Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
Ohio Birds

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Friday, June 24 at 08:47 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Hepatic Tanagers,©Barry Kent Mackay

24 Jun Request for info on the Loggerhead Kingbird sighting [Matthew Valenic ]
24 Jun Red-breasted Merganser - OSU [Matthew Shumar ]
24 Jun REMINDER / Beaver Creek Wildlife Eduaction Center Invitation [robert lane ]
23 Jun AlumLake,6-22:GreenHerons,OrchardOriole [rob thorn ]
23 Jun Western Meadowlark - Clark County [Doug Overacker ]
23 Jun Western meadowlark continues (Clarke Co) ["cwinstead AT earthlink.net" ]
22 Jun Re: Black Tern [Steve Jones ]
22 Jun Black Tern [Doreene Linzell ]
22 Jun Interesting summer birds, Muskingum County [Robert Evans ]
22 Jun WESTERN MEADOWLARK - Clark County, Near Buck Creek SP, 6/22/16, 7:15am [Stefan Minnig ]
21 Jun Scissor-tailed Flycatcher report in eBird [Paul Hurtado ]
21 Jun Territorial Male Lawrence's Warbler / Columbiana County [robert lane ]
21 Jun Swallows playing with a feather [Ken Andrews ]
21 Jun injured pileated recovers, released. [Joe Faulkner ]
21 Jun Re: young pileated woodpecker in hand [Manon Van Schoyck ]
20 Jun young pileated woodpecker in hand [Joe Faulkner ]
20 Jun Re: Great blue heron behavior [John Pogacnik ]
20 Jun Re: Great blue heron behavior [Matthew Valenic ]
20 Jun Re: Great blue heron behavior. Harrison County [Robert Hinkle ]
20 Jun Shorebirds we're unlikely to see... [Bill Whan ]
20 Jun Upland Sandpiper OSU airport [Douglas Bohanan ]
19 Jun Greene County Lark Sparrows [Doug Overacker ]
19 Jun Blendon Woods-Summer Birds ["Simpson, Bruce" ]
19 Jun Hoover Nature Preserve, Delaware County [Charles Bombaci ]
19 Jun Beaver Creek Wildlife Education Center Invitation [robert lane ]
19 Jun Male Lawrence's Warbler / Columbiana County [robert lane ]
18 Jun Areas M and N, Hoover Nature Preserve, Galena, Delaware County [Charles Bombaci ]
18 Jun Western Meadowlark [Doreene Linzell ]
18 Jun Bike 'N Bird 2016 - Dickcissels in Lorain County [Chris ]
17 Jun Dragonflies [Casey Tucker ]
17 Jun Red-headed woodpeckers in Wayne Co [Randy Rowe ]
17 Jun Re: Read Headed Woodpecker [Brian Tinker ]
17 Jun RHWP-Delaware County Residence [Tania Perry ]
16 Jun RHWP [Bill Whan ]
16 Jun Red Headed Woodpecker [Paul Graham ]
16 Jun Common Moorhen Family / Columbiana County [robert lane ]
16 Jun Re: OHIO-BIRDS Digest - 14 Jun 2016 to 15 Jun 2016 (#2016-167) ["Shafer, Marcey" ]
16 Jun Re: Pine siskins [Regina Schieltz ]
16 Jun EUCO Dove - Champaign County - Mechanicsburg Grain Elevator - 6/16/16 [Stefan Minnig ]
16 Jun Forster's Tern / Columbiana County [robert lane ]
15 Jun Black Vulture in Cuyahoga Valley [Ken Andrews ]
15 Jun Re: Summer Birding In Columbiana County [Ken Ostermiller ]
15 Jun Re: Summer Birding In Columbiana County [Mary Warren ]
15 Jun Summer Birding In Columbiana County [robert lane ]
14 Jun New Ohio Birding Drives and eBird Hotspots are active [Ken Ostermiller ]
14 Jun Big Island Wildlife Area...Shorebirds??? [Steve Jones ]
14 Jun Breeding Plumage Male Ruddy Duck / Columbiana County [robert lane ]
13 Jun Sedge Wrens - Wilderness Rd. - Wayne County. [Chris ]
13 Jun Purple Martins at Liberty Park correction [Ken Andrews ]
11 Jun Re: Question relating birds and cicadas [Nancy Obryan ]
11 Jun Re: Question relating birds and cicadas [Jim Tomko ]
11 Jun Purple Martins at Liberty Park, Summit County [Ken Andrews ]
11 Jun Re: OHIO-BIRDS Digest - 9 Jun 2016 to 10 Jun 2016 (#2016-163) [Daniel Sheffer ]
11 Jun Re: Question relating birds and cicadas [Steve Jones ]
10 Jun New Ohio Birding Drives on Ohio eBird Hotspot web site are active. [Ken Ostermiller ]
10 Jun Blendon Woods-Summer Birds ["Simpson, Bruce" ]
10 Jun Re: Question relating birds and cicadas [Ohio Birder ]
10 Jun Question relating birds and cicadas [Helen Ostermiller ]
10 Jun Pine siskins [ ]
9 Jun Re: Google art work about birders [Liz McQuaid ]
9 Jun Google art work about birders [Matthew Valenic ]
8 Jun Darke Co. Marbled Godwit [Regina Schieltz ]
8 Jun Interesting Swallow Behavior [Jon Cefus ]
8 Jun Re: Baby Juncos in NE Ohio [Matthew Valenic ]
8 Jun Re: Osprey [Steve Jones ]
8 Jun Baby Juncos [Haans Petruschke ]
8 Jun Re: Osprey [Steve Jones ]
8 Jun Ottawa NWR Census [DUG ]
7 Jun Laughing Gull Edgewater CLE [jen brumfield ]
7 Jun Re: woodcock - geauga co. ["Hutson, Timothy B" ]
7 Jun Re: Osprey [Bill Whan ]
6 Jun Geauga County Pileated feeding her young [Matthew Valenic ]
6 Jun New Ohio Birding Drives and eBird Hotspots [Ken Ostermiller ]
7 Jun Cuyahoga Valley Monthly Towpath Trail Census [DUG ]
6 Jun Re: Black Mourning Dove [Adriana Losey ]
6 Jun Osprey [Hayward Chappell ]

Subject: Request for info on the Loggerhead Kingbird sighting
From: Matthew Valenic <mmvalencic AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 21:44:34 -0400
Does anyone know anything about this sighting near the intersection of I-71
/ I-270?  Looks like an easy place to get to.



Thanks in advance,



Matt Valencic

Geauga county


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Red-breasted Merganser - OSU
From: Matthew Shumar <ohiobba2mbs AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 18:46:47 -0400
To my surprise I saw a male Red-breasted Merganser on OSU campus this
evening. The bird, an adult male, was foraging near a Double-crested
Cormorant on the Olentangy River under the Woody Hayes bridge (by the
stadium). I just had my phone, which has a crummy camera, but the image can
be seen on my eBird checklist here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30374970

I watched the bird feed (with good looks) for ~10 minutes. I haven't
encountered a RBME around this date in previous years.

~Matt

--
******************************************************
Matthew Shumar
Research Associate / Project Coordinator
Ohio Breeding Bird Atlas II
Columbus, Ohio

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: REMINDER / Beaver Creek Wildlife Eduaction Center Invitation
From: robert lane <ohiomagpie AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 12:49:39 +0000
Once again we would like to put out our annual invitation to the birding 
community, to come and visit The Beaver Creek Wildlife Education Center in 
Columbiana County. We will be the volunteer hosts at The Center tomorrow 
Saturday, June 25th, from 1PM to 5PM. Over 350 bird and mammal mounts are on 
display in natural settings. If you were to take an Ohio Division of Wildlife 
"Birds of Ohio" field checklist, you would be able to find bird mounts of 187 
species on the list, including Passenger Pigeon. The newest addition to the 
Ohio birds collection is a breathtakingly beautiful male Harlequin Duck. First 
time visitors to The Center will be amazed to find full sized mounts of mammals 
including Musk Oxen, Mountain Goat, Grizzly Bears, Mountain Lions, Bighorn 
Sheep, Timber Wolves, and Caribou, just to name a few. The Center is located at 
12798 Echo Dell Road, East Liverpool, Ohio, at the entrance to Beaver Creek 
State Park. Visit the website at 
(www.beavercreekwildlife.org). Normal 
visiting hours are Saturday and Sunday from 1PM to 5PM. Of note; this past 
Saturday morning we presented a two hour Raptor/Birds Of Prey Program with 46 
enthusiastic attendees. If you have any questions, contact me, Bob Lane at 
(330-531-3127) or at (ohiomagpie AT hotmail.com). We guarantee, if you are willing 
to make the drive to this corner of Ohio, you won't be disappointed with what 
you find here! 



Bob and Denise Lane




______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: AlumLake,6-22:GreenHerons,OrchardOriole
From: rob thorn <robthorn AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 20:57:11 -0400
A quick trip to the southern accesses of Alum Creek Lake (north of Columbus) 
yesterday found little in the way of waterbirds and plenty of landbird 
residents. There's no cicada hatch here, so I could actually hear myself and 
the birds. The beach had a small flock of gulls, mostly Ring-bills, but plus 1 
Herring. Other notables included: 


Green Herons - two, one near the beach, the other near New Galena
Cormorants - 2-3 Double-crested, probably commuters from the Columbus colony
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - a singer at near the Visitors' Center proved they 
haven't all gone chasing cicadas 

Acadian Flycatchers - good showing, with birds at most of the forest blocks 
around the southern end of the reservoir 

Willow Flycatchers - could only find 2, both in the scrub east of the Visitors' 
Center 

Swallows - all the expected ones, including a few Martins around the colony at 
the dam 

Warblers - nothing but the expected Yellow and Common Yellowthroats
Orchard Oriole - a first-year male near the Visitor's Center continues a good 
showing by this species 


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Western Meadowlark - Clark County
From: Doug Overacker <cdoveracker AT WOH.RR.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 10:09:34 -0400
As has been reported, the Western Meadowlark was seen in Clark County this
morning. It is along Moorefield Road just east of Baldwin Lane. This is just
east of Buck Creek State Park. There is enough room to pull off the road at
the intersection of Moorefield Road and Baldwin Lane. The meadowlark was
singing along the road to the east of this intersection. It was sitting on
the power lines part of the time. There were also Eastern Meadowlarks
singing in the area. The Blue Grosbeak was seen west of the intersection and
then north on Baldwin Lane while we were there. A Grasshopper Sparrow was
sitting on the fence due south of Baldwin Lane. We also saw a Bobolink
sitting in the pasture southeast of the intersection.

Doug Overacker

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Western meadowlark continues (Clarke Co)
From: "cwinstead AT earthlink.net" <cwinstead@EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 08:55:53 -0400
The Western Meadowlark that Stefan Minnig found yesterday at the corner of 
Moorefield and Baldwin Roads is still here, as is the Blue Grosbeak. 


Carl Winstead
Westerville

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Black Tern
From: Steve Jones <sjlarue1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 15:57:41 -0400
Check amongst the Killdeer for other shorebirds.  I had two Dunlin and a
couple Least Sandpipers last week.  Heard before I saw.

Steve J
On Jun 22, 2016 3:20 PM, "Doreene Linzell"  wrote:

> Ron Sempier is reporting that one Black Tern is still at Big Island 'west
> side of middle pond'. He also said that the water levels are low and if
> they stay that way, there will be good shorebird habitat.
>
> Doreene Linzell
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Black Tern
From: Doreene Linzell <dlinzell611 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 15:20:08 -0400
Ron Sempier is reporting that one Black Tern is still at Big Island 'west
side of middle pond'. He also said that the water levels are low and if
they stay that way, there will be good shorebird habitat.

Doreene Linzell

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Interesting summer birds, Muskingum County
From: Robert Evans <benbovas AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 12:45:18 -0400
This time of year I do much of my birding by ear. So I was delighted to
hear a couple species that had not reported their presence to me lately.

I had not heard either Louisiana waterthrush or cerulean warbler lately
(for about a month), so I was surprised and delighted to hear them as Jane
and I took our almost daily hike this morning around the property, over the
hilltop field and back through the wooded ravines. Both species chimed in
just as we entered the deep wooded hollow at the south end.

Other warblers have been heard regularly: yellow, common yellowthroat,
hooded and ovenbird. I haven't heard the strange-singing blue-winged
lately, but I haven't spent much time in that part of the field either. The
din of the cicadas is waning, and berry-picking around that sector may
reveal that he (they) are still there. As near as I can tell we don't have
chats this year, which is unusual.

We do have all three mimids, plenty of catbirds and mockers, and a thrasher
was calling in doublets from the top of the maple out back yesterday -
always makes me smile.

Yesterday afternoon I decided to go pick wild black raspberries for an hour
or so, since they are just becoming ripe here, and I have to be gone on
business next week when they may be at peak. (It was ever thus.) As I
worked my way along the field edge, a yellow-billed cuckoo with a cicada in
its mouth hopped up on a branch, not 15 feet away, and started chattering
at me. There may have been a nest nearby. I mowed and trimmed the narrow
trail around that portion of the edge about three weeks ago, anticipating
the berry harvest, but I don't walk it regularly. It is now mostly
re-over-grown, but passable enough with a pair of hand-pruners. I regard
encounters with cuckoos along this path to be part of the harvest. Last
year I had a similarly close encounter near to there with a black-billed
(but not in association with cicadas.)

About the only unusual species regularly present this year is red-headed
woodpecker. I hear them often in the wooded hollow just north of the house.
I always see them at our place or in the nearby countryside, five or six
times a year. But this year it is right out my back door, and almost daily.
I suspect they are nesting in one of the snags left from the derecho's
devastation four years ago. But it's like a jungle in that part of the
property, and I haven't cleared any trails there since that storm. Still,
our usual five species of woodpeckers have become six. (All the usual Ohio
species except sapsucker, for those of you keeping score at home...)

Other than that, the summer is presenting the usual sights and delights.

Bob Evans
Geologist, etc.
Hopewell Township, Muskingum

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: WESTERN MEADOWLARK - Clark County, Near Buck Creek SP, 6/22/16, 7:15am
From: Stefan Minnig <stefanminnig AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 13:13:46 +0000
Hello,


A Western Meadowlark was present this morning in a fenced cow pasture at the 
intersection of Moorefield Road and Baldwin Lane, near Buck Creek State Park in 
Clark County this morning, still singing when I left at 7:15am. I took a few 
photos and recorded the call. 



http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30341099


Also present was a Blue Grosbeak in a clump of trees just opposite the 
intersection, as well as calling Savannah Sparrows, Bobolink and a Grasshopper 
Sparrow. 



Please note that Moorefield Road in this area has very little berm and caution 
should be exercised, as vehicles pass at a high rate of speed. 



Stefan Minnig

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher report in eBird
From: Paul Hurtado <paul.j.hurtado AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 19:12:06 -0700
FYI, in case you can go check it out! :-)

...
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus) (1)
- Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park--Wet Prairie Teal and Harrier Trails,
Franklin, Ohio
- Map:

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=39.9176362,-83.2083893&ll=39.9176362,-83.2083893 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30330048
- Comments: "Intersection of Teal and Harrier Trails.  Flew from willow
scrub toward ENE.  Light colored slender bird with very long tail, twice
the length of body.  Followed with binoculars until it was lost in the
distance.  Never stopped flying once it took off.  Never split tail.  First
glance made me think of bird trailing long reeds from mouth until bins
showed it to be tail."

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Territorial Male Lawrence's Warbler / Columbiana County
From: robert lane <ohiomagpie AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 23:50:13 +0000
Today, Tuesday, about 3:00PM, we went in search of what would be a life bird 
for both of us, the Lawrence's Warbler Jeff Harvey had found early Sunday 
morning. Immediately upon arriving at the site, there it was, the all glowing 
yellow beauty with it's jet black eye-patch and throat, along with a female 
Blue-winged Warbler. Both birds moved back and forth across the road appearing 
to be on territory. Our first look and best viewing was on the north side, high 
bank side, of the road. The Lawrence's was sometimes vocal, singing what seemed 
to be very similar to the Blue-winged/Golden-winged hybrid song on Track 4 of 
The Division of Wildlife "Warblers of Ohio" CD. To reach The Sheepskin Hollow 
State Nature Preserve location, go east a total of 2.4 miles from the 
intersection with SR170 on Pancake-Clarkson Road (TR1031), after crossing the 
bridge over Little Beaver Creek, continue thru the underpass and go clear to 
the top of the hill to the signed Sheepskin parking lot on the right. Park and 
walk down the road to the east a couple hundred feet, you are now directly 
under the high tension line. The Pennsylvania State line is another 0.3 mile to 
the east at the unmarked road intersection, no Ohio, no Pennsylvania state line 
signs. If you wish to see The Sheepskin Hollow gorge, return back down the hill 
0.8 mile to the underpass area and park along the road, and walk south along 
the old railroad bed about a half mile to the trail on the left, that goes down 
into the rocky hollow. Of note, on our way home, on Little Beaver Creek just 
west of the town of Fredericktown, on Old Fredericktown Road, we had a Common 
Merganser family consisting of mom and fifteen, nearly full sized kids. 



Bob and Denise Lane / Mahoning County

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Swallows playing with a feather
From: Ken Andrews <ken.hikes AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 14:36:41 -0400
I have seen people post about this behavior in the past. I was able to see it 
for myself this morning. 


I was at Kendall Lake this morning in the Cuyahoga Valley. I saw two barn 
swallows dropping/catching a downy feather near the lake. These birds are such 
fantastic flyers. Seeing them playing with the feather was even more fun. At 
one point one of the swallows landed near the edge of the lake on the grass 
where there were Canada Geese. The swallow picked up a big goose feather for a 
moment. The brown feather was bigger than the swallow. But, it quickly 
abandoned it for a smaller downy one. 


I think they are nesting somewhere in the stone building. There is a nest on 
the side of the building. But, the birds kept going down below where the 
restrooms were located. 


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: injured pileated recovers, released.
From: Joe Faulkner <joeinthewoods AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 09:15:07 -0400
the young pileated who could not hold up its head yesterday, was a lot
better this morning.  there was still a slight tilt to the left, but we
deemed that it was worth a try to see if it could fly.  We are not in the
habit of picking up young birds.  this one was clearly unable to fly, and
not just because of its age.  When we released it, (it actually got away as
we were about to release it), it quickly gained altitude, banked to the
left and disappeared into the woods.  Chances of survival are above 90%.  I
hear mom or dad every day, so they might reunite.  That seems very likely.
     Last night I was quite worried about this little guy, but today, feel
much better.  The Pileated woodpeckers nest near our homes every year, and
it's great having them as part of our natural environment out here in our
60 acre woods.
     Photos available.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: young pileated woodpecker in hand
From: Manon Van Schoyck <mvs AT OHIONATURE.ORG>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 08:58:28 -0400
Go to www.owra.org for a list of rehabilitators near you. Good luck and thanks 
for caring. 

                                                Manon VanSchoyck
                                                OWRA Board Member

-----Original Message-----
From: Ohio birds [mailto:OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU] On Behalf Of Joe 
Faulkner 

Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 9:05 PM
To: OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU
Subject: [Ohio-birds] young pileated woodpecker in hand

 I just had a young pileated woodpecker in my hands, and have two holes in my 
arm to prove it. He appears to have an injured neck or perhaps a head injury 
from a window strike. About two hours ago, one of his parents flew around me 
three times. Could not explain that until now. It is my 

guess that what ever injury happened over two hours ago.   He was found
trying to fly up the drive, but could manage only a few yards at a time.

 The young bird is presently resting in a pet carrier, and we will reassess in 
the morning. I'm guessing there is a slight possibility that this is like a 
concussion, and in time, the bird might recover. I'm quite willing to deliver 
this bird to the nearest rehab location, and see what can be done. I'm located 
near Somerset, in Perry County, about 50 driving miles from Columbus. 


 This is a beautiful little creature, already bigger than a dove, with a huge 
bill, capable if inflicting injury. Hope he can survive to enjoy our woods once 
again. 


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: young pileated woodpecker in hand
From: Joe Faulkner <joeinthewoods AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 21:05:03 -0400
     I just had a young pileated woodpecker in my hands, and have two holes
in my arm to prove it.  He appears to have an injured neck or perhaps a
head injury from a window strike.  About two hours ago, one of his parents
flew around me three times.  Could not explain that until now.  It is my
guess that what ever injury happened over two hours ago.   He was found
trying to fly up the drive, but could manage only a few yards at a time.

     The young bird is presently resting in a pet carrier, and we will
reassess in the morning.  I'm guessing there is a slight possibility that
this is like a concussion, and in time, the bird might recover. I'm quite
willing to deliver this bird to the nearest rehab location, and see what
can be done. I'm  located  near Somerset, in Perry County, about 50 driving
miles from Columbus.

     This is a beautiful little creature, already bigger than a dove, with
a huge bill, capable if inflicting injury. Hope he can survive to enjoy our
woods once again.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Great blue heron behavior
From: John Pogacnik <jpogacnik AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 17:58:57 +0000
Working in Northwest Ohio for years, I saw a lot of great blue herons and 
egrets land on the water. Years ago I worked on a project where we worked with 
commercial fishermen. It was not uncommon to see them drop down on the open 
lake to grab a fish. We were working the Sandusky Bay area and I saw the 
silhouette of a bird on the water. It was large with a thick bill. It wasn't 
until it got up that I saw it was a black-crowned night-heron. I saw them a few 
other times do it that spring. Needless to say i have not seen it since 
carrying a camera around. It was really a bizarre sight. 



John Pogacnik

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Great blue heron behavior
From: Matthew Valenic <mmvalencic AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 13:47:08 -0400
I observed a GBH on the water and enjoyed watching those long legs come out
of the water as it took off. They can do this but I think you should
consider yourself fortunate to observe it.

Spend enough time 'in the field' and  you see all kinds of strange stuff.
For example, I have seen or heard three large trees or big branches fall in
the woods this spring, and NOT all on windy days - go figure!

Matt Valencic
Geauga County

-----Original Message-----
From: Ohio birds [mailto:OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU] On Behalf Of David
Smith
Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 1:35 PM
To: OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU
Subject: [Ohio-birds] Great blue heron behavior

So far three responders have answered that they have seen the birds land on
water. One said that it floated for 2 or 3 minutes and another said they
were offshore Lake Erie and another person wrote that one landed on a small
pond for a few seconds. I guess this is not a common thing to see but not
extremely rare either.
         Thanks
          David Smith.       Harrison Cty.
______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at
www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Great blue heron behavior. Harrison County
From: Robert Hinkle <bob AT 10SQUIRRELS.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 12:32:50 -0400
Yep !  Saw one land in Lake Erie 7-8 miles offshore while we were
walleye fishing a couple of years ago. Probably found a recently-dead
sheepshead or some other floating fishy goodie. Took right back off
again, much to the amazement of all abourd !


Bob Hinkle, Solon


On 6/19/16 5:24 PM, David Smith wrote:
> Hello,
> As I was driving across Tappan Dam today I saw a large bird flying across the 
lake when it made a sudden turn and landed on the water for maybe 2 or 3 
seconds then it flew on its previous path. It was then I saw the long legs 
trailing behind and I saw that it was a great blue heron. The water was 
probably 40 feet deep. I could not see if it caught anything. Has anyone else 
seen one do this? 

>          David Smith
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at 
www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php. 

> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Shorebirds we're unlikely to see...
From: Bill Whan <billwhan AT COLUMBUS.RR.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 08:01:53 -0400
...and maybe that's OK.

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-36533469

Bill Whan, Cols

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Upland Sandpiper OSU airport
From: Douglas Bohanan <bhern34 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 00:37:23 -0400
What can anyone tell me about the Upland Sandpiper at OSU airport? Where can it 
be seen from? 


-DB

Sent from my iPhone
______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Greene County Lark Sparrows
From: Doug Overacker <cdoveracker AT WOH.RR.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 21:51:29 -0400
We visited Oakes Quarry park Sunday morning and found about 5 Lark Sparrows.
We also found a nest in a small isolated shrub. The nest was near the ground
and the bush was only a couple feet tall. It contained four eggs. One of the
birds, probably the female, flushed from the nest acting injured to draw us
away. We were right next to the nest and I just looked down and saw it. We
quickly moved on and then found a male singing nearby. The park is on Route
235 just east of I675.

Doug Overacker
Springfield, Ohio

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Blendon Woods-Summer Birds
From: "Simpson, Bruce" <simpson AT METROPARKS.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 18:52:05 -0400
  Blendon Woods Metro Park is located in the northeast corner of Columbus
off of Rte 161 & I 270. Take the Little Turtle Way exit

  Below is a list of some of the Birds seen in the last week

    Goldenrod Trail
     Warblers
       C Yellowthroat
       Ovenbird
       Hooded
    Tanagers
       Scarlet
       Summer
    Vireos
       Red-eyed
       Yellow-throated
    Chimney Swifts-possible nesting in our Chimney Swift tower
    Hawks
      Red-tailed
      Cooper's
    N flicker
    E Bluebird-nesting in boxes
    E Towhee
    Indigo Bunting

 Thoreau Lake
    Wood Duck-male & female with Ducklings
    Mallard-male & female with Ducklings
    Heron
      Great Blue
      Green
   Belted Kingfisher
   Yellow Warbler
   Swallows
     Tree
      Barn
      N Rough-winged
   E Kingbird-pair
   E Phoebe-at least 2 pair with young
   Spotted Sandpiper-pair
   C Yellowthroat
   Red-tailed Hawk
   Cedar Waxwing
   Chimney Swift

 LakeTrail
   Woodpeckers
     Pileated
     Hairy
   Flycatchers
     Acadian
     E Wood Peewee
     Great Crested
  Indigo Bunting-adults with young
  Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
  Carolina Wren
  Brown Thrasher

 Hickory Ridge Trail
  Flycatchers
    Acadian Flycatcher
    E Wood Peewee
    Great Crested Flycatcher
 Warblers
   Hooded
   Ovenbird
 Wood Thrush-nest just off trail-eye level

Brookside Trail
 Wood Thrush
 Louisiana Waterthrush
 Red-eyed Vireo
 Scarlet Tanager

Ripple Rock Trail
 Louisiana Waterthrush

Sugarbush Trail
  Warblers
    Ovenbird
    Yellow-throated
    Hooded
    C Yellowthroat
  Cuckoos-beginning of trail-Have been seen from the Nature Center parking
lot
   Yellow-billed
   Black-billed
 Red-shouldered Hawk

 Nature Center
  Ruby-throated hummingbird
  Hairy woodpecker
  Indigo Bunting
  Turkeys
  Carolina Wren

Overlook Trail
  Red-shouldered Hawk
  Pileated Woodpecker

Turkey-everywhere
   We have observed 6 different females with young (polts)
       Bird Feeders-they know where they all are
          Nature Center
          East Blind-Thoreau Lake
          Ranger Station

 Chimney Swift Towers-If anyone sees any activity at the nesting towers,
please contact me
    Picnic area
    Amphitheater-near Nature Center
    Goldenrod Trail
    Thoreau Lake

    Blendon Woods Metro Park in Columbus
       Nature Center
          614-895-6221

       Bruce Simpson-Naturalist at Blendon Woods Metro Perk in Columbus

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Hoover Nature Preserve, Delaware County
From: Charles Bombaci <cbombaci AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 20:57:55 +0000
  We launched the H.M.S. Hoover today and monitored the section of Hoover 
Reservoir's east shore from Twin Bridges south to Land of the Lakes. Later we 
took a side trip north of Twin Bridges to check the progress of the eaglets. 
The morning wasn't too bad with reasonable temperatures and a slight breeze. 
The afternoon was a different affair as the breeze abandoned us and the 
temperature shot up. The birds seemed to care less unlike us humans. In the 
long run the activity make it manageable. 

The Prothonotary Warblers as usual did not disappoint as we located 37. They 
are now busy going at a manic pace to feed hungry mouths. I admit to being very 
bias on this account, but to me a male Prothonotary Warbler with sunlight 
striking its breast is hard to top for sheer beauty and vivid color. Most of 
today's birds were south of the area where Dr. Tonra and the graduate students 
have been banding the Prothonotaries although there was a male with a silver 
lag band. Further north we did encounter several with the colored leg bands. At 
last report 8 of the Prothonotaries that had geolocators attached to them last 
year have been re captured and the geolocators recovered. I was informed that 
the first bird had spent the winter in Columbia. 

Red-headed Woodpeckers were in good numbers today as we saw 16 in the area we 
were monitoring. Some were soaring up from perches to catch flying insects and 
then coming back to the original perch. As they flew they were a stunning sight 
with vivid colors. For just red, white and black they are extremely handsome. 

Great Blue Herons were very active as they too have many hungry mouths to tend 
to. There are a couple of rookeries in the vicinity of Hoover Reservoir. Green 
Herons were scarce today as old a few were seen. 

We observe a Black Vulture much of the morning. Not so long ago this would have 
been a rare sight at Hoover Reservoir but now they are being seen more 
regularly and in increased numbers. 

We observed three Yellow-billed Cuckoos. Two seem to be paired and we watched 
then forage in the trees at the water's edge. This often elusive species was 
anything but today. 

Cliff Swallow are feeding hatchlings under every bridge at Hoover. Several 
colonies numbered up to 100 nests made of mud and adhering to the bridge 
structure. Little heads were poking out waiting for the next meal. 

We tallied 63 species, most of which are currently feeding this year's young. 
The variety was very diverse and seemed to have something for everyone. 

Charlie BombaciHoover Nature Preserve

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Beaver Creek Wildlife Education Center Invitation
From: robert lane <ohiomagpie AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 15:47:19 +0000
We would like to put out our annual invitation to the birding community, to 
come and visit The Beaver Creek Wildlife Education Center in Columbiana County. 
We will be the volunteer hosts at The Center this upcoming Saturday, June 25th, 
from 1PM to 5PM. Over 350 bird and mammal mounts are on display in natural 
settings. If you were to take an Ohio Division of Wildlife "Birds of Ohio" 
field checklist, you would be able to find bird mounts of 187 species on the 
list, including Passenger Pigeon. The newest addition to the Ohio birds 
collection is a breathtakingly beautiful male Harlequin Duck. First time 
visitors to The Center will be amazed to find full sized mounts of mammals 
including Musk Oxen, Mountain Goat, Grizzly Bears, Mountain Lions, Bighorn 
Sheep, Timber Wolves, and Caribou, just to name a few. The Center is located at 
12798 Echo Dell Road, East Liverpool, Ohio, at the entrance to Beaver Creek 
State Park. Visit the website at 
(www.beavercreekwildlife.org). Normal 
visiting hours are Saturday and Sunday from 1PM to 5PM. Of note; yesterday 
morning we presented a two hour Raptor/Birds Of Prey Program with 46 
enthusiastic attendees. If you have any questions, contact me, Bob Lane at 
(330-531-3127) or at (ohiomagpie AT hotmail.com). I will send a reminder later in 
the week. We guarantee, if you are willing to make the drive to this corner of 
Ohio, you won't be disappointed with what you find here! 



Bob and Denise Lane

Beaver Creek Wildlife Education Center - 
Home 

www.beavercreekwildlife.org
The Wildlife Education Center is operated entirely by unpaid volunteers who are 
dedicated to connecting the community with nature, educating people of all ages 
on ... 




Beaver Creek Wildlife Education Center - 
Home 

www.beavercreekwildlife.org
The Wildlife Education Center is operated entirely by unpaid volunteers who are 
dedicated to connecting the community with nature, educating people of all ages 
on ... 





______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Male Lawrence's Warbler / Columbiana County
From: robert lane <ohiomagpie AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 13:50:35 +0000
Jeff Harvey reports that this morning, Sunday, from about 7:30AM to about 
8:30AM, at Sheepskin Hollow State Nature Preserve, he saw and photographed a 
brilliantly colored male Lawrence's Warbler. The plumage was bright yellow with 
the black eye-patch and black throat. The bird would show itself when any of 
the following songs were played; Blue-winged, Golden-winged, or Prairie. This 
has been a traditional Prairie Warbler and Blue-winged Warbler site. To reach 
this location, go east about 2.5 miles from the intersection of SR170 and 
Pancake-Clarkson Road (TR1031), after crossing the bridge over Little Beaver 
Creek, continue thru the underpass and go clear to the top of the hill to the 
signed Sheepskin parking lot on the right. Park and walk down the road a couple 
hundred feet, you are now directly under the high tension line. Check the open 
areas on both sides of the road. The Pennsylvania State Line is another half 
mile to the east. If you wish to see The Sheepskin Hollow gorge, return back 
down the hill to the underpass area, park along the road, and walk south along 
the old railroad bed about a half mile to the trail on the left into the rocky 
hollow. Worm-eating Warbler, Blue-winged Warbler, and Louisiana Waterthrush 
were here earlier this morning. Golden-crowned Kinglets nest in the pines by 
The Pancake Bridge over Little Beaver Creek. Great find Jeff!!! 



Bob Lane / Mahoning County

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Areas M and N, Hoover Nature Preserve, Galena, Delaware County
From: Charles Bombaci <cbombaci AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 20:57:15 +0000
 This morning the Big Walnut Nature Club sponsored an Osprey program at the 
boardwalk at Area M. The Osprey were in fine form with five flying about and 
perching on dead trees in the area. There were multiple close flyovers that 
provided several of our visitors excellent photo opportunities. This year the 
Osprey decided to be different. Instead of using the nest platforms they 
constructed natural nests. One nest is on the small island next to Platform #1 
and the second is at the top of a tree in Area N to the east of the old 
roadbed. There are several additional nests at Hoover Reservoir this year and 
they too are natural nests rather than being built on the man-provided 
platforms. A special thanks to the Westerville Wild Birds Unlimited and Dan 
Hall for providing a spotting scope and helping make the morning a success. 

Not to be outdone there were six male Prothonotary Warblers singing between the 
Area M parking lot and the end of the boardwalk where we set up the spotting 
scopes. One female landed on the boardwalk slightly behind the group watching 
the Osprey. She was seen leading birders and photographers along the boardwalk 
as she gleaned food for her brood. As an extra touch she was one of the 
Prothonotary Warblers banded at the preserve. A second banded Prothonotary was 
observed near the entrance to the boardwalk. 

A few other observations from the boardwalk were Cliff Swallows, Green Heron, 
Bald Eagle, Double Crested Cormorants and Baltimore Orioles. 

Later a few of us checked activity off the old roadbed in Area N. My highlight 
was observing Prothonotary Warblers coming and going to feed their hatchlings 
in a couple of my nest boxes. Those along with others singing a flitting about 
totaled 16 Prothonotary Warblers along the old roadbed, several with the new 
leg bands. In additional several Red-headed Woodpeckers were putting on a show 
for us. From an advantageous perch they would lift off and soar up to snatch an 
insect and then return to the perch. In the sunlight the white of their wings 
were like flashes of a flag in a drill team routine. They are indeed impressive 
and beautiful birds. A few other species present in Area N were Yellow-billed 
Cuckoo, Great Crested Flycatchers, Warbling Vireos, Baltimore Orioles, Osprey, 
Red-eyed Vireos, Wood Thrush and I heard but couldn't locate a Northern Parula. 

A morning well spent with great company, participants and visitors alike, as I 
saw several people I had not seen for a while. 

Charlie BombaciHoover Nature PreserveDelaware County


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Western Meadowlark
From: Doreene Linzell <dlinzell611 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 12:35:45 -0400
Following up on an ebird report by John Herman of two days ago, we both saw
and heard the Western Meadowlark about 11:15.  The bird is in the far
northeastern corner of Richland Co. It is in the southeast corner of the
intersection of Noble Rd and Townline Rd. It was first seen from Townline
Rd. But, we saw and heard it from Noble Rd. We saw it on a fence post - the
second post to the east of a small shed. It does move around.

Doreene Linzell
Dan Sanders

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Bike 'N Bird 2016 - Dickcissels in Lorain County
From: Chris <c.pierce AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 10:50:05 -0400
The Cicada strewn roads of Lorain County were full of birds during  this
mornings bike ride.

I had 35 species including 5 kinds of flycatchers, 5 sparrow species and
a highlight of 4 Dickcissels

on Island Rd. Two of them were south of the Island and Capel Rd.
intersection near the ditch, and the other

two were at that intersection. One was perched on a wire and calling
continuously.


See you on the trails,

Chris Pierce

N. Olmsted OH

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Dragonflies
From: Casey Tucker <tuckercasey AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 18:56:31 -0400
Hi Folks,
I'm sending this announcement out (see link below) because I know a lot of you 
like to search for dragonflies in addition to birds during the summer months. I 
apologize if this has already been sent previously. 

http://w3.marietta.edu/~odonata/news/survey_2016.html
The nice thing is that you can submit photo records now, whereas in the past a 
collected specimen was necessary to document occurrence. So if you like to 
photograph dragonflies and damselflies this is a good opportunity for you. 

Check it out, contact Bob Glotzhober if you're interested, and attend the Ohio 
Odonata Society (OOS) meeting on July 30th. 

Kind Regards,
Casey TuckerAdjunct InstructorBiology/Environmental ScienceCentral Ohio 
Technical Collegetucker.468 AT cotc.edu 

DirectorAmerican Avian Conservation & Research 
Institutehttp://tuckercasey.wix.com/aacri-birdstuckercasey AT hotmail.com 




                                          
______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Red-headed woodpeckers in Wayne Co
From: Randy Rowe <rowe926 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 10:12:48 -0400
If anyone wants to see red-headed woodpeckers, the place to go is along
Messner Rd. in the Killbuck Wildlife Area in Wayne county south of Wooster.
This is a wetland area with hundreds of dead trees. They are almost
guaranteed there - several in fact.

Randy Rowe, Wooster

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Read Headed Woodpecker
From: Brian Tinker <brian.c.tinker AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 08:58:04 -0400
On my last visit to the Station Road trailhead at Towpath Trail in
Brecksville on June 4th, I saw 4 different red-headed woodpeckers. One was
in the in the swamp area near the trailhead (where I've previously seen
two, and there's a confirmed nest), one was on the tree adjacent to the
bald eagle nest, and two were in the meadow as I was returning from viewing
the bald eagle nest. It's certainly possible some of these were the same
bird, but they were spread out over a distance of about  3/4 mile.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30072576

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: RHWP-Delaware County Residence
From: Tania Perry <tania.rae.perry AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 00:36:57 -0400
I am excited and fortunate to say that I am currently seeing 3 different
RHWP's feeding regularly at my feeders/suet this year. The first one
appeared around the end of March but for the past few months they r showing
up daily.
The Red Bellies and Red Heads have been displaying a vocal, drumming and
aerial tactics of an all out war for, "this is my suet cake today."
I've have lived at my current location for 14 years and for the past 5-6
haven't seen any sightings. This has been a great surprise. I am keeping my
fingers crossed that I may see some young ones in tow as the adults
continue to feed at my buffet.
I have had young HWP's and DWP's this past week and a Pileated who shows up
a couple of times a month as well.
I never grow tired of watching this amazing gift!
Thanks Paul and Bill for the reminder and wise encouragement to report.
 Tania

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: RHWP
From: Bill Whan <billwhan AT COLUMBUS.RR.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 19:00:47 -0400
Subject: Red Headed Woodpecker
Date: Thu Jun 16 2016 16:45 pm
From: paulgraham AT wowway.com

  I think it's important to report anytime one of these is observed (and 
I see them so infrequently):  Anyway I saw one today along Middleboro 
Road, in Warren County, just east/northeast of Fort Ancient State 
Memorial.  This location was probably around 3 miles north of the SR 350 
and Middleboro Road intersection.  I was able to pull off the road and 
watch it working in 3 trees.  Always a thrill to see a RHWP!

Paul Graham

Paul's right. This beauty has become a tough bird to find, though it was 
once called "the most abundant and best known of all our woodpeckers" in 
Wheaton's Birds of Ohio (1882). Trautman counted as many as 40 a day 
found as traffic roadkills during Ohio surveys during the 1920s and 
‘30s. Farmers regarded them as an agricultural pest and shot them. Their 
nest sites in dead trees and poles are far more often quickly removed. 
Cutting rural tree stands, especially the beech trees on which they fed 
in winter, have taken a toll. See 'em while you can.
Bill Whan

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Red Headed Woodpecker
From: Paul Graham <paulgraham AT WOWWAY.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 17:45:25 -0400
 I think its important to report anytime one of these is observed (and I see 
them so infrequently): Anyway I saw one today along Middleboro Road, in Warren 
County, just east/northeast of Fort Ancient State Memorial. This location was 
probably around 3 miles north of the SR 350 and Middleboro Road intersection. I 
was able to pull off the road and watch it working in 3 trees. Always a thrill 
to see a RHWP! 

Paul Graham

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Common Moorhen Family / Columbiana County
From: robert lane <ohiomagpie AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 21:34:06 +0000
Today, Thursday, while making the rounds to some old favorite birding sites, we 
found a family of Common Moorhens where they have traditionally been in the 
past. About 1:00PM, at the wetlands at the far eastern portion of Zepernick 
Lake State Wildlife Area, was a family with three cute, half grown gallinule 
chicks. The location is on the north side of SR172, 1.3 miles east of the town 
of New Alexander (CR402-Rochester Road) or 2.2 miles west of the town of New 
Garden (SR9). Park on the south side of the road at the little bridge with the 
cable blocking it. This is a dangerous traffic area. Walk back to the west to 
the culvert and look northeast into the wetland. They should be found in the 
open water area to the right. A scope is helpful. Wood Ducks galore! Continuing 
about 5 miles to the east on SR172, we arrived once again at Guilford Lake. At 
about 2:30PM at the far eastern end of the lake, the previously reported 
breeding plumage male Ruddy Duck, along with a strikingly beautiful male Common 
Merganser, were close-by along the lake face of the dam, just south of The 
Guilford Lake Grille. Of note is the fact that just 2.5 miles to the east is 
The Middle Fork of Little Beaver Creek, one of the nesting areas for Common 
Mergansers. At about 3:00 PM, the skies darkened, and super heavy rains and 
wind blasted Guilford Lake and us. 



Bob and Denise Lane / Mahoning County

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: OHIO-BIRDS Digest - 14 Jun 2016 to 15 Jun 2016 (#2016-167)
From: "Shafer, Marcey" <shafer AT METROPARKS.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 13:36:04 -0400
9iSD zz da das
On Jun 16, 2016 12:02 AM, "OHIO-BIRDS automatic digest system" <
LISTSERV AT listserv.miamioh.edu> wrote:

> There are 5 messages totaling 457 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>   1. Summer Birding In Columbiana County (3)
>   2. Black Vulture in Cuyahoga Valley
>   3. Forster's Tern / Columbiana County
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 15 Jun 2016 13:32:51 +0000
> From:    robert lane 
> Subject: Summer Birding In Columbiana County
>
> My wife Denise and I, would like to enlighten everyone to the birding
> opportunities in seldom birded by others, Columbiana County. Even though we
> live in Mahoning County, we reside only 0.4 of a mile north of the
> Columbiana County line. Having the advantage of growing up in the area, we
> have a Columbiana County Lifelist of 258 species. E-birders have a lot of
> catching up to do, with the present E-bird list at 215. Attached is a story
> I was asked to write for "The Bobolink" publication, back in 2010,
> detailing the variety of areas that can be explored in Columbiana County.
> Basically, the only changes to the story are that The Greenway Trail is now
> about 13 miles long, and Sean Logan is no longer the director of The Ohio
> Department of Natural Resources. Take a ride and see another part of Ohio.
> Hope to see you in the field.
>
>
> Bob Lane
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>       Next door, and to the east of The Bobolink Area, is the wonderfully,
> habitat diverse, and scenic Columbiana County. Over the past five summer
> seasons, during The Ohio Breeding Bird Atlas, there have been about 155
> bird species recorded. The northern half of the county is glaciated, and
> the southern half unglaciated; varying in elevation from 1446 at Round
> Knob, to 664 at the Ohio River, a change of 782 feet. The diversity of the
> county can be described as we see what borders it.
>      The rolling farmland of the western edge borders Stark and Carroll
> Counties; The Bobolink Area. In this area, along the headwaters of the
> Mahoning River, are Great Blue Heron rookeries, and some extensive marsh
> habitats, one of which, this past summer, provided the first documented
> county record of nesting Sandhill Cranes, producing two youngsters. In
> August of 2005, two Black-billed Magpies were found by my wife, Denise,
> near our hometown of Damascus. They stayed for nearly two months; being
> seen by many, including many Bobolink Area residents. Cliff Swallows can be
> found nesting on a few of the local barns.
>      The southern edge is foothills, adjacent to Jefferson County, and
> includes the 2265 acre, seldom visited, Highlandtown Lake Wildlife Area.
> This past late spring there were four Glossy Ibis seen here for several
> days. Whip-poor-will, Ruffed Grouse, and an occasional Black Vulture are
> seen here. To the south, nearby, across the county line, are nesting Common
> Ravens. A hopeful future find for the appalacian hills of Columbiana County.
>      The southeast corner is the Ohio River and the state of West
> Virginia. Here can be found: Peregrine Falcon, Osprey, Double-crested
> Cormorant, Herring and Ring-billed Gulls, and even an out of season Common
> Loon on the river.
>      Everything to the east is the state of Pennsylvania. The vast Beaver
> Creek State Park and Forest stretches along the tributaries of the Little
> Beaver Creek Wild and Scenic River. This area is nestled in rugged
> sandstone cliffs, cascading streams, and many hemlock laden hillsides and
> gorges. In May 2007, the lower portion of the Little Beaver Creek Watershed
> was dedicated as one of Audubon Ohio's Important Bird Areas. At the state
> park is a restored operating grist mill and a historic village. Remnants of
> the Sandy and Beaver Canal can be seen here and throughout the county. A
> visit to The Beaver Creek Wildlife Education Center, when in the area, is a
> must! There are over three hundred mounted birds and mammals on display, on
> weekends, May thru October. There have been 23 species of warbler recorded
> here in summer. The highlight specie of this area is the Common Merganser,
> of which, at least seven families with young were found this past season.
> Black-throated Blue Warblers are seen and heard, but nesting has not been
> confirmed. Swainson's Warbler has been reported three times in the past
> several years, but no confirmation. In the late 1960's they were reported
> from these same locations. In July 2009, a male Blackburnian Warbler was in
> the pines at the Beaver Creek State Park Campground. Golden-crowned
> Kinglets nest east of the Pancake Bridge near Sheepskin Hollow State Nature
> Preserve. Some of the other birds found in this Ohio hotspot are:
> Blue-headed Vireo, Winter Wren, Hermit Thrush, Summer Tanager, Purple
> Finch, and the following warblers: Northern Parula, Magnolia,
> Black-throated Green, Pine, Prairie, Cerulean, Worm-eating, Ovenbird, and
> Kentucky, just to name a few.
>      The northern edge completely borders Mahoning County and holds most
> of the human population. Common Nighthawks and Chimney Swifts can be found.
> At the Egypt Road Swamp are Alder Flycatcher, American Woodcock, Cedar
> Waxwing, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and Blue-winged Teal, along with a colony of
> Baltimore Checkerspot butterflies. Hard to believe now; but in the early
> 1980's, the first nesting pair of Canada Geese recorded in the county was
> here. My, how times have changed!
>      The eastern interior of the county is comprised of some large tracts
> of reclaimed strip mines, providing all the grassland species, including
> numerous Henslow's Sparrow, Grasshopper Sparrow, Eastern Meadowlark,
> Bobolink, and sometimes Northern Harrier.
>      For bicycle enthusiasts; the eleven mile long, paved Greenway
> Multi-Purpose Trail goes thru marsh area on the north end, then thru open
> fields, then thru hemlocks, and finally thru large sycamores paralleling
> the Middle Fork of Little Beaver Creek. For those who want to combine
> birding with bicycling, this is a dream ride. Sixty species are normally
> recorded in a four hour ride. Near the Franklin Square Trailhead this past
> late spring, an adult male, Yellow-headed Blackbird, was present for three
> days, a first for the county. Nests that have been found along the trail
> are: Mute Swan, Green Heron, Pied-billed Grebe, Common Moorhen, Barred Owl,
> Wood Duck, Eastern Kingbird, Wild Turkey, Yellow-throated Warbler, and
> Spotted Sandpiper, just to name a few. About halfway along the trail is the
> Teegarden Covered Bridge Trailhead Area; at this location you transition
> from seeing and hearing Black-capped Chickadee to Carolina Chickadee. Here
> you easily find Belted Kingfisher, Cerulean Warbler, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher,
> and Baltimore Oriole. Dragonflies abound here, the three inch plus
> Dragonhunter can sometimes be found near the parking lot in late July.
>      The last area to be mentioned is our favorite birding spot: the
> Guilford Lake and Salem Reservoir Area. Most of the habitats are here, from
> large bodies of water, to extensive marshland, to sycamore and hemlock
> lined stream banks. During the present, Ohio Breeding Bird Atlas, in Block
> 53B5CW, a remarkable 123 species have been recorded. Guilford Lake has a
> beautiful State Park Campground, and has summering Double-crested
> Cormorants, and Ring-billed Gulls, along with nesting Bald Eagles, Great
> Horned Owls, and Eastern Screech-owl. The Ohio Department of Natural
> Resources Director, Sean Logan, lives here with his family. On a historic
> note is the fact that Gillford Reservoir, note the original spelling, was
> constructed about 1836 to provide water for the Sandy and Beaver Canal.
> Below and to the east of the causeway is the Depot Road Marsh. The
> Firestone Yeagley Wildlife Area Parking Lot is on Depot Road, providing
> viewing access from your vehicle. American Bittern, Least Bittern, Virginia
> Rail, Prothonotary Warbler, Marsh Wren, Swamp Sparrow, American Coot, Sora,
> and numerous Green Heron can be heard and seen here. Common Moorhen and
> Hooded Merganser families can easily be seen. At Salem Reservoir Osprey can
> be found, and in July 2009, a Forster's Tern frequented the bait shop for
> several days. Sandhill Cranes and Blue-winged Teal have summered at
> Tritten's Pond in the past. The last known Barn Owl location in Columbiana
> County is here, in an old unused barn, which is also home each year, to
> baby Turkey Vultures. They are raised each year in an old grain bin for
> about eight weeks, and then fledge from the barn at about ten weeks.
>      I hope you have enjoyed this review of Columbiana County summer
> birding opportunities and I would like to extend an invitation to all to
> come and explore an eastern neighbors' backyard.
>
> August 2010
> Bob Lane
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 15 Jun 2016 09:45:22 -0400
> From:    Mary Warren 
> Subject: Re: Summer Birding In Columbiana County
>
> Take Bob up on his invitation. It is beautiful country. You won't be
> disappointed !
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
> > On Jun 15, 2016, at 9:32 AM, robert lane  wrote:
> >
> > My wife Denise and I, would like to enlighten everyone to the birding
> opportunities in seldom birded by others, Columbiana County. Even though we
> live in Mahoning County, we reside only 0.4 of a mile north of the
> Columbiana County line. Having the advantage of growing up in the area, we
> have a Columbiana County Lifelist of 258 species. E-birders have a lot of
> catching up to do, with the present E-bird list at 215. Attached is a story
> I was asked to write for "The Bobolink" publication, back in 2010,
> detailing the variety of areas that can be explored in Columbiana County.
> Basically, the only changes to the story are that The Greenway Trail is now
> about 13 miles long, and Sean Logan is no longer the director of The Ohio
> Department of Natural Resources. Take a ride and see another part of Ohio.
> Hope to see you in the field.
> >
> >
> > Bob Lane
> >
> >
> > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> >
> >      Next door, and to the east of The Bobolink Area, is the
> wonderfully, habitat diverse, and scenic Columbiana County. Over the past
> five summer seasons, during The Ohio Breeding Bird Atlas, there have been
> about 155 bird species recorded. The northern half of the county is
> glaciated, and the southern half unglaciated; varying in elevation from
> 1446 at Round Knob, to 664 at the Ohio River, a change of 782 feet. The
> diversity of the county can be described as we see what borders it.
> >     The rolling farmland of the western edge borders Stark and Carroll
> Counties; The Bobolink Area. In this area, along the headwaters of the
> Mahoning River, are Great Blue Heron rookeries, and some extensive marsh
> habitats, one of which, this past summer, provided the first documented
> county record of nesting Sandhill Cranes, producing two youngsters. In
> August of 2005, two Black-billed Magpies were found by my wife, Denise,
> near our hometown of Damascus. They stayed for nearly two months; being
> seen by many, including many Bobolink Area residents. Cliff Swallows can be
> found nesting on a few of the local barns.
> >     The southern edge is foothills, adjacent to Jefferson County, and
> includes the 2265 acre, seldom visited, Highlandtown Lake Wildlife Area.
> This past late spring there were four Glossy Ibis seen here for several
> days. Whip-poor-will, Ruffed Grouse, and an occasional Black Vulture are
> seen here.
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 15 Jun 2016 09:50:37 -0400
> From:    Ken Ostermiller 
> Subject: Re: Summer Birding In Columbiana County
>
> Excellent description, Bob, of Columbiana County birding opportunities.
>
> If birders do visit this county you might try using the new Columbiana
> County Birding Drive:
> http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Columbiana+County+Birding+Drive
> This birding drive provides a route and driving directions to visit five of
> the birding locations that Bob mentions. It doesn't cover every part of the
> county, but would provide a full day of birding.
>
> Ken Ostermiller
>
> Ken Ostermiller
>
> On Wed, Jun 15, 2016 at 9:32 AM, robert lane 
> wrote:
>
> > My wife Denise and I, would like to enlighten everyone to the birding
> > opportunities in seldom birded by others, Columbiana County. Even though
> we
> > live in Mahoning County, we reside only 0.4 of a mile north of the
> > Columbiana County line. Having the advantage of growing up in the area,
> we
> > have a Columbiana County Lifelist of 258 species. E-birders have a lot of
> > catching up to do, with the present E-bird list at 215. Attached is a
> story
> > I was asked to write for "The Bobolink" publication, back in 2010,
> > detailing the variety of areas that can be explored in Columbiana County.
> > Basically, the only changes to the story are that The Greenway Trail is
> now
> > about 13 miles long, and Sean Logan is no longer the director of The Ohio
> > Department of Natural Resources. Take a ride and see another part of
> Ohio.
> > Hope to see you in the field.
> >
> >
> > Bob Lane
> >
> >
> > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> >
> >       Next door, and to the east of The Bobolink Area, is the
> wonderfully,
> > habitat diverse, and scenic Columbiana County. Over the past five summer
> > seasons, during The Ohio Breeding Bird Atlas, there have been about 155
> > bird species recorded. The northern half of the county is glaciated, and
> > the southern half unglaciated; varying in elevation from 1446 at Round
> > Knob, to 664 at the Ohio River, a change of 782 feet. The diversity of
> the
> > county can be described as we see what borders it.
> >      The rolling farmland of the western edge borders Stark and Carroll
> > Counties; The Bobolink Area. In this area, along the headwaters of the
> > Mahoning River, are Great Blue Heron rookeries, and some extensive marsh
> > habitats, one of which, this past summer, provided the first documented
> > county record of nesting Sandhill Cranes, producing two youngsters. In
> > August of 2005, two Black-billed Magpies were found by my wife, Denise,
> > near our hometown of Damascus. They stayed for nearly two months; being
> > seen by many, including many Bobolink Area residents. Cliff Swallows can
> be
> > found nesting on a few of the local barns.
> >      The southern edge is foothills, adjacent to Jefferson County, and
> > includes the 2265 acre, seldom visited, Highlandtown Lake Wildlife Area.
> > This past late spring there were four Glossy Ibis seen here for several
> > days. Whip-poor-will, Ruffed Grouse, and an occasional Black Vulture are
> > seen here. To the south, nearby, across the county line, are nesting
> Common
> > Ravens. A hopeful future find for the appalacian hills of Columbiana
> County.
> >      The southeast corner is the Ohio River and the state of West
> > Virginia. Here can be found: Peregrine Falcon, Osprey, Double-crested
> > Cormorant, Herring and Ring-billed Gulls, and even an out of season
> Common
> > Loon on the river.
> >      Everything to the east is the state of Pennsylvania. The vast Beaver
> > Creek State Park and Forest stretches along the tributaries of the Little
> > Beaver Creek Wild and Scenic River. This area is nestled in rugged
> > sandstone cliffs, cascading streams, and many hemlock laden hillsides and
> > gorges. In May 2007, the lower portion of the Little Beaver Creek
> Watershed
> > was dedicated as one of Audubon Ohio's Important Bird Areas. At the state
> > park is a restored operating grist mill and a historic village. Remnants
> of
> > the Sandy and Beaver Canal can be seen here and throughout the county. A
> > visit to The Beaver Creek Wildlife Education Center, when in the area,
> is a
> > must! There are over three hundred mounted birds and mammals on display,
> on
> > weekends, May thru October. There have been 23 species of warbler
> recorded
> > here in summer. The highlight specie of this area is the Common
> Merganser,
> > of which, at least seven families with young were found this past season.
> > Black-throated Blue Warblers are seen and heard, but nesting has not been
> > confirmed. Swainson's Warbler has been reported three times in the past
> > several years, but no confirmation. In the late 1960's they were reported
> > from these same locations. In July 2009, a male Blackburnian Warbler was
> in
> > the pines at the Beaver Creek State Park Campground. Golden-crowned
> > Kinglets nest east of the Pancake Bridge near Sheepskin Hollow State
> Nature
> > Preserve. Some of the other birds found in this Ohio hotspot are:
> > Blue-headed Vireo, Winter Wren, Hermit Thrush, Summer Tanager, Purple
> > Finch, and the following warblers: Northern Parula, Magnolia,
> > Black-throated Green, Pine, Prairie, Cerulean, Worm-eating, Ovenbird, and
> > Kentucky, just to name a few.
> >      The northern edge completely borders Mahoning County and holds most
> > of the human population. Common Nighthawks and Chimney Swifts can be
> found.
> > At the Egypt Road Swamp are Alder Flycatcher, American Woodcock, Cedar
> > Waxwing, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and Blue-winged Teal, along with a colony
> of
> > Baltimore Checkerspot butterflies. Hard to believe now; but in the early
> > 1980's, the first nesting pair of Canada Geese recorded in the county was
> > here. My, how times have changed!
> >      The eastern interior of the county is comprised of some large tracts
> > of reclaimed strip mines, providing all the grassland species, including
> > numerous Henslow's Sparrow, Grasshopper Sparrow, Eastern Meadowlark,
> > Bobolink, and sometimes Northern Harrier.
> >      For bicycle enthusiasts; the eleven mile long, paved Greenway
> > Multi-Purpose Trail goes thru marsh area on the north end, then thru open
> > fields, then thru hemlocks, and finally thru large sycamores paralleling
> > the Middle Fork of Little Beaver Creek. For those who want to combine
> > birding with bicycling, this is a dream ride. Sixty species are normally
> > recorded in a four hour ride. Near the Franklin Square Trailhead this
> past
> > late spring, an adult male, Yellow-headed Blackbird, was present for
> three
> > days, a first for the county. Nests that have been found along the trail
> > are: Mute Swan, Green Heron, Pied-billed Grebe, Common Moorhen, Barred
> Owl,
> > Wood Duck, Eastern Kingbird, Wild Turkey, Yellow-throated Warbler, and
> > Spotted Sandpiper, just to name a few. About halfway along the trail is
> the
> > Teegarden Covered Bridge Trailhead Area; at this location you transition
> > from seeing and hearing Black-capped Chickadee to Carolina Chickadee.
> Here
> > you easily find Belted Kingfisher, Cerulean Warbler, Blue-gray
> Gnatcatcher,
> > and Baltimore Oriole. Dragonflies abound here, the three inch plus
> > Dragonhunter can sometimes be found near the parking lot in late July.
> >      The last area to be mentioned is our favorite birding spot: the
> > Guilford Lake and Salem Reservoir Area. Most of the habitats are here,
> from
> > large bodies of water, to extensive marshland, to sycamore and hemlock
> > lined stream banks. During the present, Ohio Breeding Bird Atlas, in
> Block
> > 53B5CW, a remarkable 123 species have been recorded. Guilford Lake has a
> > beautiful State Park Campground, and has summering Double-crested
> > Cormorants, and Ring-billed Gulls, along with nesting Bald Eagles, Great
> > Horned Owls, and Eastern Screech-owl. The Ohio Department of Natural
> > Resources Director, Sean Logan, lives here with his family. On a historic
> > note is the fact that Gillford Reservoir, note the original spelling, was
> > constructed about 1836 to provide water for the Sandy and Beaver Canal.
> > Below and to the east of the causeway is the Depot Road Marsh. The
> > Firestone Yeagley Wildlife Area Parking Lot is on Depot Road, providing
> > viewing access from your vehicle. American Bittern, Least Bittern,
> Virginia
> > Rail, Prothonotary Warbler, Marsh Wren, Swamp Sparrow, American Coot,
> Sora,
> > and numerous Green Heron can be heard and seen here. Common Moorhen and
> > Hooded Merganser families can easily be seen. At Salem Reservoir Osprey
> can
> > be found, and in July 2009, a Forster's Tern frequented the bait shop for
> > several days. Sandhill Cranes and Blue-winged Teal have summered at
> > Tritten's Pond in the past. The last known Barn Owl location in
> Columbiana
> > County is here, in an old unused barn, which is also home each year, to
> > baby Turkey Vultures. They are raised each year in an old grain bin for
> > about eight weeks, and then fledge from the barn at about ten weeks.
> >      I hope you have enjoyed this review of Columbiana County summer
> > birding opportunities and I would like to extend an invitation to all to
> > come and explore an eastern neighbors' backyard.
> >
> > August 2010
> > Bob Lane
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ______________________________________________________________________
> >
> > Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> > Please consider joining our Society, at
> > www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> > Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
> >
> >
> > You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> > listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> > Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
> >
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 15 Jun 2016 13:45:36 -0400
> From:    Ken Andrews 
> Subject: Black Vulture in Cuyahoga Valley
>
> There is a black vulture circling just NW of the Brookside Road Marsh in
> the Cuyahoga Valley. There are turkey vultures soaring with it for
> comparison. I can clearly see the white wing tips and shape of the big bird.
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Thu, 16 Jun 2016 01:40:20 +0000
> From:    robert lane 
> Subject: Forster's Tern / Columbiana County
>
> Unusual bird sightings at Guilford Lake continue. Tonight, Wednesday, at
> about 6:00PM, we watched a Forster's Tern actively zipping around and
> feeding out over the lake directly in front of the Mark's Landing
> Restaurant. The plumage appeared to be either adult nonbreeding or 1st
> year, with the black eye-patch easily seen. Also during the tern show, one
> of the resident adult Bald Eagles was cruising in the background.
>
>
> Bob and Denise Lane / Mahoning County
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of OHIO-BIRDS Digest - 14 Jun 2016 to 15 Jun 2016 (#2016-167)
> *****************************************************************
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Pine siskins
From: Regina Schieltz <reginasch54 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 12:32:19 -0400
A Pine Siskin was reported at Shawnee Prairie feeders just west of
Greenville in Darke Co.  on June 10

On Fri, Jun 10, 2016 at 10:39 AM, Joyce Callahan <
000000997d0c09c0-dmarc-request AT listserv.miamioh.edu> wrote:

> Most winters there are pine siskins visiting the feeders. The last few
> springs they've been observed singing & displaying. They usually disappear
> in mid-May. This year some stayed; we have breeding juncos too.
>  Photo in Ebird checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: EUCO Dove - Champaign County - Mechanicsburg Grain Elevator - 6/16/16
From: Stefan Minnig <stefanminnig AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 12:52:31 +0000
A single Eurasian-Collared Dove was at the Mechanicsburg Grain Elevator in 
Champaign County this morning around 6:30am. There was an initial report of 
four by Margaret Bowman back in January, and despite the long lapse in time, I 
decided to take a look. Funny... I was looking all around me, and the bird was 
sitting on a wire 20 feet in front of me. 



http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30252096


Stefan Minnig

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Forster's Tern / Columbiana County
From: robert lane <ohiomagpie AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 01:40:20 +0000
Unusual bird sightings at Guilford Lake continue. Tonight, Wednesday, at about 
6:00PM, we watched a Forster's Tern actively zipping around and feeding out 
over the lake directly in front of the Mark's Landing Restaurant. The plumage 
appeared to be either adult nonbreeding or 1st year, with the black eye-patch 
easily seen. Also during the tern show, one of the resident adult Bald Eagles 
was cruising in the background. 



Bob and Denise Lane / Mahoning County

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Black Vulture in Cuyahoga Valley
From: Ken Andrews <Ken.hikes AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 13:45:36 -0400
There is a black vulture circling just NW of the Brookside Road Marsh in the 
Cuyahoga Valley. There are turkey vultures soaring with it for comparison. I 
can clearly see the white wing tips and shape of the big bird. 


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Summer Birding In Columbiana County
From: Ken Ostermiller <ken.ostermiller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 09:50:37 -0400
Excellent description, Bob, of Columbiana County birding opportunities.

If birders do visit this county you might try using the new Columbiana
County Birding Drive:
http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Columbiana+County+Birding+Drive
This birding drive provides a route and driving directions to visit five of
the birding locations that Bob mentions. It doesn't cover every part of the
county, but would provide a full day of birding.

Ken Ostermiller

Ken Ostermiller

On Wed, Jun 15, 2016 at 9:32 AM, robert lane  wrote:

> My wife Denise and I, would like to enlighten everyone to the birding
> opportunities in seldom birded by others, Columbiana County. Even though we
> live in Mahoning County, we reside only 0.4 of a mile north of the
> Columbiana County line. Having the advantage of growing up in the area, we
> have a Columbiana County Lifelist of 258 species. E-birders have a lot of
> catching up to do, with the present E-bird list at 215. Attached is a story
> I was asked to write for "The Bobolink" publication, back in 2010,
> detailing the variety of areas that can be explored in Columbiana County.
> Basically, the only changes to the story are that The Greenway Trail is now
> about 13 miles long, and Sean Logan is no longer the director of The Ohio
> Department of Natural Resources. Take a ride and see another part of Ohio.
> Hope to see you in the field.
>
>
> Bob Lane
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>       Next door, and to the east of The Bobolink Area, is the wonderfully,
> habitat diverse, and scenic Columbiana County. Over the past five summer
> seasons, during The Ohio Breeding Bird Atlas, there have been about 155
> bird species recorded. The northern half of the county is glaciated, and
> the southern half unglaciated; varying in elevation from 1446 at Round
> Knob, to 664 at the Ohio River, a change of 782 feet. The diversity of the
> county can be described as we see what borders it.
>      The rolling farmland of the western edge borders Stark and Carroll
> Counties; The Bobolink Area. In this area, along the headwaters of the
> Mahoning River, are Great Blue Heron rookeries, and some extensive marsh
> habitats, one of which, this past summer, provided the first documented
> county record of nesting Sandhill Cranes, producing two youngsters. In
> August of 2005, two Black-billed Magpies were found by my wife, Denise,
> near our hometown of Damascus. They stayed for nearly two months; being
> seen by many, including many Bobolink Area residents. Cliff Swallows can be
> found nesting on a few of the local barns.
>      The southern edge is foothills, adjacent to Jefferson County, and
> includes the 2265 acre, seldom visited, Highlandtown Lake Wildlife Area.
> This past late spring there were four Glossy Ibis seen here for several
> days. Whip-poor-will, Ruffed Grouse, and an occasional Black Vulture are
> seen here. To the south, nearby, across the county line, are nesting Common
> Ravens. A hopeful future find for the appalacian hills of Columbiana County.
>      The southeast corner is the Ohio River and the state of West
> Virginia. Here can be found: Peregrine Falcon, Osprey, Double-crested
> Cormorant, Herring and Ring-billed Gulls, and even an out of season Common
> Loon on the river.
>      Everything to the east is the state of Pennsylvania. The vast Beaver
> Creek State Park and Forest stretches along the tributaries of the Little
> Beaver Creek Wild and Scenic River. This area is nestled in rugged
> sandstone cliffs, cascading streams, and many hemlock laden hillsides and
> gorges. In May 2007, the lower portion of the Little Beaver Creek Watershed
> was dedicated as one of Audubon Ohio's Important Bird Areas. At the state
> park is a restored operating grist mill and a historic village. Remnants of
> the Sandy and Beaver Canal can be seen here and throughout the county. A
> visit to The Beaver Creek Wildlife Education Center, when in the area, is a
> must! There are over three hundred mounted birds and mammals on display, on
> weekends, May thru October. There have been 23 species of warbler recorded
> here in summer. The highlight specie of this area is the Common Merganser,
> of which, at least seven families with young were found this past season.
> Black-throated Blue Warblers are seen and heard, but nesting has not been
> confirmed. Swainson's Warbler has been reported three times in the past
> several years, but no confirmation. In the late 1960's they were reported
> from these same locations. In July 2009, a male Blackburnian Warbler was in
> the pines at the Beaver Creek State Park Campground. Golden-crowned
> Kinglets nest east of the Pancake Bridge near Sheepskin Hollow State Nature
> Preserve. Some of the other birds found in this Ohio hotspot are:
> Blue-headed Vireo, Winter Wren, Hermit Thrush, Summer Tanager, Purple
> Finch, and the following warblers: Northern Parula, Magnolia,
> Black-throated Green, Pine, Prairie, Cerulean, Worm-eating, Ovenbird, and
> Kentucky, just to name a few.
>      The northern edge completely borders Mahoning County and holds most
> of the human population. Common Nighthawks and Chimney Swifts can be found.
> At the Egypt Road Swamp are Alder Flycatcher, American Woodcock, Cedar
> Waxwing, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and Blue-winged Teal, along with a colony of
> Baltimore Checkerspot butterflies. Hard to believe now; but in the early
> 1980's, the first nesting pair of Canada Geese recorded in the county was
> here. My, how times have changed!
>      The eastern interior of the county is comprised of some large tracts
> of reclaimed strip mines, providing all the grassland species, including
> numerous Henslow's Sparrow, Grasshopper Sparrow, Eastern Meadowlark,
> Bobolink, and sometimes Northern Harrier.
>      For bicycle enthusiasts; the eleven mile long, paved Greenway
> Multi-Purpose Trail goes thru marsh area on the north end, then thru open
> fields, then thru hemlocks, and finally thru large sycamores paralleling
> the Middle Fork of Little Beaver Creek. For those who want to combine
> birding with bicycling, this is a dream ride. Sixty species are normally
> recorded in a four hour ride. Near the Franklin Square Trailhead this past
> late spring, an adult male, Yellow-headed Blackbird, was present for three
> days, a first for the county. Nests that have been found along the trail
> are: Mute Swan, Green Heron, Pied-billed Grebe, Common Moorhen, Barred Owl,
> Wood Duck, Eastern Kingbird, Wild Turkey, Yellow-throated Warbler, and
> Spotted Sandpiper, just to name a few. About halfway along the trail is the
> Teegarden Covered Bridge Trailhead Area; at this location you transition
> from seeing and hearing Black-capped Chickadee to Carolina Chickadee. Here
> you easily find Belted Kingfisher, Cerulean Warbler, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher,
> and Baltimore Oriole. Dragonflies abound here, the three inch plus
> Dragonhunter can sometimes be found near the parking lot in late July.
>      The last area to be mentioned is our favorite birding spot: the
> Guilford Lake and Salem Reservoir Area. Most of the habitats are here, from
> large bodies of water, to extensive marshland, to sycamore and hemlock
> lined stream banks. During the present, Ohio Breeding Bird Atlas, in Block
> 53B5CW, a remarkable 123 species have been recorded. Guilford Lake has a
> beautiful State Park Campground, and has summering Double-crested
> Cormorants, and Ring-billed Gulls, along with nesting Bald Eagles, Great
> Horned Owls, and Eastern Screech-owl. The Ohio Department of Natural
> Resources Director, Sean Logan, lives here with his family. On a historic
> note is the fact that Gillford Reservoir, note the original spelling, was
> constructed about 1836 to provide water for the Sandy and Beaver Canal.
> Below and to the east of the causeway is the Depot Road Marsh. The
> Firestone Yeagley Wildlife Area Parking Lot is on Depot Road, providing
> viewing access from your vehicle. American Bittern, Least Bittern, Virginia
> Rail, Prothonotary Warbler, Marsh Wren, Swamp Sparrow, American Coot, Sora,
> and numerous Green Heron can be heard and seen here. Common Moorhen and
> Hooded Merganser families can easily be seen. At Salem Reservoir Osprey can
> be found, and in July 2009, a Forster's Tern frequented the bait shop for
> several days. Sandhill Cranes and Blue-winged Teal have summered at
> Tritten's Pond in the past. The last known Barn Owl location in Columbiana
> County is here, in an old unused barn, which is also home each year, to
> baby Turkey Vultures. They are raised each year in an old grain bin for
> about eight weeks, and then fledge from the barn at about ten weeks.
>      I hope you have enjoyed this review of Columbiana County summer
> birding opportunities and I would like to extend an invitation to all to
> come and explore an eastern neighbors' backyard.
>
> August 2010
> Bob Lane
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Summer Birding In Columbiana County
From: Mary Warren <windbird AT BEX.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 09:45:22 -0400
Take Bob up on his invitation. It is beautiful country. You won't be 
disappointed ! 


Sent from my iPod

> On Jun 15, 2016, at 9:32 AM, robert lane  wrote:
> 
> My wife Denise and I, would like to enlighten everyone to the birding 
opportunities in seldom birded by others, Columbiana County. Even though we 
live in Mahoning County, we reside only 0.4 of a mile north of the Columbiana 
County line. Having the advantage of growing up in the area, we have a 
Columbiana County Lifelist of 258 species. E-birders have a lot of catching up 
to do, with the present E-bird list at 215. Attached is a story I was asked to 
write for "The Bobolink" publication, back in 2010, detailing the variety of 
areas that can be explored in Columbiana County. Basically, the only changes to 
the story are that The Greenway Trail is now about 13 miles long, and Sean 
Logan is no longer the director of The Ohio Department of Natural Resources. 
Take a ride and see another part of Ohio. Hope to see you in the field. 

> 
> 
> Bob Lane
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> 
> Next door, and to the east of The Bobolink Area, is the wonderfully, habitat 
diverse, and scenic Columbiana County. Over the past five summer seasons, 
during The Ohio Breeding Bird Atlas, there have been about 155 bird species 
recorded. The northern half of the county is glaciated, and the southern half 
unglaciated; varying in elevation from 1446 at Round Knob, to 664 at the Ohio 
River, a change of 782 feet. The diversity of the county can be described as we 
see what borders it. 

> The rolling farmland of the western edge borders Stark and Carroll Counties; 
The Bobolink Area. In this area, along the headwaters of the Mahoning River, 
are Great Blue Heron rookeries, and some extensive marsh habitats, one of 
which, this past summer, provided the first documented county record of nesting 
Sandhill Cranes, producing two youngsters. In August of 2005, two Black-billed 
Magpies were found by my wife, Denise, near our hometown of Damascus. They 
stayed for nearly two months; being seen by many, including many Bobolink Area 
residents. Cliff Swallows can be found nesting on a few of the local barns. 

> The southern edge is foothills, adjacent to Jefferson County, and includes 
the 2265 acre, seldom visited, Highlandtown Lake Wildlife Area. This past late 
spring there were four Glossy Ibis seen here for several days. Whip-poor-will, 
Ruffed Grouse, and an occasional Black Vulture are seen here. 


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Summer Birding In Columbiana County
From: robert lane <ohiomagpie AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 13:32:51 +0000
My wife Denise and I, would like to enlighten everyone to the birding 
opportunities in seldom birded by others, Columbiana County. Even though we 
live in Mahoning County, we reside only 0.4 of a mile north of the Columbiana 
County line. Having the advantage of growing up in the area, we have a 
Columbiana County Lifelist of 258 species. E-birders have a lot of catching up 
to do, with the present E-bird list at 215. Attached is a story I was asked to 
write for "The Bobolink" publication, back in 2010, detailing the variety of 
areas that can be explored in Columbiana County. Basically, the only changes to 
the story are that The Greenway Trail is now about 13 miles long, and Sean 
Logan is no longer the director of The Ohio Department of Natural Resources. 
Take a ride and see another part of Ohio. Hope to see you in the field. 



Bob Lane


----------------------------------------------------------------------


 Next door, and to the east of The Bobolink Area, is the wonderfully, habitat 
diverse, and scenic Columbiana County. Over the past five summer seasons, 
during The Ohio Breeding Bird Atlas, there have been about 155 bird species 
recorded. The northern half of the county is glaciated, and the southern half 
unglaciated; varying in elevation from 1446 at Round Knob, to 664 at the Ohio 
River, a change of 782 feet. The diversity of the county can be described as we 
see what borders it. 

 The rolling farmland of the western edge borders Stark and Carroll Counties; 
The Bobolink Area. In this area, along the headwaters of the Mahoning River, 
are Great Blue Heron rookeries, and some extensive marsh habitats, one of 
which, this past summer, provided the first documented county record of nesting 
Sandhill Cranes, producing two youngsters. In August of 2005, two Black-billed 
Magpies were found by my wife, Denise, near our hometown of Damascus. They 
stayed for nearly two months; being seen by many, including many Bobolink Area 
residents. Cliff Swallows can be found nesting on a few of the local barns. 

 The southern edge is foothills, adjacent to Jefferson County, and includes the 
2265 acre, seldom visited, Highlandtown Lake Wildlife Area. This past late 
spring there were four Glossy Ibis seen here for several days. Whip-poor-will, 
Ruffed Grouse, and an occasional Black Vulture are seen here. To the south, 
nearby, across the county line, are nesting Common Ravens. A hopeful future 
find for the appalacian hills of Columbiana County. 

 The southeast corner is the Ohio River and the state of West Virginia. Here 
can be found: Peregrine Falcon, Osprey, Double-crested Cormorant, Herring and 
Ring-billed Gulls, and even an out of season Common Loon on the river. 

 Everything to the east is the state of Pennsylvania. The vast Beaver Creek 
State Park and Forest stretches along the tributaries of the Little Beaver 
Creek Wild and Scenic River. This area is nestled in rugged sandstone cliffs, 
cascading streams, and many hemlock laden hillsides and gorges. In May 2007, 
the lower portion of the Little Beaver Creek Watershed was dedicated as one of 
Audubon Ohio's Important Bird Areas. At the state park is a restored operating 
grist mill and a historic village. Remnants of the Sandy and Beaver Canal can 
be seen here and throughout the county. A visit to The Beaver Creek Wildlife 
Education Center, when in the area, is a must! There are over three hundred 
mounted birds and mammals on display, on weekends, May thru October. There have 
been 23 species of warbler recorded here in summer. The highlight specie of 
this area is the Common Merganser, of which, at least seven families with young 
were found this past season. Black-throated Blue Warblers are seen and heard, 
but nesting has not been confirmed. Swainson's Warbler has been reported three 
times in the past several years, but no confirmation. In the late 1960's they 
were reported from these same locations. In July 2009, a male Blackburnian 
Warbler was in the pines at the Beaver Creek State Park Campground. 
Golden-crowned Kinglets nest east of the Pancake Bridge near Sheepskin Hollow 
State Nature Preserve. Some of the other birds found in this Ohio hotspot are: 
Blue-headed Vireo, Winter Wren, Hermit Thrush, Summer Tanager, Purple Finch, 
and the following warblers: Northern Parula, Magnolia, Black-throated Green, 
Pine, Prairie, Cerulean, Worm-eating, Ovenbird, and Kentucky, just to name a 
few. 

 The northern edge completely borders Mahoning County and holds most of the 
human population. Common Nighthawks and Chimney Swifts can be found. At the 
Egypt Road Swamp are Alder Flycatcher, American Woodcock, Cedar Waxwing, 
Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and Blue-winged Teal, along with a colony of Baltimore 
Checkerspot butterflies. Hard to believe now; but in the early 1980's, the 
first nesting pair of Canada Geese recorded in the county was here. My, how 
times have changed! 

 The eastern interior of the county is comprised of some large tracts of 
reclaimed strip mines, providing all the grassland species, including numerous 
Henslow's Sparrow, Grasshopper Sparrow, Eastern Meadowlark, Bobolink, and 
sometimes Northern Harrier. 

 For bicycle enthusiasts; the eleven mile long, paved Greenway Multi-Purpose 
Trail goes thru marsh area on the north end, then thru open fields, then thru 
hemlocks, and finally thru large sycamores paralleling the Middle Fork of 
Little Beaver Creek. For those who want to combine birding with bicycling, this 
is a dream ride. Sixty species are normally recorded in a four hour ride. Near 
the Franklin Square Trailhead this past late spring, an adult male, 
Yellow-headed Blackbird, was present for three days, a first for the county. 
Nests that have been found along the trail are: Mute Swan, Green Heron, 
Pied-billed Grebe, Common Moorhen, Barred Owl, Wood Duck, Eastern Kingbird, 
Wild Turkey, Yellow-throated Warbler, and Spotted Sandpiper, just to name a 
few. About halfway along the trail is the Teegarden Covered Bridge Trailhead 
Area; at this location you transition from seeing and hearing Black-capped 
Chickadee to Carolina Chickadee. Here you easily find Belted Kingfisher, 
Cerulean Warbler, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, and Baltimore Oriole. Dragonflies 
abound here, the three inch plus Dragonhunter can sometimes be found near the 
parking lot in late July. 

 The last area to be mentioned is our favorite birding spot: the Guilford Lake 
and Salem Reservoir Area. Most of the habitats are here, from large bodies of 
water, to extensive marshland, to sycamore and hemlock lined stream banks. 
During the present, Ohio Breeding Bird Atlas, in Block 53B5CW, a remarkable 123 
species have been recorded. Guilford Lake has a beautiful State Park 
Campground, and has summering Double-crested Cormorants, and Ring-billed Gulls, 
along with nesting Bald Eagles, Great Horned Owls, and Eastern Screech-owl. The 
Ohio Department of Natural Resources Director, Sean Logan, lives here with his 
family. On a historic note is the fact that Gillford Reservoir, note the 
original spelling, was constructed about 1836 to provide water for the Sandy 
and Beaver Canal. Below and to the east of the causeway is the Depot Road 
Marsh. The Firestone Yeagley Wildlife Area Parking Lot is on Depot Road, 
providing viewing access from your vehicle. American Bittern, Least Bittern, 
Virginia Rail, Prothonotary Warbler, Marsh Wren, Swamp Sparrow, American Coot, 
Sora, and numerous Green Heron can be heard and seen here. Common Moorhen and 
Hooded Merganser families can easily be seen. At Salem Reservoir Osprey can be 
found, and in July 2009, a Forster's Tern frequented the bait shop for several 
days. Sandhill Cranes and Blue-winged Teal have summered at Tritten's Pond in 
the past. The last known Barn Owl location in Columbiana County is here, in an 
old unused barn, which is also home each year, to baby Turkey Vultures. They 
are raised each year in an old grain bin for about eight weeks, and then fledge 
from the barn at about ten weeks. 

 I hope you have enjoyed this review of Columbiana County summer birding 
opportunities and I would like to extend an invitation to all to come and 
explore an eastern neighbors' backyard. 


August 2010
Bob Lane









______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: New Ohio Birding Drives and eBird Hotspots are active
From: Ken Ostermiller <ken.ostermiller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 06:48:36 -0400
New Ohio Birding Drives have been added to the Ohio eBird Hotspot web site.
Birding drives provide a route and driving directions to several eBird
hotspots which may be visited in a one day trip. Feedback is especially
welcome with suggestions for improving the driving directions on these
birding drives.

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Ohio+Birding+Drives



New birding drives which have recently been added:



Akron North Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Akron+North+Birding+Drive

Akron South Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Akron+South+Birding+Drive



Alliance Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Alliance+Birding+Drive



Berlin Lake Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Berlin+Lake+Birding+Drive



Buckeye Lake Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Buckeye+Lake+Birding+Drive



Canton Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Canton+Birding+Drive



Columbus North Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Columbus+North+Birding+Drive

Columbus South Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Columbus+South+Birding+Drive



Licking County Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Licking+County+Birding+Drive



Lucas County Lakeshore Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Lucas+County+Lakeshore+Birding+Drive



Oak Openings Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Oak+Openings+Birding+Drive



Portage County North Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Portage+County+North+Birding+Drive

Portage County South Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Portage+County+South+Birding+Drive



Trumbull County Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Trumbull+County+Birding+Drive



Ohio birders have added several shared bird reporting hotspots to eBird.

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/

New hotspots which have recently been added.



Delaware County

Delaware Wildlife Area--Wildlife Rd.

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Delaware+Wildlife+Area--Wildlife+Road



Lake County

Grand River Landing

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Grand+River+Landing



Lucas County

Fallen Timbers Battlefield

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Fallen+Timbers+Battlefield


​Ken Ostermiller
eBird Hotspot reviewer for Ohio

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Big Island Wildlife Area...Shorebirds???
From: Steve Jones <sjlarue1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 05:11:35 -0400
Went over to Big Island yesterday to get a stray Black Tern...found it
eventually, along with 4 Sandhill Cranes...one with a ID tag that was too
dirty to read :-( . Oh well.
The middle containment pond on LaRue-Prospect has been drawn down exposing
plenty of shallow water.  Killdeer were everywhere,  and expected Spotted
Sandpipers were scattered throughout the middle pond.  But what was not
expected were two Dunlin and two Least Sandpipers.

Other than that...pretty typical day.

Happy birding and God bless!

Steve J.

Big Island Wildlife Area--North of Larue-Prospect Rd., Marion, Ohio, US
Jun 13, 2016 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
39 species

Canada Goose  100
Wood Duck  24
Mallard  100
Pied-billed Grebe  12
Double-crested Cormorant  125
Great Blue Heron  50
Great Egret  4
Turkey Vulture  12
Bald Eagle  3
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Common Gallinule  8
American Coot  12
Sandhill Crane  4
Killdeer  50
Spotted Sandpiper  4
Dunlin  2
Least Sandpiper  2
Black Tern  1
Mourning Dove  2
Chimney Swift  5
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Eastern Kingbird  2
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  4
Tree Swallow  30
Barn Swallow  12
Marsh Wren  4
Eastern Bluebird  2
Wood Thrush  1
Gray Catbird  2
European Starling  4
Cedar Waxwing  3
Song Sparrow  2
Eastern Towhee  1
Northern Cardinal  2
Red-winged Blackbird  30
Brown-headed Cowbird  8
Baltimore Oriole  2
American Goldfinch  4

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30218939

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Breeding Plumage Male Ruddy Duck / Columbiana County
From: robert lane <ohiomagpie AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 02:08:04 +0000
Tonight, Monday, at about 8:30PM at Guilford Lake in Columbiana County, we 
found a gorgeous male Ruddy Duck in breeding plumage, all alone out in the 
middle of the lake, opposite the state park beach. The surprise celebrity 
summer visitor, appeared perfectly healthy. At least twelve inland summering 
Double-crested Cormorants could be seen roosting in a tree in the background, 
along with numerous Green Herons returning to their evening tree roost area 
just west of Mark's Landing. 



Bob and Denise Lane / Mahoning County

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Sedge Wrens - Wilderness Rd. - Wayne County.
From: Chris <c.pierce AT ATT.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 13:49:22 -0400
I was fortunate to be able to view some Sedge Wrens with Irene Krise and
Jerry Talkington yesterday.

There are 3 - 4 and they were actively calling and popping up for short
views on Wilderness Rd.

To view them, turn on to Wilderness Rd. from the Elyria Rd. (CR 139) end
and drive towards the last telephone pole on the left

or south side. The wrens were in the tall grass in that location.


See you on the trails,


Chris Pierce

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Purple Martins at Liberty Park correction
From: Ken Andrews <ken.hikes AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 13:31:51 -0400
Sorry. I saw two males and four females. No youngsters yet. Too early.

Thanks, John, for the correction. 


Link to photo:
https://flic.kr/p/HCK6BG

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Question relating birds and cicadas
From: Nancy Obryan <nancy.obryan AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 17:53:27 -0400
We have no cicadas here (Novelty, Geauga Co.), but within a half mile of my 
house are probably six breeding pairs of Rose-Breasted Grosbeaks and two 
breeding pairs of Baltimore Orioles. I had thought that none of the Scarlet 
Tanagers or Indigo Buntings passing through had stayed nearby, but yesterday we 
had a Scarlet Tanager in a bush outside our front window and I saw a baby male 
Indigo about 1/3 mile away. 


My theory is that because the north winds made the birds late this year they 
went into silent nest-building mode almost right after they arrived. 


> Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 16:20:45 -0500
> From: jwtomkood AT WINDSTREAM.NET
> Subject: Re: [Ohio-birds] Question relating birds and cicadas
> To: OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU
> 
> Often when we see a pair of birds, especially during migration time, 
repeatedly we assume they are the same pair. And they may very well be. But 
without tagging or marking them in some way it can't be said for sure that they 
are the same pair day after day. You may have had multiple pairs moving through 
for several weeks on their way to finding and establishing a nesting territory. 
Feeder count bird densities are often underestimated due to the observer 
assuming it is the same bird making repetitive visits. So they may have wanted 
to be in the "thick" of the cicadas or they may instead have wanted to include 
that tall Cottonwood down the block in their territory or they may have moved 
further north. 

> 
> Jim Tomko
> ---- Helen Ostermiller  wrote:
> > We were particularly excited to have two pairs of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
> > and two Baltimore Orioles coming to our feeders this spring.  This lasted
> > for about 3 weeks; we were delighted to think they were nesting here.  But
> > now we haven't seen them for the past 2-3 weeks.  Today, though, I've been
> > hearing a Rose-breasted Grosbeak.  If he's come to a feeder, I wasn't here
> > to see him.
> >
> > Although our small woodlot did have some emergent cicadas, we didn't have
> > enough for them to stick around, apparently.  The cicada drone we hear is
> > coming from a woodlot across a large mowed area perhaps a quarter mile from
> > us or across the highway to the north.
> >
> > I wonder if "our" grosbeaks and orioles have followed the cicadas to where
> > there's a concentration?  Has anyone else seen this kind of disappearance?
> > Of course, we'll never know if the birds would have stayed and nested.
> >
> > I'd appreciate others' observations and thoughts.
> >
> > Helen Ostermiller
> > southern Medina County in NE Ohio
> >
> > ______________________________________________________________________
> >
> > Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> > Please consider joining our Society, at 
www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php. 

> > Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
> >
> >
> > You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> > listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> > Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
> 
> ______________________________________________________________________
> 
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at 
www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php. 

> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
> 
> 
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
                                          
______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Question relating birds and cicadas
From: Jim Tomko <jwtomkood AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 16:20:45 -0500
Often when we see a pair of birds, especially during migration time, repeatedly 
we assume they are the same pair. And they may very well be. But without 
tagging or marking them in some way it can't be said for sure that they are the 
same pair day after day. You may have had multiple pairs moving through for 
several weeks on their way to finding and establishing a nesting territory. 
Feeder count bird densities are often underestimated due to the observer 
assuming it is the same bird making repetitive visits. So they may have wanted 
to be in the "thick" of the cicadas or they may instead have wanted to include 
that tall Cottonwood down the block in their territory or they may have moved 
further north. 


Jim Tomko
---- Helen Ostermiller  wrote:
> We were particularly excited to have two pairs of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
> and two Baltimore Orioles coming to our feeders this spring.  This lasted
> for about 3 weeks; we were delighted to think they were nesting here.  But
> now we haven't seen them for the past 2-3 weeks.  Today, though, I've been
> hearing a Rose-breasted Grosbeak.  If he's come to a feeder, I wasn't here
> to see him.
>
> Although our small woodlot did have some emergent cicadas, we didn't have
> enough for them to stick around, apparently.  The cicada drone we hear is
> coming from a woodlot across a large mowed area perhaps a quarter mile from
> us or across the highway to the north.
>
> I wonder if "our" grosbeaks and orioles have followed the cicadas to where
> there's a concentration?  Has anyone else seen this kind of disappearance?
> Of course, we'll never know if the birds would have stayed and nested.
>
> I'd appreciate others' observations and thoughts.
>
> Helen Ostermiller
> southern Medina County in NE Ohio
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at 
www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php. 

> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Purple Martins at Liberty Park, Summit County
From: Ken Andrews <ken.hikes AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 14:48:13 -0400
I saw six purple martins at Liberty Park this morning while doing the Summit 
County bird census. They are apparently nesting in the plastic gourds just to 
the north of the Dog Park, which is just to the north of the athletic fields 
along Liberty Road. This is in the far northeastern section of Summit County. 



The martins were around the gourds closest to the road. There are two sets of 
gourds. 



I saw four youngsters and two adults. But, there could be more. It was getting 
hot this morning when I saw them. I was on my way back to my car at the end of 
my walk. 



You will be able to tell the young martins from the tree swallows just by size. 
And, they were calling. They sound a little bit different then the tree 
swallows. 



Note: If you haven't had enough of the cicada madness, just walk along the edge 
of the woods in that area. There are a gazillion of the bugs in that area. The 
noise will drive you crazy. They are swarming all along the path, in the trees, 
in the grass...Wow! I have seen/heard them in other areas; but, not like what I 
saw/heard this morning. It was kind of creepy! The Ledges area of that park 
farther to the north is also buzzing with the bugs. It was difficult to listen 
for and find birds over all that buzzing. 


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: OHIO-BIRDS Digest - 9 Jun 2016 to 10 Jun 2016 (#2016-163)
From: Daniel Sheffer <shefferohio AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 14:43:40 -0400
On Sat, Jun 11, 2016 at 12:01 AM, OHIO-BIRDS automatic digest system <
LISTSERV AT listserv.miamioh.edu> wrote:

> There are 6 messages totaling 448 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>   1. Pine siskins
>   2. Question relating birds and cicadas (3)
>   3. Blendon Woods-Summer Birds
>   4. New Ohio Birding Drives on Ohio eBird Hotspot web site are active.
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 10 Jun 2016 10:39:10 -0400
> From:    Joyce Callahan 
> Subject: Pine siskins
>
> Most winters there are pine siskins visiting the feeders. The last few
> springs they've been observed singing & displaying. They usually disappear
> in mid-May. This year some stayed; we have breeding juncos too.
>  Photo in Ebird checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 10 Jun 2016 15:29:23 -0400
> From:    Helen Ostermiller 
> Subject: Question relating birds and cicadas
>
> We were particularly excited to have two pairs of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
> and two Baltimore Orioles coming to our feeders this spring.  This lasted
> for about 3 weeks; we were delighted to think they were nesting here.  But
> now we haven't seen them for the past 2-3 weeks.  Today, though, I've been
> hearing a Rose-breasted Grosbeak.  If he's come to a feeder, I wasn't here
> to see him.
>
> Although our small woodlot did have some emergent cicadas, we didn't have
> enough for them to stick around, apparently.  The cicada drone we hear is
> coming from a woodlot across a large mowed area perhaps a quarter mile from
> us or across the highway to the north.
>
> I wonder if "our" grosbeaks and orioles have followed the cicadas to where
> there's a concentration?  Has anyone else seen this kind of disappearance?
> Of course, we'll never know if the birds would have stayed and nested.
>
> I'd appreciate others' observations and thoughts.
>
> Helen Ostermiller
> southern Medina County in NE Ohio
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 10 Jun 2016 15:45:15 -0400
> From:    Andrea Anderson 
> Subject: Re: Question relating birds and cicadas
>
> We get Baltimore Orioles and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks at the feeders in the
> spring here in Jefferson County. They stay a few weeks and then disappear.
> We have lots of Cicadas, but only finches and doves at the feeders now. A
> plus with the Cicadas is we hear Yellow-billed Cuckoos all the time and
> have even seen them in the yard numerous times.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jun 10, 2016, at 3:29 PM, Helen Ostermiller 
> wrote:
> >
> > We were particularly excited to have two pairs of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
> > and two Baltimore Orioles coming to our feeders this spring.  This lasted
> > for about 3 weeks; we were delighted to think they were nesting here.
> But
> > now we haven't seen them for the past 2-3 weeks.  Today, though, I've
> been
> > hearing a Rose-breasted Grosbeak.  If he's come to a feeder, I wasn't
> here
> > to see him.
> >
> > Although our small woodlot did have some emergent cicadas, we didn't have
> > enough for them to stick around, apparently.  The cicada drone we hear is
> > coming from a woodlot across a large mowed area perhaps a quarter mile
> from
> > us or across the highway to the north.
> >
> > I wonder if "our" grosbeaks and orioles have followed the cicadas to
> where
> > there's a concentration?  Has anyone else seen this kind of
> disappearance?
> > Of course, we'll never know if the birds would have stayed and nested.
> >
> > I'd appreciate others' observations and thoughts.
> >
> > Helen Ostermiller
> > southern Medina County in NE Ohio
> >
> > ______________________________________________________________________
> >
> > Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> > Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> > Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
> >
> >
> > You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> > listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> > Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 10 Jun 2016 16:36:05 -0400
> From:    Ohio Birder 
> Subject: Re: Question relating birds and cicadas
>
> Here in Medina County, by Medina Lake, I have at least 6-8 orioles that
> frequent my feeders. Since the cicadas have arrived, no orioles, jelly
> feeders are still full (drowned cicadas in the jelly too!). So I figure
> they
> are pigging out on cicadas since I was going thru a jar of jelly at least
> twice a week before the cicadas emerged.
>
> Kathy N
> Medina, OH
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Ohio birds [mailto:OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU] On Behalf Of
> Andrea Anderson
> Sent: Friday, June 10, 2016 3:45 PM
> To: OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU
> Subject: Re: Question relating birds and cicadas
>
> We get Baltimore Orioles and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks at the feeders in the
> spring here in Jefferson County. They stay a few weeks and then disappear.
> We have lots of Cicadas, but only finches and doves at the feeders now. A
> plus with the Cicadas is we hear Yellow-billed Cuckoos all the time and
> have
> even seen them in the yard numerous times.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jun 10, 2016, at 3:29 PM, Helen Ostermiller 
> wrote:
> >
> > We were particularly excited to have two pairs of Rose-breasted
> > Grosbeaks and two Baltimore Orioles coming to our feeders this spring.
> > This lasted for about 3 weeks; we were delighted to think they were
> > nesting here.  But now we haven't seen them for the past 2-3 weeks.
> > Today, though, I've been hearing a Rose-breasted Grosbeak.  If he's
> > come to a feeder, I wasn't here to see him.
> >
> > Although our small woodlot did have some emergent cicadas, we didn't
> > have enough for them to stick around, apparently.  The cicada drone we
> > hear is coming from a woodlot across a large mowed area perhaps a
> > quarter mile from us or across the highway to the north.
> >
> > I wonder if "our" grosbeaks and orioles have followed the cicadas to
> > where there's a concentration?  Has anyone else seen this kind of
> disappearance?
> > Of course, we'll never know if the birds would have stayed and nested.
> >
> > I'd appreciate others' observations and thoughts.
> >
> > Helen Ostermiller
> > southern Medina County in NE Ohio
> >
> > ______________________________________________________________________
> >
> > Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> > Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> > Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
> >
> >
> > You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> > listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> > Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 10 Jun 2016 18:06:31 -0400
> From:    "Simpson, Bruce" 
> Subject: Blendon Woods-Summer Birds
>
>   Blendon Woods Metro Park is located in the northeast corner of Columbus
> off of I 270 and Rte 161. Take the little Turtle Way exit
>
>   Below is a list of some of the Birds seen in the last week
>
>     Goldenrod Trail
>       C Yellowthroat
>       Tanagers
>           Summer
>           Scarlet
>       W Turkey
>       Chimney Swifts-possible nesting in our Chimney Swift tower
>       Yellow-throated Vireo
>       E Bluebird
>       N Flicker
>       Barred Owl
>
>   Thoreau Lake
>       Mallards
>       Wood Ducks-many ducklings
>       Herons
>         Green
>         Great Blue Heron
>      Belted Kingfisher
>      Barn Swallow
>      Cedar Waxwing
>      Yellow Warblers
>      Red-tailed Hawk
>      E Kingbird
>
>   Lake Trail
>      Woodpeckers
>          Pileated
>          Hairy
>      Rose-breasted Grosbeak
>      Scarlet Tanager
>      E Towhee
>      Hooded Warbler
>      Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
>      Flycatchers
>          Great Crested
>          Acadian
>          E Wood Peewee
>      Red-eyed Vireo
>      Cooper's Hawk
>      Carolina Wren
>      Red-headed Woodpecker
>
>   Brookside Trail
>      Louisiana Waterthrush
>      Hooded Warbler
>      Wood Thrush
>      Pileated Woodpecker
>
>   Barred Owl-Hickory Ridge, Ripple Rock Trail & Thoreau Lake
>
>
>   Sugarbush Trail
>      Cuckoos
>         Yellow-billed
>         Black-billed
>     Ovenbird
>     Hooded Warbler
>     Scarlet Tanager
>     Vireos
>       Red-eyed
>       Yellow-throated
>     Red-shouldered Hawk
>     Yellow-throated Warbler
>
>   Turkeys-everywhere-There are female Turkeys with young (polts)
>                Bird Feeders
>                   Nature Center
>                   Ranger Station
>                   East Blind-Thoreau Lake
>
>   Nature Center Bird Feeding Area
>      Indigo Bunting
>      Hairy Woodpecker
>      Carolina Wren
>      Turkeys
>      E Towhee
>      Ruby-throated Hummingbird
>
>
>
>          Blendon Woods Metro Park
>             Nature Center
>                614-895-6221
>
>         Bruce Simpson-Naturalist at Blendon Woods Metro Park in Columbus
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 10 Jun 2016 22:05:31 -0400
> From:    Ken Ostermiller 
> Subject: New Ohio Birding Drives on Ohio eBird Hotspot web site are active.
>
> ​
>
> New Ohio Birding Drives have been added to the Ohio eBird Hotspot web site.
> Birding drives provide a route and driving directions to several eBird
> hotspots which may be visited in a one day trip.
>
> http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Ohio+Birding+Drives
>
>
>
> New birding drives which have recently been added:
>
>
>
> Hamilton County Birding Drives
>
> Cincinnati Birding Drive
>
> http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Cincinnati+Birding+Drive
>
> Hamilton County Northeast Birding Drive
>
>
> 
http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Hamilton+County+Northeast+Birding+Drive 

>
> Hamilton County Northwest Birding Drive
>
>
> 
http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Hamilton+County+Northwest+Birding+Drive 

>
> Hamilton County Southeast Birding Drive
>
>
> 
http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Hamilton+County+Southeast+Birding+Drive 

>
> Hamilton County Southwest Birding Drive
>
>
> 
http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Hamilton+County+Southwest+Birding+Drive 

>
> Miami Whitewater Forest Birding Drive
>
>
> http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Miami+Whitewater+Forest+Birding+Drive
>
>
>
> Montgomery County Birding Drives
>
> Dayton Northeast Birding Drive
>
> http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Dayton+Northeast+Birding+Drive
>
> Dayton Northwest Birding Drive
>
> http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Dayton+Northwest+Birding+Drive
>
> Dayton Southwest Birding Drive
>
> http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Dayton+Southwest+Birding+Drive
>
> Dayton Southeast Birding Drive
>
> http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Dayton+Southeast+Birding+Drive
>
>
>
> Hancock County Birding Drive
>
> http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Hancock+County+Birding+Drive
>
> Findlay Birding Drive
>
> http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Findlay+Birding+Drive
>
>
>
> Lake County Birding Drive
>
> http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Lake+County+Birding+Drive
>
> Lake County Lakeshore Birding Drive
>
> http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Lake+County+Lakeshore+Birding+Drive
>
>
> Ken Ostermiller
> eBird Hotspot reviewer for Ohio
> ​
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of OHIO-BIRDS Digest - 9 Jun 2016 to 10 Jun 2016 (#2016-163)
> ****************************************************************
>



-- 
Dan

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Question relating birds and cicadas
From: Steve Jones <sjlarue1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 07:45:40 -0400
So far, we have been spared the onslaught of the 17yr Cicada...if anyone
needs a break, Big Island and Myeera Park and Wetlands are fairly
quiet...lots of birds singing... :-D
On Jun 10, 2016 3:29 PM, "Helen Ostermiller"  wrote:

> We were particularly excited to have two pairs of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
> and two Baltimore Orioles coming to our feeders this spring.  This lasted
> for about 3 weeks; we were delighted to think they were nesting here.  But
> now we haven't seen them for the past 2-3 weeks.  Today, though, I've been
> hearing a Rose-breasted Grosbeak.  If he's come to a feeder, I wasn't here
> to see him.
>
> Although our small woodlot did have some emergent cicadas, we didn't have
> enough for them to stick around, apparently.  The cicada drone we hear is
> coming from a woodlot across a large mowed area perhaps a quarter mile from
> us or across the highway to the north.
>
> I wonder if "our" grosbeaks and orioles have followed the cicadas to where
> there's a concentration?  Has anyone else seen this kind of disappearance?
> Of course, we'll never know if the birds would have stayed and nested.
>
> I'd appreciate others' observations and thoughts.
>
> Helen Ostermiller
> southern Medina County in NE Ohio
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: New Ohio Birding Drives on Ohio eBird Hotspot web site are active.
From: Ken Ostermiller <ken.ostermiller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 22:05:31 -0400
​

New Ohio Birding Drives have been added to the Ohio eBird Hotspot web site.
Birding drives provide a route and driving directions to several eBird
hotspots which may be visited in a one day trip.

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Ohio+Birding+Drives



New birding drives which have recently been added:



Hamilton County Birding Drives

Cincinnati Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Cincinnati+Birding+Drive

Hamilton County Northeast Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Hamilton+County+Northeast+Birding+Drive

Hamilton County Northwest Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Hamilton+County+Northwest+Birding+Drive

Hamilton County Southeast Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Hamilton+County+Southeast+Birding+Drive

Hamilton County Southwest Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Hamilton+County+Southwest+Birding+Drive

Miami Whitewater Forest Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Miami+Whitewater+Forest+Birding+Drive



Montgomery County Birding Drives

Dayton Northeast Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Dayton+Northeast+Birding+Drive

Dayton Northwest Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Dayton+Northwest+Birding+Drive

Dayton Southwest Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Dayton+Southwest+Birding+Drive

Dayton Southeast Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Dayton+Southeast+Birding+Drive



Hancock County Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Hancock+County+Birding+Drive

Findlay Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Findlay+Birding+Drive



Lake County Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Lake+County+Birding+Drive

Lake County Lakeshore Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Lake+County+Lakeshore+Birding+Drive


Ken Ostermiller
eBird Hotspot reviewer for Ohio
​

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Blendon Woods-Summer Birds
From: "Simpson, Bruce" <simpson AT METROPARKS.NET>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 18:06:31 -0400
  Blendon Woods Metro Park is located in the northeast corner of Columbus
off of I 270 and Rte 161. Take the little Turtle Way exit

  Below is a list of some of the Birds seen in the last week

    Goldenrod Trail
      C Yellowthroat
      Tanagers
          Summer
          Scarlet
      W Turkey
      Chimney Swifts-possible nesting in our Chimney Swift tower
      Yellow-throated Vireo
      E Bluebird
      N Flicker
      Barred Owl

  Thoreau Lake
      Mallards
      Wood Ducks-many ducklings
      Herons
        Green
        Great Blue Heron
     Belted Kingfisher
     Barn Swallow
     Cedar Waxwing
     Yellow Warblers
     Red-tailed Hawk
     E Kingbird

  Lake Trail
     Woodpeckers
         Pileated
         Hairy
     Rose-breasted Grosbeak
     Scarlet Tanager
     E Towhee
     Hooded Warbler
     Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
     Flycatchers
         Great Crested
         Acadian
         E Wood Peewee
     Red-eyed Vireo
     Cooper's Hawk
     Carolina Wren
     Red-headed Woodpecker

  Brookside Trail
     Louisiana Waterthrush
     Hooded Warbler
     Wood Thrush
     Pileated Woodpecker

  Barred Owl-Hickory Ridge, Ripple Rock Trail & Thoreau Lake


  Sugarbush Trail
     Cuckoos
        Yellow-billed
        Black-billed
    Ovenbird
    Hooded Warbler
    Scarlet Tanager
    Vireos
      Red-eyed
      Yellow-throated
    Red-shouldered Hawk
    Yellow-throated Warbler

  Turkeys-everywhere-There are female Turkeys with young (polts)
               Bird Feeders
                  Nature Center
                  Ranger Station
                  East Blind-Thoreau Lake

  Nature Center Bird Feeding Area
     Indigo Bunting
     Hairy Woodpecker
     Carolina Wren
     Turkeys
     E Towhee
     Ruby-throated Hummingbird



         Blendon Woods Metro Park
            Nature Center
               614-895-6221

        Bruce Simpson-Naturalist at Blendon Woods Metro Park in Columbus

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Question relating birds and cicadas
From: Ohio Birder <ohiobirder AT ZOOMINTERNET.NET>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 16:36:05 -0400
Here in Medina County, by Medina Lake, I have at least 6-8 orioles that
frequent my feeders. Since the cicadas have arrived, no orioles, jelly
feeders are still full (drowned cicadas in the jelly too!). So I figure they
are pigging out on cicadas since I was going thru a jar of jelly at least
twice a week before the cicadas emerged.

Kathy N
Medina, OH

-----Original Message-----
From: Ohio birds [mailto:OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU] On Behalf Of
Andrea Anderson
Sent: Friday, June 10, 2016 3:45 PM
To: OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU
Subject: Re: Question relating birds and cicadas

We get Baltimore Orioles and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks at the feeders in the
spring here in Jefferson County. They stay a few weeks and then disappear.
We have lots of Cicadas, but only finches and doves at the feeders now. A
plus with the Cicadas is we hear Yellow-billed Cuckoos all the time and have
even seen them in the yard numerous times.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 10, 2016, at 3:29 PM, Helen Ostermiller 
wrote:
>
> We were particularly excited to have two pairs of Rose-breasted
> Grosbeaks and two Baltimore Orioles coming to our feeders this spring.
> This lasted for about 3 weeks; we were delighted to think they were
> nesting here.  But now we haven't seen them for the past 2-3 weeks.
> Today, though, I've been hearing a Rose-breasted Grosbeak.  If he's
> come to a feeder, I wasn't here to see him.
>
> Although our small woodlot did have some emergent cicadas, we didn't
> have enough for them to stick around, apparently.  The cicada drone we
> hear is coming from a woodlot across a large mowed area perhaps a
> quarter mile from us or across the highway to the north.
>
> I wonder if "our" grosbeaks and orioles have followed the cicadas to
> where there's a concentration?  Has anyone else seen this kind of
disappearance?
> Of course, we'll never know if the birds would have stayed and nested.
>
> I'd appreciate others' observations and thoughts.
>
> Helen Ostermiller
> southern Medina County in NE Ohio
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at
www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Question relating birds and cicadas
From: Helen Ostermiller <hostermiller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 15:29:23 -0400
We were particularly excited to have two pairs of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
and two Baltimore Orioles coming to our feeders this spring.  This lasted
for about 3 weeks; we were delighted to think they were nesting here.  But
now we haven't seen them for the past 2-3 weeks.  Today, though, I've been
hearing a Rose-breasted Grosbeak.  If he's come to a feeder, I wasn't here
to see him.

Although our small woodlot did have some emergent cicadas, we didn't have
enough for them to stick around, apparently.  The cicada drone we hear is
coming from a woodlot across a large mowed area perhaps a quarter mile from
us or across the highway to the north.

I wonder if "our" grosbeaks and orioles have followed the cicadas to where
there's a concentration?  Has anyone else seen this kind of disappearance?
Of course, we'll never know if the birds would have stayed and nested.

I'd appreciate others' observations and thoughts.

Helen Ostermiller
southern Medina County in NE Ohio

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Pine siskins
From: Joyce Callahan <000000997d0c09c0-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 10:39:10 -0400
Most winters there are pine siskins visiting the feeders. The last few springs 
they've been observed singing & displaying. They usually disappear in mid-May. 
This year some stayed; we have breeding juncos too. 

 Photo in Ebird checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org








Subject: Re: Google art work about birders
From: Liz McQuaid <prwarbler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 23:17:23 -0400
This Google Doodle is in celebration of Phoebe Snetsinger's 85th birthday
(if she was alive) who saw over 8400 species of birds in her lifetime.

Liz McQuaid
Cleveland
If you have not already seen it, open Google and look at the picture /
animation. It's about birds and birding and even shows a guy on the right
looking through bins and writing notes in his notebook.  So Funny!



Matt Valencic

Geauga County


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at
www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Google art work about birders
From: Matthew Valenic <mmvalencic AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 22:03:04 -0400
If you have not already seen it, open Google and look at the picture /
animation. It's about birds and birding and even shows a guy on the right
looking through bins and writing notes in his notebook.  So Funny!



Matt Valencic

Geauga County


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Darke Co. Marbled Godwit
From: Regina Schieltz <reginasch54 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2016 16:51:40 -0400
This afternoon at Woods Road, Steve Miller and me observed a Marble Godwit

There was also 3 Semipalmated Sandpipers
Pied Billed Grebe,
Mallards
Great BLue Heron
Killdeer
E. meadowlark
and other normal birds.

WOods Road is west of 118 and between the towns of Ansonia and Rossburg.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Interesting Swallow Behavior
From: Jon Cefus <jcefus AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2016 13:56:48 -0400
Thanks for all the responses and interesting links! Apparently, swallows do 
play. 


Jon Cefus
Carroll County

Sent from my iPhone
______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Baby Juncos in NE Ohio
From: Matthew Valenic <mmvalencic AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2016 13:39:50 -0400
We are that other group in NE Ohio that Haans referred to. Our momma Junco is 
sitting on her second nest (three eggs) in the hay loft here at Fox Meadow Farm 
in Geauga County. Cardinals have already left their nest in the Clematis and 
momma Robin has a brood in the Japanese Maple behind the house. Momma Barn 
Swallow is on eggs above the center aisle of the barn (appropriately). The 
Great Horned Owl baby was screaming around our pasture just after dark last 
week (scary if you have not heard it before). A House Wren has filled a 
Bluebird Box with sticks but must be a false nest. IT'S A REGULAR NURSERY 
AROUND HERE! 


And the Kale is growing faster than I can give it away!

Matt Valencic
Geauga County

-----Original Message-----
From: Ohio birds [mailto:OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU] On Behalf Of Haans 
Petruschke 

Sent: Wednesday, June 8, 2016 9:02 AM
To: OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU
Subject: [Ohio-birds] Baby Juncos

Hi,

Saw my first fledgling Juncos of the season on Gildersleeve Mountain this 
morning. Others in the breeding range here in NE Ohio have seen them as early 
as mid May. The first brood nesters in my yard always seem to fledge in early 
June, and then there are an additional one or two broods in the summer. 


Haans

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Osprey
From: Steve Jones <sjlarue1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2016 10:43:13 -0400
Regarding the Osprey cam...I mistakenly said Ch 10...it is Ch 6 and CH 28
that has the Osprey tower cam.  I at least watch the weather more. :-D

Steve J.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Baby Juncos
From: Haans Petruschke <haans42 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2016 09:01:32 -0400
Hi,

Saw my first fledgling Juncos of the season on Gildersleeve Mountain this
morning. Others in the breeding range here in NE Ohio have seen them as
early as mid May. The first brood nesters in my yard always seem to fledge
in early June, and then there are an additional one or two broods in the
summer.

Haans

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Osprey
From: Steve Jones <sjlarue1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2016 05:29:20 -0400
Hey Hayward and all,

I think Ospreys are less particular than Eagles when it comes to nesting
sites.  All anyone has to do is watch Channel 10 weather, and know that
Ospreys will nest anywhere they can stick a stick. :-D  Use Maryland to
visit Chincoteague VA, instead of Virginia Beach, and you will ask yourself
why an Osprey would put a nest on an overhead traffic sign...no where near
a large body of water.

Check communication towers and any strong tree like structure...like high
tension power lines towers, and you may find it.  I saw one on a set of
power poles that looked like three railroad ties bolted together.

Happy birding and God bless,

Steve J
On Jun 7, 2016 8:54 AM, "Bill Whan"  wrote:

> Hayward--
>        Good questions. Take a look at the new Breeding Bird Atlas, which
> features a nest-map with freckles mostly over the southwestern half of
> the state. So you're in prime territory, and having a lake is a big plus
> in your area. Ospreys still are scarce along the Erie shore; eagles are
> rumored to be the cause, but they coexist inland. A combination of
> efforts to stop poisoning birds with pesticides and widespread efforts
> to introduce ospreys, here and in states to our south, has been quite
> successful. The introduction efforts largely succeeded by putting up
> lakeside nesting platforms for a growing population of northbound
> migrants; most of these platforms have fallen down, but the ospreys were
> glad to use tall structures of any kind; the Lanes did a survey in their
> northeastern Ohio territory, and found 24 nests, ALL on such structures
> (18 on cell towers, 2 on transmission towers, 2 on wooden utility poles,
> and 2 on wooden hacking structures). So maybe your lake will be
> reluctantly passed over for lack of such a structure. I have no idea why
> two (a pair?) would stay this long, though; maybe there's a platform
> somewhere nearby? I find it hard to believe that wild birds would so
> often insist on human-built structures to nest; long ago they must have
> made do with natural selections...
> Bill W
>
> On 6/6/2016 4:57 PM, Hayward Chappell wrote:
>
>> I still have one and possibly two ospreys at our little lake in Lawrence
>> County.
>>
>> I am kind of surprised. They have migrated through for past few years but
>> never stayed this long. We don't have a platform or anything. Is it usual
>> for them to stay this long?  Could they be staying but not breeding?
>>
>> thank you-
>>
>> hayward chappell
>> Lawrence County
>>
>> --
>> Hayward Chappell
>> 766 Private Rd. 3952
>> Willow Wood, OH 45696
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________
>>
>> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
>> Please consider joining our Society, at
>> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
>> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>>
>>
>> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
>> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
>> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>>
>>
>>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Ottawa NWR Census
From: DUG <0000004b93466e03-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU>
Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2016 00:06:54 +0000
JUNE 05, 2016 - OTTAWA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE MONTHLY CENSUS.ROUTES: Same 
usual morning & afternoon routes - except where closed for eagle nesting. TIME: 
8:00am~12:20pm; 1:45pm~6:20pm.TEMP.: 56~77~73 COND.: Overcast until 9:00am, 
turning mostly cloudy until 9:45am, then changing to partly sunny; winds W/SW 
at5-10mph; stormfront coming from the SW after lunch, winds gusting to 25mph; 
brief downpour from 2:50pm~2:55pm; overcast & cooler.OBS.: Katie Clink (morning 
only), Debbie Hurlvert-Minard, Donna Kuhn (morning only), Jon Minard, Dave & 
Kim Myles (morning only),Ed Pierce, Jim Reyda, Al & Betty Schlecht (morning 
only), Douglas W. Vogus & Janet Wertz. 

I. MAMMALS: 7 SPECIES.

   - Raccoon - 5

   - Mink - 1
   - Woodchuck - 2
   - Eastern Fox Squirrel - 2
   - Muskrat - 3
   - Eastern Cottontail - 1
   - White-tailed Deer - 5

II. BIRDS: 77 SPECIES.

   - Canada Goose - 199

   - Trumpeter Swan - 57 (14 young)
   - Wood Duck - 87
   - American Black Duck - 3
   - Mallard - 156
   - Hooded Merganser - 2
   - Pied-billed Grebe - 17
   - Double-crested Cormorant - 62
   - Great Blue Heron - 121
   - Great Egret - 249
   - Snowy Egret - 11
   - Green Heron - 1
   - Black-crowned Night-Heron - 11
   - Turkey Vulture - 11
   - Osprey - 1
   - Bald Eagle - 16 (5 adult,11 immature)
   - Red-tailed Hawk - 5
   - American Coot - 2
   - Sandhill Crane - 4
   - KIlldeer - 27
   - Spotted Sandpiper - 3
   - Dunlin - 1
   - American Woodcock - 1
   - Ring-billed Gull - 56
   - Herring Gull - 9
   - Mourning Dove - 10
   - Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 4
   - Great Horned Owl - 1
   - Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 3
   - Red-bellied Woodpecker - 7
   - Downy Woodpecker - 5
   - Northern Flicker - 10
   - Eastern Wood-Pewee - 4
   - Acadian Flycatcher - 1
   - Willow Flycatcher - 21
   - Eastern Phoebe - 5
   - Great Crested Flycatcher - 3
   - Eastern Kingbird - 24
   - Warbling Vireo - 20
   - Red-eyed Vireo - 5
   - Blue Jay - 14
   - Horned Lark - 6
   - Purple Martin - 39
   - Tree Swallow - 196
   - Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 2
   - Bank Swallow - 1
   - Cliff Swallow - 45
   - Barn Swallow - 44
   - Black-capped Chickadee - 4
   - White-breasted Nuthatch - 1
   - House Wren - 20
   - Marsh Wren - 10
   - Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2
   - American Robin - 50
   - Gray Catbird - 20
   - Brown Thrasher - 6
   - European Starling - 108
   - Cedar Waxwing - 9
   - Prothonotary Warbler - 4
   - Common Yellowthroat - 23
   - American Redstart - 4
   - Yellow Warbler - 109
   - Chipping Sparrow - 5
   - Field Sparrow - 6
   - Henslow's Sparrow - 1
   - Song Sparrow - 36
   - Swamp Sparrow - 5
   - Northern Cardinal - 14
   - Indigo Bunting - 11
   - Red-winged Blackbird - 535
   - Eastern Meadowlark - 2
   - Common Grackle - 87
   - Brown-headed Cowbird - 13
   - Orchard Oriole - 3
   - Baltimore Oriole - 17
   - American Goldfinch - 9
   - House Sparrow - 20

III. REPTILES: 5 SPECIES.

   - Common Snapping Turtle - 1

   - Map Turtle - 5
   - Midland Painted Turtle - 5
   - Northern Water Snake - 5
   - Eastern Garter Snake - 1

IV. AMPHIBIANS: 2 SPECIES.

   - Bullfrog - many

   - Green Frog - 4

V. FISHES: 1 SPECIES.

   - Common Carp - why, yes!


VI. BUTTERFLIES: 6 SPECIES.

   - Eastern Black Swallowtail - 1

   - Eastern Tiger Swallowtail - 2
   - Cabbage Butterfly - 1
   - Clouded Sulphur - 1
   - Pearl Crescent - 2
   - Red-spotted Purple - 2

Douglas W. Vogus - Akron, Ohio.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Laughing Gull Edgewater CLE
From: jen brumfield <elfin_skimmer AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2016 18:03:27 +0000
Had an adult Laughing Gull fly overhead and west past Edgewater Park beach 
around 1 pm 


Jen Brumfield 
Cleveland, OH
______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: woodcock - geauga co.
From: "Hutson, Timothy B" <hutsont AT BATTELLE.ORG>
Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2016 12:57:10 +0000
I had the opportunity a few years ago to get some photos of a woodcock that 
paraded in front on me only a few feet away. I interpreted what I saw that day 
as a warning or distraction display. These photos are what I got. The bird 
didn't seem to be bothered by my presence or activity at all except for this 
display. It hung around for quite a while but only displayed like this when it 
got very close. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/bugtrumpet/3718911415/in/dateposted-public/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bugtrumpet/3718899465/in/dateposted-public/

-----Original Message-----
From: Ohio birds [mailto:OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU] On Behalf Of inga 
schmidt 

Sent: Saturday, June 04, 2016 5:52 PM
To: OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU
Subject: [Ohio-birds] woodcock - geauga co.

I was pulling garlic mustard in the woods, when I saw a woodcock running along 
not far from me. I never see woodcock unless I inadvertently flush them, and 
then they typically fly a short distance in sort of an arc, and drop down 
again. This bird was sort of hunched up, and had it's wings lifted just a 
little bit away from the body. It kept moving pretty steadily, and then 
reversed direction and started going back again. I could watch it moving on the 
ground for several minutes. It took only one or two small hopping flights. I'd 
sort of lost track of it behind the ground cover when I saw it fly up and come 
down again. Very close to the place where I had flushed one from it's nest a 
few years back. So I started thinking that this could have been distraction 
display? 

though it is no where near as pronounced as say killdeer. 

Inga Schnidt
Chagrin River Road Geauga Co. at the Cuy. Co. koine

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Osprey
From: Bill Whan <billwhan AT COLUMBUS.RR.COM>
Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2016 08:54:08 -0400
Hayward--
        Good questions. Take a look at the new Breeding Bird Atlas, which
features a nest-map with freckles mostly over the southwestern half of
the state. So you're in prime territory, and having a lake is a big plus
in your area. Ospreys still are scarce along the Erie shore; eagles are
rumored to be the cause, but they coexist inland. A combination of
efforts to stop poisoning birds with pesticides and widespread efforts
to introduce ospreys, here and in states to our south, has been quite
successful. The introduction efforts largely succeeded by putting up
lakeside nesting platforms for a growing population of northbound
migrants; most of these platforms have fallen down, but the ospreys were
glad to use tall structures of any kind; the Lanes did a survey in their
northeastern Ohio territory, and found 24 nests, ALL on such structures
(18 on cell towers, 2 on transmission towers, 2 on wooden utility poles,
and 2 on wooden hacking structures). So maybe your lake will be
reluctantly passed over for lack of such a structure. I have no idea why
two (a pair?) would stay this long, though; maybe there's a platform
somewhere nearby? I find it hard to believe that wild birds would so
often insist on human-built structures to nest; long ago they must have
made do with natural selections...
Bill W

On 6/6/2016 4:57 PM, Hayward Chappell wrote:
> I still have one and possibly two ospreys at our little lake in Lawrence
> County.
>
> I am kind of surprised. They have migrated through for past few years but
> never stayed this long. We don't have a platform or anything. Is it usual
> for them to stay this long?  Could they be staying but not breeding?
>
> thank you-
>
> hayward chappell
> Lawrence County
>
> --
> Hayward Chappell
> 766 Private Rd. 3952
> Willow Wood, OH 45696
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at 
www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php. 

> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Geauga County Pileated feeding her young
From: Matthew Valenic <mmvalencic AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 23:06:05 -0400
If you spend enough time in the field you are fortunate to see some really
cool stuff. Today Kelly K and I came across a female Pileated feeding her
two very vocal daughters at the opening of their nest cavity.  Pictures are
on my Flicker page along with a 15 sec video of the juvenile calling (sounds
like an adult!).  https://www.flickr.com/photos/85567104 AT N05/



This was at Eldon Russell Park in Geauga County.



This feeding sequence took place right as we discovered the nest cavity.  We
waited another 15 minutes in the hopes of shooting some video of the same,
but mom did not show up!  We were unsure if our presence made the adult
nervous or if she had not filled up enough before returning.  We shot some
video of the kids and left.



Matt Valencic

Geauga County


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: New Ohio Birding Drives and eBird Hotspots
From: Ken Ostermiller <ken.ostermiller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 20:52:39 -0400
​

New Ohio Birding Drives have been added to the Ohio eBird Hotspot web site.
Birding drives provide a route and driving directions to several eBird
hotspots which may be visited in a one day trip.

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Ohio+Birding+Drives



Birding drives are being developed for some more popular birding
destinations in the state.



Charles Mill Lake Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Charles+Mill+Lake+Birding+Drive



Clear Fork Reservoir Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Clear+Fork+Reservoir+Birding+Drive



Cleveland Lakeshore East Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Cleveland+Lakeshore+East+Birding+Drive



Cleveland Lakeshore West Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Cleveland+Lakeshore+West+Birding+Drive



Lorain County Lakeshore Birding Drive


http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/page/edit/Lorain+County+Lakeshore+Birding+Drive 




Mansfield Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Mansfield+Birding+Drive



Mohican Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Mohican+Birding+Drive



Pleasant Hill Lake Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Pleasant+Hill+Lake+Birding+Drive



Richland B&O Trail Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Richland+B+and+O+Trail+Butler



Richland County North Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Richland+County+North+Birding+Drive



New county birding drives include:



Mahoning County Birding Drive

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Mahoning+County+Birding+Drive



Ohio birders have added two shared bird reporting hotspots to eBird.

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/

New hotspots which have recently been added.



Allen County

Tecumseh Nature Preserve

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Tecumseh+Nature+Preserve



Lucas County

Oak Openings--Ridge Trail

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Oak+Openings--Ridge+Trail


​Ken Ostermiller
eBird Hotspot reviewer for Ohio

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Cuyahoga Valley Monthly Towpath Trail Census
From: DUG <0000004b93466e03-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU>
Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2016 00:03:05 +0000
JUNE 04, 2016 - CUYAHOGA VALLEY MONTHLY TOWPATH TRAIL CENSUS.ROUTE: Red Lock 
Trailhead south to Merriman Valley - with stops at both Trail Mix in Peninsula 
& Szalay's Farm Market on Bolanz Rd.TIME: 5:30am~2:35pm TEMP.: 53~73 COND.: 
Cloudy all day with very light sprinkles from 8:35am~8:40am; very light 
sprinkles again at 1:10pm turning to steady sprinkles from 1:30pm~2:00pm. TRAIL 
COND.: Excellent. RIVER COND.: Very low & clear due to lack of rain.FT.MI.: 
13.63 OBS.: John Henry & Douglas W. Vogus. 

I. MAMMALS: 8 SPECIES, 111 TOTAL MAMMALS.

   - Mink - 1

   - Eastern Chipmunk - 73
   - Eastern Gray Squirrel - 1
   - Eastern Fox Squirrel - 3
   - Red Squirrel - 25
   - Muskrat - 2
   - Eastern Cottontail - 3
   - White-tailed Deer - 3 (doe)

II. BIRDS: 79 SPECIES, 1,120 TOTAL BIRDS.(NOTE: m = male; f = female; ? = bird 
was seen but not sexed; * = bird was heard calling but not sexed) 


   - Canada Goose - 52 (19 young)

   - Wood Duck - 24 (5m,8f,1?,1*,9 ducklings)
   - Mallard - 12 (8m,4f)
   - Great Blue Heron - 15
   - Green Heron - 2
   - Turkey Vulture - 14
   - Red-tailed Hawk - 5 (1 juvenile)
   - Killdeer - 8
   - Spotted Sandpiper - 7
   - Herring Gull - 1
   - Rock Pigeon - 4
   - Mourning Dove - 13
 - Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 9 (New Census High - previous was 4 on 06/02/2012 & 
09/08/2012) 

   - Chimney Swift - 6
   - Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1 (? - divebombing juvenile Red-tailed Hawk)
   - Belted Kingfisher - 6 (3m,1f,2?)
   - Red-headed Woodpecker - 3 (1 nest at Stanford Swamp)
   - Red-bellied Woodpecker - 13 (1f,12*)
 - Downy Woodpecker - 6 (2?,2*,2 juvenile - 1 nest in a dead buckeye tree limb) 

   - Hairy Woodpecker - 1 (*)
   - Northern Flicker - 7 (1m,3f,1?,2*)
   - Pileated Woodpecker - 3 (1?,2*)
 - American Kestrel - 1 (m - at the Akron Water Pollution Control Station - 
First Record on June Census) 

 - Peregrine Falcon - 2 (1m,1f - "Rocky" & "Gatewood" at the Ohio Turnpike 
bridge) 

   - Eastern Wood-Pewee - 13
   - Acadian Flycatcher - 7
   - Willow Flycatcher - 2
   - Eastern Phoebe - 4
 - Great Crested Flycatcher - 9 (1 nest in a sycamore snag above "Deep Lock" - 
Lock 28) 

   - Eastern Kingbird - 6
   - White-eyed Vireo - 1
   - Yellow-throated Vireo - 9
   - Warbling Vireo - 27
   - Red-eyed Vireo - 28 (New Census High - previous was 25 on 06/04/2011)
   - Blue Jay - 23 (1 juvenile)
   - American Crow - 5
   - Tree Swallow - 11 (1 nest in a black willow snag)
   - Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 14
   - Bank Swallow - 1
   - Barn Swallow - 5
   - Black-capped Chickadee - 16
   - Tufted Titmouse - 21
   - White-breasted Nuthatch - 3 (1m,2*)
   - House Wren - 4
   - Carolina Wren - 8
 - Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 14 (2m,1f,4?,7* - 2 nests: 1 in an ash tree and 1 in 
a sycamore tree) 

   - Eastern Bluebird - 1 (*)
   - Veery - 5
 - Wood Thrush - 5 (New Census High - previous was 4 on 06/01/2013 & 
07/05/2013) 

   - American Robin - 49 (1 juvenile - 1 nest in an elm tree)
   - Gray Catbird - 28 (1 nest in a multiflora rose bush)
   - European Starling - 39
 - Cedar Waxwing - 26 (8 nests: 6 in sycamore tree, 1 in black walnut tree & 1 
in autumn-olive bush) 

   - Louisiana Waterthrush - 1 (singing north of "Deep Lock" - Lock 28)
   - Blue-winged Warbler - 2 (m)
   - Common Yellowthroat - 23 (m)
   - Hooded Warbler - 5 (m)
   - American Redstart - 13 (m)
   - Cerulean Warbler - 2 (m)
   - Yellow Warbler - 43 (39m,2f,2?)
   - Yellow-throated Warbler - 3 (m)
   - Eastern Towhee - 6 (m)
   - Chipping Sparrow - 1
   - Field Sparrow - 3
   - Song Sparrow - 61
   - Swamp Sparrow - 14
   - Scarlet Tanager - 3 (m)
   - Northern Cardinal - 56 (44m,6f,6*)
   - Rose-breasted Grosbeak - 13 (12m,1f)
   - Indigo Bunting - 23 (22m,1f)
   - Red-winged Blackbird - 82 (64m,18f)
 - Eastern Meadowlark - 1 (Tied Census High from 04/02/2010 - in field between 
I-271 & Ohio Turnpike bridges - First June Record on Census) 

   - Common Grackle - 46 (2 juvenile)
   - Brown-headed Cowbird - 24 (20m,2f,2?)\
 - Orchard Oriole - 8 (7m,1 immature m - New Census High - previous was 7 on 
four different occasions) 

   - Baltimore Oriole - 14 (13m,1f)
   - House Finch - 5 (2m,3*)
   - American Goldfinch - 30 (9m,5f,14?,2*)
   - House Sparrow - 31
   - Unidentified Passerines - 8

III. REPTILES: 3 SPECIES.


   - Common Snapping Turtle - 3

   - Midland Painted Turtle - 18
   - Eastern Spiny Softshell - 1

IV. AMPHIBIANS: 3 SPECIES.


   - Gray Treefrog - 3 (heard only)

   - Bullfrog - 5

   - Green Frog - 23


V. FISHES: 3 SPECIES.

   - Common Carp - 2

   - Creek Chub - 4
   - Bluegill - 4

VI. BUTTERFLIES: 3 SPECIES.


   - Eastern Tiger Swallowtail - 2

   - Cabbage Butterfly - 1
   - Little Wood Satyr - 3

Douglas W. Vogus - Akron, Ohio.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Black Mourning Dove
From: Adriana Losey <adribirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 17:29:23 -0400
It may be melanism, an increase in black pigments. I have seen a Canada
Goose with a head that was almost completely back.

- Adri

On Monday, June 6, 2016, Thomas Guisinger <
000003d2dfa7080f-dmarc-request AT listserv.miamioh.edu> wrote:

> Early this spring I had a young Mourning Dove (that was almost black)
> visit our backyard. I thought it had gotten in something that caused this
> coloration. I have seen this bird two or three times since. If anything it
> is darker. I am trying to get a picture, but it doesn't visit often and the
> last time it didn't hang around and pose for me. Has anyone else seen a
> 'dark' Mourning Dove?
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
> 
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Osprey
From: Hayward Chappell <hayward.chappell AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 16:57:47 -0400
I still have one and possibly two ospreys at our little lake in Lawrence
County.

I am kind of surprised. They have migrated through for past few years but
never stayed this long. We don't have a platform or anything. Is it usual
for them to stay this long?  Could they be staying but not breeding?

thank you-

hayward chappell
Lawrence County

--
Hayward Chappell
766 Private Rd. 3952
Willow Wood, OH 45696

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org