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Updated on Saturday, July 4 at 08:59 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Clay-colored Sparrow,©David Sibley

4 Jul Yellow-crowned Night Heron in Sligo Creek Park update [Lisa Shannon ]
04 Jul 56th AOU Supplement released [Phil Davis ]
3 Jul Re: Greater White-fronted or Graylag Goose @ Oronoco Bay Park ? [Howard Wu ]
3 Jul Re: Greater White-fronted or Graylag Goose @ Oronoco Bay Park ? [Sharon F1727 ]
3 Jul Greater White-fronted or Graylag Goose @ Oronoco Bay Park ? [Sharon F1727 ]
3 Jul eBird -- Cromwell Valley Park -- Jul 3, 2015 [Taylor McLean ]
3 Jul Behavior - Hummer's Appetite on severely Rainy Days ["Guineabird via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
03 Jul Re: Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act Under Attack [Kurt Schwarz ]
3 Jul Re: Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act Under Attack ["'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
2 Jul Re: Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act Under Attack [JAMES SPEICHER ]
02 Jul Re: Cliff Swallow colony in Montgomery County ["'Michael Bowen' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
02 Jul Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act Under Attack [Kurt Schwarz ]
2 Jul Re: Cliff Swallow colony in Montgomery County ["j. d. newman" ]
2 Jul Re: Cliff Swallow colony in Montgomery County [Christine Ley ]
2 Jul Re: Cliff Swallow colony in Montgomery County [Don Simonson ]
2 Jul Mont Co. Y-C Night-heron, Bobwhite, Grasshopper Sparrows, Y-B Chat, Meadowlarks [Don Simonson ]
2 Jul Sorry for repeats [Suzanne Richman ]
2 Jul Crow killing baby robin [Suzanne Richman ]
2 Jul Crow killing baby robin [Suzanne Richman ]
2 Jul Crow killing baby robin [Suzanne Richman ]
2 Jul Black-bellied tree ducks [Larry Hindman ]
1 Jul Re: Sligo Creek Park empty Yellow-crowned Night-Heron nest (Silver Spring, Mont. Co.) [Ann Hobbs ]
1 Jul Re: Sligo Creek Park empty Yellow-crowned Night-Heron nest (Silver Spring, Mont. Co.) [Rob Hilton ]
1 Jul Re: Sligo Creek Park empty Yellow-crowned Night-Heron nest (Silver Spring, Mont. Co.) [Ann Hobbs ]
1 Jul 3 Y-C Night-Herons Hughes Hollow; Summer Tanager, Vesper Sparrows, Meadowlark MoCo [Don Simonson ]
1 Jul Sligo Creek Park empty Yellow-crowned Night-Heron nest (Silver Spring, Mont. Co.) [Rob Hilton ]
01 Jul Fwd: DC Area, 6/30/2015 []
30 Jun RE: Re: Hart-Miller Island, 06/29/15 [Samuel Miller ]
30 Jun RE: Re: Hart-Miller Island, 06/29/15 [Suzanne Richman ]
30 Jun Re: Hart-Miller Island, 06/29/15 [Kevin Graff ]
30 Jun Hart-Miller Island, 06/29/15 [Kevin Graff ]
30 Jun Extralimital: Little Egret in Maine - someday Maryland? ["David Moulton, Bethesda, MD" ]
30 Jun Unbelievable Morning ["MICHAEL L. SMITH" ]
30 Jun Lock-6 Cliff Swallows: Behavior RFI [Donald Sweig ]
30 Jun Summer Tanager [Donald Sweig ]
30 Jun Re: Mont Co field birds 6/20 [Don Simonson ]
30 Jun Sligo Creek Yellow-crowned Night-Herons (Montgomery Co.) [Rob Hilton ]
29 Jun Extralimital: Hello from Nebraska [JAMES SPEICHER ]
29 Jun Extralimital: RUFF seen this morning [Mike Hudson ]
28 Jun lower Eastern Shore, MD & VA, June 18-25, 2015. [Harry Armistead ]
27 Jun Oxbow Lake: Least Bittern, Least Tern [Marcy Stutzman ]
26 Jun Cliff Swallow colony in Montgomery County ["'Michael Bowen' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
26 Jun JBWS Ongoing Bird Survey -Least Bittern, Chimney Swift [Karen Caruso ]
26 Jun Eastern Kingbird nesting failure? ["Steve Long" ]
26 Jun out of area ["'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
26 Jun Eastern Kingbird fledglings [Fred Shaffer ]
26 Jun Re: Egypt Road, Dorchester Cnty - Bobwhite, Brown Thrasher ["'Elda Banks' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
25 Jun Hart-Miller Island, 06/24/15 [Kevin Graff ]
25 Jun Re: Bird behavior question. ["Jim Nelson" ]
25 Jun Re: Great show on MPT. [Lydia Schindler ]
25 Jun Glaucous Gull at Masonville (already gone) [Tim Carney ]
25 Jun Re: Caspian Tern Blackwater NWR June 17 [Bob Ringler ]
25 Jun Caspian Tern Blackwater NWR June 17 [Frode Jacobsen ]
25 Jun Bird behavior question. [Stephanie Lovell ]
24 Jun Test, disregard [Kurt Schwarz ]
24 Jun RFI Brunton Bin Parts/Repair [Kurt Schwarz ]
24 Jun Re: Great show on MPT. [Phil Davis ]
24 Jun Great show on MPT. [Hugh David Fleischmann ]
24 Jun Poplar Island: Anne Arundel Bird Club trip [Karen Caruso ]
24 Jun RFI: Brunton Bin Repair [Kurt Schwarz ]
24 Jun RFI Brunton Bino REpair [Kurt Schwarz ]
24 Jun White-throated Sparrow Gwynns Falls Trail Baltimore City [Matt Hafner ]
24 Jun the morning after [Patricia Valdata ]
23 Jun Fwd: DC Area, 6/23/2015 []
22 Jun Re: Downy Woodpecker Trapped In Garage [Brenton Reyner ]
22 Jun Re: Downy Woodpecker Trapped In Garage [Samuel Miller ]
22 Jun Downy Woodpecker Trapped In Garage [Brenton Reyner ]
22 Jun Ring-necked Duck, 4 Heron sp. at Riley's Lock, Seneca, Mont. Co. [Don Simonson ]
21 Jun Re: Egypt Road, Dorchester Cnty - Bobwhite, Brown Thrasher [Rick Borchelt ]
21 Jun Question pigeon/dove [Suzanne Richman ]
21 Jun Re: Egypt Road, Dorchester Cnty - Bobwhite, Brown Thrasher [Rick Borchelt ]
21 Jun Blackwater NWR, Dorchester Cnty - Orchard Orioles, Red-headed Woodpeckers [Karen Caruso ]
21 Jun Egypt Road, Dorchester Cnty - Bobwhite, Brown Thrasher [Karen Caruso ]
21 Jun Cliff Swallows, Montgomery County, 6/21 [John Hubbell ]
21 Jun Re: Re: Juvenile plumage question [Janet Millenson ]
21 Jun Re: Hummingbirds ["Guineabird via Maryland & DC Birding" ]

Subject: Yellow-crowned Night Heron in Sligo Creek Park update
From: Lisa Shannon <lpshannon AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 06:55:57 -0700 (PDT)
Hi all,

Just now Rob Hilton & I observed one of the Yellow-crowned Night-herons on the 
branch near where the nest had been. 


We couldn't tell whether this individual was an adult or a juvenile because we 
didn't have binoculars with us. It was kind of sad. 


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Subject: 56th AOU Supplement released
From: Phil Davis <pdavis AT ix.netcom.com>
Date: Sat, 04 Jul 2015 03:47:16 -0400
FYI ...

>Date:     Fri, 3 Jul 2015 00:00:53 -0500
>From:     NEOBIRD automatic digest system 
>Subject: NEOBIRD Digest - 6 Mar 2015 to 2 Jul 2015 (#2015-3)
>To:       NEOBIRD AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
>
>Date:    Thu, 2 Jul 2015 09:54:49 -0700
>From:    Ian Paulsen 
>Subject: AOU Supplement
>
>HI ALL:
>   Here's a PDF of the latest AOU Checklist supplement:
>
>http://www.aoucospubs.org/doi/pdf/10.1642/AUK-15-73.1
>
>
>A summary can be found here:
>
>http://blog.aba.org/2015/07/2015-aou-supplement-is-out.html
>
>sincerely
>--
>
>Ian Paulsen
>Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
>Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
>http://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
>

===================================================
Phil Davis, Secretary
MD/DC Records Committee
2549 Vale Court
Davidsonville, Maryland  21035     USA
301-261-0184
mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com

MD/DCRC Web site:  http://www.MDBirds.org/mddcrc/rcindex.html
===================================================

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Subject: Re: Greater White-fronted or Graylag Goose @ Oronoco Bay Park ?
From: Howard Wu <howiewu1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 20:36:20 -0700 (PDT)
I think this is the same domestic graylag that's been hanging out at this 
location for the last couple of years. 


Howard Wu
Herndon, VA

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Subject: Re: Greater White-fronted or Graylag Goose @ Oronoco Bay Park ?
From: Sharon F1727 <sharonf1727 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 19:47:44 -0700 (PDT)
See attached photos of the bird I saw  AT  Oronoco. It looks quite like the photos 
of a Graylag x Canada hybrid which Adam Parr kindly sent me. 



> Sharon Forsyth
> Washington, DC

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Subject: Greater White-fronted or Graylag Goose @ Oronoco Bay Park ?
From: Sharon F1727 <sharonf1727 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 19:33:48 -0700 (PDT)
Tonight, I saw what looked to me like a Greater White-fronted Goose on the dock 
next to the boathouse with the blue roof at Oronoco Bay Park in Alexandria. A 
more experienced birder took a look at a couple of the photos I took with my 
iPhone and thinks it may be a Graylag Goose (presumably domestic) or hybrid, 
which would be a lot more likely, obviously. The bird appeared to be settling 
down for the night, so my guess is that it will be there first thing tomorrow 
morning. If I can figure out how to post photos from either my phone or camera, 
I will. On the same dock there were two Herring Gulls, two Caspian Terns, and a 
Great Black-Backed Gull, along with several Canadian Geese and Ring-billed 
Gulls. 


Note that Memorial Bridge is closed tomorrow from 6 a.m. until 11 p.m. There 
may be other bridge closures as well. 


Sharon Forsyth
Washington, DC

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Subject: eBird -- Cromwell Valley Park -- Jul 3, 2015
From: Taylor McLean <mcleant11 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 17:24:46 -0400
Cromwell Valley Park
Jul 3, 2015
2:20 PM
100 Minutes

Comments: Lots of residents still singing at Cromwell Valley. 

2 Mourning Dove
2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
4 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
2 Northern Flicker
2 Pileated Woodpecker
9 Eastern Wood-Pewee
1 Acadian Flycatcher
2 Eastern Phoebe
2 Eastern Kingbird
2 Warbling Vireo
9 Red-eyed Vireo
1 American Crow
3 Tree Swallow
3 Barn Swallow
1 Carolina Chickadee
5 Tufted Titmouse
3 White-breasted Nuthatch
1 House Wren
2 Carolina Wren
3 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
5 Eastern Bluebird
1 Wood Thrush
14 American Robin
2 Brown Thrasher
2 Northern Mockingbird
1 Yellow-breasted Chat
3 Eastern Towhee
5 Chipping Sparrow
2 Field Sparrow
7 Song Sparrow
4 Northern Cardinal
6 Indigo Bunting
5 Brown-headed Cowbird
10 Orchard Oriole
6 House Finch
7 American Goldfinch

Number of Taxa: 38
Good birding!

Taylor McLean 
Towson, MD
mcleant11 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Behavior - Hummer's Appetite on severely Rainy Days
From: "Guineabird via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 16:35:17 -0400
During record rainy days feeders in yard were emptied in  one day, every 
day.
 
When the rain slackened, hummers draining the feeder went back  to normal - 
takes 2 to 3 days to empty.
 
Gail  Frantz
Old Hanover Rd
Baltimore  County
guineabird AT aol.com

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Subject: Re: Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act Under Attack
From: Kurt Schwarz <krschwa1 AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 03 Jul 2015 15:33:35 -0400
Kindly shut down this thread.  We are straying from commenting on the
contents  of the bill itself into politics, which is not permitted in this
forum.

If you care to discuss party political issues, please do so off list.

Kurt Schwarz
Ellicott City, Howard
goawaybird at verizon dot net

From:  James Bell 
Reply-To:  James Bell 
Date:  Friday, July 3, 2015 at 9:20 AM
To:  JAMES SPEICHER , KS ,
MDBirding 
Subject:  Re: [MDBirding] Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald and Golden Eagle
Protection Act Under Attack

It's actually Duke Energy's response to a massive fine for killing raptors
in the west with their wind turbines.

Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland

  
 
 
 

   From: JAMES SPEICHER 
 To: Kurt Schwarz ; MD & DC Birding

 Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2015 11:21 PM
 Subject: Re: [MDBirding] Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald and Golden Eagle
Protection Act Under Attack
  
 

Sounds like someone [is it the same representative?] is trying to burnish
his Tea Party credentials ahead of the 2016 primary elections.  ZERO chance
that either will become law, thankfully.

Extralimital about birds this time :)
In KY for the overnight.  The Nighthawks were quite active here at dusk
chasing each other and being quite vocal.  I don't see that in MD at this
time of year, but maybe that's just me...

Jim Speicher



On Thu, Jul 2, 2015 at 10:29 AM, Kurt Schwarz  wrote:
> You may recall the action for last week about the MBTA being under attack in
> Congress.  The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act is now also on the
> chopping block. If you have not already done so, or want to reiterate your
> support for the MBTA as well as BGEPA, the American Bird Conservancy has made
> it easy to to contact your legislators.
> 
> As soon as next week Congress will vote on amendments to prevent enforcement
> of a key law protecting our nation¹s symbol the Bald Eagle, the Bald and
> Golden Eagle Protection Act (BGEPA), as well as the Migratory Bird Treaty Act
> (MBTA), which protects over 1,000 species of migratory birds and makes it
> illegal to harm them except under very specific circumstances.  The Bald and
> Golden Eagle Protection Act is a crucial law needed to ensure that the
> remarkable recovery of the Bald Eagle continues, and to conserve struggling
> populations of Golden Eagle.
> 
> Just click on this link and fill in name, etc.
> You can also help by contacting your Senators and Representative. Please use
> and share this link to generate letters to your elected officials:
> 
https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=2 

> 13
>  
> Kurt Schwarz 
> Conservation Chair
> Maryland Ornithological Society
> krschwa1 AT verizon.net
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group
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> web at http://www.mdbirding.com 
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> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html

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Subject: Re: Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act Under Attack
From: "'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 13:20:18 +0000 (UTC)
It's actually Duke Energy's response to a massive fine for killing raptors in 
the west with their wind turbines. 


Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland
      From: JAMES SPEICHER 
 To: Kurt Schwarz ; MD & DC Birding 
 

 Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2015 11:21 PM
 Subject: Re: [MDBirding] Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald and Golden Eagle 
Protection Act Under Attack 

   
Sounds like someone [is it the same representative?] is trying to burnish his 
Tea Party credentials ahead of the 2016 primary elections.  ZERO chance that 
either will become law, thankfully.  

Extralimital about birds this time :)In KY for the overnight.  The Nighthawks 
were quite active here at dusk chasing each other and being quite vocal.  I 
don't see that in MD at this time of year, but maybe that's just me... 

Jim Speicher


On Thu, Jul 2, 2015 at 10:29 AM, Kurt Schwarz  wrote:

You may recall the action for last week about the MBTA being under attack in 
Congress.  The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act is now also on the 
chopping block. If you have not already done so, or want to reiterate your 
support for the MBTA as well as BGEPA, the American Bird Conservancy has made 
it easy to to contact your legislators. 

As soon as next week Congress will vote on amendments to prevent enforcement of 
a key law protecting our nation’s symbol the Bald Eagle, the Bald and Golden 
Eagle Protection Act (BGEPA), as well as the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), 
which protects over 1,000 species of migratory birds and makes it illegal to 
harm them except under very specific circumstances.  The Bald and Golden Eagle 
Protection Act is a crucial law needed to ensure that the remarkable recovery 
of the Bald Eagle continues, and to conserve struggling populations of Golden 
Eagle. 

Just click on this link and fill in name, etc.You can also help by contacting 
your Senators and Representative. Please use and share this link to generate 
letters to your elected 
officials: https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=213 Kurt 
Schwarz Conservation ChairMaryland Ornithological Societykrschwa1 AT verizon.net 



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Subject: Re: Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act Under Attack
From: JAMES SPEICHER <jugornought AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 20:21:46 -0700
Sounds like someone [is it the same representative?] is trying to burnish
his Tea Party credentials ahead of the 2016 primary elections.  ZERO chance
that either will become law, thankfully.

Extralimital about birds this time :)
In KY for the overnight.  The Nighthawks were quite active here at dusk
chasing each other and being quite vocal.  I don't see that in MD at this
time of year, but maybe that's just me...

Jim Speicher

On Thu, Jul 2, 2015 at 10:29 AM, Kurt Schwarz  wrote:

> You may recall the action for last week about the MBTA being under attack
> in Congress.  The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act is now also on the
> chopping block. If you have not already done so, or want to reiterate your
> support for the MBTA as well as BGEPA, the American Bird Conservancy has
> made it easy to to contact your legislators.
>
> As soon as next week Congress will vote on amendments to prevent
> enforcement of a key law protecting our nation’s symbol the Bald Eagle, the
> Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (BGEPA), as well as the Migratory Bird
> Treaty Act (MBTA), which *protects over 1,000 species of migratory birds* and
> makes it illegal to harm them except under very specific circumstances.
> The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act is a crucial law needed to ensure
> that the remarkable recovery of the Bald Eagle continues, and to conserve
> struggling populations of Golden Eagle.
>
> Just click on this link and fill in name, etc.
>
> *You can also help by contacting your Senators and Representative. Please
> use and share this link to generate letters to your elected officials:*
> 
https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=213 

>
>
>
> Kurt Schwarz
>
> Conservation Chair
>
> Maryland Ornithological Society
>
> krschwa1 AT verizon.net
>
>
>
>
>  --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
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> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
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> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>

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Subject: Re: Cliff Swallow colony in Montgomery County
From: "'Michael Bowen' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Thu, 02 Jul 2015 21:19:55 -0400
Interesting information, John.  Unfortunately, the swifts will 
probably still need to use the chimney after the breeding season -- 
the big move of migrant swifts comes in September/October.

MB


At 01:14 PM 7/2/2015, j. d. newman wrote:
>Chimney swifts.  I work at the NIH Animal Center on Elmer School 
>Rd.  This morning, I saw a swift dive down a chimney on a building 
>on the grounds that is being demolished.  I sent an email to the 
>facility manager asking if the demolition that part of the building 
>could be delayed until after the nesting season.  Haven't heard back, a yet.
>
>John Newman
>
>
>
>
>On Thursday, July 2, 2015 12:58 PM, Christine Ley 
> wrote:
>
>
>Great pictures!  How did you get a picture of the cliff 
>swallow.  They were flying around really fast.
>Chris ley
>Bethesda
>
>Sent from my iPad
>
> > On Jun 26, 2015, at 3:32 PM, 'Michael Bowen' via Maryland & DC 
> Birding <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com> 
wrote: 

> >
> > Having been out of action (birdingwise) with extensive overseas 
> travel followed by an eye operation, it was great to get out of 
> doors this morning (6/26) and to go looking for and finding the 
> Cliff Swallow colony on the underside of a footbridge above Lock 6 
> on the C&O Canal in Montgomery County.  This colony was first 
> pointed out, as far as I can see from eBird and MDBirding, by John 
> Hubbell on June 21, and viewed again by Gerry Hawkins on the 22nd.
> >
> > Cliff Swallow is an extremely uncommon breeder in Montgomery 
> with, as far as I'm aware, Brighton Dam on the Montgomery-Howard 
> boundary being the only reliable site.  If there are others, I'd 
> love to hear about them.
> >
> > A photo of one of the approximately 20 swallows here is embedded 
> in my eBird checklist at:
> > 
> 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24058883 

> >
> > Also on my Flickr site at:
> > http://bit.ly/1GOMtQO
> >
> > Michael Bowen
> > Bethesda
> >
> > D.H. Michael Bowen
> > 8609 Ewing Drive
> > Bethesda, MD  20817
> > Telephone: (301) 530-5764
> > e-mail:  dhmbowenATyahooDOTcom
> >
> >
> > --
> > -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the 
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> it here - 
> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>
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D.H. Michael Bowen
8609 Ewing Drive
Bethesda, MD  20817
Telephone: (301) 530-5764
e-mail:  dhmbowenATyahooDOTcom

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Subject: Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act Under Attack
From: Kurt Schwarz <krschwa1 AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 02 Jul 2015 13:29:30 -0400
You may recall the action for last week about the MBTA being under attack in
Congress.  The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act is now also on the
chopping block. If you have not already done so, or want to reiterate your
support for the MBTA as well as BGEPA, the American Bird Conservancy has
made it easy to to contact your legislators.

As soon as next week Congress will vote on amendments to prevent enforcement
of a key law protecting our nation¹s symbol the Bald Eagle, the Bald and
Golden Eagle Protection Act (BGEPA), as well as the Migratory Bird Treaty
Act (MBTA), which protects over 1,000 species of migratory birds and makes
it illegal to harm them except under very specific circumstances.  The Bald
and Golden Eagle Protection Act is a crucial law needed to ensure that the
remarkable recovery of the Bald Eagle continues, and to conserve struggling
populations of Golden Eagle.

Just click on this link and fill in name, etc.
You can also help by contacting your Senators and Representative. Please use
and share this link to generate letters to your elected officials:
https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id
=213
 
Kurt Schwarz 
Conservation Chair
Maryland Ornithological Society
krschwa1 AT verizon.net





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Subject: Re: Cliff Swallow colony in Montgomery County
From: "j. d. newman" <jdnewman AT rocketmail.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 17:14:07 +0000 (UTC)
Chimney swifts.  I work at the NIH Animal Center on Elmer School Rd.  This 
morning, I saw a swift dive down a chimney on a building on the grounds that is 
being demolished.  I sent an email to the facility manager asking if the 
demolition that part of the building could be delayed until after the nesting 
season.  Haven't heard back, a yet. 

John Newman
 


 On Thursday, July 2, 2015 12:58 PM, Christine Ley  
wrote: 

   

 Great pictures!  How did you get a picture of the cliff swallow.  They were 
flying around really fast. 

Chris ley
Bethesda

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 26, 2015, at 3:32 PM, 'Michael Bowen' via Maryland & DC Birding 
 wrote: 

> 
> Having been out of action (birdingwise) with extensive overseas travel 
followed by an eye operation, it was great to get out of doors this morning 
(6/26) and to go looking for and finding the Cliff Swallow colony on the 
underside of a footbridge above Lock 6 on the C&O Canal in Montgomery County.  
This colony was first pointed out, as far as I can see from eBird and 
MDBirding, by John Hubbell on June 21, and viewed again by Gerry Hawkins on the 
22nd. 

> 
> Cliff Swallow is an extremely uncommon breeder in Montgomery with, as far as 
I'm aware, Brighton Dam on the Montgomery-Howard boundary being the only 
reliable site.  If there are others, I'd love to hear about them. 

> 
> A photo of one of the approximately 20 swallows here is embedded in my eBird 
checklist at: 

> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24058883
> 
> Also on my Flickr site at:
> http://bit.ly/1GOMtQO
> 
> Michael Bowen
> Bethesda
> 
> D.H. Michael Bowen
> 8609 Ewing Drive
> Bethesda, MD  20817
> Telephone: (301) 530-5764
> e-mail:  dhmbowenATyahooDOTcom
> 
> 
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Subject: Re: Cliff Swallow colony in Montgomery County
From: Christine Ley <chrisley21 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 12:58:46 -0400
Great pictures! How did you get a picture of the cliff swallow. They were 
flying around really fast. 

Chris ley
Bethesda

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 26, 2015, at 3:32 PM, 'Michael Bowen' via Maryland & DC Birding 
 wrote: 

> 
> Having been out of action (birdingwise) with extensive overseas travel 
followed by an eye operation, it was great to get out of doors this morning 
(6/26) and to go looking for and finding the Cliff Swallow colony on the 
underside of a footbridge above Lock 6 on the C&O Canal in Montgomery County. 
This colony was first pointed out, as far as I can see from eBird and 
MDBirding, by John Hubbell on June 21, and viewed again by Gerry Hawkins on the 
22nd. 

> 
> Cliff Swallow is an extremely uncommon breeder in Montgomery with, as far as 
I'm aware, Brighton Dam on the Montgomery-Howard boundary being the only 
reliable site. If there are others, I'd love to hear about them. 

> 
> A photo of one of the approximately 20 swallows here is embedded in my eBird 
checklist at: 

> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24058883
> 
> Also on my Flickr site at:
> http://bit.ly/1GOMtQO
> 
> Michael Bowen
> Bethesda
> 
> D.H. Michael Bowen
> 8609 Ewing Drive
> Bethesda, MD  20817
> Telephone: (301) 530-5764
> e-mail:  dhmbowenATyahooDOTcom
> 
> 
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Subject: Re: Cliff Swallow colony in Montgomery County
From: Don Simonson <simonson AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 09:26:47 -0700 (PDT)
On 7/1/15 at noon, I observed 3 young cliff swallows in nests, and 3 adults 
foraging nearby. Very cool. 


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Subject: Mont Co. Y-C Night-heron, Bobwhite, Grasshopper Sparrows, Y-B Chat, Meadowlarks
From: Don Simonson <simonson AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 09:23:59 -0700 (PDT)
I found many surprising gems yesterday evening from 7:15 to 8:45, all seen from 
W. Willard Road, at a point 200 yards s. of Izaak Walton League Road, 
Poolesville, Mont Co. Near complete absence of biting insects, airplanes, cars 
or farm vehicles made listening and viewing conditions perfect. Highlights were 
Grasshopper Sparrows (3 total) feeding young and singing; a Yellow-breasted 
Chat at least SIXTY feet up atop a bare tree, blazing yellow in the low sun, 
for scope views for 10 minutes. 1 Horned Lark heard-only S.e. of Willard Rd. 
Eastern Meadowlark preening atop a bush for 10 minutes; Vesper and Field 
Sparrows singing. Bobwhite called from four distinctly separate and distant 
locations; provenance uncertain due to nearby hunting/dog training. Oddest of 
all, a Great Blue Heron materialized fifty feet up in a pin cherry tree in 
middle of soybean field. 


checklist at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24119315


1 adult YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON was perched at far s.e. corner of first 
impoundment on right, with a full moon rising behind it. 

Good birding!
Don Simonson
Darnestown MD

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Subject: Sorry for repeats
From: Suzanne Richman <suzanne_richman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 11:41:33 -0400
Stupid Outlook kept telling me that it was not working.
By the way, the robin baby is gone now. I'm assuming the crow was attacking it 
to eat and went back to finish the job. 


Suzanne 		 	   		  

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Subject: Crow killing baby robin
From: Suzanne Richman <suzanne_richman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 10:39:34 -0400
I was drawn outside by a lot of commotion and saw several crows and several 
robins. One crow kept stabbing a baby robin with its beak and now the crows 
flew away and have left this baby robin to die. It's still breathing on its 
back. :(. What's that all about?? I would think they'd want to eat the robin if 
they were attacking it. 


Suzanne RichmanBethesda 		 	   		  

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Subject: Crow killing baby robin
From: Suzanne Richman <suzanne_richman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 10:39:00 -0400
I was drawn outside by a lot of commotion and saw several crows and several 
robins. One crow kept stabbing a baby robin with its beak and now the crows 
flew away and have left this baby robin to die. It's still breathing on its 
back. :(. What's that all about?? I would think they'd want to eat the robin if 
they were attacking it. 


Suzanne RichmanBethesda 		 	   		  

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Subject: Crow killing baby robin
From: Suzanne Richman <suzanne_richman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 10:38:38 -0400
I was drawn outside by a lot of commotion and saw several crows and several 
robins. One crow kept stabbing a baby robin with its beak and now the crows 
flew away and have left this baby robin to die. It's still breathing on its 
back. :(. What's that all about?? I would think they'd want to eat the robin if 
they were attacking it. 


Suzanne RichmanBethesda 		 	   		  

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Subject: Black-bellied tree ducks
From: Larry Hindman <yellowdogretrievers AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 03:31:44 -0700 (PDT)
Six Black-bellied Tree Ducks were observed and photographed on a farm pond near 
Darlington about a mile from Conowingo Dam on June 30. The photos were sent to 
me but I could not detect any leg bands in the photograph. 


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Subject: Re: Sligo Creek Park empty Yellow-crowned Night-Heron nest (Silver Spring, Mont. Co.)
From: Ann Hobbs <hobbs_ann AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 20:47:59 -0400
Well sorry the tree sheriffs got to it! I am amazed that the birds stuck it out 
this year with the mess WSSC has made of the creek. Glad to hear you saw them 
the other day. 


Ann Hobbs
Silver Spring, MD



> On Jul 1, 2015, at 8:37 PM, Rob Hilton  wrote:
> 
> Ann, 
> 
> I don't think it came down last night. As of 9:15 am I saw no large branch 
debris on the road or along side the road, or anywhere on my walk in and near 
that portion of the park. The branch that the nest was on looked like it had a 
clean cut, as best as I could tell without binoculars. 

> 
> Rob Hilton
> Silver Spring
> 
>> On Wednesday, July 1, 2015 at 12:06:11 PM UTC-4, Ann Hobbs wrote:
>> Rob-
>> Thanks for reporting. Do you think it might have come down in last night's 
storm? There were big branches down all over the area this morning. 

>> 
>> 
>> For those interested, there is still at least one young night-heron near the 
still intact nest near the intersection of Windham and Sligo. Other than that, 
nothing of real note there, but due to pedestrian traffic I did not stay long. 

>> 
>> 
>> Ann Hobbs
>> Silver Spring, MD
> 
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Subject: Re: Sligo Creek Park empty Yellow-crowned Night-Heron nest (Silver Spring, Mont. Co.)
From: Rob Hilton <rob.hilton.2010 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 17:37:47 -0700 (PDT)
Ann, 

I don't think it came down last night. As of 9:15 am I saw no large branch 
debris on the road or along side the road, or anywhere on my walk in and near 
that portion of the park. The branch that the nest was on looked like it had a 
clean cut, as best as I could tell without binoculars. 


Rob Hilton
Silver Spring

On Wednesday, July 1, 2015 at 12:06:11 PM UTC-4, Ann Hobbs wrote:
> Rob-
> Thanks for reporting.  Do you think it might have come down in last night's 
storm?  There were big branches down all over the area this morning. 

> 
> 
> For those interested, there is still at least one young night-heron near the 
still intact nest near the intersection of Windham and Sligo.  Other than 
that, nothing of real note there, but due to pedestrian traffic I did not stay 
long. 

> 
> 
> Ann Hobbs
> Silver Spring, MD

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Subject: Re: Sligo Creek Park empty Yellow-crowned Night-Heron nest (Silver Spring, Mont. Co.)
From: Ann Hobbs <hobbs_ann AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 12:06:13 -0400
Rob-
Thanks for reporting. Do you think it might have come down in last night's 
storm? There were big branches down all over the area this morning. 


For those interested, there is still at least one young night-heron near the 
still intact nest near the intersection of Windham and Sligo. Other than that, 
nothing of real note there, but due to pedestrian traffic I did not stay long. 


Ann Hobbs
Silver Spring, MD


> On Jul 1, 2015, at 10:13 AM, Rob Hilton  wrote:
> 
> Just now I visited the site of the recently vacated Yellow-crowned 
Night-Heron nest along Sligo Creek Parkway near Piney Branch Road in Silver 
Spring. The branch upon which the nest was built (and which arched over the 
road) appears to have been removed since yesterday morning. I did not see any 
herons. 

> 
> The same thing happened last year to the nearby nest at Sligo Creek Parkway 
and Schuyler Road; after the young left that nest, the branch which held the 
nest (and which arched over Sligo Creek Parkway) was removed. 

> 
> In Nolte Local Park (which lies between Dale Drive and Thayer Avenue in 
Silver Spring), one Chipping Sparrow was singing. One morning last week I heard 
two singing. 

> 
> Rob Hilton
> Silver Spring
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Subject: 3 Y-C Night-Herons Hughes Hollow; Summer Tanager, Vesper Sparrows, Meadowlark MoCo
From: Don Simonson <simonson AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 08:27:43 -0700 (PDT)
On 6/30/15, at 8:20 pm, I observed a juvenile Yellow-Crowned Night-Heron 
perched in a tall snag at the south bank of the large impoundment on the left 
at Hughes Hollow, Montgomery County. It was emitting a "squawk" every minute or 
so for 10 minutes. At 8:35 the juvenile became active, stretching and moving 
about and then flew out of sight. at 8:45 more night-heron squawks, and two 
adult Yellow-Crowned Night-Herons landed on snags at the far southeast corner 
of the embankment. Two Barred Owls were duetting at the parking lot and I saw 
one Barred Owl fly across River Road into the trees. And a first-ever for me, I 
saw 6 CEDAR WAXWINGS fly from the dike out into the marsh and land on the 
mudflats, foraging. 

Hughes Hollow completed my circuit of River, W. Offutt, Mt. Nebo, Willard, 
Izaak Walton League, and Sycamore Landing Roads. Other notable birds for the 
evening included SUMMER TANAGER seen and heard at entrance to the Turf Farm on 
River Road; 1 VESPER SPARROW singing and seen well at corner of Mt. Nebo and W. 
Offutt Road; 4 VESPER Sparrows heard along Mt. Nebo and Willard Roads; singing 
1 Vesper Sparrow and 1 EASTERN MEADOWLARK perched and singing at corner of 
Willard Road and Izaak Walton Road; and 1 AMERICAN REDSTART singing on Sycamore 
Landing Road 50 yards south of first parking lot on right. a total of 58 
species after work. 

Good birding!
Don Simonson

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Subject: Sligo Creek Park empty Yellow-crowned Night-Heron nest (Silver Spring, Mont. Co.)
From: Rob Hilton <rob.hilton.2010 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 10:01:05 -0400
Just now I visited the site of the recently vacated Yellow-crowned
Night-Heron nest along Sligo Creek Parkway near Piney Branch Road in Silver
Spring.  The branch upon which the nest was built (and which arched over
the road) appears to have been removed since yesterday morning.  I did not
see any herons.

The same thing happened last year to the nearby nest at Sligo Creek Parkway
and Schuyler Road; after the young left that nest, the branch which held
the nest (and which arched over Sligo Creek Parkway) was removed.

In Nolte Local Park (which lies between Dale Drive and Thayer Avenue in
Silver Spring), one Chipping Sparrow was singing.  One morning last week I
heard two singing.

Rob Hilton
Silver Spring

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Subject: Fwd: DC Area, 6/30/2015
From: lydiaschindler AT verizon.net
Date: Wed, 01 Jul 2015 07:35:03 -0500 (CDT)




Subject: RE: Re: Hart-Miller Island, 06/29/15
From: Samuel Miller <srmiller2022 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 19:45:55 -0400
This PDF was sent out a while ago regarding public birding on the island.
On Jun 30, 2015 6:58 PM, "Suzanne Richman" 
wrote:

> Is Hart-Miller Island open to the public?
>
>
> Suzanne Richman
> Montgomery Bird Club
>
> ------------------------------
> Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 17:56:23 -0400
> Subject: [MDBirding] Re: Hart-Miller Island, 06/29/15
> From: keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com
> To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
>
>
> correction, Pectoral Sandpiper was MD 7th June record. 4th record on the
> island.  - Kevin Graff
>
> On Tue, Jun 30, 2015 at 5:54 PM, Kevin Graff 
> wrote:
>
>
> 06/29/15 – 710am-3pm
>
> Hart-Miller Island, Essex, Baltimore Co., MD
>
>
>
> WEATHER: Sunny/PC, 64-81 degrees, SW 3K- WSW 4K   OBS: Kevin Graff, Bob
> Ringler
>
>
>
> Canada Goose – 186
>
> Wood Duck – 16
>
> American Black Duck – 4
>
> Mallard – 64
>
> Black Duck X Mallard – 1 (hybrid)
>
> Ruddy Duck – 1
>
> Pied-billed Grebe – 6 (4 adults, 2 young)
>
> Double-crested Cormorant – 57
>
> Great Blue Heron – 24
>
> Great Egret – 10
>
> Glossy Ibis – 2
>
> Osprey – 12
>
> Bald Eagle – 3
>
> Peregrine Falcon – 1
>
> American Coot – 1
>
> *SEMIPALMATED PLOVER – 2 (probably late spring migrants)
>
> Killdeer – 8
>
> Spotted Sandpiper – 9
>
> *LESSER YELLOWLEGS – 3 (first of fall)
>
> *PECTORAL SANDPIPER – 1 (first of fall, MD 8th June record)
>
> Laughing Gull – 6
>
> Ring-billed Gull – 149
>
> Herring Gull – 3
>
> *LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL – 3 (adult, 1st summer, 2nd summer)
>
> Great Black-backed Gull – 6
>
> Least Tern – 26 (one juvenile)
>
> Caspian Tern – 118
>
> Forster’s Tern – 4
>
> Mourning Dove – 2
>
> *BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO – 1
>
> Chimney Swift – 1
>
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird – 1
>
> Great Crested Flycatcher – 1
>
> Eastern Kingbird – 7
>
> American Crow – 4
>
> Purple Martin – 17
>
> N Rough-winged Swallow – 1
>
> Tree Swallow – 43
>
> Bank Swallow – 82
>
> Barn Swallow – 79
>
> Carolina Chickadee – 3
>
> Carolina Wren – 3
>
> Marsh Wren – 5
>
> Gray Catbird – 4
>
> Northern Mockingbird – 1
>
> European Starling – 116
>
> Common Yellowthroat – 48
>
> Yellow Warbler – 1
>
> Song Sparrow – 2
>
> Swamp Sparrow – 1
>
> Northern Cardinal – 5
>
> Blue Grosbeak – 2
>
> Indigo Bunting – 6
>
> Red-winged Blackbird – 126 (two juvenile)
>
> Common Grackle – 17
>
> Brown-headed Cowbird – 11
>
> Orchard Oriole – 7
>
> House Finch – 1
>
> American Goldfinch – 12
>
> SPECIES: 58   INDIVIDUALS: 1336
>
>
>
> REPTILES: E Painted Turtle – 1
>
>
>
> AMPHIBIANS: Fowler’s Toad – 30
>
>
>
> BUTTERFLIES
>
> Black Swallowtail – 6
>
> Cabbage White – 10
>
> Orange Sulphur – 55
>
> Gray Hairstreak – 2
>
> Eastern Tailed Blue – 2
>
> Red-spotted Purple – 1
>
> Comma – 1
>
> Red Admiral – 2
>
> Variegated Fritillary - 2
>
> Common Buckeye – 10
>
> Pearl Crescent – 5
>
> Monarch – 2
>
> Silver-spotted Skipper – 1
>
> Wild Indigo Duskywing – 2
>
>
>
> DRAGONFLIES
>
> Common Green Darner – 2
>
> Twelve-spotted Skimmer – 1
>
> Needham’s Skimmer – 2000
>
> Blue Dasher – 5
>
> Eastern Pondhawk – 2000
>
> Black Saddlebags – 20
>
> Four-spotted Pennant – 15
>
> Halloween Pennant – 45
>
> Martha’s Pennant – 2
>
>
>
> DAMSELFLIES: (lack of time)
>
>
>
> MOTHS
>
> Black-and-yellow Lichen Moth – 1
>
> Yellow-collared Scape Moth – 1
>
>
>
> BEETLES
>
> Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle – 2
>
> Soldier Beetle – 5 (Chauliognathus pennsylvanicus)
>
> Milkweed Borer – 1
>
> Argus Tortoise Beetle – 4
>
>
>
>
>     Kevin Graff
>
>     Jarrettsville, MD
>
>     KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com
>
>
>
>
>
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Subject: RE: Re: Hart-Miller Island, 06/29/15
From: Suzanne Richman <suzanne_richman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 18:58:45 -0400
Is Hart-Miller Island open to the public?

Suzanne RichmanMontgomery Bird Club

Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 17:56:23 -0400
Subject: [MDBirding] Re: Hart-Miller Island, 06/29/15
From: keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com
To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com


correction, Pectoral Sandpiper was MD 7th June record. 4th record on the 
island. - Kevin Graff 


On Tue, Jun 30, 2015 at 5:54 PM, Kevin Graff  
wrote: 




06/29/15 – 710am-3pm

Hart-Miller Island, Essex,
Baltimore Co., MD

 

WEATHER: Sunny/PC, 64-81
degrees, SW 3K- WSW 4K   OBS: Kevin Graff, Bob Ringler

 

Canada Goose – 186

Wood Duck – 16

American Black Duck – 4

Mallard – 64

Black Duck X Mallard – 1 (hybrid)

Ruddy Duck – 1

Pied-billed Grebe – 6 (4 adults, 2 young)


Double-crested Cormorant – 57

Great Blue Heron – 24

Great Egret – 10

Glossy Ibis – 2

Osprey – 12

Bald Eagle – 3

Peregrine Falcon – 1

American Coot – 1

*SEMIPALMATED PLOVER – 2 (probably late spring migrants)


Killdeer – 8

Spotted Sandpiper – 9

*LESSER YELLOWLEGS – 3 (first of fall)


*PECTORAL SANDPIPER – 1 (first of fall, MD 8th June record)


Laughing Gull – 6

Ring-billed Gull – 149

Herring Gull – 3

*LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL – 3 (adult, 1st summer, 2nd summer)


Great Black-backed Gull – 6

Least Tern – 26 (one juvenile)


Caspian Tern – 118

Forster’s Tern – 4

Mourning Dove – 2

*BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO – 1

Chimney Swift – 1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird – 1

Great Crested Flycatcher – 1

Eastern Kingbird – 7

American Crow – 4

Purple Martin – 17

N Rough-winged Swallow – 1

Tree Swallow – 43

Bank Swallow – 82

Barn Swallow – 79

Carolina Chickadee – 3

Carolina Wren – 3

Marsh Wren – 5

Gray Catbird – 4

Northern Mockingbird – 1

European Starling – 116

Common Yellowthroat – 48

Yellow Warbler – 1

Song Sparrow – 2

Swamp Sparrow – 1

Northern Cardinal – 5

Blue Grosbeak – 2

Indigo Bunting – 6

Red-winged Blackbird – 126 (two juvenile)


Common Grackle – 17

Brown-headed Cowbird – 11

Orchard Oriole – 7

House Finch – 1

American Goldfinch – 12

SPECIES: 58   INDIVIDUALS: 1336

 

REPTILES: E Painted Turtle – 1

 

AMPHIBIANS: Fowler’s Toad – 30

 

BUTTERFLIES

Black Swallowtail – 6

Cabbage White – 10

Orange Sulphur – 55

Gray Hairstreak – 2

Eastern Tailed Blue – 2

Red-spotted Purple – 1

Comma – 1

Red Admiral – 2

Variegated Fritillary - 2

Common Buckeye – 10

Pearl Crescent – 5

Monarch – 2

Silver-spotted Skipper – 1

Wild Indigo Duskywing – 2

 

DRAGONFLIES

Common Green Darner – 2

Twelve-spotted Skimmer – 1

Needham’s Skimmer – 2000

Blue Dasher – 5

Eastern
 Pondhawk – 2000

Black Saddlebags – 20

Four-spotted Pennant – 15

Halloween Pennant – 45

Martha’s Pennant – 2

 

DAMSELFLIES: (lack of time)

 

MOTHS

Black-and-yellow Lichen Moth –
1

Yellow-collared Scape Moth – 1

 

BEETLES

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle
– 2

Soldier Beetle – 5
(Chauliognathus pennsylvanicus)

Milkweed Borer – 1

Argus Tortoise Beetle – 4

 
    Kevin Graff    Jarrettsville, MD    KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com










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Subject: Re: Hart-Miller Island, 06/29/15
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 17:56:23 -0400
correction, Pectoral Sandpiper was MD 7th June record. 4th record on the
island.  - Kevin Graff

On Tue, Jun 30, 2015 at 5:54 PM, Kevin Graff 
wrote:

>
> 06/29/15 – 710am-3pm
>
> Hart-Miller Island, Essex, Baltimore Co., MD
>
>
>
> WEATHER: Sunny/PC, 64-81 degrees, SW 3K- WSW 4K   OBS: Kevin Graff, Bob
> Ringler
>
>
>
> Canada Goose – 186
>
> Wood Duck – 16
>
> American Black Duck – 4
>
> Mallard – 64
>
> Black Duck X Mallard – 1 (hybrid)
>
> Ruddy Duck – 1
>
> Pied-billed Grebe – 6 (4 adults, 2 young)
>
> Double-crested Cormorant – 57
>
> Great Blue Heron – 24
>
> Great Egret – 10
>
> Glossy Ibis – 2
>
> Osprey – 12
>
> Bald Eagle – 3
>
> Peregrine Falcon – 1
>
> American Coot – 1
>
> *SEMIPALMATED PLOVER – 2 (probably late spring migrants)
>
> Killdeer – 8
>
> Spotted Sandpiper – 9
>
> *LESSER YELLOWLEGS – 3 (first of fall)
>
> *PECTORAL SANDPIPER – 1 (first of fall, MD 8th June record)
>
> Laughing Gull – 6
>
> Ring-billed Gull – 149
>
> Herring Gull – 3
>
> *LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL – 3 (adult, 1st summer, 2nd summer)
>
> Great Black-backed Gull – 6
>
> Least Tern – 26 (one juvenile)
>
> Caspian Tern – 118
>
> Forster’s Tern – 4
>
> Mourning Dove – 2
>
> *BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO – 1
>
> Chimney Swift – 1
>
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird – 1
>
> Great Crested Flycatcher – 1
>
> Eastern Kingbird – 7
>
> American Crow – 4
>
> Purple Martin – 17
>
> N Rough-winged Swallow – 1
>
> Tree Swallow – 43
>
> Bank Swallow – 82
>
> Barn Swallow – 79
>
> Carolina Chickadee – 3
>
> Carolina Wren – 3
>
> Marsh Wren – 5
>
> Gray Catbird – 4
>
> Northern Mockingbird – 1
>
> European Starling – 116
>
> Common Yellowthroat – 48
>
> Yellow Warbler – 1
>
> Song Sparrow – 2
>
> Swamp Sparrow – 1
>
> Northern Cardinal – 5
>
> Blue Grosbeak – 2
>
> Indigo Bunting – 6
>
> Red-winged Blackbird – 126 (two juvenile)
>
> Common Grackle – 17
>
> Brown-headed Cowbird – 11
>
> Orchard Oriole – 7
>
> House Finch – 1
>
> American Goldfinch – 12
>
> SPECIES: 58   INDIVIDUALS: 1336
>
>
>
> REPTILES: E Painted Turtle – 1
>
>
>
> AMPHIBIANS: Fowler’s Toad – 30
>
>
>
> BUTTERFLIES
>
> Black Swallowtail – 6
>
> Cabbage White – 10
>
> Orange Sulphur – 55
>
> Gray Hairstreak – 2
>
> Eastern Tailed Blue – 2
>
> Red-spotted Purple – 1
>
> Comma – 1
>
> Red Admiral – 2
>
> Variegated Fritillary - 2
>
> Common Buckeye – 10
>
> Pearl Crescent – 5
>
> Monarch – 2
>
> Silver-spotted Skipper – 1
>
> Wild Indigo Duskywing – 2
>
>
>
> DRAGONFLIES
>
> Common Green Darner – 2
>
> Twelve-spotted Skimmer – 1
>
> Needham’s Skimmer – 2000
>
> Blue Dasher – 5
>
> Eastern Pondhawk – 2000
>
> Black Saddlebags – 20
>
> Four-spotted Pennant – 15
>
> Halloween Pennant – 45
>
> Martha’s Pennant – 2
>
>
>
> DAMSELFLIES: (lack of time)
>
>
>
> MOTHS
>
> Black-and-yellow Lichen Moth – 1
>
> Yellow-collared Scape Moth – 1
>
>
>
> BEETLES
>
> Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle – 2
>
> Soldier Beetle – 5 (Chauliognathus pennsylvanicus)
>
> Milkweed Borer – 1
>
> Argus Tortoise Beetle – 4
>
>
>
>
>     Kevin Graff
>
>     Jarrettsville, MD
>
>     KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com
>
>
>
>

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Subject: Hart-Miller Island, 06/29/15
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 17:54:11 -0400
06/29/15 – 710am-3pm

Hart-Miller Island, Essex, Baltimore Co., MD



WEATHER: Sunny/PC, 64-81 degrees, SW 3K- WSW 4K   OBS: Kevin Graff, Bob
Ringler



Canada Goose – 186

Wood Duck – 16

American Black Duck – 4

Mallard – 64

Black Duck X Mallard – 1 (hybrid)

Ruddy Duck – 1

Pied-billed Grebe – 6 (4 adults, 2 young)

Double-crested Cormorant – 57

Great Blue Heron – 24

Great Egret – 10

Glossy Ibis – 2

Osprey – 12

Bald Eagle – 3

Peregrine Falcon – 1

American Coot – 1

*SEMIPALMATED PLOVER – 2 (probably late spring migrants)

Killdeer – 8

Spotted Sandpiper – 9

*LESSER YELLOWLEGS – 3 (first of fall)

*PECTORAL SANDPIPER – 1 (first of fall, MD 8th June record)

Laughing Gull – 6

Ring-billed Gull – 149

Herring Gull – 3

*LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL – 3 (adult, 1st summer, 2nd summer)

Great Black-backed Gull – 6

Least Tern – 26 (one juvenile)

Caspian Tern – 118

Forster’s Tern – 4

Mourning Dove – 2

*BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO – 1

Chimney Swift – 1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird – 1

Great Crested Flycatcher – 1

Eastern Kingbird – 7

American Crow – 4

Purple Martin – 17

N Rough-winged Swallow – 1

Tree Swallow – 43

Bank Swallow – 82

Barn Swallow – 79

Carolina Chickadee – 3

Carolina Wren – 3

Marsh Wren – 5

Gray Catbird – 4

Northern Mockingbird – 1

European Starling – 116

Common Yellowthroat – 48

Yellow Warbler – 1

Song Sparrow – 2

Swamp Sparrow – 1

Northern Cardinal – 5

Blue Grosbeak – 2

Indigo Bunting – 6

Red-winged Blackbird – 126 (two juvenile)

Common Grackle – 17

Brown-headed Cowbird – 11

Orchard Oriole – 7

House Finch – 1

American Goldfinch – 12

SPECIES: 58   INDIVIDUALS: 1336



REPTILES: E Painted Turtle – 1



AMPHIBIANS: Fowler’s Toad – 30



BUTTERFLIES

Black Swallowtail – 6

Cabbage White – 10

Orange Sulphur – 55

Gray Hairstreak – 2

Eastern Tailed Blue – 2

Red-spotted Purple – 1

Comma – 1

Red Admiral – 2

Variegated Fritillary - 2

Common Buckeye – 10

Pearl Crescent – 5

Monarch – 2

Silver-spotted Skipper – 1

Wild Indigo Duskywing – 2



DRAGONFLIES

Common Green Darner – 2

Twelve-spotted Skimmer – 1

Needham’s Skimmer – 2000

Blue Dasher – 5

Eastern Pondhawk – 2000

Black Saddlebags – 20

Four-spotted Pennant – 15

Halloween Pennant – 45

Martha’s Pennant – 2



DAMSELFLIES: (lack of time)



MOTHS

Black-and-yellow Lichen Moth – 1

Yellow-collared Scape Moth – 1



BEETLES

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle – 2

Soldier Beetle – 5 (Chauliognathus pennsylvanicus)

Milkweed Borer – 1

Argus Tortoise Beetle – 4




    Kevin Graff

    Jarrettsville, MD

    KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Extralimital: Little Egret in Maine - someday Maryland?
From: "David Moulton, Bethesda, MD" <moulton.davidh AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 14:42:24 -0700 (PDT)
In light of the high ranking that Little Egret holds on the list of "Next Ten 
Rarities to be seen in Maryland", I am sharing the photos I took today of a 
Little Egret in Portland, Maine - 3rd state record. Keep a sharp eye on those 
Snowy Egrets -- one of these days... 


Flickr: Little Egret 


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Subject: Unbelievable Morning
From: "MICHAEL L. SMITH" <ospreys AT erols.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 12:47:51 -0400
      This morning I was on me back deck recording and watching birds. 
At about 10am a male, female and two young Pileated Woodpeckers show up
    into one of my big trees. The male seemed to be doing most of the 
calling. the two young landing about halfway up the tree with their 
parents.
        For more ten minutes they were there slowly going up the tree. 
Picking as they went almost to the top. Do wish I had a digital camera.
-- 
Michael L. Smith
New Windsor, Maryland

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Subject: Lock-6 Cliff Swallows: Behavior RFI
From: Donald Sweig <skybirds.d AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 11:58:28 -0400
A friend and I spent about an hour watching and photographing the 
Cliff-Swallows that are nesting above lock-6 on the C&O canal. 

 We noticed that several of the adults seemed to be feeding or tending for 
young in more than one nest. Several times we noticed an adult fly back with 
food, go into one nest, and then after a minute or so, come out of that nest 
and fly across and go into another nest. 

   The pattern was repeated numerous times, but not always with the same nests.
 Does anyone have any information about whether Cliff-swallows tend for their 
young in a communal way?. 

  Donald Sweig
   Falls Church, Virginia
  
  

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Summer Tanager
From: Donald Sweig <skybirds.d AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 11:48:28 -0400
If friend and I had excellent views of a singing, male Summer Tanager in the 
large sycamore tree directly across River Road from the entrance to the summit 
hall turf farm, about 3:30 yesterday afternoon. 

 It was singing out on a bare limb for about 20 minutes, affording good photo 
opportunities. 

  Donald Sweig
  Falls Church, Virginia


Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Re: Mont Co field birds 6/20
From: Don Simonson <simonson AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 08:21:12 -0700 (PDT)
On Sunday June 29, Mike Bowen, Helen Patton and I followed Clive's excellent 
directions; on Westerly Road we heard and saw Blue Grosbeak, Vesper Sparrow, 
Grasshopper Sparrow, Eastern Meadowlark and Horned Lark (Lark heard only). 

Good Birding!
Don Simonson
Darnestown MD
On Saturday, June 20, 2015 at 2:35:03 PM UTC-4, Clive Harris wrote:
> It was nice conditions first thing this morning for searching for field 
birds. 

> 
> 
> First stop was Hughes Rd polo grounds - there was a Vesper Sparrow singing on 
far side of field to the E and a Blue Grosbeak along Hughes Rd.  Several 
Grasshopper Sparrows as well. 

> 
> 
> Budd Rd area had three (!) Vesper Sparrows, one right along the road, another 
singing from a tree in the middle of the field to the E and the third over at 
the Hughes Rd side of the big field. All gave decent views. 

> 
> 
> Stops at Westerly Rd and W Offut Rd produced two more Vespers and a Blue 
Grosbeak at the latter. 

> 
> 
> I then drove up to check the fields around W Old Baltimore Rd/Slidell Rd 
junction -  could not turn up the Savannah Sparrow I saw a couple of weeks 
back but Blue Grosbeak also there as well as Yellow-breasted Chat. 

> 
> 
> Good birding 
> 
> 
> Clive Harris
> Cabin John, MD

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Subject: Sligo Creek Yellow-crowned Night-Herons (Montgomery Co.)
From: Rob Hilton <rob.hilton.2010 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 10:12:31 -0400
This morning I saw three juvenile Yellow-crowned Night-Herons foraging on
the ground next to the tennis courts along Sligo Creek Parkway close to
Piney Branch Road.  The nearby nest was empty yesterday, when I saw a male
Baltimore Oriole foraging high up near the nest tree.

Rob Hilton
Silver Spring, MD

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Subject: Extralimital: Hello from Nebraska
From: JAMES SPEICHER <jugornought AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 19:44:50 -0700
Couldn't resist :)

Just here [Columbus, NE] for a few days.  Was hoping to see a W Kingbird
and hear a W Meadowlark while visiting.  Although I couldn't make a W out
of an E Kingbird, I think I did manage to hear a W Meadowlark today.  To
all appearances this was indeed a meadowlark, but it's song was not the
eastern song I'm familiar with.  I would give a rough translation as

Wah hee ho hee, dibly, dibly

and the tonal differences as

low/high/low/high/low,low

NOT the buoyant, flutelike melodious song of fame, but perhaps one of the
lessor calls given following breeding season.  Still that may not
definitively clinch an id and I came sans a field guide...

Today I noted as many [2] red-headed woodpeckers in a span of 30 minutes as
seen in two years in FRED county.

Dickcissels [sp ?] are commonplace as are Red-winged blackbirds.

Killdeer are vocally defending hidden nests and there is a kind of tern out
here that I haven't Id'd.  It's overall white, small, with an orangish bill
[I think].  A black eyebrow if memory serves [perhaps a crown inking
instead] and black wing edges both above and below.  They have a chattery
call and will come quite close above [in flight] almost as if in a
defensive gesture.

Jim Speicher

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Subject: Extralimital: RUFF seen this morning
From: Mike Hudson <birdman96 AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 10:46:20 -0400
Hey All, 

Reporting on behalf of Winger West for any people interested in chasing the 
RUFF in DE. 


It was seen shortly after 9:30 at Broadkill Beach Rd. It flew into the first 
impoundment on the north side of the road where it foraged for about 5 minutes 
before taking off again and flying out of sight. 


Good birding! 

Mike H
Chestertown, MD

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Subject: lower Eastern Shore, MD & VA, June 18-25, 2015.
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 01:02:48 +0000



















LOWER EASTERN SHORE, JUNE 18 – 25,
2015.  Liz & Harry Armistead.  At Rigby’s Folly, Ferry Neck, Talbot County,
MD, unless otherwise specified.

 

JUNE 18, THURSDAY.  Arrive at 4 P.M.  Bald Eagle 2. 
Canada Goose 41.  Small young
Osprey in “our” nest.  Deer: 1 buck, 2
does in the Woods 2 vernal pool area (where it’s cool), a buck in Field 2, 2
bucks & 3 does in Field 1.  10mm. of
rain since last time, 1mm. tonight.  A 7”
skink on the front porch.  A scolding
Gray Squirrel (the best kind).  Fair
becoming mostly overcast, 86 - 79°F.,
calm then W 15-20-10, thunder, lightning, a little rain, and wind late. But … 
has dried out quite a bit since last 

time (this will not last; stay tuned). 
As will be the case most evenings this visit, a good though distant Green
Tree Frog chorus and a couple of yard Cope’s Gray Tree Frogs.

 

JUNE 19, FRIDAY.  Royal tern 1, bald eagle 3, and, this is a
poor time of year for gulls, but 1 each of laughing, ring-billed, and
herring.  Have yet to see or hear an
Orchard Oriole here, the 1st time this has ever happened. Our trees, just about 
everywhere, must be too 

big for their tastes.  A dead gray
squirrel NE of the garage on the lawn and a very live one nearby twice
today.  Increasingly animals are
perceived as exhibiting loss, grief, or bereavement, a victory for
anthropomorphism, which is gaining respect in the scientific community. It’s 
not just elephants that deserve our 

condolences.  A 6” skink missing its
tail, a 7” one with a tail.  Cut the
overhang on the entire driveway plus the Irish Creek and Lucy Point
trails.  One each of Snowy & Cattle
egrets.  Mostly overcast becoming fair,
NW5-15-SW10, 75-86°F.  One Orange Sulphur.

 

JUNE
20, SATURDAY.  Has rained 1.3+
inches.  Bald Eagle 1.  Deer, again: 2 bucks, 1 doe in Field 1; 1
buck, 1 doe, in Field 2; 1 doe in the celebrated vernal pool of Woods 2. Seems 
like a lot of small bucks this 

year.   The bucks stop here.  Most of the day spent in Dorchester County:

 

EGYPT
ROAD: 11-12:30, SE10+, mostly overcast, 82-86°F. northern bobwhite 4 
(“singing” birds), bald 

eagle 3, prothonotary warbler 1 singing male, pine warbler 2, common
yellowthroat 13, blue grosbeak 4, indigo bunting 3, white-eyed vireo 2, 
red-eyed 

vireo 1, chipping sparrow 3, summer tanager 1, orchard oriole 2, field sparrow
2, green heron 1, great blue heron 1, tree swallow 9 (I suspect these are 
postbreeding 

birds, hence a sort of fall migrant), eastern kingbird 1, and great crested
flycatcher 1 plus 1 bullfrog, 2 green frogs, 1 cricket frog, and an apparent
red-bellied watersnake (roadkill; but I need to check the field guide).

 

BLACKWATER
N.W.R., 12:30 – 3:30, mostly overcast or fair, SE 15-20, 86-91°F. Virginia 
rail 4, bald eagle 13, common 

yellowthroat 13, pine warbler 4, summer tanager 1, red-headed woodpecker 2, 
chipping 

sparrow 6, great egret 5, snowy egret 2, eastern kingbird 2, fish crow 3,
white-eyed vireo 1, indigo bunting 3, Canada goose all of 3, mallard all of 3,
black vulture 3, gray catbird 1, and American white pelican 1 plus a tiny
Fowler’s toad on the Pool 1 road, 1 deer, 24 painted turtles, and 5 redbelly
sliders.  It is a surprise to hear the
unsolicited Virginia rails sounding off during this windy, very hot, afternoon. 
No terns or gulls seen. 


 

HIP
ROOF ROAD:  Great egret 4, diamondback
terrapin (resting on the road and “rescued”). 
3:45 P.M.  90°F.  OPOSSUM ISLAND, 4-4:15 P.M., 87°F., as seen
with a scope from Adams Road on upper Hooper’s Island. Opossum is slightly 
east of Barren 

Island.  There is not much left of
it.  A few years ago Jared Sparks and I
found an American oystercatcher nest with eggs there. Some of the birds seen 
here must be 

breeders, but I don’t know which. 
Double-crested cormorant 410, brown pelican 95, snowy egret 2, royal
tern 1, herring gull 6, Forster’s tern 6. 
Other birds here: 4 great egrets and 5 great blue herons, these
apparently nesting on Barren Island.  2
killdeer seen nearby.  Some large fig
bushes here, reminiscent of the huge ones of yesteryear, those done in, I
think, by the winter of 1977.  In Talbot
County at Toods Corner X Route 33 (near the former Carroll’s Market) a 
SHARP-SHINNED 

HAWK.  I don’t know what to make
of the 1-3 times I’ve seen sharpies these past few summers. The 2nd MD-DC 
breeding bird atlas 

shows no records for the Eastern Shore save one “observed” at Taylor’s
Island.  

 

This
is a good summer for rudbeckia, milkweed, and Queen Anne’s lace, and, in
Poplar Cove, the Ruppia maritima is as rank and dense as I’ve ever seen
it, and the cove water nice and clear. 
The “cones” on the eastern redcedars are also in big quantity, grist
for, later on, the cedar waxwing-myrtle warbler-house finch mill.

 

JUNE
21, SUNDAY.  Osprey, 16 in sight
simultaneously.  A pileated woodpecker
calling at the head of the cove.  Six
painted turtles in Frog Hollow.  Six
diamondback terrapin in the cove; no big counts of them lately. An eastern 
kingbird chases a female purple 

martin twice and an American crow twice. 
Cedar waxwing 3.  Purple martin
7.  Deer: 2 bucks and 4 does in Field
1.  For a couple of weeks now common
whitetails (a dragonfly) and bluets (a damselfly) have been conspicuously in
evidence.  Eastern cottontail 1.  BUTTERFLIES: spring/summer azure, pearl
crescent, hackberry emperor, cabbage white & American lady. Clear 77-88°F., NW 
20-15, then SW 5-10. Bald Eagle 4. 


 

JUNE
22, MONDAY.  1 each of
chuck-will’s-widow, least tern, Forster’s tern, red-tailed hawk, bald 
eagle, 

and yellow-billed cuckoo.  Cattle egret
5.  A northern mockingbird seen chasing a
fish crow and a barn swallow joins in the chase. Two eastern cottontails. Fair 
then overcast, NW5+ then SW5+ then 

NW15-25, 77-93°F.     

 

JUNE
23, TUESDAY.  Royal tern 2, common tern
5, snowy egret 1, a great horned owl at 8:30 P.M. flying low and fast out the
driveway.  Accompany a man who is
bushogging 18 areas, most of them small and along the driveway, to improve the
views.  While this is going on there are
2 bald eagles over Field 1 and 3 cattle egrets attracted by the mowing. A doe 
with her little spotted fawn is near 

the Waterthriush Pond, the 1st doe I’ve seen this year. My 1st
red-spotted purple this year lands on my Rockjumper baseball hat, attracted by
the perspiration.  A lot of 1’+ fish are
breaking the surface and thrashing at the mouth of the cove where it meets
Irish Creek.  Fair, 77 - 93°F. falling to
76 by 7:45 P.M.  Sit out by the dock and
watch the ominous, gray, approaching squall line which hits at 7:20 and the 
scary 

winds gust to c. 40m.p.h., blowing the canoe, although resting on its bottom
and containing 3 paddles and a heavy boat hook, 36 feet across the back
lawn.  There is thunder, lightning, wind,
and rain, but after the storm, at 8:50 P.M., the sky becomes a brilliant
vermillion to the north.  The rain
amounts to 1.25”.  I will spend an hour
clearing the resulting overhang along the driveway tomorrow. In Philadelphia, 
daughter Mary, trapped in 

her car during this deluge, sees the temperature fall from 98 to 73°F. in
perhaps only half an hour.  We have not
seen any cow-nosed rays in 2015.  

 

JUNE
24, WEDNESDAY.  2 wild turkeys on the
back lawn, just standing there.  Two
yellow-billed cuckoos calling.  Liz sees
4 deer and an eastern cottontail.  Most
of the day is spent in the Smith I., MD area in the company of John Weske. Get 
back at 10 P.M. to lovely moonlight and 

choruses of Cope’s Gray Tree Frogs and Green Tree Frogs.  Atmosphere. 

 

DORCHESTER
COUNTY: EGYPT ROAD, A tiny, baby eastern cottontail. BLACKWATER N.W.R., an 
immature Bald Eagle on 

Key Wallace Drive attending a roadkill. 
Four Forster’s terns at Sewards. 
ROUTE 335 north of Golden Hill, a sika deer and broods of 3 and 2 young
Canada geese.  A sika deer buck near
VIENNA.  Around sunset west of Vienna we
a boat trailer tire becomes unraveled . 
Two friendly Mexicans who live on the other side of Route 50 help us
change tires.   

 

SOMERSET
COUNTY, MD.  IN THE VICINITY OF EWELL,
SMITH ISLAND: little blue heron 3, turkey vulture 1 (often absent way out
here), fish crow 20, barn swallow 6, American oystercatcher 3, tricolored heron
1, and glossy ibis 6 plus a goat foraging on Goat Island (which is for sale and
has been for a while).  RHODES POINT
& SHEEP PEN GUT, SMITH ISLAND: glossy ibis 6, northern harrier 1 female,
American oystercatcher 3, osprey 3, purple martin 4, double-crested cormorant
5, boat-tailed grackle 3, little blue heron 2, tricolored heron 1, green heron
1, great blue heron 1, great egret 2, snowy egret 1, fish crow 4, and barn
swallow 5. 

 

SHANKS
ISLAND-CHEESEMAN ISLAND-SOUTH POINT MARSH, June 24, 2015, Wednesday. John Weske 
& Harry Armistead. These 3 places are sort of fused due to the 

eastward “migration” of the 2 islands so that what remains of them is 
joined to 

South Point Marsh in Accomack County, adjacent to the Eastern Shore of
Virginia.  We land at the north end and
walk south c. 0.63 miles, at which point the marsh ends and a long sandy area
stretches away to the south towards Tangier Island. Such fecundity here! It is 
a spectacle! The west side is mostly beach but with some 

peaty sod banks, too.  Next to the beach
are “high” areas with the panic tussocks, grasses, still sandy. These give 
off to high saltmarsh and then 

lower marsh, Spartina alterniflora. 
The higher, dune-type areas sometimes have numbers of “garden” spiders.

 

BROWN
PELICANS:  I accompany John in his
Privateer boat, that has a 115 H.P. outboard. 
We launch at Crisfield.  The
object is to assess the enormous Brown Pelican colony here to determine the
size of the youngsters with an eye to a future banding expedition. We find very 
few nests that still have eggs, 

somewhat more of chicks that are too small to band.  

 

Most
of the young (at least 310 in sight simultaneously) at the north segment of
this colony are large “downies”, already plenty large enough to band. The 
more southern sector has young that are 

larger, starting to get feathering and brownish color on their wings. My very 
rough combined estimates of the total 

number of flight-capable birds (virtually 95+% breeding adults plus a few
sub-adults not hatched out this year) is of 1,640 Brown Pelicans, probably low. 
I make no estimate of the # of young in the 

south colony.  Recently there was a small
subset of nesting pelicans back in the marsh a ways in the northeast part of
this area, difficult to get to.  We do
not see this today. 

 

One
has to figure that almost this many other pelicans may not be present, are off
hunting fish, coasting over the adjacent Chesapeake Bay waters. In past years 
official estimates (counts?) of 

the # of pairs of pelis here has sometimes exceeded 1,000. My estimates are 
made by quickly counting by 

10’s from a single vantage point for each colony. I scan off to the East 
perhaps 8 times to see 

if any peli activity is visible in the lines of Baccharis halimifolia &
Iva frutescens there.  There’s a
lot of shimmer but even so there doesn’t seem to be any action. These bushes 
may be a mile or so in the 

distance.  In past years there has been
an active pelican colony off in that direction at Peach Orchard Point.

 

DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANTS.  There may be EVEN MORE DCCOs
than pelicans.  Their young are so large
and look so much like adults today that I do not attempt an estimate of the #
of youngsters.  My rough (I SAID ROUGH)
estimate of the number of DCCOs (adults and large young) visible here is
1,960.  As with the pelis, many adults
are probably off fishing.  And in general
adult DCCOs when disturbed by the likes of us LEAVE the nest area in contrast
to Brown Pelicans.  The later circle
overhead and soon return to their nests after a person is perhaps only 150’
away from them.  So these 1,960 DCCOs may
comprise mostly youngsters.

 

OTHER
BIRDS: northern harrier 1 male, royal tern 2, osprey 3, Forster’s tern 2,
mallard 1 female, American black duck 4, seaside sparrow 2, little blue heron
2, American oystercatcher 12 (none of the 7 or 8 I am able to see close enough
wear bands), fish crow 3, laughing gull 4, and boat-tailed grackle 3. We see 
perhaps 50 Herring and 150 Great 

Black-backed Gulls.  The GBBGs greatly
outnumber the Herring Gulls.  Lots of
large, downy GBBG young present.  Strange
to say, a great blue heron lands right in the south colony.  Why? 
Perhaps it wants to eat young birds. ? 

 

NON-AVIAN
TAXA: 1 diamondback terrapin, 1 cabbage white, and 1 large black (and distant)
unID’d butterfly.  In the vicinity of the
south colony there is a large bed of morning glories. Only see a few of the 
seaside dragonlet 

dragonflies whereas sometimes there are countless 1,000s in these saltmarshes. 
Big clumps of some kind of Panicum 

grow in the higher dune-like, sandy areas, and the presence of sea rocket makes
this seem like a barrier island setting. 
The remains of a few horseshoe crabs are on the shoreline.    

 

We
are in the colony area for c. 3 hours (c. 2-5) but keep moving so as to
minimize disturbance.  No birds are
banded by us today.  NW winds, c. 12-16
m.p.h., temps in the 80s, clear or fair, extremely low tide at the start. The 
passage over from the mainland is rather 

rough and choppy, a test of the knees and lower back. Other notes of the day 
from the nearby Smith 

I., MD, area will appear in MDBIRDING in a few days. 

 

JUNE
25, THURSDAY,  Leave by 10:45 A.M.

 

Best
to all, ‘til the next time. – Harry Armistead, Philadelphia. 





 		 	   		  

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Subject: Oxbow Lake: Least Bittern, Least Tern
From: Marcy Stutzman <marciastutzman AT netscape.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 17:33:13 -0700 (PDT)
It's the LEAST we can do to report some exciting sightings at Oxbow Lake.

The Little Patuxent River is flooding back into Oxbow Lake (Little Patuxent 
River Oxbow Lake Nature Preserve). Jay Sheppard and I watch the river based on 
the readings of the gage at Savage, MD on Route 1. 


We monitor the gage height and the discharge. Jay headed over to the Oxbow when 
the gage reached around 9 feet as that is the magic number when the river 
starts rushing into the Oxbow's outlet channel and flooding the lake. Here's 
the statistics so far: 


12.64 ft at 7:15 EST (msg at 8:24 PM)
11.76 ft at 6:15 EST (msg at 7:24 PM)
10.58 ft at 5:15 EST (msg at 6:24 PM)
 9.24 ft at 4:15 EST (msg at 5:24 PM)

Jay is at the Oxbow watching and waiting because we never know what will be 
flushed out of all the vegetation once it is covered with thousands of cubic 
feet of water from the river and from the rain. He has been at several sites 
around the lake, but spent most of his time at the SE Observation Point which 
provides the broadest view of the lake. 


At 7:44 PM, Jay called to say he had one Least Tern flying around.

At 7:59 PM, he called to say a male Least Bittern had just flown across his 
field of view. 


Tomorrow morning there will still be lots of water, but by then some of it will 
have rushed back through the outlet channel to the Little Patuxent River. Can't 
wait to see what might be around in the morning. 


Marcy Stutzman
Russett, MD 20724

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Subject: Cliff Swallow colony in Montgomery County
From: "'Michael Bowen' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 15:32:36 -0400
Having been out of action (birdingwise) with extensive overseas 
travel followed by an eye operation, it was great to get out of doors 
this morning (6/26) and to go looking for and finding the Cliff 
Swallow colony on the underside of a footbridge above Lock 6 on the 
C&O Canal in Montgomery County.  This colony was first pointed out, 
as far as I can see from eBird and MDBirding, by John Hubbell on June 
21, and viewed again by Gerry Hawkins on the 22nd.

Cliff Swallow is an extremely uncommon breeder in Montgomery with, as 
far as I'm aware, Brighton Dam on the Montgomery-Howard boundary 
being the only reliable site.  If there are others, I'd love to hear 
about them.

A photo of one of the approximately 20 swallows here is embedded in 
my eBird checklist at:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24058883

Also on my Flickr site at:
http://bit.ly/1GOMtQO

Michael Bowen
Bethesda

D.H. Michael Bowen
8609 Ewing Drive
Bethesda, MD  20817
Telephone: (301) 530-5764
e-mail:  dhmbowenATyahooDOTcom


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Subject: JBWS Ongoing Bird Survey -Least Bittern, Chimney Swift
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 10:12:28 -0700 (PDT)
Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary, Anne Arundel, Maryland, US
Jun 26, 2015 7:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Ongoing Bird Survey
39 species

Wood Duck  4
Double-crested Cormorant  4
Least Bittern  2
Great Blue Heron  4
Black Vulture  12
Turkey Vulture  1
Osprey 35 Actual count: this is a known breeding/nesting area for this species 

Bald Eagle  1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  5
Mourning Dove  2
Chimney Swift  2
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Acadian Flycatcher  1
Eastern Phoebe  2
Eastern Kingbird  2
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  4
Tree Swallow  3
Barn Swallow  5
Tufted Titmouse  2
Marsh Wren  4
Carolina Wren  1
Wood Thrush  1
Gray Catbird  1
Brown Thrasher  1
European Starling  5
Common Yellowthroat  2
Yellow-throated Warbler  1
Eastern Towhee  1
Chipping Sparrow  1
Northern Cardinal  3
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  14
Common Grackle  1
Orchard Oriole  3

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Subject: Eastern Kingbird nesting failure?
From: "Steve Long" <steve.long4 AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 09:21:36 -0400
I have been watching an Eastern Kingbird build a nest, lay eggs and sit on them 
for the last few weeks. There is a 60x scope trained on the nest from my 
livingroom window, which gives me a good view of the nest on a winch out on a 
pier over the water. It seemed that the female was on the nest for too long. I 
took a walk out on the pier while the bird was off the nest and saw 3 eggs 
still in the nest after about 2 weeks. Looking up the incubation period, that 
seemed long, but not out of the question, since I don't know exactly when those 
eggs were laid. After another week or so of watching, the bird seemed to be off 
the nest much more, with no babies visible, so I walked out again. Now there is 
only one egg in the nest, with no evidence of shell or dead babies. I am 
suspecting that the eggs were not viable for some reason. But, I am wondering 
if the single egg is one of the previous 3, or the beginning of a second brood. 
Any insights from others would be appreciated. 


Steve Long
Oxford

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Subject: out of area
From: "'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 13:10:28 +0000 (UTC)
Crested Caracara is long overdue in Maryland with several reports in New Jersey 
and elsewhere along the east coast. This report, from near Newport News, has 
some potential to stray north on the western shore of the Chesapeake. 


Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 13:20:27 -0400
From: billwilliams154 AT gmail.com
To: Virginia Birds 
Subject: [Va-bird] Caracara in Poquoson
Message-ID: <47B340CE-DAE0-42F6-98CD-931779790354 AT gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain;    charset=us-ascii

Greetings All,

A photographer friend e-mailed a photo of a Crested Caracara taken at 8:50 am 
today at "Shady Banks Trailer Park" in Poquoson. 


Wish there was more info to send out.  The photo is blurry, apparently from a 
phone, but easily identifiable. 


Hopefully others may be able to relocate this bird.

Best Bird,

Bill

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Subject: Eastern Kingbird fledglings
From: Fred Shaffer <glaucousgull AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 12:02:35 +0000 (UTC)
I believe that several of my posts earlier this spring referenced a pair of 
Eastern Kingbirds nesting high in a sycamore overhanging Schoolhouse Pond.  On 
many days I saw one or both birds around the nest and/or aggressively chasing 
other birds away from the tree.  Sometimes, the kingbirds even felt the need 
to chase the offending crow, hawk or jay well beyond the limits of the pond.  
Well, now I've been seeing fledgling kingbirds around the pond the past few 
days and today I saw four juvenile kingbirds on a low snag being fed by one 
adult bird.  I think that I heard the second adult nearby.  At this point at 
least, the fledglings appear fairly approachable and they usually perch on low 
snags overhanging the water (often quite close to the boardwalk) while waiting 
to be fed.  Today, all four fledglings were clustered closely together, two on 
one branch (side by side) and two on another branch (also side by side).  
While I was watching, the adult fed one of the young birds, but that sure got 
the other three chattering.  Good birding, Fred 
ShafferGlaucousGull AT verizon.netCrofton, Anne Arundel 


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Subject: Re: Egypt Road, Dorchester Cnty - Bobwhite, Brown Thrasher
From: "'Elda Banks' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 12:03:10 +0000 (UTC)
Hi,  My husband and I saw 5 Northern Bobwhites along Wildlife Dr on 10-22-13 
at 9:00 am.Elda BanksSilver Spring 

 


 On Sunday, June 21, 2015 10:30 PM, Rick Borchelt  wrote: 

   

 With apologies, another iPhone autocorrect.  It's PERCY May Road -- much of 
its short length is grassland and grain crops.  


On Sun, Jun 21, 2015 at 8:07 PM, Mark Johnson  wrote:

Perry May Road? I can't seem to find that one...does it have more than one 
name? 

 
Thanks
 
Mark Johnson
Aberdeen
 
> Subject: Re: [MDBirding] Egypt Road, Dorchester Cnty - Bobwhite, Brown 
Thrasher 

> From: rborchelt AT gmail.com
> Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 19:42:59 -0400
> CC: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
> To: karen.caruso AT verizon.net
> 
> I had a cock bobwhite in the verge on Perry May Road two roads over from you 
this afternoon, as well as Grasshopper Sparrow, multiple Eastern Meadowlarks, 
Horned Larks, and at least one singing Dickcissel. 

> 
> 
> > On Jun 21, 2015, at 6:57 PM, Karen Caruso  wrote:
> > 
> > Egypt Road, Dorchester, Maryland, US
> > Jun 21, 2015 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
> > Protocol: Traveling
> > 10.0 mile(s)
> > 13 species
> > 
> > Northern Bobwhite 5 Audible: distinct, heard at different locations along 
Egypt Rd 

> > Great Blue Heron 1
> > Black Vulture 1
> > Turkey Vulture 5
> > Willet 1
> > American Crow 1
> > Tree Swallow 45
> > Barn Swallow 23
> > American Robin 6
> > Brown Thrasher 1
> > Northern Mockingbird 6
> > Red-winged Blackbird 46
> > Common Grackle 1
> > 
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> -- 
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-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

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Subject: Hart-Miller Island, 06/24/15
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 21:26:11 -0400
06/24/15 – 710am-3pm

Hart-Miller Island, Essex, Baltimore Co., MD



WEATHER: PC, 67-81 degrees, WNW 3K- WNW 4K

OBSERVERS: Kevin Graff, Sam Miller, Bob Ringler



Canada Goose – 208

Wood Duck – 7

American Black Duck – 6

Mallard – 71

Lesser Scaup – 1

Ruddy Duck – 2

Pied-billed Grebe – 14 (8 adults, 6 young)

Double-crested Cormorant – 63

Great Blue Heron – 22

Great Egret – 10

Glossy Ibis – 18

Osprey – 12

Bald Eagle – 2 (adult & immature)

Peregrine Falcon – 1

Common Gallinule – 1

American Coot – 2

Killdeer – 8

Spotted Sandpiper – 6

Laughing Gull – 9

Ring-billed Gull – 169

Herring Gull – 8

Lesser Black-backed Gull – 3 (two 2nd summer, one 3rd summer)

Great Black-backed Gull – 22

Least Tern – 12

Caspian Tern – 248

Common Tern – 1

Forster’s Tern – 15

Mourning Dove – 5

Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 2

Willow Flycatcher – 1

Great Crested Flycatcher – 1

Eastern Kingbird – 9

Purple Martin – 2

N Rough-winged Swallow – 1

Tree Swallow – 9

Bank Swallow – 1

Barn Swallow – 17

Carolina Chickadee – 2

Carolina Wren – 4

Marsh Wren – 2

American Robin – 1

Gray Catbird – 3

European Starling – 138

Cedar Waxwing – 4

Common Yellowthroat – 48

Song Sparrow – 3

Swamp Sparrow – 1

Northern Cardinal – 6

Blue Grosbeak – 2

Indigo Bunting – 7

Red-winged Blackbird – 119

Common Grackle – 11

Brown-headed Cowbird – 10

Orchard Oriole – 9

American Goldfinch – 11

SPECIES: 55   INDIVIDUALS: 1370



MAMMALS: Red Fox – 1



REPTILES: E Painted Turtle – 1

 AMPHIBIANS: Fowler’s Toad – 31, American Toad – 1, Bullfrog – 1



BUTTERFLIES

Black Swallowtail – 3

Cabbage White – 30

Orange Sulphur – 45

Clouded/Orange Sulphur – 1 (female white form)

Gray Hairstreak – 2

Red-spotted Purple – 1

E Tailed Blue – 1

Pearl Crescent – 8

Variegated Fritillary – 4

Lady sp – 1

Monarch – 7

Wild Indigo Duskywing – 1



DRAGONFLIES (many more, lack of time to id)

Common Green Darner – 2

Swamp Darner – 1 (male)

Widow Skimmer – 1 (male)

Twelve-spotted Skimmer – 1

Needham’s Skimmer – 2000

Seaside Dragonlet – 1 (female)

Blue Dasher – 5

Eastern Pondhawk – 1500

Black Saddlebags – 45

Carolina Saddlebags – 2

Four-spotted Pennant – 10

Halloween Pennant – 25



DAMSELFLIES: lack of time



MOTHS

Eastern Tent Caterpillar Moth – 1

Virginian Tiger Moth – 4 (Yellow Bear)

Isabella Tiger Moth – 1 (Woolly Bear)



INSECTS

Flatid Planthopper – 1

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle – 2

Convergent Lady Beetle – 5

Nine-spotted Lady Beetle – 1

Milkweed Borer – 5

Spotted Cucumber Beetle – 1



     Kevin Graff
     Jarrettsville, MD
     KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Re: Bird behavior question.
From: "Jim Nelson" <kingfishers2 AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 14:39:41 -0400
Stephanie,

For many years, we have been dealing with immature Starlings in and around our 
garden (we refer to them fondly as the “juvenile delinquents”). Once they 
are independent of their parents and feeding themselves, they show up in groups 
and like to explore and sample everything. This often involves poking around 
plants, pulling branches and flower blossoms off of plants, and even uprooting 
small seedlings. I suspect they may be the source of your friend’s damage. 


Jim Nelson

From: Stephanie Lovell 
Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2015 7:23 AM
To: MDBirding AT googlegroups.com 
Subject: [MDBirding] Bird behavior question.

I have a friend living on the 7th floor of downtown Bethesda apartment building 
with planters on her balcony who comes home to find that certain plants have 
been uprooted and tossed on the ground. The only bird I can think of is a crow 
or possibly a starling. Why would they do that? 


Stephanie Lovell

Silver Spring

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Subject: Re: Great show on MPT.
From: Lydia Schindler <lydia13621 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 10:11:23 -0700 (PDT)
On Wednesday, June 24, 2015 at 8:32:01 PM UTC-4, huey1226 wrote:
> Great show about birds right now on MPT, show is Nova.   Being reshown at 
midnight.  Worth recording. Enjoy!  

> 
> Awesome Birding in 2015!
> 
> Hugh David Fleischmann
> Owings Mills, MD 21117
> 410-598-9292

Reshowing Thursday June 25 at 3 pm.

Lydia Schindler
Darnestown

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Subject: Glaucous Gull at Masonville (already gone)
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 11:17:31 -0400
Just photographed a Glaucous Gull at Masonville. It looked good to me but I 
wanted some full experts to chime in, hence not posting immediately. It 
vanished in that time but could have easily relocated elsewhere in the Harbor. 
Ft McHenry, Canton Waterfront, Harbor Hospital would be good alternative spots 
to check. 


Also of note: 39+ Common Terns on an offshore barge including at least one 
chick. 


Tim Carney
Canton, MD

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: Caspian Tern Blackwater NWR June 17
From: Bob Ringler <ringler.bob AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 10:52:03 -0400
Frode,
   There are hundreds of Caspian Terns at Hart-Miller now, mostly
adults. We do not know of any nesting in Maryland but if they find a
suitable location they will.

On 6/25/15, Frode Jacobsen  wrote:
> I apologize for the late report, but I observed an adult CASPIAN TERN flying
> up and down the Blackwater River at Shorter's Wharf along Maple Dam Rd last
> Wednesday June 17 while conducting SHARP marsh bird surveys. I dismissed it
> as a Royal Tern at first, but I was struck by the bulky build and thick red
> bill. A more careful examination of the underwing pattern, showing a solid
> black fill on the outer primaries, confirmed that it indeed was a Caspian
> Tern! Totally unexpected at this date in Maryland if I am not mistaken.
> Other birds of note were an abundance of Seaside Sparrows, American Black
> Ducks, Marsh Wrens, Virginia and Clapper Rails, Least Bitterns, and 4 pairs
> of Eastern Willets aggressively defending their nesting grounds.
>
> Good birding and stay cool!
>
> Frode Jacobsen
> Windsor Mill, MD 21244
>
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-- 
Bob Ringler
Eldersburg MD

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Subject: Caspian Tern Blackwater NWR June 17
From: Frode Jacobsen <frodesjacobsen AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 07:14:23 -0700 (PDT)
I apologize for the late report, but I observed an adult CASPIAN TERN flying up 
and down the Blackwater River at Shorter's Wharf along Maple Dam Rd last 
Wednesday June 17 while conducting SHARP marsh bird surveys. I dismissed it as 
a Royal Tern at first, but I was struck by the bulky build and thick red bill. 
A more careful examination of the underwing pattern, showing a solid black fill 
on the outer primaries, confirmed that it indeed was a Caspian Tern! Totally 
unexpected at this date in Maryland if I am not mistaken. Other birds of note 
were an abundance of Seaside Sparrows, American Black Ducks, Marsh Wrens, 
Virginia and Clapper Rails, Least Bitterns, and 4 pairs of Eastern Willets 
aggressively defending their nesting grounds. 


Good birding and stay cool!

Frode Jacobsen
Windsor Mill, MD 21244

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Subject: Bird behavior question.
From: Stephanie Lovell <amorellovell AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 07:23:40 -0400
I have a friend living on the 7th floor of downtown Bethesda apartment
building with planters on her balcony who comes home to find that certain
plants have been uprooted and tossed on the ground.  The only bird I can
think of is a crow or possibly a starling.  Why would they do that?
Stephanie Lovell
Silver Spring

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Subject: Test, disregard
From: Kurt Schwarz <krschwa1 AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 23:04:38 -0400
Xxxxxx




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Subject: RFI Brunton Bin Parts/Repair
From: Kurt Schwarz <krschwa1 AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 21:38:07 -0400
For some reason, this message has not gone out, though I¹ve tried twice.  So
here goes again.

Last week while admiring a Dickcissel in Indiana I lost one of the rubber
things that go around the clickable eye cups of my Brunton Epoch 7.5X43
binoculars.  Brunton, alas, has gotten out of the binocular business, though
past production is still available.  I have sent an e-mail to them, but it
has elicited no response.  I presume the same has happened to the no-fault
guarantee, but I digress.  My on line searches for replacements has also not
borne fruit.   I currently have electrical tape around it to shield my
glasses from scratching. But I would like a better solution.  Any
suggestions?  Anyone know where a few might be stashed?

Kurt Schwarz
Ellicott City, Howard
goawaybird at verizon dot net


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Subject: Re: Great show on MPT.
From: Phil Davis <pdavis AT ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 20:53:27 -0400
Hi Hugh:

We have a Goffin's Cockatoo, one of the show's featured species. Can 
you image how difficult it is to keep her out of trouble around the house!!!

Phil

At 20:31 06/24/2015, Hugh David Fleischmann wrote:
>Great show about birds right now on MPT, show is Nova.   Being 
>reshown at midnight.  Worth recording. Enjoy!

==================================
Phil Davis      Davidsonville, Maryland     USA
                 mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com
================================== 

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Subject: Great show on MPT.
From: Hugh David Fleischmann <david AT macappraisals.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 20:31:56 -0400
Great show about birds right now on MPT, show is Nova. Being reshown at 
midnight. Worth recording. Enjoy! 


Awesome Birding in 2015!

Hugh David Fleischmann
Owings Mills, MD 21117
410-598-9292

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Subject: Poplar Island: Anne Arundel Bird Club trip
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 14:41:07 -0700 (PDT)
Please email me corrections or additions: If you want me to share list with you 
on e-Bird, let me know. Karen.Caruso AT verizon.net 


Poplar Island, Talbot, Maryland, US
Jun 24, 2015 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
5.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Anne Arundel Bird Club
47 species

Canada Goose  4
American Wigeon  1     Continuing at this location
American Black Duck  1
Mallard  43
Green-winged Teal  1     Continuing at this location
Surf Scoter  2
Double-crested Cormorant  95
Great Blue Heron  3
Snowy Egret  4
Cattle Egret  21     Actual count
Green Heron  1
Glossy Ibis  1     Single bird
Turkey Vulture  1
Osprey  3
Bald Eagle  1
American Avocet  1     Continuing at this location
American Oystercatcher  2     Continuing at this location
Black-bellied Plover  3     Continuing at this location
Killdeer  2
Spotted Sandpiper  1
Greater Yellowlegs  1
Willet  3
Lesser Yellowlegs  2     Continuing at this location
Dunlin  1     Continuing at this location
White-rumped Sandpiper  1
Semipalmated Sandpiper  1
Short-billed Dowitcher  1
Laughing Gull  20
Herring Gull  1
Great Black-backed Gull  3
Least Tern  105
Caspian Tern  1
Common Tern  105
Forster's Tern  1
Mourning Dove  1
Eastern Kingbird  2
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  2
Purple Martin  20
Tree Swallow  75
Barn Swallow  5
American Robin  3
Northern Mockingbird  1
Seaside Sparrow  1     Reliable at this location
Red-winged Blackbird  103
Common Grackle  1

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24040175 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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Subject: RFI: Brunton Bin Repair
From: Kurt Schwarz <krschwa1 AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 17:35:42 -0400
I lost one of the rubber eye shields to my Brunton Epoch 7.5X43 bins while
looking for Dickcissels in Indiana earlier this week.  Brunton, alas, has
gotten out of the binocular making business and my inquiries there have gone
unanswered.  Likewise, my on-line searches for replacement rubber thingies
has gone unrewarded.  Anybody have any idea of where to turn?  I currently
have electrical tape around the edges so they don¹t scratch my glasses.
This is hardly satisfactory.


Kurt Schwarz
Ellicott City, Howard
goawaybird at verizon dot net


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Subject: RFI Brunton Bino REpair
From: Kurt Schwarz <krschwa1 AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 16:20:06 -0400
I lost one of the eye cups to my Brunton Epoch 7.5X43 bins this past week.
Brunton, alas, no longer makes binoculars, and so far my e-mail has gone
unanswered.  And my searches for replacements cups on line have not been
successful.  Any suggestions as to who might have said, or other solutions
outside of electrical tape (which I am currently using to shield my glasses
from the metal bits remaining).

Kurt Schwarz
Ellicott City, Howard
goawaybird at verizon dot net


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Subject: White-throated Sparrow Gwynns Falls Trail Baltimore City
From: Matt Hafner <hafner.matt AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 15:38:34 -0400
Today at lunch, John Artes and I found a singing White-throated Sparrow
along the Gwynns Falls Trail in Baltimore City.  A couple turn up almost
every summer, but this was actually my first one for June.

No sign of the Blackpoll Warbler or Scarlet Tanager from last Thursday.

Photos in the eBird checklist:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24039206

Good birding,

Matt Hafner
Forest Hill, MD

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Subject: the morning after
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 11:32:57 -0400
I don't know if it is related to the storm passing through last night, the
cooler temperature this morning, or a second round of nesting, but the
birds were singing this morning more than they have in weeks. I heard two
Wood Thrushes, the Ovenbird, the Great Crested Flycatcher, and all the
usual residents as late as 9 a.m.

I did not hear the House Wrens this morning, even though they have built a
nest in the bluebird box that had a baby Bluebird in it a few weeks ago. I
sure hope that little guy fledged before the wrens moved in. From what I
can tell, the Phoebes are back in their nest on top of "their" light on our
house.

I hope everyone came through the storm safely. Last night while the power
was out (only for six hours, thankfully) and we had the windows open, we
could hear frogs calling to each other.

Pat Valdata
Elkton, MD

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Subject: Fwd: DC Area, 6/23/2015
From: lydiaschindler AT verizon.net
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 11:36:37 -0500 (CDT)




Subject: Re: Downy Woodpecker Trapped In Garage
From: Brenton Reyner <brenton5432 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 22:23:44 -0400
Hi all,

After a little coaxing, the bird was able to fly out on its own earlier
this evening. Thank you to all those who replied and gave some advice.

Cheers,

Brenton Reyner

Montgomery County

On Mon, Jun 22, 2015 at 6:13 PM, Anna Urciolo  wrote:

> Brenton,
>
> This might be moot now but turn off all of the lights in the garage so
> that the open door is the main light. The bird will fly toward it.
>
> Good luck.
>
> Anna
>
> ________________________________________
> From: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com [mdbirding AT googlegroups.com] on behalf
> of Brenton Reyner [brenton5432 AT gmail.com]
> Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 5:09 PM
> To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
> Subject: [MDBirding] Downy Woodpecker Trapped In Garage
>
> Hello,
>
> I currently have a Downy Woodpecker trapped in my garage. The door is open
> but it doesn't want to fly down and out. It's holding its bill open and may
> be sick but is able to fly. I but a log on the floor with some suet on it
> and was wondering what else I can do. If anyone has any suggestions feel
> free to let me know.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Brenton Reyner
>
> Montgomery County
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
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Subject: Re: Downy Woodpecker Trapped In Garage
From: Samuel Miller <srmiller2022 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 17:25:39 -0400
Brenton,
If the bird is holding its bill open, it is most likely stressed out, not
sick. From my previous experiences, these three things have worked...

1. Turn off the light and block off all of the windows, leaving only the
garage door open. Hopefully the bird will fly toward the light.

2. Leave the bird alone for a while. Usually, the problem can resolve
itself this way. It allows for the bird to calm down if stressed, and then
to make the decision to fly out by itself.

3. If all else fails, (and I don't necessarily like this method), stay in
the garage and follow the bird to keep it flying, (It will usually want to
get away from you). Like I said, I don't like this one because it increase
the stress on the bird. Eventually the bird should probably get tired and
fall down to a lower perch or the ground. At this point, you should be able
to pick up the bird without problems and bring it outside.

I hope this helps!
- Sam
On Jun 22, 2015 5:10 PM, "Brenton Reyner"  wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I currently have a Downy Woodpecker trapped in my garage. The door is open
> but it doesn't want to fly down and out. It's holding its bill open and may
> be sick but is able to fly. I but a log on the floor with some suet on it
> and was wondering what else I can do. If anyone has any suggestions feel
> free to let me know.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Brenton Reyner
>
> Montgomery County
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
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>

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Subject: Downy Woodpecker Trapped In Garage
From: Brenton Reyner <brenton5432 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 17:09:13 -0400
Hello,

I currently have a Downy Woodpecker trapped in my garage. The door is open but 
it doesn't want to fly down and out. It's holding its bill open and may be sick 
but is able to fly. I but a log on the floor with some suet on it and was 
wondering what else I can do. If anyone has any suggestions feel free to let me 
know. 


Cheers,

Brenton Reyner 

Montgomery County

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Ring-necked Duck, 4 Heron sp. at Riley's Lock, Seneca, Mont. Co.
From: Don Simonson <simonson AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 08:20:14 -0700 (PDT)
My daughter Lily and I observed 3 RING-NECKED DUCKS (2 drakes and a hen) in the 
Potomac River at Riley's Lock, Mont Co before work this morning 6/22/15. Also 2 
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS, a GREAT EGRET, three Great Blue Herons, and a GREEN 
Heron in the Turning Basin just upstream from the acqueduct over Seneca Creek. 
Also studied a singing male PROTHONOTARY WARBLER for fifteen minutes(!) at 30 
feet distance as it preened on a perch. 

good  birding!
Don Simonson, Darnestown MD

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Subject: Re: Egypt Road, Dorchester Cnty - Bobwhite, Brown Thrasher
From: Rick Borchelt <rborchelt AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 22:30:08 -0400
With apologies, another iPhone autocorrect.  It's PERCY May Road -- much of
its short length is grassland and grain crops.

On Sun, Jun 21, 2015 at 8:07 PM, Mark Johnson  wrote:

> Perry May Road? I can't seem to find that one...does it have more than one
> name?
>
> Thanks
>
> Mark Johnson
> Aberdeen
>
> > Subject: Re: [MDBirding] Egypt Road, Dorchester Cnty - Bobwhite, Brown
> Thrasher
> > From: rborchelt AT gmail.com
> > Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 19:42:59 -0400
> > CC: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
> > To: karen.caruso AT verizon.net
>
> >
> > I had a cock bobwhite in the verge on Perry May Road two roads over from
> you this afternoon, as well as Grasshopper Sparrow, multiple Eastern
> Meadowlarks, Horned Larks, and at least one singing Dickcissel.
> >
> >
> > > On Jun 21, 2015, at 6:57 PM, Karen Caruso 
> wrote:
> > >
> > > Egypt Road, Dorchester, Maryland, US
> > > Jun 21, 2015 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
> > > Protocol: Traveling
> > > 10.0 mile(s)
> > > 13 species
> > >
> > > Northern Bobwhite 5 Audible: distinct, heard at different locations
> along Egypt Rd
> > > Great Blue Heron 1
> > > Black Vulture 1
> > > Turkey Vulture 5
> > > Willet 1
> > > American Crow 1
> > > Tree Swallow 45
> > > Barn Swallow 23
> > > American Robin 6
> > > Brown Thrasher 1
> > > Northern Mockingbird 6
> > > Red-winged Blackbird 46
> > > Common Grackle 1
> > >
> > > --
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-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com

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Subject: Question pigeon/dove
From: Suzanne Richman <suzanne_richman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 19:53:44 -0400
I saw a bird looking like the ordinary mourning dove while flying. I was 
sitting on the Bethany beach and it landed on the sand. It's back was black 
with one very bright, wide, white stripe across each wing. 

Has anyone seen such a thing? If so, I'd love to know what I saw. Also, an 
osprey, great black winged gull and several laughing gulls (and bottlenose 
dolphins) were in evidence. 


Suzanne Richman 		 	   		  

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Subject: Re: Egypt Road, Dorchester Cnty - Bobwhite, Brown Thrasher
From: Rick Borchelt <rborchelt AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 19:42:59 -0400
I had a cock bobwhite in the verge on Perry May Road two roads over from you 
this afternoon, as well as Grasshopper Sparrow, multiple Eastern Meadowlarks, 
Horned Larks, and at least one singing Dickcissel. 



> On Jun 21, 2015, at 6:57 PM, Karen Caruso  wrote:
> 
> Egypt Road, Dorchester, Maryland, US
> Jun 21, 2015 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 10.0 mile(s)
> 13 species
> 
> Northern Bobwhite 5 Audible: distinct, heard at different locations along 
Egypt Rd 

> Great Blue Heron  1
> Black Vulture  1
> Turkey Vulture  5
> Willet  1
> American Crow  1
> Tree Swallow  45
> Barn Swallow  23
> American Robin  6
> Brown Thrasher  1
> Northern Mockingbird  6
> Red-winged Blackbird  46
> Common Grackle  1
> 
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Subject: Blackwater NWR, Dorchester Cnty - Orchard Orioles, Red-headed Woodpeckers
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 16:01:56 -0700 (PDT)
Blackwater NWR--Wildlife Drive, Dorchester, Maryland, US
Jun 21, 2015 11:45 AM - 1:45 PM
Protocol: Traveling
5.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Hot and humid
21 species

Mallard  22
Great Blue Heron  7
Great Egret  8
Snowy Egret  1
Osprey  3
Bald Eagle  1     Pursued by a Red-wing Blackbird
Mourning Dove  1
Red-headed Woodpecker 2 - Seen around the triangle of pines: was told they are 
nesting 

Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Eastern Kingbird  1
American Crow  2
Tree Swallow  23
Barn Swallow  53
Carolina Chickadee  1
Eastern Bluebird  1
American Robin  1
European Starling  1
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  4
Eastern Meadowlark  1
Orchard Oriole 2 - Just beyond the Photo Blind - nest in tree on left of the 
drive. Observed the happy couple courting and tending the nest 


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Subject: Egypt Road, Dorchester Cnty - Bobwhite, Brown Thrasher
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 15:57:00 -0700 (PDT)
Egypt Road, Dorchester, Maryland, US
Jun 21, 2015 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
10.0 mile(s)
13 species

Northern Bobwhite 5 Audible: distinct, heard at different locations along Egypt 
Rd 

Great Blue Heron  1
Black Vulture  1
Turkey Vulture  5
Willet  1
American Crow  1
Tree Swallow  45
Barn Swallow  23
American Robin  6
Brown Thrasher  1
Northern Mockingbird  6
Red-winged Blackbird  46
Common Grackle  1

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Subject: Cliff Swallows, Montgomery County, 6/21
From: John Hubbell <johngilhub1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 12:43:37 -0400
At Little Falls, along the Potomac River in Montgomery County, there are 26
Cliff Swallow nests under the bridge over the C&O Canal.  This is a short
walk upstream from Lock 6.  This part of the canal path is also accessible
from the Clara Barton Parkway and MacArthur Blvd, just north of Little
Falls.

I have seen a single Cliff Swallow several times over the last few weeks
along the Capital Crescent trail at Dalecarlia Reservoir, which isn't far
from these nests as the swallow flies.

This area was in one of my atlas blocks during the most recent survey, and
there were no nests there then.  There was nothing in eBird for this
location either, so maybe this is a recent colony.

John Hubbell
Washington DC

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Subject: Re: Re: Juvenile plumage question
From: Janet Millenson <janet AT twocrows.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 12:21:31 -0400
Frank,

Thanks for the very informative response. It would be interesting to 
graph different bird families against a timeline indicating length of 
juvenal plumage to see what patterns emerge. Do birds that are 
evolutionarily related have similar timetables for acquiring adult 
plumage? Or do certain common habitat/behavioral factors play a role? 
Somewhere there must be a grad student interested in following up on this!

-Janet

On 6/21/2015 11:31 AM, Frank Marenghi wrote:
> Janet,
>
> The answer (if known for some species) likely depends on the species' 
life-history characteristics and how those evolved. In some cases, there are 
aspects of the adult plumage that can not be produced except by adults due to 
hormones (bright colors or long plumes, etc). Juvenal feathers are also weaker 
than adult feather but can be grown quicker and less energetically but then 
also need to be replaced shortly thereafter. There may be other aspects of 
adult plumage that cost more energy that are needed as adults but not juveniles 
(protection as you alluded to vs, displaying and breeding). The plumage of the 
adult breeder is what is selected for, the juvenal plumage aspect contributes 
by affecting survival. 

>
> One good more technical resource is the book "Molt in North American Birds" 
(2010) by S.N.G Howell. Researching more on a particular species might be 
another approach to understand why a bird might look the way it does at a 
particular age. 

>
> Good Birding,
>
> Frank Marenghi
> Crownsville, MD
>

-- 
Janet Millenson
janet AT twocrows.com

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Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
From: "Guineabird via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 11:42:40 -0400
Excellent information and suggestions with only one  change.
Alabama's Bob Sargent's suggestion for sugar/water  ratio for all seasons 
is as follows:  
Experts recommend mixing a 1:4 ratio of sugar and water solution for  
hummingbird nectar. 
Bob  Sargent, founder of the Hummer/Bird Study Group, suggests the use of 
an open  hand as a reminder of the sugar/water ratio... 
Gail Frantz 
Old Hanover Rd 
Balto County
 
 
In a message dated 6/21/2015 8:37:02 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
fawnpalmer AT gmail.com writes:

 
Hello Helen,


A butterball ruby-throated hummingbird now is not an about-to-be-migrant.  
You are correct. The adult males migrate by mid to late August. The adult  
females follow by late August - early September. The juveniles must not only  
feed as much as possible to build up fat reserves for migration but they 
will  migrate each independently, and later still than the adults, mid - late  
September. 


A butterball ruby-throated hummingbird is a just fledged hummingbird.  This 
young bird is chubby b/c he/she has been fed in the nest by the mother.  
Once these birds fledge, their metabolism is so high that they trim  down.


Keep feeders filled with fresh sugar nectar solution. Change out every  
three or four days. Dump unused nectar, clean out rhoroughly, and  refill. 


Consider mixing a sweeter nectar solution, say 3:1 H20:white sugar. Don't  
forget ant moats to keep those sugar-seekers away from your nectar feeder.  
Hummingbirds will not drink ant-infested nectar; it has an unpleasant formic 
 acid taste. 


Trumpet Vine Campsis radicans (a Md. native) presents an extra-sweet  
nectar that is almost 33% sugar, which would be a 2:1.


Sincerely,
   Fawn A. Palmer
   Naturalist, Anita C. Leight Estuary Center
   Maryland Master Naturalist, Intern. 

On Thu, Jun 18, 2015 at 8:36 PM, helen johnson <_helenjoh AT icloud.com_ 
(mailto:helenjoh AT icloud.com) > wrote:


I am seeing many as well, males and females. Noticed one last week that  
was a butterball! Really fat! Read that they do that as they get ready for  
migration, but I would think certainly not yet. Any thoughts?

Sent  from my iPad

On Jun 14, 2015, at 12:59 AM, Cathy Tingler <_clearskyct AT verizon.net_ 
(mailto:clearskyct AT verizon.net) > wrote:



 
 
 
Glad to hear you have some hummers at your feeders. Hope others  are seeing 
hummingbirds.
Maybe one of those wood thrush's will make an appearance in your  yard 
 
 

On 06/13/15,  Susan Stiles<_Susan.Stiles AT zoominternet.net_ 
(mailto:Susan.Stiles AT zoominternet.net) > wrote:  

  
We had 4 hummers last night at one of the  feeders, chasing one another and 
occasionally getting a sip of sugar  water. 
 
For the past week, we have been serenaded  morning and evening with the 
music of the wood thrush. He -- or they --  are down in the woods near our 
stream (near Rocks State Park). Have not  been able to see him, so far, but 
loving hearing the song. It is ethereal  coming through the trees.. Here is a 
link to this bird. There's a nice  recording there of its song. 
 
 http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wood_Thrush/id
 
Susan 

----- Original Message ----- 
From: _Cathy Tingler_ (mailto:clearskyct AT verizon.net)  
To: _hb3 AT harfordbirdclub.org_ (mailto:hb3 AT harfordbirdclub.org)  
Sent: Saturday, June 13, 2015 12:09  PM
Subject: Fwd: Hummingbirds








My hummingbirds had disappeared about a month ago. I kept hearing  to wait 
until around mid June, they will come back. 
Well I put the feeder out the other morning. Hummingbirds are all  over the 
place. I have had at least one male make an appearance. The  rest have been 
females
They have been at the feeder plus they seem to be interested in my  red 
lilly's. They are even coming up to the patio and checking out the  flowers
Cathy

















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