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Updated on Thursday, October 30 at 02:05 AM EST
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Inca Tern,©BirdQuest

29 Oct RBA: Portland, OR 10-30-14 [Harry Nehls ]
29 Oct Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 10/29/2014 [Wink Gross ]
29 Oct Photos: Bald Eagle Baskett Slough NWR How Old?? [Jim Leonard ]
29 Oct Curry Birds [Tim Rodenkirk ]
29 Oct Lower Tualatin River Basin BAEA Nest Tree Lost [Jack Williamson ]
29 Oct Lane coast birds [Alan Contreras ]
29 Oct Deschutes County Wednesday Birders to Millican Valley ["judy" ]
29 Oct Re: hilarious bird photo [Joel Geier ]
29 Oct hilarious bird photo [Joel Geier ]
29 Oct Re: This morning at Ankeny NWR - 10/29/14 [Russ Namitz ]
29 Oct s cranes ["ron and Polly Maertz" ]
29 Oct Re: hilarious bird photo [Wayne Hoffman ]
29 Oct FOS Rock Sandpiper [Wayne Hoffman ]
29 Oct Osprey eating fish (Bass?) + Black Phoebe: Delta Ponds [Priscilla Nam Hari Kaur ]
29 Oct Surf Scoters at Foster ["Jeff Harding" ]
29 Oct 8 Tundra Swans on Water at Yaquina Bay [Range Bayer ]
29 Oct Wed morning, Eugene [Lawrence McQueen ]
29 Oct Re: Salem Red-throated Loon - From: Roy Gerig [Lillian ]
29 Oct This morning at Ankeny NWR - 10/29/14 [Lillian ]
29 Oct Salem Surf Scoter, 10/29/2014 [Roy Gerig ]
29 Oct Re: hilarious bird photo ["Tom Crabtree" ]
29 Oct Foster Reservoir- WW Scoters [Russ Namitz ]
29 Oct hilarious bird photo [Darrel Faxon ]
29 Oct Broughton Beach 10-27 Updates- Clark's Grebe, White-winged Scoter, Red-necked Grebe [Jen Sanford ]
29 Oct Re: [birding] Red-necked Grebe, Philomath poo ponds , Benton County [Mark Nikas ]
28 Oct WA: Eurasian Hobby - Go Fish [Russ Namitz ]
28 Oct Lincoln county coast, Tuesday ["Paul Sullivan" ]
28 Oct Commonwealth Lake, Beaverton [Michael Gold ]
28 Oct Re: [birding] Past Red-necked Grebes sightings in mid-Willamette Valley [Joel Geier ]
28 Oct Got Lewis's? Now performing in Jackson County. [Harry Fuller ]
28 Oct Past Red-necked Grebes sightings in mid-Willamette Valley [Joel Geier ]
28 Oct The rest of my day list... [Mike Patterson ]
28 Oct Red-necked Grebe, Philomath poo ponds , Benton County ["W. Douglas Robinson" ]
28 Oct Re: A close encounter []
28 Oct A close encounter [Mike Patterson ]
28 Oct Salem Red-throated Loon [Roy Gerig ]
28 Oct Re: Possible Long-toed Stint foot detail ["Robert O'Brien" ]
28 Oct that Boiler Bay alcid [Darrel Faxon ]
28 Oct Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed) [Bob Archer ]
28 Oct Aleutian cackling geese wintering near Tillamook ["WLRisser" ]
28 Oct Storm Birds again ["Wayne Hoffman" ]
28 Oct Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed) ["Wayne Hoffman" ]
28 Oct Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed) [Bob Archer ]
28 Oct Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed) [Stefan Schlick ]
28 Oct Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed) [Shawneen Finnegan ]
28 Oct Possible Long-toed Stint foot detail [ed mcv ]
28 Oct more Calidris comments [Lars Per Norgren ]
28 Oct Larks in Salem... [John Thomas ]
28 Oct Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed) [Bob Archer ]
28 Oct Re: Fwd: [Tweeters] Neah Bay Rarities Monday [Bob ]
28 Oct Fwd: [Tweeters] Neah Bay Rarities Monday [Jim Danzenbaker ]
28 Oct Ed McV's Calidris [Lars Per Norgren ]
28 Oct [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
27 Oct Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed) [ed mcv ]
27 Oct josephine Co lake selmac surf scoters [Romain Cooper ]
27 Oct Mary's Peak Rosy-finches - two varieties ["Jeff Harding" ]
27 Oct Re: probable "Vega" (photo links) ["Wayne Hoffman" ]
27 Oct Re: probable "Vega" (photo links) [Stefan Schlick ]
27 Oct Jackson Bottom Wetlands - Tree Sparrow [Steve Nord ]
28 Oct Re: Seawatch 26 Oct 2014 S. Jetty Umpqua River [d_villa ]
27 Oct thanks for flycatcher id help! [Linda Fink ]
27 Oct Seawatch 26 Oct 2014 S. Jetty Umpqua River [Matthew G Hunter ]
27 Oct Linn Co - Foster Reservoir scoters [Russ Namitz ]
27 Oct Re: probable "Vega" (photo links) ["Phil Pickering" ]
27 Oct Re: seawatch gull counts [Alan Contreras ]
27 Oct Re: seawatch gull counts [Mike Patterson ]
27 Oct Broughton Beach (Portland) Today [Jen Sanford ]
27 Oct another id question [Linda Fink ]
27 Oct Hayden Island Mystery Scoter-another pic [Beverly Hallberg ]
27 Oct seawatch gull counts [Alan Contreras ]
27 Oct Re: Boiler Bay State Wayside, Oct 26, 2014 -- Our eBird report and some commentary ["Phil Pickering" ]
27 Oct JoCo Copeland ponds ["Dennis Vroman" ]
27 Oct Hayden Island Scoters [Philip Kline ]
27 Oct probable "Vega" flavor Herring Gull, Newport ["Wayne Hoffman" ]
27 Oct Fat finger continuation [David Irons ]
27 Oct Flock of Aleutian Cackling Geese at Sheridan STP on Sunday [David Irons ]

Subject: RBA: Portland, OR 10-30-14
From: Harry Nehls <hnehls6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 23:41:46 -0700
- RBA
* Oregon
* Portland
* October 30, 2014
* ORPO1410.30

- birds mentioned

Surf scoter
White-winged Scoter
BROWN BOOBY
Brown Pelican
Rough-legged Hawk
Sandhill Crane
Sanderling
Rock Sandpiper
Red Phalarope
Sabineąs Gull
Franklinąs Gull
Heermannąs Gull
łvega˛ Herring Gull
Tropical Kingbird
BLUE JAY
BROWN THRASHER
Grasshopper Sparrow
Pine Grosbeak

- transcript

hotline: Portland Oregon Audubon RBA (weekly)
number: 503-292-6855
To report: Harry Nehls 503-233-3976  
compiler: Harry Nehls
coverage: entire state

Hello, this is the Audubon Society of Portland Rare Bird Report. This report
was made Thursday October 30. If you have anything to add call Harry Nehls
at 503-233-3976.

A major storm pushed ashore and inland during the week bringing offshore
migrants close to the beaches. Birders along the coast recorded amazingly
high numbers for many species. Few rare birds were recorded but on October
23 a BROWN BOOBY was off Boiler Bay. On October 25 one was north of Pacific
City off Tierra del Mar. A probable VEGA HERRING GULL was at Yaquina Bay
October 27.

Inland reports of wind blown birds included a BROWN PELICAN, two HEERMANNąS
GULLS, and a SABINEąS GULL at the Philomath Sewage Ponds; two RED PHALAROPES
at Fern Ridge Reservoir and two at Foster Reservoir near Sweet Home. Four
WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS were seen at Foster Reservoir and up to four along the
Columbia River in the Portland-Ridgefield area. SURF SCOTERS were reported
from Lake Selmac, the Copeland Ponds in Grants Pass, in Salem, at the
Philomath Sewage Ponds, and 10 on Foster Reservoir. Many reports along the
Columbia River in the Portland area included up to 13 off Hayden Island.

On October 26 a FRANKLINąS GULL was off Boiler Bay. The next day a
GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was seen at the South Jetty of Yaquina Bay. A ROCK
SANDPIPER was there October 29. On October 26 three TROPICAL KINGBIRDS were
in Astoria. A southward movement of CRANES was reported October 27 in
southwest Portland and in Canby. A ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK was at Jackson Bottom
in Hillsboro October 26. A BLUE JAY was reported October 28 in Albany.

On October 24 a male PINE GROSBEAK was seen near Boardman. A BROWN THRASHER
was in Mt. Vernon October 28. A SANDERLING was at the Redmond Sewage Ponds
October 26.

Thatąs it for this week.

- end transcript












Subject: Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 10/29/2014
From: Wink Gross <winkg AT hevanet.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 22:25:16 -0700
Here is the summary of my morning dogwalks from NW Seblar Terrace to the 
Pittock Mansion for the week 10/23/14 to 10/29/14. Species neither seen nor 
heard the previous week are in ALL CAPS. 


Additional information about my dogwalk, including an archive of weekly 
summaries and a checklist, may be found at 
http://www.hevanet.com/winkg/dogwalkpage.html 


The sightings are also in eBird.

We did the walk 4 days this week.

Species                # days found  (peak #, date)

Cackling Goose              1  (30+, 10/24)
CANADA GOOSE                1  (15, 10/24)
SHARP-SHINNED HAWK          1  (1, 10/23)
Cooper’s Hawk               2  (1, 10/24 & 28)
Red-tailed Hawk             1  (1, 10/28)
Band-tailed Pigeon          1  (1, 10/24)
Anna's Hummingbird          4  (4)
Red-breasted Sapsucker      1  (1, 10/29)
Downy Woodpecker            1  (1, 10/28)
Northern Flicker            4  (5)
PILEATED WOODPECKER         1  (1, 10/28)
HUTTON’S VIREO              1  (1, 10/29)
Steller's Jay               4  (6)
American Crow               4  (12, 10/24)
Black-capped Chickadee      4  (12)
Chestnut-backed Chickadee   3  (2)	
Red-breasted Nuthatch       4  (4)
Pacific Wren                2  (1, 10/28 & 29)
Bewick’s Wren               1  (3, 10/29)
Golden-crowned Kinglet      2  (3, 10/28)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet        3  (1)
Hermit Thrush               1  (1, 10/29)
American Robin              3  (6, 10/29)
Varied Thrush               4  (7)
European Starling           3  (6, 10/24)
Spotted Towhee              4  (7)
FOX SPARROW                 1  (3, 10/29)
Song Sparrow                4  (7)
Dark-eyed Junco             4  (24, 10/23)
House Finch                 1  (1, 10/28)
Lesser Goldfinch            1  (2, 10/23)
American Goldfinch          1  (1, 10/29)

In the neighborhood but not found on dogwalk: BALD EAGLE, SANDHILL CRANE, 
GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, PEREGRINE FALCON, WESTERN SCRUB-JAY, GOLDEN-CROWNED 
SPARROW 


Wink Gross
Portland

Subject: Photos: Bald Eagle Baskett Slough NWR How Old??
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 21:04:43 -0700
I went to Baskett Slough NWR this afternoon.  A Bald Eagle was perched on
top of a power pole at the narrows parking area on Coville Rd.  It was very
tolerate of me taking photos out my pickup window and never did fly away.
It had some blood and feathers on it's beak.  Must of had a recent kill.  I
am guessing it was about 3 years old.  I have heard they get the full white
head at around 4 years old.  What do you think the age is?  Click on link
for photos.  Happy Birding, Jim Leonard.





https://plus.google.com/photos/108302360004365615395/albums/6075837258074255489?authkey=CKWsw5i74ICCfw 
Subject: Curry Birds
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 19:59:03 -0700
Terry Wahl reports one TROPICAL KINGBIRD at the family ranch near Cape
Blanco on Monday and a SNOW GOOSE today.

That's all for now,
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: Lower Tualatin River Basin BAEA Nest Tree Lost
From: Jack Williamson <jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 19:06:35 -0700
When I forwarded a high-wind warning to this group the other day I wasn't
sure if my cautionary tone was appropriate - especially since (we) birders
love severe weather events.

Having said that - the last thing I expected was the message I received
today from the Jeans about the loss of their Bald Eagle Nest Tree in the
wind storm. It was a 100+ year-old ponderosa pine, over 150' tall, which a
pairs of eagles called home for the past seven years.

The nest splintered into tiny fragments on impact and except for an
unscathed mole-trap, little-else of notable interest was discovered within
the remains of the nest.

On a fun non-birding note I learned (1800 pound) scottish long haired
cattle are docile and very approachable - especially if you're bearing the
gift of apples. Information I will incorporate into all plans to visit to
this wonderful farm in the future.

http://www.jack-n-jill.net/eagle_nest_tree_lost

-- 
Jack Williamson
West Linn, Oregon
Subject: Lane coast birds
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 18:37:47 -0700
I birded the morning on both sides of the Siltcoos estuary and the early 
afternoon along South Jetty Road at Florence, both with Stephan Nance. Diane 
Pettey joined us for the north side of Siltcoos. 


Highlights at Siltcoos: Northern Shrike (adult), flushed flock of about 20 
Snowy Plovers out of the dunes, good looks at one (no bands at all) on the 
beach. 2 Semi Plovers in the area, likewise one adult and one subadult Bald 
Eagle. Also had in-yo-face looks at Wrentit, always fun. One imm. 
Red-shouldered Hawk was along the river. An odd shorebird flushed out of the 
marshy pond by the beach, Pectoral sized but making a quiet "purp" call and 
seemed rather dull for Pectoral. It had a fairly short bill. It got away, 
flying out southbound and at least briefly joining a flock of Starlings, quite 
odd. Department of Wild Speculation: a late adult Sharp-tail? 


By the way, we saw southbound flocks of Starlings all day over the inner 
beaches. I didn't realize that they had such a movement. 


A note of caution to anyone birding Siltcoos. The Waxmyrtle Trail is in poor 
condition halfway along, almost collapsed into the river, and the central 
segment alongside the river is quite dangerous. 


South Jetty Road was not very flashy, though it had several harriers. The 
channel was good, with all three loons and a surprising 13 Red-necked Grebes. 


Stephan can add anything I forgot.
.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon



Subject: Deschutes County Wednesday Birders to Millican Valley
From: "judy" <jmeredit AT bendnet.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 18:22:29 -0700
If you are going to get a flat tire, have Clay Crofton, Tom Lawler and
Howard Horvath along to do the deed. When the spare needed some air, and
none was at the "station" in Brothers, Clay knew to try the ODOT shop and
get air from them.  They were great. So we kept birding. Thanks guys.  The
morning was slow to get started. Eventually we started seeing thrushes and
meadowlarks. We saw a dozen Red tails before any other raptor species
appeared. The bluebirds were brilliant today, both Westerns and Mountain.
Raptors around Harman Road were all busy hunting on the ground. A male
Northern Harrier sat feasting while we drove by close to it. Sadly, a
Rough=legged Hawk had met it's demise recently, dead along the fenceline and
already predated.  Hundreds of Pronghorn Antelope today, nearly every place
we stopped. The coyotes must have new winter coats because they were just so
beautiful, busy hunting the same fields as the raptors.  Nice morning with
the expected species for this time of year.  We were seeing Belding's Ground
squirrels and Chipmunks scurrying around in many places.  So plenty of easy
pickings for those raptors.

List below, some birds with explanation. This report was mailed for Judy
Meredith by http://birdnotes.net

East of Bend, first stop along Moffit Road, then Brothers, Camp Creek, and
lastly Harman Road.
Bald Eagle = 3 or more Harman Rd
Northern Harrier = 4 or more
Sharp-shinned Hawk  = 1 hunting low on sage off Harman Rd
Cooper's Hawk = 2, one at WBU carpooling area, took a Cedar Waxwing
Red-tailed Hawk
Ferruginous Hawk = 4 or more Harman Rd
Rough-legged Hawk = 4 or more Harman Rd
Golden Eagle = 3
American Kestrel
Rock Dove
Mourning Dove
Northern Shrike = one for sure, a juvie, brownish. Other bird was chasing
Solitaires, Shrike species. So 2 shrikes, one unidentified.

Steller's Jay
Western Scrub-Jay
Black-billed Magpie
Common Raven
Horned Lark = big flock Harman  Rd but too distant to scrutinize, 200 or so
birds total

Canyon Wren  = Dry River Canyon overlook
Western Bluebird  = flock along Moffit
Mountain Bluebird  = lots around Harman
Townsend's Solitaire = off Harman
American Robin
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing = WBU  while  shuffling out of cars
Spotted Towhee = Brothers "oasis"
Savannah Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Western Meadowlark
American Goldfinch = Brothers "oasis"
House Sparrow

Total number of species seen: 32
birders today: Clay Crofton, Steve Day, Marion Davidson, Tom Lawler, Jan
Rising, Tim
Smith and Nancy Abrams, Howard Horvath, Ted and Susan Groszkiewicz, Diane
Burgess, Sherrie Pierce, Tom Penpraze, Judy Meredith. Good birding, judy,
jmeredit AT bendnet.com 



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Subject: Re: hilarious bird photo
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 17:33:07 -0700
P.P.P.S. To be fair to this outfit, at least they got the keywords
right.
Subject: hilarious bird photo
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 17:17:54 -0700
Hi Darrel, Tom & All,

The way I read this, only one of the birds in the photo is a Crested
Auklet. Can you tell which one it is?

www.diomedia.com/public/en/5302457/imageDetails.html

This seems to be one of the really tough and underappreciated ID
problems, even more difficult than Least vs. Long-toed Sandpiper. 

Who knew that auklets and dunlin could be so similar in flight? It must
be another example of convergent evolution, like starlings and
meadowlarks.

Happy birding,
Joel

P.S. Looking at my Sibley guide, I'd say that, despite his obvious
skills in portraying most other bird species, Mr. Sibley really screwed
up on his paintings of Crested Auklet. The internet is always right,
right?

P.P.S. This reminds me of a Statesman Journal editorial about 10 years
back, where they came down on the right side of the Snowy Plover issue
-- but ran the wrong photo, of Sanderlings.




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Subject: Re: This morning at Ankeny NWR - 10/29/14
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 17:10:56 -0700
Lillian~
There is no need to apologize at all for not being able to identify all the 
species of birds that you saw today. The fact that you shared your sightings to 
OBOL, something that you are under no obligation to do, is much appreciated. 
The fact that you saw a swan is very cool. If people want to go out and try and 
identify it to species, you have provided some helpful information as to 
presence and location. 

Sincerely,Russ NamitzMedford 		 	   		  
Subject: s cranes
From: "ron and Polly Maertz" <hadada AT centurytel.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 16:58:19 -0700
Howdy
We had about 50 SANDHILL CRANES floating over Douglas County yesterday. 
Seems like they never have a leader.
Maertz
Glide 



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Subject: Re: hilarious bird photo
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 16:48:51 -0700
Are you sure Tom?  They only count if you see the black belly patch!

Wayne

On Wed, Oct 29, 2014 at 7:30 AM, Darrel Faxon <5hats AT peak.org> wrote:

> This is too funny not to pass on.  Check out the photo for crested auklet
> flying at www.diomedia.com/public/en/5302457/imageDetails.html
>
Subject: FOS Rock Sandpiper
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 16:46:54 -0700
Found This afternoon at Yaquina Bay South Jetty, near the base of the
finger at the west end of the "Gull Spot."  Appeared to be a juv./first
fall bird.

Briefly perched next to a Dunlin, giving a nice comparison.  I was
surprised at how much bigger the Rock was compared to the Dunlin.

Wayne
Subject: Osprey eating fish (Bass?) + Black Phoebe: Delta Ponds
From: Priscilla Nam Hari Kaur <priscillanhk AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 16:16:06 -0700
Dear OBOL readers;

Most Ospreys are supposed by be gone by the end of the first week of
October, according to eBird bar graphs, but one I saw yesterday at Delta
Ponds along the river bike path was happily picking away at a pretty nice
sized fish which I think was a Bass.  Meanwhile I was happily snapping
photographs. You can see one at the link below, or below that photo click
on a link to a 15-photo slideshow. Warning, things begin to get closer up
and more red by the ending.

We at BOGS have continued to see the occasional Black Phoebe at the central
Delta Ponds area east of Goodpasture Island Rd. We saw one there on Aug 28,
and another on October 23. Others have reported them at this location this
Summer as well.  I got a decent photograph of this last one. Scroll down
below the Osprey picture + link to see the Phoebe.

Scroll down further if you want to see better photographs of the Acorn
Woodpecker we saw on the hill behind Lane Community College main campus
back on Sept 25. Since anyone last took a look at those, I have replaced my
poorly exposed ones with two much better photographs taken by Don Laufer on
that day.  Don goes with our BOGS groups on our bird walks,  and he has
been contributing the Lion's share of very fine photos for us for most of a
year now. Especially this past Summer when I was more involved with helping
to ID the birds we were seeing.

http://priscillanhk.com/birds-of-interest.html

Enjoy!

Priscilla Sokolowski
Subject: Surf Scoters at Foster
From: "Jeff Harding" <jeffharding AT centurytel.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:36:29 -0700
This morning, at 10:00 am, there were 10 Surf Scoters near the Dam on Foster
Lake.  Around 10:15 they flew off toward the east end, and I did not see
them again. I counted them in flight, and they showed no white in the wings,
so I'm confident they were not the WW Scoters that Russ saw this morning,
which I did not find. As Russ mentioned, there were two Horned Grebes, and
the Bonaparte's Gull was with a group of larger gulls lounging by the boat
ramp on the north side of the lake.

 

At Lewis Creek Park, there was a Western Flycatcher (presumed Pacific-slope,
but I did not hear it call, so I can't rule out Cordilleran). 

 

There were a fair number of Common Loons, a good number of Western Grebes,
but I could not find any Clark's Grebes or more unusual Loons.

 

I was there from about 9:30 to 2:00, Circling the lake, and missed Russ as
well as his WW Scoters. Foster Lake is big, and it would be easy to miss
something on the other side. 

 

Good birding,

Jeff
Subject: 8 Tundra Swans on Water at Yaquina Bay
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:03:30 -0700
Hi,

At 2:55 PM today (Oct. 29), Roy Lowe & Dawn Harris saw 8 Tundra Swans
in a flock on the water near the south edge corner of Idaho Flats by
the 35th Street condos.  They are swimming towards Oregon Coast
Aquarium.  Idaho Flats is the intertidal embayment just east of the
Hatfield Marine Science Center.

Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon


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Subject: Wed morning, Eugene
From: Lawrence McQueen <larmcqueen AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:38:35 -0700
Armitage County Park, McKenzie River near the confluence with Willamette River. 
Rather quiet; not helped either, by the traffic noise off I-5 and Coburg 
bridges. Except for Song, sparrows, towhees, and finches essentially absent. A 
ground-feeding group of 7 Varied Thrushes was a nice surprise. 


    Double-crested Cormorant - 3
Bald Eagle - 2 adult
White-tailed Kite - 1 possible; seen flying as silhouette. Without detail, the 
pointed wings, long tail, and gull-like flight indicated this bird; an unusual 
sight along coburg hills and following the river. 

American Kestrel - 1
Rock Pigeon - 35
Mourning Dove - 2
Anna’s Hummingbird - 1 heard
Belted Kingfisher - 1
Hairy Woodpecker - 1
Northern Flicker - 2
Red-breasted Sapsucker - 3
Northern Raven - 2
American Crow - 20
Steller's Jay - 9
Western Scrub Jay - 2 
Brown Creeper - 2
Black-capped Chickadee - 3
Chestnut-backed Chickadee - 2
Bushtit - 20
Red-breasted Nuthatch - 2
Pacific Wren - 1
Golden-crowned Kinglet - 15
American Robin - 12
Varied Thrush - 7
European Starling - 8
American Pipit - 1 overhead
Cedar Waxwing - 30
Townsend’s Warbler - 2 or 3
Song Sparrow - 10
Golden-crowned Sparrow - 1
Dark-eyed Junco - 1
Red-winged Blackbird - 1

Randy Sinnott, Don Schrouder, Dave Brown, Dan Gusset, Sim Prendergast, Ellen 
Cantor, and Larry McQueen 

Subject: Re: Salem Red-throated Loon - From: Roy Gerig
From: Lillian <lillian.e AT prodigy.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:23:01 -0700
Roy Gerig wrote:

"whenever it tries to fly it goes straight up about 5 feet then abruptly dives 
straight back into the water." 


There were a couple Canada Geese at Eagle Marsh the morning that seem to be 
having the same trouble. 
Subject: This morning at Ankeny NWR - 10/29/14
From: Lillian <lillian.e AT prodigy.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:08:06 -0700
Hello Birders!

Lots of activity at Ankeny this morning... 

Before I begin my list I want to apologize to all of you who are able to 
identify all the local birds with so much accuracy. I am very impressed with 
your knowledge! I am afraid my list may be frustrating for you because I won't 
list something unless I am VERY sure what it is and sometimes I'm not sure... 
For example I am able to ID a Canada Goose, but I can't say for sure what 
species of Canada Goose. ~ I am very sorry for the "general" ID on some of 
these birds, but that's the best I can do. I actually saw quite a few birds 
that I couldn't even get into a general category. 


That being said... here is my list for 10/29/14 at Ankeny NWR

Killdeer
Canada Goose (multiple species)
Greater White-fronted Goose
Pintail Duck
Mallard Duck
Green-winged Teal
Gulls 
American Coot

Pied-billed Grebe
Scrub Jay
Several varieties of tiny shorebirds 
Wigeon
Northern Shoveler
Great Egret

all dark eagle (Golden Eagle or juvenile Bald Eagle) 
Belted Kingfisher
Bufflehead
Brewer's Blackbird

"stinking" Starlings
Ruddy Duck
Northern Harrier

Ring-necked Duck
Mature Bald Eagle
Gadwall
Morning Dove
Dove (not a Morning Dove)
Robin
Swan - FOS - single native swan at Eagle Marsh

I apologize again for not being able to give better IDs on a few of these 
sightings, especially the swan! 


Good Birding One and All!
Lillian
Subject: Salem Surf Scoter, 10/29/2014
From: Roy Gerig <roygerig AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 13:52:48 -0700
After observers in Linn, Benton and other inland counties have been seeing good 
seabird county birds, they may be showing up here in Marion as well, a day or 
two later. The small numbers of scoters, etc that show up inland during and 
after fall storms, this kind of sighting does not seem biologically 
significant, but it is a fun part of the game we play as birders. 

There was a female SURF SCOTER on the pond in front of Lowe's Home Improvement 
by the Salem Airport at 10 this morning. She was moving around the pond a lot. 
I cannot recall right now if I've ever seen the species in Marion County. Also 
3 WESTERN GREBES, 2 HORNED GREBES. 

I looked for the Red-throated Loon that I saw yesterday across the freeway from 
there, behind Kelly's, and did not see it. There were at least 4 WESTERN 
GREBES. 

Roy Gerig, Salem OR




 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: hilarious bird photo
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 12:10:03 -0800
Come to think of it, I had 20 Crested Auklets at the Redmond Sewage Ponds last 
weekend. Thanks to the ABA Listing Committee for allowing us to count any birds 
we see that match an identified photo on the internet. 


 

Tom Crabtree, Bend

 

From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Darrel Faxon 

Sent: Wednesday, October 29, 2014 6:31 AM
To: OBOL
Subject: [obol] hilarious bird photo

 

This is too funny not to pass on. Check out the photo for crested auklet flying 
at www.diomedia.com/public/en/5302457/imageDetails.html 

Subject: Foster Reservoir- WW Scoters
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 09:30:47 -0700
There were 4 WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS near the dam on Foster Reservoir (near Sweet 
Home). I think I misidentified these birds as Surf Scoters on Monday in the 
fading light. They were in the same vicinity. 


There is still 1 BONAPARTE'S GULL in with California, Ring-billed & Herring. 
There are a lot fewer gulls, grebes & loons there today...no Clark's and only 2 
Horned. 


As you were,
Russ Namitz
Medford
 		 	   		  
Subject: hilarious bird photo
From: Darrel Faxon <5hats AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 07:30:45 -0700
This is too funny not to pass on.  Check out the photo for crested auklet
flying at www.diomedia.com/public/en/5302457/imageDetails.html
Subject: Broughton Beach 10-27 Updates- Clark's Grebe, White-winged Scoter, Red-necked Grebe
From: Jen Sanford <jjsanford AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 06:27:12 -0700
Hi all,

I posted my finds from Broughton Beach on Monday but have since been able
to verify some of the birds I was not sure about.

In the river beyond Multnomah County (closer to Wintler Park, Clark County)
I had five scoters, one of which has been verified as WHITE-WINGED SCOTER.
The scoters were drifting west while I watched and lost sight of them as
they began to pass Marine Park.  I also had one RED-NECKED GREBE cruise
by.

In the group of 13 grebes by the beach where the gulls roost I found one
possible Clark's, possible Clark's x Western hybrid.  All input I have
received on this bird is that it is indeed a CLARK'S GREBE with its bright
orangey yellow bill, white around the eye, and lighter flanks.  I imagine
it is still around, those grebes seem to have set up shop there.

I have photos of all the birds mentioned (take note I did not say I had
"good photos") on my Flickr photostream:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/stoptellingmeitsokay/

Feel free to voice concern or add comments.  Good birding (and most
excellent motorless birding!),

Jen Sanford
Portland
Subject: Re: [birding] Red-necked Grebe, Philomath poo ponds , Benton County
From: Mark Nikas <elepaio AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 00:13:08 -0700
A female type SURF SCOTER was also on the middle pond about the same time.

Mark Nikas

On Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 3:22 PM, W. Douglas Robinson <
w.douglas.robinson AT gmail.com> wrote:

> 1 in middle pond. I think first detected in Benton County since 2003.
>
> Doug
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> birding mailing list
> birding AT midvalleybirding.org
> http://midvalleybirding.org/mailman/listinfo/birding
>
Subject: WA: Eurasian Hobby - Go Fish
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 23:03:30 -0700
Tim Shelmerdine and I waited from 10am to 330pm for the bird to make an 
appearance, but were disappointed. We kept ourselves busy meeting WA birders 
and seeing some of the other local rarities like ORCHARD ORIOLE, TROPICAL 
KINGBIRD & COMMON TERN. 


There was a reported sighting before we arrived, but I believe the verdict was 
still out pending review of photos. 


Good birding,
Russ Namitz
Medford, OR
 		 	   		  
Subject: Lincoln county coast, Tuesday
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 21:26:03 -0700
OBOL:

 

We birded the Lincoln county coast today 9 AM - 3:30 PM.  Boiler Bay, Depoe
Bay, Otter Crest loop, Moolak Beach, NW 68th St., S Jetty of Yaquina Bay,
parking lot behind NOAA building, 12th St., then back to Boiler Bay.  Lots
of rain - sideways.

 

We didn't find nearly as many birds as were reported on the weekend.  NO
tubenoses, few loons, no Tropical Kingbird.

 

1             Red-throated Loon

2             Pacific Loon

9             Common Loon

2             Horned Grebe

1             Red-necked Grebe

35           Western Grebe

111        Brown Pelican

4             Brandt's Cormorant

1             Double-crested Cormorant

30           Pelagic Cormorant

1             Great Egret

5             Cackling Geese

1             Harlequin Duck

200        Surf Scoter

150        Black Scoter

2             Red-tailed Hawk

2             Peregrine Falcon

8             Black Oystercatcher

2             Black Turnstone

12           RED PHALAROPE

60           Bonaparte's Gull

48           Heermann's Gull

2             Mew Gull

4             Ring-billed Gull

625        California Gull

190        Western Gull

3             Glaucous-winged Gull

6             Elegant Tern  - S jetty, Newport

2             Common Murre

2             Pigeon Guillemot

6             Rock Pigeon

1             BLACK PHOEBE - down on rocks, end of Ellingson St, Depoe Bay

2             Steller's Jay

6             American Crow

75           European Starling

4             Dark-eyed Junco

1             Brewer's Blackbird

6             House Sparrow

 

Good birding, everyone,

 

Paul Sulllivan & Carol Karlen

McMinnville
Subject: Commonwealth Lake, Beaverton
From: Michael Gold <mhgold AT nwlink.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 18:29:47 -0700
This morning at Commonwealth Lake there were eight female mergansers and on the 
grass adjacent to the lake there were more than 300 

Cackling Geese (minima).

Mike Gold

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Subject: Re: [birding] Past Red-necked Grebes sightings in mid-Willamette Valley
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:45:39 -0700
P.S. The number of deep-water grebe reports from the mid-Willamette
Valley might be higher, if not for the unfortunate transfer of
Stahlbusch Island to Linn County, 10 or so years ago.

Trent Bray will no doubt remember finding Benton County's first recorded
Clark's Grebe on the gravel-pit ponds there, a few years before the land
swap.

Linn County birders don't seem to appreciate this spot, no doubt since
they have plenty of other deep-water spots to choose from. For Benton
County birders, even though it's the closest deep water to Corvallis, no
one goes there anymore.

Well, to be fair, it was always a hard place to bird due to the
restrictions by Morse Bros., and nowadays the Knife River gravel
company. In addition to all of the "no trespassing signs" and
fast-moving gravel trucks, the trees that they planted to block views of
the pond have been growing higher.

So without the incentive of county listing, I guess it's hard to gin up
motivation to check. I think Marcia Cutler still manages to work out
access for the Corvallis Christmas Bird Count, so that's basically the
only time that anyone checks. It might still be a good spot for
motorless birders based in Corvallis, as a relatively short bicycle
ride.

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




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Subject: Got Lewis's? Now performing in Jackson County.
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:24:36 -0700
Just as the Oregon Shakespeare Festival prepares to close its season, the
Lewis's Woodpeckers are back and their show is free to all.  Today they
were doing their best imitation of Purple Martins, something I'd never seen
before.
http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/10/28/lewis-lollapalooza/


-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Past Red-necked Grebes sightings in mid-Willamette Valley
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:17:36 -0700
Hi all,

Doug is correct that the last confirmed sighting of a Red-necked Grebe
in deep-water-challenged Benton County was in 2003. Here is an excerpt
from my Audubon field notes for that period:

        A Red-necked Grebe that showed up at the Knoll Terrace s.p. 14
        Oct was a rare bird for Benton Co. (Randy Moore). It appeared to
        be a juvenile in transition plumage, and stayed at least through
        19 Oct (J Simmons; P Vanderheul). On 27 Oct one was at Big Lake
        and two were at Foster Res. (R Campbell); the two at Foster Res.
        were still there 28 Oct (J Fleischer & M Nikas). 

As I recall, the observers were not able to conclusively rule out
Holböl's Grebe.

There was also a possible sighting at the same sewage ponds in late
August of 2006. Here is the description by Paula Vanderheul:

        I viewed 2 grebes for a long time watching a dark one with
        varied colored facial mask like. It was exercising its wings and
        moving around most of the time.  At first I thought it to be a
        pied-billed grebe.  The other was floating near it not moving
        much. Its face was more grayish with a bit of white at throat
        and longer dark neck. The bill was large, and the head was
        large. They were out in the middle and I only had my 8 X 42
        ranger eagle optics.  I suspect they both were RED-NECKED GREBE.
        Being an adult and juvenile.
        
There have been considerably more frequent sightings from Linn County,
in the August-November window and especially in late October.

Good birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




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Subject: The rest of my day list...
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:14:14 -0700
It would have been a pretty fair day even without getting to
commune with a POMARINE JAEGER...

I also saw a PARASITIC JAEGER and plenty of phalaropes at the
South Jetty.

There are still at least 6 ELEGANT TERNS at the Hammond Boat Basin.
I also saw at least 2 COMMON TERNS.  A noisy PALM WARBLER and a very
gray-headed ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER were in the shrubbery at the base of
the boat basin jetty.

Today's photo-documents are at:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbalame/archives/date-posted/2014/10/28/?view=md

I should also note that the WILLET along with 3 MARBLED GODWITS
continue to be seen at Necanicum Estuary.  A single EARED GREBE,
and one (possibly 2) CLARK'S GREBE are also present.

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: Red-necked Grebe, Philomath poo ponds , Benton County
From: "W. Douglas Robinson" <w.douglas.robinson AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 15:22:20 -0700
1 in middle pond. I think first detected in Benton County since 2003.

Doug





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Subject: Re: A close encounter
From: SJJag AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 22:13:20 +0000 (UTC)

----- Original Message -----
From: "Patterson, Mike" 
To: obol AT freelists.org, "swalalahos" , "Neal Maine" 
 

Sent: Tuesday, October 28, 2014 2:38:20 PM
Subject: [obol] A close encounter

I recount a marvelous close encounter out on the South Jetty

Wow!! Mike, just wow!

Oboloids, click open the link if you haven't already!

Steve Jaggers



salt marsh...

http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/



-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: A close encounter
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 14:38:20 -0700
I recount a marvelous close encounter out on the South Jetty
salt marsh...

http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/



-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: Salem Red-throated Loon
From: Roy Gerig <roygerig AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 13:13:32 -0700
I've been checking the deep water ponds around Salem, they are mostly in SE 
Salem, the past few days while stormy weather has seen others in the 
mid-Willamette Valley finding Brown Pelicans, Clark's Grebes, Sabines and 
Heermanns Gulls, Pacific Loons, Scoters and I don't know what all, but here in 
Salem there has been nothing besides WESTERN GREBES and HORNED GREBES in 
addition to the usual CORMORANTS, DUCKS, GEESE, etc. 

This morning, around 10, I saw a RED-THROATED LOON while peeking through the 
gate behind Kelly's looking at the large pond that you can see from I-5 near 
the exit to Detroit and Salem for Highway 22. It was in the neighborhood of the 
3 WESTERN GREBES that have been there for a few days. Not much else on this 
large gravel pond. Some COOTS, RUDDIES, CORMORANTS, PB GREBES. I drove to the 
entrance off Lancaster and walked in to get a better look and it was in close 
there and I got good looks. East of there, the Aumsville Sewage Ponds had 
little beside a lot of SHOVELERS, a few WOOD DUCKS, and 200 DUNLIN. There has 
been a (lead poisoned?) SHOVELER that holds its bill straight up at an 
impossible angle while on the water, and whenever it tries to fly it goes 
straight up about 5 feet then abruptly dives straight back into the water. Over 
and over again. 

Summer's gone, my oh my.
Roy Gerig, Salem OR
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Possible Long-toed Stint foot detail
From: "Robert O'Brien" <baro AT pdx.edu>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:21:17 -0700
I had the good fortune to be on Attu in Spring, 1998 where there were a lot
of Long-toed Stints (LTST) and
no Least Sandpipers (LESA).  They were  in breeding plumage, of course.  I
believe the pale base to the lower mandible
is overrated in LTST.  I also agree this is a very difficult identification
in Oregon.

I also have seen (eventual) Least Sandpipers 'standing tall in fall' in
Oregon.
This often happens when they are by themselves, in vegetation rather than
mudflats, and are therefore
more than a little nervous.  They appear to stretch to get a better look
around.
It is a very distinctive pose that certainly attracts a birder's attention..
I've experienced what Ed describes quite a few times on the Oregon coast in
Fall and ended up
thinking that the bird was probably a LESA but never knowing for sure.

That said, this could well be a Long-toed.

A structural field mark (of uncertain applicability to my knowledge) is the
relative length of the
central toe (after all, it is a LONG-toed Stint) relative to the length of
the bill; longer than the bill
in LTST and shorter than LESA.

I've compared Ed's bird to one I photographed on Attu.  Neither photo is
crystal clear as to the lengths,
but, at least qualitatively, they appear similar.  Note that the based of
the lower mandible in the Attu
LTST is completely dark.

http://www2.rdrop.com/users/green/LTST/LTST.jpg

Bob OBrien
Carver OR




On Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 9:39 AM, ed mcv  wrote:

> I've posted a couple more photos.  One is a decent look at the toe.  I
> lightened and increased saturation to make the toe a little more visible.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/10665268 AT N04/sets/72157648591145497
>
> Ed McVicker
>
Subject: that Boiler Bay alcid
From: Darrel Faxon <5hats AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:13:03 -0700
which I saw there at 4:20 Sunday afternoon had the right characteristics
for Crested Auklet.  I had a good, if somewhat brief look at it as it flew
by at nearly eye level, about sixty yards away.  It was a mid-sized, chunky
bodied alcid, larger than a Cassin's (of which I saw many that day), and
smaller than a Rhinoceros Auklet.  It was dark blackish gray throughout,
including wing linings and underparts, had a thick-necked, big headed
appearance, and flew with the fast, fluttery wingbeats typical of
auklets. Bill color appeared dark, or at least not discerned to be
differently colored than the plumage.  In addition to the size difference
between it and Cassin's and Rhinoceros Auklets, it was darker than either
of those species, tending toward blackish, lacked any white on the
underparts, and had a different neck and head profile.  It was
distinguishable from Whiskered Auklet by much larger size; from breeding
plumaged Marbled or Long-billed Murrelet (which would not likely be in
breeding plumage at this time of year anyway) by blacker color, wider-based
wings, and head and neck profile; from winter plumaged Tufted Puffin by
size and flight style; from all other similarly sized alcids by entirely
dark underparts.
      The sighting would not be unprecedented.  The species has been
recorded in California and as far south as Baja.  It has been sighted at
least once from a cruise ship off the Oregon coast (Jeff Gilligan, pers.
comm.).
Darrel
Subject: Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:10:48 -0700
If that is a middle toe in Ed's new pictures then it is a Least.  I do
remember Shawneen emphasizing the "J" and bi-colored bill last year, I even
have written  those notes in my guide.  But the middle toe on a Long-toed
is longer than the bill and the tarsus and this bird does not appear to
have that feature.  So those three points are strikes against a Long-toed.

Bob Archer

On Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 10:56 AM, Wayne Hoffman  wrote:

> Hi –
>
>
>
> One of the difficult lessons here is that when we really examine them
> carefully, Least Sandpipers are incredibly variable.  They vary in posture,
> head pattern, leg and toe proportions, bill size and shape – you name it.
> I bet if we look long enough we’ll find some birds with pale bill bases
> that otherwise look more like Leasts then Long-toes.
>
>
>
> I have no personal experience with conclusively identified Long-toed
> Stints, but from examination of photos, I suspect the same is true for them
> – highly variable as well.
>
>
>
> I often imagine the difficulty a birder in Thailand, say might have poring
> over flocks of peeps trying to pick out a vagrant Least Sandpiper, and
> periodically finding birds that look “different” from Long-toes, but not
> able to nail down any as definite Leasts.
>
>
>
> Wayne
>
>
>
> *From:* obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] *On
> Behalf Of *Shawneen Finnegan
> *Sent:* Tuesday, October 28, 2014 9:40 AM
> *To:* obol AT freelists.org OBOL
> *Subject:* [obol] Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
>
>
>
> All:
>
>
>
> I would say this is a Least Sandpiper, but this is a very difficult ID
> that has stumped the best, particularly in basic plumage. Leasts can
> stretch up regularly and look tall and upright which throws people off. Bob
> Archer brings up some interesting points, but doesn't mention face pattern
> and lower bill base color, which is the first thing I look for.
>
>
>
> Long-toed Stints, particularly juveniles, have a different face pattern
> that differs from Least in that the dark crown extends to the base of the
> bill and connects with the dark eyeline, such that the white supercilium
> doesn't reach the base of the bill. It creates a "J". This is less
> pronounced in basic plumage. The supercilium on Least extends to the base
> of the bill. This bird shows a faint facial pattern with some duskiness at
> the base of the bill at the forward part of the supercilium.
>
>
>
> The other thing is that Long-toeds usually, but not always, have a pale
> base to the bill, which this bird does not and vice versa with Leasts.
> There is mud at the base of this bird's bill on its right side, but not on
> the left which shows the bill to be very black.
>
>
>
> Leg length can be hard to determine because of Least's propensity to
> crouch. Unless they stand up and look alert like the bird in question,
> seeing how long the upper half of their legs are can be difficult to see.
>
>
>
> The first thing I always do is hit the books and internet search for
> photos of both species.
>
>
>
> Monte Taylor has a number of photos of LTST on his website at:
> http://www.tsuru-bird.net/a_species/stint_long-toed/
>
>
>
> Years ago Rich Stallcup thought he had found a Long-toed in Marin County,
> CA, which was finally deemed a Least Sandpiper. See video/blog by Keith
> Hansen who took lots of video of it below. The record was never submitted
> as I believe it was finally deemed to be a Least Sandpiper. But it shows
> just how hard these can be.
>
>
>
>
> 
http://thebloggerhead.wordpress.com/2009/10/27/interesting-sandpiper-has-birders-talking-learning-considering/ 

>
>
>
> Off to work. No more time to contemplate this.
>
>
>
> Shawneen Finnegan
>
> Portland, OR
>
Subject: Aleutian cackling geese wintering near Tillamook
From: "WLRisser" <wlrisser AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:10:33 -0700
Scott Carpenter told us about the flock of Aleutian cackling geese that
winters near Pacific City half an hour south of Tillamook.  We saw them
easily yesterday.  I did some research subsequently and learned that it is
well known that these geese winter where we saw them.  Jan and I are
relatively new to Oregon and weren't aware of this.  If anyone else doesn't
know about them and wants directions, contact me privately and I will send
you Scott's excellent instructions.
Subject: Storm Birds again
From: "Wayne Hoffman" <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:04:11 -0700
We are having another storm today on the coast, although much less powerful
than Saturday's.  I spent about 90 minutes at the Yaquina Bay South Jetty
this morning - 8 AM - 9:30 AM.

 

There were several hundred California Gulls, both at the gull spot and
clustered on the base of the first finger.  Among them were at least 20
adult Herring Gulls, all with clear yellow irises, a few imm. Herring Gulls,
and 35 or so Heermann's Gulls, and of course the usual Westerns,
Glaucous-wings, and Olympics, none of the latter in unusual numbers.  I
could not pick out a Thayer's.

 

At least 7 ELEGANT TERNS were flying around over the channel, and 1 roosted
a while on the first finger.

 

1 ad. Black-legged Kittiwake flew across the channe, then west along the
south jetty, then on south.

 

One group of 8+  Bonaparte's Gulls, same route.

 

At least 3 Red-throated Loons in the channel.

 

No sign of Long-tailed Duck, and few scoters present.

 

Wayne
Subject: Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
From: "Wayne Hoffman" <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 10:56:15 -0700
Hi –

 

One of the difficult lessons here is that when we really examine them 
carefully, Least Sandpipers are incredibly variable. They vary in posture, head 
pattern, leg and toe proportions, bill size and shape – you name it. I bet if 
we look long enough we’ll find some birds with pale bill bases that otherwise 
look more like Leasts then Long-toes. 


 

I have no personal experience with conclusively identified Long-toed Stints, 
but from examination of photos, I suspect the same is true for them – highly 
variable as well. 


 

I often imagine the difficulty a birder in Thailand, say might have poring over 
flocks of peeps trying to pick out a vagrant Least Sandpiper, and periodically 
finding birds that look “different” from Long-toes, but not able to nail 
down any as definite Leasts. 


 

Wayne

 

From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Shawneen Finnegan 

Sent: Tuesday, October 28, 2014 9:40 AM
To: obol AT freelists.org OBOL
Subject: [obol] Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)

 

All:

 

I would say this is a Least Sandpiper, but this is a very difficult ID that has 
stumped the best, particularly in basic plumage. Leasts can stretch up 
regularly and look tall and upright which throws people off. Bob Archer brings 
up some interesting points, but doesn't mention face pattern and lower bill 
base color, which is the first thing I look for. 


 

Long-toed Stints, particularly juveniles, have a different face pattern that 
differs from Least in that the dark crown extends to the base of the bill and 
connects with the dark eyeline, such that the white supercilium doesn't reach 
the base of the bill. It creates a "J". This is less pronounced in basic 
plumage. The supercilium on Least extends to the base of the bill. This bird 
shows a faint facial pattern with some duskiness at the base of the bill at the 
forward part of the supercilium. 


 

The other thing is that Long-toeds usually, but not always, have a pale base to 
the bill, which this bird does not and vice versa with Leasts. There is mud at 
the base of this bird's bill on its right side, but not on the left which shows 
the bill to be very black. 


 

Leg length can be hard to determine because of Least's propensity to crouch. 
Unless they stand up and look alert like the bird in question, seeing how long 
the upper half of their legs are can be difficult to see. 


 

The first thing I always do is hit the books and internet search for photos of 
both species. 


 

Monte Taylor has a number of photos of LTST on his website at: 
http://www.tsuru-bird.net/a_species/stint_long-toed/ 


 

Years ago Rich Stallcup thought he had found a Long-toed in Marin County, CA, 
which was finally deemed a Least Sandpiper. See video/blog by Keith Hansen who 
took lots of video of it below. The record was never submitted as I believe it 
was finally deemed to be a Least Sandpiper. But it shows just how hard these 
can be. 


 


http://thebloggerhead.wordpress.com/2009/10/27/interesting-sandpiper-has-birders-talking-learning-considering/ 


 

Off to work. No more time to contemplate this.

 

Shawneen Finnegan

Portland, OR
Subject: Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 10:17:53 -0700
Of course I think the best thing to do, as mentioned last time this went around 
OBOL, is get a picture of the toes :) 


Bob Archer



> On Oct 28, 2014, at 9:39 AM, Shawneen Finnegan  
wrote: 

> 
> All:
> 
> I would say this is a Least Sandpiper, but this is a very difficult ID that 
has stumped the best, particularly in basic plumage. Leasts can stretch up 
regularly and look tall and upright which throws people off. Bob Archer brings 
up some interesting points, but doesn't mention face pattern and lower bill 
base color, which is the first thing I look for. 

> 
> Long-toed Stints, particularly juveniles, have a different face pattern that 
differs from Least in that the dark crown extends to the base of the bill and 
connects with the dark eyeline, such that the white supercilium doesn't reach 
the base of the bill. It creates a "J". This is less pronounced in basic 
plumage. The supercilium on Least extends to the base of the bill. This bird 
shows a faint facial pattern with some duskiness at the base of the bill at the 
forward part of the supercilium. 

> 
> The other thing is that Long-toeds usually, but not always, have a pale base 
to the bill, which this bird does not and vice versa with Leasts. There is mud 
at the base of this bird's bill on its right side, but not on the left which 
shows the bill to be very black. 

> 
> Leg length can be hard to determine because of Least's propensity to crouch. 
Unless they stand up and look alert like the bird in question, seeing how long 
the upper half of their legs are can be difficult to see. 

> 
> The first thing I always do is hit the books and internet search for photos 
of both species. 

> 
> Monte Taylor has a number of photos of LTST on his website at: 
http://www.tsuru-bird.net/a_species/stint_long-toed/ 

> 
> Years ago Rich Stallcup thought he had found a Long-toed in Marin County, CA, 
which was finally deemed a Least Sandpiper. See video/blog by Keith Hansen who 
took lots of video of it below. The record was never submitted as I believe it 
was finally deemed to be a Least Sandpiper. But it shows just how hard these 
can be. 

> 
> 
http://thebloggerhead.wordpress.com/2009/10/27/interesting-sandpiper-has-birders-talking-learning-considering/ 

> 
> Off to work. No more time to contemplate this.
> 
> Shawneen Finnegan
> Portland, OR
Subject: Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
From: Stefan Schlick <greenfant AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 13:15:41 -0400


The following photo shows the feature that Shawneen was describing below pretty 
well: http://www.birdskorea.org/Images/images2007/08/Long-toed-Stint_RN.jpg. 

Stefan SchlickHillsboro, OR

Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 09:39:51 -0700
Subject: [obol] Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
From: shawneenfinnegan AT gmail.com
To: obol AT freelists.org

All:
I would say this is a Least Sandpiper, but this is a very difficult ID that has 
stumped the best, particularly in basic plumage. Leasts can stretch up 
regularly and look tall and upright which throws people off. Bob Archer brings 
up some interesting points, but doesn't mention face pattern and lower bill 
base color, which is the first thing I look for. 

Long-toed Stints, particularly juveniles, have a different face pattern that 
differs from Least in that the dark crown extends to the base of the bill and 
connects with the dark eyeline, such that the white supercilium doesn't reach 
the base of the bill. It creates a "J". This is less pronounced in basic 
plumage. The supercilium on Least extends to the base of the bill. This bird 
shows a faint facial pattern with some duskiness at the base of the bill at the 
forward part of the supercilium. 

The other thing is that Long-toeds usually, but not always, have a pale base to 
the bill, which this bird does not and vice versa with Leasts. There is mud at 
the base of this bird's bill on its right side, but not on the left which shows 
the bill to be very black. 

Leg length can be hard to determine because of Least's propensity to crouch. 
Unless they stand up and look alert like the bird in question, seeing how long 
the upper half of their legs are can be difficult to see. 

The first thing I always do is hit the books and internet search for photos of 
both species. 

Monte Taylor has a number of photos of LTST on his website at: 
http://www.tsuru-bird.net/a_species/stint_long-toed/ 

Years ago Rich Stallcup thought he had found a Long-toed in Marin County, CA, 
which was finally deemed a Least Sandpiper. See video/blog by Keith Hansen who 
took lots of video of it below. The record was never submitted as I believe it 
was finally deemed to be a Least Sandpiper. But it shows just how hard these 
can be. 


http://thebloggerhead.wordpress.com/2009/10/27/interesting-sandpiper-has-birders-talking-learning-considering/ 

Off to work. No more time to contemplate this.
Shawneen FinneganPortland, OR
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
From: Shawneen Finnegan <shawneenfinnegan AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 09:39:51 -0700
All:

I would say this is a Least Sandpiper, but this is a very difficult ID that
has stumped the best, particularly in basic plumage. Leasts can stretch up
regularly and look tall and upright which throws people off. Bob Archer
brings up some interesting points, but doesn't mention face pattern and
lower bill base color, which is the first thing I look for.

Long-toed Stints, particularly juveniles, have a different face pattern
that differs from Least in that the dark crown extends to the base of the
bill and connects with the dark eyeline, such that the white supercilium
doesn't reach the base of the bill. It creates a "J". This is less
pronounced in basic plumage. The supercilium on Least extends to the base
of the bill. This bird shows a faint facial pattern with some duskiness at
the base of the bill at the forward part of the supercilium.

The other thing is that Long-toeds usually, but not always, have a pale
base to the bill, which this bird does not and vice versa with Leasts.
There is mud at the base of this bird's bill on its right side, but not on
the left which shows the bill to be very black.

Leg length can be hard to determine because of Least's propensity to
crouch. Unless they stand up and look alert like the bird in question,
seeing how long the upper half of their legs are can be difficult to see.

The first thing I always do is hit the books and internet search for photos
of both species.

Monte Taylor has a number of photos of LTST on his website at:
http://www.tsuru-bird.net/a_species/stint_long-toed/

Years ago Rich Stallcup thought he had found a Long-toed in Marin County,
CA, which was finally deemed a Least Sandpiper. See video/blog by Keith
Hansen who took lots of video of it below. The record was never submitted
as I believe it was finally deemed to be a Least Sandpiper. But it shows
just how hard these can be.


http://thebloggerhead.wordpress.com/2009/10/27/interesting-sandpiper-has-birders-talking-learning-considering/ 


Off to work. No more time to contemplate this.

Shawneen Finnegan
Portland, OR
Subject: Possible Long-toed Stint foot detail
From: ed mcv <ed.mcvicker AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 09:39:24 -0700
I've posted a couple more photos.  One is a decent look at the toe.  I
lightened and increased saturation to make the toe a little more visible.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/10665268 AT N04/sets/72157648591145497

Ed McVicker
Subject: more Calidris comments
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 09:38:10 -0700
 I'm out of bed, looking at Lars Jonssons Fĺglar i Europa. Ed has provided a 
wonderful series of pictures, with angles one seldom gets when needed most. In 
addition to Bob Archer's notes--the dark crown of both Little Stint and Least 
Sandpiper is separated from the bill by pale feathers, while in the Long-toed 
"dirty-toned" feathers continue all the way to the bill and typically fuse with 
the loral streak as well. In the Long-toed Stint the loral streak is usually 
less defined than in the Least, and broken midway between bill and eye. I think 
that's an accurate description of this bird. The dark centers of the scapulars 
go all the way to the edge of the feather, ending in a very fine point. The 
base of the bill in Long-toed Stints is typically pale in both adults and 
juveniles. This is the only field mark I don't see. Lars 


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Subject: Larks in Salem...
From: John Thomas <johnpam AT mtangel.net>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 08:45:50 -0700
Yesterday afternoon I went over to look for Horned Larks just off Kuebler Blvd 
in Salem. Instead of Horned Larks, I found a flock of 20 MEADOWLARKS - I think 
the largest group I have ever seen in Marion County. 


On the home front out here NE of Silverton, we had good views of a 
White-throated Sparrow (tan morph) and a Sharp-shinned Hawk in the feeder area. 
Looked for migrating Sandhill Cranes but no luck there.... 


John Thomas
Silverton

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Subject: Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 08:19:55 -0700
Hi:  

I took a look at The Shorebird Guide by O'Brien and the rest of them, check out 
lower picture on page 290. Could be same bird. 


Longer legs
Dark centered scaps
Obscure cheek patch
Short fine tipped bill
Upright when alert
Bland face

Love to hear why its not a Long-toed.

Bob Archer
Pdx




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Subject: Re: Fwd: [Tweeters] Neah Bay Rarities Monday
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 07:58:11 -0700
I would take a chair you will need it.

Sent from my iPad

> On Oct 28, 2014, at 07:52, Jim Danzenbaker  wrote:
> 
> OBOLers,
> 
> A quick fyi for anyone interested in chasing the Eurasian Hobby in Neah Bay, 
Washington. 

> 
> I was one of the "patient birders (who) were able to get a similar quick look 
at 

> the Hobby in the same spot several hours later". If you go for this bird, 
pack your patience. 

> 
> Keep your eyes and ears skyward.
> 
> Jim Danzenbaker
> Battle Ground, WA
> 
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: 
> Date: Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 7:42 AM
> Subject: [Tweeters] Neah Bay Rarities Monday
> To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> 
> 
> Yesterday I was fortunate enough to accompany Bill Twiet, Bruce Labar, and
> Whittier Johnson to chase some of the rarities reported in Neah Bay on
> Sunday.
> 
> We started the day in town and quickly found the ORCHARD ORIOLE coming to
> the hummingbird feeders. The very friendly homeowner came out and said
> that the bird has been seen for about a week and a half. A walk through
> town produced a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW. Driving just outside of town toward
> the Waatch Valley, we came across a very vividly colored NASHVILLE
> WARBLER.
> 
> TOWN: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20358439
> 
> Carefully working our way through Waatch Valley, we made our way over to
> the sewage treatment plant. While at the base of the old quarry we watched
> the ridge line as several Bald Eagles, a Sharp-shinned Hawk, and a
> Peregrine Falcon rode the thermals over the ridge top. The EURASIAN HOBBY
> appeared suddenly over the ridge and allowed us looks for about 25-30
> seconds before disappearing into the canyon to the right of our vantage
> point. Some cheering was heard echoing through the quarry moments later.
> Another group of patient birders were able to get a similar quick look at
> the Hobby in the same spot several hours later.
> 
> SEWAGE PLANT: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20357757
> 
> Returning to town we were able to find a jaw dropping 4 TROPICAL
> KINGBIRDS, 3 in the same tree at one point. We later found one more
> Kingbird near Hobuck Beach making 5 for the day.
> 
> TOWN 2: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20357953
> HOBUCK: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20357960
> 
> We had a very successful chase with a few more minor rarities. It was
> great to ride with and learn from this group such knowledgeable birders.
> 
> 
> 
> Have a great day,
> 
> Michael Charest
> Tacoma, Washington
> mcharest AT wamail.net
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Jim Danzenbaker
> Battle Ground, WA
> 360-702-9395
> jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com
Subject: Fwd: [Tweeters] Neah Bay Rarities Monday
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 07:51:56 -0700
OBOLers,

A quick fyi for anyone interested in chasing the Eurasian Hobby in Neah
Bay, Washington.

I was one of the "patient birders (who) were able to get a similar quick
look at
the Hobby in the same spot several hours later".  If you go for this bird,
pack your patience.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: 
Date: Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 7:42 AM
Subject: [Tweeters] Neah Bay Rarities Monday
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu


Yesterday I was fortunate enough to accompany Bill Twiet, Bruce Labar, and
Whittier Johnson to chase some of the rarities reported in Neah Bay on
Sunday.

We started the day in town and quickly found the ORCHARD ORIOLE coming to
the hummingbird feeders. The very friendly homeowner came out and said
that the bird has been seen for about a week and a half. A walk through
town produced a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW. Driving just outside of town toward
the Waatch Valley, we came across a very vividly colored NASHVILLE
WARBLER.

TOWN: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20358439

Carefully working our way through Waatch Valley, we made our way over to
the sewage treatment plant. While at the base of the old quarry we watched
the ridge line as several Bald Eagles, a Sharp-shinned Hawk, and a
Peregrine Falcon rode the thermals over the ridge top. The EURASIAN HOBBY
appeared suddenly over the ridge and allowed us looks for about 25-30
seconds before disappearing into the canyon to the right of our vantage
point. Some cheering was heard echoing through the quarry moments later.
Another group of patient birders were able to get a similar quick look at
the Hobby in the same spot several hours later.

SEWAGE PLANT: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20357757

Returning to town we were able to find a jaw dropping 4 TROPICAL
KINGBIRDS, 3 in the same tree at one point. We later found one more
Kingbird near Hobuck Beach making 5 for the day.

TOWN 2: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20357953
HOBUCK: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20357960

We had a very successful chase with a few more minor rarities. It was
great to ride with and learn from this group such knowledgeable birders.



Have a great day,

Michael Charest
Tacoma, Washington
mcharest AT wamail.net



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com
Subject: Ed McV's Calidris
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 07:38:11 -0700
 I can claim no knowledge of Long-toed Stints, but the jiz of this bird isn't 
remotely Least Sandy for me. The legs are incredibly bright as well. I would 
describe the color of Least Sandpiper legs as yellow ochre while these appear 
truly yellow. Lars 


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Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 06:40:52 -0700
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: October 28, 2014 6:09:23 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Wood Duck (1 Union)
Mandarin Duck (1 Washington)
Surf Scoter (3 Josephine, 1 Union)
White-winged Scoter (1 Hood River)
Red-breasted Merganser (3 Union)
Clark's Grebe (1 Linn)
Turkey Vulture (3 Washington, 1 Yamhill)
Osprey (1 Linn)
Golden Eagle (1 Douglas)
Red-necked Phalarope (3 Clatsop, 1 Josephine, 1 Polk)
Caspian Tern (1 Douglas)
Forster's Tern (1 Clatsop)
Elegant Tern (4 Clatsop, 1 Lane, 2 Tillamook)
Violet-green Swallow (1 Jackson, 3 Josephine)
Lapland Longspur (1 Deschutes)
American Tree Sparrow (1 Washington)
White-throated Sparrow (1 Klamath)
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (Hepburn's) (1 Benton)
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (Gray-crowned) (1 Benton)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Oregon Rare Bird Alert. The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on the web at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
From: ed mcv <ed.mcvicker AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 23:56:04 -0700
While walking along the shore of Willapa Bay near Ledbetter State Park this
afternoon, I saw a single peep pop up from the salicornia.  My first
reaction was Least (size and general plumage) until I saw its posture.
While it moved around and when still, it remained more upright than a
typical Least.  I've not seen a Long-toed Stint, but remembered that
characteristic is one of many to differentiate the two species.  Several
photos later I moved on without flushing the bird.  I've posted a few
photos this evening and would like to know if others think this bird is
anything other than a juvenile Least.

I'm not on Tweeter site but perhaps someone who is would cross-post.
Thanks.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/10665268 AT N04/sets/72157648591145497

Ed McVicker
currently in Ocean Park, WA
Subject: josephine Co lake selmac surf scoters
From: Romain Cooper <romain AT frontiernet.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 22:00:12 -0700
3 surf scoters still at Lake Selmac this evening about 5pm 
(10/27/14).  Thanks again, Russ Namitz, for the heads up.

Other birds of note:
    * first Ring-Necked Ducks of the season for us
    * 4 Eared; 1 Horned Grebe;  Several Western.
    * 4 Wilson's Snipe
    * 2 Greater Yellow-Legs
    * 1 Dunlin

Romain Cooper
10398 Takilma Road
Cave Junction, OR 97523
541-592-2311  

---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com
Subject: Mary's Peak Rosy-finches - two varieties
From: "Jeff Harding" <jeffharding AT centurytel.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 21:59:54 -0700
I stopped at Mary's Peak this morning, and found four Gray-crowned
Rosy-finches, of two varieties at the summit. There were three Hepburn's, or
Gray-cheecked, and one interior, or Gray-crowned form. 

Photos here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeffharding/15027143794/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeffharding/15648714732/in/photostream/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeffharding/15461747018/in/photostream/

 

There was also a Horned Lark up there that appeared to me to be of one of
the pale races, not from the valley, but a migrant.

 

Good birding,

Jeff
Subject: Re: probable "Vega" (photo links)
From: "Wayne Hoffman" <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 20:55:34 -0700

Thanks for posting these Phil - 

I cropped these from the originals, modestly brightened them and modestly
increased the contrast because the light was kind of dull this afternoon,
and resized them.  The ones with an "a" in the file names  are tighter
croppings of the same photos as the ones sharing the same photo numbers.

Wayne



-----Original Message-----
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf
Of Phil Pickering
Sent: Monday, October 27, 2014 6:04 PM
To: obol AT freelists.org
Subject: [obol] Re: probable "Vega" (photo links)

Wayne Hoffman's photos -

http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA0218.jpg
http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA0218a.jpg
http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA0221.jpg
http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA0221a.jpg
http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA5128.jpg
http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA5132.jpg
http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA5132a.jpg



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Subject: Re: probable "Vega" (photo links)
From: Stefan Schlick <greenfant AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 23:54:41 -0400
This bird seems waaay to light-mantled to fall into the range for Vega Gull.
Stefan SchlickHillsboro, OR

> From: philliplc AT charter.net
> To: obol AT freelists.org
> Subject: [obol] Re: probable "Vega" (photo links)
> Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 18:03:59 -0700
> 
> Wayne Hoffman's photos -
> 
> http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA0218.jpg
> http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA0218a.jpg
> http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA0221.jpg
> http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA0221a.jpg
> http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA5128.jpg
> http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA5132.jpg
> http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA5132a.jpg
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
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> 
> 
 		 	   		  
Subject: Jackson Bottom Wetlands - Tree Sparrow
From: Steve Nord <stevernord AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 20:44:37 -0700
OBOL;

This afternoon there was a large collection of sparrows in the willows just
north of the wooden bird blind on the Kingfisher Marsh Trail.  This is the
blind near the junction of the gravel road that leads down from behind the
visitor center.

As I was sorting through the numerous sparrows, an AMERICAN TREE SPARROW
popped up to perch in a willow.  It showed off its plain grayish undersides
with the distinct spot in the center of the breast, then dropped back into
the brush. Not very cooperative as it would not respond to pishing for a
photo.

Also in this group of bushes:
WHITE-THROATED SPARROW
WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW
GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW
FOX SPARROW
LINCOLN'S SPARROW
SONG SPARROW
DARK-EYED JUNCO

Good Birding
Steve Nord
Beaverton, OR
Subject: Re: Seawatch 26 Oct 2014 S. Jetty Umpqua River
From: d_villa <d_villa AT mail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 03:33:59 GMT
Matt, what a wonderful way you have of breathing life into a field report! It 
has been fun, hasn't it? Thank you 


Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Smartphone


------ Original message------
From: Matthew G Hunter
Date: Mon, Oct 27, 2014 8:02 PM
To: obol AT freelists.org;
Subject:[obol] Seawatch 26 Oct 2014 S. Jetty Umpqua River

Hi Folks,
 I decided last minute (Saturday night) to go over to the S. Jetty of the 
Umpqua River and join in the fun. I arrived there about 0900 and did three 1-hr 
watches plus a final 30-min watch. Following are some photos and numbers. I 
tell you, it was so fun watching all the birds streaming by those 3.5 hours; 
I'm not kidding when I say it really seemed like 3.5 minutes. Anyway, I was 
incredibly lucky weather wise, as there were huge squalls/clouds to the north 
and south several miles. 


My favorite observations of the morning were:
*5 species of "tubenoses"
*Several beautiful Sabine's Gulls including two flying south right over the 
beach. 

*Two somewhat late Caspian Terns
*Red Phalaropes that landed fairly close by
*Peregrine Falcon "following" a Surf Scoter flock about 3/4 mile out.
*The way the gulls hour after hour came south near the end of the jetty, then 
used the uplift from the south jetty to cruise west toward the beach, then 
proceeded south. I had a nearly constant stream of gulls of many species coming 
right by me. 

*Just the massive number of birds constantly going by, from within feet of me 
to as far as I could see west at sea. 


Some photos of closer birds:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewghunter/sets/72157648596060338/

Following is the list of all species observed during the total 3.5 hours of 
observation, but the numbers are the maximum from any ONE HOUR. And, these are 
only birds within about a mile of shore, there were many thousands farther out 
that I could not identify to species, and even these are surely underestimates. 


Cackling Goose                        160
Northern Pintail                        60
Green-winged Teal                   20
Greater/Lesser Scaup               50
Surf Scoter                               1,300
White-winged Scoter               60
Long-tailed Duck                     1
Red-breasted Merganser          1
Red-throated Loon                  5
Pacific Loon                             1,500 (prob incl more RTLOs)
Common Loon                         50
Western Grebe                         3
Northern Fulmar                       100
Pink-footed Shearwater           2
Buller's Shearwater                  6
Sooty Shearwater                     2
Storm-Petrel sp.                       1
Brandt's Cormorant                  20
Double-crested Cormorant       180
Pelagic Cormorant                    5
Brown Pelican                          150
Black Turnstone                       2
Surfbird                                    1
Sanderling                                4
Dunlin                                      900
Least Sandpiper                       6
Red Phalarope                          60
Pomarine Jaeger                       2
Common Murre                        60
Cassin's Auklet                         300
Black-legged Kittiwake           14
Sabine's Gull                            2
Bonaparte's Gull                       75
Heermann's Gull                       450
Mew Gull                                 110
Western Gull                            350
California Gull                         800
Herring Gull                             60
Thayer's Gull                            1
Glaucous-winged Gull             11
Western x Glaucous-winged Gull (hybrid)     3
Caspian Tern                            2
Peregrine Falcon                       1

Amazed at the power and breadth of migration...,

Matt Hunter
Melrose, OR
Subject: thanks for flycatcher id help!
From: Linda Fink <linda AT fink.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 20:14:14 -0700
Many thanks to those who wrote with id help on my Western Wood Pewee. My 
photos and their reasons are here: 
http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/2014/10/western-wood-pewee.html

Linda
-- 
http://lindafink.blogspot.com/
http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/
http://fffwildflowers.blogspot.com/
http://finkfamilyfarmtrees.blogspot.com/


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Subject: Seawatch 26 Oct 2014 S. Jetty Umpqua River
From: Matthew G Hunter <matthewghunter AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 20:01:58 -0700
Hi Folks,
 I decided last minute (Saturday night) to go over to the S. Jetty of the
Umpqua River and join in the fun. I arrived there about 0900 and did three
1-hr watches plus a final 30-min watch. Following are some photos and
numbers. I tell you, it was so fun watching all the birds streaming by
those 3.5 hours; I'm not kidding when I say it really seemed like 3.5
minutes. Anyway, I was incredibly lucky weather wise, as there were huge
squalls/clouds to the north and south several miles.

My favorite observations of the morning were:
*5 species of "tubenoses"
*Several beautiful Sabine's Gulls including two flying south right over the
beach.
*Two somewhat late Caspian Terns
*Red Phalaropes that landed fairly close by
*Peregrine Falcon "following" a Surf Scoter flock about 3/4 mile out.
*The way the gulls hour after hour came south near the end of the jetty,
then used the uplift from the south jetty to cruise west toward the beach,
then proceeded south. I had a nearly constant stream of gulls of many
species coming right by me.
*Just the massive number of birds constantly going by, from within feet of
me to as far as I could see west at sea.

Some photos of closer birds:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewghunter/sets/72157648596060338/

Following is the list of all species observed during the total 3.5 hours of
observation, but the numbers are the maximum from any ONE HOUR. And, these
are only birds within about a mile of shore, there were many thousands
farther out that I could not identify to species, and even these are surely
underestimates.

Cackling Goose                        160

Northern Pintail                        60

Green-winged Teal                   20

Greater/Lesser Scaup               50

Surf Scoter                               1,300

White-winged Scoter               60

Long-tailed Duck                     1

Red-breasted Merganser          1

Red-throated Loon                  5

Pacific Loon                             1,500 (prob incl more RTLOs)

Common Loon                         50

Western Grebe                         3

Northern Fulmar                       100

Pink-footed Shearwater           2

Buller's Shearwater                  6

Sooty Shearwater                     2

Storm-Petrel sp.                       1

Brandt's Cormorant                  20

Double-crested Cormorant       180

Pelagic Cormorant                    5

Brown Pelican                          150

Black Turnstone                       2

Surfbird                                    1

Sanderling                                4

Dunlin                                      900

Least Sandpiper                       6

Red Phalarope                          60

Pomarine Jaeger                       2

Common Murre                        60

Cassin's Auklet                         300

Black-legged Kittiwake           14

Sabine's Gull                            2

Bonaparte's Gull                       75

Heermann's Gull                       450

Mew Gull                                 110

Western Gull                            350

California Gull                         800

Herring Gull                             60

Thayer's Gull                            1

Glaucous-winged Gull             11

Western x Glaucous-winged Gull (hybrid)     3

Caspian Tern                            2

Peregrine Falcon                       1

Amazed at the power and breadth of migration...,

Matt Hunter
Melrose, OR
Subject: Linn Co - Foster Reservoir scoters
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 19:41:20 -0700
I guess scoters were migrating in groups of three this week as there were 3 
SURF SCOTERS this evening at Foster Reservoir. Only had about 20 minutes before 
it was too dark to see. 


Other 'good' birds for me were...
1 Bonaparte's Gull
1 Clark's Grebe
6 Horned Grebe

There was a Greater Scaup with Lessers and. 4 Cinnamon Teal at the Brownsville 
sewage ponds. 


Good birding,
Russ Namitz
Medford

> Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 22:28:27 -0400
> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> To: namitzr AT hotmail.com
> Subject: eBird Report - Foster Reservoir--Shea Viewpoint, Oct 27, 2014
> 
> Foster Reservoir--Shea Viewpoint, Linn, US-OR
> Oct 27, 2014 6:05 PM - 6:30 PM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 19 species
> 
> Mallard  6
> Bufflehead  1
> Hooded Merganser  7
> Common Merganser  3
> Ruddy Duck  6
> Common Loon  6
> Pied-billed Grebe  4
> Horned Grebe  5
> Western Grebe  20
> Clark's Grebe  1     Orange bill, white over eye
> Great Blue Heron  1
> Osprey 1 White belly & undersides. Lanky, M crooked wings. Attempted to catch 
fish. 

> American Coot  500
> Dunlin  3
> Bonaparte's Gull  1
> California Gull  40
> Herring Gull  4
> Belted Kingfisher  1
> American Robin  5
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20358223 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: probable "Vega" (photo links)
From: "Phil Pickering" <philliplc AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 18:03:59 -0700
Wayne Hoffman's photos -

http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA0218.jpg
http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA0218a.jpg
http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA0221.jpg
http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA0221a.jpg
http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA5128.jpg
http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA5132.jpg
http://philliplc.com/14images/VEGA5132a.jpg



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Subject: Re: seawatch gull counts
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:38:56 -0700
People who don't do ocean watching very often don't realize that huge 
percentages of populations move in a short period of time. One year I counted - 
pretty closely - ten thousand Surf Scoters *on the water* in one long flock 
covering about four miles of the northern Lane County coast. The movement had 
chosen to rest there. They looked like the world's largest kelp string - but 
they were all Surf Scoters. And I mean zero White-wings. In two days they were 
gone. Cal Gull, Pacific Loon and, in spring, Western Sandpiper do the same 
thing, though the gulls are a bit more spread out. 

.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




On Oct 27, 2014, at 5:32 PM, Mike Patterson wrote:

> We shorted many of our numbers, because they seemed so overwhelmingly
> large.  In my notes for Sunday, wrote rates rather than try to keep
> an actual count.  We counted for 2.5 hours, so the math is:
> 
>        (Count/min)*60*2.5 = number encountered during watch
> 
> From that I got:
> 
> California Gulls 100*60*2.5 = 15000  (5000 reported)
> Northern Fulmar   10*60*2.5 = 1500   (300 reported)
> Pacific Loons     80*60*2.5 = 12000  (8000 reported)
> 
> I always hesitate reporting math based values, in part because the
> rate is not uniform over the morning and making enough rate counts
> over a morning to be statistically robust requires not paying attention
> to all the lower frequency action which is often way more interesting.
> But I've also had folks argue with the big numbers, usually folks
> who've not witnessed these kinds of events, who think I'm being over
> dramatic.  So I habitually trim them.
> 
> But given all the supporting data from other locations, I may go back
> into the eBird list and fix these (eBird filters don't like these big
> numbers either).
> 
> -- 
> Mike Patterson
> Astoria, OR
> String Theory
> http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182
> 
> 
> 
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> 
> 
Subject: Re: seawatch gull counts
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:32:17 -0700
We shorted many of our numbers, because they seemed so overwhelmingly
large.  In my notes for Sunday, wrote rates rather than try to keep
an actual count.  We counted for 2.5 hours, so the math is:

         (Count/min)*60*2.5 = number encountered during watch

 From that I got:

California Gulls 100*60*2.5 = 15000  (5000 reported)
Northern Fulmar   10*60*2.5 = 1500   (300 reported)
Pacific Loons     80*60*2.5 = 12000  (8000 reported)

I always hesitate reporting math based values, in part because the
rate is not uniform over the morning and making enough rate counts
over a morning to be statistically robust requires not paying attention
to all the lower frequency action which is often way more interesting.
But I've also had folks argue with the big numbers, usually folks
who've not witnessed these kinds of events, who think I'm being over
dramatic.  So I habitually trim them.

But given all the supporting data from other locations, I may go back
into the eBird list and fix these (eBird filters don't like these big
numbers either).

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: Broughton Beach (Portland) Today
From: Jen Sanford <jjsanford AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:18:10 -0700
Hi all,

This afternoon I walked to Broughton Beach to look for Beverly's possible
WHITE-WINGED SCOTER from yesterday.  I found what I think was the bird,
along with some of his buddies.  I took some terrible distant photos and
would love to hear what others think.  Here are three, including one with
some coots for size reference:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/stoptellingmeitsokay/15460153008/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/stoptellingmeitsokay/15025539324/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/stoptellingmeitsokay/15025539424/

The birds were definitely NOT in Multnomah County.  They were drifting west
slowly, starting at Wintler Park, then passing Marine Park before I lost
them completely.

I also finally tried to look for the hybrid Clark's X Western Grebe and
would like to know if I found the correct bird:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/stoptellingmeitsokay/15460143318/

Other highlights at Broughton Beach were 1 DUNLIN and 1 COMMON LOON, and a
late OSPREY flying south east of the Sea Scout Base.

Good birding,

Jen Sanford
Portland
Subject: another id question
From: Linda Fink <linda AT fink.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:17:11 -0700
I'm still working on adding photos to my farm bird list. Came across a 
set of photos of a flycatcher that I think is a Western Wood Pewee but 
don't know for sure. If anyone has time to look, I'd greatly appreciate 
help. 
http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/2014/10/western-wood-pewee.html

Thanks!

Linda
-- 
http://lindafink.blogspot.com/
http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/
http://fffwildflowers.blogspot.com/
http://finkfamilyfarmtrees.blogspot.com/


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Subject: Hayden Island Mystery Scoter-another pic
From: Beverly Hallberg <mapsout AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:09:31 -0700
Since Philip has asked, I thought I'd share another photo with a comparison
of 3 female Scoters all together.  The head shapes and profiles are very
different to my untrained eyes.   I just want to understand how people come
up with their conclusions so I can learn something.  Make of it what you
will and if anyone else has better photos, I'd love to see them too!

https://flic.kr/p/pQAF3p

Hooray for intriguing birds!!

Beverly Hallberg
Subject: seawatch gull counts
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:58:18 -0700
Diane and I definitely shorted our gull counts, partly because at the Florence 
jetties with a west wind, half or more of the gull movement is not across the 
jetties at all, it is along the bluff face a quarter-mile east - behind the 
observers. I suspect that there is a good updraft there. Thousands of Cals 
moved along there all day but even a wily old bureaucrat like me can't watch in 
two directions at once. 

.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




On Oct 27, 2014, at 4:51 PM, Phil Pickering wrote:

> -----Original Message----- From: Alan Contreras 
>> There is also the matter of Interesting Distractions.  
> 
> 
> For me 30k distant Cassin's Auklets is an Interesting Distraction
> from birds moving next to shore : )  Not surprising if my report
> shorted things like WW Scoters and Dave's reflects those
> more accurately, given his focus was closer in.
> 
> My loon and gull numbers may also be a bit short, although
> I would add that in my humble estimation based on
> periodic timed counts it's unlikely there were as many
> as 80k loons or 100k total gulls in view in 4 hours.
> 
> Cheers, Phil
> 
> 
> 
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> 
> 
Subject: Re: Boiler Bay State Wayside, Oct 26, 2014 -- Our eBird report and some commentary
From: "Phil Pickering" <philliplc AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:51:06 -0700
-----Original Message----- 
From: Alan Contreras 

>There is also the matter of Interesting Distractions.  


For me 30k distant Cassin's Auklets is an Interesting Distraction
from birds moving next to shore : )  Not surprising if my report
shorted things like WW Scoters and Dave's reflects those
more accurately, given his focus was closer in.

My loon and gull numbers may also be a bit short, although
I would add that in my humble estimation based on
periodic timed counts it's unlikely there were as many
as 80k loons or 100k total gulls in view in 4 hours.

Cheers, Phil



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Subject: JoCo Copeland ponds
From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman AT budget.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:45:40 -0700
Thanks Russ for posting the SURF SCOTER find at Copeland's ponds today 
(10-27-2014). They were still present (and resting nicely) at about 2:00 pm. 
One SAY'S PHOEBE on a small building in the pond area, which was busy 
attempting to chase off a BLACK PHOEBE and several YELLOW-RUMP WARBLERS. Four 
BONAPARTE'S GULLS were also present on the pond. 


Found a BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER at Fish Hatchery County Park this morning. 
Not my latest, but hanging in late none the less. 


Dennis (north of Grants Pass)
Subject: Hayden Island Scoters
From: Philip Kline <pgeorgekline AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:08:19 -0700
The Surf Scoters off Columbia Point were still there this afternoon.  I
counted 12, including 2 adult males.  The two males were off by themselves
and the rest were part of a large raft of about 75 Western Grebes (didn't
see any Clark's) and other duck species.

I also saw what I think is the same Scoter identified yesterday as a Black
Scoter.  I too would have observed this bird and left thinking I had seen a
Black Scoter, but I'm fairly sure I saw the same bird.  I uploaded a very
poor photo to the checklist linked below.  When I first arrived there were
9 female/1st-winter type Surf Scoters with the Grebe raft and all looked
pretty typical with blocky head shape and typical pattern with darker
feathers splitting the light patch into two.  Later, these birds had flown
off and there was just the mystery Scoter with the raft.  It did appear to
be fairly round-headed in profile and more compact than the Surf Scoters I
had seen earlier, but I had no other scoters to compare it to at the time.
The bill looked fairly narrow and shallow-based and made a distinct angle
with the forehead.  A very confusing bird and I would love to see more
photos of it if it sticks around or if anyone got better photos yesterday.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20355675

Philip Kline
Subject: probable "Vega" flavor Herring Gull, Newport
From: "Wayne Hoffman" <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 15:51:47 -0700
Hi -

 

About 2:30 today, Oct. 27 I encountered a probable "Vega" Gull at the
Yaquina Bay South Jetty gull spot.

 

The bird was an adult, and was initially with a typical American Herring
Gull.

 

I first noticed that the mantle was a share darker than that of the adjacent
bird, but still a bit paler than the nearby California Gulls.

 

The eye was also darker than the clear yellow of American Herring Gull
adults.

 

On close examination, the iris was yellow, but with large dark brown spots.
The eye ring was also dark, with some pinkish tint.

 

After photographing the standing bird I flushed it and got photos of the
wing surfaces as it landed a short distance away.  The bird has not
completed molt:  PRIMARIES 1-8 are new, 9 is growing, and 10 is retained old
feather.  

 

The upper surface e of the spread wing shows the "string of pearls" pattern
of Vega and Slaty-backed Gulls, although the "pearls" are not quite as white
as I expected.

 

The head was basically white, with only minor winter streaking.  [This is
apparently atypical of winter Vega, but the bird has not finished molt, so
more streaking may develop.]

 

Distinction from Thayer's Gull:  This was a large, robust bird with a bright
yellow-orange bill, too heavy for Thayer's.  Mantle shade was pale for
Thayer's; bird had more black in wingtips than typical Thayer's.  Head size
and shape more like Herring Gull - large with lower forehead, not the
rounded head of Thayer's.

 

Distinction from Slaty-backed Gull:  Mantle way too pale, iris and eyering
colors wrong.

 

Distinction from various Herring Gull hybrids:  Fully black wingtips wrong
for Herring X Glaucous,  Herring X Glaucous-winged, or any other
Glaucous-winged combinations.

 

Photos available on request.

 

 

 

Wayne

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Fat finger continuation
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 15:35:49 -0700
Hate the keypad on my phone. 

There was a flock Aleutian Cackling Geese at the Sheridan STP on Sunday 26 Oct. 
These were my first certain Aleutians in the Willamette Valley. 


Dave Irons

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Flock of Aleutian Cackling Geese at Sheridan STP on Sunday
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 15:32:57 -0700
On the way home from
The coast yesterday, Shawneen an I made a quick stop at the Sheridan sewage 
ponds to look for storm waifs. We saw the same two Red-necked Phalaropes 
reported by Stefan Schlick, but otherwise it was the usual suspects on the main 
ponds. The was a mixed flock of white-cheeked in the low grassy area behind the 
public fishing pond that included Dusky Canada Geese, Ridgway's Cackling Geese 
and birds that best fit Taverner's Cackling Goose. Additionally there a small 
sub-group of Cacklers that were of th 


Sent from my iPhone

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