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Updated on Thursday, July 24 at 07:49 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-throated Magpie-Jay,©Jan Wilczur

24 Jul Neotropic Cormorant [Suzanne Scherping ]
24 Jul Re: Audubon Action Alert: Change Glass, Save Birds [Dean Mahlstedt ]
23 Jul Black-crowned night herons at Riley's Lock Monday [Lucy Uncu ]
23 Jul Re: Sligo Creek Y-C Night Heron [Rob Hilton ]
23 Jul Neotropic Corm ["'Mary Ann Todd' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
23 Jul Trout Run Shorebirds ["'Aaron Graham' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
23 Jul Audubon Action Alert: Change Glass, Save Birds [Kurt Schwarz ]
23 Jul Truitts Landing Wilson's Phalarope [Taylor McLean ]
23 Jul Re: Neotropic Cormorant refound at Riley's ["maryatodd2 via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
23 Jul Neotropic Cormorant refound at Riley's [Matt Hafner ]
23 Jul Y-C Night Heron (3) Hughes Hollow in western Montgomery County [Jim Green ]
23 Jul Re: Sligo Creek Y-C Night Heron ["'Susan Hunt' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
22 Jul yellow bellied sapsucker [BOB PICKETT ]
22 Jul Re: Sligo Creek Y-C Night Heron [Ann Hobbs ]
22 Jul Sligo Creek Y-C Night Heron [Patricia Wood ]
22 Jul Hart-Miller Island, 07/21/4 [Kevin Graff ]
22 Jul Inner Harbor, 07/17 & 07/18 [Kevin Graff ]
22 Jul Re Neotropic Corm ["'Mary Ann Todd' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
22 Jul lower Eastern Shore of VA & MD, July 19-21, 2014. [Harry Armistead ]
22 Jul Neotropic Corm Violettes lock ["'Mary Ann Todd' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
22 Jul Fwd: DC Area, 7/22/2014 []
22 Jul Re: Cumberland (Allegany County) Cliff Swallows Nests Gone [Kurt Schwarz ]
22 Jul Re: Cumberland (Allegany County) Cliff Swallows Nests Gone ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
22 Jul Re: Cumberland (Allegany County) Cliff Swallows Nests Gone [Bob Ringler ]
22 Jul Re: Cumberland (Allegany County) Cliff Swallows Nests Gone ["Jlstasz via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
22 Jul Re: Cumberland (Allegany County) Cliff Swallows Nests Gone ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
21 Jul Cumberland (Allegany County) Cliff Swallows Nests Gone [Evelyn Ralston ]
21 Jul Maryland Natural Areas News - birding info [Marcy Stutzman ]
21 Jul Little Blue Heron-Harford Glen (Harford Co.) [Mark Johnson ]
20 Jul Least Bittern - DC? ["'Jason Berry' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
20 Jul White Ibis [Joe Hanfman ]
20 Jul "Orange" Scarlet Tanager ["Bonnie Ott" ]
19 Jul WHIB @ Assateague [robert housten ]
19 Jul Re: HOCO Conservancy ["Guineabird via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
19 Jul Re: HOCO Conservancy [Karen Caruso ]
19 Jul Re: HOCO Conservancy [MARCIA ]
18 Jul HOCO Conservancy [Sean McGuinn ]
18 Jul Re: Northern Waterthrush [Bob Ringler ]
18 Jul Re: DC Kingbird [Dan Rauch ]
18 Jul DC Kingbird [Gregory Luce ]
18 Jul Re: Rockville Willow Flycatchers [Paul Pisano ]
18 Jul DC Kingbird ["'Jason Berry' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
18 Jul Rockville Willow Flycatchers [Rob Hilton ]
17 Jul Northern Waterthrush ["George M. Jett" ]
17 Jul JBWS Ongoing Bird Survey: July 17 - 51 species [Karen Caruso ]
17 Jul Bobwhite releases ["David Moulton, Bethesda, MD" ]
17 Jul Waterthrush []
17 Jul Re: Swan Creek Avocets [Tim Carney ]
17 Jul Re: Swan Creek Avocets [Tim Carney ]
17 Jul Re: Hart-Miller Island, 07/16/14 [Bob Ringler ]
16 Jul RE: (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager ["Marcia Watson" ]
16 Jul Juv. Yellow-crowned Night Heron, Tawes Garden, Annapolis [Frank Marenghi ]
16 Jul Marbled Godwit, Whimbrel at Skimmer Island [Fred Shaffer ]
16 Jul Hart-Miller Island, 07/16/14 [Kevin Graff ]
16 Jul Tidings marina ducks [Matthew Addicks ]
16 Jul Masonville 7/16/2014 [Tim Carney ]
16 Jul Re: Swan Creek Avocets [Jeffrey Culler ]
16 Jul E. R. T. Armistead's 1960s notes, family art, et al. [Harry Armistead ]
16 Jul Volunteer at Fort McHenry this weekend ["'Bill Hubick' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
16 Jul Swan Creek Avocets [Jim Green ]
15 Jul Fwd: DC Area, 7/15/2014 []
15 Jul Fledged Kestrels [Edward Boyd ]
15 Jul Re: Wilson's Storm-Petrels in the Bay [Phil Davis ]
14 Jul Orange Scarlet Tanager [Donald Sweig ]
14 Jul 1st DC Fall Migrant! ["'Jason Berry' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
14 Jul Fw: (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager ["Winger and June West" ]
14 Jul Re: (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager ["pobrien776 via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
14 Jul Re: (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager [MARCIA ]
14 Jul Wilson's Storm-Petrels in the Bay ["'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
14 Jul Re: (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager ["pobrien776 via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
14 Jul Fwd: 2014 Final Rusty Blackbird Blitz Tallies [Robert Ostrowski ]
14 Jul Re: (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager ["Guineabird via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
14 Jul (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager ["Bonnie Ott" ]
13 Jul Greater and Lesser Scaup, Canvasback-Tydings Memorial Park-Harford Co. [Mark Johnson ]
12 Jul Red-necked Grebe [Joe Hanfman ]
12 Jul Bird Feeding Takes Wing in U.S. ["Jim Wilson" ]

Subject: Neotropic Cormorant
From: Suzanne Scherping <sscherpingdvm AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 05:24:09 -0700 (PDT)
Still here! At Violette's Lock, just above the rapids. 8:20am.

Suzanne Scherping
Gaithersburg, MD

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Subject: Re: Audubon Action Alert: Change Glass, Save Birds
From: Dean Mahlstedt <birdingboyy AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 05:06:52 -0700 (PDT)
On Wednesday, July 23, 2014 2:09:58 PM UTC-4, Kurt Schwarz wrote:
> Dear Maryland Birder,Please consider taking the below action from Audubon. 
 If you are a football fan, it would help immeasurably to say so. Kurt R. 
SchwarzConservation ChairMOSGoawa... AT verizon.netI thought you would be 
interested in this action alert from the National Audubon Society. Please join 
me in taking action today!AUDUBON ACTION ALERT: CHANGE GLASS, SAVE BIRDSThe 
Minnesota Vikings' new stadium could become a death trap for birds unless the 
stadium's builders take immediate action to incorporate bird safe measures. 
Stand with Audubon and urge the Vikings to use safer glass.It's quick and easy 
to send your own letter directly to the Minnesota Vikings and Minnesota Sports 
Facilities Authority at Audubon's Action 
Center:http://www.audubonaction.org/site/Advocacy?pagename=homepage&id=1717 


Thanks Kurt!

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Subject: Black-crowned night herons at Riley's Lock Monday
From: Lucy Uncu <unculp AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:57:30 -0400
We refound the two BC Night Heron's along the pond just up from Riley's
Lock.  We didn't see them today but since we have seen them there several
times they are probably still around.  There were also lots of teenage
Woodducks.
Lucy Uncu
Falls Church

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Subject: Re: Sligo Creek Y-C Night Heron
From: Rob Hilton <rob.hilton.2010 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:07:28 -0400
This morning around 8 am when I was strolling past the tennis courts along
Sligo Creek Parkway near Piney Branch Road, I saw an adult Yellow-crowned
Night-Heron fly toward the nest tree that Patricia Wood posted about
yesterday.  There may have been birds on the nest, but I didn't have
binoculars and the height of the nest and the lighting conditions weren't
conducive to being sure.

Rob Hilton
Silver Spring

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Subject: Neotropic Corm
From: "'Mary Ann Todd' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 16:17:28 -0400
Currently on snag close to MD shore just upstream from violettes lock. Jet 
skidoo spooking it 


Dave Czaplak

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Subject: Trout Run Shorebirds
From: "'Aaron Graham' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 11:13:33 -0700 (PDT)
 Stopped at the Oakland and Trout Run WWTPs today. There were no shorebirds at 
Oakalnd WWTP, but many Cliff Swallows and a Bald Eagle made up for it. Then at 
the sandpits behind the ponds at Trout Run there were 4 Spotted, 5 Solitary, 
and 1 Least Sandpiper, 3 Lesser Yellowlegs, and about 14 Killdeer. There were 
also two Spotteds in the second pond, and a Yellow-billed Cuckoo was calling 
while I was there. 


Good Birding,
Aaron Graham
Oakland, MD

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Subject: Audubon Action Alert: Change Glass, Save Birds
From: Kurt Schwarz <krschwa1 AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 14:09:49 -0400
Dear Maryland Birder,

Please consider taking the below action from Audubon.  If you are a football
fan, it would help immeasurably to say so.

Kurt R. Schwarz
Conservation Chair
MOS
Goawaybird AT verizon.net

I thought you would be interested in this action alert from the National
Audubon Society. Please join me in taking action today!

AUDUBON ACTION ALERT: CHANGE GLASS, SAVE BIRDS

The Minnesota Vikings' new stadium could become a death trap for birds
unless the stadium's builders take immediate action to incorporate bird safe
measures. Stand with Audubon and urge the Vikings to use safer glass.

It's quick and easy to send your own letter directly to the Minnesota
Vikings and Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority at Audubon's Action
Center:
http://www.audubonaction.org/site/Advocacy?pagename=homepage&id=1717


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Subject: Truitts Landing Wilson's Phalarope
From: Taylor McLean <mcleant11 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 11:50:23 -0400
Jul 23, 2014
Truitts Landing
Traveling
1.25 miles
65 Minutes
Observers: 1
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Truitts was sparsely populated with shorebirds. However, seeing the 
Wilson's Phalarope made up for the lack of abundance of shorebirds. A King Rail 
flew up at close range, revealing the rufous outerwing coverts. Saltmarsh 
Sparrow was also seen well. Driving and walking along the marsh, the was an 
abbreviated stop and so the checklist is not as complete as it could be. 

1 Great Egret
2 Glossy Ibis
1 King Rail -- A chicken sized bird with a long "large rail" bill. The bird was 
in the frag. Immediately adjacent to the road. The bird flew up briefly over 
the road and back into the marsh. When the bird flew up it flashed rufous on 
the outer wing coverts. This bird was too large to be a Virginia Rail. 

1 Clapper/King Rail -- Grunting noise heard well off into the marsh
8 Killdeer
2 Spotted Sandpiper
1 Greater Yellowlegs
8 Lesser Yellowlegs
5 Least Sandpiper
3 peep sp.
1 Wilson's Phalarope -- Bird seen on the north side on Truitts Landing Road 
maybe 75 yards from where the woods meets the marsh. Non breeding plumage adult 
seen swimming and foraging for surface level insects from side to side. Having 
a light gray postoccular stripe, light gray crown, white supercillium, a light 
gray back; though not totally uniform light on the back, the slightly mottled 
back did not have any dark stripes; the breast was totally white. The above 
description rules out Red-necked Phalarope which would have a well defined 
postoccular dark mask and not the thin light gray postoccular stripe. This bird 
also had a dark thin needle like bill. I saw this bird well thru a scope for 1 
minute. Then I got Paula scoped onto the bird. I then pulled out the superzoom 
but the bird flew before I could photograph, and I could not relocated. 

20 Laughing Gull
2 Forster's Tern
1 Mourning Dove
1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Eastern Wood-Pewee
4 Purple Martin
2 Barn Swallow
1 Gray Catbird
1 Saltmarsh Sparrow -- Orange supercillium as well as the orange ribbon below 
the eye, fine dark streaks breast on a light/white breast ( no orange wash on 
the breast). Also white throat and dark malar stripes 

3 Seaside Sparrow
1 American Goldfinch




Taylor Mclean
Towson, MD
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Subject: Re: Neotropic Cormorant refound at Riley's
From: "maryatodd2 via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 10:34:35 -0400
Neotropic Corm still present on snag slightly downriver Riley's Lock, Mo Co, 
MD. I'm on River at Violette's Lock, Mo Co, MD and light is much better here. 


Sent from my iPhone
Mary Ann Todd
Germantown MD

> On Jul 23, 2014, at 9:22 AM, Matt Hafner  wrote:
> 
> Marshall Iliff has the Neotropic Cormorant sitting on the MD shore a little 
downstream from Riley's Lock. 

> 
> Good luck!
> 
> Matt Hafner
> Forest Hill, MD
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Subject: Neotropic Cormorant refound at Riley's
From: Matt Hafner <hafner.matt AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 09:22:13 -0400
Marshall Iliff has the Neotropic Cormorant sitting on the MD shore a little
downstream from Riley's Lock.

Good luck!

Matt Hafner
Forest Hill, MD

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Subject: Y-C Night Heron (3) Hughes Hollow in western Montgomery County
From: Jim Green <jkgbirdman53 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 06:13:29 -0700
  I just saw 2 imm Y-C Night Herons fly across the back end of the first
impoundment towards the west. When I circled that impoundment I also found
one adult still with a plume.

FYI the MD Yellow Book lists July 18th as their latest egg date.

Jim Green
Gaithersburg MD

work in moderation, BIRD IN EXCESS  !!!

Sent from my Windows Phone
 ------------------------------
From: 'Susan Hunt' via Maryland & DC Birding 
Sent: ‎7/‎23/‎2014 7:40 AM
To: Ann Hobbs ; Patricia Wood ; Birding
Listserve 
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] Sligo Creek Y-C Night Heron

I observed an adult Y-C Night-Heron hunting in Sligo Creek just below the
Dennis Avenue Community Center on July 16. I'm assuming it was one of the
adults from the Windham nest. I haven't seen any of the fledglings since
July 4 when I saw three of them in the nest tree. (But I usually walk on
the trail, and you can't see the nest tree from the trail anymore.)

Some of the Sligo Creek Yellow-Crowned sightings are being posted on the
Friends of Sligo Creek website ("Sightings" page), but there haven't been
any postings since mine of July 16.

Susan Hunt
Sligo Woods
   *From:* Ann Hobbs 
*To:* Patricia Wood 
*Cc:* "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com" 
*Sent:* Tuesday, July 22, 2014 9:07 PM
*Subject:* Re: [MDBirding] Sligo Creek Y-C Night Heron

Thanks for posting, Patricia, glad to hear!  I have been checking the nests
near Schuyler and the one near Windham periodically and have not seen any
herons since July 7.  Assume they are still around, just hard to find?
Didn't know the nest near the tennis courts was active this year.  Loved
being able to view it on my way to work a few years back.
Ann Hobbs
Silver Spring

> On Jul 22, 2014, at 8:37 PM, "Patricia Wood"  wrote:
>
> I just spotted one of the herons on the nest that's near the tennis
courts  (if you haven't seen that nest, it's  right over the sidewalk where
the exit from the parking area for the tennis court goes over the
sidewalk--the exit nearest to Piney Branch).  I was kind of surprised to
see one there; it's been since the first week in July that I or anyone has
put a sighting on eBird around here (I just checked).  Is this late in the
year for them to be hanging around a nest?  or do some of them hang around
the old home this late usually?
>
> Patricia Wood
> Silver Spring
>
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Subject: Re: Sligo Creek Y-C Night Heron
From: "'Susan Hunt' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 04:40:52 -0700
I observed an adult Y-C Night-Heron hunting in Sligo Creek just below the 
Dennis Avenue Community Center on July 16. I'm assuming it was one of the 
adults from the Windham nest. I haven't seen any of the fledglings since July 4 
when I saw three of them in the nest tree. (But Iusually walk on the trail, 
and you can't see the nest tree from the trail anymore.) 


Some of the Sligo Creek Yellow-Crowned sightings are being posted on the 
Friends of Sligo Creek website ("Sightings" page), but there haven't been any 
postings since mine of July 16. 


Susan Hunt
Sligo Woods
 
 From: Ann Hobbs 
To: Patricia Wood  
Cc: "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com"  
Sent: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 9:07 PM
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] Sligo Creek Y-C Night Heron
  

Thanks for posting, Patricia, glad to hear! I have been checking the nests 
near Schuyler and the one near Windham periodically and have not seen any 
herons since July 7. Assume they are still around, just hard to find? Didn't 
know the nest near the tennis courts was active this year. Loved being able to 
view it on my way to work a few years back. 

Ann Hobbs
Silver Spring

> On Jul 22, 2014, at 8:37 PM, "Patricia Wood"  wrote:
> 
> I just spotted one of the herons on the nest that's near the tennis courts 
(if you haven't seen that nest, it's right over the sidewalk where the exit 
from the parking area for the tennis court goes over the sidewalk--the exit 
nearest to Piney Branch). I was kind of surprised to see one there; it's been 
since the first week in July that I or anyone has put a sighting on eBird 
around here (I just checked). Is this late in the year for them to be hanging 
around a nest? or do some of them hang around the old home this late usually? 

> 
> Patricia Wood
> Silver Spring
> 
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Subject: yellow bellied sapsucker
From: BOB PICKETT <PICKETT AT US.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:13:46 -0700 (PDT)
A friend found an injured woodpecker where she lives in Falls Church, Virginia 
to the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center in Millwood, VA today and they identified it 
as a yellow-bellied sapsucker. How likely is that to be the case that we have a 
breeding population here in Falls Church Virginia - in the suburbs of 
Washington DC? 


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Subject: Re: Sligo Creek Y-C Night Heron
From: Ann Hobbs <hobbs_ann AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 21:07:08 -0400
Thanks for posting, Patricia, glad to hear! I have been checking the nests near 
Schuyler and the one near Windham periodically and have not seen any herons 
since July 7. Assume they are still around, just hard to find? Didn't know the 
nest near the tennis courts was active this year. Loved being able to view it 
on my way to work a few years back. 

Ann Hobbs
Silver Spring

> On Jul 22, 2014, at 8:37 PM, "Patricia Wood"  wrote:
> 
> I just spotted one of the herons on the nest that's near the tennis courts 
(if you haven't seen that nest, it's right over the sidewalk where the exit 
from the parking area for the tennis court goes over the sidewalk--the exit 
nearest to Piney Branch). I was kind of surprised to see one there; it's been 
since the first week in July that I or anyone has put a sighting on eBird 
around here (I just checked). Is this late in the year for them to be hanging 
around a nest? or do some of them hang around the old home this late usually? 

> 
> Patricia Wood
> Silver Spring
> 
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Subject: Sligo Creek Y-C Night Heron
From: Patricia Wood <pwood AT capaccess.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 17:37:33 -0700 (PDT)
I just spotted one of the herons on the nest that's near the tennis courts (if 
you haven't seen that nest, it's right over the sidewalk where the exit from 
the parking area for the tennis court goes over the sidewalk--the exit nearest 
to Piney Branch). I was kind of surprised to see one there; it's been since the 
first week in July that I or anyone has put a sighting on eBird around here (I 
just checked). Is this late in the year for them to be hanging around a nest? 
or do some of them hang around the old home this late usually? 


Patricia Wood
Silver Spring

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Subject: Hart-Miller Island, 07/21/4
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:39:05 -0400
07/21/14 – 720am-3pm

Hart-Miller Island, Essex, Baltimore Co., MD



WEATHER: MC/Fair, 71-80 degrees, ESE 3K- SSE 4K

OBSERVERS: Kevin Graff, Bob Ringler



Snow Goose – 1 (immature continuing, molting to adult plumage)

Canada Goose – 278

Wood Duck – 10

American Black Duck – 1

Mallard – 86

Northern Shoveler – 2

Green-winged Teal – 1

Ruddy Duck – 5

Pied-billed Grebe – 9

Double-crested Cormorant – 31

Least Bittern – 1

Great Blue Heron – 13

Great Egret – 2

Tricolored Heron – 1 (immature continuing)

Osprey – 11

Peregrine Falcon – 2

American Coot – 10

Semipalmated Plover – 4

Killdeer – 8

Spotted Sandpiper – 6

Greater Yellowlegs – 1

Lesser Yellowlegs – 7

Semipalmated Sandpiper – 2

Least Sandpiper – 37

Short-billed Dowitcher – 6 (4 atlantic, 2 prairie)

Laughing Gull – 13

Ring-billed Gull – 857

Herring Gull – 12

Lesser Black-backed Gull – 1

Great Black-backed Gull – 152

Least Tern – 32

Caspian Tern – 698

Mourning Dove – 5

Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird – 1

Downy Woodpecker – 1

Great Crested Flycatcher – 1

Eastern Kingbird – 7

Purple Martin – 14

Tree Swallow – 105

Bank Swallow – 113

Barn Swallow – 23

Carolina Wren – 6

Marsh Wren – 11

Gray Catbird – 5

Northern Mockingbird – 4

European Starling – 225

Common Yellowthroat – 67

Yellow Warbler – 1

Song Sparrow – 4

Northern Cardinal – 4

Blue Grosbeak – 5

Indigo Bunting – 4

Red-winged Blackbird – 137

Common Grackle – 29

Brown-headed Cowbird – 12

Orchard Oriole – 4

House Finch – 2

American Goldfinch – 7

SPECIES: 59      INDIVIDUALS: 3098



MAMMALS

Red Fox – 2

Raccoon (fresh tracks)

WT Deer (fresh tracks)



AMPHIBIANS

Fowler’s Toad – 2



BUTTERFLIES

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail – 1

Black Swallowtail – 2

Spicebush Swallowtail – 1

Cabbage White – 4

Orange Sulphur – 40

Orange/Clouded – 2 (female white form)

Checkered White – 2

Gray Hairstreak – 3

Common Buckeye – 3

Question Mark – 1

Monarch – 5

Silver-spotted Skipper – 4

Least Skipper – 1



DRAGONFLIES

Common Green Darner – 1

Needham’s Skimmer – 100

Twelve-spotted Skimmer – 1

Slaty Skimmer – 5

Eastern Pondhawk – 50

Halloween Pennant – 2

Four-spotted Pennant – 20

Black Saddlebags – 10



    Kevin Graff
    Jarrettsville, MD
    keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Inner Harbor, 07/17 & 07/18
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:31:11 -0400
Belated reports at Inner Harbor area.   Attended Firehouse Expo and had a
break in afternoon on both days.


Thursday: robin and catbird, not a common sight during summer, at weinburg
waterfront park at Pier 3, next to aquarium.  Its a hot spot known as
Baltimore Inner Harbor--Pier 3.   During spring and fall migration, I found
a lot of passerines during Light Out over the years.

Also later on Thursday, on way to Firefighter's brotherhood Bash Party in
Little Italy, an immature Peregrine Falcon flew over toward SE at Pier 1.


Friday: Pier 5 - adult black-crowned night heron, another adult at Pier 6
along with common birds.   Later in evening at Pickles across from Oriole
Park during Fire Service Party, saw a Common Nighthawk flying around before
8pm.


     Kevin Graff
     Jarrettsville, MD
     keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Re Neotropic Corm
From: "'Mary Ann Todd' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 17:18:12 -0400
I'm at Rileys. Cannot refind. Jet skidoos stirring the pot. Originally on snag 
close toMD shore a bit above Violettes 


Dave Czaplak

Dave Czaplak

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Subject: lower Eastern Shore of VA & MD, July 19-21, 2014.
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 20:56:53 +0000



















LOWER EASTERN SHORE OF VA & MD, JULY 19-21, 2014. 
A 617-mile road swing.



Please bear in mind that my postings are also written for family and friends
who may have little knowledge of natural history, so some of what is said here
may be obvious to you but not to some of them.  I am not TRYING to insult
anyone's intelligence.



WILLIS WHARF, VA, July 18, seen by Sue, Lynn & Hal: 48 Whimbrels, 6
Willets, and 3 Black Skimmers.



The day after the arrival of Alexis Elizabeth Ayres, 8 lbs. 5 ozs., 20.75 in.,
4:53 P.M., daughter of our daughter, Anne, and Derek Ayres:

JULY 19, SATURDAY,
Kiptopeke (Cape Charles), Virginia area.  I spent today tagging along with
Sue Ricciardi, Hal Wierenga, and Lynn Davidson (compiler) on the Delmarva Tip
Butterfly Count (9:15 A.M. - 6:45 P.M.).  This count has been going on
for, I forget, at least 12 years anyway, and is conducted within the circle of
the Cape Charles Christmas Bird Count, established by Will Russell in 1965.



One Eurasian Collared-Dove at intersection of Route 600 and Capeville
Road.  The small colony in this area is one of the few places in Virginia
where this species may be found with counts going at least as high as 18.



Field W of Route 600 and just N of Magotha Road: an Eastern Cottontail and 170
Rock PIgeons.  The pigeons live on the concrete ships at Kiptopeke and fan
out over the agricultural fields during the day.



Magotha Road: 3 Gray Squirrels, 9 Glossy Ibis, and a d.o.r. small fawn.



Ramp Lane/Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge (ESVNWR):  A
sub-adult White Ibis, a Forster's Tern, a Bald Eagle, a Tricolored Heron, 3
Glossy Ibis, 5 Ospreys, and a Peregrine Falcon.  The Ramp Lane pond has a
Snowy Egret, but this pond has been unproductive during my infrequent visits
for the past year or more.  As one faces the Smith Island (Cape Charles it
is called) light the Bald Eagle in between the viewer and the island produced 2
young this year, and the other nest down towards Wise Point 1 youngster (fide
John MIller).



ESVNWR proper: Indigo Bunting, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, 35 Bobolinks, Great
Crested Flycatcher, Blue Grosbeak, 11 White Ibis, Orchard Oriole, Least
Sandpiper (heard by HW), all singletons unless noted otherwise.  That's a
good number of Bobolinks for so early in the fall even though they are
notorious for turning up in small numbers even as early as the beginning of
July, on their way to the Argentine.



Cape Charles Natural Area Preserve (CCNAP) is a 29-acre area just S of the town
of Cape Charles with a trail that goes out to the beach (the beach is a
restricted area).  The little pond here, mostly dried up, has several
boardwalks and is surrounded by willows, which attract Viceroys.  I see
one on the boardwalk.  Others find 4 more.  We hear a Summer Tanager,
see a flicker, and there is a Chipping Sparrow singing vigorously from the top
of a cypress and at close range, so harmless and inoffensive as to be almost
beyond belief.  Lynn, whose herp cred includes the fact the she is the
atlas coordinator for Dorchester County, MD, for the MD herp atlas effort (now
in its 5th and final year) has heard with certainty Squirrel Treefrogs here
(Hyla squirella), at the extreme northern limit of their known range. 
This is the sort of fact that Brooke Meanley would have loved.  



The 3rd edition of the Peterson reptiles and amphibians field guide shows their
northern limit as the Cape Henry-Virginia Beach area (map
296).    Google CCNAP and you'll see that other important
aspects here are the presence of the threatened Northeastern Beach Tiger
Beetle, an unusual plant - Coast Bedstraw - and a scarce habitat - maritime
dune woodland.  CCNAP is administered by the Virginia Dept. of
Conservation and Recreation.  It's a little gem.  One Painted
Turtle.  Now that we're on the subject of herps, I have heard Eastern
Narrowmouth Toads on the S side of the old ferry slip (end of Route 704) at
Kiptopeke in the wet swale areas in the upper dunes, also near the N limit of
their range, although they are in parts of MD, too.



At Townsend (pronounced locally Town's End): another Eurasian Collared-Dove.



Bull's Drive (we go no further than the gate): Grasshopper Sparrow (great view
on a fence post at close range; heard singing there, too), Least Tern, Brown
Pelican 17 (in a circling kettle) Field Sparrow singing, an active Osprey nest
on top of the tall communications tower, a doe and her fawn.



Pickett's Harbor:  Has long stretch full of big American Hackerries and
Black Cherries.  I find the only Hackberry Emperor today.  In other
years scores of them have been found here.  Brown Pelican 14,
Double-crested Cormorant 17, 1 Common Tern, 1 Royal Tern.  The lovely
maritime forest at the W end has big Loblolly Pines and a lot of Devil's
Walking Stick, hollies, and plenty of vines.



Cheapside.  Aptly named.  Many vacant lots, abandoned houses. 
Once for a couple of days an Audubon's Warbler was here, found on a Christmas
count, seen by 5-6 of us, found, I think, by Evan Obercian.  Lots of
blooming Mimosa.  We have 5 or 6 sightings of hummingbirds.  A
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher that may be a very early migrant.  One Gray
Squirrel, assuming the Weltanschauung posture.



Just W of Route 13 X Arlington Road a seafood building with 115 Herring Gulls
on the roof, all adults in breeding plumage.



Route 13, milepost 71, 6 deer.



Back to Ramp Lane, ESVNWR, 7 - 7:30 P.M.: 18 White Ibis, 12 Clapper Rails, 2
Green Herons, 60 distant Black Skimmers, 4 Great Egrets, 1 Snowy Egret, 20
Brown Pelicans, 7 Eastern Cottontails, and 3 deer (2 does and a small fawn). 



BUTTERFLYING certainly requires a special skill set.  Finding the one tiny
hairstreak after scutinizing 100s of clover blossoms.  Likewise a
diminutive Saltmarsh Skipper or 2 on a long swath of Sea Oxeye. 
Especially productive today is the line of Abelia bushes, in full bloom, on the
backside of ESVNWR.  Lynn has acquired a Special Use Permit from ESVNWR
giving us access to such restricted areas.  Special binoculars that focus
at close ranges are very helpful for butterflyers.  Today we find 25
species.  Usually it is 10 or so more, but the overcast skies, cool
weather (in the 70s), and NE winds of 15 m.p.h. put the damper on butterflies
today.  There are 10 or so others on the butterfly count.  We find
these swallowtails: Giant (rare here), Palamedes, Black, Spicebush, and Tiger. 
Silver-spotted Skippers may be the most abundant butterfly sighting
today.  Lynn's report will tell.  We miss such usually dependable
species as Snout, Duskywing, and some of the skippers and sulphurs. 
Indigo Buntings, singing males, are just about everywhere today.  



JULY 20, SUNDAY.  My 3 companions go on to do a butterfly count in the
Nassawango area in MD.  I work my way up to Rigby's Folly.  Mostly
overcast, winds NE 10, temps in high 70s, low or mid 80s, with a chance of
Denny's country fried steak.



MACHIPONGO - BOXTREE ROAD, VA.  Low tide.  8:45-9.  Eastern
Cottontail 2, Brown Pelican 2, Great Egret 1, Laughing Gull 33 (hunting in the
marshes and along the tidal guts), Forster's Tern 7, Indigo Bunting 1, Barn
Swallow 30 (actively foraging over the marsh).  The S lawn area here is
skirted by a nice stretch of Sea Oxeye which hosts one Saltmarsh Skipper.



WILLIS WHARF, VA, 9:15- 10.  Very low tide.  Whimbrel 41, Canada
Goose 16, Great Egret 3, Snowy Egret 1, Black Vulture 3, Willet 14, Marbled 
Godwit 

0, Black Skimmer 3, Forster's Tern 6.  Two Diamondback Terrapin basking on
the edge of a tidal gut.



THE REST OF THE DAY IN MD:



ELLIOTT ISLAND ROAD, MD.  12:30-3:15.  Tide low and getting
lower.  40 species, incl. Canada Goose 12, Mallard 1 (the ONLY duck), 3
Great Blue Herons, 3 Great Egrets, 13 Snowy Egrets, 2 Glossy Ibis, 29 Ospreys,
8 Blad Eagles, 2 Northern Harriers, 2 Virginia Rails, 2 Common Gallinules, 1
Greater Yellowlegs, 2 Willets (they'll be clearing out very soon), 2 Least
Sandpipers, 2 Short-billed Dowitchers, 1 Forster's Tern (the only tern), 8
Eastern Kingbirds, 5 Fish Crows, 35 Purple Martins, 6 Marsh Wrens (doing their
buzzy arerial displays), 4 Eastern Bluebirds, 65 starlings, 5 Seaside Sparrows,
3 Blue Grosbeaks, 4 Indigo Buntings, 150 Common & 2 Boat-tailed grackles,
45 cowbirds.  And so it goes, or at least, went.  Also: 2 Diamondback
Terrapin, 2 Black Swallowtails (males), and perhaps most unusual of all, a fat
Woodchuck just E of Kraft Neck X Elliott I. roads on the farm driveway
there.  I don't think I've ever seen a 'whistle pig' before on Elliott
Island Road.



BESTPITCH FERRY ROAD, Transquaking River area: A hen Wild Turkey with 7
half-grown poults, 2 Painted Turtles, 125 cowbirds.



BLACKWATER N.W.R., 4:15 - 5:30, a cameo appearance.  All of 14 species,
incl.: Great Blue Heron 5, Great Egret 14, Bald Eagle 6, Osprey 5, Killdeer 1,
Greater 3 & Lesser 14 yellowlegs, Least Sandpiper 345 (all of the peep I am
able to see are Leasts, but there are no doubt some Semipalmateds and perhaps a
few Westerns in with them), Short-billed Dowitcher 5, Pectoral Sandpiper 4,
Ring-billed Gull 1, Forster's Tern 6, Red-headed Woodpecker 1, Orchard Oriole
1.  NON-AVIAN TAXA: Painted Turtle 13, Redbelly Slider 2, Orange Sulphur
3, Cabbage White 1.  



EGYPT ROAD, 5:35, P.M.,  A hen Wild Turkey.



RIGBY'S FOLLY - Armistead digs in Talbot County.  Arrive 7:10 P.M. 
The 2 young Ospreys on our platform are impressive and the just one young (I
think) on a platform farther up the cove is, too.  They look flight-capable,
if they only knew it.  Corn is up c. 2.5' in contrast to much of it
elsewhere regionally, which much of it 7'.  There's a large, dead oak limb
on the driveway, not what I want to deal with after 200+ miles of
driving.  Then in the house a smoke alarm in a hard-to-reach place is
beeping away.  Another large limb, on the mostly-dead maple by the garage,
has fallen.  1.75" in the rain gauge since the last visit. 
Good.



JULY 21, known to the laity as, simply, Monday.  At Rigby's Folly:
overcast, 72, calm.  A Yellow-billed Cuckoo calling continuously.  A
8-point buck in Field 4.  A Gray Squirrel.  The 1st Monarch of the
year.  At Frog Hollow 19 Painted Turtles, a record count, some of them
very small young, are basking on 2 logs, 16 on one log.  Over Royal Oak is
an immature Bald Eagle soaring.  In a yard right in the middle of town are
2 Black Vultures.  MIDDLETOWN, DE.  A Velvet Ant on the paving at the
Wawa only a few feet from the doors.



JULY 22, Tuesday.  I hate to miss it, but I need to be home.  Today
John Weske, Dave Brinker, and their crew are banding Brown Pelican chicks in
the huge colony (> 1,000 pairs in some years) out in the Shanks I. area of
VA just S of Smith I., MD, and N of Tangier I., VA. 



Best to all. - Harry Armistead.





 		 	   		  

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Subject: Neotropic Corm Violettes lock
From: "'Mary Ann Todd' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 16:30:32 -0400
Montgomery Co. 

Neotropic cormorant at Violettes. Was close briefly, dropped in the river above 
Rileys lock 


Out of sight at the moment
Dave Czaplak

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Subject: Fwd: DC Area, 7/22/2014
From: lydiaschindler AT verizon.net
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:23:02 -0500 (CDT)




Subject: Re: Cumberland (Allegany County) Cliff Swallows Nests Gone
From: Kurt Schwarz <goawaybird AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:38:50 -0400
MOS went round with MHA in 2010.  As I recall, they said they would consult
us in the future, but the contact person retired within a year, and I did
not get a new one.  Nor did I ever hear anything further.  While certainly
sympathetic, I do not propose to take this issue on, as I have bigger fish
to fry, unless somebody else in MOS wants to take the lead. I would suggest
that someone contact USFWS, as they are the ones with purview in this
matter.

Please take this off-list,

Kurt R. Schwarz
Conservation Chair
MOS
Goawaybird AT verizon.net

From:  "Katahdinss AT Comcast. Net" 
Date:  Tuesday, July 22, 2014 9:25 AM
To:  Bob Ringler 
Cc:  MDBirding 
Subject:  Re: [MDBirding] Cumberland (Allegany County) Cliff Swallows Nests
Gone

I think that MOS should inquire as to whether a permit had been obtained
from FWS for nest removal, if not, it is a federal offense. If no permit had
been obtained (and in many times, this requirement is ignored by contractors
through ignorance or sloth) then we should make a formal complaint.

Gail



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Subject: Re: Cumberland (Allegany County) Cliff Swallows Nests Gone
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 13:25:34 +0000 (UTC)
I think that MOS should inquire as to whether a permit had been obtained from 
FWS for nest removal, if not, it is a federal offense. If no permit had been 
obtained (and in many times, this requirement is ignored by contractors through 
ignorance or sloth) then we should make a formal complaint. 


Gail 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Bob Ringler"  
To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com 
Sent: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 8:11:23 AM 
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] Cumberland (Allegany County) Cliff Swallows Nests Gone 


There are very few recorded egg dates for Cliff Swallows in Maryland because 
the nests are so inaccessible. Viable egg dates should probably extend a month 
later, into early August. At the Route 140 bridge over Liberty Lake I have seen 
young being fed in the nest as late as August 24. That was in 1991. On August 
22, 1999 at the same site Debbie Terry and I could see five active nests with 
young. However, Jim is probably correct that there may be a legal justification 
for removing the nests in question. 



On Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 7:54 AM, Jlstasz via Maryland & DC Birding < 
mdbirding AT googlegroups.com > wrote: 




Hi Folks, 
Removing the swallow nests (if this is what happened) is a federal offense 
under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, but only if a permit has not been 
obtained. The MBTA allows the removal of nests under certain circumstances. 
Note that the bridge was constructed as part of the Federal Highway System. The 
swallows started using it later. Those bridges were due for maintenance. 

The Yellow Book lists the egg dates for Cliff Swallow as May 22 through July 9. 
It is likely that most of the birds had finished nesting and fledged young. 





-- 
Bob Ringler 
Eldersburg MD 


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Subject: Re: Cumberland (Allegany County) Cliff Swallows Nests Gone
From: Bob Ringler <ringler.bob AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 08:11:23 -0400
   There are very few recorded egg dates for Cliff Swallows in Maryland
because the nests are so inaccessible. Viable egg dates should probably
extend a month later, into early August. At the Route 140 bridge over
Liberty Lake I have seen young being fed in the nest as late as August 24.
That was in 1991. On August 22, 1999 at the same site Debbie Terry and I
could see five active nests with young. However, Jim is probably correct
that there may be a legal justification for removing the nests in question.


On Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 7:54 AM, Jlstasz via Maryland & DC Birding <
mdbirding AT googlegroups.com> wrote:

>  Hi Folks,
>
> Removing the swallow nests (if this is what happened) is a federal offense
> under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, but only if a permit has not been
> obtained. The MBTA allows the removal of nests under certain circumstances.
> Note that the bridge was constructed as part of the Federal Highway System.
> The swallows started using it later. Those bridges were due for maintenance.
>
> The Yellow Book lists the egg dates for Cliff Swallow as May 22 through
> July 9. It is likely that most of the birds had finished nesting and
> fledged young.
>
>

-- 
Bob Ringler
Eldersburg MD

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Subject: Re: Cumberland (Allegany County) Cliff Swallows Nests Gone
From: "Jlstasz via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 07:54:33 -0400 (EDT)
Hi Folks,
 
Removing the swallow nests (if this is what happened) is a federal offense  
under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, but only if a permit has not been 
obtained.  The MBTA allows the removal of nests under certain circumstances. 
Note that the  bridge was constructed as part of the Federal Highway System. 
The swallows  started using it later. Those bridges were due for maintenance.
 
The Yellow Book lists the egg dates for Cliff Swallow as May 22 through  
July 9. It is likely that most of the birds had finished nesting and fledged  
young. 
 
Jim
 
Jim Stasz
North Beach MD
_jlstasz AT aol.com_ (mailto:jlstasz AT aol.com) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In a message dated 7/22/2014 5:59:18 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
katahdinss AT comcast.net writes:

 
 
Removing the swallow nests (if this is what happened) is a federal  offense 
under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.
 



If the repairs are being done by the state, then State HWY Admin DNR  
should be contacted as well as US FWS. Too late this year but never be 
repeated. 

 



Gail Mackiernan
Colesvile, MD







 
____________________________________
From:  "Evelyn Ralston" 
To: "MDbirding  Birding" 
Sent: Monday, July 21,  2014 10:01:23 PM
Subject: [MDBirding] Cumberland (Allegany County)  Cliff Swallows Nests Gone


On my way to Finzel etc. on Friday I stopped in Cumberland to  look for the 
Cliff Swallows nests under the route 68 bridge. I immediately  noticed 
heavy construction machinery. My foreboding was confirmed: there is a  bridge 
cleaning/repair going on, with no nest left as far as I could see. As a  
driver on the bridge I should perhaps be happy, as a birder I was not.  


Does anyone know something about this?


Happy birding,


Evelyn


Evelyn Ralston
Bethesda Md.
_evelynsr AT verizon.net_ (mailto:evelynsr AT verizon.net) 






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Subject: Re: Cumberland (Allegany County) Cliff Swallows Nests Gone
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:59:16 +0000 (UTC)
Removing the swallow nests (if this is what happened) is a federal offense 
under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. 


If the repairs are being done by the state, then State HWY Admin DNR should be 
contacted as well as US FWS. Too late this year but never be repeated. 


Gail Mackiernan 
Colesvile, MD 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Evelyn Ralston"  
To: "MDbirding Birding"  
Sent: Monday, July 21, 2014 10:01:23 PM 
Subject: [MDBirding] Cumberland (Allegany County) Cliff Swallows Nests Gone 

On my way to Finzel etc. on Friday I stopped in Cumberland to look for the 
Cliff Swallows nests under the route 68 bridge. I immediately noticed heavy 
construction machinery. My foreboding was confirmed: there is a bridge 
cleaning/repair going on, with no nest left as far as I could see. As a driver 
on the bridge I should perhaps be happy, as a birder I was not. 


Does anyone know something about this? 

Happy birding, 

Evelyn 

Evelyn Ralston 
Bethesda Md. 
evelynsr AT verizon.net 





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Subject: Cumberland (Allegany County) Cliff Swallows Nests Gone
From: Evelyn Ralston <evelynsr AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:01:23 -0400
On my way to Finzel etc. on Friday I stopped in Cumberland to look for the 
Cliff Swallows nests under the route 68 bridge. I immediately noticed heavy 
construction machinery. My foreboding was confirmed: there is a bridge 
cleaning/repair going on, with no nest left as far as I could see. As a driver 
on the bridge I should perhaps be happy, as a birder I was not. 


Does anyone know something about this?

Happy birding,

Evelyn
 
Evelyn Ralston
Bethesda Md.
evelynsr AT verizon.net



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Subject: Maryland Natural Areas News - birding info
From: Marcy Stutzman <marciastutzman AT netscape.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 09:59:21 -0700 (PDT)
There's some birding information in the:

Maryland Natural Areas News
Summer 2014 issue:
Tools of the Trade
Botany Basics
Preserving for Posterity
The Ethical Naturalist


http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?ca=a2d438e2-64a8-483e-b643-05f926a0b883&c=49ea3c90-5f10-11e3-9cc8-d4ae52754db0&ch=4a82fa20-5f10-11e3-9d71-d4ae52754db0 



Marcy Stutzman
Russett, MD 20724

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Subject: Little Blue Heron-Harford Glen (Harford Co.)
From: Mark Johnson <mj3151 AT outlook.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 11:45:40 -0400
I went looking for the recently reported Yellow-crowned Night Heron this 
morning at Harford Glen...no luck there, but as I was getting out of my car on 
arrival, I saw what I thought were five Great Egret flying north into the trees 
over the wetland just west of the parking lot. I didn't have time to get 
binoculars on them, but clicked off a couple shots of the last bird as it was 
heading out of sight over the trees. When I got home and blew up the photo, I 
realized the bird I managed a blurry photo of was a juvenile Little Blue Heron. 
It's logical to assume the other four birds were the same, based on similar 
size, but I didn't get a good enough look at any of them to say for sure. This 
was at 7:13 AM and I didn't see them after that. 

 
Mark Johnson
Aberdeen
 		 	   		  

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Subject: Least Bittern - DC?
From: "'Jason Berry' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 19:56:20 -0700
Hi Everyone,

I wish I saw this eBird altert earlier, but apparently someone reported on 
eBird seeing a Least Bittern in a tree overlooking the main gardens in the 
Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens last Friday. 


Did anyone try to relocate it? Can the original observer add any more details?

Great bird!

Jason Berry
Washington, DC

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Subject: White Ibis
From: Joe Hanfman <auk1844 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 10:12:30 -0400
4 juvenile White Ibis south of the Assateague Causeway. Currently perched in a 
tree about a mile away. 


Joe Hanfman
Columbia, MD

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Subject: "Orange" Scarlet Tanager
From: "Bonnie Ott" <Bonnieott AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 08:22:01 -0400
Thanks to everyone that responded to my Orange Scarlet question. Interesting 
reading which actually leaves me more confused than before 


I had a Ring-billed Gull in Columbia on Wednesday. 
Yesterday I was helping with an odonate walk at Patuxent refuge and heard a 
Solitary Sandpiper fly over. 


Bonnie Ott

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Subject: WHIB @ Assateague
From: robert housten <squashfly AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 18:00:00 +0000
https://www.flickr.com/photos/89246322 AT N04/14505792458/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/89246322 AT N04/14505747510/in/photostream/

On Thursday morning, 2 White Ibis flew by Ferry Landing at Assateague around 
6am. Today around 10:30am, there were 3 White Ibis feeding south of 
Assateague's main causeway. 


Scott Housten
Ocean City, Md.
 		 	   		  

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Subject: Re: HOCO Conservancy
From: "Guineabird via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 07:49:23 -0400 (EDT)
Hi Sean,
 
Our area three miles north of Reisterstown in Balto County has  the lowest 
butterfly count I can ever recall. Even the ubiquitous Cabbage White  
butterfly and Tiger Swallowtail are rare. Monarchs have not laid an egg or even 

been seen in our milkweed patch for four years.
 
This is also the first year in decades that we've had no  breeding 
Ruby-throats come to the flowers & feeders.
 
There has been no development in the area so what's causing  this dearth of 
wild things? Spraying? Hard winter? Just a bad year?
Wish I knew.
 
Gail Frantz
Old Hanover Rd
Reisterstown
 
 
In a message dated 7/18/2014 9:24:54 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
captainamerica23 AT gmail.com writes:

Great  weather for birding today out at the Conservancy. I also saw a fair 
share of  different butterfly species as well including my first Monarch of 
the summer!  Among some highlights for me; Ruby Throated Hummingbird, 
Orchard Oriole pair, Indigo Buntings, Comm. Yellow Throat. Heard many new songs 

and calls, but I  have very poor bird ID in that category. Hoping to get 
invited on some bird  walks w/ experienced birders.

Sean

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Subject: Re: HOCO Conservancy
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 02:59:43 -0700 (PDT)
On Friday, July 18, 2014 9:24:51 PM UTC-4, Sean McGuinn wrote:
> Great weather for birding today out at the Conservancy. I also saw a fair 
share of different butterfly species as well including my first Monarch of the 
summer! Among some highlights for me; Ruby Throated Hummingbird, Orchard Oriole 
pair, Indigo Buntings, Comm. Yellow Throat. Heard many new songs and calls, but 
I have very poor bird ID in that category. Hoping to get invited on some bird 
walks w/ experienced birders. 

> 
> Sean

Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in Anne Arundel County has a guided bird walk the 
first Saturday morning each month. We also have an ongoing bird survey every 
other Thursday morning starting at 7:30. Great location for woodland and water 
birds as you can see if you check the EBird hotspots list for Maryland. 


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Subject: Re: HOCO Conservancy
From: MARCIA <marshwren50 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 03:16:55 +0000 (UTC)




Subject: HOCO Conservancy
From: Sean McGuinn <captainamerica23 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 18:24:51 -0700 (PDT)
Great weather for birding today out at the Conservancy. I also saw a fair share 
of different butterfly species as well including my first Monarch of the 
summer! Among some highlights for me; Ruby Throated Hummingbird, Orchard Oriole 
pair, Indigo Buntings, Comm. Yellow Throat. Heard many new songs and calls, but 
I have very poor bird ID in that category. Hoping to get invited on some bird 
walks w/ experienced birders. 


Sean

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Subject: Re: Northern Waterthrush
From: Bob Ringler <ringler.bob AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 13:53:23 -0400
George,
   The previous early arrival record for the state was July 21, 1962 at
Ocean City. At least 8 have been banded in the period July 27-31 and the
years 1959 to 1997.


On Thu, Jul 17, 2014 at 11:39 PM, George M. Jett  wrote:

>   Folks
>
> Today Gwen and I had a surprise early migrant in the yard.  A Northern
> Waterthrush was singing and chipping loudly this morning.  Maybe a failed
> breeder, that was moving south.   With the 2 inches of rain the other day
> the swamp next door might have seemed attractive.
>
> Keep your ears open.  I will add the record to eBirds.
>
> George
> gmjett AT comcast.net
> www.georgejett.net
>
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-- 
Bob Ringler
Eldersburg MD

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Subject: Re: DC Kingbird
From: Dan Rauch <danrauch11 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 11:29:44 -0400
Kingbirds seem to be pretty adaptable to some urbanization. Not only are there 
breeding pairs and Kingman and kenilworth aquatic gardens this year, but a pair 
had a nest between the metro tracks and he community garden off north Capitol 
street. 


There was a house wren at Kingman island this morning, which I haven't seen or 
heard since March, plus a wood thrush on the River trail at Kenilworth aquatic 
gardens. A few birds seem to be restless and moving a bit. 


Dan Rauch
Washington, DC


> On Jul 18, 2014, at 11:17 AM, Gregory Luce  wrote:
> 
> I see Kingbirds with some regularity here, mostly in the near suburbs. I 
can't recall offhand whether I've seen one in the District itself, but often in 
Arlington and PG, particularly at Lake Artemesia. 

> 
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Subject: DC Kingbird
From: Gregory Luce <gluce727 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 08:17:18 -0700 (PDT)
I see Kingbirds with some regularity here, mostly in the near suburbs. I can't 
recall offhand whether I've seen one in the District itself, but often in 
Arlington and PG, particularly at Lake Artemesia. 


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Subject: Re: Rockville Willow Flycatchers
From: Paul Pisano <cheep.paul AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 08:23:22 -0400
Cool sighting, Rob.  This reminds me of the 3 Willow Flycatchers I
saw/heard at Poplar Pt., Anacostia Park last Saturday (7/12).  One was in
the trees along the river and two were along the metro right-of-way.  The
area doesn't seem particularly attractive (to the extent that I know what
attracts a Willow Flycatcher), but there's clearly something about it that
this species likes.  Compare that to the flycatcher-less Kenilworth Aquatic
Gardens, with its nice row of willows amongst a much larger wetland
spread.  Why do they like Poplar Pt but not the Gardens?

The two along the ROW were clearly defending territories and relatively
easy to see.  I just wonder what will happen to them once this area gets
developed.  Will Willow Flycatcher get pushed out of DC?  If so, enjoy them
now, while you can.

Good birding,
Paul Pisano
Arlington, VA

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Subject: DC Kingbird
From: "'Jason Berry' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 04:19:43 -0700
Early yesterday morning I saw an Eastern Kingbird in the little park on my 
block. Since we are right in the city and I have almost never seen one around 
here, I think this is an early migrants/failed breeder that came down with this 
recent strong cold front. 


Who knows what else is lurking in our forests and wetlands? Undoubtedly 
shorebirds must have hitched a ride to this "polar espress'! 


Jason Berry
Washington, DC

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Subject: Rockville Willow Flycatchers
From: Rob Hilton <rob.hilton.2010 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 06:43:37 -0400
Yesterday evening at about 9 pm, we heard two, maybe three, Willow
Flycatchers singing in Rockville.  The location is the wetland directly
across the street from the west wing of 701 King Farm Boulevard.  There was
still some light in the sky; no other birds were vocalizing.  We listened
to the birds singing for about five minutes, and they were still singing
when we got in the car and drove away.  I had no idea that this species
would be present at that wetland.

Rob Hilton
Silver Spring

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Subject: Northern Waterthrush
From: "George M. Jett" <gmjett AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 23:39:33 -0400
Folks

Today Gwen and I had a surprise early migrant in the yard. A Northern 
Waterthrush was singing and chipping loudly this morning. Maybe a failed 
breeder, that was moving south. With the 2 inches of rain the other day the 
swamp next door might have seemed attractive. 


Keep your ears open.  I will add the record to eBirds.

George 
gmjett AT comcast.net
www.georgejett.net

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Subject: JBWS Ongoing Bird Survey: July 17 - 51 species
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 13:26:47 -0700 (PDT)
Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary, Anne Arundel, US-MD
Jul 17, 2014 7:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Ongoing Bird Survey
51 species

Wood Duck  
Mallard  
Double-crested Cormorant  
Great Blue Heron  
Great Egret  
Green Heron  
Black Vulture  
Turkey Vulture  
Osprey  
Bald Eagle  
Forster's Tern  
Mourning Dove  
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  
Chimney Swift  
Belted Kingfisher  
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Downy Woodpecker  
American Kestrel  
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Acadian Flycatcher  
Eastern Phoebe  
Eastern Kingbird  
White-eyed Vireo  
Red-eyed Vireo  
Tree Swallow  
Bank Swallow  
Barn Swallow       Flock of more than 100
Carolina Chickadee  
Tufted Titmouse  
Marsh Wren  
Carolina Wren  
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  
Eastern Bluebird  
Wood Thrush  
American Robin  
Gray Catbird  
Brown Thrasher  
Northern Mockingbird  
European Starling  
Ovenbird  
Common Yellowthroat  
Eastern Towhee  
Chipping Sparrow  
Summer Tanager  
Scarlet Tanager  
Northern Cardinal       Female sitting on a nest
Indigo Bunting  
Common Grackle  
Orchard Oriole  
House Finch  
American Goldfinch  

Next survey: August 1



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Subject: Bobwhite releases
From: "David Moulton, Bethesda, MD" <moulton.davidh AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 11:57:51 -0700 (PDT)
Yesterday afternoon I decided to check out the Northern Bobwhite reported from 
Turner Road in Calvert County. Arriving at the horse barn  AT 6:30 pm, I parked 
and listened quietly for the tell-tale piping. After about 15 minutes, a 
Bobwhite started calling from north of the field somewhere around the house. I 
drove up the road expecting to see one scooting across the lawn. Instead, I 
spotted 10 Bobwhite, huddled together in a pen. I suspect that the Bobwhite 
reported from this area in the last two weeks came from the this pen too. Not 
sure whether this is an effort to re-establish a native population or instead 
to provide a ready supply for the next bird hunt. Either way, it would be nice 
to see a wild population take hold in this area, intentionally or not. 


David Moulton
Bethesda, MD

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Subject: Waterthrush
From: keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 13:52:23 -0400




Subject: Re: Swan Creek Avocets
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 06:40:22 -0700 (PDT)
No avocets this morning. Consolation prize: Glossy Ibis in the south cell.

Tim Carney
Canton, MD

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Subject: Re: Swan Creek Avocets
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 06:40:22 -0700 (PDT)
No avocets this morning. Consolation prize: Glossy Ibis in the south cell.

Tim Carney
Canton, MD

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Subject: Re: Hart-Miller Island, 07/16/14
From: Bob Ringler <ringler.bob AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 07:14:26 -0400
   The Tricolored Heron at Hart-Miller was actually a juvenile. I
mistakenly told Kevin it was an adult. The first juveniles of Herring Gull
and Caspian were noted. The Herring Gulls probably come from a colony in
the bay. Caspian Terns do not nest in Maryland and these young may be
coming from the Great Lakes region. The Acadian Flycatcher which was seen
to sing once and the White-eyed Vireo which sang continuously are unusual
in summer there. The Robin was an unexpected early migrant. Breeding
passerines that seem to have declined here include Willow Flycatcher,
Yellow Warbler, Song Sparrow, and Swamp Sparrow. Also, in the butterfly
list, add two male Checkered Whites.


On Wed, Jul 16, 2014 at 8:52 PM, Kevin Graff 
wrote:

>
> 07/16/14 – 715am-230pm
> Hart-Miller Island, Essex, Baltimore Co., MD
>
>
>
> WEATHER: MC, 71-81 degrees, WNW 6K- NNW 3K
>
> OBSERVERS: Kevin Graff, Gerry Hawkins, Bob Ringler
>
>
>
> *SNOW GOOSE – 1 (immature molting to adult plumage)
>
> Canada Goose – 459 (including three full grown young)
>
> Wood Duck – 16
>
> Gadwall – 2
>
> American Black Duck – 7
>
> Mallard – 88
>
> Green-winged Teal – 1 (Hen)
>
> Ruddy Duck – 4
>
> Pied-billed Grebe – 4
>
> Double-crested Cormorant – 28
>
> Great Blue Heron – 21
>
> Snowy Egret – 1
>
> *TRICOLORED HERON – 1 (adult)
>
> *BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON – 1 (adult)
>
> Osprey – 11
>
> Bald Eagle – 1 (immature)
>
> Peregrine Falcon – 2
>
> American Coot – 3
>
> *SEMIPALMATED PLOVER – 2
>
> Killdeer – 7 (including one downy young)
>
> Spotted Sandpiper – 6
>
> Greater Yellowlegs – 5
>
> Lesser Yellowlegs – 14
>
> Semipalmated Sandpiper – 3
>
> Least Sandpiper – 53
>
> *STILT SANDPIPER – 3
>
> *SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER – 11 (3 atlantic, 8 prairie)
>
> Laughing Gull – 4
>
> Ring-billed Gull – 435
>
> Herring Gull – 28
>
> *LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL – 4 (1 1st summer, 2 2nd summer, 1 3rd summer)
>
> Great Black-backed Gull – 122
>
> Least Tern – 40
>
> Caspian Tern – 434
>
> Common Tern – 1
>
> Mourning Dove – 6
>
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 2
>
> Downy Woodpecker – 2
>
> Eastern Wood-Pewee – 1
>
> Acadian Flycatcher – 1
>
> Eastern Kingbird – 7
>
> White-eyed Vireo – 1
>
> Crow sp – 2
>
> Purple Martin – 5
>
> N Rough-winged Swallow – 2
>
> Tree Swallow – 101
>
> Bank Swallow – 90
>
> Barn Swallow – 29
>
> Carolina Chickadee – 2
>
> Carolina Wren – 9
>
> Marsh Wren – 8
>
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 1
>
> American Robin – 1
>
> Gray Catbird – 5
>
> Northern Mockingbird – 5
>
> European Starling – 126
>
> Cedar Waxwing – 1
>
> Common Yellowthroat – 57
>
> Yellow Warbler – 1
>
> Song Sparrow – 3
>
> Northern Cardinal – 8
>
> Blue Grosbeak – 4
>
> Indigo Bunting – 5
>
> Red-winged Blackbird – 103
>
> Common Grackle – 11
>
> Brown-headed Cowbird – 19
>
> Orchard Oriole – 7
>
> House Finch – 8
>
> American Goldfinch – 5
>
> SPECIES: 68     INDIVIDUALS: 2461
>
>
>
> MAMMALS
>
> Red Fox – 2 (kits)
>
> Raccoon (fresh tracks)
>
> WT Deer ( fresh tracks)
>
>
>
> AMPHIBIANS
>
> Fowler’s Toad – 8
>
>
>
> BUTTERFLIES
>
> Black Swallowtail – 2
>
> Cabbage White – 8
>
> Orange Sulphur – 26
>
> Clouded/Orange – 2 (female white form)
>
> Pearl Crescent – 1
>
> Common Buckeye – 3
>
> Eastern Tailed Blue – 2
>
> Summer Azure – 1
>
> Painted Lady – 2
>
> Viceroy – 1
>
> Monarch – 3
>
> Silver-spotted Skipper – 2
>
> Wild Indigo Duskywing – 1
>
>
>
> DRAGONFLIES (additional 1500 more dragonflies sp)
>
> Common Green Darner – 2
>
> Needham’s Skimmer – 250
>
> Twelve-spotted Skimmer – 1
>
> Eastern Amberwing – 1
>
> Blue Corporal – 1
>
> Spangled Skimmer – 2
>
> Slaty Skimmer – 5
>
> Eastern Pondhawk – 150
>
> Halloween Pennant – 4
>
> Carolina Saddlebags – 1
>
> Black Saddlebags – 10
>
>
>
> MOTHS
>
> Virginian Tiger Moth – 2 (Yellow Bear)
>
> Milkweed Tussock Moth – 100+ (caterpillars)
>
>
>
>     Kevin Graff
>     Jarrettsville, MD
>     KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com
>
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-- 
Bob Ringler
Eldersburg MD

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Subject: RE: (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager
From: "Marcia Watson" <marshwren50 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 23:14:02 -0400
Paul,

 

Thanks for your comment. I’m not taking a stand on whether Wright is right or 
not. Was just throwing it out there for thought and discussion. Personally I 
have seen one or two orange birds but never a yellow one. That would be cool! 


Marcia

________________________

Marcia Watson

Bowie, MD

marshwren50 AT comcast.net

 

From: pobrien776 AT aol.com [mailto:pobrien776 AT aol.com] 
Sent: Monday, July 14, 2014 4:20 PM
To: marshwren50 AT comcast.net; mdbirding AT googlegroups.com; Bonnieott AT verizon.net
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager

 

Marcia, 

 

Wrick may be wright but what I have seen are Baltimore Oriole-brilliant orange 
and one bright lemon yellow bird. I recognize that there are gradations in the 
mix of yellow and red (that's what orange is) in Scarlet Tanagers. I've seen 
plenty of those off-red, but I don't get excited until they are strikingly like 
Orioles or Goldfinches at the extremes. 


 

Paul O'Brien

Rockville, Mont. Co., MD



-----Original Message-----
From: MARCIA 
To: Md Birding ; Bonnie Ott 
Sent: Mon, Jul 14, 2014 12:54 pm
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager

There's a good discussion by Rick Wright of the orange plumage online at 

http://birdaz.com/blog/2014/05/15/the-scarlet-tanager-orange-variant/


Marcia
___________
Marcia Watson
Bowie, MD
marshwren50 AT comcast.net


------ Original Message ------

From: Bonnie Ott
To: MDbirding
Sent: July 14, 2014 at 6:29 AM
Subject: [MDBirding] (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager

Yesterday we had Scarlet Tanagers at MPEA in Howard County. This one individual 
was a lovely orange. Sibley used to have an “orange variant” in his first 
guide but it is now removed. I have read that the first alternate males are 
this color. Does anyone have experience with these birds? I can’t recall 
seeing one before. 


 

https://flic.kr/p/o2GsfU

 

I’ve been out almost every day. Nice assortment of fledglings out and about 
but birds are secondary at the moment. Neat things everywhere.... mating Hag 
Moths were the coolest thing I’ve seen lately. Hard to figure out from the 
picture but the female head is on the left...male on the right and they are 
joined in the center. 


 

https://flic.kr/p/o1RhF1

 

Bonnie Ott

 

 

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Subject: Juv. Yellow-crowned Night Heron, Tawes Garden, Annapolis
From: Frank Marenghi <frank_marenghi AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 20:12:52 -0700 (PDT)
Today at lunch a co-worker alerted me to a different kind of heron out in the 
Tawes Garden. There is often a Great Blue around, sometimes Green, and 
Black-crowned Night Herons are fairly common around Annapolis in the summer, 
although I've never seen one in the garden before, so I was expecting one of 
these. I was surprised to see that she found a Yellow-crowned Night Heron 
instead. I was able to get some photos and although the lighting was 
challenging, they show the stout mostly black bill, thinner longer neck, longer 
legs, and dark grayish overall plumage with fine spotting. It was quietly 
foraging in a shaded wooded stream near the small footbridge on the Rowe Blvd 
side of the garden. It was not there when we checked later after work but it 
may have been roosting out of view. 


Photos start here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/64973768 AT N03/14650696566/

Good Birding,

Frank Marenghi
Annapolis, MD


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Subject: Marbled Godwit, Whimbrel at Skimmer Island
From: Fred Shaffer <glaucousgull AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 18:27:33 -0700
I had a fun day birding a variety of spots in Worcester and Dorchester Counties 
today, seeing many of my target birds for the day. I began the day at Ocean 
City inlet, where it was raining hard with a moderate wind blowing. I birded 
from the car, before venturing to the jetty when the rain began to let up. 
Highlights here included five or six Wilson's Storm-Petrels, which were flying 
back and forth between the red and green buoys, with some brief forays into the 
inlet. Otherwise, the rain kept bird activity down, although there were a lot 
of Common and Least Terns about, and one Lesser Black-backed Gull in the gull 
flock. 


Skimmer Island had a lot of birds and I quickly found the previously reported 
Marbled Godwit. Another great bird was a Whimbrel, which foraged along the 
edge of the island near the godwit. One Red Knot was also present, as were a 
bunch of Willets and Short-billed Dowitchers. Waders included both Snowy and 
Great Egrets, one Tricolored Heron, several Cattle Egret, and one Black-crowned 
Night Heron. 



Truitt's Landing was great, although I didn't find anything too unusual. 
Still, lots of Snowy Egrets and Glossy Ibis foraged in the wetlands, and many 
Forster's Terns flew over the marsh, with a few Least Terns mixed in. Lots of 
peeps were working the mudflats. Most were Leasts, but there were a few dozen 
Semi Sandpipers as well, and I did find one Western Sandpiper. And, the 
Seaside Sparrows are still singing from the marsh. 


I then went to Dorchester County to look for the previously reported Wilson's 
Storm-Petrels at the mouth of the Choptank River. I didn't see any storm 
petrels, but I did have some great views of the bay from both Hills Point Road 
and Ragged Point. Despite scanning the bay from both locations, I was unable 
to find anything unusual. Good birding, 


Fred Shaffer
GlaucousGull AT verizon.net
Crofton, Anne Arundel

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Subject: Hart-Miller Island, 07/16/14
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 20:52:43 -0400
07/16/14 – 715am-230pm
Hart-Miller Island, Essex, Baltimore Co., MD



WEATHER: MC, 71-81 degrees, WNW 6K- NNW 3K

OBSERVERS: Kevin Graff, Gerry Hawkins, Bob Ringler



*SNOW GOOSE – 1 (immature molting to adult plumage)

Canada Goose – 459 (including three full grown young)

Wood Duck – 16

Gadwall – 2

American Black Duck – 7

Mallard – 88

Green-winged Teal – 1 (Hen)

Ruddy Duck – 4

Pied-billed Grebe – 4

Double-crested Cormorant – 28

Great Blue Heron – 21

Snowy Egret – 1

*TRICOLORED HERON – 1 (adult)

*BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON – 1 (adult)

Osprey – 11

Bald Eagle – 1 (immature)

Peregrine Falcon – 2

American Coot – 3

*SEMIPALMATED PLOVER – 2

Killdeer – 7 (including one downy young)

Spotted Sandpiper – 6

Greater Yellowlegs – 5

Lesser Yellowlegs – 14

Semipalmated Sandpiper – 3

Least Sandpiper – 53

*STILT SANDPIPER – 3

*SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER – 11 (3 atlantic, 8 prairie)

Laughing Gull – 4

Ring-billed Gull – 435

Herring Gull – 28

*LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL – 4 (1 1st summer, 2 2nd summer, 1 3rd summer)

Great Black-backed Gull – 122

Least Tern – 40

Caspian Tern – 434

Common Tern – 1

Mourning Dove – 6

Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 2

Downy Woodpecker – 2

Eastern Wood-Pewee – 1

Acadian Flycatcher – 1

Eastern Kingbird – 7

White-eyed Vireo – 1

Crow sp – 2

Purple Martin – 5

N Rough-winged Swallow – 2

Tree Swallow – 101

Bank Swallow – 90

Barn Swallow – 29

Carolina Chickadee – 2

Carolina Wren – 9

Marsh Wren – 8

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 1

American Robin – 1

Gray Catbird – 5

Northern Mockingbird – 5

European Starling – 126

Cedar Waxwing – 1

Common Yellowthroat – 57

Yellow Warbler – 1

Song Sparrow – 3

Northern Cardinal – 8

Blue Grosbeak – 4

Indigo Bunting – 5

Red-winged Blackbird – 103

Common Grackle – 11

Brown-headed Cowbird – 19

Orchard Oriole – 7

House Finch – 8

American Goldfinch – 5

SPECIES: 68     INDIVIDUALS: 2461



MAMMALS

Red Fox – 2 (kits)

Raccoon (fresh tracks)

WT Deer ( fresh tracks)



AMPHIBIANS

Fowler’s Toad – 8



BUTTERFLIES

Black Swallowtail – 2

Cabbage White – 8

Orange Sulphur – 26

Clouded/Orange – 2 (female white form)

Pearl Crescent – 1

Common Buckeye – 3

Eastern Tailed Blue – 2

Summer Azure – 1

Painted Lady – 2

Viceroy – 1

Monarch – 3

Silver-spotted Skipper – 2

Wild Indigo Duskywing – 1



DRAGONFLIES (additional 1500 more dragonflies sp)

Common Green Darner – 2

Needham’s Skimmer – 250

Twelve-spotted Skimmer – 1

Eastern Amberwing – 1

Blue Corporal – 1

Spangled Skimmer – 2

Slaty Skimmer – 5

Eastern Pondhawk – 150

Halloween Pennant – 4

Carolina Saddlebags – 1

Black Saddlebags – 10



MOTHS

Virginian Tiger Moth – 2 (Yellow Bear)

Milkweed Tussock Moth – 100+ (caterpillars)



    Kevin Graff
    Jarrettsville, MD
    KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Tidings marina ducks
From: Matthew Addicks <turkishturkey13 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 13:20:52 -0700 (PDT)
Lesser scaup continues off point near lighthouse. Very cooperative and provided 
many great photos. Only one canvasback continued and was pretty far out of the 
back of the marina. Scope may be helpful. 

Matt Addicks
Abingdon MD

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Subject: Masonville 7/16/2014
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 10:17:03 -0700 (PDT)
Conducted my second of two July censuses at Masonville today. Very quiet, but 
there were some shorebirds on a small mudflat along the cove itself. Best 
birds: Short-billed Dowitcher, Red-breasted Merganser, Lesser Scaup, Common 
Tern, Snowy Egret, Blue Grosbeak. 


No orioles of either species was surprising.

Full list: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19117812

Tim Carney
Canton, MD

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Subject: Re: Swan Creek Avocets
From: Jeffrey Culler <cullerfuls AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 10:02:58 -0400
Still here at 10:00. Thanks Jim.
Jeff Culler
Howard County

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 16, 2014, at 8:02 AM, "Jim Green"  wrote:
> 
> Currently 3 American Avocets at Swan Creek -Anne Arundel County far
> side of south cell.
> 
> Jim Green
> Gaithersburg MD
> 
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Subject: E. R. T. Armistead's 1960s notes, family art, et al.
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 13:29:24 +0000
It’s such a slow time of year that perhaps partially
justifies this largely O.T. note.

ELIZABETH R. T. ARMISTEAD’s
FIELD NOTES & family art: a celebration of family and place.

Liz recently unearthed 2 small notebooks in which my mother,
Elizabeth R. T. Armistead (ERTA), entered field notes, mostly during the
1960s.  There are also entries by my
father, George A. Armistead (GAA), and myself (HTA), in addition to my 
father’s 

meticulous recording of rainfall amounts, all at our property, Rigby’s Folly,
on Ferry Neck in Talbot County, MD (except for notes about nearby Nelson’s
Island – see below). 

Here are excerpted records that may not yet be in the
archival record.  I have included
observers’ initials when they are not those of ERTA. Many ERTA records were 
simple year or day 

lists of common species, not completely recounted here.  

American Back Duck: 
In 1964: 2, May 27; 2, June 5 + 6 young; 2, June 17; 15, Aug 1; 2 plus 1
young, Aug. 4; 5, Aug. 17.  I can’t
imagine them breeding locally other than on an island.  But …  


Horned Grebe:  June
24, 1964, probably disabled.

Northern Bobwhite:  11
young, Sept. 2, 1964.  Many of my own
observations of young NOBO have been in Sept. & Oct., 13 of those in the
period Aug. 22 - Oct. 12, incl. 2 ad. & 5 young banded Oct. 4, 1969. Quail are 
now gone from this area. 


Ring-necked Pheasant: 
June 14, 1964, no doubt a released bird. 
They never really “took” here.

American Coot:  470,
April 30, 1967.  This is curious.  Coots are scarce anywhere on the Eastern
Shore by late April.  This could have
been March 30.  For a number of years we would see sizeable
coot flocks at Benoni Point in March and early April – coincidentally about 
the 

time I’d start using my skiff each year. 


After big fowl cholera outbreaks, such as in 1970, and the
big die-offs of Millefoil and other S.A.V. at their favored wintering
strongholds such as at Back Bay, VA, as well as the massive Chesapeake Bay SAV
die-off c. 1970, big coot numbers have not been seen by us hereabouts. I 
assumed they were always migrants from the 

South.

On the other hand … 1967 saw larger-than-usual numbers of
cold weather birds lingering into April, esp. teal, shovelers, pintails, and
Canada Geese.  On March 25, 1967, Will
Russell, Jared Sparks, and I estimated 1,100 coots at Benoni Point just S of
Rigby’s Folly in 2 large flocks (in my Bird notes, p. 37). So 470 lingering 
until April 30 are 

conceivable.  

1971 was another year of lingerers, perhaps unprecedented,
and unsurpassed since then.  Often we see
no Lesser Scaup or White-throated Sparrows on the May counts, but on May 1,
1971, there were c. 1,375 scaup on Fishing Bay as seen from Elliott I. Rd. as
well as 415 White-throated Sparrows elsewhere in southern Dorchester County,
more of both than one would expect even in mid-winter, plus … 108 Myrtle
Warblers, 8 Rusty Blackbirds, 106 Savannah Sparrows, 3 Slate-colored Juncos, 21
Common Loons, 47 Horned Grebes, 8 Tundra Swans, 9 pintails, 91 Green-winged
Teal, 2 Redheads, 83 White-winged Scoters, 10 Wilson’s Snipe, and 13 
Red-breasted 

Mergansers. (!!!).  These would be good
counts of such cold weather species 3 weeks earlier in the spring. As many as 
900 Canada Geese lingered at 

Blackwater until April 29.   

Least Tern:  7 dates
in 1964 ranging from July 18 – Aug. 23.

Eastern Meadowlark: 
Aug. 31, 1964, probably a breeder, which is unusual for here.

Diamondback Terrapin: 
laying eggs July 23, 1964.

Striped Skunk:  July
23, 1964, rare here.

1964: 1st cricket “calling” July 8 and 1st
Sea Nettle seen the same date.

My parents’ tradition was to live at Rigby’s Folly from late
March or April into September or sometimes early October each year during the
1960s and 1970s, after my father’s retirement. 
Some of their notes, however, are in the dead of winter. Back then the old 
house had no plumbing and 

only rudimentary heat in the winter. 
Rustic?  Spartan?  YES. 

My mother was not an expert birder, but I have confidence in
95%+ of her records.  Her lists make
sense, but I have not included a few of her records that I find dubious (e.g.,
Sanderling).  For that matter, some of my
own earlier records I have excised (e.g., Black-capped Chickadee).  

There are also notes by my parents on weather, esp.
precipitation, plus the relative extent of extreme tide events. Dates of the 
parents’ residence are also 

indicated below, when known.  YEAR LIST
TOTALS:

1963:  42
species.  dates?

1964:  69
species.  Apr. 9-Sept. 3.

1965:  62
species.  January (dates?); Apr. 22-Oct.
10.

1966:  80
species.  Species of most interest:
White-breasted Nuthatch, Least Sandpiper. 
  Feb. 7- March 14; March 30-Oct.
25

1967:  59
species.  Jan. 12-14; Apr. 20-Sept. 13.

1968:  70
species.  March?  Apr. 23-Sept. 14. 

Species found every year, by ERTA, 1963-1968 (26
species):  Great Blue Heron, Turkey
Vulture, Canada Goose, Tundra Swan, Mallard, Osprey, Killdeer, Laughing Gull,
Mourning Dove, Chuck-will’s-widow, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Northern 
Flicker, 

Eastern Kingbird, Blue Jay, American Crow, Purple Martin, Carolina Wren,
American Robin, Northern Mockingbird, European Starling, White-throated
Sparrow, Northern Cardinal, Red-winged Blackbird, Eastern Meadowlark, Common
Grackle, House Sparrow.  

During this period ERTA reported no Bald Eagles. This is when they were at 
their nadir. She listed no Mute Swans. I first noted them June 21, 1971, when, 

suddenly, there were 10.  

My parents, especially my father, made notes also on
interesting phenomena, extreme high or low tides, high winds, big rainfalls,
and the like, such as: the temperature dropping from 86 to 68 in 1.5 hrs. with
winds up to 35 m.p.h. on June 28, 1964; 
4.25” of rain July 30, 1970; 
temps/ falling from 82 to 70 in 20 mins. with winds of 52 m.p.h. on June
20, 1964, and 1.26” of rain that day; 
4.7” of rain June 18, 1967, and so on.  


Nelson’s Island,
1964.  Within living memory of
Minnie (Tamert) Camper (Mrs. John M. Camper; told to me sometime in the 1960s,
I think) Nelson’s Island was attached to the mainland at Nelson’s Point at 
the 

mouths of Broad Creek and the Choptank River. 


But for years in the 1950s and 1960s it was a marshy tump
feature with Spartina grasses, and Iva frutescens and Baccharis halimifolia 
bushes with windrows of Ruppia maritima dislodged from the Bay bottom and 
washed up along 

the high tide line, where there was also some sand and scattered, depauperate
coquillage.  

As a boy I would visit here. 
It was exciting to find breeding terns and ducks. Once I saw a ♀ King Eider 
in summer that I 

almost caught in a crab net.  The south
end of Nelson’s was a good spot to see Cow-nosed Rays, two of which I once, 
as 

a rogue teenage punk, harpooned.  From
the notes of ERTA, 1964:

May 21:  68 Common
Tern nests, 2 American Black Duck nests.

June 12:  5 “baby
terns” [presumably Commons], 7 American Black Duck nests with 45 eggs total.

June 27:  Common
Terns, 7 “babies,” and nests with 1 egg (11), 2 eggs (20), 3 eggs (3) for a
total of 34 nests with eggs plus American Black Duck, 1 nest with 4 eggs, and
broods of 2 and 3 ducklings.

The concentration of breeding American Black Ducks here was
somewhat analogous, though much fewer, to that of small Bodkin Island, just
south of Kent Island in Queen Annes County, north of Rigby’s Folly a ways.  

 

“I sing of the Bay.
my song is of the islands

‘ere they wash away.

 

what creatures lived on

Sharps, Long, the Roystons, Nelsons’

vanquished by the waves?” 
- from “Chesapeake Haiku”. 

All of this is not exactly like unearthing a previously
unknown colony of, say, breeding White Ibis, but - for what it’s worth - I
don’t think any of the records mentioned here were ever reported to Maryland
Birdlife and some exceed in numbers or extreme dates those in BORF.  

I was in the U. S. Army from September 1963 through June
1965 so was not present for some of the time covered by these notes, unless I
was on leave.  I cannot locate my field
notes of 1964.  My banding years were
1966-1991.  I have not included all
significant banding records in the Birds of Rigby’s Folly (BORF), the
latest print iteration of which is May 14, 2003 (58p.). After that a computer 
crash wiped out my 

electronic record of this.  But BORF has
been scanned.  I hope to incorporate
records since then and to continue to crank in maxima, extreme dates, new
species, changes in status, and expanded commentary. Banding consisted of 10-25 
mist nets, mostly 

in the fall, primarily used for the capture of passerine and neotropical
migrants. 

BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION: 
Maternal grandfather, Henry Tucker, M.D., 1871-1938 (HT). Mother, Elizabeth 
Russell Tucker Armistead, 

1902-1991 (full name Elizabeth Russell Evans Tucker Armistead; ERTA). Father, 
George A. Armistead, 1898-1980; 

GAA).  My parents were married 53 years.

HT was a Fellow of the College of Physicians of
Philadelphia, an Assistant Curator of Reptiles at the Academy of Natural
Sciences of Philadelphia, on the staff of Philadelphia General Hospital, an
instructor in emergency surgery at Jefferson Medical College, etc.

My mother’s maiden name, Tucker, lives on with daughter Anne
Tucker Armistead (37; Mrs. Derek Ayres) and grandson David Tucker Solomonov (3)
and, of course, with me, Henry (“Harry”) Tucker Armistead (73). Our Tuckers 
were New Englanders, the 

Armisteads from Virginia.

Rigby’s Folly is part of the property that belonged to my
grandparents, HT and Sophie Ashton Tucker, acquired by them in the early
1920s.  HT was especially interested in
venomous American reptiles.  He wrote and
illustrated several articles on these in medical journals.   

Family nature art:
(most of this was inspired by sightings at Rigby’s Folly or at my 
grandparents’ 

adjoining property, Tranquility):

HT (maternal grandfather and my namesake, Henry Tucker,
M.D.), paintings on Limoges china plates: 
Common Loon, Canada Goose, Brant, Tundra Swan, Mallard, Northern
Pintail, Green-winged Teal, Canvasback, Lesser Scaup, Hooded Merganser, Ruddy
Duck, Bald Eagle, Northern Bobwhite, Sora, American Woodcock, Scarlet Tanager. 

HT, paintings on saucers, tea cups, tea pots: Common Loon, Great Blue Heron, 
Black-crowned 

Night Heron, White Ibis, Greater Flamingo, Mallard, Osprey, Northern Harrier,
Swallow-tailed Kite, Red-shouldered Hawk, Killdeer, Herring Gull, Great Horned
Owl, Snowy Owl (both the owls’ bills comprise the tea pot lid handles), 
Belted 

Kingfisher, Red-headed Woodpecker, Nothern Flicker, Blue Jay, Barn Swallow,
White-breasted Nuthatch, House Wren, Gray Catbird, Eastern Meadowlark, Pine
Siskin.

HT, oil paintings: 
Flock of 11 Tundra Swans against a stormy background sky and roiling
waters.  Bald Eagle chasing an Osprey
carrying a fish.  Flock of 6 Canvasbacks
in flight.  Two Snow Geese standing at
rest.  My cousin Jeannie Downer McIntyre
also has 2 HT paintings.  HT is her great
grandfather.  Previously they were in the
apartment of my 1st cousin, and Jeannie’s mother, Jeannie Tucker
Downer.  If I remember correctly they
were of Canada Geese and American Black Ducks.

HT, ♂ Mallard in flight over water and cattails in concrete,
15 X 21”, wood frame table, metal base, repainted twice over the years by 
ERTA. 


HT, detailed drawing of a Sea Horse, August 14, 1888,
inscribed to “Miss Buckley, your obedient servant, Henry Tucker, don’t 
forget 

the painting, Peggy.”   I don’t know the
significance of this, or who Miss Buckley was. 


HT knew Witmer Stone and is acknowledged in Stone’s
magisterial Cape May book (Stone 1937) as a contributor of information.

ERTA, 4 rugs: Northern Harrier, American Goldfinches (2),
Brown-headed Nuthatches (2), and miscellaneous generic flowers.

ERTA, rug:  Canada
Geese (2), Red-bellied Woodpecker, Eastern Screech-Owl, Northern Mockingbird,
Carolina Wren, Tundra Swans (2), Raccoon, deer, Eastern Cottontail, Gray
Squirrel, the distinctive Loblolly Pine at the head of the cove, and depiction
of the house.

ERTA, rug:  Gray
Squirrel, Loblolly Pine, Raccoon, White-tailed Deer, our house, Eastern
Cottontail.    

ERTA, chair seats: 
Great Blue Heron, Canada Geese (2 chairs, 4 & 2 birds respectively),
Mallards (2 chairs, 2 & 5 respectively), Osprey, Laughing Gull, Belted
Kingfisher, generic butterflies, Eastern Cottontails (1 chair, 3 rabbits),
Eastern Screech-Owl, Carolina Wren, pet cats.          

HTA pencil drawing of a flock of 13 Canada Geese, c. 1952,
against a background of open water with distant Bald Eagle, Great Blue Heron,
other CG flocks, and saltmarsh with snags.

ERTA,  Embroidered
poem: “Rigby’s Folly,” by cousin Lysbeth Boyd Borie (1903-1990; LBB) with
peripheral Chimney Swift, Northern Mockingbird, Great Blue Heron, White-tailed
Deer, our 3 then pet cats, 4 Black Locusts in blossom, our house, 2 willow
trees. 2 Eastern Cottontails.  LBB was
the public relations director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, worked in
advertizing for TastyKake, and also was a guest speaker occasionally at the
Drexel U. School of Library Science for a course broadcaster and travel
authority Ralph Collier taught.  Here is
her poem:

 

“I shall return to seek this tranquil place

That wears a constant beauty on its face

To the sweet perfume of the locust grove

Slow-shafted sunrise over Poplar Cove

To herons streaming in blue-arrowed flight

To Chimney Swifts curving the velvet night

To small white craft laughing their sunlit way

Across the rippled satin of the Bay

To strong dark cedars anchoring the shore

Willows lamenting strangers at the door

To those three mysteries of feline grace

Deep furred, majestic, always seeking place

Not in the warmth of any suns above

But in the bright flood of their masters’ love

To gold-grained fields crested with August sun

To hushed green forests waiting the antlered run

To music sweeter than the ear has heard

The clear wild tumult of the mockingbird

I shall return to drowse in this still place

That wears the ageless shawl of Queen Annes Lace.”

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:  Thanks
to Jan Reese and Bob Ringler for information on Nelson’s Island.

REFERENCES:

Armistead, Elizabeth R. T. 
Unpublished notes, 1963-1970. 

Armistead, Henry T.  Bird
notes, vol. 1, 1965-69.  March 31,
1970.  429 pages.

______.  Birds of
Rigby’s Folly: a Chesapeake Bay farm in Talbot County, Maryland: an annotated 
checklist and regional 

ornithology including seasonal status and abundance, maxima, banding data,
breeding records, general commentary, and colloquial names. 13th iteration. May 
14, 2003. 58 pages. 


Borie, Lysbeth Boyd.  Poems
for Peter.  J. B. Lippincott.  1928. 
110pp.  The best known of her 6
titles.  Also in a 20th ed.,
Shank Painter, Pub., 1996.

Stone, Witmer.  Bird
studies at old Cape May.  Delaware
Valley Ornithological Club.  1937.  2 volumes, 941pp. in toto.

Tucker, Henry.  the
Therapeautic gazette, May 15, 1912, “A review of the dangerously poisonous
snakes of the United States.”  10
pages.  Contains 12 color plates by HT.

______.  “Scale
variations in Stilosoma extenuatum
(A. E. Brown)” in the Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of
Philadelphia.  This concerns the
Short-tailed Snake, found only in Florida.

Wilson, J. C.  Medical
pocket formulary and physician’s vade-mecum.  R. R. Bowker Co.  1900. 
267pp.  revised by HT.  In addition to these 3 HT wrote several other
titles, esp. medical ones.Best to all. - Harry Armistead, Philadelphia.

 		 	   		  

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Subject: Volunteer at Fort McHenry this weekend
From: "'Bill Hubick' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 05:45:02 -0700
Hi Everyone,


I'm coordinating a volunteer event at Fort McHenry this Saturday (7/19) and 
have about 10 spots for people who'd like to come out and help. It is certain 
to be a fun and educational morning. 



Here's the schedule, which was coordinated with the good folks at Masonville 
Cove and the National Aquarium. 


10:00am: Arrival
10:00am – 10:30am: Tour of the wetlands
10:30am – 12:30pm: Debris cleanup in the wetlands
12:30pm – 1:00pm: Seining for fish in the cove
1:00pm: Departure

The debris clean-up will be our major contribution, but we thought the 
group would enjoy learning a little about the site and the wetland. The 
seining activity will teach our group (especially kids) a little about 
the creatures that wetlands protect. Any fish
we catch will of course be added to the Maryland Biodiversity Project 
database (http://www.marylandbiodiversity.com/). All ages are welcome to
 attend, though some of the debris removal will probably best handled by
 adults. More logistical details are provided
in the attached PDF.

This event has the added benefit of taking place at one of the area's 
most important historical sites. Fort McHenry successfully defended 
Baltimore Harbor from the British in the War of 1812. It was here that 
Francis Scott Key wrote "The Star-Spangled Banner."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_McHenry
http://www.nps.gov/fomc/index.htm

Please reply off-list (bill_hubick AT yahoo.com) to sign up. 


Thanks!

b
 
Bill Hubick
Pasadena, Maryland
bill_hubick AT yahoo.com
http://www.billhubick.com
http://www.marylandbiodiversity.com
http://www.facebook.com/MarylandBiodiversity

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Subject: Swan Creek Avocets
From: Jim Green <jkgbirdman53 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 08:02:35 -0400
Currently 3 American Avocets at Swan Creek -Anne Arundel County far
side of south cell.

Jim Green
Gaithersburg MD

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Subject: Fwd: DC Area, 7/15/2014
From: lydiaschindler AT verizon.net
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 15:53:04 -0500 (CDT)




Subject: Fledged Kestrels
From: Edward Boyd <edboyd59 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 13:07:00 -0400
Kestrels have nested or attempted to nest on the structure of the control
tower at BWI airport a half dozen times or so in the last decade. Last year
as the birds began to process, the state wildlife officials trapped a large
number of birds during spring migration and relocated to another place in
the state. This included the pair that had staked out their nesting
territory and they didn't return.

This year a pair of birds began hanging in the area and showing interest in
the site as early as very late last fall. By March they began staying
around the tower every day, usually leaving from the structure early in the
day and returning late. I have no idea what day actual nesting began but it
was obvious at some point that the birds were actually tending eggs.
Sometime in May I began to see the pair coming and going throughout the day
and I knew that they were tending young.

In previous years, the birds would fledge and fly off to points unknown
immediately. This year, the first fledgling, a female, appeared on the
morning of July 11th at dawn on the railing around the tower catwalk. By
late morning a second bird appeared and this one was a male. I was off over
the weekend but I was called late Saturday because I was told that one of
the birds had hit the glass and it was seen to still be sitting on the
catwalk. Since the bird would evade them if they tried to approach it, I
advised the controllers to wait and see what happened over night, and if
the bird was still present on Sunday morning that they should call the
wildlife officials to attempt to capture it.

Sunday morning came and the bird was seen to come and go, apparently no
worse for the wear from the night before. I returned on Monday to find that
there were now 3 birds, 2 females and 1 male, still present around the
tower being attended by the adults. The birds are still here this morning,
sometimes all lined up on the railing together, awaiting for the parents to
arrive so they can scrap with each other over the various food morsels that
is being offered up. So far I have seen skinned and partially consumed
small rodents, dragonflies and scarab beetles offered up as menu choices.

This is the first year that the fledglings have stuck around after leaving
the nest. I'm not sure how long they will continue to remain here but is
has been enjoyable and fascinating to watch for a few days.

Ed Boyd
Westminster, MD

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Subject: Re: Wilson's Storm-Petrels in the Bay
From: Phil Davis <pdavis AT ix.netcom.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 02:14:29 -0400
>At 12:04 07/14/2014, Tyler Bell wrote:
>There are no Calvert eBird records for WISP.


Hi Tyler, et al.

I know of five published historical reports of Wilson's Storm-Petrels 
(WISP) from Calvert County. One was a 1924 Smithsonian specimen 
collected by Alexander Wetmore. The specimen was photographed and 
examined by the MD/DC Records Committee and was accepted as a MD record.

Interestingly, there are no accepted records of WISP for DC, despite 
various undocumented reports and six accepted specimen records of 
Leach's Storm-Petrels (from 1842 through 1933) and also two 
Band-rumped Storm-Petrels from 1893 . Even more interestingly, the 
Band-rump specimens, in the aftermath of the August 1893 "Sea 
Islands" Hurricane, were the first accept records for North America.

FYI ... Details of the MD Calvert County WISP reports follow. The 
four that are shown to be of "Reviewable" status will probably be 
changed to "Unreviewable" since no details, photos, or specimens were 
ever located. [Note: WISP observed in the bay are no longer 
reviewable by the records committee]:

MD/2010-032
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
07/31/1915
MD/CLVT
Chesapeake Beach/near Chesapeake Beach
One bird.
Reviewable
Obs: Fisher_AK
Auk 42(2):262-263. Raven 63(1):3-14. S&R:48.


MD/2002-025
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
06/21/1924
MD/CLVT
Chesapeake Beach
One male.
Accepted
Obs: Wetmore_A
USNM specimen #573319. Auk 42(2):262. S&R:48. Raven 63(1):3-14. 
Slides of specimen: five by M Gustafson; four by P Craig.
Specimen discovered in USNM by M Iliff. "Found alive...but unable to fly".
The committee found that the photographs of the specimen confirmed 
the identification.


MD/2010-030
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
07/24/1936
MD/CLVT
Kenwood Beach
One bird.
Reviewable
Obs: Overington_RB, Kaiser_B
Specimen RBO #797. Raven 63(1):3-14. Auk 60(3):451. Natural History 
Society of MD Bull. 7(2-3):14. S&R:48.
Published in The Raven as 1935. Discovered in the R. Bruce Overington 
(Laurel, MD) collection.

MD/2010-035
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
08/15/1955
MD/CLVT
(jurisdiction unknown)/Chesapeake Bay/shoreline
One bird, found dead.
Reviewable
Obs: Stewart_RE
Raven 63(1):3-14. PWRC archives note. Post Hurricane Connie.


MD/2010-034
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
10/01/1962
MD/CLVT
Solomons Island/near Solomons
Four birds.
Reviewable
Obs: (unknown)
AN 18(1):34. Raven 63(1):3-14.

Hope this helps.

Phil


===================================================
Phil Davis, Secretary
MD/DC Records Committee
2549 Vale Court
Davidsonville, Maryland  21035     USA
301-261-0184
mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com

MD/DCRC Web site:  http://www.MDBirds.org/mddcrc/rcindex.html
===================================================

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Subject: Orange Scarlet Tanager
From: Donald Sweig <skybear41 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 21:58:54 -0400
   I live in the Virginia suburbs of Washington.
 I have several photographs of a bright orange Scarlet Tanager, like a 
Baltimore Oriole, which I took at my bird bath, in my yard four or five years 
ago. 

    Donald Sweig
     Falls Church, Virginia
  

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: 1st DC Fall Migrant!
From: "'Jason Berry' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 17:59:36 -0700
Well, for me, fall migration has begun! 

Yesterday, I stopped by the puddles in the huge RFK stadium parking lot and 
found a lone (and seemingly lonely) Least Sandpiper.  I haven't checked DC's 
most reliable shorebird site since May, so hard to say if there weren't any 
earlier birds, but July 13 seems pretty early for the city. 


Hopefully other DC birders will keep this site that has treated us to such past 
shorebird oddities as Pectoral, Semi-palm, White-rumped Sandpipers and the odd 
Sanderling, and Semi-palm Plovers! Not unusual for other areas, but definitely 
for the city and especially for most of the parking lots I'm familiar with! 


Good birding everyone!

Jason Berry
Washington, DC

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Subject: Fw: (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager
From: "Winger and June West" <westw AT erols.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 17:42:59 -0400
From my brother.

Winger West
Millersville, MD
westw AT erols.com
----- Original Message ----- 
From: George West 
To: Winger and June West 
Sent: Monday, July 14, 2014 4:52 PM
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager


Seems like a surplus of yellow pigment:


"Xanthochromism is a term that may be applied to birds, fish and other animals 
whose coloration is unusually yellow through an excess of yellow pigments, or 
possibly a loss of darker pigments that allows yellow pigments to be unusually 
dominant. It is often associated with the lack of usual red pigmentation and 
its replacement with yellow." In aviculture, several species of parrot have 
been bred for unusual yellow or orange variants. Wild birds in which 
xanthochromism has been identified include the Yellow Wagtail (Motacilla 
flava), Wood Warbler (Phyllocsopus sibilatrix), Cape May Warbler (Dendroica 
tigrina), Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus), Evening Grosbeak 
(Coccothraustes vespertinus), Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes caro- linus), 
Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea), Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), 
Purple Finch (Carpodacus purpureus), Crimson-breasted Shrike(Laniarius atrococ- 
cineus) (Wapedia), and Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis; Welty and Baptista 
1988). 





----- Original Message -----
  From: Bonnie Ott
  To: Md Birding
  Sent: Monday, July 14, 2014 6:29 AM
  Subject: [MDBirding] (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager


 Yesterday we had Scarlet Tanagers at MPEA in Howard County. This one 
individual was a lovely orange. Sibley used to have an "orange variant" in his 
first guide but it is now removed. I have read that the first alternate males 
are this color. Does anyone have experience with these birds? I can't recall 
seeing one before. 


  https://flic.kr/p/o2GsfU

 I've been out almost every day. Nice assortment of fledglings out and about 
but birds are secondary at the moment. Neat things everywhere.... mating Hag 
Moths were the coolest thing I've seen lately. Hard to figure out from the 
picture but the female head is on the left...male on the right and they are 
joined in the center. 


  https://flic.kr/p/o1RhF1

  Bonnie Ott




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Subject: Re: (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager
From: "pobrien776 via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 16:20:25 -0400 (EDT)
Marcia,


Wrick may be wright but what I have seen are Baltimore Oriole-brilliant orange 
and one bright lemon yellow bird. I recognize that there are gradations in the 
mix of yellow and red (that's what orange is) in Scarlet Tanagers. I've seen 
plenty of those off-red, but I don't get excited until they are strikingly like 
Orioles or Goldfinches at the extremes. 



Paul O'Brien
Rockville, Mont. Co., MD



-----Original Message-----
From: MARCIA 
To: Md Birding ; Bonnie Ott 
Sent: Mon, Jul 14, 2014 12:54 pm
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager


There's a good discussion by Rick Wright of the orange plumage online at 

http://birdaz.com/blog/2014/05/15/the-scarlet-tanager-orange-variant/


Marcia
___________
Marcia Watson
Bowie, MD
marshwren50 AT comcast.net

------ Original Message ------

From: Bonnie Ott
To: MDbirding
Sent: July 14, 2014 at 6:29 AM
Subject: [MDBirding] (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager


Yesterday we had Scarlet Tanagers at MPEA in Howard County. This one individual 
was a lovely orange. Sibley used to have an “orange variant” in his first 
guide but it is now removed. I have read that the first alternate males are 
this color. Does anyone have experience with these birds? I can’t recall 
seeing one before. 

 
https://flic.kr/p/o2GsfU
 
I’ve been out almost every day. Nice assortment of fledglings out and about 
but birds are secondary at the moment. Neat things everywhere.... mating Hag 
Moths were the coolest thing I’ve seen lately. Hard to figure out from the 
picture but the female head is on the left...male on the right and they are 
joined in the center. 

 
https://flic.kr/p/o1RhF1
 
Bonnie Ott
 
 


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Subject: Re: (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager
From: MARCIA <marshwren50 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 16:54:18 +0000 (UTC)




Subject: Wilson's Storm-Petrels in the Bay
From: "'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 09:04:09 -0700
There is a submission for 2 Wilson's Storm-Petrels from the mouth of the 
Choptank. This is basically due east Breezy Point or southeast of Chesapeake 
Beach. There are no Calvert eBird records for WISP. Lord knows, I've tried! I'm 
surprised that Jim Stasz doesn't have any from his house during some tropical 
event. Anyway, now's a good time to be looking for them in the Bay. They're 
reliable further south off of St. Mary's County. 


Tyler Bell

jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland

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Subject: Re: (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager
From: "pobrien776 via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 12:02:50 -0400 (EDT)
The orange variant Scarlet Tanager is a rare genetic variant. I've seen maybe 
three or four in 65 years of birding. One day we were in Boy Scout Woods at 
High Island, TX and saw an orange Scarlet Tanager a few feet from a pure lemon 
yellow one, which must be rarer still. 



Paul O'Brien
Rockville, Mont. Co., MD



-----Original Message-----
From: Bonnie Ott 
To: Md Birding 
Sent: Mon, Jul 14, 2014 6:29 am
Subject: [MDBirding] (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager




Yesterday we had Scarlet Tanagers at MPEA in Howard County. This one individual 
was a lovely orange. Sibley used to have an “orange variant” in his first 
guide but it is now removed. I have read that the first alternate males are 
this color. Does anyone have experience with these birds? I can’t recall 
seeing one before. 

 
https://flic.kr/p/o2GsfU
 
I’ve been out almost every day. Nice assortment of fledglings out and about 
but birds are secondary at the moment. Neat things everywhere.... mating Hag 
Moths were the coolest thing I’ve seen lately. Hard to figure out from the 
picture but the female head is on the left...male on the right and they are 
joined in the center. 

 
https://flic.kr/p/o1RhF1
 
Bonnie Ott
 
 


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Subject: Fwd: 2014 Final Rusty Blackbird Blitz Tallies
From: Robert Ostrowski <rjostrowski AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 09:58:48 -0400
Hi everyone,

I thought you'd be interested to see some of the stats from last spring's
Rusty Blackbird Blitz. I was thrilled to see that Maryland submitted the
most checklists using the Rusty Blackbird Blitz protocol. Thanks to all who
participated!

Rob Ostrowski
Bangor, ME

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Judith Scarl
...
Some overall summary information: During the official Blitz dates (1
March-15 June 2014), a total of *14,865 checklists* that contained at least
one Rusty Blackbird observation were reported to eBird.  *New York,
Ontario, and Ohio had the greatest number of individual checklists* with
Rusties reported, with 1980, 2179, and 1183 checklists, respectively.

The majority of these checklists were reported as Traveling Counts (9849
checklists) or Stationary Counts (2183 checklists).  Only 1586 of these
observations were submitted under the Rusty Blackbird Blitz protocol.  *3238
total checklists were submitted under the Rusty Blackbird Blitz protocol;
just over half of these (1652) did not contain a report of a Rusty
Blackbird sighting.*

The *greatest number of Rusty Blackbird Blitz checklists *were submitted in
*Maryland* (410 checklists), *New York* (377 checklists) and *Virginia*
(315 checklists).  In Canada, Ontario birders submitted the greatest number
of Blitz checklists (132), with the second-highest number of Blitz
checklists submitted in the Yukon (85).

  *The number of checklists with Rusty Blackbird observations increased 62%
in 2014*, compared with the same time period in 2013.  Only 9170 checklists
with Rusty observations were reported from March 1-June 15 in 2013, 5695
fewer than during the first year of the Blitz.  Only three
states/territories participating in the Blitz did not show an increase in
the number of checklists reported containing Rusty Blackbird observations.  The
*number of checklists containing Rusty Blackbird observations increased the
most in Qu**é**bec from 2013 to 2014*; Québec birders submitted 857
checklists with Rusty Blackbirds in 2014, compared with the same period in
2013.  New York and Ontario were second and third, with 644 and 477 more
checklists, respectively.

Phenomenal job, everyone.  This is an initiative we can all be proud of.
...

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Subject: Re: (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager
From: "Guineabird via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 09:26:01 -0400 (EDT)
Have never seen the variant in MD but we encountered one on a  bird trip to 
Ohio. Beautiful.
Didn't realize it had been removed from the Sibley. That's  actually the 
reference we used when identifying the Ohio bird.
Occasionally a male Ruby-throat will show an orange  gorget.
 
Gail Frantz
Old Hanover Rd
Balto County
 
 
In a message dated 7/14/2014 6:29:51 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
Bonnieott AT verizon.net writes:

 
 
Yesterday we had Scarlet Tanagers at MPEA in Howard County. This one  
individual was a lovely orange. Sibley used to have an “orange variant” in 
his 

first guide but it is now removed. I have read that the first alternate 
males  are this color. Does anyone have experience with these birds? I can’t 
recall  seeing one before. 
 
https://flic.kr/p/o2GsfU
 
I’ve been out almost every day. Nice  assortment of fledglings out and 
about but birds are secondary at the moment. Neat things everywhere.... mating 

Hag Moths were the coolest thing I’ve seen  lately. Hard to figure out from 
the picture but the female head is on the  left...male on the right and they 
are joined in the center. 
 
https://flic.kr/p/o1RhF1
 
Bonnie Ott
 
 


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Subject: (Ho Co) Orange Scarlet Tanager
From: "Bonnie Ott" <Bonnieott AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 06:29:50 -0400
Yesterday we had Scarlet Tanagers at MPEA in Howard County. This one individual 
was a lovely orange. Sibley used to have an “orange variant” in his first 
guide but it is now removed. I have read that the first alternate males are 
this color. Does anyone have experience with these birds? I can’t recall 
seeing one before. 


https://flic.kr/p/o2GsfU

I’ve been out almost every day. Nice assortment of fledglings out and about 
but birds are secondary at the moment. Neat things everywhere.... mating Hag 
Moths were the coolest thing I’ve seen lately. Hard to figure out from the 
picture but the female head is on the left...male on the right and they are 
joined in the center. 


https://flic.kr/p/o1RhF1

Bonnie Ott

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Subject: Greater and Lesser Scaup, Canvasback-Tydings Memorial Park-Harford Co.
From: Mark Johnson <mj3151 AT outlook.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 11:00:18 -0400
There was a drake Greater Scaup teed up on a log out towards the island at 
Tydings marina this morning. He was keeping company with several Mallard and a 
hen Canvasback. The continuing drake Lesser Scaup was diving out near the tip 
of Concord Point south of the lighthouse. There may be more than one Canvasback 
in the area...the one I saw this morning was a really drab looking hen. The one 
I saw three days ago had a lighter back and darker chest, more drake-like, but 
with a brown head. The Greater Scaup eventually hit the water and was swimming 
in and out of the drooping foliage along the back of the marina when I left. 

 
Mark Johnson
Aberdeen
 		 	   		  

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Subject: Red-necked Grebe
From: Joe Hanfman <auk1844 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 09:02:20 -0400
At Violette's Lock, 1/4 mile north, and in line with the large flag pole on the 
VA side. 


Joe Hanfman
Columbia, MD

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Subject: Bird Feeding Takes Wing in U.S.
From: "Jim Wilson" <wlsngang AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 07:11:10 -0400
The Daily News segment of National Geographic online has an interesting article 
about feeding the birds. Enjoy! 



http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/07/140713-bird-feeding-seed-summer-citizen-science-diversity/?google_editors_picks=true 


Jim Wilson
Queenstown

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