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Updated on Saturday, July 4 at 10:37 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Ochre-breasted Pitta,©BirdQuest

4 Jul Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding [Don Gettinger ]
4 Jul Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding ["Ingold, James" ]
4 Jul Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding [Don Gettinger ]
4 Jul Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding ["Ingold, James" ]
4 Jul Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding [Laura Erickson ]
4 Jul Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding [Don Gettinger ]
4 Jul Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding [Peggie Mitchell ]
3 Jul Red-headed Woodpecker feeding [Don Gettinger ]
3 Jul Re: Quietness [Sue Selman ]
3 Jul Re: American Pigeon Musum [Peggie Mitchell ]
3 Jul American Pigeon Musum [Sandy Berger ]
3 Jul Re: Quietness [rgunn1 ]
3 Jul Re: Quietness ["bill ." ]
3 Jul Re: Quietness [Sue Selman ]
3 Jul humming or coming? [Don Gettinger ]
2 Jul Re: Quietness [Brian Sheehan ]
2 Jul July Migration Report [Patricia Velte ]
1 Jul Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird [John Bates ]
1 Jul Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird [Terry Mitchell ]
1 Jul Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird [John Bates ]
1 Jul Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird [John Bates ]
1 Jul Re: Blue-throated Hummingbird ["Bostian, Kelly" ]
1 Jul Re: Blue-throated Hummingbird [Jimarterburn ]
1 Jul Re: Blue-throated Hummingbird ["Bostian, Kelly" ]
1 Jul Re: Blue-throated Hummingbird [Jimarterburn ]
1 Jul FW: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird [Jim Arterburn ]
1 Jul Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird [john bates ]
1 Jul Blue-throated Hummingbird [Kurt Meisenzahl ]
30 Jun Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird [Foundation Subscriber ]
30 Jun Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird [Jim Arterburn ]
30 Jun Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird [Foundation Subscriber ]
30 Jun Bird Calls Going Wild [jwdavis ]
30 Jun FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird [Dan Reinking ]
30 Jun Upland Sandpipers [JOS GRZYBOWSKI ]
29 Jun Blue-throated Hummingbird in Comanche County [Kurt Meisenzahl ]
27 Jun Hackberry Flat [Kurt Meisenzahl ]
25 Jun Hackberry Flat yesterday [Matthew Jung ]
23 Jun Red Slough bird survey - June 23 [David Arbour ]
23 Jun Re: White-winged Dove [Foundation Subscriber ]
23 Jun Re: White-winged Dove [Jerry Taylor ]
23 Jun Re: White-winged Dove [Dan Reinking ]
22 Jun Re: White-winged Dove ["bill ." ]
22 Jun Re: White-winged Dove [Jim Jorgensen ]
22 Jun Re: White-winged Dove [Foundation Subscriber ]
22 Jun Re: White-winged Dove [John Polo ]
22 Jun Re: White-winged Dove [Andrea Green ]
22 Jun Re: White-winged Dove [Don Gettinger ]
22 Jun Re: White-winged Dove [Jennifer Kidney ]
22 Jun sw OK 20 June 2015 [JOS GRZYBOWSKI ]
22 Jun White-winged Dove ["Nola D." ]
21 Jun Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend [Mary Peterson ]
20 Jun Re: Saturday morning birding [Foundation Subscriber ]
20 Jun Re: Saturday morning birding [John Shackford ]
20 Jun Re: Saturday morning birding [Mark Cain ]
19 Jun Re: Saturday morning birding [Dora Webb ]
19 Jun Saturday morning birding [Mark Cain ]
18 Jun Red Slough today [David Arbour ]
18 Jun No Bill Birds [Bill Carrell ]
17 Jun Re: Bill [David Arbour ]
17 Jun Bill. [Larry Mays ]
17 Jun Re: Roadrunner size ["Ingold, James" ]
17 Jun Roadrunner size [Russell Doughty ]
17 Jun Re: Tropical Storm Bill's birds?? [David Arbour ]
16 Jun Red Slough Bird Survey - June 16 [David Arbour ]
16 Jun Re: Bill, where's Bill [Russell Doughty ]
16 Jun Re: Bill, where's Bill [Sandy Berger ]
16 Jun Re: Bill, where's Bill [Lauren Wilkerson ]
16 Jun Re: Bill, where's Bill [Larry Mays ]
16 Jun Re: Bill, where's Bill [Terry Mitchell ]
16 Jun Bill, where's Bill [John Sterling ]
15 Jun Rogers County and Nickel Preserve [Scott Loss ]
15 Jun Re: Thanks for the help - Payne Co. Prairie Warbler(s) [Dan Reinking ]
15 Jun Bobwhite Quail Status [William Diffin ]
13 Jun Re: Thanks for the help - Payne Co. Prairie Warbler(s) [Timothy O'Connell ]
13 Jun Re: Thanks for the help - Payne Co. Prairie Warbler(s) [JOS GRZYBOWSKI ]
13 Jun Great morning on South Jenkins [rgunn1 ]

Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding
From: Don Gettinger <donaldgettinger AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 10:33:57 -0500
Thanks Jim.  I see that the potential subscriber can try it once for free.
When I get some time to spend checking it out, I will consider this
option.  I'm cheep, cheep!  I had thought that I could use this list-site
to answer all my questions.  However, I am beginning to see that this site
is more about check-listing and birding, and less about biological aspects
of ornithology. I may not stay long, but if you want to discuss Black Mesa
(in general) or have questions about bird ectoparasites, feel free to
contact me at my personal email (donaldgettinger AT gmail.com).


On Sat, Jul 4, 2015 at 10:07 AM, Ingold, James 
wrote:

>  Don,
>
> You might want to subscribe to the Birds of North America online.  It’s
> pricey ($50/year) but the best source for information.
>
> http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/
>
> Jim
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Don Gettinger
> *Sent:* Saturday, July 04, 2015 10:00 AM
>
> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding
>
>
>
> Well, there you have it! Thanks James!  I am trying to get more literature
> together on birds in general, and Black Mesa/ Chihuahuan Desert Birds.
> Wow, look at all these references.  My red-headed woodpecker observation
> are "old hat."  That is good!
>
>
>
> But, my little question about hummingbird copulation has gone without
> responses.  The youtube video (sorry, I did not copy the link, but it is
> easy to find searching "hummingbird copulation") has a bunch of aggressive
> comments saying that this is NOT copulation, but torpor.  If the female is
> in torpor, that male is certainly not.  Date-rape drug?  What did that
> birder put in the sugar-water? Seriously, this is what I observed with the
> black-chinned, except that I watched him knock her out of the air, and then
> mount her in a similar fashion.  Also, the "event" lasted a very long time.
> I didn't look at my watch (like a real birder may have done), but it was
> over a minute, that is for sure.
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jul 4, 2015 at 9:33 AM, Ingold, James 
> wrote:
>
> From Birds of North America:
>
> *Food Capture And Consumption*
>
> During breeding season in Kansas and Florida, captured food by
> fly-catching nearly 40% of time (*n* = 62 observations, Jackson 1976
> ; *n*
> = 5,005, Venables and Collopy 1989
> )
> and “stooping” or flying to ground from a perch about 30% of time 
(Jackson 

> 1976 ).
> Sallies 3–50 m in length and 12–20 m above ground (Skinner 1928
> );
> can fly straight up in air and straight back to a perch, or elliptically,
> horizontally, or obliquely up in air, or downward over ground (Bailey 1920
> ).
> Foraged similarly on rainy and clear days during summer; 71% of daily
> foraging occurs between mid-morning and mid-afternoon (Keller 1972, Venables
> and Collopy 1989
> ).
>
> Apparently a bark gleaner for adult beetles, but does not consume beetle
> larvae, grubs, or ants to any great extent (Beal 1911
> ).
> Occasionally forages by chiseling in typical woodpecker manner with heavy
> and deliberate strokes (Skinner 1928
> ).
> In searching a tree trunk for wood-boring insects, gives it a few smart
> raps here and there and then turn its head as if listening, then attacks
> bark or wood and drills directly to lurking grub (Bailey 1920
> , 
Forbush 

> 1927 
> ).
>
> Perches on fence posts and telephone poles to look for waste grain or
> insects and other invertebrates (e.g., earthworms; Annelida) crawling on
> paved roads (Skinner 1928
> , Stoner
> 1932 );
> reported to sit on fences and telephone wires as well (Monroe 1994
> ).
> Observed placing pine cones and nuts on road to be crushed by cars at
> Huntington Beach State Park, South Carolina (K. D. Edwards pers. comm.).
> Also feeds on sap oozing from sapsucker drill holes and may occasionally
> make its own wounds in trees (McAtee 1911
> , Kilham
> 1983 ).
> Occasionally comes to bird feeders in winter, particularly to suet (Roberts
> 1932 ),
> and also continues to fly-catch and capture insects on ground during warm
> winter days (Skinner 1928
> , Kilham
> 1958a
> ).
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Don Gettinger
> *Sent:* Saturday, July 04, 2015 8:33 AM
> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding
>
>
>
> Thanks Jerry.  I went online looking for Ehrlich et al and found a free
> pdf download from waverbooks.com.  However, in the process, they asked
> for an email address, then, a credit card number, and I "chickened out."
>  Does this section on diet discuss this kind of non-peck feeding? When
> Sandy mentioned Flickers, I realized how common it was to see these birds
> foraging on the ground.  However, the red-headeds always seemed to return
> to this elevated perch, usually an open, vertical pole (fence-post, or
> telephone pole), where they sat apparently scanning the surrounding desert
> for prey.  It seemed to mimic what we see with many flycatchers.
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jul 4, 2015 at 8:04 AM, Peggie Mitchell 
> wrote:
>
> Don, try BIRDER'S HANDBOOK by Ehrlich,  Dobkin, & Wheye. Go to Red Headed
> Woodpecker under diet.
>
> Jerry Mitchell
>
> On Jul 3, 2015 6:42 PM, "Don Gettinger"  wrote:
>
> A male Red-Headed Woodpecker perches on fence-post, "sallies" out and down
> to the ground for a few seconds, then flies back to the fence-post, lands
> in the same position.  It bludgeons a large grasshopper prey that it has
> gleaned from the ground. I thought this was novel at first, but I continued
> to see it over and over.  The grasshoppers they are catching are wingless.
> I have not collected them, so am unsure about whether they are late-stage
> nymphs, or the adult females of a wingless species, or "lubber
> grasshoppers".  But this is certainly NOT woodpecking!   Does anyone know
> if this feeding strategy is common?  Or, are they are just being
> opportunistic and going for these big, readily available insects?
>
>
>
> --
>
> Donald Gettinger
>
> Senior Research Fellow
>
> Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Donald Gettinger
>
> Senior Research Fellow
>
> Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Donald Gettinger
>
> Senior Research Fellow
>
> Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
>



-- 
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding
From: "Ingold, James" <James.Ingold AT LSUS.EDU>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 15:07:52 +0000
Don,
You might want to subscribe to the Birds of North America online. It’s pricey 
($50/year) but the best source for information. 

http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/
Jim

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Don Gettinger
Sent: Saturday, July 04, 2015 10:00 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding

Well, there you have it! Thanks James! I am trying to get more literature 
together on birds in general, and Black Mesa/ Chihuahuan Desert Birds. Wow, 
look at all these references. My red-headed woodpecker observation are "old 
hat." That is good! 


But, my little question about hummingbird copulation has gone without 
responses. The youtube video (sorry, I did not copy the link, but it is easy to 
find searching "hummingbird copulation") has a bunch of aggressive comments 
saying that this is NOT copulation, but torpor. If the female is in torpor, 
that male is certainly not. Date-rape drug? What did that birder put in the 
sugar-water? Seriously, this is what I observed with the black-chinned, except 
that I watched him knock her out of the air, and then mount her in a similar 
fashion. Also, the "event" lasted a very long time. I didn't look at my watch 
(like a real birder may have done), but it was over a minute, that is for sure. 



On Sat, Jul 4, 2015 at 9:33 AM, Ingold, James 
> wrote: 

From Birds of North America:
Food Capture And Consumption
During breeding season in Kansas and Florida, captured food by fly-catching 
nearly 40% of time (n = 62 observations, Jackson 
1976; n = 
5,005, Venables and Collopy 
1989) and 
“stooping” or flying to ground from a perch about 30% of time (Jackson 
1976). 
Sallies 3–50 m in length and 12–20 m above ground (Skinner 
1928); can 
fly straight up in air and straight back to a perch, or elliptically, 
horizontally, or obliquely up in air, or downward over ground (Bailey 
1920). 
Foraged similarly on rainy and clear days during summer; 71% of daily foraging 
occurs between mid-morning and mid-afternoon (Keller 1972, Venables and Collopy 
1989). 

Apparently a bark gleaner for adult beetles, but does not consume beetle 
larvae, grubs, or ants to any great extent (Beal 
1911). 
Occasionally forages by chiseling in typical woodpecker manner with heavy and 
deliberate strokes (Skinner 
1928). In 
searching a tree trunk for wood-boring insects, gives it a few smart raps here 
and there and then turn its head as if listening, then attacks bark or wood and 
drills directly to lurking grub (Bailey 
1920, 
Forbush 
1927). 

Perches on fence posts and telephone poles to look for waste grain or insects 
and other invertebrates (e.g., earthworms; Annelida) crawling on paved roads 
(Skinner 
1928, 
Stoner 
1932); 
reported to sit on fences and telephone wires as well (Monroe 
1994). 
Observed placing pine cones and nuts on road to be crushed by cars at 
Huntington Beach State Park, South Carolina (K. D. Edwards pers. comm.). Also 
feeds on sap oozing from sapsucker drill holes and may occasionally make its 
own wounds in trees (McAtee 
1911, 
Kilham 
1983). 
Occasionally comes to bird feeders in winter, particularly to suet (Roberts 
1932), and 
also continues to fly-catch and capture insects on ground during warm winter 
days (Skinner 
1928, 
Kilham 
1958a). 



From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of Don Gettinger 

Sent: Saturday, July 04, 2015 8:33 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding

Thanks Jerry. I went online looking for Ehrlich et al and found a free pdf 
download from waverbooks.com. However, in the process, 
they asked for an email address, then, a credit card number, and I "chickened 
out." Does this section on diet discuss this kind of non-peck feeding? When 
Sandy mentioned Flickers, I realized how common it was to see these birds 
foraging on the ground. However, the red-headeds always seemed to return to 
this elevated perch, usually an open, vertical pole (fence-post, or telephone 
pole), where they sat apparently scanning the surrounding desert for prey. It 
seemed to mimic what we see with many flycatchers. 


On Sat, Jul 4, 2015 at 8:04 AM, Peggie Mitchell 
> wrote: 


Don, try BIRDER'S HANDBOOK by Ehrlich, Dobkin, & Wheye. Go to Red Headed 
Woodpecker under diet. 


Jerry Mitchell
On Jul 3, 2015 6:42 PM, "Don Gettinger" 
> wrote: 

A male Red-Headed Woodpecker perches on fence-post, "sallies" out and down to 
the ground for a few seconds, then flies back to the fence-post, lands in the 
same position. It bludgeons a large grasshopper prey that it has gleaned from 
the ground. I thought this was novel at first, but I continued to see it over 
and over. The grasshoppers they are catching are wingless. I have not collected 
them, so am unsure about whether they are late-stage nymphs, or the adult 
females of a wingless species, or "lubber grasshoppers". But this is certainly 
NOT woodpecking! Does anyone know if this feeding strategy is common? Or, are 
they are just being opportunistic and going for these big, readily available 
insects? 


--
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology



--
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology



--
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding
From: Don Gettinger <donaldgettinger AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 09:59:45 -0500
Well, there you have it! Thanks James!  I am trying to get more literature
together on birds in general, and Black Mesa/ Chihuahuan Desert Birds.
Wow, look at all these references.  My red-headed woodpecker observation
are "old hat."  That is good!

But, my little question about hummingbird copulation has gone without
responses.  The youtube video (sorry, I did not copy the link, but it is
easy to find searching "hummingbird copulation") has a bunch of aggressive
comments saying that this is NOT copulation, but torpor.  If the female is
in torpor, that male is certainly not.  Date-rape drug?  What did that
birder put in the sugar-water? Seriously, this is what I observed with the
black-chinned, except that I watched him knock her out of the air, and then
mount her in a similar fashion.  Also, the "event" lasted a very long time.
I didn't look at my watch (like a real birder may have done), but it was
over a minute, that is for sure.


On Sat, Jul 4, 2015 at 9:33 AM, Ingold, James  wrote:

>  From Birds of North America:
>
> *Food Capture And Consumption*
>
> During breeding season in Kansas and Florida, captured food by
> fly-catching nearly 40% of time (*n* = 62 observations, Jackson 1976
> ; *n*
> = 5,005, Venables and Collopy 1989
> )
> and “stooping” or flying to ground from a perch about 30% of time 
(Jackson 

> 1976 ).
> Sallies 3–50 m in length and 12–20 m above ground (Skinner 1928
> );
> can fly straight up in air and straight back to a perch, or elliptically,
> horizontally, or obliquely up in air, or downward over ground (Bailey 1920
> ).
> Foraged similarly on rainy and clear days during summer; 71% of daily
> foraging occurs between mid-morning and mid-afternoon (Keller 1972, Venables
> and Collopy 1989
> ).
>
> Apparently a bark gleaner for adult beetles, but does not consume beetle
> larvae, grubs, or ants to any great extent (Beal 1911
> ).
> Occasionally forages by chiseling in typical woodpecker manner with heavy
> and deliberate strokes (Skinner 1928
> ).
> In searching a tree trunk for wood-boring insects, gives it a few smart
> raps here and there and then turn its head as if listening, then attacks
> bark or wood and drills directly to lurking grub (Bailey 1920
> , 
Forbush 

> 1927 
> ).
>
> Perches on fence posts and telephone poles to look for waste grain or
> insects and other invertebrates (e.g., earthworms; Annelida) crawling on
> paved roads (Skinner 1928
> , Stoner
> 1932 );
> reported to sit on fences and telephone wires as well (Monroe 1994
> ).
> Observed placing pine cones and nuts on road to be crushed by cars at
> Huntington Beach State Park, South Carolina (K. D. Edwards pers. comm.).
> Also feeds on sap oozing from sapsucker drill holes and may occasionally
> make its own wounds in trees (McAtee 1911
> , Kilham
> 1983 ).
> Occasionally comes to bird feeders in winter, particularly to suet (Roberts
> 1932 ),
> and also continues to fly-catch and capture insects on ground during warm
> winter days (Skinner 1928
> , Kilham
> 1958a
> ).
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Don Gettinger
> *Sent:* Saturday, July 04, 2015 8:33 AM
> *To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding
>
>
>
> Thanks Jerry.  I went online looking for Ehrlich et al and found a free
> pdf download from waverbooks.com.  However, in the process, they asked
> for an email address, then, a credit card number, and I "chickened out."
>  Does this section on diet discuss this kind of non-peck feeding? When
> Sandy mentioned Flickers, I realized how common it was to see these birds
> foraging on the ground.  However, the red-headeds always seemed to return
> to this elevated perch, usually an open, vertical pole (fence-post, or
> telephone pole), where they sat apparently scanning the surrounding desert
> for prey.  It seemed to mimic what we see with many flycatchers.
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jul 4, 2015 at 8:04 AM, Peggie Mitchell 
> wrote:
>
> Don, try BIRDER'S HANDBOOK by Ehrlich,  Dobkin, & Wheye. Go to Red Headed
> Woodpecker under diet.
>
> Jerry Mitchell
>
> On Jul 3, 2015 6:42 PM, "Don Gettinger"  wrote:
>
> A male Red-Headed Woodpecker perches on fence-post, "sallies" out and down
> to the ground for a few seconds, then flies back to the fence-post, lands
> in the same position.  It bludgeons a large grasshopper prey that it has
> gleaned from the ground. I thought this was novel at first, but I continued
> to see it over and over.  The grasshoppers they are catching are wingless.
> I have not collected them, so am unsure about whether they are late-stage
> nymphs, or the adult females of a wingless species, or "lubber
> grasshoppers".  But this is certainly NOT woodpecking!   Does anyone know
> if this feeding strategy is common?  Or, are they are just being
> opportunistic and going for these big, readily available insects?
>
>
>
> --
>
> Donald Gettinger
>
> Senior Research Fellow
>
> Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Donald Gettinger
>
> Senior Research Fellow
>
> Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
>



-- 
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding
From: "Ingold, James" <James.Ingold AT LSUS.EDU>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 14:33:38 +0000
From Birds of North America:
Food Capture And Consumption
During breeding season in Kansas and Florida, captured food by fly-catching 
nearly 40% of time (n = 62 observations, Jackson 
1976; n = 
5,005, Venables and Collopy 
1989) and 
“stooping” or flying to ground from a perch about 30% of time (Jackson 
1976). 
Sallies 3–50 m in length and 12–20 m above ground (Skinner 
1928); can 
fly straight up in air and straight back to a perch, or elliptically, 
horizontally, or obliquely up in air, or downward over ground (Bailey 
1920). 
Foraged similarly on rainy and clear days during summer; 71% of daily foraging 
occurs between mid-morning and mid-afternoon (Keller 1972, Venables and Collopy 
1989). 

Apparently a bark gleaner for adult beetles, but does not consume beetle 
larvae, grubs, or ants to any great extent (Beal 
1911). 
Occasionally forages by chiseling in typical woodpecker manner with heavy and 
deliberate strokes (Skinner 
1928). In 
searching a tree trunk for wood-boring insects, gives it a few smart raps here 
and there and then turn its head as if listening, then attacks bark or wood and 
drills directly to lurking grub (Bailey 
1920, 
Forbush 
1927). 

Perches on fence posts and telephone poles to look for waste grain or insects 
and other invertebrates (e.g., earthworms; Annelida) crawling on paved roads 
(Skinner 
1928, 
Stoner 
1932); 
reported to sit on fences and telephone wires as well (Monroe 
1994). 
Observed placing pine cones and nuts on road to be crushed by cars at 
Huntington Beach State Park, South Carolina (K. D. Edwards pers. comm.). Also 
feeds on sap oozing from sapsucker drill holes and may occasionally make its 
own wounds in trees (McAtee 
1911, 
Kilham 
1983). 
Occasionally comes to bird feeders in winter, particularly to suet (Roberts 
1932), and 
also continues to fly-catch and capture insects on ground during warm winter 
days (Skinner 
1928, 
Kilham 
1958a). 



From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Don Gettinger
Sent: Saturday, July 04, 2015 8:33 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding

Thanks Jerry. I went online looking for Ehrlich et al and found a free pdf 
download from waverbooks.com. However, in the process, 
they asked for an email address, then, a credit card number, and I "chickened 
out." Does this section on diet discuss this kind of non-peck feeding? When 
Sandy mentioned Flickers, I realized how common it was to see these birds 
foraging on the ground. However, the red-headeds always seemed to return to 
this elevated perch, usually an open, vertical pole (fence-post, or telephone 
pole), where they sat apparently scanning the surrounding desert for prey. It 
seemed to mimic what we see with many flycatchers. 


On Sat, Jul 4, 2015 at 8:04 AM, Peggie Mitchell 
> wrote: 


Don, try BIRDER'S HANDBOOK by Ehrlich, Dobkin, & Wheye. Go to Red Headed 
Woodpecker under diet. 


Jerry Mitchell
On Jul 3, 2015 6:42 PM, "Don Gettinger" 
> wrote: 

A male Red-Headed Woodpecker perches on fence-post, "sallies" out and down to 
the ground for a few seconds, then flies back to the fence-post, lands in the 
same position. It bludgeons a large grasshopper prey that it has gleaned from 
the ground. I thought this was novel at first, but I continued to see it over 
and over. The grasshoppers they are catching are wingless. I have not collected 
them, so am unsure about whether they are late-stage nymphs, or the adult 
females of a wingless species, or "lubber grasshoppers". But this is certainly 
NOT woodpecking! Does anyone know if this feeding strategy is common? Or, are 
they are just being opportunistic and going for these big, readily available 
insects? 


--
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology



--
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding
From: Laura Erickson <chickadee AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 08:42:25 -0500
The free All About Birds website says regarding their feeding, "In addition
to catching insects by the normal woodpecker method of hammering at wood,
Red-headed Woodpeckers also catch insects in flight and hunt for them on
the ground. They also eat considerable amounts of fruit and seeds. Their
raspy calls are shriller and scratchier than the Red-bellied Woodpecker’s."

I used to see Red-headed Woodpeckers a lot in the 1970s when I started
birding, and often saw them flycatching or flying from a perch to the
ground for insects--the flashy white patches on their wings made this
wonderfully beautiful to see.

Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Sat, Jul 4, 2015 at 8:32 AM, Don Gettinger 
wrote:

> Thanks Jerry.  I went online looking for Ehrlich et al and found a free
> pdf download from waverbooks.com.  However, in the process, they asked
> for an email address, then, a credit card number, and I "chickened out."
>  Does this section on diet discuss this kind of non-peck feeding? When
> Sandy mentioned Flickers, I realized how common it was to see these birds
> foraging on the ground.  However, the red-headeds always seemed to return
> to this elevated perch, usually an open, vertical pole (fence-post, or
> telephone pole), where they sat apparently scanning the surrounding desert
> for prey.  It seemed to mimic what we see with many flycatchers.
>
> On Sat, Jul 4, 2015 at 8:04 AM, Peggie Mitchell 
> wrote:
>
>> Don, try BIRDER'S HANDBOOK by Ehrlich,  Dobkin, & Wheye. Go to Red Headed
>> Woodpecker under diet.
>>
>> Jerry Mitchell
>> On Jul 3, 2015 6:42 PM, "Don Gettinger" 
>> wrote:
>>
>>> A male Red-Headed Woodpecker perches on fence-post, "sallies" out and
>>> down to the ground for a few seconds, then flies back to the fence-post,
>>> lands in the same position.  It bludgeons a large grasshopper prey that it
>>> has gleaned from the ground. I thought this was novel at first, but I
>>> continued to see it over and over.  The grasshoppers they are catching are
>>> wingless.  I have not collected them, so am unsure about whether they are
>>> late-stage nymphs, or the adult females of a wingless species, or "lubber
>>> grasshoppers".  But this is certainly NOT woodpecking!   Does anyone know
>>> if this feeding strategy is common?  Or, are they are just being
>>> opportunistic and going for these big, readily available insects?
>>>
>>> --
>>> Donald Gettinger
>>> Senior Research Fellow
>>> Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
>>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Donald Gettinger
> Senior Research Fellow
> Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
>



-- 
-- 
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding
From: Don Gettinger <donaldgettinger AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 08:32:35 -0500
Thanks Jerry.  I went online looking for Ehrlich et al and found a free pdf
download from waverbooks.com.  However, in the process, they asked for an
email address, then, a credit card number, and I "chickened out."  Does
this section on diet discuss this kind of non-peck feeding? When Sandy
mentioned Flickers, I realized how common it was to see these birds
foraging on the ground.  However, the red-headeds always seemed to return
to this elevated perch, usually an open, vertical pole (fence-post, or
telephone pole), where they sat apparently scanning the surrounding desert
for prey.  It seemed to mimic what we see with many flycatchers.

On Sat, Jul 4, 2015 at 8:04 AM, Peggie Mitchell 
wrote:

> Don, try BIRDER'S HANDBOOK by Ehrlich,  Dobkin, & Wheye. Go to Red Headed
> Woodpecker under diet.
>
> Jerry Mitchell
> On Jul 3, 2015 6:42 PM, "Don Gettinger"  wrote:
>
>> A male Red-Headed Woodpecker perches on fence-post, "sallies" out and
>> down to the ground for a few seconds, then flies back to the fence-post,
>> lands in the same position.  It bludgeons a large grasshopper prey that it
>> has gleaned from the ground. I thought this was novel at first, but I
>> continued to see it over and over.  The grasshoppers they are catching are
>> wingless.  I have not collected them, so am unsure about whether they are
>> late-stage nymphs, or the adult females of a wingless species, or "lubber
>> grasshoppers".  But this is certainly NOT woodpecking!   Does anyone know
>> if this feeding strategy is common?  Or, are they are just being
>> opportunistic and going for these big, readily available insects?
>>
>> --
>> Donald Gettinger
>> Senior Research Fellow
>> Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
>>
>


-- 
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding
From: Peggie Mitchell <jpmitchellp AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 08:04:11 -0500
Don, try BIRDER'S HANDBOOK by Ehrlich,  Dobkin, & Wheye. Go to Red Headed
Woodpecker under diet.

Jerry Mitchell
On Jul 3, 2015 6:42 PM, "Don Gettinger"  wrote:

> A male Red-Headed Woodpecker perches on fence-post, "sallies" out and down
> to the ground for a few seconds, then flies back to the fence-post, lands
> in the same position.  It bludgeons a large grasshopper prey that it has
> gleaned from the ground. I thought this was novel at first, but I continued
> to see it over and over.  The grasshoppers they are catching are wingless.
> I have not collected them, so am unsure about whether they are late-stage
> nymphs, or the adult females of a wingless species, or "lubber
> grasshoppers".  But this is certainly NOT woodpecking!   Does anyone know
> if this feeding strategy is common?  Or, are they are just being
> opportunistic and going for these big, readily available insects?
>
> --
> Donald Gettinger
> Senior Research Fellow
> Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
>
Subject: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding
From: Don Gettinger <donaldgettinger AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 18:42:52 -0500
A male Red-Headed Woodpecker perches on fence-post, "sallies" out and down
to the ground for a few seconds, then flies back to the fence-post, lands
in the same position.  It bludgeons a large grasshopper prey that it has
gleaned from the ground. I thought this was novel at first, but I continued
to see it over and over.  The grasshoppers they are catching are wingless.
I have not collected them, so am unsure about whether they are late-stage
nymphs, or the adult females of a wingless species, or "lubber
grasshoppers".  But this is certainly NOT woodpecking!   Does anyone know
if this feeding strategy is common?  Or, are they are just being
opportunistic and going for these big, readily available insects?

-- 
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: Quietness
From: Sue Selman <selmanranch AT WILDBLUE.NET>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 17:22:30 -0500
We have not had the hard and plentiful rains here but enough to keep us going. 
I just saw a pair with little ones today,. 

Sue Selman
Selman OK
On Jul 3, 2015, at 14:53, Sandy Berger  wrote:

> Oh to have a place like yours Sue. Someday I hope to get out there and see 
your place, and your prairie chickens. 

> 
> Sandy B.
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> On Jul 3, 2015, at 8:22 AM, Sue Selman  wrote:
> 
>> I want to brag that I have at least 2 pair of Yellow-billed Cuckoos nesting 
in my yard. I also found, thanks to David Strozdas, a wonderful peanut patty 
for the woodpeckers and have regular Red-bellied and Downy Woodpeckers pigging 
out; 

>> Also, I was concerned that I had not seen any Green Herons this year but 
have recently seen one at the photo blind and one on Sleeping Bear Creek. In 
addition my Eastern Bluebirds are their 3 nest and I hope the heat doesnt kill 
the 

>> babies. Another encouraging thing or two, I saw a Lesser Prairie Chicken hen 
in the pasture which is very rare and if the conditions continue this will be a 
record year for Bobwhites. 

>> Sue Selman
>> Selman Ranch
>> Harper County Oklahoma
>> On Jul 2, 2015, at 23:41, Sandy Berger  wrote:
>> 
>>> Very nice Brian. The Phoebe may be looking for insects amongst the seeds. 
It's sounds like you have a nice yard for birds. 

>>> 
>>> Sandy B.
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPad
>>> 
>>> On Jul 2, 2015, at 10:03 PM, Brian Sheehan  
wrote: 

>>> 
>>>> I, for one, was kind of glad about the silence. Considering the recent 
kerfuffle, it was a welcome change. 

>>>> 
>>>> However, to ease things back onto topic, I'll say that our yard in Bixby 
was very active this morning. Although there was nothing too out of the 
ordinary, I had several goldfinches on the feeders at the same time as a few 
house finches, creating a nice color variety. The hummers seemed to appreciate 
my cleaning and re-filling the feeders this morning as well. Eastern Bluebirds 
sat on the fence and sang in between bouts of flycatching for bugs. A few MODOs 
pecked on the ground underneath the feeders. A rather bedraggled-looking Lark 
Sparrow came to the sunflower seed feeder for awhile. And, for a 3rd time this 
week, an Eastern Phoebe came and sat on the sunflower seed feeder and seemed to 
alternate between pecking at the seeds with uncertainty, and chasing other 
birds off. That was new to me. 

>>>> 
>>>> Good birding, all,
>>>> -Brian S.
>>>> 
>>>> > Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 21:20:00 -0500
>>>> > From: sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM
>>>> > Subject: [OKBIRDS] Quietness
>>>> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
>>>> > 
>>>> > So it is very quiet on here. Are there no good bird sightings in OK 
right now? 

>>>> > 
>>>> > Sandy B.
>>>> > 
>>>> > Sent from my iPad
>> 
Subject: Re: American Pigeon Musum
From: Peggie Mitchell <jpmitchellp AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 15:16:24 -0500
Yes. About 3 years ago. Nice place. Best to call first for hours. Small.
Neat museum on homing pigeons and their roll in WWI.
Ask when they let the Rollers out to exercise when you call for hours open.
They are neat to watch.
They have some cages with exotic pigeons. They have unusal feathers. Pretty.

When we were there, they were talking about developing birding paths.

They were a donations operation at that time.

They are on the OKC museum list. You can Google it for more information.
Peggie & Jerry
On Jul 3, 2015 3:00 PM, "Sandy Berger"  wrote:

> Anybody ever been?  It's in OKC.  My nephew just told me about it.
>
> Sandy B.
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
Subject: American Pigeon Musum
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 15:00:40 -0500
Anybody ever been?  It's in OKC.  My nephew just told me about it.

Sandy B.


Sent from my iPad
Subject: Re: Quietness
From: rgunn1 <rgunn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 09:16:42 -0500
I agree on Bob-white. Recently in Kiowa county, we flushed a couple of 
coveys with multiple young, barely-able-to-fly young. I had feared the 
nests had been flooded out. It was hard to imagine any ground nesting 
birds having success with that much precipitation but evidently they 
have re-nested and pulled it off.

D.


On 7/3/2015 8:22 AM, Sue Selman wrote:
> I want to brag that I have at least 2 pair of Yellow-billed Cuckoos 
> nesting in my yard. I also found, thanks to David Strozdas, a 
> wonderful peanut patty for the woodpeckers and have regular 
> Red-bellied and Downy Woodpeckers pigging out;
> Also, I was concerned that I had not seen any Green Herons this year 
> but have recently seen one at the photo blind and one on Sleeping Bear 
> Creek. In addition my Eastern Bluebirds are their 3 nest and I hope 
> the heat doesnt kill the
> babies. Another encouraging thing or two, I saw a Lesser Prairie 
> Chicken hen in the pasture which is very rare and if the conditions 
> continue this will be a record year for Bobwhites.
> Sue Selman
> Selman Ranch
> Harper County Oklahoma
> On Jul 2, 2015, at 23:41, Sandy Berger  > wrote:
>
>> Very nice Brian.  The Phoebe may be looking for insects amongst the 
>> seeds.  It's sounds like you have a nice yard for birds.
>>
>> Sandy B.
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>> On Jul 2, 2015, at 10:03 PM, Brian Sheehan > > wrote:
>>
>>> I, for one, was kind of glad about the silence. Considering the 
>>> recent kerfuffle, it was a welcome change.
>>>
>>> However, to ease things back onto topic, I'll say that our yard in 
>>> Bixby was very active this morning.  Although there was nothing too 
>>> out of the ordinary, I had several goldfinches on the feeders at the 
>>> same time as a few house finches, creating a nice color variety. The 
>>> hummers seemed to appreciate my cleaning and re-filling the feeders 
>>> this morning as well.   Eastern Bluebirds sat on the fence and sang 
>>> in between bouts of flycatching for bugs.  A few MODOs pecked on the 
>>> ground underneath the feeders.  A rather bedraggled-looking Lark 
>>> Sparrow came to the sunflower seed feeder for awhile. And, for a 3rd 
>>> time this week, an Eastern Phoebe came and sat on the sunflower seed 
>>> feeder and seemed to alternate between pecking at the seeds with 
>>> uncertainty, and chasing other birds off. That was new to me.
>>>
>>> Good birding, all,
>>> -Brian S.
>>>
>>> > Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 21:20:00 -0500
>>> > From:sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM 
>>> > Subject: [OKBIRDS] Quietness
>>> > To:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
>>> >
>>> > So it is very quiet on here. Are there no good bird sightings in 
>>> OK right now?
>>> >
>>> > Sandy B.
>>> >
>>> > Sent from my iPad
>
Subject: Re: Quietness
From: "bill ." <tvulture AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 08:36:51 -0500
I attribute the quietness to the interminable heat! Not a morning person at 
all, I've had to resort to getting up with the birds or risk heat-stroke later 
in the day. My recent efforts have been rewarded with Yellow-billed Cuckoo and 
Gray Catbird. Certainly not rarities, but as a mediocre birder at best, i don't 
often see them here in Enid. 


Hard to believe we'll soon be looking for shorebirds coming back south, and 
hopefully one of those Yellow-headed Blackbirds that always elude my camera! 

peace
-bill
enid garfield co ok



> Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 21:20:00 -0500
> From: sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Quietness
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> 
> So it is very quiet on here. Are there no good bird sightings in OK right 
now? 

> 
> Sandy B.
> 
> Sent from my iPad
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Quietness
From: Sue Selman <selmanranch AT WILDBLUE.NET>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 08:22:41 -0500
I want to brag that I have at least 2 pair of Yellow-billed Cuckoos nesting in 
my yard. I also found, thanks to David Strozdas, a wonderful peanut patty for 
the woodpeckers and have regular Red-bellied and Downy Woodpeckers pigging out; 

Also, I was concerned that I had not seen any Green Herons this year but have 
recently seen one at the photo blind and one on Sleeping Bear Creek. In 
addition my Eastern Bluebirds are their 3 nest and I hope the heat doesnt kill 
the 

babies. Another encouraging thing or two, I saw a Lesser Prairie Chicken hen in 
the pasture which is very rare and if the conditions continue this will be a 
record year for Bobwhites. 

Sue Selman
Selman Ranch
Harper County Oklahoma
On Jul 2, 2015, at 23:41, Sandy Berger  wrote:

> Very nice Brian. The Phoebe may be looking for insects amongst the seeds. 
It's sounds like you have a nice yard for birds. 

> 
> Sandy B.
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> On Jul 2, 2015, at 10:03 PM, Brian Sheehan  wrote:
> 
>> I, for one, was kind of glad about the silence. Considering the recent 
kerfuffle, it was a welcome change. 

>> 
>> However, to ease things back onto topic, I'll say that our yard in Bixby was 
very active this morning. Although there was nothing too out of the ordinary, I 
had several goldfinches on the feeders at the same time as a few house finches, 
creating a nice color variety. The hummers seemed to appreciate my cleaning and 
re-filling the feeders this morning as well. Eastern Bluebirds sat on the fence 
and sang in between bouts of flycatching for bugs. A few MODOs pecked on the 
ground underneath the feeders. A rather bedraggled-looking Lark Sparrow came to 
the sunflower seed feeder for awhile. And, for a 3rd time this week, an Eastern 
Phoebe came and sat on the sunflower seed feeder and seemed to alternate 
between pecking at the seeds with uncertainty, and chasing other birds off. 
That was new to me. 

>> 
>> Good birding, all,
>> -Brian S.
>> 
>> > Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 21:20:00 -0500
>> > From: sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM
>> > Subject: [OKBIRDS] Quietness
>> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
>> > 
>> > So it is very quiet on here. Are there no good bird sightings in OK right 
now? 

>> > 
>> > Sandy B.
>> > 
>> > Sent from my iPad
Subject: humming or coming?
From: Don Gettinger <donaldgettinger AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 07:15:09 -0500
Can someone on this list give me a scientific reference to hummingbird
mating, specifically copulation.  What I am witnessing with Black-chins
near Black Mesa is certainly not what I was expecting - the soft and
sensual aerial "cloacal kiss."  What I am observing is a violent act where
the male repeatedly knocks the female to the ground where she becomes
somewhat catatonic and he visits her periodically to have his way with
her.  I quickly went to that authoritative source youtube and found similar
things, with a big argument about whether this behavior was mating or just
defense of the nectar source.  Not to be anthropocentric,....no,
anthropocentrically, hey, I know copulation when I see it.  In today's pc
world,...Hummingbird males may be monsters! Please, let's not ignite a
ridiculous online argument like I witnessed on youtube.  I want something
more scientific.
Thanks for any help,
Don

-- 
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: Quietness
From: Brian Sheehan <osuwildlifer AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 22:03:51 -0500
I, for one, was kind of glad about the silence. Considering the recent 
kerfuffle, it was a welcome change. 

However, to ease things back onto topic, I'll say that our yard in Bixby was 
very active this morning. Although there was nothing too out of the ordinary, I 
had several goldfinches on the feeders at the same time as a few house finches, 
creating a nice color variety. The hummers seemed to appreciate my cleaning and 
re-filling the feeders this morning as well. Eastern Bluebirds sat on the fence 
and sang in between bouts of flycatching for bugs. A few MODOs pecked on the 
ground underneath the feeders. A rather bedraggled-looking Lark Sparrow came to 
the sunflower seed feeder for awhile. And, for a 3rd time this week, an Eastern 
Phoebe came and sat on the sunflower seed feeder and seemed to alternate 
between pecking at the seeds with uncertainty, and chasing other birds off. 
That was new to me. 

Good birding, all,-Brian S.

> Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 21:20:00 -0500
> From: sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Quietness
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> 
> So it is very quiet on here. Are there no good bird sightings in OK right 
now? 

> 
> Sandy B.
> 
> Sent from my iPad
 		 	   		  
Subject: July Migration Report
From: Patricia Velte <pvelte AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 11:22:18 -0500
Dear OKBirders,

 

July brings the return of several shorebird species and the departure of
only one species.  Both lists are included below.

 

ARRIVALS

 

Swainson's Hawk                July 14 - SE

White-faced Ibis                   July 26 - SW, C, SC, NE, SE         

Spotted Sandpiper               July 4 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Solitary Sandpiper               July 1  - ALL  

Willet                                      July 1 - ALL   

Long-billed Curlew              July 4 - NW, SW, C, SC

Marbled Godwit                    July 1 - PAN, NW, SW, C, SC, NE


Ruddy Turnstone                 July 26 - NW west to Alfalfa, Major and
Blaine Cos. Only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman Cos. Only, C, SC,
NE, SE           

Red Knot                               July 28 - NW rare in Alfalfa Co only,
C, NE

Stilt Sandpiper                      July 12 - ALL

Sanderling                            July 28 - ALL

American Avocet                  July 14 - C, SC, NE east to Nowata, Rogers,
Wagoner and Muskogee Cos. Only, SE east to Pittsburg, Atoka and McCurtain
Cos. Only

Snowy Plover                       July 19 - C, SC, NE

Piping Plover                        July 19 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Caspian Tern                        July 11- ALL

Forster's Tern                        July 10 - PAN, NW, SW

Baird's Sandpiper                July 7 - ALL

Least Sandpiper                   July 1 - PAN

Buff-breasted Sandpiper    July 26 - NW west to Woods, Woodward, Dewey and
Custer cos only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman cos only, C, SC, NE,
SE            

Pectoral Sandpiper              July 9 - ALL

Semipalmated Sandpiper   July 6 - ALL

Western Sandpiper             July 6 - ALL

Short-billed Dowitcher        July 1 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Long-billed Dowitcher         July 10 - ALL

Wilson's Phalarope             July 20 - SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Rufous Hummingbird         July 22 - PAN, SW

Peregrine Falcon                 July 28 - ALL

Least Flycatcher                   July 15 - ALL

Bank Swallow                      July 27 - ALL

Sedge Wren                          July 25 - NE, SE

Yellow Warbler                     July 20 - SW and July 25 - SE

Yellow-headed Blackbird   July 4 - PAN, NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Semipalmated Plover          July 12 - ALL

 

DEPARTURES

 

Glossy Ibis                             July 28 - NW, SW, C, SE - Rare in
Alfalfa and Major Cos. Only in NW; Rare in Tillman Co. only in SW; Rare in
Kingfisher and Canadian Cos. Only in C; Rare in S. McCurtain Co only in SE

 

 

The information presented here comes from The Oklahoma Bird Records
Committee of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society, which publishes a Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma. This booklet divides Oklahoma
into 7 geographic regions, and lists the normal dates of occurrence for each
Oklahoma bird species within each region. Observers are urged to report
unusual species, or birds out of date or out of normal range in Oklahoma,
based on the information given in this publication.

 

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society and Oklahoma Bird Records Committee web
site, http://www.okbirds.org/, includes ordering information for the Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma, information on documenting
significant records, documentation forms, instructions, and a searchable
database for Oklahoma bird migration information. Birders are cordially
invited to join the Oklahoma Ornithological Society.

 

Happy birding!

Pat Velte

pvelte AT cox.net

Oklahoma City, OK

 
Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: John Bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 17:51:05 -0500
If anything I am guilty of a Sontaran attack and hyperbolic reply, rather than 
a subversively snide and condescending response to a birdwatcher of seventeen 
years. Of course he checked. 

Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: Terry Mitchell <terry AT PECOT.COM>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 16:44:11 -0500
I must have missed something," fawning over one willing to lie for money" I
really must have missed something. Terry.

Terry Mitchell



-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of John Bates
Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2015 4:34 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird

I assume the comment was made publically for educational purposes and not
malicious intent. One’s misuse of letters might be interpreted as anger or
affront to impudence. Thankfully, I do not base my statements on
empirical/faith based data or datums. Of course, the specimens are stored at
a location unknown to me. The choice at this juncture is guilt or ignorance.
Using a noun as an adjective without a hyphen bothers me and is technically
wrong, thankfully Sibley refrains from this practice. I shall not delve into
logical statements in a prolixious attempt to qualify a mistake. What is the
harm of stating that one is wrong? I have done this myself. The use of ess
and an apostrophe is patently wrong, due to the fact that plural adjectives
have been forbade in English as well as all the languages I know. So again,
the answer is either guilt or ignorance, because we all know ornithological
societies across the nation have committed this grammatical crime. As for
fawning over one willing to lie for money, that is entirely on you. to
answer the statement of ranges, I question the eastward curve of the range
in Okla., when it curves westward in Kansas as the environment is relatively
the same. Guilt or ignorance seems to be a recurring theme. I shall always
question the emperor’s new clothes! Vehemently promoting one’s 
pronunciation 

as correct to the point of mis-correcting a person based on the assumption
one gets what one pays for, or intending to point out a person’s error with
another error as in the case of Durant(local v national, when both are
equally wrong). Lastly, I should like to point out my use of logic as a
literary device and the use of real apostrophes, which the university deems
improper.
Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: John Bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 16:39:12 -0500
And if one can not find proxlious in their reference book it make one question 
what else has been omitted. 

Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: John Bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 16:33:50 -0500
I assume the comment was made publically for educational purposes and not 
malicious intent. One’s misuse of letters might be interpreted as anger or 
affront to impudence. Thankfully, I do not base my statements on 
empirical/faith based data or datums. Of course, the specimens are stored at a 
location unknown to me. The choice at this juncture is guilt or ignorance. 
Using a noun as an adjective without a hyphen bothers me and is technically 
wrong, thankfully Sibley refrains from this practice. I shall not delve into 
logical statements in a prolixious attempt to qualify a mistake. What is the 
harm of stating that one is wrong? I have done this myself. The use of ess and 
an apostrophe is patently wrong, due to the fact that plural adjectives have 
been forbade in English as well as all the languages I know. So again, the 
answer is either guilt or ignorance, because we all know ornithological 
societies across the nation have committed this grammatical crime. As for 
fawning over one willing to lie for money, that is entirely on you. to answer 
the statement of ranges, I question the eastward curve of the range in Okla., 
when it curves westward in Kansas as the environment is relatively the same. 
Guilt or ignorance seems to be a recurring theme. I shall always question the 
emperor’s new clothes! Vehemently promoting one’s pronunciation as correct 
to the point of mis-correcting a person based on the assumption one gets what 
one pays for, or intending to point out a person’s error with another error 
as in the case of Durant(local v national, when both are equally wrong). 
Lastly, I should like to point out my use of logic as a literary device and the 
use of real apostrophes, which the university deems improper. 

Subject: Re: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: "Bostian, Kelly" <Kelly.Bostian AT TULSAWORLD.COM>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 18:12:47 +0000
I'm doing well.. And thanks for using a selective eye on my prose. There's 
almost always a little thing or two that make me groan when I read my stuff in 
print :) 


Sent from my iPhone
Kelly Bostian
Outdoors Writer
Tulsa World Media Company
www.tulsaworld.com
office | 918 581-8357
mobile | 918 231-1385
fax | 918 581-8352
315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
twitter |  AT kellybostian
blog | www.tulsaworld.com/blog
alt email | outdoors AT tulsaworld.com

On Jul 1, 2015, at 1:00 PM, Jimarterburn 
> wrote: 


Kelly,

No matter how much I proof my email I usually find an error or two after I hit 
send. Being the journalist that you are I need some pointers from you as I 
haven't noticed any errors in your articles. I can't say the same for the rest 
of the paper. Ha. 


Hope you are doing well.

Jim

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 1, 2015, at 12:55 PM, Bostian, Kelly 
> wrote: 


Jim that's a code I deal with all the time, I just put SNAFU

Kelly Bostian
Outdoors Writer
Tulsa World Media Company

www.tulsaworld.com<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.tulsaworld.com%2f> 

office | 918 581 8357
mobile | 918 231 1385
fax | 918 581 8353
315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
twitter |  AT kellybostian
blog 
|tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.tulsaworld.com%2fblog> 

email | 
kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=mailto%3aname%40tulsaworld.com> 

________________________________
From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of 
Jimarterburn [jimarterburn AT COX.NET] 

Sent: Wednesday, July 1, 2015 12:50 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Blue-throated Hummingbird

My codes for Least and Yellow-bellied Flycatchers are wrong. I should have put 
LEFL and YBFL. 


Jim

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 1, 2015, at 11:50 AM, Jim Arterburn 
> 
wrote: 




From: Jim Arterburn [mailto:jimarterburn AT cox.net]
Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2015 11:45 AM
Jim that's a code I deal with all the time, I just put SNAFU

Kelly Bostian
Outdoors Writer
Tulsa World Media Company

www.tulsaworld.com<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.tulsaworld.com%2f> 

office | 918 581 8357
mobile | 918 231 1385
fax | 918 581 8353
315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
twitter |  AT kellybostian
blog 
|tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.tulsaworld.com%2fblog> 

email | 
kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=mailto%3aname%40tulsaworld.com> 

________________________________
From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of 
Jimarterburn [jimarterburn AT COX.NET] 

Sent: Wednesday, July 1, 2015 12:50 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Blue-throated Hummingbird

My codes for Least and Yellow-bellied Flycatchers are wrong. I should have put 
LEFL and YBFL. 


Jim

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 1, 2015, at 11:50 AM, Jim Arterburn 
> 
wrote: 




From: Jim Arterburn [mailto:jimarterburn AT cox.net]
Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2015 11:45 AM
To: 'john bates'
Subject: RE: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird

John,

I agree that the range maps in field guides may be off for some species, but 
some field guides have better maps than others (Sibley for one). However you 
have to look at the intent of the range maps. Over the years I have helped on 
the range maps for most of the field guides. The maps are intended to show the 
normal range for the species not every part of the state where that species has 
been seen or is rare for that part of the state. LABU is rare in the eastern 
half of the state so the field guides leave that part of the state off their 
range maps and only show the western part of the state. Some don’t cover 
enough of the western part of the state but they are not that far off. I think 
that Sibley does a pretty good job on Lazuli Bunting (LABU). 


If you or any birder wants the most accurate and up to-date information on the 
range, dates and status of Oklahoma birds use the “Date Guide to the 
Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma – Sixth Edition 2014” (Date Guide). The 
Date Guide is the work of the Oklahoma Bird Records Committee and was published 
by the Oklahoma Ornithological Society (OOS) and can be purchased from the OOS. 
I feel that the Date Guide has the range pretty good for LABU. 


I am not sure what to make of your comment on Least Flycatcher (LEFY) versus 
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (YBFY) as I don’t report to eBirds nor do I look at 
their data. However, that is an awful broad statement considering that LEFY is 
common in all of Oklahoma while YBFL is only common in the eastern part of the 
state. In addition where both occur the LEFY is the more common species. Also 
LEFY migrates through Oklahoma earlier in the spring and fall and stays around 
a little later both seasons than YBFY. So when you say that at least half of 
LEFY sightings are YBFY are you saying that is true for all the sightings in 
Oklahoma regardless of where in the state the report is from and regardless of 
the date of the sighting? 


Lastly, I assume that your email was in regards to the out of date and out of 
range Green-tailed Towhee (GTTO). The Date Guide shows that this bird migrates 
through Cimarron County only and leaves the state around the middle of May. 
There have been confirmed sightings of GTTO for other parts of the state but 
they are rare and I believe they were from the winter months. So Hal may have 
indeed seen a GTTO and I am not saying that he didn’t. My comment about 
considering the Rufous-crowned Sparrow was that when considering a rare bird 
one should always look at the more common and/or similar species and rule those 
out. If this process is followed then you can feel more confident with their 
identification. Also, I feel that the range and date in the Date Guide as well 
as most field guides is accurate for GTTO and the maps shouldn’t show those 
out of range and out of date birds. 


Cheers,

Jim Arterburn


From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of john bates
Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2015 9:32 AM
To: 
OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 

Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird

Range maps also say L-A-Z-B is out of range for most of Okla., but we know that 
is false. Also, all the reports on ebird for L-E-F-L when at least half were 
actually Y-B-F-L. 



On Tuesday, June 30, 2015 7:31 PM, Foundation Subscriber 
> wrote: 


Hi Jim,
I have seen the rufous crowned sparrow numerous times while down there. I was 
surprised myself, The color of the crown reddish area and the green tint to the 
back and tail certainly suggested green tailed towhee. I have seem as well many 
times , including the OK panhandle. I feel pretty sure of it. Hal 

---- Jim Arterburn 
> 
wrote: 

Hal,

Did you consider Rufous-crowned Sparrow which is common down there? 
Green-tailed Towhee is rare in NE Cimarron County only in fall and spring. 


Jim

-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of Foundation Subscriber 

Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2015 6:05 PM
To: 
OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 

Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird

Several of us went down early this morning- Bill Carroll, Chad Ellis, Hal 
Yocum, Sherm Barr, but we did NOT see the blue throated hummingbird between 
7:30 - 9:45. 

Most of us went on the Wichita's for the day. My best sighting there was a male 
green tailed towhee , that is likely somewhat out of it's range there. It was 
seen at Sunset picnic area , along the creek on the rocks between the two 
bridges about 2:30 PM. Hal Yocum 

---- Dan Reinking 
> wrote: 





From: Kurt Meisenzahl 
[mailto:meisenzk AT sbcglobal.net] 

Sent: Monday, June 29, 2015 10:04 PM
To: 
okbirds-request AT lists.ou.edu 

Subject: Blue-throated Hummingbird



Since the initial sighting this morning, the Blue-throated Hummingbird

was not seen today.  During the day at least 12 bird watchers came

and went.  John Sterling and I watched the feeders until 8:30 PM.



There were several houses in the area with hummingbird feeders and I

spent some time at most of them - without success.



I will post an update tomorrow evening.



Kurt Meisenzahl

Lawton, OK

Subject: Re: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: Jimarterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 13:00:30 -0500
Kelly,

No matter how much I proof my email I usually find an error or two after I hit 
send. Being the journalist that you are I need some pointers from you as I 
haven't noticed any errors in your articles. I can't say the same for the rest 
of the paper. Ha. 


Hope you are doing well.

Jim

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 1, 2015, at 12:55 PM, Bostian, Kelly  
wrote: 

> 
> Jim that's a code I deal with all the time, I just put SNAFU
> 
> Kelly Bostian
> Outdoors Writer
> Tulsa World Media Company
> 
www.tulsaworld.com<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.tulsaworld.com%2f> 

> office | 918 581 8357
> mobile | 918 231 1385
> fax | 918 581 8353
> 315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
> twitter |  AT kellybostian
> blog 
|tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.tulsaworld.com%2fblog> 

> email | 
kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=mailto%3aname%40tulsaworld.com> 

> ________________________________
> From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of Jimarterburn 
[jimarterburn AT COX.NET] 

> Sent: Wednesday, July 1, 2015 12:50 PM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Blue-throated Hummingbird
> 
> My codes for Least and Yellow-bellied Flycatchers are wrong. I should have 
put LEFL and YBFL. 

> 
> Jim
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> On Jul 1, 2015, at 11:50 AM, Jim Arterburn 
> wrote: 

> 
> 
> 
> From: Jim Arterburn [mailto:jimarterburn AT cox.net]
> Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2015 11:45 AM
> Jim that's a code I deal with all the time, I just put SNAFU
> 
> Kelly Bostian
> Outdoors Writer
> Tulsa World Media Company
> 
www.tulsaworld.com<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.tulsaworld.com%2f> 

> office | 918 581 8357
> mobile | 918 231 1385
> fax | 918 581 8353
> 315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
> twitter |  AT kellybostian
> blog 
|tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.tulsaworld.com%2fblog> 

> email | 
kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=mailto%3aname%40tulsaworld.com> 

> ________________________________
> From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of Jimarterburn 
[jimarterburn AT COX.NET] 

> Sent: Wednesday, July 1, 2015 12:50 PM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Blue-throated Hummingbird
> 
> My codes for Least and Yellow-bellied Flycatchers are wrong. I should have 
put LEFL and YBFL. 

> 
> Jim
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> On Jul 1, 2015, at 11:50 AM, Jim Arterburn 
> wrote: 

> 
> 
> 
> From: Jim Arterburn [mailto:jimarterburn AT cox.net]
> Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2015 11:45 AM
> To: 'john bates'
> Subject: RE: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
> 
> John,
> 
> I agree that the range maps in field guides may be off for some species, but 
some field guides have better maps than others (Sibley for one). However you 
have to look at the intent of the range maps. Over the years I have helped on 
the range maps for most of the field guides. The maps are intended to show the 
normal range for the species not every part of the state where that species has 
been seen or is rare for that part of the state. LABU is rare in the eastern 
half of the state so the field guides leave that part of the state off their 
range maps and only show the western part of the state. Some don’t cover 
enough of the western part of the state but they are not that far off. I think 
that Sibley does a pretty good job on Lazuli Bunting (LABU). 

> 
> If you or any birder wants the most accurate and up to-date information on 
the range, dates and status of Oklahoma birds use the “Date Guide to the 
Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma – Sixth Edition 2014” (Date Guide). The 
Date Guide is the work of the Oklahoma Bird Records Committee and was published 
by the Oklahoma Ornithological Society (OOS) and can be purchased from the OOS. 
I feel that the Date Guide has the range pretty good for LABU. 

> 
> I am not sure what to make of your comment on Least Flycatcher (LEFY) versus 
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (YBFY) as I don’t report to eBirds nor do I look at 
their data. However, that is an awful broad statement considering that LEFY is 
common in all of Oklahoma while YBFL is only common in the eastern part of the 
state. In addition where both occur the LEFY is the more common species. Also 
LEFY migrates through Oklahoma earlier in the spring and fall and stays around 
a little later both seasons than YBFY. So when you say that at least half of 
LEFY sightings are YBFY are you saying that is true for all the sightings in 
Oklahoma regardless of where in the state the report is from and regardless of 
the date of the sighting? 

> 
> Lastly, I assume that your email was in regards to the out of date and out of 
range Green-tailed Towhee (GTTO). The Date Guide shows that this bird migrates 
through Cimarron County only and leaves the state around the middle of May. 
There have been confirmed sightings of GTTO for other parts of the state but 
they are rare and I believe they were from the winter months. So Hal may have 
indeed seen a GTTO and I am not saying that he didn’t. My comment about 
considering the Rufous-crowned Sparrow was that when considering a rare bird 
one should always look at the more common and/or similar species and rule those 
out. If this process is followed then you can feel more confident with their 
identification. Also, I feel that the range and date in the Date Guide as well 
as most field guides is accurate for GTTO and the maps shouldn’t show those 
out of range and out of date birds. 

> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Jim Arterburn
> 
> 
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of john bates
> Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2015 9:32 AM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
> 
> Range maps also say L-A-Z-B is out of range for most of Okla., but we know 
that is false. Also, all the reports on ebird for L-E-F-L when at least half 
were actually Y-B-F-L. 

> 
> 
> On Tuesday, June 30, 2015 7:31 PM, Foundation Subscriber 
> wrote: 

> 
> Hi Jim,
> I have seen the rufous crowned sparrow numerous times while down there. I was 
surprised myself, The color of the crown reddish area and the green tint to the 
back and tail certainly suggested green tailed towhee. I have seem as well many 
times , including the OK panhandle. I feel pretty sure of it. Hal 

> ---- Jim Arterburn > wrote:
>> Hal,
>> 
>> Did you consider Rufous-crowned Sparrow which is common down there? 
Green-tailed Towhee is rare in NE Cimarron County only in fall and spring. 

>> 
>> Jim
>> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of Foundation Subscriber 

>> Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2015 6:05 PM
>> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
>> Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
>> 
>> Several of us went down early this morning- Bill Carroll, Chad Ellis, Hal 
Yocum, Sherm Barr, but we did NOT see the blue throated hummingbird between 
7:30 - 9:45. 

>> Most of us went on the Wichita's for the day. My best sighting there was a 
male green tailed towhee , that is likely somewhat out of it's range there. It 
was seen at Sunset picnic area , along the creek on the rocks between the two 
bridges about 2:30 PM. Hal Yocum 

>> ---- Dan Reinking > wrote:
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> From: Kurt Meisenzahl 
[mailto:meisenzk AT sbcglobal.net] 

>>> Sent: Monday, June 29, 2015 10:04 PM
>>> To: okbirds-request AT lists.ou.edu
>>> Subject: Blue-throated Hummingbird
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Since the initial sighting this morning, the Blue-throated Hummingbird
>>> 
>>> was not seen today.  During the day at least 12 bird watchers came
>>> 
>>> and went.  John Sterling and I watched the feeders until 8:30 PM.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> There were several houses in the area with hummingbird feeders and I
>>> 
>>> spent some time at most of them - without success.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> I will post an update tomorrow evening.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Kurt Meisenzahl
>>> 
>>> Lawton, OK
>>> 
Subject: Re: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: "Bostian, Kelly" <Kelly.Bostian AT TULSAWORLD.COM>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 17:55:04 +0000
Jim that's a code I deal with all the time, I just put SNAFU

Kelly Bostian
Outdoors Writer
Tulsa World Media Company

www.tulsaworld.com<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.tulsaworld.com%2f> 

office | 918 581 8357
mobile | 918 231 1385
fax | 918 581 8353
315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
twitter |  AT kellybostian
blog 
|tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.tulsaworld.com%2fblog> 

email | 
kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=mailto%3aname%40tulsaworld.com> 

________________________________
From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of Jimarterburn 
[jimarterburn AT COX.NET] 

Sent: Wednesday, July 1, 2015 12:50 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Blue-throated Hummingbird

My codes for Least and Yellow-bellied Flycatchers are wrong. I should have put 
LEFL and YBFL. 


Jim

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 1, 2015, at 11:50 AM, Jim Arterburn 
> wrote: 




From: Jim Arterburn [mailto:jimarterburn AT cox.net]
Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2015 11:45 AM
To: 'john bates'
Subject: RE: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird

John,

I agree that the range maps in field guides may be off for some species, but 
some field guides have better maps than others (Sibley for one). However you 
have to look at the intent of the range maps. Over the years I have helped on 
the range maps for most of the field guides. The maps are intended to show the 
normal range for the species not every part of the state where that species has 
been seen or is rare for that part of the state. LABU is rare in the eastern 
half of the state so the field guides leave that part of the state off their 
range maps and only show the western part of the state. Some dont cover enough 
of the western part of the state but they are not that far off. I think that 
Sibley does a pretty good job on Lazuli Bunting (LABU). 


If you or any birder wants the most accurate and up to-date information on the 
range, dates and status of Oklahoma birds use the Date Guide to the 
Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma  Sixth Edition 2014 (Date Guide). The Date 
Guide is the work of the Oklahoma Bird Records Committee and was published by 
the Oklahoma Ornithological Society (OOS) and can be purchased from the OOS. I 
feel that the Date Guide has the range pretty good for LABU. 


I am not sure what to make of your comment on Least Flycatcher (LEFY) versus 
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (YBFY) as I dont report to eBirds nor do I look at 
their data. However, that is an awful broad statement considering that LEFY is 
common in all of Oklahoma while YBFL is only common in the eastern part of the 
state. In addition where both occur the LEFY is the more common species. Also 
LEFY migrates through Oklahoma earlier in the spring and fall and stays around 
a little later both seasons than YBFY. So when you say that at least half of 
LEFY sightings are YBFY are you saying that is true for all the sightings in 
Oklahoma regardless of where in the state the report is from and regardless of 
the date of the sighting? 


Lastly, I assume that your email was in regards to the out of date and out of 
range Green-tailed Towhee (GTTO). The Date Guide shows that this bird migrates 
through Cimarron County only and leaves the state around the middle of May. 
There have been confirmed sightings of GTTO for other parts of the state but 
they are rare and I believe they were from the winter months. So Hal may have 
indeed seen a GTTO and I am not saying that he didnt. My comment about 
considering the Rufous-crowned Sparrow was that when considering a rare bird 
one should always look at the more common and/or similar species and rule those 
out. If this process is followed then you can feel more confident with their 
identification. Also, I feel that the range and date in the Date Guide as well 
as most field guides is accurate for GTTO and the maps shouldnt show those out 
of range and out of date birds. 


Cheers,

Jim Arterburn


From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of john bates
Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2015 9:32 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird

Range maps also say L-A-Z-B is out of range for most of Okla., but we know that 
is false. Also, all the reports on ebird for L-E-F-L when at least half were 
actually Y-B-F-L. 



On Tuesday, June 30, 2015 7:31 PM, Foundation Subscriber 
> wrote: 


Hi Jim,
I have seen the rufous crowned sparrow numerous times while down there. I was 
surprised myself, The color of the crown reddish area and the green tint to the 
back and tail certainly suggested green tailed towhee. I have seem as well many 
times , including the OK panhandle. I feel pretty sure of it. Hal 

---- Jim Arterburn > wrote:
> Hal,
>
> Did you consider Rufous-crowned Sparrow which is common down there? 
Green-tailed Towhee is rare in NE Cimarron County only in fall and spring. 

>
> Jim
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of Foundation Subscriber 

> Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2015 6:05 PM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
>
> Several of us went down early this morning- Bill Carroll, Chad Ellis, Hal 
Yocum, Sherm Barr, but we did NOT see the blue throated hummingbird between 
7:30 - 9:45. 

> Most of us went on the Wichita's for the day. My best sighting there was a 
male green tailed towhee , that is likely somewhat out of it's range there. It 
was seen at Sunset picnic area , along the creek on the rocks between the two 
bridges about 2:30 PM. Hal Yocum 

> ---- Dan Reinking > wrote:
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > From: Kurt Meisenzahl 
[mailto:meisenzk AT sbcglobal.net] 

> > Sent: Monday, June 29, 2015 10:04 PM
> > To: okbirds-request AT lists.ou.edu
> > Subject: Blue-throated Hummingbird
> >
> >
> >
> > Since the initial sighting this morning, the Blue-throated Hummingbird
> >
> > was not seen today.  During the day at least 12 bird watchers came
> >
> > and went.  John Sterling and I watched the feeders until 8:30 PM.
> >
> >
> >
> > There were several houses in the area with hummingbird feeders and I
> >
> > spent some time at most of them - without success.
> >
> >
> >
> > I will post an update tomorrow evening.
> >
> >
> >
> > Kurt Meisenzahl
> >
> > Lawton, OK
> >
Subject: Re: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: Jimarterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 12:50:10 -0500
My codes for Least and Yellow-bellied Flycatchers are wrong. I should have put 
LEFL and YBFL. 


Jim

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 1, 2015, at 11:50 AM, Jim Arterburn  wrote:
> 
>  
>  
> From: Jim Arterburn [mailto:jimarterburn AT cox.net] 
> Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2015 11:45 AM
> To: 'john bates'
> Subject: RE: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
>  
> John,
>  
> I agree that the range maps in field guides may be off for some species, but 
some field guides have better maps than others (Sibley for one). However you 
have to look at the intent of the range maps. Over the years I have helped on 
the range maps for most of the field guides. The maps are intended to show the 
normal range for the species not every part of the state where that species has 
been seen or is rare for that part of the state. LABU is rare in the eastern 
half of the state so the field guides leave that part of the state off their 
range maps and only show the western part of the state. Some don’t cover 
enough of the western part of the state but they are not that far off. I think 
that Sibley does a pretty good job on Lazuli Bunting (LABU). 

>  
> If you or any birder wants the most accurate and up to-date information on 
the range, dates and status of Oklahoma birds use the “Date Guide to the 
Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma – Sixth Edition 2014” (Date Guide). The 
Date Guide is the work of the Oklahoma Bird Records Committee and was published 
by the Oklahoma Ornithological Society (OOS) and can be purchased from the OOS. 
I feel that the Date Guide has the range pretty good for LABU. 

>  
> I am not sure what to make of your comment on Least Flycatcher (LEFY) versus 
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (YBFY) as I don’t report to eBirds nor do I look at 
their data. However, that is an awful broad statement considering that LEFY is 
common in all of Oklahoma while YBFL is only common in the eastern part of the 
state. In addition where both occur the LEFY is the more common species. Also 
LEFY migrates through Oklahoma earlier in the spring and fall and stays around 
a little later both seasons than YBFY. So when you say that at least half of 
LEFY sightings are YBFY are you saying that is true for all the sightings in 
Oklahoma regardless of where in the state the report is from and regardless of 
the date of the sighting? 

>  
> Lastly, I assume that your email was in regards to the out of date and out of 
range Green-tailed Towhee (GTTO). The Date Guide shows that this bird migrates 
through Cimarron County only and leaves the state around the middle of May. 
There have been confirmed sightings of GTTO for other parts of the state but 
they are rare and I believe they were from the winter months. So Hal may have 
indeed seen a GTTO and I am not saying that he didn’t. My comment about 
considering the Rufous-crowned Sparrow was that when considering a rare bird 
one should always look at the more common and/or similar species and rule those 
out. If this process is followed then you can feel more confident with their 
identification. Also, I feel that the range and date in the Date Guide as well 
as most field guides is accurate for GTTO and the maps shouldn’t show those 
out of range and out of date birds. 

>  
> Cheers,
>  
> Jim Arterburn
>  
>  
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of john bates
> Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2015 9:32 AM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
>  
> Range maps also say L-A-Z-B is out of range for most of Okla., but we know 
that is false. Also, all the reports on ebird for L-E-F-L when at least half 
were actually Y-B-F-L. 

>  
>  
> 
> On Tuesday, June 30, 2015 7:31 PM, Foundation Subscriber  
wrote: 

>  
> 
> Hi Jim,
> I have seen the rufous crowned sparrow numerous times while down there. I was 
surprised myself, The color of the crown reddish area and the green tint to the 
back and tail certainly suggested green tailed towhee. I have seem as well many 
times , including the OK panhandle. I feel pretty sure of it. Hal 

> ---- Jim Arterburn  wrote: 
> > Hal,
> > 
> > Did you consider Rufous-crowned Sparrow which is common down there? 
Green-tailed Towhee is rare in NE Cimarron County only in fall and spring. 

> > 
> > Jim
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Foundation 
Subscriber 

> > Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2015 6:05 PM
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> > Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
> > 
> > Several of us went down early this morning- Bill Carroll, Chad Ellis, Hal 
Yocum, Sherm Barr, but we did NOT see the blue throated hummingbird between 
7:30 - 9:45. 

> > Most of us went on the Wichita's for the day. My best sighting there was a 
male green tailed towhee , that is likely somewhat out of it's range there. It 
was seen at Sunset picnic area , along the creek on the rocks between the two 
bridges about 2:30 PM. Hal Yocum 

> > ---- Dan Reinking  wrote: 
> > >  
> > > 
> > >  
> > > 
> > > From: Kurt Meisenzahl [mailto:meisenzk AT sbcglobal.net] 
> > > Sent: Monday, June 29, 2015 10:04 PM
> > > To: okbirds-request AT lists.ou.edu
> > > Subject: Blue-throated Hummingbird
> > > 
> > >  
> > > 
> > > Since the initial sighting this morning, the Blue-throated Hummingbird 
> > > 
> > > was not seen today.  During the day at least 12 bird watchers came 
> > > 
> > > and went.  John Sterling and I watched the feeders until 8:30 PM. 
> > > 
> > >  
> > > 
> > > There were several houses in the area with hummingbird feeders and I 
> > > 
> > > spent some time at most of them - without success.
> > > 
> > >  
> > > 
> > > I will post an update tomorrow evening.
> > > 
> > >  
> > > 
> > > Kurt Meisenzahl
> > > 
> > > Lawton, OK
> > >
Subject: FW: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 11:50:17 -0500
 

 

From: Jim Arterburn [mailto:jimarterburn AT cox.net] 
Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2015 11:45 AM
To: 'john bates'
Subject: RE: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird

 

John,

 

I agree that the range maps in field guides may be off for some species, but 
some field guides have better maps than others (Sibley for one). However you 
have to look at the intent of the range maps. Over the years I have helped on 
the range maps for most of the field guides. The maps are intended to show the 
normal range for the species not every part of the state where that species has 
been seen or is rare for that part of the state. LABU is rare in the eastern 
half of the state so the field guides leave that part of the state off their 
range maps and only show the western part of the state. Some don’t cover 
enough of the western part of the state but they are not that far off. I think 
that Sibley does a pretty good job on Lazuli Bunting (LABU). 


 

If you or any birder wants the most accurate and up to-date information on the 
range, dates and status of Oklahoma birds use the “Date Guide to the 
Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma – Sixth Edition 2014” (Date Guide). The 
Date Guide is the work of the Oklahoma Bird Records Committee and was published 
by the Oklahoma Ornithological Society (OOS) and can be purchased from the OOS. 
I feel that the Date Guide has the range pretty good for LABU. 


 

I am not sure what to make of your comment on Least Flycatcher (LEFY) versus 
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (YBFY) as I don’t report to eBirds nor do I look at 
their data. However, that is an awful broad statement considering that LEFY is 
common in all of Oklahoma while YBFL is only common in the eastern part of the 
state. In addition where both occur the LEFY is the more common species. Also 
LEFY migrates through Oklahoma earlier in the spring and fall and stays around 
a little later both seasons than YBFY. So when you say that at least half of 
LEFY sightings are YBFY are you saying that is true for all the sightings in 
Oklahoma regardless of where in the state the report is from and regardless of 
the date of the sighting? 


 

Lastly, I assume that your email was in regards to the out of date and out of 
range Green-tailed Towhee (GTTO). The Date Guide shows that this bird migrates 
through Cimarron County only and leaves the state around the middle of May. 
There have been confirmed sightings of GTTO for other parts of the state but 
they are rare and I believe they were from the winter months. So Hal may have 
indeed seen a GTTO and I am not saying that he didn’t. My comment about 
considering the Rufous-crowned Sparrow was that when considering a rare bird 
one should always look at the more common and/or similar species and rule those 
out. If this process is followed then you can feel more confident with their 
identification. Also, I feel that the range and date in the Date Guide as well 
as most field guides is accurate for GTTO and the maps shouldn’t show those 
out of range and out of date birds. 


 

Cheers,

 

Jim Arterburn

 

 

From: okbirds [  mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of john bates 

Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2015 9:32 AM
To:   OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird

 

Range maps also say L-A-Z-B is out of range for most of Okla., but we know that 
is false. Also, all the reports on ebird for L-E-F-L when at least half were 
actually Y-B-F-L. 


 

 

On Tuesday, June 30, 2015 7:31 PM, Foundation Subscriber < 
 drhal2 AT COX.NET> wrote: 


 

Hi Jim,
I have seen the rufous crowned sparrow numerous times while down there. I was 
surprised myself, The color of the crown reddish area and the green tint to the 
back and tail certainly suggested green tailed towhee. I have seem as well many 
times , including the OK panhandle. I feel pretty sure of it. Hal 

---- Jim Arterburn <  jimarterburn AT COX.NET> wrote: 

> Hal,
> 
> Did you consider Rufous-crowned Sparrow which is common down there? 
Green-tailed Towhee is rare in NE Cimarron County only in fall and spring. 

> 
> Jim
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: okbirds [mailto:  OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of Foundation Subscriber 

> Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2015 6:05 PM
> To:   OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
> 
> Several of us went down early this morning- Bill Carroll, Chad Ellis, Hal 
Yocum, Sherm Barr, but we did NOT see the blue throated hummingbird between 
7:30 - 9:45. 

> Most of us went on the Wichita's for the day. My best sighting there was a 
male green tailed towhee , that is likely somewhat out of it's range there. It 
was seen at Sunset picnic area , along the creek on the rocks between the two 
bridges about 2:30 PM. Hal Yocum 

> ---- Dan Reinking <  dreinking AT OU.EDU> wrote: 
> >  
> > 
> >  
> > 
> > From: Kurt Meisenzahl [mailto:  
meisenzk AT sbcglobal.net] 

> > Sent: Monday, June 29, 2015 10:04 PM
> > To:   okbirds-request AT lists.ou.edu
> > Subject: Blue-throated Hummingbird
> > 
> >  
> > 
> > Since the initial sighting this morning, the Blue-throated Hummingbird 
> > 
> > was not seen today.  During the day at least 12 bird watchers came 
> > 
> > and went.  John Sterling and I watched the feeders until 8:30 PM. 
> > 
> >  
> > 
> > There were several houses in the area with hummingbird feeders and I 
> > 
> > spent some time at most of them - without success.
> > 
> >  
> > 
> > I will post an update tomorrow evening.
> > 
> >  
> > 
> > Kurt Meisenzahl
> > 
> > Lawton, OK
> > 
Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: john bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 14:32:25 +0000
Range maps also say L-A-Z-B is out of range for most of Okla., but we know that 
is false. Also, all the reports on ebird for L-E-F-L when at least half were 
actually Y-B-F-L. 

 


 On Tuesday, June 30, 2015 7:31 PM, Foundation Subscriber  
wrote: 

   

 Hi Jim,
I have seen the rufous  crowned sparrow numerous times while down there. I was 
surprised myself, The color of the crown reddish area and the green tint to the 
back and tail certainly suggested green tailed towhee. I have seem as well many 
times , including the OK panhandle. I feel pretty sure of it.  Hal 

---- Jim Arterburn  wrote: 
> Hal,
> 
> Did you consider Rufous-crowned Sparrow which is common down there? 
Green-tailed Towhee is rare in NE Cimarron County only in fall and spring. 

> 
> Jim
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Foundation 
Subscriber 

> Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2015 6:05 PM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
> 
> Several of us went down early this morning- Bill Carroll, Chad Ellis, Hal 
Yocum, Sherm Barr, but we did NOT see the blue throated hummingbird between 
7:30 - 9:45. 

> Most of us went on the Wichita's for the day. My best sighting there was a 
male green tailed towhee , that is likely somewhat out of it's range there. It 
was seen at Sunset picnic area , along the creek on the rocks between the two 
bridges about 2:30 PM.  Hal Yocum 

> ---- Dan Reinking  wrote: 
> >  
> > 
> >  
> > 
> > From: Kurt Meisenzahl [mailto:meisenzk AT sbcglobal.net] 
> > Sent: Monday, June 29, 2015 10:04 PM
> > To: okbirds-request AT lists.ou.edu
> > Subject: Blue-throated Hummingbird
> > 
> >  
> > 
> > Since the initial sighting this morning, the Blue-throated Hummingbird 
> > 
> > was not seen today.  During the day at least 12 bird watchers came 
> > 
> > and went.  John Sterling and I watched the feeders until 8:30 PM. 
> > 
> >  
> > 
> > There were several houses in the area with hummingbird feeders and I 
> > 
> > spent some time at most of them - without success.
> > 
> >  
> > 
> > I will post an update tomorrow evening.
> > 
> >  
> > 
> > Kurt Meisenzahl
> > 
> > Lawton, OK
> > 


  
Subject: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: Kurt Meisenzahl <meisenzk AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 02:59:12 +0000
 The Blue-throated Hummingbird was not see today.
The folks out at Mountain Village will call if he is relocated.
We hope to visit neighbourhood feeders on Thursday or Friday.
I will post any updates.
Kurt MeisenzahlLawton, OK
Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 20:30:47 -0400
Hi Jim,
I have seen the rufous crowned sparrow numerous times while down there. I was 
surprised myself, The color of the crown reddish area and the green tint to the 
back and tail certainly suggested green tailed towhee. I have seem as well many 
times , including the OK panhandle. I feel pretty sure of it. Hal 

---- Jim Arterburn  wrote: 
> Hal,
> 
> Did you consider Rufous-crowned Sparrow which is common down there? 
Green-tailed Towhee is rare in NE Cimarron County only in fall and spring. 

> 
> Jim
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Foundation 
Subscriber 

> Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2015 6:05 PM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
> 
> Several of us went down early this morning- Bill Carroll, Chad Ellis, Hal 
Yocum, Sherm Barr, but we did NOT see the blue throated hummingbird between 
7:30 - 9:45. 

> Most of us went on the Wichita's for the day. My best sighting there was a 
male green tailed towhee , that is likely somewhat out of it's range there. It 
was seen at Sunset picnic area , along the creek on the rocks between the two 
bridges about 2:30 PM. Hal Yocum 

> ---- Dan Reinking  wrote: 
> >  
> > 
> >  
> > 
> > From: Kurt Meisenzahl [mailto:meisenzk AT sbcglobal.net] 
> > Sent: Monday, June 29, 2015 10:04 PM
> > To: okbirds-request AT lists.ou.edu
> > Subject: Blue-throated Hummingbird
> > 
> >  
> > 
> > Since the initial sighting this morning, the Blue-throated Hummingbird 
> > 
> > was not seen today.  During the day at least 12 bird watchers came 
> > 
> > and went.  John Sterling and I watched the feeders until 8:30 PM. 
> > 
> >  
> > 
> > There were several houses in the area with hummingbird feeders and I 
> > 
> > spent some time at most of them - without success.
> > 
> >  
> > 
> > I will post an update tomorrow evening.
> > 
> >  
> > 
> > Kurt Meisenzahl
> > 
> > Lawton, OK
> > 
Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 19:10:53 -0500
Hal,

Did you consider Rufous-crowned Sparrow which is common down there? 
Green-tailed Towhee is rare in NE Cimarron County only in fall and spring. 


Jim

-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Foundation Subscriber
Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2015 6:05 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird

Several of us went down early this morning- Bill Carroll, Chad Ellis, Hal 
Yocum, Sherm Barr, but we did NOT see the blue throated hummingbird between 
7:30 - 9:45. 

Most of us went on the Wichita's for the day. My best sighting there was a male 
green tailed towhee , that is likely somewhat out of it's range there. It was 
seen at Sunset picnic area , along the creek on the rocks between the two 
bridges about 2:30 PM. Hal Yocum 

---- Dan Reinking  wrote: 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> From: Kurt Meisenzahl [mailto:meisenzk AT sbcglobal.net] 
> Sent: Monday, June 29, 2015 10:04 PM
> To: okbirds-request AT lists.ou.edu
> Subject: Blue-throated Hummingbird
> 
>  
> 
> Since the initial sighting this morning, the Blue-throated Hummingbird 
> 
> was not seen today.  During the day at least 12 bird watchers came 
> 
> and went.  John Sterling and I watched the feeders until 8:30 PM. 
> 
>  
> 
> There were several houses in the area with hummingbird feeders and I 
> 
> spent some time at most of them - without success.
> 
>  
> 
> I will post an update tomorrow evening.
> 
>  
> 
> Kurt Meisenzahl
> 
> Lawton, OK
> 
Subject: Re: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 19:04:44 -0400
Several of us went down early this morning- Bill Carroll, Chad Ellis, Hal 
Yocum, Sherm Barr, but we did NOT see the blue throated hummingbird between 
7:30 - 9:45. 

Most of us went on the Wichita's for the day. My best sighting there was a male 
green tailed towhee , that is likely somewhat out of it's range there. It was 
seen at Sunset picnic area , along the creek on the rocks between the two 
bridges about 2:30 PM. Hal Yocum 

---- Dan Reinking  wrote: 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> From: Kurt Meisenzahl [mailto:meisenzk AT sbcglobal.net] 
> Sent: Monday, June 29, 2015 10:04 PM
> To: okbirds-request AT lists.ou.edu
> Subject: Blue-throated Hummingbird
> 
>  
> 
> Since the initial sighting this morning, the Blue-throated Hummingbird 
> 
> was not seen today.  During the day at least 12 bird watchers came 
> 
> and went.  John Sterling and I watched the feeders until 8:30 PM. 
> 
>  
> 
> There were several houses in the area with hummingbird feeders and I 
> 
> spent some time at most of them - without success.
> 
>  
> 
> I will post an update tomorrow evening.
> 
>  
> 
> Kurt Meisenzahl
> 
> Lawton, OK
> 
Subject: Bird Calls Going Wild
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 16:36:09 -0500
Have you ever been in a group of people with the same cellphone ringtones going 
of at the same time and maybe not knowing whether it is your phone or not? I 
have had this experience and thought that a way to make nature more a part of 
our daily lives would be to change the phone ringtone and increase awareness of 
our natural world. There are many sites that have free ringtones and Kentucky 
is one state with ringtones gone wild. You could have a free ringtone of the 
Bobwhite, Wood thrush, American Robin or other birds, elk, or even frogs. Why 
not consider getting a little nature into our electronic world with a ringtone 
that reminds people that there are other species out there that we need to 
think about? Most likely your ringing cellphone will not sound like all the 
others. Why not get out of the box and start a new national trend of “Ringing 
In The Birds”? 

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

http://fw.ky.gov/Kentucky-Afield/Pages/Ringtones-Gone-Wild.aspx
Subject: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: Dan Reinking <dreinking AT OU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 07:38:33 -0500
 

 

From: Kurt Meisenzahl [mailto:meisenzk AT sbcglobal.net] 
Sent: Monday, June 29, 2015 10:04 PM
To: okbirds-request AT lists.ou.edu
Subject: Blue-throated Hummingbird

 

Since the initial sighting this morning, the Blue-throated Hummingbird 

was not seen today.  During the day at least 12 bird watchers came 

and went.  John Sterling and I watched the feeders until 8:30 PM. 

 

There were several houses in the area with hummingbird feeders and I 

spent some time at most of them - without success.

 

I will post an update tomorrow evening.

 

Kurt Meisenzahl

Lawton, OK
Subject: Upland Sandpipers
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 12:38:29 +0000
Howdy,   This is belated:  But, was out the door around 4:00AM Saturday to 
make my start time for a BBS route out in western Oklahoma--north of 
Binger.   Had Upland Sandpipers going over the house--live in interior 
Norman.   So they are heading back south.   Probably normal time.  My 
earliest southbound over the house is Jun 20, and have frequently had one over 
the house before the end of June. 

   My BBS route starts in Caddo County, and creeps into Washita County.  Had 
60 species, about the norm.  One new bird for the route (have been doing this 
one since about 1992 or 1993) was a Pileated Woodpecker.  Count starts out in 
a good wooded area, ends in the ~5 species per stop cut-wheat-field zone.  No 
Bell's Vireos or orioles.  Part of the record. 


  FYEntertainment.
  Uplands are heading back.
CHEERS,                       JOE Grzybowski

Subject: Blue-throated Hummingbird in Comanche County
From: Kurt Meisenzahl <meisenzk AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 13:08:18 +0000
  Greetings OK 
birders                                                             
Jun 28 at 10:34 PM   Carol Stayer called this evening about a large 
hummingbird at Glenn Wampler'sfeeders in Mountain Village.  I got out there 
about 7:00 pm and after waiting about a ½ hour a male Blue-throated 
Hummingbird came to a branch near the feedersand eventually visited one of the 
3 hummingbird feeders.  I was able to watchthe hummingbird for about 4 or five 
minutes.  WOW!!! 

I called Lou Truex, hoping he could come over with his camera but he is in MN.
Dennis and Carol are staying with Glenn and Lee because their home was 
severelyflooded last month.   

Dennis first noticed a large hummingbird around 9:40 this morning.  He will 
call me inthe morning to let me know if it is still visiting the feeders.  


                                                                                                    
Jun 29 at 8:00 AM The hummer was back this morning at 7:20.  The Wamplers 
live on 538 NW Cheyenne Drive in Mountain Village.  The entrance to Mountain 
Village is one mile north and one mile west of Meers.  From the entrance drive 
two miles south to where the road turns right and follow Apache Drive for just 
less than a mile and you will see Cheyenne Drive on your right.  Glenn and Lee 
Wampler said birders are welcome.  Park on the shoulder of Cheyenne Drive and 
walk around the left side of the house and watch the feeders hanging on the 
frame of a swing set. 

Call my cell 580-585-0199 or email me for any questions or additional 
information. 

Kurt MeisenzahlLawton, OK

Subject: Hackberry Flat
From: Kurt Meisenzahl <meisenzk AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 04:25:41 +0000
 Spent about 3 hours (noon to 3:00) at Hackberry Flat today.  Saw thefollowing 
birds: 

Pied-billed Grebes - 3 on nestsEared Grebes - 20+ in the reservoirGlossy 
IbisWhite-faced Ibis 15+MallardsBlue-winged TealRedheadsRuddy 
DucksKestrelNorthern BobwhiteCoots - 2 on nests, one nest had at least 7 
eggsBlack-necked Stilts - 2 on nestsAmerican Avocets Killdeer - 1 nest with 3 
eggsWilson's PhalaropesMourning DovesCommon NighthawksScissor-tailed 
FlycatchersHorned LarkBarn SwallowMockingbirdsDickcisselsRed-winged 
BlackbirdsMeadowlarksCommon GracklesGreat-tailed Grackles 

Look for but did not see Herons, Egrets, Bitterns, Rails or Hawks.The 
reservoir is full. 

Kurt MeisenzahlLawton, OK

Subject: Hackberry Flat yesterday
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 16:49:23 -0500
Lonnie Gamble and I drove to Hackberry Flat yesterday and found most
holding ponds, but not all, were with water.  If this remains, we will
have some fine birding during fall migration.

We found 6 duck species (BW Teal, N. Pintail, N. Shoveler, Ruddy Duck,
Redhead and Mallard).  As in May, we had not one egret or heron.
About 15 Wilson's Phalaropes, all females, are still hanging around.
With the phalaropes was a single Gr. Yellowlegs.

The bests birds were: King Rail flying across the road in front of my
car and about six Upland Sandpipers in a fallow cotton field.  Lots of
stilts and avocets.

Saw 2 Black-tailed Jackrabbits.

Matt Jung, OKC
Subject: Red Slough bird survey - June 23
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 21:33:03 -0500
Billy Heldt (TX), Rodney Huffman (TX), Mike Dillon(TX) and I surveyed birds
today at Red Slough and found 66 species.  It was mostly clear and very hot.
Before the others joined me I found a singing Eastern Towhee at yet another
location.  This makes four locations currently with calling towhees at Red
Slough.  Here is our list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 2

Wood Duck - 8

Ring-necked Duck - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 2

Neotropic Cormorant - 4

Double-crested Cormorant - 1 

Anhinga - 13 (also lots of near fledgling young sitting in rookery.)

Least Bittern - 1 (sitting on nest.)

Great Blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 56

Snowy Egret - 5

Little-blue Heron - 31

Cattle Egret - 16

Green Heron - 1

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 5

White Ibis - ~500

Black Vulture - 10

Turkey Vulture - 11

Mississippi Kite - 6

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 8 (1 sitting on nest; 1 feeding a crayfish to small
chicks.)

Common Gallinule - 12

American Coot - 4

Mourning Dove - 44

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 16

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 4

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 7

Bell's Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 4

Fish Crow - 3

Purple Martin - 3

Tree Swallow - 24

Barn Swallow - 22

Carolina Chickadee - 6

Tufted Titmouse - 7

Carolina Wren - 8

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 3

Yellow-throated Warbler - 2

Prairie Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 3

Kentucky Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 9

Yellow-breasted Chat - 5

Summer Tanager - 3

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 17

Blue Grosbeak - 3

Indigo Bunting - 20

Painted Bunting - 4

Dickcissel - 17

Red-winged Blackbird - 23

Common Grackle - 14

Brown-headed Cowbird - 7

Orchard Oriole - 1

 

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Lilypad Forktail

Skimming Bluet

Orange/Vesper Bluet

Blue-fronted Dancer

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Mocha Emerald 

Halloween Pennant

Stillwater Clubtail

Jade Clubtail

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Golden-winged Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

Herps:

 

Southern Copperhead

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 
Subject: Re: White-winged Dove
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 10:31:23 -0500
A couple years ago I encountered a large flock of white winged doves along the 
Meers road entrance to Wichita Mts. There was likely 30-40 of them sitting on 
wires on the left side of the road ask drove to the mountains. Hal Yocum 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 23, 2015, at 8:33 AM, Dan Reinking  wrote:
> 
> Since the 1980s when Eurasian Collared-Doves expanded to Florida from the 
Bahamas (where they had been introduced), they have expanded their range 
rapidly and dramatically, essentially blanketing a significant portion of North 
America. You can view an animation of this range expansion at 
http://ebird.org/content/camerica/news/coming-soon-to-a-birding-spot-near-you-eurasian-collared-dove/?lang=en. 

> The species was first reported in Oklahoma in 1995, but now occurs nearly 
statewide and continues to increase. 

> White-winged Doves (native to Texas and other places south and west from 
there) have also been expanding their range to the north into Oklahoma in 
recent years. 

> Dan Reinking
> Sutton Avian Research Center
>  
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Don Gettinger
> Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 4:28 PM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] White-winged Dove
>  
> Speaking of doves, what the heck is happening with this ring-necked dove 
(invasive) (common name may not be correct)?? Since I have been back in the 
usa, I see it everywhere. It seems to be invading towns more than natural 
habitats. In the little town of Kenton (Cimarron Co.) they are everywhere, with 
very few mourning doves; out at my little place north of the Black Mesa, I am 
only seeing the native dove. 

> Few questions: Has anyone eaten one yet? They look a little larger than the 
Mourner, and I assume that because they are exotic, we can blast away at them. 
I have been out of the country for awhile, but the invasion seems to be 
happening very quickly. Is there data on this invasion? I used to occasionally 
see White winged doves in Cimarron Co,....but not yet this year. 

> Don
>  
> On Mon, Jun 22, 2015 at 2:35 PM, Jennifer Kidney  
wrote: 

> I've had White-winged Doves in my yard in Norman for about eight years. In 
fact, I have too many of them--30 to 50 in the winter and down to about 20 in 
the summer. They actually get on the hanging feeders and are voracious eaters, 
causing my birdseed expenses to rise alarmingly. 

> 
> Jennifer Kidney
> 
> > Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 13:58:05 -0500
> > From: nola2ns AT CABLEONE.NET
> > Subject: [OKBIRDS] White-winged Dove
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> 
> > 
> > We just saw a White-winged dove on our feeder. Do they usually come this 
far 

> > north? My bird book says they stay in the southern half of Texas.
> > Nola
> > 
> > -----Original Message----- 
> > From: OKBIRDS automatic digest system
> > Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 12:00 AM
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> > Subject: OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)
> > 
> > There is 1 message totaling 90 lines in this issue.
> > 
> > Topics of the day:
> > 
> > 1. Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend
> > 
> > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> > 
> > Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 21:42:23 -0500
> > From: Mary Peterson 
> > Subject: Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend
> > 
> > Hello All, Mary and I took a trip to Southwest Oklahoma this past 
> > weekend. We passed though the Wichitas on Friday afternoon. Not much to see 

> > late Friday afternoon, except all the beautiful flowers and lots of 
> > black-chinned hummingbirds at the Holy City. We had to go south past the 
> > headquarters to exit the west side, since a bridge was out near the usual 
> > west exit. There are still many puddles and flooded areas in the fields 
> > between the Wichitas and Altus. We spent the night in Altus. Saturday 
> > morning we went to Eldorado and then south. Do not go south from the east 
> > side of town as the road is terrible and becomes impassible about 3 miles 
> > south of town. The road south from the west side of town in paved for about 

> > 3 miles and good gravel the rest of the way south. This stretch had 3 
> > roadrunners, a Cassin's sparrow, 2 black-crested titmice and a couple of 
> > golden-fronted woodpeckers. Back at the Wichitas, there are at least a 
> > couple cave swallows nesting on the fish ladder at French Lake. There must 
> > have been quite a roar as all the water went over the dam a few weeks ago. 
> > Most of the debris is gone below the dam and the small bridge at the 
> > trailhead has been washed out. We spent the afternoon at Fort Sill at the 
> > Fort Sill and Artillery museums. This is a must see for those interested in 

> > history. Visitors must go the the visitor center off exit 40B from the 
> > turnpike to get a visitor pass. Sunday morning, we started at the 
> > Quannah Parker dam. There were a couple black-capped vireos about 100 yards 

> > west of the dam. We then went up Mt. Scott. From the parking lot at the top 

> > I walked back down about a quarter mile and had 4 rufous-crowned sparrows, 
a 

> > very vocal canyon wren and a black-capped vireo. The most numerous bird by 
> > far in the Wichitas are the many painted buntings.
> > Mark PetersonBartlesville
> > 
> > ------------------------------
> > 
> > End of OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)
> > **************************************************************
> 
> 
>  
> --
> Donald Gettinger
> Senior Research Fellow
> Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: White-winged Dove
From: Jerry Taylor <j.taylor143 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 10:15:52 -0500
I'm not sure where you live, but here in west Oklahoma City I see them 
intermittently. The first time I noticed them was about four years ago when we 
had two in our back yard. About that same time my Sister-in-law had a pair 
nesting in a tree in her front yard. That was in northwest OKC. This year I've 
seen at least one in my backyard every week or so...usually in with a group of 
Collared Doves. So it does look like they are moving north. Climate change? 


-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Nola D.
Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 1:58 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] White-winged Dove

We just saw a White-winged dove on our feeder. Do they usually come this far 
north? My bird book says they stay in the southern half of Texas. 

Nola

-----Original Message-----
From: OKBIRDS automatic digest system
Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 12:00 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)

There is 1 message totaling 90 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 21 Jun 2015 21:42:23 -0500
From:    Mary Peterson 
Subject: Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend

Hello All,     Mary and I took a trip to Southwest Oklahoma this past 
weekend. We passed though the Wichitas on Friday afternoon. Not much to see 
late Friday afternoon, except all the beautiful flowers and lots of 
black-chinned hummingbirds at the Holy City. We had to go south past the 
headquarters to exit the west side, since a bridge was out near the usual west 
exit. There are still many puddles and flooded areas in the fields 

between the Wichitas and Altus. We spent the night in Altus.     Saturday 
morning we went to Eldorado and then south. Do not go south from the east side 
of town as the road is terrible and becomes impassible about 3 miles south of 
town. The road south from the west side of town in paved for about 

3 miles and good gravel the rest of the way south. This stretch had 3 
roadrunners, a Cassin's sparrow, 2 black-crested titmice and a couple of 
golden-fronted woodpeckers. Back at the Wichitas, there are at least a couple 
cave swallows nesting on the fish ladder at French Lake. There must have been 
quite a roar as all the water went over the dam a few weeks ago. 

Most of the debris is gone below the dam and the small bridge at the trailhead 
has been washed out. We spent the afternoon at Fort Sill at the Fort Sill and 
Artillery museums. This is a must see for those interested in history. Visitors 
must go the the visitor center off exit 40B from the 

turnpike to get a visitor pass.     Sunday morning, we started at the 
Quannah Parker dam. There were a couple black-capped vireos about 100 yards 
west of the dam. We then went up Mt. Scott. From the parking lot at the top I 
walked back down about a quarter mile and had 4 rufous-crowned sparrows, a very 
vocal canyon wren and a black-capped vireo. The most numerous bird by far in 
the Wichitas are the many painted buntings. 

Mark PetersonBartlesville

------------------------------

End of OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)
************************************************************** 
Subject: Re: White-winged Dove
From: Dan Reinking <dreinking AT OU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 08:33:47 -0500
Since the 1980s when Eurasian Collared-Doves expanded to Florida from the 
Bahamas (where they had been introduced), they have expanded their range 
rapidly and dramatically, essentially blanketing a significant portion of North 
America. You can view an animation of this range expansion at 
http://ebird.org/content/camerica/news/coming-soon-to-a-birding-spot-near-you-eurasian-collared-dove/?lang=en. 


The species was first reported in Oklahoma in 1995, but now occurs nearly 
statewide and continues to increase. 


White-winged Doves (native to Texas and other places south and west from there) 
have also been expanding their range to the north into Oklahoma in recent 
years. 


Dan Reinking

Sutton Avian Research Center

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Don Gettinger
Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 4:28 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] White-winged Dove

 

Speaking of doves, what the heck is happening with this ring-necked dove 
(invasive) (common name may not be correct)?? Since I have been back in the 
usa, I see it everywhere. It seems to be invading towns more than natural 
habitats. In the little town of Kenton (Cimarron Co.) they are everywhere, with 
very few mourning doves; out at my little place north of the Black Mesa, I am 
only seeing the native dove. 


Few questions: Has anyone eaten one yet? They look a little larger than the 
Mourner, and I assume that because they are exotic, we can blast away at them. 
I have been out of the country for awhile, but the invasion seems to be 
happening very quickly. Is there data on this invasion? I used to occasionally 
see White winged doves in Cimarron Co,....but not yet this year. 


Don

 

On Mon, Jun 22, 2015 at 2:35 PM, Jennifer Kidney  
wrote: 


I've had White-winged Doves in my yard in Norman for about eight years. In 
fact, I have too many of them--30 to 50 in the winter and down to about 20 in 
the summer. They actually get on the hanging feeders and are voracious eaters, 
causing my birdseed expenses to rise alarmingly. 


Jennifer Kidney

> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 13:58:05 -0500
> From: nola2ns AT CABLEONE.NET
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] White-winged Dove
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU


> 
> We just saw a White-winged dove on our feeder. Do they usually come this far 
> north? My bird book says they stay in the southern half of Texas.
> Nola
> 
> -----Original Message----- 
> From: OKBIRDS automatic digest system
> Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 12:00 AM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)
> 
> There is 1 message totaling 90 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
> 1. Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 21:42:23 -0500
> From: Mary Peterson 
> Subject: Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend
> 
> Hello All, Mary and I took a trip to Southwest Oklahoma this past 
> weekend. We passed though the Wichitas on Friday afternoon. Not much to see 
> late Friday afternoon, except all the beautiful flowers and lots of 
> black-chinned hummingbirds at the Holy City. We had to go south past the 
> headquarters to exit the west side, since a bridge was out near the usual 
> west exit. There are still many puddles and flooded areas in the fields 
> between the Wichitas and Altus. We spent the night in Altus. Saturday 
> morning we went to Eldorado and then south. Do not go south from the east 
> side of town as the road is terrible and becomes impassible about 3 miles 
> south of town. The road south from the west side of town in paved for about 
> 3 miles and good gravel the rest of the way south. This stretch had 3 
> roadrunners, a Cassin's sparrow, 2 black-crested titmice and a couple of 
> golden-fronted woodpeckers. Back at the Wichitas, there are at least a 
> couple cave swallows nesting on the fish ladder at French Lake. There must 
> have been quite a roar as all the water went over the dam a few weeks ago. 
> Most of the debris is gone below the dam and the small bridge at the 
> trailhead has been washed out. We spent the afternoon at Fort Sill at the 
> Fort Sill and Artillery museums. This is a must see for those interested in 
> history. Visitors must go the the visitor center off exit 40B from the 
> turnpike to get a visitor pass. Sunday morning, we started at the 
> Quannah Parker dam. There were a couple black-capped vireos about 100 yards 
> west of the dam. We then went up Mt. Scott. From the parking lot at the top 
> I walked back down about a quarter mile and had 4 rufous-crowned sparrows, a 
> very vocal canyon wren and a black-capped vireo. The most numerous bird by 
> far in the Wichitas are the many painted buntings.
> Mark PetersonBartlesville
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)
> ************************************************************** 





 

-- 

Donald Gettinger

Senior Research Fellow

Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: White-winged Dove
From: "bill ." <tvulture AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 23:04:09 -0500
The ok wildlife dept website still displays 2014-15 regs and seasons. So last 
hunting season all three doves could be hunted Sep 1 - Oct 31 and Dec 20-28 
statewide, the only difference being there was no bag limit on EUCD. 

Personally, were i still a hunter I'd go for the invasive. Problem may arise 
if, as i too have noticed, they are most common in towns where one usually 
cannot hunt, our natives out in the fields will continue to bear the brunt of 
hunting. 

Here in enid I have watched the two interacting for years. While i have never 
seen aggressive behavior on the part of the Eurasian, and have done no 
scientific counts, it does seem I see a greater percentage of EUCD vs Mourning 
Dove over time. 

As an aside, I've heard of White-wings in Enid but never seen one. Does anyone 
know of a reliable area? 

peace
-bill
enid ok

from my windows phone
________________________________
From: Don Gettinger
Sent: ‎6/‎22/‎2015 16:28
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] White-winged Dove

Speaking of doves, what the heck is happening with this ring-necked dove
(invasive) (common name may not be correct)??  Since I have been back in
the usa, I see it everywhere.  It seems to be invading towns more than
natural habitats.  In the little town of Kenton (Cimarron Co.) they are
everywhere, with very few mourning doves; out at my little place north of
the Black Mesa, I am only seeing the native dove.
Few questions:  Has anyone eaten one yet?  They look a little larger than
the Mourner, and I assume that because they are exotic, we can blast away
at them.  I have been out of the country for awhile, but the invasion seems
to be happening very quickly. Is there data on this invasion?  I used to
occasionally see White winged doves in Cimarron Co,....but not yet this
year.
Don

On Mon, Jun 22, 2015 at 2:35 PM, Jennifer Kidney 
wrote:

> I've had White-winged Doves in my yard in Norman for about eight years.
> In fact, I have too many of them--30 to 50 in the winter and down to about
> 20 in the summer.  They actually get on the hanging feeders and are
> voracious eaters, causing my birdseed expenses to rise alarmingly.
>
> Jennifer Kidney
>
> > Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 13:58:05 -0500
> > From: nola2ns AT CABLEONE.NET
> > Subject: [OKBIRDS] White-winged Dove
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
>
> >
> > We just saw a White-winged dove on our feeder. Do they usually come this
> far
> > north? My bird book says they stay in the southern half of Texas.
> > Nola
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: OKBIRDS automatic digest system
> > Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 12:00 AM
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> > Subject: OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)
> >
> > There is 1 message totaling 90 lines in this issue.
> >
> > Topics of the day:
> >
> > 1. Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend
> >
> > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 21:42:23 -0500
> > From: Mary Peterson 
> > Subject: Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend
> >
> > Hello All, Mary and I took a trip to Southwest Oklahoma this past
> > weekend. We passed though the Wichitas on Friday afternoon. Not much to
> see
> > late Friday afternoon, except all the beautiful flowers and lots of
> > black-chinned hummingbirds at the Holy City. We had to go south past the
> > headquarters to exit the west side, since a bridge was out near the
> usual
> > west exit. There are still many puddles and flooded areas in the fields
> > between the Wichitas and Altus. We spent the night in Altus. Saturday
> > morning we went to Eldorado and then south. Do not go south from the
> east
> > side of town as the road is terrible and becomes impassible about 3
> miles
> > south of town. The road south from the west side of town in paved for
> about
> > 3 miles and good gravel the rest of the way south. This stretch had 3
> > roadrunners, a Cassin's sparrow, 2 black-crested titmice and a couple of
> > golden-fronted woodpeckers. Back at the Wichitas, there are at least a
> > couple cave swallows nesting on the fish ladder at French Lake. There
> must
> > have been quite a roar as all the water went over the dam a few weeks
> ago.
> > Most of the debris is gone below the dam and the small bridge at the
> > trailhead has been washed out. We spent the afternoon at Fort Sill at
> the
> > Fort Sill and Artillery museums. This is a must see for those interested
> in
> > history. Visitors must go the the visitor center off exit 40B from the
> > turnpike to get a visitor pass. Sunday morning, we started at the
> > Quannah Parker dam. There were a couple black-capped vireos about 100
> yards
> > west of the dam. We then went up Mt. Scott. From the parking lot at the
> top
> > I walked back down about a quarter mile and had 4 rufous-crowned
> sparrows, a
> > very vocal canyon wren and a black-capped vireo. The most numerous bird
> by
> > far in the Wichitas are the many painted buntings.
> > Mark PetersonBartlesville
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > End of OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)
> > **************************************************************
>



--
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: White-winged Dove
From: Jim Jorgensen <hpah AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 21:09:59 -0500
We have three feeding flicks of 7 to 19 birds everyday. We don't put out much 
in the summer but winter or summer they go through the food. Millet seems their 
preference but eat small millet as well until their crop looks like it will 
rupture. They mix now and then with mourning doves here. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 22, 2015, at 8:32 PM, Foundation Subscriber  wrote:
> 
> I see them occasionally in north Edmond at Mitch Park.  Hal Yocum
> ---- John Polo  wrote: 
>> Nola, not sure where you are. There have been a few birds in Stillwater in 
the last few years. Just had a pair in my yard yesterday. 

>> 
>> john polo
>> stillwater
Subject: Re: White-winged Dove
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 21:32:58 -0400
I see them occasionally in north Edmond at Mitch Park.  Hal Yocum
---- John Polo  wrote: 
> Nola, not sure where you are. There have been a few birds in Stillwater in 
the last few years. Just had a pair in my yard yesterday. 

> 
> john polo
> stillwater
Subject: Re: White-winged Dove
From: John Polo <jpolo AT MAIL.USF.EDU>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 20:20:18 -0500
Nola, not sure where you are. There have been a few birds in Stillwater in the 
last few years. Just had a pair in my yard yesterday. 


john polo
stillwater
Subject: Re: White-winged Dove
From: Andrea Green <andreargreen7 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 16:42:30 -0500
It's the Eurasian Collared-Dove. 

Andrea Green

> On Jun 22, 2015, at 4:27 PM, Don Gettinger  wrote:
> 
> Speaking of doves, what the heck is happening with this ring-necked dove 
(invasive) (common name may not be correct)?? Since I have been back in the 
usa, I see it everywhere. It seems to be invading towns more than natural 
habitats. In the little town of Kenton (Cimarron Co.) they are everywhere, with 
very few mourning doves; out at my little place north of the Black Mesa, I am 
only seeing the native dove. 

> Few questions: Has anyone eaten one yet? They look a little larger than the 
Mourner, and I assume that because they are exotic, we can blast away at them. 
I have been out of the country for awhile, but the invasion seems to be 
happening very quickly. Is there data on this invasion? I used to occasionally 
see White winged doves in Cimarron Co,....but not yet this year. 

> Don
> 
>> On Mon, Jun 22, 2015 at 2:35 PM, Jennifer Kidney  
wrote: 

>> I've had White-winged Doves in my yard in Norman for about eight years. In 
fact, I have too many of them--30 to 50 in the winter and down to about 20 in 
the summer. They actually get on the hanging feeders and are voracious eaters, 
causing my birdseed expenses to rise alarmingly. 

>> 
>> Jennifer Kidney
>> 
>> > Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 13:58:05 -0500
>> > From: nola2ns AT CABLEONE.NET
>> > Subject: [OKBIRDS] White-winged Dove
>> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
>> 
>> > 
>> > We just saw a White-winged dove on our feeder. Do they usually come this 
far 

>> > north? My bird book says they stay in the southern half of Texas.
>> > Nola
>> > 
>> > -----Original Message----- 
>> > From: OKBIRDS automatic digest system
>> > Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 12:00 AM
>> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
>> > Subject: OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)
>> > 
>> > There is 1 message totaling 90 lines in this issue.
>> > 
>> > Topics of the day:
>> > 
>> > 1. Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend
>> > 
>> > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>> > 
>> > Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 21:42:23 -0500
>> > From: Mary Peterson 
>> > Subject: Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend
>> > 
>> > Hello All, Mary and I took a trip to Southwest Oklahoma this past 
>> > weekend. We passed though the Wichitas on Friday afternoon. Not much to 
see 

>> > late Friday afternoon, except all the beautiful flowers and lots of 
>> > black-chinned hummingbirds at the Holy City. We had to go south past the 
>> > headquarters to exit the west side, since a bridge was out near the usual 
>> > west exit. There are still many puddles and flooded areas in the fields 
>> > between the Wichitas and Altus. We spent the night in Altus. Saturday 
>> > morning we went to Eldorado and then south. Do not go south from the east 
>> > side of town as the road is terrible and becomes impassible about 3 miles 
>> > south of town. The road south from the west side of town in paved for 
about 

>> > 3 miles and good gravel the rest of the way south. This stretch had 3 
>> > roadrunners, a Cassin's sparrow, 2 black-crested titmice and a couple of 
>> > golden-fronted woodpeckers. Back at the Wichitas, there are at least a 
>> > couple cave swallows nesting on the fish ladder at French Lake. There must 

>> > have been quite a roar as all the water went over the dam a few weeks ago. 

>> > Most of the debris is gone below the dam and the small bridge at the 
>> > trailhead has been washed out. We spent the afternoon at Fort Sill at the 
>> > Fort Sill and Artillery museums. This is a must see for those interested 
in 

>> > history. Visitors must go the the visitor center off exit 40B from the 
>> > turnpike to get a visitor pass. Sunday morning, we started at the 
>> > Quannah Parker dam. There were a couple black-capped vireos about 100 
yards 

>> > west of the dam. We then went up Mt. Scott. From the parking lot at the 
top 

>> > I walked back down about a quarter mile and had 4 rufous-crowned sparrows, 
a 

>> > very vocal canyon wren and a black-capped vireo. The most numerous bird by 

>> > far in the Wichitas are the many painted buntings.
>> > Mark PetersonBartlesville
>> > 
>> > ------------------------------
>> > 
>> > End of OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)
>> > **************************************************************
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Donald Gettinger
> Senior Research Fellow
> Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: White-winged Dove
From: Don Gettinger <donaldgettinger AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 16:27:57 -0500
Speaking of doves, what the heck is happening with this ring-necked dove
(invasive) (common name may not be correct)??  Since I have been back in
the usa, I see it everywhere.  It seems to be invading towns more than
natural habitats.  In the little town of Kenton (Cimarron Co.) they are
everywhere, with very few mourning doves; out at my little place north of
the Black Mesa, I am only seeing the native dove.
Few questions:  Has anyone eaten one yet?  They look a little larger than
the Mourner, and I assume that because they are exotic, we can blast away
at them.  I have been out of the country for awhile, but the invasion seems
to be happening very quickly. Is there data on this invasion?  I used to
occasionally see White winged doves in Cimarron Co,....but not yet this
year.
Don

On Mon, Jun 22, 2015 at 2:35 PM, Jennifer Kidney 
wrote:

> I've had White-winged Doves in my yard in Norman for about eight years.
> In fact, I have too many of them--30 to 50 in the winter and down to about
> 20 in the summer.  They actually get on the hanging feeders and are
> voracious eaters, causing my birdseed expenses to rise alarmingly.
>
> Jennifer Kidney
>
> > Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 13:58:05 -0500
> > From: nola2ns AT CABLEONE.NET
> > Subject: [OKBIRDS] White-winged Dove
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
>
> >
> > We just saw a White-winged dove on our feeder. Do they usually come this
> far
> > north? My bird book says they stay in the southern half of Texas.
> > Nola
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: OKBIRDS automatic digest system
> > Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 12:00 AM
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> > Subject: OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)
> >
> > There is 1 message totaling 90 lines in this issue.
> >
> > Topics of the day:
> >
> > 1. Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend
> >
> > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 21:42:23 -0500
> > From: Mary Peterson 
> > Subject: Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend
> >
> > Hello All, Mary and I took a trip to Southwest Oklahoma this past
> > weekend. We passed though the Wichitas on Friday afternoon. Not much to
> see
> > late Friday afternoon, except all the beautiful flowers and lots of
> > black-chinned hummingbirds at the Holy City. We had to go south past the
> > headquarters to exit the west side, since a bridge was out near the
> usual
> > west exit. There are still many puddles and flooded areas in the fields
> > between the Wichitas and Altus. We spent the night in Altus. Saturday
> > morning we went to Eldorado and then south. Do not go south from the
> east
> > side of town as the road is terrible and becomes impassible about 3
> miles
> > south of town. The road south from the west side of town in paved for
> about
> > 3 miles and good gravel the rest of the way south. This stretch had 3
> > roadrunners, a Cassin's sparrow, 2 black-crested titmice and a couple of
> > golden-fronted woodpeckers. Back at the Wichitas, there are at least a
> > couple cave swallows nesting on the fish ladder at French Lake. There
> must
> > have been quite a roar as all the water went over the dam a few weeks
> ago.
> > Most of the debris is gone below the dam and the small bridge at the
> > trailhead has been washed out. We spent the afternoon at Fort Sill at
> the
> > Fort Sill and Artillery museums. This is a must see for those interested
> in
> > history. Visitors must go the the visitor center off exit 40B from the
> > turnpike to get a visitor pass. Sunday morning, we started at the
> > Quannah Parker dam. There were a couple black-capped vireos about 100
> yards
> > west of the dam. We then went up Mt. Scott. From the parking lot at the
> top
> > I walked back down about a quarter mile and had 4 rufous-crowned
> sparrows, a
> > very vocal canyon wren and a black-capped vireo. The most numerous bird
> by
> > far in the Wichitas are the many painted buntings.
> > Mark PetersonBartlesville
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > End of OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)
> > **************************************************************
>



-- 
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: White-winged Dove
From: Jennifer Kidney <jenlkidney AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 14:35:56 -0500
I've had White-winged Doves in my yard in Norman for about eight years. In 
fact, I have too many of them--30 to 50 in the winter and down to about 20 in 
the summer. They actually get on the hanging feeders and are voracious eaters, 
causing my birdseed expenses to rise alarmingly. 


Jennifer Kidney

> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 13:58:05 -0500
> From: nola2ns AT CABLEONE.NET
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] White-winged Dove
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> 
> We just saw a White-winged dove on our feeder. Do they usually come this far 
> north? My bird book says they stay in the southern half of Texas.
> Nola
> 
> -----Original Message----- 
> From: OKBIRDS automatic digest system
> Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 12:00 AM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)
> 
> There is 1 message totaling 90 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>   1. Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sun, 21 Jun 2015 21:42:23 -0500
> From:    Mary Peterson 
> Subject: Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend
> 
> Hello All,     Mary and I took a trip to Southwest Oklahoma this past 
> weekend. We passed though the Wichitas on Friday afternoon. Not much to see 
> late Friday afternoon, except all the beautiful flowers and lots of 
> black-chinned hummingbirds at the Holy City. We had to go south past the 
> headquarters to exit the west side, since a bridge was out near the usual 
> west exit. There are still many puddles and flooded areas in the fields 
> between the Wichitas and Altus. We spent the night in Altus.     Saturday 
> morning we went to Eldorado and then south. Do not go south from the east 
> side of town as the road is terrible and becomes impassible about 3 miles 
> south of town. The road south from the west side of town in paved for about 
> 3 miles and good gravel the rest of the way south. This stretch had 3 
> roadrunners, a Cassin's sparrow, 2 black-crested titmice and a couple of 
> golden-fronted woodpeckers. Back at the Wichitas, there are at least a 
> couple cave swallows nesting on the fish ladder at French Lake. There must 
> have been quite a roar as all the water went over the dam a few weeks ago. 
> Most of the debris is gone below the dam and the small bridge at the 
> trailhead has been washed out. We spent the afternoon at Fort Sill at the 
> Fort Sill and Artillery museums. This is a must see for those interested in 
> history. Visitors must go the the visitor center off exit 40B from the 
> turnpike to get a visitor pass.     Sunday morning, we started at the 
> Quannah Parker dam. There were a couple black-capped vireos about 100 yards 
> west of the dam. We then went up Mt. Scott. From the parking lot at the top 
> I walked back down about a quarter mile and had 4 rufous-crowned sparrows, a 
> very vocal canyon wren and a black-capped vireo. The most numerous bird by 
> far in the Wichitas are the many painted buntings.
> Mark PetersonBartlesville
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)
> ************************************************************** 
 		 	   		  
Subject: sw OK 20 June 2015
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 19:22:29 +0000
Posted to eBird and OOS facebook page, but visited some areas in Greer and 
Jackson counties, and made my first visit to Hackberry Flat in years, it seems. 

Did find a pair of Cave Swallows nesting in northern Jackson County, north of 
Altus. 

It was nice to see water at Hackberry Flat, and some birds, even in mid-summer.
Among waterfowl were Blue-winged Teal (many), and a smaller number of Shoveler, 
Northern Pintail, Redhead and Ruddy Ducks.  Also Pied-billed Grebes and 
coot.  More unexpected were 3 male Cinnamon Teal and a male Green-winged Teal. 

Counted up to 11 dark ibises.  The ones I was able to identify specifically 
were all White-faced, some of whom were carrying nesting material to some 
higher ground in one of the quarter sections.  Later in the day, John Ault was 
able to pull out a Glossy among them. 

Among more interesting finds were an American Bittern (posted pic to facebook) 
and a Virginia Rail.  Few other herons--only a few Snowy and Cattle Egrets. 

Different observers have been finding different treats there, including Eared 
Grebe and Neotropic Cormorant (found by John Ault a few days earlier). 

Among shorebirds were American Avocets and Black-necked Stilts, Wilson's 
Phalarope (I had only 7, but there have been higher counts). 

Makes Hackberry look like a good birding destination the rest of the year, 
possibly beyond. 

CHEERS,                            JOE Grzybowski



Subject: White-winged Dove
From: "Nola D." <nola2ns AT CABLEONE.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 13:58:05 -0500
We just saw a White-winged dove on our feeder. Do they usually come this far 
north? My bird book says they stay in the southern half of Texas.
Nola

-----Original Message----- 
From: OKBIRDS automatic digest system
Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 12:00 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)

There is 1 message totaling 90 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 21 Jun 2015 21:42:23 -0500
From:    Mary Peterson 
Subject: Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend

Hello All,     Mary and I took a trip to Southwest Oklahoma this past 
weekend. We passed though the Wichitas on Friday afternoon. Not much to see 
late Friday afternoon, except all the beautiful flowers and lots of 
black-chinned hummingbirds at the Holy City. We had to go south past the 
headquarters to exit the west side, since a bridge was out near the usual 
west exit. There are still many puddles and flooded areas in the fields 
between the Wichitas and Altus. We spent the night in Altus.     Saturday 
morning we went to Eldorado and then south. Do not go south from the east 
side of town as the road is terrible and becomes impassible about 3 miles 
south of town. The road south from the west side of town in paved for about 
3 miles and good gravel the rest of the way south. This stretch had 3 
roadrunners, a Cassin's sparrow, 2 black-crested titmice and a couple of 
golden-fronted woodpeckers. Back at the Wichitas, there are at least a 
couple cave swallows nesting on the fish ladder at French Lake. There must 
have been quite a roar as all the water went over the dam a few weeks ago. 
Most of the debris is gone below the dam and the small bridge at the 
trailhead has been washed out. We spent the afternoon at Fort Sill at the 
Fort Sill and Artillery museums. This is a must see for those interested in 
history. Visitors must go the the visitor center off exit 40B from the 
turnpike to get a visitor pass.     Sunday morning, we started at the 
Quannah Parker dam. There were a couple black-capped vireos about 100 yards 
west of the dam. We then went up Mt. Scott. From the parking lot at the top 
I walked back down about a quarter mile and had 4 rufous-crowned sparrows, a 
very vocal canyon wren and a black-capped vireo. The most numerous bird by 
far in the Wichitas are the many painted buntings.
Mark PetersonBartlesville

------------------------------

End of OKBIRDS Digest - 20 Jun 2015 to 21 Jun 2015 (#2015-222)
************************************************************** 
Subject: Southwest Oklahoma this Weekend
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 21:42:23 -0500
Hello All, Mary and I took a trip to Southwest Oklahoma this past weekend. We 
passed though the Wichitas on Friday afternoon. Not much to see late Friday 
afternoon, except all the beautiful flowers and lots of black-chinned 
hummingbirds at the Holy City. We had to go south past the headquarters to exit 
the west side, since a bridge was out near the usual west exit. There are still 
many puddles and flooded areas in the fields between the Wichitas and Altus. We 
spent the night in Altus. Saturday morning we went to Eldorado and then south. 
Do not go south from the east side of town as the road is terrible and becomes 
impassible about 3 miles south of town. The road south from the west side of 
town in paved for about 3 miles and good gravel the rest of the way south. This 
stretch had 3 roadrunners, a Cassin's sparrow, 2 black-crested titmice and a 
couple of golden-fronted woodpeckers. Back at the Wichitas, there are at least 
a couple cave swallows nesting on the fish ladder at French Lake. There must 
have been quite a roar as all the water went over the dam a few weeks ago. Most 
of the debris is gone below the dam and the small bridge at the trailhead has 
been washed out. We spent the afternoon at Fort Sill at the Fort Sill and 
Artillery museums. This is a must see for those interested in history. Visitors 
must go the the visitor center off exit 40B from the turnpike to get a visitor 
pass. Sunday morning, we started at the Quannah Parker dam. There were a couple 
black-capped vireos about 100 yards west of the dam. We then went up Mt. Scott. 
From the parking lot at the top I walked back down about a quarter mile and had 
4 rufous-crowned sparrows, a very vocal canyon wren and a black-capped vireo. 
The most numerous bird by far in the Wichitas are the many painted buntings. 

Mark PetersonBartlesville           		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Saturday morning birding
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 18:45:50 -0400
Hi, I live in Edmond and bird at Mitch Park nearly every day, usually in the 
morning starting about7:30 to * Am . It is cooler then, the birds are generally 
quite active early to feed. The best place to park is the Mathis Brothers Skate 
Park off Covell . That entrance is the same at the front entrance of the MIddle 
School that is just west of the corner of Covell and Kelly. If I see anybody 
with binoculars I think "another birder" and usually chat with them. There are 
several others who bird there regularly in the mornings. 

Hal Yocum
---- John Shackford  wrote: 
> If you prefer to be in the immediate OKC area, I would suggest Mitch Park,
> on Covell Rd. near Sante Fe in Edmond
> 
> On Sat, Jun 20, 2015 at 1:50 AM, Mark Cain  wrote:
> 
> > Thank you both.
> >
> > Sent from my iPad
> >
> > > On Jun 19, 2015, at 10:58 PM, Dora Webb  wrote:
> > >
> > > Wichita Wildlife Refuge near Lawton.
> > >
> > > -----Original Message----- From: Mark Cain
> > > Sent: Friday, June 19, 2015 7:51 PM
> > > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> > > Subject: Saturday morning birding
> > >
> > > I would like suggestions from you guys.  My wife is taking me birding in
> > the morning for Father's Day.  Where and when, in OKC area should we go?  I
> > have birded for a while but not as seriously and extensively as many of
> > you. Thanks for any info.
> >
Subject: Re: Saturday morning birding
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 14:29:07 -0500
If you prefer to be in the immediate OKC area, I would suggest Mitch Park,
on Covell Rd. near Sante Fe in Edmond

On Sat, Jun 20, 2015 at 1:50 AM, Mark Cain  wrote:

> Thank you both.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> > On Jun 19, 2015, at 10:58 PM, Dora Webb  wrote:
> >
> > Wichita Wildlife Refuge near Lawton.
> >
> > -----Original Message----- From: Mark Cain
> > Sent: Friday, June 19, 2015 7:51 PM
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> > Subject: Saturday morning birding
> >
> > I would like suggestions from you guys.  My wife is taking me birding in
> the morning for Father's Day.  Where and when, in OKC area should we go?  I
> have birded for a while but not as seriously and extensively as many of
> you. Thanks for any info.
>
Subject: Re: Saturday morning birding
From: Mark Cain <fafcoach AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 01:50:48 -0500
Thank you both.

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 19, 2015, at 10:58 PM, Dora Webb  wrote:
> 
> Wichita Wildlife Refuge near Lawton.
> 
> -----Original Message----- From: Mark Cain
> Sent: Friday, June 19, 2015 7:51 PM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Saturday morning birding
> 
> I would like suggestions from you guys. My wife is taking me birding in the 
morning for Father's Day. Where and when, in OKC area should we go? I have 
birded for a while but not as seriously and extensively as many of you. Thanks 
for any info. 

Subject: Re: Saturday morning birding
From: Dora Webb <owl112 AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 22:58:20 -0500
Wichita Wildlife Refuge near Lawton.

-----Original Message----- 
From: Mark Cain
Sent: Friday, June 19, 2015 7:51 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Saturday morning birding

I would like suggestions from you guys.  My wife is taking me birding in the 
morning for Father's Day.  Where and when, in OKC area should we go?  I have 
birded for a while but not as seriously and extensively as many of you. 
Thanks for any info. 
Subject: Saturday morning birding
From: Mark Cain <Fafcoach AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 19:51:05 -0500
I would like suggestions from you guys. My wife is taking me birding in the 
morning for Father's Day. Where and when, in OKC area should we go? I have 
birded for a while but not as seriously and extensively as many of you. Thanks 
for any info. 

Subject: Red Slough today
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 17:53:11 -0500
Spent most of the morning at Red Slough but no storm birds.  Lots of other
good birds around though and the lighting was perfect for photography.  Here
are a few of the more notable birds encountered:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 2

Neotropic Cormorant - 2

Anhingas - lots

White Ibis - ~1000

Wood Stork - 1 adult

Purple Gallinule - 4

Common Gallinule - lots (including a pair with about a dozen small downy
chicks.)

Eastern Towhee - 1 (singing at a new location; this makes 3 territories here
this year.)

Inca Doves - 2 (at north end of Mudline road at Pleasant Hill Community;
first I have seen in the county in about a year.)

Great-tailed Grackle - 2 (rare at Red Slough.)

 

I've posted some pics of Purple Gallinules I photographed today and a Least
Bittern I photographed yesterday at:
http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma/recent_photos 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: No Bill Birds
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 10:40:16 -0500
Hello All,

Stopped by Lake Yahola en route to work this morning, not expecting to see
any storm-related avian activity, and I didn't. There was a late Common
Loon drifting along by the boat ramp when I drove up.

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Re: Bill
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 18:22:50 -0500
The east side of the storm is where the birds are usually found.  I was at
Red Slough for three hours this afternoon and went through two major rain
bands but no storm birds.  Will be back first thing in the morning.  The
storm really brought the gallinules and Least Bitterns out for good photo
opps.

 

David Arbour

 

 

Subject: Bill.
Date: Wed Jun 17 2015 14:11 pm
From: larrymays1949 AT gmail.com 

 

  Although this system isn't actually a hurricane,  it obviously has the



same footprint as one.



  The really interesting thing about it,  to me, anyway,  is that the



center appears to be crossing into the state,  not in southeastern



Oklahoma,  but right smack dead center.  Assuming any seabirds are



traveling with it,  we might want to be alert in the morning for  birds



around the big lakes toward the center of the state;  perhaps



Texhoma--maybe even lakes Thunderbird, Hefner and Overholser,  then maybe



Keystone,  or Grand Lake.



  Hey,  it might be a dud,  for sure,  but just ask Dave Arbour about what



it could be,  and anyway,  you want to get out and bird,  right?



  Larry Mays


Subject: Bill.
From: Larry Mays <larrymays1949 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 14:11:36 -0500
  Although this system isn't actually a hurricane,  it obviously has the
same footprint as one.
  The really interesting thing about it,  to me, anyway,  is that the
center appears to be crossing into the state,  not in southeastern
Oklahoma,  but right smack dead center.  Assuming any seabirds are
traveling with it,  we might want to be alert in the morning for  birds
around the big lakes toward the center of the state;  perhaps
Texhoma--maybe even lakes Thunderbird, Hefner and Overholser,  then maybe
Keystone,  or Grand Lake.
  Hey,  it might be a dud,  for sure,  but just ask Dave Arbour about what
it could be,  and anyway,  you want to get out and bird,  right?
  Larry Mays
Subject: Re: Roadrunner size
From: "Ingold, James" <James.Ingold AT LSUS.EDU>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 14:58:24 +0000
Same size

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Russell Doughty
Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2015 9:58 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Roadrunner size


Are male or females larger than the other, or do they tend to be the same size? 


Thanks.
Subject: Roadrunner size
From: Russell Doughty <rustymonroe AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 09:57:33 -0500
Are male or females larger than the other, or do they tend to be the same
size?

Thanks.
Subject: Re: Tropical Storm Bill's birds??
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 08:08:44 -0500
Yes I agree; I've already had my eye on this storm and will be watching
closely at Red Slough the next couple days!  J   The potential is the
greatest, I believe, for coastal terns and frigatebirds.

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

------------------------------

From ARBirds listserve:

 

Greetings all,

This is all a guess, but you never know....

Tropical storm Bill didn't spend much time over the Gulf of Mexico, and
certainly is not near as big or as strong as recent hurricanes.  But he did
make landfall in the right part of TX to send birds flying towards us on the
counterclockwise winds.  I'm guessing maybe not many (or none at all)
pelagic birds.  But I sure wonder about a potential first state record
Reddish Egret.

 

Of course those same winds could push coastal TX birds into calmer LA/MS.

 

Based on the projected timing and track I'd consider checking Kitchens
Bayou,  Millwood and other good heron marshes of the SW, on late Wens
evening and Thurs AM.

And of course Red Slough, OK maybe the biggest potential of all.

 

I'm in class Thurs/Fri so I can't chase it.  Not sure I would chase it, even
if I could, but if I lived in SW  AR I'd be getting twitchin fever and happy
feet.

 

Cheers, Leif  AT  Hector

 

------------------------------

 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 16
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 20:19:22 -0500
It was mostly cloudy and warm with a shower on the bird survey today.  66
species were found.  Big surprise was an adult Roseate Spoonbill which I
have only seen an adult once before at Red Slough.  Also nice was one adult
Wood Stork which roosted with the Anhingas at their rookery in Pintail Lake.
Lots of White Ibis feeding in units 30, 40, 47W, and 7.    Here is my list
for today:

 

Wood Duck - 12 

Pied-billed Grebe - 7

Neotropic Cormorant - 6 

Anhinga - 20

Least Bittern - 2 (1 sitting on nest.)

Great Blue Heron - 10

Great Egret - 53

Snowy Egret - 3

Little-blue Heron - 6

Cattle Egret - 15

Green Heron - 6

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 1

White Ibis - 587

Roseate Spoonbill - 1 adult

Wood Stork - 1 adult

Black Vulture - 7

Turkey Vulture - 15

Mississippi Kite - 3

Purple Gallinule - 9

Common Gallinule - 13

American Coot - 4

Least Tern - 1

Mourning Dove - 25

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 9

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Acadian Flycatcher - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 3

Bell's Vireo - 7

Yellow-throated Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 6

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 13

Fish Crow - 1

Purple Martin - 4

Tree Swallow - 41

Cliff Swallow - 10

Barn Swallow - 16

Carolina Chickadee - 6

Tufted Titmouse - 6

Carolina Wren - 8

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 6

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine Warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 3

Kentucky Warbler - 3

Common Yellowthroat - 12

Yellow-breasted Chat - 6

Summer Tanager - 2

Lark Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 18

Blue Grosbeak - 3

Indigo Bunting - 17

Painted Bunting - 7

Dickcissel - 19

Red-winged Blackbird - 50

Eastern Meadowlark - 2

Common Grackle - 44

Brown-headed Cowbird - 15

Orchard Oriole - 6

 

 

Odonates:

 

Citrine Forktail

Common Green Darner

Cyrano Darner

Swamp Darner

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Stillwater Clubtail

Jade Clubtail

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Black Saddlebags

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Southern Black Racer

Western Cottonmouth

Green Treefrog

Gray Treefrog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Re: Bill, where's Bill
From: Russell Doughty <rustymonroe AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 13:56:26 -0500
Yeah, we've had great luck at Sardis with rare birds coming in during
hurricane/tropical fallout and the last batch of storms last month. Now
that I can drive around the lake, I will be out tomorrow morn.
On Jun 16, 2015 1:50 PM, "Sandy Berger"  wrote:

> Keep your fingers crossed.  I'd love to see a frigatebird flying around
> over Kerr and Tenkiller.
>
> Sandy B.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> > On Jun 16, 2015, at 10:00 AM, John Sterling  wrote:
> >
> > Bill is on the way.  By the time it gets to Oklahoma, it should only be
> a rain event.  Any thoughts about the possibility it might bring coastal
> birds with it?
> >
> > Sent from my iPad
>
Subject: Re: Bill, where's Bill
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 13:50:24 -0500
Keep your fingers crossed. I'd love to see a frigatebird flying around over 
Kerr and Tenkiller. 


Sandy B.

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 16, 2015, at 10:00 AM, John Sterling  wrote:
> 
> Bill is on the way. By the time it gets to Oklahoma, it should only be a rain 
event. Any thoughts about the possibility it might bring coastal birds with it? 

> 
> Sent from my iPad
Subject: Re: Bill, where's Bill
From: Lauren Wilkerson <wilk7745 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 12:11:59 -0500
I doubt it. I live in Houston and so far its only been a rain event here.
Light to moderate rain with no wind to speak of, but we're on the outer
edge.
On Jun 16, 2015 10:00 AM, "John Sterling"  wrote:

> Bill is on the way.  By the time it gets to Oklahoma, it should only be a
> rain event.  Any thoughts about the possibility it might bring coastal
> birds with it?
>
> Sent from my iPad
Subject: Re: Bill, where's Bill
From: Larry Mays <larrymays1949 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 10:16:55 -0500
Only one way to find out,  I suppose...

On Tue, Jun 16, 2015 at 10:06 AM, Terry Mitchell  wrote:

> I've been wondering  about that myself. Terry.
>
> Terry Mitchell
> Plastic Engineering
> 918-622-9660
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of John Sterling
> Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 10:00 AM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Bill, where's Bill
>
> Bill is on the way.  By the time it gets to Oklahoma, it should only be a
> rain event.  Any thoughts about the possibility it might bring coastal
> birds with it?
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
Subject: Re: Bill, where's Bill
From: Terry Mitchell <terry AT PECOT.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 10:06:43 -0500
I've been wondering  about that myself. Terry.

Terry Mitchell
Plastic Engineering
918-622-9660

-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of John Sterling
Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 10:00 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Bill, where's Bill

Bill is on the way.  By the time it gets to Oklahoma, it should only be a
rain event.  Any thoughts about the possibility it might bring coastal
birds with it?

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Bill, where's Bill
From: John Sterling <prairie AT ITLNET.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 10:00:04 -0500
Bill is on the way. By the time it gets to Oklahoma, it should only be a rain 
event. Any thoughts about the possibility it might bring coastal birds with it? 


Sent from my iPad
Subject: Rogers County and Nickel Preserve
From: Scott Loss <scottrloss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 11:13:21 -0500
I spent all of Friday in Rogers County (doing fieldwork on the private
11,000 acre McFarlin-Ingersoll Ranch near Inola), and Sara and I also had a
chance to get over to the Nickel Preserve on Saturday morning.

The highlight on the ranch was a singing EASTERN TOWHEE that I observed.
There appear to be several of these breeding on the ranch, as indicated by
observations from a field tech that has been there every day since late
winter.

A quick walk Friday evening on the bike trail on the west side of Lake
Claremore produced two Tree Swallows and an American Coot, two common
species that I was a bit surprised to see in mid-June.

On Saturday, the Nickel Preserve was very slow as a result of scattered
thunderstorms that reduced bird detectability even when it wasn't raining
(very hard to hear bird song in a dripping forest). The only eastern
specialty species we were able to find were Scarlet Tanager, Acadian
Flycatcher, and Prairie Warbler (no wood thrush, worm-eating, blue-winged,
cerulean warbler etc.)

Scott Loss
Stillwater
Subject: Re: Thanks for the help - Payne Co. Prairie Warbler(s)
From: Dan Reinking <dreinking AT OU.EDU>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 08:22:47 -0500
I had one at the Tulsa Botanic Garden nature trail several weeks ago as well.

Dan

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jimarterburn
Sent: Saturday, June 13, 2015 9:17 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Thanks for the help - Payne Co. Prairie Warbler(s)

 

Tim,

 

I thought that I would mention that Prairie Warblers are a fairly common nester 
on the Zink Ranch is southern Osage County. The ranch is on the southern side 
of Skiatook Lake and north of Highway 97 out of Sand Springs. They have been 
there for the ten years or so that I have been going up there in June. This 
location is about fifty miles east north-east of Stillwater. 


 

Jim

Sent from my iPad


On Jun 12, 2015, at 3:39 PM, Timothy O'Connell  
wrote: 


Thanks - that's good info, James. I've been chained to my desk and haven't been 
out there myself this season. Multiple Prairie Warblers is certainly exciting 
this far outside of what we might consider the typical range for Oklahoma. For 
example, the BBA shows the western limit to be Atoka and Pittsburg counties. 
Going from one to several individuals in one year suggests to be a rapid 
expansion or colonization, and is probably worth a note to the Bulletin of the 
Oklahoma Ornithological Society. http://www.okbirds.org/publications.htm 


 

~Tim

 

 

On Jun 12, 2015, at 3:11 PM, James Hubbell wrote:





I was following leads provide by other birders. There had been reports of from 
one to up to three Prairie Warblers in the pine groove. I was in the pine 
groove off Bass Club Road as directed by others who had seen the birds in the 
days prior to my attempt. I was playing Prairie Warbler songs when I had a 
single male land high above me in the trees. I ID with Binoculars as a Male 
Prairie Warbler. A minute or so later this bird was dive bombed by another 
bird. Theses two birds went into bird tag. The other bird was also ID as a male 
Prairie Warbler during one of its pauses on a branch. There are currently 6 
listings on Ebird of these birds in the last two weeks. Hope this helps. 


 

On Fri, Jun 12, 2015 at 10:04 AM, Timothy O'Connell  
wrote: 


We had a lone male out there last summer, James. To my knowledge, this was the 
first Prairie WArbler on territory in Payne County since at least 2004. If you 
have confirmed TWO Prairie Warblers this summer then I'm quite interested in 
whatever detail you can provide on that. Was it two countersinging males? Did 
you visually confirm a breeding pair? Any elaboration you can provide on how 
you determined that there were two and the possible breeding status of the 
birds would be most appreciated! 


~tim

 

 

On Jun 12, 2015, at 9:54 AM, James Hubbell wrote:





not sure what is meant by that????

 

On Thu, Jun 11, 2015 at 12:41 PM, Timothy O'Connell  
wrote: 


TWO?!  Do tell . . .



On Jun 11, 2015, at 1:16 PM, James Hubbell wrote:

> I want to say thanks to the birders. I asked for help in finding the Prairie 
Warblers near Stillwater. I had several people send me directions and pointers, 
tips and pics. These help and I had success in finding two and I also found in 
the pines two Pine Warblers. Thanks for the help. 

>
>
>

 

 

 

 
Subject: Bobwhite Quail Status
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 05:08:07 -0500
At the OKC Audubon meeting tonight, June 15, Dr. Craig Davis will present
on The Status of Bobwhites in Oklahoma: An Overview of the OSU Quail
Project. Dr. Davis studied at Ohio State, Iowa State and Texas Tech. He has
been at OSU since 2001 where he currently holds the Bollenbach Chair in
Wildlife in the Department of Natural Resources Ecology and Management. He
has an extensive background in grassland, playa and wetland
ecology including research on cranes, shorebirds and quail. For further
information on Dr. Davis's interesting background and presentation, see the
writeup on our website, www.okc-audubon.org. Our meetings are held in the
Will Rogers Park Garden Exhibition Center, NW 36th St and I-44, just
southwest of the intersection. The meeting starts at 7 pm and lasts two
hours. Interested parties of all ages and backgrounds are welcome to
attend. This is our last formal meeting until September.

Bill Diffin
OKC Audubon President
Subject: Re: Thanks for the help - Payne Co. Prairie Warbler(s)
From: Timothy O'Connell <tim.oconnell AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2015 15:33:56 -0500
Thanks, Joe.  Interesting stuff.  
~t


On Jun 13, 2015, at 3:08 PM, JOS GRZYBOWSKI wrote:

> If you look at Nolan's (1978) classic study, and Sutton 1967, Prairie 
Warblers nested out to Cleveland, Caddo and Murray counties. The Baumgartner's 
found them in Payne county. There were fewer birders in the 1950's and 60's, 
and not too uniform coverage. 

> They were still nesting in Cleveland County in the early 1980's. The 1980's 
was a window in which numbers of species like Prairie Warbler, Black-capped 
Vireo, Orchard Orioles went downhill. 

> So it is good to see some pockets crop up, but these areas were part of their 
historic range. 

> CHEERS,                    JOE Grzybowski
> 
> 
> 
> On Saturday, June 13, 2015 10:53 AM, Timothy O'Connell 
 wrote: 

> 
> 
> That's a lot closer . . .
> 
> On Jun 13, 2015, at 9:17 AM, Jimarterburn wrote:
> 
> 
> Tim,
> 
> I thought that I would mention that Prairie Warblers are a fairly common 
nester on the Zink Ranch is southern Osage County. The ranch is on the southern 
side of Skiatook Lake and north of Highway 97 out of Sand Springs. They have 
been there for the ten years or so that I have been going up there in June. 
This location is about fifty miles east north-east of Stillwater. 

> 
> Jim
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> On Jun 12, 2015, at 3:39 PM, Timothy O'Connell  
wrote: 

> 
>> Thanks - that's good info, James. I've been chained to my desk and haven't 
been out there myself this season. Multiple Prairie Warblers is certainly 
exciting this far outside of what we might consider the typical range for 
Oklahoma. For example, the BBA shows the western limit to be Atoka and 
Pittsburg counties. Going from one to several individuals in one year suggests 
to be a rapid expansion or colonization, and is probably worth a note to the 
Bulletin of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society. 
http://www.okbirds.org/publications.htm 

>> 
>> ~Tim
>> 
>> 
>> On Jun 12, 2015, at 3:11 PM, James Hubbell wrote:
>> 
>>> I was following leads provide by other birders. There had been reports of 
from one to up to three Prairie Warblers in the pine groove. I was in the pine 
groove off Bass Club Road as directed by others who had seen the birds in the 
days prior to my attempt. I was playing Prairie Warbler songs when I had a 
single male land high above me in the trees. I ID with Binoculars as a Male 
Prairie Warbler. A minute or so later this bird was dive bombed by another 
bird. Theses two birds went into bird tag. The other bird was also ID as a male 
Prairie Warbler during one of its pauses on a branch. There are currently 6 
listings on Ebird of these birds in the last two weeks. Hope this helps. 

>>> 
>>> On Fri, Jun 12, 2015 at 10:04 AM, Timothy O'Connell 
 wrote: 

>>> We had a lone male out there last summer, James. To my knowledge, this was 
the first Prairie WArbler on territory in Payne County since at least 2004. If 
you have confirmed TWO Prairie Warblers this summer then I'm quite interested 
in whatever detail you can provide on that. Was it two countersinging males? 
Did you visually confirm a breeding pair? Any elaboration you can provide on 
how you determined that there were two and the possible breeding status of the 
birds would be most appreciated! 

>>> ~tim
>>> 
>>> 
>>> On Jun 12, 2015, at 9:54 AM, James Hubbell wrote:
>>> 
>>>> not sure what is meant by that????
>>>> 
>>>> On Thu, Jun 11, 2015 at 12:41 PM, Timothy O'Connell 
 wrote: 

>>>> TWO?!  Do tell . . .
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> On Jun 11, 2015, at 1:16 PM, James Hubbell wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> > I want to say thanks to the birders. I asked for help in finding the 
Prairie Warblers near Stillwater. I had several people send me directions and 
pointers, tips and pics. These help and I had success in finding two and I also 
found in the pines two Pine Warblers. Thanks for the help. 

>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Thanks for the help - Payne Co. Prairie Warbler(s)
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2015 20:08:39 +0000
If you look at Nolan's (1978) classic study, and Sutton 1967, Prairie Warblers 
nested out to Cleveland, Caddo and Murray counties. The Baumgartner's found 
them in Payne county.  There were fewer birders in the 1950's and 60's, and 
not too uniform coverage.  

They were still nesting in Cleveland County in the early 1980's.  The 1980's 
was a window in which numbers of species like Prairie Warbler, Black-capped 
Vireo, Orchard Orioles went downhill.  

  So it is good to see some pockets crop up, but these areas were part of 
their historic range.  CHEERS,                    JOE 
Grzybowski 

 


 On Saturday, June 13, 2015 10:53 AM, Timothy O'Connell 
 wrote: 

   

 That's a lot closer . . .
On Jun 13, 2015, at 9:17 AM, Jimarterburn wrote:


Tim,
I thought that I would mention that Prairie Warblers are a fairly common nester 
on the Zink Ranch is southern Osage County. The ranch is on the southern side 
of Skiatook Lake and north of Highway 97 out of Sand Springs. They have been 
there for the ten years or so that I have been going up there in June. This 
location is about fifty miles east north-east of Stillwater. 

Jim

Sent from my iPad
On Jun 12, 2015, at 3:39 PM, Timothy O'Connell  
wrote: 



Thanks - that's good info, James.  I've been chained to my desk and haven't 
been out there myself this season.  Multiple Prairie Warblers is certainly 
exciting this far outside of what we might consider the typical range for 
Oklahoma. For example, the BBA shows the western limit to be Atoka and 
Pittsburg counties.  Going from one to several individuals in one year 
suggests to be a rapid expansion or colonization, and is probably worth a note 
to the Bulletin of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society. 
 http://www.okbirds.org/publications.htm 

~Tim

On Jun 12, 2015, at 3:11 PM, James Hubbell wrote:

I was following leads provide by other birders. There had been reports of from 
one to up to three Prairie Warblers in the pine groove. I was in the pine 
groove off Bass Club Road as directed by others who had seen the birds in the 
days prior to my attempt. I was playing Prairie Warbler songs when I had a 
single male land high above me in the trees. I ID with Binoculars as a Male 
Prairie Warbler. A minute or so later this bird was dive bombed by another 
bird. Theses two birds went into bird tag. The other bird was also ID as a male 
Prairie Warbler during one of its pauses on a branch. There are currently 6 
listings on Ebird of these birds in the last two weeks. Hope this helps. 

On Fri, Jun 12, 2015 at 10:04 AM, Timothy O'Connell  
wrote: 


We had a lone male out there last summer, James.  To my knowledge, this was 
the first Prairie WArbler on territory in Payne County since at least 2004. If 
you have confirmed TWO Prairie Warblers this summer then I'm quite interested 
in whatever detail you can provide on that.  Was it two countersinging 
males?  Did you visually confirm a breeding pair?  Any elaboration you can 
provide on how you determined that there were two and the possible breeding 
status of the birds would be most appreciated!~tim 


On Jun 12, 2015, at 9:54 AM, James Hubbell wrote:

not sure what is meant by that????
On Thu, Jun 11, 2015 at 12:41 PM, Timothy O'Connell  
wrote: 


TWO?!  Do tell . . .


On Jun 11, 2015, at 1:16 PM, James Hubbell wrote:

> I want to say thanks to the birders. I asked for help in finding the Prairie 
Warblers near Stillwater. I had several people send me directions and pointers, 
tips and pics. These help and I had success in finding two and I also found in 
the pines two Pine Warblers. Thanks for the help. 

>
>
>












  
Subject: Great morning on South Jenkins
From: rgunn1 <rgunn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2015 11:03:12 -0500
Started late after three-inch rain and caught up with Jeff Roberts who 
had seen a bunch of stuff earlier (including a La.Water Thrush) We 
picked up a FOY Least Tern flying over flooded road. We were later 
joined by John Tharp and Rachel Wrenn and saw a lot of stuff including 
an SOE (second of ever)  Summer Tanager. Nothing else of special note 
but a lot of things that had already quit singing, was out to celebrate 
all the new water.

D.