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Updated on Saturday, April 30 at 11:53 PM EST
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Gurneys Pitta,©Barry Kent Mackay

1 May Fort Smallwood Park Saturday, April 30, 2016 16 Raptors []
30 Apr Lawrence's Warbler ["rhamiltonimprovements via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
30 Apr RE: Re: Philly Vireo? [Pat Valdata ]
30 Apr Saturday Neighborhood/CCBC Birding, 11 warbler sp. [Kojo Baidoo ]
30 Apr Re: Philly Vireo? [Kojo Baidoo ]
30 Apr Southern MD, Pt. Lookout, Calvert Cliffs [Tim Houghton ]
30 Apr Philly Vireo? [Patricia Valdata ]
30 Apr Common Loon in the Potomac about 1 mile above Seneca Creek [Lucy Uncu ]
30 Apr Quiet Waters Park - Red-shouldered Hawk, Pileated Woodpecker [Karen Caruso ]
30 Apr Thomas Point Park - Winter Wren, Red-breasted Merganser [Karen Caruso ]
30 Apr Re: Sedge Wren at Finzel Swamp ["J.B. Churchill" ]
30 Apr Rock Creek Park, Saturday 4/30/16 [Wallace Kornack ]
30 Apr Cromwell - not CRoswell [marian rutigliano ]
30 Apr CRoswell Valley Park Solitary Sandpipers [marian rutigliano ]
30 Apr Sedge Wren at Finzel Swamp [Tim Carney ]
30 Apr Re: Rose-breasted Grosbeak FOS Darnestown Mont Co [Valerie Kilgallon ]
30 Apr Yellow-crowned night-heron at the University of Maryland [ ]
30 Apr Common Gallinule []
29 Apr Schoolhouse Pond, Upper Marlboro -swallows and more Gray Catbirds [Karen Caruso ]
30 Apr Fw: [ABA Rare Bird Alert] LITTLE EGRET, a potential first for North... ["'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
29 Apr Re: Hummingbird in Riva [Wayne Bierbaum ]
29 Apr Early evening visit to Patterson Park. SORA!!! [Hugh David Fleischmann ]
29 Apr Allegany County, 4/29 [John Hubbell ]
29 Apr Re: New feature eBird! [Eugenie Nable ]
29 Apr Re: House finch eggs Question [Eugenie Nable ]
29 Apr myrtle warbler (Setophaga coronata coronata) [Eugenie Nable ]
29 Apr Sandy Point State Park - Usual suspects, nice walk.... [Karen Caruso ]
29 Apr Summer Tanager, Montgomery Co.; April 29 [Scott Baron ]
29 Apr Fwd: House finch eggs Question [Janbraumuller ]
29 Apr Backyard White-Throated Sparrows [marian rutigliano ]
29 Apr Yard Neotropic Migrants Darnestown Mont. Co. [Don Simonson ]
29 Apr Sedge Wren at KAG [Wayne Baumgartner ]
29 Apr Rock Creek Park, Friday 4/29/16 [Wallace Kornack ]
29 Apr Re: New feature eBird! [Andy Wilson ]
29 Apr New feature eBird! [Patricia Wood ]
29 Apr Hummingbird in Riva [Wayne Bierbaum ]
28 Apr Re: Bluebird Safety [Joan Cwi ]
28 Apr Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary - 55 species - Green Heron, White-eyed Vireo ( and 5 Gray Catbirds) [Karen Caruso ]
28 Apr Re: Bluebird Safety [Jim Moore ]
28 Apr Re: Bluebird Safety [Twitter Email ]
28 Apr Blue-winged Warbler in my yard, singing [Brad Phoebus ]
28 Apr Rock Creek Park, Thursday 4/28/16 [Wallace Kornack ]
28 Apr Poplar Island 4/27/2016 [Tim Carney ]
28 Apr Re: Bluebird Safety [Pat Valdata ]
28 Apr Re: Bluebird Safety [Gail Mackiernan ]
28 Apr Re: Bluebird Safety [Joan Cwi ]
28 Apr Re: Bluebird Safety [Steve Johnson ]
27 Apr Re: Rose-breasted Grosbeak FOS Darnestown Mont Co [Don Simonson ]
27 Apr MOS Conference - registration deadline extended [Marcia Watson ]
27 Apr Rock Creek Park, Kensington Migrants ["'diane Ford' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
27 Apr Riva Area Park - Killdeer, Brown Thrasher [Karen Caruso ]
27 Apr Re: Bluebird Safety [Lynne Parks ]
27 Apr Bluebird Safety [Amy Parker ]
27 Apr Ferry Neck, Blackwater, Ft. Smallwood Park, April 21-25, 2016. [Harry Armistead ]
27 Apr Fort Smallwood Park morning walk [Karen Caruso ]
27 Apr Re: Barred Owl - first for here! [Hilary Bok ]
27 Apr Rock Creek Park, Wednesday 4/27/16 [Wallace Kornack ]
27 Apr Blue Jays on the move and RHWO [Warblerick ]
27 Apr Lake Roland, 04/26/16 [Kevin Graff ]
27 Apr Re: Mimic thrush trifecta [Warblerick ]
27 Apr Belated city hawkwatch, 04/24/16 [Kevin Graff ]
27 Apr Re: Barred Owl - first for here! [Warblerick ]
27 Apr Mimic thrush trifecta [Frank Boyle ]
27 Apr Bald Eagle at Monocacy Battlefield [scott bates ]
27 Apr Barred Owl - first for here! [Frank Boyle ]
27 Apr Fort Smallwood Park Tuesday, April 26, 2016 750 Raptors []
26 Apr Fwd: DC Area, 4/26/2016 [Lydia Schindler ]
26 Apr Hart-Miller Island, 04/25/16 [Kevin Graff ]
26 Apr Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Crownsville [Karen Caruso ]
26 Apr Piney Orchard Nature Preserve - Mallard and Canada Goose with young [Karen Caruso ]
26 Apr Raptor Festival at Meadowside Nature Center this weekend! [Montgomery Parks ]
26 Apr Cerulean #1--and TWO (maybe 3)--in Patapsco Valley [Tim Houghton ]
26 Apr Re: Phenomenal Neighborhood Birding [Kojo Baidoo ]
26 Apr Re: Phenomenal Neighborhood Birding [Kojo Baidoo ]
26 Apr Phenomenal Neighborhood Birding [Kojo Baidoo ]
26 Apr 2 Swallow-tailed Kites. Fort Smallwood Park [susiericc ]

Subject: Fort Smallwood Park Saturday, April 30, 2016 16 Raptors
From: susiericc AT comcast.net
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 04:48:56 +0000 (UTC)
Fort Smallwood Park 
Pasadena, Maryland, USA 

Daily Raptor Counts: Apr 30, 2016 
Species 	Day's Count 	Month Total 	Season Total 
Black Vulture 	0 	97 	275 
Turkey Vulture 	0 	1150 	3953 
Osprey 	13 	148 	233 
Bald Eagle 	0 	46 	71 
Northern Harrier 	0 	14 	15 
Sharp-shinned Hawk 	3 	824 	858 
Cooper's Hawk 	0 	77 	103 
Northern Goshawk 	0 	0 	0 
Red-shouldered Hawk 	0 	6 	47 
Broad-winged Hawk 	0 	43 	43 
Red-tailed Hawk 	0 	31 	91 
Rough-legged Hawk 	0 	0 	0 
Golden Eagle 	0 	0 	2 
American Kestrel 	0 	71 	94 
Merlin 	0 	15 	19 
Peregrine Falcon 	0 	2 	2 
Unknown Accipiter 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Buteo 	0 	2 	3 
Unknown Falcon 	0 	2 	2 
Unknown Eagle 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Raptor 	0 	0 	0 
Swallow-tailed Kite 	0 	2 	2 
Total: 	16 	2530 	5813 

Observation start time: 	10:15 am 
Observation end time: 	4:00 pm 
Total observation time: 	5.75 hours 
Official Counter 	Sue Ricciardi 
Observers: 	Dan Walker 


Visitors: 
Bonnie Blackwell, Aniyah Williams 

Weather: 
Mostly cloudy; 51-57 degrees; fair visibility with haze; winds easterly or 
variable, 4-10 mph 


Raptor Observations: 
An Osprey kind of a day 

Non-raptor Observations: 
Two Wood Ducks; Least Sandpiper 


Report submitted by Sue Ricciardi ( susiericc AT comcast.net ) 
Fort Smallwood Park information may be found at: 
http://www.mdbirds.org/sites/mdsites/hawks/hawkwatch.html 


Site Description 
Fort Smallwood Park is located on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay at the 
mouth of the Patapsco River, 11 miles south of Baltimore, MD. Best winds are 
from the southwest. 

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Subject: Lawrence's Warbler
From: "rhamiltonimprovements via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 18:18:04 -0700 (PDT)
Patapsco Valley Park- HoCo side seen near RR tracks this morning around 8am.... 
foggy and drizzling but was able to get ID shot 


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Subject: RE: Re: Philly Vireo?
From: Pat Valdata <pvaldata1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 21:16:06 -0400
Good suggestion, Kojo. Thanks. The 2nd song in the Audubon field guide for Blue 
headed sounds like what I heard this morning. New yard bird! 



Pat Valdata 
Elkton, MD

Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device


-------- Original message --------
From: Kojo Baidoo  
Date:04/30/2016  8:28 PM  (GMT-05:00) 
To: Maryland & DC Birding  
Cc:  
Subject: [MDBirding] Re: Philly Vireo? 

I'm not the best with vireo songs, but I think Blue-headed Vireos have a 
similar song as well, and are much more likely around this date. 


Kojo Baidoo
Baltimore County

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Subject: Saturday Neighborhood/CCBC Birding, 11 warbler sp.
From: Kojo Baidoo <baidookojo6 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 17:46:32 -0700 (PDT)
Another great day in the neighborhood this morning, despite a bit of fog. When 
I stepped outside, I almost immediately heard my FOS Prairie Warbler, along 
with both Yellow Warbler and my friend the yellowthroat who just returned for 
his fourth year (at least) on the same territory. Heading on into the forest, I 
picked up a very unexpected Louisiana Waterthrush, found in the same area as 
the Northern and another Louisiana from a few days ago; possibly the same bird? 
If so, I do hope it's breeding- would be a first for my neighborhood. On the 
other side of the forest, I was very happy to encounter Black-and-white, 
Hooded, Black-throated Blue, and Yellow-rumped Warblers, along with Ovenbird 
and redstart. The fun didn't stop there, though. Along with the warblers, I had 
around five Orchard Orioles, a Scarlet Tanager (that I actually saw before I 
heard, how peculiar), sassy gnatcatchers, Red-eyed/Warbling vireos, two Swamp 
Sparrows, a few Wood Thrushes, and a fun little kinglet. The hawk nest seems to 
be doing nicely as well. When I headed back to the house, I again encountered 
the yellow warbler and yellowthroat, along with quite a few White-throated 
Sparrows. They'll be departing soon, and I will miss them a lot. My latest 
departure date as of now is May 23 of last year. Continuing on, I was surprised 
once more by a very early Least Flycatcher, complete with large head, complete 
eye ring, short primaries, small size... the works. It even called and sang for 
me (che-bek, right?), helping me out with the identification. And, finally, as 
I approached my house, the immature female Red-shouldered Hawk that has built a 
nest and mated with an adult male I know very well flew in and posed a bit 
before flying off after being mobbed by finches, chickadees, and maybe even a 
few warblers. Not bad for a day where I wasn't even considering going 
outside... 


Later in the day, I went birding around CCBC Catonsville after a piano lesson. 
I discovered that this area had some pretty good habitat a few years ago after 
being tipped off by a fellow birder who frequents the area. The only 
unfortunate part is that given my lesson time, I am only able to bird during 
the most inactive periods of the day, especially for migrants- 12:00 to 2:00. 
Fortunately, I still had a few birds, including a strutting Ovenbird, 
Blue-winged and Black-and-white Warblers, American Redstart, Northern 
Waterthrush, another Swamp Sparrow, and a very appreciated FOS Indigo Bunting, 
which I was pleased to see had adapted to the clearing of the brush they 
thrived in last year. An immature Red-shouldered Hawk was also a nice sighting, 
most likely offspring from the resident adult pair. 


And that's all, folks... hope you enjoyed this report of my day.

By the way, I haven't gotten any emails from data reviewers on eBird about the 
flycatcher, so I know I'm at least doing one thing right... 


My friend, the Commmon Yellowthroat: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/132863360 AT N02/26736025375/in/dateposted-public/ 


Complete eBird Checklist:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29309216

Kojo Baidoo
Reisterstown, MD

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Subject: Re: Philly Vireo?
From: Kojo Baidoo <baidookojo6 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 17:28:40 -0700 (PDT)
I'm not the best with vireo songs, but I think Blue-headed Vireos have a 
similar song as well, and are much more likely around this date. 


Kojo Baidoo
Baltimore County

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Subject: Southern MD, Pt. Lookout, Calvert Cliffs
From: Tim Houghton <timhoughton AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 23:58:55 +0000 (UTC)
Yesterday Kye Jenkins and I birded Point Lookout and a couple of nearby places 
. The weather was poor for the first half of our time, but it got a little 
better. We haven't as yet done the eBird checklist yet for these spots, but 
some of our favorites: 


--Eared Grebe (2) 
--Seaside Sparrow (several) 
--Royal Tern (3) 
--Forster's Tern (couple) 
--Brown Pelican (lots and lots) 
--Red-Headed Woodpecker (2) 
--Snowy Egret (1) 
--Hooded Warbler (1, female) 
--No. Waterthrush (1) 

Brad Phoebus joined us today at Calvert Cliffs where we birded for over 8 hours 
and had 79 species . We had 12 high counts, which would be expected given the 
nature of the place this time of year and the long time we spent there covering 
a lot of territory. Some of our favorites: 


--Brown Pelican (8) 
--Chuck-Will's Widow (3) 
--Pewee (1) 
--Blue-Headed Vireo (2) 
--Veery (5) 
--Hermit Thrush (2) 
--N. Waterthrush (5) 
--Blue-Winged Warbler (1) 
--Magnolia Warbler (1) 
--Yellow Warbler (3) 
--Summer Tanager (12) 
--Scarlet Tanager (7) 
--Rose-Breasted Grosbeak (6) 
--Orchard Oriole (2) 

Tim Houghton 
(Glen Arm) 

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Subject: Philly Vireo?
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 17:11:52 -0400
I think I had a Philadelphia Vireo in the yard briefly this morning, but it
left before I had a chance to record the song. Very like a Red-eyed Vireo's
but slower and with noticeable pauses between the phrases. It was loud and
close for a few moments, but unfortunately I didn't get a look at it.

I've heard Ovenbird and House Wren in the woods, too, but so far no Wood
Thrush. Seems late this year.

I have the spotting scope set up but it's focused on the fox den right now
so we can watch when the four little ones come out to play.

Pat Valdata
Elkton, MD

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Subject: Common Loon in the Potomac about 1 mile above Seneca Creek
From: Lucy Uncu <unculp AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 17:01:42 -0400
We had a beautiful breeding plumage Common Loon in the Potomac about mile
24 of the C&O Canal.
Lucy Uncu
Falls Church

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Subject: Quiet Waters Park - Red-shouldered Hawk, Pileated Woodpecker
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 11:14:36 -0700 (PDT)
Quiet Waters Park, Anne Arundel, Maryland, US
Apr 30, 2016 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
12 species

Canada Goose  1
Mallard  1
Turkey Vulture  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Blue Jay  5
American Crow  4
Barn Swallow  3
Carolina Chickadee  3
Gray Catbird  1
Chipping Sparrow  1
Northern Cardinal  4

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Subject: Thomas Point Park - Winter Wren, Red-breasted Merganser
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 11:12:37 -0700 (PDT)
Thomas Point Park, Anne Arundel, Maryland, US
Apr 30, 2016 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
14 species

Canada Goose  3
Red-breasted Merganser  1
Common Loon  1
Double-crested Cormorant  2
Osprey  5
Mourning Dove  3
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Blue Jay  6
Carolina Chickadee  3
Winter Wren  1     Small, dark, cocked tail.  Previously reported.
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  1
White-throated Sparrow  1
Northern Cardinal  8


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Subject: Re: Sedge Wren at Finzel Swamp
From: "J.B. Churchill" <jchurchi AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 14:10:04 -0400
Still there as of 1:20 pm. Seen a number of times with Chad and Crystal Fike 
(of Oakland, MD). Chad and I both got some decent photos. 


J.B. Churchill
Frostburg, MD


> On Apr 30, 2016, at 10:07 AM, Tim Carney  wrote:
> 
> I found a Sedge Wren at Finzel Swamp. It was singing in the last open marshy 
area on the left before the gate. The county line has been long debated, but 
based on insight from J.B. Churchill, I think the bird was in ALLEGANY County. 

> 
> Very foggy out here today. 
> 
> Tim Carney
> Nottingham, MD
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Saturday 4/30/16
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 12:00:01 -0400
This morning (4/30) at Rock Creek Park…..

Warbler species seen or heard: Ovenbird, Chestnut-sided, Hooded, Parula, 
Yellow-Rump, BT Green, Black-and-white, Blue-winged, Yellowthroat, BT Blue 


Of Special Note:  Common Raven FOS, Warbling Vireo FOS, Red-throated Loon FOS

——Ross Drive   (Bill)
Ovenbird     6
Chestnut-sided Warbler  
Mourning Dove  
Yellow-billed Cuckoo     2     heard
Red-bellied Woodpecker     2
Northern Flicker     3
Eastern Phoebe  
Red-eyed Vireo     3
Blue Jay  
American Crow     4
Fish Crow  
Common Raven    FOS   (heard and/or seen at 3 locations)  
Tufted Titmouse     4
White-breasted Nuthatch     3
Wood Thrush     3
American Robin     5
Scarlet Tanager     2
Northern Cardinal     2
Brown-headed Cowbird     3
American Goldfinch     4

——Equitation Field
Ovenbird  
Mourning Dove  3
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Fish Crow  
Veery  
Wood Thrush  
American Robin  2
European Starling  
Cedar Waxwing    flyby
Brown-headed Cowbird  2

——Ridge
Ovenbird     4
Hooded Warbler     (Patrick, Gary, +)
Northern Parula  
Yellow-rumped Warbler     3
Black-throated Green Warbler  
Great Blue Heron    flyby  (John)
Yellow-billed Cuckoo      heard
American Crow     3
Common Raven   (heard and/or seen at 3 locations)  
American Robin     2
Scarlet Tanager     2
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  

——Yard Parking Lot and Fence Line   (Bill)
Black-and-white Warbler     2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  
Yellow-rumped Warbler  
Mourning Dove     3
Yellow-billed Cuckoo       heard
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Warbling Vireo    FOS  (Bill)
Blue Jay     2
Fish Crow  
Tufted Titmouse     3
White-breasted Nuthatch  
House Wren  
American Robin  
White-throated Sparrow  
Eastern Towhee  
Northern Cardinal     2
House Finch     4
American Goldfinch  
House Sparrow     2

——Maintenance Yard
Ovenbird       heard
Blue-winged Warbler      heard
Common Yellowthroat      heard
Yellow-rumped Warbler     3
Red-throated Loon 6 FOS (flying in two separate groups) (Douglas, Joseph,+) 

Mourning Dove     2
Chimney Swift  
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Blue-headed Vireo      heard
Red-eyed Vireo  
American Crow  
Common Raven      (heard and/or seen at 3 locations)  
Carolina Chickadee  
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  
Indigo Bunting     2
Brown-headed Cowbird  
American Goldfinch     4

——Nature Center
Ovenbird       heard
Black-throated Blue Warbler      heard
Red-bellied Woodpecker      heard
Wood Thrush       heard
Chipping Sparrow      heard
Scarlet Tanager     2     heard

——Dog Run
Wood Duck     2    flyby    (Bill)
Northern Flicker  
Great Crested Flycatcher  
Carolina Chickadee  
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  
American Robin  2
Chipping Sparrow  
Song Sparrow  
Brown-headed Cowbird  

Contributors: Bill Butler, Greg Gough, Sharon Forsyth, Gary Nelson, Doug Gill, 
Douglas Futuyma, Joseph Jehl, Josh Berman, Patrick and Brian Newcomb, John 
Boright, Mathiew, Devon and Tully Hochhausler, Sally, David Sperling, Katharine 
Kravetz, Paul DeAnna, Tom Eck, Kelly Barsdate, plus a large ANS group 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC



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Subject: Cromwell - not CRoswell
From: marian rutigliano <mcrutig AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 07:43:04 -0700 (PDT)
Sorry - typing on mobile phone.

Marian R

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Subject: CRoswell Valley Park Solitary Sandpipers
From: marian rutigliano <mcrutig AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 07:41:57 -0700 (PDT)
2 Solitary Sandpipers seen by weekly Park Bird Walk group. Birds in stream 
(Minebank Run) along Blue Trail by Box 11. 


Marian Rutigliano

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Subject: Sedge Wren at Finzel Swamp
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 10:07:13 -0400
I found a Sedge Wren at Finzel Swamp. It was singing in the last open marshy 
area on the left before the gate. The county line has been long debated, but 
based on insight from J.B. Churchill, I think the bird was in ALLEGANY County. 


Very foggy out here today. 

Tim Carney
Nottingham, MD

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: Rose-breasted Grosbeak FOS Darnestown Mont Co
From: Valerie Kilgallon <vkilgallon AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 04:40:30 -0700 (PDT)
On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 11:08:56 PM UTC-4, Don Simonson wrote:
> Male at feeder spotted by my wife Marcia circa 8 am. It remained 25 minutes 
chowing whole sunflower seeds by the peck, then vanished. I have read the 
species is a nocturnal and Diurnal migrant, this the latter i expect. Gorgeous! 
good birding! 

> DON SIMONSON
> DARNESTOWN MD

I've had one sitting o the lip of my finch feeder early morning and late 
afternoon for the past three days. Had never seen one in my yard before! 


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Subject: Yellow-crowned night-heron at the University of Maryland
From: Fabin Casas Arenas <zapatillasdecorrer AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 07:19:31 -0400
Sorry for the late report. Yesterday evening (around 5 pm) there were one 
yellow-crowned night heron and two green herons at the pond between Technology 
Dr and Regents Dr in the University of Maryland campus. 

Best regards
FabianWashington, DC 		 	   		  

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Subject: Common Gallinule
From: keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 06:45:21 -0400




Subject: Schoolhouse Pond, Upper Marlboro -swallows and more Gray Catbirds
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 18:42:06 -0700 (PDT)
Schoolhouse Pond, Prince George's, Maryland, US
Apr 29, 2016 4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
16 species

Mallard  4
Great Blue Heron  1
Osprey  1
Solitary Sandpiper  1
Lesser Yellowlegs  2
Laughing Gull  1
American Crow  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1
Tree Swallow  12
Barn Swallow  4
Carolina Chickadee  2
Gray Catbird  3     
Yellow-rumped Warbler  2
Northern Cardinal  1
Red-winged Blackbird  2
House Sparrow  2

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Subject: Fw: [ABA Rare Bird Alert] LITTLE EGRET, a potential first for North...
From: "'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 00:16:42 +0000 (UTC)
Extralimital but if it heads north, it's gotta go through Maryland at some 
point, right? North Beach Marsh would be nice :) 


Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland

     
----- Forwarded Message -----
 From: Lucas Bobay 
 To: ABA Rare Bird Alert  
 Sent: Friday, April 29, 2016 8:03 PM
 Subject: [ABA Rare Bird Alert] LITTLE EGRET, a potential first for North...
   
Facebook AT media and (max-width:480px){#yiv1806320062 * .filtered99999 
.yiv1806320062ib_t{min-width:100% !important;}#yiv1806320062 * .filtered99999 
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!important;width:100% !important;}#yiv1806320062 * .filtered99999 
.yiv1806320062ib_img, #yiv1806320062 * .filtered99999 
.yiv1806320062ib_mid{vertical-align:top !important;}#yiv1806320062 * 
.filtered99999 
.yiv1806320062mb_blk{display:block;padding-bottom:10px;width:100% 
!important;}#yiv1806320062 * .filtered99999 
.yiv1806320062mb_hide{display:none;}#yiv1806320062 * .filtered99999 
.yiv1806320062mb_inl{display:inline;}} 

| 
|   Lucas Bobay , Michael Retter and 6 others posted in ABA Rare Bird Alert . 
      Lucas Bobay April 29 at 7:59pm   LITTLE EGRET, a potential first for 
North Carolina, found today (4/29) by myself and Sam Jolly at the Lake Landing 
impoundments of Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge, Hyde County. The bird 
was visible from about 35.514785°, -76.064073° on the dike road. It was 
associating with a group of 30 or so Snowy Egrets and some other wading birds 
in the impoundment.   Like Comment Share     | 

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| Lucas Bobay, Michael Retter and 6 others posted in ABA Rare Bird Alert. |
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| Lucas Bobay |
| April 29 at 7:59pm |

 |
|   |
| 
| LITTLE EGRET, a potential first for North Carolina, found today (4/29) by 
myself and Sam Jolly at the Lake Landing impoundments of Mattamuskeet National 
Wildlife Refuge, Hyde County. The bird was visible from about 35.514785°, 
-76.064073° on the dike road. It was associating with a group of 30 or so 
Snowy Egrets and some other wading birds in the impoundment. | 

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Subject: Re: Hummingbird in Riva
From: Wayne Bierbaum <wm.bierbaum AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 17:10:46 -0700 (PDT)
On Friday, April 29, 2016 at 7:49:43 AM UTC-4, Wayne Bierbaum wrote:
> A juvie or female was at the feeder this morning.  Riva, MD

It was a female.  A male showed up this afternoon.  

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Subject: Early evening visit to Patterson Park. SORA!!!
From: Hugh David Fleischmann <david AT macappraisals.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 19:49:32 -0400
Ran up to Patterson Park to try and find some amazing warblers being seen and 
heard about a Sora. Bam!! Add a Sorato the years list with a beautiful picture! 
Thank you Tim and Mike. 




Amazing Birding in 2016!

Hugh David Fleischmann
Owings Mills, MD 21117
410-598-9292

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Subject: Allegany County, 4/29
From: John Hubbell <johngilhub1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 19:15:07 -0400
I wore winter clothes for much of the day, but Allegany County had a lot of
warblers, mostly on Green Ridge Rd.

19 species total -- Ovenbird, Worm-eating, Northern Waterthrush,
Blue-winged, Black-and-White, Nashville, Common Yellowthroat, Hooded,
American Redstart, Cerulean, Northern Parula, Yellow, Chestnut-sided,
Black-throated Blue, Palm (both types), Pine, Yellow-rumped, Prairie,
Black-throated Green.

There seemed to have been a movement of Yellow Warblers and White-crowned
Sparrows, both of which I had at Rocky Gap, Terminus, and North Branch.

Rocky Gap had 10 Common Loons and 2 Bonaparte's Gulls.  North Branch had
quite a few shorebirds, but nothing uncommon.

John Hubbell
Washington DC

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Subject: Re: New feature eBird!
From: Eugenie Nable <eugenie.nable AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 12:19:50 -0700 (PDT)
On Friday, April 29, 2016 at 10:11:10 AM UTC-4, Patricia Wood wrote:
> Now you can Search Photos and Sounds under Explore Data on eBird! I've just 
barely looked at it, but Wow! You put in a species and get to look at all the 
pictures people have entered of that bird. I tried Great Blue Heron, and saw 
such a variety--flight shots, at nests, you name it. And under Cerulean, it was 
a great way to see what they look like from every angle. Way more variety than 
you get on Google Images. I didn't even try the sounds part of it; it was 
getting too late last night. Nice! 

> 
> Patricia Wood
> Silver Spring

Thanks for this info. Will check it out.

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Subject: Re: House finch eggs Question
From: Eugenie Nable <eugenie.nable AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 12:17:35 -0700 (PDT)
On Friday, April 29, 2016 at 2:25:52 PM UTC-4, Jan Braumuller wrote:
> Good afternoon,
>   There is a house finch that has built a nest on a shelf on top of the 
column by our front door. Although we try to avoid using the door frequently, 
we do need to on a daily basis. She is very tolerant of us, but does fly off 
the nest to a branch of our redbud only 10 feet away. She has been lying on the 
nest for 3 weeks now, long past the 12-15 day incubation period. Am I right in 
thinking that these eggs are not fertile? My question is should we just let 
nature take its course or should we intervene and remove the eggs, in the hope 
that she will have another clutch this season?  

>   Thank you in advance for your advice.  Ps: a house wren arrived today, 
but seems busy in the back yard. Hope she/he stays back there.  

>  Jan Braumuller
> Arlington
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> Begin forwarded message:
> 
> 
> From: Deb Vitkova 
> Date: April 29, 2016 at 9:59:17 AM EDT
> To: Jan 
> Subject: House finch eggs
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone

What a beautiful nest. Is there no male around to help feed the female? If 
she's had to fend for herself, she may have left the eggs to cool down for too 
long, especially with the fluctuating weather lately. 


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Subject: myrtle warbler (Setophaga coronata coronata)
From: Eugenie Nable <eugenie.nable AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 12:05:57 -0700 (PDT)
Catonsville, 2:30pm. 4.29.16 - Nine Myrtle Warblers eating from small Red 
Cedars and Tortuosa-- a rapid pass-through snack as they headed North 


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Subject: Sandy Point State Park - Usual suspects, nice walk....
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 12:05:58 -0700 (PDT)
Sandy Point State Park, Anne Arundel, Maryland, US
Apr 29, 2016 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
4.0 mile(s)
19 species

Canada Goose  11
Mallard  8
Double-crested Cormorant  3
Great Blue Heron  1
Black Vulture  11
Osprey  2
Ring-billed Gull  19
Great Black-backed Gull  1
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  13
Barn Swallow  7
Carolina Chickadee  2
Carolina Wren  1
Eastern Bluebird  1
American Robin  5
Northern Mockingbird  3
European Starling  2
Chipping Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  2


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Subject: Summer Tanager, Montgomery Co.; April 29
From: Scott Baron <baron.scott AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 14:57:24 -0400
Hi,

My friend Jason and I heard a Summer Tanager calling along the C&O Canal
this morning.  The spot is across from Blockhouse Point Conservation Park's
Canyon Trail, which dead ends at the canal.  Alternatively, you can walk
west for over 1/2 mile on the canal towpath from Pennyfield Lock.

Scott Baron
Gaithersburg, Md.

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Subject: Fwd: House finch eggs Question
From: Janbraumuller <janbraumuller AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 14:25:39 -0400
Good afternoon,
 There is a house finch that has built a nest on a shelf on top of the column 
by our front door. Although we try to avoid using the door frequently, we do 
need to on a daily basis. She is very tolerant of us, but does fly off the nest 
to a branch of our redbud only 10 feet away. She has been lying on the nest for 
3 weeks now, long past the 12-15 day incubation period. Am I right in thinking 
that these eggs are not fertile? My question is should we just let nature take 
its course or should we intervene and remove the eggs, in the hope that she 
will have another clutch this season? 

 Thank you in advance for your advice. Ps: a house wren arrived today, but 
seems busy in the back yard. Hope she/he stays back there. 

 Jan Braumuller
Arlington

Sent from my iPad

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Deb Vitkova 
> Date: April 29, 2016 at 9:59:17 AM EDT
> To: Jan 
> Subject: House finch eggs
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Backyard White-Throated Sparrows
From: marian rutigliano <mcrutig AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 10:59:33 -0700 (PDT)
I had good numbers of white-throated sparrows in and around my Towson backyard 
all winter. They have all moved on except for a pair still hanging around as 
regulars. One appeared to be bringing nest materials up to one of the trees in 
the yard. I have heard of a species that normally goes south "wintering over" 
during particularly mild winters (had a pair of Catbirds do that once) but have 
not heard of birds "summering over". Has anyone experienced this with any 
species of bird? 


Marian Rutigliano
Towson, MD  

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Subject: Yard Neotropic Migrants Darnestown Mont. Co.
From: Don Simonson <don.r.simonson AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 10:25:48 -0700 (PDT)
Lots of migrants coming through the yard all morning, all singing including 
FOS: 

Indigo Bunting (3)
Baltimore Oriole (2)
Scarlet Tanager (2)
Eastern Kingbird (1)
Chimney Swifts 
Brown Thrasher
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

good birding!
Don Simonson, Darnestown MD

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Subject: Sedge Wren at KAG
From: Wayne Baumgartner <whbaumga AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 11:26:07 -0400
In the marsh west of the cells at Kenilworth. 

   
   -Wayne

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Friday 4/29/16
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 10:28:32 -0400
This morning (4/29) at Rock Creek Park…..

Highlight:  Blackburnian Warbler (FOS)

Warbler species seen or heard: Ovenbird, L. Waterthrush, Parula, Blackburnian, 
BT Blue, BT Green, Blue-winged, Black-and-white, Yellowthroat, Yellow-rumped 


——Ross Drive   (Bill)
Ovenbird     2
Red-shouldered Hawk  
Mourning Dove  
Red-bellied Woodpecker     5
Northern Flicker     2
Red-eyed Vireo  
Blue Jay  
American Crow     4
Carolina Chickadee  
Tufted Titmouse     3
White-breasted Nuthatch     2
Carolina Wren     2
Wood Thrush     3
American Robin     5
Eastern Towhee     2
Scarlet Tanager     2
Northern Cardinal     2
American Goldfinch  

——Equitation and Ridge     (Bill, Sharon, Betsy)
Ovenbird     6
Louisiana Waterthrush  
Northern Parula     3
Blackburnian Warbler     2   FOS  (Sharon)
Black-throated Blue Warbler     2
Yellow-rumped Warbler     6
Black-throated Green Warbler      2
Mourning Dove      2
Yellow-billed Cuckoo      3
Red-bellied Woodpecker     3
Downy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Blue-headed Vireo     2
Blue Jay  1
Carolina Chickadee     2
Tufted Titmouse     4
Carolina Wren     4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher     4
Wood Thrush     4
American Robin     5
Eastern Towhee     4
Northern Cardinal     2
Brown-headed Cowbird     3
Baltimore Oriole     2
American Goldfinch     9

——Yard Parking and Fence Line    (Bill)
Mourning Dove     5
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Northern Flicker  
Red-eyed Vireo 
Blue Jay     4
American Robin  
White-throated Sparrow     3
Northern Cardinal     4
House Sparrow     2

——Maintenance Yard   (Matt, Mardi)
Blue-winged Warbler     
Black-and-white Warbler   heard
Common Yellowthroat      heard
Northern Parula       2
Yellow-rumped Warbler     4
Black-throated Green Warbler  
Cooper's Hawk      flyby  (Matt)
Mourning Dove     4
Yellow-billed Cuckoo       heard
Red-bellied Woodpecker     2
Downy Woodpecker  
Blue-headed Vireo     2
Blue Jay  
American Crow     4
Carolina Chickadee     3
Tufted Titmouse    
White-breasted Nuthatch  
House Wren  
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  
Wood Thrush  
American Robin     4
Gray Catbird  
Eastern Towhee  
Scarlet Tanager      (Mardi)
Northern Cardinal     2
Rose-breasted Grosbeak      heard
Baltimore Oriole     (Matt)
Purple Finch    (Mardi)
American Goldfinch     6

——Nature Center
Black-and-white Warbler  
Northern Parula       heard
Yellow-rumped Warbler       heard
Black-throated Green Warbler       heard
Red-bellied Woodpecker     2
Pileated Woodpecker  
Blue Jay  
Carolina Wren  
Northern Cardinal  
Common Grackle  

Observers: Bill Butler, Sharon Forsyth, Matt Cohen, Mardi Hastings, Betsy 
Lovejoy, John Boright 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC











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Subject: Re: New feature eBird!
From: Andy Wilson <awilson.gettysburg AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 10:19:28 -0400
It's awesome. Also, you can filter by an area - checkout photos for
counties, regions or hotspots.

It's a wonderful tool for checking out photos for ID challenges.

cheers

Andy

On Fri, Apr 29, 2016 at 10:11 AM, Patricia Wood  wrote:

> Now you can Search Photos and Sounds under Explore Data on eBird!  I've
> just barely looked at it, but Wow!  You put in a species and get to look at
> all the pictures people have entered of that bird.  I tried Great Blue
> Heron, and saw such a variety--flight shots, at nests, you name it.  And
> under Cerulean, it was a great way to see what they look like from every
> angle. Way more variety than you get on Google Images.   I didn't even try
> the sounds part of it; it was getting too late last night.  Nice!
>
> Patricia Wood
> Silver Spring
>
> --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
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>



-- 
Andy Wilson
Frederick, MD/Gettysburg College, PA
http://wilsongettysburg.tumblr.com/

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Subject: New feature eBird!
From: Patricia Wood <pwood AT capaccess.org>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 07:11:10 -0700 (PDT)
Now you can Search Photos and Sounds under Explore Data on eBird! I've just 
barely looked at it, but Wow! You put in a species and get to look at all the 
pictures people have entered of that bird. I tried Great Blue Heron, and saw 
such a variety--flight shots, at nests, you name it. And under Cerulean, it was 
a great way to see what they look like from every angle. Way more variety than 
you get on Google Images. I didn't even try the sounds part of it; it was 
getting too late last night. Nice! 


Patricia Wood
Silver Spring

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Subject: Hummingbird in Riva
From: Wayne Bierbaum <wm.bierbaum AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 04:49:43 -0700 (PDT)
A juvie or female was at the feeder this morning.  Riva, MD 

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Subject: Re: Bluebird Safety
From: Joan Cwi <jafjsc AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 16:52:19 -0400
Blinds help in that they will keep birds from thinking they are entering a 
space. But most strikes occur because the birds see reflection of trees on the 
glass and think they are going to land on a limb. Although I never get a strike 
on the french doors with the acopian cords, I still get occasional strikes on 
windows with blinds. I think it depends on your situation. Nothing will be 
perfect, alas. 



> On Apr 28, 2016, at 4:34 PM, Jim Moore  wrote:
> 
> Not an expert, but I've found that ordinary vertical blinds (and probably 
horizontal as well) can dramatically reduce window strikes--even if rotated to 
admit the maximum amount of light/visibility. Also, one of the more 
aesthetically appealing options, in my opinion. Though obviously you need have 
them covering the window throughout the day for it to help, but that's only a 
minor inconvenience. 

> 
> Jim Moore
> Rockville, MD
> 
> 
> On 4/28/2016 10:18 AM, Pat Valdata wrote:
>> I also subscribe to the dirty window method (thanks for the great excuse, 
Gail), but also recommend adding shrubs. When we first moved into our house we 
had a lot of bird strike problems, but as soon as the plants grew up and began 
to cover the bottom of the windows, the strikes went down. It doesn't have to 
be dense growth that blocks the light. We have viburnum, witch hazel, and 
oakleaf hydrangea, and the birds perch in them all the time. We get close up 
views, a nice side benefit. Our best bird in the hydrangea was a Tennessee 
Warbler a few years ago. 

>> 
>> Pat Valdata
>> Elkton, MD
>> 
>> Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device
>> 
>> 
>> -------- Original message --------
>> From: Gail Mackiernan 
>> Date:04/28/2016 9:46 AM (GMT-05:00)
>> To: Joan Cwi 
>> Cc: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com, kalamazooparker AT gmail.com, Steve Johnson 
 

>> Subject: Re: [MDBirding] Bluebird Safety
>> 
>> One thing that works, although maybe not so appealing, is to let your 
windows get really dirty. And screen them. We have a glass- enclosed sunroom 
near trees, and though we didn't get too many strikes, there were enough to 
worry us. We put up the provided screens on all the windows and sliding doors, 
and essentially stopped washing them. On the half of the sliding door which 
cannot be screened, we put up the UV decals, and they did seem to work. Anyway, 
we have not had any bird strikes recently, and like Joan, have seen birds veer 
away from the windows when flying towards the sunroom. 

>> 
>> Of course it does make looking out a bit more challenging, but that is a 
good excuse to go out onto the deck or the yard to see the birds! 

>> 
>> Gail Mackiernan,
>> Colesville, Md
>> 
>> Sent from my iPad
>> 
>> On Apr 28, 2016, at 9:31 AM, Joan Cwi > wrote: 

>> 
>>> I’ve had decals and the Acopian Bird Savers and found the Bird Savers to 
be more both effective, and visually more appealing. I have even had birds come 
flying directly to the window and veer sharply off just before hitting because 
of these cords. 

>>> 
>>> Also, keep in mind when using any of these products, they have to be placed 
on the outside of the window. Otherwise the glass can still reflect the trees 
without barriers. 

>>> 
>>> Joan Cwi
>>> Baltimore, MD
>>> 
>>> 
>>> On Apr 28, 2016, at 7:09 AM, Steve Johnson > wrote: 

>>>> 
>>>> We have had many bird impacts at our home windows - mostly Ovenbird and 
Swainson's Thrush, a couple others over the years. We tried several things, and 
generally the uglier, the better. It has to be a significant visual barrier for 
the birds, which usually means unattractive for us. 

>>>> 
>>>> I want to warn you specifically against one particular product, the 
"invisible" ultraviolet decals. I used two different versions of them together, 
all over our windows, and we immediately had 2 more impacts right at the decals 
the following week. Don't buy them, they are useless. 

>>>> Steve Johnson
>>>> Fairfax, Virginia
>>>> 
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>>>> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google 
Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'. 

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the web at http://www.mdbirding.com 

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>>> 
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the web at http://www.mdbirding.com 

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> 
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Subject: Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary - 55 species - Green Heron, White-eyed Vireo ( and 5 Gray Catbirds)
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 13:42:39 -0700 (PDT)
Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary, Anne Arundel, Maryland, US
Apr 28, 2016 7:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.5 mile(s)
Comments:     Cool, mist transitioning to light rain
55 species

Canada Goose  16
Wood Duck  11
Double-crested Cormorant  22
Great Blue Heron  1
Green Heron  1
Black Vulture  2
Osprey  24
Northern Harrier  1
Cooper's Hawk  1
American Coot  2
Least Sandpiper  6
Wilson's Snipe  2
Laughing Gull  34
Forster's Tern  3
Mourning Dove  3
Chimney Swift  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Eastern Kingbird  2
White-eyed Vireo  6
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  2
Tree Swallow  250
Bank Swallow  2
Barn Swallow  51
Carolina Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  2
Marsh Wren  1
Carolina Wren  1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  10
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
Wood Thrush  1
American Robin  2
Gray Catbird  5     Along the Railroad Bed Trail
Northern Mockingbird  1
European Starling  2
Ovenbird  1
Northern Waterthrush  1
Common Yellowthroat  11
Northern Parula  3
Palm Warbler  4
Yellow-rumped Warbler  12
Chipping Sparrow  1
White-throated Sparrow  17
Swamp Sparrow  3
Eastern Towhee  3
Summer Tanager  1
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  2
Red-winged Blackbird  13
Common Grackle  2
Orchard Oriole  1
American Goldfinch  4

Next survey: May 12.   Contact me if you would like to join us that morning.

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Subject: Re: Bluebird Safety
From: Jim Moore <epiphenomenon9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 16:34:36 -0400
Not an expert, but I've found that ordinary vertical blinds (and 
probably horizontal as well) can dramatically reduce window 
strikes--even if rotated to admit the maximum amount of 
light/visibility.  Also, one of the more aesthetically appealing 
options, in my opinion.  Though obviously you need have them covering 
the window throughout the day for it to help, but that's only a minor 
inconvenience.

Jim Moore
Rockville, MD


On 4/28/2016 10:18 AM, Pat Valdata wrote:
> I also subscribe to the dirty window method (thanks for the great 
> excuse, Gail), but also recommend adding shrubs. When we first moved 
> into our house we had a lot of bird strike problems, but as soon as 
> the plants grew up and began to cover the bottom of the windows, the 
> strikes went down. It doesn't have to be dense growth that blocks the 
> light. We have viburnum, witch hazel, and oakleaf hydrangea, and the 
> birds perch in them all the time. We get close up views, a nice side 
> benefit. Our best bird in the hydrangea was a Tennessee Warbler a few 
> years ago.
>
> Pat Valdata
> Elkton, MD
>
> Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Gail Mackiernan 
> Date:04/28/2016 9:46 AM (GMT-05:00)
> To: Joan Cwi 
> Cc: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com, kalamazooparker AT gmail.com, Steve 
> Johnson 
> Subject: Re: [MDBirding] Bluebird Safety
>
> One thing that works, although maybe not so appealing, is to let your 
> windows get really dirty. And screen them. We have a glass- enclosed 
> sunroom near trees, and though we didn't get too many strikes, there 
> were enough to worry us.  We put up the provided screens on all the 
> windows and sliding doors, and essentially stopped washing them. On 
> the half of the sliding door which cannot be screened, we put up the 
> UV decals, and they did seem to work. Anyway, we have not had any bird 
> strikes recently, and like Joan, have seen birds veer away from the 
> windows when flying towards the sunroom.
>
> Of course it does make looking out a bit more challenging, but that is 
> a good excuse to go out onto the deck or the yard to see the birds!
>
> Gail Mackiernan,
> Colesville, Md
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On Apr 28, 2016, at 9:31 AM, Joan Cwi  > wrote:
>
>> I’ve had decals and the Acopian Bird Savers and found the Bird Savers 
>> to be more both effective, and visually more appealing.  I have even 
>> had birds come flying directly to the window and veer sharply off 
>> just before hitting because of these cords.
>>
>> Also, keep in mind when using any of these products, they have to be 
>> placed on the outside of the window.  Otherwise the glass can still 
>> reflect the trees without barriers.
>>
>> Joan Cwi
>> Baltimore, MD
>>
>>
>> On Apr 28, 2016, at 7:09 AM, Steve Johnson > > wrote:
>>>
>>> We have had many bird impacts at our home windows - mostly Ovenbird 
>>> and Swainson's Thrush, a couple others over the years.  We tried 
>>> several things, and generally the uglier, the better.  It has to be 
>>> a significant visual barrier for the birds, which usually means 
>>> unattractive for us.
>>>
>>> I want to warn you specifically against one particular product, the 
>>> "invisible" ultraviolet decals.  I used two different versions of 
>>> them together, all over our windows, and we immediately had 2 more 
>>> impacts right at the decals the following week.  Don't buy them, 
>>> they are useless.
>>> Steve Johnson
>>> Fairfax, Virginia
>>>
>>> -- 
>>> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the 
>>> Google Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
>>> To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this 
>>> group on the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
>>> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it 
>>> here - http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>>
>> -- 
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>> group on the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
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>> here - http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
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Subject: Re: Bluebird Safety
From: Twitter Email <9nationals AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 14:40:43 -0400
This from American Bird Conservancy 

https://abcbirds.org/get-involved/bird-smart-glass/

grace

> On Apr 28, 2016, at 9:31 AM, Joan Cwi  wrote:
> 
> I’ve had decals and the Acopian Bird Savers and found the Bird Savers to be 
more both effective, and visually more appealing. I have even had birds come 
flying directly to the window and veer sharply off just before hitting because 
of these cords. 

> 
> Also, keep in mind when using any of these products, they have to be placed 
on the outside of the window. Otherwise the glass can still reflect the trees 
without barriers. 

> 
> Joan Cwi
> Baltimore, MD
> 
> 
>> On Apr 28, 2016, at 7:09 AM, Steve Johnson  
wrote: 

>> 
>> We have had many bird impacts at our home windows - mostly Ovenbird and 
Swainson's Thrush, a couple others over the years. We tried several things, and 
generally the uglier, the better. It has to be a significant visual barrier for 
the birds, which usually means unattractive for us. 

>> 
>> I want to warn you specifically against one particular product, the 
"invisible" ultraviolet decals. I used two different versions of them together, 
all over our windows, and we immediately had 2 more impacts right at the decals 
the following week. Don't buy them, they are useless. 

>> Steve Johnson
>> Fairfax, Virginia
>> 
>> -- 
>> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
'Maryland & DC Birding'. 

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the web at http://www.mdbirding.com 

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http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html 

> 
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Subject: Blue-winged Warbler in my yard, singing
From: Brad Phoebus <bradphoebus AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 10:07:13 -0700 (PDT)
Well that's a first. 

Brad Phoebus
Perry Hall MD

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Thursday 4/28/16
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 11:44:11 -0400
This morning (4/28) at Rock Creek Park in mist and later in rain……

Highlights: Chestnut-sided Warbler FOS, and Cape May Warbler (Sharon had the 
FOS Cape May yesterday afternoon at the same location) 


Warblers species seen or heard: Black-throated Green, Yellow-rump, 
Black-and-white, Worm-eating, Blue-winged, Parula, Chestnut-sided, Cape May 


——Equitation Field
Black-throated Green Warbler    (David)

——Ridge
Yellow-rumped Warbler     4
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Blue Jay  
Carolina Wren  
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher     2
Eastern Towhee  
Brown-headed Cowbird     2

——Yard Parking Lot
Yellow-rumped Warbler     2
Red-bellied Woodpecker     2
Northern Flicker 
Tufted Titmouse  
Carolina Wren  
American Robin     4
European Starling     3
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  
House Sparrow  

——Maintenance Yard
Black-and-white Warbler
Worm-eating Warbler     2    (Josh)
Blue-winged Warbler     2    (David)
Northern Parula     2++   seen or heard
Chestnut-sided Warbler     FOS   (Josh)
Black-throated Green Warbler      heard
Yellow-rumped Warbler     4+
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  
Red-bellied Woodpecker     2
Downy Woodpecker  
American Crow     3
White-breasted Nuthatch  
Carolina Wren     2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher     2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet     2
Eastern Towhee     2
Scarlet Tanager  
Indigo Bunting     2
American Goldfinch     2

——Horse Rink  (Stables Area)
Cape May Warbler     (David)

——Nature Center
Blue-winged Warbler       heard
Black-and-white
Pileated Woodpecker
American Robin     2
Northern Cardinal

Contributors:  David Moulton, Sharon Forsyth, Josh Berman, Bodo, +

Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC

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Subject: Poplar Island 4/27/2016
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 08:35:58 -0700 (PDT)
Yesterday's census was excellent. Light rain in the morning pushed down many 
swallows and shorebirds. Breeding was evident across the island. Highlights 
were numerous, but my personal favorites were the two CLIFF SWALLOWS mixed in 
with the hundreds of other swallows and a TRICOLORED HERON in the egret/ibis 
rookery. 


Lingering waterfowl included Northern Shoveler, Redhead, Greater Scaup, Lesser 
Scaup, Surf Scoter, Long-tailed Duck, and Ruddy Duck; Mallards were everywhere 
and I saw ducklings in two cells. 


Specialty breeders like Glossy Ibis, Black-necked Stilts, American 
Oystercatchers, Willets, and Seaside Sparrows were also evident. I heard two 
large rails, either King or Clapper, along with 10 Virginia Rails and one Sora. 
The Common Terns and Least Terns were not back yet but I did find two Caspian 
Terns mixed in with the gulls and several Forster's Terns foraging offshore. 


Shorebirds numbered in the hundreds; highlights included a Short-billed 
Dowitcher and two Black-bellied Plovers. Migrant passerines were also evident, 
with Blue Grosbeak and Baltimore Oriole standing out as highlights. 


Full eBird checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29259825

Tim Carney
Nottingham, MD

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Subject: Re: Bluebird Safety
From: Pat Valdata <pvaldata1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 10:18:45 -0400
I also subscribe to the dirty window method (thanks for the great excuse, 
Gail), but also recommend adding shrubs. When we first moved into our house we 
had a lot of bird strike problems, but as soon as the plants grew up and began 
to cover the bottom of the windows, the strikes went down. It doesn't have to 
be dense growth that blocks the light. We have viburnum, witch hazel, and 
oakleaf hydrangea, and the birds perch in them all the time. We get close up 
views, a nice side benefit. Our best bird in the hydrangea was a Tennessee 
Warbler a few years ago. 


Pat Valdata 
Elkton, MD

Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device


-------- Original message --------
From: Gail Mackiernan  
Date:04/28/2016  9:46 AM  (GMT-05:00) 
To: Joan Cwi  
Cc: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com, kalamazooparker AT gmail.com, Steve Johnson 
 

Subject: Re: [MDBirding] Bluebird Safety  

One thing that works, although maybe not so appealing, is to let your windows 
get really dirty. And screen them. We have a glass- enclosed sunroom near 
trees, and though we didn't get too many strikes, there were enough to worry 
us. We put up the provided screens on all the windows and sliding doors, and 
essentially stopped washing them. On the half of the sliding door which cannot 
be screened, we put up the UV decals, and they did seem to work. Anyway, we 
have not had any bird strikes recently, and like Joan, have seen birds veer 
away from the windows when flying towards the sunroom. 


Of course it does make looking out a bit more challenging, but that is a good 
excuse to go out onto the deck or the yard to see the birds! 


Gail Mackiernan,
Colesville, Md

Sent from my iPad

On Apr 28, 2016, at 9:31 AM, Joan Cwi  wrote:

I’ve had decals and the Acopian Bird Savers and found the Bird Savers to be 
more both effective, and visually more appealing. I have even had birds come 
flying directly to the window and veer sharply off just before hitting because 
of these cords. 


Also, keep in mind when using any of these products, they have to be placed on 
the outside of the window. Otherwise the glass can still reflect the trees 
without barriers. 


Joan Cwi
Baltimore, MD


On Apr 28, 2016, at 7:09 AM, Steve Johnson  wrote:

We have had many bird impacts at our home windows - mostly Ovenbird and 
Swainson's Thrush, a couple others over the years. We tried several things, and 
generally the uglier, the better. It has to be a significant visual barrier for 
the birds, which usually means unattractive for us. 


I want to warn you specifically against one particular product, the "invisible" 
ultraviolet decals. I used two different versions of them together, all over 
our windows, and we immediately had 2 more impacts right at the decals the 
following week. Don't buy them, they are useless. 

Steve Johnson
Fairfax, Virginia

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Subject: Re: Bluebird Safety
From: Gail Mackiernan <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 09:46:29 -0400
One thing that works, although maybe not so appealing, is to let your windows 
get really dirty. And screen them. We have a glass- enclosed sunroom near 
trees, and though we didn't get too many strikes, there were enough to worry 
us. We put up the provided screens on all the windows and sliding doors, and 
essentially stopped washing them. On the half of the sliding door which cannot 
be screened, we put up the UV decals, and they did seem to work. Anyway, we 
have not had any bird strikes recently, and like Joan, have seen birds veer 
away from the windows when flying towards the sunroom. 


Of course it does make looking out a bit more challenging, but that is a good 
excuse to go out onto the deck or the yard to see the birds! 


Gail Mackiernan,
Colesville, Md

Sent from my iPad

> On Apr 28, 2016, at 9:31 AM, Joan Cwi  wrote:
> 
> I’ve had decals and the Acopian Bird Savers and found the Bird Savers to be 
more both effective, and visually more appealing. I have even had birds come 
flying directly to the window and veer sharply off just before hitting because 
of these cords. 

> 
> Also, keep in mind when using any of these products, they have to be placed 
on the outside of the window. Otherwise the glass can still reflect the trees 
without barriers. 

> 
> Joan Cwi
> Baltimore, MD
> 
> 
>> On Apr 28, 2016, at 7:09 AM, Steve Johnson  
wrote: 

>> 
>> We have had many bird impacts at our home windows - mostly Ovenbird and 
Swainson's Thrush, a couple others over the years. We tried several things, and 
generally the uglier, the better. It has to be a significant visual barrier for 
the birds, which usually means unattractive for us. 

>> 
>> I want to warn you specifically against one particular product, the 
"invisible" ultraviolet decals. I used two different versions of them together, 
all over our windows, and we immediately had 2 more impacts right at the decals 
the following week. Don't buy them, they are useless. 

>> Steve Johnson
>> Fairfax, Virginia
>> 
>> -- 
>> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
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the web at http://www.mdbirding.com 

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> 
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Subject: Re: Bluebird Safety
From: Joan Cwi <jafjsc AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 09:31:37 -0400
I’ve had decals and the Acopian Bird Savers and found the Bird Savers to be 
more both effective, and visually more appealing. I have even had birds come 
flying directly to the window and veer sharply off just before hitting because 
of these cords. 


Also, keep in mind when using any of these products, they have to be placed on 
the outside of the window. Otherwise the glass can still reflect the trees 
without barriers. 


Joan Cwi
Baltimore, MD


On Apr 28, 2016, at 7:09 AM, Steve Johnson  wrote:
> 
> We have had many bird impacts at our home windows - mostly Ovenbird and 
Swainson's Thrush, a couple others over the years. We tried several things, and 
generally the uglier, the better. It has to be a significant visual barrier for 
the birds, which usually means unattractive for us. 

> 
> I want to warn you specifically against one particular product, the 
"invisible" ultraviolet decals. I used two different versions of them together, 
all over our windows, and we immediately had 2 more impacts right at the decals 
the following week. Don't buy them, they are useless. 

> Steve Johnson
> Fairfax, Virginia
> 
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Subject: Re: Bluebird Safety
From: Steve Johnson <stevejohnson2 AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 04:09:22 -0700 (PDT)
We have had many bird impacts at our home windows - mostly Ovenbird and 
Swainson's Thrush, a couple others over the years. We tried several things, and 
generally the uglier, the better. It has to be a significant visual barrier for 
the birds, which usually means unattractive for us. 


I want to warn you specifically against one particular product, the "invisible" 
ultraviolet decals. I used two different versions of them together, all over 
our windows, and we immediately had 2 more impacts right at the decals the 
following week. Don't buy them, they are useless. 

Steve Johnson
Fairfax, Virginia

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Subject: Re: Rose-breasted Grosbeak FOS Darnestown Mont Co
From: Don Simonson <don.r.simonson AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 19:25:58 -0700 (PDT)
TWO male Rose-breasted Grosbeaks at same time on feeder today. for an hour in 
the afternoon. 2 or 3 years ago, two males arrived together in spring and 
stayed for a day or two. 

Don Simonson
Darnestown, MD

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Subject: MOS Conference - registration deadline extended
From: Marcia Watson <marshwren50 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 19:27:56 -0400
MOS Is announcing that the deadline for the MOS Conference (June 10-12 in 
Salisbury) has been extended to May 14th. Sign up now. Details and registration 
form can be found on the webpage www.mdbirds.org. 


Marcia 
------------
Marcia Watson
Bowie, Maryland
marshwren50 AT comcast.net

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Kensington Migrants
From: "'diane Ford' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 20:48:06 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all, The cloudy, damp cool weather had a few migrants stalled. This morning 
I had the following species along the creek and woods: 

Baltimore Oriole 2Great crested Flycatcher 1Eastern Phoebe 1Ovenbird 1Black 
throated Blue warbler 

 ""     ""          Green warblerBlack & white WarblerAmerican 
Redstart 1Wood Thrush 2Scarlet Tanager 2Parula Warbler     3Gray Catbird 
2Ruby crowned Kinglet 2White throated Sparrow 2 


D.Ford/Bethesda, Md.

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Subject: Riva Area Park - Killdeer, Brown Thrasher
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 13:42:13 -0700 (PDT)
Riva Area Park, Anne Arundel, Maryland, US
Apr 27, 2016 2:15 PM - 3:45 PM
Protocol: Traveling
3.5 mile(s)
10 species

Turkey Vulture  2
Killdeer  1
American Crow  1
Carolina Chickadee  1
Tufted Titmouse  1
Gray Catbird  1
Brown Thrasher  1
European Starling  3
Northern Cardinal  3
Red-winged Blackbird  2


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Subject: Re: Bluebird Safety
From: Lynne Parks <v.lynneparks AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 14:53:17 -0400
Hi Amy,

Acopian Bird Savers are the most effective product.  They are cords that
hang down and they follow the 2"x4" rule.  Birds will avoid flying through
spaces that are 2" high or less and 4" wide or less.  As long as you create
a visual pattern in keeping with the 2x4 rule, that should solve your
problem.  You can cut American Bird Conservancy Tape into squares, make
lines, or patterns.  I've cut it into bird shapes.  It's best to apply
something to the outside of the windows to take care of any reflections.


Very best,
Lynne Parks
Lights Out Baltimore



On Wed, Apr 27, 2016 at 1:19 PM, Amy Parker 
wrote:

> Hi!
>
> At our school we have a lot of windows.  We also have many bluebird boxes
> that our students monitor.  We are finding that bluebirds hit our windows
> resulting in them being stunned, injured or even killed.
>
> We've created window designs to fill the empty space of the glass.  In our
> research, window decals were mentioned but we are wondering if this is the
> best practice...
>
> Would anyone in this group have any tips/techniques/suggestions on what we
> can do to prevent this situation from happening or are we on the right
> track?
>
> Thanks!
>
> --
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> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
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> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>

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Subject: Bluebird Safety
From: Amy Parker <kalamazooparker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 10:19:17 -0700 (PDT)
Hi!

At our school we have a lot of windows. We also have many bluebird boxes that 
our students monitor. We are finding that bluebirds hit our windows resulting 
in them being stunned, injured or even killed. 


We've created window designs to fill the empty space of the glass. In our 
research, window decals were mentioned but we are wondering if this is the best 
practice... 


Would anyone in this group have any tips/techniques/suggestions on what we can 
do to prevent this situation from happening or are we on the right track? 


Thanks!

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Subject: Ferry Neck, Blackwater, Ft. Smallwood Park, April 21-25, 2016.
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 15:55:32 +0000
FERRY NECK, BLACKWATER, FT. SMALLWOOD PARK, APRIL 21-25, 2016.


GAZEETEER: Might not be necessary, but just in case there’s confusion, this 
all refers to our family place, Rigby’s Folly. Lucy Point is where the mouth 
of Irish Creek meets the Choptank River mouth. It’s a real good place to sit 
and scope a LOT of open water, many square miles of it. Poplar Cove is where 
the house is situated, where the dock is. A big cove, shallow, it shows up on 
most maps distinctly. The numbering of the 7 fields proceeds clockwise from the 
Big Field in front of the house, a.k.a. Field 1. The numbering of the 8 wooded 
parcels is also clockwise starting with Woods 1 that is on the northern border 
of the property. 



My grandfather and namesake, Henry Tucker, M.D., acquired the property in the 
early 1920s. Until the late 1940s the road in from Bellevue Road, Ferry Neck 
Road, was unpaved. Ferry Neck refers to the Bellevue-Oxford Ferry, apparently 
the oldest, continuously-running private ferry in the U.S. In view from our 
shoreline is Edwards Point, at the north mouth of Poplar Cove, and Holland 
Point, at the northwest mouth of Irish Creek. Rigby’s Folly is the original 
property name dating back to c. 1703. A folly in this sense is a fanciful 
house: “an often extravagant picturesque building erected to suit a fanciful 
taste” (Webster’s), not at all like our plain jane, quirky, wooden 
farmhouse, however. There’s a nice folly showing in ‘Downtown Abbey’ some 
distance from the castle and in the gardens. 



APRIL 21, THURSDAY. 122 miles from Philadelphia to FORT SMALLWOOD PARK, Anne 
Arundel County, MD, to join Sue Ricciardi at her hawk watch here, such a 
well-organized, well-run, operation. We’re there 11-4 and there is a modest 
flight. We see 3 Chimney Swifts, 7 Blue Jays, a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, 2 
Caspian Terns, 70 Double-crested Cormorants, 4 Northern Rough-winged Swallows, 
2 Common Loons, a Barn Swallow, a Peregrine Falcon (probably a resident bird), 
a Gray Squirrel, and 2 Redbelly Cooters. Sue finds a fresh dead male Myrtle 
Warbler, a beauty. In spite of our late arrival we see some of the day’s 
total of 124 raptors, that includes 46 Sharp-shinned Hawks, 7 Ospreys 10 Bald 
Eagles, and 2 Merlins. ROUTE 33 W of Easton, 2 Wild Turkeys. RIGBY’S FOLLY, 6 
Wild Turkeys and 4 deer in Field 4. 



APRIL 22, FRIDAY. RIGBY’S FOLLY: 43 Common Grackles in a small area of Field 
1 in the wheat. From the dock: 1 Common Loon and 3 Diamondback Terrapin, the 
1st terps I’ve seen this year. About time. While doing brush work along the 
driveway find a 4-point antler in the hedgerow opposite Field 4. At 5:43 P.M. 
the warm sprinkles set off 2 Cope’s Gray Tree Frogs calling, 67 degrees F. At 
Bellevue just 3 Common Loons and 2 Gray Squirrels. Liz and I visit Your Doc’s 
In in Easton to deal with her poison ivy. Fair becoming overcast, SW 15+ 
falling to < 5 m.p.h., 62-72 degrees F. 



LUCY POINT, 1:39 - 2:39, 71 degrees F. falling to 68, mostly overcast, winds <5 
m.p.h. more or less, viz good, sprinkles the last 10 minutes. Here the mouth of 
Choptank River continues, as it has been all winter, to be disappointing. The 
near absence of gulls is puzzling. The open water birds are somewhere else. 
Surf Scoter 35, Bufflehead 23, Double-crested Cormorant 19, Bonaparte’s Gull 
1, Common Loon 6, Horned Grebe 5, Osprey 7, Bald Eagle 2 adults, Herring Gull 
1, Northern Gannet 0, Forster’s Tern 0. I see across the way at Holland Point 
that the new owners have erected 4 bluebird nesting boxes as well as a Purple 
Martin house. See just one boat, ‘the Hustler’, from St. Michaels. Really 
loud. 



APRIL 23, SATURDAY. Medium-sized Fowler’s Toad (first of the year) by the 
back steps as Liz is gardening. Clear the Lucy Point Trail and find a c. 9” 
Diamondback Terrapin carapace c. 150’ from Irish Creek. A lot of Hairy 
Woodpecker drumming in the yard. A rickety situation but repair a bluebird nest 
box climbing an extension ladder and also secure the screech-owl nest box, both 
in the yard, both unoccupied. Overcast becoming clear, NW 20, 62-70 degrees F., 
cool. Clyde Harding comes, arrives at 8:10 A.M. to discuss tree work on the 
trails and driveway. 



APRIL 24, SUNDAY. BLACKWATER N.W.R. (including a brief drive through of EGYPT 
ROAD), 7:30 A.M. - 1 P.M. cool clear, NW15, 45-54 degrees F., tidal waters 
lowish, fresh waters highish but have been lowering. 56 species. An official 
refuge “guided bird tour” (for years incorrectly designated as “bird 
walk”, with hardly any walking involved) with Liz & Harry Armistead, Jennie 
Howard, and Brian Reidy. Jennie & Brian carry large portfolios with their 
enlarged (13” X 19”!) photographs. They offer us our pick of 2; Liz chooses 
an adult Bald Eagle in a Sweet Gum. Brian has one of those camera rigs that is 
about the same dimensions and shape as the Stanley Cup A lot of their 
photography is done at places such as Merritt Island, Sanibel, Bombay Hook, 
Chincoteague, and here. Partial list (Pool 5B is the most lively spot): 



Canada Goose 10 (incl. 5 small goslings), Wood Duck 1 male, Mallard 160 (mostly 
pen-raised birds at Sewards), Blue-winged Teal 2 (Pool 5B), Northern Shoveler 
12 (Pool 5B), Green-winged Teal 8, Wild Turkey 5, AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN 5 
(massive & ponderous; in flight and at rest on the S side of “Lake 
Blackwater”), Great Blue Heron 18, Great egret 12 (Pool 5B), Glossy Ibis 13 
(Pool 5B; actively feeding and getting what look like small crayfish; ??), 
Osprey 18, Bald Eagle 32, Virginia Rail 4, Black-bellied Plover 3, Greater 
Yellowlegs 16, Lesser Yellowlegs 16, Least Sandpiper 2, Dunlin 130 (Pool 5B), 
Least Tern 2, Caspian Tern 2, Forster’s Tern 19, 



Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1, Red-headed Woodpecker 1, Purple Martin 4, Tree 
Swallow 22, Barn Swallow 4, Carolina Wren 2 (1 foraging on our right rear 
tire), Eastern Bluebird 8, Common Yellowthroat 16 (all of them singing males), 
Prairie Warbler 1, Field Sparrow 1, Chipping Sparrow 8, Orchard Oriole 1, 
American Goldfinch 6 (the males brilliant yellow). 



NON-AVIAN TAXA: Mammals: Woodchuck 1, Fox Squirrel 2, Muskrat 1, Eastern 
Cottontail 7. Herps: Southern Leopard Frog 1, Northern Watersnake 1, Redbelly 
Cooter 7, and Painted Turtle 12. Butterflies: Black Swallowtail 2, American 
Lady 1, unIDd sulphur 1. 



LUCY POINT, 4:15-5 P.M., SW5+, 64 degrees F., clear, viz good. Meagre results 
again. Common Loon 1, Osprey 7, Herring Gull 1, Double-crested Cormorant 19, 
Great Blue Heron 1. 5 boats. Poor showing, but it is nice to sit here with the 
great view. “And I shall have some peace there …/I will arise and go now 
for always night and day/I hear lake water lapping with low sounds on the 
shore./While I stand on the roadways or the pavements gray/I hear it in the 
deep heart’s core.” Yeats, ‘Lake Isle of Innisfree’. 



Dead female Box Turtle in Field 1 near the edge of Lucy Point Trail and 
driveway 75’ out, perhaps dead 2-3 weeks. Liz sees a Red Fox hunting out back 
between the house and the cove. Clear the Irish Creek Trail but have a rose 
thorn puncture my hand. Has happened dozens of times in the past, but this time 
my knuckles swell for the first time. A deer in Field 1. 58 degrees F. at 9 
P.M. 



In Field 4 ten deer & 11 Wild Turkeys (much gobbling), an imm. Bald Eagle and 2 
Eastern Bluebirds (the nest box on the phone pole is occupied) plus 2 deer 
running from Woods 6 to Woods 2 



APRIL 25, MONDAY. Lie in bed early listening to the Hairy Woodpecker hitting on 
a dead limb of the Black Walnut. He rolls out a VERY loud tattoo every 3-7 
seconds, most times at intervals of 4 seconds. A very wary bird. Took a while 
to confirm it is a hairy. One time, concealed by the front porch and silent, 
yet I flush a Common Grackle nearby on the ground. That was enough to make the 
HAWO stop drumming and fly off. 



Reminds me of what we and animals can learn from the behavior of birds, as 
recounted in What the robin knows: how birds reveal the secrets of the natural 
world by Jon Young (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012, 241p.), that tells, among 
other things, of how native Americans were so aware of the signals birds can 
send about what is happening. 



We’ve all seen songbirds fly away and then a few seconds later a sharpie or 
Coop will appear. Or when shorebirds, or waterfowl, flush and almost 
immediately afterwards one sees a peregrine, Merlin, or harrier. Chickadees and 
prairie dogs have different calls that indicate whether an approaching predator 
is on the ground or flying. And my own call, “get a load of this”, is when 
I see a peregrine. 



Woodpeckers have buffers in their skulls that keep them from having 
concussions. What’s next? Surrogate woodpecker head transplants in the NFL? 



On the dock with our coffee, 8:30-9:15, pretty good: a Lesser Yellowlegs flies 
by close, c. the 16th record for here, 2 Northern Harriers, 1 Cooper’s Hawk, 
1 adult & 1 immature Bald Eagle, 7 Ospreys, 7 Turkey Vultures, 3 Black Vultures 
& 1 Double-crested Cormorant. Twenty-two Canada Geese fly close heading NW. If 
they’re locals why aren’t they paired up? If migrants they are late. 



The cove water continues to be amazingly clear. Beautiful. Ruppia maritima 
(Widgeon Grass) is starting to grow from the bottom, up an inch or so already. 
In spite of being heavily browsed by geese and swans the past 2 winters, it 
looks as if there may be a good growth again this summer, just like the old 
days. There are small groups of little minnows today. Out in Irish Creek the 
‘Southern Pride’ from Tilghman is running trot lines. “American by birth, 
southern by the grace of God” as the bumper sticker says? I have not seen 
this boat here previously. 58 degrees F. at the start, clear, SW 15. Liz sees 
the Red Fox again. Leave at 10:24 A.M. See 2 Tiger Swallowtails on the way up 
to Pennsylvania. 



AVE ATQUE VALE. Usually the case is that people move TO the Eastern Shore, not 
away from it, but Margie Steffens and Lester Coble are leaving here. I am not 
very active in the Talbot Bird Club, of which they were active members, but I 
will miss them. It was good knowing they were there. 



BIRD FAMILIES OF THE WORLD: an invitation to the spectacular diversity of birds 
by David W. Winkler et a. (Lynx, 2015, 599 p., $96.00). Am lucky enough to 
receive a copy to review for a library journal. It weighs 7 lbs., has 2,336 
photographs and paintings, and is derivative from the massive Handbook of birds 
of the world (17 volumes). In addition to text, illus. & maps for all 243 bird 
families there are also paintings of every genus (i.e. all genera), sometimes 
30 or 40 per family. What a treasure this spectacular publication is. Seeing it 
in the mail sure made my day. 



Best to all. - Harry Armistead, Philadelphia. 		 	   		  

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Subject: Fort Smallwood Park morning walk
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 08:12:26 -0700 (PDT)
Fort Smallwood Park, Anne Arundel, Maryland, US
Apr 27, 2016 7:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
18 species

Canada Goose  25
Mallard  1
Double-crested Cormorant  123
Great Blue Heron  1
Mourning Dove  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
American Crow  2
Carolina Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  2
Eastern Bluebird  1
American Robin  3
Gray Catbird  1
Northern Mockingbird  1
Chipping Sparrow  3
Northern Cardinal  2
Red-winged Blackbird  3

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Subject: Re: Barred Owl - first for here!
From: Hilary Bok <hbok AT mac.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 08:03:39 -0700 (PDT)
I have an amazing record of not seeing owls. (I spent six years living near a 
Great Horned Owl that I used to hoot with many nights, but never actually saw.) 
So imagine my surprise a few weeks ago when I went out to my back yard here in 
Bolton Hill (Baltimore rowhouses), and there, sitting on the telephone wire, 
perhaps 20 feet from my nose, was a Barred Owl, my first ever. It looked at me; 
I looked at it; then it flew majestically off into the night. 


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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Wednesday 4/27/16
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 10:29:53 -0400
This morning (4/27) at Rock Creek Park…..

Coverage was hampered by rain.

Warbler species seem or heard: Yellow-rump, Ovenbird, Worm-eating, Blue-winged, 
Palm 


Other species of interest: Scarlet Tanager, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Indigo 
Bunting 


——Equitation Field
Yellow-rumped Warbler  
Northern Flicker  
Carolina Wren  
American Robin      6+
European Starling  
Northern Cardinal  
Brown-headed Cowbird  
 
——Ridge
Yellow-rumped Warbler     6
Double-crested Cormorant     2
Mourning Dove  
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Hairy Woodpecker  
Blue Jay     4
Carolina Chickadee  
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  
American Robin     2
Eastern Towhee     2
Common Grackle     2
Brown-headed Cowbird     3

——Yard Parking
Mourning Dove
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker

——Maintenance Yard
Ovenbird        heard
Worm-eating Warbler  
Blue-winged Warbler     2
Palm Warbler  
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)     20+
Yellow-billed Cuckoo       heard
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  
Carolina Chickadee  
Tufted Titmouse  
Carolina Wren  
Ruby-crowned Kinglet     2
American Robin     4
White-throated Sparrow  
Scarlet Tanager  
Northern Cardinal  
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  
Indigo Bunting     2
American Goldfinch  

Contributors: Gary Nelson, David Sperling, Betsy Lovejoy, Starr Kopper, John 
Williamson, David Lauter 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC

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Subject: Blue Jays on the move and RHWO
From: Warblerick <ricksussman1955 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 05:39:15 -0700 (PDT)
Lots of Blue Jays moving through right now, so that reminds me to look up for 
migrating Red-headed Woodpeckers as well, as they seem to move about the same 
time. So yesterday I saw a nice adult RHWO fly across the yard between my 
neighbors and me, down pretty low, and first thing this morning I stepped out 
and heard one immediately, and then saw it perched in a tree at the very back 
of our yard. I got my bins on it, and in the poor early morning cloudy light, 
thought it was an immature. Then I went in and got my scope and shot several 
digiscope pics. It seems it was a first year adult, with a red head but some 
black in the wings as well. 


Gotta leave soon for work, so I'm sure other goodies will pass by.

Rick Sussman
Woodbine,MD

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Subject: Lake Roland, 04/26/16
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 08:29:38 -0400
04/26/15 – 7am-730am

Lake Roland Park—Lake Roland, B Co., MD (checking out main entrance
"Lakeside Drive" to the park)



WEATHER: Fair, 64-68 degrees, SW 6 mph- SW 7 mph   OBS: 3



Black Vulture – 1

Rock Pigeon – 2

Mourning Dove – 1

Chimney Swift – 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker – 2

Downy Woodpecker – 1

Warbling Vireo – 2

Blue Jay – 2

American Crow – 1

Fish Crow – 1

N Rough-winged Swallow – 4

Carolina Chickadee – 5

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 2

American Robin – 5

European Starling – 2

Blue-winged Warbler – 1

American Redstart – 1

Northern Parula – 1

White-throated Sparrow – 2

Northern Cardinal – 4

Common Grackle – 4

American Goldfinch – 2

SPECIES: 22   INDIVIDUALS: 47




04/26/15 – 745am-835am

Lake Roland Park—Boardwalk Trail, B Co., MD



WEATHER: PC/MC, 68-70 degrees, WSW 8 mph- SW 12 mph   OBS:20+



Canada Goose – 2

Common Loon – 1

Black Vulture – 1

Turkey Vulture – 1

Northern Harrier – 1

Cooper’s Hawk – 2

Red-shouldered Hawk – 1

Broad-winged Hawk – 1

Red-tailed Hawk – 1

Rock Pigeon – 6

Mourning Dove – 2

Chimney Swift – 6

Red-bellied Woodpecker – 1

Downy Woodpecker – 2

Hairy Woodpecker – 1

Northern Flicker – 1

Eastern Phoebe – 1

Yellow-throated Vireo – 1

Warbling Vireo – 3

Blue Jay – 11

American Crow – 4

N Rough-winged Swallow – 1

Carolina Chickadee – 3

White-breasted Nuthatch – 1

Carolina Wren – 1

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 3

American Robin – 5

Northern Mockingbird – 1

European Starling – 6

Northern Parula – 1

White-throated Sparrow – 3

Northern Cardinal – 5

Common Grackle – 5

Brown-headed Cowbird – 3

American Goldfinch – 5

SPECIES: 35   INDIVIDUALS: 93




04/26/15 – 835am-1105am

Lake Roland Park—Lake Roland, B Co., MD



WEATHER: MC, 70-77 degrees, SW 12 mph- W 11 mph   OBS: 20+



Canada Goose – 16

Wood Duck – 4

Mallard – 4

Double-crested Cormorant – 3

Green Heron – 1

Black Vulture – 1

Turkey Vulture – 1

Sharp-shinned Hawk – 1

Cooper’s Hawk – 1

Red-tailed Hawk – 1

American Kestrel – 1

Killdeer – 1

Spotted Sandpiper – 6

Solitary Sandpiper – 3

Mourning Dove – 1

Chimney Swift – 2

Belted Kingfisher – 1

Red-headed Woodpecker – 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker – 3

Downy Woodpecker – 2

Pileated Woodpecker – 2

Eastern Kingbird – 1

Yellow-throated Vireo – 2

Warbling Vireo – 2

Red-eyed Vireo – 2

Blue Jay – 29

American Crow – 3

N Rough-winged Swallow – 3

Tree Swallow – 4

Barn Swallow – 2

Carolina Chickadee – 5

Tufted Titmouse – 3

White-breasted Nuthatch – 2

Carolina Wren – 2

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 5

Eastern Bluebird – 2

American Robin – 10

Gray Catbird – 2

European Starling – 2

Northern Parula – 3

Yellow Warbler – 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler – 5

Black-and-white Warbler – 2

Chipping Sparrow – 4

Song Sparrow – 1

Swamp Sparrow – 2

White-throated Sparrow – 6

Northern Cardinal – 10

Red-winged Blackbird – 3

Rusty Blackbird – 2

Common Grackle – 1

Brown-headed Cowbird – 1

American Goldfinch – 6

SPECIES: 53   INDIVIDUALS: 185



   Kevin Graff
   Jarrettsville, MD
   KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Re: Mimic thrush trifecta
From: Warblerick <ricksussman1955 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 05:08:39 -0700 (PDT)
On Wednesday, April 27, 2016 at 8:02:27 AM UTC-4, Frank Boyle wrote:
> Catbirds are back in this side of the mountain :). Northern Mockingbirds were 
here all winter. The Brown Thrasher family is starting to defend their nesting 
area (sorry folks, they don't read the "Yellow Book" anymore). 

> 
> 
> Frank Boyle
> Broken Wallet Farm
> Rohrersville, MD
> 
> Sent from my iPhone

No catbirds here yet. But Brown Thrashers singing from the treetops every 
morning, including this morning. 


We'll have to try to get together...

Rick Sussman
Woodbine,MD

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Subject: Belated city hawkwatch, 04/24/16
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 08:08:33 -0400
Made two trips to my former hawkwatch before/after the history society
event.  Staged at History Society's hawkwatch site during 'Migration:
Songbirds' Nature Connection event.   Most raptors are coming in from my
former hawkwatch site which is at least a mile away.


04/24/16 – 1215pm-1245pm

Hilltop Ridge – hawkwatch site, Baltimore, MD



WEATHER: PC, 60-62 degrees, SE 4 mph- N 3 mph   OBS: 2



Turkey Vulture – 2 (Migrating)

Sharp-shinned Hawk – 1 (Migrating)

Red-shouldered Hawk – 1 (Migrating)

Rock Pigeon – 1

Mourning Dove – 1

Chimney Swift – 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker – 1

Downy Woodpecker – 3

White-eyed Vireo – 1

Blue-headed Vireo – 2

Blue Jay – 1

American Crow – 2

Carolina Chickadee – 3

Tufted Titmouse – 2

White-breasted Nuthatch – 1

Carolina Wren – 1

House Wren – 1

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 1

American Robin – 7

Gray Catbird – 1

Northern Mockingbird – 1

European Starling – 3

Ovenbird – 1

Northern Parula - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler – 5

American Redstart – 1

White-throated Sparrow – 2

Northern Cardinal – 4

Common Grackle – 1

Baltimore Oriole – 1

House Finch – 1

House Sparrow – 3

SPECIES: 32   INDIVIDUALS: 58




04/24/16 – 1255pm-430pm

Natural History Society of MD, Baltimore, MD



WEATHER: PC/Fair, 62-67 degrees, N 3 mph- variable 5 mph   OBS: 4



Double-crested Cormorant – 4 (Migrating)

Black Vulture – 3 (Migrating)

Turkey Vulture – 13 (Migrating)

Osprey – 5 (Migrating)

Bald Eagle – 12 (9 adults, 3 immature, Migrating)

Sharp-shinned Hawk – 2 (Migrating)

Cooper’s Hawk – 2 (Migrating)

Red-tailed Hawk – 7 (Migrating)

Merlin – 1 (Migrating)

Rock Pigeon – 19

Mourning Dove – 2

Chimney Swift – 16

American Crow – 4

Fish Crow – 1

Barn Swallow – 3 (migrating)

American Robin – 2

Northern Mockingbird – 1

European Starling – 9

Yellow-rumped Warbler – 1 (migrating)

Common Grackle – 11 (7 migrating, 4 local)

Brown-headed Cowbird – 1

House Finch – 2

American Goldfinch – 2 (1 migrating)

House Sparrow – 8

SPECIES: 24   INDIVIDUALS: 131





04/24/16 – 440pm-520pm

Hilltop Ridge – hawkwatch site, Baltimore, MD



WEATHER: Fair, 67-66 degrees, calm- SE 6 mph   OBS: 2



Black Vulture – 2 (Migrating)

Turkey Vulture – 2 (Migrating)

Bald Eagle – 1 (Adult, migrating)

Sharp-shinned Hawk – 4 (Migrating)

Cooper’s Hawk – 5 (Migrating)

Broad-winged Hawk – 2 (Migrating)

Red-tailed Hawk – 2 (Migrating)

Rock Pigeon – 1

Mourning Dove – 1

Chimney Swift – 2

Downy Woodpecker – 1

White-eyed Vireo – 1

Blue Jay – 1

American Crow – 2

Common Raven – 1 (heard calling, first for Hilltop Ridge)

Carolina Chickadee – 2

Tufted Titmouse – 1

Carolina Wren – 1

Ruby-crowned Kinglet – 1

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 1

American Robin – 6

Gray Catbird – 1

Northern Mockingbird – 1

European Starling – 2

Yellow Warbler – 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler – 1

White-throated Sparrow – 2

Northern Cardinal – 2

Common Grackle – 1

House Sparrow – 2

SPECIES: 30   INDIVIDUALS: 53



    Kevin Graff

    Jarrettsville, MD

    KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Re: Barred Owl - first for here!
From: Warblerick <ricksussman1955 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 05:07:06 -0700 (PDT)
On Wednesday, April 27, 2016 at 5:20:43 AM UTC-4, Frank Boyle wrote:
> Hi All,
> 
> Just now heard a Barred Owl - this is the first time for our property here 
(Rohrersville). There is a very small wetland remnant just north of our 
property line that is still protected by, of all organizations, the Army Corps 
of Engineers. It was slated for development before the idiot developer put his 
plans in hold during the 2008 financial fiasco. Not sure how long we will have 
it, no doubt it will be filled in with *no* protest as this is Washington 
County and they don' give a damn about the environment. Developers are in the 
good ol' boys' back pocket in Hagerstown. Blanket statement? You bet it is. And 
it is true *sigh*. 

> 
> Anyhoo, that makes the "Owl List" here as follows:
> 
> Eastern Screech Owl
> Saw-Whet Owl
> Great Horned Owl
> Barred Owl
> 
> Good Birding,
> 
> 
> Frank Boyle
> Broken Wallet Farm
> Rohrersville, MD
> 
> Sent from my iPhone

Excellent Frank!! I still haven't gotten Barred Owl here, which sort of 
surprises me. But good for you!! 


Rick Sussman
Woodbine,MD

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Subject: Mimic thrush trifecta
From: Frank Boyle <ravenfrank AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 08:02:23 -0400
Catbirds are back in this side of the mountain :). Northern Mockingbirds were 
here all winter. The Brown Thrasher family is starting to defend their nesting 
area (sorry folks, they don't read the "Yellow Book" anymore). 



Frank Boyle
Broken Wallet Farm
Rohrersville, MD

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Bald Eagle at Monocacy Battlefield
From: scott bates <fennecfox1947 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 03:36:27 -0700 (PDT)
Adult bald eagle yesterday afternoon at the battlefield, perching on trees next 
to Bush Creek, 400 meters upstream from the Monocacy River. 


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Subject: Barred Owl - first for here!
From: Frank Boyle <ravenfrank AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 05:20:40 -0400
Hi All,

Just now heard a Barred Owl - this is the first time for our property here 
(Rohrersville). There is a very small wetland remnant just north of our 
property line that is still protected by, of all organizations, the Army Corps 
of Engineers. It was slated for development before the idiot developer put his 
plans in hold during the 2008 financial fiasco. Not sure how long we will have 
it, no doubt it will be filled in with *no* protest as this is Washington 
County and they don' give a damn about the environment. Developers are in the 
good ol' boys' back pocket in Hagerstown. Blanket statement? You bet it is. And 
it is true *sigh*. 


Anyhoo, that makes the "Owl List" here as follows:

Eastern Screech Owl
Saw-Whet Owl
Great Horned Owl
Barred Owl

Good Birding,


Frank Boyle
Broken Wallet Farm
Rohrersville, MD

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Fort Smallwood Park Tuesday, April 26, 2016 750 Raptors
From: susiericc AT comcast.net
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 04:28:38 +0000 (UTC)
Fort Smallwood Park 
Pasadena, Maryland, USA 

Daily Raptor Counts: Apr 26, 2016 
Species 	Day's Count 	Month Total 	Season Total 
Black Vulture 	5 	97 	275 
Turkey Vulture 	210 	1150 	3953 
Osprey 	11 	135 	220 
Bald Eagle 	7 	46 	71 
Northern Harrier 	6 	14 	15 
Sharp-shinned Hawk 	465 	821 	855 
Cooper's Hawk 	16 	77 	103 
Northern Goshawk 	0 	0 	0 
Red-shouldered Hawk 	0 	6 	47 
Broad-winged Hawk 	14 	43 	43 
Red-tailed Hawk 	6 	31 	91 
Rough-legged Hawk 	0 	0 	0 
Golden Eagle 	0 	0 	2 
American Kestrel 	5 	71 	94 
Merlin 	1 	15 	19 
Peregrine Falcon 	1 	2 	2 
Unknown Accipiter 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Buteo 	1 	2 	3 
Unknown Falcon 	0 	2 	2 
Unknown Eagle 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Raptor 	0 	0 	0 
Swallow-tailed Kite 	2 	2 	2 
Total: 	750 	2514 	5797 

Observation start time: 	7:00 am 
Observation end time: 	5:15 pm Daylight Time 
Total observation time: 	10.25 hours 
Official Counter 	Paul Fritz, Sue Ricciardi 
Observers: Chris Reed, Hugh Hoffman, Mary Jane McMillan, Paul Fritz, Ralph 
Geuder, Sue Ricciardi 



Visitors: 
Christine Stevens 

Weather: 
Partly to mostly cloudy; 65-86 degrees; good visibility; winds southwesterly 
all day, starting out on the light side then gaining in intensity over the day 
with the highest sustained wind at 23 mph, gusting to 35 mph 


Raptor Observations: 
An awesome day, especially for Sharp-shinned Hawks which were almost always in 
sight. But the best sighting occurred at 10:25 (Daylight Time) when Paul Fritz 
calmly called out: two Swallow-tailed Kites coming up the path. Indeed, the two 
adult kites with their pointed wings, deeply forked tails and buoyant flight 
came into view, though a bit distant, and headed steadily northeast over the 
water. First time ever for two Swallow-tailed Kites coming together and in 
sight at the same time. 13 raptor species with 3 falcon species 


Non-raptor Observations: 
Black-crowned Night Heron, Green Heron, Solitary Sandpiper (3), over 1400 Blue 
Jays, Savannah Sparrow (5), House Wren, Sora; dragonflies very noticeable 
today. ebird list: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29233266 



Report submitted by Sue Ricciardi ( susiericc AT comcast.net ) 
Fort Smallwood Park information may be found at: 
http://www.mdbirds.org/sites/mdsites/hawks/hawkwatch.html 


Site Description 
Fort Smallwood Park is located on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay at the 
mouth of the Patapsco River, 11 miles south of Baltimore, MD. Best winds are 
from the southwest. 

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Subject: Fwd: DC Area, 4/26/2016
From: Lydia Schindler <lydia13621 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 15:36:20 -0400
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Steve Cordle 
Date: Tue, Apr 26, 2016 at 2:34 PM
Subject: DC Area, 4/26/2016
To: BIRDEAST AT listserv.ksu.edu


Hotline:     Voice of the Naturalist
Date:        4/26/2016
Coverage:    MD/DC/VA/central and southern DE/WV panhandle
Reports, comments and questions: voice AT anshome.org
Compiler:    Helen Patton
Sponsor:     Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central
               Atlantic States (independent of NAS)
Transcriber: Steve Cordle (scordle AT capaccess.org)

Please consider joining ANS, especially if you are a
regular user of the Voice (Individual $50; Family $65;
Nature Steward $100; Audubon Advocate $200). The membership number is
301-652-9188, option 12; the address is 8940 Jones Mill Road, Chevy
Chase, MD 20815; and the web site is http://www.AudubonNaturalist.org.

This is the Voice of the Naturalist, a service of the Audubon
Naturalist Society. This report covers the week starting Tuesday,
April 20 and was completed on April 26 at 2:00 p.m.

Birds of interest this week included waterfowl, WILD TURKEY, loons,
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN, herons and egrets, raptors, rails, GLOSSY
IBIS, SANDHILL CRANE, BLACK-NECKED STILT, plovers, sandpipers, LITTLE
and ICELAND GULLS, GULL-BILLED TERN, RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD, CLIFF
SWALLOW, warblers, sparrows, SUMMER TANAGER, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK
and RED CROSSBILL.

BIRDS OF INTEREST

A longstanding, tagged adult TRUMPETER SWAN continues at Lake
Churchill in Montgomery Co, MD, with the most recent sighting on April
25. A TUNDRA SWAN was at the Patuxent Research Refuge, North Tract,
Anne Arundel Co, MD on April 23.

Noteworthy duck sightings included two REDHEADS at Beauvue Ponds,
Saint Mary's Co, MD on April 23 and one REDHEAD at the Chesapeake Bay
Environmental Center (Horsehead) Queen Anne's Co, MD on April 21 and
23.

WILD TURKEYS continued to be seen during the week including a group at
Anacostia Park, DC on April 22.

A RED-THROATED LOON was at Craney Island Disposal Area, Portsmouth, VA
on April 21. Six COMMON LOONS flew over a yard in Woodbine, Carroll
Co, MD on April 21.

An EARED GREBE was at Point Lookout, Saint Mary's Co, MD on April 23,
24 and 25.

One to two AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS were at Hog Island WMA, Surrey Co,
VA on April 20 and 24. On April 24, five AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS were
observed at Belmont Bay in Fairfax Co, VA. Five WHITE PELICANS were at
the Pamunkey Bridge on Rte. 522 on the Orange/Spotsylvania County
Line, VA on April 25. Six AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS were on Poplar
Island, Talbot Co, MD on April 25.

A LEAST BITTERN, a LITTLE BLUE HERON and two CATTLE EGRETS were at
Swan Harbor Farm Park, Harford Co, MD on April 25. Another LITTLE BLUE
HERON was at Susquehanna SP, Harford Co, MD on April 22.
YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS are attempting a nest in Annandale,
Fairfax Co, VA with one standing on the nest and another nearby, seen
on April 24.

A SWALLOW-TAILED KITE was at Snow Hill, Worcester Co, MD on April 23.
Two SWALLOW-TAILED KITES were noted at Fort Smallwood Park, Anne
Arundel Co, MD on April 25. The RAPTORTHON conducted in Augusta
County, VA on April 23 recorded 106 species which included 6 raptor
species notably 57 NORTHERN HARRIERS and 2 BROAD-WINGED HAWKS. A
NORTHERN GOSHAWK accompanied by a BALD EAGLE and 3 RED-TAILED HAWKS
were at Harford Glen, Harford Co, MD on April 24. Two BROAD-WINGED
HAWKS were soaring over Brookside Gardens, Montgomery Co, MD on April
23.

A YELLOW RAIL was heard at Rumbley Point, Somerset Co, MD on April 20.
A CLAPPER RAIL was on Dent Road, Anne Arundel Co, MD on April 23. A
KING RAIL was at Truitts Landing Worcester Co, MD on April 23 and 24.
A VIRGINIA RAIL was spotted running through a yard in Capitol Hill, DC
on April 20. A SORA was at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax Co, VA on
April 24.

A total of thirty-three GLOSSY IBIS were at the Great Dismal Swamp
NWR, Suffolk, VA on April 20. Three to four GLOSSY IBIS were at Swan
Harbor Farm Park, Harford Co, MD on April 24. A GLOSSY IBIS was at
Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax Co, VA on April 24. A GLOSSY IBIS was at
Kenilworth Gardens on April 25.

Two SANDHILL CRANES were at Augustine WA, New Castle Co, DE on April
21. A SANDHILL CRANE was at Gunpowder Falls SP, Harford Co, MD on
April 22.

Two BLACK-NECKED STILTS were at Truitts Landing, Worcester Co, MD on
April 24.

An AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER was at Craney Island Disposal Area,
Portsmouth VA on April 21. SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS were reported from
many places including: 4 at Assateague Island, Life of the Marsh
Trail, Worcester Co, MD on April 23; three to nine at Blackwater NWR,
Dorchester Co, MD on April 22 and 25; one on Hart-Miller Island,
Baltimore Co, MD on April 25; 10 at Tanyard Marsh, Caroline Co, MD on
April 24; 2 at Back Bay NWR, Virginia Beach, VA on April 23 and two to
seven at Chincoteague NWR, Accomack Co, VA on April 22.

A PECTORAL SANDPIPER was at Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, DC on April
21. A WHIMBREL was at Point Lookout, Saint Mary's Co, MD on April 23.
A MARBLED GODWIT, a RUFF and a LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER were at Bombay
Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE on April 24. Four to twenty-four LONG-BILLED
DOWITCHERS were at Truitts Landing, Worcester Co, MD during the week.

On April 21 a LITTLE GULL was spotted at Back River, Eastern Blvd,
Baltimore Co, MD on April 21. An ICELAND GULL was at Assateague Island
National Seashore, Worcester Co, MD on April 21.

A GULL-BILLED TERN was at Craney Island Disposal Area, Portsmouth, VA
on April 21. Two GULL-BILLED TERNS were at the Lynnhaven Inlet Flats,
Virginia Beach, VA on April 23.

Both CHUCK-WILL'S-WIDOW and WHIP-POOR-WILL were reported from Union
Springs, Rockingham Co, VA on April 22. Three CHUCK-WILL'S-WIDOWS were
at Back Bay NWR, Virginia Beach, VA on April 23.

The return of RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRDS continued during the week
with sightings from many venues.

A YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER was at Patapsco SP, Henryton, Howard Co, MD
on April 21. Another YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER was at Casselman River
SP, Garrett Co, MD on April 22. Five RED-COCKADED WOODPECKERS were at
Piney Grove Preserve, Sussex Co, VA on April 23. Three RED-HEADED
WOODPECKERS were at the Dismal Swamp NWR, Suffolk, VA on April 20. A
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was in Rock Creek Park, DC on April 21. A
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax Co, VA on
April 23.

Four CLIFF SWALLOWS returned to their nests under the Rte. 328 Bridge,
Talbot Co, MD seen on April 20 and 23

Migrant warblers increased in numbers and diversity. Active warbler
spots included Rock Creek Park, DC, Leesylvania SP, Prince William Co,
VA, Emory Knoll Farms and Susquehanna SP, Harford Co, MD, Piney
Orchard NP, Anne Arundel Co, MD and Huntley Meadows, Park, Fairfax Co,
VA all with double digit warbler sightings. Migrants included:
NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, BLUE-WINGED, PROTHONOTARY, NASHVILLE, CAPE MAY,
CERULEAN, CHESTNUT-SIDED, BLACKPOLL, BLACK-THROATED BLUE and
BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS.

A VESPER SPARROW and 4 WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS were in Lorton, Fairfax
Co, VA off Furnace Road on April 24. A LARK SPARROW was at the Marine
Science Consortium, Accomack Co, VA on April 20. Up to 3 HENSLOW'S
SPARROWS and a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW were on Old Legislative Road,
Allegany Co, MD on April 25. A NELSON'S SPARROW and a SEASIDE SPARROW
were on Hart-Miller Island, Baltimore Co, MD on April 25. A SAVANNAH
SPARROW and a WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW were at Lake Fairfax, VA on April
21. A GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was at the Blue Ridge Center for
Environmental Stewardship (BRCES), Loudoun Co, VA on April 25. A
SEASIDE SPARROW was on Smith Island on April 24. A LINCOLN'S SPARROW
was at Tuckahoe SP, Queen Anne's Co, MD on April 23.

An early SUMMER TANAGER was at Flag Ponds Nature Park, Calvert Co, MD
on April 21. Another SUMMER TANAGER was at Violet's Lock, Montgomery
Co, MD on April 23.

ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS were reported from many sites during the week.

On April 22 and 24,  RED CROSSBILLS were reported from Reddish Knob in
Rockingham Co, VA.

***

This week's report was based on reports on the DE, MD, VA,
and WV list servers via the ABA Internet links, and on
eBird records.

The Audubon Sanctuary Shop (301-652-3606,
http://anshome.org/shop)is an excellent source for
guidebooks and many other nature-related titles.

To report bird sightings, e-mail your report to
voice AT anshome.org. Please post reports before midnight
Monday, identify the county as well as the state, and
include your name and a Tuesday morning contact, e-mail or
phone.

Thank you for your interest, and enjoy the birds.

*Of interest to the applicable state records committee

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Subject: Hart-Miller Island, 04/25/16
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 15:10:41 -0400
04/25/16 – 715am-3pm

Hart-Miller Island, Essex, B Co., MD



WEATHER: PC/MC, 53-69 degrees, SSE 5K- SE 9K   OBS: Jeff C, Kevin G, Joe H



Canada Goose – 41

Wood Duck – 5

Gadwall – 20

American Black Duck – 18

Mallard – 33

Blue-winged Teal – 3

Northern Shoveler – 81

*NORTHERN PINTAIL – 1 (drake)

Green-winged Teal – 95

Lesser Scaup – 195

Bufflehead – 3

Red-breasted Merganser – 9

Ruddy Duck – 96

Common Loon – 4

Pied-billed Grebe – 2

Horned Grebe – 1

Double-crested Cormorant – 153

Great Blue Heron – 10

Great Egret – 4

*GLOSSY IBIS – 1

Black Vulture – 1

Turkey Vulture – 1

Osprey – 16 (7 nests occupied)

Northern Harrier – 1

Bald Eagle – 2 (adults)

American Coot – 114

*BLACK-NECKED STILT – 4

Black-bellied Plover – 50

*SEMIPALMATED PLOVER– 2

Killdeer – 3

Greater Yellowlegs – 129

Lesser Yellowlegs – 10

Dunlin – 27

Least Sandpiper – 44

Pectoral Sandpiper – 2

Wilson’s Snipe – 1

*BONAPARTE'S GULL – 9

Laughing Gull – 2

Ring-billed Gull – 25

Herring Gull – 129

Great Black-backed Gull – 51

*CASPIAN TERN – 333

Common Tern – 1

Forster’s Tern – 2

Mourning Dove – 5

Chimney Swift – 2

Ruby-throated Hummingbird – 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker – 2

Eastern Kingbird – 3

Blue Jay – 13

American Crow – 1

Fish Crow – 1

Crow Sp – 5

N Rough-winged Swallow – 2

Purple Martin – 4

Tree Swallow – 9

Barn Swallow – 4

Carolina Chickadee – 1

Carolina Wren – 4

House Wren – 1

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 3

Ruby-crowned Kinglet – 1

Wood Thrush – 1

American Robin – 2

Gray Catbird – 1

European Starling – 18

Black-and-white Warbler – 1

Common Yellowthroat – 18

Yellow-rumped Warbler – 18

Chipping Sparrow – 4

Field Sparrow – 2

*NELSON'S SPARROW – 1 (probably Atlantic sp)

*SEASIDE SPARROW – 1

Savannah Sparrow – 10

Song Sparrow – 6

Swamp  Sparrow – 6

White-throated Sparrow – 11

Northern Cardinal – 9

Blue Grosbeak – 1

Red-winged Blackbird – 98

Common Grackle – 7

Brown-headed Cowbird – 8

Orchard Oriole – 1

American Goldfinch – 16

SPECIES: 83   INDIVIDUALS: 2036



REPTILES: E Painted Turtle – 1



BUTTERFLIES

Black Swallowtail – 4

Cabbage White – 6

Orange Sulphur – 5

Clouded Sulphur – 1

Spring Azure – 1

Pearl Crescent – 3

Variegated Fritillary - 1

Juvenal’s Duskywing – 1



MOTHS: Eastern Tent Caterpillar – 250+



    Kevin Graff

    Jarrettsville, MD

    KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Crownsville
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 10:59:03 -0700 (PDT)
Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Anne Arundel, Maryland, US
Apr 26, 2016 12:00 PM - 12:45 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
8 species

Canada Goose  2
Osprey  1     Flyover
American Crow  5
Carolina Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  1
Chipping Sparrow  7
House Finch  4     Nesting: both adults seen, more than one young heard
House Sparrow  1

There is a great deal of construction going on right now: not as many species 
or individuals as I usually find at this location. 


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Subject: Piney Orchard Nature Preserve - Mallard and Canada Goose with young
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 10:54:27 -0700 (PDT)
Piney Orchard Nature Preserve, Anne Arundel, Maryland, US
Apr 26, 2016 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.5 mile(s)
18 species

Canada Goose  21
Mallard  5
Black Vulture  3
Mourning Dove  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Fish Crow  2
Tree Swallow  23
Carolina Chickadee  2
Carolina Wren  1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  4
Eastern Bluebird  2
American Robin  3
Northern Mockingbird  1
White-throated Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  8
Red-winged Blackbird  6
Common Grackle  3

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Subject: Raptor Festival at Meadowside Nature Center this weekend!
From: Montgomery Parks <montgomeryparksmd AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 10:22:18 -0700 (PDT)
You see them in the sky! You see them in the trees! Now see Maryland’s 
premier birds of prey up close at Meadowside Nature Center’s Raptor Festival. 


Stop by May 1st, anytime from 12pm-4pm and see these magnificent creatures 
up-close. 

 
This free family event is will feature live music, face painting, more games, 
crafts...and of course our resident raptors! 


I hope you can join us!  

http://www.montgomeryparks.org/nature_centers/meadow/index.shtm

Meadowside Nature Center
5100 Meadowside Lane, 
Rockville, MD 20855

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Subject: Cerulean #1--and TWO (maybe 3)--in Patapsco Valley
From: Tim Houghton <timhoughton AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 16:23:33 +0000 (UTC)
Lots of activity/singing around the Henryton area this morning. Found CERW #1 
around 6:45 a little upstream from the parking area. It was doing a monotone 
repetition of 4 or so buzzy notes which sounded probable, but I saw it soon 
when it popped over from the Carroll side to find a very high perch on a high 
tree above me. Could make out the necklace. Perfect example of the song not 
being enough the first time. I actually got it to come lower by pishing, where 
I could see it well. On my way back at 8:10 I found it again--again on Carroll 
side--both seen and heard. This 2nd time it actually sang a couple of really 
good songs. Other nice birds: yellow warblers, redstarts, scarlet tanagers, 
etc. 


After Pat-Henryton I parked at Pat-Marriottsville and walked the trail to the 
train tunnel (found worm-eating warbler and warbling vireo). Enjoyable activity 
here as well. I crossed the tracks in front of the tunnel into Henryton Center 
hotspot territory (Ca.Co) at 9:30, and that's when I heard the 2nd CERW, at the 
top of the hill to the right of the tunnel--singing nicely. On my way back at 
10:30, I heard good CERW singing again, but this time low near the path and the 
river--and I got a good look. I suspect this was the same bird as at 9:30, but 
last year 2 CERW coexisted at this same location, so I can't be sure. On ebird, 
I listed as one CERW for Henryton Center. The 2 places I heard found the 
bird(s) mimic last year. 


Now let's find more CERWs in the Patapsco Valley! 

Tim Houghton 
(Glen Arm) 

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Subject: Re: Phenomenal Neighborhood Birding
From: Kojo Baidoo <baidookojo6 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 07:50:56 -0700 (PDT)
On Tuesday, April 26, 2016 at 10:49:20 AM UTC-4, Kojo Baidoo wrote:
> On Tuesday, April 26, 2016 at 10:43:02 AM UTC-4, Kojo Baidoo wrote:
> > Yes, it's me again. This morning was absolutely phenomenal, with twelve 
warbler species making an appearance in my neighborhood and forest, along with 
other Neotropical migrants such as three vireos and a few Orchard Orioles. I 
was especially surprised by the presence of two Broad-winged Hawks roosting in 
the forest; it appears that they stopped there to rest overnight. I eventually 
saw both birds lifting off and streaming north. One other glided over 
afterward, and an Osprey as well. 

> > 
> > Warbler species: Yellow-rumped Warbler (around 40), Ovenbird (10), Common 
Yellowthroat (5), American Redstart (2), Nashville Warbler (2), Black-and-white 
Warbler (2), Yellow Warbler (2),Blue-winged Warbler (2) Northern Waterthrush, 
Louisiana Waterthrush, Palm Warbler, and Black-throated Blue Warbler. The 
vireos were White-eyed, Red-eyed, and Yellow-throated (surprisingly no 
Blue-headed); FOS kingbird was also a nice addition. 

> > 
> > My area did have a rain shower overnight, so I wouldn't be surprised if 
that caused many of the birds I saw to stop here. However, I did encounter many 
species in the same areas I had them breeding last year, so they could have 
been here already. 

> > 
> > This was a record number of warblers for me in April in any area I have 
ever been to. What I noted was the peculiar absence of the parula... maybe next 
time. 

> > 
> > Kojo Baidoo
> > Baltimore County
> 
> Actually missed a few things; FOS Wood Thrush, many House Wrens, three 
Ruby-crowned Kinglets, FOS martins, and FOS hummer. 


Aand tanager. Noted absence of juncos... they will be missed :(

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Subject: Re: Phenomenal Neighborhood Birding
From: Kojo Baidoo <baidookojo6 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 07:49:20 -0700 (PDT)
On Tuesday, April 26, 2016 at 10:43:02 AM UTC-4, Kojo Baidoo wrote:
> Yes, it's me again. This morning was absolutely phenomenal, with twelve 
warbler species making an appearance in my neighborhood and forest, along with 
other Neotropical migrants such as three vireos and a few Orchard Orioles. I 
was especially surprised by the presence of two Broad-winged Hawks roosting in 
the forest; it appears that they stopped there to rest overnight. I eventually 
saw both birds lifting off and streaming north. One other glided over 
afterward, and an Osprey as well. 

> 
> Warbler species: Yellow-rumped Warbler (around 40), Ovenbird (10), Common 
Yellowthroat (5), American Redstart (2), Nashville Warbler (2), Black-and-white 
Warbler (2), Yellow Warbler (2),Blue-winged Warbler (2) Northern Waterthrush, 
Louisiana Waterthrush, Palm Warbler, and Black-throated Blue Warbler. The 
vireos were White-eyed, Red-eyed, and Yellow-throated (surprisingly no 
Blue-headed); FOS kingbird was also a nice addition. 

> 
> My area did have a rain shower overnight, so I wouldn't be surprised if that 
caused many of the birds I saw to stop here. However, I did encounter many 
species in the same areas I had them breeding last year, so they could have 
been here already. 

> 
> This was a record number of warblers for me in April in any area I have ever 
been to. What I noted was the peculiar absence of the parula... maybe next 
time. 

> 
> Kojo Baidoo
> Baltimore County

Actually missed a few things; FOS Wood Thrush, many House Wrens, three 
Ruby-crowned Kinglets, FOS martins, and FOS hummer. 


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Subject: Phenomenal Neighborhood Birding
From: Kojo Baidoo <baidookojo6 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 07:43:02 -0700 (PDT)
Yes, it's me again. This morning was absolutely phenomenal, with twelve warbler 
species making an appearance in my neighborhood and forest, along with other 
Neotropical migrants such as three vireos and a few Orchard Orioles. I was 
especially surprised by the presence of two Broad-winged Hawks roosting in the 
forest; it appears that they stopped there to rest overnight. I eventually saw 
both birds lifting off and streaming north. One other glided over afterward, 
and an Osprey as well. 


Warbler species: Yellow-rumped Warbler (around 40), Ovenbird (10), Common 
Yellowthroat (5), American Redstart (2), Nashville Warbler (2), Black-and-white 
Warbler (2), Yellow Warbler (2),Blue-winged Warbler (2) Northern Waterthrush, 
Louisiana Waterthrush, Palm Warbler, and Black-throated Blue Warbler. The 
vireos were White-eyed, Red-eyed, and Yellow-throated (surprisingly no 
Blue-headed); FOS kingbird was also a nice addition. 


My area did have a rain shower overnight, so I wouldn't be surprised if that 
caused many of the birds I saw to stop here. However, I did encounter many 
species in the same areas I had them breeding last year, so they could have 
been here already. 


This was a record number of warblers for me in April in any area I have ever 
been to. What I noted was the peculiar absence of the parula... maybe next 
time. 


Kojo Baidoo
Baltimore County

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Subject: 2 Swallow-tailed Kites. Fort Smallwood Park
From: susiericc <susiericc AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 10:31:52 -0400
    
10:25 am Headed toward North Point 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

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