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Updated on Tuesday, February 21 at 11:16 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Elfin-woods Warbler,©Mimi Hoppe Wolf

21 Feb Re: OOS Special Projects ["O Connell, Tim" ]
21 Feb OOS Special Projects [Don Glass ]
21 Feb Re: Sharp Shinned and bird feeders ["Thompson, Steven" ]
21 Feb Re: Sharp Shinned and bird feeders ["O Connell, Tim" ]
21 Feb Re: Sharp Shinned and bird feeders [Sylvias Serpentine ]
21 Feb Sharp Shinned and bird feeders [Bob LaVal ]
20 Feb GT Grackle research, OCAS meeting tonight [William Diffin ]
19 Feb Tulsa County on 2-18-2017. [Mary Peterson ]
18 Feb Pyrrhuloxia [John Ault ]
18 Feb Black-bellied Whistling Duck [Mike Brewer ]
18 Feb Wichita Mountains Field Trip, Feb 25th [Kurt Meisenzahl ]
17 Feb GBHE eating a small Alligator video in today's news. [Jerry Davis ]
16 Feb Bird Count On The Battlefield [Chad Ellis ]
16 Feb Re: Sooner Lake access [Bill Carrell ]
16 Feb Audubon's Birds and American Science ["Harmon, Vonceil" ]
16 Feb FW: eBird Report - Durant Ecopark, Feb 16, 2017 [Doug Wood ]
16 Feb Re: Sooner Lake access [EUGENE YOUNG ]
16 Feb Sooner Lake access [John Polo ]
16 Feb Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 15 [David Arbour ]
16 Feb GBBC and Payne County Audubon announcements for February ["O Connell, Tim" ]
15 Feb Re: Pontotoc Ridge Preserve winter bird count results [William Diffin ]
15 Feb Re: Pontotoc Ridge Preserve winter bird count results [John Shackford ]
15 Feb Pontotoc Ridge Preserve winter bird count results ["Jona A. Tucker" ]
13 Feb Red Slough today [David Arbour ]
13 Feb Re: Nesting GH Owl--OKC cam [John Shackford ]
13 Feb New photos added to website [Jim Arterburn ]
13 Feb Re: Nesting GH Owl--OKC cam [Patricia Seibert ]
13 Feb Nesting GH Owl--OKC cam [John Shackford ]
13 Feb No Sighting, Great Horned Owl Lecture, Springfield, MO, Thurs 2/16 [Mark Glenshaw ]
12 Feb Fw: Interesting article on owl hearing [Jerry Davis ]
12 Feb Re: Our of control Great Blue! [Mary Peterson ]
11 Feb FW: eBird Report - Oka Yanahli, Feb 11, 2017 [Jimmy Woodard ]
11 Feb Re: Our of control Great Blue! [gloria ketcher ]
11 Feb Our of control Great Blue! [Bob LaVal ]
9 Feb Re: Neat encounter at Red Slough [Mark Cromwell ]
9 Feb Re: Chestnut-collared Longspurs [Bill Carrell ]
9 Feb Chestnut-collared Longspurs [Louis Truex ]
8 Feb Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 8 [David Arbour ]
7 Feb New Photos [Bill Carrell ]
7 Feb Neat encounter at Red Slough [David Arbour ]
7 Feb Ft. Gibson Lake [Marta Harris ]
6 Feb White-Tailed Kites, etc. [Bill Carrell ]
5 Feb White-tailed Kites [Bill Adams ]
4 Feb OKC Audubon Ft Cobb Field Trip [Larry Mays ]
4 Feb Re: Salt Plains on 2-4-2017 [Laura Stanfill ]
4 Feb Salt Plains on 2-4-2017 [Mary Peterson ]
3 Feb SW OK Friday [Steve Davis ]
3 Feb 9:00 am PCAS field trip to Sanborn Lake tomorrow - not 8:00! ["O Connell, Tim" ]
31 Jan Re: Fwd: Surf Scoter [Johnson Bridgwater ]
3 Feb OOS Special Projects [Don Glass ]
1 Feb February Migration Report [Patricia Velte ]
1 Feb Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 1 [David Arbour ]
2 Feb Re: Glaucous Gull [Bill Carrell ]
1 Feb Re: Feb. 11 - Oka' Yanahli Preserve winter bird count [Doug Wood ]
1 Feb Re: Feb. 11 - Oka' Yanahli Preserve winter bird count [Doug Wood ]
2 Feb Glaucous Gull [Mary Peterson ]
29 Jan New Photos added to website [Jim Arterburn ]
28 Jan Fwd: Surf Scoter [Bill Carrell ]
28 Jan Surf Scoter [Bill Carrell ]
26 Jan Hackberry Flat and Cotton County [Louis Truex ]
25 Jan PBase "Launch" [Bill Carrell ]
25 Jan Re: White-winged Dove [harold Yocum ]
25 Jan Re: Coopers Hawks / White-winged doves & one Kinglet ["bill ." ]
25 Jan Ft Cobb Field Trip [Larry Mays ]
24 Jan Canton Lake White-winged Scoters [Louis Truex ]
24 Jan Yard Birds [Kurt Meisenzahl ]
23 Jan Surface Geology and Bird Occurrence [William Diffin ]
21 Jan GLAS Eagle Trip [Evelyn Houck ]
21 Jan Re: GLAS Eagle Trip [Mike Brewer ]
21 Jan New photos added to website [Jim Arterburn ]
21 Jan test [Mike Brewer ]
21 Jan Re: New photos added to website [Mike Brewer ]
20 Jan Red Slough WMA and SE OK birds 1-20-17 [Charles Lyon ]
20 Jan Re: Arnett CBC Results [Sebastian ]
19 Jan Coopers Hawks / White-winged doves & one Kinglet [Mike Brewer ]
19 Jan Re: Question re Lesser Prairie Chickens [Mark Cromwell ]

Subject: Re: OOS Special Projects
From: "O Connell, Tim" <tim.oconnell AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 16:06:16 +0000
Thanks for getting the word out on this, Don!

In a bit of coincidence, the Payne County Audubon Society’s research grants 
honoring Helen Miller and the late Edwin Glover are also due on MARCH 1st. The 
grants provide $1000 to students at any level conducting field-based research 
on any native plants or animals in Oklahoma. Special consideration is given to 
projects that address the behavior, conservation, or natural history of birds. 
For application instructions: 
https://paynecountyaudubonsociety.com/scholarships/. 

~Tim O’Connell
Stillwater


On Feb 21, 2017, at 9:08 AM, Don Glass > 
wrote: 


Hello Birders,
This is just a final reminder that grant proposals for OOS special projects are 
due on March 1, 2017, that is next Wednesday! These grants are for anyone doing 
research or projects relating to Oklahoma birds. The projects are judged by a 
committee of OOS members and if awarded can provide $500.00 of funding to 
students, researchers, individuals, or civic groups proposing to do work that 
promotes the “observation, study, and conservation” of Oklahoma birds. The 
requirements and criteria for these projects can be found at the OOS website 
wwwokbirds.org under the special projects tab. If you 
have any questions feel free to contact me at the following email or phone 
number. 

Thanks and hopefully you or one of your students will consider submitting a 
proposal. 

Don Glass
OOS Special Projects Chair
dglass AT rsu.edu
918-343-7701

Subject: OOS Special Projects
From: Don Glass <DGlass AT RSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 15:08:46 +0000
Hello Birders,
This is just a final reminder that grant proposals for OOS special projects are 
due on March 1, 2017, that is next Wednesday! These grants are for anyone doing 
research or projects relating to Oklahoma birds. The projects are judged by a 
committee of OOS members and if awarded can provide $500.00 of funding to 
students, researchers, individuals, or civic groups proposing to do work that 
promotes the "observation, study, and conservation" of Oklahoma birds. The 
requirements and criteria for these projects can be found at the OOS website 
wwwokbirds.org under the special projects tab. If you have any questions feel 
free to contact me at the following email or phone number. 

Thanks and hopefully you or one of your students will consider submitting a 
proposal. 

Don Glass
OOS Special Projects Chair
dglass AT rsu.edu
918-343-7701
Subject: Re: Sharp Shinned and bird feeders
From: "Thompson, Steven" <SDThompson AT NWOSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 08:28:21 -0600
There is an obvious change in the behavior of the birds at my feeders when 
Cooper’s or Sharpies are in the neighborhood. In groups, the smaller birds 
quickly move back and forth from the feeders to heavy cover when a hawk is 
near. I’ve not noticed a change in the number of species or individuals at my 
feeders as a result of the presence of a hawk. 


Dr. Steven Thompson
Professor of Biology
Co-Director of NWOSU Museum of Natural History
Office – 201B Science Building
Office Phone - (580) 327-8566
Mail - 709 Oklahoma Blvd, Alva, OK 73717

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of O Connell, Tim
Sent: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 8:09 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Sharp Shinned and bird feeders

Anecdotes only, I’m afraid.

For 6 or 7 years I had a pair of Cooper’s Hawks nesting within ~200m of my 
backyard feeders. Just about any day of the year I spent at home keeping an eye 
on things I’d see one dart in to try to snatch something. I never noticed any 
diminution among the other birds at my feeders. (I also had Sharpies, 
Red-shoulders, and Red-tails hunting my backyard birds.) 

~tim o’connell, stillwater



On Feb 21, 2017, at 8:00 AM, Bob LaVal 
> wrote: 


Does anyone have any information on Sharp Shinned Hawk depredation on bird 
feeders and the relation to the number of birds using the feeder? I have taken 
part in the feeder watch program for 5 winters and this year the total number 
of birds is about 30 % of the average for the previous years. I have had almost 
a total absence of Gold Finches. Normally I feed flocks of up to 70 birds. One 
reason for lack of birds could be the warm dry winter. The other reason for 
lack of birds is probably the presence of 1 or 2 Sharp Shinned hawks. I don’t 
see them every day but they are close by I think. Yesterday I came home and one 
was sitting on a Shepard's Crook about 15 feet from the feeder. I took some 
pictures of him. Bird actions sometimes indicate there is danger close by 
although I don’t see the hawks, I think they are there. Only once have I seen 
the pair working as a team. 


Bob LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921

Subject: Re: Sharp Shinned and bird feeders
From: "O Connell, Tim" <tim.oconnell AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 14:08:41 +0000
Anecdotes only, I’m afraid.

For 6 or 7 years I had a pair of Cooper’s Hawks nesting within ~200m of my 
backyard feeders. Just about any day of the year I spent at home keeping an eye 
on things I’d see one dart in to try to snatch something. I never noticed any 
diminution among the other birds at my feeders. (I also had Sharpies, 
Red-shoulders, and Red-tails hunting my backyard birds.) 

~tim o’connell, stillwater



On Feb 21, 2017, at 8:00 AM, Bob LaVal 
> wrote: 


Does anyone have any information on Sharp Shinned Hawk depredation on bird 
feeders and the relation to the number of birds using the feeder? I have taken 
part in the feeder watch program for 5 winters and this year the total number 
of birds is about 30 % of the average for the previous years. I have had almost 
a total absence of Gold Finches. Normally I feed flocks of up to 70 birds. One 
reason for lack of birds could be the warm dry winter. The other reason for 
lack of birds is probably the presence of 1 or 2 Sharp Shinned hawks. I don’t 
see them every day but they are close by I think. Yesterday I came home and one 
was sitting on a Shepard's Crook about 15 feet from the feeder. I took some 
pictures of him. Bird actions sometimes indicate there is danger close by 
although I don’t see the hawks, I think they are there. Only once have I seen 
the pair working as a team. 


Bob LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921

Subject: Re: Sharp Shinned and bird feeders
From: Sylvias Serpentine <sylvias.serpentine AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 08:03:59 -0600
I've had a juvenile and an adult sharpie both visiting my feeder regularly
this year but it hasn't seemed to effect the birds especially on cold
days.  I've seen the adult sharpie in the ground with a sparrow while hold
finches where still up at the feeder eating right above it.
Warm weather has my feeders being ignored but on cold days my yard is very
popular with seed and bird eaters alike

~Jessica Torres
naturesvein.com
Education Through Interaction
Wildlife Rescue and Education

On Feb 21, 2017 8:00 AM, "Bob LaVal"  wrote:

> Does anyone have any information on Sharp Shinned Hawk depredation on bird
> feeders and the relation to the number of birds using the feeder?  I have
> taken part in the feeder watch program for 5 winters and this year the
> total number of birds is about 30 % of the average for the previous years.
> I have had almost a total absence of Gold Finches.  Normally I feed flocks
> of up to 70 birds.  One reason for lack of birds could be the warm dry
> winter.  The other reason for lack of birds is probably the presence of 1
> or 2 Sharp Shinned hawks.  I don’t see them every day but they are close by
> I think.  Yesterday I came home and one was sitting on a Shepard's Crook
> about 15 feet from the feeder.  I took some pictures of him.  Bird actions
> sometimes indicate there is danger close by although I don’t see the hawks,
> I think they are there.  Only once have I seen the pair working as a team.
>
> Bob LaVal
> 20367 Pine Mtn. LP
> Heavener, OK 74937
> Phone: 918-653-7921 <(918)%20653-7921>
>
Subject: Sharp Shinned and bird feeders
From: Bob LaVal <blaval AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 08:00:22 -0600
Does anyone have any information on Sharp Shinned Hawk depredation on bird 
feeders and the relation to the number of birds using the feeder? I have taken 
part in the feeder watch program for 5 winters and this year the total number 
of birds is about 30 % of the average for the previous years. I have had almost 
a total absence of Gold Finches. Normally I feed flocks of up to 70 birds. One 
reason for lack of birds could be the warm dry winter. The other reason for 
lack of birds is probably the presence of 1 or 2 Sharp Shinned hawks. I don’t 
see them every day but they are close by I think. Yesterday I came home and one 
was sitting on a Shepard's Crook about 15 feet from the feeder. I took some 
pictures of him. Bird actions sometimes indicate there is danger close by 
although I don’t see the hawks, I think they are there. Only once have I seen 
the pair working as a team. 


Bob LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921
Subject: GT Grackle research, OCAS meeting tonight
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 11:07:56 -0600
At tonight's February meeting of the Oklahoma City Audubon Society,
Brittany Simons will present on "Nest tree preference and the expansion of
the Great-tailed Grackle." Brittany has been studying the importance of
Bradford Pear trees in the range expansion of GT Grackles northward and
westward through Oklahoma, the Great Plains and to the Pacific Coast. One
outcome of the research is a set of recommendations on how to prune or
replace trees to discourage GT Grackles. Brittany is working in the Natural
Resource Ecology and Management program at Oklahoma State University where
she was a 2016 Wentz Research Scholar. Our OCAS meetings are currently
being held in the Senior Center at Will Rogers Park south of the Botanical
Garden and Arboretum, 3501 Pat Murphy Dr, a little west of Grand Blvd.
Meetings are from 7-9 PM including a break for drinks and snacks. All are
welcome.

Bill Diffin
OCAS President
Subject: Tulsa County on 2-18-2017.
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 03:20:58 +0000
Hello All,

 Mary and I went down to Tulsa County earlier today, since it was a warm day 
with little wind. We started below the Keystone dam and then went over to Oxley 
Nature Center. Highlights included: 



Black Vulture-4 below the Keystone dam

Red-breasted Nuthatch-4 in the pines below Keystone dam

Pine Warbler-1 singing in the pines below the Keystone dam

Lincoln's Sparrow-2 at the Oxley Nature Center feeders

Common Yellowthroat-1 male at the boardwalk at Blackbird Marsh at Oxley Nature 
Center 



Mark Peterson

Bartlesville
Subject: Pyrrhuloxia
From: John Ault <jwault742 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 17:45:47 -0600
This morning I went to the Eldorado area in search of the Pyrrhuloxia(s)
seen Thursday and Friday, by Jimmy and Larry.  I was able to find a female,
twice, but not the male.  Got three photos (see attached link).

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34476897



-- 
John Ault
Lawton, OK
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Duck
From: Mike Brewer <mike.brewer AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 14:50:09 -0600
Greetings:

Black-bellied Whistling Duck. 

This is a late report.

 

A friend came by and showed me two photos that he had taken from his home

The date was last Spring when we had a lot of heavy rains.

Many pastures and level ground areas were flooded.

 

The person, taking the photos, had domestic Canada Geese in his back yard.

Other ducks came in to his flooded yard.

 

He showed me two photos, taken in his yard, of an adult Black-bellied
Whistling Duck.

One photo displayed the duck up close, sitting on a wooden handrail of his
deck porch, overlooking his back yard.

 

I would have never believed this sighting without the photo verification.

 

This is a first for me.

The duck was about 2 miles west of Pauls Valley.

 

Have Fun & Enjoy your birding !!!

 

"Keep in Touch with Your Dreams"

 

Michael Brewer

mike.brewer AT suddenlink.net  

mike.brewer AT att.net

PO Box 1230

601 North Walnut Street

Pauls Vallley, Oklahoma 73075

 
Subject: Wichita Mountains Field Trip, Feb 25th
From: Kurt Meisenzahl <meisenzk AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 18:56:44 +0000
Greetings OK birders,  I have been scouting twice for next Saturday and did 
manageto scare up 2 Le Conte's Sparrows, Rufous-crowned Sparrows,Bewick's, 
Canyon and Rock Wrens and Chestnut-collared Longspurs,   Hope to locate 
Smith's Longspurs with the Chestnut-collared on the next try. 

Kurt MeisenzahlLawton, OK
Subject: GBHE eating a small Alligator video in today's news.
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2017 12:17:52 -0600
I expect that GBHE and other alligators eat most of the young alligators at 
Red Slough on the Ouachita National Forest. It seems it would be tough for 
this one to take off considering the size of the gator and the weight.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

-----Original Message----- 
From: Keith Newton
Sent: Friday, February 17, 2017 12:05 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: GBH eating a small Alligator video in today's news.

Here is a link to the video. I love watching stuff like this, except for the
gag factor. ha


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/bird-eats-alligator-heron-florida_us_58a70ca7e4b037d17d271263?e6hcl3di= 

Subject: Bird Count On The Battlefield
From: Chad Ellis <chad AT ELLISFAMILYOKC.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2017 18:16:53 -0600
Washita National Battlefield will be conducting a bird count this Saturday. 
Participants will meet at 7:00 am. If you are interested email me and I will 
get you the contact info for the Park Ranger who is in charge of the count. I 
was just contacted about the count today and have other commitments on 
Saturday. 


Chad Ellis
OKC, OK
Subject: Re: Sooner Lake access
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2017 11:05:00 -0600
I was there January 27. Had to get my ID updated, but otherwise no problems.

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

On Thu, Feb 16, 2017 at 9:25 AM, EUGENE YOUNG  wrote:

> Was there in December, did the Christmas Bird Count.
>
> Gene
>
> Eugene A. Young
>
>
> Agriculture, Science & Engineering
> 1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310
> Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310
> Phone: 580-628-6482
> Fax: 580-628-6209
> E-Mail: Eugene.Young AT noc.edu
> Website: www.noc.edu
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of John Polo
> Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:25 AM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Sooner Lake access
>
> Hi Birders,
>
> Someone I know who visits the restricted area of Sooner Lake, inside the
> power plant fences, said that management has changed policy and no longer
> allows birders inside. Has anyone visited and gotten in or not gotten in
> recently? I have no reason to doubt this person at all, I trust him, just
> trying to get an idea of when this might have taken place. I was there last
> in late November and had no problems then, so the change was more recent
> than that.
>
> good birding,
> john polo
> stillwater
>
Subject: Audubon's Birds and American Science
From: "Harmon, Vonceil" <vcharmon AT OU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2017 16:46:59 +0000
Audubon's Birds and American Science

Gregory Nobles, author of the forthcoming John James Audubon: The Nature of the 
American Woodsman (University of Pennsylvania Press, Spring 2017) will speak on 
The Origins of Citizen Science in the U.S.: John James Audubon and Natural 
History From the Bottom Up" on Tuesday, February 21 at 6 p.m. 

Audubons Birds of America remains an unparalleled achievement in American art. 
It immediately sealed his reputation as one of the most adulated artists of his 
time and his status as the first celebrity scientist in the U.S. Nobles fresh 
approach explores Audubon as self-made man incessantly striving to secure his 
place in American society. A skilled painter, a successful entrepreneur, and a 
prolific writer, Audubon sought status with the gentlemen of science on both 
sides of the Atlantic, but he also embraced the ornithology of ordinary people. 
In pursuit of popular acclaim in art and science, Audubon crafted an 
expressive, audacious, and decidedly masculine identity as the American 
Woodsman, a larger-than-life symbol of the new nation, a role he perfected in 
his quest for transatlantic fame. Audubon didnt just live his life; he 
performed it. 

Nobles is an OAH Distinguished Lecturer and Professor of History Emeritus at 
Georgia Instiute of Technology. An avid birdwatcher, he is the author of 
multiple books and articles on the American Revolution and the early national 
frontier. His talk, which is sponsored by the OU History Department, Honors 
College, History of Science Department, and Biological Survey, will be held in 
the Gallery of Gould Hall at OU. This event is free and open to the public. 




Vonceil Harmon
Highway Biologist
Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Oklahoma Biological Survey
111 E Chesapeake St
Norman, Oklahoma, 73019
tel) 405.325.1026
fax) 405.325.7702
vcharmon AT ou.edu

Subject: FW: eBird Report - Durant Ecopark, Feb 16, 2017
From: Doug Wood <DWood AT SE.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2017 16:17:33 +0000
HI All, nice field trip this morning to the Ecopark. Small burn area was 
covered in Killdeer and American Pipits. Doug. 



-----Original Message-----
From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu [mailto:ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu] 
Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 10:16 AM
To: Doug Wood 
Subject: eBird Report - Durant Ecopark, Feb 16, 2017

Durant Ecopark, Bryan, Oklahoma, US
Feb 16, 2017 7:20 AM - 9:20 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Ornithology class field trip to Durant Ecopark
43 species

Canada Goose  15
Gadwall  9
Mallard  7
Green-winged Teal  25
Ring-necked Duck  1
Double-crested Cormorant  3
Great Blue Heron  2
Black Vulture  4
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  2
Killdeer  21
Wilson's Snipe  3
Mourning Dove  8
Belted Kingfisher  1
Downy Woodpecker  6
Hairy Woodpecker  1
American Kestrel  1
Eastern Phoebe  3
Loggerhead Shrike  1
Blue Jay  8
American Crow  4
Carolina Chickadee  6
Tufted Titmouse  2
Carolina Wren  5
Bewick's Wren  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
Eastern Bluebird  7
American Robin  5
Northern Mockingbird  3
European Starling  50
American Pipit  21
Yellow-rumped Warbler  8
Field Sparrow  1
Dark-eyed Junco  10
White-throated Sparrow  3
Savannah Sparrow  24
Song Sparrow  4
Spotted Towhee  1
Northern Cardinal  9
Red-winged Blackbird  30
Eastern Meadowlark  45
House Finch  3
American Goldfinch  1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34401488

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Re: Sooner Lake access
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2017 15:25:12 +0000
Was there in December, did the Christmas Bird Count.

Gene

Eugene A. Young


Agriculture, Science & Engineering
1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310
Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310
Phone: 580-628-6482
Fax: 580-628-6209
E-Mail: Eugene.Young AT noc.edu
Website: www.noc.edu

-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of John Polo
Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:25 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Sooner Lake access

Hi Birders,

Someone I know who visits the restricted area of Sooner Lake, inside the power 
plant fences, said that management has changed policy and no longer allows 
birders inside. Has anyone visited and gotten in or not gotten in recently? I 
have no reason to doubt this person at all, I trust him, just trying to get an 
idea of when this might have taken place. I was there last in late November and 
had no problems then, so the change was more recent than that. 


good birding,
john polo
stillwater
Subject: Sooner Lake access
From: John Polo <jpolo AT MAIL.USF.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2017 08:25:13 -0600
Hi Birders,

Someone I know who visits the restricted area of Sooner Lake, inside the power 
plant fences, said that management has changed policy and no longer allows 
birders inside. Has anyone visited and gotten in or not gotten in recently? I 
have no reason to doubt this person at all, I trust him, just trying to get an 
idea of when this might have taken place. I was there last in late November and 
had no problems then, so the change was more recent than that. 


good birding,
john polo
stillwater
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 15
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2017 07:03:43 -0600
It was mostly clear, mild, and windy on the bird survey yesterday.  78
species were found.  Was surprised to find an Anhinga returned so early.
Here is my list for yesterday:

 

Wood Duck - 1

Gadwall - 190

Mallard - 259

Blue-winged Teal - 17

Northern Shoveler - 122

Northern Pintail - 27

Green-winged Teal - 4

Canvasback - 4

Ring-necked Duck - 180

Hooded Merganser - 8

Ruddy Duck - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 11

American White Pelican - 40

Neotropic Cormorant - 1

Double-crested Cormorant - 3

Anhinga - 1

Great-blue Heron - 8

Great Egret - 1

Black Vulture - 4

Turkey Vulture - 40

Bald Eagle - 2  

Northern Harrier - 4

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 5 

Golden Eagle - 1 adult

King Rail - 1

Virginia Rail - 1

American Coot - 607

Killdeer - 2

Greater Yellowlegs - 1

Wilson's Snipe - 1

Rock Pigeon - 1

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 2

Mourning Dove - 18

Barred Owl - 2

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Northern Flicker - 10

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 5

Blue Jay - 5

American Crow - 76

Tree Swallow - 2

Carolina Chickadee - 6

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Brown Creeper - 2

Carolina Wren - 4

House Wren - 1

Winter Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 4

Marsh Wren - 4

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 2

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 6

Eastern Bluebird - 8

Hermit Thrush - 2

American Robin - 1

Brown Thrasher - 2

American Pipit - 20

Orange-crowned Warbler - 2

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 11

Pine Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Savannah Sparrow - 2

Le Conte's Sparrow - 1

Fox Sparrow - 3

Song Sparrow - 13

Swamp Sparrow - 4

White-throated Sparrow - 19

White-crowned Sparrow - 14

Northern Cardinal - 38

Red-winged Blackbird - 25

Eastern Meadowlark - 2

Rusty Blackbird - 6

Common Grackle - 1

American Goldfinch - 4

 

 

Herps:

 

Cajun Chorus Frogs - calling

Spring Peepers - calling

Southern Leopard Frogs - calling

Blanchard Cricket Frog

 

Also:

 

Mink - 1

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: GBBC and Payne County Audubon announcements for February
From: "O Connell, Tim" <tim.oconnell AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2017 02:35:58 +0000
Dear Friends and Supporters of the Payne County Audubon Society,

We’ve got a mix of happy and sad news this month, and I’ll begin with the 
sad. With heavy heart I am relaying the news that Tom Ulrich, acclaimed 
wildlife photographer and dear friend to many in the PCAS, passed away on Feb. 
10 2017 due to complications from a rare cancer with which he was diagnosed in 
January. There’s a bit more on our website if you’d like to follow along 
with Tom’s next of kin as we await information on memorials: 
https://paynecountyaudubonsociety.com/events-calendar-2/. 


On a note that could scarcely be much lighter, this weekend is the 20th annual 
Great Backyard Bird Count 
(https://paynecountyaudubonsociety.com/citizen-science/). Please get out - or 
watch from the comfort of your living room - and report your lists to 
http://gbbc.birdcount.org/. The GBBC has developed into an extraordinary 
resource for assessing distribution and abundance of birds in mid-winter, and 
its strength is a direct result of your participation. Please plan to do some 
birding Friday–Monday for the Great Backyard Bird Count! 


Our next field trip is an unofficial one - I will be leading a group of my 
Ornithology students in a beginner’s bird walk at the Botanic Garden at OSU 
on Sunday, Feb. 26, and you are invited. Please join as at the south entrance 
(Rt. 51) at 2:00 pm on the 26th for a gentle walk with lots of time devoted to 
pointing out the common birds of Payne County. 
https://paynecountyaudubonsociety.com/whats-new/. 


Finally, on March 2nd we’ll host our next Thursday evening program, as our 
own Leslie Miller will deliver a presentation on gardening for birds. This 
should be a great program at just the right time for spring planting! 


As always, everything you’d like to know about the Payne County Audubon 
Society is on our website, so please bookmark and check often: 
https://paynecountyaudubonsociety.com/. 


Wishing you good birding,
~Tim O’Connell
PCAS President





Subject: Re: Pontotoc Ridge Preserve winter bird count results
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2017 15:00:39 -0600
Those are some very good words below the list.

Bill Diffin

On Tue, Feb 14, 2017 at 7:49 PM, Jona A. Tucker  wrote:

> Pontotoc Ridge Preserve Winter Bird Count
> Saturday, January 28, 2017
> 71 species:
> Canada Goose, 15
> Wood Duck, 2
> Wild Turkey, 7
> Northern Bobwhite, 10
> Great Blue Heron, 1
> Black Vulture, 68
> Turkey Vulture, 91
> Bald Eagle, adult 1
> Northern Harrier, 3
> Sharp-shinned Hawk, 5
> Cooper's Hawk, 2
> Red-shouldered Hawk, 4
> Red-tailed Hawk, 7
> American Woodcock, 2
> Ring-billed Gull,       1
> Mourning Dove, 4
> Eastern Screech-Owl, 1
> Great Horned Owl, 1
> Barred Owl, 4
> Belted Kingfisher, 1
> Red-headed Woodpecker, 3
> Red-bellied Woodpecker, 40
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, 3
> Downy Woodpecker, 17
> Hairy Woodpecker, 5
> Northern Flicker, 25
> Pileated Woodpecker, 10
> Eastern Phoebe, 1
> Loggerhead Shrike, 1
> Blue Jay, 41
> American Crow, 53
> Carolina Chickadee, 65
> Tufted Titmouse, 43
> White-breasted Nuthatch, 7
> Brown Creeper, 4
> Carolina Wren, 28
> Bewick's Wren, 6
> House Wren, 1
> Winter Wren, 2
> Golden-crowned Kinglet, 4
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet, 1
> Eastern Bluebird, 10
> Hermit Thrush, 12
> American Robin, 102
> Northern Mockingbird, 15
> Brown Thrasher, 10
> Cedar Waxwing, 20
> Yellow-rumped Warbler, 10
> Spotted Towhee, 3
> Eastern Towhee, 5
> Rufous-crowned Sparrow, 24
> American Tree Sparrow, 1
> Field Sparrow, 158
> Vesper Sparrow, 1
> Savannah Sparrow, 226
> Le Conte's Sparrow, 28
> Fox Sparrow, 19
> Song Sparrow, 114
> Lincoln's Sparrow, 4
> Swamp Sparrow, 1
> White-throated Sparrow, 61
> Harris's Sparrow, 19
> White-crowned Sparrow, 3
> Dark-eyed Junco, 194
> Northern Cardinal, 100
> Red-winged Blackbird, 1
> Eastern Meadowlark, 65
> Purple Finch, 25
> House Finch, 6
> Pine Siskin, 1
> American Goldfinch, 31
>
> 30 Participants: Justin Anderson, Matt Argo, Brett Bartek, Valerie
> Bradshaw, Becky Carlberg, Deane Carlberg, William Carter, Shelby Conrad,
> Holly Dobbins, Mickle Duggan, Tish Hancock, Ed Holzberger, Abby Hutto,
> Megan Knight, Stephen Knight, Phillip Leonard, Bobby Long, Jimmy Lovett,
> Dustin Lynch, Larry Mays, Meredith Mounger, Andy Schofield, John Sterling,
> Patricia Stone, Jona Tucker, Nadine Varner, Joe Whitman, Donald Winslow,
> Doug Wood, Jimmy Woodard
>
> Notes:  Five groups left HQ between 7:30 and 8:25 am. Each group was
> assigned a specific unit. At 7:30 am it was partly cloudy and 31 degrees.
> At noon the temperature was 50 degrees. Wind was from the west 0 to 15 mph.
> All groups were in from the field by 12:30 pm. All ponds had water. RCSP
> recorded in 4 units. LCSP recorded in 5 units. WODU, GBHE, and HOWR were
> new to the winter bird count, but not preserve records.
>
> It was one of those perfect days when all the birds aligned. It’s like the
> stars aligned, but better.
>
> Owls called. Turkey gobbled. Woodcock peented. Bluebirds winged. People
> looked up. After ten years of eluding us, a great blue heron was found
> during the count. There was standing water. A lot of extremely good birders
> showed up to help. People returned for another count and so they knew the
> habitat a little bit better than last year.
>
> And that’s how we finally broke our low-60’s-ceiling and recorded 71
> species in 5 hours. That’s good for a winter morning in central Oklahoma.
> It is great for winter bird count at Pontotoc Ridge!
>
> Of course it took a bunch of top-flight birders. That’s what it really
> takes: 10 or more good birders who also know the preserve. Every year we
> add a good birder to the count, and don’t lose anyone, the count improves.
>
> 2017 was our tenth and best winter bird count so far. Thirty people
> traveled here to help.
>
> Nineteen people helped with the first winter bird count in 2008. Three are
> dead. I will always think of them during this count. A few people have
> moved. Some have moved on. Several have graduated. Two of them have
> graduated more than once: Dr. Jared Wood was an undergraduate and Nicholas
> Tucker was a junior in high school. Bill Carter, Mike Duggan and Doug Wood
> started this count and help every year. Jimmy Woodard has helped every year
> except 2008. Birders are some of the most generous, helpful people in the
> world. They give their time. They give up sleep. They drive and walk
> ridiculous distances to help on parks, preserves, refuges, public and
> private lands.
>
> The birds of Pontotoc Ridge are faithful too. In spite of all the changes
> to habitat and darkness--in this area and along their migration
> routes--over the last ten years they are all still here. Each year when I
> type the count summary I’m relieved to see  the winter migrants again. And
> all the residents. I can’t help but wonder how long it will last. I feel so
> cheated that I can’t see flocks of passenger pigeons fill the sky or see
> bright Carolina parakeets a little further down the Clear Boggy and Blue
> River watersheds (Pontotoc Ridge Preserve sits near the top of both
> watersheds). Birds do disappear. No matter whether it is listed or not
> listed, never take bald eagles for granted. Nor any other bird you might
> see at Pontotoc Ridge on a perfect winter day.
>
> Thank you to everyone who helped this year--and thank you to everyone that
> has helped with any of the previous nine winter bird counts. Everyone that
> counts, counts. (To paraphrase William Bruce Cameron or whomever said that
> marvelous counting quote the first time.)
>
> Jona
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Pontotoc Ridge Preserve winter bird count results
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2017 11:25:34 -0600
Hi Jona,

Congratulations on a great count!  I was particularly impressed with
the 24 Rufous-crowned Sparrows and the 5 Hairy Woodpeckers.  Hairy
Woodpeckers are getting harder to find than in the past and seem to be
losing some ground in population numbers, in my opinion.  The number
of Le Conte's Sparrows--28--was also impressive.

And I see that you finally got your Great Blue Heron!  Congratulations again.

In addition, your summary of the count was wonderful to read!

About the "counting quote," I believe it was Einstein.  I hope I get
it exactly right, but it will be close:  "Not everything that can be
counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."

You do a fantastic job!  Keep it up!

All the best,

John

> On Feb 14, 2017, at 7:49 PM, Jona A. Tucker  wrote:
>
> 3
Subject: Pontotoc Ridge Preserve winter bird count results
From: "Jona A. Tucker" <jtucker AT TNC.ORG>
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2017 01:49:07 +0000
Pontotoc Ridge Preserve Winter Bird Count
Saturday, January 28, 2017
71 species:
Canada Goose, 15
Wood Duck, 2
Wild Turkey, 7
Northern Bobwhite, 10
Great Blue Heron, 1
Black Vulture, 68
Turkey Vulture, 91
Bald Eagle, adult 1
Northern Harrier, 3
Sharp-shinned Hawk, 5
Cooper's Hawk, 2
Red-shouldered Hawk, 4
Red-tailed Hawk, 7
American Woodcock, 2
Ring-billed Gull,       1
Mourning Dove, 4
Eastern Screech-Owl, 1
Great Horned Owl, 1
Barred Owl, 4
Belted Kingfisher, 1
Red-headed Woodpecker, 3
Red-bellied Woodpecker, 40
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, 3
Downy Woodpecker, 17
Hairy Woodpecker, 5
Northern Flicker, 25
Pileated Woodpecker, 10
Eastern Phoebe, 1
Loggerhead Shrike, 1
Blue Jay, 41
American Crow, 53
Carolina Chickadee, 65
Tufted Titmouse, 43
White-breasted Nuthatch, 7
Brown Creeper, 4
Carolina Wren, 28
Bewick's Wren, 6
House Wren, 1
Winter Wren, 2
Golden-crowned Kinglet, 4
Ruby-crowned Kinglet, 1
Eastern Bluebird, 10
Hermit Thrush, 12
American Robin, 102
Northern Mockingbird, 15
Brown Thrasher, 10
Cedar Waxwing, 20
Yellow-rumped Warbler, 10
Spotted Towhee, 3
Eastern Towhee, 5
Rufous-crowned Sparrow, 24
American Tree Sparrow, 1
Field Sparrow, 158
Vesper Sparrow, 1
Savannah Sparrow, 226
Le Conte's Sparrow, 28
Fox Sparrow, 19
Song Sparrow, 114
Lincoln's Sparrow, 4
Swamp Sparrow, 1
White-throated Sparrow, 61
Harris's Sparrow, 19
White-crowned Sparrow, 3
Dark-eyed Junco, 194
Northern Cardinal, 100
Red-winged Blackbird, 1
Eastern Meadowlark, 65
Purple Finch, 25
House Finch, 6
Pine Siskin, 1
American Goldfinch, 31

30 Participants: Justin Anderson, Matt Argo, Brett Bartek, Valerie Bradshaw, 
Becky Carlberg, Deane Carlberg, William Carter, Shelby Conrad, Holly Dobbins, 
Mickle Duggan, Tish Hancock, Ed Holzberger, Abby Hutto, Megan Knight, Stephen 
Knight, Phillip Leonard, Bobby Long, Jimmy Lovett, Dustin Lynch, Larry Mays, 
Meredith Mounger, Andy Schofield, John Sterling, Patricia Stone, Jona Tucker, 
Nadine Varner, Joe Whitman, Donald Winslow, Doug Wood, Jimmy Woodard 


Notes: Five groups left HQ between 7:30 and 8:25 am. Each group was assigned a 
specific unit. At 7:30 am it was partly cloudy and 31 degrees. At noon the 
temperature was 50 degrees. Wind was from the west 0 to 15 mph. All groups were 
in from the field by 12:30 pm. All ponds had water. RCSP recorded in 4 units. 
LCSP recorded in 5 units. WODU, GBHE, and HOWR were new to the winter bird 
count, but not preserve records. 


It was one of those perfect days when all the birds aligned. It's like the 
stars aligned, but better. 


Owls called. Turkey gobbled. Woodcock peented. Bluebirds winged. People looked 
up. After ten years of eluding us, a great blue heron was found during the 
count. There was standing water. A lot of extremely good birders showed up to 
help. People returned for another count and so they knew the habitat a little 
bit better than last year. 


And that's how we finally broke our low-60's-ceiling and recorded 71 species in 
5 hours. That's good for a winter morning in central Oklahoma. It is great for 
winter bird count at Pontotoc Ridge! 


Of course it took a bunch of top-flight birders. That's what it really takes: 
10 or more good birders who also know the preserve. Every year we add a good 
birder to the count, and don't lose anyone, the count improves. 


2017 was our tenth and best winter bird count so far. Thirty people traveled 
here to help. 


Nineteen people helped with the first winter bird count in 2008. Three are 
dead. I will always think of them during this count. A few people have moved. 
Some have moved on. Several have graduated. Two of them have graduated more 
than once: Dr. Jared Wood was an undergraduate and Nicholas Tucker was a junior 
in high school. Bill Carter, Mike Duggan and Doug Wood started this count and 
help every year. Jimmy Woodard has helped every year except 2008. Birders are 
some of the most generous, helpful people in the world. They give their time. 
They give up sleep. They drive and walk ridiculous distances to help on parks, 
preserves, refuges, public and private lands. 


The birds of Pontotoc Ridge are faithful too. In spite of all the changes to 
habitat and darkness--in this area and along their migration routes--over the 
last ten years they are all still here. Each year when I type the count summary 
I'm relieved to see the winter migrants again. And all the residents. I can't 
help but wonder how long it will last. I feel so cheated that I can't see 
flocks of passenger pigeons fill the sky or see bright Carolina parakeets a 
little further down the Clear Boggy and Blue River watersheds (Pontotoc Ridge 
Preserve sits near the top of both watersheds). Birds do disappear. No matter 
whether it is listed or not listed, never take bald eagles for granted. Nor any 
other bird you might see at Pontotoc Ridge on a perfect winter day. 


Thank you to everyone who helped this year--and thank you to everyone that has 
helped with any of the previous nine winter bird counts. Everyone that counts, 
counts. (To paraphrase William Bruce Cameron or whomever said that marvelous 
counting quote the first time.) 


Jona


Subject: Red Slough today
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2017 17:10:04 -0600
I toured two birders from Maryland around Red Slough today.  It was cold,
overcast, and windy but we did manage to find a few good birds.. Here are
the most notable:

 

Neotropic Cormorant - 1 (Otter Lake)

Bald Eagle - 2

Tree Swallows - 4 (Pintail Lake)

Blue-headed Vireo - 1 (unit 9)

Harris' Sparrow - 1 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Re: Nesting GH Owl--OKC cam
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2017 16:13:03 -0600
Pat,

Thanks a bunch for the info!
All the best,

John

On Mon, Feb 13, 2017 at 3:09 PM, Patricia Seibert 
wrote:

> HI John!
> Here is the web camera site: http://www.ustream.tv/okcowlcam
> The female of the pair was killed last year, but the male has a new mate &
> they are using the balcony again. The first attempt failed, but she is
> currently sitting on 2 eggs.
>
> Pat
>
> > On Feb 13, 2017, at 1:06 PM, John Shackford 
> wrote:
> >
> > Hello All,
> >
> > Does anyone have the web site of the GH Owl nest that has been streamed
> the last few nesting seasons in Oklahoma City?  I am wondering if this is
> being continued and if the birds have started nesting yet.  Would very much
> appreciate any help getting me in touch with this web site.
> >
> > As an alternative, does anyone know of another GH Owl site where this is
> being done?
> >
> > Many thanks for any help!
> >
> > John Shackford
> > Edmond
>
Subject: New photos added to website
From: Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2017 21:49:37 +0000
OKBirds,



I have uploaded recent photos to my website. Some of the species added 
are American Crow, Great-tailed Grackle, Herring Gull and Rough-legged 
Hawk among others.

In addition I have added a gallery of bird, butterflies, mammals and 
dragonflies from Montana this last July.

Recent Birds Gallery:

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

Montana Wildlife Gallery:

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/2016mowild

Cheers,

Jim Arterburn
Subject: Re: Nesting GH Owl--OKC cam
From: Patricia Seibert <plseibert AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2017 15:09:24 -0600
HI John! 
Here is the web camera site: http://www.ustream.tv/okcowlcam
The female of the pair was killed last year, but the male has a new mate & they 
are using the balcony again. The first attempt failed, but she is currently 
sitting on 2 eggs. 


Pat

> On Feb 13, 2017, at 1:06 PM, John Shackford  wrote:
> 
> Hello All,
> 
> Does anyone have the web site of the GH Owl nest that has been streamed the 
last few nesting seasons in Oklahoma City? I am wondering if this is being 
continued and if the birds have started nesting yet. Would very much appreciate 
any help getting me in touch with this web site. 

> 
> As an alternative, does anyone know of another GH Owl site where this is 
being done? 

> 
> Many thanks for any help!
> 
> John Shackford 
> Edmond 
Subject: Nesting GH Owl--OKC cam
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2017 13:06:03 -0600
Hello All,

Does anyone have the web site of the GH Owl nest that has been streamed the
last few nesting seasons in Oklahoma City?  I am wondering if this is being
continued and if the birds have started nesting yet.  Would very much
appreciate any help getting me in touch with this web site.

As an alternative, does anyone know of another GH Owl site where this is
being done?

Many thanks for any help!

John Shackford
Edmond
Subject: No Sighting, Great Horned Owl Lecture, Springfield, MO, Thurs 2/16
From: Mark Glenshaw <mglenshaw AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2017 09:10:08 -0600
Morning, all.

I am excited to be presenting for the first time for the Greater Ozarks
Audubon Society in Springfield, MO this Thursday, February 16 about the
Great Horned Owls I study in Forest Park in St. Louis, MO. This is a free,
public and all ages talk. Full details here:

"Forest Park Owls: Hiding In Plain Sight"
Thursday, February 16, 2017, 7:00pm
Greater Ozarks Audubon Society
Springfield Conservation Nature Center
4601 Nature Center Way
Springfield, MO 65804
(417) 888-4237

This talk will cover how I found these owls, basic facts about the species,
and the different behaviors I have been able to see and document with
photos and videos to illustrate these behaviors.

I hope to see you there-thanks and take care!

Sincerely,
Mark

Mark H.X. Glenshaw
Forest Park Owls
http://forestparkowls.blogspot.com/
mglenshaw AT gmail.com
 AT forestparkowls 
Subject: Fw: Interesting article on owl hearing
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2017 16:33:50 -0600

From: Kimberly G. Smith 
Sent: Saturday, February 11, 2017 5:00 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: FW: [Saw-whet Net] Interesting article on owl hearing

Interesting study with sound and saw-whet owl hunting…

 

********************************

Kimberly G. Smith

Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences

Department of Biological Sciences

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, AR 72701

Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010

Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu

********************************


http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/National-Wildlife/Birds/Archives/2017/Bird-Noise.aspx 





_,_._,___
Subject: Re: Our of control Great Blue!
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2017 04:10:44 +0000
 I watched a great blue heron attempt to steal someone's trout on a stringer on 
Thursday at the Illinois River. It pulled a trout out of the water a couple 
times before the owner of the stringer chased it away. I would guess that that 
bird was a well-seasoned thief. 



Mark Peterson

Bartlesville


________________________________
From: okbirds  on behalf of Mary Lane 
 

Sent: Saturday, February 11, 2017 1:10 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Our of control Great Blue!


Wow!  I love this story :>

On 2/11/2017 12:18 PM, Bob LaVal wrote:
I walked up to my pond about 11:00 this morning to fish a little. My pond is 
about 1 ac. in size and is surrounded by 20 yr. old willow trees. As I topped 
the bank, a Great Blue that frequents the pond flew from the west end of the 
pond. He normally flies the length of the pond to get over the trees easily. As 
he flew east and gained altitude, he begin to realize he had a 20mph wind 
behind him not realizing that with big spreading wings, the wind will push you 
down if it is moving faster than you are. Before he got to the end of the pond 
he realized he was not going to clear the trees and angled slightly left toward 
a small break in the tree line. Just the other side of the break were more 
trees with many small limbs reaching upward. Needless to say, he did not clear 
the second bunch of trees and tried to flair with widely outstretched wings 
which the wind caught from behind and plastered him fully extended into the 
small branches. I swear he looked at me and said that was embarrassing. He 
finally got his feet untangled and found a branch and was able to pull his 
wings in and stand up facing the wind. Seemed to be OK. In a few minutes he 
flew back by me into the wind and easily cleared the trees. Birds are fun! 


Bob LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921
Subject: FW: eBird Report - Oka Yanahli, Feb 11, 2017
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Feb 2017 18:10:55 -0600
 Nadine, Shelby Daniels from Mena-AR and myself participated in the Oka Yanahli 
winter count today. 

	
	Jimmy Woodard
	Midwest City, OK
	
Oka Yanahli, Johnston, Oklahoma, US
Feb 11, 2017 7:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
9.0 mile(s)
Comments: we participated in the Oka Yanahli winter bird count. our area was 
the far west and southwest end of the preserve. 

49 species

Canada Goose  1
Wood Duck  4
Gadwall  10
Mallard  30
Northern Shoveler  20
Northern Pintail  2
Green-winged Teal  13
Ring-necked Duck  12
Black Vulture  3
Turkey Vulture  20
Northern Harrier  5
Sharp-shinned Hawk  2
Cooper's Hawk  1
Bald Eagle  1
Red-tailed Hawk  8
Killdeer  11
Greater Yellowlegs  1
Eurasian Collared-Dove  10
White-winged Dove  2
Mourning Dove  25
Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
Downy Woodpecker  4
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  6
Pileated Woodpecker  1
American Kestrel  3
Prairie Falcon  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Loggerhead Shrike  2
Blue Jay  14
American Crow  40
Carolina Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  3
Carolina Wren  5
Bewick's Wren  4
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
Eastern Bluebird  25
American Robin  55
Northern Mockingbird  3
European Starling  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler  2
Le Conte's Sparrow  1
Field Sparrow  45
Dark-eyed Junco  10
Savannah Sparrow  75
Song Sparrow  18
Northern Cardinal  8
Eastern Meadowlark  60
American Goldfinch  1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34305808

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Re: Our of control Great Blue!
From: gloria ketcher <oprakitas AT GRAND.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Feb 2017 13:10:43 -0600
Neat thing to witness, Bob

 

 

Gloria Ketcher

         918-253-8949 

Isaiah 40:31 "But they that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength;
they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary;
and they shall walk, and not feel faint."

 

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Bob LaVal
Sent: Saturday, February 11, 2017 12:18 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Our of control Great Blue!

 

I walked up to my pond about 11:00 this morning to fish a little.  My pond
is about 1 ac. in size and is surrounded by 20 yr. old willow trees.  As I
topped the bank, a Great Blue that frequents the pond flew from the west end
of the pond.  He normally flies the length of the pond to get over the trees
easily.  As he flew east and gained altitude, he begin to realize he had a
20mph wind behind him not realizing that with big spreading wings, the wind
will push you down if it is moving faster than you are.  Before he got to
the end of the pond he realized he was not going to clear the trees and
angled slightly left toward a small break in the tree line.  Just the other
side of the break were more trees with many small limbs reaching upward.
Needless to say, he did not clear the second bunch of trees and tried to
flair with widely outstretched wings which the wind caught from behind and
plastered him fully extended into the small branches.  I swear he looked at
me and said that was embarrassing.  He finally got his feet untangled and
found a branch and was able to pull his wings in and stand up facing the
wind.  Seemed to be OK.  In a few minutes he flew back by me into the wind
and easily cleared the trees.  Birds are fun!

 

Bob LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921
Subject: Our of control Great Blue!
From: Bob LaVal <blaval AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Feb 2017 12:18:22 -0600
I walked up to my pond about 11:00 this morning to fish a little. My pond is 
about 1 ac. in size and is surrounded by 20 yr. old willow trees. As I topped 
the bank, a Great Blue that frequents the pond flew from the west end of the 
pond. He normally flies the length of the pond to get over the trees easily. As 
he flew east and gained altitude, he begin to realize he had a 20mph wind 
behind him not realizing that with big spreading wings, the wind will push you 
down if it is moving faster than you are. Before he got to the end of the pond 
he realized he was not going to clear the trees and angled slightly left toward 
a small break in the tree line. Just the other side of the break were more 
trees with many small limbs reaching upward. Needless to say, he did not clear 
the second bunch of trees and tried to flair with widely outstretched wings 
which the wind caught from behind and plastered him fully extended into the 
small branches. I swear he looked at me and said that was embarrassing. He 
finally got his feet untangled and found a branch and was able to pull his 
wings in and stand up facing the wind. Seemed to be OK. In a few minutes he 
flew back by me into the wind and easily cleared the trees. Birds are fun! 


Bob LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921
Subject: Re: Neat encounter at Red Slough
From: Mark Cromwell <mark.cromwell01 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 2017 20:55:27 -0600
cool

On Tue, Feb 7, 2017 at 8:46 PM, David Arbour  wrote:

> I was touring Hubert Hervey from Minden, LA around Red Slough this morning
> looking for birds.  We were scoping a flock of light geese (mixed Snow’s
> and Ross’) in a wheat field along Blackland Road by unit 7 when we noticed
> the geese suddenly looking upward then flushing into flight.  At the same
> time a flock of about 50 sparrows flushed from the same field and flew
> across the road in front of us into some brush.  We quickly looked up and
> saw this dark object falling straight toward earth from high up and into
> the middle of the goose flock.  We suddenly recognized it as an adult
> Golden Eagle as it slammed into one of the Snow Geese, catching it by one
> wing and struggling with it in mid-air for several seconds.  The goose
> somehow managed to pull free and escaped off to the north while the Golden
> Eagle landed in a dead snag next to us to contemplate what went wrong.  As
> he was sitting there an immature Bald Eagle came flying by to see what all
> the commotion was about.  We got nice looks at the Golden through a scope
> as he sat in the tree next to us.  What a neat encounter!
>
>
>
> David Arbour
>
> De Queen, AR
>
Subject: Re: Chestnut-collared Longspurs
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 2017 19:23:40 -0600
Sunday, saw 10-12 Chestnut-Collared Longspurs at the turn off to Lake Jed
Johnson/Holy City.

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

On Thu, Feb 9, 2017 at 3:02 PM, Louis Truex  wrote:

> Hello Everyone,
>
> Mary and I went out to the Wichita Mountains NWR to see if the
> Chestnut-collared Longspurs were still around.  We parked in the
> blocked off road just past the Meers turnoff and walked parallel
> to the Highway.  We flushed 60 Chestnut-collared Longspurs, 2
> Smiths Longspurs and 15 we just couldn't ID.....
>
> Goodest Birding!
>
> Mary and Lou Truex
> ml2x1954 AT gmail.com
> Lawton
>
> Com - WMNWR - Meers Turnoff, Comanche, Oklahoma, US
> Feb 9, 2017 12:45 PM - 2:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> 8 species (+3 other taxa)
>
> Northern Harrier  1
> Chestnut-collared Longspur  60
> Smith's Longspur  2
> longspur sp.  15
> Spizella sp.  1
> Dark-eyed Junco  2
> Vesper Sparrow  1
> Savannah Sparrow  3
> Song Sparrow  1
> Spotted Towhee  1
> Western/Eastern Meadowlark  3
>
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/
> view/checklist/S34263815
> 
 

>
Subject: Chestnut-collared Longspurs
From: Louis Truex <ml2x1954 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 2017 15:02:28 -0600
Hello Everyone,

Mary and I went out to the Wichita Mountains NWR to see if the
Chestnut-collared Longspurs were still around.  We parked in the
blocked off road just past the Meers turnoff and walked parallel
to the Highway.  We flushed 60 Chestnut-collared Longspurs, 2
Smiths Longspurs and 15 we just couldn't ID.....

Goodest Birding!

Mary and Lou Truex
ml2x1954 AT gmail.com
Lawton

Com - WMNWR - Meers Turnoff, Comanche, Oklahoma, US
Feb 9, 2017 12:45 PM - 2:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
8 species (+3 other taxa)

Northern Harrier  1
Chestnut-collared Longspur  60
Smith's Longspur  2
longspur sp.  15
Spizella sp.  1
Dark-eyed Junco  2
Vesper Sparrow  1
Savannah Sparrow  3
Song Sparrow  1
Spotted Towhee  1
Western/Eastern Meadowlark  3

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/
checklist/S34263815
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 8
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 2017 20:39:30 -0600
Hubert Hervey (LA) and I surveyed birds today at Red Slough and found 79
species.  It was partly cloudy and mild becoming windy in the afternoon.
The first

bird I heard when I arrived at Red Slough this morning was a King Rail
giving a territorial call (unprompted).  Over the next hour, everywhere we
went we found 

King Rails calling giving territorial calls.  I guess the warm spring-like
weather got them going early.  These have to be birds that were wintering at
Red Slough.  I 

was aware we had two around this winter but was very surprised to find 6
birds today.  One bird even came out in the open and put on a show for us.
The adult 

Golden Eagle was seen twice today.  Here is our list for today:

 

Canada Goose - 7

Wood Duck - 17

Gadwall - 293

Mallard - 262

Northern Shoveler - 133

Northern Pintail - 30

Green-winged Teal - 20

Canvasback - 31

Ring-necked Duck - 245

Hooded Merganser - 18

Ruddy Duck - 14

Pied-billed Grebe - 9

American White Pelican - 18

Double-crested Cormorant - 60

Great-blue Heron - 5

Great Egret - 2

Black Vulture - 26

Turkey Vulture - 36

Bald Eagle - 2  

Northern Harrier - 6

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 7

Red-tailed Hawk - 10 

Golden Eagle - 1 adult

American Kestrel - 1

King Rail - 6

Virginia Rail - 4

American Coot - 435

Greater Yellowlegs - 5

Wilson's Snipe - 77

Rock Pigeon - 3

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 1

Mourning Dove - 3

Large Owl  species - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 4

Pileated Woodpecker - 3

Eastern Phoebe - 10

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 435

Fish Crow - 5

Carolina Chickadee - 7

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Brown Creeper - 1

Carolina Wren - 5

House Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 4

Marsh Wren - 4

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 4

Eastern Bluebird - 11

Hermit Thrush - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 1

American Pipit - 2

Orange-crowned Warbler - 2

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 9

Pine Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 2

Eastern Towhee - 1

Field Sparrow - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 3

Le Conte's Sparrow - 2

Fox Sparrow - 4

Song Sparrow - 17

Swamp Sparrow - 3

White-throated Sparrow - 9

Harris' Sparrow - 1

White-crowned Sparrow - 8

Dark-eyed Junco - 1

Northern Cardinal - 15

Red-winged Blackbird - 2065

Eastern Meadowlark - 2

Western Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 2

Brown-headed Cowbird - 50

American Goldfinch - 2

 

Odonates:

 

Unidentified dragonfly - 1  (possible baskettail)

 

 

Herps:

 

Red-eared Slider

Cajun Chorus Frogs - calling

Spring Peepers - calling

Southern Leopard Frogs - calling

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: New Photos
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2017 22:32:40 -0600
Hello All,

As my PBase site is still very much "under construction", I decided to add
a small gallery of recent photos to fill in while that's going on. Mostly
birds, but there is a small collection of bison photos from the TGP. Also
some images from my SW Oklahoma swing last Sunday:


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.pbase.com_lctsimages_recent&d=DwIBaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=EuJJMBkWqXdhYI0ojr7map8mjZOgeq7uMDGuwxLRMVQ&s=GS6TgBJjrwIKK7MaXwSrketdM3HtzoCdt8iO3SZAIWY&e= 



Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Neat encounter at Red Slough
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2017 20:46:39 -0600
I was touring Hubert Hervey from Minden, LA around Red Slough this morning
looking for birds.  We were scoping a flock of light geese (mixed Snow's and
Ross') in a wheat field along Blackland Road by unit 7 when we noticed the
geese suddenly looking upward then flushing into flight.  At the same time a
flock of about 50 sparrows flushed from the same field and flew across the
road in front of us into some brush.  We quickly looked up and saw this dark
object falling straight toward earth from high up and into the middle of the
goose flock.  We suddenly recognized it as an adult Golden Eagle as it
slammed into one of the Snow Geese, catching it by one wing and struggling
with it in mid-air for several seconds.  The goose somehow managed to pull
free and escaped off to the north while the Golden Eagle landed in a dead
snag next to us to contemplate what went wrong.  As he was sitting there an
immature Bald Eagle came flying by to see what all the commotion was about.
We got nice looks at the Golden through a scope as he sat in the tree next
to us.  What a neat encounter!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR
Subject: Ft. Gibson Lake
From: Marta Harris <mbhsuzy AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2017 20:06:57 +0000
Looking for suggestions on places to bird at or near Ft. Gibson Lake.  Never 
noticed there so anything would be helpful. 

Suzy HarrisBartlesville

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
Subject: White-Tailed Kites, etc.
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Feb 2017 09:17:20 -0600
Hello All,

The White-Tailed Kites were still present in Harmon county as of Sunday,
and still as skittish as ever.
Also notable: A Merlin in Altus, plucking a hapless victim in the middle of
a side street before moving to a nearby vacant lot, most of the usual
suspects in the Eldorado area (except for Ladder-Backed Woodpecker), along
with two Barn Owls flushed from some cedars along a county road.

At Hackberry Flat, the Short-Eared Owls showed well in the evening.

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: White-tailed Kites
From: Bill Adams <ba1980 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 5 Feb 2017 02:33:21 +0000
My mom and I saw the White-tailed Kites today around 12:30pm.  As others have 
reported, they are very skittish, but we got lucky and they flew directly 
overhead once and hung around for a minute or two.  Pictures can be seen on my 
website. 

Harmon County, OK 02-04-17

  
|  
|   
|   
|   |    |

   |

  |
|  
|   |  
Harmon County, OK 02-04-17
 Southern OK Photography  |   |

  |

  |

 

Bill AdamsDuncan, OK

      From: harold Yocum 
 To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
 Sent: Saturday, February 4, 2017 2:47 PM
 Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] SW OK Friday
   
Hi Steve 
I thought about trying to go down there and see those kites . I have seen then 
down in south Texas, but no in OK. 

I R died up in Woodward Fri/ Sat helping a big volunteer dental effort. I 
managed to get the Ft. Supply Lake and to Boiling Springs Start Park. 

Birding was weak up at Ft. Supply 
Lake. Mostly gulls (ring bills) And flickers as far as numbers went. I saw a 
few ducks : mallards, shovelers. And 1 common goldeneye, and a few  common 
mergansers. 

Boiling Springs Park is a mess with hundreds of downed trees. Woodland trails 
had benefit opened. Thousands if robins, and many flickers. 

Better sightings were: brown creeper, winter wren, white breasted nuthatch and 
loggerhead shrike. 

No Eagles, and only ret tailed Hawks and kestrels. Total species 32. 
Hal


Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 3, 2017, at 10:45 PM, Steve Davis  wrote:
> 
> Thanks to John Ault's directions, Mary, Mike Mather and I found the 
White-tailed Kites today--just about where John described, but on the north 
side of the road--and as John mentioned, they were very skittish and flew away 
from us farther into the field as we approached in our car. 

> 
> We looked for the woodpeckers south of Hackberry but missed them--maybe a 
glimpse of the Ladderback--and 30 turkeys in the same area. But then we managed 
to see 4 species of owl again, including one very cooperative Short-eared Owl 
sitting on a post for a photo shoot right at dusk. 

> 
> A very nice day.
> 
> --steve d, mary l and mike m

   
Subject: OKC Audubon Ft Cobb Field Trip
From: Larry Mays <larrymays1949 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Feb 2017 18:17:10 -0600
  Morning started out a little cold and breezy,  but by days end the sun
was out,  and my car thermometer read 57 degrees.
  Nine of us birded through the day.  We had some nice birds,  and as usual
missed quite a few easy ones.  By my count we finished with 67 species.
  Duck species were noticeably absent,  but the Mallards nearly overran the
lake.
  Some of the highlights were:  Merlin at Salyer's Lake,  35 plus Mountain
Bluebirds west of Gracemont, Red-breasted Nuthatch,  two Chipping Sparrows,
Brown Thrasher, Orange-crowned Warbler,  and quite a few Yellow-rumped
Warblers--more than we deserved, several Bald Eagles--two on a nest on the
west side of the lake, two Eared Grebes at the dam, Brown Creeper and both
species of kinglet.
  To the eight die-hard birders brave enough to join me,  thanks for a
great birding day!
  Larry Mays
Subject: Re: Salt Plains on 2-4-2017
From: Laura Stanfill <laurastanfill AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Feb 2017 23:41:09 +0000
I wondered where all the Yellow-rumped Warblers were hiding. I have not seen 
one around Spavinaw all winter. 

There were a lot in the NE corner last year.
I have been seeing a nice Western Red-tailed Hawk between Salina and Pryor 
along Hwy 20. Usually sitting on the North side of the road on the fence, just 
east of Carbide road. 



Sent from 
Mail for Windows 10 


From: Mary Peterson
Sent: Saturday, February 4, 2017 5:00 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Salt Plains on 2-4-2017


Hello All,

 Mary and I went out to the Salt Plains today. It was clear, but windy. The 
bridge is out below the dam and it will probably be at least summer before it 
is open again. Sand Creek Bay was high and there is good water levels in most 
of the impoundments along the auto tour. Highlights included: 



Ducks-12 species

Ring-necked Pheasant-2

Prairie Falcon-1

American Avocet-1 below the dam

Sandhill Crane-Several hundred at Sand Creek Bay

Myrtle Warbler-Hundreds All Over


Mark Peterson

Bartlesville
Subject: Salt Plains on 2-4-2017
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Feb 2017 23:00:38 +0000
Hello All,

 Mary and I went out to the Salt Plains today. It was clear, but windy. The 
bridge is out below the dam and it will probably be at least summer before it 
is open again. Sand Creek Bay was high and there is good water levels in most 
of the impoundments along the auto tour. Highlights included: 



Ducks-12 species

Ring-necked Pheasant-2

Prairie Falcon-1

American Avocet-1 below the dam

Sandhill Crane-Several hundred at Sand Creek Bay

Myrtle Warbler-Hundreds All Over


Mark Peterson

Bartlesville
Subject: SW OK Friday
From: Steve Davis <spd8109 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 2017 22:45:03 -0600
Thanks to John Ault's directions, Mary, Mike Mather and I found the
White-tailed Kites today--just about where John described, but on the north
side of the road--and as John mentioned, they were very skittish and flew
away from us farther into the field as we approached in our car.

We looked for the woodpeckers south of Hackberry but missed them--maybe a
glimpse of the Ladderback--and 30 turkeys in the same area. But then we
managed to see 4 species of owl again, including one very cooperative
Short-eared Owl sitting on a post for a photo shoot right at dusk.

A very nice day.

--steve d, mary l and mike m
Subject: 9:00 am PCAS field trip to Sanborn Lake tomorrow - not 8:00!
From: "O Connell, Tim" <tim.oconnell AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 2017 22:07:42 +0000
Sorry for the confusion. You can come at 8:00 and find all the good birds for 
us, but the field won’t start until 9:00! 

~Tim O’Connell
PCAS President
Subject: Re: Fwd: Surf Scoter
From: Johnson Bridgwater <johnson0424 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 31 Jan 2017 13:25:26 -0800
Hi everybody-- sorry to post a political item here, but my time is always 
limited, and I believe many of you will be very interested in this. 


Senator Brecheen is trying to have black vultures added to ODWC as a "nuisance 
animal," thus people will be able to kill it indiscriminately. 


Here is the bill: 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__legiscan.com_OK_bill_SB634_2017&d=DwICaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=U3gOPotyBfqXh3o2AptUZqW8CxC0abI19tHI07LDLO0&s=RaiALQHqcAYXu0noaTlykZ29PBOKTqA1n7CcgjhkUlE&e= 




And here is what he and others claim is:


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__stateimpact.npr.org_oklahoma_2016_08_11_black-2Dvultures-2Dare-2Dprotected-2Dby-2Dtreaty-2Dbut-2Deating-2Dthe-2Dprofits-2Dof-2Doklahoma-2Dranchers_&d=DwICaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=U3gOPotyBfqXh3o2AptUZqW8CxC0abI19tHI07LDLO0&s=2Rd9Mkxju37jTxGdi5jPXsNAh96JHte1Dk0uKIcV2_Y&e= 



By way of introduction, I am Johnson Bridgwater, and my Dad was Professor 
Donald Bridgwater of BNC/ OSU/ and OU as an ornithologist, later as a Zoo 
Director at various zoos. I play at bird watching, quite an amateur but 
something I LOVE! Thanks, Johnson 





---- Bill Carrell  wrote: 
> Checked Birdingonthe.net and saw that something screwy was going on with
> the link, so here it is again:
> 
> 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.inaturalist.org_observations_5015979&d=DwIBaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=WBDeGi7tpoAZqbebymSUlKZrd8QyU5dYvilKNC2k5Q4&s=n6tl53yhaWveTr2Vawab856XagGYznmBwPn9DXlFKlk&e= 

> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Bill Carrell 
> Date: Sat, Jan 28, 2017 at 9:06 AM
> Subject: Surf Scoter
> To: okbirds 
> 
> 
> Hello All,
> 
> Friday, saw a first-winter male Surf Scoter behind the dam at Sooner Lake.
> Otherwise, waterfowl numbers were fairly low, geese almost non-existent.
> 
> Here is a link to the observation on iNaturalist:
> 
> 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.inaturalist.org_observations_5015979&d=DwIBaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=WBDeGi7tpoAZqbebymSUlKZrd8QyU5dYvilKNC2k5Q4&s=n6tl53yhaWveTr2Vawab856XagGYznmBwPn9DXlFKlk&e= 

> 
> Good Birding,
> 
> Bill Carrell
> Tulsa, OK
Subject: OOS Special Projects
From: Don Glass <DGlass AT RSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 2017 15:20:09 +0000
Hello Birders,
This is just a friendly reminder that grant proposals for OOS special projects 
are due on March 1, 2017. These grants are for anyone doing research or 
projects relating to Oklahoma birds. The projects are judged by a committee of 
OOS members and if awarded can provide $500.00 worth of funding to students, 
researchers, individuals, or civic groups proposing to do work that promotes 
the "observation, study, and conservation" of Oklahoma birds. The requirements 
and criteria for these projects can be found at the OOS website wwwokbirds.org 
under the special projects tab. If you have any questions feel free to contact 
me at the following email or phone number. 

Thanks and hopefully you or one of your students will consider submitting a 
proposal. 

Don Glass
OOS Special Projects Chair
dglass AT rsu.edu
918-343-7701
Subject: February Migration Report
From: Patricia Velte <pvelte AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Feb 2017 11:13:44 -0600
Hello OKBirders,

 

Below is the migration information for February. 

 

FEBRUARY ARRIVALS

 

Blue-winged Teal             February 20 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Cimmamon Teal               February 20 - C, SC, NE, NW, SW

Turkey Vulture                  February 16 - PAN, NW, SW, C, NE

Lesser Yellowlegs             February 19 - SW, SE

Sandhill Crane                   February 22 - PAN, C, SC, NE

Fish Crow                            February 15 - C west to Payne,
Oklahoma, Cleveland and McClain cos only, SC Pontotoc, Johnston and Marshall
cos only

Purple Martin                    February 26 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Tree Swallow                     February 26 - SC, NE, SE

American Pipit                   February 26 - PAN

Sprague's Pipit                  February 28 - ALL

 

FEBRUARY DEPARTURES

 

Northern Goshawk         February 26 - PAN

 

The information presented here comes from The Oklahoma Bird Records
Committee of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society, which publishes a Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma. This booklet divides Oklahoma
into 7 geographic regions, and lists the normal dates of occurrence for each
Oklahoma bird species within each region. Observers are urged to report
unusual species, or birds out of date or out of normal range in Oklahoma,
based on the information given in this publication.

 

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society and Oklahoma Bird Records Committee web
site, 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.okbirds.org_&d=DwICAg&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=gsBBfo2DxIn50dL9xNhNVWz0VhFcCL0VHU2JdW-dMo4&s=RDv0UlkQj_QNz8kY9xkVcIXMGe3x8InG4YduLDOTGoQ&e= 
, includes ordering information for the Date 

Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma, information on documenting
significant records, documentation forms, instructions, and a searchable
database for Oklahoma bird migration information. Birders are cordially
invited to join the Oklahoma Ornithological Society.

 

Happy birding!

Pat Velte

pvelte AT cox.net

Oklahoma City, OK

 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 1
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Feb 2017 22:35:45 -0600
It was mostly clear, relatively calm, and very warm on the bird survey
today.  82 species were found.  Finally a calm day after the last several
surveys being very windy.  Birds were very active.  Duck hunting season
ended this past weekend and the ducks have mostly left the reservoir refuge
area and have dispersed throughout the wetlands making them harder to count
but there are still a lot out there despite what my count shows compared to
last week.  The Golden Eagle showed himself twice today and both times he
was harassing the ducks in the wetlands.  One time he got harassed by a
Red-tailed Hawk which drove him off high to the east.  Frogs were calling
and butterflies and dragonflies were flying. Flowers are starting to bloom.
It was like springtime.  Here is my list for today:

 

Greater White-fronted Geese - 7

Snow Geese - 23

Wood Duck - 1

Gadwall - 275

Mallard - 178

Northern Shoveler - 47

Northern Pintail - 64

Green-winged Teal - 2085

Canvasback - 30

Ring-necked Duck - 223

Bufflehead - 1

Hooded Merganser - 8

Ruddy Duck - 7

Pied-billed Grebe - 1

American White Pelican - 2

Double-crested Cormorant - 8

Great-blue Heron - 18

Great Egret - 1

Turkey Vulture - 24

Bald Eagle - 2 adults 

Northern Harrier - 4

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 3

Red-tailed Hawk - 10 

Golden Eagle - 1 adult

American Kestrel - 2

King Rail - 1

Virginia Rail - 1

American Coot - 415

Killdeer - 11

Greater Yellowlegs - 9

Rock Pigeon - 2

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 1

Mourning Dove - 22

Barred Owl - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 3

Downy Woodpecker - 3

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 13

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 8

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

Blue Jay - 5

American Crow - 25

Fish Crow - 7

Carolina Chickadee - 9

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Carolina Wren - 8

House Wren - 4

Winter Wren - 2

Sedge Wren - 8

Marsh Wren - 5

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 2

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 8

Eastern Bluebird - 5

Hermit Thrush - 3

American Robin - 3

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Brown Thrasher - 5

American Pipit - 6

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 9

Pine Warbler - 3  singing

Common Yellowthroat - 2

Eastern Towhee - 3

Field Sparrow - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 1

Le Conte's Sparrow - 4

Fox Sparrow - 6

Song Sparrow - 19

Lincoln's Sparrow - 1

Swamp Sparrow - 12

White-throated Sparrow - 23

White-crowned Sparrow - 3

Dark-eyed Junco - 1

Northern Cardinal - 13

Red-winged Blackbird - 100

Eastern Meadowlark - 7

Rusty Blackbird - 1

Common Grackle - 2

American Goldfinch - 19

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail - 3

Variegated Meadowhawk - 2

 

 

Herps:

 

Red-eared Slider

Cajun Chorus Frogs - calling

Spring Peepers - calling

Southern Leopard Frogs - calling

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Glaucous Gull
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Feb 2017 09:47:17 -0600
The one that's been there off and on for the last couple of weeks is a
first-cycle.

Bill

On Wed, Feb 1, 2017 at 9:35 PM, Sandy Berger  wrote:

> Adult?
>
> On Wed, Feb 1, 2017 at 6:20 PM Mary Peterson 
> wrote:
>
>> Hello All,
>>
>>       There was a glaucous gull in the northeast corner of Lake Yahola in
>> Tulsa this afternoon at 4 p.m.
>>
>>
>> Mark Peterson
>>
>> Bartlesville
>>
>
Subject: Re: Feb. 11 - Oka' Yanahli Preserve winter bird count
From: Doug Wood <DWood AT SE.EDU>
Date: Wed, 1 Feb 2017 17:35:33 +0000
Sorry, meant that to be to Jona only.  Doug.


From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Doug Wood
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 11:35 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Feb. 11 - Oka' Yanahli Preserve winter bird count

Jona, I'll try and get a head count on Friday. Looks like 5-6; mostly newbies. 
Recommend keeping them with me on this one since they lack experience. Also, 
any chance you can do a guest speaker spot for Cons class? I am looking for Feb 
9 or Mar 30. Doug. 



From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jona A. Tucker
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 10:44 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Feb. 11 - Oka' Yanahli Preserve winter bird count

The winter bird count at The Nature Conservancy's Oka' Yanahli Preserve will be 
held February 11. 


We recorded 81 species at last year's count. Maybe this will be another great 
birding day-I know it will be fun. 


If you are interested in helping on February 11, please email me off of the 
listserve to register. You will need directions! Oka' Yanahli is located in 
Johnston County approximately 30 miles south of Ada. 


Best,

Jona
Jona Tucker, TNC
Preserve Manager
580-371-6751 mobile
580-777-2224 office


Subject: Re: Feb. 11 - Oka' Yanahli Preserve winter bird count
From: Doug Wood <DWood AT SE.EDU>
Date: Wed, 1 Feb 2017 17:34:37 +0000
Jona, I'll try and get a head count on Friday. Looks like 5-6; mostly newbies. 
Recommend keeping them with me on this one since they lack experience. Also, 
any chance you can do a guest speaker spot for Cons class? I am looking for Feb 
9 or Mar 30. Doug. 



From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jona A. Tucker
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 10:44 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Feb. 11 - Oka' Yanahli Preserve winter bird count

The winter bird count at The Nature Conservancy's Oka' Yanahli Preserve will be 
held February 11. 


We recorded 81 species at last year's count. Maybe this will be another great 
birding day-I know it will be fun. 


If you are interested in helping on February 11, please email me off of the 
listserve to register. You will need directions! Oka' Yanahli is located in 
Johnston County approximately 30 miles south of Ada. 


Best,

Jona
Jona Tucker, TNC
Preserve Manager
580-371-6751 mobile
580-777-2224 office


Subject: Glaucous Gull
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Feb 2017 00:20:40 +0000
Hello All,

 There was a glaucous gull in the northeast corner of Lake Yahola in Tulsa this 
afternoon at 4 p.m. 



Mark Peterson

Bartlesville
Subject: New Photos added to website
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2017 08:26:08 -0600
OKBirds,

 

I have added some new photos from early January to my "recent birds"
gallery. Some of the species added include Cackling and Greater
White-fronted Goose, eight species of ducks and Red-shouldered and
Red-tailed Hawks. The photos can be seen at the link below.

 


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.pbase.com_oklahomabirder_recentbirds&d=DwICAg&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=Lvr93p7ANG4FDW2fdTYVkziy7vFOHOI2C4V94QMbRdA&s=aAmRGieAorWOY_J9KlFqKVzfAaPFT2M8aCcMEqvTW-Y&e= 


 

Cheers,

 

Jim Arterburn
Subject: Fwd: Surf Scoter
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Jan 2017 10:07:01 -0600
Checked Birdingonthe.net and saw that something screwy was going on with
the link, so here it is again:


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.inaturalist.org_observations_5015979&d=DwIBaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=WBDeGi7tpoAZqbebymSUlKZrd8QyU5dYvilKNC2k5Q4&s=n6tl53yhaWveTr2Vawab856XagGYznmBwPn9DXlFKlk&e= 

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Bill Carrell 
Date: Sat, Jan 28, 2017 at 9:06 AM
Subject: Surf Scoter
To: okbirds 


Hello All,

Friday, saw a first-winter male Surf Scoter behind the dam at Sooner Lake.
Otherwise, waterfowl numbers were fairly low, geese almost non-existent.

Here is a link to the observation on iNaturalist:


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.inaturalist.org_observations_5015979&d=DwIBaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=WBDeGi7tpoAZqbebymSUlKZrd8QyU5dYvilKNC2k5Q4&s=n6tl53yhaWveTr2Vawab856XagGYznmBwPn9DXlFKlk&e= 


Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Surf Scoter
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Jan 2017 09:06:56 -0600
Hello All,

Friday, saw a first-winter male Surf Scoter behind the dam at Sooner Lake.
Otherwise, waterfowl numbers were fairly low, geese almost non-existent.

Here is a link to the observation on iNaturalist:


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.inaturalist.org_observations_5015979&d=DwIBaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=Dmhkrm6yF-Yi2VSkf1VGiXOLzpkRAYdyFfw40EzKQ1E&s=pROHom6IuIRyILJ90j2YTLCp6g_GYQTFKwMh_f3dRNA&e= 


Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Hackberry Flat and Cotton County
From: Louis Truex <ml2x1954 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 2017 22:40:24 -0600
Hello Everyone,

Mary and I drove the backroads to Hackberry Flat today.  We were rewarded
with 3 Ladderback Woodpeckers, 2 Long-billed Curlews, and a Prairie
Falcon.  Hackberry Flat was loaded with all 5 Geese, 900+ N Pintails, all
the usual ducks as well as 23 G Yellowlegs, 26 Least Sandpipers, 2 Dunlin
and 4 Killdeer.

T'was an awesomest day!

Goodest Birding,

Mary and Lou Truex
ml2x1954 AT gmail.com
Lawton
Subject: PBase "Launch"
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 17:34:15 -0600
Hello All,

After considerable procrastinating, I have finally gotten started setting
up a PBase photo site. Kind of bare bones at this point, just one gallery,
pictures from my trip through NM, AZ, CA and back through Oklahoma in
September. Something for everyone here, including some Oklahoma birds to
keep things "legal" in this forum. May set up a recent gallery, just to
keep things going as I plow through the archives and start organizing other
galleries and uploading images starting in 2013. Here's the link to that
gallery:

http://www.pbase.com/lctsimages/western_trip_0916

Thanks,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Re: White-winged Dove
From: harold Yocum <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 11:28:35 -0600
We have been seeing a steady increase in white winged doves around Edmond over 
the last 10 years. I moved here 18 years ago and they were absent to extremely 
rare here. Now I have seen them in my yard and neighbor parks on a regular 
basis. 

Hal Yocum ,  Edmond 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 25, 2017, at 10:50 AM, Mike Brewer  wrote:
> 
> White-winged Doves have extended into Oklahoma ‘big time’ over the last 
30-40 years. 

> There are big flocks of 24-48 at my black oil platform feeders here in Pauls 
Valley. 

>  
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Laura Stanfill
> Sent: Saturday, December 31, 2016 9:25 AM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: White-winged Dove
>  
> Just saw this bird at a feeder outside of Ada.
> Very familiar with this bird in South Texas. 
> Has it's range expanded into Oklahoma? Been seen by other birder's in the 
area? Unfortunately no photo. 

> 
> Sent from my Windows Phone
Subject: Re: Coopers Hawks / White-winged doves & one Kinglet
From: "bill ." <billwx AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 07:12:09 +0000
Thanks Mike!

Some nice yard birds you have there! I have yet to see a WW Dove, though i have 
seen reports a few exist in and around Enid. Hopefully soon... 



peace

-bill

enid garfield ok


________________________________
From: okbirds  on behalf of Mike Brewer 
 

Sent: Thursday, January 19, 2017 2:06 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Coopers Hawks / White-winged doves & one Kinglet


Greetings Bird Lovers:



My feeders, filled with Black Oil Sunflower and Suet have had some interesting 
bird behavior. 


First: I did not notice the flock of White-winged Doves perching high in the 
Native Pecan Trees. 


Suddenly, the flock of about 3 dozen or more WW Doves flushed with a loud 
sound. 




They were quickly followed very quick with two Coopers Hawks in attack.

The first was a juvenile and close behind was an adult.

The Coopers perched in the tall pecans directly across the street.

I captured photos to verify the identification.



Another nice feeder bird is a Ruby Crowned Kinglet.

The bird was photographed feeding on Suet.



Regards for good birding,



"Keep in Touch with Your Dreams"



Michael Brewer

mike.brewer AT att.net

PO Box 1230

601 North Walnut Street

Pauls Vallley, Oklahoma 73075

Subject: Ft Cobb Field Trip
From: Larry Mays <larrymays1949 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 00:37:44 -0600
I now have a full car for the trip.
Subject: Canton Lake White-winged Scoters
From: Louis Truex <ml2x1954 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2017 15:02:08 -0600
Hello Everyone,

Mary and I birded Canton Lake yesterday.  It was wonderful to see it full
again!  I had figured the fishing industry got killed there when they
pulled it down 24 feet a few years back and it struck me yesterday after
seeing NO Cormorants or White Pelicans on the lake.  I hope they've
restocked it with bait fish to get that process started again.  The area
was also hit hard by the ice storm earlier this month.  Every tree around
the lake had some form of damage and there were very few birds in the area,
which is normally very birdy.

The White-winged Scoters were at the new dam area.  The old boat ramp has
been removed but they left the upper area which is where the pictures were
taken from.  They were digiscope efforts and have not been edited.  They
can be viewed here:  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33906389

Goodest Birding,

Mary and Lou Truex
ml2x1954 AT gmail.com
Lawton
Subject: Yard Birds
From: Kurt Meisenzahl <meisenzk AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2017 16:31:16 +0000
 We were awakened this morning by Black Vultures landing on the railing of our 
deck, just outside our upstairs bedroom.  The nearest one wasonly ten feet 
from the door and I got several pictures with Sharon's cellphone. 

There was an interesting combination of birds at the feeders this morning.While 
I was still in the yard we had a White-breasted Nuthatch, a Red-breasted 
Nuthatch, and an Orange-crowned Warbler at the two suet feeders.  By the time 
I got inside they had been replaced by a DownyWoodpecker, a Red-bellied 
Woodpecker and a Mockingbird.  TwoBlack Vultures watched the proceedings from 
the electric pole nearthe back corner of our yard.   

There are probably 60 - 80 Vultures roosting in the trees south and east of our 
home.  Most are Turkey Vultures but we had 5 Black Vultures onthe deck railing 
this morning and several more were nearby. 

Kurt & Sharon MeisenzahlLawton, OK
Subject: Surface Geology and Bird Occurrence
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2017 16:11:15 -0600
At the OKC Audubon meeting tonight, Zach Poland will present on: Eastern
Oklahoma's Surface Geology Implications for Bird Habitat and Hot Spots. The
talk will be based on case studies at 10 mile or less scale of the
occurrence (based on eBird) of some common and some less common birds found
in eastern Oklahoma. It will be shown that sightings are correlated with
geology. For more on the talk and its presenter, see the OCAS homepage at
www.okc-audubon.org. The meeting will be from 7-9 PM at the Will Rogers
Park Senior Center south of NW 36th on Pat Murphy Dr between N Portland Ave
and N Grand Blvd. We are stil meetingl in the Senior Center as renovation
continues on our customary meeting place in the Garden Exhibition Center.

Bill Diffin
OCAS President
Subject: GLAS Eagle Trip
From: Evelyn Houck <efhouck727 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 15:10:24 -0600
The moon was shining and the stars twinkling brightly as 17 persons began
the caravan to Northeast Arkansas to find Bald Eagles.  By the time the
group arrived at the roosting area at 7 a.m., the temperature had dropped
to 37 degrees with a moderate south wind.  Not near the climate the group
has experienced in the past, when the wind was so very strong from the
north and we were dressed in layers, many layers!!

The Bald Eagle count was down considerably this year from 2016 by half.
Today's count was 59.  Maybe the nicer weather was to blame?  Twenty-nine
birds were seen leaving the roosting area as sunrise neared.

Additional birds seen, by species included:
Canada Goose
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Wilson's Snipe
Rock Dove
Collared Dove
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
American Crow
Bluejay
Tufted Titmouse
White breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Northern Cardinal
White crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Eastern Meadowlark
and many LBJs (little brown jobies!)

Breatfast was delicious and the comradarie was enjoyable too.  There were
five first timers to join us on the trip, including four guests.

Until next time,
Evelyn Houck
Bald EagleTrip Recorder
Grand Lake Audubon Society
Grove, Oklahoma (n.e. corner of state)
Subject: Re: GLAS Eagle Trip
From: Mike Brewer <mike.brewer AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 20:14:52 -0600
Thank You.

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Evelyn Houck
Sent: Saturday, January 21, 2017 3:10 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: GLAS Eagle Trip

 

The moon was shining and the stars twinkling brightly as 17 persons began the 
caravan to Northeast Arkansas to find Bald Eagles. By the time the group 
arrived at the roosting area at 7 a.m., the temperature had dropped to 37 
degrees with a moderate south wind. Not near the climate the group has 
experienced in the past, when the wind was so very strong from the north and we 
were dressed in layers, many layers!! 


 

The Bald Eagle count was down considerably this year from 2016 by half. Today's 
count was 59. Maybe the nicer weather was to blame? Twenty-nine birds were seen 
leaving the roosting area as sunrise neared. 


 

Additional birds seen, by species included:

Canada Goose

Red-shouldered Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

American Kestrel

Wilson's Snipe

Rock Dove

Collared Dove

Mourning Dove

Belted Kingfisher

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

American Crow

Bluejay

Tufted Titmouse

White breasted Nuthatch

Carolina Wren

Eastern Bluebird

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Northern Cardinal

White crowned Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco

Eastern Meadowlark

and many LBJs (little brown jobies!)

 

Breatfast was delicious and the comradarie was enjoyable too. There were five 
first timers to join us on the trip, including four guests. 


 

Until next time,

Evelyn Houck

Bald EagleTrip Recorder

Grand Lake Audubon Society

Grove, Oklahoma (n.e. corner of state) 

 

 

 
Subject: New photos added to website
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 11:37:17 -0600
OKBirds,

 

I have added some new photos to my recent birds gallery.  Species added
include American Crow, American Goldfinch, American Robin, Blue Jay,
Dark-eyed Junco, Eastern Bluebird, leucistic Northern Cardinal, Northern
Flicker, Red-headed Woodpecker, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and Yellow-rumped
Warbler. Most of these birds were photographed coming to the shore, of the
mostly frozen Kaw Lake, to drink. For those interested see the link below.

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

Cheers,

 

Jim Arterburn
Subject: test
From: Mike Brewer <mike.brewer AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 20:12:27 -0600
 

This is only a TEST.

One of my latest postings was rejected

 

"Keep in Touch with Your Dreams"

 

Michael Brewer

mike.brewer AT suddenlink.net

PO Box 1230

601 North Walnut Street

Pauls Vallley, Oklahoma 73075

 
Subject: Re: New photos added to website
From: Mike Brewer <mike.brewer AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 20:09:54 -0600
Jim:  

 

Thank You.

 

"Keep in Touch with Your Dreams"

 

Michael Brewer

  mike.brewer AT suddenlink.net

mike.brewer AT att.net

PO Box 1230

601 North Walnut Street

Pauls Vallley, Oklahoma 73075

 

 

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jim Arterburn
Sent: Saturday, January 21, 2017 11:37 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: New photos added to website

 

OKBirds,

 

I have added some new photos to my recent birds gallery.  Species added
include American Crow, American Goldfinch, American Robin, Blue Jay,
Dark-eyed Junco, Eastern Bluebird, leucistic Northern Cardinal, Northern
Flicker, Red-headed Woodpecker, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and Yellow-rumped
Warbler. Most of these birds were photographed coming to the shore, of the
mostly frozen Kaw Lake, to drink. For those interested see the link below.

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

Cheers,

 

Jim Arterburn
Subject: Red Slough WMA and SE OK birds 1-20-17
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 21:52:56 -0600
OK-birders,
I made a brief birding foray into SE OK with fellow birders Jeff and Jean 
Trahan and Rosemary Seidler today 1-20-17. 

We met Ford Hendershot at Red Slough WMA and did a short two hour birding 
survey there, with the best bird 

being a Neotropic Cormorant. This may have been the same bird found by David 
Arbour on his 1-3-17 survey. We then had 

excellent looks at Red-breasted Nuthatches and Purple Finches in Ford's yard. 
Ford then directed us to a farmland route he surveys, 

and we checked this area out on our way home. We found a Merlin terrorizing a 
large flock of blackbirds and a few Western Meadowlarks 

here. The links to the ebird lists with a few embedded photos are below.
Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33813169

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33813503

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33813677
Subject: Re: Arnett CBC Results
From: Sebastian <sebastianpatti AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 14:40:55 +0000
thanks, as always Eddie!

sebastianpatti AT hotmail.com
Sebastian T. Patti
(Lincoln Park)
Chicago, ILLINOIS 60614-3354
PHONE: 312/325-9555 (o) 773/248-0570 (h)
CELL: 773/304-7488
FAX: 312/325-9017(o)


________________________________
From: okbirds  on behalf of ok_forbs 
Sent: Saturday, January 14, 2017 3:07 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Arnett CBC Results

The Arnett CBC missed good weather by a single day. The day before the highs 
were in the 60's and mostly clear. However, on count day, it began at 25 
degrees and only reached the low 30's by late afternoon. Strong north winds and 
overcast skies were the norm for the day. 

The wind was a major factor, so small birds, such as chickadee's and kinglets, 
etc. were not found. 


We had 4 observers in 2 parties. Only 48 species were found; yet there were 
some noteworthy finds. 



Notable birds:
Vir. Rail 2
Sandhill Cranes 347
E. Collard-Dove 75 (40 were in a single flock)
G. Roadrunner 1
Barn Owl 3 (The first in many years)
E. Phoebe 1 (The first in many years)
L. Shrike 3
M. Bluebird 71
E. Bluebird 42
Am. Goldfinch 184 (High number)
Rough-legged Hawk 1 (CW)
Harlan's Hawk 1
Cooper's Hawk 1
Merlin 1
Prairie Falcon 1
Wild Turkey 25
Savannah Sparrow 4


A big thanks to Brandon Knowles and Bill Diffin for their efforts.




"Future historians may well be amazed by our distorted sense of proportion. How 
could intelligent beings seek to control a few unwanted species by a method 
that contaminated the entire environment and brought the threat of disease and 
death even to their own kind?" 

~Rachel Carson

Eddie Stegall
Ok_Forbs AT Zoho.com
Wichita, Ks
Subject: Coopers Hawks / White-winged doves & one Kinglet
From: Mike Brewer <mike.brewer AT ATT.NET>
Date: Thu, 19 Jan 2017 14:06:31 -0600
Greetings Bird Lovers:

 

My feeders, filled with Black Oil Sunflower and Suet have had some
interesting bird behavior.

First:  I did not notice the flock of White-winged Doves perching high in
the Native Pecan Trees.

Suddenly, the flock of about 3 dozen or more WW Doves flushed with a loud
sound.

 

They were quickly followed very quick with two Coopers Hawks in attack.

The first was a juvenile and close behind was an adult.

The Coopers perched in the tall pecans directly across the street.

I captured photos to verify the identification.

 

Another nice feeder bird is a Ruby Crowned Kinglet.

The bird was photographed feeding on Suet.

 

Regards for good birding,

 

"Keep in Touch with Your Dreams"

 

Michael Brewer

mike.brewer AT att.net

PO Box 1230

601 North Walnut Street

Pauls Vallley, Oklahoma 73075

 
Subject: Re: Question re Lesser Prairie Chickens
From: Mark Cromwell <mark.cromwell01 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Jan 2017 12:04:45 -0600
Scott, if you do not have success with LPCs at Woodward, then you might try
Canadian/Higgins, TX. I was recently quail hunting in that area and kicked
up several LPCs and possibly found roosts (it took awhile to figure out the
poop is bigger than quail)!

On Sun, Jan 15, 2017 at 11:09 AM, Esther M. Key  wrote:

> Scott,
>
> From time to time the chickens change the location of their leks which is
> the most likely reason you didn't find them.  The best way to see the leks
> is at the Lesser Prairie-chicken Festival.  We went last year for the first
> time.  Even though the weather wasn't cooperative, we were able to have a
> great view of them dancing on the leks and I can highly recommend the
> experience.  For information see http://lektreks.org/
> Esther
>
> On 1/12/2017 3:53 PM, Scott Fisher wrote:
>
> Dear Sir
>
> I am hoping you might pass this question along to your members.
>
> Where can I view Lesser Prairie Chickens?  Last year I tried following the
> directions in the Tulsa Audubon book for the Arnett site but failed
> miserably.  No doubt the directions are clear for most people and my miss
> is entirely my fault.
>
> Although I was born and raised in Oklahoma, I now live in the Chicago area
> and did not start birding until recently.  Being recently retired, I have
> time to bird and can come down to Oklahoma any time your readers think my
> chances would be best.
>
> Thank you very much for your assistance.
>
> Regards
>
> Scott Fisher
> scottfisher04 AT gmail.com
>
>
>