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Updated on Tuesday, September 2 at 07:16 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Trinidad Piping-guan,©Dan Lane

2 Sep MOS Fall Count Scheduled for Sept. 20-21, 2014 [Chuck Stirrat ]
2 Sep Nighthawks over Colesville ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
2 Sep Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory's 20th annual Kiptopeke Challenge [Paul Nasca ]
2 Sep Cromwell Valley Park, 09/02/14 [Kevin Graff ]
2 Sep Mourning warbler at Cromwell Valley Park this morning [Andy Beiderman ]
2 Sep Re: Rock Creek Park, Monday 9/2/14, Mourning Warbler [Daniel Rauch ]
2 Sep Sugarloaf Mtn Shooting Range update [JAMES SPEICHER ]
2 Sep Rock Creek Park, Monday 9/2/14, Mourning Warbler [Wallace Kornack ]
2 Sep Wheaton Regional Park today ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
02 Sep Likely Lawrence's rather than Golden-Winged at Wheaton Regional Park-Montgomery Cty [Evelyn Ralston ]
2 Sep Harford Bobolink [Matthew Addicks ]
1 Sep Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Montgomery [Michael Ostrowski ]
1 Sep Re: Kent Co. Birds 8/31/14 ["JCDLMARTIN via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
1 Sep 40 Nighthawks with a 2 year old [Warblerick ]
1 Sep [WA] 14+ Nighthawks over Hagerstown's Municipal Stadium on SAT [JAMES SPEICHER ]
1 Sep Re: Wheaton Regional Park-Montgomery Cty; Golden Winged Warbler [jugbayjs ]
1 Sep 40 Nighthawks with a 2 year old [Mike Mangiaracina ]
01 Sep Wheaton Regional Park-Montgomery Cty; Golden Winged Warbler [Evelyn Ralston ]
1 Sep More warblers, 9/1/2014 [Tim Carney ]
1 Sep Nighthawks over Silver Spring []
01 Sep Re: YB Flycatcher - Cromwell [Now eBird review process] [Jim Moore ]
1 Sep RE: YB Flycatcher - Cromwell [Tim Houghton ]
1 Sep RE: Birding is fun. [Tim Houghton ]
01 Sep Re: Wheaton Regional Park today [Evelyn Ralston ]
1 Sep Wheaton Regional Park today ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
1 Sep Birding is fun. [Ron Gutberlet ]
1 Sep Rock Creek Park, Sunday 9/1/14, Mourning Warbler [Wallace Kornack ]
1 Sep A heartfelt thank you to the reviewers...... [Karen Caruso ]
1 Sep Re: YB Flycatcher - Cromwell ["'Bill Hubick' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
01 Sep mini-fallout at eden mill []
31 Aug Kent Co. Birds 8/31/14 [Bob Ringler ]
1 Sep RE: YB Flycatcher - Cromwell [Tim Houghton ]
31 Aug Warblerage 8/31/2014 [Tim Carney ]
31 Aug Queen Anne's County today: Terrapin and John Brown [Karen Caruso ]
31 Aug Re: YB Flycatcher - Cromwell ["Jlstasz via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
31 Aug RE: YB Flycatcher - Cromwell [Tim Houghton ]
31 Aug Franklin's Gull on Jug Bay - 8/30 [Hans Holbrook ]
31 Aug 5 Am. G. Plovers in Hurlock in Dorchester county. [Dave Palmer ]
31 Aug Lake Needwood [Ron Johnson ]
31 Aug YB Flycatcher - Cromwell []
31 Aug Rock Creek Park, Sunday 8/31/14 [Wallace Kornack ]
31 Aug Re: Golden-Winged -- Wheaton Regional Park--mini-train tracks/Pine Lake -- Aug 31, 2014 [Rae Dubois ]
31 Aug Re: American Golden Plovers still at Central Sod/John Brown Rd. ["Jim Wilson" ]
31 Aug Golden-Winged -- Wheaton Regional Park--mini-train tracks/Pine Lake -- Aug 31, 2014 [psalmus50 ]
30 Aug David Sibley on CSPAN right now [Marcia Balestri ]
30 Aug American Golden Plovers still at Central Sod/John Brown Rd. ["Mark S." ]
30 Aug Ft Dupont - DC (Lots O'Warblers!) ["'Jason DC' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
30 Aug Rock Creek Park, Saturday 8/30/14 [Wallace Kornack ]
30 Aug Yellow-bellied Flycatcher at Cromwell Valley [Taylor McLean ]
30 Aug Golden-winged Warbler at Irvine Nature Center [Keith Eric Costley ]
30 Aug Raven. Cecil County ["'espijc' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
29 Aug Violette's Lock (Potomac, MD) 29 August: no Neo [Steve Johnson ]
29 Aug Swan Creek & Black Marsh 8/29/2014 [Tim Carney ]
29 Aug Finally! My Garrettt Screech-Owl ["'Aaron Graham' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
29 Aug Rock Creek Park, Friday 8/29/14 [Wallace Kornack ]
29 Aug Rock Creek Park - evening [Martin Sneary ]
29 Aug Re: Turkey Point [Patricia Valdata ]
29 Aug BOBO and MAWR in Chestertown (Kent County) [Mike Hudson ]
29 Aug Mississippi Kite - Harford []
29 Aug Sugarloaf Mtn Shooting Range update & possible [FR] Junco [JAMES SPEICHER ]
29 Aug Poplar slots taken [Marcia Balestri ]
29 Aug RE: Cromwell, good birds, YB Fly, Philly, Wilson's, 8/29/14 [Tim Houghton ]
29 Aug Re: Snowy Egret ["'Jason DC' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
29 Aug Poplar Island-Sept 19 [Marcia Balestri ]
29 Aug Re: Turkey Point [Mark Johnson ]
29 Aug Black Walnut Point, Talbot County [Dave Palmer ]
29 Aug Cromwell, good birds, YB Fly, Philly, Wilson's, 8/29/14 [Tim Houghton ]
29 Aug Turkey Point [Mark Johnson ]
29 Aug Mall birds, 8/29 [Jim Felley ]
29 Aug Snowy Egret [Hugh McGuinness ]
29 Aug Nashville Warbler at Cromwell Valley [Taylor McLean ]
29 Aug Veeries over Pasadena ["'Bill Hubick' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
28 Aug American Avocet at Mt. Calvert [Fred Shaffer ]
28 Aug Cromwell Valley Park, 08/26/14 [Kevin Graff ]
28 Aug JBWS Ongoing Bird Survey - Bobolinks, Cooper's Hawk [Karen Caruso ]
28 Aug Good morning at Bayside, other stuff [Marcia Balestri ]

Subject: MOS Fall Count Scheduled for Sept. 20-21, 2014
From: Chuck Stirrat <stirrcr1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 16:50:32 -0700 (PDT)
The annual Fall Seasonal Count sponsored by MOS will be held Saturday, 
September 20, 2014 and/or Sunday, September 21, 2014 in the Maryland-DC area. 
The MOS Board has left the choice of whether the count will be on Saturday or 
Sunday to local chapters and coordinators. Several counties have held organized 
counts for several years on the third weekend of September. In areas without an 
identified coordinator, individual parties submit their results directly to the 
statewide coordinator for inclusion. 


The guidelines for this count are the same as those used for all seasonal 
counts. Local coordinators will assign volunteers to areas, honoring requests 
whenever possible. Party leaders are responsible for tracking party miles and 
times, names of participants, and documentation for unusual sightings. A new 
checklist compilation form (AOU Supplement Order 54) is available on the MOS 
website, in the β€œSpecies Counts” section: 


http://www.mdbirds.org/counts/fall/fallcounts.html

A list of the county coordinators contact information is available on the same 
website. Anyone already organizing a count or interested in volunteering as a 
coordinator for another county without a coordinator are encouraged to contact 
the state coordinator. In addition a spreadsheet for coordinators or 
individuals to submit results to the state coordinator via email is available 
on the website. 


Chuck Stirrat, 
MOS Fall Count Coordinator
13318 Hunt Ridge, Ellicott City, MD 21042-1155
Home phone:  410-531-2417
E-mail: ChuckS20 AT verizon.net

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Subject: Nighthawks over Colesville
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 23:08:05 +0000 (UTC)
Just had two Nighthawks flying over out house in Colesville, in front of the 
rapidly approaching storm. They were high, headed ESE and 
(uncharacteristically) were flying steadily with no periods of soaring. 


Gail Mackiernan 
Colesville, MD 

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Subject: Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory's 20th annual Kiptopeke Challenge
From: Paul Nasca <63crows AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 18:03:27 -0400
I realize this is outside of the Maryland & DC area, but thought some might
be interested in joining in the fun!  (This notice is posted with the kind
permission of the Listserv Owners).  Please reply off-line:

Hello Maryland & DC Birders,

Are you up for a challenge?  How about the Kiptopeke Challenge?!

The Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory (CVWO) invites birders of all
skill levels to participate in the 20th annual Kiptopeke Challenge (KC) on
Saturday, September 20, 2014.

The KC is a fun and friendly "Big Day" birding competition.  Teams compete
to identify the greatest number of bird species in a single day within the
competition boundary of Accomack and Northampton Counties, Virginia
(including the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel.)  The purpose of the KC is to
increase awareness of fall bird migration on Virginia’s Eastern Shore and
to help raise funds for the CVWO.

It is easy to get involved and there are several categories in which to
compete: 24-Hour, 3-Hour, Youth Team (age 18 and under), and Special Venue.
The event is open to everyone regardless of their birding ability and it
only takes two people to form a team. The KC is a great way for
participants to utilize their birding skills in support of a non-profit
organization dedicated to avian research, habitat conservation, and public
education.

For more information, a brochure, or to register write to
kiptopekechallenge AT gmail.com or visit www.cvwo.org.

Best birds,

Paul Nasca

CVWO Kiptopeke Challenge Coordinator

Fredericksburg, VA

kiptopekechallenge AT gmail.com

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Subject: Cromwell Valley Park, 09/02/14
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 17:01:46 -0400
Hey all,


    I got limited time as i'm leaving for NJ tomorrow instead of Thurs for
fire company new fire units wetdown party this weekend, then two days of
Cape May birding, then 4+ days of NJ Firemen Convention in Wildwood. Home
on the 14th.

This morning, there are two Mourning Warblers during the BBC walk.  Adult
female at edge of first woods after leaving little sparrow field by the
bridge and a immature type at before box 11.  Other warblers were: Northern
Waterthrush (3), Blue-winged, C Yellowthroat, Redstart, Parula, Magnolia,
Chestnut-sided.  Wilson Warbler seen earlier by Leslie S and myself before
the walk.

Much earlier, during Light Out Baltimore, there are one Great Blue, one
Green and two Black-crowned Night Herons at the floating wetlands behind
Baltimore World Trade Center at the Inner Harbor


    Kevin Graff
    Jarrettsville, MD
    KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Mourning warbler at Cromwell Valley Park this morning
From: Andy Beiderman <aandyy AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 13:55:21 -0700 (PDT)
Sorry for the delayed post, but I saw one Mourning warbler at Cromwell Valley 
Park in Baltimore County found by Ryan Johnson near bluebird box #11 that was 
actively chipping and hopping around in low branches by the fence. Seen by the 
Baltimore Bird Club walk as well, and some photos were taken by others which 
will hopefully help document the sighting. I think another was reported around 
the same time by box #9 but disn't see it myself. Otherwise slow overall, but 
with some active pockets early. 


I did see two different blue-winged warblers, and a prairie along with some 
expected warblers. Others had reported a black billed cuckoo early in the 
morning, and also canada and wilson's warblers. 


Andy Beiderman
Baltimore, MD

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Subject: Re: Rock Creek Park, Monday 9/2/14, Mourning Warbler
From: Daniel Rauch <danrauch11 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 16:35:25 -0400
john could very likely had a prairie warbler. Through morning surveys at the 
Kenilworth Ball Fields and Kingman island, I had only 2 warblers. Both were 
hatch year prairies. while watching and photographing one for a few minutes, a 
second flew in and gave chase. I got several good looks of them together and 
photos of them separately. Both were on the east side of Heritage at the end of 
the new boardwalk. 


Only other highlight was watching a red fox make several attempts to sneak up 
on a group of gulls, mallards, killdeer, and a great egret on the tidal flats 
of Watts Branch in NE DC. 


Dan Rauch 
Washington,DC 


> On Sep 2, 2014, at 11:38 AM, Wallace Kornack  wrote:
> 
> This morning (9/2) in the Maintenance Yard at Rock Creek Park…...
> 
> It was a morning with several surprises. A Mourning Warbler was found by John 
in the ravine at the west end of the maintenance yard. From its description it 
was different from the one found yesterday---it displayed a well-defined hood. 
The Yellow-throated Warbler made a second rare appearance in the yard: the 
first was seen on August 14. The two seen today behaved like a flycatcher. Two 
Yellow-billed Cuckoos put on a show at the east end of the yard. 

> 
> -----Maintenance Yard
> Black-throated Blue Warbler     4
> Black-and-white Warbler     3    (Leon)
> Mourning Warbler     (John)
> Common Yellowthroat      
> American Redstart     4     (Leon)
> Cape May Warbler  2    (Susan)
> Northern Parula      (Judy)
> Magnolia Warbler     8
> Bay-breasted Warbler     (John)
> Blackburnian Warbler      (Judy, Tucker)
> Chestnut-sided Warbler     2
> Yellow-throated Warbler     2    (many)    
> Prairie Warbler       possible  (John)
> Black-throated Green Warbler  
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo     2     (Marina, Susan) 
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird     3+
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  
> Downy Woodpecker     5
> Northern Flicker     10++
> Pileated Woodpecker     2
> Eastern Wood-Pewee     2
> Red-eyed Vireo  
> Blue Jay     2
> American Crow     2
> Carolina Chickadee     3
> Tufted Titmouse     3
> White-breasted Nuthatch  
> House Wren     2
> Carolina Wren 
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher     4+
> American Robin     6
> European Starling  
> Northern Cardinal     3
> Common Grackle  
> Baltimore Oriole     2
> 
> Fellow Birders: John Williamson, Bill Butler, Tucker Scully, Lee Kimball, 
Leon Kass, Susan Volman, Judy Bromley, Dan Eberly, Marina True 

> 
> Have Fun Birding!
> 
> Wallace Kornack
> Washington  DC
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Subject: Sugarloaf Mtn Shooting Range update
From: JAMES SPEICHER <jugornought AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 14:12:44 -0400
In addition to the info in my original ms [below], there was a print
article about the Zoning appeal in yesterday's WASH POST entitled:

Neighbors question plans for Sugarloaf shooting ranges.

The meeting continues this evening  AT 7 at the county offices at 12
Church St in the downtown.  Parking is available in a garage adjacent
to the office bldg.  It may be possible for additional people/groups
to sign on to voice their opinions, or it may be restricted to those
who had signed up initially last week.  The decision regarding
allowing additional speakers will be made by the meeting chair at
tonight's meeting.  Speakers are generally limited to 3 minutes each.

Jim S

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: JAMES SPEICHER 
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 17:34:28 -0400
Subject: Sugarloaf Mtn Shooting Range update & possible [FR] Junco
To: MD & DC Birding 

A Board of Zoning Appeals hearing was held yesterday evening [THURS]
and is reported on in today's Frederick News Post [FNP].  The hearing
was still ongoing with citizen input  AT 10:30, so the paper was unable
to report in the print edition whether a decision was reached by the
board.  Additional time was going to be provided next TUES for citizen
input, if needed.  It's possible that the on-line edition has more
info, but I can't access it with dial-up.

The title of the FNP print article is:
Hundreds Oppose Shooting Range

Jim Speicher
BroadRun/Burkittsville area
[FR] Frederick County

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Monday 9/2/14, Mourning Warbler
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 11:38:53 -0400
This morning (9/2) in the Maintenance Yard at Rock Creek Park......

It was a morning with several surprises. A Mourning Warbler was found by John 
in the ravine at the west end of the maintenance yard. From its description it 
was different from the one found yesterday---it displayed a well-defined hood. 
The Yellow-throated Warbler made a second rare appearance in the yard: the 
first was seen on August 14. The two seen today behaved like a flycatcher. Two 
Yellow-billed Cuckoos put on a show at the east end of the yard. 


-----Maintenance Yard
Black-throated Blue Warbler     4
Black-and-white Warbler     3    (Leon)
Mourning Warbler     (John)
Common Yellowthroat      
American Redstart     4     (Leon)
Cape May Warbler  2    (Susan)
Northern Parula      (Judy)
Magnolia Warbler     8
Bay-breasted Warbler     (John)
Blackburnian Warbler      (Judy, Tucker)
Chestnut-sided Warbler     2
Yellow-throated Warbler     2    (many)    
Prairie Warbler       possible  (John)
Black-throated Green Warbler  
Yellow-billed Cuckoo     2     (Marina, Susan) 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird     3+
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Downy Woodpecker     5
Northern Flicker     10++
Pileated Woodpecker     2
Eastern Wood-Pewee     2
Red-eyed Vireo  
Blue Jay     2
American Crow     2
Carolina Chickadee     3
Tufted Titmouse     3
White-breasted Nuthatch  
House Wren     2
Carolina Wren 
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher     4+
American Robin     6
European Starling  
Northern Cardinal     3
Common Grackle  
Baltimore Oriole     2

Fellow Birders: John Williamson, Bill Butler, Tucker Scully, Lee Kimball, Leon 
Kass, Susan Volman, Judy Bromley, Dan Eberly, Marina True 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC

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Subject: Wheaton Regional Park today
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 15:19:01 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all, 

First off, we did NOT see Evelyn Ralston's Lawrence's Warbler from yesterday, 
alas; in fact, no "winged" warblers at all -- probably left us last night. A 
distinct change in the species mix and much lower diversity and abundance of 
most migrants, although an increase in Catbirds. The most activity was near 
Pine Lake with a small migrant flock and later, in Brookside Gardens along the 
native plant boardwalk (we didn't go into the gardens proper because of noise 
-- mowers, blowers, weed-whackers, etc. -- so much for the "peaceful beauty of 
the gardens!"). Interestingly, two YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHERS were well-seen, 
the first (near Pine Lake) looked identical to the individual poorly-seen 
yesterday by a number of birders. Today it was more cooperative and allowed 
good looks. The second was with the small flock at Brookside. The warbler 
flavor today was Chestnut-sided, Redstart and Black-and-White with a few 
Magnolias thrown into the mix. Not too much else of note...we need a cold 
front! 


Gail Mackiernan and Barry Cooper 
Colesville, MD 

Birds of interest: 

Wheaton Regional Park and Brookside Gardens, Montgomery, US-MD 
Comments: sunny, hot, almost no wind; not much activity but a distinct change 
in warbler species present so obviously some movement last night. 

37 species 

Wood Duck 4 
Black Vulture 1 juvenile sitting in window of white house's garage 
Cooper's Hawk 1 immature 
Chimney Swift 6 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 3 one adult male  AT  Brookside Gardens in native plant 
area 

Northern Flicker 6 
Eastern Wood-Pewee 6 
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher 2 
Acadian Flycatcher 2 one seen; another 'heard only' in different area 
Eastern Phoebe 1 Brookside Nature Ctr. pond 
Red-eyed Vireo 10 
Blue Jay 15 most were fly-overs. very vocal 
House Wren 1 
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2 
Gray Catbird 12 increase since yesterday 
Black-and-white Warbler 7 
American Redstart 6 
Northern Parula 1 
Magnolia Warbler 3 
Chestnut-sided Warbler 10 all were immatures; about half were in Brookside 
Gardens 

Eastern Towhee 2 
Baltimore Oriole 1 immature male 
House Finch 1 Nature Ctr. feeder; appeared to have conjunctivitis 
American Goldfinch 5 

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Subject: Likely Lawrence's rather than Golden-Winged at Wheaton Regional Park-Montgomery Cty
From: Evelyn Ralston <evelynsr AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2014 08:12:51 -0400
After reviewing my posted photos (links below), Gail Mackiernan and Barry 
Cooper, as well as Jeff Shenot, kindly pointed out that the bird, present 
yesterday noon near Pine Lake, is most likely a Lawrence's Warbler. It is then 
a different bird from the one reported on Sunday by David Gersten and later by 
Rae Dubois. 

Evelyn

http://tweetweet.smugmug.com/Nature/Birds/2014/i-CwKqjdb/0/L/HP7A1739-L.jpg
http://tweetweet.smugmug.com/Nature/Birds/2014/i-9VQ4NjK/0/L/HP7A1766-L.jpg
http://tweetweet.smugmug.com/Nature/Birds/2014/i-mXCTZSW/0/L/HP7A1767-L.jpg

Evelyn Ralston
Bethesda, MD
evelynsr AT verizon.net
http://tweetweet.smugmug.com/Nature/Birds/2014







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Subject: Harford Bobolink
From: Matthew Addicks <turkishturkey13 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 03:47:34 -0700 (PDT)
Walking to the bus stop this morning I saw and heard 3 bobolink flocks with 
about 30 birds total flying over. Great to see migration in action! 

Matt Addicks
Abingdon Md

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Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Montgomery
From: Michael Ostrowski <birdmath AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 23:09:37 -0400
Hi all,
   This morning I found an unexpected Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Lois Green
Conservation Park. It was on the exposed mud around the drawn down first
pond (ie the first pond you come to when walking from the parking lot).
Unfortunately it was spooked by a Cooper's Hawk and did not return.

Full checklist and documentation photos here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19643861

Mike Ostrowski
Derwood, MD

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Subject: Re: Kent Co. Birds 8/31/14
From: "JCDLMARTIN via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 22:48:58 -0400 (EDT)
I did some birding in Kent County this morning, basically following Bob  
Ringler's breadcrumbs from yesterday. I arrived at the end of Green Lane in 
Rock  Hall around 7 AM, just in time to see 2 immature BLACK-CROWNED 
NIGHT-HERONS before they disappeared into their daytime roosts. I always 
thought 

this species  was somewhat of a rarity in Kent, so they were good to see. Also 
here were 2  CASPIAN TERNS and one ROYAL TERN. This spot is definitely worth 
further visits.  From there I went straight to Eastern Neck NWR. I didn't 
find any migrant  passerines, but from the end of the Boxes Point Trail there 
was one more each of  Caspian and Royal Tern, plus a flyby COMMON TERN. 
Leaving Eastern Neck,  I came across about 100 PURPLE MARTINS roosting on some 
overhead wires, and  with them were 2 BANK SWALLOWS. 
 
My last stop in Kent was Chesapeake Farms. The number of BLACK-BELLIED  
PLOVERS on the dry pond bed was up to 12. Also in this area was an out-of-place 

 WILSON'S SNIPE among the many KILLDEER. Farther back, where some water 
remained,  there was a little more variety: both YELLOWLEGS, one PECTORAL 
SANDPIPER, LEAST  and SEMIPLMATED SANDPIPERS, and one each of WESTERN and 
WHITE-RUMPED  SANDPIPER.
 
On the way home I stopped at John Brown Road, where Mark Schilling had just 
 had 9 American Golden-Plovers and one Black-bellied Plover, all of which 
were  chased by a Kestrel just seconds before I arrived. They did not return  
while I was there.
 
Joel Martin
Catonsville, MD
 

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Subject: 40 Nighthawks with a 2 year old
From: Warblerick <ricksussman1955 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 19:05:55 -0700 (PDT)
Sounds like you had a great time! Little Milo too. Thanks for the story πŸ˜€

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Subject: [WA] 14+ Nighthawks over Hagerstown's Municipal Stadium on SAT
From: JAMES SPEICHER <jugornought AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 21:27:45 -0400
Late post

The Nighthawks competed for my attention with the Suns minor league
baseball game.  These also seemed to be moving N rather than S.  After
dark at least 2 were busy hawking insects/moths attracted by the
stadium lights.

Jim Speicher
BroadRun/Burkittsville area
[FR] Frederick County

Observations:
[WA] Washington County

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Subject: Re: Wheaton Regional Park-Montgomery Cty; Golden Winged Warbler
From: jugbayjs <JugBayJS AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 18:10:17 -0700 (PDT)
The GWWA is a Lawrence's (Golden-winged x Blue-winged hybrid). Nice find and 
good pics! 


Jeff Shenot
Croom MD

On Monday, September 1, 2014 8:31:33 PM UTC-4, Evelyn Ralston wrote:
> I was lucky enough to see the Golden Winged yesterday, but I could not get a 
photo. Today I had relatives from out of town for breakfast, and by the time 
they were gone it was close to 11 and pretty hot. Nevertheless, the light was 
nice and I went to Wheaton, really not expecting much at that late time. I 
headed straight for the lake where a large group of chimney Swifts arrived at 
the same time (60 is a conservative estimate). Near the benches, I met a birder 
who he had seen a Redstart a few minutes earlier. Then a very dapper 
Chestnut-sided Warbler materialized in front of me, then a Black-and-White, and 
I was surrounded by a small flock. The birds were in the shade under the trees 
and appeared mostly as dark shapes but I caught one in the light with my 
binoculars and…it was a Golden-Winged. Of course I cannot say if it is the 
same as yesterday's. I managed to get a few decent photos, which made my day. 
The links are in the eBird list below. Conclusion: I will always welcome 
relatives for breakfast, even during migration. 

> 
> 
> many birds to all,
> Evelyn
> 
> 
> Evelyn Ralston
> Bethesda, MD
> 
> evel... AT verizon.net
> http://tweetweet.smugmug.com/Nature/Birds/2014
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Wood Duck Β 3
> Mallard Β 2
> Great Blue Heron Β 1
> Green Heron Β 1
> Turkey Vulture Β 3
> Mourning Dove Β 8
> Chimney Swift Β 60
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird Β 1
> Northern Flicker Β 2
> Pileated Woodpecker Β 1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee Β 3
> Acadian Flycatcher Β 1
> Empidonax sp. Β 4
> Red-eyed Vireo Β 1
> Blue Jay Β 3
> Carolina Chickadee Β 6
> Tufted Titmouse Β 4
> White-breasted Nuthatch Β 3
> Carolina Wren Β 1
> American Robin Β 4
> Thrush sp. 2
> Gray Catbird Β 3
> Golden-winged Warbler Β 1 Β Β Β Β see photos at:
> http://tweetweet.smugmug.com/Nature/Birds/2014/i-CwKqjdb/0/L/HP7A1739-L.jpg
> http://tweetweet.smugmug.com/Nature/Birds/2014/i-9VQ4NjK/0/L/HP7A1766-L.jpg
> http://tweetweet.smugmug.com/Nature/Birds/2014/i-mXCTZSW/0/L/HP7A1767-L.jpg
> Black-and-white Warbler Β 1
> Chestnut-sided Warbler Β 1
> Eastern Towhee Β 1
> Northern Cardinal Β 4
> American Goldfinch Β X
> House Sparrow Β X

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Subject: 40 Nighthawks with a 2 year old
From: Mike Mangiaracina <mike.mangiaracina AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 17:43:13 -0700 (PDT)
Alisa and I just finished a spectacular night of birding on the roof with our 2 
year old son Milo. We saw about 40 common nighthawks, including a flock of 20 
heading due south. We also have about 30 chimney swifts in our chimney tonight, 
and saw many flocks of grackles and 4 bats. 


This is absolutely the right kind of birding to do with a 2 year old (as 
opposed to staring at treetops for hours looking for fall warblers). Milo was 
excitedly pointing at the sky shouting "Nighthawk!" at everything that moved, 
and correctly identified all the grackles, although he pronounces it 
"crackers." Plus we had the moon and many airplanes, two of his favorites, to 
watch. This was my best time birding since Milo was born. 


Good birding,
Mike Mangiaracina
Takoma Park, MD

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Subject: Wheaton Regional Park-Montgomery Cty; Golden Winged Warbler
From: Evelyn Ralston <evelynsr AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 20:31:32 -0400
I was lucky enough to see the Golden Winged yesterday, but I could not get a 
photo. Today I had relatives from out of town for breakfast, and by the time 
they were gone it was close to 11 and pretty hot. Nevertheless, the light was 
nice and I went to Wheaton, really not expecting much at that late time. I 
headed straight for the lake where a large group of chimney Swifts arrived at 
the same time (60 is a conservative estimate). Near the benches, I met a birder 
who he had seen a Redstart a few minutes earlier. Then a very dapper 
Chestnut-sided Warbler materialized in front of me, then a Black-and-White, and 
I was surrounded by a small flock. The birds were in the shade under the trees 
and appeared mostly as dark shapes but I caught one in the light with my 
binoculars and...it was a Golden-Winged. Of course I cannot say if it is the 
same as yesterday's. I managed to get a few decent photos, which made my day. 
The links are in the eBird list below. Conclusion: I will always welcome 
relatives for breakfast, even during migration. 


many birds to all,
Evelyn

Evelyn Ralston
Bethesda, MD
evelynsr AT verizon.net
http://tweetweet.smugmug.com/Nature/Birds/2014


Wood Duck  3
Mallard  2
Great Blue Heron  1
Green Heron  1
Turkey Vulture  3
Mourning Dove  8
Chimney Swift  60
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Northern Flicker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  3
Acadian Flycatcher  1
Empidonax sp.  4
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  3
Carolina Chickadee  6
Tufted Titmouse  4
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
Carolina Wren  1
American Robin  4
Thrush sp. 2
Gray Catbird  3
Golden-winged Warbler  1     see photos at:
http://tweetweet.smugmug.com/Nature/Birds/2014/i-CwKqjdb/0/L/HP7A1739-L.jpg
http://tweetweet.smugmug.com/Nature/Birds/2014/i-9VQ4NjK/0/L/HP7A1766-L.jpg
http://tweetweet.smugmug.com/Nature/Birds/2014/i-mXCTZSW/0/L/HP7A1767-L.jpg
Black-and-white Warbler  1
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Eastern Towhee  1
Northern Cardinal  4
American Goldfinch  X
House Sparrow  X




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Subject: More warblers, 9/1/2014
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 16:47:05 -0700 (PDT)
Today I set out to find migrants in some of my more under-birded counties. I 
didn't do too well, with only a handful of warblers here and there. Highlights 
included a Blue-winged Warbler and possible Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (I know, 
I know) at Wheaton (Montgomery), a Philadelphia Vireo at Lilypons (Frederick), 
and a Yellow-throated Vireo at Morgan Run (Carroll). The latter location looked 
like an awesome spot that needs more coverage. 


After striking out I decided to just hit my favorite spots. Richard Edden and I 
went to Soldier's Delight, where it was birdy but offered no "through" 
migrants. We did find several Pine and Prairie Warblers along the Serpentine 
Trail. From there, we went to Cromwell where it was incredibly humid and full 
of gnats. Birds were at a minimum until about 5:20 when we found some mixed 
flocks. The continuing Wilson's and Tennessee Warblers were still at bluebird 
box #10, and I briefly caught a glimpse of a Nashville in the same area. By 
5:45, activity was definitely picking up and I saw a Blackburnian between boxes 
#9 and #10 and am 50% sure I heard a Philadelphia Vireo singing here as well 
(but I'm not counting it). 


Eventually the entire place went silent, so I walked back towards the Willow 
Grove bridge; last night, the birds all seemed to have ended up there, so I 
wondered if the same held for tonight. It did. Birds were absolutely 
everywhere. I heard what sounded like a Mourning Warbler chip note and saw a 
yellowthroat-like bird on the path, but then it flew up into a tree in the 
brushy "sparrow area." I walked forwards to get a closer view, and confirmed 
the bird as a young female MOWA. Warblers were everywhere, with some Chestnuts 
and Magnolias coming with 10' of me. Baltimore Orioles, Cedar Waxwings, and 
even Gray Catbirds were hawking insects over the bridge. A pair of Blue-winged 
Warblers was bathing in the stream. A Prairie Warbler popped out of the tallest 
cedar next to the bridge. I stayed with the flock until about 7:00 when I 
decided to head home. 


Tim Carney
Canton, MD

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Subject: Nighthawks over Silver Spring
From: <hobbs_ann AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 23:06:13 +0000
Just saw 2 heading NE.
Ann Hobbs
Silver Spring

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Subject: Re: YB Flycatcher - Cromwell [Now eBird review process]
From: Jim Moore <epiphenomenon9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 14:08:18 -0400
I agree with both Bill and Tim.  ;-)  And I also would like to propose 
something new-- a third category for eBird sightings in addition to 
confirm/disconfirm.

-- I agree with Bill that for the most part, a birders' attitude towards 
the eBird review process should be "don't worry, be happy." I have been 
birding since 1966, and using eBird since 2008.  I used to follow 
intently not only whether my sightings were confirmed, but how quickly 
-- viewing these as indicia of my reputation as a birder.  Now, I do not 
know whether they are confirmed and really do not care.  While I always 
take the time to provide relevant information regarding unusual 
sightings, whether or not the sighting is confirmed is, as far as I'm 
concerned, purely a matter of database management, and developing 
policies that can be applied objectively and efficiently to broad swaths 
of data.  It is a mistake to take such judgments personally.

-- However, I also agree with Tim that some of the more restrictive 
review policies being adopted for Maryland sightings are a cause for 
concern.  Among its other functions, eBird has become a primary 
repository of Maryland bird sighting information.  If many otherwise 
credible reports are going to be disconfirmed simply for lack of a photo 
(as I believe was the case, for example, with respect to a spate of 
early fall Philadelphia Vireo sightings in 2012), then that function 
will be significantly hindered.  While I understand that all reports are 
retained in the database, disconfirming reports makes them significantly 
more difficult to access, and removes them from bar charts, species 
occurrence maps, etc.  I think there is a solution to this problem which 
should satisfy all sides.   First, reviewers ought to be given a third 
option when reviewing the sighting.  In addition to the black and white 
choices of confirm or disconfirm, which ignore the gray areas, there 
could be a third option which I would term "credible, but not 
confirmed."  This could be defined as: "a credible sighting, but not all 
indicia of reliability that might be desired under the circumstances are 
present."  So, for example, if there was a good verbal description but 
the reviewer felt a photo was necessary for confirmation, a sighting 
would be placed in this category.  Second, users utilizing eBird's many 
"explore data" functions ought to be given the option to select which 
categories of sightings they see.  Thus, they could view in a bar chart 
all sightings, only confirmed sightings, or both confirmed and credible 
sightings.  I've seen this option in other bird databases, for example 
one used for Malaysian bird sightings, so I know it is feasible.  I 
think giving eBird reviewers more options, might also take some of the 
pressure off of them in making such decisions.

-- Finally, one comment on the notion that Maryland eBird reviewers are 
overworked and get overwhelmed by the amount of data they need to 
process.  I believe there are a number of capable and qualified Maryland 
birders who would be happy to help with the eBird review process.  But 
it is my impression that there is not really an interest at Maryland 
eBird in expanding the number of reviewers.  I will not speculate on the 
reasons, but it appears the workload of Maryland eBird reviewers is of 
their own choosing.

Good birding!
Jim Moore
Rockville


On 9/1/2014 7:59 AM, 'Bill Hubick' via Maryland & DC Birding wrote:
> Tim,
>
> No need for any flames. Electronic media are tough for conveying tone. 
> Read this with a blend of matter-of-fact and a little tired. :)
>
> I'll tag in and take my turn. You're free to have your feelings and to 
> invest your volunteer reporting efforts as you see fit. I'll keep it 
> simple, as all of our time is precious. Any loss of eBird buy-in due 
> to high data quality standards is unfortunate. As we've discussed with 
> you many, many times - and you seem to have absorbed - reviewers 
> struggle to keep up with the huge volume of submissions, especially at 
> peak migration. Most of us have day jobs and families. All of us would 
> even like to do a little birding ourselves. You've chosen to protest 
> the single most difficult species, and I feel strongly that our 
> caution is warranted. When the first wave of Yellow-bellied 
> Flycatchers (YBFL) arrives, reviewers joke that it's time to head for 
> the hills. I had already sent my joking "Nice knowing you guys" e-mail 
> to the rest of the review team this year. I think Stasz was even being 
> generous with his numbers. Anecdotally, I would say that YBFL records 
> with evidence are incorrect well over 50% of the time. It's just 
> difficult to run the data because we spend a lot of time discussing 
> records with photos, and they end up being assigned to the correct 
> species, whether YBFL, Acadian Flycatcher (many of them) or Eastern 
> Phoebe. As to the disingenuous part of hearing you'll get feedback, I 
> would say that feedback has just changed. It's improved all the time 
> via increasingly sensitive filters, immediately flagged species, and 
> so on. But you're right, detailed feedback on each submission is now 
> impossible without drastic changes. From a personal standpoint, eBird 
> doesn't pay us enough. It would be a full-time job, and is simply 
> exhausting socially. A single review discussion with someone who has 
> been "birding for 13 years and knows this is NOT a phoebe" can take 
> hours. How many hours have we spent talking with just you, Tim?  There 
> are hundreds of eBird users in Maryland. And we do send feedback on 
> many, many records each week, as plenty will attest.
>
> So, while you're entitled to feelings and frustrations, I'm not sure 
> there's much to be done. I believe the majority of observers care more 
> about working on a rigorous project where the data are carefully 
> vetted and trustworthy. If I surfed around Maryland eBird and saw it 
> dripping with March Eastern Wood-Pewees and suburban goshawks, I 
> wouldn't see the point in participating. I dare say that the culture 
> is shifting toward a sense of pride in fully documenting a rare 
> species and ensuring it is verified. And for other readers - since 
> you've heard this a dozen times, Tim - all sightings are available for 
> review for posterity regardless of their status. No one can change 
> your records or remove them from the database. I maintain that an 
> interesting record with notes that happens to have not been validated 
> is more valuable 10 years from now than one that is rubber-stamped and 
> validated without discussion. So maybe our policies are a little 
> strict for the next generation of reviewers' opinions. They'll be able 
> to re-run the data like we've done many times. What do you think 
> they'll use? Photos and notes.
>
> In any case, I see no decline in Yellow-bellied Flycatcher reports. 
> eBird buy-in in Maryland is exceptionally high and I remain proud to 
> be associated with this vibrant community. Please report as much as 
> your time and interest permit.
>
> Regards,
>
> Bill
> Bill Hubick
> Pasadena, Maryland
> bill_hubick AT yahoo.com
> http://www.billhubick.com
> http://www.marylandbiodiversity.com
> http://www.facebook.com/MarylandBiodiversity
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* Tim Houghton 
> *To:* "Jlstasz AT aol.com" ; 
> "keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com" ; 
> "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com" 
> *Sent:* Sunday, August 31, 2014 8:43 PM
> *Subject:* RE: [MDBirding] YB Flycatcher - Cromwell
>
> (1) An adequate description of the YBFL will probably reveal its 
> age--most are of adults b/c they are easier. But for whatever reason, 
> adults are the ones people choose to describe, in most cases, I believe.
>
> (2) 95% of reports may not mention one key field mark or two, but 
> there are other field marks, and they don't all need to be dealt with. 
> That would be a tough thing to ask of everyone--and unnecessary 
> anyway. Thorough, successful reports don't cover everything, although 
> I admit that a YBFL carries an added burden.
>
> (3) When people take the time to write longer descriptions for the 
> demanding YBFL (and perhaps other species are in this category, too), 
> as I have done, is that a waste of time? Or perhaps an academic 
> exercise designed to educate the birder? That may be a benefit, I 
> suppose. But I don't think I, personally, will be taking time to write 
> a lengthy description of a bird if it's pretty obvious that a photo 
> is, more or less, required. Furthermore, to take the time to write 
> thorough descriptions--well, if people don't hear back (as happens) 
> from eBird after taking time to write something that ends up being 
> rejected, that's not going to encourage thorough descriptions. I 
> understand, tho: eBird reviewers (as they themselves have said) don't 
> have time to respond every time. But if reviewers are unable to be as 
> communicative as an ideal would suggest, then, too, eBird can't always 
> expect birders to be as thorough, either. That's the price to be paid 
> when a system is overburdened, as MD eBird is. Perhaps, however, 
> someone may argue that (inevitable) communication problems and de 
> facto photo requirements will not discourage thorough descriptions and 
> enthusiastic participation. If so, then we will have to agree to 
> disagree about that.
>
> Sometimes it would seem--this is just my opinion based on what I've 
> read over the years when communication issues come up-- that reviewers 
> would like birders who submit checklists to be indifferent about those 
> checklists after they are submitted. Of course, that makes life easier 
> for the reviewers, but that's not how it is for some, if not for many, 
> of the birders who participate in eBird.
>
> By the way, when I joined eBird over 2 years ago, I was told 
> explicitly--as a SELLING point--that rejected birds (e.g. YBFL or 
> whatever) or high counts would result in a response from eBird. When 
> that turned out not to be case, it's then disingenuous of eBird to 
> say--"don't worry, be happy." So it should NOT have been a selling 
> point at the time I joined? Better just to admit that circumstances 
> change, that there's been an overload, and that it kind of sucks for 
> everyone--but still plenty of good.
>
> Let the lightning and thunder come.... I appreciate that MDBirding 
> provides an objective forum where important birding concerns can be aired.
>
> Best Birding Wishes,
>
> Tim Houghton
> (Glen Arm)
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> *From:* Jlstasz AT aol.com [Jlstasz AT aol.com]
> *Sent:* Sunday, August 31, 2014 4:01 PM
> *To:* Tim Houghton; keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com; mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
> *Subject:* Re: [MDBirding] YB Flycatcher - Cromwell
>
> Hi Folks!
> Tim Houghton wrote:
> " There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4 
> birders of YBFL at Cromwell in the same small area: around boxes 10 
> and 11 on Minebank Trail. None of these involve photos so far, and 
> neither do several other YBFL reports recently accepted by eBird in MD. "
> There are 50 reports of Yellow-belled Flycatcher in eBird for August 
> 2014. One has been reviewed and invalidated because it lacked adequate 
> documentation; the other 49 are yet to be reviewed. None have been 
> validated. Starting two years ago, the Maryland eBird Team decided to 
> carefully review all reports of Yellow-bellied Flycatcher. The main 
> reason was that more than 25% of the reports that were accompanied 
> with photos were clearly not Yellow-bellied Flycatchers. A few of them 
> were not even in the Genus Empidonax.
> If Empidonax flycatchers were easy, I doubt that Ken Kaufman would 
> spend so much time in his "Field Guide to Advanced Birding." He notes 
> in the section titled "What Not To Look At On Empidonax" ....Yellow 
> Belly, with the notation that all Empidonax in fresh plumage have 
> yellow bellies. So do pewees, phoebes and many kingbirds.
> I have read through many of the written details that have accompanied 
> reports of Empidonax flycatchers. More than 95% of the written reports 
> fail to state the age: adult or immature. More than 95% of the reports 
> fail to mention primary projection. More than 95% of the reports fail 
> to mention the color of the wings. In general, descriptions of 20 
> words or fewer will be inadequate to describe the critical 
> distinguishing features.
> "There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4 
> birders of ..."
> This happens all the time. Something gets reported on eBird and others 
> go out and VOILA! It is really embarrassing when the photos from the 
> initial and subsequent reports show that the original identification 
> was in error. This has happened more than some would believe possible.
> Reports of Yellow-bellied Flycatchers will continue to accumulate in 
> the eBird Review Queue and then reviewed by a single reviewer for 
> consistency. I just know it will not be me.
> Good Birding!
> Jim
> Jim Stasz
> North Beach MD
> jlstasz AT aol.com 
> In a message dated 8/31/2014 3:10:53 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, 
> thoughton AT loyola.edu writes:
>
>     Thanks to Kevin for sending this note. I'm trying to avoid getting
>     a smart phone--I don't want to make that "leap" for various reasons.
>
>     There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4
>     birders of YBFL at Cromwell in the same small area: around boxes
>     10 and 11 on Minebank Trail. None of these involve photos so far,
>     and neither do several other YBFL reports recently accepted by
>     eBird in MD.
>
>     Aside from the Yellow-Bellied Fly, other nice birds this morning:
>     Hooded warbler female, blue-winged warbler, northern waterthrush,
>     and a male Wilson's--10 warbler species in all. I ran into Brent
>     Byers and Mary who also found a Nashville warbler and a
>     Philadelphia vireo--and thanks to them for pointing me toward the
>     hooded.
>
>     Tim Houghton
>     (Glen Arm)
>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>     *From:* mdbirding AT googlegroups.com [mdbirding AT googlegroups.com] on
>     behalf of keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com [keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com]
>     *Sent:* Sunday, August 31, 2014 12:06 PM
>     *To:* mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
>     *Subject:* [MDBirding] YB Flycatcher - Cromwell
>
>     Tim houghton just had a yellow bellied flycatcher before box 11. -
>     Kevin Graff.
>
>     Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone on the Verizon Wireless 4G
>     LTE network.
>     -- 
>     -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the
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Subject: RE: YB Flycatcher - Cromwell
From: Tim Houghton <thoughton AT loyola.edu>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 17:51:31 +0000
A pretty good and humid day at Cromwell Valley Park. Kye Jenkins and I started 
around 7 and then were joined by Ruth Bergstrom--and later joined by Jan and 
Bob. 


No yellow-bellied fly unfortunately!

But we did get 2 Philadelphia Vireos--one drabber, one brighter--around box 11.

Decent warbler day, largely Minebank Trail btw Willow Grove and Sherwood 
Bridges: 


Ovenbird (1)
Northern Waterthrush (1, creek, past box 9, where it's been for a few days)
Blue-Winged (1, a lifer for Ruth!)
BlacknWhite (1)
Tennessee (1)
Common Yellowthroat (x)
Redstart (4)
Parula (4)
Magnolia (tons, probably more than 20)
BLACKBURNIAN (1, female coloration)
Chestnut-Sided (6)
Canada (1)
Wilson's (2, male at box 11, female, woods edge above hawk-watch meadow)

eBird: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19635642 .

Tim Houghton
(Glen Arm)

________________________________
From: Bill Hubick [bill_hubick AT yahoo.com]
Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 7:59 AM
To: Tim Houghton; Jlstasz AT aol.com; keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com; 
mdbirding AT googlegroups.com 

Subject: Re: [MDBirding] YB Flycatcher - Cromwell

Tim,

No need for any flames. Electronic media are tough for conveying tone. Read 
this with a blend of matter-of-fact and a little tired. :) 


I'll tag in and take my turn. You're free to have your feelings and to invest 
your volunteer reporting efforts as you see fit. I'll keep it simple, as all of 
our time is precious. Any loss of eBird buy-in due to high data quality 
standards is unfortunate. As we've discussed with you many, many times - and 
you seem to have absorbed - reviewers struggle to keep up with the huge volume 
of submissions, especially at peak migration. Most of us have day jobs and 
families. All of us would even like to do a little birding ourselves. You've 
chosen to protest the single most difficult species, and I feel strongly that 
our caution is warranted. When the first wave of Yellow-bellied Flycatchers 
(YBFL) arrives, reviewers joke that it's time to head for the hills. I had 
already sent my joking "Nice knowing you guys" e-mail to the rest of the review 
team this year. I think Stasz was even being generous with his numbers. 
Anecdotally, I would say that YBFL records with evidence are incorrect well 
over 50% of the time. It's just difficult to run the data because we spend a 
lot of time discussing records with photos, and they end up being assigned to 
the correct species, whether YBFL, Acadian Flycatcher (many of them) or Eastern 
Phoebe. As to the disingenuous part of hearing you'll get feedback, I would say 
that feedback has just changed. It's improved all the time via increasingly 
sensitive filters, immediately flagged species, and so on. But you're right, 
detailed feedback on each submission is now impossible without drastic changes. 
From a personal standpoint, eBird doesn't pay us enough. It would be a 
full-time job, and is simply exhausting socially. A single review discussion 
with someone who has been "birding for 13 years and knows this is NOT a phoebe" 
can take hours. How many hours have we spent talking with just you, Tim? There 
are hundreds of eBird users in Maryland. And we do send feedback on many, many 
records each week, as plenty will attest. 


So, while you're entitled to feelings and frustrations, I'm not sure there's 
much to be done. I believe the majority of observers care more about working on 
a rigorous project where the data are carefully vetted and trustworthy. If I 
surfed around Maryland eBird and saw it dripping with March Eastern Wood-Pewees 
and suburban goshawks, I wouldn't see the point in participating. I dare say 
that the culture is shifting toward a sense of pride in fully documenting a 
rare species and ensuring it is verified. And for other readers - since you've 
heard this a dozen times, Tim - all sightings are available for review for 
posterity regardless of their status. No one can change your records or remove 
them from the database. I maintain that an interesting record with notes that 
happens to have not been validated is more valuable 10 years from now than one 
that is rubber-stamped and validated without discussion. So maybe our policies 
are a little strict for the next generation of reviewers' opinions. They'll be 
able to re-run the data like we've done many times. What do you think they'll 
use? Photos and notes. 


In any case, I see no decline in Yellow-bellied Flycatcher reports. eBird 
buy-in in Maryland is exceptionally high and I remain proud to be associated 
with this vibrant community. Please report as much as your time and interest 
permit. 


Regards,

Bill

Bill Hubick
Pasadena, Maryland
bill_hubick AT yahoo.com
http://www.billhubick.com
http://www.marylandbiodiversity.com
http://www.facebook.com/MarylandBiodiversity

________________________________
From: Tim Houghton 
To: "Jlstasz AT aol.com" ; "keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com" 
; "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com" 
 

Sent: Sunday, August 31, 2014 8:43 PM
Subject: RE: [MDBirding] YB Flycatcher - Cromwell

(1) An adequate description of the YBFL will probably reveal its age--most are 
of adults b/c they are easier. But for whatever reason, adults are the ones 
people choose to describe, in most cases, I believe. 


(2) 95% of reports may not mention one key field mark or two, but there are 
other field marks, and they don't all need to be dealt with. That would be a 
tough thing to ask of everyone--and unnecessary anyway. Thorough, successful 
reports don't cover everything, although I admit that a YBFL carries an added 
burden. 


(3) When people take the time to write longer descriptions for the demanding 
YBFL (and perhaps other species are in this category, too), as I have done, is 
that a waste of time? Or perhaps an academic exercise designed to educate the 
birder? That may be a benefit, I suppose. But I don't think I, personally, will 
be taking time to write a lengthy description of a bird if it's pretty obvious 
that a photo is, more or less, required. Furthermore, to take the time to write 
thorough descriptions--well, if people don't hear back (as happens) from eBird 
after taking time to write something that ends up being rejected, that's not 
going to encourage thorough descriptions. I understand, tho: eBird reviewers 
(as they themselves have said) don't have time to respond every time. But if 
reviewers are unable to be as communicative as an ideal would suggest, then, 
too, eBird can't always expect birders to be as thorough, either. That's the 
price to be paid when a system is overburdened, as MD eBird is. Perhaps, 
however, someone may argue that (inevitable) communication problems and de 
facto photo requirements will not discourage thorough descriptions and 
enthusiastic participation. If so, then we will have to agree to disagree about 
that. 


Sometimes it would seem--this is just my opinion based on what I've read over 
the years when communication issues come up-- that reviewers would like birders 
who submit checklists to be indifferent about those checklists after they are 
submitted. Of course, that makes life easier for the reviewers, but that's not 
how it is for some, if not for many, of the birders who participate in eBird. 


By the way, when I joined eBird over 2 years ago, I was told explicitly--as a 
SELLING point--that rejected birds (e.g. YBFL or whatever) or high counts would 
result in a response from eBird. When that turned out not to be case, it's then 
disingenuous of eBird to say--"don't worry, be happy." So it should NOT have 
been a selling point at the time I joined? Better just to admit that 
circumstances change, that there's been an overload, and that it kind of sucks 
for everyone--but still plenty of good. 


Let the lightning and thunder come.... I appreciate that MDBirding provides an 
objective forum where important birding concerns can be aired. 


Best Birding Wishes,

Tim Houghton
(Glen Arm)
________________________________


From: Jlstasz AT aol.com [Jlstasz AT aol.com]
Sent: Sunday, August 31, 2014 4:01 PM
To: Tim Houghton; keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com; mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] YB Flycatcher - Cromwell

Hi Folks!

Tim Houghton wrote:

" There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4 birders of 
YBFL at Cromwell in the same small area: around boxes 10 and 11 on Minebank 
Trail. None of these involve photos so far, and neither do several other YBFL 
reports recently accepted by eBird in MD. " 


There are 50 reports of Yellow-belled Flycatcher in eBird for August 2014. One 
has been reviewed and invalidated because it lacked adequate documentation; the 
other 49 are yet to be reviewed. None have been validated. Starting two years 
ago, the Maryland eBird Team decided to carefully review all reports of 
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher. The main reason was that more than 25% of the 
reports that were accompanied with photos were clearly not Yellow-bellied 
Flycatchers. A few of them were not even in the Genus Empidonax. 


If Empidonax flycatchers were easy, I doubt that Ken Kaufman would spend so 
much time in his "Field Guide to Advanced Birding." He notes in the section 
titled "What Not To Look At On Empidonax" ....Yellow Belly, with the notation 
that all Empidonax in fresh plumage have yellow bellies. So do pewees, phoebes 
and many kingbirds. 


I have read through many of the written details that have accompanied reports 
of Empidonax flycatchers. More than 95% of the written reports fail to state 
the age: adult or immature. More than 95% of the reports fail to mention 
primary projection. More than 95% of the reports fail to mention the color of 
the wings. In general, descriptions of 20 words or fewer will be inadequate to 
describe the critical distinguishing features. 


"There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4 birders of 
..." 


This happens all the time. Something gets reported on eBird and others go out 
and VOILA! It is really embarrassing when the photos from the initial and 
subsequent reports show that the original identification was in error. This has 
happened more than some would believe possible. 


Reports of Yellow-bellied Flycatchers will continue to accumulate in the eBird 
Review Queue and then reviewed by a single reviewer for consistency. I just 
know it will not be me. 


Good Birding!

Jim

Jim Stasz
North Beach MD
jlstasz AT aol.com

In a message dated 8/31/2014 3:10:53 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, 
thoughton AT loyola.edu writes: 

Thanks to Kevin for sending this note. I'm trying to avoid getting a smart 
phone--I don't want to make that "leap" for various reasons. 


There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4 birders of 
YBFL at Cromwell in the same small area: around boxes 10 and 11 on Minebank 
Trail. None of these involve photos so far, and neither do several other YBFL 
reports recently accepted by eBird in MD. 


Aside from the Yellow-Bellied Fly, other nice birds this morning: Hooded 
warbler female, blue-winged warbler, northern waterthrush, and a male 
Wilson's--10 warbler species in all. I ran into Brent Byers and Mary who also 
found a Nashville warbler and a Philadelphia vireo--and thanks to them for 
pointing me toward the hooded. 


Tim Houghton
(Glen Arm)
________________________________
From: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com [mdbirding AT googlegroups.com] on behalf of 
keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com [keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Sunday, August 31, 2014 12:06 PM
To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [MDBirding] YB Flycatcher - Cromwell

Tim houghton just had a yellow bellied flycatcher before box 11. - Kevin Graff.

Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone on the Verizon Wireless 4G LTE network.
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Subject: RE: Birding is fun.
From: Tim Houghton <thoughton AT loyola.edu>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 17:32:45 +0000
I'm not going to go item by item, but I think much of this is fine, while some 
of it misses the point. The part near the end--"The idea that writing a 
description of a bird entitles one to so much, to raise a fuss when you don't 
get your way, to demand the time of others for yourself and yourself alone 
(when 1000s of others are participating happily without asking for a thing)... 
It's just a bit much."--is off target and represent a misreading. That part, 
and the 2nd to last paragraph--perhaps arguably a bit patronizing and 
self-serving "a bit much." I'll end it there. Now time to get them fall birds! 


Tim Houghton
(Glen Arm)
________________________________
From: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com [mdbirding AT googlegroups.com] on behalf of Ron 
Gutberlet [rlgutberlet AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 11:28 AM
To: MDBirding
Subject: [MDBirding] Birding is fun.

Hi Everyone,

I don't think we need any lightning or thunder--haha. Most of us bird, because 
it is fun. We enjoy it; it is recreation. There are many ways to enjoy it. Some 
people keep records; some don't. We have a few world class experts in the MD 
birding community; we also have beginners. Most of us, including me, fall 
somewhere in between. We have folks who have birded for years but don't care to 
learn to age gulls or study shorebirds. We have others who watch gull DVDs and 
spend hours in the cold peering through landfill fences. It is all good. 


Some of us enjoy county listing, month listing, and big days. In fact, suggest 
a new list to a few of us, and watch us try to resist it; we probably can't. 
Others prefer not to keep lists at all, maybe not even a life list. 


Some of us love a project, especially if it might contribute new knowledge 
about birds and their lives or help with bird conservation. Breeding Bird 
Atlases, surveys for Audubon, May Counts, Christmas Bird Counts, Breeding Bird 
Surveys, Rarity Roundup, eBird. Some of us are real students of natural 
history; when we study nature, we want to get it right, and we want to document 
our findings. We take bird records quite seriously. 


So birding--as a casual hobby, a pastime, an academic pursuit, a lifelong 
obsession, or just a fun break from the asphalt and concrete--is many things to 
many people. We're all here on MDBirding, I presume, because one or more 
aspects of birding appeals to us. 


I think, for the most part, we all know these things. My major emphasis, 
though, is that for most of us, no matter how we enjoy it, birding is 
recreation. And one of the brilliant things about recreation is that you are 
your own boss. If you want to go out birding and identify blue jays as 
bluebirds and northern cardinals as red-tailed hawks, that's really no one's 
business but your own. If you don't like Christmas Counts, don't do them. If 
you don't like county listing, then don't. And so forth... 


But here's the rub. Here's the reason that we're not all blissfully enjoying 
our much needed recreation. Many birders also enjoy the community aspects of 
our pastime. We want to join in; we want to bird with others; we take pleasure 
in sharing what we find with others; we often want to contribute our skills to 
a good cause. And, once we decide to partake in the fun of community, we also 
give up some of our freedom. Christmas Bird Counts have compilers, and those 
compilers have responsibilities. The information collected during the CBC is 
going to be used by others, and you are no longer free to identify cardinals as 
hawks. So each of us has to decide: do I want to participate and accept the 
rules, or is my need for freedom too great? 


Each of us is free to opt out of any birding project or any form of birding. 
But if we opt in, we are no longer the boss of everything. We are now part of a 
community, and rules and conventions apply. If a diagnostic photo or voice 
recording is the gold standard for documenting an unusual observation, and you 
don't want to take photos, then it's not really reasonable to be disappointed 
when your written descriptions don't tip the balance toward instant 
"verification." 


I will never forget seeing an Osprey in great detail during one TX big day. My 
team mates were confused, and said there was no Osprey. I did a quick u turn to 
find a White-tailed Kite on the pole where the Osprey had been. Wow. Sure, I 
was tired. Yes, we were driving as fast as the law allowed. And we still needed 
Osprey for the day's list. But there was no Osprey. Based on my initial view of 
the bird and my mind's considerable processing, I could have written a 
perfectly good description of an Osprey. But a photo would have shown the 
truth--a White-tailed Kite. Written descriptions are wonderful things, 
especially those made in the field while studying a bird. And they are 
powerfully educational. What does that bill really look like? How are you going 
to describe the color of the wing bars? The practice of writing descriptions or 
making field sketches makes you a more careful observer. But a good photo is 
evidence of a whole other caliber. A photo is better. 


Reviewers are human and will never be perfect. But you could not ask for a more 
conscientious, experienced, and well meaning group of reviewers than you find 
on the MD eBird Team. These are genuinely nice people, who happen to know an 
awful lot about the distribution, status, and identification of birds. 


The MD eBird Team is not "other." We are full members of the birding and eBird 
communities. We go birding; we keep lists; we collect evidence; we enter the 
data; our submissions are reviewed. We lead field trips, serve as officers in 
bird clubs, give presentations, share photos on websites. We would be able to 
bird more and enter more data, if we didn't volunteer. Tyler Bell deserves a 
major award and probably about $100,000 per year for the work he does on behalf 
of eBird. He could be out birding, but he's inside processing reports from 
fellow birders. He is a volunteer, donating valuable recreation time to help 
his community. After all, eBird could not even exist without review. The idea 
that writing a description of a bird entitles one to so much, to raise a fuss 
when you don't get your way, to demand the time of others for yourself and 
yourself alone (when 1000s of others are participating happily without asking 
for a thing)... It's just a bit much. 


Let me make my opinion very clear. I am not speaking for Cornell of course. I 
am not even speaking for the MD eBird Team. Submitting a checklist to eBird 
does not entitle you to anything. It is a voluntary activity. You should submit 
lists, because you want to. eBird provides incredible, open access services to 
all birders. One really ought to just say thank you--to the volunteer 
reviewers, to Cornell, to all the birders who contribute sightings. The more we 
see the world and human institutions through our own selfish desires, the less 
happy we will be. Why not just relax a bit? It's a nice day. And there are 
birds out there. 


By all means, it is YOUR time.  Have fun with it!

Ron Gutberlet
Salisbury, MD
rlgutberlet AT salisbury.edu


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: Wheaton Regional Park today
From: Evelyn Ralston <evelynsr AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 12:03:11 -0400
Golden-winged still here; again near the benches at Pine lake, 5 mins ago. Will 
post photos later. 


Evelyn Ralston
bethesda, md

sent from my iPhone


> On Sep 1, 2014, at 11:36, "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" 
 wrote: 

> 
> HI all,
> 
> Having arrived late from Maine yesterday night, we got started late today 
(after 8 AM). Quite a few birders at WRP today, hoping to run into yesterday's 
Golden-winged Warbler which, alas, was not seen (as of the time we left). 
However, despite the hot, humid and otherwise apparently unfavorable 
conditions, not a bad morning. We had 8 species of warbler (including our first 
BT Blue male of the season) and other birders reported additional species of 
interest (Veery, Canada W., Balto Oriole). We stopped briefly at the Nature 
Ctr. where we had the BTB and a few more Red-eyes and Pewees. 

> 
> 100th anniversary of extinction of Passenger Pigeon, so a moment of 
silence...what species we are seeing today will not be around in 2114? 

> 
> Gail Mackiernan and Barry Cooper
> Colesville, MD
> 
> Birds of interest:
> 
> Sep 1, 2014 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM
> 38 species (+1 other taxa)
> 
> Wood Duck  1
> Green Heron  1
> Black Vulture  2     continuing juveniles near white house
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird  3
> Northern Flicker  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  7
> Empidonax sp. 1 probable Yellow-bellied but seen only very briefly; small, 
compact, appeared to have yellow throat, underparts, & face; plumage a bit 
worn;Jared got a photo 

> Great Crested Flycatcher  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  10
> House Wren  2
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  1
> Eastern Bluebird  X     heard only
> American Robin  10
> Gray Catbird  4 
> Ovenbird  1
> Blue-winged Warbler  3
> Black-and-white Warbler  6
> American Redstart  7 includ. 4 adult males
> Magnolia Warbler  3
> Blackburnian Warbler  1 adult female
> Chestnut-sided Warbler  8
> Black-throated Blue Warbler  1      AT  Brookside Nature Ctr.
> Eastern Towhee  3
> Chipping Sparrow  2
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> -- 
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Subject: Wheaton Regional Park today
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 15:36:15 +0000 (UTC)
HI all, 

Having arrived late from Maine yesterday night, we got started late today 
(after 8 AM). Quite a few birders at WRP today, hoping to run into yesterday's 
Golden-winged Warbler which, alas, was not seen (as of the time we left). 
However, despite the hot, humid and otherwise apparently unfavorable 
conditions, not a bad morning. We had 8 species of warbler (including our first 
BT Blue male of the season) and other birders reported additional species of 
interest (Veery, Canada W., Balto Oriole). We stopped briefly at the Nature 
Ctr. where we had the BTB and a few more Red-eyes and Pewees. 


100th anniversary of extinction of Passenger Pigeon, so a moment of 
silence...what species we are seeing today will not be around in 2114? 


Gail Mackiernan and Barry Cooper 
Colesville, MD 

Birds of interest: 

Sep 1, 2014 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM 
38 species (+1 other taxa) 

Wood Duck 1 
Green Heron 1 
Black Vulture 2 continuing juveniles near white house 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 3 
Northern Flicker 1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee 7 
Empidonax sp. 1 probable Yellow-bellied but seen only very briefly; small, 
compact, appeared to have yellow throat, underparts, & face; plumage a bit 
worn;Jared got a photo 

Great Crested Flycatcher 1 
Red-eyed Vireo 10 
House Wren 2 
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1 
Eastern Bluebird X heard only 
American Robin 10 
Gray Catbird 4 
Ovenbird 1 
Blue-winged Warbler 3 
Black-and-white Warbler 6 
American Redstart 7 includ. 4 adult males 
Magnolia Warbler 3 
Blackburnian Warbler 1 adult female 
Chestnut-sided Warbler 8 
Black-throated Blue Warbler 1  AT  Brookside Nature Ctr. 
Eastern Towhee 3 
Chipping Sparrow 2 




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Subject: Birding is fun.
From: Ron Gutberlet <rlgutberlet AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 11:28:37 -0400
Hi Everyone,

I don't think we need any lightning or thunder--haha. Most of us bird, because 
it is fun. We enjoy it; it is recreation. There are many ways to enjoy it. Some 
people keep records; some don't. We have a few world class experts in the MD 
birding community; we also have beginners. Most of us, including me, fall 
somewhere in between. We have folks who have birded for years but don't care to 
learn to age gulls or study shorebirds. We have others who watch gull DVDs and 
spend hours in the cold peering through landfill fences. It is all good. 


Some of us enjoy county listing, month listing, and big days. In fact, suggest 
a new list to a few of us, and watch us try to resist it; we probably can't. 
Others prefer not to keep lists at all, maybe not even a life list. 


Some of us love a project, especially if it might contribute new knowledge 
about birds and their lives or help with bird conservation. Breeding Bird 
Atlases, surveys for Audubon, May Counts, Christmas Bird Counts, Breeding Bird 
Surveys, Rarity Roundup, eBird. Some of us are real students of natural 
history; when we study nature, we want to get it right, and we want to document 
our findings. We take bird records quite seriously. 


So birding--as a casual hobby, a pastime, an academic pursuit, a lifelong 
obsession, or just a fun break from the asphalt and concrete--is many things to 
many people. We're all here on MDBirding, I presume, because one or more 
aspects of birding appeals to us. 


I think, for the most part, we all know these things. My major emphasis, 
though, is that for most of us, no matter how we enjoy it, birding is 
recreation. And one of the brilliant things about recreation is that you are 
your own boss. If you want to go out birding and identify blue jays as 
bluebirds and northern cardinals as red-tailed hawks, that's really no one's 
business but your own. If you don't like Christmas Counts, don't do them. If 
you don't like county listing, then don't. And so forth... 


But here's the rub. Here's the reason that we're not all blissfully enjoying 
our much needed recreation. Many birders also enjoy the community aspects of 
our pastime. We want to join in; we want to bird with others; we take pleasure 
in sharing what we find with others; we often want to contribute our skills to 
a good cause. And, once we decide to partake in the fun of community, we also 
give up some of our freedom. Christmas Bird Counts have compilers, and those 
compilers have responsibilities. The information collected during the CBC is 
going to be used by others, and you are no longer free to identify cardinals as 
hawks. So each of us has to decide: do I want to participate and accept the 
rules, or is my need for freedom too great? 


Each of us is free to opt out of any birding project or any form of birding. 
But if we opt in, we are no longer the boss of everything. We are now part of a 
community, and rules and conventions apply. If a diagnostic photo or voice 
recording is the gold standard for documenting an unusual observation, and you 
don't want to take photos, then it's not really reasonable to be disappointed 
when your written descriptions don't tip the balance toward instant 
"verification." 


I will never forget seeing an Osprey in great detail during one TX big day. My 
team mates were confused, and said there was no Osprey. I did a quick u turn to 
find a White-tailed Kite on the pole where the Osprey had been. Wow. Sure, I 
was tired. Yes, we were driving as fast as the law allowed. And we still needed 
Osprey for the day's list. But there was no Osprey. Based on my initial view of 
the bird and my mind's considerable processing, I could have written a 
perfectly good description of an Osprey. But a photo would have shown the 
truth--a White-tailed Kite. Written descriptions are wonderful things, 
especially those made in the field while studying a bird. And they are 
powerfully educational. What does that bill really look like? How are you going 
to describe the color of the wing bars? The practice of writing descriptions or 
making field sketches makes you a more careful observer. But a good photo is 
evidence of a whole other caliber. A photo is better. 


Reviewers are human and will never be perfect. But you could not ask for a more 
conscientious, experienced, and well meaning group of reviewers than you find 
on the MD eBird Team. These are genuinely nice people, who happen to know an 
awful lot about the distribution, status, and identification of birds. 


The MD eBird Team is not "other." We are full members of the birding and eBird 
communities. We go birding; we keep lists; we collect evidence; we enter the 
data; our submissions are reviewed. We lead field trips, serve as officers in 
bird clubs, give presentations, share photos on websites. We would be able to 
bird more and enter more data, if we didn't volunteer. Tyler Bell deserves a 
major award and probably about $100,000 per year for the work he does on behalf 
of eBird. He could be out birding, but he's inside processing reports from 
fellow birders. He is a volunteer, donating valuable recreation time to help 
his community. After all, eBird could not even exist without review. The idea 
that writing a description of a bird entitles one to so much, to raise a fuss 
when you don't get your way, to demand the time of others for yourself and 
yourself alone (when 1000s of others are participating happily without asking 
for a thing)... It's just a bit much. 


Let me make my opinion very clear. I am not speaking for Cornell of course. I 
am not even speaking for the MD eBird Team. Submitting a checklist to eBird 
does not entitle you to anything. It is a voluntary activity. You should submit 
lists, because you want to. eBird provides incredible, open access services to 
all birders. One really ought to just say thank you--to the volunteer 
reviewers, to Cornell, to all the birders who contribute sightings. The more we 
see the world and human institutions through our own selfish desires, the less 
happy we will be. Why not just relax a bit? It's a nice day. And there are 
birds out there. 


By all means, it is YOUR time.  Have fun with it!

Ron Gutberlet
Salisbury, MD
rlgutberlet AT salisbury.edu


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Sunday 9/1/14, Mourning Warbler
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 10:11:36 -0400
This morning (9/1) at Rock Creek Park.......

Mourning Warbler was found by Hanan at the south-west part of the yard. It was 
relocated by Adam at the north-west part. 


----Maintenance Yard
Blue-winged Warbler     2    (Martin)
Black-and-white Warbler     2    (Martin)
Chestnut-sided Warbler     
Mourning Warbler     (Hanan) 
Common Yellowthroat  
American Redstart     (Hanan)
Cape May Warbler     5     (Hugh)
Northern Parula     2     (Frank)
Magnolia Warbler     4     (Hugh)
Blackburnian Warbler      (Holger) 
Black-throated Blue Warbler     3     (Martin)
Common Nighthawk  
Chimney Swift     15++
Ruby-throated Hummingbird     2
Downy Woodpecker      3 
Northern Flicker     5+
Pileated Woodpecker     2
Eastern Wood-Pewee     3
Red-eyed Vireo     2
Northern Rough-winged Swallow     (Tully)
Carolina Chickadee     6
Carolina Wren  
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher     4+
Veery  
Wood Thrush  
American Robin     2
Baltimore Oriole     2
American Goldfinch     2

Fellow Birders: Hanan Jacobi, Adam Parr, Holger Pflicke, Bill Butler, Martin 
Sneary, Frank Hawkins, Dan Eberly, Susan Volman, Michael Bender, Sally, Leon 
Kass, Tully Hochhauser, Devon Hochhauser, Hugh McGuinness, Patricia Wood, ++ 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC

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Subject: A heartfelt thank you to the reviewers......
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 06:58:44 -0700 (PDT)
I don't think I had appreciated the dedication, time and effort y'all put into 
keeping Maryland's E-Bird 

data up to the highest of standards.

For all you do, thank you.

Karen Caruso

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Subject: Re: YB Flycatcher - Cromwell
From: "'Bill Hubick' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 04:59:34 -0700
Tim,

No need for any flames. Electronic media are tough for conveying tone. Read 
this with a blend of matter-of-fact and a little tired. :) 



I'll tag in and take my turn. You're free to have your feelings and to invest 
your volunteer reporting efforts as you see fit. I'll keep it simple, as all of 
our time is precious. Any loss of eBird buy-in due to high data quality 
standards is unfortunate. As we've discussed with you many, many times - and 
you seem to have absorbed - reviewers struggle to keep up with the huge volume 
of submissions, especially at peak migration. Most of us have day jobs and 
families. All of us would even like to do a little birding ourselves. You've 
chosen to protest the single most difficult species, and I feel strongly that 
our caution is warranted. When the first wave of Yellow-bellied Flycatchers 
(YBFL) arrives, reviewers joke that it's time to head for the hills. I had 
already sent my joking "Nice knowing you guys" e-mail to the rest of the review 
team this year. I think Stasz was even being generous with his numbers. 
Anecdotally, I would say that YBFL records with 

 evidence are incorrect well over 50% of the time. It's just difficult to run 
the data because we spend a lot of time discussing records with photos, and 
they end up being assigned to the correct species, whether YBFL, Acadian 
Flycatcher (many of them) or Eastern Phoebe. As to the disingenuous part of 
hearing you'll get feedback, I would say that feedback has just changed. It's 
improved all the time via increasingly sensitive filters, immediately flagged 
species, and so on. But you're right, detailed feedback on each submission is 
now impossible without drastic changes. From a personal standpoint, eBird 
doesn't pay us enough. It would be a full-time job, and is simply exhausting 
socially. A single review discussion with someone who has been "birding for 13 
years and knows this is NOT a phoebe" can take hours. How many hours have we 
spent talking with just you, Tim? There are hundreds of eBird users in 
Maryland. And we do send feedback on many, many 

 records each week, as plenty will attest.


So, while you're entitled to feelings and frustrations, I'm not sure there's 
much to be done. I believe the majority of observers care more about working on 
a rigorous project where the data are carefully vetted and trustworthy. If I 
surfed around Maryland eBird and saw it dripping with March Eastern Wood-Pewees 
and suburban goshawks, I wouldn't see the point in participating. I dare say 
that the culture is shifting toward a sense of pride in fully documenting a 
rare species and ensuring it is verified. And for other readers - since you've 
heard this a dozen times, Tim - all sightings are available for review for 
posterity regardless of their status. No one can change your records or remove 
them from the database. I maintain that an interesting record with notes that 
happens to have not been validated is more valuable 10 years from now than one 
that is rubber-stamped and validated without discussion. So maybe our policies 
are a little strict for the next 

 generation of reviewers' opinions. They'll be able to re-run the data like 
we've done many times. What do you think they'll use? Photos and notes. 



In any case, I see no decline in Yellow-bellied Flycatcher reports. eBird 
buy-in in Maryland is exceptionally high and I remain proud to be associated 
with this vibrant community. Please report as much as your time and interest 
permit. 



Regards,

Bill

 
Bill Hubick
Pasadena, Maryland
bill_hubick AT yahoo.com
http://www.billhubick.com
http://www.marylandbiodiversity.com
http://www.facebook.com/MarylandBiodiversity



________________________________
 From: Tim Houghton 
To: "Jlstasz AT aol.com" ; "keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com" 
; "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com" 
 

Sent: Sunday, August 31, 2014 8:43 PM
Subject: RE: [MDBirding] YB Flycatcher - Cromwell
 


(1) An adequate description of the YBFL will probably reveal its age--most are 
of adults b/c they are easier. But for whatever reason, adults are the ones 
people choose to describe, in most cases, I believe. 


(2) 95% of reports may not mention one key field mark or two, but there are 
other field marks, and they don't all need to be dealt with. That would be a 
tough thing to ask of everyone--and unnecessary anyway. Thorough, successful 
reports don't cover everything, although I admit that a YBFL carries an added 
burden. 


(3) When people take the time to write longer descriptions for the demanding 
YBFL (and perhaps other species are in this category, too), as I have done, is 
that a waste of time? Or perhaps an academic exercise designed to educate the 
birder? That may be a benefit, I suppose. But I don't think I, personally, will 
be taking time to write a lengthy description of a bird if it's pretty obvious 
that a photo is, more or less, required. Furthermore, to take the time to write 
thorough descriptions--well, if people don't hear back (as happens) from eBird 
after taking time to write something that ends up being rejected, that's not 
going to encourage thorough descriptions. I understand, tho: eBird reviewers 
(as they themselves have said) don't have time to respond every time. But if 
reviewers are unable to be as communicative as an ideal would suggest, then, 
too, eBird can't always expect birders to be as thorough, either. That's the 
price to be paid when a system 

 is overburdened, as MD eBird is. Perhaps, however, someone may argue that 
(inevitable) communication problems and de facto photo requirements will not 
discourage thorough descriptions and enthusiastic participation. If so, then we 
will have to agree to disagree about that. 


Sometimes it would seem--this is just my opinion based on what I've read over 
the years when communication issues come up-- that reviewers would like birders 
who submit checklists to be indifferent about those checklists after they are 
submitted. Of course, that makes life easier for the reviewers, but that's not 
how it is for some, if not for many, of the birders who participate in eBird. 


By the way, when I joined eBird over 2 years ago, I was told explicitly--as a 
SELLING point--that rejected birds (e.g. YBFL or whatever) or high counts would 
result in a response from eBird. When that turned out not to be case, it's then 
disingenuous of eBird to say--"don't worry, be happy." So it should NOT have 
been a selling point at the time I joined? Better just to admit that 
circumstances change, that there's been an overload, and that it kind of sucks 
for everyone--but still plenty of good. 


Let the lightning and thunder come.... I appreciate that MDBirding provides an 
objective forum where important birding concerns can be aired. 



Best Birding Wishes,

Tim Houghton
(Glen Arm)


________________________________
 


From: Jlstasz AT aol.com [Jlstasz AT aol.com]
Sent: Sunday, August 31, 2014 4:01 PM
To: Tim Houghton; keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com; mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] YB Flycatcher - Cromwell


Hi Folks!
 
Tim Houghton wrote: 
 
" There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4 birders of 
YBFL at Cromwell in the same small area: around boxes 10 and 11 on Minebank 
Trail. None of these involve photos so far, and neither do several other YBFL 
reports recently accepted by eBird in MD. " 

 
There are 50 reports of Yellow-belled Flycatcher in eBird for August 2014. One 
has been reviewed and invalidated because it lacked adequate documentation; the 
other 49 are yet to be reviewed. None have been validated. Starting two years 
ago, the Maryland eBird Team decided to carefully review all reports of 
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher. The main reason was that more than 25% of the 
reports that were accompanied with photos were clearly not Yellow-bellied 
Flycatchers. A few of them were not even in the Genus Empidonax. 

 
If Empidonax flycatchers were easy, I doubt that Ken Kaufman would spend so 
much time in his "Field Guide to Advanced Birding." He notes in the section 
titled "What Not To Look At On Empidonax" ....Yellow Belly, with the notation 
that all Empidonax in fresh plumage have yellow bellies. So do pewees, phoebes 
and many kingbirds. 

 
I have read through many of the written details that have accompanied reports 
of Empidonax flycatchers. More than 95% of the written reports fail to state 
the age: adult or immature. More than 95% of the reports fail to mention 
primary projection. More than 95% of the reports fail to mention the color of 
the wings. In general, descriptions of 20 words or fewer will be inadequate to 
describe the critical distinguishing features. 

 
"There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4 birders of 
..." 

 
This happens all the time. Something gets reported on eBird and others go out 
and VOILA! It is really embarrassing when the photos from the initial and 
subsequent reports show that the original identification was in error. This has 
happened more than some would believe possible. 

 
Reports of Yellow-bellied Flycatchers will continue to accumulate in the eBird 
Review Queue and then reviewed by a single reviewer for consistency. I just 
know it will not be me. 

 
Good Birding!
 
Jim
 
Jim Stasz
North Beach MD
jlstasz AT aol.com
 
In a message dated 8/31/2014 3:10:53 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, 
thoughton AT loyola.edu writes: 

Thanks to Kevin for sending this note. I'm trying to avoid getting a smart 
phone--I don't want to make that "leap" for various reasons. 

>
>
>There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4 birders of 
YBFL at Cromwell in the same small area: around boxes 10 and 11 on Minebank 
Trail. None of these involve photos so far, and neither do several other YBFL 
reports recently accepted by eBird in MD. 

>
>
>Aside from the Yellow-Bellied Fly, other nice birds this morning: Hooded 
warbler female, blue-winged warbler, northern waterthrush, and a male 
Wilson's--10 warbler species in all. I ran into Brent Byers and Mary who also 
found a Nashville warbler and a Philadelphia vireo--and thanks to them for 
pointing me toward the hooded. 

>
>
>Tim Houghton
>(Glen Arm)
>
>
>________________________________
> 
>From: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com [mdbirding AT googlegroups.com] on behalf of 
keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com [keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com] 

>Sent: Sunday, August 31, 2014 12:06 PM
>To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
>Subject: [MDBirding] YB Flycatcher - Cromwell
>
>
>Tim houghton just had a yellow bellied flycatcher before box 11. - Kevin 
Graff. 

>
>
>Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone on the Verizon Wireless 4G LTE network.
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>
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Subject: mini-fallout at eden mill
From: keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com
Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 06:53:27 -0400




Subject: Kent Co. Birds 8/31/14
From: Bob Ringler <ringler.bob AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 23:02:51 -0400
   I birded the morning in Kent County today visiting Eastern Neck NWR,
Rock Hall, and Chesapeake Farms. The water was very high along the bay. The
main pond at Chesapeake Farms is almost dry and had a small number of
shorebirds. The few highlights:

Black-crowned Night-Heron - at least 7 at Rock Hall seen at the end of
Green Lane
Black-bellied Plover - at least 6 with the Killdeer flock at the main pond
at Chesapeake Farms
Red-headed Woodpecker - 1 adult at Eastern Neck seen on Bogles Wharf Road
near the Duck Inn Trail
Eastern Kingbird - a flock of 8 at Eastern Neck at the Inglesaide
Recreation Area
Horned Lark - a flock of 7 at the main pond at Chesapeake Farms
Brown-headed Nuthatch - 1 at Eastern Neck seen on Bogles Wharf Road
Northern Waterthrush - 1 at Eastern Neck on the Wildlife Trail. The only
other warbler I saw was Common Yellowthroat.
Blue Grosbeak - an adult male perched on a utility wire on Bakers Lane

-- 
Bob Ringler
Eldersburg MD

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Subject: RE: YB Flycatcher - Cromwell
From: Tim Houghton <thoughton AT loyola.edu>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 00:43:59 +0000
(1) An adequate description of the YBFL will probably reveal its age--most are 
of adults b/c they are easier. But for whatever reason, adults are the ones 
people choose to describe, in most cases, I believe. 


(2) 95% of reports may not mention one key field mark or two, but there are 
other field marks, and they don't all need to be dealt with. That would be a 
tough thing to ask of everyone--and unnecessary anyway. Thorough, successful 
reports don't cover everything, although I admit that a YBFL carries an added 
burden. 


(3) When people take the time to write longer descriptions for the demanding 
YBFL (and perhaps other species are in this category, too), as I have done, is 
that a waste of time? Or perhaps an academic exercise designed to educate the 
birder? That may be a benefit, I suppose. But I don't think I, personally, will 
be taking time to write a lengthy description of a bird if it's pretty obvious 
that a photo is, more or less, required. Furthermore, to take the time to write 
thorough descriptions--well, if people don't hear back (as happens) from eBird 
after taking time to write something that ends up being rejected, that's not 
going to encourage thorough descriptions. I understand, tho: eBird reviewers 
(as they themselves have said) don't have time to respond every time. But if 
reviewers are unable to be as communicative as an ideal would suggest, then, 
too, eBird can't always expect birders to be as thorough, either. That's the 
price to be paid when a system is overburdened, as MD eBird is. Perhaps, 
however, someone may argue that (inevitable) communication problems and de 
facto photo requirements will not discourage thorough descriptions and 
enthusiastic participation. If so, then we will have to agree to disagree about 
that. 


Sometimes it would seem--this is just my opinion based on what I've read over 
the years when communication issues come up-- that reviewers would like birders 
who submit checklists to be indifferent about those checklists after they are 
submitted. Of course, that makes life easier for the reviewers, but that's not 
how it is for some, if not for many, of the birders who participate in eBird. 


By the way, when I joined eBird over 2 years ago, I was told explicitly--as a 
SELLING point--that rejected birds (e.g. YBFL or whatever) or high counts would 
result in a response from eBird. When that turned out not to be case, it's then 
disingenuous of eBird to say--"don't worry, be happy." So it should NOT have 
been a selling point at the time I joined? Better just to admit that 
circumstances change, that there's been an overload, and that it kind of sucks 
for everyone--but still plenty of good. 


Let the lightning and thunder come.... I appreciate that MDBirding provides an 
objective forum where important birding concerns can be aired. 


Best Birding Wishes,

Tim Houghton
(Glen Arm)
________________________________
From: Jlstasz AT aol.com [Jlstasz AT aol.com]
Sent: Sunday, August 31, 2014 4:01 PM
To: Tim Houghton; keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com; mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] YB Flycatcher - Cromwell

Hi Folks!

Tim Houghton wrote:

" There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4 birders of 
YBFL at Cromwell in the same small area: around boxes 10 and 11 on Minebank 
Trail. None of these involve photos so far, and neither do several other YBFL 
reports recently accepted by eBird in MD. " 


There are 50 reports of Yellow-belled Flycatcher in eBird for August 2014. One 
has been reviewed and invalidated because it lacked adequate documentation; the 
other 49 are yet to be reviewed. None have been validated. Starting two years 
ago, the Maryland eBird Team decided to carefully review all reports of 
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher. The main reason was that more than 25% of the 
reports that were accompanied with photos were clearly not Yellow-bellied 
Flycatchers. A few of them were not even in the Genus Empidonax. 


If Empidonax flycatchers were easy, I doubt that Ken Kaufman would spend so 
much time in his "Field Guide to Advanced Birding." He notes in the section 
titled "What Not To Look At On Empidonax" ....Yellow Belly, with the notation 
that all Empidonax in fresh plumage have yellow bellies. So do pewees, phoebes 
and many kingbirds. 


I have read through many of the written details that have accompanied reports 
of Empidonax flycatchers. More than 95% of the written reports fail to state 
the age: adult or immature. More than 95% of the reports fail to mention 
primary projection. More than 95% of the reports fail to mention the color of 
the wings. In general, descriptions of 20 words or fewer will be inadequate to 
describe the critical distinguishing features. 


"There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4 birders of 
..." 


This happens all the time. Something gets reported on eBird and others go out 
and VOILA! It is really embarrassing when the photos from the initial and 
subsequent reports show that the original identification was in error. This has 
happened more than some would believe possible. 


Reports of Yellow-bellied Flycatchers will continue to accumulate in the eBird 
Review Queue and then reviewed by a single reviewer for consistency. I just 
know it will not be me. 


Good Birding!

Jim

Jim Stasz
North Beach MD
jlstasz AT aol.com

In a message dated 8/31/2014 3:10:53 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, 
thoughton AT loyola.edu writes: 

Thanks to Kevin for sending this note. I'm trying to avoid getting a smart 
phone--I don't want to make that "leap" for various reasons. 


There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4 birders of 
YBFL at Cromwell in the same small area: around boxes 10 and 11 on Minebank 
Trail. None of these involve photos so far, and neither do several other YBFL 
reports recently accepted by eBird in MD. 


Aside from the Yellow-Bellied Fly, other nice birds this morning: Hooded 
warbler female, blue-winged warbler, northern waterthrush, and a male 
Wilson's--10 warbler species in all. I ran into Brent Byers and Mary who also 
found a Nashville warbler and a Philadelphia vireo--and thanks to them for 
pointing me toward the hooded. 


Tim Houghton
(Glen Arm)
________________________________
From: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com [mdbirding AT googlegroups.com] on behalf of 
keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com [keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Sunday, August 31, 2014 12:06 PM
To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [MDBirding] YB Flycatcher - Cromwell

Tim houghton just had a yellow bellied flycatcher before box 11. - Kevin Graff.

Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone on the Verizon Wireless 4G LTE network.

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Subject: Warblerage 8/31/2014
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 17:36:35 -0700 (PDT)
Nice day out looking for warblers at some of my favorite warbler hotspots. I 
began at Holt Park, where things were mostly quiet, but I eventually found a 
Blackburnian Warbler and a Blue-winged Warbler with some more expected species 
in a mixed flock just inside the woods from the powerline cut. 


Next was the underrated and underbirded Woodlawn Wildlife Area in Cecil County. 
Warblers were everywhere, with the highlights being Blue-winged, Black-throated 
Green, and Canada. There was also a notable Empidonax presence; I found an 
Acadian, a Least, and at least three Traill's Flycatchers. I also managed to 
nab my county Warbling Vireo. My friend manages the preserve, so I texted him 
that I was going and he alerted me to a possible SHRIKE on the property. He 
said he saw one earlier this week in some dead black locust trees on the open 
landfill portion of the property. He also said it was the same spot where he 
saw one this time two years ago, and also mentioned that the bird from two 
years ago was bashing a cicada against a barbed-wire fence nearby. He's not a 
birder but knows his birds from working there so long, so I imagine he would 
know a shrike from a mockingbird or a kingbird. The habitat looks hospitable to 
shrikes, so anyone who visits should keep an eye out. 


Perryville Community Park had lots of people and few birds, but I did find a 
Chestnut-sided along the entrance road and got my overdue county Belted 
Kingfisher. 


The picnic area at Susquehanna State Park was also very warblery. Immediately 
upon entering via the back gate I found a mixed flock, followed by an even 
bigger mixed flock just inside the woods along the "chat field." Highlights 
included Blackburnian, Canada, Tennessee, and Kentucky Warblers. 


I swung by Swan Harbor at the wrong time of day. It was very quiet, though I 
found a Least Flycatcher randomly in one of the ornamental trees along the 
entrance road with some Chipping Sparrows and bluebirds. I also found six 
juvenile Little Blue Herons in the wetland impoundment. The new impoundments 
were very low on water compared to earlier this summer and are turning into 
good mudflat habitat. 


My final stop was Cromwell. Again, warblers everywhere. Just inside the woods 
from the gravel parking lot was a flock containing at least one Wilson's 
Warbler; the bird high in the canopy looked like a male but I later saw a 
definite female low to the ground. Magnolia Warblers were everywhere; 12 would 
be a conservative estimate. The brightest Tennessee Warbler I've ever seen was 
by box 10, as was a Prairie Warbler (uncommon here). I also had a Canada 
Warbler above the lime kiln. 


Tim Carney
Canton, MD

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Subject: Queen Anne's County today: Terrapin and John Brown
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 14:57:50 -0700 (PDT)
Terrapin Nature Park, Queen Anne's, US-MD
Aug 31, 2014 7:40 AM - 9:40 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Species list
20 species

Double-crested Cormorant  
Great Egret  
Green Heron  
Osprey  
Great Black-backed Gull  
Least Tern  
Mourning Dove  
Downy Woodpecker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Acadian Flycatcher  
Red-eyed Vireo  
Blue Jay  
American Crow  
Carolina Chickadee  
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  
Northern Mockingbird  
Black-and-white Warbler  
Magnolia Warbler  
Chestnut-sided Warbler  
Northern Cardinal  



Central Sod Farms--John Brown Rd., Queen Anne's, US-MD
Aug 31, 2014 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments:     Species list
5 species

American Golden-Plover (2)
Semipalmated Plover  
Killdeer  
American Kestrel  
Horned Lark  

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Subject: Re: YB Flycatcher - Cromwell
From: "Jlstasz via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 16:01:48 -0400 (EDT)
 
Hi Folks!

 
Tim Houghton wrote: 

 
" There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4 birders  
of YBFL at Cromwell in the same small area: around boxes 10 and 11 on 
Minebank  Trail. None of these involve photos so far, and neither do several 
other YBFL  reports recently accepted by eBird in MD. "

 
There are 50 reports of Yellow-belled Flycatcher in eBird for August 2014.  
One has been reviewed and invalidated because it lacked adequate 
documentation;  the other 49 are yet to be reviewed. None have been validated. 
Starting two years ago, the Maryland eBird Team decided to carefully review all 

reports of  Yellow-bellied Flycatcher. The main reason was that more than 25% 
of the reports  that were accompanied with photos were clearly not 
Yellow-bellied Flycatchers. A few of them were not even in the Genus Empidonax. 


 
If Empidonax flycatchers were easy, I doubt that Ken Kaufman would spend so 
 much time in his "Field Guide to Advanced Birding." He notes in the 
section  titled "What Not To Look At On Empidonax" ....Yellow Belly, with the 
notation that all Empidonax in fresh plumage have yellow bellies. So do pewees, 

phoebes  and many kingbirds.

 
I have read through many of the written details that have accompanied  
reports of Empidonax flycatchers. More than 95% of the written reports fail to 

state the age: adult or immature. More than 95% of the reports fail to 
mention  primary projection. More than 95% of the reports fail to mention the 
color of  the wings. In general, descriptions of 20 words or fewer will be 
inadequate to  describe the critical distinguishing features. 

 
"There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4 birders  
of ..." 
 
This happens all the time. Something gets reported on eBird and others go  
out and VOILA! It is really embarrassing when the photos from the initial 
and  subsequent reports show that the original identification was in error. 
This has  happened more than some would believe possible.

 
Reports of Yellow-bellied Flycatchers will continue to accumulate in the  
eBird Review Queue and then reviewed by a single reviewer for consistency. I  
just know it will not be me. 

 
Good Birding!

 
Jim

 
Jim Stasz
North Beach MD
_jlstasz AT aol.com_ (mailto:jlstasz AT aol.com) 

 
 
In a message dated 8/31/2014 3:10:53 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
thoughton AT loyola.edu writes:

 
Thanks  to Kevin for sending this note. I'm trying to avoid getting a smart 
phone--I  don't want to make that "leap" for various reasons.  


There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4 birders  
of YBFL at Cromwell in the same small area: around boxes 10 and 11 on 
Minebank Trail. None of these involve photos so far, and neither do several 
other 

YBFL  reports recently accepted by eBird in MD. 


Aside from the Yellow-Bellied Fly, other nice birds this morning: Hooded  
warbler female, blue-winged warbler, northern waterthrush, and a male  
Wilson's--10 warbler species in all. I ran into Brent Byers and Mary who also  
found a Nashville warbler and a Philadelphia vireo--and thanks to them for  
pointing me toward the hooded.


Tim Houghton
(Glen Arm)
 
____________________________________
  
From: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com  [mdbirding AT googlegroups.com] on behalf of 
keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com  [keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, August 31, 2014 12:06  PM
To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [MDBirding] YB  Flycatcher - Cromwell




Tim houghton just had a yellow bellied flycatcher before box 11. - Kevin  
Graff.   


Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone on the Verizon Wireless 4G LTE  
network.
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Subject: RE: YB Flycatcher - Cromwell
From: Tim Houghton <thoughton AT loyola.edu>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 19:10:49 +0000
Thanks to Kevin for sending this note. I'm trying to avoid getting a smart 
phone--I don't want to make that "leap" for various reasons. 


There are now multiple reports (within 2-3 days) from at least 4 birders of 
YBFL at Cromwell in the same small area: around boxes 10 and 11 on Minebank 
Trail. None of these involve photos so far, and neither do several other YBFL 
reports recently accepted by eBird in MD. 


Aside from the Yellow-Bellied Fly, other nice birds this morning: Hooded 
warbler female, blue-winged warbler, northern waterthrush, and a male 
Wilson's--10 warbler species in all. I ran into Brent Byers and Mary who also 
found a Nashville warbler and a Philadelphia vireo--and thanks to them for 
pointing me toward the hooded. 


Tim Houghton
(Glen Arm)
________________________________
From: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com [mdbirding AT googlegroups.com] on behalf of 
keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com [keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Sunday, August 31, 2014 12:06 PM
To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [MDBirding] YB Flycatcher - Cromwell

Tim houghton just had a yellow bellied flycatcher before box 11. - Kevin Graff.

Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone on the Verizon Wireless 4G LTE network.

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Subject: Franklin's Gull on Jug Bay - 8/30
From: Hans Holbrook <hgomphus AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 13:40:54 -0400
During a canoe trip down the Patuxent yesterday I had an adult Franklin's fly 
by. Lucky me it land on some open snags we had past about 50 yards before. When 
we passed it the Laughing Gulls had stayed put, even though we had been rather 
close. We were able to paddle up on the bird and watch it for several minutes, 
before it moved south. The snags were close to the PG marsh, and I believe the 
bird was in PG before watching it fly off to the southwest corner of Jug Bay 
and into Anne Arundel. 


The bird was in winter plumage more or less. The smaller predominantly red bid, 
was smudged black about a 3rd way from the tip. The faded hood was dark behind 
and below the eyes. Large white eye arcs. Dark mantle and wings. Bird was 
molting primary feathers, but distinctive pattern still visible. Wing tips were 
white, black and then white out on the very tips. Overall smaller than laughing 
goals, and bit potbellied. Took photos with iPhone that are diagnostic, but not 
fantastic. 


Hans Holbrook
Crofton, AACo., MD

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: 5 Am. G. Plovers in Hurlock in Dorchester county.
From: Dave Palmer <dpalmermd59 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 09:16:22 -0700 (PDT)
I had 5 American Golden Plovers on the Shiloh Turf farm near Hurlock. They were 
on the SE side not too far from the pump in the middle of the turf. Lots of 
killdeer and Laughing gulls. Also had a lone Black Tern at the WWTP (seen from 
the dike on SE corner). 


Dave Palmer
Easton

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Subject: Lake Needwood
From: Ron Johnson <ronjohn46 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 12:12:45 -0400
Despite the humidity, it was birdy morning out at Lake Needwood. I
came across several mixed foraging groups (Blue Jay Trail and Needwood
Mansion) with warblers- Redstart, Chestnut, Magnolia, Blackburnian,
Ovenbird, Yellow and Black-Throated Blue. The big surprise was a
juvenile Red-headed Woodpecker in the walnut trees near Needwood
Mansion. After a spat with a Red-bellied Woodpecker, it flew SE
towards the hill above the lake. The eBird list is below.

Ron Johnson
Derwood, MD

Lake Needwood, Montgomery, US-MD
Aug 31, 2014 6:45 AM - 10:10 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
Comments:     partly sunny, humid, W breeze, 70s
47 species (+1 other taxa)

Canada Goose  350
Mallard  2
Great Blue Heron  1
Green Heron  1
Bald Eagle  2
Solitary Sandpiper  1
Mourning Dove  3
Chimney Swift  5
Red-headed Woodpecker  1     clearly seen in flight and on a tree
trunk, woodpecker with brown head, white wing patches and white
underside
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Downy Woodpecker  3
Northern Flicker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
Empidonax sp.  1
Eastern Phoebe  2
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
White-eyed Vireo  1
Yellow-throated Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  9
Blue Jay  7
American Crow  1
Fish Crow  2
Carolina Chickadee  10
Tufted Titmouse  11
White-breasted Nuthatch  4
House Wren  1
Carolina Wren  7
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  3
Eastern Bluebird  5
American Robin  20
Gray Catbird  15
Brown Thrasher  1
Northern Mockingbird  2
European Starling  1
Ovenbird  1
American Redstart  4
Northern Parula  1
Magnolia Warbler  2
Blackburnian Warbler  1
Yellow Warbler  1
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Eastern Towhee  3
Chipping Sparrow  3
Northern Cardinal  9
Common Grackle  2
American Goldfinch  13

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19622683

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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Subject: YB Flycatcher - Cromwell
From: keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 12:06:12 -0400




Subject: Rock Creek Park, Sunday 8/31/14
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 10:27:45 -0400
This morning (8/31) at Rock Creek Park.....

Among the 10 warbler species the Kentucky Warbler was an excellent find....It 
is rarely seen at the park. 


-----Maintenance Yard
Ovenbird      (Bill B.)
Black-and-white Warbler     
Kentucky Warbler     (Bill ?)
Common Yellowthroat     2   (Martin)
American Redstart     3    (Martin)
Cape May Warbler     (Martin)
Magnolia Warbler  
Chestnut-sided Warbler     3    (Martin)
Black-throated Blue Warbler      5   (Martin)
Black-throated Green Warbler      (Susan)
Chimney Swift     10+
Ruby-throated Hummingbird     2+
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Downy Woodpecker     2
Northern Flicker     6+
Pileated Woodpecker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee     4
Acadian Flycatcher
Red-eyed Vireo     5
American Crow     2
Carolina Chickadee     4
White-breasted Nuthatch  
House Wren     2
Carolina Wren  
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher     3
Gray Catbird  
Scarlet Tanager  
Northern Cardinal     4
Baltimore Oriole  
American Goldfinch     2

Fellow Birders: Bill Butler, Martin Sneary, Jim Lemert, Susan Volman, Bonnie 
Ott, Bill ?, Christine, George O'Brian 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC


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Subject: Re: Golden-Winged -- Wheaton Regional Park--mini-train tracks/Pine Lake -- Aug 31, 2014
From: Rae Dubois <duboiswr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 07:13:26 -0700 (PDT)
On Sunday, August 31, 2014 8:29:58 AM UTC-4, David Gersten wrote:
> Went to Wheaton Regional with my son Liam just now. We walked quickly to the 
lake shore to be there when the sun hits the shore brush. Good flock of 
warblers near the benches, including golden-winged and blue-winged. A screech 
owl was in the pines. 

> 
> 
> 
> Full list:
> 
> 
> 
> 2 Wood Duck
> 
> 4 Mallard
> 
> 3 Mourning Dove
> 
> 1 Eastern Screech-Owl
> 
> 1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
> 
> 2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
> 
> 2 Downy Woodpecker
> 
> 1 Hairy Woodpecker
> 
> 5 Northern Flicker
> 
> 3 Eastern Wood-Pewee
> 
> 3 Acadian Flycatcher
> 
> 1 Least Flycatcher
> 
> 4 Empidonax sp.
> 
> 1 Eastern Phoebe
> 
> 2 Great Crested Flycatcher
> 
> 1 Red-eyed Vireo
> 
> 5 Blue Jay
> 
> 3 American Crow
> 
> 2 Carolina Chickadee
> 
> 3 Tufted Titmouse
> 
> 3 White-breasted Nuthatch
> 
> 4 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
> 
> 4 American Robin
> 
> 5 Gray Catbird
> 
> 1 Northern Mockingbird
> 
> 7 European Starling
> 
> 1 Blue-winged Warbler
> 
> 1 Golden-winged Warbler
> 
> 4 Chestnut-sided Warbler
> 
> 1 Magnolia Warbler
> 
> 5 Black-and-white Warbler
> 
> 4 American Redstart
> 
> 1 Worm-eating Warbler
> 
> 2 Common Yellowthroat
> 
> 2 Chipping Sparrow
> 
> 1 Scarlet Tanager
> 
> 3 Northern Cardinal
> 
> 2 Common Grackle
> 
> 1 American Goldfinch
> 
> 4 House Sparrow
> 
> 
> 
> David Gersten
> 
> Silver Spring, MD

Thanks, David, for letting us know about the Golden-winged as you were leaving.
We also saw a flock that included the Golden-winged about 8:15 in the trees by 
the path that runs along the side of the lake that gets the morning sun. All of 
us got good looks - we were birding with Linda Friedland, Lydia Schindler and 
Evelyn Ralston. 

 
Woody & Rae Dubois
Wheaton, MD

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Subject: Re: American Golden Plovers still at Central Sod/John Brown Rd.
From: "Jim Wilson" <wlsngang AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 09:00:52 -0400
At 8:30 this morning, the American Golden Plover is still at the Central Sod 
Farm off of John Brown Road in Queen Anne's County.  The bird was on the 
side of the road with the weeds and irrigation pipes laying on the ground 
spaced about 25 feet apart.
While I was there it patrolled the area just where the sod begins behind the 
weedy area.

I saw no evidence of any workers or rocketeers this morning.

Jim Wilson
Queenstown

-----Original Message----- 
From: Mark S.
Sent: Saturday, August 30, 2014 12:52 PM
To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [MDBirding] American Golden Plovers still at Central Sod/John Brown 
Rd.

The AMGO reported by Mikey Lutmerding earlier this morning are still there 
as of 11:45. When I got there at about 11 o'clock there was a lot of plowing 
going on and dust being thrown in the air, but the plovers were still there.

Mark Schilling
Kent Island

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Subject: Golden-Winged -- Wheaton Regional Park--mini-train tracks/Pine Lake -- Aug 31, 2014
From: psalmus50 <psalmus50 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 08:29:34 -0400
Went to Wheaton Regional with my son Liam just now. We walked quickly to the 
lake shore to be there when the sun hits the shore brush. Good flock of 
warblers near the benches, including golden-winged and blue-winged. A screech 
owl was in the pines. 


Full list:

2 Wood Duck
4 Mallard
3 Mourning Dove
1 Eastern Screech-Owl
1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
2 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
5 Northern Flicker
3 Eastern Wood-Pewee
3 Acadian Flycatcher
1 Least Flycatcher
4 Empidonax sp.
1 Eastern Phoebe
2 Great Crested Flycatcher
1 Red-eyed Vireo
5 Blue Jay
3 American Crow
2 Carolina Chickadee
3 Tufted Titmouse
3 White-breasted Nuthatch
4 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
4 American Robin
5 Gray Catbird
1 Northern Mockingbird
7 European Starling
1 Blue-winged Warbler
1 Golden-winged Warbler
4 Chestnut-sided Warbler
1 Magnolia Warbler
5 Black-and-white Warbler
4 American Redstart
1 Worm-eating Warbler
2 Common Yellowthroat
2 Chipping Sparrow
1 Scarlet Tanager
3 Northern Cardinal
2 Common Grackle
1 American Goldfinch
4 House Sparrow

David Gersten
Silver Spring, MD

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Subject: David Sibley on CSPAN right now
From: Marcia Balestri <mebalestri AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 14:49:12 -0400
as a part of the National Book Festival
_____________________

Marcia Balestri
Worcester County, Maryland
mebalestri AT gmail.com





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Subject: American Golden Plovers still at Central Sod/John Brown Rd.
From: "Mark S." <mdbirder AT me.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 09:52:19 -0700 (PDT)
The AMGO reported by Mikey Lutmerding earlier this morning are still there as 
of 11:45. When I got there at about 11 o'clock there was a lot of plowing going 
on and dust being thrown in the air, but the plovers were still there. 


Mark Schilling
Kent Island

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Subject: Ft Dupont - DC (Lots O'Warblers!)
From: "'Jason DC' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 09:08:48 -0700 (PDT)
Hi All,

Paul Pisano, Hugh McGuiness and I met up at Fort Dupont this morning at 7:30 am 
and birded for about three hours. Were were rewarded with 14 Warbler species, A 
golden-winged Warbler, Yellow Flycatcher, and a possible fly-over Upland 
Sandpiper. Interestingly, we dipped on Tanangers... 


Here are the birds on eBird Lists:

48 total Species

12 Laughing Gull
2 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)
1 Mourning Dove
25 Chimney Swift
4 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
3 Downy Woodpecker
1 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)
1 Pileated Woodpecker
7 Eastern Wood-Pewee
1 Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
2 Great Crested Flycatcher
2 Eastern Kingbird
1 Warbling Vireo
8 Red-eyed Vireo
2 Blue Jay
4 crow sp.
5 Carolina Chickadee
2 Tufted Titmouse
3 White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern)
1 House Wren
3 Carolina Wren
6 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
50 American Robin
4 Gray Catbird
4 Northern Mockingbird
75 European Starling
6 Cedar Waxwing
2 Blue-winged Warbler
1 Golden-winged Warbler (Male)
6 Black-and-white Warbler
1 Tennessee Warbler
6 Common Yellowthroat
9 American Redstart
2 Northern Parula
4 Magnolia Warbler
2 Bay-breasted Warbler
1 Blackburnian Warbler
4 Chestnut-sided Warbler
2 Black-throated Blue Warbler
1 Black-throated Green Warbler
1 Canada Warbler
2 Eastern Towhee
3 Northern Cardinal
1 Indigo Bunting
3 Common Grackle
5 Baltimore Oriole
5 American Goldfinch
7 House Sparrow

Jason Berry
Washington, DC

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Saturday 8/30/14
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 10:43:26 -0400
This morning (8/30) at Rock Creek Park.......

----Equitation Field   
Blue-winged Warbler     (Paul)
American Restart     (Paul)
Red-eyed Vireo

----Ridge
Canada Warbler     (Paul)

------Maintenance Yard
Black-and-white Warbler     2
Tennessee Warbler       (Martin)
American Redstart     3
Magnolia Warbler     3    (Hanan)
Chestnut-sided Warbler     4     (Sally)
Chimney Swift     20++
Ruby-throated Hummingbird     2+
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Downy Woodpecker     2
Northern Flicker     4+
Pileated Woodpecker     2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Red-eyed Vireo  
House Wren  
Carolina Wren  
Northern Cardinal     2
American Goldfinch     2

----Nature Center
Chestnut-sided Warbler     (Greg)

-----Dog Run Parking Lot
Blue Jay  
American Crow  
House Wren  
Gray Catbird  
American Goldfinch  

Fellow Birders: Martin Sneary, Paul DeAnna, Sally, Tom Eck, Kathryn Kratzer, 
Chuck James, Greg Gough, Tully, Devon, Tucker Scully, Lee Kimball, Hanan 
Jacobi, Judy Bromley, Marina True, Dan Eberly, Chip Chipley, Matt Cohen, 
Weinberg, Chris, + 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington DC

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Subject: Yellow-bellied Flycatcher at Cromwell Valley
From: Taylor McLean <mcleant11 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 10:30:55 -0400
08/30
9:00-10:15

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher at Cromwell Valley. In vicinity of box 10 and not box 
11, as was seen yesterday by Tim Houghton 


Taylor Mclean
Towson, MD
mcleant11 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Golden-winged Warbler at Irvine Nature Center
From: Keith Eric Costley <oriolekec1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 09:33:25 -0400
i originally found the Golden-winged Warbler (GWWA) feeding in the trees behind 
the nature center with a mixed flock that included BLWA, BAWW, CSWA, MAWA, BTGW 
and NOPA. I first noticed the gold wing patch then the black throat. My second 
and third encounter was when I was scanning the flower beds, at approximately 
25 feet, I saw the GWWA side and front views. The crown was yellow and the 
throat was black. 


Keith Eric Costley
OrioleKEC1 AT comcast.net
OrioleKEC1 AT gmail.com
Randallstown, Baltimore County

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Subject: Raven. Cecil County
From: "'espijc' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 11:13:40 GMT




Subject: Violette's Lock (Potomac, MD) 29 August: no Neo
From: Steve Johnson <stevejohnson2 AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 19:56:33 -0700 (PDT)
Lynn and I birded Violette's Lock 2 ways this morning. 2 hours kayakking across 
to the VA side and back, looking for the Cormorant; and 1/2 hour at a single 
stop along the road back toward River Road. No Neotropic Corm between 8-10AM 
this morning. But, lots of normal river birds - Wood Duck, D-C Cormorants, 
Egrets, Herons, Osprey, Caspian Tern, Kingfisher, Phoebe, Swallows. 


But at the one stop on the road, we had 15 spp. simultaneously in two adjacent 
trees. These included Yellow_Billed Cuckoo, Black-and-White Warbler, Canada 
Warbler, and Scarlet Tanager, plus more common backyard birds. It was a "wow" 
moment around 10:30 AM, when the usual 4-5 species mixed flock swelled to 
wonderful proportions. 


see http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19604226

-Steve Johnson & Lynn Rafferty
Fairfax, VA

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Subject: Swan Creek & Black Marsh 8/29/2014
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 19:53:52 -0700 (PDT)
Swan Creek was birdy this morning. I had a nice mixed flock at the back gate in 
the wetlands, with the best birds being a Blackburnian Warbler, a 
Chestnut-sided Warbler, and several Magnolia Warblers. On the way back to the 
trailers, I watched a Yellow-billed Cuckoo annihilate a large cicada. I scanned 
the cells every hour for weird shorebirds, and came up generally empty-handed 
until the final moments of the day when I found an American Golden-Plover and a 
Short-billed Dowitcher close to the trailers at 3pm. Ryan Johnson was 
conveniently swinging by to check for golden-plovers and was able to view the 
birds right before we closed. This is about the fourth or fifth time something 
cool has shown up right before closing time. 


I was hesitant about birding after work since the activity at Swan Creek seemed 
to slow down mid-day, but I went to Black Marsh anyway and I'm glad I did. 
Immediately upon leaving my car I found a fantastic mixed flock at the 
trailhead to Black Marsh (just by the tollbooth). The most notable bird was a 
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher that made a brief cameo, and I also had a Tennessee 
Warbler foraging at eye-level. Magnolias and Redstarts were everywhere and some 
were even dropping to the ground. Lots of other warblers were in here as well. 
It took me 45 minutes just to sort through the first flock. 


When I got out into the marsh, a Black-throated Green Warbler flew at me and 
landed about two feet away from me in the low vegetation. I later saw a 
Blackburnian Warbler perched on a dead snag, slowly inching downwards in search 
of insects like a nuthatch. 


Little Blue Herons were numerous as usual, and I saw two juvenile Snowy Egrets 
along the causeway that I could have easily dismissed as juvenile LBHEs. It 
made me wonder how many times I've counted distant white egrets as LBHEs when 
they could have been SNEGs instead. Ooops. Something to worry about on my next 
visit, I guess. 


Swan Creek: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19602751
Black Marsh: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19607248

Tim Carney
Canton, MD

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Subject: Finally! My Garrettt Screech-Owl
From: "'Aaron Graham' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 18:18:36 -0700 (PDT)
 About 5 mins. ago we had a calling Eastern Screech-Owl on a pull off on Wes 
White Road. I managed a sound recording, not very loud but you can hear! ;) 
This put my Garrett Big Year up to 195. 


Good Birding,
Aaron Graham,
Oakland, MD

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Friday 8/29/14
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 20:43:51 -0400
This morning (8/29) at Rock Creek Park....

Fellow birders observed and identified 15 warbler species.

----Maintenance Yard
Worm-eating Warbler       (Gerry)
Blue-winged Warbler     2    (Gerry)
Black-and-white Warbler     4     (Holger)
Tennessee Warbler     2      (Holger) 
American Redstart     4
Cape May Warbler     2     (Hugh, Hanan)
Magnolia Warbler     2     (Hanan)
Bay-breasted Warbler     (Holger)
Blackburnian Warbler      (Hugh)
Yellow Warbler     2     (Hanan)
Chestnut-sided Warbler     5     (Holger)
Black-throated Blue Warbler       (Hugh, Hanan)
Prairie Warbler     (Hugh ?, Hanan ?)
Black-throated Green Warbler     5    (Hugh)
Canada Warbler     2     (Hugh)
Ruby-throated Hummingbird     6+
Downy Woodpecker     2
Northern Flicker     5++
Pileated Woodpecker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee     2
Red-eyed Vireo     5
Carolina Chickadee     4
White-breasted Nuthatch  
House Wren  
Carolina Wren     2
American Robin     5
Scarlet Tanager  
Northern Cardinal     2
Common Grackle  
Baltimore Oriole  

Fellow Birders: Holger Pflicke, Hugh McGuinness, Bill Butler, Mardi Hastings, 
Marjorie Rachlin, Kathryn Kratzer, Hanan Jacobi, Gerry Hawkins, Lee Kimball, 
Tucker Scully, Jim Lemert, Sally, Marina True, + 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC

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Subject: Rock Creek Park - evening
From: Martin Sneary <mvsneary AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 16:17:38 -0700 (PDT)
Having been unable to get out this morning, I was curious to see if an evening 
bird around the Maintenance Yard would (once again) prove productive. Not as 
good as the morning's sightings, but I was not disappointed. Highlights were: 
Blue-winged warbler (4), Black-and-white Warbler, Common Yellowthroat (2), 
American Redstart (2), Black-throated Blue Warbler and Black-throated Green 
Warbler. Full ebird checklist: 


Red-shouldered Hawk (Buteo lineatus)	1
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)	2
Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica)	80
Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris)	1
Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus)	2
Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)	4
Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus)	1
Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus)	2
Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens)	2
Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus)	2
crow sp. (Corvus sp. (crow sp.))	1
Carolina Chickadee (Poecile carolinensis)	2
Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor)	4
White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis)	2
House Wren (Troglodytes aedon)	4
Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus)	2
Blue-grey Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea)	1
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)	5
Grey Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)	1
Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)	2
Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera)	4
Black-and-white Warbler (Mniotilta varia)	1
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas)	2
American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla)	2
Black-throated Blue Warbler (Setophaga caerulescens)	1
Black-throated Green Warbler (Setophaga virens)	1
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)	3
Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)	1
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)	2
House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)	1

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Subject: Re: Turkey Point
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 18:54:51 -0400
Mark's report makes me very excited for the Cecil Bird Club's hawk watch
kickoff tomorrow at Turkey Point. I hope all those warblers stick around
tonight.

Meet trip leader Sean McCandless in the parking lot at 7:00 a.m. tomorrow.

Pat Valdata
Elkton

Pat Valdata
Elkton, MD


On Fri, Aug 29, 2014 at 1:19 PM, Mark Johnson  wrote:

> I spent the morning at Turkey Point (Elk Neck State Park, Cecil Co.) and
> was treated to a pretty amazing display of migrant songbird activity. As I
> was walking down the first part of the Lighthouse Trail from the parking
> lot, I could see incoming small flocks dropping down to the trees. From
> 7:15 until roughly 9:30, the action never really slowed down. The area
> surrounding the first big left bend in the trail that opens into the first
> field was absolutely alive with birds, high and low. I literally couldn't
> keep up with what was moving at any given moment. I think I ended up with
> 15 warbler species, but it wasn't so much the diversity as it was the sheer
> aggregate numbers. Blackburnian Warblers were the most numerous, followed
> by Magnolia and Redstart. Also had Blue-winged, Tennessee, Black and white,
> Chestnut-sided, Worm-eating, Canada, Bay-breasted, Prairie, Black-throated
> Green, Yellow, Parula and Common Yellowthroat. I had a Philadelphia Vireo,
> Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, Least Flycatcher, Traills, many Pewees, several
> Great crested. At one point there were five Orchard Orioles and four Blue
> Grosbeak all squeezed into a little patch of weeds right along the path.
> There were always moving birds in view, so I know I missed a lot of things,
> especially high in the tree tops. I eventually pulled myself away from that
> stretch of the path and walked out to the point. By this time, it had
> warmed up and biting flies were swarming out there, so I didn't spend much
> time, but I did see my first two Red-breasted Nuthatches of the year...
> maybe this bodes well for the winter finch forecast.
>
> Mark Johnson
> Aberdeen
>
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Subject: BOBO and MAWR in Chestertown (Kent County)
From: Mike Hudson <birdman96 AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 18:30:07 -0400
Hi All,

Today at the canal just past the Washington College Boathouse, along Quaker 
Neck Rd, I had a small flock of BOBOLINKS calling from the phragmites on the 
marsh-side of the road. I counted three for certain, and one RED-WINGED 
BLACKBIRD, but there were other birds out there for certain; the heat haze was 
pretty brutal and only a couple birds were calling so it's hard to be sure 
exactly how many. 


In this same are, there was a MARSH WREN calling. I don't know their status as 
a breeder or migrant in this area, and the habitat wasn't spectacular, but 
apparently it wasn't horrible either. 


Good birding! 

Mike H.
Chestertown, MD 

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Subject: Mississippi Kite - Harford
From: keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 18:10:07 -0400




Subject: Sugarloaf Mtn Shooting Range update & possible [FR] Junco
From: JAMES SPEICHER <jugornought AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 17:34:28 -0400
A Board of Zoning Appeals hearing was held yesterday evening [THURS]
and is reported on in today's Frederick News Post [FNP].  The hearing
was still ongoing with citizen input  AT 10:30, so the paper was unable
to report in the print edition whether a decision was reached by the
board.  Additional time was going to be provided next TUES for citizen
input, if needed.  It's possible that the on-line edition has more
info, but I can't access it with dial-up.

The title of the print article is:
Hundreds Oppose Shooting Range

I got a brief glimpse of what may have been a junco on my morning bike
ride while on Arnold Road.  White tail feathers on a bird that wasn't
a mocker and was in the wrong habitat for a Gnatcatcher is what I can
report at the moment.  I'll be on the lookout again on tomorrow's
ride.

Jim Speicher
BroadRun/Burkittsville area
[FR] Frederick County

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Subject: Poplar slots taken
From: Marcia Balestri <mebalestri AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 16:47:32 -0400
Sorry, both slots are taken.
_____________________

Marcia Balestri
Worcester County, Maryland
mebalestri AT gmail.com





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Subject: RE: Cromwell, good birds, YB Fly, Philly, Wilson's, 8/29/14
From: Tim Houghton <thoughton AT loyola.edu>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 20:33:55 +0000
Was looking through MD rarities just now on eBird and noticed that a 3rd person 
earlier this afternoon had what he thought was a Yellow-Bellied Flycatcher at 
Box 11--and may have photos. 


TH
________________________________
From: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com [mdbirding AT googlegroups.com] on behalf of Tim 
Houghton [thoughton AT loyola.edu] 

Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 1:47 PM
To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [MDBirding] Cromwell, good birds, YB Fly, Philly, Wilson's, 8/29/14

Sorry--I tried to contact someone to get a message here in real time, but that 
apparently failed. 


Bluebird Box #11 on Minebank Trail was "da man" this morning. Around 11:00am, 
after I ran into Sean Stewart, we found a YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER and a 
PHILADELPHIA VIREO near Box 11. We were quite happy! (I did all my birding btw 
the Willow Grove and Sherwood bridges.) 


Lots of pocket activity this morning. In fact, there was still a lot going on 
when I left at 12:45. I had 10 warbler species: 


Blacknwhite (1)
Tennessee (1)
C. Yellowthroat (x)
Redstart (6)
Magnolia (9)
Yellow (1)
Chestnut-Sided (9)
Prairie Warbler (2, near Sherwood bridge)
Black-Throated Green (2)
Wilson's (2, 1 male, 1 young female)

Before running into Sean I ran into 2 other birding groups. I think they had at 
least 2 species of warbler I didn't get, so there were at least 12 at Cromwell 
today. 


eBird: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19604986 .

Best birding wishes,

Tim Houghton
(Glen Arm)


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Subject: Re: Snowy Egret
From: "'Jason DC' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 13:30:05 -0700 (PDT)
On Friday, August 29, 2014 11:17:42 AM UTC-4, Hugh McGuinness wrote:
> Roosting at end of boardwalk at Keniworth Aquatic Gardens (DC) now.

Nice that this bird was refound!

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Subject: Poplar Island-Sept 19
From: Marcia Balestri <mebalestri AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 14:39:09 -0400
I have a couple of slots for the Friday, September 19 Poplar Island trip. As 
always, first come, first serve. 

_____________________

Marcia Balestri
Worcester County, Maryland
mebalestri AT gmail.com





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Subject: Re: Turkey Point
From: Mark Johnson <mj3151 AT outlook.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 14:14:29 -0400
I'm going to retract my Yellow-bellied Flycatcher report. I just looked at the 
one decent photo I have and it looks like another Least...more gray than yellow 
up to the beak and the primary projection is really tiny. 

 
Mark Johnson
Aberdeen
 		 	   		  

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Subject: Black Walnut Point, Talbot County
From: Dave Palmer <dpalmermd59 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 11:03:58 -0700 (PDT)
A spontaneous and informal outing by 7 members of the Talbot Bird Club ended up 
with 18 species of warblers and a few other good finds at Black Walnut Point. 
Species found in decreasing order of abundance included: 


Black-and-white - > 20
American redstart - > 20
Chestnut-sided - 6
Magnolia - 6
Common yellowthroat - 6
Blue-winged - 3
Canada - 3
Ovenbird - 3
Worm-eating - 2
Northern Parula - 2
Black-throated green -2
Blackburnian - 1
Black-throated blue - 1 (female)
Nashville - 1
Tennessee - 1
Northern waterthrush - 1
Prairie - 1
Hooded -1 (later in the morning nearby) 

Also had numerous Baltimore Orioles, at least 6 Veery, a few Least Flycatchers 
and Pewees, and Red-eyed vireos were everywhere. A first of season Red-breasted 
nuthatch was also reported. 


Dave Palmer
Easton, MD

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Subject: Cromwell, good birds, YB Fly, Philly, Wilson's, 8/29/14
From: Tim Houghton <thoughton AT loyola.edu>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 17:47:41 +0000
Sorry--I tried to contact someone to get a message here in real time, but that 
apparently failed. 


Bluebird Box #11 on Minebank Trail was "da man" this morning. Around 11:00am, 
after I ran into Sean Stewart, we found a YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER and a 
PHILADELPHIA VIREO near Box 11. We were quite happy! (I did all my birding btw 
the Willow Grove and Sherwood bridges.) 


Lots of pocket activity this morning. In fact, there was still a lot going on 
when I left at 12:45. I had 10 warbler species: 


Blacknwhite (1)
Tennessee (1)
C. Yellowthroat (x)
Redstart (6)
Magnolia (9)
Yellow (1)
Chestnut-Sided (9)
Prairie Warbler (2, near Sherwood bridge)
Black-Throated Green (2)
Wilson's (2, 1 male, 1 young female)

Before running into Sean I ran into 2 other birding groups. I think they had at 
least 2 species of warbler I didn't get, so there were at least 12 at Cromwell 
today. 


eBird: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19604986 .

Best birding wishes,

Tim Houghton
(Glen Arm)

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Subject: Turkey Point
From: Mark Johnson <mj3151 AT outlook.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 13:19:22 -0400
I spent the morning at Turkey Point (Elk Neck State Park, Cecil Co.) and was 
treated to a pretty amazing display of migrant songbird activity. As I was 
walking down the first part of the Lighthouse Trail from the parking lot, I 
could see incoming small flocks dropping down to the trees. From 7:15 until 
roughly 9:30, the action never really slowed down. The area surrounding the 
first big left bend in the trail that opens into the first field was absolutely 
alive with birds, high and low. I literally couldn't keep up with what was 
moving at any given moment. I think I ended up with 15 warbler species, but it 
wasn't so much the diversity as it was the sheer aggregate numbers. 
Blackburnian Warblers were the most numerous, followed by Magnolia and 
Redstart. Also had Blue-winged, Tennessee, Black and white, Chestnut-sided, 
Worm-eating, Canada, Bay-breasted, Prairie, Black-throated Green, Yellow, 
Parula and Common Yellowthroat. I had a Philadelphia Vireo, Yellow-bellied 
Flycatcher, Least Flycatcher, Traills, many Pewees, several Great crested. At 
one point there were five Orchard Orioles and four Blue Grosbeak all squeezed 
into a little patch of weeds right along the path. There were always moving 
birds in view, so I know I missed a lot of things, especially high in the tree 
tops. I eventually pulled myself away from that stretch of the path and walked 
out to the point. By this time, it had warmed up and biting flies were swarming 
out there, so I didn't spend much time, but I did see my first two Red-breasted 
Nuthatches of the year... maybe this bodes well for the winter finch forecast. 

 
Mark Johnson
Aberdeen
 		 	   		  

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Subject: Mall birds, 8/29
From: Jim Felley <jdfelley AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 09:38:48 -0700 (PDT)
My lunchtime walk produced a few highlights:
 Constitution Gardens: a wary female Shoveller among all the non-wary local 
mallards (difficult to separate, as everyone is in eclipse plumage at the 
moment). 

 The Black-crowned Night Heron is still sitting in his tree on the wouthwest 
side of the pond (look for the white splots on the sidewalk below - he seems to 
like that roosting spot). 

 Mary Ripley Gardens (between the A&I building and the Hirshhorn: Ruby-throated 
hummingbirds have been present all week, sometimes squabbling over flowers 

 August birding on the Mall can be rewarding, if you are happy with small 
rewards (I am) 

          Jim

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Subject: Snowy Egret
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 11:17:37 -0400
Roosting at end of boardwalk at Keniworth Aquatic Gardens (DC) now. 

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Subject: Nashville Warbler at Cromwell Valley
From: Taylor McLean <mcleant11 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 10:28:20 -0400
08/29/14
7:30-9:30 AM

Best bird of the morning was a Nashville Warbler on the Minebank Trail and not 
too far from box 10. 


Other warblers included Chestnut-sided, Black-and-white, Magnolia, 
Yellowthroat, Redstart, Yellow. 

Others reported Wilson's, Prairie and Black-throated Green.

Good birding!

Taylor Mclean
Towson, MD
mcleant11 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Veeries over Pasadena
From: "'Bill Hubick' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 03:24:33 -0700
Hi Everyone,

I've stepped out nearly every night and early a.m. to see if the cricket chorus 
has relented enough to permit some night listening. I could tell this morning 
wasn't the day volume-wise before I even opened the door; however, radar maps 
shared by Matt Hafner showing heavy migration made me give it five minutes. 
Flying low and calling loudly enough to be heard over the crickets were at 
least one VEERY per minute. Seems like it should be a good couple days for 
migrants. 


Good birding,

Bill

 
Bill Hubick
Pasadena, Maryland
bill_hubick AT yahoo.com
http://www.billhubick.com
http://www.marylandbiodiversity.com
http://www.facebook.com/MarylandBiodiversity

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Subject: American Avocet at Mt. Calvert
From: Fred Shaffer <glaucousgull AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 19:02:52 -0700
I went kayaking after work today, putting in at Jackson Landing and going south 
through Jug Bay and then north to the marsh off Mt. Calvert. The weather was 
spectacular, but the water level was very high keeping some of the bird 
activity down. I had hoped to find some shorebirds, but the lack of mudflats 
meant that the only shorebirds that I saw, at least initially, was a group of 
flyby Semipalmated Sandpipers. I kayaked into the marsh off Mt. Calvert, still 
hoping for some shorebirds or rails. But, it was slow here too. I kept myself 
occupied by picking out a couple dozen Bobolinks in the hundreds of flyover 
Red-winged Blackbirds in and around the marsh. 



As I kayaked back up the main channel of the Patuxent (just east of Mt. 
Calvert), I saw a large shorebird flying towards me, coming almost directly 
down the Patuxent River. I clearly saw the extremely long legs, long neck 
extended in flight, black and white pattern (above), and the long bill, 
upturned towards the tip, as the bird approached. When it dawned on me what was 
flying just over my right shoulder, the resulting explosion of activity from my 
boat sent the Avocet veering off to the right, over the marsh between the 
Western Branch and the Patuxent River (across from Mt. Calvert). I got good 
views of the bird as it flew, seeing the profile of the body and the shape of 
the thin, long bill. Unfortunately, it took me five or ten seconds to rip my 
camera from the waterproof bag it was in, but I did get a few distant, grainy 
photos that reflect at least some of the field marks that I had seen much 
clearer when the bird was so close. I followed the 

 bird in flight before losing sight of it in the tree line to the north. I 
don't know if it continued to fly off, or if it found a dry place to set down 
in the marsh. I saw the bird at approximately 6:39 pm, and it was in view for 
probably about a minute. 



And, on a more personal note, the Avocet was my 300th species seen in Maryland 
this year. I had wanted to try for 300 birds in Maryland in one calendar year 
for many years, but had been unable to do so for a variety of reasons. But, 
things seemed to have worked out fairly well this year, and it was great having 
number 300 being such a memorable bird. It has been great visiting regularly 
this year different places across the state that I had only gotten to rarely 
before, but it was also nice seeing the Mourning Warbler (#299) and the Avocet 
at two places close to home that I am so familiar with (Schoolhouse Pond and 
Jug Bay). Good birding, 


Fred Shaffer
GlaucousGull AT verizon.net
Crofton, Anne Arundel

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Subject: Cromwell Valley Park, 08/26/14
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 18:50:54 -0400
*First of Nine Tuesday weekly walks*


08/26/14 – 645am-1025am

Cromwell Valley Parkβ€”Willow Grove Farm, Baltimore Co., MD



WEATHER: PC, 61-80 degrees, calm- variable 5 mph

OBSERVERS: 22



Turkey Vulture – 1

Mourning Dove – 2

Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 1

Chimney Swift – 1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird – 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker – 3

Downy Woodpecker – 2

Eastern Wood-Pewee – 3

Warbling Vireo – 2

Red-eyed Vireo – 4

Blue Jay – 1

American Crow – 1

Carolina Chickadee – 2

Tufted Titmouse – 2

White-breasted Nuthatch – 1

Carolina Wren – 1

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 2

Eastern Bluebird – 2

American Robin – 4

Gray Catbird – 4

Northern Mockingbird – 1

Brown Thrasher – 1

European Starling – 2

Chestnut-sided Warbler – 1

American Redstart – 1

Common Yellowthroat – 2

Chipping Sparrow- 3

Song Sparrow – 1

Northern Cardinal – 4

Red-winged Blackbird – 3

Brown-headed Cowbird – 1

Baltimore Oriole – 1

American Goldfinch – 5

SPECIES: 33




08/26/14 – 830am-10am

Cromwell Valley Parkβ€”Sherwood Farm, Baltimore Co., MD



WEATHER: PC, 72-77 degrees, variable 4 mph- variable 5 mph

OBSERVERS: 22



Mourning Dove – 5

Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird – 2

Belted Kingfisher – 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker – 2

Downy Woodpecker – 2

Northern Flicker – 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee – 4

Eastern Phoebe – 1

Great Crested Flycatcher – 1

Eastern Kingbird – 1

Warbling Vireo – 2

Red-eyed Vireo – 2

Blue Jay – 2

American Crow – 9

Barn Swallow – 1

Carolina Chickadee – 2

Carolina Wren – 5

House Wren – 1

Eastern Bluebird – 4

American Robin – 1

Gray Catbird – 4

European Starling- 1

Cedar Waxwing – 2

Ovenbird – 1

Common Yellowthroat – 2

Canada Warbler – 1

Chippng Sparrow – 2

Song Sparrow – 1

Northern Cardinal – 3

Orchard Oriole – 2

Baltimore Oriole – 1

American Goldfinch – 3

SPECIES: 33




08/26/14 – 935am-940am    **Most sightings seen looking to W from Sherwood
Farm Bridge**

Cromwell Valley Parkβ€”Eck Farm, Baltimore Co., MD



WEATHER: PC, 76 degrees, calm

OBSERVERS: 22



Mourning Dove – 3

Belted Kingfisher – 1

Blue Jay – 1

American Crow – 2

Eastern Bluebird – 1

American Robin – 1

Gray Catbird – 1

European Starling – 5

Cedar Waxwing – 6

Chipping Sparrow – 1

Brown-headed Cowbird – 1

American Goldfinch – 1

SPECIES: 12





08/26/14 – 1055am-1125am

Loch Raven Reservoirβ€”Loch Raven Point, Baltimore Co., MD



WEATHER: PC, 80 degrees, NE 6 mph



Canada Goose – 67

Mallard – 8

Double-crested Cormorant – 4 (including one released after a visit to local
rehab for checkup)

Great Blue Heron – 1

Ring-billed Gull – 22

Caspian Tern – 1

Belted Kingfisher – 1

Downy Woodpecker – 1

Eastern KIngbird – 1

Red-eyed Vireo – 1

Blue Jay – 1

American Crow – 1

Tree Swallow – 2

Carolina Chickadee – 2

Carolina Wren – 1

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 1

Gray Catbird – 2

Cedar Waxwing – 1

Common Yellowthroat – 1

Chipping Sparrow – 4

Northern Cardinal – 1

American Goldfinch – 2

SPECIES: 22




    Kevin Graff

    Jarrettsville, MD

    KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: JBWS Ongoing Bird Survey - Bobolinks, Cooper's Hawk
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 15:03:22 -0700 (PDT)
Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary, Anne Arundel, US-MD
Aug 28, 2014 7:30 AM - 10:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Ongoing Bird Survey
40 species

Canada Goose  
Wood Duck  
Double-crested Cormorant  
Great Blue Heron  
Great Egret  
Black Vulture  
Turkey Vulture  
Osprey  
Northern Harrier  
Cooper's Hawk  
Bald Eagle  
Laughing Gull  
Forster's Tern  
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  
Mourning Dove  
Chimney Swift  
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Acadian Flycatcher  
Eastern Phoebe  
Red-eyed Vireo  
American Crow  
Purple Martin  
Bank Swallow  
Barn Swallow  
Carolina Chickadee  
Tufted Titmouse  
White-breasted Nuthatch  
Carolina Wren  
Eastern Bluebird  
American Robin  
Gray Catbird  
Cedar Waxwing  
Eastern Towhee  
Chipping Sparrow  
Summer Tanager  
Northern Cardinal  
Bobolink  25
Red-winged Blackbird  
American Goldfinch  

Next Survey Sept 11

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Subject: Good morning at Bayside, other stuff
From: Marcia Balestri <mebalestri AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:01:24 -0400
I (finally) had a good morning at Bayside on Assateague. Ten species of 
warblers, both orioles, and Bobolink moving through--list of warblers below. I 
also had a good heron/egret flight; nothing unusual, just pretty to watch them 
fly by in clumps. My counts in eBird are probably low as I was too busy 
watching to write stuff down, and lots of warblers got by me--either too high 
up or moving pretty fast. 


Mike Walsh and I had 14 White Ibis fly over Life of the Forest.

Scott Housten called me with 2 American Golden-Plovers at Murray Sod Farm, and 
Mike and I made it up there to catch sight of them in among the 100+ Killdeer. 
We may have seen 3 Bobolinks as well, but the heat shimmer and distance was too 
much for a positive ID. 


Warblers at Bayside:

Northern Waterthrush
Prothonotary Warbler
Nashville Warbler
American Redstart
Magnolia Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Prairie Warbler




_____________________

Marcia Balestri
Worcester County, Maryland
mebalestri AT gmail.com





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