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Updated on Sunday, May 29 at 07:47 PM EST
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Oilbird,©BirdQuest

29 May Re: Olive-sided in Hudson County [Michael Britt ]
29 May Piney Hollow - Gloucester County - local notes [Sandra Keller ]
29 May One Legged Osprey at Sandy Hook? [colleen snow ]
29 May Updates, please [Rabbi Ilene Schneider ]
29 May Probable anhinga over Cherry Hill, Nj [Joseph Palumbo ]
29 May Olive-sided in Hudson County [Michael Britt ]
29 May Hudson County Olive-sided Flycatchers [Theodore Chase Jr ]
28 May Re: Turtles laying eggs in backyard [mike hiotis ]
28 May Chat at Assunpink [Larry-Zirlin ]
28 May nihil ad rem: Turtle laying eggs in backyard [Robert Gallucci ]
27 May Trying to find shorebirds without tide charts that I studied [Yong Kong ]
27 May Garret Mountain: Kentucky Warbler 1 [Bill Elrick ]
27 May wilsons storm petrel - Cape May - timing good? [Sandra Keller ]
27 May Re: Hudson County flycatchers [Dom ]
27 May Hudson County flycatchers [Michael Britt ]
26 May Sandy Hook this AM [Jim Hayes ]
26 May "The Messenger" [Louis Bizzarro ]
26 May gloucester - wheelabrator - migration [Sandra Keller ]
26 May Nemesis "vanquished," thanks, as always, to other birders ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
25 May It ain't Disney [Cathy Blumig ]
25 May birds at home today ["cwsg1 AT excite.com" ]
25 May Garret Mountain Reservation not over just yet = Olive-sided Flycatcher 4 [Bill Elrick ]
25 May Sandy Hook, Wednesday, May 25: [Peter Bacinski ]
25 May Memorial Lake, Woodstown [Karenne Snow ]
25 May A nice walk on a warm beach ["Albert, Steven" ]
25 May Black-necked Stilt [Rod ]
25 May Assunpink Chat [Bob Dodelson ]
24 May shorebirds - Heislerville, the dredge [Sandra Keller ]
25 May Monofilament fishing line for birds' nests? [J and B ]
24 May Assunpink Caspian [Louis Bizzarro ]
24 May Monofilament fishing line [John McCarthy and Linda Stehlik ]
24 May birds at home ["cwsg1 AT excite.com" ]
23 May BirdCallsRadio Reboots w NEW Show [Mardi Dickinson ]
23 May Excellent Afternoon on Great Day Blvd, Tuckerton, Sunday: [Peter Bacinski ]
23 May Photo Study Of Birds At E.B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 5/22/16 ["Howard B. Eskin" ]
22 May Re: pelagics from shore [Michael Britt ]
22 May Pelagics from shore [Michael Britt ]
22 May Negri-Nepote [judson hamlin ]
22 May Junco ["Susie R." ]
22 May Palmyra - migration and breeders [Sandra Keller ]
22 May Black-crown Night Heron [Cathy Blumig ]
22 May Sussex County 95 species 25 warblers 15 daylight hours Fri and Sat [Fred Vir ]
22 May Holgate seawatch [Michael Britt ]
22 May Oriole nests and monofilament fishing line (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
22 May Monofilament [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
22 May Re: Orioles ...Was, Greenwald Park - Camden - breeders [William Dix ]
22 May Re: Orioles ...Was, Greenwald Park - Camden - breeders [Mike Anderson ]
22 May Re: Correction: NJA Trip High Point and Stokes - Trip was actually on 5/21 ;) [Carole Hughes ]
22 May NJA Trip High Point and Stokes - 5/22 [Carole Hughes ]
22 May Banded Red Knots [Harvey Tomlinson ]
22 May Re: Orioles ...Was, Greenwald Park - Camden - breeders [Mike ]
22 May Orioles ...Was, Greenwald Park - Camden - breeders [L Larson ]
21 May Greenwald Park - Camden - breeders [Sandra Keller ]
21 May Sooty Shearwaters [Michael Britt ]
21 May Sooty Shearwater movement [Tom Reed ]
21 May It's great to be back home ["Albert, Steven" ]
20 May Bald Pate Excellent today [Joseph Palumbo ]
20 May Sandy Hook today-good [Scott Barnes ]
20 May Message from Wildlife Biologist Chris Aquila ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
20 May Scarlet Tanagers are coming through Bayonne NJ. [Patricia Hilliard ]
20 May nightjars [Sandra Keller ]
19 May Clay-colored Sparrow, Bobs ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
19 May Woodbridge Warblers [Scott Barnes ]
19 May Mourning Warbler at Scherman Hoffman WS [Susan Garretsonfriedman ]
19 May Yard birds but can not do it all, Camden County [Yong Kong ]
18 May Blue Grosbeak Union County 230PM weds today [Fred Vir ]
18 May Re: Pileated Woodpecker Ocean County [Fred Vir ]
18 May NPS - PEPC - Deadline to Comment on "Relocate Maintenance Facilities to More Sustainable Locations - Sandy Hook" EIS [Fairfax Hutter ]
18 May Shorebirds - Cumberland [Sandra Keller ]
18 May After 37 years that we have lived in our home, [Michael Perlin ]
18 May Return to Lakewood Pine Park ["James O'Brien" ]
18 May Mourning Warbler - Curlew sandpiper [Harvey Tomlinson ]
18 May Re: Garret Mountain 5/18/16 ["B.G. Sloan" ]
18 May Garret Mountain 5/18/16 [Benjamin Barkley ]
18 May Kentucky Warbler at Flat Rock Brook, Englewood ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
17 May Re: Snowy/Little Egret Hybrid [Yong Kong ]

Subject: Re: Olive-sided in Hudson County
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 20:42:13 -0400
Fred,

Now that's substantive...though I will have to read it over several more
times to digest it;)

Thanks,
Mike

On Sun, May 29, 2016 at 10:57 AM, Michael Britt 
wrote:

> Ted,
>
> You must not bird Hudson County too often and dead wood is not a
> requirement. So long as some tall trees have some exposed snags, then
> suitable perches are available. Areas that have dead trees and/or exposed
> snags are Ocean Terminal, Hudson County Park (Stephen R. Gregg), Liberty
> State Park, Lincoln Park (Jersey City), Schmidt's Woods, Kearny Marsh,
> North Hudson Park (North Bergen), West Side Avenue in North Bergen, the
> Palisades ridge from the Jersey City Heights up to North Bergen, some
> cemeteries (though more and more is being removed), not to mention myriad
> brownfields, railroad rights-of-way, etc.
>
> I wrote John Holinka and he mentioned observing the bird in mid-May,
> roughly fifteen years ago at Stephen R. Gregg. I searched the NJAS RBA
> archives (a great resource that pre-dates the eBird bar charts) from
> 1990-2014 and the only report was 9/1/97, from Liberty State Park. Ed
> Borowik has had the bird once or twice at Lincoln Park and once at LSP
> (maybe that was his fall sighting?).
>
> I think fall is probably better considering there are more birds
> (augmented by HY birds) and more inexperienced birds (HY birds).
> Considering overall habitat quality, I think Liberty State Park has the
> best to offer, with snags on the edges of largish, successional fields.
> Looking at the eBird bar charts first for Acadian flycather, I noticed a
> line of sightings from Sandy Hook, to northern Staten Island, to Stephen R.
> Gregg, to Newark, to Garret Mountain. When you plug in John Holinka's
> Stephen R. Gregg Olive-sided sighting, you will find this same line. I
> think this is my spot and I won't stop until I find one!
>
> In closing, I was really hoping for some substantive responses, where are
> you Fred V?
>
> Thanks,
> Mike Britt
>


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Subject: Piney Hollow - Gloucester County - local notes
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 17:18:55 -0400
As in I explored this afternoon for a couple hours. I had wanted to confirm the 
Yellow-throated Warblers nesting. 

Did. Had one carrying food. Took awhile though! That is a uncommon breeder in 
the county. 


The bogs look great for post breeding wandering. As in I want that Little Blue 
Heron that Jon had a month ago! 

Keeping my fingers crossed! No wandering White Ibis today.That would be a 
county bird. And no MI Kites feeding 

overt the treelines. That’s not a county bird, but would love to see again! 

The place was actually quite birdy considering the time of day and heat. 
Prothonotary Warblers singing. That was nice. 

YT Vireo. That could breed there. I was too tired to watch it much. Not that I 
ever saw it! Just heard it. 


Dragonfy notes - hardly any. A few Blue Dashers and a lone female Eastern 
Pondhawk. 


Good birding all.


Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
Sent from my iMac






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Subject: One Legged Osprey at Sandy Hook?
From: colleen snow <c.snow357 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 15:04:02 -0400
Hi all

We took advantage of the cooler temperatures at Sandy Hook yesterday
evening until after sundown to see what birds were around.  After the sun
had gone down behind the clouds, we were on the boardwalk across from
Parking Lot C or D (I think).  There is an Osprey nest on the platform next
to the drive and just a bit to the west of the boardwalk.  We saw an Osprey
on the nest (and were told by someone else there is at least one chick in
the nest as well) and another one perched atop a snag just to the east of
the boardwalk.  Before we left, the bird on the snag flew back to the
platform and sat on the small perch above the nest.  Despite the failing
light, Hadas and I both snapped some photos to see what we could get.

When I checked my pics later, I noticed the bird on the perch was standing
on 1 leg.  I asked Hadas to check her pictures since she had taken more
photos including while it was on the snag.  In all of her photos that the
leg(s) could be seen, it was also only standing on the left leg.  The bird
is banded with a silver band but with the poor lighting we don't stand a
chance of getting a number off it.

I realize the bird may just have been resting this way but I wondered if
anyone else may have seen this.  I would think an Osprey with 1 leg doesn't
stand much chance of survival.  Do Ospreys "routinely" stand on 1 leg?

Thanks and Good Birding!

Colleen Snow
Middlesex, NJ


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Subject: Updates, please
From: Rabbi Ilene Schneider <marltonbirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 14:19:56 -0400
I haven't seen any recent postings for the fork-tailed flycatcher at
Assunpink. Has it since flown the coop, so to speak?

What is the status of the Wildlife Dr. at Brig?

Thanks.

Ilene Schneider
Marlton


-- 
Rabbi Ilene Schneider, Ed.D.

CHANUKAH GUILT
UNLEAVENED DEAD
TALK DIRTY YIDDISH

rabbi.author AT yahoo.com
http://rabbiauthor.com
facebook.com/rabbi.author


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Subject: Probable anhinga over Cherry Hill, Nj
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 13:15:42 -0400
While walking into a bagle shop at 0800 this morning, Liz spotted a
"strange" raptor flying northeast over route 70.  It was too far back to
the car for bins, so we watched the bird naked eye and concluded it was a
female anhinga.  Look to the skies if you are in Camden county.  Would like
confirmation.  Joe Palumbo/Liz Bender


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Subject: Olive-sided in Hudson County
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 10:57:50 -0400
Ted,

You must not bird Hudson County too often and dead wood is not a
requirement. So long as some tall trees have some exposed snags, then
suitable perches are available. Areas that have dead trees and/or exposed
snags are Ocean Terminal, Hudson County Park (Stephen R. Gregg), Liberty
State Park, Lincoln Park (Jersey City), Schmidt's Woods, Kearny Marsh,
North Hudson Park (North Bergen), West Side Avenue in North Bergen, the
Palisades ridge from the Jersey City Heights up to North Bergen, some
cemeteries (though more and more is being removed), not to mention myriad
brownfields, railroad rights-of-way, etc.

I wrote John Holinka and he mentioned observing the bird in mid-May,
roughly fifteen years ago at Stephen R. Gregg. I searched the NJAS RBA
archives (a great resource that pre-dates the eBird bar charts) from
1990-2014 and the only report was 9/1/97, from Liberty State Park. Ed
Borowik has had the bird once or twice at Lincoln Park and once at LSP
(maybe that was his fall sighting?).

I think fall is probably better considering there are more birds (augmented
by HY birds) and more inexperienced birds (HY birds). Considering overall
habitat quality, I think Liberty State Park has the best to offer, with
snags on the edges of largish, successional fields. Looking at the eBird
bar charts first for Acadian flycather, I noticed a line of sightings from
Sandy Hook, to northern Staten Island, to Stephen R. Gregg, to Newark, to
Garret Mountain. When you plug in John Holinka's Stephen R. Gregg
Olive-sided sighting, you will find this same line. I think this is my spot
and I won't stop until I find one!

In closing, I was really hoping for some substantive responses, where are
you Fred V?

Thanks,
Mike Britt


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Subject: Hudson County Olive-sided Flycatchers
From: Theodore Chase Jr <chase_c AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 09:49:51 -0400
I agree with Dom - my first reaction on reading Mike’s post was, “You don’t 
have enough dead trees in Hudson County!” In my experience, OSFL are always 
sitting on or flying out from the very top of a dead tree, preferably a spruce 
or fir (which narrows to a single stem at the top). I’d identify one by that 
(Pewees by contrast are at mid-level, in a forest). 

	Ted Chase
	Franklin Twp., Somerset Co.

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Subject: Re: Turtles laying eggs in backyard
From: mike hiotis <mchhiotis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 19:42:44 -0400
Robert as you know this is the time of year for mom Snapping Turtles to
wander about and lay their eggs. If one travels the Great Swamp it is
obvious many nests are dug up by the many local predators(
Raccoon,Opposum,Fox,etc.).I have a friend in South Carolina that lives near
a swamp such as yourself and he does in fact fence the nests in quite
securely. He uses a wire mesh with squares large enough to let the turtles
out. He also keeps a vigilant eye so if turtles do hatch he is there to
make sure they can escape. He has arrived home to see a pair of Blue Herons
chowing down to their delight.Once an American Bittern was close by rolling
baby turtles around in her mouth and flying off with a mouthful. I do no
know the "benefits" to the local fauna community if more Snapping Turtles
do survive in the Great Swamp.As I have seen large Snappers grab many a
Gosling, Duckling and once try to sneak up on 3 Sora chicks but their Mom
flew across the pond and rounded them up to safety. One nest may not make a
difference but it is quite interesting the turtle involved in your yard
made the effort to lay her eggs at your address. Good Luck....

Mike Hiotis
Martinsville NJ


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Subject: Chat at Assunpink
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 16:08:55 +0000
My annual pursuit of Yellow-breasted Chat at Assunpink was successful this 
morning on "only" my third try for the year, thanks to information from Louis 
Bizzaro. It is in a field (to the right of the Tree Swallow box) that I've 
never ventured into because the grass is very high there, but for a chat I 
doused myself with insect repellent and wore my permethrin pants and saw it in 
the bushes after hearing it sing. And, after checking myself thoroughly, no 
ticks! 


Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 


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Subject: nihil ad rem: Turtle laying eggs in backyard
From: Robert Gallucci <Robert AT RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 13:21:00 +0000
My apologies for mailing off topic. Emailing here in hopes we have a turtle 
lover, naturalist or biologist that can offer advice. 


Woke up this morning and found a giant snapping turtle laying eggs in the 
backyard. We are on the border of the Great Swamp but not near any significant 
water. 


I have no idea weather I should fence the area to protect the eggs once the mom 
is done or just leave it alone. 


I don't think this is the first one either. We had a strange dirt mound last 
week. Passed it off at the time. 



Thanks 

Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: Trying to find shorebirds without tide charts that I studied
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 17:07:05 -0400
I have no clue why I even bother looking up the tide chart the night before my 
trip Delaware Bay as I could never make it on the “desired” time of 
arrival. This morning was no exception. I was about 2 hours too late. 


Reason ? YK rule, I can not shoot out the door and hit the gas unless I do some 
yard/homewoods birding first. FOY Kingfisher at the homewoods pond, and burned 
more time trying to get a Doc photo. No luck there too. 


Only highlight for the day was watching 6 American Avocets fly in from Delaware 
Bay side. One beautifully dressed “girl” Avocet with five boys tagging 
along as if she is playing the Bachelorette reality show to perfection. 


Never did get the live view more than a few seconds except take some photos as 
main purpose of the visit was to punish myself on the shorebird ID. 


Very poor photos (they were very distant) on my Flicker. They were about 1 mile 
south of the Maple Avenue impoundment/over flow. So, perhaps these Avocets will 
ignore those crabbers and fishing folks and make a landing there as well. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County, NJ

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Subject: Garret Mountain: Kentucky Warbler 1
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 17:03:38 -0400
Hi, Another quick update. A Olive-sided flycatcher was west of the "show
jumping coral" at the stables at first light.
The Kentucky Warbler was singing at the south west corner of Rocky hollow
and was hard to see. It sang and flitted about for around 5 min with a few
quick sightings. Three of us heard it not sure how good the views were for
the others.
Blackpolls are getting a more common sound now and lots of females are here
already. Can not be long now until everything is over for the spring.

Garret Mountain Reservation (Park), Passaic, New Jersey, US
May 27, 2016 6:15 AM - 11:15 AM
Protocol: Traveling
4.0 mile(s)
64 species


Common Loon  1

Yellow-billed Cuckoo  2

Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1

Olive-sided Flycatcher  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  5
Great Crested Flycatcher  9
Eastern Kingbird  5
Warbling Vireo  6
Red-eyed Vireo  12

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  3
Veery  2
Swainson's Thrush  23
Wood Thrush  4

Ovenbird  4
Hi      Heard for about 5 minutes, saw briefly three times never any chance
of photos
Common Yellowthroat  4
American Redstart  5
Northern Parula  2
Yellow Warbler  1
Blackpoll Warbler  18
Black-throated Blue Warbler  2
Pine Warbler  1
Black-throated Green Warbler  2
Canada Warbler  1

Scarlet Tanager  3

Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
Orchard Oriole  1
Baltimore Oriole  12


View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29939726

*Bill Elrick*





*belrick AT NYNJBirdingGuide.com * 

*Skype  AT  bilbander*

*NYNJBirdingGuide *


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Subject: wilsons storm petrel - Cape May - timing good?
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 12:45:50 -0400
Question - I don't see many reports on ebird. Are they there in good numbers 
now? 

I am thinking Sat. early morning, then leave before the crowds hit. Its a long 
drive for 

me if an iffy sighting. Although I have a feeling June is already committed to 
stuff 

and won't make it down then! I was thinking 6:45 to 8:30 - an ocean watch from 
one 

of the dune crossovers. Wherever I find parking.....

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Re: Hudson County flycatchers
From: Dom <dom AT MONTEVIDEO.COM.UY>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 12:14:23 -0400
Mike, Chris
My view would be that they're one of those birds that have both a high
degree of habitat specificity, and don't exhibit much behavioral plasticity
- unusually even on migration. I only say this based on all my NYC
sightings. I see several birds each year and down to the very last one they
have ALL been on one of 3 specific snags distributed across Central Park.
To the extent that I walked to one snag yesterday morning for my year bird,
and sure enough there was an OSFL sitting on it.

I also think our lack of local records might be compounded by the fact that
it's a very strong-flying bird - one of the longest distance
migrant tyrannids, so maybe less likely to be forced into suboptimal
habitat by weather conditions etc?

I'd like like to think I'm wrong though, and that we'll find one in Hudson
soon!

Cheers,
Dom

www.antbirder.blogspot.com

+ 1 646 429 2667

On 27 May 2016 at 10:24, Michael Britt  wrote:

> It's been a great three days for choice flycatchers, here in Hudson County.
> Dominic Garcia-Hall and I had an ALDER FLYCATCHER at Laurel Hill on
> Wednesday and I heard two Alders at Kearny Marsh yesterday...the latter of
> which is the best spot in the county for it.
>
> Today, I heard three singing ACADIAN FLYCATCHERS at Hudson County Park in
> Bayonne. Attached is the eBird checklist with a recording of the first
> bird. Almost of the thrushes from yesterday's awesome flight have departed!
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29932916
>
> Some of the holes in my county list are my own fault, like Acadian for
> example. I either was quitting songbirds too early or birding elsewhere in
> the state. I still need my ultimate flycatcher nemesis in the
> county...Olive-sided! For an interesting exercise, look at the eBird bar
> charts for the species and you'll see this big hole, with a lack of
> sightings in my area. Historically the bird has been observed at Lincoln
> Park West, Liberty State Park, and Hudson County Park but not in recent
> years. Is it a matter of coverage? I don't think so, unless it's occurring
> in random spots that nobody really birds. Is it their migration route? Are
> they crossing the Hudson north of us by the GWB? What role does NYC play in
> their migration route, as they are recorded on Staten Island, Manhattan,
> Brooklyn, etc. Do they have a high degree of habitat selection? Central
> Park gets plenty but there is some great habitat there. I welcome any
> feedback on this, on or offlist. Had an interesting discussion with Chris
> Takacs on this subject the other day but we're both trying to figure out
> what the deal is...
>
> Mike Britt
> Bayonne
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


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Subject: Hudson County flycatchers
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 10:24:17 -0400
It's been a great three days for choice flycatchers, here in Hudson County.
Dominic Garcia-Hall and I had an ALDER FLYCATCHER at Laurel Hill on
Wednesday and I heard two Alders at Kearny Marsh yesterday...the latter of
which is the best spot in the county for it.

Today, I heard three singing ACADIAN FLYCATCHERS at Hudson County Park in
Bayonne. Attached is the eBird checklist with a recording of the first
bird. Almost of the thrushes from yesterday's awesome flight have departed!

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29932916

Some of the holes in my county list are my own fault, like Acadian for
example. I either was quitting songbirds too early or birding elsewhere in
the state. I still need my ultimate flycatcher nemesis in the
county...Olive-sided! For an interesting exercise, look at the eBird bar
charts for the species and you'll see this big hole, with a lack of
sightings in my area. Historically the bird has been observed at Lincoln
Park West, Liberty State Park, and Hudson County Park but not in recent
years. Is it a matter of coverage? I don't think so, unless it's occurring
in random spots that nobody really birds. Is it their migration route? Are
they crossing the Hudson north of us by the GWB? What role does NYC play in
their migration route, as they are recorded on Staten Island, Manhattan,
Brooklyn, etc. Do they have a high degree of habitat selection? Central
Park gets plenty but there is some great habitat there. I welcome any
feedback on this, on or offlist. Had an interesting discussion with Chris
Takacs on this subject the other day but we're both trying to figure out
what the deal is...

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Subject: Sandy Hook this AM
From: Jim Hayes <gargle57 AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 18:50:21 +0000
Greetings! I had good morning at Sandy Hook. Saw numerous male and female 
Blackpolls, 1 female Tennessee, 1 Least Flycatcher, 1 Yellow-bellied Flycatcher 
and 2 Yellow-billed Cuckoos. Least Terns, Oystercatchers, and Piping Plovers 
were at the False Hook. I saw a pair of adult plovers with 3 downy youngsters. 
I had about 70 birds in about 6 hours. 


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Subject: "The Messenger"
From: Louis Bizzarro <louis.bizzarro AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 12:12:57 -0400
Hi jerseybirders,

There is currently a feature documentary on Netflix called "The Messenger"
that explores the nature of songbirds, the intricacies of their migration,
and how humans, invasive species, and climate change are affecting them and
their habitat. There is a good synopsis of it here:

http://songbirdsos.com/about/messenger/

As well as a trailer here:

http://songbirdsos.com/ 

I watched it yesterday and was very impressed with the film. I strongly
recommend that all of you not only watch it, but also show it to others
close to you who may not be as passionate about avian creatures as
yourself. My girlfriend watched it with me and was moved as well. Plus,
most of the birds highlighted in the movie are ones we jerseybirders are
very familiar with.

Good birding,

Louis Bizzarro
Monroe Township


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Subject: gloucester - wheelabrator - migration
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 11:00:37 -0400
no. Stuff was moving, but I presume moved on from down here. Because am hearing
reports from yesterday. Decent. No mourning Warbler.... I did have 2 Veerys and 
a 

Swainsons Thrush though. The breeders around the area were quite active feeding 
young. 


Butterfly notes - loads of Red Admirals and Zabulon Skippers.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Nemesis "vanquished," thanks, as always, to other birders
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 14:45:04 +0000
Jerseybirders,

A couple of weeks back, I mentioned my intent to focus on finding my "nemesis 
species," Mourning Warbler. My brother and I had seen one in Mount Royal Park 
in Montreal in May of 1977, and that was the last time I've had anything more 
than a one-second look at this species. Today, thanks to the alert ears of Fred 
Weber, a chance meeting between he and Jim Schlickenreider, and Jim's 
subsequent post on the Garret Mountain alert, I was able to relocate a Mourning 
Warbler that Fred had found earlier. First hearing the rolling "chirry chirry 
chorry" up in the trees (?!), I carefully approached the singer, heart racing, 
anticipatory perspiration dampening my shirt. I was rewarded when a beautiful 
adult male hopped into view, actively moving around 15 feet up and sitting out 
in the open regularly. Holy Geothlypis Batman! 


I remained with the bird for many minutes until Donald DesJardins arrived. He 
and I observed it for another eight to ten minutes, at one point watching it 
drop to a low bramble bush next to the trail, but almost always perching in the 
open, singing, and giving its metal-match-scraped-across-a-file chip calls. I 
left Don to continue observing. 


A glorious end to a nice morning: Blackpoll Warblers and Red-eyed Vireos never 
out of earshot, a low-down male Hooded, high up Blackburnian, Black-and-white, 
Black-throated Green, Magnolia, Parula, and Yellow Warblers, Yellow-billed 
Cuckoos hopping into view right in front of a Blackpoll I was watching, 
tanagers and orioles all around, Pewees and GC Flycatchers swooping. As I drove 
out of the park, a Red-shouldered Hawk was soaring high above the radio tower 
at the northernmost point of the park. Late spring at its best at Garret. 


Good birding, all.

Marc Chelemer
Tenafly


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Subject: It ain't Disney
From: Cathy Blumig <wolgast AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 19:39:42 -0400
With so many people following nest cams both here in New Jersey and across
the country I thought I'd share this article which appeared in the Anchorage
Daily News.  I thought it was an interesting read. 

 

http://www.adn.com/nation-world/2016/5/20/people-love-watching-nature-on-nes
t-cams-until-it-gets-grisly/

 

 

Good birding to all,

Cathy Blumig

Somerset, NJ

 



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Subject: birds at home today
From: "cwsg1 AT excite.com" <cwsg1@EXCITE.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 18:06:48 -0400
driving home, a crow is in front of my windshield ...a mocking bird literally 
on its tail, pulling 

feathers out of its tail. In the crow's beak, a pinkish blob about the size of 
a lime. 

 
C. Wyluda
Pennington


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Subject: Garret Mountain Reservation not over just yet = Olive-sided Flycatcher 4
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 16:40:16 -0400
Hi, I was away down south for a few days last week came back on Friday and
everything was dead over the weekend it was hard to find any warblers at
all on Sunday.
Had two days off with the rain but suspected the birds were still to have a
final push. there are still a lot of Blackpolls to come as they have not
been well represented so far.

Garret Mountain Reservation (Park), Passaic, New Jersey, US
May 25, 2016 6:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
4.0 mile(s)73 species


Black Vulture  1

Killdeer  2
Spotted Sandpiper  1

Yellow-billed Cuckoo  5
Chimney Swift  20
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1

Olive-sided Flycatcher  4     actual count
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
Alder Flycatcher  1
Willow Flycatcher  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  12
Eastern Kingbird  4
Warbling Vireo  6
Red-eyed Vireo  12

Veery  1
Gray-cheeked Thrush  1
Swainson's Thrush  23
Wood Thrush  4

Gray Catbird  6
Brown Thrasher  4

Cedar Waxwing  22
Northern Waterthrush  1
Tennessee Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  6
American Redstart  10
Northern Parula  2
Magnolia Warbler  5
Bay-breasted Warbler  1
Blackburnian Warbler  4
Yellow Warbler  2
Blackpoll Warbler  24
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Black-throated Green Warbler  6
Canada Warbler  7

Eastern Towhee  3
Scarlet Tanager  8

Rose-breasted Grosbeak  4

Orchard Oriole  1
Baltimore Oriole  12

*Bill Elrick*





*belrick AT NYNJBirdingGuide.com * 

*Skype  AT  bilbander*

*NYNJBirdingGuide *


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Subject: Sandy Hook, Wednesday, May 25:
From: Peter Bacinski <petebacinski AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 13:14:37 -0400
Dear JerseyBirders:

 

I had an excellent day at the Hook with 81 species and some very nice birds.
Highlights included Willow Flycatcher, Cliff Swallow, Gray-cheeked Thrush,
13 warbler species including Yellow-breasted Chat, a very late Dark-eyed
Junco and a Blue Grosbeak.

 

Here are most of them:

 

Brant 8

Great Egret 1

Green Heron 1

Clapper Rail 1

Am. Oystercatcher 6

Killdeer 4

Greater Yellowlegs 1

Sanderling 20

Dunlin 4

Least Sandpiper 5

Semipalmated Sandpiper 30+

Short-billed Dowitcher 1

Least Tern 6

Common Tern 12

Yellow-billed Cuckoo 4

Chimney Swift 6

Downy Woodpecker 1

Northern Flicker 1

Eastern Wood-Peewee 3

Willow Flycatcher 3

Great-crested Flycatcher 6

Eastern Kingbird 3

White-eyed Vireo 8

Red-eyed Vireo 6

No. Rough-winged Swallow 1

Cliff Swallow 1 (Flying over Randolph Road)

Veery 1

Gray-cheeked Thrush 1 (Raccoon Alley)

Swainson's Thrush 3

Wood Thrush 2

Brown Thrasher 2

Cedar Waxwing 70

Ovenbird 1

Northern Waterthrush 2

Common Yellowthroat 16+

American Redstart 40+

Northern Parula 3

Magnolia Warbler 5

Bay-breasted Warbler 1

Yellow Warbler 12+

Chestnut-sided Warbler 1

Blackpoll Warbler 12+

Black-throated Blue Warbler 3

Canada Warbler 1

Yellow-breasted Chat 1 (Singing on Atlantic Drive about a half mile south of
Gunnison on west side of road.)

Field Sparrow 6

Dark-eyed Junco (Male, just below Battery Potter near the Garden)

Eastern Towhee 40+

Scarlet Tanager 3

Blue Grosbeak 1 (Singing in NW corner of Gunnison Lot)

Baltimore Oriole 1

American Goldfinch 15+

 

Good birding,

 

Pete

 

 

Pete Bacinski

Atlantic Highlands, NJ

 

Embrace Conservation

Aspire to Excellence

Always Smile and Say Thank you

 

All Things Birds-Pete Bacinski Facebook Page:

 
https://www.facebook.com/petebacinski

 

NJ.com Inside Jersey magazine for my Seen in New Jersey column

  http://www.nj.com/inside-jersey/

 

 



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Subject: Memorial Lake, Woodstown
From: Karenne Snow <njwren46 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 11:44:58 -0400
The three black-bellied whistling ducks are still at Memorial Lake in
Woodstown just off S Main St.

Those pink bills really stand out!

Karenne
Medford NJ


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Subject: A nice walk on a warm beach
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 14:30:04 +0000
I made a pre-work stop at Raritan Bay Waterfront Park this morning. I wanted to 
take advantage of the sunny warm day. The tide was mostly out, but rising. 
There was a lot of birdsong as I started out towards the flats. I was able to 
pick out a few quiet calls of a Seaside sparrow, one of my reasons for picking 
this location, but it was soon lost to the sounds of starlings, grackles, 
red-wings, marsh wrens and song sparrows and not heard again. Overhead were a 
pair of Ospreys calling. Barn and bank swallows patrolled the marsh. Back along 
the beach at the flats were Willets, Oystercatchers, Semipalmated sandpipers, 
and Sanderlings among the Laughing, Ring-billed and Great black-backed gulls. A 
Kingfisher was hovering along the tidal cut as I headed back. I was a little 
surprised to see a pair of Brant on the flats and a Common loon off the gazebo, 
presumably a 1st Summer bird as it was not in breeding plumage. All told, 31 
species, a little exercise walking the beach, and a nice start to the day. 


Good birding.

SA

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager, EHS Management
D +1-732-564-3601
M +1-732-832-6195
steven.albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road
Suite 520
Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
T +1-732-564-3600
aecom.com

Built to deliver a better world

LinkedIn 
Twitter 
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Subject: Black-necked Stilt
From: Rod <birdsmac AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 10:09:59 -0400
At Heislerville-main pool now 10:10
Rod MacKenzie

Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: Assunpink Chat
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 08:45:38 -0500
This morning I had a "singing" Chat at Assunpink in a location other than the 
radar field. 


From the parking lot of Stone Tavern Lake follow the dirt path for 100 to 200 
yards to a large open field. The bird could be heard as soon as you entered the 
field but was seen by the treeliine at the far end of the field. Also there 
were Willow Fly, Indigos, Field and Chipping Sparrows, etc 


Bob Dodelson


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Subject: shorebirds - Heislerville, the dredge
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 20:41:18 -0400
Hello,
 Marilyn and I have been exploring and studying shorebirds around the area. 
Yesterday was a trek into the dredge 

in Gloucester County. Just the usual - but that spot could use more regular 
coverage for any phalaropes that show up. 

Alas, the trek in to the east pool is still bad! And scope needed. We found 
that trekking across the dredge was the best way. 

The north dike is becoming very overgrown. 
 Heislerville today - high tide heading out. Which is what is need for the 
dredge also. Actually 1 1/2 hours before high tide to 

1 1/2 hours after is probably the best. Anyway, the Curlew was at it’s usual 
spot feeding on the mud at the NW corner. A very 

nice look. Loads of other species around. It is still quite the site! We 
couldn’t track a White-rumped down. They definitely are 

not there in numbers this season. No phalarope either. 
 We went dragonfly hunting next. Some around. But seems slow. I presume they 
are behind because of the cold, cloudy 

conditions for 2 weeks or so!!

Good birding all. We should be getting one final push for the later migrants! 
Here’s hoping Thursday morning…. I have off 

Thursday morning!


Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
Sent from my iMac






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Subject: Monofilament fishing line for birds' nests?
From: J and B <aufderhar AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 00:20:53 +0000
Its hard for me to believe that anything that puts or keeps more plastic in 
our environment in any form is a good idea. The birds did very well at 
nest-making before plastic filament came along. 

Why not just dispose of the line-- PLASTIC--and keep it out of the system? 
  
I suppose the plastic will eventually decompose or degrade and more and more 
itty bits will enter the food chain and enter the bodies of our children and 
great great grandchildren forever and ever, ad infinitum. 

  
I know of many people who are involved in beach-cleaning and shoreline 
cleaning, even gutter cleaning, picking up the smallest pieces of plastic to 
keep them from the environment. Let's not add the monofilament line to their 
woes. 

  
Joan 
Fair Haven 


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Subject: Assunpink Caspian
From: Louis Bizzarro <louis.bizzarro AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 12:44:04 -0400
Hi jerseybirders,

There is currently a Caspian Tern working its way up and down Lake
Assunpink. Also here is the Chat in its usual spot near the radar field and
a Blue Grosbeak singing right off of Clarksburg-Robbinsville Rd. about half
a mile east of the boat launch entrance.

Good birding,

Louis Bizzarro
Monroe Township


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Subject: Monofilament fishing line
From: John McCarthy and Linda Stehlik <jmcclins AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 09:48:10 -0400
  
The posts about birds using monofilament in their nests were interesting. I 
applaud the person who was cutting it into small pieces for birds to use. 


As a marine biologist I prowl the beaches often, and take every snarl of 
monofilament home in my pockets. Gulls and ospreys get their legs or beaks 
stuck in it, fish, crabs and marine mammals can get entangled, and die. 


What is the best way to dispose of it? Some beaches have bins to put It in. I 
have been putting it in bags inside garbage bags, then into our garbage cans. 
Perhaps cutting it up first will also help. Same goes for 6-pack rings - I cut 
up every ring, even the smallest, so that no bird can get its head stuck. Tell 
your friends. 


Any more ideas on disposal of monofilament?

Linda Stehlik 		 	   		  


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Subject: birds at home
From: "cwsg1 AT excite.com" <cwsg1@EXCITE.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 08:19:47 -0400
green heron yesterday evening- saw this first about 2 weeks ago
 
cuckoo (I think a yellow billed) calling this a.m. 6 or 8 "cowp" calls 
repeatedly around 7:50- 8:05 a.m. 

 
C. Wyluda
Pennington


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Subject: BirdCallsRadio Reboots w NEW Show
From: Mardi Dickinson <mardi1d AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 18:04:54 -0400
Birders et al!

I thought many of you would be interested that BirdCallsRadio is back on the 
air! http://tinyurl.com/jtuejd7 

We have our next show up with guest Judith Davis talking about the Great White 
Pelican that landed in 

Sanibel Island in February 2016.

Cheers,
Mardi Dickinson
Cape May & Norwalk CT


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Subject: Excellent Afternoon on Great Day Blvd, Tuckerton, Sunday:
From: Peter Bacinski <petebacinski AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 13:55:30 -0400
Dear Jerseybirders:

 

Great Bay Boulevard in Tuckerton was a great alternative to the partially
open Forsythe (Brig) NWR:

 

Our highlights included:

 

Great Blue Heron 2

Little Blue Heron 1

Tricolored Heron 2

BC Night-Heron 1

Glossy Ibis 12

Clapper Rail 10

Black-bellied Plover 12

Lesser Yellowlegs 2

Ruddy Turnstone 12

Red Knots 120

Least Sandpiper 2

White-rumped Sandpiper 1

Dunlin 60

Short-billed Dowitcher 10

Least Tern 4

Gull-billed Tern 6

Black Skimmer 16

Cedar Waxwing 50

Saltmarsh Sparrow 3

Seaside Sparrow 30+

 

Most of the Red Knots, Ruddy Turnstones and Black=bellied Plovers were in
breeding plumage.

 

Well worth a trip in the next week or two.

 

Good birding,

 

Pete

 

Pete Bacinski

Atlantic Highlands, NJ

 

Embrace Conservation

Aspire to Excellence

Always Smile and Say Thank you

 

All Things Birds-Pete Bacinski Facebook Page:

 
https://www.facebook.com/petebacinski

 

NJ.com Inside Jersey magazine for my Seen in New Jersey column

  http://www.nj.com/inside-jersey/

 

 



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Subject: Photo Study Of Birds At E.B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 5/22/16
From: "Howard B. Eskin" <hbeskin AT VOICENET.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 10:57:25 -0500
Briton Parker and I were able to get to E.B. Forsythe NWR in Absecon
yesterday on a dreary, dark rainy day. The refuge is under major
reconstruction and we could only cover about 20% of the Wildlife Drive.
Nevertheless, it was very birdy. There were 1000's of Dunlin in breeding
plumage on migration among the many other shorebirds. Despite the dark day
which made photography difficult, please click on the following link to
see the Photo Study:

http://www.howardsview.com/BrigMay22_16/BrigMay22_16.html

Regards,
Howard

Howard B. Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
Harleysville (Montco), PA


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Subject: Re: pelagics from shore
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 19:30:10 -0400
Clearly I meant, "overstate."

MB


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Subject: Pelagics from shore
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 19:26:26 -0400
Viewing pelagic species from shore is AWESOME! You don't have to worry
about a rocking boat and you can use your scope. Not much you can do about
the wind and rain, unless you got a sheltered spot, which is the case in
some locations. The other myth is that "east winds" are a requirement.
While east winds may be the ideal, they aren't mandatory and an array of
other factors are at play (e.g., storms, food, date, etc.).

Anyone that is a proficient hawkwatcher can become a proficient seawatcher.
The same techniques/methods are transferable. With close birds, plumage
characteristics help simplify things. With moderately distant to far birds,
GISS is the name of the game. Everybody has a different "effective range"
but there will always be birds that are "beyond the limit of conjecture!"
Now don't think for one second that I'm saying you're going to hit the
Avalon Seawatch for the first, second, or third time even, and kick some
arse. That's not going to happen! Instead, you'll be chugging a big, fat
cup of humble juice because the most common birds (distant freshwater ducks
mixed in with Scoters) are the hardest to identify! Let's just keep it to
tubenoses or more specifically shearwaters for now. There are only five
regularly-occurring species of shearwater in NJ, versus how many (albeit
unrelated) diurnal raptor possibilities, at your nearest hawkwatch. Of
those five shearwaters, two are small and three are large. Those two
smaller ones are VERY TOUGH to get from shore and their flight style is as
different as American Kestrel and Merlin. Moral of the story, you can
become quite proficient relatively quickly, with a hawkwatching foundation.
Attending pelagic trips will speed up your learning curve and I cannot
understate how awesome the Behrens & Cox book "Peterson Reference Guide To
Seawatching: Eastern Waterbirds in Flight" is. It's already a classic in my
opinion, despite the fact that it was published in 2013. Once you see a
shearwater in flight, you'll be hooked. They are even cooler than a hunting
Short-eared Owl. As always, it's essential to learn all the ducks, loons,
cormorants, gannets, jaegers, terns, gulls, etc., to avoid mistakes but
once you get a handle on tubenose flight styles, they really stand out. I
don't mean to oversimplify things here, even gannets, jaegers, and gulls
employ "dynamic soaring" in the right conditions. The bottom line here is
that you can get "pelagics from shore" and stuff like Sooty Shearwater and
Wilson's Storm Petrel can literally be seen right in the surf at times.
This really is a field trip idea that has yet to be explored in New Jersey.
It's definitely fresh and exciting...

Mike Britt
Bayonne, NJ


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Subject: Negri-Nepote
From: judson hamlin <jhhamlin AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 18:57:16 -0400
Was there from 1030-100 and had the place to myself. Usual grassland species 
were very noticeable, including Field and Grasshopper Sparrows, Indigo 
Buntings, Bluebirds and Prairie Warbler. Also had two near-adult GHO's that 
were being mobbed by Blue Jays, one hen Wild Turkey, Warbling Vireos and Willow 
Flycatcher among the other species in the fields and woods. Good if dreary day 
in the field. 


Juds0n ham1in

Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: Junco
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 14:50:31 -0400
Last year I had a Junco in June and there's one here now but it's not
cooperating with the camera.

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon


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Subject: Palmyra - migration and breeders
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 14:39:51 -0400
Hello,
 The DVOC trip this morning went quite well! I wasn't expecting any migrants 

after everything left Friday, but we did have some! It was for sure the Cuckoo 
show - 

with both YB and BB seen and heard well. Usually I find the most migrants in
the open Willow woods at the south of the place. Today most of the limited
migrants were along the river rd. They go where the bugs are! The Cuckoos and 
the Swallow show where around the Willow Woods and the Beaver Pond.
The Bittern seems to be gone. Had to move on eventually! 
Blackpolls, Redstarts, Parula, Black and White, plus Yellow and Common 
Yellowthroats. 

The breeders put on a nice show. The Peregrines being my favorite. The adults 
are being 

quite visible now that they have 4 hungry young to feed!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

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Subject: Black-crown Night Heron
From: Cathy Blumig <wolgast AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 14:04:27 -0400
A first for our farm: just now I saw a stately Black-crowned Night-Heron
standing along the edge of our pond.  Such a delight. 

 

Good birding to all,

Cathy Blumig

Somerset, NJ 



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Subject: Sussex County 95 species 25 warblers 15 daylight hours Fri and Sat
From: Fred Vir <avtrader AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 12:08:20 -0400
Was concentrating on a few target warbler species and song types in 
mostly Stokes and High Point rather than a big list.

I was side-tracked when I tried to learn a bit more on why most of the 
31 Hooded Warbler males were doing their accented calls while 3 were 
doing their most common, unaccented call.  Since the unaccented call 
seems to signify pairing could it be a way to gauge or correlate the 
percent of NJ females that have arrived here?  And can it be a correlate 
to migration's completeness? Only 3 of 31 (~10%) were paired using the 
basic and minuscule data set here.  One must know and consider how many 
days it takes for females to select a mate and then mate.....so there 
has to be an inherent adjustment.   Not sure it anyone has done the 
research and for what species.

As expected it was a poor migrant showing with only a single Tennessee, 
Wilson's and Nashville and dips on most spruce warblers.  Several 
Blackpolls were the high on migrants and the lack of Bay-breasted and 
Cape Mays forced me out of desperation to  visual check any of them with 
short songs.

  Rarer/Uncommon  breeders  were a bit down for me except for 
Blackburnians and Hooded which were numerous  :

Had
15 Ceruleans
1 Golden-winged
2 Northern Waterthrush
3 Blue-winged Warbler

Don F.  reported a Mourning Warbler in Northern Stokes.

Acadian Flycathers, Pileateds and Sapsucker seemed to be doing well 
while Canada Warbler, Nashville and Northern Waterthrush seemed to be 
gone from a few nostalgic breeding spots

thanks Fred Virrazzi
Secaucus


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Subject: Holgate seawatch
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 13:53:34 -0400
I tallied 18 SOOTY SHEARWATERS and a single MANX SHEARWATER, from the
Holgate parking lot this morning.

More details here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29837157

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Subject: Oriole nests and monofilament fishing line (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 13:06:44 -0400
Can't be 100% certain, but it looks like this old oriole nest may have
quite a bit of fishing line woven into it:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/25532728201/

Donaldson Park, Middlesex County NJ. On the banks of the Raritan, where
there's always somebody fishing...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park


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Subject: Monofilament
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 15:34:38 +0000
My husband and I fish every summer at Prospertown Lake and enjoyed the 
Baltimore Orioles who still build nests there, albeit not as many as 
previously. When we were done fishing, and reached the launch, we always CUT up 
our discarded or found monofilament into 6 inch lengths to aid birds in nest 
building. The Kingbirds also use the monofilament to build their nests over the 
lake. We do this at any lake we fish or canoe. 

We cut up new monofilament at home for our annual Baltimore Oriole's nest as 
well. 



Karen
Ocean



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Subject: Re: Orioles ...Was, Greenwald Park - Camden - breeders
From: William Dix <WilliamDix AT MSN.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 15:26:20 +0000
Last week, on our way to Magee Marsh, Joanne and I stopped in Webster, NY for 
the night to visit relatives. We watched a Baltimore Oriole on a local pond, 
wrestling with a long string of monofilament. At first I thought he might be 
entangled, but eventually realized he was just trying to extract a piece of it 
for nest building. He was having a devil of a time. I hadn't realized this was 
common practice. A photo of the bird is on Google Photos, here: 
https://goo.gl/photos/Te8HrNMdEfjb39KZ8 


There were a few strikingly handsome male Baltimore Orioles in full breeding 
plumage around the pond. This individual appeared to be in molt, which would be 
wrong for this time of year. I wondered if he could be a hybrid, although this 
is not an overlap range; or a young male, or a female. Perhaps someone could 
advise. 


Bill Dix

http://billdix.smugmug.com


________________________________________
From: JerseyBirds  on behalf of L Larson 
 

Sent: Sunday, May 22, 2016 12:10 AM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Orioles ...Was, Greenwald Park - Camden - breeders

During the Breeding Bird atlas, ca. 1995, I used to stop at Prospertown Lake, 
which is adjacent to the Great Adventure park in Ocean Co., east of New Egypt. 
There was a parking lot next to the lake, used mostly by fishermen, with oak 
trees around the edge. The trees contained previous years’ oriole nests as well 
as active nests; the place had at least three pairs. And the reason the nests 
lasted so long was that they were woven of monofilament fishing line along with 
twigs and grass. The orioles had used fishing line for the bag of the nest, as 
well as for supporting guy-lines that kept the nests from swinging. A few nests 
were decorated with red and white plastic bobbers still attached to the line. I 
suppose the birds trapped themselves sometimes — I didn’t see any — but they 
also were exploiting an abundant and indestructible nesting material. I haven’t 
been back there in years, so I don’t know whether they are still at it. 


Laurie Larson
Princeton

> On May 21, 2016, at 12:52 PM, Sandra Keller  wrote:
>
>
> A down note - we saw a long dead Baltimore Oriole entangled in fishing line.
> Pass the word when you can how dangerous that is!
>
> Good birding all.
>
> Sandra Keller
>


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Subject: Re: Orioles ...Was, Greenwald Park - Camden - breeders
From: Mike Anderson <mike.anderson AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 10:57:01 -0400
Susan and Stephanie put out brightly colored 18 inch long pieces of yarn in the 
row of red cedars by the bookstore. That makes it easy to watch the orioles 
collect the yarn for their nests. 




Mike Anderson


> On May 22, 2016, at 12:10 AM, L Larson  wrote:
> 
> During the Breeding Bird atlas, ca. 1995, I used to stop at Prospertown Lake, 
which is adjacent to the Great Adventure park in Ocean Co., east of New Egypt. 
There was a parking lot next to the lake, used mostly by fishermen, with oak 
trees around the edge. The trees contained previous years’ oriole nests as 
well as active nests; the place had at least three pairs. And the reason the 
nests lasted so long was that they were woven of monofilament fishing line 
along with twigs and grass. The orioles had used fishing line for the bag of 
the nest, as well as for supporting guy-lines that kept the nests from 
swinging. A few nests were decorated with red and white plastic bobbers still 
attached to the line. I suppose the birds trapped themselves sometimes — I 
didn’t see any — but they also were exploiting an abundant and 
indestructible nesting material. I haven’t been back there in years, so I 
don’t know whether they are still at it. 

> 
> Laurie Larson 
> Princeton
> 
>> On May 21, 2016, at 12:52 PM, Sandra Keller  
wrote: 

>> 
>> 
>> A down note - we saw a long dead Baltimore Oriole entangled in fishing line.
>> Pass the word when you can how dangerous that is!
>> 
>> Good birding all. 
>> 
>> Sandra Keller
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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Subject: Re: Correction: NJA Trip High Point and Stokes - Trip was actually on 5/21 ;)
From: Carole Hughes <ceruleanwarbler4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 10:17:52 -0400
On Sun, May 22, 2016 at 10:08 AM, Carole Hughes 
wrote:

> All,
> Led our annual NJ Audubon All Things Bird trip to High Point and Stokes
> yesterday.  A big thanks to Associate Naturalist David Bernstein for
> helping to lead the trip!
>
> As always here, we had a very productive day.  In total, we tallied 18
> warbler species, most of them local breeders.
>
> We varied the itinerary a bit this year and spent part of the morning
> walking Kuser Bog.  There were several Canada, Blackburnian, Prairie,
> Blackpoll and Northern Waterthrush singing throughout the walk.  A Wood
> Thrush on a nest right by the trail was enjoyed by all.  We also spotted
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and heard a single Pine Warbler.  Multiple male
> and female Scarlet Tanagers were very active on the walk to the bog.
>
> Our first stop at the intersection of Sawmill and Park Ridge yielded good
> looks at multiple Cerulean Warblers and Yellow-throated Vireos.  Several
> Least Flycatchers and Yellow-billed Cuckoos were heard.  Veerys, Ovenbirds,
> American Redstarts, Yellow Warblers, Chestnut-sided Warblers, Great-crested
> Flycatchers and Baltimore Orioles were numerous throughout the trip.
>
> I made a very bad imitation of a Barred Owl call and five minutes later,
> three Barred Owls began sounding off by one of the wet areas.  I'm assuming
> they got together to laugh at my poor attempt.
>
> We had one flyby Common Raven by the Deckertown Turnpike.  Stokes held two
> singing Hooded Warblers along with Northern Parula, Black-throated
> Greens and additional Blackburnians. A couple lucky souls got a very quick
> look at Pileated Woodpecker at the last stop.
>
> We finished the day with 74 species seen or heard.
>
> Good birding to all,
> Carole Hughes
> Associate Naturalist, NJA
> Verona, NJ
>


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Subject: NJA Trip High Point and Stokes - 5/22
From: Carole Hughes <ceruleanwarbler4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 10:08:51 -0400
All,
Led our annual NJ Audubon All Things Bird trip to High Point and Stokes
yesterday.  A big thanks to Associate Naturalist David Bernstein for
helping to lead the trip!

As always here, we had a very productive day.  In total, we tallied 18
warbler species, most of them local breeders.

We varied the itinerary a bit this year and spent part of the morning
walking Kuser Bog.  There were several Canada, Blackburnian, Prairie,
Blackpoll and Northern Waterthrush singing throughout the walk.  A Wood
Thrush on a nest right by the trail was enjoyed by all.  We also spotted
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and heard a single Pine Warbler.  Multiple male
and female Scarlet Tanagers were very active on the walk to the bog.

Our first stop at the intersection of Sawmill and Park Ridge yielded good
looks at multiple Cerulean Warblers and Yellow-throated Vireos.  Several
Least Flycatchers and Yellow-billed Cuckoos were heard.  Veerys, Ovenbirds,
American Redstarts, Yellow Warblers, Chestnut-sided Warblers, Great-crested
Flycatchers and Baltimore Orioles were numerous throughout the trip.

I made a very bad imitation of a Barred Owl call and five minutes later,
three Barred Owls began sounding off by one of the wet areas.  I'm assuming
they got together to laugh at my poor attempt.

We had one flyby Common Raven by the Deckertown Turnpike.  Stokes held two
singing Hooded Warblers along with Northern Parula, Black-throated
Greens and additional Blackburnians. A couple lucky souls got a very quick
look at Pileated Woodpecker at the last stop.

We finished the day with 74 species seen or heard.

Good birding to all,
Carole Hughes
Associate Naturalist, NJA
Verona, NJ


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Subject: Banded Red Knots
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 07:00:37 -0400
Hi Jersey Birders,
I spent 2 hrs yesterday morning w/ a favorite past-time...photographing
banded shorebirds.
I like to catch in bound tides and I find a spot on the beach (bayshore)
and just sit and shoot.
After a while the birds ignore me and make it easy to record bands.
Yesterday the flock numbered no more than 200 Red Knots and my final banded
tally
was:
27 Red Knots, 8 Sanderling's, and 4 Ruddy Turnstones. (photo documentation
for all)
That's a HUGE number for Knots !
I also recorded my first 2 Knots banded in Argentina. (orange flags)
There is a log to upload banded bird sighting's (
http://report.bandedbirds.org/ReportResighting.aspx) and I hope over the
next few days to get them loaded.
Also found was a White-rumped sandpiper and a Peep with an orange colored
wash over it's face and throat.
I wondered if it's akin to Snow Geese feeding in the Tundra and the rust
color they develop on their faces.
Or maybe a Red-necked Stint. The latter a hopeful wish more than anything.
The bayshore beach I use is not roped off and in the 2 hrs I spent there I
never saw anyone
Just birds!!!!!
https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven


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Subject: Re: Orioles ...Was, Greenwald Park - Camden - breeders
From: Mike <mmandrake AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 03:08:42 -0400
 They are still building their nests with fishing line out there and around 
other lakes here in Jackson. Fortunately, only once in the last 20 years have I 
seen one wrapped in fishing line. 


-----Original Message-----
From: "L Larson" 
Sent: ‎5/‎22/‎2016 12:10 AM
To: "JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU" 
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Orioles ...Was, Greenwald Park - Camden - breeders

During the Breeding Bird atlas, ca. 1995, I used to stop at Prospertown Lake, 
which is adjacent to the Great Adventure park in Ocean Co., east of New Egypt. 
There was a parking lot next to the lake, used mostly by fishermen, with oak 
trees around the edge. The trees contained previous years’ oriole nests as 
well as active nests; the place had at least three pairs. And the reason the 
nests lasted so long was that they were woven of monofilament fishing line 
along with twigs and grass. The orioles had used fishing line for the bag of 
the nest, as well as for supporting guy-lines that kept the nests from 
swinging. A few nests were decorated with red and white plastic bobbers still 
attached to the line. I suppose the birds trapped themselves sometimes — I 
didn’t see any — but they also were exploiting an abundant and 
indestructible nesting material. I haven’t been back there in years, so I 
don’t know whether they are still at it. 

  
Laurie Larson 
Princeton

> On May 21, 2016, at 12:52 PM, Sandra Keller  wrote:
>  
> 
> A down note - we saw a long dead Baltimore Oriole entangled in fishing line.
> Pass the word when you can how dangerous that is!
> 
> Good birding all. 
> 
> Sandra Keller
>  


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Subject: Orioles ...Was, Greenwald Park - Camden - breeders
From: L Larson <llarson2 AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 00:10:11 -0400
During the Breeding Bird atlas, ca. 1995, I used to stop at Prospertown Lake, 
which is adjacent to the Great Adventure park in Ocean Co., east of New Egypt. 
There was a parking lot next to the lake, used mostly by fishermen, with oak 
trees around the edge. The trees contained previous years’ oriole nests as 
well as active nests; the place had at least three pairs. And the reason the 
nests lasted so long was that they were woven of monofilament fishing line 
along with twigs and grass. The orioles had used fishing line for the bag of 
the nest, as well as for supporting guy-lines that kept the nests from 
swinging. A few nests were decorated with red and white plastic bobbers still 
attached to the line. I suppose the birds trapped themselves sometimes — I 
didn’t see any — but they also were exploiting an abundant and 
indestructible nesting material. I haven’t been back there in years, so I 
don’t know whether they are still at it. 

  
Laurie Larson 
Princeton

> On May 21, 2016, at 12:52 PM, Sandra Keller  wrote:
>  
> 
> A down note - we saw a long dead Baltimore Oriole entangled in fishing line.
> Pass the word when you can how dangerous that is!
> 
> Good birding all. 
> 
> Sandra Keller
>  


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Subject: Greenwald Park - Camden - breeders
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 12:52:17 -0400
Hello,
     Well, the trip was written up as for migrants! Wo would have thought.....
Not a single migrant warbler..... Where did they go?? 
We had a flock of Cedar Waxwings - migrants, and other birders we met
had a Veery. 

Well, the place is great for breeders! My favorites being the eye level look
at a Warbling Vireo, a Baltimore Oriole pair actively gathering food and 
entering their nest, a Red-tailed Hawk being mobbed by Jays and Grackles - 
well - feel sorry for the Red-tailed! A Cedar Waxwing pair was mate feeding.
Etc. Always something to look at in the natural world! 

A down note - we saw a long dead Baltimore Oriole entangled in fishing line.
Pass the word when you can how dangerous that is!

Good birding all. 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Sooty Shearwaters
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 11:50:59 -0400
I observed 6 SOOTY SHEARWATERS during a seawatch from Manasquan Inlet this
morning.

More details here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29812957

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Subject: Sooty Shearwater movement
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 11:30:58 -0400
Hi all,

There is a strong northbound movement of Sooty Shearwaters visible from the 
coast this morning. Observers at Cape May have seen 15+ and I tallied 41 from 
the north end of Avalon between 10:00-11:15am. Also 2 Humpback Whales visible 
from Avalon around 10:45am. 



good birding
tr


--
Tom Reed
Reed's Beach NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com

Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: It's great to be back home
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 13:26:41 +0000
Last evening returned from a week-long project in the Houston area. It afforded 
me some wonderful birding opportunities (extralimital, won't share here), 
though it seems I missed a great week to be in NJ. 


This morning I went out back to see and hear what's around, either staying or 
still moving through. It begins with an "I love my birds, but....." rant about 
the Catbird that doesn't like me being out there and who sang loudly, nonstop, 
right above me wherever I chose to stand in the backyard, to the point where I 
could barely hear any other birdsong. I outlasted him, sort of. More 
accurately, he finally afforded me a couple of short breaks, and the backyard 
birding became a little more fun. 


And so, I've come back to a House finch nest right outside my bedroom window. 
Former Robin's nest location. It appears that Chipping sparrow, Goldfinch, and 
Red-eyed vireo are staying. The Cowbird is still here. Blackpoll(s) heard but 
still not seen overhead. Cedar waxwing stopped by for a second. And the rest of 
the feeder flock is out there calling nearby. 


Nothing exotic.  But it's good to be back home.

Good birding everyone.

SA

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager, EHS Management
D +1-732-564-3601
M +1-732-832-6195
steven.albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road
Suite 520
Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
T +1-732-564-3600
aecom.com

Built to deliver a better world

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Subject: Bald Pate Excellent today
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 16:48:35 -0400
50 species of birds and 13 species of warblers today at Bald Pate.
Excellent looks at most warblers including Blue-winged, Worm eating,
Black-throated blue and green, Hooded, Magnolia, Redstart, Yellow, Common
yellow-throat, Chestnut-sided, Prairie, Ovenbird and Black and White.
Plenty of Yellow-throated vireos and Scarlet Tanagers.  The field offered
Indigo bunting and White-eyed vireos, Chipping, Song and Field sparrows.
Swainson's thrush, wood thrush and Veery were quite common along the Orange
trail.  Perfect light for viewing and a great brunch at "It's Nutts".
Retirement is special..


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Subject: Sandy Hook today-good
From: Scott Barnes <scott.barnes AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 15:40:23 -0400
Jerseybirds,

This week's NJ Audubon "Half-Day Fridays" trip at Sandy Hook had excellent
weather and birds. It took us the full three hours to walk the circuit from
Guardian Park south along the bike path to Randolph Rd and back-indicative
of a very busy morning.

Lots of migrants today including Broad-winged Hawk, 2 Yellow-billed
Cuckoos, an Eastern Wood-Pewee (surprisingly scarce so far this spring
here), 2 Blue-headed Vireos, a most cooperative Yellow-throated Vireo, and
plenty of warblers. A dull-plumaged female Bay-breasted Warbler gave us a
ID lesson, while a nearby male was just plain gorgeous. We also enjoyed
nice views of Magnolia, Blackpoll, Chestnut-sided, Black-throated Blue,
Black-throated Green, and Canada Warblers. Redstarts and Common
Yellowthroats are back in force, and most of the migrant Black-and-white
Warblers are females, typical of this date in the spring season.

My thanks to Associate Naturalist Pete Bacinski for co-leading today, and
to many of our friendly trip regulars who helped others get on birds and
shared their knowledge and expertise.

Good Birding,

Scott Barnes
All Things Birds Program Director
Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
New Jersey Audubon
tel. 609-897-9400
scott.barnes AT njaudubon.org
www.njaudubon.org

Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.


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Subject: Message from Wildlife Biologist Chris Aquila
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 15:19:31 +0000
Jerseybirders,

A message to all birders from NJ Wildlife Biologist Chris Aquila:


From: caquila AT yahoo.com

Date: Fri, May 20, 2016 12:53 AM

To: njbrcreport AT gmail.com;

Subject:Re: Clay-colored Sparrow



As a wildlife biologist conducting surveys on Scott's Mountain/Merrill Creek, 
as well as one of the actual two people (including my son), who 
initially/originally found the Clay-colored Sparrow during a field survey last 
Tuesday May 10th at 7:46am, I am asking that anyone coming up to observe the 
sparrow PLEASE use extreme common sense and do not pursue the bird 
aggressively, particularly since we are trying to gather as much information on 
the bird before it inevitably departs in the very near future. 




I cannot stress this enough. Due to the sensitivity and incredible uniqueness 
of an actual territorial Clay-colored Sparrow returning to this same exact 
location 2 yrs in a row, a professional management decision was made last week 
by myself and others not to make the location of this bird public. I think most 
(not all), people can understand why this decision was made, as birding may be 
an integral part of our lives, but the actual welfare and protection of 
wildlife is ultimately more important than a good photo or another "life bird" 
- period. Indeed, to stress my point, my son and I watched some careless 
individual yesterday get to within 8-10 ft of the bird in order to get a good 
picture. This is exactly the kind of behavior that prompted the decision in the 
first place to keep the location discrete. 




Now with the location of this bird having been made public thru postings here, 
as well as on ebird and thru "word of mouth", I once again stress to those 
birders and photographers who come out here to observe the bird, please enjoy 
it, but use common sense and discretion when doing so. 




Thank you



Chris Aquila



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Subject: Scarlet Tanagers are coming through Bayonne NJ.
From: Patricia Hilliard <philliard288 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 07:40:12 -0400
Just saw 3 STs outside my dining room window here in Bayonne, NJ.  Got to
get out to the park.  It's intense.  They must be riding in on that storm
that's coming.

See:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bayonnebirder/27033572222/in/dateposted-public/

-- 
Patricia Hilliard
Bayonne Nature Club
www.bayonnenatureclub.org


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Subject: nightjars
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 02:15:47 -0400
I ran my nightjar survey last night. Down in Cumberland County. A two week 
window 

in May to run it. But with work, etc. probably only three days that would have 
worked. 

Then the weather has to cooperate! It did tonight! Crystal clear skies, almost 
a full moon. 

Calm to very light winds. And no biting bugs either! This turned out to be one 
of my 

best runs! 30 or so Whips - some of them actually don't get counted as we saw a 
lot 

of Whips feeding along Ackley Rd. west as we drove. Only birds at set stops are
counted. That was our highlight - Marilyn had joined me - watching whips 
catching 

moths or whatever 20 ft from us in the car headlights! One landed 10 ft. in 
front 

of us! Next year we bring our cameras.....

Chucks were less - we had more at a rail stop we made before the survey. No
rails though!

And a Barred Owl was calling at stop 10 - the last stop. Where was that last
Sat!

Theres a good migration going on tonight. With NW winds supposed to kick in
in an hour or two. Hopefully putting stuff down over our area. I am still not
getting up early......

Good birding all. 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Clay-colored Sparrow, Bobs
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 20:27:12 +0000
Jerseybirders,

Clay-colored Sparrow was a mythical species for me a few years ago. One autumn, 
I "chased" (never again...learned that lesson) almost each sighting of the 
species all over northern NJ and even once in Cape May, missing the individual 
in each spot, sometimes by only a few minutes. Eventually, I saw a close-up 
individual at "Hamo" State Park in Connecticut, but it took a feeder bird in 
January of '14 before I ever saw one in NJ, and that was the last one since. 


Yesterday, for the first time in a while, I checked e-Bird's Rare Bird Alert 
and noticed that a Clay-colored Sparrow has been observed at Merrill Creek 
Reservoir in southwestern Warren County for nearly a week. Great heavens, sez 
I! Knowing how many entrances there are to Merrill Creek, I sought some advice 
as to where to start from two birders who'd been fortunate to find this 
Midwestern visitor. They generously provided guidance. 


Sometimes a hard-to-find bird is ridiculously easy. At the park's entrance, I 
slowed to listen out the window and immediately heard the "buzz buzz" song I'd 
been hearing on my Sibley app during the drive out. Within five minutes, I was 
able to locate the bird. I followed it for at least fifteen minutes as it fed 
and sang along the treeline. It did not seem to mind my presence at all, 
remaining fairly high in the foliage. Would that all rarities were so 
cooperative! There were also Least Flycatcher and the usual field species 
around. 


It will be intriguing to see how long this male remains singing for a mate, and 
what happens when a stray female DOESN'T happen by over the next week / month. 
Will it just remain, singing, ever hopeful? Or will it get its bearings and fly 
off west towards its normal territory? 


On the way in to the office, I stopped at a field in western Bedminster which, 
in years past, has offered Bobolinks a foraging area and trees in which to 
display. They were back, and visible from the road. I love the "tink tink" 
sound they make...so happy and cheerful. Two Red-shouldered Hawks were 
displaying for each other high in the clear blue, swooping and plunging, 
calling to each other all the while. Beautiful to watch Nature in the 
springtime. 


Good birding,

Marc Chelemer
Tenafly



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Subject: Woodbridge Warblers
From: Scott Barnes <scott.barnes AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 15:57:50 -0400
Jerseybirds,

I led a NJ Audubon field trip with help from Hank Burk today at two parks
in Woodbridge Twp, Middlesex Co.: William Warren Park and Ernest Oros
Preserve.

We tallied about 62 species between the two parks. Swainson's Thrush was
the most numerous migrant: there were 30+ at Warren Park and another 10+ at
Oros. Warren also hosted 3 Gray-cheeked Thrushes, 2 Veeries, and Wood
Thrush. Three Bay-breasted, 2 Blackburnian, 4 Canada, and 2 Wilson's were
among the 16 species of warblers we found. An interesting Empidonax,
possibly a Yellow-bellied Flycatcher-didn't give us a good enough view to
nail down the ID....one that got away!

NJ Audubon has one more trip to these parks next week (May 26), searching
for late-spring migrants. Check our website for details.

Good Birding,

Scott Barnes
All Things Birds Program Director
Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
New Jersey Audubon
tel. 609-897-9400
scott.barnes AT njaudubon.org
www.njaudubon.org

Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.


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Subject: Mourning Warbler at Scherman Hoffman WS
From: Susan Garretsonfriedman <susan.garretsonfriedman AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 11:24:04 -0400
Roger Johnson found an adult Mourning Warbler by the long boardwalk on the
Field Loop here at the Sanctuary at around 10 am this morning.

If anyone refinds it and gets pictures, please share!  (And where was it
during the World Series?)

Good birding,

*Susan*
Susan Garretson Friedman
Welcome Center/Nature Store Manager
Scherman Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary

New Jersey Audubon
11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
*Please note my new direct phone number:  908-396-6622*
*And new store number: 908-396-6386*

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Subject: Yard birds but can not do it all, Camden County
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 08:53:08 -0400
The warbler group around the yard this morning must be over night rain related 
? 


As soon as I stepped outside this morning (with bins and camera around my neck) 
saw and heard a Blackburnian Warbler. But they were no use as both my hands 
held Cory and Pil leash. Put the guys back in the garage to take documentation 
photo of this very special visitor (past visit has happened before). As soon as 
camera is aimed at the birds it took flight. You only get one chance, and not 
upset at the dogs at all. 


No need to list the species as many have been reported to JBirds. Warbler 
morning like this around the yard is not that common, but just bad timing as I 
had no time for birds. 


Yong Kong
Camden County

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Subject: Blue Grosbeak Union County 230PM weds today
From: Fred Vir <avtrader AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 16:38:29 -0400
Blue Grosbeak Union County 230PM weds today at Hawk Rise Park Linden NJ

Rare county bird, a male was first heard chinking then seen in the small 
forest there, near the ground.

It was on the east side of forest, inside the large loop and seemed to 
flee into the deer fence area.

34 Bobolinks
10 warbler species

fred virrazzi
secaucus nj


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Subject: Re: Pileated Woodpecker Ocean County
From: Fred Vir <avtrader AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 17:06:40 -0400
I had a pair of Pileated Woodpecker in 2005 in Plumsted multiple times 
and was asked by Fred Lesser for the location; he went and confirmed and 
perhaps others. Regardless most or all consider the Pileated confirmed 
in the most western point of the county in the '90. There may be prior 
records also.

Perhaps you meant breeding has not been confirmed, but even that may not 
be true.

tks Fred Virrazzi
Secaucus NJ

  On 5/18/2016 4:31 PM, James O'Brien wrote:
> I wanted to revisit this place to answer some of the questions that the OCBC 
uncovered. First off, when we were there on Saturday I heard a woodpecker 
drumming. Both Peggy and I thought it was a Pileated Woodpecker. We never 
located it, but then remembered about 1 year ago I reported this bird in the 
Park and today saw it and confirmed that it is in fact a Pileated Woodpecker. 

> https://flic.kr/p/r3SXZQ
> At the time it was the first confirmed sighting of a PWP in Ocean County, so 
Im appealing to Shawn that it be counted retroactively since we DID hear it on 
Saturday. Even if not, I'll get it next year cuz if its present now, its sure 
to be nesting down by the river. 

>
> Great Birding,
>
> James
> Jackson, NJ
>   		 	   		
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
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> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


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Subject: NPS - PEPC - Deadline to Comment on "Relocate Maintenance Facilities to More Sustainable Locations - Sandy Hook" EIS
From: Fairfax Hutter <savoirfairfax AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 22:27:14 -0400
Not sure if this is just a small project but remember some on JerseyBirds 
concerned about National Park Services' construction plans at Sandy Hook. 


Letter in today's mail says the Environmental Assessment (EA) was published 
5/16/16 (day after the big fallout.) Deadline to comment on EA is is 6/16/16. 


http://parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?projectID=49465

Fairfax Hutter

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Subject: Shorebirds - Cumberland
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 19:33:44 -0400
Hello,
 Doug Johnson and I were on the Natural Lands Trust volunteer trip today to 
view 

shorebirds on NLT lands. I didn't realize they owned and managed that much
habitat down there! And I am a volunteer! Anyway, a great time had by all! My 
favorite 

was Fortescue - yes the Glades Refuge covers all that area! Beach and all. And 
seeing 

Sanderlings and Great Egrets in full breeding plumage! Wow. Look up some pics
online. You know I am not the pic taker.....
 Medium tide is best. Doug and I dropped out for the last stop. Maple Ave. I 
shouldn't 

have! We hit Heislerville to try for the Phalarope. No success! And still no 
Lesser 

Yellowlegs in that main pool. Low tide doesn't help. High tide is needed here.

Thanks to Brian Johnson - Preserve Manager, Debbie Beer - Volunteer 
coordinator, and 

all the great volunteers who made it a great trip!

Sandra Keller

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Subject: After 37 years that we have lived in our home,
From: Michael Perlin <mlperlin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 16:56:38 -0400
meaning 37 years of feeders, our first ever great crested flycatcher in the
yard (and perhaps our first flycatcher ever on our property). He was
sampling the fare at a vertical feeder and the platform feeder for several
minutes til two starlings decided he was in their space, and he skedaddled
and was not seen again.

Am hoping the next one comes before 37 more years go by!

Good birding all,
Michael Perlin
Trenton NJ (Glen Afton)


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Subject: Return to Lakewood Pine Park
From: "James O'Brien" <jphillipobrien AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 16:31:31 -0400
I wanted to revisit this place to answer some of the questions that the OCBC 
uncovered. First off, when we were there on Saturday I heard a woodpecker 
drumming. Both Peggy and I thought it was a Pileated Woodpecker. We never 
located it, but then remembered about 1 year ago I reported this bird in the 
Park and today saw it and confirmed that it is in fact a Pileated Woodpecker. 

https://flic.kr/p/r3SXZQ
At the time it was the first confirmed sighting of a PWP in Ocean County, so Im 
appealing to Shawn that it be counted retroactively since we DID hear it on 
Saturday. Even if not, I'll get it next year cuz if its present now, its sure 
to be nesting down by the river. That being said, I also had magnolia warblers, 
chestnut-sided, yellow and possible cerulean. The best though was a family of 
wood duck, I counted 4 ducklings! 

https://flic.kr/p/Hbwg2r
Also seen was a very cooperative GCF, 
https://flic.kr/p/HbwfvX
a large flight of orioles and plenty of chippers and GBGC.

Great Birding,

James
Jackson, NJ
 		 	   		  

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Subject: Mourning Warbler - Curlew sandpiper
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 14:38:08 -0400
Hi Jersey Birders,
Started the morning chasing a Kentucky Warbler in Belleplain  (which I
didn't hear) but photographed a Mourning Warbler singing instead.
This bird was originally found by a World Series Team on Saturday.
I don't know the teams name but nice find Folks!
From there I went to Heislerville and caught the tides just right. (High
Tide)
It was loaded with shorebirds.
As I got out of the car I saw Curlew sandpiper right in front of me.
Some Days You see the Birds,
Some Days the Birds see You.
Also there was Western Willet which I also had 2 of over on the mud flats
at Stone Harbor yesterday, Red Knot, multiple White-rumped Sandpipers, and
hundreds of Dowitchers, Dunlin, and peeps.
Least Tern made a showing, and a lingering Bonaparte's sat all by itself in
the mud.
.https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven


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Subject: Re: Garret Mountain 5/18/16
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 14:13:29 -0400
Interesting Garret Mountain story (not about a birder,hopefully)


http://www.nj.com/passaic-county/index.ssf/2016/05/hikers_find_body_on_garret_mountain_reservation.html 


Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

On Wed, May 18, 2016 at 2:04 PM, Benjamin Barkley 
wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> Went to Garret Mountain this morning and was pleasantly surprised by the
> migration today.  I spent the first hour and a half or so along the ridge
> as a fairly steady flow of warblers came up and over. Blackpoll,
> Chestnut-sided, Magnolia, and Redstart were the most numerous, but there
> was nice mix with Worm-eating, Blue-winged, Tennessee, Nashville, Cape May,
> Bay-breasted, and Blackburnian among common suspects.  Then I worked my way
> down to the basketball courts and around Barbour Pond.  Good numbers of
> Swainson's Thrush and Canada Warbler spread throughout the park.  In total
> I had 25 species of warbler, with most in fairly decent quantity.  My first
> day back in the States, so a very nice welcome home gift.
>
> Link to eBird list...
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29754277
>
> Good birding,
> Ben Barkley
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


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Subject: Garret Mountain 5/18/16
From: Benjamin Barkley <bejoba AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 14:04:04 -0400
Hi all,

Went to Garret Mountain this morning and was pleasantly surprised by the 
migration today.  I spent the first hour and a half or so along the 
ridge as a fairly steady flow of warblers came up and over. Blackpoll, 
Chestnut-sided, Magnolia, and Redstart were the most numerous, but there 
was nice mix with Worm-eating, Blue-winged, Tennessee, Nashville, Cape 
May, Bay-breasted, and Blackburnian among common suspects.  Then I 
worked my way down to the basketball courts and around Barbour Pond.  
Good numbers of Swainson's Thrush and Canada Warbler spread throughout 
the park.  In total I had 25 species of warbler, with most in fairly 
decent quantity.  My first day back in the States, so a very nice 
welcome home gift.

Link to eBird list...
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29754277

Good birding,
Ben Barkley


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Subject: Kentucky Warbler at Flat Rock Brook, Englewood
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 15:13:40 +0000
Jerseybirders,

I had an hour available after a meeting this morning and stopped at Flat Rock 
Brook Nature Center in Englewood. I'd walked all the way to the western end and 
was on the way back when I encountered a warbler / vireo flock. There were at 
least three Canada Warblers, several Redstart, male and female Black-throated 
Blue, Chestnut-sided, Magnolia, and Blackburnian. As I was departing the area 
where the flock had been, another warbler jumped up out of low bush right in 
front of me, perhaps six feet away: all olive back, all yellow breast and 
belly, with no wing bars, streaks, stripes, or spots. And clearly visible, with 
the naked eye, was a prominent black narrow triangular patch on the face going 
down the side of the neck. It was a female Kentucky Warbler! 


Unfortunately, it had had enough of my giant human form, and flew off into deep 
tangles at least 60 feet away. I poked around a bit in the general area the 
bird had flown to, with no success at re-flushing it. 


I have to imagine it was passing through, but anyone else going to the area 
should keep "eyes sharp." It was at the western intersection of the purple and 
blue trails (there's also an eastern such intersection). 


Good birding,

Marc Chelemer


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Subject: Re: Snowy/Little Egret Hybrid
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 22:07:44 -0400
Wow, how can it be possible ? A NJ Birder  (Harvey T.) spots a very cool 
egret that may even be confirmed (by others) as a real deal can make my day 
!!!

In our neighboring states, there has been some very-awesome open discussion 
on the Stint related ID going on. I have my fingers across such that we 
JBirders also can discuss Harvey's egret here so we can all learn about this 
great find, and put a confirmed ID on this bird.

Harvey and another Mercer County "lady" JBirder are the main reason for my 
latest interest in peeps and other shorebirds. Thanks to those two !!! what 
can I say,  I much rather watch long distance shorebirds thou the scope than 
in-your-face warblers.

I took an advantage of rain today and decided on a fast-n-furious lunch time 
birding looking for storm related shorebirds that may had to make an 
emergency touch down. Found some peeps at the flooded field next to the 
Elmer Post Office. As I was watching the rain drops to bead up and roll off 
the backs of those peeps, I watched the rain drops seep right into the 
interior portions of my camera. What gives ?

Some photos from my lunch time birding on my Flickr

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County



-----Original Message----- 
From: Harvey Tomlinson
Sent: Tuesday, May 17, 2016 1:49 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Snowy/Little Egret Hybrid

Hi Jersey Birders,
Well I thought I had finally found Little Egret in NJ today but I'm pretty
sure it's not.
The two long distinct plumes that a Little Egret will show are on this bird
no doubt but it's upper head appeared to be shaggy.
Pic 4 shows a side view where this shows better. The tail plumes are being
caught in the wind but they laid flat most of the time.
The lores are a very muted yellow/green turning slate towards the bill.
Bill size was hard to judge because of distance but it looked thicker than
a Snowy and slightly concave.
Its legs are black and it's feet were a deep reddish maybe tinged w/ orange.
I found this bird on the north side of the marsh from Shellbay Ave.
There was a Little Egret in NC and MA this spring but I do not know if
either is still being seen.
One of these days we'll get a Jersey Record!
Pics on my Flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/
Good Egreting
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven


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https://www.avast.com/antivirus


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi