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Updated on Friday, October 31 at 09:00 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Red-naped Sapsucker,©Shawneen Finnegan

31 Oct HSR: Raccoon Ridge (30 Oct 2014) 319 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
31 Oct HSR: Raccoon Ridge (27 Oct 2014) 97 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
31 Oct South Branch WMA Today- Winter Birding [Vince Capp ]
31 Oct Sandy Hook today; trip tomorrow at hook cancelled [Scott Barnes ]
31 Oct Re: Hawkwatching par excellence [Fairfax Hutter ]
31 Oct Re: bird radar [Susan Garretsonfriedman ]
31 Oct Hawkwatching par excellence ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
30 Oct bird radar [Sandra Keller ]
31 Oct Possible Union Co. Raven breeding [ ]
30 Oct Lark Sparrow in Bergen County! [Larry scacchetti ]
30 Oct on the lack of Purple finches in my yard [Sandra Keller ]
30 Oct Interesting sparrow profile photo ["B.G. Sloan" ]
30 Oct Re: Reading Jersey Bird E-Mails in a RSS Reader [Phil Jeffrey ]
30 Oct Re: Reading Jersey Bird E-Mails in a RSS Reader ["Jim O'Malley" ]
30 Oct White-winged Dove continues, Cape May County [Sam Galick ]
29 Oct Reading Jersey Bird E-Mails in a RSS Reader [Mike Lyncheski ]
29 Oct Very late first fall warbler (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
29 Oct HSR: Raccoon Ridge (26 Oct 2014) 306 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
29 Oct Ash-throated Flycatcher, Cape May County [Sam Galick ]
29 Oct Iceland presentation [Philip Witt ]
29 Oct Bayshore Dr. Barnegat [Karmela ]
29 Oct Assunpink Purple Finches [Bob Dodelson ]
28 Oct HSR: Raccoon Ridge (25 Oct 2014) 48 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
28 Oct HSR: Raccoon Ridge (24 Oct 2014) 256 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
28 Oct Great Swamp NWR, Tuesday, October 28: [Peter Bacinski ]
28 Oct Chickadees again [Sandra Keller ]
28 Oct Spruce Run [John Bloomfield ]
28 Oct Fwd: Birds at the feeders [Peter Eschmann ]
28 Oct Re: Le Conte's Sparrow at Battery Kingman [Cliff Miller ]
28 Oct Four Vesper Saprrows at Cold Brook Reserve [Vince Capp ]
28 Oct Re: Le Conte's Sparrow at Battery Kingman [Cliff Miller ]
28 Oct Glenhurst ["Albert, Steven" ]
28 Oct chickadees [Laura Berlik ]
28 Oct Re: chickadee question [Tom Brown ]
28 Oct Re: chickadee question [Tom Bailey ]
28 Oct Re: chickadee question ["B.G. Sloan" ]
28 Oct Re: chickadee question [C J BRINE ]
28 Oct Le Conte's Sparrow at Battery Kingman [Cliff Miller ]
28 Oct Re: Essex County sandhill cranes [C J BRINE ]
28 Oct Re: chickadee question [C J BRINE ]
28 Oct Re: chickadee question ["B.G. Sloan" ]
28 Oct Re: Essex County sandhill cranes [Vince Capp ]
28 Oct chickadee question [Sandra Keller ]
28 Oct Nice morning at Great Swamp ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
28 Oct Glennhurst meadow Saturday [Susan Garretsonfriedman ]
28 Oct Essex County sandhill cranes [Rick Wright ]
27 Oct Ocean Terminal, Bayonne [Michael Britt ]
27 Oct The beauty of common birds (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
27 Oct Cumberland - Siskins and a Vesper Sparrow [Sandra Keller ]
27 Oct Glenhurst Meadows Fox Sparrows [Vince Capp ]
27 Oct A great day on Cape May Saturday. A nice morning at Glenhurst today ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
27 Oct Assunpink Fox Sparrow [Bob Dodelson ]
26 Oct Scissor me timbers I got forked [Larry scacchetti ]
26 Oct White-throated Sparrows, Bald Eagles, Ruby-crowned Kinglets [Sandra Keller ]
26 Oct FOY junco ["cwsg1 AT excite.com" ]
26 Oct Photo Study Of Birds At E.B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), Atlantic County, NJ, 10/25/14 ["Howard B. Eskin" ]
25 Oct Sandy Hook [Michael Britt ]
25 Oct NJ Audubon Young Birders Club Trip today [Scott Barnes ]
26 Oct Fork-tailed Flycatcher [ ]
25 Oct Island Beach morning flight [Greg Prelich ]
24 Oct Greenwald Park - Camden County [Sandra Keller ]
24 Oct Nelson's/Saltmarsh Sparrow in Highland Park ["B.G. Sloan" ]
23 Oct New house, new owls [Larry scacchetti ]
23 Oct Odd: First fall warbler & first winter sparrow on same day ["B.G. Sloan" ]
23 Oct Turkeys Reacting to Blue Jay Distress Call (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
23 Oct Another Blog on Feeders - Suet Stumps [Steve Byland ]
22 Oct Cape May Monday - Higbee Beach [Joseph Palumbo ]
22 Oct Forsythe: White Pelican & Clay-colored Sparrow 10/22 [William Keim ]
22 Oct Bird Photography Tips - Feeder Stand [Steve Byland ]
22 Oct Re: Mystery bird [Rick Wright ]
22 Oct Mystery bird [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
22 Oct Photo ID [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
22 Oct Cape May Monday - Clay Colored, Lincoln's and 12 species of raptors [Joseph Palumbo ]
22 Oct This summer's King Rail in Bayonne ["Albert, Steven" ]
21 Oct upper level winds [Sandra Keller ]
21 Oct Re: Magnificent Frigate [Michael Britt ]

Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (30 Oct 2014) 319 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 21:10:25 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Oct 30, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       0             41            121
Bald Eagle                   5             74            125
Northern Harrier             1             29             44
Sharp-shinned Hawk         102           1510           1739
Cooper's Hawk               21            128            139
Northern Goshawk             1              6              6
Red-shouldered Hawk         35             72             77
Broad-winged Hawk            0             12           3824
Red-tailed Hawk            150            461            477
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 2             14             14
American Kestrel             0            171            244
Merlin                       0             64             71
Peregrine Falcon             0             24             34
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               2             57             65

Total:                     319           2663           6980
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 09:00:00 
Observation end   time: 17:00:00 
Total observation time: 8 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Rachel Rojcewicz, Roger Johnson

Visitors:
Mark Chelemer. 


Weather:
clouds all day except for some mid-day sun, wind NW 5-10, temps in the 50s.


Raptor Observations:
BE - 1 ad, 4 im.
GE - 1 ad, 1 im. 

Best Red-shoulder flight of the season. The goshawk was an adult that
passed directly overhead.  Roger's Bird of the Day was the immature Golden
Eagle that passed on the river side below eye-level giving a classic "Coon
look".

Thank you to Roger Johnson and Rachel Rojcewicz for conducting the count
today.  This mid-week coverage is much appreciated, wish I was there to see
that adult gos!

Non-raptor Observations:

========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 

Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (27 Oct 2014) 97 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 21:10:13 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Oct 27, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       0             41            121
Bald Eagle                   1             69            120
Northern Harrier             0             28             43
Sharp-shinned Hawk          41           1408           1637
Cooper's Hawk                3            107            118
Northern Goshawk             1              5              5
Red-shouldered Hawk          0             37             42
Broad-winged Hawk            0             12           3824
Red-tailed Hawk             25            311            327
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 1             12             12
American Kestrel             7            171            244
Merlin                       1             64             71
Peregrine Falcon             0             24             34
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor              17             55             63

Total:                      97           2344           6661
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 12:30:00 
Observation end   time: 17:00:00 
Total observation time: 4.5 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Rachel Rojcewicz

Visitors:
Hikers - 7. 


Weather:
mostly clear skies, light NW wind, temp in 60s. 

Raptor Observations:
BE - 3:38A.
GE - 4:13I. 
NG - 12:37I.

Super solo effort by Rachel Rojcewicz...THANK YOU for your coverage and
count--well done!  

Rachel was treated to many close birds in good light.  

From Rachel's notes: "My Bird of the Day was easily the immature Golden
Eagle at 4:13. It approached head-on and then passed behind the owl pole at
eye-level before continuing down the river. It was the closest Golden Eagle
I have ever seen!"

Non-raptor Observations:

========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 

Subject: South Branch WMA Today- Winter Birding
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 15:49:55 -0400
Hi, all-

I enjoyed a very nice morning of Winter birding here today- ready or not.
The wooded stream valleys gave up Creepers, WB Nuts, Titmice, Chickadees,
Woodpeckers- including Saps, and several Hermit Thrushes. I also found one
Winter Wren. There were plenty of Song and Field Sparrows around at the
margins, and a few Swamp as well. White-throated Sparrows were abundant. I
did find at least 10 White-crowned Sparrows throughout, and one Fox Sparrow
was discovered lurking around in the brush that surrounds the southernmost
maintenance shed. I also enjoyed a flock of about 30 American Pipits that
kept moving around the soy field near that same shed. One adult male Harrier
was seen in the area a few times. Winter birds, all. 

 Fox Sparrows are becoming a little more widespread in our area, it would
seem. I found four yesterday at Lord Stirling Park- just west of the Dance
Floor. One was singing his clear, loud song every now and then. And I do
mean loud. 

 

Good Winter Birding!

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 

 

 

 

 



---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Sandy Hook today; trip tomorrow at hook cancelled
From: Scott Barnes <scott.barnes AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 14:27:56 -0400
Jerseybirders,

Due to the poor (especially rainy) weather forecast, tomorrow's All Things
Birds field trip at Sandy Hook is cancelled.

Today was the last of my "Half Day Fridays" walks at the hook this season.
Undoubtedly, the rarest bird we saw was (drum roll, please)....a Hairy
Woodpecker! My first at Sandy Hook in several years: the species seems to
loathe barrier islands, despite being fairly common just across the bridge
in Hartshorne Woods Park, where much more suitable forest is prevalent.

There was an excellent flight today of Golden-crowned Kinglet, Hermit
Thrush, White-throated Sparrow, and Dark-eyed Junco-the latter in the
4-figure range. Other birds included a most cooperative Winter Wren, an
Orange-crowned Warbler,singing White-crowned Sparrows, plus flyover
American Pipits, Purple Finch, and Pine Siskins.

Good Birding,

Scott Barnes
All Things Birds Program Director
Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
Editor, NJ Audubon eBird
New Jersey Audubon
tel. 609-897-9400
scott.barnes AT njaudubon.org
www.njaudubon.org

Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Hawkwatching par excellence
From: Fairfax Hutter <savoirfairfax AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 10:59:21 -0400
I second Marc's raves about Raccoon Ridge. It is just plain COOL. You can look 
DOWN on the hawks on both sides of the ridge. Even if the hawks are slow, the 
hike is beautiful with chances of rare Bobcat and more sightings. The views 
from the top are spectacular: the Delaware River below, the Poconos to the 
west, the Catskills and "Gunks" to the north, Connecticut, Sunrise Mountain, 
Catfish Fire Tower, Great Valley, and Yard reservoirs to the north and east. 


Fairfax

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 30, 2014, at 11:16 PM, "CHELEMER, MARC J"  wrote:
> 
> Jerseybirders,
> 
> Perhaps because New Jersey is blessed with hawkwatching locations which are 
easy to get to (think Cape May Hawkwatch, Alpine Lookout, Chimney Rock), all of 
which are at most, a few minutes walk from a parking lot, I think we don't 
write about "hawking" days either because they seem too easy, or because no one 
spends all day doing it (because it's so easy to get from and to the car). When 
one visits Raccoon Ridge, along the Appalachian Trail, and a two-and-a-half 
mile walk from the nearest automobile parking lot, it IS worth a few words. 

> 
> My brother and I met at 7:15 AM this morning at the Kaiser trailhead on Old 
Mine Road. Three Screech Owls were calling as I arrived. The 90-minute hike to 
the lookout included serenades by typical winter residents. We were joined at 
the lookout an hour later by Roger Johnson, the official counter. Then the 
hawks began flying by. Five Sharp-shinneds from 9-10 were a brief taste, then, 
as the fog lifted in the valleys, things began to heat up. The rest of the day 
saw hawks high, hawks low, hawks in front, hawks in the river valley. Another 
sharp-eyed birder, Rachel, who joined our happy band around Noon, found hawks 
almost as well as Chris Aquila! By 4 PM, we had tallied about 150-200 
Sharp-shinneds, a few tens of Coopers', probably 100 Red-taileds, the best 
Red-shouldered day Roger said he'd seen all year (at least 40), and about a 
dozen Bald Eagles, including two immatures cavorting in the sunlit sky, and 
later two adults also doing aerial acrobatics. The best bir! 

 d was a stunning immature Golden Eagle (one of two today), which looked like a 
Bald at a distance, but then slowly revealed its beauty-a shimmering golden 
head and bright white tail with black terminal band--as it made its way 
majestically down the Delaware River, flying below us so that we were looking 
down on it. A Grey Ghost also made an appearance, and a powerfully-flying 
Northern Goshawk cruised over as well. 

> 
> A hawk migration day where one is always moving one's binoculars or 'scope to 
find the next fast moving bird is exhilarating. But such days must end; the 
temperature drops, the cavalcade diminishes (only 20-some Red-taileds in the 
last hour. Aw). The 2-1/2 miles down would normally seem anti-climatic. But 
today, as I was driving out of the State Forest, I glimpsed a large something 
moving fast behind a line of trees and then a hulking shape out on a limb. 
Stopping and grabbing for the binocs, I saw my last bird of the day: a Great 
Horned Owl. Owls at the beginning, owl at the end, raptors all day in the 
middle. A perfect day. 

> 
> If you can devote a full day to hawkwatching, Raccoon Ridge is certainly 
worth the effort and time: the walk is beautiful, the view from the top is 
spectacular, and it's totally uncrowded: just five of us today in our island in 
the sky, with only the wind and the raptors for company. 

> 
> Good birding, defined.
> 
> Marc Chelemer
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: bird radar
From: Susan Garretsonfriedman <susan.garretsonfriedman AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 10:12:56 -0400
I had a flock of about 50-60 Flickers cross the road in front of/around me
this morning on my way in, at the bottom of Carlton Road  before it meets
Lord Stirling Road, in Stirling.  A nice start to the day!

Thanks,

*Susan*
Susan Garretson Friedman
Welcome Center/Nature Store Manager
Scherman Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary

New Jersey Audubon
11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
908-766-5787

Connect with us: [image: Facebook]

[image: 

Blogger] [image:
Flickr] [image: Twitter]
[image: YouTube]


Making New Jersey a better place for people and wildlife since 1897

On Thu, Oct 30, 2014 at 10:43 PM, Sandra Keller 
wrote:

> The whole state is green right now. A load of birds moving for Friday
> morning!
> Hermit Thrushes, Sparrows and Yellow-rumped Warblers are more than likely
> the main
> species. I wish I could get out Friday am!
>
>
> Sandra Keller
>
> Sent from my iPad mini
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Hawkwatching par excellence
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 03:16:23 +0000
Jerseybirders,

Perhaps because New Jersey is blessed with hawkwatching locations which are 
easy to get to (think Cape May Hawkwatch, Alpine Lookout, Chimney Rock), all of 
which are at most, a few minutes walk from a parking lot, I think we don't 
write about "hawking" days either because they seem too easy, or because no one 
spends all day doing it (because it's so easy to get from and to the car). When 
one visits Raccoon Ridge, along the Appalachian Trail, and a two-and-a-half 
mile walk from the nearest automobile parking lot, it IS worth a few words. 


My brother and I met at 7:15 AM this morning at the Kaiser trailhead on Old 
Mine Road. Three Screech Owls were calling as I arrived. The 90-minute hike to 
the lookout included serenades by typical winter residents. We were joined at 
the lookout an hour later by Roger Johnson, the official counter. Then the 
hawks began flying by. Five Sharp-shinneds from 9-10 were a brief taste, then, 
as the fog lifted in the valleys, things began to heat up. The rest of the day 
saw hawks high, hawks low, hawks in front, hawks in the river valley. Another 
sharp-eyed birder, Rachel, who joined our happy band around Noon, found hawks 
almost as well as Chris Aquila! By 4 PM, we had tallied about 150-200 
Sharp-shinneds, a few tens of Coopers', probably 100 Red-taileds, the best 
Red-shouldered day Roger said he'd seen all year (at least 40), and about a 
dozen Bald Eagles, including two immatures cavorting in the sunlit sky, and 
later two adults also doing aerial acrobatics. The best bird was a stunning 
immature Golden Eagle (one of two today), which looked like a Bald at a 
distance, but then slowly revealed its beauty-a shimmering golden head and 
bright white tail with black terminal band--as it made its way majestically 
down the Delaware River, flying below us so that we were looking down on it. A 
Grey Ghost also made an appearance, and a powerfully-flying Northern Goshawk 
cruised over as well. 


A hawk migration day where one is always moving one's binoculars or 'scope to 
find the next fast moving bird is exhilarating. But such days must end; the 
temperature drops, the cavalcade diminishes (only 20-some Red-taileds in the 
last hour. Aw). The 2-1/2 miles down would normally seem anti-climatic. But 
today, as I was driving out of the State Forest, I glimpsed a large something 
moving fast behind a line of trees and then a hulking shape out on a limb. 
Stopping and grabbing for the binocs, I saw my last bird of the day: a Great 
Horned Owl. Owls at the beginning, owl at the end, raptors all day in the 
middle. A perfect day. 


If you can devote a full day to hawkwatching, Raccoon Ridge is certainly worth 
the effort and time: the walk is beautiful, the view from the top is 
spectacular, and it's totally uncrowded: just five of us today in our island in 
the sky, with only the wind and the raptors for company. 


Good birding, defined.

Marc Chelemer

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: bird radar
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 22:43:17 -0400
The whole state is green right now. A load of birds moving for Friday morning!
Hermit Thrushes, Sparrows and Yellow-rumped Warblers are more than likely the 
main 

species. I wish I could get out Friday am! 


Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Possible Union Co. Raven breeding
From: Clifford Miles <0000000e98604842-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 00:19:54 +0000
I have been seeing Ravens around the Bayway Petrochemical Complex in Linden for 
over a year.  If Ravens are nesting on rooftops in NYC, they could possibly be 
nesting somewhere in the complex.  I wonder if anyone has a contact there, in 
order to check this out. 

Clifford MilesMountain Lakes, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Lark Sparrow in Bergen County!
From: Larry scacchetti <larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 20:00:09 -0400
Ive been looking for Lark Sparrow in Bergen County for quite some time now. 
Last night I thought I was goon head to Halifax Rd. and look for Clay-colored 
Sparrow, or if I'm REALLY lucky, find a Lark Sparrow. At about 10:00 am, Chris 
Takacs called me to tell me Ron Shields found a Lark Sparrow along Disposal Rd. 
down at Dekorte. The next few hours were torture! I quick drive home at lunch 
to get my camera and gas and I was all set for the trip after work. After work, 
I had to get from the top of Bergen County to the bottom during peak rush hour, 
a nightmare drive seemed imminent! Once I reached Rt. 17 traffic was horrible! 
But possibly my most genius bird chase move happened. I was in the middle lane 
in stand still traffic. I looked in my rearview mirror and saw 5 cop cars 
barreling down the left lane. When they passed me, I jumped behind them and 
rode the cherries all the way down to the meadowlands. When I arrived, There 
were 2 people already on the bird. When i! 

 t flew, the white outer tail edges where very conspicuous and it was easy to 
follow the bird when it flushed. An adult bird that was really cooperative and 
came very close at times. When it flew, it perched in one of the hemlocks near 
the carillon and vocalized several times. I was only there for about 20 minutes 
before the sun set and all the sparrows in the area disappeared. I arrived in 
just the right time and was able to enjoy the bird for 20 minutes. Hopefully 
the bird sticks a little while longer for more to enjoy it. Acocrding to Ebird, 
this is the 3rd County record, the first was at Overpeck Park in 1996, and the 
2nd just says Westwood in 2012. 


Heres some photos of the bird for anyone who's interested :

https://www.flickr.com/photos/larrybird13/

Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Westwood, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: on the lack of Purple finches in my yard
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:32:53 -0400
For the past few days, I have been concentrating on yard birding.
Probably won't have a chance for Cumberland again until Monday.

Food is out, I've been watching and listening. Cold front came through.
Zero winter finches. Sigh. I get the Siskins in storms. And things seem
to be holding true to form!

ebird notes - I am starting to carefully scan the excel chart bird list from
birdbase to see if I can safely not enter any trips. Cape May trips are a pain
because I just entered into Birdbase as county. So I have been splitting those
trips up into specific locations. Well, I am into Nov. 1997. Not safe to delete 
yet. 

11/8/97 - Brown-chested Martin.....
This might take me 3 1/2 years as opposed to 2 1/2!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Interesting sparrow profile photo
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 14:59:32 -0400
I've lately been into taking profile photos of birds, usually larger birds
on dead branches and against a gray or dark sky...very natural
environments. But early this morning I happened to take a profile photo of
a small bird against an unnatural background. The sparrow (Savannah?) was
perched in the shade on a dark chain-link fence at a local park baseball
field. In the background is the yellow dirt baseball infield illuminated by
the rising sun. Here's the photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15667612405/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Reading Jersey Bird E-Mails in a RSS Reader
From: Phil Jeffrey <phil.jeffrey AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 09:45:13 -0400
I've never had a problem with the existing ATOM and RSS feeds (in Feedly,
Google Reader &c) that can be found lower right on the list archive page:
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=JerseyBi

Phil Jeffrey
Princeton



On Thu, Oct 30, 2014 at 9:35 AM, Jim O'Malley 
wrote:

> Thanks, Mike!  That looks great.
>
> Jim O'Malley
> Randolph, NJ
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Mike
> Lyncheski
> Sent: Wednesday, October 29, 2014 11:22 PM
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Reading Jersey Bird E-Mails in a RSS Reader
>
> A long time ago I set up a blog to capture JerseyBi e-mails so that I
> could read these reports in my favorite RSS Reader on my mobile devices and
> in my browser (feedly.com).  After a long and uneventful beta period I am
> making this available to anyone that wants to use it. :)
>
> The blog address is http://jerserybirderreader.blogspot.com/  if you want
> to read the bird e-mails in a blog format in your browser.
>
> The RSS address is
> http://jerserybirderreader.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default if you want
> to use an RSS Reader to keep up to date.
>
> Feel free to write me if you have questions.
>
> Enjoy,
>
> Mike Lyncheski
> Gladstone, NJ
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>



-- 
"If you lie to the compiler, it will get its revenge"
- Henry Spencer

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Reading Jersey Bird E-Mails in a RSS Reader
From: "Jim O'Malley" <jimomalley AT ARROWLEAF.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 09:35:36 -0400
Thanks, Mike!  That looks great.

Jim O'Malley
Randolph, NJ

-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Mike 
Lyncheski 

Sent: Wednesday, October 29, 2014 11:22 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Reading Jersey Bird E-Mails in a RSS Reader

A long time ago I set up a blog to capture JerseyBi e-mails so that I could 
read these reports in my favorite RSS Reader on my mobile devices and in my 
browser (feedly.com). After a long and uneventful beta period I am making this 
available to anyone that wants to use it. :) 


The blog address is http://jerserybirderreader.blogspot.com/ if you want to 
read the bird e-mails in a blog format in your browser. 


The RSS address is
http://jerserybirderreader.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default if you want to use 
an RSS Reader to keep up to date. 


Feel free to write me if you have questions.

Enjoy,

Mike Lyncheski
Gladstone, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: White-winged Dove continues, Cape May County
From: Sam Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 08:23:38 -0400
Michael O'Brien reports: WWDO (White-winged Dove) fly by at Coral Ave, Cape May 
Point. 


Good birding.

Sam

--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Reading Jersey Bird E-Mails in a RSS Reader
From: Mike Lyncheski <mllbird AT HARRIERGROUP.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 23:22:26 -0400
A long time ago I set up a blog to capture JerseyBi e-mails so that I could
read these reports in my favorite RSS Reader on my mobile devices and in my
browser (feedly.com).  After a long and uneventful beta period I am making
this available to anyone that wants to use it. :)

The blog address is http://jerserybirderreader.blogspot.com/  if you want
to read the bird e-mails in a blog format in your browser.

The RSS address is
http://jerserybirderreader.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default if you want to
use an RSS Reader to keep up to date.

Feel free to write me if you have questions.

Enjoy,

Mike Lyncheski
Gladstone, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Very late first fall warbler (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 18:24:04 -0400
For some odd reason I recorded my first warbler of the season this past
weekend. Seems rather late. Maybe I haven't really been looking for them
this fall, as I've broadened my nature photography interests beyond birds??

For the record, it was a cute Yellow-rumped Warbler, photographed while I
was sitting in a chair on my deck:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15015670804/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (26 Oct 2014) 306 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 11:10:44 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Oct 26, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       0             41            121
Bald Eagle                  14             68            119
Northern Harrier             0             28             43
Sharp-shinned Hawk         163           1367           1596
Cooper's Hawk               10            104            115
Northern Goshawk             1              4              4
Red-shouldered Hawk          8             37             42
Broad-winged Hawk            0             12           3824
Red-tailed Hawk             82            286            302
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 4             11             11
American Kestrel            10            164            237
Merlin                       8             63             70
Peregrine Falcon             2             24             34
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               4             38             46

Total:                     306           2247           6564
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00 
Observation end   time: 17:45:00 
Total observation time: 9.75 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Brian Butler, Jim Thomson, Scott Wood, Tom Bailey

Visitors:
Additional observers: Megan Fedor, David Dunbar & Rachel Rojcewicz, Denise
Thomson. 

Thank you to all who visited today, there were plenty of birds to enjoy.  

Special thanks to my family who made their annual visit:  parents John &
Gloria Hardiman, nephew Ellis Lieberman (this was Ellis's first visit to
Coon and within seconds of arriving his first bird seen was a Golden
Eagle!), sister Teri Dlugosz and friend Scott Fean.  

Mike McCullough & Chris McHugh, Matt Skalla, the hiking group of John and
his friends, Buddy Thomson.   


My apologies for the late post (my dog ate the count sheet).
  


Weather:
partly sunny in a.m. then mostly cloudy thru afternoon, wind NW 8-20 w/
stronger gusts, temp 48-52 deg F. 


Raptor Observations:
We had a solid flight today with a fine performance by the eagles
(unfortunately the Philly kind did not do the same) with 14 Balds and 4
Goldens.  

Among the excitement today was a Peregrine having fun with a Golden
Eagle--diving on it and harassing it as the eagle attempted to move thru.
The PG's antics earns it Bird of the Day.  

Thank you to all the observers today with their sharp spotting--you were a
huge help! Coon welcomed back Tom Bailey--kudos for making the long journey
from the hinterlands of south Jersey. 



BE - 9:56A, 10:03I, 10:19I, 10:24I, 10:26A, 10:38I, 11:33I, 11:36I, 11:59I,
12:42A, 2:16I, 2:46A, 2:50I, 3:58I. 

GE - 11:28I, 11:57I, 12:41A, 2:22I. 

NG - 1:27I. 

PG - 11:57A, 12:15A. 

OS - 1 moving to northeast, not counted. 

Non-raptor Observations:
Ravens - groups of 3 and 4 seen.
TVs & BVs.
Pine Siskins (14), Purple Finches (5), Cedar Waxwings (30), Robins,
Bluebirds, Common Loon (1), Herring Gulls (flocks moving down river
valley).  
Monarch Butterfly - 1. 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 

Subject: Ash-throated Flycatcher, Cape May County
From: Sam Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 11:05:57 -0400
Louise Zemaitis reports: ATFL (Ash-throated Flycatcher) at Cox Hall Creek near 
Delview entrance in field with Martin house. 


Good birding,

Sam

--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Iceland presentation
From: Philip Witt <phwitt AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 09:55:23 -0400
For those birders who might be interested, my wife and I will be giving 
a presentation on Iceland a week from Monday. Free. See below.


Phil Witt



---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 




Somerset Naturalists:  Mon., November 10, 7:30-9:00 PM:  “Iceland”: 
Becky and Phil Witt will present a nature-oriented travelogue of two 
trips to Iceland. Sitting on the mid-Atlantic Ridge, Iceland is a land 
of contrasts, glacial ice and volcanic fire. Come to see glaciers, the 
Northern Lights, Icelandic Horses, the wild North Atlantic, and of 
course puffins.   Guests are welcome.  Free. Bridgewater Library, 1 Vogt 
Drive, off North Bridge Street, Bridgewater.

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bayshore Dr. Barnegat
From: Karmela <kmoneta AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 09:52:28 -0400
The Forsythe impoundment in Barnegat along Bayshore Drive is hopping today. 
There's one Avocet in view on a small island to the left along with some 
Greater Yellowlegs. There are Great and Little Blue Herons, Tri color Herons, 
Egrets, a Kingfisher and most ducks. It's best viewed in the morning as they 
seem to wander off later. The sun can blind you in the afternoon. A good place 
to view is the cutout a few houses north of the beach, but bring your boots, 
it's been very wet. 


Karmela Moneta
Clinton Twp and Barnegat

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Assunpink Purple Finches
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 08:22:49 -0500
I had 4 female types Purple Finches at 2 different locations in Assunpink this 
morning. Also there on the main lake were Gadwalls along with Ruddy Ducks and a 
lingering Great Egret and Osprey. By the marshy area just beyond the burnt 
house were a pair of Eastern Bluebirds (I believe they nested here this past 
spring) 

Bob Dodelson

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (25 Oct 2014) 48 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 21:10:27 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Oct 25, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       0             41            121
Bald Eagle                   1             54            105
Northern Harrier             1             28             43
Sharp-shinned Hawk          29           1204           1433
Cooper's Hawk                2             94            105
Northern Goshawk             0              3              3
Red-shouldered Hawk          4             29             34
Broad-winged Hawk            0             12           3824
Red-tailed Hawk              8            204            220
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 2              7              7
American Kestrel             0            154            227
Merlin                       1             55             62
Peregrine Falcon             0             22             32
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0             34             42

Total:                      48           1941           6258
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00 
Observation end   time: 17:45:00 
Total observation time: 9.75 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Brian Butler, Jim Thomson, Scott Wood

Visitors:
Dave Cory; Don & Fran Davidson (good luck on your move to NC); Troop 199
from Oldwick, NJ; Troop 33 from Brick, NJ; Gidget Butler. 

Hikers - 82 plus A.T. thru-hiker "Late Start" who was only 7 miles away
from completing the entire trail...congrats!


Weather:
clear to mostly clear skies, hazy visibility all day, wind W 5-12 w/
stronger gusts early, temp 45-58 deg F. 

Raptor Observations:
BE - 3:29A.
GE - 2:12I, 3:35I. 

Crazy day with all the hikers, but the 3:35 Golden Eagle made it all
worthwhile.  A well-marked immature, it suddenly appeared low and close in
front of us on the river side.  Looking down on it, the golden moved slowly
past giving us a looooong look...very cool.  Easily Bird of the Day. 

Non-raptor Observations:
TVs & BVs.
Ravens - flock of 28 moving downridge between 8:00-9:00.
Pine Siskins - 20.
Monarchs - 3.
Bucks - two 8-pointers & a 6-pointer seen near look out. 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 

Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (24 Oct 2014) 256 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 20:10:24 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Oct 24, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       1             41            121
Bald Eagle                   7             53            104
Northern Harrier             1             27             42
Sharp-shinned Hawk         134           1175           1404
Cooper's Hawk               13             92            103
Northern Goshawk             1              3              3
Red-shouldered Hawk          7             25             30
Broad-winged Hawk            0             12           3824
Red-tailed Hawk             80            196            212
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 1              5              5
American Kestrel             5            154            227
Merlin                       1             54             61
Peregrine Falcon             4             22             32
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               1             34             42

Total:                     256           1893           6210
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 09:00:00 
Observation end   time: 17:00:00 
Total observation time: 8 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Patrick Keelen, Roger Johnson

Visitors:
Hikers - 5 plus Andy the trail runner. 





Weather:
mostly sunny skies, wind NNW 10-16, temp 50-55 deg F.

Raptor Observations:
BE - 9:05A, 10:23A, 11:37A, 11:44A, 11:44I, 12:25A, 12:45I.
NG - 11:27.
GE - 4:58I. 
PG - 10:19, 3:13I, 4:24I, 4:45I.

Thank you to Patrick Keelen and Roger Johnson for their coverage today, and
an additional thanks to Patrick for conducting the count.  

PK gave Bird of the Day consideration to the Peregrines, but the clear
winner was his end of the day Golden Eagle that gave Patrick a "bins" full
of nothing but bird.  


Non-raptor Observations:
Ravens - 13.
Pine Siskins - 10.

========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 

Subject: Great Swamp NWR, Tuesday, October 28:
From: Peter Bacinski <petebacinski AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 20:33:49 -0400
Dear Jerseybirders:

 

Took a quick lunch time trip to the Swamp and was rewarded with a nice flock
of sparrows along Pleasant Plains Road near the 90 degree turn including a
Vesper, White-crowned, Field, Swamp and a bunch of White-throated Sparrows.
The pond near the locked bridge had a single drake Hooded Merganser.  I left
the Swamp by way of Lord Stirling Road where there was a flock of over a
hundred Canada Geese and among them was a Cackling Goose on the right side
of the road just before Maple.

 

Good birding,

 

Pete Bacinski

 

Atlantic Highlands, NJ

 

Embrace Conservation

Aspire to Excellence

Always Smile and Say Thank you

 

All Things Birds Blog:

http://www.njaudubon.org/SectionCenters/SectionAllThingsBirds/AllThingsBirds
Blog.aspx

 

All Things Birds-Pete Bacinski Facebook Page:

 
https://www.facebook.com/AllThingsBirds

 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Chickadees again
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 16:30:46 -0400
Thanks for all the responses! Not sure what made it to the list and what was 
just to me. 

Basically, Monmouth has both. So it's good to have one as rare. That lets the 
compiler 

make sure near the boundary. Although Sandy Hook is different with its 
population. 

Carolinas are pushing northwards. Again, it's good to be sure around that 
boundary area. 

Not just assume. Like I do a lot with this pair!

I am pretty sure I put in Chickadees in 1996, but may not have checked whether 
rare. 

You need to edit the species list for a species to show rare. Anyway, just 
finished 

Texas. If I had checked, would have remembered that Black-shouldered Kite is 
now 

White-tailed there.... These ebird compilers are very patient! 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Spruce Run
From: John Bloomfield <buckingham.nature AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 15:54:58 -0400
Hi everyone - I have not birded Spruce Run much. I went to the boat launch area 
today and found the reservoir devoid of the waterfowl I had hoped to see. Can 
anyone guide me to a better location on the reservoir? Many thanks. 


John Bloomfield


> On Oct 28, 2014, at 11:28 AM, CHELEMER, MARC J  wrote:
> 
> Jerseybirders,
> 
> I pulled into the Overlook parking lot right at 7 this morning, and spent the 
next two and a quarter hours strolling or driving the crunchy gravel of 
Pleasant Plains Road. Each moment brought small delights: Two Harriers made 
their morning commute right over my head, flying determinedly southward. A gang 
of Hermit Thrushes eyed me warily from a fruiting vine as they feasted. Two 
Vesper Sparrows worked the edge right opposite the Overlook turnaround. Five 
White-crowned Sparrows foraged at the last turnaround on the left. A chatty 
flock of 11 Pine Siskins were in the trees at the pond across the closed 
bridge. A burly Fox Sparrow skulked in the shadows of the fallen tree at the 
dogleg corner, while a Purple Finch sang its Blue-headed Vireo imitation 
nearby. A mixed flock of another Vesper, more White-crowneds, Field, Chipping, 
Song, Savannah, and White-throated Sparrows, plus Juncos were busy in the sunny 
Bluebird lot while real Bluebirds chee-cheed overhead. All in! 

 all, it was a delightful sojourn in "the Swamp" with 45 species overall and 
great sparrow views. 

> 
> I added pictures of the first and third Vespers, plus a shadowy picture of 
the Foxie, on my Flick'r page: 

> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/marc_chelemer/
> 
> Good birding.
> 
> Marc J. Chelemer
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Fwd: Birds at the feeders
From: Peter Eschmann <peteresch AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 14:43:32 -0400
just slightly wrong in the address below.

> Begin forwarded message:
> 
> From: Peter Eschmann 
> Subject: Birds at the feeders
> Date: October 26, 2014 at 1:39:55 PM EDT
> To: "JerseyBirds AT Princeton.EDU JerseyBirds AT Princeton.EDU" 
 

> 
> Fellow birders,
> 
> What an active day this is at my backyard feeders! For the first time, I’ve 
been visited by the male purple finches, after several days of seeing the 
females feeding. Also showing here for the first time this fall are 
white-throated and white-crowned sparrows, welcomed and attractive visitors. 
The usual goldfinches, house finches (battling their purple relatives for 
space/food), blue jays, downy woodpeckers, doves and song sparrows joined the 
juncos which arrived several days ago. 

> 
> Very glad to have the purple finches show after reading with envy all the 
other reports. Not surprisingly, all the birds scooted when a turkey vulture 
swooped low (below roof-level) behind the stand of trees. 

> 
> pete eschmann
> barnegat NJ


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Le Conte's Sparrow at Battery Kingman
From: Cliff Miller <cbm AT WHATEXIT.ORG>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 14:24:08 -0400
A few have asked where Battery Kingman is. It's on Sandy Hook, bay side, 1/2 
mile north of the ranger station. 


http://www.fortwiki.com/Battery_Kingman

Cliff Miller

On Oct 28, 2014, at 14:12, Cliff Miller  wrote:

> I was asked off-list if I got a pic - sadly no camera on me. The bird was in 
shadow, and a photo may have led one to conclude it was a sharp-tail, as I 
initially did. But then the bird scratched its head and showed a bold white 
crown stripe, just before flying into the phrags. Holy cow! 

> 
> Took extensive notes as this was a lifer - will submit a review. 
> 
> Cliff Miller
> 
> On Oct 28, 2014, at 13:02, Cliff Miller  wrote:
> 
>> Just had a LCSP Battery Kingman. Skulking in the hemlocks just north of the 
dirt pile. 

>> 
>> Cliff Miller
>> Brooklyn NY

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Four Vesper Saprrows at Cold Brook Reserve
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 14:20:07 -0400
Hi. Y'all. 

 I found four Vespers Sparrows at Cold Brook Reserve in Oldwick this
morning. I kicked one up right on the main trail where it passes through the
standing corn. I discovered three additional Vespers moving together as a
group in one of the hedgerows. I found seven White-crowned Sparrows in these
hedgerows as well. There were many Song, Swamp, Field and Savannah
throughout, but not nearly in the huge numbers of a week or so ago. If
Lincoln's are still here- I didn't see any. I think they have largely moved
on- from here at least.

Other fun birds included a Blue-headed Vireo, a few nice-sized mixed
blackbird flocks, and small pods of Waxwings that were roving around the
property. I found no little surprises at the pond there. 

 I only got doc shots of these Vespers, but I did manage a decent portrait
of a pretty young White-crowned. It can be viewed here:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 

Good Birding!

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 

 

 

 

 



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Le Conte's Sparrow at Battery Kingman
From: Cliff Miller <cbm AT WHATEXIT.ORG>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 14:12:08 -0400
I was asked off-list if I got a pic - sadly no camera on me. The bird was in 
shadow, and a photo may have led one to conclude it was a sharp-tail, as I 
initially did. But then the bird scratched its head and showed a bold white 
crown stripe, just before flying into the phrags. Holy cow! 


Took extensive notes as this was a lifer - will submit a review. 

Cliff Miller

On Oct 28, 2014, at 13:02, Cliff Miller  wrote:

> Just had a LCSP Battery Kingman. Skulking in the hemlocks just north of the 
dirt pile. 

> 
> Cliff Miller
> Brooklyn NY

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Glenhurst
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 18:09:53 +0000
Made a short pre-work stop this morning. Lots of birds, not all that easy to 
see. Didn't get much past the gazebo. Nothing special but I did, finally, see 
an adult white-crowned sparrow after only immatures until now. Sparrow-wise, 
song sparrows were predominant, followed by swamps and a couple of Savannahs. I 
think I like the weedy backdrops for photos better than the green leaves of 
summer. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/98494447 AT N06/15465704839/


Steven

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: chickadees
From: Laura Berlik <lberlik AT PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 13:46:35 -0400
I had understood that there was some "intermarriage" going on within the 
chickadee populations. not so? 

Laura Berlik
Princeton

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: chickadee question
From: Tom Brown <tshrike19 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 13:39:22 -0400
I'm not the compiler of the sandy hook count, and only participated once,
however, one should realize that THE common chickadee on sandy hook itself
is Black-capped Chickadee, once you cross onto the mainland Carolina
Chickadee is the more common/expected species.  Realize the Sandy Hook CBC
does not only include sandy hook, the count circle is MUCH larger.  If
there were zero black-capped chickadee's on that count, then black-capped
was hard to comeby on  sandy hook the day of the count.

cheers,

Tom Brown
On Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 1:17 PM, C J BRINE  wrote:

> Sandra,
>
> Further to the question, from the 2001 & 2013 Sandy Hook
> (Long Branch) XMas Count Results, 2001 - 236 Carolina Chickadee,
> 0 Black-capped, 2013 - 146 Carolina Chickadee, 0 Black-Capped
> Chickadee.
>
> Charles J. Brine
> Princeton
>
>
>
>
> On Tuesday, October 28, 2014 12:49 PM, C J BRINE 
> wrote:
>
>
>
> Sandra,
>
> If you look at the 2013 Monmouth County Audubon, Birds of
> Monmouth County Checklist, Carolina Chickadee is Common where as
> Black-capped is Uncommon.
>
> Charles J. Brine
> Princeton
> http://monmouthaudubon.org/checklist.htm
>
>
>
>
> On Tuesday, October 28, 2014 12:23 PM, Sandra Keller <
> sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET> wrote:
>
>
>
> 1997 - I am still on that year entering old records into ebird!
> Anyway - Sandy Hook - north pond - 2. I entered as Black-capped, but
> comes up as rare. In my notes I have "We were told that was the chickadee
> here".  Another question - does that hold for 2014 also?
>
> --
> Sandra Keller
> Barrington, NJ
> sandrakeller AT verizon.net
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: chickadee question
From: Tom Bailey <ammodramus AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:37:10 +0000
Charles,

The Long Branch CBC is not the same as the Sandy Hook CBC.

I already replied to Sandy privately but all chickadees on Sandy Hook
are Black-capped. The rest of Monmouth County is populated by Carolina
Chickadees.

Tom

Tom Bailey
Tabernacle, NJ
ammodramus at comcast.net

----- Original Message -----
From: "C J BRINE" 
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Sent: Tuesday, October 28, 2014 1:17:25 PM
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] chickadee question

Sandra,

Further to the question, from the 2001 & 2013 Sandy Hook
(Long Branch) XMas Count Results, 2001 - 236 Carolina Chickadee,
0 Black-capped, 2013 - 146 Carolina Chickadee, 0 Black-Capped
Chickadee.

Charles J. Brine
Princeton




On Tuesday, October 28, 2014 12:49 PM, C J BRINE  wrote:
 


Sandra,

If you look at the 2013 Monmouth County Audubon, Birds of
Monmouth County Checklist, Carolina Chickadee is Common where as
Black-capped is Uncommon.

Charles J. Brine
Princeton
http://monmouthaudubon.org/checklist.htm

  


On Tuesday, October 28, 2014 12:23 PM, Sandra Keller  
wrote: 

 


1997 - I am still on that year entering old records into ebird!
Anyway - Sandy Hook - north pond - 2. I entered as Black-capped, but
comes up as rare. In my notes I have "We were told that was the chickadee
here".  Another question - does that hold for 2014 also?

-- 
Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
sandrakeller AT verizon.net

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: chickadee question
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 13:34:09 -0400
I should have added something to my earlier post. When Boyle (2011) talks
about Carolina Chickadees he says "Oddly, the species does not occur at
Sandy Hook." Coupled with Boyle's statement about Black-capped (i.e.,
"present on Sandy Hook") it sounds like Black-capped is the Sandy Hook
species?

On Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 12:49 PM, C J BRINE  wrote:

> Sandra,
>
> If you look at the 2013 Monmouth County Audubon, Birds of
> Monmouth County Checklist, Carolina Chickadee is Common where as
> Black-capped is Uncommon.
>
> Charles J. Brine
> Princeton
> http://monmouthaudubon.org/checklist.htm
>
>
>
>
> On Tuesday, October 28, 2014 12:23 PM, Sandra Keller <
> sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET> wrote:
>
>
>
> 1997 - I am still on that year entering old records into ebird!
> Anyway - Sandy Hook - north pond - 2. I entered as Black-capped, but
> comes up as rare. In my notes I have "We were told that was the chickadee
> here".  Another question - does that hold for 2014 also?
>
> --
> Sandra Keller
> Barrington, NJ
> sandrakeller AT verizon.net
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: chickadee question
From: C J BRINE <brinec11 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 10:17:25 -0700
Sandra,

Further to the question, from the 2001 & 2013 Sandy Hook
(Long Branch) XMas Count Results, 2001 - 236 Carolina Chickadee,
0 Black-capped, 2013 - 146 Carolina Chickadee, 0 Black-Capped
Chickadee.

Charles J. Brine
Princeton




On Tuesday, October 28, 2014 12:49 PM, C J BRINE  wrote:
 


Sandra,

If you look at the 2013 Monmouth County Audubon, Birds of
Monmouth County Checklist, Carolina Chickadee is Common where as
Black-capped is Uncommon.

Charles J. Brine
Princeton
http://monmouthaudubon.org/checklist.htm

  


On Tuesday, October 28, 2014 12:23 PM, Sandra Keller  
wrote: 

 


1997 - I am still on that year entering old records into ebird!
Anyway - Sandy Hook - north pond - 2. I entered as Black-capped, but
comes up as rare. In my notes I have "We were told that was the chickadee
here".  Another question - does that hold for 2014 also?

-- 
Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
sandrakeller AT verizon.net

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Le Conte's Sparrow at Battery Kingman
From: Cliff Miller <cbm AT WHATEXIT.ORG>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 13:02:26 -0400
Just had a LCSP Battery Kingman. Skulking in the hemlocks just north of the 
dirt pile. 


Cliff Miller
Brooklyn NY

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Essex County sandhill cranes
From: C J BRINE <brinec11 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 09:52:37 -0700
Vince & Rick,

I checked Randolph Road, Franklin Twp. Sundays 10/12 & 10/19.
No Sandhill Cranes when I was there (late morning, early afternoon).

Charles J. Brine
Princeton


On Tuesday, October 28, 2014 12:43 PM, Vince Capp  wrote:
 


It's probably worth mentioning for everybody's benefit that the corn crop has 
indeed been harvested from the "Crane Fields" on Randolph Road in Somerset. The 
fields are now covered in Crane-friendly corn stubble, cobs and debris. It 
might be worth keeping an eye the fields there and in the nearby vicinity for 
the (hopefully) annual return of the "local" gang of Sandhills that Winter 
there. 


Good Luck!
Vince Capp
Bound Brook




-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Rick 
Wright 

Sent: Tuesday, October 28, 2014 10:52 AM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Essex County sandhill cranes

Three sandhill cranes flew over Brookdale Park, Bloomfield, a few minutes 
before ten this morning. They were headed resolutely southwest, so probably 
didn't make the day's tally at the nearby Montclair hawk watch. 

Eager to hear where they were seen next.
The only other semi-notable bird was a fine Lincoln's sparrow in the new 
Migratory Bird Habitat behind the maintenance building. 

--
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey  ABA Field Guide to Birds of 
New Jersey 
 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: chickadee question
From: C J BRINE <brinec11 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 09:49:18 -0700
Sandra,

If you look at the 2013 Monmouth County Audubon, Birds of
Monmouth County Checklist, Carolina Chickadee is Common where as
Black-capped is Uncommon.

Charles J. Brine
Princeton
http://monmouthaudubon.org/checklist.htm

  


On Tuesday, October 28, 2014 12:23 PM, Sandra Keller  
wrote: 

 


1997 - I am still on that year entering old records into ebird!
Anyway - Sandy Hook - north pond - 2. I entered as Black-capped, but
comes up as rare. In my notes I have "We were told that was the chickadee
here".  Another question - does that hold for 2014 also?

-- 
Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
sandrakeller AT verizon.net

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: chickadee question
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 12:44:15 -0400
Bill Boyle's "Birds of New Jersey" (2011) says this of Black-capped
Chickadees: "Common resident throughout the northern third of the state,
where Carolina Chickadee does not occur. ALSO PRESENT ON SANDY HOOK."
(Emphasis mine)

On Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 12:22 PM, Sandra Keller 
wrote:

> 1997 - I am still on that year entering old records into ebird!
> Anyway - Sandy Hook - north pond - 2. I entered as Black-capped, but
> comes up as rare. In my notes I have "We were told that was the chickadee
> here".  Another question - does that hold for 2014 also?
>
> --
> Sandra Keller
> Barrington, NJ
> sandrakeller AT verizon.net
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Essex County sandhill cranes
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 12:42:47 -0400
It's probably worth mentioning for everybody's benefit that the corn crop has 
indeed been harvested from the "Crane Fields" on Randolph Road in Somerset. The 
fields are now covered in Crane-friendly corn stubble, cobs and debris. It 
might be worth keeping an eye the fields there and in the nearby vicinity for 
the (hopefully) annual return of the "local" gang of Sandhills that Winter 
there. 


Good Luck!
Vince Capp
Bound Brook




-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Rick 
Wright 

Sent: Tuesday, October 28, 2014 10:52 AM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Essex County sandhill cranes

Three sandhill cranes flew over Brookdale Park, Bloomfield, a few minutes 
before ten this morning. They were headed resolutely southwest, so probably 
didn't make the day's tally at the nearby Montclair hawk watch. 

Eager to hear where they were seen next.
The only other semi-notable bird was a fine Lincoln's sparrow in the new 
Migratory Bird Habitat behind the maintenance building. 

--
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey  ABA Field Guide to Birds of 
New Jersey 
 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: chickadee question
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 12:22:49 -0400
1997 - I am still on that year entering old records into ebird!
Anyway - Sandy Hook - north pond - 2. I entered as Black-capped, but
comes up as rare. In my notes I have "We were told that was the chickadee
here".  Another question - does that hold for 2014 also?

-- 
Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
sandrakeller AT verizon.net

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Nice morning at Great Swamp
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 15:28:18 +0000
Jerseybirders,

I pulled into the Overlook parking lot right at 7 this morning, and spent the 
next two and a quarter hours strolling or driving the crunchy gravel of 
Pleasant Plains Road. Each moment brought small delights: Two Harriers made 
their morning commute right over my head, flying determinedly southward. A gang 
of Hermit Thrushes eyed me warily from a fruiting vine as they feasted. Two 
Vesper Sparrows worked the edge right opposite the Overlook turnaround. Five 
White-crowned Sparrows foraged at the last turnaround on the left. A chatty 
flock of 11 Pine Siskins were in the trees at the pond across the closed 
bridge. A burly Fox Sparrow skulked in the shadows of the fallen tree at the 
dogleg corner, while a Purple Finch sang its Blue-headed Vireo imitation 
nearby. A mixed flock of another Vesper, more White-crowneds, Field, Chipping, 
Song, Savannah, and White-throated Sparrows, plus Juncos were busy in the sunny 
Bluebird lot while real Bluebirds chee-cheed overhead. All in all, it was a 
delightful sojourn in "the Swamp" with 45 species overall and great sparrow 
views. 


I added pictures of the first and third Vespers, plus a shadowy picture of the 
Foxie, on my Flick'r page: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/marc_chelemer/

Good birding.

Marc J. Chelemer

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Glennhurst meadow Saturday
From: Susan Garretsonfriedman <susan.garretsonfriedman AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:17:19 -0400
A bit late, but just wanted to thank Terry C. and Karen E.  (with an assist
from Vince C. ] for a great walk at Glennhurst meadows Saturday.  We had
almost an embarrassment of Vesper Sparrows, which was a life bird for me,
and a White-crowned Sparrow, which was the first I'd seen on the East
coast, plus a Blue-headed Vireo, a Bald Eagle, a Swainson's Thrush and many
other fun birds.  It's always a great place to bird, but good leaders make
it so much better!

Thanks,

*Susan*
Susan Garretson Friedman
Welcome Center/Nature Store Manager
Scherman Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary

New Jersey Audubon
11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
908-766-5787

Connect with us: [image: Facebook]

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Flickr] [image: Twitter]
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Essex County sandhill cranes
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 10:52:27 -0400
Three sandhill cranes flew over Brookdale Park, Bloomfield, a few minutes
before ten this morning. They were headed resolutely southwest, so probably
didn't make the day's tally at the nearby Montclair hawk watch.
Eager to hear where they were seen next.
The only other semi-notable bird was a fine Lincoln's sparrow in the new
Migratory Bird Habitat behind the maintenance building.
-- 
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Ocean Terminal, Bayonne
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 19:27:04 -0400
I took a walk early this evening and tallied 3 Vespers and 2 Short-eared
Owls.

Details here:


http://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2014/10/27/3-vespers-2-short-eared-owls-at-ocean-terminal/ 


Mike Britt
Bayonne

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: The beauty of common birds (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:18:41 -0400
I was sitting out on my deck this afternoon when I happened to snap a photo
of a Mourning Dove foraging in the fall leaves. Maybe the best photo I've
ever taken of a Mourning Dove. You can even clearly make out the "pale
bluish orbital ring" around the eye that Sibley describes.

Just started me thinking...in our never ending quest to add new species to
our lists, sometimes we might overlook the beauty of very common species. I
know I'm guilty of that. Here's my photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15621281326/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cumberland - Siskins and a Vesper Sparrow
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 14:47:49 -0400
Hello,
 I finally managed a flock of Siskins down here! Heislerville. Love this spot. 

No waterfowl in the impoundments. Eurasian Wigeon would be nice!
Purple Finches everywhere. 
 High tide so hit Thompson's Beach Rd. Walked out past the gate hoping for a 

Nelson's. No success. Looked good! No Seaside either. I was on the sand road,
not in the marsh. Could be some out there. I have no set spot for Nelson's in 
the 

county, but am having fun trying. I was surprised to see a Vesper Sparrow on 
the 

road out at the end! Another toughie for the county. Bivalve has probably been 
my 

most reliable spot in years past. Anyway, lots of other sparrows out there so 
maybe 

it will stick. 

Butterfly notes - many Orange Sulphurs. Andba Painted Lady.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Glenhurst Meadows Fox Sparrows
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 14:24:17 -0400
Hi, Y'all. 

 I spent a few hours combing the southern half of the property today- mainly
trying to relocate the olive-gray, short-winged, nondescript little warbler
that I flushed here yesterday- to no avail. I didn't get enough of a look to
know for sure what it was. And so it goes..

I did, however find two Fox Sparrows- my first of season. A great
consolation prize, I think. I also saw one Lincoln's, five White-crowneds,
and one Vesper- and even without any Towhees ( I couldn't buy a Towhee
today! ) I wound up with twelve sparrow species on the day. Like Marc said-
a nice morning at Glenhurst.  

 Here's a link to one of the Foxies that I almost got pretty shots of:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 

I'll get 'em next time.

 

Good Birding!

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: A great day on Cape May Saturday. A nice morning at Glenhurst today
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:22:27 +0000
Jerseybirders,

Harvey Tomlinson and I met at 6:30 at Higbees on Saturday and had seen a dozen 
Woodcocks before the sun even crept over the horizon. Harvey heard a Screech 
Owl! Once it got slightly brighter, the cavalcade of birds began. I've not 
experienced a "really good" morning flight before; it was thrilling to watch 
hundreds of birds flying in from the south every moment, heading north across 
the fields. At one point, the "keekeekerr" text said the count was 500 birds 
going by the dike PER MINUTE. We spend five and half hours just at Higbees, and 
had wonderful views of many species while we tried gallantly to scare up one 
Orange-crowned Warbler, my latest nemesis. We thought we had one, but looking 
at Harvey's photos makes it seem to be a late, northern race Yellow. 


The rest of the day Harvey, George Eschenbach, and I, like Larry Scacchetti and 
his posse the next day, spent looking for the Fork-tailed Flycatcher: several 
hours at the Beanery, Cape Island Preserve, and then a dash BACK to Cape Island 
after Jake Cuomo's astounding re-find of the bird in his backyard, right across 
the RR tracks from the preserve itself. No dice, and we didn't get the 
Scissor-tailed as a consolation. We did see a "Gambel's" White-crowned Sparrow 
in the back fields at the Beanery. Regardless of the "misses," it was a 
fantastic day, and we identified 84 species without even getting near the 
ocean. Seeing so many other acquaintances was also special. 


This morning, I visited the Wagner Arboretum and Glenhurst Meadows, looking for 
Vesper Sparrow and thinking that Glenhurst would be another likely OCWA spot. I 
did find one Vesper along the back fence of the Arboretum's Children's Garden, 
but no OCWA. I feel like I'll be looking for that not-really-elusive species 
through a Christmas count! I did scare up a Woodcock and watched a really nice 
Blue-headed Vireo during my sojourn. Vince Capp was there to really do the 
place right; work beckoned and I headed off at 9:30. 


Good birding everyone.

Marc
Marc J. Chelemer

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Assunpink Fox Sparrow
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 08:23:50 -0500
On this most glorious of mornings I had my first Fox Sparrow of the fall. Lots 
of other goodies around as well including 8 Pied-billed Grebes on the main lake 

Bob Dodelson

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Scissor me timbers I got forked
From: Larry scacchetti <larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 23:14:34 -0400
Today was a a clear case of "wrong place, wrong time" 3 times! Keenan Ennis and 
I drove down together and thought it was going to be a walk up bird at the Cape 
May Creek Preserve. When we arrived, we were greeted by Pete Bacinski, always 
good to see him. We were there for about 20 minutes when we got the first 
keekeekerr from Drew Weber of the Fork-tailed Flycatcher heading over the 
meadows towards the hawk watch. So Keenan and I zipped over to the hawk watch 
in hopes that it would show. As we walked toward the Plover Ponds, the 2nd 
Keekeekerr came through from Mike Crewe about the FTFL heading out to sea but 
returning towards the State Park. So Keenan and I were teamed up with Vincent 
Nachnadowitz and the 3 of us walked the beach towards Coral Ave. On our 2nd 
trip to the cape may creek preserve we met up with Bob Dodleson, whom I was 
super excited to see for some medical advice on my smashed knuckle. Apparently 
there are no kidneys in knuckles so he couldn't help me! 

 . In the 2nd field north of Wilson Ave, there was a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 
that flew in front of me and over the tracks towards the residential area. I've 
never been so pissed to see a STFL in NJ then today. 


The 4 of us scoured all over cape island. The preserve, the meadows, state 
park, the beach, higbees, the beanery, the streets around the state park and 
the magnecite plant, I've never walked that much around Cape May in my life! 
Another upset miss today was a Tony Croasdale sighting. Apparently really good 
fudge is more important then a FTFL. There were a lot of other good sightings 
throughout the day. A rare Sam Galick at the state park, a David La Puma 
leading a trip like a boss at the plover ponds, Dave Magpiong and his daughter 
at the hawk watch, Marty Delwo at the hawk watch and then later at the 
magnecite plant. I also got to meet Jake Cuomo at the preserve at sunset, it 
was great to meet him and congratulate him on his amazing new yard bird! 


My streak of new state birds had to come to and end, I just wasn't ready for it 
to end with this bird. You can't see them all. Thats what keeps us coming back 
out! All in all it was a really good day, 83 species and probably forgot to 
mark some down. 


Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Westwood, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: White-throated Sparrows, Bald Eagles, Ruby-crowned Kinglets
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 16:00:03 -0400
Hello,
     The Rancocas Nature Center trip today to various Gloucester County
hotspots enjoyed fine weather and excellent numbers of sparrows and
Kinglets! The Scenic Trail at Riverwinds. had a couple hundred 
White-throats.
And no Song..... Very strange! We had Song elsewhere - thankfully!
About 25 Ruby-crowned Kinglets. And 2 Golden-crowned. Nothing rare today,
just great numbers of the common species. The raptor show later in the 
morning
was super with Bald Eagles migrating and a pair doing some courtship 
rituals.
Twisting and turning in the air and calling. That was our moment of the 
day!
Many Red-tailed Hawks around. Both Sharpie and Coopers. Harrier at the 
dredge
spoils. The east pool at the dredge still is looking good for 
shorebirds. Peep sp.
9 Lesser Yellowlegs, 2 Killdeer, and something else roosting that we 
could not
get a good look at. No scopes and we didn't walk down.

Butterfly notes - Common Buckeyes, Orange Sulphurs, and a Monarch.

Good birding all.

-- 
Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
sandrakeller AT verizon.net

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: FOY junco
From: "cwsg1 AT excite.com" <cwsg1@EXCITE.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 11:19:05 -0400
for me... actually a pair of them.  
 
C. Wyluda
Pennington

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Photo Study Of Birds At E.B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), Atlantic County, NJ, 10/25/14
From: "Howard B. Eskin" <hbeskin AT VOICENET.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 06:53:43 -0500
Briton Parker and I went to Brig yesterday. We had high tides, lots of
sunshine and birds!  Also, there were lots of photo opportunities among
the 54 species of birds seen. To see the Photo Study and a list of the
species seen, please click on the following link:

http://www.howardsview.com/BrigOct25_14/BrigOct25_14.html

Regards,
Howard

Howard B. Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
Harleysville (Montco), PA

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Subject: Sandy Hook
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:12:18 -0400
Jerseybirders,

Jeff Ellerbusch and I had a pretty good day at Sandy Hook, tallying in the
neighborhood of 76 species.

Highlights on my blog:

http://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2014/10/25/sandy-hook-1025/

Mike Britt
Bayonne

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Subject: NJ Audubon Young Birders Club Trip today
From: Scott Barnes <scott.barnes AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 21:19:20 -0400
Jerseybirders,

NJA Teacher-Naturalist Sam Wilson and I led the NJ Audubon Young Birders
Club field trip on the Cape May Autumn Weekend today. We had a "perfect
storm" of beautiful weather, excellent birding, and a great group of kids.
Highlights included four drake Eurasian Wigeons on lighthouse pond, a
pretty good morning flight of raptors including several latish Broad-winged
Hawks, Red-shouldered Hawk, several Bald Eagles of various age classes and
one distant Golden Eagle, calling Virginia Rail, a good study of Lesser
Black-backed Gulls in direct comparison with other larids, 2 Vesper
Sparrows, and a bunch of Purple Finches and Pine Siskins. A few lucky young
birders with sharp eyes got to see a fly-by Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at
the hawk watch--which both the leaders missed! :-)

The New Jersey Audubon Young Birders Club has an excellent array of field
trips scheduled for 2015 from Old Mine Road in the Delaware Water Gap to
Cape May, with many locations in between.  Check the website for details
and please spread the word to any young birders you may know!

http://njyoungbirders.weebly.com/

Good Birding,

Scott Barnes
All Things Birds Program Director
Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
Editor, NJ Audubon eBird
New Jersey Audubon
tel. 609-897-9400
scott.barnes AT njaudubon.org
www.njaudubon.org

Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.

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Subject: Fork-tailed Flycatcher
From: Clifford Miles <0000000e98604842-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 00:52:00 +0000
Just wondering if there is any info on the bird in Cape May.
Clifford MilesMountain Lakes, NJ

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Subject: Island Beach morning flight
From: Greg Prelich <gprelich AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 15:37:21 -0400
I was at Island Beach State Park this morning, and from 8:30 until ~10:00 AM 
with winds coming from the west, there was a strong flight of birds. The 
surprising thing to me is that with the exception of cormorants, nearly all of 
them were moving northward. It felt very Higbee-like, with large numbers and a 
south-to-north pattern. I was wondering if the northward movement is expected 
and if others have seen it at Island Beach previously. I thought that the 
HIgbee / Cape May northward morning flight effect was from re-orientation of 
nocturnal migrants as they reach the expanse of Delaware Bay, causing a 
northward flight to minimize flying over water. If so, then that explanation 
shouldn't really apply to a northward morning flight at Island Beach. It would 
be nice to get into Island Beach earlier in the morning to see what kind of 
consistent flight pattern happens soon after the sun rises, but of course this 
park is closed before 8AM, which still annoys me to no end. 


Other than a copious supply of Hermit Thrush, sparrows, juncos, and both 
kinglets, today's highlights were a Lincoln's Sparrow, 3 White-crowned 
Sparrows, 3 Purple Finches, 2 Blue-headed Vireos, 2 Black-throated Green 
Warblers, 3 Brown Creepers, 2 Winter Wrens, a Merlin, and 3 Brown Pelicans. 


Greg Prelich
Manchester, NJ
http://birdquiz.net
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Subject: Greenwald Park - Camden County
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 18:21:53 -0400
Not much! I presume more stuff out than in last night!
A late afternoon try for sparrows yielded just White throated, Song,
and 2 Swamp. No warblers either. And no Chimney Swifts. I'll try and hit
the Haddonfield chimney this weekend.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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Subject: Nelson's/Saltmarsh Sparrow in Highland Park
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 16:29:30 -0400
Pond in Donaldson Park, Highland Park. Habitat on a narrow edge of the pond
is marshy, with grasses and water plants, and cattails. Pond probably gets
occasional brackish water from tidal surges. I've seen people crabbing in
this pond, and signs on the nearby boat docks on the Raritan River
expressly prohibit crabbing.

This morning I detected a smallish sparrow furtively scurrying around the
edge of the pond among the marshy plants. It was a real skulker. The bird
ran more than it flew. A couple of times it looked like it ran over water
very briefly between the water plants.

At one point the bird popped up in clear view to check me out. I didn't
have enough time for a photo, but I got a very brief clear look in the
sunlight. Right now I am leaning towards Saltmarsh based on my Sibley's.

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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Subject: New house, new owls
From: Larry scacchetti <larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 19:49:42 -0400
So i've been living in this new house for about a month now. About 3 days of 
living there, some friends and I were hanging out in the garage, at 1:00 am, 
thats when I heard the first owl. It was a Great Horned Owl and the first owl 
for the new yard. Everyone came and gave a listen but I was the only one who 
heading into the woods. I found the bird sitting over the river and hooting 
away. At that moment an Eastern Screech-Owl began to call from the side of my 
house. Upon my return, the Screech was no where to be found, or heard. Ever 
since that night, I've had a pair of hooters in my yard almost every night;) 
One semi-rainy night, I called one in and it flew over me and the house and 
towards the direction where I believe they hunt, only 2 blocks. A friend lives 
in that direction and when he heads home at around 3 am he hears them over 
there. They stop hooting in my yard about 130-2 am. Some nights I can even hear 
them in my room through my walls. So far its been qu! 

 ite a trip living here. I've been back in the woods for some trail building 
but haven't really made my way over to where the owls spend most of their time 
calling from. When I get the time, I'll do a little more exploring. 


to be continued…

Good birding,
Larry Scacchetti

Westwood, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Odd: First fall warbler & first winter sparrow on same day
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 16:01:03 -0400
On Tuesday of this week (10/21/14) I spotted my first fall warbler
(Yellow-rumped) and my first winter sparrow (White-throated).

Seems rather late for my first fall warbler species...

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Turkeys Reacting to Blue Jay Distress Call (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 15:04:12 -0400
I've seen this happen several times before over the past ten years, but
this is the first time I've been able to get a photo. These Wild Turkeys
were all foraging heads down, rarely looking up, when suddenly a Blue Jay
gave a loud distress call nearby. Suddenly all three turkeys popped their
heads up. The mother hen (lowest turkey on the left) appears to be the most
alert:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15424126877/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Another Blog on Feeders - Suet Stumps
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 13:04:58 -0400
I did a second blog on home-made feeders. This one is on making a stump to hold 
suet and take photos. 



http://stevebyland.blogspot.com/2014/10/make-suet-log-for-better-photographs.html 


Steve Byland
Warren, NJ
sbbyland AT aol.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cape May Monday - Higbee Beach
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 20:18:55 -0700
Sorry about that.  The sparrows mentioned previously were at Higbee Beach.
The raptors were at all the usual spots in Cape May. Joe Palumbo and Liz
Bendet

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Forsythe: White Pelican & Clay-colored Sparrow 10/22
From: William Keim <keimwj AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 19:11:47 -0400
Gail Johnson and I birded Forsythe today, 10/22, and found a couple of 
interesting rarities before the rain. An American White Pelican was far out in 
the middle of the East Pool, both swimming and flying, and being attacked by 
Great Black-backed Gulls. We also found a Clay-colored Sparrow at the parking 
lot at the beginning of Jen's Trail. Photos available on my Flickr page. 

Bill KeimBuckingham, Bucks Co, PAKeimWJ AT hotmail.comphotos: 
www.flickr.com/forktail 


 		 	   		  
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bird Photography Tips - Feeder Stand
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 18:00:50 -0400
For my bird photographer friends, I recently put out a blog describing how to 
build a simple, inexpensive feeder stand that also holds a perch for easy, 
backyard photography. It can be seen at: 


http://stevebyland.blogspot.com/2014/10/photo-feeder-stand-for-better.html

Steve Byland
Warren, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Mystery bird
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 15:18:14 -0400
Or rather, purple finch, brown. Remember that it takes more than a year for
males to attain their red plumage.

On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 3:03 PM, Gary or Karen Gentile 
wrote:

> Thanks to all who were willing to help with bird ID.
> I tend to agree with the majority of very wise birders
> who pegged it at Purple Finch, female.
> I never saw one that close, or at my feeders, so thought
> it was small Grosbeak or large Purple Finch!
> Good Birding!
> Now to get Flicker posting down.
>
> Karen
> Ocean
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>



-- 
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Mystery bird
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 15:03:02 -0400
Thanks to all who were willing to help with bird ID.
I tend to agree with the majority of very wise birders
who pegged it at Purple Finch, female.
I never saw one that close, or at my feeders, so thought
it was small Grosbeak or large Purple Finch!
Good Birding!
Now to get Flicker posting down.

Karen
Ocean

Sent from my iPad

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Photo ID
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 13:42:15 -0400
Is there anyone on the list who would allow me to
send through to their email a picture of a bird on my feeder?
I'm sure it's common, but I don't know what it is and it's different than all 
the myriad of birds that feed in the yard. 

Thought it was Rose-breasted Grosbeak but now, not sure???
Can't seem to send link without whole picture popping up.
Thanks.


Karen
Ocean




Sent from my iPad

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cape May Monday - Clay Colored, Lincoln's and 12 species of raptors
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 09:32:30 -0700
As expected, Monday at Cape May was excellent for both passerines and
raptors.  The weekend cold front brought in lots of birds including a
Clay-colored sparrow and a Lincoln sparrow in the first field to the left
of the parking lot.  Walk along the edge of the hedgerow where the 2 wooden
observation towers are.  This has always been a good area for rare and
uncommon sparrows.  We also had 12 species of raptors with an early falcon
flight and a late Bald Eagle flight.

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: This summer's King Rail in Bayonne
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 14:09:39 +0000
I lost track of this. Last I recall, only one King rail was ever seen and was 
occasionally associating with a Clapper. 


My question for this gloomy day is: What did the youngsters grow up to look 
like? Hybrids? One or the other species? (OK, three questions). 


SA

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: upper level winds
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 21:09:58 -0400
For a lesson in predicting bird movement and reading those maps,
see the latest View from the Cape. I get it via email. I don't pretend
to understand a lot of it! But very interesting! I hope NW winds still
on Sunday. Will be down in Cumberland again! Or maybe the sea watch
at Avalon.

Good birding all!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Magnificent Frigate
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 18:42:02 -0400
Cooper,

Sounds like "Kearny East." There are several large impoundments and a large
DCCO roost on the railings and radio towers.
That train line goes right through there. So considering your last post,
this was essentially a GISS sighting?

Mike

On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 2:39 PM, Cooper Cronk  wrote:

> Hey Mike,
>
> This is not a daily commute for me, but I might be slightly more specific.
> I probably should have mentioned that it was in one of those large
> marshy/watery expanses that you pass through on the train. I was thinking
> the sighting may have occurred in Kearny, but I was not sure.
>
> I suppose I forgot to mention in my previous email that the sighting was
> between the Secaucus Junction stop and the next stop on the Northeast
> Corridor line. Moving south that is.
>
> I am not familiar with birding destinations in that area, but I am sure
> you could probably pick a few spots to check. My birding rarely leaves
> Middlesex County, but we get a few gems every year.
>
> Cooper Cronk
> Highland Park
>
> On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 8:08 AM, Michael Britt 
> wrote:
>
>> Cooper,
>>
>> Moving forward, if this is a daily commute, could you please provide more
>> details about the location?
>>
>> From your description, it sounds like this was in the vicinity of the
>> Secaucus Transfer Station, by exit 15X of the NJTP. With that said,
>> interested birders should check the Laurel Hill, DeKorte, Kearny area, not
>> to mention the Hudson River...
>>
>> P.S. My route takes me through that area 5 days a week...my eyes were
>> especially peeled this AM!
>>
>> Mike Britt
>>
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>>
>
>

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