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Updated on Wednesday, December 7 at 05:09 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Cliffchat,©Tony Disley

7 Dec Central Park Reservoir [Patricia Pollock ]
7 Dec Re:[SINaturaList] Dickcissel [Mike ]
7 Dec Kings Ash-throated Flycatcher YES [Sean Sime ]
6 Dec Pine Siskin/Barred Owl/Boreal Chickadee/Black-backed Woodpecker/Gray Jay, etc. [Joan Collins ]
6 Dec Re: Kings Ash-throated update [Juan Salas ]
06 Dec Re: Kings Ash-throated update [Paige Linden ]
6 Dec Kings Ash-throated update [Sean Sime ]
6 Dec Western Tanager YES - City Hall Park (Manhattan) [Karen Fung ]
6 Dec Kings County Ash-throated Flycatcher [Sean Sime ]
5 Dec Western Tanager, lower Manhattan NYC 12/5 (Monday) [Thomas Fiore ]
5 Dec Kumlien's/Thayer's Queens Co. [Andrew Baksh ]
5 Dec Rufous Hummingbird at Aquebogue [robert adamo ]
5 Dec Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
5 Dec Ash-throated Flycatcher at the Salt Marsh Nature center in Brooklyn, NY. [Juan Salas ]
5 Dec CBC starts in just NINE DAYS! ["Carena Pooth" ]
5 Dec ebird report of Ash-throated Flycatcher at Marine Park, Brooklyn 12.05.16 [Heydi Lopes ]
4 Dec eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists [Ben Cacace ]
4 Dec Central Park NYC - Sunday Dec., 4, 2016 - Ring-necked Duck, Pied-billed Grebe, etc. [Deborah Allen ]
4 Dec Re: Cupsogue to Dune Road, LI: [Mike ]
4 Dec Re: Ash-throated Flycatcher, Lido Beach Park West [John Mora ]
4 Dec South Fork LI: Pacific Loon off Montauk Point [Angus Wilson ]
4 Dec re; Bryant Park [Alan Drogin ]
4 Dec Pink footed Goose [Curt McDermott ]
4 Dec Barnacle Goose - Riverhead (Suffolk) [Derek Rogers ]
4 Dec Re: Western Tanager, lower Manhattan, NYC 12/4 (Sunday) [Carole Griffiths ]
4 Dec Harbor feeding flock [Michael Britt ]
4 Dec Brooklyn/Staten Island harbor feeding flock alert [Michael Britt ]
4 Dec Ash-throated Flycatcher, Lido Beach Park West [Queensgirl30 ]
4 Dec Western Tanager, lower Manhattan, NYC 12/4 (Sunday) [Tom Fiore ]
3 Dec 2nd Hummingbird at Aquebogue feeder [robert adamo ]
3 Dec Addendum to previous post [robert adamo ]
3 Dec Western Tanager still at City Hall Park, etc. [Deborah Allen ]
3 Dec Pt. Lookout ["syschiff" ]
3 Dec Eared Grebe - Copake Lake, Columbia County [Will Raup ]
3 Dec Re: Cave swallow Nassau county [Tim Healy ]
3 Dec Black-legged Kittiwake on Staten Island [isaac grant ]
2 Dec W. Tanager, Manhattan, NYC 12/2 - Friday [Thomas Fiore ]
3 Dec Cliff/cave swallow Nassau county [Dennis Hrehowsik ]
30 Nov RE: St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species [Rick ]
2 Dec Pink-footed Geese, 2 se NYS counties 12/2 (Orange, Nassau) [Thomas Fiore ]
3 Dec re:Bryant Park [Thomas Fiore ]
3 Dec Bryant Park [Alan Drogin ]
2 Dec Jones Beach West End ["syschiff" ]
2 Dec 2016 Christmas Bird Count - Central Park & NJ Lower Hudson [Debra Kriensky ]
2 Dec Trinity Church: Yellow-breasted Chat [Ben Cacace ]
2 Dec Cackling Goose []
2 Dec Yes - Rufous Hummingbird- Aquebogue, Suffolk [Eileen Schwinn ]
2 Dec Pink-sided Junco - Hamlin Beach SP - Thursday [Willie D'Anna ]
1 Dec Chores can convert to contentment ! [robert adamo ]
1 Dec Bronx Westchester Christmas Bird Count 2016 [Andrew Baksh ]
1 Dec NYC Area RBA: 1 December 2016 [Ben Cacace ]
1 Dec Re: The NYSBirds List []
1 Dec Re: The NYSBirds List [Andrew Baksh ]
1 Dec Western Tanager- yes [Jack Rothman ]
1 Dec Trinity Church: Yellow-breasted Chat [Ben Cacace ]
30 Nov Re: ? selasphorus sp. hummingbird (Rufous or Allen's) [robert adamo ]
30 Nov Re: St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species [Phil Jeffrey ]
1 Dec RE:The NYSBirds List ["McIntyre, Annie (PARKS)" ]
1 Dec RE:The NYSBirds List [Larry Trachtenberg ]
30 Nov Re: Netiquette & Western Tanager report fatigue [Andrew Baksh ]
30 Nov RE: St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species [Paul R Sweet ]
30 Nov Re: St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species []
1 Dec The NYSBirds List [Shaibal Mitra ]
30 Nov Re: St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species [Dominic Garcia-Hall ]
30 Nov Re: St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species [Phil Jeffrey ]
30 Nov St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species [Deborah Allen ]
30 Nov Re: Netiquette & Western Tanager report fatigue [David Barrett ]
30 Nov NYS eBird Hotspots: BirdTrax Up & Running [Ben Cacace ]
30 Nov Western Tanager, lower Manhattan NYC, 11/30 [Thomas Fiore ]
30 Nov Re: Western Tanager city hall pk Manhattan YES [Paul R Sweet ]
30 Nov Re: Netiquette & Western Tanager report fatigue [Lloyd Spitalnik ]
1 Dec Re: The NYSBirds List [Mike ]
29 Nov Upcoming Brooklyn Pelagic on Jan. 7 [Paul Guris ]
29 Nov eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists [Ben Cacace ]
29 Nov NYS eBird Hotspots: State, Counties & Locations Updated (Dec/'16) [Ben Cacace ]
29 Nov Re: Western Tanager city hall pk Manhattan YES [Deborah Allen ]

Subject: Central Park Reservoir
From: Patricia Pollock <ppoll9870 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 21:58:29 +0000 (UTC)
Mon. & Tues., 12/5 & 12/6Pat Pollock
Pied-billed Grebe NE section both daysMon.:  4 Gadwalls, 7 American Coots,pr. 
Hooded Mergansers, many Ruddies (75 or so?); many Canada Geese (50?), didn't 
see any Northern Shovelersflock of Titmice & 1 White-breasted Nuthatch, 2 
Red-tailed Hawks east side & west, Mallords growing # on Tues. (50?) 

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Subject: Re:[SINaturaList] Dickcissel
From: Mike <falecore AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 16:06:59 -0500
Flock of four Red Crossbills flew in to the pines at Midland Beach on Staten 
Island at terminus of Father Capodanno Blvd. Found by Catherine Barron. 
Coordinates N 40.5674 W -74.0923 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 7, 2016, at 12:02 PM, Seth Wollney seth.wollney AT yahoo.com 
[SINaturaList]  wrote: 

> 
> The dickcissel and pine warbler were seen around 10:30am with a flock of 
junco/tree sparrows at Midland Beach. They were between the walkway and Parking 
lot near Midland Ave and Ft Cap 

> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> __._,_.___
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--
Subject: Kings Ash-throated Flycatcher YES
From: Sean Sime <sean AT seansime.com>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 14:19:15 -0500
I just saw a tweet from Karen O'hearn that the Ash-throated Flycatcher at
Marine Park in Brooklyn is currently being seen in the weedy field just
south of the two baseball fields.
The main entrance is on Avenue U just east of Burnett. Park in the parking
lot on the north side of Avenue U.

Good birding,

Sean Sime
Brooklyn, NY

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Subject: Pine Siskin/Barred Owl/Boreal Chickadee/Black-backed Woodpecker/Gray Jay, etc.
From: Joan Collins <joan.collins AT frontier.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2016 19:29:29 -0500
Just a few notes from the summer/fall before recent sightings:

 

Red and White-winged Crossbills that nested over the winter lingered into
July.  Bruce Dudek and I observed a female White-winged Crossbill perched at
a marsh in Newcomb on June 24th, and I continued to occasionally hear this
species at Sabattis Bog (where they nested during the winter).  The only
unusual report is that Black-billed Cuckoos appeared to nest in a widespread
area across the Adirondacks (many areas in Essex and Hamilton Counties).  On
Aug. 4, I found a family group of Black-billed Cuckoos outside our house in
Long Lake.  It certainly appears this species is becoming more common in the
Adirondacks.  (Also unusual, many waterfowl species nested early - including
reports of Wood Duck young in April!  Many Common Loons nested a month
early.  It was a mild winter followed by very early ice-out on the lakes.
Hairy Woodpeckers appeared to nest 1 to 2 weeks earlier than usual also.)

 

After completing my annual Mountain Birdwatch survey on Whiteface Mountain
on June 30, 2016, I stopped at a Black-backed Woodpecker nest site I'd been
observing for two months in the Town of St. Armand.  The solo baby - a
female - had just fledged and was on a tree adjacent to the nest tree!  The
nest hole was only 3.5 feet off the ground so I worried it would be
predated.  I observed her for 2 hours being fed non-stop by the adult male.
She stayed in the same tree the entire time and called relentlessly!  I used
my scope and iPhone attachment to take photos and videos.  I posted a video
today on my Facebook page.

 

I posted lists of species from trips during May, June, July, Aug., and Sept.
on my website at:

 

May 2016:
http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/nesting-behavior/may-2016-tours-sp
ecies-lists

June 2016:
http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/nesting-behavior/june-2016-tours-s
pecies-lists

July 2016:
http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/nesting-behavior/july-2016-tours-s
pecies-lists

August 2016:
http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/nesting-behavior/august-2016-tours
-species-lists

September 2016:
http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/nesting-behavior/september-2016-to
urs-species-lists

 

The trip on July 11 was particularly memorable.  Out with a couple from
North Carolina, we spent over 4 hours on the summit of Whiteface Mountain
observing many active Bicknell's Thrushes (4:30 - 8:30 a.m.).  It was
interesting to observe this species chase away a family of foraging Amer.
Robins.  During the night, we listened to a singing Black-billed Cuckoo, a
calling Amer. Woodcock and Common Loons at the Little Tupper Lake inlet
along Sabattis Circle Road.  At the Tupper Lake marsh, we heard a Virginia
Rail and several Wilson's Snipes.  Later in the morning, after descending
Whiteface Mountain, we found a foraging Black-billed Cuckoo along River Road
that we watched for about a half-hour - it would forage and then watch us -
and forage and then watch us - over and over - such a fascinating species!
We also observed a male and female Mourning Warbler carrying food for young.
And we found 4 Black-backed Woodpeckers, 14 Gray Jays, and 6 Boreal
Chickadees.  It was a lovely day.

 

I also posted links to my ROOST (Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism)
blogs by year (2014, 2015, and 2016):

 

2016:
http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/boreal-birds/links-to-joans-2016-r
oost-blogs

2015:
http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/boreal-birds/links-to-joans-2015-r
oost-blogs

2014:
http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/boreal-birds/links-to-joans-2014-r
oost-blogs

 

The most recent blog is about a canoe trip on Fishing Brook in September,
which just opened to the public this summer ("Fishing Brook Bog" will open
in the summer of 2017).  It has beautiful boreal habitat and I found 2
Black-backed Woodpeckers and Rusty Blackbirds during the trip.  I also spent
a long time with the largest Snapping Turtle I've ever found!  (photos in
the blog)

 

Recent sightings (large lakes are not yet frozen, but we continue to have a
snow-cover):

 

Evening Grosbeaks and Pine Siskins continue to move around.  Many people in
Long Lake have reported Evening Grosbeaks showing up for a day or two at
their feeders and then disappearing.  We had Evening Grosbeaks show up
outside our house on Oct. 27, but we still had Black Bears around, so our
feeders were not up yet.  I observed flocks in Newcomb on several occasions
in Oct. and Nov., but I haven't observed any recently.  Gray Tree Frogs
called into November and I've been observing Springtails ("Snow Fleas") for
the past month!

 

12/6/16 Long Lake (Hamilton Co.)

Black-backed Woodpecker - Rt. 30 Long Lake

Gray Jay - 7 (2 Rt. 30, 3 Round Lake Trailhead on Sabattis Circle Road, and
2 at Sabattis Bog)  I often bring food to a pair of Gray Jays along Route 30
in Long Lake.  Two months ago, something happened to one and only one bird
was showing up - today, a new Gray Jay followed it in!  It was not a "tame"
bird and didn't come down for the food until I got into my car.  The tame
bird was quite vocal!  I'm glad it found a new mate.

 

A Muskrat was feeding on edge-ice on Little Tupper Lake.  I am regularly
seeing 3.

 

12/5/16 Long Lake

Pine Siskin - we continue to have one at our feeders.

 

12/4/16 Long Lake and Tupper Lake (Franklin Co.)

Ring-necked Duck - 11 on Tupper Lake

Hooded Merganser - 2 on Tupper Lake and 7 on Little Tupper Lake

Barred Owl - hunting along Sabattis Circle Road by the Round Lake Trail

Black-backed Woodpecker - 2 (1 along Route 30 and 1 at the Round Lake Trail)

Gray Jay - 7

Boreal Chickadee - 2 along Route 30

 

And one River Otter, and two Muskrats on Little Tupper Lake.

 

12/2/16 Long Lake, Newcomb, and Minerva (Essex Co.)

Gray Jay - 9 (6 in Long Lake locations, and 3 in Minerva by the snowmobile
trail - one came to my hand for food so someone must be feeding them!)

Boreal Chickadee - flock of 5 along the snowmobile trail in Minerva

Pine Siskin - flyover flock in Minerva

Golden-crowned Kinglets and Brown Creepers are around, but there are very
few Red-breasted Nuthatches.

 

Two River Otters and one Beaver were observed by the Hudson River in
Newcomb.

 

11/30/16 Long Lake

A Barred Owl vocalized near the baby monitor we have set up to bring in the
outside sounds - it blasted me out of bed!  I ran into 2 birders from
Sullivan Co. at Sabattis Bog - we fed Gray Jays and they mentioned they were
hoping to see a Black-backed Woodpecker.  A few minutes later, I heard a
Black-backed Woodpecker calling and we were able to observe it (a male).
They headed on to Saranac Lake and I continued to watch the woodpecker for
another hour.

 

On my drive home, I observed an adult Golden Eagle heading south along Route
30 in Long Lake.

 

11/27-28/16 Northern Jefferson Co. (Cape Vincent, Pt. Peninsula, and Pillar
Pt.)

Ann Spencer and I met in northern Jefferson Co. at sunset on 11/27.  We were
hoping to see Short-eared Owls, but we didn't find any.  Although, we did
see a distant silhouette of an owl - likely a Great Horned.  We stayed at
the Duck Away Motel in Chaumont.  Here are some of the species found on
11/28/16:

 

Tundra Swan ~150 off Pt. Peninsula

Wood Duck

Gadwall - 1

Long-tailed Duck

Bufflehead

Hooded Merganser

Red-breasted Merganser

Wild Turkey

Common Loon - many off the end of Pillar Point

Pied-billed Grebe - 1 near Pt. Peninsula

Double-crested Cormorant - 2

Northern Harrier - 1 male

Red-tailed Hawk - 8

Rough-legged Hawk - 5 (1 dark morph)

Herring Gull

Great Black-backed Gull

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Amer. Kestrel - 2

Peregrine Falcon - 1

Northern Shrike - 1 actively hunting bird on Pt. Peninsula; The bird was
very close to us and appeared so intent on hunting that it completely
ignored us.

Cedar Waxwing - I drove a loop around Pillar Pt. in the afternoon and found
flocks of Cedar Waxwings everywhere I stopped - they were eating Buckthorn
berries.  There were hundreds!

Snow Bunting - many flocks

 

We heard several Coyotes packs howling on 11/27 and observed a Porcupine on
Pt. Peninsula on 11/28.

 

Lots of other sightings, but I'll just list a couple of notable
observations:

 

11/22/16 Long Lake

Midday, a huge Black Bear was standing up in deep snow at the edge of
Sabattis Circle Road scratching a telephone pole!

 

11/18/16

David Buckley and I drove a large circle to the St. Lawrence Valley (up to
Massena) and over to Malone (to see the remarkable Snow Goose spectacle at
Rotary Lake at sunset).  (Lots of waterfowl species on the trip.)  Sadly, we
found a dead Barred Owl in the road by Waddington - it was 11:30 a.m. and it
was still warm, so it must have just been hit.  Things don't look good again
this winter for raptors with little prey.  We found a huge Amer. Toad in the
road by Hawkins Point in Massena!  (We stopped and coaxed it off the road
before it was hit.)  We observed thousands of Snow Geese in Malone - in
several huge waves as they came in at sunset to Rotary Lake.  The sound was
deafening as they flew over us.  Eileen and Tom Wheeler, and Mary Beth and
Bill Warburton were also at Rotary Lake that night to see the Snow Geese.

 

10/31/16 Halloween on Sabattis Circle Road!

I ran into Alan Belford on Sabattis Circle Road at the Little Tupper Lake
inlet area and we observed 23 Bohemian Waxwings, 1 Golden Eagle, 1
Red-shouldered Hawk, Gray Jays, and a river of migrating Amer. Crows flowing
by.

 

I'll be catching up on Facebook this month with photos going back to June.
We have been feeding 40 to 50 Wild Turkeys (this species fared very well
with another mild winter) - we continued to feed them over the summer.  The
cracked corn attracted a remarkable cast of mammal characters.  In late
August, a female Black Bear showed up with triplets that were just a bit
bigger in size than a house cat!  On 3 occasions, an Eastern Coyote showed
up with 2 Raccoons and they ate the corn side by side!  And a beautiful Gray
Fox showed up several times.  It was a fascinating summer/fall!

 

Joan Collins

President, NYS Ornithological Association

Editor, New York Birders

Long Lake, NY

(315) 244-7127 cell       

(518) 624-5528 home

http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/  

http://www.facebook.com/AdirondackAvian

 

 

 

 


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--
Subject: Re: Kings Ash-throated update
From: Juan Salas <juansalasprieto1971 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2016 12:35:14 -0500
I have uploaded two photos of the bird here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/23604521 AT N00/31464700335/in/datetaken-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/23604521 AT N00/31318858662/in/datetaken-public/
Good to know that it is staying around. I hope more people will be able to
see it.
Best,
Juan

On Tue, Dec 6, 2016 at 12:10 PM, Paige Linden  wrote:

> The bird is back in the tree with the nesting boxes. Showing well now.
>
> Good luck!
>
> Paige
>
>
> On Tue, Dec 6, 2016 at 11:56 AM Sean Sime  wrote:
>
>> The bird moved from the previously reported location at Marine Park and
>> had been moving south along the tree line that borders the golf course when
>> we lost sight of it.
>>
>> It often spends a lot of time not moving and stays very low to the ground
>> and can be easily overlooked.
>>
>> It was not in view when I left at 11:30.
>>
>>
>>
>> Good luck if you go!
>>
>>
>>
>> Sean Sime,
>>
>> Brooklyn, NY
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>>
>> NYSbirds-L List Info:
>>
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
>>
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>>
>>
>>
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>>
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>>
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>>
>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html
>>
>>
>>
>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>>
>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>>
>>
>>
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>>
>>
>>
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--
Subject: Re: Kings Ash-throated update
From: Paige Linden <pmlinden AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 06 Dec 2016 17:10:59 +0000
The bird is back in the tree with the nesting boxes. Showing well now.

Good luck!

Paige


On Tue, Dec 6, 2016 at 11:56 AM Sean Sime  wrote:

> The bird moved from the previously reported location at Marine Park and
> had been moving south along the tree line that borders the golf course when
> we lost sight of it.
>
> It often spends a lot of time not moving and stays very low to the ground
> and can be easily overlooked.
>
> It was not in view when I left at 11:30.
>
>
>
> Good luck if you go!
>
>
>
> Sean Sime,
>
> Brooklyn, NY
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> --
>
>
>
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
>
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
>
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>
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>
>
>
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>
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>
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>
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html
>
>
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>
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>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
>

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Subject: Kings Ash-throated update
From: Sean Sime <sean AT seansime.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2016 11:56:17 -0500
The bird moved from the previously reported location at Marine Park and had 
been moving south along the tree line that borders the golf course when we lost 
sight of it. 

It often spends a lot of time not moving and stays very low to the ground and 
can be easily overlooked. 

It was not in view when I left at 11:30. 

Good luck if you go!

Sean Sime, 
Brooklyn, NY

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Western Tanager YES - City Hall Park (Manhattan)
From: Karen Fung <easternbluebird AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2016 10:47:26 -0500
Continues in NE sector on EW path, high in tree between the two buildings as of 
10:40am 


----

Karen Fung
NYC


Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: Kings County Ash-throated Flycatcher
From: Sean Sime <sean AT seansime.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2016 10:15:43 -0500
The previously reported Ash-throated Flycatcher is currently being viewed at 
Marine Park in Brooklyn. 

Originally found by Juan Salas and subsequently stalked by Bobbi Manion.
It is frequenting the small stand of trees on the eastern side of the main loop 
trail (the trees with the owl boxes). 

 
Good birding, 
Sean Sime
Brooklyn, NY

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Subject: Western Tanager, lower Manhattan NYC 12/5 (Monday)
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 21:45:22 -0500
Monday, 5 December, 2016 -
City Hall Park, lower Manhattan, New York City

A Western Tanager continued at above park, this Monday.  It might be  
added that some who are coming to see this bird have not seen it  
before, and a fair number of those who have come to see - including  
today, 12/5 - have noted that it was a new or "life" bird for them.

The tanager seems fond of the trees (may be high in taller trees much  
of time!) in the part of the park that's between the 2 biggest  
buildings with-IN the park, or just to the east of that area, seen  
from main east-west path IN the park. The bird can be vocal - calling,  
not singing! A cross-street just to the west off of Broadway is Warren  
Street - this street is across from the aforementioned "tanager" path- 
to-east.  Subway service is easy to get to & from here, many of the  
subway lines are very nearby this modest park.

At least 4 Warbler species are lingering at City Hall Park - most  
uncommon at this date, a Black-throated Blue (male, seen with & near  
the tanager today), and (at least one remaining) Yellow-breasted Chat,  
Ovenbird, as well as male Common Yellowthroat[s].  Sparrows of at  
least 5 species (& excluding 'introduced' House) were present at City  
Hall park, as of Sunday.

City Hall Park is located south of Chambers Street, lower Manhattan -  
to the east of Broadway - it is also at the foot of the Brooklyn  
Bridge, & a few yards from the main pedestrian path to that bridge.   
The area the Tanager seems to be favoring is between the 2 major  
buildings IN the park, on / near an east-west path, be looking-up and  
listen for the distinctive calls from the tanager.  There were still a  
few Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers in the park, but fewer than had been, 10  
days prior. (If the tanager gets to a point where it is fully-reliant  
on sapsucker-flows, it may be in dire shape, based on a previous  
Manhattan December-tanager outcome which I am very familiar with.)
-   -   -   -   -
A Blue-gray Gnatcatcher I found at Randall's Island (Manhattan, in  
East River) one week ago on Monday 11/28 & reported here, which I  
photographed at the time, was seen again in the same patch of  
vegetation on Sunday 12/4 by Jason Gregg - this is an increasingly- 
late date for this species, but has been documented in December in NY  
before, albeit rather rarely. (An eBird report of the 11/28 sighting  
by David Barrett, who joined me in the initial observation, has his as  
well as my photo[s] of this bird.)

Thanks to all who give updates on current status of these & other  
uncommon or rare species - even when many may have seen them initially  
ahead of their now-ain't-then 'sell-by' date.

- - - - - - - -
A citizens basic responsibility is to be aware of the consequences of  
his or her acts.

"They tried to bury us. They didn't know we were seeds." - DeRay  
Mckesson, American activist & writer.

- - - - - - - - -
good birding,

Tom Fiore,
Manhattan


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Subject: Kumlien's/Thayer's Queens Co.
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 18:34:35 -0500
Yesterday, during one of my all day Gulling excursions in coastal Queens, I 
came across a Gull (near 84th st. Rockaway Beach) that at this time could only 
be considered a "Thumlien's" meaning (for me) it appears to show traits 
consistent with both. 


My first impression was this was an odd looking 1st Cycle Kumlien's Gull. In 
studying this bird, I thought features like the solidly dark-centered tertials 
looked more in line for Thayer's. To a lesser extent the scapulars and 
primaries were also (in my opinion) within the range of Thayer's. Although not 
as dark as I would have liked, the primary tips showed a narrow evenly whitish 
edging, consistent with Thayerish types. 


The tail pattern was the most intriguing. The fine patterning was very odd 
looking. A couple very of sharp minded Larophiles have looked at the few 
digiscope shots I shared and are at an impasse at what this Gull might be. 
Suggestions have ranged from Thayer's, Thayer's/Kumlien's and even considering 
parentage outside Kumlieni/Glaucoides. 


I have yet to download photos and do more in depth research but wanted to share 
with you all in case some of you might be interested. Below are three images 
that I shared. The tail spread was a screen shot from my camera. It might be 
that this is yet another one of those that does not get a label. 


Enjoy! 

https://flic.kr/p/NEvvtP

https://flic.kr/p/NEvvuR

https://flic.kr/p/NEvvv2

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


LSwift as the wind
֡Quiet as the forest
Conquer like the fire
ɽSteady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Subject: Rufous Hummingbird at Aquebogue
From: robert adamo <radamo4691 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 17:50:18 -0500
I had single bird at feeder between ~ 1215 & 1320. Per owner, both hummers
seen earlier in AM, but not sure if she and/or another birder saw both
birds.

Of note, as I was leaving, a lone Turkey Vulture drifted over this most
productive of properties ! Could this, once again, be the elusive "Lonesome
George" ? Whenever I see a single T.V. on the North Fork (for at least the
last few years) I start to hum and then paraphrase a line from the "3 Penny
Opera"...'could it be old Georgie's back in town ?  '  Oh well....

Cheers,
Bob

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Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 22:35:08 +0000 (UTC)
*  New York*  Syracuse   
   - December 05, 2016
*  NYSY  12. 05.16 Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):November 28, 
2016 - December 05, 2016to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering 
upstate NY counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma 
Wetlands Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, 
Jefferson, Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortlandcompiled: December 05  AT 5 
p.m. (EST)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga Audubon Homepage: 
www.onondagaaudubon.org  Greetings: This is the Syracuse Rare Bird Alert for 
the week of November 28, 2015. 

Highlights--------------
RED-THROATED LOON CATTLE EGRETAMERICAN WHITE PELICANTUNDRA SWANTRUMPETER 
SWANNORTHERN GOSHAWKSANDHILL CRANEPURPLE SANDPIPERGLAUCOUS GULLNORTHERN 
SHRIKEMARSH WRENEVENING GROSBEAK 


Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex 
(MWC)----------- 

     Two CATTLE EGRETS remain in the area as of today. They have been seen 
on East Tyre Road with horses and not at Goose Haven.     11/30: 53 TUNDRA 
SWANS were seen in the mucklands along Rt. 31 just west of the Seneca River. 2 
MARSH WRENS remain along the Wildlife Trail.     12/2: 4 TRUMPETER SWANS 
were seen in the Armitage Road fields. 6 SANDHILL CRANES were seen from East 
Road, substantially fewer than numbers of a few weeks ago. 


Cayuga County------------
     11/30: An EVENING GROSBEAK was noted from Fair Haven State Park. An 
(the) AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN was seen at Fair Haven State Park for the second 
time in recent weeks. It was seen again on December 1. It then (assuming it is 
the same bird) showed up at the south end of Cayuga Lake for two days and was 
seen drifting south at the end of Sunday.      12/1: A GLAUCOUS GULL and a 
RED-THROATED LOON were reported at Fair Haven State Park.     12/4: A PURPLE 
SANDPIPER has returned to Fair Haven State Park. It was seen at it’s usual 
place at the end of the east break wall and on the south side. It was reported 
again today. 


Onondaga County------------
     12/3: A FISH CROW was seen at the farm on Vincent Corners Road in 
Fabius.     12/5: A NORTHERN SHRIKE was seen at Three Rivers WMA north of 
Baldwinsville. It was near the duck blind on Smokey Hollow Road, the same 
location where one was seen for several weeks last year, 


Madison County------------
     12/3: 2 SANDHILL CRANES remain at an onion farm on Gee Road north of 
Chittenango. An EVENING GROSBEAK was seen at a feeder on Carpenter Road in 
Sheds. This has been one of the only consistent places to find these birds in 
the last few years. 


Oneida county------------
     11/30: A NORTHERN GOSHAWK was seen on Town Line Road west of Rt. 
26.     12/4: An EVENING FGROSBEAK was seen at Spring Farms Nature Sanctuary 
south of Clinton. A RED-THROATED LOON was seen at Sylvan Beach on Oneida Lake. 



    
--end report 
    
Joseph BrinRegion 5Baldwinsville, NY 13027  U.S.A.  
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Subject: Ash-throated Flycatcher at the Salt Marsh Nature center in Brooklyn, NY.
From: Juan Salas <juansalasprieto1971 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 16:14:25 -0500
This morning at 0945 on the southwestern corner of the ballfields, where
the trail that runs at the back of the fields joins the trail that starts
on Avenue U and 36th Street.
I am reporting here as it seems to be still the best way to let as many
people as possible about a rarity.
Full list of birds seen this morning.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32876670
Juan Salas

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Subject: CBC starts in just NINE DAYS!
From: "Carena Pooth" <carena AT prodigy.net>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 15:23:13 -0500
Hello CBC Coordinators! 

 

CBC season starts in NINE DAYS!

 

Availability of accurate CBC schedule information can help you get as many
volunteers involved in your count as possible, so we are once again updating
the online CBC calendar on the NYSOA website. This is separate from the
Audubon CBC calendar.

 

Thanks to those of you who have already provided information for your
counts.

 

If you haven't sent us your information yet, please reply to this email with
the following: 
   (Alternatively, you can fill out the form on the NYSOA website at any
time - go to  
http://www.nybirds.org/ProjCBC.htm.)  

 

Name of CBC circle     

4-letter ID of CBC circle    

CBC date  

Contact Name  

Contact email  

Contact phone number  

 

Your information will be posted as soon as I get it (unless birds get in the
way for a few hours). Thanks!

 

Carena Pooth

New York State Ornithological Association (NYSOA)

www.nybirds.org  

www.nysyoungbirders.org  

 


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Subject: ebird report of Ash-throated Flycatcher at Marine Park, Brooklyn 12.05.16
From: Heydi Lopes <kiskadee20 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 15:05:54 -0500
There is an e-bird report (via ebird alerts) from this morning,12/5/16, of
an Ash-throated flycatcher at Marine Park in Brooklyn.  Bobbi Manian is
there now and briefly saw a Myiarchus flycatcher but was not able to get a
good enough look to ID it before it disappeared from her view.

Just putting this out there if anyone wants to go look, as the bird may
still be in the area.  The area that the bird was seen in can be accessed
from corner of East 38th street and Avenue U.

Link to ebird report below:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32876670

Best regards,
Heydi Lopes
Brooklyn, NY


 


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Subject: eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 20:19:15 -0500
When working on the NYS eBird Hotspots wiki I compare the previous bar
chart list of species with the current one to pick up any additions or
deletions. By going to each county's 'Overview' page you can determine the
date the species was added for each county. Some are from newly submitted
checklists from several months/years ago.

On the 'Overview' page you can sort on 'First Seen' but if the species
wasn't added recently it won't appear at the top of the list.

For each county on the wiki click the 'Overview' link on the 'Explore a
Location' line:
— http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York

Yellow highlights a species added for the first time this year.

*Columbia County: *
Eared Grebe (30-Nov-2016)

-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots

Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots


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Subject: Central Park NYC - Sunday Dec., 4, 2016 - Ring-necked Duck, Pied-billed Grebe, etc.
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 19:36:13 -0500
Central Park NYC 
Sunday Dec., 4, 2016
OBS: Deborah Allen, m.ob. on bird walk starting from the Boathouse at 9:30am.


Highlights: Ring-necked Duck, Pied-billed Grebe, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Fox 
Sparrows, Cooper's Hawk(s). Thanks to Alli Maxfield-Carmichael, Andrea Hessel, 
MD, Karen Evans, and Sandra Critelli for spotting many of today's birds. 


Canada Goose - more than 100 mostly Reservoir
Wood Duck - 2 females & 1 male (west side of the Point)
Gadwall - 2 or 3 Harlem Meer (after walk)
American Black Duck - Meer (after walk)
Northern Shoveler - 8 Reservoir (during walk), plus at least 30 Harlem Meer 
(after walk) 

Ring-necked Duck - female continues at Harlem Meer (after walk)
Bufflehead - 4 (3 males & female) Reservoir
Hooded Merganser - 6 Turtle Pond, one or two more Reservoir
Ruddy Duck - at least 125 Reservoir, others on the Meer
Pied-billed Grebe - NE Reservoir (after walk)
American Coot - 10 Reservoir
Mourning Dove - residents
Ring-billed, Herring, and Great Black-backed Gulls - Reservoir
Cooper's Hawk - first-cycle male Evodia Field (another before the walk near 
Sparrow Rock) 

Red-tailed Hawk - 2 adults perched on west side building, other adults and 
immatures in flight 

Red-bellied Woodpecker - residents
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - Upper Lobe
Downy Woodpecker - residents
Blue Jay - residents
Black-capped Chickadee - more than 10
Tufted Titmouse - at least 20
White-breasted Nuthatch - 6
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - Evodia Field (Karen Evans)
American Robin - numbers lower, but still plenty
Northern Mockingbird - Conservatory Garden (after walk)
Cedar Waxwing - around 30 near Sparrow Rock
House Finch - several in Sweetgums in the Ramble
American Goldfinch - at least 20 in Sweetgums, other here & there
Song Sparrow - Reservoir & Boathouse parking lot
Fox Sparrow - 6 (1 Evodia Field, 1 near Gill Overlook, 2 Upper Lobe, 2 
Maintenance Field) 

White-throated Sparrow - many
Dark-eyed Junco - 2
Northern Cardinal - residents
Common Grackle - flyover flock of around 40 birds

Deb Allen

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Subject: Re: Cupsogue to Dune Road, LI:
From: Mike <mikec02 AT optonline.net>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 17:18:29 -0500
A first year Bald Eagle flew west past Cupsogue this morning. Among the very 
few other notables this morning was a dark phase Rough-legged Hawk hovering 
over the bay islands north of Cupsogue and two flocks of Snow Buntings, 
totaling about 90 birds, at Tiana Beach and south of the Ponquogue Bridge. 


Mike Cooper
Ridge, LI, NY

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Subject: Re: Ash-throated Flycatcher, Lido Beach Park West
From: John Mora <johnmmora AT optonline.net>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 16:29:28 -0500
Flycatcher was still in the same western area mid afternoon.

This bird is very flighty and is often hidden. Seen twice flying off the park 
inland to two pines beyond red storage hut adjacent to last large gravel 
parking lot. 


Northern oriole is still present as well as a flock of house finches and the 
scattered red breasted nuthatches in the pines. 


On the beach there were 10 dunlin mixed in with 25 sanderlings. Also seen was a 
tight knit group of a dozen horned grebes performing synchronized swimming and 
diving. Also present were a large number of red throated loons and fewer common 
loons, often five birds in the glass. One adult cormorant flew West far out 
likely double crested. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 4, 2016, at 9:36 AM, Queensgirl30  wrote:
> 
> Being seen now (9:39am) at far west end, in brushy area by snow fence, facing 
pink buildings. 

> 
> Donna Schulman
> Forest Hills NY
> 
> Sent from my wonder device
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> 


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Subject: South Fork LI: Pacific Loon off Montauk Point
From: Angus Wilson <oceanwanderers AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 14:58:13 -0500
At 1:16 PM a basic plumage PACIFIC LOON flew east past the bluffs at Camp
Hero SP (Suffolk Co.) and rounded the point passing out of view. A search
from several vantage points along the northside of the point failed to re
find the bird. There are a lot of Red-throated and Common Loons in the area
so care is needed. There was a report of a Pacific Loon from this location
a couple of weeks ago.

The only other bird of note at the Point was a single RAZORBILL working
it's way through the large scoter/eider flock. The RED-NECKED GREBE
continues on the southwest arm of Fort Pond Bay.

Angus Wilson
NYC & Springs

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Subject: re; Bryant Park
From: Alan Drogin <drogin AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 14:53:41 -0500
Sorry, Tom - was writing of squabbling sparrows - so don’t all rush to the 
already crowded Bryant Park just to see Common White-throated Sparrows. 


And you’re done the right thing in pointing out your Catbirds were 
“Grey”, less anyone think the US has been inundated with a rare influx of 
“Black" Catbirds which followed me home from my recent trip in the Yucatan 
(^: Like, you I also didn’t observe any Grey Catbirds in the beginning of the 
week - they appeared later - and still in numbers much lower than last year. 


Alan 


Subject: re: Bryant Park
From: Thomas Fiore >
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 07:55:00 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

hi Alan & all,

I think I know that you were referring to the (somewhat common-in- 
Manhattan's Bryant Park) White-throated Sparrows - but with the  
capitalized 'C' & 'W' you -perhaps very unintentionally!- listed a  
bird that is indeed common - Common Whitethroat (Sylvia communis) -  
but, it's common in Europe & some of northern Asia in summer moving to  
south Asia and Arabia, Africa in winter, & would be an "ultra-mega"- 
rarity in the North American or western hemisphere region;  this nys  
list is looked-at by birders from other areas too, so a few might be  
wondering in say, Ireland or Finland or even Greenland, 'wow do the  
yanks really get that bird over there in New York?' - &, as far as I  
know, we don't (but will see you & the ten-thousand-other birders in  
the nw corner of Bryant Pk., if it turns out that we do :-)

By the by, there seemed to be a modest up-tick in Gray Catbirds in  
Central Park (Manhattan, NYC) in the last few days, in selected spots,  
unless it was simply that a dozen or so had been present thru that  
larger park, & came to prominence with changes in weather, or for  
other reasons; I suspect new, modest, arrival of them from points  
north, however.  Thank you for your reporting, good to hear what's  
doing in that so-busy park that gets so many interesting birds thru a  
year.  Lincoln's  Sparrow is a darned-good December find in NY.
	 ---------
Date: 12/2/16 11:26 pm
From: Alan Drogin
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Bryant Park
This week I checked the birding action of Bryant Park for signs of  
scavenging among the food vendors in Bryant Park this winter.  
Unfortunately, the increase in booths, expanded ice rink deck eating  
area, and view-blocking two-story lounges, along with the larger  
crowds, have walled in/off many of the garden areas. That and the  
recent clearing of underbrush have rendered these areas nearly dead  
zones compared to years past where the birds had easy egress to hide  
after raiding the fallen crumbs left behind by hungry shoppers. Except  
for pigeons and fearless House Sparrows, most of the bird action has  
moved to the peripheral areas. There was a Hermit Thrush on the  
southern border and the typical Catbirds, although fewer in number at  
the northwest corner along with a Swamp Sparrow being bullied by the  
larger Common Whitethroats. A surprise was a Lincoln Sparrow skulking  
in the southwest corner, could be the same I’d seen in that area for a  
few weeks about a month ago.

Happy Birding,
Alan Drogin
- - - - -
good birding,
tom fiore -
manhattan

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Subject: Pink footed Goose
From: Curt McDermott <Tele-Tek AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 18:09:35 +0000
Hi All,

 The Pink footed Goose, previously found by Bruce Nott at the Camel Farm, was 
present this am on Turtle Bay Road off of Rt.12 in the Black dirt area of New 
Hampton. 



Good Birding,

                           Curt McDermott



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Subject: Barnacle Goose - Riverhead (Suffolk)
From: Derek Rogers <drogers0031 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 11:48:58 -0500
Just briefly picked out a single Barnacle Goose among a very large flock of 
roughly 6-7000 Canada Geese. The birds were feeding in the large farm field 
along the west side of CR-105, south of Northville Turnpike. Also present were 
2 Cackling Geese. 


Unfortunately a pick up truck drove out onto the field and kicked up the flock 
before I could get a full detail. 


The flock scattered in several directions but the majority appeared to head to 
the SW toward Merritts Pond. 


Best,
Derek Rogers
Sayville 
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Subject: Re: Western Tanager, lower Manhattan, NYC 12/4 (Sunday)
From: Carole Griffiths <Carole.Griffiths AT liu.edu>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 15:30:19 +0000
There now
________________________________
From: bounce-121054273-14379029 AT list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Tom Fiore 
 

Sent: Sunday, December 4, 2016 8:05:51 AM
To: nysbirds-L AT cornell.edu
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Western Tanager, lower Manhattan, NYC 12/4 (Sunday)

Sunday, 4 December, 2016 -
City Hall Park, lower Manhattan, New York City

Western Tanager continues at above park this morning - as do at least some of 
other most-recent species seen in the area such as a Yellow-breasted Chat, most 
regular in the Trinity Church cemetery, just down Broadway a few short blocks, 
on west side of that avenue. The "Chat #2" from near or in City Hall Park has 
not been seen yet by me this day, but a search will commence. Tanager seen & 
heard calling in the vicinity of the 'usual' areas, which is nearer the eastern 
faces of the 2 big buildings IN the park, & not far west of a prominent orange 
"detour" sign on the main east-west cross-path that is the path to be on for 
tanager-seekers. 


City Hall Park is located south of Chambers Street, lower Manhattan - to the 
east of Broadway - it is also at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge, & a few yards 
from the main pedestrian path to that bridge. The area the Tanager seems to be 
favoring is between the 2 major buildings IN the park, on / near an east-west 
path, be looking-up and listen for the distinctive call.s from the tanager. 


Other interesting birds may be in the general area too! Observers continued in 
numbers (as of 12/3) to see & seek the City Hall (and vicinity) birds. 


good birding,

Tom Fiore,
Manhattan

[sent from 100 meters distance of the park & the tanager; 7:20 - 7:55 am 
sightings.] 






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Subject: Harbor feeding flock
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 10:01:16 -0500
That should be "jaeger" and worth a look for that Kittiwake...

Mike Britt
Bayonne

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Subject: Brooklyn/Staten Island harbor feeding flock alert
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 09:59:20 -0500
As of 20 minutes ago, there was a large feeding flock (2000+) of large
gulls around the Robbin's Reef Lighthouse and Passaic Valley Sewerage
Commission outflow pipe. This area would be viewable from the Veteran's
Memorial Park area in Brooklyn or the Staten Island ferry area described by
Isaac Grant yesterday. Unfortunately for me in Bayonne, at the 9/11
Memorial at the end of the Ocean Terminal, I'm looking into the sun! If a
jaegar is within eyeshot of the Verrazano, it will undoubtedly be
attracted. Not sure how long the feeding will continue...

Mike Britt
Bayonne

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Subject: Ash-throated Flycatcher, Lido Beach Park West
From: Queensgirl30 <queensgirl30 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 09:36:35 -0500
Being seen now (9:39am) at far west end, in brushy area by snow fence, facing 
pink buildings. 


Donna Schulman
Forest Hills NY

Sent from my wonder device
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Subject: Western Tanager, lower Manhattan, NYC 12/4 (Sunday)
From: Tom Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 08:05:51 -0500




Subject: 2nd Hummingbird at Aquebogue feeder
From: robert adamo <radamo4691 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 20:49:57 -0500
This afternoon at ~ 4 PM, while looking at the now confirmed Rufous
Hummingbird (per Margaret B., homeowner, re: John S's confirming photo of
tail feathers) with her, she had a very quick snatch of a fleeting bird
whose "jizz" made her think "hummer". We now were on high alert, and it
didn't take very long for both birds to appear again, albeit a short, but
confirming view as to both being members of the family, *Trochildae *! We
were not able to confirm the newcomer's ID, during the approximately 10
times they came together near the feeder, or at the nearby wild flowers.
Almost all of these quick forays ended with one chasing the other away.
There was one instance however, that both birds seemed to land on the
feeder simultaneously, on opposite sides (and possibly out of sight of each
other) and remained at the feeder for at least 30 seconds. During this
time, Margaret observed that the back of the newcomer was a lighter green
than the Rufous, and I, with a straight-on dorsal view of it was not able
to see any orange on back, rump or tail. Darkness ended our stake-out, and
one can only wonder what the 'morrow will bring !

Cheers,
Bob

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Subject: Addendum to previous post
From: robert adamo <radamo4691 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 21:03:03 -0500
I neglected to include that anyone wanting further information re: today's
birds, can contact me off line - and also for homeowner's protocol for
getting to see birds.

Bob

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Subject: Western Tanager still at City Hall Park, etc.
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 16:34:07 -0500
Sandra Critelli reports that the Western Tanager is still at City Hall Park in 
the northeastern section and still associating with Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers. 
Sandra tells me another birder reported the Yellow-breasted Chat there today. 


Deb Allen

P. S. Noteworthy birds in Central Park in the last couple of days include 
Ring-necked Duck at the Meer today & Friday (Tony Gazso), and a Rusty Blackbird 
at the Iron Bridge (Ryan Zucker) today. 


Check out the Manhattan twitter feed  AT BirdCentralPark #birdcp

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Subject: Pt. Lookout
From: "syschiff" <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 18:11:18 -0500
Pt. Lookout 3 Dec

The town beach and jetties are undergoing major construction including today 
(Saturday). I checked the Gulls on the parking lot but didn't go toward the 
beach which is off limits. Heavy trucks carrying huge boulders were coming into 
the lot. The activity must have disturbed the 4 HARLEQUIN DUCKS since they were 
well into the inlet just opposite the "fireman's field". A slight interlude 
from watching today's CAVE SWALLOW at that spot. 


Sy Schiff
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Subject: Eared Grebe - Copake Lake, Columbia County
From: Will Raup <Hoaryredpoll AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 22:05:19 +0000
An EARED GREBE, originally reported to e-bird as a Horned Grebe continues as of 
today, December 3, 2016 at Copake Lake, Columbia County. 



Found by Leigh McBride, ID from photos by Andy Guthrie.


This is (at least) the 2nd record for Region 8, the last confirmed sighting was 
on Saratoga Lake in 1977. 



Good Birding!


Will Raup

Glenmont, NY

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Subject: Re: Cave swallow Nassau county
From: Tim Healy <tph56 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 11:40:25 -0500
Bird confirmed as a Cave Swallow and showing nicely at the described location: 
Fireman's Park. 


Cheers!
-Tim H

> On Dec 3, 2016, at 10:59 AM, Dennis Hrehowsik  
wrote: 

> 
> Bobbi Manian, Kristin Costello and I obs a tawny rumped swallow in the vacant 
lot south of the point lookout ball fields at end of lido Blvd. bird was alone 
then loosely associating with tree swallows then alone again. Bird is faithful 
to dirt path along water that passes broken concrete with rebar sticking out 
about 50 yards south of parking lot. Bird has a smudgy forehead not bright 
white with spotted undertail coverts. We tried to get some photos but windy so 
not easy. 

> 
> Dennis Hrehowsik
> Brooklyn 
> 
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Subject: Black-legged Kittiwake on Staten Island
From: isaac grant <hosesbroadbill AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 16:31:41 -0500
Was doing a seawatch off of the base of the ferry, near where the 9/11
memorial is and was lucky when a 1st year Black-legged Kittiwake flew by.
About 3:15 this afternoon.  Sorry for getting word out late but needed to
get home and blow up pics to be sure.   Bird was flying towards Bayonne.
Got some distant but diagnostic photos.  Never know what will be out
there...

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Subject: W. Tanager, Manhattan, NYC 12/2 - Friday
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 17:33:28 -0500
Friday, 2nd of December, 2016 -
City Hall Park, lower Manhattan, New York City

A Western Tanager continues at above park this Friday & seen well into  
late afternoon there.  It might be added that some who are coming to  
see this bird have not seen it before, and a fair number of those who  
have come to see in the past 9 days since the discovery (10 days ago)  
have noted that it was a new or "life" bird for them.

The tanager seems fond of the trees (may be high in taller trees much  
of time!) in the part of the park that is between the 2 biggest  
buildings with-IN the park, & just to the east of that area, seen from  
main east-west path IN the park. The bird was quite vocal any number  
of times thru mid-afternoon.

A Yellow-breasted Chat was sought in the immediate area but not seen,  
even as 1-month-now Y.-br. Chat (#1Chat) is ongoing in Trinity Church  
cemetery, as had been reported earlier today, seen in the northwest  
parts again with a bit of effort, and with a a number of other  
observers, just as with the tanager. That church & cemetery a 5-10  
minute walk down Broadway, on the western side of the avenue.

At 3 least additional warbler species are lingering at City Hall park  
- most uncommon at this date, a Black-throated Blue (male, seen with &  
near the tanager today), and at least one remaining Ovenbird, as well  
as male Common Yellowthroat.

Overall, it seemed to me that many birds have departed this park (&  
the area) in the past day or two after some fairly thorough searching  
- those still interested in seeing a Western Tanager here may want try  
soon, rather than wait long (of course, that said, the bird may end up  
being there for some time longer, but...)

City Hall Park is located south of Chambers Street, lower Manhattan -  
to the east of Broadway - it is also at the foot of the Brooklyn  
Bridge, & a few yards from the main pedestrian path to that bridge.   
The area the Tanager seems to be favoring is between the 2 major  
buildings IN the park, on / near an east-west path, be looking-up and  
listen for the distinctive calls from the tanager.  There were still  
one or two or more Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers in the park, but fewer  
than 7-10 days prior.

Saint Paul's Chapel grounds, 1 short city block SW of the south end of  
City Hall Park, and Trinity Church's cemetery grounds, open to public,  
and a few short city blocks south from same, on west side of Broadway,  
are each worth a look for more birds - on any day. Today, there did  
not seem to be a great many birds of any kind, aside from the Trinity- 
Chat, and a few sparrows & the like, & this "fit" with the diminishing  
quantity of birds at City Hall Park.

Thanks to all who give updates on current status of these & other  
uncommon or rare species;  a tip of the hat to some who have been  
expanding the circle a bit, out from City Hall & Trinity Church areas  
in that part of Manhattan. Other interesting birds might be visiting  
in the general area!

- - - - - - - -
A citizens basic responsibility is to be aware of the consequences of  
his or her acts.

"They tried to bury us. They didn't know we were seeds." - DeRay  
Mckesson, American activist & writer.
- - - - - - - -
with all the drivelosities'n'-so-forth on-list recently why, you'd  
almost think that some 'insane' notion as maybe some Russian ex-KGB*- 
guy, maybe named *Vladimir, was directing operations to try and  
determine events near the highest levels of American governance, or  
something - ohh, waittaminnitt! - "never mind" - in my best 'Emily  
Litella' (may Gilda -of the original SNL cast- Radner's blessed soul  
be in peace and a littella-outrage now, too)


good birding,

Tom Fiore,
Manhattan









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Subject: Cliff/cave swallow Nassau county
From: Dennis Hrehowsik <deepseagangster AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 10:59:54 -0500
Bobbi Manian, Kristin Costello and I obs a tawny rumped swallow in the vacant 
lot south of the point lookout ball fields at end of lido Blvd. bird was alone 
then loosely associating with tree swallows then alone again. Bird is faithful 
to dirt path along water that passes broken concrete with rebar sticking out 
about 50 yards south of parking lot. Bird has a smudgy forehead not bright 
white with spotted undertail coverts. We tried to get some photos but windy so 
not easy. 


Dennis Hrehowsik
Brooklyn 

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Subject: RE: St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species
From: Rick <rcech AT nyc.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 17:07:55 -0500
I find some granularity in reporting useful in order to keep tuned to the 
cadence of seasonal flux, especially in times of growing weather 
irregularities, even if that means noting odd appearance dates or unexpected 
frequencies of commoner stuff. This requires judgment on the part of reporters, 
however, and as noted can be overdone. 


Rick


Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE KöszDevice


-------- Original message --------
From: Paul R Sweet  
Date:11/30/2016  4:50 PM  (GMT-05:00) 
To: NYSBIRDS-L  
Cc:  
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species 

Daily lists are great and as I mentioned previously E-bird is an excellent 
place to record such data. If everyone posted their Central Park lists to 
NYSBIRDS-L it would certainly dilute the power of the list. See Kevin McGowan's 
post here https://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/msg20105.html 
regarding the original intent of the list. 



-----Original Message-----
From: bounce-121044213-11471062 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-121044213-11471062 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Deborah Allen 

Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2016 4:28 PM
To: NYSBIRDS-L
Subject: [nysbirds-l] St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species

With the recent attention on lower Manhattan parks due to the continuing 
Western Tanager and multiple Chats, we thought it might be interesting to take 
a look at the birds that people reported in those same parks in the past. 
Reading many 19th-20th century articles about NYC birds in the Wilson Journal 
of Ornithology, the Auk and elsewhere, is much like reading the NYS list today 
- including the article we place below. Some may find lists and anecdotal 
observations of any era boring - but for us they are a gold mine. We have made 
it one of our endeavors to track and understand how the local avifauna has 
changed through time...and such notes, sightings, reliable reports (including 
Christmas Count lists) are the foundation that allows us to evaluate and write 
about what happened here in the past and to grapple with the why of the 
changes. For example, unless multiple birders took the time to write that 
Bobolinks were common nesters in certain parks in several boroughs of NYC in 
the early 20th century, we would be left thinking that these birds were always 
rare in NYC. Think of the Bobwhite Quail that bred at NYBG (Bronx) and other 
parks into the early 1930s, or the amazing occurrence of a Blue-gray 
Gnatcatcher in Central Park in 1901, or the first nest of the species in New 
York State in 1963. Without these sorts of anecdotal accounts how would we know 
the number of sparrow species that once were common summer residents in NYC 
parks in the 19th Century (Vesper Sparrow anyone)? What seems like dull (or 
amazing) reading today, may be very different to NYC birders in 2050 reading 
bird lists from different parks of the Big Apple in 2016. 


Delete is a good key on your computer. Not a big deal...but we'd prefer to see 
people reporting...it keeps a buzz going on a list...and we can keep grappling 
with the facts to better understand, the Why? How? and When? It’s great that 
birders make so many lists. We encourage them to take those data and address 
another important question: what does it mean? Meanwhile we have our articles 
and books to write and field research to do (greetings from Nepal and 
Thailand!). We have an amazing contingent of fellow birders who join us on bird 
walks sometimes seven days per week (during migration) - in Central Park and 
the other parks of NYC. They tell us about what they have found all the time - 
and that makes us smile because they are seeing/doing/learning - and enjoying 
the local environment and its birds. 


We hope everyone had a Happy Thanksgiving and wish you all the best for the 
Hanukah/Christmas/Kwanzaa Holidays, 


Deborah Allen and Robert DeCandido, PhD

-----

Ornithology of St. Paul's Church [1903-04]


Even under unpromising conditions, and in unexpected places, there is often 
something for the bird-student to investigate. This is illustrated by some 
surprising records from city parks, and even from the smaller green spots, 
oases in the great desert of brick and mortar. 


As such a record I here submit, for whatever it may be worth, the results of 
observations in Saint Paul's Churchyard, New York City, made mostly during 
intervals of a few moments at noon, and occasionally in the morning, and 
covering the migration periods of spring and fall of 1903, and spring of 1904. 


Saint Paul's Church property is situated nearly midway between the East and 
North Rivers, fronting east on Broadway, Church Street at the rear, Vesey 
Street on the north side and Fulton Street on the south, and it is thus in one 
of the busiest and noisiest sections of the city. 


At the rear of the property, along Church Street, there is the constant rumble 
and roar of the elevated railroad. This church property is about 332 feet long 
by 177 feet wide, of which area the church occupies a space about 78 by 120 
feet at the Broadway end, while at the Church Street end the Church School 
takes off another slice about 30 feet wide. The space remaining consists of the 
main yard at the rear of the church, between it and the school, and a wing on 
either side of the church, each about 120 feet long by 48 feet wide. A narrow 
walk completes the circuit of the churchyard, about twenty feet from its outer 
edge. The grounds contain three large, ten medium, and forty smaller trees, not 
counting several that were being removed at the time of my count, and a number 
of shrubs and flowers, grass-plots and grass grown graves. Even the most 
nerve-hardened native bird would hardly select such a spot for a summer home, 
nor attempt to take up winter quarters there. 


Throughout the greater part of the summer and winter the noisy flock of English 
Sparrows domiciled here holds undisputed sway. It seems probable that the 
native birds that occur in the churchyard during migrations are such as are 
attracted to the green spot while passing in their flights directly over it, 
and that they are in no case stragglers from the temporary residents of the 
near-by country or parks. I have visited the churchyard many times in summer 
and winter, and during these periods between regular migratory seasons, I have 
yet to see or hear of the occurrence of a native bird. I have no spring record 
later than May, and no fall record after November, save the one of the Tree 
Sparrow, December 8, in which case it could not be fairly said that the season 
of migration was past. 


From my data I am inclined to believe, too, that the bird movement of this very 
restricted area reflects in a small way, that of the outside country. When the 
greatest number of birds was seen in the churchyard, it generally transpired 
that a bird-wave was on in the country just outside the city, which was also 
reflected in Central Park. 


Misfortune is said to make strange bed-fellows, and certainly migration 
produces unexpected incongruities between birds and environment. Species whose 
sociability about the homes of man in the country would lead one to expect them 
to be among the first and most common to occur in the city parks and green 
spots, seem in many cases to be strangely wanting in the records for such 
places, while others of notably retiring habits, surprise one by their 
unexpected appearance in the crowded marts of civilization. The Woodcock has 
been recorded on the lawn of the American Museum of Natural History and in 
Trinity Cemetery, while my Saint Paul's records of Song and Chipping Sparrows, 
Robin, Yellow Warbler, and some other of our more familiar birds are 
surprisingly few. According to the indications of the three seasons covered by 
my observations, the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker appears to be a regular visitor, 
which seems rather surprising. 


Observations covering the period from the first to the last record were: for 
1903, spring, 5 days, no birds; but on 19 days, 18 species were observed and 59 
individuals counted. Total for spring 1903 was 24 days of observation. For Fall 
1903, there were 25 days with no birds seen; there were 47 days when 26 species 
and 187 individuals were seen. Total for fall 1903 was 72 days of observation. 


For spring 1904, there were 7 days with no birds seen; there were 24 days with
22 species seen and 87 individuals counted. Total for spring 1904 was 31 days 
of observation. 


For the three seasons, this gives an average of one species seen per 2.25 days 
of observation, and 3.64 individuals on average for each day of observation. 


The list of birds noted is as follows:

1. Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, 5 records, -- 1903: April 29, 1; Sept. 25, 1; Oct. 

12, 2; Oct. 22, 1; 1904, April 6, 1; total, 6.

2. Red-bellied Woodpecker, 1 record, -- Oct. 1, 1903, 1.

3. Eastern Phoebe, 3 records, 1903, Sept. 12, 1; Sept 25, 1; Oct. 15, 1; total, 
3. 


4. Least Flycatcher, 5 records, 1903, May 19, 3; May 22, 1; Sept. 24, 1; Sept.
25, 1; 1904, May 13, 1; total, 7.

5. White-crowned Sparrow, 2 records, -- 1904, April 25, 2; April 26, 2; total,
4 (probably only two birds).

6. White-throated Sparrow, 16 records, -- 1903, May 1, 1; May 16, 1 ; May 18, 
1; May 20, 1; May 26, 1; May 28, 1; Sept. 24, 1; Sept. 26, 1; Sept. 30, 1; Oct. 

19, 2; Oct. 23, 1; Oct. 24, 1; 1904 April 25, 2; April 26, 3; May 10, 1; May 
11, 1; total, 19. 


7. [American] Tree Sparrow, 1 record, --  Dec. 8, 1903, 1.

8. Chipping Sparrow, 6 records, -- 1903 May 11, 1; 1904, April 18, 2; May 3, 1; 
May 9, 1; May 11, 1; May 12, 1; total, 7. 


9. Field Sparrow, 5 records, 1903, Oct.8, 1; 1904, April 18, 1; April 28, 1; 
April 29, 1 May 2, 1; total, 5 


10. Slate-colored Junco, 24 records, 1903, April 29, 1; Sept. 26, 1; Sept. 29, 
2; Sept. 30, 3; Oct. 2, 1; Oct. 3, 1; Oct 12, 1; Oct. 13, 1; Oct. 14, 1; Oct. 

22, 3; Oct. 23, 1; Oct. 24, 1; Oct. 26, 3; Oct. 27, 2; Oct. 28, 2; Oct. 29, 6; 
Oct. 30, 1; Oct. 31, 5; Nov. 2, 1; Nov. 5, 1; Nov. 6, 1; Nov. 10, 1; Nov. 16, 
1; 1904, Apri1 30, 1; total, 45. 


11. Song Sparrow 1 record, -- April 30, 1904, 1.

12. [Eastern] Towhee, 7 records, --- 1903 May 1, male; May 6, male; May 7, 
female; Oct. 3, female; 1904, May 5, female; May 10, 2 females; May 13, male; 
May 16, female; total, 9. 


13. Indigo Bunting, 1 record, -- May 12, 1904, bright male.

14. Scarlet Tanager, 1 record, -- May 14, 1904, male.

15. Red-eyed Vireo, 2 records, -- 1904 May 12, 1; May 13, 1; total 2.

16. Blue-wing Warbler, 2 records, -- 1903, Sept. 8, 1; Sept. 25, 1; total 2.

17. Parula Warbler, 1 record, -- May 5, 1904, 1.

18. Yellow Warbler, 3 records, -- 1903 May 19, 1; May 22, 1; Sept. 4, 1; total, 
3. 


19. Black-throated Blue Warbler, 1 record, -- Oct. 22, 1903, 1.

20. Myrtle [Yellow-rumped] Warbler, 1 record, -- Oct. 13, 1904, 1.

21. Magnolia Warbler, 1 record, -- May 20, 1903, 1.

22. Palm Warbler, 1 record, -- Oct. 13, 1903, 1.

23. Ovenbird, 11 records, -- 1903, May 15, 1; May 16, 2; May 18, 2; May 19, 2; 
Sept. 1, 1; 1904, April 25, 1; Apr. 26, 1; May 5, 1; May 16, 1; May 17, 1; May 
18, 1; total, 14. 


24. [Northern] Water Thrush, 1 record, -- May 19, 1903, 1.

25. Northern [Common] Yellow-throat, 7 records -- 1903, May 14 , 1; May 22, 1; 
Oct. 12, 1; 1904 May 11, 1; May 20, 2; May 21, 1; May 24, 2; total , 9. 


26. Canadian Warbler, 1 record, -- May 21, 1903, 1.

27. American Redstart, 5 records, -- 1903, May 19, 1; Sept. 1, 2; Sept. 3, 1; 
Sept. 4, 1; 1904, May 20, 1; total, 6. 


28. Catbirds, 10 records, -- 1903, May 9, 1; May 15, 1; May 19, 1; May 20, 1; 
Sept 29, 1; 1904, May 5, 1; May 7, 2; May 12, 1; May 13, 1; May 20, 1; total, 
11. 


29. Brown Thrasher, 4 records, -- 1903, May 4, 1; May 5, 1; May 16, 1; May 18, 
1; May 20, 3; May 22, 2; May 23, 1; May 26, 1; May 27, 2; Sept. 30, 1; Oct. 3, 
1; 1904, May 5, 2; May 6, 1; May 24, 1; total, 19. 


30. Winter Wren, 1 record, -- Oct. 28, 1904, 1.

31. Brown Creeper, 1 record, -- Oct. 12, 1903, 1. 

32. Red-breasted Nuthatch, 3 records, -- 1903, Sept. 1, 1; Sept. 8, 1; Sept.
24, 1; total, 3.

33. [Black-capped] Chickadee 14 records, -- 1903, Sept. 15, 3; Sept. 23, 1; 
Sept. 25, 7; Sept. 29, 2; Sept. 30, 2; Oct. 1, 4; Oct. 6, 2; Oct. 7, 2; Oct. 

10, 1; Oct. 12, 2; Oct. 16, 3; Oct. 19, 1; Oct. 30, 1; total, 33.

34. Golden-crowed Kinglet, 3 records, 1903, Oct. 21, 1; Oct. 29, 1; Oct. 31, 1; 
total, 1. 


35. Ruby-crowned Kinglet, 5 records, 1903, Oct. 13, 2; Oct. 14, 3; Oct. 21, 2; 
Oct. 23, 1; Oct. 24, 1; total, 9. 


36. Wood Thrush, 2 records, 1903, Oct. 14, 1; 1904, May 17, 1; total 2.

37. Wilson's Thrush [= Veery], 5 records, 1903, May 19, 1; 1904, May 12, 2; May 
17, 1; May 20, 1; May 24, 2; total, 7. 


38. Olive-backed Thrush [= Swainson's Thrush], 14 records, 1903, May 22, 2; May 
27, 1; Sept. 8, 2; Sept. 9, 1; Sept. 29, 2; Sept. 30, 1; Oct. 1, 1; Oct. 14, 1; 
1904, May 11, 1; May 12, 2; May 17, 1; May 13, 1; May 18, 1; May 20, 1; total, 
16. 


39. Hermit Thrush 32 records, -- 1903 April 29, 6; May 4, 1; Sept. 30, 2; Oct.
6, 1; Oct. 12, 2; Oct. 13, 2; Oct.14, 8; Oct. 15, 4; Oct. 16, 1; Oct. 21, 1; 
Oct. 23, 3; Oct. 24, 2; Oct. 26, 2; Oct. 27, 4; Oct. 28, 2; Oct. 29, 2; Oct. 

30, 2; Oct. 31, 4; Nov. 2, 1; Nov. 4, 3; Nov. 5, 1; Nov. 9, 1; Nov. 10, 1; 
Nov.11, 1; Nov. 16, 1; Nov. 23, 2; Nov. 24, 2; 1904, April 25, 8; April 26, 2; 
April 30, 2; total, 79. 


40. American Robin, 2 records, --1903, Oct. 21, 1; Oct. 22, 1; total, 2.

41. Bluebird, 1 record, -- Nov. 6, 1903, 2.

In the record above given, where a species occurred on consecutive dates, 
doubtless in some cases the same individual remained two or more days. In one 
instance, at least, this was certainly the case. A Hermit Thrush, one of four 
noted October 15, 1903, had a bar of light yellowish on the left wing. This 
bird was again noted on the 16th, the only one seen on the latter date. In the 
majority of cases, however, such records probably represent different 
individuals, and as far as I am able to judge, the birds make but a brief stop 
in the churchyard. In some cases the birds noted in the morning were gone by 
noon, and others not noted in the morning had appeared. 


Truly Saint Paul's Churchyard seems to be for many migrant birds an oasis in a 
desert of brick and mortar, a spot where tired and hungry individuals may drop 
down to rest and feed, and incidentally to gladden the eye and quicken the 
pulse of the city confined nature lover. 


A Robin (young of the year) noted August 30, will perhaps necessitate the 
modification of the statement regarding absence of birds during summer, though 
it is quite possible that this individual had begun a migratory movement. 


With the exception of the Robin above referred to, the first migrant (a 
[Northern] Water-Thrush) was not noted until Sept. 13, and the indications of 
the churchyard evidence were that the fall migration was either begun late, or 
that the earlier migration was hurriedly performed, with few stops. 



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Subject: Pink-footed Geese, 2 se NYS counties 12/2 (Orange, Nassau)
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 22:58:48 -0500
A huge apologia for posting again in less than 8 hours, but-

Today, Friday, December 2nd, 2016 saw a 2nd Pink-footed Goose get  
discovered in NY state, seen by maybe 8-10 or more observers, and much  
photo-documented in a county besides the one (Nassau) where a bird of  
that species, which is an "ABA CODE-4 species - meaning genuinely rare  
in North America - & that there were also at least 4 OTHER goose  
species recorded where this new find of Pink-footed - was in Orange  
County NY, those others being Greater White-fronted, Cackling-'type',  
Snow, and [Greater] Canada - I figure it's worth a mention on this NY  
STATE Iist?   The find, in Orange County, was at Camel Farm, in the  
"black dirt area" of the county, & I can't provide precise directions  
- it's somewhere on your internet, though!     And, not reported here  
for today, but present this day was the Pink-footed Goose in Nassau  
County, at the site where one's been since found by Tim Healy's dad  
and reported often here in past recent weeks - as far as I know, the  
Pink-footed in Orange County was today first found by Bruce Nott, who  
got word out to some others in the area.  Thus, just passing along in  
case there is 1-person-out-there who may not have heard about this, on  
this list.

goosing it up a notch,

tom fiore -
manhattan

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Subject: re:Bryant Park
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 07:55:00 -0500
hi Alan & all,

I think I know that you were referring to the (somewhat common-in- 
Manhattan's Bryant Park) White-throated Sparrows - but with the  
capitalized 'C' & 'W' you -perhaps very unintentionally!- listed a  
bird that is indeed common - Common Whitethroat (Sylvia communis) -  
but, it's common in Europe & some of northern Asia in summer moving to  
south Asia and Arabia, Africa in winter, & would be an "ultra-mega"- 
rarity in the North American or western hemisphere region;  this nys  
list is looked-at by birders from other areas too, so a few might be  
wondering in say, Ireland or Finland or even Greenland, 'wow do the  
yanks really get that bird over there in New York?' - &, as far as I  
know, we don't (but will see you & the ten-thousand-other birders in  
the nw corner of Bryant Pk., if it turns out that we do :-)

By the by, there seemed to be a modest up-tick in Gray Catbirds in  
Central Park (Manhattan, NYC) in the last few days, in selected spots,  
unless it was simply that a dozen or so had been present thru that  
larger park, & came to prominence with changes in weather, or for  
other reasons; I suspect new, modest, arrival of them from points  
north, however.  Thank you for your reporting, good to hear what's  
doing in that so-busy park that gets so many interesting birds thru a  
year.  Lincoln's  Sparrow is a darned-good December find in NY.
	 ---------
Date: 12/2/16 11:26 pm
From: Alan Drogin
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Bryant Park
This week I checked the birding action of Bryant Park for signs of  
scavenging among the food vendors in Bryant Park this winter.  
Unfortunately, the increase in booths, expanded ice rink deck eating  
area, and view-blocking two-story lounges, along with the larger  
crowds, have walled in/off many of the garden areas. That and the  
recent clearing of underbrush have rendered these areas nearly dead  
zones compared to years past where the birds had easy egress to hide  
after raiding the fallen crumbs left behind by hungry shoppers. Except  
for pigeons and fearless House Sparrows, most of the bird action has  
moved to the peripheral areas. There was a Hermit Thrush on the  
southern border and the typical Catbirds, although fewer in number at  
the northwest corner along with a Swamp Sparrow being bullied by the  
larger Common Whitethroats. A surprise was a Lincoln Sparrow skulking  
in the southwest corner, could be the same Id seen in that area for a  
few weeks about a month ago.

Happy Birding,
Alan Drogin
- - - - -
good birding,
tom fiore -
manhattan




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Subject: Bryant Park
From: Alan Drogin <drogin AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 02:26:34 -0500
This week I checked the birding action of Bryant Park for signs of scavenging 
among the food vendors in Bryant Park this winter. Unfortunately, the increase 
in booths, expanded ice rink deck eating area, and view-blocking two-story 
lounges, along with the larger crowds, have walled in/off many of the garden 
areas. That and the recent clearing of underbrush have rendered these areas 
nearly dead zones compared to years past where the birds had easy egress to 
hide after raiding the fallen crumbs left behind by hungry shoppers. Except for 
pigeons and fearless House Sparrows, most of the bird action has moved to the 
peripheral areas. There was a Hermit Thrush on the southern border and the 
typical Catbirds, although fewer in number at the northwest corner along with a 
Swamp Sparrow being bullied by the larger Common Whitethroats. A surprise was a 
Lincoln Sparrow skulking in the southwest corner, could be the same I’d seen 
in that area for a few weeks about a month ago. 


Happy Birding,
Alan Drogin
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Subject: Jones Beach West End
From: "syschiff" <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 15:01:12 -0500
Jones Beach 2 Dec

After checking the bar at the Coast Guard Station, Joe Giunta and I (Sy Schiff) 
went to the swale walking down to the water. Of interest were 40 RED KNOT on 
the bar with AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS and BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER. 


On the beach,looking toward the jetty, almost at the end, there were 800-1000 
DUNLIN. In the swale and on the beach were 75 SNOW BUNTINGS, 15 HORNED LARKS 
and a LAPLAND LONGSPUR with the larks. 


Sy
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Subject: 2016 Christmas Bird Count - Central Park & NJ Lower Hudson
From: Debra Kriensky <dkriensky AT nycaudubon.org>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 17:23:06 -0500
All,

Please join us for the 117th Christmas Bird Count in Central Park on
Sunday, Dec. 18. The schedule and more information can be found at
http://www.nycaudubon.org/christmas-bird-count. Dates and contact
information for the other NYC borough counts can be found there as well.

In addition to the count in Central Park (where it all began!), there will
also be counts taking place that day at the following locations in the NJ
Lower Hudson count circle: Inwood Hill, Lower Manhattan, Riverside Park,
Harlem, Stuyvesant Town, the Lower East Side, Randall's Island, Bryant
Park, Madison Square Park, and the Meadowlands (NJ). Here's hoping that the
Western Tanager in City Hall Park will stick around a little bit longer!

For questions about any of the counts or to register, please email
christmasbirdcount AT nycaudubon.org or call 212-691-7483 x. 414.

Best,

Debra Kriensky

-- 
Debra Kriensky
Conservation Biologist
New York City Audubon
71 West 23rd Street, Suite 1523
New York, NY 10010

212-691-7483 x309
646-666-8903 (direct)
www.nycaudubon.org

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Subject: Trinity Church: Yellow-breasted Chat
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 08:09:41 -0500
‪Yellow-breasted Chat continues on the north side of  AT TrinityWallSt at the 
north edge of cemetery seen  AT  8:05a. Day 30. 


Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Cackling Goose
From: <pwpost AT nyc.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 11:12:10 -0500
"Richardson's" Goose. 
Silver Lake Park, Baldwin, Nassau Co. 

Peter Post & Ardith Bondi

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Yes - Rufous Hummingbird- Aquebogue, Suffolk
From: Eileen Schwinn <beachmed AT optonline.net>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 13:06:57 -0500
The previously reported Rufous Hummingbird is still being seen at a private 
feeder in Aquebogue. Please contact me off line for information, per the 
homeowner. 

Eileen Schwinn
beachmed AT optonline.net

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Pink-sided Junco - Hamlin Beach SP - Thursday
From: Willie D'Anna <dannapotter AT roadrunner.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 06:21:46 -0500
The Pink-sided Junco at Hamlin Beach SP, originally found by Andy Guthrie on
November 24th, was seen again this Thursday morning at 11:15. I had it just
off the westbound park road in the median, just before the first turnaround
west of Parking Lot #2 (the lot with the gravel piles). It was with about a
dozen Slate-colored Juncos, which flew up from just off the road as I drove
up to them. I pulled over and waited for the juncos to return, which they
did shortly. It has been seen at this spot several times previously.
However, I did not see the bird from 8:30 until then, despite extensive
searching, and I was actually leaving when I found it. This was my second
attempt to see this junco.

 

Photos of the junco can be seen in my eBird checklist:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32807558

 

Good birding!

Willie

------------------

Willie D'Anna

Wilson, NY

dannapotterATroadrunner.com

Willie's photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/107683885 AT N07/

 


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Subject: Chores can convert to contentment !
From: robert adamo <radamo4691 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2016 23:05:00 -0500
This morning my drive to the supermarket in Riverhead was made more
palatable by spotting a single Turkey Vulture circling overhead...could it
have been "Lonesome George", the solitary T.V. that has been reported from
this area of eastern L.I. for the past couple of years ?

This afternoon. I headed up to Calverton for my annual (last 30 years at
least) cutting of our Christmas Tree. Near the intersection of Route 25 &
Fresh Pond Rd., I noticed a large hawk hovering, and after avoiding causing
an accident as I stopped/pulled over, I not only brought my binoculars up
to see a light-morph Rough-legged Hawk, but a Red-tailed Hawk, which
entered my binocular field, as well ! After those sightings, I knew I was
not going to have any problem picking out a tree which would make my wife
happy !

On the way home I had another Red-tail, and also made a stop at the Buffalo
Farm, at the intersection of Reeves Ave & Roanoke Ave, Riverhead...where I
had a "life sighting" for the fenced-off, feeding corral proper ! It goes
without saying that I have seen Canada Geese in every field surrounding the
corral (approximately 125' x 250') but I can't remember ever seeing a
single *Branta canadensis* inside it, no less the ~ 70 there today. While
only 1 buffalo was within the  fencing at the time, there have been
numerous prior visits when either none, or just a few of the animals were
there, but still no geese...albeit, ducks have been common occurrence..

Cheers,
Bob




Cheers,
Bob

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Subject: Bronx Westchester Christmas Bird Count 2016
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2016 16:44:33 -0500
The Bronx Westchester 2016 Christmas Bird Count will take place on December 
26th. If anyone is interested in participating in joining any of the teams 
covering the West Bronx, please let me know. 


For more information please Visit the Bronx Westchester Christmas Bird Count 
site at www.hras.org/bwcbc.html 

Here you will find past count summaries, check lists, rare bird forms, and 
interesting history on the count 


--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


LSwift as the wind
֡Quiet as the forest
Conquer like the fire
ɽSteady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Subject: NYC Area RBA: 1 December 2016
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2016 19:48:56 -0500
- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Dec. 1, 2016
* NYNY1612.01

- Birds mentioned
PINK-FOOTED GOOSE+
ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER+
WESTERN TANAGER+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

King Eider
selasphorus hummingbird
Sandhill Crane
Marbled Godwit
Little Gull
Glaucous Gull
Red-headed Woodpecker
Western Kingbird
Yellow-breasted Chat
Red Crossbill

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

        Gary Chapin - Secretary
        NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
        125 Pine Springs Drive
        Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

To report sightings call:
Tom Burke (212) 372-1483 (weekdays, during the day)
Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 (Long Island)

Compiler: Tom Burke, Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the NYS Rare Bird alert for Thursday, December 1st.

The PINK-FOOTED GOOSE originally discovered at Hendrickson Park, Nassu
County on Nov 1, continued to at least Nov 30, and is likely still
frequenting the area.

The female KING EIDER at Ransom Beach, Bayville, found 10 Nov, was present
to at least 16 Nov.

2 MARBLED GODWIT (S) were sighted from a kayak near Big Egg Marsh, Jamaica
Bay on Nov 13, possibly the same birds that have been in the area since
September.

A first winter LITTLE GULL was found off Montauk Point Nov 23, and a first
year GLAUCOUS GULL was loafing on the beach off Lido Park West on 13 Nov.

A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was found at Bill Richardson Park, Suffolk Nov 18
and 26, and another, an immature male, was photographed at Sunken Meadow SP
on 19 Nov.

A selasphorus hummingbird visiting a private North Fork Long Island feeder
in Aquebogue was first reported to the list 22 Nov, but had apparently been
around for four weeks. So far there are no diagnostic photos to pin it to
species, and no further reports.

A WESTERN KINGBIRD was a one-day wonder at Jones Beach West End Nov 19.

An ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER discovered at Lido West Park in Nassau County
Nov 13 was still being reported at least to Nov 27. Another Ash-throat was
found at the less accessible Bushwick Inlet Park, Brooklyn Nov 19-20.

At least two YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT (S) remain in lower Manhattan NYC parks;
one at Trinity Church found Nov 3 and still being reported as of Dec 1, the
other near City Hall Park seen at least to the 28th. Other Chat reports
come from Fort Pond Cemetery in Montauk 10 Nov, and Greenwood Cemetery 19
Nov.

Two WESTERN TANAGER (S) were discovered within a day of one another -- a
female at City Hall Park in lower Manhattan on Nov 23 and remaining through
at least Dec 1, and an adult male at Conference House Park on Staten Island
found Nov 24 and reported to at least Nov 27.

RED CROSSBILL (S) are appearing in small, sporadic numbers, with 5-6 at
Jones Beach West End on Nov 19, one at Lido West Park on the 23rd, and 7 at
Jones Beach Nov 27. All were reported to have continued west and did not
linger.

In Westchester, 13 SANDHILL CRANE (S) were photographed flying over
Playland Park in Rye on Nov 23.

To phone in reports on Long Island, call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or
weekdays call Tom Burke at (212) 372-1483.

The compilers for this week's RBA were Shaibal Mitra and Patricia Lindsay.
Tom Burke is away on vacation. Tony Lauro has been ill for the past few
weeks and we are looking forward to a complete recovery soon.

- End transcript

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Subject: Re: The NYSBirds List
From: TwoSides22 AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2016 09:38:08 -0500
How about a warning in the subject line that the post includes  politics.  
This is one place I had hoped to be able to get away from it. 
 
Jeanne
 
 
In a message dated 12/1/2016 9:06:11 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
Trachtenberg AT amsllp.com writes:

It seems  that in reporting, like life, one man's ceiling is another man's 
floor. While  I do know how to use the "delete" key, filtering is beyond my 
computer skill  set. However, in the last week alone didn't we all see more 
annoying "Black  Friday", "Cyber Monday", and "Giving Tuesday" emails in our 
inboxes than we  see "annoying," to some at least, NYSBird posts like this 
one in a month? As  to birds, today before the sun could warm things at 
Croton Point Park, I managed little more than mourning doves, mallards, Canada 

geese and a few  common sparrows -- no "good" let alone "rare" birds.. 
However, such "unworthy"  reporting species seemed apropos as our Kakistocracy 
takes hold. Indeed, with  S. Palin and Linda McMahon in consideration perhaps 
the Hulkster and Rowdy  Roddy Piper are on deck.  And to round out the 
craziness I stopped to say  hello to two CBS TV crews this morning assigned to 
cover, for what purpose  they could not exactly say, an alleged single rabid 
coyote at a condo complex  in Ossining.  

Fair and balanced bird reporting please. 

L.  Trachtenberg
Ossining


-----Original Message-----
From:  bounce-121044984-10490872 AT list.cornell.edu  
[mailto:bounce-121044984-10490872 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Shaibal  Mitra
Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2016 10:28 PM
To: NYSBIRDS  (NYSBIRDS-L AT cornell.edu)
Subject: [nysbirds-l] The NYSBirds List

Hi  everyone,

In theory there are two ways to reform the content of this  listserv: (1) 
discourage posts that are less relevant; and (2) encourage posts  that are 
more relevant.

But given the very diverse sentiments expressed  here in recent weeks, it's 
clear that people simply disagree about what is  relevant. But criticizing 
certain kinds of posts is doubly harmful: not only  is it demonstrably 
ineffective in reducing the frequency of the unwanted posts, whatever they may 

be in a particular instance, but it also discourages  contributions from 
newer participants and those who don't appreciate being  criticized. In other 
words, this ineffective tactic inadvertently conflicts  with and damages the 
prospects for the only other means of improving the  forum. I agree with 
those who have emphasized that neither the overall volume  of reports, nor the 
proportion of what any one individual might regard as  chaff, is ever great 
enough to discourage me from sifting this site every day  for items of 
personal interest.

These considerations came to mind  recently when I overheard some Long 
Island birders debating whether to chase an Ash-throated Flycatcher (to me very 

rare) vs. "the Red Crossbill" (to me  periodically ubiquitous). At this 
stage in my life, I'd much rather read a  post from Tim Healy or Steve Walter 
about the tempo and mode of a day's  migration than a how-to guide to chasing 
"the Red Crossbill." But I understand  that some newer birders might 
actually have seen more Ash-throated Flycatchers than Red Crossbills, even 
though 

this is utterly contrary to my own  development as a birder. And all of 
this is what makes birding, and NYSBirds,  so wonderful--not only can we find 
how-to information for chasing (arguably)  rare birds, but we are also 
offered insights into other people's perspectives and values. Please post more! 


Shai Mitra
Bay  Shore
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Subject: Re: The NYSBirds List
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2016 09:55:50 -0500
And there it is right there. "It seems that in reporting, like life, one man's 
ceiling is another man's floor." 


All it takes is a bit of common sense (I know it is not common), to figure out 
what might be interesting and how often to report. Some get it while others 
well...want to be heard and that too, is okay. 


Perhaps, rather than kvetching over what should be posted, folks would be 
better off getting out there and finding birds. If successful, post them using 
whatever medium but ensuring (if the find is noteworthy) that it reaches the 
wider birding community. Which is where this discussion kicked off - see the 
Brooklyn ATFL. 


Shaming anyone into not posting because of posting what "you" deem to be 
unworthy is non productive and just serves to alienate and drive people away. I 
have seen this happening already where many folks have resorted to creating 
text groups or using other tools of communication that shield them from the too 
oft critics that seem to spend more time criticizing than reporting anything. 


Furthermore, let's hope this argument on which audience or what NYS birds cater 
to is now beaten to death never to raise its head again. 


Inclusive not exclusive this thing of ours should be.

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


LSwift as the wind
֡Quiet as the forest
Conquer like the fire
ɽSteady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

> On Dec 1, 2016, at 9:06 AM, Mike  wrote:
> 
> See, I would have just assumed the CBS News crew was on the scene because the 
the rabid coyote was also in the running for a cabinet post. 

> 
>>> Indeed, with S. Palin and Linda McMahon in consideration perhaps the 
Hulkster and Rowdy Roddy Piper are on deck. 

> 
> 
> Mike Cooper
> Ridge, LI, NY
> 
> 
> 
> 
> --
> 
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
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> 
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> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
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> 
> --
> 

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Subject: Western Tanager- yes
From: Jack Rothman <jacroth1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2016 10:11:06 -0500
Easily seen in tall tree on east west path between City Hall and Municipal 
Bldg. 

Black-throated Blue, Sapsucker also seen. 
Jack Rothman

Sent from Jack's phone.
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Subject: Trinity Church: Yellow-breasted Chat
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2016 08:53:38 -0500
Continues north side of church feeding with HOSP and WTSP off Memorial Garden 
on west side of cemetery. Seen at 8:45a. Wall St. location. 


Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re: ? selasphorus sp. hummingbird (Rufous or Allen's)
From: robert adamo <radamo4691 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 19:29:04 -0500
Hi Paul,

No, I can not !

To hopefully "legitimize" this post, I'd like to share with the listserve
the following information re: the slight differences in bill length between
Rufous and Allen's Hummingbirds, which I gleaned from *The Hummingbirds of
North America*, Paul A. Johnsgard, 1983/Smithsonian Institution:

*Selasphorus rufus *_ Exposed culmen males 15-17.5 mm (ave. of 18, 16.5
mm), females 17-19 mm (ave. of 11, 18 mm).
*Selasphorus sasin *_ Exposed culmen males 15-16.5 mm (ave. of 10, 15.9
mm), females 17-18.5 mm (ave. of 9, 17.8 mm).

Cheers,
Bob
,









On Sun, Nov 27, 2016 at 2:51 PM, Paul R Sweet  wrote:

> Bob
>
> Can you point me to a reference that says bill length is a diagnostic
> character for this species pair?
>
> Thanks, Paul
>
>
> Paul Sweet
>
> Collection Manager
>
> Department of Ornithology
>
> American Museum of Natural History
>
> Central Park West at 79th Street
>
> New York, NY 10024
>
>
>
> Tel: 212 769 5780 <(212)%20769-5780>
>
> Cell: 718 757 5941 <(718)%20757-5941>
>
> From:  on behalf of robert
> adamo 
> Reply-To: robert adamo 
> Date: Sunday, November 27, 2016 at 2:07 PM
> To: "nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu" 
> Subject: [nysbirds-l] ? selasphorus sp. hummingbird (Rufous or Allen's)
>
> Without again obtaining a discernible "tell-tale tail" photo, and in the
> full knowledge of the extremely low odds of the Aquebogue bird being an
> Allen's, after further perusing yesterday's, as well as today's, shots, it
> seems the bill is too long for a Rufous, plus it appears to be slightly
> de-curved. So...I'm led to ask the following question: has hybridization
> ever been documented between these 2 species of the same genus ?
>
> Cheers
> Bob 🙃
> --
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Subject: Re: St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species
From: Phil Jeffrey <phil.jeffrey AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 19:41:14 -0500
I don't equate "interesting" with "rare".  Rare birds are often
well-characterized - not least of all in weekly RBA posts.  Interesting
birds (self-defined) run a much larger gamut than that, and I can point to
a lot of eBird checklists where there's no additional context whatsoever
for such species.

On Wed, Nov 30, 2016 at 6:10 PM, Dominic Garcia-Hall  wrote:

> I find most people reporting to eBird are pretty good about including
> context (location etc) in the comments field - not least because when it's
> a genuine rarity eBird mandates some kind of commentary.
>


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Subject: RE:The NYSBirds List
From: "McIntyre, Annie (PARKS)" <Annie.McIntyre AT parks.ny.gov>
Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2016 13:48:24 +0000
I agree with Shai, eloquently and succinctly expressed, as always. 

Hope you all enjoy this beautiful day!
 Annie 


-----Original Message-----
From: bounce-121044984-10774062 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-121044984-10774062 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Shaibal Mitra 

Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2016 10:28 PM
To: NYSBIRDS (NYSBIRDS-L AT cornell.edu)
Subject: [nysbirds-l] The NYSBirds List

ATTENTION: This email came from an external source. Do not open attachments or 
click on links from unknown senders or unexpected emails. 



Hi everyone,

In theory there are two ways to reform the content of this listserv: (1) 
discourage posts that are less relevant; and (2) encourage posts that are more 
relevant. 


But given the very diverse sentiments expressed here in recent weeks, it's 
clear that people simply disagree about what is relevant. But criticizing 
certain kinds of posts is doubly harmful: not only is it demonstrably 
ineffective in reducing the frequency of the unwanted posts, whatever they may 
be in a particular instance, but it also discourages contributions from newer 
participants and those who don't appreciate being criticized. In other words, 
this ineffective tactic inadvertently conflicts with and damages the prospects 
for the only other means of improving the forum. I agree with those who have 
emphasized that neither the overall volume of reports, nor the proportion of 
what any one individual might regard as chaff, is ever great enough to 
discourage me from sifting this site every day for items of personal interest. 


These considerations came to mind recently when I overheard some Long Island 
birders debating whether to chase an Ash-throated Flycatcher (to me very rare) 
vs. "the Red Crossbill" (to me periodically ubiquitous). At this stage in my 
life, I'd much rather read a post from Tim Healy or Steve Walter about the 
tempo and mode of a day's migration than a how-to guide to chasing "the Red 
Crossbill." But I understand that some newer birders might actually have seen 
more Ash-throated Flycatchers than Red Crossbills, even though this is utterly 
contrary to my own development as a birder. And all of this is what makes 
birding, and NYSBirds, so wonderful--not only can we find how-to information 
for chasing (arguably) rare birds, but we are also offered insights into other 
people's perspectives and values. Please post more! 


Shai Mitra
Bay Shore
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Subject: RE:The NYSBirds List
From: Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg AT amsllp.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2016 13:57:56 +0000
It seems that in reporting, like life, one man's ceiling is another man's 
floor. While I do know how to use the "delete" key, filtering is beyond my 
computer skill set. However, in the last week alone didn't we all see more 
annoying "Black Friday", "Cyber Monday", and "Giving Tuesday" emails in our 
inboxes than we see "annoying," to some at least, NYSBird posts like this one 
in a month? As to birds, today before the sun could warm things at Croton Point 
Park, I managed little more than mourning doves, mallards, Canada geese and a 
few common sparrows -- no "good" let alone "rare" birds.. However, such 
"unworthy" reporting species seemed apropos as our Kakistocracy takes hold. 
Indeed, with S. Palin and Linda McMahon in consideration perhaps the Hulkster 
and Rowdy Roddy Piper are on deck. And to round out the craziness I stopped to 
say hello to two CBS TV crews this morning assigned to cover, for what purpose 
they could not exactly say, an alleged single rabid coyote at a condo complex 
in Ossining. 


Fair and balanced bird reporting please. 

L. Trachtenberg
Ossining


-----Original Message-----
From: bounce-121044984-10490872 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-121044984-10490872 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Shaibal Mitra 

Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2016 10:28 PM
To: NYSBIRDS (NYSBIRDS-L AT cornell.edu)
Subject: [nysbirds-l] The NYSBirds List

Hi everyone,

In theory there are two ways to reform the content of this listserv: (1) 
discourage posts that are less relevant; and (2) encourage posts that are more 
relevant. 


But given the very diverse sentiments expressed here in recent weeks, it's 
clear that people simply disagree about what is relevant. But criticizing 
certain kinds of posts is doubly harmful: not only is it demonstrably 
ineffective in reducing the frequency of the unwanted posts, whatever they may 
be in a particular instance, but it also discourages contributions from newer 
participants and those who don't appreciate being criticized. In other words, 
this ineffective tactic inadvertently conflicts with and damages the prospects 
for the only other means of improving the forum. I agree with those who have 
emphasized that neither the overall volume of reports, nor the proportion of 
what any one individual might regard as chaff, is ever great enough to 
discourage me from sifting this site every day for items of personal interest. 


These considerations came to mind recently when I overheard some Long Island 
birders debating whether to chase an Ash-throated Flycatcher (to me very rare) 
vs. "the Red Crossbill" (to me periodically ubiquitous). At this stage in my 
life, I'd much rather read a post from Tim Healy or Steve Walter about the 
tempo and mode of a day's migration than a how-to guide to chasing "the Red 
Crossbill." But I understand that some newer birders might actually have seen 
more Ash-throated Flycatchers than Red Crossbills, even though this is utterly 
contrary to my own development as a birder. And all of this is what makes 
birding, and NYSBirds, so wonderful--not only can we find how-to information 
for chasing (arguably) rare birds, but we are also offered insights into other 
people's perspectives and values. Please post more! 


Shai Mitra
Bay Shore
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Subject: Re: Netiquette & Western Tanager report fatigue
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 18:16:53 -0500
Hi Lloyd,

In hindsight, I regretted not answering the bell when you called prior to 
disbanding Metro Birding Briefs. Like you, I thought the other mediums were 
sufficient for NYC/S Bird coverage and still do. 


I don't mind setting up something along the lines of MBB but I warn that I 
would be quite strict on what gets reported. 


Additionally, I should add that a few years ago I setup a twitter account for 
NY rarities. The account has not seen much activity of late but that 
could/easily change. It can be used by anyone wanting to tweet a NYS rarity 
out. The handle is,  AT NYRareBirdAlert. 


Rather than create another e-mail, I should add that a day of soggy Gulling 
from Floyd Bennett Field Brooklyn to as far as Robert Moses Long Island did not 
net me much. Highlights included a 3rd cycle type Lesser Black-backed Gull on 
the beach  AT  Field 5 RMSP and 1 juvenile Herring Gull, at FBF in front of the 
Aviator Building. The juvenile HERG (Herring Gull), was a rather clean looking 
individual, suggesting one from a local colony. 


Hopefully, no one kvetches about me slipping Gull stuff in here 😁

Cheers,

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

> On Nov 30, 2016, at 3:53 PM, Lloyd Spitalnik  
wrote: 

> 
> When I disbanded Metro Birding Briefs it was because I felt it outlived its 
usefulness. There were too many other places were reporting their Rarity 
sightings and info was getting diluted. It didn't take much time out of my life 
to run it. I'm not interested in resurrecting it but somebody (Andrew B. or 
even Dave K.) could set it up quite easily. Initially all it requires is 
setting up a list of acceptable birds to be reported. I used YahooGroups which 
is free to set it up. The main thing is whoever volunteers to do it has to be 
very strict about what is sent to the list. Integrity of the list is paramount. 
At least that's the way I maintained it. Several people over the years were 
taken off the site. 

> Birding Dude and Dave, how about it?
> All my best,
> Lloyd
> lloyd AT lloydspitalnikphotos.com
> 
>> On Wed, Nov 30, 2016 at 1:29 PM, Arie Gilbert  
wrote: 

>> Paul,
>> 
>> I concur. However...
>> 
>> Not everyone seeks the same info from 'the list'. Some folks actually like 
the daily reports of non rarities, {go figure} such as visitors who can get an 
idea of whats around by reading the archives in preparation for a trip to this 
area, etc. 

>> 
>> Back in the early days of the internet, with dial-up modems and pay per 
amount of time/data, there was a convention that should be resurrected. Trip 
reports were prefaced 'TR' in the subject line, rare birds were 'RBA', requests 
for information were 'RFI', and so on. That way after downloading the subject 
headers in one pass, {to save one from using up their monthly limit } one could 
go back in a second pass and download just the messages interested in. 

>> 
>> As far as too many Western tanager reports, provided its in the subject line 
its quite rapid to hit delete, but for those who are encumbered by work and 
other annoying distractions, knowing that a bird is still present { ie what is 
otherwise construed as too many reports } helps. 

>> 
>> If one uses an 'email client' such as Thunderbird, one can set up 'filters'. 
These can automatically delete unwanted messages and more. 

>> 
>> But what if we think of the list as a newspaper kinda. There is the comics, 
the financials, the sports pages, the local news etc. Do folks complain there 
is too much news and not enough comics? 

>> 
>> I wish that more stuff around the state was reported, and cross-posted from 
regional lists as well. In addition to TR or RFI or RBA adding the 'county' in 
the subject line would help too. 

>> 
>> Or perhaps we can get Lloyd to come out of retirement and put his Metro 
Birding Briefs back on. ;) 

>> 
>> Arie Gilbert
>> North Babylon, NY
>> 
>> WWW.Powerbirder.blogspot.com 
>>  WWW.qcbirdclub.org 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On 11/30/2016 9:28 AM, Paul R Sweet wrote:
>>> Personally I'd rather my inbox fill with reports of genuinely rare birds 
than mundane daily lists of birds seen in Central Park. E-bird is an 
appropriate place for this data? What if everyone posted their daily bird walk 
lists to this list? Just my opinion. 

>>> 
>>> Paul Sweet | Department of Ornithology | American Museum of Natural History 
| Central Park West  AT  79th St | NY 10024 | Tel 212 769 5780 | Mob 718 757 5941 

>>> 
>>> On Nov 29, 2016, at 10:20 AM, Deborah Allen  wrote:
>>> 
>>>> In my opinion, one report per day giving the general area where the bird 
was found is sufficient. 

>>>> 
>>>> Deb Allen
>>>> -----Original Message----- 
>>>> From: brian.whipple AT gmail.com 
>>>> Sent: Nov 29, 2016 9:27 AM 
>>>> To: Dennis Hrehowsik , "nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu" 
>>>> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Western Tanager city hall pk Manhattan YES 
>>>> 
>>>> I'm not tired of it. I still haven't been able to find time to see the 
bird, what with being out of town for Thanksgiving and being at work, so I 
appreciate the updates. I still want to know if I have a chance whenever I find 

>>>> time to run to City Hall Park. I would guess I'm speaking for other 
birders too. 

>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> In my opinion, a rarity is post-worthy for as long as it's present.
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> Thanks for posting, Dennis.
>>>> 
>>>>> On Tue, Nov 29, 2016 at 9:17 AM Dennis Hrehowsik 
 wrote: 

>>>>> I'm sure everyone is tired of reports about this bird and (I won't say 
but) it continues in same location of city hall park (east west path in NE 
corner) for anyone who was considering trying for it. Bird was hunkered in a 
tree with yellow leaves on south side of east west path near city hall gate it 
made one or two little half hearted nasally calls which alerted me to its 
presence. 

>>>>> 
>>>>> Dennis Hrehowsik
>>>>> Brooklyn
>>>>> --
>>>>> 
>>>>> NYSbirds-L List Info:
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>>>>> 
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>>>>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html
>>>>> 
>>>>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>>>>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>>>>> 
>>>>> --
>>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> --
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> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> All my best,
> Lloyd
> Lloyd Spitalnik Photography
> www.lloydspitalnikphotos.com
> --
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Subject: RE: St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species
From: Paul R Sweet <sweet AT amnh.org>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 21:50:19 +0000
Daily lists are great and as I mentioned previously E-bird is an excellent 
place to record such data. If everyone posted their Central Park lists to 
NYSBIRDS-L it would certainly dilute the power of the list. See Kevin McGowan's 
post here https://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/msg20105.html 
regarding the original intent of the list. 



-----Original Message-----
From: bounce-121044213-11471062 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-121044213-11471062 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Deborah Allen 

Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2016 4:28 PM
To: NYSBIRDS-L
Subject: [nysbirds-l] St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species

With the recent attention on lower Manhattan parks due to the continuing 
Western Tanager and multiple Chats, we thought it might be interesting to take 
a look at the birds that people reported in those same parks in the past. 
Reading many 19th-20th century articles about NYC birds in the Wilson Journal 
of Ornithology, the Auk and elsewhere, is much like reading the NYS list today 
- including the article we place below. Some may find lists and anecdotal 
observations of any era boring - but for us they are a gold mine. We have made 
it one of our endeavors to track and understand how the local avifauna has 
changed through time...and such notes, sightings, reliable reports (including 
Christmas Count lists) are the foundation that allows us to evaluate and write 
about what happened here in the past and to grapple with the why of the 
changes. For example, unless multiple birders took the time to write that 
Bobolinks were common nesters in certain parks in several boroughs of NYC in 
the early 20th century, we would be left thinking that these birds were always 
rare in NYC. Think of the Bobwhite Quail that bred at NYBG (Bronx) and other 
parks into the early 1930s, or the amazing occurrence of a Blue-gray 
Gnatcatcher in Central Park in 1901, or the first nest of the species in New 
York State in 1963. Without these sorts of anecdotal accounts how would we know 
the number of sparrow species that once were common summer residents in NYC 
parks in the 19th Century (Vesper Sparrow anyone)? What seems like dull (or 
amazing) reading today, may be very different to NYC birders in 2050 reading 
bird lists from different parks of the Big Apple in 2016. 


Delete is a good key on your computer. Not a big deal...but we'd prefer to see 
people reporting...it keeps a buzz going on a list...and we can keep grappling 
with the facts to better understand, the Why? How? and When? It’s great that 
birders make so many lists. We encourage them to take those data and address 
another important question: what does it mean? Meanwhile we have our articles 
and books to write and field research to do (greetings from Nepal and 
Thailand!). We have an amazing contingent of fellow birders who join us on bird 
walks sometimes seven days per week (during migration) - in Central Park and 
the other parks of NYC. They tell us about what they have found all the time - 
and that makes us smile because they are seeing/doing/learning - and enjoying 
the local environment and its birds. 


We hope everyone had a Happy Thanksgiving and wish you all the best for the 
Hanukah/Christmas/Kwanzaa Holidays, 


Deborah Allen and Robert DeCandido, PhD

-----

Ornithology of St. Paul's Church [1903-04]


Even under unpromising conditions, and in unexpected places, there is often 
something for the bird-student to investigate. This is illustrated by some 
surprising records from city parks, and even from the smaller green spots, 
oases in the great desert of brick and mortar. 


As such a record I here submit, for whatever it may be worth, the results of 
observations in Saint Paul's Churchyard, New York City, made mostly during 
intervals of a few moments at noon, and occasionally in the morning, and 
covering the migration periods of spring and fall of 1903, and spring of 1904. 


Saint Paul's Church property is situated nearly midway between the East and 
North Rivers, fronting east on Broadway, Church Street at the rear, Vesey 
Street on the north side and Fulton Street on the south, and it is thus in one 
of the busiest and noisiest sections of the city. 


At the rear of the property, along Church Street, there is the constant rumble 
and roar of the elevated railroad. This church property is about 332 feet long 
by 177 feet wide, of which area the church occupies a space about 78 by 120 
feet at the Broadway end, while at the Church Street end the Church School 
takes off another slice about 30 feet wide. The space remaining consists of the 
main yard at the rear of the church, between it and the school, and a wing on 
either side of the church, each about 120 feet long by 48 feet wide. A narrow 
walk completes the circuit of the churchyard, about twenty feet from its outer 
edge. The grounds contain three large, ten medium, and forty smaller trees, not 
counting several that were being removed at the time of my count, and a number 
of shrubs and flowers, grass-plots and grass grown graves. Even the most 
nerve-hardened native bird would hardly select such a spot for a summer home, 
nor attempt to take up winter quarters there. 


Throughout the greater part of the summer and winter the noisy flock of English 
Sparrows domiciled here holds undisputed sway. It seems probable that the 
native birds that occur in the churchyard during migrations are such as are 
attracted to the green spot while passing in their flights directly over it, 
and that they are in no case stragglers from the temporary residents of the 
near-by country or parks. I have visited the churchyard many times in summer 
and winter, and during these periods between regular migratory seasons, I have 
yet to see or hear of the occurrence of a native bird. I have no spring record 
later than May, and no fall record after November, save the one of the Tree 
Sparrow, December 8, in which case it could not be fairly said that the season 
of migration was past. 


From my data I am inclined to believe, too, that the bird movement of this very 
restricted area reflects in a small way, that of the outside country. When the 
greatest number of birds was seen in the churchyard, it generally transpired 
that a bird-wave was on in the country just outside the city, which was also 
reflected in Central Park. 


Misfortune is said to make strange bed-fellows, and certainly migration 
produces unexpected incongruities between birds and environment. Species whose 
sociability about the homes of man in the country would lead one to expect them 
to be among the first and most common to occur in the city parks and green 
spots, seem in many cases to be strangely wanting in the records for such 
places, while others of notably retiring habits, surprise one by their 
unexpected appearance in the crowded marts of civilization. The Woodcock has 
been recorded on the lawn of the American Museum of Natural History and in 
Trinity Cemetery, while my Saint Paul's records of Song and Chipping Sparrows, 
Robin, Yellow Warbler, and some other of our more familiar birds are 
surprisingly few. According to the indications of the three seasons covered by 
my observations, the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker appears to be a regular visitor, 
which seems rather surprising. 


Observations covering the period from the first to the last record were: for 
1903, spring, 5 days, no birds; but on 19 days, 18 species were observed and 59 
individuals counted. Total for spring 1903 was 24 days of observation. For Fall 
1903, there were 25 days with no birds seen; there were 47 days when 26 species 
and 187 individuals were seen. Total for fall 1903 was 72 days of observation. 


For spring 1904, there were 7 days with no birds seen; there were 24 days with
22 species seen and 87 individuals counted. Total for spring 1904 was 31 days 
of observation. 


For the three seasons, this gives an average of one species seen per 2.25 days 
of observation, and 3.64 individuals on average for each day of observation. 


The list of birds noted is as follows:

1. Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, 5 records, -- 1903: April 29, 1; Sept. 25, 1; Oct. 

12, 2; Oct. 22, 1; 1904, April 6, 1; total, 6.

2. Red-bellied Woodpecker, 1 record, -- Oct. 1, 1903, 1.

3. Eastern Phoebe, 3 records, 1903, Sept. 12, 1; Sept 25, 1; Oct. 15, 1; total, 
3. 


4. Least Flycatcher, 5 records, 1903, May 19, 3; May 22, 1; Sept. 24, 1; Sept.
25, 1; 1904, May 13, 1; total, 7.

5. White-crowned Sparrow, 2 records, -- 1904, April 25, 2; April 26, 2; total,
4 (probably only two birds).

6. White-throated Sparrow, 16 records, -- 1903, May 1, 1; May 16, 1 ; May 18, 
1; May 20, 1; May 26, 1; May 28, 1; Sept. 24, 1; Sept. 26, 1; Sept. 30, 1; Oct. 

19, 2; Oct. 23, 1; Oct. 24, 1; 1904 April 25, 2; April 26, 3; May 10, 1; May 
11, 1; total, 19. 


7. [American] Tree Sparrow, 1 record, --  Dec. 8, 1903, 1.

8. Chipping Sparrow, 6 records, -- 1903 May 11, 1; 1904, April 18, 2; May 3, 1; 
May 9, 1; May 11, 1; May 12, 1; total, 7. 


9. Field Sparrow, 5 records, 1903, Oct.8, 1; 1904, April 18, 1; April 28, 1; 
April 29, 1 May 2, 1; total, 5 


10. Slate-colored Junco, 24 records, 1903, April 29, 1; Sept. 26, 1; Sept. 29, 
2; Sept. 30, 3; Oct. 2, 1; Oct. 3, 1; Oct 12, 1; Oct. 13, 1; Oct. 14, 1; Oct. 

22, 3; Oct. 23, 1; Oct. 24, 1; Oct. 26, 3; Oct. 27, 2; Oct. 28, 2; Oct. 29, 6; 
Oct. 30, 1; Oct. 31, 5; Nov. 2, 1; Nov. 5, 1; Nov. 6, 1; Nov. 10, 1; Nov. 16, 
1; 1904, Apri1 30, 1; total, 45. 


11. Song Sparrow 1 record, -- April 30, 1904, 1.

12. [Eastern] Towhee, 7 records, --- 1903 May 1, male; May 6, male; May 7, 
female; Oct. 3, female; 1904, May 5, female; May 10, 2 females; May 13, male; 
May 16, female; total, 9. 


13. Indigo Bunting, 1 record, -- May 12, 1904, bright male.

14. Scarlet Tanager, 1 record, -- May 14, 1904, male.

15. Red-eyed Vireo, 2 records, -- 1904 May 12, 1; May 13, 1; total 2.

16. Blue-wing Warbler, 2 records, -- 1903, Sept. 8, 1; Sept. 25, 1; total 2.

17. Parula Warbler, 1 record, -- May 5, 1904, 1.

18. Yellow Warbler, 3 records, -- 1903 May 19, 1; May 22, 1; Sept. 4, 1; total, 
3. 


19. Black-throated Blue Warbler, 1 record, -- Oct. 22, 1903, 1.

20. Myrtle [Yellow-rumped] Warbler, 1 record, -- Oct. 13, 1904, 1.

21. Magnolia Warbler, 1 record, -- May 20, 1903, 1.

22. Palm Warbler, 1 record, -- Oct. 13, 1903, 1.

23. Ovenbird, 11 records, -- 1903, May 15, 1; May 16, 2; May 18, 2; May 19, 2; 
Sept. 1, 1; 1904, April 25, 1; Apr. 26, 1; May 5, 1; May 16, 1; May 17, 1; May 
18, 1; total, 14. 


24. [Northern] Water Thrush, 1 record, -- May 19, 1903, 1.

25. Northern [Common] Yellow-throat, 7 records -- 1903, May 14 , 1; May 22, 1; 
Oct. 12, 1; 1904 May 11, 1; May 20, 2; May 21, 1; May 24, 2; total , 9. 


26. Canadian Warbler, 1 record, -- May 21, 1903, 1.

27. American Redstart, 5 records, -- 1903, May 19, 1; Sept. 1, 2; Sept. 3, 1; 
Sept. 4, 1; 1904, May 20, 1; total, 6. 


28. Catbirds, 10 records, -- 1903, May 9, 1; May 15, 1; May 19, 1; May 20, 1; 
Sept 29, 1; 1904, May 5, 1; May 7, 2; May 12, 1; May 13, 1; May 20, 1; total, 
11. 


29. Brown Thrasher, 4 records, -- 1903, May 4, 1; May 5, 1; May 16, 1; May 18, 
1; May 20, 3; May 22, 2; May 23, 1; May 26, 1; May 27, 2; Sept. 30, 1; Oct. 3, 
1; 1904, May 5, 2; May 6, 1; May 24, 1; total, 19. 


30. Winter Wren, 1 record, -- Oct. 28, 1904, 1.

31. Brown Creeper, 1 record, -- Oct. 12, 1903, 1. 

32. Red-breasted Nuthatch, 3 records, -- 1903, Sept. 1, 1; Sept. 8, 1; Sept.
24, 1; total, 3.

33. [Black-capped] Chickadee 14 records, -- 1903, Sept. 15, 3; Sept. 23, 1; 
Sept. 25, 7; Sept. 29, 2; Sept. 30, 2; Oct. 1, 4; Oct. 6, 2; Oct. 7, 2; Oct. 

10, 1; Oct. 12, 2; Oct. 16, 3; Oct. 19, 1; Oct. 30, 1; total, 33.

34. Golden-crowed Kinglet, 3 records, 1903, Oct. 21, 1; Oct. 29, 1; Oct. 31, 1; 
total, 1. 


35. Ruby-crowned Kinglet, 5 records, 1903, Oct. 13, 2; Oct. 14, 3; Oct. 21, 2; 
Oct. 23, 1; Oct. 24, 1; total, 9. 


36. Wood Thrush, 2 records, 1903, Oct. 14, 1; 1904, May 17, 1; total 2.

37. Wilson's Thrush [= Veery], 5 records, 1903, May 19, 1; 1904, May 12, 2; May 
17, 1; May 20, 1; May 24, 2; total, 7. 


38. Olive-backed Thrush [= Swainson's Thrush], 14 records, 1903, May 22, 2; May 
27, 1; Sept. 8, 2; Sept. 9, 1; Sept. 29, 2; Sept. 30, 1; Oct. 1, 1; Oct. 14, 1; 
1904, May 11, 1; May 12, 2; May 17, 1; May 13, 1; May 18, 1; May 20, 1; total, 
16. 


39. Hermit Thrush 32 records, -- 1903 April 29, 6; May 4, 1; Sept. 30, 2; Oct.
6, 1; Oct. 12, 2; Oct. 13, 2; Oct.14, 8; Oct. 15, 4; Oct. 16, 1; Oct. 21, 1; 
Oct. 23, 3; Oct. 24, 2; Oct. 26, 2; Oct. 27, 4; Oct. 28, 2; Oct. 29, 2; Oct. 

30, 2; Oct. 31, 4; Nov. 2, 1; Nov. 4, 3; Nov. 5, 1; Nov. 9, 1; Nov. 10, 1; 
Nov.11, 1; Nov. 16, 1; Nov. 23, 2; Nov. 24, 2; 1904, April 25, 8; April 26, 2; 
April 30, 2; total, 79. 


40. American Robin, 2 records, --1903, Oct. 21, 1; Oct. 22, 1; total, 2.

41. Bluebird, 1 record, -- Nov. 6, 1903, 2.

In the record above given, where a species occurred on consecutive dates, 
doubtless in some cases the same individual remained two or more days. In one 
instance, at least, this was certainly the case. A Hermit Thrush, one of four 
noted October 15, 1903, had a bar of light yellowish on the left wing. This 
bird was again noted on the 16th, the only one seen on the latter date. In the 
majority of cases, however, such records probably represent different 
individuals, and as far as I am able to judge, the birds make but a brief stop 
in the churchyard. In some cases the birds noted in the morning were gone by 
noon, and others not noted in the morning had appeared. 


Truly Saint Paul's Churchyard seems to be for many migrant birds an oasis in a 
desert of brick and mortar, a spot where tired and hungry individuals may drop 
down to rest and feed, and incidentally to gladden the eye and quicken the 
pulse of the city confined nature lover. 


A Robin (young of the year) noted August 30, will perhaps necessitate the 
modification of the statement regarding absence of birds during summer, though 
it is quite possible that this individual had begun a migratory movement. 


With the exception of the Robin above referred to, the first migrant (a 
[Northern] Water-Thrush) was not noted until Sept. 13, and the indications of 
the churchyard evidence were that the fall migration was either begun late, or 
that the earlier migration was hurriedly performed, with few stops. 



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Subject: Re: St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species
From: brian.whipple AT gmail.com
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 23:29:46 +0000
Please limit postings to 2 cents.

On Wed, Nov 30, 2016 at 6:11 PM Dominic Garcia-Hall 
wrote:

> I find most people reporting to eBird are pretty good about including
> context (location etc) in the comments field - not least because when it's
> a genuine rarity eBird mandates some kind of commentary. In fact, I'd say
> once a rarity has had its initial few ebird reports, further comments tend
> to revert away from repeated descriptions of plumage and start to become a
> running track of where the bird is, or behaviour notes etc. Obviously the
> ability to look at / manipulate other facets of the eBird Big Data-set is
> totally invaluable.
>
> The GroupMe system we use in Northern New Jersey is very good for sharing
> rarity info. And tends to not suffer from reports of common birds, and is
> invite only so is kind of self-policing. But as others have pointed out,
> it's another app people gotta download and install on their phones....
>
> Personally i think nobody should be dissuaded from reporting. As David B
> pointed out, it's not hard to set email filters, and someone somewhere
> might just get themselves a lifer that otherwise would have gone un-shared
> if people hold back.
>
> Just my 3 cents
>
> Good birding.
> Dom
>
> www.antbirds.com
>
> www.aventuraargentina.com
>
> + 1 646 429 2667 <(646)%20429-2667>
>
> On 30 November 2016 at 17:19, Phil Jeffrey  wrote:
>
> The current intent of the list as given on the list's website is not what
> Kevin McGowan indicated may or may not be the original intent - and I've
> pointed this out recently - its even linked at the end of every message.
> Certainly this has not been a purely RBA list for quite some time -
> although that's more difficult to demonstrate given that there weren't any
> list archives (!) for quite some time either.
>
> eBird is only one tiny notch up from just a basic list of species.  The
> eBird reports - and I use them for trip research - are frequently without
> context so they read as:
>
> an interesting bird was seen somewhere in tens of acres of habitat
>
> and the lack of narrative is hopeless if you want to go find anything
> that's of interest to you that might drop below the anointed level of
> rarity.  I believe that eBird has damaged local birding lists by the
> removal of context from sightings.  IMHO, that context is extremely
> valuable to all level of birders and why I run my own list as I do.  I've
> mostly stopped reporting sightings to eBird for this reason.
>
> So no, eBird is not the solution.
>
> Phil Jeffrey
> Princeton
>
> On Wed, Nov 30, 2016 at 4:50 PM, Paul R Sweet  wrote:
>
> Daily lists are great and as I mentioned previously E-bird is an excellent
> place to record such data. If everyone posted their Central Park lists to
> NYSBIRDS-L it would certainly dilute the power of the list. See Kevin
> McGowan's  post here
> https://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/msg20105.html
> regarding the original intent of the list.
>
>
> --
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Subject: The NYSBirds List
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu>
Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2016 03:27:52 +0000
Hi everyone,

In theory there are two ways to reform the content of this listserv: (1) 
discourage posts that are less relevant; and (2) encourage posts that are more 
relevant. 


But given the very diverse sentiments expressed here in recent weeks, it's 
clear that people simply disagree about what is relevant. But criticizing 
certain kinds of posts is doubly harmful: not only is it demonstrably 
ineffective in reducing the frequency of the unwanted posts, whatever they may 
be in a particular instance, but it also discourages contributions from newer 
participants and those who don't appreciate being criticized. In other words, 
this ineffective tactic inadvertently conflicts with and damages the prospects 
for the only other means of improving the forum. I agree with those who have 
emphasized that neither the overall volume of reports, nor the proportion of 
what any one individual might regard as chaff, is ever great enough to 
discourage me from sifting this site every day for items of personal interest. 


These considerations came to mind recently when I overheard some Long Island 
birders debating whether to chase an Ash-throated Flycatcher (to me very rare) 
vs. "the Red Crossbill" (to me periodically ubiquitous). At this stage in my 
life, I'd much rather read a post from Tim Healy or Steve Walter about the 
tempo and mode of a day's migration than a how-to guide to chasing "the Red 
Crossbill." But I understand that some newer birders might actually have seen 
more Ash-throated Flycatchers than Red Crossbills, even though this is utterly 
contrary to my own development as a birder. And all of this is what makes 
birding, and NYSBirds, so wonderful--not only can we find how-to information 
for chasing (arguably) rare birds, but we are also offered insights into other 
people's perspectives and values. Please post more! 


Shai Mitra
Bay Shore
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Subject: Re: St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species
From: Dominic Garcia-Hall <dominic.hall AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 18:10:37 -0500
I find most people reporting to eBird are pretty good about including
context (location etc) in the comments field - not least because when it's
a genuine rarity eBird mandates some kind of commentary. In fact, I'd say
once a rarity has had its initial few ebird reports, further comments tend
to revert away from repeated descriptions of plumage and start to become a
running track of where the bird is, or behaviour notes etc. Obviously the
ability to look at / manipulate other facets of the eBird Big Data-set is
totally invaluable.

The GroupMe system we use in Northern New Jersey is very good for sharing
rarity info. And tends to not suffer from reports of common birds, and is
invite only so is kind of self-policing. But as others have pointed out,
it's another app people gotta download and install on their phones....

Personally i think nobody should be dissuaded from reporting. As David B
pointed out, it's not hard to set email filters, and someone somewhere
might just get themselves a lifer that otherwise would have gone un-shared
if people hold back.

Just my 3 cents

Good birding.
Dom

www.antbirds.com

www.aventuraargentina.com

+ 1 646 429 2667 <(646)%20429-2667>

On 30 November 2016 at 17:19, Phil Jeffrey  wrote:

> The current intent of the list as given on the list's website is not what
> Kevin McGowan indicated may or may not be the original intent - and I've
> pointed this out recently - its even linked at the end of every message.
> Certainly this has not been a purely RBA list for quite some time -
> although that's more difficult to demonstrate given that there weren't any
> list archives (!) for quite some time either.
>
> eBird is only one tiny notch up from just a basic list of species.  The
> eBird reports - and I use them for trip research - are frequently without
> context so they read as:
>
> an interesting bird was seen somewhere in tens of acres of habitat
>
> and the lack of narrative is hopeless if you want to go find anything
> that's of interest to you that might drop below the anointed level of
> rarity.  I believe that eBird has damaged local birding lists by the
> removal of context from sightings.  IMHO, that context is extremely
> valuable to all level of birders and why I run my own list as I do.  I've
> mostly stopped reporting sightings to eBird for this reason.
>
> So no, eBird is not the solution.
>
> Phil Jeffrey
> Princeton
>
> On Wed, Nov 30, 2016 at 4:50 PM, Paul R Sweet  wrote:
>
>> Daily lists are great and as I mentioned previously E-bird is an
>> excellent place to record such data. If everyone posted their Central Park
>> lists to NYSBIRDS-L it would certainly dilute the power of the list. See
>> Kevin McGowan's  post here https://www.mail-archive.com/n
>> ysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/msg20105.html regarding the original intent of the
>> list.
>>
>>
>> --
> *NYSbirds-L List Info:*
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> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to **eBird*
> *!*
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Subject: Re: St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species
From: Phil Jeffrey <phil.jeffrey AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 17:19:11 -0500
The current intent of the list as given on the list's website is not what
Kevin McGowan indicated may or may not be the original intent - and I've
pointed this out recently - its even linked at the end of every message.
Certainly this has not been a purely RBA list for quite some time -
although that's more difficult to demonstrate given that there weren't any
list archives (!) for quite some time either.

eBird is only one tiny notch up from just a basic list of species.  The
eBird reports - and I use them for trip research - are frequently without
context so they read as:

an interesting bird was seen somewhere in tens of acres of habitat

and the lack of narrative is hopeless if you want to go find anything
that's of interest to you that might drop below the anointed level of
rarity.  I believe that eBird has damaged local birding lists by the
removal of context from sightings.  IMHO, that context is extremely
valuable to all level of birders and why I run my own list as I do.  I've
mostly stopped reporting sightings to eBird for this reason.

So no, eBird is not the solution.

Phil Jeffrey
Princeton

On Wed, Nov 30, 2016 at 4:50 PM, Paul R Sweet  wrote:

> Daily lists are great and as I mentioned previously E-bird is an excellent
> place to record such data. If everyone posted their Central Park lists to
> NYSBIRDS-L it would certainly dilute the power of the list. See Kevin
> McGowan's  post here https://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/
> msg20105.html regarding the original intent of the list.
>
>
>

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Subject: St. Paul's Church, Manhattan 1903-04 - 41 species
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 16:27:37 -0500
With the recent attention on lower Manhattan parks due to the continuing 
Western Tanager and multiple Chats, we thought it might be interesting to take 
a look at the birds that people reported in those same parks in the past. 
Reading many 19th-20th century articles about NYC birds in the Wilson Journal 
of Ornithology, the Auk and elsewhere, is much like reading the NYS list today 
- including the article we place below. Some may find lists and anecdotal 
observations of any era boring - but for us they are a gold mine. We have made 
it one of our endeavors to track and understand how the local avifauna has 
changed through time...and such notes, sightings, reliable reports (including 
Christmas Count lists) are the foundation that allows us to evaluate and write 
about what happened here in the past and to grapple with the why of the 
changes. For example, unless multiple birders took the time to write that 
Bobolinks were common nesters in certain parks in several boroughs of NYC in 
the early 20th century, we would be left thinking that these birds were always 
rare in NYC. Think of the Bobwhite Quail that bred at NYBG (Bronx) and other 
parks into the early 1930s, or the amazing occurrence of a Blue-gray 
Gnatcatcher in Central Park in 1901, or the first nest of the species in New 
York State in 1963. Without these sorts of anecdotal accounts how would we know 
the number of sparrow species that once were common summer residents in NYC 
parks in the 19th Century (Vesper Sparrow anyone)? What seems like dull (or 
amazing) reading today, may be very different to NYC birders in 2050 reading 
bird lists from different parks of the Big Apple in 2016. 


Delete is a good key on your computer. Not a big deal...but we'd prefer to see 
people reporting...it keeps a buzz going on a list...and we can keep grappling 

with the facts to better understand, the Why? How? and When? It’s great that
birders make so many lists. We encourage them to take those data and address
another important question: what does it mean? Meanwhile we have our articles 
and 

books to write and field research to do (greetings from Nepal and Thailand!). 
We 

have an amazing contingent of fellow birders who join us on bird walks 
sometimes seven days per week (during migration) - in Central Park and the 
other parks of NYC. They tell us about what they have found all the time - and 
that makes us smile because they are seeing/doing/learning - and enjoying the 
local environment and its birds. 


We hope everyone had a Happy Thanksgiving and wish you all the best for the
Hanukah/Christmas/Kwanzaa Holidays,

Deborah Allen and Robert DeCandido, PhD

-----

Ornithology of St. Paul's Church [1903-04]


Even under unpromising conditions, and in unexpected places, there is often
something for the bird-student to investigate. This is illustrated by some
surprising records from city parks, and even from the smaller green spots,
oases in the great desert of brick and mortar.

As such a record I here submit, for whatever it may be worth, the results of
observations in Saint Paul's Churchyard, New York City, made mostly during
intervals of a few moments at noon, and occasionally in the morning, and
covering the migration periods of spring and fall of 1903, and spring of 1904.

Saint Paul's Church property is situated nearly midway between the East and
North Rivers, fronting east on Broadway, Church Street at the rear, Vesey
Street on the north side and Fulton Street on the south, and it is thus in one
of the busiest and noisiest sections of the city.

At the rear of the property, along Church Street, there is the constant rumble
and roar of the elevated railroad. This church property is about 332 feet long
by 177 feet wide, of which area the church occupies a space about 78 by 120
feet at the Broadway end, while at the Church Street end the Church School
takes off another slice about 30 feet wide. The space remaining consists of the
main yard at the rear of the church, between it and the school, and a wing on
either side of the church, each about 120 feet long by 48 feet wide. A narrow
walk completes the circuit of the churchyard, about twenty feet from its outer
edge. The grounds contain three large, ten medium, and forty smaller trees, not
counting several that were being removed at the time of my count, and a number
of shrubs and flowers, grass-plots and grass grown graves. Even the most
nerve-hardened native bird would hardly select such a spot for a summer home,
nor attempt to take up winter quarters there.

Throughout the greater part of the summer and winter the noisy flock of English
Sparrows domiciled here holds undisputed sway. It seems probable that the
native birds that occur in the churchyard during migrations are such as are
attracted to the green spot while passing in their flights directly over it,
and that they are in no case stragglers from the temporary residents of the
near-by country or parks. I have visited the churchyard many times in summer
and winter, and during these periods between regular migratory seasons, I have
yet to see or hear of the occurrence of a native bird. I have no spring record
later than May, and no fall record after November, save the one of the Tree
Sparrow, December 8, in which case it could not be fairly said that the season
of migration was past.

From my data I am inclined to believe, too, that the bird movement of this very
restricted area reflects in a small way, that of the outside country. When the
greatest number of birds was seen in the churchyard, it generally transpired
that a bird-wave was on in the country just outside the city, which was also
reflected in Central Park.

Misfortune is said to make strange bed-fellows, and certainly migration
produces unexpected incongruities between birds and environment. Species whose
sociability about the homes of man in the country would lead one to expect them
to be among the first and most common to occur in the city parks and green
spots, seem in many cases to be strangely wanting in the records for such
places, while others of notably retiring habits, surprise one by their
unexpected appearance in the crowded marts of civilization. The Woodcock has
been recorded on the lawn of the American Museum of Natural History and in
Trinity Cemetery, while my Saint Paul's records of Song and Chipping Sparrows,
Robin, Yellow Warbler, and some other of our more familiar birds are
surprisingly few. According to the indications of the three seasons covered by
my observations, the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker appears to be a regular visitor,
which seems rather surprising.

Observations covering the period from the first to the last record were: for
1903, spring, 5 days, no birds; but on 19 days, 18 species were observed and 59
individuals counted. Total for spring 1903 was 24 days of observation. For Fall
1903, there were 25 days with no birds seen; there were 47 days when 26 species
and 187 individuals were seen. Total for fall 1903 was 72 days of observation.

For spring 1904, there were 7 days with no birds seen; there were 24 days with
22 species seen and 87 individuals counted. Total for spring 1904 was 31 days
of observation.

For the three seasons, this gives an average of one species seen per 2.25 days
of observation, and 3.64 individuals on average for each day of observation.

The list of birds noted is as follows:

1. Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, 5 records, -- 1903: April 29, 1; Sept. 25, 1; Oct.
12, 2; Oct. 22, 1; 1904, April 6, 1; total, 6.

2. Red-bellied Woodpecker, 1 record, -- Oct. 1, 1903, 1.

3. Eastern Phoebe, 3 records, 1903, Sept. 12, 1; Sept 25, 1; Oct. 15, 1; total,
3.

4. Least Flycatcher, 5 records, 1903, May 19, 3; May 22, 1; Sept. 24, 1; Sept.
25, 1; 1904, May 13, 1; total, 7.

5. White-crowned Sparrow, 2 records, -- 1904, April 25, 2; April 26, 2; total,
4 (probably only two birds).

6. White-throated Sparrow, 16 records, -- 1903, May 1, 1; May 16, 1 ; May 18,
1; May 20, 1; May 26, 1; May 28, 1; Sept. 24, 1; Sept. 26, 1; Sept. 30, 1; Oct.
19, 2; Oct. 23, 1; Oct. 24, 1; 1904 April 25, 2; April 26, 3; May 10, 1; May
11, 1; total, 19.

7. [American] Tree Sparrow, 1 record, --  Dec. 8, 1903, 1.

8. Chipping Sparrow, 6 records, -- 1903 May 11, 1; 1904, April 18, 2; May 3, 1;
May 9, 1; May 11, 1; May 12, 1; total, 7.

9. Field Sparrow, 5 records, 1903, Oct.8, 1; 1904, April 18, 1; April  28,
1; April 29, 1 May 2, 1; total, 5

10. Slate-colored Junco, 24 records, 1903, April 29, 1; Sept. 26, 1; Sept. 29,
2; Sept. 30, 3; Oct. 2, 1; Oct. 3, 1; Oct 12, 1; Oct. 13, 1; Oct. 14, 1; Oct.
22, 3; Oct. 23, 1; Oct. 24, 1; Oct. 26, 3; Oct. 27, 2; Oct. 28, 2; Oct. 29, 6;
Oct. 30, 1; Oct. 31, 5; Nov. 2, 1; Nov. 5, 1; Nov. 6, 1; Nov. 10, 1; Nov. 16,
1; 1904, Apri1 30, 1; total, 45.

11. Song Sparrow 1 record, -- April 30, 1904, 1.

12. [Eastern] Towhee, 7 records, --- 1903 May 1, male; May 6, male; May 7,
female; Oct. 3, female; 1904, May 5, female; May 10, 2 females; May 13, male;
May 16, female; total, 9.

13. Indigo Bunting, 1 record, -- May 12, 1904, bright male.

14. Scarlet Tanager, 1 record, -- May 14, 1904, male.

15. Red-eyed Vireo, 2 records, -- 1904 May 12, 1; May 13, 1; total 2.

16. Blue-wing Warbler, 2 records, -- 1903, Sept. 8, 1; Sept. 25, 1; total 2.

17. Parula Warbler, 1 record, -- May 5, 1904, 1.

18. Yellow Warbler, 3 records, -- 1903 May 19, 1; May 22, 1; Sept. 4, 1; total,
3.

19. Black-throated Blue Warbler, 1 record, -- Oct. 22, 1903, 1.

20. Myrtle [Yellow-rumped] Warbler, 1 record, -- Oct. 13, 1904, 1.

21. Magnolia Warbler, 1 record, -- May 20, 1903, 1.

22. Palm Warbler, 1 record, -- Oct. 13, 1903, 1.

23. Ovenbird, 11 records, -- 1903, May 15, 1; May 16, 2; May 18, 2; May 19, 2;
Sept. 1, 1; 1904, April 25, 1; Apr. 26, 1; May 5, 1; May 16, 1; May 17, 1; May
18, 1; total, 14.

24. [Northern] Water Thrush, 1 record, -- May 19, 1903, 1.

25. Northern [Common] Yellow-throat, 7 records -- 1903, May 14 , 1; May 22, 1;
Oct. 12, 1; 1904 May 11, 1; May 20, 2; May 21, 1; May 24, 2; total , 9.

26. Canadian Warbler, 1 record, -- May 21, 1903, 1.

27. American Redstart, 5 records, -- 1903, May 19, 1; Sept. 1, 2; Sept. 3, 1;
Sept. 4, 1; 1904, May 20, 1; total, 6.

28. Catbirds, 10 records, -- 1903, May 9, 1; May 15, 1; May 19, 1; May 20, 1;
Sept 29, 1; 1904, May 5, 1; May 7, 2; May 12, 1; May 13, 1; May 20, 1; total,
11.

29. Brown Thrasher, 4 records, -- 1903, May 4, 1; May 5, 1; May 16, 1; May 18,
1; May 20, 3; May 22, 2; May 23, 1; May 26, 1; May 27, 2; Sept. 30, 1; Oct. 3,
1; 1904, May 5, 2; May 6, 1; May 24, 1; total, 19.

30. Winter Wren, 1 record, -- Oct. 28, 1904, 1.

31. Brown Creeper, 1 record, -- Oct. 12, 1903, 1. 

32. Red-breasted Nuthatch, 3 records, -- 1903, Sept. 1, 1; Sept. 8, 1; Sept.
24, 1; total, 3.

33. [Black-capped] Chickadee 14 records, -- 1903, Sept. 15, 3; Sept. 23, 1;
Sept. 25, 7; Sept. 29, 2; Sept. 30, 2; Oct. 1, 4; Oct. 6, 2; Oct. 7, 2; Oct.
10, 1; Oct. 12, 2; Oct. 16, 3; Oct. 19, 1; Oct. 30, 1; total, 33.

34. Golden-crowed Kinglet, 3 records, 1903, Oct. 21, 1; Oct. 29, 1; Oct. 31, 1;
total, 1.

35. Ruby-crowned Kinglet, 5 records, 1903, Oct. 13, 2; Oct. 14, 3; Oct. 21, 2;
Oct. 23, 1; Oct. 24, 1; total, 9.

36. Wood Thrush, 2 records, 1903, Oct. 14, 1; 1904, May 17, 1; total 2.

37. Wilson's Thrush [= Veery], 5 records, 1903, May 19, 1; 1904, May 12, 2; May
17, 1; May 20, 1; May 24, 2; total, 7.

38. Olive-backed Thrush [= Swainson's Thrush], 14 records, 1903, May 22, 2; May
27, 1; Sept. 8, 2; Sept. 9, 1; Sept. 29, 2; Sept. 30, 1; Oct. 1, 1; Oct. 14, 1;
1904, May 11, 1; May 12, 2; May 17, 1; May 13, 1; May 18, 1; May 20, 1; total,
16.

39. Hermit Thrush 32 records, -- 1903 April 29, 6; May 4, 1; Sept. 30, 2; Oct.
6, 1; Oct. 12, 2; Oct. 13, 2; Oct.14, 8; Oct. 15, 4; Oct. 16, 1; Oct. 21, 1;
Oct. 23, 3; Oct. 24, 2; Oct. 26, 2; Oct. 27, 4; Oct. 28, 2; Oct. 29, 2; Oct.
30, 2; Oct. 31, 4; Nov. 2, 1; Nov. 4, 3; Nov. 5, 1; Nov. 9, 1; Nov. 10, 1;
Nov.11, 1; Nov. 16, 1; Nov. 23, 2; Nov. 24, 2; 1904, April 25, 8; April 26, 2;
April 30, 2; total, 79.

40. American Robin, 2 records, --1903, Oct. 21, 1; Oct. 22, 1; total, 2.

41. Bluebird, 1 record, -- Nov. 6, 1903, 2.

In the record above given, where a species occurred on consecutive dates,
doubtless in some cases the same individual remained two or more days. In one
instance, at least, this was certainly the case. A Hermit Thrush, one of four
noted October 15, 1903, had a bar of light yellowish on the left wing. This
bird was again noted on the 16th, the only one seen on the latter date. In the
majority of cases, however, such records probably represent different
individuals, and as far as I am able to judge, the birds make but a brief stop
in the churchyard. In some cases the birds noted in the morning were gone by
noon, and others not noted in the morning had appeared.

Truly Saint Paul's Churchyard seems to be for many migrant birds an oasis in a
desert of brick and mortar, a spot where tired and hungry individuals may drop
down to rest and feed, and incidentally to gladden the eye and quicken the
pulse of the city confined nature lover.

A Robin (young of the year) noted August 30, will perhaps necessitate the
modification of the statement regarding absence of birds during summer, though
it is quite possible that this individual had begun a migratory movement. 

With the exception of the Robin above referred to, the first migrant (a
[Northern] Water-Thrush) was not noted until Sept. 13, and the indications of
the churchyard evidence were that the fall migration was either begun late, or
that the earlier migration was hurriedly performed, with few stops.  


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Subject: Re: Netiquette & Western Tanager report fatigue
From: David Barrett <miler6 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 16:26:16 -0500
When the discussion about rare bird posting options began a little over a
week ago, I was not sure a new list was needed. As others have pointed out,
NYSBirds serves a variety of purposes well, and it already has a relatively
large user base. To create yet another source for alerts -- in addition to
NYSBirds, eBird alerts, and the county-oriented Twitter/SMS alerts -- might
only serve to further fragment reporting. It probably would be better for
those who do not want certain kinds of reports to learn how to use Gmail
filters and labels (as I do) to limit what appears in the inbox and what
triggers an audible alert on the phone (the latter more restrictive than
the former).

That said, I did experiment with creating two lists using Google Groups,
which I believe offers the most feature-rich environment and, like Yahoo
Groups, is free.

The first, designed just for Manhattan, already has some reports on it, so
you can see the look and functionality:

https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=en#!forum/manhattan-rare-bird-alert

I also created but did not populate a similar list for New York City. I am
not sure what area people want covered.

If there is sufficient interest, I would be happy to work further on
implementing such a list -- which is, to say, setting a geographical range
for it, fine-tuning the posting rules, and requesting people to sign up for
posting privileges. Send your feedback directly, if you wish.

David Barrett
Manhattan



On Wed, Nov 30, 2016 at 3:53 PM, Lloyd Spitalnik <
lloyd AT lloydspitalnikphotos.com> wrote:

> When I disbanded Metro Birding Briefs it was because I felt it outlived
> its usefulness. There were too many other places were reporting their
>  Rarity sightings and info was getting diluted. It didn't take much time
> out of my life to run it. I'm not interested in resurrecting it but
> somebody (Andrew B. or even Dave K.) could set it up quite easily.
> Initially all it requires is setting up a list of acceptable birds to be
> reported. I used YahooGroups which is free to set it up. The main thing is
> whoever volunteers to do it has to be very strict about what is sent to the
> list. Integrity of the list is paramount. At least that's the way I
> maintained it. Several people over the years were taken off the site.
> Birding Dude and Dave, how about it?
> All my best,
> Lloyd
> lloyd AT lloydspitalnikphotos.com
>
> On Wed, Nov 30, 2016 at 1:29 PM, Arie Gilbert 
> wrote:
>
>> Paul,
>>
>> I concur. However...
>>
>> Not everyone seeks the same info from 'the list'.  Some folks actually
>> like the daily reports of non rarities, {go figure} such as visitors who
>> can get an idea of whats around by reading the archives in preparation for
>> a trip to this area, etc.
>>
>> Back in the early days of the internet, with dial-up modems and pay per
>> amount of time/data, there was a convention that should be resurrected.
>> Trip reports were prefaced 'TR' in the subject line, rare birds were 'RBA',
>> requests for information were 'RFI', and so on. That way after downloading
>> the subject headers in one pass, {to save one from using up their monthly
>> limit } one could go back in a second pass and download just the messages
>> interested in.
>>
>> As far as too many Western tanager reports,  provided its in the subject
>> line its quite rapid to hit delete, but for those who are encumbered by
>> work and other annoying distractions, knowing that a bird is still present
>> { ie what is otherwise construed as too many reports } helps.
>>
>> If one uses an 'email client' such as Thunderbird, one can set up
>> 'filters'.  These can automatically delete unwanted messages and more.
>>
>> But what if we think of the list as a newspaper kinda.  There is the
>> comics, the financials, the sports pages, the local news etc. Do folks
>> complain there is too much news and not enough comics?
>>
>> I wish that more stuff around the state was reported, and cross-posted
>> from regional lists as well.  In addition to TR or RFI or RBA adding the
>> 'county' in the subject line would help too.
>>
>> Or perhaps we can get Lloyd to come out of retirement and put his Metro
>> Birding Briefs back on.  ;)
>>
>> Arie Gilbert
>> North Babylon, NY
>>
>> WWW.Powerbirder.blogspot.com
>>  WWW.qcbirdclub.org
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On 11/30/2016 9:28 AM, Paul R Sweet wrote:
>>
>> Personally I'd rather my inbox fill with reports of genuinely rare birds
>> than mundane daily lists of birds seen in Central Park. E-bird is an
>> appropriate place for this data? What if everyone posted their daily bird
>> walk lists to this list? Just my opinion.
>>
>> Paul Sweet | Department of Ornithology | American Museum of Natural
>> History | Central Park West  AT  79th St | NY 10024 | Tel 212 769 5780
>> <(212)%20769-5780> | Mob 718 757 5941 <(718)%20757-5941>
>>
>> On Nov 29, 2016, at 10:20 AM, Deborah Allen 
>> wrote:
>>
>> In my opinion, one report per day giving the general area where the bird
>> was found is sufficient.
>>
>> Deb Allen
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: brian.whipple AT gmail.com
>> Sent: Nov 29, 2016 9:27 AM
>> To: Dennis Hrehowsik , "nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu"
>> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Western Tanager city hall pk Manhattan YES
>>
>> I'm not tired of it. I still haven't been able to find time to see the
>> bird, what with being out of town for Thanksgiving and being at work, so I
>> appreciate the updates. I still want to know if I have a chance whenever I
>> find time to run to City Hall Park. I would guess I'm speaking for other
>> birders too. In my opinion, a rarity is post-worthy for as long as it's
>> present. Thanks for posting, Dennis.
>>
>> On Tue, Nov 29, 2016 at 9:17 AM Dennis Hrehowsik <
>> deepseagangster AT gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> I'm sure everyone is tired of reports about this bird and (I won't say
>>> but) it continues in same location of city hall park (east west path in NE
>>> corner) for anyone who was considering trying for it.  Bird was hunkered in
>>> a tree with yellow leaves on south side of east west path near city hall
>>> gate it made one or two little half hearted nasally calls which alerted me
>>> to its presence.
>>>
>>> Dennis Hrehowsik
>>> Brooklyn
>>> --
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>>> 
 

>>>
>>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>>> 
 

>>>
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>>>
>>> --
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>
>
>
> --
> All my best,
> Lloyd
> Lloyd Spitalnik Photography
> www.lloydspitalnikphotos.com
> 
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Subject: NYS eBird Hotspots: BirdTrax Up & Running
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 15:58:26 -0500
The BirdTrax gadget on the wiki that taps into "Rarities" or plain
"Sightings" has been down for a few days. I've contacted the developer
(Zachary DeBruine) and he showed me how to get to BirdTrax where it is
currently being hosted now that the original site is no longer in play:

http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York

I've updated the code for the NYS page and the 62 county pages.
-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots

Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots


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Subject: Western Tanager, lower Manhattan NYC, 11/30
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 13:08:08 -0500
Wednesday, 30 November, 2016 -
City Hall Park, lower Manhattan, New York City

A Western Tanager continues at above park this Wednesday morning &  
seen thru a fresh rain at mid-day (start of more, which rain is very  
much needed region-wide).

The tanager seems fond of the trees (may be high in taller trees much  
of time!) in the part of the park that is between the 2 biggest  
buildings with-IN the park, & just to the east of that area, seen from  
main east-west path IN the park.

A Yellow-breasted Chat continues and was seen in late morning at the  
small (planted) traffic-island just barely across (a few yards) from  
the south edge of the above - it's being referred to as "millennium  
park" & that may be an official designation but is misleading only  
that, on-scene, this traffic-island of less than 15 yards width is in  
essence just a southern extension of City Hall park & is cut off from  
it by a few narrow curving traffic lanes (be very cautious going past  
this area!)

A minimum of 3 additional warbler species are lingering at City Hall  
park, the most uncommon by this date being Black-throated Blue (but,  
if anyone is wondering there are CBC - December records of the species  
in the region), with male & female plumages for 2 individuals, and at  
least one remaining Ovenbird, as well as the 4th warbler species noted  
below, ongoing here.

Other areas of same park are worth searching thru, especially the  
south sides, where even the tanager visited last Friday, at one  
point.  The south area with the (warm-weather-only) fountain is now  
being re-planted & trimmed for upcoming holidays, and a bit of that  
'disturbance' - with a dozen or more workers, & at least 1 leaf-blower  
in use, made for a modest dispersal of other native birds into nearby  
areas, with a few migrant species in adjacent much smaller green- 
spaces - such as 1 (ot at least 2) male Common Yellowthroats having  
gone over a road to the actual foot of the Brooklyn bridge (Manhattan  
side) ped & bike path, where there are many roses still in bloom, and  
a few other very common migrant / winter-visitor birds are also in  
these smaller areas, or may be at times.

Saint Paul's Chapel grounds, 1 short city block SW of the south end of  
City Hall Park, and Trinity Church's cemetery grounds, open to public,  
and a few short city blocks south from same, on west side of Broadway,  
are each worth a look for more birds - on any day.  A second Yellow- 
breasted Chat (or #1Chat if you prefer, as it was discovered well  
before the rare tanager-visitor) is ongoing in the Trinity Church  
cemetery, seen in the north parts at mid-day, with a bit of effort on  
my part.

City Hall Park is located south of Chambers Street, lower Manhattan -  
to the east of Broadway - it is also at the foot of the Brooklyn  
Bridge, & a few yards from the main pedestrian path to that bridge.   
The area the Tanager seems to be favoring is between the 2 major  
buildings IN the park, on / near an east-west path, be looking-up and  
listen for the distinctive calls from the tanager. It may move about  
at times & it will be interesting to see what these birds do as colder  
weather starts to come on (which for now, has not been an issue, and  
many, many insects have been available, perhaps more so with the  
substantial rain now falling, which may generate more insect- 
emergence, even in December.

There have been some Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers in the park, and some  
other birds have shown interest in the sapsucker's activities, but  
these insect-eating species ARE finding insect prey to feed on, and so  
far, those sapsuckers were not directly providing principal feeding  
via sap-runs, in caloric terms, to the insectivores - what they may  
provide though is a source of some areas where insect-prey can  
congregate, & thus a focus of food-availabilty in the trees the birds  
are using - all subject to change if-when the weather changes to  
dramatically-colder (it is 55-60+ degrees [Fahrenheit] in Manhattan  
for this rainy day).

Thanks to all who give updates on current status of these & other  
uncommon or rare species;  a tip of the hat to some who have been  
expanding the circle a bit, out from City Hall & Trinity Church areas  
in that part of Manhattan. Other interesting birds may be visiting in  
the general area too!  A Golden-crowned Kinglet, perhaps uncommon in  
downtown Manhattan, was photographed at City Hall park by Richard  
Aracil just recently, and there may be other uncommonly-seen migrants  
turning up.

- - - - - - - -
A citizens basic responsibility is to be aware of the consequences of  
his or her acts.
"They tried to bury us. They didn't know we were seeds." - DeRay  
Mckesson, American activist & writer.


good birding,

Tom Fiore,
Manhattan














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Subject: Re: Western Tanager city hall pk Manhattan YES
From: Paul R Sweet <sweet AT amnh.org>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 14:28:11 +0000
Personally I'd rather my inbox fill with reports of genuinely rare birds than 
mundane daily lists of birds seen in Central Park. E-bird is an appropriate 
place for this data? What if everyone posted their daily bird walk lists to 
this list? Just my opinion. 


Paul Sweet | Department of Ornithology | American Museum of Natural History | 
Central Park West  AT  79th St | NY 10024 | Tel 212 769 5780 | Mob 718 757 5941 


On Nov 29, 2016, at 10:20 AM, Deborah Allen 
> wrote: 


In my opinion, one report per day giving the general area where the bird was 
found is sufficient. 


Deb Allen
-----Original Message-----
From: brian.whipple AT gmail.com
Sent: Nov 29, 2016 9:27 AM
To: Dennis Hrehowsik , "nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu"
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Western Tanager city hall pk Manhattan YES

I'm not tired of it. I still haven't been able to find time to see the bird, 
what with being out of town for Thanksgiving and being at work, so I appreciate 
the updates. I still want to know if I have a chance whenever I find time to 
run to City Hall Park. I would guess I'm speaking for other birders too. 


In my opinion, a rarity is post-worthy for as long as it's present.

Thanks for posting, Dennis.

On Tue, Nov 29, 2016 at 9:17 AM Dennis Hrehowsik 
> wrote: 

I'm sure everyone is tired of reports about this bird and (I won't say but) it 
continues in same location of city hall park (east west path in NE corner) for 
anyone who was considering trying for it. Bird was hunkered in a tree with 
yellow leaves on south side of east west path near city hall gate it made one 
or two little half hearted nasally calls which alerted me to its presence. 


Dennis Hrehowsik
Brooklyn
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Subject: Re: Netiquette & Western Tanager report fatigue
From: Lloyd Spitalnik <lloyd AT lloydspitalnikphotos.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 15:53:24 -0500
When I disbanded Metro Birding Briefs it was because I felt it outlived its
usefulness. There were too many other places were reporting their  Rarity
sightings and info was getting diluted. It didn't take much time out of my
life to run it. I'm not interested in resurrecting it but somebody (Andrew
B. or even Dave K.) could set it up quite easily. Initially all it requires
is setting up a list of acceptable birds to be reported. I used YahooGroups
which is free to set it up. The main thing is whoever volunteers to do it
has to be very strict about what is sent to the list. Integrity of the list
is paramount. At least that's the way I maintained it. Several people over
the years were taken off the site.
Birding Dude and Dave, how about it?
All my best,
Lloyd
lloyd AT lloydspitalnikphotos.com

On Wed, Nov 30, 2016 at 1:29 PM, Arie Gilbert 
wrote:

> Paul,
>
> I concur. However...
>
> Not everyone seeks the same info from 'the list'.  Some folks actually
> like the daily reports of non rarities, {go figure} such as visitors who
> can get an idea of whats around by reading the archives in preparation for
> a trip to this area, etc.
>
> Back in the early days of the internet, with dial-up modems and pay per
> amount of time/data, there was a convention that should be resurrected.
> Trip reports were prefaced 'TR' in the subject line, rare birds were 'RBA',
> requests for information were 'RFI', and so on. That way after downloading
> the subject headers in one pass, {to save one from using up their monthly
> limit } one could go back in a second pass and download just the messages
> interested in.
>
> As far as too many Western tanager reports,  provided its in the subject
> line its quite rapid to hit delete, but for those who are encumbered by
> work and other annoying distractions, knowing that a bird is still present
> { ie what is otherwise construed as too many reports } helps.
>
> If one uses an 'email client' such as Thunderbird, one can set up
> 'filters'.  These can automatically delete unwanted messages and more.
>
> But what if we think of the list as a newspaper kinda.  There is the
> comics, the financials, the sports pages, the local news etc. Do folks
> complain there is too much news and not enough comics?
>
> I wish that more stuff around the state was reported, and cross-posted
> from regional lists as well.  In addition to TR or RFI or RBA adding the
> 'county' in the subject line would help too.
>
> Or perhaps we can get Lloyd to come out of retirement and put his Metro
> Birding Briefs back on.  ;)
>
> Arie Gilbert
> North Babylon, NY
>
> WWW.Powerbirder.blogspot.com
>  WWW.qcbirdclub.org
>
>
>
>
>
> On 11/30/2016 9:28 AM, Paul R Sweet wrote:
>
> Personally I'd rather my inbox fill with reports of genuinely rare birds
> than mundane daily lists of birds seen in Central Park. E-bird is an
> appropriate place for this data? What if everyone posted their daily bird
> walk lists to this list? Just my opinion.
>
> Paul Sweet | Department of Ornithology | American Museum of Natural
> History | Central Park West  AT  79th St | NY 10024 | Tel 212 769 5780
> <(212)%20769-5780> | Mob 718 757 5941 <(718)%20757-5941>
>
> On Nov 29, 2016, at 10:20 AM, Deborah Allen 
> wrote:
>
> In my opinion, one report per day giving the general area where the bird
> was found is sufficient.
>
> Deb Allen
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: brian.whipple AT gmail.com
> Sent: Nov 29, 2016 9:27 AM
> To: Dennis Hrehowsik , "nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu"
> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Western Tanager city hall pk Manhattan YES
>
> I'm not tired of it. I still haven't been able to find time to see the
> bird, what with being out of town for Thanksgiving and being at work, so I
> appreciate the updates. I still want to know if I have a chance whenever I
> find time to run to City Hall Park. I would guess I'm speaking for other
> birders too. In my opinion, a rarity is post-worthy for as long as it's
> present. Thanks for posting, Dennis.
>
> On Tue, Nov 29, 2016 at 9:17 AM Dennis Hrehowsik <
> deepseagangster AT gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> I'm sure everyone is tired of reports about this bird and (I won't say
>> but) it continues in same location of city hall park (east west path in NE
>> corner) for anyone who was considering trying for it.  Bird was hunkered in
>> a tree with yellow leaves on south side of east west path near city hall
>> gate it made one or two little half hearted nasally calls which alerted me
>> to its presence.
>>
>> Dennis Hrehowsik
>> Brooklyn
>> --
>>
>> NYSbirds-L List Info:
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
>> 
 

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>> 
 

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>> 
 

>>
>> ARCHIVES:
>> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
>> 
 

>> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
>> 
 

>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html
>> 
 

>>
>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>> 
 

>>
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All my best,
Lloyd
Lloyd Spitalnik Photography
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Subject: Re: The NYSBirds List
From: Mike <mikec02 AT optonline.net>
Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2016 09:06:31 -0500
See, I would have just assumed the CBS News crew was on the scene because the 
the rabid coyote was also in the running for a cabinet post. 


>>Indeed, with S. Palin and Linda McMahon in consideration perhaps the Hulkster 
and Rowdy Roddy Piper are on deck. 



Mike Cooper
Ridge, LI, NY




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Subject: Upcoming Brooklyn Pelagic on Jan. 7
From: Paul Guris <paulagics.com AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 22:03:28 -0500
See Life Paulagics is running our annual winter pelagic trip on Saturday,
Jan. 7 out of Brooklyn for winter seabirds.  We will be searching for
Northern Fulmar, Razorbill, Common Murre, Dovekie, Atlantic Puffin,
Kittiwake, Iceland, Glaucous, and Lesser Black-backed Gulls, Red Phalarope,
Northern Gannet, whales, dolphins, and anything else we might come across.
Dovekie, in particular, has become a specialty for us on these trips and
we've had some good counts in the past, including a 9,000+ day out of New
York!  Less common species we've seen on NY winter pelagics include
Thick-billed Murre, Black Guillemot, and even the only record of Western
Gull for the Atlantic Coast.

Our plan is to head offshore and as soon as possible chum up a flock of
gulls behind us.  We'll drag them around all day which in turn should
attract some of our target birds.  Fulmars, Kittiwakes, and even Razorbills
are often attracted.  The Gannet show can be amazing with birds coming very
close and diving for chum in our wake.  If you're going to take photographs
and plan on bringing a 500-600mm lens, we suggest you also bring a shorter
zoom.  It can be tough to fit a bird with a 6 foot wingspan into your frame
with a very long lens.

Here are the particulars:

Date:  Sat, Jan 7
Time:  5:00 AM - approx 7:00 PM
Cost:  $190
Boat:  Brooklyn VI


We will be aboard the comfortable 100' Brooklyn VI.  The boat has a full
walk-around lower deck, upper deck, heated cabin, and galley where you can
get hot food and drinks.  The boat leaves out of Sheepshead Bay in
Brooklyn.  We intend to spend our entire time in NY state pelagic waters.

For more information check out our website.  If you have questions or wish
to make a reservation, please contact us by email or phone.  We hope to see
you aboard!


-- 







*Paul A. GurisSee Life PaulagicsPO Box 161Green Lane, PA
18054215-234-6805www.paulagics.com paulagics.com
 AT gmail.com info AT paulagics.com
*

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Subject: eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 20:37:29 -0500
When I work on the NYS eBird Hotspots wiki I'll compare the previous bar
chart list of species with the current one to pick up any additions or
deletions. By going to each county's 'Overview' page you can determine the
date the species was added for each county.

For each county on the wiki click the 'Overview' link on the 'Explore a
Location' line:
— http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York

Yellow highlights a species added for the first time this year.

*Orleans County: *
Harlequin Duck (23-Nov-2016)

*Richmond County:*
Western Tanager (24-Nov-2016)

-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots

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Subject: NYS eBird Hotspots: State, Counties & Locations Updated (Dec/'16)
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 19:32:34 -0500
Thanks to  AT Team_eBird for their dedication to keeping eBird.org running
smoothly and for the group of New York State hotspot moderators for their
time reviewing shared location suggestions.

The wiki page site was developed for accessing data on eBird.org and
includes additional links to birding resources at the county and location
levels.

Species totals have been updated for all county pages. This includes the
total number of species with the equivalent color code highlighting the
county name based on the colors used on eBird's maps. The alphabetical list
of counties on the main page has been updated with total spp. #.

*Hotspot pages*: All location pages have been updated on the wiki. These
include 380 pages representing a total of 860 out of 5,274 hotspots
(16.3%). Updates involve # of species and color codings based on species #
along with updated 2016 periods for the bar chart tables displaying the
Month: Dec./2016 and the current two month period Nov. - Dec./2016 along
with the current year.

For the following counties there are individual wiki pages for the *Top 10
locations* at the top of the list of shared locations: Cayuga, Erie,
Monroe, Niagara, Orange, Oswego, Seneca, Tompkins, Kings (Brooklyn),
Queens, Richmond (Staten Island), Nassau and Suffolk Counties. For
Westchester County and New York (Borough of Manhattan) County all hotspots
have links to shared location pages.

*Bar Charts* (Species Lists): For all county and top 10 location pages
there are tables showing the months, seasons and several time frames for
the current year. Clicking any of these will bring up a complete list of
species and other taxa with bar charts representing abundance. To see a
list of species for *all* periods click on the name above the months i.e.
'New York State (473 spp.)' or 'Delaware County (223 spp.)'.

*Maps of sightings*: After bringing up a bar chart list you'll see a MAP
button to the right of each species. Clicking this will produce a map of
the latest sightings. Red icons show sightings within the past 30 days.
Click on the icons to see a list of who reported each species and click on
'Checklist' to view their submission. Click on 'Explore Rich Media' in the
right sidebar to view locations with photos, audio or video. These also
exist for any multi-location page combining the hotspots associated with
the location i.e. Durand-Eastman Park in Monroe County with its 16
locations.

*Printable Checklists*: a link has been created to produce an eBird
checklist (PDF format) for all hotspots on the wiki site. Additional
details are in this email sent to the list <
https://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/msg20153.html >.

*Tide Graphs* exist for New York County, Kings County (Brooklyn) and
Richmond County (Staten Island). There's a quick link to the tide graphs on
the "Go To >" line highlighted in blue for each location. If there are
multiple graphs on a page the left/right is generally north/south or
west/east. If you spot any issues please let me know off line.

Click 'Overview' on any of the wiki pages to bring up a sortable list of
all species along with the latest checklists submitted and a list of the
Top eBirders.

Check out 'My Location Life List', 'My County Life List' and 'My State Life
List' links on their respective pages.

For each location page click on 'Google Map Directions' to bring up a
Google Map page. On Google Maps click 'Directions' then 'Transit' to plot a
public transportation route. By clicking 'More Options and Times' you can
refine your search. This also works with 'Driving' and 'Walking'.

— Home page: http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York
— Clickable map:
http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York#ClickableMap
— Alphabetical counties:
http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York#Alphabetical

Enjoy!
-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots

Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots


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NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

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Subject: Re: Western Tanager city hall pk Manhattan YES
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 10:19:42 -0500