Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
Mississippi Birding List

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Friday, August 22 at 05:44 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Forest Falcon,©Dan Lane

22 Aug Spotted Sandpiper ["Larry Pace" ]
22 Aug Tunica County Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Lark Sparrows, leucistic Wood Stork [Jason Hoeksema ]
21 Aug Optics for the Tropics ["Martha E. Swan" ]
19 Aug Lighting Birds in Mid-Air ["" ]
18 Aug St. Catherine Creek NWR and Leflore Co. shorebirds [Jason Hoeksema ]
17 Aug GBBG [Ned and Lucy Boyajian ]
17 Aug Canada Warbler in Livingston Parish ["" ]
14 Aug Black-throated Green Warblers-Knight's Yard [Gene Knight ]
13 Aug FW: Tern??? ["David King" ]
12 Aug Tern??? ["Larry Pace" ]
12 Aug Ants in Thrasher Nest [JR Rigby ]
12 Aug House Wren - Oxford [JR Rigby ]
11 Aug Spoonbills at Dutch Brake [Gene Knight ]
10 Aug Avocets and Spoonbills [Gene Knight ]
10 Aug Gum Pond Rd - Shorebirds and Terns [JR Rigby ]
7 Aug Tunica Co. Shorebids ["" ]
7 Aug Summer bird record reminder ["Schiefer, Terence" ]
7 Aug FW: Please report banded Piping Plovers [Nick Winstead ]
06 Aug Upland Sandpiper-A&D Turf Farm [Gene Knight ]
6 Aug Re: Sandpipers [Jason Hoeksema ]
5 Aug Sandpipers ["Larry Pace" ]
5 Aug Reminder: noon lecture museum [Mary Stevens ]
4 Aug Re: Fall MOS Meeting Sep 19-21, featuring photographer and ID expert Kevin Karlson [Jason Hoeksema ]
4 Aug Mississippi Kites ["J. Allen Burrows" ]
04 Aug Western Kingbird [Ned and Lucy Boyajian ]
4 Aug Re: kite [Valery Smith ]
4 Aug Re: kite [Rob Heflin ]
4 Aug Re: Baby kite? [Valery Smith ]
4 Aug Re: Baby kite? [Jason Hoeksema ]
4 Aug Re: Baby kite? [Rob Heflin ]
4 Aug Baby kite? [Rob Heflin ]
03 Aug Buffy-b Sandpiper- A&D Turf Farm [Gene Knight ]
1 Aug Cicada brood correction [Martha Swan ]
1 Aug Re: Nest Cam - Mississippi Kites [Martha Swan ]
31 Jul BIRDS & MS RIVER. Museum Noon Lecture Aug 5 [Mary Stevens ]
29 Jul Year of Catbird ["J. Allen Burrows" ]
28 Jul Re: Quite a morning,,,, ["Randy Richardson" ]
27 Jul Yellow Warblers [Wayne Patterson ]
27 Jul MIKI nest - nearly fledged [JR Rigby ]
27 Jul Quite a morning,,,, [Ken Hackman ]
27 Jul Clarke County Observations [Robert Smith ]
27 Jul Re: Rubythroat nest [Ken Hackman ]
27 Jul Madison County Roseate Spoonbill [Ken Hackman ]
23 Jul OT: Louisiana (Port Fourchon) Pelagic Trip [Devin Bosler ]
23 Jul Re: Fwd: [TN-Bird] IN MEMORY OF BOB HATCHER [Mary Stevens ]
23 Jul Fwd: [TN-Bird] IN MEMORY OF BOB HATCHER [van harris ]
22 Jul Fall MOS Meeting Sep 19-21, featuring photographer and ID expert Kevin Karlson [Jason Hoeksema ]
21 Jul Re: Golden eagle [Jason Hoeksema ]
21 Jul Golden eagle [Billy Bump ]
21 Jul Kites [Robert Briscoe ]
20 Jul Join MOS online [JR Rigby ]
19 Jul Nest Cam - Mississippi Kites [JR Rigby ]
19 Jul Coastal Yearbirds [Gene Knight ]
14 Jul Re: Annotated List [JR Rigby ]
14 Jul Scissor-tailed flycatcher in Madison county [Lane Rushing ]
14 Jul Annotated List [Ned and Lucy Boyajian ]
14 Jul Re: Young Mississippi Kites - Yazoo Co ["Johnson, Erik" ]
13 Jul Young Mississippi Kites - Yazoo Co [JR Rigby ]
13 Jul Re: Fwd: Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton [JR Rigby ]
13 Jul Re: Fwd: Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton ["" ]
13 Jul Re: Fwd: Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton [Adam Rohnke ]
12 Jul Botswana Birds [Martha Swan ]
12 Jul MS kites [Nancy Donald ]
12 Jul MS kite [Nancy Donald ]
12 Jul Fwd: Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton [EVELYN RUSSELL ]
12 Jul Sardis Lake [Robert Briscoe ]
11 Jul Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton [Billy Mitchell ]
11 Jul Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton ["Smith, Carl G -FS" ]
10 Jul Fwd: National Academy of Sciences Gulf Research Program Fellowship Opportunity []
10 Jul Eastern Bluebird [Regina George ]
10 Jul A&D Turf Farm-South of Oxford [Gene Knight ]
8 Jul Common Ground Dove & Scissortale Flycatchers [Randy Palmer ]
08 Jul Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton [Gene Knight ]
7 Jul Re: Scissor Tailed Flycatcher in Madison County, MS [Billy ]
6 Jul Re: Scissor Tailed Flycatcher in Madison County, MS [Billy Mitchell ]
6 Jul Re: Raided Cardinal Nest wrap-up [Dana Swan ]

Subject: Spotted Sandpiper
From: "Larry Pace" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "larrypace64@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 15:18:01 -0700
Hi guys,

This one fooled me (at first). My inexperience as a birder was really showing 
this morning as I was photographing Sandpipers at Capps WMA. I was so 
accustomed to the Solitary Sandpipers showing up regularly on the mudflat that 
when I saw this bird across the pool at some distance, I tagged it as a 
Solitary and moved on. Later it landed closer (maybe 15 feet) and I was able 
to capture a few exposures before it flew. At one point during the early 
morning it was interacting with another Sandpiper (Spotted as I am used to 
seeing them) and I could tell that they were the same species just in different 
plumage. I confirmed my thoughts at home with my Stokes guide. This 
particular bird is a Spotted Sandpiper in winter plumage. The learning never 
stops. Check out the eye and you can see just how early in the morning I was 
able to get this pic. 


LP
Subject: Tunica County Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Lark Sparrows, leucistic Wood Stork
From: Jason Hoeksema <hoeksema AT olemiss.edu>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 13:49:38 -0500
Missbirders,
Gene Knight, JR Rigby, and myself birded Tunica County in the northwest
corner of Mississippi this morning. Our first highlight of the day was a
family of BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCKS, including 3 fledglings, crossing
the road in Walls. Where Bass Landing Road meets the MS River Levee, we
found a single SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER, and at least 2 LARK SPARROWS. The
Gum Pond Road area had several catfish ponds with good shorebird habitat
(especially on the south side of the road, near the forested south edge of
that complex, where the landowner has indicated its OK for birders to
visit). The shorebirds were dominated by PECTORAL SANDPIPERS, but the best
bird here were a pair of breeding-plumaged BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, and a
single leucistic WOOD STORK soaring with some companions.  This area also
had upwards of 80 LEAST TERNS (which belong to the endangered Interior
sub-species).  A few photos are here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/j_hoeksema/

Good birding!
Jason Hoeksema
Oxford, MS
Subject: Optics for the Tropics
From: "Martha E. Swan" <ulswan AT olemiss.edu>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 18:34:04 +0000
Missbirders,
Here is a response Nick Winstead received regarding Van's inquiry. I thought 
others might be interested. 


Hello Nick and Van,

Thank you for your interest in donating to Optics for the Tropics. YES =
we would love to have good used binoculars.  I will write something for =
the web page to explain what we can accept.  In the beginning we were =
getting broken, out of alignment bins, that were not repairable. It was =
a waste of postage. I feel strongly about the dignity issue of our =
peers.

I am very happy to accept your bins and send them on to a project in =
Latin America.  Thank you for thinking of us. ~ Joni Ellis, =
Director/Founder

2205 SE 23 Place
Gainesville, FL 32641

352-262-7300

Here's a link to their website for more info on this organization:

http://www.opticsforthetropics.org/


Martha Swan
1665 Toccopola Junction Road
Thaxton, MS 38871IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Lighting Birds in Mid-Air
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "skipperand@aol.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 09:51:32 -0400 (EDT)
A new solar energy company in California is lighting birds on fire in mid-air 
with a giant magnifier. They roast a bird every two minutes. And they are 
planning much larger plants. 





http://www.manufacturing.net/news/2014/08/emerging-solar-plants-scorch-birds-in-mid-air?et_cid=4105691&et_rid=210327495&type=cta 


 



Subject: St. Catherine Creek NWR and Leflore Co. shorebirds
From: Jason Hoeksema <hoeksema AT olemiss.edu>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 10:17:58 -0500
Missbirders,
I enjoyed my first visit to St. Catherine Creek NWR (Adams Co., near
Natchez) yesterday, with Gene Knight. We also met up with Chris King, Nancy
Donald, and 2 friends of theirs. What a delightful place! The water levels
were mostly too high to provide broad appeal for shorebirds (although there
were Black-necked Stilts everywhere), but the waders made up for it. The
highlights for me included good numbers of dark ibis to pick
through--mostly WHITE-FACED, but with a handful of GLOSSY mixed in. This
represents a nice opportunity to study these 2 similar species, if you can
get a good scope view showing the color of their eyes and facial skin.
Also, NEOTROPIC CORMORANTS put in a nice appearance--this is a real treat,
as this is the only reliable site for this species in Mississippi.  Of
course, we were also entertained by modest numbers of WOOD STORKS, ROSEATE
SPOONBILLS, and ANHINGAS flying about.

On the way back to Oxford, Gene and I checked a spot along CR 136 in
Leflore County that has been good for shorebirds in the last few weeks.
One drained catfish pond still held really good habitat, with thousands of
peeps (~90% Least, 10% Semipalmated), good numbers of the big species
(BLACK-NECKED STILTS & AMERICAN AVOCETS), good numbers of LONG-BILLED
DOWITCHERS, and a single WILSON'S PHALAROPE, among other things.

A few photos of the dark ibis and Neo Cormorants start here (scroll to the
right):
https://www.flickr.com/photos/j_hoeksema/14930402896/in/photostream/

Good birding!
Jason Hoeksema
Oxford, MS
Subject: GBBG
From: Ned and Lucy Boyajian <nedlucyboyajian AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 16:41:41 -0500
Posting for Terry and Marion Schiefer
Seen today, August 17, 2014
Great Black-backed Gull - Adult
Along Hwy 90 in Biloxi just east of the small craft harbor.
NRB
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Canada Warbler in Livingston Parish
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "djohns110@aol.com" for DMARC)
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 09:14:08 -0400 (EDT)
There was a post and photo on Facebook of a migrating Canada Warbler in 
Livingston Parish, Louisiana. The bird was seen and photographed yesterday. 



Livingston Parish is just south of the Mississippi Border, along Interstate 55, 
about 50 miles south of McComb. 



Seems kinda early for a Canada Warbler.


Danny
Subject: Black-throated Green Warblers-Knight's Yard
From: Gene Knight <gsknight AT hughes.net>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 09:47:38 -0500
MISSBIRDERS,

This morning we heard and saw 2 male Black-throated Green Warblers in 
our yard south of Oxford. Singing BTGR Warblers in August in MS are 
unheard of. BUT the unseasonably COOL temps might have sparked the vocals.

Gene and Shannon Knight
South of Oxford, MS
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: FW: Tern???
From: "David King" <kingdbjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 03:51:36 -0500
No Larry, your picture is of a Black Tern, probably a juvenile, but possibly
an adult in winter plumage.  The darkness of the underwings, the dark patch
at the side of the breast at the front edge of the wings and particularly
the shape of the dark ear patch wrapping around from the nape (an ear muff)
all indicate this species.  Nice photo by the way.


Dave King



-----Original Message-----
From: missbird-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:missbird-bounce AT freelists.org]
On Behalf Of Larry Pace (Redacted sender "larrypace64 AT yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Sent: Tuesday, August 12, 2014 10:22 PM
To: missbird AT freelists.org
Subject: [missbird] Tern???

Is this a juvenile Least Tern?  Sorry for the not so sharp photo.  Just
beginning to work on flight photography.  Thinking maybe my old reflexes may
not be quick enough to do justice to flying birds.

LP
Subject: Tern???
From: "Larry Pace" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "larrypace64@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 20:21:59 -0700
Is this a juvenile Least Tern? Sorry for the not so sharp photo. Just 
beginning to work on flight photography. Thinking maybe my old reflexes may 
not be quick enough to do justice to flying birds. 


LP
Subject: Ants in Thrasher Nest
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 08:43:58 -0500
Yesterday while I was trimming some thick privet in my yard I came across
what I think is a Brown Thrasher nest that had been vacated for the season.
When I picked up the nest my hand was quickly covered by one or two dozen
ants, of a non-Solenopsis variety (i.e., no nasty bites). I'm wondering if
this was just a foraging party of ants scavenging the nest, or if the ants
might maintain a presence in the nests while the brood is present.

JR
Oxford
Subject: House Wren - Oxford
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 08:15:45 -0500
Missbirders,

On my bicycle commute to work this morning I was surprised to hear a
singing House Wren behind the Food Pantry building here in Oxford off Kelly
Lane. I stopped to investigate and got visual confirmation as he hopped
around a stack of palettes.

Good birding,

JR
Oxford
Subject: Spoonbills at Dutch Brake
From: Gene Knight <gsknight AT hughes.net>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 10:11:59 -0500
MISSBIRDERS,

Here is a distant shot of the many ROSEATE SPOONBILLS at Dutch Brake in 
Sunflower Co., MS. Photo by Wayne Patterson taken yesterday, 10 Aug. 2014..

Gene Knight
Oxford, MS
Subject: Avocets and Spoonbills
From: Gene Knight <gsknight AT hughes.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 21:05:25 -0500
MISSBIRDERS,

Today Wayne Patterson and I headed to Leflore, Sunflower, and Humphreys 
Counties in search of shorebirds and waders. The catfish complex off Hwy 
82 on Leflore CR 136 remains the hotspot and only shorebird habitat we 
could find. With most of the deltas catfish industry collapsing suitable 
lowered catfish ponds are far and few between. Highlights here are: A. 
Avocet-*241*, Black-necked Stilt-*152*, Wilson's Phalarope-1, 
Long-billed Dowitcher-99, and Least Sandpiper- a conservative *2485*, 
Wood Stork-30.

At Dutch Brake in Sunflower Co. we counted *72* Roseate Spoonbills in 3 
trees!!

Cold Lake Rd in Humphreys Co. had another 25 Spoonbills, 150 
Double-crested Cormorants (No Neotropics were seen), Least Tern-60+, and 
4 Spotted Sandpipers.

Gene Knight
Oxford, MS
Subject: Gum Pond Rd - Shorebirds and Terns
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 19:28:20 -0500
Missbirders,

Stu Nielsen and I stopped by Battle Sod Farm and the Gum Pond Rd catfish
ponds today in Tunica County. Four BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPERS were near the
back of the sod farm among a large cohort of Killdeer and a lone Pectoral
Sandpiper.

On Gum Pond Rd. most of the catfish ponds nearest the road were grown up in
weeds as Q.B. Gray had reported. However, several large patches of good
mudflat and shallow water habitat was scattered around the ponds on the
south side of the road farther back from Gum Pond Rd. We found no less than
five ponds with good habitat. One near the very back had the largest
expanse of good habitat, but few birds. The strangest stop among these
ponds included a lone BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING DUCK standing near six (!)
SOLITARY SANDPIPERS. A few SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS were scattered around the
ponds as well as a few dozen Least Sandpipers, Black-necked Stilts, and
Pectoral Sandpipers.

On the west end of Gum Pond Rd near Little Texas Rd one large pond is
currently in mudflats. Approximately 125 LEAST TERNS were perched on the
mud and among them were two juvenile COMMON TERNS (identified as Common by
dark carpal bars and extent of black on the hindcrown compared with juvie
Forster's). This pond also sported 100+ Least Sandpipers and at least 11
SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS. There were also huge numbers of swallows (~500) on
the powerlines at this spot (the same spot where G. Knight, J. Hoeksema and
I found a Cave Swallow last year), but we didn't have time to sort them all
unfortunately - though five species of swallow were identified (Cliff,
Bank, Barn, Roughwing, and Tree).

Good birding,

JR
Oxford

eBird list for Gum Pond Rd:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19393039
Subject: Tunica Co. Shorebids
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "Qgray@aol.com" for DMARC)
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 16:39:48 -0400 (EDT)
I spent the morning (thurs.) in Tunica Co. looking for  shorebirds with the 
best
habitat found along Gum Pond road. All of the catfish ponds  along here
have been allowed to dry up and someone looking from the road  would
think there was nothing here but willows and weeds. One needs  to drive 
the backside of the levees to find  suitable  habitat.
On the south side of the road, there was a sprinkling of  shorebirds in 2
places along with 20+ Least terns. The best bird seen here was  a R.
Spoonbill mixed in with Great Egrets. On the north side of the  road beside
the downed catfish feeder was another pond that held the most  birds.On the
east end were you can drive to were Avocets, L. Yellowlegs,  and B.N. 
Stilts.
The west end oft this pond contained several hundred birds but  almost
out of good range to ID.   I posted a photo of the  Avocet at
 http://www.pbase.com/pintail1  



Q.B. Gray
Nesbit Ms.
Subject: Summer bird record reminder
From: "Schiefer, Terence" <TSchiefer AT entomology.msstate.edu>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 15:52:03 +0000
MISSBIRDers:

Its time to send your summer (June-July) season records to me.  They
should reach me by 20 August or sooner in order to insure that they make
the deadline for the summer season report in "North American Birds" (aka
"Field Notes", aka "American Birds").  Records received after this date can
still be included in "Birds Around the State", but timely submission of
records is strongly encouraged.  Drop me an E-mail if you need any blank
"Bird Record Cards" or "Rare Bird Report Forms" on which to submit your
records.  We'd love to have your records.

What bird records should be turned in?  Turn in any records of uncommon or
rare species, arrival or departure dates, unusual numbers of individuals, or
any other record of interest. Your record can have state-wide significance
or just be a good record for your neck of the woods.  Records of species on
the Mississippi Review List should be submitted with full details as on a
"Rare Bird Report Form". A copy of the 'Review List' and 'Rare Bird Report 
Form' 


can be accessed at: 
http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/Resources.htm 


All records submitted are archived and become part of the permanent file of
bird records available for the future study of Mississippi Birds.  Note
that birds reported in your posts to MISSBIRD do NOT become part of
Mississippi's ornithological record unless you also submit the record on a
Bird Record Card (or similar card) or Rare Bird Report Form.

Thanks.

Terry


Terence Lee Schiefer
Mississippi Entomological Museum
Box 9775
Mississippi State, MS 39762-9775
ph: 662-325-2989 (W); 662-324-3748 (H)
FAX: 662-325-8837
email: 
tschiefer AT entomology.msstate.edu 
Subject: FW: Please report banded Piping Plovers
From: Nick Winstead <Nick.Winstead AT mmns.state.ms.us>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 14:48:14 +0000
I'm forwarding this request (below) for banded Piping Plover observations. 
Cheri has been working with this species in Canada for years. Almost all of the 
banded Piping Plovers we've had in Mississippi have come from the US Northern 
Great Plains and Prairie Canada populations, with some coming from the Great 
Lakes region. The birds discussed below were banded in eastern Canada. We 
probably won't get any/many Piping Plovers from that population, but you never 
know. It'd be cool to know if any show up in Mississippi. 


Nick

Nick Winstead
Ornithologist
Mississippi Dept. of Wildlife, Fisheries, & Parks
Museum of Natural Science
2148 Riverside Drive
Jackson, Mississippi 39202
Phone: 601-576-6000
Fax: 601-354-7227
http://museum.mdwfp.com/

From: Gratto-Trevor,Cheri [Sas] [mailto:Cheri.Gratto-Trevor AT EC.GC.CA]
Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2014 4:09 PM
To: Gratto-Trevor,Cheri [Sas]
Cc: Boyne,Andrew [Dartmouth]; McKnight,Julie [Dartmouth]; Potter,Karen 
[Dartmouth]; Rock,Jen [Sackville]; Shaffer,François [Quebec]; Baker,Krista 
[St. John's]; Anne_Hecht AT fws.gov 

Subject: Please report banded Piping Plovers

In Eastern Canada (Atlantic Canada and the Magdalen Islands), the Piping Plover 
population is declining. In 2013, there were only 184 pairs in Eastern Canada, 
a decline from over 250 pairs five years ago. A recent Environment Canada (EC) 
scientific review of the Piping Plover recovery program has determined threats 
outside of the country are likely contributing to this decline. In response to 
this, Environment Canada has begun a five-year research and banding program in 
collaboration with Canadian, U.S. and Caribbean partners to identify where 
Piping Plovers migrate and spend the winter. This banding study will help us 
determine what is affecting the survival of adult and juvenile Piping Plovers 
and when and where it is occurring. 


This year Environment Canada staff banded 90 adults and 96 chicks (to date) in 
the Canadian Maritimes and the Magdalen Islands, Quebec. Black or gray flags 
with a unique two digit alpha numeric code were used, as well as a metal band 
above the joint on the other leg. (Note: A limited number of white flags were 
also used). There will be no bands below the joint (tarsus), so if you are 
looking for plovers banded in Eastern Canada, you must look above the joint 
(see photo below). A spotting scope helps to read the flag more clearly, or a 
photo may show the flag clearly. 


[cid:image001.jpg AT 01CFACC5.DD23CF00]
Photo: Piping Plover with metal band and coded gray flag. Photo: Ron 
D’Entremont 


If you observe a Piping Plover with a black, white or gray flag on its leg, 
please report it to: 

Cheri Gratto-Trevor
Research Scientist
Environment Canada
email:  Cheri.Gratto-Trevor AT ec.gc.ca



Please note the following:
1.     Flag colour, location on leg & alphanumeric code

2.     Location of sighting

3.     Date of sighting

4.     If possible, please take a photo to include with your report

THANK YOU!

________________________________

Confidentiality Notice: The information contained in this email and/or 
document(s) attached is for the exclusive use of the individual named above and 
may contain confidential, privileged and non-disclosable information. If you 
are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you are strictly 
prohibited from reading, photocopying, distributing or otherwise using this 
e-mail or its contents in any way. If you have received this transmission in 
error, please notify me immediately. 
Subject: Upland Sandpiper-A&D Turf Farm
From: Gene Knight <gsknight AT hughes.net>
Date: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 19:58:29 -0500
MISSBIRDERS,

About 7:10 pm I spotted a single UPLAND SANDPIPER on the turf farm 
between the cell tower and the cell tower guy wire fence. The bird was 
feeding 2/3 the way across the sod and heading out away from me. 150+ 
Killdeer and the single Pectoral Sandpiper were present as well but far 
from the "Uppy". I took Shannon back down for her to see it and found it 
preening and getting ready to roost (I hope) not far from where I had 
left it 30 minutes ago. The turf farm is ~7 miles south of Oxford on Hwy 7.

Gene and Shannon Knight
Oxford, MS
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Re: Sandpipers
From: Jason Hoeksema <hoeksema AT olemiss.edu>
Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2014 03:42:06 -0500
Larry,
Nice photo! The Pec Sandpiper appears to be an adult, due to the apparent
worn, ragged edges around some of the feathers, especially in the area of
the scapulars and wing coverts. If it was a juvenile, those feathers (and
its upperparts generally) would appear very uniformly fresh, with crisp
edges (and the scaps would have obvious rufous fringes with white tips).  I
hesitate to say much about the Leastie, as its feathers are not as well
visible.
Jason Hoeksema
Oxford, MS


On Tue, Aug 5, 2014 at 6:56 PM, Larry Pace 
wrote:

> Sibley cites that Pectoral Sandpipers "resemble" Least Sandpipers, size
> being the major difference. This is a comparison pic.  Any analysis for a
> Sandpiper novice?  Juveniles, breeding, etc. Any disagreement on ID?  Photo
> from Capps WMA yesterday.
>
> LP
>



-- 
Dr. Jason D. Hoeksema, Associate Professor
Department of Biology
University of Mississippi
phone: 662-915-1275
lab website 
Subject: Sandpipers
From: "Larry Pace" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "larrypace64@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2014 16:56:36 -0700
Sibley cites that Pectoral Sandpipers "resemble" Least Sandpipers, size being 
the major difference. This is a comparison pic. Any analysis for a Sandpiper 
novice? Juveniles, breeding, etc. Any disagreement on ID? Photo from Capps 
WMA yesterday. 


LP
Subject: Reminder: noon lecture museum
From: Mary Stevens <stevenswaterbird AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2014 07:25:44 -0500
Paul Hartfield with the USFWS, Jackson office will talk about his work with the 
endangered Interior Least Tern which nests on islands in the MS River along 
with other endangered species which call the river home. Ecology of the river 
will be explored. 


Mary Stripling
Museum Librarian, Retired
Mississippi Museum of Natural Science
2148 Riverside Drive
Jackson, MS 39202
Home: 675 Lakewood Rd
Vicksburg, MS 38180
Cell: 601.832.6788
Library AT mmns.state.ms.us
Stevenswaterbird AT bellsouth.net
Sent from my iPhoneIMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Re: Fall MOS Meeting Sep 19-21, featuring photographer and ID expert Kevin Karlson
From: Jason Hoeksema <hoeksema AT olemiss.edu>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 22:06:34 -0500
Missbirders,
Just a quick follow-up on my note below about the fall MOS meeting. I want
to alert you that in order to obtain the negotiated discount hotel room
rate, you will need to call the Holiday Inn in Greenwood (and explicitly
mention that you are an MOS meeting attendee) no later than August 18th.
Click through the links below for more details.

It should be a fantastic weekend, and we hope you will join us!
Jason Hoeksema
Oxford, MS


On Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 10:49 AM, Jason Hoeksema 
wrote:

> Missbirders,
> The Mississippi Ornithological Society (MOS) will hold its *fall meeting*
> in Greenwood, MS the weekend of September 19-21, 2014. You won't want to
> miss this meeting. Our special guest will be *photographer and ID expert
> Kevin Karlson  *(*The Shorebird
> Guide*
> 
), 

> who will give presentations on the amazing lives and varieties of
> shorebirds as well as his impressionistic approach to bird identification.
> In addition, Kevin will lead an interactive 1/2-day field workshop on
> Saturday to put shorebird identification to practice and showcase Delta
> birding. Meeting events will be scheduled for Friday evening through
> Saturday evening with field trips Saturday and Sunday morning. During the
> weekend, we expect to find 14+ species of shorebirds (including American
> Avocets, Black-necked Stilts, and their more cryptic cousins), along with
> thousands of waders (including Wood Stork & Roseate Spoonbill), and migrant
> passerines. Delta birding can be fantastic this time of year.
>
> For *additional details* including speaker bio, lodging information, and
> itinerary, please visit this page:
>
> http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/fall_meeting_announcement.pdf
>
> For online (or mail-in) meeting *registration*, please visit this webpage:
> http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/FallMeeting.htm
>
> Also: You can now *join MOS online*. MOS members will receive discounted
> registration for this event, are eligible to register for a meet & greet
> with Kevin Karlson on Sept. 19, and also will receive discounted
> registration for future field trips led by Delta Wind Birds
>  (who is co-sponsoring this fall
> MOS meeting). To join MOS, please visit this webpage:
> http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/Membership%20info.htm
>
> We hope to see you in Greenwood in September!
>
> best wishes,
> Jason Hoeksema & J.R. Rigby
> Oxford, MS
>
Subject: Mississippi Kites
From: "J. Allen Burrows" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "rotteral@aol.com" for DMARC)
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 21:14:31 -0500
Don't I remember Mississippi Kites being noted practitioners of siblicide? By 
that I do not mean killers of famous birding field guide authors. Nor would I 
relish making an attempt to haul one up to a nest full of fierce parents 
well-equipped with sharp pokey things and potentially a brother or sister 
unhappy about the return of the prodigal. 


J. Allen Burrows
Jackson MS
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Western Kingbird
From: Ned and Lucy Boyajian <nedlucyboyajian AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2014 13:40:18 -0500
Missbirders
Today August 4, 2014 there was a WEKI along the Kiln-Picayune Road, 
Hancock Co. This is a record early fall date for the coastal counties.
Ned Boyajian
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Re: kite
From: Valery Smith <wlrehab AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 12:01:05 -0500
Rob, if you out him in the vicinity where the others are he will call and they 
will find him ! He needs to kinda be hungry to call though . Lol! 


Val Smith,
MWR,inc

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 4, 2014, at 11:42 AM, Rob Heflin  wrote:
> 
> I can't get up with my bird rehabbers so I took him to the local bait shop 
and hand fed him crickets until he got full. I'm in the area where he was found 
in the street yesterday and looking for a nest. I've seen a couple of kites in 
the air but they aren't honing in on any tree in particular. I'm thinking that 
finding a low branch to set him on may be the best course of action at this 
point. I hate to see him not make it but he has a belly full of crickets and he 
is fully feathered from what I've seen. I think all he needs to do is solo. 

> 
> Thanks for the responses. 
> Rob
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Re: kite
From: Rob Heflin <robheflin73 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 11:42:43 -0500
I can't get up with my bird rehabbers so I took him to the local bait shop and 
hand fed him crickets until he got full. I'm in the area where he was found in 
the street yesterday and looking for a nest. I've seen a couple of kites in the 
air but they aren't honing in on any tree in particular. I'm thinking that 
finding a low branch to set him on may be the best course of action at this 
point. I hate to see him not make it but he has a belly full of crickets and he 
is fully feathered from what I've seen. I think all he needs to do is solo. 


Thanks for the responses. 
Rob


Subject: Re: Baby kite?
From: Valery Smith <wlrehab AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 11:34:15 -0500
Rob, just saw this. Yes this is a MS Kite fledgling . We are getting calls 
every day. Sometimes mom is very hesitant to fly down to the ground but if you 
can get it up in a tree the parents will take care of it. 


Val
Valery Smith, Director
Mississippi Wildlife Rehabilitation , inc
Www.mswildliferehab.org


Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 4, 2014, at 10:23 AM, Rob Heflin  wrote:
> 
> Is this a young MIKI? Just picked him up. Gonna try to get him back to nest 
tree. It's been less than 24 hours since he was picked up in the street. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> Rob Heflin 
> Isola, MS
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Re: Baby kite?
From: Jason Hoeksema <hoeksema AT olemiss.edu>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 11:33:49 -0500
Rob,
Yep, that's a juvenile Mississippi Kite, alright.
Jason


On Mon, Aug 4, 2014 at 10:34 AM, Rob Heflin  wrote:

> I will clarify. I work for MDWFP. It was brought to me and I'm trying to
> get it back to the nest tree. Just trying to ID it.
>
> Rob Heflin.
>
> > On Aug 4, 2014, at 10:24 AM, "Rob Heflin" 
> wrote:
> >
> > Is this a young MIKI? Just picked him up. Gonna try to get him back to
> nest tree. It's been less than 24 hours since he was picked up in the
> street.
> >
> > 
> > 
> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
>
> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
> Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
> View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/
>
>
>
>


-- 
Dr. Jason D. Hoeksema, Associate Professor
Department of Biology
University of Mississippi
phone: 662-915-1275
lab website 
Subject: Re: Baby kite?
From: Rob Heflin <robheflin73 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 10:34:12 -0500
I will clarify. I work for MDWFP. It was brought to me and I'm trying to get it 
back to the nest tree. Just trying to ID it. 


Rob Heflin. 

> On Aug 4, 2014, at 10:24 AM, "Rob Heflin"  wrote:
> 
> Is this a young MIKI? Just picked him up. Gonna try to get him back to nest 
tree. It's been less than 24 hours since he was picked up in the street. 

> 
> 
> 
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Baby kite?
From: Rob Heflin <robheflin73 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 10:23:09 -0500
Is this a young MIKI? Just picked him up. Gonna try to get him back to nest 
tree. It's been less than 24 hours since he was picked up in the street. 



Rob Heflin 
Isola, MS 
Subject: Buffy-b Sandpiper- A&D Turf Farm
From: Gene Knight <gsknight AT hughes.net>
Date: Sun, 03 Aug 2014 20:32:39 -0500
MISSBIRDERS,

At about 7:30 pm Shannon and I spotted a single BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER 
on the turf between the cell tower and McGregor Steel. There was a 
single Pectoral Sandpiper as well along with 50+ Killdeer and throw in 
30+ Mourning Dove. A&D Turf Farm is about 7 miles south of Oxford off Hwy 7.

Gene and Shannon Knight
Oxford, MS
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Cicada brood correction
From: Martha Swan <marthaswan AT starband.net>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 09:25:56 -0500
Sorry, ours in north MS is Brood XIII. Brood XII should have emerged this
year in southwest MS. I love the genus name: Magicicada.
Martha

-- 
Martha Swan
1665 Toccopola Junction Road
Thaxton, MS 38871
Subject: Re: Nest Cam - Mississippi Kites
From: Martha Swan <marthaswan AT starband.net>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 07:55:06 -0500
JR and Missbirders,
I've enjoyed your reports on the nesting Mississippi Kites. Some of you
newcomers may not be aware that next year (2015) we can look forward to the
emergence of "our" periodical cicadas, Brood XII (13-year cycle)I. I wonder
if the bounty will boost the kite population. Would there be any data?
Martha


On Sat, Jul 19, 2014 at 8:07 PM, JR Rigby  wrote:

> Missbirders,
>
> I've been watching the Mississippi Kites nesting in my neighborhood again
> this year. The pair have a single nestling as they did last year. At the
> beginning of this week Junior had a nearly full set of coverts, was still
> growing his flight feathers, and his new body plumage was still in pin
> feathers, particularly visible on the top of the head.
>
> I've been watching primarily how the two adults attend the nest. The
> female maintains the strongest contact with the nest. She is also the only
> one of the pair that I have witnessed spend any substantial amount of time
> on the nest. Most evenings she has settled onto the nest sometime between
> 17:00 and 19:00, ostensibly for the night (for example, this evening she
> was continuously on the nest 16:55-18:30, evidenced by video, and has been
> there each time I've checked since), but has been off the nest again by
> 06:30 each morning when I generally check the nest for the first time and
> remains in the area but off the nest for the rest of the day. When she is
> not on the nest, she is frequently perched at one of two or three sentinel
> locations in the crowns of neighboring trees within 50m or so of the nest
> where she watches over the nest and occasionally hawks a passing cicada or
> dragonfly, most often for her own appetite. I have only seen her bring food
> to Junior twice in the last week, both today in a span of 10min.
>
> The male comes to the nest irregularly and has otherwise been out of sight
> (i.e., not perching at similar nest-watch sites as the female). When he
> brings food to the nest, moreover, I have not seen him spend more than 5 to
> 10 seconds on the nest at any one visit in more than a dozen such trips.
> The time between his visits varies considerably, from 2 min to over 120
> min. The latter hiatus was not broken by a visit from the female either.
> There seems to be some, but not perfect, correlation between the size of
> the food item brought and the time lapse until the next visit. Yesterday
> afternoon, Junior worked on one unidentified, but fleshy, food item
> vigorously for over half an hour.
>
> Mississippi Kites are one of the species known to exhibit "helper"
> behavior at nests, where an additional adult or sub-adult will provide
> assistance to the mated pair in providing food and defending a nest. I was
> very curious whether last year's nestling might return as a helper this
> year, but to this point I have seen no evidence of a third MIKI involved at
> this nest.
>
> Today I managed to get video of each adult bringing food to the nestling.
> On a routine feeding visit, though the female doesn't stay long, in
> comparison with the rather business-like male (5 sec) she seems to linger
> (15 sec). Each adult has a more or less consistent "tell" when approaching
> the nest with food (allowing me to avoid filming copious amounts of
> continuously dull
> nestling-lies-on-nest-and-turns-his-head-every-two-minutes material in an
> effort to catch the adults). The female has a particular flight approach
> wherein she flies through my line of sight to the nest, but continues
> beyond the nest to an adjacent tree where she briefly perches out of sight.
> A few seconds later, she appears at the nest. The male approaches directly
> but most often vocalizes on his approach. The vocalization is not the
> typical "phee-phew" one hears from MIKI, but a softer poly-syllabic
> "phee-peeterit" (not that such descriptions ever helped anyone with a
> vocalization). The majority of the male's visits are preceded by this sound
> a second or two before he reaches the nest. I am not sure whether the
> female uses the same vocalization or not.
>
> Video clip of female adult feeding the nestling (~1min):
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/123863674 AT N04/14508304300/
>
> Video clip of male adult feeding the nestling (~1min):
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/123863674 AT N04/14508417857/
>
> Good birding!
>
> JR
> Oxford
>
>
>


-- 
Martha Swan
1665 Toccopola Junction Road
Thaxton, MS 38871
Subject: BIRDS & MS RIVER. Museum Noon Lecture Aug 5
From: Mary Stevens <stevenswaterbird AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 15:27:07 -0500
Folks. Some of u might be interested in Paul Hartfields work on the mighty 
Mississippi River with the endangered Interior Least Tern that nests on 
sandbars in the river along our state. Hope to see u at the museum. 


Free to museum members. Entrance fee for non members. 

AUGUST 5, 2014  
Tuesday, Noon Lecture
TITLE: Conservation and Management of the Lower Mississippi River: A New 
Paradigm. 

SPEAKER: Paul Hartfield, Endangered Species Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service, Jackson Office 

SUMMARY: The Mississippi River is one of the most highly engineered rivers in 
the world. Even so, the Lower Mississippi River has experienced no extinctions 
or extirpations, and retains a highly functional aquatic ecosystem. Over the 
past decade, the US Army Corps of Engineers, US Fish and Wildlife Service, the 
Lower Mississippi River Conservation Committee, and other partners have 
developed and implemented a management strategy and partnership to maintain and 
improve ecosystem values of the River. On the Mississippi River, Paul heads up 
the endangered species recovery programs for the Interior Least Tern, the Fat 
Pocketbook freshwater mussel and the Pallid Sturgeon. He will discuss the 
ecology of the river and these endangered species. 


Mary Stripling
Museum Librarian, Retired
Mississippi Museum of Natural Science
2148 Riverside Drive
Jackson, MS 39202
Home: 675 Lakewood Rd
Vicksburg, MS 38180
Cell: 601.832.6788
Library AT mmns.state.ms.us
Stevenswaterbird AT bellsouth.net
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Year of Catbird
From: "J. Allen Burrows" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "rotteral@aol.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 09:02:08 -0500
We have Gray Catbirds again in the garden where I work. None for about ten 
years and now singing, calling and bouncing around on the ground like Robins. 
It's something. 


J. Allen Burrows
City of Jackson, MSIMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Re: Quite a morning,,,,
From: "Randy Richardson" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "rxr388@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 20:38:37 -0700
Ken, 
I also found a RT hummer nest with a female raising2 chicks in Augustin the 
mid 1990's in State Line , MS in Wayne County. She raised them in a red oak 
treethat had a limb hangingabove our barn door. Seems like it was the 2nd or 
3rd week in August when they chicks left the nest. 


Randy Richardson
formally from State Line, MS

 

________________________________
 From: Ken Hackman 
To: missbird AT freelists.org 
Sent: Sunday, July 27, 2014 1:07 PM
Subject: [missbird] Quite a morning,,,,
  

I posted a couple of what I thought were nice birds earlier, including the 
Roseate Spoonbill and the Ruby-throated Hummingbird nest. I failed to mention 
that we also had a pair of Common Ground Doves along Pipeline Road. All three 
of us got good looks at the pair as they flushed right beside us while we crept 
along. I have to check my notes, but I am certain that I've never seen them 
away from coastal or river counties. That's not to suggest they aren't found in 
other places, just that those are the only places I've seen them. 


I'm not sure how many records there are of Spoonbill in the Ross Barnett area. 
I remember one a number of years ago that I think was found by Gene Knight. If 
I recall that one was only the first or second record. Please correct me if I'm 
wrong. At any rate, the spoonbill was last seen flying toward the Rankin County 
side of Pipeline Rd. I would love to know how many records there are of 
spoonbills at the Ross Barnett Res. 


I know that the RTHU obviously nest here, but I thought it was late in the 
season for that. Her chicks are young. We could barely make out their beaks as 
she fed them. I am thinking two from the way she moved. Also, after feeding, 
she sat on the nest, presumably for shading her offspring. It was very hot out. 


Any info on the rarity of the three sightings would be appreciated. It was the 
most I've been out since my surgery. I'm slowly getting my walking ability 
back. I just hope I'm ready for MOS weekend. I'm definitely coming, but I may 
have to pace myself. Thanks for the kind words from those of you who have 
contacted me. It meant a great deal to me as I went through my many 
complications. 


Ken Hackman


Sent from my iPhoneIMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/
Subject: Yellow Warblers
From: Wayne Patterson <wrp6 AT att.net>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 17:57:31 -0700
The last few weeks I have been seeing an increase in the breeding birds in the 
area which I thought may have been migrants but the three Yellow Warblers I saw 
today in Chickasaw County are the first I am sure are migrants. My first 
yellow warblers last year were on this date. Also the swallows are really 
beginning to congregate as I saw many Cliff Swallows with some Barn and 
Rough-wing flying near and over maturing soybean fields. 


Yellow Warbler http://www.pbase.com/image/156764102 

Wayne Patterson
Shannon, MS Lee Co.
Subject: MIKI nest - nearly fledged
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 13:09:44 -0500
Missbirders,

The juvenile Mississippi Kite here is getting very close to fledging.
Yesterday it was hopping around the nest at times, and at other times
gripping the nest tightly and flapping its wings vigorously. At least once
or twice he left the nest for nearby limbs, returning to the nest for
feedings (still primarily from the male). His primaries and secondaries
appear to be fully grown now. It's harder to tell about the tail, but with
the banding visible, it looks very nearly grown as well.

As of this morning junior has moved out of the nest and has spent the day
so far on a branch about 10ft from the nest. It took me a while to find
him. At first I thought perhaps he had left for good. The female's presence
at one of the sentinel spots suggested that the juvenile was still in the
tree somewhere. At one point the male returned to the nest with food, and
quickly left when the juvenile was not there. I found this still more
puzzling. On the next visit, however, the male landed on a branch to the
left of the nest, revealing the juvenile's new perch - well camouflaged by
surrounding leaves and dappled sunlight.

Feedings have been more frequent this weekend with a fairly uniform diet of
cicadas. I was able to get the nest-approach vocalization on audio, albeit
faintly, (here: http://yourlisten.com/Rigby/mikinestcall) and found the
same vocalization that I found on Dan Lane's upload at xeno-canto. Lane
reported this vocalization while the MIKI was defending the nest from a
Blue Jay. Interestingly, I also got a video of the female performing this
vocalization as the male *brought her a cicada*! The female had been
standing watch over the nest from her perch for over an hour and a quarter
when he arrived with the cicada. I thought perhaps he was bringing them
both food. Instead, the female held the cicada for some time and then left
her perch to visit the juvenile and pass off the cicada. She then did not
return to her watchpost for a full five minutes. Perhaps finding her own
meal?

Here's a video clip of the interaction between the adults:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/123863674 AT N04/14758199022/in/photostream/

This may answer another question I had about the nest-approach
vocalization. It always seemed to precede the male's arrival at the nest
with food, so I ascribed it to the male. As the male invariably arrived at
the nest with food items in his bill, however, I wondered if he could
vocalize while also holding the item. He also did not seem to vocalize
*every* time he approached, only most of the time. In the video you can see
the female vocalizing and very faintly here the nest-approach vocalization,
suggesting that perhaps it has been the female vocalizing from a nearby
perch to announce the male's approach.

With the juvenile off the nest, the adults don't seem to mind other
visitors to the nest. A Blue Jay visited the nest at least twice scavenging
food items from the interior of the nest with no harassment from the Kites.

Finally, while recording the Kites, I also inadvertently recorded what
sounds like a naive Carolina Wren making such a thorough mess of its song
that, hearing it on playback, I puzzled over it for a while, knowing that
it ought to be a wren despite the unrecognized pattern:
http://yourlisten.com/Rigby/birdsongclip26july2014
On the other hand, if there's something about this song that I've missed,
please speak up.

Good birding!

JR
Oxford
Subject: Quite a morning,,,,
From: Ken Hackman <khackman AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 13:07:53 -0500
I posted a couple of what I thought were nice birds earlier, including the 
Roseate Spoonbill and the Ruby-throated Hummingbird nest. I failed to mention 
that we also had a pair of Common Ground Doves along Pipeline Road. All three 
of us got good looks at the pair as they flushed right beside us while we crept 
along. I have to check my notes, but I am certain that I've never seen them 
away from coastal or river counties. That's not to suggest they aren't found in 
other places, just that those are the only places I've seen them. 


I'm not sure how many records there are of Spoonbill in the Ross Barnett area. 
I remember one a number of years ago that I think was found by Gene Knight. If 
I recall that one was only the first or second record. Please correct me if I'm 
wrong. At any rate, the spoonbill was last seen flying toward the Rankin County 
side of Pipeline Rd. I would love to know how many records there are of 
spoonbills at the Ross Barnett Res. 


I know that the RTHU obviously nest here, but I thought it was late in the 
season for that. Her chicks are young. We could barely make out their beaks as 
she fed them. I am thinking two from the way she moved. Also, after feeding, 
she sat on the nest, presumably for shading her offspring. It was very hot out. 


Any info on the rarity of the three sightings would be appreciated. It was the 
most I've been out since my surgery. I'm slowly getting my walking ability 
back. I just hope I'm ready for MOS weekend. I'm definitely coming, but I may 
have to pace myself. Thanks for the kind words from those of you who have 
contacted me. It meant a great deal to me as I went through my many 
complications. 


Ken Hackman


Sent from my iPhoneIMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Clarke County Observations
From: Robert Smith <rsmithent AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 13:28:17 -0400
I was up in Clarke County, Mississippi yesterday, not really birding, but I saw 
lots of birds. 

 
The two observations that stood out in my mind were: 1) an adult American robin 
near the exit of "Campground B" at Archusa Creek Water Park and 2) a 
swallow-tailed kite soaring just to the south of Highway 18 near Bucatunna 
Creek. 

 
I saw a lot of the "usual" birds for the area including: black vulture, turkey 
vulture, yellow-crowned night heron, great egret, great blue heron, snowy 
egret, cattle egret, Cooper's hawk, killdeer, morning dove, ruby-throated 
hummingbird, barred owl, belted kingfisher, red-bellied woodpecker, red-headed 
woodpecker, pileated woodpecker, Acadian flycatcher, white-eyed vireo, blue 
jay, American crow, purple martin, barn swallow, tufted titmouse, Carolina 
chickadee, Carolina wren, eastern bluebird, northern mockingbird, northern 
cardinal, and red-winged blackbird. 

 
Robert Smith
rsmithent AT msn.com
Biloxi, MS
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Rubythroat nest
From: Ken Hackman <khackman AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 11:53:56 -0500
Birding with Rynetta Coetzee and Angus Emmott from Australia. I've just found 
an active hummer nest at Mayes Lake. Isn't this pretty late? 


Ken 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 27, 2014, at 5:59 AM, Ken Hackman  wrote:
> 
> Just had a Roseate Spoonbill flyover at Pipeline Rd. At the Ross Barnett 
Reservoir. Only my second st this location 

> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Jul 23, 2014, at 9:02 PM, Devin Bosler  wrote:
>> 
>> MISSBIRD,
>> 
>> ATTENTION LOUISIANA/ MISSISSIPPI SEABIRDERS, NATURALISTS, and MARINE 
WILDLIFE ENTHUSIASTS: 

>> 
>> Here's another excellent opportunity to join your fellow Louisiana birders 
and outdoorsman to the deep, cobalt blue, offshore waters of the Louisiana 
Gulf. We've had a few fairly successful pelagic trips with Capt. John Coulon of 
Delta Blue Sport Fishing aboard the 47' F/V Cougar out of Venice Marina over 
the last five years. However, it's time for a change in captain, vessel, port, 
scenery, coverage area, etc. Over the years, the only real challenge has been 
finding an offshore vessel large enough to accommodate as many passengers as 
possible. Believe it or not, there are only three such vessels in service out 
of coastal southeast Louisiana. After some online browsing and phone calls, I'm 
proposing that we give Capt. Ed Petri of the 65' F/V Louisiana, the new owner 
of Steve Tomeny Charters, out of Port Fourchon a try this time around. This 
spacious, fishing vessel with air-conditioned cabin, showers, and other 
amenities will accommodate upwards of 25-30 birders 

> ,
>> perhaps more, depending upon level of interest and demand. So, there should 
be plenty of room for all interested persons. Not to mention, the cost per 
person will be much lower than on the other charter. We're looking at about 
$100 or less per person at this point, which is unbeatable and rather 
unbelievable for 2014 pelagic trips. Please consider joining if you can make it 
out. 

>> 
>> As of now, we plan on making the run to Mississippi Canyon and Sackett Bank 
area as we have before. We'll probably depart by about 5 or 6 AM and return by 
late afternoon/ evening. It'll be a full-day trip running about 12-14 hours 
from dock back to dock. It'll take approximately 2 hours or so to reach the 
continental shelf break and blue water, so prepare accordingly. You'll need 
sunscreen, plenty of liquids, snacks, and of course, optics and cameras. I'll 
have more details and information as this and other future trips develop. 

>> 
>> This upcoming trip will be tentatively scheduled for Saturday, 4 October 
2014. Early October should be a good timeframe for transient seabirds, 
especially shearwaters, out in the Gulf. Along with the more expected 
summer-visiting Cory's and Audubon's Shearwater, we'll have a chance, albeit 
unlikely, at a stray Great and/ or Sooty Shearwater. It'll be too late in the 
season for storm-petrels but maybe we'll luck into Masked Booby and/ or 
Red-billed Tropicbird. Who knows what else? A Texas pelagic (out of SPI) has 
had a Yellow-nosed Albatross on 26 September 2003 and the state's first South 
Polar Skua on 1 October 2004. So, you never know what we'll come across out 
there. We will have hundreds, if not thousands, of Black Terns along with other 
common inshore/ nearshore waterbirds. We may even have some migrant landbirds 
stop to rest onboard. That opens up another realm of possibilities. Plus, 
marine mammals (e.g. various spp. of whales and dolphins), many marin 

> e
>> fishes (we've had a couple of spp. of sharks, ocean sunfish, etc.), and 
we've had good looks at four different species of sea turtles. 

>> 
>> If you're interested, please contact me via email at devinbosler AT gmail.com 
and/ or mobile phone at 717-203-1795. You can always leave a voice message or 
send a text message as well. The more participants, the better, so don't 
hesitate to contact me. Please feel free to cross-post this message to the 
LABIRD listserv, as I'm not subscribed. Spread the word! 

>> 
>> best, 
>> Devin Bosler
>> 
>> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
>> 
>> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
>> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
>> Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
>> View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/
> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
> 
> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
> Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
> View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/
> 
> 
> 
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Madison County Roseate Spoonbill
From: Ken Hackman <khackman AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 05:59:26 -0500
Just had a Roseate Spoonbill flyover at Pipeline Rd. At the Ross Barnett 
Reservoir. Only my second st this location 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 23, 2014, at 9:02 PM, Devin Bosler  wrote:
> 
> MISSBIRD,
> 
> ATTENTION LOUISIANA/ MISSISSIPPI SEABIRDERS, NATURALISTS, and MARINE WILDLIFE 
ENTHUSIASTS: 

> 
> Here's another excellent opportunity to join your fellow Louisiana birders 
and outdoorsman to the deep, cobalt blue, offshore waters of the Louisiana 
Gulf. We've had a few fairly successful pelagic trips with Capt. John Coulon of 
Delta Blue Sport Fishing aboard the 47' F/V Cougar out of Venice Marina over 
the last five years. However, it's time for a change in captain, vessel, port, 
scenery, coverage area, etc. Over the years, the only real challenge has been 
finding an offshore vessel large enough to accommodate as many passengers as 
possible. Believe it or not, there are only three such vessels in service out 
of coastal southeast Louisiana. After some online browsing and phone calls, I'm 
proposing that we give Capt. Ed Petri of the 65' F/V Louisiana, the new owner 
of Steve Tomeny Charters, out of Port Fourchon a try this time around. This 
spacious, fishing vessel with air-conditioned cabin, showers, and other 
amenities will accommodate upwards of 25-30 birders 

 ,
> perhaps more, depending upon level of interest and demand. So, there should 
be plenty of room for all interested persons. Not to mention, the cost per 
person will be much lower than on the other charter. We're looking at about 
$100 or less per person at this point, which is unbeatable and rather 
unbelievable for 2014 pelagic trips. Please consider joining if you can make it 
out. 

> 
> As of now, we plan on making the run to Mississippi Canyon and Sackett Bank 
area as we have before. We'll probably depart by about 5 or 6 AM and return by 
late afternoon/ evening. It'll be a full-day trip running about 12-14 hours 
from dock back to dock. It'll take approximately 2 hours or so to reach the 
continental shelf break and blue water, so prepare accordingly. You'll need 
sunscreen, plenty of liquids, snacks, and of course, optics and cameras. I'll 
have more details and information as this and other future trips develop. 

> 
> This upcoming trip will be tentatively scheduled for Saturday, 4 October 
2014. Early October should be a good timeframe for transient seabirds, 
especially shearwaters, out in the Gulf. Along with the more expected 
summer-visiting Cory's and Audubon's Shearwater, we'll have a chance, albeit 
unlikely, at a stray Great and/ or Sooty Shearwater. It'll be too late in the 
season for storm-petrels but maybe we'll luck into Masked Booby and/ or 
Red-billed Tropicbird. Who knows what else? A Texas pelagic (out of SPI) has 
had a Yellow-nosed Albatross on 26 September 2003 and the state's first South 
Polar Skua on 1 October 2004. So, you never know what we'll come across out 
there. We will have hundreds, if not thousands, of Black Terns along with other 
common inshore/ nearshore waterbirds. We may even have some migrant landbirds 
stop to rest onboard. That opens up another realm of possibilities. Plus, 
marine mammals (e.g. various spp. of whales and dolphins), many marin 

 e
> fishes (we've had a couple of spp. of sharks, ocean sunfish, etc.), and we've 
had good looks at four different species of sea turtles. 

> 
> If you're interested, please contact me via email at devinbosler AT gmail.com 
and/ or mobile phone at 717-203-1795. You can always leave a voice message or 
send a text message as well. The more participants, the better, so don't 
hesitate to contact me. Please feel free to cross-post this message to the 
LABIRD listserv, as I'm not subscribed. Spread the word! 

> 
> best, 
> Devin Bosler
> 
> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
> 
> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
> Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
> View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/
> 
> 
> 
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: OT: Louisiana (Port Fourchon) Pelagic Trip
From: Devin Bosler <devinbosler AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:02:45 -0500
MISSBIRD,

ATTENTION LOUISIANA/ MISSISSIPPI SEABIRDERS, NATURALISTS, and MARINE WILDLIFE 
ENTHUSIASTS: 


 Here's another excellent opportunity to join your fellow Louisiana birders and 
outdoorsman to the deep, cobalt blue, offshore waters of the Louisiana Gulf. 
We've had a few fairly successful pelagic trips with Capt. John Coulon of Delta 
Blue Sport Fishing aboard the 47' F/V Cougar out of Venice Marina over the last 
five years. However, it's time for a change in captain, vessel, port, scenery, 
coverage area, etc. Over the years, the only real challenge has been finding an 
offshore vessel large enough to accommodate as many passengers as possible. 
Believe it or not, there are only three such vessels in service out of coastal 
southeast Louisiana. After some online browsing and phone calls, I'm proposing 
that we give Capt. Ed Petri of the 65' F/V Louisiana, the new owner of Steve 
Tomeny Charters, out of Port Fourchon a try this time around. This spacious, 
fishing vessel with air-conditioned cabin, showers, and other amenities will 
accommodate upwards of 25-30 birders, 

 perhaps more, depending upon level of interest and demand. So, there should be 
plenty of room for all interested persons. Not to mention, the cost per person 
will be much lower than on the other charter. We're looking at about $100 or 
less per person at this point, which is unbeatable and rather unbelievable for 
2014 pelagic trips. Please consider joining if you can make it out. 


 As of now, we plan on making the run to Mississippi Canyon and Sackett Bank 
area as we have before. We'll probably depart by about 5 or 6 AM and return by 
late afternoon/ evening. It'll be a full-day trip running about 12-14 hours 
from dock back to dock. It'll take approximately 2 hours or so to reach the 
continental shelf break and blue water, so prepare accordingly. You'll need 
sunscreen, plenty of liquids, snacks, and of course, optics and cameras. I'll 
have more details and information as this and other future trips develop. 


 This upcoming trip will be tentatively scheduled for Saturday, 4 October 2014. 
Early October should be a good timeframe for transient seabirds, especially 
shearwaters, out in the Gulf. Along with the more expected summer-visiting 
Cory's and Audubon's Shearwater, we'll have a chance, albeit unlikely, at a 
stray Great and/ or Sooty Shearwater. It'll be too late in the season for 
storm-petrels but maybe we'll luck into Masked Booby and/ or Red-billed 
Tropicbird. Who knows what else? A Texas pelagic (out of SPI) has had a 
Yellow-nosed Albatross on 26 September 2003 and the state's first South Polar 
Skua on 1 October 2004. So, you never know what we'll come across out there. We 
will have hundreds, if not thousands, of Black Terns along with other common 
inshore/ nearshore waterbirds. We may even have some migrant landbirds stop to 
rest onboard. That opens up another realm of possibilities. Plus, marine 
mammals (e.g. various spp. of whales and dolphins), many marine 

 fishes (we've had a couple of spp. of sharks, ocean sunfish, etc.), and we've 
had good looks at four different species of sea turtles. 


 If you're interested, please contact me via email at devinbosler AT gmail.com 
and/ or mobile phone at 717-203-1795. You can always leave a voice message or 
send a text message as well. The more participants, the better, so don't 
hesitate to contact me. Please feel free to cross-post this message to the 
LABIRD listserv, as I'm not subscribed. Spread the word! 


best, 
Devin Bosler

IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Re: Fwd: [TN-Bird] IN MEMORY OF BOB HATCHER
From: Mary Stevens <stevenswaterbird AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 10:35:59 -0500
Van. Thank you for sharing this about Bob Hatcher. He was very kind and 
supportive to me years ago when I was involved w eagle nest monitoring in MS. 
Mary 


Mary Stripling
Museum Librarian, Retired
Mississippi Museum of Natural Science
2148 Riverside Drive
Jackson, MS 39202
Home: 675 Lakewood Rd
Vicksburg, MS 38180
Cell: 601.832.6788
Library AT mmns.state.ms.us
Stevenswaterbird AT bellsouth.net
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 23, 2014, at 2:49 AM, van harris  
wrote: 

> 
> Conservation in the Mid-South has lost a great friend.
> 
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Wallace Coffey 
> Date: Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 10:44 PM
> Subject: [TN-Bird] IN MEMORY OF BOB HATCHER
> To: Tn Bird List 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>  
> 
> IN MEMORY OF BOB HATCHER
> 
>  
> 
> American Eagle Foundation Eagle Consultant
> 
> and Retired Eagle Project Leader,
> TN Wildlife Resources Agency (1978-2001)
> 
>  
> 
> 
> ​Van Harris
> Millington, TN​
> 
Subject: Fwd: [TN-Bird] IN MEMORY OF BOB HATCHER
From: van harris <shelbyforester1223 AT rittermail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 02:49:13 -0500
Conservation in the Mid-South has lost a great friend.

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Wallace Coffey 
Date: Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 10:44 PM
Subject: [TN-Bird] IN MEMORY OF BOB HATCHER
To: Tn Bird List 


*[image: Bob HATCHER.jpg]*



*IN MEMORY OF BOB HATCHER*



*American Eagle Foundation Eagle Consultant*

*and Retired Eagle Project Leader,*
*TN Wildlife Resources Agency (1978-2001)*



 *​Van Harris*
*Millington, TN​*
Subject: Fall MOS Meeting Sep 19-21, featuring photographer and ID expert Kevin Karlson
From: Jason Hoeksema <hoeksema AT olemiss.edu>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:49:02 -0500
Missbirders,
The Mississippi Ornithological Society (MOS) will hold its *fall meeting*
in Greenwood, MS the weekend of September 19-21, 2014. You won't want to
miss this meeting. Our special guest will be *photographer and ID expert
Kevin Karlson  *(*The Shorebird
Guide*

), 

who will give presentations on the amazing lives and varieties of
shorebirds as well as his impressionistic approach to bird identification.
In addition, Kevin will lead an interactive 1/2-day field workshop on
Saturday to put shorebird identification to practice and showcase Delta
birding. Meeting events will be scheduled for Friday evening through
Saturday evening with field trips Saturday and Sunday morning. During the
weekend, we expect to find 14+ species of shorebirds (including American
Avocets, Black-necked Stilts, and their more cryptic cousins), along with
thousands of waders (including Wood Stork & Roseate Spoonbill), and migrant
passerines. Delta birding can be fantastic this time of year.

For *additional details* including speaker bio, lodging information, and
itinerary, please visit this page:
http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/fall_meeting_announcement.pdf

For online (or mail-in) meeting *registration*, please visit this webpage:
http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/FallMeeting.htm

Also: You can now *join MOS online*. MOS members will receive discounted
registration for this event, are eligible to register for a meet & greet
with Kevin Karlson on Sept. 19, and also will receive discounted
registration for future field trips led by Delta Wind Birds
 (who is co-sponsoring this fall MOS
meeting). To join MOS, please visit this webpage:
http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/Membership%20info.htm

We hope to see you in Greenwood in September!

best wishes,
Jason Hoeksema & J.R. Rigby
Oxford, MS
Subject: Re: Golden eagle
From: Jason Hoeksema <hoeksema AT olemiss.edu>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:59:49 -0500
Billy,
Maybe you were already aware of this, but you can find 8-10 sightings of
Golden Eagles in Mississippi, and more in western TN, using the eBird Range
& Point Map tool, for example:

http://ebird.org/ebird/map/goleag?neg=true&env.minX=&env.minY=&env.maxX=&env.maxY=&zh=false&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=all&byr=1900&eyr=2014 


Of course, not all historical sightings have been put into eBird
(especially in MS), so MOS would likely have some additional records.
best wishes,
Jason Hoeksema
Oxford, MS



On Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 9:56 PM, Billy Bump  wrote:

> Is any one aware of any golden eagle sightings in north MS. Or western TN?
>
> Billy Bump
> Olive Branch
> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
>
> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
> Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
> View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/
>
>
>
>


-- 
Dr. Jason D. Hoeksema, Associate Professor
Department of Biology
University of Mississippi
phone: 662-915-1275
lab website 
Subject: Golden eagle
From: Billy Bump <billbobumpo AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 21:56:06 -0500
Is any one aware of any golden eagle sightings in north MS. Or western TN? 

Billy Bump
Olive Branch
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Kites
From: Robert Briscoe <rbriscoe2012 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 10:06:01 -0500
The Mississippi Kites nesting in my backyard had one chick. I could not find 
the adult birds this morning. The chick was perched on the edge of the nest. At 
8:30 the chick jumped out of the nest and glided behind some other trees. After 
a few minutes, the chick came back and landed in a tree where he had a good 
view of my hummingbird feeders. It sat in that tree for a few minutes and made 
a shallow dive across my backyard. The hummers scattered. The kite chick went 
back to the nest. Both adult birds landed in the nest right behind the chick. 
They seemed to be excited to see their baby take it's first flight. 

Robert Briscoe
53 CR 327
Oxford Ms
 		 	   		  
Subject: Join MOS online
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 10:00:06 -0500
Missbirders,

The membership webpage at the Mississippi Ornithological Society website
has been updated with the new dues structure. Additionally, anyone
interested in joining MOS may do so online.

http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/Membership%20info.htm

As this is brand new, please let me know off-list if you have any
difficulties using the PayPal interface. Please note that you do NOT have
to have a PayPal account to use this feature.

JR
jr.rigby AT gmail.com
Subject: Nest Cam - Mississippi Kites
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 20:07:03 -0500
Missbirders,

I've been watching the Mississippi Kites nesting in my neighborhood again
this year. The pair have a single nestling as they did last year. At the
beginning of this week Junior had a nearly full set of coverts, was still
growing his flight feathers, and his new body plumage was still in pin
feathers, particularly visible on the top of the head.

I've been watching primarily how the two adults attend the nest. The female
maintains the strongest contact with the nest. She is also the only one of
the pair that I have witnessed spend any substantial amount of time on the
nest. Most evenings she has settled onto the nest sometime between 17:00
and 19:00, ostensibly for the night (for example, this evening she was
continuously on the nest 16:55-18:30, evidenced by video, and has been
there each time I've checked since), but has been off the nest again by
06:30 each morning when I generally check the nest for the first time and
remains in the area but off the nest for the rest of the day. When she is
not on the nest, she is frequently perched at one of two or three sentinel
locations in the crowns of neighboring trees within 50m or so of the nest
where she watches over the nest and occasionally hawks a passing cicada or
dragonfly, most often for her own appetite. I have only seen her bring food
to Junior twice in the last week, both today in a span of 10min.

The male comes to the nest irregularly and has otherwise been out of sight
(i.e., not perching at similar nest-watch sites as the female). When he
brings food to the nest, moreover, I have not seen him spend more than 5 to
10 seconds on the nest at any one visit in more than a dozen such trips.
The time between his visits varies considerably, from 2 min to over 120
min. The latter hiatus was not broken by a visit from the female either.
There seems to be some, but not perfect, correlation between the size of
the food item brought and the time lapse until the next visit. Yesterday
afternoon, Junior worked on one unidentified, but fleshy, food item
vigorously for over half an hour.

Mississippi Kites are one of the species known to exhibit "helper" behavior
at nests, where an additional adult or sub-adult will provide assistance to
the mated pair in providing food and defending a nest. I was very curious
whether last year's nestling might return as a helper this year, but to
this point I have seen no evidence of a third MIKI involved at this nest.

Today I managed to get video of each adult bringing food to the nestling.
On a routine feeding visit, though the female doesn't stay long, in
comparison with the rather business-like male (5 sec) she seems to linger
(15 sec). Each adult has a more or less consistent "tell" when approaching
the nest with food (allowing me to avoid filming copious amounts of
continuously dull
nestling-lies-on-nest-and-turns-his-head-every-two-minutes material in an
effort to catch the adults). The female has a particular flight approach
wherein she flies through my line of sight to the nest, but continues
beyond the nest to an adjacent tree where she briefly perches out of sight.
A few seconds later, she appears at the nest. The male approaches directly
but most often vocalizes on his approach. The vocalization is not the
typical "phee-phew" one hears from MIKI, but a softer poly-syllabic
"phee-peeterit" (not that such descriptions ever helped anyone with a
vocalization). The majority of the male's visits are preceded by this sound
a second or two before he reaches the nest. I am not sure whether the
female uses the same vocalization or not.

Video clip of female adult feeding the nestling (~1min):
https://www.flickr.com/photos/123863674 AT N04/14508304300/

Video clip of male adult feeding the nestling (~1min):
https://www.flickr.com/photos/123863674 AT N04/14508417857/

Good birding!

JR
Oxford
Subject: Coastal Yearbirds
From: Gene Knight <gsknight AT hughes.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 12:52:30 -0500
MISSBIRDERS,

Shannon and I spent a day and a half (Wed and Thurs) between lots of 
rain on the coast searching for some resident year birds we had missed 
this spring. We arrived on the MS Gulf Coast on Wed morning and quickly 
added Gull-billed and Sandwich Terns along the Harrison Co beaches. 
Traveling over the Biloxi/Ocean Springs bridge (Hwy 90) Shannon spotted 
a single male Magnificent Frigatebird flying right at us. With northerly 
winds that day we knew we were two lucky birders.
The next morning--temps around 64 degrees---near record setting lows for 
July--and nice low humidity we set off for Graveline beach area of 
Jackson Co for Seaside Sparrows and were rewarded by several singing. 
 From there we headed north to the Pascagoula WMA off Hwy 614. A couple 
of hours watching 12's of White Ibis fly by, a single male Anhinga, and 
other local birds we finally spotted a single Swallow-tailed Kite 
soaring at mid-day. Year Bird # 5.
We then traveled west into Hancock Co off Hwy 603 north of Kiln and 
found a single C. Ground-Dove at a site that is regular for this hard to 
see local nester. On back south and east to Pass Christian to find Inca 
Doves. This is the area where the INDO's were first seen in the state in 
1996. Driving thru the streets we found a single bird walking on the 
sidewalk on E. 2nd Street. Year Bird # 7.
We ended the day at Gulfport Harbor looking at our final year bird for 
the trip--a beautiful adult plumaged Black Tern, the first southbound 
BLTE seen this season.
Great Cool weather, NO BUGS, No Humidity--On the MS Gulf Coast in 
Summer!!!! Go figure!

Gene and Shannon Knight
Oxford, MS

ps--We loved seeing all the Least Terns
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Re: Annotated List
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 20:09:09 -0500
Missbirders,

The annotated list for the coastal counties is also now up on the MOS
website:

http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/Files/Mississippi%20State%20Checklist/coast_checklist_2014.pdf 


JR


On Mon, Jul 14, 2014 at 11:15 AM, Ned and Lucy Boyajian <
nedlucyboyajian AT bellsouth.net> wrote:

> Missbirders
> The Annotated List of Birds MS Coastal Counties has been updated through
> June 30, 2014. Copies are available at both the MOS and Pearl River Audubon
> Center websites.
> Ned Boyajian
> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
>
> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
> Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
> View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/
>
>
>
>
Subject: Scissor-tailed flycatcher in Madison county
From: Lane Rushing <lanerushing12 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 13:57:51 -0500
Pair of Scissor-tails are still hanging out in the pasture on Hwy 22 north
side of road between Canton and Flora. West of Caroline Blvd entrance to
Lake Caroline--west of Mcmillon rd and east of entrance to Charleton
subdivision as previously reported by Billy Mitchell and others.  Captured
one of them perched and in flight this morning before 8am.  Shot this with
a Nikon D600 with 300mm f4 and 1.7 teleconverter (500mm equivalent).
Cropped pretty heavily.
Subject: Annotated List
From: Ned and Lucy Boyajian <nedlucyboyajian AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 11:15:31 -0500
Missbirders
The Annotated List of Birds MS Coastal Counties has been updated through 
June 30, 2014. Copies are available at both the MOS and Pearl River 
Audubon Center websites.
Ned Boyajian
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Re: Young Mississippi Kites - Yazoo Co
From: "Johnson, Erik" <ejohnson AT audubon.org>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 01:23:02 +0000
Hi JR,

What is going on with the MIKI molt is that these are 2nd calendar year (SY) 
birds molting into their second basic plumage. Like Wheeler and Clark (and also 
Pyle 2008) state, no primaries or secondaries molt in a juvenile’s first 
fall, only body feathers and sometimes (but not always) some to all rectrices. 
Because juvenile flight feathers all grow simultaneously, the inner feathers 
wouldn’t look fresher than the outer feathers. What your birds seem to show 
are the unmolted juvenile rectrices, secondaries, and outer primaries from 
their juvenile plumage acquired in 2013, and the inner primaries are the 
incoming 2nd basic growing this summer/fall. This prebasic molt can start on 
the breeding grounds, then would suspend for migration, and then complete on 
the wintering grounds. I’d bet your bird has either just dropped p4 or has 
already suspended flight feather molt for migration. They’ll also replace 
those juvenile rectrices for second basic rectrices at some point, perhaps 
after they arrive on the wintering grounds. 


Happy birding,
Erik Johnson
S Lafayette, LA
ejohnson AT audubon.org



From: missbird-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:missbird-bounce AT freelists.org] On 
Behalf Of JR Rigby 

Sent: Sunday, July 13, 2014 7:25 PM
To: MISSBIRD
Subject: [missbird] Young Mississippi Kites - Yazoo Co

Missbirders,

This afternoon about 14:00 I watched a large flock of 25+ Mississippi Kites 
hunting over a catfish farm and surrounding fields north of Yazoo City. The 
majority of those seen well with binocs from the ground were juveniles, 
distinguishable by banding in the tails and much messier coloration including a 
lot of mottled brown from below. I got a few photos, none great: 


Juvenile MIKI (note the darker inner primaries... comments below):
https://www.flickr.com/photos/123863674 AT N04/14647269682/in/photostream/

Juvenile MIKI with what looks to be a large prey for a Kite, perhaps a small 
bird or mammal (pic is too bad to tell): 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/123863674 AT N04/14644366301/in/photostream/ 


Juvenile MIKI diving for prey:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/123863674 AT N04/14667480853/in/photostream/

Juvenile MIKI diving for dragonfly:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/123863674 AT N04/14460952879/in/photostream/
Sure, that might be a fortuitous little accident (how close is that dragonfly 
to the MIKI really??? But, it tells a nice story, so go with it.). 


Two bits of info were notable for me:
1) I've never seen a Kite carrying any prey larger than an Anole Lizard or a 
small frog, so whatever that MIKI in the second picture has is the new standard 
for me. And kudos to that youngster for trying to eat that chunk on the wing. 

2) At least a couple of these juvenile birds have inner primaries (looks like 
P1-P3) that are distinctly darker than adjacent outer primaries and 
secondaries. I haven't seen many juveniles in flight, so this was new to me. I 
initially thought that these darker primaries might be newly molted 
post-juvenile plumage, but according to Clark, Wheeler and Peterson's Field 
Guide to Hawks of North America, juveniles will not molt their flight feathers 
for a full year, that is, until returning to the breeding grounds next year. So 
perhaps these are just the freshest of the primaries in the first plumage. 


Good birding,

JR
Oxford

Subject: Young Mississippi Kites - Yazoo Co
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 19:25:29 -0500
Missbirders,

This afternoon about 14:00 I watched a large flock of 25+ Mississippi Kites
hunting over a catfish farm and surrounding fields north of Yazoo City. The
majority of those seen well with binocs from the ground were juveniles,
distinguishable by banding in the tails and much messier coloration
including a lot of mottled brown from below. I got a few photos, none great:

Juvenile MIKI (note the darker inner primaries... comments below):
*https://www.flickr.com/photos/123863674 AT N04/14647269682/in/photostream/
*

Juvenile MIKI with what looks to be a large prey for a Kite, perhaps a
small bird or mammal (pic is too bad to tell):
https://www.flickr.com/photos/123863674 AT N04/14644366301/in/photostream/

Juvenile MIKI diving for prey:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/123863674 AT N04/14667480853/in/photostream/

Juvenile MIKI diving for dragonfly:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/123863674 AT N04/14460952879/in/photostream/
Sure, that might be a fortuitous little accident (how close is that
dragonfly to the MIKI really??? But, it tells a nice story, so go with it.).

Two bits of info were notable for me:
1) I've never seen a Kite carrying any prey larger than an Anole Lizard or
a small frog, so whatever that MIKI in the second picture has is the new
standard for me. And kudos to that youngster for trying to eat that chunk
on the wing.
2) At least a couple of these juvenile birds have inner primaries (looks
like P1-P3) that are distinctly darker than adjacent outer primaries and
secondaries. I haven't seen many juveniles in flight, so this was new to
me. I initially thought that these darker primaries might be newly molted
post-juvenile plumage, but according to Clark, Wheeler and Peterson's Field
Guide to Hawks of North America, juveniles will not molt their flight
feathers for a full year, that is, until returning to the breeding grounds
next year. So perhaps these are just the freshest of the primaries in the
first plumage.

Good birding,

JR
Oxford
Subject: Re: Fwd: Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton
From: JR Rigby <jr.rigby AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 17:37:21 -0500
Missbirders,

I made it by to see the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher yesterday at 16:30 in the
top of the same dead tree across from McMillon Rd. I only saw one bird, but
was only in the area for about 15min.

Photo:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/123863674 AT N04/14667423783/in/photostream/

Thanks to all who have posted on this birded.

JR
Oxford



On Sun, Jul 13, 2014 at 4:48 PM, Redacted sender tippyg AT aol.com for DMARC <
dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> wrote:

> Just came from seeing the flycatcher, great directions, thanks!  tg
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Adam Rohnke 
> To: evrusse 
> Cc: missbird 
> Sent: Sun, Jul 13, 2014 12:03 pm
> Subject: [missbird] Re: Fwd: Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton
>
>  [image: image.jpeg]The scissor tail is still here and hawking
> constantly....exact same spot as other descriptions. See horrible I phone
> pic. Attached.
>
>  Great bird!!!
>
>  Adam
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 12, 2014, at 11:51 AM, EVELYN RUSSELL  wrote:
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From: *"EVELYN RUSSELL" 
> *To: *carlsmith AT fs.fed.us
> *Sent: *Saturday, July 12, 2014 11:49:13 AM
> *Subject: *Re: [missbird] Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton
>
> I just saw THEM.  There were two....one smaller than the other.  Put on
> quite a show for me and I got pictures....not very good because I don't
> have a great camera.  Is this a pair??? I live about two miles from
> them....Evelyn Russell
>
> ------------------------------
> *From: *"Carl G Smith -FS" 
> *To: *"MISSBIRD" 
> *Sent: *Friday, July 11, 2014 10:21:43 AM
> *Subject: *[missbird] Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton
>
> Missbirders,
> The Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was directly across Hwy 22 from the entrance
> to Mcmillon Rd yesterday (July, 10th) at 4:30pm.  It was in the top of a
> big dead tree (maybe the same dead tree Gene saw it in).
> Carl Smith
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: missbird-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:missbird-bounce AT freelists.org]
> On Behalf Of Gene Knight
> Sent: Tuesday, July 08, 2014 2:12 PM
> To: MISSBIRD
> Subject: [missbird] Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton
>
> MISSBIRDERS,
>
> I saw the STFL about 11:30 am this morning directly north of the set of
> light wires that Billy Simmons has been seeing it. There is a large grown
> up field with a large old dead tree here and the STFL was perched in the
> top. Several times it sallied out and scissored about only to return to the
> top of the old dead tree.
>
> Here is Billy's original post for directions: Just saw sc tail flycatcher
> on light wire along Hwy 22 north side of road between Canton and Flora.
> West of Caroline Blvd entrance to Lake Caroline--west of Mcmillon rd and
> east of entrance to Charleton subdivision.
>
>
> Gene Knight
> Oxford, MS
> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
>
> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
> Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org View archives:
> http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely
> for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message
> or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law
> and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you
> have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete
> the email immediately.
> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
>
> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
> Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
> View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Fwd: Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "tippyg@aol.com" for DMARC)
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 17:48:53 -0400 (EDT)
Just came from seeing the flycatcher, great directions, thanks!  tg



-----Original Message-----
From: Adam Rohnke 
To: evrusse 
Cc: missbird 
Sent: Sun, Jul 13, 2014 12:03 pm
Subject: [missbird] Re: Fwd: Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton



The scissor tail is still here and hawking constantly....exact same spot as 
other descriptions. See horrible I phone pic. Attached. 



Great bird!!! 


Adam

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 12, 2014, at 11:51 AM, EVELYN RUSSELL  wrote:







From: "EVELYN RUSSELL" 
To: carlsmith AT fs.fed.us
Sent: Saturday, July 12, 2014 11:49:13 AM
Subject: Re: [missbird] Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton


I just saw THEM. There were two....one smaller than the other. Put on quite a 
show for me and I got pictures....not very good because I don't have a great 
camera. Is this a pair??? I live about two miles from them....Evelyn Russell 




From: "Carl G Smith -FS" 
To: "MISSBIRD" 
Sent: Friday, July 11, 2014 10:21:43 AM
Subject: [missbird] Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton

Missbirders,
The Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was directly across Hwy 22 from the entrance to 
Mcmillon Rd yesterday (July, 10th) at 4:30pm. It was in the top of a big dead 
tree (maybe the same dead tree Gene saw it in). 

Carl Smith

-----Original Message-----
From: missbird-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:missbird-bounce AT freelists.org] On 
Behalf Of Gene Knight 

Sent: Tuesday, July 08, 2014 2:12 PM
To: MISSBIRD
Subject: [missbird] Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton

MISSBIRDERS,

I saw the STFL about 11:30 am this morning directly north of the set of light 
wires that Billy Simmons has been seeing it. There is a large grown up field 
with a large old dead tree here and the STFL was perched in the top. Several 
times it sallied out and scissored about only to return to the top of the old 
dead tree. 


Here is Billy's original post for directions: Just saw sc tail flycatcher on 
light wire along Hwy 22 north side of road between Canton and Flora. West of 
Caroline Blvd entrance to Lake Caroline--west of Mcmillon rd and east of 
entrance to Charleton subdivision. 



Gene Knight
Oxford, MS
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org View archives: 
http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/ 








This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 

IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/









Subject: Re: Fwd: Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton
From: Adam Rohnke <atrohnke AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 12:02:39 -0500
The scissor tail is still here and hawking constantly....exact same spot as 
other descriptions. See horrible I phone pic. Attached. 


Great bird!!! 

Adam

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 12, 2014, at 11:51 AM, EVELYN RUSSELL  wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> From: "EVELYN RUSSELL" 
> To: carlsmith AT fs.fed.us
> Sent: Saturday, July 12, 2014 11:49:13 AM
> Subject: Re: [missbird] Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton
> 
> I just saw THEM. There were two....one smaller than the other. Put on quite a 
show for me and I got pictures....not very good because I don't have a great 
camera. Is this a pair??? I live about two miles from them....Evelyn Russell 

> 
> From: "Carl G Smith -FS" 
> To: "MISSBIRD" 
> Sent: Friday, July 11, 2014 10:21:43 AM
> Subject: [missbird] Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton
> 
> Missbirders,
> The Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was directly across Hwy 22 from the entrance to 
Mcmillon Rd yesterday (July, 10th) at 4:30pm. It was in the top of a big dead 
tree (maybe the same dead tree Gene saw it in). 

> Carl Smith
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: missbird-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:missbird-bounce AT freelists.org] On 
Behalf Of Gene Knight 

> Sent: Tuesday, July 08, 2014 2:12 PM
> To: MISSBIRD
> Subject: [missbird] Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton
> 
> MISSBIRDERS,
> 
> I saw the STFL about 11:30 am this morning directly north of the set of light 
wires that Billy Simmons has been seeing it. There is a large grown up field 
with a large old dead tree here and the STFL was perched in the top. Several 
times it sallied out and scissored about only to return to the top of the old 
dead tree. 

> 
> Here is Billy's original post for directions: Just saw sc tail flycatcher on 
light wire along Hwy 22 north side of road between Canton and Flora. West of 
Caroline Blvd entrance to Lake Caroline--west of Mcmillon rd and east of 
entrance to Charleton subdivision. 

> 
> 
> Gene Knight
> Oxford, MS
> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
> 
> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
> Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org View archives: 
http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/ 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 

> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
> 
> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
> Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
> View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Botswana Birds
From: Martha Swan <marthaswan AT starband.net>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 17:30:43 -0500
Missbirders,

Here is a link to a photo album on Flickr of birds we saw in Botswana.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/m_and_d_swan/sets/72157645461311494/

Some photos are useful only for ID purposes, but I hope that the album
gives you a glimpse of the incredible beauty and diversity of the birdlife
there. Thanks to those who advised on choosing a photo sharing service.
Please let me know if you see any ID errors or if you can ID the mystery
birds.

Although the Flickr account is in my name, of course Dana was the
photographer!

Enjoy,
Martha

-- 
Martha Swan
1665 Toccopola Junction Road
Thaxton, MS 38871
Subject: MS kites
From: Nancy Donald <nmdonald55 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 17:00:42 -0500
Hey all

I saw 8 MS kites soaring over a field on the south side Old Country Club
Rd. W this afternoon.  There were 3 in the same location around 10:30 this
morning then the
8  this afternoon around 2.  Some were in molt. Beautiful birds to watch.



Nancy Donald

Meridian, MS

After you have exhausted what there is in business, politics, conviviality,
and so on - have found that none of these finally satisfy, or permanently
wear - what remains? Nature remains.

Walt Whitman 
Subject: MS kite
From: Nancy Donald <nmdonald55 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 16:10:28 -0500
Hey all

Saw 8 MS kit


-- 

Nancy Donald

Meridian, MS

After you have exhausted what there is in business, politics, conviviality,
and so on - have found that none of these finally satisfy, or permanently
wear - what remains? Nature remains.

Walt Whitman 
Subject: Fwd: Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton
From: EVELYN RUSSELL <evrusse AT hughes.net>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 12:51:32 -0400 (EDT)

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: "EVELYN RUSSELL"  
To: carlsmith AT fs.fed.us 
Sent: Saturday, July 12, 2014 11:49:13 AM 
Subject: Re: [missbird] Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton 


I just saw THEM. There were two....one smaller than the other. Put on quite a 
show for me and I got pictures....not very good because I don't have a great 
camera. Is this a pair??? I live about two miles from them....Evelyn Russell 


----- Forwarded Message -----

From: "Carl G Smith -FS"  
To: "MISSBIRD"  
Sent: Friday, July 11, 2014 10:21:43 AM 
Subject: [missbird] Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton 

Missbirders, 
The Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was directly across Hwy 22 from the entrance to 
Mcmillon Rd yesterday (July, 10th) at 4:30pm. It was in the top of a big dead 
tree (maybe the same dead tree Gene saw it in). 

Carl Smith 

-----Original Message----- 
From: missbird-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:missbird-bounce AT freelists.org] On 
Behalf Of Gene Knight 

Sent: Tuesday, July 08, 2014 2:12 PM 
To: MISSBIRD 
Subject: [missbird] Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton 

MISSBIRDERS, 

I saw the STFL about 11:30 am this morning directly north of the set of light 
wires that Billy Simmons has been seeing it. There is a large grown up field 
with a large old dead tree here and the STFL was perched in the top. Several 
times it sallied out and scissored about only to return to the top of the old 
dead tree. 


Here is Billy's original post for directions: Just saw sc tail flycatcher on 
light wire along Hwy 22 north side of road between Canton and Flora. West of 
Caroline Blvd entrance to Lake Caroline--west of Mcmillon rd and east of 
entrance to Charleton subdivision. 



Gene Knight 
Oxford, MS 
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES 

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org 
List owner: Martha Swan ulswan AT olemiss.edu 
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org View archives: 
http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/ 








This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 

IMPORTANT ADDRESSES 

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org 
List owner: Martha Swan ulswan AT olemiss.edu 
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org 
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/ 




Subject: Sardis Lake
From: Robert Briscoe <rbriscoe2012 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 07:51:07 -0500
Yesterday, I saw 20 Ospreys from the second boat ramp at Hurricane Landing.
Robert Briscoe
53 CR 327
Oxford Ms
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton
From: Billy Mitchell <bill.unit AT att.net>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 17:30:03 -0500
Still there at noon today.

Billy Mitchell

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 11, 2014, at 10:21 AM, "Smith, Carl G -FS"  
wrote: 

> 
> Missbirders,
> The Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was directly across Hwy 22 from the entrance to 
Mcmillon Rd yesterday (July, 10th) at 4:30pm. It was in the top of a big dead 
tree (maybe the same dead tree Gene saw it in). 

> Carl Smith
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: missbird-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:missbird-bounce AT freelists.org] On 
Behalf Of Gene Knight 

> Sent: Tuesday, July 08, 2014 2:12 PM
> To: MISSBIRD
> Subject: [missbird] Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton
> 
> MISSBIRDERS,
> 
> I saw the STFL about 11:30 am this morning directly north of the set of light 
wires that Billy Simmons has been seeing it. There is a large grown up field 
with a large old dead tree here and the STFL was perched in the top. Several 
times it sallied out and scissored about only to return to the top of the old 
dead tree. 

> 
> Here is Billy's original post for directions: Just saw sc tail flycatcher on 
light wire along Hwy 22 north side of road between Canton and Flora. West of 
Caroline Blvd entrance to Lake Caroline--west of Mcmillon rd and east of 
entrance to Charleton subdivision. 

> 
> 
> Gene Knight
> Oxford, MS
> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
> 
> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
> Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org View archives: 
http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/ 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 

> IMPORTANT ADDRESSES
> 
> Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
> List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
> Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
> View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/
> 
> 
> 
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton
From: "Smith, Carl G -FS" <carlsmith AT fs.fed.us>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 15:21:43 +0000
Missbirders,
The Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was directly across Hwy 22 from the entrance to 
Mcmillon Rd yesterday (July, 10th) at 4:30pm. It was in the top of a big dead 
tree (maybe the same dead tree Gene saw it in). 

Carl Smith

-----Original Message-----
From: missbird-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:missbird-bounce AT freelists.org] On 
Behalf Of Gene Knight 

Sent: Tuesday, July 08, 2014 2:12 PM
To: MISSBIRD
Subject: [missbird] Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton

MISSBIRDERS,

I saw the STFL about 11:30 am this morning directly north of the set of light 
wires that Billy Simmons has been seeing it. There is a large grown up field 
with a large old dead tree here and the STFL was perched in the top. Several 
times it sallied out and scissored about only to return to the top of the old 
dead tree. 


Here is Billy's original post for directions: Just saw sc tail flycatcher on 
light wire along Hwy 22 north side of road between Canton and Flora. West of 
Caroline Blvd entrance to Lake Caroline--west of Mcmillon rd and east of 
entrance to Charleton subdivision. 



Gene Knight
Oxford, MS
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org View archives: 
http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/ 








This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 

IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Fwd: National Academy of Sciences Gulf Research Program Fellowship Opportunity
From: msw103 AT ra.msstate.edu
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 14:11:05 -0500
Folks:

Please share with students as appropriate.  Thanks in advance for sharing...

Mark

----- Forwarded message from gomrinewsletter AT lists.oceanleadership.org -----
     Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2014 21:10:57 +0000
     From: gomrinewsletter AT lists.oceanleadership.org
Reply-To: info AT gulfresearchinitiative.org
  Subject: National Academy of Sciences Gulf Research Program  
Fellowship Opportunity
       To: "gomrinewsletter AT lists.oceanleadership.org"  


[cid:image002.png AT 01CF9ACF.944F0C70]

Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship Program

The Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship  
Program is designed to engage early career individuals in the  
processes that inform U.S. science and technology policy. Fellows  
obtain essential skills and knowledge needed to work in science and  
technology policy at the federal, state, or local level.

The Gulf Research Program will host a Christine Mirzayan Fellow in  
2015, so we encourage you to spread the word among potential  
candidates. The Fellow will be part of a cohort of about two dozen  
other Fellows learning about the role of science in the federal  
government and will work directly with the Gulf Research Program and  
our Advisory Board.

We will be looking at candidates who are forward-thinking and  
cross-disciplinary. Graduate and professional school students and  
those who have completed graduate studies within the last five years  
may apply. Areas of study may include social/behavioral sciences,  
health and medicine, physical or biological sciences, engineering,  
law/business/public administration, or relevant interdisciplinary  
fields. Special consideration will be given to candidates who are from  
a Gulf state, studying at a Gulf state institution, or doing research  
relevant to the Gulf of Mexico.

The program is open to all U.S. and non-U.S. citizens who meet the  
eligibility criteria. Applicants may be U.S. citizens or U.S. lawful  
permanent residents or adjustment applicants. Other eligible  
applicants include those with valid F-1, J, asylee, or refugee status.  
Non-U.S. citizens not currently enrolled in a U.S. university must be  
within 5 years of graduation and have OPT, work authorization, or  
their visa sponsor's written authorization valid throughout the  
program period.

Applications are due September 1, 2014. The stipend for the 12-week  
fellowship (January 20 - April 10, 2015) is $8,500. To learn more or  
to apply online, please visit:  
http://sites.nationalacademies.org/pga/policyfellows/ .

Questions? Send general questions about the fellowship to  
policyfellows AT nas.edu . Send questions  
about working with the Gulf Research Program to  
gulffellowships AT nas.edu . To learn  
more about the Gulf Research Program, visit  
www.nas.edu/gulf .


----- End forwarded message -----


-- 
Mark S. Woodrey, Ph.D.
Research Coordinator/Research Biologist

Mississippi State University - Coastal Research and Extension Center
Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve
6005 Bayou Heron Road
Moss Point, MS  39562

Phone: 228-475-7047
Mobile: 228-697-0460
E-mail: msw103 AT ra.msstate.edu

Subject: Eastern Bluebird
From: Regina George <reginaluvselvis AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 13:26:38 -0500
Just saw my first Eastern Bluebird! I almost wrecked my car craning my neck
to do a double take. It's the small things for this learning birder. :)

Regina George
Oxford, MS
Subject: A&D Turf Farm-South of Oxford
From: Gene Knight <gsknight AT hughes.net>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 10:52:00 -0500
MISSBIRDERS,

Knowing it's time for southbound shorebirds I checked the turf farm out 
this am with not much to report. 30 Killdeer and a single male Pectoral 
Sandpiper were the only shorebirds seen. A pair of Horned Larks were on 
the west end with a couple of juveniles feeding about.

A single adult Least Sandpiper was spotted on one of the large bubbles 
sticking up out of the grasses/duck weed that has flourished in the 
summer rains at the Sewage Lagoon south of Oxford.

Gene Knight
Oxford, MS
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Common Ground Dove & Scissortale Flycatchers
From: Randy Palmer <randyp AT hghhardware.com>
Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2014 19:08:01 -0500
Common Ground Dove life bird & Scissortale Flycatchers in Ruston, La.

Randy Palmer
HGH Hardware Supply
601-862-0432
Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher west of Canton
From: Gene Knight <gsknight AT hughes.net>
Date: Tue, 08 Jul 2014 14:11:35 -0500
MISSBIRDERS,

I saw the STFL about 11:30 am this morning directly north of the set of 
light wires that Billy Simmons has been seeing it. There is a large 
grown up field with a large old dead tree here and the STFL was perched 
in the top. Several times it sallied out and scissored about only to 
return to the top of the old dead tree.

Here is Billy's original post for directions: Just saw sc tail 
flycatcher on light wire along Hwy 22 north side of road between Canton 
and Flora. West of Caroline Blvd entrance to Lake Caroline--west of 
Mcmillon rd and east of entrance to Charleton subdivision.


Gene Knight
Oxford, MS
IMPORTANT ADDRESSES

Post message: missbird AT freelists.org
List owner: Martha Swan  ulswan AT olemiss.edu
Unsubscribe: send email to missbird-request AT freelists.org
View archives: http://www.freelists.org/archive/missbird/


Subject: Re: Scissor Tailed Flycatcher in Madison County, MS
From: Billy <billysimmons119 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2014 16:48:53 -0500
As of 4:30 pm today the scissor tail was in same spot as yesterday. I looked 
several times earlier today without finding it. 


Billy Simmons

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 6, 2014, at 11:13 AM, Billy  wrote:
> 
> Just saw sc tail flycatcher on light wire along Hwy 22 north side of road 
between Canton and Flora. West of Caroline Blvd entrance to Lake Caroline--west 
of Mcmillon rd and east of entrance to Charleton subdivision. 

> 
> Billy Simmons
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Jun 21, 2014, at 3:00 PM, Wayne Patterson  wrote:
>> 
>> This morning two Grasshopper Sparrows were across Highway 8 from the West 
end of the Black Swamp Mitigation Bank land West of Aberdeen. At the 
intersection of 45 bypass and Highway 8 in Aberdeen go West approximately one 9 
tenths of mile. On the left or South of 8 you will see a White House with white 
fence sitting up on a hill. The first bird was found on this house's fence that 
runs parallel to 8 East of the driveway. There are a couple of signs in this 
area and the closest to the bird was "Adopt a Highway Mississippi" sign. There 
is another fence East of this house that runs South at the bottom of the hill 
before this house coming from Aberdeen. Approximately 100 yards or so south on 
this fence another bird was keeping vigil on a wooded support section of the 
fence. I did not here either one sing but here a couple of photos. 

>>  
>>  http://www.pbase.com/wpatterson/image/156203287/large
>>  
>> http://www.pbase.com/wpatterson/image/156203362
>>  
>> Wayne Patterson
>> Shannon, MS  Lee Co.
Subject: Re: Scissor Tailed Flycatcher in Madison County, MS
From: Billy Mitchell <bill.unit AT att.net>
Date: Sun, 6 Jul 2014 15:14:07 -0500
As of now, 3:10 PM, bird is still at location described.

Billy Mitchell

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 6, 2014, at 11:13 AM, Billy  wrote:
> 
> Just saw sc tail flycatcher on light wire along Hwy 22 north side of road 
between Canton and Flora. West of Caroline Blvd entrance to Lake Caroline--west 
of Mcmillon rd and east of entrance to Charleton subdivision. 

> 
> Billy Simmons
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Jun 21, 2014, at 3:00 PM, Wayne Patterson  wrote:
>> 
>> This morning two Grasshopper Sparrows were across Highway 8 from the West 
end of the Black Swamp Mitigation Bank land West of Aberdeen. At the 
intersection of 45 bypass and Highway 8 in Aberdeen go West approximately one 9 
tenths of mile. On the left or South of 8 you will see a White House with white 
fence sitting up on a hill. The first bird was found on this house's fence that 
runs parallel to 8 East of the driveway. There are a couple of signs in this 
area and the closest to the bird was "Adopt a Highway Mississippi" sign. There 
is another fence East of this house that runs South at the bottom of the hill 
before this house coming from Aberdeen. Approximately 100 yards or so south on 
this fence another bird was keeping vigil on a wooded support section of the 
fence. I did not here either one sing but here a couple of photos. 

>>  
>>  http://www.pbase.com/wpatterson/image/156203287/large
>>  
>> http://www.pbase.com/wpatterson/image/156203362
>>  
>> Wayne Patterson
>> Shannon, MS  Lee Co.
Subject: Re: Raided Cardinal Nest wrap-up
From: Dana Swan <danaswan AT starband.net>
Date: Sun, 6 Jul 2014 11:48:32 -0500
During our recent trip to Botswana, while traveling down the Chobe River
our guide pointed out a flock of White-fronted Bee-eaters attacking a large
Water Monitor who was trying to raid a nest.   Not only did the parents
attack the Monitor, the rest of the flock did also.   We didn't stay around
long enough to find out the outcome.


On Fri, Jul 4, 2014 at 11:45 PM, Judy Dorsey  wrote:

> In Louisiana once I saw a Brown Thrasher attack a water snake in a small
> pond that was heading straight toward a clueless young Cardinal.  This was
> a scene I never forgot.
>
> A year or so later I found an Audubon print of four  thrashers attacking a
> snake at a nest and bought it: http://www.wildbirds.org/birds/thrash.htm
>
> If you Google the words brown thrasher snake, some interesting videos
> appear.
>
> Judy Dorsey
> West Tennessee
>
>
> On Fri, Jul 4, 2014 at 8:20 PM, JR Rigby  wrote:
>
>> Missbirders,
>>
>> A couple of natural history notes from the aftermath of the snake
>> encounter today. The snake did return. I (quite literally) caught him back
>> at the nest a half hour later in the act of swallowing the last egg. I
>> guess once a predator finds the nest, it's over.
>>
>> ON NEST DEFENSE:
>> It's interesting that the NOCAs couldn't or wouldn't defend the nest. The
>> female would display, raising her crest and fanning her tail, very near the
>> nest while the snake was in the act of swallowing the eggs, but I never saw
>> either male or female attack the snake. Through it all the female
>> maintained much closer contact with the predator than the male who was
>> equally agitated but kept a slightly larger radius between himself and the
>> snake, and at times moved to adjacent trees from which to protest. The
>> female never left the immediate vicinity of the nest, generally within
>> inches.
>>
>> I've read that nest defense behavior varies widely among passerines. Some
>> are fearless and aggressive, others will make a lot of noise but otherwise
>> stand by while a nest is raided. Also, I wonder if a fearless species is
>> only fearless in defense of its own nest, or as the wren and finch came to
>> assist the scolding cardinals, would a more "courageous" species actually
>> defend the nest of a different species against a marauding snake?
>>
>> ON SNAKE MEMORY:
>> When I removed the snake the first time, I wondered whether a snake
>> could/would remember that there was another egg to be had. He did return,
>> but why? Was it because he knew there was another egg, or because he knew
>> he'd been disturbed while he was in the middle of something and needed some
>> closure one way or another? I checked the nest and surroundings a few times
>> after I removed the snake the *second* time, and he did not return to my
>> knowledge, at least suggesting that the snake knew the nest was played out
>> at that point and also that he had indeed returned for that third egg after
>> our first encounter.
>>
>> Good birding and mind the predators,
>>
>> JR
>>
>>
>>
>
>