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Updated on Tuesday, July 29 at 12:12 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Black Bee-Eater,©Barry Kent Mackay

29 Jul Sandy Hook - Red Knots [Steve Buckingham ]
29 Jul Article about Pete Dunne ["B.G. Sloan" ]
29 Jul EG Plover Has Not Been Seen [Alan Mart ]
28 Jul Singing birds - Summer Tanager [SandraKeller ]
28 Jul Isn't it early? ["Albert, Steven" ]
28 Jul Bayonne King Rail? [Michael Britt ]
28 Jul Re: Checklist of countable birds in NJ?? [Susan Garretsonfriedman ]
28 Jul Nesting continnuing [Gerald Peterson ]
28 Jul European Golden-Plover [Michael Turso ]
27 Jul Pine Park [James OBrien ]
27 Jul Skua Prankster [Mary DeLia ]
27 Jul Re: My Long-billed dowitcher ID at Brig [hbeskin ]
27 Jul Gloucester County shorebirding thoughts [SandraKeller ]
27 Jul My Long-billed dowitcher ID at Brig [Yong Kong ]
27 Jul Re: NJ Audubon Walk/Hilltop Reservation [Carole Hughes ]
27 Jul Skua Prankster [John James ]
27 Jul Re: Checklist of countable birds in NJ?? [John Beetham ]
27 Jul Checklist of countable birds in NJ?? ["B.G. Sloan" ]
27 Jul Skua [John James ]
26 Jul NJ Audubon Walk/Hilltop Reservation [David Bernstein ]
26 Jul Re: south polar skua in cape may? [Vince Elia ]
26 Jul All Things Birds Field Trip to Forsythe (Brig) NWR, July 26: [Peter Bacinski ]
26 Jul south polar skua in cape may? [Brian McMahon ]
26 Jul Forsythe - terns and shorebirds [SandraKeller ]
26 Jul Re: King Rail and large gathering of herons at Liberty Loop [John Bloomfield ]
26 Jul Nice morning at Sandy Hook ["Albert, Steven" ]
26 Jul Raptor Report: Eagles and Falcons Continue to Soar Above Garden State - NJ Spotlight [Stuart and Wendy ]
26 Jul King Rail and large gathering of herons at Liberty Loop [Michael Britt ]
26 Jul Immature Western Tanager at Brig. There is an immature western Tanager along the north side of the south dike road approx 1/4 mile west of the observation tower. Joe Palumbo and Liz Bender [Joseph Palumbo ]
26 Jul Photo Study Of Birds At E. B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 7/25/14 ["Howard B. Eskin" ]
25 Jul Re: Highland Park Red-headed Woodpecker [mike hiotis ]
25 Jul Highland Park Red-headed Woodpecker (Rutgers Preserve) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
25 Jul Brown Pelican migration? [Michael Britt ]
25 Jul Re: Yellow warblers - migration [Susan Treesh ]
25 Jul Pelican-palooza at Barnegat Light [Mary DeLia ]
25 Jul Yellow warblers - migration [SandraKeller ]
25 Jul buying a bluebird house; is this a good model ["Danusha V. Goska" ]
25 Jul Cape May, 7/25 AM notes -- Mississippi Kite, Yellow Warblers [Tom Reed ]
25 Jul American Crows and Japanese Beetles [Sandra Mc ]
24 Jul Pine Park [James OBrien ]
24 Jul NJ Audubon Walk/Brookdale Park [David Bernstein ]
24 Jul Cumberland bay watching [SandraKeller ]
24 Jul Eur. Golden Plove - No [Mary DeLia ]
23 Jul Personal desire to learn more about ID of European Golden-plover [Yong Kong ]
23 Jul Brown Pelicans Wildwood, NJ [Anthony Uhrich ]
23 Jul Photo Study Of Birds At E. B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 7/22/14 ["Howard B. Eskin" ]
22 Jul E. Golden Plover featured on NJN News [Sandra Mc ]
22 Jul phoebes [SandraKeller ]
22 Jul Re: JERSEYBI Digest - 20 Jul 2014 to 21 Jul 2014 (#2014-95) [Carol Anne Pagliotti ]
22 Jul Re: questions about birds for a project ["bmknj16 ." ]
22 Jul Re: questions about birds for a project [Diane C Louie ]
22 Jul Re: Searching for European Golden-plovers [Bill Elrick ]
22 Jul Re: Searching for European Golden-plovers [Bill Elrick ]
22 Jul Searching for European Golden-plovers [Mary DeLia ]
22 Jul Re: questions about birds for a project ["bmknj16 ." ]
22 Jul Re: questions about birds for a project ["Albert, Steven" ]
22 Jul questions about birds for a project ["Danusha V. Goska" ]
21 Jul bird ID request [Yong Kong ]
21 Jul Red-headed Woodpeckers in NJ?? ["B.G. Sloan" ]
21 Jul Alan Mart's labs and his Team's Eurasian Golden-Plover [Yong Kong ]
21 Jul Negri-Nepote Today- Blue Grosbeaks and Dickcissels Continue [Vince Capp ]
21 Jul Re: European Golden-Plover 7/20/14 [Larry Scacchetti ]
21 Jul European Golden-Plover 7/20/14 [Larry Scacchetti ]
21 Jul Brig, Sunday July 20: [Peter Bacinski ]
21 Jul Osprey Drownings - An Inconvenient Adaptation [Mary DeLia ]
21 Jul No Euro Golden-Plover - 7/21 early AM [Tom Johnson ]
20 Jul No Euro Golden-Plover at dark - 7/20 [Tom Johnson ]
20 Jul Re: binocular advice question / most frequently mentioned brands [Mike Anderson ]
21 Jul Eurasian Golden-Plover: The team approach to ID and another thought [Alan Mart ]
20 Jul Juvenile Hummingbirds (with Photos) [Steve Byland ]
20 Jul Nikon camera cap found in Brig today [Yong Kong ]
20 Jul Abraham Shalit Park East Brunswick ["Albert, Steven" ]
20 Jul skimmers in Navesink [Joan and Bob ]
20 Jul Np dredge spoils - shorebird notes [SandraKeller ]
20 Jul binocular advice question / most frequently mentioned brands ["Danusha V. Goska" ]
20 Jul Strange hummingbird at Franklin Parker Preserve, Burlington Co. [Elizabeth Medina-Gray ]

Subject: Sandy Hook - Red Knots
From: Steve Buckingham <sbuckingham AT LOWENSTEIN.COM>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 12:47:10 -0400
I was up at the north end of Sandy Hook last night between 5 and 7 pm and was 
pleasantly surprised to see a group of 7 Red Knots hanging out with the usual 
terns, skimmers and sandpipers. I noticed a leg tag on one of them, and they 
varied in color from one having a fairly strongly-colored breast to much 
fainter coloring. I sat in the sand down by the water right at the end of the 
temporary stringed-off area and after a while they came closer, as did a Piping 
Plover, who ventured up the shoreline and walked right past me, coming as close 
as 5 or 6 feet of me. 


Steve Buckingham, Montclair

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Article about Pete Dunne
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 09:44:41 -0400
Yesterday's Star-Ledger had a nice feature article about Pete Dunne:

Full Text at: http://bit.ly/1AtS2kQ

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: EG Plover Has Not Been Seen
From: Alan Mart <a.mart67 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 10:39:47 +0000
As far as I know, the European G Plover has net been seen since the morning of 
July 20. I looked for it on the 26th and other locals have checked the area 
since the 20th also. 


Alan Mart 
High Bridge 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Singing birds - Summer Tanager
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 20:34:26 -0400
Hello,
    Had a singing Summer Tanager this afternoon down in Cumberland County. Was
out exploring for botany and dragonflies with Gwen and Barb. There wasn't much
else singing, so I thought that interesting! 
 Purple Martins everywhere.....! Too see them staging though, hit the 
Mauricetown 

Causeway at dusk. The Purple Martin festival is soon. Now Tree Swallows were 
on a few utility wires en masse. Many Rough-winged and Bank scattered around.
Everything but Cliff. No Gull-billed or Black Tern either. Stuck on 224 for my 
county 

big year.
    Tues. I will try again for Storm-petrel.

no monarchs today. 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Isn't it early?
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 23:39:37 +0000
I worked from home today. Around mid-afternoon there was a commotion in the 
back, OK just a lot of twittering. Anyhow it was a mixed flock of titmice, 
chickadees and nuthatches; the typical winter feeder gang. Is this early for 
them to congregate? 


Tough winter coming?

Steven

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bayonne King Rail?
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 18:33:56 -0400
http://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2014/07/28/bayonne-king-rail/

Mike Britt
Bayonne, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Checklist of countable birds in NJ??
From: Susan Garretsonfriedman <susan.garretsonfriedman AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 11:51:28 -0400
We have a very few of the old NJA field cards available at SHWS.  I
understand there have been some changes in the latin names etc.
subsequently, but for all general field work they seem to work.  They in
very high demand also, so I almost hesitate to put this out here!

Thanks,

*Susan*
Susan Garretson Friedman
Welcome Center/Nature Store Manager
Scherman Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary

New Jersey Audubon
11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
908-766-5787

Connect with us: [image: Facebook]

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Making New Jersey a better place for people and wildlife since 1897


On Sun, Jul 27, 2014 at 6:21 PM, John Beetham 
wrote:

> Bernie,
>
> Would this be what you're looking for?
>
> http://www.njbrc.net/slist.html
>
> John Beetham
> Highland Park, NJ
>
>
>
> On Sun, Jul 27, 2014 at 6:14 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
>
> > I've been searching for an official checklist of countable birds in New
> > Jersey, but my search skills seem to be failing me. It seems I always
> wind
> > up at the checklist for Cape May County, not the entire state.
> >
> > Thanks in advance for any help!
> >
> > Bernie Sloan
> > Highland Park
> >
> > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> > How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> >
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Nesting continnuing
From: Gerald Peterson <ghpeterson AT EMBARQMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 11:16:44 -0400
We have active Blue Bird and active House Wren nests. Both appear to be in the 
feeding stage. 


The BB is unusual for us, over the 25 years we have had nesting boxes within 
eyesight of the house the Maple, Oak, and Sweet Gum trees have grown and made 
the boxes less appealing to BBs. The one currently active had a Chickadee nest 
early in the summer. I never cleaned it out not expecting any second nest use. 
I was surprised and happy to see the BB pair working to bring food into the 
nest today. The Wrens are on our front porch so I always notice that activity, 
but the BB nest which can been seen from the front porch is at least 200' away 
and not under general observation. 


Always happy to see a BB nest, a favorite bird in our home.

Jerry_NJ
Clinton Township

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: European Golden-Plover
From: Michael Turso <mjt0328 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 09:34:00 -0400
Hi all!

I just returned from vacation to find out that I missed an EUGP while I was 
gone, just my luck. I was curious if anyone has gone back to check since it 
disappeared to see if it has returned. I didn't read through all the messages I 
got about this bird since there were so many, so apologies if this has already 
been discussed. It may be worth checking again, let's not forget the Smith's 
Longspur went missing for a few days then was refound, so perhaps the same 
could happen here? 


Thanks in advance!

-Michael Turso
 Bergen County 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Pine Park
From: James OBrien <jphillipobrien AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 23:10:09 -0400
Its really a place that keeps on giving. In addition to all the aforementioned 
birds, today I had a family of yellow-billed cuckoos by the trout stream! 

https://flic.kr/p/ocQKvD

Also somewhat off-topic. If you have never been to Howling Woods Farm on West 
Veteran's Highway in Jackson, I suggest you make the trip. They run a wolf and 
wolf-dog rescue center that is really cool. In addition they are conserving 
native Pineland habitat that is fast disappearing in the State. All volunteer 
and all donation funded plus they have really cool t-shirts aooowwwww! 

https://flic.kr/p/otujjo

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Skua Prankster
From: Mary DeLia <maryderekemilydelia AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 21:27:17 -0400
John James,

The text alerts about the skua came through as "New User" on my phone.

​It's obvious that others didn't see that name either, since someone
outright asked the sender to identify him/herself.

This was not a funny prank. Just within the last two weeks a Great
Shearwater was found at an inland lake in the middle of upstate NY,
Madison, if I remember correctly. The bird was greatly weakened and was
sent to rehab. I don't know the final outcome, but they almost never
survive when they're found that way.

Down in S. America there are reports of many seabirds being found dead -
"starvation". So there was an eerie ring of truth to this prank.

People who have better things to do with their time, real animals to go
rescue, etc. were set on high alert by these messages, and possibly lost
time and maybe even wages to go look for the bird. What would be the
purpose of that?

Mary DeLia
E Windsor

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: My Long-billed dowitcher ID at Brig
From: hbeskin <hbeskin AT HOWARDSVIEW.COM>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 19:35:10 -0500
Nice seeing you again. As to Long-billed versus Short-billed, I checked with
Cornell and they'll be back to me. I wanted to know if anyone has done DNA
mapping on the Dowitchers and could it be possible that the Long-billed and
Short-billed Dowitchers are actually the same species. If they're two 
subspecies 

or races of the same species, then differentiation is moot. The two Dowitchers
seem to occupy the same geographies, migrate together and perhaps interbreed. 
If 

so, then the only reason to separate them is to make the listers happy. Less
than 30% of the all the bird species have actually been mapped. I'll bet you
when Cornell and LSU finish their current DNA projects during the next ten 
years 

there will be great changes to the i.d.'s and birding lists.
Regards,
Howard
> On July 27, 2014 at 6:05 PM Yong Kong  wrote:
>
>
> I made multiple trips to Brig in the past two weeks to punish myself on the
> shorebird ID.(actually trying to get dowitcherrwhipped).
>
> I too came up with a few Long-billed dowitchers based on ID tips learned from
> various sources. My personal lesson learned is that if one thinks there are
> Long-billed dowitchers at Brig, count them, watch them and move on quickly. 
Do 

> not study them for any length of time.
>
> Reason ? If you do, one of those Long-billed dowitcher that one has 
positively 

> ID'ed will eventually start to preen itself. Then, eventually, one will see
> the patterns of tail feathers on the long-billed that has been ID'ed as
> such.(actually the upper side of the central tail feathers).
>
> Then, most often, what I ended up seeing is a certain tail pattern shown on
> the Page 70 (Figure 26) of Kenn Kaufman's Advanced Birding. More 
specifically, 

> the tail pattern No. 2 of the Short-billed Dowitcher, which is the typical 
for 

> this species.
>
> So, I personally end up calling several of birds, Long-billed dowitcher with 
a 

> Short-billed Dowitcher central tail pattern. Another words, I no longer
> separate dowitcher species anymore. Please do not take it personally if I do
> not believe you had ID'ed a Long-billed dowitcher at Brig recently.
>
> Yong Kong
> yklitespeed AT comcast.net
> Berlin, NJ
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Gloucester County shorebirding thoughts
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 19:28:15 -0400
Hello,
    Doug W., Marilyn H., and myself hit the Dream Park. Was stuff moving! 
And using some exposed mud there. Nothing unusual though.
We didn't get to the dredge spoils at high tide. That's the spot for high tide.
Then the Dream Park at medium tide. Low tide is not good in the county!
Birds are too spread out. And not many points for us birders to scan them.
We are keeping various farm and fallow weedy fields in mind if we ever get 
any rain! Everything is so dry at the moment.

Butterfly notes - one Monarch. Dream Park.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: My Long-billed dowitcher ID at Brig
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 19:05:57 -0400
I made multiple trips to Brig in the past two weeks to punish myself on the 
shorebird ID.(actually trying to get dowitcherrwhipped). 


I too came up with a few Long-billed dowitchers based on ID tips learned from 
various sources. My personal lesson learned is that if one thinks there are 
Long-billed dowitchers at Brig, count them, watch them and move on quickly. Do 
not study them for any length of time. 


Reason ? If you do, one of those Long-billed dowitcher that one has positively 
ID'ed will eventually start to preen itself. Then, eventually, one will see the 
patterns of tail feathers on the long-billed that has been ID'ed as 
such.(actually the upper side of the central tail feathers). 


Then, most often, what I ended up seeing is a certain tail pattern shown on the 
Page 70 (Figure 26) of Kenn Kaufman's Advanced Birding. More specifically, the 
tail pattern No. 2 of the Short-billed Dowitcher, which is the typical for this 
species. 


So, I personally end up calling several of birds, Long-billed dowitcher with a 
Short-billed Dowitcher central tail pattern. Another words, I no longer 
separate dowitcher species anymore. Please do not take it personally if I do 
not believe you had ID'ed a Long-billed dowitcher at Brig recently. 


Yong Kong
yklitespeed AT comcast.net
Berlin, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: NJ Audubon Walk/Hilltop Reservation
From: Carole Hughes <ceruleanwarbler4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 18:46:09 -0400
I would second David's comments on Hilltop Reservation.  This is my default
spot to go to when I want an evening walk since it's only 10 minutes from
me.  Over the past few years it's grown in nicely and there is now quite a
bit of habitat for both nesting and migratory birds.  Kudos to the Hilltop
Conservancy on their efforts to protect and maintain.

Starting at the quiet time of 4:30 this afternoon, I still managed to hear
and see 37 species including an awkward and comical pair of young Brown
Thrashers who were crash landing in the shrubs and on the path.

I definitely encourage people to check out this lovely spot.

Cheers,
Carole Hughes
Verona, NJ


On Sat, Jul 26, 2014 at 8:27 PM, David Bernstein 
wrote:

> Dan Christian and I had a nice group of folks join us today for a ramble
> through the Hilltop Reservation in Essex County. This is a fabulous locale
> once home to the Essex County Sanitarium. What was once an attractive
> nuisance for abandoned building aficionados is now a great place to hike
> and bird.
>
> We had thirty three species today including a pair of Redstart, family
> groups of Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Cedar Waxwing and Blue-gray
> Gnatcatcher,three species of Flycatcher and a crowd pleasing singing Indigo
> Bunting which was joined, surprisingly, by a second singing bird with nary
> a hint of animosity between the two.
>
> A welcomed addition to our merry bunch was Tricia who filled in the quiet
> moments with Botany, invasive and native.
>
> I've mentioned this before but Essex County is under birded to put it
> charitably. Hilltop offers great opportunities to flesh out your county
> list.
>
> Good birding!
>
> David S. Bernstein
> Berkeley Heights, NJ
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Skua Prankster
From: John James <jja04261785 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 18:39:28 -0400
The south polar skua was reported on keekeekeer by "skuaprankster." Anyone with 
text alert on that account that went looking for it has been had. It was 
obvious from the start. 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Checklist of countable birds in NJ??
From: John Beetham <john.beetham AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 18:21:49 -0400
Bernie,

Would this be what you're looking for?

http://www.njbrc.net/slist.html

John Beetham
Highland Park, NJ



On Sun, Jul 27, 2014 at 6:14 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:

> I've been searching for an official checklist of countable birds in New
> Jersey, but my search skills seem to be failing me. It seems I always wind
> up at the checklist for Cape May County, not the entire state.
>
> Thanks in advance for any help!
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Checklist of countable birds in NJ??
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 18:14:37 -0400
I've been searching for an official checklist of countable birds in New
Jersey, but my search skills seem to be failing me. It seems I always wind
up at the checklist for Cape May County, not the entire state.

Thanks in advance for any help!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Skua
From: John James <jja04261785 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 13:44:03 -0400
Just look at the user name this person used to post - obvious ... 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: NJ Audubon Walk/Hilltop Reservation
From: David Bernstein <jackstraw1963 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 20:27:24 -0400
Dan Christian and I had a nice group of folks join us today for a ramble 
through the Hilltop Reservation in Essex County. This is a fabulous locale once 
home to the Essex County Sanitarium. What was once an attractive nuisance for 
abandoned building aficionados is now a great place to hike and bird. 


We had thirty three species today including a pair of Redstart, family groups 
of Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Cedar Waxwing and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher,three 
species of Flycatcher and a crowd pleasing singing Indigo Bunting which was 
joined, surprisingly, by a second singing bird with nary a hint of animosity 
between the two. 


A welcomed addition to our merry bunch was Tricia who filled in the quiet 
moments with Botany, invasive and native. 


I've mentioned this before but Essex County is under birded to put it 
charitably. Hilltop offers great opportunities to flesh out your county list. 


Good birding!

David S. Bernstein
Berkeley Heights, NJ


Sent from my iPad

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: south polar skua in cape may?
From: Vince Elia <veejer11 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 20:25:47 -0400
In my opinion, the South Polar Skua report was a prank... and a not very 
amusing one at that... if anyone has any information to the contrary, I'd be 
happy to hear it... 


Eventually, it will be determined who was behind it...

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: All Things Birds Field Trip to Forsythe (Brig) NWR, July 26:
From: Peter Bacinski <petebacinski AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 19:59:51 -0400
Dear Jerseybirders:

 

We had a group of really nice folks for our field trip today to Brig.  I
want to thank associate naturalists Mike Mandracchia and Terry Carruthers as
well as John Holinka and Sandra Escala for their welcomed assistance on
today's trip.  We had high tide for our first loop and rain during our
second, but spirits were not damped as we tallied 87 species for the day
with the following highlights:

 

Little Blue Heron 1

Tricolored Heron 2

Glossy Ibis 80+

Bald Eagle 1

American Oystercatcher 10

Spotted Sandpiper 6

Willet 6 most have departed the refuge

Whimbrel 14

Ruddy Turnstone 2

Stilt Sandpiper 4 from west pool, north dike

Semipalmated Sandpiper 2000+

Western Sandpiper 4+

Short-billed Dowitcher 500+

Long-billed Dowitcher 6+

Least Tern 2

Gull-billed Tern 8

Caspian Tern 2

Black Tern 1 from Danzenbaker Pool (east) north dike

Common Tern 2

Black Skimmer 80

Five Swallows, no Cliff

Marsh Wren 10

Saltmarsh Sparrow 1 NE corner

Seaside Sparrow 10

Blue Grosbeak 6

Bobolink 3

 

We had lots of smiles today including from yours truly.

 

My next All Things Birds field trip to Brig will be Thursday, July 31 and
our next Saturday trip will be August 2 as well as trip to Brig every
Saturday through September 13 all beginning at 8:45 a.m. for more
information or to register call 908-766-5787/

 

Good birding,

 

Pete Bacinski

NJ Audubon-All Things Birds

 

 

Atlantic Highlands, NJ

 

Embrace Conservation

Aspire to Excellence

Always Smile and Say Thank you

 

All Things Birds Blog:

http://www.njaudubon.org/SectionCenters/SectionAllThingsBirds/AllThingsBirds
Blog.aspx

 

All Things Birds-Pete Bacinski Facebook Page:

 
https://www.facebook.com/AllThingsBirds

 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: south polar skua in cape may?
From: Brian McMahon <brianmcmahon08 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 19:58:09 -0400
i saw a couple keekeekerrs today about a south polar skua in avalon. 
what was the verdict on this?  Any more info?

Brian McMahon
Lindenwold, NJ
https://www.flickr.com/photos/brianmcmahon/

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Forsythe - terns and shorebirds
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 17:40:39 -0400
Hello,
 Marilyn and I did two drives around the dikes. Surprisingly, not much 
difference 

from the changing tide. It did spread the peeps out as usual. Nice variety, the
east pool was the best with some mud showing. The NW and SW pools have 
a lot of water! Some highlights - 

Yellow-crowned Night-heron - an immature along the south dike.
Whimbrel - south dike in the grasses. 
Long-billed Dow - back. We had one along the south dike - east pool.
White-rumped Sandpiper - one on the north dike - east pool. 
Seaside Sparrows - still singing and showing nicely.
Saltmarsh Sparrow - saw one briefly as it came out of the marsh grasses.
Caspian Tern - nice to see close perched instead of far perched at Floodgates!
Gull-billed Terns - in flight.
Black Tern - we missed! One from the NJAS group. We will try again in August!
Monarch - one!

Good birding all. 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: King Rail and large gathering of herons at Liberty Loop
From: John Bloomfield <buckingham.nature AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 17:28:18 -0400
True to Michael's word, I drove up there and had about 40 GBH and 20 great 
egrets. Didn't get the rail but had a solitary glossy ibis. First time there - 
magical spot with beautiful wildflowers throughout. Got a nice indigo blunting 
and 5 yellow warblers. 


On Jul 26, 2014, at 9:53 AM, Michael Britt  wrote:

> http://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2014/07/26/king-rail-the-heron-show/
> 
> Mike Britt
> Bayonne
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Nice morning at Sandy Hook
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 18:32:42 +0000
I went to Sandy Hook this morning with my Son-in-law. He fished, I birded. I 
had 39 species. Highlights were: 



* A "yellowstart" (I love that name) down low behind the fence at K Lot - 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/98494447 AT N06/14770357473 


* A cute oystercatcher couple: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/98494447 AT N06/14747335451 


* Piping Plovers in breeding and non-breeding plumage and chicks: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/98494447 AT N06/14563849560 


* A red-breasted merganser hen. I think this is the first time in my life that 
I saw a merganser, any merganser, while wearing shorts and a tee shirt. 


And then there was the fisherman who came to me at the edge of the fenced off 
area. He wanted to know if it was OK to cross over the fence to get to the 
ocean. You know, the wire barrier with the STOP DO NOT ENTER THIS AREA signs 
every 10 feet. Really? I pointed to one of the signs and told him I didn't 
think so. He then rushed off to talk to the guy who was coming from the ocean 
side through the protected area scattering all the gulls, terns, plovers, peeps 
and dowitchers. I overheard that guy say something about no one who cares (i.e. 
officialdom) coming around before 11 AM. Ah well. I kept quiet as my 6-foot 
plus son-in-law was too far away to provide protection if I got into it with 
these two. The first guy didn't go through, though. 


My kind of day at the beach.

Steven

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Raptor Report: Eagles and Falcons Continue to Soar Above Garden State - NJ Spotlight
From: Stuart and Wendy <weluvowls AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 11:06:27 -0400
Good Morning

A link to an article of interest.

Wendy Malmid
Monroe Twp, NJ

http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/14/07/23/raptor-nests/

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: King Rail and large gathering of herons at Liberty Loop
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 09:53:52 -0400
http://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2014/07/26/king-rail-the-heron-show/

Mike Britt
Bayonne

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Immature Western Tanager at Brig. There is an immature western Tanager along the north side of the south dike road approx 1/4 mile west of the observation tower. Joe Palumbo and Liz Bender
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 06:17:21 -0700
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Photo Study Of Birds At E. B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 7/25/14
From: "Howard B. Eskin" <hbeskin AT VOICENET.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 07:48:51 -0500
Briton Parker and I went back to Brig today It was sunny and yes the
Saltmarsh Greenhead Flies were everywhere. Nevertheless, we had a
photo-filled day. To see the Photo Study and a list of the species seen,
please click on the following link:

http://www.howardsview.com/BrigJuly25th_14/BrigJuly25th_14.html

Regards,
Howard


Howard B. Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
Harleysville (Montco), PA

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Highland Park Red-headed Woodpecker
From: mike hiotis <mchhiotis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 22:03:09 -0400
Hello BG,
         A look at the excellent reference "Birds of New
Jersey"(Walsh,Elia,Kane&Halliwell) and one can read after high winter
incursions of this species,as did occur this past winter,there can be
instances of increased breeding noted(R.Kane,pers.obs.) Keep looking for
the birds and hopefully you may come across some young of the year.They are
already a possible in Somerset and a confirmed in Hunterdon County this
summer..As is also noted in the atlas breeding can occur late in the
season(V.Elia) Red-headed Woodpecker can become quite inconspicuous when
raising their young for the persistent vocalist that they can be....My
guess is if you hear them yacking young may be there....Good Luck
Mike Hiotis
Martinsville NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Highland Park Red-headed Woodpecker (Rutgers Preserve)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 20:44:16 -0400
I've reported hearing "rattle calls" of Red-headed Woodpeckers in the
evenings in the Rutgers preserve behind where I live in Highland Park.

This evening I heard the very distinctive and loud "querr" call of a
Red-headed Woodpecker multiple times. Very different from a Red-bellied
Woodpecker call...

Bill Boyle lists them as "scarce" in his "Birds of New Jersey".

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Brown Pelican migration?
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 19:46:41 -0400
Mary,

"Migration" can be an ambiguous word. Just the typical post-breeding
dispersal/mid-summer occurrence, off the central-east and south-east coast
of NJ.

Folks have been remarking on their scarcity...may actually be
impatience...they are rarely (un)common before mid/late summer...in their
usual haunts...

Mike Britt
Bayonne, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Yellow warblers - migration
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 19:45:49 -0400
Yes, I keep trying to catch yellow warblers in fall migration! Some time 
the second week in July it starts, "Jeez, they were all over the place 
here a couple  of weeks ago ... they CAN"T be gone yet ... where are 
they?"  Then I set myself to try to notice them moving around and get a 
few, but so far I haven't mastered the trick of "noticing" southbound 
yellow warblers.  Will try again this weekend.

Susan Treesh
Somerset

On 7/25/2014 6:32 PM, SandraKeller wrote:
> Marilyn and I hit some areas this afternoon for butterflies. And much to my
> surprise - I always forget how early migration starts with this species! - 
Yellow 

> Warblers everywhere. Still singing also. That was different. Nothing like NW 
winds! 

>
> Not too much else. Caspian Tern back at Floodgates, etc.
>
> Butterfly notes - Red Admirals. Plus other species.
> Dragonfly notes - one area at Floodgates had 40 plus Blue Dashers and
> Slaty Skimmers.
>
> Good birding all.
>
> Sandra Keller
>
> Sent from my iPad mini
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Pelican-palooza at Barnegat Light
From: Mary DeLia <maryderekemilydelia AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 19:02:56 -0400
I sighted 23 Brown Pelicans at Barnegat Light today.

The first in the inlet across from Andy's, then a group of 7 flew past as
we walked out to the beach along the jetty, followed by a pair, and then a
single. Those 10 got to the end of the jetty and turned south along the
shoreline.

Later a single came from the north following a fishing boat, after that a
group of 5, then another 4 also came from the north, heading south, another
individual was seen flying back into the inlet. As we returned to the car,
another individual flew into the inlet.

3 of these could be double counts - the two returning into the inlet, and
the first one I saw - so at least 20 Brown Pelicans in 90 minutes. I think
that's a NJ high count for me. I guess this is migration?

Documentation photos will be attached to the eBird report.

Good birding.

Mary DeLia
E Windsor

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Yellow warblers - migration
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 18:32:56 -0400
Marilyn and I hit some areas this afternoon for butterflies. And much to my
surprise - I always forget how early migration starts with this species! - 
Yellow 

Warblers everywhere. Still singing also. That was different. Nothing like NW 
winds! 


Not too much else. Caspian Tern back at Floodgates, etc. 

Butterfly notes - Red Admirals. Plus other species. 
Dragonfly notes - one area at Floodgates had 40 plus Blue Dashers and
Slaty Skimmers.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: buying a bluebird house; is this a good model
From: "Danusha V. Goska" <dgoska AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 16:08:15 -0400
Dear Friends,

I want to buy a bluebird house as a gift for a friend who has a yard
with a lot of grass and woods. She has a good selection of birds: blue
jays, robins, wood thrush, house wren, red bellied woodpecker, red
tailed hawk, pewee. She has also had a family of foxes and an
excessive amount of deer.

I don't want to spend a lot of time shopping and I was hoping to buy
the first good one I found. I came across a bluebird house on Amazon
that has the Audubon symbol on it. I'm assuming that that symbol is a
mark of quality, but the manufacturer is listed as "Woodlink." I don't
know if that negates Audubon as the manufacturer or not.

If you care to please send me a note about whether or not in your
experience this is a good bluebird nest box. Thank you.


http://www.amazon.com/Audubon-Coppertop-Cedar-Bluebird-NACOPBB/dp/B000HHSDI2/ref=sr_1_14?s=lawn-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1406318431&sr=1-14 


-- 
Danusha V. Goska, PhD
author, "Save Send Delete"
http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cape May, 7/25 AM notes -- Mississippi Kite, Yellow Warblers
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 14:13:15 -0400
Hi all –


There was a steady passage of shorebirds, swallows, and songbirds over Cape
May this morning, on the heels of yesterday's cold front. Some of the more
numerous or notable species included:

*Mississippi Kite-- 1 imm., moving west and then north over Cape May Point
around 8:45am.

*202 Sanderling-- most moving west past Cape May Point; the first
noticeable influx of the fall, and a fair total in general for CMP.

*15+ Solitary Sandpipers-- mostly high and departing Cape May Point toward
the SW; largest group = 3.

*A steady trickle of swallows, generally moving west along the dunes.
Ballpark figures = 250+ Barn Swallows, ~25 Bank Swallows, 2 Cliff Swallows.

*110+ Yellow Warblers-- I counted 79 engaged in "morning flight" over Coral
Ave, along with 30+ bouncing around in the dunes between CMP State Park and
the Meadows, plus numerous reports from just about anywhere on Cape Island.
Other fly-over warblers included 3 American Redstarts, a Black-and-white
Warbler, and a Louisiana Waterthrush.


good birding,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Reed's Beach NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: American Crows and Japanese Beetles
From: Sandra Mc <jerseyb AT EMBARQMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:59:37 -0400
Hello JBirders: 

Since Spring my neighborhood has been filled with Amer. Crows on a very regular 
basis rarely venturing close to the house. They are usually along the tree 
lines 75 to 100 feet from the house. In the last few days a party (don't like 
the other word used to describe them) of 4 to 5 birds have been hanging out in 
a non-native Linden tree near the house. This tree is (was) a big attraction to 
Japanese Beetles this year and this was the first big invasion of them since 
the super invasion a few years back (numbers nothing like that year). 


So here's the question - is it possible they eating the beetles? If I went out 
the back door and the birds were in the tree, they fly off only to return 
shortly I went away. This happened a few times for a couple of days. There are 
few beetles left on the tree. Are the beetles done mating for the season? 
Cooler temperatures slowing beetles down? Or did the birds find an easy source 
of food and clean the tree. 


I didn't think any birds ate the beetles. 

Sandra McNicol 
Kingwood Township 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Pine Park
From: James OBrien <jphillipobrien AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 22:12:02 -0400
Very special day at Pine Park. Sparsely populated by people but teeming with 
bugs and birds. At the pond had a family of kingbirds, a family of GC 
flycatchers, a family of phoebes, a family of chipping sparrows with fledgling 
cowbirds in tow and this secretive family of Wood Duck. 

https://flic.kr/p/oaPvYU
There were also a ton of dragonfly so if there's any enthusiasts among you, 
this was the place to be. Winding through the Park I also found many house 
finches as well as quite a few downy and flickers. At the ballfields I was 
treated to a fabulous spectacle of birding...purple martin, rough winged 
swallow, tree swallow, barn swallow, chimney swifts, more phoebe, peewee, blue 
grossbeak, 

https://flic.kr/p/oaQEGk
and over a dozen eastern bluebirds all feeding on the bugs.
https://flic.kr/p/oshNkd
Finally the resident adult red-tailed hawk came in and took up a position on 
the lights and stalked the starlings. 

https://flic.kr/p/oqhmij
Also seen was this sparrow,
https://flic.kr/p/oaPE87
goldfinch, blue-grey gnatcatcher, a lone prothonotary warbler, a lone northern 
waterthrush, cardinal and this blue-jay nest (late for the season). 

https://flic.kr/p/os2XMP

Great birding, I had to tear myself away as the Park closes at dark.

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: NJ Audubon Walk/Brookdale Park
From: David Bernstein <jackstraw1963 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:32:40 -0400
Dan Christian and I lead a nice group of folks today through this beautiful 
Essex County park straddling the towns of Bloomfield and Montclair. We were 
lucky to have Rick Wright join us and his local knowledge of the park's history 
and maintenance came in handy during the walk's quiet moments-there were 
plenty! 


Bird diversity was low today. We managed twenty four species. A Pewee here, a 
Kingbird there, and four Cedar Waxwings. A Raccoon high in a tree was an 
appreciated sight, a silk moth(Polyphemus) was also. Unfortunately, it had been 
partially consumed. It was a first for me though, alive or dead. 


Those with an interest in Essex County localities might want to keep Brookdale 
on your radar. The habitat is wonderful and should pay great dividends once 
Fall migration gets going. 


NJ Audubon always has nice walks scheduled. Hope to see you out there.

David S. Bernstein
Berkeley Heights, NJ


Sent from my iPad

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cumberland bay watching
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 13:11:35 -0400
Hello,
    Marilyn and I did a watch for Storm-petrel. No luck! The tide wasn't what I
had wanted. It was going out last night, and coming in this morning if i read 
those tide charts correctly. 5 Black Scoters were nice. With all those down in
Cape May, bound to see some up here! 
    Shorebirds are starting to congregate at Bivalve. Main st. was probably
the best. More mud along there than Strawberry Ave. A Great Blue Heron
there. Not an easy species in the summer in the county. Does anyone know
where the closest GBH breeding colony is? 
 
Rail notes - loads of Clapper Rails very visible! Wonder why they get so
visible this time of year? Many adults, just a couple young seen.

Marilyn is staying down here with a mutual friend. I wished her 
Brown Pelican!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Eur. Golden Plove - No
From: Mary DeLia <maryderekemilydelia AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 08:27:52 -0400
I returned to the golden plover field on Pittstown Rd this morning to see
if the Eur. Golden had returned.

I've scanned for a little over an hour, and it's really hard to leave. The
field is loaded with Killdeer- so much movement and activity, but no
Goldens.

I did observe the Kestrel on the ground in the field and 2 Meadowlarks. One
was mounting the other, surprisingly. Now I'll have to look up their
breeding season!

No sigh of the Peregrine today.

I parked in the pulloff at the north end of the field. This is slightly
elevated and allows views of the entire field and down into all the nooks
and crannies.

Hmm, the reminds me, I haven't had breakfast yet.

Good birding.

Mary DeLia
E Windsor

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Personal desire to learn more about ID of European Golden-plover
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:14:09 -0400
I feel very fortunate in that within one minute walk from my back door, I would 
see or hear (or both) Ovenbirds and Wood Thrush during their breeding season. A 
few days ago while walking towards the power line behind my house it dawned on 
me that I have not encountered both species in a while. Do not know how long 
since I do not keep a list. 


Felt kind of sad about the changes in the "birding" season, but at the same 
time I was motivated by the the incoming shorebirds. 


Then tonight I heard a distant song of a Wood Thrush. Last night, a Whip and a 
Barred owl call. 


Now the real reason for my post, I am hoping those folks at NJ Rare Bird 
Records Committee will send me a private e-mail (or openly here JBirds if 
determine appropriate) the reason(s) why Harvey T's plover (found on 9-3-2013 
at Brig) was rejected as the European Golden-plover, if that was the final 
determination. Or an advise when the opinion will be published. What was the 
final ID then ? 


Reason being personal desire to learn, nothing more.

Yong Kong
yklitespeed AT comcast.net
Berlin, NJ


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Brown Pelicans Wildwood, NJ
From: Anthony Uhrich <aeuhrich AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 16:18:06 -0400
At 3:19 7 birds were flying along the shore in Wildwood by 17th street
heading south.  They were pointed out by my dad Ed Uhrich at which point we
identified them as Brown Pelicans.  Wouldn't have seen them otherwise if it
weren't for him, Thanks Dad!
Anthony Uhrich
Montgomery Co. PA

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Photo Study Of Birds At E. B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 7/22/14
From: "Howard B. Eskin" <hbeskin AT VOICENET.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 09:30:52 -0500
The Saltmarsh Greenhead Flies were in peak numbers at Brig yesterday but
the birds, low tide and bright sunshine more than made up for the
discomfort. There were well over 200 Great Egrets, 50-60 Snowies and lots
of newly fledged Ospreys at the Refuge. To see the Photo Study and a list
of the species seen, please click on the following link:

http://www.howardsview.com/BrigJuly22_14/BrigJuly22_14.html

Regards,
Howard

Howard B Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
Harleysville (Montco), PA

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: E. Golden Plover featured on NJN News
From: Sandra Mc <jerseyb AT EMBARQMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 23:24:29 -0400
Hi JBirders: 

Watching NJN News at 11:00 this evening, one segment featured video of the bird 
and some brief commentary on it's location in Franklin Township, NJ. 


Sandra McNicol 
Kingwood Township 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: phoebes
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 13:25:58 -0400
Hello,
    Birds are always moving somewhat. I had a Phoebe in my yard this morning.
That doesn't breed in my local yard area. But a couple months before their
true southward migration starts. Interesting. I had a couple more at Newton 
Lake Park where I walked a bit. But they breed there. Did have a Purple Martin
there. They are moving to staging areas at the moment.

 Speaking of..... I will be in Cumberland on Thursday. Barring someone 
refinding 

the Plover! Anyway, should be loads of Purple Martins down there. 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: JERSEYBI Digest - 20 Jul 2014 to 21 Jul 2014 (#2014-95)
From: Carol Anne Pagliotti <capagliotti AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 12:42:46 -0400
We were also at Brig on Sunday. We saw a Black-crowned Night-heron, which
was a first for us. I should probably admit, we're new to birding so a lot
of birds are firsts for us. This was only our second visit to Forsythe.

Black-crowned Night-heron
https://www.flickr.com/photos/soapboxgirl/14708185132/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/soapboxgirl/14525162347/


We also saw, 


Short-billed Dowitchers
Herring Gulls
Laughing Gulls
Snowy Egrets
Great Egrets
Common Terns
Glossy Ibis
Black Skimmers

And what I think were juvenile Laughing Gulls, juvenile Herring Gulls, and a
juvenile Great Black-backed Gull.



Carol Anne Pagliotti
Washington Township, NJ (Gloucester County)



On 7/22/14 12:00 AM, "JERSEYBI automatic digest system"
 wrote:

> There are 9 messages totaling 375 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>   1. No Euro Golden-Plover - 7/21 early AM
>   2. Osprey Drownings - An Inconvenient Adaptation
>   3. Brig, Sunday July 20:
>   4. European Golden-Plover 7/20/14 (2)
>   5. Negri-Nepote Today- Blue Grosbeaks and Dickcissels Continue
>   6. Alan Mart's labs and his Team's Eurasian Golden-Plover
>   7. Red-headed Woodpeckers in NJ??
>   8. bird ID request
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Mon, 21 Jul 2014 07:31:06 -0400
> From:    Tom Johnson 
> Subject: No Euro Golden-Plover - 7/21 early AM
> 
> Jerseybirders,
> As of 7:30, there has been no sign of the golden-plover in Hunterdon Co.
> However, a Peregrine Falcon has been strafing the seemingly endless supply
> of Mourning Doves.
> Good luck,
> Tom
> 

-- 
Soapboxville
My Place to Think, Write & Rant
http://www.soapboxville.com
Twitter:  AT NJdreaming

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: questions about birds for a project
From: "bmknj16 ." <bmknj17 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 12:09:09 -0400
I know that this is straying a little off topic but it might be of interest
to from 0-1 person, maybe.  Maybe change that 0 to a negative number if
this annoys people here...

But, the reference to museum dioramas reminds me of one I saw while
visiting Cape Cod a few years ago.  Cape Cod, as in within driving distance
from Jersey, so I'm feeling mildly justified...

It was a tiny museum in the same parking lot as the entrance to one of the
two seal tour boats out of Chatham (which, btw, is the town to visit on
Cape Cod).

In its lobby (maybe pretty much the whole museum) was a diorama of local
shore birds but rather than use taxidermy, the subjects were carved.  They
style was both very evocative of their location and very realistically
(though not very detailedly (I'm sure that's a word.), if you will,
rendered.

I was so attracted to them that I tried to find out if the work of the
artist could be found for sale anywhere.  I don't recall the answer other
than the general gist of no.

If anyone ever checks them out, please steal an oystercatcher for me (No,
do not do that...).

Brett Klaproth (not out shooting so still with time on my hands...)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/26398858 AT N02/

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: questions about birds for a project
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 11:54:01 -0400
This reminds me of Matt Adrians The Mincing Mockingbird, which I recommended
recently before.


http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2014/06/the-mincing-mockingbird-guide-to-troubled-birds-by-matt-adrian.html 



Besides drawings or paintings, perhaps you might consider photographs of 
staged scenes as illustrations 

for your project. I am thinking of the dioramas at the American Museum of 
Natural History. Stephen Quinn 

is an artist (and an outstanding birder) who has worked on them.

http://www.stephencquinn.com

My friend Jerry Meyer is an artist who has created multi-media memory boxes.

http://www.denisebibrofineart.com/artists/2155

Finally, re house sparrows: Len Soucy treated every injured bird brought to the 
Raptor Trust with 

respect  no matter how common or undesirable the species.
It may be their only connection to the natural world.


Diane Louie
Madison

On Jul 22, 2014, at 9:06 AM, Danusha V. Goska  wrote:

> Dear Friends,
> 
> I am working on a bird-related project proposal I hope to send to a
> publisher soon. I have most of it worked up. Please wish me luck!
> 
> Meanwhile, I would like to pick your brains if I may. I have a few
> questions, below. If you care to, please send me a reply directly.
> 
> First, can anything good be said about house sparrows?
> 
> I know their presence here is the result of human introduction of an
> alien species. I know they are invasive and I know they compete with
> native species like bluebirds.
> 
> But can we at least say that in gritty urban settings where no other
> birds might be found, one can encounter house sparrows, and that is at
> least a good thing?
> 
> (I've researched this question through google and mostly I encounter
> hostility to house sparrows and even directives to kill them.)
> 
> Mind, I'm not trying to turn house sparrows into national icons. I'm
> just trying to advance this one feature - that in settings that would
> otherwise be bereft of birds, one can encounter house sparrows. They
> are tough survivors.
> 
> Second question. If you think metaphorically and imaginatively, what
> North American bird comes to mind when you think of the below listed
> six qualities?
> 
> I understand that the qualities below are human qualities but I am
> looking for North American birds I can associate with each.
> 
> For example, many Native Americans associated ravens with the creator
> god because ravens are so smart and tricky.
> 
> So, thinking metaphorically, are there any North American birds you'd
> associate with the below-listed human qualities, and, if so, why?
> 
> I don't know if I'll find a publisher for this project, but if I do
> and if I use your idea, I will thank you in the text.
> 
> 1) Someone juggling two potential outcomes, or even just someone
> juggling two objects
> 
> 2) Someone abandoning a potentially feasible project
> 
> 3) Looking to the future with self-confidence and a creative and
> viable plan of action
> 
> 4) Being so overworked that you lose awareness
> 
> 5) Being willfully blind because seeing everything would just overwhelm you
> 
> 6) Resting up and getting in touch with heroic role models or heroes
> from the past
> 
> Thank you in advance. And thank you again for the help with the bino
> question. I will sample some at a store. Right now it's between Nikon
> monarchs and Zeiss conquest.
> 
> Thank you also with the osprey question. The consensus seems to be
> that ospreys do occasionally drown; one poster mentioned seeing a
> drowned osprey. But that ospreys can and do release fish prey that is
> too difficult to handle.
> 
> 
> -- 
> Danusha V. Goska, PhD
> author, "Save Send Delete"
> http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Searching for European Golden-plovers
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 11:41:10 -0400
Hi Just an additional price of info. The European birds that I would see
often, during the after breeding dispersal were often right next to a major
motorway and huge roundabout junction. This was one if busiest areas in the
south Glasgow area. They are therefore not at all scared of movements by
large numbers of cars and trucks so could turn up easily in Hackensack and
Secaucus type Urban areas.
Again I am only talking about my experience of Scottish birds, though they
could easily have been Icelandic or Greenland overwintering birds. I would
say more likely to be in Pectoral Sandpiper habitat than Golden Plover
habitat.
So to summaries watch all grassy areas not just the usual sod farms or lone
beaches we usually search for American GP.
If you see a small unusual grass area with a  Golden plover that prick's
your interest and you say to yourself that is an odd place for a GP , then
give it extra scrutiny.
Good luck Bill

On Jul 22, 2014 10:24 AM, "Mary DeLia" 
wrote:

> Congratulations to Mike, Alan, and the Hunterdon birders who found and
> ID-ed the European Golden-plover.
>
> Because of miscalculations on my part, I did not have a chance to see it -
> a real heartbreaker, for me. I saw the Black-bellied Plover report with the
> photo, and let's just say it got my attention. But I waited, miscalculated
> on that and then again on Sunday.
>
> But I don't believe this is the end of the story for this bird. No, this
> isn't my inane "optimism" talking. This was an historic incursion year for
> this species into Newfoundland. Over 200 of them arrived on our continent
> this spring, and now they are moving south for winter. They are not strong
> migrants like a Pacific or an American Golden, so they might not all head
> back to Europe, and I think we could see more of them.
>
> But how to find them is the big question. They are by definition unfamiliar
> to us. What's their habitat? Behavior? What's a good search image?
>
> I've sifted through hundreds of online photo, and all but one show the
> birds in grassy habitat (these are photos from known EGPL regions of the
> world), the other shows a group with N. Lapwing in shallow water. The
> habitat is not necessarily sod, or upturned soil. But what are the
> requirements? I don't know.
>
> Where are good places to search? Salem County is sounding good. But there
> are also good spots in central NJ as well. Will they be in the same places
> as American Goldens? I'm not entirely sure. What I've read states that
> their habitat is varied during migration.
>
> The advice on the ABA blog post about this is that we should be looking
> very carefully at golden-plover flocks. But will they be with American
> Goldens necessarily? Is their migration timing the same? Different?
>
> I know one was found here now, so we should be looking now. That's my
> simplistic logic. American Goldens usually don't turn up until later. What
> about juveniles? There's a headache waiting to happen!
>
> Anyone with knowledge and experience with this species, please help us
> devise a search strategy. I also hope the locals in Hunterdon will continue
> checking that same field.
>
> Thanks in advance for any help we can get with this.
>
> Mary DeLia
> E Windsor
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Searching for European Golden-plovers
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:36:46 -0400
Hi Mary, I can only speak of birds in Scotland they are not at all like the
American ones in habit or habitat choice. They are more akin to Lapwing or
even American Robins. They like fields with sheep or cattle and they prefer
damp areas near a pond or small lake to roost communally. I doubt if I have
ever come across a solitary European GP. Remember however the ones I saw
were either waiting to go on the hills to breed or spending the winter near
the open water. They do not like hard frost and would move to the shore
areas / grass effected by the warmer ocean and not mud and spend the frost
times there. Dogleg at Brig springs to mind.
So I suspect there will be birds on Sod fields with water close by though
are more likely to be found near muddy field with livestock like the
Lapwings were in a few years ago.
Bill Elrick
 On Jul 22, 2014 10:24 AM, "Mary DeLia" 
wrote:

> Congratulations to Mike, Alan, and the Hunterdon birders who found and
> ID-ed the European Golden-plover.
>
> Because of miscalculations on my part, I did not have a chance to see it -
> a real heartbreaker, for me. I saw the Black-bellied Plover report with the
> photo, and let's just say it got my attention. But I waited, miscalculated
> on that and then again on Sunday.
>
> But I don't believe this is the end of the story for this bird. No, this
> isn't my inane "optimism" talking. This was an historic incursion year for
> this species into Newfoundland. Over 200 of them arrived on our continent
> this spring, and now they are moving south for winter. They are not strong
> migrants like a Pacific or an American Golden, so they might not all head
> back to Europe, and I think we could see more of them.
>
> But how to find them is the big question. They are by definition unfamiliar
> to us. What's their habitat? Behavior? What's a good search image?
>
> I've sifted through hundreds of online photo, and all but one show the
> birds in grassy habitat (these are photos from known EGPL regions of the
> world), the other shows a group with N. Lapwing in shallow water. The
> habitat is not necessarily sod, or upturned soil. But what are the
> requirements? I don't know.
>
> Where are good places to search? Salem County is sounding good. But there
> are also good spots in central NJ as well. Will they be in the same places
> as American Goldens? I'm not entirely sure. What I've read states that
> their habitat is varied during migration.
>
> The advice on the ABA blog post about this is that we should be looking
> very carefully at golden-plover flocks. But will they be with American
> Goldens necessarily? Is their migration timing the same? Different?
>
> I know one was found here now, so we should be looking now. That's my
> simplistic logic. American Goldens usually don't turn up until later. What
> about juveniles? There's a headache waiting to happen!
>
> Anyone with knowledge and experience with this species, please help us
> devise a search strategy. I also hope the locals in Hunterdon will continue
> checking that same field.
>
> Thanks in advance for any help we can get with this.
>
> Mary DeLia
> E Windsor
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Searching for European Golden-plovers
From: Mary DeLia <maryderekemilydelia AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:24:25 -0400
Congratulations to Mike, Alan, and the Hunterdon birders who found and
ID-ed the European Golden-plover.

Because of miscalculations on my part, I did not have a chance to see it -
a real heartbreaker, for me. I saw the Black-bellied Plover report with the
photo, and let's just say it got my attention. But I waited, miscalculated
on that and then again on Sunday.

But I don't believe this is the end of the story for this bird. No, this
isn't my inane "optimism" talking. This was an historic incursion year for
this species into Newfoundland. Over 200 of them arrived on our continent
this spring, and now they are moving south for winter. They are not strong
migrants like a Pacific or an American Golden, so they might not all head
back to Europe, and I think we could see more of them.

But how to find them is the big question. They are by definition unfamiliar
to us. What's their habitat? Behavior? What's a good search image?

I've sifted through hundreds of online photo, and all but one show the
birds in grassy habitat (these are photos from known EGPL regions of the
world), the other shows a group with N. Lapwing in shallow water. The
habitat is not necessarily sod, or upturned soil. But what are the
requirements? I don't know.

Where are good places to search? Salem County is sounding good. But there
are also good spots in central NJ as well. Will they be in the same places
as American Goldens? I'm not entirely sure. What I've read states that
their habitat is varied during migration.

The advice on the ABA blog post about this is that we should be looking
very carefully at golden-plover flocks. But will they be with American
Goldens necessarily? Is their migration timing the same? Different?

I know one was found here now, so we should be looking now. That's my
simplistic logic. American Goldens usually don't turn up until later. What
about juveniles? There's a headache waiting to happen!

Anyone with knowledge and experience with this species, please help us
devise a search strategy. I also hope the locals in Hunterdon will continue
checking that same field.

Thanks in advance for any help we can get with this.

Mary DeLia
E Windsor

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: questions about birds for a project
From: "bmknj16 ." <bmknj17 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:18:23 -0400
Hi Danusha.

Though it sounds like you're writing a text that's more
whimsical/metaphorical, there's the option of presenting the perceived good
and bad facts re: house sparrows and letting those speak for themselves,
letting the reader draw his or her own conclusions, as they are apt to do
anyway.  But another big positive is that, in their ubiquitousness, and
their proximity to and comfort with us, I'm betting that they, at least in
part, are among the first species to help inspire many young people,
especially those in urban settings, toward caring about wildlife and the
environment.

Re: your list:

1 house wren--multi-nest builders and abandoners
2 brown-headed cowbird--passing on responsibility for offspring to other
species, or any bird trying to swallow more than it could handle.
3 bald eagle--putting massive effort into massive nest-building, for
confidence, with the link to the theme of optimism of their making a
comeback
4 Guessing you could jokingly tie this to the woodpeckers.  Wonder if they
ever get a headache or out of sorts from all that banging.  Or, depending
upon how anecdotal--as opposed to broad--you're getting, any species with a
large brood, as when ducks lead the young over storm drains, etc.
5 any that has to pinpoint a food source from a massive selection of
options, as a school of fish, field of flowers, flock of smaller birds, etc.
6 those anhingas spend a lot of time drying off/resting, with outstretched
wings that can suggest icon status or heroism

A few of those were stretching as well, but I had just a few minutes on my
hands.

Good luck with publication.  Sounds like a fun, interesting take.

Brett Klaproth
https://www.flickr.com/photos/26398858 AT N02/

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: questions about birds for a project
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 13:22:42 +0000
So, I think a male House Sparrow is a really good looking bird. Yes they seem 
to be everywhere, and in less than pristine environments. But, good for them. 


I dislike starlings much more.

Steven

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com
 
AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

 Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.


-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Danusha V. 
Goska 

Sent: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 9:07 AM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] questions about birds for a project

Dear Friends,

I am working on a bird-related project proposal I hope to send to a
publisher soon. I have most of it worked up. Please wish me luck!

Meanwhile, I would like to pick your brains if I may. I have a few
questions, below. If you care to, please send me a reply directly.

First, can anything good be said about house sparrows?

I know their presence here is the result of human introduction of an
alien species. I know they are invasive and I know they compete with
native species like bluebirds.

But can we at least say that in gritty urban settings where no other
birds might be found, one can encounter house sparrows, and that is at
least a good thing?

(I've researched this question through google and mostly I encounter
hostility to house sparrows and even directives to kill them.)

Mind, I'm not trying to turn house sparrows into national icons. I'm
just trying to advance this one feature - that in settings that would
otherwise be bereft of birds, one can encounter house sparrows. They
are tough survivors.

Second question. If you think metaphorically and imaginatively, what
North American bird comes to mind when you think of the below listed
six qualities?

I understand that the qualities below are human qualities but I am
looking for North American birds I can associate with each.

For example, many Native Americans associated ravens with the creator
god because ravens are so smart and tricky.

So, thinking metaphorically, are there any North American birds you'd
associate with the below-listed human qualities, and, if so, why?

I don't know if I'll find a publisher for this project, but if I do
and if I use your idea, I will thank you in the text.

1) Someone juggling two potential outcomes, or even just someone
juggling two objects

2) Someone abandoning a potentially feasible project

3) Looking to the future with self-confidence and a creative and
viable plan of action

4) Being so overworked that you lose awareness

5) Being willfully blind because seeing everything would just overwhelm you

6) Resting up and getting in touch with heroic role models or heroes
from the past

Thank you in advance. And thank you again for the help with the bino
question. I will sample some at a store. Right now it's between Nikon
monarchs and Zeiss conquest.

Thank you also with the osprey question. The consensus seems to be
that ospreys do occasionally drown; one poster mentioned seeing a
drowned osprey. But that ospreys can and do release fish prey that is
too difficult to handle.


-- 
Danusha V. Goska, PhD
author, "Save Send Delete"
http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: questions about birds for a project
From: "Danusha V. Goska" <dgoska AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:06:46 -0400
Dear Friends,

I am working on a bird-related project proposal I hope to send to a
publisher soon. I have most of it worked up. Please wish me luck!

Meanwhile, I would like to pick your brains if I may. I have a few
questions, below. If you care to, please send me a reply directly.

First, can anything good be said about house sparrows?

I know their presence here is the result of human introduction of an
alien species. I know they are invasive and I know they compete with
native species like bluebirds.

But can we at least say that in gritty urban settings where no other
birds might be found, one can encounter house sparrows, and that is at
least a good thing?

(I've researched this question through google and mostly I encounter
hostility to house sparrows and even directives to kill them.)

Mind, I'm not trying to turn house sparrows into national icons. I'm
just trying to advance this one feature - that in settings that would
otherwise be bereft of birds, one can encounter house sparrows. They
are tough survivors.

Second question. If you think metaphorically and imaginatively, what
North American bird comes to mind when you think of the below listed
six qualities?

I understand that the qualities below are human qualities but I am
looking for North American birds I can associate with each.

For example, many Native Americans associated ravens with the creator
god because ravens are so smart and tricky.

So, thinking metaphorically, are there any North American birds you'd
associate with the below-listed human qualities, and, if so, why?

I don't know if I'll find a publisher for this project, but if I do
and if I use your idea, I will thank you in the text.

1) Someone juggling two potential outcomes, or even just someone
juggling two objects

2) Someone abandoning a potentially feasible project

3) Looking to the future with self-confidence and a creative and
viable plan of action

4) Being so overworked that you lose awareness

5) Being willfully blind because seeing everything would just overwhelm you

6) Resting up and getting in touch with heroic role models or heroes
from the past

Thank you in advance. And thank you again for the help with the bino
question. I will sample some at a store. Right now it's between Nikon
monarchs and Zeiss conquest.

Thank you also with the osprey question. The consensus seems to be
that ospreys do occasionally drown; one poster mentioned seeing a
drowned osprey. But that ospreys can and do release fish prey that is
too difficult to handle.


-- 
Danusha V. Goska, PhD
author, "Save Send Delete"
http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: bird ID request
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 21:34:06 -0400
Below is a Flicker from my birding friend, Keith. I am particularly interested 
in two smaller shorebirds in flight along with the flock of Whimbrel. And the 
sparrow spp. that was feeding along a tidal gut as if he/she was a rail 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/sjraptor/

Yong Kong
yklitespeed AT comcast.net
Berlin, NJ


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Red-headed Woodpeckers in NJ??
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:55:56 -0400
For the past few evenings I have been hearing what sounds a heck of a lot
like a Red-headed Woodpecker's "rattle call" from my deck. I also heard
these calls for a week or so in the spring. They sound exactly like the
final recording at this Audubon Society web page:

 http://bit.ly/1qYWTEu

Bill Boyle's "Birds of New Jersey" says these birds are a threatened
species in NJ, and that they are "scarce". But the habitat seems good...a
relatively open area in the Rutgers preserve near Johnson Park. Any other
birds make a call like the Red-headed Woodpecker's "rattle call"?

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Alan Mart's labs and his Team's Eurasian Golden-Plover
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 17:52:48 -0400
Scene on the JBird's seems bit slow lately so I am hoping fellow birders will 
not mind my posting here today. 


I can totally relate to Alan's sadness on passing of his beloved labs. I have 
blown-off so many birding days because I felt so guilty that I would be outside 
all day (birding) while my dogs have to be inside of the house while I am out. 


I have posted this video several times. But, perhaps, one more time for Alan 
and to his two labs. Who know, life moves on in unknown paths. Perhaps, Alan's 
labs may have let him to the Eurasian Golden-Plover. I would like to think so. 


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03n1rpN4IJ8

Yong Kong
yklitespeed AT comcast.net
Berlin, NJ


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Negri-Nepote Today- Blue Grosbeaks and Dickcissels Continue
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 15:08:12 -0400
Hi, Y'all.

I finally spotted the Blue Grosbeaks here today-  they have been eluding me
all season. Both the male and female were present and active in the brushy
cedars just off the property's NE corner, and they were frequently making
runs to the trees and thickets that surround the farmhouse there. The female
Dickcissel and her brood{s} were not present at the usual location, so I
just ambled along looking to find some Grasshopper Sparrows to play with.
While photographing the herds of juvie sparrows that I stumbled upon, I
noticed the adult female Dickcissel sound asleep, perched near the bottom of
a cedar tree. I quietly sat down and waited for her to wake up, and then was
able to just enjoy the bird at close range while she slept, yawned and
preened, and though she was aware of my presence after a while- paid me no
heed. After a while one of the juvenile birds began calling close by, and
that snapped her right out of her slumber and off she went  to take care of
business. A great birding moment for me, although kneeling in the gravel for
40 minutes looks like it's going to leave a mark. 

 A few shots of the sleepy bird can be seen here:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 

Good Birding!

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 

 

 

 



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: European Golden-Plover 7/20/14
From: Larry Scacchetti <larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 10:42:37 -0400
Sorry, the proper link is :

Flickr.com/photos/larrbird13

Larry

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 21, 2014, at 10:37 AM, Larry Scacchetti  
wrote: 

> 
> Sorry for late post but I had a very long weekend. Saturday night I spent the 
night at my buddy's in little egg harbor, all intentions of heading to 
Pittstown, it was hard falling asleep. I believe it was Mike who apologized for 
the confusion about getting the word out, I think it was perfect! Saturday 
evening, not to late, on a weekend, so people who work during the week are 
actually able to chase! Alyssa Della Fave and I followed the leader almost the 
whole way up, safely of course, arriving at 7:30 am. I was shocked at how the 
place wasn't swarmed with eager birders. We watched the bird for an hour 1/2 as 
it fed and covered a small area in the field. The bird was fairly close, maybe 
150 yards from the road. Just after 9:00 am the bird took flight and headed 
SSW. Naked eye, the birds underwing was an incredible flash of white! As it 
started to climb to clear the tree line, it let out 2-3 calls that were very 
distinct, a short, 1 note peep that had a sweet ring t! 

 o it. 
> 
> After the bird left, Skyler Streich and I drove around in a very large figure 
8, in hopes of relocating the bird. Out of the infinite amount of fields in 
that area, we only found maybe 3 that would have been perfect, the others being 
soy and grass that was to tall. 

> 
> By the time we went and got lunch, we returned to the masses. Out of state 
plates peppered the area. We stayed for a bit in hopes of its return. 

> 
> I took some photos of the bird that can be seen here :
> 
> Www.flickr.com/photos/larrybird13.com
> 
> Thanks again to Mike, Alan, Frank, Sam and anyone else aided in this 
spectacular find! 

> 
> Good birding,
> 
> Larry Scacchetti
> Hillsdale, NJ
> 
> Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: European Golden-Plover 7/20/14
From: Larry Scacchetti <larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 10:37:09 -0400
Sorry for late post but I had a very long weekend. Saturday night I spent the 
night at my buddy's in little egg harbor, all intentions of heading to 
Pittstown, it was hard falling asleep. I believe it was Mike who apologized for 
the confusion about getting the word out, I think it was perfect! Saturday 
evening, not to late, on a weekend, so people who work during the week are 
actually able to chase! Alyssa Della Fave and I followed the leader almost the 
whole way up, safely of course, arriving at 7:30 am. I was shocked at how the 
place wasn't swarmed with eager birders. We watched the bird for an hour 1/2 as 
it fed and covered a small area in the field. The bird was fairly close, maybe 
150 yards from the road. Just after 9:00 am the bird took flight and headed 
SSW. Naked eye, the birds underwing was an incredible flash of white! As it 
started to climb to clear the tree line, it let out 2-3 calls that were very 
distinct, a short, 1 note peep that had a sweet ring to ! 

 it. 

After the bird left, Skyler Streich and I drove around in a very large figure 
8, in hopes of relocating the bird. Out of the infinite amount of fields in 
that area, we only found maybe 3 that would have been perfect, the others being 
soy and grass that was to tall. 


By the time we went and got lunch, we returned to the masses. Out of state 
plates peppered the area. We stayed for a bit in hopes of its return. 


I took some photos of the bird that can be seen here :

Www.flickr.com/photos/larrybird13.com

Thanks again to Mike, Alan, Frank, Sam and anyone else aided in this 
spectacular find! 


Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Hillsdale, NJ

Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Brig, Sunday July 20:
From: Peter Bacinski <petebacinski AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 08:48:36 -0400
Dear JerseyBirders:

 

Barbara Bassett and I had an excellent trip to Brig in the rain and strong
winds early on, but brightened later.  The weather kept the Green-heads to a
minimum.

 

We tallied 81 species for the day with the following highlights:

 

Glossy Ibis 120

American Oystercatcher 4

Black-bellied Plover just 1

Whimbrel 10

Stilt Sandpiper 3 from south dike Danzenbaker (east) pool

Western Sandpipers 5

Long-billed Dowitcher 12+ Closely observed all in at least partial breeding.
Probably plenty more present.  Heard one call note.

Least Tern 3

Gull-billed Tern 8

Black Tern 1 from east dike

Seaside Sparrow 10

Blue Grosbeak 5

 

Please consider my All Things Birds trip here this coming Saturday at 8:45
a.m.  A fun time to be at the refuge with lots of possible surprises.  Check
out my blog below for bird info and awesome images.

 

Truly a very enjoyable day for us both.

 

Good Birding,

 

Pete Bacinski

 

Atlantic Highlands, NJ

 

Embrace Conservation

Aspire to Excellence

Always Smile and Say Thank you

 

All Things Birds Blog:

http://www.njaudubon.org/SectionCenters/SectionAllThingsBirds/AllThingsBirds
Blog.aspx

 

All Things Birds-Pete Bacinski Facebook Page:

 
https://www.facebook.com/AllThingsBirds

 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Osprey Drownings - An Inconvenient Adaptation
From: Mary DeLia <maryderekemilydelia AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 08:44:42 -0400
I think, at one point or another, we've all had someone explain to us how
the Osprey's talons get locked onto fish, and they can get pulled under by
a large fish and drown. Some very reputable organizations readily state
this as a fact on their web pages. But I never really thought about it
until Danusha asked the question here on JerseyBirds.

I read Mark Bartosik's article that Diana sent. He's the same guy from the
pBase link that Danusha posted. He's documented several instances when the
Osprey does let go of a fish that's too big and doesn't stop fighting.
Meanwhile, there are no documented cases of the Osprey being pulled under
that I could find, from anyone.

And think about your own experience watching Osprey. I bet most of us have
seen them drop fish in mid-air, especially if there are Bald Eagles in the
area! Even Ben Franklin noticed that:

http://www.greatseal.com/symbols/turkey.html

Giving it some further thought, it seems that having talons that lock onto
prey, that can not be unlocked at will, would be a very inconvenient
adaptation. So, at least for me, that part of the story has been debunked.

But I won't go so far as to say that it could never possibly happen that an
Osprey got pulled down by a fish, maybe if fishing line is involved (?).

Good birding.

Mary DeLia
E Windsor

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: No Euro Golden-Plover - 7/21 early AM
From: Tom Johnson <tbj4 AT CORNELL.EDU>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 07:31:06 -0400
Jerseybirders,
As of 7:30, there has been no sign of the golden-plover in Hunterdon Co.
However, a Peregrine Falcon has been strafing the seemingly endless supply
of Mourning Doves.
Good luck,
Tom


-- 
Tom Johnson
tbj4 AT cornell.edu

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: No Euro Golden-Plover at dark - 7/20
From: Tom Johnson <tbj4 AT CORNELL.EDU>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 20:51:11 -0400
Hi Jerseybirders,
A group of hopeful birders waited until dark for the golden-plover to fly
back into the sod farm in Hunterdon Co. this evening. It did not.
Good luck,
Tom


-- 
Tom Johnson
tbj4 AT cornell.edu

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: binocular advice question / most frequently mentioned brands
From: Mike Anderson <mike.anderson AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 20:27:18 -0400
Recommendations from birders is a good start on your quest for new bins. The 
next step is to go to a store where you can try all the species of bins, and 
then decide what fits your hands, eyes and budget. 

Mike


Mike Anderson


> On Jul 20, 2014, at 3:04 PM, "Danusha V. Goska"  wrote:
> 
> Dear Friends,
> 
> I have compiled the chart, and I can report the most frequently
> mentioned brands, below:
> 
> Nikon monarch. Mentioned 16 times. These were all recommendations
> 
> Zeiss mentioned 8 times but only two of these were recommendations;
> the rest were comments about how Zeiss is a leader in the field but
> how one can do almost as well with a less expensive pair
> 
> Swarovski was mentioned six times and recommended twice. Actually a
> third mention of Swarovski may have been a recommendation but the
> person stipulated that I'd be spending $2,579 and mentioned if I were
> not prepared to spend that amount I might want to try something else.
> 
> A couple of other brands were mentioned as well but each received only
> one mention each.
> 
> -- 
> Danusha V. Goska, PhD
> author, "Save Send Delete"
> http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Eurasian Golden-Plover: The team approach to ID and another thought
From: Alan Mart <a.mart67 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 00:11:38 +0000
I'll venture to guess that you know my weekend was made by the Eurasian 
Golden-Plover in Pittstown. However, the other people involved with the ID 
should be noted as this was a group effort, starting with Mike Hoitis, and 
continuing with Pete Kwiatek, John DeMarris, Frank Sencher, Sam Galick (others 
Sam got feedback from) and Rob Fergus. A true team effort! 


I also want to share an interesting twist related to this bird. On June 6, I 
lost one of my beloved labs and then on July 15 I lost my other lab (my birding 
buddy). As you can imagine this has been a tough week. On Thursday, I asked 
some of the local Hunterdon birders to find me a good bird as I needed some 
cheering up. They delivered with the Eurasian Golden-Plover on Saturday. Thank 
all, the distraction has helped! 


Alan Mart 
High Bridge 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Juvenile Hummingbirds (with Photos)
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 19:37:08 -0400
After the posts about fewer Hummingbirds at local feeders, it was nice to see a 
whole batch of juveniles show up in the yard today. At least 3, possibly 4 
individuals were hitting the flowers and feeders hard after a summer with two 
adults (one male, one female) making infrequent visits. 


Lots of chances for photos today.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_byland/14701157034/

Also at the feeders today, juvenile Downy, Hairy and Red-bellied Woodpeckers, 
juvie Titmice, Bluebirds, Catbirds, Chipping Sparrows and Cardinals. 


Steve Byland
Warren Township

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Nikon camera cap found in Brig today
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 19:35:37 -0400
Found a Nikon camera cap at the lower parking area of the Jen's trail today (by 
the metal gate). I can sent it to the owner via a snail mail. 


My guess is this birder may have lost it while getting back to the car after 
taking a picture of a Juv. Little Blue Heron what was feeding at Jen's trail 
pond. 


Also, I have a photo of three Stilt Sandpipers observed at Brig today, in case 
anyone is interested. 


Yong Kong
yklitespeed AT comcast.net
Berlin, NJ



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Abraham Shalit Park East Brunswick
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 23:24:03 +0000
I didn't get to go see the golden plover today. Next chance, Wednesday morning 
(hope it hangs around), and my big plans to drive down to Brig fell through. 


So, I stayed in town (East Brunswick) for some early, quick birding. Of 
particular note, I stopped at Abraham Shalit Park on Hart's Lane. Just a small 
patch with a shallow pond, lots of dead, bare trees and second growth woodland 
going up a hill. I've driven by it for more than 20 years and didn't give it 
much thought. Anyhow, 45 minutes today yielded 23 species including a 
hummingbird, solitary and spotted sandpipers, phoebe, house wrens, red-eyed 
vireo, both crows, and rough-winged swallow among others. Earlier in the 
spring, I also had yellowthroat, yellow warbler and a kingfisher here. 


Easy, open views of several environments in a compact setting, virtually no 
walking, almost 30 species. I'm not suggesting that this is a special 
destination to spend time on the road for, but not a bad place if you live 
nearby. 


Steven

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: skimmers in Navesink
From: Joan and Bob <aufderhar AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 19:12:52 +0000
There were 3 black skimmers working the Navesink River close to sunset Friday 
evening, first time I've seen them there. 




Joan 

Fair Haven 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Np dredge spoils - shorebird notes
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 15:09:02 -0400
Hello,
    Marilyn and I hit this mid day for a couple of hours. Would have liked to
chase the European Golden-Plover! I hear that might get difficult. 

4 Spotted Sandpipers on the edges of the east pool. Nothing else! It's probably
going to be hit or miss here for shorebirds unless the west pool gets some
water again.

The swallow show was impressive. The Bank and Rough- winged were over the
sand and the dry west pool. 60 or so Tree Swallows were over the east pool. 
Many of the Tree Swallows were showing a more extensive white crescent up the
side of the rump than usually. I am wondering if a molt issue? Will look that 
up in 

Pyle when I return home.

Nature notes - Viceroy butterflies - a lot! And that place was alive with 
dragonflies! 

A female Comet Darner was nice. 

Good birding all. 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: binocular advice question / most frequently mentioned brands
From: "Danusha V. Goska" <dgoska AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 15:04:50 -0400
Dear Friends,

I have compiled the chart, and I can report the most frequently
mentioned brands, below:

Nikon monarch. Mentioned 16 times. These were all recommendations

Zeiss mentioned 8 times but only two of these were recommendations;
the rest were comments about how Zeiss is a leader in the field but
how one can do almost as well with a less expensive pair

Swarovski was mentioned six times and recommended twice. Actually a
third mention of Swarovski may have been a recommendation but the
person stipulated that I'd be spending $2,579 and mentioned if I were
not prepared to spend that amount I might want to try something else.

A couple of other brands were mentioned as well but each received only
one mention each.

-- 
Danusha V. Goska, PhD
author, "Save Send Delete"
http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Strange hummingbird at Franklin Parker Preserve, Burlington Co.
From: Elizabeth Medina-Gray <emedinagray AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 12:10:04 -0400
Another birder and I saw a strange hummingbird in the bogs about a quarter
or half mile west into the Franklin Parker Preserve from the Speedwell
entrance on rt. 563, in the general area near an observation platform.
We're very unsure about the ID (I haven't been able to find anything like
it in field guides or online) and I wasn't able to get any pictures
unfortunately. The bird was larger than a Ruby-throated hummingbird,
overall rufous and green and white, and with dark (black) marks across (or
near) its eyes and down the sides of its face. I'm not a Jersey local (just
visiting), but I wanted to get the info out there in case it turns out to
be something rare and other birders can find it again. Any ideas about ID?

Elizabeth Medina-Gray
Seymour, CT

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How to report NJ bird sightings: