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Updated on Thursday, November 27 at 08:29 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


KIng of Saxony Bird-of-Paradise,©BirdQuest

27 Nov Newport & Seal Rock birds (nothing rare) [Joel Geier ]
27 Nov Tropical Kingbird reappears- Astoria. [Andrew Mattingly ]
27 Nov What would an Aytha[A] x Aytha[B] hybrid look like? [Joel Geier ]
27 Nov Broughton Beach & Hayden Island-Columbia Pt. [Beverly Hallberg ]
27 Nov LCC Ponds, Eugene, Lane County - Thanksgiving Day 11/27/2014 ["Anne & Dan Heyerly" ]
27 Nov LBB Gull (yes)- Ricketts Rd., Goshen, Lane County, Thanksgiving Day 11/27/2014 ["Anne & Dan Heyerly" ]
27 Nov OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species [Alan Contreras ]
27 Nov Re: OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species [Craig Tumer ]
27 Nov Coos Bay 11/27/2014 [Tim Rodenkirk ]
27 Nov An Outstanding Morning on Mary's Peak - 26 Nov 2014 [Jack Williamson ]
27 Nov OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species [Alan Contreras ]
27 Nov Re: OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species [Bob Archer ]
27 Nov Re: Bean Goose and Boobies ["Yahoo" ]
27 Nov Before the snow: Birding Forest Road 44 in Hood River and Wasco Counties [Bob Archer ]
27 Nov Re: LBBG today (for larophiles) ["Phil Pickering" ]
27 Nov Re: Philomath Sewage Ponds corrigendum 11/26/2017 report [Alan Contreras ]
27 Nov Philomath Sewage Ponds corrigendum 11/26/2017 report ["Anne & Dan Heyerly" ]
27 Nov LBBG today (for larophiles) [Alan Contreras ]
27 Nov Re: OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species [David Irons ]
27 Nov Re: LBBG today (for larophiles) ["Phil Pickering" ]
27 Nov Re: OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species [Scott Carpenter ]
27 Nov Re: Weird Savannah Sparrow [David Irons ]
26 Nov Benton Co. 11/26/2014 ["Anne & Dan Heyerly" ]
26 Nov Lesser Black-backed Gulls today [Owen Schmidt ]
26 Nov Marys Peak [Thomas Cable ]
26 Nov Evening Grosbeak [Lillian ]
26 Nov Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 11/26/2014 [Wink Gross ]
26 Nov Weird Savannah Sparrow ["Tom Crabtree" ]
26 Nov Weird Savannah Sparrow ["Tom Crabtree" ]
26 Nov Re: OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species [David Irons ]
27 Nov Bean Goose yes, Boobies No [david smith ]
26 Nov can you see this [Laura Mountainspring ]
26 Nov OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species [Scott Carpenter ]
26 Nov Re: obol Digest V3 #372 [DAVY CROCKETT ]
26 Nov Wednesday Birding near Sisters, gobble gobble ["judy" ]
26 Nov Wed morning Eugene LBBG [Lawrence McQueen ]
26 Nov JACKSON COUNTY; WREN FEEDING ON MY HOUSE, NOT HOUSE WREN [Harry Fuller ]
26 Nov Both Lesser BB Gulls still present [Alan Contreras ]
26 Nov S. Coast Birds of Late [Tim Rodenkirk ]
26 Nov Injured Short-eared owl. [Charlotte Hottmann ]
26 Nov Re: Beverly's photo--SW Portland duck [David Irons ]
26 Nov Odd Junco - Eugene ["L Markoff" ]
26 Nov Beverly's photo [Darrel Faxon ]
26 Nov Re: Lesser Black-backed Gull photos ["Phil Pickering" ]
26 Nov Lesser Black-backed Gull photos [Barbara Combs ]
26 Nov RBA: Portland, OR 11-26-14 [Harry Nehls ]
25 Nov Snow Geese at Sauvie [Chris Downie ]
25 Nov very probable Pintail Snipe - Curry County [Jeff Gilligan ]
25 Nov Fwd: Another pic of Dwight's Redhead - Pochard look-a-like [Bob Archer ]
25 Nov Wile E Jay ["L Markoff" ]
25 Nov Re: Common and less common Pochards [Bob ]
25 Nov Re: Common and less common Pochards [Bob ]
25 Nov Re: VIDEOS of Aythya porteri (aka SW Portland Redhead/Pochard/hybrid thingie) [Alan Contreras ]
25 Nov possible tree sparrow on Rentenaar Rd., Sauvie Island ["WLRisser" ]
25 Nov Pochards & Gunnar [Joel Geier ]
25 Nov VIDEOS of Aythya porteri (aka SW Portland Redhead/Pochard/hybrid thingie) [Joel Geier ]
25 Nov VIDEOS of Aythya porteri (aka SW Portland Redhead/Pochard/hybrid thingie) [Jay Withgott ]
25 Nov Re: Common and less common Pochards [Alan Contreras ]
25 Nov Common and less common Pochards [Joel Geier ]
25 Nov another oddball duck [Dwight P ]
26 Nov Re: Common Pochard Challenge ["Jenkins, Maurice A." ]
25 Nov Re: LBBG photos... ["Phil Pickering" ]
25 Nov A note on salvage permits [Alan Contreras ]
25 Nov Re: Common Pochard Challenge [Wayne Hoffman ]
25 Nov Another pic of Dwight's Redhead - Pochard look-a-like [Alan Contreras ]
25 Nov Re: Another pic of Dwight's Athya sp..... [Mike Patterson ]
25 Nov Re: Another pic of Dwight's Redhead - Pochard look-a-like [Wayne Hoffman ]
25 Nov Re: Another pic of Dwight's Redhead - Pochard look-a-like []
26 Nov Re: Common Pochard Challenge ["Jenkins, Maurice A." ]
25 Nov Re: LBBG photos... [Mike Patterson ]
25 Nov Re: Another pic of Dwight's Redhead - Pochard look-a-like [Alan Contreras ]
25 Nov Another pic of Dwight's Redhead - Pochard look-a-like [Beverly Hallberg ]
25 Nov Lesser BB Gull photos needed [Alan Contreras ]
25 Nov American Tree Sparrow, Rentenaar Road, Sauvie Island [Wink Gross ]
25 Nov Lincoln County Rough-legged Hawk ["Deb Holland" ]
25 Nov LBB Gull update [Alan Contreras ]

Subject: Newport & Seal Rock birds (nothing rare)
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 17:00:09 -0800
Hi all,

Our family made a day trip out to Newport, with the aim of a truly
traditional Thanksgiving dinner (supposedly the original menu at
Plymouth was heavy on fish, crustaceans and shellfish though the place
we visited didn't offer eel, I'm not sure if the Pilgrim had "chips"
with their fish).

We ate lunch near the gull resting puddle along the South Jetty and
enjoyed the usual good variety of gulls, plus close views of the many
BROWN PELICANS plus numerous BRANDT'S and a few PELAGIC CORMORANTS
flying back and forth. A few PACIFIC LOONS and at least one COMMON LOON
were diving between the jetties, and a big flock of WESTERN (type)
GREBES were in the usual place a bit west of the bridge. I didn't see
any alcids except for one COMMON MURRE flying upriver.

I made a half-hearted search for unusual Sulids on the
pilings/navigation structures around the base of the bridge, but didn't
see any. A couple other people with gynormous scopes were closer to the
action and presumably would have been jumping up and down if they saw
something worth jumping around about.

Afterwards we went down to Seal Rock where we had the beach entirely to
ourselves for about an hour. I've seldom seen the place so birdless --
no Harlequin Ducks, no scoters, no rockpipers, just a few cormorants on
the rocks and the usual GULL flock. We found a smallish dead seal (also
several debris-covered bird carcasses) which caused great interest for
our new puppy. Unbeknownst to me she managed to roll around on the seal
carcass for a bit before we got back in the van for the long drive home
-- and I was the one destined to sit with her. But she had a great time.

The tree damage caused by the recent ice storm in the Burnt
Woods/Blodgett area was truly amazing. In some areas practically every
alder larger than 5 inches in diameter has been snapped off, with the
broken-off treetops scattered like so many matchsticks among the
standing trunks. Douglas-firs were also hit pretty hard, as were Oregon
white oaks back in the Willamette Valley and Kings Valley area.

Happy birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




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Subject: Tropical Kingbird reappears- Astoria.
From: Andrew Mattingly <amattingly82 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 16:13:05 -0800
Hopefully this doesn't send too many people on a wild goose chase like the last 
time I reported- but as I was leaving for Mother in Laws today, a Tropical 
Kingbird was staked out in a tree in my back yard (near the monkey tree on 
Alameda in Astoria.) 




Andrew Mattingly



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Subject: What would an Aytha[A] x Aytha[B] hybrid look like?
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 16:11:23 -0800
Per Scott Carpenter's question, "What would a Scaup [Lesser or Greater]
x Redhead hybrid look like?

This book:

        The Birds of Europe with North Africa and the Middle East
        HEINZEL, Hermann, Richard FITTER and John PARSLOW.
        
at least in its Swedish edition (there are also English and German
editions on Amazon, the English versions mention Britain) discusses and
depicts about a dozen combinations, including Tufted x Ring-necked Duck,
Tufted Duck x Greater Scaup, and Tufted Duck x Common Pochard. 

The last one is noted as resembling a small "American Pochard" (Redhead)
but with a somewhat steeper forehead and with less contrast between the
bill and the dark tip.

The combinations of Lesser/Greater Scaup x Redhead aren't covered, nor
anything with Canvasback, but a perusal of the dozen or so examples
suggest that broad range of possibilities are possible, some of them not
intuitive in terms of the manifestation of parental genes in terms of
structure, plumage, and bill color, and depending on the gender/species
combinations of the parents.

Throw in the the idea of back-crosses, 1/8th or 1/16th parentage, and
molt stages, plus active/diving vs. resting head shapes, and the
possibilities become truly bewildering. Perhaps there could be an entire
list-serv devoted to speculation about putative Aythya hybrids.

Glad diskutering,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis





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Subject: Broughton Beach & Hayden Island-Columbia Pt.
From: Beverly Hallberg <mapsout AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 14:06:25 -0800
At 12:30 pm today there was a Red-breasted Merganser with the usual flock
of Western Grebes at Columbia Pt.

https://flic.kr/p/pW4if6

I struck out on the reported Snow Bunting.  I heard some distant Horned
Larks but couldn't find them with scope or bins.  The fire station area and
airport fields were being used for hunting by a Short-eared Owl and an
American Kestrel.  Maybe this is why the Horned Larks and possible Snow
Bunting were elsewhere.

3 Short-eared Owls remain in the area.  One was found on the beach between
the 2 sets of pilings.

https://flic.kr/p/pW5Jdt

Dogs continue to run off-leash in this area regularly :-(  despite the
signage.

Beverly
Subject: LCC Ponds, Eugene, Lane County - Thanksgiving Day 11/27/2014
From: "Anne & Dan Heyerly" <tanager AT nu-world.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 13:46:13 -0800
On our way back home after looking for the LBB Gull this morning, Anne & I
stopped by the LCC ponds to see what was there.  Nothing out of the
ordinary, in short.
Here's the list (it was raining, I didn't count):
Ring-necked Duck
Bufflehead
Hooded Merganser
American Wigeon (most numerous species)
Mallard
Northern Shoveler
Gadwall
American Coot

There might have been Ruddy Duck too. I don't remember.

Good Birding,

Dan Heyerly, Eugene
Subject: LBB Gull (yes)- Ricketts Rd., Goshen, Lane County, Thanksgiving Day 11/27/2014
From: "Anne & Dan Heyerly" <tanager AT nu-world.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 13:40:53 -0800
Anne and I stopped by Ricketts Rd. this morning around 11:00am. It was
raining pretty hard, but we could see the gulls on the pond did not include
either of the two LBB individuals. We could see from the elevated road by
the RR tracks that the adult LBBG was indeed out in the field on the south
side of the road. From the elevated road by the RR tracks, and if you look
at the power line and particularly the structure with three poles, it was
beyond that a little ways and approximately 40-feet to the east of the
easternmost pole itself. We drove west on the road for a closer look but it
was hidden behind grass and the brushy tree line out in that field when we
were approximately even with where it had been. We had no chance to see its
yellow feet from the RR track, and when we drove west to be even with where
it was, we could not even see it.

Good luck to anyone that might try for it later today or in future days.

Dan Heyerly, Eugene

 
Subject: OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 12:44:27 -0800
If we are really lucky, it has been eaten.
.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




On Nov 27, 2014, at 12:36 PM, Craig Tumer wrote:

> I went to the OES pond this morning, hoping to study this bird, but it was 
nowhere to be found. 

> 
> Hopefully, it will return. 
> 
> Craig Tumer
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> On Nov 27, 2014, at 10:13 AM, David Irons  wrote:
> 
>> Scott,
>> 
>> Lots of interesting questions. As I looked at the bird yesterday, I actually 
wondered of it might be partially leucistic, as the pale breast and washed out 
looking flanks are odd. I only live a mile or so from the pond. Hopefully, this 
bird sticks around and reveals some answers to the various questions. 

>> 
>> I appreciate your intellectual curiosity about this bird. 
>> 
>> Dave Irons
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>> On Nov 27, 2014, at 9:44 AM, "Scott Carpenter"  
wrote: 

>> 
>>> Hi Dave,
>>> 
>>> I tend to agree with you that this bird is most likely a Redhead, but I'm 
not sure we can say that with 100% confidence at this point. To put it another 
way, if someone asked me to show them their lifer Redhead, this is not the bird 
I would choose to show them. Back in my listing days, this bird would have been 
recorded as "Redhead (probable)", although I realize the way I kept my personal 
list was just that -- personal and subjective. 

>>> 
>>> I tend to agree with you that the structure on this bird likely does not 
support this bird being 1/2 Canvasback. What is not clear to me is what a 
Redhead that is 1/8 Canvasback, or 1/16 Canvasback, etc., would look like. Do 
we know if the structural and plumage influence would be similar in proportion 
(e.g., would a bird that is 1/16th Canvasback show a bill that looks 1/16th 
like a Canvasback bill, and would it also have plumage that is influenced only 
1/16th by the Canvasback genes)? I have no idea what the answer to that is. 
Unfortunately, the more time I spent with this bird, the more questions I had, 
even if some were esoteric. For example: 

>>> 
>>> - What would a (Lesser or Greater) Scaup x Redhead look like? Except for 
the size of the nail on the bill, their structures are similar, as are portions 
of their female plumages. How could one reasonably identify such a hybrid? This 
was one of my initial thoughts after looking at Dwight's original photo, and I 
still don't know the answer to that question. Hybridization with a Scaup seems 
much more likely than with a Common Pochard. 

>>> 
>>> - Which feathers is this bird currently molting? Presumably, this bird 
completed its prebasic wing molt on its breeding (or staging) grounds. Did its 
head feathers already molt? Is it now molting the feathers on the rest of the 
body? Are some of the feathers simply lacking pigment, or are they bleached out 
because they should have molted a while ago, or is something else going on? 

>>> 
>>> - Of all the times I've seen Redhead family units on their breeding grounds 
(both locally at Ridgefield NWR and elsewhere in the western US), why have I 
never seen one look like this? I definitely pay attention to female duck 
plumage (and eclipse male duck plumage, for that matter), and I have seen 
Redheads with quite a bit of white, but never this much. Is my sample size too 
small, am I unlucky, or is this bird's molt different enough from standard for 
this species that it is indeed atypical? 

>>> 
>>> I have additional questions, but as my wife tells me, I should keep some of 
the voices inside my head. 

>>> 
>>> In terms of hybridization, the Birds of North America Online says of 
Redheads: "Known to hybridize with all 4 North American Aythya species in the 
wild and with an impressive number of species in captivity (Johnsgard 1960, 
Haramis 1982). Redhead × Canvasback hybrids can be fertile (Johnsgard 1960)." I 
find that last sentence rather interesting to ponder, and I wonder if their 
ever will be a period of time where Redheads and Canvasbacks breed along the 
lines of Olympic (Western x Glaucous-winged) Gulls or Golden-winged/Blue-winged 
Warblers. 

>>> 
>>> Since email cannot easily convey emotion, please know that I mean no 
disrespect to you and your arguments for this being a Redhead. In fact, I 
suspect you are indeed correct, but I feel like it is still worthwhile to ask 
questions about this bird and to keep an eye on it over the next month or so. 
At the very least, it should be educational about molt progression in this 
bird. And who knows what else it might turn up -- it already produced a record 
of a Goldeneye for this small pond. 

>>> 
>>> Thanks, Dwight, for sharing this bird -- it's been interesting, 
educational, and fun. 

>>> 
>>> -- 
>>> Scott Carpenter
>>> Portland, Oregon
>>> -------------------------
>>> http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/
>>> 
>>> 
>>> On Wed, Nov 26, 2014 at 5:45 PM, David Irons  wrote:
>>> This bird is not in what we consider "typical plumage" because it is 
molting. The bill pattern is typical for a female Redhead. Having seen a number 
hybrid Aythya ducks, one thing is pretty consistent with hybrids and that is 
bill pattern is intermediate between the two parent species. I don't anything 
about the shape or pattern of the bill on this bird that suggests Canvasback 
and there don't seem to be any other structural aspects that suggest Canvasback 
parentage. I saw this bird today in direct comparison with Ring-necked Ducks (a 
comparatively small Aythya). It is the same size and has a similar sized bill, 
which can be seen in one Dwight Porter's original photos. 

>>> 
>>> In terms of size, head shape and bill pattern this bird matches a Redhead. 
Looking "different" or "not typical" are not enough to start speculating that 
it is a hybrid or another species. Most of the speculative opinions about this 
bird have included little if any substantive support for the putative ID's. 

>>> 
>>> Dave Irons
>>> Portland, OR
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPhone 
>>> 
>>> On Nov 26, 2014, at 3:59 PM, "Scott Carpenter"  
wrote: 

>>> 
>>>> I spent some time with Dwight Porter's interesting duck at OES Pond along 
Nicol Rd in SW Portland. My impression in the field was that this duck is not 
in typical plumage for a Redhead, and I could see why Dwight concluded there 
might be some Canvasback genes present. 

>>>> 
>>>> I put some photos online at:  http://bit.ly/11vElEM
>>>> 
>>>> Although photo 4 shows relatively typical flight feathers for Redhead, the 
lower neck, breast, and flanks are not what I typically see in Redheads this 
time of year. I'm not suggesting there are any Pochard genes present, but I 
also think one cannot definitively rule out that this bird has another Aythya 
species in its lineage, or that it has some plumage aberration. 

>>>> 
>>>> Hopefully this bird will stick around for a while -- it will be 
interesting to see what it looks like in a month or two. 

>>>> 
>>>> On a related note, googling "female redhead duck" yields more pertinent 
results than "female redhead". 

>>>> 
>>>> -- 
>>>> Scott Carpenter
>>>> Portland, Oregon
>>>> -------------------------
>>>> http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
Subject: Re: OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species
From: Craig Tumer <craig AT greatskua.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 12:36:57 -0800
I went to the OES pond this morning, hoping to study this bird, but it was 
nowhere to be found. 


Hopefully, it will return. 

Craig Tumer

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 27, 2014, at 10:13 AM, David Irons  wrote:
> 
> Scott,
> 
> Lots of interesting questions. As I looked at the bird yesterday, I actually 
wondered of it might be partially leucistic, as the pale breast and washed out 
looking flanks are odd. I only live a mile or so from the pond. Hopefully, this 
bird sticks around and reveals some answers to the various questions. 

> 
> I appreciate your intellectual curiosity about this bird. 
> 
> Dave Irons
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Nov 27, 2014, at 9:44 AM, "Scott Carpenter"  
wrote: 

>> 
>> Hi Dave,
>> 
>> I tend to agree with you that this bird is most likely a Redhead, but I'm 
not sure we can say that with 100% confidence at this point. To put it another 
way, if someone asked me to show them their lifer Redhead, this is not the bird 
I would choose to show them. Back in my listing days, this bird would have been 
recorded as "Redhead (probable)", although I realize the way I kept my personal 
list was just that -- personal and subjective. 

>> 
>> I tend to agree with you that the structure on this bird likely does not 
support this bird being 1/2 Canvasback. What is not clear to me is what a 
Redhead that is 1/8 Canvasback, or 1/16 Canvasback, etc., would look like. Do 
we know if the structural and plumage influence would be similar in proportion 
(e.g., would a bird that is 1/16th Canvasback show a bill that looks 1/16th 
like a Canvasback bill, and would it also have plumage that is influenced only 
1/16th by the Canvasback genes)? I have no idea what the answer to that is. 
Unfortunately, the more time I spent with this bird, the more questions I had, 
even if some were esoteric. For example: 

>> 
>> - What would a (Lesser or Greater) Scaup x Redhead look like? Except for the 
size of the nail on the bill, their structures are similar, as are portions of 
their female plumages. How could one reasonably identify such a hybrid? This 
was one of my initial thoughts after looking at Dwight's original photo, and I 
still don't know the answer to that question. Hybridization with a Scaup seems 
much more likely than with a Common Pochard. 

>> 
>> - Which feathers is this bird currently molting? Presumably, this bird 
completed its prebasic wing molt on its breeding (or staging) grounds. Did its 
head feathers already molt? Is it now molting the feathers on the rest of the 
body? Are some of the feathers simply lacking pigment, or are they bleached out 
because they should have molted a while ago, or is something else going on? 

>> 
>> - Of all the times I've seen Redhead family units on their breeding grounds 
(both locally at Ridgefield NWR and elsewhere in the western US), why have I 
never seen one look like this? I definitely pay attention to female duck 
plumage (and eclipse male duck plumage, for that matter), and I have seen 
Redheads with quite a bit of white, but never this much. Is my sample size too 
small, am I unlucky, or is this bird's molt different enough from standard for 
this species that it is indeed atypical? 

>> 
>> I have additional questions, but as my wife tells me, I should keep some of 
the voices inside my head. 

>> 
>> In terms of hybridization, the Birds of North America Online says of 
Redheads: "Known to hybridize with all 4 North American Aythya species in the 
wild and with an impressive number of species in captivity (Johnsgard 1960, 
Haramis 1982). Redhead × Canvasback hybrids can be fertile (Johnsgard 1960)." 
I find that last sentence rather interesting to ponder, and I wonder if their 
ever will be a period of time where Redheads and Canvasbacks breed along the 
lines of Olympic (Western x Glaucous-winged) Gulls or Golden-winged/Blue-winged 
Warblers. 

>> 
>> Since email cannot easily convey emotion, please know that I mean no 
disrespect to you and your arguments for this being a Redhead. In fact, I 
suspect you are indeed correct, but I feel like it is still worthwhile to ask 
questions about this bird and to keep an eye on it over the next month or so. 
At the very least, it should be educational about molt progression in this 
bird. And who knows what else it might turn up -- it already produced a record 
of a Goldeneye for this small pond. 

>> 
>> Thanks, Dwight, for sharing this bird -- it's been interesting, educational, 
and fun. 

>> 
>> -- 
>> Scott Carpenter
>> Portland, Oregon
>> -------------------------
>> http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/
>> 
>> 
>>> On Wed, Nov 26, 2014 at 5:45 PM, David Irons  wrote:
>>> This bird is not in what we consider "typical plumage" because it is 
molting. The bill pattern is typical for a female Redhead. Having seen a number 
hybrid Aythya ducks, one thing is pretty consistent with hybrids and that is 
bill pattern is intermediate between the two parent species. I don't anything 
about the shape or pattern of the bill on this bird that suggests Canvasback 
and there don't seem to be any other structural aspects that suggest Canvasback 
parentage. I saw this bird today in direct comparison with Ring-necked Ducks (a 
comparatively small Aythya). It is the same size and has a similar sized bill, 
which can be seen in one Dwight Porter's original photos. 

>>> 
>>> In terms of size, head shape and bill pattern this bird matches a Redhead. 
Looking "different" or "not typical" are not enough to start speculating that 
it is a hybrid or another species. Most of the speculative opinions about this 
bird have included little if any substantive support for the putative ID's. 

>>> 
>>> Dave Irons
>>> Portland, OR
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPhone 
>>> 
>>>> On Nov 26, 2014, at 3:59 PM, "Scott Carpenter"  
wrote: 

>>>> 
>>>> I spent some time with Dwight Porter's interesting duck at OES Pond along 
Nicol Rd in SW Portland. My impression in the field was that this duck is not 
in typical plumage for a Redhead, and I could see why Dwight concluded there 
might be some Canvasback genes present. 

>>>> 
>>>> I put some photos online at:  http://bit.ly/11vElEM
>>>> 
>>>> Although photo 4 shows relatively typical flight feathers for Redhead, the 
lower neck, breast, and flanks are not what I typically see in Redheads this 
time of year. I'm not suggesting there are any Pochard genes present, but I 
also think one cannot definitively rule out that this bird has another Aythya 
species in its lineage, or that it has some plumage aberration. 

>>>> 
>>>> Hopefully this bird will stick around for a while -- it will be 
interesting to see what it looks like in a month or two. 

>>>> 
>>>> On a related note, googling "female redhead duck" yields more pertinent 
results than "female redhead". 

>>>> 
>>>> -- 
>>>> Scott Carpenter
>>>> Portland, Oregon
>>>> -------------------------
>>>> http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/
>> 
>> 
>> 
Subject: Coos Bay 11/27/2014
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 11:29:45 -0800
Had a few minutes this morning and went over to Pigeon Point in the Empie
area of Coos Bay.  After about a half an hour of sorting through the many
shorebirds I finally found the RED KNOT.  Also present were 12 MARBLED
GODWITS and the lone WILLET. There were several hundred Dunlin and a few
Westerns with the flock, did not see any Leasties (but I am sure there were
some in there).  Also about a dozen sanderlings.

Off to turkeyland- ENJOY!

Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: An Outstanding Morning on Mary's Peak - 26 Nov 2014
From: Jack Williamson <jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 11:08:39 -0800
I arrived at the parking lot at 0645 then walked to the summit to wait for
sunrise. The winds seemed to be stronger than the forecasted 25-35 mph when
I got out of the car - but since there was no one else in the parking lot,
I was more excited about the possibility of having the top of the peak to
myself to photograph an unusual species or two than I was concerned about
how the wind might effect my day.

As luck would have it, as I turned away from the views of the sunrise to
begin my search for birds, there was a Gray-Growned Rosy-Finch foraging in
the gravel just 50 feet away.  This was the second time in a week that I
had the chance to photograph a really-tame lifer. I am getting spoiled.

After laying in the wet grass for nearly 40 minutes getting close shots of
the finch under varying light, I heard what a I thought was the call of a
Pine Grosbeak which I took as a sign that it was time for me get out of the
wind. Fortunately for me most reports of the grosbeak came from the leeward
side of the peak near the "bench". It took three trips around the peak
before finding a single female calling from the top a distant noble fir.
Back to the realty of photographing most birds from a long way away and
under back-lit conditions.

http://www.jack-n-jill.net/blog/2014/11/an-outstanding-morning-on-marys-peak---26-nov-2014 


-- 
Jack Williamson
West Linn, Oregon
Subject: OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 11:01:35 -0800
I thought there was a good open-wing shot.  Not detailed enough?
.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




On Nov 27, 2014, at 10:52 AM, Bob Archer wrote:

> Hi: To keep pushing my last email, without being able to see details of the 
wing coverts, how can we tell this is even an adult. Doesn't the idea that it 
is a HY Redhead doing its normal PF molt make more sense? 

> 
> Bob Archer
> pdx
> 
> On Thu, Nov 27, 2014 at 9:43 AM, Scott Carpenter  
wrote: 

> Hi Dave,
> 
> I tend to agree with you that this bird is most likely a Redhead, but I'm not 
sure we can say that with 100% confidence at this point. To put it another way, 
if someone asked me to show them their lifer Redhead, this is not the bird I 
would choose to show them. Back in my listing days, this bird would have been 
recorded as "Redhead (probable)", although I realize the way I kept my personal 
list was just that -- personal and subjective. 

> 
> I tend to agree with you that the structure on this bird likely does not 
support this bird being 1/2 Canvasback. What is not clear to me is what a 
Redhead that is 1/8 Canvasback, or 1/16 Canvasback, etc., would look like. Do 
we know if the structural and plumage influence would be similar in proportion 
(e.g., would a bird that is 1/16th Canvasback show a bill that looks 1/16th 
like a Canvasback bill, and would it also have plumage that is influenced only 
1/16th by the Canvasback genes)? I have no idea what the answer to that is. 
Unfortunately, the more time I spent with this bird, the more questions I had, 
even if some were esoteric. For example: 

> 
> - What would a (Lesser or Greater) Scaup x Redhead look like? Except for the 
size of the nail on the bill, their structures are similar, as are portions of 
their female plumages. How could one reasonably identify such a hybrid? This 
was one of my initial thoughts after looking at Dwight's original photo, and I 
still don't know the answer to that question. Hybridization with a Scaup seems 
much more likely than with a Common Pochard. 

> 
> - Which feathers is this bird currently molting? Presumably, this bird 
completed its prebasic wing molt on its breeding (or staging) grounds. Did its 
head feathers already molt? Is it now molting the feathers on the rest of the 
body? Are some of the feathers simply lacking pigment, or are they bleached out 
because they should have molted a while ago, or is something else going on? 

> 
> - Of all the times I've seen Redhead family units on their breeding grounds 
(both locally at Ridgefield NWR and elsewhere in the western US), why have I 
never seen one look like this? I definitely pay attention to female duck 
plumage (and eclipse male duck plumage, for that matter), and I have seen 
Redheads with quite a bit of white, but never this much. Is my sample size too 
small, am I unlucky, or is this bird's molt different enough from standard for 
this species that it is indeed atypical? 

> 
> I have additional questions, but as my wife tells me, I should keep some of 
the voices inside my head. 

> 
> In terms of hybridization, the Birds of North America Online says of 
Redheads: "Known to hybridize with all 4 North American Aythya species in the 
wild and with an impressive number of species in captivity (Johnsgard 1960, 
Haramis 1982). Redhead × Canvasback hybrids can be fertile (Johnsgard 1960)." I 
find that last sentence rather interesting to ponder, and I wonder if their 
ever will be a period of time where Redheads and Canvasbacks breed along the 
lines of Olympic (Western x Glaucous-winged) Gulls or Golden-winged/Blue-winged 
Warblers. 

> 
> Since email cannot easily convey emotion, please know that I mean no 
disrespect to you and your arguments for this being a Redhead. In fact, I 
suspect you are indeed correct, but I feel like it is still worthwhile to ask 
questions about this bird and to keep an eye on it over the next month or so. 
At the very least, it should be educational about molt progression in this 
bird. And who knows what else it might turn up -- it already produced a record 
of a Goldeneye for this small pond. 

> 
> Thanks, Dwight, for sharing this bird -- it's been interesting, educational, 
and fun. 

> 
> -- 
> Scott Carpenter
> Portland, Oregon
> -------------------------
> http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/
> 
> 
> On Wed, Nov 26, 2014 at 5:45 PM, David Irons  wrote:
> This bird is not in what we consider "typical plumage" because it is molting. 
The bill pattern is typical for a female Redhead. Having seen a number hybrid 
Aythya ducks, one thing is pretty consistent with hybrids and that is bill 
pattern is intermediate between the two parent species. I don't anything about 
the shape or pattern of the bill on this bird that suggests Canvasback and 
there don't seem to be any other structural aspects that suggest Canvasback 
parentage. I saw this bird today in direct comparison with Ring-necked Ducks (a 
comparatively small Aythya). It is the same size and has a similar sized bill, 
which can be seen in one Dwight Porter's original photos. 

> 
> In terms of size, head shape and bill pattern this bird matches a Redhead. 
Looking "different" or "not typical" are not enough to start speculating that 
it is a hybrid or another species. Most of the speculative opinions about this 
bird have included little if any substantive support for the putative ID's. 

> 
> Dave Irons
> Portland, OR
> 
> Sent from my iPhone 
> 
> On Nov 26, 2014, at 3:59 PM, "Scott Carpenter"  wrote:
> 
>> I spent some time with Dwight Porter's interesting duck at OES Pond along 
Nicol Rd in SW Portland. My impression in the field was that this duck is not 
in typical plumage for a Redhead, and I could see why Dwight concluded there 
might be some Canvasback genes present. 

>> 
>> I put some photos online at:  http://bit.ly/11vElEM
>> 
>> Although photo 4 shows relatively typical flight feathers for Redhead, the 
lower neck, breast, and flanks are not what I typically see in Redheads this 
time of year. I'm not suggesting there are any Pochard genes present, but I 
also think one cannot definitively rule out that this bird has another Aythya 
species in its lineage, or that it has some plumage aberration. 

>> 
>> Hopefully this bird will stick around for a while -- it will be interesting 
to see what it looks like in a month or two. 

>> 
>> On a related note, googling "female redhead duck" yields more pertinent 
results than "female redhead". 

>> 
>> -- 
>> Scott Carpenter
>> Portland, Oregon
>> -------------------------
>> http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/
> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Re: OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 10:52:53 -0800
Hi:  To keep pushing my last email, without being able to see details of
the wing coverts, how can we tell this is even an adult.  Doesn't the idea
that it is a HY Redhead doing its normal PF molt make more sense?

Bob Archer
pdx

On Thu, Nov 27, 2014 at 9:43 AM, Scott Carpenter 
wrote:

> Hi Dave,
>
> I tend to agree with you that this bird is most likely a Redhead, but I'm
> not sure we can say that with 100% confidence at this point. To put it
> another way, if someone asked me to show them their lifer Redhead, this is
> not the bird I would choose to show them. Back in my listing days, this
> bird would have been recorded as "Redhead (probable)", although I realize
> the way I kept my personal list was just that -- personal and subjective.
>
> I tend to agree with you that the structure on this bird likely does not
> support this bird being 1/2 Canvasback. What is not clear to me is what a
> Redhead that is 1/8 Canvasback, or 1/16 Canvasback, etc., would look like.
> Do we know if the structural and plumage influence would be similar in
> proportion (e.g., would a bird that is 1/16th Canvasback show a bill that
> looks 1/16th like a Canvasback bill, and would it also have plumage that is
> influenced only 1/16th by the Canvasback genes)? I have no idea what the
> answer to that is. Unfortunately, the more time I spent with this bird, the
> more questions I had, even if some were esoteric. For example:
>
> - What would a (Lesser or Greater) Scaup x Redhead look like? Except for
> the size of the nail on the bill, their structures are similar, as are
> portions of their female plumages. How could one reasonably identify such a
> hybrid? This was one of my initial thoughts after looking at Dwight's
> original photo, and I still don't know the answer to that question.
> Hybridization with a Scaup seems much more likely than with a Common
> Pochard.
>
> - Which feathers is this bird currently molting? Presumably, this bird
> completed its prebasic wing molt on its breeding (or staging) grounds. Did
> its head feathers already molt? Is it now molting the feathers on the rest
> of the body? Are some of the feathers simply lacking pigment, or are they
> bleached out because they should have molted a while ago, or is something
> else going on?
>
> - Of all the times I've seen Redhead family units on their breeding
> grounds (both locally at Ridgefield NWR and elsewhere in the western US),
> why have I never seen one look like this? I definitely pay attention to
> female duck plumage (and eclipse male duck plumage, for that matter), and I
> have seen Redheads with quite a bit of white, but never this much. Is my
> sample size too small, am I unlucky, or is this bird's molt different
> enough from standard for this species that it is indeed atypical?
>
> I have additional questions, but as my wife tells me, I should keep some
> of the voices inside my head.
>
> In terms of hybridization, the Birds of North America Online says of
> Redheads: "Known to hybridize with all 4 North American Aythya species in
> the wild and with an impressive number of species in captivity (Johnsgard
> 1960, Haramis 1982). Redhead × Canvasback hybrids can be fertile (Johnsgard
> 1960)." I find that last sentence rather interesting to ponder, and I
> wonder if their ever will be a period of time where Redheads and
> Canvasbacks breed along the lines of Olympic (Western x Glaucous-winged)
> Gulls or Golden-winged/Blue-winged Warblers.
>
> Since email cannot easily convey emotion, please know that I mean no
> disrespect to you and your arguments for this being a Redhead. In fact, I
> suspect you are indeed correct, but I feel like it is still worthwhile to
> ask questions about this bird and to keep an eye on it over the next month
> or so. At the very least, it should be educational about molt progression
> in this bird. And who knows what else it might turn up -- it already
> produced a record of a Goldeneye for this small pond.
>
> Thanks, Dwight, for sharing this bird -- it's been interesting,
> educational, and fun.
>
> --
> Scott Carpenter
> Portland, Oregon
> -------------------------
> http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/
>
>
> On Wed, Nov 26, 2014 at 5:45 PM, David Irons  wrote:
>
>> This bird is not in what we consider "typical plumage" because it is
>> molting. The bill pattern is typical for a female Redhead. Having seen a
>> number hybrid Aythya ducks, one thing is pretty consistent with hybrids and
>> that is bill pattern is intermediate between the two parent species. I
>> don't anything about the shape or pattern of the bill on this bird that
>> suggests Canvasback and there don't seem to be any other structural aspects
>> that suggest Canvasback parentage. I saw this bird today in direct
>> comparison with Ring-necked Ducks (a comparatively small Aythya). It is the
>> same size and has a similar sized bill, which can be seen in one Dwight
>> Porter's original photos.
>>
>> In terms of size, head shape and bill pattern this bird matches a
>> Redhead. Looking "different" or "not typical" are not enough to start
>> speculating that it is a hybrid or another species. Most of the speculative
>> opinions about this bird have included little if any substantive support
>> for the putative ID's.
>>
>> Dave Irons
>> Portland, OR
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Nov 26, 2014, at 3:59 PM, "Scott Carpenter" 
>> wrote:
>>
>> I spent some time with Dwight Porter's interesting duck at OES Pond along
>> Nicol Rd in SW Portland. My impression in the field was that this duck is
>> not in typical plumage for a Redhead, and I could see why Dwight concluded
>> there might be some Canvasback genes present.
>>
>> I put some photos online at:  http://bit.ly/11vElEM
>>
>> Although photo 4 shows relatively typical flight feathers for Redhead,
>> the lower neck, breast, and flanks are not what I typically see in Redheads
>> this time of year. I'm not suggesting there are any Pochard genes present,
>> but I also think one cannot definitively rule out that this bird has
>> another Aythya species in its lineage, or that it has some plumage
>> aberration.
>>
>> Hopefully this bird will stick around for a while -- it will be
>> interesting to see what it looks like in a month or two.
>>
>> On a related note, googling "female redhead duck" yields more pertinent
>> results than "female redhead".
>>
>> --
>> Scott Carpenter
>> Portland, Oregon
>> -------------------------
>> http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/
>>
>>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Bean Goose and Boobies
From: "Yahoo" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "rockawaybirder@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 10:50:39 -0800
> 
> I am finally getting the chance to look for the goose and boobies in both 
Pacific City and Newport. Any updates on these would be appreciated as well as 
any additional stops I should make. 

> 
> Seattle, WA
> Rockaway Beach, OR
> Waldport, OR
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> www.ilenesamowitz.com
> www.ilenesamowitzphoto.com
> 
> 


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Subject: Before the snow: Birding Forest Road 44 in Hood River and Wasco Counties
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 10:26:08 -0800
Hi:

Yesterday I headed out to FR 44 (Dufur Mill Road) to see what birds remain
in the high foothills of Mt Hood.  I needed to get out there before they
close the road for the winter.  I was happy to whistle in 4 Northern
Pygmny-Owls and found an American Three-toed and a Black-backed Woodpecker.
Bummed that I did not stumble across anything rare, but need to keep
trying.  Pictures of a few owls and other bird ramblings here:


http://www.birdfellow.com/members/BobArcher/field_reports/888-before-the-snow-forest-road-44-in-hood-river-and-wasco-counties 



Bob Archer
PDX
Subject: Re: LBBG today (for larophiles)
From: "Phil Pickering" <philliplc AT charter.net>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 10:22:29 -0800
Yeah I can see a little darkness on the alula and
the tertials look sort of washed brownish.
Still the appearance is more mature than
I am seeing in other 3rd-cycle images, none
of which show anything close to mature
primaries.



-----Original Message----- 
From: Alan Contreras
Sent: Thursday, November 27, 2014 10:15 AM
To: philliplc AT charter.net
Cc: OBOL
Subject: LBBG today (for larophiles)

When we saw them side-by-side in a moment of sunlight, the younger bird has a 
definite brownish 

mantle-wash compared to 
the older.  Only visible when you get a flat side view.


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Subject: Re: Philomath Sewage Ponds corrigendum 11/26/2017 report
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 10:20:18 -0800
Dan, MY bogus grebe had the right color on the neck !

Happy Thanksgiving to the world of OBOLoids.  See you in CBC season.
.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




On Nov 27, 2014, at 10:15 AM, Anne & Dan Heyerly wrote:

> Obolinks,
> 
> I confess I did not look at the grebes carefully on our brief stop at dusk on 
Wednesday 11/26/2014. It has been kindly and privately pointed out that no one 
else has reported Horned Grebes at that location in a while. In hindsight the 
grebes were rather “long-necked”, but never to the extent they would be 
confused with a floating Budweiser Long-Neck! (Hi Alan!) In addition, the sides 
of their necks were dusky and they had some white on their chins (noted by 
Anne, but not me). I only know that for sure they were small grebes. I hereby 
withdraw the report of Horned Grebes from PSPs on 11/26/2014. 

> 
> Regarding the numbers of ducks I reported, other than the Canada Goose, 
Canvasbacks, and Cinnamon Teal the quantities are simply estimates arrived at 
from home over an hour after seeing the birds. My numbers likely are both high 
for some and low for others. 

> 
> Good Birding, and Happy Thanksgiving!
> 
> Dan Heyerly, Eugene
> 
>  
> 
Subject: Philomath Sewage Ponds corrigendum 11/26/2017 report
From: "Anne & Dan Heyerly" <tanager AT nu-world.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 10:15:41 -0800
Obolinks,

I confess I did not look at the grebes carefully on our brief stop at dusk
on Wednesday 11/26/2014.  It has been kindly and privately pointed out that
no one else has reported Horned Grebes at that location in a while. In
hindsight the grebes were rather "long-necked", but never to the extent they
would be confused with a floating Budweiser Long-Neck! (Hi Alan!)  In
addition, the sides of their necks were dusky and they had some white on
their chins (noted by Anne, but not me). I only know that for sure they were
small grebes.  I hereby withdraw the report of Horned Grebes from PSPs on
11/26/2014.

Regarding the numbers of ducks I reported, other than the Canada Goose,
Canvasbacks, and Cinnamon Teal the quantities are simply estimates arrived
at from home over an hour after seeing the birds. My numbers likely are both
high for some and low for others.  

Good Birding, and Happy Thanksgiving!

Dan Heyerly, Eugene

 
Subject: LBBG today (for larophiles)
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 10:15:04 -0800
When we saw them side-by-side in a moment of sunlight, the younger bird has a 
definite brownish mantle-wash compared to the older. Only visible when you get 
a flat side view. 

.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




On Nov 27, 2014, at 9:50 AM, Phil Pickering wrote:

> Nice shots. Confirms the apparent funkiness of
> the "subadult".
> 
> The mantle is virtually (although not perfectly)
> mature, and P5-8 do look fully mature despite the
> immaturity of the bill pattern and iris. 
> It also does seem primary molt might have
> been suspended on P9, which appears to be
> missing with no sign of new growth while the
> old P10 is retained. 
> It would not be surprising if this individual was
> older than 3rd-cycle with aspects of maturity
> delayed.
> 
> Phil
> 
> 
> 
> http://oschmidt.net/OwenLSchmidtLLC/LBBG.html
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
Subject: Re: OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 10:13:57 -0800
Scott,

Lots of interesting questions. As I looked at the bird yesterday, I actually 
wondered of it might be partially leucistic, as the pale breast and washed out 
looking flanks are odd. I only live a mile or so from the pond. Hopefully, this 
bird sticks around and reveals some answers to the various questions. 


I appreciate your intellectual curiosity about this bird. 

Dave Irons

Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 27, 2014, at 9:44 AM, "Scott Carpenter"  wrote:

> Hi Dave,
> 
> I tend to agree with you that this bird is most likely a Redhead, but I'm not 
sure we can say that with 100% confidence at this point. To put it another way, 
if someone asked me to show them their lifer Redhead, this is not the bird I 
would choose to show them. Back in my listing days, this bird would have been 
recorded as "Redhead (probable)", although I realize the way I kept my personal 
list was just that -- personal and subjective. 

> 
> I tend to agree with you that the structure on this bird likely does not 
support this bird being 1/2 Canvasback. What is not clear to me is what a 
Redhead that is 1/8 Canvasback, or 1/16 Canvasback, etc., would look like. Do 
we know if the structural and plumage influence would be similar in proportion 
(e.g., would a bird that is 1/16th Canvasback show a bill that looks 1/16th 
like a Canvasback bill, and would it also have plumage that is influenced only 
1/16th by the Canvasback genes)? I have no idea what the answer to that is. 
Unfortunately, the more time I spent with this bird, the more questions I had, 
even if some were esoteric. For example: 

> 
> - What would a (Lesser or Greater) Scaup x Redhead look like? Except for the 
size of the nail on the bill, their structures are similar, as are portions of 
their female plumages. How could one reasonably identify such a hybrid? This 
was one of my initial thoughts after looking at Dwight's original photo, and I 
still don't know the answer to that question. Hybridization with a Scaup seems 
much more likely than with a Common Pochard. 

> 
> - Which feathers is this bird currently molting? Presumably, this bird 
completed its prebasic wing molt on its breeding (or staging) grounds. Did its 
head feathers already molt? Is it now molting the feathers on the rest of the 
body? Are some of the feathers simply lacking pigment, or are they bleached out 
because they should have molted a while ago, or is something else going on? 

> 
> - Of all the times I've seen Redhead family units on their breeding grounds 
(both locally at Ridgefield NWR and elsewhere in the western US), why have I 
never seen one look like this? I definitely pay attention to female duck 
plumage (and eclipse male duck plumage, for that matter), and I have seen 
Redheads with quite a bit of white, but never this much. Is my sample size too 
small, am I unlucky, or is this bird's molt different enough from standard for 
this species that it is indeed atypical? 

> 
> I have additional questions, but as my wife tells me, I should keep some of 
the voices inside my head. 

> 
> In terms of hybridization, the Birds of North America Online says of 
Redheads: "Known to hybridize with all 4 North American Aythya species in the 
wild and with an impressive number of species in captivity (Johnsgard 1960, 
Haramis 1982). Redhead × Canvasback hybrids can be fertile (Johnsgard 1960)." 
I find that last sentence rather interesting to ponder, and I wonder if their 
ever will be a period of time where Redheads and Canvasbacks breed along the 
lines of Olympic (Western x Glaucous-winged) Gulls or Golden-winged/Blue-winged 
Warblers. 

> 
> Since email cannot easily convey emotion, please know that I mean no 
disrespect to you and your arguments for this being a Redhead. In fact, I 
suspect you are indeed correct, but I feel like it is still worthwhile to ask 
questions about this bird and to keep an eye on it over the next month or so. 
At the very least, it should be educational about molt progression in this 
bird. And who knows what else it might turn up -- it already produced a record 
of a Goldeneye for this small pond. 

> 
> Thanks, Dwight, for sharing this bird -- it's been interesting, educational, 
and fun. 

> 
> -- 
> Scott Carpenter
> Portland, Oregon
> -------------------------
> http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/
> 
> 
> On Wed, Nov 26, 2014 at 5:45 PM, David Irons  wrote:
> This bird is not in what we consider "typical plumage" because it is molting. 
The bill pattern is typical for a female Redhead. Having seen a number hybrid 
Aythya ducks, one thing is pretty consistent with hybrids and that is bill 
pattern is intermediate between the two parent species. I don't anything about 
the shape or pattern of the bill on this bird that suggests Canvasback and 
there don't seem to be any other structural aspects that suggest Canvasback 
parentage. I saw this bird today in direct comparison with Ring-necked Ducks (a 
comparatively small Aythya). It is the same size and has a similar sized bill, 
which can be seen in one Dwight Porter's original photos. 

> 
> In terms of size, head shape and bill pattern this bird matches a Redhead. 
Looking "different" or "not typical" are not enough to start speculating that 
it is a hybrid or another species. Most of the speculative opinions about this 
bird have included little if any substantive support for the putative ID's. 

> 
> Dave Irons
> Portland, OR
> 
> Sent from my iPhone 
> 
> On Nov 26, 2014, at 3:59 PM, "Scott Carpenter"  wrote: 

> 
>> I spent some time with Dwight Porter's interesting duck at OES Pond along 
Nicol Rd in SW Portland. My impression in the field was that this duck is not 
in typical plumage for a Redhead, and I could see why Dwight concluded there 
might be some Canvasback genes present. 

>> 
>> I put some photos online at:  http://bit.ly/11vElEM
>> 
>> Although photo 4 shows relatively typical flight feathers for Redhead, the 
lower neck, breast, and flanks are not what I typically see in Redheads this 
time of year. I'm not suggesting there are any Pochard genes present, but I 
also think one cannot definitively rule out that this bird has another Aythya 
species in its lineage, or that it has some plumage aberration. 

>> 
>> Hopefully this bird will stick around for a while -- it will be interesting 
to see what it looks like in a month or two. 

>> 
>> On a related note, googling "female redhead duck" yields more pertinent 
results than "female redhead". 

>> 
>> -- 
>> Scott Carpenter
>> Portland, Oregon
>> -------------------------
>> http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Re: LBBG today (for larophiles)
From: "Phil Pickering" <philliplc AT charter.net>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 09:50:53 -0800
Nice shots. Confirms the apparent funkiness of
the "subadult".

The mantle is virtually (although not perfectly)
mature, and P5-8 do look fully mature despite the
immaturity of the bill pattern and iris. 

It also does seem primary molt might have
been suspended on P9, which appears to be
missing with no sign of new growth while the
old P10 is retained. 

It would not be surprising if this individual was
older than 3rd-cycle with aspects of maturity
delayed.

Phil



http://oschmidt.net/OwenLSchmidtLLC/LBBG.html



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Subject: Re: OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species
From: Scott Carpenter <slcarpenter AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 09:43:19 -0800
Hi Dave,

I tend to agree with you that this bird is most likely a Redhead, but I'm
not sure we can say that with 100% confidence at this point. To put it
another way, if someone asked me to show them their lifer Redhead, this is
not the bird I would choose to show them. Back in my listing days, this
bird would have been recorded as "Redhead (probable)", although I realize
the way I kept my personal list was just that -- personal and subjective.

I tend to agree with you that the structure on this bird likely does not
support this bird being 1/2 Canvasback. What is not clear to me is what a
Redhead that is 1/8 Canvasback, or 1/16 Canvasback, etc., would look like.
Do we know if the structural and plumage influence would be similar in
proportion (e.g., would a bird that is 1/16th Canvasback show a bill that
looks 1/16th like a Canvasback bill, and would it also have plumage that is
influenced only 1/16th by the Canvasback genes)? I have no idea what the
answer to that is. Unfortunately, the more time I spent with this bird, the
more questions I had, even if some were esoteric. For example:

- What would a (Lesser or Greater) Scaup x Redhead look like? Except for
the size of the nail on the bill, their structures are similar, as are
portions of their female plumages. How could one reasonably identify such a
hybrid? This was one of my initial thoughts after looking at Dwight's
original photo, and I still don't know the answer to that question.
Hybridization with a Scaup seems much more likely than with a Common
Pochard.

- Which feathers is this bird currently molting? Presumably, this bird
completed its prebasic wing molt on its breeding (or staging) grounds. Did
its head feathers already molt? Is it now molting the feathers on the rest
of the body? Are some of the feathers simply lacking pigment, or are they
bleached out because they should have molted a while ago, or is something
else going on?

- Of all the times I've seen Redhead family units on their breeding grounds
(both locally at Ridgefield NWR and elsewhere in the western US), why have
I never seen one look like this? I definitely pay attention to female duck
plumage (and eclipse male duck plumage, for that matter), and I have seen
Redheads with quite a bit of white, but never this much. Is my sample size
too small, am I unlucky, or is this bird's molt different enough from
standard for this species that it is indeed atypical?

I have additional questions, but as my wife tells me, I should keep some of
the voices inside my head.

In terms of hybridization, the Birds of North America Online says of
Redheads: "Known to hybridize with all 4 North American Aythya species in
the wild and with an impressive number of species in captivity (Johnsgard
1960, Haramis 1982). Redhead × Canvasback hybrids can be fertile (Johnsgard
1960)." I find that last sentence rather interesting to ponder, and I
wonder if their ever will be a period of time where Redheads and
Canvasbacks breed along the lines of Olympic (Western x Glaucous-winged)
Gulls or Golden-winged/Blue-winged Warblers.

Since email cannot easily convey emotion, please know that I mean no
disrespect to you and your arguments for this being a Redhead. In fact, I
suspect you are indeed correct, but I feel like it is still worthwhile to
ask questions about this bird and to keep an eye on it over the next month
or so. At the very least, it should be educational about molt progression
in this bird. And who knows what else it might turn up -- it already
produced a record of a Goldeneye for this small pond.

Thanks, Dwight, for sharing this bird -- it's been interesting,
educational, and fun.

-- 
Scott Carpenter
Portland, Oregon
-------------------------
http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/


On Wed, Nov 26, 2014 at 5:45 PM, David Irons  wrote:

> This bird is not in what we consider "typical plumage" because it is
> molting. The bill pattern is typical for a female Redhead. Having seen a
> number hybrid Aythya ducks, one thing is pretty consistent with hybrids and
> that is bill pattern is intermediate between the two parent species. I
> don't anything about the shape or pattern of the bill on this bird that
> suggests Canvasback and there don't seem to be any other structural aspects
> that suggest Canvasback parentage. I saw this bird today in direct
> comparison with Ring-necked Ducks (a comparatively small Aythya). It is the
> same size and has a similar sized bill, which can be seen in one Dwight
> Porter's original photos.
>
> In terms of size, head shape and bill pattern this bird matches a Redhead.
> Looking "different" or "not typical" are not enough to start speculating
> that it is a hybrid or another species. Most of the speculative opinions
> about this bird have included little if any substantive support for the
> putative ID's.
>
> Dave Irons
> Portland, OR
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Nov 26, 2014, at 3:59 PM, "Scott Carpenter" 
> wrote:
>
> I spent some time with Dwight Porter's interesting duck at OES Pond along
> Nicol Rd in SW Portland. My impression in the field was that this duck is
> not in typical plumage for a Redhead, and I could see why Dwight concluded
> there might be some Canvasback genes present.
>
> I put some photos online at:  http://bit.ly/11vElEM
>
> Although photo 4 shows relatively typical flight feathers for Redhead, the
> lower neck, breast, and flanks are not what I typically see in Redheads
> this time of year. I'm not suggesting there are any Pochard genes present,
> but I also think one cannot definitively rule out that this bird has
> another Aythya species in its lineage, or that it has some plumage
> aberration.
>
> Hopefully this bird will stick around for a while -- it will be
> interesting to see what it looks like in a month or two.
>
> On a related note, googling "female redhead duck" yields more pertinent
> results than "female redhead".
>
> --
> Scott Carpenter
> Portland, Oregon
> -------------------------
> http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/
>
>
Subject: Re: Weird Savannah Sparrow
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 07:04:36 +0000
Tom,

While this bird strikes me as longer billed than our typical local Savannah 
Sparrows, I don't think that the bill isn't quite hefty enough for a 
Large-billed and it isn't shaped right for that form. Your bird appears to have 
a very straight culmen, a la a Cassin's Finch bill, whereas Large-billed 
normally have a slightly decurved culmen. I suspect that this bird is merely an 
"out of towner" as Mike Patterson might say. 


James Rising's "The Sparrows of the United States and Canada" (1996) offers a 
great table of measurements for Savannah Sparrows from all over North America 
(including Mexico). It shows culmen length ranges from birds taken/banded (not 
sure) in Alaska and the Northwest Territory that overlap with the culmen length 
ranges of birds from Sonora, Mexico (presumed Large-billed types). Given the 
recent typhoon and subsequent cold blast that pushed into the region, it seems 
more plausible that this bird originated from a more northerly and migratory 
breeding population rather than the sedentary southerly Large-billed breeding 
populations. If I were to see your bird in Oregon, I too would notice it as 
something atypical. 


I happen to have an email address for James Rising, so I've cc'd him on this. 
Perhaps he can offer an opinion on the origin of this individual. 


Dave Irons
Portland, OR 

From: tc AT empnet.com
To: obol AT freelists.org
CC: COBOL AT lists.oregonstate.edu
Subject: [obol] Weird Savannah Sparrow
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 21:03:21 -0800

Last weekend I ran across an unusual looking Savannah in Bend’s Old Mill 
District (for you locals it was on the south side of the tunnel feeding in the 
weeds on the hillside opposite the north end of the dog park). It is much 
heavier billed than the ones we normally see here. Here is the sequence 
https://picasaweb.google.com/112496990053174978105/OregonBirds?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCKir3oKAuNrvaQ&feat=directlink 
It is very similar to the Large-billed Savannah’s I saw in southern California. 
Here is a link to a photo of a similar bird labelled as 
such:http://jimburnsphotos.com/media/Savannah-Sparrow-large-bill.jpg Since the 
Large-billed form isn’t supposed to occur north of the Salton Sea inland I’d be 
interested in hearing comments about this bird. Thanks, Tom Crabtree, Bend 
Subject: Benton Co. 11/26/2014
From: "Anne & Dan Heyerly" <tanager AT nu-world.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 22:30:14 -0800
Anne and I birded Mary's Peak today. We found one Gray-crowned Rosy-finch at
the summit near the fenced in antennas. We waited in the high winds and
chilly temps lower down for Pine Grosbeaks, but none showed! Same luck as
Tom Cable's this day.  We did find several Red-breasted Nuthatches,
Chestnut-backed Chickadees, Varied Thrushes, and one Common Raven in the
Mary's Peak environs.

On the way home we stopped and picked up a 30-day permit, which is the
longest permit they (Public Works Department) will issue, and then visited
the Philomath Sewage Ponds. 

Northern Shoveler - GOB SMACK! (350-400?)
Green-winged Teal - fewer than 10
CINNAMON TEAL (male) - 1
American Wigeon - 20
American Coot - gob smack (250?)
Lesser Scaup - 20?
Bufflehead - 150
CANVASBACK - 8 (7 males + 1 female)
Ruddy Duck - 40
Horned Grebe - 4 maybe
Canada Goose - 1 
Ring-necked Duck - 40
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK - 1 
Red-tailed Hawk - 1 
Golden-crowned Sparrow - 4 
Song Sparrow - 1 
Savannah Sparrow - 1 

That's it for now.

Good luck,

Dan Heyerly, Eugene

 





Subject: Lesser Black-backed Gulls today
From: Owen Schmidt <oschmidt AT att.net>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 22:09:14 -0800
……. photos of 2 birds:

http://oschmidt.net/OwenLSchmidtLLC/LBBG.html 
 


oschmidt AT att.net
Wednesday, November 26, 2014


Subject: Marys Peak
From: Thomas Cable <tecable AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 21:43:45 -0800
 I found one Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch on the summit of Marys Peak this morning. 
I don't know where it's posse was. 

 I was not able to locate any Pine Grosbeaks. It was mostly clear but very 
windy. 

	
	Tom Cable
	Eugene



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Subject: Evening Grosbeak
From: Lillian <lillian.e AT prodigy.net>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 21:12:03 -0800
Happy Thanksgiving Birders...

Female Evening Grosbeak sighted in Camas,first sighting for us in many years.

Otherwise the regular feeder birds:

Red-breasted Nuthatch
Spotted Towhee
Scrub Jay
Juncos
Black-capped Chickadee

Lillian
Subject: Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 11/26/2014
From: Wink Gross <winkg AT hevanet.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 21:04:47 -0800
Here is the summary of my morning dogwalks from NW Seblar Terrace to the 
Pittock Mansion for the week 11/20/14 to 11/26/14. Species neither seen nor 
heard the previous week are in ALL CAPS. 


Additional information about my dogwalk, including an archive of weekly 
summaries and a checklist, may be found at 
http://www.hevanet.com/winkg/dogwalkpage.html 


The sightings are also in eBird.

We did the walk 6 days this week.

Species                # days found  (peak #, date)

SHARP-SHINNED HAWK          1  (1, 11/20)
COOPER’S HAWK               1  (1, 11/26)
Anna's Hummingbird          5  (2)
Northern Flicker            6  (3)
Steller's Jay               6  (6)
American Crow               6  (9)
COMMON RAVEN                1  (1, 11/26)
Black-capped Chickadee      6  (12)
Chestnut-backed Chickadee   3  (4)	
Red-breasted Nuthatch       5  (5, 11/20)
Brown Creeper               1  (1, 11/26)
Pacific Wren                3  (2)
BEWICK’S WREN               1  (1, 11/24)
Golden-crowned Kinglet      2  (6, 11/20)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet        1  (1, 11/20)
Hermit Thrush               1  (1, 11/26)
American Robin              3  (12, 11/20)
Varied Thrush               5  (6)
European Starling           4  (6)
Spotted Towhee              6  (5)
Song Sparrow                6  (7)
Dark-eyed Junco             6  (27, 11/20)

In the neighborhood but not found on dogwalk: Red-tailed Hawk

Misses (birds found at least 3 days during previous 2 weeks but not found this 
week): House Finch 


Wink Gross
Portland

Subject: Weird Savannah Sparrow
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 21:03:21 -0800
Last weekend I ran across an unusual looking Savannah in Bend's Old Mill
District (for you locals it was on the south side of the tunnel feeding in
the weeds on the hillside opposite the north end of the dog park).  It is
much heavier billed than the ones we normally see here.  

 

Here is the sequence

 

https://picasaweb.google.com/112496990053174978105/OregonBirds?authuser=0

&authkey=Gv1sRgCKir3oKAuNrvaQ&feat=directlink 

 

It is very similar to the Large-billed Savannah's I saw in southern
California.  Here is a link to a photo of a similar bird labelled as such:

http://jimburnsphotos.com/media/Savannah-Sparrow-large-bill.jpg 

 

Since the Large-billed form isn't supposed to occur north of the Salton Sea
inland I'd be interested in hearing comments about this bird.  

 

Thanks,

 

Tom Crabtree, Bend
Subject: Weird Savannah Sparrow
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 21:03:21 -0800
Last weekend I ran across an unusual looking Savannah in Bend's Old Mill
District (for you locals it was on the south side of the tunnel feeding in
the weeds on the hillside opposite the north end of the dog park).  It is
much heavier billed than the ones we normally see here.  

 

Here is the sequence

 

https://picasaweb.google.com/112496990053174978105/OregonBirds?authuser=0

&authkey=Gv1sRgCKir3oKAuNrvaQ&feat=directlink 

 

It is very similar to the Large-billed Savannah's I saw in southern
California.  Here is a link to a photo of a similar bird labelled as such:

http://jimburnsphotos.com/media/Savannah-Sparrow-large-bill.jpg 

 

Since the Large-billed form isn't supposed to occur north of the Salton Sea
inland I'd be interested in hearing comments about this bird.  

 

Thanks,

 

Tom Crabtree, Bend
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Subject: Re: OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 17:45:13 -0800
This bird is not in what we consider "typical plumage" because it is molting. 
The bill pattern is typical for a female Redhead. Having seen a number hybrid 
Aythya ducks, one thing is pretty consistent with hybrids and that is bill 
pattern is intermediate between the two parent species. I don't anything about 
the shape or pattern of the bill on this bird that suggests Canvasback and 
there don't seem to be any other structural aspects that suggest Canvasback 
parentage. I saw this bird today in direct comparison with Ring-necked Ducks (a 
comparatively small Aythya). It is the same size and has a similar sized bill, 
which can be seen in one Dwight Porter's original photos. 


In terms of size, head shape and bill pattern this bird matches a Redhead. 
Looking "different" or "not typical" are not enough to start speculating that 
it is a hybrid or another species. Most of the speculative opinions about this 
bird have included little if any substantive support for the putative ID's. 


Dave Irons
Portland, OR

Sent from my iPhone 

On Nov 26, 2014, at 3:59 PM, "Scott Carpenter"  wrote:

> I spent some time with Dwight Porter's interesting duck at OES Pond along 
Nicol Rd in SW Portland. My impression in the field was that this duck is not 
in typical plumage for a Redhead, and I could see why Dwight concluded there 
might be some Canvasback genes present. 

> 
> I put some photos online at:  http://bit.ly/11vElEM
> 
> Although photo 4 shows relatively typical flight feathers for Redhead, the 
lower neck, breast, and flanks are not what I typically see in Redheads this 
time of year. I'm not suggesting there are any Pochard genes present, but I 
also think one cannot definitively rule out that this bird has another Aythya 
species in its lineage, or that it has some plumage aberration. 

> 
> Hopefully this bird will stick around for a while -- it will be interesting 
to see what it looks like in a month or two. 

> 
> On a related note, googling "female redhead duck" yields more pertinent 
results than "female redhead". 

> 
> -- 
> Scott Carpenter
> Portland, Oregon
> -------------------------
> http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/
Subject: Bean Goose yes, Boobies No
From: david smith <smithdwd AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 00:25:15 +0000
 About 11 this morning(and earlier by others) Mr Bean, and other geese, were 
grazing close to the road 1/2 way toward observation area. They were not 
spooked as the intervening brush "screened them"(they thought). Between a few 
observers comparing times, Haystack Rock was watched most of the morning with 
no Booby/ies sighted. 62 degrees, mild, clear. David Smith 
Subject: can you see this
From: Laura Mountainspring <mntsprg AT wmni.net>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 16:03:10 -0800
not sure if any of my emails are posting....

thanks

Happy Thanksgiving
Laura Mountainspring
Subject: OES Pond Redhead/Aythya Species
From: Scott Carpenter <slcarpenter AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 15:58:41 -0800
I spent some time with Dwight Porter's interesting duck at OES Pond along
Nicol Rd in SW Portland. My impression in the field was that this duck is
not in typical plumage for a Redhead, and I could see why Dwight concluded
there might be some Canvasback genes present.

I put some photos online at:  http://bit.ly/11vElEM

Although photo 4 shows relatively typical flight feathers for Redhead, the
lower neck, breast, and flanks are not what I typically see in Redheads
this time of year. I'm not suggesting there are any Pochard genes present,
but I also think one cannot definitively rule out that this bird has
another Aythya species in its lineage, or that it has some plumage
aberration.

Hopefully this bird will stick around for a while -- it will be interesting
to see what it looks like in a month or two.

On a related note, googling "female redhead duck" yields more pertinent
results than "female redhead".

-- 
Scott Carpenter
Portland, Oregon
-------------------------
http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/
Subject: Re: obol Digest V3 #372
From: DAVY CROCKETT <alamodavy AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 14:52:24 -0800
Please add to next OBOL Digest.
Ray Michimoto and Davy Crockett spotted a male Snow Bunting on Marine Drive, 
just East of the fire station on the fence line. There is parking close to the 
building. This was same spot as one was seen 2 years ago. 

 
> Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 01:15:07 -0500
> From: obol AT freelists.org
> To: ecartis AT freelists.org
> Subject: obol Digest V3 #372
> 
> obol Digest	Wednesday, November 26 2014	Volume: 03  Issue: 372
> 
> In This Issue:
> 	#1:	From: Chris Downie 
> 		Subject: [obol] Snow Geese at Sauvie
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #1 in digest
> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 22:10:51 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Snow Geese at Sauvie
> From: Chris Downie 
> 
> I traveled out to Sauvie Island this afternoon to track down the recently
> reported Ross's Goose.  I found one but it took me over an hour to identify
> it among a huge flock of Snow Geese.   Estimates from this large grouping
> of birds near Fazio Farms; 1 Ross's, 400+ Snow Geese. 1000+ Cacklers, and
> 120 Sandhill Cranes.
> Chris Downie, Portland
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of obol Digest V3 #372
> **************************
> 
> 
 		 	   		  
Subject: Wednesday Birding near Sisters, gobble gobble
From: "judy" <jmeredit AT bendnet.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 13:58:28 -0800
Target for this day before Thanksgiving was WILD TURKEY and we had 2 small 
flocks. Jan Rising gets birder of the day for spotting both flocks for us. 
Thanks to Carolyn Rochelle, birder of the day as well for scouting and 
giving us a dependable route for turkeys. One flock was along Indian Ford 
Road and the other at the intersection of Indian Ford/Camp Polk Rd. White 
headed WP was a crowd pleaser today. Most birds stayed hidden and quiet 
until the sunshine came out around 9:30 or 10 and activity began.   Areas 
birded were Sage Meadows Rd, Indian Ford Rd, Camp Polk Rd, Appaloosa, and 
general residential suburban areas near Sisters.
This report was mailed for Judy Meredith by http://birdnotes.net

Wild Turkey
California Quail
Red-tailed Hawk
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Mourning Dove
White-headed Woodpecker  a female
Northern Flicker
Steller's Jay
Western Scrub-Jay
Black-billed Magpie
Common Raven
Mountain Chickadee
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Pygmy Nuthatch
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Townsend's Solitaire
American Robin
European Starling
Spotted Towhee
Dark-eyed Junco
Red-winged Blackbird
House Finch
House Sparrow
Total number of species seen: 24
Birders today were Kim and Reg Reisenbichler, Clay and Marilyn Crofton, 
Carolyn Rochelle, Jan Rising, Mike Golden, Susan Groszkiewicz, Marion 
Davidson, Tom Lawler, Howard Horvath, Sherrie Pierce, and Judy Meredith. 
jmeredit AT bendnet.com


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Subject: Wed morning Eugene LBBG
From: Lawrence McQueen <larmcqueen AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 13:26:21 -0800
We went to see the Lesser Black-backed Gull previously posted, at Camas Swale. 
We found an adult and a 3d-yr bird. Many in our group were able to get photos. 
Owen Schmitt arrived from Portland around 11am just as the large group of gulls 
were landing on the field pond, evidently from the dump on Short Mountain. 
Owen, with his super-lens, was able to get both the birds together in the same 
photo. The gull flock was mostly Ring-billed, and it contained a few California 
Gulls, some Herring Gulls, a Glaucous-winged Gull, possible Western / G-w 
hybrid, and the two LBBG. There was also a range of juveniles, one of which was 
very pale. 


Cackling Goose - a swarm landed in a separate field.
Eurasian Wigeon - 1 
American Wigeon - many
Mallard - some came late 
Northern Shoveler - 4
Northern Pintail - 1
Great Blue Heron - 3
Northern Harrier - 1 
Bald Eagle - 1 adult 
Red-shouldered Hawk - 1 along RR 
Red-tailed Hawk - 4
Rough-legged Hawk - 1 
Ring-billed Gull - many
California Gull - a few
Herring Gull - about 10
LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL - 2
Glaucous-winged Gull - 1 good one
Belted Kingfisher - 1
Northern Flicker - 2
American Kestrel - 2
Peregrine Falcon - 1 
Black Phoebe = 1
Western Scrub-Jay - 1
American Crow - few
Common Raven - 40+
Black-capped Chickadee - 4 
Bewick's Wren - 2
Western Bluebird - heard
American Robin -10
European Starling - small flocks
American Pipit - 1
Spotted Towhee - 1
Song Sparrow - 6
Red-winged Blackbird - 3
Western Meadowlark - 1
House Finch - 3
Pine Siskin - 2
American Goldfinch - 12

Vickie Buck, Dennis Arendt, Randy Sinnott, Jim Regali, Silvia Maulding, Kit 
Larsen, Dave Brown, and Larry McQueen - a few others stopped by. 

 
Subject: JACKSON COUNTY; WREN FEEDING ON MY HOUSE, NOT HOUSE WREN
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 13:23:12 -0800
Two Golden Eagles over Emigrant Lake...and the wren feeding ON my house was
a Pacific Wren.
Also double Golden Eagle adults

https://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/11/26/under-the-double-eagle-2/


-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Both Lesser BB Gulls still present
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 12:52:53 -0800
See Sylvia's note below.
.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon


Begin forwarded message:

> From: Sylvia Maulding 
> Subject: LBBG
> Date: November 26, 2014 12:38:31 PM PST
> To: Alan Contreras 
> 
> The Wed. group had 2 LBBG together this morning about 10:40. photos were 
taken with them both in the same photo. 

> 
> Sent from my iPad
> Sylvia, Springfield OR
> 
Subject: S. Coast Birds of Late
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 12:28:43 -0800
The male HOODED ORIOLE turned up today again (Wednesday the 26th), five
days after Barb Griffin first saw it at her feeders in North Bend.  I was
able to see it today also, it was in back of her yard and up for a couple
minutes- beautiful bird.  Barb wanted everyone to know that it hasn't been
very regular (!) so expect a long wait if you come to look for it.  Her
number in North Bend is 756-5688.

Terry Wahl said that there is a N. MOCKINGBIRD in Langlois, Cury near the
Greasy Spoon cafe.  He said it has been aound for over a week now.

I looked for the Bandon Snow Bunting finally today (found by Rick Foster
last Sunday).  The only bird I saw on the beach was a pipit.  Since this
was three days later and the beach gets a lot of dog-walking traffic I do
not expect to refind it...  Along the south jetty in Bandon I found the
rockpiper flock and with them was at least one ROCK SANDPIPER, a bird that
has been tough to find in Coos the past few years.  Flying around in the
lower bay were four BONAPARTE'S GULLS, three adults and one first winter
bird.

Nice and sunny out, time to go out and do some more birding!

Merry Thanksgiving all,
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: Injured Short-eared owl.
From: Charlotte Hottmann <kcshottmann AT q.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 14:40:33 -0500 (EST)
Good morning all, 

Driving northwest on Ankeny Hill Road at 8:00 this morning, I was glancing at 
the fake coyotes and a red-tailed hawk hunting in the newly planted grass field 
just west of I-5 when this pile of feathers by the side of the road caught my 
eye. The look was brief, but I was certain it was a fatally wounded owl. I 
dashed home for my camera and some gloves to move it off the road, for I 
couldn't bear to see such a beautiful bird become another road-kill pancake. 


I returned to find it still intact and in the same spot; it was indeed an owl. 
After I took a couple of pictures, and a few cars passed, I attempted to pick 
it up (left the gloves in the car). To my shock, it moved! I hadn't really 
looked at it that closely, for I was in the road, just over a blind hill, and 
the sun was in my eyes. I took another picture, and decided I couldn't just 
leave it there. It's movements were slow and initially a bit unsteady, it's 
left wing was obviously injured. I decided to pick it up and see if I could 
take it to Turtle Ridge Wildlife Center. It settled steadily and comfortably in 
the palm of my right hand as I walked the 40 yards back to my car. It didn't 
flinch when another car passed, or as we got into the car. Thankful for an 
automatic transmission, I started the my engine with my left hand, buckled in, 
and drove with this beautiful, soft, warm bellied bird in my hand the 5 or so 
miles to Turtle Ridge. 

I hope it survives it's injuries. I will post an update on it's well-fare 
later. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/95295128 AT N03/15884534292/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/95295128 AT N03/15699423677/

Charlotte Hottmann, 



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Subject: Re: Beverly's photo--SW Portland duck
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 19:14:29 +0000
Shawneen and I just returned from going to see this duck. While the bill seems 
a tad large, something that has on occasion confused me initially in the past, 
I can't see any features on this duck that suggest that it is either a hybrid 
or a Common Pochard. The bill pattern–contrast between the dark bill nail and 
the subterminal light band, the shape of the bill nail, and angle of the 
subterminal light band–all seem to fit Redhead and don't seem to match what I'm 
seeing in the dozens of images of winter female Common Pochards that I'm 
looking at online. Some have commented on the head shape, which looks squareish 
and somewhat flat across the crown. In my opinion, it also best fits Redhead. 
While head shape on Aythya ducks is quite plastic (particularly on feeding 
birds) and not that reliable as a field mark, most of the images of female 
pochards show birds with a flatter forehead to bill slope and some degree of 
peak in the center of crown. Many of the female pochards I'm seeing in photos 
tend to suggest Canvasback more than Redhead. I think that impression is driven 
by the crown profile and bill/forehead slope. 


There are images online in which Common Pochard females seem to be near 
identical to female Redheads. This alone introduces a scintilla of doubt, but 
overall I am hard-pressed to arrive at, or even entertain any conclusion other 
than that this bird is a Redhead. 


One thing that often drives speculation about birds like this is the fact that 
we sometimes fail to study common birds. The bulk of our experiences with 
Redhead come during the spring and summer months when we are seeing obvious 
pairs of this species at sites where they are known breeders. We see obvious 
males and attending females and on we go without ever stopping to study the 
females, which are mostly devoid of conspicuous field marks. Then, when we see 
a molting bird out of season and seemingly out of place (sans all the normal 
cues that allow us to make a quick and easy ID), we are challenged because we 
have no experiential basis for comparison. Migrant, molting Redheads are pretty 
scarce in western Oregon, so it is remarkably easy to get derailed by something 
that is quite different from our usual Redhead search image (I have done it 
with similar-appearing bird). Once others start suggesting that the bird could 
be a hybrid, or that the bird has an overly large bill, or that the head shape 
isn't right for Redhead, we are easily swayed by the power of that suggestion. 
It then becomes very difficult to start over and look at the bird with 
unsullied preconceived notions. 


In this case, one very influential voice for me was that of Bob Flores. As a 
Washington resident, who probably doesn't invest much effort into building an 
Oregon list, Bob doesn't have a dog in the fight. Further, for many years Bob, 
who is a very active birder, was the refuge manager at Columbia National 
Wildlife Refuge in east-central Washington, where Redhead is presumably a lot 
more common than it is in the Willamette Valley. Bob was the first to ask, "why 
isn't this just a Redhead." Upon reading his opinion, which I value, I pumped 
my own mental brakes and tried to start over with this bird, ignoring all the 
noisy speculation in this forum. Starting from "why isn't this just a Redhead," 
and attempting to look at the photos and the live bird with fresh eyes, I have 
found no reason to disagree with Bob's opinion. Seeing the bird in life has 
only served to reinforce the conclusion that was coming from looking at all the 
photos that have been shared. 


Dave Irons
Portland, OR 

Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 07:51:31 -0800
Subject: [obol] Beverly's photo
From: 5hats AT peak.org
To: obol AT freelists.org

Since nobody else seems sure of the id of the duck, I'll add my speculations. I 
haven't looked at any drawings or photos of pochards, but the duck in Beverly 
Halberg's photo has the head shape, ghost white patch on the face, bill shape 
and color that suggest to me Redhead x Greater Scaup. Darrel 
Subject: Odd Junco - Eugene
From: "L Markoff" <canyoneagle AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 08:11:58 -0800
This odd Junco has been in the yard for awhile, hanging with a flock of
about 30 Oregon-type Juncos.  Might it be a Cassiar?  A Slate-colored?
Or...?

 

https://www.flickr.com/gp/canyoneagle/4U9T66/

 

 

Thanks!

 

Lori Markoff

Eugene
Subject: Beverly's photo
From: Darrel Faxon <5hats AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 07:51:31 -0800
Since nobody else seems sure of the id of the duck, I'll add my
speculations.  I haven't looked at any drawings or photos of pochards, but
the duck in Beverly Halberg's photo has the head shape, ghost white patch
on the face, bill shape and color that suggest to me Redhead x Greater
Scaup.

Darrel
Subject: Re: Lesser Black-backed Gull photos
From: "Phil Pickering" <philliplc AT charter.net>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 02:44:20 -0800
>The flight photo shows no white spots near the wing tips

Not questioning that it's a second individual (second gull on
the grassy knoll), but the outermost primary which would
normally have the lone white mirror in a fully mature bird is 
not detectable at all in the standing shots. It may still be 
growing or perhaps in a state of suspended molt.

Also it clearly has well formed apical spots, which based on
photo study seems more than a bit odd for a subadult. It
could be that there is something out of sync with the
maturity of this individual.

Phil


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Subject: Lesser Black-backed Gull photos
From: Barbara Combs <bcombs232 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 00:41:37 -0800
I uploaded some of my photos of this gull to eBird.  I took them on the
24th, not on
the day the checklist was generated, the 23rd of November.

I had written some details, but lost them when the session expired while I
was learning how to upload photos to eBird.  Sigh. I give up for now and
will rewrite them later.

There is a left side, a right side, a flight photo, and a photo near a
Ring-billed Gull for a size comparison.  The flight photo shows no white
spots near the wing tips, which would be expected if this bird is a
subadult, as most or all of those who have seen it seem to believe.

Here is the link:  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20675151

-- 
Barbara Combs   obie '70
Lane County, OR
Subject: RBA: Portland, OR 11-26-14
From: Harry Nehls <hnehls6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 00:05:35 -0800
- RBA
* Oregon
* Portland
* November 26, 2014
* ORPO1411.26

- birds mentioned

TUNDRA BEAN GOOSE
Ross¹s Goose
Trumpeter Swan
Long-tailed Duck
Red-breasted Merganser
BROWN BOOBY
Snowy Egret
Cattle Egret
Rough-legged Hawk
Red Phalarope
LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL
Short-eared Owl
YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER
Barn Swallow
Snow Bunting
Common Yellowthroat
American Tree Sparrow
Black-headed Grosbeak
HOODED ORIOLE
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch
Pine Grosbeak

- transcript

hotline: Portland Oregon Audubon RBA (weekly)
number: 503-292-6855
To report: Harry Nehls 503-233-3976  
compiler: Harry Nehls
coverage: entire state

Hello, this is the Audubon Society of Portland Rare Bird Report. This report
was made Wednesday November 26. If you have anything to add call Harry Nehls
503-292-6855. 

Two LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS are now being seen along Ricketts Road a
couple of miles north of Creswell. On November 21 a bright HOODED ORIOLE
visited a feeder in North Bend but did not remain. The Vadis YELLOW-BELLIED
SAPSUCKER near North Plains continues to be seen. On November 22 a BROWN
BOOBY flew southward past Boiler Bay. The Yaquina Bay and Pacific City
BOOBIES continue to be seen as is the Nestucca NWR TUNDRA BEAN GOOSE.

The Flores Lake CATTLE EGRET is still being seen. On November 23 a SNOW
BUNTING was on Bullards beach north of Bandon. A TRUMPETER SWAN was seen
November 22 near Westport.

A RED-BREASTED MERGANSER was seen November 25 on Vancouver Lake. The SNOWY
EGRET continues at Post Office Lake near the Ridgefield NWR. On November 21
a ROSS¹S GOOSE was among the goose flocks in Scappoose Bottoms. It, or
another was on Sauvie Island November 25. A TREE SPARROW was along Rentenaar
Road on the island that day. A rather tame TREE SPARROW and three
SHORT-EARED OWLS are now at Broughton Beach near the Portland Airport.

A RED PHALAROPE was seen November 22 at the Yamhill Sewage Ponds. Three BARN
SWALLOWS were at Salem that day. Six ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS and a late COMMON
YELLOWTHROAT were at Finley NWR November 22. Three PINE GROSBEAKS and 24
ROSY-FINCHES continue on Marys Peak in the Coast Range near Philomath. On
November 24 a BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK visited a Eugene feeder.

A pair of PINE GROSBEAKS were at the Big River Golf Course near McNary Dam
November 23. That day a group of five ROSY-FINCHES were at Smith Rocks State
Park. A LONG-TAILED DUCK is now being seen on the pond at Malheur NWR
Headquarters.

That¹s it for this week.

- end transcript










Subject: Snow Geese at Sauvie
From: Chris Downie <downtown71 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 22:10:51 -0800
I traveled out to Sauvie Island this afternoon to track down the recently
reported Ross's Goose.  I found one but it took me over an hour to identify
it among a huge flock of Snow Geese.   Estimates from this large grouping
of birds near Fazio Farms; 1 Ross's, 400+ Snow Geese. 1000+ Cacklers, and
120 Sandhill Cranes.

Chris Downie, Portland
Subject: very probable Pintail Snipe - Curry County
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 22:48:22 -0700
I recently talked with Terry Wahl who reports an intriguing sighting/hearing of 
a probable Pintail Snipe, Terry hears Common Snipe daily in season on his 
family ranch. 


 He was on another ranch and flushed two snipe that flew off calling one after 
the other. One called like a typical Wilson's Snipe. The other repeatedly 
called in what Terry described as a like a squeeze toy making an "ank" sound. 
He later went online and listened to various snipe calls and found that the 
bird he heard matched the calls of Pintail Snipe. Terry has had many very good 
finds through the years on his ranch and elsewhere, and is a very good 
observer. 


The subject snipe is on another ranch and at a location that is not accessible 
to birders. 



Jeff Gilligan 

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Subject: Fwd: Another pic of Dwight's Redhead - Pochard look-a-like
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 21:38:24 -0800
Hi: 

If Pyle is current, and I can read the jargon...Seems all the pochards go 
through their PF molt from Sep to Mar. So with the brown eye ( problem is 
females also show brown eyes) and dullish bill, isn't this a hatch year bird a 
little late in a PF molt? I tried to age based on the open wing but I can't 
tell if there are molt limits . The nice contrasting gray wing stripe favors a 
Redhead over Canvasback. 


I would find it fun to see an in focus picture of the nail, large in REDH 
smaller in CANV and very tiny in Common Pochard. 




We seem to have a few ducks to track this winter in the area!
> 

Bob Archer
PDX

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Subject: Wile E Jay
From: "L Markoff" <canyoneagle AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 20:54:54 -0800
Hi Obol,

 

This morning one of the Steller's Jays eating suet from the feeder outside
my second-floor window got a little carried away with the suet...literally!

 

It tried to pick up a large piece of suet.  It would pick it up, but the
suet was so heavy that the Jay would lose its grip and drop it.  It tried
several times until finally it had the suet firmly in it bill.  It moved to
the edge of the feeder and launched into the air...and then fell like a
rock!  It reminded me of Wile E Coyote, anvil in his arms, falling off a
cliff... nyerrrrrrrr...BOOM!  I jumped out of my chair, ran to the window,
and saw the Jay on the ground with the suet.  It tried again to lift it, but
couldn't do it.  It eventually gave up and flew off.

 

Given that Steller's Jays weigh less than 4 oz, I suspect that the piece of
suet weighed more than the Jay.  Too bad I don't have video of that Jay,
what a hoot!  But, here are two photos, one of a Jay at the suet feeder and
the other of the piece of suet from the failed launch.

 

 
https://www.flickr.com/gp/canyoneagle/L4hC6q/

 

Gravity 1, Jay 0.

 

Lori Markoff

Eugene
Subject: Re: Common and less common Pochards
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 20:04:07 -0800
Oops forgot my last sentence. Any species not listed by the State is considered 
a protected species. 


Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 25, 2014, at 20:02, Bob  wrote:
> 
> Waterfowl hunting regulations cover species the State has authorized to be 
hunt. The species chosen are common species an that is why you can not find 
those such as pochard. Basically the State lists in it's regulations those 
species and how many can be taken daily. 

> 
> Bob Flores
> Ridgefield, WA
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Nov 25, 2014, at 19:15, Alan Contreras  wrote:
>> 
>> Jeez, are there learned gentlemen on this list?  Who knew?
>> 
>> I have no idea how nonstandard waterfowl are handled by the regs. Are you 
perchance conflating pochards and poachers? 

>> 
>> Have a blast out there, Gunnar N.
>> 
>> .
>> .
>> Alan Contreras
>> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
>> 
>> Eugene, Oregon
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On Nov 25, 2014, at 7:06 PM, Joel Geier wrote:
>>> 
>>> Hi all,
>>> 
>>> I've been looking hard in the ODFW migratory waterfowl hunting
>>> regulations but have not yet been able to find daily bag limits on
>>> Common Pochard, Baikal Teal, Taiga Bean-Goose, Tufted Duck, Eurasian
>>> Wigeon, Chiloe Wigeon, Mandarin Duck, Black Swan, Garganey, Red-breasted
>>> Goose or other similar species that I'm usually aiming for when I clean
>>> the spiderwebs out of my 12-gauge to go out hunting for a day.
>>> 
>>> Could some of the learned gentlemen on this list please advise on how I
>>> should interpret the ODFW bag limits, as they don't mention any of these
>>> species?
>>> 
>>> Yours sincerely,
>>> Gunnar Norland
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>> 
>>> 
>> 
Subject: Re: Common and less common Pochards
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 20:01:20 -0800
Waterfowl hunting regulations cover species the State has authorized to be 
hunt. The species chosen are common species an that is why you can not find 
those such as pochard. Basically the State lists in it's regulations those 
species and how many can be taken daily. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 25, 2014, at 19:15, Alan Contreras  wrote:
> 
> Jeez, are there learned gentlemen on this list?  Who knew?
> 
> I have no idea how nonstandard waterfowl are handled by the regs. Are you 
perchance conflating pochards and poachers? 

> 
> Have a blast out there, Gunnar N.
> 
> .
> .
> Alan Contreras
> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
> 
> Eugene, Oregon
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> On Nov 25, 2014, at 7:06 PM, Joel Geier wrote:
>> 
>> Hi all,
>> 
>> I've been looking hard in the ODFW migratory waterfowl hunting
>> regulations but have not yet been able to find daily bag limits on
>> Common Pochard, Baikal Teal, Taiga Bean-Goose, Tufted Duck, Eurasian
>> Wigeon, Chiloe Wigeon, Mandarin Duck, Black Swan, Garganey, Red-breasted
>> Goose or other similar species that I'm usually aiming for when I clean
>> the spiderwebs out of my 12-gauge to go out hunting for a day.
>> 
>> Could some of the learned gentlemen on this list please advise on how I
>> should interpret the ODFW bag limits, as they don't mention any of these
>> species?
>> 
>> Yours sincerely,
>> Gunnar Norland
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
Subject: Re: VIDEOS of Aythya porteri (aka SW Portland Redhead/Pochard/hybrid thingie)
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 19:56:23 -0800
Good idea, there may well be a difference in taste.

Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPhone 



> On Nov 25, 2014, at 7:38 PM, Joel Geier  wrote:
> 
> Dear Mr. Jay and all,
> 
> The video is very nice but can I shoot it?
> 
> Yours sincerely,
> Gunnar Norland
> 
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 


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Subject: possible tree sparrow on Rentenaar Rd., Sauvie Island
From: "WLRisser" <wlrisser AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 19:53:05 -0800
I reported a chipping sparrow eating seed across from the apple tree on
Rentenaar Road a few days ago.  I got to thinking about this after the tree
sparrow was reported from Broughton Beach.  I was far away from the alleged
chipping sparrow, and all that I noticed was a small, clear breasted sparrow
with an obvious red crown.  I wasn't closed enough to see details of the
face or to see if there was  a dark spot on the breast.  Since Sibley and
others don't picture the chipping sparrow as having a red crown at this time
of year, perhaps I was looking at a tree sparrow.  You might keep your eye
out when looking at sparrows on Rentenaar Road.  Will Risser, Portland.
Subject: Pochards & Gunnar
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 19:49:08 -0800
Apologies all, our Swedish house guest got a bit out of line. We have
him sedated now but he's still twitching a bit and mumbling something
about Emperor Geese.

Happy birding,
Joel




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Subject: VIDEOS of Aythya porteri (aka SW Portland Redhead/Pochard/hybrid thingie)
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 19:38:55 -0800
Dear Mr. Jay and all,

The video is very nice but can I shoot it?

Yours sincerely,
Gunnar Norland




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Subject: VIDEOS of Aythya porteri (aka SW Portland Redhead/Pochard/hybrid thingie)
From: Jay Withgott <withgott AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 19:19:25 -0800
Hello all -- 

I have posted videos of the Aythya duck found by Dwight Porter at the Oregon 
Episcopal School (OES) pond here: 


https://picasaweb.google.com/114481402865976904547/OESAythya?authkey=Gv1sRgCLiuyPHujNLvLg 


There is one long video of a continuous swim followed by fifteen (15) short 
clips of the bird in between dives. Videos are helpful for an identification 
issue such as this because taken together, they show the bird from all angles 
so that bill shape, head shape, etc. can be more reliably judged. I was unable 
to adjust my camera settings to compensate well for glare, so the bird appears 
more washed-out and less brown than it actually is, but the videos do give an 
accurate impression of shapes. Make sure to click on the little setting icon in 
the lower right corner to get the High-Def version for each video one by one, 
bcs it seems not to be the default on Picasa. 


I have been of the opinion from the beginning that the bird is a Redhead, and I 
still feel that way, although I certainly wouldn't bet a huge amount on it and 
am willing to be convinced otherwise. The new book "Rare Birds of North 
America" has nice Common Pochard illustrations (p 62) that look tempting and 
suggest variation that might potentially envelop this bird, but its comparative 
Redhead illustration looks even better, and when one surveys photos online, the 
pochards to me look more Canvasback-like to my eye than the OES bird does. What 
is unquestionable is that at least half of its feathers are badly bleached (the 
result of a delayed or incomplete molt?), so that it is impossible to say much 
about what the bird's plumage colors should be. I would not take its paleness 
to suggest Canvasback parentage, but simply bleaching. And honestly I'm not 
sure we can even rule out some other type of hybrid, say, Redhead x Scaup or 
Redhead x Ring-neck. "Redhead" may seem most parsi 

 monious for now, or maybe we should call it "Aythya porteri", but hopefully it 
will stick around for a while and morph into a Pochard. 

  
At the end of the set of duck videos on the Picasa site above, you can treat 
yourself to a far more pleasing video of Jen Sanford's AMERICAN TREE SPARROW 
near PDX, and a glimpse of the SHORT-EARED OWLS interacting with a Bald Eagle 
there as well. 


Jay Withgott, in SW Portland not too far from that weird duck


PS -- And oh yes, my favorite female Common Pochard photo on the internet is 
here: 


http://photography.nationalgeographic.com/photography/photo-contest/2013/entries/229378/view/ 





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Subject: Re: Common and less common Pochards
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 19:14:21 -0800
Jeez, are there learned gentlemen on this list?  Who knew?

I have no idea how nonstandard waterfowl are handled by the regs. Are you 
perchance conflating pochards and poachers? 


Have a blast out there, Gunnar N.

.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




On Nov 25, 2014, at 7:06 PM, Joel Geier wrote:

> Hi all,
> 
> I've been looking hard in the ODFW migratory waterfowl hunting
> regulations but have not yet been able to find daily bag limits on
> Common Pochard, Baikal Teal, Taiga Bean-Goose, Tufted Duck, Eurasian
> Wigeon, Chiloe Wigeon, Mandarin Duck, Black Swan, Garganey, Red-breasted
> Goose or other similar species that I'm usually aiming for when I clean
> the spiderwebs out of my 12-gauge to go out hunting for a day.
> 
> Could some of the learned gentlemen on this list please advise on how I
> should interpret the ODFW bag limits, as they don't mention any of these
> species?
> 
> Yours sincerely,
> Gunnar Norland
> 
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
Subject: Common and less common Pochards
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 19:06:18 -0800
Hi all,

I've been looking hard in the ODFW migratory waterfowl hunting
regulations but have not yet been able to find daily bag limits on
Common Pochard, Baikal Teal, Taiga Bean-Goose, Tufted Duck, Eurasian
Wigeon, Chiloe Wigeon, Mandarin Duck, Black Swan, Garganey, Red-breasted
Goose or other similar species that I'm usually aiming for when I clean
the spiderwebs out of my 12-gauge to go out hunting for a day.

Could some of the learned gentlemen on this list please advise on how I
should interpret the ODFW bag limits, as they don't mention any of these
species?

Yours sincerely,
Gunnar Norland




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Subject: another oddball duck
From: Dwight P <gpic4dp AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 18:00:31 -0800
As I was entertaining pochard fantasies I forgot about this oddball. It was
in the same pond as the funky Redhead last week. I only saw it one day-
11/22.

I am not going to proclaim an identification so as not to bias anyone, but
if anyone is interested in taking a shot here's a poor photo of the oddball
next to a coot for scale. I don't have any better photos- sorry.

http://www.pbase.com/dwight_porter/image/158352841

There must be something in the water at the Oregon Episcopal School
Wetlands.

Dwight Porter
Portland, Oregon
Subject: Re: Common Pochard Challenge
From: "Jenkins, Maurice A." <alanjenkins AT ou.edu>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 01:33:02 +0000
Wayne,



Excellent response as usual. I was trying to be brief and generalized in order 
to not be as confusing as the regulations can be. 


I would point out that tolerance and legality are not the same thing, many 
illegal acts are tolerated and enforcement can be lax, off and on. At times 
enforcement is made to appear lax so that illegal activity can be detected and 
then laws are enforced sometimes for the sake of appearing to be enforced, 
Operation Falcon is an example. Also, the non-federal governmental entities can 
regulate what they want, but the federal migratory bird regulations have 
priority. 




It's my understanding that a hunting license is a permit to "take" migratory 
game birds (with a federal stamp when taking waterfowl). But if by game birds 
you mean galliforms, they are not federally regulated or listed as Migratory 
Birds, although some may be regulated if they are a endangered species. 




In my experience sarcasm is not always recognized as such, and someone not 
familiar of the regulations might be led into thinking birders or OBOL was 
actually suggesting the actions as suggested were genuine suggestions. 




Regards,



Alan





________________________________
From: Wayne Hoffman [whoffman AT peak.org]
Sent: Tuesday, November 25, 2014 4:34 PM
To: Jenkins, Maurice A.
Cc: baro AT pdx.edu; obol
Subject: Re: [obol] Re: Common Pochard Challenge

The original message may have been sarcasm, but the case is not asclearcut as 
you state. 


"Baiting" waterfowl is illegal only for the purposes of hunting. Feeding sucks 
in non-hunted areas may or may not be in the ducks best interests, but it sure 
is tolerated in urban areas all over Oregon and the rest of the country. 
Crystal Spring Park in SE Portland tries to regulate the type of food (no 
bread) but recommends cracked corn. 


Indeed, possession of migratory bird parts is illegal without a permit, BUT the 
law has an exception for guess what? Game birds. So if someone picks up a 
road-killed hawk, robin, or swallow, possession of the bird or parts thereof is 
illegal. But for a duck, goose, grouse, or dove - no violation unless it can be 
proved to having been obtained illegally. In practice, wildlife agents are 
tolerant of salvage for transport to a person or institution with a permit, as 
well. 


Wayne

On Tue, Nov 25, 2014 at 4:09 PM, Jenkins, Maurice A. 
> wrote: 


I'll give the anonymous (wink, wink) poster of this message the benefit of the 
doubt and class it as sarcasm. If anyone else concludes the message as anything 
but facetious, or if they are simply ignorant of the regulations they should 
know and consider: 




1) Baiting waterfowl is illegal. There are airborne federal agents who look for 
waterfowl baiting. 




2) The Common Pochard is listed as a Migratory Bird, and the MB regulations 
don't allow trapping, harassment or the possession of body parts (feathers) 
without appropriate permits. 




I am not being holier than others; I have a don't have a permit for the 
Violet-Green birdhouse full of feathers laid down last spring. 




Busted!,



Alan Jenkins

Creswell, OR

________________________________
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org 
[obol-bounce AT freelists.org] on behalf of 
Robert O'Brien [baro AT pdx.edu] 

Sent: Monday, November 24, 2014 8:47 PM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Common Pochard Challenge

Don't tell anyone I suggested this.
Go out to the pond with some corn and a Smelt net.
Relieve 'the duck' of a few feathers. She needs new ones anyway.
Send them in for DNA analysis.
Remember, you didn't here it here.
Anonymous.  Carver OR
PS  This could be perfectly legal.
After all, she's a game bird so we just need a birder that's game.


Subject: Re: LBBG photos...
From: "Phil Pickering" <philliplc AT charter.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 17:03:55 -0800
>Sure seems like there are two birds to me...

I suggested 1 bird to Allen, questioning whether a
third cycle would normally show apparently mature
apical spots, but Sally Hill's image does seem 
to show a different individual.

At this resolution I can detect the apparent
signs of immaturity in the coverts and tertials,
and the bill pattern is more clear and suggests
normal fading for this species, rather than
general mud staining. Forgive a laroskeptic.

Phil


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Subject: A note on salvage permits
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 17:02:41 -0800
Following up on Wayne's mention of a permit for possession of road-killed or 
window-killed birds, I will mention that I attempted to get such a permit two 
years ago. I had arranged for the biology department at Willamette University 
to receive and use and specimens I salvaged, and this was perfectly fine with 
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife permit office, which issued me a permit. They 
understood exactly what I was doing and why. 


However, when I attempted to get the required state permit from ODFW, I 
encountered the most appalling, obstructive and unhelpful correpondence and 
process that I have ever had with any state agency, with the exception of a 
recent spectacular performance by DMV. 


The bottom line is that ODFW simply refused to accept a request from a major 
Oregon university, signed by a highly respected ornithologist, as a basis for 
issuing me a general-purpose salvage permit, because the request didn't meet 
their obscure and unfathomable standards. It was a uniquely irrational process 
and an extremely sour experience - needless to say it will be a while before I 
do ODFW any favors. 


So anyone who attempts to get permits to touch roadkill, good luck.

.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




On Nov 25, 2014, at 4:34 PM, Wayne Hoffman wrote:

> The original message may have been sarcasm, but the case is not asclearcut as 
you state. 

> 
> "Baiting" waterfowl is illegal only for the purposes of hunting. Feeding 
sucks in non-hunted areas may or may not be in the ducks best interests, but it 
sure is tolerated in urban areas all over Oregon and the rest of the country. 
Crystal Spring Park in SE Portland tries to regulate the type of food (no 
bread) but recommends cracked corn. 

> 
> Indeed, possession of migratory bird parts is illegal without a permit, BUT 
the law has an exception for guess what? Game birds. So if someone picks up a 
road-killed hawk, robin, or swallow, possession of the bird or parts thereof is 
illegal. But for a duck, goose, grouse, or dove - no violation unless it can be 
proved to having been obtained illegally. In practice, wildlife agents are 
tolerant of salvage for transport to a person or institution with a permit, as 
well. 

> 
> Wayne  
> 
> On Tue, Nov 25, 2014 at 4:09 PM, Jenkins, Maurice A.  
wrote: 

> I'll 
> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Common Pochard Challenge
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:34:15 -0800
The original message may have been sarcasm, but the case is not asclearcut
as you state.

"Baiting" waterfowl is illegal only for the purposes of hunting.  Feeding
sucks in non-hunted areas may or may not be in the ducks best interests,
but it sure is tolerated in urban areas all over Oregon and the rest of the
country.  Crystal Spring Park in SE Portland tries to regulate the type of
food (no bread) but recommends cracked corn.

Indeed, possession of migratory bird parts is illegal without a permit,
 BUT the law has an exception for guess what?  Game birds.  So if someone
picks up a road-killed hawk, robin, or swallow, possession of the bird or
parts thereof is illegal.  But for a duck, goose, grouse, or dove - no
violation unless it can be proved to having been obtained illegally.  In
practice, wildlife agents are tolerant of salvage for transport to a person
or institution with a permit, as well.

Wayne

On Tue, Nov 25, 2014 at 4:09 PM, Jenkins, Maurice A. 
wrote:

>  I'll give the anonymous (wink, wink) poster of this message the benefit
> of the doubt and class it as sarcasm.  If anyone else concludes the message
> as anything but facetious, or if they are simply ignorant of the
> regulations they should know and consider:
>
>
>
> 1) Baiting waterfowl is illegal.  There are airborne federal agents who
> look for waterfowl baiting.
>
>
>
> 2) The Common Pochard is listed as a Migratory Bird, and the MB
> regulations don't allow trapping, harassment or the possession of body
> parts (feathers) without appropriate permits.
>
>
>
> I am not being holier than others; I have a don't have a permit for the
> Violet-Green birdhouse full of feathers laid down last spring.
>
>
>
> Busted!,
>
>
>
> Alan Jenkins
>
> Creswell, OR
>  ------------------------------
> *From:* obol-bounce AT freelists.org [obol-bounce AT freelists.org] on behalf
> of Robert O'Brien [baro AT pdx.edu]
> *Sent:* Monday, November 24, 2014 8:47 PM
> *To:* obol
> *Subject:* [obol] Common Pochard Challenge
>
>   Don't tell anyone I suggested this.
> Go out to the pond with some corn and a Smelt net.
> Relieve 'the duck' of a few feathers. She needs new ones anyway.
> Send them in for DNA analysis.
> Remember, you didn't here it here.
> Anonymous.  Carver OR
> PS  This could be perfectly legal.
> After all, she's a game bird so we just need a birder that's game.
>
>
>
Subject: Another pic of Dwight's Redhead - Pochard look-a-like
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:30:07 -0800
This plumage can't be newer than last spring sometime, except for a few new 
flight feathers or tertials, I can't remember what was showing in the original 
pics. The paler area on the bill seems atypically mushed-out along the proximal 
side (closer to the head). 


Maybe it's a pochard X Greater Scaup….
.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




On Nov 25, 2014, at 4:20 PM, Wayne Hoffman wrote:

> Hi, Alan - 
> 
> Bill looks kind of big to me too - and head shape seems wrong, kind of 
flat-topped, at least in this photo. Bill pattern is not wrong for Redhead, but 
not quite typical either. 

> 
> I also am having trouble understanding the bird's molt status. The feathers 
seem incredibly worn, more so than any normal duck should show this time or 
year. I wonder if it skipped the molt into eclipse and we are seeing old worn 
basic plumage? 

> 
> Wayne
> 
> On Tue, Nov 25, 2014 at 3:58 PM, Alan Contreras  wrote:
> I have trouble thinking that the bill on this bird is standard equipment for 
a pure Redhead. I'd be interested in other people's views on that question. 

> .
> .
> Alan Contreras
> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
> 
> Eugene, Oregon
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Nov 25, 2014, at 3:54 PM, Beverly Hallberg wrote:
> 
>> Just thought I'd post another picture of Dwight's Redhead at the Vermont St. 
Wetlands. Not a great picture but another view showing the bill coloration and 
faint eyeing. As a bonus, there was a Common Goldeneye female on the pond today 
- who spent most of her time underwater! 

>> 
>> https://flic.kr/p/pftuEg
>> 
>> Beverly
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Another pic of Dwight's Athya sp.....
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:28:37 -0800
I think I'm going to defer my fist pounding proclamations until
after this this has molted into something definitive.

This bird is sporting some serious beakage, though.

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: Re: Another pic of Dwight's Redhead - Pochard look-a-like
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:20:54 -0800
Hi, Alan -

Bill looks kind of big to me too - and head shape seems wrong, kind of
flat-topped, at least in this photo.  Bill pattern is not wrong for
Redhead, but not quite typical either.

I also am having trouble understanding the bird's molt status.  The
feathers seem incredibly worn, more so than any normal duck should show
this time or year.  I wonder if it skipped the molt into eclipse and we are
seeing old worn basic plumage?

Wayne

On Tue, Nov 25, 2014 at 3:58 PM, Alan Contreras 
wrote:

> I have trouble thinking that the bill on this bird is standard equipment
> for a pure Redhead.  I'd be interested in other people's views on that
> question.
> .
> .
> Alan Contreras
> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
>
> Eugene, Oregon
>
>
>
>
> On Nov 25, 2014, at 3:54 PM, Beverly Hallberg wrote:
>
> Just thought I'd post another picture of Dwight's Redhead at the Vermont
> St. Wetlands.  Not a great picture but another view showing the bill
> coloration and faint eyeing.  As a bonus, there was a Common Goldeneye
> female on the pond today - who spent most of her time underwater!
>
> https://flic.kr/p/pftuEg
>
> Beverly
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Another pic of Dwight's Redhead - Pochard look-a-like
From: bwilson AT peak.org
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:12:31 -0800 (PST)
My first reaction on seeing the photo was, "That's not a Redhead bill." 
The junction of bill and forehead is flatter, a bit like a Canvasback --
or Pochard, maybe.

Then I googled other Redhead and Pochard photos, thought about angles of
the bird's head to the camera and the bird's posture, and lapsed into
uncertainty.  This bird does look odd.  Is it actually out of range for
the shape of a Redhead bill and head?  I just don't know.  I hope someone
does.

-- Barbara Wilson


> I have trouble thinking that the bill on this bird is standard equipment
> for a pure Redhead.  I'd be interested in other people's views on that
> question.
> .
> .
> Alan Contreras
> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
>
> Eugene, Oregon
>
>
>
>
> On Nov 25, 2014, at 3:54 PM, Beverly Hallberg wrote:
>
>> Just thought I'd post another picture of Dwight's Redhead at the Vermont
>> St. Wetlands.  Not a great picture but another view showing the bill
>> coloration and faint eyeing.  As a bonus, there was a Common Goldeneye
>> female on the pond today - who spent most of her time underwater!
>>
>> https://flic.kr/p/pftuEg
>>
>> Beverly
>
>





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Subject: Re: Common Pochard Challenge
From: "Jenkins, Maurice A." <alanjenkins AT ou.edu>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 00:09:07 +0000
I'll give the anonymous (wink, wink) poster of this message the benefit of the 
doubt and class it as sarcasm. If anyone else concludes the message as anything 
but facetious, or if they are simply ignorant of the regulations they should 
know and consider: 




1) Baiting waterfowl is illegal. There are airborne federal agents who look for 
waterfowl baiting. 




2) The Common Pochard is listed as a Migratory Bird, and the MB regulations 
don't allow trapping, harassment or the possession of body parts (feathers) 
without appropriate permits. 




I am not being holier than others; I have a don't have a permit for the 
Violet-Green birdhouse full of feathers laid down last spring. 




Busted!,



Alan Jenkins

Creswell, OR

________________________________
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [obol-bounce AT freelists.org] on behalf of Robert 
O'Brien [baro AT pdx.edu] 

Sent: Monday, November 24, 2014 8:47 PM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Common Pochard Challenge

Don't tell anyone I suggested this.
Go out to the pond with some corn and a Smelt net.
Relieve 'the duck' of a few feathers. She needs new ones anyway.
Send them in for DNA analysis.
Remember, you didn't here it here.
Anonymous.  Carver OR
PS  This could be perfectly legal.
After all, she's a game bird so we just need a birder that's game.

Subject: Re: LBBG photos...
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:04:45 -0800
If you go to eBird (yes, I said go to eBird) and use the Explore a 
region function, you can pull up photos by Sally Hill:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20664125

John Sullivan:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20665683

and Noah Styker:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20663596

Sure seems like there are two birds to me...


-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: Re: Another pic of Dwight's Redhead - Pochard look-a-like
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 15:58:38 -0800
I have trouble thinking that the bill on this bird is standard equipment for a 
pure Redhead. I'd be interested in other people's views on that question. 

.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




On Nov 25, 2014, at 3:54 PM, Beverly Hallberg wrote:

> Just thought I'd post another picture of Dwight's Redhead at the Vermont St. 
Wetlands. Not a great picture but another view showing the bill coloration and 
faint eyeing. As a bonus, there was a Common Goldeneye female on the pond today 
- who spent most of her time underwater! 

> 
> https://flic.kr/p/pftuEg
> 
> Beverly
Subject: Another pic of Dwight's Redhead - Pochard look-a-like
From: Beverly Hallberg <mapsout AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 15:54:30 -0800
Just thought I'd post another picture of Dwight's Redhead at the Vermont
St. Wetlands.  Not a great picture but another view showing the bill
coloration and faint eyeing.  As a bonus, there was a Common Goldeneye
female on the pond today - who spent most of her time underwater!

https://flic.kr/p/pftuEg

Beverly
Subject: Lesser BB Gull photos needed
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 15:37:55 -0800
There is some discussion about whether one or two LBB Gulls are present at 
Creswell. My impression is that the "subadult" bird I saw yesterday has a 
pigmented bill and is not the same as the obvious nice clean bird that I saw 
today. However, the Muddy Bill Theory is also being discussed. My impression is 
that the darker-billed bird also had smudgier head plumage, but there is a 
question of photo exposure. 


Thus anyone with photos of this/these birds should send them to the Oregon Bird 
Records Committee for digestion. 


to:  Harry Nehls - hnehls6 AT comcast.net

.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon



Subject: American Tree Sparrow, Rentenaar Road, Sauvie Island
From: Wink Gross <winkg AT hevanet.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 15:21:03 -0800
Apparently, it’s a good year for Brown Boobies, Lesser Black-backed Gulls (but,
c’mon Lane County—share the wealth!), and AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS.
One was feeding with juncos, White-crowneds, Golden-crowneds, and one WHITE-
THROATED SPARROW along Rentenaar Road about 10AM today at the main 
slough half-way down the road.    An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was 
across the road from Boys(?) Lake.

At the far west end of Rentenaar, I thought I heard the rusty-hinge call of
a Rusty Blackbird, but I couldn’t locate it.  Something to watch out for.

The ROSS’S GOOSE was in a large flock of Cacklers just north of the Columbia
Co. line on Sauvie Island Road about 9AM this morning.  Two Snow Geese were
also on the flock.

Wink Gross
Portland

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Subject: Lincoln County Rough-legged Hawk
From: "Deb Holland" <deborah.holland AT star-thrower.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 14:53:07 -0800
    Hello,

 I searched for the Rough-legged Hawk between 1 and 3 PM yesterday, along the 1 
mile stretch of Hwy101, between the Hwy 18 exit and 3 Rock Road. 

 Missed the hawk on the first pass, but found a 1st year White-tailed Kite in 
the west marsh. 

 On the second pass, the Rough-legged Hawk was perched on an evergreen next to 
the road.  While I was enjoying the close view, the Kite sailed out of the 
field toward the larger Hawk, which immediately took off.  Watched both birds 
fly into the east marshes. 


 Deb in Newport

  


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Subject: LBB Gull update
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 14:04:42 -0800
I was at the gull spot on Ricketts Road south of Goshen from about 11:15 until 
12:30. The full adult LBB Gull was on the pond most of the time, but flew over 
to the dump for twenty minutes. We did not see the subadult bird at all. Also 
present were a wide variety of gulls (mostly Ringbills) and ducks, with 
multiple harriers, a red-tail, a large peregrine and a couple of Bald Eagles. 


.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon