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Updated on Tuesday, August 26 at 05:32 PM EST
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Black Skimmers,©BirdQuest

26 Aug Late comment on the Elmer Golden Plovers [Yong Kong ]
26 Aug hunting on Franklin Township open space [Theodore Chase ]
26 Aug Griggstown Grasslands Today.. [Vince Capp ]
26 Aug Re: Under the wire? [Henry Kielblock ]
26 Aug HSR: Raccoon Ridge (25 Aug 2014) 15 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
26 Aug Under the wire? [Vince Elia ]
26 Aug Migration continues ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
26 Aug Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Stone Harbor [Tom Reed ]
26 Aug more at the spoils [SandraKeller ]
26 Aug NP dredge spoils - migrants [SandraKeller ]
26 Aug Re: Owl in the Box update [Lisa Potash ]
25 Aug Allentown - No upland, only goldens :) [Lisa Ryan ]
25 Aug Re: Glenhurst Meadows - Caution [David Emma ]
25 Aug Stone Harbor Point - terns [SandraKeller ]
25 Aug Re: Glenhurst Meadows - Caution [Vince Capp ]
25 Aug My first 2014 fall warbler higbee trip [Yong Kong ]
25 Aug Glenhurst Meadows - Caution ["Robert AT rgallucci.com" ]
25 Aug Re: Following the migration, bit by tiny bit ["Robert AT rgallucci.com" ]
25 Aug Following the migration, bit by tiny bit ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
25 Aug HSR: Raccoon Ridge (24 Aug 2014) 41 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
25 Aug HSR: Raccoon Ridge (23 Aug 2014) 1 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
25 Aug Yard Towhee [Sandra Mc ]
25 Aug nyt on ravens in Manhattan ["Danusha V. Goska" ]
25 Aug Re: Allentown American Golden Plover [C J BRINE ]
24 Aug nighthawk - greenwald park - Camden county [SandraKeller ]
24 Aug Barn Owl article [Michael Britt ]
24 Aug All Things Birds Field Trip to Forsythe (Brigantine) NWR, Saturday, August 23, 2014 [Peter Bacinski ]
24 Aug ID help needed ["Susie R." ]
24 Aug 8/24 Seawatch: Manasquan Inlet [Michael Britt ]
24 Aug Allentown American Golden Plover [Bob Dodelson ]
24 Aug Surprisingly good morning at Higbee [Linda Widdop ]
23 Aug Golden-Plovers [Ellen DeCarlo ]
23 Aug My update comment -Elmer Golden Plovers [Yong Kong ]
23 Aug Re: Owl in the Box ["B.G. Sloan" ]
23 Aug golden plovers [SandraKeller ]
23 Aug Golden Plover, Monmouth County [Larry-Zirlin ]
23 Aug Elmer Golden Plovers [Yong Kong ]
23 Aug Golden Plovers [SandraKeller ]
23 Aug My first Egret photos of 2014 ["B.G. Sloan" ]
23 Aug Jarvis Sound, Cape May [Larry-Zirlin ]
22 Aug Elmer and Johnson Farm area, Cumberland Co. [Yong Kong ]
22 Aug EB Forsythe and Local Migrants [Matt Webster ]
22 Aug Cumberland big year notes [SandraKeller ]
22 Aug Toronto ["Albert, Steven" ]
21 Aug Grasspipers: Elmer, Coomb's, & Johnson Sod Farms [David Weber ]
21 Aug Coleman Road near Johnson Sod Farm [Yong Kong ]
21 Aug Five Highland Park turkeys (photo)...ties my NJ yard bird record ["B.G. Sloan" ]
21 Aug Marbled Godwit Sedge Islands [greg prelich ]
21 Aug Re: is Bayonne King Rail still around? [karen swaine ]
21 Aug grasspipers - salem county [SandraKeller ]
20 Aug Evening herons at Stone Harbor [Tom Reed ]
20 Aug owls ["cwsg1 AT excite.com" ]
20 Aug Smithsonian needs help transcribing field notes [Peggy Cadigan ]
20 Aug crow with broken wing [Joan and Bob ]
19 Aug Keep an eye out for banded Ospreys in South Jersey [Samuel Galick ]
19 Aug nighthawks - local notes [SandraKeller ]
19 Aug Monarch butterfly question (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
19 Aug Finderne Wetlands Snowy Egret Update- [Vince Capp ]
19 Aug Finderne Wetlands: Little Blue Heron, Glossy Ibis, and a Snowy Egret, too! [Vince Capp ]
19 Aug Re: crow needs help [Peggy Cadigan ]
19 Aug Re: crow needs help [Diane C Louie ]
19 Aug crow needs help [Joan and Bob ]
18 Aug Pine Park [James OBrien ]
18 Aug My powerline birds [Yong Kong ]
18 Aug Bayonne King Rail [John Beetham ]
18 Aug Marbled Godwit - Cumberland [SandraKeller ]
18 Aug Piping plovers having worst year since receiving federal 'threatened' status - Egg Harbor Township - pressofAtlanticCity.com Mobile [Stuart and Wendy ]
18 Aug A Little Night Musing [William Dix ]
18 Aug HSR: Raccoon Ridge (16 Aug 2014) 3 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
18 Aug HSR: Raccoon Ridge (15 Aug 2014) 3 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
18 Aug Epic Fail...then all quiet ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
18 Aug Assunpink Cuckoos & Work-eating [Bob Dodelson ]
18 Aug mystery bird I asked about in spring may be a Baltimore Oriole ["Danusha V. Goska" ]
17 Aug Nighthawks this evening... [Michael Hodanish ]
17 Aug My retun trip to Brig [Yong Kong ]
17 Aug Wheelabrator - migrants - Prothonotary [SandraKeller ]

Subject: Late comment on the Elmer Golden Plovers
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 18:05:56 -0400
Bit too late about commenting on my error describing a "Juv A. Golden Plover" 
in my prior post on 8-23 , but perhaps clarification may be still required. 


When I wrote my post on 8-23, I was mostly intrigued by the 5th golden plover 
that I initially missed counting during the "first" scope scan, and called it a 
Juv in my post when in fact it was a molting adult golden plover. Of all 5 
birds I observed that day, this 5th bird was in a slight different molting 
stage than the other 4 AMGP to the point that a novice birder like me could 
notice it. If I recall, it might have had bit more white in the undertail 
coverts as compare to the fellow brothers/sisters AMGP. 


I was hoping others who have observed all 5 or 6 plovers would chime in but no 
takers. Reason why I waited. So I guess it was also the most likely AMGP as 
well just in a slight different stage of molting. 


Yong Kong
yklitespeed AT comcast.net
Berlin, NJ


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Subject: hunting on Franklin Township open space
From: Theodore Chase <chase_c AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 17:33:51 -0400
	Since I have been working with our Open Space Consultant refining  
the rules for hunting on Franklin Township Open Space, I may as well  
give birders a heads-up on what affects them.
	Basically: Sept. 13 - Oct. 31: bow hunting only, all day, but  
birders can be on the property (I would suggest at least an orange  
hat), though the hunters are supposed to know the trails and aim away  
from them.  Dec. 8-13: hunting all day, including firearms on Negri- 
Nepote, Griggstown and Bunker Hill; STAY OUT!  Nov. 1 - Feb. 21: bow  
hunting after 1:30 PM on all properties, stay out after 1:30; and  
Nov. 24 - Feb. 14, firearm hunting on Negri-Nepote, Griggstown and  
Bunker Hill after 1:30, stay out.  You are safe to go on all  
properties up till 1:30; and there is no hunting on Sundays, no  
firearm hunting on Thanksgiving and Christmas.  Hunting is for deer  
only, to reduce the overbrowsing of the forests.  The lower part of  
Griggstown is a safe zone, OK to go on; I'd check maps, which should  
be posted with the hunting rules on the township web site soon.  Ther  
will be signs designating the safe zone(s).
	Ted Chase
	Franklin Township

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Subject: Griggstown Grasslands Today..
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 17:09:00 -0400
Hi, Y'all-

Well, it wasn't exactly Warbler Central, but that's OK- I had a few fun
birds out there. I was actually checking for Bobolinks, and I found six
moving around the fields there. I was hoping they would be attracted by the
large numbers of birds that have been mobbing the parking lot- eating the
seed that is often left there by a local bird lover. So far the Bobs show no
interest. The Flock of Mourning Doves enjoying the seeded lot has grown to
about 60, though. Field and Grasshopper Sparrows are still tending young,
and Hummers were like Elvis today- they were everywhere. 

 Best birds went to a newly arrived flock of Tree Swallows- there were about
20 early in the morning, and that number only grew as the morning wore on-
all circling low around the fields bordering the parking lot. When they
numbered around 60, I figured that was it- until a single flight of around
100 came in and joined them. It was like a big, twittering shoal of fish out
there for a while. 

 The local Juvie Cooper's Hawk made two unsuccessful passes at the Cowbirds
that were stuffing themselves with supermarket seed while I was there. As I
was leaving, I noticed three Broad-winged Hawks soaring high over the fields
within a small mixed kettle of Black and Turkey Vultures- probably my first
migrant hawks of the year. It was nice to see. 

 

Good Birding!

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 



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Subject: Re: Under the wire?
From: Henry Kielblock <hlkiel AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 16:36:11 -0400
What do you suspect it means??
Henry Kielblock

-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Vince Elia
Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2014 1:11 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Under the wire?

In reading back over some of the posts for August, I saw the use of the term 
going "under the wire"... I sincerely hope that doesn't mean what I suspect it 
means... 


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Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (25 Aug 2014) 15 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 13:08:19 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Aug 25, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       0              6              6
Bald Eagle                   1              4              4
Northern Harrier             1              1              1
Sharp-shinned Hawk           2              7              7
Cooper's Hawk                0              3              3
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              1              1
Broad-winged Hawk           11             40             40
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             0              1              1
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0

Total:                      15             63             63
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 10:00:00 
Observation end   time: 15:00:00 
Total observation time: 5 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Brian Butler, Gidget Butler

Visitors:
Hikers - 9, and A.T. SOBO "Quiet". 


Weather:
clear to mostly sunny skies, wind NE/E 0-5, 78 deg F.

Raptor Observations:
BE - 2:45I. 

SS, RT, and im. BE seen but not counted.

Bird of the Day was an easy pick for BB: Coon's first NH of the season--a
Gray Ghost that "was hugging the ridge on the river side with a smooth
steady flight."  

Many thanks to Mr. Butler and Gidget for their solo count today.  

Non-raptor Observations:
Monarch - 1.
Hummingbirds - 2. 
Ravens - 4. 
Bear cub - 1. 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

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Subject: Under the wire?
From: Vince Elia <veejer11 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 13:11:25 -0400
In reading back over some of the posts for August, I saw the use of the term 
going "under the wire"... I sincerely hope that doesn't mean what I suspect it 
means... 


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Subject: Migration continues
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 16:07:47 +0000
Jerseybirders,

I visited the Overlook at Great Swamp on the way home from work yesterday, 
spending a half-hour in the tranquil early evening scanning the tops of every 
snag looking for Olive-sided Flycatcher. None of those visible (evidently it 
prefers warmer climes, given Tom Reed's find of one this morning on Cape May), 
but two Common Nighthawks flew across the marsh and gave a long and wonderful 
view through the 'scope in the western light. 


This morning, Rob Gallucci and I met at Glenhurst Meadows for a before-work 
loop around the trails. Best bird was a Philadelphia Vireo amidst a very active 
mixed flock which also included several Red-eyed Vireos, two Nashvilles, a 
Chestnut-sided, a Yellow, and a Magnolia Warbler, about a dozen Redstarts, plus 
the usual Paridae. We also viewed both resident adult and immature Red-headed 
Woodpeckers by the river, Hummingbirds, empids, and loads of other residents. A 
determined Yellow-throated Vireo was still singing. 


We had to tear ourselves away from birding to head to work. I bet, with another 
hour or two, there remained other pockets of migrants to be found. 


Good birding indeed!

Marc
Marc J. Chelemer


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Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Stone Harbor
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 12:00:42 -0400
Hi all ‚Äď

There was a Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Stone Harbor Point this morning. It
was in the nw. corner of the site (the area the Smith's Longspur favored
during late-Jan). It was difficult to see from the outer beach, and was
usually hidden behind dunes and vegetation. Sadly, it seems a reminder is
always necessary-- do not go into any into roped-off areas. Nummy Island
was home to 47 Western Willets, along with Tricolored and Little Blue
Herons, during the AM high tide.

The recent easterlies have put a dent in songbird migration locally, though
I heard there was at least one Mourning Warbler at Higbee this morning, and
I saw an Olive-sided Flycatcher along Reed's Beach Road that almost became
breakfast for a Cooper's Hawk. A weak front will move through on Wednesday,
so it might be worth a look for migrants in your local patch on Thurs/Fri
mornings.


good birding,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Reed's Beach NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com

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Subject: more at the spoils
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 11:35:22 -0400
Sorry, hit the send button there!

Pewees, Willow, and Least Flycatchers.

Canada, Blackburnian, Blue-winged, Magnolia, Yellow Warblers, etc.

Butterfly notes - many Red-spotted Purples.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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Subject: NP dredge spoils - migrants
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 11:32:18 -0400
It was actually quite good this morning! I started in my yard with nothing.
It was even slow at the woods here for a bit. Stuff was already settled in by
the time I arrived. It took effort. I had to work to get on everything deep in
the trees feeding. But ended with 9 species of warbler, and flycatchers.
Some highlights:

Both Caspian and Forster's Terns feeding in the medium tide cove. No Black
Terns - yet!

Sandra Keller

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Subject: Re: Owl in the Box update
From: Lisa Potash <lisapotash6 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 02:29:21 -0400
Jerseybirders,

Happy to report the juv screech owl (Red Jr.) showed up in the yard box 8 days 
after it's first appearance. Looking older, with more feathers growing in on 
the face. 


It's been fascinating watching this owl (I think it's the young of the red/gray 
that used the box in the spring, though didn't raise their brood in it) the 
past 2 days now. I was planning on birding for migrating warblers today, but 
was glad to see him sunning this morning, and decided to enjoy this treat 
instead. 


What a wonderful little creature....I am honored to be able to closely observe 
it's behavior while sticking out of the hole on and off through the day, and 
leaving at nightfall - as it practically "falls' out of the box, down the 
gentle slope to i suspect a low lying branch. 


Last night (pre-dusk) I was watching through the scope (with iphone attached - 
great no shake with the earbud remote) and it started to call before my eyes! 
Have a video of this on flickr link. 


Tonight it "dropped" out and down to the slope again, and an hour later we 
heard it calling. 


So cool to see the owl's pupils get larger and larger as night time 
approaches...one moment it is appearing to practically be sleeping, and the 
next moment, it shoots it's head to one side spying something! (got this video 
to share also) 


Last night (dusk) it intently watched 3 unassuming young robins feeding in the 
grass. I thought the owl was going to fall out of the box...his little head 
turned down at the ground and wings tw 


I'm also taken with just how "different" this juvenile can look! You can tell 
from the pictures (I've taken many, and staying up way too late sorting through 
them) how changeable it's features can be.....that's an owl for you. Sometimes 
the owl reminds me of a cat...take away the beak and replace it with a nose, 
and you'll see what i mean. 


I must admit, that yesterday I got a bit aggressive with the picture taking, 
and moved my scope onto the porch. I had cleaned the windows in the kitchen 
(span of 5 in a row) and then thought, why not get 5' closer, and even clearer 
pictures? Well, I knew better, but did it anyway. When the owl appeared in the 
entrance hole, it must have felt my presence too closely, and I believe it 
showed an aggressive/or scared response. Eyes very wide, and after looking at 
the video/pictures, realized that the bird was clicking its tongue against it's 
beak...I've read this is aggression. Not good. 

After 5 mins I brought my scope back inside, and learned my lesson. I don't 
want to stress this bird out, and need to be respectful at all times by laying 
off the pictures, and sometimes pretending it's not there. 


If you happen to have an owl box, and hear owls, I think you've got a great 
chance of having a visitor!! 


Link to a number of new pictures and videos to flickr if you're interested 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/95291506 AT N07/ 


Good birding,
Lisa Potash
Oakland

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Subject: Allentown - No upland, only goldens :)
From: Lisa Ryan <fleabit AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 23:31:42 -0400
Jason Denesevich and I met this afternoon at Reed's Sod Farm in Allentown to 
look for the Upland Sandpipers that were reported this morning. The most birds 
were in the first dirt field across from the white fence as you head east on 
526 from Sharon Station Rd. Amongst the killdeer were 2 faraway birds that we 
really wanted to be uppies, but decided the were probably pectorals. After 
searching fields up and down the road, we returned there at 6:30 - the birds 
were much closer to the road, and Jason immediately spotted American 
Golden-plovers - we found 4 in all, looking quite spiffy in their little black 
caps. Our uppies did prove to be pecs, but we were quite pleased with our 
consolation bird! 


Lisa Ryan
Mays Landing

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Subject: Re: Glenhurst Meadows - Caution
From: David Emma <demma175 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 23:05:53 -0400
I'm pretty sure dogs are not allowed at Glenhurst meadows at all.  And as
someone who spent the first 30 years of his life finding and photographing
snakes, I can personally assure you that NO species of snake found there or
anywhere within Somerset County for that matter, are harmful.  They should
simply be left alone.


On Mon, Aug 25, 2014 at 8:29 PM, Vince Capp  wrote:

> The only people that have to worry about the Coyotes at Glenhurst are those
> who walk their dogs on the trails there off-leash. A hungry Coyote, or pair
> of Coyotes, doesn't view your dog as a "dog" at all, regardless of its
> breed
> or size. They view it as food- plain and simple. They are generally
> terrified of humans. I have never heard of a pet dog being taken at
> Glenhurst or anywhere else in this area, but it happens every day in areas
> where Coyotes are common. Coyotes are indeed present in the area- make no
> mistake. I would suggest to anyone who insists on bringing a dog to
> Glenhurst or any other of the 'wilder' areas where Coyotes can be found to
> keep it leashed. The presence of a human 4 feet away from the potential
> meal
> is deterrent enough in almost all cases. Leaving the dog at home might
> actually be better, but hey- it's your dog.
>
> Visitors to Glenhurst Meadows should also take comfort in the fact that
> there are no venomous snakes to be found in the woods or meadows there. Nor
> any of the lowland drainage areas within the Passaic River Basin, for that
> matter. There are a few Copperheads way up in some of the rocky hills in
> northern Somerset and Morris counties, but this species totally shuns these
> flood plains altogether. Rattlesnakes were extirpated from the area around
> 100 years ago. The odds of encountering any dangerous snakes at Glenhurst
> is
> just about zero. Visitors should know that any snakes they encounter in the
> meadows, including the very large Black Racers that live there- though
> dramatic in their size, are in fact perfectly harmless. Enjoy them, they
> are
> indeed magnificent- but don't fear them. Leave them be and go find a
> Connecticut Warbler or something.
>
> Vince Capp
> Bound Brook
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of
> Robert AT rgallucci.com
> Sent: Monday, August 25, 2014 5:45 PM
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Glenhurst Meadows - Caution
>
> Hi all,
>
> Quick note regarding Glenhurst. The migration is in full swing and birding
> couldn't be better. Just a couple of notes of friendly caution. My GF
> Cynthia was there this afternoon with Stryder, our Newf mix,  and a wild
> dog, possibly Coyote stalked up on them from the tall grass. I was not
> there, so I cannot confirm if it was a wild dog or Coyote.   I have been
> seeing fresh tracks and scat the past few weeks from bear and coyote, but
> that is not unusual for the area . Most bears and coyotes want nothing to
> do
> with us.
>
> I have ale personally found two very large black snakes on two separate
> days. One by the back bridge and the other on the east trail. I believe
> they
> were either Rat or Racers. Not aggressive, one played dead and the other
> bolted when I accidentally stepped near it (but not as fast as I bolted in
> the opposite direction).
>
> They just cut all the trails in Glenhurst  and there is a great deal of
> dead
> grass cover on the trails. Just want everyone to be safe.
>
> Rob
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>
>
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Subject: Stone Harbor Point - terns
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 20:29:42 -0400
Hello,
 The DVOC trip to the point this morning - we did walk that 2 miles out to 
almost 

the end! The tip is farther out than it was a few years ago. What happened!?
At high tide, numerous species come here to roost. It was impressive! The
comparisons of Royal and Caspian Terns, Common and Forsters was nice. 
I have a few tern questions to look up tomorrow. Juveniles..... they are so
variable! Other highlights were 7 Piping Plovers as we walked back, 
7 Lesser Black-backed Gulls - 6 second summer birds and 1 first summer.
Oystercatchers everywhere when the tide receded again. Western Willets 
at that exposed sandbar at the north end of Nummy's. Once the water finally
receded enough! It's getting harder to find exposed mud flats around Nummy's
anymore. Don't know why! We had a few Tricolored Herons. I heard about the
90 plus roosting! That is some site! 1 Yellow-crowned Night-heron out on an 
exposed mudflat at the north end of Nummy's. 

All the Caspians we got a good look at at Stone Harbor were adults. I always
find that interesting as most that we see at Floodgates are the first-summer 
birds! Different migration and staging patterns interest me. 

I hit a few spots in Cumberland on my way home. Couldn't find a Dowitcher to
save my life! I need Long-billed yet. And no juvenile Snowys. I had wanted 
another 

look and study of them. It seems young Little Blue can show the bright yellow 
lores. 

Just to confuse issues!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

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Subject: Re: Glenhurst Meadows - Caution
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 20:29:06 -0400
The only people that have to worry about the Coyotes at Glenhurst are those
who walk their dogs on the trails there off-leash. A hungry Coyote, or pair
of Coyotes, doesn't view your dog as a "dog" at all, regardless of its breed
or size. They view it as food- plain and simple. They are generally
terrified of humans. I have never heard of a pet dog being taken at
Glenhurst or anywhere else in this area, but it happens every day in areas
where Coyotes are common. Coyotes are indeed present in the area- make no
mistake. I would suggest to anyone who insists on bringing a dog to
Glenhurst or any other of the 'wilder' areas where Coyotes can be found to
keep it leashed. The presence of a human 4 feet away from the potential meal
is deterrent enough in almost all cases. Leaving the dog at home might
actually be better, but hey- it's your dog.  

Visitors to Glenhurst Meadows should also take comfort in the fact that
there are no venomous snakes to be found in the woods or meadows there. Nor
any of the lowland drainage areas within the Passaic River Basin, for that
matter. There are a few Copperheads way up in some of the rocky hills in
northern Somerset and Morris counties, but this species totally shuns these
flood plains altogether. Rattlesnakes were extirpated from the area around
100 years ago. The odds of encountering any dangerous snakes at Glenhurst is
just about zero. Visitors should know that any snakes they encounter in the
meadows, including the very large Black Racers that live there- though
dramatic in their size, are in fact perfectly harmless. Enjoy them, they are
indeed magnificent- but don't fear them. Leave them be and go find a
Connecticut Warbler or something. 

Vince Capp
Bound Brook




-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of
Robert AT rgallucci.com
Sent: Monday, August 25, 2014 5:45 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Glenhurst Meadows - Caution

Hi all,

Quick note regarding Glenhurst. The migration is in full swing and birding
couldn't be better. Just a couple of notes of friendly caution. My GF
Cynthia was there this afternoon with Stryder, our Newf mix,  and a wild
dog, possibly Coyote stalked up on them from the tall grass. I was not
there, so I cannot confirm if it was a wild dog or Coyote.   I have been
seeing fresh tracks and scat the past few weeks from bear and coyote, but
that is not unusual for the area . Most bears and coyotes want nothing to do
with us.

I have ale personally found two very large black snakes on two separate
days. One by the back bridge and the other on the east trail. I believe they
were either Rat or Racers. Not aggressive, one played dead and the other
bolted when I accidentally stepped near it (but not as fast as I bolted in
the opposite direction).

They just cut all the trails in Glenhurst  and there is a great deal of dead
grass cover on the trails. Just want everyone to be safe.

Rob

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Subject: My first 2014 fall warbler higbee trip
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 19:26:32 -0400
Thanks to a local gas station sign that said, $ 3.11, I made may first 2014 
fall warbler trip to Highee Sunday morning and I stunk-up the place as usual. 
Reason ? 


Please copy and paste the following onto Google Earth 38 57 22.06 N 74 57 44 W

When I got to the end of the trail on Field No. 3 and it was time to hit, found 
a plump looking warbler (on the right side of the trail before an old hidden 
walking path no one walks on) with all (what it appeared me) yellowish bottom 
moving around within the very thick and dark brush area. The bird never moved 
higher than about 3 feet above the ground and I lost sight of it. Never got the 
"wish come true" all 360 degree bottom to top and head to tail view. Viewing 
was very brief. Never heard the call note or I had my birding-ear on at the 
time. 


While walking back to the parking lot, tried to convince myself it was a 
Mourning Warbler, a very dull looking one. Then the reality set it in that the 
bird was most likely a Canada based on the "unbroken" white eye ring that I 
remember seeing. Did I say I also saw the entire under part all yellowish ? 
What is the difference between the "faint gray necklace or broken breast band" 
when you see those features in a dense brush for a quick few seconds, 
especially on the 1st year birds ? Nashville ruled out based on behavior and no 
neck pattern, etc. I like to think. 


Trips like this are reason why I do not report to eBird.

Yong Kong
yklitespeed AT comcast.net
Berlin, NJ




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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Glenhurst Meadows - Caution
From: "Robert AT rgallucci.com" <Robert@RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 14:45:25 -0700
Hi all,

Quick note regarding Glenhurst. The migration is in full swing and birding 
couldnít be better. Just a couple of notes of friendly caution. My GF Cynthia 
was there this afternoon with Stryder, our Newf mix, and a wild dog, possibly 
Coyote stalked up on them from the tall grass. I was not there, so I cannot 
confirm if it was a wild dog or Coyote. I have been seeing fresh tracks and 
scat the past few weeks from bear and coyote, but that is not unusual for the 
area . Most bears and coyotes want nothing to do with us. 


I have ale personally found two very large black snakes on two separate days. 
One by the back bridge and the other on the east trail. I believe they were 
either Rat or Racers. Not aggressive, one played dead and the other bolted when 
I accidentally stepped near it (but not as fast as I bolted in the opposite 
direction). 


They just cut all the trails in Glenhurst and there is a great deal of dead 
grass cover on the trails. Just want everyone to be safe. 


Rob

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Following the migration, bit by tiny bit
From: "Robert AT rgallucci.com" <Robert@RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 14:22:18 -0700
Hey Marc,


So glad you got them the Yellow-throated Vireo. It was a great day at
Glenhurst. NJ birding is such a small world. Cynthia and I ran into those
young ladies at Brig a few weeks ago. Great people. Think its time to go
after all these Golden Plovers I am reading about. Best thing about being
a new birder is how easy it is to get life birds.

Rob

On 8/25/14, 5:00 PM, "CHELEMER, MARC J"  wrote:

>Hello, Jerseybirders.
>
>I've been trying to follow the passerine migration in short bits of
>birding over the past few days.  On Friday, I spent a very brief
>interlude at Garret Mountain at the north end of Barbour's Pond, hoping
>for lightning to strike twice in the form of a Mourning Warbler...my
>nemesis bird this year (all years, really).  No luck, although I had a
>heart-stopping moment when I heard a very loud "tschick" that sounded
>like my aural image of the Mourning's call:  a metal match being struck
>along a fine metallic file.  Turned out to be a Northern Waterthrush.
>
>On Saturday afternoon, I visited the south side of Lake Henry in Mahwah,
>awed by Larry Scacchetti's THREE-YEAR search for a Bobwhite in that area
>which recently proved successful.  Knowing that the chances of lightning
>striking twice there were even lower, I just enjoyed the late-day feel of
>the place, with my reward being a close-up Worm-eating Warbler.
>
>Yesterday, I birded Glenhurst Meadows and had a birder's second greatest
>joy:  showing another birder a Lifer.  Two companions I had just met and
>I were heading for the "warbler show" by the river (alerted by Rob
>Gallucci, his wife, and Strider, who were coming back from there) when I
>heard a Yellow-throated Vireo singing (!) nearby.  Neither of my
>companions recognized the song, nor had they ever seen one, so we gave up
>the dash for the Riverside Trail and looked for the YTVI instead.  The
>happiness on the face of one of my companions when, after fifteen
>minutes, we saw the bird in full sunlight made the whole day worthwhile.
>The rest of the morning was enjoyable if subdued; small groups of a few
>warblers (including another Worm-eating and a Chestnut-sided), two Least
>and two Solitary Sandpipers, and numerous Red-headed Woodpeckers.
>Forty-nine species for the morning.
>
>This morning, I tried Chimney Rock at around 7:15.  (NOTE to anyone
>coming from the north:  Voesseler Road is CLOSED from Washington Valley
>all the way down to the entrance to the hawkwatch (Miller Lane),
>requiring a long detour of about 10-15 minutes.  So come up from the
>south at all times.)  It didn't matter; the parking lot was loaded with
>woodpeckers and Pewees, but no small passerines at all until I came back
>at 8:35 from a walk through the woods.  Then, at least there was a
>smattering of Redstarts and one Magnolia.  About half a dozen Red-eyed
>Vireos were seen or heard in the hour and twenty minutes, but no Phillys.
> Maybe it got better after I left.  No Ravens visible at that hour over
>the quarry either.  This seemed to be a place at which I arrived too
>early.
>
>Where to tomorrow, with hopes that more migrants will arrive?  Decisions,
>decisions...
>
>Good birding, everyone.
>
>Marc J. Chelemer
>Tenafly
>
>
>List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Following the migration, bit by tiny bit
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 21:00:11 +0000
Hello, Jerseybirders.

I've been trying to follow the passerine migration in short bits of birding 
over the past few days. On Friday, I spent a very brief interlude at Garret 
Mountain at the north end of Barbour's Pond, hoping for lightning to strike 
twice in the form of a Mourning Warbler...my nemesis bird this year (all years, 
really). No luck, although I had a heart-stopping moment when I heard a very 
loud "tschick" that sounded like my aural image of the Mourning's call: a metal 
match being struck along a fine metallic file. Turned out to be a Northern 
Waterthrush. 


On Saturday afternoon, I visited the south side of Lake Henry in Mahwah, awed 
by Larry Scacchetti's THREE-YEAR search for a Bobwhite in that area which 
recently proved successful. Knowing that the chances of lightning striking 
twice there were even lower, I just enjoyed the late-day feel of the place, 
with my reward being a close-up Worm-eating Warbler. 


Yesterday, I birded Glenhurst Meadows and had a birder's second greatest joy: 
showing another birder a Lifer. Two companions I had just met and I were 
heading for the "warbler show" by the river (alerted by Rob Gallucci, his wife, 
and Strider, who were coming back from there) when I heard a Yellow-throated 
Vireo singing (!) nearby. Neither of my companions recognized the song, nor had 
they ever seen one, so we gave up the dash for the Riverside Trail and looked 
for the YTVI instead. The happiness on the face of one of my companions when, 
after fifteen minutes, we saw the bird in full sunlight made the whole day 
worthwhile. The rest of the morning was enjoyable if subdued; small groups of a 
few warblers (including another Worm-eating and a Chestnut-sided), two Least 
and two Solitary Sandpipers, and numerous Red-headed Woodpeckers. Forty-nine 
species for the morning. 


This morning, I tried Chimney Rock at around 7:15. (NOTE to anyone coming from 
the north: Voesseler Road is CLOSED from Washington Valley all the way down to 
the entrance to the hawkwatch (Miller Lane), requiring a long detour of about 
10-15 minutes. So come up from the south at all times.) It didn't matter; the 
parking lot was loaded with woodpeckers and Pewees, but no small passerines at 
all until I came back at 8:35 from a walk through the woods. Then, at least 
there was a smattering of Redstarts and one Magnolia. About half a dozen 
Red-eyed Vireos were seen or heard in the hour and twenty minutes, but no 
Phillys. Maybe it got better after I left. No Ravens visible at that hour over 
the quarry either. This seemed to be a place at which I arrived too early. 


Where to tomorrow, with hopes that more migrants will arrive? Decisions, 
decisions... 


Good birding, everyone.

Marc J. Chelemer
Tenafly


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (24 Aug 2014) 41 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 14:08:28 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Aug 24, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       4              6              6
Bald Eagle                   3              3              3
Northern Harrier             0              0              0
Sharp-shinned Hawk           3              5              5
Cooper's Hawk                3              3              3
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          1              1              1
Broad-winged Hawk           27             29             29
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             0              1              1
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0

Total:                      41             48             48
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00 
Observation end   time: 17:30:00 
Total observation time: 9.5 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Andy Fedor, Brian Butler, Jim Thomson, Megan Fedor

Visitors:
A.T. SOBOs Faith & Smiley, and NOBO Science Tooth. 
Hikers - 19. 

Nice to see most of the Coon crew back for another fall, and hello to our
missing comrade, PF, up in Mass.


Weather:
heavy fog early clearing to mostly sunny skies w/ increasing clouds later
in afternoon, wind N/NW 4-8 early changing to N/NE 2-6, temp 57-78 deg F. 

Raptor Observations:
BE - 12:25I, 1:05, 2:45A. 

RT - not counted. 

Bird of the Day goes to the immature Broad-winged Hawk with an attitude
that made several passes at the owl decoy.

Additional observers: Scott Wood, Stephen Bagen, Maura Griffin, Rachel
Rojcewicz. Thank you to JT for his extra efforts today in keeping the
count.

Non-raptor Observations:
Raven - 1.
TVs & BVs.
Hummingbird - 6 (including one chasing an imm. Broad-wing and another
diving on the owl decoy 3x!!!).
Common Nighthawk - 2 passing at 10:00 am. 
Cedar Waxwing - 20+.
Scarlet Tanager - 2. 
Blue-gr Gnatcatcher.
Great-horned Owl - one heard calling.
Yellow-thr & Red-eyed Vireos. 
Dark-eyed Junco - 1 (maybe a local breeder). 

7 Warbler spp: Prairie, Blackburnian, Black & White, Blue-winged, Magnolia,
Amer. Redstart, Blk-thr Green. 

Monarch Butterfly - 1. 
Tiger & Black Swallowtails. 

Five-lined Skink - one small juvenile.
Timber Rattlesnake - one seen by BB along trail. 

Bears - mother and three cubs seen by MF, AF, & BH. 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

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Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (23 Aug 2014) 1 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 14:08:47 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Aug 23, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       1              2              2
Bald Eagle                   0              0              0
Northern Harrier             0              0              0
Sharp-shinned Hawk           0              2              2
Cooper's Hawk                0              0              0
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              0              0
Broad-winged Hawk            0              2              2
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             0              1              1
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0

Total:                       1              7              7
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 09:45:00 
Observation end   time: 11:45:00 
Total observation time: 2 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Scott Wood

Weather:
rain, low clouds, wind E light, temp 66 deg F.

Raptor Observations:
Our Bird of the Day was our only bird of the day--an Osprey that was
pumping thru in the rain. 

Non-raptor Observations:
Ovenbird - 3.
Wood Thrush - 1.
Cedar Waxwing - 3. 
Turkey - one heard gobbling.
Red Eft - 8. 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 

Subject: Yard Towhee
From: Sandra Mc <jerseyb AT EMBARQMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 12:20:07 -0400
Hello JBirders : 

An Eastern Towhee had been calling daily in my wooded back yard since the end 
of April, every day. One day in June, I found a female too, so I hope they 
nested. In lat May then into June and July an Indigo Bunting sang daily. It's 
been about five days now that the Towhee song has stopped. They gave me a nice 
long run but have have missed not hearing it. The woods are pretty quiet except 
for the American Crow. 


Sandra McNicol 
Kingwood Township 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: nyt on ravens in Manhattan
From: "Danusha V. Goska" <dgoska AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 11:10:21 -0400
NYT on ravens in Manhattan:


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/25/nyregion/nevermore-ravens-sighted-in-new-york.html?_r=0 


-- 
Danusha V. Goska, PhD
author, "Save Send Delete"
http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Allentown American Golden Plover
From: C J BRINE <brinec11 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 07:34:46 -0700
cBob,

Great tip on RT. 526>Sharon Station Rd. Sod field.

No AMGP, no Baird's but an Upland Sp at 8:45AM(still there at 9:15AM)!

I ran out to loop the 5 sod sites in/around Rts. 539 & 526 starting there†
at about at 7:05AM. Reed at Valero produced nothing, not even Killdeer. Rt, 526
west of Sharon St. Rd. place had nothing. The east of Sharon Rd. "spot" 
initially 

was all Killdeer & lots of them. Finally after a couple passes, a PA birder
came & we got 2 Semi Sp,1 Least Sp, 1 Pectoral and a flyover 
Yellowlegs(Greater?). 


I then met pre-work birder who must have followed me by minutes at Reed/Valero
who said he got 2 Upland Sp immediately at the first dirt area, almost on the 
road. 

We birded Sharon St. X Herbert sod field with loads of Killdeer and ditto at 
Herbert X† 

RT. 539(going for Highstown side now being stripped).

Another pass at Rt. 526 east of Sharon Rd. produced the 1 Uppie among many 
Killdeer. 

It was located right across from the 1st horse turn out shed, 1 st door coming 
from† 

Sharon Rd. †A revisit 30 mins. later had the Uppie exactly there again. I 
almost did† 

go back a 8:45 as the farm folks had started liquid fertilizing and all had 
scooted at 

7:35AM. But for some reason they did 3-4 rows and quit. All Sp's then came †and 
parked 

it just behind the fertized area. Uppie was poking around in & out of a sparse 
grass row 

behind.

Charles


On Sunday, August 24, 2014 9:34 AM, Bob Dodelson  wrote:
 


I saw the American Golden Plover that Greg Prelich found yesterday about 7AM 
today. The Reeds sod farm that the bird was found on is located on route 526. 
It is across the road from the vast White Birch Farm which is surrounded by a 
white fence.. The location is 0.8 miles east of the traffic light at the 
junction of rt. 526 and Sharon Station Rd. The bird was on the upturned dirt 
about 50 yards from the road accompanied by enough Killdeers to satisfy even 
the most avid Killdeerophile. 

I then went to the Reeds farm located about 0.8 miles west of the 
aforementioned traffic light. The Bairds Sandpiper that Mary Delia found a few 
days ago was still present. It was very close to the dirt (gravel) road that 
separates the fields once you turn off of route 526. It dwarfed the nearby 
Least Sandpipers. It is a truly stunning bird with its buff coloration in 
front. It flew off and gave its call. Unfortunately I'm not too good with 
sandpiper flight calls but it seemed to match what Sibley describes. 

There may be 2 Bairds in the area. On Friday about 7PM (thanks to a heads up 
from Keenan Ennis) I had a Bairds (the only bird present) at the Reed sod farm 
in Allentown. I call this the "main" sod farm as the office is located here. 
(Good to ask permission to bird the area). It is across from the Valero gas 
station. Other areas to check while in the neighborhood include Gordon Road (a 
mile or two north of Allentown heading toward Hightstown on 539North) which 
last year was the hot spot with Bairds, Buff-breasted and Upland Sandpipers 
among others. This year it has been birdless thus far. Another mile or 2 north 
on 539 will lead you to Herbert Rd which has been productive this year 

Here is a list of the shorebirds I have seen the past few days.
Killdeer, Semipalmated, Black-bellied and American Golden Plovers.
Least, Semipalmated, Bairds, Solitary and Pectoral Sandpipers and Lesser 
Yellowlegs. 

Horned Larks have been present intermittently at most of the above locations.
Soon the beautiful Buff-breasted Sandpiper should be making an appearance. (On 
9/12/2011 I had 13 on the "main" sod farm!) and remember to keep checking for 
that elusive "mega" tick 

With regard to Gregs Caspian Tern on Lake Assunpink yesterday. For the past few 
years (but not 2014 thus far) I have had 2 Caspian Terns in either June or 
August or both. None of the birds were seen for more that 1 day and I did not 
see them today when I passed by. 

Sorry for the length of this report
Bob Dodelson

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: nighthawk - greenwald park - Camden county
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 21:27:53 -0400
It flew in the late afternoon. I may have flushed it. It was low. 
I am searching for a spot for dusk migrants. This wasn't that!
I'll keep trying the river areas at dusk!

Some migrants - Blue-winged, Redstarts, Chesnut-sided, Gnatcatcher,
Baltimore Orioles. And an empi. It flew off before I had much of a chance
to listen for a call note. Annoying! It went down as Traill's. 

Had 60 or so Swifts overhead for 10 minutes as they headed east to some
roosting location. 

Butterfly notes - a summer azure. Feeding. Not much else in those
cloudy, cool conditions!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Barn Owl article
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 12:15:48 -0400
Jerseybirders,

Since the NJAS eBird portal got hacked, not all of the articles it once
hosted have been re-posted. I was assured that they would be in the near
future (they got to hire a web person) but on the NJAS website instead.

In the meantime, I re-posted my "How To Identify and Find Barn Owl in New
Jersey" article on my blog.


http://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2014/08/24/how-to-identify-and-find-barn-owl-tyto-alba-in-new-jersey/ 


Mike Britt
Bayonne, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: All Things Birds Field Trip to Forsythe (Brigantine) NWR, Saturday, August 23, 2014
From: Peter Bacinski <petebacinski AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 12:00:39 -0400
Dear JerseyBirders:

 

We had an excellent trip to Forsythe (the birders call it Brig) NWR
yesterday with 84 species tallied.  I want to thank associate naturalists
Mike Mandracchia, Rob Fanning and Andy Lamy for their excellent leadership
along the way.  The water levels continue to be extremely high in the refuge
combined with high tide and strong easterly winds holding the water
on-shore, there was little habitat for shorebirds, but we did have many
noteworthy sightings including the following:

 

Green-winged Teal 4

Wild Turkey 1 in the parking lot

Least Bittern 1 seen flying at exit pond

Little Blue Heron 1 Juv.

Tricolored Heron 1

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron 1 Juv.

Bald Eagle 1 adult

Northern Harrier 1

Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 an early arrival

Cooper's Hawk 3

Virginia Rail 1

Willet 1 Eastern

Whimbrel 2

Western Sandpiper 4

Long-billed Dowitcher 4 calling

Least Tern 20

Caspian Tern 6

Black Tern 1 Juv. at exit pond

Purple Martin 2

Savannah Sparrow 1

Saltmarsh Sparrow 4

Seaside Sparrow 4

Blue Grosbeak 2

Bobolink 2

 

Our second trip around as the tide subsided a bit was much improved over the
first.  We had another fun day in the field.

 

Mike Mandracchia and I made a post trip visit to Great Bay Boulevard
Tuckerton and drove down to the bay where we had:

 

Brown Pelican 9

American Oystercatcher 90+

Black Skimmer 100

Royal Tern 8

Western Sandpiper 1

 

Good birding,

 

Pete Bacinski-All Things Birds

NJ Audubon

 

Atlantic Highlands, NJ

 

Embrace Conservation

Aspire to Excellence

Always Smile and Say Thank you

 

All Things Birds Blog:

http://www.njaudubon.org/SectionCenters/SectionAllThingsBirds/AllThingsBirds
Blog.aspx

 

All Things Birds-Pete Bacinski Facebook Page:

 
https://www.facebook.com/AllThingsBirds

 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: ID help needed
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 11:26:46 -0400
Small (4-4.5"), vireo-like bird, black line through eye, found and stayed
in lower level of shrubs and trees.

What caught my attention was the call that sounded much like a baby
chicken, a constant "peep, peep, peep."

Thanks for any help.

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: 8/24 Seawatch: Manasquan Inlet
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 11:04:00 -0400
http://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2014/08/24/seawatching-manasquan-inlet/

Mike Britt
Bayonne

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Allentown American Golden Plover
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 08:34:26 -0500
I saw the American Golden Plover that Greg Prelich found yesterday about 7AM 
today. The Reeds sod farm that the bird was found on is located on route 526. 
It is across the road from the vast White Birch Farm which is surrounded by a 
white fence.. The location is 0.8 miles east of the traffic light at the 
junction of rt. 526 and Sharon Station Rd. The bird was on the upturned dirt 
about 50 yards from the road accompanied by enough Killdeers to satisfy even 
the most avid Killdeerophile. 

I then went to the Reeds farm located about 0.8 miles west of the 
aforementioned traffic light. The Bairds Sandpiper that Mary Delia found a few 
days ago was still present. It was very close to the dirt (gravel) road that 
separates the fields once you turn off of route 526. It dwarfed the nearby 
Least Sandpipers. It is a truly stunning bird with its buff coloration in 
front. It flew off and gave its call. Unfortunately I'm not too good with 
sandpiper flight calls but it seemed to match what Sibley describes. 

There may be 2 Bairds in the area. On Friday about 7PM (thanks to a heads up 
from Keenan Ennis) I had a Bairds (the only bird present) at the Reed sod farm 
in Allentown. I call this the "main" sod farm as the office is located here. 
(Good to ask permission to bird the area). It is across from the Valero gas 
station. Other areas to check while in the neighborhood include Gordon Road (a 
mile or two north of Allentown heading toward Hightstown on 539North) which 
last year was the hot spot with Bairds, Buff-breasted and Upland Sandpipers 
among others. This year it has been birdless thus far. Another mile or 2 north 
on 539 will lead you to Herbert Rd which has been productive this year 

Here is a list of the shorebirds I have seen the past few days.
Killdeer, Semipalmated, Black-bellied and American Golden Plovers.
Least, Semipalmated, Bairds, Solitary and Pectoral Sandpipers and Lesser 
Yellowlegs. 

Horned Larks have been present intermittently at most of the above locations.
Soon the beautiful Buff-breasted Sandpiper should be making an appearance. (On 
9/12/2011 I had 13 on the "main" sod farm!) and remember to keep checking for 
that elusive "mega" tick 

With regard to Gregs Caspian Tern on Lake Assunpink yesterday. For the past few 
years (but not 2014 thus far) I have had 2 Caspian Terns in either June or 
August or both. None of the birds were seen for more that 1 day and I did not 
see them today when I passed by. 

Sorry for the length of this report
Bob Dodelson

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Surprisingly good morning at Higbee
From: Linda Widdop <linda AT TECHIMPACT.ORG>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 01:25:45 +0000
Hi Jersey Birders - Harvey and I had the place to ourselves this morning. Most 
birders watched the weather and went elsewhere. We were pleasantly surprised 
with warbler, kingbird and swallow movement. The Kingbirds really put on a 
show. Hope for more tomorrow. 


Linda

Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Golden-Plovers
From: Ellen DeCarlo <ellendecarlo1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 20:05:25 -0400
I am hoping to try for the Golden-Plovers tomorrow morning but I'm not
familiar with the area or the sod farms.  Does anyone have any directions
or coordinates to get us to the location(s) where they were seen?  Thank
you.

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: My update comment -Elmer Golden Plovers
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 19:29:53 -0400
Thanks to a very prompt private email from a fellow birder, I went through my 
photos. 


Based his comments and ID tips, and my further review of field guides, and 
Sandra's post, all my golden plover pictures "appears" like A. Golden Plovers. 


Isn't JBirds great ?

I can send photos to those who are interested.

Another lesson learned, do not go birding and try to ID birds during work lunch 
break when you only have about 15 min to spare. 


Yong Kong
yklitespeed AT comcast.net
Berlin, NJ


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Owl in the Box
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 19:20:09 -0400
I'd meant to reply to this, but forgot. I was also hearing Screech Owl
calls (from the Rutgers preserve) four or five nights in a row about the
same time as these original postings from a week ago. The bird (birds?) was
always on the move...calling nearby, then progressively farther away, or
vice versa. Sometimes you could barely make out the call through the
Katydid chorus. Don't think I've heard any calls over the past few days,
but then I've been sleeping more soundly as the cool night air continues.

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park


On Sun, Aug 17, 2014 at 8:23 AM, Susie R.  wrote:

> We've been hearing screech owls on and off for about 2 weeks now.  As with
> Jeanine, our screech owl box is still empty.
>
> Susie R.
> Tewksbury/Califon
>
>
> On Sun, Aug 17, 2014 at 7:49 AM, jeanine apgar  wrote:
>
> > There was a screech owl here last night also, first time all summer that
> I
> > heard. And we haven't used air conditioning so I wouldn't have missed
> it. I
> > have a box, but so far no takers.
> >
> > Jeanine
> > Galloway
> >
> > On 8/16/2014 9:57 PM, Lisa Potash wrote:
> >
> >> JerseyBirders,
> >>
> >> Since we've turned off the a.c. and opened the windows, have heard a
> >> screech owl 2 of 3 nights here. I was wondering if it could be a young
> >> screech owl calling for it's parents?
> >>
> >> I'm always keeping an eye out on the owl box, but was at the shore house
> >> today, and got a call from my son saying there was a "new" screech owl
> in
> >> our yard box. This was about 11 am with sunshine. I'm proud to say that
> I
> >> have 23/24 year old sons....and have raised them to appreciate the
> birding
> >> world....they do! They got the scope on him, bins, and even took some
> >> pictures (to send immediately!) to dear old mom!
> >>
> >> The link below takes you to 3 new pictures of a (I'm pretty certain)
> >> juvenile screech owl. A bit strange looking...all the feathers around
> the
> >> head are not fully present. I was a little worried that it could be my
> >> "red" owl that was in the box for a number of weeks, but doesn't seems
> to
> >> be.
> >>
> >> Once I arrived home from the shore, the little critter was visible as
> >> dusk was approaching. Watched him fly quickly out of the box, seemed to
> go
> >> into a nearby tree, but I didnt' want to pursue him, and stress him.
> >> Needless to say, I'm thrilled, and hope to seem more of this owl.
> >>
> >> I'd had lots of enjoyment this march/april with a gray and red screech
> in
> >> the box (observed them together 1 day) then the gray owl for about 5
> days
> >> straight, and the red owl hung around on and off until April 21st.
> >> Unfortunately the pair didn't produce a brood in this box. Since then
> I'd
> >> had a downy woodpecker who would occasionally sit in the box, peering
> out
> >> at dusk.
> >>
> >> I can only hope that this new owl (not sure what color morph it
> >> is...seems it might be red) may be the offspring of the pair?!
> >>
> >> https://www.flickr.com/photos/95291506 AT N07/14941350595/in/photostream/
> >>
> >> Good birding all,
> >> Lisa Potash
> >> Oakland
> >>
> >> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> >> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> >>
> >>
> > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> > How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> >
>
>
>
> --
> "Let us praise the noble *turkey vulture*: No one envies him; he harms
> nobody; and he contemplates our little world from a most serene and noble
> height." Edward Abbey
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: golden plovers
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 19:13:35 -0400
The one we saw really well. The hourglass shape of the brown on the back
of the neck was quite obvious. I recall that field mark from the Pacific at
Johnson Sod. Pacific is straight. The other two were too far. It's good to
try for the more rare species! But a closer look would be required - for me
at least. All three goldens were slimmer bodied and smaller in general than
the Black Bellied Plovers. It's my understanding that the European is the 
size of a Black-bellied, so that rules that out. It was a nice study of the one
at least. Just watch the traffic for those who head there!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Golden Plover, Monmouth County
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 22:46:26 +0000
Greg Prelich, Shari & I went out looking for shorebirds on dirt today. After 
finding nothing of note at Whitesbog (10 Least, 1 Spotted) we hit the sod farms 
in Monmouth County. Gosh, Reed's has a lot of fields in the area. After 
checking 3 fields and coming up absolutely empty, Shari & I went to lunch in 
Allentown. Greg soldiered on and don't you know it, came up with an American 
Golden Plover in yet another Reed's field on CR 526, east of Sharon Station 
Road. 


Later in Assunpink, Greg found a Solitary Sandpiper in a mud puddle in a field 
on Eldridge Rd, just around the corner from the navigation beacon field parking 
lot. 


The most interesting non-shorebird today was a Caspian Tern swooping over 
Assunpink Lake. At first we thought it must be a gull, but full black cap and 
huge red bill proved otherwise. 


Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Elmer Golden Plovers
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 18:05:53 -0400
Can I be a party pooper about the Elmer  Golden Plovers ?

I had the chance to see them Friday during my work lunch break. Saw 5. There
was one Juv that I had to go back (while counting) take a double look to
make sure it was not a Juv Black-bellied. I passed it the first time w/ the
scope.

Rather then being all excited to see these golden plovers, my birding
stomach was only half full and had some self disappointment.  Why ?

I could not rule out as to why those 5 plovers that I observed are not
Pacific or Euro Golden Plovers. Reason for that is obvious, lack of
knowledge. Hoping local pro-expert birder(s) that makes living at birding
will chime in to confirm that they are all A. Golden Plovers as previously 
reported.

 http://www.oceanwanderers.com/NJPGP.html

Yong Kong
yklitespeed AT comcast.net
Berlin, NJ


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Golden Plovers
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 16:28:23 -0400
We had three of the six Golden Plovers around 3:45 at the previously reported
Elmer Sod on Rt. 40. We had not much at Johnson! I still need Golden Plover
for Cumberland! 

Good birding all!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: My first Egret photos of 2014
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 15:55:14 -0400
Haven't taken a decent Great Egret photo since last September. Yesterday I
ran across a very cooperative bird in the pond in Donaldson Park, Middlesex
County. My first Egret photos of the year!

* I really like the vibrant colors in this photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15008497651/

* I had to sneak around quite a bit to get this close-up with my mini-zoom
pocket camera:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15008497611/

* And a slight change of subject. This photo illustrates the small wonders
of nature...the intricacies of a spider web the size of a CD. Quite the
engineering feat. Web is illuminated by a shaft of sunlight for only about
15 minutes a day. Photo taken a few feet from our deck:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/14885381981/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Jarvis Sound, Cape May
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 02:06:30 +0000
Shari & I spent a couple of hours tootling around Jarvis Sound on the Skimmer 
this morning‚ÄĒwhile no boobies or other rarities were found, we did get pretty 
close up looks at a lot of birds. I’ve noticed that birds are a lot less wary 
when approached from water rather than land. Why is that? 


Highlights were Whimbrel, White-rumped Sandpiper, Ruddy Turnstone, a Clapper 
Rail chick, plus lots of oystercatchers. Bonus: the naturalist on board was Sam 
Galick! 


Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Elmer and Johnson Farm area, Cumberland Co.
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 19:17:03 -0400
During work lunch break today, take a ride out to the previously reported David 
Weber's Golden Plover location at west of Elmer at Rt 40 West. They were there. 


Then towards my Coleman Road near Johnson Sod Farm to seek out my prior 
shorebirds. None there. 


Then took the (Shirley Rd, Elmer, NJ 08318, USA, Google Earth it) way back to 
the office. Many Black-bellied there at the sod field, off Rt 77. 


Reason for my writing is, hope this helps others that are visiting this w'nd.

Yong Kong
yklitespeed AT comcast.net
Berlin, NJ




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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: EB Forsythe and Local Migrants
From: Matt Webster <mattweb100 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 12:19:56 -0400
A busy summer, and my job, has swallowed up most of my time thus the reason
I haven't posted in awhile, but I did make it to EB Forsythe NWR yesterday
evening for a run/walk/car ride around the loop. My attempted run was cut
short by the greenheads, so after I eventually retreated to the car, I took
a drive around right before dark. Nothing out of the ordinary, but it was
nice to see:
BLACK TERN
TRICOLORED HERON
LITTLE BLUE HERON
20+ CASPIAN TERNS

The last few days around the house, I've observed a few migrants.
Highlights included:
TENNESSEE WARBLER (earliest date on this migrant for me)
3 CHESTNUT SIDED WARBLERS
Many AMERICAN REDSTARTS, BLACK AND WHITE WARBLERS, and GC FLYCATCHERS
1 YELLOW WARBLER

Butterfly notes: 13 Monarchs around the loop at Brig, Red-banded
Hairstreak, Summer Azure, American Lady, and a few Orange Sulphurs

Matt Webster
Cedarbrook, NJ
mattweb100 AT gmail.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cumberland big year notes
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 11:41:15 -0400
Hello,
 1 Cliff Swallow. Not too be taken for granted down here! Bivalve - Strawberry 
Ave. 

200 or so Tree Swallows there also. In fact, that was the only spot I hit with 
a good sized 

Swallow concentration! The tern show there was good, but no Black Tern. 250 is 
still 

iffy! I didn't do well with shorebirds because of the water levels. Just 
starting to get 

good now. And off to work I go!

Butterfly notes - Single Monarchs scattered around.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Toronto
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 11:40:21 +0000
Jersey Birders -

I will spending a couple of days in Toronto next week. I see from websites that 
there are several hotspots, all of which look potentially interesting. If any 
of you would be willing to share any thoughts or insights regarding where to 
bird, it would be appreciated. 


Please reply off-line.

Steven

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Grasspipers: Elmer, Coomb's, & Johnson Sod Farms
From: David Weber <weberbirding AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 20:52:52 -0400
Hi all,

As Yong already said, I had a decent day today to start off the
"Grasspiper" season around Johnson Sod Farm.  Although, to be honest, I had
no grass-pipers, only Sod-Plovers.  Following Sandra's report earlier this
morning of some activity over at Coomb's Sod Farm (Salem Co.), I decided to
go out and check the area.

Because of an eBird report by Jack Mahon from west of Elmer yesterday, I
decided to start by going to check out that area.  As luck would have it,
Jack's BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS were there, as were KILLDEER and SEMIPALMATED
PLOVERS, but also an early surprise: three AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVERS.  A
later report from SNJBIRDS said there were five.  For those who want to go
look, this is a small patch of sod that is west of Elmer on Rt. 40.  It's
on the south side, so you have to be going east on 40 in order to pull over
and scan the sod.  Pull over as far as you can!

A quick check of Coomb's Sod Farm yielded some more Black-bellied Plovers
and some distant plovers in the plowed up part (probably Semipalmated).
 Then a check of Johnson Sod Farm yielded more Black-bellied Plovers and
Killdeer (in the plowed area).  Both places had some HORNED LARK.

With all of these plovers around, it seems the fall sod farm season has
begun.  Best of luck with everyone's searches!

Good birding,
David Weber

P.S.  For those who bird Johnson Sod Farm, please remember that almost all
of the sod is in CUMBERLAND COUNTY, not Salem County.  Only the tiniest bit
on the east side is in Salem.  Please use the hotspot Johnson Sod Farm
(Cumberland Co.) if you use eBird, unless you are 100% certain you are in
Salem.  Please see

http://www.maptechnica.com/us-county-boundary-map/county/Salem/state/NJ/countyid/34033 

for a map of Salem's boundaries.

-- 


*David Jonas WeberCornell University, Class of 2016Natural Resources,
Applied Ecology*
*weberbirding AT gmail.com *

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Coleman Road near Johnson Sod Farm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 19:21:15 -0400
Fantastic find by David Webber at west of Elmer, 3 Golden Plovers. Main reason 
for my writing is to support Sandra's kind and continue effort to keep us 
informed as to the status of grasspipers at Johnson Farm area. 

I too swung by the Johnson Farm during lunch but as Sandra had pointed out, the 
sod and dirt fields were devoid of grassland birds. 


By chance turned into (Coleman Rd, Elmer, NJ 08318, USA- Google Earth it !!) 
from Rt 77. At the end of Coleman Road (at the intersection of Canhouse Road), 
I observed about a dozen or so of Least Sandpipers (as far as I could tell thru 
the scope view) and Semipalmated Plovers. Also, several killdeer mixed in. 


Habitat is fresh plowed field with no vegetation, all dark brown top soil. When 
I visited around noon, these birds may have been attracted to the area since 
the field was being sprayed for irrigation. 


Based on David's find, let's hope that my observation today is also a good 
indication for this coming weekend for some grassland birds to finally show up 
at the Johnson Farm area.. Perhaps one of those today's Least was "that" 
special grasspiper, which I was unable to make a positive ID. Have one or two 
interesting photos of Least I am questioning. Let me know if you are 
interested. 


Yong Kong
yklitespeed AT comcast.net
Berlin, NJ




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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Five Highland Park turkeys (photo)...ties my NJ yard bird record
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 17:21:49 -0400
Late this afternoon I looked out the window and saw five Wild Turkeys.
Looked like a hen turkey with four nearly grown poults. Haven't had that
many turkeys as yard birds since February 2013. The most I've seen at one
time recently is two turkeys.

I managed to snap a darkish documentary photo of the hen leading three of
the poults. The fourth was just out of camera range to the left:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/14806646038/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Marbled Godwit Sedge Islands
From: greg prelich <gprelich AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 15:46:05 -0400
Larry Zirlin and I spent a great morning canoeing the sedge islands at
Island Beach State Park. Highlights: 1 Marbled Godwit, 30 Brown Pelicans, 3
Caspian Terns, 46 Royal Terns, 1 immature Yellow-crowned Night-heron, 2
Little Blue Herons, 1 Tri-colored Heron, 1 Red Knot and 11 species of
shorebirds.  Also 1 ray with ~3 ft wingspan 'flew' under the boat.

Greg Prelich
http://birdquiz.net

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: is Bayonne King Rail still around?
From: karen swaine <karmaya AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 14:48:22 -0400
help! 


we'd love to see this king rail, so if anyone has seen the rail recently 
(after monday's post)  please post the info as to where and what time of 
day...  better yet, you may send it to me personally! thankyou!


karen swaine, highland park


and other news ... hummer has been visiting the cardinal flowers and 
trumpet vine blooms, & one day last week i was in front garden watering 
afew sad plants (so dry lately) & had just sprayed the hummer feeder 
also, and suddenly there it was at the feeder.  i stood still as it went 
to each opening - the flew over to my bright red shirt checking me out.. 
almost landing on my head.. what a thrill.  a day later i watched as a 
hummer chased a chickadee around and out of the yard.. 


[as i was typing this post, a hummer came to the flowers again... & i'm 
smiling]


two days ago heard a baltimore oriole in back but it was quickly moving 
south towards donaldson park and the river and i never saw it. a bright 
orange plastic ribbon that the construction crews tied to the fence 
right at the foot of our backyard i flapping in athe breeze,  & thought 
that might help attract a B.O - plus the orange oriole feeder has a 1/2 
orange in it; but i've never seen an oriole at that feeder. last yr 
catbirds ate grape jelly i put in  -- but this summer- nothing.  & 
everything is so different out back because of the change in the 
environment.   i don't want to think about all the critters that might 
have had their homes destroyed when every tree out back was taken down - 
along with insects et al in the trees that the birds eat.. so i am 
feeding the birds (yes i know, it's summer, there's plenty around in 
other gardens also,  but they are probably traumatized at this point and 
i want them to be imprinted on OUR garden! :o)


the goldfinches are eating the coneflowers, and i saw one eating 
goldenrod buds! 


downies & redbellies are visiting the thistle feeder in which we've been 
extravagantly using a mix of very finely chopped sunflower seed along 
with the thistle... i've watched to see if they are enlarging the 
openings, but i think not... interesting.


ok... haven't posted for a while, so this one is longer than it should 
be!
doing a rain dance,
karen, highland park

On Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 06:48 PM, John Beetham wrote:

> The King Rail at the Bayonne Golf Course was briefly visible between 
> 9:30
> and 10 this morning. It appeared around the same spot where others 
> have
> reported it: on the mudflats below the long green bridge near the 
> sunken
> barge.
>
> Other sightings included two Yellow-crowned Night Herons, one adult 
> and one
> immature.
>
> John Beetham
> Highland Park, NJ
>
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: grasspipers - salem county
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 11:48:45 -0400
Hello,
 As in Johnson Sod in Cumberland wad devoid of birds yet again! Did have 
numerous 

Horned Larks there.
 Coombs sod just north of Johnson had a huge mixed flock. I came back 30 
minutes 

later and nothing. That's how quick these birds can go! For those down there 
searching, 

keep in mind. Also a field at mile 16 - the west side of 77. Looks good for 
Uppies. I couldn't 

scan long as had to get home.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Evening herons at Stone Harbor
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 23:17:45 -0400
Hi all ‚Äď

I joined Mike Crewe, Lillian Armstrong, and Chris & Glen Davis to conduct a
survey of herons and egrets flying into the Gull Island area this evening.
To do this, we watched from the footbridge at Scotch Bonnet, along Stone
Harbor Boulevard. Gull Island, along with a couple other nearby sites, host
a large number of colonial wading birds during the summer. At this point in
the season, "evening roost flights" are likely enhanced by both the current
year's offspring and postbreeding birds from the south.

We counted arriving birds in 15-minute intervals, starting 2 hours before
sunset and continuing until 15 minutes after sunset. The majority of the
birds we counted came from the west, and were most likely commuting back
from the Delaware Bayshore marshes (mainly Snowy Egret, Great Egret, and
Glossy Ibis). Many of the Tricolored and Little Blue Herons arrived from
the north and south, suggesting that most of them remained in the Atlantic
Coast marshes. The biggest 15-minute segment, 7:19 to 7:34pm, brought 498
arrivals (347 of them Snowy Egrets).

Included in our total of 2,078 birds were:
597 Great Egrets
1,081 Snowy Egrets
39 Little Blue Herons
86 Tricolored Herons (92 counted from Wetlands Institute on Tuesday eve)
22 Black-crowned Night-Herons (leaving roosts)
1 Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (leaving roost; 13 at Wetlands Institute on
Monday eve)
252 Glossy Ibises

Other birds of note included a Whimbrel, 2 Gull-billed Terns, and 300+
Forster's Terns.

For folks who want to see this: drive about halfway out Stone Harbor Blvd,
and you'll come to a small bridge at the road's only curve. Park in the
pull-out on the north side of the road and walk out to a wooden footbridge,
scanning to the north to view the concentration sites and arriving birds. A
scope is necessary. I believe that the 'Skimmer' boat runs a trip from the
Wetlands Institute on Wednesday evenings, which may get you closer to these
areas.


good birding,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Reed's Beach NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: owls
From: "cwsg1 AT excite.com" <cwsg1@EXCITE.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 23:13:11 -0400
heard some funky GHO calls tonight around 8pm
 
C. Wyluda
Pennington

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Smithsonian needs help transcribing field notes
From: Peggy Cadigan <peggycadigan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 20:26:09 -0400
I thought this project might be of interest to list members.

> The Smithsonian is looking for volunteers to help them transcribe thousands 
of hand-written documents. 


Among the projects: 
The field notebooks of the Virginia bird-watcher James W. Eike,
The field notes of Martin Moynihan who traveled along the western edge of South 
America to observe gulls from Peru south to Chile. The Smithsonian states: "His 
field notes reflect his attention to detail including time of day, changes of 
appearance, notations of the birdsí songs , sketches and other annotations. 
Please join us in transcribing his firsthand observations and discover some of 
the similarities and differences through the eyes of this important tropical 
naturalist." 


To learn how to volunteer: https://transcription.si.edu/about

For more information on these projects: 
https://transcription.si.edu/browse?filter=collection%3A6 



Peggy Cadigan, Librarian
Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ.





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> How to report NJ bird sightings: 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: crow with broken wing
From: Joan and Bob <aufderhar AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 21:23:33 +0000
The young crow seems perky and had an uneventful ride to Toms River where he is 
in the capable hands of 


Donald Bonica, Toms River Avian Care, 1916 Kenilworth Court, Toms River NJ 
08753 

732-255-9270 
Birds: Raptors, passerines, wading birds, waterfowl, sea birds 

Thanks to all for your suggestions. 




Joan 

Fair Haven 




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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Keep an eye out for banded Ospreys in South Jersey
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 22:23:34 -0400
Forwarding information on a recent project by Conserve Wildlife; keep an
eye out for banded Ospreys this fall!

Hey,

I'm honored to inform you about a new project in New Jersey
where young ospreys are being banded with an auxiliary band,
a red alpha-numeric band. Ospreys should be dispersing and
migrating to their wintering areas soon, so I'm busy working
on getting the word out. Hopefully we'll get some
re-sightings on them before they get to their wintering
areas, where they'll be for the next two years.

Hopefully you'll join the group!! You can learn more on our
website:
http://www.conservewildlifenj.org/protecting/projects/redband/

Feel free to invite other avian/wildlife photographers to
join the group, especially those to the south along the
Atlantic Flyway.

Happy Osprey Watching! -Ben

To find out more about this group and to accept or decline
this invitation, click here:

https://www.flickr.com/groups/2732471 AT N22/

Good birding,

Sam

-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: nighthawks - local notes
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 21:18:06 -0400
None tonight! I was a mile from my house - scanned from the parking lot
at Crows Woods in Haddonfield. Not having any success here! Will try 
again on NW winds some night. This area looked so perfect! Even a soccer
game going on - with lights. I had a couple bats!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Monarch butterfly question (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:52:24 -0400
As nearly as I can recollect, this photo might well depict the last Monarch
I've seen in NJ:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/7854095740/ (Taken at
Negri-Nepote in July 2012)

Do I just happen to hang out in the wrong areas here in NJ, or are Monarchs
becoming less common here?

Thanks!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Finderne Wetlands Snowy Egret Update-
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:25:15 -0400
Hi all-

After looking more closely at the many photos I took today, and with a
little nudging from Jeff- we've readily agreed that there were in fact two
Snowy Egrets at Finderne today- not the one bird as I had previously stated.
If you look closely at the photos I posted- you will see the difference in
the lores and bill between the two birds. I will post a shot of both birds
together in one frame shortly- I know I have a two-fer in there worth
sharing. The rest of my earlier post stands. 

 Sorry for the confusion, but seeing two Snowies in Somerset County is
better than one any day. Thanks to Jeff Ellerbusch for helping me see both
the differences and similarities more clearly. If I had a hat I'd tip it. 

 

Good birding

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 

 

 

 



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Finderne Wetlands: Little Blue Heron, Glossy Ibis, and a Snowy Egret, too!
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 13:31:10 -0400
Hi, Y'all

I went to Finderne Wetlands this morning at around 7 AM in the hopes of
relocating the previously reported Little Blue Heron and Glossy Ibis. I
bumped into David Bernstein and Jeff Ellerbusch there, and quite frankly I
don't think any of us were quite prepared for the wild spectacle of wading
birds that we would encounter there. There were a total of 22 Great Egrets
present, 4-5 Great Blue Herons, a Black-crowned Night Heron, a Green Heron,
a Little Blue Heron, a Glossy Ibis, and an immature Snowy Egret that joined
the group after we had been there for a while. At one point, there was 10-12
Great Egrets, a Great Blue, the Snowy and the Glossy all foraging together
in the same little puddle that was no more than 40 feet in diameter. It was
quite a sight, indeed. The whole time the immature Great Blue present was
trying exert dominance over the group, and claim possession of the puddle-
that didn't really work out so well. 

 It was a heck of a thing to see- in Somerset County of all places! One of
those exceptional moments in birding. I was glad that David and Jeff got to
enjoy it as well. None of us expected to see seven species of wading birds
in here this morning. 

 Here's a link to a few photos of the morning's leggy superstars;

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 

Great Birding!!

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: crow needs help
From: Peggy Cadigan <1bookworm AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 13:02:53 -0400
According to the list of licensed NJ Wildlife Rehabilitators, Donald Bonica in 
Toms River isn't too far from you. 732-255-9270. 


Full list: 
http://www.njfishandwildlife.com/pdf/rehab_list.pdf

Peggy Cadigan
Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 19, 2014, at 12:12 PM, Joan and Bob  wrote:
> 
> I just captured a (young?) crow with a broken wing ...does anybody know the 
closet bird rehab to me. I'm in Fair Haven. 

> Should I give it water?  Food? what kind? 
>   
> Thanks, 
> Joan 
>   
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: crow needs help
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 12:25:56 -0400
Hereís the link to the Raptor Trust in Millington. Call them for more 
information. 


http://theraptortrust.org/the-birds/injured/


Diane Louie
Madison



On Aug 19, 2014, at 12:12 PM, Joan and Bob  wrote:

> I just captured a (young?) crow with a broken wing ...does anybody know the 
closet bird rehab to me. I'm in Fair Haven. 

> Should I give it water?  Food? what kind? 
>   
> Thanks, 
> Joan 
>   
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: crow needs help
From: Joan and Bob <aufderhar AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:12:05 +0000
I just captured a (young?) crow with a broken wing ...does anybody know the 
closet bird rehab to me. I'm in Fair Haven. 

Should I give it water?  Food? what kind? 
  
Thanks, 
Joan 
  

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Pine Park
From: James OBrien <jphillipobrien AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 20:49:07 -0400
Its been an interesting few days in the area...getting lots of blue grossbeak 
along any open meadow or powerline cuts I find. 

https://flic.kr/p/ouQ83p
In the Park I had all type of flycatcher today. Going from the Sibley's Birds I 
think this is an acadian, 

https://flic.kr/p/oLj91E
and this a willow.
https://flic.kr/p/oN54mv
Also had kingbird, great crested, peewee, cedar waxwing and what I think is a 
juvenile phoebe. 

https://flic.kr/p/ovRecH
The bluebird family is doing very well, had them all bathing together at the 
ballfields. Parents were copulating so Im thinking they will double clutch. 

https://flic.kr/p/ovRgUN
Family of wood ducks is doing great also.
https://flic.kr/p/oNjhjh
Tried for nighthawks today but no luck.

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: My powerline birds
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 19:34:10 -0400
After getting home from work and sending my photos of the White-face Ibis taken 
at Brig on Sunday to a NJ birder, who had requested it, took my usual walk to 
the power line w/ the dogs. Will anyone believe me that I had four Eastern 
Wood-Pewees in one bin view and there were at least two more within the tiny 
dead pine stand next to the power line ? Lots of late afternoon sun at this 
location. Also, there was an Empid, that was, unlike the pewees, perched on a 
branch low to the ground, facing scrub-shrub habitat that is typical of power 
line habitat. So it makes 5 birds in one bin view. 


Unlike the pewees who usually return to the same dead branch after taking a 
flight, this Empid took flight but landed on other branch then out of sight. 
Help me Id this Empid as I can send the photo. 


As far as my photos of the White-face Ibis, they are poor quality, but in my 
opinion, they are most useful to birders like me. Reason ? That is how most of 
us see birds in reality, not those shown on the field guides. 


Now my real reason for writing. So excited to see Brian Hardiman posting about 
the "Coon". I highly recommend visiting those hawk counters and stay late in 
the afternoon to view those late flying raptors and get to know those guys 
after the count is over. I did not make it last year due to the price of 
petrol. 


Yong Kong
yklitespeed AT comcast.net
Berlin, NJ




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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bayonne King Rail
From: John Beetham <john.beetham AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 18:48:34 -0400
The King Rail at the Bayonne Golf Course was briefly visible between 9:30
and 10 this morning. It appeared around the same spot where others have
reported it: on the mudflats below the long green bridge near the sunken
barge.

Other sightings included two Yellow-crowned Night Herons, one adult and one
immature.

John Beetham
Highland Park, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Marbled Godwit - Cumberland
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 17:45:02 -0400
Hello,
 Marilyn and I got to East Point too late - the flight had stopped. Doesn't 

last long in August! I was a little surprised that we didn't track down much
in the way of feeding flocks. They must have dispersed far and wide! 
Gnatcatchers 

and Baltimore Orioles were the main migrants we saw. I had changed my mind
about the migrants yesterday at Wheelabrator. After an email from a fellow
Jerseybirder. They were "true" migrants so to speak. Had many again today
at East Point! 
     A slow passerine day meant off to other areas early. 1 Marbled Godwit
feeding on an exposed sandbar at Moore's Beach was a needed county
big year bird! Worth the walk south. Or se - whatever. Many Caspian Terns,
that was different from last time. One eastern willet. 2 western. Red knots
increased from last week. Etc.
     We had one of those intriguing Snowy Egrets again. Bill structure on the
Little Blue end, yet bright yellow lores like an adult Snowy. I am just 
assuming 

a Snowy, yet it did come up recently on Id frontiers. Hybrid was suggested.
Very interesting.

250 is still within reach - but some needed passerine migrants would have 
helped! 

Marilyn is embedding the Godwit pic into the ebird report. I shared with 
her after I completed it. Then she shares it back to me. This sharing is
much more time efficient than individual reports. After everything is shared,
then we just edit our copies - theres always a couple species seen by one
and not the other!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Piping plovers having worst year since receiving federal 'threatened' status - Egg Harbor Township - pressofAtlanticCity.com Mobile
From: Stuart and Wendy <weluvowls AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:34:17 -0400
a link to an article of interest

Wendy Malmid
Monroe twp, NJ



http://m.pressofatlanticcity.com/communities/eht/piping-plovers-having-worst-year-since-receiving-federal-threatened-status/article_9c95c36e-24c3-11e4-8e4c-0019bb2963f4.html?mode=jqm 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: A Little Night Musing
From: William Dix <williamdix AT MSN.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 13:56:01 -0400
I must not have been sleeping soundly. Through my open window at around 2:30 AM 
I heard the whinny of an Eastern Screech-Owl and the alarm barks of a Red Fox. 
I've heard each one individually before, but not both at the same time. Just a 
coincidence? Is/was there any sort of interaction between them? Then just 
before dawn I enjoyed the hooting of a Great Horned Owl. It's been many years 
since I've heard him in the neighborhood. There was fox scat in the driveway 
when I went to fetch the newspaper. 

A patch of woods has recently been cleared about 0.4 miles down the road, to 
make way for a new house. I wonder if any of this could be the result of 
habitat disturbance. 



Bill Dix   
Princeton

http://billdix.smugmug.com

 		 	   		  
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (16 Aug 2014) 3 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 11:08:54 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Aug 16, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       0              1              1
Bald Eagle                   0              0              0
Northern Harrier             0              0              0
Sharp-shinned Hawk           2              2              2
Cooper's Hawk                0              0              0
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              0              0
Broad-winged Hawk            1              2              2
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             0              1              1
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0

Total:                       3              6              6
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 12:30:00 
Observation end   time: 15:30:00 
Total observation time: 3 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        

Visitors:
Lou Espinosa, Solangel Velez, and Danielle Espinosa from Elizabeth,
NJ--thanks for your visit and interest in the hawk migration...make sure
you come back later this fall when the hawks are flying!

Hikers - 11, including A.T. NOBO (Appalachian Trail Northbounder) "Ketchup"
(or was it "Catch Up"?) who became an official observer by spotting a
Turkey Vulture .  Good job!


Good to be back on top for another fall season. Looking forward to the
birds, the Irregulars, and the anticipation of what the migration will
bring...BH


Weather:
mostly to partly cloudy, wind SW 0-8, temp low 70s. 

Raptor Observations:
BE - 2 immatures seen together, not counted. 
RT - 1 local floating around.
AK - 1 male in flight w/ prey, perched and fed. Stayed around all
afternoon, not counted.  

Bird of the Day was the male Kestrel--a beautiful, beautiful bird. 

Non-raptor Observations:
Tree, Barn, Bank, & Cliff Swallows, Purple Martins. 
Wood Thrush, Blue-gr Gnatcatcher, Red-eyed Vireo, Scarlet Tanager, E. Wood
Pewee, House Wren, Amer. Golfinch. 
Turkey Vultures. 

Tiger Swallowtails.  

No Ravens seen or heard and no Black Vultures seen. 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 

Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (15 Aug 2014) 3 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 10:08:33 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Aug 15, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       1              1              1
Bald Eagle                   0              0              0
Northern Harrier             0              0              0
Sharp-shinned Hawk           0              0              0
Cooper's Hawk                0              0              0
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              0              0
Broad-winged Hawk            1              1              1
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             1              1              1
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0

Total:                       3              3              3
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 12:45:00 
Observation end   time: 16:30:00 
Total observation time: 3.75 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Patrick Keelen

Weather:
mostly cloudy, wind NW 3-9, temp 62 deg F. 

Raptor Observations:
BE - 4 individuals seen but not counted.  An immature Bald Eagle earned
Bird of the Day with its "better viewed without bins" look that it gave. 

Non-raptor Observations:
Ravens - 5.
Cedar Waxwings.
Chimney Swifts. 

Thank you to PK for making the long hike and conducting the first count of
the new season. 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardiman AT nac.net)

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 

Subject: Epic Fail...then all quiet
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT att.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 14:19:16 +0000
Jerseybirders,

On Sunday, borrowing from the playbook written by my two hirsute birding 
buddies, I went "under the wire" and took a very long walk to the end of a very 
long barrier island to look for large shorebirds with very long bills. The 
four-hour round trip was not successful in that regard; I guess the birds must 
move back and forth between the aforementioned barrier island and the other 
islands and inlets across the channel. It looks like one has to be there nearly 
every day doing research, and likely in a boat. Consolation was provided by 
four Piping Plovers, standing out clearly against a mudflats about halfway down 
the peninsula, and six Brown Pelicans frolicking between said barrier island 
and the mainland. Oystercatchers are clearly on the move; on one sandbar, I saw 
nineteen of them! And one flock of Semipalmated Plovers numbered at least 150. 
Nice. 


This morning before work, I spent an hour at Glenhurst Meadows, but it was very 
quiet. One Black-and-White Warbler, two Redstarts, and three Canada Warblers 
were the only Parulidae other than the numerous resident Yellowthroats I was 
able to see or hear in the short time I had. I ran into Vince Capp and two 
other birders; they also confirmed that the area had been devoid of migrants up 
to that point on their walk as well. 


Patience

Marc J. Chelemer

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Assunpink Cuckoos & Work-eating
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 08:51:27 -0500
This AM by the farmhouse with the fruit stand within the WMA I had Black-billed 
Cuckoo and Worm-eating Warbler (first time I've ever seen this bird at 
Assunpink). 

By the boat lunch area and surrounding fields of Stone Tavern Lake I had 
Yellow-billed Cuckoo and some other nice birds including Rose-breasted & Blue 
Grosbeaks, Indigo Bunting, Baltimore Oriole, Ruby-throated Hummingbird & Field 
Sparrows 

The Herbert Rd and Sharon Stn Rd sod farms have lots of Killdeer but the only 
new bird since my last posting is Horned Larks 

Bob Dodelson

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: mystery bird I asked about in spring may be a Baltimore Oriole
From: "Danusha V. Goska" <dgoska AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 07:34:39 -0400
Hey, friends.

Back in spring i was housesitting in a wooded spot in Morris County
and I kept hearing this repetitive song that consistently began with
two notes that sound nothing so much as like "boo bee" to me.

I heard the song a million times, throughout the day. Drove me nuts.

I am deaf in one ear so I can't locate sound. I saw a lot of birds but
I couldn't associate this song with any of the birds I saw.

A couple of kind, helpful people sent me private messages saying it
was probably a Baltimore oriole and I was highly offended, as I know
Baltimore orioles well. I always hear them in spring before I see
them, and I rejoice when I hear them, because they are a sign of
spring and very colorful birds.

Also I love them because they eat tent caterpillars and I must confess
to being thoroughly creeped out by tent caterpillars.

I am at the same house now and I am hearing not the entire song but
the initial "boo bee" phrase that the spring bird ALWAYS began its
song with, to the point of making me crazy.

At the same time I heard this distinctive "boo bee" I saw a Baltimore
oriole and heard its rattle, so I have to guess they are the same
bird.

I just went, again, to the Cornell page for the Baltimore oriole and
listened to all of their recordings and while there is one song that
contains something like this bird's "boo bee" phrase, there is nothing
that matches it exactly. So I'm not completely crazy.

Thank you again, normally in Paterson, this morning in Morris County.
-- 
Danusha V. Goska, PhD
author, "Save Send Delete"
http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Nighthawks this evening...
From: Michael Hodanish <luv2howl AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 22:14:12 -0400
Observed approximately 50-60 common nighthawks this evening, between 6:30 &
8PM, circling back and forth above our farm and adjacent Colliers Mills.
They were about 60 yards up, hawking some kind of insects  based upon their
movements.  Also mixed in were a few purple martins and one unidentified
gull.

Mike Hodanish
Howling Woods Farm
www.howlingwoods.org
Jackson, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: My retun trip to Brig
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 21:25:50 -0400
I went back to Brig today for a very specific intent of searching for Least 
Sandpipers with the hope that I would find one with the same or similar plumage 
with the one I had the day before for a live view and study. And I did. 


Found about 8 or so. one at the tern island where Caspian terns have been 
sighted. The rest at the end of the dike drive to the right, in that tidal 
creek channel, during the high tide. 


The Least I observed today behaved as they should have and as described on 
several field guides. Along the high tide line with crouched position feeding. 
All expected ID features and habitat and behavior. 


However, the Least I observed the day before was all standing all tall and 
proud, and feeding in grass habitat, all by itself. 


Very remote chance I may burn all my shorebird field guides in my woodstove 
this winter, except Pete Dunne's book, of course. 


On bright side, I did get to see a White-faced Ibis and a beautiful Juv N. 
Harrier after the dog leg. Photo for those who are interested. 


Yong Kong
yklitespeed AT comcast.net
Berlin, NJ


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Wheelabrator - migrants - Prothonotary
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 19:08:43 -0400
An interesting afternoon with a Redstart, a couple Gnatcatchers, 4 male
Baltimore Orioles, and a Prothonotary! Strange migrants - I think fairly local
breeders moving somewhat. I was looking for Mourning with no success.
Hopefully Monday in Cumberland!

Butterfly notes - a good variety. Zabulon Skippers being the most
numerous.

Dragonfly notes - Common Whitetails everywhere.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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