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Updated on Sunday, January 22 at 07:45 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Dot-winged Antwren,©Dan Lane

22 Jan Delaware bay salt marsh birding- Bird like Mike Britt [Yong Kong ]
22 Jan Re: Bergen County - Stateline Lookout Gyrfalcon - 1/22/2017 [birds ]
22 Jan Bergen County - Stateline Lookout Gyrfalcon - 1/22/2017 [Ray Duffy ]
22 Jan Greater-white Fronted Geese [Patty ]
22 Jan Gyr alert [Michael Britt ]
21 Jan Catbird at New Brooklyn Lake Park, Camden County [Yong Kong ]
21 Jan Bald Eagles at Great Swamp (and some 360 photos) [Steve Byland ]
21 Jan Waterfowl - still low diversity and numbers [Sandra Keller ]
18 Jan Cape May - always great! but not so much today..... [Sandra Keller ]
18 Jan ducks/photography ["bmknj16 ." ]
18 Jan Bob's Assunpink notes on Pileated Woodpecker [Yong Kong ]
18 Jan Assunpink notes [robert dodelson ]
17 Jan Together for Birds Petition [Steve Holmer ]
16 Jan On Long-tailed Ducks in Burlington [Sandra Keller ]
16 Jan At least three-years returning Red-shouldered Hawk in Gloucester County ? [Yong Kong ]
17 Jan Brigantine Island this morning [Jim Hayes ]
16 Jan Ducks - slow [Sandra Keller ]
16 Jan Re: Black-capped/Carolina contact zone in NJ [Karen Swaine ]
16 Jan Re: Black-capped/Carolina contact zone in NJ [Joan Detyna ]
16 Jan Re: winter high count [Karen Swaine ]
16 Jan Re: Black-capped/Carolina contact zone in NJ [Andrew Bobe ]
16 Jan Black-capped/Carolina contact zone in NJ ["B.G. Sloan" ]
16 Jan Upcoming Bergen County Audubon Meeting [Beth Goldberg ]
15 Jan Atlantic and Ocean Co. salt marsh birding [Yong Kong ]
15 Jan waterfowl - Burlington county [Sandra Keller ]
15 Jan Re: Alcid spotted at IBSP, Ocean County, Jan 14 [David Lapuma ]
15 Jan Request for information [Bill Boyle ]
15 Jan Alcid spotted at IBSP, Ocean County, Jan 14 [Becky Laboy ]
14 Jan Distinguishing Black-capped and Carolina Chickadees - Sibley Guides [L Larson ]
14 Jan Re: help re Black-capped chickadee in Haddonfield [Sandra Keller ]
15 Jan Re: help re Black-capped chickadee in Haddonfield [Karen Swaine ]
14 Jan Camden To Salem Co. birding [Yong Kong ]
14 Jan Camden birds and Philly [Sandra Keller ]
14 Jan Birds in the Blizzard (Video) [Steve Byland ]
14 Jan Black-capped chickadee in Haddonfield [Marty DeAngelo ]
14 Jan East Brunswick Sandhill cranes YES ["Albert, Steven" ]
14 Jan Sandhill Cranes -- No [John Beetham ]
14 Jan Orange-crowned Warbler - Trenton [Jeffrey Climpson ]
13 Jan Raritan Estuary Christmas Bird Count, Jan 1, 2017 [Tom Ostrand ]
13 Jan Semipalmated Sandpiper Migration Monitoring Project [Stuart and Wendy Malmid ]
13 Jan Crested Cara Cara: No ["James O'Brien" ]
13 Jan Washington Crossing Audubon Society Program on Mon. Jan. 16 [J Hummel ]
12 Jan Crested Caracara [Christopher Takacs ]
12 Jan Cumberland - woodcock [Sandra Keller ]
12 Jan Crested Cara cara [Christopher Takacs ]
12 Jan Re: Sandhill Cranes East Brunswick NO ["Albert, Steven" ]
12 Jan Sandhill Cranes East Brunswick YES [Dominick Petrellese ]
12 Jan Sandhill Cranes - East Brunswick (no) [Patrick Belardo ]
11 Jan Miss ID a bird in public, then must fess up [Yong Kong ]
11 Jan Mockingbird and MANY others at the Feeders (Video) [Steve Byland ]
11 Jan Re: Sandhill Cranes ["Albert, Steven" ]
11 Jan Sandhill Cranes [Henry Burk ]
11 Jan Re: Passing of a Friend ["James O'Brien" ]
10 Jan Re: Passing of a Friend [celticcail ]
10 Jan Re: Passing of a Friend [Dena Temple ]
10 Jan Salem county - shortie and Longspurs [Sandra Keller ]
10 Jan Camden big year - new locations [Sandra Keller ]
11 Jan Passing of a friend [Landis Eaton ]
10 Jan Re: Passing of a Friend [Diane C Louie ]
10 Jan Re: Passing of a Friend [Diane C Louie ]
10 Jan Passing of a Friend ( Harvey's Hummer) [Yong Kong ]
10 Jan Re: Passing of a Friend ["James O'Brien" ]
10 Jan Re: Passing of a Friend [Dom ]
10 Jan Re: Passing of a Friend [Dena Temple ]
10 Jan Re: Passing of a Friend [Vince Capp ]
10 Jan Re: Passing of a Friend [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
10 Jan Passing of a Friend [Harvey Tomlinson ]
9 Jan Horned Lark flock in Glassboro, Gloucester Co. [Yong Kong ]
9 Jan road name correction [Sandra Keller ]
9 Jan Camden big year birding - Tuckahoe Turf Farm [Sandra Keller ]
9 Jan Re: She Made It! ["Bell, Tyler" ]
9 Jan Long Branch CBC update [Tom Brown ]
9 Jan The 195 Loop yesterday (long post) ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
9 Jan January Birds at Troy Meadows NJ on a Windy Day (video) [Dave Blinder ]
8 Jan Light Phase Rough-legged Hawk at Motts Creek Inn [Yong Kong ]
8 Jan She Made It! [Harvey Tomlinson ]

Subject: Delaware bay salt marsh birding- Bird like Mike Britt
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 19:36:56 -0500
As today is my last day out true-birding until the weekend I headed over 
towards the Delaware bay salt marsh. Foggy and cloudy sky but I was not 
complaining. Shorebirds were at great distance and most birds were just a dot 
or silhouette out in the marsh. Regardless of the weather conditions, decided 
to bird like Mike Britt. What do I mean by that ? 


Bird like Mike as if the bird you are looking for is really out there. Got out 
the scope and decided to shift though each bird or as best as I could. Then saw 
a group of 5 green-winged teals via scope. Had to study to each one. Four males 
and one female. Then closer look revealed one male was missing a vertical white 
bar. Instead it had horizontal stripe along the entire body length. 
Unmistakable as it was surrounded by standard green-winged male teals with 
vertical bar. 


I am not requesting ebird reviewers to accept my sighting or even asking fellow 
JBirders to go chase as I could not get the Doc photo. So the teal I saw does 
not exist. 


The 1,000 strong shorebird flock that I have been chasing since last August was 
in lower numbers today. In the past the flock mostly comprised of dunlins but 
also included black-bellied plovers, peeps and dowitchers. I was so lucky today 
in that the portion of the flock decided to take flight, and saw one with all 
white rump. Followed it with the scope until it landed again than it was all 
lost in that large flock of shorebirds on the ground. I suck at shorebird ID, 
especially during the winter. 


Call me a Stringers as I have no photos of this shorebird with white-rump 
either. But some other photos on my Flickr in case some may express interest. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
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Subject: Re: Bergen County - Stateline Lookout Gyrfalcon - 1/22/2017
From: birds <birdinggreg AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 19:11:11 -0500
I’ve posted some distant photographs of the “possible" Gyrfalcon, taken 
this afternoon at the State Line Lookout. I hope that they will help to 
correctly ID this bird: 
http://www.greggard.com/blog/2017/1/gyrfalcon-palisades-nj 


Thank you Michael Girone and Michael Britt for spreading the word and others 
for keeping updates on this bird. I hope it will stick around for couple more 
days so more people can enjoy it. 


Greg Gard


> On Jan 22, 2017, at 6:11 PM, Ray Duffy  wrote:
> 
> I headed up to Stateline Lookout this afternoon to look for the Gyrfalcon 
reported yesterday. Around 3:53pm, Ray Gilbert spotted a larger and lighter 
gray falcon flying from the south headed north below the ridgeline over the 
river. The falcon flew north and perched on a tree maybe a quarter mile or less 
up the ridge for about 10 minutes from the area where the hawk watch is 
generally conducted here (near the restaurant). From there, the bird took off 
and we think it headed south again, looked like it did the same motion, a low 
flight. We were not able to relocate the bird after it took off. From what I 
gathered, this seems to be the pattern for this as the bird was seen late 
yesterday afternoon and a day or two beforehand, a possible large peregrine was 
seen around the same time and in the same area (post 3:30pm). 

> 
> I have extracted an image from my video of the perched bird in my ebird check 
list: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33870033 

> 
> Several other people were present and they have better shots, but it looks to 
be good for a gyrfalcon. 

> 
> Ray Duffy 
> Secaucus, NJ 
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Bergen County - Stateline Lookout Gyrfalcon - 1/22/2017
From: Ray Duffy <marshwren AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 23:11:42 +0000
I headed up to Stateline Lookout this afternoon to look for the Gyrfalcon 
reported yesterday. Around 3:53pm, Ray Gilbert spotted a larger and lighter 
gray falcon flying from the south headed north below the ridgeline over the 
river. The falcon flew north and perched on a tree maybe a quarter mile or less 
up the ridge for about 10 minutes from the area where the hawk watch is 
generally conducted here (near the restaurant). From there, the bird took off 
and we think it headed south again, looked like it did the same motion, a low 
flight. We were not able to relocate the bird after it took off. From what I 
gathered, this seems to be the pattern for this as the bird was seen late 
yesterday afternoon and a day or two beforehand, a possible large peregrine was 
seen around the same time and in the same area (post 3:30pm). 


I have extracted an image from my video of the perched bird in my ebird check 
list: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33870033 


Several other people were present and they have better shots, but it looks to 
be good for a gyrfalcon. 


Ray Duffy 
Secaucus, NJ 


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
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Subject: Greater-white Fronted Geese
From: Patty <pattyrehn5 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 12:51:00 -0500
Continue at Mannington Marsh mixed in with Canada Geese. 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 21, 2017, at 4:40 PM, Sandra Keller  wrote:
> 
> But stuff around! A LT Duck at Mannington Marsh - Kings Highway was a county 
bird! 

> Not everything in ebird yet, I don't believe I have that one yet! It did fly 
off - I didn't 

> think far, but that species does move around a lot. It has been a good winter 
for this 

> duck in SW Jersey. I went chasing stuff after Gloucester County. I am easily 
side tracked.... 

> Camden will have to wait til Monday or Tues. The hunters are around in Salem 
County 

> in good numbers. Please be careful. I do believe they pushed the geese flock 
off the 

> farm fields around Seabrook and Halltown where David first had the White 
fronted Geese 

> today and onto the water. Yong and Scott refound them on the water at 
Mannington - 

> Kings Highway area. And the Cackling was still at Memorial Lake - Woodstown. 
> 
> I had an interesting Canada at Mannington. 2/3 the size of a Canada. And had 
a bit 

> of a longer primary projection. But no difference in back color, and the head 
and bill 

> structure were exact with the "normal" Canada next to it. I presume a Lesser 
Canada. 

> 
> Good birding all.
> 
> Sandra Keller
> 
> Sent from my iPad mini
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Gyr alert
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 09:18:26 -0500
Late yesterday afternoon, a gray GYRFALCON was observed from the State Line
Lookout in Alpine. Apparently locals were not notified until around 10PM.
It goes without saying but keep your eyes peeled. I've been telling friends
that the JC/Bayonne waterfront is long overdue...

Mike Britt
Bayonne


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
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Subject: Catbird at New Brooklyn Lake Park, Camden County
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 15:52:03 -0500
So many birding choices this morning, Barnegat Light, Cape May, Mannington 
Marsh, Del Heaven then visit Harvey T, or re-do the Northern Shore tour again. 
Ended up bailing on all of them to bird around the yard and home woods. 


Bird brain birder that I am, after yard birding, decided to head over to the 
New Brooklyn Lake Park in search of Pileated Woodpecker along the mature 
riparian habitat that line the Great Egg Harbor River corridor. Why not try ? 
Of course I failed to find one. Consolation prize was a catbird responding to 
my spitting practice into the brush and woods. 


Then the lame birding day and the poor choices I have made was all saved when 
Sandra Keller called to let me know she was going to chase three Greater 
White-fronted Goose previously found my David W. at Mannington Mash vicinity. 

I suck at chasing bird had no desire initially.

Then it dawned on me, I had to go. Reason ? I had to save face and try to 
redeem myself in trying to find the real Greater White-fronted Goose, and not 
imposters that I previously texted out to the Group. Doc photos of catbird on 
my Flickr. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Bald Eagles at Great Swamp (and some 360 photos)
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 15:39:41 -0500
Adult Bald Eagles were annoying the ducks at the Friends Blind this afternoon 
(Great Swamp NWR). On the walk out, I took some 360 panoramic shots (too 
distant to see the Eagles). I used a pole to place the camera above the blinds 
for an interesting effect. Photo at: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_byland/32294203032/

Steve Byland
Warren Township


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Waterfowl - still low diversity and numbers
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 16:40:38 -0500
But stuff around! A LT Duck at Mannington Marsh - Kings Highway was a county 
bird! 

Not everything in ebird yet, I don't believe I have that one yet! It did fly 
off - I didn't 

think far, but that species does move around a lot. It has been a good winter 
for this 

duck in SW Jersey. I went chasing stuff after Gloucester County. I am easily 
side tracked.... 

Camden will have to wait til Monday or Tues. The hunters are around in Salem 
County 

in good numbers. Please be careful. I do believe they pushed the geese flock 
off the 

farm fields around Seabrook and Halltown where David first had the White 
fronted Geese 

today and onto the water. Yong and Scott refound them on the water at 
Mannington - 

Kings Highway area. And the Cackling was still at Memorial Lake - Woodstown. 

I had an interesting Canada at Mannington. 2/3 the size of a Canada. And had a 
bit 

of a longer primary projection. But no difference in back color, and the head 
and bill 

structure were exact with the "normal" Canada next to it. I presume a Lesser 
Canada. 


Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Cape May - always great! but not so much today.....
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 20:47:00 -0500
I always love heading down to bird Cape May. Always something around. And all 
the different habitats make for a great day. 

Alas, today I went 0/5 in birds I was chasing. Not good! I go when I can. I 
don’t plan around tides or time of day. I should, but 

don’t have that flexibility. Sigh….. The ocean was good at Two Mile Beach. 
Close in Long-tailed Ducks, Common Loons, Black 

and Surf Scoters, etc. But no King Eider. And of course the few accipitors I 
got a look at were not the Gos. That wall was a great 

spot to scan Hereford Inlet. But of course no Godwits for me. Etc. Etc. 

On a bright note - a GHO sounded off a couple times as I was unloading my car 
tonight. So picked up that for Camden! 


Godo birding all.


Sandra Keller
sandrakeller AT verizon.net

Sent from my Imac





How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: ducks/photography
From: "bmknj16 ." <bmknj17 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 19:14:38 -0500
I'm just back to photographing birds after a longish break and had some
good luck with ducks on my first two outings along the North Shore.

For this site's purposes, Takanassee has been quiet and the Cheesequake
Creek (Does anyone have a guess as to why?) even quieter, with just a
red-breasted merganser and a few bufflehead down by Old Spy Road any of the
times I visited that and various other points along its bank.

As a side note to what in itself is really a side note...  My favorite shot
of the day, FYI, is that of a remote control boat stuck in the mud in the
middle of one of the ponds at which I was shooting.  That's because I saw
its *adult *owner place it in the water and aim it at a very high
speed toward a group of birds that surely would have been injured by it had
they not taken off at its very near approach.

For that speed and his resulting inability to control it, it ended up stuck
at the inner border of a few yards worth of phragmites on the other side of
the water, and I suppose it drifted to its current spot where its sat
motionless the entire day.  Had it been a child's I'd have been ambivalent,
and likely would have retrieved it (was wearing waders) on his or her
behalf.  But in this case, no.  Trust the guy didn't want to look at me
anyway as I was removing all of my gear from the water and ground as he
passed on his way to assess the shipwreck.

Anyway, in posting these first dozen shots since summer on Flickr, I was
thinking how that site has changed since I joined it about ten years ago.

I decided I wanted to write something directed toward young and/or new
wildlife photographers to instruct, maybe inspire them to do the type of
work they might want to do, and more so might not realize they can do.

Not really sure how to reach that audience until its members one a time add
me as a contact but at that point they'd have to find the text.  So I'll
likely add it to my profile there at some point.

But for now I'm attaching parts 1 and 2 of a potential series to my
favorite image of the two days..

If interested...
https://www.flickr.com/photos/26398858 AT N02/32251942851/in/dateposted-public/

Brett Klaproth


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Bob's Assunpink notes on Pileated Woodpecker
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 19:10:39 -0500
First,

Bob D., what a fantastic find and view of the Pileated Woodpecker you had 
while you were leaving the Assunpink WMA !!!

Now, if I could share my story of Pileated Woodpecker search at the Oldmans 
Creek Preserve last weekend. I had no intention or even remote interest 
chasing that Pileated at the Preserve but went to visit since a birder I was 
with expressed an interest in the chase.  I did not even know where that 
place was until I got there.

As soon as we arrived, based on the observation of forest structure there, I 
could immediately tell why the woody was sighted there and long staying 
bird.  Then we started our search. Then, I saw a woodpecker JIZZ like bird 
flush from the distance that I thought it could match the appearance of the 
Pileated.

Then we arrived at the location where the bird was flushed. Soon after we 
found a snag where the bird was flushed from that had all signs of Pileated 
Woodpecker peeling off the bark in search of insects.   That was all I need 
to see and find and my bird-brain stomach was full. For me, it was worth the 
50 mile around trip drive. However, I would never report to eBird that I 
have confirmation of Pileated there based on my lame-n-poor  flight view of 
the bird from that distance.

Am I the only birder that gets all excited to explore and find evidence or 
habitat signs of birds that your know they could be there, but totally happy 
with not seeing the bird in live action for ebird reports ?

The Pileated Woodpecker tree that I saw on my Flickr.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County





-----Original Message----- 
From: robert dodelson
Sent: Wednesday, January 18, 2017 3:37 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Assunpink notes

I birded Assunpink for about 1 hour this afternoon.
The female Canvasback that Scott Barnes found Sunday was still on the lake
Ducks and a growing number of Common Mergansers (about 30)
The River Otter seen by 1 individual Sunday was not refound.
The highlight for me occurred while exiting the WMA at Brown Street in
Roosevelt. A Pileated Woodpecker flew across the road!
Bob Dodelson


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Assunpink notes
From: robert dodelson <rdodelson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 15:37:19 -0500
I birded Assunpink for about 1 hour this afternoon.
The female Canvasback that Scott Barnes found Sunday was still on the lake
with a few Mallards, Black Ducks, Hooded Mergs, Ring-necked Ducks, Ruddy
Ducks and a growing number of Common Mergansers (about 30)
The River Otter seen by 1 individual Sunday was not refound.
The highlight for me occurred while exiting the WMA at Brown Street in
Roosevelt. A Pileated Woodpecker flew across the road!
Bob Dodelson


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
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Subject: Together for Birds Petition
From: Steve Holmer <sholmer AT ABCBIRDS.ORG>
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 21:31:37 +0000
Steve Holmer
Vice President of Policy
American Bird Conservancy &
Director, Bird Conservation Alliance
202-888-7490
sholmer AT abcbirds.org

www.abcbirds.org, 
https://abcbirds.org/get-involved/bird-conservation-alliance/, ABC on 
Facebook, 
ABC Videos 







How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
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Subject: On Long-tailed Ducks in Burlington
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 22:05:51 -0500
There’s two around up there! Marilyn and I found another when we went chasing 
at Taylor’s. We had a female. The other was 

an adult male. 

It’s called the Patagonia rest stop effect. The more birders looking, the 
more is found! 


Good birding all. 


Sandra Keller
sandrakeller AT verizon.net

Sent from my Imac





How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

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List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
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Subject: At least three-years returning Red-shouldered Hawk in Gloucester County ?
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 20:14:27 -0500
I waited all week to go birding this weekend. Then wasted it away chasing ebird 
reported birds. What gives. 


This afternoon, back to my usual birding with no outside influence. 
Fast-n-furious lunch time birding I kind of enjoy so much. I had about about 20 
min to spare. 


About the same month, same week, same time, same tree, I observed an adult 
red-shouldered hawk today. Could it be the same adult from 3 years ago and 
returning ? 


Photo of Red-shoulder on my Flicker. Fairly busy four way stop intersection per 
south jersey standard. Must be the same returning bird ? 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
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Subject: Brigantine Island this morning
From: Jim Hayes <gargle57 AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 01:12:46 +0000
I was at the south end of Brigantine Island (Lagoon Blvd., within sight of 
Harrah's) this morning. There were hundreds of Oystercatchers roosting with a 
lesser number of Ring-billed Gulls and about 40 to 50 Willets a little ways 
away, with 3 or 4 Marbled Godwits mixed in. At Forsythe I had 2 pairs of Tundra 
Swans, 1 pair close to the Gull Tower. 


Jim Hayes, Wanaque, NJ


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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Ducks - slow
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 17:50:56 -0500
As in not many species around. Hardly anything at Big Timber - Camden. 
I did walk that area to the south of the ball field. Disgusting! But potential 
for 

different species. Just imagine 10 years worth of trash that was thrown 
overboard 

from boats on the DE river. Washed up here.....

Pileated is starting to rank up there with Woodcock for me.......
Spent an hour at the OMCP in Salem County. Nice area! 

Not too much else of note for me.

Good birding all. 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Re: Black-capped/Carolina contact zone in NJ
From: Karen Swaine <kmswaine AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 22:38:48 +0000
hi,


just responded to bernie's post saying the ones i have seen today seem to be BC 
chickadees according to sibley, et al. 



but i have certainly heard disctinct songs in spring, summer and fall, some the 
typical BC sone, some the carolina. i will be taking much closer looks at all 
of them from now on. 



the first time i heard a carolina chickadee singing i was in princeton, about 
12 years ago, and got thorougly confused, looking at a chickadee singing, 
hearing something unfamiliar! 



good birding,

karen highland park


________________________________
From: JerseyBirds  on behalf of Joan Detyna 
 

Sent: Monday, January 16, 2017 2:56 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Black-capped/Carolina contact zone in NJ

I have lived in the southern part of Hunterdon County for 17 years and I have 
had both Carolina and Black-capped Chickadees (and probably many hybrids) in my 
yard. Mostly it had been Carolinas in the summer and many years back, 
Black-cappeds in the winter. Then it "appeared" as if, for a number if years 
that only hybrids and Carolinas were around. This winter I have many beautiful 
Black-capped Chickadees back. 


Having said that, I have also volunteered at bird banding for several years in 
northern Mercer County. Many times it is very hard to identify a chickadee - 
one that looks like a Carolina will measure out as a Black-capped or vise 
versa. We have been getting lots of hybrids too and this winter we had more 
Black-cappeds than I had remembered having in a while. So, in addition to 
"singing each others songs", IDing a chickadee by physical characteristics 
alone can be a difficult if not impossible task. Sometimes you need the 
measurements, the definitive criteria. 


Joan Detyna
Ringoes, NJ

> On Jan 16, 2017, at 12:59 PM, Andrew Bobe  wrote:
>
> I've lived in Hamilton, Mercer County for 10 yrs. By no means am I any 
authority on chickadee species here. But anecdotally, I've only heard one BCCH 
song in Mercer County in 10 yrs. Like Bernie and others have said, doesn't mean 
it had to be a BCCH doing the singing. But that's the only one I've counted. My 
gut feeling is that on this side of the state, the contact zone has probably 
moved north to Hunterdon County. FWIW 

> Andrew Bobe
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jan 16, 2017, at 10:42 AM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
>>
>> Thought I'd add something to the recent discussion about identifying
>> Black-capped and Carolina Chickadees. There are areas in NJ where
>> separating the two species can be a daunting task. In these areas there may
>> be both species, and even hybrids. And separating them by song may not be
>> reliable as each species can learn the songs of the other, and some birds
>> can have a song that is a "hybridized" song.
>>
>> Sibley calls such an area a "contact zone". In the link Laurie Larson
>> provided, Sibley notes: "In a narrow band from northern New Jersey to
>> Kansas, however, Black-capped and Carolina Chickadee meet and hybridize. In
>> that area, chickadees are essentially unidentifiable, and observers can
>> only say that an individual bird 'shows the characteristics of' one species
>> or the other."
>>
>> Sibley goes into more detail in his "The Identification of Chickadees in
>> New Jersey: A Tool for the Breeding Bird Atlas":
>> http://www.sibleyguides.com/wp-content/uploads/Chickadees_NJ1.pdf
Identification of Chickadees in New Jersey - Sibley 
Guides 

www.sibleyguides.com
Records of New Jersey Birds The Identification of Chickadees in New Jersey: A 
Tool for the Breeding Bird Atlas by DAVID SIBLEY wo species of Chickadees are 
found in ... 




>>
>> From what I've read, I live in the NJ "contact zone". I've heard the songs
>> of both species here, so I'm assuming both species are present, even though
>> I can't be sure that it's a Black-capped singing a Black-capped song, for
>> example. A couple of years ago there was a bird that sang an odd
>> combination of both species' songs.
>>
>> Bernie Sloan
>> Highland Park
>>
>>
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
> 


[https://s0.wp.com/i/blank.jpg] 


Reporting
www.njbrc.com
Review List Species Report Review List species and species new to the state to 
the New Jersey Bird Records Committee. The Records Committee maintains an 
"official" list of all birds known to have b... 




>> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
>> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
> 


[https://s0.wp.com/i/blank.jpg] 


Reporting
www.njbrc.com
Review List Species Report Review List species and species new to the state to 
the New Jersey Bird Records Committee. The Records Committee maintains an 
"official" list of all birds known to have b... 




> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
> 


[https://s0.wp.com/i/blank.jpg] 


Reporting
www.njbrc.com
Review List Species Report Review List species and species new to the state to 
the New Jersey Bird Records Committee. The Records Committee maintains an 
"official" list of all birds known to have b... 




or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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Subject: Re: Black-capped/Carolina contact zone in NJ
From: Joan Detyna <jdetyna AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 14:56:40 -0500
I have lived in the southern part of Hunterdon County for 17 years and I have 
had both Carolina and Black-capped Chickadees (and probably many hybrids) in my 
yard. Mostly it had been Carolinas in the summer and many years back, 
Black-cappeds in the winter. Then it "appeared" as if, for a number if years 
that only hybrids and Carolinas were around. This winter I have many beautiful 
Black-capped Chickadees back. 


Having said that, I have also volunteered at bird banding for several years in 
northern Mercer County. Many times it is very hard to identify a chickadee - 
one that looks like a Carolina will measure out as a Black-capped or vise 
versa. We have been getting lots of hybrids too and this winter we had more 
Black-cappeds than I had remembered having in a while. So, in addition to 
"singing each others songs", IDing a chickadee by physical characteristics 
alone can be a difficult if not impossible task. Sometimes you need the 
measurements, the definitive criteria. 


Joan Detyna
Ringoes, NJ

> On Jan 16, 2017, at 12:59 PM, Andrew Bobe  wrote:
> 
> I've lived in Hamilton, Mercer County for 10 yrs. By no means am I any 
authority on chickadee species here. But anecdotally, I've only heard one BCCH 
song in Mercer County in 10 yrs. Like Bernie and others have said, doesn't mean 
it had to be a BCCH doing the singing. But that's the only one I've counted. My 
gut feeling is that on this side of the state, the contact zone has probably 
moved north to Hunterdon County. FWIW 

> Andrew Bobe 
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Jan 16, 2017, at 10:42 AM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
>> 
>> Thought I'd add something to the recent discussion about identifying
>> Black-capped and Carolina Chickadees. There are areas in NJ where
>> separating the two species can be a daunting task. In these areas there may
>> be both species, and even hybrids. And separating them by song may not be
>> reliable as each species can learn the songs of the other, and some birds
>> can have a song that is a "hybridized" song.
>> 
>> Sibley calls such an area a "contact zone". In the link Laurie Larson
>> provided, Sibley notes: "In a narrow band from northern New Jersey to
>> Kansas, however, Black-capped and Carolina Chickadee meet and hybridize. In
>> that area, chickadees are essentially unidentifiable, and observers can
>> only say that an individual bird 'shows the characteristics of' one species
>> or the other."
>> 
>> Sibley goes into more detail in his "The Identification of Chickadees in
>> New Jersey: A Tool for the Breeding Bird Atlas":
>> http://www.sibleyguides.com/wp-content/uploads/Chickadees_NJ1.pdf
>> 
>> From what I've read, I live in the NJ "contact zone". I've heard the songs
>> of both species here, so I'm assuming both species are present, even though
>> I can't be sure that it's a Black-capped singing a Black-capped song, for
>> example. A couple of years ago there was a bird that sang an odd
>> combination of both species' songs.
>> 
>> Bernie Sloan
>> Highland Park
>> 
>> 
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

>> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
>> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
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Subject: Re: winter high count
From: Karen Swaine <kmswaine AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 18:36:50 +0000
This weekend we counted 14 species in our small back garden (doing the feeder 
count), probably the most ever in winter. Had song sparrow, carolina wren along 
with the regulars. No starlings or grackles. 

Have never had a bluebird here afaik.
Karen, highland park

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Steve Byland 
Date: 1/14/17 3:49 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Birds in the Blizzard (Video)

As usual, when it snows, my feeders are packed. Maybe a dozen species of birds, 
including Bluebirds hard at work. Dried Mealworms, Sunflower Seeds and Suet are 
all popular 


Steve Byland
Warren Township
sbbyland at


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Subject: Re: Black-capped/Carolina contact zone in NJ
From: Andrew Bobe <cprincipalis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 12:59:40 -0500
I've lived in Hamilton, Mercer County for 10 yrs. By no means am I any 
authority on chickadee species here. But anecdotally, I've only heard one BCCH 
song in Mercer County in 10 yrs. Like Bernie and others have said, doesn't mean 
it had to be a BCCH doing the singing. But that's the only one I've counted. My 
gut feeling is that on this side of the state, the contact zone has probably 
moved north to Hunterdon County. FWIW 

Andrew Bobe 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 16, 2017, at 10:42 AM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
> 
> Thought I'd add something to the recent discussion about identifying
> Black-capped and Carolina Chickadees. There are areas in NJ where
> separating the two species can be a daunting task. In these areas there may
> be both species, and even hybrids. And separating them by song may not be
> reliable as each species can learn the songs of the other, and some birds
> can have a song that is a "hybridized" song.
> 
> Sibley calls such an area a "contact zone". In the link Laurie Larson
> provided, Sibley notes: "In a narrow band from northern New Jersey to
> Kansas, however, Black-capped and Carolina Chickadee meet and hybridize. In
> that area, chickadees are essentially unidentifiable, and observers can
> only say that an individual bird 'shows the characteristics of' one species
> or the other."
> 
> Sibley goes into more detail in his "The Identification of Chickadees in
> New Jersey: A Tool for the Breeding Bird Atlas":
> http://www.sibleyguides.com/wp-content/uploads/Chickadees_NJ1.pdf
> 
> From what I've read, I live in the NJ "contact zone". I've heard the songs
> of both species here, so I'm assuming both species are present, even though
> I can't be sure that it's a Black-capped singing a Black-capped song, for
> example. A couple of years ago there was a bird that sang an odd
> combination of both species' songs.
> 
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

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Subject: Black-capped/Carolina contact zone in NJ
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 10:42:33 -0500
Thought I'd add something to the recent discussion about identifying
Black-capped and Carolina Chickadees. There are areas in NJ where
separating the two species can be a daunting task. In these areas there may
be both species, and even hybrids. And separating them by song may not be
reliable as each species can learn the songs of the other, and some birds
can have a song that is a "hybridized" song.

Sibley calls such an area a "contact zone". In the link Laurie Larson
provided, Sibley notes: "In a narrow band from northern New Jersey to
Kansas, however, Black-capped and Carolina Chickadee meet and hybridize. In
that area, chickadees are essentially unidentifiable, and observers can
only say that an individual bird 'shows the characteristics of' one species
or the other."

Sibley goes into more detail in his "The Identification of Chickadees in
New Jersey: A Tool for the Breeding Bird Atlas":
http://www.sibleyguides.com/wp-content/uploads/Chickadees_NJ1.pdf

From what I've read, I live in the NJ "contact zone". I've heard the songs
of both species here, so I'm assuming both species are present, even though
I can't be sure that it's a Black-capped singing a Black-capped song, for
example. A couple of years ago there was a bird that sang an odd
combination of both species' songs.

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park


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Subject: Upcoming Bergen County Audubon Meeting
From: Beth Goldberg <goldbug310 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 07:22:56 -0500
Join BCAS on Wednesday, January 18th as we welcome local author Jim Wright
who will illuminate the history of Allendale’s Celery Farm nature refuge
and historic John Fell House – two subjects near and dear to his heart—in a
free talk and slideshow. Wright will explain the unsung John Fell’s heroic
role in the Revolutionary War and discuss the house that bears his name and
the swamp that he owned – better known today as the 107- acre Celery Farm.
Wright, who writes the popular “Bird Watcher” for The Record, is in a
unique position to talk about John Fell and the Celery Farm. He has written
extensively on both subjects, and he is deputy warden of the natural
area—once called Fell’s Meadows. A slide show featuring archival photos and
nature shots of the Celery Farm will illustrate Wright’s talk. Chapter
business meeting begins at 7:30 with program at 8PM.  Meetings are free and
open to public and held at Teaneck Creek Conservancy, 20 Puffin Way,
Teaneck.

-- 
Beth Goldberg
Fair Lawn


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Subject: Atlantic and Ocean Co. salt marsh birding
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 17:53:04 -0500
Keith and I birded from Amasa Landing in Tuckerton to Cedar Run Dock road marsh 
habitat, of course including the Tuckerton marsh. 


Our wish bird was the previously reported Crested Caracara by CT to land on our 
lap. That did not happed. However, we took a long look at all vultures observed 
along the way, about 20 or so total ? I have no clue. Consolation prize was a 
light morph rough-legged hawk at Dock Road marsh. 


The most excellent high light of the day was watching a NJ Birder pulling up 
into my driveway this morning, when I was loading up to go birding. Fantastic 
time spent birding around the yard and hoping the Raven would come by calling 
and showing its flight. No Dice. 


Doc shots of rough-legged hawk on my Flickr.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County



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Subject: waterfowl - Burlington county
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 17:02:40 -0500
Seems to be stuff moving into Burlington county. Not too much luck
in Camden county - although I did pick up a couple new birds. Not
sure what..... I am missing common birds still! Marilyn was with me.
She picked up some birds!

More stuff on the Delaware in Burlington. Canvasback, Goldeneyes,
Great Corms, LT Duck! - that was a county bird we chased! A friend
had earlier at Taylors Refuge. Not much earlier - these flocks move!
Most of the goodies - including the LTDU - were around the Riverton
Yacht Club - 3 miles south? - of Taylors when we refound.

Good birding all - time for the games!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Re: Alcid spotted at IBSP, Ocean County, Jan 14
From: David Lapuma <david.lapuma AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 18:20:28 +0000
Becky,

Your bird in question is a loon. On my small phone screen it looks like a 
winter plumaged red-throated loon but I'm having a hard time ruling out winter 
common loon without a better head profile shot. 


Good birding,

David

________________________
David A. La Puma, PhD
Director, Cape May Bird Observatory
New Jersey Audubon
600 Route 47 North
Cape May Court House, NJ 08210
p: 609.400.3833 (internal use: ext 922)
c: 732.447.4894
f: 609.861.1651

w: http://birdcapemay.org
w: http://www.njaudubon.org
Making New Jersey a Better Place for People and Wildlife Since 1897

Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldnt be done. - Amelia 
Earhart 


________________________________
From: JerseyBirds  on behalf of Becky Laboy 
 

Sent: Sunday, January 15, 2017 6:43:04 AM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Alcid spotted at IBSP, Ocean County, Jan 14

Hello Jersey Birders,
Yesterday I spotted an Alcid off the coast of Island Beach State Park,
Ocean County, viewed from the trail at the Interpretive Center (A-16) that
leads to the beach. The bird was associating with Black Scoters. Here is a
link to very distant photos. https://www.flickr.com/photos/130500170 AT N08/?
I'm thinking Murre. Hoping others will chase. (Sorry for the delayed
report!)
Happy Birding!
Becky Laboy
Ocean County


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> 

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Subject: Request for information
From: Bill Boyle <njsawwhet AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 11:27:24 -0500
I received the following request through the NJ Bird Records Committee
website. If anyone has a response, please do so directly to the inquirer.

 

Bill Boyle

Cape May

 

 

Hi

I am an artist/photographer and jersey bird list member. For four years I
have been photographing the crow roost next to the Trenton Transit railroad
station at night. Last week when I went to photograph there were no crows
and  trees had been taken down on both sides of the station. I would like to
find out who was responsible for doing this, why, and anything anyone knows
about what will happen to these thousands of crows or where they are now. My
work is about conservation and habitat loss and I would like to write the
story of this roost. could you post this to the list?

Thanks

Betsey Hansell

215 295 1660

 

Betsey Hansell Photographer
www.betseyhansell.net
Betsey Hansell 



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Subject: Alcid spotted at IBSP, Ocean County, Jan 14
From: Becky Laboy <becky.laboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:43:04 -0500
Hello Jersey Birders,
Yesterday I spotted an Alcid off the coast of Island Beach State Park,
Ocean County, viewed from the trail at the Interpretive Center (A-16) that
leads to the beach. The bird was associating with Black Scoters. Here is a
link to very distant photos. https://www.flickr.com/photos/130500170 AT N08/?
I'm thinking Murre. Hoping others will chase. (Sorry for the delayed
report!)
Happy Birding!
Becky Laboy
Ocean County


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Subject: Distinguishing Black-capped and Carolina Chickadees - Sibley Guides
From: L Larson <llarson2 AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 20:56:44 -0500
Check this out---



http://www.sibleyguides.com/bird-info/black-capped-chickadee/black-capped-carolina-chickadee/ 


Best,
Laurie


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Subject: Re: help re Black-capped chickadee in Haddonfield
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 19:44:43 -0500
Yes, a Black-capped Chickadee is a north Jersey bird. When we get migrants, 
they are probably from NY and even further north. Black-capped is really rare 
in south Jersey. 



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Subject: Re: help re Black-capped chickadee in Haddonfield
From: Karen Swaine <kmswaine AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 00:23:00 +0000
Ok. This has been confusing me for a while.

What's the big deal with seeing a black capped chickadee, one of our most 
common back yard birds? 


Is it that he black capped chickadee is usually only in northern nj, and the 
carolina chickadee usually in south jersey? 


But ... the BC chickadee is not smaller, but larger than the carolina. (see 
final sentence in post below) 


So will somebody, please explain...

Thankyou.
Karen





Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Marty DeAngelo 
Date: 1/14/17 2:33 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Black-capped chickadee in Haddonfield

I'm 99% sure I just had a black-capped chickadee at one of my feeders.
Several chickadees are moving back and forth, but one has significantly
broader white secondaries, purely white cheeks and brighter plumage along
the flanks. It also has whiter tail edges akin to (but not as extensive as)
a junco. Heard it call a couple times and it's definitely a shorter,
rougher call. The only thing off is that the bib isn't "rough-edged" though
it is smaller than the other 2-3 birds.

Marty DeAngelo
Haddonfield


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> 

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Subject: Camden To Salem Co. birding
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 19:14:45 -0500
I find it very stressful following Ebird trail following a bird report. Today 
was that case. 


My original plan for the day was to bird at home and be happy. That was all and 
spend time with Mary. 


But things changed at day light and headed out local patches of Camden County 
with Keith Phillips. Then towards Oldmans Creek Preserve and the vicinity. 


I was still the birder that I wished (phantom birder) in that no fellow 
JBirders would see me birding in live action. Then the very-very- sharp eye 
birder Marilyn Henry caught Keith and I at Oldmans Creek Preserve. I was busted 
as an arm-chair and internet birder being active in the field. 


Keith and I were so close on the Pileated Woodpecker confirmation but honest 
rules, no dice for the record on our side. Then the next party we saw go in 
nails it. All good, Awesome Marilyn !!! 


Poor Doc Raven photos from this morning at  home-birding on my Flickr.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County



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Subject: Camden birds and Philly
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 16:20:00 -0500
Hello,
 Started out this raw morning on the DVOC trip to FDR park in Philly. Always a 
pleasure birding with friends and 

learning a new spot! Please see the DVOC web site for the field trips for those 
interested. They are free and open 

to all. They cover the whole area, not just Philly.
 Gloucester Park in Camden County is proving very good! The gull show was 
great. I managed a LBBG, no white-winged 

gulls. I’ll be working on that! I would assume best time is the afternoon 
when the gulls fly south - downriver - from the dumps. 

I could be wrong at that. No waterfowl there. Common Mergs are around in good 
numbers. Cooper River Park had many. 

But nothing else like loons or a RB Merg! Tinicum in Philly had loads of Common 
Mergs also. Plus other goodies. 


Good birding all.


Sandra Keller
sandrakeller AT verizon.net

Sent from my Imac





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Subject: Birds in the Blizzard (Video)
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 15:48:41 -0500
As usual, when it snows, my feeders are packed. Maybe a dozen species of birds, 
including Bluebirds hard at work. Dried Mealworms, Sunflower Seeds and Suet are 
all popular. 


Video at:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_byland/32159676942/

Steve Byland
Warren Township
sbbyland at aol.com


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Subject: Black-capped chickadee in Haddonfield
From: Marty DeAngelo <martytdx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 19:33:18 +0000
I'm 99% sure I just had a black-capped chickadee at one of my feeders.
Several chickadees are moving back and forth, but one has significantly
broader white secondaries, purely white cheeks and brighter plumage along
the flanks. It also has whiter tail edges akin to (but not as extensive as)
a junco. Heard it call a couple times and it's definitely a shorter,
rougher call. The only thing off is that the bib isn't "rough-edged" though
it is smaller than the other 2-3 birds.

Marty DeAngelo
Haddonfield


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Subject: East Brunswick Sandhill cranes YES
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 18:13:35 +0000
Seen by an observer, not me, at 12:30 way in the back of those private fields 
at the back of Heavenly Farms. The ground is rolling. They seem to easily slip 
out of site. 


Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601  M 732.832.6195
Internal 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600 F 732.369.0122



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Subject: Sandhill Cranes -- No
From: John Beetham <john.beetham AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 11:08:48 -0500
The three Sandhill Cranes that have been seen intermittently in Middlesex
County this week were not at Heavenly Farms or in the adjacent fields as of
9:00 this morning.

John Beetham
Highland Park, NJ


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Subject: Orange-crowned Warbler - Trenton
From: Jeffrey Climpson <jkgreenwing AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 10:48:27 -0500
The orange-crowned warbler at the Trenton sewerage authority continues as
of Friday, January 13, 2017.  It was showing very nicely at around 2:15
pm.  Also present were both kinglets and a yellow-rump, equally as
accommodating.  In the afternoon, the area near where the high cement wall
starts along the access driveway across from the treatment ponds is in the
sun, so I suspect that helps encourage both bug and warbler activity at
that time of day.

Jeff Climpson
Flemington, NJ


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Subject: Raritan Estuary Christmas Bird Count, Jan 1, 2017
From: Tom Ostrand <tostrand AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 23:49:55 -0500
The 79th Raritan Estuary Christmas Bird count on Jan 1, 2017 found 105 
species (third highest total in count history) and 40506 individual 
birds.  The weather was excellent, with a mostly clear sky, wind usually 
calm with occasional periods of 5-15 mph, and an early morning 
temperature of 35, rising to over 50 in the afternoon.
Sixty-two participants covered 20 areas in the densely settled and 
heavily industrial heart of New Jersey, mostly in Middlesex County, plus 
a slice of Union County.

The count registered 8 new high totals: AMERICAN WIGEON, SURF SCOTER, 
BLACK SCOTER, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, PEREGRINE FALCON, WHITE-BREASTED 
NUTHATCH, and ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER.
Several of these were significantly higher than any previous year.
BALD EAGLES at 23 nearly doubled last year's high count of 13.
Fifteen BLACK SCOTERS were seen in Raritan Bay, far exceeding the 
previous record of 2, and 5 ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS were a notable 
increase over the single birds found in only 3 previous counts.

RED-BELLIED WOODPECKERS continued their increase with 131, surpassing 
last year's new record of 126.

Seven species counts matched the highest number from previous years: 
PINTAIL, GREATER YELLOWLEGS, PILEATED WOODPECKER, COMMON RAVEN, WINTER 
WREN, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET and PALM WARBLER.

Two species commonly found in relatively low numbers were missed 
completely this year.
BROWN CREEPER has been on all but 3 counts since 1965, and every one 
from 2004 through 2015.
Since 1947, FIELD SPARROW was found on every count except for 2003, 2015 
and this year.

All the count results can be seen at https://goo.gl/cKkpfV.

As always, the success of the count is entirely due to the preparation, 
dedication and great birding by all the participants.

  Tom Ostrand
  Raritan CBC compiler


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Subject: Semipalmated Sandpiper Migration Monitoring Project
From: Stuart and Wendy Malmid <weluvowls AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 19:17:14 -0500
Jerseybirders Article below about the work NJAS is doing monitoring the 
Semipalmated Sandpiper population. 



good birding,

Wendy Malmid
Monroe Twp,NJ



Audubon tracks Semipalmated Sandpiper from South America to Delaware Bay 

NJ AUDUBON – For David Mizrahi, Vice President of Research and Monitoring for 
New Jersey Audubon, the job comes with tropical heat, huge mosquitos and plenty 
of deep mud. 


Because, for an ornithologist working on migratory shorebirds, the places to 
find wintering Jersey shorebirds are in northern South America, in regions of 
French Guiana, Suriname and the northeastern coastline of Brazil. 


That was where Mizrahi and his team spent recent weeks, as they tracked 
shorebirds who spend a few weeks every year in the Delaware Bay, a critical 
stopover on a 15,000-mile journey each year from the South American coast, up 
the Atlantic Coast to freezing breeding grounds in the eastern Canadian Arctic. 


Mizrahi’s team set up sophisticated tracking stations, with what look like 
old-school television antennae. Tiny “nanotags,” which are button-sized 
radio transmitters, are affixed to the shorebirds’ backs. The stations can 
then swiftly detect transmissions from the birds 12 to 15 miles away. 


A solar-powered computer tracks the transmissions, allowing researchers to 
pinpoint a bird’s movements. 


On his most recent trip, Mizrahi was hyper-focused on the Semipalmated 
Sandpiper. It is a species that New Jersey Audubon has been monitoring in 
Delaware Bay during spring migration since 2000. 


Of grave concern is the steady, 30-year decline in the numbers of Semipalmated 
Sandpiper, a trend based on surveys that New Jersey Audubon and others have 
conducted. 


New Jersey Audubon has been studying the species in South America since 2008 
and is collaborating with biologists and resource managers in the Western 
Hemisphere to develop and implement research, monitoring and conservation plans 
for Semipalmated Sandpiper and other shorebirds that experienced dramatic 
declines. 


“We know a lot about what happens to these birds when they come to North 
America, but very little about what happens when they go to Central and South 
America in the winter,” Mizrahi said. “Here, in the United States, we tend 
to take for granted the availability of information and financial resources for 
conservation. We assume that’s happening in other places in the world. But in 
places like Suriname and Brazil, limited resources tend to be focused on 
protecting endemic species.” 


According to Mizrahi, the key to saving this population of small, 
brown-and-white shorebirds is to understand where they fly every year. 


There are also hunters, who shoot these shorebirds for sport and food. To help 
maintain the population, New Jersey Audubon has been working with the Suriname 
Forest Service’s Nature Conservation Division to curtail illegal hunting, to 
increase law enforcement and to educate hunters. 


Mizrahi said the population of the Semipalmated Sandpiper, between 2 million 
and 2.5 million a generation ago, has dwindled to about 400,000. Its struggles 
are consistent with many other shorebirds, who New Jersey Audubon is also 
tracking and reporting rapid declines. 


“To save the Semipalmated Sandpiper and other shorebirds like the endangered 
Red Knots, we must determine the status of the species in its core South 
American migration and winter ranges, where it spends seven to eight months a 
year,” Mizrahi said. “We need to understand spatial relationships between 
wintering regions, migration routes and breeding areas, and identify the 
threats. And we all need to recognize Delaware Bay as a major nexus where birds 
encounter threats ” 


Mizrahi said he and his team look forward to returning in late 2017, and then 
again, in 2018 to continue to track these birds and identify ways in which to 
stabilize and increase the population. New Jersey Audubon considers this 
project to be vital to fulfill the overall mission; fundraising is paramount. 


“When you have a species like this with such a complex lifestyle, there are 
plenty of challenges to overcome,” Mizrahi said. “This is a bird that 
migrates from one hemisphere to another, and does that every year over a 
12-year or more lifespan. 


“As you can imagine, a bird that’s on the move as much as a Semipalmated 
Sandpiper can encounter many challenges during its lifetime,” Mizrahi said. 
“Our program is about identifying the threats that underlie population 
declines, where and when they occur and implementing successful solutions.” 



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Subject: Crested Cara Cara: No
From: "James O'Brien" <jphillipobrien AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 22:21:38 +0000
Pulled out all the stops today but no luck. Both peregrines were on the 
Barnegat water tower and displayed warding behavior out over the 8th street 
beach, diving one after the other at some unseen interloper. I searched the 
trails there but no luck although Im sure there was a raptor there they did not 
like. Hearing nearby crows I tracked them down but it turns out they were 
signaling at a house cat. As I returned to the parking lot all of the gulls in 
the area began a huge ruckus and wheeled up above the lighthouse. Below was a 
large dark raptor with a cross shaped profile. Because it was back-lit, getting 
field marks was impossible, but it landed on the large radio tower overlooking 
the bay. Alas no cara-cara but it was instead an adult bald eagle! 


https://flic.kr/p/RcsJGZ

On the jetty were the regulars including quite a few red-breasted mergs and 
finally this group of about 3 dozen common eider. 


https://flic.kr/p/RcsJwt


All in all another great day despite the miss. I recommend going because even 
if you strike out, it's still just a wonderful place. 



Regards,


James

Jackson, NJ



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Subject: Washington Crossing Audubon Society Program on Mon. Jan. 16
From: J Hummel <juanita.hummel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 12:27:55 -0500
Dear Jersey Birders -

WCAS will be hosting a presentation by yours truly entitled "Birds of Cuba"
this coming Monday, Jan. 16, 2017.  The focus will be on the 26 species of
Cuban endemics as well as the  West Indian endemics that also make their
homes in Cuba, and their current conservation status.  The program starts
at 8 pm, but do come at 7:30 for refreshments and conversation before the
talk. Location is Stainton Hall at The Pennington School, 112 W Delaware
Ave, Pennington, NJ.  The program is free  of charge and all are welcome to
attend.

Juanita Hummel


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Subject: Crested Caracara
From: Christopher Takacs <americanchris22 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 2017 20:22:30 -0500
3:45 pm I followed some raucous crows to see what they were into. I spotted
a large bird silhouetted again the sky on a telephone pole at the east end
of East 6th St. Barnegat Light. Couldn't make it out at first but once I
came around to the south of it I could see it was a Crested Caracara. The
bird was bombed by crows for 20 minutes while it preened. It then flew off
to the north towards the lighthouse before I lost sight of it. Checked the
area and didn't see it again or did I hear the crows. Might have been
chased towards IBSP. photo can be seen here
https://www.flickr.com/photos/96567639 AT N00/31898802830/in/dateposted-public/

Good Birding,
Chris Takacs
Lyndhurst


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Subject: Cumberland - woodcock
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 2017 18:41:40 -0500
Slow otherwise. Scattered ducks arounds. I couldn't find any big 
concentrations. 

Between the recent freezeup and hunting season, ducks are wary right now. 
Got my orange cap out of the trunk and off I went onto some trail areas. The 
Woodcock 

was along the NLT Eagle trail. Plus an adult Bald Eagle letting an immature 
know - go 

away! They even locked talons briefly! As I was driving down 55 with my car 
temp 

reading 63, brine trucks were heading north doing their thing. Today sure was 
nice, 

but winter returns this weekend. Perhaps a respite for the birds also before it 
gets 

cold again. 

Butterfly notes - none. I was surprised! 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Crested Cara cara
From: Christopher Takacs <americanchris22 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 2017 16:02:53 -0500
Crested Cara cara on pole at 4pm 6th Street and the beach entrance Barnegat
Light LBI

Chris Takacs
LYNDHURST


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Subject: Re: Sandhill Cranes East Brunswick NO
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 2017 16:09:24 +0000
Just cruised Heavenly Farms, the Cultural Center and the Fairgrounds and the 
farm next to Heavenly. 


Did not see them. However, at the back of the field at the adjacent Clark's 
Farm, the rear of the field is very uneven. They could easily be back there out 
of sight. I will swing by later on the PM, or as soon as someone posts "Yes"! 


Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601  M 732.832.6195
Internal 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600 F 732.369.0122


On Jan 12, 2017, at 10:04 AM, Dominick Petrellese 
> wrote: 


After seeing Patricks post I shuffled over to Heavenly Farms and found the
3 Sandhill Cranes at around 9:15AM. I was able to manage a few shots before
a jogger spooked them. They flew towards the adjacent farm and looked like
they landed near the tree line. I tried to relocate but to no avail. I hope
they hang around for a little while.

Thank you for the post Patrick.


Dominick Petrellese


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> 

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Subject: Sandhill Cranes East Brunswick YES
From: Dominick Petrellese <dompetrell AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 2017 10:04:05 -0500
After seeing Patricks post I shuffled over to Heavenly Farms and found the
3 Sandhill Cranes at around 9:15AM. I was able to manage a few shots before
a jogger spooked them. They flew towards the adjacent farm and looked like
they landed near the tree line. I tried to relocate but to no avail. I hope
they hang around for a little while.

Thank you for the post Patrick.


Dominick Petrellese


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Subject: Sandhill Cranes - East Brunswick (no)
From: Patrick Belardo <pbelardo AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 2017 07:28:04 -0500
3 Sandhill Cranes were photographed by another birder at the Middlesex county 
fairgrounds on Cranbury Rd. In East Brunswick late yesterday. I did a quick 
check this morning before work but did NOT find them. I checked adjacent 
Heavenly Farms as well but I only had a short time. There's a lot of open 
habitat in this area. If you're in the vicinity be sure to look for them. Great 
Middlesex county sighting! 


Patrick Belardo
Piscataway, NJ


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Subject: Miss ID a bird in public, then must fess up
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 20:21:29 -0500
I happened to be within Oldmans Township vicinity in Salem County today for a 
non-birding activity. So birding was limited to fast-n-furious drive-bys and 
view from inside of the truck. Plenty of waterfowl in the waters of Oldmans 
Creek but did not bother as I have little or no patience to shift thru ducks. 


Then saw 5 waterfowl feeding all by themselves. I immediately texted 5 Greater 
white-fronted Goose to the local group without further study although I had all 
doubts that my ID was in the mud. I had no field guide w/ me. 


Last time I saw a Greater white-fronted Goose was when birding with Brandon Reo 
at Port Republic (Nacote Creek) a few winters ago, same day we also lucked out 
on a long-eared owl. The goose was with 6 Canada’s and the white at the base 
of bill was very noticeable. However, the 5 goose I saw did not but I still 
shot from the hip. So I must fess up. I could use a refresher course in ID of 
Greater white-fronted Goose in live action, but have no clue where to go find 
one with 100% chance success. 


Cool thing is I found some more birds down the road shoulder/utility line as 
soon as I hit the road as fast as I got off the road to take photos of these 
domestic Graylag Goose. 


To those who do not want to be called a novice birder some photos on my Flickr.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County




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Subject: Mockingbird and MANY others at the Feeders (Video)
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 16:11:23 -0500
Since the snow, I have had HUGE numbers of birds at my feeders. The clear 
favorite is dried mealworms drawing Bluebirds (a large flock), Mockingbirds, 
Titmice, Chickadees, Blue Jays, All Woodpeckers, Cardinals, All Wrens, All 
Sparrows, All Blackbirds, WB and RB Nuthatches, All Finches, Wild Turkeys and 
Crows. Many winters (especially in snow) I get Towhees, Catbirds, Thrashers and 
occasionally Orioles and Warblers. Granted, Dried mealworms aren't cheap, but 
you can get an 11 pound bag on line delivered for under $60 that should last 
most of the winter. Dried mealworms are even more popular than suet, which I 
also provide. 


I have lots of video of Bluebirds on my site at the mealworm feeder, so I 
decided to post one of a Mockingbird there today at: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_byland/32104715632/

Steve Byland
Warren Township


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Subject: Re: Sandhill Cranes
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 18:57:51 +0000
By about 1:20, when I got there, they were gone. Cruised around to the other 
haunts and came back to Randolph, but did not see them. 


Oh well.  It was good to be out, feels like spring!

SA


Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager, EHS Management
D +1-732-564-3601
M +1-732-832-6195
steven.albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road
Suite 520
Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
T +1-732-564-3600
aecom.com

Built to deliver a better world

FORTUNE World's Most Admired Companies 2016
-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Henry Burk
Sent: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 12:47 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Sandhill Cranes

7 Sandhill Cranes continuing on Randolph Road, Franklin Township, in field next 
to water company. 


Hank Burk 
Cranford 


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Subject: Sandhill Cranes
From: Henry Burk <hjburk AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 17:47:14 +0000
7 Sandhill Cranes continuing on Randolph Road, Franklin Township, in field next 
to water company. 


Hank Burk 
Cranford 


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Subject: Re: Passing of a Friend
From: "James O'Brien" <jphillipobrien AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 15:09:21 +0000
I just spoke to a rehabber friend of mine and while difficult, rehabbing 
hummers is totally possible. The fact that bird expired is proof that it was 
either sick or injured. I dont see the harm in trying to save a bird that is 
destined to die without it. Im sure the purists among us would say to let 
nature take its course, but we are also part of nature and not just passive 
observers as harvey's efforts remind us. 



James

Jackson, NJ


________________________________
From: Dena Temple 
Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 10:10 PM
To: James O'Brien; JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Passing of a Friend

James and all,

Only licensed wildlife rehabilitators can rehab wildlife legally in NJ. And 
since the bird actuallywasn't injured, it's questionable whether capturing a 
bird "for its own good" is rehabbing anyway. Probably best to do our best to 
provide shelter and hope for the best. 


Dena Temple
Middletown
denat01 AT verizon.net

----- Original Message -----
From: "James O'Brien" 
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 20:00:09 +0000
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Passing of a Friend

> In thinking about this a bit more, is there precedent for capturing the bird 
and re-habbing it until Spring? We do the same thing with raptors with feather 
damage--ie waiting for the molt--and based on your setup Harvey, you were 75% 
of the way there in providing habitat. Just curious. 

>
>
> James
>
> Jackson, NJ
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: JerseyBirds  on behalf of Harvey 
Tomlinson  

> Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 9:00 AM
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Passing of a Friend
>
> Hi Jersey Birders,
> It is with unbelievable sadness I am reporting the death of my Little
> Hummer friend PipSqueak
> Old Man Winter finally took her last night. She just couldn't make the snow
> storm, howling winds, and bitter cold nights.
> Looking out on an empty Hummer Hut is heart breaking.
> How such a tiny creature could have had such a big impact on my life is
> amazing.
> It was an honor and privilege to have had her grace my gardens even for
> such a short time.
> And in that time the smiles she put on my face were endless.
> I always knew this day might come.Unlike Rufous Hummers that nest in Alaska
> and are hard-wired for the cold this little one had the odds stacked
> against her from the beginning.
> She defied identification except to say one parent was Archilocus and one
> was Calypte. A West Coast gal for sure
> And adding insult to injury she made a left instead of a right landing in
> the lap of Winter.
> I did my best to help her thru the cold but Mother Nature plays no
> favorites.
>  I am so sorry my little Friend.
> I will truly miss You.
> harvey
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
>> 

> 
[https://s0.wp.com/i/blank.jpg] 

>
> Reporting
> www.njbrc.com
> Review List Species Report Review List species and species new to the state 
to the New Jersey Bird Records Committee. The Records Committee maintains an 
"official" list of all birds known to have b... 

>
>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
> 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>

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or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Passing of a Friend
From: celticcail <0000025ed36331da-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 23:58:01 -0500
    
Dena and all,
With 14 years of rehab experience, I could not agree more.  Hummers are 
notoriously difficult to rehab in any case; they do not do well in captivity.  

Cailin O'Connor Pompton Lakes


Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Dena Temple  
Date: 1/10/17  10:10 PM  (GMT-05:00) 
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU 
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Passing of a Friend 

James and all,

Only licensed wildlife rehabilitators can rehab wildlife legally in NJ. And 
since the bird actuallywasn't injured, it's questionable whether capturing a 
bird "for its own good" is rehabbing anyway. Probably best to do our best to 
provide shelter and hope for the best. 


Dena Temple
Middletown
denat01 AT verizon.net

----- Original Message -----
From: "James O'Brien" 
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 20:00:09 +0000
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Passing of a Friend

> In thinking about this a bit more, is there precedent for capturing the bird 
and re-habbing it until Spring?  We do the same thing with raptors with 
feather damage--ie waiting for the molt--and based on your setup Harvey, you 
were 75% of the way there in providing habitat.  Just curious. 

> 
> 
> James
> 
> Jackson, NJ
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: JerseyBirds  on behalf of Harvey 
Tomlinson  

> Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 9:00 AM
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Passing of a Friend
> 
> Hi Jersey Birders,
> It is with unbelievable sadness I am reporting the death of my Little
> Hummer friend PipSqueak
> Old Man Winter finally took her last night. She just couldn't make the snow
> storm, howling winds, and bitter cold nights.
> Looking out on an empty Hummer Hut is heart breaking.
> How such a tiny creature could have had such a big impact on my life is
> amazing.
> It was an honor and privilege to have had her grace my gardens even for
> such a short time.
> And in that time the smiles she put on my face were endless.
> I always knew this day might come.Unlike Rufous Hummers that nest in Alaska
> and are hard-wired for the cold this little one had the odds stacked
> against her from the beginning.
> She defied identification except to say one parent was Archilocus and one
> was Calypte. A West Coast gal for sure
> And adding insult to injury she made a left instead of a right landing in
> the lap of Winter.
> I did my best to help her thru the cold but Mother Nature plays no
> favorites.
>  I am so sorry my little Friend.
> I will truly miss You.
> harvey
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
> 

> 
[https://s0.wp.com/i/blank.jpg] 

> 
> Reporting
> www.njbrc.com
> Review List Species Report Review List species and species new to the state 
to the New Jersey Bird Records Committee. The Records Committee maintains an 
"official" list of all birds known to have b... 

> 
> 
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> 

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or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi



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or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Passing of a Friend
From: Dena Temple <denat01 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 22:10:27 -0500
James and all,

Only licensed wildlife rehabilitators can rehab wildlife legally in NJ. And 
since the bird actuallywasn't injured, it's questionable whether capturing a 
bird "for its own good" is rehabbing anyway. Probably best to do our best to 
provide shelter and hope for the best. 


Dena Temple
Middletown
denat01 AT verizon.net

----- Original Message -----
From: "James O'Brien" 
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 20:00:09 +0000
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Passing of a Friend

> In thinking about this a bit more, is there precedent for capturing the bird 
and re-habbing it until Spring? We do the same thing with raptors with feather 
damage--ie waiting for the molt--and based on your setup Harvey, you were 75% 
of the way there in providing habitat. Just curious. 

> 
> 
> James
> 
> Jackson, NJ
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: JerseyBirds  on behalf of Harvey 
Tomlinson  

> Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 9:00 AM
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Passing of a Friend
> 
> Hi Jersey Birders,
> It is with unbelievable sadness I am reporting the death of my Little
> Hummer friend PipSqueak
> Old Man Winter finally took her last night. She just couldn't make the snow
> storm, howling winds, and bitter cold nights.
> Looking out on an empty Hummer Hut is heart breaking.
> How such a tiny creature could have had such a big impact on my life is
> amazing.
> It was an honor and privilege to have had her grace my gardens even for
> such a short time.
> And in that time the smiles she put on my face were endless.
> I always knew this day might come.Unlike Rufous Hummers that nest in Alaska
> and are hard-wired for the cold this little one had the odds stacked
> against her from the beginning.
> She defied identification except to say one parent was Archilocus and one
> was Calypte. A West Coast gal for sure
> And adding insult to injury she made a left instead of a right landing in
> the lap of Winter.
> I did my best to help her thru the cold but Mother Nature plays no
> favorites.
>  I am so sorry my little Friend.
> I will truly miss You.
> harvey
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
> 

> 
[https://s0.wp.com/i/blank.jpg] 

> 
> Reporting
> www.njbrc.com
> Review List Species Report Review List species and species new to the state 
to the New Jersey Bird Records Committee. The Records Committee maintains an 
"official" list of all birds known to have b... 

> 
> 
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> 

---
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or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Salem county - shortie and Longspurs
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 19:23:18 -0500
Well, the snow covered fields are already gone! That snow melts fast. The Lark
flock on Featherbed Lane west was on a field to the north. And moving around
a lot..... I managed two of the three Longspurs. Another birder had all three, 
so they 

are sticking. I forget the day Scott had already. They should stick, it's just 
a matter 

of finding the flock now! Which can be anywhere in that area. 2 Snow Buntings 
still 

with the flock. 

The Shortie - 5:22 or so first appearance? I am forgetting. Another birder and 
I 

were scanning everywhere. Just wait at the kestrel box - theres nothing in it.
Look north toward the red house. The Shortie likes this area between the house 
and 

the box. It seems to start hunting late. And it sounds off frequently! That was 
so 

neat to hear! Shame it doesnt start hunting earlier! Location, timing, etc. 
from David 

W.

Good birding all. 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Camden big year - new locations
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 19:11:48 -0500
Gloucester Park on the Delaware. And what views! I was standing right
on the river. Not much on the river, but I believe this place has potential 
more 

so when birds are moving. I did pick up Great Corm here in flight. 

Those abandoned industrial areas might prove productive. As one heads south.

I checked again the border for Gloucester and Camden counties at Big Timber
Creek. It's a lot closer to the north bank than I thought. Most of that cove is
Gloucester. Ebird states count everything you see from a location. Just like a 
yard list! The LT Duck was in Camden waters. The Goldeneyes flew in from the 
north, 

so I had in Camden. They were in Gloucester waters on the water though.

A key for this year will be river access points. So far, so good! 

Missed the Shoveler Matt had at Lake George. I tried, but scanning through 
a couple hundred roosting Mallards got to me! I left for Salem.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Passing of a friend
From: Landis Eaton <hensfoot1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 00:11:10 +0000
Dear Harvey- I sympathize with you so much and am so sorry for your loss.
You did everything right and maybe even prolonged the life of that precious
bird so that we could all cheer it on and appreciate how much these tiny
little things endure. My friend gave me the book "Animal Speak" after we
hosted a rufous hummer last November 18th -December 12th. " ...the
hummingbird is a symbol for accomplishing that which seems impossible. It
will teach you to find the joy of living from your own life circumstances."
Thank you little bird.
Landis Eaton
Princeton


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Passing of a Friend
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 19:00:22 -0500
Across the eons, it has been this sort of pioneer which has led to new species 
and the planet’s amazing biodiversity. 

Perhaps your little friend’s adventurous spirit lives on in her progeny as 
well as in your memories. 


Diane Louie, Madison

> On Jan 10, 2017, at 9:00 AM, Harvey Tomlinson  wrote:
> 
> Hi Jersey Birders,
> It is with unbelievable sadness I am reporting the death of my Little
> Hummer friend PipSqueak
> Old Man Winter finally took her last night. She just couldn't make the snow
> storm, howling winds, and bitter cold nights.
> Looking out on an empty Hummer Hut is heart breaking.
> How such a tiny creature could have had such a big impact on my life is
> amazing.
> It was an honor and privilege to have had her grace my gardens even for
> such a short time.
> And in that time the smiles she put on my face were endless.
> I always knew this day might come.Unlike Rufous Hummers that nest in Alaska
> and are hard-wired for the cold this little one had the odds stacked
> against her from the beginning.
> She defied identification except to say one parent was Archilocus and one
> was Calypte. A West Coast gal for sure
> And adding insult to injury she made a left instead of a right landing in
> the lap of Winter.
> I did my best to help her thru the cold but Mother Nature plays no
> favorites.
> I am so sorry my little Friend.
> I will truly miss You.
> harvey
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Passing of a Friend
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 18:55:49 -0500
> On Jan 10, 2017, at 9:00 AM, Harvey Tomlinson  wrote:
> 
> Hi Jersey Birders,
> It is with unbelievable sadness I am reporting the death of my Little
> Hummer friend PipSqueak
> Old Man Winter finally took her last night. She just couldn't make the snow
> storm, howling winds, and bitter cold nights.
> Looking out on an empty Hummer Hut is heart breaking.
> How such a tiny creature could have had such a big impact on my life is
> amazing.
> It was an honor and privilege to have had her grace my gardens even for
> such a short time.
> And in that time the smiles she put on my face were endless.
> I always knew this day might come.Unlike Rufous Hummers that nest in Alaska
> and are hard-wired for the cold this little one had the odds stacked
> against her from the beginning.
> She defied identification except to say one parent was Archilocus and one
> was Calypte. A West Coast gal for sure
> And adding insult to injury she made a left instead of a right landing in
> the lap of Winter.
> I did my best to help her thru the cold but Mother Nature plays no
> favorites.
> I am so sorry my little Friend.
> I will truly miss You.
> harvey
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Passing of a Friend ( Harvey's Hummer)
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 15:30:56 -0500
I must say I have never shed a tear over finding a dead bird. But Harvey’s 
PipSqueak was totally different experience. Perhaps because I have actually met 
her last week doing her thing moving back and forth from Harvey’s home-made 
Hummer warming hut to that multiflora rose seeking shelter. 


I had two layers of spandex cycling tights and a fleece pants over gore-tex 
rain paints on when I saw the PipSqueak in live action, since I was at Stone 
Harbor “cold and snow” birding prior to running into Harvey at Nummey 
Island. What a contrast to the windy-cold-snowy day birding then one gets to 
see this bright greenish plumage hummer about 30 min later. 


I was up around 5 AM this morning to add more firewood to woodstove, and 
watched the weather report where the reported temp was around teens in my 
neighborhood, yet Del Heaven and Villas was showing 28 degrees. I immediately 
turned into a PipSqueak cheerleader rather than the usual arm-chair and 
internet bird watcher that I am. 


Then at work I read Harvey’s post and I did shed a tear. Perhaps because I 
met her personally. Especially I got to see her eyes, where a long lasting true 
relationship can begin to form. No doubt none of those ebird photos will ever 
be able to duplicate my experience with PipSqueak. 

.
Thank you for sharing, Harvey !!!

Yong Kong
Camden County


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Passing of a Friend
From: "James O'Brien" <jphillipobrien AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 20:00:09 +0000
In thinking about this a bit more, is there precedent for capturing the bird 
and re-habbing it until Spring? We do the same thing with raptors with feather 
damage--ie waiting for the molt--and based on your setup Harvey, you were 75% 
of the way there in providing habitat. Just curious. 



James

Jackson, NJ


________________________________
From: JerseyBirds  on behalf of Harvey Tomlinson 
 

Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 9:00 AM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Passing of a Friend

Hi Jersey Birders,
It is with unbelievable sadness I am reporting the death of my Little
Hummer friend PipSqueak
Old Man Winter finally took her last night. She just couldn't make the snow
storm, howling winds, and bitter cold nights.
Looking out on an empty Hummer Hut is heart breaking.
How such a tiny creature could have had such a big impact on my life is
amazing.
It was an honor and privilege to have had her grace my gardens even for
such a short time.
And in that time the smiles she put on my face were endless.
I always knew this day might come.Unlike Rufous Hummers that nest in Alaska
and are hard-wired for the cold this little one had the odds stacked
against her from the beginning.
She defied identification except to say one parent was Archilocus and one
was Calypte. A West Coast gal for sure
And adding insult to injury she made a left instead of a right landing in
the lap of Winter.
I did my best to help her thru the cold but Mother Nature plays no
favorites.
 I am so sorry my little Friend.
I will truly miss You.
harvey


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
> 


[https://s0.wp.com/i/blank.jpg] 


Reporting
www.njbrc.com
Review List Species Report Review List species and species new to the state to 
the New Jersey Bird Records Committee. The Records Committee maintains an 
"official" list of all birds known to have b... 



or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Passing of a Friend
From: Dom <dom AT MONTEVIDEO.COM.UY>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 12:18:45 -0500
A sad story indeed Harvery! As you probably know, your hummer likely ended
up here (and stayed) as a direct result of its hybrid genome - and your
feeders were likely not influential on its behavior. I don't know if it's
been tested in either hummer genus but there was an interesting experiment
a couple years ago with swainson's thrushes that linked 'hybrid migration
routes' to hybrid parentage:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ele.12326/abstract

Cheers
Dom

Dominic Garcia-Hall

HOBOKEN, NJ

www.antbirds.com




On 10 January 2017 at 11:28, Dena Temple  wrote:

> Harvey, you were a good host to your little friend. We went through this a
> few years ago, building a heat lamp with a temperature sensor over the
> feeder for our little hummer, but sometimes our best efforts just are not
> enough. Maybe it's natural selection, since this little fellow lacked the
> necessary sense of direction, as you said. Regardless, it is very sad
> that the story ended here, and now. Thanks for sharing it with us.
>
> Dena Temple
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Harvey Tomlinson 
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 09:00:11 -0500
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Passing of a Friend
>
> > Hi Jersey Birders,
> > It is with unbelievable sadness I am reporting the death of my Little
> > Hummer friend PipSqueak
> > Old Man Winter finally took her last night. She just couldn't make the
> snow
> > storm, howling winds, and bitter cold nights.
> > Looking out on an empty Hummer Hut is heart breaking.
> > How such a tiny creature could have had such a big impact on my life is
> > amazing.
> > It was an honor and privilege to have had her grace my gardens even for
> > such a short time.
> > And in that time the smiles she put on my face were endless.
> > I always knew this day might come.Unlike Rufous Hummers that nest in
> Alaska
> > and are hard-wired for the cold this little one had the odds stacked
> > against her from the beginning.
> > She defied identification except to say one parent was Archilocus and one
> > was Calypte. A West Coast gal for sure
> > And adding insult to injury she made a left instead of a right landing in
> > the lap of Winter.
> > I did my best to help her thru the cold but Mother Nature plays no
> > favorites.
> >  I am so sorry my little Friend.
> > I will truly miss You.
> > harvey
> >
> >
> > How to report NJ bird sightings: see
> 
> > or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> > List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> >
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see  reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Passing of a Friend
From: Dena Temple <denat01 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 11:28:03 -0500
Harvey, you were a good host to your little friend. We went through this a 
few years ago, building a heat lamp with a temperature sensor over the 
feeder for our little hummer, but sometimes our best efforts just are not 
enough. Maybe it's natural selection, since this little fellow lacked the 
necessary sense of direction, as you said. Regardless, it is very sad 
that the story ended here, and now. Thanks for sharing it with us.

Dena Temple

----- Original Message -----
From: Harvey Tomlinson 
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 09:00:11 -0500
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Passing of a Friend

> Hi Jersey Birders,
> It is with unbelievable sadness I am reporting the death of my Little
> Hummer friend PipSqueak
> Old Man Winter finally took her last night. She just couldn't make the 
snow
> storm, howling winds, and bitter cold nights.
> Looking out on an empty Hummer Hut is heart breaking.
> How such a tiny creature could have had such a big impact on my life is
> amazing.
> It was an honor and privilege to have had her grace my gardens even for
> such a short time.
> And in that time the smiles she put on my face were endless.
> I always knew this day might come.Unlike Rufous Hummers that nest in 
Alaska
> and are hard-wired for the cold this little one had the odds stacked
> against her from the beginning.
> She defied identification except to say one parent was Archilocus and one
> was Calypte. A West Coast gal for sure
> And adding insult to injury she made a left instead of a right landing in
> the lap of Winter.
> I did my best to help her thru the cold but Mother Nature plays no
> favorites.
>  I am so sorry my little Friend.
> I will truly miss You.
> harvey
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> 


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Subject: Re: Passing of a Friend
From: Vince Capp <00000326c7e06828-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 15:56:17 +0000
I never thought I would well up over a post here on Jersey Birds. Must be those 
darned allergies.... 

Vince CappBayonet Point, FL

      From: Harvey Tomlinson 
 To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 9:00 AM
 Subject: [JERSEYBI] Passing of a Friend
   
Hi Jersey Birders,
It is with unbelievable sadness I am reporting the death of my Little
Hummer friend PipSqueak
Old Man Winter finally took her last night. She just couldn't make the snow
storm, howling winds, and bitter cold nights.
Looking out on an empty Hummer Hut is heart breaking.
How such a tiny creature could have had such a big impact on my life is
amazing.
It was an honor and privilege to have had her grace my gardens even for
such a short time.
And in that time the smiles she put on my face were endless.
I always knew this day might come.Unlike Rufous Hummers that nest in Alaska
and are hard-wired for the cold this little one had the odds stacked
against her from the beginning.
She defied identification except to say one parent was Archilocus and one
was Calypte. A West Coast gal for sure
And adding insult to injury she made a left instead of a right landing in
the lap of Winter.
I did my best to help her thru the cold but Mother Nature plays no
favorites.
 I am so sorry my little Friend.
I will truly miss You.
harvey


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or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
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Subject: Re: Passing of a Friend
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 15:13:13 +0000
Followed your story of PipSqueak and loved every moment of reading her
story and building of Hummer Hut and hoping and wishing that all would turn
out wondrous and there would be a happy ending.
It was not to be. She gave you memories and you gave us a story of fighting 
through odds not in our favor, but still fighting, with a little help from our 
friends. 

She gave "the good fight"!
Was there a moment you thought about bringing her inside or is that so out
of the question, that it is simply, a stupid question?
Again, thanks for the story of the journey of PipSqueak.
RIP Pip.

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 10, 2017, at 9:00 AM, Harvey Tomlinson  wrote:
> 
> Hi Jersey Birders,
> It is with unbelievable sadness I am reporting the death of my Little
> Hummer friend PipSqueak
> Old Man Winter finally took her last night. She just couldn't make the snow
> storm, howling winds, and bitter cold nights.
> Looking out on an empty Hummer Hut is heart breaking.
> How such a tiny creature could have had such a big impact on my life is
> amazing.
> It was an honor and privilege to have had her grace my gardens even for
> such a short time.
> And in that time the smiles she put on my face were endless.
> I always knew this day might come.Unlike Rufous Hummers that nest in Alaska
> and are hard-wired for the cold this little one had the odds stacked
> against her from the beginning.
> She defied identification except to say one parent was Archilocus and one
> was Calypte. A West Coast gal for sure
> And adding insult to injury she made a left instead of a right landing in
> the lap of Winter.
> I did my best to help her thru the cold but Mother Nature plays no
> favorites.
> I am so sorry my little Friend.
> I will truly miss You.
> harvey
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

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Subject: Passing of a Friend
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 09:00:11 -0500
Hi Jersey Birders,
It is with unbelievable sadness I am reporting the death of my Little
Hummer friend PipSqueak
Old Man Winter finally took her last night. She just couldn't make the snow
storm, howling winds, and bitter cold nights.
Looking out on an empty Hummer Hut is heart breaking.
How such a tiny creature could have had such a big impact on my life is
amazing.
It was an honor and privilege to have had her grace my gardens even for
such a short time.
And in that time the smiles she put on my face were endless.
I always knew this day might come.Unlike Rufous Hummers that nest in Alaska
and are hard-wired for the cold this little one had the odds stacked
against her from the beginning.
She defied identification except to say one parent was Archilocus and one
was Calypte. A West Coast gal for sure
And adding insult to injury she made a left instead of a right landing in
the lap of Winter.
I did my best to help her thru the cold but Mother Nature plays no
favorites.
 I am so sorry my little Friend.
I will truly miss You.
harvey


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Subject: Horned Lark flock in Glassboro, Gloucester Co.
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 19:49:59 -0500
I had about 10 min. to spare for fast-n-furious lunch time birding today. With 
the snow on the ground the one and only option place to visit was no brainer. 


Neale Road (near the Route 55 exit onto Rt 322) near Rowan University. Actually 
Rowan athletic fields are on this road as well. Nice flock of Horned Lark 
feeding close to the road. They sound like insects when feeding so close to 
your ears. 


The flock was not as large as last winter experience. I had no time to shift 
through the flock just in case. So took many photos as I could for later view 
at home. Reviewing the photos there were no longspurs I could find. Some photos 
on my Flicker. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County


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Subject: road name correction
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 16:52:38 -0500
That's Pestleton Rd. 1 or 2 miles to the NW of Tuckahoe Turf. Of course a 10 or 
15 minute 

drive there!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Camden big year birding - Tuckahoe Turf Farm
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 16:48:22 -0500
And area. I put into ebird as Union Rd. as not sure where the farm ends and
other properties begin. Looked perfect - and still does - for Horned Lark! I 
couldn't find a one...... Ah! Bluebird probably my best bird there. Or the 
Savanah 

Sparrows. I have no clue how hard or easy each might be in the county! There's
an area to the north - Pendleton Rd. - that has a huge horse farm also. I spent
time there also. Went home via a couple spots in Williamstown. Still no
Larks! Just because the habitat is good, the flocks still could be elsewhere.
Like Salems Featherbed Lane! This Tuckahoe area will see me - and hopefully
Marilyn - with a dusk watch also. 

Tues. will be the river in Camden, and then south. 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Re: She Made It!
From: "Bell, Tyler" <belljt AT SI.EDU>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 18:23:26 +0000
There is a hatch year female Rufous Hummingbird that has been coming to two 
neighbor's feeders since the middle of October. We were very concerned about it 
surviving the cold temps the last three nights. Last night, the mercury dropped 
to 4 but she showed up at the one feeder just before 7 and drank heartily. 
Since the temp tonight is to be in the low 20s, it seems she's out of the woods 
for a while. 


Hope your hummer does the same!
 Tyler Bell
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
647 Contees Wharf Rd.
Edgewater, Maryland 21037
belljt AT si.edu



Date:    Sun, 8 Jan 2017 07:29:13 -0500
From:    Harvey Tomlinson >
Subject: She Made It!

Hi Jersey Birders,
If you heard this LOUD Hooray echoing over the snow drifts early this morning 
that was me! 


My tiny Hybrid Hummingbird was at her heated Hummer Hut this morning roosting 
on the feeder under the heat lamp. 

She left the Hut at 5PM last night and I really didn't think I would see her 
this morning. It was a brutal night out there. Unbelievable. 


My wife suggested I might consider taking the hummer feeders down earlier next 
year so I assure this doesn't happen again but I really don't believe it's the 
feeders that draw them in. It's the gardens and flowers they see. Actually a 
lot of the juvenile hummers that visit my gardens late Fall, including this 
hybrid, don't use the feeders right away. They don't know what they are. 


Now a Hummers curiosity will get the better of them and they soon catch on 
which probably serves them well on the journey South. 


Those that know which way South is.....
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven



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Subject: Long Branch CBC update
From: Tom Brown <tshrike19 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 12:31:09 -0500
Hi All,

I had posted a quick recap of the 82nd Long Branch CBC before heading out
west, but I've been able to finalize the results now that I'm back.

Highlights:  addition of Ross's goose and peregrine falcon on count day
bumps the total from 120 to 122 for the final species total.   The Ross's
goose was observed and photographed by Valerie Mathes within the count
circle on count day , and the peregrine falcon was observed by Nerses
Kazanjian.

Harlequin Duck (only the 11th time for count), Baltimore Oriole (2),
Long-eared Owl (16th time for count, but scarce in recent times), Northern
Saw-whet Owl, Cackling Goose, Greater Yellowlegs, Clay-colored Sparrow,
Great Egret, Pileated Woodpecker (5th record, but several in recent years),
and Common Raven (observed over last four years).

High counts were set for the following species:
Cackling Goose, Gadwall, Black Vulture (97, twenty one more than previous
high), Red-breasted Nuthatch (23, nine more than the previous high),
White-breasted Nuthatch (98, thirty two above the previous high), American
Pipit, and Palm Warbler (11, five above the previous high).

Thanks to all the participants who helped to make the count a success.

cheers,

Tom Brown
Middletown, NJ


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Subject: The 195 Loop yesterday (long post)
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 15:05:38 +0000
Jerseybirders,

My wife suggested that, for my birthday, I ought to go birding to celebrate. 
Since Friday was a workday and the weather looked inclement on Saturday (not so 
inclement, however, since there were all kinds of reports from birders, at 
least before noon), I went yesterday on a long loop with Interstate 195 as its 
southern border. 


I started at Conine's Pond in Allentown, looking for the two Barnacle Geese 
reported there mid-day Saturday by Andrew Marden. More than an hour of 'scoping 
from 7:30 onward from many different angles yielded no Barnacles, although 
several Snow Geese were resting with the Canadas (as best as I could tell, they 
all had a black gape...no Ross'), and I was just about to leave when I made one 
last scan with the binoculars: There they were!, standing up for a brief moment 
to stretch, just long enough to be seen, and then settling back in for a 
snooze. 


On to the Trenton Sewage Ponds. What an amazing spectacle this is turning out 
to be. I met Peggy Cadigan and Jessica Howland there, and the three of us 
watched the small passerines both in the trees and diving into the square tanks 
just behind them. The vantage point at the gate provided a clue as to the 
foraging tactics of the warblers: they either sit on the guard railings 
surrounding the tanks and foray, flycatcher-like, above the water, or they land 
on the vertical walls of the tank and grip them tightly, like a swift. It was a 
unique view of a bright Pine Warbler clinging to the wet slick walls of this 
no-doubt smelly watery environment, waiting for small insects to appear. The 
juxtaposition of small brightly-colored sprites amidst this industrial grey, 
black, and brown environment was striking. The Northern Rough-winged Swallows 
do it better, of course, as this is their milieu. The warblers seemed to have 
been imitating their tactics. One Orange-crowned Warbler also put in a brief 
appearance on the opposite side of the road, foraging quickly in the low 
tangles, wonderfully olive and yellow against the leaf and branch litter. 


Then to the Manasquan Reservoir Environmental Center, a place I'd never been. 
It's an perfect destination, with great views of the water and all the 
waterfowl on it (at least seven or eight Pied-billed Grebes, perhaps more), and 
the long-standing Orange-crowned Warbler did not disappoint, appearing almost 
immediately at the suet feeder, providing ample opportunity for study of its 
plain coloration. This was a much duller bird than the one at Trenton. Also, 
there must have been 1,000 or more Common Mergansers out in the reservoir as 
well, always a beautiful sight. 


Peggy and Jessica had mentioned a male Eurasian Wigeon at the Shark River 
Inlet, so that was my next stop...at the far eastern end of 195, where it turns 
into 138. The bird was with other American Wigeon, Black Ducks, and Gadwall in 
a sheltered corner of the Inlet, and was strikingly beautiful in the early 
afternoon sun. Each year is different in one's birding life: in 2016, I think I 
had to make four or five trips to this area to finally find the Eurasion Wigeon 
that was there. The Inlet itself sheltered hundreds and hundreds of Brant, 
Bufflehead, and other ducks. A very big immature Cooper's Hawk stood watch on 
the shore. But the wind was ferocious and right into my face. An alert that the 
Pink Footed Goose in Holmdel had been refound, plus the ticking clock on my 
birding morning, pulled me northward. 


Ben Barkley, who refound the PFGO, deserves huge accolades for fortitude, as 
Marlu Lake in Thompson Park was only accessible on foot or via cross-country 
skis, as I discovered when I arrived. I made the  of a mile trek along the 
roadway and ski trails to the area Ben had suggested, and there, sleeping on 
the ice (a recurring theme for the geese yesterday; would I be correct in 
assuming that, if their foraging grounds are covered in snow completely, they 
just hunker down for a day until the snow melts?), was the Pink-footed Goose, 
all by itself. Surprising to me, but not, apparently, to e-Bird, was a Gray 
Catbird flitting through the vines next to the lake. A bird which will no doubt 
seem like a nuisance a few months from now was a welcome visitor in this cold, 
white and brown environment. Cardinals, White-throated Sparrows, Titmice, 
Chickadees, and Kinglets moved in the trees and brush on the trail back. 


I had 58 species on the day, a great birthday present from my wife.

Good birding all.

Marc Chelemer
Tenafly


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Subject: January Birds at Troy Meadows NJ on a Windy Day (video)
From: Dave Blinder <daveblinderphotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 13:18:11 -0100
The usual suspects stayed near the sunlight and flowing spring water on a
brisk day in Morris County New Jersey.  It was a nice viewing of the
Eastern Bluebirds as I don’t see them on most visits.  Possibly the first
time I’ve gotten clear footage of a Blue Jay also.

Other birds seen:  Rusty Blackbird (6), Red-tailed Hawk, Red-headed
Woodpecker (3), American Goldfinch


https://www.facebook.com/daveblinderphotography/videos/734601640045987/

or

https://youtu.be/Ngji7srytik



Dave Blinder
Denville, NJ
http://facebook.com/daveblinderstudios
http://youtube.com/daveblinder1
http://instagram.com/njhomephotos
http://daveblinder.com


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Subject: Light Phase Rough-legged Hawk at Motts Creek Inn
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 8 Jan 2017 14:38:23 -0500
First, Bravo to Harvey and his Hybrid Hummingbird !!! That hummer is in good 
hands no doubt. 


Second, Congratulations to all NJ’s top 100 eBirders. I did follow all of you 
time to time !! 


I moseyed over towards Motts Creek Inn this morning hoping for a Rough-legged 
Hawk under the different weather condition than the recent past visits where I 
have bombed. First road side birding was in order. Horned Larks in Hammonton 
where fields was not a blueberry field. Plenty of Savannahs along weedy field 
road sides along Pomona and a few chipping sparrows. Fox sparrows along Oyster 
Creek Road. 


High light was Light Phase Rough-legged Hawk at Motts Creek Inn. What gives ? I 
was about to give up hope and leaning towards that I am incapable of find a 
Rough-legged Hawk around my birding patch in South Jersey. First Buteo I had in 
the scope turned out to be it, It was a very distant bird and the scope view 
was the only option. I think the light reflecting off the snow on the ground 
had everything to do with ID of this raptor. Otherwise I am uncertain if the 
white rump and the dark band at the end of the tail would have been visible 
from that distance. Stayed with the bird w/ the scope then quick glimpse of 
other ID feathers that indicated light phase. It glided towards the Parkway 
bridge, then lost sight of it. 


Take out the snow on the ground and fantastic light condition, most likely I 
would have came home and told Mary that I saw an un-ID Buteo. To me personally, 
perfect way to find a Rough-legged and study. Much better than those up north 
black dirt region’s roughlegs that Mike Britt whistles them in for naked eye 
view for every birder to see. 


Yong Kong
Camden County


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Subject: She Made It!
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 8 Jan 2017 07:29:13 -0500
Hi Jersey Birders,
If you heard this LOUD Hooray echoing over the snow drifts early this
morning that was me!
My tiny Hybrid Hummingbird was at her heated Hummer Hut this morning
roosting on the feeder under the heat lamp.
She left the Hut at 5PM last night and I really didn't think I would see
her this morning.
It was a brutal night out there.
Unbelievable.
My wife suggested I might consider taking the hummer feeders down earlier
next year so I assure this doesn't happen again but I really don't believe
it's the feeders that draw them in.
It's the gardens and flowers they see.
Actually a lot of the juvenile hummers that visit my gardens late Fall,
including this hybrid, don't use the feeders right away.
They don't know what they are.
Now a Hummers curiosity will get the better of them and  they soon catch on
which probably serves them well on the journey South.
Those that know which way South is.....
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven


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or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
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