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Updated on Saturday, June 25 at 02:22 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Smith:s Longspur,©Barry Kent Mackay

25 Jun White-faced Ibis currently present South End of East Pond JBWR [Gail Benson ]
25 Jun Ruff @ JBWR 3:00 [Tim Healy ]
25 Jun Re: Ruff Update @ JBWR 1:59 pm [Andrew Baksh ]
25 Jun Ruff Update [Ken ]
25 Jun Ruff at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge (Queens Co} [Ken ]
25 Jun Sandwich Tern Cupsogue CP, Suffolk Co. [Patricia Lindsay ]
25 Jun White-faced Ibis, Jamaica Bay (Yes) [Anthony Collerton ]
25 Jun Suffolk County Goatsuckers 6-24-16 [Arie Gilbert ]
24 Jun NYC Area RBA: 24 June 2016 [Ben Cacace ]
24 Jun Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge -- No White-face this AM ["syschiff" ]
24 Jun Re: [Bruce Horwith ]
24 Jun Brooklyn Bird Club Evening Presentation [Dennis Hrehowsik ]
24 Jun Massapequa Raven [Robert Taylor ]
24 Jun Wood and Hermit Thrushes Southern Tier of NY [David Nicosia ]
22 Jun Leucistic Robin at Brooklyn Botanic Garden [BradleyKlein mail ]
22 Jun Orchard Beach Cliff Swallows [Jack Rothman ]
21 Jun White-faced Ibis and Hooded Merganser Jamaica Bay [Adrian Burke ]
21 Jun Acadian Flycatcher and Jamaica Bay East Pond Water Level Update... [Andrew Baksh ]
21 Jun Royals Terns on Great Gull Island [Joseph DiCostanzo ]
21 Jun Cupsogue Birding 6-19 [Andrew Baksh ]
21 Jun Re: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. [Robert Paxton ]
21 Jun Re: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. ["Matthew A. Young" ]
20 Jun Re: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. [David Nicosia ]
20 Jun Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
20 Jun RE: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. [Shaibal Mitra ]
20 Jun New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. [David Nicosia ]
20 Jun New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. [David Nicosia ]
19 Jun Central Park NYC - Sunday June 19, 2016 - incl. R-t hummingbird & 4 sp. of Wood Warblers [Deborah Allen ]
19 Jun Cliff Swallows at Van Cortlandt Park ["Carney, Martin" ]
19 Jun Cliff Swallows Van Cortlandt Park Bronx- YES [Dawn Hannay ]
19 Jun Re:speaking of cliff swallows and Van Cortlandt's [Larry Trachtenberg ]
18 Jun Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx Co. 6/18 [Thomas Fiore ]
18 Jun possible Siberian Common Tern, WESA, etc - Cupsogue, Suffolk Co []
18 Jun Fwd: [cayugabirds-l] Black-necked Stilt at Knox-Marcellus Marsh at Montezuma [Donna Schulman ]
18 Jun Tri-colored Heron @ Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge [Andrew Baksh ]
18 Jun Van Cortlandt Ciiff Swallows. [Nadir Souirgi ]
18 Jun Re: White-faced Ibis present now (JBWR) [Andrew Baksh ]
18 Jun White-faced Ibis present now (JBWR) [Gail Benson ]
17 Jun NYC Area RBA: 17 June 2016 [Ben Cacace ]
17 Jun Garganey at Montezuma NWR: Friday Si!!! [BOB WASHBURN ]
17 Jun Re: Any recent Garganey info? [Robert Lewis ]
17 Jun Re: Any recent Garganey info? [Scott Haber ]
17 Jun Re: Any recent Garganey info? [Karyn ]
16 Jun Re: Garganey YES [Liz Martens ]
16 Jun Jamaica Bay WR ["syschiff" ]
16 Jun Re: [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands - may be a released rehabilitated bird [jimmy lee ]
16 Jun Any recent Garganey info? [BOB WASHBURN ]
16 Jun Re: Garganey YES [BOB WASHBURN ]
16 Jun 16 "Anhinga's" taking some sun on McGann-Mercy High School's Softball Field in Riverhead ! [robert adamo ]
16 Jun Red-Headed Woodpecker, Robert Moses SP [Jonathan Stocker ]
14 Jun Jamaica Bay East Pond/ Queens County [Sean Sime ]
14 Jun Adirondack Birding Festival Highlights [Joan Collins ]
14 Jun Queens County Bird Club - Upcoming Meeting - Wed. 06/15 - Mike DiGiorgio presents "A Bird Painter's Journey" ["Nancy Tognan" ]
13 Jun NYS eBird Hotspots - State, Counties & Locations Updated (Jun/'16) [Ben Cacace ]
13 Jun Re: [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands [Gerald Smith ]
13 Jun Re: [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands - may be a released rehabilitated bird [Ardith Bondi ]
13 Jun Re: [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands [Ardith Bondi ]
13 Jun Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
13 Jun Re: [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands [Scott Varney ]
13 Jun RE: [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands [Will Raup ]
13 Jun Re: [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands [Gerald Smith ]
13 Jun Re:[MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands [Richard Guthrie ]
13 Jun Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands [Richard Guthrie ]
13 Jun Wilson's Phalarope seen today? [Brian Whipple ]
13 Jun LABU Liberty State Park [Shane Blodgett ]
13 Jun Re:[NJBIRDS] Lark Bunting, Hudson County [Dominic Garcia-Hall ]
12 Jun Snow in June [Curt McDermott ]
12 Jun FW: Garganey YES ["Carena Pooth" ]
12 Jun Wilson's Phalarope ["Carney, Martin" ]
12 Jun Central Park NYC - Sunday June 12, 2016 -Am. Redstarts & Black-and-white Warbler [Deborah Allen ]
12 Jun Phalarope on EAST pond [Pat Aitken ]
12 Jun Wilson's Phalarope yes [Pat Aitken ]
12 Jun Garganey YES [Carena Pooth ]
12 Jun Garganey YES! [Sean Sime ]
12 Jun Wilson's Phalarope continues-Jamaica Bay East Pond (Sunday) [Karen Fung ]
11 Jun Re: Arctic Tern at Breezy Point [Long Island Birding ]

Subject: White-faced Ibis currently present South End of East Pond JBWR
From: Gail Benson <gbensonny AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 15:21:40 -0400
Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge south end of East Pond -White-faced Ibis. (The
Ruff left the pond half an hour ago -flew over the trees. Waiting for it to
come back.)

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Ruff @ JBWR 3:00
From: Tim Healy <tph56 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 15:03:53 -0400
The Ruff was still visible from the Big John's overlook, well south of the 
Raunt on the east side 10 mins ago. It was moving south at a very fast pace 
initially, but it has slowed to forage on a mudflat just before the cove bends 
out of view. I imagine the south end would supply good views as well, but one 
should take care not to step out and disturb the bird from the southern 
shoreline. In the process of sending this email, the bird took off and looked 
to be headed north, somewhat towards the bay. Not currently in view. 


Really handsome individual! Rufous with a somewhat darker neck ruff. Thanks to 
all who update on the whereabouts and comings and goings of the bird. 


Cheers!
-Tim H

> On Jun 25, 2016, at 2:00 PM, Andrew Baksh  wrote:
> 
> The Ruff is being seen at the north end of the East Pond. It is on the east 
side and making its way back south. If you are at the overlook at Big John's, 
look north or south along the east side and you should be able to pick this 
bird up. 

> 
> It looks a bit like "Rufous Ruff" from 2012 but it has a lot more breeding 
plumage - 
http://birdingdude.blogspot.com/2012/07/2nd-ruff-at-jamaica-bay-wildlife-refuge.html?m=1 

> 
> For anyone wondering about the various East Pond areas nomenclatures, please 
check out the map https://www.scribd.com/mobile/doc/153262543/East-Pond-Guide 

> 
> Cheers,
> 
> --------
> "I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule 
of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ 
Frederick Douglass 

> 
> 風 Swift as the wind
> 林 Quiet as the forest
> 火 Conquer like the fire
> 山 Steady as the mountain
> Sun Tzu  The Art of War
> 
>> (__/)
>> (= '.'=)                                            
>> (") _ (")                                     
>> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 
> 
> Andrew Baksh
> www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
> 
>> On Jun 25, 2016, at 12:50 PM, Ken  wrote:
>> 
>> Last seen at s/s of Raunt, best viewed from overlook east of Big John's 
Pond. 

>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>> --
>> 
>> NYSbirds-L List Info:
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
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>> 
>> ARCHIVES:
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>> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html
>> 
>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>> 
>> --
> --
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
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> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Re: Ruff Update @ JBWR 1:59 pm
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 14:00:29 -0400
The Ruff is being seen at the north end of the East Pond. It is on the east 
side and making its way back south. If you are at the overlook at Big John's, 
look north or south along the east side and you should be able to pick this 
bird up. 


It looks a bit like "Rufous Ruff" from 2012 but it has a lot more breeding 
plumage - 
http://birdingdude.blogspot.com/2012/07/2nd-ruff-at-jamaica-bay-wildlife-refuge.html?m=1 


For anyone wondering about the various East Pond areas nomenclatures, please 
check out the map https://www.scribd.com/mobile/doc/153262543/East-Pond-Guide 


Cheers,

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

> On Jun 25, 2016, at 12:50 PM, Ken  wrote:
> 
> Last seen at s/s of Raunt, best viewed from overlook east of Big John's Pond.
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> --
> 
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
> 
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html
> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> 
> --

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Ruff Update
From: Ken <feustel AT optonline.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 12:50:45 -0400
Last seen at s/s of Raunt, best viewed from overlook east of Big John's Pond.

Sent from my iPhone

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Ruff at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge (Queens Co}
From: Ken <feustel AT optonline.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 12:23:06 -0400
Male currently on east side of East Pond below Raunt, with Laughing Gulls.

Ken & Sue Feustel 

Sent from my iPhone

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--
Subject: Sandwich Tern Cupsogue CP, Suffolk Co.
From: Patricia Lindsay <pjlindsay AT optonline.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 12:16:57 -0400
This morning just before 10:00 as the tide was coming up an adult Sandwich Tern 
appeared on the flats. It remained about an hour then flew off. 


Sent from my iPhone

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--
Subject: White-faced Ibis, Jamaica Bay (Yes)
From: Anthony Collerton <icollerton AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 09:25:00 -0400
Just flew in to the SE corner of the East Pond (9:25am)

Sent from my iPhone

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--
Subject: Suffolk County Goatsuckers 6-24-16
From: Arie Gilbert <ArieGilbert AT optonline.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 09:11:39 -0400
Last night a group of us went in search of goatsuckers.

The first sucky thing we encountered was an accident on sunrise highway 
that closed all three lanes and herded the traffic off onto the service 
road. Police closed all of the lanes because it involved a death, and 
hours later on our return the road was still closed to traffic eastbound.

After finally arriving in Quogue and walking some roads we heard a Chuck 
wills widow calling, after some time, in this location: 
https://goo.gl/maps/STy7SXHkRqN2   but it was distant and came from west 
of where we were. we could not relocate it afterwards.

on our way back home we stopped at Hampton west park 
https://goo.gl/maps/JxoKFuvdM6U2  where we heard 2 distant calling whip 
poor wills.

Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY

WWW.Powerbirder.blogspot.com
  WWW.qcbirdclub.org





-----

Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2016.0.7640 / Virus Database: 4604/12488 - Release Date: 06/25/16


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--
Subject: NYC Area RBA: 24 June 2016
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 22:44:05 -0400
- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Jun. 24, 2016
* NYNY1606.24

- Birds mentioned
WHITE-FACED IBIS+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

American Bittern
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Piping Plover
Willet (subspecies "Western Willet")
Red Knot
White-rumped Sandpiper
WESTERN SANDPIPER
Gull-billed Tern
Black Tern
Roseate Tern
COMMON TERN (Siberian form longipennis)
Royal Tern
Barn Owl
Acadian Flycatcher
Cliff Swallow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Summer Tanager
BLUE GROSBEAK

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

        Gary Chapin - Secretary
        NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
        125 Pine Springs Drive
        Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

To report sightings call:
Tom Burke (212) 372-1483 (weekdays, during the day)
Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 (Long Island)

Compiler: Tom Burke, Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, June 24th 2016
at 6pm. The highlights of today's tape are WHITE-FACED IBIS, BLUE GROSBEAK,
WESTERN SANDPIPER, interesting COMMON TERNS and more.

An adult WHITE-FACED IBIS has been continuing its fairly regular visits to
the southeast corner of the East Pond at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge as
reported each day from Saturday at least through Tuesday afternoon.
Diligent scanning through the flock of Glossy Ibis gathered there as they
continuously cycle into and out of the pond plus some patience have and may
still produce views of the White-faced. Saturday morning the White-faced
stayed for about 25 minutes and then flew out alone towards the marsh south
of the former West Pond but it could not be relocated there. Also Saturday
morning a TRICOLORED and four LITTLE BLUE HERONS were feeding at mid-tide
on the flats on the former West Pond. The south marsh and adjacent area has
also been attracting one or two GULL-BILLED TERNS lately. Two ROYAL TERNS
flew east over the East Pond Saturday morning and an ACADIAN FLYCATCHER
that had been in the vicinity at Big John's Pond and was still singing
there Tuesday morning and if there one should certainly visit the bird
blind at Big John's Pond to view the young BARN OWLS in the nest box across
the pond but please do nothing to disturb them.

Out east at least 3 BLUE GROSBEAKS have been present among the nice
assemblage of birds around the grasslands at the former Grumman airport in
Calverton. The Grosbeaks, including adult and subadult plumaged males and a
female, have been in the vicinity at the southwest section of the airport
property and surrounding fields near the terminus of Line Road at Grumman
Boulevard. As these birds are hopefully nesting please do nothing that
would interrupt their activities. Also in that area could still be a SUMMER
TANAGER pair present earlier and GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS are common nesters in
the grasslands there.

At Cupsogue County Park in Westhampton Dunes where an entry fee is now
charged shorebirds present recently on the celebrated flats there featured
an apparent adult WESTERN SANDPIPER last Saturday along with some PIPING
PLOVERS, single WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER and RED KNOT, a Western WILLET among
the Easterns and small numbers of a variety of species that will not be
completing the journey farther north this summer. An AMERICAN BITTERN was
also seen Saturday along with a ROYAL TERN and two ROSEATE TERNS while
quite interesting there was a COMMON TERN showing aspects of the Siberian
form longipennis though solidifying this identification would require much
more detail than is currently available. Interestingly as well a similarly
plumaged COMMON TERN was nicely photographed yesterday at Nickerson Beach
west of Point Lookout. But again it is difficult to determine given the
variability among age groups of COMMON TERNS exactly which subspecies is
involved here. A BLACK TERN was also at Nickerson Thursday and scattered
ROYAL TERNS have occurred from Plumb Beach and Nickerson Beach all the way
out to Great Gull Island.

CLIFF SWALLOWS have been present within New York City limits recently but a
couple feeding over the fields at Van Cortlandt Park Saturday through
Wednesday and others constructing a couple of nests at Orchard Beach, these
in the Bronx.

To phone in reports on Long Island, call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or
weekdays call Tom Burke at (212) 372-1483.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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--
Subject: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge -- No White-face this AM
From: "syschiff" <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 14:23:29 -0400
Jamaica Bay WR, 9:00-11:00 AM 24 June

Joe Giunta and I (Sy Schiff) went to the south end, walking on a newly created 
path through the phragmites to reach a small mud flat that held us and a scope. 
(The water is coming down and for the first time in years, early enough for the 
beginning return shorebird flight). 


We spent the morning on the East Pond, first scanning north from the south end 
and then south from Big Johns Pond. Besides the Mallard and Black Ducks, there 
were a few Gadwall. Shorebirds consisted of Willet, American Oystercatchers and 
a pair of Greater Yellowlegs. A dozen + Forster's Terns were actively feeding 
in the pond. No other terns. Willow Flycatchers were calling at the South end, 
but we did not find an earlier reported Acadian Flycatcher. 


 At Big Johns Pond, a Barn Owl looked out of the box watching the Snowy Egrets 
fishing while both Night-Herons (mostly Black-crowns) surrounded the pool. 
Catbirds and a Yellow Warbler flitted about. A tranquil and lovely view. 


A great summer birding morning on the East Pond with 38 Species seen. BUT, no 
white-faced ibis! 


Sy
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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Re:
From: Bruce Horwith <bruce.horwith AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 12:14:34 -0400
Hi Chip,
Mainly I just check the NYS e-bird list since it gives me real time notes
on what's being seen, where (nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu). But you might like
this one as well: http://dereksnest.blogspot.com/

Bruce

*Bruce Horwith*
*16 Salt Marsh Path*
*East Hampton, NY 11937*
*(631) 599-0040*

On Fri, Jun 24, 2016 at 11:38 AM, Chip Dineen  wrote:

> Hi Bruce, I recently purchased some stuff at your store and the salesman
> told me to reach out to you about local birding blogs.  Could you recommend
> any in particular.  I already read Eric Salzman but wonder about others.
>
> Thank you,  Chip Dineen

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Subject: Brooklyn Bird Club Evening Presentation
From: Dennis Hrehowsik <deepseagangster AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 09:19:10 -0400
*Tuesday, June 28th, 7:00 P.M.*

*The Wondrous World of Fireflies*

*Presenter: Sarah Lewis*


*Location: Brooklyn Public Library Central Branch
 at Grand Army Plaza*

Sara Lewis will present her research on the evolutionary role of the
flashing lights of fireflies, which is detailed in her new book: *Silent
Sparks: The Wondrous World of Fireflies * Sara’s talk will be followed by
an evening walk in search of fireflies.

Sara is a professor of Biology at Tufts University and has presented her
fascination with fireflies in a popular TED  talk.
http://www.ted.com/talks/sara_lewis_the_loves_and_lies_of_fireflies



http://www.brooklynbirdclub.org/meetings.htm

Dennis Hrehowsik

Brooklyn

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Subject: Massapequa Raven
From: Robert Taylor <rmtaylo516 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 09:02:08 -0400
Just seen by rte 107 x Southern State pkwy, being harassed by 2 Crows.

Rob in Massapequa

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Subject: Wood and Hermit Thrushes Southern Tier of NY
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 08:25:23 -0400
All,

I have an evening walk that I try to do every day and one of the joys of
this walk
is the presence of thrushes and their songs. For many years, HERMIT THRUSHES
were by far the more common thrush. The trail goes through a ravine with
hemlock
in the ravine and mainly a northern red oak, beech, and sugar maple forest
outside the
ravine. About a 1/2 mile up the hill you run into a fairly mature oak
forest, again mainly northern red oak, with some white oak, many sugar and
red maples, beech, some cherry and a few white pine. There is plenty of
undergrowth.  Conifers are scarce in this upland wood. The upland wood is
on one side of the trail and an abandoned Christmas tree plantation is on
the other side with balsam and fraser firs, silver fir, and white spruce,
all between about 30 and 40 feet tall.

Earlier this June I was surprised and happy to hear so many WOOD THRUSH
along this walk with as many as 5 singing males from the ravine to the
upland woods and 1 even in the abandoned Christmas tree plantation. The
HERMIT THRUSHES were scarce with only 1 singing male found in the ravine at
the beginning and none in the uplands which was unlike other years.

However, last night I walked this same trail and HERMIT THRUSHES  were
found in the upland trail with 2 counter singing males (very beautiful I
may add) and NO WOOD THRUSHES singing!!!! I could barely make out the call
of 1 wood thrush farther down in the Christmas tree plantation. But wood
thrushes were not in song at all.

The lesson here is that if censusing singing males you have to be careful.
One would assume the wood thrush was very common on the trail a week ago
with very few hermits and but if you went last evening you would say wood
thrush are scarce and hermits are more common! They seem to be sharing
similar habitat along this trail but maybe are at different life cycles
related to nesting, second broods etc??


Anyway thought I would share this and see if others have noticed this with
thrushes especially. I find it interesting on the habitat selection of the
thrushes, especially hermit and wood which share our woods in the southern
tier. Veeries are present in Broome Co as expected  but not in these drier
upland habitats on this trail.

Cheers,
Dave Nicosia

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Subject: Leucistic Robin at Brooklyn Botanic Garden
From: BradleyKlein mail <mail AT bradleyklein.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 11:02:08 -0400
The Brooklyn Botanic Garden held a Summer Solstice, Musical event the evening 
of Tuesday June 21, 2016. Hundreds of visitors attended an evening Bird Walk 
and Concert - and most got good views of a strikingly leucistic American Robin 
among the familiar Summer birds. Almost completely white with a few dark 
markings on wings. Dark eyes. Standard yellow dark-tipped robin bill. On the 
ground feeding near the Spanish Bluebell plantings. 


Bradley Klein and Danielle Gustafsons
We lead monthly nature programs for the BBG. See their website for details.


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Subject: Orchard Beach Cliff Swallows
From: Jack Rothman <jacroth1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 10:06:30 -0400
Two Cliff Swallow nests are being constructed at Orchard Beach, Pelham Bay 
Park, Bronx. 

One beginning nest is located along a beam, above the sign that says, “Cold 
Beer Only.” This is at the closed and fenced off bath house, near the beach 
police station. The birds nested in the exact spot last year. 

Directly across is another bath house. I spotted another Cliff Swallow 
scrunched into a corner where she is also just beginning to build a nest. 


At Turtle Cove there most likely is a hummingbird nest. Sunday, Bronx Brendan 
alerted me to the possibility, as he saw the hummer go in and out of a tree, 
near the place where a hummer nested a few years ago. I looked today and saw 
the bird dart from the tree but I could not locate the nest either. 



While waiting around there was a Baltimore Oriole, two Hairy Woodpeckers, a few 
Goldfinches, a Yellow Warbler and more of the usual nesting birds in our park. 


If you decide to go to Orchard Beach to find the nest, be advised the parking 
fee is now $ 7.00 M-F, $9:00 weekends. If you get to the area early, park at 
Rodman’s Neck and walk over, about 15-20 minutes. The lot fills up fast in 
the morning. 


Jack Rothman
cityislandbirds.com
 


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Subject: White-faced Ibis and Hooded Merganser Jamaica Bay
From: Adrian Burke <adrianb70 AT nyclabschool.org>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 20:27:47 -0400
White-faced ibis just picked up with about 40 glossy ibis at south end of
East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife refuge. A female hooded merganser is
present here as well.

Adrian Burke, Manhattan

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Subject: Acadian Flycatcher and Jamaica Bay East Pond Water Level Update...
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 20:19:25 -0400
As of this morning, an Acadian Flycatcher continues at Jamaica Bay Wildlife 
Refuge. It was actively calling before taking a bath at Big John's pond this 
AM. A word of caution to seekers, please exercise diligence in eliminating the 
more usual Willow Flycatcher. 


On the East Pond water level management: NPS, has made a concerted effort to 
get a head start with the draining of the East Pond. It started with draining 
in the spring which allowed us to identify a drainage problem, that was 
subsequently addressed. However, recently I noticed another issue with the 
drainage outflow which was slower than usual. To the naked eye it appears to be 
the build up of muck/sand at the outflow and just needs clearing to allow a 
strong flow. NPS was informed and they are working on getting that taken care 
of so we should see the outflow picking up shortly. In any event, it is my 
opinion that we are right on track to getting the water level where it needs to 
be. 


Lastly, I am working on finalizing an updated East Pond map, which will include 
some of the changes we saw from Hurricane Sandy. That map will be made 
available online, at the same link I have provided in the past. 


Cheers,

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Subject: Royals Terns on Great Gull Island
From: Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost AT nyc.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 12:13:10 -0400
Earlier this morning Peter Paton saw 2 Royal Terns flying west (towards Orient 
Pt) past Great Gull Island. He got a photo of one bird. 


Also this morning, after the sun up thunderstorms, there was a second year 
American Redstart on the island, so there is still some bird movement going on. 


Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Cupsogue Birding 6-19
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 11:57:50 -0400
On Sunday, I headed out east with the intentions of getting in a shorebird 
survey at Cupsogue. Since I got there around high tide, I spent some time doing 
a sea-watch which was non productive. 


I then birded the Cupsogue flats on a falling tide. The number of birds were 
paltry but I managed 12 species of shorebirds which is not too shabby for this 
time of the year. The shorebird highlights were 1 White-rumped Sandpiper (with 
a bum left eye), 1 non breeding plumaged Red Knot, 5 Piping Plovers, one of 
which was banded with the Virginia Tech schema and one "ratty" looking Western 
Willet, previously reported by Michael McBrien. 


The Tern numbers were not great with 127 as my high count of Common Terns. 3 of 
which were 1 st Summer types, warranting carefully study as distance and the 
uneven terrain often gave that "short-legged" look that is associated with the 
rarer Arctic Terns. 4 Forster's Terns and 3 Least Terns, rounded out the 
expected Sternas. 


1 Royal and 2 Roseate Terns were late arrivals; the latter, listed as 
endangered both federally and locally, is always a pleasing sight and these two 
were pristine looking adults. 


I opted not to bird the second tide cycle leaving that to Pat and Shai. An 
evening seawatch was also abandoned after getting Intel from Tom Burke and Gail 
Benson who reported all was quiet at Shinnecock Inlet. 


A quick stop at Epcal with Tom and Gail, did not amount to much in terms of 
Blue Grosbeaks or Summer Tanagers. I chalked that up to a case of "GI" (on my 
part) or bad time of the day where birds were singing less. I did however, 
enjoy the many Grasshopper Sparrows. If that place was managed properly, I 
wonder if Henslow's could return? 


Cheers,

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Subject: Re: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
From: Robert Paxton <rop1 AT columbia.edu>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 09:42:02 +0200
Hi Shai, David et al.,
    Don't forget that the Black-throated Green Warbler is not a species of
purely "northern affinities" or cool temperatures. The Wayne's
Black-throated Green Warbler is still found along the southeastern coast
from the Great Dismal Swamp of extreme s.e. Virginia south along the coast
of the Carolinas, in Atlantic White Cedar, Bald Cypress, and Loblolly Pine.
  Yrs.,  Bob Paxton

On Tue, Jun 21, 2016 at 2:18 AM, Matthew A. Young  wrote:

> Hello,
>
>
> The plantings of Norway spruce have greatly expanded the range of
> Blackburnian and Magnolia Warblers, and to a lesser extent Yellow-rumped
> Warbler in upstate NY. I find Yellow-rumps will use red pine plantations
> more than Magnolia or Blackburnians. Black-throated Green's have always
> preferred the native northern hardwoods usually with hemlock IMO. I find
> white pine to be used about equally by all of them.
>
>
> Matt
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* bounce-120575433-44102615 AT list.cornell.edu <
> bounce-120575433-44102615 AT list.cornell.edu> on behalf of David Nicosia <
> daven102468 AT gmail.com>
> *Sent:* Monday, June 20, 2016 8:12 PM
> *To:* Shaibal Mitra
> *Cc:* NYSBIRDS-L; broomebirds AT googlegroups.com
> *Subject:* Re: [nysbirds-l] New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County,
> NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
>
> One thing I have noticed in the southern tier of NY, is that
> BLACK-THROATED GREENS tend to be the most
> common warbler of "northern" affinities, with just a few BLACKBURNIANS
> around here and there. The forests
> in the southern tier on the north slopes tend to be northern hardwoods,
> including sugar maple, beech, northern red oak
> eastern hemlock and white pine. The eastern hemlock seems to be the most
> common conifer on the northern slopes. The
> southern slopes tend to be more oak(both white and northern red), with
> white pine, the most common conifer. It is harder to find
> Black-throated Greens or any warbler of northern affinities here (although
> not impossible). We have only a
> few isolated forests where there may be a balsam fir or red spruce tree
> here or there and they are just isolated. We do have norway spruce
> plantations, but to my knowledge around the Broome county area at least,
> not as extensive as NW Chenango County. I also
> see more extensive norway spruce plantations in Cortland County, southern
> Cayuga County, southern Madison Co and southern Onondaga Co
> especially over the high terrain.   One wonders if swainson's thrush is
> found in these areas too??? I would imagine blackburnians
> are probably everywhere in these areas too. I know at Long Pond State Park
> there is a fairly large norway spruce plantation and I found
> blackburnians to be most common along with Magnolia warblers a few years
> back. Black throated greens seemed to be more common
> in the native woodlands which were maple, beech and hemlock.
>
> So, I wonder if BLACKBURNIANS prefer spruce, fir and red pine to white
> pine and hemlock, which is far more common
> in the southern tier?  Maybe Black-throated Greens prefer hemlock and
> white pine at least in central NY??
>
> Dave
>
>
>
> On Mon, Jun 20, 2016 at 4:10 PM, Shaibal Mitra  > wrote:
>
>> Hi Dave and all,
>>
>> I also find the breeding distribution of Black-throated Green Warbler
>> perplexing.
>>
>> It is common and widespread over what strikes me as an unusually broad
>> array of forest types, giving absolutely no indication to my eye of any
>> kind of specialized preference. Yet it is absent from many places that look
>> superficially as good (or better, in terms of the density of conifers) as
>> places where they are numerous. For example, in southern Rhode Island both
>> this species and also Hermit Thrush breed quite commonly in extremely
>> unimpressive-looking* oak woods with just a few pitch or white pines. And
>> in this same area, BT Green Warbler also breeds in Atlantic White Cedar
>> bogs, another southern-style forest type. But on nearby Long Island, these
>> very same habitats (along the very same moraines) are completely shunned by
>> Black-throated Green Warblers (and support just a very few Hermit Thrushes,
>> which here are restricted to the very "best" Pitch Pine forests).
>>
>> Even more striking is the scarcity of both of these species in
>> near-upstate New York (e.g., Westchester and Orange Counties, and
>> elsewhere) in nice-looking Transition Zone woods. This disparity takes a
>> lot of getting used to for anyone who has seen the kind of sterile and
>> depauperate woods* they like in RI, but now that I get it, David's
>> observations from Chenango County seem just a more extreme example of a
>> pattern I see in a lot of places.
>>
>> I've always wondered if the limiting factor was not so much the
>> vegetation type but some combination of temperature and humidity; southern
>> RI probably has lower maximum temps at this time of year, owing to the
>> ocean influence, than do many low-mid elevation places in upstate NY. In
>> addition to these two species, Northern Waterthrush, Canada Warbler, Purple
>> Finch, and other boreal-associated species also co-occur as breeders
>> surprisingly close to the coast in RI, in utterly non-boreal forest types:
>>
>>
>> 
http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L732767?yr=all&m=6&rank=mrec&hs_sortBy=taxon_order&hs_o=asc 

>> http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L335600/all/6
>>
>> If this temp/humidity explanation is true, the absence/scarcity of these
>> species on similarly ocean-cooled eastern Long Island is more difficult to
>> explain but might be attributable to the very small and highly fragmented
>> nature of its woodlands, in addition to their already emphasized low
>> quality.*
>>
>> Anyway, these were my thoughts when I read this very interesting and
>> inspiring report. I think I'll count some Ovenbirds somewhere tomorrow
>> morning!
>>
>> Shai Mitra
>> Bay Shore
>>
>> *It took me a while to come up with these euphemisms to replace the
>> phrases I would use naturally when speaking .
>>
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________
>> From: bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu [
>> bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of David Nicosia [
>> daven102468 AT gmail.com]
>> Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 2:28 PM
>> To: NY Birds; Cayuga birds; broomebirds AT googlegroups.com
>> Subject: [nysbirds-l] New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY:
>> Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
>>
>> Had a chance to bird New Michigan State Forest from mid to late morning
>> Today, 6/20/16.
>> This forest is a high elevation boreal-type forest which is quite rare in
>> upstate NY
>> outside the Adirondacks and Catskills. There are areas of dense NORWAY
>> SPRUCES
>> planted by the CCC groups back in the 1930s so much of this forest is
>> dense and fairly
>> mature. There are also areas of RED PINE within a more typical northern
>> hardwoods type
>> forest of SUGAR MAPLE, AMERICAN BEECH, CHERRY  and other deciduous trees
>> and
>> scattered native BALSAM FIR and to a lesser extent EASTERN HEMLOCK.
>>
>> The deep spruce woods are homes to a large population (locally) of
>> BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS.  In addition, you can find SWAINSON'S THRUSH here
>> too along with
>> WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS which again are quite rare outside our bigger
>> mountains.
>> Once thing that puzzled me was the lack of BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS
>> and
>> YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. The most common warbler was the OVENBIRD but a
>> close
>> second was the BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER. Do BLACKBURNIANS out-compete
>> BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS? Or was the lack of hemlock ravines more a
>> factor here?
>> I also was able to record the beautiful song of the SWAINSON'S THRUSH and
>> append to my e-bird list which can be linked below.
>>
>> In any event, I drove for over 9 miles in this beautiful area and
>> carefully counted as many birds as I could hear. My e-bird list is my best
>> effort at an "exact" count. I was conservative and very careful not to
>> double count. I was amazed that I totaled 69 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS in 9
>> miles and a whopping 86 OVENBIRDS with a total of 50 species. I took just
>> under 3 hours.
>>
>> see e-bird list here....  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30317959
>>
>> Dave Nicosia
>> Johnson City, NY
>>
>>
>>
>>
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Subject: Re: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
From: "Matthew A. Young" <may6 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:18:26 +0000
Hello,


The plantings of Norway spruce have greatly expanded the range of Blackburnian 
and Magnolia Warblers, and to a lesser extent Yellow-rumped Warbler in upstate 
NY. I find Yellow-rumps will use red pine plantations more than Magnolia or 
Blackburnians. Black-throated Green's have always preferred the native northern 
hardwoods usually with hemlock IMO. I find white pine to be used about equally 
by all of them. 



Matt


________________________________
From: bounce-120575433-44102615 AT list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of David Nicosia 
 

Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 8:12 PM
To: Shaibal Mitra
Cc: NYSBIRDS-L; broomebirds AT googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: 
Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. 


One thing I have noticed in the southern tier of NY, is that BLACK-THROATED 
GREENS tend to be the most 

common warbler of "northern" affinities, with just a few BLACKBURNIANS around 
here and there. The forests 

in the southern tier on the north slopes tend to be northern hardwoods, 
including sugar maple, beech, northern red oak 

eastern hemlock and white pine. The eastern hemlock seems to be the most common 
conifer on the northern slopes. The 

southern slopes tend to be more oak(both white and northern red), with white 
pine, the most common conifer. It is harder to find 

Black-throated Greens or any warbler of northern affinities here (although not 
impossible). We have only a 

few isolated forests where there may be a balsam fir or red spruce tree here or 
there and they are just isolated. We do have norway spruce 

plantations, but to my knowledge around the Broome county area at least, not as 
extensive as NW Chenango County. I also 

see more extensive norway spruce plantations in Cortland County, southern 
Cayuga County, southern Madison Co and southern Onondaga Co 

especially over the high terrain. One wonders if swainson's thrush is found in 
these areas too??? I would imagine blackburnians 

are probably everywhere in these areas too. I know at Long Pond State Park 
there is a fairly large norway spruce plantation and I found 

blackburnians to be most common along with Magnolia warblers a few years back. 
Black throated greens seemed to be more common 

in the native woodlands which were maple, beech and hemlock.

So, I wonder if BLACKBURNIANS prefer spruce, fir and red pine to white pine and 
hemlock, which is far more common 

in the southern tier? Maybe Black-throated Greens prefer hemlock and white pine 
at least in central NY?? 


Dave



On Mon, Jun 20, 2016 at 4:10 PM, Shaibal Mitra 
> wrote: 

Hi Dave and all,

I also find the breeding distribution of Black-throated Green Warbler 
perplexing. 


It is common and widespread over what strikes me as an unusually broad array of 
forest types, giving absolutely no indication to my eye of any kind of 
specialized preference. Yet it is absent from many places that look 
superficially as good (or better, in terms of the density of conifers) as 
places where they are numerous. For example, in southern Rhode Island both this 
species and also Hermit Thrush breed quite commonly in extremely 
unimpressive-looking* oak woods with just a few pitch or white pines. And in 
this same area, BT Green Warbler also breeds in Atlantic White Cedar bogs, 
another southern-style forest type. But on nearby Long Island, these very same 
habitats (along the very same moraines) are completely shunned by 
Black-throated Green Warblers (and support just a very few Hermit Thrushes, 
which here are restricted to the very "best" Pitch Pine forests). 


Even more striking is the scarcity of both of these species in near-upstate New 
York (e.g., Westchester and Orange Counties, and elsewhere) in nice-looking 
Transition Zone woods. This disparity takes a lot of getting used to for anyone 
who has seen the kind of sterile and depauperate woods* they like in RI, but 
now that I get it, David's observations from Chenango County seem just a more 
extreme example of a pattern I see in a lot of places. 


I've always wondered if the limiting factor was not so much the vegetation type 
but some combination of temperature and humidity; southern RI probably has 
lower maximum temps at this time of year, owing to the ocean influence, than do 
many low-mid elevation places in upstate NY. In addition to these two species, 
Northern Waterthrush, Canada Warbler, Purple Finch, and other boreal-associated 
species also co-occur as breeders surprisingly close to the coast in RI, in 
utterly non-boreal forest types: 



http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L732767?yr=all&m=6&rank=mrec&hs_sortBy=taxon_order&hs_o=asc 

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L335600/all/6

If this temp/humidity explanation is true, the absence/scarcity of these 
species on similarly ocean-cooled eastern Long Island is more difficult to 
explain but might be attributable to the very small and highly fragmented 
nature of its woodlands, in addition to their already emphasized low quality.* 


Anyway, these were my thoughts when I read this very interesting and inspiring 
report. I think I'll count some Ovenbirds somewhere tomorrow morning! 


Shai Mitra
Bay Shore

*It took me a while to come up with these euphemisms to replace the phrases I 
would use naturally when speaking . 




________________________________________
From: 
bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu] 
on behalf of David Nicosia 
[daven102468 AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 2:28 PM
To: NY Birds; Cayuga birds; 
broomebirds AT googlegroups.com 

Subject: [nysbirds-l] New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: 
Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. 


Had a chance to bird New Michigan State Forest from mid to late morning Today, 
6/20/16. 

This forest is a high elevation boreal-type forest which is quite rare in 
upstate NY 

outside the Adirondacks and Catskills. There are areas of dense NORWAY SPRUCES
planted by the CCC groups back in the 1930s so much of this forest is dense and 
fairly 

mature. There are also areas of RED PINE within a more typical northern 
hardwoods type 

forest of SUGAR MAPLE, AMERICAN BEECH, CHERRY  and other deciduous trees and
scattered native BALSAM FIR and to a lesser extent EASTERN HEMLOCK.

The deep spruce woods are homes to a large population (locally) of BLACKBURNIAN 
WARBLERS. In addition, you can find SWAINSON'S THRUSH here too along with 

WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS which again are quite rare outside our bigger 
mountains. 

Once thing that puzzled me was the lack of BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS and
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. The most common warbler was the OVENBIRD but a close
second was the BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER. Do BLACKBURNIANS out-compete 
BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS? Or was the lack of hemlock ravines more a factor 
here? 

I also was able to record the beautiful song of the SWAINSON'S THRUSH and 
append to my e-bird list which can be linked below. 


In any event, I drove for over 9 miles in this beautiful area and carefully 
counted as many birds as I could hear. My e-bird list is my best effort at an 
"exact" count. I was conservative and very careful not to double count. I was 
amazed that I totaled 69 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS in 9 miles and a whopping 86 
OVENBIRDS with a total of 50 species. I took just under 3 hours. 


see e-bird list here....  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30317959

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY




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Subject: Re: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 20:12:11 -0400
One thing I have noticed in the southern tier of NY, is that BLACK-THROATED
GREENS tend to be the most
common warbler of "northern" affinities, with just a few BLACKBURNIANS
around here and there. The forests
in the southern tier on the north slopes tend to be northern hardwoods,
including sugar maple, beech, northern red oak
eastern hemlock and white pine. The eastern hemlock seems to be the most
common conifer on the northern slopes. The
southern slopes tend to be more oak(both white and northern red), with
white pine, the most common conifer. It is harder to find
Black-throated Greens or any warbler of northern affinities here (although
not impossible). We have only a
few isolated forests where there may be a balsam fir or red spruce tree
here or there and they are just isolated. We do have norway spruce
plantations, but to my knowledge around the Broome county area at least,
not as extensive as NW Chenango County. I also
see more extensive norway spruce plantations in Cortland County, southern
Cayuga County, southern Madison Co and southern Onondaga Co
especially over the high terrain.   One wonders if swainson's thrush is
found in these areas too??? I would imagine blackburnians
are probably everywhere in these areas too. I know at Long Pond State Park
there is a fairly large norway spruce plantation and I found
blackburnians to be most common along with Magnolia warblers a few years
back. Black throated greens seemed to be more common
in the native woodlands which were maple, beech and hemlock.

So, I wonder if BLACKBURNIANS prefer spruce, fir and red pine to white pine
and hemlock, which is far more common
in the southern tier?  Maybe Black-throated Greens prefer hemlock and white
pine at least in central NY??

Dave



On Mon, Jun 20, 2016 at 4:10 PM, Shaibal Mitra 
wrote:

> Hi Dave and all,
>
> I also find the breeding distribution of Black-throated Green Warbler
> perplexing.
>
> It is common and widespread over what strikes me as an unusually broad
> array of forest types, giving absolutely no indication to my eye of any
> kind of specialized preference. Yet it is absent from many places that look
> superficially as good (or better, in terms of the density of conifers) as
> places where they are numerous. For example, in southern Rhode Island both
> this species and also Hermit Thrush breed quite commonly in extremely
> unimpressive-looking* oak woods with just a few pitch or white pines. And
> in this same area, BT Green Warbler also breeds in Atlantic White Cedar
> bogs, another southern-style forest type. But on nearby Long Island, these
> very same habitats (along the very same moraines) are completely shunned by
> Black-throated Green Warblers (and support just a very few Hermit Thrushes,
> which here are restricted to the very "best" Pitch Pine forests).
>
> Even more striking is the scarcity of both of these species in
> near-upstate New York (e.g., Westchester and Orange Counties, and
> elsewhere) in nice-looking Transition Zone woods. This disparity takes a
> lot of getting used to for anyone who has seen the kind of sterile and
> depauperate woods* they like in RI, but now that I get it, David's
> observations from Chenango County seem just a more extreme example of a
> pattern I see in a lot of places.
>
> I've always wondered if the limiting factor was not so much the vegetation
> type but some combination of temperature and humidity; southern RI probably
> has lower maximum temps at this time of year, owing to the ocean influence,
> than do many low-mid elevation places in upstate NY. In addition to these
> two species, Northern Waterthrush, Canada Warbler, Purple Finch, and other
> boreal-associated species also co-occur as breeders surprisingly close to
> the coast in RI, in utterly non-boreal forest types:
>
>
> 
http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L732767?yr=all&m=6&rank=mrec&hs_sortBy=taxon_order&hs_o=asc 

> http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L335600/all/6
>
> If this temp/humidity explanation is true, the absence/scarcity of these
> species on similarly ocean-cooled eastern Long Island is more difficult to
> explain but might be attributable to the very small and highly fragmented
> nature of its woodlands, in addition to their already emphasized low
> quality.*
>
> Anyway, these were my thoughts when I read this very interesting and
> inspiring report. I think I'll count some Ovenbirds somewhere tomorrow
> morning!
>
> Shai Mitra
> Bay Shore
>
> *It took me a while to come up with these euphemisms to replace the
> phrases I would use naturally when speaking .
>
>
>
> ________________________________________
> From: bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu [
> bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of David Nicosia [
> daven102468 AT gmail.com]
> Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 2:28 PM
> To: NY Birds; Cayuga birds; broomebirds AT googlegroups.com
> Subject: [nysbirds-l] New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY:
> Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
>
> Had a chance to bird New Michigan State Forest from mid to late morning
> Today, 6/20/16.
> This forest is a high elevation boreal-type forest which is quite rare in
> upstate NY
> outside the Adirondacks and Catskills. There are areas of dense NORWAY
> SPRUCES
> planted by the CCC groups back in the 1930s so much of this forest is
> dense and fairly
> mature. There are also areas of RED PINE within a more typical northern
> hardwoods type
> forest of SUGAR MAPLE, AMERICAN BEECH, CHERRY  and other deciduous trees
> and
> scattered native BALSAM FIR and to a lesser extent EASTERN HEMLOCK.
>
> The deep spruce woods are homes to a large population (locally) of
> BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS.  In addition, you can find SWAINSON'S THRUSH here
> too along with
> WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS which again are quite rare outside our bigger
> mountains.
> Once thing that puzzled me was the lack of BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS
> and
> YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. The most common warbler was the OVENBIRD but a
> close
> second was the BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER. Do BLACKBURNIANS out-compete
> BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS? Or was the lack of hemlock ravines more a
> factor here?
> I also was able to record the beautiful song of the SWAINSON'S THRUSH and
> append to my e-bird list which can be linked below.
>
> In any event, I drove for over 9 miles in this beautiful area and
> carefully counted as many birds as I could hear. My e-bird list is my best
> effort at an "exact" count. I was conservative and very careful not to
> double count. I was amazed that I totaled 69 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS in 9
> miles and a whopping 86 OVENBIRDS with a total of 50 species. I took just
> under 3 hours.
>
> see e-bird list here....  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30317959
>
> Dave Nicosia
> Johnson City, NY
>
>
>
>
> --
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Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 20:48:28 +0000 (UTC)
*  New York*  Syracuse   
   - June 20, 2016
*  NYSY  06. 20. 16 Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):June 13, 2016 
- June 20, 2016to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering upstate NY 
counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma Wetlands 
Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, 
Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortlandcompiled: June 20  AT 4:00 p.m. 
(EDT)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga Audubon Homepage: 
www.onondagaaudubon.org  Greetings: This is the Syracuse Rare Bird Alert for 
the week of June 13, 2015. 

Highlights--------------
LEAST BITTERNSNOWY EGRETGARGANEYEURASIAN WIGEONRUDDY DUCKBLACK-NECKED 
STILTSWAINSON’S THRUSHPROTHONOTARY WARBLERORCHARD ORIOLE 


Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex 
(MWC)------------ 

          The big news this week is the mega-rarity BLACK-NECKED STILT 
that was found in Knox-Marsellus Marsh on 6/18. Luckily this bird has stuck 
around and has been seen by almost everyone who has looked for it. It was 
present this morning at the west end of Knox-Marsellus and easily picked out 
with a scope from East Road. Unfortunately the even more rare GARGANY has not 
been seen since 6/16.      6/17: A LEAST BITTERN was found at the Morgan 
Road marsh.      6/18: BLACK-NECKED STILT discovered at Knox-Marsellus Marsh 
from East Road.  An ERUASIAN WIGEON was also seen from East Road. A 
PROTHONOTARY WARBLER was again found in the forested area on Armitage Road.   
  6/19: A LEAST BITTERN was found along Towpath Road. 


Onondaga County------------
     6/18: A SNOWY EGRET was found on Onondaga Lake from the new walking 
trail starting at the State Fair area.     6/20: Two adult male RUDDY DUCKS 
were seen on Beaver lake. 


Oneida County------------
     6/17: An ORCHARD ORIOLE was seen at Utica Marsh.

Oswego County------------
     6/15: 3 SWAINSON’S THRUSHES were heard along Otto Mills Road north of 
Redfield. 


Cayuga County------------
     6/19: 6 PROTHONOTARY WARBLERS were seen and photographed by birders 
paddling around Howland’s Island. They appear to be in areas inaccesible by 
foot.      

     
 
--end report 
    
Joseph BrinRegion 5Baldwinsville, NY 13027  U.S.A.

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Subject: RE: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 20:10:09 +0000
Hi Dave and all,

I also find the breeding distribution of Black-throated Green Warbler 
perplexing. 


It is common and widespread over what strikes me as an unusually broad array of 
forest types, giving absolutely no indication to my eye of any kind of 
specialized preference. Yet it is absent from many places that look 
superficially as good (or better, in terms of the density of conifers) as 
places where they are numerous. For example, in southern Rhode Island both this 
species and also Hermit Thrush breed quite commonly in extremely 
unimpressive-looking* oak woods with just a few pitch or white pines. And in 
this same area, BT Green Warbler also breeds in Atlantic White Cedar bogs, 
another southern-style forest type. But on nearby Long Island, these very same 
habitats (along the very same moraines) are completely shunned by 
Black-throated Green Warblers (and support just a very few Hermit Thrushes, 
which here are restricted to the very "best" Pitch Pine forests). 


Even more striking is the scarcity of both of these species in near-upstate New 
York (e.g., Westchester and Orange Counties, and elsewhere) in nice-looking 
Transition Zone woods. This disparity takes a lot of getting used to for anyone 
who has seen the kind of sterile and depauperate woods* they like in RI, but 
now that I get it, David's observations from Chenango County seem just a more 
extreme example of a pattern I see in a lot of places. 


I've always wondered if the limiting factor was not so much the vegetation type 
but some combination of temperature and humidity; southern RI probably has 
lower maximum temps at this time of year, owing to the ocean influence, than do 
many low-mid elevation places in upstate NY. In addition to these two species, 
Northern Waterthrush, Canada Warbler, Purple Finch, and other boreal-associated 
species also co-occur as breeders surprisingly close to the coast in RI, in 
utterly non-boreal forest types: 



http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L732767?yr=all&m=6&rank=mrec&hs_sortBy=taxon_order&hs_o=asc 

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L335600/all/6

If this temp/humidity explanation is true, the absence/scarcity of these 
species on similarly ocean-cooled eastern Long Island is more difficult to 
explain but might be attributable to the very small and highly fragmented 
nature of its woodlands, in addition to their already emphasized low quality.* 


Anyway, these were my thoughts when I read this very interesting and inspiring 
report. I think I'll count some Ovenbirds somewhere tomorrow morning! 


Shai Mitra
Bay Shore

*It took me a while to come up with these euphemisms to replace the phrases I 
would use naturally when speaking . 




________________________________________
From: bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of David Nicosia 
[daven102468 AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 2:28 PM
To: NY Birds; Cayuga birds; broomebirds AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [nysbirds-l] New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: 
Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. 


Had a chance to bird New Michigan State Forest from mid to late morning Today, 
6/20/16. 

This forest is a high elevation boreal-type forest which is quite rare in 
upstate NY 

outside the Adirondacks and Catskills. There are areas of dense NORWAY SPRUCES
planted by the CCC groups back in the 1930s so much of this forest is dense and 
fairly 

mature. There are also areas of RED PINE within a more typical northern 
hardwoods type 

forest of SUGAR MAPLE, AMERICAN BEECH, CHERRY  and other deciduous trees and
scattered native BALSAM FIR and to a lesser extent EASTERN HEMLOCK.

The deep spruce woods are homes to a large population (locally) of BLACKBURNIAN 
WARBLERS. In addition, you can find SWAINSON'S THRUSH here too along with 

WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS which again are quite rare outside our bigger 
mountains. 

Once thing that puzzled me was the lack of BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS and
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. The most common warbler was the OVENBIRD but a close
second was the BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER. Do BLACKBURNIANS out-compete 
BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS? Or was the lack of hemlock ravines more a factor 
here? 

I also was able to record the beautiful song of the SWAINSON'S THRUSH and 
append to my e-bird list which can be linked below. 


In any event, I drove for over 9 miles in this beautiful area and carefully 
counted as many birds as I could hear. My e-bird list is my best effort at an 
"exact" count. I was conservative and very careful not to double count. I was 
amazed that I totaled 69 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS in 9 miles and a whopping 86 
OVENBIRDS with a total of 50 species. I took just under 3 hours. 


see e-bird list here....  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30317959

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY




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Subject: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 14:28:49 -0400
Had a chance to bird New Michigan State Forest from mid to late morning
Today, 6/20/16.
This forest is a high elevation boreal-type forest which is quite rare in
upstate NY
outside the Adirondacks and Catskills. There are areas of dense NORWAY
SPRUCES
planted by the CCC groups back in the 1930s so much of this forest is dense
and fairly
mature. There are also areas of RED PINE within a more typical northern
hardwoods type
forest of SUGAR MAPLE, AMERICAN BEECH, CHERRY  and other deciduous trees and
scattered native BALSAM FIR and to a lesser extent EASTERN HEMLOCK.

The deep spruce woods are homes to a large population (locally) of
BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS.  In addition, you can find SWAINSON'S THRUSH here
too along with
WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS which again are quite rare outside our bigger
mountains.
Once thing that puzzled me was the lack of BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS and
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. The most common warbler was the OVENBIRD but a close
second was the BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER. Do BLACKBURNIANS
out-compete BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS? Or was the lack of hemlock
ravines more a factor here?
I also was able to record the beautiful song of the SWAINSON'S THRUSH and
append to my e-bird list which can be linked below.

In any event, I drove for over 9 miles in this beautiful area and carefully
counted as many birds as I could hear. My e-bird list is my best effort at
an "exact" count. I was conservative and very careful not to double count.
I was amazed that I totaled 69 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS in 9 miles and a
whopping 86 OVENBIRDS with a total of 50 species. I took just under 3
hours.

see e-bird list here....  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30317959

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY

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Subject: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 14:28:49 -0400
Had a chance to bird New Michigan State Forest from mid to late morning
Today, 6/20/16.
This forest is a high elevation boreal-type forest which is quite rare in
upstate NY
outside the Adirondacks and Catskills. There are areas of dense NORWAY
SPRUCES
planted by the CCC groups back in the 1930s so much of this forest is dense
and fairly
mature. There are also areas of RED PINE within a more typical northern
hardwoods type
forest of SUGAR MAPLE, AMERICAN BEECH, CHERRY  and other deciduous trees and
scattered native BALSAM FIR and to a lesser extent EASTERN HEMLOCK.

The deep spruce woods are homes to a large population (locally) of
BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS.  In addition, you can find SWAINSON'S THRUSH here
too along with
WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS which again are quite rare outside our bigger
mountains.
Once thing that puzzled me was the lack of BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS and
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. The most common warbler was the OVENBIRD but a close
second was the BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER. Do BLACKBURNIANS
out-compete BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS? Or was the lack of hemlock
ravines more a factor here?
I also was able to record the beautiful song of the SWAINSON'S THRUSH and
append to my e-bird list which can be linked below.

In any event, I drove for over 9 miles in this beautiful area and carefully
counted as many birds as I could hear. My e-bird list is my best effort at
an "exact" count. I was conservative and very careful not to double count.
I was amazed that I totaled 69 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS in 9 miles and a
whopping 86 OVENBIRDS with a total of 50 species. I took just under 3
hours.

see e-bird list here....  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30317959

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY

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--
Subject: Central Park NYC - Sunday June 19, 2016 - incl. R-t hummingbird & 4 sp. of Wood Warblers
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 18:00:30 -0400
Central Park NYC - Ramble
Sunday June 19, 2016
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob. on bird walk starting from the 
dock on Turtle Pond at 9am. 


Highlights today included four species of Wood Warblers and a male 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird. 


Reservoir birds seen before the walk (Deb). 

Canada Goose - 35 plus 2 families with 3 goslings each Reservoir
Gadwall - 3 males & 2 females Reservoir
Mallard - at least 6 Reservoir, others Turtle Pond
Double-crested Cormorant - around 20 Reservoir, 2 Turtle Pond
Great Egret - 4 Reservoir
Black-crowned Night-Heron - adult in flight Reservoir (spotted by Wolfgang 
Demisch) 

Red-tailed Hawk - Reservoir
Herring Gull - 4 or 5 Reservoir
Great Black-backed Gull - 7 Reservoir
Chimney Swift - 3 Castle collecting twigs
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - adult male Shakespeare Garden
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker - family Weather Station Circle with adult feeding young 
(Sandra Critelli), imm. Shakespeare Garden 

Northern Flicker - Azalea Pond
Great Crested Flycatcher - pair Azalea Pond
Eastern Kingbird - pair nesting at Turtle Pond 
Warbling Vireo - several heard/singing (Reservoir, Warbler Rock, Azalea Pond, 
Maintenance Field) 

Red-eyed Vireo - east of Evodia Field (Bob before walk)
Blue Jay - several locations
Barn Swallow - 2 adults Reservoir, 4 adults & fledgling Turtle Pond
Black-capped Chickadee - several locations
White-breasted Nuthatch - immature male molting (black feathers coming in on 
head) Gill Overlook 

House Wren - 2, one singing Mugger's Woods
American Robin
Gray Catbird - several locations
Black-and-white Warbler - female Upper Lobe
American Redstart - immature male Warbler Rock (Sandra Critelli)
Northern Parula - male Summer House
Yellow Warbler - adult female Upper Lobe
Eastern Towhee -male singing east of Evodia Field (Bob before walk)
Red-winged Blackbird - singing male Turtle Pond
Common Grackle
Baltimore Oriole - several locations
House Finch - Upper Lobe, Balancing Rock

Tom Walsh reported another Black-crowned Night-Heron in the Ramble. 

Deb Allen

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Subject: Cliff Swallows at Van Cortlandt Park
From: "Carney, Martin" <carneym AT fordhamprep.org>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 13:01:57 -0400
Still present at 1 pm, southeast quadrant of Parade Grounds, near tennis
courts...Martin Carney

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Subject: Cliff Swallows Van Cortlandt Park Bronx- YES
From: Dawn Hannay <dawnvla AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 10:54:26 -0400
The Cliff Swallows reported yesterday by Nadir Souirgi and Tom Fiore were still 
present this morning at 9 AM, over the SE quadrant of the Parade Ground in Van 
Cortlandt Park in the Bronx. 

Dawn Hannay

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re:speaking of cliff swallows and Van Cortlandt's
From: Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg AT amsllp.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 11:40:14 +0000
At the northern tip of the river walk in Croton (along the Hudson north of 
Croton Harmon station) I was surprised to see a cliff swallow giving great 
looks at about 7:45 pm. They are known to breed - don't know about this year -- 
under the Rte. 9 / Croton River bridge right by Van Cortlandt Manor. 


L. Trachtemberg
Ossining

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 18, 2016, at 11:11 PM, Thomas Fiore  wrote:
> 
> Saturday, 18 June 2016
> 
> Two Cliff Swallows with other more-regular swallows as reported to this list 
earlier by Nadir Sourgi were still present, flying low around the SE quadrant 
(areas where no sports were being played at the later hour) of the Parade 
Ground ballfields, at Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx Co., late in the day. Although 
the species has bred in the Bronx, & may have attempted to in the west Bronx, 
it is at least uncommon if not somewhat rare in this month. At least 3 of us 
were observing in the 4-5 p.m. hour. 

> 
> The Parade Ground part of that park is adjacent to Broadway (yep, the same 
long thoroughfare that runs past Times Square, when it gets into midtown 
Manhattan). 

> 
> good birds,
> 
> Tom Fiore
> Manhattan
> 
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> 
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Subject: Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx Co. 6/18
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 20:48:05 -0400
Saturday, 18 June 2016

Two Cliff Swallows with other more-regular swallows as reported to  
this list earlier by Nadir Sourgi were still present, flying low  
around the SE quadrant (areas where no sports were being played at the  
later hour) of the Parade Ground ballfields, at Van Cortlandt Park,  
Bronx Co., late in the day.  Although the species has bred in the  
Bronx, & may have attempted to in the west Bronx, it is at least  
uncommon if not somewhat rare in this month.  At least 3 of us were  
observing in the 4-5 p.m. hour.

The Parade Ground part of that park is adjacent to Broadway (yep, the  
same long thoroughfare that runs past Times Square, when it gets into  
midtown Manhattan).

good birds,

Tom Fiore
Manhattan

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Subject: possible Siberian Common Tern, WESA, etc - Cupsogue, Suffolk Co
From: <mcb3mb AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 21:47:57 -0500




Subject: Fwd: [cayugabirds-l] Black-necked Stilt at Knox-Marcellus Marsh at Montezuma
From: Donna Schulman <queensgirl30 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 19:36:18 -0400
Another bird to look for if you're going to Montezuma.

Donna Schulman
Forest Hills, NY

* *

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Kevin J. McGowan 
Date: Sat, Jun 18, 2016 at 6:05 PM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Black-necked Stilt at Knox-Marcellus Marsh at
Montezuma
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 


It doesn't look like this ever got posted on this list. This morning,
Saturday, 18 June 2016, Stacy Robinson was looking for the Garganey at
Knox-Marsellus and found a Black-necked Stilt instead!!! Although the
Garganey remained elusive and had not been seen by the time I left this
afternoon, the stilt was seen throughout the day. When I was there just
past noon, the looks were horrible because of the distance and heat
shimmer. But, fortunately, a stilt is a giant shorebird that is boldly
patterned in simple black and white, and so is easily identified with
confidence from a great distance.

Although Black-necked Stilt is an expected vagrant along the New York
coast, it is rare in the state even there. I haven't done the research, but
I believe this may be the third upstate record of the species in New York
and the first for the Cayuga Lake Basin. It certainly was a new state bird
for me!

Kevin
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Subject: Tri-colored Heron @ Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 12:39:23 -0400
For the folks birding at the bay who might be interested. A Tri-colored Heron 
is currently feeding on the north side edge of the area "formerly known as the 
West Pond." 


With Tom Burke and Gail Benson.

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Subject: Van Cortlandt Ciiff Swallows.
From: Nadir Souirgi <nadir75 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 11:02:15 -0400
There are currently a pair of Cliff Swallows, along with Tree, Barn, and 
Rough-winged, actively feeding over the southwest section of the Parade 
Grounds. Aside from being flagged on eBird as RARE, this is the first time I've 
encountered this species in Van Cortlandt Park. 


Happy birding,

Nadir Souirgi
Inwood, NYC

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re: White-faced Ibis present now (JBWR)
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 10:41:04 -0400
An update for those thinking of twitching the WFIB (White-faced Ibis), The bird 
just flew out from the East Pond, over Crossbay seemingly heading towards the 
south marsh. 


Other highlights included 2 Royal Terns that just flew over the south end of 
the East Pond heading north east. 


Cheers,

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

> On Jun 18, 2016, at 10:05 AM, Gail Benson  wrote:
> 
> White-faced Ibis present now in Southeast corner of East pond (Jamaica Bay 
Wildlife Refuge). Tom Burke, Andrew Baksh, Gail Benson 

> 
> --
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Subject: White-faced Ibis present now (JBWR)
From: Gail Benson <gbensonny AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 10:05:37 -0400
White-faced Ibis present now in Southeast corner of East pond (Jamaica Bay
Wildlife Refuge).  Tom Burke, Andrew Baksh, Gail Benson

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Subject: NYC Area RBA: 17 June 2016
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 22:02:50 -0400
- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Jun. 17, 2016
* NYNY1606.17

- Birds mentioned
GARGANEY+ (extralimital in Seneca County)
WHITE-FACED IBIS+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Gadwall
Greater Scaup
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Black Vulture
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Virginia Rail
Semipalmated Plover
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Dunlin
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Wilson's Phalarope
Parasitic Jaeger
Gull-billed Tern
Black Tern
Royal Tern
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
Barn Owl
Barred Owl
Red-headed Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Merlin
Acadian Flycatcher
Alder Flycatcher
Common Raven
Mourning Warbler
Hooded Warbler
Grasshopper Sparrow
Blue Grosbeak
Pine Siskin

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

        Gary Chapin - Secretary
        NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
        125 Pine Springs Drive
        Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

To report sightings call:
Tom Burke (212) 372-1483 (weekdays, during the day)
Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 (Long Island)

Compiler: Tom Burke, Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, June 17th 2016
at 6pm. The highlights of today's tape are WHITE-FACED IBIS, WILSON'S
PHALAROPE, GULL-BILLED TERN, BLACK TERN, PARASITIC JAEGER, BLUE GROSBEAK,
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER and an extralimital GARGANEY.

As the Summer season settles in excitement continues at Jamaica Bay
Wildlife Refuge. A WHITE-FACED IBIS has maintained its seemingly
unpredictable visits to the south end of the East Pond Thursday evening.
Sitting in among the many Glossy Ibis that continue to cycle into and out
of the pond. On Saturday a WILSON'S PHALAROPE was also spotted on the East
Pond and was present around the Raunt on Sunday but not seen thereafter.
Young BARN OWLS can periodically be seen in the nest box that is across Big
John's Pond as viewable from the bird blind. Please do not do anything to
disturb these birds. Waiting patiently in the blind will ultimately provide
pleasing views of the young owls. Also at Jamaica Bay a GULL-BILLED TERN
has, as in past years, been appearing along the marsh and beach south of
the former West Pond. Hopefully at some point we can stop saying "former"
if restoration were ever to begin. An ACADIAN FLYCATCHER was also singing
along the Big John's Pond trail last Sunday and later.

Other recent tern sightings include a BLACK TERN at Nickerson Beach
Wednesday and single ROYAL TERNS at Great Kills Park and Shinnecock Inlet
Saturday with 3 at Jones Beach West End Tuesday. Two PARASITIC JAEGERS were
also reported off Shinnecock Inlet Saturday. Though seawatching generally
has not been very productive lately though it should be rewarding with the
appropriate winds.

Also out east two BLUE GROSBEAKS were still present Tuesday around the
southwest end of the former Grumman airport in Calverton. This area also
home for numerous GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS and other grassland birds. A very
valuable but rapidly declining habitat in our region certainly worthy of
preservation.

A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was reported Wednesday flying along the median at
the western end of Robert Moses State Park and another continues at Muscoot
Farm in northern Westchester County.

The Greenwich-Stamford Summer Bird Count including much of eastern
Westchester County recorded an average 135 species last weekend. New for
the count was a MERLIN in Chappaqua. The 243rd species all time for this 41
year old endeavor. Other highlights featured 10 species of waterfowl
including GADWALL, GREATER SCAUP and HOODED and RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS, 3
BLACK VULTURES, nesting BALD EAGLE, at least 6 RED-SHOULDERED HAWKS, a few
VIRGINIA RAILS, 10 species of shorebirds including SEMIPALMATED PLOVER and
SANDPIPER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, SANDERLING and DUNLIN, a BLACK SKIMMER, both
cuckoos at least 12 BARRED OWLS, 4 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS, two ALDER
FLYCATCHERS, over a dozen COMMON RAVENS, 14 species of warblers including
HOODED and MOURNING and a feeder visiting PINE SISKIN.

For those who may somehow not have heard, a drake GARGANEY has been present
since at least June 5th at the Knox-Marsellus Marsh part of the Montezuma
NWR just west of the town of Montezuma in Seneca County. The duck is mostly
seen from East Road where visibility is usually best in the afternoon. This
will be a first New York record pending acceptance by NYSARC.

To phone in reports on Long Island, call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or
weekdays call Tom Burke at (212) 372-1483.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

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Subject: Garganey at Montezuma NWR: Friday Si!!!
From: BOB WASHBURN <nyc_bob AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 14:35:29 -0400
The bird was viewed by a handful of folks in one of the smaller ponds in the SE 
corner. A Bald eagle just put everything up. Trying to relocate. 


BOB WASHBURN

On the East Road

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Subject: Re: Any recent Garganey info?
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 13:56:33 +0000 (UTC)
Thanks for the update.
Not to be a broken record, as I've asked this before, but has anyone 
investigated the possibility that this bird is an escapee?   Any informed 
opinion on this topic? 

Now I know Montezuma refuge is a beautiful place, as many years ago I lived 
nearby, but it's a long trip for me now, and I can see Garganeys in a zoo. 

Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY

      From: Scott Haber 
 To: Karyn  
Cc: BOB WASHBURN ; NYSbirds 
 Sent: Friday, June 17, 2016 7:37 AM
 Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Any recent Garganey info?
   
Mike Powers reported on the Cayugabirds list that the Garganey was present 
yesterday (Thursday), and visible from East Rd. 

-Scott
On Jun 17, 2016, at 7:32 AM, Karyn  wrote:


If you receive any positive replies, please let me know. I am traveling through 
the area. 

Thank you, 
Karyn Delaney -- 



  
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Subject: Re: Any recent Garganey info?
From: Scott Haber <scotthaber1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 07:37:52 -0400
Mike Powers reported on the Cayugabirds list that the Garganey was present 
yesterday (Thursday), and visible from East Rd. 


-Scott

> On Jun 17, 2016, at 7:32 AM, Karyn  wrote:
> 
> If you receive any positive replies, please let me know. I am traveling 
through the area. 

> Thank you, 
> Karyn Delaney
> 
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Subject: Re: Any recent Garganey info?
From: Karyn <kdelaney17 AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 07:32:23 -0400




Subject: Re: Garganey YES
From: Liz Martens <birder428 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 22:07:00 +0000 (UTC)
I was there on Tuesday 6/14 from 1:30-3pm and 4-4:45pm.  There were about 10 
people looking for the bird during those times, and it was not seen.  

Good Luck! 
Liz Martens 

 On Thursday, June 16, 2016 3:31 PM, BOB WASHBURN  
wrote: 

 

 

BOB

Whereabouts unknown 

> On Jun 12, 2016, at 10:10 PM, Carena Pooth  wrote:
> 
> Correction (with apologies and profuse thanks)....this afternoon the bird
> was found by Mike Zebehazy. 
> Many thanks also to the others who helped me get on the bird, to Jay McGowan
> for initially discovering the bird and getting the word out, and to all who
> posted updates and kept me jealous enough to inspire me to make the 4-hour
> drive there & back today. 
> Carena Pooth
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: bounce-120556317-74633745 AT list.cornell.edu
> [mailto:bounce-120556317-74633745 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Carena
> Pooth
> Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2016 3:27 PM
> To: NYSBIRDS-L 
> Subject: [nysbirds-l] Garganey YES
> 
> Knox-Marcellus Marsh. Found by Mike H. 2pm today in the water, feeding in
> scattered vegetation along western edge of the big rectangular pond. Seen by
> about 10-15 others, very good scope views. Still there at 3pm when I left. 
> 
> 
> --
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Subject: Jamaica Bay WR
From: "syschiff" <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 18:03:26 -0400
Jamaica Bay WR 16 June

Joe Giunta and I (Sy Schiff) walked to Big Johns Pond and scanned the East 
Pond. Lots of feeding IBIS (25), all GLOSSY. We went to the south end for 
better looks, but still couldn't come up with a White-faced. The Barn Owl 
continues in the box. 


On the west pond, we walked to the breech, looked across and found a single 
GULL-BILLED TERN. (could the other one be on a nest?) Success for 1 of our 2 
targets. 


While we concentrated on our target birds and did not bird the gardens, we 
managed to count 40 species of breeding birds. Of note wee 10 FORSTER'S TERNS, 
2 BLACK SKIMMERS, 4 WILLOW FLYCATCHERS, 5 HOUSE WRENS, 15 YELLOW WARBLERS, 5 
EASTERN TOWHEE and the usual numbers of other expected breeding birds. 


Sy
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Subject: Re: [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands - may be a released rehabilitated bird
From: jimmy lee <leewah AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 20:40:46 +0000 (UTC)
All,

according to the Raptor Trust , their snowy owl was banded.
HTH.

Good birding.

Jimmy Lee



Jimmy Lee 

South Brunswick, NJ

----- Original Message -----From: Ardith Bondi To: 
NYSBIRDS Sent: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 20:22:50 -0000 
(UTC)Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the 
Shawangunk Grasslands - may be a released rehabilitated bird 


The Raptor Trust released a rehabilitated Snowy Owl in the Shawangunk Mountains 
on March 29 (see this New Yorker article 
http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2016/06/inside-the-avian-clinic-wild-bird-fund.html). 
If it's that bird, it was already originally picked up near LaGuardia airport 
with a gunshot wound. It would be a shame if it were shot again. It was 
rehabilitated first at the Wild Bird Fund and then taken to the Raptor Trust. 
The bird was named "Hedwig" and had a lot of followers. Perhaps the story will 
help to protect it. There's a photo of it in the article. 


Ardith Bondi

On 6/13/16 3:59 PM, Scott Varney wrote:> Perhaps a bit of optimism is needed 
here... Consider that this Snowy Owl> is being extremely well-protected in its 
current location. The security> guards and most other humans would recognize 
the simple beauty and> unusual timing of this fantastic bird. I'd like to 
believe that the owl> will be provided the greatest protection.>> Perhaps this 
is a fine example of how even Birdwatcher's should keep> away from the area. I 
would like to hope that everyone would be mindful> of the bird's safety as 
opposed to acting in a manner that simply aims> for a personal life list 
addition.>> Happy Birding,>> Scott Varney> Salem, NY>> "Contemplate 
preservation vs conservation.">> Sent from my iPhone>> On Jun 13, 2016, at 3:31 
PM, Richard Guthrie  
> wrote:>>> If they do, it would be a 
violation of State and Federal Laws. They>> might end up on the other side of 
the bars if so.>>>> Rich>>>> On Mon, Jun 13, 2016 at 3:29 PM, Pia Davis 
> > wrote:>>>> $10. says the 
guards will shoot the owl at some point.>>>>>> On Jun 13, 2016, at 3:27 PM, 
"Richard Guthrie>> richardpguthrie AT gmail.com 
>> [MidHudsonBirds]" 
> 
> wrote:>>>>>>>> Ken McDermott 
called earlier to report that the SNOWY OWL that>>> Curt discovered yesterday 
was seen again today.>>>>>> It has been near the Wallkill Correctional 
Facility.>>>>>> Yesterday it was near McKendrick Road west of Rt. 208 on>>> 
correctional facility property.>>>>>> You can drive the perimeter roads looking 
for the owl. But...>>>>>> Word of caution: This is a prison. There are Prison 
Guards>>> patrolling the grounds - where the owl has been seen.>>>>>> Just 
don't get out of your car, walk around or set up scopes,>>> cameras, or 
anything else that might make them nervous.>>>>>> They are serious.>>>>>> 
Amazing, eh?>>>>>> Rich>>>>>> -->>> Richard Guthrie>>> New Baltimore>>>>>>>>> 
__._,_.___>>> 
------------------------------------------------------------------------>>> 
Posted by: Richard Guthrie >> 
>>>> 
------------------------------------------------------------------------>>> 
Reply via web post>>> 
>>> 
• Reply to sender>>> 
>>> 
• Reply to group>>> 
>>> 
• Start a New Topic>>> 
>>> 
• Messages in this topic>>> 
>>> 
(1)>>>>>> 
------------------------------------------------------------------------>>> 
Have you tried the highest rated email app? >>> With 
4.5 stars in iTunes, the Yahoo Mail app is the highest rated>>> email app on 
the market. What are you waiting for? Now you can>>> access all your inboxes 
(Gmail, Outlook, AOL and more) in one>>> place. Never delete an email again 
with 1000GB of free cloud storage.>>> 
------------------------------------------------------------------------>>> To 
visit the Mid-Hudson Birds web site go to:>>> 
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MidHudsonBirds>>> Post message: 
MidHudsonBirds AT yahoogroups.com>>> >>> 
Subscribe: MidHudsonBirds-subscribe AT yahoogroups.com>>> 
>>> Unsubscribe: 
MidHudsonBirds-unsubscribe AT yahoogroups.com>>> 
>>> List owner: 
MidHudsonBirds-owner AT yahoogroups.com>>> 
>>>>>> Visit Your Group>>> 
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.>>>>>> __,_._,___>>>>>>>>>> -->> Richard Guthrie>>>> -->> *NYSbirds-L List 
Info:*>> Welcome and Basics >> 
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Subject: Any recent Garganey info?
From: BOB WASHBURN <nyc_bob AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 15:39:13 -0400
Pardon if I missed something but I haven't seen any Garganey reports, positive 
or negative on the list serve, eBird or Facebook since June 12. Tomorrow looks 
nice so I'm thinking about heading up from the City. 


Any fresh intel???

Many thanks

BOB WASHBURN
NYC

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Subject: Re: Garganey YES
From: BOB WASHBURN <nyc_bob AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 15:30:45 -0400

BOB

Whereabouts unknown 

> On Jun 12, 2016, at 10:10 PM, Carena Pooth  wrote:
> 
> Correction (with apologies and profuse thanks)....this afternoon the bird
> was found by Mike Zebehazy. 
> Many thanks also to the others who helped me get on the bird, to Jay McGowan
> for initially discovering the bird and getting the word out, and to all who
> posted updates and kept me jealous enough to inspire me to make the 4-hour
> drive there & back today. 
> Carena Pooth
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: bounce-120556317-74633745 AT list.cornell.edu
> [mailto:bounce-120556317-74633745 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Carena
> Pooth
> Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2016 3:27 PM
> To: NYSBIRDS-L 
> Subject: [nysbirds-l] Garganey YES
> 
> Knox-Marcellus Marsh. Found by Mike H. 2pm today in the water, feeding in
> scattered vegetation along western edge of the big rectangular pond. Seen by
> about 10-15 others, very good scope views. Still there at 3pm when I left. 
> 
> 
> --
> 
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Subject: 16 "Anhinga's" taking some sun on McGann-Mercy High School's Softball Field in Riverhead !
From: robert adamo <radamo4691 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 00:00:22 -0400
Today, at ~ 0900, while turning into the entrance of Saddle Lakes Condos,
on the n/s/o Middle Rd. (where we live) out of the corner of my eye, I saw
a # of large, dark birds with outstretched wings, standing in the infield
of the above school, located at the s/w/c/o Ostrander Ave & Middle Rd.

By the time I finished confusing our "guardian of the gate" by entering and
exiting in record time, and before seeing the birds again, I realized my
original flash as to species, was to say the least, a cruel twist of one's
imagination ! Knowing what they were (Turkey Vultures) before laying eyes
on them again, was of little consolation, but I did manage to get some
terrific photos...from when most of them were "sunning" at the same time,
to when a couple of them looked like they were playing ball !

It seems a soft ball had been left on the field in the vicinity of 2nd
base, and some of the roaming birds must have thought it might be edible.
At first, they tried pulling at the ball with their bills without success,
before pushing the ball a head of them for a foot or so, by again, using
their bills.

A couple of people stopped as I was shooting to ask what kind of birds I
was looking at, and complimented me on the use of my car, in order to get a
clearer shot at them. Because of the 5 ft cyclone fence around the field, I
had to park my car up on the grass shoulder of the road, as close to the
fence as possible, and still be able to stand on the running board, which
allowed me to position the camera above the fence, and not through it !

Cheers,
Bob

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Subject: Red-Headed Woodpecker, Robert Moses SP
From: Jonathan Stocker <jonathanlstocker AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 01:26:36 +0000 (UTC)
A quick time restricted pass at Robert Moses State Park was highlighted by a 
Red-Headed Woodpecker flying down the median from just west of the Police 
headquarters before heading out over the golf course.   

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Subject: Jamaica Bay East Pond/ Queens County
From: Sean Sime <sean AT seansime.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 21:34:07 -0400
A mid day trip to the East Pond did not turn up the Wilson's Phalarope seen
earlier this week, but the Acadian Flycatcher, Gull-billed Tern and
White-faced Ibis were all present.
The only shorebirds seen were Eastern Willet, Semipalmated Sandpiper,
Lesser Yellowlegs and Greater Yellowlegs, but it was low tide and certainly
not optimal for numbers of birds to be roosting on the east pond.

Good birding,

Sean Sime
Brooklyn, NY

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Subject: Adirondack Birding Festival Highlights
From: Joan Collins <joan.collins AT frontier.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 10:27:37 -0400
The Adirondack Birding Festival was held this past weekend (June 10, 11, &
12).  The dinner cruise Friday night on the WW Durant on Raquette Lake was
fun as usual!  Nina Schoch gave a fascinating presentation on Common Loons
at the Adirondack Museum on Saturday.  Friday's weather was fine, but
Saturday and Sunday were rainy - particularly on Saturday.

 

Mary Beth Warburton and I led a trip to Sabattis Circle Road, Sabattis Bog,
and a hike on the Round Lake Trail on Friday.  We found 54 species.
Highlights included:

 

Ruffed Grouse - standing in the Round Lake Trail

Osprey - at its nest

Broad-winged Hawk - pair interacting over Sabattis Bog

Amer. Woodcock - flushed from the Round Lake Trail

Olive-sided Flycatcher - heard at Sabattis Bog (they appear to be nesting
again at Bog Stream)

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher

Alder Flycatcher

Least Flycatcher

Gray Jay - pair that came out for food near the Round Lake Trail

Hermit Thrush - feeding young at its nest at the edge of the road!

16 warbler species including Palm and Canada

Pine Siskin

 

Mary Beth Warburton and I led a trip to Ferd's Bog on Saturday in the rain
(with temps in the mid 40s!).  The rain was too heavy to be out on the
boardwalk, so we stayed in the forest, but the trip was finally cut short by
the weather.  The trip on the rail bed along Brown's Tract Inlet was
canceled since it was pouring rain.  We were still able to observe warblers
and other species through the rain drops!  Yellow-bellied Flycatchers were
vocal, as were Brown Creepers, Winter Wrens, and a Swainson's Thrush.
Purple Finches and Pine Siskins were also heard.

 

I led a trip to Moose River Plains on Sunday.  We stopped at the Red River,
hiked a short distance on the Mitchell Pond's Trail, hiked to Helldiver
Pond, and hiked to Icehouse Pond.  We had some rain and strong winds on this
trip (with temps in the 40s again!), but not downpours.  Highlights
included:

 

American Woodcock - adult in the road and then we spotted a young bird with
it!

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - pair feeding young at a nest site

Northern Flicker

Merlin - heard by a likely nest location at camp site #74

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher

Alder Flycatcher

Least Flycatcher

Boreal Chickadee - 6! (We found at least 4 Boreal Chickadees as we pulled up
to our first stop of the morning by the Red River.  We had nice views of the
birds who were in a mixed flock with Black-capped Chickadees.  We also found
at least 2 Boreal Chickadees near the entrance to the short drive to the
Helldiver Pond Trailhead.  They were also in a mixed flock with Black-capped
Chickadees.)

Winter Wren

Veery

Hermit Thrush

13 warbler species including nice views of Canada Warblers

Scarlet Tanager

Purple Finch

 

**Just a note about Hairy Woodpecker nesting - every year during the
Adirondack Birding Festival (2nd weekend in June), we observe Hairy
Woodpeckers feeding young at nest holes.  This year, the young fledged long
before the Festival.  It appears they nested 1 to 2 weeks earlier this year.
This year-round species seemed to take advantage of the warmer weather in
early spring.  On the other hand, (the migrant) Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers
appear to be nesting on their usual dates.  Nina Schoch noted that Common
Loons are nesting much earlier this year with the record early ice-out.
Canada Geese, Amer. Black Ducks, and Wood Ducks also appear to have nested
much earlier than usual.**

 

It was nice to see familiar faces at the Festival!  Hopefully, the weather
will work out better next year!

 

Joan Collins

President, NYS Ornithological Association

Editor, New York Birders

Long Lake, NY

(315) 244-7127 cell       

(518) 624-5528 home

http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/     

http://www.facebook.com/AdirondackAvian

 


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Subject: Queens County Bird Club - Upcoming Meeting - Wed. 06/15 - Mike DiGiorgio presents "A Bird Painter's Journey"
From: "Nancy Tognan" <nancy.tognan AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 09:21:52 -0400
The Queens County Bird Club will be meeting at the Alley Pond Environmental
Center, 228-06 Northern Blvd Douglaston, NY 11362  >Map of location<  

 

at 8:00 pm on Wednesday, June 15, 2016.  Free admission.  Refreshments
served (ice cream this month)

Public transportation users:  Meeting location is one mile from Bayside LIRR
station;  you can either walk, take the Q12 bus, or use car service located
at station.

 

Mike DiGiorgio will present "A Bird Painter's Journey"

 

         Wildlife artist Mike DiGiorgio writes: "The profession of
illustration is an extremely difficult one today.  Add the element of
primarily painting birds, and you come up with an almost impossible
endeavor." The modern-day bird illustrator has many obstacles to overcome,
from publishers' easy access to bird photography to shrinking magazine and
book sales. In his presentation, DiGiorgio will trace his personal journey,
beginning as a boy with a hopeless obsession with common city backyard
birds, to later rural searches for warblers, herons, and nightjars - all in
his quest to capture them in line and color. Louis Fuertes was his main
artistic hero, and Don Eckelberry, who asked him to join his group of
artists, his primary mentor.

 

        Michael DiGiorgio is a nationally recognized artist who is currently
living in Madison, CT. Mike's painting and drawings have appeared in a
variety of nature books and journals, such as such as: Breeding Bird Atlas
of CT, Master's Guide to Birding, Audubon Field Guide to Birds/ Eastern and
Western region, Bird Watcher's Digest, Sanctuary (Massachusetts Audubon
Magazine), Audubon Magazine and Audubon Nature Yearbook. Mike is currently
illustrating plates for a new guide to Brazil with Robert Ridgley and Guy
Tudor.  To find out more about Mike, see his website www.mdigiorgio.com
Copies of his prints will be available for sale after the meeting.  

                 

Nancy Tognan 

nancy.tognan AT gmail.com   

Vice President, Queens County Bird Club 

 

See http://www.qcbirdclub.org/   for more information on trips, speakers,
and other events! 

See our 'Birding Maps & Locations' page for directions to and info about
many local birding hotspots

 

* QCBC is a tax exempt, charitable organization {501c3}.  *


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Subject: NYS eBird Hotspots - State, Counties & Locations Updated (Jun/'16)
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 20:05:34 -0400
Thanks to  AT Team_eBird for their dedication to keeping eBird.org running
smoothly and for the group of New York State hotspot moderators for their
time reviewing shared location suggestions.

This relates to the wiki pages I've developed for accessing data on
eBird.org with additional links to birding related resources related to the
county and location level.

*Species totals* have been updated for all county pages. This includes the
total number of species with the equivalent color code highlighting the
county name based on the colors used on eBird's maps. The alphabetical list
of counties on the main page has been updated with total spp. #.

*Hotspot pages*: All location pages have been updated on the wiki. These
include 219 pages representing a total of 670 out of 4,392 hotspots (15%).
Updates involve # of species and color codings based on species # along
with updated 2016 periods for the bar chart tables displaying the Month:
Jun./2016 and the current two month period May - Jun./2016 along with the
current year.

*Tide Graphs* exist for New York County, Kings County (Brooklyn) and
Richmond County (Staten Island). There's a quick link to the tide graphs on
the "Go To >" line highlighted in blue for each location. If there are
multiple graphs on a page the left/right is generally north/south or
west/east. If you spot any issues please let me know off line.

For the following counties there are* individual wiki pages for the *Top 10
locations** at the top of the list of shared locations: Cayuga, Erie,
Monroe, Niagara, Orange, Oswego, Seneca, Tompkins, Kings (Brooklyn),
Queens, Richmond (Staten Island), Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester Counties.
For New York County (Borough of Manhattan) all hotspots have links to
shared location pages.

*Bar Charts (Species Lists)*: For all county and top location pages there's
a table showing the months, seasons and several time frames for the current
year. Clicking any of these will bring up a complete list of species and
other taxa with bar charts representing abundance. To see a list of species
for *all* periods click on the name above the months i.e. 'New York State
(473 spp.)' or 'Chautauqua County (302 spp.)'.

*Map of sightings*: After bringing up a bar chart list you'll see a MAP
button to the right of each species. Clicking this will produce a map of
the latest sightings. Red icons show sightings within the past 30 days.
Click on the icons to see a list of who reported each species and click on
'Checklist' to view their submission.

Click 'Overview' on any of the wiki pages to bring up a sortable list of
all species along with the latest checklists submitted and a list of the
Top eBirders.

Check out 'My Location Life List', 'My County Life List' and 'My State Life
List' links on their respective pages.

For each location page click on 'Google Map Directions' to bring up a
Google Map page. On Google Maps click 'Directions' then 'Transit' to plot a
public transportation route. By clicking 'More Options and Times' you can
refine your search. This also works with 'Driving' and 'Walking'.

*Home page*: http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York
*Clickable map*:
http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York#ClickableMap
*Alphabetical list of counties*:
http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York#Alphabetical

Enjoy!
-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots

Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots


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Subject: Re: [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands
From: Gerald Smith <goshawk AT gisco.net>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 17:08:44 -0400
I respectfully disagree as it is rather hard to hide a Snowy Owl in summer if 
it stays. In this case personally I think working with the system is a good 
idea ,however,since I am a couple hundred miles distant I will not be directly 
involved Good luck to both the owl and birder's Gerry Smith 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 13, 2016, at 15:47, Pia Davis  wrote:
> 
> Do they know it's there? If they don't know, possibly better for the owl to 
keep it that way. It's a gamble to assume the warden would react positively to 
this type of intervention. 

> 
> 
> 
>> On Jun 13, 2016, at 3:42 PM, Gerald Smith  wrote:
>> 
>> It might be prudent for a birding group representative to contact the warden 
regarding the birds presence and proactively hopefully assure staff awareness 
and protection Gerry Smith 

>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>>> On Jun 13, 2016, at 15:31, Richard Guthrie  
wrote: 

>>> 
>>> If they do, it would be a violation of State and Federal Laws. They might 
end up on the other side of the bars if so. 

>>> 
>>> Rich
>>> 
>>>> On Mon, Jun 13, 2016 at 3:29 PM, Pia Davis  wrote:
>>>> $10. says the guards will shoot the owl at some point.
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>>> On Jun 13, 2016, at 3:27 PM, "Richard Guthrie richardpguthrie AT gmail.com 
[MidHudsonBirds]"  wrote: 

>>>>> 
>>>>>  
>>>>> 
>>>>> Ken McDermott called earlier to report that the SNOWY OWL that Curt 
discovered yesterday was seen again today. 

>>>>> 
>>>>> It has been near the Wallkill Correctional Facility.
>>>>> 
>>>>> Yesterday it was near McKendrick Road west of Rt. 208 on correctional 
facility property. 

>>>>> 
>>>>> You can drive the perimeter roads looking for the owl. But...
>>>>> 
>>>>> Word of caution: This is a prison. There are Prison Guards patrolling the 
grounds - where the owl has been seen. 

>>>>> 
>>>>> Just don't get out of your car, walk around or set up scopes, cameras, or 
anything else that might make them nervous. 

>>>>> 
>>>>> They are serious.
>>>>> 
>>>>> Amazing, eh?
>>>>> 
>>>>> Rich
>>>>> 
>>>>> -- 
>>>>> Richard Guthrie
>>>>> New Baltimore
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> __._,_.___
>>>>> Posted by: Richard Guthrie 
>>>>> Reply via web post • Reply to sender • Reply to group • Start a New 
Topic • Messages in this topic (1) 

>>>>> 
>>>>> Have you tried the highest rated email app?
>>>>> With 4.5 stars in iTunes, the Yahoo Mail app is the highest rated email 
app on the market. What are you waiting for? Now you can access all your 
inboxes (Gmail, Outlook, AOL and more) in one place. Never delete an email 
again with 1000GB of free cloud storage. 

>>>>>          
>>>>> To visit the Mid-Hudson Birds web site go to: 
>>>>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MidHudsonBirds  
>>>>> Post message: MidHudsonBirds AT yahoogroups.com 
>>>>> Subscribe:  MidHudsonBirds-subscribe AT yahoogroups.com 
>>>>> Unsubscribe:  MidHudsonBirds-unsubscribe AT yahoogroups.com 
>>>>> List owner:  MidHudsonBirds-owner AT yahoogroups.com 
>>>>> 
>>>>> VISIT YOUR GROUP
>>>>> • Privacy • Unsubscribe • Terms of Use 
>>>>> .
>>>>>  
>>>>> 
>>>>> __,_._,___
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> -- 
>>> Richard Guthrie
>>> 
>>> --
>>> NYSbirds-L List Info:
>>> Welcome and Basics
>>> Rules and Information
>>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>>> Archives:
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>>> Please submit your observations to eBird!
>>> --
> 

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Subject: Re: [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands - may be a released rehabilitated bird
From: Ardith Bondi <ardbon AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 16:22:50 -0400
The Raptor Trust released a rehabilitated Snowy Owl in the Shawangunk 
Mountains on March 29 (see this New Yorker article 

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2016/06/inside-the-avian-clinic-wild-bird-fund.html). 

If it's that bird, it was already originally picked up near LaGuardia 
airport with a gunshot wound. It would be a shame if it were shot again. 
It was rehabilitated first at the Wild Bird Fund and then taken to the 
Raptor Trust. The bird was named "Hedwig" and had a lot of followers. 
Perhaps the story will help to protect it. There's a photo of it in the 
article.

Ardith Bondi

On 6/13/16 3:59 PM, Scott Varney wrote:
> Perhaps a bit of optimism is needed here... Consider that this Snowy Owl
> is being extremely well-protected in its current location. The security
> guards and most other humans would recognize the simple beauty and
> unusual timing of this fantastic bird. I'd like to believe that the owl
> will be provided the greatest protection.
>
> Perhaps this is a fine example of how even Birdwatcher's should keep
> away from the area. I would like to hope that everyone would be mindful
> of the bird's safety as opposed to acting in a manner that simply aims
> for a personal life list addition.
>
> Happy Birding,
>
> Scott Varney
> Salem, NY
>
> "Contemplate preservation vs conservation."
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jun 13, 2016, at 3:31 PM, Richard Guthrie  > wrote:
>
>> If they do, it would be a violation of State and Federal Laws. They
>> might end up on the other side of the bars if so.
>>
>> Rich
>>
>> On Mon, Jun 13, 2016 at 3:29 PM, Pia Davis > > wrote:
>>
>>     $10. says the guards will shoot the owl at some point.
>>
>>
>>     On Jun 13, 2016, at 3:27 PM, "Richard Guthrie
>>     richardpguthrie AT gmail.com 
>>     [MidHudsonBirds]" >     > wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>     Ken McDermott called earlier to report that the SNOWY OWL that
>>>     Curt discovered yesterday was seen again today.
>>>
>>>     It has been near the Wallkill Correctional Facility.
>>>
>>>     Yesterday it was near McKendrick Road west of Rt. 208 on
>>>     correctional facility property.
>>>
>>>     You can drive the perimeter roads looking for the owl. But...
>>>
>>>     Word of caution: This is a prison. There are Prison Guards
>>>     patrolling the grounds - where the owl has been seen.
>>>
>>>     Just don't get out of your car, walk around or set up scopes,
>>>     cameras, or anything else that might make them nervous.
>>>
>>>     They are serious.
>>>
>>>     Amazing, eh?
>>>
>>>     Rich
>>>
>>>     --
>>>     Richard Guthrie
>>>     New Baltimore
>>>
>>>
>>>     __._,_.___
>>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

>>>     Posted by: Richard Guthrie >>     >
>>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

>>>     Reply via web post
>>> 
 

>>>     	• 	Reply to sender
>>> 
 

>>>     	• 	Reply to group
>>> 
 

>>>     	• 	Start a New Topic
>>> 
 

>>>     	• 	Messages in this topic
>>> 
 

>>>     (1)
>>>
>>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

>>>     Have you tried the highest rated email app? 
>>>     With 4.5 stars in iTunes, the Yahoo Mail app is the highest rated
>>>     email app on the market. What are you waiting for? Now you can
>>>     access all your inboxes (Gmail, Outlook, AOL and more) in one
>>>     place. Never delete an email again with 1000GB of free cloud storage.
>>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

>>>     To visit the Mid-Hudson Birds web site go to:
>>>     http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MidHudsonBirds
>>>     Post message: MidHudsonBirds AT yahoogroups.com
>>>     
>>>     Subscribe: MidHudsonBirds-subscribe AT yahoogroups.com
>>>     
>>>     Unsubscribe: MidHudsonBirds-unsubscribe AT yahoogroups.com
>>>     
>>>     List owner: MidHudsonBirds-owner AT yahoogroups.com
>>>     
>>>
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>>>
>>>
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>>> 
 

>>>
>>>     • Privacy
>>>      •
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>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
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>>
>> --
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Subject: Re: [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands
From: Ardith Bondi <ardbon AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 16:08:08 -0400
FYI, the Raptor Trust released a rehabilitated Snowy Owl in the 
Shawangunk Mountains on March 29 (see this New Yorker article 

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2016/06/inside-the-avian-clinic-wild-bird-fund.html). 

If it's that bird, it was already originally picked up near LaGuardia 
airport with a gunshot wound. It would be a shame if it were shot again. 
It was rehabilitated first at the Wild Bird Fund and then taken to the 
Raptor Trust. The bird was named "Hedwig" and had a lot of followers. 
Perhaps the story will help to protect it. There's a photo of it in the 
article.

Ardith Bondi

On 6/13/16 3:42 PM, Gerald Smith wrote:
> It might be prudent for a birding group representative to contact the
> warden regarding the birds presence and proactively hopefully assure
> staff awareness and protection Gerry Smith
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jun 13, 2016, at 15:31, Richard Guthrie  > wrote:
>
>> If they do, it would be a violation of State and Federal Laws. They
>> might end up on the other side of the bars if so.
>>
>> Rich
>>
>> On Mon, Jun 13, 2016 at 3:29 PM, Pia Davis > > wrote:
>>
>>     $10. says the guards will shoot the owl at some point.
>>
>>
>>     On Jun 13, 2016, at 3:27 PM, "Richard Guthrie
>>     richardpguthrie AT gmail.com 
>>     [MidHudsonBirds]" >     > wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>     Ken McDermott called earlier to report that the SNOWY OWL that
>>>     Curt discovered yesterday was seen again today.
>>>
>>>     It has been near the Wallkill Correctional Facility.
>>>
>>>     Yesterday it was near McKendrick Road west of Rt. 208 on
>>>     correctional facility property.
>>>
>>>     You can drive the perimeter roads looking for the owl. But...
>>>
>>>     Word of caution: This is a prison. There are Prison Guards
>>>     patrolling the grounds - where the owl has been seen.
>>>
>>>     Just don't get out of your car, walk around or set up scopes,
>>>     cameras, or anything else that might make them nervous.
>>>
>>>     They are serious.
>>>
>>>     Amazing, eh?
>>>
>>>     Rich
>>>
>>>     --
>>>     Richard Guthrie
>>>     New Baltimore
>>>
>>>
>>>     __._,_.___
>>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

>>>     Posted by: Richard Guthrie >>     >
>>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

>>>     Reply via web post
>>> 
 

>>>     	• 	Reply to sender
>>> 
 

>>>     	• 	Reply to group
>>> 
 

>>>     	• 	Start a New Topic
>>> 
 

>>>     	• 	Messages in this topic
>>> 
 

>>>     (1)
>>>
>>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

>>>     Have you tried the highest rated email app? 
>>>     With 4.5 stars in iTunes, the Yahoo Mail app is the highest rated
>>>     email app on the market. What are you waiting for? Now you can
>>>     access all your inboxes (Gmail, Outlook, AOL and more) in one
>>>     place. Never delete an email again with 1000GB of free cloud storage.
>>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

>>>     To visit the Mid-Hudson Birds web site go to:
>>>     http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MidHudsonBirds
>>>     Post message: MidHudsonBirds AT yahoogroups.com
>>>     
>>>     Subscribe: MidHudsonBirds-subscribe AT yahoogroups.com
>>>     
>>>     Unsubscribe: MidHudsonBirds-unsubscribe AT yahoogroups.com
>>>     
>>>     List owner: MidHudsonBirds-owner AT yahoogroups.com
>>>     
>>>
>>>     Visit Your Group
>>> 
 

>>>
>>>
>>>     Yahoo! Groups
>>> 
 

>>>
>>>     • Privacy
>>>      •
>>>     Unsubscribe
>>>     
>>>     • Terms of Use 
>>>
>>>     .
>>>
>>>     __,_._,___
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Richard Guthrie
>>
>> --
>> *NYSbirds-L List Info:*
>> Welcome and Basics 
>> Rules and Information 
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
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Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 20:01:19 +0000 (UTC)
*  New York*  Syracuse   
   - June 13, 2016
*  NYSY  06. 13. 16 Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):June 06, 2016 
- June 13, 2016to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering upstate NY 
counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma Wetlands 
Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, 
Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortlandcompiled: June 06  AT 3:00 p.m. 
(EDT)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga Audubon Homepage: 
www.onondagaaudubon.org  Greetings: This is the Syracuse Rare Bird Alert for 
the week of June 06, 2015. 

Highlights--------------BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONBLUE-WINGED 
TEALGARGANEYACADIAN FLYCATCHERPHILADELPHIA VIREOSWAINSON’S THRUSHPROTHONOTARY 
WARBLERCERULEAN WARBLERGRASSHOPPER SPARROWNELSON’S SPARROWORCHARD ORIOLE 




Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex 
(MWC)------------ 

     The GARGANEY, first reported on 6/5 was seen throughout the week up to 
yesterday at Knox-Marsellus Marsh. There have been no reports negative or 
positive yet today. 10 species of Shorebirds and a Phalarope species were 
reported from the complex this week. Among them were BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER and 
WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER.     6/10: A NELSON’S SPARROW was seen and nicely 
photographed along the Wildlife Trail.     6/11: An ORCHARD ORIOLE was seen 
along the Wildlife Trail.     6/12: The PROTHONOTARY WARBLER at the Armitage 
Road wooded area was seen again. An ORCHARD ORIOLE and a BLACK-CROWNED 
NIGHT-HERON were found on VanDyne Spoor Road. 


Cayuga County------------
     6/9: An ACADIAN FLYCATCHER continues to be heard and seen at Sterling 
Nature Center. 


Onondaga County------------
     6/13: A CERULEAN WARBLER was heard and seen at eye level on the Lake 
Loop Trail at Beaver Lake Nature Center. 


Oswego county------------
     6/9: A SWAINSON’S THRUSH was heard on Otto Mills Road north of 
Redfield.     6/11: 3 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS were found on Main Street in 
Richland. 


Herkimer County------------
     6/6: Two adult and 11 young BLUE-WINGED TEAL were seen and photographed 
in a pond on McKoon’s Road northeast of Richfield Springs.      

 
--end report 
    
Joseph BrinRegion 5Baldwinsville, NY 13027  U.S.A.  
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Subject: Re: [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands
From: Scott Varney <scottvarney1968 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 15:59:37 -0400
Perhaps a bit of optimism is needed here... Consider that this Snowy Owl is 
being extremely well-protected in its current location. The security guards and 
most other humans would recognize the simple beauty and unusual timing of this 
fantastic bird. I'd like to believe that the owl will be provided the greatest 
protection. 


Perhaps this is a fine example of how even Birdwatcher's should keep away from 
the area. I would like to hope that everyone would be mindful of the bird's 
safety as opposed to acting in a manner that simply aims for a personal life 
list addition. 


Happy Birding,

Scott Varney
Salem, NY

"Contemplate preservation vs conservation."

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 13, 2016, at 3:31 PM, Richard Guthrie  
wrote: 

> 
> If they do, it would be a violation of State and Federal Laws. They might end 
up on the other side of the bars if so. 

> 
> Rich
> 
>> On Mon, Jun 13, 2016 at 3:29 PM, Pia Davis  wrote:
>> $10. says the guards will shoot the owl at some point.
>> 
>> 
>>> On Jun 13, 2016, at 3:27 PM, "Richard Guthrie richardpguthrie AT gmail.com 
[MidHudsonBirds]"  wrote: 

>>> 
>>>  
>>> 
>>> Ken McDermott called earlier to report that the SNOWY OWL that Curt 
discovered yesterday was seen again today. 

>>> 
>>> It has been near the Wallkill Correctional Facility.
>>> 
>>> Yesterday it was near McKendrick Road west of Rt. 208 on correctional 
facility property. 

>>> 
>>> You can drive the perimeter roads looking for the owl. But...
>>> 
>>> Word of caution: This is a prison. There are Prison Guards patrolling the 
grounds - where the owl has been seen. 

>>> 
>>> Just don't get out of your car, walk around or set up scopes, cameras, or 
anything else that might make them nervous. 

>>> 
>>> They are serious.
>>> 
>>> Amazing, eh?
>>> 
>>> Rich
>>> 
>>> -- 
>>> Richard Guthrie
>>> New Baltimore
>>> 
>>> 
>>> __._,_.___
>>> Posted by: Richard Guthrie 
>>> Reply via web post • Reply to sender • Reply to group • Start a New 
Topic • Messages in this topic (1) 

>>> 
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>>>          
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> 
> 
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Subject: RE: [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands
From: Will Raup <hoaryredpoll AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 19:58:27 +0000
won't matter.

Will Raup
Glenmont, NY



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S6 active, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Gerald Smith 
Date: 6/13/2016 3:42 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Richard Guthrie 
Cc: Pia Davis , NYSBIRDS_L , 
midhudsonbirds AT yahoogroups.com 

Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the 
Shawangunk Grasslands 


It might be prudent for a birding group representative to contact the warden 
regarding the birds presence and proactively hopefully assure staff awareness 
and protection Gerry Smith 


Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 13, 2016, at 15:31, Richard Guthrie 
> wrote: 


If they do, it would be a violation of State and Federal Laws. They might end 
up on the other side of the bars if so. 


Rich

On Mon, Jun 13, 2016 at 3:29 PM, Pia Davis 
> wrote: 

$10. says the guards will shoot the owl at some point.


On Jun 13, 2016, at 3:27 PM, "Richard Guthrie 
richardpguthrie AT gmail.com [MidHudsonBirds]" 
> 
wrote: 




Ken McDermott called earlier to report that the SNOWY OWL that Curt discovered 
yesterday was seen again today. 


It has been near the Wallkill Correctional Facility.

Yesterday it was near McKendrick Road west of Rt. 208 on correctional facility 
property. 


You can drive the perimeter roads looking for the owl. But...

Word of caution: This is a prison. There are Prison Guards patrolling the 
grounds - where the owl has been seen. 


Just don't get out of your car, walk around or set up scopes, cameras, or 
anything else that might make them nervous. 


They are serious.

Amazing, eh?

Rich

--
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New Baltimore


__._,_.___
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> 

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Subject: Re: [MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands
From: Gerald Smith <goshawk AT gisco.net>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 15:42:05 -0400
It might be prudent for a birding group representative to contact the warden 
regarding the birds presence and proactively hopefully assure staff awareness 
and protection Gerry Smith 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 13, 2016, at 15:31, Richard Guthrie  wrote:
> 
> If they do, it would be a violation of State and Federal Laws. They might end 
up on the other side of the bars if so. 

> 
> Rich
> 
>> On Mon, Jun 13, 2016 at 3:29 PM, Pia Davis  wrote:
>> $10. says the guards will shoot the owl at some point.
>> 
>> 
>>> On Jun 13, 2016, at 3:27 PM, "Richard Guthrie richardpguthrie AT gmail.com 
[MidHudsonBirds]"  wrote: 

>>> 
>>>  
>>> 
>>> Ken McDermott called earlier to report that the SNOWY OWL that Curt 
discovered yesterday was seen again today. 

>>> 
>>> It has been near the Wallkill Correctional Facility.
>>> 
>>> Yesterday it was near McKendrick Road west of Rt. 208 on correctional 
facility property. 

>>> 
>>> You can drive the perimeter roads looking for the owl. But...
>>> 
>>> Word of caution: This is a prison. There are Prison Guards patrolling the 
grounds - where the owl has been seen. 

>>> 
>>> Just don't get out of your car, walk around or set up scopes, cameras, or 
anything else that might make them nervous. 

>>> 
>>> They are serious.
>>> 
>>> Amazing, eh?
>>> 
>>> Rich
>>> 
>>> -- 
>>> Richard Guthrie
>>> New Baltimore
>>> 
>>> 
>>> __._,_.___
>>> Posted by: Richard Guthrie 
>>> Reply via web post • Reply to sender • Reply to group • Start a New 
Topic • Messages in this topic (1) 

>>> 
>>> Have you tried the highest rated email app?
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on the market. What are you waiting for? Now you can access all your inboxes 
(Gmail, Outlook, AOL and more) in one place. Never delete an email again with 
1000GB of free cloud storage. 

>>>          
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>>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MidHudsonBirds  
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>>> 
>>> VISIT YOUR GROUP
>>> • Privacy • Unsubscribe • Terms of Use 
>>> .
>>>  
>>> 
>>> __,_._,___
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Richard Guthrie
> 
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Subject: Re:[MidHudsonBirds] Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands
From: Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 15:31:26 -0400
If they do, it would be a violation of State and Federal Laws. They might
end up on the other side of the bars if so.

Rich

On Mon, Jun 13, 2016 at 3:29 PM, Pia Davis  wrote:

> $10. says the guards will shoot the owl at some point.
>
>
> On Jun 13, 2016, at 3:27 PM, "Richard Guthrie richardpguthrie AT gmail.com
> [MidHudsonBirds]"  wrote:
>
>
>
> Ken McDermott called earlier to report that the SNOWY OWL that Curt
> discovered yesterday was seen again today.
>
> It has been near the Wallkill Correctional Facility.
>
> Yesterday it was near McKendrick Road west of Rt. 208 on correctional
> facility property.
>
> You can drive the perimeter roads looking for the owl. But...
>
> Word of caution: This is a prison. There are Prison Guards patrolling the
> grounds - where the owl has been seen.
>
> Just don't get out of your car, walk around or set up scopes, cameras, or
> anything else that might make them nervous.
>
> They are serious.
>
> Amazing, eh?
>
> Rich
>
> --
> Richard Guthrie
> New Baltimore
>
>
> __._,_.___
> ------------------------------
> Posted by: Richard Guthrie 
> ------------------------------
> Reply via web post
> 
 

> • Reply to sender
> 
 

> • Reply to group
> 
 

> • Start a New Topic
> 
 

> • Messages in this topic
> 
 

> (1)
> ------------------------------
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Subject: Snowy Owl Ulster Couty near the Shawangunk Grasslands
From: Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 15:27:31 -0400
Ken McDermott called earlier to report that the SNOWY OWL that Curt
discovered yesterday was seen again today.

It has been near the Wallkill Correctional Facility.

Yesterday it was near McKendrick Road west of Rt. 208 on correctional
facility property.

You can drive the perimeter roads looking for the owl. But...

Word of caution: This is a prison. There are Prison Guards patrolling the
grounds - where the owl has been seen.

Just don't get out of your car, walk around or set up scopes, cameras, or
anything else that might make them nervous.

They are serious.

Amazing, eh?

Rich

-- 
Richard Guthrie
New Baltimore

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Subject: Wilson's Phalarope seen today?
From: Brian Whipple <brian.whipple AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 14:10:51 -0400
Any word on the Wilson's Phalarope today (Mon Jun 13)? I'm hoping it sticks
around for another week (but I'm keeping my expectations low).

On Sunday, June 12, 2016, Carney, Martin  wrote:

> Still in same location at 5:45 pm...Martin Carney
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Subject: LABU Liberty State Park
From: Shane Blodgett <shaneblodgett AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 15:08:01 +0000 (UTC)
This from Sam Galick:

https://goo.gl/maps/McQXzGtxWNz

IC parking lot is Interpretive Center
Shane BlodgettBrooklyn NY


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Subject: Re:[NJBIRDS] Lark Bunting, Hudson County
From: Dominic Garcia-Hall <dominic.hall AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 10:37:35 -0400
Quite a few of us looking are looking but not refound yet. There are fairly
strong offshore winds so might be worth keeping an eye peeled in lower
Manhattan or even Governors island if anyone happens to be there.
Dom.

On Monday, June 13, 2016, Andrew Baksh birdingdude AT gmail.com [ebirdsnyc] <
ebirdsnyc-noreply AT yahoogroups.com> wrote:

>
>
> For anyone bored with the Garganey chatter or looking for a new quest.
>
> --------
> "I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the
> ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own
> abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass
>
> 風 Swift as the wind
> 林 Quiet as the forest
> 火 Conquer like the fire
> 山 Steady as the mountain
> Sun Tzu   *The Art of War*
> 
>
> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)
>
> (") _ (")
>
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!
>
>
> Andrew Baksh
> www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
>
> Begin forwarded message:
>
> *From:* Samuel Galick  >
> *Date:* June 13, 2016 at 7:44:44 AM EDT
> *To:* JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> 
> *Subject:* *[JERSEYBI] Lark Bunting, Hudson County*
> *Reply-To:* sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM
> 
>
> Simon Lane reports:
>
> Male Lark Bunting - Liberty SP - very distinctive. Hanging around road
> edges just N of IC parking area. Seen several times.
>
> Good birding,
>
> Sam
>
>
> --
> Sam Galick
> Cape May, NJ
> sam.galick AT gmail.com
> 
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> 
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>
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> ------------------------------
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Subject: Snow in June
From: Curt McDermott <tele-tek AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 22:57:39 -0400
This afternoon while returning home from Rhinebeck in Dutchess County, with my 
Wife and Daughter, I stopped at Hopeland Trails on Old Post Rd., Staatsburg, NY 
to check on the Chat reported by John Askildsen weeks ago. After about five 
minutes of listening, we were able to hear the bird calling from East of the 
parking lot. We continued south and crossed the Hudson into Ulster County. We 
then chose an odd path home by cutting through the property of the Shawangunk 
and Wallkill Correctional facilities, just to the East of the Shawangunk 
Grasslands. To our great surprise, at 7:45PM, we stumbled upon a VERY white 
SNOWY OWL on the prison grounds. My father, Ken McDermott was close by and was 
able to share in the sighting. Can't say I have ever had both species in the 
same day and have certainly never been wearing shorts before while looking at a 
Snowy Owl. You just never know!! 

See Birds,                Curt McDermott 		 	   		  
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Subject: FW: Garganey YES
From: "Carena Pooth" <carena AT prodigy.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 22:10:44 -0400
Correction (with apologies and profuse thanks)....this afternoon the bird
was found by Mike Zebehazy. 
Many thanks also to the others who helped me get on the bird, to Jay McGowan
for initially discovering the bird and getting the word out, and to all who
posted updates and kept me jealous enough to inspire me to make the 4-hour
drive there & back today. 
Carena Pooth

-----Original Message-----
From: bounce-120556317-74633745 AT list.cornell.edu
[mailto:bounce-120556317-74633745 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Carena
Pooth
Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2016 3:27 PM
To: NYSBIRDS-L 
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Garganey YES

Knox-Marcellus Marsh. Found by Mike H. 2pm today in the water, feeding in
scattered vegetation along western edge of the big rectangular pond. Seen by
about 10-15 others, very good scope views. Still there at 3pm when I left. 


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Subject: Wilson's Phalarope
From: "Carney, Martin" <carneym AT fordhamprep.org>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 21:28:20 -0400
Still in same location at 5:45 pm...Martin Carney

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Subject: Central Park NYC - Sunday June 12, 2016 -Am. Redstarts & Black-and-white Warbler
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 20:52:02 -0400
Central Park NYC - North End
Sunday June 12, 2016
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob. on bird walk starting from the 
Conservatory Garden at 9am. 


Highlight: Am. Redstarts & late Black-and-white Warbler. The list includes some 
birds seen before the walk. 


Canada Goose - pair with 3 goslings & others Reservoir (Deb before walk), Meer
Gadwall - pair NE Reservoir (Deb before walk), 2 males & 1 female Meer
Mallard - Meer 
Double-crested Cormorant - around 20 Reservoir (Deb before walk), flyovers
Great Egret - flyovers (Andrea Hessel)
Snowy Egret - flyovers mostly in groups of 3 (Andrea & Carine)
Black-crowned Night-Heron - adult Reservoir (Deb before walk)
Herring Gull - low numbers Reservoir (Deb before walk)
Great Black-backed Gull - low numbers (Deb before walk)
Chimney Swift - overhead here & there (Carine Mitchell)
Red-bellied Woodpecker - female Loch (Andrea Hessel)
Downy Woodpecker - Meer, Loch
Northern Flicker - 2 females displaying Wildflower Meadow
Great Crested Flycatcher - Loch, HighMeadow/Lily Ponds
Eastern Kingbird - display flight at Grassy Knoll (Deb before walk)
Warbling Vireo - singing & seen several locations
Red-eyed Vireo - pairs continue High Meadow & Great Hill
Blue Jay
White-breasted Nuthatch - heard Meer
Wood Thrush - 2 males heard at Loch
American Robin
Gray Catbird - some singing
Northern Mockingbird - north of Reservoir (Deb before walk)
Black-and-white Warbler - female Lily Ponds (tweeted earlier by J. B. Russell 
at N. entrance Ridge Trail) 

American Redstart - female Conservatory Garden, imm. male singing at Lily Ponds
Song Sparrow - pair with singing male Conservatory Garden
Norther Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird - at least 2 males at the Meer
Brown-headed Cowbird - male SE of Nutter's Battery
Baltimore Oriole - male & female SE of Nutter's Battery, female carrying food 
at Blockhouse (Carine Mitchell) 

House Finch - female - Meer (Carine M.)
American Goldfinch - 3 SE of Nutter's Battery

Sol Shamilzadeh reports that one of Pale Male's fledgings fell into the 
Conservatory Water (model boat pond) and was rescued by police and taken
 to the Wild Bird Fund. 

Deb Allen

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Subject: Phalarope on EAST pond
From: Pat Aitken <aitkenpatricia AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 20:55:28 +0000
Correcting location.  Still feeding actively when I left.

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Subject: Wilson's Phalarope yes
From: Pat Aitken <aitkenpatricia AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 20:20:26 +0000
Still present on West pond at jamaica bay, near raunt

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Subject: Garganey YES
From: Carena Pooth <carena AT prodigy.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 15:26:35 -0400
Knox-Marcellus Marsh. Found by Mike H. 2pm today in the water, feeding in 
scattered vegetation along western edge of the big rectangular pond. Seen by 
about 10-15 others, very good scope views. Still there at 3pm when I left. 



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Subject: Garganey YES!
From: Sean Sime <sean AT seansime.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 14:16:52 -0400
The bird is currently in view. See previous posts for additional info.

Sean Sime
Brooklyn

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Wilson's Phalarope continues-Jamaica Bay East Pond (Sunday)
From: Karen Fung <easternbluebird AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 08:52:07 -0400
Same spot as yesterday: by the Raunt, visible from Big Johns overlook. Looking 
at it now 8:50a 


----

Karen Fung
NYC
http://BIRDSiVIEWS.com

Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: Re: Arctic Tern at Breezy Point
From: Long Island Birding <michaelzito AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 21:19:22 -0400
Hello everyone,
To update, thanks for those of you emailed me about the situation at Breezy.
I have learned that the Breezy Point Coop won a court battle over 50 years
ago, and is under the impression that they are one of the few places in the
US where land is owned to the "low tide line" (not the high tide line).
From what I have read, this is because the decision in the case stated the
Coop owns new land that was created by the construction of a jetty.  This
was supposed to mean new beach that was created, however the Coop has
interpreted the ruling to also include land that is under water.  It seems
like a complicated situation there, and although you might be able to win
in court because of the Public Trust Doctrine and likely incorrect
interpretation of the ruling, it wouldn't be worth the hassle.  If you
really wanted to be a jerk though, you could always walk in the water past
the low tide line!

Mike Z.


On Sat, Jun 11, 2016 at 8:14 PM, Long Island Birding 
wrote:

> Just an FYI about general New York Beach Access, I believe the high water
> mark (high tide line) is the demarcation used to separate public and
> private beach property.  Meaning if you walk on the wet sand that is
> covered by water half of the day, you are OK.  There was even a ruling in
> 1988 in NY to favor this access that overturned a previous ruling on this
> issue in Glen Cove.
>
> 
http://www.nytimes.com/1988/11/24/sports/outdoors-beach-use-decision-appealed.html 

> http://www.leagle.com/decision/1989890153AD2d737_1656/SMITH%20v.%20STATE
>
> Mike Z
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jun 11, 2016 at 6:48 PM, Isaac Grant 
> wrote:
>
>> I met an Australian birder at Jamaica Bay who really wanted to see Piping
>> Plovers so I took him to breezy point. I was expecting it to pour on us so
>> I left my camera and phone in the car. We parked at Tilden and walked a
>> good ways down the beach until we found a large loafing flock. Mixed in
>> with them was a first summer Arctic Tern. Seen on the ground through scope
>> for about 2 minutes among common terns and then seen in flight as well when
>> birds were flushed by a beach walker. Bird flew off over the ocean and I
>> lost it flying out to sea. Also present were 7 1st summer Common Terns.
>>
>> I was eventually chased off the beach by an angry and hostile Breezy
>> resident who was completely unimpressed by an Arctic Tern on "his" beach.
>> Bird was seen about 5:45 and I've just gotten back to the car.
>>
>> Isaac Grant
>> Senior Loan Officer
>> --
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>>
>>
>

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