week ["O Connell, Tim" ]
26 Aug The Partners In Flight Landbird Conservation Plan [Jerry Davis ]
23 Aug Red Slough Bird Survey - August 23 [David Arbour ]
23 Aug Hefner, canal inlet [William Diffin ]
19 Aug Re: tern at shawnee reservoir [Ian Brandenburg ]
18 Aug Re: tern at shawnee reservoir [William Diffin ]
16 Aug Red Slough Bird Survey - August 16 [David Arbour ]
16 Aug Re: Photos [Jo ]
16 Aug Common Loon - Lk. Heifner [John Hurd ]
16 Aug Hackberry Flat yesterday [Matthew Jung ]
16 Aug Re: tern at shawnee reservoir ["Feldt, Andrew N." ]
16 Aug Re: tern at shawnee reservoir [Will Foster ]
16 Aug Re: tern at shawnee reservoir ["Doughty, Russell B." ]
16 Aug tern at shawnee reservoir [Will Foster ]
16 Aug Photos [Terry Mitchell ]
16 Aug Re: Rufous Hummers [DALA GRISSOM ]
16 Aug Re: Rufous Hummers ["bill ." ]
15 Aug Re: Rufous Hummers [DALA GRISSOM ]
15 Aug Re: Rufous Hummers ["O Connell, Tim" ]
15 Aug Rufous Hummers [DALA GRISSOM ]
13 Aug Bird on South Jenkins [rgunn1 ]
11 Aug Re: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing ["Doughty, Russell B." ]
10 Aug Re: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing ["Doughty, Russell B." ]
10 Aug Re: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing [John Shackford ]
10 Aug Re: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing [EUGENE YOUNG ]
10 Aug Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing ["Doughty, Russell B." ]
10 Aug Hackberry Flat yesterday [Matthew Jung ]
9 Aug Red Slough Bird Survey - Aug. 9 [David Arbour ]
9 Aug Re: Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found [Melinda Droege ]
8 Aug Re: Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found [mcgeecnt ]
8 Aug Re: Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found [Bill Carrell ]
8 Aug Re: Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found [Patricia Seibert ]
8 Aug Re: Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found [Melinda Droege ]
8 Aug Re: Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found [Bill Carrell ]
8 Aug Re: Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found [JOS GRZYBOWSKI ]
7 Aug Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found [Scott Loss ]
7 Aug Re: Black-chinned in Enid ["bill ." ]
6 Aug Re: Black-chinned in Enid [John Shackford ]
6 Aug Re: Black-chinned in Enid [Jennifer Kidney ]
6 Aug Black-chinned in Enid ["bill ." ]
6 Aug Bachman's Sparrow still at Birch Lake, Sat Aug 6 [Melinda Droege ]
5 Aug Tulsa Audubon Martin Roost Watch, The Messenger Screening [John Kennington ]
5 Aug OOS Bulletin [EUGENE YOUNG ]
5 Aug Re: Bachman's Sparrow Osage County [Melinda Droege ]
4 Aug QUERY OKBIRDS [Bob LaVal ]
1 Aug August Migration Report [Patricia Velte ]
1 Aug Re: Stillwater to OKC [Sharon Henthorn ]
1 Aug Re: Martins and Hummers [John Kennington ]
31 Jul Stillwater to OKC [Scott Loss ]
30 Jul Martins and Hummers [Moninya Mulder ]
29 Jul Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost [Melinda Droege ]
29 Jul OKC Lagoon Common Tern [Cameron Carver ]
29 Jul Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost [Mark Cromwell ]
29 Jul Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost [Mike Brewer ]
29 Jul Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost [Lisa Wiesbauer ]
28 Jul Re: Catching up [Jennifer Kidney ]
28 Jul Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost [John Kennington ]
28 Jul Tulsa Purple Martin Roost [Caitlin L ]
27 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 27 [David Arbour ]
27 Jul Lake Hefner today [Sharon Henthorn ]
26 Jul Sludge pond OKC [Sharon Henthorn ]
26 Jul Hefner Loon [Bill Carrell ]
26 Jul Re: New Photos Added to Website [Mark Cromwell ]
26 Jul ID help [Terry Mitchell ]
25 Jul New Photos Added to Website [Jim Arterburn ]
24 Jul Catching up [rgunn1 ]
20 Jul Fwd: Tulsa Audubon - Corrected Link for The Messenger [Jim Deming ]
19 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 19 [David Arbour ]
18 Jul Re: Is this a White Winged Dove [Sue Lutze ]
18 Jul Re: Lake Yahola Sunday [Melinda Droege ]
18 Jul Re: Is this a White Winged Dove [Lauren Wilkerson ]
18 Jul Is this a White Winged Dove [Sue Lutze ]
18 Jul Lake Yahola Sunday [Bill Carrell ]
17 Jul Hackberry Flat, Thurdsay 7/14 [ML2x ]
17 Jul Rose lake today 7-17 [John Hurd ]
17 Jul Re: Cormorant in July? [Jim Arterburn ]

Subject: Payne County Audubon events this week
From: "O Connell, Tim" <tim.oconnell AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 02:51:58 +0000
Dear Friends and Supporters of the Payne County Audubon Society,

Birds are on the move and we’re excited to begin Autumn 2016 programming to 
help you get the most out of migration season. 


Unless you’re checking our website 
(https://paynecountyaudubonsociety.com/whats-new/) regularly then this is late 
notice, but there is a field trip tomorrow morning, SATURDAY, 8/27 at Babcock 
Park in Stillwater. To join in, meet trip leader John Polo in the parking lot 
under the pines and past the soccer fields, along the creek at 8:00 am. 


Our next field trip after that will be Saturday Sep. 10 to Hackberry Flat WMA 
in southeastern Oklahoma. That trip will surely be a shorebird extravaganza! 



Our first Thursday evening program will be our annual potluck dinner and 
meet-n-greet, Sep. 1, at 6:00 pm, in the Education Center of the Botanic Garden 
at OSU. This is a casual gathering designed to discuss our upcoming activities 
for 2016 and 2017 and hear your great suggestions for things you would like to 
do. 


Instructions - please 1) attend, 2) bring with you a dish to share (savory, 
sweet, drinks - anything!), and 3) bring a friend. 


No dish? No problem! We’d rather have you there then make you worry about 
preparing the dish. 



Finally - we need you. (Yep, you.) The Payne County Audubon Society is a both a 
volunteer-run community non-profit and a local arm of the National Audubon 
Society. We are always open to folks who think they might want to contribute in 
some way to our programming. For example, there are many wonderful local 
activities in which we could engage to promote various conservation and 
education initiatives of the National Audubon Society, but our local board 
members are generally stretched too thin to scratch the surface of implementing 
any of these here in Payne County. With a little more help we could, so please 
don’t be shy if you think you’d like to help! We do have openings on the 
board, too. If you’re interested, please let me know. 


That’s all for now. If I miss you in the field tomorrow morning, I’ll look 
forward to seeing you at our potluck meet-n-greet on Thursday. Good birding, 

~Tim O’Connell
PCAS President

https://paynecountyaudubonsociety.com/

Subject: The Partners In Flight Landbird Conservation Plan
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 12:34:55 -0500
Information and Reading for all interested in Birds. Its condense form helps 
you to note the species in your area that need help and what you can do for 
them. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR

http://www.partnersinflight.org/plans/landbird-conservation-plan/downloads/
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - August 23
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 22:08:10 -0500
It was mild and overcast in the morning turning mostly sunny and hot and in
the afternoon and windy all day.  70 species were found today.  Passerines
were tough today and I had to work hard to get what I did as they were
mostly silent and the wind had them in deep cover.  I was on the Pintail
Lake observation platform this morning when I heard a Common Gallinule give
an alarm call fairly close to me.  I looked just in time to see a juvenile
Cooper's Hawk flying across the levee and into a dense patch of American
Lotus in Pintail Lake.  He was followed by a very agitated adult Common
Gallinule who went into the lotus after him after following the hawk across
open water from the levee.  I heard a lot of commotion and gallinules
calling from the lotus patch.  I figured the hawk had to have ended up in
the water and probably had caught a gallinule chick.  I waited for several
minutes but the hawk never came out.  So I started walking down the levee to
get closer.  Suddenly the hawk came swimming out of the Lotus into the edge
of the open water followed closely by two adult gallinules.  As I got closer
the hawk suddenly flushed from the water as easily as a duck and flew off
with empty talons.  Apparently what I thought was a water logged hawk trying
to make it to shore was really a hawk chasing after its prey on the swim.  I
knew they would run on the ground through brush chasing down prey but
swimming after prey was a new one.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 19

Wood Duck - 21

Mallard - 9

Blue-winged Teal - 9

Northern Shoveler - 2

Northern Pintail - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 21

Neotropic Cormorant - 2

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 11

Great-blue Heron - 10

Great Egret - 24

Snowy Egret - 1

Little-blue Heron - 14

Cattle Egret - 136

Green Heron - 1

White Ibis - 49

Black Vulture - 10

Turkey Vulture - 48

Mississippi Kite - 7

Cooper's Hawk - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 3

Purple Gallinule - 4

Common Gallinule - 32 (also several broods.)

American Coot - 11

Killdeer - 1

Least Sandpiper - 1 

Rock Pigeon - 4

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 3

Mourning Dove - 17

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 3

Chimney Swift - 3

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 10

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 5

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Alder Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 1

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 7

Bell's Vireo - 3 (adult feeding fledglings.)

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 71

Purple Martin - 2

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 30

Bank Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 35

Barn Swallow - 3

Cave Swallow - 1 juvenile 

Carolina Chickadee - 7

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 11

Yellow Warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Yellow-breasted Chat - 2

Summer Tanager - 2

Eastern Towhee - 2

Lark Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 14

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 16

Painted Bunting - 1

Red-winged Blackbird - 4

Oriole species - 1 (juvenile in bad light at a distance.)

House Sparrow - 1

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Red/Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Western Cottonmouth

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Hefner, canal inlet
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 15:59:44 -0500
A mud flat has emerged on the golf course side, and shorebirds are starting
to use it. Today saw Least (27), Semipalmated (10), Pectoral (1) and Stilt
(1) Sandpipers and Killdeer (10). Also RB Gull (102), Forster's Tern (22),
Am White Pelican (2), Great Egret (26), Great Blue Heron (9). Waterfowl
were Blue-winged Teal (15), Mallard (8) and some domestic mallards, geese
and muscovies.

Bill Diffin, OKC
Subject: Re: tern at shawnee reservoir
From: Ian Brandenburg <brandenburgi AT STAUGUSTINEACADEMY.ORG>
Date: Fri, 19 Aug 2016 03:31:38 -0500
Will,

On your first picture shown when I followed the link, if you look closely
at the bill of the bird, it's more suggestive towards a Forster's Tern.
It's very very difficult to see, and there is a chance my eyes are
deceiving me, but it seem that about halfway down the bill, the color
changes from the yellow/orange color to a black color. This is more seen on
Forster's Terns rather than Least Terns. In edition, Lesst Terns are
drastically smaller than most other terns. I would relate them to the size
of a Mourning Dove. From a distance this can be difficult to decipher, but
closer up it should be more identifiable. So I am more convinced that it is
a Forster's Tern. I hope this helps! Also, the others make great points
about this.

-Ian

On Thursday, August 18, 2016, William Diffin  wrote:

> Photos of Least and Forster's can be compared at the following
> site. Andrew makes some good points about the precise pattern of black and
> white on the head and wings. A third thing to look at is the length and
> shape of the tail.
> https://nationalzoo.si.edu/scbi/migratorybirds/featured_
> photo/bird.cfm?pix=Least+Tern
>
> Bill
>
> On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 12:06 PM, Feldt, Andrew N.  > wrote:
>
>> Will,
>>
>> You should also note that it is the tips of the primaries which are dark
>> rather than the leading edge of the wings.  This suggests a Forster’s Tern
>> with the light head indicating the beginning of the change to winter
>> plumage.  The only oddity then is that the bill looks a bit yellow rather
>> somewhat more orange color one would expect.
>>
>> Andy
>>
>> On Aug 16, 2016, at 11:00 AM, Doughty, Russell B. > > wrote:
>>
>> If it has white there on the forehead, than Interior Least Tern.
>> ------------------------------
>> *From:* okbirds > > on behalf of
>> Will Foster > >
>> *Sent:* Tuesday, August 16, 2016 9:03:09 AM
>> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
>> 
>> *Subject:* [OKBIRDS] tern at shawnee reservoir
>>
>> Hello everyone,
>>
>> I spotted this tern at Shawnee Reservoir yesterday while fishing and was
>> hoping someone could help me make a positive ID. I'm sorry for the low
>> quality pictures; I was working with my cell phone from a canoe.
>>
>> Here is a link to the photos: http://imgur.com/a/zwUvB.
>>
>> Thank you in advance,
>> Will Foster
>>
>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: tern at shawnee reservoir
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2016 05:32:28 -0500
Photos of Least and Forster's can be compared at the following site. Andrew
makes some good points about the precise pattern of black and white on the
head and wings. A third thing to look at is the length and shape of the
tail.

https://nationalzoo.si.edu/scbi/migratorybirds/featured_photo/bird.cfm?pix=Least+Tern 


Bill

On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 12:06 PM, Feldt, Andrew N.  wrote:

> Will,
>
> You should also note that it is the tips of the primaries which are dark
> rather than the leading edge of the wings.  This suggests a Forster’s Tern
> with the light head indicating the beginning of the change to winter
> plumage.  The only oddity then is that the bill looks a bit yellow rather
> somewhat more orange color one would expect.
>
> Andy
>
> On Aug 16, 2016, at 11:00 AM, Doughty, Russell B.  > wrote:
>
> If it has white there on the forehead, than Interior Least Tern.
> ------------------------------
> *From:* okbirds > on behalf
> of Will Foster >
> *Sent:* Tuesday, August 16, 2016 9:03:09 AM
> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
> *Subject:* [OKBIRDS] tern at shawnee reservoir
>
> Hello everyone,
>
> I spotted this tern at Shawnee Reservoir yesterday while fishing and was
> hoping someone could help me make a positive ID. I'm sorry for the low
> quality pictures; I was working with my cell phone from a canoe.
>
> Here is a link to the photos: http://imgur.com/a/zwUvB.
>
> Thank you in advance,
> Will Foster
>
>
>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - August 16
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 23:08:40 -0500
It was overcast & mild with sporadic light rain on the survey today.  69
species were found.  We just received 4 inches of rain and it was too wet to
drive the grass covered levees to a lot of the locations I usually visit.
Had to stick to graveled roads and levees and walking in to certain areas.
The extra rainfall we have received this summer has resulted in water levels
in the wetland units to be still fairly deep which means we have no
shorebird habitat this year and is undoubtedly why no storks or spoonbills
have showed up yet, since they require drying up wetlands for feeding in.
The first fall migrant ducks and warblers showed up today.  Also had the
opportunity to watch a family of Common Gallinules with 2 newly hatched
chicks (their 2nd brood) and also 2 full-sized juveniles from their first
brood.  The adults as well as the juveniles helped with the feeding of the
chicks.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 7

Wood Duck - 48

Mallard - 7

Blue-winged Teal - 3

Northern Shoveler - 2

Pied-billed Grebe - 29

Neotropic Cormorant - 12

Double-crested Cormorant - 3

Anhinga - 22

Great-blue Heron - 9

Great Egret - 22

Snowy Egret - 4

Little-blue Heron - 14

Cattle Egret - 181

Green Heron - 5

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 4

White Ibis - 80

Black Vulture - 18

Turkey Vulture - 10

Mississippi Kite - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 6

Common Gallinule - 37 (also 2 small chicks.)

American Coot - 9

Sandpiper species - 1 (heard briefly at a distance; either Spotted or
Solitary)

Rock Pigeon - 6

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 3

Mourning Dove - 13

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 4

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 7

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 2

Alder Flycatcher - 3

Least Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 4

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

Bell's Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 13

Purple Martin - 1

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Bank Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 43

Barn Swallow - 10

Cave Swallow - 2 juveniles 

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Yellow Warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 2

Yellow-breasted Chat - 1

Summer Tanager - 2

Eastern Towhee - 4

Northern Cardinal - 13

Blue Grosbeak - 1

Indigo Bunting - 17

Painted Bunting - 3

Dickcissel - 1

Red-winged Blackbird - 6

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Prince Baskettail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Red/Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 
Subject: Re: Photos
From: Jo <jo.loyd AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 21:35:26 -0500
Enjoyed your pictures. I really liked my visit to Big Bend and Fort Davis a 
number of years ago. We were there about the third week of April and the desert 
was in bloom for a bonus. 


Jo

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Terry Mitchell
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 8:34 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Photos

 

It’s been a while since I posted any photos. Here’s a link that goes back 
to the spring, including photos from the 2016 Lesser Prairie Chicken Festival, 
a trip I took to Big Bend and a few odd shots. Here’s the link if you care to 
look. Thanks Terry. 


 

http://www.pbase.com/ttownvstrom/recent_photos 
 &page=all 


 

Terry Mitchell

Plastic Engineering 

918-622-9660

 
Subject: Common Loon - Lk. Heifner
From: John Hurd <jackhurd AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 20:58:08 -0500
Continuing bird 8/16/2016Prairie dog point20:30
OKCJack H 		 	   		  
Subject: Hackberry Flat yesterday
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 12:53:47 -0500
Lonnie and I, again, chased birds at Hackberry Flat yesterday, from
10:30 am to 6:30 pm,  On the way into the preserve heading west, there
were 50+ Turkey Vultures in the air at various heights.

Shorebirds we saw were both Yellowlegs, LB Dowitchers, Solitary,
Stilt, Upland, Least, and Bairds Sandpipers and one Marbled Godwit.
American Avocets have mostly molted into basic plumage and we saw lots
of BN Stilts with juveniles.

Duck we noted were BW Teal, N. Pintail, Ruddy and Mallard.  Raptors we
saw: Red-tailed Hawk, Swainson's Hawk and American Kestrel, we were
not able to re-located the Peregrine Falcon from last week.

The best bird and one missing from my photo files in Oklahoma,
American Bittern.  We had an opportunity to take about 4 frames before
it dove into the grass cover.

On the way toward Hollister we flushed a large number of Swainson's
Hawks (20+) from the fields to the east of the county road.

Matt Jung, OKC
Subject: Re: tern at shawnee reservoir
From: "Feldt, Andrew N." <afeldt AT OU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 17:06:10 +0000
Will,

You should also note that it is the tips of the primaries which are dark rather 
than the leading edge of the wings. This suggests a Forster’s Tern with the 
light head indicating the beginning of the change to winter plumage. The only 
oddity then is that the bill looks a bit yellow rather somewhat more orange 
color one would expect. 


Andy

On Aug 16, 2016, at 11:00 AM, Doughty, Russell B. 
> wrote: 


If it has white there on the forehead, than Interior Least Tern.
________________________________
From: okbirds > on behalf of 
Will Foster > 

Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 9:03:09 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] tern at shawnee reservoir

Hello everyone,

I spotted this tern at Shawnee Reservoir yesterday while fishing and was hoping 
someone could help me make a positive ID. I'm sorry for the low quality 
pictures; I was working with my cell phone from a canoe. 


Here is a link to the photos: http://imgur.com/a/zwUvB.

Thank you in advance,
Will Foster

Subject: Re: tern at shawnee reservoir
From: Will Foster <wcfost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 11:53:29 -0500
Thank you for your help!

On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 11:00 AM, Doughty, Russell B. <
russell.doughty AT ou.edu> wrote:

> If it has white there on the forehead, than Interior Least Tern.
> ------------------------------
> *From:* okbirds  on behalf of Will Foster <
> wcfost AT GMAIL.COM>
> *Sent:* Tuesday, August 16, 2016 9:03:09 AM
> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> *Subject:* [OKBIRDS] tern at shawnee reservoir
>
> Hello everyone,
>
> I spotted this tern at Shawnee Reservoir yesterday while fishing and was
> hoping someone could help me make a positive ID. I'm sorry for the low
> quality pictures; I was working with my cell phone from a canoe.
>
> Here is a link to the photos: http://imgur.com/a/zwUvB.
>
> Thank you in advance,
> Will Foster
>
Subject: Re: tern at shawnee reservoir
From: "Doughty, Russell B." <russell.doughty AT OU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 16:00:11 +0000
If it has white there on the forehead, than Interior Least Tern.

________________________________
From: okbirds  on behalf of Will Foster 
 

Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 9:03:09 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] tern at shawnee reservoir

Hello everyone,

I spotted this tern at Shawnee Reservoir yesterday while fishing and was hoping 
someone could help me make a positive ID. I'm sorry for the low quality 
pictures; I was working with my cell phone from a canoe. 


Here is a link to the photos: http://imgur.com/a/zwUvB.

Thank you in advance,
Will Foster
Subject: tern at shawnee reservoir
From: Will Foster <wcfost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 09:03:09 -0500
Hello everyone,

I spotted this tern at Shawnee Reservoir yesterday while fishing and was
hoping someone could help me make a positive ID. I'm sorry for the low
quality pictures; I was working with my cell phone from a canoe.

Here is a link to the photos: http://imgur.com/a/zwUvB.

Thank you in advance,
Will Foster
Subject: Photos
From: Terry Mitchell <terry AT PECOT.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 08:34:23 -0500
It’s been a while since I posted any photos. Here’s a link that goes back
to the spring, including photos from the 2016 Lesser Prairie Chicken
Festival, a trip I took to Big Bend and a few odd shots. Here’s the link if
you care to look. Thanks Terry.



http://www.pbase.com/ttownvstrom/recent_photos&page=all



Terry Mitchell

Plastic Engineering

918-622-9660
Subject: Re: Rufous Hummers
From: DALA GRISSOM <naejalad AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 02:14:12 +0000
I set up a flicker account. Not sure if this will work, but pics are here. I 
have lots more I'll add later. I'm wanting help to make sure these are Rufous. 


Dala

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lady4moose/
Sent from my iPad

On Aug 15, 2016, at 8:15 PM, bill . > 
wrote: 


For those who like myself don't "do" facebook, might i suggest Flickr? Easy 
free sign up, post tons of pics free and give links here or elsewhere all 
without the annoyances of fb. 

Would love to see your pics!
peace
bill
enid garfield ok

------ Original message------
From: DALA GRISSOM
Date: Mon, Aug 15, 2016 18:39
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU;
Subject:Re: [OKBIRDS] Rufous Hummers

I'm not on Facebook.

Sent from my iPad

> On Aug 15, 2016, at 1:21 PM, O Connell, Tim 
> wrote: 

>
> For Dala and anyone else who might want to share photos of birds,
>
> We do have a Facebook group for the Oklahoma Ornithological Society. If you 
use Facebook, it can be a really handy place to share/post photos, collect 
feedback, etc. 

> ~tim
>
>
>> On Aug 15, 2016, at 12:38 PM, DALA GRISSOM 
> wrote: 

>>
>> I think I have two Rufous Hummingbirds at my feeders that showed up 
yesterday. I'm trying to get them ID'd before I put on ebird. I have pics I can 
send if anyone wants to help ID. 

>>
>> Dala Grissom
>> Shawnee, OK
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Rufous Hummers
From: "bill ." <billwx AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 01:15:15 +0000
For those who like myself don't "do" facebook, might i suggest Flickr? Easy 
free sign up, post tons of pics free and give links here or elsewhere all 
without the annoyances of fb. 

Would love to see your pics!
peace
bill
enid garfield ok

------ Original message------
From: DALA GRISSOM
Date: Mon, Aug 15, 2016 18:39
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU;
Subject:Re: [OKBIRDS] Rufous Hummers

I'm not on Facebook.

Sent from my iPad

> On Aug 15, 2016, at 1:21 PM, O Connell, Tim  wrote:
>
> For Dala and anyone else who might want to share photos of birds,
>
> We do have a Facebook group for the Oklahoma Ornithological Society. If you 
use Facebook, it can be a really handy place to share/post photos, collect 
feedback, etc. 

> ~tim
>
>
>> On Aug 15, 2016, at 12:38 PM, DALA GRISSOM  wrote:
>>
>> I think I have two Rufous Hummingbirds at my feeders that showed up 
yesterday. I'm trying to get them ID'd before I put on ebird. I have pics I can 
send if anyone wants to help ID. 

>>
>> Dala Grissom
>> Shawnee, OK
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Rufous Hummers
From: DALA GRISSOM <naejalad AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2016 23:39:10 +0000
I'm not on Facebook.

Sent from my iPad

> On Aug 15, 2016, at 1:21 PM, O Connell, Tim  wrote:
> 
> For Dala and anyone else who might want to share photos of birds,
> 
> We do have a Facebook group for the Oklahoma Ornithological Society. If you 
use Facebook, it can be a really handy place to share/post photos, collect 
feedback, etc. 

> ~tim
> 
> 
>> On Aug 15, 2016, at 12:38 PM, DALA GRISSOM  wrote:
>> 
>> I think I have two Rufous Hummingbirds at my feeders that showed up 
yesterday. I'm trying to get them ID'd before I put on ebird. I have pics I can 
send if anyone wants to help ID. 

>> 
>> Dala Grissom
>> Shawnee, OK
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Rufous Hummers
From: "O Connell, Tim" <tim.oconnell AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2016 18:21:48 +0000
For Dala and anyone else who might want to share photos of birds,

We do have a Facebook group for the Oklahoma Ornithological Society. If you use 
Facebook, it can be a really handy place to share/post photos, collect 
feedback, etc. 

~tim


> On Aug 15, 2016, at 12:38 PM, DALA GRISSOM  wrote:
> 
> I think I have two Rufous Hummingbirds at my feeders that showed up 
yesterday. I'm trying to get them ID'd before I put on ebird. I have pics I can 
send if anyone wants to help ID. 

> 
> Dala Grissom
> Shawnee, OK
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Rufous Hummers
From: DALA GRISSOM <naejalad AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2016 17:38:49 +0000
I think I have two Rufous Hummingbirds at my feeders that showed up yesterday. 
I'm trying to get them ID'd before I put on ebird. I have pics I can send if 
anyone wants to help ID. 


Dala Grissom
Shawnee, OK

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Bird on South Jenkins
From: rgunn1 <rgunn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2016 19:24:51 -0500
Of interest (to me anyhow,) were a number of Upland Sandpipers over the 
past 5 days, an Olive-sided Flycatcher on the 10th and a American 
Bittern still hanging around back east off Jenkins on the 11th,  
(obviously didn't look at their calendars before they left). And this 
evening I walked briefly with John Tharp and saw a Broad-winged Hawk.


D.
Subject: Re: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing
From: "Doughty, Russell B." <russell.doughty AT OU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 14:35:11 +0000
Thanks Mia, Eugene, John and Bruce!

________________________________
From: okbirds  on behalf of Mia Revels 
<0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request AT LISTS.OU.EDU> 

Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 6:34:31 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing

I'm not sure that this is useful information or not, but here goes. Red Cedar 
are actually conifers, not angiosperms. Thus, the blue structures that we call 
berries are actually modified, blue pigmented female cones that "trick" birds 
into eating them and becoming the agents of red cedar transport to new areas. 
These little blue cones are not at all tasty and contain very little nutrient 
value. Birds typically do not eat them until there is nothing left except them. 
And, if they can make it fine without eating them, you will find the little 
blue cones left there in spring. I learned all that when student asked me about 
it in my Evolution and Diversity lecture on plant evolution. I had to look it 
up, and was delighted to learn all of that. I don't know a thing about Holly 
berries, however! 


Best Wishes,

Mia Revels


On Wed, Aug 10, 2016 at 1:53 PM, Doughty, Russell B. 
> wrote: 


Excellent, thanks John. I do wonder if given a choice what the waxwings, 
robins, and starlings would prefer. Cedar or holly berries? 



You can see the range maps here" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilex_opaca


and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilex_decidua

Russ
________________________________
From: okbirds > on behalf of 
John Shackford > 

Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 12:59:10 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing

Hi Russell,

I don't know much about the food habits of birds in eastern Oklahoma, but your 
hypothesis seems to me to be a good--and interesting--question to try to gather 
information on there. 



But I would add that I have never felt that any cedar berry feeding species 
here in central Oklahoma thinks cedar berries are low priority/non-optimal 
food: they seem to be eaten readily whenever the berries become ripe. (The 
relationship between robins and chinaberry berries, on the other hand (and in 
my opinion), is a case where a food stuff is definitely avoided as long as 
possible, the berries only being eaten very late in the winter when most other 
foodstuff has already been devoured.) 


And one additional point on distribution: cedar-berry eaters often sit (and 
deposit cedar seed droppings along fence rows, where you will often notice a 
significant number of cedar trees, more than in the surrounding areas. 


I never realized holly trees used to be a prevalent species in eastern 
Oklahoma, an interesting. stand-alone fact in itself. 


Best wishes,

John Shackford
Edmond, OK

On Wed, Aug 10, 2016 at 12:26 PM, EUGENE YOUNG 
> wrote: 

One of the key roles is fire. In KS and OK, fire in prairies has long kept the 
cedar in check. Prevention of fire allowed cedars to spread, and take over 
prairie habitat. Historically, even the riparian habitats were burned, thus 
likely reducing cedar tree abundance, at least in the prairie regions of both 
states. Its been well documented in the literature as settlers moved across 
the Plains, fire prevention occurred and riparian habitat increasedeven out 
into western regions of both states. Mammals and birds followed these riparian 
havens and began to occupy new territories. As riparian habitat became more 
dense, and as we began to reintroduce fire as a grassland management tool, 
riparian habitats usually dont burn well and often remain intactunless there 
were years without fire and enough litter builds up (ex. what happened in 
Morton County KS a few years back). However, no doubt the original seed source 
for prairie cedars was likely from those cedars along riparian habitat, and 
this often is observed today, where fire has a more difficult time damaging 
trees especially within the Flint Hills due to annual burning. The result, not 
enough litter to allow fire to get hot enough to impact trees and shrubs long 
streams and ravines. And if the grasslands are not burned every 3-5 years, 
cedars can begin to encroach upon the prairie. 


European Starlings, and American Robins are also great consumers of cedar 
berries, as are many other species. But certainly, starlings, robins and 
waxwings would be the big three consumers. The fact that starlings are 
year-long residents, might make them even more important in the distribution of 
cedars. During the fall, they flock up early (now for example) and will feed on 
cedar berries, often devouring everything in sight before the waxwings or 
robins migrate through the region. 


Hope that helps.

Gene

Eugene A. Young


Agriculture, Science & Engineering
Northern Oklahoma College
1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310
Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310
Phone: 580-628-6482
Fax: 580-628-6209
E-Mail: Eugene.Young AT noc.edu
Website: www.noc.edu



From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of Doughty, Russell B. 

Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 11:18 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing


Howdy all,



I wanted to float a hypothesis among the birding community and see what kind of 
feedback I get. Please let me know what you think and if you can help in some 
way. 




I hypothesize that the annihilation of the deciduous and American holly tree 
species from the Ouachita Highland landscape of Oklahoma and Arkansas 
drastically altered the diet of the cedar waxwings, forcing them to eat red 
cedar berries with much greater frequency (Juniperus virginiana). This shift in 
food availability for cedar waxwing plays an important role in red cedar 
encroachment over time. 




Here is some background. The holly trees were favored for piano keys and inlay 
by woodworkers. The trees were also cut and sold in the winter as Christmas 
decorations. The Ouachita forest was completely logged over several times 
(Smith 1986), which also caused massive population declines in the holly. In my 
56 mile hike from Talihina to Queen Wilhelmina, I found only 2 specimens of 
holly. Both were on the southside of the ridge in a drainage. But my 
90-year-old aunt says that the holly was every where in SE Oklahoma when she 
was a kid. 




I'm a PhD student in Dr. Xiangming Xiao's group. We work with geospacial data 
to conduct spatiotemporal analysis of ecosystem processes. Thus far, red cedar 
encroachment does not seem to correlate very well to changes in climate. 
However, the distribution of red cedar in the state paints a pattern. The red 
cedar is not just randomly distributed across the state. It most frequently 
occurs along the wooded stream corridors in our watersheds. I'd suspect the 
distribution of cedar are highly correlated with cedar waxwing habitat. 




I'm curious if restoration of holly would help curb the encroachment of red 
cedar by providing waxwings an alternative food source. I'm also curious if 
another bird species is playing a role. I'm no ornithologist; birding is just a 
hobby for me. I'd be pleased if someone has some thoughts to share. 




Thanks,



Russ



Smith, K. L. (1986). Sawmill: the Story of Cutting the Last Great Virgin Forest 
East of Rockies (p). University of Arkansas Press. 





--
Mia Revels, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Northeastern State University
611 Grand Ave.
Tahlequah, Oklahoma
(918) 444-3824
revels AT nsuok.edu


**CONFIDENTIALITY** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain 
confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized 
disclosure or use of this information is prohibited. 

Subject: Re: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing
From: "Doughty, Russell B." <russell.doughty AT OU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 18:53:11 +0000
Excellent, thanks John. I do wonder if given a choice what the waxwings, 
robins, and starlings would prefer. Cedar or holly berries? 



You can see the range maps here" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilex_opaca


and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilex_decidua

Russ
________________________________
From: okbirds  on behalf of John Shackford 
 

Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 12:59:10 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing

Hi Russell,

I don't know much about the food habits of birds in eastern Oklahoma, but your 
hypothesis seems to me to be a good--and interesting--question to try to gather 
information on there. 



But I would add that I have never felt that any cedar berry feeding species 
here in central Oklahoma thinks cedar berries are low priority/non-optimal 
food: they seem to be eaten readily whenever the berries become ripe. (The 
relationship between robins and chinaberry berries, on the other hand (and in 
my opinion), is a case where a food stuff is definitely avoided as long as 
possible, the berries only being eaten very late in the winter when most other 
foodstuff has already been devoured.) 


And one additional point on distribution: cedar-berry eaters often sit (and 
deposit cedar seed droppings along fence rows, where you will often notice a 
significant number of cedar trees, more than in the surrounding areas. 


I never realized holly trees used to be a prevalent species in eastern 
Oklahoma, an interesting. stand-alone fact in itself. 


Best wishes,

John Shackford
Edmond, OK

On Wed, Aug 10, 2016 at 12:26 PM, EUGENE YOUNG 
> wrote: 

One of the key roles is fire. In KS and OK, fire in prairies has long kept the 
cedar in check. Prevention of fire allowed cedars to spread, and take over 
prairie habitat. Historically, even the riparian habitats were burned, thus 
likely reducing cedar tree abundance, at least in the prairie regions of both 
states. Its been well documented in the literature as settlers moved across 
the Plains, fire prevention occurred and riparian habitat increasedeven out 
into western regions of both states. Mammals and birds followed these riparian 
havens and began to occupy new territories. As riparian habitat became more 
dense, and as we began to reintroduce fire as a grassland management tool, 
riparian habitats usually dont burn well and often remain intactunless there 
were years without fire and enough litter builds up (ex. what happened in 
Morton County KS a few years back). However, no doubt the original seed source 
for prairie cedars was likely from those cedars along riparian habitat, and 
this often is observed today, where fire has a more difficult time damaging 
trees especially within the Flint Hills due to annual burning. The result, not 
enough litter to allow fire to get hot enough to impact trees and shrubs long 
streams and ravines. And if the grasslands are not burned every 3-5 years, 
cedars can begin to encroach upon the prairie. 


European Starlings, and American Robins are also great consumers of cedar 
berries, as are many other species. But certainly, starlings, robins and 
waxwings would be the big three consumers. The fact that starlings are 
year-long residents, might make them even more important in the distribution of 
cedars. During the fall, they flock up early (now for example) and will feed on 
cedar berries, often devouring everything in sight before the waxwings or 
robins migrate through the region. 


Hope that helps.

Gene

Eugene A. Young


Agriculture, Science & Engineering
Northern Oklahoma College
1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310
Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310
Phone: 580-628-6482
Fax: 580-628-6209
E-Mail: Eugene.Young AT noc.edu
Website: www.noc.edu



From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of Doughty, Russell B. 

Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 11:18 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing


Howdy all,



I wanted to float a hypothesis among the birding community and see what kind of 
feedback I get. Please let me know what you think and if you can help in some 
way. 




I hypothesize that the annihilation of the deciduous and American holly tree 
species from the Ouachita Highland landscape of Oklahoma and Arkansas 
drastically altered the diet of the cedar waxwings, forcing them to eat red 
cedar berries with much greater frequency (Juniperus virginiana). This shift in 
food availability for cedar waxwing plays an important role in red cedar 
encroachment over time. 




Here is some background. The holly trees were favored for piano keys and inlay 
by woodworkers. The trees were also cut and sold in the winter as Christmas 
decorations. The Ouachita forest was completely logged over several times 
(Smith 1986), which also caused massive population declines in the holly. In my 
56 mile hike from Talihina to Queen Wilhelmina, I found only 2 specimens of 
holly. Both were on the southside of the ridge in a drainage. But my 
90-year-old aunt says that the holly was every where in SE Oklahoma when she 
was a kid. 




I'm a PhD student in Dr. Xiangming Xiao's group. We work with geospacial data 
to conduct spatiotemporal analysis of ecosystem processes. Thus far, red cedar 
encroachment does not seem to correlate very well to changes in climate. 
However, the distribution of red cedar in the state paints a pattern. The red 
cedar is not just randomly distributed across the state. It most frequently 
occurs along the wooded stream corridors in our watersheds. I'd suspect the 
distribution of cedar are highly correlated with cedar waxwing habitat. 




I'm curious if restoration of holly would help curb the encroachment of red 
cedar by providing waxwings an alternative food source. I'm also curious if 
another bird species is playing a role. I'm no ornithologist; birding is just a 
hobby for me. I'd be pleased if someone has some thoughts to share. 




Thanks,



Russ



Smith, K. L. (1986). Sawmill: the Story of Cutting the Last Great Virgin Forest 
East of Rockies (p). University of Arkansas Press. 

Subject: Re: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 12:59:10 -0500
Hi Russell,

I don't know much about the food habits of birds in eastern Oklahoma, but
your hypothesis seems to me to be a good--and interesting--question to try
to gather information on there.


But I would add that I have never felt that any cedar berry feeding species
here in central Oklahoma thinks cedar berries are low priority/non-optimal
food:  they seem to be eaten readily whenever the berries become ripe.
 (The relationship between robins and chinaberry berries, on the other hand
(and in my opinion), is a case where a food stuff is definitely avoided as
long as possible, the berries only being eaten very late in the winter when
most other foodstuff has already been devoured.)

And one additional point on distribution:  cedar-berry eaters often sit
(and deposit cedar seed droppings along fence rows, where you will often
notice a significant number of cedar trees, more than in the surrounding
areas.

I never realized holly trees used to be a prevalent species in eastern
Oklahoma, an interesting. stand-alone fact in itself.

Best wishes,

John Shackford
Edmond, OK

On Wed, Aug 10, 2016 at 12:26 PM, EUGENE YOUNG  wrote:

> One of the key roles is fire.  In KS and OK, fire in prairies has long
> kept the cedar in check.  Prevention of fire allowed cedars to spread, and
> take over prairie habitat.  Historically, even the riparian habitats were
> burned, thus likely reducing cedar tree abundance, at least in the prairie
> regions of both states.  It’s been well documented in the literature as
> settlers moved across the Plains, fire prevention occurred and riparian
> habitat increased…even out into western regions of both states.  Mammals
> and birds followed these riparian havens and began to occupy new
> territories.  As riparian habitat became more dense, and as we began to
> reintroduce fire as a grassland management tool, riparian habitats usually
> don’t burn well and often remain intact…unless there were years without
> fire and enough litter builds up (ex. what happened in Morton County KS a
> few years back).  However, no doubt the original seed source for prairie
> cedars was likely from those cedars along riparian habitat, and this often
> is observed today, where fire has a more difficult time damaging trees
> especially within the Flint Hills due to annual burning.  The result, not
> enough litter to allow fire to get hot enough to impact trees and shrubs
> long streams and ravines.  And if the grasslands are not burned every 3-5
> years, cedars can begin to encroach upon the prairie.
>
>
>
> European Starlings, and American Robins are also great consumers of cedar
> berries, as are many other species.  But certainly, starlings, robins and
> waxwings would be the big three consumers.  The fact that starlings are
> year-long residents, might make them even more important in the
> distribution of cedars.  During the fall, they flock up early (now for
> example) and will feed on cedar berries, often devouring everything in
> sight before the waxwings or robins migrate through the region.
>
>
>
> Hope that helps.
>
>
>
> Gene
>
>
>
> Eugene A. Young
>
>
>
>
>
> Agriculture, Science & Engineering
>
> Northern Oklahoma College
>
> 1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310
>
> Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310
>
> Phone: 580-628-6482
>
> Fax: 580-628-6209
>
> E-Mail: Eugene.Young AT noc.edu
>
> Website: www.noc.edu
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Doughty,
> Russell B.
> *Sent:* Wednesday, August 10, 2016 11:18 AM
> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> *Subject:* [OKBIRDS] Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar
> Waxwing
>
>
>
> Howdy all,
>
>
>
> I wanted to float a hypothesis among the birding community and see what
> kind of feedback I get. Please let me know what you think and if you can
> help in some way.
>
>
>
> I hypothesize that the annihilation of the deciduous and American holly
> tree species from the Ouachita Highland landscape of Oklahoma and Arkansas
> drastically altered the diet of the cedar waxwings, forcing them to eat red
> cedar berries with much greater frequency (*Juniperus virginiana*). This
> shift in food availability for cedar waxwing plays an important role in red
> cedar encroachment over time.
>
>
>
> Here is some background. The holly trees were favored for piano keys and
> inlay by woodworkers. The trees were also cut and sold in the winter as
> Christmas decorations. The Ouachita forest was completely logged over
> several times (Smith 1986), which also caused massive population declines
> in the holly. In my 56 mile hike from Talihina to Queen Wilhelmina, I found
> only 2 specimens of holly. Both were on the southside of the ridge in a
> drainage. But my 90-year-old aunt says that the holly was every where in SE
> Oklahoma when she was a kid.
>
>
>
> I'm a PhD student in Dr. Xiangming Xiao's group. We work with geospacial
> data to conduct spatiotemporal analysis of ecosystem processes. Thus far,
> red cedar encroachment does not seem to correlate very well to changes in
> climate. However, the distribution of red cedar in the state paints a
> pattern. The red cedar is not just randomly distributed across the state.
> It most frequently occurs along the wooded stream corridors in our
> watersheds. I'd suspect the distribution of cedar are highly correlated
> with cedar waxwing habitat.
>
>
>
> I'm curious if restoration of holly would help curb the encroachment of
> red cedar by providing waxwings an alternative food source. I'm also
> curious if another bird species is playing a role. I'm no ornithologist;
> birding is just a hobby for me. I'd be pleased if someone has some thoughts
> to share.
>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
>
>
> Russ
>
>
>
> Smith, K. L. (1986). *Sawmill: the Story of Cutting the Last Great Virgin
> Forest East of Rockies (p)*. University of Arkansas Press.
>
Subject: Re: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 17:26:10 +0000
One of the key roles is fire. In KS and OK, fire in prairies has long kept the 
cedar in check. Prevention of fire allowed cedars to spread, and take over 
prairie habitat. Historically, even the riparian habitats were burned, thus 
likely reducing cedar tree abundance, at least in the prairie regions of both 
states. It's been well documented in the literature as settlers moved across 
the Plains, fire prevention occurred and riparian habitat increased...even out 
into western regions of both states. Mammals and birds followed these riparian 
havens and began to occupy new territories. As riparian habitat became more 
dense, and as we began to reintroduce fire as a grassland management tool, 
riparian habitats usually don't burn well and often remain intact...unless 
there were years without fire and enough litter builds up (ex. what happened in 
Morton County KS a few years back). However, no doubt the original seed source 
for prairie cedars was likely from those cedars along riparian habitat, and 
this often is observed today, where fire has a more difficult time damaging 
trees especially within the Flint Hills due to annual burning. The result, not 
enough litter to allow fire to get hot enough to impact trees and shrubs long 
streams and ravines. And if the grasslands are not burned every 3-5 years, 
cedars can begin to encroach upon the prairie. 


European Starlings, and American Robins are also great consumers of cedar 
berries, as are many other species. But certainly, starlings, robins and 
waxwings would be the big three consumers. The fact that starlings are 
year-long residents, might make them even more important in the distribution of 
cedars. During the fall, they flock up early (now for example) and will feed on 
cedar berries, often devouring everything in sight before the waxwings or 
robins migrate through the region. 


Hope that helps.

Gene

Eugene A. Young


Agriculture, Science & Engineering
Northern Oklahoma College
1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310
Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310
Phone: 580-628-6482
Fax: 580-628-6209
E-Mail: Eugene.Young AT noc.edu
Website: www.noc.edu



From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Doughty, Russell B.
Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 11:18 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing


Howdy all,



I wanted to float a hypothesis among the birding community and see what kind of 
feedback I get. Please let me know what you think and if you can help in some 
way. 




I hypothesize that the annihilation of the deciduous and American holly tree 
species from the Ouachita Highland landscape of Oklahoma and Arkansas 
drastically altered the diet of the cedar waxwings, forcing them to eat red 
cedar berries with much greater frequency (Juniperus virginiana). This shift in 
food availability for cedar waxwing plays an important role in red cedar 
encroachment over time. 




Here is some background. The holly trees were favored for piano keys and inlay 
by woodworkers. The trees were also cut and sold in the winter as Christmas 
decorations. The Ouachita forest was completely logged over several times 
(Smith 1986), which also caused massive population declines in the holly. In my 
56 mile hike from Talihina to Queen Wilhelmina, I found only 2 specimens of 
holly. Both were on the southside of the ridge in a drainage. But my 
90-year-old aunt says that the holly was every where in SE Oklahoma when she 
was a kid. 




I'm a PhD student in Dr. Xiangming Xiao's group. We work with geospacial data 
to conduct spatiotemporal analysis of ecosystem processes. Thus far, red cedar 
encroachment does not seem to correlate very well to changes in climate. 
However, the distribution of red cedar in the state paints a pattern. The red 
cedar is not just randomly distributed across the state. It most frequently 
occurs along the wooded stream corridors in our watersheds. I'd suspect the 
distribution of cedar are highly correlated with cedar waxwing habitat. 




I'm curious if restoration of holly would help curb the encroachment of red 
cedar by providing waxwings an alternative food source. I'm also curious if 
another bird species is playing a role. I'm no ornithologist; birding is just a 
hobby for me. I'd be pleased if someone has some thoughts to share. 




Thanks,



Russ



Smith, K. L. (1986). Sawmill: the Story of Cutting the Last Great Virgin Forest 
East of Rockies (p). University of Arkansas Press. 
Subject: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing
From: "Doughty, Russell B." <russell.doughty AT OU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 16:18:16 +0000
Howdy all,


I wanted to float a hypothesis among the birding community and see what kind of 
feedback I get. Please let me know what you think and if you can help in some 
way. 



I hypothesize that the annihilation of the deciduous and American holly tree 
species from the Ouachita Highland landscape of Oklahoma and Arkansas 
drastically altered the diet of the cedar waxwings, forcing them to eat red 
cedar berries with much greater frequency (Juniperus virginiana). This shift in 
food availability for cedar waxwing plays an important role in red cedar 
encroachment over time. 



Here is some background. The holly trees were favored for piano keys and inlay 
by woodworkers. The trees were also cut and sold in the winter as Christmas 
decorations. The Ouachita forest was completely logged over several times 
(Smith 1986), which also caused massive population declines in the holly. In my 
56 mile hike from Talihina to Queen Wilhelmina, I found only 2 specimens of 
holly. Both were on the southside of the ridge in a drainage. But my 
90-year-old aunt says that the holly was every where in SE Oklahoma when she 
was a kid. 



I'm a PhD student in Dr. Xiangming Xiao's group. We work with geospacial data 
to conduct spatiotemporal analysis of ecosystem processes. Thus far, red cedar 
encroachment does not seem to correlate very well to changes in climate. 
However, the distribution of red cedar in the state paints a pattern. The red 
cedar is not just randomly distributed across the state. It most frequently 
occurs along the wooded stream corridors in our watersheds. I'd suspect the 
distribution of cedar are highly correlated with cedar waxwing habitat. 



I'm curious if restoration of holly would help curb the encroachment of red 
cedar by providing waxwings an alternative food source. I'm also curious if 
another bird species is playing a role. I'm no ornithologist; birding is just a 
hobby for me. I'd be pleased if someone has some thoughts to share. 



Thanks,


Russ


Smith, K. L. (1986). Sawmill: the Story of Cutting the Last Great Virgin Forest 
East of Rockies (p). University of Arkansas Press. 
Subject: Hackberry Flat yesterday
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 11:07:47 -0500
I birded Hackberry Flat from 7:30 am to 2:30 pm Tuesday.  Encountered
rain while on the turnpike and even south-west of Lawton but no rain
at the site.  They did receive 1/2" on Monday.  The reservoir is as
full as I've ever seen it but water was low or missing in many places
on the south boundary.

The BEST birds I saw and photographed were a Least Bittern in the Weir
unit and the Peregrin Falcon I missed during the last visit in 7/18.
The Peregrin was found on the south boundary road in the (mostly) dead
tree row, it is a first year pacific bird, very dark with a dark
helmet (and a very full crop). Even found a male Yellow-headed
Blackbird with a nearly naked head, must be molting?

I also flushed 2 American Bitterns, one from the ditch along the east
boundary road and the other from the ditch in Sandpiper Unit while
driving north on Roosevelt Road.

Shorebirds were Least, Bairds, Solitary and Stilt sandpipers plus lots
of LB Dowitchers.  The amount of juvenile Night-Herons is amazing,
most are Black-crowned with a fair number of Yellow-crowned.  Saw many
Black-necked Stilts with youngsters and the same
holds for Avocets and White-faced Ibis.

Duck species I found were Mallard, Gadwall, Redhead and Ruddy
Iw/ducklings).  There are many Pied-billed Grebe and American Coot
juveniles.

Matt Jung, OKC
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Aug. 9
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 9 Aug 2016 22:33:52 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot on the bird survey today.  63 species were
found.  A few migrants starting to pass through now.  The Rough-leaf
Dogwoods and Hercules-club trees have become very popular with the Empids,
buntings, cardinals, etc. who are gorging themselves on their berries.  I
had 3 Cave Swallows hanging out with Barn Swallows at the first bridge south
of the north parking lot on Red Slough road.  Huge numbers of Mississippi
Kites can be seen aerial feeding together high in the sky over units 38 &
27a during the middle of the day now.  They have been doing this for several
weeks now and their numbers are growing.    And I am amazed at the Towhees
we have.  I keep finding more and more of them everywhere I go at Red Slough
this summer.  Up until 3 summers ago, this species had never been found here
in the summer.  There numbers have been growing every year and now they are
everywhere there is open scrub habitat and second growth.  I'm seeing pairs
together and last summer I had a family group.  Here is my list for today:

 

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 6

Wood Duck - 44  (also 2 broods seen.)

Mallard - 7

Pied-billed Grebe - 24

Neotropic Cormorant - 7

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 21

Turkey Vulture - 19

Mississippi Kite - 77

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 3

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 2 adults (also 2 small chicks.)

Common Gallinule - 37 (also several broods of small chicks.)

American Coot - 5

Mourning Dove - 11

Inca Dove - 1

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 10

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 5

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Alder Flycatcher - 3

Least Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 3

Great-crested Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 6

White-eyed Vireo - 4

Bell's Vireo - 1

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 16

Purple Martin - 1

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 28

Cave Swallow - 3 juveniles (including one individual in near adult plumage.)

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 8

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Yellow-breasted Chat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 5

Field Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 10

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 16

Painted Bunting - 2

Dickcissel - 3

Red-winged Blackbird - 3

Brown-headed Cowbird - 1

House Sparrow - 1

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Striped Saddlebags

Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Green Treefrog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Aug 2016 13:00:46 -0500
thanks Karen for the information on clammyweed...always fun to find a new
one.

On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 4:38 PM, mcgeecnt  wrote:

> In Arkansas the native cleome is called clammyweed. I think the genus name
> is Polanisia.
> Karen McGee
>
>
>
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Express 3, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Melinda Droege 
> Date: 8/8/16 12:20 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found
>
> Concerning the Bachman's debacle:  perhaps I was guilty of the
> twitch-reward syndrome.  Glad so many good birders went out to Birch to
> check.  In fact I think I will go again tomorrow and really spend some time
> looking and listening.
>
> On another note:  does anyone know if Spider plant (cleome) grows wild?  I
> saw some today near some Copan mudflats and wondered if it is a native or
> just escaped.
>
> Melinda Droege
> Bartlesville
>
> On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 9:21 AM, Bill Carrell <
> cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> I had to run up to Skiatook on Saturday afternoon, so I decided to go to
>> Birch Lake from there. I got to the picnic pavilions and heard the song
>> described by Scott. I tracked down the bird (saw it singing) and got a few
>> pictures, also got sound recordings. Turned out after a closer look that it
>> was a rather worn and ragged looking Field Sparrow. There could be a
>> Bachman's Sparrow up there, but this guy did have me fooled for a few
>> minutes.
>>
>> Bill Carrell
>> Tulsa, OK
>>
>> On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 8:56 AM, JOS GRZYBOWSKI <
>> j_grzybowski AT sbcglobal.net> wrote:
>>
>>> Thanks Scott for your post.
>>> EBird has been a challenge, and I accumulate records in the queue that
>>> leave uncertainty--don't make a decision on them.
>>> Coming out at about 100 records/year with which I eventually will have
>>> to deal.
>>>
>>> And I am more skeptical of reports now than before I started reviewing
>>> for eBird.
>>> Have prematurely validated records where observers I felt were capable
>>> enough for ID also claimed a photo, asked sometimes just for record, and
>>> had to invalidate upon receiving the photo.
>>>
>>> And birders can get suckered, even by themselves.  I have done it to
>>> myself, except that I take some effort in looking over my own shoulder
>>> (Hopefully do it rarely at least).  Wanting to believe it rather than being
>>> more objective and cautious--the twitch-reward syndrome.  Remember a
>>> Gyrfalcon report of a bird watched for some 40 minutes on a distant
>>> fencepost by a group of our active birders.  One observer took a photo
>>> through the scope.  Even after explaining that tan imm. Gyrs should not
>>> have a yellow cere (visible in photo, but it was big!!!)..., or the Lesser
>>> Nighthawk of a bird with a twisted tail flying among Commons, ....
>>>
>>> I once had a Field Sparrow that did a perfect Magnolia Warbler song (in
>>> sw. NY).   Drew my attention because it was in a regrowth area.
>>>
>>> Every so often, these birders are vindicated.  So, don't want to be too
>>> presumptive in the other direction.  However, will have to wait for
>>> something more tangible on this one.
>>>
>>>  Could not hear anything on the tape you posted to facebook, but was
>>> mostly "cruising" around facebook looking for a Peregrine pic claimed as a
>>> tundrius that was more likely an anatum--will go back to yours with ear
>>> phones plugged.
>>>
>>> Glad to have you on the scene.  Glad to hear Jim got out there.  He
>>> located some in that area a while back, and thought some Tulsa birders felt
>>> they were still out there.
>>>
>>> CHEERS,                                           JOE
>>>
>>>
>>> On Sunday, August 7, 2016 8:30 PM, Scott Loss 
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> Sara and I had errands to run in Tulsa today, so we decided to make a
>>> detour by Birch Lake in Osage County to try for the reported Bachman's
>>> Sparrow(s).
>>>
>>> We spent about 40 minutes at and near the picnic pavilion at the Twin
>>> Coves rec area (north side of the lake, south of Barnsdall), but we were
>>> unable to confirm the presence of any Bachman's Sparrows. We heard 2
>>> sparrows singing Bachman's like songs (one just east of the Pavilion, one
>>> farther off to the north in the larger open field area); however, these
>>> songs also sounded similar to aberrant field sparrow songs I have heard
>>> before. The songs were made up of 2-3 clear whistles followed by a trill on
>>> a lower pitch, and they never varied across the numerous times we heard
>>> them. We never were able to get a visual on the birds, but we did run into
>>> Jim Hoffman from Tulsa who noted that he saw a pink-billed sparrow in the
>>> area of where one of the songs was coming from. Jim also noted that the
>>> songs were not as variable and high-pitched as the Bachman's Sparrows he
>>> has heard/seen many times, including during an irruption of the species
>>> into Osage County in the 1990's. I agreed that they did not match any of
>>> Bachman's recordings I listened to on Xenocanto.
>>>
>>> We certainly do not overrule the possibility that a Bachman's Sparrow
>>> could be present at this location; the habitat is good for them. However,
>>> the only singing sparrows we heard were within the expected range of
>>> variation for field sparrow.
>>>
>>> NOTE: I am also trying to post a video that includes the aberrant Field
>>> Sparrow songs on the OOS Facebook page, but the file size is causing some
>>> issues.
>>>
>>> Scott Loss
>>> Stillwater
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found
From: mcgeecnt <mcgeecnt AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 16:38:32 -0500
In Arkansas the native cleome is called clammyweed. I think the genus name is 
Polanisia.Karen McGee 



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Express 3, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Melinda Droege  
Date: 8/8/16 12:20 PM (GMT-06:00) To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU Subject: Re: 
[OKBIRDS] Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found 

Concerning the Bachman's debacle:  perhaps I was guilty of the twitch-reward 
syndrome.  Glad so many good birders went out to Birch to check.  In fact I 
think I will go again tomorrow and really spend some time looking and 
listening. 

On another note:  does anyone know if Spider plant (cleome) grows wild?  I 
saw some today near some Copan mudflats and wondered if it is a native or just 
escaped. 

Melinda DroegeBartlesville
On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 9:21 AM, Bill Carrell  
wrote: 

I had to run up to Skiatook on Saturday afternoon, so I decided to go to Birch 
Lake from there. I got to the picnic pavilions and heard the song described by 
Scott. I tracked down the bird (saw it singing) and got a few pictures, also 
got sound recordings. Turned out after a closer look that it was a rather worn 
and ragged looking Field Sparrow. There could be a Bachman's Sparrow up there, 
but this guy did have me fooled for a few minutes. 

Bill CarrellTulsa, OK
On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 8:56 AM, JOS GRZYBOWSKI  
wrote: 

Thanks Scott for your post.  
EBird has been a challenge, and I accumulate records in the queue that leave 
uncertainty--don't make a decision on them.Coming out at about 100 records/year 
with which I eventually will have to deal. 

And I am more skeptical of reports now than before I started reviewing for 
eBird.  

Have prematurely validated records where observers I felt were capable enough 
for ID also claimed a photo, asked sometimes just for record, and had to 
invalidate upon receiving the photo. 

And birders can get suckered, even by themselves.  I have done it to myself, 
except that I take some effort in looking over my own shoulder (Hopefully do it 
rarely at least).  Wanting to believe it rather than being more objective and 
cautious--the twitch-reward syndrome.  Remember a Gyrfalcon report of a bird 
watched for some 40 minutes on a distant fencepost by a group of our active 
birders.  One observer took a photo through the scope.  Even after explaining 
that tan imm. Gyrs should not have a yellow cere (visible in photo, but it was 
big!!!)..., or the Lesser Nighthawk of a bird with a twisted tail flying among 
Commons, .... 


I once had a Field Sparrow that did a perfect Magnolia Warbler song (in sw. 
NY).   Drew my attention because it was in a regrowth area. 


Every so often, these birders are vindicated.  So, don't want to be too 
presumptive in the other direction.  However, will have to wait for something 
more tangible on this one.  


 Could not hear anything on the tape you posted to facebook, but was mostly 
"cruising" around facebook looking for a Peregrine pic claimed as a tundrius 
that was more likely an anatum--will go back to yours with ear phones plugged. 

Glad to have you on the scene.  Glad to hear Jim got out there.  He located 
some in that area a while back, and thought some Tulsa birders felt they were 
still out there. 


CHEERS,                                           JOE   

    On Sunday, August 7, 2016 8:30 PM, Scott Loss  wrote:
  

 Sara and I had errands to run in Tulsa today, so we decided to make a detour 
by Birch Lake in Osage County to try for the reported Bachman's Sparrow(s). 


We spent about 40 minutes at and near the picnic pavilion at the Twin Coves rec 
area (north side of the lake, south of Barnsdall), but we were unable to 
confirm the presence of any Bachman's Sparrows. We heard 2 sparrows singing 
Bachman's like songs (one just east of the Pavilion, one farther off to the 
north in the larger open field area); however, these songs also sounded similar 
to aberrant field sparrow songs I have heard before. The songs were made up of 
2-3 clear whistles followed by a trill on a lower pitch, and they never varied 
across the numerous times we heard them. We never were able to get a visual on 
the birds, but we did run into Jim Hoffman from Tulsa who noted that he saw a 
pink-billed sparrow in the area of where one of the songs was coming from. Jim 
also noted that the songs were not as variable and high-pitched as the 
Bachman's Sparrows he has heard/seen many times, including during an irruption 
of the species into Osage County in the 1990's. I agreed that they did not 
match any of Bachman's recordings I listened to on Xenocanto. 


We certainly do not overrule the possibility that a Bachman's Sparrow
could be present at this location; the habitat is good for them. However, the 
only singing sparrows we heard were within the 

expected range of variation for field sparrow.

NOTE: I am also trying to post a video that includes the aberrant Field Sparrow 
songs on the OOS 

Facebook page, but the file size is causing some issues.

Scott Loss
Stillwater


     


Subject: Re: Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 13:41:26 -0500
Just a follow-up note, as I told Josh offline, if he had a good look at the
bird, I trust his call on the ID. Just be sure to exercise some caution if
you go up there looking for it.

Bill

On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 12:47 PM, Patricia Seibert 
wrote:

> Hi All
> Jo Loyd & I sent 2 hours at the area at Birch Lake today. I was fooled by
> an aberrant song of a Filed Sparrow. It took some tracking through the tall
> grass, but the song I thought was a Bachman's turned out to be coming from
>  a Field Sparrow. I wouldn't be surprised to have a Bachman's there, but we
> sure couldn't find any.
>
> Patricia Seibert
> Tulsa, OK
>
> On Aug 8, 2016, at 12:20 PM, Melinda Droege  > wrote:
>
> Concerning the Bachman's debacle:  perhaps I was guilty of the
> twitch-reward syndrome.  Glad so many good birders went out to Birch to
> check.  In fact I think I will go again tomorrow and really spend some time
> looking and listening.
>
> On another note:  does anyone know if Spider plant (cleome) grows wild?  I
> saw some today near some Copan mudflats and wondered if it is a native or
> just escaped.
>
> Melinda Droege
> Bartlesville
>
> On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 9:21 AM, Bill Carrell <
> cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> I had to run up to Skiatook on Saturday afternoon, so I decided to go to
>> Birch Lake from there. I got to the picnic pavilions and heard the song
>> described by Scott. I tracked down the bird (saw it singing) and got a few
>> pictures, also got sound recordings. Turned out after a closer look that it
>> was a rather worn and ragged looking Field Sparrow. There could be a
>> Bachman's Sparrow up there, but this guy did have me fooled for a few
>> minutes.
>>
>> Bill Carrell
>> Tulsa, OK
>>
>> On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 8:56 AM, JOS GRZYBOWSKI <
>> j_grzybowski AT sbcglobal.net> wrote:
>>
>>> Thanks Scott for your post.
>>> EBird has been a challenge, and I accumulate records in the queue that
>>> leave uncertainty--don't make a decision on them.
>>> Coming out at about 100 records/year with which I eventually will have
>>> to deal.
>>>
>>> And I am more skeptical of reports now than before I started reviewing
>>> for eBird.
>>> Have prematurely validated records where observers I felt were capable
>>> enough for ID also claimed a photo, asked sometimes just for record, and
>>> had to invalidate upon receiving the photo.
>>>
>>> And birders can get suckered, even by themselves.  I have done it to
>>> myself, except that I take some effort in looking over my own shoulder
>>> (Hopefully do it rarely at least).  Wanting to believe it rather than being
>>> more objective and cautious--the twitch-reward syndrome.  Remember a
>>> Gyrfalcon report of a bird watched for some 40 minutes on a distant
>>> fencepost by a group of our active birders.  One observer took a photo
>>> through the scope.  Even after explaining that tan imm. Gyrs should not
>>> have a yellow cere (visible in photo, but it was big!!!)..., or the Lesser
>>> Nighthawk of a bird with a twisted tail flying among Commons, ....
>>>
>>> I once had a Field Sparrow that did a perfect Magnolia Warbler song (in
>>> sw. NY).   Drew my attention because it was in a regrowth area.
>>>
>>> Every so often, these birders are vindicated.  So, don't want to be too
>>> presumptive in the other direction.  However, will have to wait for
>>> something more tangible on this one.
>>>
>>>  Could not hear anything on the tape you posted to facebook, but was
>>> mostly "cruising" around facebook looking for a Peregrine pic claimed as a
>>> tundrius that was more likely an anatum--will go back to yours with ear
>>> phones plugged.
>>>
>>> Glad to have you on the scene.  Glad to hear Jim got out there.  He
>>> located some in that area a while back, and thought some Tulsa birders felt
>>> they were still out there.
>>>
>>> CHEERS,                                           JOE
>>>
>>>
>>> On Sunday, August 7, 2016 8:30 PM, Scott Loss 
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> Sara and I had errands to run in Tulsa today, so we decided to make a
>>> detour by Birch Lake in Osage County to try for the reported Bachman's
>>> Sparrow(s).
>>>
>>> We spent about 40 minutes at and near the picnic pavilion at the Twin
>>> Coves rec area (north side of the lake, south of Barnsdall), but we were
>>> unable to confirm the presence of any Bachman's Sparrows. We heard 2
>>> sparrows singing Bachman's like songs (one just east of the Pavilion, one
>>> farther off to the north in the larger open field area); however, these
>>> songs also sounded similar to aberrant field sparrow songs I have heard
>>> before. The songs were made up of 2-3 clear whistles followed by a trill on
>>> a lower pitch, and they never varied across the numerous times we heard
>>> them. We never were able to get a visual on the birds, but we did run into
>>> Jim Hoffman from Tulsa who noted that he saw a pink-billed sparrow in the
>>> area of where one of the songs was coming from. Jim also noted that the
>>> songs were not as variable and high-pitched as the Bachman's Sparrows he
>>> has heard/seen many times, including during an irruption of the species
>>> into Osage County in the 1990's. I agreed that they did not match any of
>>> Bachman's recordings I listened to on Xenocanto.
>>>
>>> We certainly do not overrule the possibility that a Bachman's Sparrow
>>> could be present at this location; the habitat is good for them. However,
>>> the only singing sparrows we heard were within the expected range of
>>> variation for field sparrow.
>>>
>>> NOTE: I am also trying to post a video that includes the aberrant Field
>>> Sparrow songs on the OOS Facebook page, but the file size is causing some
>>> issues.
>>>
>>> Scott Loss
>>> Stillwater
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found
From: Patricia Seibert <plseibert AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 12:47:05 -0500
Hi All
Jo Loyd & I sent 2 hours at the area at Birch Lake today. I was fooled by an 
aberrant song of a Filed Sparrow. It took some tracking through the tall grass, 
but the song I thought was a Bachman's turned out to be coming from a Field 
Sparrow. I wouldn't be surprised to have a Bachman's there, but we sure 
couldn't find any. 


Patricia Seibert
Tulsa, OK

> On Aug 8, 2016, at 12:20 PM, Melinda Droege  wrote:
> 
> Concerning the Bachman's debacle: perhaps I was guilty of the twitch-reward 
syndrome. Glad so many good birders went out to Birch to check. In fact I think 
I will go again tomorrow and really spend some time looking and listening. 

> 
> On another note: does anyone know if Spider plant (cleome) grows wild? I saw 
some today near some Copan mudflats and wondered if it is a native or just 
escaped. 

> 
> Melinda Droege
> Bartlesville
> 
>> On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 9:21 AM, Bill Carrell 
 wrote: 

>> I had to run up to Skiatook on Saturday afternoon, so I decided to go to 
Birch Lake from there. I got to the picnic pavilions and heard the song 
described by Scott. I tracked down the bird (saw it singing) and got a few 
pictures, also got sound recordings. Turned out after a closer look that it was 
a rather worn and ragged looking Field Sparrow. There could be a Bachman's 
Sparrow up there, but this guy did have me fooled for a few minutes. 

>> 
>> Bill Carrell
>> Tulsa, OK
>> 
>>> On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 8:56 AM, JOS GRZYBOWSKI  
wrote: 

>>> Thanks Scott for your post.  
>>> EBird has been a challenge, and I accumulate records in the queue that 
leave uncertainty--don't make a decision on them. 

>>> Coming out at about 100 records/year with which I eventually will have to 
deal. 

>>> 
>>> And I am more skeptical of reports now than before I started reviewing for 
eBird. 

>>> Have prematurely validated records where observers I felt were capable 
enough for ID also claimed a photo, asked sometimes just for record, and had to 
invalidate upon receiving the photo. 

>>> 
>>> And birders can get suckered, even by themselves. I have done it to myself, 
except that I take some effort in looking over my own shoulder (Hopefully do it 
rarely at least). Wanting to believe it rather than being more objective and 
cautious--the twitch-reward syndrome. Remember a Gyrfalcon report of a bird 
watched for some 40 minutes on a distant fencepost by a group of our active 
birders. One observer took a photo through the scope. Even after explaining 
that tan imm. Gyrs should not have a yellow cere (visible in photo, but it was 
big!!!)..., or the Lesser Nighthawk of a bird with a twisted tail flying among 
Commons, .... 

>>> 
>>> I once had a Field Sparrow that did a perfect Magnolia Warbler song (in sw. 
NY). Drew my attention because it was in a regrowth area. 

>>> 
>>> Every so often, these birders are vindicated. So, don't want to be too 
presumptive in the other direction. However, will have to wait for something 
more tangible on this one. 

>>> 
>>> Could not hear anything on the tape you posted to facebook, but was mostly 
"cruising" around facebook looking for a Peregrine pic claimed as a tundrius 
that was more likely an anatum--will go back to yours with ear phones plugged. 

>>> 
>>> Glad to have you on the scene. Glad to hear Jim got out there. He located 
some in that area a while back, and thought some Tulsa birders felt they were 
still out there. 

>>> 
>>> CHEERS,                                           JOE 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> On Sunday, August 7, 2016 8:30 PM, Scott Loss  wrote:
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Sara and I had errands to run in Tulsa today, so we decided to make a 
detour by Birch Lake in Osage County to try for the reported Bachman's 
Sparrow(s). 

>>> 
>>> We spent about 40 minutes at and near the picnic pavilion at the Twin Coves 
rec area (north side of the lake, south of Barnsdall), but we were unable to 
confirm the presence of any Bachman's Sparrows. We heard 2 sparrows singing 
Bachman's like songs (one just east of the Pavilion, one farther off to the 
north in the larger open field area); however, these songs also sounded similar 
to aberrant field sparrow songs I have heard before. The songs were made up of 
2-3 clear whistles followed by a trill on a lower pitch, and they never varied 
across the numerous times we heard them. We never were able to get a visual on 
the birds, but we did run into Jim Hoffman from Tulsa who noted that he saw a 
pink-billed sparrow in the area of where one of the songs was coming from. Jim 
also noted that the songs were not as variable and high-pitched as the 
Bachman's Sparrows he has heard/seen many times, including during an irruption 
of the species into Osage County in the 1990's. I agreed that they did not 
match any of Bachman's recordings I listened to on Xenocanto. 

>>> 
>>> We certainly do not overrule the possibility that a Bachman's Sparrow could 
be present at this location; the habitat is good for them. However, the only 
singing sparrows we heard were within the expected range of variation for field 
sparrow. 

>>> 
>>> NOTE: I am also trying to post a video that includes the aberrant Field 
Sparrow songs on the OOS Facebook page, but the file size is causing some 
issues. 

>>> 
>>> Scott Loss
>>> Stillwater
> 
Subject: Re: Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 12:20:17 -0500
Concerning the Bachman's debacle:  perhaps I was guilty of the
twitch-reward syndrome.  Glad so many good birders went out to Birch to
check.  In fact I think I will go again tomorrow and really spend some time
looking and listening.

On another note:  does anyone know if Spider plant (cleome) grows wild?  I
saw some today near some Copan mudflats and wondered if it is a native or
just escaped.

Melinda Droege
Bartlesville

On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 9:21 AM, Bill Carrell <
cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT gmail.com> wrote:

> I had to run up to Skiatook on Saturday afternoon, so I decided to go to
> Birch Lake from there. I got to the picnic pavilions and heard the song
> described by Scott. I tracked down the bird (saw it singing) and got a few
> pictures, also got sound recordings. Turned out after a closer look that it
> was a rather worn and ragged looking Field Sparrow. There could be a
> Bachman's Sparrow up there, but this guy did have me fooled for a few
> minutes.
>
> Bill Carrell
> Tulsa, OK
>
> On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 8:56 AM, JOS GRZYBOWSKI  > wrote:
>
>> Thanks Scott for your post.
>> EBird has been a challenge, and I accumulate records in the queue that
>> leave uncertainty--don't make a decision on them.
>> Coming out at about 100 records/year with which I eventually will have to
>> deal.
>>
>> And I am more skeptical of reports now than before I started reviewing
>> for eBird.
>> Have prematurely validated records where observers I felt were capable
>> enough for ID also claimed a photo, asked sometimes just for record, and
>> had to invalidate upon receiving the photo.
>>
>> And birders can get suckered, even by themselves.  I have done it to
>> myself, except that I take some effort in looking over my own shoulder
>> (Hopefully do it rarely at least).  Wanting to believe it rather than being
>> more objective and cautious--the twitch-reward syndrome.  Remember a
>> Gyrfalcon report of a bird watched for some 40 minutes on a distant
>> fencepost by a group of our active birders.  One observer took a photo
>> through the scope.  Even after explaining that tan imm. Gyrs should not
>> have a yellow cere (visible in photo, but it was big!!!)..., or the Lesser
>> Nighthawk of a bird with a twisted tail flying among Commons, ....
>>
>> I once had a Field Sparrow that did a perfect Magnolia Warbler song (in
>> sw. NY).   Drew my attention because it was in a regrowth area.
>>
>> Every so often, these birders are vindicated.  So, don't want to be too
>> presumptive in the other direction.  However, will have to wait for
>> something more tangible on this one.
>>
>>  Could not hear anything on the tape you posted to facebook, but was
>> mostly "cruising" around facebook looking for a Peregrine pic claimed as a
>> tundrius that was more likely an anatum--will go back to yours with ear
>> phones plugged.
>>
>> Glad to have you on the scene.  Glad to hear Jim got out there.  He
>> located some in that area a while back, and thought some Tulsa birders felt
>> they were still out there.
>>
>> CHEERS,                                           JOE
>>
>>
>> On Sunday, August 7, 2016 8:30 PM, Scott Loss 
>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Sara and I had errands to run in Tulsa today, so we decided to make a
>> detour by Birch Lake in Osage County to try for the reported Bachman's
>> Sparrow(s).
>>
>> We spent about 40 minutes at and near the picnic pavilion at the Twin
>> Coves rec area (north side of the lake, south of Barnsdall), but we were
>> unable to confirm the presence of any Bachman's Sparrows. We heard 2
>> sparrows singing Bachman's like songs (one just east of the Pavilion, one
>> farther off to the north in the larger open field area); however, these
>> songs also sounded similar to aberrant field sparrow songs I have heard
>> before. The songs were made up of 2-3 clear whistles followed by a trill on
>> a lower pitch, and they never varied across the numerous times we heard
>> them. We never were able to get a visual on the birds, but we did run into
>> Jim Hoffman from Tulsa who noted that he saw a pink-billed sparrow in the
>> area of where one of the songs was coming from. Jim also noted that the
>> songs were not as variable and high-pitched as the Bachman's Sparrows he
>> has heard/seen many times, including during an irruption of the species
>> into Osage County in the 1990's. I agreed that they did not match any of
>> Bachman's recordings I listened to on Xenocanto.
>>
>> We certainly do not overrule the possibility that a Bachman's Sparrow
>> could be present at this location; the habitat is good for them. However,
>> the only singing sparrows we heard were within the expected range of
>> variation for field sparrow.
>>
>> NOTE: I am also trying to post a video that includes the aberrant Field
>> Sparrow songs on the OOS Facebook page, but the file size is causing some
>> issues.
>>
>> Scott Loss
>> Stillwater
>>
>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 09:21:03 -0500
I had to run up to Skiatook on Saturday afternoon, so I decided to go to
Birch Lake from there. I got to the picnic pavilions and heard the song
described by Scott. I tracked down the bird (saw it singing) and got a few
pictures, also got sound recordings. Turned out after a closer look that it
was a rather worn and ragged looking Field Sparrow. There could be a
Bachman's Sparrow up there, but this guy did have me fooled for a few
minutes.

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 8:56 AM, JOS GRZYBOWSKI 
wrote:

> Thanks Scott for your post.
> EBird has been a challenge, and I accumulate records in the queue that
> leave uncertainty--don't make a decision on them.
> Coming out at about 100 records/year with which I eventually will have to
> deal.
>
> And I am more skeptical of reports now than before I started reviewing for
> eBird.
> Have prematurely validated records where observers I felt were capable
> enough for ID also claimed a photo, asked sometimes just for record, and
> had to invalidate upon receiving the photo.
>
> And birders can get suckered, even by themselves.  I have done it to
> myself, except that I take some effort in looking over my own shoulder
> (Hopefully do it rarely at least).  Wanting to believe it rather than being
> more objective and cautious--the twitch-reward syndrome.  Remember a
> Gyrfalcon report of a bird watched for some 40 minutes on a distant
> fencepost by a group of our active birders.  One observer took a photo
> through the scope.  Even after explaining that tan imm. Gyrs should not
> have a yellow cere (visible in photo, but it was big!!!)..., or the Lesser
> Nighthawk of a bird with a twisted tail flying among Commons, ....
>
> I once had a Field Sparrow that did a perfect Magnolia Warbler song (in
> sw. NY).   Drew my attention because it was in a regrowth area.
>
> Every so often, these birders are vindicated.  So, don't want to be too
> presumptive in the other direction.  However, will have to wait for
> something more tangible on this one.
>
>  Could not hear anything on the tape you posted to facebook, but was
> mostly "cruising" around facebook looking for a Peregrine pic claimed as a
> tundrius that was more likely an anatum--will go back to yours with ear
> phones plugged.
>
> Glad to have you on the scene.  Glad to hear Jim got out there.  He
> located some in that area a while back, and thought some Tulsa birders felt
> they were still out there.
>
> CHEERS,                                           JOE
>
>
> On Sunday, August 7, 2016 8:30 PM, Scott Loss 
> wrote:
>
>
> Sara and I had errands to run in Tulsa today, so we decided to make a
> detour by Birch Lake in Osage County to try for the reported Bachman's
> Sparrow(s).
>
> We spent about 40 minutes at and near the picnic pavilion at the Twin
> Coves rec area (north side of the lake, south of Barnsdall), but we were
> unable to confirm the presence of any Bachman's Sparrows. We heard 2
> sparrows singing Bachman's like songs (one just east of the Pavilion, one
> farther off to the north in the larger open field area); however, these
> songs also sounded similar to aberrant field sparrow songs I have heard
> before. The songs were made up of 2-3 clear whistles followed by a trill on
> a lower pitch, and they never varied across the numerous times we heard
> them. We never were able to get a visual on the birds, but we did run into
> Jim Hoffman from Tulsa who noted that he saw a pink-billed sparrow in the
> area of where one of the songs was coming from. Jim also noted that the
> songs were not as variable and high-pitched as the Bachman's Sparrows he
> has heard/seen many times, including during an irruption of the species
> into Osage County in the 1990's. I agreed that they did not match any of
> Bachman's recordings I listened to on Xenocanto.
>
> We certainly do not overrule the possibility that a Bachman's Sparrow
> could be present at this location; the habitat is good for them. However,
> the only singing sparrows we heard were within the expected range of
> variation for field sparrow.
>
> NOTE: I am also trying to post a video that includes the aberrant Field
> Sparrow songs on the OOS Facebook page, but the file size is causing some
> issues.
>
> Scott Loss
> Stillwater
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 13:56:25 +0000
Thanks Scott for your post.  
EBird has been a challenge, and I accumulate records in the queue that leave 
uncertainty--don't make a decision on them.Coming out at about 100 records/year 
with which I eventually will have to deal. 

And I am more skeptical of reports now than before I started reviewing for 
eBird.  

Have prematurely validated records where observers I felt were capable enough 
for ID also claimed a photo, asked sometimes just for record, and had to 
invalidate upon receiving the photo. 

And birders can get suckered, even by themselves.  I have done it to myself, 
except that I take some effort in looking over my own shoulder (Hopefully do it 
rarely at least).  Wanting to believe it rather than being more objective and 
cautious--the twitch-reward syndrome.  Remember a Gyrfalcon report of a bird 
watched for some 40 minutes on a distant fencepost by a group of our active 
birders.  One observer took a photo through the scope.  Even after explaining 
that tan imm. Gyrs should not have a yellow cere (visible in photo, but it was 
big!!!)..., or the Lesser Nighthawk of a bird with a twisted tail flying among 
Commons, .... 


I once had a Field Sparrow that did a perfect Magnolia Warbler song (in sw. 
NY).   Drew my attention because it was in a regrowth area. 


Every so often, these birders are vindicated.  So, don't want to be too 
presumptive in the other direction.  However, will have to wait for something 
more tangible on this one.  


 Could not hear anything on the tape you posted to facebook, but was mostly 
"cruising" around facebook looking for a Peregrine pic claimed as a tundrius 
that was more likely an anatum--will go back to yours with ear phones plugged. 

Glad to have you on the scene.  Glad to hear Jim got out there.  He located 
some in that area a while back, and thought some Tulsa birders felt they were 
still out there. 


CHEERS,                                           JOE   

    On Sunday, August 7, 2016 8:30 PM, Scott Loss  wrote:
 

 Sara and I had errands to run in Tulsa today, so we decided to make a detour 
by Birch Lake in Osage County to try for the reported Bachman's Sparrow(s). 


We spent about 40 minutes at and near the picnic pavilion at the Twin Coves rec 
area (north side of the lake, south of Barnsdall), but we were unable to 
confirm the presence of any Bachman's Sparrows. We heard 2 sparrows singing 
Bachman's like songs (one just east of the Pavilion, one farther off to the 
north in the larger open field area); however, these songs also sounded similar 
to aberrant field sparrow songs I have heard before. The songs were made up of 
2-3 clear whistles followed by a trill on a lower pitch, and they never varied 
across the numerous times we heard them. We never were able to get a visual on 
the birds, but we did run into Jim Hoffman from Tulsa who noted that he saw a 
pink-billed sparrow in the area of where one of the songs was coming from. Jim 
also noted that the songs were not as variable and high-pitched as the 
Bachman's Sparrows he has heard/seen many times, including during an irruption 
of the species into Osage County in the 1990's. I agreed that they did not 
match any of Bachman's recordings I listened to on Xenocanto. 


We certainly do not overrule the possibility that a Bachman's Sparrowcould be 
present at this location; the habitat is good for them. However, the only 
singing sparrows we heard were within theexpected range of variation for field 
sparrow. 


NOTE: I am also trying to post a video that includes the aberrant Field Sparrow 
songs on the OOS Facebook page, but the file size is causing some issues. 


Scott Loss
Stillwater


  
Subject: Birch Lake - Bachman's Sparrow Not Found
From: Scott Loss <scottrloss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Aug 2016 20:29:44 -0500
Sara and I had errands to run in Tulsa today, so we decided to make a
detour by Birch Lake in Osage County to try for the reported Bachman's
Sparrow(s).

We spent about 40 minutes at and near the picnic pavilion at the Twin Coves
rec area (north side of the lake, south of Barnsdall), but we were unable
to confirm the presence of any Bachman's Sparrows. We heard 2 sparrows
singing Bachman's like songs (one just east of the Pavilion, one farther
off to the north in the larger open field area); however, these songs also
sounded similar to aberrant field sparrow songs I have heard before. The
songs were made up of 2-3 clear whistles followed by a trill on a lower
pitch, and they never varied across the numerous times we heard them. We
never were able to get a visual on the birds, but we did run into Jim
Hoffman from Tulsa who noted that he saw a pink-billed sparrow in the area
of where one of the songs was coming from. Jim also noted that the songs
were not as variable and high-pitched as the Bachman's Sparrows he has
heard/seen many times, including during an irruption of the species into
Osage County in the 1990's. I agreed that they did not match any of
Bachman's recordings I listened to on Xenocanto.

We certainly do not overrule the possibility that a Bachman's Sparrow could
be present at this location; the habitat is good for them. However, the
only singing sparrows we heard were within the expected range of variation
for field sparrow.

NOTE: I am also trying to post a video that includes the aberrant Field
Sparrow songs on the OOS Facebook page, but the file size is causing some
issues.

Scott Loss
Stillwater
Subject: Re: Black-chinned in Enid
From: "bill ." <billwx AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Aug 2016 03:37:48 +0000
John,
Thank you! Much appreciated. I think he's been around for awhile so perhaps 
better pics can yet be had. Love those hummers! 

peace
-bill
enid garfield ok

------ Original message------
From: John Shackford
Date: Sat, Aug 6, 2016 20:43
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU;
Subject:Re: [OKBIRDS] Black-chinned in Enid

Bill,

I say you got it! And nice picture for a hard subject to boot. You can see the 
line between the black chin and the purple below the black, with a nice 
division line between. A Ruby-throat in bad light would not show the break on 
the throat that abruptly . Congratulations! 


John Shackford
Edmond

On Sat, Aug 6, 2016 at 6:41 PM, Jennifer Kidney 
> wrote: 


Unless you get that purple flash, they're really hard to confirm. I had them in 
my Norman yard a few years ago, but I haven't seen them since, although I know 
they're common as close as Chickasha. 



Jennifer Kidney

Norman


________________________________
From: okbirds > on behalf of 
bill . > 

Sent: Saturday, August 06, 2016 6:23 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Black-chinned in Enid


Hi all,

For awhile I've suspected a Black-chinned adult male was visiting my Enid 
feeder, but have not been able to get good looks in proper lighting. Finally i 
have photos which, i think, confirms the id. Some potential problems though... 
photos were taken through a dirty double-paned window which faces east at 
nearly 6pm. With that in mind I'd appreciate comments on this pic 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/critters101_william/28197032263/in/album-72157634889801650/ 



Not earth-shattering news i know, but a potential lifer for me in a place i 
didn't expect, right here at home. Thanks for your time. 



peace

-bill

enid garfield ok
Subject: Re: Black-chinned in Enid
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2016 20:43:17 -0500
Bill,

I say you got it!  And nice picture for a hard subject to boot.  You can
see the line between the black chin and the purple below the black, with a
nice division line between.  A Ruby-throat in bad light would not show the
break on the throat  that abruptly . Congratulations!

John Shackford
Edmond

On Sat, Aug 6, 2016 at 6:41 PM, Jennifer Kidney 
wrote:

> Unless you get that purple flash, they're really hard to confirm.  I had
> them in my Norman yard a few years ago, but I haven't seen them since,
> although I know they're common as close as Chickasha.
>
>
> Jennifer Kidney
>
> Norman
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* okbirds  on behalf of bill . <
> billwx AT LIVE.COM>
> *Sent:* Saturday, August 06, 2016 6:23 PM
> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> *Subject:* [OKBIRDS] Black-chinned in Enid
>
>
> Hi all,
>
>
> For awhile I've suspected a Black-chinned adult male was visiting my Enid
> feeder, but have not been able to get good looks in proper lighting.
> Finally i have photos which, i think, confirms the id. Some potential
> problems though... photos were taken through a dirty double-paned window
> which faces east at nearly 6pm. With that in mind I'd appreciate comments
> on this pic
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/critters101_william/28197032263/in/album-
> 72157634889801650/
>
>
> Not earth-shattering news i know, but a potential lifer for me in a place
> i didn't expect, right here at home. Thanks for your time.
>
>
> peace
>
> -bill
>
> enid garfield ok
>
Subject: Re: Black-chinned in Enid
From: Jennifer Kidney <jenlkidney AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2016 23:41:41 +0000
Unless you get that purple flash, they're really hard to confirm. I had them in 
my Norman yard a few years ago, but I haven't seen them since, although I know 
they're common as close as Chickasha. 



Jennifer Kidney

Norman


________________________________
From: okbirds  on behalf of bill . 
Sent: Saturday, August 06, 2016 6:23 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Black-chinned in Enid


Hi all,

For awhile I've suspected a Black-chinned adult male was visiting my Enid 
feeder, but have not been able to get good looks in proper lighting. Finally i 
have photos which, i think, confirms the id. Some potential problems though... 
photos were taken through a dirty double-paned window which faces east at 
nearly 6pm. With that in mind I'd appreciate comments on this pic 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/critters101_william/28197032263/in/album-72157634889801650/ 



Not earth-shattering news i know, but a potential lifer for me in a place i 
didn't expect, right here at home. Thanks for your time. 



peace

-bill

enid garfield ok
Subject: Black-chinned in Enid
From: "bill ." <billwx AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2016 23:23:44 +0000
Hi all,

For awhile I've suspected a Black-chinned adult male was visiting my Enid 
feeder, but have not been able to get good looks in proper lighting. Finally i 
have photos which, i think, confirms the id. Some potential problems though... 
photos were taken through a dirty double-paned window which faces east at 
nearly 6pm. With that in mind I'd appreciate comments on this pic 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/critters101_william/28197032263/in/album-72157634889801650/ 



Not earth-shattering news i know, but a potential lifer for me in a place i 
didn't expect, right here at home. Thanks for your time. 



peace

-bill

enid garfield ok
Subject: Bachman's Sparrow still at Birch Lake, Sat Aug 6
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2016 16:05:07 -0500
Even tho it was raining hard I went to look for the Bachman's Josh
Engelbert found yesterday.  The rain finally stopped at 11:00 and birds,
especially a family of Blue Grosbeaks, started singing.  Then I heard some
whistles and trills and there he was!  Got fairly good looks in bad light.

This is a great way to see a Bachman's...no wading thru chiggery weeds or
tick-filled woods.  Go to the northern most park, Twin Coves, and then go
to the pavilion on the right.  Just sit in the pavilion and wait.  Face the
horseshoe pits and he sang from the highest tree.  Josh said he sang
constantly on Friday but he sang only a few times today, probably because
cold and wet.

Melinda Droege
Bartlesville
Subject: Tulsa Audubon Martin Roost Watch, The Messenger Screening
From: John Kennington <johnkennington AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2016 16:37:40 -0500
The Martins Are Back!! - Roost Watch Set For Saturday, Aug. 6

I'm pleased to report we finally have some good numbers of Martins roosting
in downtown Tulsa. This is a wildlife spectacle you don't want to miss!

The watch this year is set for 8:15 p.m. to dark on Saturday,  Aug. 6.  We
will again meet at the Downtown Doubletree Hotel, 616 W. Seventh St., but
we will likely NOT be observing from the top of the parking garage, since
the birds are not (as of yesterday) using those trees. We will have a Tulsa
Audubon table set up in front of the Doubletree entrance and we will direct
you from there to the best observation area. You may want to bring a chair
with you.

As in previous years, Roost Watchers are encouraged to meet for dinner and
talk Martins at the Doubletree's "Made Market" restaurant in the hotel at
6:30 p.m. I've spoken to the manager and they will be expecting us!!

You may park on the area streets or in the Doubletree garage. You will need
to pay to park in the garage, though if you join us for dinner they will
validate your parking ticket.

We again want to say thank you to the Doubletree Hotel for allowing us to
use their facilities, and especially being tolerant of the birds.
________________________________
Flycatcher Trail Outdoor Classroom & Demonstration Garden

It’s time for another Garden Clean-up Day! School starts August 19th!

Please come:  Saturday, August 6th   8 AM-Noon. Cold Water Provided.
Jenks High School, 404 E. F St.  Jenks,  (N. 3rd St. & E. F St.) North of
stadium
________________________________
The Messenger Movie

On Thursday, Aug. 25th TAS is hosting a showing of the critically-acclaimed
songbird conservation documentary, The Messenger. This film powerfully
portrays a number of conservation issues facing bird populations, and uses
technology and novel filming techniques to provide some amazing footage of
songbirds in flight. This is the same film the Sutton Center presented back
in March at the Circle Cinema, but we want to bring it back to Tulsa for
those not able to see it earlier.

This screening will be on Thursday, August 25 at 6:30 p.m. at Cinemark
Tulsa, 10802 E 71st St  (71st & 169). Tickets are $10.

This will be a fund-raiser for TAS, and the way it works is you order your
tickets on-line in advance, but your card will not be charged immediately.
There is a minimum number of tickets we need to sell (67 in our case), and
once that is met the movie is confirmed and you are charged. This is the
same arrangement we had a few years ago for the film  A Birder's Guide To
Everything, and that movie was a sell out for us!

You can learn more about the movie, view the trailer and order you tickets
at:

  https://www.tugg.com/events/117369

If you are thinking about going please be sure to reserve your tickets
ASAP, so we can get the showing confirmed.

This is a powerful film that is likely to move anyone with an interest in
birds. I have not seen it myself, but as we all know the outlook for birds
is not always good news. Some folks I know who have seen it said some parts
may not be appropriate for younger children.
Subject: OOS Bulletin
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2016 19:16:52 +0000
If you are a member of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society the June Bulletin 
has gone to print. Your June Bulletin and Newsletter should be sent out in the 
mail within the next two weeks, so you should have by mid-August. The delays 
are a result of working on the Bulletin. The Newsletter has been complete for 
some time...so if you have any issues or concerns, I was the hold up. September 
issues will be on-time since they contain time sensitive material associated 
with the fall meeting. 


Respectfully,
Gene

Eugene A. Young
Editor, Bulletin of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society

Agriculture, Science & Engineering
Northern Oklahoma College
1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310
Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310
Phone: 580-628-6482
Fax: 580-628-6209
E-Mail: Eugene.Young AT noc.edu
Website: www.noc.edu


Subject: Re: Bachman's Sparrow Osage County
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2016 12:06:30 -0500
Good find Josh...herd them over to Washington County!

On Fri, Aug 5, 2016 at 10:57 AM, Josh Engelbert 
wrote:

> I'm on the north side of Birch Lake and there are 1 or 2 Bachman's
> Sparrows singing near the picnic pavilions. I was able to get very good
> looks. If anyone would like exact location, I can email you a google maps
> screenshot.
>
> Josh Engelbert
> Copan, OK
Subject: QUERY OKBIRDS
From: Bob LaVal <blaval AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 4 Aug 2016 05:48:49 -0500
QUERY OKBIRDS
Subject: August Migration Report
From: Patricia Velte <pvelte AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2016 15:08:15 -0500
Dear OKBirders,

 

Below are the Arrival and Depature lists for August.

 

ARRIVALS

 

Green-winged Teal                             August 26 - ALL

American Bittern                                 August 25 - ALL

Sora                                                    August 15 - ALL

Osprey                                                August 20 - ALL

Northern Harrier                                  August 24 - SW, C, SC, SE

Black-bellied Plover                            August 2 - ALL

American Golden-Plover                    August 28 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

California Gull                                     August 11 - PAN, NW, C,
SC, NE

Common Tern                                    August 18 - NW, C, SC, NE

Wilson's Snipe                                     August 21 - ALL

Red-necked Phalarope                       August 28 - ALL

Olive-sided Flycatcher                        August 18 - ALL

Western Wood-Pewee                        August 16 - PAN Cimarron Co only

Alder Flycatcher                                 August 6 - C, SC, NE, SE

Willow Flycatcher                               August 4 - ALL

Hammond's Flycatcher                      August 28 - PAN rare in Cimarron
Co only

Dusky Flycatcher                               August 27 - rare in Cimarron
Co only

Cassin's Vireo                                     August 25 - PAN rare in
Cimarron Co only

Tree Swallow                                      August 1 - SW, C

White-breasted Nuthatch                    August 30 - PAN rare in Cimarron
Co only

Northern Waterthrush                         August 25 - ALL

Virginia's Warbler                                August 15 - PAN rare in
Cimarron Co only

MacGillivray's Warbler                       August 20 - PAN Cimarron Co
only

Mourning Warbler                               August 25 - C, SC, NE, SE

American Redstart                              August 21 - ALL

Black-throated Green Warbler           August 13 - ALL

Canada Warbler                                  August 28 - C, SC, NE, SE

Wilson's Warbler                                 August 23 - ALL

Clay-colored Sparrow                         August 18 - PAN

Brewer's Sparrow                               August 25 - PAN Cimarron Co
only

Black-headed Grosbeak                     August 21 - PAN

Lazuli Bunting                                      August 18 - PAN

Brewer's Blackbird                              August 27 - PAN

 

DEPARTURES

 

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck              August 26 - C, SC Rare in Major Co

Franklin's Gull                                     August 15 - Uncommon and
local

Western Kingbird                                August 23 - NW, SW, C, SC,
NE all counties except Delaware, Cherokee and Adair, SE east to Pittsburg,
Atoka and western Choctaw cos only

Wood Thrush                                      August 6 - SW rare in Caddo
and Comanche cos only, C, SC, NE, SE

Worm-eating Warbler                         August 25 - NE Ottawa, Delaware,
Cherokee and Adair cos only, SE Le Flore and McCurtain cos only

Louisiana Waterthrush                        August 23 - NW Major, Dewey and
Blain cos only, SW Caddo and Comanche cos only, C, SC, NE, SE

Blue-winged Warbler                          August 8 - NE rare in Delaware,
Cherokee, Adair and Sequoyah cos only

Prairie Warbler                                    August 20 - NE west to
Craig, Rogers, Tulsa, south Osage and Okmulgee cos only, SE

Bachman's Sparrow                           August 31 - NE rare in Osage,
Creek, Okmulgee and Delaware cos only, SE rare in Atoka, Pushmataha and
McCurtain cos only

Scarlet Tanager                                  August 6 - NE west to
Craig, Mayes, Wagoner and Muskogee cos only, SE Le Flore, Pushmataha and
McCurtain cos only

 

 

The information presented here comes from The Oklahoma Bird Records
Committee of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society, which publishes a Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma. This booklet divides Oklahoma
into 7 geographic regions, and lists the normal dates of occurrence for each
Oklahoma bird species within each region. Observers are urged to report
unusual species, or birds out of date or out of normal range in Oklahoma,
based on the information given in this publication.

 

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society and Oklahoma Bird Records Committee web
site, http://www.okbirds.org/, includes ordering information for the Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma, information on documenting
significant records, documentation forms, instructions, and a searchable
database for Oklahoma bird migration information. Birders are cordially
invited to join the Oklahoma Ornithological Society.

 

Happy birding!

Pat Velte

pvelte AT cox.net

Oklahoma City, OK

 

 
Subject: Re: Stillwater to OKC
From: Sharon Henthorn <shenthorn205 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2016 09:17:59 -0500
Thanks for the travelogue of common or not-so-common hot spots. The areas of 
Rose Lake, ponds north of Hefner dam, and Sludge Lagoon are often busy when 
nowhere else is. 


Yesterday At Rose Lake I came upon a turkey vulture eating road-kill; and a 
family of green-winged teal in the ponds east of the road. One of the sunning 
turtles was bigger than the teal that was sharing its mud bank. 


Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 31, 2016, at 9:43 PM, Scott Loss  wrote:

I had an errand in OKC, so I turned it into a birding trip with several stops 
between Stillwater and there. I didn't find anything amazing, but shorebird 
migration is certainly picking up; I ended up with 9 shorebird species across 
all stops. Here are stop by stop highlights: 


Boomer Lake (Stillwater) - a Semipalmated Sandpiper (uncommon for Stillwater)

Lake Carl Blackwell dam - nothing at all of interest on lake

Dolese gravel pit (Guthrie) - Stilt Sandpiper, Greater Yellowlegs, Least 
Sandpipers, around 15 Snowy Egrets 


Rose Lake (63rd and N Sara Rd, Yukon) - Excellent mudflat habitat with 8 
shorebird spp., including Black-necked Stilts (2), Stilt Sandpiper, Wilson's 
Phalarope, Semipalmated Plover, etc 


Lake Overholser (scanned from NE corner cofferdam area) - nothing at all of 
interest on the lake 


Lake Hefner - almost nothing on the lake, except the continuing Common Loon, 1 
white pelican, 1 coot, and 1 ring-billed gull 


NW OKC Sludge lagoon - around a dozen Forster's Terns, 3 Least Terns, and a 
tern I'm still trying to turn into a Common (but probably won't be able to ID 
because of my poor picture quality). 


Scott Loss
Stillwater
Subject: Re: Martins and Hummers
From: John Kennington <johnkennington AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2016 02:03:59 -0500
Kelly Bostian had a nice article in Sunday's Tulsa World on the Purple
Martins situation. I had referred him to our local expert Dick Sherry.

*http://bit.ly/2aVxI4O *

John Kennington

On Sat, Jul 30, 2016 at 11:46 AM, Moninya Mulder 
wrote:

> When we moved last October, I left one of the martin houses with new folks
> (north of Sulphur). They report no birds. I set up the other martin house
> here near  Roff, OK. We have seen tire kickers but no buyers. They just go
> in and out of house and chitter a lot. Hoping next year they will move in.
> The hummingbirds have finally returned. A couple months ago we had a
> tornado come through. I didn’t have any humming birds until a month ago and
> now am up to 5. There were dozens before the storm.
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Mark Cromwell
> *Sent:* Friday, July 29, 2016 3:24 PM
> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost
>
>
>
> We did have Purple Martins again this year near Perkins & a good hatch.
> The last nestlings are learning to fly this week and all others are gone!!
> Mark
>
>
>
> On Fri, Jul 29, 2016 at 1:11 PM, Renanne Baker 
> wrote:
>
> I THOUGHT I WAS THE ONLY ONE WITHOUT MARTINS. IT SEEMS I WAS WRONG. THE
> PAST 2 YEARS HAVE HAD SCOUT BIRDS THAT DISAPPEAR AFTER A COUPLE WEEKS.
> MAYBE THEY STAYED NORTH FOR THE WINTER.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
> On Jul 29, 2016, at 10:43 AM, Mike Brewer  > wrote:
>
> *I have had the same bad issue with my Purple Martins.*
>
> *I have had a dozen or more pairs in the past.*
>
> *Except for the last two years, I have had zero.*
>
>
>
> *I love Purple Martins and this drastic drop can dishearten a person’s
> soul.*
>
>
>
> *Kindest Regards,*
>
>
>
> *Mike Brewer*
>
> *Pauls Valley, Oklahoma*
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU ] *On
> Behalf Of *John Kennington
> *Sent:* Thursday, July 28, 2016 1:49 AM
> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
> *Subject:* Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost
>
>
>
> 2016 has been a very bad year for Purple Martins, in northeast Oklahoma as
> well as other states. We have seen some birds in downtown Tulsa in the
> vicinity of the Doubletree Hotel, but the numbers are much lower than
> normal. We decided to cancel our July 23 Purple Martin Watch. However, we
> expect more migrating birds will be joining roost, and hope they will
> settle in at a convenient location to view. So we are still planning to
> host our second watch on Saturday, August 6th. We'll be announcing the
> exact time and location next week.
>
>
>
> John Kennington
>
> Tulsa Audubon
>
>
>
> On Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 12:57 AM, Caitlin L  wrote:
>
> Hi all,
>
> I remember hearing about the Tulsa Purple Martin roost about this time
> last year. Does anyone have any information on where they are gathering
> this year? I confess, I might have missed an email. I live in Stillwater
> and want to make the drive out to see them again. Thank you for any help!
>
> Good birding,
>
> Caitlin M Laughlin
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Stillwater to OKC
From: Scott Loss <scottrloss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Jul 2016 21:43:50 -0500
I had an errand in OKC, so I turned it into a birding trip with several
stops between Stillwater and there. I didn't find anything amazing, but
shorebird migration is certainly picking up; I ended up with 9 shorebird
species across all stops. Here are stop by stop highlights:

Boomer Lake (Stillwater) - a Semipalmated Sandpiper (uncommon for
Stillwater)

Lake Carl Blackwell dam - nothing at all of interest on lake

Dolese gravel pit (Guthrie) - Stilt Sandpiper, Greater Yellowlegs, Least
Sandpipers, around 15 Snowy Egrets

Rose Lake (63rd and N Sara Rd, Yukon) - Excellent mudflat habitat with 8
shorebird spp., including Black-necked Stilts (2), Stilt Sandpiper,
Wilson's Phalarope,  Semipalmated Plover, etc

Lake Overholser (scanned from NE corner cofferdam area) - nothing at all of
interest on the lake

Lake Hefner - almost nothing on the lake, except the continuing Common
Loon, 1 white pelican, 1 coot, and 1 ring-billed gull

NW OKC Sludge lagoon - around a dozen Forster's Terns, 3 Least Terns, and a
tern I'm still trying to turn into a Common (but probably won't be able to
ID because of my poor picture quality).

Scott Loss
Stillwater
Subject: Martins and Hummers
From: Moninya Mulder <oden_mulder AT BRIGHTOK.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 11:46:16 -0500
When we moved last October, I left one of the martin houses with new folks 
(north of Sulphur). They report no birds. I set up the other martin house here 
near Roff, OK. We have seen tire kickers but no buyers. They just go in and out 
of house and chitter a lot. Hoping next year they will move in. The 
hummingbirds have finally returned. A couple months ago we had a tornado come 
through. I didn’t have any humming birds until a month ago and now am up to 
5. There were dozens before the storm. 


 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Mark Cromwell
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 3:24 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost

 

We did have Purple Martins again this year near Perkins & a good hatch. The 
last nestlings are learning to fly this week and all others are gone!! Mark 


 

On Fri, Jul 29, 2016 at 1:11 PM, Renanne Baker  > wrote: 


I THOUGHT I WAS THE ONLY ONE WITHOUT MARTINS. IT SEEMS I WAS WRONG. THE PAST 2 
YEARS HAVE HAD SCOUT BIRDS THAT DISAPPEAR AFTER A COUPLE WEEKS. MAYBE THEY 
STAYED NORTH FOR THE WINTER. 


Sent from my iPad


On Jul 29, 2016, at 10:43 AM, Mike Brewer  > wrote: 


I have had the same bad issue with my Purple Martins.

I have had a dozen or more pairs in the past.

Except for the last two years, I have had zero.

 

I love Purple Martins and this drastic drop can dishearten a person’s soul.

 

Kindest Regards,

 

Mike Brewer

Pauls Valley, Oklahoma

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of John Kennington
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2016 1:49 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU  
Subject: Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost

 

2016 has been a very bad year for Purple Martins, in northeast Oklahoma as well 
as other states. We have seen some birds in downtown Tulsa in the vicinity of 
the Doubletree Hotel, but the numbers are much lower than normal. We decided to 
cancel our July 23 Purple Martin Watch. However, we expect more migrating birds 
will be joining roost, and hope they will settle in at a convenient location to 
view. So we are still planning to host our second watch on Saturday, August 
6th. We'll be announcing the exact time and location next week. 


 

John Kennington

Tulsa Audubon

 

On Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 12:57 AM, Caitlin L  > wrote: 


Hi all,

I remember hearing about the Tulsa Purple Martin roost about this time last 
year. Does anyone have any information on where they are gathering this year? I 
confess, I might have missed an email. I live in Stillwater and want to make 
the drive out to see them again. Thank you for any help! 


Good birding, 

Caitlin M Laughlin 

 

 
Subject: Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 17:33:15 -0500
The martins in Bartlesville seem to be stable....no more but no less and
there are young.

On Fri, Jul 29, 2016 at 3:23 PM, Mark Cromwell 
wrote:

> We did have Purple Martins again this year near Perkins & a good hatch.
> The last nestlings are learning to fly this week and all others are gone!!
> Mark
>
> On Fri, Jul 29, 2016 at 1:11 PM, Renanne Baker 
> wrote:
>
>> I THOUGHT I WAS THE ONLY ONE WITHOUT MARTINS. IT SEEMS I WAS WRONG. THE
>> PAST 2 YEARS HAVE HAD SCOUT BIRDS THAT DISAPPEAR AFTER A COUPLE WEEKS.
>> MAYBE THEY STAYED NORTH FOR THE WINTER.
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>> On Jul 29, 2016, at 10:43 AM, Mike Brewer > > wrote:
>>
>> *I have had the same bad issue with my Purple Martins.*
>>
>> *I have had a dozen or more pairs in the past.*
>>
>> *Except for the last two years, I have had zero.*
>>
>>
>>
>> *I love Purple Martins and this drastic drop can dishearten a person’s
>> soul.*
>>
>>
>>
>> *Kindest Regards,*
>>
>>
>>
>> *Mike Brewer*
>>
>> *Pauls Valley, Oklahoma*
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:* okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU ] *On
>> Behalf Of *John Kennington
>> *Sent:* Thursday, July 28, 2016 1:49 AM
>> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
>> *Subject:* Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost
>>
>>
>>
>> 2016 has been a very bad year for Purple Martins, in northeast Oklahoma
>> as well as other states. We have seen some birds in downtown Tulsa in the
>> vicinity of the Doubletree Hotel, but the numbers are much lower than
>> normal. We decided to cancel our July 23 Purple Martin Watch. However, we
>> expect more migrating birds will be joining roost, and hope they will
>> settle in at a convenient location to view. So we are still planning to
>> host our second watch on Saturday, August 6th. We'll be announcing the
>> exact time and location next week.
>>
>>
>>
>> John Kennington
>>
>> Tulsa Audubon
>>
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 12:57 AM, Caitlin L  wrote:
>>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> I remember hearing about the Tulsa Purple Martin roost about this time
>> last year. Does anyone have any information on where they are gathering
>> this year? I confess, I might have missed an email. I live in Stillwater
>> and want to make the drive out to see them again. Thank you for any help!
>>
>> Good birding,
>>
>> Caitlin M Laughlin
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
Subject: OKC Lagoon Common Tern
From: Cameron Carver <c.o.carver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 16:46:08 -0500
Greetings,

Heather Shaffery and I visited the sewage lagoon today near Lake Hefner. A
Common Tern was the highlight. 3 Forster's Tern and 52 Ring-billed Gulls
were also hanging out on the flats.

Yesterday the Common Loon continued at Lake Hefner.

Cameron Carver
OKC
Subject: Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost
From: Mark Cromwell <mark.cromwell01 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 15:23:34 -0500
We did have Purple Martins again this year near Perkins & a good hatch. The
last nestlings are learning to fly this week and all others are gone!! Mark

On Fri, Jul 29, 2016 at 1:11 PM, Renanne Baker  wrote:

> I THOUGHT I WAS THE ONLY ONE WITHOUT MARTINS. IT SEEMS I WAS WRONG. THE
> PAST 2 YEARS HAVE HAD SCOUT BIRDS THAT DISAPPEAR AFTER A COUPLE WEEKS.
> MAYBE THEY STAYED NORTH FOR THE WINTER.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On Jul 29, 2016, at 10:43 AM, Mike Brewer  > wrote:
>
> *I have had the same bad issue with my Purple Martins.*
>
> *I have had a dozen or more pairs in the past.*
>
> *Except for the last two years, I have had zero.*
>
>
>
> *I love Purple Martins and this drastic drop can dishearten a person’s
> soul.*
>
>
>
> *Kindest Regards,*
>
>
>
> *Mike Brewer*
>
> *Pauls Valley, Oklahoma*
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU ] *On
> Behalf Of *John Kennington
> *Sent:* Thursday, July 28, 2016 1:49 AM
> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
> *Subject:* Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost
>
>
>
> 2016 has been a very bad year for Purple Martins, in northeast Oklahoma as
> well as other states. We have seen some birds in downtown Tulsa in the
> vicinity of the Doubletree Hotel, but the numbers are much lower than
> normal. We decided to cancel our July 23 Purple Martin Watch. However, we
> expect more migrating birds will be joining roost, and hope they will
> settle in at a convenient location to view. So we are still planning to
> host our second watch on Saturday, August 6th. We'll be announcing the
> exact time and location next week.
>
>
>
> John Kennington
>
> Tulsa Audubon
>
>
>
> On Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 12:57 AM, Caitlin L  wrote:
>
> Hi all,
>
> I remember hearing about the Tulsa Purple Martin roost about this time
> last year. Does anyone have any information on where they are gathering
> this year? I confess, I might have missed an email. I live in Stillwater
> and want to make the drive out to see them again. Thank you for any help!
>
> Good birding,
>
> Caitlin M Laughlin
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost
From: Mike Brewer <mike.brewer AT ATT.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 10:43:55 -0500
I have had the same bad issue with my Purple Martins.

I have had a dozen or more pairs in the past.

Except for the last two years, I have had zero.

 

I love Purple Martins and this drastic drop can dishearten a person’s soul.

 

Kindest Regards,

 

Mike Brewer

Pauls Valley, Oklahoma

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of John Kennington
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2016 1:49 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost

 

2016 has been a very bad year for Purple Martins, in northeast Oklahoma as well 
as other states. We have seen some birds in downtown Tulsa in the vicinity of 
the Doubletree Hotel, but the numbers are much lower than normal. We decided to 
cancel our July 23 Purple Martin Watch. However, we expect more migrating birds 
will be joining roost, and hope they will settle in at a convenient location to 
view. So we are still planning to host our second watch on Saturday, August 
6th. We'll be announcing the exact time and location next week. 


 

John Kennington

Tulsa Audubon

 

On Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 12:57 AM, Caitlin L  > wrote: 


Hi all,

I remember hearing about the Tulsa Purple Martin roost about this time last 
year. Does anyone have any information on where they are gathering this year? I 
confess, I might have missed an email. I live in Stillwater and want to make 
the drive out to see them again. Thank you for any help! 


Good birding, 

Caitlin M Laughlin 

 
Subject: Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost
From: Lisa Wiesbauer <lakehaven58 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 03:32:37 -0500
Does anyone know why the numbers are down this year?


On Thursday, July 28, 2016, John Kennington 
wrote:
> 2016 has been a very bad year for Purple Martins, in northeast Oklahoma
as well as other states. We have seen some birds in downtown Tulsa in the
vicinity of the Doubletree Hotel, but the numbers are much lower than
normal. We decided to cancel our July 23 Purple Martin Watch. However, we
expect more migrating birds will be joining roost, and hope they will
settle in at a convenient location to view. So we are still planning to
host our second watch on Saturday, August 6th. We'll be announcing the
exact time and location next week.
> John Kennington
> Tulsa Audubon
> On Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 12:57 AM, Caitlin L  wrote:
>>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> I remember hearing about the Tulsa Purple Martin roost about this time
last year. Does anyone have any information on where they are gathering
this year? I confess, I might have missed an email. I live in Stillwater
and want to make the drive out to see them again. Thank you for any help!
>>
>> Good birding,
>>
>> Caitlin M Laughlin
>
Subject: Re: Catching up
From: Jennifer Kidney <jenlkidney AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 18:30:28 -0500
I got this, Dick. I just got back from Colorado. I don't think you've been 
kicked off; I just think that all OKBirds posts don't reach everyone. Also, 
there are many fewer than in the past. 


Jennifer Kidney

> Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 18:37:18 -0500
> From: rgunn1 AT COX.NET
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Catching up
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> 
> I am off OKBirds again. Must think you are spam. I just waited and it 
> fixed itself last time. Probably wont this go around., If someone can 
> tell me how to get back on, contact at my personal email address. 
> OKBirds won't get through.
> 
> Bird wise, best is an early American Bittern off Jenkins to the east 
> behind Potts locked gate.  Got a great look,watched it closely for five 
> minutes to be sure. The daily species count has gone up from 20 or so in 
> the middle of June to almost forty the last few days--all the normal 
> stuff and lots of herons, egrets on the flooded hay fields.
> 
> Otherwise, some A-hole dropped a litter of puppies off on Bratcher 
> Miner. There were supposedly six there this morning but by the time we 
> got there we could only locate four. They  (the evil doers) always drop 
> them on weekends when I can't get them to the shelter. Currently I have 
> a backyard full of part beagle (?) puppies lounging on the cool, wet 
> concrete till tomorrow. Tired, thirsty and hungry , they went through a 
> month's worth of Blossom's food in a couple of hours and one fell asleep 
> with his head in the waterbowl.  How can our fellow Oklahomans be so 
> callous? Dropping them off is one thing, but in this weather?
> 
> D.
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost
From: John Kennington <johnkennington AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 01:48:41 -0500
2016 has been a very bad year for Purple Martins, in northeast Oklahoma as
well as other states. We have seen some birds in downtown Tulsa in the
vicinity of the Doubletree Hotel, but the numbers are much lower than
normal. We decided to cancel our July 23 Purple Martin Watch. However, we
expect more migrating birds will be joining roost, and hope they will
settle in at a convenient location to view. So we are still planning to
host our second watch on Saturday, August 6th. We'll be announcing the
exact time and location next week.

John Kennington
Tulsa Audubon

On Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 12:57 AM, Caitlin L  wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> I remember hearing about the Tulsa Purple Martin roost about this time
> last year. Does anyone have any information on where they are gathering
> this year? I confess, I might have missed an email. I live in Stillwater
> and want to make the drive out to see them again. Thank you for any help!
>
> Good birding,
>
> Caitlin M Laughlin
>
Subject: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost
From: Caitlin L <gaeliccat AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 00:57:39 -0500
Hi all,

I remember hearing about the Tulsa Purple Martin roost about this time last
year. Does anyone have any information on where they are gathering this
year? I confess, I might have missed an email. I live in Stillwater and
want to make the drive out to see them again. Thank you for any help!

Good birding,

Caitlin M Laughlin
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 27
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 22:18:24 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot on most of the survey today but became overcast
with light rain near the end of the survey.  61 species were found.  Waiting
for fall migration to start.  Only one species today would be considered a
migrant and that was the shrike.  They leave RS in April but always show
back up in mid-August.  Today's bird was two weeks earlier than normal.
They actually breed in the county just north of us in upland pastures.  Unit
44 is slowly drying up and there is starting to get to be a nice
concentration of waders feeding there including White Ibis and
Yellow-crowned Night-Herons.  This is the spot that Wood Storks and
Spoonbills will probably first show up at when they arrive.  Here is my list
for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 3

Wood Duck - 58  (also 1 brood seen.)

Northern Bobwhite - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 29

Neotropic Cormorant - 11

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 24 

Great-blue Heron - 10

Great Egret - 44

Snowy Egret - 37

Little-blue Heron - 40

Cattle Egret - 43

Green Heron - 3

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 10

White Ibis - 17

Black Vulture - 4

Turkey Vulture - 17

Mississippi Kite - 38

Purple Gallinule - 5 

Common Gallinule - 18 (also 7 chicks.)

American Coot - 9

Least Tern - 1

Mourning Dove - 20

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 6

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 8

Northern Flicker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 1

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 6

Bell's Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

American Crow - 10

Fish Crow - 2

Purple Martin - 3

Tree Swallow - 8

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 17

Cliff Swallow - 2

Barn Swallow - 42

Carolina Chickadee - 5

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Gray Catbird - 4

Northern Mockingbird - 3

Common Yellowthroat - 8

Yellow-breasted Chat - 3

Summer Tanager - 2

Eastern Towhee - 4

Field Sparrow - 1

Lark Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 21

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 16

Painted Bunting - 6

Dickcissel - 12

Red-winged Blackbird - 25

Common Grackle - 1

House Sparrow - 6

 

Odonates:

 

Citrine Forktail

Common Green Darner

Swamp Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Flag-tailed Spinyleg

Two-striped Forceptail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

"red" Saddlebags species

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Lake Hefner today
From: Sharon Henthorn <shenthorn205 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 15:24:28 -0500
I was circling the lake and noted mostly quiet and peace.  A few fishermen,
some egrets, mallards, and great blue herons, and some mourning doves and
mockingbirds.  The lone American white pelican remains on the lake, and
today was also a common loon close to the dam.

At the sludge lagoon were fewer than yesterday, but included a green heron.
The scissortail was again bouncing around the beach presumably for beach
insects.  Sharon
Subject: Sludge pond OKC
From: Sharon Henthorn <shenthorn205 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 15:48:25 -0500
I am searching the beach for shorebirds after last night heavy rain. American 
avocets, Forster's terns and ring-billed gulls. Nearby floating was a 
pied-billed grebe. And several mallards including a mom and seven ducklings. As 
I began to type, two deer strolled across the hill to drink from the south 
shoreline. Now I see a barn swallow in flight, a scissor tail flycatcher moving 
above the beach surface, mourning doves and a great blue heron hunting for 
food. 

The pond was dry much of this year and is now getting direct rain. It is behind 
John Marshall high school west of 122nd& Portland. 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Hefner Loon
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 13:10:43 -0500
Hello All,

Did a circuit around Hefner on the way to my sister's in Norman Sunday,
found a non-breeding plumaged Common Loon near Prairie Dog Point. Saw
another one about a week ago in Tulsa, think they've probably been
summering rather than migrating through early. Here's a link to the
observation on iNaturalist:

http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/3741070

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Re: New Photos Added to Website
From: Mark Cromwell <mark.cromwell01 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 11:14:24 -0500
Great pics. You are a terrific photographer. (I would have tossed those
rear end images, but you're after plumage, etc.).
Cheers, mc

On Mon, Jul 25, 2016 at 8:11 PM, Jim Arterburn  wrote:

> OKBirds,
>
>
>
> A few more shorebird photos. Included in this group are Wilson’ Phalarope,
> Spotted Sandpiper and Solitary Sandpiper. All photos are from this spring
> in south Tulsa County. The photos have been added to the beginning of my
> “Recent Birds” gallery at the link below.
>
>
>
> http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds
>
>
>
> Cheers,
>
>
>
> Jim Arterburn
>
> Tulsa, Oklahoma
>
> www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder
>
>
>
Subject: ID help
From: Terry Mitchell <terry AT PECOT.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 10:45:56 -0500
Here’s a link to 4 photos of a bird I saw Saturday at Blackbird Marsh at
Oxley Nature Center. I initially thought it was a Eastern Phoebe and I
after looking around a few books I think that is what is still. Now for the
reasons that I am questioning it 1-I can’t find anything in any book that I
have that totally matches the photos (maybe I don’t have the best books)
2-the whole time I watched it, it was eating a cattail. I looked closely
while it was eating and it was pulling out pieces of the cattail out and
eating it, I thought maybe it was eating insects on the cattail and I
looked closely at it after and couldn’t see anything. 3-in the 10 minutes
or so I watched it, it never bobbed its tail one time. Maybe I’m missing
something obvious, but let’s see if anyone has any ideas. Thanks Terry.



http://www.pbase.com/ttownvstrom/image/163740833



Terry Mitchell

Plastic Engineering

918-622-9660
Subject: New Photos Added to Website
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2016 20:11:18 -0500
OKBirds,

 

A few more shorebird photos. Included in this group are Wilson' Phalarope,
Spotted Sandpiper and Solitary Sandpiper. All photos are from this spring in
south Tulsa County. The photos have been added to the beginning of my
"Recent Birds" gallery at the link below.

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

Cheers,

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Catching up
From: rgunn1 <rgunn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 18:37:18 -0500
I am off OKBirds again. Must think you are spam. I just waited and it 
fixed itself last time. Probably wont this go around., If someone can 
tell me how to get back on, contact at my personal email address. 
OKBirds won't get through.

Bird wise, best is an early American Bittern off Jenkins to the east 
behind Potts locked gate.  Got a great look,watched it closely for five 
minutes to be sure. The daily species count has gone up from 20 or so in 
the middle of June to almost forty the last few days--all the normal 
stuff and lots of herons, egrets on the flooded hay fields.

Otherwise, some A-hole dropped a litter of puppies off on Bratcher 
Miner. There were supposedly six there this morning but by the time we 
got there we could only locate four. They  (the evil doers) always drop 
them on weekends when I can't get them to the shelter. Currently I have 
a backyard full of part beagle (?) puppies lounging on the cool, wet 
concrete till tomorrow. Tired, thirsty and hungry , they went through a 
month's worth of Blossom's food in a couple of hours and one fell asleep 
with his head in the waterbowl.  How can our fellow Oklahomans be so 
callous? Dropping them off is one thing, but in this weather?

D.
Subject: Fwd: Tulsa Audubon - Corrected Link for The Messenger
From: Jim Deming <birdbrain.jim AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 21:45:16 -0500
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Tulsa Audubon Society 
Date: Sat, Jul 16, 2016 at 2:56 PM
Subject: Tulsa Audubon - Corrected Link for The Messenger
To: Jim 


Purchase tickets for The Messenger movie

My previous email had an incorrect link for the Messenger Movie. The
correct link is:

https://www.tugg.com/events/117369

 


*The Messenger Movie*
On Thursday, Aug. 25th TAS is hosting a showing of the critically-acclaimed
songbird conservation documentary, The Messenger. This film powerfully
portrays a number of conservation issues facing bird populations, and uses
technology and novel filming techniques to provide some amazing footage of
songbirds in flight. This is the same film the Sutton Center presented back
in March at the Circle Cinema, but we want to bring it back to Tulsa for
those not able to see it earlier.

This screening will be on Thursday, August 25 at 6:30 p.m. at Cinemark
Tulsa, 10802 E 71st St  (71st & 169). Tickets are $10.

This will be a fund-raiser for TAS, and the way it works is you order your
tickets on-line in advance, but your card will not be charged immediately.
There is a minimum number of tickets we need to sell (67 in our case), and
once that is met the movie is confirmed and you are charged. This is the
same arrangement we had a few years ago for the film * A Birder's Guide To
Everything*, and that movie was a sell out for us!

You can learn more about the movie, view the trailer and order you tickets
at:

https://www.tugg.com/events/117369

 


If you are thinking about going please be sure to reserve your tickets
ASAP, so we can get the showing confirmed.

This is a powerful film that is likely to move anyone with an interest in
birds. I have not seen it myself, but as we all know the outlook for birds
is not always good news. Some folks I know who have seen it said some parts
may not be appropriate for younger children.



John Kennington, President
918-809-6325
email: johnkennington AT gmail.com
web: www.tulsaaudubon.org

 



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Contact Us:
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-- 
Jim Deming
524 S. Tamarack Ave.
Broken Arrow, OK  74012
(918) 864-4707
carpe annum
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 19
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 19:17:32 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot with a light breeze on the bird survey today.
60 species were found.  Very few species still singing.  2 Black Terns in
mostly breeding plumage were a surprise on Lotus Lake this morning.  Its
been probably 10 years or more since I saw this species at Red Slough this
time of year.  I ran into the forest service technician who was checking
duck boxes and found out that we currently have 4 Black-bellied Whistling
Ducks sitting on eggs now.  Juvenile Neotropic Cormorants and Anhingas are
all over the place now that most of them have fledged.  Here is my list for
today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 5

Wood Duck - 56  (also 2 broods seen.)

Mallard - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 1

Neotropic Cormorant - 7

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 25 

American Bittern - 1

Great-blue Heron - 18

Great Egret - 39

Snowy Egret - 19

Little-blue Heron - 12

Cattle Egret - 91

Green Heron - 13

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 3

Black Vulture - 66

Turkey Vulture - 16

Mississippi Kite - 26

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 8 (also 2 broods.) 

Common Gallinule - 24 (also several broods.)

American Coot - 9

Killdeer - 1

Least Tern - 2

Black Tern - 2 (still mostly in breeding plumage.)

Mourning Dove - 6

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 1

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 2

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 3

Bell's Vireo - 3

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

American Crow - 11

Fish Crow - 4

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 12

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 5

Cliff Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 15

Carolina Chickadee - 7

Carolina Wren - 12

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Prairie Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 13

Yellow-breasted Chat - 6

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 11

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 17

Painted Bunting - 5

Dickcissel - 12

Red-winged Blackbird - 30

Brown-headed Cowbird - 1

Orchard Oriole -2

 

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Citrine Forktail

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Two-striped Forceptail

Jade Clubtail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer 

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Striped Saddlebags

"red" Saddlebags species

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Is this a White Winged Dove
From: Sue Lutze <slutze AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 19:44:05 -0500
Thanks, Lauren. I will try to get a closer look at them to see if they in fact 
do have a blue eye ring! 


From: Lauren Wilkerson 
Sent: Monday, July 18, 2016 3:03 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Is this a White Winged Dove

Hi Susanne,


Yes! They are White-winged doves. I see them all the time in Houston, but it's 
special to see them in OKC. Do they have a blue eye ring? I can't tell from the 
photos, but adult birds have bright blue eye rings and red feet, while 
hatch-year birds are much blander, almost a uniform light grey. 



Congratulations,

Lauren


On Mon, Jul 18, 2016 at 1:24 PM, Sue Lutze  wrote:

 I had my first ever bird in my yard. I think they are White Winged Doves? 
Three of them who have been here 2 days now in NW OKC. 

  142381342N04 AT flickr.com

  Thanks for any and all help with the ID.  
  Susanne Lutze



 "We spend precious hours fearing the inevitable. It would be wise to use that 
time adoring our families, cherishing our friends, and living our lives. ~ Maya 
Angelou 
Subject: Re: Lake Yahola Sunday
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 16:22:35 -0500
Bill,
there was a non-breeding plumage loon in Bartlesville from June 21 to July
5.  That loony loon may have gone to Yahola....

On Mon, Jul 18, 2016 at 11:25 AM, Bill Carrell <
cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT gmail.com> wrote:

> Hello All,
>
> Sunday morning at Lake Yahola, saw 16 Forster's Terns and one Common Loon.
> The Loon was in non-breeding plumage, I'm guessing that it's been here all
> summer and not an early migrant, I didn't check the lake through June so
> I'm not certain.
>
> Good Birding,
>
> Bill Carrell
> Tulsa, OK
>
Subject: Re: Is this a White Winged Dove
From: Lauren Wilkerson <wilk7745 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 15:03:48 -0500
Hi Susanne,

Yes! They are White-winged doves. I see them all the time in Houston, but
it's special to see them in OKC. Do they have a blue eye ring? I can't tell
from the photos, but adult birds have bright blue eye rings and red feet,
while hatch-year birds are much blander, almost a uniform light grey.

Congratulations,
Lauren

On Mon, Jul 18, 2016 at 1:24 PM, Sue Lutze  wrote:

> I had my first ever bird in my yard. I think they are White Winged Doves?
> Three of them who have been here 2 days now in NW OKC.
> 142381342N04 AT flickr.com
>
> Thanks for any and all help with the ID.
> Susanne Lutze
>
>
>
> "We spend precious hours fearing the inevitable. It would be wise to use
> that time adoring our families, cherishing our friends, and living our
> lives. ~ Maya Angelou
>
Subject: Is this a White Winged Dove
From: Sue Lutze <slutze AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 13:24:41 -0500
I had my first ever bird in my yard. I think they are White Winged Doves? Three 
of them who have been here 2 days now in NW OKC. 

142381342N04 AT flickr.com

Thanks for any and all help with the ID.  
Susanne Lutze



"We spend precious hours fearing the inevitable. It would be wise to use that 
time adoring our families, cherishing our friends, and living our lives. ~ Maya 
Angelou 
Subject: Lake Yahola Sunday
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 11:25:33 -0500
Hello All,

Sunday morning at Lake Yahola, saw 16 Forster's Terns and one Common Loon.
The Loon was in non-breeding plumage, I'm guessing that it's been here all
summer and not an early migrant, I didn't check the lake through June so
I'm not certain.

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Hackberry Flat, Thurdsay 7/14
From: ML2x <ml2x AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 16:08:57 -0500
Hello Everyone,  
Been working on getting a new computer up and running. This report is from last 
Thursdaywhen Mary and I did our survey. The cattails are very prolific and have 
made viewing muchmore difficult. Most of these birds were seen in pockets along 
the levees which were 5ft hiwith grass......didn't not get to survey the Big 
Unit..... 

Goodest Birding,
Mary and Lou Truexml2x AT sbcglobal.netLawton
Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
Jul 14, 2016 7:45 AM - 3:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
14.0 mile(s)
60 species (+5 other taxa)

Mallard  16
Blue-winged Teal  28
Northern Shoveler  8
Northern Pintail  10
Redhead  46
Ruddy Duck  22
Northern Bobwhite  18
Pied-billed Grebe  36
Double-crested Cormorant  3
Great Blue Heron  9
Great Egret  24
Snowy Egret  8
Little Blue Heron  3
Cattle Egret  31
Green Heron  1
Black-crowned Night-Heron  87     Actual count of which about 45 were juveniles
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  2
White-faced Ibis  225
Turkey Vulture  1
Swainson's Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  1
American Coot  125
Black-necked Stilt  303     141 Sub adults 22 chicks....Actual count
American Avocet  172
American Golden-Plover 1 Breeding plumage. Black face and belly with gold head, 
nape and back. 

Snowy Plover  1
Killdeer  58
Spotted Sandpiper  5
Solitary Sandpiper  5
Greater Yellowlegs  193
Lesser Yellowlegs  54
Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs  65
Stilt Sandpiper  3
Baird's Sandpiper  47
Least Sandpiper  19
Semipalmated Sandpiper  9
Western Sandpiper  12
Semipalmated/Western Sandpiper  4
peep sp.  150
Long-billed Dowitcher  6
Wilson's Phalarope  29
Ring-billed Gull  1
Black Tern  7
Eurasian Collared-Dove  4
Mourning Dove  67
Common Nighthawk  6
American Kestrel  3
Western Kingbird  2
Eastern Kingbird  1
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  9
Loggerhead Shrike  1
Horned Lark  8
Cliff Swallow  60
swallow sp.  12
Northern Mockingbird  2
Lark Sparrow  6
Dickcissel  47
Red-winged Blackbird  125
Western Meadowlark  2
Eastern Meadowlark  5
Western/Eastern Meadowlark  22
Yellow-headed Blackbird  9
Common Grackle  21
Great-tailed Grackle  27
Brown-headed Cowbird  8

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30715362
 		 	   		  
Subject: Rose lake today 7-17
From: John Hurd <jackhurd AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 11:47:30 -0500
Good variety of Shore birds and fun Eagle antics at Rose Lake this morningGood 
to see friends out enjoying the birds too.Rose Lake, Canadian, Oklahoma, USJul 
17, 2016 8:00 AM - 9:45 AMProtocol: Stationary24 speciesMallard 8Great Blue 
Heron 12Great Egret 16Snowy Egret 6Little Blue Heron 7Cattle Egret 1Turkey 
Vulture 1Mississippi Kite 1Bald Eagle 3 This juv was seen stooping on Ducks, 
Adult latter came in caught a small fish and gave to one of two Juv's sitting 
on a branchKilldeer 1Spotted Sandpiper 1Greater Yellowlegs 1Baird's Sandpiper 
27Least Sandpiper 7Semipalmated Sandpiper 1Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 6Eurasian 
Collared-Dove 1Mourning Dove 3American Crow 1Barn Swallow 6Red-winged Blackbird 
23Yellow-headed Blackbird 1Common Grackle 6American Goldfinch 1 

Jack HurdOKC



 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Cormorant in July?
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 09:29:55 -0500
The are in Oklahoma year around, but in small numbers around the lakes in the 
summer and nest near you at the Salt plains NWR among other parts of the state. 
Neotropic Cormorants nest at the Salt Plains also among other areas in the 
state. While the field guide maps are good for general distribution of birds 
the best information for bird distribution of Oklahoma is the "Date Guide to 
the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma" published by the OOS. This guide not only 
breaks down species by dates, but also by regions and rarity. The Date Guide is 
a valuable tool and if you don't have you should get one from the OOS Website. 


Jim

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 17, 2016, at 3:27 AM, bill .  wrote:
> 
> Hi all,
> 
> 
> Just curious but how unusual is it (or not) to find a DC Cormorant in 
northern Oklahoma this time of year? The range maps i have consulted show my 
area on the line between "migration" and "winter", neither of which i think 
apply here. But as we all say, the birds don't read the maps. 

> 
> 
> I, and most of Enid, was at Meadowlake Park on the 4th. Going through pics 
later something on a landing out in the lake i had thought was just another 
hybrid/domestic duck turned out to be this oddity. Just curious. 

> 
> peace
> 
> -bill
> 
> enid garfield ok
> 
> 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/critters101_william/27744202174/in/album-72157634889801650/