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Updated on Tuesday, May 24 at 03:57 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Northern Wheatear,©David Sibley

24 May Fort Bunker Hill - 8 Warblers and more! ["'Jason DC' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
24 May Rock Creek Park, Tuesday 5/24/16 [Wallace Kornack ]
24 May Masonville 5/24/2016 [Tim Carney ]
24 May 97th Dorchester County May Bird Count, May 7, 2016. [Harry Armistead ]
24 May Re: On NPR: "We Followed a Snowy Owl from Maryland to Toronto" [Lydia Schindler ]
24 May Ceruleans at Patapsco. [Tim Houghton ]
24 May Re: On NPR: "We Followed a Snowy Owl from Maryland to Toronto" [Joan Cwi ]
24 May Re: On NPR: "We Followed a Snowy Owl from Maryland to Toronto" [Marcia Watson ]
24 May Blue Mash Nature Trail -- May 24, 2016 [john pangborn ]
24 May 98th Dorchester County May Bird Count, May 14, 2016. [Harry Armistead ]
24 May Hurlock, Hooper's I., Blackwater, May 21-23, 2016. [Harry Armistead ]
24 May Short-billed Dowitcher at Swan Creek [Fred Shaffer ]
24 May On NPR: "We Followed a Snowy Owl from Maryland to Toronto" [Janet Millenson ]
24 May Wheaton Regional Park today ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
23 May I Blue winged and golden winged warblers in Allegheny or Frederick counties [Marilyn Taylor ]
23 May little bennett-kentucky warbler []
23 May Bullbat Bonanza Mont. Co., Spotted Sandpiper/ Peeps question [Don Simonson ]
24 May A win for bird conservation in the MD Coastal Bays IBA []
23 May Re: Fw: At the Library of Congress: "Feeding Wild Birds in America: A Surprising History" [Samuel Miller ]
23 May Fw: At the Library of Congress: "Feeding Wild Birds in America: A Surprising History" ["'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
23 May RE: Annual MOS Birding Report ["David Fleischmann" ]
23 May Annual MOS Birding Report [Russ Ruffing ]
23 May Re: Re: June 3-4 Deepwater Pelagic [Frank Marenghi ]
23 May Re: Rock Creek Park, Monday 5/23/16 [Wallace Kornack ]
23 May RE: Re: June 3-4 Deepwater Pelagic ["jcdlmartin via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
23 May Re: Grey, damp Sunday morning: perfect time to bird a couple of ponds.... [Mark Rositol ]
23 May Olive-sided Flycatcher Millington [Jared Parks ]
23 May Dickcissel and Black-billed Cuckoo [Hugh David Fleischmann ]
23 May Rock Creek Park, Monday 5/23/16 [Wallace Kornack ]
23 May M [Hugh David Fleischmann ]
23 May Re: June 3-4 Deepwater Pelagic [Edward Boyd ]
22 May Re: Rock Creek Park, Sunday 5/22/16 []
22 May Grey, damp Sunday morning: perfect time to bird a couple of ponds.... [Karen Caruso ]
22 May shorebirds in Charles Co. question [Duvall Sollers ]
22 May Rock Creek Park, Sunday 5/22/16 [Wallace Kornack ]
22 May Re: Bkackpoll Warbler and Barn Owl and other sightings in Rohrersville [Warblerick ]
22 May SOSH OC Inlet [Kurt Schwarz ]
22 May OC Inlet [Kurt Schwarz ]
22 May Bkackpoll Warbler and Barn Owl and other sightings in Rohrersville [Frank Boyle ]
22 May Fort Smallwood Park Friday, May 20, 2016 39 Raptors []
21 May Saturday (5/21) birding in the rain [Jim Green ]
21 May Thank you Matt [Kurt Schwarz ]
21 May Sooty Shearwaters in Worcester County [Matt Hafner ]
21 May Canadian Rockies bird watching suggestions? [Debbie Taylor ]
21 May Monocacy National Battlefield, Frederick Co., May 20 [Scott Baron ]
21 May Swan Harbor Farm today [Patricia Valdata ]
21 May Disappearing Hummingbirds...it's the Tulip tree's "fault" [JAMES SPEICHER ]
21 May Re: Disappearing Hummingbirds [JimC ]
21 May Disappearing Hummingbirds [Warblerick ]
21 May Disappearing Hummingbirds [Frank Boyle ]
20 May Olive-sided Flycatcher at Black Marsh [Tim Carney ]
20 May Greater Rockville Area Bird Challenge -- thhis Sunday, May 22 [Matt Von Hendy ]
20 May Parulas attacking window ["thbeal via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
20 May Re: Late WTSP [Janet Millenson ]
20 May Druid Hill Park, Baltimore City--Jones Falls Trail and disc golf area [Steven Mickletz ]
20 May Rock Creek Park, Friday 5/20/16 [Wallace Kornack ]
20 May Centennial's Great Today! [Sean McGuinn ]
20 May Swan Creek 5/19/2016 [Tim Carney ]
20 May Anne Arundel Trumpeter Swans ["'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
20 May Re: Late WTSP [Warblerick ]
20 May Late WTSP [marian rutigliano ]
20 May Late WTSP [Warblerick ]
19 May Nighthawks at Cromwell Valley Park, Baltimore County [James Meyers ]
19 May Re: Maryland BirdTrax for Rarities [Marcy Stutzman ]
19 May Re: Kent & Caroline Counties - May 18th [Jerald Reb ]
19 May [FR] Best Bike Ride Bird today... [JAMES SPEICHER ]
19 May Re: Maryland BirdTrax for Rarities [Jared Fisher ]
19 May Maryland BirdTrax for Rarities []
19 May Rock Creek Park, Thursday 5/19/16 [Wallace Kornack ]
19 May : Ruffed Grouse Finzel [Kurt Schwarz ]
19 May Thank you [Kurt Schwarz ]
19 May Hart-Miller Island, 05/18/16 [Kevin Graff ]
19 May Elliott Island Riad, May 14, 2016. [Harry Armistead ]
19 May Elliott Island Road, May 7, 2016. [Harry Armistead ]
18 May Kent & Caroline Counties - May 18th [Jim Green ]
18 May June 3-4 Deepwater Pelagic [Dan Small ]

Subject: Fort Bunker Hill - 8 Warblers and more!
From: "'Jason DC' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 13:51:56 -0700 (PDT)
Hi All,

I had a chance to get out to so some mid afternoon birding at Fort Bunker Hill 
in NE DC (check out it's Hotspot marker in eBird for location). 


In any case, not much singing except Redstarts and some thrushes. Best bird 
Lincoln Sparrow and sining male Chestnut-sided Warbler. 


Here's the whole list:

Fort Bunker Hill Park, District of Columbia, District of Columbia, US
May 24, 2016 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
Comments:    Windy, but calm on east side of park where most of the birds were.
27 species

Red-tailed Hawk  1 soaring
Chimney Swift  3
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1 (female)
Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
Downy Woodpecker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
House Wren  1
Carolina Wren  3
Veery  1
Swainson's Thrush  1
Wood Thrush  2
American Robin  6
Gray Catbird  8
Ovenbird  1
Common Yellowthroat  1 (female)
American Redstart  7 (male & female)
Magnolia Warbler  2 (male & female)
Bay-breasted Warbler  1 (female)
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1    singing male
Blackpoll Warbler  1
Canada Warbler  2 (male & female)
Lincoln's Sparrow  1 Very skitish in more open areas of park.   
Eastern Towhee  4
Scarlet Tanager  1 (female)
Northern Cardinal  3
Common Grackle  5
Brown-headed Cowbird  1


Good Birding!

Jason Berry
Washington, DC

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Tuesday 5/24/16
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 15:38:58 -0400
This morning (5/24) at Rock Creek Park…..

Fellow birders saw or heard the following 10 warbler species: Ovenbird, 
Blackpoll, Redstart, Tennessee, Nashville, Yellowthroat, Magnolia, 
Bay-breasted, Blackburnian, Black-throated Green 


——Equitation Field
American Redstart  
Blackpoll Warbler  
Mourning Dove     6
Chimney Swift  
Red-bellied Woodpecker     2
Downy Woodpecker     3
Northern Flicker     2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Great Crested Flycatcher  
Red-eyed Vireo     6
Blue Jay        3
Carolina Chickadee     3
Tufted Titmouse     2
Carolina Wren  
Wood Thrush  
American Robin     3
European Starling     2
Eastern Towhee     2
Brown-headed Cowbird  
American Goldfinch     2

——Ridge
Ovenbird     2
Blackpoll Warbler  
Mourning Dove     3
Chimney Swift  
Red-bellied Woodpecker     4
Eastern Wood-Pewee     2
Red-eyed Vireo     2
Blue Jay     2
American Crow  
Carolina Chickadee     4
Tufted Titmouse     3
White-breasted Nuthatch     3
Carolina Wren     3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher     3
Swainson's Thrush  
Wood Thrush     2
American Robin     8
European Starling  
Eastern Towhee  
Northern Cardinal      4
Brown-headed Cowbird      2
American Goldfinch     2

——Yard Parking Lot
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Great Crested Flycatcher  
White-breasted Nuthatch  
Carolina Wren  
American Goldfinch  
House Sparrow  

——Fence Line
Chimney Swift  
Red-bellied Woodpecker     2
Northern Flicker     2
Red-eyed Vireo  
White-breasted Nuthatch  
House Wren     2
Carolina Wren     2
American Robin     2
Gray Catbird  
Scarlet Tanager  
Northern Cardinal  
House Sparrow    2

——Maintenance Yard
Tennessee Warbler  
Nashville Warbler  
Common Yellowthroat  
American Redstart  
Magnolia Warbler     2
Bay-breasted Warbler  
Blackburnian Warbler  
Black-throated Green Warbler  
hawk sp.  
Mourning Dove  
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  
Red-bellied Woodpecker     2
Downy Woodpecker  
Northern Flicker  
Pileated Woodpecker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee        2
Great Crested Flycatcher  
Red-eyed Vireo  
Tufted Titmouse     2
Carolina Wren 
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher         
American Robin  
Scarlet Tanager  
Northern Cardinal     3
Brown-headed Cowbird  
American Goldfinch       

Contributors: Bill Butler, Jim Lemert, Ed Lyon, Leon Kass, Starr Kopper, Susan 
Volman, David Lauder, Mike 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC







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Subject: Masonville 5/24/2016
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 10:54:49 -0700 (PDT)
Results from today's census at Masonville can be found below. Highlights 
included a late Least Flycatcher; transient warblers, flycatchers, and 
tanagers; a Bank Swallow mixed in with the more expected species; and a 
low-flying American Kestrel which is probably breeding nearby. Something 
spooked the Common Terns on the offshore barge and I counted at least 60 birds 
in flight, but the actual total might be closer to 80 or even 100. 


Tim Carney
Nottingham, MD

Masonville Cove, Baltimore, Maryland, US
May 24, 2016 7:15 AM - 11:15 AM
Protocol: Area
141.0 ac
Comments:     Mostly cloudy, 58-74°F, 6-13 mph WNW
55 species

Canada Goose  72
Mallard  50
Lesser Scaup  1
Ruddy Duck  14
Double-crested Cormorant  58
Great Blue Heron  6
Great Egret  2
Black Vulture  4
Turkey Vulture  5
Osprey  7
Killdeer  11     3 chicks
Spotted Sandpiper  9
Least Sandpiper  8
Semipalmated Sandpiper  2
Ring-billed Gull  85
Great Black-backed Gull  6
Least Tern  1
Common Tern  60
Mourning Dove  4
American Kestrel  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
Least Flycatcher  1
Eastern Kingbird  9
Warbling Vireo  6
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  10
Tree Swallow  12
Bank Swallow  1
Barn Swallow  15
Carolina Wren  5
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  7
American Robin  15
Gray Catbird  5
Northern Mockingbird  10
European Starling  110
Cedar Waxwing  135
Northern Waterthrush  2
Common Yellowthroat  4
American Redstart  4
Yellow Warbler  8
Blackpoll Warbler  3
Canada Warbler  1
White-throated Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  5
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  14
Blue Grosbeak  4
Indigo Bunting  3
Red-winged Blackbird  23
Common Grackle (Purple)  14
Orchard Oriole  9
Baltimore Oriole  4
House Finch  3
American Goldfinch  5

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29880775 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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Subject: 97th Dorchester County May Bird Count, May 7, 2016.
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 17:44:08 +0000
97th DORCHESTER COUNTY MAY BIRD COUNT, May 7, 2016. 5 observers in 5 areas. 155 
species (135 on this weekend in 2015). 



ABBREVIATIONS: BNWR, Blackwater N.W.R. EIR, Elliott Island Road. KNR, Kraft 
Neck Road. 



SYMBOLISM: spotted sandpiper 30 (5, 1-12) means a grand total of 30 seen by 
(all) 5 parties whose totals ranged from 1 to 12. king rail 3 & if nothing else 
typed there one can sum they were seen by just 1 party. least sandpiper 131 (3, 
17-75) so if one totals the 17 and 75 (= 92) this subtracted from the grand 
total of 131 will reveal the 3rd party’s total, which is 39. Underscored 
and/or boldfaced species and numbers indicate either a rarity or notable high 
count. 



WATERFOWL: Canada goose 245 (5, 7-116), tundra swan 1, wood duck 15 (2, 2-13), 
American black duck 26 (3, 2-16), mallard 230 (5, 8-102), blue-winged teal 2 
(EIR), northern shoveler 1, canvasback 3 (2 hens, 1 drake; EIR), ring-necked 
duck 2 (HWwTP), lesser scaup 1, bufflehead 2, red-breasted merganser 1, ruddy 
duck 212 (3, 1-155), 



the PRIMITIVES: northern bobwhite 3 (2, 1-2), wild turkey 10 (4, 1-6), common 
loon 13 (3, 2-7), PIED-BILLED GREBE 8 (new high count; GR)), NORTHERN GANNET 4 
(1st count record; GR), double-crested cormorant 43 (5, 1-18), American white 
pelican 1 (BNWR), brown pelican 12 (3, 2-7), least bittern 3 (2, 1-2), great 
blue heron 65 (5, 3-30), great egret 28 (4, 1-22), snowy egret 40 (3, 1-23), 
green heron 4 (3, 1-2), black-crowned night heron 1 (EIR), glossy ibis 17 (2, 
1-16), 



RAPTORS: black vulture 17 (5, 1-6), turkey vulture 177 (5, 11-79), osprey 84 
(5, 6-33), BALD EAGLE 94 (5, 1-47), northern harrier 5 (2, 1-4), sharp-shinned 
hawk 1, Cooper’s hawk 1, red-shouldered hawk 1 (KNR), red-tailed hawk 6 (3, 
1-3), American kestrel 1, 



RALLIDS: clapper rail 9 (2, 2-7), king rail 3, Virginia rail 24 (2, 8-16), 
common gallinule 6 (EIR), 



SHOREBIRDS: black-necked stilt 5 (EIR), semipalmated plover 1 (low), killdeer 
16 (5, 1-5), spotted sandpiper 30 (5, 1-12; a lot for here), solitary sandpiper 
20 (3, 1-18), greater yellowlegs 246 (4, 1-195), willet 19 (2, 3-16), lesser 
yellowlegs 144 (3, 4-75), dunlin 116 (2, 1-115; low), least sandpiper 131 (3, 
17-75), pectoral sandpiper 2, semipalmated sandpiper 8 (3, 2-4), Wilson’s 
snipe 1, 



LARIDS: laughing gull 1,269 (5, 1-689), ring-billed gull 91 (3, 1-50), herring 
gull 23 (3, 4-12), great black-backed gull 1, least tern 13 (4, 2-5), Caspian 
tern 1 (Lewis Wharf Road), common tern 2, Forster’s tern 23 (3, 3-17; low), 
royal tern 11 (3, 2-7), 



TRANSITIONAL LANDBIRDS: rock pigeon 8 (4, 1-3), mourning dove 51 (5, 4-22), 
yellow-billed cuckoo 3 (2, 1-2), eastern screech-owl 6 (2, 2-4), 
chuck-will’s-widow 2 (very low), chimney swift 25 (4, 2-15), ruby-throated 
hummingbird 2 (2, 1-1), red-headed woodpecker 6 (2, 2-4), red-bellied 
woodpecker 18 (5, 1-6), downy woodpecker 12 (5, 1-3), hairy woodpecker 3 (2, 
1-2), northern flicker 8 (4, 1-4), pileated woodpecker 2 (2, 1-1), 



eastern wood-pewee 1, willow flycatcher 1, eastern phoebe 1, great crested 
flycatcher 69 (5, 7-20), eastern kingbird 27 (5, 1-9), white-eyed vireo 23 (5, 
1-7), blue-headed vireo 1, red-eyed vireo 34 (5, 3-10), blue jay 18 (5, 3-5), 
American crown 164 (5, 12-91), fish crow 21 (5, 1-12), horned lark 1, 



SWALLOWS: purple martin 51 (5, 4-18), tree swallow 628 (5, 5-352), northern 
rough-winged swallow 10, bank swallow 5 (2, 2-3), cliff swallow 4, 



LI’L SPRITES: Carolina chickadee 51 (5, 6-15), tufted titmouse 73 (5, 8-17), 
brown-headed nuthatch 27 (4, 2-9), house wren 28 (4, 1-16), marsh wren 29 (2, 
5-24), Carolina wren 61 (5, 6-21), blue-gray gnatcatcher 17 (4, 1-8), 
ruby-crowned kinglet 1, 



THRUSH TYPES + 2 oddballs: eastern bluebird 29 (4, 2-15), veery 1, wood thrush 
9 (5, 1-3), American robin 85 (5, 11-26), gray catbird 44 (5, 3-14), brown 
thrasher 7 (3, 1-5), northern mockingbird 57 (5, 6-16), European starling 153 
(5, 9-50), cedar waxwing 12 (3, 1-6), 



WARBLERS: ovenbird 39 (4, 2-21), worm-eating warbler 4 (2, 2-2), Louisiana 
waterthrush 1, northern waterthrush 1, blue-winged warbler 1, black-and-white 
warbler 6 (2, 2-4), prothonotary warbler 2 (2, 1-1), common yellowthroat 123 
(5, 4-63), hooded warbler 1, American redstart 4 (3, 1-2), northern parula 5 
(4, 1-2), yellow warbler 10 (4, 1-5), chestnut-sided warbler 1, pine warbler 51 
(5, 4-27), yellow-rumped (myrtle) warbler 22 (4, 2-12), prairie warbler 14 (3, 
1-11), black-throated green warbler 1, yellow-breasted chat 2, (2, 1-1), 



SPARROWS: eastern towhee 20 (5, 1-6), chipping sparrow 117 (5, 9-40), field 
sparrow 6 (3, 1-3), Savannah sparrow 3 (2, 1-2), grasshopper sparrow 3 (2, 
1-2), saltmarsh sparrow 1 (EIR), seaside sparrow 54 (2, 9-45), song sparrow 6 
(2, 3-3), swamp sparrow 10 (2, 1-9), white-throated sparrow 7 (2, 3-4), 



the PRETTY ONES: summer tanager 13 (4, 2-6), scarlet tanager 2, northern 
cardinal 132 (5, 15-37), blue grosbeak 22 (5, 1-11), indigo bunting 21 (4, 
1-10), 



BLACKBIRDS: bobolink 2, red-winged blackbird 798 (5, 67-355), eastern 
meadowlark 10 (3, 1-6), common grackle 457 (5, 35-145), boat-tailed grackle 29 
(3, 1-23), brown-headed cowbird 79 (5, 1-36), orchard oriole 24 (5, 1-10), 
Baltimore oriole 1 



END GAMERS: house finch 2, American goldfinch 51 (4, 7-16), house sparrow 18 
(4, 2-10). 



COVERAGE: Taylor’s Island, Suzette Stitely. County north of Route 50, Rick 
Palmer. greater Elliott Island Road area, Harry Armistead. greater Blackwater 
National Wildlife Refuge area, Dave Palmer. Neck District, George Radcliffe. 
Hooper's I. was not covered. 



EFFORT: 5 observers, in 5 areas. 4:45 A.M. - 9:15 P.M. hours by car 23, by foot 
39. miles by car 381, by foot 13. hours at night 7, miles at night 28. 



FAMILY GROUP REPRESENTATION: waterfowl 13 (good), heron types 7 (so so), 
raptors 10 (good), rallids 4 (so so), shorebirds 13 (O.K.), terns 5 (good), 
woodpeckers 6 (all there are), flycatchers 5 (O.K.), swallows 6 (all there 
are), warblers 18 (good), sparrows 10 (good). 



15 SPECIES: the most highly counted: laughing gull 1,269, red-winged blackbird 
798, tree swallow 628, common grackle 457, barn swallow 279, greater yellowlegs 
246, Canada goose 245, mallard 230, ruddy duck 212, turkey vulture 177, 
American crow 164, European starling 153, lesser yellowlegs 144, northern 
cardinal 132, and least sandpiper 131. 



WATER LEVELS both tidal and fresh as high as I’ve ever seen them. Yellowlegs 
seem to be at home both in the submerged salt marsh and flooded fields. Out in 
the marsh by the yellow house on the east side of Island Creek there are 
exactly 40 carp, all 1’ - 1.5’, in 10 inches of tidal water on the 
pavement. I ran one over. On Griffith Neck Road, c. 1/3 of a mile from the 
nearest open water, similarly-sized carp are swimming in a ditch, threading 
their way between cattails and Phragmites. Official low tide, such as it is, is 
at 9:26 A.M. As a result of the extremely high tides 7 shorebird species are 
seen on the road paving today: Greater & Lesser yellowlegs, Solitary Sandpiper, 
Spotted Sandpiper, Willet, Least Sandpiper, and Semipalmated Plover. 



WEATHER: 49 - 60 degrees F. Occasional light rain at the start. Calm becoming 
SW 15-20, then NW 15, then at dusk SE 5+. Fair becoming clear. The sky with a 
marvelous clarity, cleansed by the rains. 



some OTHER DETAILS are in the summary of my own day on May 7, posted earlier, 
including non-avian taxa I saw (or heard). 



Best to all. - Harry Armistead, Philadelphia. 		 	   		  

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Subject: Re: On NPR: "We Followed a Snowy Owl from Maryland to Toronto"
From: Lydia Schindler <lydia13621 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 13:29:42 -0400
Great backstory! Our thanks to the BBC.

Lydia Schindler
Darnestown, MD

On Tue, May 24, 2016 at 12:47 PM, Joan Cwi  wrote:

> I just have to toot our horn a little here—the Baltimore Bird Club
> purchased the transmitter ($3,000) that was placed on Baltimore’s
> back—hence his name. I agree with Marsha, this is a great video to watch.
> There is also some more information about Baltimore’s journeys on Project
> Snowstorm’s website.  Go this url and check out Baltimore: The Rest of the
> Story.
> http://www.projectsnowstorm.org/blog-posts/page/2/
>
> Joan Cwi
> Baltimore, MD
> jafjsc AT verizon.net
>
> On May 24, 2016, at 12:39 PM, Marcia Watson 
> wrote:
>
> I just watched the video and want to share some details, to encourage
> people to watch it.  It tells the story of our own owl "Baltimore," who
> showed up at Martin State Airport, and was captured by and fitted with a
> GPS transmitter as part of Dave Brinker's Project Snowstorm.  Baltimore was
> eventually released at Assateague, and this video is about Adam Cole's
> quest to follow Baltimore's tracks north to the Arctic and if possible, to
> sight the bird there.
>
> Adam's bio on the NPR website says "Adam Cole is a reporter and producer
> for the Science Desk, where he creates short documentary videos, radio
> pieces, animations, musical podcast segments, data visualizations, and GIFs
> about science."  This video is excellent, well worth watching.
>
> Janet, thanks so much for bringing it to our attention.
>
> Marcia
> ------------
> Marcia Watson
> Bowie, Maryland
> marshwren50 AT comcast.net
>
>
> On May 24, 2016, at 11:27 AM, Janet Millenson  wrote:
>
> Featuring our very own Dave Brinker and Project Snowstorm:
>
>
> 
http://www.npr.org/2016/05/24/479223874/we-followed-a-snowy-owl-from-maryland-to-ontario 

>
>
> Janet Millenson
> Potomac, MD (Montgomery County)
> janet AT twocrows.com
> ----------------------------------------------------------------
> "Look at the birds!" -- Pascal the parrot
>
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>
>
> --
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>
>
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Subject: Ceruleans at Patapsco.
From: Tim Houghton <timhoughton AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 17:02:39 +0000 (UTC)
The 2 CERULEANS-- the Lords of the Train --are singing on the hill in the 
territory of the train tunnel, at the Carrol Co. hotspot Henryton Center. 


I only found ONE CERULEAN at the Henryton spot on the other/HoCo side of the 
river. This one could be the "4th" I found earlier in the season. It was even 
audible from the parking lot, just a little downstream near the river singing 
(and seen). 


I searched thoroughly for the other one that had been seen upstream for a 
period of time and I couldn't find it. My gut tells me it's not there. It could 
be elsewhere, or, perhaps , it is the bird I did find today. Nice if some 
people could check on it?! 


Before today, the last Cerulean reported in this area was over 2 weeks ago. I 
don't think people have been going here lately. 


I went pretty far upstream, well past the spots where CERW has been this spring 
and in the past, but maybe I didn't go far enough. 


I have found no CERW at McKeldin and no CERW south of there to Old Court. The 
CERW found at Woodstock/downstream was only found once. 


Probably fair to say there are THREE BREEDING CERULEANS IN THE PATAPSCO VALLEY 
this spring, 2016. Of course, keep your eyes and ears open. Could be another 
one somewhere. 


Tim Houghton 
(Glen Arm) 

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Subject: Re: On NPR: "We Followed a Snowy Owl from Maryland to Toronto"
From: Joan Cwi <jafjsc AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 12:47:56 -0400
I just have to toot our horn a little here—the Baltimore Bird Club purchased 
the transmitter ($3,000) that was placed on Baltimore’s back—hence his 
name. I agree with Marsha, this is a great video to watch. There is also some 
more information about Baltimore’s journeys on Project Snowstorm’s website. 
Go this url and check out Baltimore: The Rest of the Story. 

http://www.projectsnowstorm.org/blog-posts/page/2/ 
 


Joan Cwi
Baltimore, MD
jafjsc AT verizon.net 

> On May 24, 2016, at 12:39 PM, Marcia Watson  wrote:
> 
> I just watched the video and want to share some details, to encourage people 
to watch it. It tells the story of our own owl "Baltimore," who showed up at 
Martin State Airport, and was captured by and fitted with a GPS transmitter as 
part of Dave Brinker's Project Snowstorm. Baltimore was eventually released at 
Assateague, and this video is about Adam Cole's quest to follow Baltimore's 
tracks north to the Arctic and if possible, to sight the bird there. 

> 
> Adam's bio on the NPR website says "Adam Cole is a reporter and producer for 
the Science Desk, where he creates short documentary videos, radio pieces, 
animations, musical podcast segments, data visualizations, and GIFs about 
science." This video is excellent, well worth watching. 

> 
> Janet, thanks so much for bringing it to our attention.
> 
> Marcia 
> ------------
> Marcia Watson
> Bowie, Maryland
> marshwren50 AT comcast.net 
> 
> 
> On May 24, 2016, at 11:27 AM, Janet Millenson > wrote: 

> 
>> Featuring our very own Dave Brinker and Project Snowstorm:
>> 
>> 
http://www.npr.org/2016/05/24/479223874/we-followed-a-snowy-owl-from-maryland-to-ontario 
 

>> 
>> Janet Millenson
>> Potomac, MD (Montgomery County)
>> janet AT twocrows.com 
>> ----------------------------------------------------------------
>> "Look at the birds!" -- Pascal the parrot
>> 
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Subject: Re: On NPR: "We Followed a Snowy Owl from Maryland to Toronto"
From: Marcia Watson <marshwren50 AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 12:39:29 -0400
I just watched the video and want to share some details, to encourage people to 
watch it. It tells the story of our own owl "Baltimore," who showed up at 
Martin State Airport, and was captured by and fitted with a GPS transmitter as 
part of Dave Brinker's Project Snowstorm. Baltimore was eventually released at 
Assateague, and this video is about Adam Cole's quest to follow Baltimore's 
tracks north to the Arctic and if possible, to sight the bird there. 


Adam's bio on the NPR website says "Adam Cole is a reporter and producer for 
the Science Desk, where he creates short documentary videos, radio pieces, 
animations, musical podcast segments, data visualizations, and GIFs about 
science." This video is excellent, well worth watching. 


Janet, thanks so much for bringing it to our attention.

Marcia 
------------
Marcia Watson
Bowie, Maryland
marshwren50 AT comcast.net


> On May 24, 2016, at 11:27 AM, Janet Millenson  wrote:
> 
> Featuring our very own Dave Brinker and Project Snowstorm:
> 
> 
http://www.npr.org/2016/05/24/479223874/we-followed-a-snowy-owl-from-maryland-to-ontario 

> 
> 
> Janet Millenson
> Potomac, MD (Montgomery County)
> janet AT twocrows.com
> ----------------------------------------------------------------
> "Look at the birds!" -- Pascal the parrot
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Subject: Blue Mash Nature Trail -- May 24, 2016
From: john pangborn <pangborn.john19 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 09:18:43 -0700
Submitted from eBird Android 1.2.1

5 Canada Goose
1 Wild Turkey
3 Turkey Vulture
1 Osprey
1 Mourning Dove
1 Chimney Swift
2 Great Crested Flycatcher
1 White-eyed Vireo
3 Red-eyed Vireo
1 Blue Jay
4 Tree Swallow
1 House Wren
2 Carolina Wren
2 Eastern Bluebird
1 Wood Thrush
5 American Robin
3 Brown Thrasher
2 Northern Mockingbird
5 Cedar Waxwing
1 Ovenbird
3 Common Yellowthroat
1 Chipping Sparrow
3 Field Sparrow
9 Eastern Towhee
6 Northern Cardinal
6 Red-winged Blackbird

Number of Taxa: 26
John pangborn
Gaithersburg md

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Subject: 98th Dorchester County May Bird Count, May 14, 2016.
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 15:59:18 +0000
98th DORCHESTER COUNTY MAY BIRD COUNT, May 14, 2016, midnight - 9 P.M. 166 
species (154 last year; 153 last week, with about 1/2 the coverage then of 
today … excellent considering). 14 observers in 9 parties, best ever 
coverage, plus a few birds added by non-participating visitors or participants 
poaching (with the compiler’s blessing) outside of assigned areas. For the 
1st time there is some coverage by boat. The 3 most diverse areas, that also 
have the longest routes and hours, recorded 103 (103 on May 7), 117 (no 
comparable route on May 7) and 113 (114 on May 7) species respectively. 



ABBREVIATIONS: BNWR = Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. EIR = Elliott Island 
Road. HI = Hooper’s Island. 



WATERFOWL: Canada goose 305 (7, 2-124), tundra swan 1, wood duck 22 (6, 2-7), 
gadwall 2 (a pair; EIR), American black duck 27 (3, 2-20), mallard 168 (6, 
4-81), green-winged teal 1 (a drake; EIR), canvasback 3 (2 hens, 1 drake; EIR; 
present May 7), red-breasted merganser 6 (HI), ruddy duck 47, unIDd duck 2, 



the PRIMITIVES: NORTHERN BOBWHITE 7 (2, 2-5; continues to hang on, but just by 
the skin of its teeth), wild turkey 23 (6, 1-14), common loon 4, double-crested 
cormorant 598 (6, 4-434), American white pelican 1, BROWN PELICAN 140 (2, 
3-137), 



HERON TYPES (“heibs" - herons, egrets, ibis, bitterns, a DuMontism): least 
bittern 2 (EIR), great blue heron 105 (8, 1-48), great egret 59 (6, 1-40), 
snowy egret 29 (3, 1-21), tricolored heron 1 (EIR), green heron 3 (2, 1-2), 
black-crowned night heron 3 (2, 1-2), glossy ibis 1 (BNWR, same one seen by 2 
parties here), 



RAPTORS: black vulture 51 (5, 2-41; roost of 41 at the Pig Farm), turkey 
vulture 247 (9, 4-100), osprey 171 (8, 2-77), BALD EAGLE 138 (8, 1-71), 
sharp-shinned hawk 1, Cooper’s hawk 3 (3, 1-1), red-shouldered hawk 3 (2, 
1-2), broad-winged hawk 1, red-tailed hawk 9 (5, 1-3), unIDd hawk 1, 



RALLIDS: clapper rail 10 (3, 2-5), king rail 3, Virginia rail 36 (3, 1-25), 
unIDd rail 4, common gallinule 12 (EIR), 



SHOREBIRDS: American oystercatcher 2 (Swan Harbor), black-bellied plover 2, 
semipalmated plover 11 (2, 1-10; low), killdeer 23 (5, 2-8), spotted sandpiper 
24 (5, 1-7; good count by area standards), solitary sandpiper 2 (2, 1-1), 
greater yellowlegs 18 (3, 3-8; low), willet 18 (3, 1-12), lesser yellowlegs 22 
(2, 3-19; low), ruddy turnstone 9 (Swan Harbor), sanderling 4 (Swan Harbor), 
dunlin 270 (3, 27-195; somewhat low), least sandpiper 124 (3, 12-85; low), 
white-rumped sandpiper 1 (BNWR), semipalmated sandpiper 11 (2, 1-10; low), 
American woodcock 1 (EIR; has declined precipitously here), 



LARIDS: Bonaparte’s gull 1 (Lewis Wharf Road), laughing gull 443 (8, 3-225; 
somewhat low), ring-billed gull 20 (3, 2-13), herring gull 75 (6, 3-54), great 
black-backed gull 17 (Hooper’s Island), unIDd gull 4, least tern 6 (3, 1-3), 
common tern 4 (Hooper’s Island), Forster’s tern 19 (4, 2-9; low), royal 
tern 4 (2, 1-3), unIDd tern (Forster’s or Common) 47 (2, 6-41), 



“TRANSITIONAL” LANDBIRDS: rock pigeon 34 (6, 1-18), mourning dove 93 (7, 
3-28), yellow-billed cuckoo 30 (8, 1-7), barn owl 1 (EIR), eastern screech-owl 
4 (2, 2-2), great horned owl 8 (3, 2-3), common nighthawk 1 (Taylor’s 
Island), chuck-will’s-widow 21 (4, 1-10; but strangely scarce in several 
areas), chimney swift 71 (6, 5-19), ruby-throated hummingbird 14 (8, 1-3), 
belted kingfisher 4 (all north of Route 50, as would be expected), 



WOODPECKERS: red-headed woodpecker 18 (5, 1-9; increasing here in the past few 
years), red-bellied woodpecker 18 (6, 1-6), downy woodpecker 24 (6, 2-7), hairy 
woodpecker 4 (2, 1-3), northern flicker 12 (4, 1-5), pileated woodpecker 6 (4, 
1-2), 



FLYCATCHERS: eastern wood-pewee: 32 (8, 1-12), Acadian flycatcher 8 (5, 1-4), 
eastern phoebe 2 (2, 1-1; normally only breeds here north of Route 50), great 
crested flycatcher 145 (9, 1-40; 145 is nice, but actually low compared to some 
years), eastern kingbird 79 (8, 3-16), 



THIS ’N’ THAT (but mostly that): white-eyed vireo 40 (7, 1-14), 
yellow-throated vireo 1, red-eyed vireo 97 (9, 1-30), blue jay 23 (4, 2-11; 
rather scarce here for some reason; West Nile Virus?), American crow 134 (8, 
1-33), fish crow 28 (3, 2-18), unIDd crow 12; horned lark 7 (2, 1-6), 



SWALLOWS: purple martin 432 (7, 5-225), tree swallow 251 (9, 3-81), northern 
rough-winged swallow 5 (north party), bank swallow 21 (north party), cliff 
swallow 4 (Brookview; also seen May 7, 10 & 15), barn swallow 275 (9, 1-100), 



LI’L SPRITES: Carolina chickadee 80 (8, 4-21), tufted titmouse 86 (9, 1-26), 
brown-headed nuthatch 43 (5, 1-17), BROWN CREEPER 1 (north Taylor’s Island; 
only the 2nd record), house wren 39 (5, 1-15), marsh wren 62 (6, 1-30), 
Carolina wren 90 (7, 1-24), blue-gray gnatcatcher 67 (8, 1-24), ruby-crowned 
kinglet 1, 



THRUSH TYPES: eastern bluebird 28 (6, 1-12; somewhat low), veery 1, wood thrush 
13 (5, 1-5; rather scarce here), unIDd Catharus thrush 2, American robin 181 
(9, 1-53; Cambridge is the robin capitol of this county), gray catbird 51 (7, 
4-12), brown thrasher 14 (4, 1-9), northern mockingbird 85 (8, 2-23), 



ODD COUPLE: European starling (boo, hiss) 404 (9, 12-133), cedar waxwing 110 
(4, 9-60), 



WARBLERS: ovenbird 62 (7, 1-30), worm-eating warbler 15 (5, 1-6), Louisiana 
waterthrush 2 (breeds only north of Route 50 here), northern waterthrush 2 (2, 
1-1), blue-winged warbler 1 (north Taylor’s Island), black-and-white warbler 
26 (5, 1-9), prothonotary warbler 20 (4, 1-12), COMMON YELLOWTHROAT 286 (9, 
3-101), American redstart 49 (6, 1-19; a new high, I think), Cape May warbler 
1, northern parula 20 (6, 1-6), magnolia warbler 14 (4, 1-5), bay-breasted 
warbler 3 (2, 1-2), Blackburnian warbler 1, yellow warbler 13 (6, 1-4), 
chestnut-sided warbler 2 (2, 1-1), blackpoll warbler 12 (6, 1-5; widespread by 
local standards), black-throated blue warbler 9 (4, 1-4), PINE WARBLER 167 (6, 
1-79), yellow-rumped (myrtle) warbler 7 (4, 1-2), yellow-throated warbler 5 (2, 
2-3; declining here), prairie warbler 13 (5, 1-3), Canada warbler 1 male (EIR), 
Wilson’s warbler 2 (2, 1-1), yellow-breasted chat 7 (5, 1-3), unIDd warbler 
6, 



SPARROWS: eastern towhee 25 (5, 3-9), chipping sparrow 166 (9, 2-38), field 
sparrow 23 (6, 1-8), Savannah sparrow 2 (2, 1-1), grasshopper sparrow 43 (5, 
1-22; biggest population here is in the Neck District), saltmarsh sparrow 1 
(EIR; in steep decline here; prefers Spartina patens meadows), seaside sparrow 
112 (4, 2-75), song sparrow 11 (3, 2-7), swamp sparrow 12 (2, 1-11; increasing, 
I believe, as a breeder in tidal marshes that are interspersed with Baccharis 
halimifolia and other higher vegetation), sparrow unIDd 12, 



the PRETTY ONES: summer tanager 33 (8, 1-13), scarlet tanager 15 (6, 1-8), 
northern cardinal 133 (8, 1-42), rose-breasted grosbeak 2, blue grosbeak 74 (7, 
1-40), indigo bunting 109 (8, 1-35), 



BLACKBIRDS: bobolink 11, red-winged blackbird 921 (9, 12-265), eastern 
meadowlark 21 (6, 1-14; good for a declining species), common grackle 564 (9, 
4-205), boat-tailed grackle 13 (2, 4-9), brown-headed cowbird 118 (8, 3-52), 
orchard oriole 61 (7, 1-22), Baltimore oriole 2 (2, 1-1; a few breed in north 
county), oriole unIDd 2, 



END GAMERS: house finch 17 (4, 2-6), American goldfinch 76 (7, 1-31), house 
sparrow 74 (6, 2-36). 



WIDE VARIATION in party numbers as well as the few species seen in all 9 areas 
(only 12 such species) are due to several factors. Several parties have no salt 
marsh, others have little or no fresh water and/or deciduous forest, efforts 
ranged from 21 hours in one area to 4-5 in others, one party was largely 
stationary, mileages varied from 2 to 133 miles by car, and, of course, 
different skill levels were involved. 



SYMBOLISM: bobolink 11 (and nothing else; assume seen by only 1 party); 
brown-headed cowbird 118 (8, 3-52) = 118 seen by 8 parties whose totals ranged 
from 3 to 52. In the case of birds seen by all parties this is indicated by 9 
underscored and boldfaced. Fish Crow 28 (3, 2-18) = 28 seen by 3 parties whose 
totals range from 2-18 and if one subtracts the total of 2 & 18 (i.e. 20) from 
28 that will give you the total of the 3rd party: 8. Underscoring and 
boldfacing indicates unusual numbers rather than rare species, since no truly 
unusual species were seen. Some of these totals may not be THAT unusual, but I 
like to draw attention to how numerous some birds may be here. 



EFFORT: hours on foot 20, by car 69, by boat 2, stationary 1.5. miles on foot 
16, by car 584, by boat 2.3 hours, at night (owling) 8 hours, miles at night 
32. Some of these figures are approximate or estimates as I did not receive 
complete totals from all parties. 



COVERAGE: 1. county north of Route 50, Colin McAllister; 2. greater Blackwater 
N.W.R. area and south to Shorter’s Wharf, Cedar Creek Road, Robbins & 
Lakesville, etc., David Palmer; 3. Route 16 and its side roads, Frank Morgan, 
Hannah Muchnick & Johnnie Simpson; 4. Neck District, Dan & Linda Southworth; 5. 
Elliott Island Road and its side roads incl. Bestpitch Ferry, Kraft Neck, Lewis 
Wharf, Drawbridge, Griffith Neck & Henry’s Crossroads plus Drawbridge per se, 
Harry Armistead; 6. Taylor’s and Hooper’s Islands, Lynn Davidson; 7. 
Cambridge, Suzette Stitely; 8. north Taylor’s Island, Bonnie & Jonathan 
Willey; 9. Restricted areas of Blackwater N.W.R.: Kentuck Swamp and Big Creek 
Marsh (an area adjacent to Nanticoke River), Matt Whitbeck & Nate Carle. In 
addition Glen Lovelace contributed several birds seen incidental to his field 
work in Delaware but seen in adjacent extreme NE Dorchester. 



MISSED SPECIES: northern harrier (hard to believe; 3 seen by me May 7), 
green-winged teal, whip-poor-will (a bad month for nightjars), black-necked 
stilt (I saw 5 on May 7), short-billed dowitcher, black-throated green warbler, 
white-throated sparrow, Caspian tern, barred owl. It would not be very 
surprising if ALL of these were seen. 



WEATHER: (defintely): 60 - 57 (just after sunrise) rising to 77 degrees F. at 
4:11 P.M., then falling 17 degrees (77 to 60) from 4:30 - 5 P.M. and after the 
storm hit by 5:15 P.M. Clear becoming partly cloudy by late morning, calm until 
then except sometimes light & variable < 10 m.p.h. in the late pre-dawn period, 
then NW 15+. Misty, diffuse, head-high areas of patchy fog before sunrise. 
Ominous dark clouds materialize in the late afternoon and by the time I hit the 
E.I.R. then show a few great shafts of light streaming down. 



Late in the afternoon the clouds are off to the SW advancing rapidly with 
numerous mammiform formations depending from them, one of these with what looks 
like an incipient tornado funnel, then the winds hit at up to 45-50 m.p.h. from 
the SW and there is heavy rain for c. 0.5 hours. But rather suddenly it begins 
to clear from the west, the rain stops, and there are partial rainbows in front 
of the very deep, purplish-gray clouds off to the east. 



A group of 5 Snowy Egrets, somewhat distant, flies in front of one of the 
rainbows. Then a scary, huge, anvil-shaped cloud approaches from the west but 
brings only high winds in this evening, plus on May 15 & 16, with some rain 
Saturday night on my way home, this and the winds strong enough so that while 
driving it feels as if I am maneuvering a boat in big swells. During the storm 
Lynn Davidson reports some sleet at Hooper’s Island. From 4:30 P.M. onward 
the strong winds vary from SW to NW then SW again. Crazy. 



The sky is with a marvelous clarity, cleansed by the rains. At night the 
constellations are clearly seen. The Milky Way extends across most of the open 
sky high overhead from Cassiopeia on down to the horizon to the southeast. The 
moon, 51% visible, sets at 2:11 A.M. Sunrise is 5:55, sunset at 8:09. Low tide 
at Fishing Point (Elliott Island) is 3:42 A.M., high at 9:24 A.M., low again at 
4:15 P.M. The afternoon low tide is much lower than normal, lots of good mud. 



SPECIES GROUP REPRESENTATION: waterfowl 10 (so so), heron types 8 (oh so so 
so), raptors 9 (also so so), rallids 4 (you guessed it - so so), shorebirds 16 
(O.K.), gulls 5 (good), terns 4 (so so also), owls 3 (so so), woodpeckers 6 
(good; all 6 of those possible; the sapsucker is not really possible), 
flycatchers 5 (par), swallows 6 (good), warblers 25 (so nice to be able to say 
… excellent), sparrows incl. towhee 9 (par … considering the good coverage 
today). 



the 15 MOST NUMEROUS SPECIES: red-winged blackbird 921, double-crested 
cormorant 598, common grackle 564, laughing gull 443, purple martin 432, 
European starling 404, Canada goose 305, common yellowthroat 286, barn swallow 
275, dunlin 270, tree swallow 251, turkey vulture 247, American robin 181, 
osprey 171, mallard 168. At 138 bald eagle comes in 20th. 



REPRESENTATIVE INCREASES MAY 7 - MAY 14. As is always the case some birds are 
in bigger numbers the 2nd weekend of May, specifically Acadian Flycatcher, 
Eastern Wood Pewee, Great Crested Flycatcher, Eastern Kingbird, Blue Grosbeak, 
Indigo Bunting, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, White-eyed Vireo, Red-eyed Vireo, Summer 
Tanager, Orchard Oriole, and Semipalmated Sandpiper. This is true for these 
listed species every year. That said, numbers of these today seem a bit low, 
due I suppose to the preceding cool and rainy weather. It is also notable that 
they are so low because: 1, this count is on the latest possible date, plus 2, 
it’s even later than that because of the leap year. Conversely waterfowl, 
White-throated Sparrows, Myrtle Warblers, Savannah Sparrows, and some others 
decline from the 1st to 2nd May weekend. 



MAMMALS: I reported mine, and other non-avian taxa, in a previous posting. Up 
in north Dorchester Colin McAllister sees 1 ea. of Fox & Gray squirrels, 
Virginia Opossum, and River Otter plus 2 Eastern Cottontails. 



APPRECIATION is greatly extended to all the participants, almost all of whom do 
not live in Dorchester County. Very gratifying to receive their lists promptly, 
that are neat, complete, and sensible, not a single curveball. Please help out 
next year, especially on May 13, 2017: this will be the 100th May bird count 
here. Hallelujah. Champagne will be in order. 



Best to all. - Harry Armistead, Philadelphia.       
 		 	   		  

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Subject: Hurlock, Hooper's I., Blackwater, May 21-23, 2016.
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 15:44:09 +0000
HURLOCK, HOOPER’S I., BLACKWATER & environs, MAY 21-23, 2016. Turtles (called 
turkles by some locally) on the move. This has been a good spring here for 
spotted sandpipers. 



MAY 21, SATURDAY. Rain, again. Arrive c. 3 P.M. at Rigby’s Folly. Sides of 
the driveway along Woods 2 and Woods 6 have been ditched recently and are 
brimming over. Better in the ditch than ON the driveway. Overcast, rain, NE 15 
becoming NW 15, the place is a swamp, a very green one. Cold, damp. Rain is 
steady but fine yet very dense. Gray Squirrel 2. A doe in the yard. Sit on the 
front porch and watch the wetness. 



MAY 22, SUNDAY. EGYPT ROAD, 6:45 - 7:15 A.M.: NORTHERN BOBWHITE 2, wood duck 5, 
bald eagle 1, prothonotary warbler 1, blue grosbeak 4, indigo bunting 4, great 
crested flycatcher 2, field sparrow 2, common yellowthroat 5, white-eyed vireo 
1, and orchard oriole 2 plus 3 eastern cottontails, 2 green frogs, and 2 sika 
deer. Overcast, drizzle, 54 degrees F., winds NW 10. 



BLACKWATER N.W.R. A “guided bird tour” 8 A.M. - 11:45 A.M. but list below 
includes some birds seen before and after in the period 7:30 A.M. - 12:15 P.M. 
Overcast, sprinkles and rain, off and on, temp. 52-56 degrees F., winds NW 
10-15. Mist and fog off and on, visibility often only 1 or 2 miles. Tidal water 
lowish, fresh waters high except some impoundments have been drained or are 
being drained. Participants: Cathy Cooper, Lura & Steve Nieberding & myself. 8 
eastern cottontails, 5 FOX SQUIRRELS (incl. a grouping of 3 adjacent to Pool 
3D), 1 muskrat, a d.o.r. raccoon on Key Wallace Drive, and a big ole snapping 
turtle depositing her eggs on a mound on the N side of Wildlife Drive just W of 
Pool 1, where I have seen this species mating several times. Complete list: 



Canada goose 4, mallard 2, double-crested cormorant 2, American white pelican 1 
(the disabled bird continues, now in its 5th [I think] year), great blue heron 
9, great egret 21, black vulture 1, turkey vulture 8, osprey 4, bald eagle 22, 
red-tailed hawk 1, spotted sandpiper 4, greater yellowlegs 1, semipalmated 
sandpiper 65, Caspian tern 3, mourning dove 8, ruby-throated hummingbird 1, 
red-headed woodpecker 3 adults, red-bellied woodpecker 2, northern flicker 1, 
pileated woodpecker 2, great crested flycatcher 8, eastern kingbird 5, red-eyed 
vireo 1, blue jay 2, American crow 6, fish crow 1, horned lark 1, purple martin 
12, tree swallow 36, barn swallow 40, 



bank swallow 3, Carolina chickadee 3 (an active nest cavity near the blind), 
tufted titmouse 3, house wren 1, Carolina wren 4, eastern bluebird 4, wood 
thrush 1, American robin 8, gray catbird 1, northern mockingbird 3, European 
starling 20, ovenbird 1, common yellowthroat 20, pine warbler 6, eastern towhee 
1, chipping sparrow 8, grasshopper sparrow 3 (killer views of 2 perched atop 
posts on the drive in to the Visitor Center), summer tanager 3, northern 
cardinal 7, blue grosbeak 2, indigo bunting 7, red-winged blackbird 75, common 
grackle 60, brown-headed cowbird 2, orchard oriole 10 (incl. a female gathering 
nesting material, cattail fluff, next to the blind), American goldfinch 2, and 
house sparrow 6. 



HIP ROOF ROAD: Red-headed Woodpecker 1 adult, Canada goose 27. SWAN HARBOR, 
1:15 P.M.: BLACK SKIMMER 3, adults, it’s been years since I (or anyone else?) 
has seen skimmers in Dorchester County), brown pelican 25, least tern 5, 
American oystercatcher 1, sanderling 2, ruddy turnstone 1, bald eagle just 1, 
dunlin 55. OPOSSUM ISLAND (as seen and scoped from near Old Salty’s), 1:35 
P.M.: brown pelican 60, willet 1, bald eagle 1, and numerous cormorants. 
Experimental jetties just S of NARROWS FERRY BRIDGE, Hooper’s I. 2 P.M.: 
brown pelican 20, double-crested cormorant 95, willet 1, sanderling 2, dunlin 
23, semipalmated sandpiper 1, bald eagle 1, and common loon 1. Shorebirds roost 
on the jetty rocks at high tide. There’ve been several records of purple 
sandpipers here. 



DECOURSEY BRIDGE ROAD, 3:15: semipalmated sandpiper 5, bald eagle 2 (there’s 
an eagle nest here SE of the bridge). MIDDLETOWN BRANCH ROAD, 3:45: 
prothonotary warbler 1, white-eyed vireo 1. HOG FARM on Indiantown Road, 4:20 
P.M.: laughing gull 210, ring-billed gull 7, and not as much of a swine 
presence as in past years: 



BROOKVIEW, To look for the persnickety, somewhat coy, cliff swallows. Am here 
4:45 - 6 P.M. but no cliffies. I do see: belted kingfisher 1, eastern phoebe 1, 
least tern 1, osprey 1 (on a nest), rock pigeon 3, house finch 4, northern 
flicker 1, wood duck 3, orchard oriole 4, house sparrow 6, barn swallow 6, 
great crested flycatcher 1, spotted sandpiper 2, and double-crested cormorant 1 
plus an eastern cottontail. Overcast with drizzle, 57 degrees F. Some 
nice-sized fish are jumping. Strong current going upstream, tidal, I guess. I 
do not visit the nearby borrow pit where Bank and Northern Rough-winged 
swallows have their nest burrows. 



MAY 23, MONDAY, almost all of this in Dorchester County:


HURLOCK WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT. So nice to take take my time here instead 
of the usually brief visit: 9 - 10:15 A.M. Nice beds of daisies on the dike 
between the NW & NE cells, where I walk out to the center of the 4 cells. Count 
27 turtle snouts sticking up above the water’s surface. Eastern cottontail 1. 
A few swamp magnolias are blooming in the woods N of the cells. The cattails 
and other marsh vegetation continue to spread and consolidate in the N part of 
the NW cell, perhaps will eventually attract a rail or 2. NW < 10, 57-60, 
overcast but ceiling getting higher, no rain, nice conditions. Excellent 
visibility. Complete list: 



Canada goose 14 voting-age adults plus 7 fuzzy goslings, tundra swan 1 adult 
(capable of weak flight; flies across the SW cell unsteadily), mallard 11, wood 
duck 1 of the female persuasion, ruddy duck 18 (all of them cute), black 
vulture 1, turkey vulture 9, osprey 3 (nest visible off to the east a ways), 
spotted sandpiper 4, least sandpiper 1, semipalmated sandpiper 17, laughing 
gull 1 adult, least tern 1, mourning dove 4, chimney swift 5 (coursing around 
at low altitudes), downy woodpecker 1, blue jay 1, American crow 4, purple 
martin 3, tree swallow 3, bank swallow 3, barn swallow 6, Carolina wren 1, 
American robin 9, northern mockingbird 1, European starling 6, chipping sparrow 
1, blue grosbeak 3, indigo bunting 1, red-winged blackbird 20, common grackle 
11, and house sparrow 1. 



EGYPT ROAD:  8 turkey vultures on a manure pile.  11 A.M.  


back to BLACKWATER N.W.R., 11:15 - 1:30, overcast, 61-64, occasional sprinkles, 
but nice, the weather improves today. It isn’t until I return to Philadelphia 
by 5:45 P.M. that I learn today is NATIONAL TURTLE DAY. They picked a good one 
for that. Today I see 7 SPECIES OF TURTLES HERE (numbers in parentheses 
represent individuals I “saved” - get’ em off the road): 



snapping turtle (depositing eggs; differs from yesterday’s; different 
location), spotted turtle 1 (1), box turtle 1 (1), mud turtle 3 (2), painted 
turtle 14 (1), diamondback terrapin 1, and red-bellied cooter 3. Also: 2 fox 
squirrels and 1 red-spotted purple. 



selected birds: semipalmated sandpiper 185, dunlin 230, spotted sandpiper 1, 
Virginia rail 7, red-headed woodpecker 2 adults, mallard a female with 4 
downies, American white pelican 1, black vulture 2 delectating on what’s left 
of the d.o.r. raccoon. Canada goose 26. 



MALKUS BRIDGE, up c. 100’ from the N end, a d.o.r. snapping turtle. EASTON 
near the E shoulder of Route 50, 2 Canada Goose broods of 2 & 5 large young. 
ROUTE 33 W of Easton: 4 wild turkeys in the usual field across from Town 7 
Country. On the way back to Philadelphia: N. OF CORDOVA in a field W of Route 
309: 315 ring-billed gulls and 95 laughing gulls. This is the ONLY “gull 
field” seen these 3 days. 



MOST NOTABLE T-SHIRT SEEN TODAY (in Wawa, of course) in huge block letters: 
“Messy hair, no makeup, just chillin’ “. Works for me, although in any 
given circumstance I usually eschew cosmetics anyway. 



Best to all. - Harry Armistead. 		 	   		  

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Subject: Short-billed Dowitcher at Swan Creek
From: Fred Shaffer <glaucousgull AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 15:38:11 +0000 (UTC)
I birded at Swan Creek for a few hours this morning.  The highlight was when I 
found a Short-billed Dowitcher feeding on the far shore of the north cell.  
Other shorebirds present included lots of peeps (both Least and Semipalmated) 
and a few Dunlin and yellowlegs. Lots of Spotted Sandpipers were also working 
the water's edge. The marsh was productive as well. I saw one adult Little Blue 
Heron briefly in flight before in settled back down, hidden by the marsh 
vegetation.  And, when I was on the observation platform, I heard a Least 
Bittern call several times.  Also, a Marsh Wren was singing relentlessly from 
the marsh.  Another highlight from this area was five Least Terns flying back 
and forth over the water and the marsh, calling as they went.  Good birding, 

Fred ShafferGlaucousGull AT verizon.netCrofton, Anne Arundel

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Subject: On NPR: "We Followed a Snowy Owl from Maryland to Toronto"
From: Janet Millenson <janet AT twocrows.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 11:27:20 -0400
Featuring our very own Dave Brinker and Project Snowstorm:


http://www.npr.org/2016/05/24/479223874/we-followed-a-snowy-owl-from-maryland-to-ontario 



Janet Millenson
Potomac, MD (Montgomery County)
janet AT twocrows.com
----------------------------------------------------------------
"Look at the birds!" -- Pascal the parrot

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Subject: Wheaton Regional Park today
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 14:51:58 +0000 (UTC)
HI all, 

Just back from China and finally, a sunny morning to try and see if any 
migrants lingered in our area. Did WRP and a bit of Brookside Gardens (native 
plant area only). Had a nice flock of Blackpolls (6) together feeding just 
above eye level in the bitches bordering the Shorefield parking lot. Otherwise 
just singletons for 5 warbler species. Interesting Empid foraging along Pine 
Lake -- ("Traill's" type that seemed to fit Willow more than Alder and no, not 
because it was in willows ). Lots of Gnatcatchers, House Wrens and Cedar 
Waxwings about but many other local breeders like Baltimore. Orioles seemed 
uncharacteristically quiet. Still, nice to see some USA birds for a change! 


Gail Mackiernan and Barry Cooper 
Colesville, MD 


Wheaton Regional Park and Brookside Gardens, Montgomery, Maryland, US 
May 24, 2016 7:45 AM - 9:45 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
2.0 mile(s) 
Comments: sunny, warm, becoming breezy; a few migrants and local breeders 
49 species 

Birds of interest: 

Wood Duck 2 
Green Heron 1 
Red-shouldered Hawk 2 
Spotted Sandpiper 1 
Chimney Swift 3 
Eastern Wood-Pewee 2 
Acadian Flycatcher 1 heard only 
Willow Flycatcher 1 (probable) 
Eastern Phoebe 1 Nature Ctr 
Great Crested Flycatcher 1 
Eastern Kingbird 3 
Red-eyed Vireo 8 
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 2 
Tree Swallow 8 
Barn Swallow 10 Gude Gardens 
House Wren 6 
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 8 
Eastern Bluebird 2 
Wood Thrush 3 
Gray Catbird 5 
Cedar Waxwing 60 estimate; abundant around lake 
Ovenbird 1 
Common Yellowthroat 1 
American Redstart 1 
Yellow Warbler 1 female 
Blackpoll Warbler 7 6 together feeding in birches next to Shorefield parking 
lot; 4 males and two females; another heard only along lake 

Chipping Sparrow 3 
Eastern Towhee 2 
Scarlet Tanager 1 heard only 
Baltimore Oriole 2 
House Finch 3 

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Subject: I Blue winged and golden winged warblers in Allegheny or Frederick counties
From: Marilyn Taylor <operacrazed39 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 15:45:49 -0700 (PDT)
I live in Anne Arundel County and would like to show a visitor these birds. Any 
advice welcome. Thanks 


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Subject: little bennett-kentucky warbler
From: jfstuo38 AT gmail.com
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 19:09:54 -0700 (PDT)
today i heard and saw with several good views of a kentucky warbler on the 
stoneybrook trail right past the wilsons mill trail where it meets the 
stoneybrook trail and about 2 hours later on my way back i heard it again in 
the same area. also on the W. Piedmont trail next to browning run trail and the 
wims ball field area i saw 2 male scarlet tanagers and one flew to the wims 
area and the other stayed on the north side of the trail. it was like their 
territories met near the road and then down in the wims area there is a 
yellow-breasted chat which i have seen there more than once in the last few 
days. also an indigo. a good day of which about 28 birds were seen at LB plus 
others at other places. 


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Subject: Bullbat Bonanza Mont. Co., Spotted Sandpiper/ Peeps question
From: Don Simonson <don.r.simonson AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 18:55:46 -0700 (PDT)
67 COMMON NIGHTHAWKS (aka Bullbats) at Violettes Lock on C and O Canal between 
8 and 8:30 pm after storm. I counted 22 passing me toward the northeast, with 
45 more in sight upstream at that time. Many were hawking low over the rushing 
river. only 3 heard calling. 


Earlier in the day, One COMMON NIGHTHAWK fos calling, flying north very high 
over my yard at 4 pm just before storm hit reminded me to check the river. The 
nighthawk was one of 41 species I observed in the yard today, many were eating 
suet. 


Also at Violettes were 27 small shorebirds, which rushed up and down river in 1 
or 2 flocks, occasionally alighting on logs. I was able to ID two as Spotted 
Sandpipers but not sure they were really part of the group. the remainder I 
could not ID without scope. 


I dont think I have ever seen a large flock of Spotted Sandpipers. is 27 
possible? 


Good birding!
Don Simonson, Darnestown md

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Subject: A win for bird conservation in the MD Coastal Bays IBA
From: dlitedirector AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 00:34:27 +0000 (UTC)
Good news for the Maryland Coastal Bays Important Bird Area (IBA): 

‘Flagpole Island’ closed, renamed by state 
Manmade island created to replace lost bird habitat, boaters protested last 
year 


More about Tern Island from Audubon Maryland-DC: 
Tern Island is for the birds 

Jim Rapp 
dlitedirector AT comcast.net 
443-614-0261 

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Subject: Re: Fw: At the Library of Congress: "Feeding Wild Birds in America: A Surprising History"
From: Samuel Miller <srmiller2022 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 20:14:39 -0400
I attended one of Paul's presentations earlier this year on his book and it
was great! I would definitely recommend going. It provides a very
interesting history of bird feeding as well as its implications today.

- Sam Miller
Gambrills, MD

On Mon, May 23, 2016 at 7:45 PM, 'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC
Birding  wrote:

> This sounds interesting!
>
> Tyler Bell
> jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
> California, Maryland
>
>
>
> ----- Forwarded Message -----
> *From:* paul.baicich 
> *To:* Paul J. Baicich 
> *Cc:* Margaret A. Barker 
> *Sent:* Monday, May 23, 2016 6:25 PM
> *Subject:* At the Library of Congress: "Feeding Wild Birds in America: A
> Surprising History"
>
> Dear Friends and Colleagues,
>
> You might be interested in this talk at the Library of Congress on
> Thursday and the associated blog post. The presentation is sponsored by the
> Science, Technology & Business Division at the library.
>  *"Feeding Wild Birds in America: A Surprising History"*
> *    Presented by Paul J. Baicich and Margaret A. Barker*
>  *Date:* Thursday, May 26, 2016
> *Time:* 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
> *Place:* Mary Pickford Theater, 3rd Floor, Madison Building
>  (Independence
> Avenue, between 1st and 2nd Streets)
>
> Here is our Library of Congress guest-blog from last week:
>
> 
http://blogs.loc.gov/inside_adams/2016/05/wild-bird-parties-all-year-long-authors-talk-on-may-26/ 

>
> And the attachment gives you more details on the presentation.
>
> Please share as you see fit.
>
>
>                 best,
>                 Paul
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
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> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here -
> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>

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Subject: Fw: At the Library of Congress: "Feeding Wild Birds in America: A Surprising History"
From: "'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 23:45:04 +0000 (UTC)
This sounds interesting!
Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland

     
----- Forwarded Message -----
 From: paul.baicich 
 To: Paul J. Baicich  
Cc: Margaret A. Barker 
 Sent: Monday, May 23, 2016 6:25 PM
 Subject: At the Library of Congress: "Feeding Wild Birds in America: A 
Surprising History" 

   
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DIV.yiv7877619236WordSection1 {}Dear Friends and Colleagues, You might be 
interested in this talk at the Library of Congress on Thursday and 
the associated blog post. The presentation is sponsored by the Science, 
Technology & Business Division at the library. "Feeding Wild Birds in 
America: A Surprising History"    Presented by Paul J. Baicich and Margaret 
A. Barker Date: Thursday, May 26, 2016Time: 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.Place: 
Mary Pickford Theater, 3rd Floor, Madison Building (Independence Avenue, 
between 1st and 2nd Streets) Here is our Library of Congress guest-blog from 
last 
week:http://blogs.loc.gov/inside_adams/2016/05/wild-bird-parties-all-year-long-authors-talk-on-may-26/ And 
the attachment gives you more details on the presentation. Please share as you 
see fit.                  best,                
Paul                            


  

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Subject: RE: Annual MOS Birding Report
From: "David Fleischmann" <david AT macappraisals.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 15:59:32 -0400
Thank you Russ for this incredible synopsis of Maryland. Wow, what a lot of 
detailed information. To me, this adds to the overall enjoyment of birding as 
it gives one a total perspective of what's going on throughout the state. Some 
of us would be lost in Western Maryland or the Eastern Shore without this 
report. 


I can only speak for myself, that I am excited, that I finally made it into 
this report. I have arrived as a birder!! I look forward to reading this each 
year and will continue to do so. Keep up the amazing work. Thanks again and 
have a great day! 


Awesome Birding in 2016!!

Hugh David Fleischmann
Owings Mills, MD 21117
C-410-598-9292
david AT macappraisals.com


-----Original Message-----
From: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com [mailto:mdbirding AT googlegroups.com] On Behalf 
Of Russ Ruffing 

Sent: Monday, May 23, 2016 3:27 PM
To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [MDBirding] Annual MOS Birding Report



Hello All,



It is with many, many apologies that I FINALLY am publishing the 2015 Annual 
Birding Report for the MD/DC region. See attached. For a number of reasons, 
this took me a full two months longer than it normally takes. I was just really 
busy with personal items this winter and spring. But, nonetheless, here it is, 
and I hope you enjoy it! 




You'll notice there are quite a few counties missing summaries this year, so if 
you want to take one on for the 2016 report, PLEASE LET ME KNOW! It's not that 
hard especially if you are tracking birds in your county throughout the year. 




I really appreciate all the help from those that provided material.



As always, please let me know if you catch any errors or omissions, and I'll 
generate a revision sometime soon if need be. 




Take care,



Russ Ruffing

Woodstock, MD

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Subject: Annual MOS Birding Report
From: Russ Ruffing <ruff2 AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 14:26:32 -0500 (CDT)

Hello All,



It is with many, many apologies that I FINALLY am publishing the 2015 Annual 
Birding Report for the MD/DC region. See attached. For a number of reasons, 
this took me a full two months longer than it normally takes. I was just really 
busy with personal items this winter and spring. But, nonetheless, here it is, 
and I hope you enjoy it! 




You'll notice there are quite a few counties missing summaries this year, so if 
you want to take one on for the 2016 report, PLEASE LET ME KNOW! It's not that 
hard especially if you are tracking birds in your county throughout the year. 




I really appreciate all the help from those that provided material.



As always, please let me know if you catch any errors or omissions, and I'll 
generate a revision sometime soon if need be. 




Take care,



Russ Ruffing

Woodstock, MD

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Subject: Re: Re: June 3-4 Deepwater Pelagic
From: Frank Marenghi <frank_marenghi AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 11:06:23 -0700 (PDT)
I would love to but have a family commitment on the 5th out of state and can't 
make it! I am not happy about missing this, anyone on the fence should just do 
it, the potential is huge and either way there will be good birds! :-) 


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Subject: Re: Rock Creek Park, Monday 5/23/16
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 13:16:32 -0400
Correction: Should read, “Fellow birders found only two warbler 
species—Magnolia and Blackpoll.” 


Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC


> On May 23, 2016, at 11:05 AM, Wallace Kornack  wrote:
> 
> This morning (5/23) at Rock Creek Park…….
> 
> Happened upon a Marsh Wren at the Fence Line. Fellow Warblers found only two 
warbler species—Magnoila and Blackpoll. 

> 
> ——Ridge
> Magnolia Warbler  
> Blackpoll Warbler     6
> Mourning Dove  
> Chimney Swift  
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  
> Great Crested Flycatcher  
> Yellow-throated Vireo  2
> Red-eyed Vireo  
> Carolina Wren  
> Swainson's Thrush  
> Wood Thrush  
> American Robin  2
> European Starling  
> Eastern Towhee  
> Northern Cardinal  
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak     female
> Brown-headed Cowbird     2
> American Goldfinch  
> 
> ——Yard Parking and Fence Line
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  
> Pileated Woodpecker  
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  
> Carolina Chickadee  
> House Wren  
> Marsh Wren     FOS  at Fence Line
> Carolina Wren  
> American Robin     4
> Eastern Towhee 
> Northern Cardinal  
> Brown-headed Cowbird     2
> House Sparrow      2
> 
> ——Maintenance Yard
> Mourning Dove     2
> Chimney Swift  
> Red-bellied Woodpecker     2
> Downy Woodpecker  
> Northern Flicker      2
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  
> Great Crested Flycatcher     2
> Blue Jay  
> American Crow     3
> Fish Crow  
> Carolina Chickadee     2
> House Wren 
> Carolina Wren     2
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher     2
> American Robin     7
> Gray Catbird  
> European Starling  
> Cedar Waxwing      10
> Northern Cardinal      4
> American Goldfinch     2
> 
> ——Nature Center
> Downy Woodpecker  
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  
> Red-eyed Vireo  
> Blue Jay  
> White-breasted Nuthatch  3
> Carolina Wren  
> Swainson's Thrush  2
> Wood Thrush  
> American Robin  3
> Gray Catbird  
> Northern Cardinal  
> House Sparrow  2
> 
> Contributors: Bill Butler, Jim Lemert, Sharon Forsyth, Mike Parr, Joshua 
Heiser, Daniel + 

> 
> Have Fun Birding!
> 
> Wallace Kornack
> Washington  DC
> 
> 

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Subject: RE: Re: June 3-4 Deepwater Pelagic
From: "jcdlmartin via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 12:29:35 -0400
I just signed up. Anita said we're very close. C'mon folks, let's make this 
happen! 


Joel Martin
Catonsville MD

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail

On Monday, May 23, 2016 Edward Boyd  wrote:

Hello Everyone,


I've heard from the folks at Paulagics and the boat is close, REAlLY CLOSE, to 
having the number of people needed to sail. For everyone that has been watching 
the bird list over the weekend, the Sooty Shearwaters have been cruising past 
the inshore waters over the last few days in good numbers. We can only wonder 
what is going by out in the deep waters offshore. If you are wondering too, 
perhaps you might consider signing up and making this trip happen? You can get 
more info and make the reservations at the link in the original email. 



Hope to see you next Friday evening!


Ed Boyd


On Tue, May 17, 2016 at 9:01 PM, Edward Boyd  wrote:

Hello Everyone:


For all of you seabird enthusiasts, and even those new to offshore boat trips, 
Paul Guris of See Life Paulagics is scheduled to lead an overnight trip out of 
Lewes, DE on June 3rd-4th. Although a fantastic trip can't be guaranteed, 
several of the best pelagic trips that I have ever been on have been at this 
exact time of year. One trip was out of New Jersey and the others have been out 
of North Carolina; there have been few trips at this season that have gotten as 
far off the Maryland coast as this trip has the potential to go for comparison. 
Those other trips out of NJ and NC have produced plenty of Jeagers, South Polar 
Skua, Manx Shearwater, Audubon's Shearwater, Cory's Shearwater, Great 
Shearwater, Sooty Shearwater and Northern Fulmar. Some of the trips have 
produced Arctic Tern, and Pterodroma Petrels are also possible. This is the 
prime time of year for European Storm-Petrel off the Outer Banks. With the 
currents moving north, who knows where those birds might wind up? In addition 
to the variety of birds, this time of year can produce some amazing numbers of 
birds and some of the best weather conditions for pelagic viewing. Whales, 
dolphins and other mammals are also a possibility in the deeper waters farther 
offshore, especially near the canyon drop-offs. If you've ever considered 
taking one of these trips, this is one time of year that can really pay off 
with lots to see and warm conditions to make for a comfortable ride. 



If you are interested in a great opportunity to see some of these (and 
hopefully many of these) offshore specialties, you shouldn't let this 
opportunity pass. These trips used to be full well in advance, with wait lists 
a common occurrence. In the last few years, interest in these trips has waned, 
for whatever reason, and a number of trips at various seasons have been 
cancelled due to a lack of participation. This trip might be the last 
opportunity for an unknown period of time to get far offshore to this area, 
especially at this season. I've been told that this trip currently needs 
another 15 participants to sail and the bookings must be in by next Thursday, 
May, 26th or the trip will be scrubbed.  



If you have been on the fence about deciding on whether to go on this trip or 
not, I urge you to make your decision now and make you contacts to book onto 
this trip at the links below. Should those not work in this email, the link to 
the site is  where you can find more information about 
the trip and booking information. 



I hope to see you onboard in a couple of weeks.


Ed Boyd

Westminster, MD


From: "See Life Paulagics LLC" 
To: edboyd1959 AT comcast.net
Sent: Saturday, May 7, 2016 7:08:37 AM
Subject: Update of Spring Pelagics








UPDATE ON SPRING PELAGICS 



 



June 3-4 Lewes (DE & MD Waters) 

This trip is also in jeopardy of NOT sailing  we need a minimum of 23 
spaces that MUST be filled to sail. It's important to get your spaces booked 
early because the Paulagics office is always closed on pelagic trip dates. If 
you call and leave a message and we don't get back to you within a few days, we 
probably didn't get the message.  So please try again.  Thank you for your 
patience as we struggle with the demands of life, mostly medically.  



This may be one of the last trips offered out of this port if we can't get this 
trip out.  Trip participation has been extremely difficult, and the market has 
just about abandoned us. 





See Life Paulagics LLC| info AT paulagics.com| 215-234-6805 | paulagics.com

See what's happening on our social sites:







See Life Paulagics LLC, PO BOX 161, Green Lane, PA 18054

SafeUnsubscribe™ edboyd1959 AT comcast.net

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Subject: Re: Grey, damp Sunday morning: perfect time to bird a couple of ponds....
From: Mark Rositol <mrositol510 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 09:29:04 -0700 (PDT)
You may have seen the Mute Swan at the West Pond. But it is usually in the East 
pond. And I did see it yesterday as well in the East Pond. When the E.pond 
freezes in the winter, it often goes over to the West. The East is off of 
Chrysler Way, while the West is accessed off of Race Track Rd. Of course you 
could walk down the railroad tracks and split both ponds. 


M. Rositol
Fort Washington, MD

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Subject: Olive-sided Flycatcher Millington
From: Jared Parks <amredstart AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 09:14:36 -0700 (PDT)
My brother and I dodged raindrops yesterday 5-22 at Millington WMA in Kent 
County and were rewarded with an Olive-sided Flycatcher on a trail off of #10 
School Road. The parking area for the trail is past where the road bends to the 
left. The parking area is on the right and if you walk the trail down to where 
it opens on both sides into second growth scrub, the bird was hawking insects 
from the tall dead snags on the left. We also had an adult male Summer Tanager 
here as well. 


JRP

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Subject: Dickcissel and Black-billed Cuckoo
From: Hugh David Fleischmann <david AT macappraisals.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 11:51:39 -0400
Today myself and Middleton Evans went to the Frederick County area to search 
for some good birds. Our first stop was Sixes Bridge Road to find the 
Dickcissel! Success on the DICK. As soon as we parked, at the intersection of 
Keysville Rd and Sixes Bridge Rd, we heard several. We ended up seeing 2 males 
and 1 female. The female had nesting material in her mouth. Got great pictures. 

Then off to Audrey Carroll Audubon to find me a Black-billed Cuckoo. What an 
interesting location. Has great field habitat and early succession forest and 
attracts many birds. We had several Chats all over the place. And I got the 
Black-billed Cuckoo; LIFER #302. Thanks to Middleton's keen eyes, I was very 
blessed. It is an awesome day to be a birder. I will post pictures later. 


Amazing Birding in 2016!

Hugh David Fleischmann
Owings Mills, MD 21117
410-598-9292

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Monday 5/23/16
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 11:05:12 -0400
This morning (5/23) at Rock Creek Park…….

Happened upon a Marsh Wren at the Fence Line. Fellow Warblers found only two 
warbler species—Magnoila and Blackpoll. 


——Ridge
Magnolia Warbler  
Blackpoll Warbler     6
Mourning Dove  
Chimney Swift  
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Great Crested Flycatcher  
Yellow-throated Vireo  2
Red-eyed Vireo  
Carolina Wren  
Swainson's Thrush  
Wood Thrush  
American Robin  2
European Starling  
Eastern Towhee  
Northern Cardinal  
Rose-breasted Grosbeak     female
Brown-headed Cowbird     2
American Goldfinch  

——Yard Parking and Fence Line
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Pileated Woodpecker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Carolina Chickadee  
House Wren  
Marsh Wren     FOS  at Fence Line
Carolina Wren  
American Robin     4
Eastern Towhee 
Northern Cardinal  
Brown-headed Cowbird     2
House Sparrow      2

——Maintenance Yard
Mourning Dove     2
Chimney Swift  
Red-bellied Woodpecker     2
Downy Woodpecker  
Northern Flicker      2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Great Crested Flycatcher     2
Blue Jay  
American Crow     3
Fish Crow  
Carolina Chickadee     2
House Wren 
Carolina Wren     2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher     2
American Robin     7
Gray Catbird  
European Starling  
Cedar Waxwing      10
Northern Cardinal      4
American Goldfinch     2

——Nature Center
Downy Woodpecker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Red-eyed Vireo  
Blue Jay  
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
Carolina Wren  
Swainson's Thrush  2
Wood Thrush  
American Robin  3
Gray Catbird  
Northern Cardinal  
House Sparrow  2

Contributors: Bill Butler, Jim Lemert, Sharon Forsyth, Mike Parr, Joshua 
Heiser, Daniel + 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC


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Subject: M
From: Hugh David Fleischmann <david AT macappraisals.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 10:47:26 -0400

Amazing Birding in 2016!

Hugh David Fleischmann
Owings Mills, MD 21117
410-598-9292

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Subject: Re: June 3-4 Deepwater Pelagic
From: Edward Boyd <edboyd59 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 10:29:23 -0400
Hello Everyone,

I've heard from the folks at Paulagics and the boat is close, REAlLY CLOSE,
to having the number of people needed to sail. For everyone that has been
watching the bird list over the weekend, the Sooty Shearwaters have been
cruising past the inshore waters over the last few days in good numbers. We
can only wonder what is going by out in the deep waters offshore. If you
are wondering too, perhaps you might consider signing up and making this
trip happen? You can get more info and make the reservations at the link in
the original email.

Hope to see you next Friday evening!

Ed Boyd

On Tue, May 17, 2016 at 9:01 PM, Edward Boyd  wrote:

> Hello Everyone:
>
> For all of you seabird enthusiasts, and even those new to offshore boat
> trips, Paul Guris of See Life Paulagics is scheduled to lead an overnight
> trip out of Lewes, DE on June 3rd-4th. Although a fantastic trip can't be
> guaranteed, several of the best pelagic trips that I have ever been on have
> been at this exact time of year. One trip was out of New Jersey and the
> others have been out of North Carolina; there have been few trips at this
> season that have gotten as far off the Maryland coast as this trip has the
> potential to go for comparison. Those other trips out of NJ and NC have
> produced plenty of Jeagers, South Polar Skua, Manx Shearwater, Audubon's
> Shearwater, Cory's Shearwater, Great Shearwater, Sooty Shearwater and
> Northern Fulmar. Some of the trips have produced Arctic Tern, and
> Pterodroma Petrels are also possible. This is the prime time of year for
> European Storm-Petrel off the Outer Banks. With the currents moving north,
> who knows where those birds might wind up? In addition to the variety of
> birds, this time of year can produce some amazing numbers of birds and some
> of the best weather conditions for pelagic viewing. Whales, dolphins and
> other mammals are also a possibility in the deeper waters farther offshore,
> especially near the canyon drop-offs. If you've ever considered taking
> one of these trips, this is one time of year that can really pay off with
> lots to see and warm conditions to make for a comfortable ride.
>
> If you are interested in a great opportunity to see some of these (and
> hopefully many of these) offshore specialties, you shouldn't let this
> opportunity pass. These trips used to be full well in advance, with wait
> lists a common occurrence. In the last few years, interest in these trips
> has waned, for whatever reason, and a number of trips at various seasons
> have been cancelled due to a lack of participation. This trip might be the
> last opportunity for an unknown period of time to get far offshore to this
> area, especially at this season. I've been told that this trip currently
> needs another 15 participants to sail and the bookings must be in by next
> Thursday, May, 26th or the trip will be scrubbed.
>
> If you have been on the fence about deciding on whether to go on this trip
> or not, I urge you to make your decision now and make you contacts to book
> onto this trip at the links below. Should those not work in this email, the
> link to the site is  where you can find more
> information about the trip and booking information.
>
> I hope to see you onboard in a couple of weeks.
>
> Ed Boyd
> Westminster, MD
>
> ------------------------------
> *From: *"See Life Paulagics LLC" 
> *To: *edboyd1959 AT comcast.net
> *Sent: *Saturday, May 7, 2016 7:08:37 AM
> *Subject: *Update of Spring Pelagics
>
>
> 
 

> 
 

> 
 

> 
 

> 
 

> UPDATE ON SPRING PELAGICS
>
>
> *June 3-4 Lewes (DE & MD Waters) *
> This trip is also *in **jeopardy of NOT sailing*  we need a minimum of 23
> spaces that MUST be filled to sail. It's important to get your spaces
> booked early because the Paulagics office is always closed on pelagic trip
> dates. If you call and leave a message and we don't get back to you within
> a few days, we probably didn't get the message.  So please try again.
> Thank you for your patience as we struggle with the demands of life, mostly
> medically.
>
> This may be one of the last trips offered out of this port if we can't get
> this trip out.  Trip participation has been extremely difficult, and the
> market has just about abandoned us.
>
> See Life Paulagics LLC| info AT paulagics.com| 215-234-6805 | p
> 
 

> aulagics.com
> See what's happening on our social sites:
> [image: Facebook]
> 
 
[image: 

> Twitter]
> 
 

>
> See Life Paulagics LLC, PO BOX 161, Green Lane, PA 18054
> SafeUnsubscribe™ edboyd1959 AT comcast.net
> 
 

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Subject: Re: Rock Creek Park, Sunday 5/22/16
From: rselkirk AT mindspring.com
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 16:53:11 -0700 (PDT)
On Sunday, May 22, 2016 at 11:28:31 AM UTC-4, Wallace Kornack wrote:
> This misty and at times rainy morning (5/22) at Rock Creek Park……
> 
> 
> ——Equitation Field  (Paul, Devon, Tully)
> Blackpoll Warbler     2
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  
> Blue Jay
> Tufted Titmouse  
> White-breasted Nuthatch  
> Swainson's Thrush  
> American Robin     3
> 
> 
> ——Ridge
> Chestnut-sided Warbler  
> Blackpoll Warbler     10
> Mourning Dove     3
> Barred Owl    at Ross Drive  (Paul)
> Red-bellied Woodpecker
> Red-eyed Vireo
> Wood Thrush  
> American Robin  
> European Starling     2
> Chipping Sparrow  
> Northern Cardinal     2
> American Goldfinch  
> 
> 
> ——Fence Line
> Blackpoll Warbler  
> Downy Woodpecker  
> House Wren  
> Brown-headed Cowbird  
> House Sparrow  
> 
> 
> ——Maintenance Yard
> Common Yellowthroat      (Tully)
> Mourning Dove      2
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  
> Great Crested Flycatcher  
> Carolina Chickadee  
> Wood Thrush  
> American Robin  
> Northern Cardinal     3
> 
> 
> 
> ——Nature Center
> Night-Heron     sp.  
> American Crow     4
> Carolina Wren  
> Swainson's Thrush  
> American Robin     2
> House Sparrow 
> 
> 
> Contributors:  Paul DeAnna, Jim Lemert, Tully and Devon Hochhausler, Mardi 
Hastings 

> 
> 
> Have Fun Birding!
> 
> 
> Wallace Kornack
> Washington  DC

Hi Wallace

I came across Bluebird about 7:30 or so this morning on the path in front of 
the Nature Center. 


Rennie Selkirk

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Subject: Grey, damp Sunday morning: perfect time to bird a couple of ponds....
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 11:49:34 -0700 (PDT)
Schoolhouse Pond, Prince George's, Maryland, US
May 22, 2016 10:30 AM - 11:50 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Cool, light rain
18 species

Canada Goose  2
Mallard  2
Great Blue Heron  2
Black Vulture  1
Bald Eagle  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Eastern Kingbird  1
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Tree Swallow  4
Barn Swallow  5
Carolina Chickadee  1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  2
Eastern Bluebird  1
Gray Catbird  1
Northern Mockingbird  1
Northern Cardinal  3
Red-winged Blackbird  3
Common Grackle  2

Depot Pond - West, Prince George's, Maryland, US
May 22, 2016 1:00 PM - 1:45 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
12 species

Mute Swan  1     continuing
Wood Duck  5
Mallard  2
Double-crested Cormorant  3
Great Blue Heron  1
Mourning Dove  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  3
Carolina Wren  1
American Robin  2
Northern Cardinal  2
Common Grackle  1

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Subject: shorebirds in Charles Co. question
From: Duvall Sollers <dbsollers61 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 14:34:07 -0400
Hi everyone!

I’m thinking of heading down to Charles County to look for shorebirds later 
this week. Does anyone know of any fairly reliable spots for them in Charles 
County? I’ve being having LOTS of trouble locating them on my own. 


Thanks!

Duvall Sollers
Hereford, MD


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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Sunday 5/22/16
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 11:28:24 -0400
This misty and at times rainy morning (5/22) at Rock Creek Park……

——Equitation Field  (Paul, Devon, Tully)
Blackpoll Warbler     2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Blue Jay
Tufted Titmouse  
White-breasted Nuthatch  
Swainson's Thrush  
American Robin     3

——Ridge
Chestnut-sided Warbler  
Blackpoll Warbler     10
Mourning Dove     3
Barred Owl    at Ross Drive  (Paul)
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Red-eyed Vireo
Wood Thrush  
American Robin  
European Starling     2
Chipping Sparrow  
Northern Cardinal     2
American Goldfinch  

——Fence Line
Blackpoll Warbler  
Downy Woodpecker  
House Wren  
Brown-headed Cowbird  
House Sparrow  

——Maintenance Yard
Common Yellowthroat      (Tully)
Mourning Dove      2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Great Crested Flycatcher  
Carolina Chickadee  
Wood Thrush  
American Robin  
Northern Cardinal     3

——Nature Center
Night-Heron     sp.  
American Crow     4
Carolina Wren  
Swainson's Thrush  
American Robin     2
House Sparrow 

Contributors: Paul DeAnna, Jim Lemert, Tully and Devon Hochhausler, Mardi 
Hastings 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC

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Subject: Re: Bkackpoll Warbler and Barn Owl and other sightings in Rohrersville
From: Warblerick <ricksussman1955 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 07:51:28 -0700 (PDT)
On Sunday, May 22, 2016 at 7:08:38 AM UTC-4, Frank Boyle wrote:
> Hi All,
> 
> We had a Blackpoll Warbler stop by yesterday - that's a first for the yard 
list - heard and verified it's song. I have had them in spring migration in 
years past down in the Palisades (NW DC) where I used to work on MacArthur 
Boulevard. 

> 
> We also have Barn Owls! There is an old 1930s house just to the NE of our 
property line that has been abandoned for many years - I suspect that is where 
the BAOW is hanging out. There are lots of voles, field mice, and rats around 
the agricultural fields and hedgerows and our meadow for them to feed on. 

> 
> Also have Great Horned Owls hooting right next to the back porch in a Norway 
Maple and grove of White Pines. It won't be long before the resident Screech 
Owls begin their nightly toots and calls. 

> 
> Very nice rain birds!  
> 
> Stay dry out there,
> 
> Frank 
> 
> 
> Frank Boyle
> Broken Wallet Farm
> Rohrersville, MD
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone

Hey Frank,
 Congrats on the Blackpolls! I had a pair here feeding in my one large Red Oak 
on last Saturdays May Count, but they're pretty scarce here too. Sounds like 
you've got a nice selection of owls there too. Barn Owl has become such a rare 
breeder anymore, you're very lucky. Did you see it or hear it (or both)? Must 
be a very difficult spring to raise babies, with all the rain, particularly for 
the owls. 


Nice report!

Keep your stick on the pond.

Rick Sussman
Woodbine,MD

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Subject: SOSH OC Inlet
From: Kurt Schwarz <kurtschwarz4 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 06:31:05 -0700
The yuck off shore lifted a bit and I tricked out three shearwaters. It
closed back in. Looks thicker to the south but headin to Assateague any way.

Thanks to those who provided advice, Mark, Leslie, Matt.

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Subject: OC Inlet
From: Kurt Schwarz <kurtschwarz4 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 05:39:58 -0700
Parking lot closed for auto show. Visibility out to sea virtually nil, can
only see a bit ruins buoys.

Kurt Schwarz
Ellicott City
kurtschwarz4 at gmail

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Subject: Bkackpoll Warbler and Barn Owl and other sightings in Rohrersville
From: Frank Boyle <ravenfrank AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 07:08:36 -0400
Hi All,

We had a Blackpoll Warbler stop by yesterday - that's a first for the yard list 
- heard and verified it's song. I have had them in spring migration in years 
past down in the Palisades (NW DC) where I used to work on MacArthur Boulevard. 


We also have Barn Owls! There is an old 1930s house just to the NE of our 
property line that has been abandoned for many years - I suspect that is where 
the BAOW is hanging out. There are lots of voles, field mice, and rats around 
the agricultural fields and hedgerows and our meadow for them to feed on. 


Also have Great Horned Owls hooting right next to the back porch in a Norway 
Maple and grove of White Pines. It won't be long before the resident Screech 
Owls begin their nightly toots and calls. 


Very nice rain birds!  

Stay dry out there,

Frank 


Frank Boyle
Broken Wallet Farm
Rohrersville, MD


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Fort Smallwood Park Friday, May 20, 2016 39 Raptors
From: susiericc AT comcast.net
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 02:49:03 +0000 (UTC)
Fort Smallwood Park 
Pasadena, Maryland, USA 

Daily Raptor Counts: May 20, 2016 
Species 	Day's Count 	Month Total 	Season Total 
Black Vulture 	8 	21 	296 
Turkey Vulture 	20 	535 	4488 
Osprey 	8 	57 	290 
Bald Eagle 	2 	68 	139 
Northern Harrier 	0 	16 	31 
Sharp-shinned Hawk 	0 	596 	1454 
Cooper's Hawk 	0 	32 	135 
Northern Goshawk 	0 	0 	0 
Red-shouldered Hawk 	0 	0 	47 
Broad-winged Hawk 	1 	248 	291 
Red-tailed Hawk 	0 	18 	109 
Rough-legged Hawk 	0 	0 	0 
Golden Eagle 	0 	0 	2 
American Kestrel 	0 	12 	106 
Merlin 	0 	15 	34 
Peregrine Falcon 	0 	3 	5 
Unknown Accipiter 	0 	2 	2 
Unknown Buteo 	0 	0 	3 
Unknown Falcon 	0 	0 	2 
Unknown Eagle 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Raptor 	0 	0 	0 
Mississippi Kite 	0 	4 	4 
Swallow-tailed Kite 	0 	0 	2 
Total: 	39 	1627 	7440 

Observation start time: 	9:15 am 
Observation end time: 	3:30 pm Daylight Time 
Total observation time: 	6.25 hours 
Official Counter 	Sue Ricciardi 
Observers: 	Chris Reed, John Hubble 


Visitors: 
Christine Stevens 

Weather: 
Partly cloudy; 65-74 degrees; good to excellent visibility; winds light, often 
with an easterly component,5-8 mph 


Raptor Observations: 


Non-raptor Observations: 
14 Common Nighthawks 


Report submitted by Sue Ricciardi ( susiericc AT comcast.net ) 
Fort Smallwood Park information may be found at: 
http://www.mdbirds.org/sites/mdsites/hawks/hawkwatch.html 


Site Description 
Fort Smallwood Park is located on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay at the 
mouth of the Patapsco River, 11 miles south of Baltimore, MD. Best winds are 
from the southwest. 

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Subject: Saturday (5/21) birding in the rain
From: Jim Green <jkgbirdman53 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 22:20:26 -0400
Kathy Calvert and I spent a full day birding today with a few highlights and 
many "lowlights". We spent most of the morning in St Mary's Co - Point Lookout, 
Long Neck RD, Beachville RD, etc looking primarily for shorebirds. Other than a 
few killdeer we found nothing else. 


Before our crazy thoughts could be reconsidered we were beelining it to 
Assateague (unfortunately not as the crow flies) for the Sooty Shearwaters. We 
arrived at the north beach of the State Park just after 2:30 and after 15 
minutes had some great views of two birds in our scopes and saw 5 total in just 
over a half hour. All were working their way north as previously reported. We 
also had a Red-throated Loon flying north as well. The Sooty Shearwater was a 
life bird for me so the drive was definitely worth it. 


Based on the success that I had earlier in the week with shorebirds in Caroline 
County we were very optimistic heading for the previously reported flooded 
field areas. With all of the rain since then and today we figured shorebirds 
would still be around in good numbers and variety. We hit Kinder Rd, Box Knife 
Rd, Whites Lane, Kibler Rd and even Drapers Mill Rd. 


I think we saw more wet and flooded fields throughout Caroline County than even 
I expected. We did not keep any lists or report anything to ebird. I believe 
that we did not see more than 15 shorebirds birds total in the entire county. 
They all either moved out or found new places to hide. We had a few killdeer, 
semipalmated plovers and sandpipers and one greater yellowlegs for our efforts. 
We then made our way back across the bay bridge and headed back to our meeting 
spot. 


Wanted to also say major kudos to Bill, Dave, Matt and Mikey for an excellent 
tally of species under very soggy and trying conditions. Look forward to 
hearing more about your noon to noon endeavors. 


CONGRATULATIONS !!!

Jim Green
Gaithersburg MD


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Thank you Matt
From: Kurt Schwarz <kurtschwarz4 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 18:07:23 -0700
For finally posting re Sooty Shearwaters off OC and the like. Many have
logged on eBird but nobody's posted to MdBirding. Only by chance did I see
it on the gadget today and am planning a trek tomorrow. Not super
optimistic given shift of wind to the north but what the heck!

Kurt Schwarz
Ellicott City

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Subject: Sooty Shearwaters in Worcester County
From: Matt Hafner <hafner.matt AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 19:59:57 -0400
Sooty Shearwaters are making their annual migration north along the coast and 
put on quite a show for the IBA Birdathon team last evening and others today. 
There is a good chance to see Sooty Shearwaters from shore every year in late 
May-early June, but some days are better than others. The last two days were 
apparently quite good. All of the birds we saw were in direct migration north 
and not hanging around, but there will be more coming. 


If you want to see scope some shearwaters from shore, head down the coast over 
the next 10 days. If you want killer views and photos of shearwaters, sign up 
for the upcoming Paulagics trip out of Lewes! 


More on the birdathon later!

Matt Hafner
Forest Hill, MD

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Subject: Canadian Rockies bird watching suggestions?
From: Debbie Taylor <debrataylor11 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 15:18:28 -0700 (PDT)
I know that this isn't the exact place to ask this, but has anyone been to the 
Canadian Rockies to do birdwatching? We will be at Banff, Jasper and Lake 
Louise plus other areas during late July and early August. Thanks. And yes, I 
did contact some local birding groups. Debbie & Lou Taylor 


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Subject: Monocacy National Battlefield, Frederick Co., May 20
From: Scott Baron <baron.scott AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 17:11:38 -0400
Hi, birders.

A colleague and I birded part of Monocacy National Battlefield for the
National Park Service's National Capital area parks bioblitz.  We
concentrated on the Gambrill Mill Trail area.  We got 56 species.

A Prothonotary Warbler was in what I'd consider to be marginal habitat at
the millpond.  I wonder if it will stick around? A flyover Red-headed
Woodpecker was a nice surprise.  We heard but could not see a singing Blue
Grosbeak.

Happy birding,

Scott Baron
Gaithersburg, Md.

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Subject: Swan Harbor Farm today
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 15:57:34 -0400
I did a quick drive through today and although you can't see much from a
car, I saw one beautiful breeding-plumage Semi-palmated Plover, a female
Wood Duck taking a stroll, and a pair of Killdeer making more Killdeer.

Earlier today I saw a Blackpoll Warbler at the Water's Edge community
center in Belcamp. I haven't been able to get out to see too many warblers
this spring, so that was a treat. He sang for me, too.

Pat Valdata
Elkton, MD

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Subject: Disappearing Hummingbirds...it's the Tulip tree's "fault"
From: JAMES SPEICHER <jugornought AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 14:25:36 -0400
On 5/21/16, JimC wrote:
We 'had' three RTHBs 7-10days ago over on the marsh and none for the
last 5 or so?!
****************************
It's been pointed out in past years that when *Tulip trees bloom, they
provide an abundant supply of nectar to nectar feeders incl hummers.

I've observed Tulip tree blossoms on the ground recently. So just be patient... 


My hummer female did put in a brief appearance this morning.

Jim Speicher
BroadRun/Burkittsville area
[FR] Frederick County
WA Co. MOS member

*From Wiki:
Liriodendron is a genus of two species of characteristically large
deciduous trees in the magnolia family. These trees are widely known
by the common name tulip tree or tuliptree for their large flowers
superficially resembling tulips. The Latin Liriodendron actually means
"lily tree",. The tulip tree is sometimes referred to as "tulip
poplar" …

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Subject: Re: Disappearing Hummingbirds
From: JimC <jimcancil AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 08:58:25 -0700 (PDT)
Ya, it's strange Frank... We 'had' three RTHBs 7-10days ago over on the marsh 
and none for the last 5 or so?! I reckoned they were headed north?? We have 
three feeders at home ..and my single feeder at my business in Salisbury has 
not been visited to my knowledge. My wife is pretty religious about not letting 
the nectar go sour. 


Jim

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Subject: Disappearing Hummingbirds
From: Warblerick <ricksussman1955 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 06:54:03 -0700 (PDT)
Still seeing at least one male here today, though sightings of females have 
been scarce. Keep your stick on the pond. 


Rick Sussman
Woodbine, MD

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Subject: Disappearing Hummingbirds
From: Frank Boyle <ravenfrank AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 05:51:50 -0400
The rain here in Pleasant Valley is relentless, as it is for all of you. We 
have three RTHBs which have gone into hiding (they did the same thing last year 
around this date, albeit under different meteorological circumstances) but I am 
hoping today's incessant downpours will bring them to the feeders. Most flowers 
do not produce nectar on days like this. 


Happy Deluge Birding,


Frank Boyle
Broken Wallet Farm
Rohrersville, MD


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Olive-sided Flycatcher at Black Marsh
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 16:42:47 -0400
I found an Olive-sided Flycatcher along the Black Marsh Trail in North Point 
State Park. Walk down the trail to the bench, and look left. The bird was 
hawking insects from a bare tree in the back treeline. Note that the trail is 
closed past the bench. 


A Prothonotary Warbler sang once at the entrance to the causeway and there were 
some migrant warblers in the woods. 


Tim Carney
Nottingham, MD

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Subject: Greater Rockville Area Bird Challenge -- thhis Sunday, May 22
From: Matt Von Hendy <vonhendy1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 12:44:07 -0700 (PDT)
Greater Rockville Bird Challenge— Sunday, May 22

The primary goal of this challenge is to see if it’s possible to see 100+ 
bird species with in the greater Rockville area this coming Sunday May 22nd. 
For the purposes of this challenge, the greater Rockville area includes 
anything within seven miles of the Rockville Town Center. 


Secondary goals of the challenge are to get birders out to explore birding 
spots within the local area and to provide an opportunity for the bird 
enthusiasts to meet at an informal Tally Rally to be held Sunday evening from 
8-9 pm at the Silver Dinner on Rockville Pike. 


There area 3 ways to participate:

1) Submit what you sightings to EBird by 7 pm on Sunday

2) E-mail what you have found to me by Sunday at 7 pm; my e-mail is 
vonhendy AT hotmail.com 


3) Bring your birding list and come to an informal Tally Rally which be held at 
the Silver Dinner from 8-9 pm on Sunday evening. It’s not necessary, but 
please let me know if you are coming so I know how big a table to get. 


If you have questions or would like more information, please feel free to 
e-mail me or send me a message on Facebook. 


Matt Von Hendy

Rockville, MD

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Subject: Parulas attacking window
From: "thbeal via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 14:48:24 -0400
Pair of Parulas perched in bushes, providing great photo ops, spent 20 minutes 
attacking window. 



Tom Beal
Glenn Dale, MD

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Subject: Re: Late WTSP
From: Janet Millenson <janet AT twocrows.com>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 14:16:04 -0400
I had one in my yard yesterday, and two on Tuesday.


Janet Millenson
Potomac, MD (Montgomery County)
janet AT twocrows.com
----------------------------------------------------------------
"Look at the birds!" -- Pascal the parrot


On 5/20/2016 8:22 AM, Warblerick wrote:
> Fairly quiet in the yard this morning, considering the first nice sunny 
morning in a long time. Most interesting find was a late WHITE-THROATED SPARROW 
skulking along the back fence line. My last yard sighting prior was May 11, two 
days before May Count. 

>
> Rick Sussman
> Woodbine, MD
>


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Subject: Druid Hill Park, Baltimore City--Jones Falls Trail and disc golf area
From: Steven Mickletz <smickletz AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 09:58:33 -0700 (PDT)
A couple Canada Warblers today!

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Friday 5/20/16
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 12:45:57 -0400
This morning (5/20) at Rock Creek Park…..

Maintenance Yard yielded most warbler species.

18 Warbler species seen or heard: Ovenbird, Blue-winged, Tennessee, Kentucky, 
Yellowthroat, Hooded, Redstart, Cape May, Parula, Magnolia, Bay-breasted, 
Blackburnian, Chestnut-sided, Blackpoll, BT Blue, Yellow-rump, BT Green, Canada 


——Equitation Field
American Redstart  
Blackpoll Warbler     	2
Canada Warbler  
Great Blue Heron     flyby
Mourning Dove  
Red-bellied Woodpecker     3
Downy Woodpecker  
Northern Flicker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee     2
Red-eyed Vireo     4
Blue Jay  
American Crow  
Carolina Chickadee     2
Tufted Titmouse  
White-breasted Nuthatch     4
Carolina Wren  
Wood Thrush     3
American Robin     4
Cedar Waxwing     11+
Eastern Towhee     2
Northern Cardinal      2
Brown-headed Cowbird     3
Baltimore Oriole  
American Goldfinch 

——Ridge
Ovenbird  
American Redstart  
Blackpoll Warbler  
Yellow-rumped Warbler  
Black-throated Green Warbler  
Canada Warbler  
Mourning Dove     3
Red-bellied Woodpecker     5
Northern Flicker  
Pileated Woodpecker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee     3
Yellow-throated Vireo  
Red-eyed Vireo  
American Crow  
Carolina Chickadee  
Tufted Titmouse  
White-breasted Nuthatch     3
Carolina Wren     4
Swainson's Thrush  
Wood Thrush     4
American Robin     10
Chipping Sparrow  
Eastern Towhee     3
Scarlet Tanager     2
Northern Cardinal     3
Brown-headed Cowbird  
American Goldfinch

——Yard Parking Lot and Fence Line
Kentucky Warbler      (Rennie)
Common Yellowthroat  
Turkey Vulture      2
Acadian Flycatcher  
Red-eyed Vireo  
White-breasted Nuthatch  
House Wren  
Swainson's Thrush  
House Finch  

——Maintenance Yard
Blue-winged Warbler  
Tennessee Warbler  
Common Yellowthroat  
American Redstart  
Cape May Warbler 
Northern Parula  
Magnolia Warbler     5
Bay-breasted Warbler     2
Blackburnian Warbler     2
Chestnut-sided Warbler     
Blackpoll Warbler  
Black-throated Blue Warbler  
Black-throated Green Warbler  
Canada Warbler  
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Northern Flicker  
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Blue Jay  2
Fish Crow  
crow sp. 
Swainson's Thrush  
Gray Catbird  
Cedar Waxwing  15
Scarlet Tanager 
Baltimore Oriole  

——Nature Center
Hooded Warbler  
Magnolia Warbler  
Chestnut-sided Warbler  
Canada Warbler  
Mourning Dove  
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Swainson's Thrush  
Wood Thrush  
House Finch  
House Sparrow     3

Summary of all species listed above: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29793751 
 


Contributors: Bill Butler, Leon Kass, Matt Cohen, John Boright, Bodo Stern, 
Susan Volman, Mardi Hastings, Jim Lemert, Katharine Kravitz, Michael Drake, 
Rennie Selkirk, Hanan Jacoby, Starr Kopper, Doris Rody, Howard Schwartz, Amy 
Roberts, Wendy and John, John Leszczynski,++ 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC


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Subject: Centennial's Great Today!
From: Sean McGuinn <captainamerica23 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 09:24:54 -0700 (PDT)
Great mix of warblers and vireo's. Also Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Orchard Orioles, 
Great Egret, Indigo Bunting...it was just a good bird every other one! 


Sean M.

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Subject: Swan Creek 5/19/2016
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 05:55:29 -0700 (PDT)
Yesterday's census was great. I had a nice mixed flock of passerines on the 
road to the wetlands including VEERY and WILSON'S WARBLER. A SEASIDE SPARROW 
was singing in the wetlands. The cells held hundreds of shorebirds including 10 
DUNLIN and 2 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERs; in the afternoon, many of the shorebirds 
moved to the reef ball line along the beach at low tide, and I got to see one 
of the White-rumps up close. SEMIPALMATED PLOVERs and SPOTTED SANDPIPERs were 
everywhere. I heard a WILLOW FLYCATCHER calling and watched a WARBLING VIREO 
singing in the wetlands--hopefully I can confirm both as breeding there this 
season. 


I ran into Ryan Johnson in the wetlands who calmly pointed out a COMMON 
NIGHTHAWK flying over at 13:04--a new site bird for me. Ryan also found a 
WHITE-WINGED SCOTER and a COMMON LOON slowly floating down the bay which I did 
not see in the morning. After my final check of the wetlands, I found a 
GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH where the woods first open up into the wetlands (near the 
observation deck). 


Full list below. Due to an increase in field work, I am not sure when the next 
birdwalk will be, but it will not be in early June as previously mentioned. 


Tim Carney
Nottingham, MD

Swan Creek Wetland--Cox Creek DMCF, Anne Arundel, Maryland, US
May 19, 2016 7:30 AM - 3:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.2 mile(s)
Comments: *** NOTE: Swan Creek/Cox Creek is an active industrial site and 
mitigation project in northern Anne Arundel Co. Access is at the end of Kembo 
Road off Fort Smallwood Road near 695. The site is open ONLY Monday through 
Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Please be in your car and leaving at 3:30 p.m.. 
Remember to always sign in at the office, to be on your best behavior (people 
have worked hard to coordinate this access), and to stick to permitted areas. 
This Swan Creek map linked here details where you are and aren't allowed to 
walk. http://www.billhubick.com/docs/swan_creek_map.jpg. *** 


Mostly cloudy, 58-71°F, calm-6 mph variable directions.
89 species (+1 other taxa)

Canada Goose  36
Mallard  25
Lesser Scaup  2     Flagged as high count. Lingering pair out on the river.
White-winged Scoter 1 Flagged as late. Male offshore, first spotted by Ryan 
Johnson. 

Bufflehead  4     Flagged as late. Lingering birds out on the river.
Ruddy Duck 106 Flagged as high count. 41 in the north cell; 65 out on the 
river. 

Common Loon  1
Double-crested Cormorant  129
Great Blue Heron  6
Snowy Egret  1
Little Blue Heron  3
Black Vulture  4
Turkey Vulture  8
Osprey  10
Bald Eagle  2
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk (borealis)  1
Semipalmated Plover 86 Flagged as high count. 51 in the north cell; 1 in the 
south cell; 34 in the wetlands. 

Killdeer  7
Spotted Sandpiper 56 Flagged as high count. 24 in the north cell; 26 in the 
south cell; 6 in the wetlands. 

Greater Yellowlegs  8
Lesser Yellowlegs  6
Dunlin  10
Least Sandpiper 571 Flagged as high count. 561 in the north cell; 2 in the 
south cell; 8 in the wetlands. 

White-rumped Sandpiper 2 Flagged as rare but annual at this location. Both seen 
in the north cell in the morning, and then one was seen along the reef ball 
line at low tide. 

Semipalmated Sandpiper  20
Ring-billed Gull  7
Herring Gull (American)  2
Great Black-backed Gull  4
Least Tern  2
Common Tern  1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  3
Mourning Dove  2
Common Nighthawk  1
Chimney Swift  12
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Downy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Willow Flycatcher  1
Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)  1
Least Flycatcher  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Eastern Kingbird  8
White-eyed Vireo  2
Warbling Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  8
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  1
Fish Crow  4
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  8
Purple Martin  2
Tree Swallow  6
Bank Swallow  3
Barn Swallow  13
Carolina Chickadee  8
Marsh Wren  2
Carolina Wren  10
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  7
Eastern Bluebird  2
Veery  1
Gray-cheeked Thrush  1
American Robin  1
Gray Catbird  8
Brown Thrasher  1
Northern Mockingbird  1
European Starling  22
Cedar Waxwing  2
Northern Waterthrush  2
Black-and-white Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat 42 Flagged as high count. 21 in the wetlands; 8 along the 
powerline; 12 in the woods; 1 at the retention pond. Mostly females. 

American Redstart  9
Northern Parula  1
Magnolia Warbler  1
Yellow Warbler  4
Blackpoll Warbler  1
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Wilson's Warbler  1
Seaside Sparrow  1
Savannah Sparrow (Savannah)  1
Song Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  18
Blue Grosbeak  5
Indigo Bunting  20
Red-winged Blackbird  50
Common Grackle (Purple)  5
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
Orchard Oriole  13
American Goldfinch  17

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29791025 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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Subject: Anne Arundel Trumpeter Swans
From: "'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 12:48:27 +0000 (UTC)
The pair of immature Trumpeter Swans that have been in a restricted location at 
the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater but are currently in 
a field that is viewable by the public. If anyone is interested, and I can't 
guarantee they'll be there for any length of time, drive east on 214, south on 
Muddy Creek Road then left onto Contees Wharf Road, about a mile south of 214. 
You'll probably be accosted by security but tell them you're going onto the 
trails. Drive down the gravel road then right near the construction. At the 
stop, go straight. At the next stop, go straight. You'll end up at a circle. 
Park back in the direction you came from. There's a field there which is where 
the birds are currently grazing. 

See attached image for location.

Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland

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Subject: Re: Late WTSP
From: Warblerick <ricksussman1955 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 05:35:20 -0700 (PDT)
On Friday, May 20, 2016 at 8:22:23 AM UTC-4, Warblerick wrote:
> Fairly quiet in the yard this morning, considering the first nice sunny 
morning in a long time. Most interesting find was a late WHITE-THROATED SPARROW 
skulking along the back fence line. My last yard sighting prior was May 11, two 
days before May Count. 

> 
> Rick Sussman
> Woodbine, MD

I have recorded only 1 sighting in my AVISYS database that is later, May 25, 
2003 in Montgomery County. 


Rick Sussman
Woodbine,MD

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Subject: Late WTSP
From: marian rutigliano <mcrutig AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 05:28:12 -0700 (PDT)
I have a pair of them still in and around my backyard. Last saw them yesterday. 


Marian Rutigliano
Towson

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Subject: Late WTSP
From: Warblerick <ricksussman1955 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 05:22:23 -0700 (PDT)
Fairly quiet in the yard this morning, considering the first nice sunny morning 
in a long time. Most interesting find was a late WHITE-THROATED SPARROW 
skulking along the back fence line. My last yard sighting prior was May 11, two 
days before May Count. 


Rick Sussman
Woodbine, MD

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Subject: Nighthawks at Cromwell Valley Park, Baltimore County
From: James Meyers <jamesleomeyers AT mac.com>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 18:49:47 -0700 (PDT)
Over 100 Nighthawks were seen at Cromwell V.P. this evening as my wife Joanne 
and I were checking on some Bluebird boxes. Beginning at 7:25 PM we saw a group 
of 43 birds. As they moved off to the north towards Loch Raven Reservoir we saw 
more groups coming from the south. Most of these birds were fairly low and 
obviously hunting insects. As I looked at the low flying birds through my 
binoculars I noticed that there were more Nighthawks at high altitude, 
something I have never seen before. The high flying birds appeared to be 
heading north without the circling and aerial acrobats that the lower feeding 
birds were exhibiting. By 8:00 PM the flight was over. I estimated 110 birds, 
probably the most I've ever seen in migration. 


Jim Meyers  -  Parkville, Baltimore County

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Subject: Re: Maryland BirdTrax for Rarities
From: Marcy Stutzman <marciastutzman AT netscape.net>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 15:15:16 -0700 (PDT)
I have two BirdTrax gadgets on my Google homepage, one for MD and one for DE. 
Just recently they stopped working. I found the answer to making them work 
again here: 


AccuBirder
http://www.accubirder.com/
http://www.accubirder.com/gadgets.php

BirdTrax Instructions

If you want to keep your BirdTrax gadget running, and do not want to use 
Accubirder, you can either (1) re-enter your settings into the code generator 
at birdventurebirding.com, or (2) replace the part of your code shown below 
with the new link: 


Replace this...

url=https://birdtrax-explorer.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/birdtrax.xml

...with this!

url=http://www.accubirder.com/code/birdtrax

Marcy Stutzman
Russett, MD 20724

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Subject: Re: Kent & Caroline Counties - May 18th
From: Jerald Reb <jrebelboy AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 15:14:02 -0400
Hello all,

I didn't have my scope with me, but I didn't see any shorebirds at Knife 
Box/Whites lane. However at the intersection of Kibler Rd and Whitelysburgh Rd, 
I had a Short-billed Dowitcher, 3 Greater Yellowlegs, a Semipalmated Plover, 
and some smaller shorebirds which I was unable to identify with just my bins. 


Jerald

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 18, 2016, at 11:08 PM, Jim Green  wrote:
> 
> Hi everybody:
> 
> I spent a long but very enjoyable day today in the above counties. 
Yesterday's posts from Kye Jenkins about the Kent County Black Skimmer & 
White-winged Scoter kind of decided what direction I was going to bird. I was 
not really expecting either bird to hang around (neither did) but you never 
know. I started in Kent Co. enjoying a nice variety of swallows at the 
Chestertown WWTP including a pair of Bank Swallows that were literally flying 
close enough to me to easily pick up their "cigar bands" without the aid of 
binoculars. A quick visit to Chesapeake Farms yielded nothing but common and 
expected birds. 

> 
> When I arrived at Eastern Neck NWR the tide was beginning to go out. From the 
causeway I had a count of 36 Semipalmated Plovers. When I entered them in ebird 
the number was flagged as high. This would be the first of three different 
times that my observations of this bird throughout the day at different 
locations yielded high counts as far as ebird was concerned. There were also 6 
Dunlin here with their black bellies in full view. 

> 
> Birding the rest of the refuge was fairly quiet. I only had a handful of 
warblers and Blackpoll was the only one that was not a potential breeding bird. 

> 
> About two hours later I returned to the causeway and immediately saw some 
Caspian Terns fly in and land on the mudflats, a total of seven. They were soon 
joined by single Forster's and Common Terns. The tide was lower than before and 
a few other shorebirds had joined the original mix. The new species were a 
single White-rumped Sandpiper and a Ruddy Turnstone. The bird was facing away 
from me and preening for about five minutes when I first saw it and even though 
I could see the orangish legs it wasn't until it began walking around that i 
was sure of the ID. 

> 
> I then headed to Caroline County to see which farm fields still had enough 
water in them to attract shorebirds. Outside of Greensboro I was headed down 
Knife Box Rd towards the intersection with Whites Lane when I passed a small 
flooded field (12151 was the address) and was pleasantly surprised to find six 
Short-billed Dowitchers. 

> 
> I then pulled down Whites Lane (just off of Knife Box Rd) and birded the farm 
field bordering both roads. There was not alot of water left in the field and 
also not large numbers of shorebirds either. But the quality more than made up 
for the quantity. Besides the 51 Semipalmated Plovers there were also 7 Dunlin, 
3 Black-bellied Plovers and 1 Ruddy Turnstone. Once again I was surprised to 
see the latter. Two days ago Danny Poet and Steve Westre also had the turnstone 
here along with much higher counts of other shorebirds. 

> 
> My final stop of the day was on Kinder Rd near Federalsburg. As I pulled up 
to the flooded field I had my only encounter of the day with another 
birder...Glenn Lovelace, whom I had never met before. Nothing unusual here. The 
only thing of note was the "high count" (according to ebird) of the 28 
Semi-palmated Plovers. 

> 
> It was a fun and rewarding day to be on across the Bay Bridge.
> 
> Jim Green
> Gaithersburg MD
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Subject: [FR] Best Bike Ride Bird today...
From: JAMES SPEICHER <jugornought AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 15:08:16 -0400
...had to be the Grasshopper Sparrow for once perched high on a fence
post rather than huddled down in the grass out-of-sight.  Lots of
Catbirds and Mockers around as well as 2 GB Herons.

Feeder note:
Last dates for the following:
Junco 4/6
White-crowned Sp 5/9
White-throated Sp 5/12

Jim Speicher
BroadRun/Burkittsville area
[FR] Frederick County
WA Co. MOS member

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Subject: Re: Maryland BirdTrax for Rarities
From: Jared Fisher <Jared.Fisher AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 15:02:29 -0400
Hi all,

There is also a BirdTrax gadget at http://www.mdbirding.com/ebird.html  .
Unknown to me, it had been down for a few days, but it should be fixed now.

Statewide gadget is also working on the mobile page
http://www.mdbirding.com/mobile.html  but I haven't had time to update the
other links.

Feel free to let me know of other problems with the site.

Jared

On Thu, May 19, 2016 at 2:38 PM,  wrote:

> As I haven't been able to find a Maryland BirdTrax for rarities, I made
> one and put it here: http://www.wsyacy.com/MdBirdTrax.html
> The BirdTrax software [and/or curator(s)] works very well but there are
> occasional glitches.
>
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>

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Subject: Maryland BirdTrax for Rarities
From: walterscottyoung AT gmail.com
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 11:38:03 -0700 (PDT)
As I haven't been able to find a Maryland BirdTrax for rarities, I made one and 
put it here: http://www.wsyacy.com/MdBirdTrax.html 

The BirdTrax software [and/or curator(s)] works very well but there are 
occasional glitches. 


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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Thursday 5/19/16
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 11:53:31 -0400
This morning (5/19) at Rock Creek Park……

Note: Gray-cheeked Thrush and Summer Tanager seen at Nature Center loop trail. 


8 Warbler species seen or heard: Ovenbird, Yellowthroat, Redstart, Parula, 
Magnolia, Chestnut-sided, Black-throated Blue, Yellow-rump 


——Equitation Field
Ovenbird      2
American Redstart  
Chestnut-sided Warbler  
Black-throated Blue Warbler  
Yellow-rumped Warbler  
Mourning Dove     4
Red-bellied Woodpecker     2
Downy Woodpecker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Acadian Flycatcher  
Red-eyed Vireo  
Blue Jay  
American Crow
Tufted Titmouse  
Carolina Wren  
Swainson's Thrush     2
Wood Thrush  
American Robin     3
Cedar Waxwing     8
Eastern Towhee  
Northern Cardinal  
Brown-headed Cowbird  
Baltimore Oriole  
American Goldfinch     2

——Ridge
Ovenbird  
Common Yellowthroat  
American Redstart     3
Northern Parula  
Magnolia Warbler  
Chestnut-sided Warbler     2
Black-throated Blue Warbler  
Yellow-rumped Warbler    2  
Red-shouldered Hawk  
Mourning Dove     6
Common Nighthawk  
Red-bellied Woodpecker     4
Northern Flicker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee      3
Fish Crow  
Carolina Chickadee  
Tufted Titmouse     4
White-breasted Nuthatch  
Carolina Wren     3
Swainson's Thrush  
Wood Thrush     5
American Robin      7
European Starling  
Cedar Waxwing     4
Eastern Towhee     3
Scarlet Tanager     2
Northern Cardinal     3
Brown-headed Cowbird     2
Baltimore Oriole      3

——Fence Line    (Bill)
Northern Flicker  
Red-eyed Vireo  
House Wren  
Carolina Wren     2
Baltimore Oriole  
House Sparrow     2

——Maintenance Yard    (Bill)
American Redstart  
Yellow-rumped Warbler 
Mourning Dove      2
Red-bellied Woodpecker     2
Northern Flicker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Carolina Chickadee  
American Robin  
Cedar Waxwing      11
Northern Cardinal  
Common Grackle     2
American Goldfinch     2

——Nature Center     (Bill. Jim B., Lesley)
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Mourning Dove     2
Red-bellied Woodpecker      2
Pileated Woodpecker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Acadian Flycatcher  
Red-eyed Vireo  
Blue Jay     2
Carolina Chickadee    4
Tufted Titmouse  
White-breasted Nuthatch     4
Carolina Wren  
Veery  
Gray-cheeked Thrush     2    (Jim B. +)
Swainson's Thrush     4
Wood Thrush     3
American Robin     9
Summer Tanager    FOS  (Jim B., Lesley)
Northern Cardinal     4
Common Grackle  
Brown-headed Cowbird  
House Finch     2
House Sparrow 

Summary of the birds listed above: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29772546 
 


Contributors: Bill Butler, Leon Kass, Paul DeAnna, David Lauter, Jim Lemert, 
Betsy Stephens, Jim Boughton, Lesley Simmons 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack




















Washington  DC

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Subject: : Ruffed Grouse Finzel
From: Kurt Schwarz <kurtschwarz4 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 08:39:57 -0700
One is drumming by parking lot. Was doing so at 11:00 and continues.

Kurt Schwarz

Ellicott City

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Subject: Thank you
From: Kurt Schwarz <kurtschwarz4 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 08:38:15 -0700
Rich, Tim, Joe, J.B. and one or two I've forgotten.

We had great looks at GW wArb and Henslow's with bonus BB cuckoo.

Kurt Schwarz
Ellicott City

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Subject: Hart-Miller Island, 05/18/16
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 10:58:46 -0400
05/18/16 – 715am-3pm

Hart-Miller Island, Essex, B Co., MD



WEATHER: Overcast/MC, 53-65 degrees, N 3K- N 4K (peaked at 11K around 11am)


OBS: Mario C (from Costa Rica), Kevin G, Bob R



Canada Goose – 56

Wood Duck – 5

Gadwall – 2

American Black Duck – 3

Mallard – 54

Northern Shoveler – 5

*NORTHERN PINTAIL – 2

Green-winged Teal – 12

Lesser Scaup – 10

*RED-BREASTED MERGANSER – 1

Ruddy Duck – 24

Common Loon – 2

Pied-billed Grebe – 1

Double-crested Cormorant – 19

Great Blue Heron – 11

Great Egret – 3

*TRICOLORED HERON – 1 (adult)

*GLOSSY IBIS – 20

Osprey – 16

Northern Harrier – 1

Bald Eagle – 5 (2 adults, 3 immature)

Peregrine Falcon – 2

*VIRGINIA RAIL – 1

American Coot – 41

*BLACK-NECKED STILT – 2

Black-bellied Plover – 142

Semipalmated Plover – 38

Killdeer – 6

Spotted Sandpiper – 6

Greater Yellowlegs – 4

Lesser Yellowlegs – 8

Dunlin – 943

Least Sandpiper – 161

Semipalmated Sandpiper – 84

*WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER – 2

*PECTORAL SANDPIPER – 3

*SHORT-BILLED DOWICHER – 37 (5 prairie)

Ring-billed Gull – 49

Herring Gull – 45

Great Black-backed Gull – 6

*LEAST TERN – 1

Caspian Tern – 281

Mourning Dove – 3

Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 1

Chimney Swift – 5

Great Crested Flycatcher – 1

Eastern Kingbird – 9

Red-eyed Vireo – 1

American Crow – 2

Purple Martin – 21

Tree Swallow – 47

Bank Swallow – 2

Barn Swallow – 56

Carolina Chickadee – 1

Carolina Wren – 2

House Wren – 1

Marsh Wren – 4

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 3

Gray Catbird – 7

Brown Thrasher – 1

European Starling – 5

Northern Waterthrush – 1

Black-and-white Warbler – 1

Common Yellowthroat – 48

American Redstart – 8

Northern Parula – 1

Magnolia Warbler – 3

Yellow Warbler – 9

Chestnut-sided Warbler – 1

Blackpoll Warbler – 1

Black-throated Blue Warbler – 2

Yellow-rumped Warbler – 4

Prairie Warbler – 1 (female)

Yellow-breasted Chat – 1

Savannah Sparrow – 2

Song Sparrow – 2

Swamp Sparrow – 4

Northern Cardinal – 9

Blue Grosbeak – 2

Indigo Bunting – 2

*BOBOLINK – 2

Red-winged Blackbird – 151

Brown-headed Cowbird – 8

Orchard Oriole – 9

American Goldfinch – 24

SPECIES: 85   INDIVIDUALS: 2583



MAMMALS: Red Fox – 3



REPTILES: E Painted Turtle – 1



AMPHIBIANS: Fowler’s Toad – 3, Green Frog – 1, Bullfrog – 1



BUTTERFLIES: Cabbage White – 1, Pearl Crescent – 1, Common Buckeye – 1



DRAGONFLIES: C Green Darner – 1, Needham’s Skimmer – 1


INSECTS: E Tent Caterpillar – 6, Two-spotted Lady Beetle - 1


    Kevin Graff
    Jarrettsville, MD
    KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Elliott Island Riad, May 14, 2016.
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 13:23:56 +0000
ELLIOTT ISLAND ROAD, May 14, 2016, Midnight - 9 P.M. 113 species (1 less than 
on May 7; 7 more than on this weekend in 2015). 133 miles by car. Totals for 
May 7, 2016 are in parentheses. 



Canada goose 46 (65, no goslings either day), wood duck 5 (2), gadwall 2 (0), 
American black duck 20 (16), mallard 18 (102, grant it, many of them are 
pen-raised), blue-winged teal 0 (2), green-winged teal 1 male (0), canvasback 3 
(3, 2 females, 1 male, with the ruddies), ruddy duck 29 (155), NORTHERN 
BOBWHITE 0 (0), wild turkey 2 (2), common loon 0 (2 in northward migration), 
double-crested cormorant 120 (9), brown pelican 3 (7), 



least bittern 2 (2, 1 calling RIGHT NEXT to the road), great blue heron 22 
(30), great egret 2 (1, curiously low), snowy egret 21 (23), tricolored heron 1 
(0), green heron 2 (1,) black-crowned night heron 0 (1), glossy ibis 0 (1, last 
species of the day, settling in where the night herons usually come at dusk), 
black vulture 2 (3), turkey vulture 100 (79), osprey 48 (33), BALD EAGLE 71 
(47), northern harrier 0 (4), red-shouldered hawk 2 (1), red-tailed hawk 3 (3), 



clapper rail 3 (7), Virginia rail 25, 1 flushed at close range (16, 3 flushed 
at close range), common gallinule 12 (6), black-necked stilt 0 (5), 
semipalmated plover 0 (1), killdeer 2 (3), spotted sandpiper 6 (5), solitary 
sandpiper 1 (1), 7 (GREATER YELLOWLEGS 195), willet 12 (16), lesser yellowlegs 
3 (75), dunlin 195 (115), least sandpiper 27 (39), semipalmated sandpiper 10 
(2), American woodcock 1 (0), 



Bonaparte’s gull 1 (0), laughing gull 100 (411), ring-billed gull 13 (1), 
herring gull 3 (4), least tern 1 (5 at Vienna), Caspian tern 0 (1), Forster’s 
tern 2 (3, curiously low), royal tern 3 (7), rock pigeon 4 (1, at Vienna), 
mourning dove 28 (22), yellow-billed cuckoo 4 (0), barn owl 1 (0), eastern 
screech-owl 2 (2), great horned owl 3 (0), CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOW 4 (0, 1st miss 
ever), chimney swift 10 (3), ruby-throated hummingbird 1 (0), red-headed 
woodpecker 2 (2), red-bellied woodpecker 1 (1), downy woodpecker 4 (3), hairy 
woodpecker 0 (2), northern flicker 1 (2), pileated woodpecker 0 (1), 



eastern wood pewee 3 (0), Acadian flycatcher 1 (0), great crested flycatcher 40 
(18), eastern kingbird 12 (6), white-eyed vireo 14 (7), red-eyed vireo 15 (4), 
blue jay 11 (4), American crow 33 (22), fish crow 2 (12), purple martin 17 (6), 
tree swallow 65 (170), bank swallow 1 (0), barn swallow 100 (125), Carolina 
chickadee 13 (11), tufted titmouse 17 (16), brown-headed nuthatch 6 (7), house 
wren 9 (16, fond of marsh hammocks with many standing dead trees), marsh wren 
30 (24), Carolina wren 18 (15), blue-gray gnatcatcher 7 (4), 



eastern bluebird 4 (2), wood thrush 1 (3), American robin 38 (26), gray catbird 
7 (9), brown thrasher 0 (1), northern mockingbird 14 (12), European starling 
100 (50), ovenbird 30 (21), worm-eating warbler 1 (0), northern waterthrush 0 
(1), black-and-white warbler 0 (2), prothonotary warbler 4 (1), common 
yellowthroat 101 (63), American redstart 0 (1 male), northern parula 0 (1 
male), yellow warbler 4 (5), pine warbler 40 (27), myrtle warbler 0 (2), 
prairie warbler 2 (1 male), Canada warbler 1 male (0), yellow-breasted chat 1 
(1), 



eastern towhee 9 (6), chipping sparrow 34 (22), field sparrow 1 (1), Savannah 
sparrow 1 (2), grasshopper sparrow 0 (1), saltmarsh sparrow 1 (1, in decline 
here), seaside sparrow 75 (45), song sparrow 2 (3), swamp sparrow 11 (9; 
increasing here as breeders; a lot of singing these 2 days), summer tanager 13 
(6), scarlet tanager 1 (0), northern cardinal 42 (30), blue grosbeak 14 (5), 
indigo bunting 25 (6), red-winged blackbird 265 (355), eastern meadowlark 1 
(3), common grackle 205 (145), boat-tailed grackle 9 (23), brown-headed cowbird 
52 (36), orchard oriole 16 (10), house finch 3 (2, Vienna), American goldfinch 
10 (14), house sparrow 5 (2). 



WEATHER (defintely): 60 - 57 (just after sunrise) rising to 77 at 4:11 P.M., 
then falling 17 degrees from 4:30 - 5 P.M. and after the storm hit by 5:15 P.M. 
Clear becoming partly cloudy by late morning, calm until then except sometimes 
light & variable < 10 m.p.h. in the late pre-dawn period, then NW 15+. Misty, 
diffuse, head-high areas of patchy fog before sunrise. Ominous dark clouds 
materialize in the late afternoon and by the time I hit the E.I.R. then show a 
few great shafts of light streaming down. 



Late in the afternoon the clouds are off to the SW advancing rapidly with 
numerous mammiform formations depending from them, one of them with what looks 
like an incipient tornado funnel, then the winds hit at up to 45-50 m.p.h. from 
the SW and there is heavy rain for c. 0.5 hours. But then it begins to clear 
from the west, the rain stops and there are partial rainbows in front of the 
very deep, purplish-gray clouds that are off to the east where there are 
partial, intense rainbows. 



A group of 5 Snowy Egrets, somewhat distant, flies in front of one of the 
rainbows. Then a scary, huge, anvil-shaped cloud approaches from the west but 
brings only high winds in this evening , plus on May 15 & 16, with some rain 
Saturday night on my way home, strong enough so that while driving it feels as 
if I am maneuvering a boat in big swells. During the storm Lynn Davidson 
reports some sleet at Hooper’s Island. From 4:30 onward the strong winds vary 
from SW to NW then SW again. Crazy. 



The sky is with a marvelous clarity, cleansed by the rains. At night the 
constellations are clearly seen. The Milky Way extends across most of the open 
sky high overhead from Cassiopeia on down to the horizon to the southeast. The 
moon, 51% visible, sets at 2:11 A.M. Sunrise is 5:55, sunset at 8:09. Low tide 
at Fishing Point is 3:42 A.M., high at 9:24 A.M., low again at 4:15 P.M. The 
afternoon low tide is much lower than normal, lots of good mud. 



AREAS COVERED: Elliott Island Road in its entirety, also Henry’s Crossroads, 
Lewis Wharf Road, Griffith Neck Road, Drawbridge, town of Vienna, parts of 
Drawbridge Road, parts of Steele Neck Road, Kraft Neck Road (muddy, wet & 
treacherous), Bestpitch Ferry Road, Bucktown, and Decoursey Bridge Road. Go up 
and down the entire length of Elliott Island Road 3 times, one of those in 
darkness. 



NON-AVIAN TAXA, pretty good on May 14: MAMMALS: white-tailed deer 3 (3), sika 
deer 11 (6), eastern cottontail 0 (1), red fox 1 kit (1 d.o.r. with attendant 
turkey vulture chowing down), muskrat 0 (5, usually do not see any; energized 
by the very high waters), gray squirrel 0 (1), fox squirrel 0 (2, 1 on Lewis 
Wharf Road at very close range), raccoon 1 (1), Virginia opossum 1 (0), and 
woodchuck 2 “field fatty” (0). 



BATRACHIANS: cricket frog c. 12 (xx, big chorus next to Griffith Neck Road), 
spring peeper 0 (1), southern leopard frog 10 (c. 19), green frog 9 (1), 
Cope’s gray tree frog c. 10 (0), carpenter frog 2 (0), green tree frog c. 30 
(0), Fowler’s toad 1 (0), and bullfrog 8 (0). 



REPTILES: mud turtle 4 (1), red belly slider 6 (0), snapping turtle 1 a tiny 
youngster (0), painted turtle 43 (0), box turtle 1 (0), diamondback terrapin 10 
(0), northern water snake 1 d.o.r. (1 (c. 2’), red-bellied water snake 1 
d.o.r. (1), black racer 1 nearly d.o.r. (0). 



BUTTERFLIES: red-spotted purple 2 (1), tiger swallowtail 2 (0), red admiral 1 
(0), and (several distant, smallish dark ones I did not ID). I see dozen or so 
frogs saltating across the road after sunset, probably leopards. BUGS: marsh 
fireflies 15 (only one of the special marsh fireflies seen). Usually they 
glimmer all over through the Spartina in May. FLOWERS: lots of the small, white 
daffodils still in their blooming prime. 



FAMILY GROUP REPRESENTATION: waterfowl 8 (7 so so), heron types 6 (7 the same), 
raptors 6 (7 also so so), rallids 3 (3, poor), shorebirds 10 (11 O.K.), terns 3 
(4 good, for here), owls 3 (1 poor), woodpeckers 4 (all 6), warblers 9 verging 
on pathetic (12, good, for here), sparrows 9 (8, not counting towhee, good). 



REPRESENTATIVE INCREASES MAY 7 - MAY 14. As is always the case some birds are 
in bigger numbers the 2nd weekend, specifically Acadian Flycatcher, Eastern 
Wood Pewee, Great Crested Flycatcher, Eastern Kingbird, Blue Grosbeak, Indigo 
Bunting, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, White-eyed Vireo, Red-eyed Vireo, Summer 
Tanager, Orchard Oriole, and Semipalmated Sandpiper. This is true for these 
listed species every year. 



MISCELLANEOUS: I use clickers some of the time to count Bald Eagle, Common 
Yellowthroat, Pine Warbler, and Ovenbird. Some of the area along Henry’s 
Crossroads is heavily posted by the Alabama Forest Owners Association (?). In 
the period midnight to 5 A.M. only 3 cars go by. Both today and on May 7 I talk 
with friendly turkey hunters. Of course they want to know if I’ve seen any. 
This is the 1st time in 98 starts that I disembark to eat lunch in a 
restaurant, 12:30 - 1, at Millie’s Road House in Vienna, a good move. 



Best to all. - Harry Armistead, Philadelphia.       		 	   		  

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Subject: Elliott Island Road, May 7, 2016.
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 13:03:14 +0000
ELLIOTT ISLAND ROAD, May 7, 2016 (a segment of the 97th Dorchester County May 
Bird Count; the first 97 are the hardest). Roll out of the sack at 2:38 A.M. 
… time to get moving. Am in the field 4:45 A.M. - 9:15 P.M. I forego the 
all-nighter in view of the rain (it’s raining steady at 2:38) and somewhat 
spooky weather forecast. 114 species (13 more than on this weekend in 2015). 94 
miles by car. 



Canada goose 65 (no goslings), wood duck 2, American black duck 16, mallard 102 
(grant it, many of them are pen-raised), blue-winged teal 2, canvasback 3 (2 
females, 1 male, with the ruddies), ruddy duck 155, NORTHERN BOBWHITE 0, wild 
turkey 2, common loon 2 (in northward migration), double-crested cormorant 9, 
brown pelican 7, 



least bittern 2 (1 calling RIGHT NEXT to the road), great blue heron 30, great 
egret 1 (curiously low), snowy egret 23, green heron 1, black-crowned night 
heron 1, glossy ibis 1 (last species of the day, settling in where the night 
herons usually come at dusk), black vulture 3, turkey vulture 79, osprey 33, 
BALD EAGLE 47, northern harrier 4, red-shouldered hawk 1, red-tailed hawk 3, 



clapper rail 7, Virginia rail 16, common gallinule 6, black-necked stilt 5, 
semipalmated plover 1, killdeer 3, spotted sandpiper 5, solitary sandpiper 1, 
GREATER YELLOWLEGS 195, willet 16, lesser yellowlegs 75, dunlin 115, least 
sandpiper 39, semipalmated sandpiper 2, laughing gull 411, ring-billed gull 1, 
herring gull 4, least tern 5 (at Vienna), Caspian tern 1, Forster’s tern 3 
(curiously low), royal tern 7, rock pigeon 1 (Vienna), mourning dove 22, 
eastern screech-owl 2, CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOW 0 (1st miss ever), chimney swift 3, 
red-headed woodpecker 2, red-bellied woodpecker 1, downy woodpecker 3, hairy 
woodpecker 2, northern flicker 2, pileated woodpecker 1, 



great crested flycatcher 18, eastern kingbird 6, white-eyed vireo 7, red-eyed 
vireo 4, blue jay 4, American crow 22, fish crow 12, purple martin 6, tree 
swallow 170, barn swallow 125, Carolina chickadee 11, tufted titmouse 16, 
brown-headed nuthatch 7, house wren 16 (fond of marsh hammocks with many 
standing dead trees), marsh wren 24, Carolina wren 15, blue-gray gnatcatcher 4, 



eastern bluebird 2, wood thrush 3, American robin 26, gray catbird 9, brown 
thrasher 1, northern mockingbird 12, European starling 50, ovenbird 21, 
northern waterthrush 1, black-and-white warbler 2, prothonotary warbler 1, 
common yellowthroat 63, American redstart 1 male, northern parula 1 male, 
yellow warbler 5, pine warbler 27, myrtle warbler 2, prairie warbler 1 male, 
yellow-breasted chat 1, 



eastern towhee 6, chipping sparrow 22, field sparrow 1, Savannah sparrow 2, 
grasshopper sparrow 1, saltmarsh sparrow 1 (in decline here), seaside sparrow 
45, song sparrow 3, swamp sparrow 9, summer tanager 6, northern cardinal 30, 
blue grosbeak 5, indigo bunting 6, red-winged blackbird 355, eastern meadowlark 
3, common grackle 145, boat-tailed grackle 23, brown-headed cowbird 36, orchard 
oriole 10, house finch 2 (Vienna), American goldfinch 14, house sparrow 2. 



WATER LEVELS both tidal and fresh as high as I’ve ever seen them. Yellowlegs 
seem to be at home both in the submerged salt marsh and flooded fields. Out in 
the marsh by the yellow house on the east side of Island Creek there are 
exactly 40 carp, all 1’ - 1.5’, in 10 inches of tidal water on the 
pavement. I ran one over. On Griffith Neck Road, c. 1/3 of a mile from the 
nearest open water, similarly-sized carp are swimming in a ditch, threading 
their way between cattails and Phragmites. Official low tide, such as it is, is 
at 9:26 A.M. As a result of the extremely high tides 7 shorebird species are 
seen on the road paving today: Greater & Lesser yellowlegs, Solitary Sandpiper, 
Spotted Sandpiper, Willet, Least Sandpiper, and Semipalmated Plover. 



WEATHER: 49 - 60 degrees F. Occasional light rain at the start. Calm becoming 
SW 15-20, then NW 15, then at dusk SE 5+. Fair becoming clear. The sky with a 
marvelous clarity, cleansed by the rains. 



AREAS COVERED: Elliott Island Road in its entirety, also Henry’s Crossroads, 
Lewis Wharf Road, Griffith Neck Road, Drawbridge, town of Vienna, parts of 
Drawbridge Road, parts of Steele Neck Road, but not unpaved Kraft Neck Road, 
considered too sloppy and treacherous to give it a chance. 



NON-AVIAN TAXA (not the best representation): MAMMALS: white-tailed deer 3, 
sika deer 6, eastern cottontail 1, red fox 1 (d.o.r. with attendant turkey 
vulture chowing down), muskrat 5 (usually do not see any; energized by the very 
high waters), gray squirrel 1, fox squirrel 2 (1 on Lewis Wharf Road at very 
close range; we stare at each other for a couple minutes then I say in a 
normal, low, conversational tone: “You better get some smarts soon; not 
everyone will be as accommodating as I am”, at which point, gently chastened, 
it slowly scampers off), and raccoon 1. BATRACHIANS, few: cricket frog (big 
chorus next to Griffith Neck Road), spring peeper 1, southern leopard frog c. 
19, green frog 1. REPTILES: mud turtle 1, northern water snake 1 (c. 2’). 
Perhaps motivated by the very high waters, a big, fat, 3’ Red-bellied 
Watersnake is on the road; I gently try to push it off the pavement with a 
stick, but it is very pugnacious and lunges at me; eventually I get it off the 
road. BUTTERFLIES: just a red-spotted purple and several distant, smallish dark 
ones I do not ID. BUGS: only one of the special marsh fireflies seen. Usually 
they glimmer all over through the Spartina in May. FLOWERS: lots of the small, 
white daffodils still in their blooming prime. 



FAMILY GROUP REPRESENTATION: waterfowl 7 (so so), heron types 7 (the same), 
raptors 7 (also so so), rallids 3 (poor), shorebirds 11 (O.K.), terns 4 (good, 
for here), owls 1 (poor), woodpeckers all 6, warblers 12 (good, for here), 
sparrows 8, not counting towhee (good). 



EVENING, so lovely, as it often is, especially when the atmosphere suddenly 
improves after a not-so-nice day. Many times in the evening conditions become 
benign, the winds die, the sun shines, and the marsh comes alive with singing 
and displaying Marsh Wrens, Willets, Virginia Rails, Seaside Sparrows, 
Boat-tailed Grackles, Swamp Sparrows, and Red-winged Blackbirds. The sun brings 
new colors to the vast expanse of marsh grasses. Egrets wing their way 
unerringly from Dorchester’s marshes to their colonies on Smith Island. 
Yellowlegs and Least Sandpipers call. The slimmest sliver of a new moon, 
fingernail clipping in the sky, is visible to the west at sunset. Under these 
conditions it’s tempting to think Elliott Island marsh is as it always was in 
its hey day … but it isn’t. Ten species that used to be a “lead pipe 
cinch” here are not to be had anymore. “But yet I know, where’er I 
go,/That there hath passed away a glory from the earth … We will grieve not, 
rather find/Strength in what remains behind … ” - Wordsworth. 



On thing HAS become apparent in this life. On the strength of 60 ounces of good 
Wawa coffee, topped off by a 20 oz. Cherry Coke Zero chaser, the chances of 
nodding off at the wheel - no matter WHAT the hours one spends on the go - are, 
themselves, a zero, too. That’s not to say that the kidneys don’t pay a 
price. It goes in one ear and out the other. 



Best to all. - Harry Armistead, Philadelphia.  		 	   		  

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Subject: Kent & Caroline Counties - May 18th
From: Jim Green <jkgbirdman53 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 23:08:45 -0400
Hi everybody:

I spent a long but very enjoyable day today in the above counties.
Yesterday's posts from Kye Jenkins about the Kent County Black Skimmer &
White-winged Scoter kind of decided what direction I was going to bird. I
was not really expecting either bird to hang around (neither did) but you
never know. I started in Kent Co. enjoying a nice variety of swallows at
the Chestertown WWTP including a pair of Bank Swallows that were literally
flying close enough to me to easily pick up their "cigar bands" without the
aid of binoculars. A quick visit to Chesapeake Farms yielded nothing but
common and expected birds.

When I arrived at Eastern Neck NWR the tide was beginning to go out. From
the causeway I had a count of 36 Semipalmated Plovers. When I entered them
in ebird the number was flagged as high. This would be the first of three
different times that my observations of this bird throughout the day at
different locations yielded high counts as far as ebird was concerned.
There were also 6 Dunlin here with their black bellies in full view.

Birding the rest of the refuge was fairly quiet. I only had a handful of
warblers and Blackpoll was the only one that was not a potential breeding
bird.

About two hours later I returned to the causeway and immediately saw some
Caspian Terns fly in and land on the mudflats, a total of seven. They were
soon joined by single Forster's and Common Terns. The tide was lower than
before and a few other shorebirds had joined the original mix. The new
species were a single White-rumped Sandpiper and a Ruddy Turnstone. The
bird was facing away from me and preening for about five minutes when I
first saw it and even though I could see the orangish legs it wasn't until
it began walking around that i was sure of the ID.

I then headed to Caroline County to see which farm fields still had enough
water in them to attract shorebirds. Outside of Greensboro I was headed
down Knife Box Rd towards the intersection with Whites Lane when I passed a
small flooded field (12151 was the address) and was pleasantly surprised to
find six Short-billed Dowitchers.

I then pulled down Whites Lane (just off of Knife Box Rd) and birded the
farm field bordering both roads. There was not alot of water left in the
field and also not large numbers of shorebirds either. But the quality more
than made up for the quantity. Besides the 51 Semipalmated Plovers there
were also 7 Dunlin, 3 Black-bellied Plovers and 1 Ruddy Turnstone. Once
again I was surprised to see the latter. Two days ago Danny Poet and Steve
Westre also had the turnstone here along with much higher counts of other
shorebirds.

My final stop of the day was on Kinder Rd near Federalsburg. As I pulled up
to the flooded field I had my only encounter of the day with another
birder...Glenn Lovelace, whom I had never met before. Nothing unusual here.
The only thing of note was the "high count" (according to ebird) of the 28
Semi-palmated Plovers.

It was a fun and rewarding day to be on across the Bay Bridge.

Jim Green
Gaithersburg MD

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Subject: June 3-4 Deepwater Pelagic
From: Dan Small <small.m.dan AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 16:49:39 -0700 (PDT)
I second everything that Ed said. This is a great opportunity to get out to 
deep water in a relatively under birded time of year in MD. 


Has this info been posted to the various Facebook pages?

Dan Small
Chestertown, MD

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