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Updated on Wednesday, March 4 at 10:47 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Veery

4 Mar R.I.P. Dark Morph Red Tail ["R. Adney Jr." ]
4 Mar Re: Cal Towhee Call note [Tim Rodenkirk ]
5 Mar Re: Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA ["Wilson Cady" ]
05 Mar Help with birding in Lake Oswego please [David Lantz ]
4 Mar Re: Cal Towhee Call note ["Dennis Vroman" ]
4 Mar Re: Cal Towhee Call note [Alan Contreras ]
4 Mar Cal Towhee Call note [Roy Gerig ]
04 Mar American Dipper at Big Creek Fish Hatchery [Mike Patterson ]
4 Mar [COBOL] East of Bend, Eagles galore = Harman Road is HOT ["judy" ]
04 Mar Wednesday morning Eugene [Kit Larsen ]
4 Mar JoCo singing Fox Sparrow ["Dennis Vroman" ]
04 Mar Snowy Owl still at Fern Ridge? [Jeff Miller ]
4 Mar Spring in Corvallis [Hendrik Herlyn ]
4 Mar jackson county: sex is in the air and on perches [Harry Fuller ]
4 Mar 54 Pine Grosbeaks on PCT in Linn County ["W. Douglas Robinson" ]
4 Mar Fwd: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
3 Mar Management of Hayfields for Grassland Birds [Lillian ]
3 Mar Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species ["Olin Allen" ]
3 Mar Quiz for the day [Stephanie Hazen ]
3 Mar Re: Photos: Streaked Horned Lark Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15 [Lillian ]
04 Mar Re: [birding] FOY Turkey Vulture [Michael Medina ]
3 Mar Pacific Crest Trail Black-backed Woodpeckers and Sooty Grouse [Hendrik Herlyn ]
04 Mar Re: 60-90 Great Blue Herons in Flight - Portland [Michael Medina ]
03 Mar Pine Grosbeak and woodpeckers [kit ]
3 Mar Re: [birding] FOY Turkey Vulture ["R. Adney Jr." ]
03 Mar Re: Photos: Streaked Horned Lark Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15 [Joel Geier ]
3 Mar answer to Belted Kinfisher quiz [Stephanie Hazen ]
3 Mar 18 Photos: Two Canada Geese Mating at Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15 [Jim Leonard ]
3 Mar Listing Results proof sheets have been sent ["Paul Sullivan" ]
3 Mar Listing Results proof sheets have been sent ["Paul Sullivan" ]
3 Mar Linn Co PINE GROSBEAKS and BB WOODPECKER ["deweysage AT frontier.com" ]
3 Mar Re: Photos: Streaked Horned Lark Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15 [Alan Contreras ]
3 Mar Photos: Streaked Horned Lark Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15 [Jim Leonard ]
3 Mar Updated photos from Wallowa Trip: Gyrfalcon, Pine Grosbeaks, and other fun birds [Khanh Tran ]
3 Mar Birders Night tonight [Owen Schmidt ]
3 Mar Re: Eurasia wigeon [Roy Lowe ]
3 Mar Re: Stopping OBOL messages [Russ Namitz ]
3 Mar Re: Eurasia wigeon [Tim Rodenkirk ]
3 Mar Re: Eurasia wigeon [Kris Gmail ]
03 Mar Eurasia wigeon [David Lantz ]
3 Mar Re: Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd. [Alan Contreras ]
3 Mar Re: Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd. ["Tom Crabtree" ]
3 Mar Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd. [Luke Ferrenburg ]
3 Mar News from Vale ["Richard W. Musser" ]
3 Mar How do I stop the OBOL postings coming to my =?UTF-8?Q?email??Date: Tue, 03 Mar 2015 09:27:53 -0700 []
3 Mar Re: obol Digest V4 #65 [Paula Rich ]
2 Mar March 2 - Lane Co: Tundra Swans and Greater White-fronted Geese ["Anne & Dan Heyerly" ]
2 Mar Fern Ridge/Royal Ave. Snowy Owl not seen Monday March 2, 2015 ["Anne & Dan Heyerly" ]
02 Mar Pleasures of Unknown Hawk [Frank Kolwicz ]
2 Mar Sunday March 1 - Linn County Pine Grosbeaks ["Anne & Dan Heyerly" ]
2 Mar Baby Weasel Riding a Woodpecker [Jim Leonard ]
3 Mar Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species ["Richard W. Musser" ]
2 Mar Bird Photography Workshop April 11 at Sherwood, Oregon ["Don" ]
02 Mar Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species [Mike Patterson ]
2 Mar White-throated Sparrow (2) at Sauvie Island [George Neavoll ]
2 Mar Photos of unknown Hawk [Jim Leonard ]
2 Mar Great blue herons and the I-205 bridge over the Willamette River [Jeff Dillon ]
2 Mar reL Great blue heron flight 205 bridge [Bonnie Comegys ]
02 Mar 60-90 Great Blue Herons in Flight - Portland [Michael Medina ]
2 Mar Re: dark 'tails ["Tom Crabtree" ]
2 Mar dark 'tails [Lars Per Norgren ]
2 Mar Pleasures of Unknown Hawk [Alan Contreras ]
2 Mar Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified ["Robert O'Brien" ]
2 Mar Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified ["Tom Crabtree" ]
2 Mar Talking Waters in Albany ["van der Horst" ]
02 Mar Willows [Mike Patterson ]
2 Mar Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified [Jim Leonard ]
1 Mar Lincoln County today [Christopher Hinkle ]
01 Mar Re: quiz for the day and and interview with this month's OBA photo contest winner.... [Susan Deagle ]
1 Mar quiz for the day and and interview with this month's OBA photo contest winner.... [Stephanie Hazen ]
1 Mar Tuesday, March 3rd, is Birders Night [Owen Schmidt ]
1 Mar ASHLAND DIPPER UPDATE [Harry Fuller ]
01 Mar Re: Curry CA Towhee et al. [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
1 Mar Curry CA Towhee et al. [Tim Rodenkirk ]
01 Mar rufous hummingbird Portland on NW Skyline [Mark H ]
1 Mar Re: Pale Red-tail in CO [Lyn Topinka ]

Subject: R.I.P. Dark Morph Red Tail
From: "R. Adney Jr." <rfadney AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 19:16:02 -0800
Yesterday I saw the remains of the Dark Morph Red Tail that I shot photos of 
and shared February 17th. It was lying alongside I-5 southbound near where shot 
the photos. I have to admit I wept a bit, after watching this bird return year 
after year I had become quite attached to it. It never seemed to be in a good 
spot to photograph until this year. Funny how one can become attached to an 
animal that is not ones pet. 


Rich Adney

http://avianpics.blogspot.com/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/adneyvisualarts/
http://www.oregonimages.net


From: rfadney AT hotmail.com
To: obol AT freelists.org; birding AT midvalleybirding.org
Subject: Dark Morph Red Tail Photos
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 19:31:28 -0800




For anyone who is interested, here are a couple links to my Flickr Album for 
January and February 2015 and specifically the Dark Morph Red Tail that can 
often be seen on I-5 between the McKenzie River and Coburg. 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/adneyvisualarts/15946339443/in/photostream/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/adneyvisualarts/16540520456/in/photostream/

Rich Adney

http://avianpics.blogspot.com/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/adneyvisualarts/
http://www.oregonimages.net
 		 	   		   		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Cal Towhee Call note
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 17:43:10 -0800
Who knows what I heard.  Whatever it was didn't come out.  Ken Burton heard
not only the chip notes but a song also back on 12 Feb. It seems a real
coincidence I would hear the same kind of call in the same place so go
figure.  I am still holding out hope the bird continues and someone
actually sees it. I heard it call about 8 times in a half hour period, no
Spotted Towhee calls or GC Sparrow calls I have ever heard or anything
besides that very metallic chink. The bird would not pish out either- grrr.

Tim

On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 4:46 PM, Dennis Vroman  wrote:

>  Come to think of it, Golden-crowned Sparrow's chip note can sometime
> sound pretty similar to Cal Towhee.  Recall hearing one in the fall once in
> the upper Sacramento Valley that I thought was a Cal Towhee until I saw the
> bird.
>
> Dennis
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> *From:* Alan Contreras 
> *To:* roygerig AT hotmail.com
> *Cc:* obol AT freelists.org
> *Sent:* Wednesday, March 04, 2015 3:38 PM
> *Subject:* [obol] Re: Cal Towhee Call note
>
> Maybe a Golden-crowned Sparrow with a dry mouth?
>
> Alan Contreras
> Eugene, Oregon
>
> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
>
> On Mar 4, 2015, at 3:05 PM, Roy Gerig  wrote:
>
>  I have whined too much on OBOL during the past 3 years about my back.
> During that time I could not take care of my backyard, but now I am finally
> well enough to clear the brush and start to get a nice garden again.  Today
> I was snipping, chopping, and sawing into the tangled SW corner, it is
> almost like tangled chaparrel.   I stopped when I heard an exact replica of
> California Towhee call notes.  It was nearby, but I could not see it.  It
> was very loud.  I heard the call note maybe a dozen times over a couple of
> minutes.  I lived in South Pasadena and in the Valley in SoCal for 8 years,
> and I know the call very well.  It seems to me that the chance of this
> being an actual California Towhee are vanishingly small, but the sound was
> perfect for it.  No starlings were around, only a couple of House Sparrows,
> a dozen Juncos, 2 BC Chickadees, an Anna's Hummer, and it was definitely a
> bird call.  So what was it?  I left and I scattered a lot of seed around
> the area which I can see it from my house.  I am watching for it.  Spotted
> Towhees frequent the area.
>
> I cannot think of any, but is another bird the culprit?
>
> Roy Gerig, Salem OR
>
>
Subject: Re: Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 01:37:24 GMT
 What an unexpected find, congratulations on a great county first. Wilson Cady 

Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Bob 
To: , Obol , Jim Danzenbaker 
, Ryan Abe , Luke Hanes 
, Susan Setterberg  

Cc: 
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:58:44 -0800


I tried to find the pigeon you Lamont again going upstream checking the pilings 
I am now at frenchmans bar just sitting. so far also I've picked up first year 
Westernand Thayers gull and a group of 6 Savannah Sparrows. Bob Sent from my 
Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID 

 
 Bob  wrote:
 
I am at the end of Lower River Rd bait fish are in and gulls/ cormorants 
everywhere. As i sat here a pigeon gullimot fly by 20 yds off shore going up 
stream. It came by to fast for a photo. Cant miss the fat body tapering on both 
ends and large white wing patches. Seen five minutes ago 1014 hrs. 

 
 Bob Flores
 Ridgefield, WA
 
 Sent from my iPad_______________________________________________
 Tweeters mailing list
 Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
 http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Help with birding in Lake Oswego please
From: David Lantz <lantz503 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 01:30:56 +0000
A friend will be coming up from Southern Oregon for a short time. I had a
very good trip planned out but the the way things are working out we will
only have a short amount of time. Would anybody be able to suggest some
specific hotspots? and have a few ideas but I would love some suggestions.

Thank you David
Subject: Re: Cal Towhee Call note
From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman AT budget.net>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 16:46:12 -0800
Come to think of it, Golden-crowned Sparrow's chip note can sometime sound 
pretty similar to Cal Towhee. Recall hearing one in the fall once in the upper 
Sacramento Valley that I thought was a Cal Towhee until I saw the bird. 


Dennis
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Alan Contreras 
  To: roygerig AT hotmail.com 
  Cc: obol AT freelists.org 
  Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 3:38 PM
  Subject: [obol] Re: Cal Towhee Call note


  Maybe a Golden-crowned Sparrow with a dry mouth?

  Alan Contreras
  Eugene, Oregon


  acontrer56 AT gmail.com


  Sent from my iPhone 





  On Mar 4, 2015, at 3:05 PM, Roy Gerig  wrote:


 I have whined too much on OBOL during the past 3 years about my back. During 
that time I could not take care of my backyard, but now I am finally well 
enough to clear the brush and start to get a nice garden again. Today I was 
snipping, chopping, and sawing into the tangled SW corner, it is almost like 
tangled chaparrel. I stopped when I heard an exact replica of California Towhee 
call notes. It was nearby, but I could not see it. It was very loud. I heard 
the call note maybe a dozen times over a couple of minutes. I lived in South 
Pasadena and in the Valley in SoCal for 8 years, and I know the call very well. 
It seems to me that the chance of this being an actual California Towhee are 
vanishingly small, but the sound was perfect for it. No starlings were around, 
only a couple of House Sparrows, a dozen Juncos, 2 BC Chickadees, an Anna's 
Hummer, and it was definitely a bird call. So what was it? I left and I 
scattered a lot of seed around the area which I can see it from my house. I am 
watching for it. Spotted Towhees frequent the area. 



    I cannot think of any, but is another bird the culprit?


    Roy Gerig, Salem OR
Subject: Re: Cal Towhee Call note
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 15:38:00 -0800
Maybe a Golden-crowned Sparrow with a dry mouth?

Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPhone 



> On Mar 4, 2015, at 3:05 PM, Roy Gerig  wrote:
> 
> I have whined too much on OBOL during the past 3 years about my back. During 
that time I could not take care of my backyard, but now I am finally well 
enough to clear the brush and start to get a nice garden again. Today I was 
snipping, chopping, and sawing into the tangled SW corner, it is almost like 
tangled chaparrel. I stopped when I heard an exact replica of California Towhee 
call notes. It was nearby, but I could not see it. It was very loud. I heard 
the call note maybe a dozen times over a couple of minutes. I lived in South 
Pasadena and in the Valley in SoCal for 8 years, and I know the call very well. 
It seems to me that the chance of this being an actual California Towhee are 
vanishingly small, but the sound was perfect for it. No starlings were around, 
only a couple of House Sparrows, a dozen Juncos, 2 BC Chickadees, an Anna's 
Hummer, and it was definitely a bird call. So what was it? I left and I 
scattered a lot of seed around the area which I can see it from my house. I am 
watching for it. Spotted Towhees frequent the area. 

> 
> I cannot think of any, but is another bird the culprit?
> 
> Roy Gerig, Salem OR
Subject: Cal Towhee Call note
From: Roy Gerig <roygerig AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 15:05:19 -0800
I have whined too much on OBOL during the past 3 years about my back. During 
that time I could not take care of my backyard, but now I am finally well 
enough to clear the brush and start to get a nice garden again. Today I was 
snipping, chopping, and sawing into the tangled SW corner, it is almost like 
tangled chaparrel. I stopped when I heard an exact replica of California Towhee 
call notes. It was nearby, but I could not see it. It was very loud. I heard 
the call note maybe a dozen times over a couple of minutes. I lived in South 
Pasadena and in the Valley in SoCal for 8 years, and I know the call very well. 
It seems to me that the chance of this being an actual California Towhee are 
vanishingly small, but the sound was perfect for it. No starlings were around, 
only a couple of House Sparrows, a dozen Juncos, 2 BC Chickadees, an Anna's 
Hummer, and it was definitely a bird call. So what was it? I left and I 
scattered a lot of seed around the area which I can see it from my house. I am 
watching for it. Spotted Towhees frequent the area. 

I cannot think of any, but is another bird the culprit?
Roy Gerig, Salem OR 		 	   		  
Subject: American Dipper at Big Creek Fish Hatchery
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 14:38:16 -0800
I got really lucky today at Big Creek Fish Hatchery near Knappa
this morning with the perfect combination of decent light and a
cooperative AMERICAN DIPPER.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbalame/sets/72157651158107062/

Usually I get one or the other, but not both...


-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
Problem? what problem?
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2667



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Subject: [COBOL] East of Bend, Eagles galore = Harman Road is HOT
From: "judy" <jmeredit AT bendnet.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 14:26:09 -0800
Deschutes County birding, east of Bend.

Full sunshine today on the open spaces east of town. We stopped at Horse
Ridge, spots along side roads on our way to Harman Road for the raptor show.
We did not find any Sage Thrashers today, and only one long tailed type
sparrow at a distance so can't put any bird on the list today with name Sage
in it. We stopped first thing and last thing at the Dry Canyon overlook to
try for quail but heard and saw none. The Prairie Falcon pair was actively
circling around and perhaps landed in 2 options for nesting there. The Bald
Eagles farther east numbered well over 25 birds, mostly adults or  near
adults. We had at least 4 Golden Eagles and many Ferruginous Hawks.
Difficult to get an accurate count as birds were in the air so much,
tangling with each other etc.  One could hardly look across a field without
seeing several Belding's ground squirrels so that seemed to be the
attraction. Also, the workers were disking or making furrows which got the
squirrels up for easy prey.  Morning light was perfect on Mountain Bluebirds
and Horned Larks today, looking sharp and oh so bright with new feathers.
No Rough-legged Hawks today. Too early for Swainson's Hawks.

This report was mailed for Judy Meredith by http://birdnotes.net
Canada Goose
Bald Eagle
Red-tailed Hawk
Ferruginous Hawk, more of them than Red-tailed Hawks.
Golden Eagle
American Kestrel
Prairie Falcon
Rock Dove
Say's Phoebe, one seen by Howard's car
Common Raven
Horned Lark, in pairs now
Mountain Bluebird
Townsend's Solitaire
European Starling
Total number of species seen: 14
Birders today:  Joe Barry, Ann Nora Kruger and  Ken Hashagen, Kathy Hall,
Merle Greenway, Sherrie Pierce, Susan and Ted Groszkiewicz, Mary
Oppenheimer, Howard Horvath,  Tom Penpraze and Judy Meredith,
jmeredit AT bendnet.com
_______________________________________________
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COBOL AT lists.oregonstate.edu
http://lists.oregonstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/cobol

To unsubscribe, send a message to:
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with the word "unsubscribe" in the body. 



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Subject: Wednesday morning Eugene
From: Kit Larsen <kit AT uoregon.edu>
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 14:05:06 -0800
This posting is from Dennis Arendt:

The Eugene Wednesday group went to the Delta Ponds.  Dave Brown, who 
lives at the edge of the Delta Ponds, had a Tennessee Warbler at his 
suet feeder yesterday.  There was also a previously reported 
MacGillivray's Warbler in the blackberries between the Valley River Inn 
and the bridge.  With a group of twelve, two good bird possibilities and 
a gorgeous morning, we headed to one our most commonly visited sites.  
The MacGillivray's Warbler was seen only by Sylvia and it remained out 
of sight for the rest of us.  The Tennessee Warbler was not relocated.  
We did have a first of year Orange-crowned Warbler and a good variety of 
other birds.  A total of 59 species were seen.  The entire list is 
below.

Cackling Goose
Canada Goose
Wood Duck - only two
Gadwall
American Wigeon
Mallard
Northern Shoveler
Green-winged Teal
Ring-necked Duck
Lesser Scaup - on the river
Bufflehead
Common Merganser - on the river
Pied-billed Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron - at the nest trees east of the ponds
Turkey Vulture
Bald Eagle
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Coot
Killdeer
Greater Yellowlegs
Dunlin - a small group of thirty or so
Long-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Snipe
Ring-billed Gull
Glaucous-winged Gull - plus several other unidentified large gulls
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Anna's Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Red-breasted Sapsucker
Northern Flicker
Steller's Jay
Western Scrub-Jay
American Crow
Tree Swallow - only a few over the ponds
Violet-green Swallow - only one
Black-capped Chickadee
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Bewick's Wren - searching for nest holes already
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
American Robin
Varied Thrush
European Starling
Orange-crowned Warbler - one seen briefly by a few
MacGillivray's Warbler - only seen by one person
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Spotted Towhee
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow - one seen briefly
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Brewer's Blackbird
House Finch
Pine Siskin
American Goldfinch

Randy Sinnott, Sylvia Maulding, Judy and Steve Franzen, Kit Larsen, 
Ellen Cantor, Scott McNeeley, Dave Brown, Jim Regali, Marie and Cindy 
(left early) and Dennis Arendt


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Subject: JoCo singing Fox Sparrow
From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman AT budget.net>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 13:15:56 -0800
Late this morning (03-04-15), just outside our front door (we are a little 
northeast of the Merlin I-5 exit) there was a Sooty Fox Sparrow singing. Did 
well, sounded like a summer-time song. Earlier, I notice 2 in this area, one 
must be attempting to impress the other. 


Dennis 
Subject: Snowy Owl still at Fern Ridge?
From: Jeff Miller <jmiller AT biologicaldiversity.org>
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 12:40:28 -0800
Has the Fern Ridge Reservoir snowy owl been seen lately? The latest eBird
report is from February 22.
 
Jeff Miller
Subject: Spring in Corvallis
From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 11:44:19 -0800
It must be getting spring! A short walk down the main path at Bald Hill
Park this morning produced my FOY RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD (1 male) and
VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOWS (2), plus 2 TURKEY VULTURES soaring overhead and a
few TREE SWALLOWS checking out nest boxes..

Love was in the air: I watched a male NORTHERN HARRIER perform his aerial
loop display in front of a seemingly unimpressed female, while a pair of
RED-TAILED HAWKS circled amorously above the tree line.

And there was music everywhere: Songsters were out in full force, including
MOURNING DOVE, HUTTON'S VIREO, BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, BEWICK'S WREN,
RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, SPOTTED TOWHEE, SONG SPARROW, OREGON JUNCO, HOUSE and
PURPLE FINCHES and LESSER GOLDFINCH.

A beautiful day for a morning walk!

Good birding

Hendrik

-- 
__________________________
Hendrik G. Herlyn
Corvallis, OR


*"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home."     -- Gary Snyder*
Subject: jackson county: sex is in the air and on perches
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 09:42:12 -0800
pand the pairs are forming: jackson county: sex is in the air and on perches

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: 54 Pine Grosbeaks on PCT in Linn County
From: "W. Douglas Robinson" <w.douglas.robinson AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 09:19:21 -0800
At 0.79 miles north from the pacific crest trail intersection with highway 20. 
The usual flock seems to be quite large now. Very talkative. Another group of 8 
was at the 0.23 mile mark. 


Also a mountain bluebird here.

Good birding
Doug

(PS sorry Hendrik and Oscar!)





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Subject: Fwd: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 06:23:32 -0800
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: March 4, 2015 6:10:08 AM PST

*** Species Summary:

Tundra Bean-Goose (1 Tillamook)
Chukar (1 Multnomah)
Lesser Yellowlegs (1 Polk)
Herring Gull (1 Klamath)
Anna's Hummingbird (1 Klamath)
Gyrfalcon (1 Wallowa)
MacGillivray's Warbler (1 Lane)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Oregon Rare Bird Alert. The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on the web at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: Management of Hayfields for Grassland Birds
From: Lillian <lillian.e AT prodigy.net>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 23:12:42 -0800
Hello Birders,

After my previous email I did a little searching to see what I could learn 
about farming practices and ground nesting birds... Below are some good 
recommendations from the Massachusetts Audubon. I don't know if anything like 
it exists for Oregon farmers, but maybe it should... 


--------------------------------------------------

MANAGEMENT OF HAYFIELDS FOR GRASSLAND BIRDS 

Mowing is central to many farming operations as well as the conservation of 
grassland habitats. The following suggestions can be used on hayfields to 
improve wildlife habitat while minimizing a reduction in the quality or 
quantity of hay harvests. 

Options

Keep alert for grassland birds nesting in fields. Mowing around areas where 
birds are frequently seen or leaving small patches unmowed can easily protect 
many nesting birds. Small unmowed patches will provide cover and feeding areas 
for birds for the remainder of the summer. 


Rotating sizable fields (greater than ten acres) that are mowed early with 
those that are mowed late (hay used for bedding straw, etc.) Each season can 
provide some fields for nesting birds while minimizing an impact on high 
quality hay. 


If possible, defer mowing until near the end of the grassland bird breeding 
season (i.e., after July 15) on fields not used for intensive hay production. 
This includes areas such as fallow fields, edge habitats, marginal farmlands 
and weedy areas. 


Flushing bars can be used on haying equipment to move birds hiding in grass.

Avoiding nighttime mowing will reduce the risks of injuring roosting birds.

Raising mower blades to six inches or more may avoid crushing some nests and 
young. 


Local bird clubs or conservation organizations can help determine where and 
what birds are nesting in hayfields. Careful observations can determine the 
approximate nest locations and when birds have successfully raised their young. 
(See Appendix 4 for a list of local Audubon/conservation societies to contact.) 



Found on the Massachusetts Audubon site - 
http://www.massaudubon.org/our-conservation-work/wildlife-research-conservation/grassland-birds/grassland-birds-manual/agricultural-lands 


--------------------------------------------------


The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has these recommendations 
for Rotational Mowing (but I have never seen this practice in Oregon) - 
http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/nrcs143_009930.pdf 


--------------------------------------------------

So, the answer is there are recommendations for farming practices that are more 
thoughtful of ground nesting birds... I didn't read all of the information on 
the 2 websites above. I did read the suggestions for mowing and I don't think I 
have ever seen those suggestions being put into practice here in Oregon... 


Lillian
Subject: Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species
From: "Olin Allen" <olinallen AT earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 23:09:19 -0800
Folks:

 

For what it's worth, Bill Clark is virtually certain that the dark red-tail
that Jim photographed at Baskett Slough is a Harlan's, although he would
like to see the upper surface of the tail for confirmation (no surprise
there!).  I agree with Mike's statement that, "Just because a well respected
individual favors a certain ID doesn't make the ID correct."  Yet, I would
think that the opinions of certain individuals might carry more weight than
others.  In this case, Bill has examined several thousand live birds,
photographs and museum skins of dark red-tails - probably many times more
than the rest of us put together - so surely that counts for something.

 

Some commenters mentioned the brown or rufous color of this bird in deciding
that it wasn't a Harlan's.  Sorry, but I don't see that color at all.  This
bird has the blackish plumage that is typical of Harlan's.  I have seen both
"chocolate" and rufous morphs of red-tails, and their colors are much warmer
than this bird.  I also don't think the photos allow for determination of
the extent of feathering of the tarsus.  However, it's interesting to note
that all birds that Bill considers to be Harlan's (by plumage) have
feathering significantly farther down the tarsus than typical western
red-tails, although not as far down as rough-legs or golden eagles.  Having
seen about 5 Harlan's in the hand, I can attest to how strikingly different
the tarsus feathering is between Harlan's and typical red-tails.  The
difference is actually measurable and may be statistically significant.

 

Olin

------------

Olin Allen

Shangri-Llama Farm

Monmouth, Oregon

 

 
Subject: Quiz for the day
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 22:47:08 -0800
https://picasaweb.google.com/101700670573128910486/WhatBirdIsThis?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCMKAzfC0pIiNSA&feat=directlink 
 


Click on link above and identify this bird as your quiz for the day.

Stephanie
Subject: Re: Photos: Streaked Horned Lark Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15
From: Lillian <lillian.e AT prodigy.net>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 22:43:26 -0800
Hello Birders, 

I was out on Livermore Rd. on 3/2/15 also, and looking for Horned Larks since 
there has been so much talk about them here on OBOL... I didn't see any. 


The event/problem I am about to share may already be well known, I haven't read 
any studies about what is causing the number of larks to decline (I know the 
usual suspects are loss of habitat and other human activities)... My husband 
and I witnessed a situation near Baskett Slough a few years back that broke our 
hearts. It happened at the East end of Coville Rd., not far from the 
intersection with 99W, on the North side of the road. There are grass/hay 
fields there and the farmers where mowing and baling... The field was full of 
Horned Larks, they were calling in a way that sounded to us to be very 
stressed. We believed that there were nests in the grass that was being mowed 
and the birds were distraught. We did not see any evidence of destroyed 
nests... and maybe we were just projecting our own emotions onto the situation, 
but I am convinced that nests were being destroyed. (I have seen birds feeding 
in fields where farm work is being done and this was 

 not the same!)

Is there a way that grass farmers can postpone mowing until after nesting 
season? Or would they miss their crop with that timing? All the fields of grass 
being grown in the Willamette Valley seem like they would be very appealing to 
ground nesting birds. From the birds' perspective it's really a dirty trick - 
here is all this lovely nesting habitat, but then it gets mowed before the 
young can fledge. - If that is the only window of opportunity for the farmers 
to harvest I don't know what could be done... 


If it seems that anyone is interested in the event I will try to figure out 
when it happened and then look for photos, I don't know if we have any or not. 


This situation is very similar to the problem with these large burn piles 
waiting to dry... Whenever I see those piles of brush waiting to dry I think 
about all the small animals and birds that would be attracted to such a cozy 
pile to set up house, and what a cruel death is in store for them when the pile 
is burned... Again, I don't have a good idea to solve the problem. 


I apologize for sharing such a sad and morbid situation... but if there is 
anything that could be done to protect the nests (without putting the farmers 
out of business) maybe someone has an answer. 


Lillian 
Subject: Re: [birding] FOY Turkey Vulture
From: Michael Medina <802redwood AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 04:17:50 +0000
I too saw my FOY of turkey vulture today over Wood Village/Gresham.

MIchael Medina
On Tue, Mar 3, 2015 at 7:34 PM R. Adney Jr.  wrote:

> I spotted several Turkey Vultures today in Douglas county, near Dillard,
> Winston and Roseburg heading north.
>
>
> Rich Adney
>
> http://avianpics.blogspot.com/
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/adneyvisualarts/
> http://www.oregonimages.net
>
>
> > From: gwhite AT peak.org
> > Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 06:30:36 -0800
> > To: birding AT midvalleybirding.org
> > Subject: [birding] FOY Turkey Vulture
> >
> > In keeping with Joel's request ... we saw our first Turkey Vulture
> Monday afternoon on Riverside Drive between Albany and Corvallis.
> >
> > Still no Rufous Hummingbirds around here, though; haven't seen or heard
> them yet. This is right around the time we usually see our first, which
> seem to be just passing through. The summer residents seem to show up a
> little later.
> >
> > Gary
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > birding mailing list
> > birding AT midvalleybirding.org
> > http://midvalleybirding.org/mailman/listinfo/birding
>
Subject: Pacific Crest Trail Black-backed Woodpeckers and Sooty Grouse
From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 20:13:29 -0800
Hello folks,

Oscar and I must be the only birders who have hiked the Pacific Crest Trail
recently and actually managed to miss the Pine Grosbeaks. :-) We spent
almost three hours, hiking a good 2 miles in beautiful, sunny and warm
weather, and found absolutely no sign of grosbeaks (and hardly any other
sign of bird life). To our particular dismay, upon returning to the parking
area, we ran into Mary Anne Sohlstrom and Patty Bernardi, who had arrived
after us and turned around before we got back, yet had managed to find one
singing PINE GROSBEAK male along the trail. Arrgh!

On a happier note, we did find a very cooperative female BLACK-BACKED
WOODPECKER about 2 miles down the trail, and a male on the way back, closer
to the parking area. We also heard a SOOTY GROUSE booming from a ways below
the trail.

A few pictures of the female Black-backed Woodpecker can be viewed here:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsk8ZQzYH

A beautiful day to be out, and now we have a perfect excuse to go back
there soon and try again!

Happy birding

Hendrik

-- 
__________________________
Hendrik G. Herlyn
Corvallis, OR


*"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home."     -- Gary Snyder*
Subject: Re: 60-90 Great Blue Herons in Flight - Portland
From: Michael Medina <802redwood AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 04:13:19 +0000
I should note that this was crossing the Columbia River, a few of you
responded that there was a roost on the Willamette.

On Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 1:26 PM Michael Medina <802redwood AT gmail.com> wrote:

> Today around 11 am, while driving over the l-205 bridge, I saw 60-90 great
> blue herons in flight. Was driving in traffic, so count is inaccurate, but
> I can't say I've ever seen this.
>
> Michael Medina
> Portland, OR
Subject: Pine Grosbeak and woodpeckers
From: kit <kit AT uoregon.edu>
Date: Tue, 03 Mar 2015 20:04:43 -0800
After finding Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein on the PCT north of 
Santiam Pass, we saw at least 25 Pine Grosbeak, quite flighty and 
unsettled. We tracked a female Black-backed Woodpecker with two other 
woodpeckers tapping in the distance. Then two females were in the same 
tree, seemingly sparring with each other, darting around the trunk, one 
raising its wings several times, then a short in-flight tangle and they 
both went off. We never saw a male.

We found a female American Three-toed Woodpecker on the PCT near Big 
Lake, about 100 yards south of where the trail crosses the Old Santiam 
Wagon Road, Forest Service 811 or 810, depending on the map.

Kit Larsen with Jim Ott and Jim Hardman
Eugene



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Subject: Re: [birding] FOY Turkey Vulture
From: "R. Adney Jr." <rfadney AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 19:34:10 -0800
I spotted several Turkey Vultures today in Douglas county, near Dillard, 
Winston and Roseburg heading north. 


Rich Adney

http://avianpics.blogspot.com/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/adneyvisualarts/
http://www.oregonimages.net


> From: gwhite AT peak.org
> Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 06:30:36 -0800
> To: birding AT midvalleybirding.org
> Subject: [birding] FOY Turkey Vulture
> 
> In keeping with Joel's request ... we saw our first Turkey Vulture Monday 
afternoon on Riverside Drive between Albany and Corvallis. 

> 
> Still no Rufous Hummingbirds around here, though; haven't seen or heard them 
yet. This is right around the time we usually see our first, which seem to be 
just passing through. The summer residents seem to show up a little later. 

> 
> Gary
> 
> _______________________________________________
> birding mailing list
> birding AT midvalleybirding.org
> http://midvalleybirding.org/mailman/listinfo/birding
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Photos: Streaked Horned Lark Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 03 Mar 2015 19:11:26 -0800
Hi all,

I found approximately 50 Streaked Horned Larks when I walked Livermore
Rd. from south to north, as part of ODFW's last Willamette Valley
grassland bird survey some years back (2008?).

The private lands along Livermore Rd. are one of the main strongholds of
this endemic Willamette Valley (and Puget trough) subspecies, outside of
Corvallis Airport (CVO) where numbers have dropped alarmingly in the
past couple of years. The other main stronghold is on private farm land
in western Linn County, where there has been little monitoring.

The word "woeful" doesn't begin to describe the current state of
conservation efforts. 

Even though Streaked Horned Larks were federally listed as Threatened
under the Endangered Species Act two years ago, putting them on the same
level as Northern Spotted Owl, Marbled Murrelet, Snowy Plover, and (more
recently) Yellow-billed Cuckoo among Oregon's native birds, only a tiny
fragment of their habitat has gained recognition as "critical habitat."
This site along Livermore Rd. is just one key patch that has no official
recognition.

All this winter, I've been soliciting reports of ANY sort of Horned
Larks, as part of a project to check for banded birds (either from the
critically endangered Puget Sound subpopulation, or from CVO where
numbers seemed more secure, at least until last breeding season).

The astonishing thing has been how VERY FEW reports of Horned Larks have
appeared, either on OBOL, the Midvalley list, eBird, BirdNotes, or via
direct reports. We've had far more volunteers willing to follow up on
lark reports, than we've had recent lark reports to follow up on.

Of course spotting banded larks is tough, so a bit of redundancy never
hurts. But I keep sending volunteers out to the same few flocks that
have been reported regularly all winter, and not much new has emerged.

The season is shifting now, as we're starting to move into nesting
season. The focus for March through June will turn to nesting habitat
alterations and impacts. Please contact me if you're interested in
helping.

Happy migration,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




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Subject: answer to Belted Kinfisher quiz
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 19:07:55 -0800
Marlowe Kissinger. Susan Deagle, and Dottie Belknap all got it right, 
Doug Beall’s photo was of a female Belted Kingfisher.  A male would 
have not had the rust colored strip across its chest.

see photo at link:

http://www.orbirds.org 

Cheers!

Stephanie

Subject: 18 Photos: Two Canada Geese Mating at Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 17:48:06 -0800
I was at the narrows along Covelle Rd. at Baskett Slough yesterday
morning.  I was watching and photographing two Canada Geese.  One started
dipping it's head & neck into the water and throwing water onto it's body.
Then both geese were doing the dipping together.  I have never seen or
photographed Canada Geese mating.  The male got on the back of the female
and held onto her neck with it's bill.  After mating they both dipped in
the water several times and flapped their wings.  It was very interesting
to see and photograph.  It must be that time of the year.  In the last
month I have photographed Northern Shovelers, Mallards and Northern
Pintails mating.  Click on link below for 18 photos of the action.  Happy
Birding, Jim Leonard.





https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/CanadaGeeseMatingBaskettNWR030215?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCLXIw7eEqOGxuwE&feat=directlink 
Subject: Listing Results proof sheets have been sent
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 17:45:13 -0800
Folks,

 

Today I sent out proof sheets to everyone who submitted 20114 Oregon Listing
Results.  Please let me know if you find errors, so I can correct them
before the results are published on the OBA website.

 

If you sent in (or thought you sent in)  Listing Results and you do not get
a proof sheet, let me know.

 

Last minute folks, I'll still take your numbers if you get them in ASAP!!

 

 

Paul T. Sullivan

paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com  

503-472-5306 h

971-237-4864 c

 

 
Subject: Listing Results proof sheets have been sent
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 17:45:13 -0800
Folks,

 

Today I sent out proof sheets to everyone who submitted 20114 Oregon Listing
Results.  Please let me know if you find errors, so I can correct them
before the results are published on the OBA website.

 

If you sent in (or thought you sent in)  Listing Results and you do not get
a proof sheet, let me know.

 

Last minute folks, I'll still take your numbers if you get them in ASAP!!

 

 

Paul T. Sullivan

paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com  

503-472-5306 h

971-237-4864 c

 

 
_______________________________________________
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http://lists.oregonstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/cobol

To unsubscribe, send a message to:
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with the word "unsubscribe" in the body.
Subject: Linn Co PINE GROSBEAKS and BB WOODPECKER
From: "deweysage AT frontier.com" <deweysage@frontier.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 15:38:07 -0800
Kathy and I venture to Santiam Pass this morning and headed north on the PCT. 
About a mile in we had the PINE GROSBEAKS and a male and female BLACK BACKED 
WOODPECKERS. 


Cheers

Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein
Subject: Re: Photos: Streaked Horned Lark Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 15:28:58 -0800
We saw a lark on the road there on Saturday, maybe two miles south of 
Perrydale. 


Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPhone 



> On Mar 3, 2015, at 3:04 PM, Jim Leonard  wrote:
> 
> The last few times I have been out to Baskett Slough NWR I have been watching 
for Streaked Horned Larks to photograph. Yesterday morning I found one that 
didn't fly away and let me photograph it from my pickup window along Livermore 
Rd. North of Baskett Slough NWR. Click on link below Happy Birding, Jim 
Leonard. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/StreakedHornedLarkBaskettNWR030315?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCPzr37OTqszTwAE&feat=directlink 
Subject: Photos: Streaked Horned Lark Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 15:04:48 -0800
The last few times I have been out to Baskett Slough NWR I have been
watching for Streaked Horned Larks to photograph.  Yesterday morning I
found one that didn't fly away and let me photograph it from my pickup
window along Livermore Rd. North of Baskett Slough NWR. Click on link
below  Happy Birding, Jim Leonard.





https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/StreakedHornedLarkBaskettNWR030315?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCPzr37OTqszTwAE&feat=directlink 
Subject: Updated photos from Wallowa Trip: Gyrfalcon, Pine Grosbeaks, and other fun birds
From: Khanh Tran <khanhbatran AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 22:55:47 +0000
 
Hi Obolers: 

Sorry for the delay but here are some updates photos of Gyrfalcon, Great Gray, 
Pine Grosbeaks and other goodies from recent Wallowas trips. 


I love winter birding and it's always a thrill to see these beautiful birds 
against a wintry setting. I also included other owls, grouse, and bird photos 
from recent trips to North central WA. Seeing Gyrfalcons and Snowy Owls on 
glacial erratics and small rocks is really cool and adds to their allure. 


Hope you enjoy the photos. 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/23662496 AT N02/


Peace, love and good birding. 


Khanh Tran 


www.ktbirding.com              		 	   		  

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Subject: Birders Night tonight
From: Owen Schmidt <oschmidt AT att.net>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 14:51:03 -0800
…… Portland Audubon House, 5151 NW Cornell, 7:00 pm! 

oschmidt AT att.net
Tuesday, March 3, 2015




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Subject: Re: Eurasia wigeon
From: Roy Lowe <roy.loweiii AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 14:46:06 -0800
Same is true for Grand Prairie Park in Albany and often there are multiple 
Eurasian wigeon present including male and females. 


Roy

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 3, 2015, at 1:58 PM, Tim Rodenkirk  wrote:
> 
> Anyone interested in real close up photos of a male Eurasian Wigeon should 
visit Mingus Park in Coos Bay. There is one overwintering with the American 
Wigeon, and the birds often feed in the grass right next to the trail around 
the pond. You can basically walk right up to it. 

>  
> Go Ducks!
> Tim R
> Coos Bay
> 
>> On Tue, Mar 3, 2015 at 12:54 PM, Kris Gmail  
wrote: 

>> I regularly saw Eurasian widgeons at that same location in March and April 
of last year. 

>> 
>> So maybe they will be around for a few weeks again this year.
>> 
>> Regards, Kris 
>> 
>>> On Mar 3, 2015, at 12:04 PM, David Lantz  wrote:
>>> 
>>> There are two pairs of Eurasian Wigeons at the Tualatin River National 
Wildlife Refuge. They are at the viewing platform at the end. 

>>> 
>>> David Lantz
>>> 
> 
Subject: Re: Stopping OBOL messages
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 14:31:05 -0800
I contacted Greg Baker, but in case anyone else would like help.
The address to manage your subscription is 
http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
At the bottom left, "Choose an action" will allow you to change how messages 
come to your Inbox. 

I always have mine set for "Vacation mode on" so that I don't receive any OBOL 
messages directly to my Inbox, but I can still post messages if I want. 

I, personally, tend to read the message via the ABA 
website.http://birding.aba.org/maillist/OR01 

Good birding,Russ NamitzMedford, OR 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Eurasia wigeon
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 13:58:26 -0800
Anyone interested in real close up photos of a male Eurasian Wigeon should
visit Mingus Park in Coos Bay.  There is one overwintering with the
American Wigeon, and the birds often feed in the grass right next to the
trail around the pond. You can basically walk right up to it.

Go Ducks!
Tim R
Coos Bay

On Tue, Mar 3, 2015 at 12:54 PM, Kris Gmail 
wrote:

> I regularly saw Eurasian widgeons at that same location in March and April
> of last year.
>
> So maybe they will be around for a few weeks again this year.
>
> Regards, Kris
>
> On Mar 3, 2015, at 12:04 PM, David Lantz  wrote:
>
> There are two pairs of Eurasian Wigeons at the Tualatin River National
> Wildlife Refuge. They are at the viewing platform at the end.
>
> David Lantz
>
>
Subject: Re: Eurasia wigeon
From: Kris Gmail <kristeneisenman AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 12:54:17 -0800
I regularly saw Eurasian widgeons at that same location in March and April of 
last year. 


So maybe they will be around for a few weeks again this year.

Regards, Kris 

> On Mar 3, 2015, at 12:04 PM, David Lantz  wrote:
> 
> There are two pairs of Eurasian Wigeons at the Tualatin River National 
Wildlife Refuge. They are at the viewing platform at the end. 

> 
> David Lantz
Subject: Eurasia wigeon
From: David Lantz <lantz503 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 03 Mar 2015 20:04:48 +0000
There are two pairs of Eurasian Wigeons at the Tualatin River National
Wildlife Refuge. They are at the viewing platform at the end.

David Lantz
Subject: Re: Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd.
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 12:01:55 -0800
Meadowview is off 99 north of the Eugene airport.

Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPhone 



> On Mar 3, 2015, at 11:46 AM, Tom Crabtree  wrote:
> 
> And Meadowview Road is where???
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf
> Of Luke Ferrenburg
> Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 10:24 AM
> To: obol AT freelists.org
> Subject: [obol] Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd. 
> 
> I was checking out the huge swan flock on Meadowview rd. and saw a
> particular individual I initially thought looked good for a Trumpeter Swan.
> However, it put its head down to feed on the grass and I lost it in the sea
> of white. Just something to keep an eye out for if anyone checks out the
> flock.
> 
> -Luke Ferrenburg 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol Manage your account or
> unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 


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Subject: Re: Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd.
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 11:46:15 -0800
And Meadowview Road is where???

-----Original Message-----
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf
Of Luke Ferrenburg
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 10:24 AM
To: obol AT freelists.org
Subject: [obol] Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd. 

I was checking out the huge swan flock on Meadowview rd. and saw a
particular individual I initially thought looked good for a Trumpeter Swan.
However, it put its head down to feed on the grass and I lost it in the sea
of white. Just something to keep an eye out for if anyone checks out the
flock.

-Luke Ferrenburg 

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd.
From: Luke Ferrenburg <lukeferrenburg AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 10:23:41 -0800
I was checking out the huge swan flock on Meadowview rd. and saw a particular 
individual I initially thought looked good for a Trumpeter Swan. However, it 
put its head down to feed on the grass and I lost it in the sea of white. Just 
something to keep an eye out for if anyone checks out the flock. 


-Luke Ferrenburg 

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: News from Vale
From: "Richard W. Musser" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "mussermcevoy@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 16:36:30 +0000 (UTC)
Hello,     Today I had 2 Harris's sparrows here---and they have been absent 
for 14 days. I first saw Harris's sparrows here (between 1 and 3) on Jan. 7th, 
and they continued daily until Feb 17. Also, yesterday, I saw a pair of Am. 
Crows in downtown Vale. Best regards, Dick Musser (4 mi. NW of Vale) 
Subject: How do I stop the OBOL postings coming to my =?UTF-8?Q?email??Date: Tue, 03 Mar 2015 09:27:53 -0700
From: <greg AT bigdecadebirder.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 11:28:00 -0500 (EST)




Subject: Re: obol Digest V4 #65
From: Paula Rich <richpaula AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 08:11:59 -0800

 


> Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 01:06:48 -0500
> From: obol AT freelists.org
> To: ecartis AT freelists.org
> Subject: obol Digest V4 #65
> 
> obol Digest	Monday, March 02 2015	Volume: 04  Issue: 065
> 
> In This Issue:
> 	#1:	From: Christopher Hinkle 
> 		Subject: [obol] Lincoln County today
> 	#2:	From: Jim Leonard 
> 		Subject: [obol] Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> 	#3:	From: Mike Patterson 
> 		Subject: [obol] Willows
> 	#4:	From: "van der Horst" 
> 		Subject: [obol] Talking Waters in Albany
> 	#5:	From: "Tom Crabtree" 
> 		Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> 	#6:	From: "Robert O'Brien" 
> 		Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> 	#7:	From: Alan Contreras 
> 		Subject: [obol] Pleasures of Unknown Hawk 
> 	#8:	From: Lars Per Norgren 
> 		Subject: [obol] dark 'tails
> 	#9:	From: "Tom Crabtree" 
> 		Subject: [obol] Re: dark 'tails
> 	#10:	From: Michael Medina <802redwood AT gmail.com>
> 		Subject: [obol] 60-90 Great Blue Herons in Flight - Portland
> 	#11:	From: Bonnie Comegys 
> 		Subject: [obol] reL Great blue heron flight 205 bridge
> 	#12:	From: Jeff Dillon 
> 		Subject: [obol] Great blue herons and the I-205 bridge over the Willa
> 	#13:	From: Jim Leonard 
> 		Subject: [obol] Photos of unknown Hawk
> 	#14:	From: George Neavoll 
> 		Subject: [obol] White-throated Sparrow (2) at Sauvie Island
> 	#15:	From: Mike Patterson 
> 		Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species
> 	#16:	From: Bob 
> 		Subject: [obol] Golden eagle and brant, Wahkiakum Co., WA
> 	#17:	From: "Don" 
> 		Subject: [obol] Bird Photography Workshop April 11 at Sherwood, Orego
> #18: From: "Richard W. Musser"  (Redacted sender 
"mussermcevoy AT yahoo.com" for DMARC) 

> 		Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species
> 	#19:	From: Jim Leonard 
> 		Subject: [obol] Baby Weasel Riding a Woodpecker
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #1 in digest
> Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 22:15:14 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Lincoln County today
> From: Christopher Hinkle 
> 
> Adrian, our parents and I headed to Newport this morning for a bright sunny
> day on the coast. Yaquina Head produced the Burrowing Owl perched in its
> usual spot, looking cute. Lots of Black Scoters, looking north from the
> lighthouse, and some porpoises offshore. At Ona Beach we were surprised to
> find an imm. Golden Eagle circling overhead before flying east. It must be
> a pretty good bird for the central coast. We had only a few minutes at
> Hatfield Marine Science Center and could not find the Palm Warblers or
> anything else of note.
> Good birding,
> 
> Christopher Hinkle
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #2 in digest
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 05:21:14 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> From: Jim Leonard 
> 
> I recently posted some photos of an unknown hawk to me.  I had lots of
> input from OBOL members that was helpful.  I also looked at a lot of photos
> online.  I have concluded that the hawk is a Harlan's dark-morph Red-tailed
> Hawk photographed at Baskett Slough NWR along Livermore Rd.  These photos
> were taken in February.  Click on link below to see photos.  Happy Birding,
> Jim Leonard.
> 
> 
> 
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/UnknownHawkBaskett22415?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJmygrjfl6y3yQE&feat=directlink 

> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #3 in digest
> Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 08:55:55 -0800
> From: Mike Patterson 
> Subject: [obol] Willows
> 
> I celebrate the early spring by celebrating one of my favorite
> riparian shrubs.
> 
> http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/
> 
> -- 
> Mike Patterson
> Astoria, OR
> Problem? what problem?
> http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2667
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #4 in digest
> From: "van der Horst" 
> Subject: [obol] Talking Waters in Albany
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 09:16:10 -0800
> 
> My husband and I spent a delightful Sunday morning at Talking Waters Gardens 
in Albany, finding close to 29 species of birds, including GREEN HERON, 
VIRGINIA RAIL (heard 2X), BLACK PHOEBE (heard both song and call, saw two 
flycatching over the wetlands), CINNAMON TEAL (2 pairs) and my FOY VIOLET-GREEN 
SWALLOW. I followed this flying swallow until I was 90% sure it had large white 
saddle bags and a pale face. The MARSH WRENS were singing away in the wetlands, 
and we even spotted one gathering cattail fluff for a nest. A good place to 
spot elusive Marsh Wrens up close. Raptors included an AMERICAN KESTREL hunting 
from a bare tree, RED-TAILED HAWKS circling above. 

> This season is probably prime time to get high bird species counts. A trail 
from the same parking lot goes into Simpson Park and runs along the Willamette 
River. We didnt walk there, but the edge of the woods was birdy, including a 
singing BROWN CREEPER. There are directions to the place at the end of this 
article. Dogs are allowed on leash. 

> 
> 
http://www.oregonlive.com/travel/index.ssf/2014/08/tumbling_waters_at_albany_crea.html 

> 
> Kathy van der Horst
> Portland, OR
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #5 in digest
> From: "Tom Crabtree" 
> Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 09:37:50 -0800
> 
> Jim,
> 
> Your hawk is a dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk. It is not a Harlans Hawk. 
Dark-phase Harlans Hawks are usually blackish in appearance, not a rich 
rufous-brown. Harlans Hawks have a variable amount of white streaking on the 
head, throat and usually on the belly as well. For a pair of excellent articles 
on Harlans Hawk ID check out the following from Birding magazine. 

> 
> http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p30.pdf 
> 
> www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p5w1harlans.pdf 	
> 
> Tom Crabtree, Bend
> 
> ********************
> From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf 
Of Jim Leonard 

> Sent: Monday, March 02, 2015 5:21 AM
> To: obol
> Subject: [obol] Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> 
> I recently posted some photos of an unknown hawk to me. I had lots of input 
from OBOL members that was helpful. I also looked at a lot of photos online. I 
have concluded that the hawk is a Harlan's dark-morph Red-tailed Hawk 
photographed at Baskett Slough NWR along Livermore Rd. These photos were taken 
in February. Click on link below to see photos. Happy Birding, Jim Leonard. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/UnknownHawkBaskett22415?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJmygrjfl6y3yQE&feat=directlink 

> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #6 in digest
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 09:53:33 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> From: "Robert O'Brien" 
> 
> I agree with Tom, that it is not a Harlan's but an unusual, dark Red-tail.
> Nevertheless it would be very interesting to see Frank's photos, especially
> the top of the tail.
> Bob OBrien
> 
> 
> On Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 9:37 AM, Tom Crabtree  wrote:
> 
> > Jim,
> >
> > Your hawk is a dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk.  It is not a Harlans Hawk.
> > Dark-phase Harlans Hawks are usually blackish in appearance, not a rich
> > rufous-brown.  Harlans Hawks have a variable amount of white streaking on
> > the head, throat and usually on the belly as well.  For a pair of excellent
> > articles on Harlans Hawk ID check out the following from Birding magazine.
> >
> > http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p30.pdf
> >
> > www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p5w1harlans.pdf
> >
> > Tom Crabtree, Bend
> >
> > ********************
> > From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On
> > Behalf Of Jim Leonard
> > Sent: Monday, March 02, 2015 5:21 AM
> > To: obol
> > Subject: [obol] Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> >
> > I recently posted some photos of an unknown hawk to me.  I had lots of
> > input from OBOL members that was helpful.  I also looked at a lot of photos
> > online.  I have concluded that the hawk is a Harlan's dark-morph Red-tailed
> > Hawk photographed at Baskett Slough NWR along Livermore Rd.  These photos
> > were taken in February.  Click on link below to see photos.  Happy Birding,
> > Jim Leonard.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > 
https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/UnknownHawkBaskett22415?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJmygrjfl6y3yQE&feat=directlink 

> >
> >
> >
> > OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> > Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> > Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> >
> >
> >
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #7 in digest
> From: Alan Contreras 
> Subject: [obol] Pleasures of Unknown Hawk 
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:01:38 -0800
> 
> Any chance it will fly away soon?  Just asking.
> .
> .
> Alan Contreras
> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
> Eugene, Oregon
> 
> 
> > 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #8 in digest
> From: Lars Per Norgren 
> Subject: [obol] dark 'tails
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:32:04 -0800
> 
> I believe Harlan's Hawks have no red in the tail, white at the base? These 
rufous/brown/chestnut jobs are often common in Washington County in winter, 
perhaps less so in the bigger valley to the south of Tualatin. I recall Mike 
Denny reporting some years ago that they nest in ne BC, the sub-arctic 
lowlands. The ones I see seem a third smaller than pale 'tails. Maybe they're 
all males? But Mike Denny made some similar remark about size in that 
illuminating posting of the past. Lars 

> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #9 in digest
> From: "Tom Crabtree" 
> Subject: [obol] Re: dark 'tails
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 12:19:34 -0800
> 
> Lars,
> 
> Harlan's tails are highly variable.  Some have red, some don't.  They can be
> black, brown, white, red and all combinations thereof.  Check out these from
> William Clark's article in the January 2009 issue of birding.
> http://www.aba.org/birding/v41n1p30.pdf and more here:
> http://www.aba.org/birding/v41n1p36w1.pdf 
> 
> Tom 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf
> Of Lars Per Norgren
> Sent: Monday, March 02, 2015 10:32 AM
> To: obol AT freelists.org
> Subject: [obol] dark 'tails
> 
>  I believe Harlan's Hawks have no red in the tail, white at the base? These
> rufous/brown/chestnut jobs are often common in Washington County in winter,
> perhaps less so in the bigger valley to the south of Tualatin. I recall Mike
> Denny reporting some years ago that they nest in ne BC, the sub-arctic
> lowlands. The ones I see seem a third smaller than pale 'tails. Maybe
> they're all males? But Mike Denny made some similar remark about size in
> that illuminating posting of the past.  Lars
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol Manage your account or
> unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #10 in digest
> From: Michael Medina <802redwood AT gmail.com>
> Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 21:26:03 +0000
> Subject: [obol] 60-90 Great Blue Herons in Flight - Portland
> 
> Today around 11 am, while driving over the l-205 bridge, I saw 60-90 great
> blue herons in flight. Was driving in traffic, so count is inaccurate, but
> I can't say I've ever seen this.
> Michael Medina
> Portland, OR
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #11 in digest
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 13:38:10 -0800
> Subject: [obol] reL Great blue heron flight 205 bridge
> From: Bonnie Comegys 
> 
> some years ago, in late Feb. or so, was driving over the I205 bridge and
> saw a large flock of very big birds, which as they passed over were to my
> amazement Great blue herons. emailed Harry Nehls about it, and he said was
> likely they were heading to a heron rookery, perhaps on Ross Island. never
> have seen such a sight again, great timing
> Bonnie Comegys
> NE PortlandParkrose, Portland Oregon
> blcomegys AT gmail.com
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #12 in digest
> Subject: [obol] Great blue herons and the I-205 bridge over the Willamette 
Rive 

> From: Jeff Dillon 
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 14:41:52 -0800
> 
> Goat Island is located just down river from the I-205 bridge (across from the 
mouth of the Clackamas River) and it contains a sizable great blue heron 
rookery. You can see the rookery from the Maddox Woods trail on the west side 
of the river (good now because the trees have not leafed out yet). It is 
interesting to watch these herons and note where they are going / coming from. 
A number of these birds head southeast toward the Beavercreek area and others 
seem to focus on the Clackamas River drainage while others head up the 
Willamette River. Sometimes it can remind you of airplanes coming into the 
Portland airport - they seem to stagger their out-going or incoming flights 
between individual birds. 

> 
> Jeff Dillon
> Gladstone, Oregon
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #13 in digest
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 16:02:19 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Photos of unknown Hawk
> From: Jim Leonard 
> 
> Earlier today I reposted unknown hawk photos I had previously posted.  I
> had many different opinions on what type of Hawk it was including a
> Harlan's.  I am now receiving emails that it's not a Harlan but a
> dark-morph red-tailed.  It's confusing when you post an unknown species and
> receive different opinions.  I have concluded that any hawk photos I post
> in the future I will just call them hawks and let the OBOL readers decide
> what they are.  I do appreciate everyone's input and thanks again, Jim
> Leonard.
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #14 in digest
> From: George Neavoll 
> Subject: [obol] White-throated Sparrow (2) at Sauvie Island
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 17:41:43 -0800
> 
> WHITE-THROATED SPARROW (snappy white-striped form) seen by Sabin Belknap and 
me at former "Harris's Sparrow spot" on Rentenaar Road this afternoon (3/2/15). 
Another, less distinctly marked, also there, in large flock of mostly 
GOLDEN-CROWNED, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS. Golden-crowned leucistic beauty doesn't 
show today. (It was there as recently as a week ago.) 

> 
> On mammal front, three COLUMBIAN WHITE-TAILED DEER at Ridgefield NWR this 
morning. 

> 
> George Neavoll
> S.W. Portland 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #15 in digest
> Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 18:11:39 -0800
> From: Mike Patterson 
> Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species
> 
> There is a fundamental assumption at work here which is probably not
> tenable.
> 
> Just because the majority opinion favors a certain ID doesn't mean
> it's the right ID.  Just because a well respected individual favors
> a certain ID doesn't make the ID correct.  And just because the trend in
> opinion favors one ID, those who disagree are under no obligation to
> change their opinions and follow the majority.
> 
> Your photo, while aesthetically well executed, does not provide enough
> detail to satisfy everybody sufficiently for a unanimous opinion.
> 
> I, for example, am still not wholly convinced that the bird doesn't
> have feathered tarsi.  On the other hand, the tail clearly does not
> show the appropriate marks for a Rough-legged Hawk nor can I find
> anything that would convince me that this is a Ferruginous Hawk.  Based
> on what I can see (and assuming the apparent featheriness of the tarsi
> is an artifact of the way the bird is sitting), I also lean toward
> Dark-phase Western Red-tailed Hawk (not Harlan's).
> 
> However, I do not believe that any of us has any business being
> definitive about this bird based on the information available in the
> photos.  We simply cannot, in my opinion, resolve the identity of
> this bird to a degree that justified any label other than probable
> dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk of unknown type.
> 
> The notion that the collective (and undoubtedly brilliant) minds of
> OBOL will always have an answer that is definitive and unequivocal is
> misguided and doomed to disappoint those looking for absolutes in
> a messy biological landscape...
> 
> 
> -- 
> Mike Patterson
> Astoria, OR
> Problem? what problem?
> http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2667
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #16 in digest
> Subject: [obol] Golden eagle and brant, Wahkiakum Co., WA
> From: Bob 
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 18:35:17 -0800
> 
> Bit of a late post on the eagle. This morning a adult golden eagle was seen 
sitting in a field with atleast a dozen Bald eagles and numerous ravens along 
the Grays Harbor River ( i think). It was mile marker 16 on Hwy 4. 

> 
> Also about an hour ago i had 21 black brant on the Columbia River about 4 
miles from the Cowlitz County line along Hwy 4. 

> 
> There are thousands of gulls all along the river in both Wahkiakum and 
Cowlitz Co's. I did not have the time to stop and check them out. 

> 
> Bob Flores
> Ridgefield, WA
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #17 in digest
> From: "Don" 
> Subject: [obol] Bird Photography Workshop April 11 at Sherwood, Oregon 
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 19:38:50 -0800
> 
> Friends of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Complex is holding a Bird
> Photography Workshop.
>  
> 
> Award-winning Photographer Paul Bannick will be leading this workshop April
> 11 from 7am to noon.
> 
>  
> 
> Topics that will be covered include:
> 
> q  Getting the best bird photographs at lowest cost and 
> 
>                 with the least technical variables
> 
> q     Pros and cons of different shooting modes
> 
> q     Exposure compensation
> 
> q     Depth of field
> 
> q     Shutter speed and ISO
> 
> q  Flash (when to use)
> 
> q  Finding birds
> 
> q  Getting closer to birds
> 
> q  In the field assistance in image making
> 
> q  Ethics of Photographing
> 
>  
> 
> The site will be nearby to the Sherwood, Oregon, location of the Tualatin
> River NWR. 
> 
> Exact details will be sent to registered participants.
> 
> More details are available on the Friend's website at
> http://www.friendsoftualatinrefuge.org/photosociety
> 
> There is a small fee and attendance is limited.
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #18 in digest
> Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 04:39:15 +0000 (UTC)
> From: "Richard W. Musser"  (Redacted sender 
"mussermcevoy AT yahoo.com" for DMARC) 

> Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species
> 
> Hi Mike, I agree with your fundamental assumption, and as far as I'm 
concerned, it's tenable. This is my view---IDing Red-tailed hawks, as to 
subspecies, is terribly difficult, and it's not worth it to me to put up much 
of an argument as to subspecies---because the itself species is so varied. We 
would not be having this discussion if the species were a N. Goshawk, a 
Harris's hawk, or a Ferruginous hawk. These three species are narrowly defined, 
within each, there isn't much variability. Have any of you observed adult 
Harris's hawks? I'll tell you---every one looks the same----and falconers 
sometimes refer to them as ,"clones." I view these clearly defined species as, 
"well settled." This is not the case with Buteo jamaicensis (Red-tailed 
hawks)---and the bird books reflect this with extra pages of subspecies 
description. As far as I'm concerned, our RTs are more settled in the east, and 
become more confused as we go west. Still, even in the east, there are some 
huge 

> size differences within RTs---but in coloration, the easterns look alike. 
It's difficult for me to accept a definition of a subspecies (Harlan's RTs) 
that is so broad----that it's possible that none of the individuals look alike! 
When I think of this likely hood, (which from the photos seems great)---I 
wonder, how can we have a subspecies, or even a species, where all the 
individuals look considerably different? Red-tails are a complex species, and 
are ripe for DNA illumination. After this is figured out, our Swainson's hawks 
and Roughlegged hawks, are just about as confused, and need similar untangling. 
In defense of the guys that discuss this subject intently, they are making an 
effort to explain generally accepted subspecies descriptions (Kriders vs 
Harlans) vs dark western RT)----but there is lots of overlap. And this is why I 
view your fundamental assumption, as tenable. I hope you're well. Best regards, 
Dick Musser (4mi. NW of Vale) 

>      
>  
> On Monday, March 2, 2015 7:11 PM, Mike Patterson  wrote: 

>    
> 
>  There is a fundamental assumption at work here which is probably not
> tenable.
> 
> Just because the majority opinion favors a certain ID doesn't mean
> it's the right ID.  Just because a well respected individual favors
> a certain ID doesn't make the ID correct.  And just because the trend in
> opinion favors one ID, those who disagree are under no obligation to
> change their opinions and follow the majority.
> 
> Your photo, while aesthetically well executed, does not provide enough
> detail to satisfy everybody sufficiently for a unanimous opinion.
> 
> I, for example, am still not wholly convinced that the bird doesn't
> have feathered tarsi.  On the other hand, the tail clearly does not
> show the appropriate marks for a Rough-legged Hawk nor can I find
> anything that would convince me that this is a Ferruginous Hawk.  Based
> on what I can see (and assuming the apparent featheriness of the tarsi
> is an artifact of the way the bird is sitting), I also lean toward
> Dark-phase Western Red-tailed Hawk (not Harlan's).
> 
> However, I do not believe that any of us has any business being
> definitive about this bird based on the information available in the
> photos.  We simply cannot, in my opinion, resolve the identity of
> this bird to a degree that justified any label other than probable
> dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk of unknown type.
> 
> The notion that the collective (and undoubtedly brilliant) minds of
> OBOL will always have an answer that is definitive and unequivocal is
> misguided and doomed to disappoint those looking for absolutes in
> a messy biological landscape...
> 
> 
> -- 
> Mike Patterson
> Astoria, OR
> Problem? what problem?
> http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p&67
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
> 
> 
>    
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #19 in digest
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 21:12:23 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Baby Weasel Riding a Woodpecker
> From: Jim Leonard 
> 
> This Incredible Photo Of A Baby Weasel Riding A Woodpecker Is Straight Out
> Of A Children's Fantasy Book http://bzfd.it/1FPdHVu  Happy Birding, Jim
> Leonard.
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of obol Digest V4 #65
> *************************
> 
> 
 		 	   		  
Subject: March 2 - Lane Co: Tundra Swans and Greater White-fronted Geese
From: "Anne & Dan Heyerly" <tanager AT nu-world.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 23:18:51 -0800
Today around mid-day there were approximately 20 Greater White-fronted Geese
and between 300-600 Tundra Swans out in a grass seed field along the north
side of Meadowview Rd., and west of its intersection with Green Hill Rd.
This spot is just north and slightly east of the Eugene Airport and to the
west of Hwy. 99.

I've never seen such a large flock of swans in this part of the valley
before.

Good birding,

Dan Heyerly, Eugene
Subject: Fern Ridge/Royal Ave. Snowy Owl not seen Monday March 2, 2015
From: "Anne & Dan Heyerly" <tanager AT nu-world.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 23:07:46 -0800
I'll have the raptor route (Lane #1) numbers tomorrow, but I wanted to
relate this bit of news today. Typically we can see the Snowy Owl from at
least one of three vantage points when completing our raptor route.  The
water level at Fern Ridge is very high with very little mud and virtually no
stumps visible (the exception being a few at the SW corner and along the
western edge just north of the Fern Ridge Shores Marina on Jeans Rd.).  We
saw no shorebirds along the reservoir's edge. We did NOT see the Snowy Owl
today either. A birder from Sacramento, CA was visiting friends/relatives in
Eugene and was looking for it.  We left as she started the hike out to the
end of Royal Ave. We do not know if she saw the bird.  

Good Birding,

Dan Heyerly, Eugene
Subject: Pleasures of Unknown Hawk
From: Frank Kolwicz <kolwicz AT minetfiber.com>
Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 23:02:57 -0800
Alan,

If it's the dark-morph Red-tail you're asking about, I haven't seen it 
in the last few days - at least a couple of days before seeing you at 
the narrows. I go up Livermore and back every day at various times 
visiting my bird feeding stations and looking for new little beasties to 
photograph and have been checking for it.

Frank
in Monmouth


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Subject: Sunday March 1 - Linn County Pine Grosbeaks
From: "Anne & Dan Heyerly" <tanager AT nu-world.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 23:01:02 -0800
Obolinks,

Anne and I also drove to the PCT at the Santiam Pass on Sunday. We got there
a little after 12 noon and walked up the trail where we encountered one Paul
Sullivan. We then continued on for a few more minutes and found the flock in
a little "swale" off to the west of the trail (maybe 100 meters north of the
Mt. Jefferson Wilderness sign). We didn't count the flock, but guessed maybe
20 were in it. They were feeding on the Bear Grass seed heads that were
still standing vertical and full of seeds. There was approximately 6-8
inches of snow on the ground. Beautiful birds:  Raspberries and Apricots.
As is typical for searches sometimes, when we got back to the car we saw two
grosbeaks sitting in the top of a fire-killed tree about 100 meters away to
the north.  It was a distant but identifiable view with bins. We were
watching and listening for woodpeckers in that area as well as in the
Hoodoo/Big Lake parking lots on the south side of Hwy. 20, but we did not
see or hear any.

We drove up the road to Foley Seed Orchard (back in Lane County and
approximately opposite the road to Belknap Crater) to see what we could see.
It was pretty quiet, but there were two ("courtin"?) Ruffed Grouse staring
at us from the grassy area inside the orchard and between the trees.  A pair
of American Dippers were paired up on Blue River just above where it empties
into Blue River Reservoir itself. That reservoir is down further than I have
ever seen it. It's going to be a dry summer I predict.

Good Birding,

Dan Heyerly, Eugene
Subject: Baby Weasel Riding a Woodpecker
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 21:12:23 -0800
This Incredible Photo Of A Baby Weasel Riding A Woodpecker Is Straight Out
Of A Children's Fantasy Book http://bzfd.it/1FPdHVu  Happy Birding, Jim
Leonard.
Subject: Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species
From: "Richard W. Musser" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "mussermcevoy@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 04:39:15 +0000 (UTC)
Hi Mike,     I agree with your fundamental assumption, and as far as I'm 
concerned, it's tenable. This is my view---IDing Red-tailed hawks, as to 
subspecies, is terribly difficult, and it's not worth it to me to put up much 
of an argument as to subspecies---because the itself species is so varied. We 
would not be having this discussion if the species were a N. Goshawk, a 
Harris's hawk, or a Ferruginous hawk. These three species are narrowly defined, 
within each, there isn't much variability. Have any of you observed adult 
Harris's hawks? I'll tell you---every one looks the same----and falconers 
sometimes refer to them as ,"clones." I view these clearly defined species as, 
"well settled." This is not the case with Buteo jamaicensis (Red-tailed 
hawks)---and the bird books reflect this with extra pages of subspecies 
description. As far as I'm concerned, our RTs are more settled in the east, and 
become more confused as we go west. Still, even in the east, there are some 
huge size differences within RTs---but in coloration, the easterns look alike. 
It's difficult for me to accept a definition of a subspecies (Harlan's RTs) 
that is so broad----that it's possible that none of the individuals look alike! 
When I think of this likely hood, (which from the photos seems great)---I 
wonder, how can we have a subspecies, or even a species, where all the 
individuals look considerably different? Red-tails are a complex species, and 
are ripe for DNA illumination. After this is figured out, our Swainson's hawks 
and Roughlegged hawks, are just about as confused, and need similar untangling. 
In defense of the guys that discuss this subject intently, they are making an 
effort to explain generally accepted subspecies descriptions (Kriders vs 
Harlans) vs dark western RT)----but there is lots of overlap. And this is why I 
view your fundamental assumption, as tenable. I hope you're well. Best regards, 
Dick Musser (4mi. NW of Vale) 

     
 

 On Monday, March 2, 2015 7:11 PM, Mike Patterson  wrote: 

   

 There is a fundamental assumption at work here which is probably not
tenable.

Just because the majority opinion favors a certain ID doesn't mean
it's the right ID.  Just because a well respected individual favors
a certain ID doesn't make the ID correct.  And just because the trend in
opinion favors one ID, those who disagree are under no obligation to
change their opinions and follow the majority.

Your photo, while aesthetically well executed, does not provide enough
detail to satisfy everybody sufficiently for a unanimous opinion.

I, for example, am still not wholly convinced that the bird doesn't
have feathered tarsi.  On the other hand, the tail clearly does not
show the appropriate marks for a Rough-legged Hawk nor can I find
anything that would convince me that this is a Ferruginous Hawk.  Based
on what I can see (and assuming the apparent featheriness of the tarsi
is an artifact of the way the bird is sitting), I also lean toward
Dark-phase Western Red-tailed Hawk (not Harlan's).

However, I do not believe that any of us has any business being
definitive about this bird based on the information available in the
photos.  We simply cannot, in my opinion, resolve the identity of
this bird to a degree that justified any label other than probable
dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk of unknown type.

The notion that the collective (and undoubtedly brilliant) minds of
OBOL will always have an answer that is definitive and unequivocal is
misguided and doomed to disappoint those looking for absolutes in
a messy biological landscape...


-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
Problem? what problem?
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2667



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Subject: Bird Photography Workshop April 11 at Sherwood, Oregon
From: "Don" <ac7zg AT frontier.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 19:38:50 -0800
Friends of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Complex is holding a Bird
Photography Workshop.

 

Award-winning Photographer Paul Bannick will be leading this workshop April
11 from 7am to noon.

 

Topics that will be covered include:

q  Getting the best bird photographs at lowest cost and 

                with the least technical variables

q     Pros and cons of different shooting modes

q     Exposure compensation

q     Depth of field

q     Shutter speed and ISO

q  Flash (when to use)

q  Finding birds

q  Getting closer to birds

q  In the field assistance in image making

q  Ethics of Photographing

 

The site will be nearby to the Sherwood, Oregon, location of the Tualatin
River NWR. 

Exact details will be sent to registered participants.

More details are available on the Friend's website at
http://www.friendsoftualatinrefuge.org/photosociety

There is a small fee and attendance is limited.

 
Subject: Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 18:11:39 -0800
There is a fundamental assumption at work here which is probably not
tenable.

Just because the majority opinion favors a certain ID doesn't mean
it's the right ID.  Just because a well respected individual favors
a certain ID doesn't make the ID correct.  And just because the trend in
opinion favors one ID, those who disagree are under no obligation to
change their opinions and follow the majority.

Your photo, while aesthetically well executed, does not provide enough
detail to satisfy everybody sufficiently for a unanimous opinion.

I, for example, am still not wholly convinced that the bird doesn't
have feathered tarsi.  On the other hand, the tail clearly does not
show the appropriate marks for a Rough-legged Hawk nor can I find
anything that would convince me that this is a Ferruginous Hawk.  Based
on what I can see (and assuming the apparent featheriness of the tarsi
is an artifact of the way the bird is sitting), I also lean toward
Dark-phase Western Red-tailed Hawk (not Harlan's).

However, I do not believe that any of us has any business being
definitive about this bird based on the information available in the
photos.  We simply cannot, in my opinion, resolve the identity of
this bird to a degree that justified any label other than probable
dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk of unknown type.

The notion that the collective (and undoubtedly brilliant) minds of
OBOL will always have an answer that is definitive and unequivocal is
misguided and doomed to disappoint those looking for absolutes in
a messy biological landscape...


-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
Problem? what problem?
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2667



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Subject: White-throated Sparrow (2) at Sauvie Island
From: George Neavoll <gneavoll AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 17:41:43 -0800
WHITE-THROATED SPARROW (snappy white-striped form) seen by Sabin Belknap and me 
at former "Harris's Sparrow spot" on Rentenaar Road this afternoon (3/2/15). 
Another, less distinctly marked, also there, in large flock of mostly 
GOLDEN-CROWNED, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS. Golden-crowned leucistic beauty doesn't 
show today. (It was there as recently as a week ago.) 


On mammal front, three COLUMBIAN WHITE-TAILED DEER at Ridgefield NWR this 
morning. 


George Neavoll
S.W. Portland 

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Subject: Photos of unknown Hawk
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 16:02:19 -0800
Earlier today I reposted unknown hawk photos I had previously posted.  I
had many different opinions on what type of Hawk it was including a
Harlan's.  I am now receiving emails that it's not a Harlan but a
dark-morph red-tailed.  It's confusing when you post an unknown species and
receive different opinions.  I have concluded that any hawk photos I post
in the future I will just call them hawks and let the OBOL readers decide
what they are.  I do appreciate everyone's input and thanks again, Jim
Leonard.
Subject: Great blue herons and the I-205 bridge over the Willamette River
From: Jeff Dillon <hirundorustica AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 14:41:52 -0800
Goat Island is located just down river from the I-205 bridge (across from the 
mouth of the Clackamas River) and it contains a sizable great blue heron 
rookery. You can see the rookery from the Maddox Woods trail on the west side 
of the river (good now because the trees have not leafed out yet). It is 
interesting to watch these herons and note where they are going / coming from. 
A number of these birds head southeast toward the Beavercreek area and others 
seem to focus on the Clackamas River drainage while others head up the 
Willamette River. Sometimes it can remind you of airplanes coming into the 
Portland airport - they seem to stagger their out-going or incoming flights 
between individual birds. 


Jeff Dillon
Gladstone, Oregon

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Subject: reL Great blue heron flight 205 bridge
From: Bonnie Comegys <blcomegys AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 13:38:10 -0800
some years ago, in late Feb. or so, was driving over the I205 bridge and
saw a large flock of very big birds, which as they passed over were to my
amazement Great blue herons. emailed Harry Nehls about it, and he said was
likely they were heading to a heron rookery, perhaps on Ross Island. never
have seen such a sight again, great timing

Bonnie Comegys
NE PortlandParkrose, Portland Oregon
blcomegys AT gmail.com
Subject: 60-90 Great Blue Herons in Flight - Portland
From: Michael Medina <802redwood AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 21:26:03 +0000
Today around 11 am, while driving over the l-205 bridge, I saw 60-90 great
blue herons in flight. Was driving in traffic, so count is inaccurate, but
I can't say I've ever seen this.

Michael Medina
Portland, OR
Subject: Re: dark 'tails
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 12:19:34 -0800
Lars,

Harlan's tails are highly variable.  Some have red, some don't.  They can be
black, brown, white, red and all combinations thereof.  Check out these from
William Clark's article in the January 2009 issue of birding.
http://www.aba.org/birding/v41n1p30.pdf and more here:
http://www.aba.org/birding/v41n1p36w1.pdf 

Tom 

-----Original Message-----
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf
Of Lars Per Norgren
Sent: Monday, March 02, 2015 10:32 AM
To: obol AT freelists.org
Subject: [obol] dark 'tails

 I believe Harlan's Hawks have no red in the tail, white at the base? These
rufous/brown/chestnut jobs are often common in Washington County in winter,
perhaps less so in the bigger valley to the south of Tualatin. I recall Mike
Denny reporting some years ago that they nest in ne BC, the sub-arctic
lowlands. The ones I see seem a third smaller than pale 'tails. Maybe
they're all males? But Mike Denny made some similar remark about size in
that illuminating posting of the past.  Lars

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Subject: dark 'tails
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:32:04 -0800
 I believe Harlan's Hawks have no red in the tail, white at the base? These 
rufous/brown/chestnut jobs are often common in Washington County in winter, 
perhaps less so in the bigger valley to the south of Tualatin. I recall Mike 
Denny reporting some years ago that they nest in ne BC, the sub-arctic 
lowlands. The ones I see seem a third smaller than pale 'tails. Maybe they're 
all males? But Mike Denny made some similar remark about size in that 
illuminating posting of the past. Lars 


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Subject: Pleasures of Unknown Hawk
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:01:38 -0800
Any chance it will fly away soon?  Just asking.
.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon


> 
Subject: Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
From: "Robert O'Brien" <baro AT pdx.edu>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 09:53:33 -0800
I agree with Tom, that it is not a Harlan's but an unusual, dark Red-tail.
Nevertheless it would be very interesting to see Frank's photos, especially
the top of the tail.

Bob OBrien


On Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 9:37 AM, Tom Crabtree  wrote:

> Jim,
>
> Your hawk is a dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk.  It is not a Harlan’s Hawk.
> Dark-phase Harlan’s Hawks are usually blackish in appearance, not a rich
> rufous-brown.  Harlan’s Hawks have a variable amount of white streaking on
> the head, throat and usually on the belly as well.  For a pair of excellent
> articles on Harlan’s Hawk ID check out the following from Birding magazine.
>
> http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p30.pdf
>
> www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p5w1harlans.pdf
>
> Tom Crabtree, Bend
>
> ********************
> From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On
> Behalf Of Jim Leonard
> Sent: Monday, March 02, 2015 5:21 AM
> To: obol
> Subject: [obol] Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
>
> I recently posted some photos of an unknown hawk to me.  I had lots of
> input from OBOL members that was helpful.  I also looked at a lot of photos
> online.  I have concluded that the hawk is a Harlan's dark-morph Red-tailed
> Hawk photographed at Baskett Slough NWR along Livermore Rd.  These photos
> were taken in February.  Click on link below to see photos.  Happy Birding,
> Jim Leonard.
>
>
>
>
>
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/UnknownHawkBaskett22415?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJmygrjfl6y3yQE&feat=directlink 

>
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 09:37:50 -0800
Jim,

Your hawk is a dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk. It is not a Harlan’s Hawk. 
Dark-phase Harlan’s Hawks are usually blackish in appearance, not a rich 
rufous-brown. Harlan’s Hawks have a variable amount of white streaking on the 
head, throat and usually on the belly as well. For a pair of excellent articles 
on Harlan’s Hawk ID check out the following from Birding magazine. 


http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p30.pdf 

www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p5w1harlans.pdf 	

Tom Crabtree, Bend

********************
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Jim Leonard 

Sent: Monday, March 02, 2015 5:21 AM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified

I recently posted some photos of an unknown hawk to me. I had lots of input 
from OBOL members that was helpful. I also looked at a lot of photos online. I 
have concluded that the hawk is a Harlan's dark-morph Red-tailed Hawk 
photographed at Baskett Slough NWR along Livermore Rd. These photos were taken 
in February. Click on link below to see photos. Happy Birding, Jim Leonard. 






https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/UnknownHawkBaskett22415?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJmygrjfl6y3yQE&feat=directlink 




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Subject: Talking Waters in Albany
From: "van der Horst" <kathyfrans AT opusnet.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 09:16:10 -0800
My husband and I spent a delightful Sunday morning at Talking Waters Gardens in 
Albany, finding close to 29 species of birds, including GREEN HERON, VIRGINIA 
RAIL (heard 2X), BLACK PHOEBE (heard both song and call, saw two flycatching 
over the wetlands), CINNAMON TEAL (2 pairs) and my FOY VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW. I 
followed this flying swallow until I was 90% sure it had large white saddle 
bags and a pale face. The MARSH WRENS were singing away in the wetlands, and we 
even spotted one gathering cattail fluff for a nest. A good place to spot 
elusive Marsh Wrens up close. Raptors included an AMERICAN KESTREL hunting from 
a bare tree, RED-TAILED HAWKS circling above. 


This season is probably prime time to get high bird species counts. A trail 
from the same parking lot goes into Simpson Park and runs along the Willamette 
River. We didn’t walk there, but the edge of the woods was birdy, including a 
singing BROWN CREEPER. There are directions to the place at the end of this 
article. Dogs are allowed on leash. 



http://www.oregonlive.com/travel/index.ssf/2014/08/tumbling_waters_at_albany_crea.html 


Kathy van der Horst
Portland, OR
Subject: Willows
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 08:55:55 -0800
I celebrate the early spring by celebrating one of my favorite
riparian shrubs.

http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
Problem? what problem?
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2667



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Subject: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 05:21:14 -0800
I recently posted some photos of an unknown hawk to me.  I had lots of
input from OBOL members that was helpful.  I also looked at a lot of photos
online.  I have concluded that the hawk is a Harlan's dark-morph Red-tailed
Hawk photographed at Baskett Slough NWR along Livermore Rd.  These photos
were taken in February.  Click on link below to see photos.  Happy Birding,
Jim Leonard.





https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/UnknownHawkBaskett22415?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJmygrjfl6y3yQE&feat=directlink 
Subject: Lincoln County today
From: Christopher Hinkle <christopher.hinkle2 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 22:15:14 -0800
Adrian, our parents and I headed to Newport this morning for a bright sunny
day on the coast. Yaquina Head produced the Burrowing Owl perched in its
usual spot, looking cute. Lots of Black Scoters, looking north from the
lighthouse, and some porpoises offshore. At Ona Beach we were surprised to
find an imm. Golden Eagle circling overhead before flying east. It must be
a pretty good bird for the central coast. We had only a few minutes at
Hatfield Marine Science Center and could not find the Palm Warblers or
anything else of note.

Good birding,

Christopher Hinkle
Subject: Re: quiz for the day and and interview with this month's OBA photo contest winner....
From: Susan Deagle <sdeagle AT mac.com>
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 21:34:26 -0800
One of my top five favorite birds!
This is a female…she’s got the pretty rusty red band that the male lacks. 
Isn’t she beautiful? 

She got my vote!
Susie Deagle



> On Mar 1, 2015, at 8:35 PM, Stephanie Hazen  
wrote: 

> 
> http://www.orbirds.org/index.html 
> 
> OK, photo fans, quiz for the day…what is the sex of bird in
> the winning photo in the February OBA photo contest?
> 
> Click on link above to see the great photo of a belted
> kingfisher submitted by Doug Beall.
> 
> I asked Doug to tell us more about how he got the shot,
> and here is what he wrote:
> 
>> "Kingfishers are a very wary bird that usually takes off quickly
>> when any human movement is occurring within 60 yards.
>> The unique colours, behaviors and feeding habits have always
>> fascinated me and I have spent many hours observing and attempting
>> to obtain a quality photograph. I finally found several birds that are
>> less wary and they fish near a highway at the coast and allowed me
>> to set up with proper lighting and distance which I obtain began
>> approaching verrrrrry slowwwwly [50']. The bird sporadically yammered
>> at me but allowed the tripod and the Canon 1D MK IV- 500mm+1.4 lens to 
remain. 

>> Photo taken Feb. 4pm slightly overcast.”
> 
> See Doug’s website at:
>> 
>> http://abirdsingsbecauseithasasong.com/recent-journeys 
 

> 
> 
> Cheers!
> 
> Stephanie
> 
Subject: quiz for the day and and interview with this month's OBA photo contest winner....
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 20:35:24 -0800
http://www.orbirds.org/index.html 

OK, photo fans, quiz for the day…what is the sex of bird in
the winning photo in the February OBA photo contest?

Click on link above to see the great photo of a belted
kingfisher submitted by Doug Beall.

I asked Doug to tell us more about how he got the shot,
and here is what he wrote:

> "Kingfishers are a very wary bird that usually takes off quickly
> when any human movement is occurring within 60 yards.
> The unique colours, behaviors and feeding habits have always
> fascinated me and I have spent many hours observing and attempting
> to obtain a quality photograph. I finally found several birds that are
> less wary and they fish near a highway at the coast and allowed me
> to set up with proper lighting and distance which I obtain began
> approaching verrrrrry slowwwwly [50']. The bird sporadically yammered
> at me but allowed the tripod and the Canon 1D MK IV- 500mm+1.4 lens to 
remain. 

> Photo taken Feb. 4pm slightly overcast.”

See Doug’s website at:
> 
> http://abirdsingsbecauseithasasong.com/recent-journeys 
 



Cheers!

Stephanie
Subject: Tuesday, March 3rd, is Birders Night
From: Owen Schmidt <oschmidt AT att.net>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 19:19:54 -0800
…….. 7:00 pm, Portland Audubon House, 5151 NW Cornell Road. Free! Bring 
your bird photos and videos, or come to see what others bring. Potpourri. Easy 
bird quiz ……… 


oschmidt AT att.net
Sunday, March 1, 2015




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Subject: ASHLAND DIPPER UPDATE
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 18:58:51 -0800
https://atowhee.wordpress.com/2015/03/01/ashland-dipper-update/

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Re: Curry CA Towhee et al.
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 18:54:45 -0800
We are seeing both green and rufous backed male Selasphorus in our yard 
this past week, north of Bandon, Coos Co.

Saw a TURKEY VULTURE over our house for the first of spring, and one in 
Bandon today.

cheers
Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein
Bandon OR

On 3/1/2015 5:29 PM, Tim Rodenkirk wrote:
>
>
> On the way home I stopped at Knute Andersson's place which is a few 
> miles SW of Langlois, Curry.  He had an all green-backed male 
> Selaphorus Hummer at his feeder that did an Allen's type display so I 
> would guess it was an ALLEN'S HUMMER!
>
> Merry migration indeed!!!!!!!!!
> Tim Rodenkirk
> back in Coos Bay



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Subject: Curry CA Towhee et al.
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 17:29:32 -0800
I will start with Saturday's Cape Arago Audubon trip around Coos Bay, there
were 10 of us and the weather was sunny and a bit cool:

No Harris's Sparrow in Eastside

The female BULLOCK'S ORIOLE was still at Bob Fields feeders in Coos Bay.
Also saw an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER coming to one of his suet feeders and
several BAND-TAILED PIGEONS. He has a very birdy yard and lots of feeders.

The adult male HOODED ORIOLE was an immediate show at Barb Griffin's in
North Bend.  Heard it was there again today.  No Tennesse anymore as
previously reported.

We ran out of time and it got real windy so we didn't go to Lakeside to
look for the Rusty Blackbird.

I then headed south. Stopped at New River and saw two male Selasphorus with
partially green backs. One did an Allen's type display.  I suspect both
were hybrids.

Later in the day in Ophir, Curry I saw 17 Greater White-fronted Geese.

Camped in an undisclosed location on the Siskiyou NF last night east of
Gold Beach.  Got down to 26F. This morning before dawn I heard a Western
Screech-owl and a Northern Spotted Owl.  Neither bird was solicited making
hearing them all the more cool.

I then drove to Harbor- near Brookings.  I arrived near the boat ramp
around 8AM and heard the metallic chink note of what sure sounded like a CA
TOWHEE almost immediately.  I forgot my iPod so i just pished and pished. I
heard several more call notes in about the first half hour but could NOT
see the bird. After a while it quit calling.  I came back around noon and
heard nada.  I think there is indeed a CA Towhee here. Ken Burton never
actually saw it either but he heard a full song as well as call notes, that
was on the 12th of Feb. Oh, neither Don Munson or Jim Rogers has seen this
species in Curry.  The checklist shows three previous records.  Don said
they are all from the '94 list and neither him nor Jim know any details on
these old records?

I took a jog along Oceanview Drive and found a SAY'S PHOEBE on the east
side of the road at the two houses just south of the red colored storage
building place.

On the way home I stopped at Knute Andersson's place which is a few miles
SW of Langlois, Curry.  He had an all green-backed male Selaphorus Hummer
at his feeder that did an Allen's type display so I would guess it was an
ALLEN'S HUMMER!

Merry migration indeed!!!!!!!!!
Tim Rodenkirk
back in Coos Bay
Subject: rufous hummingbird Portland on NW Skyline
From: Mark H <scuff02 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 16:31:56 -0800
Just an hour ago, our first male rufous landed and few for a while on NW
Skyline near Germantown (elev 1100)

Weve been feeding them for 15 years, and this is within just a few days of
past year first arrivals.

Mark Huffaker
Portland, OR



Subject: Re: Pale Red-tail in CO
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 16:12:40 -0800
Thanks Tom ... I too was wondering what the answer was to Craig's question as 
to why this wouldn't be considered a Krider's ... I've never seen a Krider's 
and really appreciate learning ... your points were all educational for me ... 
Thanks. 


Lyn




On Sun, 1 Mar 2015 15:48:03 -0800
"Tom Crabtree"  wrote:

> Craig & Richard, 
> 
>  
> 
> Hopefully Brian will reply to this as he is one of the experts in the
> field.  I would say it isn’t Krider’s because of these factors:
> 
>  
> 
> 1.       Range, as mentioned by Richard, Krider’s don’t occur this
> far west (weakest of the arguments, to be sure); Liguori & Sullivan’s
> article in the March 2010 Birding says there are no documented
> records west of the Rockies.
> 
> 2.       The underparts are too white; Krider’s should show a lot of
> buffy coloration
> 
> 3.       The tail appears to be too red.  Krider’s are mostly white.  
> 
> 4.       Adult male Krider’s (as this appears to be in age) show a
> dark malar region.  This bird’s is white with a few dusky streaks
> 
> 5.       Krider’s should show a well-defined sub-terminal band on the
> tail.  
> 
>  
> 
> One other point is that Krider’s taxonomic status is unclear.  Some
> consider it a subspecies while others believe it is a pale extreme of
> the borealis subspecies.
> 
>  
> 
> Tom Crabtree
> 
>  
> 
> From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On
> Behalf Of Craig Miller Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2015 10:59 AM
> To: Richard W. Musser
> Cc: tom crabtree; Charles Gates; obol; Brian Sullivan
> Subject: [obol] Re: Pale Red-tail in CO
> 
>  
> 
> Hi Richard,
> 
>  
> 
> All your points are well-taken, and I pretty much agree with
> everything you say. However, the what I was wondering (and seems to
> be missed, or am I missing something?) is if we do take the edgy step
> of conjecturing, why doesn't this bird fit Krider's better than
> Harlan's? 
> 
>  
> 
> Craig
> 
> 
Lyn Topinka
Vancouver, Wa.
www.NorthwestJourney.com
www.NorthwestBirding.com
www.ColumbiaRiverImages.com


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