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Updated on Saturday, March 7 at 10:39 PM EST
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Lazuli Bunting

8 Mar Fort Smallwood Park Saturday, March 7, 2015 15 Raptors []
7 Mar Red-headed Woodpecker Lock 10 [mz_annethrope ]
7 Mar landfill, bowerman area & fort howard, 03/07/15 [Kevin Graff ]
8 Mar RE: rough legged irvine [Tim Houghton ]
7 Mar Re: Lapland Longspur in Harford County [Tim Carney ]
7 Mar Lapland Longspur near Middletown, Frederick County, March 7 [Jim Wilkinson ]
7 Mar Re: Iceland Gull at Canton Waterfront [Taylor McLean ]
7 Mar Lapland Longspur in Harford County [Tim Carney ]
07 Mar Elkton turkeys ["pvaldata1 AT gmail.com" ]
7 Mar Re: rough legged irvine [Kevin Graff ]
07 Mar Iceland Gull at Canton Waterfront [Mike Hudson ]
7 Mar Rough- Legged Hawk in Northern MD [Samuel Miller ]
7 Mar Re: Great Cormorant DC. [Mark Rositol ]
7 Mar RE: rough legged irvine [Tim Houghton ]
7 Mar rough legged irvine []
07 Mar WW Scoter - Fort Howard Park, B'more []
7 Mar FOS Tree Swallow Potomac River PG Cty [Mark Rositol ]
7 Mar Osprey at Fort Smallwood, AA County ["'Bird couple' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
07 Mar Ho Co (Rough-legged Hawk) ["Bonnie Ott" ]
7 Mar Finally! First Osprey of season, Jug Bay [jugbayjs ]
7 Mar rough legged irvine [Kye jenkins ]
7 Mar Worcester Sandhill Crane is back [mike burchett ]
6 Mar DC Duck Bonanza [Hugh McGuinness ]
6 Mar Cedar Wax Wings at Owensville PO [Wayne Bierbaum ]
6 Mar Re: pipits and River Otter, Fletcher's Boatyard, DC [Zach Slavin ]
6 Mar Kent County Field Birds - 03--06-15 ["'Dan Small' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
6 Mar Re: pipits and River Otter, Fletcher's Boatyard, DC [Zach Slavin ]
6 Mar Great Cormorant DC. [Hugh McGuinness ]
6 Mar Re: White-winged scoters dc waters old town Alexandria [Mike Hensley ]
6 Mar FOY osprey on Bodkin Creek [blueheron05 ]
6 Mar Raven in PG County [Thomas Harten ]
5 Mar Re: pipits and River Otter, Fletcher's Boatyard, DC [Daniel Rauch ]
05 Mar Snow Birds Today ["George M. Jett" ]
5 Mar pipits and River Otter, Fletcher's Boatyard, DC [Frank Hawkins ]
5 Mar Birding the Yard (Reisterstown) [David Greenspoon ]
5 Mar Yardlist for a snowy day ["'Warren and Lisa Strobel' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
5 Mar Maryland Pelagic - Common Murre, Atlantic Puffin, Dovekie, Razorbill, Northern Fulmar, Black-legged Kittiwake [Mark Hoffman ]
5 Mar Re: Towson Bald Eagle [marian rutigliano ]
5 Mar Re: Towson Bald Eagle [Anita Tyler ]
4 Mar Towson Bald Eagle [Logan Young ]
4 Mar Piebald Grackle [Wayne Bierbaum ]
04 Mar FOS yard bird [Janet Millenson ]
4 Mar Great Cormorant, Alexandria - No [jugbayjs ]
4 Mar WEEK-OLD 2/23/15 sighting - possible SNOWY OWL (fly-by) Darnestown, Montgomery County [Don Simonson ]
4 Mar Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it... ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
4 Mar Comon Raven at Harford rd [Michael Bradley ]
4 Mar Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it... [Jim Wilkinson ]
4 Mar Cecil Bird Club meeting canceled [Patricia Valdata ]
4 Mar White-winged Scoters in Fredrick [Kathy Calvert ]
4 Mar Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it... ["'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
4 Mar RE: Re: Ovenbird? [Suzanne Richman ]
4 Mar Allegany Co. - Cumberland terminus [Art Drauglis ]
4 Mar Re: Ovenbird? [jugbayjs ]
4 Mar Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it... [Laura Rinier ]
4 Mar Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it... ["'Christine Huffman' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
4 Mar Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it... [Andy Wilson ]
4 Mar Ovenbird? [Suzanne Richman ]
4 Mar Re: Swan Creek Walk 3/21/2015 []
4 Mar Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it... ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
04 Mar Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it... [Phil Davis ]
3 Mar downtown Baltimore/Quarry Lake area [Kevin Graff ]
4 Mar Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it... [MARCIA ]
03 Mar Fwd: DC Area, 3/3/2015 []
3 Mar Lower Eastern Shore, February 20 - March 1, 2015. [Harry Armistead ]
03 Mar meters across the border: Great Cormorant, Alexandria []
3 Mar Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it... ["Guineabird via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
3 Mar Wood duck at Kent Narrows this morning [Diana Linnekin ]
03 Mar way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on its back ["Jim Wilson" ]
3 Mar Swan Creek Walk 3/21/2015 [Tim Carney ]
3 Mar Red-throated Loons Ft Washington National Park PG County [Mark Rositol ]
3 Mar Pine Siskins at thisle feeder in Silver Spring ["'Elda Banks' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
2 Mar The Auk, Condor and Maryland Birdlife Online Journal Articles now Avaliable for free ["'Dan Small' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
2 Mar Re: Greater White-fronted Geese, National Mall; Mar. 2 [Hugh McGuinness ]
2 Mar Greater White-fronted Geese, National Mall; Mar. 2 [Scott Baron ]
2 Mar Re: Re: Predatory American Crow [Adam Beidler ]
2 Mar White-winged scoters dc waters old town Alexandria [Adam Parr ]

Subject: Fort Smallwood Park Saturday, March 7, 2015 15 Raptors
From: susiericc AT comcast.net
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2015 03:08:31 +0000 (UTC)
----- Original Message -----

Fort Smallwood Park 
Pasadena, Maryland, USA 

Daily Raptor Counts: Mar 07, 2015 
Species 	Day's Count 	Month Total 	Season Total 
Black Vulture 	0 	0 	0 
Turkey Vulture 	9 	9 	14 
Osprey 	1 	1 	1 
Bald Eagle 	1 	1 	1 
Northern Harrier 	0 	0 	0 
Sharp-shinned Hawk 	0 	0 	0 
Cooper's Hawk 	1 	1 	1 
Northern Goshawk 	0 	0 	0 
Red-shouldered Hawk 	0 	0 	0 
Broad-winged Hawk 	0 	0 	0 
Red-tailed Hawk 	3 	3 	3 
Rough-legged Hawk 	0 	0 	0 
Golden Eagle 	0 	0 	0 
American Kestrel 	0 	0 	0 
Merlin 	0 	0 	0 
Peregrine Falcon 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Accipiter 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Buteo 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Falcon 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Eagle 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Raptor 	0 	0 	0 
Total: 	15 	15 	20 

Observation start time: 	10:30:00 
Observation end time: 	15:30:00 
Total observation time: 	5 hours 
Official Counter 	Sue Ricciardi 
Observers: 	


Visitors: 
Warren Strobel 

Weather: 
Mostly cloudy; 30 to a balmy 42 degrees; excellent visibility; winds 
southwesterly, 6-11 mph 


Raptor Observations: 
Hallelujah! After 6 days and 19 hours of observation (we usually have about 51 
hours of observation in at this date!)yielding only 5 Turkey Vultures, we 
finally had a day that resembled spring migration. First Osprey of the season, 
sighted by Warren Strobel. 


Non-raptor Observations: 
About 500 ducks including a dozen Common Mergansers.  Complete e-bird 
checklist:  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22222702 



Report submitted by Sue Ricciardi ( susiericc AT comcast.net ) 
Fort Smallwood Park information may be found at: 
http://www.mdbirds.org/sites/mdsites/hawks/hawkwatch.html 


Site Description 
Fort Smallwood Park is located on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay at the 
mouth of the Patapsco River, 11 miles south of Baltimore, MD. Best winds are 
from the southwest. The Park is closed to visitors on Wednesdays. 

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Subject: Red-headed Woodpecker Lock 10
From: mz_annethrope <truebluetwo AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 17:54:41 -0800 (PST)
Spotted a Red-headed Woodpecker (flyover) at 5:00 driving east on Clara Barton 
Hwy. It was just west of Lock 10. 


Marina True
Maryland

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Subject: landfill, bowerman area & fort howard, 03/07/15
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 20:35:06 -0500
03/07/15 – 10am-1145am    (**restricted access**)

Eastern Sanitary Landfill, Baltimore Co., MD



OBSERVERS: 4



Canada Goose – 56 (6, 7, 9, 13, 12, 2, 2, 5)

Black Vulture – 66

Turkey Vulture – 9

Northern Harrier – 3

Bald Eagle – 4

Sharp-shinned Hawk – 1

Red-shouldered Hawk – 1

Red-tailed Hawk – 4

Ring-billed Gull – 2800

Herring Gull – 1400

Iceland Gull – 2 (ad & 1st)

Lesser Black-backed Gull – 4 (3 ad, 1 2nd)

Glaucous Gull – 1 (1st W, presume same from Jan 19th)

Great Black-backed Gull – 3

Rock Pigeon – 1 (flyby)

Blue Jay – 1 (flyby)

American Crow – 50

Fish Crow – 235

American Robin – 2

Northern Mockingbird – 1

European Starling – 855

American Pipit – 1 (flyover calling)

Song Sparrow – 1

White-throated Sparrow – 2

Red-winged Blackbird – 4

Common Grackle – 28

House Sparrow – 1 (near building)

SPECIES: 27




03/07/15 – 1150pm-1245pm

Gunpowder Falls SP—Bowerman Area



OBSERVERS: 4



Canada Goose – 2 (in distance)

Black Vulture – 4

Turkey Vulture – 3

Northern Harrier – 1

Bald Eagle – 1 (immature)

Red-tailed Hawk – 2

Ring-billed Gull – 13

Herring Gull – 1

Mourning Dove – 1

Short-eared Owl – 1 (flushed, photos taken)

Northern Flicker – 3

Pileated Woodpecker – 1

Blue Jay – 1

American Crow – 35

Fish Crow – 15

Horned Lark – 1 (flyover calling, toward landfill)

Carolina Chickadee – 2

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Hermit Thrush – 2

American Robin – 12

Brown Thrasher – 3

Northern Mockingbird – 4

European Starling – 8

Eastern Towhee – 3

American Tree Sparrow – 1

Field Sparrow – 1

Fox Sparrow – 3

Song Sparrow – 4

Swamp Sparrow – 4

White-throated Sparrow – 13

“Slate-colored” Junco – 12

Northern Cardinal – 5

Red-winged Blackbird – 5

Common Grackle – 39 (4 bronzed)

American Goldfinch – 1

SPECIES: 35





03/07/15 – 120pm-240pm

Fort Howard Park, Baltimore Co., MD



OBSERVERS: 4



Canada Goose – 32

Tundra Swan – 79

Gadwall – 8

American Wigeon – 2

American Black Duck – 34

Mallard – 31

Canvasback – 24

Ring-necked Duck – 1 (Drake)

Greater Scaup – 11

Lesser Scaup – 220

White-winged Scoter – 2 (Pair)

Long-tailed Duck – 3 (Drakes)

Bufflehead – 63

Common Merganser – 2 (Pair)

Red-breasted Merganser – 3

Ruddy Duck – 5

Common Loon – 1

Double-crested Cormorant – 1 (flyover)

Turkey Vulture – 1

Bald Eagle – 2 (adult & immature)

Sharp-shinned Hawk – 1

American Coot – 5

Ring-billed Gull – 35

Herring Gull – 45

Great Black-backed Gull – 33

Mourning Dove – 1

Northern Flicker – 2

Blue Jay – 1

American Crow – 2

Carolina Chickadee – 1

American Robin – 11

Northern Mockingbird – 1

European Starling – 6

Song Sparrow – 1

White-throated Sparrow – 5

“Slate-colored” Junco – 5

Northern Cardinal – 4

Red-winged Blackbird – 43

Common Grackle – 155

Brown-headed Cowbird – 3

American Goldfinch – 1 (distance flyby)

SPECIES: 41

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Subject: RE: rough legged irvine
From: Tim Houghton <thoughton AT loyola.edu>
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2015 01:12:12 +0000
Kevin, you are wrong.

They've had that gate up most of the time since there has been a lot of snow. 
The Center was open. The trails were open. I talked to the people at the 
Center, who explained they don't want cars going down there. The trails are 
open. The trails WERE open today. Check Irvine website. I was there today, and 
you were not. Call their number, too, if you want. Other people were on the 
trails. I was inside the center, too. So please, recognize that you don't know 
the situation, not in this case. And, too, sometimes they forget to take the 
gate down if the entire place was closed the previous day, as it was on Friday, 
but that's probably not why it was up today. The entire place was open...today. 
OK? 


TH
________________________________
From: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com [mdbirding AT googlegroups.com] on behalf of 
Kevin Graff [keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Saturday, March 07, 2015 5:06 PM
To: Tim Houghton
Cc: michael.matwichuk AT gmail.com; mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] rough legged irvine

Tim, that's not correct. They put up the "trail closed" sign chain which means 
trail is closed to public. This is to prevent people going down the path due to 
ice and snow; for hunting on other days and when there are no staffs on duty. 
Park is open to public at 9am seven day a week. Its best to call, to make sure 
the trail is open. 




    Kevin Graff
    Jarrettsville, MD
    KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com


On Sat, Mar 7, 2015 at 3:22 PM, Tim Houghton 
> wrote: 

The chain is there to prevent cars from going down the asphalt path. The center 
and the trails are open--open since 9am. Go under or around the chain. 


TH
________________________________________
From: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com 
[mdbirding AT googlegroups.com] on behalf of 
michael.matwichuk AT gmail.com 
[michael.matwichuk AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Saturday, March 07, 2015 2:47 PM
To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [MDBirding] rough legged irvine

For what it's worth, unless you can spot a rough-legged from the parking lot, 
the path at Irvine is chained off/closed today (Saturday, ~3PM). 


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Subject: Re: Lapland Longspur in Harford County
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 16:34:30 -0800 (PST)
Also in Harford or nearby:

12 White-winged Scoters and 2 Redheads on the Cecil side at Lapidum. **The road 
to Lapidum was VERY SLUSHY and I barely made it back up. Not recommended 
without 4WD until everything melts** 


Lots of waterfowl out on the river at Swan Harbor, including American Wigeon, 
Northern Pintail, Redhead, Canvasback, and lots of Tundra Swans. 3 pipits and a 
Horned Lark on the entrance road at SH. 


Rusty Blackbird with a mixed blackbird flock on Park Beach Drive in Perryman.

2 Mute Swans at the Club House Road Pond. I wondered if the Home Depot Pond 
birds moved, but they were still there when I drove past, so there are 2 
separate pairs in the area. No woodcocks at Home Depot from 6:00-6:20ish. 


Tim Carney
Canton, MD

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Subject: Lapland Longspur near Middletown, Frederick County, March 7
From: Jim Wilkinson <lakekoshare AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 16:14:10 -0800 (PST)
I had one Lapland Longspur mixed in with approximately 75 Horned Larks in a 
manure-covered field along Bussard Road, between Old Middletown Road and Roy 
Shafer Road. There were also some pipits and a meadowlark in the same field. 


In northeast Washington County I saw a similar group of birds along Watery Road 
but could not find any longspurs. I did have two Wilson's Snipe along the 
stream there, however. 


Jim Wilkinson
Columbia, MD

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Subject: Re: Iceland Gull at Canton Waterfront
From: Taylor McLean <mcleant11 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 19:02:33 -0500
Mike,
Nice bird!
When you saw the Iceland Gull at the Inner Harbor, was it east or west of the 
Aquarium? Any details would be much appreciated. 

Your other locations were spot on.

Thanks,

Taylor Mclean
Towson, MD
mcleant11 AT gmail.com

> On Mar 7, 2015, at 4:33 PM, Mike Hudson  wrote:
> 
> Hi all, 
> 
> There is a first-cycle ICELAND GULL on the east end of the Promenade, along 
the Baltimore Inner Harbor. I first found the bird at Henderson Wharf in Fell's 
Point, but the flock moved into the west end of the Canton Waterfront Park and 
joined a larger group of gulls feeding on dead fish and coots. 

> 
> The area they were is a small park between Lakewood and Montford Avenues, 
directly off of Boston Street across the way from the shopping center at the 
Can Company. The eBird HotSpot that roughly corresponds to this area is simply 
called Canton Waterfront Park, and the marker is just a bit to east of this 
location. 

> 
> Other notable species present included NORTHERN SHOVELERS, CANVASBACKS, 
LESSER SCAUP, COMMON MERGANSERS, and a LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL. 

> 
> Good birding! 
> 
> Mike H. 
> Chestertown, MD 
> 
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Subject: Lapland Longspur in Harford County
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 18:13:57 -0500
One, possibly two, along Canning House Rd in Perryman. The first I saw had 
bright rufous on the neck but the bird I photographed was dull. With a large 
flock of larks. 2 pipits also. Could not relocate on second pass. Not a lot of 
room to pull over and the cars kept flushing the birds. 


Tim Carney
Canton, MD

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Elkton turkeys
From: "pvaldata1 AT gmail.com" <pvaldata1@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 17:25:50 -0500
Five wild turkeys near the intersection of Blue Ball and Elkton Roads this 
afternoon. Second time I've seen them in that area. 


Pat Valdata
Elkton, MD

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Subject: Re: rough legged irvine
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 17:06:30 -0500
Tim, that's not correct.   They put up the "trail closed" sign chain which
means trail is closed to public.    This is to prevent people going down
the path due to ice and snow; for hunting on other days and when there are
no staffs on duty.   Park is open to public at 9am seven day a week.  Its
best to call, to make sure the trail is open.



    Kevin Graff
    Jarrettsville, MD
    KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com


On Sat, Mar 7, 2015 at 3:22 PM, Tim Houghton  wrote:

> The chain is there to prevent cars from going down the asphalt path. The
> center and the trails are open--open since 9am. Go under or around the
> chain.
>
> TH
> ________________________________________
> From: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com [mdbirding AT googlegroups.com] on behalf
> of michael.matwichuk AT gmail.com [michael.matwichuk AT gmail.com]
> Sent: Saturday, March 07, 2015 2:47 PM
> To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
> Subject: [MDBirding] rough legged irvine
>
> For what it's worth, unless you can spot a rough-legged from the parking
> lot, the path at Irvine is chained off/closed today (Saturday, ~3PM).
>
> --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
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> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here -
> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>
> --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
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> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
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> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>

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Subject: Iceland Gull at Canton Waterfront
From: Mike Hudson <birdman96 AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 16:33:20 -0500
Hi all, 

There is a first-cycle ICELAND GULL on the east end of the Promenade, along the 
Baltimore Inner Harbor. I first found the bird at Henderson Wharf in Fell's 
Point, but the flock moved into the west end of the Canton Waterfront Park and 
joined a larger group of gulls feeding on dead fish and coots. 


The area they were is a small park between Lakewood and Montford Avenues, 
directly off of Boston Street across the way from the shopping center at the 
Can Company. The eBird HotSpot that roughly corresponds to this area is simply 
called Canton Waterfront Park, and the marker is just a bit to east of this 
location. 


Other notable species present included NORTHERN SHOVELERS, CANVASBACKS, LESSER 
SCAUP, COMMON MERGANSERS, and a LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL. 


Good birding! 

Mike H. 
Chestertown, MD 

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Subject: Rough- Legged Hawk in Northern MD
From: Samuel Miller <srmiller2022 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 16:08:46 -0500
While driving down I-70 (Dwight D Eisenhower HWY) a single Rough- Legged
Hawk crossed the road at a very low elevation from the area of South
Mountain State Park heading southwest towards Greenbrier State Park. The
raptor was a particularly lighter light phase with prominent, dark wrist
patches.

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Subject: Re: Great Cormorant DC.
From: Mark Rositol <mrositol510 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 12:40:34 -0800 (PST)
Bird is present now in same or similar location. 

Mark Rositol 
Fort Washington, MD 

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Subject: RE: rough legged irvine
From: Tim Houghton <thoughton AT loyola.edu>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 20:22:40 +0000
The chain is there to prevent cars from going down the asphalt path. The center 
and the trails are open--open since 9am. Go under or around the chain. 


TH
________________________________________
From: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com [mdbirding AT googlegroups.com] on behalf of 
michael.matwichuk AT gmail.com [michael.matwichuk AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Saturday, March 07, 2015 2:47 PM
To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [MDBirding] rough legged irvine

For what it's worth, unless you can spot a rough-legged from the parking lot, 
the path at Irvine is chained off/closed today (Saturday, ~3PM). 


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Subject: rough legged irvine
From: michael.matwichuk AT gmail.com
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 11:47:59 -0800 (PST)
For what it's worth, unless you can spot a rough-legged from the parking lot, 
the path at Irvine is chained off/closed today (Saturday, ~3PM). 


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Subject: WW Scoter - Fort Howard Park, B'more
From: keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 14:15:34 -0500




Subject: FOS Tree Swallow Potomac River PG Cty
From: Mark Rositol <mrositol510 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 10:58:55 -0800 (PST)
I went checking to see if the Red-throated Loons and other waterfowl were 
around at Fort Washington Park along the Potomac. No luck on the RTLOs, WWSC, 
or RNGR. I did get my FOS Tree Swallows(2) flying into my view over the main 
channel. Lot of ice floating along the Potomac as well as ducks. Some of the 
highlights were 4 Common Goldeneye, Red-breasted Merganser(hen), Tundra Swans 
67, Common Merganser 75+,Canvasback, American Wigeon and much more. The giant 
raft of Scaup includes both Greater and Lesser. This raft would be better 
viewed from the Virginia side. There must be something good in there that is 
going missed. 


Mark Rositol
Fort Washington, MD



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Subject: Osprey at Fort Smallwood, AA County
From: "'Bird couple' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 13:21:59 -0500
Following on Jeff Shenot's posting, I had an Osprey at Fort Smallwood about 20 
minutes ago. Could have been the same bird reported yesterday from nearby 
Bodkin Creek. 


Spring?!

Warren Strobel
Annapolis 

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Ho Co (Rough-legged Hawk)
From: "Bonnie Ott" <Bonnieott AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 12:47:29 -0500
Really excited to have a Rough-legged flyover Meadowbrook Park today. It’s 
been a couple decades since I have had one in the county. 

I had a migrant Great Blue Heron fly over the house the day before yesterday. 
Four were at Wilde Lake the other day. 


The hawk was fairly high and made two passes before heading out of sight. Was 
able to get a documentation shot (thank goodness!). 


https://flic.kr/p/qyCxN7

Bonnie Ott

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Subject: Finally! First Osprey of season, Jug Bay
From: jugbayjs <JugBayJS AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 09:38:14 -0800 (PST)
While eating lunch with my son (~12:20pm), I just saw the first Osprey of the 
season here (Jug Bay). It was directly behind our house, hovering over the main 
channel of the Patuxent and it caught my eye. I saw it dive and come up with a 
fish, then it then flew right at us and flew to a perch near the house to eat 
it. 


In the last 15 or so years that I've kept track, this is the second latest date 
we have had here for the first-of-year sighting (latest was March 9). Avg is 
somewhere between Mar 1-5 and earliest was Feb 16. 


Cheers :-)
Jeff Shenot
Croom MD 

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Subject: rough legged irvine
From: Kye jenkins <kyebird54 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 08:36:10 -0800 (PST)
Tim Houghton texted me at 11am ,he had rough legged hawk and a raven at 
Irvine./Snowshoes would be helpful,kye 


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Subject: Worcester Sandhill Crane is back
From: mike burchett <mikeburchett23 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 11:29:49 -0500
Same field along Rt 50 in Berlin across from Advance Auto parts. Under the
Geico billboard.

Mike Burchett
Ocean Pines, MD

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Subject: DC Duck Bonanza
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 21:30:22 -0500
A late afternoon trip along the Potomac starting in Old Town, Alexandria
was very productive today.

At the end of Orinoco St, the three WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS were showing well
and visible for the hour and fifteen minutes I was there. Also at this spot
were 2 Common Goldeneyes, at least 7 Bald Eagles, 32 Northern Shovelers, 43
Gadwall, several large rafts of Lesser Scaup conservatively estimated at
1600, 2 Greater Scaup, 61 Buffleheads and a minimum of 9 Great Blue Herons.
The highlight was refinding the immature GREAT CORMORANT found by Sherman
Suter in Virginia earlier this week. Today it was roosting on the rip-rap
north of the pilings at the DC Water plant on the eastern shore of the
river in DC waters. A scope and low heat haze is absolutely necessary to
see most of these birds. Afternoon is also better b/c then the sun is at
the observer's back.

From there I traveled north to Tide Lock Park. The ability to get up high
makes this a terrific vantage point for scoping the river and especially
the far shore. Highlights here were many of the same birds that were seen
from Orinoco St. The GREAT CORMORANT, which had disappeared for a while,
was found sitting in front of the pilings/dock-like structure at DC Water.
The puddle ducks began to feed on the river and so the Shoveler Count
increased to 42 and the Gadwall count to 57. Six Canvasbacks, 5 Redheads,
and 11 Red-breasted Mergansers rounded out the notables.

Next up was the Washington Sailing Marina, Here there were at least 285
REDHEADS, 4 Common Goldneyes (including the first drakes I have ever seen
in DC), another immature male WHITE-WINGED SCOTER, 2 male LONG-TAILED
DUCKS, at least 1500 Lesser Scaup, and a lone AMERICAN PIPIT walking around
on the ice floes in the middle of the river.

A stop at Gravelly Point at dusk revealed that the river was frozen south
to Hain's Pt, so the best birding to be had was from the sailing marina
south. It appeared that parts of the Anacostia were open, but not too many
birds could be seen there. Hain's Point was closed this afternoon when I
arrived, and even though I cursed it when there, it forced me to head south
to the much more productive waters off Alexandria.

Good birding to all!

Hugh

-- 
Hugh McGuinness
Washington, D.C.

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Subject: Cedar Wax Wings at Owensville PO
From: Wayne Bierbaum <wm.bierbaum AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 17:04:09 -0800 (PST)
The 25 ft Cedar tree above the outdoor postal box has ripe berries and Waxwings 
were in and out of the tree most of the day. They were approachable to within 
10 feet. Robins also raided the tree. 


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Subject: Re: pipits and River Otter, Fletcher's Boatyard, DC
From: Zach Slavin <zkslavin AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 19:00:11 -0500
Scroll backwards from here to see the otter/fox interaction observed at
Fletcher's Cove in NW DC today: https://flic.kr/p/ruTKVg

The only other notable bird was a Field Sparrow (and possibly a second) in
a clearing near where the otter was seen.

Zach Slavin
Washington, DC


On Fri, Mar 6, 2015 at 4:26 PM, Zach Slavin  wrote:

> Saw the otter a few minutes ago on the little peninsula that's the
> furthest point downriver you can see from the Fletcher's cove boathouse. I
> was looking all over for it (and birds) when the fox I was watching sniffed
> right up to what I thought was a rock but turned out to be an otter laying
> in the snow! The otter rolled onto its back before quickly turning towards
> the fox and chasing it off a short ways. Lost the otter soon after, but it
> was a lot bigger relative to the fox than I anticipated- they were pretty
> close in size, with the otter possibly being the larger of the two! Photo
> of the end of their encounter is attached.
>
> Also present were some relatively boring birds- bluebirds, Common Mergs,
> and a Canvasback being the best I've seen so far.
>
> -Zach Slavin
> Washington, DC
>
> [image: image1.JPG]
>
>
>
> On Mar 5, 2015, at 9:11 PM, Daniel Rauch  wrote:
>
> Frank -I love that you saw the river otter. 3 years ago I saw a river
> otter at Fletcher's sliding around on the ice near the first rock
> outcropping before the main Potomac River channel. By the time I got back
> to my office, grabbed a camera to document it, and headed back, it was
> gone.   Did you get a photograph?
>
> In Spring 2014, we were conducting frog call surveys in Kenilworth Park.
> We saw three river otters in Watts Branch, just under the bridge with the
> jersey barriers.
>
> The District of Columbia fisheries. Division has spotted them a few times
> on the Potomac between Fletcher's and Chain Bridge over the last 10 years.
>
> That is a nice collection of ducks as well.
>
> Dan Rauch
> Washington DC
>
>
> On Mar 5, 2015, at 6:33 PM, Frank Hawkins  wrote:
>
> A late afternoon visit to Fletcher's boatyard today started well with at
> least 8 American Pipits feeding along the edge of the floating ice in the
> river. A nice collection of ducks included a canvasback, two gadwall, 11
> common merganser, 2 hooded mergansers, 5 ring-necked ducks and four
> mallard.
>
> I got a big surprise a bit later when a river otter burst out of the
> water, scootched across the ice on its belly towards the boat pontoon, and
> dived back into the river again. It came up a few minutes later with an
> enormous catfish, about the same body-length as the otter. It hauled the
> catfish onto the ice, with much snorting and tugging, and started to bite
> holes in the fish's belly. The catfish was thrashing around rather weakly,
> and after a few minutes the otter gave up and dived back into the water.
> Not a sight I expected to see in DC!..
>
> Frank Hawkins
>
> Washington DC.
>
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Subject: Kent County Field Birds - 03--06-15
From: "'Dan Small' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 15:19:46 -0800 (PST)
All,

I spent a good part of the day looking through loads of Horned Larks on road 
sides around Kent County. I was able to find the two species I really wanted to 
see - 3 Snow Buntings along Worton Lynch Rd and 2 Lapland Longspurs along 
Kennedyville Rd. 


Unfortunately, due to reckless speeding by lots of area drivers I found 8 dead 
birds along the road side. 


Dan Small
Chestertown, MD

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Subject: Re: pipits and River Otter, Fletcher's Boatyard, DC
From: Zach Slavin <zkslavin AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 16:26:44 -0500
Saw the otter a few minutes ago on the little peninsula that's the furthest 
point downriver you can see from the Fletcher's cove boathouse. I was looking 
all over for it (and birds) when the fox I was watching sniffed right up to 
what I thought was a rock but turned out to be an otter laying in the snow! The 
otter rolled onto its back before quickly turning towards the fox and chasing 
it off a short ways. Lost the otter soon after, but it was a lot bigger 
relative to the fox than I anticipated- they were pretty close in size, with 
the otter possibly being the larger of the two! Photo of the end of their 
encounter is attached. 


Also present were some relatively boring birds- bluebirds, Common Mergs, and a 
Canvasback being the best I've seen so far. 


-Zach Slavin
Washington, DC





> On Mar 5, 2015, at 9:11 PM, Daniel Rauch  wrote:
> 
> Frank -I love that you saw the river otter. 3 years ago I saw a river otter 
at Fletcher's sliding around on the ice near the first rock outcropping before 
the main Potomac River channel. By the time I got back to my office, grabbed a 
camera to document it, and headed back, it was gone. Did you get a photograph? 

> 
> In Spring 2014, we were conducting frog call surveys in Kenilworth Park. We 
saw three river otters in Watts Branch, just under the bridge with the jersey 
barriers. 

> 
> The District of Columbia fisheries. Division has spotted them a few times on 
the Potomac between Fletcher's and Chain Bridge over the last 10 years. 

> 
> That is a nice collection of ducks as well.
> 
> Dan Rauch
> Washington DC
> 
> 
>> On Mar 5, 2015, at 6:33 PM, Frank Hawkins  wrote:
>> 
>> A late afternoon visit to Fletcher's boatyard today started well with at 
least 8 American Pipits feeding along the edge of the floating ice in the 
river. A nice collection of ducks included a canvasback, two gadwall, 11 common 
merganser, 2 hooded mergansers, 5 ring-necked ducks and four mallard. 

>> 
>> I got a big surprise a bit later when a river otter burst out of the water, 
scootched across the ice on its belly towards the boat pontoon, and dived back 
into the river again. It came up a few minutes later with an enormous catfish, 
about the same body-length as the otter. It hauled the catfish onto the ice, 
with much snorting and tugging, and started to bite holes in the fish's belly. 
The catfish was thrashing around rather weakly, and after a few minutes the 
otter gave up and dived back into the water. Not a sight I expected to see in 
DC!.. 

>> 
>> Frank Hawkins
>> 
>> Washington DC. 
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Subject: Great Cormorant DC.
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 16:02:43 -0500
I've relocated the Great Corm sitting on the rip rap under the DC water is life 
plant as viewed from Orinoco st in Alexandria. If any one wants to chase, call 
me and I'll wait--631-697-2099 


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Subject: Re: White-winged scoters dc waters old town Alexandria
From: Mike Hensley <mikedh1980 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 12:35:07 -0800 (PST)
On Monday, March 2, 2015 at 1:32:57 PM UTC-5, Adam Parr wrote:
> Sorry, that should be Rivergate Park. :
> 
> The White-winged Scoters are visible now from Riverside Park in Alexandria, 
spread out in the middle of the channel. There is also a lone female 
Long-tailed Duck, Canvasbacks, and all the other usual duckspects. Thanks Dan! 

> 
> Adam Parr
> Takoma Park.

Two (maybe 3) birds were visible from Windmill Hill Park this afternoon around 
2pm. They were in the water north of the 495 bridge. 


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Subject: FOY osprey on Bodkin Creek
From: blueheron05 <blueheron05 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 09:26:01 -0800 (PST)
This morning an osprey perched for about a half an hur on a tree overlooking 
Wharf creek on the Bodkin. Alas, the creek is covered in ice and snow except 
where bubblers keep the water clear near piers, and power company has removed 
the nest built last year on a utility pole across from where the osprey sat. 


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Subject: Raven in PG County
From: Thomas Harten <tjharten1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 09:59:57 -0500
I was driving my wife up to the Suitland Metro this morning and had a
Common Raven fly-by over Rte 4, near the Clinton-Mellwood exit.

Too bad it wasn't a few miles south, would love to have one for Calvert!

Tom Harten
Owings

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Subject: Re: pipits and River Otter, Fletcher's Boatyard, DC
From: Daniel Rauch <danrauch11 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 21:11:04 -0500
Frank -I love that you saw the river otter. 3 years ago I saw a river otter at 
Fletcher's sliding around on the ice near the first rock outcropping before the 
main Potomac River channel. By the time I got back to my office, grabbed a 
camera to document it, and headed back, it was gone. Did you get a photograph? 


In Spring 2014, we were conducting frog call surveys in Kenilworth Park. We saw 
three river otters in Watts Branch, just under the bridge with the jersey 
barriers. 


The District of Columbia fisheries. Division has spotted them a few times on 
the Potomac between Fletcher's and Chain Bridge over the last 10 years. 


That is a nice collection of ducks as well.

Dan Rauch
Washington DC


> On Mar 5, 2015, at 6:33 PM, Frank Hawkins  wrote:
> 
> A late afternoon visit to Fletcher's boatyard today started well with at 
least 8 American Pipits feeding along the edge of the floating ice in the 
river. A nice collection of ducks included a canvasback, two gadwall, 11 common 
merganser, 2 hooded mergansers, 5 ring-necked ducks and four mallard. 

> 
> I got a big surprise a bit later when a river otter burst out of the water, 
scootched across the ice on its belly towards the boat pontoon, and dived back 
into the river again. It came up a few minutes later with an enormous catfish, 
about the same body-length as the otter. It hauled the catfish onto the ice, 
with much snorting and tugging, and started to bite holes in the fish's belly. 
The catfish was thrashing around rather weakly, and after a few minutes the 
otter gave up and dived back into the water. Not a sight I expected to see in 
DC!.. 

> 
> Frank Hawkins
> 
> Washington DC. 
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Subject: Snow Birds Today
From: "George M. Jett" <gmjett AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 19:05:30 -0600 (CST)




Subject: pipits and River Otter, Fletcher's Boatyard, DC
From: Frank Hawkins <a.f.a.hawkins AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:33:10 -0500
A late afternoon visit to Fletcher's boatyard today started well with at
least 8 American Pipits feeding along the edge of the floating ice in the
river. A nice collection of ducks included a canvasback, two gadwall, 11
common merganser, 2 hooded mergansers, 5 ring-necked ducks and four
mallard.

I got a big surprise a bit later when a river otter burst out of the water,
scootched across the ice on its belly towards the boat pontoon, and dived
back into the river again. It came up a few minutes later with an enormous
catfish, about the same body-length as the otter. It hauled the catfish
onto the ice, with much snorting and tugging, and started to bite holes in
the fish's belly. The catfish was thrashing around rather weakly, and after
a few minutes the otter gave up and dived back into the water. Not a sight
I expected to see in DC!..

Frank Hawkins

Washington DC.

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Subject: Birding the Yard (Reisterstown)
From: David Greenspoon <greenspoon AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:15:14 -0500
Snow day today, and so I kept an eye on my feeder and around the yard (I
have twin 6-week-olds and so all of my birding of late has been home and
woodlot/drainage pond across street :). Got 16 species. Nothing out of the
ordinary, but a very large flock of Robins flying back and forth while I
shoveled.

Reisterstown, Baltimore, US-MD
Mar 5, 2015 7:41 AM - 5:59 PM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments:     Seen from house this snow day. Submitted from  BirdLog NA for
Android v1.9.6
16 species

Canada Goose  14
Black Vulture  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  2
Carolina Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
American Robin  400     rough estimate. large flock going back and forth
over house.
Song Sparrow  1
White-throated Sparrow  2
Dark-eyed Junco  8
Northern Cardinal  2
House Finch  1
American Goldfinch  2
House Sparrow  1

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22186718

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Subject: Yardlist for a snowy day
From: "'Warren and Lisa Strobel' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 23:02:31 +0000 (UTC)
 Lisa was off work, and I worked from home. We enjoyed watching the birds hit 
the feeders hard all day long. 

Good Birding!Warren and Lisa StrobelAnnapolis

 
Lovenest, Anne Arundel, US-MD
Mar 5, 2015 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments:    Approximately 6" of snow falling throughout the day
19 species

Red-tailed Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  6
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Blue Jay  1
Carolina Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Brown Creeper  1
Carolina Wren  2
Eastern Bluebird  2
American Robin  1
European Starling  5
White-throated Sparrow  1
Dark-eyed Junco  6
Northern Cardinal  2
Common Grackle  1    Maybe more in trees
American Goldfinch  10

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22186698 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)


  

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Subject: Maryland Pelagic - Common Murre, Atlantic Puffin, Dovekie, Razorbill, Northern Fulmar, Black-legged Kittiwake
From: Mark Hoffman <wcbirding AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 12:02:06 -0500
Maryland Pelagics sponsored another very successful pelagic trip out of
Ocean City, Maryland, this past Sunday, March 1, 2015, on the Morning Star,
piloted Monty Hawkins.  His ability to put us “on the bird” continues to
amaze.


With the impending snow/ice storm, it wasn’t certain we should run the trip
– but Monty had decided Sunday would be much better offshore than Saturday,
and we decided to give it a try.  It would be our last chance for the full
gamut of winter pelagics.


We left the dock shortly after 6 am, and noted a few ducks etc. in the
harbor and Inlet on our way out, with the highlight being the continuing
Red-necked Grebe(s).  Offshore, the first nice find was also RNGR, but this
time a flock of four headed south, then a single, and a flock of three, so
a total of eight for the first pelagic eBird checklist of the day (lists
kept for each one-hour segment).


We had some distance Razorbills and large alcids (sp.), but the first good
bird was at 0844, with a full breeding plumage Common Murre that was very
approachable and enjoyed by all.  It is interesting that the murres usually
allow close approach by the boat, while the Razorbills are very skittish.
It was quickly followed up by a second COMU at 0912, this one not quite in
breeding plumage, and seemingly not interested in flying.  The photo
opportunities were amazing.  Common Murre use to be a great rarity in
Maryland, but we have been very successful in finding them off Ocean City
since 2011.


Photos of second murre (and the other highlights listed below) starting at:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/wcbirding/16717004525/


As the day wore on, the very gentle seas (1-2 foot) made the birding good,
and the little snow mixed in was not a bother.  We picked up scattered
small (and larger) groups of Razorbills.  A flock of 16 at 0912, 13 at
0933, 10 at 1104, etc.  The total for the day was 77.  We also came across
three more COMUs, between 1003-1038, so a total of five for the day.  All
of them in complete or partial breeding plumage.


The next goody was an Atlantic Puffin at 1042.  We managed to see single
puffins off-and-on, through 1328, with a total of 10 for the day.  A very
good count by MD standards.  Puffins are between the murres and Razorbills
in their “approachability”, and although great looks and photos were had by
all, they don’t allow the boat to come up right next to them.  We also had
our first (of only seven for the day) Dovekie.  We did get some good view s
later on, but clearly this doesn't seem to have been a big winter for
them.  We also saw several pods of dolphins and several whales, including a
Humpbacked.


At 1209 we had a group of four Northern Fulmars, the first of seven for the
trip.  One was a beautiful dark phase, which we rarely see in MD waters.
 Chumming helps bring these birds in, and we had a steady gull/gannet flock
all day, thanks to the indefatigable efforts of Mikey and Jim B.


The final highlight was the first of four Black-legged Kittiwakes, at
1242.  This one an adult (photos indicate second year), the rest first
basic, some of which followed us for short distances for much of the
afternoon.


The seas picked up just slightly in the pm, and it started raining/sleeting
pretty good the last couple hours, but everyone was too jazzed from our
success to let it bother them.  And when we were back at the Inlet, there
was a huge (1000+) flock of Surf Scoters just off the fishing pier, and
another RNGR.  Monty made a pass through them, and then headed for the
dock, arriving at 1715.


Our maximum distance offshore was 46 miles SE of Ocean City.  Trip totals
for “species of interest”:  Red-necked Grebe 8, Northern Gannet 54, Dovekie
7, Common Murre 5, Razorbill 77, Atlantic Puffin 10, large alcid (sp.) 12,
Black-legged Kittiwake 4.  eBird has data for loons, large gulls, etc.


Observers: M. Hoffman leader/organizer, Jim Brighton and Mikey Lutmerding
co-leaders.  Participants: Zach Baer, Marcia Balestri, Dennis Coskren,
Middleton Evans, Kathy Calvert, Linda Chittum, Russell Hillsley, Derek
Hudgins, Miles Marsh, Joel Martin, Carol McCullough,  Sam Miller, Leslie
Starr, Mark Rositol, Claire Wayner.   Thanks to the co-leaders and
participants that make these trips possible.


Send me an email if you are interested in a trip in mid-April.


 Mark Hoffman

wcbirding AT gmail.com

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Subject: Re: Towson Bald Eagle
From: marian rutigliano <mcrutig AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 05:33:53 -0800 (PST)
There is also a breeding pair of Bald Eagles at Cromwell Valley Park - also 
nearby. 


Marian Rutigliano
Towson

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Subject: Re: Towson Bald Eagle
From: Anita Tyler <anitatyler AT mac.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 00:47:10 -0800 (PST)
On Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 6:02:05 PM UTC-5, Logan Young wrote:
> This is a little late but I spotted a juvenile Bald Eagle in Towson at the 
intersection of Bellona Ave and N Charles St on Saturday morning around 7:30AM, 
perched on a bare branch above Charles St. I was driving so there were no 
photos but the size and bill were unmistakable. One of the more developed areas 
I've seen an eagle hang out in, but Robert E Lee Park is not far from there. 


Hi - we do have a pair of bald eagles at Robert E. Lee Park. Their nest is 
towards the north end of Lake Roland. 


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Subject: Towson Bald Eagle
From: Logan Young <ltt6young AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 14:58:03 -0800 (PST)
This is a little late but I spotted a juvenile Bald Eagle in Towson at the 
intersection of Bellona Ave and N Charles St on Saturday morning around 7:30AM, 
perched on a bare branch above Charles St. I was driving so there were no 
photos but the size and bill were unmistakable. One of the more developed areas 
I've seen an eagle hang out in, but Robert E Lee Park is not far from there. 


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Subject: Piebald Grackle
From: Wayne Bierbaum <wm.bierbaum AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 14:41:15 -0800 (PST)
In Riva, there is a Common Grackle with bright white lateral wing primaries, 
white neck and white middle tail feathers. It is almost startling in flight. 


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Subject: FOS yard bird
From: Janet Millenson <janet AT twocrows.com>
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 17:14:22 -0500
A beautiful male Common Grackle showed up at my feeder a little while 
ago. That means spring might actually arrive sometime this month, 
right?? Soon there will be a whole annoying flock of grackles gobbling 
down the sunflower seed, but for now I'll consider the sight of a single 
bird a favorable omen of the migrating multitudes to come.


Janet Millenson
Potomac, MD (Montgomery County)
janet AT twocrows.com
----------------------------------------------------------------
"Look at the birds!" -- Pascal the parrot

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Subject: Great Cormorant, Alexandria - No
From: jugbayjs <JugBayJS AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 13:53:00 -0800 (PST)
Great find Sherman! I looked for the GRCO today at lunch but had no luck. I was 
hoping to get lucky enough to see it in PG County MD as a County bird, if it 
had been there. This is an awesome find for the DC area, with very few records, 
and it should probably be looked for again over the next few days to see if it 
returns. 


This is a tricky area for eBird and record committee folks tho. For reports 
I've made when looking from the VA shore (only a few), I'm very careful to 
distinguish between state boundaries. The pilings where it was sitting 
yesterday are so close to the VA line that literally if it had flown about 10 
meters (30 feet) away from shore - as Sherman said - it would have been out of 
VA! Depending on the flight direction, it could easily enter MD or DC waters, 
and it obviously flew up MD waters to get there! I saw no posts from this 
morning and don't know if it was seen by anyone today. I saw one other birder 
also looking for it but he had not seen it either. 


Jones Point Park is a good place to watch for birds on the river, but you need 
a scope for many of them. Many birds seen on or over the river in the vicinity 
of the W end of the bridge could either be in DC or MD. Most are likely in MD, 
depending on how far from shore and how far north of the bridge they are. 
Almost everything south of the bridge and east of a line running from the point 
due south would be in MD. The VA line is very close to the shore above the 
bridge, and then just below it comes in at a right angle up to the shore (low 
water mark); its at a point about half way from the bridge to tip at Jones 
Point. It then follows the shore around to the old house, and then goes more or 
less due south to the tip of a point of VA land more or less straight across 
from (just below) the mouth of Broad Cr. I suspect many of the birds on or over 
the river reported from Windmill Hill Park, and to a lesser extent (but likely 
still significant) some birds on the Potomac mainstem reported from Jones Point 
Park are actually not in VA. 


The WW Scoters (3) were present but only one made it into VA waters while I was 
there; I enjoyed seeing it forage for crayfish and was outside (east) of teh 
pilings the whole time, but it swam to within about 10 feet of the pilings 
while it was eating one. Pretty cool to watch! The rest of the time they were 
farther out, and were in both DC and MD waters. I saw two Red-necked Grebes 
(together) in MD and DC waters but they were not close enough to shore to be in 
VA waters while I was there. 


Besides the one WWSC, the only waterfowl I saw in VA water from Jones Point or 
Windmill Hill Parks were a few Mallards. There were no diving ducks in VA water 
or even anywhere near the shore while I was there. A few coots and a 
pied-billed grebe were in VA waters, and a few gulls, but all other species 
observed there were in DC and MD waters. I did not count any waterfowl in the 
cove at Hunting Creek since they were all in VA (and not really at Jones Point 
park, if I was going to report them I would use a differnt location for them). 
I looked at all the birds there anyway with a scope, in case there were any 
rarities. There were only about 55 Mallards, 2 black ducks, only the usual 
gulls, and no shorebirds. 


Jeff Shenot
Croom Md

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Subject: WEEK-OLD 2/23/15 sighting - possible SNOWY OWL (fly-by) Darnestown, Montgomery County
From: Don Simonson <simonson AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 12:18:43 -0800 (PST)
Held back this info for a week: on Monday February 23, at about 12 noon, my 
wife Marcia and I were at home in Darnestown, Montgomery, MD. She glanced out 
the kitchen window when she saw a huge bird flying, heading southwest into our 
neighbor's yard. She yelled "What's that! it's huge! it's an owl! It's a white 
owl! It's a Snowy Owl!" I did not see the bird. By the time I reached the 
kitchen the bird had flown out of sight. She described huge white bird with 
round, very round wingtips, and that it flew like an owl not a hawk. She saw 
the owl in flight as it passed between two very large conifers, the bird was 
huge. I grabbed my boots and ran out into the snow but I could not relocate it. 
I drove up and down our street looking, but saw only the local mob of loitering 
fish crows screaming and streaming off in a southwesterly direction, ignoring a 
Red-shouldered Hawk perched on phone pole beneath them. 


Given that she only saw the bird for a few seconds, it kept flying, the fact 
that all of upcounty was snow-covered and roads treacherous, and the extremely 
low probability that a Snowy Owl could be seen in Mont Co from our yard, I did 
not post the sighting. 


Three days later, on Thursday Feb 26th, I saw that a Snowy Owl was reported on 
MDbirding, in Poolesville, Montgomery County, at the Izaak Walton League, on 
Wednesday February 25th. I watched the online postings and decided to keep mum 
about this owl sighting for a week. Our house is located near the intersection 
of Seneca Road and Esworthy Road. The entrance to Izaak Walton League is 6 
miles due west of our house. Farm fields and parklands between us and IWLA. 


Marcia has seen Snowy Owls in flight before. She is also very familiar with 
Red-tailed, Red-shouldered, Cooper's and Sharp-shinned hawks flying and 
perching in our yard - several times a week). She also knows Barred, 
Great-Horned Owls. She has seen but is less familiar with Barn Owl and 
Short-eared Owls, which could be considered hypothetically. However, the 
enormous size, noon-time flight would appear to rule out Barn, and the 
all-white appearance would rule out Short-Eared. We have recorded Barn Owl 
twice in 35 years at home; as well as every other owl species known to occur in 
MD, except no Short-Eared Owls yet. 


On February 14, 2014 (one year and nine days prior to this occurrence), I saw 
and reported a Snowy Owl flying across the farm field adjoining our yard. 
Marcia did not get to see that one, I am glad she saw this one to even the 
tally! 

Good birding!
Don Simonson
Darnestown, Montgomery County, MD
simonson at verizon dot net

 

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Subject: Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it...
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 20:18:00 +0000 (UTC)
If you go to BirdGuides web site: 
http://www.birdguides.com/webzine/article.asp?a=4886 


There are more photros and some commentary as well. It IS, apparently,. quite 
real... 


Gail Mackiernan 
Colesville, MD 
----- Original Message -----

From: "'Christine Huffman' via Maryland & DC Birding" 
 

To: "Andy Wilson"  
Cc: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" 
, "Phil Davis" , "MDbirding" 
 

Sent: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 9:05:37 AM 
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with 
weasel on it... 


I got this from a true Brit bird fanatic, watcher, artist, naturalist. Think it 
may be real. 


Sent from my iPad 
Christie Huffman 
Great Falls, VA 

On Mar 4, 2015, at 8:57 AM, Andy Wilson < awilson.gettysburg AT gmail.com > wrote: 





I agree, that if you see the full series of photos, a Photoshop job looks less 
likely. https://www.birdguides.com/webzine/article.asp?a=4886 


Interestingly, I've heard very little (actually no) skepticism from the usually 
pathologically cynical British birders. (I'm allowed to say that, being one.) 


As Gail pointed out, weasels are tiny but ferocious---the first one I ever saw 
was chasing a domestic cat! More likely in defense than attack, but remarkable 
none-the-less. On average, a Green Woodpecker would be around five times the 
mass of a weasel--enough to carry the unfortunate predator a few feet, then: 
Plop Goes The Weasel. 


Interesting factoid about Green Woodpeckers from Gill's "Ornithology" 
tome--they are the largest bird to employ flap bounding (undulating) flight. 


And, for a bit more fun, here is the weaselpecker meme: 
http://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/news/weasel-riding-a-woodpecker-photo-is-the-internets-favorite-new-meme-201533 


cheers 

Andy Wilson 
Frederick 


On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 7:37 AM, Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss% 40comcast.net 
%3E < katahdinss AT comcast.net > wrote: 


Since then I have seen a series of photos of this encounter, as the bird is flying towards the camera and I have to say, they don't look quite as suspicious -- the European Weasel is very small, it is the smallest member of the order Carnivora-- also called "Least Weasel" and can weigh as little as one ounce. Green Woodpeckers feed a lot on the ground like Flickers so it is not impossible for one to be attacked by a ground predator. Barry thought a weasel would be reluctant to take on a bird as large as a Green Woodpecker but they sometimes take rabbits and Brit rabbits are bigger than our cottontail. So I guess it's not impossible but we hear it is a photoshop job, I still would not be surprised... Phil -- they are also found in Africa Gail From: "Phil Davis" < pdavis AT ix.netcom.com > To: "MDbirding" < mdbirding AT googlegroups.com > Sent: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 2:19:12 AM Subject: Re: [MDBirding] way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it... But are you talking about an African or a European weasel? At 22:15 03/03/2015, MARCIA wrote:
I agree with Gail that the image is suspiciously photo-shoppy. I would be surprised if the woodpecker could fly with the weight of the weasel on its back. ================================== Phil Davis Davidsonville, Maryland USA mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com ================================== -- -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'. To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this group on the web at http://www.mdbirding.com Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here - http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html -- -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'. To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this group on the web at http://www.mdbirding.com Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here - http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
-- Andy Wilson Frederick, MD/Gettysburg College, PA http://wilsongettysburg.tumblr.com/ -- -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'. To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this group on the web at http://www.mdbirding.com Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here - http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
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Subject: Comon Raven at Harford rd
From: Michael Bradley <michaelbradley023 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 11:17:58 -0800 (PST)
This morning at 8:45 while reorganizing my bedroom and birding the backyard 
feeders. A Common Raven soared in from the East and pull up on a telephone 
poll... I suspected right away it was a Raven and confirmed once I put glasses 
on it. Large Bird with big long beak and thick puffy neck. The bird stayed only 
a minute of two then lifted off showing the "Wedge Tail" and headed west 
towards Harford Road. It did not call. Even though the windows were closed it 
would have been close enough to be heard. I am totally jacked about seeing this 
bird here. I've seen many in Oregon but never in Baltimore. Woo Hoo!!! 


Seen at
Northway Dr and Harford rd Baltimore.

Bird on!!!
Michael

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Subject: Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it...
From: Jim Wilkinson <lakekoshare AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:49:52 -0800 (PST)
On Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 2:19:39 AM UTC-5, Phil Davis wrote:
> But are you talking about an African or a European weasel?
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> At 22:15 03/03/2015, MARCIA wrote:
> 
> 
> I agree with Gail that the image is
> suspiciously photo-shoppy.  I would be surprised if the woodpecker
> could fly with the weight of the weasel on its back. 
> 
> 
> 
> ==================================
> 
> Phil
> Davis      Davidsonville,
> Maryland     USA
> 
>         
>         
> 
> mailto... AT ix.netcom.com
> 
> ==================================

Probably about as real as this:

http://imgur.com/gallery/RFSgkaw    :)

Jim Wilkinson
Columbia, MD

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Subject: Cecil Bird Club meeting canceled
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 13:32:06 -0500
The March 4th Cecil Bird Club Meeting has been canceled because of the iffy
weather. We apologize for that, but want everyone to be safe in case the
wet roads freeze earlier than predicted tonight.

Still no siskins in my yard, but I do have a nice flock of Goldfinches, and
one of them is getting a very bright throat. Today's thaw has made more of
the witch hazel buds open, and there's a Flicker on the birdfeeder, so
there are little spots of yellow in our front yard.

The Weather Channel claims that it will be warmer than usual for mid-March,
so there's hope.

Pat Valdata
Elkton, MD

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Subject: White-winged Scoters in Fredrick
From: Kathy Calvert <kathycalvert1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 13:16:43 -0500
Three just north of boat landing at Lander on the C&O Canal.

Kathy Calvert 
Adamstown 

Sent from my iPhone 

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Subject: Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it...
From: "'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 17:36:14 +0000 (UTC)
Interestingly, Snopes gave it a thumbs up.

http://www.snopes.com/photos/animals/weasel.asp

Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland


________________________________
From: 'Christine Huffman' via Maryland & DC Birding 
 

To: Andy Wilson  
Cc: Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E ; 
Phil Davis ; MDbirding  

Sent: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 9:05 AM
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with 
weasel on it... 




I got this from a true Brit bird fanatic, watcher, artist, naturalist. Think it 
may be real. 


Sent from my iPad
Christie Huffman
Great Falls, VA



On Mar 4, 2015, at 8:57 AM, Andy Wilson  wrote:


I agree, that if you see the full series of photos, a Photoshop job looks less 
likely. https://www.birdguides.com/webzine/article.asp?a=4886 

>
>
>Interestingly, I've heard very little (actually no) skepticism from the 
usually pathologically cynical British birders. (I'm allowed to say that, being 
one.) 

>
>
>As Gail pointed out, weasels are tiny but ferocious---the first one I ever saw 
was chasing a domestic cat! More likely in defense than attack, but remarkable 
none-the-less. On average, a Green Woodpecker would be around five times the 
mass of a weasel--enough to carry the unfortunate predator a few feet, then: 
Plop Goes The Weasel. 

>
>
>Interesting factoid about Green Woodpeckers from Gill's "Ornithology" 
tome--they are the largest bird to employ flap bounding (undulating) flight. 

>
>
>And, for a bit more fun, here is the weaselpecker meme: 
http://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/news/weasel-riding-a-woodpecker-photo-is-the-internets-favorite-new-meme-201533 

>
>
>cheers
>
>
>Andy Wilson
>Frederick
>
>
>
>
>On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 7:37 AM, Gail B. Mackiernan 
%3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E  wrote: 

>
>Since then I have seen a series of photos of this encounter, as the bird is 
flying towards the camera and I have to say, they don't look quite as 
suspicious -- the European Weasel is very small, it is the smallest member of 
the order Carnivora-- also called "Least Weasel" and can weigh as little as one 
ounce. Green Woodpeckers feed a lot on the ground like Flickers so it is not 
impossible for one to be attacked by a ground predator. Barry thought a weasel 
would be reluctant to take on a bird as large as a Green Woodpecker but they 
sometimes take rabbits and Brit rabbits are bigger than our cottontail. 

>>
>>
>>So I guess it's not impossible but we hear it is a photoshop job, I still 
would not be surprised... 

>>
>>
>>Phil -- they are also found in Africa 
>>
>>
>>Gail
>>
>>
>>________________________________
>>
>>From: "Phil Davis" 
>>To: "MDbirding" 
>>Sent: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 2:19:12 AM
>>Subject: Re: [MDBirding] way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with 
weasel on it... 

>>
>>
>>
>>But are you talking about an African or a European weasel?
>>
>>
>>

>>
>>
>>
>>
>>At 22:15 03/03/2015, MARCIA wrote:
>>
>>I agree with Gail that the image is
suspiciously photo-shoppy.  I would be surprised if the woodpecker
could fly with the weight of the weasel on its back.  
>>==================================
>>Phil
Davis      Davidsonville,
Maryland     USA
>>        
         mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com
>>================================== 
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>>
>>
>>
>>
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>
>
>
>-- 
>
>Andy Wilson
>Frederick, MD/Gettysburg College, PA
>http://wilsongettysburg.tumblr.com/
>
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>

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Subject: RE: Re: Ovenbird?
From: Suzanne Richman <suzanne_richman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 12:21:28 -0500
Yes, thanks, someone else wrote me and I determined that it was indeed a hermit 
thrush. 


Suzanne

> Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 08:19:37 -0800
> From: JugBayJS AT gmail.com
> To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
> Subject: [MDBirding] Re: Ovenbird?
> 
> It is most likely a Hermit Thrush, do you know them? Hermit Thrush has a 
prominent eyering and similar color and markings compared with an Ovenbird. The 
striping on the chest is heavy dark spots that align vertically. They are 
common here in winter (but not in large numbers). We are a month away from the 
early date for Ovenbird (April 5 according to the Yellow book). Of course a 
true winter vagrant Ovenbird could occur, but I would think if it was here this 
winter you'd be aware of it already (and so would many birders, who would want 
to see your winter Ovenbird!). The prolonged severe weather we've had in Feb 
gave many bird feeders and backyard bird watchers prolonged viewing of winter 
birds. 

> 
> They are also quite prone to be feeding on the ground. Although they are 
associated with northern and or higher elevation areas for their breeding 
habitat needs, and often they're associated with mature forests in those 
breeding areas, during winter the same bird's habitat preferences are very 
different. Hermit Thrushes can be quite cosmopolitan in winter. Although they 
are generally not numerous or found in large flocks (compared to other 
thrushes/mainly robins), they are normally distributed throughout our 
metropolitan area. It is not uncommon or unusual for one to over-winter in 
Washington, if a neighborhood/backyard there has adequate food and cover. Chevy 
Chase and many older areas surrounding Washington have abundant mature trees 
and mature shrubbery that provide suitable winter habitat for forest species. 

> 
> Jeff Shenot
> Croom MD
> 
> -- 
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
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http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html 

 		 	   		  

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Subject: Allegany Co. - Cumberland terminus
From: Art Drauglis <lwsyrup AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 08:54:03 -0800 (PST)
Located continuing Harlequin Duck in river next to a concrete abutment for RR 
bridge. 

Tagged Trumpeter Swan seen with Canada geese about 1/2 mile down river.
1 canvasback, horned grebe, buffleheads, coots, PB grebe among others.
Pedestrian bridge is very slick. Use caution
Art D.
W., DC

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Subject: Re: Ovenbird?
From: jugbayjs <JugBayJS AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 08:19:37 -0800 (PST)
It is most likely a Hermit Thrush, do you know them? Hermit Thrush has a 
prominent eyering and similar color and markings compared with an Ovenbird. The 
striping on the chest is heavy dark spots that align vertically. They are 
common here in winter (but not in large numbers). We are a month away from the 
early date for Ovenbird (April 5 according to the Yellow book). Of course a 
true winter vagrant Ovenbird could occur, but I would think if it was here this 
winter you'd be aware of it already (and so would many birders, who would want 
to see your winter Ovenbird!). The prolonged severe weather we've had in Feb 
gave many bird feeders and backyard bird watchers prolonged viewing of winter 
birds. 


They are also quite prone to be feeding on the ground. Although they are 
associated with northern and or higher elevation areas for their breeding 
habitat needs, and often they're associated with mature forests in those 
breeding areas, during winter the same bird's habitat preferences are very 
different. Hermit Thrushes can be quite cosmopolitan in winter. Although they 
are generally not numerous or found in large flocks (compared to other 
thrushes/mainly robins), they are normally distributed throughout our 
metropolitan area. It is not uncommon or unusual for one to over-winter in 
Washington, if a neighborhood/backyard there has adequate food and cover. Chevy 
Chase and many older areas surrounding Washington have abundant mature trees 
and mature shrubbery that provide suitable winter habitat for forest species. 


Jeff Shenot
Croom MD

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Subject: Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it...
From: Laura Rinier <armytech021 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 07:22:35 -0800 (PST)
On Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 2:19:39 AM UTC-5, Phil Davis wrote:
> But are you talking about an African or a European weasel?
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> At 22:15 03/03/2015, MARCIA wrote:
> 
> 
> I agree with Gail that the image is
> suspiciously photo-shoppy.  I would be surprised if the woodpecker
> could fly with the weight of the weasel on its back. 
> 
> 
> 
> ==================================
> 
> Phil
> Davis      Davidsonville,
> Maryland     USA
> 
>         
>         
> 
> mailto... AT ix.netcom.com
> 
> ==================================

Those memes are cracking me up!

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Subject: Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it...
From: "'Christine Huffman' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 09:05:37 -0500
I got this from a true Brit bird fanatic, watcher, artist, naturalist. Think it 
may be real. 


Sent from my iPad
Christie Huffman
Great Falls, VA

> On Mar 4, 2015, at 8:57 AM, Andy Wilson  wrote:
> 
> I agree, that if you see the full series of photos, a Photoshop job looks 
less likely. https://www.birdguides.com/webzine/article.asp?a=4886 

> 
> Interestingly, I've heard very little (actually no) skepticism from the 
usually pathologically cynical British birders. (I'm allowed to say that, being 
one.) 

> 
> As Gail pointed out, weasels are tiny but ferocious---the first one I ever 
saw was chasing a domestic cat! More likely in defense than attack, but 
remarkable none-the-less. On average, a Green Woodpecker would be around five 
times the mass of a weasel--enough to carry the unfortunate predator a few 
feet, then: Plop Goes The Weasel. 

> 
> Interesting factoid about Green Woodpeckers from Gill's "Ornithology" 
tome--they are the largest bird to employ flap bounding (undulating) flight. 

> 
> And, for a bit more fun, here is the weaselpecker meme: 
http://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/news/weasel-riding-a-woodpecker-photo-is-the-internets-favorite-new-meme-201533 

> 
> cheers
> 
> Andy Wilson
> Frederick
> 
> 
>> On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 7:37 AM, Gail B. Mackiernan 
%3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E  wrote: 

>> Since then I have seen a series of photos of this encounter, as the bird is 
flying towards the camera and I have to say, they don't look quite as 
suspicious -- the European Weasel is very small, it is the smallest member of 
the order Carnivora-- also called "Least Weasel" and can weigh as little as one 
ounce. Green Woodpeckers feed a lot on the ground like Flickers so it is not 
impossible for one to be attacked by a ground predator. Barry thought a weasel 
would be reluctant to take on a bird as large as a Green Woodpecker but they 
sometimes take rabbits and Brit rabbits are bigger than our cottontail. 

>> 
>> So I guess it's not impossible but we hear it is a photoshop job, I still 
would not be surprised... 

>> 
>> Phil -- they are also found in Africa 
>> 
>> Gail
>> 
>> From: "Phil Davis" 
>> To: "MDbirding" 
>> Sent: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 2:19:12 AM
>> Subject: Re: [MDBirding] way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with 
weasel on it... 

>> 
>> But are you talking about an African or a European weasel?
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> At 22:15 03/03/2015, MARCIA wrote:
>> I agree with Gail that the image is suspiciously photo-shoppy. I would be 
surprised if the woodpecker could fly with the weight of the weasel on its 
back. 

>> ==================================
>> Phil Davis      Davidsonville, Maryland     USA
>>                   mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com
>> ==================================
>> 
>> -- 
>> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
'Maryland & DC Birding'. 

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the web at http://www.mdbirding.com 

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http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html 

>> 
>> -- 
>> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
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http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html 

> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Andy Wilson
> Frederick, MD/Gettysburg College, PA
> http://wilsongettysburg.tumblr.com/
> -- 
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
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Subject: Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it...
From: Andy Wilson <awilson.gettysburg AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 08:57:38 -0500
I agree, that if you see the full series of photos, a Photoshop job looks
less likely. https://www.birdguides.com/webzine/article.asp?a=4886

Interestingly, I've heard very little (actually no) skepticism from the
usually pathologically cynical British birders. (I'm allowed to say that,
being one.)

As Gail pointed out, weasels are tiny but ferocious---the first one I ever
saw was chasing a domestic cat! More likely in defense than attack, but
remarkable none-the-less. On average, a Green Woodpecker would be around
five times the mass of a weasel--enough to carry the unfortunate predator a
few feet, then: Plop Goes The Weasel.

Interesting factoid about Green Woodpeckers from Gill's "Ornithology"
tome--they are the largest bird to employ flap bounding (undulating) flight.

And, for a bit more fun, here is the weaselpecker meme:

http://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/news/weasel-riding-a-woodpecker-photo-is-the-internets-favorite-new-meme-201533 


cheers

Andy Wilson
Frederick


On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 7:37 AM, Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%
40comcast.net%3E  wrote:

> Since then I have seen a series of photos of this encounter, as the bird
> is flying towards the camera and I have to say, they don't look quite as
> suspicious -- the European Weasel is very small, it is the smallest
> member of the order Carnivora-- also called "Least Weasel" and can weigh as
> little as one ounce. Green Woodpeckers feed a lot on the ground like
> Flickers so it is not impossible for one to be attacked by a ground
> predator. Barry thought a weasel would be reluctant to take on a bird as
> large as a Green Woodpecker but they sometimes take rabbits and Brit
> rabbits are bigger than our cottontail.
>
> So I guess it's not impossible but we hear it is a photoshop job, I still
> would not be surprised...
>
> Phil -- they are also found in Africa 
>
> Gail
>
> ------------------------------
> *From: *"Phil Davis" 
> *To: *"MDbirding" 
> *Sent: *Wednesday, March 4, 2015 2:19:12 AM
> *Subject: *Re: [MDBirding] way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying
>  with weasel on it...
>
> But are you talking about an African or a European weasel?
>
> 
> 
>
>
> At 22:15 03/03/2015, MARCIA wrote:
>
> I agree with Gail that the image is suspiciously photo-shoppy.  I would be
> surprised if the woodpecker could fly with the weight of the weasel on its
> back.
>
>  ==================================
> Phil Davis      Davidsonville, Maryland     USA
>                   mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com
>  ==================================
>
> --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
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> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
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> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>
>  --
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>



-- 
Andy Wilson
Frederick, MD/Gettysburg College, PA
http://wilsongettysburg.tumblr.com/

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Subject: Ovenbird?
From: Suzanne Richman <suzanne_richman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 08:52:08 -0500
I was pretty sure I saw an ovenbird poking around my backyard this morning. 
White eyering, strong striping on the breast. Could this be possible? I live 
near Friendship Heights (Chevy Chase). 


Suzanne 		 	   		  

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Subject: Re: Swan Creek Walk 3/21/2015
From: alanmyoung AT gmail.com
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 05:29:17 -0800 (PST)
On Tuesday, March 3, 2015 at 8:30:19 AM UTC-5, Tim Carney wrote:
> Hi folks,
> 
> There is an upcoming walk at Swan Creek. It will be on Saturday, March 21, 
from 7:00am-11:00am but we might finish early. I'm hoping for good waterfowl 
numbers. 

> 
> There will be a lot of walking on relatively uneven ground, so sturdy 
footwear is a must. Also, given the site's location and exposure to the 
elements (particularly wind) it will be weather-dependent, and we won't go if 
it's raining, icy, or the winds are extreme. 

> 
> Please email me OFFLINE if you'd like to sign up. I have a set number of 
spots but there will be a waiting list. 

> 
> Tim Carney
> Canton, MD

Good Morning Tim. My wife and I would like to join your walk on 21 March at 
Swan Creek. We also heard about your walk from the Anne Arundel Bird Club. I 
would particularly like to come along so I can learn the ropes that will allow 
us to visit there and follow the access rules properly. 


Thanks,
Alan and Sue Young
Millersville, MD

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Subject: Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it...
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 12:37:20 +0000 (UTC)
Since then I have seen a series of photos of this encounter, as the bird is 
flying towards the camera and I have to say, they don't look quite as 
suspicious -- the European Weasel is very small, it is the smallest member of 
the order Carnivora-- also called "Least Weasel" and can weigh as little as one 
ounce. Green Woodpeckers feed a lot on the ground like Flickers so it is not 
impossible for one to be attacked by a ground predator. Barry thought a weasel 
would be reluctant to take on a bird as large as a Green Woodpecker but they 
sometimes take rabbits and Brit rabbits are bigger than our cottontail. 


So I guess it's not impossible but we hear it is a photoshop job, I still would 
not be surprised... 


Phil -- they are also found in Africa  

Gail 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Phil Davis"  
To: "MDbirding"  
Sent: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 2:19:12 AM 
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with 
weasel on it... 


But are you talking about an African or a European weasel? 

 
 


At 22:15 03/03/2015, MARCIA wrote: 


I agree with Gail that the image is suspiciously photo-shoppy. I would be 
surprised if the woodpecker could fly with the weight of the weasel on its 
back. 




================================== 
Phil Davis Davidsonville, Maryland USA 
mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com 
================================== 

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Subject: Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it...
From: Phil Davis <pdavis AT ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 02:19:12 -0500
But are you talking about an African or a European weasel?





At 22:15 03/03/2015, MARCIA wrote:
>I agree with Gail that the image is suspiciously photo-shoppy.  I 
>would be surprised if the woodpecker could fly with the weight of 
>the weasel on its back.

==================================
Phil Davis      Davidsonville, Maryland     USA
                 mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com
================================== 

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Subject: downtown Baltimore/Quarry Lake area
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 22:58:26 -0500
This am, did the Light Out Baltimore and found two live woodcocks and a
junco.  Then checked out the harbor to see the ice condition.


03/03/15 – 630am-645am   (very little open water)

Baltimore Inner Harbor—West Side, Baltimore, MD



WEATHER: Overcast, 28 degrees, calm- NE 6 mph



Mallard – 20

Greater Scaup – 1 (Drake)

Bufflehead – 1 (Hen)

Ruddy Duck – 3

American Coot – 1

Ring-billed Gull – 161

Herring Gull – 10

Great Black-backed Gull – 4

Rock Pigeon – 1 (flyby)

Fish Crow – 1

American Robin – 3 (one B’more Visitor Ctr, two MD Science Ctr)

Northern Mockingbird – 1 (MD Science Ctr)

European Starling – 4

House Sparrow – 5 (MD Science Ctr)

SPECIES: 14      INDIVIDUALS: 216




03/03/15 – 645am-650am  (very little open water around Pier 1)

Baltimore Inner Harbor—North Side, Baltimore, MD



WEATHER: Overcast, 28 degrees, NE 6 mph



Mallard – 23 (22 at Pier 1, 1 at floating wetlands behind WTC aka Pier 2)

Greater Scaup – 2 (Pair, Pier 1)

Lesser Scaup – 1 (Drake, Pier 1)

Hooded Merganser – 1 (Drake, Pier 1)

Ruddy Duck – 5 (Pier 1)

Ring-billed Gull – 43 (several on roof of USS Constellation ticket office
building)

Herring Gull – 3

Great Black-backed Gull – 1

Fish Crow – 2

House Sparrow – 4 (Pratt Street Pavilion)

SPECIES: 10     INDIVIDUALS: 85




03/03/15 – 650am-655am    (ebird hot spot, 40+ species found there during
LOB monitoring)

Baltimore Inner Harbor—Pier 3, Baltimore, MD



WEATHER: Overcast, 28 degrees, NE 8 mph



Mallard – 1 (Drake rested on edge of pier)

Ring-billed Gull – 10

Herring Gull – 2

Great Black-backed Gull – 1

Rock Pigeon – 1 (flyby)

Mourning Dove – 1 (flyby)

Fish Crow – 1

European Starling – 1 (flyby)

“Slate-colored” Junco – 1 (Weinberg Waterfront Park)

House Sparrow – 1

SPECIES: 10      INDIVIDUALS: 20




03/03/15 – 655am-7am  (ebird hot spot, had several passerines around black
locust trees during LOB)

Baltimore Inner Harbor—Pier 4, Baltimore, MD



WEATHER: Overcast, 28 degrees, NE 8 mph



Mallard – 4 (2 pairs)

Ring-billed Gull – 7

Rock Pigeon – 1 (flyby)

European Starling – 1 (flyby)

House Sparrow – 2

SPECIES: 5      INDIVIDUALS: 15




03/03/15 – 7am-705am  (ebird hot spot, waterfront garden had dozens of
warbler species, rails)

Baltimore Inner Harbor—Pier 5, Baltimore, MD



WEATHER: Overcast, 28 degrees, NE 8 mph



Mallard – 2 (flyby)

Ring-billed Gull – 5

Herring Gull – 1

Great Black-backed Gull – 1 (flyby)

Rock Pigeon – 1

American Crow – 1

Fish Crow – 4

American Robin – 1

European Starling – 2

House Sparrow – 1

SPECIES: 10     INDIVIDUALS: 19




03/03/15 – 705am-715am   (ebird hot spot, in past had field birds and good
# of ducks in winter)

Baltimore Inner Harbor—Pier 6, Baltimore, MD



WEATHER: Overcast, 28 degrees, NE 8 mph



Mallard – 10 (5 pairs)

Lesser Scaup – 4 (2 pairs)

Bufflehead – 1 (Hen)

Ruddy Duck – 39 (17 drakes, 22 hens)

Double-crested Cormorant – 1

American Coot – 4

Bonaparte’s Gull – 1

Ring-billed Gull – 78

Herring Gull – 12

Great Black-backed Gull – 11

Fish Crow – 2

European Starling – 3

Song Sparrow – 1

House Sparrow – 1

SPECIES: 14    INDIVIDUALS: 168




03/03/15 – 750am-835am

Caves Farm (restricted access)



WEATHER: Overcast, 28 degrees, ENE 8 mph



Northern Harrier – 2

Red-tailed Hawk – 2

Rough-legged Hawk – 1 (light morph adult)

Mourning Dove – 1

Northern Flicker – 1

Blue Jay – 1

American Crow – 5

Tufted Titmouse – 1

Carolina Wren – 1

Eastern Bluebird – 1

American Robin – 1

Northern Mockingbird – 2

European Starling – 2

Eastern Towhee – 1

American Tree Sparrow – 1

Field Sparrow – 1

Fox Sparrow – 1

Song Sparrow – 2

White-throated Sparrow – 4

“Slate-colored” Junco – 9

Northern Cardinal – 2

Red-winged Blackbird – 8 (single flock flyby NNE)

Common Grackle – 1 (flyby N)

American Goldfinch – 1 (flyby)

SPECIES: 24      INDIVIDUALS:




03/03/15 – 915am-1035am

Quarry Lake, Baltimore Co., MD



WEATHER: Overcast, 28 degrees, E 9 mph- ESE 9 mph

OBSERVERS: 4



Canada Goose – 6

Hooded Merganser – 2 (Pair)

Common Merganser – 7 (2 drakes, 5 hens)

Bald Eagle – 1 (Adult)

Red-tailed Hawk – 2

Ring-billed Gull – 16

Rock Pigeon – 6

Mourning Dove – 3

Northern Flicker – 1

Blue Jay – 1

American Crow – 6

American Robin – 20

Northern Mockingbird – 2

European Starling – 5

“Slate-colored” Junco – 1

Red-winged Blackbird – 1

Common Grackle – 1

House Sparrow – 2

SPECIES: 18     INDIVIDUALS: 83




03/03/15 – 1005am-1015am

Moores Branch Wetlands, Baltimore Co., MD



WEATHER: Overcast, 28 degrees, E 9 mph

OBSERVERS: 4



Sharp-shinned Hawk – 1

Ring-billed Gull – 3

Rock Pigeon – 2

Mourning Dove – 1

Northern Flicker – 1

Blue Jay – 1

American Crow – 3

American Robin – 3

European Starling – 2

Red-winged Blackbird – 1 (flyover)

SPECIES: 10     INDIVIDUALS: 19



     Kevin Graff

     Jarrettsville, MD

     KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it...
From: MARCIA <marshwren50 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 03:15:07 +0000 (UTC)




Subject: Fwd: DC Area, 3/3/2015
From: lydiaschindler AT verizon.net
Date: Tue, 03 Mar 2015 16:08:48 -0600 (CST)




Subject: Lower Eastern Shore, February 20 - March 1, 2015.
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 19:01:13 +0000



















LOWER EASTERN SHORE, FEBRUARY 20 – MARCH 1, 2015. In the alive of winter in 
spite of its 

proverbial “icy grip”.  Sparrows &
waterfowl especially.  Very cold, most
waters frozen.  Harry & Liz
Armistead.

FEBRUARY 20, FRIDAY. 
A Bald Eagle N of the DE-Chesapeake Canal. Going through Middletown, DE, the 
car smacks a House Sparrow. Route 481 from Rts. 301 to 309: 365 sparrows 

(2/3 juncos, 1/3 whitethroats) plus 4 hit earlier by cars, and 25 Horned Larks,
1 meadowlark.  With this entire visit
ground-feeding song birds throng to the road edge with its small areas of
exposed soil, grass, and grit.  Route 309:
 40 sparrows, a towhee on road edges, and
2 d.o.r. sparrows. Bellevue & Ferry Neck rds., 35 sparrows. Arrive at our 
place, Rigby’s Folly , at 2:38 

P.M. and see 1 ea. of catbird, thrasher & mockingbird, a Pileated
Woodpecker, 600 Canada Geese & 40 Tundra Swans hunkered in the icy lee of
Holland Point, 3 Bald Eagles.  1 Gray
Squirrel.  Clear, 21-18°F.,
NW 10-15 becoming calm.  6” of recent
snow on the ground.  Choptank River is
frozen solid as far as the eye can see. 
Locally it went down to 4 this morning. 
Have to use 4WD to get through the drifts on the driveway.  

FEBRUARY 21, SATURDAY. 
14-31, SW 10-15 or calm, overcast. 
Fine sleet or snow from 4 P.M. 
MINUS, below 0°F. readings in several local places this morning. Liz HEARS a 
Bald Eagle while sitting in the 

living room. 4 Gray Squirrels. 600 Common Grackles at John Swaine’s. EGYPT 
ROAD, 7:45-8:35 & 11:50-12:10: Snow 

Goose 380, Canada Goose 5, Blue Goose 16, Northern Harrier 1, Killdeer 1,
flicker 1, Horned Lark 3, bluebird only 1, American Pipit 1 (seen by Don
Messersmith & his Northern Virginia Audubon Society group), SPARROWS: Field
1, Savannah 1, Song 12, White-throated 9, White-crowned 2 imm., junco 6,
goldfinch 1. 

BLACKWATER N.W.R., 8:45 – 11:45.  Bleak, waters 99%+ frozen solid: Snow Goose
5, Canada Goose 1,600, Tundra Swan 70, black duck 2, Mallard 11, Great Blue
Heron 2, Bald Eagle 26, Northern Harrier 3, Killdeer 1, Eastern Bluebird 1,
towhee 1, Fox 8, Song 80 & White-crowned 2 sparrows, junco
24, meadowlark 1, and Rusty Blackbird 4 (probably more but I don’t scrutinize
all the small blackbird flocks, some of them taking flight without allowing a
close approach).  Resident volunteers Betty
& Lynn Whetzel photographed a female American Kestrel yesterday at Key
Wallace X Egypt roads that has a pale blue marker (patagial?) on its right
wing, any numbers or letters concealed by its feathering. They also see a 
cottontail today. 2 of the 3 eagle eggs on the eagle videocam 

have hatched as of today.  

The EXPULSION: we’re not referring to Michelangelo,
Delacroix, Holbein, or, even the Palatine Chapel. No, this involves a pudgy 
mouse expelled from 

the Visitor Center.  I see it outside the
entrance.  I like my rodents fat, furry,
and fussy; this one excels with all those qualities. Nevertheless it’s not 
good to have one in the 

V.C.  Watch out, little fella, or a
harrier may nail you.  15 – 26°F.
at the refuge.  200 Snow Geese over Route
50 N of the Talbot side of the Malkus Bridge. 
Three Hermit Thrushes along Ferry Neck Rd. on the way back to our place.

Along Washington Street in Cambridge within a stretch of
about 100 yards I get the car washed at Kool Ice, where I also purchase shad 
and 

shad roe (from NC), get 100 lbs. of corn, 25 of sunflower seeds, and 25 of
mixed bird seed at the Southern Service Corp., and get gas, breakfast, cash,
and lunch foods plus a newspaper at the Wawa. 
Kool Ice can seem like the National Aquarium lite with all sorts of
shellfish and rendered regular fish on display including a dozen handsome
Spanish Mackerel, a fish, if I have any encounters with them at all, is more
likely to be off of Beach Haven in August.

FEBRUARY 22, SUNDAY. 
Find a dead Carolina Wren on the lawn. 
This winter may be bad for them as well as bluebirds, Killdeer, and the
few surviving quail, but, I hope not for the … li’l squirreleepoo. 400 
Canada Geese forage in our Big Field. Fog, mist, calm, overcast, clearing c. 11 

A.M., 37 degrees F. at the start,.  In
spite of the cold, melt water pours out of Field 6 into the Waterthrush Pond. A 
large, pale poodle appears in front of the 

house chasing a doe.   With apologies to
Robert Frost: “Whose dog this is I think I know./ Their house is off of 
Anderby 

Hall Road though./ They will not see me standing here./ Watching the havoc
wreaked by fido.”  That was at 1:23
P.M.  A couple of hours later there’s a
procession of a golf cart, then a sedan, looking for the dog. The drivers do 
not stop to chat. A few years 

ago 2 dogs were seen chasing deer here, witnessed by the entire Talbot Bird
Club field trip that day, some of the deer so alarmed they swam across Irish
Creek to Holland Point, and one other took off from Lucy Point and swam so far
towards Cook’s Point it eventually became hard to see. 

Lucy Point today, 3 – 5:30, is a happier place with some
water finally opening up on the Choptank River and c. 4,057 waterfowl (11
species) present: Canvasback 395, Redhead 4, Canada Goose 3,050, Bufflehead 
320, 

Tundra Swan 26, Ruddy Duck 1, Lesser 110 & Greater 2 scaup, Common
Goldeneye 135, Mallard 2, and COMMON MERGANSER 2, the latter only
the 2nd property record. 
Also, 46 Herring Gulls and 2 Bald Eagles standing, Blackwater-style, way
out on the ice.  Ice is piled 10’ high at
Holland Point.  The waterfowl come here,
building in in numbers, as this and 2 other small “leads” open up. The 
newspaper says waves 1-2 feet in spite of 

the solid covering of ice!  Calm, fair
becoming clear, 42-44, high haze.  After
2.5 hours I start to get chilled.  “The
tangled bine stems scored the sky/ Like strings of broken lyres./ And all
mankind that haunted nigh/ Had sought their household fires.” (Thomas Hardy). 
In my case I seek the crawl space, 1st 

floor, geothermal heating system.  The
“bine stems” along the Lucy Point Trail consist of honeysuckle, Smilax
(greenbrier), Trumpet Creeper, thorny blackberry tangles, and Poison Ivy.   

FEBRUARY 23, MONDAY. 
Much open water now on the Choptank. 
Overcast becoming fair, NW 15-20, temp. 35 and falling, to 29 by 4:45
P.M. and 24 by 9:30.  The 1st
towhee at the feed this visit. 

FEBRUARY 24, TUESDAY. 
Out at Lucy Point a fair waterfowl show again, 2:30 -3:30, with Bufflehead 80, 
Lesser Scaup 75, 

Common Goldeneye 50, Greater Scaup 1, Ruddy Duck 1, Canvasback 20, and no
gulls.  These are all in a sort of polynya
c. 100 yards by 25’, the birds actively diving, desperate for food and fuel 
it 

seems.  Liz hears a Great Horned Owl at
noon and also these species singing: House Finch, cardinal, and White-throated
Sparrow.  A Hermit Thrush in Woods 6 and
24 Wild Turkeys in the milo stubble of Field 4. 
Along the driveway on the S side of Field 4 are 2 Gray Squirrels and a FOX
SQUIRREL, the FOSQ only c. the 8th property record. 90 birds at our feeding 
stations around the 

house simultaneously.  At Bellevue NO
open water is in sight.  Fair becoming
overcast, 18-27, calm then S 5-10. 

FEBRUARY 25, WEDNESDAY. 
Liz hears a Great Horned Owl at 6 P.M. 
34 degrees F. at 9:30 A.M. 
Frustrating “sea watch” at Lucy Point 4-5 P.M. Much more water but birds so 
diostant that, 

combined with shimmer, hard to ID: ducks unID’d 2,030, Canada Goose 1,610,
Tundra Swan 47, Herring Gull 20 plus a very distant flock, suddenly arising, of
c. 470.  Ducks in order of  most abundant seem to be Bufflehead,
Canvasback, Lesser Scaup & Common Goldeneye. Also: a Great Blue heron, a 
flicker, a 

Red-tailed Hawk, 3 Red-winged Blackbirds & 1 deer. New for this visit are Surf 
Scoter 2 & 1 

ea. of Red-breasted Merganser and Long-tailed Duck. 39-37°F., calm or SW5, 
clear but getting 

hazy.  Over at Holland Point a furry Red
Fox negotiates the rip rap with ease.

FEBRUARY 26, THURSDAY. 
Common Grackles arrive big time at the feeding stations. At one time there are 
c. 575 birds at the 

feed (!), c. 85%+ grackles.  Fortunately
they are not present after today.  Overcast, NE 10, 32°F. 
Snow, fine but dense and sometimes heavy in the morning lasting until c.
10 A.M.  Beautiful.  Wild Turkey 24 in Field 4, 10:15 A.M.

DORCHESTER COUNTY.  EGYPT ROAD,
noon – 12:30 & 4:15-4:30: Snow Goose 1,100, Canada Goose 2,300, Northern
Harrier 1, Red-tailed Hawk 3, Mourning Dove 24, Horned Lawk 8, Hermit Thrush 1,
and sparrows: Savannah 1, Song 8, White-throated 15, White-crowned 1 imm., and
junco 30 plus a d.o.r. (requiescat in pavement) Gray Squirrel at the
Prothonotary Place.  BLACKWATER N.W.R., a
quick drive through since Wildlife Drive and the Visitor Center are closed due
to the snow: Tundra Swan 65, Great Blue Heron 1, Bald Eagle 12, Northern 
Harrier 

3, Red-tailed Hawk 2, Herring Gull 10, American Kestrel 1, American Robin 45,
Fox Sparrow 1, and Eastern Meadowlark 20. 
Liz and I see a male Mallard rise from a Key Wallace Drive ditch and fly
straight into a telephone wire, then plummet to the ground. I remember seeing a 
Short-billed Dowitcher do 

that at Pea I. N.W.R. once; then as it fell it smacked against an approaching
car’s windshield and was finally finished off by a Fish Crow. A triple whammy 
from Hell. 


SWAN HARBOR & HOOPER’S ISLAND, 1 – 3:45 P.M. Lovely snow dusting on pine 
needles and 

cedars, snow plastered on the NE-facing trunks of the trees, most of the Bay on
the W side of Hooper’s I. open, much of Honga River so also.. Eighteen 
waterfowl species: Canada Goose 24, 

Tundra Swan 230, Gadwall 8, American Wigeon 12, American Black Duck 4, Mallard
2, Canvasback 90, Lesser 40 & Greater 2 scaup, Surf 85 & White-winged 2
scoters, Long-tailed Duck 4, Bufflehead 200, Common Goldeneye 45, Hooded 8
& Red-breasted 4 mergansers, Ruddy Duck 2, and 2,530 REDHEADS
(in 8 flocks, estimated by “counting” by 10s). 
Also: Common Loon 2, Horned Grebe 2, Bald Eagle 5, Northern Harrier 2,
Red-shouldered Hawk 1 imm., Mourning Dove 3, American Kestrel 2, American Robin
65, towhee 1, and sparrows: Fox 7, Song 12, White-throated 35, Slate-colored
Junco 45, and House 20.  Red-winged
Blackbird 450.   Tidal waters very
low.  32-38, overcast, NW 5-15, 1-4” of
snow on the ground.  And … Brown-headed
Nuthatch 1 (at the Birchmeiers’ feeders; cute; damned cute) 

But … I’m not finished with cute. 
Recently I came by a copy of the 2nd ed. of Birds of New
Guinea by Thane K. Pratt & Bruce M. Beehler (Princeton, 2015, 528pp.,
$49.50), a gift that I treasure more each time I browse it. If I remember 
Beehler found the 1st 

Dorchester County Upland Sandpiper. 
Looking over the excellent 110 paintings I see birds such as Pygmy
Lorikeet, Buff-faced Pygmy Parrot, and Little Kingfisher, all of them about the
size of a sparrow with prominent bills and heads comprising much of their
length, tails (except for the lorikeet) present “in traces”. Now there’s 
some more good cute. Lars 

Egede-Nissen and I worked as deck hands on the ‘Thorshal’ in the summer of
1959.  At Lae, New Guinea, a brilliant
little dove collided with something on this freighter. Birding was on my back 
burner then, but I 

suspect it was an Ornate Fruit-Dove, a bird that has 8 different colors (if one
counts its 3 shades of green).  It might
qualify as cute, too.

GOLDEN HILL, 4:10 P.M.: 2 Sika Deer, Black Vulture 2, Sharp-shinned
Hawk 2.  CAMBRIDGE, 4:31: Rock Pigeon 7,
Canada Goose 1,000, Cooper’s Hawk 1. 
ROUTE 33 W of Easton, Wild Turkey 33.

FEBRUARY 27, FRIDAY.  Our
property nuthatch drought continues, but at the feeding stations this visit are
20 species: titmouse, chickadee, cardinal, American Crow, jaybird, towhee,
junco, Red-winged Blackbird, Common Grackle, House Finch, goldfinch, and these
sparrows: junco, song, white-throated, and fox, redbelly, flicker, mocker, and
thrasher, and, finally, starling, 15 of these species today, our daily high
this winter.  A Gray Squirrel, a male, is
in and out of the big “Wood Duck box” in our yard mounted on the Willow
Oak.  This one has the itches; when it
scratches that itch its hind leg is in all ablurr. Snow comes straight down in 
the calm air, 

32-33, snow ends c. 8:30, winds becoming NW 10-15, 32-33°F. and fair in the
afternoon, then overcast at 10:45 P.M.  I
rehang the askew driveway sign.  

FEBRUARY 28, SATURDAY.  Going
out our driveway Liz spots a Great Horned Owl flying away at 6:09 A.M., when it
is  19°F. 
Birdwalk at BLACKWATER N.W.R., 7:30 – 1:30 (official “walk” is from 8-12
with 8 observers).  41 species: Liz
Armistead, Carol Carrio, Carol Czerkies, and Valerie & Samuel Rickett with
Linda and Tom Goldberg making a cameo appearance. 20-29°F., fair becoming 
overcast with a 

chance of leftover shad, NW<10, high haze. 
95% of central refuge water frozen. 
Eight of the Bald Eagles we see are bunched up around what looks to be a
dead Tundra Swan.  Nice to see Walter
Ellison & Nancy Martin, and to give them the grip, as they lead their Kent
County Bird Club contingent.

Complete list:  Canada Goose
2,000, Tundra Swan 480, Wood Duck 3 (1 male, 2 females at the Prothonotary
Place), black duck 14, Mallard 34, Common Merganser 6, AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
1(presumably the disabled bird now present for its 4th year), Great
Blue Heron 7, Black 3 & Turkey 24 vultures, BALD EAGLE 58 (at
least), Northern Harrier 2, Red-tailed Hawk 1, Killdeer 1, Herring 1 &
Ring-billed 10 gulls, Rock Pigeon 10 (Cambridge), Mourning Dove 4, Red-bellied
1 & Downy 2 woodpeckers, American Kestrel 4, Blue Jay 3, American 7 &
Fish 3 crows, Horned Lark 3 (Egypt Road), Carolina Chickadee 1, Tufted Titmouse
1, Brown-headed Nuthatch 5, Eastern Bluebird 2, American Robin 7, Northern
Mockingbird 2, European Starling 125, Myrtle Warbler 1, sparrows: Field 6, Fox
2, Song 18, White-throated 24, White-crowned 1, and Slate-colored Junco 20,
Northern Cardinal 5, Red-winged Black bird 400, Common (and how) Grackle 6,000
or so, and House Sparrow 10.   

I like to end the birdwalks where the Route 335 bridge crosses
Blackwater River.  That is a good place
to see numbers of eagles; sometimes an adult will descend and land on one of
the phone poles right in front of everyone. 
Today there is a roadkill Raccoon there that I move off the road so
scavengers, such as eagles, will not end up as roadkill themselves. On the 
parking lot pavement are 90 Muskrat 

tails and a few feet, probably there in connection with the outdoors festival
held a few miles S on Route 335 today at the school in Golden Hill. Part of 
this festival is a Muskrat skinning 

contest.  This year for the first time
women competitors will have to skin 5 Muskrats, up from 3 previously, and on a
par with men contestants.  Muskrat meals
are served.  A sort of beauty contest,
Miss Outdoors, is held, I think, following the skinning.  To each his/her own.

MARCH 1, SUNDAY.  Time
to head back to Pennsylvania.  A female
Sharp-shinned Hawk perches in a maple on the edge of the yard. Leave the old 
place at 10:06 A.M. The 33 Wild Turkeys are again in a field S of 

Route 33 and W of Easton.  Nine Horned
Larks along Route 481, Queen Annes County. 
A 138-mile drive through snow, rain, drizzle, sleet, and ice.  Trying. 
Having the car washed at Kool Ice’s brushless car wash yesterday was a
poor decision.  Best to all. – Harry
Armistead, Philadelphia.





 		 	   		  

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Subject: meters across the border: Great Cormorant, Alexandria
From: sjsuter29 AT verizon.net
Date: Tue, 03 Mar 2015 10:56:00 -0600 (CST)
A first-year Great Cormorant was roosting on the pilings NE of Fords Landing, 
Alexandria late this morning. If it were to fly East 10 m, it would be over DC 
waters. 


Sherman Suter
Alexandria VA 22307

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Subject: Re: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on it...
From: "Guineabird via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 11:11:10 -0500
Sure this pic isn't PhotoShop?
 
Ever hear Nat "King" Cole's 1943 hit, "Straighten Up and Fly  Right". The 
song describes a buzzard who coaxes a monkey to sit on his  back for a 
flight. His idea is to dive, throw the monkey off his back, then eat  it.
 
Reminds me of the old wives tale that  claimed hummingbirds hitched rides 
on larger birds during  migration.
 
 
Gail Frantz
Old Hanover Rd
Baltimore County
 
 
In a message dated 3/3/2015 8:31:08 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
wlsngang AT verizon.net writes:

 
 
The photos and story at this site ... 

http://www.itv.com/news/2015-03-02/incredible-image-shows-weasel-flying-on-woodpeckers-back/ 

are brought to you from Hornchurch Country Park, UK.   Enjoy.
 
Jim Wilson
Queenstown


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Subject: Wood duck at Kent Narrows this morning
From: Diana Linnekin <dlinnekin AT mailcity.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 06:26:52 -0800 (PST)
I was at Kent Narrows (between the Bridges and the Jetty Restaurants) at 8 AM 
this morning and there was a male wood duck in a group of ducks that included 
Scaups, Canvasbacks, Mallards and Ruddy Ducks. Happy Birding! 


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Subject: way out of area ... Woodpecker shown flying with weasel on its back
From: "Jim Wilson" <wlsngang AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 03 Mar 2015 08:31:08 -0500
The photos and story at this site ... 
http://www.itv.com/news/2015-03-02/incredible-image-shows-weasel-flying-on-woodpeckers-back/ 

are brought to you from Hornchurch Country Park, UK.  Enjoy.

Jim Wilson
Queenstown

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Subject: Swan Creek Walk 3/21/2015
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 05:30:19 -0800 (PST)
Hi folks,

There is an upcoming walk at Swan Creek. It will be on Saturday, March 21, from 
7:00am-11:00am but we might finish early. I'm hoping for good waterfowl 
numbers. 


There will be a lot of walking on relatively uneven ground, so sturdy footwear 
is a must. Also, given the site's location and exposure to the elements 
(particularly wind) it will be weather-dependent, and we won't go if it's 
raining, icy, or the winds are extreme. 


Please email me OFFLINE if you'd like to sign up. I have a set number of spots 
but there will be a waiting list. 


Tim Carney
Canton, MD

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Subject: Red-throated Loons Ft Washington National Park PG County
From: Mark Rositol <mrositol510 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 05:04:03 -0800 (PST)
Viewed from light house area. Four working the area between light house and 
Swan Creek. Also a continuing Red-necked Grebe. Both Scaup,Canvasback, Tundra 
Swan,etc. 


Mark Rositol 
Fort Washington, MD 

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Subject: Pine Siskins at thisle feeder in Silver Spring
From: "'Elda Banks' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 02:13:47 +0000 (UTC)
I was so happy to see 5 Pine Siskins at our thistle feeder today!  Like 
several other birders we haven't had much activity at our thisle feeder this 
winter. And we've only seen Pine Siskins in our yardone other year. So today 
was a real treat.Elda BanksSilver Spring 


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Subject: The Auk, Condor and Maryland Birdlife Online Journal Articles now Avaliable for free
From: "'Dan Small' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 16:29:52 -0800 (PST)
All,

Two great ornithological journals, The Auk and The Condor, are now available 
online for free. All but the latest years can be accessed here 
http://aoucospubs.org/ and for older years go to the SORA website - 
https://sora.unm.edu/. 


This is a fantastic resource for those interested in all aspects of avian 
biology. 


In addition, Volumes 1-61 (1945-2005) of Maryland Birdlife are now available on 
SORA as well. 


Dan Small
Chestertown, MD

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Subject: Re: Greater White-fronted Geese, National Mall; Mar. 2
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 16:41:20 -0500
I just cruised around the National Mall and could not find the Greater
White-fronted Geese (GWFG) reported earlier. I found the flock of CAGOs
south of the Washington Monument, but no GWFGs within. Next I cruised by
Constitution Gardens Pond where there were a few geese that I did not stop
to check. Then on to West Potomac Park where geese are gathering, along
with more than 60 Mallard. No geese at all to be found on the golf course
at the north end of Hains Pt.

Dang!

Hugh

On Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 2:26 PM, Scott Baron  wrote:

> Hi,
>
> At around 11:30 I saw two Gr. White-fr. Geese on the Mall with
> approximately 250 Canada Geese.  They were feeding in the vicinity of a big
> puddle in between the south side of the Washington Monument and
> Independence Ave.  These birds were of the Greenland race.
>
> Happy birding,
>
> Scott Baron
> Gaithersburg, Md.
>
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-- 
Hugh McGuinness
Washington, D.C.

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Subject: Greater White-fronted Geese, National Mall; Mar. 2
From: Scott Baron <baron.scott AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 14:26:48 -0500
Hi,

At around 11:30 I saw two Gr. White-fr. Geese on the Mall with
approximately 250 Canada Geese.  They were feeding in the vicinity of a big
puddle in between the south side of the Washington Monument and
Independence Ave.  These birds were of the Greenland race.

Happy birding,

Scott Baron
Gaithersburg, Md.

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Subject: Re: Re: Predatory American Crow
From: Adam Beidler <adam.beidler AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 13:34:22 -0500
I saw an American Crow kill a Northern Mockingbird that was trying to
harrass it--probably protecting a nest.  It happened right outside Tysons
Corner Mall in Northern Virginia last spring.

Adam Beidler
Vienna, VA

On Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 1:18 PM, marian rutigliano  wrote:

> Hmm.I wondered about the aggressive behavior I've been seeing in my yard.
> I had a feeder on a pole, that squirrels couldn't get to, that split and
> fell over. I had to do a less than optimal re-rig of the feeder on the
> stump of a branch from a tree trunk. The cardinals have been extremely
> aggressive in dive bombing and harassing the squirrels who try to use the
> feeder. While cardinals are not particularly timid birds, I have never
> thought they had the same kind of bird gangsta moxie of, say, crows or blue
> jays. These cardinals are among the most aggressively territorial I have
> seen; a desperate need for food seems a plausible cause for such an
> adaptation.
>
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Subject: White-winged scoters dc waters old town Alexandria
From: Adam Parr <balaenopteron AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:32:57 -0800 (PST)
Sorry, that should be Rivergate Park. :

The White-winged Scoters are visible now from Riverside Park in Alexandria, 
spread out in the middle of the channel. There is also a lone female 
Long-tailed Duck, Canvasbacks, and all the other usual duckspects. Thanks Dan! 


Adam Parr
Takoma Park.

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