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Updated on Monday, July 28 at 02:44 PM EST
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Western Sandpiper,©Shawneen Finnegan

28 Jul First Annual Crow-tasting [Alan Contreras ]
28 Jul OBA Annual Meeting [HARVEY W SCHUBOTHE ]
28 Jul Re: Jackson Bottom Wetlands [Steve Engel ]
28 Jul how to make a hummingbird feeder [Stephanie Hazen ]
28 Jul [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
28 Jul Summer Vagrants [Rob Conway ]
27 Jul Re: Nesting catbirds at HMSC [Joel Geier ]
27 Jul Re: Nesting catbirds at HMSC [Joel Geier ]
27 Jul Re: Nesting catbirds at HMSC [Joel Geier ]
28 Jul Re: Nesting catbirds at HMSC [David Irons ]
27 Jul Re: Nesting catbirds at HMSC [Wayne Hoffman ]
27 Jul Nesting catbirds at HMSC [Joel Geier ]
27 Jul aging catbirds [Mike Patterson ]
27 Jul Catbird Nesting [Wayne Hoffman ]
27 Jul [Fwd: [birding] Audubon Print Exhibit, Lectures & Programs Upcoming in Salem] [Joel Geier ]
27 Jul Re: Gray Catbird [David Irons ]
27 Jul STILT SANDPIPER - Baskett slough NWR [Erik Knight ]
27 Jul Catbird Reports at HMSC (Jun 18-11 AM July 27) that Include Photos, Links to Photos, Vocalization Comments [Range Bayer ]
27 Jul Re: Gray Catbird [Lawrence McQueen ]
27 Jul Gray Catbird [Marlowe Kissinger ]
27 Jul barred owlets - Josephine Co. [Romain Cooper ]
26 Jul Seaside to South Jetty Today [Bob Archer ]
26 Jul frr Stilt Sand [Alan Contreras ]
26 Jul Eagle Rock [Jack Williamson ]
26 Jul Re: More on Coos Bay Merlin 7/26/2014 [Wayne Hoffman ]
26 Jul 31 Photos: Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge [Jim Leonard ]
26 Jul Re: Summer Merlins [Tim Rodenkirk ]
26 Jul UPDATE ON ASHLAND SCREECH-OWLS [Harry Fuller ]
26 Jul Summer Merlins ["Roger Robb" ]
26 Jul More on Coos Bay Merlin 7/26/2014 [Tim Rodenkirk ]
26 Jul Newport Or. gray catbird [Marlowe Kissinger ]
26 Jul Re: Martins [Bob ]
26 Jul Martins [Bob Burley ]
26 Jul Re: mimid slam [David Irons ]
26 Jul Some Coos Birds 7/26/2014 [Tim Rodenkirk ]
26 Jul Another Ap [BILL ROSIE ]
26 Jul mimid slam [Darrel Faxon ]
26 Jul Best West Coast Pelagic Field Guides [James Billstine ]
26 Jul Shorebirds Ridgefield NWR [Bob ]
26 Jul Shorebirds Ridgefield NWR [Bob ]
26 Jul The meaning of two catbirds [Mike Patterson ]
26 Jul Photos: Pied-billed Grebe Juveniles Baskett Slough NWR [Jim Leonard ]
26 Jul Article: Once-common marine birds disappearing from our coast [Lee Cain ]
26 Jul [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
25 Jul birding apps ["Bruce & Katie Dugger" ]
25 Jul HMSC Gray CatbirdS [Mike Patterson ]
25 Jul Nehalem Sewage Ponds: Pectoral Sanpipers continue.. [David Bailey ]
25 Jul Re: Jackson Bottom Wetlands [Steve Engel ]
25 Jul YOUNG BIRDS, INC ASHLAND SCREECH OWLET [Harry Fuller ]
25 Jul Re: Seabird in Columbia Gorge ["5hats AT peak.org" ]
25 Jul Re: recommended bird apps [Brandon Wagner ]
25 Jul No More Turkey ["L Markoff" ]
25 Jul Re: birding apps [Bob Archer ]
25 Jul Re: Fwd: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River ["Tom Crabtree" ]
25 Jul Re: birding apps ["Tom Crabtree" ]
25 Jul Re: Bend to Malheur [Jack Williamson ]
25 Jul Bend to Malheur [Colleen McDaniel ]
25 Jul Make that TWO catbirds at HMSC ["Harris, Dawn" ]
25 Jul Re: birding apps [Joel Geier ]
25 Jul Seabird in Columbia Gorge [Lars Per Norgren ]
25 Jul Re: Fwd: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River [Alan Contreras ]
25 Jul Fwd: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River ["Susan T. Murphy" ]
24 Jul Recommended Apps [roger freeman ]
24 Jul Sauvie Island Yellow-headed Blackbirds [Max Smith ]
24 Jul *Re: Re: Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River [Range Bayer ]
24 Jul SAS Keizer Rapids Field Trip Summary [Mike Unger ]
24 Jul Re: Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River [Nels Nelson ]
24 Jul Re: [PortlandAreaBirds] Vanport Wetlands (Portland) shorebirds [Tim Rodenkirk ]
24 Jul Nehalem Sewage Ponds Stint NO [James Billstine ]
24 Jul Re: Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River [Range Bayer ]
24 Jul Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River [Shawneen ]
24 Jul [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
24 Jul RBA: Portland, OR 7-24-14 [Harry Nehls ]
23 Jul In memoriam: Jack Walters [Joel Geier ]
23 Jul Re: Request for help with grouse ID [Craig Miller ]
23 Jul Nehalem Lagoons [Lars Per Norgren ]

Subject: First Annual Crow-tasting
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 12:18:40 -0700
The First Annual OBA Crow-Tasting has begun !

We thought it would be fun to ask active birders to send in their best story of 
embarassing or humorous misidentifications, from which we will select a batch 
to run in a future issue of Oregon Birds. Make your entry no more than a few 
paragraphs, and suggest a humorous title if you like. Send to me by August 15 
for consideration for the first batch. No photos. 


I have so many possible entries of my own that it will take a while to sort 
them out. I'll have a Grebe with That. The Amazing Shrinking Godwit. The 
Pot-bellied Petrel. 



.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon



Subject: OBA Annual Meeting
From: HARVEY W SCHUBOTHE <ninerharv2 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 12:07:57 -0700
Bandon is the location for the 2014 OBA annual meeting. The meeting will help 
from September 26 to September 28th at the Community Center (1200 W 11th Street 
SW in the heart of City Park). 

 
The event opens with a Friday night dinner featuring Dan Gleason as our 
speaker. A day of organized birding trips is set for Saturday to provide an 
opportunity to build on life and Curry and Coos County lists. On Saturday 
evening, following dinner, our annual membership business meeting will be 
conducted and Roy Lowe will speak. We close Sunday with a half day of organized 
birding trips. 

 
More information on lodging and registration will be forthcoming later this 
week. Mark your calendars now. 

 
Harv Schubothe
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Jackson Bottom Wetlands
From: Steve Engel <Steve.Engel AT hillsboro-oregon.gov>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 12:05:59 -0700
I took a quick bird walk along the Tualatin River riparian trail, overlook of 
pintail pond and around Kingfisher marsh this morning. 

In no particular order (sorry about that): 

Western Wood Pewee - heard
Swainson's Thrush - call note heard
Belted Kingfisher - heard
American Robin - feeding fledglings
Spotted Towhee
Black-headed Grosbeak
Black-capped Chickadee
Common Yellow Throat - numerous vocalizations
Bewick's Wren
Northern Flicker
Lazuli Bunting - at least one singing male
Red-winged Blackbird - lots of fledglings out and about
Tree Swallow - some nest boxes with nestlings, some with fledglings
Great Egret - just 2 in pintail pond
Great Blue Heron - 6
Greater Yellow Legs - heard
Canada Goose - 44
Hooded Merganser - 2 brown
Barn Swallow - 8
American Goldfinch - 10
Cedar Waxwing
Killdeer - 2
American Kestrel - female near osprey nest
Scrub Jay - harassing kestrel

Cooper's Hawk - the most interesting observation of the morning went like this: 
To my right 3 American Goldfinches perched on bare branches high up, two of 
them vocalizing in what I first thought were begging calls but there was no 
begging behavior, later I took it to be alarm calls. To my left, dense trees 
emanating the sound of multiple highly-alarmed Black-capped Chickadees (judging 
by the intensity and the multiple dee dee dee's at the end of the call) and a 
Bewick's Wren or two. Straight ahead a large ash tree with an adult Cooper's 
Hawk deep inside it, changing perches several times but not really exposing 
itself much, looking all around after reaching each new perch. Then it exited 
the tree and flew some distance away. I waited to see how soon all the songbird 
alarms would die down. It was quiet in under a minute and the goldfinches began 
preening away. 



Steve Engel, Recreation Program Supervisor
Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve | Parks and Recreation Department 
2600 SW Hillsboro Hwy., Hillsboro, OR 97123
Phone: 503-681-6283 |fax 503-681-6277
email: steve.engel AT hillsboro-oregon.gov
web: www.jacksonbottom.org



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Subject: how to make a hummingbird feeder
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 10:46:53 -0700
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUZ6v57Z9n8

Click on link above to see how to make a hummingbird feeder!

Stephanie


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Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 06:13:13 -0700
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: July 28, 2014 6:07:26 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Cackling Goose (1 Lane)
Tundra Swan (1 Lake)
Canvasback (1 Lane)
Redhead (1 Benton)
Hooded Merganser (1 Lake)
Red-tailed Hawk (Harlan's) (1 Deschutes)
Stilt Sandpiper (1 Polk)
Forster's Tern (1 Lane)
Long-eared Owl (2 Deschutes)
Black Swift (2 Deschutes)
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (1 Crook, 1 Jefferson)
Gray Catbird (1 Lincoln)
Yellow-breasted Chat (1 Jefferson)
Tricolored Blackbird (1 Jefferson)

---------------------------------------------
The report below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on 
the web at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: Summer Vagrants
From: Rob Conway <robin_birder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 06:42:33 +0000
Today at my backyard feeders I had Cassin's Finches (at least 5) and a Calliope 
Hummingbird (male, beautiful purple ruff edged gorget). Wondering if the 
rainstorm from a couple of days ago drove them to lower ground. 

 
Also at the feeders good numbers of both American and Lesser Goldfinch, many 
Black Headed Grossbeaks, Mourning Doves (under the feeder), House Finches, BC 
and CB Chickadees, Red Breasted Nuthatch (no White for a week), Song Sparrows 
and Spotted Towhees. 

 
The woods at the edge of the property still have a Nashville Warbler, 2 yellow 
Warblers, at least 3 species of flycatcher and Downy, Hairy, and Pileated 
Woodpeckers as well a Northern Flicker, and RB Sapsuckers. The juvenile 
Red-tailed hawks are still around but much less vocal and the Turkey Vultures 
fly the ridge all day long. Red Crossbills are almost daily visitors to water 
features. Anna's Hummers are back in numbers (at least 7) and there are still 2 
Rufous in the mix. I heard California Quail this morning, but not sure if it is 
the real thing or starlings doing an immitation. 

Good Birding!
Rob

Rob Conway 
Camas, WA
45.58N 122.44W - elevation 310 ft.
robin_birder AT hotmail.com

 


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Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Re: Nesting catbirds at HMSC
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 19:09:41 -0700
P.S. Just to clear, I meant no affront to Wayne, whom I consider to be
an exemplary birder. Just where Wayne was inclined to be tolerant of
birders who sometimes step over the line (as I often am myself), I think
Dave is right that it's a very bright line when you have a rare breeding
species. Use of playback should just be off the chart, regardless of
individual opinions about whether or not it will make a significant
impact. Unless you're ready to sit out there 24 hours a day for the next
couple of weeks, it's impossible to know how many other birders might
try "just one quick playback."

Joel

On Sun, 2014-07-27 at 18:44 -0700, Joel Geier wrote:

> Dave Irons wrote:
> 
> > They shouldn't have to respond at all, because at this point using
> playback definitely qualifies as a step over the line as outlined in
> the ABA Code of Ethics document.
> 
> Thanks Dave, that really boils it down to the basics.
> 
> Joel

Subject: Re: Nesting catbirds at HMSC
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 18:44:09 -0700
Dave Irons wrote:

> They shouldn't have to respond at all, because at this point using
playback definitely qualifies as a step over the line as outlined in the
ABA Code of Ethics document.

Thanks Dave, that really boils it down to the basics.

Joel
Subject: Re: Nesting catbirds at HMSC
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 17:50:32 -0700
Hi Wayne,

Thanks for your reply. No, I don't plan to come over and look for these
birds. It sounds like you local birders are doing a good job of
documenting them and I've seen plenty of catbirds. They are cool birds
and the best way to enjoy them is in the heart of their nesting range.

My sense is that this is a species that is probably more resistant to
disturbance than most songbirds, because of their preference for dense
tangles and small territorial requirements. As I mentioned, I've seen
catbirds nesting along some very heavily used trails. So I'm far less
worried than I would be for some other species. However, I still think
it's worth bringing this up since there are over 1000 birders on this
list. Whereas catbirds were so common along the trail that I mentioned
in the DC area that no one but me was paying attention (though some
joggers were looking strangely at me for looking at them), it's a
different situation with catbirds in Newport.

If you find more than one fledgling I will be very pleasantly surprised.
But even if there is indeed just one fledgling, that might not
necessarily be an indictment of birders for disturbance. Anytime a pair
is nesting on the fringe or outside of its normal territory, there are
probably a lot of non-ideal conditions that could affect nest
productivity. That's an additional reason to give such pairs plenty of
room.

But beyond this one pair, there is a general principle here that is
worth remembering. Birders should make an effort to avoid disrupting
nesting songbirds, especially in heavily used locations.

Good birding,
Joel


On Sun, 2014-07-27 at 17:11 -0700, Wayne Hoffman wrote:
> Hi, Joel -
> 
> 
> 
> Some good points.
> 
> 
> I do not know if you have come over to see the catbird(s), but I would
> like to make a few comments about the location and the situation:
> 
> 
> 1..We have documented one fledgling.  There easily could be more.  No
> more than one at a time was seen, but the way these birds are
> behaving, that does not mean much.
> 
> 
> 2.  The specifics of the location reduce the opportunities for
> excessive disturbance.  The core area where they are, is a very dense
> tangle of  Himalayan Blackberry with emergent Twinberry, Red
> Elderberry, a small Holly tree, and a large Willow.  Just to the west
> is a row of large Red Alders.  The catbirds are mostly seen in the
> Holly and Willow, and seen disappearing into the lower shrubbery.
>  Occasionally one is seen foraging in the Twinberry.  They do not seem
> to use the alders much.  It would be possible to leave the trail and
> wade into the thicket, but very difficult and bloody, and I believe I
> would be able to see signs (broken or cut vegetation) if anyone tried.
> Or, someone could climb down off the footbridge and wade through the
> intertidal high marsh toward the Holly tree.  I suspect if someone did
> so, the birds would just move a short distance back into the tangle ad
> go about their business.  All of the viewing I know about has come
> from the trail (west end of Nature Trail, the footbridge, the road
> near the HMSC back gate, or a brushy area across the road.  The nature
> trail and the foot bridge offer the best views, but few birders would
> be tempted to leave them for closer approach.
> 
> 
> 3.  The trail is heavily used by birders, joggers, walkers, and
> occasionally bikers, and the whole community of birds in that tangle
> seems to be very acclimated to the presence of people on the trail.
> 
> 
> 4.   Early on, some birders used song recordings on their phones to
> pull in the male.  At the time he was thought to be alone.  He
> responded, but it appears this did not reach a level of interfering
> with nesting.  At this point in the cycle I doubt they would respond
> much.
> 
> 
> Wayne

Subject: Re: Nesting catbirds at HMSC
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 00:47:42 +0000
Wayne Hoffman wrote:

Early on, some birders used song recordings on their phones to pull
 in the male.  At the time he was thought to be alone.  He responded, 
but it appears this did not reach a level of interfering with nesting. 
 At this point in the cycle I doubt they would respond much.

They shouldn't have to respond at all, because at this point using playback 
definitely qualifies as a step over the line as outlined in the ABA Code of 
Ethics document at the link that Joel shared. 


Dave Irons
Portland, OR 




Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 17:11:55 -0700
Subject: [obol] Re: Nesting catbirds at HMSC
From: whoffman AT peak.org
To: joel.geier AT peak.org
CC: obol AT freelists.org

Hi, Joel -
Some good points.
I do not know if you have come over to see the catbird(s), but I would like to 
make a few comments about the location and the situation: 


1..We have documented one fledgling. There easily could be more. No more than 
one at a time was seen, but the way these birds are behaving, that does not 
mean much. 

2. The specifics of the location reduce the opportunities for excessive 
disturbance. The core area where they are, is a very dense tangle of Himalayan 
Blackberry with emergent Twinberry, Red Elderberry, a small Holly tree, and a 
large Willow. Just to the west is a row of large Red Alders. The catbirds are 
mostly seen in the Holly and Willow, and seen disappearing into the lower 
shrubbery. Occasionally one is seen foraging in the Twinberry. They do not seem 
to use the alders much. It would be possible to leave the trail and wade into 
the thicket, but very difficult and bloody, and I believe I would be able to 
see signs (broken or cut vegetation) if anyone tried. Or, someone could climb 
down off the footbridge and wade through the intertidal high marsh toward the 
Holly tree. I suspect if someone did so, the birds would just move a short 
distance back into the tangle ad go about their business. All of the viewing I 
know about has come from the trail (west end of Nature Trail, the footbridge, 
the road near the HMSC back gate, or a brushy area across the road. The nature 
trail and the foot bridge offer the best views, but few birders would be 
tempted to leave them for closer approach. 


3. The trail is heavily used by birders, joggers, walkers, and occasionally 
bikers, and the whole community of birds in that tangle seems to be very 
acclimated to the presence of people on the trail. 


4. Early on, some birders used song recordings on their phones to pull in the 
male. At the time he was thought to be alone. He responded, but it appears this 
did not reach a level of interfering with nesting. At this point in the cycle I 
doubt they would respond much. 


Wayne

On Sun, Jul 27, 2014 at 4:36 PM, Joel Geier  wrote:

Hi all,



Good work by the birders this morning who confirmed nesting and with the

observation of at least one fledgling being attended by an adult, by the

Gray Catbird pair at Hatfield Marine Science Center.



At the risk of being called a "scold" I'll stick my neck out now with a

reminder that this now clearly fits into the category of "locally rare

nesting species" as discussed on the American Birding Association's

ethics page:

http://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html

Since this is a very heavily birded location, I hope that birders can

give these birds plenty of room and resist the urge to do anything more

than observe them from a respectful distance along the trail.



I am not suggesting that anyone has done anything otherwise, up until

now. However, this first breeding record for the Oregon Coast has

created a lot of attention and a lot of birders are likely to be

curious. This is a somewhat unusual situation where a first breeding

record is in a very easily accessed location. In particular, it could be

tempting to "add more documentation" to the record books.



On the bright side, it helps that catbirds are secretive birds that

spend most of their time inside dense tangles. That probably helped them

in dealing with the amount of human traffic at this location (I've seen

them using some similar situations farther east, even along one

heavily-used jogging trail in the greater Washington D.C. area).



Someone no doubt will point out that the presence of a fledgling

indicates "successful" nesting despite lots of attention from birders.

However, one fledgling is on the low end for a species that normally has

broods of 3 or 4. At any rate, this stage -- when the fledgling has just

left the nest and is still being fed by a parent -- is still a very

sensitive stage.



Good birding,

Joel



--

Joel Geier

Camp Adair area north of Corvallis











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Subject: Re: Nesting catbirds at HMSC
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 17:11:55 -0700
Hi, Joel -

Some good points.

I do not know if you have come over to see the catbird(s), but I would like
to make a few comments about the location and the situation:

1..We have documented one fledgling.  There easily could be more.  No more
than one at a time was seen, but the way these birds are behaving, that
does not mean much.

2.  The specifics of the location reduce the opportunities for excessive
disturbance.  The core area where they are, is a very dense tangle of
 Himalayan Blackberry with emergent Twinberry, Red Elderberry, a small
Holly tree, and a large Willow.  Just to the west is a row of large Red
Alders.  The catbirds are mostly seen in the Holly and Willow, and seen
disappearing into the lower shrubbery.  Occasionally one is seen foraging
in the Twinberry.  They do not seem to use the alders much.  It would be
possible to leave the trail and wade into the thicket, but very difficult
and bloody, and I believe I would be able to see signs (broken or cut
vegetation) if anyone tried.   Or, someone could climb down off the
footbridge and wade through the intertidal high marsh toward the Holly
tree.  I suspect if someone did so, the birds would just move a short
distance back into the tangle ad go about their business.  All of the
viewing I know about has come from the trail (west end of Nature Trail, the
footbridge, the road near the HMSC back gate, or a brushy area across the
road.  The nature trail and the foot bridge offer the best views, but few
birders would be tempted to leave them for closer approach.

3.  The trail is heavily used by birders, joggers, walkers, and
occasionally bikers, and the whole community of birds in that tangle seems
to be very acclimated to the presence of people on the trail.

4.   Early on, some birders used song recordings on their phones to pull in
the male.  At the time he was thought to be alone.  He responded, but it
appears this did not reach a level of interfering with nesting.  At this
point in the cycle I doubt they would respond much.

Wayne


On Sun, Jul 27, 2014 at 4:36 PM, Joel Geier  wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> Good work by the birders this morning who confirmed nesting and with the
> observation of at least one fledgling being attended by an adult, by the
> Gray Catbird pair at Hatfield Marine Science Center.
>
> At the risk of being called a "scold" I'll stick my neck out now with a
> reminder that this now clearly fits into the category of "locally rare
> nesting species" as discussed on the American Birding Association's
> ethics page:
> http://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html
> Since this is a very heavily birded location, I hope that birders can
> give these birds plenty of room and resist the urge to do anything more
> than observe them from a respectful distance along the trail.
>
> I am not suggesting that anyone has done anything otherwise, up until
> now. However, this first breeding record for the Oregon Coast has
> created a lot of attention and a lot of birders are likely to be
> curious. This is a somewhat unusual situation where a first breeding
> record is in a very easily accessed location. In particular, it could be
> tempting to "add more documentation" to the record books.
>
> On the bright side, it helps that catbirds are secretive birds that
> spend most of their time inside dense tangles. That probably helped them
> in dealing with the amount of human traffic at this location (I've seen
> them using some similar situations farther east, even along one
> heavily-used jogging trail in the greater Washington D.C. area).
>
> Someone no doubt will point out that the presence of a fledgling
> indicates "successful" nesting despite lots of attention from birders.
> However, one fledgling is on the low end for a species that normally has
> broods of 3 or 4. At any rate, this stage -- when the fledgling has just
> left the nest and is still being fed by a parent -- is still a very
> sensitive stage.
>
> Good birding,
> Joel
>
> --
> Joel Geier
> Camp Adair area north of Corvallis
>
>
>
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Nesting catbirds at HMSC
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 16:36:15 -0700
Hi all,

Good work by the birders this morning who confirmed nesting and with the
observation of at least one fledgling being attended by an adult, by the
Gray Catbird pair at Hatfield Marine Science Center.

At the risk of being called a "scold" I'll stick my neck out now with a
reminder that this now clearly fits into the category of "locally rare
nesting species" as discussed on the American Birding Association's
ethics page:
http://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html
Since this is a very heavily birded location, I hope that birders can
give these birds plenty of room and resist the urge to do anything more
than observe them from a respectful distance along the trail.

I am not suggesting that anyone has done anything otherwise, up until
now. However, this first breeding record for the Oregon Coast has
created a lot of attention and a lot of birders are likely to be
curious. This is a somewhat unusual situation where a first breeding
record is in a very easily accessed location. In particular, it could be
tempting to "add more documentation" to the record books.

On the bright side, it helps that catbirds are secretive birds that
spend most of their time inside dense tangles. That probably helped them
in dealing with the amount of human traffic at this location (I've seen
them using some similar situations farther east, even along one
heavily-used jogging trail in the greater Washington D.C. area).

Someone no doubt will point out that the presence of a fledgling
indicates "successful" nesting despite lots of attention from birders.
However, one fledgling is on the low end for a species that normally has
broods of 3 or 4. At any rate, this stage -- when the fledgling has just
left the nest and is still being fed by a parent -- is still a very
sensitive stage.

Good birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis





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Subject: aging catbirds
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 16:21:21 -0700
According to Pyle:

"Juv (Jun-Aug) has upperparts with a brownish wash, undertail coverts 
pale rufous to grayish and loosely textured, IRIS GRAY to GRAY BROWN, 
mouth lining extensively whitish, and tongue yellowish."

Feather colors fade and "loosely textured" is also a condition in birds
beginning their pre-basic molt (I've learned this from years of aging
Song Sparrows).  The iris color is the least subjective character in
aging catbirds and one that one should be able to suss out in the field
with close observation.

The berry-eating bird in one of the photos I took appears to show
a gray iris contrasting with the black of the pupil.  This does not
show definitively in the Kissinger photos, though "cat5" might be
coxable in the original with a bit of brightness/contrast adjustment.


http://kiawahislandbanding.blogspot.com/2013/10/the-fine-points-of-aging-gray-catbirds.html 


https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/nabb/v015n02/p0045-p0052.pdf

Bushes full of catbirds...

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: Catbird Nesting
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 15:38:06 -0700
Hi -

I was at HMSC this morning (July 27) with Chuck Philo when Marlowe
Kissinger arrived.  I have just finished looking at photos I took this
morning, and have a few that show an adult sitting near a fledgling.  The
fledgling still has some fleshiness to its gape, and in direct comparison,
its tail is not as long as the adult's.

I may have  photos of two (both?) adults, as there seem to be some minor
plumage differences.  When we arrived this morning, the birds were fairly
wet, presumably from moving through dew-drenched shrubbery.

Other notes:

Wilson's Warblers seem to be moving today.  At least one was at the catbird
place, and I saw another in a willow in the quarry at Yaquina Head.  The
latter is not nesting habitat.

A few Ring-billed Gull juvs. have shown up this weekend with the thousands
of California Gulls.

Mammal note:

Friday afternoon an Elephant Seal pup was found on the Quarry Cove beach at
Yaquina Head, and was still there yesterday morning.  It is tagged, and
staff got a number off the tag, so I imagine we will find out where it is
from.  It was pretty weak and bleeding a bit from its mouth, so I doubt it
will survive.

Wayne
Subject: [Fwd: [birding] Audubon Print Exhibit, Lectures & Programs Upcoming in Salem]
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 14:03:23 -0700
-------- Forwarded Message --------
From: Jon Hazen 
To: MIDVALLEYBIRDING 
Subject: [birding] Audubon Print Exhibit, Lectures & Programs Upcoming
in Salem
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 12:15:24 -0700


As reported Sunday (today), in the Statesman Journal, Hallie Ford Museum of
Art in Salem (State Street across from Willson Park - State & Cottage NE) &
the Capitol) will be showing 30 prints from John James Audubon’s “Royal
Octavo Edition” on loan from Western Oregon University archives.



Companion programs include William Sounder, author of Pulitzer
Prize-nominated “Under a Wild Sky: John James Audubon and the Making of
“The Birds of American”.  Mr. Sounder will present an illustrated lecture
at 5 PM September 21st at Paulus Lecture Hall at Hallie Ford Museum of Art.



The PBS documentary “Drawn from Nature” about Audubon’s life will be 
shown 

at 7:30 PM on September 23rd, and on October 21st in the Roger Hull Lecture
Hall at Hallie Ford Museum of Art.



Admission to the lectures and films is no charge.  Museum admission is $6
general, $4 seniors, $3 for students and educators, and no charge for those
17 years or younger.  The museum has free admission on Tuesdays.



More information from Hallie Ford Museum: 503-370-6855.



It sounds like an exciting lineup of programs and exhibits.



Joel—will you cross post this to OBOL & the Mid Valley Nature List, please?
I don’t subscribe but I think some of their readers may appreciate the
notice.  Thanks.



Jon Hazen

NE Salem
_______________________________________________
birding mailing list
birding AT midvalleybirding.org
http://midvalleybirding.org/mailman/listinfo/birding

Subject: Re: Gray Catbird
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 20:51:00 +0000
Greetings All,

Larry McQueen is absolutely correct about the one catbird in Newport being a 
juvenile. Birds of North America Online describes the undertail coverts of 
juveniles as being buffy to pale rufous (clearly the case with one of the two 
birds in Marlowe Kissinger's photos), whereas after hatch-year birds have 
chestnut undertail coverts. I agree that the shape of the tips of the tail 
feathers (tapered and pointed) is also a good age indicator, along with the 
pale pink at the gape. 


It seems that there can be little doubt that Gray Catbirds nested behind the 
Hatfield Marine Science Center, providing the first breeding record for the 
Oregon Coast and, unless I've missed something, the first breeding record west 
of the Cascades. Great work by all who have been keeping track of these birds 
and taking the photos that have documented this exciting discovery. 


Dave Irons
Portland, OR 



Subject: [obol] Re: Gray Catbird
From: larmcqueen AT msn.com
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 10:22:43 -0700
CC: obol AT freelists.org
To: rosebudgurl AT msn.com

Marlowe and everyone,
Has anyone noticed, or did I miss-read something? The first catbird looks like 
a juvenile to me: the rather loose, attenuated feathering and pink soft tissue 
at the mouth. And, the position of the adult by the bird looks like it is being 
fed. Compare also, the color of the undertail coverts in both birds, which is 
rather dull in the young one. Compare also, the rather juvy-like (unformed) 
feathers in these coverts with the sleek, bright feathering of the adult. It 
looks as if there are at least 3 catbirds. 

If this is correct, a record is set. 
Larry

On Jul 27, 2014, at 9:42 AM, Marlowe Kissinger  
wrote:Thank you all for your help. When I got to the area you all pointed out 
Wayne Hoffman was there and helped me find the birds. 

Saw both Catbirds.

             Thank you again, Made my day

             Marlowe

Forgot how to add Pictures so hope I do this right


http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/cat5_zps965bd804.jpg?t=1406392662 




http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/cats3_zpsfc4821fa.jpg?t=1406392624 



http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/cats2_zps155252be.jpg?t=1406392581 

 		 	   		  
Subject: STILT SANDPIPER - Baskett slough NWR
From: Erik Knight <erikknight05 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 13:10:21 -0700
OBOLers,

There is currently a STILT SANDPIPER on the North side of the Narrows at
Baskett Slough NWR.

______________
Erik Knight
Portland, OR
Subject: Catbird Reports at HMSC (Jun 18-11 AM July 27) that Include Photos, Links to Photos, Vocalization Comments
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 13:07:27 -0700
Hi,

Because of the mystery of the 1 and now 2 Gray Catbird situation at
the OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) and the possibility of
nesting, it might be interesting to look at a compilation of links to
photos and notes about singing or vocalizing to try to piece things
together.

Chuck Philo first found a catbird at the HMSC on June 18 and Mike
Patterson first found 2 there on July 26.

Below, in chronological sequence for the HMSC catbird situation are:
1)  excerpts only from those OBOL postings that included links to
photos, gave long details of plumage, or mentioned whether a catbird
was singing or vocal.  All OBOL postings are available through OBOL
archives at http://www.freelists.org/archive/obol

2)  comments about a catbird sighting at the HMSC in eBird reports
that were available as of 11 AM on July 27 that included photos or had
links to photos, gave long details of plumage, or mentioned whether a
catbird was singing or vocal.  This morning there were 25 eBird
reports that have been processed and available for catbird sightings.
Below are only those eBird reports that I found that included photos,
gave long details of plumage, or mentioned whether a catbird was
singing or vocal.  For all eBird reports of 1-2 Gray Catbirds at the
HMSC, go to http://bit.ly/WZOOpS  Then zoom in all the way while
dragging the map each time so that the HMSC is centered on screen.
Then click the 1 blue icon in Newport (the icon is in Newport but the
catbird observation was at the HMSC), and the 3 red icons in the HMSC
area to see the 25 individual reports.  I shortened the URL because
the full eBird URL is very long and could be disjointed and unusable
in some email readers.

Cornell's All about Birds has general information about catbird
nesting that may be helpful or relevant at
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/gray_catbird/lifehistory   Perhaps
others can look at the HMSC photos and chronological vocalization
notes and figure out the situation with the catbirds at the HMSC.

It's interesting!

Range Bayer, Newport

*** Chronological Sequence of HMSC Catbird during June 18-July 27 (11
AM) [My limited comments are in brackets.] ***
=========================
From: Harris, Dawn 
Date: Wed, Jun 18, 2014 at 9:58 AM
Subject: [obol] Photos of Gray Catbird
To: OBOL 

Roy Lowe snapped some images of the Gray Catbird first found by Chuck
Philo this morning.  They can be seen at

https://www.flickr.com/photos/24707703 AT N06/sets/72157645187050716/

Dawn Harris

=====================
June 19.  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18846250 by
Molly Sultany.  "Gray Catbird.  Observed in willows near wooden
bridge."  [Includes good photo.]

================================
From: Range Bayer 
Date: Fri, Jun 20, 2014 at 9:02 AM
Subject: Fwd: [obol] Gray Catbird in Lincoln Co. at the HMSC Nature Trail--Yes
To: Oregon Birders OnLine , "Lincoln Co. Birding &
Nature Observing" 

This morning (June 20), Chuck Philo saw and heard it at 8:40 AM in the
same general area.

=====================================================
Date: Sun, Jun 22, 2014 at 4:46 PM
Subject: [obol] Re: Lincoln Gray Catbird 6/21
To: sapsuckers AT gmail.com, OBOL-to post 

Jim and I saw it yesterday, 6/21, about 5pm, on our way to do the
Trask Summit BBS.  It sang as well, what a delight!

Karan and Jim Fairchild

From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On
Behalf Of Jamie Simmons
Sent: Saturday, June 21, 2014 8:56 PM
To: OBOL-to post
Subject: [obol] Lincoln Gray Catbird 6/21

The Gray Catbird at the Hatfield Marine Science Center trail was
present but not particularly cooperative today between 10 and 11 am.
During that hour I saw it 3 times for about a second or 2 each,
diagnostic views but teasing.  I did hear it singing at least a couple
of times.

==========================
June 22.  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18886867 by
John Allen.  "1 Gray Catbird.  A continuing bird.  Excellent views,
close in, have photos, videos [not included in eBird].  Located in the
trees at the end of the long wooden bridge on the nature trail behind
Hatfield MSC.  Seen by three other local birders."  1 adult male.

=================
June 24.  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18900239 by
William Hemstrom.  "1 Gray Catbird.  Heard calling (not singing) in
bushes behind the ODFW [USFWS] building, as has previously been
reported."

===================
June 24.  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18910631 by Deb
Holland.  "1 Gray Catbird.  Mewing and about 40 seconds of song."

=================
June 25.  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18910891 by Deb
Holland.  "Gray Catbird.  More mewing and a short song."

========================================
From: Diane Pettey 
Date: Thu, Jun 26, 2014 at 6:41 PM
Subject: [obol] Lincoln Co (Yachats) Sightings & (Newport) Gray
Catbird/Western Kingbird - YES
To: OBOL 

Today, I birded Lincoln County's coast.   [clipped]  Later, I met up
with David Smith of Portland and Chuck Philo of Newport.  Chuck got us
incredible views of the Gray Catbird behind the USFWS building.  It
was singing from a holly tree and seemed to have staked out it's
territory.

================================
From: Paul Sullivan 
Date: Fri, Jun 27, 2014 at 9:20 PM
Subject: Gray Catbird at Hatfield Marine Science Center, Newport
To: obol AT freelists.org, range.bayer AT gmail.com
Cc: carolk AT viclink.com

Folks,

Carol & I visited Newport today, 11:30 - 5.  We spent some time
dodging rain.  We concentrated our efforts behind the HMSC, looking
for the Catbird, 2:20 - 4:25 PM.  We never heard it sing.  Carol saw
it first.  I finally saw it in the thick bushes west of the south end
of the boardwalk at the south end of the HMSC trail.  ...

===========================
From: Range Bayer 
Date: Sat, Jul 5, 2014 at 5:03 PM
Subject: Hatfield Marine Science Center Catbird--Yes and Grass Mt.
To: Oregon Birders OnLine , "Lincoln Co. Birding &
Nature Observing" 

Chuck Philo found the Gray Catbird in the same area along the Hatfield
Marine Science Center Nature Trail this morning (7/5).  It is quiet
and not calling for a mate, so patience is required to find it.

================
July 6-16.  No postings to OBOL but it was reported to eBird during
this time, see following entries.  .

=================
July 9.  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19058806 by
Christopher Hinkle, Nels Nelson.  "1 Gray Catbird.  Heard singing at
8:50, eventually seen briefly. Good, extensive views at 10:00."
[Includes 3 good photos.]

=======================
July 12.  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19082005 by
Molly Sultany.  "1 Gray Catbird.  Seen near bridge as previously
reported by several others."

=======================
From:  
Date: Thu, Jul 17, 2014 at 7:15 AM
Subject: [obol] Catbird still present HMSC
To: obol AT freelists.org

I was able to find the GRAY CATBIRD this morning eating twinberries at
the west end of the wetland bridge along the Hatfield Marine Sciences
Trail in Newport.  It also sang a bit, [end of text]

=====================
July 18.  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19136424 by
Brendon Yoder.  "1 Gray Catbird.  Near the south end of the estuary
trail.  Heard the distinctive mewing call in bushes, then got a good
look: solid gray with black cap."

===============================
From: Oscar Harper 
Date: Sat, Jul 19, 2014 at 8:28 PM
Subject: [obol] Newport Catbird continues
To: OBOL 

Hello all,

Hendrik and I made a quick dash to Newport this afternoon to look for
the GRAY CATBIRD.  We weren't disappointed - the bird obligingly
called several times as soon as we walked up to its favorite patch of
bushes, and a few minutes later we were able to watch it as it crept
among the branches, foraging on berries.

=====================
July 19.  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19154531 by
Kelsey O'Sullivan, Lukas Ferrenburg.  "1 Gray Catbird.  Seen on south
end of estuary trail.  Heard 'mewing' call and seen well."

===============================
July 22.  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19186162 by Ken
Chamberlain.  "1 Gray Catbird.  Ongoing rarity. After about 50 min
wait it emerged from twinflower bush to land on a cow parsnip seed
head for about 15 seconds.  I happened to glance that way to notice,
then scoped for several seconds.  Gray bird, black cap, robin sized.
Did not sing or call at that time.  A bit later several mew calls from
thicket.  Located at north end of alders about 75 ft North of
trailhead.  Added info after entering checklist.  On returning to area
I saw the bird several more times.  It was feeding on twinflower
berries then flying north into hooker's will patch just east of the
east - west chain link fence at south entry to HMSC."

=====================================
From: Mike Patterson 
Date: Fri, Jul 25, 2014 at 6:25 PM
Subject: [obol] HMSC Gray CatbirdS
To: OBOL 

I arrived at the Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) Trail at 6:10
this morning, entering from the Oregon Aquarium end of the trail.  A
young man with one of those hipster beards was busily mowing the part
of the trail that is leads to the wetland bridge.  That's also right
next to the favored bush for the GRAY CATBIRD.  I figured I was SOL.
I walked the other parts of the trail in a very grumpy mood.  I
stopped to pish at some chickadees and had gray UFO zip past me.
Almost certainly a catbird, because it disappeared into the shrubbery
never to be noted again.  I figured that was the catbird tick for the
day.

I went to breakfast.

I wasn't going to start my work until around 10:00 so I came back to
the HMSC trail around 07:45.  The catbird was back in its favorite
bush.

Then a second one appeared and then disappeared.

I saw another birder down the trail and I called her to come see the
catbirds.  It turns out that she'd already seen one of them, but being
from Arkansas didn't think much of it.  We chatted for a while.  I
pointed out West Coast Bewick's Wrens and Song Sparrows.  Then the
catbirds started performing.

It is surprisingly difficult to get two catbirds in the same shot.
This is the best I could do.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbalame/14558776530/

=================================
From: Mike Patterson 
Date: Sat, Jul 26, 2014 at 7:52 AM
Subject: [obol] The meaning of two catbirds
To: OBOL , swalalahos 

I consider the low-probability presence of two GRAY CATBIRDS in a single 
bush... 


http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/

============================
From: Lawrence McQueen 
Date: Sun, Jul 27, 2014 at 10:22 AM
Subject: [obol] Re: Gray Catbird
To: rosebudgurl AT msn.com
Cc: obol 

Marlowe and everyone,

Has anyone noticed, or did I miss-read something?  The first catbird
looks like a juvenile to me:  the rather loose, attenuated feathering
and pink soft tissue at the mouth.  And, the position of the adult by
the bird looks like it is being fed.  Compare also, the color of the
undertail coverts in both birds, which is rather dull in the "young"
one.  Compare also, the rather juvy-like (unformed) feathers in these
coverts with the sleek, bright feathering of the adult.  It looks as
if there are at least 3 catbirds.

If this is correct, a record is set.

Larry


On Jul 27, 2014, at 9:42 AM, Marlowe Kissinger  wrote:
Thank you all for your help. When I got to the area you all pointed
out Wayne Hoffman was there and helped me find the birds.  Saw both
Catbirds.

             Thank you again, Made my day

             Marlowe

Forgot how to add Pictures so hope I do this right


http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/cat5_zps965bd804.jpg?t=1406392662 


http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/cats3_zpsfc4821fa.jpg?t=1406392624 


http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/cats2_zps155252be.jpg?t=1406392581 



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Subject: Re: Gray Catbird
From: Lawrence McQueen <larmcqueen AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 10:22:43 -0700
Marlowe and everyone,

Has anyone noticed, or did I miss-read something? The first catbird looks like 
a juvenile to me: the rather loose, attenuated feathering and pink soft tissue 
at the mouth. And, the position of the adult by the bird looks like it is being 
fed. Compare also, the color of the undertail coverts in both birds, which is 
rather dull in the young one. Compare also, the rather juvy-like (unformed) 
feathers in these coverts with the sleek, bright feathering of the adult. It 
looks as if there are at least 3 catbirds. 


If this is correct, a record is set. 

Larry


On Jul 27, 2014, at 9:42 AM, Marlowe Kissinger  wrote:

> Thank you all for your help. When I got to the area you all pointed out Wayne 
Hoffman was there and helped me find the birds. 

> Saw both Catbirds.
> 
>              Thank you again, Made my day
> 
>              Marlowe
> 
> Forgot how to add Pictures so hope I do this right
> 
> 
http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/cat5_zps965bd804.jpg?t=1406392662 

> 
> 
> 
http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/cats3_zpsfc4821fa.jpg?t=1406392624 

> 
> 
http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/cats2_zps155252be.jpg?t=1406392581 

Subject: Gray Catbird
From: Marlowe Kissinger <rosebudgurl AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 09:42:27 -0700
Thank you all for your help. When I got to the area you all pointed out Wayne 
Hoffman was there and helped me find the birds. 

Saw both Catbirds.

             Thank you again, Made my day

             Marlowe

Forgot how to add Pictures so hope I do this right


http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/cat5_zps965bd804.jpg?t=1406392662 




http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/cats3_zpsfc4821fa.jpg?t=1406392624 



http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/cats2_zps155252be.jpg?t=1406392581 



 		 	   		  
Subject: barred owlets - Josephine Co.
From: Romain Cooper <romain AT frontiernet.net>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 07:58:28 -0700
We have seen and/ or heard the 2 Barred Owl fledglings (but not any 
adults) here near our home in the Illinois Valley, Josephine Co. on 
the evenings of 7/23 and 7/29.  They are very vocal with begging 
calls.  We got very good looks at the owlets (7/23) using flashlights 
and binocs and they are "far enough along" feather-wise to discern 
that they are Barred Owls (vertical stripes on their breasts).

Romain Cooper
10398 Takilma Road
Cave Junction, OR 97523
541-592-2311 



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Subject: Seaside to South Jetty Today
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 22:42:44 -0700
Hi:

I looked for shorebirds today in Clatsop County.  Nothing super rare found.
Two Elegant Terns off Parking Lot D, lots of Western peeps and some
Sanderlings on beach and one Black-bellied Plover.

 I am trying my first google picture set of a Ruddy Turnstone at the cove,
hope this works:


https://plus.google.com/photos/117998954337911599230/albums/6040610117787159777

Bob Archer
PDX
Subject: frr Stilt Sand
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 21:27:37 -0700
Eugene birder Jim Buch found a Stilt Sandpiper adult near the Fern Ridge 
platform on Friday. 


Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPhone 




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Subject: Eagle Rock
From: Jack Williamson <jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 21:04:25 -0700
We drove to Eagle Rock in Crook County today to look for the Blue-gray
Gnatcatcher and, powered by the suggestion of someone who knows the area
well, the White-throated Swift. Both showed up (seemingly) on cue.

http://www.jack-n-jill.net/blog/2014/7/eagle-rock---crook-county-oregon


-- 
Jack Williamson
West Linn, Oregon
Subject: Re: More on Coos Bay Merlin 7/26/2014
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 19:19:38 -0700
Hi -

It is always worth while, although often not possible, to try to determine
age and sex of out-of-season birds where immatures and/or the two sexes are
distinguishable.

With a Merlin, if you could have determined back color (bluish back = adult
male. brown = female or immature) you are a step toward answering your
question.  Ad. Females can be distinguished from young birds with
difficulty.

In Peregrines, spring and summer second-year birds can be distinguished
from first-year and from adults by wing molt status.  I have not been able
to find out if this is also the case with Merlins, but I kind of doubt it.

Wayne


On Sat, Jul 26, 2014 at 4:44 PM, Tim Rodenkirk 
wrote:

> I thought the MERLIN I saw on the N. Spit of Coos Bay today was early so I
> checked the Coos records.  It turns out that there are three other July
> records.  In Coos, this species normally disappears in the spring in early
> May, our latest spring record is 1 June 2000 at New River (TR). In the fall
> most migrants do not show up until late August or early September.  Our
> earliest August record is a bird seen out on the North Spit on 6 Aug 2003
> (TR).  The three July records are as follows:
>
> One on the North Spit on 19 July 1998 (D. Lauten).
> One at Bandon Marsh NWR on 24 July 2002 (D. Lauten, K, Castelein).
> And one at the North Spit on 11 July 2008 (TR).
>
> These really early records may well be failed breeders or immature birds
> that never migrate north to their breeding grounds, hard to say?  Anyhow,
> July records anywhere in Oregon are rare. Last I remember there were no
> breeding records in Oregon.
>
>
> Happy birding!
> Tim R
> Coos Bay
>
>
Subject: 31 Photos: Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 19:11:40 -0700
I went out to Baskett Slough NWR several mornings this last week.  Photos
include: American White Pelicans, Black-necked Stilts, Great Egrets,
Wilson's Phalarope Juveniles, Pied-billed Grebe Juveniles and Green Heron.
Click on link below for photos.  Happy Birding Jim Leonard.






https://plus.google.com/photos/108302360004365615395/albums/6040545903659292257?authkey=CO6ty6fvocSr3QE 
Subject: Re: Summer Merlins
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 18:08:30 -0700
Roger,

I think I saw that in BOGR- I guess I should have said confirmed breeding
records.  I can't imagine they would be breeding on the coast or in the
Coast Range (yet?), so a July record here on the coast seems more unusual
than say, in NE Oregon.

Sure would be cool to confirm breeding here in Oregon. Sounds like there
were quite a few records during the BBA project (remember that- old timers)
on the east side though.

Tim


On Sat, Jul 26, 2014 at 5:29 PM, Roger Robb  wrote:

>  Tim, the only summer record of Merlin for me was June 14, 2006, a bird
> observed at Jasper State Park along the Middle Fork of the Willamette
> while birding with Larry McQueen and the Wed group.  After posting the
> sighting Larry and I received an email from mutual friend and falconer,
> Dan Fenske, stating that Merlins had nested just west of the park along
> the river in the late 90’s.  I suspect there’s a good deal of under
> birded territory in Oregon.
>
> Best,
>
> Roger
>
> Springfield, OR
>
Subject: UPDATE ON ASHLAND SCREECH-OWLS
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 18:03:45 -0700
THEY ARE APPARENTLY THRIVING:
http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/07/26/every-day-is-owlsday-round-here/

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Summer Merlins
From: "Roger Robb" <brrobb AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 17:29:45 -0700
Tim, the only summer record of Merlin for me was June 14, 2006, a bird
observed at Jasper State Park along the Middle Fork of the Willamette while
birding with Larry McQueen and the Wed group.  After posting the sighting
Larry and I received an email from mutual friend and falconer, Dan Fenske,
stating that Merlins had nested just west of the park along the river in the
late 90's.  I suspect there's a good deal of under birded territory in
Oregon.

Best,
Roger 
Springfield, OR
Subject: More on Coos Bay Merlin 7/26/2014
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 16:44:16 -0700
I thought the MERLIN I saw on the N. Spit of Coos Bay today was early so I
checked the Coos records.  It turns out that there are three other July
records.  In Coos, this species normally disappears in the spring in early
May, our latest spring record is 1 June 2000 at New River (TR). In the fall
most migrants do not show up until late August or early September.  Our
earliest August record is a bird seen out on the North Spit on 6 Aug 2003
(TR).  The three July records are as follows:

One on the North Spit on 19 July 1998 (D. Lauten).
One at Bandon Marsh NWR on 24 July 2002 (D. Lauten, K, Castelein).
And one at the North Spit on 11 July 2008 (TR).

These really early records may well be failed breeders or immature birds
that never migrate north to their breeding grounds, hard to say?  Anyhow,
July records anywhere in Oregon are rare. Last I remember there were no
breeding records in Oregon.


Happy birding!
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: Newport Or. gray catbird
From: Marlowe Kissinger <rosebudgurl AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 15:37:25 -0700
I am in Newport and would love to find the Gray Catbird. Can anyone give me 
directions on how to find it. I've read it likes a certain plant. Not good on 
my plant ID's. Any help appreciated. 

I'm here till Sunday afternoon. Is there a better time of day to find it. 

            Thanks,  Marlowe
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Martins
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 15:12:18 -0700
That is great I also had one fly over my house yesterday although unlike you 
there are colonies within 6 miles of my place. First for me as well. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 26, 2014, at 13:43, "Bob Burley"  wrote:
> 
> I just had 2 Purple Martin's fly about over the property.In 20 years living 
here I have never seen any. I live in NW Multnomah county at 1100' surrounded 
by commercial forest. Things are on the move. 

> 
> Bob Burley
Subject: Martins
From: Bob Burley <bob AT burleys.org>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 13:43:15 -0700
I just had 2 Purple Martin's fly about over the property.In 20 years living
here I have never seen any. I live in NW Multnomah county at 1100'
surrounded by commercial forest. Things are on the move.

Bob Burley
Subject: Re: mimid slam
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 13:01:17 -0700
Fields and Malheur HQ certainly.

Dave Irons

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 26, 2014, at 12:41 PM, "Darrel Faxon" <5hats AT peak.org> wrote:

> Now that Gray Catbird has been added to the list of mimids seen near the 
Marine Science center (Sage Thrasher, Brown Thrasher, and Northern Mockingbird 
having been seen there previously), I'm curious how many spots in Oregon can 
claim the same list, or match the four mimid total for one location. Fields, 
maybe? 

> And by the way, Mike, great photo of the two catbirds, difficulty 
notwithstanding. Thanks for sharing it. 

>  
> Darrel 


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Subject: Some Coos Birds 7/26/2014
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 12:57:53 -0700
This morning out at the old Weyco pond site on the north spit of Coos Bay I
saw/jumped 5 PECTORAL SANDPIPERS.  I also saw a single juvie WILSON'S
PHALAROPE, likely fledged at the site- no adults around anymore though.
 Duck-wise there are two different broods of CINNAMON TEAL which have been
regular breeders at the site the past 5 yrs. or so.  30+ Gadwall broods,
hard to count as there are so many of them now. Also saw my first MERLIN of
the "fall", it was chasing the Pecs, swallows, and whatever else was in the
vicinity of it as it flew through. Not much else around shorebird-wise as
the site is almost totally overgrown with spike rush and carex now. I did
have fly-over Whimbrel and G. Yellowlegs.

Merry migration!
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: Another Ap
From: BILL ROSIE <watice AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 19:56:38 +0000
One birding ap that is bound to get quite a lot of use is:
 
Idunno...............
 
Once loaded onto your Iphone, and you will see many birds, more of them at a 
distance, that will leave you exclaiming "I dunno" what that one was. 


Bill Tice: Birding - The best excuse for getting outdoors, and avoiding chores.
 		 	   		  
Subject: mimid slam
From: Darrel Faxon <5hats AT peak.org>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 12:41:12 -0700
Now that Gray Catbird has been added to the list of mimids seen near the
Marine Science center (Sage Thrasher, Brown Thrasher, and Northern
Mockingbird having been seen there previously), I'm curious how many spots
in Oregon can claim the same list, or match the four mimid total for one
location. Fields, maybe?
  And by the way, Mike, great photo of the two catbirds, difficulty
notwithstanding. Thanks for sharing it.

Darrel
Subject: Best West Coast Pelagic Field Guides
From: James Billstine <billstinj AT sou.edu>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 10:11:45 -0700
What are the best Field Guides for studying up on pelagic species of birds?
I thought I recalled someone telling me that a previous edition of Nat Geo
was the most accurate, but I don't remember which one.

James
Subject: Shorebirds Ridgefield NWR
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 09:26:32 -0700
This morning at about 0800 hrs.

South Big unit

Least sandpiper  20
Killdeer  20
Greater yellowlegs  14
Pectoral sandpiper  1
Semipalmated plover  2
Long-billed dowitcher  3
Semipalmated sandpiper 1

Also two bank swallows.

Canvasback unit and very hard to see i had three pectoral sandpipers.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my iPad
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Shorebirds Ridgefield NWR
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 09:26:32 -0700
This morning at about 0800 hrs.

South Big unit

Least sandpiper  20
Killdeer  20
Greater yellowlegs  14
Pectoral sandpiper  1
Semipalmated plover  2
Long-billed dowitcher  3
Semipalmated sandpiper 1

Also two bank swallows.

Canvasback unit and very hard to see i had three pectoral sandpipers.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my iPad


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Subject: The meaning of two catbirds
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 07:52:41 -0700
I consider the low-probability presence of two GRAY CATBIRDS in
a single bush...

http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: Photos: Pied-billed Grebe Juveniles Baskett Slough NWR
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 07:48:33 -0700
I went out to Baskett Slough NWR yesterday morning and photographed many
birds.  Click on link below for photos of Pied-billed Grebe Juveniles.
Happy Birding, Jim Leonard.






https://plus.google.com/photos/108302360004365615395/albums/6040379292104810977?authkey=CMrXhtqh0Pz6Rw 
Subject: Article: Once-common marine birds disappearing from our coast
From: Lee Cain <lcain AT astoriak12.org>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 07:02:27 -0700
Don't be too misled by the recently viral video of the anchovy school with
snorkelers in southern California:


http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2024155783_birddeclinesxml.html?syndication=rss 



-- 
Lee Cain
Astoria
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 06:19:55 -0700
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: July 26, 2014 6:07:52 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Redhead (1 Benton)
Wild Turkey (1 Sherman)
Horned Grebe (1 Deschutes)
Pectoral Sandpiper (1 Deschutes)
Black-chinned Hummingbird (2 Crook)
Bank Swallow (1 Lane)
Gray Catbird (2 Lincoln)
Tricolored Blackbird (2 Linn)

---------------------------------------------
The report below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on 
the web at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Subject: birding apps
From: "Bruce & Katie Dugger" <tinamou AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 22:37:17 -0700
Joel forgot my favorite: iPuke

This is by far the best app I've found for pelagic birding.  The screen
creates a swell that is slightly out of sync with the prevailing conditions.
This is guaranteed to make you feel ill, which invariably leads to others
seeing great birds while you recover on the boat deck.

Here's to dreaming of an el Nino induced rarity off shore this fall!
Bruce 



Msg: #4 in digest
Subject: [obol] Re: birding apps
From: Joel Geier 
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:59:39 -0700

Not sure if I've mentioned these before, but these are the three mobile
phone applications that I've found most useful:

1) iShade : When dealing with bright sun, hold the phone over your eyebrows
for a better look at the bird.

You can also try this to shade your binoculars. Unfortunately some of the
newer phones (though thankfully not iPads yet) have gotten so small that
they no longer work for standard-sized bins. A hopeful development is that
some manufacturers have begun marketing "large-print" phones for members of
the Baby Boom generation.

2) iBall : Cover one eyeball with your phone, while you watch the bird with
the other eyeball. This gives you a 2-D view of the bird astonishingly
similar to what you'll find on most birding websites. 

3-D views just bring in unnecessary complications, such as a sense of scale
which will only make it more difficult to turn that next Pectoral Sandpiper
into a stint.

3) iPayAttention : This is the simplest app to use. After you download the
app, just put the phone in your pocket, and your rate of birdfinding will
increase by up to a factor of three. The developer's advert claims that this
app also leads to seven times more keen observations of bird behavior,
though how they quantify "keenness" is anyone's guess.

Happy birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Still happily birding in the paleodigital age Camp Adair area north of
Corvallis




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Subject: HMSC Gray CatbirdS
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 18:25:09 -0700
I arrived at the Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) Trail at
6:10 this morning, entering from the Oregon Aquarium end of the
trail.  A young man with one of those hipster beards was busily
mowing the part of the trail that is leads to the wetland bridge.
That's also right next to the favored bush for the GRAY CATBIRD.
I figured I was SOL.  I walked the other parts of the trail in a
very grumpy mood.  I stopped to pish at some chickadees and had
gray UFO zip past me.  Almost certainly a catbird, because it
disappeared into the shrubbery never to be noted again.  I figured that
was the catbird tick for the day.

I went to breakfast.

I wasn't going to start my work until around 10:00 so I came back to the
HMSC trail around 07:45.  The catbird was back in its favorite bush.

Then a second one appeared and then disappeared.

I saw another birder down the trail and I called her to come see the
catbirds.  It turns out that she'd already seen one of them, but being
from Arkansas didn't think much of it.  We chatted for a while.  I
pointed out West Coast Bewick's Wrens and Song Sparrows.  Then the
catbirds started performing.

It is surprisingly difficult to get two catbirds in the same shot.  This
is the best I could do.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbalame/14558776530/

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: Nehalem Sewage Ponds: Pectoral Sanpipers continue..
From: David Bailey <davidcbaileyoregon AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 17:53:25 -0700
25 July 2014
Nehalem Sewage Treatment Ponds
Tillamook County, Oregon

High tide--ish (near slack) 3pm

I checked the ponds this morning and found only a single PECTORAL SANDPIPER
on the N. water's-edge of the NE pond. I came back this afternoon around
high tide and found three PECTORAL SANDPIPERS, and single LEAST and SPOTTED
SANPIPER. No other migrant shorebirds were showing. The PECTORALS all
appeared to be after hatch year birds (not juveniles). I made a preliminary
identification of 2 adults and one 2nd-year bird, but I want to review my
photos to be more certain. The 2nd-year bird had a retained juvenile rufous
scapular that stood out on its upperparts, and very worn coverts. It was a
bit smaller and had a slightly higher pitched call than the two other
Pectorals which appeared to be males from their larger size and heavier
(darker) breast ("pectoral") markings. I decided that the 2nd-year bird
must be a female.

Incidentally, none of these Pec's looked anything like the small Calidrid I
reported on as a possible Long-toed Stint the other day. The facial
markings of the crown and supercillium were much to streaked with dark, the
bills were too long and thick-base, and the plumage details of the body
were different. The birds were all too big and obviously bigger than peeps.
The adult LEAST SANDPIPER that was there was also a very different
individual than the possible rare I found there the other day. I am stating
this just to help clarify the circumstances. At no time did I think that I
had mis-identified a peep for a Pectoral on Monday. Years ago, Skip Russel
and I were birding the old Wayco ponds on the N. Spit of Coos bay and a
single Pectoral Sandpiper was all alone on the flats at some distance, a
bright juvenal, and we did mistake the id initially as a Least Sandpiper.
It can happen, but once bitten, twice shy as the saying goes, and I don't
believe that was the case with my recent RBA.

David

David C. Bailey
Manzanita, Oregon for the summer
Subject: Re: Jackson Bottom Wetlands
From: Steve Engel <Steve.Engel AT hillsboro-oregon.gov>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 17:00:26 -0700
Shorebird activity observed this morning at the north end of the wetlands:

Killdeer - 4
Spotted Sandpiper - 1
Least Sandpiper - 3
Long-billed Dowitcher - 8
Greater Yellowlegs - 1

The birds were at the west edge of the two large ponds visible to the east of 
the main N-S trail and nearest to the north parking lot trail access. 

Adult bald eagle and one hatch year bird observed perched near each other in 
oak trees on east side of large pond. 

2 Lazuli Bunting singing
2 male Kingfishers
8 Great Blue Heron
3 Great Egret
8 Vaux's Swift 
were some of the other birds observed.

Yesterday one adult osprey was standing on the rim of the nest at south end of 
Pintail pond and one was perched nearby. At least one bird was observed flying 
in the vicinity of the nest this morning. 



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Subject: YOUNG BIRDS, INC ASHLAND SCREECH OWLET
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 15:13:06 -0700
http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/07/25/being-young/

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Re: Seabird in Columbia Gorge
From: "5hats AT peak.org" <5hats@peak.org>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 20:08:31 +0000
Well.... Suzy’s description didn’t sound like it would fit Caspian Tern to 
me..and don’t forget a frigatebird was once seen at Umatilla. 


 

Darrel

Sent from Windows Mail


From: Lars Per Norgren
Sent: ‎July‎ ‎25‎, ‎2014 ‎8‎:‎27‎ ‎AM
To: obol AT freelists.org
Subject: [obol] Seabird in Columbia Gorge


 I vote "Caspian Tern". I saw one at Mosier (from freeway, at freeway speeds) 
two days earlier. Sharper cut to the wing than the Cal Gulls, bigger, streaming 
tail of sorts. Always an inspirational bird. Put it on my life list at Thompson 
Reservoir (Lake County) when I was six years old, 1967. That's some distance 
from the ocean, but very close to Winter Rim. Lars 


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Subject: Re: recommended bird apps
From: Brandon Wagner <bmwboarder AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 10:17:53 -0700
Hey Roger,
The others have some good ideas.  I think I will represent the other side
of the coin though..

iBird Pro: tons of calls/songs and descriptions.
BirdLog North America: To make checklists to submit straight to ebird.
Easier than pen/paper.
BirdsEye: Locate a specific bird, see bar charts, and see rare bird alerts.
Oregon2020: View the Hotspot squares for helping with the Oregon 2020
project.
Master Birder by Larkwire: Bird sounds quiz/game.
Rode Rec: Good recording app - for recording unknown calls and then
puzzling over them later.

Not totally related, but Motion-X GPS:  You can pre-download terrain maps
for areas you wont' have cell service, the gps still works when out of cell
range, giving you a second version of whatever is your primary map. (it
does use up your battery a lot though).

I had other ones similar to iBird Pro (Peterson Birds Field Guide), but I
didn't use it much, and didn't have enough space on my phone for all of
them.

Cheers,
Brandon Wagner
Subject: No More Turkey
From: "L Markoff" <canyoneagle AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 10:03:55 -0700
Hi Obol,

 

I am on the road quite a bit, sometimes for family reasons, other times
because I love exploring.  When I am on the road my husband, Paul, is kind
enough to take charge of putting out chow and water for my birds and
critters.  While I was on the road for several weeks in June moving our
daughter from Austin, TX to Beaverton, OR, Paul discovered a hen Turkey with
8 poults in our yard.  

 

He watched them with growing interest and in short time became quite fond of
them.  One night after I was home again I gave him Turkey for supper.  He
had a hard time eating it.  He didn't like the idea of eating something akin
to his new friends.  So I told him I won't buy any more Turkey.  I asked him
how it was different than eating beef.  He replied that he doesn't have a
cow in his backyard.  

 

I stopped eating meat 8 years ago and am pleased that he doesn't want to eat
Turkey any more.  Hmmmmmm... Maybe I should get a pet cow for the backyard.
It would be worth it if I could get him to stop eating meat!

 

For some photos of Henrietta and her eight kids go here:

 

https://www.flickr.com/gp/canyoneagle/d979M2/

 

Lori Markoff

Eugene

 

 

 
Subject: Re: birding apps
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:38:38 -0700
I am downloading all of those. Great stuff.

The iPad is another good one. I keep phone in my hip pocket for safety when I 
slip on gravel coming down mountain trails. 


Bob Archer



> On Jul 25, 2014, at 10:28 AM, "Tom Crabtree"  wrote:
> 
> Those are good ones, to be sure, Joel. My favorite app, is an oldie, and they 
sure don't make 'em like they used to. It was iRack (sometimes with a "Q") but 
it is so unstable with these new OS's that you can't use it reliably any more. 

> 
> Tom Crabtree, Bend
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf 
Of Joel Geier 

> Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 8:00 AM
> To: Oregon Birders OnLine
> Subject: [obol] Re: birding apps
> 
> Not sure if I've mentioned these before, but these are the three mobile phone 
applications that I've found most useful: 

> 
> 1) iShade : When dealing with bright sun, hold the phone over your eyebrows 
for a better look at the bird. 

> 
> You can also try this to shade your binoculars. Unfortunately some of the 
newer phones (though thankfully not iPads yet) have gotten so small that they 
no longer work for standard-sized bins. A hopeful development is that some 
manufacturers have begun marketing "large-print" phones for members of the Baby 
Boom generation. 

> 
> 2) iBall : Cover one eyeball with your phone, while you watch the bird with 
the other eyeball. This gives you a 2-D view of the bird astonishingly similar 
to what you'll find on most birding websites. 

> 
> 3-D views just bring in unnecessary complications, such as a sense of scale 
which will only make it more difficult to turn that next Pectoral Sandpiper 
into a stint. 

> 
> 3) iPayAttention : This is the simplest app to use. After you download the 
app, just put the phone in your pocket, and your rate of birdfinding will 
increase by up to a factor of three. The developer's advert claims that this 
app also leads to seven times more keen observations of bird behavior, though 
how they quantify "keenness" is anyone's guess. 

> 
> Happy birding,
> Joel
> 
> --
> Joel Geier
> Still happily birding in the paleodigital age Camp Adair area north of 
Corvallis 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol Manage your account or 
unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol 

> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 


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Subject: Re: Fwd: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:32:22 -0800
Suzy,

 

You are right it is best to report on possibilities. I don’t think most or 
even many people assumed you were texting while driving any more than we assume 
that every message on OBOL is composed in that fashion. You were the 
unfortunate victim of someone who jumped to an erroneous conclusion. Keep the 
reports coming and go catch up on your sleep. 


 

Tom

 

From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Alan Contreras 

Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 7:26 AM
To: suzantmurphy AT msn.com
Cc: OBOL
Subject: [obol] Re: Fwd: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River

 

Good job. It is always better to report a "maybe" so others can check it out. 
somehow I doubted that you were steering with your toes. 


Alan Contreras

Eugene, Oregon

 

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

 

Sent from my iPhone 





 


On Jul 25, 2014, at 8:13 AM, "Susan T. Murphy"  wrote:

late posting: 
Subject: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River

 

Yesterday around 10.30 am what looked me as a seabird flew in front of my 
vehicle on I84W at close range from the mouth of the Deschutes towards the 
Columbia River. It was a white bird with long narrow pointed wings that had a 
band of sharply contrasting black that seemed to go the length of the wing. My 
look was very brief as driving, but my attention was drawn to the long white 
streaming tail feathers, i would estimate several inches long. Now that i am 
home, it looks to me a possible Red-billed tropic bird. Don't know if one ever 
seen this far north or this far inland. It struck me as very unusual and in the 
obol spirit of making information available, i had my passenger send notice to 
someone who could get the word out. I am not a nut, altho i did make a joke 
about hallucinating after several days of driving. 

I have seen tropicbirds before, but in recent years, and the possibility was 
not on my radar with the initial report. I didnt think it was required to be 
certain of a sighting to report the possibility. I didn't think i had to 
explain who was sending notice for me either, but am doing so to clarify my 
sighting details and to end any questions about my driving safety. If anyone in 
the area, they may want to keep an eye out for this bird. suzy 




Subject: Re: birding apps
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:28:23 -0800
Those are good ones, to be sure, Joel. My favorite app, is an oldie, and they 
sure don't make 'em like they used to. It was iRack (sometimes with a "Q") but 
it is so unstable with these new OS's that you can't use it reliably any more. 


Tom Crabtree, Bend

-----Original Message-----
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Joel Geier 

Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 8:00 AM
To: Oregon Birders OnLine
Subject: [obol] Re: birding apps

Not sure if I've mentioned these before, but these are the three mobile phone 
applications that I've found most useful: 


1) iShade : When dealing with bright sun, hold the phone over your eyebrows for 
a better look at the bird. 


You can also try this to shade your binoculars. Unfortunately some of the newer 
phones (though thankfully not iPads yet) have gotten so small that they no 
longer work for standard-sized bins. A hopeful development is that some 
manufacturers have begun marketing "large-print" phones for members of the Baby 
Boom generation. 


2) iBall : Cover one eyeball with your phone, while you watch the bird with the 
other eyeball. This gives you a 2-D view of the bird astonishingly similar to 
what you'll find on most birding websites. 


3-D views just bring in unnecessary complications, such as a sense of scale 
which will only make it more difficult to turn that next Pectoral Sandpiper 
into a stint. 


3) iPayAttention : This is the simplest app to use. After you download the app, 
just put the phone in your pocket, and your rate of birdfinding will increase 
by up to a factor of three. The developer's advert claims that this app also 
leads to seven times more keen observations of bird behavior, though how they 
quantify "keenness" is anyone's guess. 


Happy birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Still happily birding in the paleodigital age Camp Adair area north of 
Corvallis 





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Subject: Re: Bend to Malheur
From: Jack Williamson <jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:21:33 -0700
Compliments of East Cascades Audubon Society and Harneybirder.com

http://birdingoregon.info/Home/HarneyCounty/tabid/189/Default.aspx


On Fri, Jul 25, 2014 at 9:10 AM, Colleen McDaniel <
colleen.mcdaniel79 AT gmail.com> wrote:

> I'm heading down to Bend from Portland for the first time this Sunday and
> then down to Malheur on Monday for work.
>
> Could I get some suggestions on places to go for birding? Any
> advice/suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
>
> Bird on!
> Colleen McDaniel
>
>
>


-- 
Jack Williamson
West Linn, Oregon
Subject: Bend to Malheur
From: Colleen McDaniel <colleen.mcdaniel79 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:10:20 -0700
I'm heading down to Bend from Portland for the first time this Sunday and
then down to Malheur on Monday for work.

Could I get some suggestions on places to go for birding? Any
advice/suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

Bird on!
Colleen McDaniel
Subject: Make that TWO catbirds at HMSC
From: "Harris, Dawn" <dawn_harris AT fws.gov>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:01:52 -0700
Mike Patterson just dropped into my office to share some news: he was
watching the gray catbird this morning along the HMSC nature trail when,
much to his surprise, two catbirds appeared near the twinberry bush at the
end of the bridge.  Another birder from Arkansas was present to see the two
catbirds.  Mike believes he has a photo showing both at the same time and
will share later.


Dawn Harris
Visitor Services Manager

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex
2127 SE Marine Science Drive
Newport OR 97365
541-867-4550

www.facebook.com/usfwsoregoncoast
Subject: Re: birding apps
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:59:39 -0700
Not sure if I've mentioned these before, but these are the three mobile
phone applications that I've found most useful:

1) iShade : When dealing with bright sun, hold the phone over your
eyebrows for a better look at the bird.

You can also try this to shade your binoculars. Unfortunately some of
the newer phones (though thankfully not iPads yet) have gotten so small
that they no longer work for standard-sized bins. A hopeful development
is that some manufacturers have begun marketing "large-print" phones for
members of the Baby Boom generation.

2) iBall : Cover one eyeball with your phone, while you watch the bird
with the other eyeball. This gives you a 2-D view of the bird
astonishingly similar to what you'll find on most birding websites. 

3-D views just bring in unnecessary complications, such as a sense of
scale which will only make it more difficult to turn that next Pectoral
Sandpiper into a stint.

3) iPayAttention : This is the simplest app to use. After you download
the app, just put the phone in your pocket, and your rate of birdfinding
will increase by up to a factor of three. The developer's advert claims
that this app also leads to seven times more keen observations of bird
behavior, though how they quantify "keenness" is anyone's guess.

Happy birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Still happily birding in the paleodigital age
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




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Subject: Seabird in Columbia Gorge
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:27:03 -0700
 I vote "Caspian Tern". I saw one at Mosier (from freeway, at freeway speeds) 
two days earlier. Sharper cut to the wing than the Cal Gulls, bigger, streaming 
tail of sorts. Always an inspirational bird. Put it on my life list at Thompson 
Reservoir (Lake County) when I was six years old, 1967. That's some distance 
from the ocean, but very close to Winter Rim. Lars 


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Subject: Re: Fwd: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:26:27 -0700
Good job. It is always better to report a "maybe" so others can check it out. 
somehow I doubted that you were steering with your toes. 


Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPhone 



> On Jul 25, 2014, at 8:13 AM, "Susan T. Murphy"  wrote:
> 
>> late posting: 
>> Subject: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
>>> 
>>> Yesterday around 10.30 am what looked me as a seabird flew in front of my 
vehicle on I84W at close range from the mouth of the Deschutes towards the 
Columbia River. It was a white bird with long narrow pointed wings that had a 
band of sharply contrasting black that seemed to go the length of the wing. My 
look was very brief as driving, but my attention was drawn to the long white 
streaming tail feathers, i would estimate several inches long. Now that i am 
home, it looks to me a possible Red-billed tropic bird. Don't know if one ever 
seen this far north or this far inland. It struck me as very unusual and in the 
obol spirit of making information available, i had my passenger send notice to 
someone who could get the word out. I am not a nut, altho i did make a joke 
about hallucinating after several days of driving. 

>>> I have seen tropicbirds before, but in recent years, and the possibility 
was not on my radar with the initial report. I didnt think it was required to 
be certain of a sighting to report the possibility. I didn't think i had to 
explain who was sending notice for me either, but am doing so to clarify my 
sighting details and to end any questions about my driving safety. If anyone in 
the area, they may want to keep an eye out for this bird. suzy 

>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
Subject: Fwd: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: "Susan T. Murphy" <suzantmurphy AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:13:00 -0700
> late posting: 
> Subject: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
>> 
>> Yesterday around 10.30 am what looked me as a seabird flew in front of my 
vehicle on I84W at close range from the mouth of the Deschutes towards the 
Columbia River. It was a white bird with long narrow pointed wings that had a 
band of sharply contrasting black that seemed to go the length of the wing. My 
look was very brief as driving, but my attention was drawn to the long white 
streaming tail feathers, i would estimate several inches long. Now that i am 
home, it looks to me a possible Red-billed tropic bird. Don't know if one ever 
seen this far north or this far inland. It struck me as very unusual and in the 
obol spirit of making information available, i had my passenger send notice to 
someone who could get the word out. I am not a nut, altho i did make a joke 
about hallucinating after several days of driving. 

>> I have seen tropicbirds before, but in recent years, and the possibility was 
not on my radar with the initial report. I didnt think it was required to be 
certain of a sighting to report the possibility. I didn't think i had to 
explain who was sending notice for me either, but am doing so to clarify my 
sighting details and to end any questions about my driving safety. If anyone in 
the area, they may want to keep an eye out for this bird. suzy 

>> 
>> 
>> 
Subject: Recommended Apps
From: roger freeman <carrotguy55 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 19:47:50 -0700
I'm sure this question has been asked 1000 times, but I would appreciate
some recommendations of favorite birding Apps for iPad/iPhones  that some
of you have used/tried.  I can imagine Sibley, or NatGeo are a couple.
Thanks for the input!
Roger Freeman
Silverton Oregon
Subject: Sauvie Island Yellow-headed Blackbirds
From: Max Smith <oregonmax AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 19:00:45 -0700
While making a brief stop at the Reeder Road observation shelter, I spotted
two unmistakable Yellow-headed Blackbird males perched near a feeder at the
ODFW equipment yard. Apart the active Osprey nest, Rentenaar Road was
pretty quiet.

Max Smith

Portland
Subject: *Re: Re: Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:13:26 -0700
Hi Nels,

Thanks for your message.  Perhaps the texter was riding as a
passenger, but Shawneen wrote " I received several text messages from
Suzy Murphy about a bird seen while driving 65 MPH."

Shawneen later wrote: "She has been driving a long time"

When I am a passenger in a vehicle, I do not say I have been driving
and don't think of myself as driving.  When I talk about others
driving, the only person I refer to as driving is the driver.  Perhaps
others include being a passenger when they use "while driving" or to a
person "has been driving."  You are correct, the text that Shawneen
quotes from the texter does not indicate that the texter texts that
she was driving or was riding.

You are right, I jumped to a conclusion that the texter was driving; I
apologize for not making it clear in my email that it is not clear in
Shawneen's email if the texter was driving or riding, and that
hopefully the texter was riding because there is a safety concern with
texting while driving.

Thanks for your comments.

Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon


On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 2:32 PM, Nels Nelson  wrote:
> Hi RB,
>
> Haven't met you yet and don't mean to pick a fight, but there is ZERO
> evidence in Suzy's
> or Shawneen's emails or texts saying they wrote or sent the texts WHILE
> DRIVING.
> She SAW THE BIRD while driving, as I (and I assume you) and all of us
> birders have
> at one time or another.
>
> I'm with you 100% in your thinking and comments about thoughtless,
> inconsiderate
> and outright DANGEROUS drivers that mess with their electronic gadgets,
> keypads
> and text while driving.  They ought to make the fines high enough that
> drivers
> wouldn't even THINK about writing or sending a text while driving a vehicle.
>
> Jumping to conclusions is another matter.
>
> Happy Birding,
>
> Nels Nelson
> (Hillsboro Birder, retired after 30+ years in law enforcement)
>
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 12:00 PM, Range Bayer  wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> Hmmm, I have almost been hit several times by distracted drivers using
>> electronic devices, and it is illegal now to do so  in Oregon with the
>> exception of police, emergency responders and drivers in emergency
>> situations (http://www.drivinglaws.org/oregon.php).  Texting while
>> driving 65 mph and  pulling a camper...
>>
>> Range Bayer
>>
>> On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 11:27 AM, Shawneen 
>> wrote:
>> > For anyone birding near the Deschutes River.  I received several text
>> > messages from Suzy Murphy about a bird seen while driving 65 MPH.
>> >
>> >
>> > " Just saw at mouth of Deschutes river fly over to the columbia at 65
>> > miles
>> > per hour. What looked like a sea bird. Long thin wings black and white
>> > pattern light underbelly, with longish white streamiing tail feathers.
>> > Can't
>> > stop hauling a camper. If someone close maybe they can check it out.
>> >
>> > Thanks,Suzy Murphy"
>> >
>> >
>> > "It's was the tail feathers. I'm no seabird expert, but those were the
>> > longest streamers I have seen , like LT Jaeger. Got a 2 second look. My
>> > impression was the wings had sharp contrast b/w, much more black, like
>> > whole
>> > trailing edge."
>> >
>> >
>> > She has been driving a long time and NOW, I have been driving for 8 days
>> > and
>> > no references to check at present.
>> >
>> >
>> > lt was flying north across the Columbia River towards Washington.
>> >
>> >
>> > Shawneen Finnegan
>> >
>> >
>> > Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>
>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>
>>
>


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Subject: SAS Keizer Rapids Field Trip Summary
From: Mike Unger <unger730 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:02:01 -0700
Hello Birders:



For today's Salem Audubon birding field trip at Keizer Rapids Park,
Barbara, Carolyn and I were joined by 9 others.  The group survived through
a brief shower or two but the consensus of the group was that it always
rains when Mike leads a walk.  But it was not a wash out by any stretch of
the imagination.  We walked 2 miles through three distinct habitats and
identified (saw or heard) a record 42 birds for Keizer Rapids Park!



After Keizer Rapids Park, six of us went to Country Glen Park in Keizer
which was quite nice even the sun showed through and there was no rain.  We
walked about one mile while identifying 23 species.



Most notable sightings:

·  Two *Sharp-shinned Hawks* in the Gallery Forest at Keizer Rapids;

·  Four *Osprey* over the river;

·  Two *Bald Eagles* flew by us in the north part of Keizer Rapids Park;

·  One *Cooper’s Hawk* at Keizer Rapids;

·  Two *Vaux’s Swifts* over the parking lot at Keizer Rapids just as we
were getting ready to leave;

·  Two *Rufous* and two *Anna’s* Hummingbirds at Country Glen Park.  The
Rufous Hummingbirds were getting nectar from some Hostas;

·  Two *Common Yellowthroats* at Country Glen Park that we got a good look
at.  (One female and a young one).  The female had a quite bright yellow
throat;

·  In general, *Cedar Waxwings* and *American Goldfinches* were the most
prevalent at Country Glen Park but the Western Scrub-Jays were the most
active and noisiest.

A complete list of today's birds follows.


*Our next SAS field trip will be at Minto-Brown Island Park on Wednesday,
August 6th at 7:30 a.m.*   Join us if you can.


Mike Unger

Keizer, OR

-------------------------------------------------------------------


*Checklist Summary for July 24, 2014 *
Number of Checklists: 2
Number of Species: 49

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): Keizer Rapids Park  AT  7:20 AM
(2): Country Glen Park  AT  11:10 AM



34 Canada Goose -- (1)
10 Mallard -- (1)
1 California Quail -- (1)
4 Great Blue Heron -- (1)
6 Turkey Vulture -- (1),(2)
4 Osprey -- (1)
2 Sharp-shinned Hawk -- (1)
1 Cooper's Hawk -- (1)
2 Bald Eagle -- (1)
3 Red-tailed Hawk -- (1)
1 Spotted Sandpiper -- (1)
10 Mourning Dove -- (1),(2)
2 Vaux's Swift -- (1)
2 Anna's Hummingbird -- (2)
2 Rufous Hummingbird -- (2)
2 Belted Kingfisher -- (1)
4 Downy Woodpecker -- (1),(2)
1 Northern Flicker -- (1)
1 Northern Flicker (Red-shafted) -- (2)
8 Western Wood-Pewee -- (1),(2)
3 Steller's Jay -- (1)
3 Western Scrub-Jay -- (1)
21 Western Scrub-Jay (Coastal) -- (1),(2)
2 American Crow -- (1)
8 Violet-green Swallow -- (1)
6 Barn Swallow -- (1),(2)
1 Cliff Swallow -- (1)
40 swallow sp. -- (1)
22 Black-capped Chickadee -- (1),(2)
41 Bushtit -- (1)
1 Red-breasted Nuthatch -- (1)
1 White-breasted Nuthatch -- (1)
1 Brown Creeper -- (1)
3 Bewick's Wren -- (1),(2)
3 Swainson's Thrush -- (1),(2)
12 American Robin -- (1),(2)
2 European Starling -- (2)
41 Cedar Waxwing -- (1),(2)
3 Common Yellowthroat -- (1),(2)
1 Yellow Warbler -- (1)
16 Spotted Towhee -- (1),(2)
18 Song Sparrow -- (1),(2)
4 White-crowned Sparrow -- (1)
2 Black-headed Grosbeak -- (2)
2 Brewer's Blackbird -- (2)
14 House Finch -- (1),(2)
1 Purple Finch -- (1)
39 American Goldfinch -- (1),(2)
15 House Sparrow -- (2)
Subject: Re: Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: Nels Nelson <nelsnelson7 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:32:01 -0700
Hi RB,

Haven't met you yet and don't mean to pick a fight, but there is ZERO
evidence in Suzy's
or Shawneen's emails or texts saying they wrote or sent the texts WHILE
DRIVING.
She SAW THE BIRD while driving, as I (and I assume you) and all of us
birders have
at one time or another.

I'm with you 100% in your thinking and comments about
thoughtless, inconsiderate
and outright DANGEROUS drivers that mess with their electronic gadgets,
keypads
and text while driving.  They ought to make the fines high enough that
drivers
wouldn't even THINK about writing or sending a text while driving a vehicle.

Jumping to conclusions is another matter.

Happy Birding,

Nels Nelson
(Hillsboro Birder, retired after 30+ years in law enforcement)





On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 12:00 PM, Range Bayer  wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Hmmm, I have almost been hit several times by distracted drivers using
> electronic devices, and it is illegal now to do so  in Oregon with the
> exception of police, emergency responders and drivers in emergency
> situations (http://www.drivinglaws.org/oregon.php).  Texting while
> driving 65 mph and  pulling a camper...
>
> Range Bayer
>
> On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 11:27 AM, Shawneen 
> wrote:
> > For anyone birding near the Deschutes River.  I received several text
> > messages from Suzy Murphy about a bird seen while driving 65 MPH.
> >
> >
> > " Just saw at mouth of Deschutes river fly over to the columbia at 65
> miles
> > per hour. What looked like a sea bird. Long thin wings black and white
> > pattern light underbelly, with longish white streamiing tail feathers.
> Can't
> > stop hauling a camper. If someone close maybe they can check it out.
> >
> > Thanks,Suzy Murphy"
> >
> >
> > "It's was the tail feathers. I'm no seabird expert, but those were the
> > longest streamers I have seen , like LT Jaeger. Got a 2 second look. My
> > impression was the wings had sharp contrast b/w, much more black, like
> whole
> > trailing edge."
> >
> >
> > She has been driving a long time and NOW, I have been driving for 8 days
> and
> > no references to check at present.
> >
> >
> > lt was flying north across the Columbia River towards Washington.
> >
> >
> > Shawneen Finnegan
> >
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Re: [PortlandAreaBirds] Vanport Wetlands (Portland) shorebirds
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 13:43:10 -0700
Jeff and Adrian,

I agree! I saw an adult today out on the N. Spit of Coos Bay.  I checked my
data base which goes back to 1998.  The only other yrs. I found July
Pecs was in 2005 and 2010.  As I remember both yrs. I had one of the few
adult reports in Oregon so it sure seems like a banner yr!

Merry migration,
Tim R
Coos Bay


On Wed, Jul 23, 2014 at 8:35 PM, Jeff Gilligan 
wrote:

>
> >
> > Seems like the best adult Pectoral year I can remember!
> >
> > Happy fall,
> >
> > Adrian Hinkle
> >
> > --
> > -
>
> You are young - but your memory is accurate.  It is also the best I can
> remember, and I am nearly certain of that.
>
> Jeff Gilligan
>
>
>
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Nehalem Sewage Ponds Stint NO
From: James Billstine <billstinj AT sou.edu>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 13:18:18 -0700
I lurked along the edge of the Nehalem sewage ponds today from 9 to about
11 and couldn't find a stint-like bird. Four Pectoral Sandpipers, a Spotted
Sandpiper, a Killdeer, and a handful of Least and Western Sandpipers. Also,
a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE.

On the way back home, I stopped at the Bay City Sewage ponds and found a
BLACK PHOEBE.

Good Shorebirding,

James Billstine
Subject: Re: Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 12:00:24 -0700
Hi,

Hmmm, I have almost been hit several times by distracted drivers using
electronic devices, and it is illegal now to do so  in Oregon with the
exception of police, emergency responders and drivers in emergency
situations (http://www.drivinglaws.org/oregon.php).  Texting while
driving 65 mph and  pulling a camper...

Range Bayer

On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 11:27 AM, Shawneen  wrote:
> For anyone birding near the Deschutes River.  I received several text
> messages from Suzy Murphy about a bird seen while driving 65 MPH.
>
>
> " Just saw at mouth of Deschutes river fly over to the columbia at 65 miles
> per hour. What looked like a sea bird. Long thin wings black and white
> pattern light underbelly, with longish white streamiing tail feathers. Can't
> stop hauling a camper. If someone close maybe they can check it out.
>
> Thanks,Suzy Murphy"
>
>
> "It's was the tail feathers. I'm no seabird expert, but those were the
> longest streamers I have seen , like LT Jaeger. Got a 2 second look. My
> impression was the wings had sharp contrast b/w, much more black, like whole
> trailing edge."
>
>
> She has been driving a long time and NOW, I have been driving for 8 days and
> no references to check at present.
>
>
> lt was flying north across the Columbia River towards Washington.
>
>
> Shawneen Finnegan
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: Shawneen <shawneenfinnegan AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 11:27:35 -0700
For anyone birding near the Deschutes River. I received several text messages 
from Suzy Murphy about a bird seen while driving 65 MPH. 


" Just saw at mouth of Deschutes river fly over to the columbia at 65 miles per 
hour. What looked like a sea bird. Long thin wings black and white pattern 
light underbelly, with longish white streamiing tail feathers. Can't stop 
hauling a camper. If someone close maybe they can check it out. 

Thanks,Suzy Murphy"

"It's was the tail feathers. I'm no seabird expert, but those were the longest 
streamers I have seen , like LT Jaeger. Got a 2 second look. My impression was 
the wings had sharp contrast b/w, much more black, like whole trailing edge." 


She has been driving a long time and NOW, I have been driving for 8 days and no 
references to check at present. 


lt was flying north across the Columbia River towards Washington.

Shawneen Finnegan 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 06:24:04 -0700

From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: July 24, 2014 6:08:56 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Horned Grebe (3 Deschutes)
Black-necked Stilt (1 Polk)
American Avocet (1 Hood River)
Snowy Plover (1 Clatsop)
Sanderling (1 Union)
Pectoral Sandpiper (3 Deschutes)
Black-chinned Hummingbird (1 Jefferson)
Veery (1 Multnomah)
Yellow-breasted Chat (1 Jefferson)
Tricolored Blackbird (1 Jefferson)
Yellow-headed Blackbird (2 Columbia)

---------------------------------------------
The report below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on 
the web at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: RBA: Portland, OR 7-24-14
From: Harry Nehls <hnehls6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 00:14:14 -0700
- RBA
* Oregon
* Portland
* July 24, 2014
* ORPO1406.24

- birds mentioned

American White Pelican
Black-bellied Plover
Snowy Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Solitary Sandpiper
Wandering Tattler
Marbled Godwit
Stilt Sandpiper
LONG-TOED STINT
Sanderling
Dunlin
Bairds Sandpiper
LITTLE STINT
Pectoral Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
ELEGANT TERN
Gray Catbird
HOODED ORIOLE

- transcript

hotline: Portland Oregon Audubon RBA (weekly)
number: 503-292-6855
To report: Harry Nehls 503-233-3976  
compiler: Harry Nehls
coverage: entire state

Hello, this is the Audubon Society of Portland Rare Bird Report. This report
was made Thursday July 24. If you have anything to add call Harry Nehls at
503-233-3976.

On July 19 a male HOODED ORIOLE visited a feeder near Bend. It did not
remain. A probable LITTLE STINT was seen July 21 at the South Jetty of the
Columbia River. A possible LONG-TOED STINT was seen July 23 at the Nehalem
Sewage Ponds. On July 19 five ELEGANT TERNS were at the mouth of the
Columbia River.

Shorebird movements continued during the week with several PECTORAL
SANDPIPERS reported. On July 21 a BAIRDS SANDPIPER and a SEMIPALMATED
SANDPIPER were at New River in Coos County. On July 20, 12 MARBLED GODWITS
were at Coos Bay. A MARBLED GODWIT was at Yaquina Bay July 22. The Marine
Science Center CATBIRD continues to be seen. On July 21 a TATTLER was at
Ecola State Park. On the beach at Gearhart July 19 were a SNOWY PLOVER, 23
SANDERLINGS, and 128 SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS.

Among the shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR July 22 was a BAIRDS SANDPIPER. On
July 23 a SOLITARY SANDPIPER was on the refuge. On July 20 forty WHITE
PELICANS were at Smith/Bybee Lakes in North Portland. Two STILT SANDPIPERS
were at the Tualatin NWR July 23. Four DUNLIN and a SEMIPALMATED PLOVER were
there July 22. On July 21 a BAIRDS SANDPIPER was at the Philomath Sewage
Ponds.

At Ladd Marsh near LaGrande July 22 were four MARBLED GODWITS and a juvenile
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. ON July 20 a BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER and a MARBLED
GODWIT were at Wickiup Reservoir south of Bend.

Thats it for this week.

- end transcript














Subject: In memoriam: Jack Walters
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 22:53:52 -0700
Hi all,

I mentioned Jack Walters in passing in my preceding post to the Oregon
Birding list. Most Oregon birders probably won't be familiar with the
name.

Jack was one of the greatest birding story-tellers that I never met.

Due to my tendency to wander down to the NW corner of Nevada now and
then, I used to hear from him via e-mail every winter, when he'd start
thinking about the possibilities for "Arctic wonders" such as Gyrfalcon
or Common Redpoll.

Jack passed away some years back, but I still can never go out to the
Coleman Valley, or Sheldon NWR, without thinking about him.

Jack's postings on the NVBIRDS list were hands-down some of the best
birding stories that have ever been written for our part of the
continent. Who else would ever have written about bringing in small owls
by setting up a Coleman cooler with the lid up, and a lantern light
trained on it to draw in moths?

I see that his books are still for sale even though he's passed away.
Hopefully his widow (who presumably had to put up with his birding
activities for many years) is still benefiting from the sales. Anyway
here are a couple of links where you can find Jack's remarkable stories:


https://www.leg.state.nv.us/app/lcbstore/a/p-114-bird-stories-and-sightings-in-nevada-volume-1-loons-to-nighthawks.aspx 



http://books.google.com/books/about/Bird_Stories_and_Sightings_in_Nevada.html?id=QG4zAAAACAAJ 


Considering Jack's legacy, it seems good to point out that he put "bird
stories" first in his title, before "sightings."

A good way to honor Jack's memory would be, on your next bird outing, to
think not what was the best bird, but what was the best bird story that
you came back with from the field.

Good birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corallis




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Subject: Re: Request for help with grouse ID
From: Craig Miller <gismiller AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 22:44:04 -0700
RE: Ruffed Grouse - I've heard this species multiple times along Silver
Creek near Silver Creek Marsh Campground (north of Thompson Reservoir).
Also, I've seen one at Chandler State Park (along Hwy 395 between Valley
Falls and Lakeview). I believe they are uncommon to rare throughout the
Fremont National Forest in riparian areas.

RE: Sooty Grouse - they nest in good numbers along Winter Rim; I hear them
every spring nearly as far north as Summer Lake Refuge Headquarters. I hear
them occasionally on my Breeding Bird Survey route between Gearhart
Mountain and Dairy Creek (in the Fremont National Forest). Also I have seen
one along Hwy 395 about 2 miles south of Chandler State Park. It is my
impression that they are prevalent over most of the Fremont National
Forest, and as Kevin notes, in the north Warner Mountains.

Craig Miller


On Wed, Jul 23, 2014 at 8:39 PM, Kevin Spencer  wrote:

> Hi,
>
> As far as I know, the "Blue Grouse" on Winter Rim would be Sooty Grouse.
> I've encountered them many times there, and in the forest to the west. I
> have also encountered Sooty Grouse in the North Warners (really just The
> Warners, but I mean the Oregon portion of the  Warner Mountains).
>
> As for the maps ..... I'd say grouse maps for both Ruffed and Sooty are
> lacking in that part of the state for both Ruffed and Sooty, and maybe the
> whole state (I can only comment  about Klamath and Lake Cos.) and that goes
> for both National Geographic and Sibley's. Maybe the maps for those grouse
> didn't receive much attention, due to lack of reports, observations... I
> don't know. What may have happened is that Breeding Bird Surveys were used,
> or partly used, as a way to base or outline the margins of presence. With a
> lack of reporting on BBS for grouse in general it could influence a loss of
> area where they normally occur. I know hunters could be a good source for
> knowledge of occurance as they generally are not going to be hunting where
> there is not any chance of bagging game. Maybe they should be consulted.
>
> The map for Sooty Grouse, in  Sibley's Guide, shows a departure towards
> the west at the CA/OR state line. A more accurate line might be to continue
> northward with a small peak to include the north end of the Warner
> Mountains. The map for Oregon could widen its main eastern north-south
> line, somewhat, to include Winter Rim. North of Winter Rim the habitat
> really shrinks westward, so including Winter Rim would be a slight
> adjustment. The National Geographic map appears very similar to the Sibley
> Guide's Sooty Grouse map. So, that map should consider the same
> adjustments.
>
>
> The Ruffed Grouse map in Sibley's Guide appears to make that species  look
> like it is restricted to the coast range in Oregon. I am not familiar
> enough with Ruffed Grouse statewide to comment for the whole state, but for
> Klamath County it is a somewhat common species, especially in the deciduous
> areas around Upper Klamath Lake. That is a unique area admittedly, but it
> is significant enough that it should have been included in the range map
> for that species. I have heard of a few Ruffed Grouse being reported in
> Lake County, scattered, but none for the Warner Mountains. I have not heard
> of Ruffed  Grouse being reported between Upper Klamath Lake and say
> Gearhart Wilderness (just a place that's east of Klamath Falls that people
> are familiar with). The reports  I've heard were from approx. Gearhart
> eastward to the westside of Goose Lake Valley. I dont know if those few
> reports should cause inclusion of that area on a fieldguide range map. But
> definitely the perimeter of the Upper Klamath Lake area and outward along
> its tributaries should be included.
>
> The National Geographic map for Ruffed Grouse appears to be accurate for
> the most part, at the map shows eastward extension into Klamath County. Not
> including any of Lake County if find, and then encountering one, say  in
> Lake County, being at the edge, or an outlier, would then be significant,
> and definitely worth reporting, or talking about, especially by a hunter
> (which is one my sources for Ruffed Grouse in Lake County... about 35 years
> ago... but I have not encounter Ruffed Grouse in Lake County myself).
>
> I'd say the grouse is a Sooty Grouse, and that both Sibley's and National
> Geographic's field guides should make some slight adjustments to their
> Sooty Grouse maps. (and Sibley's map for Ruffed Grouse too).
>
> Good for you, pointing that out.
>
> Kevin Spencer
> rriparia AT charter.net
> Klamath Falls, OR
>
> I ' on a field trip to the Summer Lake area this weekend (Sat-Tue).  On
> Sunday, we drove up Winter Ridge to Pioneer Peak, then south along the
> ridge road (NR26?) to the switchbacks.  While on top of the ridge, we came
> upon a hen or juvenile grouse sitting in the middle of the road,  Click on
> the link below for a series of low resolution photos.
>
>
>
> 
*https://plus.google.com/photos/107892236367702076331/albums/6039284676539261153?authkey=CMDqo_P87szkxAE* 

> 
 

>
>
> The grouse appeared to be either a sooty or dusky grouse.  We are fairly
> certain that it wasn't a greater sage-grouse because of our grouse's tail,
> which was blunt.  Sage-grouse have a long, pointed tail, and they probably
> wouldn't be found in that habitat.
>
>
> Sibley 2nd edition field guide range maps don't show either of these
> "blue" grouse in the Winter Ridge area.  It appears that the sooty grouse
> doesn't normally come as far east as Winter Ridge, and the dusky grouse is
> only found in the Enterprise/Joseph area in Oregon.
>
>
> Can anyone tell us if either (or both) of the sooty or dusky grouse can be
> found on Winter Ridge?  Also, can anyone venture an opinion on the identity
> of the grouse in the photos?
>
>
> Thanks,
>
>
> Tim Johnson
> Salem, OR
>
>
Subject: Nehalem Lagoons
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 22:32:27 -0700
 The place closes at 4pm on weekdays. I was staring at three Pecs and two 
Leasts at the north bank when an employee drove out to tell me "We lock the gat 
at 4". The wind was a constant 30mph when I was there, making it hard to use a 
scope. The sun was out and heat waves bad. Then I got drenched in the three or 
four minutes walking to the car. The small rocks of the rip-rap are brown and 
make for lots of hiding places. My first pass along the north shore I flushed 
various birds before I saw them. Careful scoping on the return pass still 
failed to reveal one sandpiper that flushed from underfoot. 

 There was lots of activity in the ne corner of the sw pond, sandpipers 
repeatedly fluttering up into view in the same area where Canada Geese and 
California Gulls were loafing. Lars 


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