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Updated on Wednesday, August 27 at 08:47 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Palmchat,©BirdQuest

27 Aug [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
26 Aug OBA Registration [HARVEY W SCHUBOTHE ]
26 Aug Re: Coos birds [HARVEY W SCHUBOTHE ]
26 Aug Coos birds [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
26 Aug JoCo shorebirds [Russ Namitz ]
26 Aug Re: a very successful Josephine County chase ["Dennis Vroman" ]
26 Aug Re: sad news (off topic) [Andy Frank ]
26 Aug this is the right link for the hawk with jesses [Stephanie Hazen ]
26 Aug Re: ugly crow photo needed [Stephen Deagle ]
26 Aug sad news ["Paul Sullivan" ]
26 Aug Oregon Birds update [Alan Contreras ]
26 Aug New yard bird [Lois Miller ]
26 Aug Jackson Bottom Wetlands Shorebirds [Steve Nord ]
26 Aug ugly crow photo needed [Alan Contreras ]
25 Aug Umpqua Estuary 24 Aug 2014 [Matthew G Hunter ]
25 Aug hawk with jesses near Ft. Rock [Stephanie Hazen ]
25 Aug Re: JoCo - 8 shorebird species [Zia Fukuda ]
25 Aug Mt. Ashland: Mt Quail, Bluebird & Chickadee [Harry Fuller ]
25 Aug Re: JoCo - 8 shorebird species [Russ Namitz ]
25 Aug a very successful Josephine County chase ["Paul Sullivan" ]
25 Aug Costa's Hummingbird at Owl Thicket ["kimdelo AT yahoo.com" ]
25 Aug BirdsEye-Redmond Sewage Ponds-2014-8-25 ["kimdelo AT yahoo.com" ]
25 Aug Willow Creek Res, Morrow County - Semipalmated Sandpipers, black-necked Stilt ["Jeff Harding" ]
25 Aug juvenile Herman's Gulls and Eastern Kingbird in Clatsop Co. [Jeff Gilligan ]
25 Aug Re: JoCo - 8 shorebird species [Romain Cooper ]
25 Aug JoCo - 8 shorebird species [Russ Namitz ]
25 Aug Marion Co Brewer's Sparrow, Semi-Sandpipers 8/25 [Roy Gerig ]
25 Aug Fall flocking [Brandon Green ]
25 Aug Re: Jackson Bottom Wetlands shorebirds Monday morning [Steve Engel ]
25 Aug Camp Sherman birds [Bob Bender ]
25 Aug Juvenile Cassin's Vireo - Need Confimation [Keith Saylor ]
25 Aug Re: Introduction to Shorebirds [Russ Namitz ]
25 Aug Stilt Sp and Semipalmated Sandpiper link [Bob Archer ]
25 Aug [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
24 Aug Vaux's Swift Roosting Behavior [Barbara Combs ]
24 Aug Introduction to Shorebirds [Misty Stromme ]
24 Aug Philomath Sewage Ponds - today's shorebirds, and UPCOMING TEMPORARY CLOSURE [Hendrik Herlyn ]
24 Aug Re: Upland Sandpipers in OR [Russ Namitz ]
24 Aug black hawk may be Dark Morph Red Tail [Kevin Spencer ]
24 Aug Re: Fwd: [birding] Upland sandpiper at Corvallis Airport [Jeff Gilligan ]
24 Aug Oregon Cascades Birds [Thomas Meinzen ]
24 Aug Mid-Columbia Highlights 2013 - seeking reports [J Hayes ]
24 Aug Re: Upland Sandpiper at Corvallis Airport [Christopher Hinkle ]
24 Aug MIGRANTS IN JACKSON COUNTY: SHOREBIRDS, LANDBIRDS [Harry Fuller ]
24 Aug Fwd: [birding] Upland sandpiper at Corvallis Airport [Joel Geier ]
24 Aug Re: Swainson's Thrushes, NW Portland [Tim Rodenkirk ]
24 Aug Jackson Bottom Wetlands shorebirds [Steve Nord ]
24 Aug Continuing Stilt Sandpiper - Jackson Bottoms [Erik Knight ]
24 Aug Boiler Bay ["Phil Pickering" ]
24 Aug Swainson's Thrushes, NW Portland--oops! [Wink Gross ]
24 Aug The second post in series about looking for Spotted Owls in Oregon. [Jack Williamson ]
24 Aug Swainson's Thrushes, NW Portland [Wink Gross ]
24 Aug Re: Stilt Sandpiper at Jackson bottom [Colby Neuman ]
24 Aug Re: Portland Waterthrush [Lawrence McQueen ]
24 Aug Re: Peregrine/Gadwall mystery [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
24 Aug Stilt Sandpiper at Jackson bottom [Steve Nord ]
23 Aug Portland Waterthrush []
23 Aug Photo: Peregrine Falcon Immature Baskett Slough NWR [Jim Leonard ]
24 Aug Re: Peregrine/Gadwall mystery ["Jenkins, Maurice A." ]
23 Aug Re: Peregrine/Gadwall mystery [Matthew G Hunter ]
23 Aug Pelagic Registration Forms [HARVEY W SCHUBOTHE ]
23 Aug Hummingbird article [Oscar Harper ]
23 Aug Delta Ponds [Vjera Thompson ]
23 Aug Hatfield Lake this morning ["Tom Crabtree" ]
23 Aug Hatfield Lake this morning ["Tom Crabtree" ]
23 Aug Newport shorebirds ["Wayne Hoffman" ]
23 Aug Re: Peregrine/Gadwall mystery ["Wayne Hoffman" ]
23 Aug Re: Non-bird: Knobcone Pine - Pinus attenuata ["Dennis Vroman" ]
23 Aug Re: Non-bird: Knobcone Pine - Pinus attenuata [Keith Saylor ]
23 Aug Marbled Godwit Photo [Keith Saylor ]
23 Aug Re: FW: Re: 2 Semipalmated Sandpipers? [David Irons ]
23 Aug Re: study in warblers at Whiskey Springs in Jefferson County Oregon [Jeff and Lauretta Young ]
23 Aug Gray Flycatcher ["Allen Prigge" ]
23 Aug FW: Re: 2 Semipalmated Sandpipers? [Russ Namitz ]
23 Aug study in warblers at Whiskey Springs in Jefferson County Oregon [Jeff and Lauretta Young ]
23 Aug [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]

Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 06:20:05 -0700
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: August 27, 2014 6:07:49 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Upland Sandpiper (1 Benton)
Stilt Sandpiper (4 Washington)
Elegant Tern (1 Lincoln)
Eastern Kingbird (1 Wallowa)
Lazuli Bunting (1 Marion)

---------------------------------------------
The report below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on 
the web at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: OBA Registration
From: HARVEY W SCHUBOTHE <ninerharv2 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 20:05:38 -0700
The OBA annual meeting is now one month away. Come to Bandon September 26-28th. 
It is the BEST time of the year for vagrant passerines on the south coast, a 
GREAT time to go on an offshore pelagic and FANASTIC time for shorebirds. 
Registration materials went to OBA members in the mail today and are also 
on-line at the Oregon Birding Association website. Again, you do not need to be 
a member of the OBA to participate. Come on down and check us out. Send me an 
e-mail offline and I will get registration materials to you. 

 
We still have room for our special deep water pelagic trip before the 
conference. Again, we are taking registrations separate from our regular 
registration. This is to allow us to give you back your pelagic check in the 
event that ocean conditions, extremely unlikely but has happened, prevent the 
trip for going out. Instead of writing reimbursement checks, we will simply 
return yours in the rare case that happens. 

 
See you in Bandon in a month.
 
Harv 
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Coos birds
From: HARVEY W SCHUBOTHE <ninerharv2 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 17:55:46 -0700
Pine siskins flying by south Bandon as well.

Harv

Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone.
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein
Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2014 5:28 PM
To: OBOL
Reply To: deweysage AT frontier.com
Subject: [obol] Coos birds


At least 4 BAIRD'S SANDPIPERS were at New River this morning.

We suddenly have PINE SISKINS at our feeder....showed up in the past day
or so.  North of Bandon, Coos Co.

Cheers
Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein
Bandon OR



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Subject: Coos birds
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 17:27:00 -0700
At least 4 BAIRD'S SANDPIPERS were at New River this morning.

We suddenly have PINE SISKINS at our feeder....showed up in the past day 
or so.  North of Bandon, Coos Co.

Cheers
Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein
Bandon OR



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Subject: JoCo shorebirds
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 17:14:39 -0700
Unlike Dennis, I went out in the afternoon and had a different experience. 
The BAIRD'S SANDPIPER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS continue at Cave Junction 
Wastewater Ponds, but the Semipalmated & Western Sandpiper appears to have 
moved on. 

At Lake Selmac, I only saw 1 Western Sandpiper. I was rewarded by my county 
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE swimming close to the dam. 

Good birding,Russ NamitzMedford 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: a very successful Josephine County chase
From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman AT budget.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 15:33:40 -0700
Wish to thank Russ for calling me about all the great shorebird finds the 
party had; greatly appreciated Russ.

You are doing good Paul...a lot closer to your goal then you were at the 
beginning of this year.  You can make it!  Just 2 more to go!!

Whet over to Lake Selmac this morning (08-26-14) and managed to re-located: 
2 LESSER YELLOWLEGS; 2 BAIRD'S and WESTERN, LEAST, and SPOTTED SANDPIPERS. 
Also, at the western side of the lake was a SEMIPAMATED PLOVER.  KILLDEER 
were present too (7 of the their 8).

Also present on Lake Selmac was an EARED GREBE and the usual Duck suspects 
for this time of the year.

Dennis

Subject: a very successful Josephine County chase


> OBOL:
>
> When last we left off my quest for 200 species in Josephine County, my 
> total
> stood at 195.  When Russ Namitz's post (below) came through on Friday, I 
> saw
> two birds I could add to my county list.  However, we were already 
> committed
> to The Bird Guide's pelagic trip on Saturday, and the Cave Junction sewage
> ponds are not open on weekends.
>
> When we got back from the pelagic trip I sent Russ a note, and he said he
> was hoping for a Baird's Sandpiper at Cave Junction as well.  I drove down
> on Sunday afternoon and did some forest birding early this morning. 
> Nothing
> new there.
>
> When I arrived at the Cave Junction sewage pond at 10 AM today, Russ was
> already there with Romain & Christie Cooper.  They quickly put me on to a
> BAIRD'S SANDPIPER (#196), a LESSER YELLOWLEGS (#197), and a SEMIPLAMATED
> SANDPIPER (#198).  Also present were Least and Western Sandpipers, and
> Killdeer.  We heard a Virginia Rail, and a Cooper's Hawk flew over.  The
> resident Black Phoebe was flycatching about.
>
> We went on to Lake Selmac, where we found more Least and Western 
> Sandpipers,
> two more Baird's, several Spotted Sandpipers, Killdeer, and a Semipalmated
> Plover (not #199 -- I'd seen one before in 1999)
>
> So.... if one is aiming to see 200 species in each of Oregon's 36 
> counties,
> that's 7200 county birds.  That means I'm at 7198/7200, which equals 
> 99.97%.
> Getting close...
> (Since someone will ask: With the "over 200" tally I have in a number of
> counties my total county bird tally is 8130.)
>
> Good birding, everyone,
>
> Paul Sullivan




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Subject: Re: sad news (off topic)
From: Andy Frank <andydfrank AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 15:02:14 -0700
​Paul, thank you for letting us know the sad news regarding Dave's daughter.

For those wondering if they should do something, I'd like to share this
piece written by Andrew Tobias​ some time after the death of his partner.

*"CONDOLENCES*


*The main thing to say is that it’s “pass/fail.” As my wise friend Patty
Marx, the writer, explained to me, “People agonize over what to say, as if
there’s something they could say that would actually make it better” –
certainly I always agonize in these situations – “when in fact there’s
nothing to say except, thinking of you in this difficult time.” Or words to
that effect. Sure, there will be the occasional piece of amazing advice, or
the perfect anecdote or shared memory. But basically, Patty says, you
either send a note (and pass) or become paralyzed trying, as I so often
have (and fail).*

*Now that I’ve experienced it from the other end, I plan to fail less
often. (And to send nicer flowers.) Not least because it’s now okay to do
it by email. Sure, it’s classier to send a handwritten note. But I have
lost the ability to write anything legible by hand. And if one does send a
physical note, one sort of puts an obligation on the recipient to reply in
kind, and, well, I’m sorry, but I’m responding by email."*

Andy Frank
Subject: this is the right link for the hawk with jesses
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 13:09:43 -0700
> 

https://picasaweb.google.com/101700670573128910486/HawkWithJesses?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCNWMpPqOkP2UJw&feat=directlink 

> 
> 
> 
> My photography friend, Len Boeder, made this photo of a red-tailed hawk 
wearing jesses this past week. 

> It was on highway 18 after you leave Fort Rock and about a third of the way 
to highway 31. 

> 
> Anybody missing a hawk?
> 
> Stephanie Hazen
> Salem



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Subject: Re: ugly crow photo needed
From: Stephen Deagle <sdeagle AT mac.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 12:38:16 -0700
There are no ugly crows!! Corvids are my favorites.
;o)
Susie Deagle


On Aug 26, 2014, at 9:26 AM, Alan Contreras wrote:

> If you have a photo of a truly ugly crow, I'd like a copy for use in Oregon 
Birds. Thanks. 

> .
> .
> Alan Contreras
> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
> 
> Eugene, Oregon
> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: sad news
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 12:00:10 -0700
Word has filtered around (through Facebook) that Dave Irons daughter Lily, age 
23, was killed in a single car accident over the weekend near Lava Beds 
National Monument in N. California. 


 

Condolences may be sent to Dave Irons, 6555 SW Old Scholls Ferry Rd Apt 8, 
Portland OR 97223. 


 

I’m sorry to be the bearer of such sad news. Our thoughts are with Dave and 
his family. 


 

Paul Sullivan

 
Subject: Oregon Birds update
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 11:27:34 -0700
Just a little update for the Oregon Birding Association members who are on 
OBOL. 


The full-color 2013 highlights issue goes to press around Sep. 8 and will reach 
members around October 1. 


The fall issue with features on the changing status of Oregon's birds, plus a 
big year etc. will go to press around Nov. 15 and reach members around Dec. 15, 
depending on whether it gets caught in the Christmas mailing season. 



.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon



Subject: New yard bird
From: Lois Miller <rarebirdart AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 10:56:21 -0700
I just had a flock of Elegant Terns come over the dune and circle my yard !
Never expected this species for my yard list...yard bird # 168
We have been watching a large flock of at least 50 around the hill at the
Port the past few days though.

Lois Miller
Port Orford
Subject: Jackson Bottom Wetlands Shorebirds
From: Steve Nord <stevernord AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 10:28:42 -0700
OBOL;

The morning, the STILT SANDPIPER continues at Pintail Pond at Jackson
Bottom Wetlands in Hillsboro.

Other shorebirds seen:

35 GREATER YELLOWLEGS
12 LESSER YELLOWLEGS
3 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER (they stood together at one point allowing for
this high count)
37 LEAST SANDPIPER
48 WESTERN SANDPIPER
32 KILLDEER
3 SPOTTED SANDPIPER
2 BAIRD'S SANDPIPER
5 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER
5 RED-NECKED PHALAROPE (flew in and stayed only about 15 minutes before
flying off)
4 WILSON'S SNIPE

Good Birding
Steve Nord
Beaverton, OR
Subject: ugly crow photo needed
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 09:26:04 -0700
If you have a photo of a truly ugly crow, I'd like a copy for use in Oregon 
Birds. Thanks. 

.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon



Subject: Umpqua Estuary 24 Aug 2014
From: Matthew G Hunter <matthewghunter AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 22:38:41 -0700
Hi Folks,

Strong winds prevented a canoe launch from Salmon Harbor on Sunday morning,
but Dan Karpa (who discovered the nesting Great Egrets on Bolon Island)
said his sailboat likes the wind, so ... that sounded good to me. Rick
Foster and Dan and I headed out on his 37 ft sailboat towing an inflatable.
We first cruised by Bolon Island where there was a group of YOUNG GREAT
EGRETS STILL IN THE NEST TREE BEING FED BY ADULTS (link to photos below).
We then continued out to Barrett's Landing where we anchored, then took an
inflatable to motor and paddle over to The Point and watch birds as the
tide came in. Mostly the usual subjects present. Nice looks at GREEN
HERONS, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, LEAST AND WESTERN SANDPIPER, BAIRD'S
SANDPIPER, SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS, a large group of 200 NORTHERN PINTAIL,
a handful of NORTHERN SHOVELERS. Oddly, no terns or eagles. Photos and
complete checklists below....

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewghunter/sets/72157646456502449/

Checklists w/notes:
Lower Schofield Creek:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19564143
Bolon Island: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19566055
Umpqua Estuary: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19564336

Matt Hunter
Melrose, OR
Subject: hawk with jesses near Ft. Rock
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 22:18:31 -0700
https://picasaweb.google.com/101700670573128910486/TRWCRRSilentAuction?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCMPiyJ6rvcrZmwE&feat=directlink 


My photography friend, Len Boeder, made this photo of a red-tailed hawk wearing 
jesses this past week. 

It was on highway 18 after you leave Fort Rock and about a third of the way to 
highway 31. 


Anybody missing a hawk?

Stephanie Hazen
Salem

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Subject: Re: JoCo - 8 shorebird species
From: Zia Fukuda <zialeefukuda AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 21:53:03 -0700
Looks like I need to make a trip out to Cave Junction. Romain, do you know
if anyone will be out birding the area again?  I'm at a loss for
shorebirds.
Zia
On Aug 25, 2014 4:44 PM, "Romain Cooper"  wrote:

> As Russ implied, there was a single Baird's Sandpiper at the Cave Junction
> wastewater site along with the other shorebirds.  A  Virginia's Rail,
> American Coot & Cooper's Hawk, were among more expected birds at the
> wastewater site.  A Green-backed Heron and Double-Crested Cormorant were
> among the more expected birds at Lake Selmac.
>
> cheers,    Romain
>
> At 03:11 PM 8/25/2014, Russ Namitz wrote:
>
>> I birded a few hours this morning before work with visiting birder Paul
>> Sullivan and local birders Christy and Romain Cooper.
>>
>> At the Cave Junction  Wastewater Ponds, we enjoyed the continuing
>> SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS there among the peep flock (1
>> Western, 10 Least) and the vociferous Killdeer.
>>
>> We moved on to Lake Selmac and there was a SEMIPALMATED PLOVER there with
>> Killdeer, several SPOTTED SANDPIPERS and 2 more Baird's Sandpipers that
>> flew in to join the peep flock (1 Western, 4 Least).
>>
>> It was a great day of shorebirding in Josephine County considering the
>> location.
>>
>> Good birding,
>> Russ Namitz
>> Medford, OR
>>
>
> Romain Cooper
> 10398 Takilma Road
> Cave Junction, OR 97523
> 541-592-2311
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Mt. Ashland: Mt Quail, Bluebird & Chickadee
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 21:45:27 -0700
Plus nice long encounter with G-t Towhee
http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/08/25/mt-ashland-august-afternoon/

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Re: JoCo - 8 shorebird species
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 21:43:45 -0700
We birded with Christie Dunn and Romain Cooper.  Sorry about that Christie.
Russ

From: namitzr AT hotmail.com
To: obol AT freelists.org
Subject: JoCo - 8 shorebird species
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 15:11:33 -0700




I birded a few hours this morning before work with visiting birder Paul 
Sullivan and local birders Christy and Romain Cooper. 

At the Cave Junction Wastewater Ponds, we enjoyed the continuing SEMIPALMATED 
SANDPIPER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS there among the peep flock (1 Western, 10 
Least) and the vociferous Killdeer. 

We moved on to Lake Selmac and there was a SEMIPALMATED PLOVER there with 
Killdeer, several SPOTTED SANDPIPERS and 2 more Baird's Sandpipers that flew in 
to join the peep flock (1 Western, 4 Least). 

It was a great day of shorebirding in Josephine County considering the 
location. 

Good birding,Russ NamitzMedford, OR 		 	   		   		 	   		  
Subject: a very successful Josephine County chase
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 21:11:49 -0700
OBOL:

When last we left off my quest for 200 species in Josephine County, my total
stood at 195.  When Russ Namitz's post (below) came through on Friday, I saw
two birds I could add to my county list.  However, we were already committed
to The Bird Guide's pelagic trip on Saturday, and the Cave Junction sewage
ponds are not open on weekends.

When we got back from the pelagic trip I sent Russ a note, and he said he
was hoping for a Baird's Sandpiper at Cave Junction as well.  I drove down
on Sunday afternoon and did some forest birding early this morning.  Nothing
new there.

When I arrived at the Cave Junction sewage pond at 10 AM today, Russ was
already there with Romain & Christie Cooper.  They quickly put me on to a
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER (#196), a LESSER YELLOWLEGS (#197), and a SEMIPLAMATED
SANDPIPER (#198).  Also present were Least and Western Sandpipers, and
Killdeer.  We heard a Virginia Rail, and a Cooper's Hawk flew over.  The
resident Black Phoebe was flycatching about.

We went on to Lake Selmac, where we found more Least and Western Sandpipers,
two more Baird's, several Spotted Sandpipers, Killdeer, and a Semipalmated
Plover (not #199 -- I'd seen one before in 1999)

So.... if one is aiming to see 200 species in each of Oregon's 36 counties,
that's 7200 county birds.  That means I'm at 7198/7200, which equals 99.97%.
Getting close...
(Since someone will ask: With the "over 200" tally I have in a number of
counties my total county bird tally is 8130.)

Good birding, everyone,

Paul Sullivan

================================
[obol] JoCo SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER
. From: Russ Namitz 
. To: 
. Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 15:10:09 -0700
This afternoon at the Cave Junction wastewater treatment plant there was a 
Semipalmated Sandpiper and a Lesser Yellowlegs among a small flock of 
Western/Least Sandpipers.

I believe the sandpiper is a county 1st, but am not sure.  This location
housed 
another county 1st earlier this year in the form of a Great-tailed Grackle.

Good birding,
Russ Namitz
Medford




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Subject: Costa's Hummingbird at Owl Thicket
From: "kimdelo AT yahoo.com" <kimdelo@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 20:49:01 -0700
Owl Thicket, Deschutes, US-OR
Aug 25, 2014 12:40 AM - 12:50 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.1 mile(s)
Comments:  Submitted from BirdLog NA for Android v1.9.3
4 species

Costa's Hummingbird 1  White superciliam, slightly curved bill, wings reach 
past tail 

Northern Flicker (Red-shafted) 1
Mountain Chickadee 2
Spotted Towhee 1

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19575590 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
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Subject: BirdsEye-Redmond Sewage Ponds-2014-8-25
From: "kimdelo AT yahoo.com" <kimdelo@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 20:40:51 -0700
Observer: Kimdel Owen
2014-08-25 00:10
Redmond Sewage Ponds
Protocol: Traveling
2 Miles
30 Minutes
Observers: 1
All birds reported? Yes
  3  Canada Goose   
  30  Mallard   
  4  Cinnamon Teal   
  25  Northern Shoveler   
  25  Northern Pintail   
  12  Green-winged Teal   
  5  Bufflehead   
  2  Pied-billed Grebe   
  10  Double-crested Cormorant   
  2  Great Blue Heron   
  4  Turkey Vulture   
  1  Osprey   
  3  Swainson's Hawk   
  2  Red-tailed Hawk   
  30  Killdeer   
  4  Spotted Sandpiper   
  5  Greater Yellowlegs   
  5  Lesser Yellowlegs   
  2  Baird's Sandpiper   
  6  Least Sandpiper   
  5  Western Sandpiper   
  5  Red-necked Phalarope   
  3  California Gull   
  20  Mourning Dove   
  5  Common Nighthawk   
  3  Common Raven   
  4  Barn Swallow   
  10  Brewer's Blackbird   

This report was created and sent using BirdsEye BirdLog 
(http://birdseyebirding.com/) 


Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
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Subject: Willow Creek Res, Morrow County - Semipalmated Sandpipers, black-necked Stilt
From: "Jeff Harding" <jeffharding AT centurytel.net>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 19:14:38 -0700
There were a lot of peeps at Willow Creek Reservoir near Heppner in Morrow
County yesterday afternoon. In the small inlet by the bridge on the way in
from Heppner there was a small group of a dozen LEAST SANDPIPERS with two
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS. Also present were 4 GREATER YELLOWLEGS, 4 KILLDEER
and two SPOTTED SANDPIPERS.

 

Further on, at the main inlet to the reservoir, there was a lot of mud and a
lot of shorebirds, mostly peeps, and most of which were pretty distant.
There was one BLACK-NECKED STILT, 20 or so GREATER YELLOWLEGS, at least two
LESSER YELLOWLEGS, and two RED-NECKED PHALAROPES. The peeps included
WESTERN, LEAST, and BAIRDS, but I hesitate to speculate on numbers, because
most were distant. There were on the order of 150 al together. There were 4
WILSON'S SNIPE close-in, that I flushed as I approached the edge of the mud.
It seemed a remarkable aggregation.

 

I have photos, which I'll include in eBird checklists, when I can put them
together.

Good birding,

Jeff

                
Subject: juvenile Herman's Gulls and Eastern Kingbird in Clatsop Co.
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 18:50:03 -0700
I have read that there was a total nesting failure this year for Heerman's 
Gulls. I can write that is not entirely accurate. Two days ago the gull flock 
at the creek on the beach at Ocean Park, WA (including about 60 Herman's) had 5 
juvenile Herman's Gulls. 


Today Willapa Bay had more gulls than I have ever seen there, particularly 
Ring-billed Gulls. There must be some food related reason for the very large 
numbers. A dense flock of about 600 Brown Pelicans were putting on a show in 
the Columbia River estuary today. I read recently that there are about 25,000 
Brown Pelicans currently near the mouth of the Columbia, and that a few pairs 
are attempting to nest. 


This afternoon here was an Eastern Kingbird on the fence line on the north side 
of Highway 26 near the old Olney's Restaurant. 


The single juv. Long-billed Curlew was still at Ledbetter Point yesterday.

Two days ago there was a single Lesser Goldfinch at the light house at North 
Head, Pacific County, WA. (Phil PickeringI think I recall you seeing Lesser 
Goldfinch at Cascade Head.?) 



Jeff Gilligan











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Subject: Re: JoCo - 8 shorebird species
From: Romain Cooper <romain AT frontiernet.net>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 16:41:06 -0700
As Russ implied, there was a single Baird's Sandpiper at the Cave 
Junction wastewater site along with the other 
shorebirds.  A  Virginia's Rail,  American Coot & Cooper's Hawk, were 
among more expected birds at the wastewater site.  A Green-backed 
Heron and Double-Crested Cormorant were among the more expected birds 
at Lake Selmac.

cheers,    Romain

At 03:11 PM 8/25/2014, Russ Namitz wrote:
>I birded a few hours this morning before work with visiting birder 
>Paul Sullivan and local birders Christy and Romain Cooper.
>
>At the Cave Junction  Wastewater Ponds, we enjoyed the continuing 
>SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS there among the peep 
>flock (1 Western, 10 Least) and the vociferous Killdeer.
>
>We moved on to Lake Selmac and there was a SEMIPALMATED PLOVER there 
>with Killdeer, several SPOTTED SANDPIPERS and 2 more Baird's 
>Sandpipers that flew in to join the peep flock (1 Western, 4 Least).
>
>It was a great day of shorebirding in Josephine County considering 
>the location.
>
>Good birding,
>Russ Namitz
>Medford, OR

Romain Cooper
10398 Takilma Road
Cave Junction, OR 97523
541-592-2311  



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Subject: JoCo - 8 shorebird species
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 15:11:33 -0700
I birded a few hours this morning before work with visiting birder Paul 
Sullivan and local birders Christy and Romain Cooper. 

At the Cave Junction Wastewater Ponds, we enjoyed the continuing SEMIPALMATED 
SANDPIPER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS there among the peep flock (1 Western, 10 
Least) and the vociferous Killdeer. 

We moved on to Lake Selmac and there was a SEMIPALMATED PLOVER there with 
Killdeer, several SPOTTED SANDPIPERS and 2 more Baird's Sandpipers that flew in 
to join the peep flock (1 Western, 4 Least). 

It was a great day of shorebirding in Josephine County considering the 
location. 

Good birding,Russ NamitzMedford, OR 		 	   		  
Subject: Marion Co Brewer's Sparrow, Semi-Sandpipers 8/25
From: Roy Gerig <roygerig AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 13:16:34 -0700
I had most excellent looks at an adult BREWER'S SPARROW this morning at the NW 
corner of Pintail Marsh at Ankeny NWR south of Salem. My first thought as it 
flew across the trail behind me was Chipping Sparrow, based on size, flight 
pattern, and shape but when it landed in the closest bush to the NW corner, it 
was immediately obvious as a BREWER'S, pale drab gray brown all over, narrow 
white eyering, no color contrast between nape and crown and back, small bill, 
very little contrast in the weak face pattern - basically a lack of field marks 
could characterize this bird. It is one of the cutest little birds you'll ever 
see. I had a good study for 10 minutes, with chances to consult my Sibley in 
between, while it cavorted with a couple of SAVANNAH SPARROWS. It is the same 
size, in terms of length and wingspan, of a Savannah Sparrow, but much slimmer, 
so that it only weighs about half of what a Savannah does. The crown seems very 
narrowly striped. No color contrast anywhere on the bird, just pale gray brown. 
Undersides unmarked, but the same pale gray brown. There were hardly any 
shorebirds present, 5 LEAST SANDPIPERS and 2 KILLDEER were about it. 

I went over to Hunsaker-Duckflat Rd next, and found one of the SOLITARY 
SANDPIPERS from the weekend, first found by Jeff Harding (I saw 2 later), one 
GR YELLOWLEGS, and 2 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS (in poor light, facing into the 
sun) but I feel confident in my ID. They looked like adults - one already in 
winter plumage, the other not - or possibly very worn or later juveniles. 
Either way, they had the bill shape and everything else of SESA rather than 
either Least or Westerns. Very plain gray back on one, more brown plus gray on 
the other. Black legs, tubular bill not tapering at the end, very slightly if 
at all drooped. You'll see pictures of the birds I saw in Sibley. The same way 
I use dichotomous keys to things, I end up using pictures when it's all said 
and done. 

Roy Gerig, Salem OR 		 	   		  
Subject: Fall flocking
From: Brandon Green <brandon.green18 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 10:32:05 -0700
Earlier this morning, a small flock of AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES were at my
feeders.  Though I've seen them around town in small numbers this summer,
these were the first that I've hosted in a good six months.  Over the next
3-4 weeks, those numbers should grow to 60-100+.  And who knows... maybe a
SISKIN or two will make an appearance!  I've also recently noticed that
BUSHTITS and BC CHICKADEES are feeding in mixed flocks (with the occasional
BEWICK'S WREN).

I still have one RUFOUS HUMMER working my fuchsias, but I imagine that she
won't be around for much longer.

Brandon
Eugene
Subject: Re: Jackson Bottom Wetlands shorebirds Monday morning
From: Steve Engel <Steve.Engel AT hillsboro-oregon.gov>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 10:10:39 -0700
Made a special point of getting to work early this morning after hearing from 
JBWP weekend staff of Sunday morning shorebirds at Pintail Pond. It was worth 
it. Being the first ones there (0715) Sarah Pinnock and I witnessed the exodus 
of at least 20 Great Egrets and 10 Great Blue Herons from the sw corner of the 
pond. From the east side we viewed a dozen species of shorebirds and we may 
have missed a species or two since our attention didn't wander far from what 
was right in front of us. 


Western Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Semi-palmated Sandpiper - 1
Stilt Sandpiper - 1
Baird's Sandpiper - 2 (3)
Solitary Sandpiper - 1
Spotted Sandpiper - 1
Wilson's Snipe - 2
Semi-palmated Plover 
Killdeer
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs

Steve Engel, Nature Program Supervisor
Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve | Parks and Recreation Department 
2600 SW Hillsboro Hwy., Hillsboro, OR 97123
Phone: 503-681-6283 |fax 503-681-6277
email: steve.engel AT hillsboro-oregon.gov
web: www.jacksonbottom.org




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Subject: Camp Sherman birds
From: Bob Bender <bobolink06 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 10:10:17 -0700
Birders, from our cabin deck on the Metolius River we had four species of 
woodpeckers, Hairy, White Headed, Williamson's and Red Naped Sapsuckers. The 
bird of the day was an immature Goshawk which jetted across the lawn in pursuit 
of a chipmunk. The rodent found refuge under a log. Still a few Rufous Hummers, 
rare PeWee and YR Warbler. Bob Bender Camp Sherman and Eugene 


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Juvenile Cassin's Vireo - Need Confimation
From: Keith Saylor <kfsaylor AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 08:44:09 -0700
Yesterday I had three species feeding juveniles out of the nest in the same
Shorepine.

The three species were:

Golden-crowned Kinglet
Cassin's Vireo
and possible
Hutton's Vireo

I was not able to capture many photos as the activity and movement was
extreme in the conifer.

I captured this photo of a juvenile Golden-crowned.


https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/gPcRCdAirK4YlFkByiyY79MTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink 


I then captured this photo of what I assumed was a juvenile Cassin's Vireo.
I share it with you to illicit your confirmation that this is a juvenile
Cassin's.


https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/H6La4XjVN4sadgj0GIEkx9MTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink 


Thanks,
-- 
Keith F. Saylor
Subject: Re: Introduction to Shorebirds
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 08:37:19 -0700
Misty and others~

The Oregon Shorebird Festival is coming up and is a good place to practice 
shorebird identification with experienced leaders. It is a unique section of 
coast and has quite a bit to offer the visiting birders including scenic 
haystack vistas and up to 4 species of pinnipeds haul out on Simpson 
Reef.http://www.fws.gov/oregoncoast/shorebirdfestival.htm 

Good birding,Russ NamitzMedford 		 	   		  
Subject: Stilt Sp and Semipalmated Sandpiper link
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 07:15:51 -0700
Hi:

Here is a link to photos of birds seen in Hillsboro.  You need to zoom in
to see birds better and I stuck a few comments on right side.


https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/117998954337911599230/albums/6051324930280599361/6051324939119073378?pid=6051324939119073378&oid=117998954337911599230 




I tested this google link with daughter . seems to be easier to zoom in on
pictures with Google than with Flickr?

Bob Archer
pdx
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 06:25:04 -0700
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: August 25, 2014 6:07:45 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Black-crowned Night-Heron (1 Deschutes)
American Avocet (2 Jackson, 3 Lane)
Stilt Sandpiper (10 Washington)
Elegant Tern (1 Clatsop)
Black Swift (1 Deschutes)
Dusky Flycatcher (1 Washington)
Eastern Kingbird (1 Umatilla)
Bewick's Wren (1 Wallowa)
American Pipit (1 Wallowa)
Black-and-white Warbler (1 Polk)
Green-tailed Towhee (1 Douglas)
Lazuli Bunting (1 Marion)
Bobolink (1 Deschutes)

---------------------------------------------
The report below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on 
the web at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: Vaux's Swift Roosting Behavior
From: Barbara Combs <bcombs232 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 23:37:15 -0700
This evening I saw a Vaux's Swift dive into the top of my neighbor's tall
fir tree just after sunset, apparently to roost there.  I am aware of a
number of of a number of observations of tree roosts for Vaux's Swifts in
other states, but have not heard of any in Oregon.  Has anyone else seen a
Vaux's Swift go to roost in a tree in Oregon?

-- 
Barbara Combs   obie '70
Lane County, Ob
Subject: Introduction to Shorebirds
From: Misty Stromme <mstromme AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 22:43:00 -0700
Hello OBOLers,

It's been a while since I have been active on OBOL, so please pardon me if
I have posted this incorrectly.

I am seeing reports of various shorebirds being seen at local wetland areas
(Jackson Bottom, Ridgefield, etc). I am an intermediate birder (about 10
years now), but I find shorebirds - peeps, in particular - and gulls quite
challenging to identify. As I am a teacher, I have a few weeks befoere I
get in full-on back-to-school mode. I want to make the most of the time and
go out birding as much as possible. If you are experienced in shorebird
identification and you are willing to go on a field trip to share some
identification tips with me, please contact me individually. Thanks for
reading.

Misty in Lake Oswego
mstromme AT gmail.com
Subject: Philomath Sewage Ponds - today's shorebirds, and UPCOMING TEMPORARY CLOSURE
From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 20:28:59 -0700
Hello folks,

This morning, there were 9 species of shorebirds at the Philomath Sewage
Ponds (alas, no sign of any Upland Sandpipers :-)):

Semipalmated Plover - 1
Spotted Sandpiper - 2
Greater Yellowlegs - 5
Lesser Yellowlegs - 2
Least Sandpiper - 50
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 1
Western Sandpiper - 1
Short-billed Dowitcher - 1
Red-necked Phalarope - 13

Otherwise, it was pretty much business as usual, although duck numbers are
steadily increasing - Northern Shovelers are up to almost 300, and there
were at least 11 female Northern Pintails around.

Now for the bad news - here's a heads-up to all who plan to visit this site
in the coming weeks: The Philomath Public Works Department has informed me
that as of tomorrow, *the ponds will be closed to visiting birders for an
unspecified period of time* due to an upcoming construction process
(re-rocking of some of the dikes). They will not issue any new entry
permits for the time being, and they are asking birders to not enter the
area (by vehicle or on foot) if any construction vehicles or workers are in
evidence! I was told that the project is expected to be done in about 2
weeks ... we'll see.

It is too bad that this project coincides with a time when shorebird action
is really heating up. I will keep an eye on the situation and let you all
know when the construction has been completed and the ponds are open to
birders again. Until then, please comply with the Philomath PWD's wishes,
so we don't jeopardize future access to this great site!.

Happy almost-fall-birding!

Hendrik


-- 
__________________________
Hendrik G. Herlyn
Corvallis, OR


*"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home."     -- Gary Snyder*
Subject: Re: Upland Sandpipers in OR
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 19:12:25 -0700
I believe the Florence bird turned out to be a Buff-breasted Sandpiper.

I agree with Christopher that OBRC should consider the review status of this 
species. 


Two summers ago, Dave Lauten called me about a bird that showed up in beloved 
Coos County. Alas, I was on top of a mountain somewhere in the Cascades for 
that 1 day wonder. 


Good birding,
Russ Namitz
 		 	   		  
Subject: black hawk may be Dark Morph Red Tail
From: Kevin Spencer <rriparia AT charter.net>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 22:10:53 -0400 (EDT)
I was gone for the weekend, and I did not get to the area where the 
black hawk was located.

I'm forwarding a  message from the original observer,  sent to me 
yesterday, along with the link to photos taken on the second visit. I 
will need to compare both sets of photos to see if they could be the 
same bird. Buteos are moving through the area, but chances of having 
different dark morph birds at the same location seem low to me. I'll 
still be checking the photos though.


Kevin Spencer
rriparia AT charter.net
Klamath Falls, OR

-------- Begin forwarded message --------
Subject: Re: Dark Morph Red Tail
Date: 8/23/14 4:22:25 PM
From: "layton Pace"
To: "Kevin Spencer"



Kevin,

I drove back through yesterday and saw a dark morph Red-tailed Hawk on 
Sevenmile Rd. near the prior sighting.  Attached is a Flickr link.  I 
saw it fly and it had a red tail.

No telling if it is the same bird.  It seems to sit more upright and the 
bill looks different.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ecjllp/sets/72157646374078778/ 
 

    
    
image  

    
    
    
    
    
  
  
View on www.flickr.com 
 

Preview by Yahoo 

  
    
    
Subject: Re: Fwd: [birding] Upland sandpiper at Corvallis Airport
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 18:35:26 -0700
It has also occurred on Cape Blanco, near Langlois, and at South Beach, Newport 
- perhaps elsewhere that I am not thinking of - but no question - it is a rare 
vagrant. 


.


On Aug 24, 2014, at 5:07 PM, Joel Geier  wrote:

> Interesting ephemeral report but unfortunately no other local sightings of 
this bird were reported later in the afternoon. On the assumption that hte bird 
was southbound, might be worth watching for at Fern Ridge or better yet, in 
some of the prairie restoration areas off KR Neilsen Rd. or along Amazon Creek. 

> 
> If I recall correctly there was also a Upland Sandpiper report from Florence 
in late August a couple of years ago. 

> 
> Good birding,
> Joel



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Subject: Oregon Cascades Birds
From: Thomas Meinzen <thomasmeinzen AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 18:25:13 -0700
It's been a while since I've posted here, so I thought I'd share some bird
sightings from camping in the Oregon Cascades with friends in recent weeks.

We spent today and yesterday at Melakwa Lake in eastern Lane County, with a
dazzling view of the Three Sisters. I pished up a sizable flock of 18
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS along the lakeshore this morning, along with 1
NASHVILLE WARBLER, 1 GREEN-TAILED TOWHEE, Dark-eyed Juncos, Yellow-rumped
Warblers, Red-breasted Nuthatches, Chestnut-backed Chicakdees, and
Golden-crowned Kinglets. RED CROSSBILLS were everywhere, and an OSPREY was
successfully fishing the lake the entire time we were there. I also saw one
LEWIS'S WOODPECKER, likely a migrant, depart from a snag as we hiked up a
nearby peak. A few migrant birds could be heard overheard as we slept under
the stars.

Last weekend I went up to a cabin along the Little Deschutes River with
friends and had CLARK'S NUTCRACKER, RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD, and a NORTHERN
GOSHAWK there. Alway fun!

Happy end of summer!
Thomas Meinzen
Eugene
Subject: Mid-Columbia Highlights 2013 - seeking reports
From: J Hayes <balgryph AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 17:54:12 -0700
Greetings, Obolers

As some of you know, I do the writeup for the mid-Columbia region for OB.
This covers Hood River, Wasco, Sherman and Gilliam counties.

This applies mostly to people who DO NOT use eBird, as I have already
winnowed through that resource.

I have my report pretty much ready, but some sightings people reported to
me got irretrievably lost when Yahoo mail got hacked (or whatever happened,
it was pretty catastrophic).

So, I'm calling upon you, Oregon birders, to please search through your
sightings from the above named counties (from 2013) and send me the
HIGHLIGHTS (best/most unusual birds, high counts, out of season, out of
expected range, confirmed breeding reports, etc.) from those birding trips.

Thank you in advance,

Jeff Hayes
balgryph at gmail dot com
Subject: Re: Upland Sandpiper at Corvallis Airport
From: Christopher Hinkle <christopher.hinkle2 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 19:30:13 -0500
I don't have any references at hand for more specific statistics, but I
believe late August is peak for vagrant Upland Sandpipers on the west
coast. At this time of year I'm always looking/listening for them at
promising spots like Broughton Beach. Adrian and I heard and saw one at the
deflation plain at Florence exactly two years ago today.

Now that they appear extirpated as breeders in Oregon, and given the
paucity of reports on the West Coast (only about 30 records for
California?), it might be a good candidate for OBRC review.

Cheers,

Chris
Subject: MIGRANTS IN JACKSON COUNTY: SHOREBIRDS, LANDBIRDS
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 17:22:59 -0700
Baird's Sandpipers & other shorebirds
Warbling Vireo, Pac-slope, warblers
http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/08/24/e-migrants-migrants/


-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Fwd: [birding] Upland sandpiper at Corvallis Airport
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 17:07:23 -0700
Interesting ephemeral report but unfortunately no other local sightings
of this bird were reported later in the afternoon. On the assumption
that hte bird was southbound, might be worth watching for at Fern Ridge
or better yet, in some of the prairie restoration areas off KR Neilsen
Rd. or along Amazon Creek.

If I recall correctly there was also a Upland Sandpiper report from
Florence in late August a couple of years ago.

Good birding,
Joel

-------- Forwarded Message --------
From: W. Douglas Robinson 
To: Midvalley Birding Midvalley 
Subject: [birding] Upland sandpiper at CVO
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 12:50:48 -0700


Randy Moore just saw an upland touch down near north end of airport and take 
off again. Keep an eye out. 


Doug



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birding AT midvalleybirding.org
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Subject: Re: Swainson's Thrushes, NW Portland
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 16:18:58 -0700
Same here in Coos Bay. I had one call about every two seconds at 5:30AM.
 Actually I had heard them a couple days before but just a call or two.
Still another week or two before we get the mega-flights with multiple
calls per second (I usually hear them at or around dawn in biggest number).

Merry migration!

Tim R
Coos Bay


On Sun, Aug 24, 2014 at 11:25 AM, Wink Gross  wrote:

> First Fall Swainson's Thrush heard overhead yesterday (Aug 23)
> morning at about 0615.
>
> 1998: Aug 27
> 1999: Aug 28
> 2000: Aug 26
> 2001: Aug 25
> 2002: Aug 26
> 2003: Aug 25
> 2004: Aug 20
> 2005: Aug 23
> 2006: Aug 22
> 2007: Aug 23
> 2008: Aug 28
> 2009: Aug 21
> 2010: Sep 3
> 2011: Aug 24
> 2012: Aug 28
> 2013: Aug 23
> 2014: Aug 24
>
> Wink Gross
> NW Portland
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
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>
>
>
Subject: Jackson Bottom Wetlands shorebirds
From: Steve Nord <stevernord AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 15:35:39 -0700
OBOL;

This morning Pintail Pond at Jackson Bottom was the place to be to see a
wide variety of shorebird species.  I saw 13 species or shorebirds.  The
highlight was the STILT SANDPIPER, which many birders got to see this
morning. It was a wonderful crowd sharing all these fun birds. Perhaps
others will post with their sightings, but here my eBird list, along with 2
photos of the Stilt Sandpiper:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19562748

Water levels are dropping, but looks like we should have good shorebird
habitat for a little while longer. Great time to get out and study those
waders.  The amazing aspect was that even after staring at the mudflats for
over an hour, thinking I covered the territory well, new species were being
discovered (Pectoral, Solitary, Dowitcher)

When I first arrived, soon after sunrise, there were many Great Egrets and
Great Blue Herons on the pond, along with a huge flock of Mallards.  They
departed soon after.

Good Birding
Steve Nord
Beaverton OR.
Subject: Continuing Stilt Sandpiper - Jackson Bottoms
From: Erik Knight <erikknight05 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 14:55:55 -0700
The Stilt Sandpiper is still at Jackson Bottoms along with all other
reported peeps - no sign of Solitary Sandpiper.

______________
Erik Knight
Portland, OR
Subject: Boiler Bay
From: "Phil Pickering" <philliplc AT charter.net>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 14:40:53 -0700
8:30-9:00 AM (8/24):
clear wind N 5-15

1 Pacific Loon
300 Sooty Shearwater (N 1+ mile)
20 Double-crested Cormorant
30 Brandt's Cormorant
50 Pelagic Cormorant
7 Surf Scoter
1000+ Red-necked Phalarope (scattered with
  minor movement both directions most 1+ mile)
150 California Gull (most juv N)
40 Western Gull
2 Caspian Tern
150 Common Murre
30 Pigeon Guillemot (a few juv)
12 Marbled Murrelet (on the water at least 4 juv)

Phil
philliplc AT charter.net


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Subject: Swainson's Thrushes, NW Portland--oops!
From: Wink Gross <winkg AT hevanet.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 13:26:35 -0700
[Of course, the 2014 date should be Aug 23.  Hate it when I do that.]

First Fall Swainson's Thrush heard overhead yesterday (Aug 23) 
morning at about 0615. 

1998: Aug 27
1999: Aug 28
2000: Aug 26
2001: Aug 25
2002: Aug 26
2003: Aug 25
2004: Aug 20
2005: Aug 23
2006: Aug 22
2007: Aug 23
2008: Aug 28
2009: Aug 21
2010: Sep 3
2011: Aug 24
2012: Aug 28
2013: Aug 23
2014: Aug 23

Wink Gross
NW Portland


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Subject: The second post in series about looking for Spotted Owls in Oregon.
From: Jack Williamson <jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 12:32:54 -0700
http://www.jack-n-jill.net/blog/2014/8/spotted-owl-adventure---off-to-a-slow-start 


-- 
Jack Williamson
West Linn, Oregon
Subject: Swainson's Thrushes, NW Portland
From: Wink Gross <winkg AT hevanet.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 11:25:55 -0700
First Fall Swainson's Thrush heard overhead yesterday (Aug 23) 
morning at about 0615. 

1998: Aug 27
1999: Aug 28
2000: Aug 26
2001: Aug 25
2002: Aug 26
2003: Aug 25
2004: Aug 20
2005: Aug 23
2006: Aug 22
2007: Aug 23
2008: Aug 28
2009: Aug 21
2010: Sep 3
2011: Aug 24
2012: Aug 28
2013: Aug 23
2014: Aug 24

Wink Gross
NW Portland


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Subject: Re: Stilt Sandpiper at Jackson bottom
From: Colby Neuman <colby.neuman AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 09:58:47 -0700
The Stilt Sandpiper continues at Jackson Bottom along with the others 
mentioned...plus a Solitary Sandpiper and a Pectoral Sandpiper. 


Colby
PDX


> On Aug 24, 2014, at 7:35 AM, Steve Nord  wrote:
> 
> Obol;
> 
> Currently looking at a STILT SANDPIPER on Pintail pond at Jackson bottom 
wetlands in hillboro. Also present Bairds sandpiper, 1-2 Semipalmated sandpiper 
lots of yellowlegs of both species. Semipalmated plovers, 

> 
> Steve nord
> Beaverton or
Subject: Re: Portland Waterthrush
From: Lawrence McQueen <larmcqueen AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 09:51:02 -0700
Yup.  Northern Waterthrush.

Larry


On Aug 23, 2014, at 10:40 PM, pnitens AT qfwfq.org wrote:Y

> This morning at McCormick Pier Condo just north of the Steel Bridge in
> downtown Portland I got a glimpse of what I think was a Northern
> Waterthrush. I grabbed my camera and waited near the sighting point for
> nearly 20 minutes before the bird came back out into the open and I was
> able to get photographs:
> http://www.qfwfq.org/mccormickpier/northern-waterthrush-20140823a.jpg
> http://www.qfwfq.org/mccormickpier/northern-waterthrush-20140823b.jpg
> After about a minute in the open it disappeared back into the ornamental
> vegetation again, and didn't reappear in the next half hour or so.
> 
> Notes for would-be chasers:
> The bird was between the southernmost building of the complex (606 NW
> Naito Parkway - the "A" building) and the greenway that runs along the
> Willamette.
> There isn't a lot what I would have considered suitable habitat here, so
> I'm not so optimistic it stayed around. I will however keep my eyes open
> and repost if I see it again.
> There is no public parking in the condo complex. The nearest public
> parking is out on Naito Parkway.
> It's a very urban area, with all that entails.
> 
> Tait
> NW Portland
> 
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 



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Subject: Re: Peregrine/Gadwall mystery
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 08:02:38 -0700
Matt

I'm sort of late coming in to this.....I've looked at my fair share of 
predator kills in my time as a biologist.   Avian predators pull or 
pluck feathers of their prey resulting in cleanly pulled feathers.    
Mammals are much messier, and tend not to pluck feathers but tear or 
chew them off, resulting in shafts that chewed, or cut or sawed off.   
It is rather an obvious difference.   I can't say what happened here 
except to agree with Alan that these feathers do not appear to be chewed 
off.

Cheers
Dave Lauten



On 8/23/2014 8:55 PM, Jenkins, Maurice A. wrote:
>
> I noticed that the second primary from the left in the photo has the 
> proximal quarter of the shaft enveloped in the sheath of a growing 
> feather and the leftmost one appears to have the remnants of sheathing 
> on the proximal end.  This suggest a molt in progress to me.  
> Primaries growing in on an HY peregrine are usually in the same stage 
> of growth and similarly sheathed.  The longest two primaries are 
> usually the last to become unsheathed and free of blood in 
> the proximal shaft.  These considerations made me think the bird was 
> molting and therefore at least a SY bird.
>
> I can't explain why the feathers aren't bent as they would be if a 
> pulled out by an avian or mammalian predator using it's mouth.  They 
> are cleanly pulled without apparent damage to the feather shafts.
>
> Alan Jenkins
>
> Creswell, Oregon
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* obol-bounce AT freelists.org [obol-bounce AT freelists.org] on 
> behalf of Wayne Hoffman [whoffman AT peak.org]
> *Sent:* Saturday, August 23, 2014 4:49 PM
> *To:* matthewghunter AT gmail.com; umpquabirds AT freelists.org; 
> obol AT freelists.org
> *Subject:* [obol] Re: Peregrine/Gadwall mystery
>
> Hi, Matt 
>
> A couple of thoughts.
>
> First, the bases of primaries are very tough and do not easily break. 
>   I would bet they were bitten.  Therefore, A third player, raptor or 
> carnivore, likely was involved.
>
> One scenario:  the  falcon was attacked while trying to defend its 
> kill.  Loss of that many primaries was likely fatal for the falcon.
>
> Alternate  scenario:  Something else caught or was scavenging the 
> Gadwall; the falcon tried to steal it, and was injured in the fight.
>
> Careful examination of the feather shafts might show detail that would 
> distinguish between beak damage (from a raptor) and tooth damage (from 
> a carnivore).
>
> Wayne
>
> *From:*obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] 
> *On Behalf Of *Matthew G Hunter
> *Sent:* Friday, August 22, 2014 11:33 PM
> *To:* umpquabirds AT freelists.org; obol AT freelists.org
> *Subject:* [obol] Peregrine/Gadwall mystery
>
> Hi Folks,
>
> On Tuesday, August 19, my wife and kids and I were traveling up Hwy 
> 138 to go hike Mount Bailey. At about 0930 [and at 43.2482, -122.3117] 
> just a mile or two west of Stump Lake we saw something interesting on 
> the road and went back to look at it. It was a mostly eaten adult male 
> GADWALL, fairly fresh. While walking both sides of the highway to see 
> what other "parts" I could find, I happened upon several primary 
> feathers and a few small body feathers from a PEREGRINE FALCON (photos 
> of both here), also with blood fairly fresh:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewghunter/sets/72157646747934182/
>
>
> What happened here? My guess is that early in the morning the 
> peregrine killed the Gadwall at Stump Lake, or above the highway not 
> far from the discovery location and came down to the highway to eat it 
> and got hit by a vehicle. I could find no other evidence of the 
> peregrine than these primaries, two of which are broken at the base, 
> the others whole (plus just a few body feathers). It may have "limped" 
> off somewhere out of sight. The brownish primaries indicate an 
> immature bird which sometimes means less coordination and/or less wise 
> decisions. What do you think happened?
>
> In case you have not seen it, check out this digital collection of 
> wing and tail images at the Slater Museum of Natural History; it is 
> amazing and useful:
>
> 
http://digitalcollections.pugetsound.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/slaterwing 

>
> For example, regarding the peregrine primaries, compare with this 
> photo from the wing and tail image collection:
> 
http://digitalcollections.pugetsound.edu/cdm/ref/collection/slaterwing/id/11754/rec/1 

>
> All the Best,
>
> Matt Hunter
> Melrose, OR
>
Subject: Stilt Sandpiper at Jackson bottom
From: Steve Nord <stevernord AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 07:35:13 -0700
Obol;

Currently looking at a STILT SANDPIPER on Pintail pond at Jackson bottom
wetlands in hillboro. Also present Bairds sandpiper, 1-2 Semipalmated
sandpiper lots of yellowlegs of both species. Semipalmated plovers,

Steve nord
Beaverton or
Subject: Portland Waterthrush
From: pnitens AT qfwfq.org
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 22:40:28 -0700
This morning at McCormick Pier Condo just north of the Steel Bridge in
downtown Portland I got a glimpse of what I think was a Northern
Waterthrush. I grabbed my camera and waited near the sighting point for
nearly 20 minutes before the bird came back out into the open and I was
able to get photographs:
http://www.qfwfq.org/mccormickpier/northern-waterthrush-20140823a.jpg
http://www.qfwfq.org/mccormickpier/northern-waterthrush-20140823b.jpg
After about a minute in the open it disappeared back into the ornamental
vegetation again, and didn't reappear in the next half hour or so.

Notes for would-be chasers:
The bird was between the southernmost building of the complex (606 NW
Naito Parkway - the "A" building) and the greenway that runs along the
Willamette.
There isn't a lot what I would have considered suitable habitat here, so
I'm not so optimistic it stayed around. I will however keep my eyes open
and repost if I see it again.
There is no public parking in the condo complex. The nearest public
parking is out on Naito Parkway.
It's a very urban area, with all that entails.

Tait
NW Portland




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Subject: Photo: Peregrine Falcon Immature Baskett Slough NWR
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 21:07:54 -0700
I was at Baskett Slough NWR this morning and a immature Peregrine Falcon
swooped down at eye level right in front of me.  It scared up all the
shorebirds on the pond.  I was only able to get one photo and it is not a
clear photo but shows what I saw.  They are so fast it seemed like a blur
flying by.  Click on link for photo. Happy Birding, Jim Leonard.





https://plus.google.com/photos/108302360004365615395/albums/6050976255146115745?authkey=COKP0_2k5qPZdg 
Subject: Re: Peregrine/Gadwall mystery
From: "Jenkins, Maurice A." <alanjenkins AT ou.edu>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 03:55:35 +0000
I noticed that the second primary from the left in the photo has the proximal 
quarter of the shaft enveloped in the sheath of a growing feather and the 
leftmost one appears to have the remnants of sheathing on the proximal end. 
This suggest a molt in progress to me. Primaries growing in on an HY peregrine 
are usually in the same stage of growth and similarly sheathed. The longest two 
primaries are usually the last to become unsheathed and free of blood in the 
proximal shaft. These considerations made me think the bird was molting and 
therefore at least a SY bird. 




I can't explain why the feathers aren't bent as they would be if a pulled out 
by an avian or mammalian predator using it's mouth. They are cleanly pulled 
without apparent damage to the feather shafts. 




Alan Jenkins

Creswell, Oregon



________________________________
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [obol-bounce AT freelists.org] on behalf of Wayne 
Hoffman [whoffman AT peak.org] 

Sent: Saturday, August 23, 2014 4:49 PM
To: matthewghunter AT gmail.com; umpquabirds AT freelists.org; obol AT freelists.org
Subject: [obol] Re: Peregrine/Gadwall mystery

Hi, Matt 

A couple of thoughts.

First, the bases of primaries are very tough and do not easily break. I would 
bet they were bitten. Therefore, A third player, raptor or carnivore, likely 
was involved. 


One scenario: the falcon was attacked while trying to defend its kill. Loss of 
that many primaries was likely fatal for the falcon. 


Alternate scenario: Something else caught or was scavenging the Gadwall; the 
falcon tried to steal it, and was injured in the fight. 


Careful examination of the feather shafts might show detail that would 
distinguish between beak damage (from a raptor) and tooth damage (from a 
carnivore). 


Wayne

From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Matthew G Hunter 

Sent: Friday, August 22, 2014 11:33 PM
To: umpquabirds AT freelists.org; obol AT freelists.org
Subject: [obol] Peregrine/Gadwall mystery

Hi Folks,
On Tuesday, August 19, my wife and kids and I were traveling up Hwy 138 to go 
hike Mount Bailey. At about 0930 [and at 43.2482, -122.3117] just a mile or two 
west of Stump Lake we saw something interesting on the road and went back to 
look at it. It was a mostly eaten adult male GADWALL, fairly fresh. While 
walking both sides of the highway to see what other "parts" I could find, I 
happened upon several primary feathers and a few small body feathers from a 
PEREGRINE FALCON (photos of both here), also with blood fairly fresh: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewghunter/sets/72157646747934182/

What happened here? My guess is that early in the morning the peregrine killed 
the Gadwall at Stump Lake, or above the highway not far from the discovery 
location and came down to the highway to eat it and got hit by a vehicle. I 
could find no other evidence of the peregrine than these primaries, two of 
which are broken at the base, the others whole (plus just a few body feathers). 
It may have "limped" off somewhere out of sight. The brownish primaries 
indicate an immature bird which sometimes means less coordination and/or less 
wise decisions. What do you think happened? 

In case you have not seen it, check out this digital collection of wing and 
tail images at the Slater Museum of Natural History; it is amazing and useful: 

http://digitalcollections.pugetsound.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/slaterwing
For example, regarding the peregrine primaries, compare with this photo from 
the wing and tail image collection: 


http://digitalcollections.pugetsound.edu/cdm/ref/collection/slaterwing/id/11754/rec/1 


All the Best,
Matt Hunter
Melrose, OR
Subject: Re: Peregrine/Gadwall mystery
From: Matthew G Hunter <matthewghunter AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 20:15:39 -0700
Good points Wayne. Thanks.
Matt
On Aug 23, 2014 4:49 PM, "Wayne Hoffman"  wrote:

> Hi, Matt –
>
>
>
> A couple of thoughts.
>
>
>
> First, the bases of primaries are very tough and do not easily break.   I
> would bet they were bitten.  Therefore, A third player, raptor or
> carnivore, likely was involved.
>
>
>
> One scenario:  the  falcon was attacked while trying to defend its kill.
> Loss of that many primaries was likely fatal for the falcon.
>
>
>
> Alternate  scenario:  Something else caught or was scavenging the Gadwall;
> the falcon tried to steal it, and was injured in the fight.
>
>
>
> Careful examination of the feather shafts might show detail that would
> distinguish between beak damage (from a raptor) and tooth damage (from a
> carnivore).
>
>
>
> Wayne
>
>
>
> *From:* obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] *On
> Behalf Of *Matthew G Hunter
> *Sent:* Friday, August 22, 2014 11:33 PM
> *To:* umpquabirds AT freelists.org; obol AT freelists.org
> *Subject:* [obol] Peregrine/Gadwall mystery
>
>
>
> Hi Folks,
>
> On Tuesday, August 19, my wife and kids and I were traveling up Hwy 138 to
> go hike Mount Bailey. At about 0930 [and at 43.2482, -122.3117] just a mile
> or two west of Stump Lake we saw something interesting on the road and went
> back to look at it. It was a mostly eaten adult male GADWALL, fairly fresh.
> While walking both sides of the highway to see what other "parts" I could
> find, I happened upon several primary feathers and a few small body
> feathers from a PEREGRINE FALCON (photos of both here), also with blood
> fairly fresh:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewghunter/sets/72157646747934182/
>
>
> What happened here? My guess is that early in the morning the peregrine
> killed the Gadwall at Stump Lake, or above the highway not far from the
> discovery location and came down to the highway to eat it and got hit by a
> vehicle. I could find no other evidence of the peregrine than these
> primaries, two of which are broken at the base, the others whole (plus just
> a few body feathers). It may have "limped" off somewhere out of sight. The
> brownish primaries indicate an immature bird which sometimes means less
> coordination and/or less wise decisions. What do you think happened?
>
> In case you have not seen it, check out this digital collection of wing
> and tail images at the Slater Museum of Natural History; it is amazing and
> useful:
>
>
> 
http://digitalcollections.pugetsound.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/slaterwing 

>
> For example, regarding the peregrine primaries, compare with this photo
> from the wing and tail image collection:
>
> 
http://digitalcollections.pugetsound.edu/cdm/ref/collection/slaterwing/id/11754/rec/1 

>
>
>
> All the Best,
>
> Matt Hunter
> Melrose, OR
>
Subject: Pelagic Registration Forms
From: HARVEY W SCHUBOTHE <ninerharv2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 20:01:10 -0700
Registration forms for the OBA special deep water pelagic trips were mailed to 
members today. But you not need to be a member of OBA to register for the 
September 26th trip. Also you do not need to register for the conference to 
participate on the pelagic trip. Registration forms are also online at the 
Oregon Birding Association website or you can e-mail me offline and I will 
ensure a form gets you way. 

 



As part of its 35th Annual Meeting in Bandon,
Oregon, the Oregon Birding Association is offering a special, deep water
pelagic trip prior to the Meeting. Registration for the trip is separate as the
pelagic registration check will be returned should weather and coastal
conditions prevent the charter from departing on the morning of September 26th.
You can participate in the special
pelagic trip only without  or attending
the Annual Meeting or being a member. Should the pelagic trip be canceled
on the morning of Sept. 26th,
land based field trips will be made available as an alternative at no cost
for those who have registered for the Annual Meeting. Space is limited to 30,
so please register for the pelagic trip ASAP.


 		 	   		  
Subject: Hummingbird article
From: Oscar Harper <oeharper3 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 18:53:42 -0700
I saw this article in today's paper and thought it was an interesting read:


http://www.latimes.com/science/la-sci-sn-hummingbird-sweet-taste-receptors-20140821-story.html 


Last year, we had a chance to confirm this first-hand: We noticed that our
new neighbors, a friendly couple from India, had put up a hummingbird
feeder, but we never saw any hummers visit that feeder, although we had 3-4
birds at our feeder every day. They must have noticed it, too, because one
day they asked us about it. Turned out that they had filled their feeder
with pure water! We gave them the proper recipe, and since then the hummers
have been visiting both of our feeders with equal frequency.

Good birding

Oscar
Subject: Delta Ponds
From: Vjera Thompson <nemesisquail AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 18:48:07 -0700
OBOLers, 

I just poked around a bit in Delta Ponds near the red bicycle bridge. I was 
rewarded with side-by-side looks at a GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGs with a 
small flock of peeps. I also saw a female LAZULI BUNTING, which I would guess 
is a migrant. 


Not bad for a hot August afternoon. 

Good birding,
Vjera Thompson 
Eugene, OR



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Subject: Hatfield Lake this morning
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 18:18:28 -0800
I dropped by Hatfield Lake this morning to see what shorebirds were around.
Things were a bit more lively than yesterday but the Avocets Howard saw were
nowhere to be found.  The shorebirds I had were:

 

Killdeer  5

Solitary Sandpiper  1

Greater Yellowlegs  3

Lesser Yellowlegs  6

Least Sandpiper  10

Western Sandpiper  2

Long-billed Dowitcher  1

Wilson's Snipe  5

Wilson's Phalarope  2

Red-necked Phalarope  10

 

The rest of the birds I saw were:

Canada Goose  X

Mallard  X

Cinnamon Teal  X

Northern Pintail  X

Green-winged Teal  X

Pied-billed Grebe  1

Osprey  1

American Coot  X

California Gull  1

Mourning Dove  2

American Kestrel  1

Barn Swallow  20

Marsh Wren  4

Savannah Sparrow  6

Western Meadowlark  6

Yellow-headed Blackbird  30

 

Tom Crabtree, Bend

 
Subject: Hatfield Lake this morning
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 18:18:28 -0800
I dropped by Hatfield Lake this morning to see what shorebirds were around.
Things were a bit more lively than yesterday but the Avocets Howard saw were
nowhere to be found.  The shorebirds I had were:

 

Killdeer  5

Solitary Sandpiper  1

Greater Yellowlegs  3

Lesser Yellowlegs  6

Least Sandpiper  10

Western Sandpiper  2

Long-billed Dowitcher  1

Wilson's Snipe  5

Wilson's Phalarope  2

Red-necked Phalarope  10

 

The rest of the birds I saw were:

Canada Goose  X

Mallard  X

Cinnamon Teal  X

Northern Pintail  X

Green-winged Teal  X

Pied-billed Grebe  1

Osprey  1

American Coot  X

California Gull  1

Mourning Dove  2

American Kestrel  1

Barn Swallow  20

Marsh Wren  4

Savannah Sparrow  6

Western Meadowlark  6

Yellow-headed Blackbird  30

 

Tom Crabtree, Bend

 
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Subject: Newport shorebirds
From: "Wayne Hoffman" <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 16:59:08 -0700
Hi - 

 

Chuck Philo and I birded along the Marine Science Center Nature Trail this
morning from about 9:30 - 11:30.

 

Highlights were  1 Lesser Yellowlegs and 4 Baird's Sandpipers.  The latter
were all juvs.

 

Also seen:

 

Whimbrel                                            1

Western Sandpiper                         20-40

Least Sandpiper                                20-40

Red-necked Phalarope                  1

 

Yesterday Chuck had 2 Ruddy Turnstones there.

 

Wayne
Subject: Re: Peregrine/Gadwall mystery
From: "Wayne Hoffman" <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 16:49:50 -0700
Hi, Matt – 

 

A couple of thoughts.

 

First, the bases of primaries are very tough and do not easily break. I would 
bet they were bitten. Therefore, A third player, raptor or carnivore, likely 
was involved. 


 

One scenario: the falcon was attacked while trying to defend its kill. Loss of 
that many primaries was likely fatal for the falcon. 


 

Alternate scenario: Something else caught or was scavenging the Gadwall; the 
falcon tried to steal it, and was injured in the fight. 


 

Careful examination of the feather shafts might show detail that would 
distinguish between beak damage (from a raptor) and tooth damage (from a 
carnivore). 


 

Wayne

 

From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Matthew G Hunter 

Sent: Friday, August 22, 2014 11:33 PM
To: umpquabirds AT freelists.org; obol AT freelists.org
Subject: [obol] Peregrine/Gadwall mystery

 

Hi Folks,

On Tuesday, August 19, my wife and kids and I were traveling up Hwy 138 to go 
hike Mount Bailey. At about 0930 [and at 43.2482, -122.3117] just a mile or two 
west of Stump Lake we saw something interesting on the road and went back to 
look at it. It was a mostly eaten adult male GADWALL, fairly fresh. While 
walking both sides of the highway to see what other "parts" I could find, I 
happened upon several primary feathers and a few small body feathers from a 
PEREGRINE FALCON (photos of both here), also with blood fairly fresh: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewghunter/sets/72157646747934182/


What happened here? My guess is that early in the morning the peregrine killed 
the Gadwall at Stump Lake, or above the highway not far from the discovery 
location and came down to the highway to eat it and got hit by a vehicle. I 
could find no other evidence of the peregrine than these primaries, two of 
which are broken at the base, the others whole (plus just a few body feathers). 
It may have "limped" off somewhere out of sight. The brownish primaries 
indicate an immature bird which sometimes means less coordination and/or less 
wise decisions. What do you think happened? 


In case you have not seen it, check out this digital collection of wing and 
tail images at the Slater Museum of Natural History; it is amazing and useful: 


http://digitalcollections.pugetsound.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/slaterwing

For example, regarding the peregrine primaries, compare with this photo from 
the wing and tail image collection: 


http://digitalcollections.pugetsound.edu/cdm/ref/collection/slaterwing/id/11754/rec/1 


 

All the Best,

Matt Hunter
Melrose, OR
Subject: Re: Non-bird: Knobcone Pine - Pinus attenuata
From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman AT budget.net>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 16:32:49 -0700
For OBOL folks...trees are always bird related, but no direct bird info here.

Knobcone Pine web site; some photos show cones. Note the they are pretty 
"knobby," especially near the end of the cone where attached to the stem. 
Knobcone cones are more slender them Monterey Pine cones, which are more on the 
round side. I worked with the cross for many years in the Forest Service and 
the cross cones are more Monterey Pine-like then Knobcone. 


Knobcone photos

http://www.stevenkharper.com/knobconepine.html

Closer view of cones

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Knobcone_Pine_Cone.jpg

Below are web sites showing Monterey Pine. Note the end nearest the stem is not 
as "knobby" as with Knobcone and roundness of the cones. 


http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/article/montereypines_01

Closer view of cones

http://www.howardianlnr.org.uk/treesmontereypine-frt.html

The cones in the photos that Keith took might be Knobcone x Monterey Pine 
cross, which may have been planted in that area. They are good photos. Don't 
think the Bandon trees are pure Knobcone. 



  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Keith Saylor 
  To: obol AT freelists.org 
  Sent: Saturday, August 23, 2014 3:35 PM
  Subject: [obol] Re: Non-bird: Knobcone Pine - Pinus attenuata


 The informative responses inspired me to take images of the Knobcone stand in 
Bandon SNA. Here is a link to the images: 


 
https://picasaweb.google.com/110367164600474964103/10TreesKnobconePine?authuser=0&feat=directlink 



  Thanks again.




  On Fri, Aug 22, 2014 at 8:53 AM, Keith Saylor  wrote:

 There is a stand of Knobcone Pine on the western edge of the Bandon State 
Natural Area. I have not observed this species anywhere else in the whole of 
BSNA or in any of the surrounding natural areas. Is there anyone on list who 
has a sense of the natural history and distribution of this species in Oregon? 


    Thanks,

    Keith F. Saylor





  -- 
  Keith F. Saylor
Subject: Re: Non-bird: Knobcone Pine - Pinus attenuata
From: Keith Saylor <kfsaylor AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 15:35:12 -0700
The informative responses inspired me to take images of the Knobcone stand
in Bandon SNA. Here is a link to the images:


https://picasaweb.google.com/110367164600474964103/10TreesKnobconePine?authuser=0&feat=directlink 


Thanks again.


On Fri, Aug 22, 2014 at 8:53 AM, Keith Saylor  wrote:

> There is a stand of Knobcone Pine on the western edge of the Bandon State
> Natural Area. I have not observed this species anywhere else in the whole
> of BSNA or in any of the surrounding natural areas. Is there anyone on list
> who has a sense of the natural history and distribution of this species in
> Oregon?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Keith F. Saylor
>
>


-- 
Keith F. Saylor
Subject: Marbled Godwit Photo
From: Keith Saylor <kfsaylor AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 15:28:02 -0700
Here is a link to a photo (low quality) of the Marbled Godwits I had on the
Coos Bay side of the North Spit in Coos County. Two Godwits and Two Whimbrel


https://picasaweb.google.com/110367164600474964103/3BirdsMarbledGodwit?authuser=0&feat=directlink 


Keith

-- 
Keith F. Saylor
Subject: Re: FW: Re: 2 Semipalmated Sandpipers?
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 19:40:21 +0000
Greetings All,

Interestingly, larger flocks of Semipalmated Sandpipers are detected far more 
regularly in Washington than they are in Oregon. Birds of Washington (Wahl et 
al. Eds. 2005) lists three Puget Trough counts of 20+ birds (all from late 
July-early August) and I believe that there have been counts of 30 or more in 
the P.T. since that book was published. In September 2008, Steve Mlodinow and I 
made a four-day trip to eastern Washington. The first day was spent birding 
around Potholes Reservoir, Soap Lake, and various other shallow lakes with 
mudflats. We found multiple juvenile Semipalmated Sandpipers in every flock of 
Western Sandpipers that we encountered, with a high count of six at Soap Lake. 
I can't remember exactly how many Semis we saw that day, but as I recall, it 
was at least twenty. 


BTW Russ, Congratulations on finding the first Semipalmated Sandpiper for 
Josephine. I have some dim recollection of a discussion from a few months back, 
which pointed out that Josephine was perhaps the only Oregon county where 
Semipalmated Sandpiper had not been recorded. It was surely the only remaining 
western Oregon county without a record. Having birded some in Josephine, I can 
appreciate the challenges of finding shorebirds there. 


Dave Irons

From: namitzr AT hotmail.com
To: obol AT freelists.org
Subject: [obol] FW: Re: 2 Semipalmated Sandpipers?
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 10:43:56 -0700




Looks like 6 is the number to beat.  
Russ

Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 20:13:19 -0700
Subject: Re: [obol] Re: 2 Semipalmated Sandpipers?

A few years ago, on Aug 5, 2009, Daniel Ferrar and I had at least 6 
Semipalmated Sandpipers in a small mixed flock of peeps (about 10 Least, 15 
Westerns). That's the biggest concentration I've come across in Oregon so far. 



Hendrik


On Fri, Aug 22, 2014 at 7:41 PM, Alan Contreras 

Multiple birds are fairly regular in the northern half of Oregon. I once saw 
four in a flock at Tillamook. 



Alan ContrerasEugene, Oregon








 		 	   		   		 	   		  
Subject: Re: study in warblers at Whiskey Springs in Jefferson County Oregon
From: Jeff and Lauretta Young <jeffandlaurettayoung AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 12:37:27 -0700
Dear Larry,
Thank you so much for correcting our misidentifications! One of the reasons we 
venture to post on obol that we saw something and provide a picture is that we 
have found our colleagues willingness to share their knowledge in a helpful 
way, as you have done, to be very valuable and instructive. 


Warm regards,
Jeff and Lauretta
On Aug 23, 2014, at 11:15 AM, Lawrence McQueen  wrote:

> I thought you would like to know that on this flickr link, the bird labelled 
W. Wood Pewee is actually a Dusky Flycatcher (if not, a Hammonds), and the 
Goshawk is actually a Coopers Hawk. Im. Goshawks have a distinct white eyeline 
(supercilium), are gray-brown in plumage instead of the warm brown, and have 
coarser ventral striping. There are other features more subtle that are 
different (if these are not subtle enough). 

> 
> Enjoyed the pictures, especially of the fem Williamsons eating berries and 
the juvy solitaire. 

> 
> Larry
> 
> 
> 
> On Aug 23, 2014, at 7:20 AM, Jeff and Lauretta Young 
 wrote: 

> 
>> Whiskey Springs is in Jefferson County-- near Black Butte. You can find 
excellent directions on the birding Oregon Jefferson County site. It is some 
distance of course from the major metropolitan areas but if you want a long day 
trip or an overnight stay with a couple of morning visits we 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> we highly recommend this site.
>> 
>> The springs is hardly visible from the road so be sure to take the 
directions with you-- your cell phone will not work there for your GPS. Your 
car GPS might work.. 

>> 
>> take some folding camp chairs since sitting on the logs and rocks is quite 
uncomfortable and noisy--- go before 10 AM-- the show stops around 10 in the 
morning.. 

>> 
>> there are a couple of "puddles" where the birds bath and drink and hang 
out-- position your chairs to watch and then wait after you make all your noise 
and within about 10 minutes the birds come back 

>> 
>> We'll post some pictures on our flickr site 
soon--www.flickr.com/photos/youngbirders 

>> 
>> 
>> the past week was a study in warblers
>> 
>> we saw Orange Crowned, Black Throated Gray, Nashville, Hermit, Townsend, 
MacGillivray's and Wilsons and Yellow Rumped 

>> 
>> the only miss that we expected was Yellow
>> 
>> many flycatchers, a Hairy Woodpecker "family"-- male/female and juvenile , 
White Headed Woodpecker, Williamson's Sapsucker 

>> 
>> many Fox Sparrows and Mountain Chickadees and Cedar Waxwings eating the 
cherries at the base of the springs--even the Woodpeckers tried out some fruit 
in between the insect eating.. 

>> 
>> lovely spot with the occasional unusual one that flies in like the female 
Western Tanager for a few minutes and a vireo to liven things up 

>> 
>> it was really the warbler show however
>> 
>> and maybe if we can't decipher what's in some of our pictures we'll ask you 
smart colleagues for help 

>> 
>> enjoy the show, it was a lovely and fascinating way to spend a couple of 
early morning hours-- probably also good in the evening but we didn't go at 
that time of day 

>> 
>> enjoy... Jeff and Lauretta
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>> 
>> 
> 



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Subject: Gray Flycatcher
From: "Allen Prigge" <prigge1 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 11:08:52 -0700

-- First winter individual seen this morning in small trees along Lane  
Community College access road adjacent to sewage ponds. Easily identified  
by distinctive downward tail movement.

Al Prigge


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Subject: FW: Re: 2 Semipalmated Sandpipers?
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 10:43:56 -0700
Looks like 6 is the number to beat.  
Russ

Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 20:13:19 -0700
Subject: Re: [obol] Re: 2 Semipalmated Sandpipers?

A few years ago, on Aug 5, 2009, Daniel Ferrar and I had at least 6 
Semipalmated Sandpipers in a small mixed flock of peeps (about 10 Least, 15 
Westerns). That's the biggest concentration I've come across in Oregon so far. 



Hendrik


On Fri, Aug 22, 2014 at 7:41 PM, Alan Contreras 

Multiple birds are fairly regular in the northern half of Oregon. I once saw 
four in a flock at Tillamook. 



Alan ContrerasEugene, Oregon








 		 	   		  
Subject: study in warblers at Whiskey Springs in Jefferson County Oregon
From: Jeff and Lauretta Young <jeffandlaurettayoung AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 07:20:23 -0700
Whiskey Springs is in Jefferson County-- near Black Butte. You can find 
excellent directions on the birding Oregon Jefferson County site. It is some 
distance of course from the major metropolitan areas but if you want a long day 
trip or an overnight stay with a couple of morning visits we 





  we highly recommend this site.

The springs is hardly visible from the road so be sure to take the directions 
with you-- your cell phone will not work there for your GPS. Your car GPS might 
work.. 


take some folding camp chairs since sitting on the logs and rocks is quite 
uncomfortable and noisy--- go before 10 AM-- the show stops around 10 in the 
morning.. 


there are a couple of "puddles" where the birds bath and drink and hang out-- 
position your chairs to watch and then wait after you make all your noise and 
within about 10 minutes the birds come back 


We'll post some pictures on our flickr site 
soon--www.flickr.com/photos/youngbirders 



the past week was a study in warblers

we saw Orange Crowned, Black Throated Gray, Nashville, Hermit, Townsend, 
MacGillivray's and Wilsons and Yellow Rumped 


the only miss that we expected was Yellow

many flycatchers, a Hairy Woodpecker "family"-- male/female and juvenile , 
White Headed Woodpecker, Williamson's Sapsucker 


many Fox Sparrows and Mountain Chickadees and Cedar Waxwings eating the 
cherries at the base of the springs--even the Woodpeckers tried out some fruit 
in between the insect eating.. 


lovely spot with the occasional unusual one that flies in like the female 
Western Tanager for a few minutes and a vireo to liven things up 


it was really the warbler show however

and maybe if we can't decipher what's in some of our pictures we'll ask you 
smart colleagues for help 


enjoy the show, it was a lovely and fascinating way to spend a couple of early 
morning hours-- probably also good in the evening but we didn't go at that time 
of day 


enjoy... Jeff and Lauretta




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Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 06:12:11 -0700
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: August 23, 2014 6:08:19 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Long-tailed Duck (2 Lincoln)
Laysan Albatross (1 Lincoln)
Wilson's Storm-Petrel (1 Lincoln)
Ashy Storm-Petrel (1 Lincoln)
Black Storm-Petrel (1 Lincoln)
Northern Harrier (1 Douglas)
Franklin's Gull (1 Umatilla)
Herring Gull (1 Umatilla)
Elegant Tern (1 Clatsop)
Black-chinned Hummingbird (1 Crook)
Eastern Kingbird (1 Crook, 1 Umatilla)
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (1 Crook)
Lark Sparrow (1 Tillamook)
Bullock's Oriole (1 Umatilla)

---------------------------------------------
The report below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on 
the web at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated