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Updated on Thursday, July 28 at 06:31 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Boat-billed Heron,©Dan Lane

28 Jul Re: Catching up [Jennifer Kidney ]
28 Jul Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost [John Kennington ]
28 Jul Tulsa Purple Martin Roost [Caitlin L ]
27 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 27 [David Arbour ]
27 Jul Lake Hefner today [Sharon Henthorn ]
26 Jul Sludge pond OKC [Sharon Henthorn ]
26 Jul Hefner Loon [Bill Carrell ]
26 Jul Re: New Photos Added to Website [Mark Cromwell ]
26 Jul ID help [Terry Mitchell ]
25 Jul New Photos Added to Website [Jim Arterburn ]
24 Jul Catching up [rgunn1 ]
20 Jul Fwd: Tulsa Audubon - Corrected Link for The Messenger [Jim Deming ]
19 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 19 [David Arbour ]
18 Jul Re: Is this a White Winged Dove [Sue Lutze ]
18 Jul Re: Lake Yahola Sunday [Melinda Droege ]
18 Jul Re: Is this a White Winged Dove [Lauren Wilkerson ]
18 Jul Is this a White Winged Dove [Sue Lutze ]
18 Jul Lake Yahola Sunday [Bill Carrell ]
17 Jul Hackberry Flat, Thurdsay 7/14 [ML2x ]
17 Jul Rose lake today 7-17 [John Hurd ]
17 Jul Re: Cormorant in July? [Jim Arterburn ]
17 Jul Cormorant in July? ["bill ." ]
16 Jul Photos added to PBase Website [Jim Arterburn ]
16 Jul Hackberry Flat yesterday [Matthew Jung ]
15 Jul Colorado Atlas II book preorder [Pete Janzen ]
13 Jul Bird-Friendly Yards [Ann Gordon ]
13 Jul New Photos Added to PBase Website [Jim Arterburn ]
12 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 12 [David Arbour ]
12 Jul Barred Owls in mid Tulsa [Patricia Seibert ]
11 Jul Southbound [Bill Carrell ]
8 Jul Re: New photos added to PBase Website [Jim Arterburn ]
8 Jul New photos added to PBase Website [Jim Arterburn ]
8 Jul Rose Lake and surrounding area - 7/8/16 [Deanne McKinney ]
8 Jul Free magazines/journals [Claire Curry ]
6 Jul Re: FW: eBird Report - Texas County, OK, US, Jul 3, 2016 [John Shackford ]
5 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 5 [David Arbour ]
5 Jul Re: 30 Year Eagle Take Permits [Melinda Droege ]
5 Jul Re: 30 Year Eagle Take Permits [Melinda Droege ]
5 Jul Re: 30 Year Eagle Take Permits [John Kennington ]
5 Jul Re: 30 Year Eagle Take Permits [Melinda Droege ]
5 Jul 30 Year Eagle Take Permits [John Kennington ]
4 Jul Re: Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs added to PBase Website [Jim Arterburn ]
4 Jul Re: Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs added to PBase Website [John Shackford ]
4 Jul Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs added to PBase Website [Jim Arterburn ]
4 Jul Salt Plains on 7-4-2016 [Mary Peterson ]
3 Jul Black-chinned Hummingbird range ["bill ." ]
3 Jul Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 29 ["bill ." ]
1 Jul July Migration Report [Patricia Velte ]
1 Jul Re: New Photos Uploaded [Mark Cromwell ]
29 Jun Red Slough Bird Survey - June 29 [David Arbour ]
29 Jun New Photos Uploaded [Jim Arterburn ]
26 Jun Re: New Red Slough photos posted online [Tom Ewert ]
24 Jun New Red Slough photos posted online [David Arbour ]
23 Jun Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos [Jim Arterburn ]
23 Jun Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos [John Shackford ]
23 Jun Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos [EUGENE YOUNG ]
23 Jun Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos [Sebastian ]
22 Jun Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos [Jim Arterburn ]
21 Jun Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20 [Jerry Davis ]
21 Jun Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20 [Jerry Davis ]
20 Jun Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20 [David Arbour ]
19 Jun This morning on Suoth Jenkins [rgunn1 ]
19 Jun Re: FW: eBird Report - Joe B. Barnes Park, Jun 19, 2016 [John Shackford ]
18 Jun Belated report - Cave Swallow at Red Slough [David Arbour ]
18 Jun Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 13 - corrections! [David Arbour ]
18 Jun Bird list serve [Dora Webb ]
18 Jun Red Slough Bird Survey - June 13 [David Arbour ]
12 Jun Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday [John Shackford ]
12 Jun Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday [Doug Wood ]
11 Jun Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday [Pete Janzen ]
11 Jun Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday [Doug Wood ]
11 Jun Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday [John Shackford ]
11 Jun Re: Oklahoma Bird Pictures [JOS GRZYBOWSKI ]
11 Jun Correction: date of Chester Fire [Pete Janzen ]
11 Jun Major County BBS route last Saturday [Pete Janzen ]
10 Jun Oklahoma Bird Pictures [Ken or Carol Williams ]

Subject: Re: Catching up
From: Jennifer Kidney <jenlkidney AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 18:30:28 -0500
I got this, Dick. I just got back from Colorado. I don't think you've been 
kicked off; I just think that all OKBirds posts don't reach everyone. Also, 
there are many fewer than in the past. 


Jennifer Kidney

> Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 18:37:18 -0500
> From: rgunn1 AT COX.NET
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Catching up
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> 
> I am off OKBirds again. Must think you are spam. I just waited and it 
> fixed itself last time. Probably wont this go around., If someone can 
> tell me how to get back on, contact at my personal email address. 
> OKBirds won't get through.
> 
> Bird wise, best is an early American Bittern off Jenkins to the east 
> behind Potts locked gate.  Got a great look,watched it closely for five 
> minutes to be sure. The daily species count has gone up from 20 or so in 
> the middle of June to almost forty the last few days--all the normal 
> stuff and lots of herons, egrets on the flooded hay fields.
> 
> Otherwise, some A-hole dropped a litter of puppies off on Bratcher 
> Miner. There were supposedly six there this morning but by the time we 
> got there we could only locate four. They  (the evil doers) always drop 
> them on weekends when I can't get them to the shelter. Currently I have 
> a backyard full of part beagle (?) puppies lounging on the cool, wet 
> concrete till tomorrow. Tired, thirsty and hungry , they went through a 
> month's worth of Blossom's food in a couple of hours and one fell asleep 
> with his head in the waterbowl.  How can our fellow Oklahomans be so 
> callous? Dropping them off is one thing, but in this weather?
> 
> D.
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost
From: John Kennington <johnkennington AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 01:48:41 -0500
2016 has been a very bad year for Purple Martins, in northeast Oklahoma as
well as other states. We have seen some birds in downtown Tulsa in the
vicinity of the Doubletree Hotel, but the numbers are much lower than
normal. We decided to cancel our July 23 Purple Martin Watch. However, we
expect more migrating birds will be joining roost, and hope they will
settle in at a convenient location to view. So we are still planning to
host our second watch on Saturday, August 6th. We'll be announcing the
exact time and location next week.

John Kennington
Tulsa Audubon

On Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 12:57 AM, Caitlin L  wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> I remember hearing about the Tulsa Purple Martin roost about this time
> last year. Does anyone have any information on where they are gathering
> this year? I confess, I might have missed an email. I live in Stillwater
> and want to make the drive out to see them again. Thank you for any help!
>
> Good birding,
>
> Caitlin M Laughlin
>
Subject: Tulsa Purple Martin Roost
From: Caitlin L <gaeliccat AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 00:57:39 -0500
Hi all,

I remember hearing about the Tulsa Purple Martin roost about this time last
year. Does anyone have any information on where they are gathering this
year? I confess, I might have missed an email. I live in Stillwater and
want to make the drive out to see them again. Thank you for any help!

Good birding,

Caitlin M Laughlin
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 27
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 22:18:24 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot on most of the survey today but became overcast
with light rain near the end of the survey.  61 species were found.  Waiting
for fall migration to start.  Only one species today would be considered a
migrant and that was the shrike.  They leave RS in April but always show
back up in mid-August.  Today's bird was two weeks earlier than normal.
They actually breed in the county just north of us in upland pastures.  Unit
44 is slowly drying up and there is starting to get to be a nice
concentration of waders feeding there including White Ibis and
Yellow-crowned Night-Herons.  This is the spot that Wood Storks and
Spoonbills will probably first show up at when they arrive.  Here is my list
for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 3

Wood Duck - 58  (also 1 brood seen.)

Northern Bobwhite - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 29

Neotropic Cormorant - 11

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 24 

Great-blue Heron - 10

Great Egret - 44

Snowy Egret - 37

Little-blue Heron - 40

Cattle Egret - 43

Green Heron - 3

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 10

White Ibis - 17

Black Vulture - 4

Turkey Vulture - 17

Mississippi Kite - 38

Purple Gallinule - 5 

Common Gallinule - 18 (also 7 chicks.)

American Coot - 9

Least Tern - 1

Mourning Dove - 20

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 6

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 8

Northern Flicker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 1

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 6

Bell's Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

American Crow - 10

Fish Crow - 2

Purple Martin - 3

Tree Swallow - 8

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 17

Cliff Swallow - 2

Barn Swallow - 42

Carolina Chickadee - 5

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Gray Catbird - 4

Northern Mockingbird - 3

Common Yellowthroat - 8

Yellow-breasted Chat - 3

Summer Tanager - 2

Eastern Towhee - 4

Field Sparrow - 1

Lark Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 21

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 16

Painted Bunting - 6

Dickcissel - 12

Red-winged Blackbird - 25

Common Grackle - 1

House Sparrow - 6

 

Odonates:

 

Citrine Forktail

Common Green Darner

Swamp Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Flag-tailed Spinyleg

Two-striped Forceptail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

"red" Saddlebags species

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Lake Hefner today
From: Sharon Henthorn <shenthorn205 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 15:24:28 -0500
I was circling the lake and noted mostly quiet and peace.  A few fishermen,
some egrets, mallards, and great blue herons, and some mourning doves and
mockingbirds.  The lone American white pelican remains on the lake, and
today was also a common loon close to the dam.

At the sludge lagoon were fewer than yesterday, but included a green heron.
The scissortail was again bouncing around the beach presumably for beach
insects.  Sharon
Subject: Sludge pond OKC
From: Sharon Henthorn <shenthorn205 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 15:48:25 -0500
I am searching the beach for shorebirds after last night heavy rain. American 
avocets, Forster's terns and ring-billed gulls. Nearby floating was a 
pied-billed grebe. And several mallards including a mom and seven ducklings. As 
I began to type, two deer strolled across the hill to drink from the south 
shoreline. Now I see a barn swallow in flight, a scissor tail flycatcher moving 
above the beach surface, mourning doves and a great blue heron hunting for 
food. 

The pond was dry much of this year and is now getting direct rain. It is behind 
John Marshall high school west of 122nd& Portland. 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Hefner Loon
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 13:10:43 -0500
Hello All,

Did a circuit around Hefner on the way to my sister's in Norman Sunday,
found a non-breeding plumaged Common Loon near Prairie Dog Point. Saw
another one about a week ago in Tulsa, think they've probably been
summering rather than migrating through early. Here's a link to the
observation on iNaturalist:

http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/3741070

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Re: New Photos Added to Website
From: Mark Cromwell <mark.cromwell01 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 11:14:24 -0500
Great pics. You are a terrific photographer. (I would have tossed those
rear end images, but you're after plumage, etc.).
Cheers, mc

On Mon, Jul 25, 2016 at 8:11 PM, Jim Arterburn  wrote:

> OKBirds,
>
>
>
> A few more shorebird photos. Included in this group are Wilson’ Phalarope,
> Spotted Sandpiper and Solitary Sandpiper. All photos are from this spring
> in south Tulsa County. The photos have been added to the beginning of my
> “Recent Birds” gallery at the link below.
>
>
>
> http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds
>
>
>
> Cheers,
>
>
>
> Jim Arterburn
>
> Tulsa, Oklahoma
>
> www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder
>
>
>
Subject: ID help
From: Terry Mitchell <terry AT PECOT.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 10:45:56 -0500
Here’s a link to 4 photos of a bird I saw Saturday at Blackbird Marsh at
Oxley Nature Center. I initially thought it was a Eastern Phoebe and I
after looking around a few books I think that is what is still. Now for the
reasons that I am questioning it 1-I can’t find anything in any book that I
have that totally matches the photos (maybe I don’t have the best books)
2-the whole time I watched it, it was eating a cattail. I looked closely
while it was eating and it was pulling out pieces of the cattail out and
eating it, I thought maybe it was eating insects on the cattail and I
looked closely at it after and couldn’t see anything. 3-in the 10 minutes
or so I watched it, it never bobbed its tail one time. Maybe I’m missing
something obvious, but let’s see if anyone has any ideas. Thanks Terry.



http://www.pbase.com/ttownvstrom/image/163740833



Terry Mitchell

Plastic Engineering

918-622-9660
Subject: New Photos Added to Website
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2016 20:11:18 -0500
OKBirds,

 

A few more shorebird photos. Included in this group are Wilson' Phalarope,
Spotted Sandpiper and Solitary Sandpiper. All photos are from this spring in
south Tulsa County. The photos have been added to the beginning of my
"Recent Birds" gallery at the link below.

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

Cheers,

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Catching up
From: rgunn1 <rgunn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 18:37:18 -0500
I am off OKBirds again. Must think you are spam. I just waited and it 
fixed itself last time. Probably wont this go around., If someone can 
tell me how to get back on, contact at my personal email address. 
OKBirds won't get through.

Bird wise, best is an early American Bittern off Jenkins to the east 
behind Potts locked gate.  Got a great look,watched it closely for five 
minutes to be sure. The daily species count has gone up from 20 or so in 
the middle of June to almost forty the last few days--all the normal 
stuff and lots of herons, egrets on the flooded hay fields.

Otherwise, some A-hole dropped a litter of puppies off on Bratcher 
Miner. There were supposedly six there this morning but by the time we 
got there we could only locate four. They  (the evil doers) always drop 
them on weekends when I can't get them to the shelter. Currently I have 
a backyard full of part beagle (?) puppies lounging on the cool, wet 
concrete till tomorrow. Tired, thirsty and hungry , they went through a 
month's worth of Blossom's food in a couple of hours and one fell asleep 
with his head in the waterbowl.  How can our fellow Oklahomans be so 
callous? Dropping them off is one thing, but in this weather?

D.
Subject: Fwd: Tulsa Audubon - Corrected Link for The Messenger
From: Jim Deming <birdbrain.jim AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 21:45:16 -0500
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Tulsa Audubon Society 
Date: Sat, Jul 16, 2016 at 2:56 PM
Subject: Tulsa Audubon - Corrected Link for The Messenger
To: Jim 


Purchase tickets for The Messenger movie

My previous email had an incorrect link for the Messenger Movie. The
correct link is:

https://www.tugg.com/events/117369

 


*The Messenger Movie*
On Thursday, Aug. 25th TAS is hosting a showing of the critically-acclaimed
songbird conservation documentary, The Messenger. This film powerfully
portrays a number of conservation issues facing bird populations, and uses
technology and novel filming techniques to provide some amazing footage of
songbirds in flight. This is the same film the Sutton Center presented back
in March at the Circle Cinema, but we want to bring it back to Tulsa for
those not able to see it earlier.

This screening will be on Thursday, August 25 at 6:30 p.m. at Cinemark
Tulsa, 10802 E 71st St  (71st & 169). Tickets are $10.

This will be a fund-raiser for TAS, and the way it works is you order your
tickets on-line in advance, but your card will not be charged immediately.
There is a minimum number of tickets we need to sell (67 in our case), and
once that is met the movie is confirmed and you are charged. This is the
same arrangement we had a few years ago for the film * A Birder's Guide To
Everything*, and that movie was a sell out for us!

You can learn more about the movie, view the trailer and order you tickets
at:

https://www.tugg.com/events/117369

 


If you are thinking about going please be sure to reserve your tickets
ASAP, so we can get the showing confirmed.

This is a powerful film that is likely to move anyone with an interest in
birds. I have not seen it myself, but as we all know the outlook for birds
is not always good news. Some folks I know who have seen it said some parts
may not be appropriate for younger children.



John Kennington, President
918-809-6325
email: johnkennington AT gmail.com
web: www.tulsaaudubon.org

 



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-- 
Jim Deming
524 S. Tamarack Ave.
Broken Arrow, OK  74012
(918) 864-4707
carpe annum
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 19
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 19:17:32 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot with a light breeze on the bird survey today.
60 species were found.  Very few species still singing.  2 Black Terns in
mostly breeding plumage were a surprise on Lotus Lake this morning.  Its
been probably 10 years or more since I saw this species at Red Slough this
time of year.  I ran into the forest service technician who was checking
duck boxes and found out that we currently have 4 Black-bellied Whistling
Ducks sitting on eggs now.  Juvenile Neotropic Cormorants and Anhingas are
all over the place now that most of them have fledged.  Here is my list for
today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 5

Wood Duck - 56  (also 2 broods seen.)

Mallard - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 1

Neotropic Cormorant - 7

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 25 

American Bittern - 1

Great-blue Heron - 18

Great Egret - 39

Snowy Egret - 19

Little-blue Heron - 12

Cattle Egret - 91

Green Heron - 13

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 3

Black Vulture - 66

Turkey Vulture - 16

Mississippi Kite - 26

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 8 (also 2 broods.) 

Common Gallinule - 24 (also several broods.)

American Coot - 9

Killdeer - 1

Least Tern - 2

Black Tern - 2 (still mostly in breeding plumage.)

Mourning Dove - 6

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 1

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 2

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 3

Bell's Vireo - 3

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

American Crow - 11

Fish Crow - 4

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 12

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 5

Cliff Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 15

Carolina Chickadee - 7

Carolina Wren - 12

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Prairie Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 13

Yellow-breasted Chat - 6

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 11

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 17

Painted Bunting - 5

Dickcissel - 12

Red-winged Blackbird - 30

Brown-headed Cowbird - 1

Orchard Oriole -2

 

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Citrine Forktail

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Two-striped Forceptail

Jade Clubtail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer 

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Striped Saddlebags

"red" Saddlebags species

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Is this a White Winged Dove
From: Sue Lutze <slutze AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 19:44:05 -0500
Thanks, Lauren. I will try to get a closer look at them to see if they in fact 
do have a blue eye ring! 


From: Lauren Wilkerson 
Sent: Monday, July 18, 2016 3:03 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Is this a White Winged Dove

Hi Susanne,


Yes! They are White-winged doves. I see them all the time in Houston, but it's 
special to see them in OKC. Do they have a blue eye ring? I can't tell from the 
photos, but adult birds have bright blue eye rings and red feet, while 
hatch-year birds are much blander, almost a uniform light grey. 



Congratulations,

Lauren


On Mon, Jul 18, 2016 at 1:24 PM, Sue Lutze  wrote:

 I had my first ever bird in my yard. I think they are White Winged Doves? 
Three of them who have been here 2 days now in NW OKC. 

  142381342N04 AT flickr.com

  Thanks for any and all help with the ID.  
  Susanne Lutze



 "We spend precious hours fearing the inevitable. It would be wise to use that 
time adoring our families, cherishing our friends, and living our lives. ~ Maya 
Angelou 
Subject: Re: Lake Yahola Sunday
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 16:22:35 -0500
Bill,
there was a non-breeding plumage loon in Bartlesville from June 21 to July
5.  That loony loon may have gone to Yahola....

On Mon, Jul 18, 2016 at 11:25 AM, Bill Carrell <
cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT gmail.com> wrote:

> Hello All,
>
> Sunday morning at Lake Yahola, saw 16 Forster's Terns and one Common Loon.
> The Loon was in non-breeding plumage, I'm guessing that it's been here all
> summer and not an early migrant, I didn't check the lake through June so
> I'm not certain.
>
> Good Birding,
>
> Bill Carrell
> Tulsa, OK
>
Subject: Re: Is this a White Winged Dove
From: Lauren Wilkerson <wilk7745 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 15:03:48 -0500
Hi Susanne,

Yes! They are White-winged doves. I see them all the time in Houston, but
it's special to see them in OKC. Do they have a blue eye ring? I can't tell
from the photos, but adult birds have bright blue eye rings and red feet,
while hatch-year birds are much blander, almost a uniform light grey.

Congratulations,
Lauren

On Mon, Jul 18, 2016 at 1:24 PM, Sue Lutze  wrote:

> I had my first ever bird in my yard. I think they are White Winged Doves?
> Three of them who have been here 2 days now in NW OKC.
> 142381342N04 AT flickr.com
>
> Thanks for any and all help with the ID.
> Susanne Lutze
>
>
>
> "We spend precious hours fearing the inevitable. It would be wise to use
> that time adoring our families, cherishing our friends, and living our
> lives. ~ Maya Angelou
>
Subject: Is this a White Winged Dove
From: Sue Lutze <slutze AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 13:24:41 -0500
I had my first ever bird in my yard. I think they are White Winged Doves? Three 
of them who have been here 2 days now in NW OKC. 

142381342N04 AT flickr.com

Thanks for any and all help with the ID.  
Susanne Lutze



"We spend precious hours fearing the inevitable. It would be wise to use that 
time adoring our families, cherishing our friends, and living our lives. ~ Maya 
Angelou 
Subject: Lake Yahola Sunday
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 11:25:33 -0500
Hello All,

Sunday morning at Lake Yahola, saw 16 Forster's Terns and one Common Loon.
The Loon was in non-breeding plumage, I'm guessing that it's been here all
summer and not an early migrant, I didn't check the lake through June so
I'm not certain.

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Hackberry Flat, Thurdsay 7/14
From: ML2x <ml2x AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 16:08:57 -0500
Hello Everyone,  
Been working on getting a new computer up and running. This report is from last 
Thursdaywhen Mary and I did our survey. The cattails are very prolific and have 
made viewing muchmore difficult. Most of these birds were seen in pockets along 
the levees which were 5ft hiwith grass......didn't not get to survey the Big 
Unit..... 

Goodest Birding,
Mary and Lou Truexml2x AT sbcglobal.netLawton
Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
Jul 14, 2016 7:45 AM - 3:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
14.0 mile(s)
60 species (+5 other taxa)

Mallard  16
Blue-winged Teal  28
Northern Shoveler  8
Northern Pintail  10
Redhead  46
Ruddy Duck  22
Northern Bobwhite  18
Pied-billed Grebe  36
Double-crested Cormorant  3
Great Blue Heron  9
Great Egret  24
Snowy Egret  8
Little Blue Heron  3
Cattle Egret  31
Green Heron  1
Black-crowned Night-Heron  87     Actual count of which about 45 were juveniles
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  2
White-faced Ibis  225
Turkey Vulture  1
Swainson's Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  1
American Coot  125
Black-necked Stilt  303     141 Sub adults 22 chicks....Actual count
American Avocet  172
American Golden-Plover 1 Breeding plumage. Black face and belly with gold head, 
nape and back. 

Snowy Plover  1
Killdeer  58
Spotted Sandpiper  5
Solitary Sandpiper  5
Greater Yellowlegs  193
Lesser Yellowlegs  54
Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs  65
Stilt Sandpiper  3
Baird's Sandpiper  47
Least Sandpiper  19
Semipalmated Sandpiper  9
Western Sandpiper  12
Semipalmated/Western Sandpiper  4
peep sp.  150
Long-billed Dowitcher  6
Wilson's Phalarope  29
Ring-billed Gull  1
Black Tern  7
Eurasian Collared-Dove  4
Mourning Dove  67
Common Nighthawk  6
American Kestrel  3
Western Kingbird  2
Eastern Kingbird  1
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  9
Loggerhead Shrike  1
Horned Lark  8
Cliff Swallow  60
swallow sp.  12
Northern Mockingbird  2
Lark Sparrow  6
Dickcissel  47
Red-winged Blackbird  125
Western Meadowlark  2
Eastern Meadowlark  5
Western/Eastern Meadowlark  22
Yellow-headed Blackbird  9
Common Grackle  21
Great-tailed Grackle  27
Brown-headed Cowbird  8

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30715362
 		 	   		  
Subject: Rose lake today 7-17
From: John Hurd <jackhurd AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 11:47:30 -0500
Good variety of Shore birds and fun Eagle antics at Rose Lake this morningGood 
to see friends out enjoying the birds too.Rose Lake, Canadian, Oklahoma, USJul 
17, 2016 8:00 AM - 9:45 AMProtocol: Stationary24 speciesMallard 8Great Blue 
Heron 12Great Egret 16Snowy Egret 6Little Blue Heron 7Cattle Egret 1Turkey 
Vulture 1Mississippi Kite 1Bald Eagle 3 This juv was seen stooping on Ducks, 
Adult latter came in caught a small fish and gave to one of two Juv's sitting 
on a branchKilldeer 1Spotted Sandpiper 1Greater Yellowlegs 1Baird's Sandpiper 
27Least Sandpiper 7Semipalmated Sandpiper 1Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 6Eurasian 
Collared-Dove 1Mourning Dove 3American Crow 1Barn Swallow 6Red-winged Blackbird 
23Yellow-headed Blackbird 1Common Grackle 6American Goldfinch 1 

Jack HurdOKC



 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Cormorant in July?
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 09:29:55 -0500
The are in Oklahoma year around, but in small numbers around the lakes in the 
summer and nest near you at the Salt plains NWR among other parts of the state. 
Neotropic Cormorants nest at the Salt Plains also among other areas in the 
state. While the field guide maps are good for general distribution of birds 
the best information for bird distribution of Oklahoma is the "Date Guide to 
the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma" published by the OOS. This guide not only 
breaks down species by dates, but also by regions and rarity. The Date Guide is 
a valuable tool and if you don't have you should get one from the OOS Website. 


Jim

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 17, 2016, at 3:27 AM, bill .  wrote:
> 
> Hi all,
> 
> 
> Just curious but how unusual is it (or not) to find a DC Cormorant in 
northern Oklahoma this time of year? The range maps i have consulted show my 
area on the line between "migration" and "winter", neither of which i think 
apply here. But as we all say, the birds don't read the maps. 

> 
> 
> I, and most of Enid, was at Meadowlake Park on the 4th. Going through pics 
later something on a landing out in the lake i had thought was just another 
hybrid/domestic duck turned out to be this oddity. Just curious. 

> 
> peace
> 
> -bill
> 
> enid garfield ok
> 
> 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/critters101_william/27744202174/in/album-72157634889801650/ 
Subject: Cormorant in July?
From: "bill ." <billwx AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 08:27:42 +0000
Hi all,


Just curious but how unusual is it (or not) to find a DC Cormorant in northern 
Oklahoma this time of year? The range maps i have consulted show my area on the 
line between "migration" and "winter", neither of which i think apply here. But 
as we all say, the birds don't read the maps. 



I, and most of Enid, was at Meadowlake Park on the 4th. Going through pics 
later something on a landing out in the lake i had thought was just another 
hybrid/domestic duck turned out to be this oddity. Just curious. 


peace

-bill

enid garfield ok



https://www.flickr.com/photos/critters101_william/27744202174/in/album-72157634889801650/ 
Subject: Photos added to PBase Website
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 20:42:45 -0500
 

OKBirds,

For those not yet tired of shorebird photos, if there are any, I have added
a few spring migration photos of Dunlin, Long-billed Dowitcher and Stilt
Sandpiper from south Tulsa County. The photos have been added to the
beginning of my "Recent Birds" gallery at the link below.

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

Cheers,

 

Jim

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Hackberry Flat yesterday
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 16:30:08 -0500
Arrived south of Hollister, at SH-54 and E-W Road 188, at 7:10 am and
the first bird was the resident Barn Owl flying to roost into the
sheet metal barn on the SE corner of the intersection.  Good omen!

Saw large number of Mourning Doves driving west on CR-188, the
Dickcissels were still very vocal and at least 4 recently fledged
Grasshopper Sparrows were on the fence line or in the road bed and so
were three Scissor-tailed Flycatchers. Found one Grasshopper Sparrow
still singing its heart out and made a video recording.

There is still a good amount of water in the various units and the reservoir.

Drove the east boundary road south to Capps Road (south boundary) and
proceeded west to the row of (now mostly dead) trees and stopped to
observe two Common Nighthawks chasing.  Looking around, I noticed a
Peregrine Falcon sitting in one of the dead trees and grabbed my
camera, just enough movement to flush the falcon.  Oh well, it’s the
tale of the one that got away!

The previous night Hackberry Flat had received 1.5 inches of rain
according to the biologist, there was water standing in the
agricultural fields to the south and Avocets and Killdeer were all
over it.  Some must be nesting in these fields because both species
did the ‘injured bird’ mimicry and I made a video recording of a
particularly convincing Killdeer.

The other highlights were a fly-by of an American Bittern (while
speaking with the biologist between Sandpiper and Yellowleg unit) and
finding a King Rail in the open along Crowford Road, near the
observation tower at the dead end.

Here is what I found:

1.	Mallard – 2
2.	Readhead – 2
3.	Bobwhite Quail – 1 seen, >10 heard
4.	Pied-billed Grebe - >40 including chicks
5.	Eared Grebe – 2
6.	Double-crested Cormorant – 5
7.	American Bittern – 1
8.	Great Blue Heron - >5
9.	Little Blue Heron – 1 juvenile
10.	Great Egret - >10
11.	Snowy Egret - >20
12.	Cattle Egret -  >40
13.	Black-crowned Night-Heron – 2 juveniles
14.	Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - >5, 3 juveniles
15.	White-faced Ibis - >30
16.	American Kestrel – 2
17.	King Rail – 1
18.	Common Gallinule – 1 adult with 2 chicks
19.	American Coot – many adults and chicks
20.	Killdeer – lots and lots
21.	Black-necked Stilts - >30 including 2 chicks
22.	American Avocet - >30
23.	Great Yellowlegs – 9
24.	Least Sandpiper – several doing a fly-by
25.	Solitary Sandpiper – 1
26.	Upland Sandpiper – 1 doing a fly-by
27.	Mourning Dove - >200
28.	Barn Owl – 1
29.	Common Nighthawk - >20
30.	Scissor-tailed Flycatcher – 6
31.	Purple Martin – 1
32.	Cliff Swallow - >2000
33.	Barn Swallow - >10
34.	Grasshopper Sparrow – 1 adult singing + 4 juveniles
35.	Dickcissel - >40
36.	Eastern Meadowlark – 2 heard singing
37.	Red-winged Blackbird - lots
38.	Meadowlark species - >50
39.	Great0tailed Grackle – many
40.	Common Grackle - >20

Saw zero Cowbirds.

Matt Jung, OKC
Subject: Colorado Atlas II book preorder
From: Pete Janzen <pete.janzen AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 11:56:26 -0500
Sounds like if you want a copy of this you are probably advised to pre-order 
it. There won't be a lot of extras apparently. 

Pete Janzen. Wichita, KS

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: DAVID A LEATHERMAN 
> Date: July 13, 2016 at 6:22:28 PM CDT
> To: "boris.kondratieff AT colostate.edu" , 
Whitney Cranshaw , "Paul.Ode AT colostate.edu" 
, Dennis Paulson , Scott 
Seltman , "tom.shane AT sbcglobal.net" , 
"pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net" , David Ely 
, Davis Noble , Sue Kenney 
, Norma Jean Verhoeff  

> Subject: FW: Important Atlas II Update!
> 
> FYI. Great reference book soon to be available. Spread the word to folks who 
might be interested in this publication. As Lynn says, probably will be very 
difficult to obtain after the initial printing. 

> 
> Dave Leatherman
> 
> From: cobreedingbirdatlas2 AT gmail.com
> Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 16:21:30 -0600
> Subject: Important Atlas II Update!
> To: cobreedingbirdatlas2 AT gmail.com
> 
> Greetings Volunteers of the Second Colorado Breeding Bird Atlas,
> 
> As many of you know, over the past couple of year I have transitioned from 
using my Fort Lewis College email (wickersham_l AT fortlewis.edu) for most Atlas 
business to this gmail address(cobreedingbirdatlas2 AT gmail.com). This transition 
was necessary initially because Fort Lewis College would no longer allow me to 
distribute mass emails to Atlas volunteers, friends, and stakeholders. Now, as 
the project nears its completion, this email address will remain available for 
communicating about the Atlas into the foreseeable future. Though my Fort Lewis 
College email will remain active for a couple more months or so, please update 
my contact information accordingly and email me through this address as much as 
possible moving forward. 

> 
> It seems in this transition that some of your emails did not make it into 
this distribution list and for that i sincerely apologize. You may have missed 
the periodic updates on progress of the Atlas, so here's a recap of recent 
events. 

> 
> The new Atlas II website is now live and available for use at 
www.cobreedingbirdatlasii.org . There, you may query blocks for species lists 
and breeding evidence, or query species for block lists. Also provided on the 
website are Atlas II Distribution and Change Maps, Priority Block Counts, and 
summary data comparing the two Atlases. What is NOT in the book is the complete 
text of the Atlas II book including detailed accounts for 262 species, and 
short accounts for almost 2 dozen more. Detailed accounts include information 
on habitat use (including graph), distribution and change since Atlas I, 
breeding phenology text (and graph), and a short discussion on conservation and 
management. But what really brings the Atlas II book to life are the intricate 
illustrations from Colorado's own artist Radeaux. 

> 
> After many years of long and hard work, the Atlas II book is nearly complete. 
At this time, we are implementing the final edits to the book layout. 
Following, a few logistical tasks remain before we can send the book to the 
printer. Co-publishers The Colorado Bird Atlas Partnership and Colorado Parks 
and Wildlife seek to generate as many pre-orders as possible and initiate a 
mass distribution upon launch of the book. (We hope to plan a book launch party 
in both Durango and Denver). Many of you have already pre-ordered your copy of 
Atlas II and we thank you for your continued support. We know you have been 
anxiously awaiting the book launch for many, many months, and we truly 
appreciate your patience with this very long and intricate process. 

> 
> For those of you yet to pre-order your copy of the Atlas, please consider 
placing an order soon. We will base our print run largely on our number of 
pre-orders; and possibly, few copies will be available to purchase after the 
book launch. You have all dedicated your personal time (and some expenses) 
towards this herculean effort that documents current distribution, and change 
in distribution across 20 years, of Colorado's breeding birds. This landmark 
achievement in bird conservation will be utilized by wildlife and other natural 
resource professionals to guide sound habitat management practices in our state 
that strive to maintain bird populations for generations to come. Your 
contributions to long-term bird conservation will be forever chronicled in the 
Atlas II publication. Proceeds from book sales will go directly towards meeting 
the myriad costs of publication. Additional proceeds will be saved for the 
initiation of Atlas III (in 2027)! 

> 
> Thank you for your support of Colorado's birds. More updates on the launch 
will be forthcoming. Visit www.cobreedingbirdatlasii.org to pre-order your copy 
of the book! 

> 
> Good Birding,
> 
> Lynn 
> 
> -- 
> Lynn E. Wickersham
> Atlas II Project Manager
> San Juan Institute of Natural and Cultural Resources
> Fort Lewis College
> 1000 Rim Drive
> Durango, CO  81301
> (970) 247-7245
> wickersham_l AT fortlewis.edu
> cobreedingbirdatlas2 AT gmail.com
Subject: Bird-Friendly Yards
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 14:44:25 -0500
Each September the Arkansas Audubon Society conducts adult workshops at
beautiful Ferncliff Camp in Ferndale, AR just west of Little Rock.  On
September 17-18 of this year we invite you to join us for a weekend of fun,
learning and fellowship with folks who are passionate about the natural
world.  In addition to The Bird-Friendly Yard the choices are The Monarch
Butterfly or Aquatic Biology.  More information can be found on the
Arkansas Audubon Society website, www.arbirds.org.  I hope that some of you
will join us.

Ann Gordon
Subject: New Photos Added to PBase Website
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 01:26:03 -0500
OKBirds,

 

I am back to my shorebird photo uploads. Species added this round include
American Golden-Plover, Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Semipalmated Plover and
Upland Sandpiper. 

For those interested see the link below to my Recent Birds Gallery. The
above listed species are at the beginning of this gallery.

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

Cheers,

 

Jim

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 12
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 21:25:24 -0500
It was partly cloudy, warm, and very windy on the bird survey today.  60
species were found.  Things have really slowed down.  Very little singing
going on now.  The high winds caused birds to be scarce as well.  Here is my
list for today:

 

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 2

Canada Goose - 6

Wood Duck - 4

Mallard - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 3

Neotropic Cormorant - 3

Anhinga - 23 (also nests with young.)

Great-blue Heron - 8

Great Egret - 13

Snowy Egret - 25

Little-blue Heron - 7

Cattle Egret - 72

Green Heron - 5

White Ibis - 2

Black Vulture - 5

Turkey Vulture - 12

Mississippi Kite - 7

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 4 

Common Gallinule - 15 (also several broods.)

American Coot - 7

Killdeer - 1

Mourning Dove - 21

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 4

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 1

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 4

White-eyed Vireo - 7

Bell's Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 4

Fish Crow - 3

Purple Martin - 2

Tree Swallow - 2

Cliff Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 32

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 6

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 3

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 8

Yellow-breasted Chat - 14

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Lark Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 27

Blue Grosbeak - 8

Indigo Bunting - 27

Painted Bunting - 11

Dickcissel - 28

Red-winged Blackbird - 23

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 1

Brown-headed Cowbird - 7

Orchard Oriole - 4

Baltimore Oriole - 1

 

 

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Citrine Forktail

Blue-fronted Dancer

Common Green Darner

Swamp Darner

Regal Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Two-striped Forceptail

Jade Clubtail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Golden-winged Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Common Whitetail

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Striped Saddlebags

Red Saddlebags

Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Southern Leopard Frog

 

 

Good birding!

 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Barred Owls in mid Tulsa
From: Patricia Seibert <plseibert AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 15:12:38 -0500
Hello Ok Birders
This year I have had a lot of fun watching a pair of Barred Owls successfully 
fledge 3 young in a neighborhood very close to mine in Tulsa. The gal that has 
gotten cameras installed has watched them raise young for at least 3 seasons. 
(Barred Owls of Mid-town Tulsa on Facebook). The habitat that the owls have 
adapted to is not great, but they are making it! So a church in the 
neighborhood less than 3 blocks from the nest site wants to expand their 
parking lot, and destroy several mature trees......long story short, neighbors 
are protesting. They have started a petition drive to get the City of Tulsa 
zoning board to deny the request to change zoning to allow destruction of the 
trees and two homes. The petition can be found at the following link. Please 
consider signing this petition with me. 


https://www.change.org/p/tulsa-board-of-adjustment-no-parking-lot-in-residential-rs-3?recruiter=false&utm_source=petitions_share&utm_medium=copylink 

Thanks, 
Patricia Seibert
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Southbound
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Jul 2016 09:08:12 -0500
Hello All,

Saw a couple of early migrants over the weekend, a Spotted Sandpiper along
Fry Creek at 131st in Tulsa County on Saturday, and a Ring-Billed Gull
below Kaw dam on Sunday.

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Re: New photos added to PBase Website
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2016 19:49:12 -0500
Here is the link - http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jim Arterburn
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2016 7:48 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: New photos added to PBase Website

 

OKBirds,

 

I have decided to take a break from my shorebird uploads to post some photos
of other bird families from this spring. Species include Bald Eagle, Black
Tern flight shots, Brown Thrasher, Blue-winged Teal, Cedar Waxwing, Cliff
Swallow juveniles, Dickcissel, Eastern Bluebird juvenile, Eastern Kingbird,
Least Tern, Mourning Dove sitting in water, Red-tailed Hawk being chased by
a Northern Mockingbird, Northern Bobwhite, Orchard Oriole sub-adult,
Olive-sided Flycatcher, Savannah Sparrow, Summer Tanager sub-adult, and a
pair of Wood ducks

 

Cheers,

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder  

 
Subject: New photos added to PBase Website
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2016 19:48:09 -0500
OKBirds,

 

I have decided to take a break from my shorebird uploads to post some photos
of other bird families from this spring. Species include Bald Eagle, Black
Tern flight shots, Brown Thrasher, Blue-winged Teal, Cedar Waxwing, Cliff
Swallow juveniles, Dickcissel, Eastern Bluebird juvenile, Eastern Kingbird,
Least Tern, Mourning Dove sitting in water, Red-tailed Hawk being chased by
a Northern Mockingbird, Northern Bobwhite, Orchard Oriole sub-adult,
Olive-sided Flycatcher, Savannah Sparrow, Summer Tanager sub-adult, and a
pair of Wood ducks

 

Cheers,

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Rose Lake and surrounding area - 7/8/16
From: Deanne McKinney <trialsz63 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2016 16:55:57 -0500
This morning I made the rounds over by Rose Lake and vicinity. This was the
first time I've been over there in about a month. Starting at the corner of
NW 50th (Wagner Rd.) and County Line Rd. there were the usual Painted and
Indigo Buntings, Carolina Chickadees and Dickcissels. About 3/4 mile west
of there on Wagner Rd. there were lots more Dickcissels making plenty of
noise, including several young ones. Walking right down the middle of the
road was a single Northern Bobwhite. Another one could be heard in the
field on the SE corner of Morgan Rd and Wagner Rd. I've been hearing them
in that area more and more but this is only the second time I've seen one
there. I'm glad to know that they're making their way back to that area.

On over toward the NW 63rd and Kilpatrick Turnpike, there were lots more
Dickcissels, a few Red-winged Blackbirds and Scissor-tailed Flycatchers,
but not much in the way of shorebirds. The water in that spot has nearly
all dried up except in the northernmost part of that area. There were some
Killdeer and 25-30 Great Egrets. It was starting to rain when I went by
there so I couldn't see much else and didn't stay but just a minute or two.

Rose Lake itself is starting to dry up a little, exposing some good muddy
flats. The water is pretty shallow but there must be enough food around to
attract the 40+ Great Egrets that were there. A few Great Blue Herons and
one Little Blue were there, as were a few sandpipers; at least three Least
Sandpipers, a couple of Solitary and a couple of Spotted Sandpipers. There
was one that I couldn't identify and there quite possibly were others that
I didn't see. Now that there is some mud for the birds to poke around in,
it might be worth checking out from time to time.

Of course there were the usual multitudes of Red-eared Sliders and I also
saw one Snapping Turtle - about teenager sized.

Rose Lake eBird checklist, with a couple of photos:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30596240

Deanne McKinney
OKC
Subject: Free magazines/journals
From: Claire Curry <larksparrow AT EECLAIRE.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2016 11:56:24 -0500
I have several nice piles of Audubon Field Notes (1949-1963, becomes 
American Birds), American Birds (ca. 1963-1984), Birding magazines (June 
1989-Oct. 1995, plus several years in the 2000s), Birder's World (Feb. 
1996-Oct. 2001), a few Bird Watcher's Digest, Winging It (ABA 
newsletter- 2000s), Southwestern Naturalist (vol. 53 no 4 through vol. 
55 no. 4), Evolution (April 2013-Jan. 2014), and assorted Systematic 
Zoology from around 1969-1970s (plus one from 1982).

If you will take them all, I am happy to give them away for free and 
meet you anywhere along my weekly migratory path between NC TX 
(Decatur/Denton area) and Stillwater.  (So possibilities for meeting 
could include Ardmore, Paul's Valley, Norman, Oklahoma City, 
Stillwater).  If you want more exact details on which volumes I have, 
let me know and I will double-check.  Email is larksparrow AT eeclaire.com.

Thanks,
Claire Curry
Subject: Re: FW: eBird Report - Texas County, OK, US, Jul 3, 2016
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 Jul 2016 23:05:02 -0500
Good, interesting reports, Jimmy and Nadine.  Thanks!

John

On Wed, Jul 6, 2016 at 6:41 PM, Jimmy Woodard  wrote:

>         Nadine recorded as I conducted the Hooker BBS route over the 4th
> of July weekend. This route runs from 5 miles due
>         south of Hooker and goes mostly west and ends about 8 miles
> north/northwest of Guymon.
>         Top 5 birds by total numbers were: Mourning Dove(458), Western
> Meadowlark(449), Red-winged Blackbird(365), Horned
>         Lark(321), and House Sparrow(306).
>         Somewhat of a surprise but not totally unexpected were Upland
> Sandpiper(6), White-winged Dove(1 in open country away
>         from any town), and Curve-billed Thrasher(3). Gallinaceous birds
> were detected in decent numbers: Pheasant(41),
>         Scaled Quail(16) and Bobwhite(9).
>
>         Jimmy Woodard
>         Midwest City, OK
>
>
> Texas County, OK, US, Texas, Oklahoma, US Jul 3, 2016 5:57 AM - 10:15 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 25.0 mile(s)
> Comments:     Nadine and I did the Hooker BBS route.
> 34 species
>
> Scaled Quail  16
> Northern Bobwhite  9
> Ring-necked Pheasant  41
> Swainson's Hawk  16
> Killdeer  36
> Upland Sandpiper  6
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  33
> Eurasian Collared-Dove  126     cumulative totals.
> White-winged Dove  1
> Mourning Dove  458
> Burrowing Owl  3
> Common Nighthawk  11
> Western Kingbird  21
> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  1
> Loggerhead Shrike  1
> Horned Lark  321     cumulative totals.
> Barn Swallow  58
> American Robin  7
> Curve-billed Thrasher  3
> Northern Mockingbird  6
> European Starling  77
> Cassin's Sparrow  35
> Grasshopper Sparrow  52     cumulative totals.
> Lark Sparrow  36
> Lark Bunting  27
> Blue Grosbeak  4
> Dickcissel  138     cumulative totals.
> Red-winged Blackbird  365
> Western Meadowlark  449
> Great-tailed Grackle  65
> Brown-headed Cowbird  7
> Orchard Oriole  4
> Bullock's Oriole  1
> House Sparrow  306
>
> View this checklist online at
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30570697
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 5
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 21:55:37 -0500
It was mostly cloudy, warm, and windy on the survey today.  70 species were
found.  Not much singing going on now.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 2

Canada Goose - 6

Wood Duck - 25

Pied-billed Grebe - 2

Neotropic Cormorant - 5

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 25 (also nests with young.)

Least Bittern - 3

Great-blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 24

Snowy Egret - 20

Little-blue Heron - 13

Cattle Egret - 34

Green Heron - 5

White Ibis - 2

Black Vulture - 11

Turkey Vulture - 30

Mississippi Kite - 9

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 6 

Common Gallinule - 20 (also several broods.)

American Coot - 8

Killdeer - 9

Peep species (Pectoral?) - 1 flyover

Mourning Dove - 11

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 4

Great-horned Owl - 1

Chimney Swift - 3

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 9

Bell's Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 5

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 20

Fish Crow - 1

Purple Martin - 10

Tree Swallow - 4

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 3

Cliff Swallow - 5

Barn Swallow - 11

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 3

Common Yellowthroat - 5

Yellow-breasted Chat - 4

Summer Tanager - 3

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 18

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 23

Painted Bunting - 9

Dickcissel - 12

Red-winged Blackbird - 27

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Brown-headed Cowbird - 15

Orchard Oriole - 3

 

 

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Familiar Bluet

Swamp Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Two-striped Forceptail

Jade Clubtail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Common Whitetail

Wandering Glider

Red Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

Southern Black Racer

Green Anole

Green Treefrog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: 30 Year Eagle Take Permits
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 18:19:05 -0500
All,
It was real easy to go and comment on regulations.gov
If I can do it anyone can.  Also very interesting to poke around on that
site to see other nasty things going on.  Just hope our comments make a
difference....


On Tue, Jul 5, 2016 at 5:42 PM, John Kennington 
wrote:

> You can still go to the actual US Fish and Wildlife comment portal. There
> are detailed instructions at:
>
> http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/eagle-take-notes-c.pdf
>
> But here is the key info. The web site is:
>
> www.regulations.gov
>
> In the Search box type FWS-R9-MB-2011-0094, which is the docket number for
> this rulemaking. On the resulting page you can submit a comment by clicking
> on the “Comment Now!” button and then paste your letter in the box that
> shows up. You do have the option for submitting comments for yourself or on
> behalf of someone else or an organization.
>
> Thanks,
> John
>
> On Tue, Jul 5, 2016 at 5:34 PM, Melinda Droege 
> wrote:
>
>> Although it is not yet midnight of July 5 the link to save the eagles
>> says it is no longer active.  If there is another way I can comment please
>> let us or at least me know in case I am poking the wrong button....
>> Politics is so rigged and irritating....what's an old lady to do?
>>
>> Melinda Droege
>> Bartlesville
>>
>> On Tue, Jul 5, 2016 at 2:15 PM, John Kennington > > wrote:
>>
>>> The deadline for comments is today, July 5th at midnight. The link below
>>> makes it very easy to leave a comment. This proposal to issue 30 year
>>> permits for wind turbines to kill Bald and Golden Eagles is outrageous and
>>> must be stopped! This is especially disturbing for us in Oklahoma since the
>>> Sutton Center in Bartlesville, with their Bald Eagles reintroduction
>>> project, led to the population recovering, and the subsequent removal from
>>> the Endangered Species list.
>>>
>>> Do we really want to see the offspring of those birds be killed in the
>>> name of wind energy profits???
>>>
>>> For more background, see:
>>>
>>> http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/eagle-take-notes-c.pdf
>>>
>>> You can also visit this link, which makes it very east to leae a comment:
>>>
>>> http://www.audubonaction.org/site/R?i=YZo2sTn4ZCgneaEPVv9bRQ
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> John Kennington
>>> Tulsa Audubon
>>>
>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: 30 Year Eagle Take Permits
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 17:53:50 -0500
thanks John!

On Tue, Jul 5, 2016 at 5:42 PM, John Kennington 
wrote:

> You can still go to the actual US Fish and Wildlife comment portal. There
> are detailed instructions at:
>
> http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/eagle-take-notes-c.pdf
>
> But here is the key info. The web site is:
>
> www.regulations.gov
>
> In the Search box type FWS-R9-MB-2011-0094, which is the docket number for
> this rulemaking. On the resulting page you can submit a comment by clicking
> on the “Comment Now!” button and then paste your letter in the box that
> shows up. You do have the option for submitting comments for yourself or on
> behalf of someone else or an organization.
>
> Thanks,
> John
>
> On Tue, Jul 5, 2016 at 5:34 PM, Melinda Droege 
> wrote:
>
>> Although it is not yet midnight of July 5 the link to save the eagles
>> says it is no longer active.  If there is another way I can comment please
>> let us or at least me know in case I am poking the wrong button....
>> Politics is so rigged and irritating....what's an old lady to do?
>>
>> Melinda Droege
>> Bartlesville
>>
>> On Tue, Jul 5, 2016 at 2:15 PM, John Kennington > > wrote:
>>
>>> The deadline for comments is today, July 5th at midnight. The link below
>>> makes it very easy to leave a comment. This proposal to issue 30 year
>>> permits for wind turbines to kill Bald and Golden Eagles is outrageous and
>>> must be stopped! This is especially disturbing for us in Oklahoma since the
>>> Sutton Center in Bartlesville, with their Bald Eagles reintroduction
>>> project, led to the population recovering, and the subsequent removal from
>>> the Endangered Species list.
>>>
>>> Do we really want to see the offspring of those birds be killed in the
>>> name of wind energy profits???
>>>
>>> For more background, see:
>>>
>>> http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/eagle-take-notes-c.pdf
>>>
>>> You can also visit this link, which makes it very east to leae a comment:
>>>
>>> http://www.audubonaction.org/site/R?i=YZo2sTn4ZCgneaEPVv9bRQ
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> John Kennington
>>> Tulsa Audubon
>>>
>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: 30 Year Eagle Take Permits
From: John Kennington <johnkennington AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 17:42:57 -0500
You can still go to the actual US Fish and Wildlife comment portal. There
are detailed instructions at:

http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/eagle-take-notes-c.pdf

But here is the key info. The web site is:

www.regulations.gov

In the Search box type FWS-R9-MB-2011-0094, which is the docket number for
this rulemaking. On the resulting page you can submit a comment by clicking
on the “Comment Now!” button and then paste your letter in the box that
shows up. You do have the option for submitting comments for yourself or on
behalf of someone else or an organization.

Thanks,
John

On Tue, Jul 5, 2016 at 5:34 PM, Melinda Droege 
wrote:

> Although it is not yet midnight of July 5 the link to save the eagles says
> it is no longer active.  If there is another way I can comment please let
> us or at least me know in case I am poking the wrong button....
> Politics is so rigged and irritating....what's an old lady to do?
>
> Melinda Droege
> Bartlesville
>
> On Tue, Jul 5, 2016 at 2:15 PM, John Kennington 
> wrote:
>
>> The deadline for comments is today, July 5th at midnight. The link below
>> makes it very easy to leave a comment. This proposal to issue 30 year
>> permits for wind turbines to kill Bald and Golden Eagles is outrageous and
>> must be stopped! This is especially disturbing for us in Oklahoma since the
>> Sutton Center in Bartlesville, with their Bald Eagles reintroduction
>> project, led to the population recovering, and the subsequent removal from
>> the Endangered Species list.
>>
>> Do we really want to see the offspring of those birds be killed in the
>> name of wind energy profits???
>>
>> For more background, see:
>>
>> http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/eagle-take-notes-c.pdf
>>
>> You can also visit this link, which makes it very east to leae a comment:
>>
>> http://www.audubonaction.org/site/R?i=YZo2sTn4ZCgneaEPVv9bRQ
>>
>> Thanks,
>> John Kennington
>> Tulsa Audubon
>>
>
>
Subject: Re: 30 Year Eagle Take Permits
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 17:34:50 -0500
Although it is not yet midnight of July 5 the link to save the eagles says
it is no longer active.  If there is another way I can comment please let
us or at least me know in case I am poking the wrong button....
Politics is so rigged and irritating....what's an old lady to do?

Melinda Droege
Bartlesville

On Tue, Jul 5, 2016 at 2:15 PM, John Kennington 
wrote:

> The deadline for comments is today, July 5th at midnight. The link below
> makes it very easy to leave a comment. This proposal to issue 30 year
> permits for wind turbines to kill Bald and Golden Eagles is outrageous and
> must be stopped! This is especially disturbing for us in Oklahoma since the
> Sutton Center in Bartlesville, with their Bald Eagles reintroduction
> project, led to the population recovering, and the subsequent removal from
> the Endangered Species list.
>
> Do we really want to see the offspring of those birds be killed in the
> name of wind energy profits???
>
> For more background, see:
>
> http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/eagle-take-notes-c.pdf
>
> You can also visit this link, which makes it very east to leae a comment:
>
> http://www.audubonaction.org/site/R?i=YZo2sTn4ZCgneaEPVv9bRQ
>
> Thanks,
> John Kennington
> Tulsa Audubon
>
Subject: 30 Year Eagle Take Permits
From: John Kennington <johnkennington AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 14:15:00 -0500
The deadline for comments is today, July 5th at midnight. The link below
makes it very easy to leave a comment. This proposal to issue 30 year
permits for wind turbines to kill Bald and Golden Eagles is outrageous and
must be stopped! This is especially disturbing for us in Oklahoma since the
Sutton Center in Bartlesville, with their Bald Eagles reintroduction
project, led to the population recovering, and the subsequent removal from
the Endangered Species list.

Do we really want to see the offspring of those birds be killed in the name
of wind energy profits???

For more background, see:

http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/eagle-take-notes-c.pdf

You can also visit this link, which makes it very east to leae a comment:

http://www.audubonaction.org/site/R?i=YZo2sTn4ZCgneaEPVv9bRQ

Thanks,
John Kennington
Tulsa Audubon
Subject: Re: Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs added to PBase Website
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 20:38:25 -0500
John,

 

Thanks again.

 

Jim

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of John Shackford
Sent: Monday, July 04, 2016 5:16 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs added to PBase Website

 

Jim,

 

Another set of great side by side comparisons--of yellowlegs.  Thanks!

 

John Shackford

Edmond   

 

On Mon, Jul 4, 2016 at 4:00 PM, Jim Arterburn  > wrote: 


OKBirds,

 

I have uploaded photos from this spring of two more similar shorebird species 
– Greater Yellowlegs and Lesser Yellowlegs. I thought photos of these similar 
looking species would be helpful for comparison. These photos can be seen at 
the top of the following link - http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds 


 

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder  

 

 
Subject: Re: Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs added to PBase Website
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 17:16:20 -0500
Jim,

Another set of great side by side comparisons--of yellowlegs.  Thanks!

John Shackford
Edmond

On Mon, Jul 4, 2016 at 4:00 PM, Jim Arterburn  wrote:

> OKBirds,
>
>
>
> I have uploaded photos from this spring of two more similar shorebird
> species – Greater Yellowlegs and Lesser Yellowlegs. I thought photos of
> these similar looking species would be helpful for comparison.  These
> photos can be seen at the top of the following link -
> http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds
>
>
>
>
>
> Jim Arterburn
>
> Tulsa, Oklahoma
>
> www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder
>
>
>
Subject: Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs added to PBase Website
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 16:00:47 -0500
OKBirds,

 

I have uploaded photos from this spring of two more similar shorebird
species - Greater Yellowlegs and Lesser Yellowlegs. I thought photos of
these similar looking species would be helpful for comparison.  These photos
can be seen at the top of the following link -
http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Salt Plains on 7-4-2016
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 20:42:30 +0000
Hello All,

 Mary and I went out to the Salt Plains earlier today. It was cloudy early and 
then became partly cloudy and much warmer. There was some water flowing through 
the dam, Sand Creek Bay was full and there was good shorebird habitat at 
Sandpiper trail. Highlights included: 



Least bittern-1 calling about 1/4 mile beyond the platform at Sand Creek Bay

Little Blue Heron-Several at Sand Creek Bay

Black-crowned Night-Heron-Several at Sand Creek Bay

White-faced Ibis-6 at Sand Creek Bay

Snowy Plover-10+ at Sandpiper Trail

Killdeer-Several at Sandpiper Trail

American Avocet-50+ at Sand Creek Bay

Black-necked Stilt-1 at Sand Creek Bay

Greater Yellowlegs-2 at Sandpiper Trail

Least Sandpiper-2 at Sandpiper Trail

Yellow Warbler-2 at Sand Creek Bay


Mark Peterson

Bartlesville

Subject: Black-chinned Hummingbird range
From: "bill ." <billwx AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sun, 3 Jul 2016 10:26:51 +0000
Hi all...


A few years ago someone posted to the list who was doing a thesis on the 
northward-expanding range of the Black-chinned Hummingbird. I never heard the 
results, but ebird does show several north of Edmond and a couple at Salt 
Plains nw of me, in addition to scattered reports up into Kansas. 



I'm hesitant to report because I've never actually seen one, and i know how 
tricky lighting can be. Yet I've had 2 sightings recently at my apartment 
window feeder in Enid that *appear to me* to be an adult male BCHU. Near the 
same time of day the usual few adult male Ruby-throats were coming to feed and 
i could easily distinguish the different color and amount of color in the 
gorget. So far the only pics are in evening and show no gorget color, but the 
Ruby males do show color. (My feeder is on the second story of an apartment 
building, facing east.) I was hoping for some morning photos, but just now 
we're having a thunderstorm. Rain is great for bringing them in, but clouds 
obscure their colors. 



My question is, how likely is it that one shows up this far north? Thanks much!


peace

-bill

enid garfield ok
Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 29
From: "bill ." <billwx AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sun, 3 Jul 2016 06:21:26 +0000
Very impressive list David! Several of these birds would be lifers for me, 
though my interest this year has turned more toward the inverts. Just curious, 
have you considered adding Leps to your already extensive inventory, either 
here or on the okleps list? I'm sure many would be interested. 



peace

-bill

enid garfield ok

________________________________
From: okbirds  on behalf of David Arbour 
 

Sent: Wednesday, June 29, 2016 10:31 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Red Slough Bird Survey - June 29


It was mostly clear and hot with a little wind on the bird survey today. 64 
species were found. Lots of young of the year out. Here is my list for today: 




Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 4

Canada Goose - 2 (also 4 young.)

Wood Duck - 44

Pied-billed Grebe - 9

Neotropic Cormorant - 6 (the young have fledged.)

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 24 (also nests with young.)

Least Bittern - 1

Great-blue Heron - 10

Great Egret - 9

Snowy Egret - 1

Little-blue Heron - 17

Cattle Egret - 35

Green Heron - 10

Black Vulture - 1

Turkey Vulture - 20

Mississippi Kite - 6

Purple Gallinule - 6 (also 3 chicks.)

Common Gallinule - 15 (also several broods with a total of 17 chicks.)

American Coot - 7

Mourning Dove - 19

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 5

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Willow Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 4

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 4

Bell's Vireo - 5

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 10

Fish Crow - 11

Purple Martin - 7

Tree Swallow - 4

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 6

Barn Swallow - 41

Carolina Chickadee - 4

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 13

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 5

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 8

Common Yellowthroat - 10

Yellow-breasted Chat - 8

Summer Tanager - 2

Eastern Towhee - 2

Lark Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 14

Blue Grosbeak - 1

Indigo Bunting - 18

Painted Bunting - 5

Dickcissel - 16

Red-winged Blackbird - 43

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 10

Brown-headed Cowbird - 13

Orchard Oriole - 3







Odonates:



Fragile Forktail

Slender Spreadwing

Common Green Darner

Swamp Darner

Regal Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Bayou Clubtail

Jade Clubtail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Widow Skimmer

Eastern Amberwing

Common Whitetail

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags





Herps:



Common Snapping Turtle

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog





Good birding!





David Arbour

De Queen, AR























Subject: July Migration Report
From: Patricia Velte <pvelte AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2016 10:55:33 -0500
Dear OKBirders,

 

July brings the return of several shorebird species and the departure of
only one species.  Both lists are included below.

 

ARRIVALS

 

Swainson's Hawk                  July 14 - SE

White-faced Ibis                   July 26 - SW, C, SC, NE, SE         

Spotted Sandpiper                July 4 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Solitary Sandpiper                July 1  - ALL  

Willet                                    July 1 - ALL   

Long-billed Curlew               July 4 - NW, SW, C, SC

Marbled Godwit                   July 1 - PAN, NW, SW, C, SC, NE            

Ruddy Turnstone                  July 26 - NW west to Alfalfa, Major and
Blaine Cos. Only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman Cos. Only, C, SC,
NE, SE           

Red Knot                               July 28 - NW rare in Alfalfa Co only,
C, NE

Stilt Sandpiper                      July 12 - ALL

Sanderling                            July 28 - ALL

American Avocet                  July 14 - C, SC, NE east to Nowata, Rogers,
Wagoner and Muskogee Cos. Only, SE east to Pittsburg, Atoka and McCurtain
Cos. Only

Snowy Plover                        July 19 - C, SC, NE

Piping Plover                        July 19 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Caspian Tern                        July 11- ALL

Forster's Tern                       July 10 - PAN, NW, SW

Baird's Sandpiper                 July 7 - ALL

Least Sandpiper                    July 1 - PAN

Buff-breasted Sandpiper      July 26 - NW west to Woods, Woodward, Dewey and
Custer cos only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman cos only, C, SC, NE,
SE            

Pectoral Sandpiper               July 9 - ALL

Semipalmated Sandpiper     July 6 - ALL

Western Sandpiper               July 6 - ALL

Short-billed Dowitcher         July 1 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Long-billed Dowitcher          July 10 - ALL

Wilson's Phalarope              July 20 - SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Rufous Hummingbird           July 22 - PAN, SW

Peregrine Falcon                  July 28 - ALL

Least Flycatcher                   July 15 - ALL

Bank Swallow                       July 27 - ALL

Sedge Wren                          July 25 - NE, SE

Yellow Warbler                    July 20 - SW and July 25 - SE

Yellow-headed Blackbird     July 4 - PAN, NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Semipalmated Plover          July 12 - ALL

 

DEPARTURES

 

Glossy Ibis                             July 28 - NW, SW, C, SE - Rare in
Alfalfa and Major Cos. Only in NW; Rare in Tillman Co. only in SW; Rare in
Kingfisher and Canadian Cos. Only in C; Rare in S. McCurtain Co only in SE

 

 

The information presented here comes from The Oklahoma Bird Records
Committee of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society, which publishes a Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma. This booklet divides Oklahoma
into 7 geographic regions, and lists the normal dates of occurrence for each
Oklahoma bird species within each region. Observers are urged to report
unusual species, or birds out of date or out of normal range in Oklahoma,
based on the information given in this publication.

 

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society and Oklahoma Bird Records Committee web
site, http://www.okbirds.org/, includes ordering information for the Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma, information on documenting
significant records, documentation forms, instructions, and a searchable
database for Oklahoma bird migration information. Birders are cordially
invited to join the Oklahoma Ornithological Society.

 

Happy birding!

Pat Velte

pvelte AT cox.net

Oklahoma City, OK

 

 
Subject: Re: New Photos Uploaded
From: Mark Cromwell <mark.cromwell01 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2016 06:02:02 -0500
Alright! Thanks Jim for the excellent pics and explanation. I learned
something this morning from your excellent images. And then, I got to see
the displays of the Buff breasted Sandpipers.

On Wed, Jun 29, 2016 at 7:24 PM, Jim Arterburn  wrote:

> OKBirds,
>
> I am in the process of working up my shorebird photos from this spring and
> have just uploaded photos of Baird’s Sandpiper and White-rumped Sandpiper.
> These two closely related species are similar in appearance so I thought I
> would post photos of these two species for comparison. These photos can be
> seen at the top of the following link -
> http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds
>
>
>
> Jim Arterburn
>
> Tulsa, Oklahoma
>
> www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder
>
>
>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 29
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2016 22:31:05 -0500
It was mostly clear and hot with a little wind on the bird survey today.  64
species were found.  Lots of young of the year out.  Here is my list for
today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 4

Canada Goose - 2 (also 4 young.)

Wood Duck - 44

Pied-billed Grebe - 9

Neotropic Cormorant - 6 (the young have fledged.)

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 24 (also nests with young.)

Least Bittern - 1

Great-blue Heron - 10

Great Egret - 9

Snowy Egret - 1

Little-blue Heron - 17

Cattle Egret - 35

Green Heron - 10

Black Vulture - 1

Turkey Vulture - 20

Mississippi Kite - 6

Purple Gallinule - 6 (also 3 chicks.)

Common Gallinule - 15 (also several broods with a total of 17 chicks.)

American Coot - 7

Mourning Dove - 19

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 5

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Willow Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 4

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 4

Bell's Vireo - 5

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 10

Fish Crow - 11

Purple Martin - 7

Tree Swallow - 4

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 6

Barn Swallow - 41

Carolina Chickadee - 4

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 13

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 5

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 8

Common Yellowthroat - 10

Yellow-breasted Chat - 8

Summer Tanager - 2

Eastern Towhee - 2

Lark Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 14

Blue Grosbeak - 1

Indigo Bunting - 18

Painted Bunting - 5

Dickcissel - 16

Red-winged Blackbird - 43

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 10

Brown-headed Cowbird - 13

Orchard Oriole - 3

 

 

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Slender Spreadwing

Common Green Darner

Swamp Darner

Regal Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Bayou Clubtail

Jade Clubtail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Widow Skimmer

Eastern Amberwing

Common Whitetail

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

Common Snapping Turtle

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: New Photos Uploaded
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2016 19:24:49 -0500
OKBirds,

I am in the process of working up my shorebird photos from this spring and
have just uploaded photos of Baird's Sandpiper and White-rumped Sandpiper.
These two closely related species are similar in appearance so I thought I
would post photos of these two species for comparison. These photos can be
seen at the top of the following link -
http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Re: New Red Slough photos posted online
From: Tom Ewert <ewert.tom AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 18:51:02 -0500
David, great photos, love the king rail photos. Tom Ewert

On Fri, Jun 24, 2016 at 8:23 PM, David Arbour  wrote:

> I’ve posted a bunch of new photos to the Red Slough Photo Gallery “Recent
> Photos” page.  See them at this link:
>
>
>
> http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma/recent_photos
>
>
>
> David Arbour
>
> De Queen, AR
>
Subject: New Red Slough photos posted online
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 20:23:23 -0500
I've posted a bunch of new photos to the Red Slough Photo Gallery "Recent
Photos" page.  See them at this link:

 

http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma/recent_photos 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR
Subject: Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 09:11:29 -0500
Gene,

 

I have seen these displays a few times over the years also, but this is the
first time that I was close enough to hear the little tick call the male
gives when doing the display. It was neat to watch and hear.

 

Jim

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of EUGENE YOUNG
Sent: Wednesday, June 22, 2016 7:47 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos

 

Seen in KS several times, always very cool.

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone


On Jun 22, 2016, at 6:43 PM, Jim Arterburn  > wrote:

OKBirds,

 

I have uploaded some photos of Buff-breasted Sandpipers performing their
breeding display. Buff-breasted Sandpipers give a dual wing or single wing
display on leks on their breeding grounds in the Arctic tundra. During this
display they raise their wing(s) and flash the bright white underwings to
attract females. In addition they point their bill in the air and give a
soft tick call. They sometimes give these display during migration. On May
11-12 there were about fifty Buff-breasted Sandpipers on the Leonard sod
farms and I was able to photograph, watch and hear several displaying and
calling males. 

 

Here is the link to this gallery 

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder  

 
Subject: Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 01:38:13 -0500
Great series of photographs, Jim.

Thanks for sharing.

John Shackford

On Wed, Jun 22, 2016 at 7:46 PM, EUGENE YOUNG  wrote:

> Seen in KS several times, always very cool.
>
> Gene Young Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jun 22, 2016, at 6:43 PM, Jim Arterburn  > wrote:
>
> OKBirds,
>
>
>
> I have uploaded some photos of Buff-breasted Sandpipers performing their
> breeding display. Buff-breasted Sandpipers give a dual wing or single wing
> display on leks on their breeding grounds in the Arctic tundra. During this
> display they raise their wing(s) and flash the bright white underwings to
> attract females. In addition they point their bill in the air and give a
> soft tick call. They sometimes give these display during migration. On May
> 11-12 there were about fifty Buff-breasted Sandpipers on the Leonard sod
> farms and I was able to photograph, watch and hear several displaying and
> calling males.
>
>
>
> Here is the link to this gallery
>
>
>
> http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds
>
>
>
>
>
> Jim Arterburn
>
> Tulsa, Oklahoma
>
> www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder 
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 00:46:36 +0000
Seen in KS several times, always very cool.

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 22, 2016, at 6:43 PM, Jim Arterburn 
> wrote: 


OKBirds,

I have uploaded some photos of Buff-breasted Sandpipers performing their 
breeding display. Buff-breasted Sandpipers give a dual wing or single wing 
display on leks on their breeding grounds in the Arctic tundra. During this 
display they raise their wing(s) and flash the bright white underwings to 
attract females. In addition they point their bill in the air and give a soft 
tick call. They sometimes give these display during migration. On May 11-12 
there were about fifty Buff-breasted Sandpipers on the Leonard sod farms and I 
was able to photograph, watch and hear several displaying and calling males. 


Here is the link to this gallery

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds


Jim Arterburn
Tulsa, Oklahoma
www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder
Subject: Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos
From: Sebastian <sebastianpatti AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 00:32:02 +0000
Those are just wonderful Jim...thanks for sharing!



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Jim Arterburn 
Date: 6/22/16 6:43 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos

OKBirds,

I have uploaded some photos of Buff-breasted Sandpipers performing their 
breeding display. Buff-breasted Sandpipers give a dual wing or single wing 
display on leks on their breeding grounds in the Arctic tundra. During this 
display they raise their wing(s) and flash the bright white underwings to 
attract females. In addition they point their bill in the air and give a soft 
tick call. They sometimes give these display during migration. On May 11-12 
there were about fifty Buff-breasted Sandpipers on the Leonard sod farms and I 
was able to photograph, watch and hear several displaying and calling males. 


Here is the link to this gallery

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds


Jim Arterburn
Tulsa, Oklahoma
www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder
Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 18:43:22 -0500
OKBirds,

 

I have uploaded some photos of Buff-breasted Sandpipers performing their
breeding display. Buff-breasted Sandpipers give a dual wing or single wing
display on leks on their breeding grounds in the Arctic tundra. During this
display they raise their wing(s) and flash the bright white underwings to
attract females. In addition they point their bill in the air and give a
soft tick call. They sometimes give these display during migration. On May
11-12 there were about fifty Buff-breasted Sandpipers on the Leonard sod
farms and I was able to photograph, watch and hear several displaying and
calling males. 

 

Here is the link to this gallery 

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 10:08:18 -0500
Purple Martins have been in serious decline for several decades and all the 
people that want martins will not get them. Those lucky enough to have them 
need to take care of them to keep them. The Purple Martin Conservation Society 
on-line has data and suggestions of how to manage your martins and how you 
might attract martins. Many factors are involved, poor box placement, owners of 
Martin boxes being wildlife slumlords and not caring for them, not getting rid 
of predators and competitors such as house sparrows and European starlings etc. 
By looking at the website you can decide what you need to do to alter the 
habitat situation. Gourds have a greater occupancy rate than the traditional 
martin boxes because martin gourds provide more distance from other occupants 
and can get 100% occupancy whereas traditional boxes usually get 75% or less. 


I have had Purple Martin boxes up for 25 years doing the right things and have 
not gotten nesting martins yet, only roosting young of the year Martins looking 
for a place to stay until they fly to Brazil. I wish you well in your efforts 
and martins need all the help they can get. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

From: Sarah A. FRANKLIN 
Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2016 9:37 AM
To: jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM ; ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20

We always had Martins in our house for the past forty years until 3 years ago. 
They don't even visit the house. Do you have any idea how we can get them back? 




On Tuesday, June 21, 2016 8:38 AM, Jerry Davis  wrote:





You have a housing shortage. There are 85 species of cavity nesting birds in 
the US and this problem is universal throughout the world. For cavity nesting 
birds when the nesting time comes and all pairs do not have the opportunity to 
nest, the season can be lost for these birds. I know that the Forest Service is 
broke with funds going west to fight fires and ODWC is understaffed and 
underfunded but it seems like there should be birders in Oklahoma interested in 
helping the birds with nest boxes for swallows and martins. They fly 2,000 
miles to nest and find no vacancies. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

From: David Arbour 
Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 10:39 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20

It was partly cloudy and hot on the bird survey today. 55 species were found. 
The dog days of summer seem to have set in and the birds are getting silent. 
Lots of young of the year are out now including some fledglings from our martin 
box. We placed the martin box out on the splitter levee between Lotus and 
Pintail lakes about 3 or 4 years ago but this is the first year martins used 
it. In the previous years it was used by Tree Swallows who fiercely defended it 
every time martins showed up to check it out, running the martins off. This 
year 3 pairs of martins showed up which was too many for the Tree Swallows to 
deal with so they gave up and all nested together. The swallows were in the 
vents in the attic accessed from the side of the box and the martins were in 
the main box. Interesting combination. Only 2 pairs of martins ended up nesting 
there but they had already won the battle with the Tree Swallows. Here is my 
list for today: 


Black-bellied Whistling Duck – 1
Wood Duck – 12
Pied-billed Grebe - 4
Neotropic Cormorant – 3
Anhinga – 13  
Least Bittern – 3 
Great-blue Heron - 7
Great Egret - 16
Little-blue Heron - 3
Cattle Egret - 2
Green Heron - 10
Black Vulture - 1
Turkey Vulture - 26
Cooper’s Hawk – 1
Broad-winged Hawk - 2
Purple Gallinule – 15 (also 2 broods of tiny young.)
Common Gallinule – 18 (also several broods of young.)
American Coot - 10
Mourning Dove – 8
Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 7
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3
Downy Woodpecker – 1
Eastern Phoebe - 1
Great-crested Flycatcher - 1
Eastern Kingbird - 3
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2
White-eyed Vireo - 12
Bell's Vireo - 4
Red-eyed Vireo - 4
Blue Jay - 3
American Crow - 6
Fish Crow - 6
Purple Martin - 8
Tree Swallow – 14
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1
Barn Swallow - 32
Tufted Titmouse - 5
Carolina Wren - 7
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 4
Eastern Bluebird - 2
Northern Mockingbird - 1
Pine warbler - 3
Prothonotary Warbler – 10
Common Yellowthroat - 8
Yellow-breasted Chat - 14
Summer Tanager - 1
Northern Cardinal – 21
Indigo Bunting - 28
Painted Bunting - 9
Dickcissel - 18
Red-winged Blackbird – 27
Common Grackle - 6
Brown-headed Cowbird – 1
Orchard Oriole - 3
Baltimore Oriole – 2


Odonates:

Lilypad Forktail
Common Green Darner
Regal Darner
Cyrano Darner
Prince Baskettail
Mocha Emerald
Stillwater Clubtail
Halloween Pennant
Four-spotted Pennant
Eastern Pondhawk
Slaty Skimmer
Blue Dasher
Widow Skimmer
Common Whitetail
Spot-winged Glider
Carolina Saddlebags
Black Saddlebags


Herps:

American Alligator
Red-eared Slider
Blanchard's Cricket Frog
Green Treefrog
Bronze Frog
Bullfrog



Good birding!

David Arbour
De Queen, AR



Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 08:34:20 -0500
You have a housing shortage. There are 85 species of cavity nesting birds and 
this problem is universal throughout the world. For cavity nesting birds when 
the nesting time comes and all do not have the opportunity to nest, the season 
can be lost for these birds. I know that the Forest Service is broke with funds 
going west to fight fires and ODWC is understaffed and underfunded but it seems 
like there should be birders in Oklahoma interested in helping the birds with 
nest boxes for swallows and martins. They fly 2,000 miles to nest and find no 
vacancies. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

From: David Arbour 
Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 10:39 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20

It was partly cloudy and hot on the bird survey today. 55 species were found. 
The dog days of summer seem to have set in and the birds are getting silent. 
Lots of young of the year are out now including some fledglings from our martin 
box. We placed the martin box out on the splitter levee between Lotus and 
Pintail lakes about 3 or 4 years ago but this is the first year martins used 
it. In the previous years it was used by Tree Swallows who fiercely defended it 
every time martins showed up to check it out, running the martins off. This 
year 3 pairs of martins showed up which was too many for the Tree Swallows to 
deal with so they gave up and all nested together. The swallows were in the 
vents in the attic accessed from the side of the box and the martins were in 
the main box. Interesting combination. Only 2 pairs of martins ended up nesting 
there but they had already won the battle with the Tree Swallows. Here is my 
list for today: 


 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck – 1

Wood Duck – 12

Pied-billed Grebe - 4

Neotropic Cormorant – 3

Anhinga – 13  

Least Bittern – 3 

Great-blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 16

Little-blue Heron - 3

Cattle Egret - 2

Green Heron - 10

Black Vulture - 1

Turkey Vulture - 26

Cooper’s Hawk – 1

Broad-winged Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule – 15 (also 2 broods of tiny young.)

Common Gallinule – 18 (also several broods of young.)

American Coot - 10

Mourning Dove – 8

Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 7

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Downy Woodpecker – 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 12

Bell's Vireo - 4

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 6

Fish Crow - 6

Purple Martin - 8

Tree Swallow – 14

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 32

Tufted Titmouse - 5

Carolina Wren - 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 4

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Pine warbler - 3

Prothonotary Warbler – 10

Common Yellowthroat - 8

Yellow-breasted Chat - 14

Summer Tanager - 1

Northern Cardinal – 21

Indigo Bunting - 28

Painted Bunting - 9

Dickcissel - 18

Red-winged Blackbird – 27

Common Grackle - 6

Brown-headed Cowbird – 1

Orchard Oriole - 3

Baltimore Oriole – 2

 

 

Odonates:

 

Lilypad Forktail

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Mocha Emerald

Stillwater Clubtail

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Spot-winged Glider

Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 22:39:58 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot on the bird survey today.  55 species were
found.  The dog days of summer seem to have set in and the birds are getting
silent.  Lots of young of the year are out now including some fledglings
from our martin box.  We placed the martin box out on the splitter levee
between Lotus and Pintail lakes about 3 or 4 years ago but this is the first
year martins used it.  In the previous years it was used by Tree Swallows
who fiercely defended it every time martins showed up to check it out,
running the martins off.  This year 3 pairs of martins showed up which was
too many for the Tree Swallows to deal with so they gave up and all nested
together.  The swallows were in the vents in the attic accessed from the
side of the box and the martins were in the main box.  Interesting
combination.  Only 2 pairs of martins ended up nesting there but they had
already won the battle with the Tree Swallows.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 1

Wood Duck - 12

Pied-billed Grebe - 4

Neotropic Cormorant - 3

Anhinga - 13  

Least Bittern - 3 

Great-blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 16

Little-blue Heron - 3

Cattle Egret - 2

Green Heron - 10

Black Vulture - 1

Turkey Vulture - 26

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Broad-winged Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 15 (also 2 broods of tiny young.)

Common Gallinule - 18 (also several broods of young.)

American Coot - 10

Mourning Dove - 8

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 7

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 12

Bell's Vireo - 4

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 6

Fish Crow - 6

Purple Martin - 8

Tree Swallow - 14

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 32

Tufted Titmouse - 5

Carolina Wren - 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Pine warbler - 3

Prothonotary Warbler - 10

Common Yellowthroat - 8

Yellow-breasted Chat - 14

Summer Tanager - 1

Northern Cardinal - 21

Indigo Bunting - 28

Painted Bunting - 9

Dickcissel - 18

Red-winged Blackbird - 27

Common Grackle - 6

Brown-headed Cowbird - 1

Orchard Oriole - 3

Baltimore Oriole - 2

 

 

Odonates:

 

Lilypad Forktail

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Mocha Emerald

Stillwater Clubtail

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Spot-winged Glider

Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: This morning on Suoth Jenkins
From: rgunn1 <rgunn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 22:20:24 -0500
Along with virtually no other birds--two Black Vultures.

D.
Subject: Re: FW: eBird Report - Joe B. Barnes Park, Jun 19, 2016
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 13:58:52 -0500
Jimmy,

You have great lists even on a bike ride.  Congratulations and
thanks--helps me understand what my old eyes and ears are missing in our
neighborhood!.

John Shackford
Edmond

On Sun, Jun 19, 2016 at 12:50 PM, Jimmy Woodard  wrote:

>                 A few observations from a morning ride around the park.
>
>         Jimmy Woodard
>         Midwest City, OK
>
>
> Joe B. Barnes Park, Oklahoma, Oklahoma, US Jun 19, 2016 7:30 AM
> Protocol: Incidental
> Comments:     rode my bike around the park.
> 39 species
>
> Mallard  8
> Turkey Vulture  1
> Mississippi Kite  4
> Red-shouldered Hawk  1
> Eurasian Collared-Dove  6
> Mourning Dove  3
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
> Chimney Swift  5
> Belted Kingfisher  1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
> Downy Woodpecker  2
> Eastern Phoebe  3
> Great Crested Flycatcher  2
> Western Kingbird  2
> Eastern Kingbird  2
> Red-eyed Vireo  3
> Blue Jay  3
> American Crow  6
> Barn Swallow  5
> Carolina Chickadee  2
> Tufted Titmouse  1
> House Wren  1
> Carolina Wren  3
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  2
> Eastern Bluebird  4
> American Robin  2
> Brown Thrasher  2
> Northern Mockingbird  3
> European Starling  15
> Summer Tanager  1
> Northern Cardinal  10
> Indigo Bunting  3
> Red-winged Blackbird  2
> Great-tailed Grackle  15
> Brown-headed Cowbird  5
> Baltimore Oriole  2
> House Finch  4
> American Goldfinch  2
> House Sparrow  10
>
> View this checklist online at
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30302334
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
>
Subject: Belated report - Cave Swallow at Red Slough
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 21:31:34 -0500
This past Thursday while I was touring a birder from NYC, we encountered a
juvenile Cave Swallow on Fossil Valley Rd. (formerly Appleberry Ln.) next to
unit 13.  We also had most of the usual good wetland birds including an
American Bittern.

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR
Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 13 - corrections!
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 21:25:35 -0500
There's a typo.  Should have read 73 species rather than 3.  Also, my
internet was down when I sent this last week but it didn't send until today
when my service came back up.

 

David

 

From: David Arbour [mailto:arbour AT windstream.net] 
Sent: Saturday, June 18, 2016 5:00 PM
To: OKBIRDS 
Cc: ARBirds-L 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 13

 

It was overcast, mild, and rainy on the survey today turning partly cloudy
near the end of the survey.  3 species were found.  Here is my list for
today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 9

Wood Duck - 7

Northern Bobwhite - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 7

Neotropic Cormorant - 7

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 13  (also several nests with downy young.)

American Bittern - 1

Least Bittern - 3 adults (also 1 downy juvenile.)

Great-blue Heron - 9

Great Egret - 44

Snowy Egret - 1

Little-blue Heron - 10

Cattle Egret - 17

Green Heron - 12

Black Vulture - 5

Turkey Vulture - 9

Mississippi Kite - 2

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red Shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 13

Common Gallinule - 19

American Coot - 7

Least Tern - 2

Mourning Dove - 15

Rock Pigeon - 3

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 9

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 2

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 10

Bell's Vireo - 1

Yellow-throated Vireo - 3

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 7

Fish Crow - 1

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 14

Barn Swallow - 18

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren - 11

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 9

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 5

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 7

Yellow-breasted Chat - 7

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Lark Sparrow - 4

Northern Cardinal - 21

Blue Grosbeak - 3

Indigo Bunting - 17

Painted Bunting - 5

Dickcissel - 13

Red-winged Blackbird - 24

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 17

Brown-headed Cowbird - 13

Orchard Oriole - 1

Baltimore Oriole - 1

House Sparrow - 1

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Blue Dasher

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Western Cottonmouth

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Gray Treefrog

Cajun Chorus Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Bird list serve
From: Dora Webb <owl112 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 20:01:43 -0500
I'm no longer receiving mail from ok birds. Is the list still up and sending? I 
really miss it. 

Dora Webb
Owl112 AT  cox.net


Sent from my iPad
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 13
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 16:59:55 -0500
It was overcast, mild, and rainy on the survey today turning partly cloudy
near the end of the survey.  3 species were found.  Here is my list for
today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 9

Wood Duck - 7

Northern Bobwhite - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 7

Neotropic Cormorant - 7

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 13  (also several nests with downy young.)

American Bittern - 1

Least Bittern - 3 adults (also 1 downy juvenile.)

Great-blue Heron - 9

Great Egret - 44

Snowy Egret - 1

Little-blue Heron - 10

Cattle Egret - 17

Green Heron - 12

Black Vulture - 5

Turkey Vulture - 9

Mississippi Kite - 2

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red Shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 13

Common Gallinule - 19

American Coot - 7

Least Tern - 2

Mourning Dove - 15

Rock Pigeon - 3

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 9

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 2

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 10

Bell's Vireo - 1

Yellow-throated Vireo - 3

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 7

Fish Crow - 1

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 14

Barn Swallow - 18

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren - 11

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 9

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 5

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 7

Yellow-breasted Chat - 7

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Lark Sparrow - 4

Northern Cardinal - 21

Blue Grosbeak - 3

Indigo Bunting - 17

Painted Bunting - 5

Dickcissel - 13

Red-winged Blackbird - 24

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 17

Brown-headed Cowbird - 13

Orchard Oriole - 1

Baltimore Oriole - 1

House Sparrow - 1

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Blue Dasher

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Western Cottonmouth

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Gray Treefrog

Cajun Chorus Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 20:38:03 -0500
Double cool with a Mt. Plover, etc., Doug, Pete and Carter

John Shackford
Edmond,

On Sun, Jun 12, 2016 at 3:25 PM, Doug Wood  wrote:

> Thanks Pete. We found 2nd Lazuli Bunting male this morning; chasing each
> other.  Doug.
>
>
> Sent via the Samsung GALAXY S®4, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Pete Janzen
> Date:06/11/2016 5:38 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Major County BBS route last Saturday
>
> Doug
>
> I had an interesting conversation with Duane Nelson at the CFO meeting in
> Lamar.  Summer Tanager has colonized a number of new areas as a breeding
> species in SE Colorado, especially in Bent and Las Animas Counties.  Kevin
> Groeneweg and I had two or three of them at Cottonwood Canyon in Baca Co.,
> Colorado on May 5.  Two males were counter-singing.  surely these are all
> the western subspecies and the photos we took appeared to buttress that
> supposition.
>
> If you want to look for the Black Phoebe, from the tri-state marker head
> north into Colorado.  The road turns east after 1.5 miles and becomes Road
> C.  After less than a mile, there is a low-water bridge where it crosses
> the creek and they were building the nest under the bridge.  Not in the
> Okie Motherland but damn close.  Really surprised us.
>
> Pete
>
> On 6/11/2016 5:16 PM, Doug Wood wrote:
>
> Pete, cool report.  Bill Carter and I are at Hoot Owl currently while I
> complete my Cimarron county routes (Felt and Keyes).  The male Summer
> Tanager at Hoot Owl has a girlfriend now.  Male Lazuli Bunting has been
> singing around the cabins for 3 days now - very cool.  Two male Vermilion
> Flycatchers in Kenton still.  One Mountain Plover on Keyes route this
> morning.  Burrowung Owls numerous and lots of Cassin's Sparrows on the
> routes.  Doug.
>
>
>
>
> --
> Pete Janzen Wichita, KS pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net
>
Subject: Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday
From: Doug Wood <DWood AT SE.EDU>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 20:25:19 +0000
Thanks Pete. We found 2nd Lazuli Bunting male this morning; chasing each other. 
Doug. 



Sent via the Samsung GALAXY S4, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Pete Janzen
Date:06/11/2016 5:38 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Major County BBS route last Saturday

Doug

I had an interesting conversation with Duane Nelson at the CFO meeting in 
Lamar. Summer Tanager has colonized a number of new areas as a breeding species 
in SE Colorado, especially in Bent and Las Animas Counties. Kevin Groeneweg and 
I had two or three of them at Cottonwood Canyon in Baca Co., Colorado on May 5. 
Two males were counter-singing. surely these are all the western subspecies and 
the photos we took appeared to buttress that supposition. 


If you want to look for the Black Phoebe, from the tri-state marker head north 
into Colorado. The road turns east after 1.5 miles and becomes Road C. After 
less than a mile, there is a low-water bridge where it crosses the creek and 
they were building the nest under the bridge. Not in the Okie Motherland but 
damn close. Really surprised us. 


Pete

On 6/11/2016 5:16 PM, Doug Wood wrote:
Pete, cool report. Bill Carter and I are at Hoot Owl currently while I complete 
my Cimarron county routes (Felt and Keyes). The male Summer Tanager at Hoot Owl 
has a girlfriend now. Male Lazuli Bunting has been singing around the cabins 
for 3 days now - very cool. Two male Vermilion Flycatchers in Kenton still. One 
Mountain Plover on Keyes route this morning. Burrowung Owls numerous and lots 
of Cassin's Sparrows on the routes. Doug. 






--
Pete Janzen Wichita, KS 
pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net 
Subject: Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday
From: Pete Janzen <pete.janzen AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 17:38:44 -0500
Doug

I had an interesting conversation with Duane Nelson at the CFO meeting 
in Lamar.  Summer Tanager has colonized a number of new areas as a 
breeding species in SE Colorado, especially in Bent and Las Animas 
Counties.  Kevin Groeneweg and I had two or three of them at Cottonwood 
Canyon in Baca Co., Colorado on May 5.  Two males were counter-singing.  
surely these are all the western subspecies and the photos we took 
appeared to buttress that supposition.

If you want to look for the Black Phoebe, from the tri-state marker head 
north into Colorado.  The road turns east after 1.5 miles and becomes 
Road C.  After less than a mile, there is a low-water bridge where it 
crosses the creek and they were building the nest under the bridge.  Not 
in the Okie Motherland but damn close.  Really surprised us.

Pete

On 6/11/2016 5:16 PM, Doug Wood wrote:
> Pete, cool report.  Bill Carter and I are at Hoot Owl currently while 
> I complete my Cimarron county routes (Felt and Keyes).  The male 
> Summer Tanager at Hoot Owl has a girlfriend now.  Male Lazuli Bunting 
> has been singing around the cabins for 3 days now - very cool.  Two 
> male Vermilion Flycatchers in Kenton still.  One Mountain Plover on 
> Keyes route this morning.  Burrowung Owls numerous and lots of 
> Cassin's Sparrows on the routes.  Doug.
>
>


-- 
Pete Janzen Wichita, KS pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net
Subject: Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday
From: Doug Wood <DWood AT SE.EDU>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 22:16:20 +0000
Pete, cool report. Bill Carter and I are at Hoot Owl currently while I complete 
my Cimarron county routes (Felt and Keyes). The male Summer Tanager at Hoot Owl 
has a girlfriend now. Male Lazuli Bunting has been singing around the cabins 
for 3 days now - very cool. Two male Vermilion Flycatchers in Kenton still. One 
Mountain Plover on Keyes route this morning. Burrowung Owls numerous and lots 
of Cassin's Sparrows on the routes. Doug. 



Sent via the Samsung GALAXY S4, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Pete Janzen
Date:06/11/2016 6:54 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Major County BBS route last Saturday

I just thought I would post a few comments about the BBS route I ran in
Major Co. last Saturday.  I found 49 species of birds. This is an
interesting route that starts just north of Seiling and goes north to
Lone Mountain.  Dickcissels were in absolutely unprecedented numbers
with 90 seen at 27 stops.  I think in some drought years there have only
been 5 or so.  N. Bobwhite was the second most numerous species with 87
seen at 41 stops.  Cassin's Sparrow was absent for the first time ever
on this route.  Birds new to the count were Barred Owl and
Black-and-White Warbler. These were both seen early in the route in oak
habitat within the North Canadian watershed.  I found Rufous-crowned
Sparrow at four stops.  About 19 years ago the major Chester Fire burned
about 30 square miles and huge stands of red cedar were destroyed.
Following that event, I started seeing a few Rufous-crowns at Stop 42,
which is marked in e-bird as the "Bluffs on Griever Creek". This year I
was really surprised to find them at some other stops as well.  At
several of these I was able to record video of singing males.  At Stop
22 (after the 3 minutes were up) I got the best video and after I played
a recording of the song two more RCSP popped up out of nearby thickets.
I believe that the major rains of this past May, combined with the
longer-term changes resulting from the fire have created favorable
breeding conditions for this species.  There are probably quite a number
of them breeding in the Gloss Mountains region this summer.  Several
other species were more numerous than usual, including Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher and Common Nighthawk.

I am probably retiring from this route as it is well over 200 miles from
my home and additionally I believe that next year the second Kansas
Breeding Bird Atlas will commence, taking a lot of my discretionary
time.  This route has been really fascinating to me and I sincerely hope
that someone steps up to continue this route.  Please contact me if you
are interested and want to know anything more about the route.

As I have just returned to this listserv after a long hiatus, I thought
I would report briefly a few things from a visit to Black Mesa in the
first week of May.  Migrants were notably scarce.  We found a total of
five Black-throated Sparrows (all singing males) at the Easter Pageant
area.  There was a singing Summer Tanager at the Hoot Owl Ranch.  There
was a pair of Vermillion Flycatchers in Kenton and another pair at Black
Mesa St Park.  A Great Egret was at Lake Etling.  Perhaps most notably
was a Black Phoebe seen just 2 miles north of the state line along
Carrizo Creek, paired with an Eastern/Black Phoebe hybrid.  They were
constructing a nest under a low-water bridge.  This species should be
looked for along the creek on the Oklahoma side of the state line and
probably at Lake Etling as well.  I was told by friends in Colorado that
Black Phoebe has been expanding in numbers and in geographical range
along the Front Range in Colorado in recent years.

Best regards to my Oklahoma birding friends, many of whom I have not
seen in person for a long, long time.

--
Pete Janzen Wichita, KS pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net
Subject: Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 15:13:58 -0500
Thanks, Pete, for a great email!

John Shackford
Edmond

On Sat, Jun 11, 2016 at 6:44 AM, Pete Janzen 
wrote:

> I just thought I would post a few comments about the BBS route I ran in
> Major Co. last Saturday.  I found 49 species of birds. This is an
> interesting route that starts just north of Seiling and goes north to Lone
> Mountain.  Dickcissels were in absolutely unprecedented numbers with 90
> seen at 27 stops.  I think in some drought years there have only been 5 or
> so.  N. Bobwhite was the second most numerous species with 87 seen at 41
> stops.  Cassin's Sparrow was absent for the first time ever on this route.
> Birds new to the count were Barred Owl and Black-and-White Warbler. These
> were both seen early in the route in oak habitat within the North Canadian
> watershed.  I found Rufous-crowned Sparrow at four stops.  About 19 years
> ago the major Chester Fire burned about 30 square miles and huge stands of
> red cedar were destroyed. Following that event, I started seeing a few
> Rufous-crowns at Stop 42, which is marked in e-bird as the "Bluffs on
> Griever Creek". This year I was really surprised to find them at some other
> stops as well.  At several of these I was able to record video of singing
> males.  At Stop 22 (after the 3 minutes were up) I got the best video and
> after I played a recording of the song two more RCSP popped up out of
> nearby thickets.  I believe that the major rains of this past May, combined
> with the longer-term changes resulting from the fire have created favorable
> breeding conditions for this species.  There are probably quite a number of
> them breeding in the Gloss Mountains region this summer.  Several other
> species were more numerous than usual, including Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
> and Common Nighthawk.
>
> I am probably retiring from this route as it is well over 200 miles from
> my home and additionally I believe that next year the second Kansas
> Breeding Bird Atlas will commence, taking a lot of my discretionary time.
> This route has been really fascinating to me and I sincerely hope that
> someone steps up to continue this route.  Please contact me if you are
> interested and want to know anything more about the route.
>
> As I have just returned to this listserv after a long hiatus, I thought I
> would report briefly a few things from a visit to Black Mesa in the first
> week of May.  Migrants were notably scarce.  We found a total of five
> Black-throated Sparrows (all singing males) at the Easter Pageant area.
> There was a singing Summer Tanager at the Hoot Owl Ranch.  There was a pair
> of Vermillion Flycatchers in Kenton and another pair at Black Mesa St
> Park.  A Great Egret was at Lake Etling.  Perhaps most notably was a Black
> Phoebe seen just 2 miles north of the state line along Carrizo Creek,
> paired with an Eastern/Black Phoebe hybrid.  They were constructing a nest
> under a low-water bridge.  This species should be looked for along the
> creek on the Oklahoma side of the state line and probably at Lake Etling as
> well.  I was told by friends in Colorado that Black Phoebe has been
> expanding in numbers and in geographical range along the Front Range in
> Colorado in recent years.
>
> Best regards to my Oklahoma birding friends, many of whom I have not seen
> in person for a long, long time.
>
> --
> Pete Janzen Wichita, KS pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net
>
Subject: Re: Oklahoma Bird Pictures
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 18:57:32 +0000
Wow, Some pretty serious photo time.  
         Great series Ken. 
CHEERS,                     JOE Grzybowski
 

 On Friday, June 10, 2016 9:54 PM, Ken or Carol Williams 
 wrote: 

 

 Fellow Birders,

Now that migration for this spring has ended, I have had time to catch 
up on my extensive backlog of spring pictures.  I was way behind.  
Anyway, if anyone is interested in seeing a lot of bird pictures check 
out my Recent Folder. http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures

This folder includes pictures of Oklahoma birds plus the following sub 
folders.

I had previously posted about the Hudsonian Godwits, I found at 
Hackberry Flats in May.  Pictures of them plus other pictures from the 
trip can be seen in my Recent Folder at 

http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/hackberry_flats__wichita_mountains_nwr_spring_2016 


Also, included in Recent Folder are spring pictures from our Black Mesa 
trip  http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/black_mesa__may_2016

And a folder on the mating courtship display of Buff-breasted Sandpipers 
at the Leonard Sod Farms 
http://www.pcom/kcswildshots/buffbreasted_sandpiper_courtship_displaying

Ken Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots


  
Subject: Correction: date of Chester Fire
From: Pete Janzen <pete.janzen AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 06:46:55 -0500
I did a typo, the Chester fire was in 2009.  Here is a link to an 
article about it 
https://agblog.ok.gov/2009/07/13/update-on-chester-fire-in-major-county/
-- 
Pete Janzen Wichita, KS pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net
Subject: Major County BBS route last Saturday
From: Pete Janzen <pete.janzen AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 06:44:26 -0500
I just thought I would post a few comments about the BBS route I ran in 
Major Co. last Saturday.  I found 49 species of birds. This is an 
interesting route that starts just north of Seiling and goes north to 
Lone Mountain.  Dickcissels were in absolutely unprecedented numbers 
with 90 seen at 27 stops.  I think in some drought years there have only 
been 5 or so.  N. Bobwhite was the second most numerous species with 87 
seen at 41 stops.  Cassin's Sparrow was absent for the first time ever 
on this route.  Birds new to the count were Barred Owl and 
Black-and-White Warbler. These were both seen early in the route in oak 
habitat within the North Canadian watershed.  I found Rufous-crowned 
Sparrow at four stops.  About 19 years ago the major Chester Fire burned 
about 30 square miles and huge stands of red cedar were destroyed. 
Following that event, I started seeing a few Rufous-crowns at Stop 42, 
which is marked in e-bird as the "Bluffs on Griever Creek". This year I 
was really surprised to find them at some other stops as well.  At 
several of these I was able to record video of singing males.  At Stop 
22 (after the 3 minutes were up) I got the best video and after I played 
a recording of the song two more RCSP popped up out of nearby thickets.  
I believe that the major rains of this past May, combined with the 
longer-term changes resulting from the fire have created favorable 
breeding conditions for this species.  There are probably quite a number 
of them breeding in the Gloss Mountains region this summer.  Several 
other species were more numerous than usual, including Scissor-tailed 
Flycatcher and Common Nighthawk.

I am probably retiring from this route as it is well over 200 miles from 
my home and additionally I believe that next year the second Kansas 
Breeding Bird Atlas will commence, taking a lot of my discretionary 
time.  This route has been really fascinating to me and I sincerely hope 
that someone steps up to continue this route.  Please contact me if you 
are interested and want to know anything more about the route.

As I have just returned to this listserv after a long hiatus, I thought 
I would report briefly a few things from a visit to Black Mesa in the 
first week of May.  Migrants were notably scarce.  We found a total of 
five Black-throated Sparrows (all singing males) at the Easter Pageant 
area.  There was a singing Summer Tanager at the Hoot Owl Ranch.  There 
was a pair of Vermillion Flycatchers in Kenton and another pair at Black 
Mesa St Park.  A Great Egret was at Lake Etling.  Perhaps most notably 
was a Black Phoebe seen just 2 miles north of the state line along 
Carrizo Creek, paired with an Eastern/Black Phoebe hybrid.  They were 
constructing a nest under a low-water bridge.  This species should be 
looked for along the creek on the Oklahoma side of the state line and 
probably at Lake Etling as well.  I was told by friends in Colorado that 
Black Phoebe has been expanding in numbers and in geographical range 
along the Front Range in Colorado in recent years.

Best regards to my Oklahoma birding friends, many of whom I have not 
seen in person for a long, long time.

-- 
Pete Janzen Wichita, KS pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net
Subject: Oklahoma Bird Pictures
From: Ken or Carol Williams <kcwilliams AT TULSACONNECT.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 21:53:42 -0500
Fellow Birders,

Now that migration for this spring has ended, I have had time to catch 
up on my extensive backlog of spring pictures.  I was way behind.  
Anyway, if anyone is interested in seeing a lot of bird pictures check 
out my Recent Folder. http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures

This folder includes pictures of Oklahoma birds plus the following sub 
folders.

I had previously posted about the Hudsonian Godwits, I found at 
Hackberry Flats in May.  Pictures of them plus other pictures from the 
trip can be seen in my Recent Folder at 

http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/hackberry_flats__wichita_mountains_nwr_spring_2016 


Also, included in Recent Folder are spring pictures from our Black Mesa 
trip  http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/black_mesa__may_2016

And a folder on the mating courtship display of Buff-breasted Sandpipers 
at the Leonard Sod Farms 
http://www.pcom/kcswildshots/buffbreasted_sandpiper_courtship_displaying

Ken Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots