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Updated on Saturday, January 31 at 06:54 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Meadowlark,©John Schmitt

31 Jan Pine Siskins have returned! [Lewis Pond ]
31 Jan Surf Scoter [Terry Mitchell ]
31 Jan Re: Evening Grosbeak [Larry Mays ]
31 Jan Evening Grosbeak [Hollis Price ]
30 Jan Tulsa Audubon Grey Snow Eagle House Field Trip Postponed [John Kennington ]
29 Jan Re: an owl, an eagle and a woodpecker [Foundation Subscriber ]
29 Jan an owl, an eagle and a woodpecker [Steve Davis ]
29 Jan Nickel Preserve Winter Bird Count coming up!! [Mia Revels ]
28 Jan Skuas and penguins [Sandy Berger ]
28 Jan Recent birds [Terry Mitchell ]
28 Jan Re: Tenkiller Loons - Four Species Day [Sandy Berger ]
28 Jan Re: Tenkiller Loons - Four Species Day [Jimarterburn ]
27 Jan Red Slough Bird Survey - Jan. 27 [David Arbour ]
27 Jan Tenkiller Loons - Four Species Day [Jim Arterburn ]
27 Jan Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down? [Foundation Subscriber ]
27 Jan Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down? [Jennifer Kidney ]
27 Jan More Hefner Gulls [Cameron Carver ]
27 Jan Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down? ["Curtis, Tom" ]
27 Jan Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down? [Jennifer Kidney ]
27 Jan Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count 2014 results [Mia Revels ]
27 Jan Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down? [Sharon Henthorn ]
27 Jan Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down? ["M. S. Harris" ]
26 Jan Lake Murray 01-24-15 with pictures [Bill Adams ]
26 Jan Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down? [Foundation Subscriber ]
26 Jan Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down? ["Feldt, Andrew N." ]
26 Jan Bird Feeder Numbers Down? ["Bostian, Kelly" ]
26 Jan Re: Hefner gulls [Chad Ellis ]
26 Jan Youth Birding Camp Scholarships [John Kennington ]
25 Jan FOY Birds Today [Bill Carrell ]
25 Jan Re: Hefner gulls [JOS GRZYBOWSKI ]
25 Jan Request for guest speaker on migratory birds ["Sander, Melanie" ]
25 Jan OCAS Meeting Monday [William Diffin ]
25 Jan Hefner gulls [Joe Grzybowski ]
24 Jan Re: GLAS Eagle Watch [DALA GRISSOM ]
24 Jan GLAS Eagle Watch [Evelyn Houck ]
24 Jan Re: Hefner and Overholser this morning [Kristi Hendricks ]
24 Jan Hefner and Overholser this morning [Cameron Carver ]
23 Jan Re: L Hefner Common Loons [Jennie Brooks ]
23 Jan L Hefner Common Loons [William Diffin ]
21 Jan Re: Tundra Swans and Raptor Photos [Jim Arterburn ]
21 Jan Re: Tundra Swans and Raptor Photos [Jim Jorgensen ]
21 Jan Tundra Swans and Raptor Photos [Jim Arterburn ]
20 Jan Red Slough Bird Survey - Jan. 20 [David Arbour ]
20 Jan Re: Barn owl [Terri Underhill ]
20 Jan Tulsa Audubon News - Tim O'Connell, Eagles, Youth Scholarships [John Kennington ]
20 Jan Re: Sooner Lake this Monday [Foundation Subscriber ]
20 Jan Sooner Lake this Monday [Matthew Jung ]
20 Jan Lake Hefner - Snipe and Short-eared Owl [Scott Loss ]
19 Jan Re: Rose-Faced Lovebird [Jan Dolph ]
19 Jan Cedar Waxwing [Warren Williams ]
19 Jan Bluebird boxes [Dora Webb ]
19 Jan Re: Lake Hefner yesterday [Kevin Groeneweg ]
19 Jan Lake Hefner yesterday [Sharon Henthorn ]
19 Jan Barn owl [tunderhill ]
19 Jan Re: Rose-Faced Lovebird [Deanne McKinney ]
18 Jan Rose-Faced Lovebird [Jan Dolph ]
18 Jan southwest OK birding [Jimmy Woodard ]
18 Jan Re: Mocking birds with brains! [Moninya Mulder ]
18 Jan Re: Mocking birds with brains! [John Shackford ]
18 Jan Re: Pine Siskins [Foundation Subscriber ]
18 Jan Re: Pine Siskins [Dora Webb ]
18 Jan Re: Pine Siskins [Jan Dolph ]
18 Jan Re: Mocking birds with brains! [Sue Selman ]
18 Jan Re: Pine Siskins [Deanne McKinney ]
18 Jan Re: Pine Siskins [Jennifer Kidney ]
18 Jan Re: Pine Siskins [Kurt Meisenzahl ]
18 Jan Pine Siskins [larrymays1949 ]
18 Jan Mocking birds with brains! [Moninya Mulder ]
18 Jan Kaw Lake and Ponca Lake today [EUGENE YOUNG ]
16 Jan More Swans [Bill Carrell ]
16 Jan Re: https://www.flickr.com/photos/130744824@N08/ [Sue Selman ]
15 Jan New Raptor Photos [Jim Arterburn ]
15 Jan Re: Flicker [Jan Dolph ]
15 Jan https://www.flickr.com/photos/130744824@N08/ [Jan Dolph ]
15 Jan Re: RFI sites for longspurs, etc. out-of-state birder [Bill Buskirk ]
15 Jan Swans ["Bostian, Kelly" ]

Subject: Pine Siskins have returned!
From: Lewis Pond <breaker57 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 15:24:15 -0800
The Pine Siskins are at my feeder in Sand Springs. I saw at least 4 today. I 
used to get them every year but they have taken about a five year hiatus. 

Subject: Surf Scoter
From: Terry Mitchell <terry AT PECOT.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 15:36:42 -0600
I got a call this morning from Jimmy Woodard saying he had a Surf Scoter at the 
New Mannford ramp on Keystone Lake. I saw it later at 11:30 AM. Terry. 


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Subject: Re: Evening Grosbeak
From: Larry Mays <larrymays1949 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 13:34:27 -0600
Fantastic!  Tell him to call his friends.

On Sat, Jan 31, 2015 at 1:13 PM, Hollis Price  wrote:

> I have had an evening grosbeak at my feeders this morning.  I live NE of
> Jones.
>
> https://flic.kr/p/qXYwDh
>
>
> Hollis Price
>
Subject: Evening Grosbeak
From: Hollis Price <hollis AT PRICESRUS.NET>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 13:13:01 -0600
I have had an evening grosbeak at my feeders this morning.  I live NE of
Jones.

https://flic.kr/p/qXYwDh


Hollis Price
Subject: Tulsa Audubon Grey Snow Eagle House Field Trip Postponed
From: John Kennington <johnkennington AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 10:21:28 -0600
Tulsa Audubon Grey Snow Eagle House Field Trip Postponed

Due to the heavy rain forecast for Jan. 31, we are rescheduling for Sat.
Feb. 7.

Visit to the Iowa Tribe’s Bah Kho-je Xla Chi (Grey Snow Eagle House) in
Perkins, OK, an eagle rehabilitation facility to house and protect injured
eagles. They have over 50 non-releasable Golden and Bald Eagles. Meet at
8:00 a.m. at the Braum's parking lot at 101st and Riverside in south Tulsa.
Click here for their web page. For more information, contact Gary Siftar,
918-455-6627, gsiftar AT okraptors.com.
Subject: Re: an owl, an eagle and a woodpecker
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:23:39 -0500
Steve, A friend and I birded Sooner Lake on the 19th. We were lucky I guess as 
we saw 5 eagles. 3 were mature and 2 immature. We saw mature circling over the 
pond at the west side of 177 and 15. A 

We could not get in ( not on the list) so we drove the perimeter looking at the 
lake as visible, the trees and fields. our species count was 53-54 as I recall. 
Many species of ducks , but very few geese. We did sight a pair of Western 
grebes at the most eastern fishing/boating entry point along 15. I was hoping 
for small flocks of longspurs but saw NONE. Covey of 10 bob white quail just 
after the turn on to the dirt road at the NW corner of the perimeter road. 

This Monday we went to the Wichita Mts., again seeking longspurs . NO Longspurs 
anywhere near the Meers prairie dog town. We spent 1.5 hours walking the area 
and only flushed meadowlarks. We had sightings of rufous crowned sparrow at the 
dam area of the most eastern lake( ?Johnson Lake). Many species at Long Lake 
picnic area. One Lewis's and many red-headed woodpeckers at the west end of 
French Lake- all easy to see and photograph. 2-3 large groups of sandhill 
cranes flew over, flock of 13 pelicans flew over and in one large flock of 
Canada geese (50-60) were 12 Snow geese. 46 species for the day. 

Both trips were very rewarding.  Hal
---- Steve Davis  wrote: 
> I took a friend to Sooner Lake yesterday to look for a Bald Eagle. On the
> way from I-35, along Hwy 412 before mile marker 3 and the little pond
> that's on the south side of the road, we spied a big nest with something
> sitting in it. I thought it might be a Red-tailed Hawk, but it turned out
> to be a Great Horned Owl sticking the top of its head out of the nest.
> 
> At Sooner Lake, we saw many Common Goldeneyes, scaup, Red-tailed Hawks and
> Kestrels, but no eagles. As we left, the fellow at the guard house said
> they had seen three young ones flying around early in the morning; we were
> there around noon. But we drove down the road north of the pond on the
> west side of Hwy 177 and saw 3 cormorants on stumps in the water and a
> Belted Kingfisher along the water's edge. Then, about a half mile down the
> road, there was an adult Bald Eagle sitting in a snag on the south side of
> the road near a farm house. When we turned down the road that runs by the
> farm, the eagle floated away to another snag near a small pond, where he
> scared up ducks, geese and doves.
> 
> We took Hwy 177 south through Stillwater on the way home and stopped by
> Lake Carl Blackwell. There was no activity on the big dead tree when we
> got there, but we made a stop at the little store and when we came out, I
> saw the Lewis's Woodpecker fly in and we got great looks.
> 
> It was a very nice day.
> 
> --steve d.
Subject: an owl, an eagle and a woodpecker
From: Steve Davis <spd8109 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 13:05:13 -0600
I took a friend to Sooner Lake yesterday to look for a Bald Eagle. On the
way from I-35, along Hwy 412 before mile marker 3 and the little pond
that's on the south side of the road, we spied a big nest with something
sitting in it. I thought it might be a Red-tailed Hawk, but it turned out
to be a Great Horned Owl sticking the top of its head out of the nest.

At Sooner Lake, we saw many Common Goldeneyes, scaup, Red-tailed Hawks and
Kestrels, but no eagles. As we left, the fellow at the guard house said
they had seen three young ones flying around early in the morning; we were
there around noon. But we drove down the road north of the pond on the
west side of Hwy 177 and saw 3 cormorants on stumps in the water and a
Belted Kingfisher along the water's edge. Then, about a half mile down the
road, there was an adult Bald Eagle sitting in a snag on the south side of
the road near a farm house. When we turned down the road that runs by the
farm, the eagle floated away to another snag near a small pond, where he
scared up ducks, geese and doves.

We took Hwy 177 south through Stillwater on the way home and stopped by
Lake Carl Blackwell. There was no activity on the big dead tree when we
got there, but we made a stop at the little store and when we came out, I
saw the Lewis's Woodpecker fly in and we got great looks.

It was a very nice day.

--steve d.
Subject: Nickel Preserve Winter Bird Count coming up!!
From: Mia Revels <revels AT NSUOK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 11:12:14 -0600
Hello Oklahoma Birders!

The Annual Nickel Preserve Winter Bird Count is scheduled for this coming
TUESDAY, February 3 from 8:00 am to 3:00 pm. I hope that many of you will
be able to participate!

If you haven't visited the Nickel Preserve yet, this is a great opportunity
to bird in one of the most beautiful natural areas in Oklahoma. The
preserve is located in the foothills of the Ozark Mountains with the scenic
Illinois River flowing through and even adjacent to some areas:

http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/oklahoma/placesweprotect/j-t-nickel-family-nature-and-wildlife-preserve.xml 


Newcomers are very welcome and can contact me for information and
directions (revels AT nsuok.edu, (918) 444-3824).  I look forward to seeing
the regulars as well!  And irregulars -;-).  We will meet at the Eagle
Bluff Resort parking lot on Hwy 10 just a few miles northeast of Tahlequah
at 8:00 am. Jeremy Tubbs, the Preserve Director, and I will pass out bird
checklists/maps and we will organize into groups with assigned areas to
cover.

We will all meet at the Preserve Headquarters at 3:00 for hot chili (or
possibly my famous chicken soup)! Drop me an email if you need a veggie
option, I can handle that easily.  At that time we will compile a species
list for the day (with numbers to be tabulated later).  I look forward to
seeing you there!

Mia Revels
Tahlequah, OK

-- 
Mia Revels, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Northeastern State University
611 Grand Ave.
Tahlequah, Oklahoma
(918) 444-3824
revels AT nsuok.edu


***CONFIDENTIALITY*** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain
confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized
disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.
Subject: Skuas and penguins
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 19:34:20 -0600
On OETA now.  Remembering Lake Overholser's skua.

Sandy B.

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Recent birds
From: Terry Mitchell <terry AT PECOT.COM>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 12:47:17 -0600
I recently purchased a new lens, a Tamron 150-600mm and here are a few of
the first photos with it if you care  to look. I’m still learning how to
get good shots with it, but it looks like it will be all right. Terry.



http://www.pbase.com/ttownvstrom/recent_photos



















Terry Mitchell

Plastic Engineering

918-622-9660
Subject: Re: Tenkiller Loons - Four Species Day
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 06:36:56 -0600
Thanks Jim. So all those places were closed too. I knew Strayhorn, chicken 
creek, and snake creek were. What a shame. I understand why. Too costly to keep 
open. But every year more and more places are shut down, keeping birders out. 


Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 28, 2015, at 5:12 AM, Jimarterburn  wrote:
> 
> Sandy,
> 
> Most parks were closed so I had to walk in to scope for loons. It really wore 
me out and I doubt I will do that again. 

> 
> When you drive in a Buckhorn follow the paved road till you come to a gate 
across the road. Right before the gate there is a dirt road to the left. Follow 
this road till it ends at a small cove with boat docks. Walk over the small 
rise to the north and you are looking at an expanse of the lake. The loons 
often spend time here. Off to your right you see a Chicken Creek and to your 
left is Snake Creek and further left is Blackgum. 

> 
> Have fun.
> 
> Jim
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Jan 27, 2015, at 9:45 PM, Sandy Berger  wrote:
>> 
>> I'm so glad you went to see what you could see. I have no idea where 
Buckhorn is. North of Cookson??? Great count. I was so discouraged the last 
time I went up cause my favorite places are closed. And I hardly saw a thing. 
This gives me hope. 😄 

>> 
>> Sandy
>> 
>> Sent from my iPad
>> 
>>> On Jan 27, 2015, at 8:45 PM, Jim Arterburn  wrote:
>>> 
>>> OKBirds,
>>>  
>>> I spent the day counting loons at Lake Tenkiller for the first time this 
winter season. I ended up with all the four species of loons recorded for 
Oklahoma. I had 347 Common Loons for the day, but only one loon from Strayhorn 
Landing. They were concentrated in a few areas (Blackgum Landing, Buckhorn, 
Cookson and Carlisle Cove). I also had 2 Yellow-billed Loons (Buckhorn and 
Cookson), 3 Pacific Loons and 3 Red-throated Loons at Blackgum. Not many Horned 
Grebes around and virtually no ducks. Cormorants were absent from the lake 
except at Cherokee Landing State Park which had around two hundred. Both 
Ring-billed and Bonaparte’s Gull numbers were low also. 

>>>  
>>>  
>>> Jim Arterburn
>>> Tulsa, Oklahoma
>>> www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder
>>>  
Subject: Re: Tenkiller Loons - Four Species Day
From: Jimarterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 05:12:15 -0600
Sandy,

Most parks were closed so I had to walk in to scope for loons. It really wore 
me out and I doubt I will do that again. 


When you drive in a Buckhorn follow the paved road till you come to a gate 
across the road. Right before the gate there is a dirt road to the left. Follow 
this road till it ends at a small cove with boat docks. Walk over the small 
rise to the north and you are looking at an expanse of the lake. The loons 
often spend time here. Off to your right you see a Chicken Creek and to your 
left is Snake Creek and further left is Blackgum. 


Have fun.

Jim

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 27, 2015, at 9:45 PM, Sandy Berger  wrote:
> 
> I'm so glad you went to see what you could see. I have no idea where Buckhorn 
is. North of Cookson??? Great count. I was so discouraged the last time I went 
up cause my favorite places are closed. And I hardly saw a thing. This gives me 
hope. 😄 

> 
> Sandy
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Jan 27, 2015, at 8:45 PM, Jim Arterburn  wrote:
>> 
>> OKBirds,
>>  
>> I spent the day counting loons at Lake Tenkiller for the first time this 
winter season. I ended up with all the four species of loons recorded for 
Oklahoma. I had 347 Common Loons for the day, but only one loon from Strayhorn 
Landing. They were concentrated in a few areas (Blackgum Landing, Buckhorn, 
Cookson and Carlisle Cove). I also had 2 Yellow-billed Loons (Buckhorn and 
Cookson), 3 Pacific Loons and 3 Red-throated Loons at Blackgum. Not many Horned 
Grebes around and virtually no ducks. Cormorants were absent from the lake 
except at Cherokee Landing State Park which had around two hundred. Both 
Ring-billed and Bonaparte’s Gull numbers were low also. 

>>  
>>  
>> Jim Arterburn
>> Tulsa, Oklahoma
>> www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder
>>  
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Jan. 27
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 22:04:27 -0600
It was clear and warm (mid 70's) today on the bird survey.  80 species and
one hybrid were found.  I surveyed more in wooded areas today than I
normally do.  Duck hunting season is over and the Mallards have scattered
all over the area now making it difficult to get high counts like I do when
the hunting pressure keeps them concentrated in the refuge area.  The
Gadwalls and Green-winged Teal are still mostly holding in the refuge area.
The "Brewer's Duck" which is a Mallard X Gadwall hybrid was seen on Lotus
Lake in with the Gadwalls.  I actually saw him last week on the count too
but forgot to mention him.  A very nice looking bird.  Here are my results
from today:

 

Canada Goose - 4

Wood Duck - 2

Gadwall - 1365

"Brewer's Duck" - 1 male

American Wigeon - 5

Mallard - 180

Northern Shoveler - 39

Northern Pintail - 41

Green-winged Teal - 2000

Ring-necked Duck - 109

Hooded Merganser - 10

Ruddy Duck - 9

Pied-billed Grebe - 19

Double-crested Cormorant - 5

Great Blue Heron - 7

Black Vulture - 10

Turkey Vulture - 18

Bald Eagle - 1 imm.

Northern Harrier - 4

Cooper's Hawk - 3

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 12

American Kestrel - 1

Virginia Rail - 14

American Coot - 1425

Killdeer - 97

Greater Yellowlegs - 12

Ring-billed Gull - 1

Mourning Dove - 17

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 3

Belted Kingfisher - 3

Red-headed Woodpecker - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 7

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 6

Downy Woodpecker - 5

Hairy Woodpecker - 2

Northern Flicker - 7

Pileated Woodpecker - 3

Eastern Phoebe - 6

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

Blue Jay - 5

American Crow - 600

Fish Crow - 5

Carolina Chickadee - 10

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Brown Creeper - 2

Carolina Wren - 5

Bewick's Wren - 1

Winter Wren - 2

Sedge Wren - 3

Marsh Wren - 5

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 1

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 5

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Hermit Thrush - 6

American Robin - 2

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Brown Thrasher - 1

European Starling - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 5

Pine Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 2

Spotted Towhee - 2

Eastern Towhee - 3

Savannah Sparrow - 16

LeConte's Sparrow - 1

Fox Sparrow - 7

Song Sparrow - 21

Lincoln's Sparrow - 1

Swamp Sparrow - 7

White-throated Sparrow -12

White-crowned Sparrow - 24

Dark-eyed Junco - 1

Northern Cardinal - 6

Red-winged Blackbird - 1750

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Rusty Blackbird -21

Brewer's Blackbird - 4

Common Grackle - 3

American Goldfinch - 3

House Sparrow - 3

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Missouri River Cooter

Southern Painted Turtle

Cajun Chorus Frogs - calling

Spring Peeper - calling

Southern Leopard Frogs - calling

 

Also:  

 

Checkered White butterfly

Question Mark butterfly

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Tenkiller Loons - Four Species Day
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 20:45:59 -0600
OKBirds,

 

I spent the day counting loons at Lake Tenkiller for the first time this
winter season. I ended up with all the four species of loons recorded for
Oklahoma. I had 347 Common Loons for the day, but only one loon from
Strayhorn Landing. They were concentrated in a few areas (Blackgum Landing,
Buckhorn, Cookson and Carlisle Cove). I also had 2 Yellow-billed Loons
(Buckhorn and Cookson), 3 Pacific Loons and 3 Red-throated Loons at
Blackgum. Not many Horned Grebes around and virtually no ducks. Cormorants
were absent from the lake except at Cherokee Landing State Park which had
around two hundred.  Both Ring-billed and Bonaparte's Gull numbers were low
also.

 

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 20:45:19 -0500
Jennifer, I know for sure that brown thrashers have no more than average 
problems here in OK and survive through most winters. At Mitch Park in Edmond 
we see them weekly in the park all winter long. Today I saw on at the Wichita 
Mts. Long Lake picnic area. Check guides that all show winter range to be south 
of the OHIO River, and in lower elevations east to the coast , but not the 
Applachains. Hal Yocum 

---- Jennifer Kidney  wrote: 
> Also this year, I had a lingering Brown Thrasher. He appeared to be not fully 
fledged and flew like a Roadrunner. I last saw him on the morning of New Year's 
Eve (December 31), but I got him for the Cleveland County Audubon Society CBC. 
I fear that he succumbed to the bitter cold, a cat, or the alternating Cooper's 
and Sharp-shinned Hawks that have lately been making frequent forays into my 
yard. Those two have also taken out several of the White-winged Doves. 

> 
> Jennifer Kidney
> Norman
> 
> Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 15:37:17 -0600
> From: jenlkidney AT HOTMAIL.COM
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> 
> 


I'm finding these reports of back yard birds interesting, especially with 
regard to doves. The largest number of birds in my yard this winter is 
White-winged Doves--I generally have 20 to 30 of them, but for the past four 
years I have had 50 to 60, so that number is down. I rarely have a Eurasian 
Collared-Dove, but I usually have a pair of Mourning Doves. I thought I would 
have winter sparrows at last this year--since the demise of my visiting 
White-throated Sparrow in the frigid and snowy winter of 2010-2011, I've had 
only occasional visitors. This fall I had visits from Harris's, White-crowned, 
Song, and White-throated Sparrows, but none of them stayed. And the Dark-eyed 
Juncos are a little better than last year, but still few and far between. I do, 
however, have more American Goldfinches and Pine Siskins this year than in the 
past four years, as well as Tufted Titmice, Carolina Wrens, and Northern 
Cardinals. I always have a resident pair of Carolina Wrens and a Northern 
Mockingbird, as well as Downy and Red-bellied Woodpeckers. These birds are not 
as voracious as White-winged Doves or European Starlings (of which I have very 
few right now), so I'm not feeding as much either. 

> 
> Jennifer Kidney
> Norman 
> 
> > Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 09:39:54 -0600
> > From: henthorn1 AT COX.NET
> > Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> > 
> > Although I haven't monitored species numbers this winter in my OKC yard, 
the 

> > most numerous and regular by far are the Eurasian collared-doves.  Daily I
> > see from 6-30.  Rarely do I see mourning doves and I have seen one
> > white-winged dove this season.  Sharon
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of M. S. Harris
> > Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2015 7:29 AM
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> > Subject: Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
> > 
> > Here is eastern Bartlesville our winter birds have changed dramatically 
over 

> > the last 3 years.  We used to get lots of winter sparrows, but now only see
> > the occasional dark-eyed junco. We've not had any purple finches in about 5 

> > years, but still have a few house finches with lower numbers than in
> > previous years.  We have a regular Carolina wren and the occasional house
> > wren (2 x this winter) but the most numerous bird for us this winter is
> > mourning doves. It's not unusual to see upwards of 20 or 25 under our large 

> > maple tree where we hang all our feeders. Our high count this winter was 32 

> > ... as best as you can count mourning doves on the move.
> > 
> > I've attributed the decrease in variety, especially sparrows, to the
> > urbanization of SE Bartlesville.  When we moved here 18 years ago, we were
> > the last street on this edge of town.  The houses across the street backed
> > up to a small pasture, then mixed woods.  That is almost all gone now with
> > the addition of houses back to back some 5-6 years ago.
> > 
> > Just my two cents.
> > 
> > Suzy Harris
> > Bartlesville
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Bostian, Kelly
> > Sent: Monday, January 26, 2015 4:44 PM
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> > Subject: [OKBIRDS] Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
> > 
> > Hi all,
> > I had a call today from a woman in Owasso who said she normally goes 
through 

> > several bags of feed and a few cakes of suet each year, filling the seed
> > feeders least once a day. She hasn't had them this year and fills feeders
> > maybe once a week. The last few years she's had lot of Eurasian collard
> > doves but doesn't have those either.
> > 
> > Has anyone else had similar experiences this winter?
> > 
> > Kelly Bostian
> > Outdoors Writer
> > Tulsa World Media Company
> > www.tulsaworld.com
> > office | 918 581 8357
> > mobile | 918 231 1385
> > fax | 918 581 8353
> > 315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
> > twitter |  AT kellybostian
> > blog |tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian
> > email | kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com
>  		 	   		   		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
From: Jennifer Kidney <jenlkidney AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 17:58:02 -0600
Also this year, I had a lingering Brown Thrasher. He appeared to be not fully 
fledged and flew like a Roadrunner. I last saw him on the morning of New Year's 
Eve (December 31), but I got him for the Cleveland County Audubon Society CBC. 
I fear that he succumbed to the bitter cold, a cat, or the alternating Cooper's 
and Sharp-shinned Hawks that have lately been making frequent forays into my 
yard. Those two have also taken out several of the White-winged Doves. 


Jennifer Kidney
Norman

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 15:37:17 -0600
From: jenlkidney AT HOTMAIL.COM
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU




I'm finding these reports of back yard birds interesting, especially with 
regard to doves. The largest number of birds in my yard this winter is 
White-winged Doves--I generally have 20 to 30 of them, but for the past four 
years I have had 50 to 60, so that number is down. I rarely have a Eurasian 
Collared-Dove, but I usually have a pair of Mourning Doves. I thought I would 
have winter sparrows at last this year--since the demise of my visiting 
White-throated Sparrow in the frigid and snowy winter of 2010-2011, I've had 
only occasional visitors. This fall I had visits from Harris's, White-crowned, 
Song, and White-throated Sparrows, but none of them stayed. And the Dark-eyed 
Juncos are a little better than last year, but still few and far between. I do, 
however, have more American Goldfinches and Pine Siskins this year than in the 
past four years, as well as Tufted Titmice, Carolina Wrens, and Northern 
Cardinals. I always have a resident pair of Carolina Wrens and a Northern 
Mockingbird, as well as Downy and Red-bellied Woodpeckers. These birds are not 
as voracious as White-winged Doves or European Starlings (of which I have very 
few right now), so I'm not feeding as much either. 


Jennifer Kidney
Norman 

> Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 09:39:54 -0600
> From: henthorn1 AT COX.NET
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> 
> Although I haven't monitored species numbers this winter in my OKC yard, the
> most numerous and regular by far are the Eurasian collared-doves.  Daily I
> see from 6-30.  Rarely do I see mourning doves and I have seen one
> white-winged dove this season.  Sharon
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of M. S. Harris
> Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2015 7:29 AM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
> 
> Here is eastern Bartlesville our winter birds have changed dramatically over
> the last 3 years.  We used to get lots of winter sparrows, but now only see
> the occasional dark-eyed junco.  We've not had any purple finches in about 5
> years, but still have a few house finches with lower numbers than in
> previous years.  We have a regular Carolina wren and the occasional house
> wren (2 x this winter) but the most numerous bird for us this winter is
> mourning doves.  It's not unusual to see upwards of 20 or 25 under our large
> maple tree where we hang all our feeders.  Our high count this winter was 32
> ... as best as you can count mourning doves on the move.
> 
> I've attributed the decrease in variety, especially sparrows, to the
> urbanization of SE Bartlesville.  When we moved here 18 years ago, we were
> the last street on this edge of town.  The houses across the street backed
> up to a small pasture, then mixed woods.  That is almost all gone now with
> the addition of houses back to back some 5-6 years ago.
> 
> Just my two cents.
> 
> Suzy Harris
> Bartlesville
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Bostian, Kelly
> Sent: Monday, January 26, 2015 4:44 PM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
> 
> Hi all,
> I had a call today from a woman in Owasso who said she normally goes through
> several bags of feed and a few cakes of suet each year, filling the seed
> feeders least once a day. She hasn't had them this year and fills feeders
> maybe once a week. The last few years she's had lot of Eurasian collard
> doves but doesn't have those either.
> 
> Has anyone else had similar experiences this winter?
> 
> Kelly Bostian
> Outdoors Writer
> Tulsa World Media Company
> www.tulsaworld.com
> office | 918 581 8357
> mobile | 918 231 1385
> fax | 918 581 8353
> 315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
> twitter |  AT kellybostian
> blog |tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian
> email | kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com
 		 	   		   		 	   		  
Subject: More Hefner Gulls
From: Cameron Carver <c.o.carver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 17:17:52 -0600
Greetings,

I ran to Hefner this afternoon after work. The lighting was terrible and there 
were biting insects. Gasp! 

I could not locate a Thayer's or Iceland Gull.

I viewed a first winter Lesser Black-backed in flight from the dam.

I also found a gull swimming with a group of Herring that I strongly suspect 
was a second-cycle California Gull. I studied it for a brief enough period to 
have strong opinions, but not long enough to make a definitive statement (or 
photo-document) as I lost the bird. 


Cameron Carver
Lubbock, TX (currently in OKC)

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
From: "Curtis, Tom" <tom.curtis AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 22:57:44 +0000
My bird numbers have been declining drastically for several years, which really 
confuses me. I live in a relatively sparsely populated area adjacent to 
Keystone Lake and can't even see the neighbors' houses. I have nine acres of 
land that have been essentially untouched since I bought the place 8 years ago. 
About two acres of land directly around the house is in the relatively early 
stages of succession with a few scattered full-grown trees as it was cleared 
down to dirt about 15 years ago when the house was built. There has been no 
further construction or significant clearing of land in the area during that 
time. About 90% of the remainder is likely pretty close to what appears to be 
the current climax forest in the area. When I first came here in '06 the winter 
bird population included good numbers of several species of sparrows. Now a 
sparrow of any sort (aside from Juncos) is highly unusual. I have not seen 
Harris' sparrow, towhee, fox sparrow, tree sparrow, song sparrow, 
white-throated sparrow, or Lincoln's sparrow for the past three years, and I've 
seen only two white-crowned sparrows that stayed for a few hours one evening 
last year. The typical "tree" birds (chickadees, titmouse, nuthatch, cardinals, 
and blue jays) and mourning doves are still pretty common, but even goldfinches 
are scarce. I spread seed mix and whole corn on the ground and have several 
sunflower seed feeders. Birds aren't the only animals that have declined. I'm 
down to one fox squirrel (from about 15-20 a few years ago), and the half-dozen 
rabbits that were around a couple years ago also are gone. 


I use no pesticides or lawn chemicals. I have identified only two issues (aside 
from normal succession) that may be contributing factors. The first is a 
decline in the quality of seed mixes. The second is the big ice storm in '09, 
but I would have thought that might actually have helped as the clean-up 
process resulted in a number of brush-piles around the place. 


Ironically, we had more birds before the cat that came with the house "went to 
live with another family". 


Any insights would be appreciated,
Tom Curtis
Subject: Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
From: Jennifer Kidney <jenlkidney AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 15:37:17 -0600
I'm finding these reports of back yard birds interesting, especially with 
regard to doves. The largest number of birds in my yard this winter is 
White-winged Doves--I generally have 20 to 30 of them, but for the past four 
years I have had 50 to 60, so that number is down. I rarely have a Eurasian 
Collared-Dove, but I usually have a pair of Mourning Doves. I thought I would 
have winter sparrows at last this year--since the demise of my visiting 
White-throated Sparrow in the frigid and snowy winter of 2010-2011, I've had 
only occasional visitors. This fall I had visits from Harris's, White-crowned, 
Song, and White-throated Sparrows, but none of them stayed. And the Dark-eyed 
Juncos are a little better than last year, but still few and far between. I do, 
however, have more American Goldfinches and Pine Siskins this year than in the 
past four years, as well as Tufted Titmice, Carolina Wrens, and Northern 
Cardinals. I always have a resident pair of Carolina Wrens and a Northern 
Mockingbird, as well as Downy and Red-bellied Woodpeckers. These birds are not 
as voracious as White-winged Doves or European Starlings (of which I have very 
few right now), so I'm not feeding as much either. 


Jennifer Kidney
Norman 

> Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 09:39:54 -0600
> From: henthorn1 AT COX.NET
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> 
> Although I haven't monitored species numbers this winter in my OKC yard, the
> most numerous and regular by far are the Eurasian collared-doves.  Daily I
> see from 6-30.  Rarely do I see mourning doves and I have seen one
> white-winged dove this season.  Sharon
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of M. S. Harris
> Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2015 7:29 AM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
> 
> Here is eastern Bartlesville our winter birds have changed dramatically over
> the last 3 years.  We used to get lots of winter sparrows, but now only see
> the occasional dark-eyed junco.  We've not had any purple finches in about 5
> years, but still have a few house finches with lower numbers than in
> previous years.  We have a regular Carolina wren and the occasional house
> wren (2 x this winter) but the most numerous bird for us this winter is
> mourning doves.  It's not unusual to see upwards of 20 or 25 under our large
> maple tree where we hang all our feeders.  Our high count this winter was 32
> ... as best as you can count mourning doves on the move.
> 
> I've attributed the decrease in variety, especially sparrows, to the
> urbanization of SE Bartlesville.  When we moved here 18 years ago, we were
> the last street on this edge of town.  The houses across the street backed
> up to a small pasture, then mixed woods.  That is almost all gone now with
> the addition of houses back to back some 5-6 years ago.
> 
> Just my two cents.
> 
> Suzy Harris
> Bartlesville
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Bostian, Kelly
> Sent: Monday, January 26, 2015 4:44 PM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
> 
> Hi all,
> I had a call today from a woman in Owasso who said she normally goes through
> several bags of feed and a few cakes of suet each year, filling the seed
> feeders least once a day. She hasn't had them this year and fills feeders
> maybe once a week. The last few years she's had lot of Eurasian collard
> doves but doesn't have those either.
> 
> Has anyone else had similar experiences this winter?
> 
> Kelly Bostian
> Outdoors Writer
> Tulsa World Media Company
> www.tulsaworld.com
> office | 918 581 8357
> mobile | 918 231 1385
> fax | 918 581 8353
> 315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
> twitter |  AT kellybostian
> blog |tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian
> email | kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com
 		 	   		  
Subject: Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count 2014 results
From: Mia Revels <revels AT NSUOK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 14:02:49 -0600
Hello Everyone,

I have finally recovered from my respiratory ills and caught up at school
enough to write up the Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count!

It was held on December 23rd and we had 8 volunteers who came out for the
count. Many thanks to all of you! It was a gray, windy, cold day, but we
all had a great time despite the weather. We ended up the count day
watching ducks fly in to roost at the Little River National Wildlife Refuge
with a grand total of 89 species!

Mia Revels
Tahlequah, OK

p.s. I am tentatively scheduling the next Broken Bow CBC on Sunday,
December 27, 2015.  Many people have asked that it be on a weekend because
it is so far from everywhere.  You can let me know off list if there is a
reason not to have it then.  Thanks!


  Canada Goose 87  Wood Duck 133  Green-winged Teal 22  Mallard 22  Northern
Pintail 4  Northern Shoveler 9  Gadwall 47  AmericanWigeon 26  Redhead
2  Ring-necked
Duck 32  Common Goldeneye 42  Bufflehead 29  Hooded Merganser 13  Ruddy Duck
6  Common Loon 4  Pied-billed Grebe 7  Horned Grebe 5  Double-crested
Comorant 40  Great Blue Heron 9  Black Vulture 18  Turkey Vulture 37  Bald
Eagle 2  Northern Harrier 1  Sharp-shinned Hawk 1  Cooper's Hawk 1
Red-shouldered
Hawk 3  Red-tailed Hawk 3  American Kestrel 6  American Coot 6
Killdeer 3  Wilson's
Snipe  3  Rock Pigeon 5  Eurasian Collared-Dove 2  Mourning Dove 30  Inca
Dove 4  Great Horned Owl 1  Belted Kingfisher 5  Red-headed Woodpecker
3  Red-bellied
Woodpecker 9  Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 6  Downey Woodpecker 5  Hairy
Woodpecker 1  Northern Flicker 22  Pileated Woodpecker 6  Eastern
Phoebe 9  Loggerhead
Shrike 3  Blue Jay 66  American Crow 130  Fish Crow 3  Carolina Chickadee 24
TuftedTitmouse 26  White-breasted Nuthatch 5  Brown-headed Nuthatch 1  Brown
Creeper 3  Carolina Wren 14  Golden-crowned Kinglet 10  Ruby-crowned Kinglet
3  Eastern Bluebird 23  American Robin 319  Northern Mockingbird 28  Brown
Thrasher 8  European Starling 254  American Pipet 1  Cedar Waxwing 42
Yellow-rumped
Warbler 1  Pine Warbler 6  Eartern Towhee 2  Spotted Towhee 1  Chipping
Sparrow 3  Field Sparrow 4  LeConte's Sparrow 4  Fox Sparrow 19  Song
Sparrow 15  Lincoln's Sparrow 8  Swamp Sparrow 6  White-throated
Sparrow 147  White-crowned
Sparrow 12  Dark-eyedJunco 123  Northern Cardinal 110  Red-winged Blackbird
137  Eastern Meadowlark 19  Brewer's Blackbird 329  Common Grackle 38
Brown-headed
Cowbird 3  Purple Finch 4  House Finch 6  Pine Siskin 26  American Goldfinch
168  House Sparrow 6
Total                                                89 species!

-- 
Mia Revels, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Northeastern State University
611 Grand Ave.
Tahlequah, Oklahoma
(918) 444-3824
revels AT nsuok.edu


***CONFIDENTIALITY*** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain
confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized
disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.
Subject: Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
From: Sharon Henthorn <henthorn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 09:39:54 -0600
Although I haven't monitored species numbers this winter in my OKC yard, the
most numerous and regular by far are the Eurasian collared-doves.  Daily I
see from 6-30.  Rarely do I see mourning doves and I have seen one
white-winged dove this season.  Sharon

-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of M. S. Harris
Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2015 7:29 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down?

Here is eastern Bartlesville our winter birds have changed dramatically over
the last 3 years.  We used to get lots of winter sparrows, but now only see
the occasional dark-eyed junco.  We've not had any purple finches in about 5
years, but still have a few house finches with lower numbers than in
previous years.  We have a regular Carolina wren and the occasional house
wren (2 x this winter) but the most numerous bird for us this winter is
mourning doves.  It's not unusual to see upwards of 20 or 25 under our large
maple tree where we hang all our feeders.  Our high count this winter was 32
... as best as you can count mourning doves on the move.

I've attributed the decrease in variety, especially sparrows, to the
urbanization of SE Bartlesville.  When we moved here 18 years ago, we were
the last street on this edge of town.  The houses across the street backed
up to a small pasture, then mixed woods.  That is almost all gone now with
the addition of houses back to back some 5-6 years ago.

Just my two cents.

Suzy Harris
Bartlesville

-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Bostian, Kelly
Sent: Monday, January 26, 2015 4:44 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Bird Feeder Numbers Down?

Hi all,
I had a call today from a woman in Owasso who said she normally goes through
several bags of feed and a few cakes of suet each year, filling the seed
feeders least once a day. She hasn't had them this year and fills feeders
maybe once a week. The last few years she's had lot of Eurasian collard
doves but doesn't have those either.

Has anyone else had similar experiences this winter?

Kelly Bostian
Outdoors Writer
Tulsa World Media Company
www.tulsaworld.com
office | 918 581 8357
mobile | 918 231 1385
fax | 918 581 8353
315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
twitter |  AT kellybostian
blog |tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian
email | kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com
Subject: Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
From: "M. S. Harris" <mbhsuzy AT CABLEONE.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 07:29:00 -0600
Here is eastern Bartlesville our winter birds have changed dramatically over
the last 3 years.  We used to get lots of winter sparrows, but now only see
the occasional dark-eyed junco.  We've not had any purple finches in about 5
years, but still have a few house finches with lower numbers than in
previous years.  We have a regular Carolina wren and the occasional house
wren (2 x this winter) but the most numerous bird for us this winter is
mourning doves.  It's not unusual to see upwards of 20 or 25 under our large
maple tree where we hang all our feeders.  Our high count this winter was 32
... as best as you can count mourning doves on the move.

I've attributed the decrease in variety, especially sparrows, to the
urbanization of SE Bartlesville.  When we moved here 18 years ago, we were
the last street on this edge of town.  The houses across the street backed
up to a small pasture, then mixed woods.  That is almost all gone now with
the addition of houses back to back some 5-6 years ago.

Just my two cents.

Suzy Harris
Bartlesville

-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Bostian, Kelly
Sent: Monday, January 26, 2015 4:44 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Bird Feeder Numbers Down?

Hi all,
I had a call today from a woman in Owasso who said she normally goes through
several bags of feed and a few cakes of suet each year, filling the seed
feeders least once a day. She hasn't had them this year and fills feeders
maybe once a week. The last few years she's had lot of Eurasian collard
doves but doesn't have those either.

Has anyone else had similar experiences this winter?

Kelly Bostian
Outdoors Writer
Tulsa World Media Company
www.tulsaworld.com
office | 918 581 8357
mobile | 918 231 1385
fax | 918 581 8353
315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
twitter |  AT kellybostian
blog |tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian
email | kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com
Subject: Lake Murray 01-24-15 with pictures
From: Bill Adams <ba1980 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 18:57:05 -0800
Stopped by Lake Murray on the way home from looking for the Eastern Screech Owl 
that was seen South of Durant, but didn't find it. We didn't have that many 
species at Lake Murray, but had about 3-6 Common Loons in the marina area that 
got really close which provided for some good pictures. We only birded from the 
lodge to the South end of the lake. Had at least a dozen Common Loons. 


Pictures:
http://www.southernokphotography.com/p833933761


Canada Geese
Common Loons
Pied-billed Grebe
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
American Coot
Ring-billed Gull
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Tufted Titmouse
Dark-eyed Junco


Bill Adams
Duncan, OK
Subject: Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 18:12:32 -0500
My backyard in Edmond seems to be the local hangout for both mourning and 
collared doves. But I do think the numbers are lower this year. On a daily 
basis I see 4-6 of each this year. Last year I had 10-12 of each. All sparrows 
are down at my feeders except the house sparrow. Many juncos, cardinals, 
bluejays, goldfinches, house finches, and both downy and red-bellied 
woodpeckers.. I have a few of everything else-both kinglets, siskins, y. b. 
sapsucker, creeper. I have 1 pair of C. wrens and have had 1 winter wren. 

Occasionally a coopers hawk and nearly daily a sharp-shinned hawk.  hal yocum
---- "Bostian wrote: 
> Hi all,
> I had a call today from a woman in Owasso who said she normally goes through 
several bags of feed and a few cakes of suet each year, filling the seed 
feeders least once a day. She hasn't had them this year and fills feeders maybe 
once a week. The last few years she's had lot of Eurasian collard doves but 
doesn't have those either. 

> 
> Has anyone else had similar experiences this winter?
> 
> Kelly Bostian
> Outdoors Writer
> Tulsa World Media Company
> www.tulsaworld.com
> office | 918 581 8357
> mobile | 918 231 1385
> fax | 918 581 8353
> 315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
> twitter |  AT kellybostian
> blog |tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian
> email | kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com
Subject: Re: Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
From: "Feldt, Andrew N." <afeldt AT OU.EDU>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 23:02:34 +0000
Kelly,

While my number of species and total individuals is slightly up in my Project 
Feederwatch numbers, I have only seen one Eurasian Collared-Dove in my 
Feederwatch observing so far this year and that is significantly down from the 
past two years when I saw at least two (and up to seven) each week (but the 
years previous to that were low). I still see them occasionally on my bike ride 
to work, so they are still around - just not in my backyard! But, I have 
nothing to quantify anything but my back yard. 


Andy

> On Jan 26, 2015, at 4:43 PM, Bostian, Kelly  
wrote: 

> 
> Hi all,
> I had a call today from a woman in Owasso who said she normally goes through 
several bags of feed and a few cakes of suet each year, filling the seed 
feeders least once a day. She hasn't had them this year and fills feeders maybe 
once a week. The last few years she's had lot of Eurasian collard doves but 
doesn't have those either. 

> 
> Has anyone else had similar experiences this winter?
> 
> Kelly Bostian
> Outdoors Writer
> Tulsa World Media Company
> www.tulsaworld.com
> office | 918 581 8357
> mobile | 918 231 1385
> fax | 918 581 8353
> 315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
> twitter |  AT kellybostian
> blog |tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian
> email | kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com
Subject: Bird Feeder Numbers Down?
From: "Bostian, Kelly" <Kelly.Bostian AT TULSAWORLD.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 22:43:59 +0000
Hi all,
I had a call today from a woman in Owasso who said she normally goes through 
several bags of feed and a few cakes of suet each year, filling the seed 
feeders least once a day. She hasn't had them this year and fills feeders maybe 
once a week. The last few years she's had lot of Eurasian collard doves but 
doesn't have those either. 


Has anyone else had similar experiences this winter?

Kelly Bostian
Outdoors Writer
Tulsa World Media Company
www.tulsaworld.com
office | 918 581 8357
mobile | 918 231 1385
fax | 918 581 8353
315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
twitter |  AT kellybostian
blog |tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian
email | kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com
Subject: Re: Hefner gulls
From: Chad Ellis <chad AT ELLISFAMILYOKC.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 14:09:30 -0600
Here is the link to photos taken yesterday afternoon of a white gull at Hefner. 
I make no judgement about its classification, and defer that to those of you 
who are far better at gulls than I. This gull was observed by Jack Hurd, Bob 
Ellis, and myself. Photos are of low quality digiscoped through a 20x60x80 
Vortex scope with an iPhone 4s. 

http://flic.kr/p/qDYqCP

Chad Ellis
OKC, OK

> On Jan 25, 2015, at 1:41 PM, JOS GRZYBOWSKI  
wrote: 

> 
> Have a tendency to be cautious on reporting tougher ID birds rarities, but 
believe this bird I found at Hefner mid-morning was well within the range of 
Iceland Gull, my primary caveat being that it was out in the middle of the 
lake, so a distant view. Sent the previous message from my iPhone--a newby for 
me. Here are some details. 

> Found the bird on the water far out among the Red-breasted Mergansers, 
primary distinctions being that it was whiter, even in the back, than the gulls 
next to it, and that the wing tips of the folded wing looked very pale and even 
toned to the tips. On gulls next to it, could make out the black tips and white 
spots and gray mantles. This bird was paler than the pale gray mantles of what 
I thought were Ring-billed Gulls next to it, and not much larger. Could also 
make out the black bill, paling some at base, but still a distant view. It was 
distant enough, the water choppy enough (wind blowing hard), that I had to 
concentrate on watching it--waited almost 10 minutes before it flushed a 
little. Even lost it in the jiggle of the scope resting on my car seat for a 
bit Took a minute to relocate. When it flushed up a little, saw that the 
primaries seemed even toned pale to tips--also for tail. 

> Waited more until it flew, then watched it move around in the wind, and 
actually move in 100 yards or more closer before landing on the water again. 

> In looking at some references, this bird was actually at the pale side the 
variation in Iceland/Kumlien's. Because of the distance, did not see detail of 
pattern, but it was clearly a whiter gull, with whitish, rather than tannish 
wing-tips. There were other jizz features, etc. noted, so feel this an Iceland. 
Tried working along the dam to see if I could get a closer view, but no luck. 
Somebody could get lucky, and get pictures. 

> The gull groups on the west side of the Lake and among the merganser on the 
west side of the lake had a good sprinkling of Herring among them (perhaps 100 
or so). At least two Lesser Black-backed Gulls, one 2nd winter, and the second 
a first-winter bird. Kept seeing them, so may have been more. Also, at least 
one adult Thayer's, this bird possibly in the swarm-range of variation--just 
viewing--no pics, but the white mirrors on outer primaries looked like they 
coalesced some spots. 

> The Long-tailed Ducks hung out (together) more with the subgroup of 
goldeneye. There were a lot of Red-breasted Mergansers, with a few small 
subgroups of Commons merged in--possible 1700 mergansers in all. 

>   Haven't birded a whole morning in a few weeks now, so pleasant distraction.
> CHEERS,                                      JOE Grzybowski
> 
> 
> On Sunday, January 25, 2015 10:56 AM, Joe Grzybowski 
 wrote: 

> 
> 
> Possible first winter Iceland gull among mergansers seen from west dam. 
Uniform (almost) white primaries. Almost white back. White head. Mostly dark 
bill. Also at least two lesser black backed gulls, one adult thayers and two 
long-tailed Ducks. 

> Cheers. Joe grzybowski
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
Subject: Youth Birding Camp Scholarships
From: John Kennington <johnkennington AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 09:33:54 -0600
This year we are opening up our Tulsa Audubon Youth Birding Camp
Scholarships to young birders anywhere in Oklahoma. So if you know of a
young birder (between 14-18 as of June 1st) please pass this information on
to them. The deadline is Jan 31, but I can extend that a few extra days.

The camps we are offering scholarships to this year are the American
Birding Association camps in Colorado or Delaware. The details on each are
on the application form.

We are looking for young folks who have a distinct interest in birds rather
than just the outdoors, nature, etc., since the focus of the ABA camps is
birding.

Regarding the criteria, we are obviously waiving the Tulsa area
requirement. And the short presentation does not need to be in Tulsa, but
at the closest Audubon/birding group.

Contact me with any questions, 918-809-6325, johnkennington AT gmail.com.

John Kennington
Tulsa Audubon


Thanks to a generous donor, Tulsa Audubon is pleased to again offer two
full scholarships, each worth approx. $1,200, to young birders to attend a
youth birding camp in the summer of 2014. There are several such camps in
different parts of the country and the scholarship can be applied to any of
these.  The eligible camps are described on the application

. 

Some excellent discussion on youth birding camps can be found on the Young
Birders Facebook page

. 

More
good info can be found on the American Birding Associations Young Birder’s
Blog

 

.
To be eligible, you must meet these criteria:

   -    Live in the general Tulsa area (or now anywhere in Oklahoma)
   -    Be between 14-18 years old (as of June 1st, 2014)
   -    Be willing to provide a short report (about 10 minutes) at a TAS
   meeting (or other Audubon/birding club)
   -    Be willing to provide 10 volunteer hours (such as at Oxley, giving
   a bird talk to an elementary school class, leading a youth field trip,
   etc., or your own idea, something meaningful to you.)

To apply, please provide these three things:

   1. Write an essay (approximately 500 words) answering these questions:
    What is the importance of birds to you, why is birding an important
   activity for you, and how does it make you a better conservationist?
   2. List your five greatest achievements to date. (These need not be
   bird-related.)
   3. Provide a letter of recommendation from a teacher, parent or an adult
   birding friend that should cover what they know about your commitment to
   birds and birding.

The deadline to apply is January 31, 2015, but you are encouraged to send
in your applications as soon as possible, since these camps fill
up very fast and we will judge applications as they arrive.
The scholarship will cover the camp fee. Transportation and other
incidental expenses will be paid by the camper or his/her family.
Additional funding to help with transportation may be available on an as
needed basis.
Click here for application

 
Subject: FOY Birds Today
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 16:04:41 -0600
Hello All,

            Saw a couple of FOY birds today in North Tulsa county, American
Tree Sparrow and a female-type columbarius Merlin (possibly dining on one
of the former) near "Snipe Corner" near 166th and N. Sheridan.

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Re: Hefner gulls
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 11:41:13 -0800
Have a tendency to be cautious on reporting tougher ID birds rarities, but 
believe this bird I found at Hefner mid-morning was well within the range of 
Iceland Gull, my primary caveat being that it was out in the middle of the 
lake, so a distant view. Sent the previous message from my iPhone--a newby for 
me. Here are some details. 


Found the bird on the water far out among the Red-breasted Mergansers, primary 
distinctions being that it was whiter, even in the back, than the gulls next to 
it, and that the wing tips of the folded wing looked very pale and even toned 
to the tips. On gulls next to it, could make out the black tips and white spots 
and gray mantles. This bird was paler than the pale gray mantles of what I 
thought were Ring-billed Gulls next to it, and not much larger. Could also make 
out the black bill, paling some at base, but still a distant view. It was 
distant enough, the water choppy enough (wind blowing hard), that I had to 
concentrate on watching it--waited almost 10 minutes before it flushed a 
little. Even lost it in the jiggle of the scope resting on my car seat for a 
bit Took a minute to relocate. When it flushed up a little, saw that the 
primaries seemed even toned pale to tips--also for tail. 

Waited more until it flew, then watched it move around in the wind, and 
actually move in 100 yards or more closer before landing on the water again. 


In looking at some references, this bird was actually at the pale side the 
variation in Iceland/Kumlien's. Because of the distance, did not see detail of 
pattern, but it was clearly a whiter gull, with whitish, rather than tannish 
wing-tips. There were other jizz features, etc. noted, so feel this an Iceland. 
Tried working along the dam to see if I could get a closer view, but no luck. 
Somebody could get lucky, and get pictures. 


The gull groups on the west side of the Lake and among the merganser on the 
west side of the lake had a good sprinkling of Herring among them (perhaps 100 
or so). At least two Lesser Black-backed Gulls, one 2nd winter, and the second 
a first-winter bird. Kept seeing them, so may have been more. Also, at least 
one adult Thayer's, this bird possibly in the swarm-range of variation--just 
viewing--no pics, but the white mirrors on outer primaries looked like they 
coalesced some spots. 

 The Long-tailed Ducks hung out (together) more with the subgroup of goldeneye. 
There were a lot of Red-breasted Mergansers, with a few small subgroups of 
Commons merged in--possible 1700 mergansers in all. 

  Haven't birded a whole morning in a few weeks now, so pleasant distraction.
CHEERS,                                      JOE Grzybowski



On Sunday, January 25, 2015 10:56 AM, Joe Grzybowski 
 wrote: 

 


Possible first winter Iceland gull among mergansers seen from west dam. Uniform 
(almost) white primaries. Almost white back. White head. Mostly dark bill. Also 
at least two lesser black backed gulls, one adult thayers and two long-tailed 
Ducks. 

Cheers. Joe grzybowski
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Request for guest speaker on migratory birds
From: "Sander, Melanie" <melanie_sander AT NPS.GOV>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 12:39:14 -0600
Hi,

Chickasaw National Recreation Area is seeking guest speakers to provide
programs on migratory birds. Program dates are April 25, 2015 and May 9,
2015 celebrating National Jr. Ranger Day and World Migratory Bird Day,
respectively. General audiences are expected.

Interested parties are encouraged to email melanie_sander AT nps.gov or
contact by phone at 580 622 7232 for addition information.

Thank you,

-- 
Melanie Sander, Volunteer Coordinator
Chickasaw National Recreation Area
1008 West Second Street
Sulphur, OK 73086
(580)622-7232 (office)
(580)622-6931 (fax)

Lieu Days - Monday and Tuesday

"*ganyani ganyani"  *little by little ~ Northern Sotho
Subject: OCAS Meeting Monday
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 12:17:07 -0600
The January meeting of OKC Audubon will be tomorrow night, Jan 25, 7-9 pm
at the Will Rogers Park Garden Center, NW 36th St and I-44. The guest
speaker will be Dr. Doug Wood, Ornithologist, Professor and birder
extraordinaire. His presentation is titled “Ecuador in 4G: Going, Going,
Guango, Galapagos”. The talk will cover a trip to Ecuador in Summer 2014.
His travels included Papallacta Pass and Guongo Lodge, and the Galapagos
Islands. Subjects will be birds, mammals, herps, and conservation.
Non-members are welcome to attend. Further details are available on the
OCAS home page at http://okc-audubon.org/
Bill Diffin
OKC Audubon President
Subject: Hefner gulls
From: Joe Grzybowski <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 10:53:41 -0600
Possible first winter Iceland gull among mergansers seen from west dam. Uniform 
(almost) white primaries. Almost white back. White head. Mostly dark bill. Also 
at least two lesser black backed gulls, one adult thayers and two long-tailed 
Ducks. 

Cheers. Joe grzybowski
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: GLAS Eagle Watch
From: DALA GRISSOM <naejalad AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 19:50:20 -0600
Sounds like fun. Can you tell us if this was on private or public areas and 
locations. I would really like to see. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 24, 2015, at 2:40 PM, Evelyn Houck  wrote:
> 
> Weather and Bald Eagles cooperated today when 17 persons departed Grove, 
Oklahoma, on the annual caravan into northwest Arkansas in search of Bald 
Eagles. The temperature was 22 degrees as the group departed at 6 a.m., and 50 
degrees upon their return at 1 p.m.; skies were clear and only a breeze of 
wind. 

> 
> The count of Bald Eagles totaled 126 conservatively! As the group approached 
the roost east of Gravette, birds were already leaving for the day. About 50 
were observed in the trees along a bluff and leaving the roost. Another large 
group of mature and immature Eagles were seen as the group looped around 
Gravette and to their breakfast stop. Two mature and one immature bird(s) were 
spotted on the edge of a pond near the road. Other sightings along the way gave 
great looks and photo ops near the road too. 

> 
> Other birds of interest included a pair of Rusty Blackbirds at the Sweptco 
Plant near Gentry; Loggerhead Shrike; Am. Kestrel; Pileated Woodpecker; 
Red-bellied Woodpecker; Collared Dove; White Pelicans, etc. 

> 
> Evelyn Houck
> Grand Lake Audubon Society
> Grove, Delaware County, OK
> n.e. corner of Oklahoma
> 
> 
Subject: GLAS Eagle Watch
From: Evelyn Houck <efhouck727 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 14:40:24 -0600
Weather and Bald Eagles cooperated today when 17 persons departed Grove,
Oklahoma, on the annual caravan into northwest Arkansas in search of Bald
Eagles.  The temperature was 22 degrees as the group departed at 6 a.m.,
and 50 degrees upon their return at 1 p.m.; skies were clear and only a
breeze of wind.

The count of Bald Eagles totaled 126 conservatively!   As the group
approached the roost east of Gravette, birds were already leaving for the
day. About 50 were observed in the trees along a bluff and leaving the
roost.  Another large group of mature and immature Eagles were seen as the
group looped around Gravette and to their breakfast stop.  Two mature and
one immature bird(s) were spotted on the edge of a pond near the road.
Other sightings along the way gave great looks and photo ops near the road
too.

Other birds of interest included a pair of Rusty Blackbirds at the Sweptco
Plant near Gentry; Loggerhead Shrike; Am. Kestrel; Pileated Woodpecker;
Red-bellied Woodpecker; Collared Dove; White Pelicans, etc.

Evelyn Houck
Grand Lake Audubon Society
Grove, Delaware County, OK
n.e. corner of Oklahoma
Subject: Re: Hefner and Overholser this morning
From: Kristi Hendricks <hendricks.kristi AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 13:05:12 -0600
I thought I'd add to the gull discussion by saying that the OKC Community
College has a healthy number of Ring-Billed Gulls that are permanent
residents. I have not recently gone to study the population for any other
species of gulls, but if anyone finds themselves passing by the college, it
might be worth a look, especially if you want photos since they're not
terribly afraid of people. The college has a decent-sized pond where I've
seen a Great Blue Heron, a Night Heron, GW Egrets, Gadwalls, etc. But, they
also have a large Canadian Geese population that really appreciates
handouts ...

On Sat, Jan 24, 2015 at 12:56 PM, Cameron Carver 
wrote:

> Caleb Frome and I spent the morning searching for good gulls at Hefner and
> Overholser. We were later joined by Brandan Thurston. Between the three of
> us we only managed to nab 4 species and failed to find our target Thayer's
> Gull.
>
> From Stars and Stripes we could see many gulls. Bonaparte's were working
> the middle of the lake diving into the rafts of Red-breasted Merganser. A
> few Herring and quite a few Ring-billed were on the many spits. I only saw
> one Common Loon. Several Horned Grebe were seen.
>
> From Prairie Dog Point/Lakeshore we had much better luck. Looking toward
> the dam we found a raft of Common Merganser and Common Goldeneye. Mixed in
> were Ring-billed Gull, Herring Gull and at least two Lesser Black-backed
> Gull.
> I may have seen a light-mantled gull in the mix, but it could have just
> been lighting. I failed to check the rest of the characteristics of the
> bird to eliminate other possibilities.
>
> Overholser had Ring-billed and Herring. Also had quite a few Common
> Merganser.
>
> Cameron Carver
> Lubbock, TX (Currently in OKC)
>
Subject: Hefner and Overholser this morning
From: Cameron Carver <c.o.carver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 12:56:32 -0600
Caleb Frome and I spent the morning searching for good gulls at Hefner and
Overholser. We were later joined by Brandan Thurston. Between the three of
us we only managed to nab 4 species and failed to find our target Thayer's
Gull.

From Stars and Stripes we could see many gulls. Bonaparte's were working
the middle of the lake diving into the rafts of Red-breasted Merganser. A
few Herring and quite a few Ring-billed were on the many spits. I only saw
one Common Loon. Several Horned Grebe were seen.

From Prairie Dog Point/Lakeshore we had much better luck. Looking toward
the dam we found a raft of Common Merganser and Common Goldeneye. Mixed in
were Ring-billed Gull, Herring Gull and at least two Lesser Black-backed
Gull.
I may have seen a light-mantled gull in the mix, but it could have just
been lighting. I failed to check the rest of the characteristics of the
bird to eliminate other possibilities.

Overholser had Ring-billed and Herring. Also had quite a few Common
Merganser.

Cameron Carver
Lubbock, TX (Currently in OKC)
Subject: Re: L Hefner Common Loons
From: Jennie Brooks <2014birder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 11:02:18 -0600
Thanks for the update.

On Friday, January 23, 2015, William Diffin  wrote:

> I made a thorough search for loons on Wednesday by observing from along
> the east side access points reached from Britton Rd and all along the dam.
> Found 12 Common Loons. On Thursday I searched again along the east side
> access points but walked the dam from the northeast parking lot to the big
> turn from the E-W section to the SW-NE section. It was more windy Thursday
> and the loons were all pretty close to the dam. I found 14, all Commons.
> The Common Mergansers have arrived, and DC Cormorants have dramatically
> increased in numbers. An adult Bald Eagle was flying or perching around the
> lake the entire time I was there.
>
> Bill
>
Subject: L Hefner Common Loons
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 10:59:14 -0600
I made a thorough search for loons on Wednesday by observing from along the
east side access points reached from Britton Rd and all along the dam.
Found 12 Common Loons. On Thursday I searched again along the east side
access points but walked the dam from the northeast parking lot to the big
turn from the E-W section to the SW-NE section. It was more windy Thursday
and the loons were all pretty close to the dam. I found 14, all Commons.
The Common Mergansers have arrived, and DC Cormorants have dramatically
increased in numbers. An adult Bald Eagle was flying or perching around the
lake the entire time I was there.

Bill
Subject: Re: Tundra Swans and Raptor Photos
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 19:22:22 -0600
Thanks Jim

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jim Jorgensen
Sent: Wednesday, January 21, 2015 5:33 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Tundra Swans and Raptor Photos

 

Thank you Jim. Beautiful images.

Sent from my iPhone


On Jan 21, 2015, at 4:54 PM, Jim Arterburn  > wrote: 


OKBirds,

 

I have uploaded a group of photos taken in Osage and Kay Counties on January 
16, 2015 to my website. Photos include 11 Tundra Swans from Osage County as 
well as a variety of Red-tailed Hawks including a nice “western” light 
morph, Rough-legged Hawks, several Northern Harriers, Cackling Geese and a few 
Ring-billed Gulls and a Herring Gull. For those interested the link to the 
photos is below. 


 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder  

 
Subject: Re: Tundra Swans and Raptor Photos
From: Jim Jorgensen <hpah AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 17:32:54 -0600
Thank you Jim. Beautiful images.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 21, 2015, at 4:54 PM, Jim Arterburn  wrote:
> 
> OKBirds,
>  
> I have uploaded a group of photos taken in Osage and Kay Counties on January 
16, 2015 to my website. Photos include 11 Tundra Swans from Osage County as 
well as a variety of Red-tailed Hawks including a nice “western” light 
morph, Rough-legged Hawks, several Northern Harriers, Cackling Geese and a few 
Ring-billed Gulls and a Herring Gull. For those interested the link to the 
photos is below. 

>  
> http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds
>  
> Jim Arterburn
> Tulsa, Oklahoma
> www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder
>  
Subject: Tundra Swans and Raptor Photos
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 16:54:19 -0600
OKBirds,

 

I have uploaded a group of photos taken in Osage and Kay Counties on January
16, 2015 to my website. Photos include 11 Tundra Swans from Osage County as
well as a variety of Red-tailed Hawks including a nice "western" light
morph, Rough-legged Hawks, several Northern Harriers, Cackling Geese and a
few Ring-billed Gulls and a Herring Gull. For those interested the link to
the photos is below.

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Jan. 20
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 23:13:48 -0600
It was partly cloudy and mild with a little wind on the bird survey today.
69 species were found.  Highlight of the day was hearing screaming calls and
looking up to see an adult Golden Eagle soaring with an adult Bald Eagle.
The Golden Eagle was the one screaming and apparently agitated and the Bald
Eagle took the hint and left toward the southwest.   Here is my list for
today:

 

Greater White-fronted Goose - 90

Canada Goose - 5

Gadwall - 1600

American Wigeon - 4

Mallard - 715

Northern Shoveler - 69

Northern Pintail - 192

Green-winged Teal - 1200

Ring-necked Duck - 56

Canvasback - 4

Hooded Merganser - 5

Ruddy Duck - 34

Pied-billed Grebe - 25

Double-crested Cormorant - 7

Great Blue Heron - 7

Black Vulture - 11

Turkey Vulture - 65

Bald Eagle - 2 adults

Northern Harrier - 7

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 2

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 9

Golden Eagle - 1 adult

American Kestrel - 1

Virginia Rail - 4

American Coot - 405

Killdeer - 154

Least Sandpiper - 5

Mourning Dove - 13

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 3

Rock Pigeon - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 3

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 9

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 5

Loggerhead Shrike - 2

Blue Jay - 1

American Crow - 592

Fish Crow - 17

Carolina Chickadee - 8

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 6

Bewick's Wren - 1

Winter Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 4

Marsh Wren - 2

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 1

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 6

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 4

Brown Thrasher - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 4

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 15

Fox Sparrow - 2

Song Sparrow - 11

Swamp Sparrow - 9

White-throated Sparrow - 2

White-crowned Sparrow - 17

Northern Cardinal - 9

Red-winged Blackbird - 109

Eastern Meadowlark - 14

Rusty Blackbird -11

Common Grackle - 40

American Goldfinch - 2

House Sparrow - 1

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Cajun Chorus Frog - calling

Southern Leopard Frog - calling

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Barn owl
From: Terri Underhill <tunderhill AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 14:34:00 -0600
Greetings OKBirders,
 
The Sam Noble Museum contacted me about the Barn Owl. The Sam Noble Museum is 
very interested in acquiring the specimen for their ornithology collection. 
Hopefully the gentleman from Tipton OK can arrange the delivery of the specimen 
to Norman. 

Thanks to all the interested parties that contacted me about this matter.
 
Good birding,
Terri Underhill
Edmond OK
www.okiebirdcam.com 
 
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of tunderhill
Sent: Monday, January 19, 2015 2:09 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Barn owl
 
Hello OKBirders,
A gentleman contacted me through the OKC Audubon. He lives in Tipton Oklahoma 
and said he found a barn owl that had died in his barn. He put it in his 
freezer and thought that somebody might be able to us it. 

I told him if anybody contacted me about it I would give them his phone 
number.I will post a little bit of his message below. You can email me off the 
list for his contact info at tunderhill AT cox.net 

 
'I have a carcass of a beautiful barn owl that died on my farm without 
incident. It's in perfect condition and I was wondering who I could donate it 
to for a reasonable cause. I notified my county Warden about it so there's 
nothing illegal or shady about it. I wanted to mount it but I cannot do it 
legally. I just hate to see it go to waste. Its such a pretty bird .' 

 
Goog birding,
Terri Underhill
Edmond OK
 
 
 
 
 
Sent from Samsung tablet
Subject: Tulsa Audubon News - Tim O'Connell, Eagles, Youth Scholarships
From: John Kennington <johnkennington AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 13:23:02 -0600
*President's Message*

We have lots going on in January and early February! But first I want thank
 everyone who responded to our annual appeal. Your support is essential for
TAS to continue its good work. We recently have arranged to accept
donations of stock, and already have one generous contribution of  $5,000,
to be used for feeding wildlife being rehabilitated.  If you would like to
make a contribution please visit www.tulsaaudubon.org/donate.htm

 

.

Here is quick overview of what we have going, in chronological order.
Scroll down for the details.

This week is our monthly meeting featuring Dr. Tim O'Connell from OSU
speaking about bird vocalizations. And don't forget we meet for dinner with
our speaker at 5:30 at Peppers.

Next weekend, Jan. 24/25, is our annual Eagle Days event, where you can
view Bald Eagles in the wild from 8-9:30 and then see live eagles and other
raptors up close and personal at the Jenks Math & Science building from
10-2. Everything is repeated both Sat. and Sun. (And we have a new, really
cool Kim Doner-designed Eagle Days t-shirt making it's debut!)

Keeping with the Eagle theme, on Sat. Jan. 31st we are visiting the Iowa
Tribe’s Bah Kho-je Xla Chi (Grey Snow Eagle House) in Perkins, OK. This
eagle rehabilitation facility houses and protects injured and
non-releasable Golden and Bald Eagles(they currently have over 50 birds in
residence). We've gone here the last few years, but it has been such a
popular trip we're offering it again.

Jan. 31st is also the deadline for applications for our youth scholarships
to summer birding camps. Thanks to a generous donor we can offer these
$1,200 scholarships to the American Birding Association camps in Colorado
or Delaware. These are life-changing events for the young people who can
go, so if you know of someone between 14-18 who loves birds please pass
this on!

Next up is high-tech birding.  Our own Kathy McAnally will be offering a
class on "Using eBird".  This is Cornell University’s free web
site/database for every birder. You will learn how to record your
sightings, use the tools to plan trips and record your life lists. If you
keep any type of bird list, from a week-long trip to Texas or the birds at
your feeder this morning, then eBird is for you.  We're offering two
sessions, either Tues afternoon Feb. 10 from 12:30-1:30 pm or Wed evening Feb.
11 7:00-8:00 pm.

Feb. 15th is the early-bird deadline to register for the 6th annual Lesser
Prairie-Chicken Festival in Woodward, OK. While a bit far from Tulsa, TAS
is the primary sponsor. If you have yet to make it out there, this is the
year to do it! You'll be joining birders from across the nation and get up
close and personal looks at the birds. Even if you not a hard-code birder,
seeing the chickens displaying on their leks is one of those epic wildlife
experiences you will never forget. See www.lektreks.org

for 

more info.

We also are offering youth scholarships to the Lesser Prairie-Chicken
Festival in April.  If you know of a young birder please pass this
information along and have them get in touch with me.

Finally, I have a few bags of bird seed left over from our sale in October.
I've included the list below.

John Kennington, President

------------------------------
*January Meeting - Tues Jan. 20*
Our January meeting is "Bird Vocalization " with Tim O’Connell. Tim
O’Connell, Ph.D. is Associate Professor in the Department of Research
Ecology and Management at Oklahoma State University. Through field studies
of breeding songbirds, Dr. O’Connell asks important questions about ecology
and how we can apply what we know in working toward restoration. He is
highly skilled in recognizing bird vocalization and will share knowledge in
that area tonight.  The meeting starts at 7:00 pm for snacks, with the
program at 7:30. We meet at the Tulsa Garden Center, 2435 South Peoria in
Tulsa. Everyone is also invited to join our speaker and other TAS friends
for dinner at 5:30 at Pepper's Grill in Utica Square (on 21st Street across
the street from Wendy's.)
.
------------------------------
*Eagle Days - Jan 24/25*

Tulsa Eagle Days are this Saturday and Sunday January 24-25.

*Eagle Watch 8-9:30 am, Helmerich Park on Riverside Dr. between 71st and
81st*

The first part is an outdoor watch of a live nest along the Arkansas River.
Our location for this portion of the day is Helmerich Park. The park is
located on Riverside Drive between 71st and 81 streets in Tulsa. Parking
and restrooms are available at the entrance. There is a walkway that leads
to the river's edge where the nest can be seen across the river. We will
have spotting scopes set up so folks can get a good view of the eagles.

*Live Eagle Presentations, vendors, etc. 10am Jenks Math and Science Center*

Following the Bald Eagle watch we also have an indoor program at Jenks High
School from 10am to 2pm. At this venue, we will have a number of large
birds (live, educational birds) to show including a Golden Eagle, Owls, and
a Bald Eaglerepresented by our big three bird organizations (Tulsa Zoo,
Grey Snow Eagle House, and Sutton Avian Research Center) . In addition,
there will be more than 10 informational booths from a variety of bird
related organizations. The indoor event is held in the Math and Science
Center at Jenks High School and is located at the corner of B Street and
2nd street in Jenks, just 5 minutes away from the outdoor watch. See below
for a map to the school.

We're partnering with the Jenks High School Ornithology Club to again
present this exciting program! For more information contact Todd Humphrey,
918-810-4492.

------------------------------
*Youth Birding Camp Scholarships*

Thanks to a generous donor, Tulsa Audubon is pleased to again offer two
full scholarships, each worth approx. $1,200, to young birders to attend a
youth birding camp in the summer of 2014. There are several such camps in
different parts of the country and the scholarship can be applied to any of
these.  The eligible camps are described on the application

. 

Some excellent discussion on youth birding camps can be found on the Young
Birders Facebook page

. 

More
good info can be found on the American Birding Associations Young Birder’s
Blog

 

.
To be eligible, you must meet these criteria:

   -    Live in the general Tulsa area
   -    Be between 14-18 years old (as of June 1st, 2014)
   -    Be willing to provide a short report (about 10 minutes) at a TAS
   meeting

To apply, please provide these three things:

   1. Write an essay (approximately 500 words) answering these questions:
    What is the importance of birds to you, why is birding an important
   activity for you, and how does it make you a better conservationist?
   2. List your five greatest achievements to date. (These need not be
   bird-related.)
   3. Provide a letter of recommendation from a teacher, parent or an adult
   birding friend that should cover what they know about your commitment to
   birds and birding.

The deadline to apply is January 31, 2015, but you are encouraged to send
in your applications as soon as possible, since these camps fill
up very fast and we will judge applications as they arrive.
The scholarship will cover the camp fee. Transportation and other
incidental expenses will be paid by the camper or his/her family.
Additional funding to help with transportation may be available on an as
needed basis.
Click here for application

 


------------------------------
*Visit to Bah Kho-je xla Chi (Grey Snow Eagle House)*
*Saturday, January 31*

Mark your calendar for a visit to the Iowa Tribe’s Bah Kho-je Xla Chi (Grey
Snow Eagle House) in Perkins, OK, an eaglerehabilitation facility to house
and protect injured eagles. They have dozens of non-releasable Golden and
Bald Eagles.  Click here for their web page

. 

If you have not seen this incredible facility yet be sure to join us.
Seeing so many eagles up close and personal will be a memorable experience.

We will meet at 8:15 a.m. at the Braum's parking lot at 101st and Riverside
(2825 E. 101st ) in south Tulsa. If you live west of Tulsa and would like
to meet us there, please follow the directions below. We'd like everyone to
caravan or arrive at10:00 a.m. They have an electric gate that will be
closed until we get there, so we ask everyone to arrive at the Aviary about
the same time to minimize the impact on the Iowa aviary staff.

For more information, or for directions, please contact Gary Siftar,
918-455-627 <918-455-6627>, gsiftar AT okraptors.com. If you
are coming please contact Gary and he will send you a map.

Directions: Take the Creek Turnpike to I-44 and get off on Hwy 33 West
(through Drumwright and Cushing), and then South on 177 at Perkins . Turn
South at Sonic/McDonalds through Perkins (watch speed) across the Cimarron
and another 1.25 to 1.5 miles and then West (Right) on E0740 Rd also marked
E152nd St. Go West about .4 miles and it's on the South (Left).

You can enter the following destination on maps.google.com

 

35.939452,
-97024131.

------------------------------
*Using eBird*

"Using eBird", with Kathy McAnally, will explore Cornell University’s
database Ebird.  We will learn how to record our sightings, use the tools
to plan trips and record your life lists.  Remember using Ebird contributes
the necessary data to aid Cornell’s research. You will be using computers
in the TCC classroom, so no need to bring your own. Kathy is offering two
sessions to accompdate everyone;s schedule. Choose eitherTues Feb. 10 from
12:30-1:30 pm or Wed Feb. 11 7:00-8:00 pm. Registration is limited to 20,
and you must emailkathy.mcanally AT tulsacc.edu to register by Feb 1.

------------------------------
*"Earth Matters" Film Series*

The All Souls Green Team is hosting Earth Matters, a monthly community
environmental film showing, beginning Tuesday, January 20. All films will
start at 6:00 p.m. in Emerson Hall at All Souls Unitarian Church, 2952
South Peoria. Snacks and drinks will be available and a discussion will
follow each of the films.

Co-sponsors of the series are Congregation B’nai Emunah, the League of
Women Voters of Metropolitan Tulsa, Hope Unitarian Church, the University
of Oklahoma Center for Studies in Democracy and Culture, the Sierra Club of
Oklahoma, Clean Energy Future Oklahoma, and the LEAD Agency/Grand
Riverkeeper.

The series schedule is:
January 20, “The 11th Hour,” (92 minutes) with Leonardo DiCaprio, is a look
at climate change: where we've been, where we're going and, most important,
how we can change.
February 17,  “More than Honey,” (91 minutes) Tracking down the causes of
the worldwide die-off of honey bees and why it matters to the future of our
food supply.
March 31, “Tar Creek,” (95 minutes) Local filmmakers tell the story of an
environmental disaster that happened right here in Northeastern Oklahoma.
(note: this date is an exception to the third Tuesday scheduling as the
third Tuesday is during Spring break).
April 21, “Climate of Doubt," (60 minutes) PBS Frontline looks at the
politics of global warming
May 19, “The United States of  OklaH2Oma,”  (28.5 minutes) An in-depth look
at water, the issue that will frame our future.

All film showings will be free and open to the public.

Contact: Herb Beattie               918.706.0949
herb.beattie AT sbcglobal.net

------------------------------
*Bird Seed*

Here is what I have left. Call or email John to get your name on it. I can
bring it to the Tues. meeting or hold it for you to pick up later.

(2) 25 lbs Black Oil Sunflower - $16
(1) 50 lbs Black Oil Sunflower - $23
(1) 35 lbs Songbird Mix - $40
(5) 7 lbs Safflower - $8
(3) 5.5 lbs Sunflower Hearts - $10
(1) 8 lbs Nyjer (Thistle) - $15
(3) 20 oz Nyjer (Thistle) Sock - $10
(4) 5 lbs Fruit and Nut Blend - $10
(3) 5 lbs Corn on the Cob - $5
(6) Gourmet Bird Bards - $4
(16) Woodpecker Bird Bars - $4
(2) Suet Cake, Orange Harvest - $2
(4) Suet and Seed Cakes - $2
(6) Freeze Dried Meal Worms - $8

------------------------------

*TAS On Facebook*

If you have not done so, become a friend of TAS on Facebook

and 

keep up with the latest TAS news. Please feel free to post info of interest
to Audubon members, and if you are at any of our TAS events share your own
photos, notes, observations, etc.
------------------------------


John Kennington, President
918-809-6325
email: johnkennington AT gmail.com
web: www.tulsaaudubon.org

 
Subject: Re: Sooner Lake this Monday
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 13:04:59 -0600
I was up at Sooner Lake yesterday arriving about 9:20 . Like Matt I saw a very 
similar array of birds, eagles, hawks and geese. But I could not find the 
LONGSPURS. Where were you walking the fields or grounds? Did you get to go 
inside the OGE fence with a pass from Audubon if Tulsa? 

I saw a covey of Bob white quail near the NE entry road to go around the dam 
and right where the blacktop ends and dirt road starts. Right near the corner. 

Along Rt. 15 at one if the boat launches I saw a pair if western grebes in the 
water. Sighted 2 l. Shrikes on drive around the lake , north and east side . 

Many many red tailed hawks, a coopers along Rt 177, a harrier, 4 eagles -3 
adults and 1 immature. 

Like Matt I noted that duck and especially geese numbers down . 
Many c. Goldeneye , hundreds of coots, few hooded mergansers, 
Very few sparrow species noted- house, field, Harris only. 
Woodpeckers-downy, red bellied & red headed and a few flickers. 
Any clue to the LONGSPURS welcome! 
Hal Yocum 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 20, 2015, at 11:45 AM, Matthew Jung  wrote:
> 
> I woke up early and decided that it was a good day to bird Sooner
> Lake; arrived at 9 AM (the grass fire north of Guthry was still
> smoldering as I passed).
> 
> The duck numbers are relatively low compared to what I’ve seen in the
> past but several boats with fisher men were out plowing the lake at
> high speeds. The north pond held most the duck species but there were
> a few in the channel between the power plants, mostly Mallards and
> Lesser Scaup.
> 
> I found five Bald Eagles, two adults, a sub-adult and two juveniles
> and finally, after four years trying, was able to photograph Smith’s
> Longspurs – only two but better than none?  It’s only the second time
> I saw Smith’s Longspurs on the ground and the first time ever perched
> in a tree; most I’ve seen were in flight.
> 
> One tree held two eagles, an adult and a sub-adult – got photos;
> another gorgeous adult was perched on a tall pole on the east side of
> the property where the road around the lake starts to curve to the
> south; it was in perfect light and I must have taken >100 photos!
> Here is what I saw:
> 
> 1.    Great Blue Heron
> 2.    DC Cormorant
> 3.    Pied-billed Grebe
> 4.    American Coot – just a few
> 5.    Canada Goose
> 6.    Green-winged Teal
> 7.    Mallard
> 8.    Northern Pintail
> 9.    Gadwall
> 10.    Bufflehead
> 11.    Hooded Merganser
> 12.    Lesser Scaup
> 13.    Common Goldeneye
> 14.    Ring-necked Duck
> 15.    Ruddy Duck
> 16.    American Kestrel
> 17.    Red-tailed Hawk
> 18.    American Bald Eagle
> 19.    Northern Harrier
> 20.    Northern Cardinal
> 21.    Northern Mockingbird
> 22.    Spotted Towhee
> 23.    Smith’s Longspur – about 50, I walked at least one mile before
> flushing the first bird.
> 24.    Savannah Sparrow
> 25.    Carolina Wren
> 26.    Eastern Bluebird
> 27.    American Goldfinch
> 
> Not a single Meadow Lark or Red-winged Blackbird; how strange is that?
> There were a few huge carp in the shallows foraging with the backs
> exposed.
> 
> Matt Jung, OKC
Subject: Sooner Lake this Monday
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 11:45:46 -0600
I woke up early and decided that it was a good day to bird Sooner
Lake; arrived at 9 AM (the grass fire north of Guthry was still
smoldering as I passed).

The duck numbers are relatively low compared to what I’ve seen in the
past but several boats with fisher men were out plowing the lake at
high speeds. The north pond held most the duck species but there were
a few in the channel between the power plants, mostly Mallards and
Lesser Scaup.

I found five Bald Eagles, two adults, a sub-adult and two juveniles
and finally, after four years trying, was able to photograph Smith’s
Longspurs – only two but better than none?  It’s only the second time
I saw Smith’s Longspurs on the ground and the first time ever perched
in a tree; most I’ve seen were in flight.

One tree held two eagles, an adult and a sub-adult – got photos;
another gorgeous adult was perched on a tall pole on the east side of
the property where the road around the lake starts to curve to the
south; it was in perfect light and I must have taken >100 photos!
Here is what I saw:

1.	Great Blue Heron
2.	DC Cormorant
3.	Pied-billed Grebe
4.	American Coot – just a few
5.	Canada Goose
6.	Green-winged Teal
7.	Mallard
8.	Northern Pintail
9.	Gadwall
10.	Bufflehead
11.	Hooded Merganser
12.	Lesser Scaup
13.	Common Goldeneye
14.	Ring-necked Duck
15.	Ruddy Duck
16.	American Kestrel
17.	Red-tailed Hawk
18.	American Bald Eagle
19.	Northern Harrier
20.	Northern Cardinal
21.	Northern Mockingbird
22.	Spotted Towhee
23.	Smith’s Longspur – about 50, I walked at least one mile before
flushing the first bird.
24.	Savannah Sparrow
25.	Carolina Wren
26.	Eastern Bluebird
27.	American Goldfinch

Not a single Meadow Lark or Red-winged Blackbird; how strange is that?
 There were a few huge carp in the shallows foraging with the backs
exposed.

Matt Jung, OKC
Subject: Lake Hefner - Snipe and Short-eared Owl
From: Scott Loss <scottrloss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 07:08:13 -0600
Sara and I took advantage of the beautiful weather on Monday to walk the
Lake Hefner bike loop. It was eerie how calm the lake was; even in the
mid-afternoon, the lake was like glass.

No rarities found, but some highlights included:

Common Loon - 7 along the dam
Horned Grebe - 5
Pied-billed Grebe - >75, most in a single raft off the dam
15 duck spp - nothing rare
4 shorebird spp - Killdeer, Least Sandpipers, Greater Yellowlegs, and a
Snipe hanging out on the edge of one of the sewage ponds north of the dam
Bonaparte's Gull - >50
Short-eared Owl - flushed from about 15 feet from a clump of grass along
the sidewalk along the dam (interestingly, we flushed a SEOW from this area
when we were at the lake on a similar day in late March last year)

Scott Loss
Stillwater
Subject: Re: Rose-Faced Lovebird
From: Jan Dolph <russetdm AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 23:41:15 -0600
The lovebird comes most days with the sparrows. He had a fit today because I 
was taking down Christmas lights. He finally started eating the berries from my 
Washington Hawthorne tree. My Eurasian and White wing doves are down. Mourning 
doves have not been around since summer. I have four male and three female 
cardinals that come daily. I only see one mockingbird. I have not seen the 
Sharp-shinned or Cooper’s Hawk but one time in December. I am sure they are 
around. But, I have not seen them lately. The three bluejays come daily. I have 
several chickadees. I can’t tell how many. They are so fast. I have four 
wrens that show up and a downy and hairy woodpecker that I have noticed. When 
it was cold I had a lot of juncos. Last Saturday, I saw a group of robins on my 
neighbors roof. They did not stay around. 


 

I do enjoy the squirrels. I can remember when they were not in our 
neighborhood. I have some that are very tame. They will rest on my kitchen 
window and look in until I come out with food. 


 

I am ready for the owls to be spotted. I really enjoy finding and watching 
them. 


 

The only bird that was exciting to see was the lovebird for me. I could not 
believe my eyes the first time I saw him. He does not act tame at all. 


 

As you can see. I do not have much going on in my yard either. Keep in touch 
when you can. 


 

Happy birding,

 

Jan Dolph

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Deanne McKinney
Sent: Monday, January 19, 2015 12:36 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Rose-Faced Lovebird

 

I haven't seen the lovebird at my house since October. It sounds like he likes 
it at your house though. 


 

The Sharp-shinned Hawk that I've seen here has been coming for quite awhile - 
at least since late last summer. It is immature. I don't know how long it takes 
for them to get their adult feathers but it looks like the same one that keeps 
coming back. Given the smorgasbord of sparrows at the feeders lately, it must 
be having more successful feeding trips here than I've witnessed. 


 

There is also a Cooper's Hawk that has been coming around for over a year. At 
least I think it's the same one. It comes to the yard every day just as the 
Sharp-shinned does. It's noticeably larger and has adult feathers, among other 
markings that distinguish it from the Sharp-shinned. Last Saturday, both of 
them were in the yard at the same time, sitting on different fences. That was 
pretty neat to see. I think the Cooper's is picking off all the doves. There 
are fewer and fewer of them around now. There used to be three kinds of doves 
coming to the yard, upwards of three dozen at a time on a good day. Now there 
is only one pair of Eurasian Collared Doves left. I suppose that when those are 
gone, the Cooper's Hawk may pick off the rest of the squirrels, or it might 
just find a new neighborhood. 


 

My email address is below. You can email me directly if you'd like so we don't 
bore the rest of the OKbirds folks with talk about our yard birds. 


 

Deanne

trialsz63 AT gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

On Sun, Jan 18, 2015 at 10:22 PM, Jan Dolph  wrote:

Jan. 18, 2015 Sunday

 

As I was taking down Christmas lights around 3:30 today. I heard the lovebird. 
He had arrived again with his buddies the sparrows. He stayed around and had 
his meal of sunflower seeds and peanuts. I was afraid the cold weather had 
taken his life until today. I do hope he survives the weather that is ahead of 
him. 


 

I wanted to post because so many of you had asked about him and told me about 
the escaped parrots that had come to your feeders in the past. 


 

Happy birding,

 

Jan Dolph

Northwest Oklahoma City,

 

 

 
Subject: Cedar Waxwing
From: Warren Williams <wwphoto3 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 16:18:52 -0600
New backyard bird for me. Photo is here:
http://upload.pbase.com/image/158877673

 

Warren Williams

Sand Springs

 

 

  Photography Home Page

  Amazon Author Page

 

 

 
Subject: Bluebird boxes
From: Dora Webb <owl112 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 13:36:44 -0600
Perfect day to clean out the Bluebird boxes on our greenbelt. Gave them a good 
scrubbing after removing all the sparrow nests. I need to do a better job of 
monitoring them in hopes of an actual Bluebird using them! Instead of the 
sparrows. 

Dora and Carl Webb
Subject: Re: Lake Hefner yesterday
From: Kevin Groeneweg <kgroeneweg AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 11:20:53 -0800
I also stopped by Hefner on Sunday, but in the late morning. I walked out to 
the edge of the water at Stars and Stripes and a Prairie Dog Point and got 
sand-blasted for my efforts. However, I did see a few shorebirds; Least 
Sandpipers and Greater Yellowlegs along with some Killdeer. Lots of gulls, with 
one Lesser Black-backed and one, possibly two Thayer's. Lots of Goldeneye and 
Red-breasted Mergs on the lake, and 4 common loons along the dam. 


Kevin Groeneweg
Midwest City


Lake Hefner, Oklahoma, US-OK
Jan 18, 2015 10:09 AM - 12:48 PM
Protocol: Traveling
9.0 mile(s)
Comments:     
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8 38 species (+1 other taxa) Canada Goose 147 Gadwall 39 Mallard 46 Mallard (Domestic type) 25 Northern Shoveler 19 Northern Pintail 34 Green-winged Teal 3 Ring-necked Duck 6 Greater Scaup 4 Lesser Scaup 10 Bufflehead 6 Common Goldeneye 224 Hooded Merganser 4 Common Merganser 45 Red-breasted Merganser 113 Common Loon 4 Pied-billed Grebe 14 Horned Grebe 7 Double-crested Cormorant 274 Large number off Prairie Dog Point American White Pelican 24 Great Blue Heron 1 American Coot 71 Killdeer 6 Greater Yellowlegs 5 Least Sandpiper 19 Bonaparte's Gull 17 Ring-billed Gull 760 Herring Gull 86 Thayer's Gull 1 Lesser Black-backed Gull 1 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 20 American Crow 4 Carolina Wren 1 European Starling X Song Sparrow 2 Red-winged Blackbird 30 Great-tailed Grackle 50 Brown-headed Cowbird 2 House Finch 1 On Monday, January 19, 2015 10:46 AM, Sharon Henthorn wrote: I took my binoculars and scope yesterday afternoon in hopes of getting good sightings at the lake. I was rewarded instantly with six eastern bluebirds and a red-bellied woodpecker just north of the inlet in a tree. After that I might as well have stayed home. The wind was so strong that I couldn’t steady the scope to get clear looks at the myriad waterfowl in the lake. The gulls were hovering over the diving birds, and a small number of pied-billed grebes and buffleheads were near the dam. I could not find any shorebirds, and I believe both Bonaparte’s gulls and ring-billed gulls were flying nearby. There were lots of pelicans flying in near shore. There were both Canada geese and cackling geese feeding near the cockleburs on the lake floor, joined by a few unidentified ducks. A flock of about forty-five blackbird-like birds flew up and disappeared in the brush. The optical equipment was totally useless, as all I identified were seen without them. But it should have been a good day for novice birders who need to see only a small number of birds well. The pelicans were graceful and close-by. The pied-billed grebes and buffleheads were easy to see, and the cackling geese were easy to tell from the larger Canada geese. Sometimes I get too greedy for numbers or complexity, and forget to enjoy the simple things. Sharon
Subject: Lake Hefner yesterday
From: Sharon Henthorn <henthorn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 10:46:41 -0600
I took my binoculars and scope yesterday afternoon in hopes of getting good
sightings at the lake.  I was rewarded instantly with six eastern bluebirds
and a red-bellied woodpecker just north of the inlet in a tree. 

 

After that I might as well have stayed home.  The wind was so strong that I
couldn't steady the scope to get clear looks at the myriad waterfowl in the
lake.  The gulls were hovering over the diving birds, and a small number of
pied-billed grebes and buffleheads were near the dam.  I could not find any
shorebirds, and I believe both Bonaparte's gulls and ring-billed gulls were
flying nearby.  There were lots of pelicans flying in near shore.  There
were both Canada geese and cackling geese feeding near the cockleburs on the
lake floor, joined by a few unidentified ducks.  A flock of about forty-five
blackbird-like birds flew up and disappeared in the brush.  

 

The optical equipment was totally useless, as all I identified were seen
without them.  But it should have been a good day for novice birders who
need to see only a small number of birds well.  The pelicans were graceful
and close-by.  The pied-billed grebes and buffleheads were easy to see, and
the cackling geese were easy to tell from the larger Canada geese.
Sometimes I get too greedy for numbers or complexity, and forget to enjoy
the simple things.

 

Sharon
Subject: Barn owl
From: tunderhill <tunderhill AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 02:09:06 -0600
Hello OKBirders,
A gentleman contacted me through the OKC Audubon.  He lives in Tipton Oklahoma 
and said he found a barn owl that had died in his barn. He put it in his 
freezer and thought that somebody might be able to us it.  

I told him if anybody contacted me about it I would give them his phone 
number.I will post a little bit of his message below. You can email me off the 
list for his contact info at tunderhill AT cox.net 


'I have a carcass of a beautiful barn owl that died on my farm without 
incident. It's in perfect condition and I was wondering who I could donate it 
to for a reasonable cause.   I notified my county Warden about it so there's 
nothing illegal or shady about it.  I wanted to mount it but I cannot do it 
legally. I just hate to see it go to waste. Its such a pretty bird .' 


Goog birding,
Terri Underhill
Edmond OK





Sent from Samsung tablet
Subject: Re: Rose-Faced Lovebird
From: Deanne McKinney <trialsz63 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 00:35:39 -0600
I haven't seen the lovebird at my house since October. It sounds like he
likes it at your house though.

The Sharp-shinned Hawk that I've seen here has been coming for quite awhile
- at least since late last summer. It is immature. I don't know how long it
takes for them to get their adult feathers but it looks like the same one
that keeps coming back. Given the smorgasbord of sparrows at the feeders
lately, it must be having more successful feeding trips here than I've
witnessed.

There is also a Cooper's Hawk that has been coming around for over a year.
At least I think it's the same one. It comes to the yard every day just as
the Sharp-shinned does. It's noticeably larger and has adult feathers,
among other markings that distinguish it from the Sharp-shinned. Last
Saturday, both of them were in the yard at the same time, sitting on
different fences. That was pretty neat to see. I think the Cooper's is
picking off all the doves. There are fewer and fewer of them around now.
There used to be three kinds of doves coming to the yard, upwards of three
dozen at a time on a good day. Now there is only one pair of Eurasian
Collared Doves left. I suppose that when those are gone, the Cooper's Hawk
may pick off the rest of the squirrels, or it might just find a new
neighborhood.

My email address is below. You can email me directly if you'd like so we
don't bore the rest of the OKbirds folks with talk about our yard birds.

Deanne
trialsz63 AT gmail.com





On Sun, Jan 18, 2015 at 10:22 PM, Jan Dolph  wrote:

> Jan. 18, 2015 Sunday
>
>
>
> As I was taking down Christmas lights around 3:30 today. I heard the
> lovebird.  He had arrived again with his buddies the sparrows.   He stayed
> around and had his meal of sunflower seeds and peanuts.  I was afraid the
> cold weather had taken his life until today.  I do hope he survives the
> weather that is ahead of him.
>
>
>
> I wanted to post because so many of you had asked about him and told me
> about the escaped parrots that had come to your feeders in the past.
>
>
>
> Happy birding,
>
>
>
> Jan Dolph
>
> Northwest Oklahoma City,
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Rose-Faced Lovebird
From: Jan Dolph <russetdm AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 22:22:16 -0600
Jan. 18, 2015 Sunday

 

As I was taking down Christmas lights around 3:30 today. I heard the
lovebird.  He had arrived again with his buddies the sparrows.   He stayed
around and had his meal of sunflower seeds and peanuts.  I was afraid the
cold weather had taken his life until today.  I do hope he survives the
weather that is ahead of him.

 

I wanted to post because so many of you had asked about him and told me
about the escaped parrots that had come to your feeders in the past. 

 

Happy birding,

 

Jan Dolph

Northwest Oklahoma City,

 

 
Subject: southwest OK birding
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 18:43:32 -0600
                I spent most of the day cruising thru the Wichita Mtns then
down to the Claypool area in Jefferson County to look for the previously
reported

                Crested Caracaras.

                Highlights today were one Lewis' Woodpecker along the road
into French Lake in the Wichta Mtns refuge, four Mountain Bluebirds just
outside

                the west end of the refuge, 25 Chestnut-collared Longspurs
at the dogtown near the Meers turnoff near the Holy City, 8 Bald Eagles on
the Parker

                Ranch near Claypool, 1100 Sandhill Cranes just northwest of
Chattanooga in Tillman County, numerous shrikes all day including at least
ten on

                the roads around the Parker Ranch near Claypool in Jefferson
County. Also, I saw Prairie Falcon, Merlin, Ferruginous Hawk and Rough-leg
Hawk

                in the ranch lands near Claypool.

                Alas, I did not see any caracaras despite searching the
county roads north of Hwy 70 near Claypool for about two hours.

 

                Anyway, it was a good day to be out. the temp reached 75 and
the winds weren't gale force. I almost doubled my yearlist just today.

 

 

                Jimmy Woodard

                Midwest City, OK
Subject: Re: Mocking birds with brains!
From: Moninya Mulder <oden_mulder AT BRIGHTOK.NET>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 16:01:26 -0600
Guess you would have to ask the bird. :) I remain happily uncommitted and 
vague. 


 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of John Shackford
Sent: Sunday, January 18, 2015 3:48 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Mocking birds with brains!

 

I wasn't sure whether you meant breeding territorial or feeder territorial (or 
both) Mockingbird, but I suspect feeder territorial is the most appropriate 
designation. 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Sun, Jan 18, 2015 at 11:56 AM, Sue Selman  > wrote: 


That is really cool. The Red-winged Blackbirds are my problem.

Sue Selman

Haper County OK

 

On Jan 18, 2015, at 8:26, Moninya Mulder  > wrote: 






For weeks I have been watching a territorial mockingbird chase everything for 
the feeder stations. I recently changed to a songbird mix that has dried fruit 
and nuts. With that mix I had to loosen up the food, once in a while, as the 
sticky fruit stuck up the feeder. This morning I noticed that the entire feeder 
station was needing a refill. Pre-mocking bird I put out 25 pounds or so a 
week, then it is slowed to 10 pounds. Now back up to 20ish pounds. As I drank 
my coffee and watched the show outside my window, along with 3 cats, there was 
NO mockingbird just flocks of Titmouse, Chickadee, Cardinal, Goldfinch, 
Sparrows and several other hungry birds. Then terror from above, the 
Mockingbird flew down and scared them all away, but not too far. They were 
waiting, scattered about the bushes and close trees. The Mockingbird, aka 
little shit (LS), went directly to the songbird feeder and began pulling out 
seeds until he got his reward of fruit. He tried every opening of three tubes. 
Then LS flew to a watching post a few yards away and all the birds returned. 
This happened every 15 minutes or so. I am tickle at the brains of the bird and 
how I get to see such drama and bird behavior out my window. Well, I have 
enjoyed this list (mostly, hate human drama) and wanted to share this perfect 
morning! Love a bird with brains! 


Moninya Mulder

N. of Sulphur Oklahoma

 

 
Subject: Re: Mocking birds with brains!
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 15:48:26 -0600
I wasn't sure whether you meant breeding territorial or feeder territorial
(or both) Mockingbird, but I suspect feeder territorial is the most
appropriate designation.









On Sun, Jan 18, 2015 at 11:56 AM, Sue Selman 
wrote:

> That is really cool. The Red-winged Blackbirds are my problem.
> Sue Selman
> Haper County OK
>
> On Jan 18, 2015, at 8:26, Moninya Mulder  wrote:
>
> For weeks I have been watching a territorial mockingbird chase everything
> for the feeder stations. I recently changed to a songbird mix that has
> dried fruit and nuts. With that mix I had to loosen up the food, once in a
> while, as the sticky fruit stuck up the feeder. This morning I noticed that
> the entire feeder station was needing a refill. Pre-mocking bird I put out
> 25 pounds or so a week, then it is slowed to 10 pounds. Now back up to
> 20ish pounds.  As I drank my coffee and watched the show outside my window,
> along with 3 cats, there was NO mockingbird just flocks of Titmouse,
> Chickadee, Cardinal, Goldfinch, Sparrows and several other hungry birds.
> Then terror from above, the Mockingbird flew down and scared them all away,
> but not too far. They were waiting, scattered about the bushes and close
> trees. The Mockingbird, aka little shit (LS), went directly to the songbird
> feeder and began pulling out seeds until he got his reward of fruit. He
> tried every opening of three tubes. Then LS flew to a watching post a few
> yards away and all the birds returned. This happened every 15 minutes or
> so. I am tickle at the brains of the bird and how I get to see such drama
> and bird behavior out my window. Well, I have enjoyed this list (mostly,
> hate human drama) and wanted to share this perfect morning! Love a bird
> with brains!
> Moninya Mulder
> N. of Sulphur Oklahoma
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Pine Siskins
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 13:57:23 -0600
Larry, I have had a couple pine siskins at my yard feeders in Edmond . We have 
seen only a couple in Mitch Park as well. 

Other backyard nice visitors have included: a winter wren (Jan 8) and a few 
golden -crowned kinglets and ruby crowned kinglets on Jan9. 

Our most unusual bird at Mitch park has been a hybrid spotted / eastern towhee- 
minimal spots and some of them are slightly colored a pale rusty 

color. 
Hal Yocum 
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 18, 2015, at 11:18 AM, larrymays1949  wrote:
> 
> 
> About a week or so back I had, among a growing swarm of goldfinches, my first 
of season siskin at the feeders. Now the number has grown to at least 5. Anyone 
else getting these little zreeeezers at their stations? 

> 
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note® II, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Re: Pine Siskins
From: Dora Webb <owl112 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 13:51:38 -0600
I had about 8 pine siskins at the finch feeder about two weeks ago. They 
flushed when I walked closer to the door and never came back. 

Dora Webb
Edmond, OK

From: larrymays1949 
Sent: Sunday, January 18, 2015 11:18 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Subject: Pine Siskins


About a week or so back I had, among a growing swarm of goldfinches, my first 
of season siskin at the feeders. Now the number has grown to at least 5. Anyone 
else getting these little zreeeezers at their stations? 


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note® II, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Re: Pine Siskins
From: Jan Dolph <russetdm AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 13:14:55 -0600
Deanne,

 

Have you seen the Rose lovebird in January? He would come with the sparrows. I 
had two American goldfinches when it was so cold. They were in their greenish 
feathers. I heard them and took a second look and saw them at my feeder. I have 
not seen them since. I hope you keep the Sharp-shinned hawk at your house. He 
usually comes to my house. I saw him in early December. 


 

Happy birding,

Jan Dolph

Northwest Oklahoma City

 

PS Could you please send me your E-mail address?  I had it at one time.

 

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Deanne McKinney
Sent: Sunday, January 18, 2015 11:42 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Pine Siskins

 

At my NW OKC home, I can't get the Pine Siskins to visit despite the variety of 
feeders and food placed in the feeders. No goldfinches either. There is, 
however, a plethora of House Sparrows and Dark-Eyed Juncos that attract a 
persistent Sharp-shinned hawk. I'd love to have the siskins pay a visit though. 


 

On Sun, Jan 18, 2015 at 11:18 AM, larrymays1949  
wrote: 


 

About a week or so back I had, among a growing swarm of goldfinches, my first 
of season siskin at the feeders. Now the number has grown to at least 5. Anyone 
else getting these little zreeeezers at their stations? 


 

Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note® II, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

 
Subject: Re: Mocking birds with brains!
From: Sue Selman <selmanranch AT WILDBLUE.NET>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 11:56:13 -0600
That is really cool. The Red-winged Blackbirds are my problem.
Sue Selman
Haper County OK
On Jan 18, 2015, at 8:26, Moninya Mulder  wrote:

> For weeks I have been watching a territorial mockingbird chase everything for 
the feeder stations. I recently changed to a songbird mix that has dried fruit 
and nuts. With that mix I had to loosen up the food, once in a while, as the 
sticky fruit stuck up the feeder. This morning I noticed that the entire feeder 
station was needing a refill. Pre-mocking bird I put out 25 pounds or so a 
week, then it is slowed to 10 pounds. Now back up to 20ish pounds. As I drank 
my coffee and watched the show outside my window, along with 3 cats, there was 
NO mockingbird just flocks of Titmouse, Chickadee, Cardinal, Goldfinch, 
Sparrows and several other hungry birds. Then terror from above, the 
Mockingbird flew down and scared them all away, but not too far. They were 
waiting, scattered about the bushes and close trees. The Mockingbird, aka 
little shit (LS), went directly to the songbird feeder and began pulling out 
seeds until he got his reward of fruit. He tried every opening of three tubes. 
Then LS flew to a watching post a few yards away and all the birds returned. 
This happened every 15 minutes or so. I am tickle at the brains of the bird and 
how I get to see such drama and bird behavior out my window. Well, I have 
enjoyed this list (mostly, hate human drama) and wanted to share this perfect 
morning! Love a bird with brains! 

> Moninya Mulder
> N. of Sulphur Oklahoma
Subject: Re: Pine Siskins
From: Deanne McKinney <trialsz63 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 11:41:55 -0600
At my NW OKC home, I can't get the Pine Siskins to visit despite the
variety of feeders and food placed in the feeders. No goldfinches either.
There is, however, a plethora of House Sparrows and Dark-Eyed Juncos that
attract a persistent Sharp-shinned hawk. I'd love to have the siskins pay a
visit though.

On Sun, Jan 18, 2015 at 11:18 AM, larrymays1949 
wrote:

>
> About a week or so back I had, among a growing swarm of goldfinches, my
> first of season siskin at the feeders.  Now the number has grown to at
> least 5.  Anyone else getting these little zreeeezers at their stations?
>
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note® II, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
>
Subject: Re: Pine Siskins
From: Jennifer Kidney <jenlkidney AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 11:32:44 -0600
I've had them as well the past two weeks along with the goldfinches.

Jennifer Kidney
Norman

Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 11:18:58 -0600
From: larrymays1949 AT GMAIL.COM
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Pine Siskins
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU


About a week or so back I had, among a growing swarm of goldfinches, my first 
of season siskin at the feeders. Now the number has grown to at least 5. Anyone 
else getting these little zreeeezers at their stations? 

Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note II, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Pine Siskins
From: Kurt Meisenzahl <meisenzk AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 09:32:31 -0800
We did not see more than one or two Pine Siskins until 1 weeks ago.
As many as 7 have been seen on the thistle feeders this past week.

Just counted 11 Pine Siskins on the thistle feeders and on the ground
at 11:30 this morning.....

Kurt & Sharon Meisenzahl
Lawton, OK 


On Sunday, January 18, 2015 11:18 AM, larrymays1949  
wrote: 

  




About a week or so back I had, among a growing swarm of goldfinches, my first 
of season siskin at the feeders. Now the number has grown to at least 5. Anyone 
else getting these little zreeeezers at their stations? 


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note II, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Pine Siskins
From: larrymays1949 <larrymays1949 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 11:18:58 -0600
About a week or so back I had, among a growing swarm of goldfinches, my first 
of season siskin at the feeders.  Now the number has grown to at least 5. 
 Anyone else getting these little zreeeezers at their stations? 


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note® II, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Mocking birds with brains!
From: Moninya Mulder <oden_mulder AT BRIGHTOK.NET>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 08:26:55 -0600
For weeks I have been watching a territorial mockingbird chase everything
for the feeder stations. I recently changed to a songbird mix that has dried
fruit and nuts. With that mix I had to loosen up the food, once in a while,
as the sticky fruit stuck up the feeder. This morning I noticed that the
entire feeder station was needing a refill. Pre-mocking bird I put out 25
pounds or so a week, then it is slowed to 10 pounds. Now back up to 20ish
pounds.  As I drank my coffee and watched the show outside my window, along
with 3 cats, there was NO mockingbird just flocks of Titmouse, Chickadee,
Cardinal, Goldfinch, Sparrows and several other hungry birds.  Then terror
from above, the Mockingbird flew down and scared them all away, but not too
far. They were waiting, scattered about the bushes and close trees. The
Mockingbird, aka little shit (LS), went directly to the songbird feeder and
began pulling out seeds until he got his reward of fruit. He tried every
opening of three tubes. Then LS flew to a watching post a few  yards away
and all the birds returned. This happened every 15 minutes or so. I am
tickle at the brains of the bird and how I get to see such drama and bird
behavior out my window. Well, I have enjoyed this list (mostly, hate human
drama) and wanted to share this perfect morning! Love a bird with brains!

Moninya Mulder

N. of Sulphur Oklahoma

 
Subject: Kaw Lake and Ponca Lake today
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 02:31:51 +0000
Had to give a presentation today at Kaw City for the Eagle Watch, so I took a 
couple students birding! Highlights include: 

5-6 Bald Eagles (Kaw)
Adult Lesser Black-backed Gull at Marina N of dam at Kaw
15 Herring Gull at PC Lake, about 30 at marina and dam (Kaw)
30 Bonaparte's at marina and dam area
Ringbills a ton at both
Canada geese and coots at both
2 pelican, about 4-5 DC Cormorants, Gadwall, 4 Red-breasted Merganser all at 
marina and dam area 

N Pintail at PC Lake
C Goldeneye at Kaw
Buffleheads, Hooded Mergs at both lakes
Comm Merg at Kaw
Green-winged Teal on River S of dam
Robins, Blue Jays, were in good numbers throughout!

Good day to be out!

Gene Young
NOC-Tonkawa

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone
Subject: More Swans
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2015 12:55:37 -0600
Hello All,

            This morning, found two Trumpeter Swans in Mohawk Park along
the golf course lagoon near the Oxley gate. Also got mugged by a group of
Egyptian/domestic/hybrid geese who basically poked their heads into my car
window, screaming for a handout.

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Re: https://www.flickr.com/photos/130744824@N08/
From: Sue Selman <selmanranch AT WILDBLUE.NET>
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2015 07:30:11 -0600
 Jan I have not been paying attention to where this is.
 I would love to have them in my yard but I live out here in the prairie.
 Sue Selman
 Harper CT OK
On Jan 15, 2015, at 13:07, Jan Dolph  wrote:

> These are pictures of the Rose lovebird in my yard. The pictures were taken 
Jan. 6, 2015. 

> https://www.flickr.com/photos/130744824 AT N08/
>  
> Happy birding,
>  
> Jan Dolph
Subject: New Raptor Photos
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 16:22:35 -0600
OKBirds,

 

I spent some time Tuesday January 13, 2015 photographing raptors in north
Tulsa County. There were lots around and even a few cooperative individuals
including an immature Red-tailed Hawk with a Cotton Rat. Species include
Bald Eagle, Northern Harrier, American Kestrel, Red-shouldered Hawk and
several Red-tail Hawk individuals and morphs. See the link below for my
"Recent Birds" gallery.

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Re: Flicker
From: Jan Dolph <russetdm AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 13:09:46 -0600
John,

 

Thanks so much for your help.

 

Jan Dolph

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of John Kennington
Sent: Wednesday, January 14, 2015 7:52 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Flicker

 

Jan,

 

When you are looking at your picture in Flickr, on the lower right area of the 
screen are some icons. Click on the arrow pointing to the right, which is 
"Share this photo". A little window will pop up, and on here click the Link 
option, and then copy and paste that into your OKBirds message. 


 

John

 

 

 

On Wed, Jan 14, 2015 at 6:05 PM, Jan Dolph  wrote:

Could someone please explain to me how I post pictures? I now have my Rose 
lovebird on Flicker. What do I do now? 


 

Thanks,

 

Jan Dolph

 
Subject: https://www.flickr.com/photos/130744824@N08/
From: Jan Dolph <russetdm AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 13:07:35 -0600
These are pictures of the Rose lovebird in my yard.  The pictures were taken
Jan. 6, 2015. 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/130744824 AT N08/

 

Happy birding,

 

Jan Dolph 
Subject: Re: RFI sites for longspurs, etc. out-of-state birder
From: Bill Buskirk <billb AT EARLHAM.EDU>
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 08:52:36 -0500
Thanks, John. I really appreciate the help! Bill 



From: "John Kennington"  
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Sent: Wednesday, January 14, 2015 5:33:37 PM 
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] RFI sites for longspurs, etc. out-of-state birder 

Bill, 
I've got a page on the Tulsa Audubon site about finding longspurs in Oklahoma. 
Here is the intro explaining it: 




A common question birders visiting Oklahoma ask is "Where can I find 
longspurs?" This question has been asked on the OKBirds Listserve many times 
over the years, and on this page I have compiled the answers from Oklahoma 
birders. Steve Schafer and Joe Grzybowski have especially contributed very 
informative posts. Finally, I've added two posts from Cyndie Browning on her 
birding adventures at the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, which include longspur 
searches. 


Please be aware that some of this information is a few years old, but in 
general it is still all relevant and should serve as a guide to finding 
longspurs in Oklahoma. There is also excellent information included on 
identifying longspurs. 





The page is at: 

http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/longspurs.htm 

Good luck! 
John Kennington 
Tulsa Audubon 



On Wed, Jan 14, 2015 at 3:45 PM, Bill Buskirk < billb AT earlham.edu > wrote: 

BQ_BEGIN

I meant Chestnut-collared. 


From: "William Buskirk" < billb AT EARLHAM.EDU > 
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Sent: Wednesday, January 14, 2015 2:46:15 PM 
Subject: [OKBIRDS] RFI sites for longspurs, etc. out-of-state birder 

Hey all, 

My brother and I are retired and getting stir crazy during the winter months in 
Indiana. We have decided to visit (aka adventure) areas not familiar to us 
through our previous travels and birding. We decided on the Kansas, Oklahoma, 
TX Panhandle area, and probably E New Mexico as filling the bill for a trip 
before the end of the month. 


Among the birds we would like to target finding are Smith's, McCown's and 
Chestnut-sided Longspurs. Can any of you share locations and techniques for 
good ("reliable") chances of finding longspurs in your area at this season? We 
would appreciate it! 


I've been following the presence of Lewis' Woodpecker at Wichita Mtn. We'll 
give that a try as well. 


Feel free to contact me at billb  AT  earlham.edu . 

Thanks, 

Bill 

Bill Buskirk 
Professor of Biology, emeritus 
Earlham College 
Richmond, IN 47374 


From: "Jennie Brooks" < 2014birder AT GMAIL.COM > 
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 2015 2:15:55 PM 
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Canceling 

Julie, I think I found it for you. 
IMPORTANT: The following commands (shown in capital letters) which help you 
review or change your subscription settings MUST BE sent to 
listserv AT lists.ou.edu 
To unsubscribe to the list, send the command SIGNOFF OKBIRDS 
Jennie 


On Tue, Jan 13, 2015 at 12:13 PM, Julie McFarland < juliejmcfarland AT att.net > 
wrote: 


BQ_BEGIN
I'm sorry, but I would like to cancel my notifications. I inadvertently deleted 
the email that allowed me to do that myself. Any help would be much 
appreciated. 


Sincerely, 
Julie McFarland 
BQ_END



BQ_END

Subject: Swans
From: "Bostian, Kelly" <Kelly.Bostian AT TULSAWORLD.COM>
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 05:49:47 +0000
A little info on Swans in the Tulsa World today, with thanks to Jim Arterburn 
for some great photos! 



http://www.tulsaworld.com/communities/bixby/news/rare-winter-guests-trumpeter-swans-spotted-around-tulsa-area/article_3e7c728f-583d-5f88-aef3-7964484d2424.html 


Kelly Bostian
Outdoors Writer
Tulsa World Media Company
www.tulsaworld.com
office | 918 581 8357
mobile | 918 231 1385
fax | 918 581 8353
315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
twitter |  AT kellybostian
blog |tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian
email | kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com