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Updated on Sunday, June 26 at 06:52 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Kirtlands Warbler Nest,©Barry Kent Mackay

26 Jun Re: New Red Slough photos posted online [Tom Ewert ]
24 Jun New Red Slough photos posted online [David Arbour ]
23 Jun Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos [Jim Arterburn ]
23 Jun Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos [John Shackford ]
23 Jun Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos [EUGENE YOUNG ]
23 Jun Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos [Sebastian ]
22 Jun Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos [Jim Arterburn ]
21 Jun Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20 [Jerry Davis ]
21 Jun Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20 [Jerry Davis ]
20 Jun Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20 [David Arbour ]
19 Jun This morning on Suoth Jenkins [rgunn1 ]
19 Jun Re: FW: eBird Report - Joe B. Barnes Park, Jun 19, 2016 [John Shackford ]
18 Jun Belated report - Cave Swallow at Red Slough [David Arbour ]
18 Jun Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 13 - corrections! [David Arbour ]
18 Jun Bird list serve [Dora Webb ]
18 Jun Red Slough Bird Survey - June 13 [David Arbour ]
12 Jun Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday [John Shackford ]
12 Jun Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday [Doug Wood ]
11 Jun Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday [Pete Janzen ]
11 Jun Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday [Doug Wood ]
11 Jun Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday [John Shackford ]
11 Jun Re: Oklahoma Bird Pictures [JOS GRZYBOWSKI ]
11 Jun Correction: date of Chester Fire [Pete Janzen ]
11 Jun Major County BBS route last Saturday [Pete Janzen ]
10 Jun Oklahoma Bird Pictures [Ken or Carol Williams ]
9 Jun Looking for young naturalists [Ann Gordon ]
9 Jun Fw: Tribute to Phoebe Snetsinger (google) [Sebastian ]
6 Jun Re: Out of state birder coming to OK in late June [larrymays1949 ]
6 Jun Re: Out of state birder coming to OK in late June [Andrew Barndt ]
2 Jun Red Slough Bird Survey - June 2 [David Arbour ]
2 Jun Hackberry Flat yesterday with stop at the Wichitas [Matthew Jung ]
1 Jun Re: June Migration Report [Jim Arterburn ]
1 Jun June Migration Report [Patricia Velte ]
1 Jun Re: Out of state birder coming to OK in late June [Doug Wood ]
31 May Franklin's Gull vs. Laughing Gull [Jim Arterburn ]
31 May Out of state birder coming to OK in late June [Andrew Barndt ]
31 May No Subject [Bill Carrell ]
30 May No Subject [John Shackford ]
29 May Re: Yellow-billed and Common Loon, L. Hefner - yes [John Ault ]
29 May Re: Yellow-billed and Common Loon, L. Hefner - yes [Ian Brandenburg ]
29 May Re: Yellow-billed and Common Loon, L. Hefner - yes [John Hurd ]
29 May Phoebe nest question [Mark Cromwell ]
28 May Fwd: eBird Report - Lake Carl Blackwell, May 28, 2016 ["O Connell, Tim" ]
28 May Yellow-billed and Common Loon, L. Hefner - yes [Matthew Jung ]
28 May Loon [larrymays1949 ]
27 May SET OKBIRDS MAIL [Bob LaVal ]
27 May Swainson's warbler [Ann Gordon ]
27 May YBLO still present- Lake Hefner [Spencer Coffey ]
27 May Re: Yellow-billed Loon [Zach DuFran ]
26 May Yellow-billed Loon [Jonah Padberg ]
25 May Hackberry Flat 5-25-2016 [ML2x ]
26 May Re: YB Loon at Hefner [Liz McCrae ]
25 May Re: YB Loon at Hefner [Ken or Carol Williams ]
25 May Adams Ranch on 2-25-2016 [Mary Peterson ]
25 May YB Loon at Hefner [William Diffin ]
25 May Re: Hefner Loon, Whimbrel [William Diffin ]
24 May Red Slough Bird Survey - May 24 [David Arbour ]
24 May Pathfinder Parkway on 5-24-2016 [Mary Peterson ]
24 May Bunting on South Jenkins [rgunn1 ]
23 May Re: Hefner Loon, Whimbrel [Matthew Jung ]
23 May Hefner Loon, Whimbrel [William Diffin ]
23 May Re: Hackberry Flat Survey + Cave Swallows in the Wichita's [ML2x ]
23 May hefner 23May2016 [JOS GRZYBOWSKI ]
23 May Re: Thoughts on this bird ["Mark A. Trainor" ]
23 May Re: Hackberry Flat Survey + Cave Swallows in the Wichita's [Ken or Carol Williams ]
23 May Black-Billed Cuckoo, Again [Bill Carrell ]
23 May Re: Three Eagles at NE 63rd St bridge in Oklahoma City [William Diffin ]
23 May Three Eagles at NE 63rd St bridge in Oklahoma City [Calvin Rees ]
23 May Re: Thoughts on this bird [William Diffin ]
22 May Re: Purple Gallinule in Payne Co. injured wing? [Deanne McKinney ]
22 May Re: Purple Gallinule in Payne Co. injured wing? ["O Connell, Tim" ]
22 May Re: Purple Gallinule in Payne Co. injured wing? [Sylvias Serpentine ]
22 May Purple Gallinule in Payne Co. injured wing? [Deanne McKinney ]
22 May Ibis ["Humphrey, Todd" ]
22 May White faced Ibis Tulsa county ["Humphrey, Todd" ]
22 May Re: Lake Hefner: Yellow-billed Loon [Bob Funston ]

Subject: Re: New Red Slough photos posted online
From: Tom Ewert <ewert.tom AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 18:51:02 -0500
David, great photos, love the king rail photos. Tom Ewert

On Fri, Jun 24, 2016 at 8:23 PM, David Arbour  wrote:

> I’ve posted a bunch of new photos to the Red Slough Photo Gallery “Recent
> Photos” page.  See them at this link:
>
>
>
> http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma/recent_photos
>
>
>
> David Arbour
>
> De Queen, AR
>
Subject: New Red Slough photos posted online
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 20:23:23 -0500
I've posted a bunch of new photos to the Red Slough Photo Gallery "Recent
Photos" page.  See them at this link:

 

http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma/recent_photos 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR
Subject: Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 09:11:29 -0500
Gene,

 

I have seen these displays a few times over the years also, but this is the
first time that I was close enough to hear the little tick call the male
gives when doing the display. It was neat to watch and hear.

 

Jim

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of EUGENE YOUNG
Sent: Wednesday, June 22, 2016 7:47 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos

 

Seen in KS several times, always very cool.

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone


On Jun 22, 2016, at 6:43 PM, Jim Arterburn  > wrote:

OKBirds,

 

I have uploaded some photos of Buff-breasted Sandpipers performing their
breeding display. Buff-breasted Sandpipers give a dual wing or single wing
display on leks on their breeding grounds in the Arctic tundra. During this
display they raise their wing(s) and flash the bright white underwings to
attract females. In addition they point their bill in the air and give a
soft tick call. They sometimes give these display during migration. On May
11-12 there were about fifty Buff-breasted Sandpipers on the Leonard sod
farms and I was able to photograph, watch and hear several displaying and
calling males. 

 

Here is the link to this gallery 

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder  

 
Subject: Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 01:38:13 -0500
Great series of photographs, Jim.

Thanks for sharing.

John Shackford

On Wed, Jun 22, 2016 at 7:46 PM, EUGENE YOUNG  wrote:

> Seen in KS several times, always very cool.
>
> Gene Young Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jun 22, 2016, at 6:43 PM, Jim Arterburn  > wrote:
>
> OKBirds,
>
>
>
> I have uploaded some photos of Buff-breasted Sandpipers performing their
> breeding display. Buff-breasted Sandpipers give a dual wing or single wing
> display on leks on their breeding grounds in the Arctic tundra. During this
> display they raise their wing(s) and flash the bright white underwings to
> attract females. In addition they point their bill in the air and give a
> soft tick call. They sometimes give these display during migration. On May
> 11-12 there were about fifty Buff-breasted Sandpipers on the Leonard sod
> farms and I was able to photograph, watch and hear several displaying and
> calling males.
>
>
>
> Here is the link to this gallery
>
>
>
> http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds
>
>
>
>
>
> Jim Arterburn
>
> Tulsa, Oklahoma
>
> www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder 
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 00:46:36 +0000
Seen in KS several times, always very cool.

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 22, 2016, at 6:43 PM, Jim Arterburn 
> wrote: 


OKBirds,

I have uploaded some photos of Buff-breasted Sandpipers performing their 
breeding display. Buff-breasted Sandpipers give a dual wing or single wing 
display on leks on their breeding grounds in the Arctic tundra. During this 
display they raise their wing(s) and flash the bright white underwings to 
attract females. In addition they point their bill in the air and give a soft 
tick call. They sometimes give these display during migration. On May 11-12 
there were about fifty Buff-breasted Sandpipers on the Leonard sod farms and I 
was able to photograph, watch and hear several displaying and calling males. 


Here is the link to this gallery

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds


Jim Arterburn
Tulsa, Oklahoma
www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder
Subject: Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos
From: Sebastian <sebastianpatti AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 00:32:02 +0000
Those are just wonderful Jim...thanks for sharing!



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Jim Arterburn 
Date: 6/22/16 6:43 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos

OKBirds,

I have uploaded some photos of Buff-breasted Sandpipers performing their 
breeding display. Buff-breasted Sandpipers give a dual wing or single wing 
display on leks on their breeding grounds in the Arctic tundra. During this 
display they raise their wing(s) and flash the bright white underwings to 
attract females. In addition they point their bill in the air and give a soft 
tick call. They sometimes give these display during migration. On May 11-12 
there were about fifty Buff-breasted Sandpipers on the Leonard sod farms and I 
was able to photograph, watch and hear several displaying and calling males. 


Here is the link to this gallery

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds


Jim Arterburn
Tulsa, Oklahoma
www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder
Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpiper Breeding Display Photos
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 18:43:22 -0500
OKBirds,

 

I have uploaded some photos of Buff-breasted Sandpipers performing their
breeding display. Buff-breasted Sandpipers give a dual wing or single wing
display on leks on their breeding grounds in the Arctic tundra. During this
display they raise their wing(s) and flash the bright white underwings to
attract females. In addition they point their bill in the air and give a
soft tick call. They sometimes give these display during migration. On May
11-12 there were about fifty Buff-breasted Sandpipers on the Leonard sod
farms and I was able to photograph, watch and hear several displaying and
calling males. 

 

Here is the link to this gallery 

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 10:08:18 -0500
Purple Martins have been in serious decline for several decades and all the 
people that want martins will not get them. Those lucky enough to have them 
need to take care of them to keep them. The Purple Martin Conservation Society 
on-line has data and suggestions of how to manage your martins and how you 
might attract martins. Many factors are involved, poor box placement, owners of 
Martin boxes being wildlife slumlords and not caring for them, not getting rid 
of predators and competitors such as house sparrows and European starlings etc. 
By looking at the website you can decide what you need to do to alter the 
habitat situation. Gourds have a greater occupancy rate than the traditional 
martin boxes because martin gourds provide more distance from other occupants 
and can get 100% occupancy whereas traditional boxes usually get 75% or less. 


I have had Purple Martin boxes up for 25 years doing the right things and have 
not gotten nesting martins yet, only roosting young of the year Martins looking 
for a place to stay until they fly to Brazil. I wish you well in your efforts 
and martins need all the help they can get. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

From: Sarah A. FRANKLIN 
Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2016 9:37 AM
To: jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM ; ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20

We always had Martins in our house for the past forty years until 3 years ago. 
They don't even visit the house. Do you have any idea how we can get them back? 




On Tuesday, June 21, 2016 8:38 AM, Jerry Davis  wrote:





You have a housing shortage. There are 85 species of cavity nesting birds in 
the US and this problem is universal throughout the world. For cavity nesting 
birds when the nesting time comes and all pairs do not have the opportunity to 
nest, the season can be lost for these birds. I know that the Forest Service is 
broke with funds going west to fight fires and ODWC is understaffed and 
underfunded but it seems like there should be birders in Oklahoma interested in 
helping the birds with nest boxes for swallows and martins. They fly 2,000 
miles to nest and find no vacancies. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

From: David Arbour 
Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 10:39 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20

It was partly cloudy and hot on the bird survey today. 55 species were found. 
The dog days of summer seem to have set in and the birds are getting silent. 
Lots of young of the year are out now including some fledglings from our martin 
box. We placed the martin box out on the splitter levee between Lotus and 
Pintail lakes about 3 or 4 years ago but this is the first year martins used 
it. In the previous years it was used by Tree Swallows who fiercely defended it 
every time martins showed up to check it out, running the martins off. This 
year 3 pairs of martins showed up which was too many for the Tree Swallows to 
deal with so they gave up and all nested together. The swallows were in the 
vents in the attic accessed from the side of the box and the martins were in 
the main box. Interesting combination. Only 2 pairs of martins ended up nesting 
there but they had already won the battle with the Tree Swallows. Here is my 
list for today: 


Black-bellied Whistling Duck – 1
Wood Duck – 12
Pied-billed Grebe - 4
Neotropic Cormorant – 3
Anhinga – 13  
Least Bittern – 3 
Great-blue Heron - 7
Great Egret - 16
Little-blue Heron - 3
Cattle Egret - 2
Green Heron - 10
Black Vulture - 1
Turkey Vulture - 26
Cooper’s Hawk – 1
Broad-winged Hawk - 2
Purple Gallinule – 15 (also 2 broods of tiny young.)
Common Gallinule – 18 (also several broods of young.)
American Coot - 10
Mourning Dove – 8
Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 7
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3
Downy Woodpecker – 1
Eastern Phoebe - 1
Great-crested Flycatcher - 1
Eastern Kingbird - 3
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2
White-eyed Vireo - 12
Bell's Vireo - 4
Red-eyed Vireo - 4
Blue Jay - 3
American Crow - 6
Fish Crow - 6
Purple Martin - 8
Tree Swallow – 14
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1
Barn Swallow - 32
Tufted Titmouse - 5
Carolina Wren - 7
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 4
Eastern Bluebird - 2
Northern Mockingbird - 1
Pine warbler - 3
Prothonotary Warbler – 10
Common Yellowthroat - 8
Yellow-breasted Chat - 14
Summer Tanager - 1
Northern Cardinal – 21
Indigo Bunting - 28
Painted Bunting - 9
Dickcissel - 18
Red-winged Blackbird – 27
Common Grackle - 6
Brown-headed Cowbird – 1
Orchard Oriole - 3
Baltimore Oriole – 2


Odonates:

Lilypad Forktail
Common Green Darner
Regal Darner
Cyrano Darner
Prince Baskettail
Mocha Emerald
Stillwater Clubtail
Halloween Pennant
Four-spotted Pennant
Eastern Pondhawk
Slaty Skimmer
Blue Dasher
Widow Skimmer
Common Whitetail
Spot-winged Glider
Carolina Saddlebags
Black Saddlebags


Herps:

American Alligator
Red-eared Slider
Blanchard's Cricket Frog
Green Treefrog
Bronze Frog
Bullfrog



Good birding!

David Arbour
De Queen, AR



Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 08:34:20 -0500
You have a housing shortage. There are 85 species of cavity nesting birds and 
this problem is universal throughout the world. For cavity nesting birds when 
the nesting time comes and all do not have the opportunity to nest, the season 
can be lost for these birds. I know that the Forest Service is broke with funds 
going west to fight fires and ODWC is understaffed and underfunded but it seems 
like there should be birders in Oklahoma interested in helping the birds with 
nest boxes for swallows and martins. They fly 2,000 miles to nest and find no 
vacancies. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

From: David Arbour 
Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 10:39 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20

It was partly cloudy and hot on the bird survey today. 55 species were found. 
The dog days of summer seem to have set in and the birds are getting silent. 
Lots of young of the year are out now including some fledglings from our martin 
box. We placed the martin box out on the splitter levee between Lotus and 
Pintail lakes about 3 or 4 years ago but this is the first year martins used 
it. In the previous years it was used by Tree Swallows who fiercely defended it 
every time martins showed up to check it out, running the martins off. This 
year 3 pairs of martins showed up which was too many for the Tree Swallows to 
deal with so they gave up and all nested together. The swallows were in the 
vents in the attic accessed from the side of the box and the martins were in 
the main box. Interesting combination. Only 2 pairs of martins ended up nesting 
there but they had already won the battle with the Tree Swallows. Here is my 
list for today: 


 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck – 1

Wood Duck – 12

Pied-billed Grebe - 4

Neotropic Cormorant – 3

Anhinga – 13  

Least Bittern – 3 

Great-blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 16

Little-blue Heron - 3

Cattle Egret - 2

Green Heron - 10

Black Vulture - 1

Turkey Vulture - 26

Cooper’s Hawk – 1

Broad-winged Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule – 15 (also 2 broods of tiny young.)

Common Gallinule – 18 (also several broods of young.)

American Coot - 10

Mourning Dove – 8

Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 7

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Downy Woodpecker – 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 12

Bell's Vireo - 4

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 6

Fish Crow - 6

Purple Martin - 8

Tree Swallow – 14

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 32

Tufted Titmouse - 5

Carolina Wren - 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 4

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Pine warbler - 3

Prothonotary Warbler – 10

Common Yellowthroat - 8

Yellow-breasted Chat - 14

Summer Tanager - 1

Northern Cardinal – 21

Indigo Bunting - 28

Painted Bunting - 9

Dickcissel - 18

Red-winged Blackbird – 27

Common Grackle - 6

Brown-headed Cowbird – 1

Orchard Oriole - 3

Baltimore Oriole – 2

 

 

Odonates:

 

Lilypad Forktail

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Mocha Emerald

Stillwater Clubtail

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Spot-winged Glider

Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 22:39:58 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot on the bird survey today.  55 species were
found.  The dog days of summer seem to have set in and the birds are getting
silent.  Lots of young of the year are out now including some fledglings
from our martin box.  We placed the martin box out on the splitter levee
between Lotus and Pintail lakes about 3 or 4 years ago but this is the first
year martins used it.  In the previous years it was used by Tree Swallows
who fiercely defended it every time martins showed up to check it out,
running the martins off.  This year 3 pairs of martins showed up which was
too many for the Tree Swallows to deal with so they gave up and all nested
together.  The swallows were in the vents in the attic accessed from the
side of the box and the martins were in the main box.  Interesting
combination.  Only 2 pairs of martins ended up nesting there but they had
already won the battle with the Tree Swallows.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 1

Wood Duck - 12

Pied-billed Grebe - 4

Neotropic Cormorant - 3

Anhinga - 13  

Least Bittern - 3 

Great-blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 16

Little-blue Heron - 3

Cattle Egret - 2

Green Heron - 10

Black Vulture - 1

Turkey Vulture - 26

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Broad-winged Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 15 (also 2 broods of tiny young.)

Common Gallinule - 18 (also several broods of young.)

American Coot - 10

Mourning Dove - 8

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 7

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 12

Bell's Vireo - 4

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 6

Fish Crow - 6

Purple Martin - 8

Tree Swallow - 14

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 32

Tufted Titmouse - 5

Carolina Wren - 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Pine warbler - 3

Prothonotary Warbler - 10

Common Yellowthroat - 8

Yellow-breasted Chat - 14

Summer Tanager - 1

Northern Cardinal - 21

Indigo Bunting - 28

Painted Bunting - 9

Dickcissel - 18

Red-winged Blackbird - 27

Common Grackle - 6

Brown-headed Cowbird - 1

Orchard Oriole - 3

Baltimore Oriole - 2

 

 

Odonates:

 

Lilypad Forktail

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Mocha Emerald

Stillwater Clubtail

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Spot-winged Glider

Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: This morning on Suoth Jenkins
From: rgunn1 <rgunn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 22:20:24 -0500
Along with virtually no other birds--two Black Vultures.

D.
Subject: Re: FW: eBird Report - Joe B. Barnes Park, Jun 19, 2016
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 13:58:52 -0500
Jimmy,

You have great lists even on a bike ride.  Congratulations and
thanks--helps me understand what my old eyes and ears are missing in our
neighborhood!.

John Shackford
Edmond

On Sun, Jun 19, 2016 at 12:50 PM, Jimmy Woodard  wrote:

>                 A few observations from a morning ride around the park.
>
>         Jimmy Woodard
>         Midwest City, OK
>
>
> Joe B. Barnes Park, Oklahoma, Oklahoma, US Jun 19, 2016 7:30 AM
> Protocol: Incidental
> Comments:     rode my bike around the park.
> 39 species
>
> Mallard  8
> Turkey Vulture  1
> Mississippi Kite  4
> Red-shouldered Hawk  1
> Eurasian Collared-Dove  6
> Mourning Dove  3
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
> Chimney Swift  5
> Belted Kingfisher  1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
> Downy Woodpecker  2
> Eastern Phoebe  3
> Great Crested Flycatcher  2
> Western Kingbird  2
> Eastern Kingbird  2
> Red-eyed Vireo  3
> Blue Jay  3
> American Crow  6
> Barn Swallow  5
> Carolina Chickadee  2
> Tufted Titmouse  1
> House Wren  1
> Carolina Wren  3
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  2
> Eastern Bluebird  4
> American Robin  2
> Brown Thrasher  2
> Northern Mockingbird  3
> European Starling  15
> Summer Tanager  1
> Northern Cardinal  10
> Indigo Bunting  3
> Red-winged Blackbird  2
> Great-tailed Grackle  15
> Brown-headed Cowbird  5
> Baltimore Oriole  2
> House Finch  4
> American Goldfinch  2
> House Sparrow  10
>
> View this checklist online at
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30302334
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
>
Subject: Belated report - Cave Swallow at Red Slough
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 21:31:34 -0500
This past Thursday while I was touring a birder from NYC, we encountered a
juvenile Cave Swallow on Fossil Valley Rd. (formerly Appleberry Ln.) next to
unit 13.  We also had most of the usual good wetland birds including an
American Bittern.

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR
Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 13 - corrections!
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 21:25:35 -0500
There's a typo.  Should have read 73 species rather than 3.  Also, my
internet was down when I sent this last week but it didn't send until today
when my service came back up.

 

David

 

From: David Arbour [mailto:arbour AT windstream.net] 
Sent: Saturday, June 18, 2016 5:00 PM
To: OKBIRDS 
Cc: ARBirds-L 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 13

 

It was overcast, mild, and rainy on the survey today turning partly cloudy
near the end of the survey.  3 species were found.  Here is my list for
today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 9

Wood Duck - 7

Northern Bobwhite - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 7

Neotropic Cormorant - 7

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 13  (also several nests with downy young.)

American Bittern - 1

Least Bittern - 3 adults (also 1 downy juvenile.)

Great-blue Heron - 9

Great Egret - 44

Snowy Egret - 1

Little-blue Heron - 10

Cattle Egret - 17

Green Heron - 12

Black Vulture - 5

Turkey Vulture - 9

Mississippi Kite - 2

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red Shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 13

Common Gallinule - 19

American Coot - 7

Least Tern - 2

Mourning Dove - 15

Rock Pigeon - 3

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 9

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 2

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 10

Bell's Vireo - 1

Yellow-throated Vireo - 3

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 7

Fish Crow - 1

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 14

Barn Swallow - 18

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren - 11

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 9

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 5

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 7

Yellow-breasted Chat - 7

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Lark Sparrow - 4

Northern Cardinal - 21

Blue Grosbeak - 3

Indigo Bunting - 17

Painted Bunting - 5

Dickcissel - 13

Red-winged Blackbird - 24

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 17

Brown-headed Cowbird - 13

Orchard Oriole - 1

Baltimore Oriole - 1

House Sparrow - 1

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Blue Dasher

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Western Cottonmouth

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Gray Treefrog

Cajun Chorus Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Bird list serve
From: Dora Webb <owl112 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 20:01:43 -0500
I'm no longer receiving mail from ok birds. Is the list still up and sending? I 
really miss it. 

Dora Webb
Owl112 AT  cox.net


Sent from my iPad
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 13
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 16:59:55 -0500
It was overcast, mild, and rainy on the survey today turning partly cloudy
near the end of the survey.  3 species were found.  Here is my list for
today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 9

Wood Duck - 7

Northern Bobwhite - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 7

Neotropic Cormorant - 7

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 13  (also several nests with downy young.)

American Bittern - 1

Least Bittern - 3 adults (also 1 downy juvenile.)

Great-blue Heron - 9

Great Egret - 44

Snowy Egret - 1

Little-blue Heron - 10

Cattle Egret - 17

Green Heron - 12

Black Vulture - 5

Turkey Vulture - 9

Mississippi Kite - 2

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red Shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 13

Common Gallinule - 19

American Coot - 7

Least Tern - 2

Mourning Dove - 15

Rock Pigeon - 3

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 9

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 2

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 10

Bell's Vireo - 1

Yellow-throated Vireo - 3

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 7

Fish Crow - 1

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 14

Barn Swallow - 18

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren - 11

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 9

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 5

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 7

Yellow-breasted Chat - 7

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Lark Sparrow - 4

Northern Cardinal - 21

Blue Grosbeak - 3

Indigo Bunting - 17

Painted Bunting - 5

Dickcissel - 13

Red-winged Blackbird - 24

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 17

Brown-headed Cowbird - 13

Orchard Oriole - 1

Baltimore Oriole - 1

House Sparrow - 1

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Blue Dasher

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Western Cottonmouth

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Gray Treefrog

Cajun Chorus Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 20:38:03 -0500
Double cool with a Mt. Plover, etc., Doug, Pete and Carter

John Shackford
Edmond,

On Sun, Jun 12, 2016 at 3:25 PM, Doug Wood  wrote:

> Thanks Pete. We found 2nd Lazuli Bunting male this morning; chasing each
> other.  Doug.
>
>
> Sent via the Samsung GALAXY S®4, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Pete Janzen
> Date:06/11/2016 5:38 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Major County BBS route last Saturday
>
> Doug
>
> I had an interesting conversation with Duane Nelson at the CFO meeting in
> Lamar.  Summer Tanager has colonized a number of new areas as a breeding
> species in SE Colorado, especially in Bent and Las Animas Counties.  Kevin
> Groeneweg and I had two or three of them at Cottonwood Canyon in Baca Co.,
> Colorado on May 5.  Two males were counter-singing.  surely these are all
> the western subspecies and the photos we took appeared to buttress that
> supposition.
>
> If you want to look for the Black Phoebe, from the tri-state marker head
> north into Colorado.  The road turns east after 1.5 miles and becomes Road
> C.  After less than a mile, there is a low-water bridge where it crosses
> the creek and they were building the nest under the bridge.  Not in the
> Okie Motherland but damn close.  Really surprised us.
>
> Pete
>
> On 6/11/2016 5:16 PM, Doug Wood wrote:
>
> Pete, cool report.  Bill Carter and I are at Hoot Owl currently while I
> complete my Cimarron county routes (Felt and Keyes).  The male Summer
> Tanager at Hoot Owl has a girlfriend now.  Male Lazuli Bunting has been
> singing around the cabins for 3 days now - very cool.  Two male Vermilion
> Flycatchers in Kenton still.  One Mountain Plover on Keyes route this
> morning.  Burrowung Owls numerous and lots of Cassin's Sparrows on the
> routes.  Doug.
>
>
>
>
> --
> Pete Janzen Wichita, KS pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net
>
Subject: Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday
From: Doug Wood <DWood AT SE.EDU>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 20:25:19 +0000
Thanks Pete. We found 2nd Lazuli Bunting male this morning; chasing each other. 
Doug. 



Sent via the Samsung GALAXY S4, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Pete Janzen
Date:06/11/2016 5:38 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Major County BBS route last Saturday

Doug

I had an interesting conversation with Duane Nelson at the CFO meeting in 
Lamar. Summer Tanager has colonized a number of new areas as a breeding species 
in SE Colorado, especially in Bent and Las Animas Counties. Kevin Groeneweg and 
I had two or three of them at Cottonwood Canyon in Baca Co., Colorado on May 5. 
Two males were counter-singing. surely these are all the western subspecies and 
the photos we took appeared to buttress that supposition. 


If you want to look for the Black Phoebe, from the tri-state marker head north 
into Colorado. The road turns east after 1.5 miles and becomes Road C. After 
less than a mile, there is a low-water bridge where it crosses the creek and 
they were building the nest under the bridge. Not in the Okie Motherland but 
damn close. Really surprised us. 


Pete

On 6/11/2016 5:16 PM, Doug Wood wrote:
Pete, cool report. Bill Carter and I are at Hoot Owl currently while I complete 
my Cimarron county routes (Felt and Keyes). The male Summer Tanager at Hoot Owl 
has a girlfriend now. Male Lazuli Bunting has been singing around the cabins 
for 3 days now - very cool. Two male Vermilion Flycatchers in Kenton still. One 
Mountain Plover on Keyes route this morning. Burrowung Owls numerous and lots 
of Cassin's Sparrows on the routes. Doug. 






--
Pete Janzen Wichita, KS 
pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net 
Subject: Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday
From: Pete Janzen <pete.janzen AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 17:38:44 -0500
Doug

I had an interesting conversation with Duane Nelson at the CFO meeting 
in Lamar.  Summer Tanager has colonized a number of new areas as a 
breeding species in SE Colorado, especially in Bent and Las Animas 
Counties.  Kevin Groeneweg and I had two or three of them at Cottonwood 
Canyon in Baca Co., Colorado on May 5.  Two males were counter-singing.  
surely these are all the western subspecies and the photos we took 
appeared to buttress that supposition.

If you want to look for the Black Phoebe, from the tri-state marker head 
north into Colorado.  The road turns east after 1.5 miles and becomes 
Road C.  After less than a mile, there is a low-water bridge where it 
crosses the creek and they were building the nest under the bridge.  Not 
in the Okie Motherland but damn close.  Really surprised us.

Pete

On 6/11/2016 5:16 PM, Doug Wood wrote:
> Pete, cool report.  Bill Carter and I are at Hoot Owl currently while 
> I complete my Cimarron county routes (Felt and Keyes).  The male 
> Summer Tanager at Hoot Owl has a girlfriend now.  Male Lazuli Bunting 
> has been singing around the cabins for 3 days now - very cool.  Two 
> male Vermilion Flycatchers in Kenton still.  One Mountain Plover on 
> Keyes route this morning.  Burrowung Owls numerous and lots of 
> Cassin's Sparrows on the routes.  Doug.
>
>


-- 
Pete Janzen Wichita, KS pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net
Subject: Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday
From: Doug Wood <DWood AT SE.EDU>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 22:16:20 +0000
Pete, cool report. Bill Carter and I are at Hoot Owl currently while I complete 
my Cimarron county routes (Felt and Keyes). The male Summer Tanager at Hoot Owl 
has a girlfriend now. Male Lazuli Bunting has been singing around the cabins 
for 3 days now - very cool. Two male Vermilion Flycatchers in Kenton still. One 
Mountain Plover on Keyes route this morning. Burrowung Owls numerous and lots 
of Cassin's Sparrows on the routes. Doug. 



Sent via the Samsung GALAXY S4, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Pete Janzen
Date:06/11/2016 6:54 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Major County BBS route last Saturday

I just thought I would post a few comments about the BBS route I ran in
Major Co. last Saturday.  I found 49 species of birds. This is an
interesting route that starts just north of Seiling and goes north to
Lone Mountain.  Dickcissels were in absolutely unprecedented numbers
with 90 seen at 27 stops.  I think in some drought years there have only
been 5 or so.  N. Bobwhite was the second most numerous species with 87
seen at 41 stops.  Cassin's Sparrow was absent for the first time ever
on this route.  Birds new to the count were Barred Owl and
Black-and-White Warbler. These were both seen early in the route in oak
habitat within the North Canadian watershed.  I found Rufous-crowned
Sparrow at four stops.  About 19 years ago the major Chester Fire burned
about 30 square miles and huge stands of red cedar were destroyed.
Following that event, I started seeing a few Rufous-crowns at Stop 42,
which is marked in e-bird as the "Bluffs on Griever Creek". This year I
was really surprised to find them at some other stops as well.  At
several of these I was able to record video of singing males.  At Stop
22 (after the 3 minutes were up) I got the best video and after I played
a recording of the song two more RCSP popped up out of nearby thickets.
I believe that the major rains of this past May, combined with the
longer-term changes resulting from the fire have created favorable
breeding conditions for this species.  There are probably quite a number
of them breeding in the Gloss Mountains region this summer.  Several
other species were more numerous than usual, including Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher and Common Nighthawk.

I am probably retiring from this route as it is well over 200 miles from
my home and additionally I believe that next year the second Kansas
Breeding Bird Atlas will commence, taking a lot of my discretionary
time.  This route has been really fascinating to me and I sincerely hope
that someone steps up to continue this route.  Please contact me if you
are interested and want to know anything more about the route.

As I have just returned to this listserv after a long hiatus, I thought
I would report briefly a few things from a visit to Black Mesa in the
first week of May.  Migrants were notably scarce.  We found a total of
five Black-throated Sparrows (all singing males) at the Easter Pageant
area.  There was a singing Summer Tanager at the Hoot Owl Ranch.  There
was a pair of Vermillion Flycatchers in Kenton and another pair at Black
Mesa St Park.  A Great Egret was at Lake Etling.  Perhaps most notably
was a Black Phoebe seen just 2 miles north of the state line along
Carrizo Creek, paired with an Eastern/Black Phoebe hybrid.  They were
constructing a nest under a low-water bridge.  This species should be
looked for along the creek on the Oklahoma side of the state line and
probably at Lake Etling as well.  I was told by friends in Colorado that
Black Phoebe has been expanding in numbers and in geographical range
along the Front Range in Colorado in recent years.

Best regards to my Oklahoma birding friends, many of whom I have not
seen in person for a long, long time.

--
Pete Janzen Wichita, KS pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net
Subject: Re: Major County BBS route last Saturday
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 15:13:58 -0500
Thanks, Pete, for a great email!

John Shackford
Edmond

On Sat, Jun 11, 2016 at 6:44 AM, Pete Janzen 
wrote:

> I just thought I would post a few comments about the BBS route I ran in
> Major Co. last Saturday.  I found 49 species of birds. This is an
> interesting route that starts just north of Seiling and goes north to Lone
> Mountain.  Dickcissels were in absolutely unprecedented numbers with 90
> seen at 27 stops.  I think in some drought years there have only been 5 or
> so.  N. Bobwhite was the second most numerous species with 87 seen at 41
> stops.  Cassin's Sparrow was absent for the first time ever on this route.
> Birds new to the count were Barred Owl and Black-and-White Warbler. These
> were both seen early in the route in oak habitat within the North Canadian
> watershed.  I found Rufous-crowned Sparrow at four stops.  About 19 years
> ago the major Chester Fire burned about 30 square miles and huge stands of
> red cedar were destroyed. Following that event, I started seeing a few
> Rufous-crowns at Stop 42, which is marked in e-bird as the "Bluffs on
> Griever Creek". This year I was really surprised to find them at some other
> stops as well.  At several of these I was able to record video of singing
> males.  At Stop 22 (after the 3 minutes were up) I got the best video and
> after I played a recording of the song two more RCSP popped up out of
> nearby thickets.  I believe that the major rains of this past May, combined
> with the longer-term changes resulting from the fire have created favorable
> breeding conditions for this species.  There are probably quite a number of
> them breeding in the Gloss Mountains region this summer.  Several other
> species were more numerous than usual, including Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
> and Common Nighthawk.
>
> I am probably retiring from this route as it is well over 200 miles from
> my home and additionally I believe that next year the second Kansas
> Breeding Bird Atlas will commence, taking a lot of my discretionary time.
> This route has been really fascinating to me and I sincerely hope that
> someone steps up to continue this route.  Please contact me if you are
> interested and want to know anything more about the route.
>
> As I have just returned to this listserv after a long hiatus, I thought I
> would report briefly a few things from a visit to Black Mesa in the first
> week of May.  Migrants were notably scarce.  We found a total of five
> Black-throated Sparrows (all singing males) at the Easter Pageant area.
> There was a singing Summer Tanager at the Hoot Owl Ranch.  There was a pair
> of Vermillion Flycatchers in Kenton and another pair at Black Mesa St
> Park.  A Great Egret was at Lake Etling.  Perhaps most notably was a Black
> Phoebe seen just 2 miles north of the state line along Carrizo Creek,
> paired with an Eastern/Black Phoebe hybrid.  They were constructing a nest
> under a low-water bridge.  This species should be looked for along the
> creek on the Oklahoma side of the state line and probably at Lake Etling as
> well.  I was told by friends in Colorado that Black Phoebe has been
> expanding in numbers and in geographical range along the Front Range in
> Colorado in recent years.
>
> Best regards to my Oklahoma birding friends, many of whom I have not seen
> in person for a long, long time.
>
> --
> Pete Janzen Wichita, KS pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net
>
Subject: Re: Oklahoma Bird Pictures
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 18:57:32 +0000
Wow, Some pretty serious photo time.  
         Great series Ken. 
CHEERS,                     JOE Grzybowski
 

 On Friday, June 10, 2016 9:54 PM, Ken or Carol Williams 
 wrote: 

 

 Fellow Birders,

Now that migration for this spring has ended, I have had time to catch 
up on my extensive backlog of spring pictures.  I was way behind.  
Anyway, if anyone is interested in seeing a lot of bird pictures check 
out my Recent Folder. http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures

This folder includes pictures of Oklahoma birds plus the following sub 
folders.

I had previously posted about the Hudsonian Godwits, I found at 
Hackberry Flats in May.  Pictures of them plus other pictures from the 
trip can be seen in my Recent Folder at 

http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/hackberry_flats__wichita_mountains_nwr_spring_2016 


Also, included in Recent Folder are spring pictures from our Black Mesa 
trip  http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/black_mesa__may_2016

And a folder on the mating courtship display of Buff-breasted Sandpipers 
at the Leonard Sod Farms 
http://www.pcom/kcswildshots/buffbreasted_sandpiper_courtship_displaying

Ken Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots


  
Subject: Correction: date of Chester Fire
From: Pete Janzen <pete.janzen AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 06:46:55 -0500
I did a typo, the Chester fire was in 2009.  Here is a link to an 
article about it 
https://agblog.ok.gov/2009/07/13/update-on-chester-fire-in-major-county/
-- 
Pete Janzen Wichita, KS pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net
Subject: Major County BBS route last Saturday
From: Pete Janzen <pete.janzen AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 06:44:26 -0500
I just thought I would post a few comments about the BBS route I ran in 
Major Co. last Saturday.  I found 49 species of birds. This is an 
interesting route that starts just north of Seiling and goes north to 
Lone Mountain.  Dickcissels were in absolutely unprecedented numbers 
with 90 seen at 27 stops.  I think in some drought years there have only 
been 5 or so.  N. Bobwhite was the second most numerous species with 87 
seen at 41 stops.  Cassin's Sparrow was absent for the first time ever 
on this route.  Birds new to the count were Barred Owl and 
Black-and-White Warbler. These were both seen early in the route in oak 
habitat within the North Canadian watershed.  I found Rufous-crowned 
Sparrow at four stops.  About 19 years ago the major Chester Fire burned 
about 30 square miles and huge stands of red cedar were destroyed. 
Following that event, I started seeing a few Rufous-crowns at Stop 42, 
which is marked in e-bird as the "Bluffs on Griever Creek". This year I 
was really surprised to find them at some other stops as well.  At 
several of these I was able to record video of singing males.  At Stop 
22 (after the 3 minutes were up) I got the best video and after I played 
a recording of the song two more RCSP popped up out of nearby thickets.  
I believe that the major rains of this past May, combined with the 
longer-term changes resulting from the fire have created favorable 
breeding conditions for this species.  There are probably quite a number 
of them breeding in the Gloss Mountains region this summer.  Several 
other species were more numerous than usual, including Scissor-tailed 
Flycatcher and Common Nighthawk.

I am probably retiring from this route as it is well over 200 miles from 
my home and additionally I believe that next year the second Kansas 
Breeding Bird Atlas will commence, taking a lot of my discretionary 
time.  This route has been really fascinating to me and I sincerely hope 
that someone steps up to continue this route.  Please contact me if you 
are interested and want to know anything more about the route.

As I have just returned to this listserv after a long hiatus, I thought 
I would report briefly a few things from a visit to Black Mesa in the 
first week of May.  Migrants were notably scarce.  We found a total of 
five Black-throated Sparrows (all singing males) at the Easter Pageant 
area.  There was a singing Summer Tanager at the Hoot Owl Ranch.  There 
was a pair of Vermillion Flycatchers in Kenton and another pair at Black 
Mesa St Park.  A Great Egret was at Lake Etling.  Perhaps most notably 
was a Black Phoebe seen just 2 miles north of the state line along 
Carrizo Creek, paired with an Eastern/Black Phoebe hybrid.  They were 
constructing a nest under a low-water bridge.  This species should be 
looked for along the creek on the Oklahoma side of the state line and 
probably at Lake Etling as well.  I was told by friends in Colorado that 
Black Phoebe has been expanding in numbers and in geographical range 
along the Front Range in Colorado in recent years.

Best regards to my Oklahoma birding friends, many of whom I have not 
seen in person for a long, long time.

-- 
Pete Janzen Wichita, KS pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net
Subject: Oklahoma Bird Pictures
From: Ken or Carol Williams <kcwilliams AT TULSACONNECT.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 21:53:42 -0500
Fellow Birders,

Now that migration for this spring has ended, I have had time to catch 
up on my extensive backlog of spring pictures.  I was way behind.  
Anyway, if anyone is interested in seeing a lot of bird pictures check 
out my Recent Folder. http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures

This folder includes pictures of Oklahoma birds plus the following sub 
folders.

I had previously posted about the Hudsonian Godwits, I found at 
Hackberry Flats in May.  Pictures of them plus other pictures from the 
trip can be seen in my Recent Folder at 

http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/hackberry_flats__wichita_mountains_nwr_spring_2016 


Also, included in Recent Folder are spring pictures from our Black Mesa 
trip  http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/black_mesa__may_2016

And a folder on the mating courtship display of Buff-breasted Sandpipers 
at the Leonard Sod Farms 
http://www.pcom/kcswildshots/buffbreasted_sandpiper_courtship_displaying

Ken Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots
Subject: Looking for young naturalists
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 14:20:04 -0500
The Arkansas Audubon Society has several places available in the June 19-24
session of its outstanding Halberg Ecology Camp.  The camp is for 11or 12
year old kids who are interested in the natural environment.  It features
hands-on experiences in ornithology, mammalogy, herpetology, botany,
geology and aquatic biology as well as recreational activities such as
canoeing, swimming and volleyball. The camp is held at a National Forest
Service facility near Hot Springs Arkansas.  The campers need not be from
Arkansas and financial assistance is available.  For more information click
on the Halberg Ecology Camp link at the Arkansas Audubon Society website,
www.arbirds.org or contact Camp Executive Director, Tamzen Tumlison,
ttumlison AT gmail.com.

Ann Gordon, Ecology Camp Co-Chair
Subject: Fw: Tribute to Phoebe Snetsinger (google)
From: Sebastian <sebastianpatti AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 14:19:27 +0000
FYI.


From the Missouri List-serve . . . today's Google doodle. . .


sebastianpatti AT hotmail.com
Sebastian T. Patti
(Lincoln Park)
Chicago, ILLINOIS 60614-3354
PHONE: 312/325-9555 (o) 773/248-0570 (h)
CELL: 773/304-7488
FAX: 312/325-9017(o)


________________________________
From: Missouri Wild Bird Forum  on behalf of Edge 
Wade  

Sent: Thursday, June 9, 2016 7:07 AM
To: MOBIRDS-L AT PO.MISSOURI.EDU
Subject: Tribute to Phoebe Snetsinger (google)

Mobirders,

This would have been Phoebe Snetsinger's 85th birthday. She is the featured 
person for today's Google Doodle. Good brief article 



http://www.cnet.com/news/google-doodle-goes-to-the-birds-for-birdwatcher-phoebe-snetsinger/ 



[https://cnet1.cbsistatic.com/hub/i/r/2016/06/08/1ecf8a6b-94a3-4e6a-a766-ea6b42f83ad8/thumbnail/670x503/078306225e7c429bcd883108133afc29/snetsinger.gif] 


Google Doodle goes to the birds for bird-watcher Phoebe 
Snetsinger 

www.cnet.com
By the time of her death, Snetsinger had seen 8,398 species of birds.



and, if you click on remembering her life with a special 
Doodle within 
the article, you'll see the doodle featuring 5 bird species special to her. 


Edge Wade
Columbia, MO
edgew AT mchsi.com

________________________________
The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
Archives / Subscription 
options / ASM 
Website / Email the list 
owners 


ABA Birding Code of Ethics

ASM Fall Meeting: September 23-25, 2016 at Camp Clover Point, Lake of the 
Ozarks State Park, Kaiser, MO Details and Online 
Registration 
Subject: Re: Out of state birder coming to OK in late June
From: larrymays1949 <larrymays1949 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 21:35:51 -0400
  What birds are on your wish list?  If I'm back, or on my way back, I'll 
absolutely let you know. 

  Trinidad & Tobago were pretty good to me. Got 93 lifers.  Also picked up 23 
ABA birds before I left.  

  Bad news was I got my car broken into while I was photographing a Mangrove 
Cuckoo.  Pretty expensive lifer, lol. 



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note® II, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Andrew Barndt
Date:06/06/2016 8:19 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Out of state birder coming to OK in late June
Any others? Definitely could use more responses; remember that even if you aren't able to physically guide me around, an email with info that only a local knowledge could give is also greatly appreciated. Thanks! Andrew Barndt andrew.barndt AT gmail.com CAPS LOCK IS NOT CRUISE CONTROL FOR AWESOME YOU GUYS - Patrick Shipsey
Subject: Re: Out of state birder coming to OK in late June
From: Andrew Barndt <andrew.barndt AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 20:19:17 -0400
Any others? Definitely could use more responses; remember that even if you
aren't able to physically guide me around, an email with info that only a
local knowledge could give is also greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

Andrew Barndt
andrew.barndt AT gmail.com

CAPS LOCK IS NOT CRUISE CONTROL FOR AWESOME YOU GUYS - Patrick Shipsey
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 2
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2016 22:40:45 -0500
It was overcast, mild, and windy, with several showers on the bird survey
today.  74 species were found.  Migration is basically over and we are
settling into a summer pattern.  I heard a commotion today and turned and
looked and saw about 8 Tree Swallows having a territorial dispute over the
water and as I watched two birds locked onto each other and fell into the
water where they continued to fight each other in the water for at least
30-40 seconds.  There just happened to be passing by at that moment about 15
feet away an alligator about 5 ft. in length.  He suddenly changed direction
and headed for the fighting birds in the water.  Just as the gator reached
them and made a grab for them the two bird broke apart and flew away.  The
gator missed them by an inch.  I thought they were goners.  I was amazed
that the birds could lift off the water so quick after having been in it for
as long as they were.  Here is my list for today:

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 5
Canada Goose - 2 adults with brood.
Wood Duck - 7
Pied-billed Grebe - 4
Neotropic Cormorant - 4 (also several near fledging young in a couple
nests.)
Double-crested Cormorant - 1
Anhinga - 21 (Several sitting on nests.)
Least Bittern - 4
Great-blue Heron - 8
Great Egret - 22
Snowy Egret - 3
Cattle Egret - 1
Green Heron - 7
Black Vulture - 4
Turkey Vulture - 19
Mississippi Kite - 3
Red Shouldered Hawk - 1
Purple Gallinule - 9
Common Gallinule - 12
American Coot - 5
Killdeer - 1
Least Tern - 1
Mourning Dove - 13
Eurasian Collared-Dove - 1
Rock Pigeon - 2
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 3
Barred Owl - 1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2
Downy Woodpecker - 3
Willow Flycatcher - 1 (calling on nesting territory)
Eastern Phoebe - 2
Great-crested Flycatcher - 2
Eastern Kingbird - 4
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 5
White-eyed Vireo - 7
Bell's Vireo - 3
Yellow-throated Vireo - 1
Red-eyed Vireo - 4
Blue Jay - 1
American Crow - 6
Fish Crow - 1
Purple Martin - 2
Tree Swallow - 21
Cliff Swallow - 6
Barn Swallow - 14
Carolina Chickadee - 2
Tufted Titmouse - 5
Carolina Wren - 5
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3
Eastern Bluebird - 8
Wood Thrush - 1
Northern Mockingbird - 4
Yellow-throated Warbler - 1
Pine warbler - 2
Prairie Warbler - 1
Black-and-white Warbler - 1
Prothonotary Warbler - 4
Kentucky Warbler - 2
Common Yellowthroat - 3
Yellow-breasted Chat - 8
Summer Tanager - 5
Eastern Towhee - 2
Lark Sparrow - 2
Northern Cardinal - 13
Blue Grosbeak - 2
Indigo Bunting - 15
Painted Bunting - 2
Dickcissel - 19
Red-winged Blackbird - 35
Common Grackle - 39
Brown-headed Cowbird - 13
Baltimore Oriole - 1
House Sparrow - 1


Odonates:

Eastern Pondhawk
Blue Dasher
Common Whitetail


Herps:

American Alligator
Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad
Blanchard's Cricket Frog
Green Treefrog
Bronze Frog
Bullfrog



Good birding!

David Arbour
De Queen, AR
















Subject: Hackberry Flat yesterday with stop at the Wichitas
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2016 11:56:05 -0500
Lonnie Gamble and I birded Hackberry Flat yesterday afternoon.  Best
birds we found were:

Two American Golden Plovers, one in glorious breeding plumage (many
photos made!!) but far out in a flooded field, just south of the south
boundary road, west of the (now mostly dead) willow tree row,

A single Hudsonian Godwit (photos)

At least 4 Snowy Plovers (no photos)

A possible Dunlin in basic plumage (photo sent for verification)

Ducks we saw: Redheads, Mallards, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Pintails

One adult and 2 juvenile Black-crowned Night Herons

American White Pelican standing in the grass next to the canal just
south of the Weir unit with a WF Ibis and a Snowy Egret.

Lots of ibis, A. Avocets (some with chicks), Black-necked Stilts.

We visited Wichita Mountains NWR in the morning and attempted to get
photos of Cave Swallows (attempt in futility) and Black-capped Vireos
(ditto).  Saw both species but photos are still in the future!

We did see and hear many Rufous-crowned Sparrows (photos are poor,
heavy overcast).

Matt Jung, OKC
Subject: Re: June Migration Report
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2016 12:42:06 -0500
Sharon

These are the nonbreeders (first year birds) returning. They don't go all the 
way to the breeding grounds. This goes for most of the shorebirds. In fact you 
can often find nonbreeders of several shorebird species at the Salt Plains NWR 
or other good sites all summer. 


Jim

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 1, 2016, at 12:03 PM, Sharon Henthorn  wrote:
> 
> Problem with the report. How can lesser yellowlegs arrive by late June and 
depart by early June? 

> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> On Jun 1, 2016, at 11:23 AM, Patricia Velte  wrote:
> 
> Dear OKBirders,
>  
> A much shorter list this month! Below are the arrival and departure lists for 
June. 

>  
> ARRIVALS
>  
> Wood Stork June 7 - Johnston and Marshall Cos. Only in SC; Bryan, Choctaw and 
S. McCurtain Cos. Only in SE 

> Roseate Spoonbill June 7 - Rare in Johnston and Marshall Cos. Only in SC; 
Rare in S. McCurtain Co. only in SE; Rare in Bryan Co. only in SE 

> Greater Yellowlegs                          June 28 - ALL
> Lesser Yellowlegs                             June 26 - ALL
> Upland Sandpiper June 22 - NW, SW, C, SC, SE 

> Cave Swallow June 30 - SE rare in south McCurtain co only 

>  
> DEPARTURES
>  
> Eared Grebe                                      June 1 - ALL
> Swainson's Hawk                             June 1 - SE
> Spotted Sandpiper                          June 4 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Lesser Yellowlegs June 1 - NW, C, SC, NE and June 4 - PAN, SW, SE 

> Ruddy Turnstone June 1 - NW west to Alfalfa, Major and Blaine Cos. Only, SW 
west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman Cos. Only, C, SC, NE, SE 

> Stilt Sandpiper                                   June 1 - ALL
> Sanderling                                           June 1 - ALL
> American Golden-Plover              June 1 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Forster's Tern                                    June 1 - PAN, NW, SW
> Least Sandpiper                                June 7 - PAN
> White-rumped Sandpiper            June 20 - ALL
> Pectoral Sandpiper                          June 12 - ALL
> Semipalmated Sandpiper             June 5 - ALL
> Wilson's Phalarope                          June 5 - SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Olive-sided Flycatcher                   June 3 - ALL
> Western Wood-Pewee                 June 5 - PAN Cimarron Co only
> Alder Flycatcher                               June 1 - C, SC, NE, SE
> Willow Flycatcher                             June 2 -  ALL
> Least Flycatcher                                June 1 - ALL
> Swainson's Thrush                           June 4 - ALL
> Cedar Waxwing                                June 4 - ALL
> Cerulean Warbler June 30 - NE rare in Delaware and Cherokee cos only, SE rare 
in LeFlore and McCurtain cos only 

> Lazuli Bunting                                    June 4 - PAN
> Indigo Bunting                                   June 2 - PAN
> Pine Siskin                                           June 1 - ALL
>  
> The information presented here comes from The Oklahoma Bird Records Committee 
of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society, which publishes a Date Guide to the 
Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma. This booklet divides Oklahoma into 7 
geographic regions, and lists the normal dates of occurrence for each Oklahoma 
bird species within each region. Observers are urged to report unusual species, 
or birds out of date or out of normal range in Oklahoma, based on the 
information given in this publication. 

>  
> The Oklahoma Ornithological Society and Oklahoma Bird Records Committee web 
site, http://www.okbirds.org/, includes ordering information for the Date Guide 
to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma, information on documenting significant 
records, documentation forms, instructions, and a searchable database for 
Oklahoma bird migration information. Birders are cordially invited to join the 
Oklahoma Ornithological Society. 

>  
> Happy birding!
> Pat Velte
> pvelte AT cox.net
> Oklahoma City, OK
>  
Subject: June Migration Report
From: Patricia Velte <pvelte AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2016 11:23:39 -0500
Dear OKBirders,

 

A much shorter list this month!  Below are the arrival and departure lists
for June.

 

ARRIVALS

 

Wood Stork                                        June 7 - Johnston and
Marshall Cos. Only in SC; Bryan, Choctaw and S. McCurtain Cos. Only in SE

Roseate Spoonbill                          June 7 - Rare in Johnston and
Marshall Cos. Only in SC; Rare in S. McCurtain Co. only in SE; Rare in Bryan
Co. only in SE

Greater Yellowlegs                          June 28 - ALL

Lesser Yellowlegs                             June 26 - ALL

Upland Sandpiper                            June 22 - NW, SW, C, SC, SE


Cave Swallow                                    June 30 - SE rare in south
McCurtain co only

 

DEPARTURES

 

Eared Grebe                                      June 1 - ALL

Swainson's Hawk                             June 1 - SE

Spotted Sandpiper                          June 4 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Lesser Yellowlegs                             June 1 - NW, C, SC, NE and
June 4 - PAN, SW, SE

Ruddy Turnstone                             June 1 - NW west to Alfalfa,
Major and Blaine Cos. Only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman Cos. Only,
C, SC, NE, SE

Stilt Sandpiper                                   June 1 - ALL

Sanderling                                           June 1 - ALL

American Golden-Plover              June 1 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Forster's Tern                                    June 1 - PAN, NW, SW

Least Sandpiper                                June 7 - PAN

White-rumped Sandpiper            June 20 - ALL

Pectoral Sandpiper                          June 12 - ALL

Semipalmated Sandpiper             June 5 - ALL

Wilson's Phalarope                          June 5 - SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Olive-sided Flycatcher                   June 3 - ALL

Western Wood-Pewee                 June 5 - PAN Cimarron Co only

Alder Flycatcher                               June 1 - C, SC, NE, SE

Willow Flycatcher                             June 2 -  ALL

Least Flycatcher                                June 1 - ALL

Swainson's Thrush                           June 4 - ALL

Cedar Waxwing                                June 4 - ALL

Cerulean Warbler                            June 30 - NE rare in Delaware
and Cherokee cos only, SE rare in LeFlore and McCurtain cos only

Lazuli Bunting                                    June 4 - PAN

Indigo Bunting                                   June 2 - PAN

Pine Siskin                                           June 1 - ALL

 

The information presented here comes from The Oklahoma Bird Records
Committee of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society, which publishes a Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma. This booklet divides Oklahoma
into 7 geographic regions, and lists the normal dates of occurrence for each
Oklahoma bird species within each region. Observers are urged to report
unusual species, or birds out of date or out of normal range in Oklahoma,
based on the information given in this publication.

 

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society and Oklahoma Bird Records Committee web
site, http://www.okbirds.org/, includes ordering information for the Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma, information on documenting
significant records, documentation forms, instructions, and a searchable
database for Oklahoma bird migration information. Birders are cordially
invited to join the Oklahoma Ornithological Society.

 

Happy birding!

Pat Velte

pvelte AT cox.net

Oklahoma City, OK

 
Subject: Re: Out of state birder coming to OK in late June
From: Doug Wood <DWood AT SE.EDU>
Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2016 14:20:55 +0000
This sounds like a job for one Lou Truex....

________________________________
From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of Andrew Barndt 
[andrew.barndt AT GMAIL.COM] 

Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2016 10:38 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Out of state birder coming to OK in late June

Hello OK birders,

I'm Andrew Barndt, a high school sophomore from Massachusetts. Some of you may 
recognize me from a previous email I sent in March asking for information on 
birding the OKC area. I got many helpful responses, and since I haven't yet, I 
want to thank everyone who gave me information on that area. 


I'm returning to Shawnee for another high school speech and debate competition 
from June 21st-25th, and have determined that I can fit in two full days of 
birding afterwards before moving on with my family's road trip. With those two 
days, I plan to visit the southwest corner of Oklahoma, specifically the 
Wichita Mountains, the town of Eldorado, and Hackberry Flat WMA (with a quick 
stop on the way in or around Norman). 


The main thing I'm looking for is someone who knows the area and willing to 
spend time showing me around any or all of the aforementioned areas. Emails 
with specific information (especially regarding the Eldorado area) are always 
helpful and welcome, but nothing surpasses having someone who knows the area 
well right there with you. I can also provide a list of target species if that 
would help. 


Thanks!

Andrew Barn
​dt​
​Hudson, MA
​

andrew.barndt AT gmail.com
Subject: Franklin's Gull vs. Laughing Gull
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 23:19:01 -0500
OKBirds,

 

On the OOS Facebook page there has been some questions on identification of
hooded gulls (Fanklin's vs. Laughing). I posted the text below on the OOS
Facebook page but thought it might be of interest here for those of you who
are not on the OOS Facebook page. If you are not on the OOS Facebook page
you should consider joining. The link is
https://www.facebook.com/groups/18864377410/. I had these two Franklin's
Gulls on the same flooded field in Bixby two days apart. The first two
photos are of a classic adult in breeding plumage. The last two photos are
of a second-cycle (first-summer) bird. The second bird is one that can be
confused with an adult Laughing Gull. In flight you can see some white
speckling in the face, thicker eye-crescents, dark bill and dark primaries
(both on the underwing and upperwing) with more black and very little white
in the primaries. In the last photo the bill looks bigger, but that is due
to the position of the head feathers. In both of the last two photos you can
see dark marks on the primary coverts. So this is a second-cycle bird versus
an adult Laughing Gull. Something else to consider is habitat. Franklin's
Gulls migrating through Oklahoma use flooded and plowed fields, sod farms
especially the dirt areas where the sod has recently been cut, rivers, lakes
and marshes. Laughing Gulls, while rare in Oklahoma, are found on Oklahoma
lakes, and sometimes rivers below dams and between lakes. But birds have
wings and can be seen out of their habitat. This is another example of where
spending time learning to identify our common birds will pay off when a
rare, similar looking bird shows up.

 

For the link to the Franklin's Gulls see below. They are the first four
photos in my "Recent Birds" gallery.

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Out of state birder coming to OK in late June
From: Andrew Barndt <andrew.barndt AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 23:38:22 -0400
Hello OK birders,

I'm Andrew Barndt, a high school sophomore from Massachusetts. Some of you
may recognize me from a previous email I sent in March asking for
information on birding the OKC area. I got many helpful responses, and
since I haven't yet, I want to thank everyone who gave me information on
that area.

I'm returning to Shawnee for another high school speech and debate
competition from June 21st-25th, and have determined that I can fit in two
full days of birding afterwards before moving on with my family's road
trip. With those two days, I plan to visit the southwest corner of
Oklahoma, specifically the Wichita Mountains, the town of Eldorado, and
Hackberry Flat WMA (with a quick stop on the way in or around Norman).

The main thing I'm looking for is someone who knows the area and willing to
spend time showing me around any or all of the aforementioned areas. Emails
with specific information (especially regarding the Eldorado area) are
always helpful and welcome, but nothing surpasses having someone who knows
the area well right there with you. I can also provide a list of target
species if that would help.

Thanks!

Andrew Barn
​dt​
​Hudson, MA
​

andrew.barndt AT gmail.com
Subject: No Subject
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 08:31:21 -0500
There were several pairs in Black Mesa State Park this weekend, males doing
territorial vocalizations and females gathering nesting material.

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

On Mon, May 30, 2016 at 4:17 PM, John Shackford 
wrote:

> Question?
>
> Does anyone have a fairly recent record of Yellow Warbler during the
> breeding season in the Black Mesa area of Oklahoma?  Perhaps the best place
> for such a record, if there is one, would be in the large cottonwoods, etc.
> at the upper (south) end of Lake Etling (along the inflow stream),
>
> Personally, I can't remember seeing a Yellow Warbler recent out there.
> Maybe someone could query the lists of birds entered in the national data
> base several Oklahomans have been participating in--can't remember what the
> heck the data base is call just now.  Thanks for any insight anyone has on
> this question.
>
> John Shackford
> Edmond
>
Subject: No Subject
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 16:17:04 -0500
Question?

Does anyone have a fairly recent record of Yellow Warbler during the
breeding season in the Black Mesa area of Oklahoma?  Perhaps the best place
for such a record, if there is one, would be in the large cottonwoods, etc.
at the upper (south) end of Lake Etling (along the inflow stream),

Personally, I can't remember seeing a Yellow Warbler recent out there.
Maybe someone could query the lists of birds entered in the national data
base several Oklahomans have been participating in--can't remember what the
heck the data base is call just now.  Thanks for any insight anyone has on
this question.

John Shackford
Edmond
Subject: Re: Yellow-billed and Common Loon, L. Hefner - yes
From: John Ault <jwault742 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 14:41:19 -0500
This morning (8:30 Sunday) I saw the Yellow-billed and Common Loons from
Prairie Dog Point.​  I then drove to the western portion of the dam and was
able to get better looks.

On Sun, May 29, 2016 at 1:09 PM, Ian Brandenburg <
brandenburgi AT staugustineacademy.org> wrote:

> What part of the lake did you see it today? I'm headed down there tomorrow
> morning to check it out and I'd like to know where to look.
>
>
> On Sunday, May 29, 2016, John Hurd  wrote:
>
>> Yellow Billed and Common Loon Continue
>> SUNDAY 5/29 9:00 a.m.
>> same location
>>
>> Jack Hurd
>> OKC
>>
>> > Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 12:50:51 -0500
>> > From: mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM
>> > Subject: [OKBIRDS] Yellow-billed and Common Loon, L. Hefner - yes
>> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
>> >
>> > This morning I saw, and photographed the subject birds. First they
>> > were in the south-center part of the lake and slowly made their way
>> > into the south-west corner, easy to see from Prairie Dog point. There
>> > were no boats in that area.
>> >
>> > Will post photos by Sunday on my flickr page.
>> >
>> > Matt Jung, OKC
>> > www.flickr.com/photos/mpjinokc/
>>
>


-- 
John Ault
Lawton, OK
Subject: Re: Yellow-billed and Common Loon, L. Hefner - yes
From: Ian Brandenburg <brandenburgi AT STAUGUSTINEACADEMY.ORG>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 13:09:01 -0500
What part of the lake did you see it today? I'm headed down there tomorrow
morning to check it out and I'd like to know where to look.

On Sunday, May 29, 2016, John Hurd  wrote:

> Yellow Billed and Common Loon Continue
> SUNDAY 5/29 9:00 a.m.
> same location
>
> Jack Hurd
> OKC
>
> > Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 12:50:51 -0500
> > From: mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM
> 
> > Subject: [OKBIRDS] Yellow-billed and Common Loon, L. Hefner - yes
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> 
> >
> > This morning I saw, and photographed the subject birds. First they
> > were in the south-center part of the lake and slowly made their way
> > into the south-west corner, easy to see from Prairie Dog point. There
> > were no boats in that area.
> >
> > Will post photos by Sunday on my flickr page.
> >
> > Matt Jung, OKC
> > www.flickr.com/photos/mpjinokc/
>
Subject: Re: Yellow-billed and Common Loon, L. Hefner - yes
From: John Hurd <jackhurd AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 09:19:06 -0500
Yellow Billed and Common Loon ContinueSUNDAY 5/29 9:00 a.m.same location
Jack HurdOKC

> Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 12:50:51 -0500
> From: mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Yellow-billed and Common Loon, L. Hefner - yes
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> 
> This morning I saw, and photographed the subject birds.  First they
> were in the south-center part of the lake and slowly made their way
> into the south-west corner, easy to see from Prairie Dog point. There
> were no boats in that area.
> 
> Will post photos by Sunday on my flickr page.
> 
> Matt Jung, OKC
> www.flickr.com/photos/mpjinokc/
 		 	   		  
Subject: Phoebe nest question
From: Mark Cromwell <mark.cromwell01 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 08:30:12 -0500
We have enjoyed watching Phoebe's nest on the outdoor fan on the back porch
for several years. This year the first nesting was successful and the 4
fledged last week - during all the wind and rain!

Since the fledging - one of adult Phoebe pair would return to the nest and
seemingly "check it". We concluded they wanted to make sure all the
nestlings were out.

This morning a peculiar thing has happened. The Phoebe nest is gone from
the back porch fan and it is *resting on the fence rail*. It is at least
40' to 50' to the fence..........

How did the Phoebe nest move from the back porch to the fence rail? It is
in one piece. If anyone has an idea I would sure appreciate it.

Peace,

Mark Cromwell
Perkins, OK
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Lake Carl Blackwell, May 28, 2016
From: "O Connell, Tim" <tim.oconnell AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 19:13:59 +0000
I’m strongly suspecting breeding of Broad-winged Hawk and Chipping Sparrow at 
Lake Carl Blackwell this year. Today (May 28th) sure feels like the latest 
I’ve had these species that far west in Payne County. 

~Tim


PS: The gallinule persists at Coyle Rd and 92nd St.



Begin forwarded message:

From: >
Subject: eBird Report - Lake Carl Blackwell, May 28, 2016
Date: May 28, 2016 at 2:06:24 PM CDT
To: >

Lake Carl Blackwell, Payne, Oklahoma, US
May 28, 2016 9:50 AM - 11:40 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
44 species

Turkey Vulture  6
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Broad-winged Hawk 1 Seen clearly twice; the first time it also gave its 
"pee-eeeeeeee" call. Smallish Buteo, mostly light underneath with broad white 
subterminal band on tail. I've seen Broadwings here in the past, but I don't 
think this late in the season. Breeding suspected. 

Killdeer  1
Mourning Dove  2
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  2
Barred Owl 2 2 inds calling in response to two "who-cooks-for-you"s from me. 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Downy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
White-eyed Vireo  2
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  3
Fish Crow  1
Barn Swallow  2
Cliff Swallow  2
Carolina Chickadee  8
Tufted Titmouse  3
White-breasted Nuthatch  4
Carolina Wren  4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  5
Eastern Bluebird  2
Brown Thrasher  2
Northern Mockingbird  1
Black-and-white Warbler  2
Prothonotary Warbler  1
Kentucky Warbler  2
Northern Parula  2
Pine Warbler  4
Chipping Sparrow 3 Singing males combined with the date suggested breeding to 
me. This would be a first in my 12 years or so of monitoring Lake Carl 
Blackwell. 

Field Sparrow  3
Summer Tanager  2
Northern Cardinal  11
Indigo Bunting  5
Painted Bunting  2
Dickcissel  1
Red-winged Blackbird  3
Common Grackle  4
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
Baltimore Oriole  2
American Goldfinch  2

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29954249 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Subject: Yellow-billed and Common Loon, L. Hefner - yes
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 12:50:51 -0500
This morning I saw, and photographed the subject birds.  First they
were in the south-center part of the lake and slowly made their way
into the south-west corner, easy to see from Prairie Dog point. There
were no boats in that area.

Will post photos by Sunday on my flickr page.

Matt Jung, OKC
www.flickr.com/photos/mpjinokc/
Subject: Loon
From: larrymays1949 <larrymays1949 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 10:13:21 -0400
Jimmy Woodard just messaged me here in beautiful Miami, Florida, and asked me 
to post on the listserv that the Yellow-billed Loon is still present at Lake 
Hefner. I should also add that Sooty Terns are present in abundance at Dry 
Tortugas National Park, LOL. 



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note® II, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: SET OKBIRDS MAIL
From: Bob LaVal <blaval AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 19:16:45 -0500
SET OKBIRDS MAIL
Subject: Swainson's warbler
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 18:43:56 -0500
We netted and banded a Swainson's warbler today at Sequoyah National
Wildlife Refuge near Vian.  We believe this is a first for our MAPS banding
station.

Ann Gordon
Subject: YBLO still present- Lake Hefner
From: Spencer Coffey <4thcoffey AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 13:04:50 -0500
YBLO still present at 1030-1130 this morning, swimming with the lone COLO.
The COLO was following the YBLO from the middle of the lake to the west
side of the lake where they both dove and fed.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29936797

Good birding,
Spencer Coffey
OKC
Subject: Re: Yellow-billed Loon
From: Zach DuFran <zdufran AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 07:36:29 -0500
YBLO is still on the lake as of 7 am. John Tharp and I had some nice close 
looks from W Shoreline Dr. 


Zach

On May 26, 2016, at 2:51 PM, Jonah Padberg  wrote:

The Yellow-billed Loon is still here on the NW side of the lake as of 2:30.

--Jonah
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Yellow-billed Loon
From: Jonah Padberg <jonah.padberg AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 14:51:30 -0500
The Yellow-billed Loon is still here on the NW side of the lake as of 2:30.

--Jonah
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Hackberry Flat 5-25-2016
From: ML2x <ml2x AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 22:15:50 -0500
Hello Everyone,

Well, Hackberry Flat picked up 4” of rain Sun and Mon nights and the place is 
totally flooded 

right now. There water on the N side of the reservoir has backed up over the 
road and is still 

200 yards wide. There is nothing but deep water in all the units which is in 
the process of 

being moved.  Most of the nesting has been disturbed but they will re-nest.

Most of the birds we found were in the cotton fields off the S boundary road.

Goodest Birding,

Mary and Lou Truex
ml2x AT sbcglobal.net
Lawton



Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
May 25, 2016 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
11.0 mile(s)
Comments: 4 more inches of rain on Sun and Mon. Property is totally flooded. 

38 species (+1 other taxa)

Gadwall  4
American Wigeon  2
Mallard  14
Blue-winged Teal  31
Northern Shoveler  22
Northern Pintail  6
Ruddy Duck  14
Northern Bobwhite  16
Pied-billed Grebe  3
Eared Grebe  12
White-faced Ibis  77
Turkey Vulture  1
American Coot  114
Black-necked Stilt  72
American Avocet  47
Killdeer  83
Spotted Sandpiper  4
Greater Yellowlegs  2
Hudsonian Godwit  2
White-rumped Sandpiper  441
Wilson's Phalarope  52
Franklin's Gull  8
Black Tern  6
Mourning Dove  16
Common Nighthawk  36
American Kestrel  2
Ash-throated Flycatcher  1
Western Kingbird  2
Eastern Kingbird  1
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  13
Loggerhead Shrike  2
Barn Swallow  7
Northern Mockingbird  1
Lark Sparrow  4
Dickcissel  47
Red-winged Blackbird  14
Western/Eastern Meadowlark  16
Common Grackle  8
Great-tailed Grackle  6
Subject: Re: YB Loon at Hefner
From: Liz McCrae <lmccrae AT OKCZOO.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 01:42:41 +0000
YB Loon was still hanging around the west side of the lake around 7:00 this 
evening. Was at the north end of the first pull off on the dam, just north of 
Britton. Was right along the shore, about 10 feet off the rocks. It dove 
shortly after I spotted it. Took me awhile to find it again, and it was due 
east of the spot I has originally seen it, about 50 yards or so out, and it 
stayed out there the rest of the time I was on the dam, which was about 20 
minutes. Was really hard to spot out there with the water as choppy as it was. 


Liz McCrae



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: William Diffin 
Date: 05/25/2016 3:56 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] YB Loon at Hefner

Present 1:30 - 2:00 pm along west dam. Swam north to south about 50 yards out. 
Began diving north of Britton Rd quite close to shore. Caught a large green 
fish and spent 10 minutes wallowing at the surface and diving before it got the 
fish down. Then idled out toward the middle of the lake. When I arrived Devin 
(OK) and Barbara (Dallas) had scopes set up and were digiscoping the bird at 
the first turn to the NE going north from Britton. 


At the northeast dam parking lot were a pair of adult plumage Caspian Terns 
along with Ring-billed Gulls, Franklin's Gulls and Forster's Terns. The Caspian 
Terns had very large orange bills with small dusky area at the tip, light gray 
back lighter than RBG, and greater overall size than RBG. 


Bill Diffin, OKC

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Subject: Re: YB Loon at Hefner
From: Ken or Carol Williams <kcwilliams AT TULSACONNECT.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 20:37:01 -0500
Fellow Birders,

I was at Lake Hefner at 8 AM today and the Yellow-billed Loon was 
feeding just off the riprap at the 2nd parking area. If fed there for a 
while and then started moving away and then went out towards the middle 
of the lake.  I drove around the lake, stopping to look and was unable 
locate it again.

I was able to get a few pictures and I posted the best 2 shots on my 
website in the top of my Recent Folder at 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/1_recent_pictures.

Thanks to everyone who posted their sighting of the loon it made it easy 
to find.

Ken Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots


On 5/25/2016 3:55 PM, William Diffin wrote:
> Present 1:30 - 2:00 pm along west dam. Swam north to south about 50 
> yards out. Began diving north of Britton Rd quite close to shore. 
> Caught a large green fish and spent 10 minutes wallowing at the 
> surface and diving before it got the fish down. Then idled out toward 
> the middle of the lake. When I arrived Devin (OK) and Barbara (Dallas) 
> had scopes set up and were digiscoping the bird at the first turn to 
> the NE going north from Britton.
> At the northeast dam parking lot were a pair of adult plumage Caspian 
> Terns along with Ring-billed Gulls, Franklin's Gulls and Forster's 
> Terns. The Caspian Terns had very large orange bills with small dusky 
> area at the tip, light gray back lighter than RBG, and greater overall 
> size than RBG.
> Bill Diffin, OKC
Subject: Adams Ranch on 2-25-2016
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 21:56:15 +0000
Hello All,
 The Bartlesvile area received about 2 1/2" of rain early this morning. I went 
out to the Adams ranch, about a mile north of downtown Bartlesville hoping to 
find some shorebirds. The recently planted fields were about 1/3 covered with 
water. The laughing gull, which was standing in the field about 200 yards away, 
was a complete surprise. It stood sideways to me for about 10 minutes and 
preened for a couple minutes before flying off. Highlights included: 


Lesser Golden Plover-1
Killdeers-3
Dunlin-1
White-rumped Sandpiper-1
Laughing Gull-1 adult
Black Tern-4

Mark Peterson
Bartlesvile
Subject: YB Loon at Hefner
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 15:55:53 -0500
Present 1:30 - 2:00 pm along west dam. Swam north to south about 50 yards
out. Began diving north of Britton Rd quite close to shore. Caught a large
green fish and spent 10 minutes wallowing at the surface and diving before
it got the fish down. Then idled out toward the middle of the lake. When I
arrived Devin (OK) and Barbara (Dallas) had scopes set up and were
digiscoping the bird at the first turn to the NE going north from Britton.

At the northeast dam parking lot were a pair of adult plumage Caspian Terns
along with Ring-billed Gulls, Franklin's Gulls and Forster's Terns. The
Caspian Terns had very large orange bills with small dusky area at the tip,
light gray back lighter than RBG, and greater overall size than RBG.

Bill Diffin, OKC
Subject: Re: Hefner Loon, Whimbrel
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 10:11:02 -0500
It's a good year for me to see even one. With eight, I could retire.

On Mon, May 23, 2016 at 9:58 PM, Matthew Jung  wrote:

> so you saw a Whimbrel after all?
>
> On 5/23/16, William Diffin  wrote:
> > The short of it is I made a complete circle of the lake without finding
> the
> > YB Loon. It was very choppy from 10:40 am to 12:40 pm, so hard to find a
> > loon roosting out in the lake if it was there. I did find a Whimbrel at
> > Prairie Dog Point. It took flight north across the lake as I pulled into
> > the shoreline parking lot, a big shorebird with apparently grey wings
> from
> > the rear in level flight. I couldn't see the bill, and from that angle I
> > could't be positive that it lacked any orange or buff wing color. Oh
> well,
> > chalk one up for big shorebird sp. -- no way it was coming back south
> into
> > that wind. But about 10 minutes later it did come back from exactly where
> > it went. When it reached the shore it flew back and forth a couple of
> > times, showing the down-curved bill and the grey color of the secondary
> > covert area. Then it flew down the point to the east and disappeared into
> > the inlet. I took off running in that direction, whereupon the
> > bird reappeared around the point and flew west to land of all places
> right
> > in the middle of the road near the shoreline parking area. A red pickup
> > truck was tooling along the road and flushed the bird. It took off to the
> > east and again disappeared into the inlet. I was not able to locate
> > it there.
> >
> > Bill Diffin, OKC
> >
>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - May 24
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 22:40:09 -0500
It was overcast, warm, and a bit windy on the survey today.  72 species were
found.  The only migrants I saw today were a group of Black Terns and a
couple flyover Black-necked Stilts.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 8

Wood Duck - 7

Mallard - 5 (also one brood of 8 small young with hen.)

Blue-winged Teal - 5

Hooded Merganser - 2

Pied-billed Grebe - 9 (one on nest.)

Neotropic Cormorant - 8

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 16 (Several sitting on nests.)

Least Bittern - 5 (1 sitting on nest.)

Great-blue Heron - 14

Great Egret - 22

Snowy Egret - 1

Cattle Egret - 8

Green Heron - 8

Black Vulture - 33

Turkey Vulture - 7

Mississippi Kite - 5

Cooper's Hawk - 2

Red Shouldered Hawk - 2

King Rail - 1  

Purple Gallinule - 11

Common Gallinule - 27 (one pair with 7 small chicks.)

American Coot - 12

Killdeer - 3

Black-necked Stilt - 2

Black Tern - 11

Mourning Dove - 13

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 7

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 5

Willow Flycatcher - 2 (calling on nesting territories)

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 8

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 4

White-eyed Vireo - 6

Bell's Vireo - 6

Yellow-throated Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 7

Fish Crow - 6

Purple Martin - 3

Tree Swallow - 28

Barn Swallow - 7

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Wood Thrush - 2

Cedar Waxwing - 7

Yellow-throated Warbler - 2

Pine warbler - 2

Prairie Warbler - 2

Black-and-white Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 8

Common Yellowthroat - 12

Yellow-breasted Chat - 14

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Northern Cardinal - 22

Indigo Bunting - 23

Painted Bunting - 7

Dickcissel - 29

Red-winged Blackbird - 25

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 34

Brown-headed Cowbird - 6

Orchard Oriole - 5

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Lilypad Forktail

Vesper Bluet

Common Green Darner 

Cyrano Darner

Stillwater Clubtail

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Great-blue Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Spot-winged Glider

Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Broad-banded Watersnake

Yellow-bellied Watersnake

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Pathfinder Parkway on 5-24-2016
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 20:51:14 +0000
Hello All,

 I walked the Pathfinder Parkway in Bartlesville this morning from the high 
school to several hundred yards east of the tanks and back. It was cloudy and 
warm. The migration seems to be almost over. Highlights included: 



Swainson's Thrush-3

Northern Parula-1

Yellow-throated Warbler-1

Prothonotary Warbler-1

American Redstart-1

Wilson's Warbler-1


Mark Peterson

Bartlesville
Subject: Bunting on South Jenkins
From: rgunn1 <rgunn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 11:49:27 -0500
This morning, all the usuals--plus a pair of Lazuli Buntings-- a singing 
male and attendant female on the same bare branch. They were back a mile 
or so on the private road that runs east and then south.

D.
Subject: Re: Hefner Loon, Whimbrel
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 21:58:22 -0500
so you saw a Whimbrel after all?

On 5/23/16, William Diffin  wrote:
> The short of it is I made a complete circle of the lake without finding the
> YB Loon. It was very choppy from 10:40 am to 12:40 pm, so hard to find a
> loon roosting out in the lake if it was there. I did find a Whimbrel at
> Prairie Dog Point. It took flight north across the lake as I pulled into
> the shoreline parking lot, a big shorebird with apparently grey wings from
> the rear in level flight. I couldn't see the bill, and from that angle I
> could't be positive that it lacked any orange or buff wing color. Oh well,
> chalk one up for big shorebird sp. -- no way it was coming back south into
> that wind. But about 10 minutes later it did come back from exactly where
> it went. When it reached the shore it flew back and forth a couple of
> times, showing the down-curved bill and the grey color of the secondary
> covert area. Then it flew down the point to the east and disappeared into
> the inlet. I took off running in that direction, whereupon the
> bird reappeared around the point and flew west to land of all places right
> in the middle of the road near the shoreline parking area. A red pickup
> truck was tooling along the road and flushed the bird. It took off to the
> east and again disappeared into the inlet. I was not able to locate
> it there.
>
> Bill Diffin, OKC
>
Subject: Hefner Loon, Whimbrel
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 16:01:47 -0500
The short of it is I made a complete circle of the lake without finding the
YB Loon. It was very choppy from 10:40 am to 12:40 pm, so hard to find a
loon roosting out in the lake if it was there. I did find a Whimbrel at
Prairie Dog Point. It took flight north across the lake as I pulled into
the shoreline parking lot, a big shorebird with apparently grey wings from
the rear in level flight. I couldn't see the bill, and from that angle I
could't be positive that it lacked any orange or buff wing color. Oh well,
chalk one up for big shorebird sp. -- no way it was coming back south into
that wind. But about 10 minutes later it did come back from exactly where
it went. When it reached the shore it flew back and forth a couple of
times, showing the down-curved bill and the grey color of the secondary
covert area. Then it flew down the point to the east and disappeared into
the inlet. I took off running in that direction, whereupon the
bird reappeared around the point and flew west to land of all places right
in the middle of the road near the shoreline parking area. A red pickup
truck was tooling along the road and flushed the bird. It took off to the
east and again disappeared into the inlet. I was not able to locate
it there.

Bill Diffin, OKC
Subject: Re: Hackberry Flat Survey + Cave Swallows in the Wichita's
From: ML2x <ml2x AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 15:31:49 -0500
Hi Ken,

That bug Joe G found 3 Red-necked Phalaropes on the N road on Sunday! Nice 
group of Godwits for sure! 

Can’t wait to see the pics...any of the FWDU’s by chance? I have not able 
to get a shot yet...... 


Lou

From: Ken or Carol Williams 
Sent: Monday, May 23, 2016 10:37 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Hackberry Flat Survey + Cave Swallows in the Wichita's

Lou,

I was down at Hackberry Friday afternoon and Saturday morning. Just before dark 
on Friday about 100 Hudsonian Godwits and 10 Marbled Godwits came into the 
field on the south end. They were all gone Saturday morning except for about 15 
Hudsonians on Saturday morning. I also had 6 Black-bellied Plovers, 50 Stilt 
Sandpipers, 2 Fulvous Whistling-Ducks, 2 Lesser Scaup, 30 immature Swainson's 
Hawks and numerous other birds listed on your list for the trip. A total of 58 
species for the trip. 



Saturday about 10:30, I was setting on the North road watching the Wilson's 
Phalaropes and ever so often there would be a small flock of shorebirds come 
in, circled the North end of the lake once and then head North. I sat there and 
watched them for about 30 minutes and several small flocks came by. 


I will have picture on my website after I have had time to go through them and 
work them up. I will post when I get them done. 



Happy Birding,


Ken Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots




On 5/21/2016 9:43 PM, ML2x wrote:

  Hello Everyone!

 Yesterday evening, Mary and I went out to the French Lake Dam fish ladder to 
see how many 

 Cave Swallows were nesting. We had 3 with active nests along with 2 Barn 
Swallow nests and 

  3 Cliff Swallow nests.

 This afternoon, we did our May 20-31 survey. The shorebird migration is 
nearing an end with 

 Wilson’s Phalaropes, White-rumped Sandpipers and Stilt Sandpipers making up 
99% of the 

 bird volume. This season we only missed the Dunlin, Buff-breasted Sandpiper 
and Red-necked 

 Phalarope which was awfully good considering it had been 6 years since the 
property had been 

  wet during migration.  Here’s the results from today....

  Goodest Birding,

  Mary and Lou Truex
  ml2x AT sbcglobal.net
  Lawton

  Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
  May 21, 2016 1:30 PM - 7:00 PM
  Protocol: Traveling
  17.0 mile(s)
  55 species (+3 other taxa)

  Gadwall  8
  American Wigeon  6
  Mallard  14
  Blue-winged Teal  88
  Northern Shoveler  52
  Northern Pintail  7
  Green-winged Teal  1
  Redhead  2
  Ruddy Duck  26
  Northern Bobwhite  4
  Pied-billed Grebe  3
 Eared Grebe 78 Actual count. Gold plumage along sides of heads. Thin bills. No 
nesting observed. 

  Double-crested Cormorant  8
  Great Egret  3
  Snowy Egret  5
  Black-crowned Night-Heron  6
  White-faced Ibis  71
  Turkey Vulture  1
  Swainson's Hawk  3
  Red-tailed Hawk  1
  King Rail  1     heard
  American Coot  127
  Black-necked Stilt  66     6 of which were sitting nests
  American Avocet  64     7 of which were sitting nests
  Black-bellied Plover  2
  Snowy Plover  1
  Killdeer  41
  Spotted Sandpiper  13
  Greater Yellowlegs  3
  Lesser Yellowlegs  3
  Hudsonian Godwit  13
  Stilt Sandpiper  262
  Baird's Sandpiper  3
  Least Sandpiper  5
  White-rumped Sandpiper  1276
  Semipalmated Sandpiper  3
  Western Sandpiper  1
  peep sp.  150
  Long-billed Dowitcher  1
  Wilson's Phalarope  214
  Franklin's Gull  57
  Black Tern  73
  Mourning Dove  4
  Common Nighthawk  15
  American Kestrel  3
  Western Kingbird  1
  Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  5
  Loggerhead Shrike  2
  Barn Swallow  7
  Cliff Swallow  17
  swallow sp.  50
  Northern Mockingbird  1
  Lark Sparrow  6
  Dickcissel  28
  Red-winged Blackbird  31
  Western/Eastern Meadowlark  8
  Common Grackle  22
  Great-tailed Grackle  6

Subject: hefner 23May2016
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 17:26:51 +0000
Spun past Hefner this morning trying for the YBLO.  No luck.  Did find a 
basic-plumage Common Loon, clearly different from Pat's picture.  Also a 
Laughing Gull, about 25 Franklin's 
Gulls.CHEERS,                         JOE Grzybowski 
Subject: Re: Thoughts on this bird
From: "Mark A. Trainor" <mtrain53 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 15:39:52 +0000
Thank you!

Cheers, M>Train

On May 23, 2016, at 6:11 AM, William Diffin 
> wrote: 


The greenish back is a fairly common occurrence on Western Kingbirds in this 
area. The tail is tented, i.e. pitched like a roof, which is causing the 
notched appearance or at least contributing to it in these views. The edges of 
the outer tail feathers may not be visible because the outer tail feathers are 
drawn in under the other tail feathers. In three out of six of the images of 
Western Kingbirds at AllAboutBirds, the outer tail feathers are drawn under 
that way. 


It is often useful to compare pictures of birds to illustrations in guides. The 
bright edges on the tertials and coverts of your bird don't fit with my guide's 
illustration. What I see on internet images are light edges but not as wide as 
on your bird. It is easy to speculate that the extra-bright edges and green 
back reflect introgression from Tropical or Couch's Kingbird. 


It might be helpful to listen to the dawn song of your bird and hear how it 
compares to other nearby Western Kingbirds. For male Western Kingbirds and 
Scissortails work starts early, before the sky starts to brighten. I made my 
annual predawn visit to the Western Kingbird colony at Eldon Lyon Park early 
Sunday morning. It was a little late, the horizon was already lightening up a 
bit, but six Western Kingbirds were still singing energetically. There is some 
individual variation in the song which one would want to understand when 
listening for something different enough to qualify as a different species. 


Thanks for sharing your photos. Such cases are a reminder that each bird is 
unique and has its own story to tell. 


Bill Diffin, OKC

On Fri, May 20, 2016 at 2:09 PM, Mark A. Trainor 
> wrote: 

Taken this morning in Nida.


https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10153504569316960&id=666071959&set=gm.1060233037375216&source=48 


Cheers, M>Train
Subject: Re: Hackberry Flat Survey + Cave Swallows in the Wichita's
From: Ken or Carol Williams <kcwilliams AT TULSACONNECT.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 10:37:38 -0500
Lou,

I was down at Hackberry Friday afternoon and Saturday morning.  Just 
before dark on Friday about 100 Hudsonian Godwits and 10 Marbled Godwits 
came into the field on the south end.  They were all gone Saturday 
morning except for about 15 Hudsonians on Saturday morning.  I also had 
6 Black-bellied Plovers, 50 Stilt Sandpipers, 2 Fulvous Whistling-Ducks, 
2 Lesser Scaup, 30 immature Swainson's Hawks and numerous other birds 
listed on your list for the trip.  A total of 58 species for the trip.

Saturday about 10:30, I was setting on the North road watching the 
Wilson's Phalaropes and ever so often there would be a small flock of 
shorebirds come in, circled the North end of the lake once and then head 
North.  I sat there and watched them for about 30 minutes and several 
small flocks came by.

I will have picture on my website after I have had time to go through 
them and work them up.  I will post when I get them done.

Happy Birding,

Ken Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots


On 5/21/2016 9:43 PM, ML2x wrote:
> Hello Everyone!
> Yesterday evening, Mary and I went out to the French Lake Dam fish 
> ladder to see how many
> Cave Swallows were nesting.  We had 3 with active nests along with 2 
> Barn Swallow nests and
> 3 Cliff Swallow nests.
> This afternoon, we did our May 20-31 survey.  The shorebird migration 
> is nearing an end with
> Wilson’s Phalaropes, White-rumped Sandpipers and Stilt Sandpipers 
> making up 99% of the
> bird volume.  This season we only missed the Dunlin, Buff-breasted 
> Sandpiper and Red-necked
> Phalarope which was awfully good considering it had been 6 years since 
> the property had been
> wet during migration.  Here’s the results from today....
> Goodest Birding,
> Mary and Lou Truex
> ml2x AT sbcglobal.net 
> Lawton
> Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
> May 21, 2016 1:30 PM - 7:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 17.0 mile(s)
> 55 species (+3 other taxa)
>
> Gadwall  8
> American Wigeon  6
> Mallard  14
> Blue-winged Teal  88
> Northern Shoveler  52
> Northern Pintail  7
> Green-winged Teal  1
> Redhead  2
> Ruddy Duck  26
> Northern Bobwhite  4
> Pied-billed Grebe  3
> Eared Grebe  78     Actual count.  Gold plumage along sides of heads.  
> Thin bills.  No nesting observed.
> Double-crested Cormorant  8
> Great Egret  3
> Snowy Egret  5
> Black-crowned Night-Heron  6
> White-faced Ibis  71
> Turkey Vulture  1
> Swainson's Hawk  3
> Red-tailed Hawk  1
> King Rail  1     heard
> American Coot  127
> Black-necked Stilt  66     6 of which were sitting nests
> American Avocet  64     7 of which were sitting nests
> Black-bellied Plover  2
> Snowy Plover  1
> Killdeer  41
> Spotted Sandpiper  13
> Greater Yellowlegs  3
> Lesser Yellowlegs  3
> Hudsonian Godwit  13
> Stilt Sandpiper  262
> Baird's Sandpiper  3
> Least Sandpiper  5
> White-rumped Sandpiper  1276
> Semipalmated Sandpiper  3
> Western Sandpiper  1
> peep sp.  150
> Long-billed Dowitcher  1
> Wilson's Phalarope  214
> Franklin's Gull  57
> Black Tern  73
> Mourning Dove  4
> Common Nighthawk  15
> American Kestrel  3
> Western Kingbird  1
> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  5
> Loggerhead Shrike  2
> Barn Swallow  7
> Cliff Swallow  17
> swallow sp.  50
> Northern Mockingbird  1
> Lark Sparrow  6
> Dickcissel  28
> Red-winged Blackbird  31
> Western/Eastern Meadowlark  8
> Common Grackle  22
> Great-tailed Grackle  6
Subject: Black-Billed Cuckoo, Again
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 09:18:45 -0500
Hello All,

For the second time in three days, saw a Black-Billed Cuckoo, this time at
Rentie's Grove preserve by Jenks East Elementary. Here is a link to the
observation on iNaturalist:

http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/3277485

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Re: Three Eagles at NE 63rd St bridge in Oklahoma City
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 07:17:26 -0500
Thanks, Calvin. I'll forward your note to Neil.

On Mon, May 23, 2016 at 6:53 AM, Calvin Rees  wrote:

> I saw two adult eagles and a juvenile at the bridge on NE 63rd St bear
> Douglas in Oklahoma City Sunday morning.
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29849550
>
> I posted photos on the checklist as I had been told it is rare for them to
> be there. They are there all year so I find that statement to be odd from
> Cornell.
>
> The head of the OKC Audubon Society said there was someone that watches
> this nest and would like a photo of the juvenile.
>
> Calvin
>
Subject: Three Eagles at NE 63rd St bridge in Oklahoma City
From: Calvin Rees <calvinok AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 06:53:10 -0500
I saw two adult eagles and a juvenile at the bridge on NE 63rd St bear Douglas 
in Oklahoma City Sunday morning. 


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29849550

I posted photos on the checklist as I had been told it is rare for them to be 
there. They are there all year so I find that statement to be odd from Cornell. 


The head of the OKC Audubon Society said there was someone that watches this 
nest and would like a photo of the juvenile. 


Calvin
Subject: Re: Thoughts on this bird
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 06:11:27 -0500
The greenish back is a fairly common occurrence on Western Kingbirds in
this area. The tail is tented, i.e. pitched like a roof, which is causing
the notched appearance or at least contributing to it in these views. The
edges of the outer tail feathers may not be visible because the outer tail
feathers are drawn in under the other tail feathers. In three out of six of
the images of Western Kingbirds at AllAboutBirds, the outer tail feathers
are drawn under that way.

It is often useful to compare pictures of birds to illustrations in guides.
The bright edges on the tertials and coverts of your bird don't fit with my
guide's illustration. What I see on internet images are light edges but not
as wide as on your bird. It is easy to speculate that the extra-bright
edges and green back reflect introgression from Tropical or Couch's
Kingbird.

It might be helpful to listen to the dawn song of your bird and hear how it
compares to other nearby Western Kingbirds. For male Western Kingbirds and
Scissortails work starts early, before the sky starts to brighten. I made
my annual predawn visit to the Western Kingbird colony at Eldon Lyon
Park early Sunday morning. It was a little late, the horizon
was already lightening up a bit, but six Western Kingbirds were
still singing energetically. There is some individual variation in the
song which one would want to understand when listening for something
different enough to qualify as a different species.

Thanks for sharing your photos. Such cases are a reminder that each bird
is unique and has its own story to tell.

Bill Diffin, OKC

On Fri, May 20, 2016 at 2:09 PM, Mark A. Trainor 
wrote:

> Taken this morning in Nida.
>
>
> 
https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10153504569316960&id=666071959&set=gm.1060233037375216&source=48 

>
> Cheers, M>Train
>
Subject: Re: Purple Gallinule in Payne Co. injured wing?
From: Deanne McKinney <trialsz63 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 19:51:26 -0500
To answer your question about whether or not the gallinule held its right
wing like that while at rest, I'd have to say that it held the wing in that
position the entire time I was watching it - about thirty minutes. It was
walking around most of the time that I was observing it so I can't say that
I saw it at rest. It did seem to be foraging just fine though.

I agree that keeping a watchful eye on this bird is the best idea right
now.

Deanne McKinney
OKC

On Sun, May 22, 2016 at 6:26 PM, O Connell, Tim 
wrote:

> Hmm, there was no indication of any problem with the bird during the half
> hour or so that I watched it last night.  Was it consistently holding the
> wing like that while at rest, Deanne?
>
> I’d recommend patience and caution before anyone go try to capture this
> bird.  It’s foraging just fine and, though a bit extralimital, is using
> appropriate habitat.  In addition to my concern that the bird either isn’t
> really injured or, if it is, that capture could cause further injury, this
> pond is on private land.  If we could determine that the bird really did
> need medical attention, I *could not more strongly recommend against
> trying to capture it without full knowledge and permission of the
> landowners*.
>
> Let’s keep an eye on it for a few days, and from a respectful distance.
> ~Tim
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On May 22, 2016, at 6:04 PM, Deanne McKinney  > wrote:
>
> This afternoon I saw the Purple Gallinule that had previously been
> reported in Payne County. This bird appears to have an injured right wing.
> I don't know if this is something that a wildlife rehab person might be
> able to help with but it looks to me like it wouldn't be able to fly the
> way it is now. There are a few photos of it on my flickr page if anyone
> would like to take a look.
>
> https://flic.kr/p/HiMnHR
>
> https://flic.kr/p/GZyJnE
>
> https://flic.kr/p/HpPjtP
>
> Deanne McKinney
> OKC
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Purple Gallinule in Payne Co. injured wing?
From: "O Connell, Tim" <tim.oconnell AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 23:26:51 +0000
Hmm, there was no indication of any problem with the bird during the half hour 
or so that I watched it last night. Was it consistently holding the wing like 
that while at rest, Deanne? 


I’d recommend patience and caution before anyone go try to capture this bird. 
It’s foraging just fine and, though a bit extralimital, is using appropriate 
habitat. In addition to my concern that the bird either isn’t really injured 
or, if it is, that capture could cause further injury, this pond is on private 
land. If we could determine that the bird really did need medical attention, I 
could not more strongly recommend against trying to capture it without full 
knowledge and permission of the landowners. 


Let’s keep an eye on it for a few days, and from a respectful distance.
~Tim






On May 22, 2016, at 6:04 PM, Deanne McKinney 
> wrote: 


This afternoon I saw the Purple Gallinule that had previously been reported in 
Payne County. This bird appears to have an injured right wing. I don't know if 
this is something that a wildlife rehab person might be able to help with but 
it looks to me like it wouldn't be able to fly the way it is now. There are a 
few photos of it on my flickr page if anyone would like to take a look. 


https://flic.kr/p/HiMnHR

https://flic.kr/p/GZyJnE

https://flic.kr/p/HpPjtP

Deanne McKinney
OKC



Subject: Re: Purple Gallinule in Payne Co. injured wing?
From: Sylvias Serpentine <sylvias.serpentine AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 18:09:13 -0500
Really? It only stretched is wings once when i saw it and didn't see
anything odd but if that's true we should try to get it to the osu vet
hospital.
They are the closest rehab place and would probably jump at the idea to
study a rarer bird like that.

~Jessica Torres
SylviasSerpentine.com
Education Through Interaction
Wildlife Education and Wild Reptile Removal.
On May 22, 2016 6:05 PM, "Deanne McKinney"  wrote:

> This afternoon I saw the Purple Gallinule that had previously been
> reported in Payne County. This bird appears to have an injured right wing.
> I don't know if this is something that a wildlife rehab person might be
> able to help with but it looks to me like it wouldn't be able to fly the
> way it is now. There are a few photos of it on my flickr page if anyone
> would like to take a look.
>
> https://flic.kr/p/HiMnHR
>
> https://flic.kr/p/GZyJnE
>
> https://flic.kr/p/HpPjtP
>
> Deanne McKinney
> OKC
>
>
>
Subject: Purple Gallinule in Payne Co. injured wing?
From: Deanne McKinney <trialsz63 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 18:04:36 -0500
This afternoon I saw the Purple Gallinule that had previously been reported
in Payne County. This bird appears to have an injured right wing. I don't
know if this is something that a wildlife rehab person might be able to
help with but it looks to me like it wouldn't be able to fly the way it is
now. There are a few photos of it on my flickr page if anyone would like to
take a look.

https://flic.kr/p/HiMnHR

https://flic.kr/p/GZyJnE

https://flic.kr/p/HpPjtP

Deanne McKinney
OKC
Subject: Ibis
From: "Humphrey, Todd" <Todd.Humphrey AT JENKSPS.ORG>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 22:31:09 +0000
Sorry for the confusion. That is 126th street north, not 127th

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: White faced Ibis Tulsa county
From: "Humphrey, Todd" <Todd.Humphrey AT JENKSPS.ORG>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 22:29:12 +0000
There is a white faced ibis at 127th st North just west of 75. It's in a field 
on the south side of 126th. I just received this report from Lewis Pond. 
Unfortunately, I can't jump in the truck to see it since I just had knee 
surgery Friday afternoon. The closest address is 12601 126th street north. 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Lake Hefner: Yellow-billed Loon
From: Bob Funston <bobf AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 15:22:41 -0500
The Yellow-billed Loon was still there at 3:00 pm this afternoon. It was at 
about the mid-point in the second parking area north of Britton Road. It was 
about 150 yards out (a five iron for me). 


Bob Funston