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Updated on Wednesday, September 17 at 12:23 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Red-throated Loon,©Julie Zickefoose

17 Sep Western Kingbird at Swan Harbor Farm [Matt Hafner ]
17 Sep Wheaton Regional Park today ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
17 Sep Rock Creek Park, Wednesday 9/17/14 [Wallace Kornack ]
17 Sep Kent County Fall Count 21 Sept [Walter Ellison ]
17 Sep Hart-Miller Island, 09/15/14 [Kevin Graff ]
17 Sep Lincoln's Sparrow at Hughes Hollow [Jim Green ]
16 Sep Nighthawk show-Perryman Park (Harford Co.) [Mark Johnson ]
16 Sep Connecticut Warbler Rock Creek Park Maintenance Yard 3:45 pm [Judy Bromley ]
16 Sep RFI -- Garganey at Chincoteague May 1992 ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
16 Sep Re: [eBird Alert] Needs Alert for Maryland ["'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
16 Sep Connecticut Warbler [Kevin Graff ]
16 Sep Poplar Island, Sept 16 [Karen Caruso ]
16 Sep Fwd: DC Area, 9/16/14 []
16 Sep Wheaton Regional Park today ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
16 Sep Masonville 9/16/2014 [Tim Carney ]
16 Sep Rock Creek Park, Tuesday 9/16/14 [Wallace Kornack ]
16 Sep Warbler ID ["pvaldata1 AT gmail.com" ]
16 Sep Connecticut warbler at Cromwell Valley Park [Andy Beiderman ]
15 Sep Turkey Pt Hawk Watch Tuesday ["pvaldata1 AT gmail.com" ]
15 Sep Re: Montgomery Bird Club program this Wednesday ["David L. Crooks" ]
15 Sep Montgomery Bird Club program this Wednesday [Anna Urciolo ]
15 Sep Black Marsh 9/15/2014 [Tim Carney ]
15 Sep Re: Out-Of-Area, albino hummer in VA? [Hugh McGuinness ]
15 Sep Out-Of-Area, albino hummer in VA? [Tim Houghton ]
15 Sep Ho Co (Grasshopper Sparrow +) ["Bonnie Ott" ]
15 Sep Broadwinged Hawks et al on C&O Canal - Great Falls to Seneca [Lucy Uncu ]
15 Sep Cromwell [Tim Houghton ]
15 Sep Wheaton Regional Park today ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
15 Sep Rock Creek Park, Monday 9/15/14 [Wallace Kornack ]
15 Sep Pelican banding, Adam I., Sept. 3 [Harry Armistead ]
15 Sep September 20, Dorchester County [Harry Armistead ]
14 Sep Over 4,000 BW Hawks at Cromwell Valley Park, Baltimore County [James Meyers ]
14 Sep Philly Vireo, Hughes mammals ["'Clive Harris' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
14 Sep [FR or WA] Hawk/snake encounter & BWHA [few] [JAMES SPEICHER ]
14 Sep Battle of Baltimore Bicentennial birds [Harry Armistead ]
14 Sep 280 Broad-wings! ["Peter Lev" ]
14 Sep Rock Creek Park, Sunday 9/14/14 [Wallace Kornack ]
14 Sep More from Battery Kemble, DC [Frank Hawkins ]
14 Sep 50+ Broad-winged Hawk kettle at Wheaton Regional ["'diane Ford' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
14 Sep Wheaton Regional Park today ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
14 Sep Acadian vs. Yellow-bellied Flycatcher ID article [Jim Moore ]
13 Sep Billingsley marsh, Prince George's county [David Mozurkewich ]
13 Sep Accidental Bird Study Sounds Alarm About Common Unseen Radiation [Kurt Schwarz ]
13 Sep Fruitless Talbot and Dorchester Rarity Search, Good Action at Eastern Neck [Kurt Schwarz ]
13 Sep Buff-breasted Sandpipers-Dorchester Co [Gerry Hawkins ]
13 Sep Re: Graham Area, Gunpowder FSP [Lynne Parks ]
13 Sep Re: Red-headed Woodpecker at Cromwell Valley Park 9/13/2014 [Tim Carney ]
13 Sep Re: Re: 9/11/2001 ["'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
13 Sep Graham Area, Gunpowder FSP [Lynne Parks ]
13 Sep Re: yellow-crowned night-heron ["'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
13 Sep Rock Creek Park, Saturday 9/13/14 [Wallace Kornack ]
13 Sep Wheaton Regional Park today ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
13 Sep Brewster's Warbler, Battery Kemble, DC [Frank Hawkins ]
13 Sep Re: Sandhill Crane and 268 Raptors at Cromwell VP Baltimore Co. [Warblerick ]
13 Sep Red-headed Woodpecker at Cromwell Valley Park 9/13/2014 [Tim Carney ]
13 Sep Yellow Warblers - DC ["'Jason DC' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
13 Sep Eastern Shore 9/12 [Richard Edden ]
12 Sep Shiloh Turf Farm, Dorchester, Friday Evening ["JCDLMARTIN via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
12 Sep Sandhill Crane and 268 Raptors at Cromwell VP Baltimore Co. [James Meyers ]
12 Sep 7 marbled godwits at skimmer right now... [Richard Edden ]
12 Sep Cromwell, 16 warblers, good day, 9/12/14 [Tim Houghton ]
12 Sep Whiskered Tern at Cape May - watch out in MD? [Phil Davis ]
12 Sep Rock Creek Park, Friday 9/12/14 [Wallace Kornack ]
12 Sep Wheaton Regional Park today ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
12 Sep Yough reservoir - sanderling [David Powell ]
12 Sep Eastern Shore on behalf of Richard Edden [Tim Carney ]
12 Sep CVP []
11 Sep Re: Re: 9/11/2001 [JAMES SPEICHER ]
11 Sep Olive-sided flycatcher? At Wheaton Regional Park (MoCo) this afternoon [Ann Hobbs ]
12 Sep Re: Re: 9/11/2001 [MARCIA ]
11 Sep Rock Creek Park, Thursday 9/11/14 [Wallace Kornack ]
11 Sep 9/11/2001 memories ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
11 Sep Re: Kevin Graff Out of area []
11 Sep Kevin Graff Out of area ["Jim Wilson" ]
11 Sep First record of Rufous Hummingbird for Somerset Co. ["'Bill Hubick' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
11 Sep Ongoing Bird Survey JBWS Sept 11 [Karen Caruso ]

Subject: Western Kingbird at Swan Harbor Farm
From: Matt Hafner <hafner.matt AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:55:53 -0400
Josh Emm reports a Western Kingbird at Swan Harbor Farm near Havre de Grace! On 
the power lines along the entrance road. 


Great find!

Matt Hafner 
Forest Hill, MD

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Subject: Wheaton Regional Park today
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 16:43:23 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all, 

Not too many neotropical migrants but the day started early with an influx of 
Red-eyed Vireos near the Shorefield parking lot which contained a nice 
PHILADELPHIA VIREO and a Warbling Vireo; they were bathing in the wet leaves of 
the small birches along the lot. Rather quiet after that until we ran into a 
few warblers near Pine Lake; one was a surprise, a Kentucky Warbler which alas 
managed to fade away, although later another birder also saw it briefly. A 
flurry of activity at about 9:00 brought the warbler species total to 11 and 
later, Rae and Woody Dubois added a Nashville so 12 species for the day. 
Nothing in any number save Yellowthroats and Magnolias, however. Lots of 
Catbirds, a fly-over flock of Cedar Waxwings, and a FOS Indigo Bunting for us 
at Brookside Nature Ctr. -- Rae and Woody also had a single low Broadwing as 
they were leaving the parking area. 


Gail Mackiernan and Barry Cooper 
Colesville, MD 

52 species (+1 other taxa) 
Birds of interest 

Wood Duck 4 
Great Blue Heron 1 
Green Heron 1 
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 flushed off ground, had some small prey item 
Red-shouldered Hawk 1 heard only 
Chimney Swift 3 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 4 2  AT  Brookside in jewelweed 
Hairy Woodpecker 1 female 
Northern Flicker 12 
Eastern Wood-Pewee 5 
Acadian Flycatcher 1 Brookside 
Empidonax sp. 1 Brookside, looked most like Traill's but not well-seen 
Warbling Vireo 1 
Philadelphia Vireo 1 
Red-eyed Vireo 12 
Blue Jay 20 
House Wren 3 
Carolina Wren 5 
Gray Catbird 20 estimate; good numbers both in WRP and Brookside 
Brown Thrasher 1 
Cedar Waxwing 12 early fly-over flock 
Black-and-white Warbler 4 
Kentucky Warbler 1 foraging near Pine Lake; 
Common Yellowthroat 10 2  AT  Brookside 
American Redstart 4 
Northern Parula 3 
Magnolia Warbler 12 4  AT  Brookside 
Blackburnian Warbler 1 dull HY bird 
Chestnut-sided Warbler 5 one  AT  Brookside 
Blackpoll Warbler 1 
Black-throated Blue Warbler 1 female 
Black-throated Green Warbler 2 
Eastern Towhee 2 
Chipping Sparrow 1 (where are they this year?) 
Scarlet Tanager 2 in picnic area as we were leaving 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1 fly-over, calling 
Indigo Bunting 1 immature 

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Wednesday 9/17/14
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 11:30:35 -0400
This morning (9/17) at Rock Creek Park maintenance yard.....

Fellow birders identified 14 warbler species.  

Of particular note: Yellow-throated Vireo, Bay-breasted Warbler, Blackpoll 
Warbler 


Ovenbird     2
Black-and-white Warbler     4
Tennessee Warbler  
Common Yellowthroat     7
American Redstart     5
Cape May Warbler     7
Northern Parula     2
Magnolia Warbler     13
Bay-breasted Warbler  
Chestnut-sided Warbler     3
Blackpoll Warbler  
Black-throated Blue Warbler     8
Black-throated Green Warbler     3
Canada Warbler     2
Chimney Swift     50++
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 
Belted Kingfisher    FOS  flyby 
Red-bellied Woodpecker     6
Downy Woodpecker     7
Hairy Woodpecker  
Northern Flicker     2
Pileated Woodpecker     2
Yellow-throated Vireo  
Red-eyed Vireo     6
Blue Jay     3
Carolina Chickadee     12
Tufted Titmouse     3
House Wren  
Carolina Wren     2
American Robin     4
Gray Catbird  
Brown Thrasher  
Scarlet Tanager     2
Northern Cardinal     3
Rose-breasted Grosbeak     2
Indigo Bunting  
Common Grackle     100+
American Goldfinch  

Fellow Birders: Bill Butler, Greg Gough, Jeff Shenot, Paul DeAnna, Dan Eberly, 
Leon Kass, Marjorie Rachlin, Jim Lemert, John Williamson, Kathryn Kratzer, Joan 
Moyers, Amy Roberts 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington DC

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Subject: Kent County Fall Count 21 Sept
From: Walter Ellison <rossgull61 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:59:32 -0400
Hi All,

Where does the time go? On Sunday (21 Sept) we will be conducting the
county-wide Kent County Fall Count under the auspices of the Maryland
Ornithological Society (MOS). In essence the count is similar in practice
to a Christmas Bird Count (CBC) as observers attempt to count all birds of
all species in an assigned territory in the county (unlike a more limited
CBC-circle, we use the whole county) keeping track of hours and miles on
foot and by car (like a CBC). We have lots of territory available for
interested observers.  In past years Fall Count tallies have generally
exceeded 110 species ranging up to over 120. Please contact us at home via
e-mail or phone if you want to take a territory or join a preexisting team.
Walter's *e-mail* is rossgull61  gmail.com and our home phone is
410-778-9568. The weather is looking good for Sunday, clear with
temperatures ranging from the low 60s to mid 80s, with moderate
southwesterly winds.

Good birding,

Walter Ellison & Nancy Martin

23460 Clarissa Rd
Chestertown, MD 21620

-- 
Observing Nature is like unwrapping a big pile of presents every time you
take a walk

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Subject: Hart-Miller Island, 09/15/14
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:42:15 -0400
09/15/14 – 710am-3pm

Hart-Miller Island, Baltimore Co., MD



WEATHER: MC/Fair, 55-71 degrees, calm- SE 4K

OBSERVERS: Kevin Graff, Bob Ringler



Canada Goose – 50

Wood Duck – 20

Gadwall – 2 (pair)

American Black Duck – 7

Mallard – 97

Blue-winged Teal – 35

Northern Shoveler – 18

Green-winged Teal – 29

Pied-billed Grebe – 2

Double-crested Cormorant – 85

Great Blue Heron – 8

Osprey – 1

Bald Eagle – 1 (immature)

Northern Harrier – 1

Merlin – 1

Peregrine Falcon – 1

American Coot – 11

Black-bellied Plover – 14

*AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVER – 1

Semipalmated Plover – 28

Killdeer – 3

Spotted Sandpiper – 2

Greater Yellowlegs – 4

Lesser Yellowlegs – 38

*WHIMBREL – 2

*MARBLED GODWIT – 1

*RUDDY TURNSTONE – 1

*SANDERLING – 4

Semipalmated Sandpiper – 95

Least Sandpiper – 8

*WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER – 5

Peep sp – 3

*BAIRD'S SANDPIPER – 1 (juvenile)

Pectoral Sandpiper – 9

Large shorebird sp – 1

*STILT SANDPIPER – 4

Short-billed Dowitcher – 9

Laughing Gull – 15

Ring-billed Gull – 31

Herring Gull – 8

*LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL – 1 (3rd W)

Great Black-backed Gull – 25

Caspian Tern – 288

*ROYAL TERN – 1 (Bob only)

Mourning Dove – 23

Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 1

Chimney Swift – 198

Ruby-throated Hummingbird – 1

Downy Woodpecker – 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee – 2

Acadian Flycatcher – 1

*WILLOW FLYCATCHER – 1 (late, excellent look)

Traill’s Flycatcher – 3 (same area with Willow)

Empidonax Sp – 1

Red-eyed Vireo – 3

Tree Swallow – 513

Bank Swallow – 3

Barn Swallow – 63

Carolina Chickadee – 1

Carolina Wren – 7

Marsh Wren – 1

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 1

Swainson’s Thrush – 1

Gray Catbird – 9

European Starling – 976

Black-and-white Warbler – 2

Tennessee Warbler – 1

Common Yellowthroat – 21

American Redstart – 3

Northern Parula – 1

Magnolia Warbler – 3

Yellow Warbler – 3

Black-throated Blue Warbler – 2

Palm Warbler – 1 (western)

*YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER – 1

Black-throated Green Warbler – 1

Northern Cardinal – 11

Blue Grosbeak – 1

Indigo Bunting – 6

Bobolink – 55

Red-winged Blackbird – 149

Brown-headed Cowbird – 18

House Finch – 1

American Goldfinch – 19

SPECIES: 80      INDIVIDUALS: 3080



MAMMALS

Red Fox – 4


AMPHIBIANS

Fowler's Toad - 1


BUTTERFLIES

Black Swallowtail – 1

Cabbage White – 5

Orange Sulphur – 33

Clouded/Orange Sulphur – 1 (female white form)

Gray Hairstreak – 1

Eastern Tailed Blue – 1

Painted Lady – 2

Common Buckeye – 5

Pearl Crescent – 40

Monarch – 42

Zabulon Skipper – 2

Silver-spotted Skipper – 1



MOTHS

Milkweed Tussock Moth – 4 (caterpillars)

Virginian Tiger Moth – 1 (Yellow Bear – beige)


    Kevin Graff
    Jarrettsville, MD
    KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Lincoln's Sparrow at Hughes Hollow
From: Jim Green <jkgbirdman53 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 08:26:16 -0400
  Also Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Magnolia, Black-throated Green   and
Chestnut-sided Warblers...(Montgomery County)...3 Great Egrets also.

Jim Green
Gaithersburg MD

work in moderation, BIRD IN EXCESS  !!!

Sent from my Windows Phone

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Subject: Nighthawk show-Perryman Park (Harford Co.)
From: Mark Johnson <mj3151 AT outlook.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 21:39:51 -0400
This evening I walked the loop around the impoundment at Perryman Park and was 
treated to a spectacular show put on by 15-20 Common Nighthawks feeding over 
the impoundment and surrounding fields. A single bird flew over at 6:29 PM, 
then at 6:45, four more flew in low and started looping and diving over the 
impoundment. More arrived soon thereafter and my high count was 15 in view at 
once, but the total number was probably higher. The show went on continuously 
from 6:45 until 7:05 PM when they gradually moved off over the fields. The best 
place to watch was up on the track...walk up the ramp and turn left...anywhere 
close to the ramp was a good central location. They tended to stay more to the 
brushy side than the wet side of the impoundment. I hadn't seen that many 
nighthawks together since I was a kid, when they used to gather over the 
schoolyard behind our house in Baltimore Co. It was a beautiful night and a 
great show. 

 
Mark Johnson
Aberdeen, MD
 		 	   		  

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Subject: Connecticut Warbler Rock Creek Park Maintenance Yard 3:45 pm
From: Judy Bromley <jlbromley AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 15:04:22 -0700 (PDT)
The Maintenance Yard was eerily quiet until I flushed up a bird on the eastern 
edge of the woods. It flew up to a horizontal branch, 8 feet in front of me and 
proceeded to walk back and forth as if on a fashion show runway. Nice eye ring, 
brownish head and throat, dull or light yellow all the way to the undertail 
coverts, light colored legs. Wished I had someone else there to share this 
gorgeous view of Connecticut Warbler. 


Hope it stays the night to greet tomorrow's dawn birders.

Judy Bromley
Bethesda, MD

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Subject: RFI -- Garganey at Chincoteague May 1992
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 20:28:56 +0000 (UTC)
Hi -- 

The Virginia Records Committee is re-opening the 1992 Garganey report from 
Chincoteague, VA. The drake bird was found by Barry Cooper and viewed by a lot 
of birders who were at the refuge to see a Little Egret, present at the same 
time in the same area. The following message was sent to VABirds by VARCOM 
Secretary, Wendy Ealding, and she asked that we post to MDBirding, since we 
know a number of Marylanders also saw this bird. 


Gail Mackiernan and Barry Cooper 
Colesville, MD 

Here's Wendy's message: 

From: Wendy Ealding < wendy.ealding AT gmail.com> 

Subject: RFI - Garganey at Chincoteague in May 1992 

VARCOM is trying to track down any information, particularly any field notes or 
photos, of the Garganey that was reported from Chincoteague in 

May 1992. Although this is a long time ago, it's likely that many birders were 
visiting around that time to see the Little Egret, (I was one of them, although 
I 

wasn't aware of the Garganey). So, if you are one of those people who have any 
information on the Garganey,please contact me off the list-serv. 


Wendy Ealding 
VARCOM Secretary 

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Subject: Re: [eBird Alert] Needs Alert for Maryland
From: "'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 12:49:34 -0700
Hopefully nobody ran out to jump in the car for this! I invalidated it as 
Location - Imprecise and asked the observer to fix the location. One can always 
hope, though! 


 
Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland


----- Original Message -----
From: "ebird-alert AT cornell.edu" 
To: jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
Cc: 
Sent: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 3:44 PM
Subject: [eBird Alert] Needs Alert for Maryland 

*** Species Summary:

Whiskered Tern (1 Baltimore)

---------------------------------------------

Whiskered Tern (Chlidonias hybrida) (1)
- Reported Sep 16, 2014 12:00 by Warren Cairo
- cape may point state park, Baltimore, Maryland
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=39.364555,-76.661025&ll=39.364555,-76.661025 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19851213
- Comments: "Seen flying over Bunker pond with a Black Tern"

***********

You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Needs Alert for 
Maryland 


Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
http://ebird.org/ebird/alerts

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Subject: Connecticut Warbler
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 15:29:57 -0400
Immature Connecticut Warbler refound by a couple of birders pass box 11 at
Cromwell Valley Park.   I had one early yesterday at the MES boat dock
(private).  They're started to arrive.


    Kevin Graff
    Jarrettsville, MD
    KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Poplar Island, Sept 16
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 10:53:11 -0700 (PDT)
Knapps Narrows Marina, Talbot, US-MD
Sep 16, 2014 9:00 AM - 9:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
5.0 mile(s)
10 species

Mallard  15
Double-crested Cormorant  4
Great Blue Heron  5
Snowy Egret  1
Green Heron  1
Turkey Vulture  9
Osprey  5
Bald Eagle  1
Laughing Gull  15
Forster's Tern  1



Poplar Island, Talbot, US-MD
Sep 16, 2014 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
5.0 mile(s)
34 species

Canada Goose  2
American Black Duck  10
Mallard  300     estimate
Blue-winged Teal  6
Northern Shoveler  20
Northern Pintail  9
Green-winged Teal  45     Estimate
Surf Scoter  2     Continuing
Ruddy Duck  65     Estimate
Double-crested Cormorant  75     Estimate
Great Blue Heron  6
Great Egret  6
Snowy Egret  12
Cattle Egret  5
Osprey  1
Bald Eagle  5
Virginia Rail  4     audible
Black-bellied Plover  5
Semipalmated Plover  3
Killdeer  30     close estimate
Spotted Sandpiper  2
Greater Yellowlegs  3
Lesser Yellowlegs  1
Sanderling  1
Least Sandpiper  25     estimate
Semipalmated Sandpiper  100     estimate
Short-billed Dowitcher  6
Laughing Gull  200
Ring-billed Gull  6
Herring Gull  40
Great Black-backed Gull  15
Forster's Tern  1
Red-winged Blackbird  200
Brown-headed Cowbird  100

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Subject: Fwd: DC Area, 9/16/14
From: lydiaschindler AT verizon.net
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 11:00:09 -0500 (CDT)




Subject: Wheaton Regional Park today
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 15:58:41 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all, 

Scattered clouds at first, sun soon breaking through. Lots of very early 
diurnal activity (e.g. 11 Flickers feeding together on the lawn and a fly-over 
group of calling Rose-breasted Grosbeaks) but it then got rather quiet. About 8 
AM we ran into a small mixed flock near Pine Lake which included the only BT 
Blue of the day. After this faded away, it was *very* quiet again until 
another, larger flock materialized at the edge of the big field -- this 
provided more excitement with FOS Nashville, at least one bright Canada, 
White-eyed Vireo (singing) and other species. Ended up with 10 species of 
warbler which is not too shabby. After it too faded, and as the breeze got up, 
we went over to Brookside Gardens for about 30 minutes, only adding a few more 
of the common species (e.g. Redstart, Yellowthroat). However as we were 
leaving, we saw a small "kettle" in the sky quite high - 1 Black V., 2 Turkey 
V.s and 1 Broadwing together. 


Gail Mackiernan and Barry Cooper 
Colesville, MD 

Wheaton Regional Park and Brookside Gardens, Montgomery, US-MD 
54 species 

Canada Goose 12 fly-over  AT  Gardens 
Wood Duck 2 
Great Blue Heron 1 
Black Vulture 1 
Turkey Vulture 3 
Cooper's Hawk 1 being mobbed by Fish Crows along Shorefield Rd. 
Red-shouldered Hawk 1 heard only 
Broad-winged Hawk 1 in small group high up, with Black and Turkey Vultures, 
seen as leaving gardens 

Chimney Swift 2 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 4 
Belted Kingfisher 1 
Hairy Woodpecker 1 heard only 
Northern Flicker 20 estimate; had 11 together feeding on ground near carousel 
first thing, then others here and there throughout morning 

Pileated Woodpecker 1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee 4 
Great Crested Flycatcher 1 
White-eyed Vireo 1 immature (dark eye) but singing 
Red-eyed Vireo 15 
Blue Jay 15 estimate; obvious and vocal but not as many as previous days 
House Wren 4 
Veery 1 
American Robin 25 estimate 
Gray Catbird 20 estimate; good numbers in Gardens 
Brown Thrasher 2 
Black-and-white Warbler 5 
Nashville Warbler 1 FOS 
Common Yellowthroat 10 exact count; 3 were adult males 
American Redstart 7 
Northern Parula 3 
Magnolia Warbler 5 
Chestnut-sided Warbler 5 
Black-throated Blue Warbler 1 
Black-throated Green Warbler 3 
Canada Warbler 1 may have been two 
Eastern Towhee 2 
Scarlet Tanager 1 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 4 3 early, in fly-over, calling group; 1 in Gardens 

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Subject: Masonville 9/16/2014
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 08:19:52 -0700 (PDT)
Conducted my second census of the month at Masonville this morning. I was 
really hoping for some kind of mixed migrant flock, but it wasn't meant to be. 
Strangely quiet throughout, with no non-Killdeer shorebirds and no raptors. 


Highlights included a juvenile YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON roosting in trees 
along the DMCF with three Black-crowned NHs, the continuing GADWALL hen with a 
broken wing which successfully oversummered in the DMCF, and an adult male 
BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER in the campus area. 


Full list: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19848482

Tim Carney
Canton, MD

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Tuesday 9/16/14
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 10:56:43 -0400
This morning (9/16) at Rock Creek Park....

Birds of the Day:  Prairie Warbler and Red-headed Woodpecker

Fellow Birders identified 10 Warbler Species: Cape May, Canada, Redstart, 
Yellowthroat, Magnolia, Chestnut-sided, Blackpoll, Black-throated Blue, 
Black-throated Green, Prairie 


----Ridge   (Greg)
Cape May Warbler  
Eastern Wood-Pewee

----Yard Parking Lot  (Greg)
Canada Warbler
American Redstart

-----Maintenance Yard
Common Yellowthroat  
American Redstart     2
Cape May Warbler     4
Magnolia Warbler     2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  
Blackpoll Warbler     (Jim)
Black-throated Blue Warbler     3
Black-throated Green Warbler     (Stephen)
Red-shouldered Hawk     heard
Common Nighthawk     2
Chimney Swift     40+
Ruby-throated Hummingbird     2
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER   FOS  flyby  (Greg, Marina)
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Hairy Woodpecker  
Northern Flicker  
Pileated Woodpecker     2
Great Crested Flycatcher     3
Red-eyed Vireo     3
Blue Jay     2
Carolina Chickadee     5
White-breasted Nuthatch  
House Wren  
Carolina Wren     2
American Robin     5
Gray Catbird     2
Scarlet Tanager     2
Rose-breasted Grosbeak     3
Common Grackle  
Baltimore Oriole     2
House Sparrow  

----Dog Run   (Greg)
PRAIRIE WARBLER
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Swainson's Thrush   

Fellow Birders: Greg Gough, Gerry Hawkins, Bill Butler, Leon Kass, Susan 
Volman, Mardi Hastings, Marina True, Dan Eberly, Jim Lemert, Ed Lyon, Hanan 
Jacobi, Stephen Jones 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC

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Subject: Warbler ID
From: "pvaldata1 AT gmail.com" <pvaldata1@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 10:43:10 -0400
In Meadow Park, Elkton, saw warbler at a distance, yellow breast, greenish 
back, darker wings, acting like flycatcher and black and white warbler. Anyone 
know what it might be? Also had palm warbler, many squabbling empids, nine 
killdeer, many juvenile bluebirds. All from parking area by westernwoods 
pavilion. 


Pat Valdata
Elkton, MD

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Subject: Connecticut warbler at Cromwell Valley Park
From: Andy Beiderman <aandyy AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 06:51:48 -0700 (PDT)
Just past box 11 on way to 12 on fence side in tangle. Last seen at 9:15 and 
unable to relocate. Crappy pics but can see chunky shape and long undertail 
coverts. 


Andy Beiderman
Baltimore, MD

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Subject: Turkey Pt Hawk Watch Tuesday
From: "pvaldata1 AT gmail.com" <pvaldata1@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 22:15:52 -0400
If anyone goes to Turkey Point tomorrow, can you please send me a report of 
your sightings? We have no one scheduled, and Broadwings are moving through. 
Would be very grateful. 

Pat

Pat Valdata
Elkton, MD

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Subject: Re: Montgomery Bird Club program this Wednesday
From: "David L. Crooks" <davidlcrooks AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 21:47:31 -0400
Sorry for being tardy, but I took these photos at Hughes Hollow on
September 6th.  I would like to get some confirmation as I had not seen
these birds mentioned recently and the folks that did ID were not sure:

Magnolia Warbler
https://flic.kr/p/oT2nrG

Eastern Wood Pewee
https://flic.kr/p/oTPMDB

Thanks!

David L. Crooks



On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 7:16 PM, Anna Urciolo  wrote:

>  Come join the Montgomery Bird Club for its first program of the season:
>
>
> This Wednesday, September 17 - 7:30 p.m. *Birds and Other Wildlife in
> Botswana and Zimbabwe.* Suzanne Dater will present a slide show of the
> landscape, birds, mammals, and reptiles of southern Africa. The region
> covered is in the Botswana’s Okavango Delta and the Chobe River and
> Zimbabwe and Victoria Falls. Many of these animals are threatened by
> poaching and by years of drought that have changed the landscape. The
> national parks and reserves play a paramount role in conserving wildlife.
> Come see the striking interaction among animals and the pounding waters of
> Victoria Falls.
>
> Our meetings are held at the Potomac Presbyterian Church, 10301 River Road
> in Potomac, Maryland.  Doors open at 7:00 p.m., refreshments 7:30 and
> meeting starts at 8:00 p.m.
>
> All are welcome.
>
> Anna Urciolo
> Rockville, MD
>
>
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-- 
David L. Crooks

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Subject: Montgomery Bird Club program this Wednesday
From: Anna Urciolo <urcioloa AT sidwell.edu>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 23:16:51 +0000
Come join the Montgomery Bird Club for its first program of the season:



This Wednesday, September 17 - 7:30 p.m. Birds and Other Wildlife in Botswana 
and Zimbabwe. Suzanne Dater will present a slide show of the landscape, birds, 
mammals, and reptiles of southern Africa. The region covered is in the 
Botswana's Okavango Delta and the Chobe River and Zimbabwe and Victoria Falls. 
Many of these animals are threatened by poaching and by years of drought that 
have changed the landscape. The national parks and reserves play a paramount 
role in conserving wildlife. Come see the striking interaction among animals 
and the pounding waters of Victoria Falls. 


Our meetings are held at the Potomac Presbyterian Church, 10301 River Road in 
Potomac, Maryland. Doors open at 7:00 p.m., refreshments 7:30 and meeting 
starts at 8:00 p.m. 


All are welcome.

Anna Urciolo
Rockville, MD

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Subject: Black Marsh 9/15/2014
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:12:18 -0700 (PDT)
Spent a very pleasant evening at Black Marsh. I was hoping for some kind of 
bittern or rail; no luck there, but the wave of warblers more than made up for 
it. Just inside the woods from the parking lot was a small flock comprised of 
Magnolias, a Redstart, an Ovenbird, and a Rose-breasted Grosbeak which was at 
waist-level in a tangle. A Veery was standing on the path as I walked out to 
the wetland. 


Not much out in the water, but I saw some small birds flying around the eastern 
edge of the causeway so I went to investigate. From a distance, I figured they 
were titmice, or maybe pewees, but they were actually warblers. The first bird 
to pop up was a Cape May, followed by an adult male Canada. Several more 
expected species joined in, and then I saw a Blackburnian, a Black-throated 
Green, two Chestnut-sideds, and a Bay-breasted make appearances. 


I walked out past the powerhouse and to the shoreline, where I saw a 
Blackburnian and a Cape May (probably the same two from earlier) on the same 
limb, just sitting there, picking at whatever was hidden in the bark. I saw 
this before in Cape May, NJ at the "magic trees" (Siberian elm maybe?). On the 
way back, I found a Blue Grosbeak and my FOS Palm Warblers (Westerns). 


eBird list: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19844047

Tim Carney
Canton, MD

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Subject: Re: Out-Of-Area, albino hummer in VA?
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:27:38 -0400
As a quick search of the interweb shows, these images were taken in August
2011. Very cool, but old news.

Hugh

On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 5:17 PM, Tim Houghton  wrote:

>  Thought these photos of an albino ruby-throated might be interesting.
> Taken, I was told, at a park in Staunton, VA. "Fifteen-year-old
> photographer Marlin Shank was fortunate enough to capture several images
> of a rare albino ruby-throated hummingbird while in a park in Staunton,
> Va."
>
>  Hope the information is accurate.
>
>  TH
>
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-- 
Hugh McGuinness
Washington, D.C.

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Subject: Out-Of-Area, albino hummer in VA?
From: Tim Houghton <thoughton AT loyola.edu>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 21:17:58 +0000
Thought these photos of an albino ruby-throated might be interesting. Taken, I 
was told, at a park in Staunton, VA. "Fifteen-year-old photographer Marlin 
Shank was fortunate enough to capture several images of a rare albino 
ruby-throated hummingbird while in a park in Staunton, Va." 


Hope the information is accurate.

TH

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Subject: Ho Co (Grasshopper Sparrow +)
From: "Bonnie Ott" <Bonnieott AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 15:28:16 -0400
Was out searching fields in Western Howard County and most notable was a 
Grasshopper Sparrow. I never found them breeding in my regular areas and this 
was the first I’ve seen since spring. 

My first Green-winged teal of the year and the 400 Broad-wings I counted were a 
pittance. (I didn’t look up much). 


The Grasshopper was a young bird and still had streaks..... 
https://flic.kr/p/peygbh 


Mallard  12
Green-winged Teal  2
Double-crested Cormorant  1
Great Blue Heron  1
Great Egret  1
Green Heron  2
Black Vulture  4
Turkey Vulture  8
Osprey  1
Broad-winged Hawk  400
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Killdeer  8
Spotted Sandpiper  1
Solitary Sandpiper  2
Least Sandpiper  1
Mourning Dove  4
Chimney Swift  22
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Downy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  3
Empidonax sp.  4
Eastern Phoebe  2
Eastern Kingbird  1
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  6
Tree Swallow  12
Barn Swallow  4
Carolina Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  4
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
House Wren  2
Carolina Wren  1
Eastern Bluebird  4
Gray Catbird  6
Northern Mockingbird  5
European Starling  18
Cedar Waxwing  5
Common Yellowthroat  8
Yellow Warbler  1
Palm Warbler  6
Black-throated Green Warbler  1
Chipping Sparrow  7
Grasshopper Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  15
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  10
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Blue Grosbeak  2
Indigo Bunting  14
Bobolink  6
Red-winged Blackbird  9
House Finch  2
House Sparrow  18

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Subject: Broadwinged Hawks et al on C&O Canal - Great Falls to Seneca
From: Lucy Uncu <unculp AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 15:30:51 -0400
This morning following Don Sweig's post yesterday, I headed out to Great
Falls Tavern (MD side) to see if the Broadwings would appear.  Don was
there and between us we probably saw 20 Broadwings along with tons of
Chimney Swifts (I can't even guess how many but certainly hundreds) between
9:30 and 10:15.  I then headed off by bike upstream and saw nothing very
special:

20 or so Woodduck
5 Great Egret
6 Great Blue Heron
4 Green Heron
4 Bluebirds
1 Hairy Woodpecker
8 DC Cormorant
plus the usual chickadees, titmice and cardinals

Lucy Uncu
Falls Church

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Subject: Cromwell
From: Tim Houghton <thoughton AT loyola.edu>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 19:01:49 +0000
Blue-Headed Vireo (1)
Palm Warbler (3)

The usual stuff beyond that, a few pockets. Notable things: Rose-Breasted 
Grosbeak (5), Wilson's Warbler (5+), and very large numbers of cedar waxings. 
Many Warbling Vireos, too. I was standing so still while watching the 
Blue-Headed that some waxwings were flycatching near my head. 


Tim Houghton
(Glen Arm)

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Subject: Wheaton Regional Park today
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:14:39 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all, 

Beautiful morning, but after some brief early activity, not too much to show 
for our efforts -- there had obviously been an influx of Yellowthroats and 
Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, but most other migrants were in relatively low 
numbers. Best birds were a very briefly seen adult Cape May and a somewhat late 
adult male Canada Warbler but otherwise, no real excitement. One Broadwing came 
up out of the woods (another seen by other birders) but today no kettles aloft. 
We went into Brookside Gardens from the Nature Ctr. end and picked up a few 
more of the "usual suspects" but nothing new. 


Oh well, lots of autumn left! 

Gail Mackiernan and Barry Cooper 
Colesville, MD 

44 species 
Birds of interest: 

Wood Duck 3 
Mallard 2 
Great Blue Heron 2 
Green Heron 1 
Red-shouldered Hawk 1 
Broad-winged Hawk 1 seemed to have just come out from woods and starting to 
soar up. 

Chimney Swift 2 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 4 
Belted Kingfisher 1 
Northern Flicker 8 
Pileated Woodpecker 1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee 3 including adult feeding large fledged young 
White-eyed Vireo 1 
Red-eyed Vireo 12 
Blue Jay 20 estimate 
House Wren 3 
American Robin 50 estimate; several large fly-over flocks early 
Gray Catbird 18 increase since yesterday; a number in Gardens 
Brown Thrasher 3 one in Gardens 
Black-and-white Warbler 2 
Common Yellowthroat 8 
American Redstart 9 3 in Gardens 
Cape May Warbler 1 adult male 
Magnolia Warbler 12 several in Gardens 
Chestnut-sided Warbler 4 
Canada Warbler 1 adult male by Pine Lake 
Eastern Towhee 2 
Scarlet Tanager 2 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 5 influx since yesterday 

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Monday 9/15/14
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 11:45:03 -0400
This morning (9/15) at Rock Creek Park.....

Birds of the Day:  Common Raven (FOS) and Palm Warbler (FOS)

Fellow birders identified 11 Warbler Species. Other birds of interest were 
Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Scarlet Tanager, Brown Thrasher and Rose-breasted 
Grosbeak. 


----Ridge   (Greg, Lemert)
Magnolia Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Common Yellowthroat

----Maintenance Yard
Black-and-white Warbler     4
Tennessee Warbler       (Tucker)
Common Yellowthroat     3
American Redstart     6
Cape May Warbler     6   (Greg)
Northern Parula      (Susan)
Magnolia Warbler     9
Chestnut-sided Warbler     2
Black-throated Blue Warbler     5
Palm Warbler     3    FOS
Black-throated Green Warbler      (Marina)
Yellow-billed Cuckoo       (Marina)
Chimney Swift       30++  flying very close to ground
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  
Red-bellied Woodpecker     3
Downy Woodpecker     2
Hairy Woodpecker  
Northern Flicker     3
Pileated Woodpecker     2
Eastern Wood-Pewee     3
Empidonax sp.     2
Great Crested Flycatcher     2
Red-eyed Vireo     9+
Blue Jay     2
American Crow     5
Carolina Chickadee     9
Tufted Titmouse     2
White-breasted Nuthatch  
House Wren     3
Carolina Wren  
Wood Thrush  
American Robin     18+
Gray Catbird     2
Brown Thrasher     4
Scarlet Tanager     7
Northern Cardinal     4
Rose-breasted Grosbeak     4
Common Grackle  
Baltimore Oriole     2

----Dog Run   (Greg)
Black-and-white Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Common Raven   FOS

Fellow Birders: Greg Gough, Martin Sneary, Tucker Skully, Lee Kimball, Marjorie 
Rachlin, Leon Kass, Susan Volman, Roberts, Joan Moyers, Dan Eberly, Marina 
True, Mat Cohen, + 








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Subject: Pelican banding, Adam I., Sept. 3
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 13:14:15 +0000


Thanks to John Weske for sending details about the banding of Brown Pelican 
chicks this past September 3 on Adam Island in Dorchester County, a trip 
organized by Dave Brinker. 100 were banded, about half of those there that were 
bandable. 25 of those were checked for avian flu and west nile virus by 
veterinarian Cindy Driscoll and an assistant of hers plus a vet from the 
Baltimore zoo. That is a time-consuming and labor intensive process, otherwise 
more would have been banded. This is the last hurrah for pelican banding this 
breeding season on the Bay. It isn't unusual for pelican chicks to still be in 
the nest this late. - Harry Armistead, Philadelphia. 


 		 	   		  

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Subject: September 20, Dorchester County
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 12:57:00 +0000
Pardon yet another Dorchester rant ... but if you just happen to be in 
Dorchester next Saturday, or passing through, please let me know what birds you 
see and I'll crank them in to the official fall count totals, after trying to 
eliminate any possible duplication with the folks counting there that day. 
Thanks. - Harry Armistead, Philadelphia. 

 		 	   		  

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Subject: Over 4,000 BW Hawks at Cromwell Valley Park, Baltimore County
From: James Meyers <jamesleomeyers AT mac.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 18:38:31 -0700 (PDT)
One of the most enjoyable days on record at Cromwell Valley Park today, Sunday 
Sept. 14th, as kettle after kettle, stream after stream of Broad-winged Hawks 
were seen throughout the day. A nice mix of sun and clouds with light NW winds 
made conditions very pleasant, as well as a great group of skilled observers 
and thrilled visitors that witnessed the flight! Perhaps as many as 30 or 40 
people on the hill at one time. Numerous kettles formed right over the watch 
site giving spectacular views. Nice mix of sun and clouds provided a good 
background to see the BWs even at great heights. More than a few of the 
visitors had never seen such a flight and were duly impressed!! 


Totals - Cromwell Valley Park HawkWatch - Sunday, Sept. 14th, 2014 - 8:00 AM to 
6:00 PM 

Some of the top hawk watchers in the Baltimore area were on hand to assist with 
the count…go to the website hawkcount.org for details 

 
Broadwings - 4,428

Sharpies - 47

Coops - 6

Osprey - 10

N.Harrier - 5

B. Eagle - 9

Kestrel - 9

Merlin - 1

Redtail - 3

Jim Meyers
Parkville MD

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Subject: Philly Vireo, Hughes mammals
From: "'Clive Harris' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 17:42:24 -0700
 As others noted a big push of Philadelphia Vireos today - I had a very bright 
one in a mixed flock of migrants near the entrance gate at Blue Mash late this 
afternoon. I then went over to Hughes Hollow (checked the Polo Grounds, nothing 
there - has anyone seen anything of interest there recently?) and had a few 
small flocks of commoner migrants, mostly B/T Green and Maggies. Highlight was 
an Eastern Striped Skunk that came lolloping down the main dyke - I was ahead 
of it and stepped onto the cross dyke to give it some room and got some great 
photos. This is becoming a good place for mammal sightings - 2 weeks back I had 
an American Mink dashing around just N of where the dykes meet. 

 
Good birding 
 
Clive Harris
Cabin John, MD
 

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Subject: [FR or WA] Hawk/snake encounter & BWHA [few]
From: JAMES SPEICHER <jugornought AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 20:09:26 -0400
Traveling on Monument Road which straddles the border between
Frederick [FR] and Washington [WA] counties, my sister and I were
stunned to observe a Red-tailed hawk fly across the road not 30 feet
ahead, grab a snake from the forest edge, wheel and disappear in the
direction it had come from initially, all in a span of seconds.  The
snake was in the forest rather than on the road and must have been
under observation by the hawk from a perch prior to the "snatch."  It
was quite a sight.  We continued to the WASH Monument SP hawk watch
site on what seemed an ideal day for migrating hawks.  However, in the
hour that we observed [1430 to 1530], we saw no more than 4
Broad-winged hawks and little else other than both vultures.

Jim Speicher
BroadRun/Burkittsville area
[FR] Frederick County

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Subject: Battle of Baltimore Bicentennial birds
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 21:39:50 +0000
Not much but fun to see something in the midst of the grandiose hoopla, highly 
regimented, lengthy tours, noise, and hobnobbing with relatives. Friday, 
September 12, George spots an immature Bald Eagle right over Fort McHenry while 
6 Blue Angels jets perform breathtaking and extremely loud maneuvers, often at 
low altitude, plus a Caspian Tern and 3 unidentified warblers.. Near the scene 
of the North Point battle site, Saturday, September 13 there's an adult Bald 
Eagle on top of a communication tower and George sees two other adults close 
by. In this same area, at Todd's Inheritance, there are 24 Cattle Egrets, 25 
Canada Geese, an immature Red-shouldered Hawk, and a Great Blue Heron with two 
distant Osprey nests visible. Back in the heart of Baltimore a Red-tailed Hawk 
is perched on a spire next to the big Synagogue as seen from the Maryland 
Museum of Military History. By the Inner Harbor at Federal Hill Park I see an 
Osprey low in flight plus a Chimney Swift in spite of the close presence of the 
6 Blue Angels jets again. Later in the afternoon 2 Black Vultures are right 
over Ft. McHenry, a Gray Squirrel runs on the grounds, and a few minutes after 
the end of the massive fireworks display we see a Great Blue Heron fly low 
through the smoke headed towards the city and Inner Harbor at 10:15 P.M. 
There's enough wind so that the "broad stripes and bright stars" of the huge 
30' X 42' flag are "so gallantly streaming". A very affecting experience this 
weekend, and well-attended by the National Emblem. Best to all. - George, Harry 
& Liz Armistead, Philadelphia. 

 		 	   		  

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Subject: 280 Broad-wings!
From: "Peter Lev" <plev AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 17:39:09 -0400
I was birding from 3:45-5:00 at the old rugby field (now a meadow) at the
north end of Robert E. Lee Park.  At 4:40 I put my binocs on 2 Turkey
Vultures just across the Light Rail tracks and was surprised to see a stream
of Broad-winged hawks behind them, flying fairly high.   I counted 235
Broad-wings  in one continuous group, some kettling, most just flying
southwest.  A few minutes after this group passed by I saw 45 more.  It's
possible but unlikely that some of the first group had circled back; it's
also possible that I missed the front end of the stream.  Anyway, a group
this size was a stunning experience.

 

2 comments:  1. This part of Robert E. Lee park is a few miles west and
slightly south of the hawkwatch at Cromwell Valley Park.  I wonder if many
of the hawks seen at Cromwell also pass by the north end of Robert E. Lee.

2. Migrating hawks rarely fly past 5:00, so the Broad-wings I saw should be
spending the night somewhere in the Baltimore area.  Be looking for them
tomorrow!

 

Peter Lev

Baltimore, MD

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Sunday 9/14/14
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 12:19:25 -0400
This morning (9/14) at Rock Creek Park.....

We had a fallout with some warblers in double figures. In all, fellow birders 
found 13 warbler species. The Cape May Warbler continues to astound--it is 
estimated that 12 to more than 20 Cape Mays were seen. In addition a rare Pine 
Warbler was found. Other highlights include a Philadelphia Vireo and a Warbling 
Vireo--both were seen at the Ridge--as well as a Gray-cheeked Thrush seen at 
the Nature Center.. 


----Ridge   (Greg)
Canada Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Northern Parula
Philadelphia Vireo
Warbling Vireo     rare
Great Crested Flycatcher
Baltimore Oriole

----Maintenance Yard
Black-and-white Warbler     4
Nashville Warbler  
Common Yellowthroat     4
American Redstart     10
Cape May Warbler     12 - 20   
Northern Parula     2
Magnolia Warbler     17
Blackburnian Warbler     2
Chestnut-sided Warbler     16
Blackpoll Warbler  
Black-throated Blue Warbler     10
Pine Warbler     rare
Canada Goose      flyby
Double-crested Cormorant     flyby
Laughing Gull    3    flyby
Barred Owl       yard parking lot
Chimney Swift     3
Ruby-throated Hummingbird     2
Red-bellied Woodpecker     3
Downy Woodpecker     2
Hairy Woodpecker     2
Northern Flicker     4
Pileated Woodpecker     2
Eastern Wood-Pewee     3
Great Crested Flycatcher     4
Red-eyed Vireo     20+
Blue Jay  
American Crow     3
Carolina Chickadee     10
Tufted Titmouse     3     yard parking lot
White-breasted Nuthatch  
Carolina Wren  
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher     3
Swainson's Thrush  
Wood Thrush  
Gray Catbird     2
Chipping Sparrow  
Scarlet Tanager     6
Northern Cardinal     5
Rose-breasted Grosbeak     3
Indigo Bunting     4
Common Grackle  
Baltimore Oriole  
American Goldfinch     4

----Nature Center   (Steve)
Gray-cheeked Thrush     FOS
Northern Flicker
American Robin     large flock
Northern Cardinal

Fellow Birders: Greg Gough, Steve Johnson, Bill Butler, Doug Gill, Martin 
Sneary, Holger Pflicke, Gerry Hawkins, Paul DeAnna, Kathryn Kratzer, Marjorie 
Rachlin, Lynn Rafferty, Tucker Scully, Lee Kimball, Judy Bromley, Julia 
Redmond, Michael Redmond, Susan Volman, Mardi Hastings, Gary Jones, Hanan 
Jacobi, Margaret, Hugh McGuinness, Jim Lemert, Gary and Kevin, Adam Parr, Dan 
Eberly, Lisa Shannon, Rob Hilton, Bill Young, David Sperling, Edith Gray, 
Michael Gill, Elda Banks, Fran, Nick Constantinople, ++ 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC








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Subject: More from Battery Kemble, DC
From: Frank Hawkins <a.f.a.hawkins AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 12:06:30 -0400
A very pleasant morning at Battery Kemble, NW DC this morning revealed two
Philadelphia Vireos (one very bright yellow underneath, the other a bit
duller) in the company of many Red-eyed, a Tennessee Warbler and a
Broad-winged hawk, but only three other species of warblers. Three Scarlet
Tanagers, three Baltimore Orioles and a Brown Thrasher otherwise.

Frank Hawkins, Washington DC.

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Subject: 50+ Broad-winged Hawk kettle at Wheaton Regional
From: "'diane Ford' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 08:42:50 -0700
Hi all,
 Birded the mini train track area for a short time with Gail M, Barry C. et al- 
I'm sure Gail will post a more complete list; everyone got on 

the Red-breasted Nuthatch on the pine near the tracks. Warblers seemed a little 
slow and thin in variety, mostly being a Red-eyed Vireo/Eastern Wood Peewee 
show. North end of Pine lake had a small flock of warblers: Tennessee, B&W, 
BTGW, AmRestart, CSW, 

Common Yellowthroat. Walking back, Bob Augustine spotted a nice kettle of 50+ 
Broad-winged Hawks steaming south/southeast. 


Looks like fall coming.

D.Ford/Bethesda, Md.

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Subject: Wheaton Regional Park today
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 15:41:47 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all, 

Lovely cold front, sunny morning but other trhan an early flight of Red-eyes 
and a few warblers, not much happened until about 8:30. From then on we had 
some action but not overwhelming, several nice FOS birds however. Bob Augustine 
found a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH foraging in a white pine, and we all watched it 
fly back and forth between the cones to a near-by locust, carrying a pine seed 
with it each time, for several minutes. Not sure if it was stashing them or 
just using the tree to crack the seeds. A couple of early morning Broadwings 
came up and later, Barry and I had two high kettles (one of 25+ birds and 
another of 7) over Brookside Gardens. Just 8 species of warbler, a bit 
disappointing, best being a HY Blackpoll, FOS for me. It got breezy and slowed 
down and we checked out the Nature Center and the closest bit of the Gardens 
without much to add other than the hawks and a few of the common warblers. 


Gail Mackiernan and Barry Cooper 
Colesville, MD 

Birds of interest: 

50 species (+2 other taxa) 

Wood Duck 4 
Great Blue Heron 1 
Green Heron 1 
Black Vulture 2 local juveniles flying near white house 
Cooper's Hawk 1 fly-over 
Red-shouldered Hawk 3 
Broad-winged Hawk 35 FOS; two singles early, then two kettles over Brookside of 
25+ and 7 birds about 10:30 AM 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird 3 
Belted Kingfisher 1 
Hairy Woodpecker 1 
Northern Flicker 8 
Pileated Woodpecker 1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee 3 
Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher) 1 
White-eyed Vireo 1 singing 
Red-eyed Vireo 25 9 early in one flock, then 2s and 3s throughout 
Blue Jay 20 estimate 
Red-breasted Nuthatch 1 FOS; found by Bob Augustine; foraging in white pine, 
then flying back and forth to locust to eat (or stash) pine seeds. 

House Wren 4 
Veery 1 
Wood Thrush 1 
Gray Catbird 12 
Brown Thrasher 2 
Black-and-white Warbler 8 
Common Yellowthroat 4 
American Redstart 9 
Magnolia Warbler 8 
Chestnut-sided Warbler 7 
Blackpoll Warbler 1 HY 
Black-throated Blue Warbler 1 
Black-throated Green Warbler 4 
Eastern Towhee 2 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1 

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Subject: Acadian vs. Yellow-bellied Flycatcher ID article
From: Jim Moore <epiphenomenon9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 10:23:22 -0400
Hello everyone,

In connection with the discussion of Yellow-bellied Flycatcher 
identification a week or so ago here, I wanted to post this link to a 
good and freely available pdf of a 1986 article from Birding magazine by 
Bret Whitney and Kenn Kaufman focusing onone of the ID challenges for 
our area: Yellow-bellied Flycatcher versus Acadian Flycatcher 
identification.  (There is also some discussion of "Western Flycatcher" 
(now split into Pacific-slope Flycatcher and Cordilleran Flycatcher), 
but that can be simply skipped over).  If anyone believes there are 
inaccuracies in this article, feel free to post.

The Empidonax Challenge: Part IV 

 


Kenn Kaufman's two Advanced Birding books (1990 and 2011) are also to be 
recommended on this topic, though they of course cover more species and 
are not free.

Good birding!
Jim Moore
Rockville, MD

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Subject: Billingsley marsh, Prince George's county
From: David Mozurkewich <mozurk AT bellAtlantic.net>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 20:00:17 -0400
This morning, I had the great pleasure of spending 3 hours birding the
marshes north of Jug Bay by boat with Greg Kearns and about 20 members
of the Patuxent chapter MOS and Prince George's Audubon.  We saw most
of the expected marsh birds.  Great Egrets, perhaps a dozen, outnumbered
the Great Blue and Green Herons.  No falcons today but nice views of
Bald eagles and Ospreys in about equal numbers and at least one
Harrier has returned for the winter.  A single flock of Canada Geese and
many small groups of Wood Ducks, totalling perhaps 50 to 100 were
probably local breeders gathering up into winter flocks but the Blue
and Green-winged Teal were newly-arrived migrants and the Mallards may
have been a mix of both.  And it's always enjoyable to watch the
Red-winged Blackbirds, descending on the wild rice by the thousands.

The tide was very high. This is normally a bad time to be out in the
marsh if you want to see rails; with no exposed mud, there is no decent
stage for a photo-op . Nevertheless, we got good, prolonged looks at a
handful of Soras where the matted-down wild rice provided both a
surface where the rails could walk and a clear enough line of sight for
us to see them.  It is always a treat to see these shy, pretty birds.
Least Bitterns nest in in good numbers.  We didn't find any today but
while admiring the Soras, an AMERICAN BITTERN spooked from nearby
giving us to a prolonged view of it flying low over the marsh toward
the Western Branch.

Alone, that would have been a good trip but today was for the ears, not
the eyes.  The Soras were calling.  On and on.  Some chucks and clicks
but also their lovely whistles and whinnies.  Overlapping each other.
A continuous chorus, calling non-stop from all directions.   I have
never heard anything like it and see no reason to doubt Greg's claim
that there were over ONE HUNDRED SORAS vocalizing.

By the mid-90's Greg had banded 5000 Soras along the Patuxent River.
Then the population crashed.  Greg discovered that these rails are
dependent on the wild rice which, due to browsing by resident Canada
Geese, nearly disappeared by the late '90s.  He began harvesting seeds,
replanting the rice, developed techniques for protecting the rice from
summering geese and began programs for managing the resident goose
population.  The result is a spectacular success story.  The rice is
back to its 1980's level and now the wildlife dependent on the rice is
also returning.  We should all thank Greg for his relentless efforts.

David Mozurkewich
Seabrook MD

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Subject: Accidental Bird Study Sounds Alarm About Common Unseen Radiation
From: Kurt Schwarz <krschwa1 AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 19:06:24 -0400
For the first time, scientists have revealed that average levels of
electromagnetic noise, or "electrosmog," completely disrupt the magnetic
compass of migratory robins. This is true even when the electromagnetic
signal levels are just 1/1000th of the limit the World Health Organization
(WHO) defines as harmless.

For the full article see http://preview.tinyurl.com/npbjel9

Kurt Schwarz
Conservation Chair
Maryland Ornithological Society
goawaybird at verizon dot net


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Subject: Fruitless Talbot and Dorchester Rarity Search, Good Action at Eastern Neck
From: Kurt Schwarz <krschwa1 AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 18:58:55 -0400
After the MOS Board meeting in Chestertown, I ventured to Pickering Creek,
and could not locate the Hudsonian Godwit.  Just both yellowlegs, and a
Stilt Sandpiper from the "second" platform.  First platform had a single
Least and more Yellowlegs.

I then make my way to Shiloh Turf Farm, mostly through pouring rain.  The
rooute number signage was confusing as all get out but I finally got there.
Viewing was tough in the pouring rain and all I could trick out were a
single American Golden, and several Black-bellied and Semipalmated Plovers.
I could not discern any Buff-breasted Sandpipers.

Before the Board meeting we enjoyed a fruitful venture into Eastern Neck
under the able leadership of Walter Ellison.  Highlights were a young male
Blackburninan, two flavors of Grosbeak, and good looks at a Veery.  My Kent
list grew by 13 species.

Kurt Schwarz
Ellicott City


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Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpipers-Dorchester Co
From: Gerry Hawkins <maineusa AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 18:30:23 -0400
Marc Rositol and I just saw four Buff-breasted Sandpipers foraging together in 
the dirt area at the Shiloh Church Turf Farm, within 40-50 yards of Shiloh 
Church Hurlock Road, and before he arrived I saw five together in the grass. 
Also present were an American Golden-Plover, 9 Black-bellied Plovers, two 
Pectoral Sandpipers, several Semipalmated Plovers, two Least Sandpipers and 
several dozen Semipalmated Sandpipers, as well as Killdeer and Horned Larks. 

Gerry Hawkins
Arlington, VA

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: Graham Area, Gunpowder FSP
From: Lynne Parks <v.lynneparks AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 14:08:34 -0700 (PDT)
Warbling--pale and singing, Philadelphia--yellow throat, Red-eyed--long bill, 
Tennessee--bright green back. All by the first and third stream crossings at 
Graham Area, Gunpowder today. Anyone want to help me survey birds here? 

As the crow flies, it's only about two miles from Cromwell Valley Park.
Lynne

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Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpecker at Cromwell Valley Park 9/13/2014
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 12:42:41 -0700 (PDT)
Actually, let me amend my "nothing else of note" comment. We found a 
Philadelphia Vireo at the Sherwood Farm (west) bridge. I also had one yesterday 
afternoon at the dry streambed across from bluebird box #10. I know some of you 
are still looking for one this year. 


Tim Carney
Canton, MD

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Subject: Re: Re: 9/11/2001
From: "'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 12:16:36 -0700
In addition to that, Ken and Karen Hollinga (Ken was the ABA convention manager 
at the time) had flown on United flight 77 out of Dulles which, ultimately days 
later, was flown into the Pentagon. Another attendee had flown from Boston to 
LAX and her flight was ultimately destined for one of the towers. She was so 
freaked out she took a bus home. Jane Kostenko and I were going to drive home 
but Southwest promised our flight was still on schedule. It was eerie pulling 
into LAX in the hotel shuttle with no other cars anywhere except police and 
getting on the plane and not being allowed anywhere near the cockpit after 
boarding. Coincidentally, our flight had stopped westbound somewhere and we 
didn't have to get off. I had walked up to use the forward restroom and the 
pilot invited me in to sit in the copilot's seat. That'll never happen again. 

 
And we vividly remember the boat ride over and back and how out of touch we 
were. Seeing the Island Scrub Jay really had no meaning when we knew what was 
going on, or at least we thought we knew. 

Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland
 

________________________________
 From: MARCIA 
To: Wallace Kornack ; mdbirding AT googlegroups.com 
Cc: Wallace Kornack  
Sent: Thursday, September 11, 2014 9:42 PM
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] Re: 9/11/2001
  


More 9/11 memories. I was at the American Birding Association conference in 
California on 9/11/2001. Mike and Joy Bowen and Tyler Bell and Jane Kostenko 
were also at the conference, maybe others from Maryland that I don't remember. 


On that day, I was on a boat trip to Santa Cruz Island. We had left the hotel 
super early, before the news from NY and DC broke. But someone heard a snatch 
of news on the boat radio on the way out to the island, and so word passed 
through the group, but at the time we did not realize the extent and thought 
that the planes struck the towers in some kind of accident. 


On the way back to the mainland, we all huddled around the boat radio to listen 
to the news, and learned of the terrorist connection. But without seeing the 
images, we still did not fully appreciate the extent of the devastation. 


It was not until we returned to the hotel in the evening and were able to watch 
TV that we truly understood the extent. That evening at the ABA dinner, there 
was brief talk about canceling the rest of the conference, but when it was 
realized that all flights were canceled and we couldn't get home, it was 
decided to carry on. A birder at my table, who was also an ordained minister, 
led the group in prayer, not a usual happening at an ABA event. 


The remainder of the conference was decidedly sober. The next day, I was slated 
to be on a field trip to Landenbergh Air Force Base, but since they were on 
high alert - their missiles were actually up out of their silos, we could see 
them when we drove past - our field trip was sent instead to one of the 
historic California missions. I recall that many birders did not have the heart 
for birding, and simply went into the restored church to pray. 


At the end of the conference, commercial flights were still not leaving 
California, because they were keeping the air space open for the military. I 
had gotten a rental car before the conference started, and Hertz let me drive 
it home to Maryland, no extra charge. I drove solo across the country in 5 and 
a half days. It was an eerie drive, with the silent skies and the repeated 
sights of fully armed National Guard and Reserves camped out on the lawns of 
schools in small towns across the country. 


The most moving sight for me: on the Baltimore Beltway (or maybe it was I-95 in 
MD), people had hung banners spelling out the words of the Star Spangled 
Banner, one line on each successive overpass. I still tear up when I think of 
it. 


PS: best bird of the conference, six California Condors at Mt. Pinos, from the 
captive breeding and release program. At the time there were only 18 birds 
flying in the wild, so we saw 1/3 of the population. 


Marcia
___________
Marcia Watson
Bowie, MD
marshwren50 AT comcast.net


------ Original Message ------

From: Wallace Kornack
To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Cc: Wallace Kornack
Sent: September 11, 2014 at 8:19 PM
Subject: [MDBirding] Re: 9/11/2001

I remember that day exactly as Gail recalled how we were informed of the 
attack. I was stunned almost to the point of disbelief. Yet the news reports of 
that day were even more disturbing. How can one ever forget. 


Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC

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Subject: Graham Area, Gunpowder FSP
From: Lynne Parks <v.lynneparks AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 11:11:58 -0700 (PDT)
How do I get an area listed as a hot spot?  Reminder please.
I had an early Gray-cheeked Thrush the other day and a Veery plus Wood Thrushes 
today. 

Lynne

Graham Area, Gunpowder Falls State Park, Baltimore, US-MD
Sep 13, 2014 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
33 species

Mourning Dove  40
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  2
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  3
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Downy Woodpecker  7
Northern Flicker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  4
Warbling Vireo  2
Philadelphia Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  5
Blue Jay  10
Carolina Chickadee  9
Tufted Titmouse  7
White-breasted Nuthatch  6
Carolina Wren  7
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  1
Veery  1
Wood Thrush  2
American Robin  12
Gray Catbird  13
Northern Mockingbird  1
Ovenbird  1
Tennessee Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  13
American Redstart  3
Northern Parula  1
Magnolia Warbler  2
Black-throated Green Warbler  1
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  9
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
American Goldfinch  2

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Subject: Re: yellow-crowned night-heron
From: "'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 10:20:03 -0700
Sue Hamilton reports an adult Yellow-crowned Night-Heron at the Calvert Marine 
Museum in Solomons. Jane Kostenko and I saw an adult there years ago. Usually 
only see juveniles at North Beach Marsh so an adult is a nice find! 


Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland
 

________________________________
 From: Sue Hamilton 
To: jtylerbell AT yahoo.com 
Sent: Saturday, September 13, 2014 11:58 AM
Subject: yellow-crowned night-heron
  

Had training at the museum this am, went wandering in the marsh, and saw an 
adult yellow-crowned which allowed me to take photo. 


I am no longer on Md birds so I thought maybe you'd report for me.

sue

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Saturday 9/13/14
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 11:34:55 -0400
This morning (9/13) at Rock Creek Park....

The maintenance yard was active but the equitation field, ridge and nature 
center were quiet. My thanks goes to Bill who kept the bird count until I 
arrived at the yard with the birders I led on a Maryland Bird Club Tour. Fellow 
birders are surprised by the number of Cape May Warblers that continue to be 
seen at the yard. 


The following list is for birds seen at the yard.

Ovenbird  
Black-and-white Warbler     3
Nashville Warbler  
Common Yellowthroat     6
American Redstart     2
Cape May Warbler     7
Magnolia Warbler     14     
Black-throated Blue Warbler     7
Red-shouldered Hawk       heard
Rock Pigeon      flyby
Mourning Dove     8
Barred Owl       flyby
Chimney Swift     10+
Ruby-throated Hummingbird     7
Red-bellied Woodpecker     3
Downy Woodpecker     2
Hairy Woodpecker  
Northern Flicker     2++
Pileated Woodpecker     3
Eastern Wood-Pewee     4
Great Crested Flycatcher     3
Red-eyed Vireo     2
Blue Jay  
Carolina Chickadee     5
Tufted Titmouse     2
Red-breasted Nuthatch  
House Wren  
Carolina Wren     4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher     3
Swainson's Thrush  
Wood Thrush     3
American Robin     4
Gray Catbird     3
Brown Thrasher     3
Scarlet Tanager     3
Northern Cardinal     8
Rose-breasted Grosbeak     5
Indigo Bunting       fem.
Common Grackle     25    flyby
Baltimore Oriole  

Fellow Birders: Robin Skinner, Cindy Hwang, Fandy Munsin, Steve Johnson, Lynn 
Rafferty, Bill Butler, Holger Pflicke, Gerry Hawkins, Susan Volman, Julia 
Redmond, Michael Redmond, Tully Hochhauser, Devon Hochhauser, Amy Roberts, Leon 
Kass, Dan Eberly, Chip Chipley, Margaret, Dan Levine, Tom Eck, Brandt Ryder, 
Luke Powell, Mat Cohen, +20 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington DC

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Subject: Wheaton Regional Park today
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 15:32:25 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all, 

Overcast early and getting more so as the morning wore on, with one brief 
period of weak sun. The clear night however must have been what the migrants 
wanted as much of what was around yesterday was gone. Only *one* Pewee (and 
that at Brookside Nature Ctr.) and only two Red-eyes, where they were 
everywhere yesterday. Almost our first bird was a nice Blue-winged near the 
wall of vines but little after that until about 8:30. We did run into one small 
mixed flock which contained some warblers and walking around we picked up a few 
more, including an Ovenbird in the woods near the Nature Center. Nine species 
for us and Evelyn Ralston saw a Blackpoll we missed in the same flock. Still a 
lot of Robins and Blue Jays, but the neotropicals were thin on the ground. 
Maybe tomorrow when the sun returns... 


Gail Mackiernan and Barry Cooper 
Colesville, MD 

Birds of interest: 

42 species (+1 other taxa) 

Wood Duck 4 
Green Heron 1 
Red-shouldered Hawk 1 heard only 
Chimney Swift 2 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 3 
Northern Flicker 6 
Pileated Woodpecker 1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee 1 
Acadian Flycatcher 1 Nature Ctr 
Great Crested Flycatcher 1 
Red-eyed Vireo 2 
Blue Jay X fairly numerous fly-overs and throughout area in small parties 
House Wren 2 
Wood Thrush 1 
American Robin 35 estimate; not as abundant as yesterday but still good numbers 
around and flying overhead 

Gray Catbird 9 
Brown Thrasher 1 
Ovenbird 1  AT  Nature Ctr. in woods 
Blue-winged Warbler 1 
Black-and-white Warbler 2 
Common Yellowthroat 4 
American Redstart 4 
Northern Parula 1 
Magnolia Warbler 4 
Chestnut-sided Warbler 3 
Black-throated Blue Warbler 2 female 
Eastern Towhee 2 
Scarlet Tanager 2 
Common Grackle 25 one fly-over flock, others around  AT  Nature Ctr. 



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Subject: Brewster's Warbler, Battery Kemble, DC
From: Frank Hawkins <a.f.a.hawkins AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 11:10:45 -0400
I saw an interesting male Brewster's-type warbler this morning where the
lower part of Battery Kemble Park meets Potomac Avenue, just above
Fletcher's boatyard. It was golden on the crown, with broad bright yellow
wingbars, a dark line through the eye, pale yellow on the breast and
greyish-blue on the back. With it in a flock were two or three redstarts
and a black-and-white warbler.

Frank Hawkins, Washington DC

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Subject: Re: Sandhill Crane and 268 Raptors at Cromwell VP Baltimore Co.
From: Warblerick <ricksussman1955 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 08:03:52 -0700 (PDT)
On Friday, September 12, 2014 10:40:23 PM UTC-4, James Meyers wrote:
> A Sandhill Crane was seen flying in a stream of Broad-winged Hawks at the 
Cromwell Valley Park HawkWatch today, Friday Sept. 12th. Single Sandhill Cranes 
are becoming annual visitors during both spring and fall migration here at 
Cromwell. Today was also the first substantial push of Broad-winged Hawks and 
Sharp-shinned Hawks. 

> 
> The cold front that came across the region on Thursday has kicked up the 
first really good numbers of raptors here in the north-east. Many hawk watch 
sites north of us reported triple digit numbers of BWs. This may result in some 
good flights here in Maryland in the next few days. Cromwell Valley Park is 
hosting a HAWKFEST on Saturday and Sunday this weekend from 10 AM to 3 PM. We 
hope some numbers of migrant raptors will show up!! At least there will be some 
rehabbed raptors to see close up on both days. Several local bird groups will 
be on hand. The regular group of hawk watchers will be on the hill to answer 
any questions visitors may have concerning hawk migration over Cromwell. 

> 
> CROMWELL VALLEY PARK HAWKWATCH TOTALS - Friday , Sept. 12th 2014 - 9 AM to 5 
PM observers included Brad Cernohorsky-Bob Rineer-Cal and Bud Orvis-Pete 
Lev-Hugh Hoffman-Mary Jane McMillan-Susan Minor-Joe Stag 

> 
> B. Eagle -6
> 
> Osprey - 10
> 
> N. Harrier - 3
> 
> Sharpies - 20
> 
> Coopers - 3 ( locals quite active)
> 
> Kestrels - 17
> 
> Broadwings - 205
> 
> Redtails - 1 (several locals seen)
> 
> Red-shoulders - 1 ( "    "     "     " )
> 
> Merlin - 1
> 
> Jim Meyers
> Parkvill Md

I had my first Sharpie of the season on Friday as well, and another adult 
Red-headed Woodpecker, and American Kestrel flyover. And an adult Bald Eagle 
soaring over heading WSW. 


Rick Sussman
Woodbine,MD

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Subject: Red-headed Woodpecker at Cromwell Valley Park 9/13/2014
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 10:41:42 -0400
Heidi Trasatti and I had a juvenile (gray head) RHWO fly through the trees 
above the lime kiln this morning. It eventually landed in the tallest tree 
above the renovated house. We lost it as it worked its way south towards the 
stream. 


Nothing else of note. Where are the Connecticuts?!?

Tim Carney
Canton, MD

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Yellow Warblers - DC
From: "'Jason DC' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 06:39:21 -0700 (PDT)
Hi All, 

This morning I have to stick close to home, but I was surprised to have two 
Yellow Warblers on my street at the Hobart Pocket Parks. Seems like it is 
getting late for these early migrants. 


What wasn't surprising was their showing up in these Honey Locust Trees. Even 
though this park is about 1000 square feet in urban DC, it is a very reliable 
place during spring migration to get Yellow Warbler. 


Also had Green & Great Blue Heron, Kestrel, Accipiter sp. at the nearby 
McMillan Reservoir. 


Hope the birding is good farther afield!

Jason Berry
Washington, DC

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Subject: Eastern Shore 9/12
From: Richard Edden <richardedden AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 09:27:17 -0400
A wonderful day of Eastern Shore birding finally came round yesterday.
 After a week of checking on the Hudsonian Godwit and the disasterous news
that it wasn't seen Thursday, we still decided to start at Pickering Creek
and after a look at the first platform (Lesser Yellowlegs and Blue-winged
Teal), we were rewarded with the *HUDSONIAN GODWIT* showing well at the
second platform.  Thanks to Tim Carney for tips on where to go when we got
to the car park. A lifer for me (and my mum, ACE, who is visiting). There
wasn't much activity on the walk back, with just one Magnolia Warbler
signalling any migration.
From there, we pushed on to Shiloh, and after finding a pocket of lots of
Killdeer and Pectoral Sandpipers (ACE lifer), we found some scopeable *American
Golden-plovers* (lifer both) and while looking at them my mum found
three *Buff-breasted
Sandpipers *(lifer both).  3 for 3 on target birds, by about 10 am!  I
suggested we call it a day and head home for lunch.
We ditched that plan and headed down to Princess Anne for the wonderful
hospitality and hummer show. Thanks so much Kathy!  I am inspired to get
more feeders myself for next year. *Rufous Hummingbird* also a lifer for
both (although this might be an ebird anomoly for me - I thought I'd seen
one in LA). 4 for 4.
From there, we didn't really have a plan or an agenda. We headed to Truitts
Landing.  It was high tide, but I wonder if that helped keep things off the
floor - there were reasonable numbers of sparrows flying (read, occasional,
but not too frustrating) and we were rewarded with *Seaside and Saltmarsh
Sparrows *(ACE lifers) showing in the same clump.  We didn't see
Brown-headed Nuthatch, for our first miss of the day.  From there, we went
to Figgs Landing where the pond had *Short-billed Dowitcher* (ACE lifer),
then to Public Landing where there was an impressive gathering of Laughing
Gulls, and three *Semipalmated Plovers* (ACE lifer) on the car park. From
there, we braved the motorcycle weekend at Ocean City and had a go at
Skimmer. We missed out on Skimmers, but up to 8 *Marbled Godwits* made up
for it. Also Oycs and SAnderling in good numbers.
This was my first trip out to the MD shore this year, so I got a bunch of
MD year birds... hopefully I'll get back out there in November for the rest.

All in all a good day.

Richard (and Anne) Edden
Owings Mills (and Grayshott)

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Subject: Shiloh Turf Farm, Dorchester, Friday Evening
From: "JCDLMARTIN via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 23:12:30 -0400
This evening:
 
Black-Bellied Plover -- 4
American Golden-Plover -- 7
Pectoral Sandpiper -- 14
Buff-breasted Sandpiper -- 3
 
The best views were just before sunset when a large mixed flock settled  
into the field S of the dirt lane.
 
Around 4:30 I saw the previously reported HUDSONIAN GODWIT at Pickering  
Creek.
 
Joel Martin
Catonsville, MD

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Subject: Sandhill Crane and 268 Raptors at Cromwell VP Baltimore Co.
From: James Meyers <jamesleomeyers AT mac.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 19:40:23 -0700 (PDT)
A Sandhill Crane was seen flying in a stream of Broad-winged Hawks at the 
Cromwell Valley Park HawkWatch today, Friday Sept. 12th. Single Sandhill Cranes 
are becoming annual visitors during both spring and fall migration here at 
Cromwell. Today was also the first substantial push of Broad-winged Hawks and 
Sharp-shinned Hawks. 


The cold front that came across the region on Thursday has kicked up the first 
really good numbers of raptors here in the north-east. Many hawk watch sites 
north of us reported triple digit numbers of BWs. This may result in some good 
flights here in Maryland in the next few days. Cromwell Valley Park is hosting 
a HAWKFEST on Saturday and Sunday this weekend from 10 AM to 3 PM. We hope some 
numbers of migrant raptors will show up!! At least there will be some rehabbed 
raptors to see close up on both days. Several local bird groups will be on 
hand. The regular group of hawk watchers will be on the hill to answer any 
questions visitors may have concerning hawk migration over Cromwell. 


CROMWELL VALLEY PARK HAWKWATCH TOTALS - Friday , Sept. 12th 2014 - 9 AM to 5 PM 
observers included Brad Cernohorsky-Bob Rineer-Cal and Bud Orvis-Pete Lev-Hugh 
Hoffman-Mary Jane McMillan-Susan Minor-Joe Stag 


B. Eagle -6

Osprey - 10

N. Harrier - 3

Sharpies - 20

Coopers - 3 ( locals quite active)

Kestrels - 17

Broadwings - 205

Redtails - 1 (several locals seen)

Red-shoulders - 1 ( "    "     "     " )

Merlin - 1

Jim Meyers
Parkvill Md

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Subject: 7 marbled godwits at skimmer right now...
From: Richard Edden <richardedden AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:06:15 -0400
,... And a thousand Harley's. In case anyone is near.
Richard Edden
Owings mills MD

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Subject: Cromwell, 16 warblers, good day, 9/12/14
From: Tim Houghton <thoughton AT loyola.edu>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 19:16:16 +0000
First, thanks to Kevin for posting earlier for me, re Cape May Warbler. The 
morning started great with three Cape Mays behind the barn that's up from 
Willow Grove parking. A nice mixed flock there. A number of other pockets, too. 
62 species. 


Warblers:

Ovenbird (2)
Black-and-White (2)
Tennessee (1)
NASHVILLE (1)
Yellowthroat
Redstart
CAPE MAY (3)
Parula (1)
Magnolia
Blackburnian (1)
Chestnut-Sided (4)
Blackpoll (1)
Black-Throated Blue (1)
Pine (1)
Black-Throated Green (1)
Canada (1)

Others:

Yellow-Billed Cuckoo (4)
YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER (1, adult)
Yellow-Throated Vireo (1)
Philadelphia Vireo (1)
Veery (1)
SWAINSON'S THRUSH (3)
Rose-Breasted Grosbeak (2)

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19809896

Best Birding Wishes,

Tim Houghton
(Glen Arm)







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Subject: Whiskered Tern at Cape May - watch out in MD?
From: Phil Davis <pdavis AT ix.netcom.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 13:40:48 -0400
MD Birding:

The last time a Whiskered Tern showed up at Cape May (in 1993), it 
moved around and ended up in Delaware, mostly at Ted Harvey  WMA.

Keep your eyes open in case it started to move up and down the coast, 
maybe into Maryland!

Phil


>To: staff AT narba.org
>Subject: [NARBA] Cape May, New Jersey - Whiskered Tern
>Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:48:39 +0000
>From: NARBA 
>
>A Whiskered Tern was just reported at Bunker Pond in Cape May, NJ.

==================================
Phil Davis      Davidsonville, Maryland     USA
                 mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com
================================== 

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Friday 9/12/14
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:29:10 -0400
This morning (9/12) in the maintenance yard at Rock Creek Park.....

Fellow birders had 14 warbler species with Magnolia Warbler, Black-throated 
Blue and American Redstart in double figures. The Cape May Warblers continue to 
attract considerable attention. Birding activity was very good well after the 
usual departure time. 


Ovenbird  
Black-and-white Warbler     5
Tennessee Warbler     5    (Paul)
Nashville Warbler     3    (Randy)
Common Yellowthroat     3
American Redstart     23
Cape May Warbler     6    (Martin)
Northern Parula  
Magnolia Warbler     21
Blackburnian Warbler     (Martin)
Chestnut-sided Warbler     7
Black-throated Blue Warbler     19    (Martin)
Black-throated Green Warbler     7
Canada Warbler     (Martin)
Chimney Swift     10+
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  5
Red-bellied Woodpecker     4
Downy Woodpecker     4
Northern Flicker     3
Eastern Wood-Pewee     5
Great Crested Flycatcher     3
Red-eyed Vireo     7
Blue Jay  
Carolina Chickadee     7
House Wren     5
Carolina Wren     4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher     2
Wood Thrush  
Gray Catbird     2
Scarlet Tanager     4
Northern Cardinal     3
Rose-breasted Grosbeak     2
Common Grackle     4
Baltimore Oriole     3

Fellow Birders: Martin Sneary, Bill Butler, Paul DeAnna, Randy Weaver, Sally, 
Jim Lemert, Judy Bromley, Mardi Hastings, Dan Eberly, Mat Cohen, Hanan Jacobi, 
Susan Volman, Jim Phelps, Jonathan Cook, Chuck Jones, Stephen Jones 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC

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Subject: Wheaton Regional Park today
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 15:42:52 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all, 

Sunny, cool and breezy this morning. A very large early passage of Red-eyed 
Vireos and Pewees, as well as diurnal migrants such as Robins (everywhere) but 
not as many warblers as hoped-for with the cold front. Actually much quieter 
than last few days. With the breeze and sun, things also shut down early and we 
went over to Brookside Nature Ctr where we added a few of the common species 
but nothing new. The Gardens are still noisy with tree-cutting. We personally 
had 10 species of warbler, best being single Blue-winged and Blackburnian, and 
some other birders added a Tennessee. 


Gail Mackiernan and Barry Cooper 
Colesville, MD 

Birds of interest: 

50 species (+2 other taxa) 

Wood Duck 4 
Great Blue Heron 1 
Green Heron 1 
Turkey Vulture 1 
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 fly-over 
Cooper's Hawk 2 immatures, soaring 
Red-shouldered Hawk 2 
Chimney Swift 2 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 4 
Hairy Woodpecker 2 
Northern Flicker 12 
Pileated Woodpecker 1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee 15 conservative estimate; common and vocal in most areas 
Acadian Flycatcher 1 
Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher) 1 
Empidonax sp. 1 possible YBFL, seen at "wall of vines" being chased by 
Traill's-type; small, compact, appeared very yellow but not seen well enough to 
confirm ID 

Red-eyed Vireo 25 conservative estimate 
Blue Jay 20 estimate; vocal fly-overs 
House Wren 1 
Eastern Bluebird X heard only fly-overs 
American Robin 60 estimate; abundant as fly-overs, perched and feeding in vines 
and on ground throughout, especially before 9 AM 

Gray Catbird 12 
Northern Waterthrush 1 
Blue-winged Warbler 1 
Black-and-white Warbler 8 
Common Yellowthroat 4 
American Redstart 9 
Northern Parula 1 
Magnolia Warbler 15 6  AT  Brookside Nature Ctr 
Blackburnian Warbler 1 
Chestnut-sided Warbler 10 
Black-throated Green Warbler 4 
Eastern Towhee 3 
Scarlet Tanager 7 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1 
Baltimore Oriole 2 
American Goldfinch 7 

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Subject: Yough reservoir - sanderling
From: David Powell <seneca.ranger AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 11:04:17 -0400
One sanderling and two pecs present. Golden Plover not seen

Dave Powell

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Subject: Eastern Shore on behalf of Richard Edden
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 07:18:54 -0700 (PDT)
Richard is in the field and asked me to post for him...

Hudsonian Godwit is still at Pickering Creek in Talbot County as of 7:30 am.

American Golden-Plover and Buff-breasted Sandpiper are still at Shiloh Church 
Turf Farm in Dorchester County as of 10:15 am. 


Tim Carney
Canton, MD

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Subject: CVP
From: keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 08:17:49 -0400




Subject: Re: Re: 9/11/2001
From: JAMES SPEICHER <jugornought AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 23:39:13 -0400
My boss and I were at the Walter Reed Annex in a BSL3 [biosafety level
3] lab working on a West Nile virus vaccine study.  Needless to say we
were out of touch with the world and had quite a surprise in store on
leaving the isolation of the biocontainment lab.

I would suggest the Flight 93 Memorial site [Shanksville/Somerset Co.
PA] as a stunning place to visit and reflect on the events of 9/11/01.
My memory is that it is about 30 miles west on US 30 from the
intersection with I-70 at Breezewood.  And if you go, why not bird?
It is a mostly open habitat and there is an eBird Hotspot for the
Memorial that needs work...19 species on 3 lists:

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L2409388?yr=all&m=&rank=mrec

Jim Speicher
BroadRun/Burkittsville area
[FR] Frederick County

On 9/11/14, MARCIA  wrote:
> More 9/11 memories.  I was at the American Birding Association conference in
> California on 9/11/2001.  Mike and Joy Bowen and Tyler Bell and Jane
> Kostenko were also at the conference, maybe others from Maryland that I
> don't remember.
>
> On that day, I was on a boat trip to Santa Cruz Island. We had left the
> hotel super early, before the news from NY and DC broke.  But someone heard
> a snatch of news on the boat radio on the way out to the island, and so word
> passed through the group, but at the time we did not realize the extent and
> thought that the planes struck the towers in some kind of accident.
>
> On the way back to the mainland, we all huddled around the boat radio to
> listen to the news, and learned of the terrorist connection.  But without
> seeing the images, we still did not fully appreciate the extent of the
> devastation.
>
> It was not until we returned to the hotel in the evening and were able to
> watch TV that we truly understood the extent.  That evening at the ABA
> dinner, there was brief talk about canceling the rest of the conference, but
> when it was realized that all flights were canceled and we couldn't get
> home, it was decided to carry on.  A birder at my table, who was also an
> ordained minister, led the group in prayer, not a usual happening at an ABA
> event.
>
> The remainder of the conference was  decidedly sober.  The next day, I was
> slated to be on a field trip to Landenbergh Air Force Base, but since they
> were on high alert - their missiles were actually up out of their silos, we
> could see them when we drove past -  our field trip was sent instead to one
> of the historic California missions.  I recall that many birders did not
> have the heart for birding, and simply went into the restored church to
> pray.
>
> At the end of the conference, commercial flights were still not leaving
> California, because they were keeping the air space open for the military.
>  I had gotten a rental car before the conference started, and Hertz let me
> drive it home to Maryland, no extra charge.  I drove solo across the country
> in 5 and a half days.  It was an eerie drive, with the silent skies and the
> repeated sights of fully armed National Guard and Reserves camped out on the
> lawns of schools in small towns across the country.
>
> The most moving sight for me:  on the Baltimore Beltway (or maybe it was
> I-95 in MD), people had hung banners spelling out the words of the Star
> Spangled Banner, one line on each successive overpass. I still tear up when
> I think of it.
>
> PS: best bird of the conference, six California Condors at Mt. Pinos, from
> the captive breeding and release program.  At the time there were only 18
> birds flying in the wild, so we saw 1/3 of the population.
>
> Marcia
> ___________
> Marcia Watson
> Bowie, MD
> marshwren50 AT comcast.net
>
>
> ------ Original Message ------
>
> From: Wallace Kornack
> To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
> Cc: Wallace Kornack
> Sent: September 11, 2014 at 8:19 PM
> Subject: [MDBirding] Re: 9/11/2001
>
> I remember that day exactly as Gail recalled how we were informed of the
> attack. I was stunned almost to the point of disbelief.  Yet the news
> reports of that day were even more disturbing.  How can one ever forget.
>
> Wallace Kornack
> Washington  DC
>
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Subject: Olive-sided flycatcher? At Wheaton Regional Park (MoCo) this afternoon
From: Ann Hobbs <hobbs_ann AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 22:52:09 -0400
Hi Everyone,
Attached are links to three bad shots of a flycatcher at Pine Lake in bad light 
just before the rain hit this afternoon. Thought it might be an olive-sided, 
due to apparent white flank patches in third photo. 

Thoughts appreciated.  
Nothing else of note at WRP, but there were a few redstarts and red-eyed vireos 
at Brookside Nature Center. 

Thanks,
Ann Hobbs
Silver Spring, MD


> 
> Wheaton Regional Park 9/11/14 

> 
> Wheaton Regional Park 9/11/14 

> 
> Wheaton Regional Park 9/11/14 


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Subject: Re: Re: 9/11/2001
From: MARCIA <marshwren50 AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 01:42:53 +0000 (UTC)




Subject: Rock Creek Park, Thursday 9/11/14
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 20:03:02 -0400
This morning (9/10) in the maintenance yard at Rock Creek Park......

My thanks go to Gerry who provided additional reports of birds that were seen 
after Bill and I left this morning for Bombay Hook. 


Black-and-white Warbler  `   2
Tennessee Warbler     4
Nashville Warbler  
Common Yellowthroat     6
American Redstart     11
Cape May Warbler     5
Northern Parula  
Magnolia Warbler     10
Chestnut-sided Warbler     2
Black-throated Blue Warbler     7
Canada Warbler  
Red-shouldered Hawk     3
Chimney Swift     20+
Ruby-throated Hummingbird     3
Red-bellied Woodpecker     4
Downy Woodpecker     2
Hairy Woodpecker  
Northern Flicker     8
Eastern Wood-Pewee     3
Eastern Phoebe  
Great Crested Flycatcher     4
Red-eyed Vireo     3
American Crow     28
Carolina Chickadee     5
Tufted Titmouse     3
House Wren     2
Carolina Wren  
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  
Gray Catbird  
Scarlet Tanager     2
Northern Cardinal     4
Baltimore Oriole     3

Fellow Birders: Gerry Hawkins, Bill Butler, Marjorie Rachlin, Susan Volman, 
Judy Bromley, Scott Young, Leon Kass, Jim Philipson, Marina True 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC


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Subject: 9/11/2001 memories
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 22:13:12 +0000 (UTC)
On Tuesday, September 11, 2001 Barry and I, along with Wallace Kornack and Jim 
Lemert, were birding at Rock Creek Park. We had done the Ridge and Yard and 
were making our way around the Nature Center when one of the NPS employees 
stuck her head out a window and told us about the (then ongoing) attacks on the 
World Trade Center and the Pentagon. We were of course shocked and also, 
initially disbelieving that such events could actually be happening. The NPS 
person told us we should "go home" but -- in a state of shock -- we finished 
our rounds at the Dog Run. Getting home for us was an ordeal as all the streets 
leading out of DC were jammed but we eventually made it, and like everyone 
else, remained glued to our TV all day. The next day we four were back at the 
Ridge, very eery as no airplanes overhead save fighter jets patrolling the 
skies. 


I looked at our notes for 9/11 today -- migrants included 5 Bay-breasts, 5 
Blackpolls, 5 Blackburnians, 1 Canada, 3 Nashvilles, 6 Redstarts, 8 BT Greens, 
8 Magnolias, 15 Yellowthroats, 1 BT Blue, 5 Chestnut-sideds, 6 Scarlet 
Tanagers, 1 Balto. Oriole, 6 R-B Grosbeaks, 1 Veery and a Lincoln's Sparrow. 
The birds continued their age-old journeys despite the immense human tragedy 
that day... 


Gail Mackiernan 
Colesville, MD 

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Subject: Re: Kevin Graff Out of area
From: keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 14:44:10 -0400




Subject: Kevin Graff Out of area
From: "Jim Wilson" <wlsngang AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 14:40:26 -0400
I believe that Mr. Graff deserves to be noted for his work on the Higbee Dike 
in Cape May. This is a quote from Seasonal Research at Cape May Bird 
Observatory. 



“Morning Flight – 10 September 2014

The Higbee Dike hosted a better-than-advertised warbler flight this morning, 
but you had to wake up early to know it ever happened...most of the action was 
over by 8am. Redstarts led the way, 

followed by strong showings from Northern Waterthrush, Yellow Warbler, and 
Northern Parula. Bird Of The Day honors undoubtedly go to the Kentucky Warbler 
that showed its face on two brief 

occasions. Kevin Graff noticed the bird at sunrise, just as it bombed into the 
vegetation near the top of the foot path. It got up again about an hour later 
and briefly shot north, just above the 

phragmites, allowing an opportunity to see its classic black mask and yellow 
spectacles. This is a tough species to see in Cape May during the fall, and is 
almost never seen at the dike.” 


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Subject: First record of Rufous Hummingbird for Somerset Co.
From: "'Bill Hubick' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 11:40:06 -0700
Hi Everyone,

An immature RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD is visiting the home of Kathy (Kat) Green near 
Princess Anne, Somerset Co. By our records, this appears to be the first county 
record. Bruce Peterjohn banded it today and confirmed it as an immature male 
Rufous Hummingbird. Visitors are welcome, but must contact Kat and her husband 
in advance. She will provide the address and any info about parking and best 
viewing times/location. 


Phone: 443-880-6693
E-mail: billscat1111 AT aol.com

 
You can see a photo at Maryland Biodiversity Project now as well:
http://www.marylandbiodiversity.com/viewSpecies.php?species=1147

Thanks, Kat! Congratulations again on the cool visitor and first county record! 


Good birding!

Bill


Bill Hubick
Pasadena, Maryland
bill_hubick AT yahoo.com
http://www.billhubick.com
http://www.marylandbiodiversity.com
http://www.facebook.com/MarylandBiodiversity

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Subject: Ongoing Bird Survey JBWS Sept 11
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 09:30:28 -0700 (PDT)
Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary, Anne Arundel, US-MD
Sep 11, 2014 7:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Species list: Ongoing bird survey
41 species

Canada Goose  
Wood Duck  
Mallard  
Double-crested Cormorant  
Great Blue Heron  
Great Egret  
Black Vulture  
Turkey Vulture  
Osprey  
Northern Harrier  
Cooper's Hawk  
Bald Eagle  
Red-shouldered Hawk  
Red-tailed Hawk  
Sora      Audible
Laughing Gull  
Ring-billed Gull  
Mourning Dove  
Chimney Swift  
Belted Kingfisher  
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Eastern Phoebe  
Red-eyed Vireo  
Blue Jay  
American Crow  
Carolina Chickadee  
Tufted Titmouse  
Carolina Wren  
Eastern Bluebird  
Gray Catbird  
Brown Thrasher  
Northern Mockingbird  
Common Yellowthroat  
Hooded Warbler  
Northern Parula  
Eastern Towhee  
Song Sparrow  
Blue Grosbeak  
Indigo Bunting  
Red-winged Blackbird  
American Goldfinch  

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