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Updated on Friday, January 30 at 02:30 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Giant Wren,©Sophie Webb

30 Jan The Five Coolest Sounds in Nature ["Carol" ]
30 Jan Sounds of nature [Bobbett Pierce ]
30 Jan Re: My 5 favorite bird sounds [Steve Engel ]
30 Jan FAVORITE SOUNDS...CONTINUED [Harry Fuller ]
30 Jan Third call for Oregon Listing Results ["Paul Sullivan" ]
30 Jan Third call for Oregon Listing Results ["Paul Sullivan" ]
30 Jan 5 Favorite Sounds in Nature [James Billstine ]
30 Jan Re: The five coolest sounds in nature ["Dennis Vroman" ]
30 Jan Re: best sounds ["Dennis Vroman" ]
30 Jan The five coolest sounds in nature ["Diane Trainer" ]
30 Jan favorite sounds..... [Stephanie Hazen ]
30 Jan How about 5 favorite views (in Oregon) ["Mary Anne Sohlstrom" ]
30 Jan Re: The five coolest sounds in nature [Darrel Faxon ]
30 Jan Gilliam/Morrow Counties yesterday [Jen Sanford ]
29 Jan favorite sounds ["Patrick Gallagher" ]
30 Jan My 5 favorite bird sounds [Stefan Schlick ]
29 Jan Re: The five coolest sounds in nature [Lois Miller ]
29 Jan (no subject) ["Allen Prigge" ]
29 Jan Re: The five coolest sounds in nature ["Karan Fairchild" ]
29 Jan Re: The five coolest sounds in nature [Hendrik Herlyn ]
29 Jan Black-headed Gull chase this weekend? [Christopher Hinkle ]
29 Jan Re: The five coolest sounds in nature ["Pamela Johnston" ]
29 Jan Re: The five coolest sounds in nature [Pam Otley ]
29 Jan Willamette River birds today [Thomas Meinzen ]
29 Jan best sounds [Alan Contreras ]
29 Jan My favorite sounds in nature [Roy Gerig ]
29 Jan Re: The five coolest sounds in nature [Karen Saxton ]
29 Jan Re: The five coolest sounds in nature [Thomas Meinzen ]
29 Jan Re: The five coolest sounds in nature [Andy Frank ]
30 Jan Re: The five coolest sounds in nature ["dawn v" ]
29 Jan Re: The five coolest sounds in nature [Thomas Meinzen ]
29 Jan Re: The five coolest sounds in nature [Mark Nikas ]
29 Jan Re: The five coolest sounds in nature [Mitch Ratzlaff ]
29 Jan Re: The five coolest sounds in nature [Bob Archer ]
29 Jan Coos Warblers- Tennessee and others plus amazing weather date [Tim Rodenkirk ]
30 Jan Sauvie Island today (Portland) []
29 Jan The five coolest sounds in nature [Joel Geier ]
29 Jan Re: re Larch Mtn area [Bob ]
29 Jan NORM BARRETT'S WHITE HAWK [Harry Fuller ]
29 Jan Re: Bald Eagle breeding displays [Mike Patterson ]
29 Jan RFI Peru [John Thomas ]
29 Jan Re: Bald Eagle breeding displays [Mike Patterson ]
30 Jan Re: Black-headed Gull and Eagles Mating ["Jenkins, Maurice A." ]
29 Jan Clackamas County report ["Tim Janzen" ]
29 Jan Finley Golden Eagle, Trumpeter Swans, etc. [Hendrik Herlyn ]
29 Jan On Swans, Trumpeters today in southern Polk County [Roy Gerig ]
29 Jan Wallace Marine Park [Jamie Bishop ]
29 Jan re Larch Mtn area [Lars Per Norgren ]
29 Jan EARLY BIRDS: TV IN JANUARY [Harry Fuller ]
29 Jan Bald Eagles at the nest in Salem [Lillian ]
29 Jan Black -headed gull in Astoria [Tom McNamara ]
29 Jan Fw: Lane Co. SNOW BUNTING 29 Jan 2015 ["Diane Pettey" ]
29 Jan Lane Co. SNOW BUNTING 29 Jan 2015 ["Diane Pettey" ]
29 Jan Re: Trumpeter Swans in Suver & Airlie areas [Kristin ]
29 Jan Is Grants Pass Ross's Goose Still Being Seen [David Kollen ]
29 Jan Splitting hairs on junco taxonomy [Mike Patterson ]
29 Jan Winchester Bay Greater White Fronted Geese ["R. Adney Jr." ]
29 Jan Re: NE Oregon photo gallery [David Irons ]
29 Jan A Gallery of Photos from NE Oregon 23-25 January [David Irons ]
29 Jan RBA: Portland, OR 1-29-15 [Harry Nehls ]
28 Jan Black-headed Gull and Eagles Mating [Bob Hancy ]
28 Jan (no subject) [Steven Holt ]
28 Jan Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 1/28/2015 [Wink Gross ]
29 Jan Re: White-wing tagged Red-tailed Hawk, Tillamook ["dawn v" ]
28 Jan Tennessee Warbler, N Bend, Coos Co [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
28 Jan Re: GOT WINTER? NOT SO MUCH HERE On the Long Beach Peninsula either [Jeff Gilligan ]
28 Jan Probable Barred Owl Westmoreland [Chris Bennett ]
28 Jan Curry Gyr ["Diane Trainer" ]
28 Jan Re: GOT WINTER? NOT SO MUCH HERE IN SOUTHERN OREGON [Joel Geier ]
28 Jan GOT WINTER? NOT SO MUCH HERE IN SOUTHERN OREGON [Harry Fuller ]
28 Jan Tundra Bean Goose Nestucca NWR 1/26/15 YES [Linda Berkemeier ]
29 Jan Re: White-wing tagged Red-tailed Hawk, Tillamook [d_villa ]
28 Jan White-wing tagged Red-tailed Hawk, Tillamook [d_villa ]
28 Jan Astoria Black-headed Gull - photos [Diana Byrne ]
28 Jan Trumpeter Swans in Suver & Airlie areas [Joel Geier ]
28 Jan Eugene Wed morning [kit ]

Subject: The Five Coolest Sounds in Nature
From: "Carol" <imcaroling AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 11:00:03 -0800
1.  Coyotes “talking” as they keep tabs on each other’s whereabouts.   
2.  Owls, any kind of owls, hooting.    
3.  Thunder.
4.  Quiet footsteps while walking through a grove of giant Redwoods.
5.  A gentle breeze through Aspen leaves.

Interestingly, most choices are things that I’ve held dear since a child.

Carol Hiler
    
Subject: Sounds of nature
From: Bobbett Pierce <ensatina3 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 13:38:10 -0500
Some of the sounds go on my memorable list, rather than ones I recall fondly. A 
few were downright alarming -- deafening thunder with lightening, high in the 
mountains with nowhere to hide; snowy tree crickets in late summer (a 
favorite), mourning dove (personal): and I don't know why I might tear up when 
large numbers of calling geese fly over in formation, heading north (goodbye!). 
A calling lion sounded like it was just outside our tent while unwittingly 
camping near Wildlife Safari in Oregon years ago (sheesh); and two favorites: 
rain at night while comfy in bed, and that quietest of sounds: in the midst of 
falling snow. 

Lona Pierce   		 	   		  
Subject: Re: My 5 favorite bird sounds
From: Steve Engel <Steve.Engel AT hillsboro-oregon.gov>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 09:51:06 -0800
I can't resist. This topic is enticing. I wonder if it still happens this way 
but in the 1990's, when the ship I worked on berthed in Juneau during the month 
of June, one could hear an entire mountainside (1800 foot Mt Roberts, rising 
nearly straight up from behind downtown Juneau) alive with Hermit Thrush, 
Varied Thrush and Swainson's Thrush. The mountainside must have encompassed 
numerous territories of each species and it was like a giant speaker aimed at 
the waterfront. Morning and evening times produced especially beautiful 
symphonies. 


Steve Engel, Nature Program Supervisor
See our Winter & Spring classes here: 
http://www.hillsboro-oregon.gov/index.aspx?page=1370 


Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve | Parks and Recreation Department 
2600 SW Hillsboro Hwy., Hillsboro, OR 97123
Phone: 503-681-6283 |fax 503-681-6277
email: steve.engel AT hillsboro-oregon.gov




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Subject: FAVORITE SOUNDS...CONTINUED
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 09:47:41 -0800
My vote goes to the Sandhill Crane with its convoluted windpipe and sky
high bugling...not only unforgettable, inimitable, but one of nature's
oldest sounds from a living creature...the soft murmur of conifers when a
breeze blows through their upper limbs, whispering mysterious phrases we
humans cannot comprehend...a six-inch deep stream going over a two foot
high cataract, water in motion completely oblivious to the inanities of
mankind

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Third call for Oregon Listing Results
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 09:43:02 -0800
Thanks to the 78 people who have already submitted their Oregon listing
results.

 

We are half way to the deadline for submitting results.  I would like to
encourage those who have made the effort to go see birds and record their
numbers to report their results to me.

 

What would you think if you went to the records of your favorite sports team
(professional or amateur) and found it full of gaps.  What if you could not
find the stats for Mikey Mantle or Larry Bird?  What if one team or era were
missing? I encourage everyone to report their numbers. Let's make the record
as complete as we can.

 

This is the third call for submission of your numbers as of Dec. 31, 2014.
There are three ways you can submit. 

1.      Go to the OBA website and use the online form at
www.orbirds.org/2014listing_exported/2014listing.php
   This will
automatically come to me.

2.      Fill out the form at the bottom of this email and email it back to
me at paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com  

3.      Print the form at the bottom of this email and mail it to me at Paul
T. Sullivan, 1014 SE Rummel St., McMinnville, OR 97128

 

I look forward to receiving your numbers.

Thanks for participating. 

 

Paul T. Sullivan

-----------------------------------

Oregon Listing Results Form for 2014

 

Listing results will be compiled by Paul Sullivan for publication on the OBA
website. A summary will appear in the spring issue of Oregon Birds. 

The deadline for submission of data is the end of February. 
Use the form below to submit your lists as of December 31, 2014. Lists
should conform to the ABA Listing Rules. 

The thresholds for publication are as follows: 

Oregon State Life List: 300 or more 
Oregon State Year List: 250 or more 
Any County Life List: 100 or more 
Any County Year List: 100 or more 
Oregon Motorless Life List: 100 or more 
Oregon Motorless Year List: 100 or more 

Birds Photographed in Oregon Life List: 100 or more 
Local Circle Life List: 100 or more 
Local Circle Year List: 100 or more 
Your Yard List: No limit 
Your Favorite Refuge: 100 or more 
Your Favorite Spot: 100 or more

                              

Oregon State                     

______  Life List as of Dec 31, 2014              

______  Year List for 2014             

                              

Oregon Counties                             

                              

Life Lists as of Dec 31, 2014                              

                              

______  Baker Life List

______  Benton Life List

______  Clackamas Life List

______  Clatsop Life List

______  Columbia Life List

______  Coos Life List

______  Crook Life List

______  Curry Life List

______  Deschutes Life List

______  Douglas Life List

______  Gilliam Life List

______  Grant Life List

______  Harney  Life List

______  Hood River Life List

______  Jackson Life List

______  Jefferson Life List

______  Josephine Life List

______  Klamath Life List

______  Lake Life List

______  Lane Life List

______  Lincoln Life List

______  Linn Life List

______  Malheur Life List

______  Marion Life List

______  Morrow Life List

______  Multnomah Life List

______  Polk Life List

______  Sherman Life List

______  Tillamook Life List

______  Umatilla Life List

______  Union Life List

______  Wallowa Life List

______  Wasco Life List

______  Washington Life List

______  Wheeler Life List

______  Yamhill Life List

                              

2014 Year Lists                  

                              

______  Baker 2014 list

______  Benton  2014 list

______  Clackamas 2014 list

______  Clatsop 2014 list

______  Columbia 2014 list

______  Coos 2014 list

______  Crook 2014 list

______  Curry 2014 list

______  Deschutes 2014 list

______  Douglas 2014 list

______  Gilliam 2014 list

______  Grant 2014 list

______  Harney 2014 list

______  Hood River 2014 list

______  Jackson 2014 list

______  Jefferson 2014 list

______  Josephine 2014 list

______  Klamath 2014 list

______  Lake 2014 list

______  Lane 2014 list

______  Lincoln 2014 list

______  Linn 2014 list

______  Malheur 2014 list

______  Marion  2014 list

______  Morrow 2014 list

______  Multnomah 2014 list

______  Polk 2014 list

______  Sherman 2014 list

______  Tillamook 2014 list

______  Umatilla 2014 list

______  Union 2014 list

______  Wallowa 2014 list

______  Wasco 2014 list

______  Washington 2014 list

______  Wheeler 2014 list

______  Yamhill  2014 list

 

Oregon Motorless Birding List                     

                              

______  your Oregon motorless life list     

______  your Oregon motorless 2014 list  

                              

Birds Photographed in Oregon                    

                              

______  Life List 

 

Local 15-mile diameter Circle Counts  (describe your circle) ______________


(Sample descriptions: Clatsop County, from Saddle Mtn. to Haystack Rock at
Cannon Beach

                                         Lane County, Eugene CBC circle)

                              

______  your circle life list             

______  your circle 2014 list          

                              

Your yard lists (name nearest city)                             

                              

______  Yard list #1 ______________        

______  Yard list #2 ______________        

                              

Your favorite Wildlife Refuge List (name the refuge)


                              

______  Refuge #1 ______________         

______  Refuge #2 ______________         

                              

Your favorite birding spot (name the spot)                             

                              

______  Spot #1 ______________              

______  Spot #2 ______________

 

Your name ________________________________________

Your email ________________________________________

 
Subject: Third call for Oregon Listing Results
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 09:43:02 -0800
Thanks to the 78 people who have already submitted their Oregon listing
results.

 

We are half way to the deadline for submitting results.  I would like to
encourage those who have made the effort to go see birds and record their
numbers to report their results to me.

 

What would you think if you went to the records of your favorite sports team
(professional or amateur) and found it full of gaps.  What if you could not
find the stats for Mikey Mantle or Larry Bird?  What if one team or era were
missing? I encourage everyone to report their numbers. Let's make the record
as complete as we can.

 

This is the third call for submission of your numbers as of Dec. 31, 2014.
There are three ways you can submit. 

1.      Go to the OBA website and use the online form at
www.orbirds.org/2014listing_exported/2014listing.php
   This will
automatically come to me.

2.      Fill out the form at the bottom of this email and email it back to
me at paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com  

3.      Print the form at the bottom of this email and mail it to me at Paul
T. Sullivan, 1014 SE Rummel St., McMinnville, OR 97128

 

I look forward to receiving your numbers.

Thanks for participating. 

 

Paul T. Sullivan

-----------------------------------

Oregon Listing Results Form for 2014

 

Listing results will be compiled by Paul Sullivan for publication on the OBA
website. A summary will appear in the spring issue of Oregon Birds. 

The deadline for submission of data is the end of February. 
Use the form below to submit your lists as of December 31, 2014. Lists
should conform to the ABA Listing Rules. 

The thresholds for publication are as follows: 

Oregon State Life List: 300 or more 
Oregon State Year List: 250 or more 
Any County Life List: 100 or more 
Any County Year List: 100 or more 
Oregon Motorless Life List: 100 or more 
Oregon Motorless Year List: 100 or more 

Birds Photographed in Oregon Life List: 100 or more 
Local Circle Life List: 100 or more 
Local Circle Year List: 100 or more 
Your Yard List: No limit 
Your Favorite Refuge: 100 or more 
Your Favorite Spot: 100 or more

                              

Oregon State                     

______  Life List as of Dec 31, 2014              

______  Year List for 2014             

                              

Oregon Counties                             

                              

Life Lists as of Dec 31, 2014                              

                              

______  Baker Life List

______  Benton Life List

______  Clackamas Life List

______  Clatsop Life List

______  Columbia Life List

______  Coos Life List

______  Crook Life List

______  Curry Life List

______  Deschutes Life List

______  Douglas Life List

______  Gilliam Life List

______  Grant Life List

______  Harney  Life List

______  Hood River Life List

______  Jackson Life List

______  Jefferson Life List

______  Josephine Life List

______  Klamath Life List

______  Lake Life List

______  Lane Life List

______  Lincoln Life List

______  Linn Life List

______  Malheur Life List

______  Marion Life List

______  Morrow Life List

______  Multnomah Life List

______  Polk Life List

______  Sherman Life List

______  Tillamook Life List

______  Umatilla Life List

______  Union Life List

______  Wallowa Life List

______  Wasco Life List

______  Washington Life List

______  Wheeler Life List

______  Yamhill Life List

                              

2014 Year Lists                  

                              

______  Baker 2014 list

______  Benton  2014 list

______  Clackamas 2014 list

______  Clatsop 2014 list

______  Columbia 2014 list

______  Coos 2014 list

______  Crook 2014 list

______  Curry 2014 list

______  Deschutes 2014 list

______  Douglas 2014 list

______  Gilliam 2014 list

______  Grant 2014 list

______  Harney 2014 list

______  Hood River 2014 list

______  Jackson 2014 list

______  Jefferson 2014 list

______  Josephine 2014 list

______  Klamath 2014 list

______  Lake 2014 list

______  Lane 2014 list

______  Lincoln 2014 list

______  Linn 2014 list

______  Malheur 2014 list

______  Marion  2014 list

______  Morrow 2014 list

______  Multnomah 2014 list

______  Polk 2014 list

______  Sherman 2014 list

______  Tillamook 2014 list

______  Umatilla 2014 list

______  Union 2014 list

______  Wallowa 2014 list

______  Wasco 2014 list

______  Washington 2014 list

______  Wheeler 2014 list

______  Yamhill  2014 list

 

Oregon Motorless Birding List                     

                              

______  your Oregon motorless life list     

______  your Oregon motorless 2014 list  

                              

Birds Photographed in Oregon                    

                              

______  Life List 

 

Local 15-mile diameter Circle Counts  (describe your circle) ______________


(Sample descriptions: Clatsop County, from Saddle Mtn. to Haystack Rock at
Cannon Beach

                                         Lane County, Eugene CBC circle)

                              

______  your circle life list             

______  your circle 2014 list          

                              

Your yard lists (name nearest city)                             

                              

______  Yard list #1 ______________        

______  Yard list #2 ______________        

                              

Your favorite Wildlife Refuge List (name the refuge)


                              

______  Refuge #1 ______________         

______  Refuge #2 ______________         

                              

Your favorite birding spot (name the spot)                             

                              

______  Spot #1 ______________              

______  Spot #2 ______________

 

Your name ________________________________________

Your email ________________________________________

 
_______________________________________________
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Subject: 5 Favorite Sounds in Nature
From: James Billstine <billstinj AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 09:15:31 -0800
The wind blowing across the high desert of Eastern Oregon

A Western Meadowlark calling at sunset

Swainson's Thrush songs in the coast range

A Common Loon yodeling on a glacial lake

The boom of the waves on the ocean
Subject: Re: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman AT budget.net>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 08:52:24 -0800
There's another winter-time "cracking" sound that happens. While attending NY 
State Ranger School in the Adirondack Mtns, in the middle of winter when temps 
go below -30 degrees (which is often there), you can hear the hardwood trees 
frost cracking. Sounds like 22 rifle shots. The coldest night I recall there 
was when it was 46 below. Also, heard ice cracking on Lake Ontario. 


Dennis

  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Pamela Johnston 
  To: obol 
  Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 9:03 PM
  Subject: [obol] Re: The five coolest sounds in nature


 I told Joel off-list that ice is not as dramatic for me, but I remember 
hearing the cracking sound of the pond by my grade school in Massachusetts. 


 The soughing of White Pine boughs in the breeze, but firs are satisfying, too. 


 Varied Thrush songs in the fog. The thrushes have a lot to offer; Robin song, 
Swainson’s Thrush at dusk, and Veery. Nobody said we had to be original in 
our choices! 


 The odd sounds of the Icterids, like the song of a Yellow-headed Blackbird, 
the cellophane rustle of some Grackles, the squeaks of Brewer’s Blackbird. 
There is something exciting about these unmelodic and screechy calls. 


 Horses chewing hay, sort of like Dawn’s kids breathing in their sleep, a 
calming sound. My own horse nickering to me, especially good the first time you 
hear it. 


  Pamela Johnston
Subject: Re: best sounds
From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman AT budget.net>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 08:45:41 -0800
Can still recall hearing 4 Curved-billed Thrashers calling (all from 
different locations), pre-dawn, IN Bisbee, AZ while sitting outside waiting 
to go on a birding field trip.  What a treat!

Dennis

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Alan Contreras" 
To: "OBOL" 
Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 8:48 PM
Subject: [obol] best sounds


>I can't improve on some of the suggested sounds, but I can add a remarkable 
>three-bird chorus. On one occasion in the 1980s I heard a Swainson's 
>Thrush, Hermit Thrush and Veery singing simultaneously. I was standing near 
>Canyon Creek south of John Day.
>
> Alan Contreras
> Eugene, Oregon
>
> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
> 




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Subject: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: "Diane Trainer" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "dtoregon@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 08:31:51 -0800
1. The bugling of Sandhill Cranes as they fly over. 
2. A Song Sparrow singing in the sun. 
3. The bark of a Short-eared Owl. 
4. The Hermit Thrush just out of sight. 
5. The excitement of a birder, in muted tones, upon seeing a life bird. 

Cheers!
Diane
Birding is what you make of it and what it makes of you. 


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Subject: favorite sounds.....
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 08:00:52 -0800
Many years ago I took a borrowed canoe down to Charleston and paddled the 
estuary with folks from the 

South Slough Estuarine Reserve.

We paddled under the highway bridge where common murres were perched, cooing 
and calling. 

The bridge compounded the sounds with echoes and it was other worldly.

Western Screech Owls nest on our property. When the babies perch on our deck, 
the sounds they 

make when their parents approach with food is more excited than kids at a 
playground! 


Once when camping on the coast with paddling friends, Ed and Carol Deery, we 
were forced to 

come home by a storm with high winds. We decided to experience the winds and 
walked out 

to Cape Meares light house. The winds were so strong we could not hear each 
other talk. I 

have never heard such a constant roar as that wind!

I love the sound of golden crowned kinglets “tsking” in the woods! Often 
you cannot find them, but 

by their sound, you know you are not alone!

And last, but not least, I love the drumming of woodpeckers! It is fun to 
follow the sound, and 

try to find who is the percussionist is!

Stephanie Hazen













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Subject: How about 5 favorite views (in Oregon)
From: "Mary Anne Sohlstrom" <masohlstrom AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 06:53:16 -0800
All – the sounds were fun, so how about – What are your five favorite 
scenic views in Oregon? 


Mine include, but are not necessarily limited to:

From the top of Steens Mountain and all of the gorges

Picture Gorge

Painted Hills

The Rimrock along Hwy 26 between Mitchell & Brogan

And – ANYTHING through the windows in my tent!

Cheers,

Mary Anne Sohlstrom

PS: my favorite sounds: “Booming” surf, thunder, mountain streams tumbling 
over rocks, a crackling campfire and any echo! 
Subject: Re: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: Darrel Faxon <5hats AT peak.org>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 06:46:38 -0800
Just five?
It would be hard  to disagree with some of the other favorites, so:
(1)  the fluting melody of the Veery;
(2) the chorus of tree frogs a thousand voices strong;
(3) the exuberant song of a male Black-headed Grosbeak continuing 
non-stop for twenty minutes ( I have timed them!);
      But how about:
(4) the booming, deep, resonant hoot of a Great Gray Owl;
(5) the liquid "heep" of tens of thousands of migrant Swainson's 
Thrushes, filling the sky from horizon to horizon;,
(6) Wrentits singing all through the winter period when all other bird 
song is silent, and
(7) Song Sparrows beginning to tune up in anticipation of spring as soon 
as evening light begins to increase in mid-December?

      In the non-animal category;
(1) the pounding of storm-driven surf from ten miles inland, and
2) the "I demand your attention" roar of a 100 mile + southwester.

      Thank you, Joel, for bringing up this thread.

Darrel


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Subject: Gilliam/Morrow Counties yesterday
From: Jen Sanford <jjsanford AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 06:41:28 -0800
Hi all,

I spent yesterday birding mostly Gilliam County, but also a little bit of
Morrow.  Dense fog in the southern half of Gilliam changed my initial game
plan of hitting the southeastern corner of the county.  Instead I focused
on Willow Creek Wildlife Area, Arlington, Middle Rock Creek Lane, and "The
Tree" Lane (on google maps as Old Tree Road).   I had 39 species for the
day.

Highlights:

-Large flock of CANADA and SNOW GEESE on the dirt road between Willow Creek
and Three Mile Canyon Road in Morrow County
-Vocalizing pheasants (I think?) in the sage at Willow Creek fascinated my
dogs to no end
-GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE continuing in Arlington, mingling with the
coots and domestic ducks
-MERLIN perched on a snag along Highway 19 south of Arlington
-RING-NECKED PHEASANT along Middle Rock Creek Lane
-Large flocks of WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS along Middle Rock Creek Lane
totaling at least 50 birds
-Two ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS along Old Tree Road near the wind turbines,
including my first dark morph
-HORNED LARKS and WESTERN MEADOWLARKS everywhere

I plan to get back to Gilliam again in a few months and explore more new
places, hopefully with less fog.  I put a small album together on Flickr if
you're into that sort of thing:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/stoptellingmeitsokay/sets/72157650490740076/

Good birding,

Jen Sanford
Portland
Subject: favorite sounds
From: "Patrick Gallagher" <galacres AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 22:42:13 -0800
I'm surprised no one has mentioned the sound of those villains, the brown 
headed cowbirds. That bubbling can't be forgotten. 


And for international birds, how about the Eurasian Hoopoe, such a memorable 
sound both the common and scientific names are onamatopoetic. 


Patrick Gallagher
Salem

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Subject: My 5 favorite bird sounds
From: Stefan Schlick <greenfant AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 01:08:51 -0500
My all-time favorite is the MUSICIAN WREN with its unbelievable song. 
When visiting any of the southern European countries along the Mediterranean, 
there is nothing providing more comfort on a warm summer night than the endless 
'tyuh' of the EURASIAN SCOPS OWL. 

In North America, I really enjoyed the peent and droplet notes of the AMERICAN 
WOODCOCK. 

Locally, a singing PACIFIC WREN always brings out a smile. Another really cool 
everyday call is the subdued nasal squeak of the RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH when 
they are just a little annoyed (ok, I also love their hoot). 

Stefan SchlickHillsboro, OR
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: Lois Miller <rarebirdart AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 21:44:42 -0800
I love reading this thread 
Hard to pick just 5 though 

1) my favorite is waking up to a yard full of Laughing Kookaburras every 
morning in Australia. You just can't wake up in a bad mood listening to that ! 

2) the song of a Swainsons Thrush on a warm summer evening 
3) the sounds of Costa Rica at dawn. All the birds... throw in a few Howler 
Monkeys and maybe a frog or two :) perfect 

4) sitting on the cliffs on St Lawrence Island in a colony of thousands of 
Murres ,Auklets and looking out and seeing walrus is just bonus 

5) sitting in my rocker out on my deck just listening to the ocean. Especially 
during heavy surf when I can even feel it 


Lois Miller
Port Orford 

Sent from my iPhone

> 
> 


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Subject: (no subject)
From: "Allen Prigge" <prigge1 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 21:44:05 -0800

I'm with Thomas Meinzen. The eerie and haunting call of the COMMON LOON  
would be among my favorites. I remember it well from Boy Scout canoe trips  
in northern Minnesota.

In an Ornithology class at the U of Minnesota biological station at Itasca  
State Park, the professor described the song of the VEERY. "It sounds like  
it's singing in a rain barrel" Great description!

HERMIT THRUSH, WOOD THRUSH, NORTHERN CARDINAL and BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK  
also come to mind.

Al Prigge


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Subject: Re: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: "Karan Fairchild" <alderspr AT peak.org>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 21:26:10 -0800
I would have a hard time distilling it to just five, but one that stands out is 
the first time I hear violet-green swallows in the spring, swooping into our 
meadow to check out the nest boxes. I love hearing everyone’s experiences. 


 
Subject: Re: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 21:24:21 -0800
What a marvelous topic! So many beautiful sounds out there ...

For me, the call of Sandhill Cranes is certainly way near the top of the
list ... few sounds can touch me like those of an early morning flock of
cranes, flying high over the sagebrush at Malheur NWR at sunrise, joined by
a morning chorus of Western Meadowlarks, Brewer's Sparrows and Sage
Thrashers ...

Or a dozen or more Red-winged Blackbirds, ringing in spring in a still
wintery marsh ...

And, harking back to my boyhood days, the haunting pre-dawn song of the
Eurasian Blackbird - I hate to say it, but its Transatlantic cousin, the
American Robin, sadly pales in comparison ... :-)

Going farther afield, I will never forget the harmonized dueting of a pair
of Toucan Barbets on the west slope of the Ecuadorian Andes, and the
enigmatic sound of the almost impossible-to-see Southern Nightingale-Wren
emanating from an impenetrable tropical thicket.

And speaking of Nightingales .... how could I leave out this most
accomplished among Europe's songsters, who can fill a warm summer night
with unspeakable joy!

I could go on and on ... loons yodeling on a northern lake; a lone,
love-struck curlew over a vast East Frisian marsh; or the eerie hooting of
a Tawny Owl from a nearby copse, only seconds after the village church bell
finished ringing in another New Year ...

Thanks for this wonderful topic!

Hendrik


On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 7:03 PM, Bob Archer  wrote:

> Hi:
>
> All kinds of whales, birds etc can be thought of.. but  to keep it with
> North American birds:
>
> 1st 2nd 3rd 4th and 5th place:
>
>  Try not to listen to a White-eyed Vireo singing in a thick woods on a
> warm summer day. Sirens (the sea nymphs)  are easier to ignore. No tape
> does them justice.
>
> Honorable mention non birds:
>
> a) Singing Humpback Whales just beyond visual sight underwater.
>
> b) My dog Huck howling at a whistling train.
>
> Bob Archer
>
>
> On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 6:23 PM, Joel Geier  wrote:
>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> Noticing Roy Gerig's mention of Trumpeter Swans' sonorous calls as one
>> of his five favorite sounds in nature, I'd like to suggest this as a
>> topic that could help us get through the usual February doldrums.
>>
>> Also, now that everyone and their sister has a camera, there seems to be
>> even more of a lurch than ever toward the visual side of the overall
>> field experience.
>>
>> So here's my own Top 5 list of natural sounds, though not in any
>> particular order since it's hard to choose.
>>
>> I agree with Roy, the sonorous calls of a Trumpeter flock need to be in
>> the top five.
>>
>> Unfortunately the Trumpeter flocks that I mentioned yesterday didn't
>> vocalize while I was scanning them. So the last time I heard a
>> Trumpeter's call was one lonely bird that Marty St. Louis pointed out as
>> it circled over the Summer Lake Wildlife Area headquarters, as a few of
>> us were leaving the lunchtime CBC meet-up (certainly one of the most
>> civilized CBC traditions in Oregon).
>>
>> Here's my full list. I'm going to limit this to sounds that I've
>> actually heard here in the Pacific Northwest, or else this would be
>> really hard. It's heavily biased toward birds, of course.
>>
>> 1. Trumpeter Swan flocks (especially in February when they're really
>> talkative).
>> 1. Pacific Chorus-Frogs in full chorus (easy to hear right now).
>> 1. Boreal Owl song coming out of the darkness high in the Ochocos.
>> 1. Western Meadowlark bubbling song at the top of Baskett Butte.
>> 1. Brewer's Sparrows singing away amid the smell of warm sagebrush.
>> 1. Snapping sounds of trees falling in an ice storm.
>>
>> Yes, I numbered all of them as #1 since I can't rank them. Bean counters
>> might also notice that there were six of them -- not my problem.
>>
>> If I was to go outside of Oregon, I'd include:
>>
>> 1. Sound of ice contracting and cracking on lakes on a cold night in a
>> more northern climates;
>> 1. Wolves howling far out in the night in NW Minnesota.
>> 1. The sound (maybe imaginary?) of the Northern Lights in northern
>> Manitoba.
>> 1. Songs and drums from a nearby Masai village, punctuated by the
>> distant roars of African Lions, while camping out on Masai Mara.
>> 1. The sounds of the spring breakup of ice on the Neva River in
>> Leningrad/St. Petersburg.
>>
>> Looking forward to other aural lists ....
>>
>> Joel
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>
>>
>>
>


-- 
__________________________
Hendrik G. Herlyn
Corvallis, OR


*"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home."     -- Gary Snyder*
Subject: Black-headed Gull chase this weekend?
From: Christopher Hinkle <christopher.hinkle2 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 21:22:38 -0800
Obolers:

Is anyone chasing the Black-headed Gull this weekend, and willing to pick
me and Adrian up in Corvallis?

Or course we can contribute gas money, fun conversation and - hopefully -
some good birds.

Saturday works best but Sunday would work too - who needs the super bowl
with lifers to be seen.

Cheers,

Christopher Hinkle
Subject: Re: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: "Pamela Johnston" <pamelaj AT SpiritOne.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 21:03:08 -0800
I told Joel off-list that ice is not as dramatic for me, but I remember hearing 
the cracking sound of the pond by my grade school in Massachusetts. 


The soughing of White Pine boughs in the breeze, but firs are satisfying, too.

Varied Thrush songs in the fog. The thrushes have a lot to offer; Robin song, 
Swainson’s Thrush at dusk, and Veery. Nobody said we had to be original in 
our choices! 


The odd sounds of the Icterids, like the song of a Yellow-headed Blackbird, the 
cellophane rustle of some Grackles, the squeaks of Brewer’s Blackbird. There 
is something exciting about these unmelodic and screechy calls. 


Horses chewing hay, sort of like Dawn’s kids breathing in their sleep, a 
calming sound. My own horse nickering to me, especially good the first time you 
hear it. 


Pamela Johnston
Subject: Re: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: Pam Otley <pamo1954 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 20:57:29 -0800
Two great horned owls calling and answering each other in the quiet of
early morning.

Approaching wind gusts in the high mountains, whooshing, getting louder and
louder, finally rattling the tent and moving on.

Coyotes howling, yipping, singing in the distance.

Extended thunder rumbling and thunderous claps

Swainson's thrush ethereal song

Hard to stop at five...honorable mention: western meadowlark!

Thanks, Joel, fun thread,

Pam Otley
Subject: Willamette River birds today
From: Thomas Meinzen <thomasmeinzen AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 20:48:27 -0800
Some birds along the Willamette River in Eugene today:

3 DC Cormorants fighting over a big Asian carp one of them caught
3 Mew Gulls at River Wood near Skinner Butte
1 Western Gull    "
Hutton's Vireo on Skinner Butte, south side
Leucisitic Robin   "
Juvenile RED-SHOULDERED HAWK perched atop a 10' tall spindly oak in Razor
Park, along the West Bank Bike Path, Willamette River. This is the first
Red-shoulder I've seen along the river in 7 years of biking and birding
along it.

The shrubs already have new buds and leaves on Skinner Butte. It's January
and signs of spring are already apparent! Spring seems to arrive earlier
and earlier every year...

Good birding,
Thomas Meinzen
Eugene
Subject: best sounds
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 20:48:18 -0800
I can't improve on some of the suggested sounds, but I can add a remarkable 
three-bird chorus. On one occasion in the 1980s I heard a Swainson's Thrush, 
Hermit Thrush and Veery singing simultaneously. I was standing near Canyon 
Creek south of John Day. 


Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPhone 




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Subject: My favorite sounds in nature
From: Roy Gerig <roygerig AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 20:45:31 -0800
Marbled Murrelets in an old-growth forest just before 5 AM,and as Joel suggests 
Jimi is up there too. Roy Gerig, Salem OR 
Subject: Re: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: Karen Saxton <kcsaxton AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 20:41:40 -0800
* A lion calling for his companions to join him in Hwange Nat Park(made
more amazing as we were parked near him in an open vehicle)
* tropical thunderstorm with rain
* the bubbling call of the Oropendola
* the combined calls of the swainson's thrush and black headed grosbeak at
dawn
* the spotted owls calling across the valley to each other

On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 7:53 PM, Thomas Meinzen 
wrote:

> Dawn reminded me, I've got to add the robin's song to my list.
>  Also, the whistling of the Whiskered Screech-Owl... good memories of my
> first night on Madera Canyon, when we saw seven of them.
>
> Thomas
>
> On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 7:51 PM, Thomas Meinzen 
> wrote:
>
>> Great topic, Joel! Here's seven of my favorite nature sounds:
>>
>> - The calls of Sandhill Cranes in the sunset on their breeding grounds (I
>> have isolated meadows in southeastern Oregon in mind for this one)
>> -  Coyotes howling across the sagebrush at night or before a lightning
>> storm
>> -  The Swainson's Thrush song fluting through the forest on a misty
>> morning
>> -  The peent of a nighthawk... such an iconic summer sound for me
>> - The wail of the Common Loon on its breeding grounds in Wisconsin.
>> Reminds me of my dad - it's his favorite.
>> - The sound of rain at night... when we're heading somewhere with a solid
>> roof (i.e. not camping)
>> - The pure silence of a morning where no humans are up and about
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Thomas Meinzen
>> Eugene
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 6:23 PM, Joel Geier  wrote:
>>
>>> Hi all,
>>>
>>> Noticing Roy Gerig's mention of Trumpeter Swans' sonorous calls as one
>>> of his five favorite sounds in nature, I'd like to suggest this as a
>>> topic that could help us get through the usual February doldrums.
>>>
>>> Also, now that everyone and their sister has a camera, there seems to be
>>> even more of a lurch than ever toward the visual side of the overall
>>> field experience.
>>>
>>> So here's my own Top 5 list of natural sounds, though not in any
>>> particular order since it's hard to choose.
>>>
>>> I agree with Roy, the sonorous calls of a Trumpeter flock need to be in
>>> the top five.
>>>
>>> Unfortunately the Trumpeter flocks that I mentioned yesterday didn't
>>> vocalize while I was scanning them. So the last time I heard a
>>> Trumpeter's call was one lonely bird that Marty St. Louis pointed out as
>>> it circled over the Summer Lake Wildlife Area headquarters, as a few of
>>> us were leaving the lunchtime CBC meet-up (certainly one of the most
>>> civilized CBC traditions in Oregon).
>>>
>>> Here's my full list. I'm going to limit this to sounds that I've
>>> actually heard here in the Pacific Northwest, or else this would be
>>> really hard. It's heavily biased toward birds, of course.
>>>
>>> 1. Trumpeter Swan flocks (especially in February when they're really
>>> talkative).
>>> 1. Pacific Chorus-Frogs in full chorus (easy to hear right now).
>>> 1. Boreal Owl song coming out of the darkness high in the Ochocos.
>>> 1. Western Meadowlark bubbling song at the top of Baskett Butte.
>>> 1. Brewer's Sparrows singing away amid the smell of warm sagebrush.
>>> 1. Snapping sounds of trees falling in an ice storm.
>>>
>>> Yes, I numbered all of them as #1 since I can't rank them. Bean counters
>>> might also notice that there were six of them -- not my problem.
>>>
>>> If I was to go outside of Oregon, I'd include:
>>>
>>> 1. Sound of ice contracting and cracking on lakes on a cold night in a
>>> more northern climates;
>>> 1. Wolves howling far out in the night in NW Minnesota.
>>> 1. The sound (maybe imaginary?) of the Northern Lights in northern
>>> Manitoba.
>>> 1. Songs and drums from a nearby Masai village, punctuated by the
>>> distant roars of African Lions, while camping out on Masai Mara.
>>> 1. The sounds of the spring breakup of ice on the Neva River in
>>> Leningrad/St. Petersburg.
>>>
>>> Looking forward to other aural lists ....
>>>
>>> Joel
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: Thomas Meinzen <thomasmeinzen AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 19:53:52 -0800
Dawn reminded me, I've got to add the robin's song to my list.
 Also, the whistling of the Whiskered Screech-Owl... good memories of my
first night on Madera Canyon, when we saw seven of them.

Thomas

On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 7:51 PM, Thomas Meinzen 
wrote:

> Great topic, Joel! Here's seven of my favorite nature sounds:
>
> - The calls of Sandhill Cranes in the sunset on their breeding grounds (I
> have isolated meadows in southeastern Oregon in mind for this one)
> -  Coyotes howling across the sagebrush at night or before a lightning
> storm
> -  The Swainson's Thrush song fluting through the forest on a misty morning
> -  The peent of a nighthawk... such an iconic summer sound for me
> - The wail of the Common Loon on its breeding grounds in Wisconsin.
> Reminds me of my dad - it's his favorite.
> - The sound of rain at night... when we're heading somewhere with a solid
> roof (i.e. not camping)
> - The pure silence of a morning where no humans are up and about
>
> Cheers,
> Thomas Meinzen
> Eugene
>
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 6:23 PM, Joel Geier  wrote:
>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> Noticing Roy Gerig's mention of Trumpeter Swans' sonorous calls as one
>> of his five favorite sounds in nature, I'd like to suggest this as a
>> topic that could help us get through the usual February doldrums.
>>
>> Also, now that everyone and their sister has a camera, there seems to be
>> even more of a lurch than ever toward the visual side of the overall
>> field experience.
>>
>> So here's my own Top 5 list of natural sounds, though not in any
>> particular order since it's hard to choose.
>>
>> I agree with Roy, the sonorous calls of a Trumpeter flock need to be in
>> the top five.
>>
>> Unfortunately the Trumpeter flocks that I mentioned yesterday didn't
>> vocalize while I was scanning them. So the last time I heard a
>> Trumpeter's call was one lonely bird that Marty St. Louis pointed out as
>> it circled over the Summer Lake Wildlife Area headquarters, as a few of
>> us were leaving the lunchtime CBC meet-up (certainly one of the most
>> civilized CBC traditions in Oregon).
>>
>> Here's my full list. I'm going to limit this to sounds that I've
>> actually heard here in the Pacific Northwest, or else this would be
>> really hard. It's heavily biased toward birds, of course.
>>
>> 1. Trumpeter Swan flocks (especially in February when they're really
>> talkative).
>> 1. Pacific Chorus-Frogs in full chorus (easy to hear right now).
>> 1. Boreal Owl song coming out of the darkness high in the Ochocos.
>> 1. Western Meadowlark bubbling song at the top of Baskett Butte.
>> 1. Brewer's Sparrows singing away amid the smell of warm sagebrush.
>> 1. Snapping sounds of trees falling in an ice storm.
>>
>> Yes, I numbered all of them as #1 since I can't rank them. Bean counters
>> might also notice that there were six of them -- not my problem.
>>
>> If I was to go outside of Oregon, I'd include:
>>
>> 1. Sound of ice contracting and cracking on lakes on a cold night in a
>> more northern climates;
>> 1. Wolves howling far out in the night in NW Minnesota.
>> 1. The sound (maybe imaginary?) of the Northern Lights in northern
>> Manitoba.
>> 1. Songs and drums from a nearby Masai village, punctuated by the
>> distant roars of African Lions, while camping out on Masai Mara.
>> 1. The sounds of the spring breakup of ice on the Neva River in
>> Leningrad/St. Petersburg.
>>
>> Looking forward to other aural lists ....
>>
>> Joel
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>
>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: Andy Frank <andydfrank AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 19:53:38 -0800
I'll add the bouncing ball sound of a Western Screech-owl.  I've always
loved the sound, and there's added pleasure in it being an owl.

I won't add Bald Eagle, which I think has the biggest disconnect between
its visual and aural aspects.

And this gives me the opportunity to share some interesting behavior I've
recently witnessed.  I've had Western Screech-owls in my yard each of the
past 5 nights, with several of them being right at dusk as well as later in
the evening.  On 4 of the 5 nights there were definitely 2 present.  2 of
those nights both were seen, and the other 2 nights there was an obvious
duet with different sounding birds.  I have not seen any by or in a nest
hole.

Last night was especially good.  We first heard one at 5:25PM, which was
surprising as it was still fairly light.  At 6:10PM I heard one again and
went outside and easily found it perched on a branch.  Then a 2nd one flew
in.  One of my daughters heard one again at 10:30PM and one outside my
window awakened me at 12:40AM.

They nested in our yard in 2008 and 2011, but I did not observe such
consistent courting either year, but we're hoping this is a harbinger of
them returning to nest here.

Andy Frank
Subject: Re: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: "dawn v" <d_villa AT mail.com>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 04:51:27 +0100




Subject: Re: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: Thomas Meinzen <thomasmeinzen AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 19:51:15 -0800
Great topic, Joel! Here's seven of my favorite nature sounds:

- The calls of Sandhill Cranes in the sunset on their breeding grounds (I
have isolated meadows in southeastern Oregon in mind for this one)
-  Coyotes howling across the sagebrush at night or before a lightning storm
-  The Swainson's Thrush song fluting through the forest on a misty morning
-  The peent of a nighthawk... such an iconic summer sound for me
- The wail of the Common Loon on its breeding grounds in Wisconsin. Reminds
me of my dad - it's his favorite.
- The sound of rain at night... when we're heading somewhere with a solid
roof (i.e. not camping)
- The pure silence of a morning where no humans are up and about

Cheers,
Thomas Meinzen
Eugene





On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 6:23 PM, Joel Geier  wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> Noticing Roy Gerig's mention of Trumpeter Swans' sonorous calls as one
> of his five favorite sounds in nature, I'd like to suggest this as a
> topic that could help us get through the usual February doldrums.
>
> Also, now that everyone and their sister has a camera, there seems to be
> even more of a lurch than ever toward the visual side of the overall
> field experience.
>
> So here's my own Top 5 list of natural sounds, though not in any
> particular order since it's hard to choose.
>
> I agree with Roy, the sonorous calls of a Trumpeter flock need to be in
> the top five.
>
> Unfortunately the Trumpeter flocks that I mentioned yesterday didn't
> vocalize while I was scanning them. So the last time I heard a
> Trumpeter's call was one lonely bird that Marty St. Louis pointed out as
> it circled over the Summer Lake Wildlife Area headquarters, as a few of
> us were leaving the lunchtime CBC meet-up (certainly one of the most
> civilized CBC traditions in Oregon).
>
> Here's my full list. I'm going to limit this to sounds that I've
> actually heard here in the Pacific Northwest, or else this would be
> really hard. It's heavily biased toward birds, of course.
>
> 1. Trumpeter Swan flocks (especially in February when they're really
> talkative).
> 1. Pacific Chorus-Frogs in full chorus (easy to hear right now).
> 1. Boreal Owl song coming out of the darkness high in the Ochocos.
> 1. Western Meadowlark bubbling song at the top of Baskett Butte.
> 1. Brewer's Sparrows singing away amid the smell of warm sagebrush.
> 1. Snapping sounds of trees falling in an ice storm.
>
> Yes, I numbered all of them as #1 since I can't rank them. Bean counters
> might also notice that there were six of them -- not my problem.
>
> If I was to go outside of Oregon, I'd include:
>
> 1. Sound of ice contracting and cracking on lakes on a cold night in a
> more northern climates;
> 1. Wolves howling far out in the night in NW Minnesota.
> 1. The sound (maybe imaginary?) of the Northern Lights in northern
> Manitoba.
> 1. Songs and drums from a nearby Masai village, punctuated by the
> distant roars of African Lions, while camping out on Masai Mara.
> 1. The sounds of the spring breakup of ice on the Neva River in
> Leningrad/St. Petersburg.
>
> Looking forward to other aural lists ....
>
> Joel
>
>
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Re: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: Mark Nikas <elepaio AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 19:42:54 -0800
>
> 5 sounds (all native, wild and not introduced)
>
>
>
> The crack of nearby thunder and its rolling aftermath.  My most memorable
> was long ago camping up in the Pasayten wilderness.  We were camped near
> the base of a narrow canyon with sheer rock walls.  The thunderstorm was
> directly overhead.  The lightning was blinding and seemed to be bouncing
> off the walls of the canyon.  The thunder was deafening and reverberated
> through my body from head to toe. Scary awesome.
>
>
>
> My son’s first cry in the delivery room. Relief, joy, love, pride, fear.
> A whirlwind of emotions was conjured up by that sound.
>
>
>
> The ethereal, ventriloqual song of the Varied Thrush.  I first heard that
> haunting song in the 70’s after moving here from the northeast.  I’d be
> hiking or mushrooming in the forest on Mary’s Peak and that eerie high
> pitched sound would seem to emanate from the trees itself.  I had no idea
> what it was.  Thoughts ranged from Bigfoot to some unfamiliar rodent.  It
> was a couple of years before I first saw what it was coming out of.  I was
> astounded.  I can be anywhere in the world and hear a tape of that call and
> be instantly transported to the dark and wondrous wet forests of Oregon.
>
>
>
> Spring in any extensive marshland.  Virginia rails, Soras, bullfrogs,
> Bitterns, Red-winged and Yellow-headed Blackbirds, mosquitoes, tree frogs
> and always a sound or 2 that make me wonder what the heck was that.  A
> sexual cacophony of strident croaks, groans, whistles, hoots and peeps.
>
>
>
> A steady, not too heavy Oregon rain at night with my bedroom window open
> and comforter pulled up to my chin.  Puts me to sleep in minutes and always
> conjures up pleasant dreams.
>
>
>
> Mark Nikas
>
Subject: Re: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: Mitch Ratzlaff <mitch.ratzlaff AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 19:21:18 -0800
Hearing a singing American Dipper is right up there on my list. My son and
I heard one today on the Three Rivers in Tillamook county while (vainly)
fishing for steelhead. It's truly a highlight as far as I'm concerned.
I agree with Joel too, that being awakened on a dark night by a calling
Boreal Owl is not something one can forget.

My other two favorites are sort of understated but are nostalgic sounds
from my youth. Western meadowlarks singing in the early morning at Malheur
field station while anticipating a day of birding; Dickcissels singing all
around me on the prairie in Oklahoma (a sound I heard many times as a kid
visiting my grandparents farm during Spring in NW Oklahoma).

Mitch Ratzlaff
Dallas

On Thursday, January 29, 2015, Joel Geier  wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> Noticing Roy Gerig's mention of Trumpeter Swans' sonorous calls as one
> of his five favorite sounds in nature, I'd like to suggest this as a
> topic that could help us get through the usual February doldrums.
>
> Also, now that everyone and their sister has a camera, there seems to be
> even more of a lurch than ever toward the visual side of the overall
> field experience.
>
> So here's my own Top 5 list of natural sounds, though not in any
> particular order since it's hard to choose.
>
> I agree with Roy, the sonorous calls of a Trumpeter flock need to be in
> the top five.
>
> Unfortunately the Trumpeter flocks that I mentioned yesterday didn't
> vocalize while I was scanning them. So the last time I heard a
> Trumpeter's call was one lonely bird that Marty St. Louis pointed out as
> it circled over the Summer Lake Wildlife Area headquarters, as a few of
> us were leaving the lunchtime CBC meet-up (certainly one of the most
> civilized CBC traditions in Oregon).
>
> Here's my full list. I'm going to limit this to sounds that I've
> actually heard here in the Pacific Northwest, or else this would be
> really hard. It's heavily biased toward birds, of course.
>
> 1. Trumpeter Swan flocks (especially in February when they're really
> talkative).
> 1. Pacific Chorus-Frogs in full chorus (easy to hear right now).
> 1. Boreal Owl song coming out of the darkness high in the Ochocos.
> 1. Western Meadowlark bubbling song at the top of Baskett Butte.
> 1. Brewer's Sparrows singing away amid the smell of warm sagebrush.
> 1. Snapping sounds of trees falling in an ice storm.
>
> Yes, I numbered all of them as #1 since I can't rank them. Bean counters
> might also notice that there were six of them -- not my problem.
>
> If I was to go outside of Oregon, I'd include:
>
> 1. Sound of ice contracting and cracking on lakes on a cold night in a
> more northern climates;
> 1. Wolves howling far out in the night in NW Minnesota.
> 1. The sound (maybe imaginary?) of the Northern Lights in northern
> Manitoba.
> 1. Songs and drums from a nearby Masai village, punctuated by the
> distant roars of African Lions, while camping out on Masai Mara.
> 1. The sounds of the spring breakup of ice on the Neva River in
> Leningrad/St. Petersburg.
>
> Looking forward to other aural lists ....
>
> Joel
>
>
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org 
>
>
>
Subject: Re: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 19:03:11 -0800
Hi:

All kinds of whales, birds etc can be thought of.. but  to keep it with
North American birds:

1st 2nd 3rd 4th and 5th place:

 Try not to listen to a White-eyed Vireo singing in a thick woods on a warm
summer day. Sirens (the sea nymphs)  are easier to ignore. No tape does
them justice.

Honorable mention non birds:

a) Singing Humpback Whales just beyond visual sight underwater.

b) My dog Huck howling at a whistling train.

Bob Archer


On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 6:23 PM, Joel Geier  wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> Noticing Roy Gerig's mention of Trumpeter Swans' sonorous calls as one
> of his five favorite sounds in nature, I'd like to suggest this as a
> topic that could help us get through the usual February doldrums.
>
> Also, now that everyone and their sister has a camera, there seems to be
> even more of a lurch than ever toward the visual side of the overall
> field experience.
>
> So here's my own Top 5 list of natural sounds, though not in any
> particular order since it's hard to choose.
>
> I agree with Roy, the sonorous calls of a Trumpeter flock need to be in
> the top five.
>
> Unfortunately the Trumpeter flocks that I mentioned yesterday didn't
> vocalize while I was scanning them. So the last time I heard a
> Trumpeter's call was one lonely bird that Marty St. Louis pointed out as
> it circled over the Summer Lake Wildlife Area headquarters, as a few of
> us were leaving the lunchtime CBC meet-up (certainly one of the most
> civilized CBC traditions in Oregon).
>
> Here's my full list. I'm going to limit this to sounds that I've
> actually heard here in the Pacific Northwest, or else this would be
> really hard. It's heavily biased toward birds, of course.
>
> 1. Trumpeter Swan flocks (especially in February when they're really
> talkative).
> 1. Pacific Chorus-Frogs in full chorus (easy to hear right now).
> 1. Boreal Owl song coming out of the darkness high in the Ochocos.
> 1. Western Meadowlark bubbling song at the top of Baskett Butte.
> 1. Brewer's Sparrows singing away amid the smell of warm sagebrush.
> 1. Snapping sounds of trees falling in an ice storm.
>
> Yes, I numbered all of them as #1 since I can't rank them. Bean counters
> might also notice that there were six of them -- not my problem.
>
> If I was to go outside of Oregon, I'd include:
>
> 1. Sound of ice contracting and cracking on lakes on a cold night in a
> more northern climates;
> 1. Wolves howling far out in the night in NW Minnesota.
> 1. The sound (maybe imaginary?) of the Northern Lights in northern
> Manitoba.
> 1. Songs and drums from a nearby Masai village, punctuated by the
> distant roars of African Lions, while camping out on Masai Mara.
> 1. The sounds of the spring breakup of ice on the Neva River in
> Leningrad/St. Petersburg.
>
> Looking forward to other aural lists ....
>
> Joel
>
>
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
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> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Coos Warblers- Tennessee and others plus amazing weather date
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:50:50 -0800
Hi All,

Just broke down the high temps to date in Coos County for January.
Normally we have a high of 52F and a low of 40F (this is all for North Bend
where weather data is recorded).  Only two dates this month were at 52F,
every other date has been above with 11 of the 29 days being over 60F-
wow!  I bet one of the warmest on record but I am not sure how to determine
that.  Only one high temp record I know of- 70F on the 25th.

Today while heading out of my work place late afternoon at the BLM office
in North Bend I spied a small bird near the airport entrance which is
across the road.  I pulled over and stopped.  There were two PALM WARBLERS
there.  It has been an exceptional winter for this species in Coos, here
are the bird reports I know of in January:
2- North Bend
1- Coos Bay
1- Coquille
2- Bandon

Of course when you talk Curry we are in a different ballpark- Terry Wahl
has 10 to 15 on the family ranch near Cape Blanco, there is one or two at
the Blue Silos into Floras Lake, one in Gold Beach reported by Jeff
Gilligan and Terry Wahl and who knows how many in between there and
Brookings since no one reports from there much anymore.

As for ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS I walk my dog in about a mile square area
west of Millicoma Marsh in the Eastside area of Coos Bay regularly.  I know
of at least 6 Orange-crowneds in that area, this of course does not include
Millicoma Marsh and only hits the very west end of the Eastside
neighborhood.  I can about count on seeing one or two any time I go dog
walking, it is amazing!

Today I stopped at Barb Griffin's place in North Bend right after work. I
walked to the Camillea bush right of way, no sign of any activity though. I
waited several minutes and noticed a YR Warbler in a nearby thicket. It
flew over to the camillea and almost immediately the TENNESSEE WARBLER
popped out and chased it off.  Pretty easy to see bird, at least now.

Saw Terry Wahl today and he said one NASHVILLE WARBLER is still regular at
the ranch barn which is near Cape Blanco, Curry.

What will February bring?
Merry 2015!
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: Sauvie Island today (Portland)
From: SJJag AT comcast.net
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 02:34:27 +0000 (UTC)
Linda and I waited out the worst of the fog and had a productive visit to the 
island. 


Highlights include a dozen Bald Eagles around Coon Point, including two mature 
adults near a new nest in the tree line to the South of the viewing area. 

Tundra Swans on the lake, Sandhill Cranes, a Peregrine Falcon, numerous ducks 
in the near ponds. 


On the East side there were a few hundred Snow Geese, great views, another 
Peregrine, more Eagles and Sandhills. 


The viewing platform showed many ducks including at least two Canvasbacks, and 
more Swans. 


Rentenauer Road had many sparrows, (a Lincoln's or two) a surprisingly large 
group of Morning Doves (perhaps 20 or more) and an interesting group of 

6 Greater Yellowlegs in one of the small pons/wetland spots about 2/3 of the 
way out from Sauvie Is. Rd. 


Several other birders out as well.

Steve Jaggers
Linda Neumann


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Subject: The five coolest sounds in nature
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:23:57 -0800
Hi all,

Noticing Roy Gerig's mention of Trumpeter Swans' sonorous calls as one
of his five favorite sounds in nature, I'd like to suggest this as a
topic that could help us get through the usual February doldrums.

Also, now that everyone and their sister has a camera, there seems to be
even more of a lurch than ever toward the visual side of the overall
field experience. 

So here's my own Top 5 list of natural sounds, though not in any
particular order since it's hard to choose.

I agree with Roy, the sonorous calls of a Trumpeter flock need to be in
the top five.

Unfortunately the Trumpeter flocks that I mentioned yesterday didn't
vocalize while I was scanning them. So the last time I heard a
Trumpeter's call was one lonely bird that Marty St. Louis pointed out as
it circled over the Summer Lake Wildlife Area headquarters, as a few of
us were leaving the lunchtime CBC meet-up (certainly one of the most
civilized CBC traditions in Oregon).

Here's my full list. I'm going to limit this to sounds that I've
actually heard here in the Pacific Northwest, or else this would be
really hard. It's heavily biased toward birds, of course.

1. Trumpeter Swan flocks (especially in February when they're really
talkative).
1. Pacific Chorus-Frogs in full chorus (easy to hear right now).
1. Boreal Owl song coming out of the darkness high in the Ochocos.
1. Western Meadowlark bubbling song at the top of Baskett Butte.
1. Brewer's Sparrows singing away amid the smell of warm sagebrush.
1. Snapping sounds of trees falling in an ice storm.

Yes, I numbered all of them as #1 since I can't rank them. Bean counters
might also notice that there were six of them -- not my problem.

If I was to go outside of Oregon, I'd include:

1. Sound of ice contracting and cracking on lakes on a cold night in a
more northern climates;
1. Wolves howling far out in the night in NW Minnesota.
1. The sound (maybe imaginary?) of the Northern Lights in northern
Manitoba.
1. Songs and drums from a nearby Masai village, punctuated by the
distant roars of African Lions, while camping out on Masai Mara.
1. The sounds of the spring breakup of ice on the Neva River in
Leningrad/St. Petersburg.

Looking forward to other aural lists ....

Joel




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Subject: Re: re Larch Mtn area
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:15:31 -0800
Thanks Lars i had no idea there is a Larch Mt in Oregon.

Bob

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 29, 2015, at 14:19, Lars Per Norgren  wrote:
> 
> Folks, note that Bob is talking about a "larch Mtn" in Clark County WA, not 
the more famous one in extreme eastern Multnomah County. Loggers in early 20th 
century NW referred to noble fir as "larch". Many counties in nw Oregon and I 
assume western WA have "Larch Mtns" where members of the genus Larix are 
absent. Lars 

> 
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> 
> 


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Subject: NORM BARRETT'S WHITE HAWK
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 17:45:12 -0800
One lof Jackson County best and more active birders photo0gra[phed what is
apparently a very white Red-tail:  it;s on this website:
http://www.nmbnaturephotography.com/newest-photos/

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Re: Bald Eagle breeding displays
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 17:39:16 -0800
Should probably include this as well:

"Most aggression among adults in response to territorial disputes during
nesting; among all ages in response to competition for food any time of
the year, but especially during winter, and for favorite foraging
perches and roosting sites; and among nestlings for food. Territorial
Bald Eagles may chase nonbreeders, especially adults, from the
territory. Aggressive interactions among nestlings common, occasionally
leading to death of the smaller, younger nestling (termed siblicide;
Herrick 1932). Death may occur because of food deprivation or actual
physical harassment from older individual. Frequency of occurrence of
siblicide not well documented in this species (Stalmaster 1987).

"Actual physical contact rare among Bald Eagles, but can be fatal (e.g.,
Roberts 1985). In experimental foraging study, pirating aggressor struck
by defending conspecific on only 10 of 541 (1.8%) contested foraging
events (Hansen 1986). In Minnesota, a territorial individual struck an
intruder 7 times, although without apparent injury (Fraser 1981). Fatal
injury from territorial encounters reported based on circumstantial
evidence such as talon-puncture wounds found on dead eagle. At Alaskan
communal feeding sites, interaction outcomes governed by size, hunger
level, and possibly position (air superior to ground), but not age
(Hansen 1986). Fischer (1985) also failed to observe age advantage for
piracy attempts by Bald Eagles wintering on the Mississippi River.
Knight and Skagen (1988) showed an age advantage only for “smaller”
adults in w. Washington, contrary to Stalmaster and Gessaman’s (1984)
observation that younger Bald Eagles (immature plumage) were subordinate
to adults for the same study area."

Mike Patterson wrote:
> From Birds of North America (on-line):
>
> "Sexual Behavior "Courtship
>
> "Spectacular courtship rituals, involving vocalizations and
> acrobatic flight displays. Perhaps most noted courtship act is
> Cartwheel Display, in which courting pair fly to great altitude, lock
> talons, and tumble/cartwheel back toward earth; pair break off
> display at the last moment to avoid collision with the ground. Other
> courtship displays include Chase Display, in which paired individuals
> will pursue each other, occasionally lock talons, roll, and dive; and
> so-called Roller-Coaster Flight, in which eagle will fly to great
> altitude, fold wings, and dive directly to earth, swooping back up at
> the last instance to avoid collision with the ground (Stalmaster
> 1987)."
>
>
> If anyone has actual cited references to the contrary, I'm sure we
> would all be happy to read them...
>

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
The Problem With Big Years
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2550



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Subject: RFI Peru
From: John Thomas <johnpam AT mtangel.net>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 17:29:32 -0800
Hello OBOLers,

Anybody have recommendations on best local guiding services in Peru? We are 
thinking about northern Peru at this point and not the Amazon. We realize Field 
Guides, VENT,RockJumper, Tropical Birding, Wings, etc. cover the area but their 
prices have skyrocketed in recent years and causing us to balk a bit...We are 
Hummingbird aficionados and have been to Ecuador several times so... that's the 
focus between the feathers. All the birds and wildlife would be appreciated. 


It looks like several lodges would be necessary to semi-see the area....Words 
of advice? 



Thanks, Good Birding, 

John Thomas
Silverton

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Subject: Re: Bald Eagle breeding displays
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 17:28:10 -0800
"Sexual Behavior
"Courtship

"Spectacular courtship rituals, involving vocalizations and acrobatic
flight displays. Perhaps most noted courtship act is Cartwheel Display,
in which courting pair fly to great altitude, lock talons, and
tumble/cartwheel back toward earth; pair break off display at the last
moment to avoid collision with the ground. Other courtship displays
include Chase Display, in which paired individuals will pursue each
other, occasionally lock talons, roll, and dive; and so-called
Roller-Coaster Flight, in which eagle will fly to great altitude, fold
wings, and dive directly to earth, swooping back up at the last instance
to avoid collision with the ground (Stalmaster 1987)."


If anyone has actual cited references to the contrary, I'm sure we
would all be happy to read them...

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
The Problem With Big Years
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2550



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Subject: Re: Black-headed Gull and Eagles Mating
From: "Jenkins, Maurice A." <alanjenkins AT ou.edu>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 01:05:51 +0000
Bald Eagle talon or foot grappling, as it is called, does occur during the 
mating season, but it is in fact agonistic (combative) behavior and occurs 
between birds of the same gender. In the cases I have heard of where the sexes 
of the birds are known it was found that talon grappling occurred between two 
males or two females. Many people have called it courtship behavior, but it 
probably never is. 




Alan Jenkins

Creswell, Oregon

________________________________
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [obol-bounce AT freelists.org] on behalf of Bob 
Hancy [sailinghanu AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Wednesday, January 28, 2015 10:22 PM
To: OBOL
Subject: [obol] Black-headed Gull and Eagles Mating


​Greetings ~ with help from Linda P. I was able to see and photograph the 
Black-headed Gull this morning (thank you all for the photos and the help!). 
This one was a toughie. Linda then showed me Wireless Road, where I hope to 
find many birds in the future (not much today though). I then headed to the 
Eagle Sanctuary off of Hwy 30 and found a couple of American White Pelicans and 
a few Bald Eagles. Two adult eagles were doing the spring mating ritual where 
they grab each others feet and fall to the (almost) ground. I have photos of 
the feet grabbing, but they released as soon as they grabbed on. Very cool 
indeed to witness this. I'm over 80 species so far for the year - and with try 
number 3, I'll be heading to San Francisco to see some of the rarities down 
there next week. I'm no globe-trotter, but I'm going to give it an honest try 
in the lower 48. 


Anyway - 36 species today. 60 degree weather and SUNNY at Astoria (it's like a 
holiday - I think people leave work and go sit in the sun when this happens in 
Astoria)​. 


My photos and details of the day are here: 
RPHancy.com 



​Bob
Bird is the Word.​

Subject: Clackamas County report
From: "Tim Janzen" <tjanzen AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:30:05 -0800
Dan van den Broek and I spent some time birding in the Canby and Molalla 
regions today. The biggest surprise was 12 GREAT EGRETS in a pasture along 
Sprague Rd. north of Molalla. To the best of my knowledge, no more than 2 Great 
Egrets have ever been seen at the same location at the same time anywhere in 
Clackamas County. A WHITE-THROATED SPARROW was in a large sparrow flock along 
Sprague Rd. A male REDHEAD was in the swale along Anderson Rd. near Canby. A 
large flock of about 80 AMERICAN PIPITS were also along Anderson Rd. 


Sincerely,

Tim Janzen
Subject: Finley Golden Eagle, Trumpeter Swans, etc.
From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 15:26:26 -0800
Hello folks,

Oscar and I took advantage of the sunny weather and made a quick run down
to Finley NWR this afternoon.

Several raptors were circling over Bruce Road, including a GOLDEN EAGLE,
one PEREGRINE FALCON, several RED-TAILED and two ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS.

McFadden Marsh had several throusand CACKLING GEESE and hundreds of DUSKY
CANADA GEESE. We were unable to detect any white geese in the flock, but
there were a few TUNDRA and 2 TRUMPETER SWANS on the marsh.

The north part of the refuge produced many of the usual suspects, including
a cooperative BLACK PHOEBE at HQ pond, but nothing out of the ordinary.

A nice day to be out and about!

Happy pre-spring birding

Hendrik

-- 
__________________________
Hendrik G. Herlyn
Corvallis, OR


*"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home."     -- Gary Snyder*
Subject: On Swans, Trumpeters today in southern Polk County
From: Roy Gerig <roygerig AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 14:58:01 -0800
I think that I just deleted my message to obol and Joel and I don't know how to 
get it back so here goes again (apologies if another similar message appears): 

I have been observing the wintering TRUMPETER SWANS of southern Polk County 
since the 1970s. Joel posted about them yesterday and today was a great day to 
go see them, the flock he mentioned along Suver Road was still there this 
morning, 57 Swans, but so far away that I could not be sure of numbers of each, 
TRUMPETER or TUNDRA, I could see two sizes. From there I drove 10 miles west 
along Suver Road then Airlie Road and could see about 40 Swans in the same spot 
Joel mentioned yesterday near the Tartar Road turnoff, again far from any road 
so I kept going, south on Maple Grove Road a mile to Priem Road, another 
favored spot for Trumpeters. The flock there was close to the road, and in the 
quiet spring day, I could easily see that all 37 Swans there were TRUMPETER 
SWANS, and even better, I could hear them. If you have not heard the sound of 
Trumpeters then I am sure that you want to, it is one of my favorite 5 sounds 
in nature. 

I want to say something about Swans in the Willamette Valley. Down in Linn 
County, between say Halsey and Brownsville, you could go find 1500 Tundra Swans 
this time of year, but seldom if ever a Trumpeter. At Ankeny NWR you can often 
find upwards of 100 Tundras, but the only Trumpeter I have ever seen there was 
the one last year from February to May on Eagle Marsh which seemed to be sick 
or injured. The only, or at least the very best, reliable place to ever find 
Trumpeters in the Willamette Valley is the part of southern Polk County that 
Joel referred to yesterday and that I am referring to here; from the Maple 
Grove area west 10-11 miles along Airlie Road then Suver Road, across Hwy 99. 
Joel has been reporting on these magnificent birds now for more than a decade, 
and I kept tabs on them from the late 1970s for 2 or 3 decades into the early 
2000s. Bill Tice noted them during that time as well. Their numbers have grown 
slowly in that time. Trumpeters seem to tolerate more hilly and sometimes more 
enclosed areas, while Tundras generally favor flat open grass seed field areas 
in winter. 

The 2 Swan species are not so hard to identify, and you can look in your Sibley 
or anywhere for that. I recommend that you go to Suver, south of Monmouth and 
north of Corvallis, and look in the areas Joel spoke of yesterday or that I 
mentioned here, until you find Trumpeters. Do it soon, they tend to leave a 
little early, another month or so and they'll be gone until next winter. They 
do mix with Tundras - some of the time, not all the time. 

To get to Priem Road, turn south off Airlie Road at Maple Grove, go south a 
mile or less from Airlie Road, then west on Priem Road. Up the hill, where 
there is a large new vineyard planted now, I saw 2 WHITE-TAILED KITES today and 
there was a ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK near the TRUMPETER SWAN flock. Some of you might 
remember an AMERICAN TREE SPARROW that I think Jeff Gilligan and Nick Lethaby 
found at the corner on Priem Road where there is a small clump of trees, the 
only trees for a ways, 25-30 years ago. I and others saw it a day or two later. 
It stayed a little while then flew off. 

Roy Gerig, Salem OR

 		 	   		  
Subject: Wallace Marine Park
From: Jamie Bishop <pidgies AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 17:20:25 -0500
I took a walk in Wallace Marine Park this morning heading north on the path
to the west of the baseball rosette to the little pond and back. Because
I'm out of state, the usual suspects are all still new and wonderful. The
highlights of my walk were the Varied Thrush, Golden-crowned Sparrows,
American Wigeons, and a leisurely visit with a nonchalant Spotted Towhee
who seemed to enjoy my company. I was within 3 feet of it when it popped
out continued to forage right next to me. :)

My eBird list is as follows:

Jamie Bishop
Jan 29, 2015
US-OR-Salem-200 Glen Creek Rd NW
Traveling
1 miles
152 Minutes
Observers: 1
All birds reported? Yes
Comments:
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8

116 Cackling Goose
5 American Wigeon
4 Mallard
2 Pied-billed Grebe
1 Red-tailed Hawk
X gull sp.
17 Mourning Dove
3 Anna's Hummingbird
2 Downy Woodpecker
4 Northern Flicker (Red-shafted)
5 Steller's Jay
15 Western Scrub-Jay
8 American Crow
16 Chestnut-backed Chickadee
7 Bushtit
1 Golden-crowned Kinglet
2 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
23 American Robin
1 Varied Thrush
30 European Starling
6 Spotted Towhee
5 Song Sparrow
8 Golden-crowned Sparrow
40 Dark-eyed Junco (Oregon)
2 Brewer's Blackbird
2 Lesser Goldfinch
6 House Sparrow
2 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)
Subject: re Larch Mtn area
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 14:19:32 -0800
 Folks, note that Bob is talking about a "larch Mtn" in Clark County WA, not 
the more famous one in extreme eastern Multnomah County. Loggers in early 20th 
century NW referred to noble fir as "larch". Many counties in nw Oregon and I 
assume western WA have "Larch Mtns" where members of the genus Larix are 
absent. Lars 


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Subject: EARLY BIRDS: TV IN JANUARY
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 13:23:21 -0800
Turkey Vultures are back a month earlier than what used to be normal here
in Jackson County, and I may be last birder around t see one.
https://atowhee.wordpress.com/2015/01/29/water-days/

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Bald Eagles at the nest in Salem
From: Lillian <lillian.e AT prodigy.net>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:55:31 -0800
Good Day Birders!

A little freeway birding this morning in Salem revealed 1 mature adult Bald 
Eagle on the nest, a sub-adult bird sitting on a branch near the nest, and 
another mature adult sitting in the next tree... This nest was reported here on 
OBOL last year, but I was never able to spot it (probably because the trees 
were in full leaf). The trees are still bare now so the nest and the eagles are 
easy to see from I-5... 


It's a post card day, go out and enjoy it!
Lillian
Subject: Black -headed gull in Astoria
From: Tom McNamara <tmcmac67 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:51:42 -0800
The gull is present at 12: 30 about one hundred and twenty meters south of
Dairy Queen , right across from Tapiola  Park.
Good birding,
Tom
Subject: Fw: Lane Co. SNOW BUNTING 29 Jan 2015
From: "Diane Pettey" <surfbird AT q.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:07:22 -0800
OOPS, apologies for no directions!
N. Jetty of the Siuslaw River. Bird was observed feeding in shallow pond in 
foredune basin on north side of jetty, between the parking lot and the 
ocean.
DP
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Diane Pettey" 
To: "OBOL" 
Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 11:59 AM
Subject: Lane Co. SNOW BUNTING 29 Jan 2015


> Hi OBOLers,
> At 1030 today, I saw a first winter female SNOW BUNTING. I called Anne 
> Caples here in Florence and she said Tom Mickel reported it to OBOL a few 
> days ago. I never saw a post so it may have fallen through a digest 
> crevasse.
>
> regards,
> Diane Pettey
> Heceta Beach, OR
> surfbird AT q.com 



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Subject: Lane Co. SNOW BUNTING 29 Jan 2015
From: "Diane Pettey" <surfbird AT q.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 11:59:15 -0800
Hi OBOLers,
At 1030 today, I saw a first winter female SNOW BUNTING. I called Anne 
Caples here in Florence and she said Tom Mickel reported it to OBOL a few 
days ago. I never saw a post so it may have fallen through a digest 
crevasse.

regards,
Diane Pettey
Heceta Beach, OR
surfbird AT q.com 



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Subject: Re: Trumpeter Swans in Suver & Airlie areas
From: Kristin <nristik AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 11:04:24 -0800
On Wed, Jan 28, 2015 at 3:22 PM, Joel Geier  wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> This time of winter is when the various small family groups of TRUMPETER
> SWANS that regularly winter in southern Polk County start to coalesce
> into larger flocks, so I always try to do a count.
>
> Today on my way back from some errands in Monmouth I found flocks in two
> places:
>
> 1) West side of Airlie Rd. just north of Tarter Rd (about 5 miles west &
> north from Hwy 99W): Here I counted 35 Trumpeters and 19 Tundra Swans.
> They were much easier to view from Tarter Rd. just west of the yellow
> house at the intersection, as this road gets less traffic, and Airlie
> Rd. has practically no shoulders in this stretch.
>
> 2) North side of Suver Rd. about 1/2 mile east of Hwy 99W: Here I
> counted 19 Trumpeters and 16 Tundra Swans. This is also a tough place to
> find a safe turnout, so I used the field approach just across from Olson
> Farms' main base of operations.
>
> So that's a total of 54 Trumpeter Swans (a fairly typical number for
> recent years) and 35 Tundra Swans.
>
> I could well be off by 5 or so on my count of Trumpeters vs. Tundras,
> since in both places the swans were far off the road and I had to guess
> on a few of them.
>
> The Tarter Rd. location is probably the less stressful of the two
> locations for roadside swan viewing, but be aware that there is a
> logging operation active farther west on Tarter Rd., so log trucks are
> using the road.
>
> One driver coming down the road with a full load of Douglas-fir logs
> stopped his truck to ask if those were really swans out there. He
> thought it was pretty cool to have swans out there.
>
> Happy birding,
> Joel
>
> --
> Joel Geier
> Camp Adair area north of Corvallis
>
>
>
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Is Grants Pass Ross's Goose Still Being Seen
From: David Kollen <davekollen AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 10:29:00 -0800
Hello All,
I am going to be in Grants Pass tomorrow and was wondering if the Ross's
Goose is still being seen in the area. Thanks.

Dave Kollen
Brookings
Subject: Splitting hairs on junco taxonomy
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 06:57:02 -0800
Cassiar Junco is the correct term for the form of junco Mr Irons
posted photos for.  However, subspecies may not be.

Many junco specialist suggest Cassiar Junco may be a hybrid or clinal
intermediary between Slate-colored and Oregon Juncos.  So, calling
these birds Cassiar Juncos could be thought of as analogous to calling
WesternXGlaucous-winged Gulls "Olympic" Gulls.

This is, of course, an entirely academic argument and not everyone is
necessarily on the same page regarding the taxonomic state of Cassiar
Junco.  I bring this up only so that we all have something to discuss
while we're enjoying the pastime of sorting through juncos in a flock
and marveling at their diversity.

All juncos count.

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
The Problem With Big Years
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2550



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Subject: Winchester Bay Greater White Fronted Geese
From: "R. Adney Jr." <rfadney AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 06:52:31 -0800
I found three Greater White Fronted Geese hanging out with several Canada geese 
in the creek near the bridge at Winchester Bay yesterday. Here is a link to 
some images showing some good angles for identification. 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/adneyvisualarts/sets/72157650546498465/

Rich Adney

http://avianpics.blogspot.com/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/adneyvisualarts/
http://www.oregonimages.net
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: NE Oregon photo gallery
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 09:10:14 +0000
I should have mentioned that this gallery includes a photo of the hybrid 
Red-naped Sapsucker X Red-breasted Sapsucker that is wintering in the Hillcrest 
Cemetary (right next to Eastern Oregon State University) in La Grande. I also 
added several photos of some interesting juncos that we saw in Enterprise over 
the weekend. There is at least one typical "Cassiar" Junco and some other birds 
that have characteristics that are suggestive of Cassiar, but are not clear-cut 
representatives of that form. Studying juncos in the NE Oregon wintering flocks 
is really interesting, as there seem to be lots of birds that don't necessarily 
fit neatly into the normal boxes we use for sorting them out. 



http://www.birdfellow.com/photos/gallery/934-northeast-oregon-trip-23-25-january-2015 


Dave Irons
Portland, OR 
 		 	   		  
Subject: A Gallery of Photos from NE Oregon 23-25 January
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 08:28:48 +0000
Shawneen and I spent last weekend birding in NE Oregon (mostly Wallowa County) 
with groups of birders from Bend and Salem. Although we struck out on the Cape 
May Warbler, we managed to track down a number of other winter specialty birds. 
I've created a gallery of bird photos from our trip. Included are shots of the 
Gyrfalcon, Gray-crowned Rosy-Finches, Pine Grosbeaks, Northern Shrike, Bohemian 
Waxwing and other species. 



http://www.birdfellow.com/photos/gallery/934-northeast-oregon-trip-23-25-january-2015 


Dave Irons
Portland, OR 
 		 	   		  
Subject: RBA: Portland, OR 1-29-15
From: Harry Nehls <hnehls6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 00:06:13 -0800
- RBA
* Oregon
* Portland
* January 29, 2015
* ORPO1501.29

- birds mentioned

BEAN GOOSE
Red-throated Loon
American White Pelican
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Snowy Owl
Burrowing Owl
Gyrfalcon
Tree Swallow
BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER
TENNESSEE WARBLER
Wilsons Warbler
HOODED ORIOLE
Pine Grosbeak

- transcript

hotline: Portland Oregon Audubon RBA (weekly)
numbr: 503-292-6855
To report: Harry Nehls  503-233-3976  
compiler: Harry Nehls
coverage: entire state

Hello, this is the Audubon Society of Portland Rare Bird Report. This report
was made Thursday January 29. If you have anything to add call Harry Nehls
at 503-233-3976.

The Nestucca NWR BEAN GOOSE is still being seen. The Astoria BLACK-HEADED
GULL  is still in the area moving between Wireless Road and the Astoria
waterfront. The Milwaukie BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER has moved into the
residential area south of the treatment plant. A HOODED ORIOLE and a
TENNESSEE WARBLER are still being seen west of the North Bend Airport. The
white GYRFALCON is still being seen in the Flores Lake area and the GYRFALON
east of Joseph continues. The Yaquina Head BURROWING OWL is still present.
The Fern Ridge Reservoir SNOW OWL continues to be seen.

Increasing reports of TREE SWALLOWS may indicate an early northward
movement.

On January 25 a singing WILSONS WARBLER was in a Ridgefield, WA
neighborhood. Up to four RED-THROATED LOONS are now on the Columbia River in
North Portland. On January 22 a WHITE PELICAN was along the South Umpqua
River east of Canyonville. A flock of up to 12 PINE GROSBEAKS are now being
seen at the ski area on Mt. Ashland.

Thats it for this week.

- end transcript























Subject: Black-headed Gull and Eagles Mating
From: Bob Hancy <sailinghanu AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 22:22:01 -0800
​Greetings ~ with help from Linda P. I was able to see and photograph the
Black-headed Gull this morning (thank you all for the photos and the
help!).  This one was a toughie.  Linda then showed me Wireless Road, where
I hope to find many birds in the future (not much today though).  I then
headed to the Eagle Sanctuary off of Hwy 30 and found a couple of American
White Pelicans and a few Bald Eagles.  Two adult eagles were doing the
spring mating ritual where they grab each others feet and fall to the
(almost) ground.  I have photos of the feet grabbing, but they released as
soon as they grabbed on.  Very cool indeed to witness this.  I'm over 80
species so far for the year - and with try number 3, I'll be heading to San
Francisco to see some of the rarities down there next week.  I'm no
globe-trotter, but I'm going to give it an honest try in the lower 48.

Anyway - 36 species today.  60 degree weather and SUNNY at Astoria (it's
like a holiday - I think people leave work and go sit in the sun when this
happens in Astoria)​.

My photos and details of the day are here:  RPHancy.com



​Bob
Bird is the Word.​
Subject: (no subject)
From: Steven Holt <sh AT stockpix.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 21:13:20 -0800
I was greatly enjoying the Gyr discussion but please people trim 
extraneous old messages off.  However, there were 49 posts in the digest 
version and I just paged through the Tuesday digest and it was over 90 
pages long.

It was a bit like pulling teeth to find anything new.  You generally add 
nothing but aggravation if you include so bloody much redundant info to 
such an active list.

Best,

Steve

P.S.  I learned about birds initially from books and thought Gyrfalcon 
was pronounced GYREfalcon.  William S. Clark  heard me say this when I 
first got to know him (I was in Junior High).  A great lover of words 
and etymology, he corrected me rather abruptly and I haven't said 
GYREfalcon since.


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Subject: Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 1/28/2015
From: Wink Gross <winkg AT hevanet.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 21:08:36 -0800
Here is the summary of my morning dogwalks from NW Seblar Terrace to the 
Pittock Mansion for the week 1/15/15 to 1/21/15. Species neither seen nor heard 
the previous week are in ALL CAPS. 


Additional information about my dogwalk, including an archive of weekly 
summaries and a checklist, may be found at 
http://www.hevanet.com/winkg/dogwalkpage.html 


The sightings are also in eBird.

We did the walk 4 days this week.

Species                # days found  (peak #, date)

SHARP-SHINNED HAWK          1  (1, 1/23)
Anna's Hummingbird          3  (3, 1/23)
Red-breasted Sapsucker      1  (1, 1/28)
Downy Woodpecker            1  (3, 1/28)
Hairy Woodpecker            2  (2, 1/22)
Northern Flicker            3  (3)
Pileated Woodpecker         1  (1, 1/23)
Steller's Jay               4  (12, 1/22)
American Crow               4  (7)
Black-capped Chickadee      4  (10)
Chestnut-backed Chickadee   3  (2)
Bushtit                     1  (13, 1/28)    	
Red-breasted Nuthatch       2  (3, 1/23)
PACIFIC WREN                4  (3)
Bewicks Wren               3  (2)
Golden-crowned Kinglet      1  (5, 1/23)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet        1  (1, 1/28)
American Robin              4  (100, 1/28)
Varied Thrush               4  (4, 1/28)
European Starling           4  (7)
Spotted Towhee              4  (3)
Fox Sparrow                 2  (1, 1/27 & 28)
Song Sparrow                4  (10)
Dark-eyed Junco             4  (8)
House Finch                 3  (7, 1/23)
Lesser Goldfinch            2  (2, 1/22 & 23)

In the neighborhood but not found on dogwalk: Band-tailed Pigeon, BROWN 
CREEPER, Evening Grosbeak (fide J. Striemer) 


Misses (birds found at least 3 days during previous 2 weeks but not found this 
week): Hermit Thrush 


Wink Gross
Portland

Subject: Re: White-wing tagged Red-tailed Hawk, Tillamook
From: "dawn v" <d_villa AT mail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 04:42:04 +0100




Subject: Tennessee Warbler, N Bend, Coos Co
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 18:51:41 -0800
The TENNESSEE WARBLER was in the Chamelia bush in Barb's backyard, North 
Bend, this afternoon around 2:30 to 3:15 or so.  Tim Rodenkirk, Barb, 
and myself were present.  It flew off to the south, so it's making it's 
way around.   Distinct call note audible.

Cheers
Dave Lauten


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Subject: Re: GOT WINTER? NOT SO MUCH HERE On the Long Beach Peninsula either
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 18:47:42 -0800
There are rhododendrons in full bloom, and a Pacific Wren was in full song. 
There were 11 Greater Yellowlegs on the little cove - but that is a normal 
wintering number 


Jeff gilligan






On Jan 28, 2015, at 5:23 PM, Joel Geier  wrote:

> Not so much here in the mid-Willamette valley, either.
> 
> I thought I spotted else something unusually early when I saw a pair of 
American Kestrels copulating on the north side of Corvallis last week. But as 
I'm working through the local field notes here, I see that Carol and Jim Hiler 
reported the same thing in North Albany on 26 Dec. 

> 
> We did have winter here, but it came in November, and it only lasted for a 
week. The water wars are going to be ugly this summer, unless February brings 
something radically different in terms of snowpack. 

> 
> Joel
> 
> ------


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Subject: Probable Barred Owl Westmoreland
From: Chris Bennett <tayben7 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 18:39:08 -0800
At our Westmoreland home 2 weeks ago I was sitting in back room with the
light off, I saw a dark shadow fly by out of the corner of my eye.  I
looked out the window there was a Owl sitting on our Arbor with good back
lighting on it .  It was just looking around. It was much bigger than a
Screech and no ear tuffs.  It sat there for about a minute then took
towards the Westmoreland park.  Yesterday morning on our daily walk around
6 AM.  I sited a movement near the Crystal Springs at Westmoreland park
near the play area.  It came up from around the water went towards a tree.
I moved around to get the correct angle to see what it was,  it was an Owl
it was about the same size and looks as before sitting on a big limb, I did
not hear it call.  Had to leave and catch up with my walking party. I'm
guessing a Barred Owl.
Chris
Subject: Curry Gyr
From: "Diane Trainer" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "dtoregon@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 17:50:57 -0800
I am so grateful to have seen the Gyrfalcon, on Sunday. Heedless of the 
contretemps on this listserv, I drove down from Portland to see it. I think it 
was well worth the trip. I had never seen one before this. (Thanks for the 
directions to the 3 dark blue silos on Floras Loop and to a couple of birders 
that gave me more explicit directions as to its whereabouts.) 


No, I didn't take any pictures, I'm not a photographer. 

I bird because in that moment when I first see the bird I only live in that 
moment, there is no yesterday and no tomorrow. There is only the now and the 
bird. 


I entered it in eBird and I don't really care what anyone thinks about that. It 
is a magnificent bird. Watching it fly and hunt for over an hour was a thrill. 
It is truly a wind master. 


Cheers!
D. Trainer
Birding is what you make of it and what it makes of you!

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Subject: Re: GOT WINTER? NOT SO MUCH HERE IN SOUTHERN OREGON
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 17:23:19 -0800
Not so much here in the mid-Willamette valley, either.

I thought I spotted else something unusually early when I saw a pair of
American Kestrels copulating on the north side of Corvallis last week.
But as I'm working through the local field notes here, I see that Carol
and Jim Hiler reported the same thing in North Albany on 26 Dec.

We did have winter here, but it came in November, and it only lasted for
a week. The water wars are going to be ugly this summer, unless February
brings something radically different in terms of snowpack.

Joel

-------- Forwarded Message --------
To: Mid-Valley Nature 
Subject: Coffin Butte wildflowers putting out leaves and other spring
happenings
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 15:21:13 -0800

Yesterday along the Coffin Butte trail (part of E.E. Wilson Wildlife
Area, on the west side of Hwy 99W just north of the landfill), a few
leaves of the MENZIE'S LARKSPURS were visible. I looked for but didn't
see any Snow Queen yet, in the places where it usually blooms.

A mushroom that at least superficially looked like Agaric (dull orange,
not bright red like Fly Agaric but with similar white spots), roughly 4
inches in diameter, was also up.

A RAVEN perched on a dead snag (one of the Douglas-firs that was girdled
some years back, to help give the oaks more of a chance) and gave a
series of the "kwid-dip" calls that they often make this time of year.
It also was fluffing its wings a bit as it gave this call.
Unfortunately, as soon as it noticed I was watching, it flew away so I
didn't gain much more insight into this behavior. I'm wondering if this
might be part of the mating process.

Meanwhile a PACIFIC WREN was singing furiously back in the woods.
"Pacific" sometimes seems like an inappropriate name for these busy and
feisty little birds.

As I came down the trail, what appeared to be a FERAL CAT (but missing
all but a stub of its tail) dashed off into the brush. I think this
might explain a distant sighting of what I previously thought was an
undersized Bobcat on the butte.  I've seen honest-to-goodness Bobcats on
the butte a couple of times in recent years, but the cat that I saw a
couple of months ago was unusually small for a Bobcat at that time of
year.

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis 
Subject: GOT WINTER? NOT SO MUCH HERE IN SOUTHERN OREGON
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 17:07:56 -0800
https://atowhee.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/winter/
-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Tundra Bean Goose Nestucca NWR 1/26/15 YES
From: Linda Berkemeier <linda.berkemeier AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 16:45:49 -0800
Burrowing Owl not seen at Yaquina Lighthouse and apparently had not been seen 
all day 1/27. 

Have seen many, many species in two days. Especially edifying for us to see all 
three Mergansers almost everywhere we have been from Nestucca area to Seal 
Beach, as we stay in Otis and traverse Lincoln City. 


Linda and Tom Berkemeier
SE Portland




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Subject: Re: White-wing tagged Red-tailed Hawk, Tillamook
From: d_villa <d_villa AT mail.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 00:11:17 GMT
Circled back to look again and get pix. It looks like TO not 10. Also has a leg 
band I can't read. It's immature, an adult just came and chased it away. 


dawn v

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Smartphone


------ Original message------
From: d_villa
Date: Wed, Jan 28, 2015 3:56 PM
To: OBOL;
Subject:[obol] White-wing tagged Red-tailed Hawk, Tillamook

Driving home just saw a Red tailed Hawk on a fence post with a shiny white wing 
tag, #10. 


Hwy 101 between Tillamook city and the air museum.

dawn v

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Smartphone
Subject: White-wing tagged Red-tailed Hawk, Tillamook
From: d_villa <d_villa AT mail.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 23:55:42 GMT
Driving home just saw a Red tailed Hawk on a fence post with a shiny white wing 
tag, #10. 


Hwy 101 between Tillamook city and the air museum.

dawn v

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Smartphone
Subject: Astoria Black-headed Gull - photos
From: Diana Byrne <diana.byrne AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 15:25:29 -0800
Here are some photos of the Black-headed Gull:
http://cannonbeachbirder.blogspot.com/2015/01/black-headed-gull.html

The Black-headed Gull was on the pilings along Marine Drive at 11am, just east 
of the Dairy Queen, with a few Mew Gulls. It then flew off over the bay to the 
SE, towards Wireless Rd., about 11:15am. 


- Diana Byrne

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Subject: Trumpeter Swans in Suver & Airlie areas
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 15:22:16 -0800
Hi all,

This time of winter is when the various small family groups of TRUMPETER
SWANS that regularly winter in southern Polk County start to coalesce
into larger flocks, so I always try to do a count.

Today on my way back from some errands in Monmouth I found flocks in two
places:

1) West side of Airlie Rd. just north of Tarter Rd (about 5 miles west &
north from Hwy 99W): Here I counted 35 Trumpeters and 19 Tundra Swans.
They were much easier to view from Tarter Rd. just west of the yellow
house at the intersection, as this road gets less traffic, and Airlie
Rd. has practically no shoulders in this stretch.

2) North side of Suver Rd. about 1/2 mile east of Hwy 99W: Here I
counted 19 Trumpeters and 16 Tundra Swans. This is also a tough place to
find a safe turnout, so I used the field approach just across from Olson
Farms' main base of operations.

So that's a total of 54 Trumpeter Swans (a fairly typical number for
recent years) and 35 Tundra Swans.

I could well be off by 5 or so on my count of Trumpeters vs. Tundras,
since in both places the swans were far off the road and I had to guess
on a few of them.

The Tarter Rd. location is probably the less stressful of the two
locations for roadside swan viewing, but be aware that there is a
logging operation active farther west on Tarter Rd., so log trucks are
using the road.

One driver coming down the road with a full load of Douglas-fir logs
stopped his truck to ask if those were really swans out there. He
thought it was pretty cool to have swans out there.

Happy birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis





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Subject: Eugene Wed morning
From: kit <kit AT uoregon.edu>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 14:42:24 -0800
Dennis submitted this report:

The Wednesday birders from Eugene went to the Delta Ponds this morning.  
The cold cloudy skies turned to bright sun and warmth by mid morning.  
The biggest surprise this morning was the number of Wilson's Snipe that 
flew up from the pond edges north of the car dealerships.  Estimates of 
over fifty individuals seemed accurate.  Also, the group saw at least 
two adult Bald Eagles, a Peregrine Falcon and a Merlin.  The duck 
population was fairly normal.  A Eurasian Teal was present with a group 
of Green-winged Teal in the pond north of the pedestrian bridge over the 
delta highway.  This is most likely the same bird seen by the Wednesday 
group on December 17.  The Eurasian Teal is still considered to be a 
subspecies of the Green-winged Teal.  A White-throated Sparrow was among 
a group of Golden-crowned Sparrows.  The entire list follows.

Cackling Goose
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Wigeon
Mallard
Northern Shoveler
Green-winged Teal - many and a Eurasian Teal
Ring-necked Duck
Lesser Scaup - on the river
Bufflehead
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Pied-billed Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret - several in the tall cottonwoods
Bald Eagle - two to four individuals
Cooper's Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Coot
Killdeer
Spotted Sandpiper
Long-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Snipe - an amazing large and active group
Mew Gull - one flying over
Ring-billed Gull
Glaucous-winged Gull
Anna's Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon
Western Scrub-Jay
American Crow
Black-capped Chickadee
Bushtit
Brown Creeper
Bewick's Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
American Robin
Varied Thrush
European Starling
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Spotted Towhee
Fox Sparrow
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow - one
White-crowned Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Red-winged Blackbird
House Finch
Pine Siskin - a few only
American Goldfinch

Dave Brown, Joni Dawning, Judy Franzen, Vickie Buck, Ellen Cantor, Scott 
McNeeley, Randy Sinnott, Don Schrouder, Jim Ott, Kit Larsen, Jim Regali 
and Dennis Arendt

Dennis Arendt



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