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Updated on Thursday, July 30 at 01:44 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-fronted Goose,©David Sibley

30 Jul Re: Things are getting interesting on Jenkins. [Matthew Jung ]
30 Jul Things are getting interesting on Jenkins. [rgunn1 ]
30 Jul Hackberry Flat omission from 7-29-2015 [ML2x ]
30 Jul Re: White-winged Parakeet/MWC [Jan Dolph ]
30 Jul Re: Hackberry Flat 7-29-2015 [Russell Doughty ]
29 Jul Hackberry Flat 7-29-2015 [ML2x ]
29 Jul Re: White-winged Parakeet/MWC [Foundation Subscriber ]
29 Jul Re: Status of Sprague's Pipit [Russell Doughty ]
28 Jul Re: White-winged Parakeet/MWC [Jan Dolph ]
29 Jul Re: Status of Sprague's Pipit [EUGENE YOUNG ]
29 Jul Re: Status of Sprague's Pipit [EUGENE YOUNG ]
28 Jul Re: Status of Sprague's Pipit [Russell Doughty ]
28 Jul Re: Status of Sprague's Pipit [Russell Doughty ]
28 Jul Re: Status of Sprague's Pipit [Laura Erickson ]
29 Jul Re: Status of Sprague's Pipit [EUGENE YOUNG ]
28 Jul Status of Sprague's Pipit [Russell Doughty ]
27 Jul OKC Sludge Lagoon [Cameron Carver ]
26 Jul Re: White-winged Parakeet/MWC [James Hubbell ]
26 Jul Re: Not the first, but the second [ROBERT LAVAL ]
26 Jul Not the first, but the second [Jennifer Kidney ]
25 Jul Re: White-winged Parakeet/MWC [Lindell Dillon ]
25 Jul White-winged Parakeet/MWC [Jimmy Woodard ]
23 Jul Dates set for 2016 Red Slough Birding Convention [David Arbour ]
23 Jul Re: Tulsa Martin Roost [Foundation Subscriber ]
23 Jul Tulsa Martin Roost ["Humphrey, Todd" ]
22 Jul Hackberry Flat 7-21-2015 [ML2x ]
21 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 21 [David Arbour ]
21 Jul Martin Invasion ["Humphrey, Todd" ]
21 Jul A bit OT: Audubon exhibition ["Wainwright, Charlotte E." ]
21 Jul New Birding Opportunity [John Hurd ]
21 Jul Re: Call for papers for Fall OOS meeting/OCT 9-11 in Durant ["Humphrey, Todd" ]
19 Jul Call for papers for Fall OOS meeting/OCT 9-11 in Durant [Jimmy Woodard ]
18 Jul Hackberry Flat 7-18.....FUWD, not in our group. [ML2x ]
18 Jul Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 14 [Mary Jo Peterson ]
17 Jul Re: barn owl [John Shackford ]
17 Jul barn owl [Sue Selman ]
17 Jul Fulvous Whistling Ducks at Hackberry Flat - Yes [M B Kamp ]
17 Jul Fulvous Whistling Duck - Hackberry Flat - wait awhile [John Ault ]
15 Jul Re: Hackberry Flat Survey, Jul 15, 2015 [Melinda Droege ]
15 Jul Re: Hackberry Flat Survey, Jul 15, 2015 [Sue Selman ]
15 Jul Hackberry Flat Survey, Jul 15, 2015 [ML2x ]
14 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 14 [David Arbour ]
14 Jul Re: Tallgrass prairie [John Fisher ]
14 Jul Re: Tallgrass prairie ["Curtis, Tom" ]
14 Jul Re: Tallgrass prairie ["Curtis, Tom" ]
13 Jul Re: Tallgrass prairie [Don Gettinger ]
14 Jul Re: Hackberry Flat FUWD and EAGR chicks 7-13-2015 [Kurt Meisenzahl ]
13 Jul Hackberry Flat FUWD and EAGR chicks 7-13-2015 [ML2x ]
13 Jul Re: Tallgrass prairie [John Fisher ]
13 Jul Tallgrass prairie ["Curtis, Tom" ]
13 Jul Re: Hackberry Flat Fulvous Whistling-Ducks and Eared Grebes. [Dan Reinking ]
12 Jul Hackberry Flat Fulvous Whistling-Ducks and Eared Grebes. [ML2x ]
10 Jul Re: Whimbrel and other Shorebirds [Jim Arterburn ]
10 Jul Whimbrel and other Shorebirds [Jim Arterburn ]
8 Jul Re: Stinchcomb East yesterday [Foundation Subscriber ]
8 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 8 [David Arbour ]
8 Jul Re: Stinchcomb East yesterday [Jim Jorgensen ]
8 Jul Terns on the Move [Scott Loss ]
8 Jul Two Tern Day at Hefner [Cameron Carver ]
8 Jul Stinchcomb East yesterday [William Diffin ]
7 Jul Re: 2015 Spring Shorebird Photos Added to Website [Jim Arterburn ]
7 Jul Re: 2015 Spring Shorebird Photos Added to Website [Jim Arterburn ]
7 Jul 2015 Spring Shorebird Photos Added to Website [Jim Arterburn ]
7 Jul Re: Double the year-round range of of one. [Terry Mitchell ]
7 Jul Double the year-round range of of one. [John Bates ]
6 Jul Re: FW: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird [John Bates ]
6 Jul Re: Yellow-headed Blackbird [Foundation Subscriber ]
6 Jul Yellow-headed Blackbird [William Diffin ]
5 Jul Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding [Don Gettinger ]
5 Jul Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding [William Diffin ]
5 Jul French [John Bates ]
4 Jul Re: B-B-W-D [John Bates ]
5 Jul Re: B-B-W-D [Bill Adams ]
4 Jul Re: B-B-W-D [Sebastian ]
4 Jul Re: B-B-W-D [John Bates ]
4 Jul I was wrong. [John Bates ]

Subject: Re: Things are getting interesting on Jenkins.
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 13:40:37 -0500
Good show, Dick!  Matt

On 7/30/15, rgunn1  wrote:
> John Tharp and I did the full run on South Jenkins this morning. Over
> four miles round trip and  the high dew point made things uncomfortable
> (it is good to bird with meteorologist--I always thought it was the high
> humidity that was bothering me.) Along Jenkins we picked up a Black and
> White Warbler and then a Willow Flycatcher back east of Potts' land.
> Then on a diminishing pond (now a mud hole) two miles back we picked up
> a slew of sandpipers which included (thanks to John) Bairds, Least,
> Pectoral, Spotted, Solitary and Upland (flyover) Sandpipers.  Also,
> mixed in with 60+ Killdeers were 3 Semi-Palmated Plovers and a Lesser
> Yellowlegs. Got close to 70 species for the day. This is Jenkins not
> Hackberry Flat or Red Slough!! i wish we could have dragged a few of the
> AOU folks down there with us to show them what summer in Cleveland
> county is like.
>
> I think the hot weather has dried out the local wet spots and  had
> concentrated the shorebirds and the fly catcher and warbler were proof
> that the summer will end some day soon.
>
> D.
>
Subject: Things are getting interesting on Jenkins.
From: rgunn1 <rgunn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 11:40:20 -0500
John Tharp and I did the full run on South Jenkins this morning. Over 
four miles round trip and  the high dew point made things uncomfortable 
(it is good to bird with meteorologist--I always thought it was the high 
humidity that was bothering me.) Along Jenkins we picked up a Black and 
White Warbler and then a Willow Flycatcher back east of Potts' land. 
Then on a diminishing pond (now a mud hole) two miles back we picked up 
a slew of sandpipers which included (thanks to John) Bairds, Least, 
Pectoral, Spotted, Solitary and Upland (flyover) Sandpipers.  Also, 
mixed in with 60+ Killdeers were 3 Semi-Palmated Plovers and a Lesser 
Yellowlegs. Got close to 70 species for the day. This is Jenkins not 
Hackberry Flat or Red Slough!! i wish we could have dragged a few of the 
AOU folks down there with us to show them what summer in Cleveland 
county is like.

I think the hot weather has dried out the local wet spots and  had 
concentrated the shorebirds and the fly catcher and warbler were proof 
that the summer will end some day soon.

D.
Subject: Hackberry Flat omission from 7-29-2015
From: ML2x <ml2x AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 11:38:49 -0500
Hello Everyone,

I failed to post the 1 Black-bellied Plover we had yesterday. It was just 
starting to come 

out of breeding plumage.

Mea Culpa,

Lou Truex
Subject: Re: White-winged Parakeet/MWC
From: Jan Dolph <russetdm AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 04:05:06 -0500
Thanks, I just could not remember the name of the bird at the moment. I see him 
every day. You just forget about their name when they are in your yard all the 
time. He really holds his own against the white wing doves. Have you heard 
anything more about the lady in Bethany's bird? 


I appreciate you answering me back.

Happy birding,

Jan Dolph
Northwest Oklahoma City, OK

-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Foundation Subscriber
Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2015 12:08 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: White-winged Parakeet/MWC

I think you are talking about Peach Faced Love Bird. There are considerable 
colonies of them in Phoenix, and Tucson. I had not heard of them in OKC-. They 
are included in most current bird books. ( Nat. Geo Birds of N. Am) Hal Yocum 


.--- Jan Dolph  wrote: 
> Could you please describe what the Conure parrot looks like? I looked it up 
on the Internet and found many different colors. I have been feeding a small 
parrot for over a year that comes twice daily. I live off Council Road and 
Northwest Highway. He comes from the North. I realize this is not your friends 
bird that comes to my house. But, if she can’t capture her bird it may give 
her some comfort to know that other parrots do make it when the weather is bad. 
The one that comes to my house was called a Peached faced something parrot. I 
just can’t remember right off hand the name. I have a picture some place. I 
will try to find the name. You can hear him coming and he will not come down 
from the trees if I am in the yard. He looks very healthy and a beautiful 
green, blue and yellow tail feathers. He still comes with his friends the 
sparrows. 

> 
>  
> 
> I can see the Mississippi Kites from my house flying higher up in the sky. At 
the beginning of summer they were in a tree very close to me. They would fly 
right down by my head in the back yard. I was so afraid they would build a 
nest. Usually, the MK are closer to 50th and Council I believe. Most of my 
trees are not that high. 

> 
>  
> 
> Please let me know about the Conure parrot.
> 
>  
> 
> Happy birding,
> 
>  
> 
> Jan Dolph
> 
> Northwest Oklahoma City, OK
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of James Hubbell
> Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2015 9:11 PM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: White-winged Parakeet/MWC
> 
>  
> 
> On this subject. Be on the look out in Bethany. My friend that lives there 
had a Conure Parrot escape yesterday. He is still in the area. He was heard 
yelling at Mississippi Kites. Along 36th, between council and Lake Overholser. 
If any one see or captures this please let me know. My Friend would really like 
to get his John Bon Jovi back. 

> 
>  
> 
> Thanks
> 
>  
> 
> On Sat, Jul 25, 2015 at 10:14 AM, Lindell Dillon  
wrote: 

> 
> Might put out some colored parrot food and lure it. In 2004 a Lutino 
Cockatiel showed up at one of my feeders. Took me about a week to catch her, 
but we did. Eleven years later, Peaches is still with us. She's a great watch 
bird. Lets out a big alarm call if she sees anything in the back yard she deems 
dangerous. That includes crows, hawks, blue jays, cats, dogs, and humans. 

> 
>  
> 
> On Sat, Jul 25, 2015 at 8:08 AM, Jimmy Woodard  wrote:
> 
> I just observed and heard calling a White-winged Parakeet in the trees in our 
yard. it flew across the road and sat in a tree chattering for a few 

> 
> minutes before flying off. I could hear it calling from somewhere just to the 
east of us for a few minutes so it’s still in the neighborhood. 

> 
>  
> 
> I tried calling to it and it did turn around and look at me but that was it. 
It most likely is an escapee from the large flea market that goes on each 

> 
> weekend at the corner of NE 23rd and Midwest Blvd. this is just a half mile 
north of us. 

> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>                 Jimmy Woodard
> 
>                 Midwest City, OK
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
Subject: Re: Hackberry Flat 7-29-2015
From: Russell Doughty <rustymonroe AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 00:28:55 -0500
Lol awesome. Look me up next time y'all come to Sardis or these goodest
parts.

918-699-9215
Russ
On Jul 29, 2015 8:55 PM, "ML2x"  wrote:

>   Hello Everyone,
>
> I birded Hackberry Flat with 2 biologists from the Wichita Mountains and
> Kelvin Schoonover, the
> biologist at Hackberry Flat, today.  I certainly had a goodest time and we
> saw some goodest birds.
> We had a Common Gallinule on the N boundary road on the N side of the road
> at the inlet valve.
> We had a Long-billed Curlew fly over us out of the Millet unit.  We had 44
> Eared Grebe chicks and
> 121 Black-necked Stilt chicks from 15% to 90% developed.  I’ve never seen
> more Coot chicks
> anywhere at anytime.  There was a big increase in Blue-winged Teal at the
> lake.  We had 18 shorebird
> species for the day.
>
> Goodest Birding,
>
> Mary and Lou Truex
> ml2x AT sbcglobal.net
> Lawton
>
> Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
> Jul 29, 2015 6:30 AM - 1:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 21.0 mile(s)
> 59 species (+5 other taxa)
>
> Fulvous Whistling-Duck  2     In flight.  Black underwings, tan body,
> white tail-band.
> Wood Duck  6
> American Wigeon  9     Actual count
> Mallard  18
> Blue-winged Teal  275     Actual count
> Northern Shoveler  4
> Northern Pintail  2
> Redhead  225
> Ruddy Duck  96
> Northern Bobwhite  28
> Pied-billed Grebe  X
> Eared Grebe  79    44 chicks, 35 adults.
> Great Blue Heron  7
> Great Egret  8
> Little Blue Heron  2
> Cattle Egret  7
> Black-crowned Night-Heron  6
> Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  4
> White-faced Ibis  8
> Glossy/White-faced Ibis  51
> Red-tailed Hawk  1
> King Rail  1
> Common Gallinule  1
> American Coot  700     Possibly in the 700's with 400+ chicks out in the
> back units.
> Black-necked Stilt  217     121 chicks, 96 adults.
> American Avocet  78     17 chicks, 61 adults
> Snowy Plover  1
> Killdeer  X
> Spotted Sandpiper  1
> Solitary Sandpiper  19
> Greater Yellowlegs  43
> Lesser Yellowlegs  225
> Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs  75
> Upland Sandpiper  7
> Long-billed Curlew  1
> Stilt Sandpiper  171     Actual count
> Baird's Sandpiper  19
> Least Sandpiper  14
> Pectoral Sandpiper  1
> Semipalmated Sandpiper  8
> peep sp.  25
> Short-billed Dowitcher  3     Orange chested, spotting surrounded by buff
> color, not white.  Tertials very busy looking, not clean like the LBDO.
> Long-billed Dowitcher  5
> Wilson's Phalarope  88
> Black Tern  74
> Forster's Tern  2
> Eurasian Collared-Dove  5
> Mourning Dove  X
> Great Horned Owl  2
> Common Nighthawk  21
> Black-chinned Hummingbird  1
> American Kestrel  1
> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  8
> Loggerhead Shrike  2
> Horned Lark  3
> Barn Swallow  15
> Cliff Swallow  200
> swallow sp.  100
> Northern Mockingbird  1
> Lark Sparrow  2
> Dickcissel  X
> Red-winged Blackbird  X
> Western/Eastern Meadowlark  8
> Common Grackle  35
> Great-tailed Grackle  45
>
Subject: Hackberry Flat 7-29-2015
From: ML2x <ml2x AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 20:55:14 -0500
Hello Everyone,

I birded Hackberry Flat with 2 biologists from the Wichita Mountains and Kelvin 
Schoonover, the 

biologist at Hackberry Flat, today. I certainly had a goodest time and we saw 
some goodest birds. 

We had a Common Gallinule on the N boundary road on the N side of the road at 
the inlet valve. 

We had a Long-billed Curlew fly over us out of the Millet unit. We had 44 Eared 
Grebe chicks and 

121 Black-necked Stilt chicks from 15% to 90% developed. I’ve never seen more 
Coot chicks 

anywhere at anytime. There was a big increase in Blue-winged Teal at the lake. 
We had 18 shorebird 

species for the day.

Goodest Birding,

Mary and Lou Truex
ml2x AT sbcglobal.net
Lawton

Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
Jul 29, 2015 6:30 AM - 1:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
21.0 mile(s)
59 species (+5 other taxa)

Fulvous Whistling-Duck 2 In flight. Black underwings, tan body, white 
tail-band. 

Wood Duck  6
American Wigeon  9     Actual count
Mallard  18
Blue-winged Teal  275     Actual count
Northern Shoveler  4
Northern Pintail  2
Redhead  225
Ruddy Duck  96
Northern Bobwhite  28
Pied-billed Grebe  X
Eared Grebe  79    44 chicks, 35 adults.
Great Blue Heron  7
Great Egret  8
Little Blue Heron  2
Cattle Egret  7
Black-crowned Night-Heron  6
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  4
White-faced Ibis  8
Glossy/White-faced Ibis  51
Red-tailed Hawk  1
King Rail  1
Common Gallinule  1
American Coot 700 Possibly in the 700's with 400+ chicks out in the back units. 

Black-necked Stilt  217     121 chicks, 96 adults.
American Avocet  78     17 chicks, 61 adults
Snowy Plover  1
Killdeer  X
Spotted Sandpiper  1
Solitary Sandpiper  19
Greater Yellowlegs  43
Lesser Yellowlegs  225
Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs  75
Upland Sandpiper  7
Long-billed Curlew  1
Stilt Sandpiper  171     Actual count
Baird's Sandpiper  19
Least Sandpiper  14
Pectoral Sandpiper  1
Semipalmated Sandpiper  8
peep sp.  25
Short-billed Dowitcher 3 Orange chested, spotting surrounded by buff color, not 
white. Tertials very busy looking, not clean like the LBDO. 

Long-billed Dowitcher  5
Wilson's Phalarope  88
Black Tern  74
Forster's Tern  2
Eurasian Collared-Dove  5
Mourning Dove  X
Great Horned Owl  2
Common Nighthawk  21
Black-chinned Hummingbird  1
American Kestrel  1
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  8
Loggerhead Shrike  2
Horned Lark  3
Barn Swallow  15
Cliff Swallow  200
swallow sp.  100
Northern Mockingbird  1
Lark Sparrow  2
Dickcissel  X
Red-winged Blackbird  X
Western/Eastern Meadowlark  8
Common Grackle  35
Great-tailed Grackle  45
Subject: Re: White-winged Parakeet/MWC
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 13:07:57 -0400
I think you are talking about Peach Faced Love Bird. There are considerable 
colonies of them in Phoenix, and Tucson. I had not heard of them in OKC-. They 
are included in most current bird books. ( Nat. Geo Birds of N. Am) Hal Yocum 


.--- Jan Dolph  wrote: 
> Could you please describe what the Conure parrot looks like? I looked it up 
on the Internet and found many different colors. I have been feeding a small 
parrot for over a year that comes twice daily. I live off Council Road and 
Northwest Highway. He comes from the North. I realize this is not your friends 
bird that comes to my house. But, if she can’t capture her bird it may give 
her some comfort to know that other parrots do make it when the weather is bad. 
The one that comes to my house was called a Peached faced something parrot. I 
just can’t remember right off hand the name. I have a picture some place. I 
will try to find the name. You can hear him coming and he will not come down 
from the trees if I am in the yard. He looks very healthy and a beautiful 
green, blue and yellow tail feathers. He still comes with his friends the 
sparrows. 

> 
>  
> 
> I can see the Mississippi Kites from my house flying higher up in the sky. At 
the beginning of summer they were in a tree very close to me. They would fly 
right down by my head in the back yard. I was so afraid they would build a 
nest. Usually, the MK are closer to 50th and Council I believe. Most of my 
trees are not that high. 

> 
>  
> 
> Please let me know about the Conure parrot.
> 
>  
> 
> Happy birding,
> 
>  
> 
> Jan Dolph
> 
> Northwest Oklahoma City, OK
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of James Hubbell
> Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2015 9:11 PM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: White-winged Parakeet/MWC
> 
>  
> 
> On this subject. Be on the look out in Bethany. My friend that lives there 
had a Conure Parrot escape yesterday. He is still in the area. He was heard 
yelling at Mississippi Kites. Along 36th, between council and Lake Overholser. 
If any one see or captures this please let me know. My Friend would really like 
to get his John Bon Jovi back. 

> 
>  
> 
> Thanks
> 
>  
> 
> On Sat, Jul 25, 2015 at 10:14 AM, Lindell Dillon  
wrote: 

> 
> Might put out some colored parrot food and lure it. In 2004 a Lutino 
Cockatiel showed up at one of my feeders. Took me about a week to catch her, 
but we did. Eleven years later, Peaches is still with us. She's a great watch 
bird. Lets out a big alarm call if she sees anything in the back yard she deems 
dangerous. That includes crows, hawks, blue jays, cats, dogs, and humans. 

> 
>  
> 
> On Sat, Jul 25, 2015 at 8:08 AM, Jimmy Woodard  wrote:
> 
> I just observed and heard calling a White-winged Parakeet in the trees in our 
yard. it flew across the road and sat in a tree chattering for a few 

> 
> minutes before flying off. I could hear it calling from somewhere just to the 
east of us for a few minutes so it’s still in the neighborhood. 

> 
>  
> 
> I tried calling to it and it did turn around and look at me but that was it. 
It most likely is an escapee from the large flea market that goes on each 

> 
> weekend at the corner of NE 23rd and Midwest Blvd. this is just a half mile 
north of us. 

> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>                 Jimmy Woodard
> 
>                 Midwest City, OK
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
Subject: Re: Status of Sprague's Pipit
From: Russell Doughty <rustymonroe AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 00:59:07 -0500
Thanks, Gene! I learn so much more when I query the community.



On Tue, Jul 28, 2015 at 8:37 PM, EUGENE YOUNG  wrote:

>  On previous email, should be Fed Register!
>
>  LPN  is listing priority number, ranges from 1-12, you can find what
> each # means on FWS web pages, or FR from ca 1983!  Since it went from 8-11
> it should remain a candidate, but very low priority!  The lower the # the
> greater the priority for listing under ESA!
>
>  Timeframes for actions are listed in the FRs, in some instances dictated
> by statute (ESA, or other associated regs, ex. NEPA), or by courts!
>
>  If you read the FR you will notice they take into account BBS data, CBC
> data plus other data provided in previous public comment periods!  Thus,
> the movement from 8 to 11 is the same process that took the Lesser
> Prairie-chicken from a high LPN up to a 2 and eventually to listing as T!
> Same process that removed the Bald Eagle and Peregrine Falcon from listing!
>
>  This may help:
>
>  http://www.fws.gov/Midwest/endangered/glossary/index.html
>
>  Gene
>
> Gene Young Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 28, 2015, at 7:43 PM, Russell Doughty 
> wrote:
>
>   Gene, thanks! It does say LPN 11 - for what does that stand? So is it
> expected that it will be removed as a candidate? I'm putting together some
> educational materials and I don't want it to be out-of-date tomorrow.
>
>  Thanks again.
>
> On Tue, Jul 28, 2015 at 7:31 PM, EUGENE YOUNG 
> wrote:
>
>>  The USFWS will make a final decision on the Candidate listing status
>> going from an 8 to an 11, which means the species is doing better than
>> previously believed!
>>
>>  Gene Young
>> NOC, Tonkawa
>>
>> Gene Young Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Jul 28, 2015, at 7:03 PM, Russell Doughty 
>> wrote:
>>
>>   Howdy all,
>>
>>  I'm curious as to the listing status of Sprague's Pipit (*Anthus
>> spragueii*). It has been a candidate since Sept 2010, but appears in the
>> ODWC powerpoint of listed species noting, "USFWS to take listing further
>> action by Sept 30, 2015. It's not clear to me what this statement means.
>>
>>  Thanks,
>>
>>  Russ
>>
>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: White-winged Parakeet/MWC
From: Jan Dolph <russetdm AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 22:14:50 -0500
Could you please describe what the Conure parrot looks like? I looked it up on 
the Internet and found many different colors. I have been feeding a small 
parrot for over a year that comes twice daily. I live off Council Road and 
Northwest Highway. He comes from the North. I realize this is not your friends 
bird that comes to my house. But, if she can’t capture her bird it may give 
her some comfort to know that other parrots do make it when the weather is bad. 
The one that comes to my house was called a Peached faced something parrot. I 
just can’t remember right off hand the name. I have a picture some place. I 
will try to find the name. You can hear him coming and he will not come down 
from the trees if I am in the yard. He looks very healthy and a beautiful 
green, blue and yellow tail feathers. He still comes with his friends the 
sparrows. 


 

I can see the Mississippi Kites from my house flying higher up in the sky. At 
the beginning of summer they were in a tree very close to me. They would fly 
right down by my head in the back yard. I was so afraid they would build a 
nest. Usually, the MK are closer to 50th and Council I believe. Most of my 
trees are not that high. 


 

Please let me know about the Conure parrot.

 

Happy birding,

 

Jan Dolph

Northwest Oklahoma City, OK

 

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of James Hubbell
Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2015 9:11 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: White-winged Parakeet/MWC

 

On this subject. Be on the look out in Bethany. My friend that lives there had 
a Conure Parrot escape yesterday. He is still in the area. He was heard yelling 
at Mississippi Kites. Along 36th, between council and Lake Overholser. If any 
one see or captures this please let me know. My Friend would really like to get 
his John Bon Jovi back. 


 

Thanks

 

On Sat, Jul 25, 2015 at 10:14 AM, Lindell Dillon  wrote:

Might put out some colored parrot food and lure it. In 2004 a Lutino Cockatiel 
showed up at one of my feeders. Took me about a week to catch her, but we did. 
Eleven years later, Peaches is still with us. She's a great watch bird. Lets 
out a big alarm call if she sees anything in the back yard she deems dangerous. 
That includes crows, hawks, blue jays, cats, dogs, and humans. 


 

On Sat, Jul 25, 2015 at 8:08 AM, Jimmy Woodard  wrote:

 I just observed and heard calling a White-winged Parakeet in the trees in our 
yard. it flew across the road and sat in a tree chattering for a few 


 minutes before flying off. I could hear it calling from somewhere just to the 
east of us for a few minutes so it’s still in the neighborhood. 


 

 I tried calling to it and it did turn around and look at me but that was it. 
It most likely is an escapee from the large flea market that goes on each 


 weekend at the corner of NE 23rd and Midwest Blvd. this is just a half mile 
north of us. 


 

 

                Jimmy Woodard

                Midwest City, OK

 

 
Subject: Re: Status of Sprague's Pipit
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 01:37:18 +0000
On previous email, should be Fed Register!

LPN is listing priority number, ranges from 1-12, you can find what each # 
means on FWS web pages, or FR from ca 1983! Since it went from 8-11 it should 
remain a candidate, but very low priority! The lower the # the greater the 
priority for listing under ESA! 


Timeframes for actions are listed in the FRs, in some instances dictated by 
statute (ESA, or other associated regs, ex. NEPA), or by courts! 


If you read the FR you will notice they take into account BBS data, CBC data 
plus other data provided in previous public comment periods! Thus, the movement 
from 8 to 11 is the same process that took the Lesser Prairie-chicken from a 
high LPN up to a 2 and eventually to listing as T! Same process that removed 
the Bald Eagle and Peregrine Falcon from listing! 


This may help:

http://www.fws.gov/Midwest/endangered/glossary/index.html

Gene

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 28, 2015, at 7:43 PM, Russell Doughty 
> wrote: 


Gene, thanks! It does say LPN 11 - for what does that stand? So is it expected 
that it will be removed as a candidate? I'm putting together some educational 
materials and I don't want it to be out-of-date tomorrow. 


Thanks again.

On Tue, Jul 28, 2015 at 7:31 PM, EUGENE YOUNG 
> wrote: 

The USFWS will make a final decision on the Candidate listing status going from 
an 8 to an 11, which means the species is doing better than previously 
believed! 


Gene Young
NOC, Tonkawa

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 28, 2015, at 7:03 PM, Russell Doughty 
> wrote: 


Howdy all,

I'm curious as to the listing status of Sprague's Pipit (Anthus spragueii). It 
has been a candidate since Sept 2010, but appears in the ODWC powerpoint of 
listed species noting, "USFWS to take listing further action by Sept 30, 2015. 
It's not clear to me what this statement means. 


Thanks,

Russ


Subject: Re: Status of Sprague's Pipit
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 01:17:33 +0000
Details can be found here in FEDERAL REGISTRAR:

http://ecos.fws.gov/speciesProfile/profile/speciesProfile.action?spcode=B0GD#status 


Gene

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 28, 2015, at 7:52 PM, Russell Doughty 
> wrote: 


Laura,

Thanks for your info. I'm more familiar with economic trends, but this is an 
investment that doesn't look to have a sustainable return. The "further listing 
action to take place by September 30th, 2015" doesn't tell me much - is there a 
deadline or action expected to be taken prior to this date? 


Here is the powerpoint at which I'm gandering: 
http://www.wildlifedepartment.com/wildlifemgmt/515listed.pdf 


The PDF hails from this webpage which has been updated since the last time I 
saw it a few months ago: 
http://www.wildlifedepartment.com/wildlifemgmt/endangeredspecies.htm 


Russ

On Tue, Jul 28, 2015 at 7:40 PM, Laura Erickson 
> wrote: 

Here's a link to the Breeding Bird Survey trend graph for Sprague's Pipit. Draw 
your own conclusions about whether it's doing well. 


http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/graphs12c/s07000SUR.png

Best, Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Tue, Jul 28, 2015 at 7:31 PM, EUGENE YOUNG 
> wrote: 

The USFWS will make a final decision on the Candidate listing status going from 
an 8 to an 11, which means the species is doing better than previously 
believed! 


Gene Young
NOC, Tonkawa

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 28, 2015, at 7:03 PM, Russell Doughty 
> wrote: 


Howdy all,

I'm curious as to the listing status of Sprague's Pipit (Anthus spragueii). It 
has been a candidate since Sept 2010, but appears in the ODWC powerpoint of 
listed species noting, "USFWS to take listing further action by Sept 30, 2015. 
It's not clear to me what this statement means. 


Thanks,

Russ





--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds. There is 
something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature--the assurance 
that dawn comes after night, and spring after the winter. 


            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
Subject: Re: Status of Sprague's Pipit
From: Russell Doughty <rustymonroe AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 19:52:29 -0500
Laura,

Thanks for your info. I'm more familiar with economic trends, but this is
an investment that doesn't look to have a sustainable return. The "further
listing action to take place by September 30th, 2015" doesn't tell me much
- is there a deadline or action expected to be taken prior to this date?

Here is the powerpoint at which I'm gandering:
http://www.wildlifedepartment.com/wildlifemgmt/515listed.pdf

The PDF hails from this webpage which has been updated since the last time
I saw it a few months ago:
http://www.wildlifedepartment.com/wildlifemgmt/endangeredspecies.htm

Russ

On Tue, Jul 28, 2015 at 7:40 PM, Laura Erickson  wrote:

> Here's a link to the Breeding Bird Survey trend graph for Sprague's Pipit.
> Draw your own conclusions about whether it's doing well.
>
> http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/graphs12c/s07000SUR.png
>
> Best, Laura Erickson
> Duluth, MN
>
> On Tue, Jul 28, 2015 at 7:31 PM, EUGENE YOUNG 
> wrote:
>
>>  The USFWS will make a final decision on the Candidate listing status
>> going from an 8 to an 11, which means the species is doing better than
>> previously believed!
>>
>>  Gene Young
>> NOC, Tonkawa
>>
>> Gene Young Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Jul 28, 2015, at 7:03 PM, Russell Doughty 
>> wrote:
>>
>>   Howdy all,
>>
>>  I'm curious as to the listing status of Sprague's Pipit (*Anthus
>> spragueii*). It has been a candidate since Sept 2010, but appears in the
>> ODWC powerpoint of listed species noting, "USFWS to take listing further
>> action by Sept 30, 2015. It's not clear to me what this statement means.
>>
>>  Thanks,
>>
>>  Russ
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> --
> Laura Erickson
>
> For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>
> There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
> There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
> nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
> winter.
>
>             --Rachel Carson
>
> Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>
Subject: Re: Status of Sprague's Pipit
From: Russell Doughty <rustymonroe AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 19:43:55 -0500
Gene, thanks! It does say LPN 11 - for what does that stand? So is it
expected that it will be removed as a candidate? I'm putting together some
educational materials and I don't want it to be out-of-date tomorrow.

Thanks again.

On Tue, Jul 28, 2015 at 7:31 PM, EUGENE YOUNG  wrote:

>  The USFWS will make a final decision on the Candidate listing status
> going from an 8 to an 11, which means the species is doing better than
> previously believed!
>
>  Gene Young
> NOC, Tonkawa
>
> Gene Young Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 28, 2015, at 7:03 PM, Russell Doughty 
> wrote:
>
>   Howdy all,
>
>  I'm curious as to the listing status of Sprague's Pipit (*Anthus
> spragueii*). It has been a candidate since Sept 2010, but appears in the
> ODWC powerpoint of listed species noting, "USFWS to take listing further
> action by Sept 30, 2015. It's not clear to me what this statement means.
>
>  Thanks,
>
>  Russ
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Status of Sprague's Pipit
From: Laura Erickson <chickadee AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 19:40:30 -0500
Here's a link to the Breeding Bird Survey trend graph for Sprague's Pipit.
Draw your own conclusions about whether it's doing well.

http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/graphs12c/s07000SUR.png

Best, Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Tue, Jul 28, 2015 at 7:31 PM, EUGENE YOUNG  wrote:

>  The USFWS will make a final decision on the Candidate listing status
> going from an 8 to an 11, which means the species is doing better than
> previously believed!
>
>  Gene Young
> NOC, Tonkawa
>
> Gene Young Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 28, 2015, at 7:03 PM, Russell Doughty 
> wrote:
>
>   Howdy all,
>
>  I'm curious as to the listing status of Sprague's Pipit (*Anthus
> spragueii*). It has been a candidate since Sept 2010, but appears in the
> ODWC powerpoint of listed species noting, "USFWS to take listing further
> action by Sept 30, 2015. It's not clear to me what this statement means.
>
>  Thanks,
>
>  Russ
>
>
>


-- 
-- 
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
Subject: Re: Status of Sprague's Pipit
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 00:31:43 +0000
The USFWS will make a final decision on the Candidate listing status going from 
an 8 to an 11, which means the species is doing better than previously 
believed! 


Gene Young
NOC, Tonkawa

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 28, 2015, at 7:03 PM, Russell Doughty 
> wrote: 


Howdy all,

I'm curious as to the listing status of Sprague's Pipit (Anthus spragueii). It 
has been a candidate since Sept 2010, but appears in the ODWC powerpoint of 
listed species noting, "USFWS to take listing further action by Sept 30, 2015. 
It's not clear to me what this statement means. 


Thanks,

Russ

Subject: Status of Sprague's Pipit
From: Russell Doughty <rustymonroe AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 19:03:50 -0500
Howdy all,

I'm curious as to the listing status of Sprague's Pipit (*Anthus spragueii*).
It has been a candidate since Sept 2010, but appears in the ODWC powerpoint
of listed species noting, "USFWS to take listing further action by Sept 30,
2015. It's not clear to me what this statement means.

Thanks,

Russ
Subject: OKC Sludge Lagoon
From: Cameron Carver <c.o.carver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 16:42:36 -0500
Greetings,

I stopped by the Sludge Lagoon up near Hefner this afternoon. I figured it 
would be a worthwhile stop and it did not disappoint. 


The first thing I noticed as I pulled up was the many white birds on the 
shoreline. Those white birds were all gulls and terns. I counted 30 Ring-billed 
Gulls and 24 Forster's Terns. I estimated Black Terns at about 25. I also 
counted 26 Least Terns (the most I've ever seen at one place away from the 
coast). This was a bit more difficult as there were several in the air and it 
looked as though some were flying back and forth from the direction of Hefner. 


As shorebirds go, I was at a disadvantage since I was not carrying my scope 
with me. I estimated 15 peeps and had 1 Stilt Sandpiper. There were several 
Killdeer. I could not find any other plovers, but it would not surprise me if 
they were out there. I will have to return soon with a scope as I can't resist 
some good shorebirding. 


Cameron Carver
OKC

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: White-winged Parakeet/MWC
From: James Hubbell <hubmutt AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 21:10:53 -0500
On this subject. Be on the look out in Bethany. My friend that lives there
had a Conure Parrot escape yesterday. He is still in the area. He was heard
yelling at Mississippi Kites. Along 36th, between council and Lake
Overholser. If any one see or captures this please let me know. My Friend
would really like to get his John Bon Jovi back.

Thanks

On Sat, Jul 25, 2015 at 10:14 AM, Lindell Dillon 
wrote:

> Might put out some colored parrot food and lure it.  In 2004 a Lutino
> Cockatiel showed up at one of my feeders.  Took me about a week to catch
> her, but we did.  Eleven years later, Peaches is still with us.  She's a
> great watch bird.  Lets out a big alarm call if she sees anything in the
> back yard she deems dangerous.  That includes crows, hawks, blue jays,
> cats, dogs, and humans.
>
> On Sat, Jul 25, 2015 at 8:08 AM, Jimmy Woodard  wrote:
>
>>                 I just observed and heard calling a White-winged Parakeet
>> in the trees in our yard. it flew across the road and sat in a tree
>> chattering for a few
>>
>>                 minutes before flying off. I could hear it calling from
>> somewhere just to the east of us for a few minutes so it’s still in the
>> neighborhood.
>>
>>
>>
>>                 I tried calling to it and it did turn around and look at
>> me but that was it. It most likely is an escapee from the large flea market
>> that goes on each
>>
>>                 weekend at the corner of NE 23rd and Midwest Blvd. this
>> is just a half mile north of us.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>                 Jimmy Woodard
>>
>>                 Midwest City, OK
>>
>
>
Subject: Re: Not the first, but the second
From: ROBERT LAVAL <blaval AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 19:38:33 -0500
Speaking of Nuthatches!! I live in extreme east central OK. White Breasted NH 
are common here and visit my platform feeder most days year around. I am 
fortunate that Red Breasted and Brown Headed also visit at times. Brown Headed 
nested close by one summer and brought the whole family to the feeder for about 
a month. It is interesting to watch the White Breasted interact with other 
birds at the feeder. They are very aggressive and have a "take no prisoners" 
attitude. They will puff up and open their wings wide and forward and rush 
almost any bird that comes to the feeder while they are there. I have seen 
Red-bellied WP and Blue Jays retreat without any resistance rather than face 
the sudden attack. All of the Nuthatches are very tame around the feeder as far 
as people are concerned and will come with me standing right by it. I have 
taken pictures form as close as 3 feet. Perhaps your bird will continue to come 
now that it has found your feeder. 
Subject: Not the first, but the second
From: Jennifer Kidney <jenlkidney AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 19:11:51 -0500
Dear Fellow Birders,

This morning I had a White-breasted Nuthatch at my safflower feeder. This is 
only the second time I've seen one in my back yard--the first was nine years 
ago--he was creeping down my pecan tree. My friend and neighbor, Anais 
Starr-Raeside, had said she'd been hearing them, but I doubted that as Blue 
Jays sometimes make a nuthatch like call, but this was a confirmation. 


By the way, over the years, I've enjoyed the posts on OK Birds, but it seems as 
if everyone has defected to e-bird, which I find boring. I like the stories! 


Jennifer Kidney
middle of Norman
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: White-winged Parakeet/MWC
From: Lindell Dillon <reddirtbird AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 10:14:57 -0500
Might put out some colored parrot food and lure it.  In 2004 a Lutino
Cockatiel showed up at one of my feeders.  Took me about a week to catch
her, but we did.  Eleven years later, Peaches is still with us.  She's a
great watch bird.  Lets out a big alarm call if she sees anything in the
back yard she deems dangerous.  That includes crows, hawks, blue jays,
cats, dogs, and humans.

On Sat, Jul 25, 2015 at 8:08 AM, Jimmy Woodard  wrote:

>                 I just observed and heard calling a White-winged Parakeet
> in the trees in our yard. it flew across the road and sat in a tree
> chattering for a few
>
>                 minutes before flying off. I could hear it calling from
> somewhere just to the east of us for a few minutes so it’s still in the
> neighborhood.
>
>
>
>                 I tried calling to it and it did turn around and look at
> me but that was it. It most likely is an escapee from the large flea market
> that goes on each
>
>                 weekend at the corner of NE 23rd and Midwest Blvd. this
> is just a half mile north of us.
>
>
>
>
>
>                 Jimmy Woodard
>
>                 Midwest City, OK
>
Subject: White-winged Parakeet/MWC
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 08:08:38 -0500
                I just observed and heard calling a White-winged Parakeet in
the trees in our yard. it flew across the road and sat in a tree chattering
for a few 

                minutes before flying off. I could hear it calling from
somewhere just to the east of us for a few minutes so it's still in the
neighborhood.

 

                I tried calling to it and it did turn around and look at me
but that was it. It most likely is an escapee from the large flea market
that goes on each

                weekend at the corner of NE 23rd and Midwest Blvd. this is
just a half mile north of us.

 

 

                Jimmy Woodard

                Midwest City, OK
Subject: Dates set for 2016 Red Slough Birding Convention
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 17:34:04 -0500
The dates for the 2016 Red Slough Birding Convention will be May 7 - 10.
Hope you can make it!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR
Subject: Re: Tulsa Martin Roost
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 14:16:55 -0400
I was surprised to see so many ( 300+ ) at Yaholo Dam area yesterday about 9:30 
AM . Also quite a few barn swallows, and few black headed gulls , likely 
Bonepartes. Hal Yocum, Edmond 

---- "Humphrey wrote: 
> Last night one of our Tulsa Audubon members scouted out the downtown Tulsa 
Purple Martin roost sight. He estimated that there are currently about 200,000 
Martins at this roost. TAS is hosting a watch party on Saturday at 8pm. 
Observation will take place at the Tulsa Community College parking lot at 10th 
and Elgin in downtown Tulsa. There is an informal dinner planned for 6:30pm at 
the Mazzios at 10th and Cincinnati. Everyone is welcome. 

> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Tulsa Martin Roost
From: "Humphrey, Todd" <Todd.Humphrey AT JENKSPS.ORG>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 18:07:26 +0000
Last night one of our Tulsa Audubon members scouted out the downtown Tulsa 
Purple Martin roost sight. He estimated that there are currently about 200,000 
Martins at this roost. TAS is hosting a watch party on Saturday at 8pm. 
Observation will take place at the Tulsa Community College parking lot at 10th 
and Elgin in downtown Tulsa. There is an informal dinner planned for 6:30pm at 
the Mazzios at 10th and Cincinnati. Everyone is welcome. 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Hackberry Flat 7-21-2015
From: ML2x <ml2x AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 14:44:57 -0500
Hello Everyone,

I birded Hackberry Flat yesterday with Matt Jung and David Chaffin(from Tenn). 
I had a goodest 

time and hope they did as well. The Eared Grebe chicks are getting larger. We 
had 34 in the Millet 

unit on the east side just past the berm. We also had 3 Short-billed 
Dowitchers, too many Coot 

chicks and adults still sitting on nests to count, the Fulvous Whistling-Duck 
flew over us when 

we were counting the Millet unit, one Black-bellied Whistling-Duck at the lake 
along with really 

large numbers of Lesser Yellowlegs, Black-necked Stilts, American Avocets, and 
Soras. I don’t ever 

remember having 31 Soras present on any count, ever.

The shorebird water is drying up fast with the with the temps in the 100’s. 
There will still be plenty 

of water to take care of the chicks next to the levees in the units, as well as 
water in the canals. 


I have been posting some of my pictures on Facebook on the Oklahoma 
Ornithological page if you 

are interested.

Goodest Birding,

Mary and Lou Truex
ml2x AT sbcglobal.net
Lawton

Tillman - Hackberry Flat, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
Jul 21, 2015 7:30 AM - 2:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
21.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Matt Jung and David Chaffin
47 species (+6 other taxa)

American Wigeon  5
Mallard  9
Blue-winged Teal  71
Northern Shoveler  4
Northern Pintail  8
dabbling duck sp.  4
Redhead  275     blocked in 25's.
Ruddy Duck  26
Northern Bobwhite  17
Pied-billed Grebe  38     20 adults, 18 chicks
Eared Grebe  77     43 adults, 34 chicks.  Pics submitted
Double-crested Cormorant  1
Great Blue Heron  4
Green Heron  1
Black-crowned Night-Heron  5
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  1
Glossy/White-faced Ibis  49
Swainson's Hawk  1
King Rail  4
Sora  31     Seen and heard 31 individuals.
American Coot  X
Black-necked Stilt  195     117 adults, 78 chicks.  Actual count
American Avocet  194     182 adults, 12 chicks
Killdeer  X
Solitary Sandpiper  11
Greater Yellowlegs  114
Lesser Yellowlegs  525
Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs  150     Blocked in 25's.
Upland Sandpiper  4
Stilt Sandpiper  41
Baird's Sandpiper  6
Least Sandpiper  37
Semipalmated Sandpiper  4
peep sp.  50
Short-billed Dowitcher  3     Pic submitted.
Long-billed Dowitcher  4
Wilson's Phalarope  78     Actual count
Black Tern  22
Forster's Tern  1
Eurasian Collared-Dove  4
Mourning Dove  X
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  4
Horned Lark  3
Barn Swallow  28
Cliff Swallow  42
swallow sp.  25
Northern Mockingbird  1
Dickcissel  X
Red-winged Blackbird  X
Eastern Meadowlark  3
Western/Eastern Meadowlark  5
Common Grackle  X
Great-tailed Grackle  X

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24347284 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 21
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:09:06 -0500
It was mostly cloudy and warm on the bird survey today.  71 species were
found.  I started at 6:02 a.m. so I could get done before it got too hot but
fortunately the clouds kept things a lot cooler than they were yesterday.  I
played a Screech-Owl call first thing and had two answer back from some
woods along Mudline road.  I found a new location with a calling Eastern
Towhee which makes 5 locations this year now.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 3

Wood Duck - 38

Ring-necked Duck - 2 males

Pied-billed Grebe - 10

American White Pelican - 45

Neotropic Cormorant - 2 (1 on nest in Anhinga rookery.)

Double-crested Cormorant - 1 

Anhinga - 11 adults and fledged young.  (also 1 nest with young still.)

Least Bittern - 2

Great Blue Heron - 11

Great Egret - 166

Snowy Egret - 48

Little-blue Heron - 12

Cattle Egret - 3

Green Heron - 10

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 8

White Ibis - 11

Turkey Vulture - 18

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 12 adults (also 3 broods seen.)

Common Gallinule - 20 adults (also 2 broods seen.)

American Coot - 7

Killdeer - 4

Spotted Sandpiper - 8

Solitary Sandpiper - 1

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 3

Western Sandpiper - 1

Least Sandpiper - 74

Least Tern - 1

Mourning Dove - 10

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 8

Eastern Screech-Owl - 2

Chimney Swift - 2

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Willow Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 7

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 8

Bell's Vireo - 1

American Crow - 11

Fish Crow - 2

Tree Swallow - 4

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 16

Cliff Swallow - 3

Barn Swallow - 31

Carolina Chickadee - 5

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Carolina Wren - 13

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Black-and-White Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 15

Yellow-breasted Chat - 3

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2 singing (1 at new location.)

Northern Cardinal - 11

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 16

Painted Bunting - 4

Dickcissel - 6

Red-winged Blackbird - 33

Common Grackle - 56

Orchard Oriole - 3

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Spot-winged Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

Herps:

 

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Green Treefrog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Martin Invasion
From: "Humphrey, Todd" <Todd.Humphrey AT JENKSPS.ORG>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 21:20:39 +0000
Tulsa Audubon is hosting a Purple Martin roost watch THIS Saturday in downtown 
Tulsa. The pre-watch dinner will begin at 6:30pm at the Mazzios at 10th and 
Elgin. The roost watch location is the Tulsa Community College parking lot at 
10th and Cincinnati in downtown Tulsa. We know there are well over 100,000 
Martins coming to this roost and expect numbers to increase over the coming 
days. We will host a second watch on Saturday, August 9 with the same schedule 
as above. Everyone is welcome. 


Just to make clear, this is a MARTIN invasion, not a Martian invasion. You can 
see additional last minute changes on the web at tulsaaudubon.org 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: A bit OT: Audubon exhibition
From: "Wainwright, Charlotte E." <charlotte.wainwright AT OU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:05:42 +0000
Hi all,

For those who may not know, the Sam Noble Museum of Natural History in Norman 
currently has an exhibition going on called "Audubon and the art of birds". It 
includes some of Audubon's original paintings as well as many from other famous 
bird artists. I went to see the exhibition last week and was impressed. 

The exhibition closes this Sunday (July 27th) so if you have not had a chance 
to see it yet, I would recommend a visit. Museum tickets are $8 for adults, $6 
for seniors, and $5 for kids. 

Subject: New Birding Opportunity
From: John Hurd <jackhurd AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 11:46:24 -0600
Hi all
Oklahoma City has opened a new trail: West River Trail. This trail winds seven 
miles south along the N. Canadian river from Lake Overholser to Meridian Ave.I 
took on the 1.5 miles from Crystal lake to Meridian. (and back)Enjoyed very 
little, trash, human traffic, rouge trails, four wheeling trucks, etc. (only 
saw 3 bicycles, and 1 truck)Enjoyed the post rain cool and joyful songs of tons 
of birds. 

Give it a try before it is found by the general public at large.
I identified: Near Crystal Lake Park35 speciesCanada Goose 15Great Blue Heron 
3Great Egret 2Black-crowned Night-Heron 1Turkey Vulture 7Mississippi Kite 
5Cooper's Hawk 3Red-tailed Hawk 1Killdeer 1Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 1Eurasian 
Collared-Dove 3Mourning Dove 12Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1 (heard)Red-bellied 
Woodpecker 1Western Kingbird 8Blue Jay 4American Crow 12Northern Rough-winged 
Swallow 2Barn Swallow 4Carolina Chickadee 9Carolina Wren 1Bewick's Wren 
1Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 3American Robin 15Gray Catbird 1Brown Thrasher 2Northern 
Cardinal 12Indigo Bunting 1Common Grackle 25Great-tailed Grackle 6Brown-headed 
Cowbird 15Baltimore Oriole 1House Finch 2American Goldfinch 14House Sparrow 25 

Good Birding
Jack HurdOKC
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Call for papers for Fall OOS meeting/OCT 9-11 in Durant
From: "Humphrey, Todd" <Todd.Humphrey AT JENKSPS.ORG>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 17:11:25 +0000
Hey Jimmy. I went to the athletic offices yesterday and asked about the 2016 
fall schedule. On this visit, I was told they wouldn't know until May!!! SO, am 
I right in understanding that the banquet is on Saturday night, is that right? 
Also, how many normally attend the banquet? Our meeting place in the Sharp 
Center will serve right at 100. Is that too small? If so, I would need to do 
some checking on an alternate space to see if tables could be moved to 
accommodate. As it is, our Presentation hall only has rectangular tables... Not 
sure if round tables are necessary? I think the presentation hall could hold 
more people but we would more than likely need to go with the rectangles. 


With these things in mind, I don't think a home football game would prevent us 
from hosting. 


Your thoughts...

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 19, 2015, at 2:00 PM, Jimmy Woodard 
> wrote: 


 Call for Papers for the Fall Meeting of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society: 
October 9-11, 2015 at the Russell Building of Southeastern in Durant 



The OOS Fall Meeting will be held at Southeastern OSU in Durant on October 
9-11th and we would love to hear from you. At this technical meeting, there 
will be talks and poster presentations on Saturday afternoon, October 10. 


For the third year, OOS will be honoring the best graduate and undergraduate 
presentations with cash awards. Cash awards will be given for best graduate 
presentation, best undergraduate presentation and best poster presentation. 
Runners-up in each category will also receive a cash award. 


If you would like to present, please send an abstract(no more than 300 words) 
of your presentation to j.woodard AT cox.net. Be sure to 
include your name, affiliation, presentation title and whether you would prefer 
a poster or oral presentation. If you are a student, please let me know if you 
are a graduate or undergraduate. The deadline for abstract submission is 
September 25, 2015. 


Thanks, and I am looking forward to hearing from you.

Jimmy Woodard,
OOS President Elect
Subject: Call for papers for Fall OOS meeting/OCT 9-11 in Durant
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 14:00:34 -0500
            Call for Papers for the Fall Meeting of the Oklahoma
Ornithological Society: October 9-11, 2015 at the Russell Building of
Southeastern in Durant


 

 

The OOS Fall Meeting will be held at Southeastern OSU in Durant on October
9-11th and we would love to hear from you. At this technical meeting, there
will be talks and poster presentations on Saturday afternoon, October 10.

 

For the third year, OOS will be honoring the best graduate and undergraduate
presentations with cash awards. Cash awards will be given for best graduate
presentation, best undergraduate presentation and best poster presentation.
Runners-up in each category will also receive a cash award.

 

If you would like to present, please send an abstract(no more than 300
words) of your presentation to j.woodard AT cox.net. Be sure to include your
name, affiliation, presentation title and whether you would prefer a poster
or oral presentation.  If you are a student, please let me know if you are a
graduate or undergraduate. The deadline for abstract submission is September
25, 2015.

 

Thanks, and I am looking forward to hearing from you.

 

Jimmy Woodard,

OOS President Elect

 
Subject: Hackberry Flat 7-18.....FUWD, not in our group.
From: ML2x <ml2x AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 21:22:21 -0500
Hello Everyone,

I was fortunate to bird with Melinda and Dan Droege today at Hackberry Flat. We 
did NOT have the 

Fulvous Whistling-Duck today but did have the BBWD. Soras(22) were everywhere. 
That was the most 

I’d ever heard at HF. We had tons of chicks in some of the back units that 
can’t be seen from the roads, 

but the water is really pulling down quickly in those units. The units will not 
be re-flooded so that they 

can be worked for duck season. The water put out on that hot ground is gone in 
3 or 4 days anyway. 

Here’s the list for today.....

Goodest birding,

Mary and Lou Truex
ml2x AT sbcglobal.net
Lawton

Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
Jul 18, 2015 6:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
16.0 mile(s)
53 species (+3 other taxa)

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck 1 1 bird in flight, white wing patches, dangling 
legs. 

Mallard  1
Blue-winged Teal  41
Northern Shoveler  3
Northern Pintail  8
Redhead  250     block count
Ruddy Duck  38
Northern Bobwhite  13
Pied-billed Grebe  48     12 chicks
Eared Grebe  57     19 chicks, 1 active nest with young being actively fed.
Double-crested Cormorant  1
Great Blue Heron  3
Great Egret  1
Little Blue Heron  1
Cattle Egret  7
Black-crowned Night-Heron  2
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  6
White-faced Ibis  21
Swainson's Hawk  1
King Rail  3
Sora  22     all heard calling.
Black-necked Stilt  121     26 chicks in varying sizes
American Avocet  91     8 chicks about 75%
Killdeer  X
Spotted Sandpiper  3
Solitary Sandpiper  5
Greater Yellowlegs  200
Willet  1
Lesser Yellowlegs  900
Stilt Sandpiper  7
Baird's Sandpiper  5
Least Sandpiper  63
Pectoral Sandpiper  3
Semipalmated Sandpiper  42
Western Sandpiper  4
peep sp.  100
Short-billed Dowitcher 2 orange chest, no white on spotting, tightly patterned 
tertials 

Long-billed Dowitcher  3
Wilson's Phalarope  72     actual count
Black Tern  7
Mourning Dove  X
Common Nighthawk  11
American Kestrel  1
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  3
Horned Lark  4
Barn Swallow  15
Cliff Swallow  75
swallow sp.  30
Lark Sparrow  2
Grasshopper Sparrow  1
Dickcissel  X
Red-winged Blackbird  X
Western/Eastern Meadowlark  3
Common Grackle  X
Great-tailed Grackle  X
Brown-headed Cowbird  3

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24307984 
Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 14
From: Mary Jo Peterson <m_mpeterson AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 10:43:59 -0500
'!'
Sent from my U.S. Cellular® Android-powered device

David Arbour  wrote:

>Robert Bastarache (USFS) and I surveyed birds today at Red Slough and found
>73 species.  It was mostly clear and very hot with a little wind.  Shorebird
>numbers are increasing and the two locations with mudflats that they are
>using are units 7 and 44.  I checked on one of the Purple Gallinule nests I
>have been watching and it was full of small black downy young, apparently
>recently hatched.  Songbirds are not singing much now and I noticed that
>they are now traveling in feeding groups of mixed species in the woodlands
>as I encountered two such groups today.  Here is our list for today:
>
> 
>
>Wood Duck - 43
>
>Mallard - 2
>
>Ring-necked Duck - 1 male
>
>Pied-billed Grebe - 8 adults (1 with 2 young.)
>
>American White Pelican - 4
>
>Neotropic Cormorant - 2 (1 on nest in Anhinga rookery.)
>
>Double-crested Cormorant - 1 
>
>Anhinga - 23 adults and fledged young.  (also 2 nests with young.)
>
>Great Blue Heron - 16
>
>Great Egret - 56
>
>Snowy Egret - 120
>
>Little-blue Heron - 18
>
>Cattle Egret - 22
>
>Green Heron - 12
>
>Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 14
>
>White Ibis - 28
>
>Black Vulture - 4
>
>Turkey Vulture - 18
>
>Mississippi Kite - 5
>
>Red-shouldered Hawk - 2
>
>Red-tailed Hawk - 1
>
>Purple Gallinule - 3 adults (also nest full of small downy chicks.)
>
>Common Gallinule - 11 adults (also brood of 9 small downy chicks.)
>
>Killdeer - 6
>
>Spotted Sandpiper - 1
>
>Solitary Sandpiper - 10
>
>Greater Yellowlegs - 1
>
>Semipalmated Sandpiper - 2
>
>Least Sandpiper - 32
>
>Pectoral Sandpiper - 1
>
>Mourning Dove - 9
>
>Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 10
>
>Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2
>
>Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2
>
>Downy Woodpecker - 3
>
>Pileated Woodpecker - 2
>
>Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1
>
>Acadian Flycatcher - 2
>
>Eastern Phoebe - 2
>
>Eastern Kingbird - 4
>
>Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1
>
>White-eyed Vireo - 10
>
>Bell's Vireo - 2
>
>Yellow-throated Vireo - 5
>
>Red-eyed Vireo - 1
>
>American Crow - 4
>
>Purple Martin - 7
>
>Tree Swallow - 8
>
>Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 7
>
>Cliff Swallow - 1
>
>Barn Swallow - 11
>
>Carolina Chickadee - 5
>
>Tufted Titmouse - 3
>
>Carolina Wren - 10
>
>Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2
>
>Northern Mockingbird - 1
>
>Pine Warbler - 2
>
>Black-and-White Warbler - 1
>
>Prothonotary Warbler - 2
>
>Kentucky Warbler - 1
>
>Common Yellowthroat - 4
>
>Yellow-breasted Chat - 4
>
>Summer Tanager - 3
>
>Eastern Towhee - 1
>
>Northern Cardinal - 15
>
>Indigo Bunting - 18
>
>Painted Bunting - 6
>
>Dickcissel - 10
>
>Red-winged Blackbird - 27
>
>Eastern Meadowlark - 1
>
>Common Grackle - 8
>
>Brown-headed Cowbird - 2
>
>Orchard Oriole - 2
>
> 
>
> 
>
>Odonates:
>
> 
>
>Citrine Forktail
>
>Spreadwing species
>
>Common Green Darner
>
>Cyrano Darner
>
>Regal Darner
>
>Prince Baskettail
>
>Royal River Cruiser
>
>Jade Clubtail
>
>Halloween Pennant
>
>Eastern Pondhawk
>
>Slaty Skimmer
>
>Great-blue Skimmer
>
>Widow Skimmer
>
>Common Whitetail
>
>Blue Dasher
>
>Spot-winged Glider
>
>Wandering Glider
>
>Black Saddlebags
>
> 
>
>Herps:
>
> 
>
>American Alligator
>
>Western Cottonmouth
>
>Orange-striped Ribbon Snake
>
>Southern Leopard Frog
>
>Bronze Frog
>
> 
>
>Also saw a large Bobcat.
>
> 
>
> 
>
>Good birding!
>
> 
>
>David Arbour
>
>De Queen, AR
>
> 
>
> 
>
> 
>
> 
>
> 
>
Subject: Re: barn owl
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 23:04:29 -0500
Hi Sue,

Barn Owls would surely eat a young mocker--even an old one if they can
catch it. The same for a Great Horned Owl or a barnyard kitty, if there are
any around.  Young birds--of most any species--are most vulnerable just out
of the nest.  This is partly compensated for in a population by laying more
eggs in the nest than just enough to replace mom and dad when their time
comes.

But let's hope the little guy just moved somewhere else and is doing fine.

Good to hear from you.

John Shackford
Edmond


On Fri, Jul 17, 2015 at 9:46 PM, Sue Selman 
wrote:

> I am wondering if a Barn Owl might eat a bird? I had a fledgling Mocking
> Bird in my front year along with a parent feeding it.
> When I went in for the evening the Mocking Bird was in a small tree in my
> yard but the next morning there was an Barn Owl
> feather under the tree and I have not seen the little on.
>
> Sue Selman
> Selman Ok
Subject: barn owl
From: Sue Selman <selmanranch AT WILDBLUE.NET>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 21:46:53 -0500
I am wondering if a Barn Owl might eat a bird? I had a fledgling Mocking Bird 
in my front year along with a parent feeding it. 

When I went in for the evening the Mocking Bird was in a small tree in my yard 
but the next morning there was an Barn Owl 

feather under the tree and I have not seen the little on.

Sue Selman
Selman Ok
Subject: Fulvous Whistling Ducks at Hackberry Flat - Yes
From: M B Kamp <mbkamp AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 18:31:43 -0500
Friday, July 17, 2015. George and I arrived at Hackberry Flat about 7am this
morning. We stopped first at the reservoir where I saw one FUWD a few
minutes later - flying north in the distance. We spent 2 hours checking out
the reservoir and not seeing any more FUWD. We did see one BBWD. At the
suggestion of a Texas birder we met along the road, we moved to the Weir
Unit arriving about 10am. At about that time, George and the Texas birder
both saw two FUWD flying across the unit and disappearing into the
vegetation. By noon we had two more sightings of a single FUWD flying in
that unit, shared with three other birders. We also saw two BBWD in the Weir
Unit.

 

Marty Kamp

Tulsa, Oklahoma USA

 
Subject: Fulvous Whistling Duck - Hackberry Flat - wait awhile
From: John Ault <jwault742 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 15:41:59 -0500
Arrived at Hackberry Flat about 8:45 a.m. and surveyed the Reservoir from
the north and south sides for a Fulvous Whistling Duck (FUWD).  About 10:45
drove to the south side of the Weir Unit (towards the east side); four
birders were present and said two Fulvous Whistling Ducks had flown in and
landed in the vegetation in the northern part of the unit (south of the
rank vegetation).  As I was turning my pickup around one FUWD got up, flew
west and landed east of the observation blind.  Three times during the next
hour and 15 minutes (until about noon) a FUWD would jump up, fly
around above the unit, and then land.

Persevere, you've got a chance.

-- 
John Ault
Lawton, OK
Subject: Re: Hackberry Flat Survey, Jul 15, 2015
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jul 2015 18:55:23 -0500
It sounds gooder than goodest!!!!!  I cannot wait to get to Hackberry!
 thanks Mary and Lou for finding the goodest birds of all!

Melinda D

On Wed, Jul 15, 2015 at 4:27 PM, ML2x  wrote:

> Hello Everyone,
>
> Mary and I birded with Joe Grzybowski today.  We had a seriously goodest
> time finding the
> Fulvous Whistling-Duck on the reservoir, 2 Black Bellied Whistling-Ducks
> just west of the
> Avocet unit, a Short-billed Dowitcher, 38 Eared Grebe chicks, an American
> Bittern, 4 King
> Rails and 9 Soras.  We also tallied 20 shorebird species which isn't
> ungoodest for mid-July!
>
> Goodest Birding,
>
> Mary and Lou Truex
> ml2x AT sbcglobal.net
>
>
>
> Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
> Jul 15, 2015 6:25 AM - 1:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 14.0 mile(s)
> 62 species (+3 other taxa)
>
> Black-bellied Whistling-Duck  2     Black trailing wing edge with large
> white stripe running laterally.
> Fulvous Whistling-Duck  1     tan head, black wings, white tail band.  Pic
> previously submitted.
> Gadwall  2
> American Wigeon  2
> Mallard  12
> Blue-winged Teal  69     12 chicks
> Northern Shoveler  6
> Northern Pintail  14
> Redhead  323     Actual count.
> Ruddy Duck  42
> Northern Bobwhite  12
> Pied-billed Grebe  61     12 chicks
> Eared Grebe  111     38 Chicks, 83 adults.  Actual count
> Double-crested Cormorant  2
> American Bittern  1     Heard making it's gulping call..
> Great Blue Heron  6
> Great Egret  3
> Black-crowned Night-Heron  4
> Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  3
> Glossy Ibis  1     Blue facial outline, no plum towards eye, gray legs
> with red knees
> White-faced Ibis  203
> Turkey Vulture  1
> King Rail  4
> Sora  9     8 calling, 1 seen.  Large yellow bill, black face, gray cheeks
> and neck, yellow legs.
> Black-necked Stilt  101     8 on nest 13 chicks.....actual count
> American Avocet  99
> Snowy Plover  4
> Killdeer  92
> Spotted Sandpiper  4
> Solitary Sandpiper  18
> Greater Yellowlegs  175
> Willet  2
> Lesser Yellowlegs  725
> Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs  75
> Upland Sandpiper  2
> Stilt Sandpiper  27     actual count
> Baird's Sandpiper  19
> Least Sandpiper  51
> Pectoral Sandpiper  2
> Semipalmated Sandpiper  6
> Western Sandpiper  3
> Short-billed Dowitcher  1     buffy edging, no white on spotting.  Very
> patterned tertials.
> Long-billed Dowitcher  12
> Wilson's Phalarope  173     actual count
> Black Tern  32
> Mourning Dove  X
> Great Horned Owl  1
> Common Nighthawk  24
> Ladder-backed Woodpecker  1
> American Kestrel  2
> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  6
> Horned Lark  5
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1
> Purple Martin  5
> Barn Swallow  16
> Cliff Swallow  13
> swallow sp.  10
> Common Yellowthroat  1
> Lark Sparrow  2
> Dickcissel  X
> Red-winged Blackbird  X
> Western/Eastern Meadowlark  X
> Yellow-headed Blackbird  4
> Common Grackle  X
> Great-tailed Grackle  X
>
> View this checklist online at
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24278405
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Re: Hackberry Flat Survey, Jul 15, 2015
From: Sue Selman <selmanranch AT WILDBLUE.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Jul 2015 17:19:46 -0500
That is wonderful compared to what it was like during the drought.
Sue Selman
Selman OK
On Jul 15, 2015, at 17:10, Sandy Berger  wrote:

> Holy Cow!  That is really good for mid July.
> 
> Sandy B.
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Jul 15, 2015, at 4:27 PM, ML2x  wrote:
>> 
>> Hello Everyone,
>> 
>> Mary and I birded with Joe Grzybowski today. We had a seriously goodest time 
finding the 

>> Fulvous Whistling-Duck on the reservoir, 2 Black Bellied Whistling-Ducks 
just west of the 

>> Avocet unit, a Short-billed Dowitcher, 38 Eared Grebe chicks, an American 
Bittern, 4 King 

>> Rails and 9 Soras. We also tallied 20 shorebird species which isn't 
ungoodest for mid-July! 

>> 
>> Goodest Birding,
>> 
>> Mary and Lou Truex
>> ml2x AT sbcglobal.net
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
>> Jul 15, 2015 6:25 AM - 1:00 PM
>> Protocol: Traveling
>> 14.0 mile(s)
>> 62 species (+3 other taxa)
>> 
>> Black-bellied Whistling-Duck 2 Black trailing wing edge with large white 
stripe running laterally. 

>> Fulvous Whistling-Duck 1 tan head, black wings, white tail band. Pic 
previously submitted. 

>> Gadwall  2
>> American Wigeon  2
>> Mallard  12
>> Blue-winged Teal  69     12 chicks
>> Northern Shoveler  6
>> Northern Pintail  14
>> Redhead  323     Actual count.
>> Ruddy Duck  42
>> Northern Bobwhite  12
>> Pied-billed Grebe  61     12 chicks
>> Eared Grebe  111     38 Chicks, 83 adults.  Actual count
>> Double-crested Cormorant  2
>> American Bittern  1     Heard making it's gulping call..
>> Great Blue Heron  6
>> Great Egret  3
>> Black-crowned Night-Heron  4
>> Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  3
>> Glossy Ibis 1 Blue facial outline, no plum towards eye, gray legs with red 
knees 

>> White-faced Ibis  203
>> Turkey Vulture  1
>> King Rail  4
>> Sora 9 8 calling, 1 seen. Large yellow bill, black face, gray cheeks and 
neck, yellow legs. 

>> Black-necked Stilt  101     8 on nest 13 chicks.....actual count
>> American Avocet  99
>> Snowy Plover  4
>> Killdeer  92
>> Spotted Sandpiper  4
>> Solitary Sandpiper  18
>> Greater Yellowlegs  175
>> Willet  2
>> Lesser Yellowlegs  725
>> Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs  75
>> Upland Sandpiper  2
>> Stilt Sandpiper  27     actual count
>> Baird's Sandpiper  19
>> Least Sandpiper  51
>> Pectoral Sandpiper  2
>> Semipalmated Sandpiper  6
>> Western Sandpiper  3
>> Short-billed Dowitcher 1 buffy edging, no white on spotting. Very patterned 
tertials. 

>> Long-billed Dowitcher  12
>> Wilson's Phalarope  173     actual count
>> Black Tern  32
>> Mourning Dove  X
>> Great Horned Owl  1
>> Common Nighthawk  24
>> Ladder-backed Woodpecker  1
>> American Kestrel  2
>> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  6
>> Horned Lark  5
>> Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1
>> Purple Martin  5
>> Barn Swallow  16
>> Cliff Swallow  13
>> swallow sp.  10
>> Common Yellowthroat  1
>> Lark Sparrow  2
>> Dickcissel  X
>> Red-winged Blackbird  X
>> Western/Eastern Meadowlark  X
>> Yellow-headed Blackbird  4
>> Common Grackle  X
>> Great-tailed Grackle  X
>> 
>> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24278405 

>> 
>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Hackberry Flat Survey, Jul 15, 2015
From: ML2x <ml2x AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Jul 2015 16:27:24 -0500
Hello Everyone,

Mary and I birded with Joe Grzybowski today.  We had a seriously goodest 
time finding the
Fulvous Whistling-Duck on the reservoir, 2 Black Bellied Whistling-Ducks 
just west of the
Avocet unit, a Short-billed Dowitcher, 38 Eared Grebe chicks, an American 
Bittern, 4 King
Rails and 9 Soras.  We also tallied 20 shorebird species which isn't 
ungoodest for mid-July!

Goodest Birding,

Mary and Lou Truex
ml2x AT sbcglobal.net



Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
Jul 15, 2015 6:25 AM - 1:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
14.0 mile(s)
62 species (+3 other taxa)

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck  2     Black trailing wing edge with large 
white stripe running laterally.
Fulvous Whistling-Duck  1     tan head, black wings, white tail band.  Pic 
previously submitted.
Gadwall  2
American Wigeon  2
Mallard  12
Blue-winged Teal  69     12 chicks
Northern Shoveler  6
Northern Pintail  14
Redhead  323     Actual count.
Ruddy Duck  42
Northern Bobwhite  12
Pied-billed Grebe  61     12 chicks
Eared Grebe  111     38 Chicks, 83 adults.  Actual count
Double-crested Cormorant  2
American Bittern  1     Heard making it's gulping call..
Great Blue Heron  6
Great Egret  3
Black-crowned Night-Heron  4
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  3
Glossy Ibis  1     Blue facial outline, no plum towards eye, gray legs with 
red knees
White-faced Ibis  203
Turkey Vulture  1
King Rail  4
Sora  9     8 calling, 1 seen.  Large yellow bill, black face, gray cheeks 
and neck, yellow legs.
Black-necked Stilt  101     8 on nest 13 chicks.....actual count
American Avocet  99
Snowy Plover  4
Killdeer  92
Spotted Sandpiper  4
Solitary Sandpiper  18
Greater Yellowlegs  175
Willet  2
Lesser Yellowlegs  725
Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs  75
Upland Sandpiper  2
Stilt Sandpiper  27     actual count
Baird's Sandpiper  19
Least Sandpiper  51
Pectoral Sandpiper  2
Semipalmated Sandpiper  6
Western Sandpiper  3
Short-billed Dowitcher  1     buffy edging, no white on spotting.  Very 
patterned tertials.
Long-billed Dowitcher  12
Wilson's Phalarope  173     actual count
Black Tern  32
Mourning Dove  X
Great Horned Owl  1
Common Nighthawk  24
Ladder-backed Woodpecker  1
American Kestrel  2
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  6
Horned Lark  5
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1
Purple Martin  5
Barn Swallow  16
Cliff Swallow  13
swallow sp.  10
Common Yellowthroat  1
Lark Sparrow  2
Dickcissel  X
Red-winged Blackbird  X
Western/Eastern Meadowlark  X
Yellow-headed Blackbird  4
Common Grackle  X
Great-tailed Grackle  X

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24278405

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 14
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Jul 2015 21:38:55 -0500
Robert Bastarache (USFS) and I surveyed birds today at Red Slough and found
73 species.  It was mostly clear and very hot with a little wind.  Shorebird
numbers are increasing and the two locations with mudflats that they are
using are units 7 and 44.  I checked on one of the Purple Gallinule nests I
have been watching and it was full of small black downy young, apparently
recently hatched.  Songbirds are not singing much now and I noticed that
they are now traveling in feeding groups of mixed species in the woodlands
as I encountered two such groups today.  Here is our list for today:

 

Wood Duck - 43

Mallard - 2

Ring-necked Duck - 1 male

Pied-billed Grebe - 8 adults (1 with 2 young.)

American White Pelican - 4

Neotropic Cormorant - 2 (1 on nest in Anhinga rookery.)

Double-crested Cormorant - 1 

Anhinga - 23 adults and fledged young.  (also 2 nests with young.)

Great Blue Heron - 16

Great Egret - 56

Snowy Egret - 120

Little-blue Heron - 18

Cattle Egret - 22

Green Heron - 12

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 14

White Ibis - 28

Black Vulture - 4

Turkey Vulture - 18

Mississippi Kite - 5

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 3 adults (also nest full of small downy chicks.)

Common Gallinule - 11 adults (also brood of 9 small downy chicks.)

Killdeer - 6

Spotted Sandpiper - 1

Solitary Sandpiper - 10

Greater Yellowlegs - 1

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 2

Least Sandpiper - 32

Pectoral Sandpiper - 1

Mourning Dove - 9

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 10

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 3

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 4

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 10

Bell's Vireo - 2

Yellow-throated Vireo - 5

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

American Crow - 4

Purple Martin - 7

Tree Swallow - 8

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 7

Cliff Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 11

Carolina Chickadee - 5

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren - 10

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Pine Warbler - 2

Black-and-White Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 2

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 4

Yellow-breasted Chat - 4

Summer Tanager - 3

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 15

Indigo Bunting - 18

Painted Bunting - 6

Dickcissel - 10

Red-winged Blackbird - 27

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 8

Brown-headed Cowbird - 2

Orchard Oriole - 2

 

 

Odonates:

 

Citrine Forktail

Spreadwing species

Common Green Darner

Cyrano Darner

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Royal River Cruiser

Jade Clubtail

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Spot-winged Glider

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Western Cottonmouth

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog

 

Also saw a large Bobcat.

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Tallgrass prairie
From: John Fisher <rgs455 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Jul 2015 10:15:34 -0400
TNC's Tallgrass Prairie Preserve is in northern Osage County in the NE part of 
the state. Spotted Ground Squirrel is a distinct possibility but I think they 
are mainly west of I-35. 


FWIW, NW OK is mainly mid & short grass prairie.  

John

  
---- Don Gettinger  wrote: 
> A good record, but not really valid without a specimen (mammaling is a
> little different than birding).  It was possibly *Spermophilus spilosoma--* I
> think the common name is the Spotted Ground Squirrel.  It is about the same
> size as the thirteen-lined, and often appears to be plain brown dorsally
> (or with light blondish spots).  What county were you in?  I assume the
> "tallgrass prairie" was in the northwestern part of the state. Also
> possible is a juvenile prairie dog, and this is the time of year you see
> them crossing roads.  You would confirm this, of course, by the proximity
> of a "town."
> 
> On Mon, Jul 13, 2015 at 5:05 PM, John Fisher  wrote:
> 
> > Tom,
> >
> > The only ground squirrel on record at the preserve is the thirteen-lined.
> > Where did you see i?.
> >
> > FWIW, thisseems to be a good year for jacks at the prairie.  I've seen
> > more this year than ever before.
> >
> > John
> >
> > ---- "Curtis wrote:
> > > Was up at the tallgrass prairie last weekend and just getting caught up
> > on notes, etc.  There were more nighthawks than I have seen in several
> > years, and I saw a half dozen scissor-tailed flycatchers (I typically see
> > 0-2 on a trip around the circle).  Of note was a green-backed heron along
> > the stream that is a couple of miles north from the refuge office.
> > >
> > > Also a good day for mammals: in addition to the bison, we saw a
> > jack-rabbit and a white-tailed deer with a couple of fawns.  Finally, we
> > also saw a ground-squirrel of some sort. It definitely was not gray or fox
> > squirrel, chipmunk, or prairie dog.  I looked up possible species and came
> > up with thirteen-lined ground squirrel which apparently is not common on
> > the refuge (Payne et al., 2001).  I am not sure that is correct because it
> > had a uniform brownish back, sides and head.  Any ideas?
> > >
> > > Have fun
> > > Tom Curtis
> > >
> > > J.T. Curtis, Ph.D.
> > > Department of Pharmacology & Physiology
> > > Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences
> > > 1111 W 17th St.
> > > Tulsa OK 74107
> > >
> > > Phone: 918-561-8471
> > > e-Mail:  tom.curtis AT okstate.edu
> > >
> >
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Donald Gettinger
> Senior Research Fellow
> Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: Tallgrass prairie
From: "Curtis, Tom" <tom.curtis AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Tue, 14 Jul 2015 14:03:24 +0000
Sorry, wrong button.  Disregard.

Tom

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Curtis, Tom
Sent: Tuesday, July 14, 2015 9:01 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Tallgrass prairie

Ok, so with yesterday’s order, how much have we spent?

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Don Gettinger
Sent: Monday, July 13, 2015 10:05 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Tallgrass prairie

A good record, but not really valid without a specimen (mammaling is a little 
different than birding). It was possibly Spermophilus spilosoma-- I think the 
common name is the Spotted Ground Squirrel. It is about the same size as the 
thirteen-lined, and often appears to be plain brown dorsally (or with light 
blondish spots). What county were you in? I assume the "tallgrass prairie" was 
in the northwestern part of the state. Also possible is a juvenile prairie dog, 
and this is the time of year you see them crossing roads. You would confirm 
this, of course, by the proximity of a "town." 


On Mon, Jul 13, 2015 at 5:05 PM, John Fisher 
> wrote: 

Tom,

The only ground squirrel on record at the preserve is the thirteen-lined. Where 
did you see i?. 


FWIW, thisseems to be a good year for jacks at the prairie. I've seen more this 
year than ever before. 


John

---- "Curtis wrote:
> Was up at the tallgrass prairie last weekend and just getting caught up on 
notes, etc. There were more nighthawks than I have seen in several years, and I 
saw a half dozen scissor-tailed flycatchers (I typically see 0-2 on a trip 
around the circle). Of note was a green-backed heron along the stream that is a 
couple of miles north from the refuge office. 

>
> Also a good day for mammals: in addition to the bison, we saw a jack-rabbit 
and a white-tailed deer with a couple of fawns. Finally, we also saw a 
ground-squirrel of some sort. It definitely was not gray or fox squirrel, 
chipmunk, or prairie dog. I looked up possible species and came up with 
thirteen-lined ground squirrel which apparently is not common on the refuge 
(Payne et al., 2001). I am not sure that is correct because it had a uniform 
brownish back, sides and head. Any ideas? 

>
> Have fun
> Tom Curtis
>
> J.T. Curtis, Ph.D.
> Department of Pharmacology & Physiology
> Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences
> 1111 W 17th St.
> Tulsa OK 74107
>
> Phone: 918-561-8471
> e-Mail: 
tom.curtis AT okstate.edu> 

>



--
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: Tallgrass prairie
From: "Curtis, Tom" <tom.curtis AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Tue, 14 Jul 2015 14:01:00 +0000
Ok, so with yesterday’s order, how much have we spent?

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Don Gettinger
Sent: Monday, July 13, 2015 10:05 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Tallgrass prairie

A good record, but not really valid without a specimen (mammaling is a little 
different than birding). It was possibly Spermophilus spilosoma-- I think the 
common name is the Spotted Ground Squirrel. It is about the same size as the 
thirteen-lined, and often appears to be plain brown dorsally (or with light 
blondish spots). What county were you in? I assume the "tallgrass prairie" was 
in the northwestern part of the state. Also possible is a juvenile prairie dog, 
and this is the time of year you see them crossing roads. You would confirm 
this, of course, by the proximity of a "town." 


On Mon, Jul 13, 2015 at 5:05 PM, John Fisher 
> wrote: 

Tom,

The only ground squirrel on record at the preserve is the thirteen-lined. Where 
did you see i?. 


FWIW, thisseems to be a good year for jacks at the prairie. I've seen more this 
year than ever before. 


John

---- "Curtis wrote:
> Was up at the tallgrass prairie last weekend and just getting caught up on 
notes, etc. There were more nighthawks than I have seen in several years, and I 
saw a half dozen scissor-tailed flycatchers (I typically see 0-2 on a trip 
around the circle). Of note was a green-backed heron along the stream that is a 
couple of miles north from the refuge office. 

>
> Also a good day for mammals: in addition to the bison, we saw a jack-rabbit 
and a white-tailed deer with a couple of fawns. Finally, we also saw a 
ground-squirrel of some sort. It definitely was not gray or fox squirrel, 
chipmunk, or prairie dog. I looked up possible species and came up with 
thirteen-lined ground squirrel which apparently is not common on the refuge 
(Payne et al., 2001). I am not sure that is correct because it had a uniform 
brownish back, sides and head. Any ideas? 

>
> Have fun
> Tom Curtis
>
> J.T. Curtis, Ph.D.
> Department of Pharmacology & Physiology
> Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences
> 1111 W 17th St.
> Tulsa OK 74107
>
> Phone: 918-561-8471
> e-Mail: 
tom.curtis AT okstate.edu> 

>



--
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: Tallgrass prairie
From: Don Gettinger <donaldgettinger AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Jul 2015 22:05:01 -0500
A good record, but not really valid without a specimen (mammaling is a
little different than birding).  It was possibly *Spermophilus spilosoma--* I
think the common name is the Spotted Ground Squirrel.  It is about the same
size as the thirteen-lined, and often appears to be plain brown dorsally
(or with light blondish spots).  What county were you in?  I assume the
"tallgrass prairie" was in the northwestern part of the state. Also
possible is a juvenile prairie dog, and this is the time of year you see
them crossing roads.  You would confirm this, of course, by the proximity
of a "town."

On Mon, Jul 13, 2015 at 5:05 PM, John Fisher  wrote:

> Tom,
>
> The only ground squirrel on record at the preserve is the thirteen-lined.
> Where did you see i?.
>
> FWIW, thisseems to be a good year for jacks at the prairie.  I've seen
> more this year than ever before.
>
> John
>
> ---- "Curtis wrote:
> > Was up at the tallgrass prairie last weekend and just getting caught up
> on notes, etc.  There were more nighthawks than I have seen in several
> years, and I saw a half dozen scissor-tailed flycatchers (I typically see
> 0-2 on a trip around the circle).  Of note was a green-backed heron along
> the stream that is a couple of miles north from the refuge office.
> >
> > Also a good day for mammals: in addition to the bison, we saw a
> jack-rabbit and a white-tailed deer with a couple of fawns.  Finally, we
> also saw a ground-squirrel of some sort. It definitely was not gray or fox
> squirrel, chipmunk, or prairie dog.  I looked up possible species and came
> up with thirteen-lined ground squirrel which apparently is not common on
> the refuge (Payne et al., 2001).  I am not sure that is correct because it
> had a uniform brownish back, sides and head.  Any ideas?
> >
> > Have fun
> > Tom Curtis
> >
> > J.T. Curtis, Ph.D.
> > Department of Pharmacology & Physiology
> > Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences
> > 1111 W 17th St.
> > Tulsa OK 74107
> >
> > Phone: 918-561-8471
> > e-Mail:  tom.curtis AT okstate.edu
> >
>



-- 
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: Hackberry Flat FUWD and EAGR chicks 7-13-2015
From: Kurt Meisenzahl <meisenzk AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Jul 2015 02:22:39 +0000
Sora!!!  We also saw or heard several.
Kurt Meisenzahl 


     On Monday, July 13, 2015 8:54 PM, ML2x  wrote:
   

 Hello Everyone, I went to Hackberry today with Kurt Meisenzahl.  We had a 
nice run of birds with the exception that the shorebird numbers were down and 
more yellowlegs had arrived.  I’mposting my pics as I get them 
edited(nothing as good as Jim Arterburn, Bill Adams or Larry Hancock) on the 
OOS site on Facebook.  The EAGR chicks were out as we had19 today.  I 
couldn’t even imagine how many Coots will be there after all their younghatch 
as there are nests all over the property.  We were finally able to drive 2 
additionallevees that have been too wet.  There were even more BNST’s back 
there....... Goodest Birding, Mary and Lou Truexml2x AT sbcglobal.net  Tillman 
- Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US 

Jul 13, 2015 6:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
13.0 mile(s)
52 species (+4 other taxa)

Fulvous Whistling-Duck  1     Pic submitted to OBRC
Gadwall  2
Mallard  13
Blue-winged Teal  61
Northern Shoveler  6
Northern Pintail  13
Redhead  137     Actual count
Ruddy Duck  62     Actual count
Northern Bobwhite  8
Pied-billed Grebe  66     18 were chicks.
Eared Grebe  91     19 were chicks.  Pics submitted to OBRC
Great Blue Heron  2
Great Egret  5
Little Blue Heron  1
Cattle Egret  6
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  2
Glossy Ibis  3     Pics submitted for final ID to Joe G.
White-faced Ibis  71
Turkey Vulture  2
King Rail  1
American Coot  X
Black-necked Stilt  106     24 chicks
American Avocet  68     13 chicks
Snowy Plover  6     5 chicks
Killdeer  88
Solitary Sandpiper  3
Greater Yellowlegs  240
Willet  1
Lesser Yellowlegs  68
Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs  100
Upland Sandpiper  1
Stilt Sandpiper  2
Least Sandpiper  13
Semipalmated Sandpiper  2
peep sp.  50
Long-billed Dowitcher  3
Wilson's Phalarope  38
Black Tern  2
Eurasian Collared-Dove  4
Mourning Dove  20
Great Horned Owl  1
Common Nighthawk  28
Black-chinned Hummingbird  1
American Kestrel  1
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  4
Horned Lark  4
Barn Swallow  6
Cliff Swallow  3
Lark Sparrow  2
Dickcissel  X
Red-winged Blackbird  X
Western/Eastern Meadowlark  3
Yellow-headed Blackbird  1
Common Grackle  25
Great-tailed Grackle  20
grackle sp.  30

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24250390 


  
Subject: Hackberry Flat FUWD and EAGR chicks 7-13-2015
From: ML2x <ml2x AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Jul 2015 20:53:44 -0500
Hello Everyone,

I went to Hackberry today with Kurt Meisenzahl. We had a nice run of birds with 
the 

exception that the shorebird numbers were down and more yellowlegs had arrived. 
I’m 

posting my pics as I get them edited(nothing as good as Jim Arterburn, Bill 
Adams or 

Larry Hancock) on the OOS site on Facebook.  The EAGR chicks were out as we had
19 today. I couldn’t even imagine how many Coots will be there after all 
their young 

hatch as there are nests all over the property. We were finally able to drive 2 
additional 

levees that have been too wet.  There were even more BNST’s back there.......

Goodest Birding,

Mary and Lou Truex
ml2x AT sbcglobal.net


Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
Jul 13, 2015 6:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
13.0 mile(s)
52 species (+4 other taxa)

Fulvous Whistling-Duck  1     Pic submitted to OBRC
Gadwall  2
Mallard  13
Blue-winged Teal  61
Northern Shoveler  6
Northern Pintail  13
Redhead  137     Actual count
Ruddy Duck  62     Actual count
Northern Bobwhite  8
Pied-billed Grebe  66     18 were chicks.
Eared Grebe  91     19 were chicks.  Pics submitted to OBRC
Great Blue Heron  2
Great Egret  5
Little Blue Heron  1
Cattle Egret  6
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  2
Glossy Ibis  3     Pics submitted for final ID to Joe G.
White-faced Ibis  71
Turkey Vulture  2
King Rail  1
American Coot  X
Black-necked Stilt  106     24 chicks
American Avocet  68     13 chicks
Snowy Plover  6     5 chicks
Killdeer  88
Solitary Sandpiper  3
Greater Yellowlegs  240
Willet  1
Lesser Yellowlegs  68
Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs  100
Upland Sandpiper  1
Stilt Sandpiper  2
Least Sandpiper  13
Semipalmated Sandpiper  2
peep sp.  50
Long-billed Dowitcher  3
Wilson's Phalarope  38
Black Tern  2
Eurasian Collared-Dove  4
Mourning Dove  20
Great Horned Owl  1
Common Nighthawk  28
Black-chinned Hummingbird  1
American Kestrel  1
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  4
Horned Lark  4
Barn Swallow  6
Cliff Swallow  3
Lark Sparrow  2
Dickcissel  X
Red-winged Blackbird  X
Western/Eastern Meadowlark  3
Yellow-headed Blackbird  1
Common Grackle  25
Great-tailed Grackle  20
grackle sp.  30

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24250390 
Subject: Re: Tallgrass prairie
From: John Fisher <rgs455 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Jul 2015 18:05:51 -0400
Tom,

The only ground squirrel on record at the preserve is the thirteen-lined. Where 
did you see i?. 


FWIW, thisseems to be a good year for jacks at the prairie. I've seen more this 
year than ever before. 


John

---- "Curtis wrote: 
> Was up at the tallgrass prairie last weekend and just getting caught up on 
notes, etc. There were more nighthawks than I have seen in several years, and I 
saw a half dozen scissor-tailed flycatchers (I typically see 0-2 on a trip 
around the circle). Of note was a green-backed heron along the stream that is a 
couple of miles north from the refuge office. 

> 
> Also a good day for mammals: in addition to the bison, we saw a jack-rabbit 
and a white-tailed deer with a couple of fawns. Finally, we also saw a 
ground-squirrel of some sort. It definitely was not gray or fox squirrel, 
chipmunk, or prairie dog. I looked up possible species and came up with 
thirteen-lined ground squirrel which apparently is not common on the refuge 
(Payne et al., 2001). I am not sure that is correct because it had a uniform 
brownish back, sides and head. Any ideas? 

> 
> Have fun
> Tom Curtis
> 
> J.T. Curtis, Ph.D.
> Department of Pharmacology & Physiology
> Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences
> 1111 W 17th St.
> Tulsa OK 74107
> 
> Phone: 918-561-8471
> e-Mail:  tom.curtis AT okstate.edu
> 
Subject: Tallgrass prairie
From: "Curtis, Tom" <tom.curtis AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Mon, 13 Jul 2015 21:18:55 +0000
Was up at the tallgrass prairie last weekend and just getting caught up on 
notes, etc. There were more nighthawks than I have seen in several years, and I 
saw a half dozen scissor-tailed flycatchers (I typically see 0-2 on a trip 
around the circle). Of note was a green-backed heron along the stream that is a 
couple of miles north from the refuge office. 


Also a good day for mammals: in addition to the bison, we saw a jack-rabbit and 
a white-tailed deer with a couple of fawns. Finally, we also saw a 
ground-squirrel of some sort. It definitely was not gray or fox squirrel, 
chipmunk, or prairie dog. I looked up possible species and came up with 
thirteen-lined ground squirrel which apparently is not common on the refuge 
(Payne et al., 2001). I am not sure that is correct because it had a uniform 
brownish back, sides and head. Any ideas? 


Have fun
Tom Curtis

J.T. Curtis, Ph.D.
Department of Pharmacology & Physiology
Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences
1111 W 17th St.
Tulsa OK 74107

Phone: 918-561-8471
e-Mail:  tom.curtis AT okstate.edu
Subject: Re: Hackberry Flat Fulvous Whistling-Ducks and Eared Grebes.
From: Dan Reinking <dreinking AT OU.EDU>
Date: Mon, 13 Jul 2015 09:02:54 -0500
That observation would be good to write up as a note for the OOS Bulletin. 
There are relatively few nest records for OK, and they mostly farther north and 
west than Hackberry. 


Dan Reinking

Sutton Avian Research Center

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of ML2x
Sent: Sunday, July 12, 2015 10:08 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Hackberry Flat Fulvous Whistling-Ducks and Eared Grebes.

 

Hello Everyone,

 

Mary and I birded Hackberry Flat on Saturday, 7-11-2015 and had a really 
awesomest morning. 


It is hard to believe that seeing 2 Fulvous Whistling-Ducks wouldn’t be the 
highlight of the day 


but finding 11 Eared Grebe chicks being fed by 3 female Eared Grebes stole the 
show. We also 


found one Eared Grebe female still sitting on a nest. Other highlights included 
a drake Cinnamon 


Teal, 3 Soras, 4 King Rails, 3 possible Short-billed Dowitchers, 1 Hudsonian 
Godwit as well as 


1 breeding plumage American Golden-Plover.

 

 

Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
Jul 11, 2015 6:15 AM - 11:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
9.0 mile(s)
50 species (+3 other taxa)

Fulvous Whistling-Duck 2 Tan heads and chests with no spotting, black wings and 
white tail band in flight. Dark bill. Birds located in the Avocet Unit on the 
east side. 

Gadwall  2
American Wigeon  3
Mallard  9
Blue-winged Teal  105
Cinnamon Teal  1     Drake.Full cinnamon coloration.
Northern Shoveler  7
Northern Pintail  28
Redhead  141     One possibly on nest.  Actual count
Ruddy Duck  36
Northern Bobwhite  13
Pied-billed Grebe 51 5 still on nests with 7 of the count being chicks. Mostly 
in Millet unit. 

Eared Grebe 51 11 chicks in the millet with 3 females feeding them. 1 still on 
nest, 44 males on reservoir. Pics submitted to Joe on OBRC. 

Great Blue Heron  2
Cattle Egret  1
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  2
White-faced Ibis  97
Turkey Vulture  2
King Rail  4
Sora  1     All by vocalization.
American Coot  49     5 of the count were chicks and 5 were sitting nests.
Black-necked Stilt 86 5-25%, 4-75%, 11-90% developed chicks. 4 sitting nests. 
Actual count 

American Avocet  64
American Golden-Plover  1     Pic sent to OBRC-Joe
Killdeer  27
Solitary Sandpiper  4
Greater Yellowlegs  176
Willet  2
Lesser Yellowlegs  39
Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs  30
Hudsonian Godwit 1 Black spotting and barring as it was changing back to winter 
plumage. Long unturned bill and black axillaries. 

Stilt Sandpiper  14
Least Sandpiper  38
Semipalmated Sandpiper  3
Western Sandpiper  2
peep sp.  100
Short-billed Dowitcher 3 Fully orange chest with no barring and no white around 
spotting. Pic Submitted for evaluation to Joe. 

Long-billed Dowitcher  71
Wilson's Phalarope  51     Actual count.  80% males
Black Tern  12
Mourning Dove  39
Great Horned Owl  2
Common Nighthawk  23
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  3
Horned Lark  4
Barn Swallow  10
Cliff Swallow  4
Lark Sparrow  2
Dickcissel  X
Red-winged Blackbird  X
Western/Eastern Meadowlark  12
Common Grackle  38
Great-tailed Grackle  27

View this checklist online at 
 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24235318 


Goodest Birding,

 

Mary and Lou Truex

ml2x AT sbcglobal.net
Subject: Hackberry Flat Fulvous Whistling-Ducks and Eared Grebes.
From: ML2x <ml2x AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 12 Jul 2015 10:07:42 -0500
Hello Everyone,

Mary and I birded Hackberry Flat on Saturday, 7-11-2015 and had a really 
awesomest morning. 

It is hard to believe that seeing 2 Fulvous Whistling-Ducks wouldn’t be the 
highlight of the day 

but finding 11 Eared Grebe chicks being fed by 3 female Eared Grebes stole the 
show. We also 

found one Eared Grebe female still sitting on a nest. Other highlights included 
a drake Cinnamon 

Teal, 3 Soras, 4 King Rails, 3 possible Short-billed Dowitchers, 1 Hudsonian 
Godwit as well as 

1 breeding plumage American Golden-Plover.


Tillman - Hackberry Flat Survey, Tillman, Oklahoma, US
Jul 11, 2015 6:15 AM - 11:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
9.0 mile(s)
50 species (+3 other taxa)

Fulvous Whistling-Duck 2 Tan heads and chests with no spotting, black wings and 
white tail band in flight. Dark bill. Birds located in the Avocet Unit on the 
east side. 

Gadwall  2
American Wigeon  3
Mallard  9
Blue-winged Teal  105
Cinnamon Teal  1     Drake.Full cinnamon coloration.
Northern Shoveler  7
Northern Pintail  28
Redhead  141     One possibly on nest.  Actual count
Ruddy Duck  36
Northern Bobwhite  13
Pied-billed Grebe 51 5 still on nests with 7 of the count being chicks. Mostly 
in Millet unit. 

Eared Grebe 51 11 chicks in the millet with 3 females feeding them. 1 still on 
nest, 44 males on reservoir. Pics submitted to Joe on OBRC. 

Great Blue Heron  2
Cattle Egret  1
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  2
White-faced Ibis  97
Turkey Vulture  2
King Rail  4
Sora  1     All by vocalization.
American Coot  49     5 of the count were chicks and 5 were sitting nests.
Black-necked Stilt 86 5-25%, 4-75%, 11-90% developed chicks. 4 sitting nests. 
Actual count 

American Avocet  64
American Golden-Plover  1     Pic sent to OBRC-Joe
Killdeer  27
Solitary Sandpiper  4
Greater Yellowlegs  176
Willet  2
Lesser Yellowlegs  39
Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs  30
Hudsonian Godwit 1 Black spotting and barring as it was changing back to winter 
plumage. Long unturned bill and black axillaries. 

Stilt Sandpiper  14
Least Sandpiper  38
Semipalmated Sandpiper  3
Western Sandpiper  2
peep sp.  100
Short-billed Dowitcher 3 Fully orange chest with no barring and no white around 
spotting. Pic Submitted for evaluation to Joe. 

Long-billed Dowitcher  71
Wilson's Phalarope  51     Actual count.  80% males
Black Tern  12
Mourning Dove  39
Great Horned Owl  2
Common Nighthawk  23
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  3
Horned Lark  4
Barn Swallow  10
Cliff Swallow  4
Lark Sparrow  2
Dickcissel  X
Red-winged Blackbird  X
Western/Eastern Meadowlark  12
Common Grackle  38
Great-tailed Grackle  27

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24235318 


Goodest Birding,

Mary and Lou Truex
ml2x AT sbcglobal.net
Subject: Re: Whimbrel and other Shorebirds
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 10 Jul 2015 20:01:42 -0500
OKBirds,

 

I forgot to include the link to photos of this bird. They are the first
three photos in this gallery.

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

 

Jim

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jim Arterburn
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2015 7:51 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Whimbrel and other Shorebirds

 

OKBirds,

 

This morning I stopped by the Bixby, Leonard and Wagoner County sod farms to
see which shorebirds are heading back south. I had some of the expected
species (see list below) plus a Whimbrel. This is my first fall Whimbrel in
Oklahoma (their fall migration takes place between late June and late
October). Not sure if it was a failed breeder or a first or second year bird
moving around.

 

Killdeer - 76 (starting to group together)

Solitary Sandpiper - 1

Greater Yellowlegs - 4

Lesser Yellowlegs - 27

Upland Sandpiper - 3

Whimbrel - 1

Stilt Sandpiper - 1

Least Sandpiper - 6

Pectoral Sandpiper - 2

 

Cheers,

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder  

 
Subject: Whimbrel and other Shorebirds
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 10 Jul 2015 19:51:29 -0500
OKBirds,

 

This morning I stopped by the Bixby, Leonard and Wagoner County sod farms to
see which shorebirds are heading back south. I had some of the expected
species (see list below) plus a Whimbrel. This is my first fall Whimbrel in
Oklahoma (their fall migration takes place between late June and late
October). Not sure if it was a failed breeder or a first or second year bird
moving around.

 

Killdeer - 76 (starting to group together)

Solitary Sandpiper - 1

Greater Yellowlegs - 4

Lesser Yellowlegs - 27

Upland Sandpiper - 3

Whimbrel - 1

Stilt Sandpiper - 1

Least Sandpiper - 6

Pectoral Sandpiper - 2

 

Cheers,

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Re: Stinchcomb East yesterday
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 8 Jul 2015 23:18:25 -0400
Recent returns to Mitch Park include: A. Goldfinch ( Male), Baltimore oriole 
immature male. We still have a leucistic C. Chickadee that I have seen at least 
once a week ( when I am in town) since April. Sherm Barr has a great photo that 
I will bring to first fall meeting. 

Hal Yocum
---- Jim Jorgensen  wrote: 
> Thank you Bill. It's always a pleasure to read your posts. Best wishes,
> Jim
> Hpah AT cox.net
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> > On Jul 8, 2015, at 2:45 PM, William Diffin  wrote:
> > 
> > Walked the main trail at Stinchcomb to where the incline begins in the area 
of the big playa, a difficult walk in mud boots. Trail was quite soft in the 
low spots. The warm, still and cloudy conditions were ideal for flies and 
mosquitos, and they were making the most of it. I seemed to proceed from one 
singing Painted Bunting's territory to the next without interruption. About 
every other singer was visible. There were some Indigo Buntings singing as 
well, but they were outnumbered roughtly two to one. Also heard a few snatches 
of White-eye Vireo song, but nothing serious. A few Cardinals were singing and 
some of the other expected year-round residents. The most unusual sighting of 
the day was a pelecinid wasp (ref. Kaufman, pg. 329). The big playa along the 
trail starting at the incline is full to the base of the slope. 

> >  
> > Bill Diffin
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 8
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 8 Jul 2015 21:42:03 -0500
It was partly cloudy, mild, and very windy on the bird survey today.  64
species were found.  Shorebirds are finally starting to move back through.
Heron and egret numbers are increasing.  Checked two of my 4 known Eastern
Towhee territories and found both birds singing.  They seem to like to sing
in the middle of the day as well as in the mornings.  Black Terns are rarely
seen in the summer down here and when they are they are always in
nonbreeding plumage.  But today I had 3 that were still in full breeding
plumage.  Here is my list for today:

 

Wood Duck - 31

Mallard - 15

Blue-winged Teal - 2

Pied-billed Grebe - 2

Neotropic Cormorant - 3 (1 on nest in Anhinga rookery; the two other NECO
nests apparently failed, too many bad storms this year!)

Double-crested Cormorant - 1 

Anhinga - 20 (most of the young have fledged now.)

Least Bittern - 2

Great Blue Heron - 19

Great Egret - 87

Snowy Egret - 35

Little-blue Heron - 23

Cattle Egret - 3

Green Heron - 6

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 4

White Ibis - 37

Black Vulture - 3

Turkey Vulture - 8

Mississippi Kite - 4

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 5 (1 sitting on nest; 1 with several small downy chicks.)

Common Gallinule - 8 (1 sitting on nest.)

American Coot - 4

Killdeer - 4

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 3

Least Sandpiper - 2

Short-billed Dowitcher - 3 adults (meloudious "tu-tu" call notes)

Black Tern - 3 (in breeding plumage.)

Mourning Dove - 14

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 3

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 5

White-eyed Vireo - 6

Bell's Vireo - 1

Blue Jay - 1

American Crow - 5

Fish Crow - 5

Tree Swallow - 24

Barn Swallow - 17

Carolina Chickadee - 4

Carolina Wren - 5

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 5

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 10

Yellow-breasted Chat - 6

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2 (singing males; one was also seen.)

Northern Cardinal - 15

Indigo Bunting - 16

Painted Bunting - 4

Dickcissel - 15

Red-winged Blackbird - 39

Eastern Meadowlark - 2

Common Grackle - 16

Brown-headed Cowbird - 5

Orchard Oriole - 4

 

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Black Saddlebags

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Three-toed Box Turtle

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Eastern Gray Treefrog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Stinchcomb East yesterday
From: Jim Jorgensen <hpah AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 8 Jul 2015 21:32:16 -0500
Thank you Bill. It's always a pleasure to read your posts. Best wishes,
Jim
Hpah AT cox.net

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 8, 2015, at 2:45 PM, William Diffin  wrote:
> 
> Walked the main trail at Stinchcomb to where the incline begins in the area 
of the big playa, a difficult walk in mud boots. Trail was quite soft in the 
low spots. The warm, still and cloudy conditions were ideal for flies and 
mosquitos, and they were making the most of it. I seemed to proceed from one 
singing Painted Bunting's territory to the next without interruption. About 
every other singer was visible. There were some Indigo Buntings singing as 
well, but they were outnumbered roughtly two to one. Also heard a few snatches 
of White-eye Vireo song, but nothing serious. A few Cardinals were singing and 
some of the other expected year-round residents. The most unusual sighting of 
the day was a pelecinid wasp (ref. Kaufman, pg. 329). The big playa along the 
trail starting at the incline is full to the base of the slope. 

>  
> Bill Diffin
Subject: Terns on the Move
From: Scott Loss <scottrloss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Jul 2015 20:44:41 -0500
Terns as a group appear to be on the move right now. Yesterday morning
during a quick stop at Lake Yahola in Tulsa, I saw 2 Black Terns and a
Caspian Tern (along with a Willet).

Tonight at Boomer Lake in Stillwater, 3 Forster's Terns and a Least Tern
made quick stops to forage over the lake before continuing south.

Scott Loss
Stillwater
Subject: Two Tern Day at Hefner
From: Cameron Carver <c.o.carver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Jul 2015 20:11:38 -0500
Greetings,

Heather Shaffery and I quickly looped around Lake Hefner today while
running errands. With it so full, it was slow. Best birds were 3 Least
Terns and a Black Tern working the area along the dam.

Cameron Carver
Oklahoma City
Subject: Stinchcomb East yesterday
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Jul 2015 14:45:44 -0500
Walked the main trail at Stinchcomb to where the incline begins in the area
of the big playa, a difficult walk in mud boots. Trail was quite soft in
the low spots. The warm, still and cloudy conditions were ideal for flies
and mosquitos, and they were making the most of it. I seemed to
proceed from one singing Painted Bunting's territory to the next without
interruption. About every other singer was visible. There were some Indigo
Buntings singing as well, but they were outnumbered roughtly two to one.
Also heard a few snatches of White-eye Vireo song, but nothing serious. A
few Cardinals were singing and some of the other expected year-round
residents. The most unusual sighting of the day was a pelecinid wasp (ref.
Kaufman, pg. 329). The big playa along the trail starting at the incline is
full to the base of the slope.

Bill Diffin
Subject: Re: 2015 Spring Shorebird Photos Added to Website
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 7 Jul 2015 17:16:52 -0500
Sandy,

 

Also check out this Semipalmated Sandpiper photo which shows the partial 
webbing between the toes, hence the name semipalmated. 


 

http://www.pbase.com/image/160498992

 

 

Jim

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Sandy Berger
Sent: Tuesday, July 07, 2015 3:53 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: 2015 Spring Shorebird Photos Added to Website

 

Thanks for sharing, Jim. I'm glad you got a shot of the White-rumped and Bairds 
together. Good comparison photo. 


 

Sandy B.



Sent from my iPad


On Jul 7, 2015, at 3:28 PM, Jim Arterburn  > wrote: 


OKBirds,

 

I have added my shorebird photos from this spring to my website. These photos 
were taken in NE Oklahoma and mainly from south Tulsa County. I have added 
quite a few photos of some species as I have tried to include plumages ranging 
from nonbreeding plumage, molting into breeding plumage to full breeding 
plumage. I have tried to be as accurate on possible on the various plumages, 
but if anyone notices any errors please let me know. For anyone interested 
please see the link below. 


 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/sandpipers

 

Cheers,

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder  

 
Subject: Re: 2015 Spring Shorebird Photos Added to Website
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 7 Jul 2015 15:57:05 -0500
Sandy,

 

Thanks. It is nice when luck is on your side.

 

Jim

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Sandy Berger
Sent: Tuesday, July 07, 2015 3:53 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: 2015 Spring Shorebird Photos Added to Website

 

Thanks for sharing, Jim. I'm glad you got a shot of the White-rumped and Bairds 
together. Good comparison photo. 


 

Sandy B.



Sent from my iPad


On Jul 7, 2015, at 3:28 PM, Jim Arterburn  > wrote: 


OKBirds,

 

I have added my shorebird photos from this spring to my website. These photos 
were taken in NE Oklahoma and mainly from south Tulsa County. I have added 
quite a few photos of some species as I have tried to include plumages ranging 
from nonbreeding plumage, molting into breeding plumage to full breeding 
plumage. I have tried to be as accurate on possible on the various plumages, 
but if anyone notices any errors please let me know. For anyone interested 
please see the link below. 


 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/sandpipers

 

Cheers,

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder  

 
Subject: 2015 Spring Shorebird Photos Added to Website
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 7 Jul 2015 15:28:49 -0500
OKBirds,

 

I have added my shorebird photos from this spring to my website. These
photos were taken in NE Oklahoma and mainly from south Tulsa County. I have
added quite a few photos of some species as I have tried to include plumages
ranging from nonbreeding plumage, molting into breeding plumage to full
breeding plumage. I have tried to be as accurate on possible on the various
plumages, but if anyone notices any errors please let me know. For anyone
interested please see the link below.

 

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/sandpipers

 

Cheers,

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Re: Double the year-round range of of one.
From: Terry Mitchell <terry AT PECOT.COM>
Date: Tue, 7 Jul 2015 11:20:17 -0500
I have a request, if you are going to continue to write posts like this and
several previous posts , please write them so an average old Okie like me
can understand what the heck you are talking about. Terry.



-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of John Bates
Sent: Tuesday, July 07, 2015 9:51 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Double the year-round range of of one.

Whoops, I apologize for ignorance. At the risk of becoming imbred, I hardly
know why L-E-P-C is not aggendumized for the nation. If one doubles the
omnipresent range, it is imbelievable and incomparable. I suspect
oil-companies want to buy cheaper land.
Subject: Double the year-round range of of one.
From: John Bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 7 Jul 2015 09:51:08 -0500
Whoops, I apologize for ignorance. At the risk of becoming imbred, I hardly 
know why L-E-P-C is not aggendumized for the nation. If one doubles the 
omnipresent range, it is imbelievable and incomparable. I suspect oil-companies 
want to buy cheaper land. 

Subject: Re: FW: FW: Blue-throated Hummingbird
From: John Bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2015 22:41:49 -0500
Granted, you do(thou dost) not use E bird. Many competent Oklahoman 
birdwatchers do. Do not expect me to believe that you(see previous) knew the 
difference aurally, when all sightings on record almost match the first half of 
the present year. I made my initial post in May. 

Subject: Re: Yellow-headed Blackbird
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2015 12:37:42 -0500
I drove Rose Lake on Sunday as well. The herons and egrets were plentiful, even 
a good number of cattle egrets in the cattle fields just south of the "lake". I 
saw a couple dickcissels and a single kingfisher. 

My only "returnee" at Mitch has been a single male goldfinch last Thursday. 
There is a leucistic c. Chickadee at Mitch as well . It has been seen by me on 
5-6 occasions starting I early March . Sherm Barr got an excellent photo of it. 

Hal Yocum

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 6, 2015, at 12:25 PM, William Diffin  wrote:
> 
> Brian Marra photographed a Yellow-headed Blackbird at Rose Lake on July 5th. 
I was there this morning and didn't see any. Everything is full of water, but 
birds are still not particularly numerous. I saw several Great Egrets and 
Little Blue Herons, one Snowy Egret. 

>  
> At Stinchcomb West, Indigo Buntings and Painted Buntings are still singing. 
The playa is full and has a scattering of waders around the edges, the three 
species listed above plus Great Blue Herons. Common Grackles are numerous in 
the swampy areas around the power line crossing. 

>  
> Bill Diffin, OKC
Subject: Yellow-headed Blackbird
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2015 12:25:26 -0500
Brian Marra photographed a Yellow-headed Blackbird at Rose Lake on July
5th. I was there this morning and didn't see any. Everything is full of
water, but birds are still not particularly numerous. I saw several Great
Egrets and Little Blue Herons, one Snowy Egret.

At Stinchcomb West, Indigo Buntings and Painted Buntings are still singing.
The playa is full and has a scattering of waders around the edges, the
three species listed above plus Great Blue Herons. Common Grackles are
numerous in the swampy areas around the power line crossing.

Bill Diffin, OKC
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding
From: Don Gettinger <donaldgettinger AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 5 Jul 2015 14:10:27 -0500
Yes, evidently this is well-known.  But I love these little observations
because now every time I see a woodpecker, I will notice more about their
feeding behavior.  I am betting that I never see a sapsucker sallying out
from a fence-post to glean insects off the ground.  But when prey is
abundant,...anything is possible.

On Sun, Jul 5, 2015 at 12:33 PM, William Diffin 
wrote:

> There used to be a Red-headed Woodpecker colony at Eldon Lyon Park in
> Bethany. It may still be there, but I haven't been down to check in a
> while. They were getting a lot of competition from Starlings for nest holes
> the last few times I observed them. A frequently observed feeding behavior
> was much as you describe with the perching location being the side of a
> tree trunk five or six feet above the ground. Moths were one of the prey
> items.
>
> Bill Diffin, OKC
>
> On Fri, Jul 3, 2015 at 6:42 PM, Don Gettinger 
> wrote:
>
>> A male Red-Headed Woodpecker perches on fence-post, "sallies" out and
>> down to the ground for a few seconds, then flies back to the fence-post,
>> lands in the same position.  It bludgeons a large grasshopper prey that it
>> has gleaned from the ground. I thought this was novel at first, but I
>> continued to see it over and over.  The grasshoppers they are catching are
>> wingless.  I have not collected them, so am unsure about whether they are
>> late-stage nymphs, or the adult females of a wingless species, or "lubber
>> grasshoppers".  But this is certainly NOT woodpecking!   Does anyone know
>> if this feeding strategy is common?  Or, are they are just being
>> opportunistic and going for these big, readily available insects?
>>
>> --
>> Donald Gettinger
>> Senior Research Fellow
>> Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
>>
>
>


-- 
Donald Gettinger
Senior Research Fellow
Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpecker feeding
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 5 Jul 2015 12:33:15 -0500
There used to be a Red-headed Woodpecker colony at Eldon Lyon Park in
Bethany. It may still be there, but I haven't been down to check in a
while. They were getting a lot of competition from Starlings for nest holes
the last few times I observed them. A frequently observed feeding behavior
was much as you describe with the perching location being the side of a
tree trunk five or six feet above the ground. Moths were one of the prey
items.

Bill Diffin, OKC

On Fri, Jul 3, 2015 at 6:42 PM, Don Gettinger 
wrote:

> A male Red-Headed Woodpecker perches on fence-post, "sallies" out and down
> to the ground for a few seconds, then flies back to the fence-post, lands
> in the same position.  It bludgeons a large grasshopper prey that it has
> gleaned from the ground. I thought this was novel at first, but I continued
> to see it over and over.  The grasshoppers they are catching are wingless.
> I have not collected them, so am unsure about whether they are late-stage
> nymphs, or the adult females of a wingless species, or "lubber
> grasshoppers".  But this is certainly NOT woodpecking!   Does anyone know
> if this feeding strategy is common?  Or, are they are just being
> opportunistic and going for these big, readily available insects?
>
> --
> Donald Gettinger
> Senior Research Fellow
> Harold W Manter Laboratory of Parasitology
>
Subject: French
From: John Bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 5 Jul 2015 00:50:57 -0500
<<< pardon, my French, if you please?>>
Subject: Re: B-B-W-D
From: John Bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 22:34:07 -0500
Right on!
Subject: Re: B-B-W-D
From: Bill Adams <ba1980 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 5 Jul 2015 02:23:22 +0000
The best place I have found them is at the gated community of Falconhead Resort 
near Marietta, OK (South-central OK). They usually nest there, but with all the 
rain this year, I don't know. 

 Just let them know at the gate you are there to look at the birds and they 
should let you in. 


Bill AdamsDuncan, OK.
      From: John Bates 
 To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
 Sent: Saturday, July 4, 2015 6:51 PM
 Subject: [OKBIRDS] B-B-W-D
   
I wanted to see this duck, but all Sibley had was a dot. I wasted money looking 
in Okla. city. 


  
Subject: Re: B-B-W-D
From: Sebastian <sebastianpatti AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 21:03:59 -0500
Well, that's a head-scratcher!!

sebastianpatti AT hotmail.com 
Sebastian T. Patti 
(Lincoln Park) 
Chicago, ILLINOIS 60614-3354 
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> Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 20:27:16 -0500
> From: johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] B-B-W-D
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> 
> If one can place a dot on a tiny map, put it in the right location. What can 
be expected from the capitalistic answer to a proper field-guide. 

 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: B-B-W-D
From: John Bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 20:27:16 -0500
If one can place a dot on a tiny map, put it in the right location. What can be 
expected from the capitalistic answer to a proper field-guide. 

Subject: I was wrong.
From: John Bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 19:09:42 -0500
I was wrong. Sontarran deserves two Rs