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Updated on Saturday, September 20 at 10:09 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Egyptian Plover,©BirdQuest

20 Sep Re: Whiskered Tern [Rick Wright ]
20 Sep Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May Co. [Tom Reed ]
19 Sep Whiskered Tern [Peggy Cadigan ]
19 Sep Whiskered Tern recap -- 19 Sep [Tom Reed ]
19 Sep HSR: Raccoon Ridge (19 Sep 2014) 1143 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
19 Sep Marbled Godwit, Island Beach SP [Larry-Zirlin ]
19 Sep Re: MIGRATORY BIRD TREATY ACT [Diane C Louie ]
19 Sep MIGRATORY BIRD TREATY ACT [Stormyeyes99 ]
19 Sep Greenwald park - migration this morning - yes [SandraKeller ]
19 Sep Re: SOT (sorta off topic): Wing Collection [Diane C Louie ]
19 Sep Re: SOT (sorta off topic): Wing Collection / roadkill ["Danusha V. Goska" ]
19 Sep Re: SOT (sorta off topic): Wing Collection [Diane C Louie ]
19 Sep Re: Bird ID ["Dr. Mark Kantrowitz" ]
19 Sep Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May Co. [Tom Reed ]
18 Sep Bird ID [David Emma ]
18 Sep Whiskered Tern recap -- 18 Sep [Tom Reed ]
18 Sep HSR: Raccoon Ridge (18 Sep 2014) 240 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
18 Sep Re: Great Horned Owl feather? (photo) [Diane C Louie ]
18 Sep Winter Wren, Glenhurst Meadows [Vince Capp ]
18 Sep Connecticut Warbler, Great Swamp NWR [Vince Capp ]
18 Sep Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May Co. [Tom Reed ]
18 Sep Encouraging subscriptions to KeeKeeKerr ["Campanella, Connie" ]
18 Sep Info on Whiskered Tern [Richard Wolfert ]
18 Sep Two nice birding experiences ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
18 Sep Great Horned Owl feather? (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
18 Sep Common Yellowthroat fall out ["Susie R." ]
17 Sep Whiskered Tern update -- 17 Sep [Tom Reed ]
17 Sep HSR: Raccoon Ridge (17 Sep 2014) 337 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
17 Sep HSR: Raccoon Ridge (16 Sep 2014) 35 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
17 Sep Island Beach State Park 9-17-14 [Shawn Wainwright ]
17 Sep Magical [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
17 Sep Mourning Warbler, Cold Brook Reserve [Vince Capp ]
17 Sep Avocet [SandraKeller ]
17 Sep Southern Ocean Birding Group Meeting Oct 2. - Speaker Rick Wright [Linda Gangi ]
17 Sep Red-necked Phalarope migration [Theodore Chase ]
17 Sep Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County [Sam Galick ]
17 Sep Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County [Sam Galick ]
17 Sep Dredge - Gloucester - migration - eh [SandraKeller ]
17 Sep Somebody pin that tern to the beach! [Linda Widdop ]
17 Sep Whiskered Tern at Coral Ave., Cape May NOW ["John J. Collins" ]
17 Sep Scherman Hoffman Hawk Watch [Susan Garretsonfriedman ]
16 Sep Bird, Butterfly, and Ode list from Cape May Point State Park 9-14-14 [Shawn Wainwright ]
16 Sep Re: Whiskered Tern videoclip [Fairfax Hutter ]
16 Sep Fwd: Whiskered Tern photos 9/16/14 [Linda Gangi ]
16 Sep Whiskered Tern pics from today [Linda Gangi ]
16 Sep Whiskered Tern photos 9/16/14 [Linda Gangi ]
16 Sep Re: Whiskered Tern videoclip [William Dix ]
16 Sep Whiskered Tern videoclip [Jimmy Lee ]
16 Sep DVOC this Thursday Sep 18 - "Birding Down Under" with Rob Hynson [Steve Kacir ]
16 Sep Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County [Sam Galick ]
16 Sep Re: Owl in the Box update [Lisa Potash ]
16 Sep HSR: Raccoon Ridge (15 Sep 2014) 1125 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
16 Sep Wilmington Canyon Pelagic - a great trip ["Albert, Steven" ]
15 Sep Re: Yard Birds [Alice Leurck ]
15 Sep Kestrels in Oradell ["Albert, Steven" ]
15 Sep Merlin & a big dragonfly flight at RU today [Susan Treesh ]
15 Sep Yard Birds ["Dr. Mark Kantrowitz" ]
15 Sep warbler numbers [SandraKeller ]
15 Sep Overnight radar movies [Walter Gura ]
15 Sep Cumberland migration - yes [SandraKeller ]
15 Sep Lincoln's Sparrow at Cold Brook Reserve [Vince Capp ]
15 Sep Re: Broad-winged Hawks over Spruce Run. [mike hiotis ]
15 Sep Re: Broad-winged Hawks over Spruce Run. ["Susie R." ]
15 Sep Whiskered Tern yes! [Susan Hoffmann ]
15 Sep Warbler Whiplash in my back yard [Fairfax Hutter ]
15 Sep Broad-winged Hawks over Spruce Run. [mike hiotis ]
15 Sep Re: suggestion for Audubon trips [Trina Anderson ]
15 Sep Re: suggestion for Audubon trips [Theodore Chase ]
15 Sep Re: suggestion for Audubon trips [Diane C Louie ]
15 Sep Re: suggestion for Audubon trips [Karmela ]
15 Sep Re: suggestion for Audubon trips [Rick Wright ]
15 Sep Re: suggestion for Audubon trips [Laura Berlik ]
15 Sep Glenhurst Meadows this morning ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
15 Sep Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County [Sam Galick ]
15 Sep Re: suggestion for Audubon trips [Kathy ]
14 Sep Re: suggestion for Audubon trips [Peggy Cadigan ]

Subject: Re: Whiskered Tern
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 10:41:38 -0400
Pallas's original description (1811) reads "Gula late alba," throat white
on the side.

But I'm certain that we owe the name "whiskered" to Temminck, who in 1820
-- supposing the species new -- called the bird "hirondelle-de-mer moustac"
and described the head markings as including "une large moustache." I
assume that the English name "whiskered tern" is simply a translation of
Temminck's French.

Best,
rick

On Fri, Sep 19, 2014 at 11:10 PM, Peggy Cadigan <1bookworm AT comcast.net>
wrote:

> With all the talk about the Whiskered Tern, I became curious as to how it
> got its name. This is the earliest description I could find:
> Whiskered Tern, Sterna Leucopareia
> “…in a line below the ear to the ear-coverts, a stripe of white, forming
> the whisker or moustache; back, wing-coverts, upper tail-coverts and
> tail-feathers, uniform dark grey…”
> The Naturalist’s Library-Ornithology, Vol. XIV
> Birds of Great Britain, Ireland,
> Part IV, Natatores
> Sir William Jardine
> 1843
> p. 281
>
>
> Peggy Cadigan
> Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ
> 1bookworm AT comcast.net
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>



-- 
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May Co.
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 08:28:20 -0400
Hi all,

The Whiskered Tern continues this morning (Day 9). Today's first report was
from the beach at Cape May Pt State Park around 8:00am.


good birding,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Cape May NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern
From: Peggy Cadigan <1bookworm AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 23:10:45 -0400
With all the talk about the Whiskered Tern, I became curious as to how it got 
its name. This is the earliest description I could find: 

Whiskered Tern, Sterna Leucopareia
in a line below the ear to the ear-coverts, a stripe of white, forming the 
whisker or moustache; back, wing-coverts, upper tail-coverts and tail-feathers, 
uniform dark grey 

The Naturalists Library-Ornithology, Vol. XIV
Birds of Great Britain, Ireland,
Part IV, Natatores
Sir William Jardine
1843
p. 281


Peggy Cadigan
Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ
1bookworm AT comcast.net
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern recap -- 19 Sep
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 22:51:00 -0400
NJBIRDS/Jerseybirds:


The Whiskered Tern continued at Cape May Point through 6:40 this evening
(Friday, 19 Sep).

A few items--

1) Its routine on Friday was almost the exact opposite of the previous two
days. The tern spent much of the morning at Cape May Point State Park,
alternating between Bunker Pond (first sighting at 7:22am) and the adjacent
beachfront. The bird became more elusive around midday and made more
infrequent visits to the pond through the PM hours (last visit 3:30pm?).
After a bit of searching this evening, it flew in from "the rips" and
joined a flock of Common Terns resting on the beach between Whilldin &
Coral Avenues. It was last seen flying off toward the east (6:40pm).

2) The best way to keep track of the bird is to monitor or subscribe to
"Keekeekerr," the local RBA text service. Recent entries can be found here:
http://keekeekerr.com/textalerts/keekeekerr. To send/receive alerts on your
phone, text "SUBSCRIBE keekeekerr" (no quotes) to the number 41411.

3) Otherwise, the best strategy is to start at Bunker Pond and the
Hawkwatch Platform. If the bird hasn't been making recent visits--and
nobody on the platform knows of its current whereabouts--then check the
beachfront, starting at the old bunker and continuing west and north around
the Point, searching for roosting tern flocks and birds feeding close to
shore.


good luck and good birding,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Cape May NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (19 Sep 2014) 1143 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 21:09:11 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 19, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       7             51             72
Bald Eagle                   4             29             42
Northern Harrier             1              5              7
Sharp-shinned Hawk          27            113            126
Cooper's Hawk                1              5             10
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              3              4
Broad-winged Hawk         1095           3491           3552
Red-tailed Hawk              1             16             16
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             4             28             36
Merlin                       1              2              6
Peregrine Falcon             1              6              6
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               1              3              3

Total:                    1143           3752           3880
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 09:00:00 
Observation end   time: 18:30:00 
Total observation time: 9.5 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Matt Jardel, Megan Fedor, Patrick Keelen, Rachel Rojcewicz

Visitors:
Additional observers: Rally Bartholomew, Kevin Weinman.

Thank you to everyone for your awesome spotting on yet another gorgeous day
on Coon.  


Weather:
mostly sunny w/ 30%-60% cloud cover, wind E/SE 2-8, temp 52-64 deg F. 

Raptor Observations:
BE - 4:05A, 4:10I, 4:35(2I). Others floating around (including 4 circling
together), not counted. 
PG - 10:20, high flying to S.

Nice BW movement today with fairly consistent numbers per hour from 10:00
to 4:00.  

Bird of the Day was the spunky Sharpie, in late afternoon light, that made
several passes at the owl decoy while vocalizing.  It then perched nearby
before taking another swipe at the owl, and then perched again before
disappearing into the trees. 

Non-raptor Observations:
Ravens - 2.
TVs & BVs.
Tree Swallows.
Nighthawk - 1. 
Cedar Waxwings.
Cape May Warbler - 1.
Buck Moths.
MONARCHS - 106 (by far the highest count this season).
========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 

Subject: Marbled Godwit, Island Beach SP
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 18:21:50 +0000
Today, from the kayak/canoe launch at the Winter Anchorage, I was able to see 
with my scope, 1 Marbled Godwit on the sand bar almost directly in front of the 
launch but pretty far off. This answers the question of whether or not you need 
a boat to see this large bird. If the tide is low, and the light is right (it 
was cloudy today) you can. There were also 8 pelicans, more than a dozen 
oystercatchers, Black-bellied Plovers and Semipalmated Plovers, Royal Terns,all 
seen well through the scope, plus a lot of smaller birds that were beyond the 
edge of conjecture. 



Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
larry-zirlin at comcast.net 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: MIGRATORY BIRD TREATY ACT
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 12:34:22 -0400
the collections i mentioned are for federal investigations and scientific 
research (wing collection is in a university) so i am guessing there must be a 
safe harbor for those. 

yes, ordinary citizens should not be collecting feathers or keeping bird 
(parts)/bodies for their own collections. take a picture. 


diane louie
madison

On Sep 19, 2014, at 12:03 PM, Stormyeyes99  wrote:

> I guess some on the list aren't aware that the collecting of feathers,
> parts etc. of most species is illegal.
> 
> http://www.fws.gov/migratorybirds/regulationspolicies/mbta/mbtintro.html
> 
> 
> 
> Barb S.
> Lafayette, NJ
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: MIGRATORY BIRD TREATY ACT
From: Stormyeyes99 <stormyeyes99 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 12:03:16 -0400
I guess some on the list aren't aware that the collecting of feathers,
parts etc. of most species is illegal.

http://www.fws.gov/migratorybirds/regulationspolicies/mbta/mbtintro.html



Barb S.
Lafayette, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Greenwald park - migration this morning - yes
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 12:01:22 -0400
Finally! A normal day up here! I only had a little over an hour. Hit 2 
different areas 

basically. A couple nice flocks. I beat the brush for Mourning and Cinnecticut.
No luck! It slowed down when it got cloudy again. Highlights in brief:

6 Phoebes - flycatching along the creek. Wish I could have gone further west to
see if more,
Winter Wren - my fos.
Wilson's Warbler

Good birding all.
Hope that Whiskered sticks! Heading down Sat. morning with a friend who
hasn't seen it yet!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: SOT (sorta off topic): Wing Collection
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 11:53:08 -0400
OK, Im getting even more feedback on the wings.

The following is not for the squeamish.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________ 


One of the drivers, I have learned, for the development of feather 
identification as a discipline has been the need 

to investigate airline crashes caused by collisions with birds/flocks. By 
identifying the species and number 

of birds involved from the feathers collected at the scene, this had led to 
preventive airplane engine design as well 

as habitat management around the airports, i.e.; forensic pathology (in this 
case, the dead birds) to help the living 

(both birds and humans).

Diane Louie
Madison


On Sep 19, 2014, at 10:51 AM, Diane C Louie  wrote:

> Ive received feedback that folks were not aware of the Feather Atlas. Along 
the same lines, 

> here is the link to the Wing Collection (I used to be a pathologist, so I 
find this fascinating.accordingly, 

> viewer discretion is advised).
> 
http://digitalcollections.pugetsound.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/slaterwing 

> 
> 
> Diane Louie
> Madison
> 
> 
> On Sep 18, 2014, at 6:46 PM, Diane C Louie  wrote:
> 
>> Do you know about the Feather Atlas? One way to search is to plug in 
features like pattern and color and come 

>> up with displays of possible species.
>> 
>> 
http://www.fws.gov/lab/featheratlas/idtool.php?button=Get+Started+with+Feather+Identification%21 

>> 
>> 
>> Heres are the primary feathers of the Great Horned Owl. You can click on 
the link in the table 

>> for the secondaries.
>> http://www.fws.gov/lab/featheratlas/feather.php?Bird=GHOW_primary_dark
>> 
>> Diane Louie
>> Madison
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On Sep 18, 2014, at 11:02 AM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
>> 
>>> After looking at lots of feather images on the Internet I'm thinking this
>>> is a Great Horned Owl wing feather, but not sure if it's a primary or
>>> secondary wing feather. Maybe someone with more expertise than I have can
>>> help out? (I've included my shoe as a point of reference. The shoe is a
>>> little over one foot long).
>>> 
>>> Here's the photo:
>>> 
>>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15278011572/
>>> 
>>> (Photo taken in Johnson Park, Middlesex County).
>>> 
>>> Thanks,
>>> 
>>> Bernie Sloan
>>> Highland Park
>>> 
>>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>> 
> 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: SOT (sorta off topic): Wing Collection / roadkill
From: "Danusha V. Goska" <dgoska AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 11:26:35 -0400
Diane Louie mentions, below, that she used to be a pathologist and so
the wing collection is attractive to her. She warned us about looking
-- I looked -- and looking at wings not connected to bodies didn't
work for me. But looking at isolated feathers does work for me.

I am a pedestrian and walk a lot. I've seen a lot of roadkill. A good
percentage is opossums. I suspect that they are all absinthe drinkers
and become suicidal easily.

But I do happen on birds. Once I came upon a perfectly preserved adult
owl. I couldn't walk past it without picking it up and carrying it to
a university. I suggested to them that they taxiderm it. I think they
thought I was nuts. I probably was nuts. I just couldn't pass that
beautiful, beautiful bird and let it decompose into the roadside for
no reason.

Once I happened upon an injured ruby-throated hummingbird, again, by
the side of the road. I picked it up and carried it about a mile to
the nearest building, an elementary school. I asked them to phone bird
rehabilitators and give it another chance. I think they thought I was
nuts, too. Who carries injured hummingbirds into a school? But I
really was in an isolated area, with miles to go in my walk, and
theirs was the closest thing to refuge.

This weekend I found a dead raven on the sidewalk in front of
Corrado's on Berdan Avenue in Wayne. I stared at it for several
minutes, trying to figure out how it died. I turned it over with my
stick. It looked so intact. Again, I thought, I should not be standing
here staring at a dead bird. It's socially inappropriate.

Further on in that same walk, I saw a beautiful, salmon colored down
quilt in the road. I thought, I'm going to take that home! As I got
closer, I saw what was sticking out of the edges of the quilt: hooves
and a tail. It looked as if someone had covered a dead or dying
roadkill deer with a salmon colored down quilt. I did not disturb
either and walked on.

I rarely see dead birds in the woods. Usually I see a bundle of
feathers, clearly the remains of a meal. But, on the road, I do see a
lot of birds. It's always an occasion for momentary sadness, and also
curiosity, and then I chastise myself, "Don't stare at dead birds in
public; it's weird."

From now on I will think of Diane the pathologist.

On Fri, Sep 19, 2014 at 10:51 AM, Diane C Louie  wrote:
> I've received feedback that folks were not aware of the Feather Atlas. Along 
the same lines, 

> here is the link to the Wing Collection (I used to be a pathologist, so I 
find this fascinating....accordingly, 

> viewer discretion is advised).
> 
http://digitalcollections.pugetsound.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/slaterwing 

>
>
> Diane Louie
> Madison
>
>
> On Sep 18, 2014, at 6:46 PM, Diane C Louie  wrote:
>
>> Do you know about the Feather Atlas? One way to search is to plug in 
features like pattern and color and come 

>> up with displays of possible species.
>>
>> 
http://www.fws.gov/lab/featheratlas/idtool.php?button=Get+Started+with+Feather+Identification%21 

>>
>>
>> Here's are the primary feathers of the Great Horned Owl. You can click on 
the link in the table 

>> for the secondaries.
>> http://www.fws.gov/lab/featheratlas/feather.php?Bird=GHOW_primary_dark
>>
>> Diane Louie
>> Madison
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sep 18, 2014, at 11:02 AM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
>>
>>> After looking at lots of feather images on the Internet I'm thinking this
>>> is a Great Horned Owl wing feather, but not sure if it's a primary or
>>> secondary wing feather. Maybe someone with more expertise than I have can
>>> help out? (I've included my shoe as a point of reference. The shoe is a
>>> little over one foot long).
>>>
>>> Here's the photo:
>>>
>>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15278011572/
>>>
>>> (Photo taken in Johnson Park, Middlesex County).
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>>
>>> Bernie Sloan
>>> Highland Park
>>>
>>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>>
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 



-- 
Danusha V. Goska, PhD
author, "Save Send Delete"
http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: SOT (sorta off topic): Wing Collection
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 10:51:30 -0400
Ive received feedback that folks were not aware of the Feather Atlas. Along 
the same lines, 

here is the link to the Wing Collection (I used to be a pathologist, so I find 
this fascinating.accordingly, 

viewer discretion is advised).
http://digitalcollections.pugetsound.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/slaterwing


Diane Louie
Madison


On Sep 18, 2014, at 6:46 PM, Diane C Louie  wrote:

> Do you know about the Feather Atlas? One way to search is to plug in features 
like pattern and color and come 

> up with displays of possible species.
> 
> 
http://www.fws.gov/lab/featheratlas/idtool.php?button=Get+Started+with+Feather+Identification%21 

> 
> 
> Heres are the primary feathers of the Great Horned Owl. You can click on the 
link in the table 

> for the secondaries.
> http://www.fws.gov/lab/featheratlas/feather.php?Bird=GHOW_primary_dark
> 
> Diane Louie
> Madison
> 
> 
> 
> On Sep 18, 2014, at 11:02 AM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
> 
>> After looking at lots of feather images on the Internet I'm thinking this
>> is a Great Horned Owl wing feather, but not sure if it's a primary or
>> secondary wing feather. Maybe someone with more expertise than I have can
>> help out? (I've included my shoe as a point of reference. The shoe is a
>> little over one foot long).
>> 
>> Here's the photo:
>> 
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15278011572/
>> 
>> (Photo taken in Johnson Park, Middlesex County).
>> 
>> Thanks,
>> 
>> Bernie Sloan
>> Highland Park
>> 
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Bird ID
From: "Dr. Mark Kantrowitz" <mark.kantrowitz AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 10:14:51 -0400
Sadly, I had the opportunity the other day to study a recently deceased
red-eyed vireo in my hand.  The crispness of the facial features, the
uniform breast color and the smallish-appearing eye of the photo bird
suggests a red-eye, assuming the yellow wash is more a photographic
aberration.   Philadelphia's features seem generally more "blurry" and it
gives the appearance of a rather large eye, somewhat like what we see in a
ruby-crowned kinglet.

Mark Kantrowitz
Hillsdale
-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of David
Emma
Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2014 11:30 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Bird ID

Hello All,

This picture was taken by a friend of mine.  There have been conflicting
attempts to ID this bird.  I will not sway you by saying what I think it is.
Cast your vote.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/50151064 AT N06/15280963901/

Dave Emma
Stanhope

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May Co.
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 09:28:55 -0400
Hi all,

The Whiskered Tern continues this morning-- multiple reports from the Cape May 
Point State Park beach and Bunker Pond, the most recent around 9:15am. 



good birding,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Cape May NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Bird ID
From: David Emma <demma175 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 23:29:49 -0400
Hello All,

This picture was taken by a friend of mine.  There have been conflicting
attempts to ID this bird.  I will not sway you by saying what I think it
is.  Cast your vote.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/50151064 AT N06/15280963901/

Dave Emma
Stanhope

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern recap -- 18 Sep
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 22:05:49 -0400
NJBIRDS/Jerseybirds –

The Whiskered Tern's appearances at Cape May Point today largely mirrored
its Wednesday routine.

The bird was first seen around 9:45am on the beach near St. Mary's (beyond
the south end of Lehigh Avenue), and was subsequently viewed on the beach
near Coral Avenue through much of the late-morning. It apparently went out
to feed in "the rips" around noon, and then made its first appearance on
Bunker Pond (Cape May Pt. State Park) at 12:45pm. It spent most of the
afternoon feeding on Bunker Pond or resting on the adjacent State Park
beach. The last sighting on Bunker Pond was apparently around 6pm.

Again, morning (especially early-AM) has become a tougher time to find the
bird, and it seems to be spending much of the AM lounging on beaches with
tern flocks or feeding over the rips. Midday/afternoon has been best,
particularly at Bunker Pond and the State Park beach. Evening continues to
be the toughest time to pin it down.

I know there's still a number of folks--both from NJ and from places much
farther away--who haven't yet had a chance to see this bird, so we'll
continue to supply updates, especially as likely locations/routines change,
or the bird disappears.

Thanks to everyone who provided information today.


good birding,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Cape May NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (18 Sep 2014) 240 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 21:09:55 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 18, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       3             44             65
Bald Eagle                   0             25             38
Northern Harrier             1              4              6
Sharp-shinned Hawk          11             86             99
Cooper's Hawk                0              4              9
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              3              4
Broad-winged Hawk          219           2396           2457
Red-tailed Hawk              2             15             15
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             2             24             32
Merlin                       0              1              5
Peregrine Falcon             0              5              5
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               2              2              2

Total:                     240           2609           2737
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 10:00:00 
Observation end   time: 16:00:00 
Total observation time: 6 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Arne Olson, Patrick Keelen, Roger Johnson

Visitors:
Hikers - 4. 


Weather:
30%-60% cloud cover, wind NW 0-4, temp 62-72 deg F.

Raptor Observations:
Multiple Bald Eagle sightings but none counted.
A close Cooper's circled the lookout and gave eye-popping looks before
cruising upridge, not counted. 
Most of the BWs were seen between 10:00 and noon. 

Non-raptor Observations:
Raven.
Tree Swallows - huge flock.
Hummingbirds - 3. 
TVs & BVs.
E. Towhee.
E. Wood Pewee.
E. Phoebe. 
Monarchs - 11.
Buck Moths. 

Olive-sided Flycatcher - one in top of snag hawking insects including a
buck moth; gave us super looks. Sorry JT, but this flycatcher gets Bird of
the Day.  
========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

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Subject: Re: Great Horned Owl feather? (photo)
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 18:46:23 -0400
Do you know about the Feather Atlas? One way to search is to plug in features 
like pattern and color and come 

up with displays of possible species.


http://www.fws.gov/lab/featheratlas/idtool.php?button=Get+Started+with+Feather+Identification%21 



Heres are the primary feathers of the Great Horned Owl. You can click on the 
link in the table 

for the secondaries.
http://www.fws.gov/lab/featheratlas/feather.php?Bird=GHOW_primary_dark

Diane Louie
Madison



On Sep 18, 2014, at 11:02 AM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:

> After looking at lots of feather images on the Internet I'm thinking this
> is a Great Horned Owl wing feather, but not sure if it's a primary or
> secondary wing feather. Maybe someone with more expertise than I have can
> help out? (I've included my shoe as a point of reference. The shoe is a
> little over one foot long).
> 
> Here's the photo:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15278011572/
> 
> (Photo taken in Johnson Park, Middlesex County).
> 
> Thanks,
> 
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Winter Wren, Glenhurst Meadows
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 17:57:58 -0400
Hi all,

I went to Glenhurst this morning before I headed to the Great Swamp, and had
a surprisingly intense blitz of warblers and associates. Nine Warbler
species were tallied, and it was my best sustained flurry of the year to
date. I didn't really expect it after what seemed like somewhat unfavorable
winds overnight. 'Best Bird' was a Winter Wren, up above the grassy
temporary pond- in the swale between the dike and the river trail there.
There may be two. I forgot to mention this in my earlier post. 

 

Good birding!

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 

 

 



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Connecticut Warbler, Great Swamp NWR
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 14:59:02 -0400
HI, Y'all. 

 I discovered a Connecticut Warbler late this morning in the Great Swamp
Wilderness Area. It was only 150 feet +/- up the trail that starts at the
east end of White Bridge Road, in case anybody wants to try to relocate the
bird. As you walk up the trail, you will quickly see a grove of young,
tightly packed Red Maples on the left. The bird was in the ground cover
there, and retreated to the grove of Maples, along with the Nashville it was
keeping company with. 

 I put  a few photos up, and though they lighting was very poor, the bird at
least 'allowed' ne to take a few shots that wound up providing a useful
study in the structure of this species. I apologize in advance for the poor
quality- some dunderhead had the camera set all wrong. Doh!

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 

Good Birding!

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 

 

 



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May Co.
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 14:47:19 -0400
Hi all,

Apologies for the late update-- the Whiskered Tern continues at Cape May Point 
through 2:45pm. The bird was seen on the beach at Coral Ave during the late-AM, 
and has been putting in occasional appearances on Bunker Pond since 12:45. 



good birding,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Reed's Beach NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com

Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Encouraging subscriptions to KeeKeeKerr
From: "Campanella, Connie" <cc AT STATESIDE.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 17:32:12 +0000
http://www.keekeekerr.com/


In light of our newest Cape May Point rarity please consider signing up for and 
supporting KEEKEEKERR -- the real time Birding Text Alert service. 


It is a fantastic resource.    

Thank you.  

Connie Campanella
Alexandria, Virginia
Cape May Point, New Jersey



    

-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Richard 
Wolfert 

Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2014 1:14 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Info on Whiskered Tern

I finally have a clear day tomorrow (Friday) to return to Cape May IF the 
Whiskered Tern is seen today. 


If it is, please post here or email me directly.

Thanks,
Rich Wolfert
East Brunswick, NJ
  - NJ Nature Notes Website 
  - NJ Nature Notes Facebook Page
  - Flicker page


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Info on Whiskered Tern
From: Richard Wolfert <rwolfert AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 13:14:27 -0400
I finally have a clear day tomorrow (Friday) to return to Cape May IF the 
Whiskered Tern is seen today. 


If it is, please post here or email me directly.

Thanks,
Rich Wolfert
East Brunswick, NJ
  - NJ Nature Notes Website 
  - NJ Nature Notes Facebook Page
  - Flicker page


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Two nice birding experiences
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 15:13:28 +0000
Jerseybirders,

Yesterday, I stopped at a place I've driven by every Wednesday for nine years 
and never visited...the "Hazardous Woods" on the south side of Soldier Field 
Road in Paramus, across from Cedar Park Cemetery. Anybody who has ever driven 
this road has seen the huge signs warning of the presence of heavy metals on 
the site. It would seem to warn anyone to stay far away. But...on the eastern 
end of the woods, there's a sign for a nature trail, and yesterday, checked it 
out. As I got out of my car, a flock of Nighthawks flitted over the cemetery 
and headed south, with one of their number deciding to remain to hawk insects 
over the expanse of the cemetery itself. Nice! As I entered the woods, two 
Great Horned Owls were calling (it was only 6:30 PM!). A mob of Bluejays 
gathered to harass one in a hidden perch, and I could not get an angle to see 
its nocturnal denizen. Meanwhile, its partner went silent, perhaps to avoid 
being mobbed itself. Nice to know that there's a pair in these woods, though. 
Clearly worth another visit! Otherwise, only Robins populated the crepuscular 
forest floor. 


This morning, I visited Cold Brook Preserve near Oldwick, on the heels of Vince 
Capp's report from yesterday. Sure enough, one of the first birds I found was a 
cheeky Lincoln's Sparrow. Working the brushy edges turned up another Lincoln's, 
which I was able to photograph (thank you, Simon Lane, for showing me the way 
to set my camera to capture fast-moving birds!), plus Field Sparrows, Indigo 
Buntings, and some widely varying Savannah Sparrows. I was pleasantly surprised 
to find a singing White-eyed Vireo, which popped up and gave a nice display. He 
was only about 8 feet away and one could see the lime-green forehead and white 
eye without binoculars! Nice views of other brush-favoring birds were had, and 
a Cooper's Hawk and Kestrel provided overhead aerial interest. Bluebirds and 
Bobolinks called from overhead as well. A very satisfying before-work couple of 
hours. 


I put a couple of photos of the Lincoln's Sparrow on my Flickr page. Vince 
doesn't have any competition, but one can see some of the color and plumage 
details. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/marc_chelemer/

Good birding to everyone today!

Marc J. Chelemer
Tenafly


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Great Horned Owl feather? (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 11:02:25 -0400
After looking at lots of feather images on the Internet I'm thinking this
is a Great Horned Owl wing feather, but not sure if it's a primary or
secondary wing feather. Maybe someone with more expertise than I have can
help out? (I've included my shoe as a point of reference. The shoe is a
little over one foot long).

Here's the photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15278011572/

(Photo taken in Johnson Park, Middlesex County).

Thanks,

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Common Yellowthroat fall out
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 10:04:21 -0400
There must be 15 Common Yellowthroats here this morning, in addition to one
or two Ovenbirds.

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern update -- 17 Sep
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 23:33:42 -0400
NJBIRDS/Jerseybirds:

The Whiskered Tern was a bit more difficult to pin down today. It went
missing until about 10:30am, when it was located within a roosting flock on
the beach at Coral Avenue (Cape May Point). It did not appear on Bunker
Pond until 1pm, but proceeded to make brief+regular stops there through at
least 5:40. When not feeding on Bunker Pond, the bird would occasionally
land on the State Park beach, but would also just as frequently fly off
toward St. Mary's, Coral Ave, or the rips. It has changed its "usual
pattern" a bit, perhaps due to the location(s) of roosting tern flocks,
which haven't been as reliable on the State Park beach the last two days.
It's also worth mentioning that its appearances on Bunker Pond averaged
about 5min today, much shorter than the 15-20+min shows it often put on
during the weekend.

Evening continues to be the worst time to find the Whiskered Tern; morning
has become more challenging (first appearances after 8am/10am the last two
mornings); midday/afternoon continues to be best.

The best gameplan (other than just subscribing to "Keekeekerr") is probably
to try Bunker Pond first and, if the bird isn't present, work the beach
from Cape May Pt State Park west and north toward Coral Ave, searching for
concentrations of roosting terns/gulls, and watching for the bird flying
over/feeding close to shore. I'll be working the hawkwatch tomorrow
(Thursday), and will be happy to provide updates to anyone who stops by.

More news, good or bad, tomorrow.


good birding,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Cape May NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (17 Sep 2014) 337 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 22:09:11 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 17, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       7             41             62
Bald Eagle                   3             25             38
Northern Harrier             0              3              5
Sharp-shinned Hawk          17             75             88
Cooper's Hawk                0              4              9
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              3              4
Broad-winged Hawk          301           2177           2238
Red-tailed Hawk              1             13             13
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             5             22             30
Merlin                       0              1              5
Peregrine Falcon             3              5              5
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0

Total:                     337           2369           2497
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 09:00:00 
Observation end   time: 19:00:00 
Total observation time: 10 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Larry Bailey, Megan Fedor, Patrick Keelen, Rachel Rojcewicz

Visitors:
Michael & Sharon Muller; John & Sara from Mt. Bethel (welcome back!); Jeff
& Evelyn (who will never look at clouds in the same way again).

A.T. SOBOs: Weezy & Cheese Puff. 
Other hikers - 6 including Nester & Fossey from PA & WA.

Thanks to all for your company & conversation on another beautiful day on
the ridge. 


Weather:
fog in valleys early, 0% cloud cover early increasing to 30%-50% rest of
day, wind light & variable, temp 51-68 deg F. 

Raptor Observations:
BE - 9:56(2I), 2:25A (other eagles seen much of day including 3 & 4
together, but not counted). 

RS - immature seen moving upridge, not counted. 

PG - 2:35A, 2:50(A&I). 

Only 5 raptors counted thru noon. The BWs started after 1:00 with the
biggest hour from 4:00-5:00 with 173. The three PGs within 10 minutes was a
nice treat. 

Bird of the Day was a male Kestrel that showed off its stunning colors in
the early evening light. 

Non-raptor Observations:
Raven.
TVs & BVs.
Hummingbird - 1. 
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - first of season.
Cedar Waxwings - 17, 16, 19.
Great-blue Heron - 1.
Tree Swallows.
Chimney Swifts.
Monarchs - 6.
Buck Moth - first of season. 
Bears - two seen by L. Bailey along trail on his hike to Coon. 

========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

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Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (16 Sep 2014) 35 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 21:09:19 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 16, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       5             34             55
Bald Eagle                   1             22             35
Northern Harrier             1              3              5
Sharp-shinned Hawk           8             58             71
Cooper's Hawk                0              4              9
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              3              4
Broad-winged Hawk           16           1876           1937
Red-tailed Hawk              1             12             12
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             2             17             25
Merlin                       0              1              5
Peregrine Falcon             1              2              2
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0

Total:                      35           2032           2160
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 10:00:00 
Observation end   time: 18:00:00 
Total observation time: 8 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Patrick Keelen

Weather:
morning fog, mostly cloudy skies, wind NNW 3-8, temp 53-70 deg F.

Raptor Observations:
BE - 2:44I.
PG - 4:36I. 


Thank you to PK for your solo coverage and count on a very tough day of
hawking. Some consolation was the late afternoon Peregrine that almost made
a meal of a sharp-shin...the PG made 3 unsuccessful dives on the SS and
gave some great looks earning it PK's Bird of the Day.   



Non-raptor Observations:
Ravens - 5.
Monarchs - 9.
Hikers - 7.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

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Subject: Island Beach State Park 9-17-14
From: Shawn Wainwright <shawneagleeyes1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 22:08:18 -0400
Island Beach State Park in Berkeley hosted a pretty good day, though not as
good as yesterday it was still great conditions with *12 species of
Warblers *and *9 Red-breasted Nuthatches!* Seems quite a few Ocean Birders
went to Island Beach today including me. Here's the combined list from all
of us. 2 *Tricolored Herons*, 2* Little Blue Herons*, 2 *Caspian
Terns*, 3 *Royal
Terns*, *Merlin*, *American Kestrel*, 2 *Peregrine Falcons*, 16 *Northern
Flickers*, *White-eyed Vireo*, 2 *Red-eyed Vireos*, 2 *Blue-gray
Gnatcatchers*, *Great Crested Flycatcher*, 6 *Cedar Waxwings*, 9*
Red-breasted Nuthatches*!!! ( 8 on Reed's Road, 1 at Spizzle Creek ), 4*
Magnolia Warblers*, *Pine Warbler*, *Prairie Warbler*, 2* Black-and-white
Warblers*, 6* Common Yellowthroats*, 2 *American Redstarts*, 2 *Cape May
Warblers*, *Northern Parula*, 2 *Northern Waterthrushes*, *Nashville
Warbler*, *Yellow Warbler*, *Palm Warbler*, 2* Eastern Towhees*, 17
*Bobolinks*, and a *Baltimore Oriole*.

Good birding!

Shawn Wainwright
Toms River
ShawnEagleEyes1 AT aol.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Magical
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 21:34:59 -0400
There was between 35-40 Night Hawks at Assunpink WMA tonight over 
the archery range. It was a wonderful sight watching them gliding so 
effortlessly 

over the field. They were there around 6 o'clock! They were rather high up but 
unmistakably Night Hawks. 

Also today on the Lake were 3 Ospreys, several Great Egrets, Great Blue Herons, 

3 Pied-billed Grebes, Cormorants and several Wood Ducks and 2 Kingfishers.
And at 6 o'clock, a bat!
 Karen
  Ocean, NJ

Sent from my iPad

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Mourning Warbler, Cold Brook Reserve
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 15:45:04 -0400
HI, all. 

Cold Brook gave up a few good birds today, but you really had to squeeze
them out. Best Bird was by far a First Fall Mourning Warbler- well worth all
of the scouring I think. I also located two Lincoln's Sparrows, one of which
was singing- which was delightful to hear. Other birds seen included an
Acadian Fly, 10 plus Savannahs, a few fly-by Bobolink and a Nashville
Warbler. Both a Sharpie and a Cooper's were prowling around the thicket tops
for easy pickin's. Both birds were juveniles, and the Sharpie just missed a
Blue Jay dinner while I watched. Drat. 

 

I managed a useful shot of the Mourning, and a prettier shot of my singing
Lincoln's Sparrow. They can be viewed here:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 

I just decided- that will be the name of my next Blues Band: 'The Singing
Lincolns'. 

 

Good Birding

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 

 

 

 



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Subject: Avocet
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:22:08 -0400
Now at Bivalve - high st. boardwalk. 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Southern Ocean Birding Group Meeting Oct 2. - Speaker Rick Wright
From: Linda Gangi <ltgangi AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 17:17:13 +0000
----- Original Message -----




The next meeting of the Southern Ocean Birding Group is October 2 with special 
guest speaker, Rick Wright doing the program, Oops, My Mistake: In Search of 
the Great Horned Mop. We meet at the Tuckerton Seaport, Hunting Shanty at 7 
p.m. This should be a great event, so bring a friend. He will also have his 
book for sale and signing. 

  

Linda Gangi 
Manahawkin, NJ 08050 

Enjoy this lovely quote: 

The iris pond has flowered 
Before the old temple; 
I sell tea this evening 
By the water's edge. 
It is steeped in the cups 
With the moon and stars; 
Drink and wake forever 
From your worldly sleep. 

- Baisao (1675-1763 







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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Red-necked Phalarope migration
From: Theodore Chase <chase_c AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 13:15:34 -0400
	Below is the abstract of a Short Communication to appear in the next  
issue of Ibis, the flagship publication of the British  
Ornithologists' Union. It is sort of out of area, but the bird almost  
certainly passed through NJ, or at least NJ waters, and I think you  
will agree it is a remarkable finding!
	Ted Chase
	Franklin Twp
Geolocator tagging reveals Pacific migration of Red-necked Phalarope  
Phalaropus lobatus breeding in Scotland  Malcolm Smith1,*, Mark  
Bolton2, David J. Okill3, Ron W. Summers4, Pete Ellis5, Felix  
Liechti6 andJeremy D. Wilson7

The migration route of Red-necked Phalarope populations breeding on  
North Atlantic islands has been subject to considerable speculation.  
Geolocator tags were fitted to nine Red-necked Phalaropes breeding in  
northern Scotland to assess whether they migrated to Palaearctic or  
Nearctic wintering grounds. Of four birds known to return, two had  
retained their tags, of which one was recaptured. This male Phalarope  
left Shetland on 1 August 2012 and crossed the Atlantic Ocean to the  
Labrador Sea off eastern Canada in 6 days, then moved south to reach  
Florida during September, crossed the Gulf of Mexico into the Pacific  
Ocean and reached an area between the Galapagos Islands and the South  
American coast by mid-October, where it remained until the end of  
April, returning by a similar route until the tag battery failed as  
the bird was crossing the Atlantic Ocean. The total migration of 22  
000 km is approximately 60% longer than the previously assumed route  
to the western part of the Arabian Sea, and this first evidence of  
migration of a European breeding bird to the Pacific Ocean also helps  
to indicate the possible migratory route of the large autumn  
movements of Red-necked Phalaropes down the east coast of North  
America. 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
  
Subject: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County
From: Sam Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:55:59 -0400
More information about the Whiskered Tern- it was seen yesterday. Currently 
it's feeding off of St Pete's dune crossing. 


Good birding,

Sam

--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick


Begin forwarded message:

> From: Mark Garland 
> Date: September 17, 2014 at 12:42:56 PM EDT
> To: Sam Galick 
> Subject: Re: [NJBIRDS] Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County
> 
> Hi Sam:
> 
> It was on the beach at Coral for nearly an hour, and there were multiple 
sightings yesterday. 

> 
> Mark
> 
> 
>> On Sep 17, 2014, at 12:41 PM, Sam Galick  wrote:
>> 
>> The Whiskered Tern was found again this morning after not being seen 
yesterday; this time flying just offshore Cape May Point. It landed briefly in 
front of the Coral Ave. dune crossing. 

>> 
>> Good birding,
>> 
>> Sam
>> 
>> --
>> Sam Galick
>> Cape May, NJ
>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick
>> 
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=NJBIRDS
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County
From: Sam Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:42:17 -0400
The Whiskered Tern was found again this morning after not being seen yesterday; 
this time flying just offshore Cape May Point. It landed briefly in front of 
the Coral Ave. dune crossing. 


Good birding,

Sam

--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Dredge - Gloucester - migration - eh
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 11:57:56 -0400
Well, this funky fall continues! Marilyn and I had a slow morning. Birds were 
scattered. 

Very difficult! I picked up more walking out to head to work. That place can be 
like 

that. The birds could settle in those north woods. And she called and said a 
singing 

Prairie Warbler after I had left. Very strange morning. Highlights were. 
Gray-cheeked 

Thrush, empi sp. - I like them!, Loads of Common Yellowthroats - I was 
searching 

for Connecticut with no luck!, Black-throated Green, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, 
Philly 

Vireo, loads of Warbling, etc. 30 or so Rough-winged Swallows - most over the 
East 

Pool. Just a few Trees. Different than the weekend.

East pond - this is still a great highlight. Scope needed. Eagle-eyed Marilyn 
spotted 

a Stilt Sandpiper in the flock there! Most stuff is along the west edge. I had 
to go. 

Marilyn and a mutual friend were heading down for another angle. Blue-winged 
Teal 

and Shovelers. 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Somebody pin that tern to the beach!
From: Linda Widdop <linda AT TECHIMPACT.ORG>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:55:54 +0000
Hi JBs - the worst thing about traveling to California for work isn't the work 
or the traffic or the travel or the hotels. It's reading about a Whiskered Tern 
in Cape May! Ugh. 


Elegant Terns abound here. I got my lifer White-headed Woodpecker on Sunday. 
But I have to admit that I changed my flight back home from Sunday to Friday in 
hopes that "Wiskas" sticks around til Sat. 


Anybody got superglue and the will to help a sister out?

Linda

Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern at Coral Ave., Cape May NOW
From: "John J. Collins" <jjcbird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:51:26 -0400
The Whiskered Tern is presently on the beach left of the jetty at Coral Ave., 
Cape May! 


John J. Collins
Raritan NJ
Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Scherman Hoffman Hawk Watch
From: Susan Garretsonfriedman <susan.garretsonfriedman AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:25:23 -0400
Hi all,

The Scherman Hoffman Hawkwatch up on the roof saw 4 Bald Eagles, 4 Osprey,
1 Raven, 12 Monarchs and 1087 Broad-winged Hawks on Monday (among other
species).

On Tuesday, with Pete Dunne & Pete Basinski in attendance, 3 Osprey and
1093 Broad-wingeds were counted.

Who knows what today will bring...?

Good Birding,

*Susan*
Susan Garretson Friedman
Welcome Center/Nature Store Manager
Scherman Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary

New Jersey Audubon
11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
908-766-5787

Connect with us: [image: Facebook]

[image: 

Blogger] [image:
Flickr] [image: Twitter]
[image: YouTube]


Making New Jersey a better place for people and wildlife since 1897

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bird, Butterfly, and Ode list from Cape May Point State Park 9-14-14
From: Shawn Wainwright <shawneagleeyes1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 21:01:19 -0400
Went down for the Whiskered Tern in Cape May, New Jersey 9-14-14 whish is
a code 5 bird and only the 3rd record for North America. Went there with
Scott Fisher and Jane Aguilu. It was great to see so many people I hav'nt
seen in a while too! Waited about a half hour on the beach with the huge
crowd of people, then some people made the sacrifice and left and then it
flew right in and landed in front of us, stayed for 15 minutes then flew
over to bunker pond to feed. Great day out there!  Even got some
Butterflies and Odes as well! Birded from 10:20am to about 3:30pm. Temps in
the upper 60's to 70's later on. Thanks to Jane Aguilu for driving!


Here's the list:

At Cape May Point State Park in Cape May, New Jersey: 48 species

Great Egret - 2
Snowy Egret - 1
Mute Swan - 16
Canada Goose - 6
American Wigeon - 4
Gadwall - 4
Mallard - 20+
Black Vulture - 14
Turkey Vulture - 28
Osprey - 6
Bald Eagle - 2
Sharp-shinned Hawk - 10
Red-shouldered Hawk - 2
Red-tailed Hawk - 3
American Kestrel - 1
Merlin - 1
Peregrine Falcon - 1
Ring-billed Gull - 2
Laughing Gull - 60+
Herring Gull - 30+
Great Black-backed Gull - 10+
Black Tern - 1
Whiskered Tern - 1
Common Tern - 10+
Forster's Tern - 50+
Royal Tern - 3
Rock Pigeon - 2
Mourning Dove - 2
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1
Belted Kingfisher - 1
Northern Flicker - 1
Tree Swallow - 8
Carolina Wren - 2
Gray Catbird - 4
American Robin - 4
Carolina Chickadee - 2
White-breasted Nuthatch - 1
Blue Jay - 2
Fish Crow - 6
European Starling - 10+
Palm Warbler - 8
Common Yellowthroat - 1
Northern Cardinal - 2
Red-winged Blackbird - 10+
Common Grackle - 4


Butterflies seen: 14 species

Cabbage White - 4
Orange Sulphur - 1
Cloudless Sulphur - 1
Gray Hairstreak - 1
Pearl Crescent - 1
Red-spotted Purple - 2
Painted Lady - 6
American Lady - 2
Common Buckeye - 2
Monarch - 10 - 2 were tagged, awaiting results
Viceroy - 1
Silver-spotted Skipper - 2
Sachem - 50+
Zabulon Skipper - 1


Odes seen: 9 species

Familiar Bluet - 2
Eastern Pondhawk - 1
Twelve-spotted Skimmer - 1
Slaty Skimmer - 1
Blue Dasher - 4
Autumn Meadowhawk - 1
Common Green Darner - 6
Black Saddlebags - 3
Carolina Saddlebags - 10


Nature notes:

American Bullfrog - 1
Eastern Painted Turtle - 1
Black and Yellow Argiope - 5
Bald-faced Hornet - 40+ and the nest


Butterflies in my yard in Toms River: 6 species - it was a little late for
butterflies when we got back but some were still flying after 4:30pm

Cabbage White - 2
Red-spotted Purple - 1
Red-banded Hairstreak - 1
Silver-spotted Skipper - 1
Peck's Skipper - 4
Sachem - 20+


Nature notes:

Potter Wasp - 1
Blue-winged Wasp - 1
Northern Paper Wasp - 2
Common Paper Wasp - 1
Mud Dauber Wasp - 1
Bald-faced Hornet - 2


Bird of the day: Whiskered Tern

Butterfly of the day: Viceroy

Ode of the day: Twelve-spotted Skimmer

Nature note of the day: Black and Yellow Argiope


All the photos from the trip can be seen here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/shawn_wainwright/sets/72157647633086036/

 Great day!

Shawn Wainwright
Toms River
ShawnEagleEyes1 AT aol.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Whiskered Tern videoclip
From: Fairfax Hutter <savoirfairfax AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 18:10:10 -0400
He's (or is it she?) got ROCK STAR STATUS!

Sent from my LilyPad

> On Sep 16, 2014, at 5:12 PM, William Dix  wrote:
> 
> Amazing work!  Amazing bird!  Thanks for sharing, Jimmie.
> 
> .................................
> 
> Bill Dix   
> Princeton
> 
> http://billdix.smugmug.com
> 
> 
> 
>> Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 20:48:27 +0000
>> From: leewah AT COMCAST.NET
>> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Whiskered Tern videoclip
>> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
>> 
>> Hi all,
>> 
>> Here's an awesome video of the whiskered tern 
http://www.nemesisbird.com/birding/rarities/chase/whiskered-tern-video/ 

>> 
>> awesome visual feast (shooting and editing) and awesome learning tool!
>> 
>> 
>> Congratulations and thanks to Andy McGann.
>> 
>> Jimmy
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Jimmy Lee 
>> 
>> South Brunswick, NJ
>> 
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>                         
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Fwd: Whiskered Tern photos 9/16/14
From: Linda Gangi <ltgangi AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 21:36:21 +0000
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ltgangi/ 
  
Was able to get down to Cape May for the Whiskered Tern, I uploaded a few to 
Flickr. 



Linda Gangi 
Manahawkin, NJ 08050 

Enjoy this lovely quote: 

The iris pond has flowered 
Before the old temple; 
I sell tea this evening 
By the water's edge. 
It is steeped in the cups 
With the moon and stars; 
Drink and wake forever 
From your worldly sleep. 

- Baisao (1675-1763 







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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern pics from today
From: Linda Gangi <ltgangi AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 21:40:00 +0000
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ltgangi/ 
  
Took some pics of the Whiskered Tern today, enjoy. 


Linda Gangi 
Manahawkin, NJ 08050 

Enjoy this lovely quote: 

The iris pond has flowered 
Before the old temple; 
I sell tea this evening 
By the water's edge. 
It is steeped in the cups 
With the moon and stars; 
Drink and wake forever 
From your worldly sleep. 

- Baisao (1675-1763 






List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern photos 9/16/14
From: Linda Gangi <ltgangi AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 21:31:43 +0000
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ltgangi/ 
  
Was able to get down to Cape May for the Whiskered Tern, I uploaded a few to 
Flickr. 



Linda Gangi 
Manahawkin, NJ 08050 

Enjoy this lovely quote: 

The iris pond has flowered 
Before the old temple; 
I sell tea this evening 
By the water's edge. 
It is steeped in the cups 
With the moon and stars; 
Drink and wake forever 
From your worldly sleep. 

- Baisao (1675-1763 






List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Whiskered Tern videoclip
From: William Dix <williamdix AT MSN.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 17:12:50 -0400
Amazing work!  Amazing bird!  Thanks for sharing, Jimmie.

.................................

Bill Dix   
Princeton

http://billdix.smugmug.com



> Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 20:48:27 +0000
> From: leewah AT COMCAST.NET
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Whiskered Tern videoclip
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> 
> Hi all,
>  
> Here's an awesome video of the whiskered tern 
http://www.nemesisbird.com/birding/rarities/chase/whiskered-tern-video/ 

>  
> awesome visual feast (shooting and editing) and awesome learning tool!
>  
>  
> Congratulations and thanks to Andy McGann.
>  
> Jimmy
> 
> 
> 
> Jimmy Lee 
> 
> South Brunswick, NJ
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>  
 		 	   		  
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern videoclip
From: Jimmy Lee <leewah AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 20:48:27 +0000
Hi all,
 
Here's an awesome video of the whiskered tern 
http://www.nemesisbird.com/birding/rarities/chase/whiskered-tern-video/ 

 
awesome visual feast (shooting and editing) and awesome learning tool!
 
 
Congratulations and thanks to Andy McGann.
 
Jimmy



Jimmy Lee 

South Brunswick, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
 
Subject: DVOC this Thursday Sep 18 - "Birding Down Under" with Rob Hynson
From: Steve Kacir <setkacir AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 11:34:21 -0400
Hello Birders, 

The Delaware Valley Ornithological Club (DVOC) returns to its regular formal 
meeting schedule this Thursday Sep 18. The meeting features the program 
"Birding Down Under" by Rob Hynson who will be visiting the US for an all too 
brief month before returning home to the other side of the planet. Don't miss 
it! 


All who have an interest are invited to attend; the program is free with no 
admission charged. Club meetings will begin at 7:30PM and are held at the 
Academy of Natural Sciences, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia, PA 
19103. A pre-meeting dinner takes place at Asia on the Parkway, not far from 
the Academy. More details and directions to the Academy and Asia on the Parkway 
can be found on the DVOC website: http://www.dvoc.org/Main.htm 


"Birding Down Under"

Australia is a lucky country. With deserts, beautiful coasts, rain forests, 
grasslands and deep ocean, the continent provides a large diversity of habitats 
and bird life. From deep sea pelagic birding trips to the urban centers, 
opportunities for birding and exploration abound. When early settlers sent 
their collections of specimens back to Britain, many specimens were branded as 
hoaxes, such were the oddities of evolution to be found in the Australian 
frontier. Over two thirds of world's seabird species have been recorded in 
Australian waters, and the country boasts the longest banding project of 
seabirds captured at-sea. These features secure Australia's place as the 
seabird capital of the world. 


Rob Hynson: 
Rob Hynson grew up in London and started birding when he was about eight years 
old, after being inspired by birder and actor Bill Oddie of the TV series "The 
Goodies." After completing an undergraduate degree in London, Rob moved to St 
Andrews to play golf every day and work on his PhD in Biochemistry. After 
completing his PhD, he moved to Philadelphia to take up a post-doctoral 
position at Drexel University. There, Rob soon found the DVOC and joined the 
ranks of the club, with some special focus working on the DVOC Checklist 
Committee. While in Philadelphia, Rob also met his wife Carolyn MacCann, an 
Australian researcher, who was working as a postdoctoral fellow in psychology. 
Inevitably, Philadelphia's loss was Australia's gain, and Rob moved to Sydney 
with Carolyn, where they were we'd in 2011. The couple still resides in the 
Sydney area along with their son Ben. Rob has birded throughout most of Britain 
and a fair amount of the US from North Carolina to Maine on the East Coast as 
well as southern California and Michigan. Rob has visited much of the 
Australian continent and many of its islands. He has also birded in Japan, 
Antarctica and Argentina. While living in Australia, Rob discovered the camera 
and became as much a photographer as a birder. His photos can be seen on PBase: 
http://www.pbase.com/rob_hynson 



We hope to see you there, 

Steve Kacir
DVOC Vice President
setkacirgmail.com
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County
From: Sam Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 08:36:33 -0400
The Whiskered Tern was seen again this morning on the Cape May Point State Park 
beach. Everyday it's been working between the beach and Bunker Pond in front of 
the Cape May Hawkwatch. 


Good birding,

Sam

--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Owl in the Box update
From: Lisa Potash <lisapotash6 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 00:54:43 -0400
Jersey Birders,

It's been a few weeks so I wanted to share some observations of the Imm. 
Screech Owl (Red Jr.)using the yard owl box as a roost the past month. 

"He's" looking quite mature now with feathers filling-in around the beak and 
upper breast area. This is a good looking bird, especially in sunlight. 


Surprising how awake and "active" the owl is during daylight hours for a 
nocturnal creature. If the sun is out Red will often be out in the mid morning, 
midday, and once or twice before leaving the box at dusk. I've been keeping a 
journal just for the owls, and it's been very helpful in keeping dates and 
observations straight. 


When I was away for a couple of days, my son watched the owl at dusk and 
reported that while the bird was at the entrance hole, it suddenly started to 
"yawn" and then proceeded to "bite" the top of the box's overhang. Not sure 
what that was about? 


Last week I heard mobbing birds in the side yard where there's a tight grouping 
of 30' pines and a chestnut tree. It was too dense to spot the owl, but I'm 
pretty certain he was in there. 


On Friday I was out on the driveway practicing my tennis toss, and turned 
around to face the backyard and noticed some small birds flying over the owl 
box. I was surprised to see Red Jr suddenly fly from the mid-sized oak (close 
by the box) and quickly enter the entrance hole. It took only 3 flaps of the 
wings to get him to the box. 


Tonight (dusk) I was looking at the bird through my scope and watched it make a 
"new face." At first I thought it was calling, but then it seemed like the the 
owl was working on bringing up a pellet. Looked kind of like gagging - very 
interesting to witness. Tonight when leaving the box, the owl flew the very 
short distance (flap, flap) to the neighboring maple tree to the right of the 
box. I'm going to check underneath the tree to see if I can find a pellet on 
the ground. 


I know the survival rate is quite low for a first year screech owl. I'm rather 
attached to the little raptor, and I hope it has continued good fortune with 
the changing seasons. It appears to be very healthy. 


Here's a link to the latest photos and videos for those interested: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/95291506 AT N07/

Good Birding,
Lisa Potash
Oakland

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (15 Sep 2014) 1125 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 00:09:46 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 15, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                      10             29             50
Bald Eagle                   6             21             34
Northern Harrier             2              2              4
Sharp-shinned Hawk          12             50             63
Cooper's Hawk                0              4              9
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              3              4
Broad-winged Hawk         1091           1860           1921
Red-tailed Hawk              1             11             11
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             2             15             23
Merlin                       0              1              5
Peregrine Falcon             1              1              1
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0

Total:                    1125           1997           2125
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:30:00 
Observation end   time: 18:00:00 
Total observation time: 9.5 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Jim Thomson, Megan Fedor, Patrick Keelen

Visitors:
Rally Bartholomew & his Warren County Community College students--thanks
for making the hike and visiting.

Susan & Lisa--Happy Birthday!  

Hikers - 20. 

Hello to SK & SL in NH, MR & AR in CA, and JW (aka Mr. Haicoon) in NJ--hope
you all get back to Coon this fall.


Weather:
mostly sunny skies w/ patchy fog early, wind variable & light, temp 48-68
deg F. 

Raptor Observations:
BE - 12:11I, 1:40A, 1:59I, 3:32I, 4:25A, 4:25I. 
PG - 5:24A. 

About 90% of the BWs passed between 9:00 and 11:00. Some birds were likely
missed due to periods of patchy fog and poor visibility at times.

It seemed the adult BW that ripped past the owl decoy early in the day was
a lock for Bird of the Day until the 5:24 adult Peregrine (our first of the
season) appeared and showed how it's really done.  We were able to get on
the PG far upridge and follow its path head-on to us and the owl...an
awesome WOW bird and hands- down Bird of the Day.  

Many thanks to Jim, Patrick, and Megan for their outstanding spotting!

Non-raptor Observations:
Ravens - 2.
Hummingbirds - 2.
TVs & BVs.
Great-blue Heron - 1.
Barn Swallows - 2.
Chimney Swifts.
Cedar Waxwings - 85.
Tree Swallows - tremendous #s moving early during the BW flights, and
another push late in the day. 
Monarchs - 13. 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 

Subject: Wilmington Canyon Pelagic - a great trip
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 02:42:36 +0000
John Stippick did a great job recapping the trip, so I won't try. But it was my 
second pelagic trip, saw four life birds, dozed through and missed two more in 
the afternoon, and got seasick for the first time ever (maybe not a highlight, 
but certainly notable). Only one bruise on my thigh from getting hurled into 
something while moving around the boat in the choppy seas. 


I posted a couple of pictures. Nothing great. I am just pleased to have gotten 
the birds in the viewfinder. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/98494447 AT N06/15066284739

I wouldn't mind seeing a good picture of the jaeger (mine may not even qualify 
for "documentation purposes") 


Can't wait to go again.

Steven

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Yard Birds
From: Alice Leurck <alice.leurck AT ATT.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 19:40:56 -0400
I also saw a Winter Wren this morning. I was quite surprised!
Alice Leurck
Ramsey

On 9/15/2014 5:43 PM, 'Dr. Mark Kantrowitz' mark.kantrowitz AT verizon.net 
[fyke] wrote:
>
> Had my first ever yard Ovenbird yesterday.  And today, an extremely 
> early winter wren showed up. We've had nesting House and Carolina 
> wrens on our property this year and was expecting to see a recently 
> fledged Carolina, but it was definitely a winter 
> wren..........................
>
> Time to get winter coats out of storage?
>
> Mark Kantrowitz
>
> Hillsdale
>
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Kestrels in Oradell
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 23:33:39 +0000
You know how we see that long-tailed not-too-large bird and think/which/hope 
it's a kestrel, but it's invariably a mourning dove? 


Well, it always pays to take a second look and to look closely. Yesterday, 
while visiting Beth El Cemetery in Oradell, I looked up and wrote off the 
falcon-looking bird as a dove. But then I looked again and squinted a little (I 
seem to squint a lot lately) and sure enough it was indeed a kestrel. I looked 
around and found it was one of three "working the plots"! Nice diversion to a 
somber morning. 


Steven

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Merlin & a big dragonfly flight at RU today
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 18:58:13 -0400
My favorite place for noontime birding at the Rutgers Cook-Douglass 
Campus is the Cook Student Organic plots along Poultry Farm Road.  
Particularly in fall the mix of produce, decaying produce and the bugs 
it brings, compost, fencing, and weeds (lots and lots of thick weeds, in 
the plots that got abandoned - great birding in those plots) make it the 
best spot to try for something or other.  Today there seemed to be a 
giant flight of giant dragonflies going on.  Do they migrate?  They were 
acting like swallows, swirling around and slowly moving south.  Then, a 
merlin just screamed through  the area a couple times, caught a thermal 
and circled higher and higher until it required binoculars, then took 
off heading northeast.  Maybe hunting the dragonflies?

A palm warbler, the first of many I'm sure, was rooting around. And I 
wondered, "what the heck will the plot cultivator do with 60 heads of 
Chinese cabbage?"

Susan Treesh
Somerset

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Yard Birds
From: "Dr. Mark Kantrowitz" <mark.kantrowitz AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:43:54 -0400
Had my first ever yard Ovenbird yesterday.  And today, an extremely early
winter wren showed up. We've had nesting House and Carolina wrens on our
property this year and was expecting to see a recently fledged Carolina, but
it was definitely a winter wren..........

 

Time to get winter coats out of storage?

 

Mark Kantrowitz

Hillsdale


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: warbler numbers
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:32:38 -0400
I meant to highlight some warblers. 15 species. Canada, loads of Redstarts,
Parulas, Blue-winged, Cape May. etc. 

Not many flycatchers! Did have Veerys and Wood Thrush in addition to
the Gray-cheeked. 

I kept looking up for Broad-winged! No luck. I keep seeing reports. I'll have 
to 

camp out at East Point some late morning with NW winds and sun.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Overnight radar movies
From: Walter Gura <waltg19149 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:29:28 -0400
In response to something Sandra mentioned, there is an easy way to
monitor overnight radar.  It can be found at:

http://weather.rap.ucar.edu/radar

(If the link doesn't work then google:   ucar ral real time weather data
radar)
  Assume it is 6:00AM and you want to check the overnight radar.  All you
have to do is click on the drop down box "loop duration" and check however
many hours you wish to view (6 hours will take you back to midnight).
Then  just hit on whatever local radar in the map area you wish to view.
Or hit "Contiguous U.S." to see the overnight radar for the whole country.
You will then be shown a "movie" of continuing screen captures from the
National Weather Service.  ( This site uses UTC time which is 4 hours ahead
of us.  If the map reads 0600 UTC then it is 2:00 AM our time. )
    Warning:  Connecticut Warblers travel under the radar and you won't be
able to tell if your local patch is hopping with birds even if the screen
seems empty.  Interpreting radar is  a mixture of science and art (neither
of which I have), so unless you have been studying it for years then get
out birding anyway.
     Good luck,
           Walt Gura
            Phila., Pa.
            waltg19149 AT gmail.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cumberland migration - yes
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:29:22 -0400
And wow! But different. Good numbers, but spread out. Not my usual
find a huge flock and work it. I had a different warbler every 10 ft. it seemed
down various trails, I hit some woods areas also as I wanted to see if a 
Nighthawk would flush. None did. Still need for my big year! I was doing some
bushwacking for Connecticut and Mourning. No luck with either! 
My next time down there on NW winds, I'll hit East Point early - that's my
most reliable spot in Cumberland for Connecticut. That one I can id in flight! 
Mourning no. I did pick up a Gray-cheeked Thrush and a juvenile LB Dow.
243. Slowly inching my way to 250. 

Dragonfly notes - the predominate was Saddlebags. Mainly black, but some
Carolinas in there. 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Lincoln's Sparrow at Cold Brook Reserve
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:11:45 -0400
Hi, Y'all.

I discovered a Lincoln's Sparrow here this morning- the earliest one I'd
ever found. I also found around 10+ Savannahs, and 5 or so Palms. The fields
are all still full of corn, so it's not quite sparrow time here yet- but the
early arriving Lincoln's was a welcome surprise. I also found two singing
White-eyed Vireos, 2 Cooper's, and an adult male Harrier. I heard Ravens
kronking away in the distance- I presume the clan from the quarry just south
of here. 

 I only managed a distant, harshly lit shot of the Lincoln's- but it gets
the job done. It can be viewed here:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 

Good Birding!

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Broad-winged Hawks over Spruce Run.
From: mike hiotis <mchhiotis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:05:56 -0400
Thanks Ladies sounds like fun for all....Mike H.

On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 4:56 PM, Susie R.  wrote:

> Thanks for posting this, Mike.  It goaded me into picking up my bins and
> going out to the front porch, from which I saw 52 birds in about 20
> minutes.  Now I'll pour myself a glass of wine and resume my hawk-watching.
>
> Susie R.
> Tewksbury/Califon
>
> On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 3:22 PM, mike hiotis  wrote:
>
>> Today between 11:15-12:15 I was able to see kettles of Broad-winged
>> Hawks from the Rte31 - Van Syckles Rd. parking lot when scanning for
>> shorebirds here.I tallied a conservative 617 birds in that hour with
>> kettle
>> numbers as follows(90,153,128,29,15 70,109,15,8).The hawks originated high
>> out of the northeast and continued west along the small ridge leading to
>> Jugtown Mountain.Most Hunterdon birders know this ridge can attract Hawks
>> on flight days and in general.I am sure local hawk watches could be
>> racking
>> up some bird totals and wish them all luck.These were speck birds...the
>> type that makes many a good birder refrain from hawk watching..Love it!
>>
>> Mike Hiotis
>> Martinsville NJ
>> Mchhiotis AT gmail.com
>>
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>>
>
>

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Broad-winged Hawks over Spruce Run.
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:56:01 -0400
Thanks for posting this, Mike.  It goaded me into picking up my bins and
going out to the front porch, from which I saw 52 birds in about 20
minutes.  Now I'll pour myself a glass of wine and resume my hawk-watching.

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon

On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 3:22 PM, mike hiotis  wrote:

> Today between 11:15-12:15 I was able to see kettles of Broad-winged
> Hawks from the Rte31 - Van Syckles Rd. parking lot when scanning for
> shorebirds here.I tallied a conservative 617 birds in that hour with kettle
> numbers as follows(90,153,128,29,15 70,109,15,8).The hawks originated high
> out of the northeast and continued west along the small ridge leading to
> Jugtown Mountain.Most Hunterdon birders know this ridge can attract Hawks
> on flight days and in general.I am sure local hawk watches could be racking
> up some bird totals and wish them all luck.These were speck birds...the
> type that makes many a good birder refrain from hawk watching..Love it!
>
> Mike Hiotis
> Martinsville NJ
> Mchhiotis AT gmail.com
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern yes!
From: Susan Hoffmann <hoffmany AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:50:01 -0400
It's still here. Seen from 3:30 to 4:15 at the bunker pond. Black tern still 
keeping company. 


Sunny warm day! Great life bird! 8-)

Susan Hoffmann
Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Warbler Whiplash in my back yard
From: Fairfax Hutter <savoirfairfax AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 15:58:56 -0400
Waves of warblers, Flycatchers, and Vireos have been passing through Lawrence 
today. Their ROW follows the Shipetaukin Creek (north) that drains the Pole 
Farm emptying into the D&R Canal south of Princeton, passes below my back 
windows, rather than the gas pipeline next door. Too many fleeting flashes of 
lemon yellow, blood orange, olive green, and blue-gray, to fully count or ID 
but double-digit Redstarts (some still singing males in breeding plumage), 
Parulas (singing), Magnolias, Black-throated Blues (singing) & Greens, Black & 
Whites, Warbling Vireos, Yellow-throated Vireos, Red-eyed Vireos, Wood Peewees, 
and assorted Flycatchers with wingbars. 


Sent from my LilyPad

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Broad-winged Hawks over Spruce Run.
From: mike hiotis <mchhiotis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 15:22:12 -0400
Today between 11:15-12:15 I was able to see kettles of Broad-winged
Hawks from the Rte31 - Van Syckles Rd. parking lot when scanning for
shorebirds here.I tallied a conservative 617 birds in that hour with kettle
numbers as follows(90,153,128,29,15 70,109,15,8).The hawks originated high
out of the northeast and continued west along the small ridge leading to
Jugtown Mountain.Most Hunterdon birders know this ridge can attract Hawks
on flight days and in general.I am sure local hawk watches could be racking
up some bird totals and wish them all luck.These were speck birds...the
type that makes many a good birder refrain from hawk watching..Love it!

Mike Hiotis
Martinsville NJ
Mchhiotis AT gmail.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: suggestion for Audubon trips
From: Trina Anderson <laporello AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 15:01:47 -0400
How about dispensing with the labels and bring along your Field Guide to
Birders. It'll be as challenging as IDing birds.

Trina Anderson
Middletown

On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 12:48 PM, Theodore Chase 
wrote:

>         I think introductions at the beginning AND name tags (simple
> stick-on) are a good idea.  If I am introduced to more than two people at
> once I can't remember the names of any of them; tags will reinforce.  It is
> great to actually meet someone whose name you have seen on JerseyBirds.  At
> introductions, people can indicate their level of expertise if they wish -
> or not, as they please.  (I'm usually both learning and giving advice.)
>         Ted Chase
>         Franklin Twp
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: suggestion for Audubon trips
From: Theodore Chase <chase_c AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 12:48:29 -0400
	I think introductions at the beginning AND name tags (simple stick- 
on) are a good idea.  If I am introduced to more than two people at  
once I can't remember the names of any of them; tags will reinforce.   
It is great to actually meet someone whose name you have seen on  
JerseyBirds.  At introductions, people can indicate their level of  
expertise if they wish - or not, as they please.  (I'm usually both  
learning and giving advice.)
	Ted Chase
	Franklin Twp 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: suggestion for Audubon trips
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 12:33:31 -0400
i like the ideas of name tags and introductions. the leaders can facilitate the 
introductions. 

i dont think the numbers are necessary: the leaders should be knowledgeable
and the more experienced birders should be willing to share 
with others. after all, they are attending a group birding event. anti-social 
birders or those 

who feel dragged down by beginners should bird on their own, hire a private 
guide, or find 

a trip matching their level or style  and not take out their frustration or 
disappointment 

on the other birders. the trip organizers can help by writing a description of 
the tour 

describing the level of birding experience that it is geared toward, the pace, 
and any 

physical access issues. (i recall terry mceaneys ground rules: no whiners 
allowed!" reminds 

me of seinfelds soup nazi).

Diane Louie
Madison

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: suggestion for Audubon trips
From: Karmela <kmoneta AT ATT.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 11:55:48 -0400
I think the concept being proposed was to have the trip leader act as a 
facilitator. Why not kick off the tour by having everyone introduce themselves. 
This isn't much different than what's done at business conferences where the 
conference leader sets the tone and encourages interaction. It's easy to 
introduce yourself when there is a relatively small group, but more difficult 
with the larger groups. 

My suggestion would be a simple round of introductions initially and then on 
with the spotting. 


Karmela Moneta
Clinton Township and Barnegat

> On Sep 15, 2014, at 11:41 AM, Rick Wright  wrote:
> 
> Far simpler than codes and name tags and whatever else will inevitably be
> proposed over the next day or two is simply minding one's manners:
> 
> When you meet someone you don't know, introduce yourself.
> 
> Problem solved.
> 
> On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 11:26 AM, Laura Berlik 
> wrote:
> 
>> I LOVE the idea of 1-5, and the idea of maybe and A or T for ask me or
>> tell me would keep a whole lot of people happy.  It is so much more fun
>> when no one is stifled or annoyed. It would even work on this list serve,
>> though it's especially useful on a bird walk as you suggest.
>> 
>> Laura Berlik
>> 2 T
>> Princeton
>> 
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Rick Wright
> Bloomfield, NJ
> 
> Review Editor, Birding 
> Senior Leader, WINGS 
> Birding New Jersey 
> ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey
> 
 

> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: suggestion for Audubon trips
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 11:41:25 -0400
Far simpler than codes and name tags and whatever else will inevitably be
proposed over the next day or two is simply minding one's manners:

When you meet someone you don't know, introduce yourself.

Problem solved.

On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 11:26 AM, Laura Berlik 
wrote:

> I LOVE the idea of 1-5, and the idea of maybe and A or T for ask me or
> tell me would keep a whole lot of people happy.  It is so much more fun
> when no one is stifled or annoyed. It would even work on this list serve,
> though it's especially useful on a bird walk as you suggest.
>
> Laura Berlik
> 2 T
> Princeton
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>



-- 
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: suggestion for Audubon trips
From: Laura Berlik <lberlik AT PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 11:26:01 -0400
I LOVE the idea of 1-5, and the idea of maybe and A or T for ask me or tell me 
would keep a whole lot of people happy. It is so much more fun when no one is 
stifled or annoyed. It would even work on this list serve, though it's 
especially useful on a bird walk as you suggest. 


Laura Berlik
2 T
Princeton

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Glenhurst Meadows this morning
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 15:06:41 +0000
Good morning, Jerseybirders,

After a trip down to Cape May this weekend for the Whiskered Tern and the 
overnight pelagic (thanks, David B. for all the driving), I returned to 
familiar climes today at Glenhurst Meadows. Joe Pescatore was photographing on 
the main trail; we birded together about 90 minutes. We came upon one nice 
mixed flock on the little rise on the crossover trail, and stayed with it as it 
moved first west, then north. The active group included Redstart, 
Black-throated Green, Parula, Palm, Nashville, Magnolia, Black-and-White, and 
Blackpoll Warblers, three RE Vireos, a very cooperative Philadelphia Vireo, and 
a FOS for both of us Ruby-crowned Kinglet (I see that others have been reported 
around the area). We stayed with the flock for about 45 minutes and watched all 
of them in perfect illumination. We heard a very loud chip note three times 
deep in tangles, but could not see its maker. Darn. At around 9, I headed for 
work and left Joe, digiscope set-up in hand, heading for the back part of the 
area; he may report more later. I met Grant Price on the trail back; he had 
seen and heard a Winter Wren. 


A fine, cool morning.    Good birding, everyone.

Marc J. Chelemer
Bedminster


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County
From: Sam Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 08:28:07 -0400
KEEKEEKERR - DLaPuma:
Whst (Whiskered Tern) seen earlier on beach, flushed and not currently in view. 
If found, please report. 


KEEKEEKERR - DLaPuma:
Last seen in tern flock west of Bunker, CMSP

Good birding,

Sam

--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: suggestion for Audubon trips
From: Kathy <pabirder AT PTD.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 07:17:22 -0400
Great idea. I am in PA but on our. bird walks often the leader doesn't 
introduce people. People who know each other tend to talk to each other which 
makes it awkward for others. Also some "experts" (not all) tend to want to show 
off their knowledge 

or past experiences. your thoughts along with others would make for a 
friendlier walk. 

I was in a walk in CA where the leader did not call out the ID until people had 
a chance to see and attempt to ID the bird for themselves-obviously better for 
more stationary birds. 


Kathy Stagl
Emmaus PA
   
> On Sep 14, 2014, at 10:18 PM, "Danusha V. Goska"  wrote:
> 
> I want to make a suggestion re: Audubon birdwatching trips. I think
> this suggestion might make the trips even better for participants.
> Newcomers might have a warmer, more inclusive, more enjoyable
> experience.
> 
> I've been on a couple of these trips and something has been lacking
> for me: facilitated interaction between those in the group.
> 
> Leaders are great and charming, but much interaction is between group
> members and leaders. I have felt awkward making contact with group
> members because I don't know them and I don't know what kind of
> comment would work for them.
> 
> During today's Audubon trip to Skylands, I thought it would be great
> if we had been offered the option of nametags with identifications as
> described below.
> 
> Why I think these optional nametags would be a good idea
> 
> Nametags provide the person's name, so you can address him or her.
> 
> Nametags encourage us to talk to each other.
> 
> Three key pieces of info that would fit easily on a nametag help us to
> know what to say to each other.
> 
> An example of how this would work. During today's Audubon trip to
> Skylands, at many points in the walk, clumps of participants were
> standing around together, beyond earshot of the guide.
> 
> We could have helped each other, but we didn't talk to each other.
> 
> I saw some bluebirds in the apple trees. The sun was behind the
> bluebirds, so their color was not apparent. I wanted to say to the
> folks standing next to me, "You can recognize bluebirds by their
> hunched silhouette, even when you can't see their color," but I
> thought, I shouldn't say this, because these folks might be experts ...
> 
> Later, though, one of the people who had been standing next to me
> said, "Is a bluebird the same thing as a blue jay?"
> 
> So, yeah, I should have passed birding knowledge on to him, but I let
> the chance pass me by, because I didn't know his level.
> 
> Also, I wanted to ask folks if they had ever seen a barn owl at
> Skylands, and I wanted to ask what the likely fate of the late wood
> duck ducklings would be (they are still ducklings, this late in the
> summer), but I didn't know which members of the group had what level
> of knowledge.
> 
> So I'd like to suggest OPTIONAL nametags with three pieces of info on them:
> 
> Name
> 
> Two boxes with the option of checking one or the other or neither:
> "Ask me questions" or "Tell me stuff."
> 
> Then five numbers, with the option of circling one. The numbers would
> communicate:
> 
> Bird watching level between one and five (obviously not all these
> words would fit on a nametag, but numbers one through five would)
> 
> One: I've heard of birdwatching and I may buy binoculars and a field
> guide soon.
> 
> Two: I've been birdwatching casually for about a year and I can
> identify a dozen or more common birds near my home/work without aid of
> a field guide
> 
> Three: I've been birdwatching for more than a year and I know about a
> hundred birds
> 
> Four: I've been birdwatching for years. I can identify most birds I
> see by sight, behavior, or call.
> 
> Five: I can identify eighty percent or more of the birds I see in any
> habitat without a field guide by sight, behavior, or call. I lead
> trips, give talks, publish, maintain nesting boxes.
> 
> Danusha in Paterson, NJ
> 
> -- 
> Danusha V. Goska, PhD
> author, "Save Send Delete"
> http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866
> 
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> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: suggestion for Audubon trips
From: Peggy Cadigan <1bookworm AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 23:20:34 -0400
Danusha, I think this is a splendid idea. I am a new birder and this system 
would make it much easier to facilitate conversation. 


Peggy Cadigan
#2.5 on your scale
Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ
1bookworm AT comcast.net

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 14, 2014, at 10:18 PM, "Danusha V. Goska"  wrote:
> 
> I want to make a suggestion re: Audubon birdwatching trips. 
> Danusha V. Goska, PhD
> author, "Save Send Delete"
> 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: