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Updated on Thursday, November 20 at 01:25 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Chestnut-sided Shrike-Vireo,©Sophie Webb

20 Nov Rails [Henthorn1 ]
20 Nov Re: Red Slough Rock Wren photo [Foundation Subscriber ]
20 Nov Wear some orange ["Bostian, Kelly" ]
20 Nov Re: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker [Timothy O'Connell ]
20 Nov Red Slough Rock Wren photo [David Arbour ]
19 Nov Re: Wigeons and loons [Foundation Subscriber ]
19 Nov Wigeons and loons [Steve Davis ]
19 Nov Re: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker [Jim Jorgensen ]
19 Nov Re: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker [Lewis Pond ]
19 Nov Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker [Jim Jorgensen ]
18 Nov Re: Lewis's Woodpecker - Lake Carl Blackwell [John Polo ]
18 Nov Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 18 ...7 wren day! [David Arbour ]
18 Nov Re: Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count Date: Tuesday, December 23 [John Sterling ]
18 Nov Lewis's Woodpecker - Lake Carl Blackwell [Scott Loss ]
18 Nov Lewis's Woodpecker, Payne County [John Polo ]
18 Nov Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count Date: Tuesday, December 23 [Mia Revels ]
18 Nov Late Lark Sparrow - Boomer Lake, Stillwater [Scott Loss ]
18 Nov Re: FW: Snowy Owl [EUGENE YOUNG ]
17 Nov Re: Birder needs advice [John Kennington ]
17 Nov Birder needs advice [David Arbour ]
17 Nov Re: FW: Snowy Owl [John Fisher ]
17 Nov Re: FW: Snowy Owl [Dan Reinking ]
17 Nov Re: FW: Snowy Owl [David McNeely ]
17 Nov Re: Smith's Longspurs - Stillwater [john bates ]
17 Nov Re: FW: Snowy Owl [John Shackford ]
16 Nov Re: FW: Snowy Owl [JOS GRZYBOWSKI ]
16 Nov Re: Snowy Owl Deceased [John Bates ]
16 Nov Re: Snowy Owl Deceased [John Bates ]
16 Nov Re: Snowy Owl Deceased [Jana Singletary ]
16 Nov Re: Snowy Owl Deceased [John Bates ]
16 Nov Smith's Longspurs - Stillwater [Scott Loss ]
16 Nov ODWC LPC expert to speak [William Diffin ]
16 Nov Re: Snowy Owl Deceased ["M.S. Harris" ]
16 Nov Re: Snowy Owl Deceased [Patricia Seibert ]
16 Nov FW: Snowy Owl ["Ingold, James" ]
16 Nov Re: Snowy Owl Deceased [David John ]
16 Nov FW: eBird Report - Dolese Sand Pit (Guthrie), Nov 15, 2014 [Jimmy Woodard ]
16 Nov Re: Snowy Owl Deceased [Jim Arterburn ]
16 Nov Re: Snowy Owl Deceased [Lindell Dillon ]
16 Nov Snowy Owl Deceased [Jim Arterburn ]
15 Nov Consolation prize [Steve Davis ]
15 Nov Re: Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK ["Reinking, Daniel L." ]
15 Nov Re: Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK [Melinda Droege ]
15 Nov Re: Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK [David John ]
15 Nov Re: Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK ["Reinking, Daniel L." ]
15 Nov Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK [CM Laughlin ]
14 Nov OKC Audubon Field trip/Guthrie Sand pits [Jimmy Woodard ]
14 Nov Re: November Migration Report [James Hubbell ]
14 Nov Western Grebe [Bill Carrell ]
13 Nov Re: FOS Junco in Edmond [Foundation Subscriber ]
13 Nov FOS Junco in Edmond ["okcbirder AT gmail.com" ]
12 Nov Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 12 [David Arbour ]
11 Nov Re: Northern Saw- whet Owl [Susan Prescott ]
11 Nov Stillwater Migrants - Arctic Geese & White-winged Dove [Scott Loss ]
11 Nov Re: Northern Saw- whet Owl [John Fisher ]
11 Nov Re: Northern Saw- whet Owl [John Sterling ]
11 Nov Re: Northern Saw- whet Owl [Susan Prescott ]
10 Nov Northern Saw- whet Owl [John Sterling ]
10 Nov Loon Lecture by Dr. Walter Piper at the University of Tulsa, Friday Nov. 14 [Mia Revels ]
10 Nov Avocet and Lake Yahola [Lewis Pond ]
10 Nov Re: Red Slough Yellow Rail Rope Drag Results [Lewis Pond ]
9 Nov Red Slough Yellow Rail Rope Drag Results [David Arbour ]
8 Nov Little Gull, Late Nighthawk [Bill Carrell ]
7 Nov Lake Hefner [Kevin Groeneweg ]
7 Nov Re: Flying penguins [Sharon Henthorn ]
7 Nov Copan: Washington County [Melinda Droege ]
7 Nov Re: Flying penguins [Ellie Womack ]
7 Nov Flying penguins [Henthorn1 ]
7 Nov Re: South jenkins ["Feldt, Andrew N." ]
7 Nov Re: South jenkins [Steve Schafer ]
7 Nov South jenkins [rgunn1 ]
6 Nov Re: OKBIRDS Digest - 5 Nov 2014 (#2014-365) [Nola ]
6 Nov Re: White-throated Sparrow eating Flowering Dogwood berries [Janet Curth ]
6 Nov Re: FW: eBird Report - Lake Hefner, Nov 5, 2014 [Deanne McKinney ]
6 Nov Question???? [Patti Muzny ]
6 Nov Re: White-throated Sparrow eating Flowering Dogwood berries [Ellie Womack ]

Subject: Rails
From: Henthorn1 <henthorn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 11:57:15 -0600
Foundation subscriber asked about the yellow rails. They witness Virginia rails 
on the Arnett, OK CBC most years. Details of the upcoming CBC will be 
forthcoming, scheduled for final week of December. Eddie Stegall will notify us 
soon. 

Sharon Henthorn

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Red Slough Rock Wren photo
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 11:27:37 -0600
Dave, 
Any sign of the "great photos" of the yellow rail that the man from Dallas said 
he would send to you ? I really hope to see those . 

Hal Yocum 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 20, 2014, at 8:00 AM, David Arbour  wrote:
> 
> I posted a photo of the Red Slough Rock Wren on our Red Slough Photo Gallery 
site. You can see it here: 

>  
> http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma/recent_photos
>  
> I forgot to mention that while I was following the bird around while it was 
feeding, trying to get photos, it would fly into the cover of tall grass and 
brush that was growing along the mowed levee and at one point it sat up in a 
willow tree. I finally lost it and as I walked back down the levee to return to 
my truck I spied the bird feeding on the ground underneath my truck. Then it 
flew up inside the under carriage of the truck. I shook the truck before I got 
in it to leave to make sure he got out before I started moving. I drove a 
little ways down the levee then stopped and looked back with my binos and he 
was already back out feeding on the ground. I looked for the wren yesterday but 
it was gone. Apparently, it left overnight to find a more suitable habitat with 
a lot of rocks. 

>  
> David Arbour
> De Queen, AR
Subject: Wear some orange
From: "Bostian, Kelly" <Kelly.Bostian AT TULSAWORLD.COM>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 15:53:33 +0000
A note to birders who might not know, rifle season for deer begins Saturday 
(Nov. 22 - Dec. 7) 


The great majority of hunters are careful and safe, but rifle bullets carry 
long distances and a hunter focused on a deer might not see a person in plain 
clothes in the background. More than 190,000 people bought rifle tags last 
year. All it takes is one person to make one mistake. All deer hunters are 
required by law to wear hunter orange at all times while in the field during 
this season and it is wise for anyone in the woods to at least wear a hunter 
orange ball cap or stocking hat. 


I recommend wearing orange whether you believe you are in a deer hunting area 
or not. Again, while the great majority of deer hunters are law-abiding it only 
takes one who is not to make a fatal mistake. 


Be good and safe out there.


Kelly Bostian
Outdoors Writer
Tulsa World Media Company
www.tulsaworld.com
office | 918 581 8357
mobile | 918 231 1385
fax | 918 581 8353
315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
twitter |  AT kellybostian
blog |tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian
email | kelly.bostian AT tulsaworld.com
Subject: Re: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker
From: Timothy O'Connell <tim.oconnell AT OKSTATE.EDU>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 09:28:41 -0600
For a bit of perspective, the Red-headed Woodpeckers are unusual at Lake Carl 
Blackwell, too. I've birded that place pretty heavily for the past 10 years, 
including continuous breeding season surveys, Christmas Bird Counts, GBBC. 
During that time, I might have found a Red-headed on something like 1/10 of my 
trips. I was really surprised to see so many of them zipping about the park 
during our OOS field trip there last month, and glad to hear that they're 
sticking around. That is, of course, unless that meaniehead Lewis's succeeds in 
chasing them all off! 

~tim





On Nov 19, 2014, at 5:49 PM, Jim Jorgensen wrote:

> It was interesting watching them this morning. He ran off the juvenile 
> Red Headed Woodpecker and would sometimes see it in distant trees to the west 
going out after it (RHW juvi). There was another mature RHW which would stay in 
the trees to the east. It didn't seem to get into the conflict at all. There 
were Starlings in the favored tree which the LW did not bother at all. There 
were also two hairy or downys in the tree and the LW would leave alone as well. 
I considered that the LW would tire out but I think it expended much more enery 
than it took in while I was there. It was well worth the trip watching the 
"dog-fights" going on between the two birds.....the bonus was seeing the 
superior combatant...(aggressor)! 

> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Nov 19, 2014, at 5:10 PM, Lewis Pond  wrote:
>> 
>> The Lewis' Woodpecker was still on the same tree as of 2:30 today - 
11/19/14. Also, got a great look at a Prairie Falcon. Good trip! 

Subject: Red Slough Rock Wren photo
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 08:00:10 -0600
I posted a photo of the Red Slough Rock Wren on our Red Slough Photo Gallery
site.  You can see it here:

 

http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma/recent_photos 

 

I forgot to mention that while I was following the bird around while it was
feeding, trying to get photos, it would fly into the cover of tall grass and
brush that was growing along the mowed levee and at one point it sat up in a
willow tree.  I finally lost it and as I walked back down the levee to
return to my truck I spied the bird feeding on the ground underneath my
truck.  Then it flew up inside the under carriage of the truck.  I shook the
truck before I got in it to leave to make sure he got out before I started
moving.  I drove a little ways down the levee then stopped and looked back
with my binos and he was already back out feeding on the ground.  I looked
for the wren yesterday but it was gone.  Apparently, it left overnight to
find a more suitable habitat with a lot of rocks.

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR
Subject: Re: Wigeons and loons
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 22:33:24 -0500
Steve,
I likewise drove the Lake Hefner Dam at about 4:45-5:20. Many coots, p.b. 
grebe, few horned grebe, both gulls( ring bill and Bonaparte's) and , to the 
east of the fishing pier, one lone loon that at close observation I feel was a 
yellow billed loon. Indeed there was yellowness to the bill, generally held it 
pointing "up", had a prominent forehead bump and smaller backhead one, had the 
large pale neck markings . We got photos ( a friend) . I plan to get my friend 
to email the 2-3 best photos or two to some better experts for their opinion. 
Distance 30-40 yards out. Easily viewed with my scope. My total species for the 
day was 51. 

This morning at Hefner Park I sighted a very tan and white junco and we got 
excellent photos of that as well. Likewise I will share that through my friend. 

Nine sparrows for the day as well- I think all likely ones now except savannah.
Hal
---- Steve Davis  wrote: 
> Mary and I found at least a dozen male and female wigeons, along with a
> variety of other waterfowl, at the little pond at Canterbury retirement
> center off NW 122nd this afternoon.
> 
> Then we drove around the dam at Lake Hefner, seeing 5 Common Loons, 8-10
> Horned Grebes, about a 100 white pelicans, nearly as many DC Cormorants,
> and a dozen or more Bonaparte's Gulls in a frenzy in a cove on on the east
> end of the dam.
Subject: Wigeons and loons
From: Steve Davis <spd8109 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 19:46:18 -0600
Mary and I found at least a dozen male and female wigeons, along with a
variety of other waterfowl, at the little pond at Canterbury retirement
center off NW 122nd this afternoon.

Then we drove around the dam at Lake Hefner, seeing 5 Common Loons, 8-10
Horned Grebes, about a 100 white pelicans, nearly as many DC Cormorants,
and a dozen or more Bonaparte's Gulls in a frenzy in a cove on on the east
end of the dam.
Subject: Re: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker
From: Jim Jorgensen <hpah AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 17:49:13 -0600
It was interesting watching them this morning. He ran off the juvenile 
Red Headed Woodpecker and would sometimes see it in distant trees to the west 
going out after it (RHW juvi). There was another mature RHW which would stay in 
the trees to the east. It didn't seem to get into the conflict at all. There 
were Starlings in the favored tree which the LW did not bother at all. There 
were also two hairy or downys in the tree and the LW would leave alone as well. 
I considered that the LW would tire out but I think it expended much more enery 
than it took in while I was there. It was well worth the trip watching the 
"dog-fights" going on between the two birds.....the bonus was seeing the 
superior combatant...(aggressor)! 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 19, 2014, at 5:10 PM, Lewis Pond  wrote:
> 
> The Lewis' Woodpecker was still on the same tree as of 2:30 today - 11/19/14. 
Also, got a great look at a Prairie Falcon. Good trip! 

Subject: Re: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker
From: Lewis Pond <breaker57 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 15:10:42 -0800
The Lewis' Woodpecker was still on the same tree as of 2:30 today - 11/19/14. 
Also, got a great look at a Prairie Falcon. Good trip! 

Subject: Carl Blackwell Lewis's woodpecker
From: Jim Jorgensen <hpah AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 11:15:21 -0600
As described! A first for me and a fierce show of territorial instincts. 11:12 
am..just leaving. 

Lewis's woodpecker.

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Lewis's Woodpecker - Lake Carl Blackwell
From: John Polo <jpolo AT MAIL.USF.EDU>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 22:16:02 -0600
Hi Birders,
Brandy and i went out after work to look for the Lewis's. As we walked around 
in the area where Scott said he found it, we heard a Red-headed Woodpecker 
grunting and then it flew to the snag the Scott described. There it was met by 
the Lewis's, which chased it off. The Red-headed Woodpecker made two more tries 
at the tree and the Lewis's rebuffed it both times. I tried to get a photo, but 
the late sun didn't provide me with good enough light for decent photos, but as 
Scott indicated, clear looks made the bird unmistakeable. As we watched the 
bird, it flew over to another nearby snag, eyed an existing woodpecker hole, 
then returned to the large snag, where it remained as we departed. 


good birding,
john polo
Stillwater
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 18 ...7 wren day!
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 20:28:19 -0600
It was cold, clear, and windy on the bird survey today.  66 species were
found.  Temps dropped down to 17 degrees last night and there was some ice
around on the lakes and wetlands.  Highlight of the day was finding a Rock
Wren feeding on the ground on a mowed levee.  I was able to get some decent
pics and will post them later.  After finding this bird I realized I only
needed 3 more wren species to make it a 7 wren day; so I made a little extra
effort and easily found the 3 wrens I needed.  I regularly find 6 wren
species at Red Slough in the fall and winter but usually only find all six
on the same day once or twice a year, so it was a fun accomplishment to get
7 species today.   Also had the adult Golden Eagle soaring over the
reservoirs again today.  This second cold front that came through Sunday
night apparently pushed a bunch of our ducks further south as well as a lot
of our passerines.  Here is my list for today:

 

Wood Duck - 91

Gadwall - 407

Mallard - 974

Blue-winged Teal - 1

Northern Shoveler - 34

Northern Pintail - 29

Green-winged Teal - 330

Ring-necked Duck - 97

Hooded Merganser - 75

Ruddy Duck - 3

Pied-billed Grebe - 15

Double-crested Cormorant - 78

Great Blue Heron - 19

Black Vulture - 5

Turkey Vulture - 7

Bald Eagle - 3 (2 adults & 1 imm.)

Northern Harrier - 6

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 5

Golden Eagle - 1 adult

American Kestrel - 1

American Coot - 125

Wilson's Snipe - 6

Bonaparte's Gull - 6

Ring-billed Gull - 10

Mourning Dove - 6

Belted Kingfisher - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 7

Eastern Phoebe - 8

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 10

Fish Crow - 3

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Carolina Wren - 2

Bewick's Wren - 1

House Wren - 2

Winter Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 1

Marsh Wren - 1

Rock Wren - 1 (New species for RS!)

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 4

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

American Pipit - 2

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 24

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Chipping Sparrow - 1

Field Sparrow - 3

Savannah Sparrow - 9

LeConte's Sparrow - 1

Fox Sparrow - 2

Song Sparrow - 15

Swamp Sparrow - 12

White-throated Sparrow - 4

White-crowned Sparrow - 5

Dark-eyed Junco - 5

Northern Cardinal - 3

Red-winged Blackbird - 140

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 380

American Goldfinch - 3

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour 

 

 
Subject: Re: Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count Date: Tuesday, December 23
From: John Sterling <prairie AT ITLNET.NET>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 17:28:23 -0600
I will be there.  Should be staying with Berlin.

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 18, 2014, at 12:28 PM, Mia Revels  wrote:
> 
> Greetings OK-Birders!
> 
> The Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count will be on Tuesday, December 23 this 
year. 

> 
> On the evening of Monday, December 22, we will meet at Papa Poblano's 
Restaurant just north of the traffic light east of Idabel. I have made 
reservations for 7:00 pm, which will allow time to eat and afterwards, to form 
groups, and to hand out checklists and other info for the count. I will provide 
maps showing the various units and we will determine who covers which. 

> 
> On the count day we will meet for lunch at Steven's Gap Restaurant at 1:00 
PM. This Restaurant is on the west side of Hwy 259 in Hochatown, just south of 
the road that goes into Steven's Gap. After lunch we will conduct a preliminary 
species tally and see what we have missed. Those who are staying will then go 
back out, ending at sundown in Unit 2 of the Little River National Wildlife 
Refuge where we will watch the waterfowl come to roost and hope for a Woodcock. 

> 
> I know this count is a long way from anywhere, but it is a lovely part of 
Oklahoma that you may not get to very often. Please consider joining us for a 
fun birding trip! Contact Mia at: Cell (479) 444-9492 or revels AT nsuok.edu 

> 
> -- 
> Mia Revels, Ph.D.
> Professor of Biology
> Northeastern State University
> 611 Grand Ave. 
> Tahlequah, Oklahoma
> (918) 444-3824
> revels AT nsuok.edu
> 
> 
> **CONFIDENTIALITY** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain 
confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized 
disclosure or use of this information is prohibited. 
Subject: Lewis's Woodpecker - Lake Carl Blackwell
From: Scott Loss <scottrloss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 16:57:23 -0600
Thanks to Torre Hovick and John Polo for getting the word out on the
Lewis's Woodpecker. I'll add a few more words.

I spotted the bird around 2:15 pm today while teaching my applied ecology
and conservation class. Within the Lake Carl Blackwell park area, it is
hanging pretty tight to a giant dead tree southwest across the road from
the park's general store, park office, and gas station. To get there, enter
the park off of highway 51 west of Stillwater (self-pay required - $5 or $6
to get in). Follow the main road straight north almost all the way to the
lake (first you will cross a causeway across a small arm of the lake). When
you get to the vicinity of the store/office the road starts to curve east.
As you curve you will see the big dead tree ahead of you on the east side
of the road.

The bird is actively chasing all woodpeckers away from this tree (including
Red-headed and Red-bellied) so perhaps it is thinking of setting up a
territory at least for awhile. In fact it did nothing but chase a juvenile
Red-headed Woodpecker for a good 10 minutes at one point. Otherwise, it
frequently sallied on fly-catching forays between that tree and some of the
living oaks around it. I checked on it four times over the course of 2
hours and it was always in the same dead tree.

I managed to leave my camera in the coat in my office, so I do not have
photo documentation. I will be back teaching there tomorrow afternoon, so I
will attempt to get a photo at that point. My summary is that it is
unmistakable and was clearly seen. One of my students, Alex James (a
skilled local birder) was also able to see and confirm the ID.

Scott Loss
Stillwater
Subject: Lewis's Woodpecker, Payne County
From: John Polo <jpolo AT MAIL.USF.EDU>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 15:04:46 -0600
Birders,
This report is 2nd hand from Torre Hovick. Scott Loss found a Lewis's 
Woodpecker in a tree across the street from the gas station at Lake Carl 
Blackwell. Not sure of the time frame, but within the last 30 minutes, I 
believe. Scott asked to get the word out quickly for anyone who wants to go 
see. Nice find, Scott! 


While I'm posting, Payne County Audubon Society is planning a trip to Sooner 
Lake this Saturday. Meet at Bill's Corner at 8:30a. You'll need a state-issued 
ID to get in. Bill's Corner is at the corner of HWY 177 and HWY 64. Right now 
the forecast has a high chance for thunderstorms. If that holds, the trip will 
probably be cancelled. The best place to check the status of the trip is PCAS' 
new website, at the current URL: 

http://paynecountyaudubonsociety.wordpress.com/

good birding,
john polo
Stillwater
Subject: Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count Date: Tuesday, December 23
From: Mia Revels <revels AT NSUOK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 12:28:06 -0600
Greetings OK-Birders!

The Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count will be on Tuesday, December 23 this
year.

On the evening of Monday, December 22, we will meet at Papa Poblano's
Restaurant just north of the traffic light east of Idabel.  I have made
reservations for 7:00 pm, which will allow time to eat and afterwards, to
form groups, and to hand out checklists and other info for the count.  I
will provide maps showing the various units and we will determine who
covers which.

On the count day we will meet for lunch at Steven's Gap Restaurant at 1:00
PM. This Restaurant is on the west side of Hwy 259 in Hochatown, just south
of the road that goes into Steven's Gap. After lunch we will conduct a
preliminary species tally and see what we have missed. Those who are
staying will then go back out, ending at sundown in Unit 2 of the Little
River National Wildlife Refuge where we will watch the waterfowl come to
roost and hope for a Woodcock.

I know this count is a long way from anywhere, but it is a lovely part of
Oklahoma that you may not get to very often. Please consider joining us for
a fun birding trip!  Contact Mia at: Cell (479) 444-9492 or revels AT nsuok.edu

-- 
Mia Revels, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Northeastern State University
611 Grand Ave.
Tahlequah, Oklahoma
(918) 444-3824
revels AT nsuok.edu


***CONFIDENTIALITY*** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain
confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized
disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.
Subject: Late Lark Sparrow - Boomer Lake, Stillwater
From: Scott Loss <scottrloss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 09:48:37 -0600
I stopped to scan the numerous waterfowl on Boomer Lake this morning. The
best bird turned out to be a LARK SPARROW on the point off the south
parking lot on the east side. Didn't think this was a notable bird until I
ran an eBird query and saw that this is one of the latest ever records for
this latitude in the interior US.

The lake itself was loaded with waterfowl (it always seems to be on
mornings when at least some ice is present) - 11 duck species with hundreds
of individuals, plus 2 Horned Grebes, 1 Common Loon, Least Sandpipers, etc.

Also, I'm continuing to have good birds flying over our north Stillwater
yard around and shortly after sunrise. Today was the 3rd straight day with
flyover Smith's Longspurs; also had one that sounded more Lapland
Longspur-like (but leaving unidentified), plus several Pine Siskins, pipit,
hundreds of Red-winged Blackbirds and Robins, dozens of Brewer's
Blackbirds, etc.

Scott Loss
Stillwater
Subject: Re: FW: Snowy Owl
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 04:23:04 +0000
FYI, in case you are interested:

Kerlinger, Lein, and Boxall (see below) conducted work in the 80s and more or 
less concluded the following: irrruptions were not actually as common as once 
thought, but were actually incursions into "normal" wintering ranges, in part 
by examining areas near Calgary (Alberta Canada) and the winter distribution 
using specimens and CBCs, etc. In fact, the northern plains, at least through 
KS is part of their normal winter range (Kerlinger et al. 1985 and Parmelee 
1992). It can occur in most years in KS, although it's rare and somewhat 
irregular (Thompson et al. 2011 Birds of KS). OK is considered a location for 
vagrancy, especially during irruptive years. 


Most birds observed during irruptions are young birds (the Bartlesville bird 
looked to be a young female), both males and females (supporting the high 
success during breeding, which would be tied to high lemming populations, and 
subsequent dispersal). Within their normal wintering areas, birds are healthy. 
A bird observed not too far from the OK state-line, in Sumner County KS, was 
observed for several weeks, and pellet contents indicated it had enough food 
based on the small sample size (Subramaniam et al. 2011). The irruption of 
2011-2012, Robbins and Otte (2013) tallied up total observations from KS and 
MO, and for KS there were 154 reports, a majority were HY birds, and a majority 
of salvaged birds were emaciated, supporting the idea that many young birds 
die. 


Here is some of the literature referenced above and early history info (if I 
didn't put title, it's because you can search in that journal via SORA and/or 
online , or the KOS web page, or you can access in libraries): 


Boxall and Lein 1982. Feeding ecology of Snowy Owls wintering in southern 
Alberta. Arctic 35(2):282-290 


_____.  1989.  JFO 60(1):20-29

Gross. 1944. Auk 61(1):1-18

Holt et al. 1999.  Family Strigidae in Handbook of Birds of the World, Vol 5.

Kerlinger and Lein 1986. Differences in winter ranges among age-sex classes of 
Snowy Owl in NA. Ornis Scandinavica 17:1-7. 


_____. 1988. JFO 59(1):7-12.

Kerlinger, Lein and Sevick. 1985. Distribution and population fluctuations of 
wintering Snowy Owls. Can. J. Zoology 63(8):1829-1834. 


Parmelee.  1992. Snowy Owl.  BNA account.

Robbins and Otte. 2013. KOS Bull. 64(4):41-44

Shelford. 1945. Auk 62(4):592-596.

Subrmaniam et al. 2011.  KOS Bull. 62(4):42-45

A good web site: http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/gotsnowies2013/

Personally, I think habitat is critical to survival for birds this far south. 
If birds have habitat with enough prey, they survive. Wetland habitats and 
reservoirs might provide better habitat (great at capturing birds, even over 
open water) with greater diversity of prey than agriculture fields and 
grasslands, especially if snow covered. I think birds that have been around for 
3-4 weeks, likely make it back north...if some anthropogenic factor doesn't 
kill them first (shootings, power line collision, electrocution, road kill, 
etc.). 


Interestingly, concerning site fidelity as indicated by message below: I've 
heard of winter site fidelity, but ironically, for breeding it's not really 
important. The owls go where the food is abundant...thus, nesting site fidelity 
isn't strong at all (see web page above and look at Sat. studies near the end). 
As a kid, at my aunt and uncles home I can remember seeing Snowy Owls in the 
Neshaminy/Lower South Hampton suburbs of Philly (PA) just about every winter. 
The Marland owl a couple of years ago in OK, I was told by a land owner (she 
works here) the bird was present the year before. I've heard similar stories in 
KS, birds showing up for a couple of yrs in a row. 


Gene


Eugene A. Young


Agriculture, Science & Engineering
1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310
Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310
Phone: 580-628-6482
Fax: 580-628-6209
E-Mail: Eugene.Young AT noc.edu
Website: www.noc.edu

-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of John Fisher
Sent: Monday, November 17, 2014 12:00 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] FW: Snowy Owl

John,

In 1971 an adult snowy stayed in a hay field south of the Arkansas River about 
4 miles west of Sand Springs. The farmer that owned the field said it had been 
there before and he was glad to see it since it always made a serious dent in 
the cotton rats. The first time I saw it was in late October - early November. 
I think it left sometime in March but.... It appeared to be healthy - at least 
there were lots of pellets next to its favorite hay bale in the middle of the 
field and didn't seem to be having any trouble catching prey. In following 
years, I saw it or another a couple of times in that same field. 


John

---- John Shackford  wrote: 
> Dear James,
> 
> A good question about early Snowy Owls which took me a bit to chase 
> down an acceptable answer.  In 1975 I did a summary paper in the OOS 
> Bulletin (December Issue) entitled "The Snowy Owl in Oklahoma."  The 
> impetus for this paper was an invasion of Snowy Owls in Oklahoma 
> during the winter of 1974-5. We had at least 20 Snowies show up that winter! 

> 
> In this summary paper there was one Snowy Owl "seen repeatedly from 
> 'early November' to 7 December" 1963 "near Lake Carl Blackwell, Payne 
> County, north-central Oklahoma by various observers" including Fred 
> and Marguerite Baumgartner. This is the earliest record I am aware of for OK. 

> 
> Additionally, perhaps of interest, Dr. George Sutton wondered if these 
> Snowies that made it this far south were the result of lemming crashes 
> to the far north.  These lemming crashes remove the Owls food supply 
> resulting in the Owls moving further south than usual in search of a food 
supply. 

> Doc therefore felt that many of these early winter birds likely 
> starved and this was one possible reason most records were in early 
> winter.  Somewhat refuting this in one instance, at least, was a Snowy 
> seen NW of OK City from 6January-14 February [1975] that possibly survived 
the winter. 

> 
> I hope this helps.
> 
> John Shackford
> Edmond, OK
> 
> On Sun, Nov 16, 2014 at 11:09 AM, Ingold, James 
> 
> wrote:
> 
> >  *From:* Ingold, James
> > *Sent:* Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:08 AM
> > *To:* 'okbirds'
> > *Subject:* Snowy Owl
> >
> >
> >
> > Can anyone tell me if this is the earliest record for a Snowy Owl in 
> > Oklahoma?
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > *James L. Ingold, Ph.D.*
> >
> > *Professor – Department of Biological Sciences*
> >
> > *Director – Museum of Life Sciences*
> >
> > *Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor – Museum of Life 
> > Sciences*
> >
> > *Louisiana State University in Shreveport*
> >
> >
> >
> > Office: (318) 797-5236
> >
> > Fax: (318) 797-5222
> >
> > james.ingold AT lsus.edu  www.lsus.edu
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
Subject: Re: Birder needs advice
From: John Kennington <johnkennington AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 14:01:46 -0600
I've cc'd Karyn directly, but also sending to OKBirds.

Here are a few resources.

Tulsa Audubon has an online state-wide "Guide to Birding in Oklahoma"
describing birding spots around the state. Areas are grouped by region, and
also on a Google map. See:

http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/birding-guide.htm

The OKC Audubon Society has some excellent descriptions of birding hotspots
in the OKC area. See:

http://okc-audubon.org/category/birding-hot-spots/

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society publishes a Date Guide to the birds of
Oklahoma, broken down by region of the state, so you can see what to expect
in difference seasons. A new version was just published this year and can
be purchased at:

http://okbirds.org/publications.htm

Good Birding!,
John Kennington
Tulsa Audubon





On Mon, Nov 17, 2014 at 1:49 PM, David Arbour  wrote:

>       Can someone help her?  I’m not familiar with the area.  See message
> below:
>
>
>
> David Arbour
>
> De Queen, AR
>
>
>  ------------------------------
>
> *From:* Karyn Dillard [mailto:kjdillard AT sbcglobal.net]
> *Sent:* Monday, November 17, 2014 12:22 PM
> *To:* David Arbour
> *Subject:*
>
>
>
> I will be spending a few days in Oklahoma right after Txsgv at the
> Greenleaf State Park. I like to bird when possible. Any suggestions on
> what to look for? How do I get on OK Birding list? Thank you for your help.
>
> Karyn Dillard
>
> Little Rock
>
>
>
>
>   ------------------------------
>
Subject: Birder needs advice
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 13:49:39 -0600
Can someone help her?  I'm not familiar with the area.  See message below:

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

  _____  

From: Karyn Dillard [mailto:kjdillard AT sbcglobal.net] 
Sent: Monday, November 17, 2014 12:22 PM
To: David Arbour
Subject: 

 


I will be spending a few days in Oklahoma right after Txsgv at the Greenleaf
State Park. I like to bird when possible. Any suggestions on what to look
for? How do I get on OK Birding list? Thank you for your help.

Karyn Dillard 

Little Rock

 

 

  _____  
Subject: Re: FW: Snowy Owl
From: John Fisher <rgs455 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 13:00:27 -0500
John,

In 1971 an adult snowy stayed in a hay field south of the Arkansas River about 
4 miles west of Sand Springs. The farmer that owned the field said it had been 
there before and he was glad to see it since it always made a serious dent in 
the cotton rats. The first time I saw it was in late October - early November. 
I think it left sometime in March but.... It appeared to be healthy - at least 
there were lots of pellets next to its favorite hay bale in the middle of the 
field and didn't seem to be having any trouble catching prey. In following 
years, I saw it or another a couple of times in that same field. 


John

---- John Shackford  wrote: 
> Dear James,
> 
> A good question about early Snowy Owls which took me a bit to chase down an
> acceptable answer.  In 1975 I did a summary paper in the OOS Bulletin
> (December Issue) entitled "The Snowy Owl in Oklahoma."  The impetus for
> this paper was an invasion of Snowy Owls in Oklahoma during the winter of
> 1974-5.  We had at least 20 Snowies show up that winter!
> 
> In this summary paper there was one Snowy Owl "seen repeatedly from 'early
> November' to 7 December" 1963 "near Lake Carl Blackwell, Payne County,
> north-central Oklahoma by various observers" including Fred and Marguerite
> Baumgartner. This is the earliest record I am aware of for OK.
> 
> Additionally, perhaps of interest, Dr. George Sutton wondered if these
> Snowies that made it this far south were the result of lemming crashes to
> the far north.  These lemming crashes remove the Owls food supply resulting
> in the Owls moving further south than usual in search of a food supply.
> Doc therefore felt that many of these early winter birds likely starved and
> this was one possible reason most records were in early winter.  Somewhat
> refuting this in one instance, at least, was a Snowy seen NW of OK City
> from 6January-14 February [1975] that possibly survived the winter.
> 
> I hope this helps.
> 
> John Shackford
> Edmond, OK
> 
> On Sun, Nov 16, 2014 at 11:09 AM, Ingold, James 
> wrote:
> 
> >  *From:* Ingold, James
> > *Sent:* Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:08 AM
> > *To:* 'okbirds'
> > *Subject:* Snowy Owl
> >
> >
> >
> > Can anyone tell me if this is the earliest record for a Snowy Owl in
> > Oklahoma?
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > *James L. Ingold, Ph.D.*
> >
> > *Professor – Department of Biological Sciences*
> >
> > *Director – Museum of Life Sciences*
> >
> > *Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor – Museum of Life Sciences*
> >
> > *Louisiana State University in Shreveport*
> >
> >
> >
> > Office: (318) 797-5236
> >
> > Fax: (318) 797-5222
> >
> > james.ingold AT lsus.edu  www.lsus.edu
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
Subject: Re: FW: Snowy Owl
From: Dan Reinking <dreinking AT OU.EDU>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 08:18:28 -0600
I just received a call from someone who used to work in wildlife refuges who 
saw the owl on Friday the 14th. He described it well and saw it fly down into 
the center median of the highway; he turned around, and went back for a better 
look at it. 


Dan

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of JOS GRZYBOWSKI
Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2014 10:07 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] FW: Snowy Owl

 

Tie. Earliest was Nov 15, 1976 at the Will Rogers International Airport in OKC. 
Discovered by Wes Issacs. Noted there for over 3 months. 


CHEERS,                             JOE Grzybowski

 

On Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:09 AM, "Ingold, James"  
wrote: 


 

From: Ingold, James 
Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:08 AM
To: 'okbirds'
Subject: Snowy Owl

 

Can anyone tell me if this is the earliest record for a Snowy Owl in Oklahoma?

 

 

James L. Ingold, Ph.D.

Professor – Department of Biological Sciences

Director – Museum of Life Sciences

Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor – Museum of Life Sciences

Louisiana State University in Shreveport

 

Office: (318) 797-5236

Fax: (318) 797-5222

  james.ingold AT lsus.edu  
www.lsus.edu 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: FW: Snowy Owl
From: David McNeely <mcneely4 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 07:29:05 -0600
John, The Snowy Owl southern incursions in recent years have been attributed 
not to lemming crashes, but rather the opposite. In years with lemming 
irruptions, the young owls (Snowy Owls produce rather prodigious clutches for a 
bird of prey) survive exceptionally well due to the abundant lemmings. The more 
owls in the north, the more there are that move south in winter, and the 
further south they end up. Owls captured during these irruptions have actually 
been in pretty good condition. I will search for references concerning this, 
but it has been rather widely reported. 


David McNeely

---- John Shackford  wrote: 
> Dear James,
> 
> A good question about early Snowy Owls which took me a bit to chase down an
> acceptable answer.  In 1975 I did a summary paper in the OOS Bulletin
> (December Issue) entitled "The Snowy Owl in Oklahoma."  The impetus for
> this paper was an invasion of Snowy Owls in Oklahoma during the winter of
> 1974-5.  We had at least 20 Snowies show up that winter!
> 
> In this summary paper there was one Snowy Owl "seen repeatedly from 'early
> November' to 7 December" 1963 "near Lake Carl Blackwell, Payne County,
> north-central Oklahoma by various observers" including Fred and Marguerite
> Baumgartner. This is the earliest record I am aware of for OK.
> 
> Additionally, perhaps of interest, Dr. George Sutton wondered if these
> Snowies that made it this far south were the result of lemming crashes to
> the far north.  These lemming crashes remove the Owls food supply resulting
> in the Owls moving further south than usual in search of a food supply.
> Doc therefore felt that many of these early winter birds likely starved and
> this was one possible reason most records were in early winter.  Somewhat
> refuting this in one instance, at least, was a Snowy seen NW of OK City
> from 6January-14 February [1975] that possibly survived the winter.
> 
> I hope this helps.
> 
> John Shackford
> Edmond, OK
> 
> On Sun, Nov 16, 2014 at 11:09 AM, Ingold, James 
> wrote:
> 
> >  *From:* Ingold, James
> > *Sent:* Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:08 AM
> > *To:* 'okbirds'
> > *Subject:* Snowy Owl
> >
> >
> >
> > Can anyone tell me if this is the earliest record for a Snowy Owl in
> > Oklahoma?
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > *James L. Ingold, Ph.D.*
> >
> > *Professor – Department of Biological Sciences*
> >
> > *Director – Museum of Life Sciences*
> >
> > *Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor – Museum of Life Sciences*
> >
> > *Louisiana State University in Shreveport*
> >
> >
> >
> > Office: (318) 797-5236
> >
> > Fax: (318) 797-5222
> >
> > james.ingold AT lsus.edu  www.lsus.edu
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >

--
David McNeely
Subject: Re: Smith's Longspurs - Stillwater
From: john bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 05:14:54 -0800
Right on!


On Sunday, November 16, 2014 2:48 PM, Scott Loss  wrote:
 


Working in the driveway as the sun came out in Stillwater this afternoon after 
the snow, I was excited to hear the dry rattle calls of Smith's Longspurs 
overhead. Looked up and had around 75 flying over toward the southwest. My 
first longspurs of the season and our 148th yard species.. 


Scott Loss
Stillwater
Subject: Re: FW: Snowy Owl
From: John Shackford <johnshackford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 01:01:45 -0600
Dear James,

A good question about early Snowy Owls which took me a bit to chase down an
acceptable answer.  In 1975 I did a summary paper in the OOS Bulletin
(December Issue) entitled "The Snowy Owl in Oklahoma."  The impetus for
this paper was an invasion of Snowy Owls in Oklahoma during the winter of
1974-5.  We had at least 20 Snowies show up that winter!

In this summary paper there was one Snowy Owl "seen repeatedly from 'early
November' to 7 December" 1963 "near Lake Carl Blackwell, Payne County,
north-central Oklahoma by various observers" including Fred and Marguerite
Baumgartner. This is the earliest record I am aware of for OK.

Additionally, perhaps of interest, Dr. George Sutton wondered if these
Snowies that made it this far south were the result of lemming crashes to
the far north.  These lemming crashes remove the Owls food supply resulting
in the Owls moving further south than usual in search of a food supply.
Doc therefore felt that many of these early winter birds likely starved and
this was one possible reason most records were in early winter.  Somewhat
refuting this in one instance, at least, was a Snowy seen NW of OK City
from 6January-14 February [1975] that possibly survived the winter.

I hope this helps.

John Shackford
Edmond, OK

On Sun, Nov 16, 2014 at 11:09 AM, Ingold, James 
wrote:

>  *From:* Ingold, James
> *Sent:* Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:08 AM
> *To:* 'okbirds'
> *Subject:* Snowy Owl
>
>
>
> Can anyone tell me if this is the earliest record for a Snowy Owl in
> Oklahoma?
>
>
>
>
>
> *James L. Ingold, Ph.D.*
>
> *Professor – Department of Biological Sciences*
>
> *Director – Museum of Life Sciences*
>
> *Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor – Museum of Life Sciences*
>
> *Louisiana State University in Shreveport*
>
>
>
> Office: (318) 797-5236
>
> Fax: (318) 797-5222
>
> james.ingold AT lsus.edu  www.lsus.edu
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: FW: Snowy Owl
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 20:07:02 -0800
Tie. Earliest was Nov 15, 1976 at the Will Rogers International Airport in OKC. 
Discovered by Wes Issacs. Noted there for over 3 months. 

CHEERS,                             JOE Grzybowski



On Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:09 AM, "Ingold, James"  
wrote: 

 


 
From:Ingold, James 
Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:08 AM
To: 'okbirds'
Subject: Snowy Owl
 
Can anyone tell me if this is the earliest record for a Snowy Owl in Oklahoma?
 
 
James L. Ingold, Ph.D.
Professor – Department of Biological Sciences
Director – Museum of Life Sciences
Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor – Museum of Life Sciences
Louisiana State University in Shreveport
 
Office: (318) 797-5236
Fax: (318) 797-5222
james.ingold AT lsus.edu  www.lsus.edu
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased
From: John Bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 19:11:23 -0600
I seems coming to Okla. is a death sentence.
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased
From: John Bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 18:11:21 -0600
Thank you for restoring my faith.
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased
From: Jana Singletary <jssingletary AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 17:02:25 -0600
If you are speaking of the owl near Bowring, OK several years ago, then you are 
definitely mistaken. I, for one, called to report the injured owl. A local 
rehabber went to the area and trapped the bird, but sadly the wound was 
infected and the bird did not survive. 

Jana Singletary
Tulsa

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 16, 2014, at 4:43 PM, John Bates  wrote:
> 
> Reminds me of the last time a snowy owl was sighted near Tulsa. On the third 
day, my father and I drove to see it. To our dismay the bird was on the ground 
and had been shot. We saw many people there looking. It might have been 
recently inflicted and we thought surely somebody had called Wildcares or 
something. Upon returning to Okla. city, we called and learned nobody had done 
so. The no good reprobates. My estimation of Tulsan birdwatchers was diminished 
substantially. This does not speak for all birdwatchers, but seriously. 

Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased
From: John Bates <johnc.bates AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 16:43:05 -0600
Reminds me of the last time a snowy owl was sighted near Tulsa. On the third 
day, my father and I drove to see it. To our dismay the bird was on the ground 
and had been shot. We saw many people there looking. It might have been 
recently inflicted and we thought surely somebody had called Wildcares or 
something. Upon returning to Okla. city, we called and learned nobody had done 
so. The no good reprobates. My estimation of Tulsan birdwatchers was diminished 
substantially. This does not speak for all birdwatchers, but seriously. 

Subject: Smith's Longspurs - Stillwater
From: Scott Loss <scottrloss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 14:48:28 -0600
Working in the driveway as the sun came out in Stillwater this afternoon
after the snow, I was excited to hear the dry rattle calls of Smith's
Longspurs overhead. Looked up and had around 75 flying over toward the
southwest. My first longspurs of the season and our 148th yard species..

Scott Loss
Stillwater
Subject: ODWC LPC expert to speak
From: William Diffin <okiebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 14:11:37 -0600
The speaker at the November meeting of OCAS will be Allan Janus, a research
supervisor with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. Allan has
been instrumental in the development of the Lesser Prairie Chicken
conservation program being implemented in Oklahoma. Habitat degradation is
believed to be a main cause of the decline of the LPC's range from 22
Oklahoma counties to 9. The main thrust of current conservation plans is to
get the cooperation of landowners and business interests in the protection
and restoration of habitat. In March 2014 the USFWS announced the
long-awaited federal listing of the LPC. The decision was to give the
bird "threatened" status, one step below "endangered", in combination with
the issuance of a special rule under section 4(d) of the Endangered Species
Act to limit regulatory impacts on landowners and businesses. The USFWS was
greatly influenced in its listing decision by the ongoing efforts of the
states to implement cooperative plans to conserve the chickens. Allan will
present on the development of these cooperative plans and the
positive outcomes projected. More information is available in our November
newsletter, available under the Membership tab on our website,
www.okc-audubon.org. Detail on the recent history of the listing decision
is available at the USFWS Ecological Services page devoted to the chickens,
http://www.fws.gov/southwest/es/lpc.html.
The meeting will be held as usual in the Will Rogers Park Garden Exhibition
Center, NW 36th St and Interstate 44, from 7 to 9 PM. The meeting is open
to all interested parties. Visitors and non-members are encouraged to
attend.
Bill Diffin
OKC Audubon President
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased
From: "M.S. Harris" <mbhsuzy AT CABLEONE.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 12:32:55 -0600
So said to hear. Glad I took the time to go see it yesterday afternoon. It was 
a lifer for me. Good that Patricia is getting it to TU to be of further 
benefit. 


 

Suzy Harris

Bartlesville, OK

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Patricia Seibert
Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:48 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Snowy Owl Deceased

 

Hi David & OK Birders,

Those were exactly my thoughts as I picked up the frozen body this morning. If 
only it had been a mile or two east or west of this highway......it broke my 
heart to find the lifeless body a pile of feathers on the roadside, almost 
directly across the highway from the water tower described yesterday as a 
landmark. To come from so far, then die on the roadside. It still had some fur 
in its talons, looked to be from a rabbit. This beautiful Snowy Owl is now in 
the freezer on its way to becoming part of the collection for study at the 
University of Tulsa. 


Patricia Seibert

Tulsa, OK


On Nov 16, 2014, at 11:01 AM, David John  wrote:

Yesterday, after returning from observing the owl, I emailed a friend to say I 
was concerned that it would fly across the highway and be hit by a vehicle. On 
my way back to Tulsa, a Red-tailed Hawk did just that. It flew across the 
highway and landed in the grass on the other side. If a vehicle had been there 
at that moment, it would have been hit. 

 
How often we have been told not to disturb wildlife, and I certainly hold to 
that. I wonder, though, in this situation should the owl have been shooed away 
from the highway? On a country road there wouldn't have been as much a problem. 
But Hwy. 75 is a busy, divided state highway and the likelihood of it being hit 
was high. 

 
It is strange how one can form an attachment to a lovely, unusual (for 
Oklahoma) bird such as the Snowy, and then feel a sense of loss a day later 
upon learning it was dead. It came all the way from the tundra to Oklahoma only 
to have this happen. How sad. 

 
David John



David T. John, dtjohn07 AT msn.com, 15020 N. Lewis Ave., Skiatook, OK 74070, 
918-396-4277. 

 

  _____  

Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 09:10:26 -0600
From: jimarterburn AT COX.NET
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Snowy Owl Deceased
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU

Yes, or a truck. Pat said the face was in pretty bad shape.

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Lindell Dillon
Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2014 8:54 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased

 

Hit by a car?  Too bad. 

 

On Sun, Nov 16, 2014 at 8:16 AM, Jim Arterburn  wrote:

OKBirds,

 

I just got a call from Pat Seibert that she found the Snowy Owl dead along the 
south bound lane of Highway 75 and asked if I would post to OKBirds. 


 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 

 
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased
From: Patricia Seibert <plseibert AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 11:48:21 -0600
Hi David & OK Birders,
Those were exactly my thoughts as I picked up the frozen body this morning. If 
only it had been a mile or two east or west of this highway......it broke my 
heart to find the lifeless body a pile of feathers on the roadside, almost 
directly across the highway from the water tower described yesterday as a 
landmark. To come from so far, then die on the roadside. It still had some fur 
in its talons, looked to be from a rabbit. This beautiful Snowy Owl is now in 
the freezer on its way to becoming part of the collection for study at the 
University of Tulsa. 


Patricia Seibert
Tulsa, OK

> On Nov 16, 2014, at 11:01 AM, David John  wrote:
> 
> Yesterday, after returning from observing the owl, I emailed a friend to say 
I was concerned that it would fly across the highway and be hit by a vehicle. 
On my way back to Tulsa, a Red-tailed Hawk did just that. It flew across the 
highway and landed in the grass on the other side. If a vehicle had been there 
at that moment, it would have been hit. 

>  
> How often we have been told not to disturb wildlife, and I certainly hold to 
that. I wonder, though, in this situation should the owl have been shooed away 
from the highway? On a country road there wouldn't have been as much a problem. 
But Hwy. 75 is a busy, divided state highway and the likelihood of it being hit 
was high. 

>  
> It is strange how one can form an attachment to a lovely, unusual (for 
Oklahoma) bird such as the Snowy, and then feel a sense of loss a day later 
upon learning it was dead. It came all the way from the tundra to Oklahoma only 
to have this happen. How sad. 

>  
> David John
> 
> 
> 
> David T. John, dtjohn07 AT msn.com, 15020 N. Lewis Ave., Skiatook, OK 74070, 
918-396-4277. 

>  
> Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 09:10:26 -0600
> From: jimarterburn AT COX.NET
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Snowy Owl Deceased
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> 
> Yes, or a truck. Pat said the face was in pretty bad shape.
> 
>  
> 
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Lindell Dillon
> Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2014 8:54 AM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased
> 
>  
> 
> Hit by a car?  Too bad.
> 
>  
> 
> On Sun, Nov 16, 2014 at 8:16 AM, Jim Arterburn  wrote:
> 
> OKBirds,
> 
>  
> 
> I just got a call from Pat Seibert that she found the Snowy Owl dead along 
the south bound lane of Highway 75 and asked if I would post to OKBirds. 

> 
>  
> 
> Jim Arterburn
> 
> Tulsa, Oklahoma
> 
> www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder
> 
>  
> 
>  
Subject: FW: Snowy Owl
From: "Ingold, James" <James.Ingold AT LSUS.EDU>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 17:09:20 +0000
From: Ingold, James
Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2014 11:08 AM
To: 'okbirds'
Subject: Snowy Owl

Can anyone tell me if this is the earliest record for a Snowy Owl in Oklahoma?


James L. Ingold, Ph.D.
Professor - Department of Biological Sciences
Director - Museum of Life Sciences
Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor - Museum of Life Sciences
Louisiana State University in Shreveport

Office: (318) 797-5236
Fax: (318) 797-5222
james.ingold AT lsus.edu 
www.lsus.edu 







Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased
From: David John <dtjohn07 AT MSN.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 11:01:46 -0600
Yesterday, after returning from observing the owl, I emailed a friend to say I 
was concerned that it would fly across the highway and be hit by a vehicle. On 
my way back to Tulsa, a Red-tailed Hawk did just that. It flew across the 
highway and landed in the grass on the other side. If a vehicle had been there 
at that moment, it would have been hit. 

 
How often we have been told not to disturb wildlife, and I certainly hold to 
that. I wonder, though, in this situation should the owl have been shooed away 
from the highway? On a country road there wouldn't have been as much a problem. 
But Hwy. 75 is a busy, divided state highway and the likelihood of it being hit 
was high. 

 
It is strange how one can form an attachment to a lovely, unusual (for 
Oklahoma) bird such as the Snowy, and then feel a sense of loss a day later 
upon learning it was dead. It came all the way from the tundra to Oklahoma only 
to have this happen. How sad. 

 
David John




David T. John, dtjohn07 AT msn.com, 15020 N. Lewis Ave., Skiatook, OK 74070, 
918-396-4277. 

 
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 09:10:26 -0600
From: jimarterburn AT COX.NET
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Snowy Owl Deceased
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU

Yes, or a truck. Pat said the face was in pretty bad shape. From: okbirds 
[mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Lindell Dillon 

Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2014 8:54 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased Hit by a car? Too bad. On Sun, Nov 16, 2014 at 
8:16 AM, Jim Arterburn  wrote:OKBirds, I just got a call 
from Pat Seibert that she found the Snowy Owl dead along the south bound lane 
of Highway 75 and asked if I would post to OKBirds. Jim ArterburnTulsa, 
Oklahomawww.PBase.com/oklahomabirder 
Subject: FW: eBird Report - Dolese Sand Pit (Guthrie), Nov 15, 2014
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 09:46:42 -0600
 Here is a report from yesterday's field trip to the Guthrie sand pits. We also 
visited Guthrie Lake and Liberty 

 Lake southwest of town but didn't find much at either place. We did see an 
adult Bald Eagle at both lakes. The 

 adult at Guthrie Lake was harassing the waterfowl. It finally forced one duck 
into the water and it kept flying 

 over the spot at the south end of the lake. unfortunately, the drama was 
mostly not in our direct view so we don't 

	know the outcome.
 Just an FYI, there is now a $3 per person day use fee charged at Liberty Lake. 



	Jimmy Woodard
	Midwest City, OK


Dolese Sand Pit (Guthrie), Logan, US-OK
Nov 15, 2014 8:15 AM - 10:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
Comments: field trip for OKC Audubon. participants were Dave and Sue Woodson, 
Sharon Henthorn, Susan Prescott, Hal Yoakum, Jack Hurd, Brian Marra, Steve 
Davis and myself. 

59 species (+1 other taxa)

Cackling Goose  2
Canada Goose  24
Gadwall  30
American Wigeon  4
Mallard  100
Northern Shoveler  15
Northern Pintail  2
Green-winged Teal  30
Ring-necked Duck  12
Lesser Scaup  25
Bufflehead  45
Common Goldeneye  2
Hooded Merganser  40
Ruddy Duck  16
Pied-billed Grebe  5
Horned Grebe  1
Double-crested Cormorant  2
Great Blue Heron  4
Northern Harrier  2
Sharp-shinned Hawk  1
Bald Eagle  1     adult.
Red-shouldered Hawk  2
Red-tailed Hawk  2
American Coot  40
Killdeer  16
Spotted Sandpiper 2 both appeared to be winter plumaged individuals although 
one appeared to have a few faint spots on the rear flanks. plain brown backs, 
yellowish legs, brownish patches down onto the neck with a white wedge below 
that onto the neck. 

Greater Yellowlegs  3
Least Sandpiper  12
peep sp.  25
Bonaparte's Gull  3
Ring-billed Gull  24
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  16
Eurasian Collared-Dove  2
Mourning Dove  4
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Downy Woodpecker  2
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  6
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Blue Jay  5
American Crow  15
Carolina Chickadee  5
Tufted Titmouse  2
Carolina Wren  6
Eastern Bluebird  8
American Robin  80
Northern Mockingbird  2
European Starling  18
Yellow-rumped Warbler  26
Spotted Towhee  1
Song Sparrow  1
White-throated Sparrow  7
Harris's Sparrow  4
White-crowned Sparrow  3
Dark-eyed Junco  8
Northern Cardinal  30
Red-winged Blackbird  14
Eastern Meadowlark  10
American Goldfinch  50
House Sparrow  20

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20563311 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 09:10:26 -0600
Yes, or a truck. Pat said the face was in pretty bad shape.

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Lindell Dillon
Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2014 8:54 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased

 

Hit by a car?  Too bad. 

 

On Sun, Nov 16, 2014 at 8:16 AM, Jim Arterburn  wrote:

OKBirds,

 

I just got a call from Pat Seibert that she found the Snowy Owl dead along the 
south bound lane of Highway 75 and asked if I would post to OKBirds. 


 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 

 
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl Deceased
From: Lindell Dillon <reddirtbird AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 08:53:38 -0600
Hit by a car?  Too bad.

On Sun, Nov 16, 2014 at 8:16 AM, Jim Arterburn  wrote:

> OKBirds,
>
>
>
> I just got a call from Pat Seibert that she found the Snowy Owl dead along
> the south bound lane of Highway 75 and asked if I would post to OKBirds.
>
>
>
> Jim Arterburn
>
> Tulsa, Oklahoma
>
> www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder
>
>
>
Subject: Snowy Owl Deceased
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 08:16:12 -0600
OKBirds,

 

I just got a call from Pat Seibert that she found the Snowy Owl dead along
the south bound lane of Highway 75 and asked if I would post to OKBirds.

 

Jim Arterburn

Tulsa, Oklahoma

www.PBase.com/oklahomabirder

 
Subject: Consolation prize
From: Steve Davis <spd8109 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 21:14:29 -0600
Thanks to Jimmy and all for a great birding outing this morning. Mary
stayed home to meet the Skunk Whisperer to rid us of a recent interloper,
while I ventured out with the group. As a consolation for her missing the
morning's outing, we drove by Lake Hefner this afternoon, a little after 4,
starting at Stars and Stripes Park and going clockwise around the lake.

We saw the usual birds on the south and southwest. When we got to the south
inlet road, we were looking at a Great Egret and Pied-billed Grebe out in
the lake, when I noticed some birds in the inlet above the concrete
spillway.

There were 3 mallards and a lone male Wood Duck dabbling in its
spectacularly colorful feathers. We got out the camera and Mary took a few
(hundred or so) pictures from the car window, then drove over to the north
side to take a closer look, taking several more photos before he decided
he'd had enough exposure and flew off a ways into the lake.

Then, just before a couple with a tiny chihuahua with a tinier wool pooch
jacket pulled up and got out of their car, one by one, three immature
Black-crowned Night Herons flew from somewhere up the creek, down to the
east edge of the spillway, where they were met by three Great Egrets, a
Great Blue Heron and a Ring-billed Gull.

Altogether, a pretty nice consolation prize, we thought.

--steve d and mary l
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK
From: "Reinking, Daniel L." <dreinking AT OU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 23:58:36 +0000
Still present at 4:30 today.
A photo is available at 
http://suttoncenter.org/pages/birds_listserv?cat=Owl,%20Snowy. 

Dan
________________________________
From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of Melinda Droege 
[oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM] 

Sent: Saturday, November 15, 2014 15:36
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK

It was still there at 2:30 and 3:30....I took a carload of grandkids each 
time....they loved it.....easy to see and on same pole. thanks to all.... 

Melinda Droege

On Sat, Nov 15, 2014 at 2:11 PM, David John 
> wrote: 

The Snowy Owl was still perched on the utility pole this afternoon at 2:00.


David T. John, dtjohn07 AT msn.com, 15020 N. Lewis Ave., 
Skiatook, OK 74070, 918-396-4277. 


> Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 18:44:14 +0000
> From: dreinking AT OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
>
> The owl was found this morning by Ryan VanZant, a colleague of mine. It was 
perched on top of a telephone pole near the blue water tower on the east side 
of Highway 75 north of 2900 Road. I was cycling when he found it and rode over 
to see it. It was still present when I left it about 60 minutes ago. 

> Dan Reinking
> Sutton Avian Research Center
> ________________________________________
> From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf 
of CM Laughlin [gaeliccat AT GMAIL.COM] 

> Sent: Saturday, November 15, 2014 12:28
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK
>
> Hello birders,
>
> I have a report of a Snowy Owl from a falconer: "Along Highway 75, South of 
Bartlesville. Between West 2700 and West 2900." He sent me a cell phone 
picture, and it looks like a Snowy Owl to me. He had it on a telephone pole 
near the road from at least 10:45 - 11:30am today, November 15. 

>
> If anyone else sights it, let us know. I might have to make a trip up.
>
> Good birding,
> Caitlin M Laughlin
> OKC
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 15:36:28 -0600
It was still there at 2:30 and 3:30....I took a carload of grandkids each
time....they loved it.....easy to see and on same pole.  thanks to all....
Melinda Droege

On Sat, Nov 15, 2014 at 2:11 PM, David John  wrote:

> The Snowy Owl was still perched on the utility pole this afternoon at
> 2:00.
>
>
> David T. John, dtjohn07 AT msn.com, 15020 N. Lewis Ave., Skiatook, OK
> 74070, 918-396-4277.
>
> > Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 18:44:14 +0000
> > From: dreinking AT OU.EDU
> > Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> >
> > The owl was found this morning by Ryan VanZant, a colleague of mine. It
> was perched on top of a telephone pole near the blue water tower on the
> east side of Highway 75 north of 2900 Road. I was cycling when he found it
> and rode over to see it. It was still present when I left it about 60
> minutes ago.
> > Dan Reinking
> > Sutton Avian Research Center
> > ________________________________________
> > From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of CM Laughlin [
> gaeliccat AT GMAIL.COM]
> > Sent: Saturday, November 15, 2014 12:28
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> > Subject: [OKBIRDS] Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK
> >
> > Hello birders,
> >
> > I have a report of a Snowy Owl from a falconer: "Along Highway 75, South
> of Bartlesville. Between West 2700 and West 2900." He sent me a cell phone
> picture, and it looks like a Snowy Owl to me. He had it on a telephone pole
> near the road from at least 10:45 - 11:30am today, November 15.
> >
> > If anyone else sights it, let us know. I might have to make a trip up.
> >
> > Good birding,
> > Caitlin M Laughlin
> > OKC
>
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK
From: David John <dtjohn07 AT MSN.COM>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 14:11:58 -0600
The Snowy Owl was still perched on the utility pole this afternoon at 2:00. 



David T. John, dtjohn07 AT msn.com, 15020 N. Lewis Ave., Skiatook, OK 74070, 
918-396-4277. 

 
> Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 18:44:14 +0000
> From: dreinking AT OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> 
> The owl was found this morning by Ryan VanZant, a colleague of mine. It was 
perched on top of a telephone pole near the blue water tower on the east side 
of Highway 75 north of 2900 Road. I was cycling when he found it and rode over 
to see it. It was still present when I left it about 60 minutes ago. 

> Dan Reinking
> Sutton Avian Research Center
> ________________________________________
> From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of CM Laughlin 
[gaeliccat AT GMAIL.COM] 

> Sent: Saturday, November 15, 2014 12:28
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK
> 
> Hello birders,
> 
> I have a report of a Snowy Owl from a falconer: "Along Highway 75, South of 
Bartlesville. Between West 2700 and West 2900." He sent me a cell phone 
picture, and it looks like a Snowy Owl to me. He had it on a telephone pole 
near the road from at least 10:45 - 11:30am today, November 15. 

> 
> If anyone else sights it, let us know. I might have to make a trip up.
> 
> Good birding,
> Caitlin M Laughlin
> OKC
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK
From: "Reinking, Daniel L." <dreinking AT OU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 18:44:14 +0000
The owl was found this morning by Ryan VanZant, a colleague of mine. It was 
perched on top of a telephone pole near the blue water tower on the east side 
of Highway 75 north of 2900 Road. I was cycling when he found it and rode over 
to see it. It was still present when I left it about 60 minutes ago. 

Dan Reinking
Sutton Avian Research Center
________________________________________
From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of CM Laughlin 
[gaeliccat AT GMAIL.COM] 

Sent: Saturday, November 15, 2014 12:28
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK

Hello birders,

I have a report of a Snowy Owl from a falconer: "Along Highway 75, South of 
Bartlesville. Between West 2700 and West 2900." He sent me a cell phone 
picture, and it looks like a Snowy Owl to me. He had it on a telephone pole 
near the road from at least 10:45 - 11:30am today, November 15. 


If anyone else sights it, let us know. I might have to make a trip up.

Good birding,
Caitlin M Laughlin
OKC
Subject: Snowy Owl near Bartlesville, OK
From: CM Laughlin <gaeliccat AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 12:28:47 -0600
Hello birders, 

I have a report of a Snowy Owl from a falconer: "Along Highway 75, South of 
Bartlesville. Between West 2700 and West 2900." He sent me a cell phone 
picture, and it looks like a Snowy Owl to me. He had it on a telephone pole 
near the road from at least 10:45 - 11:30am today, November 15. 


If anyone else sights it, let us know. I might have to make a trip up.

Good birding, 
Caitlin M Laughlin
OKC
Subject: OKC Audubon Field trip/Guthrie Sand pits
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 20:20:09 -0600
                                Looks like the weather is going to cooperate
for tomorrow's trip. We will meet at 8AM at the Love's at Hwy 33 and I-35 in
Guthrie.

                                The Love's is on the west side of I-35.

                                Most of the trip will be car birding with
minimal walking. Dress appropriately for the cold temps and low wind chills.
Bring snacks and

                                something to drink. 

                                

 

 

                Jimmy Woodard

                Midwest City, OK

                405-365-5685
Subject: Re: November Migration Report
From: James Hubbell <hubmutt AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 15:59:30 -0600
Thank you

On Wed, Nov 5, 2014 at 1:35 PM, Patricia Velte  wrote:

> Dear OKBirders,
>
>
>
> I'll try to keep sending these monthly reports unless they become a bother
> to OKBirds subscribers.  Please note that this information is also
> available in a searchable format on the OOS website.  Go to:
> http://okbirds.org/obrc-database-search.htm  You can enter a month in the
> ARRIVAL field (e.g., November) and view a list of that month's arrivals.
> Click on the individual species and you'll see date and location
> information as it appears in the Date Guide.
>
>
>
> ARRIVALS
>
>
>
> Ross's Goose                           November 9 - ALL
>
> Trumpeter Swan                        November 15 - NW,SW,C,NE
>
> Tundra Swan                             November 1 - ALL
>
> White-winged Scoter                  November 5 - C,NE
>
> American Scoter                        November 11 - NE
>
> Long-tailed Duck                       November 20 - PAN,NW,SW,C,SC,NE
>
> Common Goldeneye                  November 1 - ALL
>
> Red-throated Loon                    November 4 - C,NE
>
> Pacific Loon                             November 4 - C,NE
>
> Northern Goshawk                     November 26 - PAN, NW
>
> Thayer's Gull                             November 15 - NW,C,SC,SE
>
> Glaucous Gull                           November 11 - NW,C,NE
>
> Northern Shrike                         November 24 - PAN
>
> Harris's Sparrow                        November 6 - SW,SC,SE
>
> Lapland Longspur                     November 1 - ALL
>
> Smith's Longspur                      November 4 - NW,SW,C,NE
>
> Cassin's Finch                           November 25 - PAN
>
> Red Crossbill                            November 4 - ALL
>
> Evening Grosbeak                     November 18 - ALL
>
>
>
> DEPARTURES
>
>
>
> Blue-winged Teal                       November 1 - PAN
>
> American White Pelican             November 26 - PAN
>
> Neotropic Cormorant                 November 4 -SE
>
> American Bittern                        November 25 - ALL
>
> Great Egret                               November 18 - PAN
>
> Snowy Egret                             November 5 - ALL
>
> Little Blue Heron                        November 5 - NW,SW,C,SC,NE,SE
>
> Cattle Egret                               November 6 - ALL
>
> Black-crowned Night-Heron        November 26 - PAN,NW,SW,NE
>
> Turkey Vulture                           November 12 - PAN,SW,SW,C,NE
>
> Osprey                                     November 27 - ALL
>
> Peregrine Falcon                       November 1 - ALL
>
> King Rail                                   November 25 - NW,SW,C,SC,NE,SE
>
> Sora                                         November 14 -
> PAN,NW,SW,C,SC,NE
>
> Common Gallinule                     November 16 - NW,SW,C,SC,SE
>
> Sandhill Crane                           November 30 - PAN,C,SC,NE
>
> Whooping Crane                       November 10 - NW,SW
>
> Black-bellied Plover                   November 15 - ALL
>
> American Golden Plover            November 18 - NW,SW,C,SC,NE,SE
>
> American Avocet                       November 20 - NW,SW,C,SC,NE,SE
>
> Greater Yellowlegs                    November 16 - PAN
>
> Least Sandpiper                        November 1 - PAN
>
> Baird's Sandpiper                      November 10 - ALL
>
> Pectoral Sandpiper                    November 14 - ALL
>
> Dunlin                                       November 27 - SW,C,SC,NE,SE
>
> Long-billed Dowitcher                November 15 - PAN,NW,NE
>
> Wilson's Snipe                          November 25 - PAN
>
> Forster's Tern                            November 4 - PAN,SW
>
> Rufous Hummingbird                 November 20 - PAN,NW,SW,C,SC,NE
>
> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher            November 18 - NW,SW,C,SC,NE,SE
>
> Blue-headed Vireo                     November 1 - NW,SW,C,SC,NE,SE
>
> Fish Crow                                 November 1 - C,SC,NE,SE
>
> Tree Swallow                             November 1 - SW,C,SC,NE,SE
>
> House Wren                              November 6 - PAN,NW
>
> Chipping Sparrow                      November 25 - PAN,NW
>
> Vesper Sparrow                        November 23 - NW,C,NE
>
> Lark Sparrow                             November 1 - NW,SW,C,SC,NE,SE
>
> Savannah Sparrow                    November 10 - PAN
>
> Grasshopper Sparrow                November 2 - NW,C,NE
>
>
>
> Pat Velte
>
> pvelte AT cox.net
>
> Oklahoma City
>
>
>
> The information presented here comes from The Oklahoma Bird Records
> Committee of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society, which publishes a Date
> Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma. This booklet divides
> Oklahoma into 7 geographic regions, and lists the normal dates of
> occurrence for each Oklahoma bird species within each region. Observers are
> urged to report unusual species, or birds out of date or out of normal
> range in Oklahoma, based on the information given in this publication.
>
>
>
> The Oklahoma Ornithological Society and Oklahoma Bird Records Committee
> web site, http://www.okbirds.org/, includes ordering information for the
> Date Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma, information on
> documenting significant records, documentation forms, instructions, and a
> searchable database for Oklahoma bird migration information. Birders are
> cordially invited to join the Oklahoma Ornithological Society.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Western Grebe
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 12:59:18 -0600
Hello All,

             This morning, saw a Western Grebe on Lake Yahola. Also FOS
Common Goldeneye.

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Re: FOS Junco in Edmond
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 16:58:05 -0600
We certainly feeding lots of juncos and assorted sparrows at Mitch Park. Hal 
Yocum 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 13, 2014, at 1:39 PM, "okcbirder AT gmail.com"  
wrote: 

> 
> Spotted a Junco in our backyard this morning. Guess it's time to get the 
feeders out with this cold weather to give the little ones some encouragement 
to eat and play while we watch. 

> 
> Dave & Sue
> OKC Birders
Subject: FOS Junco in Edmond
From: "okcbirder AT gmail.com" <okcbirder@GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 13:39:15 -0600
Spotted a Junco in our backyard this morning. Guess it's time to get the 
feeders out with this cold weather to give the little ones some encouragement 
to eat and play while we watch. 


Dave & Sue
OKC Birders
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 12
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 21:16:00 -0600
It was partly cloudy, cold and windy on the bird survey today.  Temps
dropped down to 29 degrees last night and the high today was in the low
forties.  Amazingly, 70 species were found.  The cold front moved a lot of
ducks down our way.  Black-bellied Whistling Ducks are lingering for a new
late date for RS.  Also, a late Black-throated Green Warbler was a surprise
as it fed in a wind blown willow on one of the lake levees.  I saw an adult
Golden Eagle twice today as it harassed the mass of ducks on Pintail and
Lotus lakes.  Then a large flock of crows dropped down from high in the sky
and harassed the eagle in flight for about 15 minutes.  The first Rusty
Blackbirds of the season have shown up.  I seldom see Lesser Scaups at Red
Slough anymore so a small flock on Otter Lake was a treat.  I heard two
flocks of Snow Geese migrating up high but they must have really been up
there as I couldn't see them.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 16

Snow Goose - 5

Canada Goose - 10

Wood Duck - 25

Gadwall - 1,445

American Wigeon - 6

Mallard - 1,036

Northern Shoveler - 44

Northern Pintail - 7

Green-winged Teal - 720

Ring-necked Duck - 568

Lesser Scaup - 4

Ruddy Duck - 9

Pied-billed Grebe - 18

Double-crested Cormorant - 45

Great Blue Heron - 7

Black Vulture - 3

Turkey Vulture - 18

Bald Eagle - 1 subadult

Northern Harrier - 5

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 4

Golden Eagle - 1 adult

American Kestrel - 1

American Coot - 180

Killdeer - 34

Greater Yellowlegs - 2

Wilson's Snipe - 39

Ring-billed Gull - 1

Mourning Dove - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 6

Eastern Phoebe - 6

Blue Jay - 4

American Crow - 122

Fish Crow - 4

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Carolina Wren - 3

House Wren - 1

Winter Wren - 2

Sedge Wren - 1

Marsh Wren - 2

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 1

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 6

Eastern Bluebird - 2

American Robin - 80

Northern Mockingbird - 1

American Pipit - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 1

Black-throated Green Warbler - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Field Sparrow - 7

Savannah Sparrow - 4

LeConte's Sparrow - 3

Fox Sparrow - 2

Song Sparrow - 15

Swamp Sparrow - 7

White-throated Sparrow - 6

White-crowned Sparrow - 8

Northern Cardinal - 7

Red-winged Blackbird - 200

Eastern Meadowlark - 12

Rusty Blackbird - 6

Common Grackle - 175

American Goldfinch - 11

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour 

 
Subject: Re: Northern Saw- whet Owl
From: Susan Prescott <Susan-Prescott AT OMRF.ORG>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 16:57:01 +0000
Thanks for the info.

Susan P
________________________________________
From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of John Fisher [rgs455 AT COX.NET]
Sent: Tuesday, November 11, 2014 9:55 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Northern Saw- whet Owl

If I remember right, the park was called Dripping Springs when it was private. 
When the state purchaed the property, they changed the name to Natural Falls 
State Park since already they had Dripping Springs State Park near Okmulgee. 


John


---- John Sterling  wrote:
> Yes,you are correct.  They are the same.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> > On Nov 11, 2014, at 8:10 AM, Susan Prescott  
wrote: 

> >
> > Is Dripping Springs State Park the same as Dripping Falls? If not, then 
where is Dripping Falls SP? 

> > ________________________________________
> > From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of John Sterling 
[prairie AT ITLNET.NET] 

> > Sent: Monday, November 10, 2014 9:58 PM
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> > Subject: [OKBIRDS] Northern Saw- whet Owl
> >
> > Guess the subject line got your attention. Spent several days in northeast 
Oklahoma looking for N. Saw-whet Owls. Looked around Miami from the Kansas 
border to Grove. Could not locate any habitats that looked suitable, no 
conifers. 

> >
> > Finally made it down to Dripping Falls State Park. Had not been there for 
several years. Well worth going there, very birdy. Found a great spot according 
to Jimmy Woodard. A north facing hill along a stream with conifers. Played the 
call from sunset to after dark, nothing. Checked again in the morning, no owl. 

> >
> > Had to go some miles south to find more conifers. Checked out several 
areas. The owls could be around, but there is a massive amount of country to 
search through and not many birds, great trip anyway. Visited James Waffle and 
Jim Harman. Jim is home and doing ok. He has a couple people helping him. 

> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Sent from my
Subject: Stillwater Migrants - Arctic Geese & White-winged Dove
From: Scott Loss <scottrloss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 10:30:06 -0600
All 5 species of arctic geese flew over our house in Stillwater early this
morning riding the bitter north winds. Biggest numbers were Snow Geese
(~420), followed by high-flying (migratory) Canadas, Greater White-fronted,
Cackling, and a at least 5 (probably a couple dozen) Ross's Geese mixed in
with the Snows. Thedere were also hundrs of ducks in many flocks that were
too high to ID.

I also had a White-winged Dove rocket past pretty low. This is an uncommon
species for this part of the state, and the 2nd I've seen from our yard
(other record was in April).

A 5-minute stop at Boomer Lake also produced my first Horned Grebe of the
season (and 1st ever for the lake), a large number of Buffleheads, and a
foursome of Black Vultures. Interestingly, I have now seen Black Vultures 6
times in various parts of Payne County this fall, and every time it has
been a group of 4 (all the same birds or just a coincidence?).

Scott Loss
Stillwater
Subject: Re: Northern Saw- whet Owl
From: John Fisher <rgs455 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 10:55:28 -0500
If I remember right, the park was called Dripping Springs when it was private. 
When the state purchaed the property, they changed the name to Natural Falls 
State Park since already they had Dripping Springs State Park near Okmulgee. 


John


---- John Sterling  wrote: 
> Yes,you are correct.  They are the same.
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> > On Nov 11, 2014, at 8:10 AM, Susan Prescott  
wrote: 

> > 
> > Is Dripping Springs State Park the same as Dripping Falls? If not, then 
where is Dripping Falls SP? 

> > ________________________________________
> > From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of John Sterling 
[prairie AT ITLNET.NET] 

> > Sent: Monday, November 10, 2014 9:58 PM
> > To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> > Subject: [OKBIRDS] Northern Saw- whet Owl
> > 
> > Guess the subject line got your attention. Spent several days in northeast 
Oklahoma looking for N. Saw-whet Owls. Looked around Miami from the Kansas 
border to Grove. Could not locate any habitats that looked suitable, no 
conifers. 

> > 
> > Finally made it down to Dripping Falls State Park. Had not been there for 
several years. Well worth going there, very birdy. Found a great spot according 
to Jimmy Woodard. A north facing hill along a stream with conifers. Played the 
call from sunset to after dark, nothing. Checked again in the morning, no owl. 

> > 
> > Had to go some miles south to find more conifers. Checked out several 
areas. The owls could be around, but there is a massive amount of country to 
search through and not many birds, great trip anyway. Visited James Waffle and 
Jim Harman. Jim is home and doing ok. He has a couple people helping him. 

> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > Sent from my
Subject: Re: Northern Saw- whet Owl
From: John Sterling <prairie AT ITLNET.NET>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 09:30:01 -0600
Yes,you are correct.  They are the same.

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 11, 2014, at 8:10 AM, Susan Prescott  wrote:
> 
> Is Dripping Springs State Park the same as Dripping Falls? If not, then where 
is Dripping Falls SP? 

> ________________________________________
> From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of John Sterling 
[prairie AT ITLNET.NET] 

> Sent: Monday, November 10, 2014 9:58 PM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Northern Saw- whet Owl
> 
> Guess the subject line got your attention. Spent several days in northeast 
Oklahoma looking for N. Saw-whet Owls. Looked around Miami from the Kansas 
border to Grove. Could not locate any habitats that looked suitable, no 
conifers. 

> 
> Finally made it down to Dripping Falls State Park. Had not been there for 
several years. Well worth going there, very birdy. Found a great spot according 
to Jimmy Woodard. A north facing hill along a stream with conifers. Played the 
call from sunset to after dark, nothing. Checked again in the morning, no owl. 

> 
> Had to go some miles south to find more conifers. Checked out several areas. 
The owls could be around, but there is a massive amount of country to search 
through and not many birds, great trip anyway. Visited James Waffle and Jim 
Harman. Jim is home and doing ok. He has a couple people helping him. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my
Subject: Re: Northern Saw- whet Owl
From: Susan Prescott <Susan-Prescott AT OMRF.ORG>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 14:10:58 +0000
Is Dripping Springs State Park the same as Dripping Falls? If not, then where 
is Dripping Falls SP? 

________________________________________
From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of John Sterling 
[prairie AT ITLNET.NET] 

Sent: Monday, November 10, 2014 9:58 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Northern Saw- whet Owl

Guess the subject line got your attention. Spent several days in northeast 
Oklahoma looking for N. Saw-whet Owls. Looked around Miami from the Kansas 
border to Grove. Could not locate any habitats that looked suitable, no 
conifers. 


Finally made it down to Dripping Falls State Park. Had not been there for 
several years. Well worth going there, very birdy. Found a great spot according 
to Jimmy Woodard. A north facing hill along a stream with conifers. Played the 
call from sunset to after dark, nothing. Checked again in the morning, no owl. 


Had to go some miles south to find more conifers. Checked out several areas. 
The owls could be around, but there is a massive amount of country to search 
through and not many birds, great trip anyway. Visited James Waffle and Jim 
Harman. Jim is home and doing ok. He has a couple people helping him. 





Sent from my
Subject: Northern Saw- whet Owl
From: John Sterling <prairie AT ITLNET.NET>
Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2014 21:58:07 -0600
Guess the subject line got your attention. Spent several days in northeast 
Oklahoma looking for N. Saw-whet Owls. Looked around Miami from the Kansas 
border to Grove. Could not locate any habitats that looked suitable, no 
conifers. 


Finally made it down to Dripping Falls State Park. Had not been there for 
several years. Well worth going there, very birdy. Found a great spot according 
to Jimmy Woodard. A north facing hill along a stream with conifers. Played the 
call from sunset to after dark, nothing. Checked again in the morning, no owl. 


Had to go some miles south to find more conifers. Checked out several areas. 
The owls could be around, but there is a massive amount of country to search 
through and not many birds, great trip anyway. Visited James Waffle and Jim 
Harman. Jim is home and doing ok. He has a couple people helping him. 





Sent from my 
Subject: Loon Lecture by Dr. Walter Piper at the University of Tulsa, Friday Nov. 14
From: Mia Revels <revels AT NSUOK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2014 11:42:12 -0600
Dr. Walter Piper from Chapman University will present a lecture entitled,
“Do Common Loons Use Footholds to Acquire Territories?”, on Friday, Nov.
14, from 3-4 p.m. at the University of Tulsa in Oliphant Hall room 300.
The lecture is free and open to the public.  Dr. Piper has conducted
long-term research on loons for over 20 years and will present recent
research findings and an overview of his research.  For more information or
to get directions, contact Dr. Charles R. Brown (918-631-3943) or Barbara
Barnard (918-631-2205).

-- 
Mia Revels, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Northeastern State University
611 Grand Ave.
Tahlequah, Oklahoma
(918) 444-3824
revels AT nsuok.edu


***CONFIDENTIALITY*** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain
confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized
disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.
Subject: Avocet and Lake Yahola
From: Lewis Pond <breaker57 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2014 08:09:32 -0800
We saw an American Avocet at Sand Springs Lake this morning. First time I have 
ever seen one here. 


We went to Lake Yahola this morning - lots of Franklin's Gulls and Ring-billed. 
I couldn't find the Little Gull. There are hundreds of ducks and coots this 
morning. 

Subject: Re: Red Slough Yellow Rail Rope Drag Results
From: Lewis Pond <breaker57 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2014 05:34:26 -0800
Some birds we all saw that David didn't include:

1. AT LEAST 10 Gadwalls.
2. More Coots than you could count.
3. 45 Mallards
4. 3 Green Wing Teal
5. 2 Ring-necked ducks
6. 1 Lesser Scaup
7. 1 Pied billed grebe
8. 5 GB Heron
9. 6 Turkey Vultures
10. 2 Norther Harrier
11. 1 Sharp-shinned Hawk
12. 2 Red tailed hawks
13. 7 Mourning doves
14. 1 Belted Kingfisher
15. 1 Fish Crow
16. 2 Loggerhead Shrikes
17. 1 Eastern Phoebe
18. 1 Northern Flicker
19. 1 Downy Woodpecker
20. 1 Blue Jay
21. 2 Carolina Chickadee
22. 2 House Wren
23.  2 Marsh Wren
24. Swamp Sparrow
25. 4 Eastern Bluebirds
26. 1 Brown Thrasher
27.  1 Northern Mockingbird
28. 3 Yellow-rumped Warblers
29. 1 Eastern Towhee (probable - heard at least)
30. 8 Savannah Sparrow
31. 2 Fox Sparrow
32. 5 Northern Cardinal
33. 5 Eastern Meadowlark
34. 3 American Goldfinch
35. 5 Song Sparrow

That is just off the top of my head - I didn't keep a list.
Subject: Red Slough Yellow Rail Rope Drag Results
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sun, 9 Nov 2014 18:13:23 -0600
Thirteen people showed up for the Yellow Rail rope drag at Red Slough today.
We found one Yellow Rail which gave everyone excellent looks from about 4
feet away for about 5 minutes as it set up on a clump of grass in plain view
and walked around on the ground.  This was the best looks I have personally
ever had in all the years I have been doing this.  We should have some good
pictures up on the Red Slough Photo gallery site soon.  The rail was a lifer
for 11 of the 13 people present.  Three states (OK, AR, TX) were
represented.  Also, everyone had excellent close up views of Sedge and Marsh
Wrens, and LeConte's Sparrows.  These were lifer's for some also.  After we
found the rail, we stopped the drag and headed after other birds at the
reservoirs.  A big surprise, and lifer for some, were lingering
Black-bellied Whistling Ducks on Pintail Lake.  Also, a couple people found
a Least Flycatcher and described it very well to me.  Other interesting
sightings included American Alligators, Green Treefrogs, Cottonmouth, Queen
butterfly, and several species of Odonates.  Here is our list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Ducks - 10 immatures

Bald Eagle - 1 immature

Yellow Rail - 1

Virginia Rail - 2 (both heard)

Common Gallinule - 2 immatures

Least Flycatcher - 1 (seen by two birders during tour.)

Winter Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 1

Marsh Wren - several

American Pipit - 2

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Vesper Sparrow - 1

LeConte's Sparrow - ~20

 

Odonates:

 

Bluet species

Southern Spreadwing

Eastern Pondhawk

Blue-faced Meadowhawk

Variegated Meadowhawk

 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 
Subject: Little Gull, Late Nighthawk
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2014 20:20:18 -0600
Hello All,

            Friday morning, saw a first-cycle Little Gull at Lake Yahola.
It was still present Saturday evening. Later, saw Harris' Sparrows at
Oxley. Also on Friday, while I was going to the bank, saw a rather late
Common Nighthawk near 71st and I-75.

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK
Subject: Lake Hefner
From: Kevin Groeneweg <kgroeneweg AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2014 20:09:48 -0800
I stopped by Lake Hefner this afternoon at about 1:00 on my way out of town. 
Loads of ducks on the lake, especially near Prairie Dog Point. On the west side 
of the point I was surprised to see a Buff-breasted Sandpiper. Several Least 
Sandpipers, a Greater Yellowlegs and two Avocets. Also, as previously reported 
near the dam, 30 Red-breasted Mergansers, 6 Horned Grebes and 1 Common Loon. 
Full list below, with a couple of pics of the Buff-breasted. 



http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20468831


Kevin Groeneweg
Midwest City
Subject: Re: Flying penguins
From: Sharon Henthorn <henthorn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2014 18:25:44 -0600
I always gullible. Ha!! Sharon

 

But I still don't know how such clumsy flyers as sora can migrate.  One of
the many areas of yet-to-be-discovered science!

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ellie Womack
Sent: Friday, November 07, 2014 4:15 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Flying penguins

 

But don't overlook the sequel:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzhDsojoqk8

Ellie Womack

Grove, OK

 

 

-----Original Message----- 

From: Henthorn1 

Sent: Friday, November 7, 2014 4:02 PM 

To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU   

Subject: [OKBIRDS] Flying penguins 

 

I wouldn't have believed it!! 

That explains a lot. Sharon

 

Sent from my iPhone

 

  _____  


  

This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus
  protection is active. 

 
Subject: Copan: Washington County
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2014 16:52:18 -0600
This morning Mark Peterson and I birded around Copan Lake.  We started by
walking around the marsh/pond at the Tallgrass Wetlands.  There were only a
few Mallards and a coot on the pond but we flushed many sparrows (mostly
song and swamp) and an Am Bittern.  No LeConte's or sedge or marsh wrens
were found.
Walking toward the river we found a Winter Wren, heard Horned Larks and
pipits.
Mark had spotted two Spotted Towhees earlier.

Later Mark heard a PIne Siskin and I got a good look at it along with
Harris, Fox and White-crowned.

Below the dam were several Greater Yellowlegs and an immature Herring Gull.
Three more siskins flew over.  At Youngs Lake there were gadwalls,
green-wings and lots of decoys.

On the lake were approximately 1,000 ducks, the majority being Gadwalls.
Also were Am wigeon,Mallard, N Shoveler, pintail, canvasback, a few
Ring-necks and lots of Ruddys.  Also about 4 Horned Grebes.  But the most
exciting find were 3 BLACK VULTURES that flew right over our heads.  It was
a Washington Co bird for me.  Mark had seen one in May and there are a
couple sightings on the books but this was huge for me.  I have been
looking for them for years here, never expected to see them in November
when our Turkey Vultures are quite scarce.

It was a really good day to bird.

Melinda Droege
Bartlesville
Subject: Re: Flying penguins
From: Ellie Womack <e-womack AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2014 16:14:31 -0600
But don't overlook the sequel:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzhDsojoqk8
Ellie Womack
Grove, OK


-----Original Message-----
From: Henthorn1
Sent: Friday, November 7, 2014 4:02 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Flying penguins

I wouldn't have believed it!!
That explains a lot. Sharon

Sent from my iPhone

---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com
Subject: Flying penguins
From: Henthorn1 <henthorn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2014 16:02:35 -0600
I wouldn't have believed it!! 
That explains a lot. Sharon

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: South jenkins
From: "Feldt, Andrew N." <afeldt AT OU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2014 20:39:49 +0000
But it is so far from April 1!

Andy
Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 7, 2014, at 1:26 PM, Steve Schafer  wrote:
> 
>> On Fri, 7 Nov 2014 11:50:06 -0600, you wrote:
>> 
>> Question: How can a bird that flies as poorly as a Sora ever manage to 
>> to migrate--north wind or not?
> 
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dfWzp7rYR4
Subject: Re: South jenkins
From: Steve Schafer <steve AT FENESTRA.COM>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2014 14:26:04 -0500
On Fri, 7 Nov 2014 11:50:06 -0600, you wrote:

>Question: How can a bird that flies as poorly as a Sora ever manage to 
>to migrate--north wind or not?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dfWzp7rYR4
Subject: South jenkins
From: rgunn1 <rgunn1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2014 11:50:06 -0600
Been away for a few days and this morning, after nice north wind, I saw 
a Sora on the outlet creek and little else...

Question: How can a bird that flies as poorly as a Sora ever manage to 
to migrate--north wind or not?

D.
Subject: Re: OKBIRDS Digest - 5 Nov 2014 (#2014-365)
From: Nola <nola2ns AT CABLEONE.NET>
Date: Thu, 6 Nov 2014 19:50:02 -0600
When I see all the migratory birds listed I have to smile because we head to 
the Rio Grand Valley shortly where I observe most of those birds there. We 
belong to the Colorado Arroyo Audubon Society there, but I know of no local 
society in Washington Co 

Nola


Sent from my U.S. Cellular® Smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: OKBIRDS automatic digest system  
Date:11/06/2014  12:00 AM  (GMT-06:00) 
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Cc:  
Subject: OKBIRDS Digest - 5 Nov 2014 (#2014-365) 

There are 5 messages totaling 433 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Question????
  2. Hefner birds this afternoon
  3. Arrival and departure dates
  4. FW: eBird Report - Lake Hefner, Nov 5, 2014
  5. White-throated Sparrow eating Flowering Dogwood berries

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 5 Nov 2014 14:12:22 -0600
From:    Hollis Price 
Subject: Re: Question????

Thanks for resuming this. I have always enjoyed it. I also have the date guide, 
but this is nice to see in this monthly format. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 5, 2014, at 1:30 PM, Patricia Velte  wrote:
> 
> Hi James,
>  
> I am the person who would post the monthly arrival and departure dates. 
Thanks for calling me nice :-) 

>  
> It didn't seem as though there was much interest in the monthly emails, and 
as I hit a few busy months this spring, I just didn't get the migration report 
sent and I didn't pick back up again in the summer. 

>  
> I'm happy to start distributing it again and will send the November list 
shortly. 

>  
> Happy birding,
>  
> Pat Velte
> pvelte AT cox.net
> Oklahoma City
>  
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of James Hubbell
> Sent: Tuesday, November 04, 2014 7:34 PM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Question????
>  
> There use to be a nice person on here that would post the expected arrivals 
and departures at the beginning of each month. I have not seen those in a 
while. I was wonder if there is a reason why they stopped and if any one has an 
idea where to find a list like that. 

>  
>  
> Thanks

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 5 Nov 2014 15:53:30 -0600
From:    Henthorn1 
Subject: Hefner birds this afternoon

What a treasure trove! Seen from dam and shoreline between 2-3. Believe it or 
not! 


Great egrets. Canada geese. American white pelicans. Ruddy ducks. Northern 
pintails. American wigeon. Buffleheads. Lesser scaup. Mallard. Green winged 
teal. Red breasted mergansers. Greater yellowlegs. Killdeer. American coots. 
Common loon. Grebe species(horned or eared). Doublecrested cormorants. 
Franklins gull. Ring billed gulls. Great blue herons. Belted kingfisher. Hooded 
mergansers. Gadwall. Redheads. Piedbilled grebes. 



E-bird report to follow. 
Sharon


Sent from my iPhone

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 5 Nov 2014 15:58:34 -0600
From:    Peggie Mitchell 
Subject: Arrival and departure dates

We have also been missing your post. Thank you for beginning them again.
Peggie Mitchell
On Nov 5, 2014 1:30 PM, "Patricia Velte"  wrote:

Hi James,



I am the person who would post the monthly arrival and departure dates.
Thanks for calling me nice :-)



It didn't seem as though there was much interest in the monthly emails, and
as I hit a few busy months this spring, I just didn't get the migration
report sent and I didn't pick back up again in the summer.



I'm happy to start distributing it again and will send the November list
shortly.



Happy birding,



Pat Velte

pvelte AT cox.net

Oklahoma City



*From:* okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] *On Behalf Of *James Hubbell

*Sent:* Tuesday, November 04, 2014 7:34 PM
*To:* OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
*Subject:* Question????



There use to be a nice person on here that would post the expected arrivals
and departures at the beginning of each month. I have not seen those in a
while. I was wonder if there is a reason why they stopped and if any one
has an idea where to find a list like that.





Thanks

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 5 Nov 2014 19:09:12 -0600
From:    Sharon Henthorn 
Subject: FW: eBird Report - Lake Hefner, Nov 5, 2014

-----Original Message-----
From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu [mailto:ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu] 
Sent: Wednesday, November 05, 2014 7:05 PM
To: henthorn1 AT cox.net
Subject: eBird Report - Lake Hefner, Nov 5, 2014

Lake Hefner, Oklahoma, US-OK
Nov 5, 2014 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: 61 degrees, calm, blue skies; seen from shoreline road and dam only 

23 species (+2 other taxa)

Canada Goose  80
Gadwall  3     water treatment pond
American Wigeon  12     among large raft of ruddy ducks
Mallard  20
Northern Pintail  6
Green-winged Teal  12
Redhead  5     water treatment pond
Greater Scaup  2     among ruddy ducks
Bufflehead  1     among ruddies
Hooded Merganser  6     water treatment pond
Red-breasted Merganser  9     next to dam at south entrance
Ruddy Duck  200
Common Loon 1 seen from dam just south of Bluff Creek park beyond a group of 
coots 

Pied-billed Grebe  5
Horned/Eared Grebe  1
Double-crested Cormorant  80
American White Pelican  30
Great Blue Heron  2
Great Egret  2
American Coot  30
Killdeer  5
Greater Yellowlegs  1
Franklin's Gull  1     near exit of dam
gull sp.  200     no effort to identify the gulls
Belted Kingfisher  1     at water treatment pond

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20453385 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 5 Nov 2014 20:37:41 -0600
From:    Ken or Carol Williams 
Subject: White-throated Sparrow eating Flowering Dogwood berries

Fellow Birders,

I wanted to share an interesting bird observation from last week. I  
found a group of of White-throated Sparrow eating Flowering Dogwood 
berries in Nowata County. There were at least 8 to 10 birds which I 
watched for over 2 hours and took pictures of them eating the berries.  
They would fly up and pull on a berry until it came lose and then take 
it to the ground to eat it.  I have never seen White-throated Sparrows 
feeding on berries before.  It was very entertaining. The pictures can 
be found in 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/whitethroated_sparrow_on_dogwood

Ken Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots

------------------------------

End of OKBIRDS Digest - 5 Nov 2014 (#2014-365)
**********************************************
Subject: Re: White-throated Sparrow eating Flowering Dogwood berries
From: Janet Curth <jgcurth AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 6 Nov 2014 11:23:51 -0600
Beautiful, Ken. Thank you. My favorite winter birdsong issues forth from these 
WC sparrows. 



On Nov 5, 2014, at 8:37 PM, Ken or Carol Williams  
wrote: 


> Fellow Birders,
> 
> I wanted to share an interesting bird observation from last week. I found a 
group of of White-throated Sparrow eating Flowering Dogwood berries in Nowata 
County. There were at least 8 to 10 birds which I watched for over 2 hours and 
took pictures of them eating the berries. They would fly up and pull on a berry 
until it came lose and then take it to the ground to eat it. I have never seen 
White-throated Sparrows feeding on berries before. It was very entertaining. 
The pictures can be found in 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/whitethroated_sparrow_on_dogwood 

> 
> Ken Williams
> Owasso, OK
> http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots
Subject: Re: FW: eBird Report - Lake Hefner, Nov 5, 2014
From: Deanne McKinney <trialsz63 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 6 Nov 2014 10:44:07 -0600
It looks like there was quite a variety at Lake Hefner. Thank you for
letting us know what you found.

Deanne



On Wed, Nov 5, 2014 at 7:09 PM, Sharon Henthorn  wrote:

> -----Original Message-----
> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu [mailto:ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu]
> Sent: Wednesday, November 05, 2014 7:05 PM
> To: henthorn1 AT cox.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Lake Hefner, Nov 5, 2014
>
> Lake Hefner, Oklahoma, US-OK
> Nov 5, 2014 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.0 mile(s)
> Comments:     61 degrees, calm, blue skies; seen from shoreline road and
> dam only
> 23 species (+2 other taxa)
>
> Canada Goose  80
> Gadwall  3     water treatment pond
> American Wigeon  12     among large raft of ruddy ducks
> Mallard  20
> Northern Pintail  6
> Green-winged Teal  12
> Redhead  5     water treatment pond
> Greater Scaup  2     among ruddy ducks
> Bufflehead  1     among ruddies
> Hooded Merganser  6     water treatment pond
> Red-breasted Merganser  9     next to dam at south entrance
> Ruddy Duck  200
> Common Loon  1     seen from dam just south of Bluff Creek park beyond a
> group of coots
> Pied-billed Grebe  5
> Horned/Eared Grebe  1
> Double-crested Cormorant  80
> American White Pelican  30
> Great Blue Heron  2
> Great Egret  2
> American Coot  30
> Killdeer  5
> Greater Yellowlegs  1
> Franklin's Gull  1     near exit of dam
> gull sp.  200     no effort to identify the gulls
> Belted Kingfisher  1     at water treatment pond
>
> View this checklist online at
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20453385
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
>
Subject: Question????
From: Patti Muzny <patti.muzny AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 6 Nov 2014 09:17:41 -0600
The “nice” description was very appropriate! J

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Patricia Velte
Sent: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 1:30 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: Question????

 

Hi James,

 

I am the person who would post the monthly arrival and departure dates. Thanks 
for calling me nice :-) 


 

It didn't seem as though there was much interest in the monthly emails, and as 
I hit a few busy months this spring, I just didn't get the migration report 
sent and I didn't pick back up again in the summer. 


 

I'm happy to start distributing it again and will send the November list 
shortly. 


 

Happy birding,

 

Pat Velte

pvelte AT cox.net

Oklahoma City

 

From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of James Hubbell
Sent: Tuesday, November 04, 2014 7:34 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Question????

 

There use to be a nice person on here that would post the expected arrivals and 
departures at the beginning of each month. I have not seen those in a while. I 
was wonder if there is a reason why they stopped and if any one has an idea 
where to find a list like that. 


 

 

Thanks
Subject: Re: White-throated Sparrow eating Flowering Dogwood berries
From: Ellie Womack <e-womack AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 6 Nov 2014 08:58:43 -0600
That’s interesting. Many years ago bluebird bander Charlotte Jernigan 
enlisted a bunch of us to try luring bluebirds to feed on dogwood berries. I 
forget the procedures, but none of us were very successful. I was thinking of 
that yesterday as I walked under my dogwoods loaded with berries. Enjoyed the 
pictures. 

Ellie Womack
Grove, OK

From: Ken or Carol Williams
Sent: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 8:37 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] White-throated Sparrow eating Flowering Dogwood berries

Fellow Birders,

I wanted to share an interesting bird observation from last week. I found a 
group of of White-throated Sparrow eating Flowering Dogwood berries in Nowata 
County. There were at least 8 to 10 birds which I watched for over 2 hours and 
took pictures of them eating the berries. They would fly up and pull on a berry 
until it came lose and then take it to the ground to eat it. I have never seen 
White-throated Sparrows feeding on berries before. It was very entertaining. 
The pictures can be found in 
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots/whitethroated_sparrow_on_dogwood 


Ken Williams
Owasso, OK
http://www.pbase.com/kcswildshots

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