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Updated on Monday, January 26 at 11:29 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Noisy Scrub-bird,©BirdQuest

26 Jan Re: White Pelicans [Jason Hoeksema ]
26 Jan Re: White Pelicans ["Diane Lafferty" ]
22 Jan SPAC Winter Bird Count ["Robinson, Mitch" ]
20 Jan Ramblin [Robert Briscoe ]
20 Jan Say's Phoebe Oktibbeha Co. ["Linda Cambre" ]
19 Jan what to do when you think you see a rare bird [w/ new web links] [JR Rigby ]
19 Jan what to do when you think you see a rare bird [Jason Hoeksema ]
19 Jan Laughing Gull, Snow Geese - Sardis Lower Lake, Panola Co [JR Rigby ]
19 Jan Say's Phoebe, Oktibbeha County [Gaynell Perry ]
18 Jan Western Red-tailed Hawk in Monroe County [Wayne Patterson ]
18 Jan Horned grebes at Ross Barnett [docpullen ]
18 Jan Re: Tropical Kingbird [Lcartee ]
17 Jan Say's Phoebe; Bufflehead question ["Jeffrey W. Harris" ]
16 Jan Ross Barnett Waterfowl [William B Woodard ]
16 Jan upcoming sparrow, woodcock, and gull events [Jason Hoeksema ]
15 Jan MOS website to www.missbird.org [JR Rigby ]
14 Jan Say's phoebe [Nancy Donald ]
13 Jan Say's Phoebe/Oktibbeha Co., MS/Tuesday, 13 Jan. ["Schiefer, Terence" ]
13 Jan No Subject ["Barbour, Philip - NRCS, Fort Worth, TX" ]
11 Jan Re: Thayer's Gull [Ned and Lucy Boyajian ]
11 Jan new dark-mantled gull - Sardis Lower Lake - Panola Co [JR Rigby ]
11 Jan Tropical Kingbird / Thayer's-like Gull persist ["Jeffrey W. Harris" ]
10 Jan western-type Dark-eyed Junco - Sardis Lake [JR Rigby ]
9 Jan Say's Phoebe/Oktibbeha Co.,MS/Friday, 9 Jan. ["Schiefer, Terence" ]
08 Jan Thayer's Gull [Ned and Lucy Boyajian ]
7 Jan Yesterday's "shutdown" [Martha Swan ]
7 Jan Sibley on "Cackling-ish Geese" [JR Rigby ]
7 Jan Fwd: [TN-Bird] Re: Ivory Gull [van harris ]
6 Jan test [Martha Swan ]
05 Jan Re: "New" abbreviations []
5 Jan Re: "New" abbreviations ["Jesse Yancy" ]
5 Jan Re: "New" abbreviations [Billy Mitchell ]
5 Jan Re: Christmas Card Bird and other Wildlife list [Barbara Qualls ]
5 Jan Re: "New" abbreviations [Jason Hoeksema ]
5 Jan Re: "New" abbreviations [Wayne Patterson ]
05 Jan Re: "New" abbreviations []
5 Jan Re: "New" abbreviations [van harris ]
5 Jan Re: "New" abbreviations [JR Rigby ]
5 Jan Re: "New" abbreviations ["Matt Smith" ]
5 Jan "New" abbreviations ["Jesse Yancy" ]
5 Jan Say's Phoebe/Oktibbeha Co.,MS/Monday 5 Jan. ["Schiefer, Terence" ]
04 Jan Tropical Kingbird [Ned and Lucy Boyajian ]
3 Jan Say's Phoebe still present ["Schiefer, Terence" ]
02 Jan Re: vermilion flycatacher []
3 Jan Re: vermilion flycatacher [justin evans ]
2 Jan Say's Phoebe ["Jeffrey W. Harris" ]
2 Jan Say's Phoebe/Oktibbeha Co.,MS ["Schiefer, Terence" ]
1 Jan Arkabutla Lake Christmas Bird Count. [van harris ]
31 Dec RESULTS: JACKSON CBC DEC 27, 2014 [M P STEVENS ]
31 Dec Re: Hawk ["Jeffrey W. Harris" ]
31 Dec Hawk ["Jeffrey Pilgrim" ]
31 Dec Tropical Kingbird/Hancock Co., MS/Tuesday, 30 Dec. ["Schiefer, Terence" ]
30 Dec Re: tropical kingbird seen today [Marion Schiefer ]
30 Dec Rusty Blackbirds [Dianne Patterson ]
30 Dec Hawk, id requested. ["Larry Smith" ]
29 Dec Tropical Kingbird update - photos and audio [JR Rigby ]
29 Dec Kingbird [Randy Palmer ]
29 Dec Tropical Kingsbird sighting? [Randy Palmer ]
28 Dec Re: White dove, I think [Rynetta Coetzee ]
28 Dec Re: Tropical Kingbird located again [Jason Hoeksema ]
28 Dec Tropical Kingbird located again [Sharon Milligan ]
27 Dec Re: Tropical Kingbird []
27 Dec Tropical Kingbird 12/26 ["Martha E. Swan" ]
27 Dec Tropical Kingbird [Ned and Lucy Boyajian ]
26 Dec Bay Springs Lake Tishomingo County in NE Mississippi [Wayne Patterson ]
26 Dec Sandhill Cranes [Robert Briscoe ]
26 Dec Re: Tropical Kingbird update? ["Anholt, Allison" ]
26 Dec T. Kingbird [jay morris ]
26 Dec Tropical Kingbird update? ["J.R.Rigby" ]
26 Dec White dove, I think ["Dance, Gayla" ]
25 Dec Long-tailed Duck []
24 Dec Re: Harlans, I think ["Johnson, Erik" ]
24 Dec Re: Harlans, I think [William Mitchell ]
24 Dec Re: Harlans, I think [JR Rigby ]
24 Dec Re: Harlans, I think [JR Rigby ]
24 Dec Re: Harlans, I think ["Frank Hensley" ]

Subject: Re: White Pelicans
From: Jason Hoeksema <hoeksema AT olemiss.edu>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 09:59:21 -0600
Diane & Scottie,
There are typically at least a few (and sometimes more) American White
Pelicans within reasonable photographic distance at the spillway from
Sardis Lake dam into Lower Sardis Lake (Panola County). Birders and
photographers can closely approach the spillway from either side (north or
south).  Also, there is often a group of pelicans loafing on the beach just
west of the spillway, on the north side of lower lake. This area can be
reached by walking from the parking areas near the spillway or further
west. The Sardis Dam area can be reached from Hwy 35 from Batesville, or
from Hwy 315 if you're coming from Oxford or from Memphis.  In winter, this
is also usually a nice spot to photograph Bonaparte's Gulls, sometimes
other gull species, Pied-billed Grebes, and sometimes waterfowl.
Good birding,
Jason Hoeksema
Oxford, MS

On Mon, Jan 26, 2015 at 9:39 AM, Diane Lafferty 
wrote:

> Scottie
>
> Sometimes I think you can see more at the lake in Jackson.  But here is
> asking.  Anybody know where you can take pictures of White Pelicans?  We
> see
> them fly over in Waveland sometimes.
> Diane
>
> P.S.  Scottie - If you reply to missbird she can sign you up.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Scottie Whigham [mailto:scottiewhigham39401 AT gmail.com]
> Sent: Sunday, January 25, 2015 5:18 PM
> To: dlaffert AT netdoor.com
> Subject: White Pelicans
>
> Hey Dianne, do you know any Audubon society's on coast who would know where
> some white Pelicans are?  Figured you'd know.  Wonder if we could get up a
> trip this month or maybe a few of us could photograph some.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
>
> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
> Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
> View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: White Pelicans
From: "Diane Lafferty" <dlaffert AT netdoor.com>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 09:39:38 -0600
Scottie

Sometimes I think you can see more at the lake in Jackson.  But here is
asking.  Anybody know where you can take pictures of White Pelicans?  We see
them fly over in Waveland sometimes.
Diane

P.S.  Scottie - If you reply to missbird she can sign you up.

-----Original Message-----
From: Scottie Whigham [mailto:scottiewhigham39401 AT gmail.com] 
Sent: Sunday, January 25, 2015 5:18 PM
To: dlaffert AT netdoor.com
Subject: White Pelicans

Hey Dianne, do you know any Audubon society's on coast who would know where
some white Pelicans are?  Figured you'd know.  Wonder if we could get up a
trip this month or maybe a few of us could photograph some.  

Sent from my iPhone


IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

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List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
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Subject: SPAC Winter Bird Count
From: "Robinson, Mitch" <mrrobinson AT audubon.org>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 18:45:52 +0000
We had wonderful weather on Saturday for our Winter Bird Count at Strawberry 
Plains. Our staff and 21 volunteers (including J.R. Rigby's 2yr old daughter) 
recorded a total of 69 species, with highlights of a Lincoln's Sparrow and 
American Black Duck. 


To view or download the list, which includes all species counts back to 2002, 
visit the link below. 

http://strawberryplains.audubon.org/documents/spac-winter-bird-count

Mitchell Robinson
Conservation Education Manager
Strawberry Plains Audubon Center
285 Plains Road, Holly Springs, MS 38635
662-252-1155
[StrawberryHrgb]
Subject: Ramblin
From: Robert Briscoe <rbriscoe2012 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 20:22:22 -0600
I started at the Coldwater Refuge at about 9:00 AM. Things were kind of slow at 
first. I picked up the trash under the big shed and around the tower. After a 
few more minutes ducks and geese were coming from all directions. I watched 
thousands of birds landing near the tower. I left after about an hour and birds 
were still coming in to the Refuge. I checked the Ballentine area of Panola 
County for Sandhill Cranes but did not see any. There were mixed flocks of 
Geese on both sides of Ditchbank Road and also along Samuels Road. I traveled 
Highway 315 west of Sledge to the Coldwater East Levee and turned north. I 
drove on the levee to Crenshaw Road. The fields on the east side of the levee 
were wet nearly all the way. There were some Ducks but I was surprised at the 
number of Yellow Legs, Dowitchers and Snipes. Tunica County also had big 
numbers of Ducks, Geese, Hawks and Gulls. I came back down through Panola 
county and found the Sandhill Cranes on the north side of Curtis Road and about 
one half mile west of Bluff Road. It was about 5:30 PM when I found the cranes. 
The light was not very good. I counted 300 plus and then realized that the big 
blob to the right was also cranes. They were standing so close together, my 
first thought was a patch of weeds. I did not finish counting but there was a " 
bunch" of cranes there. 

Robert Briscoe
53 CR 327
Oxford Ms
 		 	   		  
Subject: Say's Phoebe Oktibbeha Co.
From: "Linda Cambre" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "cambrelinda@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 12:19:56 -0600
The Say's Phoebe was present at 11:20 this morning on the fence on West Line Rd 
on MS State's South Farm, adjacent to the Horse Park. 


Linda Cambre
Starkville

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Subject: what to do when you think you see a rare bird [w/ new web links]
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 22:51:23 -0600
I am reposting Jason Hoeksema's earlier message with the appropriate links
updated to the new MOS website. Sorry for any confusion. --JR

***********

Missbirders,

I thought I would take a minute to provide a few reminders, for what to do
when you find a rare bird in Mississippi.  Keep in mind, this is all
optional of course--this e-mail is for those of you who want to participate
in the exchange of info about rare bird sightings, and try to document your
sightings and have them become part of the ornithological record for our
state. We hope you will, but pleas ignore if you're not interested. Also,
many of you know this stuff already--feel free to ignore, or chime in if
you disagree.

*First, how do you know what's rare or unusual? * A good starting point is
to consult* this list *that is revised almost every year by the Mississippi
Bird Records Committee (MBRC):

http://www.missbird.org/Files/Rare%20Bird%20Files/REVIEW_SPECIES_LIST_January_2013.pdf 

Anything on the top part of that page is a 'Review Species' and anything on
the bottom part of that page is considered uncommon enough to warrant some
form of report. This list was recently revised slightly by the MBRC, and
will be updated online soon.

Also, the *state checklist* has a lot of info on which species are rare,
when and where:

http://www.missbird.org/Files/Mississippi%20State%20Checklist/MOS_Checklist_January_2014.pdf 


as does the* annotated checklist of birds in the coastal counties*:

http://www.missbird.org/Files/Mississippi%20State%20Checklist/coast_checklist_2014.pdf 


*Please note that the statewide checklist was *thoroughly *revised at a
recent meeting of the MBRC, and the revised version will be posted online
soon.

If you use eBird (which I hope you do!), the functional definition of a
rare bird is if eBird 'flags' your record and asks for more "Details."

*OK, so you're pretty darn sure you've found a rare bird. What do you do?*
First, tell some people!  If you're really not sure of the ID, consult some
other birders to try to nail down the ID. One place you can consult other
birders, either with a question or by posting a photo of a bird you're not
sure of, is at the Mississippi Birding Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1432365546994059/

Once you nail down an ID, the rest of us would really like to hear about
your sighting on missbird. Please post!

If your bird is flagged in eBird, you will be asked to enter "Details."  A
key point is that in these Details, it is most important for you to *describe
the bird* in as much detail as you are able to, emphasizing key field
marks, behavior, vocalizations, etc. that helped you distinguish it from
similar species. A few comments on the context, situation, etc. are fine,
but please focus on providing a thorough description of the bird.  If you
don't provide a sufficient description of the bird, Ned or someone else
will have to write to you to ask for more details, so it is really helpful
if you can just give sufficient details up front. If you have photos, you
can embed them in your e-bird checklist, or provide a link, or just mention
that you have photos, so that we can ask to see them later.

If you see a Review Species (top half of that rare bird list from the
MBRC), or a species not seen before in the state, PLEASE send a report to
Gene Knight using this form:

http://www.missbird.org/Files/Rare%20Bird%20Files/MS_Bird_Records_Committee_Doc_Form-Jan_2012.doc 

***Even if someone else found the bird, and you went and saw it later,
please send a report!*  For example, the recent rare flycatchers, Say's
Phoebe and Tropical Kingbird, are both* review species*.  If you chase them
and see them, we want reports from you. Ditto the Sprague's Pipit in Panola
County. We've gotten hardly any review forms submitted for these birds,
despite dozens of people chasing and finding these birds.

**When completing the review form, as mentioned above for eBird,
please *describe
the bird* as it appeared to you in the field, noting important field marks,
behavior, vocalizations, and other clues that helped you distinguish it
from similar species.

If you found a bird that is "Rare or Uncommon," i.e. it is on the bottom
half of that list from the MBRC, the Mississippi Ornithological Society
would appreciate hearing about it. A 'long form' (used for reporting Review
Species) is not required, but you can report these sightings using archival
3 x 5 cards (which Terry Schiefer will mail you if you ask him). There has
been recent discussion of providing an online/electronic alternative for
submitting those records--stay tuned.

*Have you read this far, and want more?*  Haha, you asked for it. Last
year, Gene Knight and I gave a program on this topic at the Museum of
Natural Sciences in Jackson, and our talks are available online here:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfSRFL3Zd99kklx0u3BWizw
A full 3 hours of this stuff!

OK, that's probably enough for now.  Thanks for tolerating this long post.
Jason Hoeksema
Oxford, MS

p.s. if you go birding somewhere in the state, we've love to hear a trip
report on missbird, even if you didn't find anything particularly rare.
What is happening in the bird world, in your corner of the state?  Such
trip reports are a great way for many of us to keep up with what's going on
out there, to learn about locations for birding, and your reports can help
motivate others to get out and bird!
Subject: what to do when you think you see a rare bird
From: Jason Hoeksema <hoeksema AT olemiss.edu>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 22:35:52 -0600
Missbirders,
I thought I would take a minute to provide a few reminders, for what to do
when you find a rare bird in Mississippi.  Keep in mind, this is all
optional of course--this e-mail is for those of you who want to participate
in the exchange of info about rare bird sightings, and try to document your
sightings and have them become part of the ornithological record for our
state. We hope you will, but pleas ignore if you're not interested. Also,
many of you know this stuff already--feel free to ignore, or chime in if
you disagree.

*First, how do you know what's rare or unusual? * A good starting point is
to consult* this list *that is revised almost every year by the Mississippi
Bird Records Committee (MBRC):

http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/Files/Rare%20Bird%20Files/REVIEW_SPECIES_LIST_January_2013.pdf 

Anything on the top part of that page is a 'Review Species' and anything on
the bottom part of that page is considered uncommon enough to warrant some
form of report. This list was recently revised slightly by the MBRC, and
will be updated online soon.

Also, the *state checklist* has a lot of info on which species are rare,
when and where:

http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/Files/Mississippi%20State%20Checklist/MOS_Checklist_January_2014.pdf 


as does the* annotated checklist of birds in the coastal counties*:

http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/Files/Mississippi%20State%20Checklist/coast_checklist_2014.pdf 


*Please note that the statewide checklist was *thoroughly *revised at a
recent meeting of the MBRC, and the revised version will be posted online
soon.

If you use eBird (which I hope you do!), the functional definition of a
rare bird is if eBird 'flags' your record and asks for more "Details."

*OK, so you're pretty darn sure you've found a rare bird. What do you do?*
First, tell some people!  If you're really not sure of the ID, consult some
other birders to try to nail down the ID. One place you can consult other
birders, either with a question or by posting a photo of a bird you're not
sure of, is at the Mississippi Birding Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1432365546994059/

Once you nail down an ID, the rest of us would really like to hear about
your sighting on missbird. Please post!

If your bird is flagged in eBird, you will be asked to enter "Details."  A
key point is that in these Details, it is most important for you to *describe
the bird* in as much detail as you are able to, emphasizing key field
marks, behavior, vocalizations, etc. that helped you distinguish it from
similar species. A few comments on the context, situation, etc. are fine,
but please focus on providing a thorough description of the bird.  If you
don't provide a sufficient description of the bird, Ned or someone else
will have to write to you to ask for more details, so it is really helpful
if you can just give sufficient details up front. If you have photos, you
can embed them in your e-bird checklist, or provide a link, or just mention
that you have photos, so that we can ask to see them later.

If you see a Review Species (top half of that rare bird list from the
MBRC), or a species not seen before in the state, PLEASE send a report to
Gene Knight using this form:

http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/Files/Rare%20Bird%20Files/MS_Bird_Records_Committee_Doc_Form-Jan_2012.doc 

***Even if someone else found the bird, and you went and saw it later,
please send a report!*  For example, the recent rare flycatchers, Say's
Phoebe and Tropical Kingbird, are both* review species*.  If you chase them
and see them, we want reports from you. Ditto the Sprague's Pipit in Panola
County. We've gotten hardly any review forms submitted for these birds,
despite dozens of people chasing and finding these birds.

**When completing the review form, as mentioned above for eBird,
please *describe
the bird* as it appeared to you in the field, noting important field marks,
behavior, vocalizations, and other clues that helped you distinguish it
from similar species.

If you found a bird that is "Rare or Uncommon," i.e. it is on the bottom
half of that list from the MBRC, the Mississippi Ornithological Society
would appreciate hearing about it. A 'long form' (used for reporting Review
Species) is not required, but you can report these sightings using archival
3 x 5 cards (which Terry Schiefer will mail you if you ask him). There has
been recent discussion of providing an online/electronic alternative for
submitting those records--stay tuned.

*Have you read this far, and want more?*  Haha, you asked for it. Last
year, Gene Knight and I gave a program on this topic at the Museum of
Natural Sciences in Jackson, and our talks are available online here:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfSRFL3Zd99kklx0u3BWizw
A full 3 hours of this stuff!

OK, that's probably enough for now.  Thanks for tolerating this long post.
Jason Hoeksema
Oxford, MS

p.s. if you go birding somewhere in the state, we've love to hear a trip
report on missbird, even if you didn't find anything particularly rare.
What is happening in the bird world, in your corner of the state?  Such
trip reports are a great way for many of us to keep up with what's going on
out there, to learn about locations for birding, and your reports can help
motivate others to get out and bird!
Subject: Laughing Gull, Snow Geese - Sardis Lower Lake, Panola Co
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 16:33:58 -0600
Missbirders,

While abundance was not high, gull diversity got a 25% bump at Lower Lake
this morning with the usual Ring-billed, Bonaparte's, Herring, and Lesser
Black-backed (adult, continuing) being joined by a stray Laughing Gull
(photo: https://flic.kr/p/qzvSW1). Both the Herring Gull and the Lesser
Black-backed Gull were vocal, a nice bonus for the local gulling scene.

The parking area overlooking the Marina/Engineer's Point afforded the best
views of roosting gulls along the shore. The ~100 gulls were overwhelmingly
Ring-billed with an age breakdown of 79 adult, 8 2nd-Year, and 3 1st-Year
type plumages.

Two flocks of Snow Geese, not a usual sight from Lower Lake, each 100+ and
totaling about 300 birds flew over, both headed north.

We're easily impressed up here.

Good birding,

JR
Oxford
Subject: Say's Phoebe, Oktibbeha County
From: Gaynell Perry <gcperry1 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 12:27:46 -0600
Spotted the lovely Say's with cinnamon buff belly at 11:15 on MLK Monday 
bobbing its tail on fence row along the section of South Farm Road that forms 
the northern perimeter of MSU Horse Park. The bird, hunting, soon flew into the 
west wind and briefly did its kestrel-like hover routine. 


Many thanks to Terry and all!

Gaynell Perry
MemphisIMPORTANT ADDRESSES

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Subject: Western Red-tailed Hawk in Monroe County
From: Wayne Patterson <wrp6 AT att.net>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 18:08:32 -0800
Missbirders,

Today I was heading East on Highway 8 a few miles West of Aberdeen and came 
across a dark morph Western Red-tailed Hawk sitting in a tree near the highway 
to the west of Greater Ebenezer MB Church. Robert Stewart had told me of seeing 
one recently near some catfish ponds and this bird, probably the same one, was 
a couple miles west of these ponds. While I usually see these dark beauties 
every year or so they don't afford much chance of getting a photo. They seem to 
me to be even more skittish than other types. This one took pity. 


http://www.pbase.com/wpatterson/image/158860884
http://www.pbase.com/wpatterson/image/158860893
http://www.pbase.com/wpatterson/image/158860894

Wayne Patterson
Shannon, MS  Lee Co.
Subject: Horned grebes at Ross Barnett
From: docpullen <docpullen AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 12:53:14 -0600
Just saw 3 horned grebes about 0.75 mi S of mile marker109 and 10 others 0.25 
mi S of mile marker 112 on Natchez Trace. Lots of buffleheads and white 
pelicans also present. 


Ruth and Tom Pullen  -,j_祊lhw1텤j{Wv'rzǧu隊[h+,n*ݭz_祊lb! 
0~+-܆+hw 
Subject: Re: Tropical Kingbird
From: Lcartee <lcartee AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 10:16:27 -0600
Has anyone seen the Tropical Kingbird since Jan 12? That was the last report on 
ebird. Going to try for it today. Thanks. 


Lewis Cartee

> On Jan 4, 2015, at 2:30 PM, Ned and Lucy Boyajian 
 wrote: 

> 
> To All
> The TRKI was still present today, 12:35 PM, corner of Locust and Jordan River 
Drive, Bay St Louis. 

> Ned Boyajian
> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
> 
> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
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> View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/
> 
> 
> 
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Subject: Say's Phoebe; Bufflehead question
From: "Jeffrey W. Harris" <jwharris30 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 2015 16:05:03 -0600
Hello Birders,

I saw the phoebe on the MSU South Farm (where it was originally discovered)
at about 2:00 PM today.  I also recorded 2 Buffleheads on video.  They
seemed to have different shaped heads.  Maybe a trick of light.  I have
attached some snapshots from video to see if anyone wants to explain the
differences in head shape, etc.

Sincerely,

Jeff Harris
Subject: Ross Barnett Waterfowl
From: William B Woodard <ben_woodard AT icloud.com>
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2015 18:57:47 -0600
Hello All,

The Education and Shooting Center held a relative diverse selection of 
waterfowl this evening. 


AMERICAN WIGEON
NORTHERN PINTAIL
GREEN WINGED TEAL
NORTHERN SHOVELER
MALLARD
GADWALL
REDHEAD

The blind provides excellent photo opportunities for those enthusiasts amongst 
us. Hope everyone has a great weekend. 


Best,
Ben Woodard

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Subject: upcoming sparrow, woodcock, and gull events
From: Jason Hoeksema <hoeksema AT olemiss.edu>
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2015 11:15:23 -0600
Missbirders,
Delta Wind Birds will conduct 3 birding events in the next 5 weeks, and we
hope you will join us!

Sparrow ID workshop (Oxford area): Saturday, Jan. 31
Woodcocks & Wine (Holly Springs, MS): Saturday, Feb. 7
Gull ID workshop (northwest MS Delta): Friday afternoon, Feb. 20

The Sparrow workshop will start with an indoor session, including work on
vocalizations and comparison of museum specimens, followed by a field trip
to the Sardis Waterfowl Refuge, which is known for its sparrows, including
the beautiful and elusive LeConte's Sparrow.  The Woodcocks & Wine event,
co-sponsored by our partners at Strawberry Plains Audubon Center, will
include a talk on Woodcock biology, a film on shorebird migration, food &
drink, a silent auction, and hopefully witnessing the courtship displays of
male woodcocks.  The Gull ID workshop will include indoor instruction and
field practice at nearby hotspots.

For more information and to register, please visit the Delta Wind Birds
website here:
https://www.deltawindbirds.org/events/

Feel free to e-mail me with any questions about these events.

Good birding,
Jason Hoeksema
Oxford, MS
Subject: MOS website to www.missbird.org
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 20:57:12 -0600
Missbirders,

This is a final reminder to change the bookmarks in your web browsers to
www.missbird.org for information on the Mississippi Ornithological Society
including membership info, checklists, and meeting announcements. The
www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com domain will expire at the end of
this month.

Good birding,

JR
Oxford
Subject: Say's phoebe
From: Nancy Donald <nmdonald55 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2015 20:23:14 -0600
Hey all,

I was able to locate the Say's phoebe this afternoon a little before 4 pm
after about an hour of searching West Line Rd, South Farm, MSU, Starkville,
 It was working the west fence line just north of the horse park between
the orange metal gates and the open shed.  Pretty bird with light orangy
rufous belly and light gray back.  Puffed up in the cold weather.  Nice
area to bird.  Lots of sparrows and meadowlarks.  Also saw 3 Am. kestrels,
a Merlin, a Loggerhead shrike and a Red-tailed hawk. Thanks to Terry
Schiefer for his directions.

Ran out of time to try for C. mergansers at Oktibbeha Lake.  Soon, maybe.

-- 

Nancy Donald

Meridian, MS

After you have exhausted what there is in business, politics, conviviality,
and so on - have found that none of these finally satisfy, or permanently
wear - what remains? Nature remains.

Walt Whitman 
Subject: Say's Phoebe/Oktibbeha Co., MS/Tuesday, 13 Jan.
From: "Schiefer, Terence" <TSchiefer AT entomology.msstate.edu>
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2015 19:57:23 +0000
MISSBIRDers:

The SAY'S PHOEBE at the Mississippi State University South Farm, Oktibbeha 
County, Mississippi, continues as of today, Tuesday, 13 January. The bird was 
in its usual location today, near the south end of West Line Road. I did not 
see the bird yesterday, and on Sunday it was farther east than it had been 
previously seen - along the fence line paralleling the creek past the bottom of 
the hill. If you go down into this area, beware of the old metal bridge 
crossing the creek; there are several large holes at the corners and edges of 
the bridge where your car could easily get stuck. Some of the roads on South 
Farm are currently quite muddy following the recent rains. If you get to see 
the bird, your sighting feedback would be appreciated as I am trying to keep 
track of all who saw the bird and when. 


Also, the two female COMMON MERGANSERS at Oktibbeha County Lake were still 
present this morning. 


Terry


Terence Lee Schiefer
Mississippi Entomological Museum
Box 9775
Mississippi State, MS 39762-9775
ph: 662-325-2989 (W); 662-324-3748 (H)
FAX: 662-325-8837
email: 
tschiefer AT entomology.msstate.edu 
Subject: No Subject
From: "Barbour, Philip - NRCS, Fort Worth, TX" <Philip.Barbour AT ftw.usda.gov>
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2015 18:33:31 +0000
MissBird,

The 25th Audubon Sidon CBC (code: MSSI) was conducted on Sunday, 28 December 
2014. 

We had 13 birders in 4 field parties and 2 birders at feeders.

Weather was marginal but could have been worse with a forecast for rain all 
day. It mostly held off 

but did pick up in the late afternoon. All in all, I believe it did contribute 
to fewer birds and fewer species found. 


Highlights were:
Common Goldeneye - 1 female well seen and documented by 3 birders (only the 2nd 
time found on this count). 

Common Ground Dove - 3 well seen and documented by the same 3 birders that saw 
the Goldeneye (only the 2nd time found on this count). 

Red-tailed Hawk, harlani, light morph (photographed).

Biggest miss was Great Horned Owl which was documented for Count Week only.

In the 2014 the circle lost more catfish ponds converted back to row crop 
production. 


The full report can be found at:
http://netapp.audubon.org/CBC/Compiler/?circleid=54917#
Compiler/Reports/Summary

Total species: 97

Thank you,
Philip J. Barbour, Ph.D.,Certified Wildlife Biologist
Leflore County, Sidon, MS
Sidon CBC (MSSI) compiler.






This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: Re: Thayer's Gull
From: Ned and Lucy Boyajian <nedlucyboyajian AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2015 20:31:10 -0600
To All
Regarding the Thayer's Gull I reported:
Some of the reports I have read and photos I have viewed differ 
significantly from the individual I observed. A full , detailed report 
will be submitted to the MOSBRC, but some salient features were:
At rest.
Size:  Seen  in direct comparison with Herring and Ring-billed Gulls.  
Intermediate in size between the two, :perhaps a bit closer to HEGU.
Overall coloration: More like an Iceland Gull than anything else.
Bill: All dark (with perhaps a small light  dash at base of lower 
mandible).Proportionately slight even in comparison with RBGU. Gonydeal 
angle scarcely discernible.
Primaries-. Brown, distinctly darker than rest of wing. Pale edging 
fairly distinct.
In flight
Primaries-dorsal view "Striped" effect
Primaries-ventral view essentially unmarked dull white, contrasting with 
more smoky linings.
Ned Boyajian
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Subject: new dark-mantled gull - Sardis Lower Lake - Panola Co
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2015 19:45:43 -0600
Missbirders,

Today at noon I spotted a gull on Sardis Lower Lake larger than surrounding
Ring-billed Gulls with a dark gray mantle and an all-black or nearly
all-black bill. My views were quite distant but good through a scope. It
was obviously a different bird from the continuing adult Lesser
Black-backed Gull (LBBG) both because of the dark bill and because the
adult LBBG was visible in the foreground of the same view (photo:
https://flic.kr/p/qLvSf6 a couple of other photos there too... none good).

I spotted the bird from the spillway parking lot. After initial study and
getting a few photos, I moved to what I thought would be a closer vantage
on the north side of the lake but never relocated the bird (but did get
closer views of the adult: https://flic.kr/p/qLN7aT). Subsequent searching
both there and in the dam area of the main lake through 3:45pm did not turn
up the bird in question.

My tentative ID is a 3rd-cycle Lesser Black-backed Gull, but can't be sure
without additional looks. I hope someone else can relocate the bird for a
positive ID.

An aside on Canada Geese:
I've been studying the Canada Goose population around the lake after
noticing some smaller, short-necked individuals (e.g., the right-most bird
here: https://flic.kr/p/qKV2Re). These birds appear consistently
short-necked in and out of the water, and may be smaller than those of the
main flock but only by close comparison. Today I followed a group of a
dozen or so that were separate from the main flock of about 150 geese.
Here's a photo of these "apparently short-necked birds":
https://flic.kr/p/pPV7Zc. If anyone has any insight into the subspecies
represented in the area and these birds in particular (even if they're just
B. c. canadensis in a low posture), I'd be eager to here.

Good birding,

J.R.
Oxford
Subject: Tropical Kingbird / Thayer's-like Gull persist
From: "Jeffrey W. Harris" <jwharris30 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2015 12:01:10 -0600
Hello Birders,

Zach Lohman and I ran into several other birders yesterday while checking
MS costal spots.  We found the Tropical Kingbird at the spot where it was
first found.  Olivia Graves and Jen and Buck Buchanan also saw the bird
with us.  It did not vocalize, but it obviously looked like a
Tropical-Couch's type with the notched tail, greenish back and bright
yellow breast belly and whitish throat.  Note:  we found the bird after
1:30 PM and did not see it in the morning.  Olivia told us that it is more
reliably seen in the afternoon.

We also ran into Pullen Watkins and Nancy Donald on the beach where the
juvenile Thayer's Gull was found.  We found the gull, but our looks wee
brief before it flew away.  It was obviously lighter in color with a crisp
pattern of brown on white that stood out from several immature or juvenile
Herring Gulls nearby.  The head shape also seemed different than the
Herring, but Zachary and I would have preferred longer study and photos to
scrutinize before calling it a Thayer's.  We will probably report it as a
Thayer's / Herring juvenile in eBird.

Sincerely,

Jeff Harris
Subject: western-type Dark-eyed Junco - Sardis Lake
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2015 04:09:08 -0600
Missbirders,

Thursday morning I photographed what appears to be a female western-type
subspecies of Dark-eyed Junco at Sardis Lower Lake in Panola Co. For now, I
am not sure whether the bird is Cassiar or Oregon subspecies. The
relatively low contrast overall in the plumage suggests perhaps Cassiar
(Junco hyemalis cismontanus), but having little experience with western
juncos, and being aware of the general difficulty of separating females of
these varieties, I cannot say for sure and have solicited input from others.

The bird responded to pishing next to the boat ramp at the outflow channel
of Sardis Lower Lake at approximately 9:45am on Thursday morning. Temp: 10
degrees Fahrenheit.

Two okay-ish photos:
https://flic.kr/p/qsCZds
https://flic.kr/p/qK5fhF

Good birding,

JR
Oxford
Subject: Say's Phoebe/Oktibbeha Co.,MS/Friday, 9 Jan.
From: "Schiefer, Terence" <TSchiefer AT entomology.msstate.edu>
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2015 19:25:10 +0000
MISSBIRDers:

The SAY'S PHOEBE at Mississippi State University South Farm, Oktibbeha County, 
Mississippi, continues as of today, Friday, 9 January. The bird has been seen 
each day since first found on 1 January, except for yesterday in the bitter 
cold temperatures. Today, the bird was along West Line Road among some small 
bushy trees in a low spot on the west side of the road a short distance north 
of the Horse Park. The bird moved north along the road and then east along a 
fence line perpendicular to the road, (located just before the small fenced in 
weedy area at the top of the hill on the west side of the road). This is one 
fence line to the north of where I have seen the bird in the past. I also want 
to remind folks that the gate to South Farm is closed on weekends. 


Terry


Terence Lee Schiefer
Mississippi Entomological Museum
Box 9775
Mississippi State, MS 39762-9775
ph: 662-325-2989 (W); 662-324-3748 (H)
FAX: 662-325-8837
email: 
tschiefer AT entomology.msstate.edu 
Subject: Thayer's Gull
From: Ned and Lucy Boyajian <nedlucyboyajian AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2015 14:40:23 -0600
I saw a gull  around10:30 AM this morning (Jan 8) .about 1/2 mile east 
of the Silver Slipper Casino parking lot, Hancock Co.which I identified 
as a rather pale juvenile Thayer's. It flew eastward when flushed.
Ned Boyajian
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
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View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Yesterday's "shutdown"
From: Martha Swan <marthaswan AT starband.net>
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2015 10:51:34 -0600
Missbirders,

There was a temporary technical difficulty yesterday with Freelists,
Missbird's host. If you tried to post a message during that time, you
received a "Delivery Failure" notification with the message "List Shut
Down" among other indecipherable content. Everything appears to be back to
normal now. Sorry for any inconvenience.
Happy New Year!

Martha

-- 
Martha Swan
Toccopola, MS (Pontotoc County)
Subject: Sibley on "Cackling-ish Geese"
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2015 09:45:58 -0600
Missbirders,

This past November I reported four Cackling Geese up at Arkabutla Lake. In
subsequent weeks I saw other geese at the same spot that gave me pause
(short-looking necks, shorter bills, rounder heads, steeper foreheads...),
but ultimately didn't quite register as Cackling Geese. David Sibley
recently posted on his blog about these "Cackling-ish" Canada Geese.

I thought I would share the post here in case others have scrutinized the
similarly puzzling birds.

http://www.sibleyguides.com/2014/12/cackling-ish-geese/#more-12334

Also, here is an older post of his giving a more complete treatment of the
Canada/Cackling problem:


http://www.sibleyguides.com/2007/07/identification-of-cackling-and-canada-goose/ 


Good birding,

JR
Oxford
Subject: Fwd: [TN-Bird] Re: Ivory Gull
From: van harris <shelbyforester1223 AT rittermail.com>
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2015 09:04:55 -0600
FYI

Van Harris
Millington, TN
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Kevin Breault 
Date: Wed, Jan 7, 2015 at 8:56 AM
Subject: [TN-Bird] Re: Ivory Gull
To: "tcbirdwatch AT comcast.net" , TN-Bird Post <
tn-bird AT freelists.org>


 What a question. Of course you should go! If it were me (and I had my
Ivory just after my daughter was born in Chicago in the '90s), I would stop
for the night in Mount Vernon, IL (about half the distance). Several good
hotels are there. Make sure you make preparations re the cold for yourself
and your car. Good luck!
Kevin Breault
Brentwood, TN
 ------------------------------
*From:* tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org [tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org] on
behalf of Tommy Curtis [tcbirdwatch AT comcast.net]
*Sent:* Tuesday, January 06, 2015 7:08 PM
*To:* TN-Bird Post
*Subject:* [TN-Bird] Ivory Gull

   *A birding friend from St. Louis sent us information about an Ivory Gull
being seen on the Mississippi River near Quincy, Illinois.  Just thought
I’d post in case some Tennessee birder wanted to make a drive that far to
see a lifer.  Information is on the Illinois RBA about where it is being
seen today.  We’ve debated all afternoon about driving up tomorrow as we
have never seen this beautiful bird and our hearts say “go” but our old
bodies say “another foolish idea” for two people in their mid-70’s. 
Don’t 

know which will win out tonight.*

*Tommy & Virginia Curtis*
*Smithville, TN*
*DeKalb County*
Subject: test
From: Martha Swan <marthaswan AT starband.net>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2015 21:09:31 -0600
Technical problems with Freelists

-- 
Martha Swan
Toccopola, MS (Pontotoc County)
Subject: Re: "New" abbreviations
From: msw103 AT ra.msstate.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2015 21:51:51 -0600
I agree with Van and Jason's comments.

Mark

Quoting Jason Hoeksema :

> Thanks everyone for the useful info on the 4-letter codes.  I agree with
> Van Harris that good manners calls for typing out the full name of a
> species at least upon the first usage in an e-mail.
>
> I also prefer species names in ALL CAPS when they are in a body of other
> text, so that they are easy to pick out. This practice is a rule on some
> other listservs, and I think it works well, but that is just my personal
> preference.
>
> Jason Hoeksema
> Oxford, MS
>
> On Mon, Jan 5, 2015 at 2:47 PM, Wayne Patterson  wrote:
>
>> Crossley's Field Guide has an index of them, if you'd rather have it in
>> book form.  The guide is pretty useful as well.
>>
>> Wayne Patterson
>> Shannon, MS  Lee Co.
>>
>>
>>   On Monday, January 5, 2015 2:40 PM, JR Rigby  wrote:
>>
>>
>> Hi Jesse,
>>
>> These four letter codes are used by bird banders and often as shorthand
>> among birders. They suffer from being easier to use than to decipher
>> because most of them are constructed in a very regular and easy to remember
>> way (but this often leads to use of incorrect codes where they deviate from
>> the pattern... adding to confusion).
>>
>> The codes and their decoding are available here:
>> http://www.birdpop.org/DownloadDocuments/Alpha_codes_tax.pdf
>> Just use a simple ctrl-f search to find the common name or code of
>> interest.
>>
>> There is also a recent and exhaustive set of commentary about usage of
>> these codes by birders available on the ABA Blog:
>> Rich Wright: http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/the-code.html
>> Derek Lovitch:
>> http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/open-mic-the-deal-with-alpha-codes-part-1.html
>> Derek Lovitch Part II:
>> http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/open-mic-the-deal-with-alpha-codes-part-2.html
>>
>> Hope that helps,
>>
>> JR
>> Oxford
>>
>> On Mon, Jan 5, 2015 at 2:29 PM, Jesse Yancy  wrote:
>>
>> This might sound simplistic, but I?m often confused by the new
>> abbreviations that are often used in this forum (TRKI for tropical
>> kingbird, for instance) and I was wondering if there is some sort of guide
>> to these or are they just ones birders use as shorthand.
>> Jesse Yancy
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>



-- 
Mark S. Woodrey, Ph.D.
Research Coordinator/Research Biologist

Mississippi State University - Coastal Research and Extension Center
Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve
6005 Bayou Heron Road
Moss Point, MS  39562

Phone: 228-475-7047
Mobile: 228-697-0460
E-mail: msw103 AT ra.msstate.edu



IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Re: "New" abbreviations
From: "Jesse Yancy" <jlyancy AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2015 17:09:30 -0600
Thank you all so much. Admittedly, I’m somewhat relieved to discover that I 
am not the only one who considers them somewhat vexing, that they are indeed 
“easier to use than decipher”. 


Jesse Yancy

 

From: Billy Mitchell [mailto:bill.unit AT att.net] 
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2015 3:41 PM
To: hoeksema AT olemiss.edu
Cc: Wayne Patterson; jlyancy AT comcast.net; MISSBIRD
Subject: Re: [missbird] Re: "New" abbreviations

 

And, of course, there's an app for that!  Search for "Bird Codes".

 

B Mitchell

Sent from my iPhone


On Jan 5, 2015, at 3:00 PM, Jason Hoeksema  wrote:

Thanks everyone for the useful info on the 4-letter codes. I agree with Van 
Harris that good manners calls for typing out the full name of a species at 
least upon the first usage in an e-mail. 


I also prefer species names in ALL CAPS when they are in a body of other text, 
so that they are easy to pick out. This practice is a rule on some other 
listservs, and I think it works well, but that is just my personal preference. 


Jason Hoeksema
Oxford, MS

 

On Mon, Jan 5, 2015 at 2:47 PM, Wayne Patterson  wrote:

Crossley's Field Guide has an index of them, if you'd rather have it in book 
form. The guide is pretty useful as well. 


 

Wayne Patterson

Shannon, MS  Lee Co.

 

On Monday, January 5, 2015 2:40 PM, JR Rigby  wrote:

 

Hi Jesse,

 

These four letter codes are used by bird banders and often as shorthand among 
birders. They suffer from being easier to use than to decipher because most of 
them are constructed in a very regular and easy to remember way (but this often 
leads to use of incorrect codes where they deviate from the pattern... adding 
to confusion). 


 

The codes and their decoding are available here: 
http://www.birdpop.org/DownloadDocuments/Alpha_codes_tax.pdf 


Just use a simple ctrl-f search to find the common name or code of interest.

 

There is also a recent and exhaustive set of commentary about usage of these 
codes by birders available on the ABA Blog: 


Rich Wright: http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/the-code.html

Derek Lovitch: 
http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/open-mic-the-deal-with-alpha-codes-part-1.html 


Derek Lovitch Part II: 
http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/open-mic-the-deal-with-alpha-codes-part-2.html 


 

Hope that helps,

 

JR

Oxford

 

On Mon, Jan 5, 2015 at 2:29 PM, Jesse Yancy  wrote:

This might sound simplistic, but I’m often confused by the new abbreviations 
that are often used in this forum (TRKI for tropical kingbird, for instance) 
and I was wondering if there is some sort of guide to these or are they just 
ones birders use as shorthand. 


Jesse Yancy 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: "New" abbreviations
From: Billy Mitchell <bill.unit AT att.net>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2015 15:40:55 -0600
And, of course, there's an app for that!  Search for "Bird Codes".

B Mitchell

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 5, 2015, at 3:00 PM, Jason Hoeksema  wrote:
> 
> Thanks everyone for the useful info on the 4-letter codes. I agree with Van 
Harris that good manners calls for typing out the full name of a species at 
least upon the first usage in an e-mail. 

> 
> I also prefer species names in ALL CAPS when they are in a body of other 
text, so that they are easy to pick out. This practice is a rule on some other 
listservs, and I think it works well, but that is just my personal preference. 

> 
> Jason Hoeksema
> Oxford, MS
> 
>> On Mon, Jan 5, 2015 at 2:47 PM, Wayne Patterson  wrote:
>> Crossley's Field Guide has an index of them, if you'd rather have it in book 
form. The guide is pretty useful as well. 

>> 
>> Wayne Patterson
>> Shannon, MS  Lee Co.
>> 
>> 
>> On Monday, January 5, 2015 2:40 PM, JR Rigby  wrote:
>> 
>> 
>> Hi Jesse,
>> 
>> These four letter codes are used by bird banders and often as shorthand 
among birders. They suffer from being easier to use than to decipher because 
most of them are constructed in a very regular and easy to remember way (but 
this often leads to use of incorrect codes where they deviate from the 
pattern... adding to confusion). 

>> 
>> The codes and their decoding are available here: 
http://www.birdpop.org/DownloadDocuments/Alpha_codes_tax.pdf 

>> Just use a simple ctrl-f search to find the common name or code of interest.
>> 
>> There is also a recent and exhaustive set of commentary about usage of these 
codes by birders available on the ABA Blog: 

>> Rich Wright: http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/the-code.html
>> Derek Lovitch: 
http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/open-mic-the-deal-with-alpha-codes-part-1.html 

>> Derek Lovitch Part II: 
http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/open-mic-the-deal-with-alpha-codes-part-2.html 

>> 
>> Hope that helps,
>> 
>> JR
>> Oxford
>> 
>> On Mon, Jan 5, 2015 at 2:29 PM, Jesse Yancy  wrote:
>> This might sound simplistic, but I’m often confused by the new 
abbreviations that are often used in this forum (TRKI for tropical kingbird, 
for instance) and I was wondering if there is some sort of guide to these or 
are they just ones birders use as shorthand. 

>> Jesse Yancy
>>  
>> 
>> 
>> 
Subject: Re: Christmas Card Bird and other Wildlife list
From: Barbara Qualls <bqualls AT umc.edu>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2015 21:09:55 +0000
What?!?  No partridge in a pear tree?!
Impressive list, otherwise. And a gaggle of good friends and family it sounds 
like. 


Thanks,
Barbara
Jackson, MS
From: missbird-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:missbird-bounce AT freelists.org] On 
Behalf Of van harris 

Sent: Monday, January 05, 2015 2:39 PM
To: tn-birds; missbird; mzsdocents; Lee Gutteridge; adam riley; rick taylor; 
chad brown; margaret; kay owen 

Subject: [missbird] Christmas Card Bird and other Wildlife list

​Dates of observation:  Dec 15 - DEec 28 (approx)

Number in party: 1

Effort: practically none

Weather: who cares!

Equipment:  letter opener, recliner, longnecks


Number of cards: 63

Number of cards illustrated with birds or other wildlife: 58

Bird species #cards #individuals illustrated 


Black-footed Penguin 1 10 

Emporer Penguin 1 1 

penguin sp. 1 4 

flamingo sp. 1 1 

Bald Eagle 1 1 

Marbled Godwit 1 1 

Am Woodcock 1 1 

dove sp 4 4 

Great Horned Owl 2 2 

Snowy Owl 1 1 

0wl sp 2 3 

Downy Woodpecker 2 5 

Red-bellied Woodpecker 1 1 

Blue Jay 2 2 

Black-billed Magpie 1 1 

Red-breasted Nuthatch 2 2 

Winter Wren 2 2 

Golden-crowned Kinglet 1 1 

Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1 1 

Loggerhead Shrike 1 1 

E Bluebird 2 2 

Am Robin 1 1 

Black-capped Chickadee 6 10 

N Cardinal 13 22 

Evening Grosbeak 1 2 

Eur Bulfinch 1 1 

House Finch 1 2 

Am Goldfinch 1 1 



mammal species

Dog 3 4 

Red Fox 2 2 

Wolf 1 1 

Cat 1 1 

Raccoon 1 1 

Polar Bear 4 9 

Black Bear 1 1 

Chipmunk 2 5 

Gray Squirrel 1 1 

Red Squirrel 1 3 

Wood Mouse 1 6 

Rabbit 3 4 

Elephant 1 1 

Horse 2 5 

Donkey 1 1 

White Rhinoceros 1 1 

Dromedary Camel 1 3 

Sheep 2 3 

White-tailed Deer 2 3 

Moose 1 1 

deer sp. 3 3 



amphibian species

Red-eyed Tree Frog 1 1 




Van Harris
Millington, TN, USA






Individuals who have received this information in error or are not authorized 
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information in any way. 
Subject: Re: "New" abbreviations
From: Jason Hoeksema <hoeksema AT olemiss.edu>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2015 15:00:20 -0600
Thanks everyone for the useful info on the 4-letter codes.  I agree with
Van Harris that good manners calls for typing out the full name of a
species at least upon the first usage in an e-mail.

I also prefer species names in ALL CAPS when they are in a body of other
text, so that they are easy to pick out. This practice is a rule on some
other listservs, and I think it works well, but that is just my personal
preference.

Jason Hoeksema
Oxford, MS

On Mon, Jan 5, 2015 at 2:47 PM, Wayne Patterson  wrote:

> Crossley's Field Guide has an index of them, if you'd rather have it in
> book form.  The guide is pretty useful as well.
>
> Wayne Patterson
> Shannon, MS  Lee Co.
>
>
>   On Monday, January 5, 2015 2:40 PM, JR Rigby  wrote:
>
>
> Hi Jesse,
>
> These four letter codes are used by bird banders and often as shorthand
> among birders. They suffer from being easier to use than to decipher
> because most of them are constructed in a very regular and easy to remember
> way (but this often leads to use of incorrect codes where they deviate from
> the pattern... adding to confusion).
>
> The codes and their decoding are available here:
> http://www.birdpop.org/DownloadDocuments/Alpha_codes_tax.pdf
> Just use a simple ctrl-f search to find the common name or code of
> interest.
>
> There is also a recent and exhaustive set of commentary about usage of
> these codes by birders available on the ABA Blog:
> Rich Wright: http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/the-code.html
> Derek Lovitch:
> http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/open-mic-the-deal-with-alpha-codes-part-1.html
> Derek Lovitch Part II:
> http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/open-mic-the-deal-with-alpha-codes-part-2.html
>
> Hope that helps,
>
> JR
> Oxford
>
> On Mon, Jan 5, 2015 at 2:29 PM, Jesse Yancy  wrote:
>
> This might sound simplistic, but I’m often confused by the new
> abbreviations that are often used in this forum (TRKI for tropical
> kingbird, for instance) and I was wondering if there is some sort of guide
> to these or are they just ones birders use as shorthand.
> Jesse Yancy
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: "New" abbreviations
From: Wayne Patterson <wrp6 AT att.net>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2015 12:47:05 -0800
Crossley's Field Guide has an index of them, if you'd rather have it in book 
form. The guide is pretty useful as well. 


Wayne Patterson
Shannon, MS  Lee Co. 


On Monday, January 5, 2015 2:40 PM, JR Rigby  wrote:
  


Hi Jesse,

These four letter codes are used by bird banders and often as shorthand among 
birders. They suffer from being easier to use than to decipher because most of 
them are constructed in a very regular and easy to remember way (but this often 
leads to use of incorrect codes where they deviate from the pattern... adding 
to confusion). 


The codes and their decoding are available here: 
http://www.birdpop.org/DownloadDocuments/Alpha_codes_tax.pdf 

Just use a simple ctrl-f search to find the common name or code of interest.

There is also a recent and exhaustive set of commentary about usage of these 
codes by birders available on the ABA Blog: 

Rich Wright: http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/the-code.html

Derek Lovitch: 
http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/open-mic-the-deal-with-alpha-codes-part-1.html 

Derek Lovitch Part II: 
http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/open-mic-the-deal-with-alpha-codes-part-2.html 


Hope that helps,

JR
Oxford


On Mon, Jan 5, 2015 at 2:29 PM, Jesse Yancy  wrote:

This might sound simplistic, but I’m often confused by the new abbreviations 
that are often used in this forum (TRKI for tropical kingbird, for instance) 
and I was wondering if there is some sort of guide to these or are they just 
ones birders use as shorthand. 

>Jesse Yancy 
> 
Subject: Re: "New" abbreviations
From: msw103 AT ra.msstate.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2015 14:44:54 -0600
Jesse (and others):

Here is a link to a more comprehensive list than that provided by the  
bird banding laboratory (as explained in the introduction to this  
website):

http://www.birdpop.org/alphacodes.htm

Merry birding,

Mark

Quoting Jesse Yancy :

> This might sound simplistic, but I'm often confused by the new abbreviations
> that are often used in this forum (TRKI for tropical kingbird, for instance)
> and I was wondering if there is some sort of guide to these or are they just
> ones birders use as shorthand.
>
> Jesse Yancy
>
>
>
>



-- 
Mark S. Woodrey, Ph.D.
Research Coordinator/Research Biologist

Mississippi State University - Coastal Research and Extension Center
Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve
6005 Bayou Heron Road
Moss Point, MS  39562

Phone: 228-475-7047
Mobile: 228-697-0460
E-mail: msw103 AT ra.msstate.edu



IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

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List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
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Subject: Re: "New" abbreviations
From: van harris <shelbyforester1223 AT rittermail.com>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2015 14:44:25 -0600
When posting bird information on Internet listserves, it is considered good
manners to use the full name of the species the first time that it appears
in the post.  If one wishes to use the name again in that post, it is okay
to use the banding shorthand.  I think so anyway.

Van Harris
Millington, TN

On Mon, Jan 5, 2015 at 2:36 PM, Matt Smith 
wrote:

> Jesse,
>
> The four-letter codes were originally created as shorthand for banders.
> There's a couple of different systems in use, but here's a good source that
> lists the basic rules you can use to figure out the code for probably 99%
> of species:
>
> https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/bandcodes.html
>
> And as for deciphering them, here's a handy alphabetical list:
>
> http://www.birdpop.org/DownloadDocuments/Alpha_codes_eng.pdf
>
> Hope this helps,
> Matt Smith
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jan 5, 2015, at 2:29 PM, "Jesse Yancy"  wrote:
>
> This might sound simplistic, but I’m often confused by the new
> abbreviations that are often used in this forum (TRKI for tropical
> kingbird, for instance) and I was wondering if there is some sort of guide
> to these or are they just ones birders use as shorthand.
>
> Jesse Yancy
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: "New" abbreviations
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2015 14:40:15 -0600
Hi Jesse,

These four letter codes are used by bird banders and often as shorthand
among birders. They suffer from being easier to use than to decipher
because most of them are constructed in a very regular and easy to remember
way (but this often leads to use of incorrect codes where they deviate from
the pattern... adding to confusion).

The codes and their decoding are available here:
http://www.birdpop.org/DownloadDocuments/Alpha_codes_tax.pdf
Just use a simple ctrl-f search to find the common name or code of interest.

There is also a recent and exhaustive set of commentary about usage of
these codes by birders available on the ABA Blog:
Rich Wright: http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/the-code.html
Derek Lovitch:
http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/open-mic-the-deal-with-alpha-codes-part-1.html
Derek Lovitch Part II:
http://blog.aba.org/2014/12/open-mic-the-deal-with-alpha-codes-part-2.html

Hope that helps,

JR
Oxford

On Mon, Jan 5, 2015 at 2:29 PM, Jesse Yancy  wrote:

> This might sound simplistic, but I’m often confused by the new
> abbreviations that are often used in this forum (TRKI for tropical
> kingbird, for instance) and I was wondering if there is some sort of guide
> to these or are they just ones birders use as shorthand.
>
> Jesse Yancy
>
>
>
Subject: Re: "New" abbreviations
From: "Matt Smith" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "mcsmitfl@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2015 14:36:24 -0600
Jesse,

The four-letter codes were originally created as shorthand for banders. There's 
a couple of different systems in use, but here's a good source that lists the 
basic rules you can use to figure out the code for probably 99% of species: 


https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/bandcodes.html

And as for deciphering them, here's a handy alphabetical list:

http://www.birdpop.org/DownloadDocuments/Alpha_codes_eng.pdf

Hope this helps,
Matt Smith

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 5, 2015, at 2:29 PM, "Jesse Yancy"  wrote:
> 
> This might sound simplistic, but I’m often confused by the new 
abbreviations that are often used in this forum (TRKI for tropical kingbird, 
for instance) and I was wondering if there is some sort of guide to these or 
are they just ones birders use as shorthand. 

> Jesse Yancy
>  
Subject: "New" abbreviations
From: "Jesse Yancy" <jlyancy AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2015 14:29:58 -0600
This might sound simplistic, but I'm often confused by the new abbreviations
that are often used in this forum (TRKI for tropical kingbird, for instance)
and I was wondering if there is some sort of guide to these or are they just
ones birders use as shorthand. 

Jesse Yancy 

 
Subject: Say's Phoebe/Oktibbeha Co.,MS/Monday 5 Jan.
From: "Schiefer, Terence" <TSchiefer AT entomology.msstate.edu>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2015 19:56:17 +0000
MISSBIRDers:

The SAY'S PHOEBE continues at the Mississippi State University South Farm as of 
today, Monday, 5 January. Today it was a few fence lines to the north of where 
it had been seen in the past, on a fence line running east from West Line Road 
(the one with the standing dead tree trunk just south of the fence) about half 
way between the Beef Unit Building and the bend in the road by the Horse Park. 
The wind and sun have given the roads at South Farm a chance to dry out, so 
there should not be a problem with muddy roads. 


The two female COMMON MERGANSERS continue at Oktibbeha County Lake. They are 
most often seen in the arm of the lake between the campground and Harrell Road. 


Terry


Terence Lee Schiefer
Mississippi Entomological Museum
Box 9775
Mississippi State, MS 39762-9775
ph: 662-325-2989 (W); 662-324-3748 (H)
FAX: 662-325-8837
email: 
tschiefer AT entomology.msstate.edu 
Subject: Tropical Kingbird
From: Ned and Lucy Boyajian <nedlucyboyajian AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2015 14:30:52 -0600
To All
The TRKI was still present today, 12:35 PM, corner of Locust and Jordan 
River Drive, Bay St Louis.
Ned Boyajian
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Subject: Say's Phoebe still present
From: "Schiefer, Terence" <TSchiefer AT entomology.msstate.edu>
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2015 22:46:54 +0000
The Say's Phoebe at the Mississippi State University South Farm was still 
present this morning, Saturday, 3 January. A photo of the bird is attached. 
With the recent rains, the roads have become very muddy with some of the worst 
areas being in the area where the Phoebe is being seen. Hopefully things will 
dry out some by the time the gate is open on Monday. Be careful not to get 
stuck! Directions to the area where the Say's Phoebe is being seen: From Hwy. 
12 in Starkville, go south on Spring Street which becomes Blackjack Road. Turn 
right onto Stone Blvd. which will become a gravel road at the entrance gate to 
the South Farm where it becomes South Farm Road. Take the second right onto 
West Line Road. The road curves south, then continues straight south until it 
makes a hard left just before the Mississippi Horse Park and Agricultural 
Center. The Phoebe has been seen in the fields to the right (west) of the road 
just before the bend and along the road just past the bend adjacent to the 
Horse Park. Continuing past the bend there is a road intersecting from the 
left. This is a good spot to turn around, since you will need to exit the same 
way you came in. However, the Phoebe has also been seen beyond the road to the 
left near where the road goes down a hill and curves back to the north. The 
bird is seen foraging from the fences, often with a flock of Bluebirds nearby. 
There is a Cooper's Hawk, Merlin, and several Kestrels in the area, so 
hopefully our bird will not be unlucky. 




Terry Schiefer

Starkville
Subject: Re: vermilion flycatacher
From: msw103 AT ra.msstate.edu
Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2015 22:09:47 -0600
Justin:

Very nice picture.  Where exactly in Lucedale did you see this bird?   
I am sure there are others who would like to make a trip to check this  
one out.... Including me.

Merry Birding,

Mark

Quoting justin evans :

> Saw this bird today in Lucedale.  Sorry the quality isn't better.   
> Though some might enjoy this show-off.(This is my first post here.   
> Hope I haven't broken protocol.)
> JEvans



-- 
Mark S. Woodrey, Ph.D.
Research Coordinator/Research Biologist

Mississippi State University - Coastal Research and Extension Center
Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve
6005 Bayou Heron Road
Moss Point, MS  39562

Phone: 228-475-7047
Mobile: 228-697-0460
E-mail: msw103 AT ra.msstate.edu



IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

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List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
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Subject: Re: vermilion flycatacher
From: justin evans <jde124 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2015 01:12:52 +0000
Saw this bird today in Lucedale. Sorry the quality isn't better. Though some 
might enjoy this show-off.(This is my first post here. Hope I haven't broken 
protocol.) 

JEvans 		 	   		  
Subject: Say's Phoebe
From: "Jeffrey W. Harris" <jwharris30 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2015 17:03:30 -0600
Hello Birders,

Terry and Marion Schiefer and I saw the bird again today in the rain.  I
had some crude photos from a video taken in the rain.  The bird was where
Terry had described in his previous email yesterday.  Photos with my ebird
list at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21147812

Sincerely,

Jeff Harris
Subject: Say's Phoebe/Oktibbeha Co.,MS
From: "Schiefer, Terence" <TSchiefer AT entomology.msstate.edu>
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2015 03:13:39 +0000
MISSBIRDers:



Marion and I found a Say's Phoebe at the Mississippi State University South 
Farm, Oktibbeha County, Mississippi today, Thursday, 1 January. The bird was 
near the southwest corner of the South Farm on the road north of the horse 
park/Mississippi Agricultural Center (There is a large white tank near the 
spot) . The South Farm is accessed from the south end of Stone Blvd. The bird 
was foraging from the fence along the north edge of the road. The South Farm is 
closed over the University holiday and on weekends, and is open weekdays 8:00 
AM to 5:00 PM (I'm not certain of opening time - it is possibly earlier). The 
farm should be open on Monday when the University is back in session. Hopefully 
the bird will hang around for others to see. 




Terry Schiefer

Starkville
Subject: Arkabutla Lake Christmas Bird Count.
From: van harris <shelbyforester1223 AT rittermail.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2015 15:32:06 -0600
​The Arkabutla Lake Christmas Bird Count was held on Tuesday, December 30,
2014.  Observers were Van Harris (compiler), Lisa Jorgensen, Dick Preston,
Rob Harbin, Jay Walko, Dan Twedt and Judy Dorsey.

Time was 6:15 am until 5 pm.  Temperatures were 34-46 F.  Sunny and windy.

Auto hours - 16.5
Auto miles - 228
Foot miles - 9
Foot hours - 20

Owling - 1.5 hours



Gr White-fronted Goose - 1335
Snow Goose - 48,500
Ross' Goose - 265
Canada Goose - 197
Gadwall - 55
Mallard - 265
N Shoveler - 153
N Pintail - 378
Green-winged Teal - 12
Canvasback - 1
Redhead - 1
Ring-necked Duck - 32
Lesser Scaup - 51
Bufflehead - 77
Com Goldeneye - 2
Hooded Marganser - 149
Ruddy Duck - 25
Wild Turkey - 1
Pied-billed Grebe - 27
Horned Grebe - 3
Am White Pelican - 268
Great Blue Heron - 68
Black Vulture - 138
Turkey Vulture - 58
N Harrier - 29
Cooper's Hawk - 2
Bald Eagle - 4
Red-shouldered Hawk - 5
Red-tailed Hawk - 48
Sandhill Crane - 4
Killdeer - 363
Gr Yellowlegs - 23
Lesser Yellowlegs - 47
Least Sandpiper - 18
Wilson's Snipe - 20
Bonaparte's Gull - 502
Ring-billed Gull - 7122
Herring Gull - 36
Lesser Black-backed Gull - 1
Forster's Tern - 1
Rock Pigeon - 95
Mourning Dove - 99
Great Horned Owl - 1
Barred Owl - 1
Belted Kingfisher - 4
Red-headed Woodpecker - 21
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 62
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 18
Downy Woodpecker - 14
N Flicker - 21
Pileated Woodpecker - 3
Am Kestrel - 11
E Phoebe - 7
Loggerhead Shrike - 7
Blue Jay - 52
Am Crow - 124
Horned Lark - 118
Carolina Chickadee - 31
Tufted Titmouse - 42
White-breasted Nuthatch - 7
Brown Creeper - 2
Winter Wren - 2
Carolina Wren - 53
Golden-crowned Kinglet - 7
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 10
E Bluebird - 97
Hermit Thrush - 2
Am Robin - 68
Brown Thrasher - 2
N Mockingbird - 29
Eur Starling - 792
Am Pipit - 2
Cedar Waxwing - 15
Lapland Longspur - 100
Pine Warbler - 14
Yellow-rumped Warbler - 24
E Towhee - 13
Chipping Sparrow - 33
Field Sparrow - 18
Vesper Sparrow - 2
Savannah Sparrow - 66
Fox Sparrow - 6
Song Sparrow - 31
Swamp Sparrow - 10
White-throated Sparrow - 296
White-crowned Sparrow - 6
Dark-eyed Junco - 150
N Cardinal - 219
Red-winged Blackbird - 747
E Meadowlark - 166
Brewer's Blackbird - 200
Com Grackle - 733
Brown-headed Cowbird - 25
House Finch - 51
Purple Finch - 24
Pine Siskin - 3
Am Goldfinch - 37
House Sparrow - 97


Total species - 98    (24 year average - 96)

New to count - Lesser Black-backed Gull
New high count - Brewer's Blackbird, Black Vulture (tie), Lesser Yellowlegs
(tie),Herring Gull (tie), Rock Pigeon (tie)

Notable misses - Wood Duck, Hairy Woodpecker, Am Coot
New low count - Song Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow


Van Harris
Millington, TN
Subject: RESULTS: JACKSON CBC DEC 27, 2014
From: M P STEVENS <stevenswaterbird AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2014 19:15:22 -0800
Jackson Audubon CBC ends day with
102 species.
The 49th(1965-2014) Jackson
Audubon CBC (115thAnnual Audubon Christmas Bird Count) was held
Saturday, Dec 28, 2014 around the Ross Barnett Rez. We had 23 participants in 8 
parties counting. 

A “Big Thank You” to all who counted even as the weather promised to be 
grim 

and messy with 100% chance of rain predicted. Luckily the weather held and the
rain poured in at about 5pm dark. The weather was not great for birding with
cloudy overcast skies but the temps were mild ranging from 54 to 65 with no
wind.  
At
the Tally Up Supper held at Pullen Watson’s house we tallied 102 species. 
Most 

duck numbers were very low except we had 1,831 Hooded Mergansers, as well as
low numbers for quite a few other species. 
Highlights:
1 White-winged Dove (new to the
count) 
5 Adult Bald Eagles plus at least 1
baby in nest. 
3 Coopers Hawks
1 Krider’s Red-tail Hawk plus 14
Red-tails 
1 Caspian Tern (3rdtime
on count) 
1 White-crowned Sparrow 
20 Brewer’s Blackbirds
6 Purple Finch 
High Counts: 
6 Virginia Rail (previous high count
2)
84 Collared Doves
97 Red-bellied Woodpeckers
10 Marsh Wrens
13 Common Yellowthroat  (same high count as in 1975)
1,769 Rusty Blackbirds
Low Counts: 
1 Fish Crow (average about 20)
1 Hermit Thrush 
1 Field Sparrow 
13 Savannah Sparrow (lower than
average)
Big Misses: 
Eastern Screech-Owl 
Great Horned Owl 
American Pipit
Redhead (count week)
American Wigeon (cw)
Northern Pintail (cw)
Wilson’s Snipe (cw) (135) by Andrew
Whitehurst by boat 
 
2014 Jackson CBC
Participants: Cyndy Mitchell, John Bonelli, Rose
Bonelli, Marcus, Daniele & Dominico Tellkamp, Chris King, Mary Stripling, Bill
Stripling, Jane Wasser, Rynetta Coetzee, Pullen Watkins, Billy Mitchell, 
Michelle 

Williams, Lisa Pelletier, Louise Partridge, Reese Partridge, Sarah Lea Anglin,
Dale Anglin, Bebe Wolfe, Dave King, Jack Herring, Chris Carey, Andrew
Whitehurst and Andrew Whitehurst Jr.  
 
Num. Species Reported last 10 years.  
Year 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 
Species  102 91 100 109 96 103 104 108 103 104 


Mary Stripling
Vice President/Membership Chair
Jackson Audubon Society
675 Lakewood Road
Vicksburg, MS 39180
Cell: 601-832-6788
Subject: Re: Hawk
From: "Jeffrey W. Harris" <jwharris30 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2014 18:05:01 -0600
Dear Jeffrey,

I saw the same bird while traveling north today.  I could not stop, but I
also thought that it was NOT a Red-tailed.  The head seemed very white with
some brown streaks.  It also seemed to have a slimmer profile than typical
of Red-tails.  I also think the legs were feather white to the talons.  I
will try to find and photo it tomorrow.

Sincerely,

Jeff Harris

On Wednesday, December 31, 2014, Jeffrey Pilgrim <
dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> wrote:

>
> I'm currently driving down 45 south and I'm pretty positive I spotted a
> rough legged hawk about five minutes before seeing the Houston Aberdeen
> sign. It could have been a white morph red tail but his head white with
> some brown. He also had some white on his back and wings. Beautiful hawk t
> regardless. I hope someone is able to make a more positive ID.
>
> Jeffrey *Pilgrim*
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
> 
>
Subject: Hawk
From: "Jeffrey Pilgrim" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "pilgrimjeffrey@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2014 08:56:17 -0800
I'm currently driving down 45 south and I'm pretty positive I spotted a rough 
legged hawk about five minutes before seeing the Houston Aberdeen sign. It 
could have been a white morph red tail but his head white with some brown. He 
also had some white on his back and wings. Beautiful hawk t regardless. I hope 
someone is able to make a more positive ID. 


Jeffrey Pilgrim

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
Subject: Tropical Kingbird/Hancock Co., MS/Tuesday, 30 Dec.
From: "Schiefer, Terence" <TSchiefer AT entomology.msstate.edu>
Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2014 04:00:07 +0000
MISSBIRDers:



Marion and I traveled to Bay Saint Louis today, Tuesday, 30 December, to search 
for the Tropical Kingbird. We found it shortly after arriving about 12:30 PM on 
Locust Lane, about half way between Jordan River Drive and Apple Avenue. The 
bird flew off after about ten minutes, and we lost track of it. We relocated 
the bird about 2:00 PM on Jordan River Drive and watched it off and on until 
3:30. Most of this time it was along Jordan River Drive, from the bend west of 
Locust Lane to just east of Cherry Lane. On one occasion it flew to the south 
into a small grove of Chinese tallow trees on the north side of Bay Cove Drive. 
The day was cold, overcast, and with a strong north wind, so the areas along 
Jordan River Drive may have offered some protection from the wind. We only 
heard the bird call once. We observed the bird flycatching for insects and 
feeding on the fruit of Chinese tallow trees. 




Terry Schiefer

Starkville
Subject: Re: tropical kingbird seen today
From: Marion Schiefer <marion_schiefer AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2014 17:41:44 -0600
Terry and I saw the tropical kingbird this afternoon in same areas as 
previously posted. Terry will post more details later. 


Marion Schiefer
Starkville

Date: Mon, 29 Dec 2014 09:31:38 -0600
Subject: [missbird] Kingbird
From: randyp AT hghhardware.com
To: missbird AT freelists.org

Ken Hackman and I found the Kingbird this morning (9:30 a.m.) at the corner of 
Locust Lane and Jourdan River Drive. 

 		 	   		  
Subject: Rusty Blackbirds
From: Dianne Patterson <hummers2 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2014 11:25:18 -0600
This morning in Clay county we saw a flock of about 200 Rusty Blackbirds in the 
area of Hazelwood Rd and Old Payne Rd. 


Merlin had a Red Wing Blackbird for breakfast at the corner of Judge Thomas Rd. 
and Barton Ferry Rd. 


Happy New Year!
Dianne & Jim Patterson

Sent from Dianne PattersonIMPORTANT ADDRESSES

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Subject: Hawk, id requested.
From: "Larry Smith" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "jlarrysmooth@aol.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2014 11:14:31 -0500
 This bird found dead in Hattiesburg area 3-4 days ago.? Photos taken on bed of 
pickup truck.? Note tip of humanoid digit in one of the photos for size 
comparison.? Cooper's vs Sharpie???? 

  ?
  Larry The Ancient
  (Jim Puckett:? do you want me to give you credit for the photos?)?
    
     
      
     
  
Subject: Tropical Kingbird update - photos and audio
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Dec 2014 10:01:01 -0600
Missbirders,

Jason Hoeksema, Mark Dolan, and I made the trip down to Bay St. Louis from
Oxford to see the Tropical Kingbird yesterday. Thanks to Michael Sandoz,
Susan Epps, and Jay Cliburn for their assistance staking out the bird. When
we arrived in the area at 10:30am the bird was initially sallying from
snags along Apple Ave before moving west and then north along Locust Ln.
After a couple of brief stints out of sight, the bird became increasingly
obliging for viewers near the house at the end of Locust Lane where we
watched the bird for about 45 minutes. The bird was initially unresponsive
to conservative use of playback but later responded briefly to a playback
attempt. As we were leaving the bird became very vocal for about five
minutes providing ample opportunity for good recordings.

Jason Hoeksema got some great photos:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/j_hoeksema

While Jason was getting photos I was recording audio for MMNS. I've posted
a 30 sec clip here: https://flic.kr/p/qigYEj

We were very lucky with the weather as conditions were partly sunny (and a
balmy 70 F) around the TRKI spot while dense fog enveloped areas further
east. We stopped for a great walk at a fog-enveloped Graveline Beach so I
could get my Ammodramus fix before the long ride home. Among the multitude
of Sedge Wrens, we had a handful of Seaside Sparrows and had a tolerant and
very photogenic Nelson's Sparrow foraging around a flock of Dunlin.
https://flic.kr/p/qibQZN (multiple photos)

Ammodramus, shorebirds, and a first state record make for a really good
chase!

Good birding,

JR
Oxford
Subject: Kingbird
From: Randy Palmer <randyp AT hghhardware.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Dec 2014 09:31:38 -0600
Ken Hackman and I found the Kingbird this morning (9:30 a.m.) at the corner
of Locust Lane and Jourdan River Drive.
Subject: Tropical Kingsbird sighting?
From: Randy Palmer <randyp AT hghhardware.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Dec 2014 09:13:39 -0600
Im in area of last sighting of Kingbird. Has anybody seen it today?
Subject: Re: White dove, I think
From: Rynetta Coetzee <rynetta.coetzee AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2014 13:12:09 -0600
Yes it was a white dove. They specially breed white doves to release at
weddings which is a very bad thing. People don't  realize and obviously
don't care that these doves are not wild and can't care for themselves once
released. Being pure white, they become easy targets for raptors and being
totally ignorant about life outside of a cage, they will easily be hit by
moving traffic as what happened to the one I hit with my car. It was
definitely the same dove as it was close to Walmart on Lakeland Drive.

Rynetta

On Sun, Dec 28, 2014 at 11:06 AM, Dance, Gayla  wrote:

> Oh, no!   Did it look like a dove to you?
>
> Gayla
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Dec 28, 2014, at 8:05 AM, Rynetta Coetzee  > wrote:
>
> I saw the bird yesterday when it collided with my car's windscreen on my
> way home after the CBC. I could not stop to see what happened with it after
> the collision.
>
> Rynetta Coetzee
> Jackson, MS
>
>
> On Fri, Dec 26, 2014 at 1:10 PM, Dance, Gayla  > wrote:
> Brandon reservoir folks,
>
> Is anyone else seeing the blindingly white dove who is hanging out on
> Lakeland near Walmart?   I have seen him/her several times now. Wedding
> escapee?
>
> Gayla Dance
> Brandon side of reservoir.
>
>
> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
>
> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
> Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org missbird-request AT freelists.org>
> View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Tropical Kingbird located again
From: Jason Hoeksema <jason.hoeksema AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2014 11:04:14 -0600
Right now the bird is at the north end of Locust Lane on private property but 
intermittently visible from public property on Locust Lane. 

Jason Hoeksema (with JR Rigby and Mark Dolan)


Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 28, 2014, at 10:31 AM, Sharon Milligan <2sharon123 AT gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> This morning, Don McKee and Charley Delmas relocated the Tropical Kingbird at 
the corner of Apple and Cherry in Bay St Louis. 

> Posting for them......
> Sharon Milligan
> Biloxi​
Subject: Tropical Kingbird located again
From: Sharon Milligan <2sharon123 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2014 10:31:25 -0600
This morning, Don McKee and Charley Delmas relocated the Tropical Kingbird
at the corner of Apple and Cherry in Bay St Louis.
Posting for them......
Sharon Milligan
Biloxi​
Subject: Re: Tropical Kingbird
From: msw103 AT ra.msstate.edu
Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2014 18:29:03 -0600
Folks:

In addition to find the TRKI in the 'usual' location, I checked for  
the Long-tailed Duck on Bayou Caddy but did not find the bird.  I  
spent about 45 minutes in the area looking but only saw the expected  
characters - DCCOs, LAGUs, BRPEs, RBMEs, HOMEs, and BUFFs.

Merry Birding

Mark

Quoting Ned and Lucy Boyajian :

> To all:
> I have received a message that the TRKI was seen again this A.M. December 27.
> Ned Boyajian
> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
>
> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
> Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
> View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/
>
>
>



-- 
Mark S. Woodrey, Ph.D.
Research Coordinator/Research Biologist

Mississippi State University - Coastal Research and Extension Center
Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve
6005 Bayou Heron Road
Moss Point, MS  39562

Phone: 228-475-7047
Mobile: 228-697-0460
E-mail: msw103 AT ra.msstate.edu



IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Tropical Kingbird 12/26
From: "Martha E. Swan" <ulswan AT olemiss.edu>
Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2014 21:44:01 +0000
Missbirders,
I'm posting this report for a non-subscriber:

My parents and I tried for the Tropical Kingbird in Bay St Louis today. We
arrived at the spot around 10:30 with no success (we ran into other people
who had canvassed the area for an hour and hadn't seen the bird). After
birding around the coast for awhile, we decided to re-check the area just
before 2pm. We pulled in and immediately spotted the bird hunting from the
tops of trees and the dead end sign on Locust Ln. After about 10 minutes
the bird flew and perched on the power line by the Jourdan River/Bay Cove
intersection before flying East along the canal.

Will Lewis


Martha Swan
Toccopola, MS



IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

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List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
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Subject: Tropical Kingbird
From: Ned and Lucy Boyajian <nedlucyboyajian AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2014 12:36:33 -0600
To all:
I have received a message that the TRKI was seen again this A.M. 
December 27.
Ned Boyajian
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Bay Springs Lake Tishomingo County in NE Mississippi
From: Wayne Patterson <wrp6 AT att.net>
Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2014 18:22:21 -0800
Missbirders,

This morning, ahead of this weekends rain, I traveled up to see if any Loons 
were present and I was not disappointed. At Cotton Springs Boat Ramp there was 
a Red-throated, Pacific, and five Common Loons. At McDougal Boat Ramp there was 
a concentration of Loons with a single Red-throated and 69 Common Loons. I was 
also privy to watching two adult Bald Eagles double team a female Gadwall. I 
would say there were 25+ loons in this small area and the single duck. The 
Eagles would circle and make a run for the duck. Occasionally a loon would go 
under but for the most part they just watched the drama with me. The duck would 
go under and resurface and this went on for what seemed like five minutes and I 
believe the eagles were wearing the duck down. Fortunately for the duck two 
fishing boats launched from McDougal and made their way into the area while at 
the same time a barge was coming close spooking the eagles and saving the day 
for the duck. 


Here is a link to a distant photo of the Pacific Loon. This is an adult with a 
very dark back and you if you look close you can see the dark outline of the 
chin strap. 

http://www.pbase.com/image/158640001

Wayne Patterson
Shannon, MS Lee Co.
Subject: Sandhill Cranes
From: Robert Briscoe <rbriscoe2012 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2014 18:45:45 -0600
There were 650 Sandhill Cranes north of Ballentine Road and west of Sandbed 
Road in Panola County at 3:50 PM today. 

Robert Briscoe
53 CR 327
Oxford Ms
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Tropical Kingbird update?
From: "Anholt, Allison" <aanholt AT audubon.org>
Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2014 21:47:48 +0000
All-

The kingbird was in the same location on Jordan River Drive as of 12/24. Hope 
that info helps! 


Allison Anholt

________________________________________
From: missbird-bounce AT freelists.org  on behalf 
of J.R.Rigby  

Sent: Friday, December 26, 2014 2:22:31 PM
To: MISSBIRD
Subject: [missbird] Tropical Kingbird update?

Please post any current info on the continuation of the Tropical Kingbird to 
missbird. A few of us away from the coast hope to try for it this weekend. 


JRIMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/



IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
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View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: T. Kingbird
From: jay morris <falconsgrip6 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2014 14:27:30 -0600
Several of us are meeting at the old Kmart parking  lot at hwy 90 and 603
in bay st Louis tomorrow morning(saturday)between 8 and 830 if any of you
folks would  like to join us.  Call 2282365240 for any questions.

J. Morris
Subject: Tropical Kingbird update?
From: "J.R.Rigby" <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2014 14:22:31 -0600
Please post any current info on the continuation of the Tropical Kingbird to 
missbird. A few of us away from the coast hope to try for it this weekend. 


JRIMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: White dove, I think
From: "Dance, Gayla" <dancegf AT millsaps.edu>
Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2014 19:10:24 +0000
Brandon reservoir folks,

Is anyone else seeing the blindingly white dove who is hanging out on Lakeland 
near Walmart? I have seen him/her several times now. Wedding escapee? 


Gayla Dance
Brandon side of reservoir.  


IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Long-tailed Duck
From: msw103 AT ra.msstate.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Dec 2014 12:58:37 -0600
Hi Folks:

Although not nearly as significant a find at Nancy and Libby's  
Tropical Kingbird, our boat crew (Allison Anholt, Jared Feura, and I)  
found a Long-tailed duck that should "seeable" from the shore.  Note  
that the bird has not been seen, nor looked for as far as I know,  
since this past Tuesday's count.  Below are directions and a Google  
Earth image to help you locate the bird.  If you have any questions,  
please feel free to e-mail or call me on my cellphone (228-697-0460).   
Good luck finding this bird- a good one to chase after looking at the  
Tropical Kingbird.

Merry Birding,

Mark

DIRECTIONS:

We found this bird swimming around in the harbor/dock area at the  
south end of Ann Street, which is located just west of the Silver  
Slipper Casino. You will need to access Ann Street off of Lakeshore  
Drive in Hancock County. I have also attached a Google Earth Image  
showing the exact location of the harbor area.  We watched the bird  
swimming in and around the docks as well as out in Bayou Caddy.   
Should be easily seen from the docks with some patience if the bird is  
still in the area.


-- 
Mark S. Woodrey, Ph.D.
Research Coordinator/Research Biologist

Mississippi State University - Coastal Research and Extension Center
Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve
6005 Bayou Heron Road
Moss Point, MS  39562

Phone: 228-475-7047
Mobile: 228-697-0460
E-mail: msw103 AT ra.msstate.edu

Subject: Re: Harlans, I think
From: "Johnson, Erik" <ejohnson AT audubon.org>
Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2014 17:48:07 +0000
The last photo (011) shows pretty narrow barring in the tail and some rufous 
tones in the upperparts - both good marks for "Krider's" over "Harlan's". But 
the patagial marking is pretty broad and dark. Here in LA we see a lot of birds 
that aren't classic easterns, but rather cline into "Fuertes'" and "Krider's" 
types, with the palest "Krider's" being an extreme along this cline. In any 
case, I don't anything points to this bird being a "Harlan's", but I'm forever 
uncertain what is the hard line for what makes a "Krider's". Certainly, the 
pale head AND pale tail are unlike what we could consider classic eastern or 
"Fuertes'" types. 


Erik Johnson
S Lafayette, LA
Ejohnson AT Audubon.org



From: missbird-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:missbird-bounce AT freelists.org] On 
Behalf Of William Mitchell 

Sent: Wednesday, December 24, 2014 10:31 AM
To: JR Rigby
Cc: MISSBIRD
Subject: [missbird] Re: Harlans, I think

I did read the article you suggested and didn't get much more convinced of 
either, but I knew I could get a consensus by posting the photos! Thanks 
everyone! 


Billy Mitchell

On Wednesday, December 24, 2014 9:50 AM, JR Rigby 
> wrote: 


Also, I didn't mean to imply that it's obvious this is a Krider's which can be 
very similar to Harlan's light morph. Slight buffy tones underneath (rather 
than perfectly white for Harlan's), very pale upperwing coverts, and banding on 
the remiges indicate Krider's. But the markings underneath are also on the 
heavy end for Krider's. 


JR

On Wed, Dec 24, 2014 at 9:36 AM, JR Rigby 
> wrote: 

That's a beautiful Krider's. Nice find and photos. There's a nice ABA pub by 
Jerry Liguori and Brian Sullivan on this subspecies available here: 
https://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p38.pdf 


JR

On Wed, Dec 24, 2014 at 9:28 AM, Frank Hensley 
> wrote: 

I'm more inclined to call it a juvenile Krider's. In my Sibley guide the 
Harlan's always have darker heads and the Krider's have heads that are much 
whiter. But I don't claim any expertise so I'm eager to hear other opinions and 
interpretations. 


On Wednesday, December 24, 2014 4:59 AM, William Mitchell 
> wrote: 


This hawk was along the Galleria Parkway north of Madison for the past two 
days. After considerable reading on the web, I'm thinking Harlan's white morph? 


Billy Mitchell
Pelahatchie Bay

Subject: Re: Harlans, I think
From: William Mitchell <bill.unit AT att.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2014 08:30:47 -0800
I did read the article you suggested and didn't get much more convinced of 
either, but I knew I could get a consensus by posting the photos! Thanks 
everyone! 


Billy Mitchell 


On Wednesday, December 24, 2014 9:50 AM, JR Rigby  wrote:
  


Also, I didn't mean to imply that it's obvious this is a Krider's which can be 
very similar to Harlan's light morph. Slight buffy tones underneath (rather 
than perfectly white for Harlan's), very pale upperwing coverts, and banding on 
the remiges indicate Krider's. But the markings underneath are also on the 
heavy end for Krider's. 


JR


On Wed, Dec 24, 2014 at 9:36 AM, JR Rigby  wrote:
That's a beautiful Krider's. Nice find and photos. There's a nice ABA pub by 
Jerry Liguori and Brian Sullivan on this subspecies available here: 
https://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p38.pdf 

>
>
>JR
>
>
>On Wed, Dec 24, 2014 at 9:28 AM, Frank Hensley  
wrote: 

>I'm more inclined to call it a juvenile Krider's. In my Sibley guide the 
Harlan's always have darker heads and the Krider's have heads that are much 
whiter. But I don't claim any expertise so I'm eager to hear other opinions and 
interpretations. 

>>
>>
>>
>>On Wednesday, December 24, 2014 4:59 AM, William Mitchell  
wrote: 

>>  
>>
>>
>>This hawk was along the Galleria Parkway north of Madison for the past two 
days. After considerable reading on the web, I'm thinking Harlan's white morph? 

>>
>>
>>Billy Mitchell
>>Pelahatchie Bay
>>
>>     
Subject: Re: Harlans, I think
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2014 09:50:13 -0600
Also, I didn't mean to imply that it's obvious this is a Krider's which can
be *very* similar to Harlan's light morph. Slight buffy tones underneath
(rather than perfectly white for Harlan's), very pale upperwing coverts,
and banding on the remiges indicate Krider's. But the markings underneath
are also on the heavy end for Krider's.

JR

On Wed, Dec 24, 2014 at 9:36 AM, JR Rigby  wrote:
>
> That's a beautiful Krider's. Nice find and photos. There's a nice ABA pub
> by Jerry Liguori and Brian Sullivan on this subspecies available here:
> https://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p38.pdf
>
> JR
>
> On Wed, Dec 24, 2014 at 9:28 AM, Frank Hensley <
> dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> wrote:
>>
>> I'm more inclined to call it a juvenile Krider's.  In my Sibley guide the
>> Harlan's always have darker heads and the Krider's have heads that are much
>> whiter. But I don't claim any expertise so I'm eager to hear other opinions
>> and interpretations.
>>
>>
>>   On Wednesday, December 24, 2014 4:59 AM, William Mitchell <
>> bill.unit AT att.net> wrote:
>>
>>
>> This hawk was along the Galleria Parkway north of Madison for the past
>> two days. After considerable reading on the web, I'm thinking Harlan's
>> white morph?
>>
>> Billy Mitchell
>> Pelahatchie Bay
>>
>>
>>
Subject: Re: Harlans, I think
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2014 09:36:44 -0600
That's a beautiful Krider's. Nice find and photos. There's a nice ABA pub
by Jerry Liguori and Brian Sullivan on this subspecies available here:
https://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p38.pdf

JR

On Wed, Dec 24, 2014 at 9:28 AM, Frank Hensley 
wrote:
>
> I'm more inclined to call it a juvenile Krider's.  In my Sibley guide the
> Harlan's always have darker heads and the Krider's have heads that are much
> whiter. But I don't claim any expertise so I'm eager to hear other opinions
> and interpretations.
>
>
>   On Wednesday, December 24, 2014 4:59 AM, William Mitchell <
> bill.unit AT att.net> wrote:
>
>
> This hawk was along the Galleria Parkway north of Madison for the past two
> days. After considerable reading on the web, I'm thinking Harlan's white
> morph?
>
> Billy Mitchell
> Pelahatchie Bay
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Harlans, I think
From: "Frank Hensley" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "dr_frank_hensley@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2014 15:28:39 +0000 (UTC)
I'm more inclined to call it a juvenile Krider's.  In my Sibley guide the 
Harlan's always have darker heads and the Krider's have heads that are much 
whiter. But I don't claim any expertise so I'm eager to hear other opinions and 
interpretations. 


 On Wednesday, December 24, 2014 4:59 AM, William Mitchell  
wrote: 

   

 This hawk was along the Galleria Parkway north of Madison for the past two 
days. After considerable reading on the web, I'm thinking Harlan's white morph? 

Billy MitchellPelahatchie Bay