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Updated on Sunday, March 8 at 01:44 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Greater Painted Snipe,©BirdQuest

8 Mar Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back [Ian Woodman ]
8 Mar Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back [Larry Scacchetti ]
8 Mar Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back [Stephen Shaw ]
7 Mar Re: A Pine Warbler has survived to date but it appears the Western Tanager did not [Christopher ]
7 Mar A Pine Warbler has survived to date but it appears the Western Tanager did not ["Keith Lowe mythos25 AT live.com [NS-RBA]" ]
7 Mar A Pine Warbler has survived to date but it appears the Western Tanager did not [Keith Lowe ]
8 Mar Re: Chickadeesvs Sharp shinned Hawk [Carmel Smith ]
7 Mar Re: Chickadeesvs Sharp shinned Hawk [Andrew Stadnyk ]
07 Mar Chickadeesvs Sharp shinned Hawk [Marg Millard ]
7 Mar Brown Thrasher, Fox Sparrow, Northern Mockingbird [James Hirtle ]
7 Mar "The Messenger" documentary (SongbirdSOS) Crowdfunding campaign [James Churchill ]
06 Mar Re: Pugwash Harbour [V Redden ]
06 Mar waxwings + snow buntings in e. Wolfville [Jim Wolford ]
6 Mar Re: Eurasian Kestrel [Rob Woods ]
6 Mar Eagle nest [Richard Stern ]
6 Mar Re: [NatureNS] Eurasian Kestrel ["Rob Woods rrtwoods AT yahoo.com [NS-RBA]" ]
6 Mar Submission of winter bird sighting records to Nova Scotia Birds ["Laviolette, Lance (EXP)" ]
6 Mar Re: Pugwash Harbour ["rita.paul AT ns.sympatico.ca" ]
6 Mar Re: Pugwash Harbour []
6 Mar Robin singing in Lunenburg [Nancy P Dowd ]
06 Mar Re: Pugwash Harbour [V Redden ]
06 Mar Tobeatic through the eyes of Mark Bennan [Ken McKenna ]
6 Mar Frost ["rita.paul AT ns.sympatico.ca" ]
6 Mar Fwd: Celebrating 350 years of publishing: access any article throughout March [James Churchill ]
5 Mar Re: Pugwash Harbour ["rita.paul AT ns.sympatico.ca" ]
05 Mar BARRED OWL, KINGSTON, 5MAR15: 5:15PM [Barbara & Pat ]
5 Mar Re: Pugwash Harbour [Richard Stern ]
05 Mar Pugwash Harbour [V Redden ]
05 Mar common eiders behaviour [Paul Ruggles ]
5 Mar Rarities chase this weekend [Larry Scacchetti ]
5 Mar Re: Anybody seen the following birds this week [David Simpson ]
5 Mar Re: Anybody seen the following birds this week ["Elizabeth Doull" ]
5 Mar Anybody seen the following birds this week [Rob Woods ]
05 Mar RE: Red-bellied woodpecker update for Sunnybrook [John and Nhung ]
5 Mar Re: Red-bellied woodpecker update for Sunnybrook [Patrick Kelly ]
5 Mar Red-bellied woodpecker update for Sunnybrook [James Hirtle ]
4 Mar Spring Obs [Ian Manning ]
04 Mar robin in Wolfville (+ polar bears in Labrador) [Jim Wolford ]
04 Mar Saw-whet Owls [Ken McKenna ]
4 Mar Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back ["rita.paul AT ns.sympatico.ca" ]
4 Mar Re: Humour [At ]
04 Mar Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back [David & Alison Webster ]
4 Mar Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back [Randy Lauff ]
04 Mar Nesting Ravens? [GayleMacLean ]
04 Mar Humour [Don MacNeill ]
4 Mar brown creeper singing [nancy dowd ]
4 Mar RE: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back [Angus MacLean ]
4 Mar Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back [Keith Lowe ]
4 Mar Wood Ducks [James Hirtle ]
4 Mar Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back [Stephen Shaw ]
1 Mar Re: Eider's "creche" [Ian McLaren ]
3 Mar RE: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back [Keith Lowe ]
3 Mar RE: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back ["Walt Norris" ]
4 Mar Recent Red-bellied Woodpecker Reports [James Hirtle ]
4 Mar RE: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back [Stephen Shaw ]
4 Mar Winter Wren [James Hirtle ]
03 Mar short eared owl [Clyde Stoddard ]
03 Mar Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back [David & Alison Webster ]
03 Mar Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back [GayleMacLean ]
3 Mar BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back [Burkhard Plache ]
3 Mar Re: hypopag-something: what is it? [Randy Lauff ]
3 Mar Fwd: hypopag-something: what is it? [Stephen Shaw ]
3 Mar Re: hypopag-something: what is it? [Dusan Soudek ]
3 Mar Re: hypopag-something: what is it? [Richard Stern ]
3 Mar Re: hypopag-something: what is it? [N Robinson ]
3 Mar Re: hypopag-something: what is it? [Randy Lauff ]
3 Mar Re: hypopag-something: what is it? [N Robinson ]
3 Mar Re: hypopag-something: what is it? [Randy Lauff ]
03 Mar Re: hypopag-something: what is it? [Ken McKenna ]
3 Mar RE: hypopag-something: what is it? [Keith Lowe ]
3 Mar hypopag-something: what is it? [Stephen Shaw ]
2 Mar Re: BNS/NSBS Field Trip: Valley Birding, Sun. Mar. 8 @ 9:00 AM [Richard Stern ]
2 Mar Re: BNS/NSBS Field Trip: Valley Birding, Sun. Mar. 8 @ 9:00 AM [Rob Woods ]
2 Mar BNS/NSBS Field Trip: Valley Birding, Sun. Mar. 8 @ 9:00 AM [Patrick Kelly ]
2 Mar Re: Forestry context;very long: Re: No clearcutting on Sundays [Bev Wigney ]
02 Mar Old Growth Forests (BC) by Mark Brennan [Ken McKenna ]

Subject: Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back
From: Ian Woodman <calicoangus AT bell.net>
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2015 01:09:05 -0500
If it's not, judging from all the research I'd say Stephen needs to find a 
hobby! :) 


> 
> ô¿ô
>  ~ 
Sent from Ian's iPhone
This message contains 100% recycled electrons.

> On Mar 7, 2015, at 11:10 PM, Larry Scacchetti  
wrote: 

> 
> I can't tell if this is a joke post or not. 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Mar 7, 2015, at 11:47 PM, Stephen Shaw  wrote:
>> 
>> Hi Dave and others,
>> At risk of flogging a dead horse, I’ll take up cudgels with Dave’s call 
that "35° from image horizontal when measured [see below]... means almost 
nothing". In the BBC interview, this UK guy has a big rig camera and appears to 
be an experienced photographer. Anyone like this who has to take a snap 
decision for a quick bird photo is going to try to hold the rig horizontal, and 
my guess is that anyone competent could hold it level to within ±2° of 
horizontal, even me. Photographers may wish to comment. 

>> 
>> How about 'when measured’? I imported a JPEG copy of the woodpecker-weasel 
image into the very useful image analysis program ImageJ*, and with the 
angle-measurer tool measured the shadow angle from the vertical at 47.17° (± 
1.5% coefficient of variation, n=7); my eyeball guess had been 50°, and the 
very low CV% means that the wing shadow, clear and almost linear, made it 
possible to make very reliable repeat measurements. The sun’s implied 
elevation then is (90 minus this), or 42.83°, not 35°. 

>> I thought it would take at least a degree in Astronomy (not me) and a load 
of work to estimate where the sun actually was on the day in question in that 
part of UK, but this turns out to be relatively easy. 

>> 
>> For the calculation you first need the coordinates of the site from one of 
the several latitude-longitude calculators available on the web, for instance: 

>> www.latlong.net/  
>> The result is latitude 51.562254, longitude 0.218605, for Hornchurch, E. 
London, UK. 

>> 
>> Several sun height calculators are also available, for instance: 
>> keisan.casio.com/exec/system/1224682277   
>> Besides the latitude and longitude, the date needs to be specified, which is 
the Monday the day before the BBC post, therefore 1 March 2015; zero reference, 
0 GMT; then the time (not yet daylight saving time) which is only given in the 
BBC post as 'afternoon’. My guess for this would be ~3PM, but maybe it could 
have been as early as 2PM. 

>> 
>> The results returned by the calculator for sun elevation (altitude measured 
from earth horizontal) using these 1 March 2015 values for Hornchurch are 

>> 2PM:  26.47°
>> 3PM:  20.78°
>> 4PM:  13.47°
>> The maximum height of the sun on that day occurs near 12:30PM, but is still 
only 30.74° 

>> 
>> Conclusion: The measured estimate of the sun’s elevation from the JPEG 
(42.83°), is therefore too high by 16.4° at 2PM, and 22.4° at 3PM, to have 
been taken on 1 March 2015. I don’t believe that an experienced photographer 
would be holding his camera at anywhere near either of these angles to make the 
situation right. And if that were true, the loaded woodpecker would actually be 
heading upwards by 22° (3PM), probably close to stall angle. In fact according 
to the report, the woodpecker was heading towards a crash landing, therefore 
downwards. 

>> 
>> Another way to look at it using the Keisan calculator is to ask on what 
first date/time the sun elevation would equal close to the value measured from 
the image, 42.83°. The answer is several weeks later than 1 March, on 23 May 
2015 (if 3PM) and on 19 April (if photo was taken at 2PM). 

>> 
>> This seems like pretty good evidence that this photo could not have been 
shot on or even close to 1 March 2015. If the ‘Monday’ in question were 
even earlier in the year, the sun would be lower and the angle fit would be 
even worse. Among other salient points, Randy’s is particularly persuasive, 
about the relative weight of the weasel with solid bones versus the 
woodpecker’s hollow bones implying that the bird could not fly carrying such 
a large load. 

>> 
>> The only powerful point of view that needs to be considered is that of the 
weasel itself, as relayed in Dave’s original post, which in case you missed 
it was: 

>> 
>> >> But as, is often the case, the passenger felt he was taken.
>> 
http://newsthump.com/2015/03/03/weasel-shocked-by-hidden-charges-after-cheap-woodpecker-flight/ 

>> DW<<
>> 
>> Steve (Hfx)
>> 
>> *Google to ImageJ, select the site and download the version for your 
operating system. It is a very useful, powerful but easy to use program, 
developed and maintained to the present with US govt funds and so is available 
for free. Highly recommended. 

>> 
>> --------------------------------------------------
>> 
>>> On Mar 4, 2015, at 11:31 AM, David & Alison Webster  
wrote: 

>>> Hi Steve & All,
>>>   I think there is no reason to suppose it not to be genuine.
>>> 
>>> The angle of shadow cast by the wing, more like 35o from the image 
horizontal when measured, means almost nothing because this angle would be 
dependent upon the angle of the camera relative to true horizontal. One would 
expect a loaded bird to fly with maximum angle of attack so as to avoid an 
unscheduled pancake landing. 

>>> 
>>> The foreleg, being small, against the bird, perhaps somewhat buried in 
short feathers, with an edge of sparse fur to cast the shadow, the shadow trace 
possibly dimmed by light reflected from the neck and just barely at a greater 
angle from the image horizontal than the wing shadow would be expected to cast 
faint or no detectable shadow. Even the shadow distal to the foot is very 
faint. 

>>> 
>>> This is in addition to the complaint registered by the passenger which adds 
authenticity. Why would a non-existent passenger complain about being treated 
unfairily ?. 

>>> 
>>>   Time will tell.
>>> 
>>> Yt, Dave Webster, Kentville
>>>   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Stephen Shaw" 
>>> To: 
>>> Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 1:57 AM
>>> Subject: Re: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a 
woodpecker's back 

>>> 
>>> 
>>>> Hi Keith,
>>>> I could only find one other shot, a low power pan with poor focus which 
therefore doesn’t resolve anything. Do you have a URL for other shots? 

>>>> 
>>>> If you look at the prominent bright area on the side of the bird’s 
throat which abruptly turns into a dark shadow on the breast just forward of 
the wing, this must have been shot in bright sunlight (in mid afternoon in 
February, apparently). From the angle of the shadow (caused by occlusion by the 
bend of the extended wing), sunlight would have to have been falling from the 
right, top, about 50 degrees off vertical, and roughly in the plane of the 
photo. I’m not sure, but am surprised that the sun would appear so high in a 
February afternoon in UK. For a 50° angle of illumination, it’s then 
surprising that the front edge of the weasel’s left leg doesn’t appear to 
cast any shadow on the woodpecker. Also, if you magnify the image on screen and 
focus on the bases of the left primaries, the clear regular pattern of 
alternating dark-light bands on the distal part of the primary feathers gives 
way to a rotated square pattern near the bases that doesn’t blend in and 
looks artificial. Next to this is an out of focus area that is surprising given 
the excellent focus on the ends of the primaries, which is where the most 
motion-blur would be expected if that’s what’s generating the poor 
resolution on the proximal wing. 

>>>> 
>>>> You can over-analyze images like this, and probably none of this allows us 
to tell for sure if it is genuine or not, but in aggregate it still looks very 
dubious to me. I also didn’t find his pitch particularly convincing — he 
really went out specifically to look for this species of woodpecker? 

>>>> Steve
>>>> 
>>>> On Mar 3, 2015, at 10:43 PM, Keith Lowe  wrote:
>>>> 
>>>>> There are multiple shots of it. Some articles referred to it as "baby"
>>>>> weasel. Here is a video of him explaining the circumstances.
>>>>> http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-31722410
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>>> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca 
[mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca] 

>>>>> On Behalf Of Walt Norris
>>>>> Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 10:28 PM
>>>>> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
>>>>> Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
>>>>> woodpecker's back
>>>>> 
>>>>> As a photographer I would say this is a hoax  .
>>>>> 
>>>>> Cheers,
>>>>> Walt
>>>>> 
>>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>>> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca 
[mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca] 

>>>>> On Behalf Of Stephen Shaw
>>>>> Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 9:52 PM
>>>>> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
>>>>> Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
>>>>> woodpecker's back
>>>>> 
>>>>> Too good to be true? As with the recent tufty eared squirrel, I'd suspect 

>>>>> some sort of photo-fraud.
>>>>> The British green woodpecker is quite a large bird, about 12.5 inches 
long 

>>>>> according to Peterson et al, and while a least weasel should be about 
7-8" 

>>>>> long, this one looks more like 6".
>>>>> Has the weasel been photoshopped in?  It doesn't look to be gripping the
>>>>> neck of the bird and indenting the feathers there with any intensity, as 
you 

>>>>> might suspect it would be doing in the circumstances.
>>>>> Steve
>>>>> ________________________________________
>>>>> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca] on
>>>>> behalf of Burkhard Plache [burkhardplache AT gmail.com]
>>>>> Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 6:04 PM
>>>>> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
>>>>> Subject: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
>>>>> woodpecker's back
>>>>> 
>>>>> In case you are interested to see
>>>>> http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> -----
>>>> No virus found in this message.
>>>> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
>>>> Version: 2015.0.5751 / Virus Database: 4299/9221 - Release Date: 03/03/15
>> 
Subject: Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back
From: Larry Scacchetti <larrybird4134 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2015 00:10:43 -0400
I can't tell if this is a joke post or not. 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 7, 2015, at 11:47 PM, Stephen Shaw  wrote:
> 
> Hi Dave and others,
> At risk of flogging a dead horse, I’ll take up cudgels with Dave’s call 
that "35° from image horizontal when measured [see below]... means almost 
nothing". In the BBC interview, this UK guy has a big rig camera and appears to 
be an experienced photographer. Anyone like this who has to take a snap 
decision for a quick bird photo is going to try to hold the rig horizontal, and 
my guess is that anyone competent could hold it level to within ±2° of 
horizontal, even me. Photographers may wish to comment. 

> 
> How about 'when measured’? I imported a JPEG copy of the woodpecker-weasel 
image into the very useful image analysis program ImageJ*, and with the 
angle-measurer tool measured the shadow angle from the vertical at 47.17° (± 
1.5% coefficient of variation, n=7); my eyeball guess had been 50°, and the 
very low CV% means that the wing shadow, clear and almost linear, made it 
possible to make very reliable repeat measurements. The sun’s implied 
elevation then is (90 minus this), or 42.83°, not 35°. 

> I thought it would take at least a degree in Astronomy (not me) and a load of 
work to estimate where the sun actually was on the day in question in that part 
of UK, but this turns out to be relatively easy. 

> 
> For the calculation you first need the coordinates of the site from one of 
the several latitude-longitude calculators available on the web, for instance: 

> www.latlong.net/  
> The result is latitude 51.562254, longitude 0.218605, for Hornchurch, E. 
London, UK. 

> 
> Several sun height calculators are also available, for instance: 
> keisan.casio.com/exec/system/1224682277   
> Besides the latitude and longitude, the date needs to be specified, which is 
the Monday the day before the BBC post, therefore 1 March 2015; zero reference, 
0 GMT; then the time (not yet daylight saving time) which is only given in the 
BBC post as 'afternoon’. My guess for this would be ~3PM, but maybe it could 
have been as early as 2PM. 

> 
> The results returned by the calculator for sun elevation (altitude measured 
from earth horizontal) using these 1 March 2015 values for Hornchurch are 

> 2PM:  26.47°
> 3PM:  20.78°
> 4PM:  13.47°
> The maximum height of the sun on that day occurs near 12:30PM, but is still 
only 30.74° 

> 
> Conclusion: The measured estimate of the sun’s elevation from the JPEG 
(42.83°), is therefore too high by 16.4° at 2PM, and 22.4° at 3PM, to have 
been taken on 1 March 2015. I don’t believe that an experienced photographer 
would be holding his camera at anywhere near either of these angles to make the 
situation right. And if that were true, the loaded woodpecker would actually be 
heading upwards by 22° (3PM), probably close to stall angle. In fact according 
to the report, the woodpecker was heading towards a crash landing, therefore 
downwards. 

> 
> Another way to look at it using the Keisan calculator is to ask on what first 
date/time the sun elevation would equal close to the value measured from the 
image, 42.83°. The answer is several weeks later than 1 March, on 23 May 2015 
(if 3PM) and on 19 April (if photo was taken at 2PM). 

> 
> This seems like pretty good evidence that this photo could not have been shot 
on or even close to 1 March 2015. If the ‘Monday’ in question were even 
earlier in the year, the sun would be lower and the angle fit would be even 
worse. Among other salient points, Randy’s is particularly persuasive, about 
the relative weight of the weasel with solid bones versus the woodpecker’s 
hollow bones implying that the bird could not fly carrying such a large load. 

> 
> The only powerful point of view that needs to be considered is that of the 
weasel itself, as relayed in Dave’s original post, which in case you missed 
it was: 

> 
> >> But as, is often the case, the passenger felt he was taken.
> 
http://newsthump.com/2015/03/03/weasel-shocked-by-hidden-charges-after-cheap-woodpecker-flight/ 

> DW<<
> 
> Steve (Hfx)
> 
> *Google to ImageJ, select the site and download the version for your 
operating system. It is a very useful, powerful but easy to use program, 
developed and maintained to the present with US govt funds and so is available 
for free. Highly recommended. 

> 
> --------------------------------------------------
> 
>> On Mar 4, 2015, at 11:31 AM, David & Alison Webster  
wrote: 

>> Hi Steve & All,
>>   I think there is no reason to suppose it not to be genuine.
>> 
>> The angle of shadow cast by the wing, more like 35o from the image 
horizontal when measured, means almost nothing because this angle would be 
dependent upon the angle of the camera relative to true horizontal. One would 
expect a loaded bird to fly with maximum angle of attack so as to avoid an 
unscheduled pancake landing. 

>> 
>> The foreleg, being small, against the bird, perhaps somewhat buried in short 
feathers, with an edge of sparse fur to cast the shadow, the shadow trace 
possibly dimmed by light reflected from the neck and just barely at a greater 
angle from the image horizontal than the wing shadow would be expected to cast 
faint or no detectable shadow. Even the shadow distal to the foot is very 
faint. 

>> 
>> This is in addition to the complaint registered by the passenger which adds 
authenticity. Why would a non-existent passenger complain about being treated 
unfairily ?. 

>> 
>>   Time will tell.
>> 
>> Yt, Dave Webster, Kentville
>>   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Stephen Shaw" 
>> To: 
>> Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 1:57 AM
>> Subject: Re: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a 
woodpecker's back 

>> 
>> 
>>> Hi Keith,
>>> I could only find one other shot, a low power pan with poor focus which 
therefore doesn’t resolve anything. Do you have a URL for other shots? 

>>> 
>>> If you look at the prominent bright area on the side of the bird’s throat 
which abruptly turns into a dark shadow on the breast just forward of the wing, 
this must have been shot in bright sunlight (in mid afternoon in February, 
apparently). From the angle of the shadow (caused by occlusion by the bend of 
the extended wing), sunlight would have to have been falling from the right, 
top, about 50 degrees off vertical, and roughly in the plane of the photo. 
I’m not sure, but am surprised that the sun would appear so high in a 
February afternoon in UK. For a 50° angle of illumination, it’s then 
surprising that the front edge of the weasel’s left leg doesn’t appear to 
cast any shadow on the woodpecker. Also, if you magnify the image on screen and 
focus on the bases of the left primaries, the clear regular pattern of 
alternating dark-light bands on the distal part of the primary feathers gives 
way to a rotated square pattern near the bases that doesn’t blend in and 
looks artificial. Next to this is an out of focus area that is surprising given 
the excellent focus on the ends of the primaries, which is where the most 
motion-blur would be expected if that’s what’s generating the poor 
resolution on the proximal wing. 

>>> 
>>> You can over-analyze images like this, and probably none of this allows us 
to tell for sure if it is genuine or not, but in aggregate it still looks very 
dubious to me. I also didn’t find his pitch particularly convincing — he 
really went out specifically to look for this species of woodpecker? 

>>> Steve
>>> 
>>> On Mar 3, 2015, at 10:43 PM, Keith Lowe  wrote:
>>> 
>>>> There are multiple shots of it. Some articles referred to it as "baby"
>>>> weasel. Here is a video of him explaining the circumstances.
>>>> http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-31722410
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]
>>>> On Behalf Of Walt Norris
>>>> Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 10:28 PM
>>>> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
>>>> Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
>>>> woodpecker's back
>>>> 
>>>> As a photographer I would say this is a hoax  .
>>>> 
>>>> Cheers,
>>>> Walt
>>>> 
>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]
>>>> On Behalf Of Stephen Shaw
>>>> Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 9:52 PM
>>>> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
>>>> Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
>>>> woodpecker's back
>>>> 
>>>> Too good to be true?  As with the recent tufty eared squirrel, I'd suspect
>>>> some sort of photo-fraud.
>>>> The British green woodpecker is quite a large bird, about 12.5 inches long
>>>> according to Peterson et al, and while a least weasel should be about 7-8"
>>>> long, this one looks more like 6".
>>>> Has the weasel been photoshopped in?  It doesn't look to be gripping the
>>>> neck of the bird and indenting the feathers there with any intensity, as 
you 

>>>> might suspect it would be doing in the circumstances.
>>>> Steve
>>>> ________________________________________
>>>> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca] on
>>>> behalf of Burkhard Plache [burkhardplache AT gmail.com]
>>>> Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 6:04 PM
>>>> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
>>>> Subject: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
>>>> woodpecker's back
>>>> 
>>>> In case you are interested to see
>>>> http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446
>>> 
>>> 
>>> -----
>>> No virus found in this message.
>>> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
>>> Version: 2015.0.5751 / Virus Database: 4299/9221 - Release Date: 03/03/15
> 
Subject: Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back
From: Stephen Shaw <srshaw AT Dal.Ca>
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2015 03:47:20 +0000
Hi Dave and others,
At risk of flogging a dead horse, Ill take up cudgels with Daves call that 
"35 from image horizontal when measured [see below]... means almost nothing". 
In the BBC interview, this UK guy has a big rig camera and appears to be an 
experienced photographer. Anyone like this who has to take a snap decision for 
a quick bird photo is going to try to hold the rig horizontal, and my guess is 
that anyone competent could hold it level to within 2 of horizontal, even me. 
Photographers may wish to comment. 


How about 'when measured? I imported a JPEG copy of the woodpecker-weasel 
image into the very useful image analysis program ImageJ*, and with the 
angle-measurer tool measured the shadow angle from the vertical at 47.17 ( 
1.5% coefficient of variation, n=7); my eyeball guess had been 50, and the 
very low CV% means that the wing shadow, clear and almost linear, made it 
possible to make very reliable repeat measurements. The suns implied elevation 
then is (90 minus this), or 42.83, not 35. 

I thought it would take at least a degree in Astronomy (not me) and a load of 
work to estimate where the sun actually was on the day in question in that part 
of UK, but this turns out to be relatively easy. 


For the calculation you first need the coordinates of the site from one of the 
several latitude-longitude calculators available on the web, for instance: 

www.latlong.net/
The result is latitude 51.562254, longitude 0.218605, for Hornchurch, E. 
London, UK. 


Several sun height calculators are also available, for instance:

keisan.casio.com/exec/system/1224682277 

Besides the latitude and longitude, the date needs to be specified, which is 
the Monday the day before the BBC post, therefore 1 March 2015; zero reference, 
0 GMT; then the time (not yet daylight saving time) which is only given in the 
BBC post as 'afternoon. My guess for this would be ~3PM, but maybe it could 
have been as early as 2PM. 


The results returned by the calculator for sun elevation (altitude measured 
from earth horizontal) using these 1 March 2015 values for Hornchurch are 

2PM:  26.47
3PM:  20.78
4PM:  13.47
The maximum height of the sun on that day occurs near 12:30PM, but is still 
only 30.74 


Conclusion: The measured estimate of the suns elevation from the JPEG 
(42.83), is therefore too high by 16.4 at 2PM, and 22.4 at 3PM, to have been 
taken on 1 March 2015. I dont believe that an experienced photographer would 
be holding his camera at anywhere near either of these angles to make the 
situation right. And if that were true, the loaded woodpecker would actually be 
heading upwards by 22 (3PM), probably close to stall angle. In fact according 
to the report, the woodpecker was heading towards a crash landing, therefore 
downwards. 


Another way to look at it using the Keisan calculator is to ask on what first 
date/time the sun elevation would equal close to the value measured from the 
image, 42.83. The answer is several weeks later than 1 March, on 23 May 2015 
(if 3PM) and on 19 April (if photo was taken at 2PM). 


This seems like pretty good evidence that this photo could not have been shot 
on or even close to 1 March 2015. If the Monday in question were even earlier 
in the year, the sun would be lower and the angle fit would be even worse. 
Among other salient points, Randys is particularly persuasive, about the 
relative weight of the weasel with solid bones versus the woodpeckers hollow 
bones implying that the bird could not fly carrying such a large load. 


The only powerful point of view that needs to be considered is that of the 
weasel itself, as relayed in Daves original post, which in case you missed it 
was: 


>> But as, is often the case, the passenger felt he was taken.

http://newsthump.com/2015/03/03/weasel-shocked-by-hidden-charges-after-cheap-woodpecker-flight/ 

DW<<

Steve (Hfx)

*Google to ImageJ, select the site and download the version for your operating 
system. It is a very useful, powerful but easy to use program, developed and 
maintained to the present with US govt funds and so is available for free. 
Highly recommended. 


--------------------------------------------------

On Mar 4, 2015, at 11:31 AM, David & Alison Webster 
> wrote: 

Hi Steve & All,
  I think there is no reason to suppose it not to be genuine.

 The angle of shadow cast by the wing, more like 35o from the image horizontal 
when measured, means almost nothing because this angle would be dependent upon 
the angle of the camera relative to true horizontal. One would expect a loaded 
bird to fly with maximum angle of attack so as to avoid an unscheduled pancake 
landing. 


 The foreleg, being small, against the bird, perhaps somewhat buried in short 
feathers, with an edge of sparse fur to cast the shadow, the shadow trace 
possibly dimmed by light reflected from the neck and just barely at a greater 
angle from the image horizontal than the wing shadow would be expected to cast 
faint or no detectable shadow. Even the shadow distal to the foot is very 
faint. 


 This is in addition to the complaint registered by the passenger which adds 
authenticity. Why would a non-existent passenger complain about being treated 
unfairily ?. 


  Time will tell.

Yt, Dave Webster, Kentville
 ----- Original Message ----- From: "Stephen Shaw" 
> 

To: >
Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 1:57 AM
Subject: Re: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a 
woodpecker's back 



Hi Keith,
I could only find one other shot, a low power pan with poor focus which 
therefore doesnt resolve anything. Do you have a URL for other shots? 


If you look at the prominent bright area on the side of the birds throat which 
abruptly turns into a dark shadow on the breast just forward of the wing, this 
must have been shot in bright sunlight (in mid afternoon in February, 
apparently). From the angle of the shadow (caused by occlusion by the bend of 
the extended wing), sunlight would have to have been falling from the right, 
top, about 50 degrees off vertical, and roughly in the plane of the photo. Im 
not sure, but am surprised that the sun would appear so high in a February 
afternoon in UK. For a 50 angle of illumination, its then surprising that the 
front edge of the weasels left leg doesnt appear to cast any shadow on the 
woodpecker. Also, if you magnify the image on screen and focus on the bases of 
the left primaries, the clear regular pattern of alternating dark-light bands 
on the distal part of the primary feathers gives way to a rotated square 
pattern near the bases that doesnt blend in and looks artificial. Next to this 
is an out of focus area that is surprising given the excellent focus on the 
ends of the primaries, which is where the most motion-blur would be expected if 
thats whats generating the poor resolution on the proximal wing. 


You can over-analyze images like this, and probably none of this allows us to 
tell for sure if it is genuine or not, but in aggregate it still looks very 
dubious to me. I also didnt find his pitch particularly convincing  he really 
went out specifically to look for this species of woodpecker? 

Steve

On Mar 3, 2015, at 10:43 PM, Keith Lowe 
> wrote: 


There are multiple shots of it. Some articles referred to it as "baby"
weasel. Here is a video of him explaining the circumstances.
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-31722410


-----Original Message-----
From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]
On Behalf Of Walt Norris
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 10:28 PM
To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
woodpecker's back

As a photographer I would say this is a hoax  .

Cheers,
Walt

-----Original Message-----
From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]
On Behalf Of Stephen Shaw
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 9:52 PM
To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
woodpecker's back

Too good to be true?  As with the recent tufty eared squirrel, I'd suspect
some sort of photo-fraud.
The British green woodpecker is quite a large bird, about 12.5 inches long
according to Peterson et al, and while a least weasel should be about 7-8"
long, this one looks more like 6".
Has the weasel been photoshopped in?  It doesn't look to be gripping the
neck of the bird and indenting the feathers there with any intensity, as you
might suspect it would be doing in the circumstances.
Steve
________________________________________
From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca] on
behalf of Burkhard Plache [burkhardplache AT gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 6:04 PM
To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
Subject: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
woodpecker's back

In case you are interested to see
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446



-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2015.0.5751 / Virus Database: 4299/9221 - Release Date: 03/03/15

Subject: Re: A Pine Warbler has survived to date but it appears the Western Tanager did not
From: Christopher <cpetershfx AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 21:25:20 -0400
Hi Keith,

I looked at your Miners Marsh E-bird report. I was pleasantly surprised to see 
you reporting a variety of species. I assumed the area would be frozen 
preventing Black Ducks and Mallards from enjoying the area. There must be some 
open water? Could you walk the trail comfortably? 


Chris Peters

On Mar 7, 2015, at 8:52 PM, Keith Lowe  wrote:

> Paolo and I birded in the valley today. One Pine Warbler is still doing well 
at the Blair St, Kentville location but the news is not so good regarding the 
Western Tanager in Middleton. I was spoke with the home owner briefly today and 
she said it returned with an injured leg after a weather bomb we had a while 
ago and a couple days after that it never returned again. 

Subject: A Pine Warbler has survived to date but it appears the Western Tanager did not
From: "Keith Lowe mythos25 AT live.com [NS-RBA]" <NS-RBA-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 20:52:54 -0400
Paolo and I birded in the valley today. One Pine Warbler is still doing well
at the Blair St, Kentville location but the news is not so good regarding
the Western Tanager in Middleton. I was spoke with the home owner briefly
today and she said it returned with an injured leg after a weather bomb we
had a while ago and a couple days after that it never returned again. 
Subject: A Pine Warbler has survived to date but it appears the Western Tanager did not
From: Keith Lowe <mythos25 AT live.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 20:52:54 -0400
Paolo and I birded in the valley today. One Pine Warbler is still doing well
at the Blair St, Kentville location but the news is not so good regarding
the Western Tanager in Middleton. I was spoke with the home owner briefly
today and she said it returned with an injured leg after a weather bomb we
had a while ago and a couple days after that it never returned again. 
Subject: Re: Chickadeesvs Sharp shinned Hawk
From: Carmel Smith <girlby AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2015 00:23:14 +0000 (UTC)
Well that was an interesting episode, Marg.  Says something about making sure 
the birds have tangles to navigate!  I'm going to be planting a lot more vine 
plants this summer. 


I once saw a junco in the froze position. I kept an eye on it and it was there 
so long I thought it was literally frozen, as the weather was very cold.  It 
was there for half an hour.  I went outside to see what I could make of it, 
then I spied a shrike in a nearby tree.  The junco then took off and the 
shrike behind it and I then ran after the them.  The junco headed into the 
woods and I don't know what happened then. I was so sorry that I went outside. 
 Though there have been other cases of a bird in need, such as frozen onto 
something (the feet must have been wet) where it was the thing to do.  In 
general though, best to assume as you did, and see what happens.  If it was 
there for an hour I think I'd have to investigate somehow though.  A 
cautionary tale! 

Carmel SmithMidville BranchLunenburg County 

 On Saturday, March 7, 2015 6:41 PM, Marg Millard  wrote: 

   

 I was just privileged to watch the most amazing bit of nature, live, in my 
own grapevine. Over the years there have been many interesting things appear 
and take place outside my kitchen window. Todays incident has ranked with 
the very best.
I was filling the kettle, just looked out to see who was feeding when I 
noticed a solitary chickadee frozen holding to an upright bit of vine. Very 
still. I looked about as we have been visited from time to time a small 
Sharpie who works very industriously but so far (thankfully or not I cannot 
decide; it has to eat too) ) hasn't caught anything. I didn't see anything 
but thought I would go pick up the camera, remembering the lovely photos I 
got last Sat.. Just as I came back to the window, the hawk blew into the 
vine. It knew there was something there for sure but just didn't pick the 
chickadee out. There was a lot of twitching and peering maybe 10 minutes 
worth. Suddenly in flew another chickadee and it began to taunt the hawk and 
chattering and peeping it seemed to encourage the other to do the same. They 
moved through a real tangle and
and right up behind the hawk, then in front, dropping back into the heavy 
tangle. Hawk was really taking notice of all this and began trying to grab 
one or the other. Chickadee #2 flew straight out out of sight with the hawk 
after it. No. 1 Chickadee was back to being frozen.  I went to the window on 
the other side of the house and could see nothing so returned to the kitchen 
and there were two bird frozen and the hawk booting it across the front yard 
after? nothing I could see.
Fascinating.
Marg
Marg Millard
19 White Point 2 Rd.,
White Point, Queens Co.,
R.R. # 1 Hunts Point,
Nova Scotia , Canada
B0T 1G0 (902)683-2393
MargMillard.ca 




   
Subject: Re: Chickadeesvs Sharp shinned Hawk
From: Andrew Stadnyk <Andrew.Stadnyk AT Dal.Ca>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 21:48:42 +0000
Just watched a sharpie eat a starling in my backyard! But didn't see it take 
the starling off my feeder. 


Andy Stadnyk
Lower Sackville

________________________________________
From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca  on behalf 
of Marg Millard  

Sent: March 7, 2015 5:17 PM
To: naturens
Subject: [NatureNS] Chickadeesvs Sharp shinned Hawk

I was just privileged to watch the most amazing bit of nature, live, in my
own grapevine. Over the years there have been many interesting things appear
and take place outside my kitchen window. Todays incident has ranked with
the very best.
I was filling the kettle, just looked out to see who was feeding when I
noticed a solitary chickadee frozen holding to an upright bit of vine. Very
still. I looked about as we have been visited from time to time a small
Sharpie who works very industriously but so far (thankfully or not I cannot
decide; it has to eat too) ) hasn't caught anything. I didn't see anything
but thought I would go pick up the camera, remembering the lovely photos I
got last Sat.. Just as I came back to the window, the hawk blew into the
vine. It knew there was something there for sure but just didn't pick the
chickadee out. There was a lot of twitching and peering maybe 10 minutes
worth. Suddenly in flew another chickadee and it began to taunt the hawk and
chattering and peeping it seemed to encourage the other to do the same. They
moved through a real tangle and
and right up behind the hawk, then in front, dropping back into the heavy
tangle. Hawk was really taking notice of all this and began trying to grab
one or the other. Chickadee #2 flew straight out out of sight with the hawk
after it. No. 1 Chickadee was back to being frozen.  I went to the window on
the other side of the house and could see nothing so returned to the kitchen
and there were two bird frozen and the hawk booting it across the front yard
after? nothing I could see.
Fascinating.
Marg
Marg Millard
19 White Point 2 Rd.,
White Point, Queens Co.,
R.R. # 1 Hunts Point,
Nova Scotia , Canada
B0T 1G0 (902)683-2393
MargMillard.ca

Subject: Chickadeesvs Sharp shinned Hawk
From: Marg Millard <mmillard AT eastlink.ca>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 17:17:25 -0400
I was just privileged to watch the most amazing bit of nature, live, in my 
own grapevine. Over the years there have been many interesting things appear 
and take place outside my kitchen window. Todays incident has ranked with 
the very best.
I was filling the kettle, just looked out to see who was feeding when I 
noticed a solitary chickadee frozen holding to an upright bit of vine. Very 
still. I looked about as we have been visited from time to time a small 
Sharpie who works very industriously but so far (thankfully or not I cannot 
decide; it has to eat too) ) hasn't caught anything. I didn't see anything 
but thought I would go pick up the camera, remembering the lovely photos I 
got last Sat.. Just as I came back to the window, the hawk blew into the 
vine. It knew there was something there for sure but just didn't pick the 
chickadee out. There was a lot of twitching and peering maybe 10 minutes 
worth. Suddenly in flew another chickadee and it began to taunt the hawk and 
chattering and peeping it seemed to encourage the other to do the same. They 
moved through a real tangle and
and right up behind the hawk, then in front, dropping back into the heavy 
tangle. Hawk was really taking notice of all this and began trying to grab 
one or the other. Chickadee #2 flew straight out out of sight with the hawk 
after it. No. 1 Chickadee was back to being frozen.  I went to the window on 
the other side of the house and could see nothing so returned to the kitchen 
and there were two bird frozen and the hawk booting it across the front yard 
after? nothing I could see.
Fascinating.
Marg
Marg Millard
19 White Point 2 Rd.,
White Point, Queens Co.,
R.R. # 1 Hunts Point,
Nova Scotia , Canada
B0T 1G0 (902)683-2393
MargMillard.ca 

Subject: Brown Thrasher, Fox Sparrow, Northern Mockingbird
From: James Hirtle <jrhbirder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 21:01:12 +0000
Dorothy Poole and I watched the brown thrasher at the Dufferin Street location 
in Lunenburg today. It was about my 15th trip or better for the bird and 
finally success. Dorothy saw the fox sparrow there also, but I was too focused 
on the thrasher trying to get some adequate photos. The northern mockingbird 
was present still at First Peninsula. 

 
James R. Hirtle
LaHave  
 		 	   		  
Subject: "The Messenger" documentary (SongbirdSOS) Crowdfunding campaign
From: James Churchill <jameslchurchill AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 16:53:17 -0400
folks,

The documentary, "The Messenger", by SongbirdSOS Productions, about major
songbird declines has a crowdfunding campaign to help them finish the
documentary:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/the-messenger--3

The film is also going to be on The Nature of Things, March 19th:
http://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episodes/songbirdsos

Maybe there are opportunities for us to hold some screenings of this
locally??

cheers,


-- 
James Churchill
Kentville, Nova Scotia
jameslchurchill AT gmail.com
(902) 681-2374
Subject: Re: Pugwash Harbour
From: V Redden <reddenville AT nncweb.ca>
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2015 23:22:29 -0400
I would take an ice and horse racing combo anytime.
Virginia

A spark burns down the forest - Ovambo Namibia

On 3/6/2015 12:49 PM, rita.paul AT ns.sympatico.ca wrote:
> And today, Heather one of the family of the competing horsemen in those races 
is in 

> Australia competing for the Worlds Driving Championship.
> He is also Canada's leading sulky driver.
> It was great training for young horsemen -
> Enjoy the winter
> Paul
>
> > On March 6, 2015 at 12:28 PM heather.drope AT ns.sympatico.ca wrote:
> >
> >
> > It wasn't that many years ago that Wallace Bay would freeze over and they 
would have sulky races 

> on it. HeatherAa
> >
> >
> > ---- V Redden  wrote:
> > > The Northumberland Strait ice is covered in snow. It actually looks like 
a windblown farm 

> field. No
> > > ice chunks to be seen.
> > >
> > > Virginia Redden
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > A spark burns down the forest - Ovambo Namibia
> > > On 3/5/2015 6:29 PM, rita.paul AT ns.sympatico.ca wrote:
> > > > I don't know exactly where you were Richard but the last few days open
> > > > water is visible from shore around Tancock. Not much ice in Mahone Bay 
an easterly wind 

> > > > will break a lot up.
> > > > My Grandfather used to say St Patricks day was the best day to travel 
on 

> > > > the ice - that is Northumberland Strait ice - a few days yet!
> > > > Enjoy the winter
> > > > Paul
> > > >> On March 5, 2015 at 6:09 PM Richard Stern  
wrote: 

> > > >>
> > > >> When Bernard and I were down on the Blandford Peninsula and in Chester 
last Sat., the sea was 

> > > >> frozen in places as far as the eye could see, and in the other places 
was full of ice 

> chunks, It
> > > >> reminded me of March in Northern Nfld. A local man we met said he's 
lived there 12 years 

> and has
> > > >> never seen anything like it.
> > > >>
> > > >> Richard
> > > >>
> > > >> On Thu, Mar 5, 2015 at 5:48 PM, V Redden  >
> > > >> wrote:
> > > >>
> > > >> Pugwash Harbour is frozen over and all the Rivers. First time that I 
can remember. The Strait 

> > > >> is frozen as far as I can see. The ducks have all gone somewhere and i 
haven't found them 

> > > >> again. All winter we had Common and Red-breasted Mergansers and Common 
Goldeneye. Many times 

> > > >> I examined the flock and did not see any Barrow's Goldeneye.
> > > >>
> > > >> Virginia Redden
> > > >> Port Howe NS
> > > >>
> > > >>
> > > >> --
> > > >> A spark burns down the forest - Ovambo Namibia
> > > >>
> > > >>
> > > >>
> > > >>
> > > >> --
> > > >> #################
> > > >> Dr.R.B.Stern,
> > > >> P.O. Box 300,
> > > >> Port Williams,
> > > >> N.S., Canada,
> > > >> B0P 1T0
> > > >> Richard Stern,
> > > >> Port Williams, NS, Canada
> > > >> sternrichard AT gmail.com 
> > > >> ###################
> > > >
> > > > No virus found in this message.
> > > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com 
> > > > Version: 2015.0.5751 / Virus Database: 4299/9235 - Release Date: 
03/05/15 

> > > >
> > >
>
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com 
> Version: 2015.0.5751 / Virus Database: 4299/9241 - Release Date: 03/06/15
>
Subject: waxwings + snow buntings in e. Wolfville
From: Jim Wolford <jimwolford AT eastlink.ca>
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2015 16:03:07 -0400
> Subject: [ValleyNature] waxwings + snow buntings in e. Wolfville
> Date: March 6, 2015 at 3:53:55 PM AST
> To: Nature BNS 
> 
> Today, near the 100 snow buntings that are our daily visitors in east-end 
Wolfville, were about 10 or more waxwings  at least one was a Bohemian, but my 
looks at the others were not diagnostic. 

> 
> Cheers from Jim in Wolfville.
> _______________________________________________
> Nature mailing list
> Nature AT blomidonnaturalists.ca
> http://blomidonnaturalists.ca/mailman/listinfo/nature_blomidonnaturalists.ca
Subject: Re: Eurasian Kestrel
From: Rob Woods <rrtwoods AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 18:49:39 +0000 (UTC)
The Eurasian Kestral was observed March 6 at approximately 1030am at Hartlan 
point hovering near the shoreline before crossing the road to the golf course. 

Rob Woods A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not 
preserved, except in memory. (Leonard Nimoy) 

      From: Pat McKay 
 To: "naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca"  
 Sent: Monday, February 9, 2015 9:57 AM
 Subject: [NatureNS] Eurasian Kestrel
   
Hello All,

Yesterday afternoon Susann Myers and I saw and photographed the Eurasian 
Kestrel at Hartlen Point just before 3pm. When first seen it was perched on the 
small concrete bunker structure to the right of the Coast guard house closer to 
the beach. It appeared to be eating something. Later it flew and hunted over 
the hill on the golf course. We had great views of it flying, but I only 
managed one rather distant photograph of it eating - good enough for ID 
purposes however. 


Pat McKay


  
Subject: Eagle nest
From: Richard Stern <sternrichard AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 14:48:28 -0400
The one in Eagle Landing subdivision in N.Kentville that has been much seen
and photographed in the last few years has blown(?) down. No doubt the
developers who have cut down nearly all the surrounding trees to build more
roads and houses will be pleased.

Richard

-- 
#################
Richard Stern,
Port Williams, NS, Canada
sternrichard AT gmail.com
###################
Subject: Re: [NatureNS] Eurasian Kestrel
From: "Rob Woods rrtwoods AT yahoo.com [NS-RBA]" <NS-RBA-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 18:49:39 +0000 (UTC)
The Eurasian Kestral was observed March 6 at approximately 1030am at Hartlan 
point hovering near the shoreline before crossing the road to the golf course. 

Rob Woods A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not 
preserved, except in memory. (Leonard Nimoy) 

      From: Pat McKay 
 To: "naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca"  
 Sent: Monday, February 9, 2015 9:57 AM
 Subject: [NatureNS] Eurasian Kestrel
   
Hello All,

Yesterday afternoon Susann Myers and I saw and photographed the Eurasian 
Kestrel at Hartlen Point just before 3pm. When first seen it was perched on the 
small concrete bunker structure to the right of the Coast guard house closer to 
the beach. It appeared to be eating something. Later it flew and hunted over 
the hill on the golf course. We had great views of it flying, but I only 
managed one rather distant photograph of it eating - good enough for ID 
purposes however. 


Pat McKay


  
Subject: Submission of winter bird sighting records to Nova Scotia Birds
From: "Laviolette, Lance (EXP)" <lance.laviolette AT lmco.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 17:55:40 +0000
Hi Everyone,

The deadline for the submission of winter (December-February) records for 
inclusion in the next issue of Nova Scotia Birds is March 9. For those of you 
who have already sent me their records or who have been submitting throughout 
the season through eBird or NatureNS, many thanks. For those of you who haven't 
yet done so and wish to do so, please send a summary of your sightings in the 
following format: 


Species name, date(s) observed, location (+ county), number seen (age and sex 
if known), observer(s) name, comments 


You can send your sightings through email to: 
lance.laviolette AT lmco.com 


or through Canada Post to:

Mr. Lance Laviolette
RR#1
Glen Robertson, Ontario
K0B 1H0

All the best,

Lance

======================
Lance Laviolette
Records Editor
NS Birds
lance.laviolette AT lmco.com

Subject: Re: Pugwash Harbour
From: "rita.paul AT ns.sympatico.ca" <rita.paul@ns.sympatico.ca>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 12:49:29 -0400 (AST)




Subject: Re: Pugwash Harbour
From: <heather.drope AT ns.sympatico.ca>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 12:28:58 -0400
It wasn't that many years ago that Wallace Bay would freeze over and they would 
have sulky races on it. Heather 



---- V Redden  wrote: 
> The Northumberland Strait ice is covered in snow. It actually looks like a 
windblown farm field. No 

> ice chunks to be seen.
> 
> Virginia Redden
> 
> 
> 
> A spark burns down the forest - Ovambo Namibia
> On 3/5/2015 6:29 PM, rita.paul AT ns.sympatico.ca wrote:
> > I don't know exactly where you were Richard but the last few days open
> > water is visible from shore around Tancock. Not much ice in Mahone Bay an 
easterly wind 

> > will break a lot up.
> > My Grandfather used to say St Patricks day was the best day to travel on
> > the ice - that is Northumberland Strait ice - a few days yet!
> > Enjoy the winter
> > Paul
> >> On March 5, 2015 at 6:09 PM Richard Stern  wrote:
> >>
> >> When Bernard and I were down on the Blandford Peninsula and in Chester 
last Sat., the sea was 

> >> frozen in places as far as the eye could see, and in the other places was 
full of ice chunks, It 

> >> reminded me of March in Northern Nfld. A local man we met said he's lived 
there 12 years and has 

> >> never seen anything like it.
> >>
> >> Richard
> >>
> >> On Thu, Mar 5, 2015 at 5:48 PM, V Redden > 

> >> wrote:
> >>
> >> Pugwash Harbour is frozen over and all the Rivers. First time that I can 
remember. The Strait 

> >> is frozen as far as I can see. The ducks have all gone somewhere and i 
haven't found them 

> >> again. All winter we had Common and Red-breasted Mergansers and Common 
Goldeneye. Many times 

> >>     I examined the flock and did not see any Barrow's Goldeneye.
> >>
> >>     Virginia Redden
> >>     Port Howe NS
> >>
> >>
> >>     -- 
> >>     A spark burns down the forest - Ovambo Namibia
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> -- 
> >> #################
> >> Dr.R.B.Stern,
> >> P.O. Box 300,
> >> Port Williams,
> >> N.S., Canada,
> >> B0P 1T0
> >> Richard Stern,
> >> Port Williams, NS, Canada
> >> sternrichard AT gmail.com 
> >> ###################
> >
> > No virus found in this message.
> > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com 
> > Version: 2015.0.5751 / Virus Database: 4299/9235 - Release Date: 03/05/15
> >
> 
Subject: Robin singing in Lunenburg
From: Nancy P Dowd <nancypdowd AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 11:51:31 -0400
Nice to hear for the first time this year early on a cold morning. 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Pugwash Harbour
From: V Redden <reddenville AT nncweb.ca>
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2015 11:49:35 -0400
The Northumberland Strait ice is covered in snow. It actually looks like a 
windblown farm field. No 

ice chunks to be seen.

Virginia Redden



A spark burns down the forest - Ovambo Namibia
On 3/5/2015 6:29 PM, rita.paul AT ns.sympatico.ca wrote:
> I don't know exactly where you were Richard but the last few days open
> water is visible from shore around Tancock. Not much ice in Mahone Bay an 
easterly wind 

> will break a lot up.
> My Grandfather used to say St Patricks day was the best day to travel on
> the ice - that is Northumberland Strait ice - a few days yet!
> Enjoy the winter
> Paul
>> On March 5, 2015 at 6:09 PM Richard Stern  wrote:
>>
>> When Bernard and I were down on the Blandford Peninsula and in Chester last 
Sat., the sea was 

>> frozen in places as far as the eye could see, and in the other places was 
full of ice chunks, It 

>> reminded me of March in Northern Nfld. A local man we met said he's lived 
there 12 years and has 

>> never seen anything like it.
>>
>> Richard
>>
>> On Thu, Mar 5, 2015 at 5:48 PM, V Redden > 

>> wrote:
>>
>> Pugwash Harbour is frozen over and all the Rivers. First time that I can 
remember. The Strait 

>> is frozen as far as I can see. The ducks have all gone somewhere and i 
haven't found them 

>> again. All winter we had Common and Red-breasted Mergansers and Common 
Goldeneye. Many times 

>>     I examined the flock and did not see any Barrow's Goldeneye.
>>
>>     Virginia Redden
>>     Port Howe NS
>>
>>
>>     -- 
>>     A spark burns down the forest - Ovambo Namibia
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -- 
>> #################
>> Dr.R.B.Stern,
>> P.O. Box 300,
>> Port Williams,
>> N.S., Canada,
>> B0P 1T0
>> Richard Stern,
>> Port Williams, NS, Canada
>> sternrichard AT gmail.com 
>> ###################
>
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com 
> Version: 2015.0.5751 / Virus Database: 4299/9235 - Release Date: 03/05/15
>
Subject: Tobeatic through the eyes of Mark Bennan
From: Ken McKenna <kenmcken AT eastlink.ca>
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2015 11:21:27 -0400
Ken McKenna
Box 218 Stellarton NS
B0K 1S0
902 752-7644

Hi all

Just received this link below and I think members of the group would enjoy Mark 
Brennan's artistic look at the Tobeatic. 


cheers
Ken


 Hello friends, a big project just completed. The Tobeatic Sketches is a look 
at the Tobeatic Wilderness through art and writing. It is a pdf download. Lots 
of photos, art and of course the written story of those two amazing trips. 



please enjoy slowly!


http://www.markbrennanfineart.ca/the-tobeatic-sketches-e-book/


-- 

Mark A. Brennan
Landscape Painter, Nature Sound Recordist
www.markbrennanfineart.ca
Subject: Frost
From: "rita.paul AT ns.sympatico.ca" <rita.paul@ns.sympatico.ca>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 09:42:08 -0400 (AST)




Subject: Fwd: Celebrating 350 years of publishing: access any article
 throughout March
From: James Churchill <jameslchurchill AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 08:20:24 -0400
hi folks,
See this about open access to all Royal Society articles through March:
https://royalsociety.org/publishing350/

cheers

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Royal Society Publishing <
publishing.dohtbjjujqguidk AT newsletters.royalsociety.org>
Date: Fri, Mar 6, 2015 at 7:51 AM
Subject: Celebrating 350 years of publishing: access any article throughout
March
To: jameslchurchill AT gmail.com


     Online version
 | Mob
ile
ve

rsion

    [image:
The Royal Society]




*Celebrating the 350th anniversary of Philosophical Transactions
**Philosophical
Transactions, *the world's first science journal, is 350 today. To mark
this auspicious occasion, we have published two very special, commemorative
issues of the journal and organised a programme of events including films,
debates and a discussion meeting.  In addition, all Royal Society journal
content, from 1665 to 2015, is *free to access* until the end of March.
 Access all journal content

     *Publishing
350 - from foundation to future*
------------------------------
    Celebrating 350 years of
*Ph*
*il*
*osophical
Transactions: *physical sciences papers
This
special, open access anniversary issue of *Philosophical Transactions
A *highlights
some of the revolutionary and inspirational physical sciences papers
published in the journal during its 350 year history. Accompanying
commentaries by current experts in the field explain the impact of the
historic papers on modern science.       Celeb
rat
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years of *Philosophical Transactions: *life sciences papers
This
special, open access anniversary issue of *Philosophical Transactions B *takes
the same approach of highlighting seminal biological sciences papers published
in the journal over the past 350 years.  The accompanying commentaries by
leading scientists in the field explain how the papers have impacted on
current thinking.
     *Science Stories* films
Watch a
series of films showing how scientific papers have inspired leading
scientists and influenced the world around us.      Special 2015 Discussion
Meeting: Bioinspiration of new technologies

This Discussion Meeting, which will be webcast live, will bring together
scientists from a range of disciplines to discuss how nature has inspired
their work and how this can contribute to the technological evolution.  The
meeting will take place on 27 May 2015.      The future of scholarly
scientific communication - the debates
In April
and May we are holding a series of discussions on evolving and
controversial areas in scholarly communication, looking at the impact of
technology, the culture of science and how scientists might communicate in
the future.      Publish or perish? How has *Philosophical Transactions *shaped
science today?

This academic conference, which will take place on 19-21 March, will
discuss the birth of scientific publishing, the legacy of *Philosophical Tr*
*ansactions *and the history of scientific journals, examining how they
have shaped science.      A Special issue of Young Scientists Journal

The Royal Society's Partnership Grants scheme will be working with the
Young Scientists Journal in order to help the next generation of scientists
to get their findings in to print.          *Most downloaded and cited *
------------------------------

*Our most downloaded and cited content from 2014 is free to access until
the end of the year.*

*Biology Letters*
Most downloa
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Most downlo 
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*Most
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*Interface*
Most downloaded and cited content from 2014


*Interface Focus*
Most downloaded and cited content from 2014


  *Come and meet us at*
------------------------------

International Conference on Multifunctional, Hybrid and Nanomaterials
9-13 March 2015
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28-31 March 2015
San Francisco, USA

Society for General Microbiology
30 March - 2 April 2015
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11-15 May 2015
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-- 
James Churchill
Kentville, Nova Scotia
jameslchurchill AT gmail.com
(902) 681-2374
Subject: Re: Pugwash Harbour
From: "rita.paul AT ns.sympatico.ca" <rita.paul@ns.sympatico.ca>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:29:57 -0400 (AST)




Subject: BARRED OWL, KINGSTON, 5MAR15: 5:15PM
From: Barbara & Pat <barpat AT eastlink.ca>
Date: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 18:26:37 -0400
5MAR15: 5:15PM

MALE, BARRED OWL PERCHED, IN THE BACKYARD WOODLAND ABOUT 75FT FROM OUR 
LOCATION, INSIDE OUR HOME. 

EARLIER IN THE DAY THERE WERE RED AND GREY SQUIRRELS, CLEANING UP FROM UNDER 
OUR FEEDERS, 

HOWEVER, NO SQUIRRELS, THAT WE COULD SEE, DURING THE OWL’S PRESENCE. 
THE OWL ORIGINALLY PERCHED ABOUT 60FT FROM OUR BARRED OWL, NESTBOX. 
SUBSEQUENTLY, IT MOVED 

TO A POSITION FURTHER FROM THE NESTBOX BUT CONTINUED TO VISUALLY SURVEY OUR 
BACKYARD AND THE 

AREA NEAR ITS PERCH.
DEPARTED AT APPROXIMATELY 6:15PM

BARBARA AND PAT
Subject: Re: Pugwash Harbour
From: Richard Stern <sternrichard AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:09:34 -0400
When Bernard and I were down on the Blandford Peninsula and in Chester last
Sat., the sea was frozen in places as far as the eye could see, and in the
other places was full of ice chunks, It reminded me of March in Northern
Nfld. A local man we met said he's lived there 12 years and has never seen
anything like it.

Richard

On Thu, Mar 5, 2015 at 5:48 PM, V Redden  wrote:

> Pugwash Harbour is frozen over and all the Rivers. First time that I can
> remember. The Strait is frozen as far as I can see. The ducks have all gone
> somewhere and i haven't found them again. All winter we had Common and
> Red-breasted Mergansers and Common Goldeneye. Many times I examined the
> flock and did not see any Barrow's Goldeneye.
>
> Virginia Redden
> Port Howe NS
>
>
> --
> A spark burns down the forest - Ovambo Namibia
>
>


-- 
#################
Dr.R.B.Stern,
P.O. Box 300,
Port Williams,
N.S., Canada,
B0P 1T0
Richard Stern,
Port Williams, NS, Canada
sternrichard AT gmail.com
###################
Subject: Pugwash Harbour
From: V Redden <reddenville AT nncweb.ca>
Date: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 17:48:40 -0400
Pugwash Harbour is frozen over and all the Rivers. First time that I can 
remember. The Strait is 

frozen as far as I can see. The ducks have all gone somewhere and i haven't 
found them again. All 

winter we had Common and Red-breasted Mergansers and Common Goldeneye. Many 
times I examined the 

flock and did not see any Barrow's Goldeneye.

Virginia Redden
Port Howe NS


-- 
A spark burns down the forest - Ovambo Namibia
Subject: common eiders behaviour
From: Paul Ruggles <cpruggles AT eastlink.ca>
Date: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 16:15:28 -0400
Hi all,

 I was out  AT  Rainbow Haven last week and got some video of a group of Common 
Eiders. 

 I mistook them for a flock of geese landing.

 First I thought I was "filming" a feeding frenzy. 
But after landing they coalesced  into a compact mass of about 20 birds. 
 
Quite an amazing sight. Too bad I wasn't closer.
 
Has anyone else observed this?

The short video is on my youtube site below.
Paul.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCN9vPZWRq8auD66f8rfEKeQ
Subject: Rarities chase this weekend
From: Larry Scacchetti <larrybird4134 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 14:53:25 -0500
Myself and 7 others are will be traveling up to Nova Scotia this weekend.
I haven't been up there since last year for the Tundra Bean Goose and I'm
looking forward to returning.  My/our targets are the Kestrel, Fieldfare,
Mew Gulls, and Gray Partridge.  I have the locations for all the birds but
 1, I'm having trouble finding the proper info I desire.  The Sharp-tailed
Grouse on PEI.  Is it worth chasing or searching for?  It seems that there
are very few birds and that they are hard to find.  Can anyone help me with
these birds?  Any info on or off list we'll be much appreciated!

Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Westwood, NJ
Subject: Re: Anybody seen the following birds this week
From: David Simpson <david.sonsimp AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 14:36:06 -0400
Rob: I had a red-necked grebe in Halifax Harbour last week. Saw it on the
ferry heading to Dartmouth.


David Simpson
On 5 Mar 2015 13:36, "Elizabeth Doull"  wrote:

>  Hi Rob
>
> Birds I often see in those locations, but not in the past three weeks...
> .......................
>
> 14 Ring-necked Duck    Mill Lake, Halifax County, Nova Scotia  - Keith
> Lowe found them on March 1st
>
> Barrow's Goldeneye      off Bedford Boat Club
>
> Surf Scoter  -  off Eastern Passage look off  (better in the morning when
> the sun is behind you/  off Cowbay
>
> Horned Grebe -  Halifax Harbour, Off Cowbay, Bayswater - tide is important
> to keep in mind
>
> Red Throated Loon -  off Cowbay,  Port George   - tide is important to
> keep in mind
>
> Harlequin Duck  -  there was a male in Halifax Harbour, but no follow ups
> after the big snow blizzard
> -  Maybe Peggy's Cove may have a few?   Port George has a few
>
Subject: Re: Anybody seen the following birds this week
From: "Elizabeth Doull" <edoull AT ns.sympatico.ca>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 13:30:47 -0400
Hi Rob

Birds I often see in those locations, but not in the past three weeks...
.......................

14 Ring-necked Duck    Mill Lake, Halifax County, Nova Scotia  - Keith Lowe 
found them on March 1st

Barrow's Goldeneye      off Bedford Boat Club

Surf Scoter  -  off Eastern Passage look off  (better in the morning when 
the sun is behind you/  off Cowbay

Horned Grebe -  Halifax Harbour, Off Cowbay, Bayswater - tide is important 
to keep in mind

Red Throated Loon -  off Cowbay,  Port George   - tide is important to keep 
in mind

Harlequin Duck  -  there was a male in Halifax Harbour, but no follow ups 
after the big snow blizzard
-  Maybe Peggy's Cove may have a few?   Port George has a few 
Subject: Anybody seen the following birds this week
From: Rob Woods <rrtwoods AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:39:38 +0000 (UTC)
Hello, Heading out birding tomorrow. Checked the ebird lists and has anybody 
seen the following birds this week in Halifax county Harlequin DuckBarrow's 
GoldeneyeRingNecked DuckSurf ScoterGrebesRed Throated Loon  Some where seen 
by Ken McKeena at Sober Island but I wont be able to bird out that 
far. Thanks Rob Woods A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, 
but not preserved, except in memory. (Leonard Nimoy) 
Subject: RE: Red-bellied woodpecker update for Sunnybrook
From: John and Nhung <nhungjohn AT eastlink.ca>
Date: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 05:50:28 -0400
Last winter, I put some suet on an old spruce stump about three feet high.
It was a great attractant for starlings and blue jays, and that flock of
starlings ended up attanting an accipiter (probably a big sharp-shin, but I
still wonder), which had at least one meal, thanks to the flock.  

 

Just a thought . J.

 

From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]
On Behalf Of Patrick Kelly
Sent: March 4, 2015 9:28 PM
To: 
Subject: Re: [NatureNS] Red-bellied woodpecker update for Sunnybrook

 

I have a sharp-shinned and the red-bellied woodpecker in my area (Falmouth)
was at my suet feeder twice but was skittish and was in and out again. I
couldn't get anything better than a blurry picture. I'm guessing that having
a bright red head may have something to do with it! 

Sent from my iPad


On Mar 4, 2015, at 9:21 PM, "James Hirtle"  wrote:

Sad news from Sunnybrook that the red-bellied woodpecker there ended up as a
meal for a hawk.  Probabably a sharp-shinned, but they need food too and it
has been a hard winter on all birds I believe.  
 
James R. Hirtle
LaHave 
 



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com
Subject: Re: Red-bellied woodpecker update for Sunnybrook
From: Patrick Kelly <Patrick.Kelly AT Dal.Ca>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 01:28:05 +0000
I have a sharp-shinned and the red-bellied woodpecker in my area (Falmouth) was 
at my suet feeder twice but was skittish and was in and out again. I couldn't 
get anything better than a blurry picture. I'm guessing that having a bright 
red head may have something to do with it! 


Sent from my iPad

On Mar 4, 2015, at 9:21 PM, "James Hirtle" 
> wrote: 


Sad news from Sunnybrook that the red-bellied woodpecker there ended up as a 
meal for a hawk. Probabably a sharp-shinned, but they need food too and it has 
been a hard winter on all birds I believe. 


James R. Hirtle
LaHave
Subject: Red-bellied woodpecker update for Sunnybrook
From: James Hirtle <jrhbirder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 01:17:24 +0000
Sad news from Sunnybrook that the red-bellied woodpecker there ended up as a 
meal for a hawk. Probabably a sharp-shinned, but they need food too and it has 
been a hard winter on all birds I believe. 

 
James R. Hirtle
LaHave  
 		 	   		  
Subject: Spring Obs
From: Ian Manning <ianmanning4 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 17:07:19 -0400
Hi Everyone,

It's been a long winter, but it seems like Spring is finally starting to
start up!

I've built a little webmap to track signs of spring as they pop up around
NS.

This map is built from an on-line form. You can enter your data here.

http://bit.ly/NS-Spring-Obs

The form feeds into a spreadsheet, which is then displayed geographically
in a map. It's looking pretty bleak at the moment, so it'd be awesome to
get some more observations.

http://bit.ly/NS-Spring

Best,
Ian
Subject: robin in Wolfville (+ polar bears in Labrador)
From: Jim Wolford <jimwolford AT eastlink.ca>
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 14:39:47 -0400
> Subject: [ValleyNature] robin in Wolfville (+ polar bears in Labrador)
> Date: March 4, 2015 at 2:32:20 PM AST
> To: Nature BNS 
> 
> MARCH 4, 2015 - At 2 p.m. I was just leaving the Acadia Arena, when a bright 
spring-like AMERICAN ROBIN landed close by on a power line in the bright 
sunlight of this relatively balmy day. This robin was apparently alone and 
coloured as brightly as male robins can be. He lingered and gave me great 
looks; binoculars were unrequired. Of course, there is no way to tell if this 
bird was a new arrival or had just given the slip to an overwintering flock. He 
may have been looking, perhaps futilely, for a spot to hunt for earthworms? 
(tired of multiflora rose-hips?). 

> 
> This is not related, but an interesting report on Stories From Here on CBC 
Radio in the past hour mentioned that 9 polar bears were present at Black 
Tickle in Labrador. This must be quite early in the year for the bears to have 
come off the sea ice to be anywhere near land, which should happen in perhaps 
April or later when the ice is breaking up in the North. 

> 
> Cheers from Jim in Wolfville.
> _______________________________________________
> Nature mailing list
> Nature AT blomidonnaturalists.ca
> http://blomidonnaturalists.ca/mailman/listinfo/nature_blomidonnaturalists.ca
Subject: Saw-whet Owls
From: Ken McKenna <kenmcken AT eastlink.ca>
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 13:07:18 -0400
Ken McKenna
Box 218 Stellarton NS
B0K 1S0
902 752-7644


Hi all
I have received a couple photos of Saw-whet Owls recently. One was taken by 
Melanie MacDonald NW of Sheet Harbour Feb 18 and a second was photographed last 
night ( Mar 3) by Emily Munro near the A&W and Sobeys head office in 
Stellarton. 


cheers
Ken
Subject: Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back
From: "rita.paul AT ns.sympatico.ca" <rita.paul@ns.sympatico.ca>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 11:56:50 -0400 (AST)




Subject: Re: Humour
From: At <hamst AT xplornet.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 11:52:12 -0400
I Like it!
Sent from my iPad

> On Mar 4, 2015, at 10:38 AM, Don MacNeill  wrote:
> 
> One of my favourite cartoons
> 
> Don
> -- 
> Don MacNeill donmacneill AT bellaliant.net
> 
Subject: Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back
From: David & Alison Webster <dwebster AT glinx.com>
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 11:31:53 -0400
Hi Steve & All,
    I think there is no reason to suppose it not to be genuine.

    The angle of shadow cast by the wing, more like 35o from the image 
horizontal when measured, means almost nothing because this angle would be 
dependent upon the angle of the camera relative to true horizontal. One 
would expect a loaded bird to fly with maximum angle of attack so as to 
avoid an unscheduled pancake landing.

    The foreleg, being small, against the bird, perhaps somewhat buried in 
short feathers, with an edge of sparse fur to cast the shadow, the shadow 
trace possibly dimmed by light reflected from the neck and just barely at a 
greater angle from the image horizontal than the wing shadow would be 
expected to cast faint or no detectable shadow. Even the shadow distal to 
the foot is very faint.

    This is in addition to the complaint registered by the passenger which 
adds authenticity. Why would a non-existent passenger complain about being 
treated unfairily ?.

    Time will tell.

Yt, Dave Webster, Kentville
    ----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Stephen Shaw" 
To: 
Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 1:57 AM
Subject: Re: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a 
woodpecker's back


> Hi Keith,
> I could only find one other shot, a low power pan with poor focus which 
> therefore doesnt resolve anything. Do you have a URL for other shots?
>
> If you look at the prominent bright area on the side of the birds throat 
> which abruptly turns into a dark shadow on the breast just forward of the 
> wing, this must have been shot in bright sunlight (in mid afternoon in 
> February, apparently).  From the angle of the shadow (caused by occlusion 
> by the bend of the extended wing), sunlight would have to have been 
> falling from the right, top, about 50 degrees off vertical, and roughly in 
> the plane of the photo.   Im not sure, but am surprised that the sun 
> would appear so high in a February afternoon in UK.  For a 50 angle of 
> illumination, its then surprising that the front edge of the weasels 
> left leg doesnt appear to cast any shadow on the woodpecker.  Also, if 
> you magnify the image on screen and focus on the bases of the left 
> primaries, the clear regular pattern of alternating dark-light bands on 
> the distal part of the primary feathers gives way to a rotated square 
> pattern near the bases that doesnt blend in and looks artificial.  Next 
> to this is an out of focus area that is surprising given the excellent 
> focus on the ends of the primaries, which is where the most motion-blur 
> would be expected if thats whats generating the poor resolution on the 
> proximal wing.
>
> You can over-analyze images like this, and probably none of this allows us 
> to tell for sure if it is genuine or not, but in aggregate it still looks 
> very dubious to me.  I also didnt find his pitch particularly 
> convincing  he really went out specifically to look for this species of 
> woodpecker?
> Steve
>
> On Mar 3, 2015, at 10:43 PM, Keith Lowe  wrote:
>
>> There are multiple shots of it. Some articles referred to it as "baby"
>> weasel. Here is a video of him explaining the circumstances.
>> http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-31722410
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca 
>> [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]
>> On Behalf Of Walt Norris
>> Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 10:28 PM
>> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
>> Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
>> woodpecker's back
>>
>> As a photographer I would say this is a hoax  .
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Walt
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca 
>> [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]
>> On Behalf Of Stephen Shaw
>> Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 9:52 PM
>> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
>> Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
>> woodpecker's back
>>
>> Too good to be true?  As with the recent tufty eared squirrel, I'd 
>> suspect
>> some sort of photo-fraud.
>> The British green woodpecker is quite a large bird, about 12.5 inches 
>> long
>> according to Peterson et al, and while a least weasel should be about 
>> 7-8"
>> long, this one looks more like 6".
>> Has the weasel been photoshopped in?  It doesn't look to be gripping the
>> neck of the bird and indenting the feathers there with any intensity, as 
>> you
>> might suspect it would be doing in the circumstances.
>> Steve
>> ________________________________________
>> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca] on
>> behalf of Burkhard Plache [burkhardplache AT gmail.com]
>> Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 6:04 PM
>> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
>> Subject: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
>> woodpecker's back
>>
>> In case you are interested to see
>> http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446
>>
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2015.0.5751 / Virus Database: 4299/9221 - Release Date: 03/03/15
> 
Subject: Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back
From: Randy Lauff <randy.lauff AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 11:02:59 -0400
Nice analysis from a photographic standpoint.

1. I agree with the apparent calmness of the weasel critique. In addition,
if you were that woodpecker, wouldn't you be scared guano-less and be
trying to remove that weasel as if nothing else in the world mattered? I'd
expect a struggle.

2. How much mass do you think a woodpecker can carry? Remember, size for
size, birds are a lot lighter than mammals, I suspect that weasel weighs in
at the same or more than the woodpecker. I strongly doubt that a woodpecker
could carry this much mass and continue flying.

Randy

_________________________________
RF Lauff
Way in the boonies of
Antigonish County, NS.

On 4 March 2015 at 09:01, Angus MacLean  wrote:

> I agree with Steve. I'm certain the weasel would not be so calm soaring
> through the sky.  Tampered photos show up daily - so many people like to
> pull the wool over our eyes.
> Angus
>
> ------------------------------
> From: mythos25 AT live.com
> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
> Subject: Re: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
> woodpecker's back
> Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:17:28 +0000
>
>
> Wow that is quite the analysis Stephen. When I have more time this evening
> I will bring up the photo and follow your analysis.
>
> Nat Geo looked got an expert to look into it and while he wouldn't say it
> with certain he believes it is real. You may want to consider sending your
> analysis to him.
>
>
> 
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2015/03/150303-weasels-woodpeckers-animals-science-weaselpecker-photos/ 

>
> Here are more photos
>
> 
http://www.explosion.com/87192/this-weasel-hijacks-a-green-woodpecker-and-gets-a-free-ride/ 

>
>
>
> *From:* Stephen Shaw 
> *Sent:* ‎Wednesday‎, ‎March‎ ‎04‎, ‎2015 ‎2‎:‎01‎ ‎AM
> *To:* NatureNS 
>
> Hi Keith,
> I could only find one other shot, a low power pan with poor focus which
> therefore doesn’t resolve anything. Do you have a URL for other shots?
>
> If you look at the prominent bright area on the side of the bird’s throat
> which abruptly turns into a dark shadow on the breast just forward of the
> wing, this must have been shot in bright sunlight (in mid afternoon in
> February, apparently).  From the angle of the shadow (caused by occlusion
> by the bend of the extended wing), sunlight would have to have been falling
> from the right, top, about 50 degrees off vertical, and roughly in the
> plane of the photo.   I’m not sure, but am surprised that the sun would
> appear so high in a February afternoon in UK.  For a 50° angle of
> illumination, it’s then surprising that the front edge of the weasel’s 
left 

> leg doesn’t appear to cast any shadow on the woodpecker.  Also, if you
> magnify the image on screen and focus on the bases of the left primaries,
> the clear regular pattern of alternating dark-light bands on the distal
> part of the primary feathers gives way to a rotated square pattern near the
> bases that doesn’t blend in and looks artificial.  Next to this is an out
> of focus area that is surprising given the excellent focus on the ends of
> the primaries, which is where the most motion-blur would be expected if
> that’s what’s generating the poor resolution on the proximal wing.
>
> You can over-analyze images like this, and probably none of this allows us
> to tell for sure if it is genuine or not, but in aggregate it still looks
> very dubious to me. I also didn’t find his pitch particularly convincing 
— 

> he really went out specifically to look for this species of woodpecker?
> Steve
>
> On Mar 3, 2015, at 10:43 PM, Keith Lowe  wrote:
>
> > There are multiple shots of it. Some articles referred to it as "baby"
> > weasel. Here is a video of him explaining the circumstances.
> > http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-31722410
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [
> mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca ]
> > On Behalf Of Walt Norris
> > Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 10:28 PM
> > To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
> > Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
> > woodpecker's back
> >
> > As a photographer I would say this is a hoax  .
> >
> > Cheers,
> > Walt
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [
> mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca ]
> > On Behalf Of Stephen Shaw
> > Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 9:52 PM
> > To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
> > Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
> > woodpecker's back
> >
> > Too good to be true?  As with the recent tufty eared squirrel, I'd
> suspect
> > some sort of photo-fraud.
> > The British green woodpecker is quite a large bird, about 12.5 inches
> long
> > according to Peterson et al, and while a least weasel should be about
> 7-8"
> > long, this one looks more like 6".
> > Has the weasel been photoshopped in?  It doesn't look to be gripping the
> > neck of the bird and indenting the feathers there with any intensity, as
> you
> > might suspect it would be doing in the circumstances.
> > Steve
> > ________________________________________
> > From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca] on
> > behalf of Burkhard Plache [burkhardplache AT gmail.com]
> > Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 6:04 PM
> > To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
> > Subject: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
> > woodpecker's back
> >
> > In case you are interested to see
> > http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446
> >
>
>
Subject: Nesting Ravens?
From: GayleMacLean <duartess AT EastLink.ca>
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 10:43:39 -0400
 Today, as I was shovelling my front walkway & driveway for the umpteenth time 
this winter, I heard and saw a number of crows putting up quite a ruckus in one 
of the nearby trees in my neighbours yard down by the green belt. I know there 
has been a Red-tail Hawk flying around as well as a Raven so I figured 
something was in one of the trees. 

I went back in with my shovel to go out to the back deck to shovel it off and 
to my astonishment, what do I see down in my dog yard but 2 Ravens pulling all 
the stuffing out of one of my big stuffed dog toys! One was doing the pulling 
out & the other was stuffing it's beak with it. The crows were all up in the 
nearby tree cawing away! 

Needless to say, my English Springer Spaniels could see them too & they wanted 
out! I told them to 'cool their jets, however. I took a couple of pictures 
through the patio door but between the rain on the window and also on the glass 
panels of the deck, they didn't turn out very well. I did go down the basement 
to try & get some pics when I opened up the basement door but they saw me & 
flew off. I am quite sure they were Ravens because of the harassment by the 
crows and because they were very big. And I did hear one making their deep 
croaking call, so I'm pretty sure it was. There have been a number of Ravens 
around. There were a couple of young ones down in the greenbelt late last 
summer. 

I figure they might be back if they thought that this would make wonderful 
nesting material. I just hope they would not have thought that the stuffing was 
food! 

Anyway, I thoroughly enjoyed watching the two of them work as a team. 
I SO enjoy all the bird activity in my backyard! Always something interesting 
going on! 

 
Cheers!
 
Gayle MacLean
Dartmouth
Subject: Humour
From: Don MacNeill <donmacneill AT bellaliant.net>
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 10:38:23 -0400
One of my favourite cartoons

Don
-- 
Don MacNeill donmacneill AT bellaliant.net
Subject: brown creeper singing
From: nancy dowd <nancypdowd AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 09:59:21 -0400
I just heard my first Brown Creeper this year in Bridgewater. Always one of the 
first songsters I notice at this location. 


Nancy
Subject: RE: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back
From: Angus MacLean <cold_mac AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:01:14 -0300
I agree with Steve. I'm certain the weasel would not be so calm soaring through 
the sky. Tampered photos show up daily - so many people like to pull the wool 
over our eyes. 

Angus
 
From: mythos25 AT live.com
To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
Subject: Re: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a 
woodpecker's back 

Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:17:28 +0000







Wow that is quite the analysis Stephen. When I have more time this evening I 
will bring up the photo and follow your analysis. 

Nat Geo looked got an expert to look into it and while he wouldn't say it with 
certain he believes it is real. You may want to consider sending your analysis 
to him. 


http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2015/03/150303-weasels-woodpeckers-animals-science-weaselpecker-photos/ 

Here are more 
photoshttp://www.explosion.com/87192/this-weasel-hijacks-a-green-woodpecker-and-gets-a-free-ride/ 



From: Stephen Shaw
Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 2:01 AM
To: NatureNS

Hi Keith,

I could only find one other shot, a low power pan with poor focus which 
therefore doesnt resolve anything. Do you have a URL for other shots? 


  

If you look at the prominent bright area on the side of the birds throat which 
abruptly turns into a dark shadow on the breast just forward of the wing, this 
must have been shot in bright sunlight (in mid afternoon in February, 
apparently). From the angle of the shadow (caused by occlusion by the bend of 
the extended wing), sunlight would have to have been falling from the right, 
top, about 50 degrees off vertical, and roughly in the plane of the photo. Im 
not sure, but am surprised that the sun would appear so high in a February 
afternoon in UK. For a 50 angle of illumination, its then surprising that the 
front edge of the weasels left leg doesnt appear to cast any shadow on the 
woodpecker. Also, if you magnify the image on screen and focus on the bases of 
the left primaries, the clear regular pattern of alternating dark-light bands 
on the distal part of the primary feathers gives way to a rotated square 
pattern near the bases that doesnt blend in and looks artificial. Next to this 
is an out of focus area that is surprising given the excellent focus on the 
ends of the primaries, which is where the most motion-blur would be expected if 
thats whats generating the poor resolution on the proximal wing. 




You can over-analyze images like this, and probably none of this allows us to 
tell for sure if it is genuine or not, but in aggregate it still looks very 
dubious to me. I also didnt find his pitch particularly convincing  he really 
went out specifically to look for this species of woodpecker? 


Steve  



On Mar 3, 2015, at 10:43 PM, Keith Lowe  wrote:



> There are multiple shots of it. Some articles referred to it as "baby"

> weasel. Here is a video of him explaining the circumstances.

> http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-31722410

> 

> 

> -----Original Message-----

> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]

> On Behalf Of Walt Norris

> Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 10:28 PM

> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca

> Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a

> woodpecker's back

> 

> As a photographer I would say this is a hoax  . 

> 

> Cheers,

> Walt

> 

> -----Original Message-----

> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]

> On Behalf Of Stephen Shaw

> Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 9:52 PM

> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca

> Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a

> woodpecker's back

> 

> Too good to be true?  As with the recent tufty eared squirrel, I'd suspect

> some sort of photo-fraud.  

> The British green woodpecker is quite a large bird, about 12.5 inches long

> according to Peterson et al, and while a least weasel should be about 7-8"

> long, this one looks more like 6".

> Has the weasel been photoshopped in?  It doesn't look to be gripping the

> neck of the bird and indenting the feathers there with any intensity, as you

> might suspect it would be doing in the circumstances. 

> Steve

> ________________________________________

> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca] on

> behalf of Burkhard Plache [burkhardplache AT gmail.com]

> Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 6:04 PM

> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca

> Subject: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a

> woodpecker's back

> 

> In case you are interested to see

> http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446

> 






 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back
From: Keith Lowe <mythos25 AT live.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:17:28 +0000
Wow that is quite the analysis Stephen. When I have more time this evening I 
will bring up the photo and follow your analysis. 



Nat Geo looked got an expert to look into it and while he wouldn't say it with 
certain he believes it is real. You may want to consider sending your analysis 
to him. 




http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2015/03/150303-weasels-woodpeckers-animals-science-weaselpecker-photos/ 



Here are more photos


http://www.explosion.com/87192/this-weasel-hijacks-a-green-woodpecker-and-gets-a-free-ride/ 










From: Stephen Shaw
Sent: ‎Wednesday‎, ‎March‎ ‎04‎, ‎2015 ‎2‎:‎01‎ ‎AM
To: NatureNS





Hi Keith,
I could only find one other shot, a low power pan with poor focus which 
therefore doesn’t resolve anything. Do you have a URL for other shots? 

  
If you look at the prominent bright area on the side of the bird’s throat 
which abruptly turns into a dark shadow on the breast just forward of the wing, 
this must have been shot in bright sunlight (in mid afternoon in February, 
apparently). From the angle of the shadow (caused by occlusion by the bend of 
the extended wing), sunlight would have to have been falling from the right, 
top, about 50 degrees off vertical, and roughly in the plane of the photo. 
I’m not sure, but am surprised that the sun would appear so high in a 
February afternoon in UK. For a 50° angle of illumination, it’s then 
surprising that the front edge of the weasel’s left leg doesn’t appear to 
cast any shadow on the woodpecker. Also, if you magnify the image on screen and 
focus on the bases of the left primaries, the clear regular pattern of 
alternating dark-light bands on the distal part of the primary feathers gives 
way to a rotated square pattern near the bases that doesn’t blend in and 
looks artificial. Next to this is an out of focus area that is surprising given 
the excellent focus on the ends of the primaries, which is where the most 
motion-blur would be expected if that’s what’s generating the poor 
resolution on the proximal wing. 


You can over-analyze images like this, and probably none of this allows us to 
tell for sure if it is genuine or not, but in aggregate it still looks very 
dubious to me. I also didn’t find his pitch particularly convincing — he 
really went out specifically to look for this species of woodpecker? 

Steve  

On Mar 3, 2015, at 10:43 PM, Keith Lowe  wrote:

> There are multiple shots of it. Some articles referred to it as "baby"
> weasel. Here is a video of him explaining the circumstances.
> http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-31722410
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]
> On Behalf Of Walt Norris
> Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 10:28 PM
> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
> Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
> woodpecker's back
> 
> As a photographer I would say this is a hoax  . 
> 
> Cheers,
> Walt
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]
> On Behalf Of Stephen Shaw
> Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 9:52 PM
> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
> Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
> woodpecker's back
> 
> Too good to be true?  As with the recent tufty eared squirrel, I'd suspect
> some sort of photo-fraud.  
> The British green woodpecker is quite a large bird, about 12.5 inches long
> according to Peterson et al, and while a least weasel should be about 7-8"
> long, this one looks more like 6".
> Has the weasel been photoshopped in?  It doesn't look to be gripping the
> neck of the bird and indenting the feathers there with any intensity, as you
> might suspect it would be doing in the circumstances. 
> Steve
> ________________________________________
> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca] on
> behalf of Burkhard Plache [burkhardplache AT gmail.com]
> Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 6:04 PM
> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
> Subject: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
> woodpecker's back
> 
> In case you are interested to see
> http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446
>
Subject: Wood Ducks
From: James Hirtle <jrhbirder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 02:01:36 +0000
Steven Shewchuk on Feb. 23 had a male and female wood duck at First South. I 
suspect this pair were returning migrants. 

 
James R. Hirtle
LaHave  
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back
From: Stephen Shaw <srshaw AT Dal.Ca>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 05:57:58 +0000
Hi Keith,
I could only find one other shot, a low power pan with poor focus which 
therefore doesnt resolve anything. Do you have a URL for other shots? 

  
If you look at the prominent bright area on the side of the birds throat which 
abruptly turns into a dark shadow on the breast just forward of the wing, this 
must have been shot in bright sunlight (in mid afternoon in February, 
apparently). From the angle of the shadow (caused by occlusion by the bend of 
the extended wing), sunlight would have to have been falling from the right, 
top, about 50 degrees off vertical, and roughly in the plane of the photo. Im 
not sure, but am surprised that the sun would appear so high in a February 
afternoon in UK. For a 50 angle of illumination, its then surprising that the 
front edge of the weasels left leg doesnt appear to cast any shadow on the 
woodpecker. Also, if you magnify the image on screen and focus on the bases of 
the left primaries, the clear regular pattern of alternating dark-light bands 
on the distal part of the primary feathers gives way to a rotated square 
pattern near the bases that doesnt blend in and looks artificial. Next to this 
is an out of focus area that is surprising given the excellent focus on the 
ends of the primaries, which is where the most motion-blur would be expected if 
thats whats generating the poor resolution on the proximal wing. 


You can over-analyze images like this, and probably none of this allows us to 
tell for sure if it is genuine or not, but in aggregate it still looks very 
dubious to me. I also didnt find his pitch particularly convincing  he really 
went out specifically to look for this species of woodpecker? 

Steve  

On Mar 3, 2015, at 10:43 PM, Keith Lowe  wrote:

> There are multiple shots of it. Some articles referred to it as "baby"
> weasel. Here is a video of him explaining the circumstances.
> http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-31722410
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]
> On Behalf Of Walt Norris
> Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 10:28 PM
> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
> Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
> woodpecker's back
> 
> As a photographer I would say this is a hoax  . 
> 
> Cheers,
> Walt
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]
> On Behalf Of Stephen Shaw
> Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 9:52 PM
> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
> Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
> woodpecker's back
> 
> Too good to be true?  As with the recent tufty eared squirrel, I'd suspect
> some sort of photo-fraud.  
> The British green woodpecker is quite a large bird, about 12.5 inches long
> according to Peterson et al, and while a least weasel should be about 7-8"
> long, this one looks more like 6".
> Has the weasel been photoshopped in?  It doesn't look to be gripping the
> neck of the bird and indenting the feathers there with any intensity, as you
> might suspect it would be doing in the circumstances. 
> Steve
> ________________________________________
> From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca] on
> behalf of Burkhard Plache [burkhardplache AT gmail.com]
> Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 6:04 PM
> To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
> Subject: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
> woodpecker's back
> 
> In case you are interested to see
> http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446
> 
Subject: Re: Eider's "creche"
From: Ian McLaren <I.A.McLaren AT Dal.Ca>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 15:01:51 +0000
I think it's high-school dance. 

Cheers, Ian

Ian McLaren

________________________________________
From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca  on behalf 
of Paul Ruggles  

Sent: March 1, 2015 9:47 AM
To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
Cc: Cora Swinamer
Subject: [NatureNS] Eider's "creche"

I was out  AT  Rainbow Haven on Friday and got an interesting clip of a group of 
Eiders forming a "creche". Has anyone seen this behaviour in the middle of 
winter? 

I have placed the clip in my drop box.
(hope you have better luck viewing it than my last effort)



Paul



https://www.dropbox.com/s/rphov0tp70s4aqv/strange%20Eider%20behaviour%20.mov?dl=0 

Subject: RE: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back
From: Keith Lowe <mythos25 AT live.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 22:43:12 -0400
There are multiple shots of it. Some articles referred to it as "baby"
weasel. Here is a video of him explaining the circumstances.
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-31722410


-----Original Message-----
From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]
On Behalf Of Walt Norris
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 10:28 PM
To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
woodpecker's back

As a photographer I would say this is a hoax  . 

Cheers,
Walt

-----Original Message-----
From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]
On Behalf Of Stephen Shaw
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 9:52 PM
To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
woodpecker's back

Too good to be true?  As with the recent tufty eared squirrel, I'd suspect
some sort of photo-fraud.  
The British green woodpecker is quite a large bird, about 12.5 inches long
according to Peterson et al, and while a least weasel should be about 7-8"
long, this one looks more like 6".
Has the weasel been photoshopped in?  It doesn't look to be gripping the
neck of the bird and indenting the feathers there with any intensity, as you
might suspect it would be doing in the circumstances. 
Steve
________________________________________
From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca] on
behalf of Burkhard Plache [burkhardplache AT gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 6:04 PM
To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
Subject: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
woodpecker's back

In case you are interested to see
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446
Subject: RE: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back
From: "Walt Norris" <w_norris AT ns.sympatico.ca>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 22:27:34 -0400
As a photographer I would say this is a hoax  . 

Cheers,
Walt

-----Original Message-----
From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]
On Behalf Of Stephen Shaw
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 9:52 PM
To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
Subject: RE: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
woodpecker's back

Too good to be true?  As with the recent tufty eared squirrel, I'd suspect
some sort of photo-fraud.  
The British green woodpecker is quite a large bird, about 12.5 inches long
according to Peterson et al, and while a least weasel should be about 7-8"
long, this one looks more like 6".
Has the weasel been photoshopped in?  It doesn't look to be gripping the
neck of the bird and indenting the feathers there with any intensity, as you
might suspect it would be doing in the circumstances. 
Steve 
________________________________________
From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca] on
behalf of Burkhard Plache [burkhardplache AT gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 6:04 PM
To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
Subject: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a
woodpecker's back

In case you are interested to see
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446
Subject: Recent Red-bellied Woodpecker Reports
From: James Hirtle <jrhbirder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 02:00:29 +0000
I've recently had reports and photos of red-bellied woodpeckers from Prince's 
Inlet Drive (male), Sunnybrook (female) and from Bridgewater by the hospital 
(female) and Bridgewater at Shipyards Landing (male). 

 
James R. Hirtle
LaHave  
 		 	   		  
Subject: RE: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back
From: Stephen Shaw <srshaw AT Dal.Ca>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 01:52:23 +0000
Too good to be true? As with the recent tufty eared squirrel, I'd suspect some 
sort of photo-fraud. 

The British green woodpecker is quite a large bird, about 12.5 inches long 
according to Peterson et al, and while a least weasel should be about 7-8" 
long, this one looks more like 6". 

Has the weasel been photoshopped in? It doesn't look to be gripping the neck of 
the bird and indenting the feathers there with any intensity, as you might 
suspect it would be doing in the circumstances. 

Steve 
________________________________________
From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca] on behalf 
of Burkhard Plache [burkhardplache AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 6:04 PM
To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
Subject: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's 
back 


In case you are interested to see
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446
Subject: Winter Wren
From: James Hirtle <jrhbirder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 01:25:17 +0000
Elke Love of Vogler's Cove has had a winter wren recently. She sent me pictures 
of the bird in the open on the white snow. 

 
James R. Hirtle
LaHave  
 		 	   		  
Subject: short eared owl
From: Clyde Stoddard <pipingploverss AT eastlink.ca>
Date: Tue, 03 Mar 2015 19:45:02 -0400
 1 short eared owl at the hawk at 610, 3 march 2015
seen by clyde stoddart
Subject: Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back
From: David & Alison Webster <dwebster AT glinx.com>
Date: Tue, 03 Mar 2015 19:28:32 -0400
But as, is often the case, the passenger felt he was taken.

http://newsthump.com/2015/03/03/weasel-shocked-by-hidden-charges-after-cheap-woodpecker-flight/ 

DW
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Burkhard Plache 
  To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca 
  Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 6:04 PM
 Subject: [NatureNS] BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's 
back 



  In case you are interested to see
  http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446

  No virus found in this message.
  Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
  Version: 2015.0.5751 / Virus Database: 4299/9221 - Release Date: 03/03/15
Subject: Re: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back
From: GayleMacLean <duartess AT EastLink.ca>
Date: Tue, 03 Mar 2015 19:14:44 -0400
Regardless of where this was filmed, this is amazing footage!
So unusual!
Many thanks for sharing!
Gayle MacLean
Dartmouth 
 
On 03/03/15 06:23 PM, Burkhard Plache  wrote: 
>  
>  
>  
> In case you are interested to see
> http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446
> 
> 
Subject: BBC Article - Weasel photographed riding on a woodpecker's back
From: Burkhard Plache <burkhardplache AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 18:04:05 -0400
In case you are interested to see
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446
Subject: Re: hypopag-something: what is it?
From: Randy Lauff <randy.lauff AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 15:36:04 -0400
David's looking for "subnivea", the habitat under the snow cover, but still
above ground. "Mice" and weasels are denizens of this habitat.

But hypopagea is still different....(insert maniacal laughter here!)

Randy

_________________________________
RF Lauff
Way in the boonies of
Antigonish County, NS.

On 3 March 2015 at 15:08, Stephen Shaw  wrote:

>  Thanks to all respondents.
> As usual DW (below) has scored highest on this test, discovering apparent
> parallel evolution of the root.
> All Greek to me too, but Randy must be pleased to be vindicated.
> Steve (Hfx)
>
>  Begin forwarded message:
>
>  *From: *David & Alison Webster 
>  *Subject: * *Re: [NatureNS] hypopag-something: what is it?*
>  *Date: *March 3, 2015 at 12:30:55 PM AST
>  *To: *Steve Shaw 
>
> Probably hypogeous/hypogaeous ; Bot/Zoo; growing or ripening underground.
> From the Peanut Gallery.
>
>
>  Also there is a hyponivea or some such word meaning under the snow but I
> can't find it.
> DW
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Stephen Shaw" 
> To: 
> Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 12:01 PM
> Subject: [NatureNS] hypopag-something: what is it?
>
>
> A recent announcement of an upcoming talk in New Glasgow involving Randy
> was to concern insects on and under the snow.
> It mentioned the unfamiliar-to-me word 'hypopagea' (or maybe it was
> 'hypopagaea' -- I've deleted the post), so I made a note to look it up.
>
> Nothing on Wikipedia under either spelling, and more surprisingly nothing
> useful on Google, where I usually get at least million hits for anything.
> (There's a thesis in Spanish on _Arachis hypopagaea_, not sure what that
> is)
>
> Have I got the spelling wrong, or is this a neologism?  Please explain,
> someone.
> Steve
>
>
>
Subject: Fwd: hypopag-something: what is it?
From: Stephen Shaw <srshaw AT Dal.Ca>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 19:08:16 +0000
Thanks to all respondents.
As usual DW (below) has scored highest on this test, discovering apparent 
parallel evolution of the root. 

All Greek to me too, but Randy must be pleased to be vindicated.
Steve (Hfx)

Begin forwarded message:
From: David & Alison Webster >
Subject: Re: [NatureNS] hypopag-something: what is it?
Date: March 3, 2015 at 12:30:55 PM AST
To: Steve Shaw >

Probably hypogeous/hypogaeous ; Bot/Zoo; growing or ripening underground. From 
the Peanut Gallery. 


Also there is a hyponivea or some such word meaning under the snow but I can't 
find it. 

DW
----- Original Message ----- From: "Stephen Shaw" 
> 

To: >
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 12:01 PM
Subject: [NatureNS] hypopag-something: what is it?


A recent announcement of an upcoming talk in New Glasgow involving Randy was to 
concern insects on and under the snow. 

It mentioned the unfamiliar-to-me word 'hypopagea' (or maybe it was 
'hypopagaea' -- I've deleted the post), so I made a note to look it up. 


Nothing on Wikipedia under either spelling, and more surprisingly nothing 
useful on Google, where I usually get at least million hits for anything. 

(There's a thesis in Spanish on _Arachis hypopagaea_, not sure what that is)

Have I got the spelling wrong, or is this a neologism? Please explain, someone. 

Steve

Subject: Re: hypopag-something: what is it?
From: Dusan Soudek <soudekd AT ns.sympatico.ca>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 14:06:29 -0400 (AST)




Subject: Re: hypopag-something: what is it?
From: Richard Stern <sternrichard AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 13:39:09 -0400
If it's hypophagia, it means under-eating.

Richard

On Tue, Mar 3, 2015 at 12:41 PM, N Robinson  wrote:

> Maybe it is a misspelling of 'hypophagia".
>
> Nancy
>
> On Tue, Mar 3, 2015 at 11:01 AM, Stephen Shaw  wrote:
>
>> A recent announcement of an upcoming talk in New Glasgow involving Randy
>> was to concern insects on and under the snow.
>> It mentioned the unfamiliar-to-me word 'hypopagea' (or maybe it was
>> 'hypopagaea' -- I've deleted the post), so I made a note to look it up.
>>
>> Nothing on Wikipedia under either spelling, and more surprisingly nothing
>> useful on Google, where I usually get at least million hits for anything.
>> (There's a thesis in Spanish on _Arachis hypopagaea_, not sure what that
>> is)
>>
>> Have I got the spelling wrong, or is this a neologism?  Please explain,
>> someone.
>> Steve
>>
>
>


-- 
#################
Dr.R.B.Stern,
P.O. Box 300,
Port Williams,
N.S., Canada,
B0P 1T0
Richard Stern,
Port Williams, NS, Canada
sternrichard AT gmail.com
###################
Subject: Re: hypopag-something: what is it?
From: N Robinson <nrobbyn AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 12:18:53 -0500
Actually it refers to low food intake - kind of what happens to some
wildlife in winter...

It was just a guess, sent off at the same time, I think, as your
explanation!

Nancy

On Tue, Mar 3, 2015 at 12:05 PM, Randy Lauff  wrote:

> Nope. That word would translate to "below eating".
>
> Randy
>
> _________________________________
> RF Lauff
> Way in the boonies of
> Antigonish County, NS.
>
> On 3 March 2015 at 12:41, N Robinson  wrote:
>
>> Maybe it is a misspelling of 'hypophagia".
>>
>> Nancy
>>
>> On Tue, Mar 3, 2015 at 11:01 AM, Stephen Shaw  wrote:
>>
>>> A recent announcement of an upcoming talk in New Glasgow involving Randy
>>> was to concern insects on and under the snow.
>>> It mentioned the unfamiliar-to-me word 'hypopagea' (or maybe it was
>>> 'hypopagaea' -- I've deleted the post), so I made a note to look it up.
>>>
>>> Nothing on Wikipedia under either spelling, and more surprisingly
>>> nothing useful on Google, where I usually get at least million hits for
>>> anything.
>>> (There's a thesis in Spanish on _Arachis hypopagaea_, not sure what that
>>> is)
>>>
>>> Have I got the spelling wrong, or is this a neologism?  Please explain,
>>> someone.
>>> Steve
>>>
>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: hypopag-something: what is it?
From: Randy Lauff <randy.lauff AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 13:05:33 -0400
Nope. That word would translate to "below eating".

Randy

_________________________________
RF Lauff
Way in the boonies of
Antigonish County, NS.

On 3 March 2015 at 12:41, N Robinson  wrote:

> Maybe it is a misspelling of 'hypophagia".
>
> Nancy
>
> On Tue, Mar 3, 2015 at 11:01 AM, Stephen Shaw  wrote:
>
>> A recent announcement of an upcoming talk in New Glasgow involving Randy
>> was to concern insects on and under the snow.
>> It mentioned the unfamiliar-to-me word 'hypopagea' (or maybe it was
>> 'hypopagaea' -- I've deleted the post), so I made a note to look it up.
>>
>> Nothing on Wikipedia under either spelling, and more surprisingly nothing
>> useful on Google, where I usually get at least million hits for anything.
>> (There's a thesis in Spanish on _Arachis hypopagaea_, not sure what that
>> is)
>>
>> Have I got the spelling wrong, or is this a neologism?  Please explain,
>> someone.
>> Steve
>>
>
>
Subject: Re: hypopag-something: what is it?
From: N Robinson <nrobbyn AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 11:41:29 -0500
Maybe it is a misspelling of 'hypophagia".

Nancy

On Tue, Mar 3, 2015 at 11:01 AM, Stephen Shaw  wrote:

> A recent announcement of an upcoming talk in New Glasgow involving Randy
> was to concern insects on and under the snow.
> It mentioned the unfamiliar-to-me word 'hypopagea' (or maybe it was
> 'hypopagaea' -- I've deleted the post), so I made a note to look it up.
>
> Nothing on Wikipedia under either spelling, and more surprisingly nothing
> useful on Google, where I usually get at least million hits for anything.
> (There's a thesis in Spanish on _Arachis hypopagaea_, not sure what that
> is)
>
> Have I got the spelling wrong, or is this a neologism?  Please explain,
> someone.
> Steve
>
Subject: Re: hypopag-something: what is it?
From: Randy Lauff <randy.lauff AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 12:34:53 -0400
Hmmm...all I'll say is, it's great to have a Greek speaking friend! We too
could not find the right word to describe the habitat, so we did make up
the word hypopagea.

Randy

_________________________________
RF Lauff
Way in the boonies of
Antigonish County, NS.

On 3 March 2015 at 12:22, Ken McKenna  wrote:

> Hi Steve.
> I am pretty sure it is a new word made up by Randy.  I guess those at the
> presentation will learn why he coined the term or he might might elaborate
> before that to this forum? I double checked on the spelling before I sent
> out the message.
>  Guess it is a neologism -have to admit I had to google that one as well.
>
> Cheers
> Ken
>
> Ken McKenna
> Box 218
> Stellarton
> NS B0K 1S0
>
>
> > On Mar 3, 2015, at 12:01 PM, Stephen Shaw  wrote:
> >
> > A recent announcement of an upcoming talk in New Glasgow involving Randy
> was to concern insects on and under the snow.
> > It mentioned the unfamiliar-to-me word 'hypopagea' (or maybe it was
> 'hypopagaea' -- I've deleted the post), so I made a note to look it up.
> >
> > Nothing on Wikipedia under either spelling, and more surprisingly
> nothing useful on Google, where I usually get at least million hits for
> anything.
> > (There's a thesis in Spanish on _Arachis hypopagaea_, not sure what that
> is)
> >
> > Have I got the spelling wrong, or is this a neologism?  Please explain,
> someone.
> > Steve
>
Subject: Re: hypopag-something: what is it?
From: Ken McKenna <kenmcken AT eastlink.ca>
Date: Tue, 03 Mar 2015 12:22:31 -0400
Hi Steve. 
I am pretty sure it is a new word made up by Randy. I guess those at the 
presentation will learn why he coined the term or he might might elaborate 
before that to this forum? I double checked on the spelling before I sent out 
the message. 

 Guess it is a neologism -have to admit I had to google that one as well. 

Cheers 
Ken

Ken McKenna
Box 218  
Stellarton
NS B0K 1S0


> On Mar 3, 2015, at 12:01 PM, Stephen Shaw  wrote:
> 
> A recent announcement of an upcoming talk in New Glasgow involving Randy was 
to concern insects on and under the snow. 

> It mentioned the unfamiliar-to-me word 'hypopagea' (or maybe it was 
'hypopagaea' -- I've deleted the post), so I made a note to look it up. 

> 
> Nothing on Wikipedia under either spelling, and more surprisingly nothing 
useful on Google, where I usually get at least million hits for anything. 

> (There's a thesis in Spanish on _Arachis hypopagaea_, not sure what that is)
> 
> Have I got the spelling wrong, or is this a neologism? Please explain, 
someone. 

> Steve   
Subject: RE: hypopag-something: what is it?
From: Keith Lowe <mythos25 AT live.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 12:18:00 -0400
Here is the line from the original email.

Our "April" presentation will be actually be held March 31 and the topic
will be Hypopagea - the Realm of Winter-active Insects

-----Original Message-----
From: naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca [mailto:naturens-owner AT chebucto.ns.ca]
On Behalf Of Stephen Shaw
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 12:02 PM
To: naturens AT chebucto.ns.ca
Subject: [NatureNS] hypopag-something: what is it?

A recent announcement of an upcoming talk in New Glasgow involving Randy was
to concern insects on and under the snow.   
It mentioned the unfamiliar-to-me word 'hypopagea' (or maybe it was
'hypopagaea' -- I've deleted the post), so I made a note to look it up.   

Nothing on Wikipedia under either spelling, and more surprisingly nothing
useful on Google, where I usually get at least million hits for anything.
(There's a thesis in Spanish on _Arachis hypopagaea_, not sure what that is)

Have I got the spelling wrong, or is this a neologism?  Please explain,
someone.
Steve   
Subject: hypopag-something: what is it?
From: Stephen Shaw <srshaw AT Dal.Ca>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 16:01:59 +0000
A recent announcement of an upcoming talk in New Glasgow involving Randy was to 
concern insects on and under the snow. 

It mentioned the unfamiliar-to-me word 'hypopagea' (or maybe it was 
'hypopagaea' -- I've deleted the post), so I made a note to look it up. 


Nothing on Wikipedia under either spelling, and more surprisingly nothing 
useful on Google, where I usually get at least million hits for anything. 

(There's a thesis in Spanish on _Arachis hypopagaea_, not sure what that is)

Have I got the spelling wrong, or is this a neologism? Please explain, someone. 

Steve   
Subject: Re: BNS/NSBS Field Trip: Valley Birding, Sun. Mar. 8 @ 9:00 AM
From: Richard Stern <sternrichard AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 17:17:11 -0400
Unless something changes significantly by Sunday, people will need
snowshoes for Miner's Marsh, and pretty much anywhere else off-road around
here.

Richard

On Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 4:04 PM, Rob Woods  wrote:

>
> Reminder that March 8th is the first day of Daylight Savings Time. Your
> clock spring forward 1 hour at 2am.
>
>
>
> A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved,
> except in memory. (Leonard Nimoy)
>
>   ------------------------------
>  *From:* Patrick Kelly 
> *To:* NatureNS 
> *Sent:* Monday, March 2, 2015 3:16 PM
> *Subject:* [NatureNS] BNS/NSBS Field Trip: Valley Birding, Sun. Mar. 8  AT 
> 9:00 AM
>
>  Sunday, March 8, 2015 – Valley Birding. Leader: Patrick Kelly (902)
> 472-2322 E-mail: patrick.kelly AT dal.ca. This will be a joint trip between
> the Blomidon Naturalists Society and the Nova Scotia Bird Society. Meet at
> 9 a.m. at the Wolfville waterfront. We will be looking for nesting raptors
> (they like to get an early start!), lingering winter visitors, and rarities
> in and around Grand Pré and Canning. We will end the day at Miner's Marsh
> in Kentville. If you have never been there now is a great time to learn
> where it is, as it's a very active birding spot during the breeding season.
> Dress warmly and bring a lunch.
>
> ==========================================================================
>  Patrick Kelly
>  Director of Computer Facilities
>
> ==========================================================================
>  Faculty of Architecture and Planning
>  Dalhousie University
>
> ==========================================================================
>  MAIL                                   COURIER
>  PO Box 15000                           5410 Spring Garden Road
>  Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2           Halifax, Nova Scotia
>  Canada                                 Canada
>
> ==========================================================================
>  Phone:(902) 494-3294    FAX:(902) 423-6672   E-mail:patrick.kelly AT dal.ca
>
> ==========================================================================
>
>
>
>


-- 
#################
Dr.R.B.Stern,
P.O. Box 300,
Port Williams,
N.S., Canada,
B0P 1T0
Richard Stern,
Port Williams, NS, Canada
sternrichard AT gmail.com
###################
Subject: Re: BNS/NSBS Field Trip: Valley Birding, Sun. Mar. 8 @ 9:00 AM
From: Rob Woods <rrtwoods AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 20:04:07 +0000 (UTC)
 Reminder that March 8th is the first day of Daylight Savings Time. Your clock 
spring forward 1 hour at 2am.   A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can 
be had, but not preserved, except in memory. (Leonard Nimoy) 

      From: Patrick Kelly 
 To: NatureNS  
 Sent: Monday, March 2, 2015 3:16 PM
 Subject: [NatureNS] BNS/NSBS Field Trip: Valley Birding, Sun. Mar. 8  AT  9:00 AM
   
 Sunday, March 8, 2015 – Valley Birding. Leader: Patrick Kelly (902) 
472-2322 E-mail: patrick.kelly AT dal.ca. This will be a joint trip between the 
Blomidon Naturalists Society and the Nova Scotia Bird Society. Meet at 9 a.m. 
at the Wolfville waterfront. We will be looking for nesting raptors (they like 
to get an early start!), lingering winter visitors, and rarities in and around 
Grand Pré and Canning. We will end the day at Miner's Marsh in Kentville. If 
you have never been there now is a great time to learn where it is, as it's a 
very active birding spot during the breeding season. Dress warmly and bring a 
lunch.  



==========================================================================Patrick 
KellyDirector of Computer 
Facilities==========================================================================Faculty 
of Architecture and PlanningDalhousie 
University==========================================================================MAIL 
                                  COURIERPO Box 15000       
                    5410 Spring Garden RoadHalifax, Nova Scotia 
B3H 4R2           Halifax, Nova ScotiaCanada                   
            
  Canada==========================================================================Phone:(902) 
494-3294    FAX:(902) 
423-6672   E-mail:patrick.kelly AT dal.ca========================================================================== 



  
Subject: BNS/NSBS Field Trip: Valley Birding, Sun. Mar. 8 @ 9:00 AM
From: Patrick Kelly <Patrick.Kelly AT Dal.Ca>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 19:16:01 +0000
Sunday, March 8, 2015  Valley Birding. Leader: Patrick Kelly (902) 472-2322 
E-mail: patrick.kelly AT dal.ca. This will be a joint 
trip between the Blomidon Naturalists Society and the Nova Scotia Bird Society. 
Meet at 9 a.m. at the Wolfville waterfront. We will be looking for nesting 
raptors (they like to get an early start!), lingering winter visitors, and 
rarities in and around Grand Pr and Canning. We will end the day at Miner's 
Marsh in Kentville. If you have never been there now is a great time to learn 
where it is, as it's a very active birding spot during the breeding season. 
Dress warmly and bring a lunch. 


==========================================================================

Patrick Kelly

Director of Computer Facilities

==========================================================================

Faculty of Architecture and Planning

Dalhousie University

==========================================================================

MAIL                                   COURIER

PO Box 15000                           5410 Spring Garden Road

Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2           Halifax, Nova Scotia

Canada                                 Canada

==========================================================================

Phone:(902) 494-3294    FAX:(902) 423-6672   E-mail:patrick.kelly AT dal.ca

==========================================================================
Subject: Re: Forestry context;very long: Re: No clearcutting on Sundays
From: Bev Wigney <bkwigney AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 09:37:38 -0700
David  (and all),

Thanks for the excellent commentary on the forestry industry and on
agriculture as well.  The Chronicle Herald article that you linked to is
certainly enough to sicken anyone who cares about the future of our
forests.  Terrible to think that vast areas of forest are being destroyed
to feed a biomass power plant.  {Digression: One has to wonder why there
hasn't been as much enthusiasm to build biomass generators to use up the
sewage sludge - contaminated with chemicals, heavy metals and
pharmaceuticals - that cities are so eager to spread on farmland.  It would
doubtless save a goodly amount of forest from destruction to feed the
biomass plants}.   Also, that high value hardwood is being harvested and
tossed in  with pulp logs because it's too much nuisance and expense to
separate out saw logs to go to the factories that have a demand for them.
Sheesh.  Give me a break.  As was stated in the CH article, this is like
turning 100 dollar bills into 10 dollar bills.  This is more than
pathetic.  {Digression: And why not grow hemp for paper-making rather than
hacking down so much forest?  I've been told that hemp grows well and
quickly and makes excellent quality paper}.

To me, the situations such as you have described  (forestry and
agricultural  - may as well throw in the fishery too) make me feel like the
world has gone insane.  It's all about money, money, money, with little
regard for the Future.  The Future?  What might that be?

Yes, I agree, 'small is beautiful.'  I'm seeing young farmers in my own
community near Round Hill, proving that small scale farms can indeed
produce plenty of vegetables to feed many families while working the land
in a very ethical and sustainable way.  Believe it or not, all farms worked
pretty much that way in the not-so-long forgotten past.  My father-in-law's
dairy cow farm was a model of efficiency.  Very nearly a self-contained,
sustainable operation with everything from feed, to animal bedding, to
lumber for the farm buildings produced on the land - and with large
amounts of milk  produced without the use of BST or any of the other
blights  that have been flogged as necessary for profitability.  The garden
grew enough produce for the family.  The occasional cull cow or a hog was
butchered in his well-equipped little butcher shop.  His woodlot was well
managed and produced all the logs he ever needed for new barn structures
and improvements around his farm.  He had plenty of land for pasture and to
produce hay and grain without destroying all the hedge rows  along the
fence lines.  Nothing was wasted.  Nothing was inappropriately used.  There
was respect for livestock, wildlife, the forest, and the flora and fauna
that thrived there.  Some would call this kind of farming old-fashioned.
Some might call it inefficient.  In my opinion, having watched him farm for
over 35 years, I would call it sane and ethical.

So, how do we get off the ridiculous trajectory?  How can we get back to a
way that isn't hell bent on destruction?  I expect there is a way, but
there has to be a major sea change in how things are done.  I hope the up
and coming generation can set things back on course.

bev wigney
Round Hill, NS
Subject: Old Growth Forests (BC) by Mark Brennan
From: Ken McKenna <kenmcken AT eastlink.ca>
Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 12:26:07 -0400
Ken McKenna
Box 218 Stellarton NS
B0K 1S0
902 752-7644

re Pictou Co. Naturalist presentations

Hi all

Tomorrow, Tues March 3 at 6:30 pm at the community room of the New Glasgow 
library, local naturalist and artist Mark Brennan, from White Hill will give a 
presentation titled "Seeking the Great Silence-Exploring the Old Growth Forests 
of Vancouver Island Through Art and Sound". 


Mark has been expanding his art work into recording sounds in nature and in May 
2014, he made a trip to Vancouver Island where he captured both sights and 
sounds of old growth forests and he will share this work with us and 
demonstrate how this not only a way to preserve these intact wildernesses in 
art but also how it has deepened the sense of wild in him and hopefully to us 
the audience. He will also be speaking on the Garry Oak forest - an amazing 
ecosystem. Mark always puts on a great presentation as his passion for nature 
pours out so come on out and bring a friend to show support. 


Note the correction of the date from my last notice. This presentation is March 
3 -not May 3. 



3) Our "April" presentation will be actually be held Tues. March 31 and the 
topic will be Hypopagea - the Realm of Winter-active Insects 


St. Francis Xavier Student Lucas Daut will be joined by teacher Randy Lauff as 
they present findings on research into insects active in winter. 


Ask anyone - 'What happens to insects in winter?' and you'll likely get one of 
two answers: 'They die.' or 'They go dormant.' In reality, we do find 
snowfleas, winter stoneflies and snow scorpionflies active on milder days in 
winter. However, those insects reflect a mere pittance of the activity which 
some beetles and bugs (among others) show. Where are all these winter-active 
insects? In hypopagea, of course!" 


Everyone welcome to come out and find out about this intriguing topic with a 
strange new name!