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Updated on Sunday, August 2 at 03:51 PM EST
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Red-cockaded Woodpecker,©Mimi Hoppe Wolf

2 Aug Swallow-tailed Kite Washington Cty [Mark Rositol ]
2 Aug Swan Creek (8/1) and Fort Smallwood Park (8/2) ["'Bill Hubick' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
2 Aug Swallow-tailed Kite Salisbury Wicomico [Betsy Bangert ]
2 Aug shorebirds around Loch Raven & White Marsh [Kevin Graff ]
2 Aug Re: Re: Ebird question [Hugh McGuinness ]
2 Aug Re: Re: Ebird question ["'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
01 Aug Re: Black-headed Gull? [Kurt Schwarz ]
1 Aug Black-headed Gull? ["'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
01 Aug Ho Co (Miss Kite) ["Bonnie Ott" ]
1 Aug Re: Ebird question [Art Drauglis ]
1 Aug Re: lower Eastern Shore, July 24-29, 2015, VA & MD, equal time, VA 1st. [Larry Hindman ]
31 Jul lower Eastern Shore, July 24-29, 2015, VA & MD, equal time, VA 1st. [Harry Armistead ]
31 Jul Browns Bridge area closed [Kurt Schwarz ]
31 Jul Re: Ebird question ["Jlstasz via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
31 Jul Ebird question [Sharon F1727 ]
31 Jul Re: Two Upland Sandpipers in Dorchester County on 29 July.These biirds were [Gene Ricks ]
31 Jul Re: reducing human/bird conflicts on Skimmer Island & others []
31 Jul reducing human/bird conflicts on Skimmer Island & others []
30 Jul [FR] Bike Ride eggshell and subdued/vanished House Wren [JAMES SPEICHER ]
30 Jul Re: Re: RFI on Horsehead Tricolors [Hugh Vandervoort ]
30 Jul Re: RFI on Horsehead Tricolors [s byrd ]
30 Jul Re: Two Upland Sandpipers in Dorchester County on 29 July.These biirds were [Joe Hanfman ]
29 Jul Re: AmericanGoldfinches are back! [Birdman42 ]
29 Jul Cecil Co. White Ibis [Mark Johnson ]
29 Jul Two Upland Sandpipers in Dorchester County on 29 July.These biirds were [Les Roslund ]
29 Jul Tufted Titmouse wars [Patricia Valdata ]
29 Jul Re: AmericanGoldfinches are back! [Kipp Lunt ]
29 Jul Re: AmericanGoldfinches are back! [Linda Schwartz ]
29 Jul Poplar Island 7/29/2015 [Tim Carney ]
28 Jul RE: AmericanGoldfinches are back! [Anna Urciolo ]
28 Jul AmericanGoldfinches are back! ["'Elda Banks' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
28 Jul Re: Voice of the Naturalist: DC Area, 7/28/2015 [Adam Parr ]
28 Jul Fwd: DC Area, 7/28/2015 [Lydia Schindler ]
28 Jul Re: Voice of the Naturalist: DC Area, 7/28/2015 [JAMES SPEICHER ]
28 Jul Voice of the Naturalist: DC Area, 7/28/2015 [Lydia Schindler ]
28 Jul Re: Avocets continue at Swan Creek [Andy Beiderman ]
28 Jul Avocets continue at Swan Creek [Fred Shaffer ]
28 Jul Salisbury Airport [Kye jenkins ]
28 Jul Re: Flicker question [Michael Roane ]
27 Jul Salisbury Airport [Kye jenkins ]
27 Jul White Ibis, Somerset County [Thomas Ostrowski ]
27 Jul Skimmer Island [Jeffrey Culler ]
27 Jul Night Herons at Schoolhouse Pond []
27 Jul Re: Avocets at Swan Creek [Matt Hafner ]
27 Jul Avocets at Swan Creek ["'Andrew Clemens' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
27 Jul Flicker question [Janet Millenson ]
27 Jul Avocets remain at Swam Creek ["'Bird couple' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
27 Jul Re: People walking on Skimmer Island right now. Someone I can call? ["'Elda Banks' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
26 Jul MD Natural Resources Police Number [Kurt Schwarz ]
26 Jul Re: People walking on Skimmer Island right now. Someone I can call? [Sharon F1727 ]
26 Jul Re: Maryland Big Day 7/24 [Alex Wiebe ]
26 Jul Re: Maryland Big Day 7/24 [Matt Hafner ]
26 Jul Re: People walking on Skimmer Island right now. Someone I can call? [Marcia Balestri ]
26 Jul Re: Maryland Big Day 7/24 [Jared Fisher ]
26 Jul Re: Maryland Big Day 7/24 [Russ Ruffing ]
26 Jul Green Herons at Depot Pond (East) [Michael Roane ]
26 Jul Re: Maryland Big Day 7/24 [Don Simonson ]
26 Jul Tri-colored Heron Jug Bay [jugbayjs ]
26 Jul Tri-colored Heron Jug Bay - no [jugbayjs ]
26 Jul Swan Creek in northern Anne Arundel Co. (7/26) ["'Bill Hubick' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
26 Jul Re: People walking on Skimmer Island right now. Someone I can call? ["'Elda Banks' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
26 Jul Upland Sandpipers - Salisbury Airport [Alex Wiebe ]
26 Jul Paper Mill Flats [Kye jenkins ]
26 Jul Tri-colored Heron Jug Bay [Wayne Baumgartner ]
26 Jul 2015 Turkey Point Hawk Watch [Patricia Valdata ]
26 Jul Re: People walking on Skimmer Island right now. Someone I can call? [Phil Davis ]
26 Jul People walking on Skimmer Island right now. Someone I can call? [Marcia Balestri ]
26 Jul Re: Maryland Big Day 7/24 [David Powell ]
26 Jul Maryland Big Day 7/24 [Alex Wiebe ]
26 Jul 56 WOOD DUCKS - Riley's Lock turning basin, C and O Canal Mont. Co. [Don Simonson ]
25 Jul Snowy Egrets at Swan Harbor [Tim Carney ]
25 Jul Re: RFI on Horsehead Tricolors ["'Andrew Clemens' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
25 Jul RFI on Horsehead Tricolors [Kurt Schwarz ]
25 Jul Queen Anne's County Tricolored Herons & Willet [Fred Shaffer ]
24 Jul Re: West Nile Virus detected [Daniel Rauch ]
24 Jul Tri color juvies at Queen Anne Couny ["'Andrew Clemens' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]

Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite Washington Cty
From: Mark Rositol <mrositol510 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 13:47:54 -0700 (PDT)
Viewed from near the train tracks at Weverton along the C&O Canal. Flying 
south, I failed to get a photo against the clear sky. I decided to enjoy it as 
it flew off. A lifer for me. Possibly seen in Frederick County as well. Have to 
check the map when I get home. 


Mark Rositol 
Fort Washington, MD 

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Subject: Swan Creek (8/1) and Fort Smallwood Park (8/2)
From: "'Bill Hubick' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 18:23:20 +0000 (UTC)
Hi Everyone,
Stan Arnold, Ed Carlson, and I did a weekend survey of Swan Creek in northern 
Anne Arundel Co. yesterday (8/1). The avocets appear to have moved on, but 100+ 
shorebirds continue along the edges of the dredge cells. In addition to similar 
numbers of KILLDEER, SPOTTED SANDPIPERs, LEAST and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERs, and 
LESSER YELLOWLEGS, there were a few more PECTORAL SANDPIPERs (4) and our first 
SEMIPALMATED PLOVERs (2) of the season. The summering BUFFLEHEAD (2), LESSER 
SCAUP (2), and RUDDY DUCKs (6) continue. We didn't see the Blue-winged Teal. 
Halloween Pennants emerged to mark the official transition to late summer. 


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24458040
On a walk with my daughters at Fort Smallwood Park this morning (8/2), a 
CASPIAN TERN had returned with a begging youngster in tow, our first of the 
season. I noted four ORCHARD ORIOLEs, the first I've seen locally in a couple 
weeks. At least two of them were obvious migrants flying high and landing in 
the tree tops. An ACADIAN FLYCATCHER continues to sing along the wooded edge 
near the gate (not a consistent nesting species here year to year). 


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24465295

Good birding,
Bill
*** NOTE: Swan Creek/Cox Creek is an active industrial site and mitigation 
project in northern Anne Arundel Co. Access is at the end of Kembo Road off 
Fort Smallwood Road near 695. The site is open ONLY Monday through Friday, 7:30 
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Please be in your car and leaving at 3:30 p.m.. Remember to 
always sign in at the office, to be on your best behavior (people have worked 
hard to coordinate this access), and to stick to permitted areas. This Swan 
Creek map linked here details where you are and aren't allowed to walk. 
http://www.billhubick.com/docs/swan_creek_map.jpg. *** 


Bill HubickPasadena, Marylandbill_hubick AT yahoo.comhttp://www.billhubick.com
http://www.marylandbiodiversity.com
http://www.facebook.com/MarylandBiodiversity

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Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite Salisbury Wicomico
From: Betsy Bangert <elizabetsy111 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 09:51:10 -0400
A STKI was observed this morning by Ellen Lawler in Salisbury in a spruce tree 
near Oak Hill Apartments off of Riverside Dr. It was relocated a little bit 
south of the area by Ryan Johnson at the intersection of Crestview Ln and 
Riverside Dr. also perched in a spruce tree. It presently is soaring north of 
Oak Hill Apartments. Good luck to anyone who tries! Congrats on a nice find 
Ellen! 


Good Birding!

Betsy Bangert
Ocean Pines, MD

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: shorebirds around Loch Raven & White Marsh
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 08:39:04 -0400
Hey all,


     Before I joined Debbie Terry to check couple of flats at Loch Raven,
had two Solitary Sandpipers in a flooded fields near Whitelyn Farms.  At
Paper Mill Flats: we had 6 Killdeer, 1 Spotted, 1 Solitary, 1 Greater
Yellowlegs, 80 Semipalmated Sandpiper and 4 Least Sandpiper.  Then to
Warren Flats and only 1 Killdeer.  A couple weeks ago at warren flats, I
had a spotted and two lesser yellowlegs.    Then I went on to White Marsh
to check on Corporate Drive Retention Pond: 1 Solitary, 1 Greater
Yellowlegs, 1 Lesser Yellowlegs, 8 Least Sandpiper and 6 Semipalmated
Sandpiper.  Around this time last year, I had a juvenile Bairds Sandpiper
there.


      Kevin Graff
      Jarrettsville, MD
      KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Re: Re: Ebird question
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 04:49:34 -0400
But can't things like Budgie be added to the domestic birds of DC, so that
it doesn't get included in lists?

Hugh

On Sat, Aug 1, 2015 at 10:20 PM, 'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC
Birding  wrote:

> Sharon:
>
> Budgie probably isn't in a list of "domestic" birds for DC so there's no
> choice but the real deal. It'll eventually get invalidated as the only
> feral population in the US, if it still exists, is/was in Hernando Beach,
> Florida. My info is ancient, though! But, reporting exotics may pay off
> eventually if the population becomes established. Happens all the time in
> California, Texas and Florida. If it's a single bird, not too likely!
>
> Tyler Bell
> jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
> California, Maryland
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Art Drauglis 
> *To:* Maryland & DC Birding 
> *Sent:* Saturday, August 1, 2015 8:51 AM
> *Subject:* [MDBirding] Re: Ebird question
>
> On Friday, July 31, 2015 at 5:39:12 PM UTC-4, Sharon F1727 wrote:
> > I thought Ebird would treat my record of what I assume was an escaped
> budgie in DC the same way it treated the domestic goose I recorded at
> Kenilworth Gardens, but instead the software seems to be recording it as if
> it was a legitimate, wild budgerigar. Am I missing something? Is there an
> established protocol for recording escapees, and if not, and is it better
> not to record them at all? Thanks
> >
> > Sharon Forsyth
> > Washington, DC
>
> My experience is that it may take a few days (or weeks) or a reviewer to
> catch up things like this.
>
> Art D
> W. DC
>
>
>
>
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>
>
> --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
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>



-- 
Hugh McGuinness
Washington, D.C.

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Subject: Re: Re: Ebird question
From: "'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 02:20:15 +0000 (UTC)
Sharon:
Budgie probably isn't in a list of "domestic" birds for DC so there's no choice 
but the real deal. It'll eventually get invalidated as the only feral 
population in the US, if it still exists, is/was in Hernando Beach, Florida. My 
info is ancient, though! But, reporting exotics may pay off eventually if the 
population becomes established. Happens all the time in California, Texas and 
Florida. If it's a single bird, not too likely! 


Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland
      From: Art Drauglis 
 To: Maryland & DC Birding  
 Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2015 8:51 AM
 Subject: [MDBirding] Re: Ebird question
   
On Friday, July 31, 2015 at 5:39:12 PM UTC-4, Sharon F1727 wrote:
> I thought Ebird would treat my record of what I assume was an escaped budgie 
in DC the same way it treated the domestic goose I recorded at Kenilworth 
Gardens, but instead the software seems to be recording it as if it was a 
legitimate, wild budgerigar. Am I missing something? Is there an established 
protocol for recording escapees, and if not, and is it better not to record 
them at all? Thanks 

> 
> Sharon Forsyth
> Washington, DC

My experience is that it may take a few days (or weeks) or a reviewer to catch 
up things like this. 


Art D
W. DC



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Subject: Re: Black-headed Gull?
From: Kurt Schwarz <goawaybird AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 01 Aug 2015 16:14:03 -0400
That bill looks red to me! I think you have the genuine article! Nice
find!!!!!

Kurt Schwarz
Ellicott City, Howard
Goawaybird at verizon dot net


On 8/1/15, 3:58 PM, "'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding"
 wrote:

>Jane Kostenko and I spent the night with a friend who lives in a private
>beach community in Calvert County. After watching the "blue moon" last
>night, we thought we'd get up early and do some beach combing. Sadly,
>there were no significant waves to wash up fresh fossils. But, as the
>morning wore on, gulls started to come to the beach near his cottage. I
>spied a bird that I initially thought was a Bonaparte's Gull. I grabbed
>the point and shoot and walked toward the group until they started to get
>antsy then snapped a few frames as doc shots for eBird. Now, looking at
>the pix, we believe this is a Black-headed Gull. Not many hooded gulls
>with red bill and red legs! I'd love to know that we're right!
>
>Uncropped
>
>https://www.flickr.com/photos/8671193 AT N08/20180677246/in/dateposted-public
>/
> 
>Heavily cropped
>https://www.flickr.com/photos/8671193 AT N08/20198272782/in/dateposted-public
>/
>
>Tyler Bell
>jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
>California, Maryland
>
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>- http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html


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Subject: Black-headed Gull?
From: "'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 19:58:50 +0000 (UTC)
Jane Kostenko and I spent the night with a friend who lives in a private beach 
community in Calvert County. After watching the "blue moon" last night, we 
thought we'd get up early and do some beach combing. Sadly, there were no 
significant waves to wash up fresh fossils. But, as the morning wore on, gulls 
started to come to the beach near his cottage. I spied a bird that I initially 
thought was a Bonaparte's Gull. I grabbed the point and shoot and walked toward 
the group until they started to get antsy then snapped a few frames as doc 
shots for eBird. Now, looking at the pix, we believe this is a Black-headed 
Gull. Not many hooded gulls with red bill and red legs! I'd love to know that 
we're right! 


Uncropped

https://www.flickr.com/photos/8671193 AT N08/20180677246/in/dateposted-public/
 
Heavily cropped
https://www.flickr.com/photos/8671193 AT N08/20198272782/in/dateposted-public/

Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland

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Subject: Ho Co (Miss Kite)
From: "Bonnie Ott" <Bonnieott AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 01 Aug 2015 14:50:26 -0400
I was delighted to find a Mississippi Kite this morning at the Howard County 
Conservancy. It was perched in a dead snag and had a few Fish Crows nearby. 
They were “talking” to it but not harassing it. I watched it hunt for 
dragonflies over the field 5 times. It spent about 30 minutes before catching a 
thermal and sailing away. Luckily a number of people got there in time to see 
it. Most especially Jo Solem who has had it on her county wish list for as long 
as I have known her 


A great start to the fall season! https://flic.kr/p/wLHyT1

Bonnie Ott

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Subject: Re: Ebird question
From: Art Drauglis <lwsyrup AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 05:51:46 -0700 (PDT)
On Friday, July 31, 2015 at 5:39:12 PM UTC-4, Sharon F1727 wrote:
> I thought Ebird would treat my record of what I assume was an escaped budgie 
in DC the same way it treated the domestic goose I recorded at Kenilworth 
Gardens, but instead the software seems to be recording it as if it was a 
legitimate, wild budgerigar. Am I missing something? Is there an established 
protocol for recording escapees, and if not, and is it better not to record 
them at all? Thanks 

> 
> Sharon Forsyth
> Washington, DC

My experience is that it may take a few days (or weeks) or a reviewer to catch 
up things like this. 


Art D
W. DC

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Subject: Re: lower Eastern Shore, July 24-29, 2015, VA & MD, equal time, VA 1st.
From: Larry Hindman <yellowdogretrievers AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 05:03:40 -0700 (PDT)
On Friday, July 31, 2015 at 7:39:08 PM UTC-4, Harry Armistead wrote:
> LOWER EASTERN SHORE, JULY 25-29, 2015, equal time in MD
> & VA, 1st in VA.  Because
> of frequent rains, I guess, many Magnolia grandiflora still have a few
> blossoms.  The crepe myrtles are
> luxuriant and there are some huge clusters of pokeweed, that will be 
patronized 

> by catbirds and thrushes.  In the tidal
> and brackish areas the marsh hibiscuses are in full bloom, esp. at Pool 5 of
> Blackwater refuge.  
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> JULY 25, SATURDAY. Seen from Route 13:  A doe & her little fawn near Smyrna, 
DE, 

> out on the mud of a tidal creek.  A
> Cattle Egret with cattle N of Pocomoke City, MD.  At the Purdue chicken 
plant near Accomac, VA, 

> 190 Canada Geese.
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> CHINCOTEAGUE, VA, AREA. 
> Brief visits to 3 areas.  The
> CAUSEWAY, 4:30-5:15, high tide, 84-85°F., winds S 5-10: bald eagle 5, glossy
> ibis 8, short-billed dowitcher 80, greater yellowlegs 6, willet 3, 
Forster’s 

> tern 80, brown pelican 4, seaside sparrow 1, black-necked stilt 4, whimbrel 
11, 

> boat-tailed grackle 22, fish crow 5, great blue heron 6, great egret 80, 
snowy 

> egret 75, black skimmer 65, little blue heron 5, tricolored heron 6, osprey 
3, 

> American oystercatcher 3, common tern 2, royal tern 1, white ibis 0, and
> Caspian tern 1.  The fecundity of the
> causeway is so impressive.  100s of
> nesting gulls, laughing and herring.  SNOW
> GOOSE POOL, except for the ditches, very dry, grassy, so not much action: 
white 

> ibis 11, snowy egret 7, great egret 2, little blue heron 2, least sandpiper 
5, 

> black skimmer 1.  SWAN COVE, water level
> low so lots of mud: cattle egret 55, snowy egret 7, white ibis 11, glossy 
ibis 

> 3, tricolored heron 4, tundra swan 1 (no doubt disabled), little blue heron 
5, 

> great blue heron 3, osprey 1, American oystercatcher 1, semipalmated plover 
25, 

> greater yellowlegs 5, short-billed dowitcher 120, willet 8, royal tern 90,
> black skimmer 3, indigo bunting 1 male, Forster’s tern 10, Canada goose 45,
> great egret 25, least/semipalmated sandpipers 110.  With the big buildup to 
the pony festival 

> there are 100s of cars yet am able to navigate around pretty well with few
> delays. 
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> WHITE IBIS.  I have
> talked with George Armistead about the count of 1,700 White Ibis that he, Tom
> Johnson, and Doug Gochfeld made early in the day of Thursday, July 23 on the
> Chincoteague causeway at Queen Sound. 
> This was a careful count.  George
> believes there may have been even more counted if they had started earlier in
> the day.
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> JULY 26, SUNDAY.  CAPE
> CHARLES/KIPTOPEKE, VA.  The day of the
> Delmarva Tip annual butterfly count that takes place within the same circle 
as 

> the Cape Charles Christmas Bird Count. 
> Twenty or so of us assemble at the Visitor Center of the Eastern Shore
> of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge (ESVNWR), incl. Teta Kain, Adrienne 
Frank 

> et al.  I accompany compiler Lynn
> Davidson and Hal Wierenga.  We butterfly
> from 9 A.M. until 7 P.M., covering 50 miles of roads, mid-80s, sunny, S winds
> 10 m.p.h.  
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> We pay special attention to patches of clover, sea oxeye,
> mustard, dogbane, several butterfly gardens, passion flowers (spectacular
> flowers but w/o butterflies), mimosas, and, especially, abelia bushes.  The 
abelias of the ESVNWR are especially 

> productive, examples of non-native plants that are prime butterfly habitat 
and 

> should be preserved and even expanded.  Their
> flowering is especially lush this summer. 
> Areas we cover include Ramp Lane, Bull’s Drive, ESVNWR, Magothy Bay
> Natural Area Preserve, and these roads: Custis Tomb, Holly Dale, Jacobia, and
> Arlington.  This count is nice because you
> don’t have to get up early, and much of the action is done within the 
comfort 

> of a car with AC, peering at close range into road shoulders and ditches at 
vegetation 

> good for butterflies.  This is a skill
> set I do not do very well with, but Lynn & Hal are experts, seeing all sorts
> of butterflies before I do, if, in fact, I see them at all.
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> BUT FIRST THE BIRDS: Locally breeding species – blue
> grosbeak 4, indigo bunting 7, white-eyed vireo 1, northern cardinal 6, 
Carolina 

> wren 5, yellow-billed cuckoo 3, northern bobwhite 3, clapper rail 4, white 
ibis 

> 80, bald eagle 3, chipping sparrow 6, northern mockingbird 7, grasshopper
> sparrow 17 (most of these, to our surprise, in low-growth soy
> bean fields), field sparrow 1, summer tanager 3 (incl. a male carrying food),
> eastern bluebird 4, orchard oriole 3, eastern meadowlark 2, red-tailed hawk 
2, mourning 

> dove 3, ruby-throated hummingbird 7, eastern wood pewee 2.  Before we hook 
up LD & HW see a 

> yellow-throated warbler at a well-vegetated puddle next to Holly Dale Road 
and 

> later in the day we see 4 yellow warblers at the same place, all I suspect
> early migrants.  Hal & Lynn also see
> 6 wild turkeys and a red fox early in the day. 
> 
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> Some of the dragonflies Lynn & Hal ID are halloween
> pennants, green darners, and amberwings. 
> We also see a gray squirrel and hear another, the latter singing his
> little heart out, plus 3 cicada species, many hummingbird moths, 7 eastern
> cottontails, and 14 deer.  A sap seep in
> an oak tree at Custis and several muddy puddles help to boost our butterfly
> totals.  
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> The BUTTERFLIES.  At
> least 29 species incl. > 200 swallowtails of 5 species (in order of
> abundance – spicebush, tiger, palamedes, black, and 1 of the rare 
giants).  There are lots of buckeyes, esp. in the 

> clover.  Also azures, red admiral,
> checkerspots, duskywings, eastern tailed blue, red-spotted purples, snouts,
> juniper hairstreaks, an American lady, a common wood nymph, tawny emperors,
> cabbage whites, cloudless and orange sulphurs, a couple of monarchs, 
variegated 

> fritillaries, and various skippers: saltmarsh (fond of sea oxeye), zabulon,
> silver-spotted, broad-winged, and sachem plus an additional  hairstreak 
whose name escapes me.  I’m not very familiar with bugs so pardon any 

> incorrect nomenclature.  
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> We dine at the Great Machipongo Clam Shack in
> Nassawadox.  Pretty good food.  Excellent clam chowder & stewed tomatoes,
> good flounder, and a merely so-so martini. 
> The GMCS is loaded with hundreds of knickknacks and accessories to food,
> most of them pretty tasteful once one gets past the T-shirt section, and 
there 

> are huge freezers full of seafood with notices on them to open them up.  
Afterwards there is a vigorous chorus of 

> katydids outside of the restaurant right next to the parking area under a
> waxing gibbous moon and it is nice to listen to some great organ compositions
> on “Pipe Dreams” on the way south to my minimalist but somewhat 
inexpensive 

> motel room, that lacks a phone, a clock, and, to this sinus-challenged
> birdhead, a comforting, reassuring box of tissues, but to its credit it does
> have a small fridge … but the Peacock suffices. 
> And Room 3 will again be the site of the Cape Charles Christmas Bird
> Count compilation, c. 7 P.M., this coming December 30.  In spite of such 
vagaries, a MOST stimulating 

> day. 
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> JULY 27, MONDAY.  Nice
> to sleep in.  Work my way north, ending
> at our place, Rigby’s Folly, on Ferry Neck, Talbot County, MD, at 7:45
> P.M.  Hand-lettered sign near Townsend,
> VA: “For sale.  Horse and greenhead fly
> trap.”  Later Dave Brinker gives me a
> tutorial on what this is.  On the traffic
> report of WHRO: “Armistead is congested.” 
> A road named after an ancestor. 
> As it turns out I AM congested, out of Claritin, but WHRO has no way of
> knowing this.  
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> OYSTER, VA DUMP & LANDFILL.  9:45 – 10:10 A.M.  Substantial rain.  
Stayed in the car.  They’re accommodating here.  If you go be extremely 
courteous and 

> respectful.  Night-herons 79 (incl. at
> least 6 adult Yellow-crowned Night Herons, 56 black vultures, 235 Canada 
geese, 

> 20 Herring and 215 laughing gulls, 5 snowy egrets, 4 great egrets, but,
> surprisingly, no boat-tailed grackles or fish crows.  75°F., S 5-10, 
overcast, and, the 

> rain.  The night herons, motionless in
> the willows, gray eminences, as are the black vultures, waiting for the next
> delivery of delectable garbage.
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> WILLIS WHARF, VA.  75°F.,
> 10:30 – 11 A.M., calm, overcast, low tide. 
> Whimbrel 10, killdeer 2, greater yellowlegs 1, great blue heron 7, green
> heron 2, great egret 12, Caspian 1, Forster’s 6 & gull-billed 1 terns,
> American oystercatcher 2, least sandpiper 11, semipalmated plover 5, barn
> swallow 50, yellow-crowned night heron 1 immature, snowy egret 2, and bald
> eagle 1 plus a painted turtle in the Ballard Park pond.  Zero willets, 
marbled godwits, or ruddy 

> turnstones.  TEMPERANCEVILLE, VA, near
> the Tyson chicken plant: 2 bald eagles.
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> DEAL ISLAND W.M.A., Somerset County, MD.  12:45 – 2:15 P.M., 81-85°F.,
> mostly overcast, winds SW 15, high tide but falling.  To be sure, work has 
been done on the 

> periphery of the 2,800-acre impoundment, but there are next-to-no birds in
> it.  Dumpster Road is open.  Edges of Riley Roberts Road have been
> bushogged.  Both roads have gravel and 15
> m.p.h. is about as comfortable as one, at least this one, can drive.  Great 
egret 58, snowy egret 19, black-necked 

> stilt 1 large, flying juvenile, glossy ibis 9 (checked for white-faced but 
… 

> no), tricolored heron 2, unID’d duck 7, great blue heron 3, Canada goose 
11, 

> bald eagle 2, black vulture 4, turkey vulture 14, osprey 4, short-billed
> dowitcher 1, greater yellowlegs 17, seaside sparrow 7, boat-tailed grackle 1,
> northern harrier 1, red-winged blackbird 70, eastern bluebird 3, and eastern
> kingbird 1 plus a male Black Swallowtail and 2 deer.  No willets – the 
breeders have probably left. 

> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> BLACKWATER N.W.R., MD: 83-87°F., mostly overcast, SW 15, 3:45 – 6
> P.M., tidal water high, impounded fresh waters low.  Not a GREAT deal.  
Mallard 49, American black duck 8, Canada 

> goose 24, spotted 1, least 19 & semipalmated 8 sandpipers, greater
> yellowlegs 8, red-headed woodpecker 3 (2 adults & 1 flying juvenile),
> Virginia rail 4, chipping sparrow 12, pileated woodpecker 1, green heron 1,
> great blue heron 12, great egret 14, snowy egret 3, bald eagle 9, osprey 6,
> red-tailed hawk 1, Forster’s tern 3, red-winged blackbird 1,240
> (funny time of year to see a big blackbird flock, eh?), indigo bunting 3, 
blue 

> grosbeak 3, eastern kingbird 3, American white pelican 1, and tree swallow 70
> plus 1 deer, 2 painted turtles, and 2 eastern cottontails (plus an additional
> bunny d.o.r.).  Most of the shorebirds
> are in Pool 5B. 
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> RIGBY’S FOLLY, arrive c. 7:50 P.M.  Fair, 81°F., winds SW 5+, 
13.5/16ths” in 

> the rain gauge since last time. 
> Ruby-throated hummingbird at the feeder, 1 green heron.  In the cove 3 
diamondback terrapin.  3 does at the driveway bend.  Fields are still fallow, 
lush with grasses 

> and weeds, and much sorghum left over from last year’s spillage.  A gray 
squirrel scampers, lickety-split, 

> across Route 329 earlier in the day.  
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> JULY 28, TUESDAY.  4
> painted turtles in Frog Hollow.  Lots of
> bluets (damselflies) over the SAV around the dock.  Most of this SAV is 
Ruppia maritima, 

> and there is A LOT of it, the cove a morass. 
> Jan Reese suggests that much of the SAV here earlier in the year is 
Zannichellia 

> palustris (Horned Pondweed), saying that the Ruppia (Widgeon Grass,
> still spelled with the d in contrast to the bird) develops later.  A doe and 
2 small fawns at the driveway bend 

> at 7:15 P.M.  Just take it easy today, sleep
> 10 hours last night, recovering from 2 active days.  4 pearl crescents.  Do 
a few chores.  Two bald eagles low, over Field 7.   

> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> JULY 29, WEDNESDAY. 
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> BLACKWATER N.W.R. (+ Egypt Road, too),  6:45-7:30 A.M.  What a difference a 
day (or a different time 

> of day) makes.  Some of yesterday’s
> totals from the late afternoon are in parentheses: great egret 63 (14), bald
> eagle 18 (9), eastern cottontail 11 (2), greater yellowlegs 4 (8), 
semipalmated 

> plover 1 (0), red-tailed hawk 1, snowy egret 6 (3), American black duck 13 
(8), 

> red-headed woodpecker 1, American white pelican 1 (1), grasshopper sparrow 1,
> least/semipalmated sandpiper 25, indigo bunting 4, blue grosbeak 4, gray
> squirrel 1.  In the late afternoon today,
> c. 3:41 P.M., at Blackwater: 245 brown-headed cowbirds, 4 Forster’s terns, 
and 

> a short-billed dowitcher.  60 rock
> pigeons (a lot for this county) in a field west of Egypt Road.
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> ADAM ISLAND, DORCHESTER COUNTY, MD.  9 A.M. – noon.  A trip to band young 
brown pelicans.  Thirty will have specimens taken to test for 

> West Nile Virus and Avian Influenza also.  There are c. 125 pairs.  We band 
252 young pelicans, all of them 

> “downies” (with little or no feathering yet) as opposed to nearly 
adult-sized “bruisers” 

> and so-called “naked chicks” (those too small to band and lacking down or
> feathers).  The recovery rate for banded
> brown pelicans is 8% according to Dave Brinker, so with any luck 20 or so of
> our birds today will be heard from again. 
> 
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> There are 19 of us, organized by Dave and John Weske and
> including Don Webster, Marion Clement, and Beth Reynolds, transported in 3
> boats.  I see no sign of the great blue
> herons and the bald eagle pair that nested on Adam in recent years.  Off to 
the south on Holland Island, where 

> once we banded 1,456 chicks in one day, apparently no pelicans are
> breeding this year, but there are still plenty of cormorants.  
Dorchester’s former thriving heron/ibis 

> colonies are a shadow of what they used to be. 
> Most of the cormorant nests today – far fewer than pelican nests - are
> on the remains of the toppled U. S. Navy tower.
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> Counts of flight-capable birds in sight at one time:
> Double-crested cormorant 55, brown pelican 240, herring gull 135, great 
black-backed 

> gull 20.  Also seen: great egret 1,
> osprey 4 (2 pairs; 2 nests seen), American oystercatcher 8, seaside sparrow 
1, 

> unID’d duck 1 (probably a gadwall; it is backlit), least sandpiper 14, 
laughing 

> gull 1, barn swallow 2, MUTE SWAN 2. 
> High tide c. noon.  Winds SW 5-10,
> fair, temps. In the low-mid 80s.  I made
> what I believe is a complete count of pelican nests still with eggs with 
these 

> results: 1 egg 2 nests; 2 eggs 2 nests; 3 eggs 4 nests; 2 eggs & 1 young 3
> nests; 1 egg & 2 young 1 nest.  Plus
> there are perhaps 30-40 downies still too small to band.  This is my 49th 
year of visits to 

> the Dorchester islands, the first being 1967 when Van Hubbard and I took my
> small skiff up Fin Creek on Bloodsworth Island.
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> Some ADAM ISLAND DRAMATIS PERSONAE.  John, bearing bandoliers of strings of 
bands 

> and parachute cord at a jaunty angle, and cutoff leather gloves, looks like 
and 

> is the genuine article, and he closes the clunky pelican bands with the
> precision and speed of a neurosurgeon, and is great company, too.  Beth, the 
only person I know who has 

> recordings of klezmer reggae, and Marion, also get good crimps on the bands
> they do when I bring them birds to process. 
> Don, longtime DNR person, has tales of recent 5-figure counts of
> Redheads on the lower Chesapeake Bay of MD, that I bet no birders are aware 
of, 

> symptomatic of the gulf between them and game biologists.  He also knows 
former Phillies owner Ruly 

> Carpenter and has been hunting locally with the likes of Mike Schmidt, Larry
> Bowa, and Greg Luzinski.   
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> CROCHERON: royal tern 9, double-crested cormorant 40, brown
> pelican 11.  
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> MISCELLANEOUS OTHER SIGHTINGS TODAY.  Route 33 at 5:40 A.M. a d.o.r. Striped
> Skunk.  A gray squirrel next to Route 50
> in Easton.  A yellow-billed cuckoo at
> Golden Hill.  A red-headed woodpecker at
> the “big bend” of Route 336 and Edgar Road. 
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> ROYAL TERNS.  John
> Weske et al. banded 45 royal tern chicks recently at Reedy Island, the little
> island c. 2 mi. N of Skimmer Island (Ocean City, MD).
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> DOLPHINS.  Talbot
> County.  Recently sizeable pods of
> dolphins have been encountered in the Tred Avon and Miles rivers.  Our 
neighbors, Michael & Nancy Lytell, 

> saw some in the Tred Avon recently and photographed the falcate dorsal fin, 
all 

> that was showing, of one.  I’ve never
> seen them from our shoreline and would like to get them on the yard list 
along 

> with the manatee seen recently in the Delaware-Chesapeake Canal.  Marshall 
Iliff and I saw some dolphins once 

> off Holland Island on a June 1 and Jared Sparks and I found a dead one on 
Adam 

> Island.  Thanks to Kathy Shuman for this
> informative UR:.
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
http://patch.com/maryland/annapolis/boaters-spot-large-pod-dolphins-near-st-michaels-0 

> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> Best to all. – Harry Armistead, Philadelphia.
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> “Fortunately, for squirrels, they have cuteness on their
> side.  Plenty of people feed squirrels
> just like other people feed birds.  The
> troublemakers’ acrobatics can be fun to watch. 
> But, rodents that they are, after a while their gnawing, feeder-destroying  
habits may shave points off the cuteness 

> factor.”  Feeding wild birds in
> America: culture, commerce & conservation by Paul J. Baicich, Margaret
> A. Barker & Carrol L. Henderson (Texas A&M University Press, 2015, 306
> p.) [My Droll Yankee feeders have been patronized by squirrels for many 
years; 

> these feeders seem impervious to any squirrel damage. – HTA]

Thank you Harry. Found them the next day.  Larry

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Subject: lower Eastern Shore, July 24-29, 2015, VA & MD, equal time, VA 1st.
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Jul 2015 23:39:06 +0000



















LOWER EASTERN SHORE, JULY 25-29, 2015, equal time in MD
& VA, 1st in VA.  Because
of frequent rains, I guess, many Magnolia grandiflora still have a few
blossoms.  The crepe myrtles are
luxuriant and there are some huge clusters of pokeweed, that will be patronized
by catbirds and thrushes.  In the tidal
and brackish areas the marsh hibiscuses are in full bloom, esp. at Pool 5 of
Blackwater refuge.  

 

JULY 25, SATURDAY. Seen from Route 13: A doe & her little fawn near Smyrna, DE, 

out on the mud of a tidal creek.  A
Cattle Egret with cattle N of Pocomoke City, MD. At the Purdue chicken plant 
near Accomac, VA, 

190 Canada Geese.

 

CHINCOTEAGUE, VA, AREA. 
Brief visits to 3 areas.  The
CAUSEWAY, 4:30-5:15, high tide, 84-85°F., winds S 5-10: bald eagle 5, glossy
ibis 8, short-billed dowitcher 80, greater yellowlegs 6, willet 3, Forster’s
tern 80, brown pelican 4, seaside sparrow 1, black-necked stilt 4, whimbrel 11,
boat-tailed grackle 22, fish crow 5, great blue heron 6, great egret 80, snowy
egret 75, black skimmer 65, little blue heron 5, tricolored heron 6, osprey 3,
American oystercatcher 3, common tern 2, royal tern 1, white ibis 0, and
Caspian tern 1.  The fecundity of the
causeway is so impressive.  100s of
nesting gulls, laughing and herring.  SNOW
GOOSE POOL, except for the ditches, very dry, grassy, so not much action: white
ibis 11, snowy egret 7, great egret 2, little blue heron 2, least sandpiper 5,
black skimmer 1.  SWAN COVE, water level
low so lots of mud: cattle egret 55, snowy egret 7, white ibis 11, glossy ibis
3, tricolored heron 4, tundra swan 1 (no doubt disabled), little blue heron 5,
great blue heron 3, osprey 1, American oystercatcher 1, semipalmated plover 25,
greater yellowlegs 5, short-billed dowitcher 120, willet 8, royal tern 90,
black skimmer 3, indigo bunting 1 male, Forster’s tern 10, Canada goose 45,
great egret 25, least/semipalmated sandpipers 110. With the big buildup to the 
pony festival 

there are 100s of cars yet am able to navigate around pretty well with few
delays. 

 

WHITE IBIS.  I have
talked with George Armistead about the count of 1,700 White Ibis that he, Tom
Johnson, and Doug Gochfeld made early in the day of Thursday, July 23 on the
Chincoteague causeway at Queen Sound. 
This was a careful count.  George
believes there may have been even more counted if they had started earlier in
the day.

 

JULY 26, SUNDAY.  CAPE
CHARLES/KIPTOPEKE, VA.  The day of the
Delmarva Tip annual butterfly count that takes place within the same circle as
the Cape Charles Christmas Bird Count. 
Twenty or so of us assemble at the Visitor Center of the Eastern Shore
of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge (ESVNWR), incl. Teta Kain, Adrienne Frank
et al.  I accompany compiler Lynn
Davidson and Hal Wierenga.  We butterfly
from 9 A.M. until 7 P.M., covering 50 miles of roads, mid-80s, sunny, S winds
10 m.p.h.  

 

We pay special attention to patches of clover, sea oxeye,
mustard, dogbane, several butterfly gardens, passion flowers (spectacular
flowers but w/o butterflies), mimosas, and, especially, abelia bushes. The 
abelias of the ESVNWR are especially 

productive, examples of non-native plants that are prime butterfly habitat and
should be preserved and even expanded.  Their
flowering is especially lush this summer. 
Areas we cover include Ramp Lane, Bull’s Drive, ESVNWR, Magothy Bay
Natural Area Preserve, and these roads: Custis Tomb, Holly Dale, Jacobia, and
Arlington.  This count is nice because you
don’t have to get up early, and much of the action is done within the comfort
of a car with AC, peering at close range into road shoulders and ditches at 
vegetation 

good for butterflies.  This is a skill
set I do not do very well with, but Lynn & Hal are experts, seeing all sorts
of butterflies before I do, if, in fact, I see them at all.

 

BUT FIRST THE BIRDS: Locally breeding species – blue
grosbeak 4, indigo bunting 7, white-eyed vireo 1, northern cardinal 6, Carolina
wren 5, yellow-billed cuckoo 3, northern bobwhite 3, clapper rail 4, white ibis
80, bald eagle 3, chipping sparrow 6, northern mockingbird 7, grasshopper
sparrow 17 (most of these, to our surprise, in low-growth soy
bean fields), field sparrow 1, summer tanager 3 (incl. a male carrying food),
eastern bluebird 4, orchard oriole 3, eastern meadowlark 2, red-tailed hawk 2, 
mourning 

dove 3, ruby-throated hummingbird 7, eastern wood pewee 2. Before we hook up LD 
& HW see a 

yellow-throated warbler at a well-vegetated puddle next to Holly Dale Road and
later in the day we see 4 yellow warblers at the same place, all I suspect
early migrants.  Hal & Lynn also see
6 wild turkeys and a red fox early in the day. 


 

Some of the dragonflies Lynn & Hal ID are halloween
pennants, green darners, and amberwings. 
We also see a gray squirrel and hear another, the latter singing his
little heart out, plus 3 cicada species, many hummingbird moths, 7 eastern
cottontails, and 14 deer.  A sap seep in
an oak tree at Custis and several muddy puddles help to boost our butterfly
totals.  

 

The BUTTERFLIES.  At
least 29 species incl. > 200 swallowtails of 5 species (in order of
abundance – spicebush, tiger, palamedes, black, and 1 of the rare giants). 
There are lots of buckeyes, esp. in the 

clover.  Also azures, red admiral,
checkerspots, duskywings, eastern tailed blue, red-spotted purples, snouts,
juniper hairstreaks, an American lady, a common wood nymph, tawny emperors,
cabbage whites, cloudless and orange sulphurs, a couple of monarchs, variegated
fritillaries, and various skippers: saltmarsh (fond of sea oxeye), zabulon,
silver-spotted, broad-winged, and sachem plus an additional hairstreak whose 
name escapes me. I’m not very familiar with bugs so pardon any 

incorrect nomenclature.  

 

We dine at the Great Machipongo Clam Shack in
Nassawadox.  Pretty good food.  Excellent clam chowder & stewed tomatoes,
good flounder, and a merely so-so martini. 
The GMCS is loaded with hundreds of knickknacks and accessories to food,
most of them pretty tasteful once one gets past the T-shirt section, and there
are huge freezers full of seafood with notices on them to open them up. 
Afterwards there is a vigorous chorus of 

katydids outside of the restaurant right next to the parking area under a
waxing gibbous moon and it is nice to listen to some great organ compositions
on “Pipe Dreams” on the way south to my minimalist but somewhat inexpensive
motel room, that lacks a phone, a clock, and, to this sinus-challenged
birdhead, a comforting, reassuring box of tissues, but to its credit it does
have a small fridge … but the Peacock suffices. 
And Room 3 will again be the site of the Cape Charles Christmas Bird
Count compilation, c. 7 P.M., this coming December 30. In spite of such 
vagaries, a MOST stimulating 

day. 

 

JULY 27, MONDAY.  Nice
to sleep in.  Work my way north, ending
at our place, Rigby’s Folly, on Ferry Neck, Talbot County, MD, at 7:45
P.M.  Hand-lettered sign near Townsend,
VA: “For sale.  Horse and greenhead fly
trap.”  Later Dave Brinker gives me a
tutorial on what this is.  On the traffic
report of WHRO: “Armistead is congested.” 
A road named after an ancestor. 
As it turns out I AM congested, out of Claritin, but WHRO has no way of
knowing this.  

 

OYSTER, VA DUMP & LANDFILL. 9:45 – 10:10 A.M. Substantial rain. Stayed in the 
car. They’re accommodating here. If you go be extremely courteous and 

respectful.  Night-herons 79 (incl. at
least 6 adult Yellow-crowned Night Herons, 56 black vultures, 235 Canada geese,
20 Herring and 215 laughing gulls, 5 snowy egrets, 4 great egrets, but,
surprisingly, no boat-tailed grackles or fish crows. 75°F., S 5-10, overcast, 
and, the 

rain.  The night herons, motionless in
the willows, gray eminences, as are the black vultures, waiting for the next
delivery of delectable garbage.

 

WILLIS WHARF, VA.  75°F.,
10:30 – 11 A.M., calm, overcast, low tide. 
Whimbrel 10, killdeer 2, greater yellowlegs 1, great blue heron 7, green
heron 2, great egret 12, Caspian 1, Forster’s 6 & gull-billed 1 terns,
American oystercatcher 2, least sandpiper 11, semipalmated plover 5, barn
swallow 50, yellow-crowned night heron 1 immature, snowy egret 2, and bald
eagle 1 plus a painted turtle in the Ballard Park pond. Zero willets, marbled 
godwits, or ruddy 

turnstones.  TEMPERANCEVILLE, VA, near
the Tyson chicken plant: 2 bald eagles.

 

DEAL ISLAND W.M.A., Somerset County, MD.  12:45 – 2:15 P.M., 81-85°F.,
mostly overcast, winds SW 15, high tide but falling. To be sure, work has been 
done on the 

periphery of the 2,800-acre impoundment, but there are next-to-no birds in
it.  Dumpster Road is open.  Edges of Riley Roberts Road have been
bushogged.  Both roads have gravel and 15
m.p.h. is about as comfortable as one, at least this one, can drive. Great 
egret 58, snowy egret 19, black-necked 

stilt 1 large, flying juvenile, glossy ibis 9 (checked for white-faced but …
no), tricolored heron 2, unID’d duck 7, great blue heron 3, Canada goose 11,
bald eagle 2, black vulture 4, turkey vulture 14, osprey 4, short-billed
dowitcher 1, greater yellowlegs 17, seaside sparrow 7, boat-tailed grackle 1,
northern harrier 1, red-winged blackbird 70, eastern bluebird 3, and eastern
kingbird 1 plus a male Black Swallowtail and 2 deer. No willets – the 
breeders have probably left. 


 

BLACKWATER N.W.R., MD: 83-87°F., mostly overcast, SW 15, 3:45 – 6
P.M., tidal water high, impounded fresh waters low. Not a GREAT deal. Mallard 
49, American black duck 8, Canada 

goose 24, spotted 1, least 19 & semipalmated 8 sandpipers, greater
yellowlegs 8, red-headed woodpecker 3 (2 adults & 1 flying juvenile),
Virginia rail 4, chipping sparrow 12, pileated woodpecker 1, green heron 1,
great blue heron 12, great egret 14, snowy egret 3, bald eagle 9, osprey 6,
red-tailed hawk 1, Forster’s tern 3, red-winged blackbird 1,240
(funny time of year to see a big blackbird flock, eh?), indigo bunting 3, blue
grosbeak 3, eastern kingbird 3, American white pelican 1, and tree swallow 70
plus 1 deer, 2 painted turtles, and 2 eastern cottontails (plus an additional
bunny d.o.r.).  Most of the shorebirds
are in Pool 5B. 

 

RIGBY’S FOLLY, arrive c. 7:50 P.M. Fair, 81°F., winds SW 5+, 13.5/16ths” 
in 

the rain gauge since last time. 
Ruby-throated hummingbird at the feeder, 1 green heron. In the cove 3 
diamondback terrapin. 3 does at the driveway bend. Fields are still fallow, 
lush with grasses 

and weeds, and much sorghum left over from last year’s spillage. A gray 
squirrel scampers, lickety-split, 

across Route 329 earlier in the day.  

 

JULY 28, TUESDAY.  4
painted turtles in Frog Hollow.  Lots of
bluets (damselflies) over the SAV around the dock. Most of this SAV is Ruppia 
maritima, 

and there is A LOT of it, the cove a morass. 
Jan Reese suggests that much of the SAV here earlier in the year is 
Zannichellia 

palustris (Horned Pondweed), saying that the Ruppia (Widgeon Grass,
still spelled with the d in contrast to the bird) develops later. A doe and 2 
small fawns at the driveway bend 

at 7:15 P.M.  Just take it easy today, sleep
10 hours last night, recovering from 2 active days. 4 pearl crescents. Do a few 
chores. Two bald eagles low, over Field 7. 


 

JULY 29, WEDNESDAY. 

 

BLACKWATER N.W.R. (+ Egypt Road, too), 6:45-7:30 A.M. What a difference a day 
(or a different time 

of day) makes.  Some of yesterday’s
totals from the late afternoon are in parentheses: great egret 63 (14), bald
eagle 18 (9), eastern cottontail 11 (2), greater yellowlegs 4 (8), semipalmated
plover 1 (0), red-tailed hawk 1, snowy egret 6 (3), American black duck 13 (8),
red-headed woodpecker 1, American white pelican 1 (1), grasshopper sparrow 1,
least/semipalmated sandpiper 25, indigo bunting 4, blue grosbeak 4, gray
squirrel 1.  In the late afternoon today,
c. 3:41 P.M., at Blackwater: 245 brown-headed cowbirds, 4 Forster’s terns, 
and 

a short-billed dowitcher.  60 rock
pigeons (a lot for this county) in a field west of Egypt Road.

 

ADAM ISLAND, DORCHESTER COUNTY, MD. 9 A.M. – noon. A trip to band young brown 
pelicans. Thirty will have specimens taken to test for 

West Nile Virus and Avian Influenza also. There are c. 125 pairs. We band 252 
young pelicans, all of them 

“downies” (with little or no feathering yet) as opposed to nearly 
adult-sized “bruisers” 

and so-called “naked chicks” (those too small to band and lacking down or
feathers).  The recovery rate for banded
brown pelicans is 8% according to Dave Brinker, so with any luck 20 or so of
our birds today will be heard from again. 


 

There are 19 of us, organized by Dave and John Weske and
including Don Webster, Marion Clement, and Beth Reynolds, transported in 3
boats.  I see no sign of the great blue
herons and the bald eagle pair that nested on Adam in recent years. Off to the 
south on Holland Island, where 

once we banded 1,456 chicks in one day, apparently no pelicans are
breeding this year, but there are still plenty of cormorants. Dorchester’s 
former thriving heron/ibis 

colonies are a shadow of what they used to be. 
Most of the cormorant nests today – far fewer than pelican nests - are
on the remains of the toppled U. S. Navy tower.

 

Counts of flight-capable birds in sight at one time:
Double-crested cormorant 55, brown pelican 240, herring gull 135, great 
black-backed 

gull 20.  Also seen: great egret 1,
osprey 4 (2 pairs; 2 nests seen), American oystercatcher 8, seaside sparrow 1,
unID’d duck 1 (probably a gadwall; it is backlit), least sandpiper 14, 
laughing 

gull 1, barn swallow 2, MUTE SWAN 2. 
High tide c. noon.  Winds SW 5-10,
fair, temps. In the low-mid 80s.  I made
what I believe is a complete count of pelican nests still with eggs with these
results: 1 egg 2 nests; 2 eggs 2 nests; 3 eggs 4 nests; 2 eggs & 1 young 3
nests; 1 egg & 2 young 1 nest.  Plus
there are perhaps 30-40 downies still too small to band. This is my 49th year 
of visits to 

the Dorchester islands, the first being 1967 when Van Hubbard and I took my
small skiff up Fin Creek on Bloodsworth Island.

 

Some ADAM ISLAND DRAMATIS PERSONAE. John, bearing bandoliers of strings of 
bands 

and parachute cord at a jaunty angle, and cutoff leather gloves, looks like and
is the genuine article, and he closes the clunky pelican bands with the
precision and speed of a neurosurgeon, and is great company, too. Beth, the 
only person I know who has 

recordings of klezmer reggae, and Marion, also get good crimps on the bands
they do when I bring them birds to process. 
Don, longtime DNR person, has tales of recent 5-figure counts of
Redheads on the lower Chesapeake Bay of MD, that I bet no birders are aware of,
symptomatic of the gulf between them and game biologists. He also knows former 
Phillies owner Ruly 

Carpenter and has been hunting locally with the likes of Mike Schmidt, Larry
Bowa, and Greg Luzinski.   

 

CROCHERON: royal tern 9, double-crested cormorant 40, brown
pelican 11.  

 

MISCELLANEOUS OTHER SIGHTINGS TODAY.  Route 33 at 5:40 A.M. a d.o.r. Striped
Skunk.  A gray squirrel next to Route 50
in Easton.  A yellow-billed cuckoo at
Golden Hill.  A red-headed woodpecker at
the “big bend” of Route 336 and Edgar Road. 

 

ROYAL TERNS.  John
Weske et al. banded 45 royal tern chicks recently at Reedy Island, the little
island c. 2 mi. N of Skimmer Island (Ocean City, MD).

 

DOLPHINS.  Talbot
County.  Recently sizeable pods of
dolphins have been encountered in the Tred Avon and Miles rivers. Our 
neighbors, Michael & Nancy Lytell, 

saw some in the Tred Avon recently and photographed the falcate dorsal fin, all
that was showing, of one.  I’ve never
seen them from our shoreline and would like to get them on the yard list along
with the manatee seen recently in the Delaware-Chesapeake Canal. Marshall Iliff 
and I saw some dolphins once 

off Holland Island on a June 1 and Jared Sparks and I found a dead one on Adam
Island.  Thanks to Kathy Shuman for this
informative UR:.

 


http://patch.com/maryland/annapolis/boaters-spot-large-pod-dolphins-near-st-michaels-0 


 

Best to all. – Harry Armistead, Philadelphia.

 

“Fortunately, for squirrels, they have cuteness on their
side.  Plenty of people feed squirrels
just like other people feed birds.  The
troublemakers’ acrobatics can be fun to watch. 
But, rodents that they are, after a while their gnawing, feeder-destroying 
habits may shave points off the cuteness 

factor.”  Feeding wild birds in
America: culture, commerce & conservation by Paul J. Baicich, Margaret
A. Barker & Carrol L. Henderson (Texas A&M University Press, 2015, 306
p.) [My Droll Yankee feeders have been patronized by squirrels for many years;
these feeders seem impervious to any squirrel damage. – HTA]





 		 	   		  

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Subject: Browns Bridge area closed
From: Kurt Schwarz <krschwa1 AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 31 Jul 2015 19:25:34 -0400
Per today's Post WSSC has closed the Browns Bridge Rec Area due to a sewage 
spill. Closure is for 30 days. 


Kurt Schwarz 
Ellicott City, Howard
goawaybird at verizon dot net

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Subject: Re: Ebird question
From: "Jlstasz via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Jul 2015 17:48:31 -0400
Hi Sharon,
 
 

I don't know how DC treats them, but in Maryland your Budgerigar would get  
flagged and a reviewer would treat it as an Exotic/Escape. It would not 
show up  in any bar charts or maps.
 
Jim
 
Jim Stasz
North Beach MD
_jlstasz AT sol.com_ (mailto:jlstasz AT sol.com) 
one of several eBird Reviewers for Maryland

 
 
 
In a message dated 7/31/2015 5:39:14 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
sharonf1727 AT gmail.com writes:

I  thought Ebird would treat my record of what I assume was an escaped 
budgie in  DC the same way it treated the domestic goose I recorded at 
Kenilworth Gardens, but instead the software seems to be recording it as if it 
was a 

 legitimate, wild budgerigar. Am I missing something? Is there an 
established protocol for recording escapees, and if not, and is it better not 
to 

record  them at all? Thanks

Sharon Forsyth
Washington, DC

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Subject: Ebird question
From: Sharon F1727 <sharonf1727 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Jul 2015 14:39:12 -0700 (PDT)
I thought Ebird would treat my record of what I assume was an escaped budgie in 
DC the same way it treated the domestic goose I recorded at Kenilworth Gardens, 
but instead the software seems to be recording it as if it was a legitimate, 
wild budgerigar. Am I missing something? Is there an established protocol for 
recording escapees, and if not, and is it better not to record them at all? 
Thanks 


Sharon Forsyth
Washington, DC

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Subject: Re: Two Upland Sandpipers in Dorchester County on 29 July.These biirds were
From: Gene Ricks <gricks1949 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Jul 2015 15:56:21 -0400
Two still there 11:00 A.M Friday July 31.
On Jul 30, 2015 12:50 PM, "Joe Hanfman"  wrote:

> Upland Sandpipers still there. More towards the south end of the field as
> described by Les. Not with the Killdeers.
>
> Joe Hanfman
> Columbia, MD
>
> On Jul 29, 2015, at 4:19 PM, Les Roslund  wrote:
>
> These birds were east of Maple  Dam Road south of 4791 Maple Dam Road at
> 1:15 p.m. They were in a wheat stubble field about 50 yards from the road.
>
> --
> Les Roslund
> Easton, MD
>
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Subject: Re: reducing human/bird conflicts on Skimmer Island & others
From: dlitedirector AT comcast.net
Date: Fri, 31 Jul 2015 16:49:58 +0000 (UTC)
Excellent suggestion, Gail -- thanks. If appropriate for this listerve, please 
send suggestions and ideas for what will work to minimize human/bird conflict 
on these islands. 


If inappropriate for the listserve, please send suggestions directly to Dave 
Wilson at marshhawk67 AT gmail.com. 

Thanks! 
Jim Rapp 
----- Original Message -----

From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" 
 

To: dlitedirector AT comcast.net 
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2015 12:25:19 PM 
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] reducing human/bird conflicts on Skimmer Island & 
others 


I think it would help to have some *off-shore* signs telling folks not to land 
or approach the island closer than "x yards" -- I have seen signs like this 
near other breeding islands, e.g. in Maine. Education of course will also help, 
as will enforcement. I got the impression from comments on this page that the 
response of the DNR police is less than enthusastic...this has to change. The 
area should be patrolled regularly. 


Gail Mackiernan 


----- Original Message -----

From: dlitedirector AT comcast.net 
To: "mdbirding"  
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2015 11:38:57 AM 
Subject: [MDBirding] reducing human/bird conflicts on Skimmer Island & others 



Audubon Md-DC has kicked off the IBA (Important Bird Area) Champions program, 
which is designed to enlist birders to take action on bird conservation issues 
in Maryland and the District of Columbia. 




One of our target IBAs is the Maryland Coastal Bays IBA, the barrier island 
system behind Ocean City and Assateague where Skimmer Island is located. See: 




http://www.dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/Publiclands/Natural_Areas/SkimmerIsland.asp 





For years trespassing on Skimmer Island during the colonial nesting bird 
breeding season has diminished the fledging success of black skimmers, royal 
terns, and the suite of island nesting herons, egrets, and ibis. 




Soon, we will launch a campaign to engage the community about issues 
surrounding human disturbance on Skimmer and the four other newly created 
islands in this globally significant shallow estuary. 




For now, if you are in the coastal bays and see people trespassing on these 
islands, please notify the Natural Resources Police at 410-548-7070 (FYI: this 
is the local number for the NRP. If no one answers, the call automatically 
connect to the state-wide 24-hour number, 410-260-8888). 




If you are able, please email Dave Wilson at 



marshhawk67 AT gmail.com 



with the following information when you witness trespassing: 



Date(s) 

Time(s) 

Location of island 

Nature of activity 

Number of people 

Number of boats/Jetskis 

Presence of dogs 



Audubon will be using this information to bolster conservation efforts in the 
future so we greatly appreciate your participation in the important endeavor. 




Sincerely, 



Dave Wilson 

IBA Champions 




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Subject: reducing human/bird conflicts on Skimmer Island & others
From: dlitedirector AT comcast.net
Date: Fri, 31 Jul 2015 15:38:57 +0000 (UTC)

Audubon Md-DC has kicked off the IBA (Important Bird Area) Champions program, 
which is designed to enlist birders to take action on bird conservation issues 
in Maryland and the District of Columbia. 




One of our target IBAs is the Maryland Coastal Bays IBA, the barrier island 
system behind Ocean City and Assateague where Skimmer Island is located. See: 




http://www.dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/Publiclands/Natural_Areas/SkimmerIsland.asp 




For years trespassing on Skimmer Island during the colonial nesting bird 
breeding season has diminished the fledging success of black skimmers, royal 
terns, and the suite of island nesting herons, egrets, and ibis. 




Soon, we will launch a campaign to engage the community about issues 
surrounding human disturbance on Skimmer and the four other newly created 
islands in this globally significant shallow estuary. 




For now, if you are in the coastal bays and see people trespassing on these 
islands, please notify the Natural Resources Police at 410-548-7070 (FYI: this 
is the local number for the NRP. If no one answers, the call automatically 
connect to the state-wide 24-hour number, 410-260-8888). 




If you are able, please email Dave Wilson at 



marshhawk67 AT gmail.com 



with the following information when you witness trespassing: 



Date(s) 

Time(s) 

Location of island 

Nature of activity 

Number of people 

Number of boats/Jetskis 

Presence of dogs 



Audubon will be using this information to bolster conservation efforts in the 
future so we greatly appreciate your participation in the important endeavor. 




Sincerely, 



Dave Wilson 

IBA Champions 


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Subject: [FR] Bike Ride eggshell and subdued/vanished House Wren
From: JAMES SPEICHER <jugornought AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 22:42:05 -0400
I chanced to observe a fragment of a Robin's egg this morning on
Carroll Boyer Rd.  Still lots of time for those babies to grow, of
course.

My constantly performing House Wren either went silent yesterday, or
has left the premises, or met with an untimely accident [Sharpie?].
Perhaps, it was just time to fold the show.  I had an active nestbox
this year for the first time and although I never knew how many
hatchlings there were and wasn't able to observe the nest leaving day,
I believe I did observe a fledgling begging from an adult some time
later.

Jim Speicher
BroadRun/Burkittsville area
[FR] Frederick County
WCBC member

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Subject: Re: Re: RFI on Horsehead Tricolors
From: Hugh Vandervoort <hughva AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 19:00:46 -0400
On Tuesday there was one at the near end the lake, hanging out with a bunch
of Snowy Egrets.

Annapolis, MD
My Birding Blog
http://hughvandervoort.com/

On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 2:06 PM, s byrd  wrote:

> On Saturday, July 25, 2015 at 3:58:16 PM UTC-4, Kurt Schwarz wrote:
> > Where at Cheasapeake/Horsehead are the Tricolors being seen?
> >
> > K Schwarz
> >
> > Ellicott city
> > goawaybirdat Verizon dot org
>
> Saw 2 Tricoloreds there on the 28th . Clumbsily landing on the tops of the
> small trees near the trail left of Lake Knapp (the marsh that the trail
> encircles ) . They flew out of site towards the marsh and one refound
> feeding in the marsh when we got to the right side of the marsh (wooded
> area of the trail ) .
>
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Subject: Re: RFI on Horsehead Tricolors
From: s byrd <mybyrdz5 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 11:06:53 -0700 (PDT)
On Saturday, July 25, 2015 at 3:58:16 PM UTC-4, Kurt Schwarz wrote:
> Where at Cheasapeake/Horsehead are the Tricolors being seen?
> 
> K Schwarz
> 
> Ellicott city
> goawaybirdat Verizon dot org

Saw 2 Tricoloreds there on the 28th . Clumbsily landing on the tops of the 
small trees near the trail left of Lake Knapp (the marsh that the trail 
encircles ) . They flew out of site towards the marsh and one refound feeding 
in the marsh when we got to the right side of the marsh (wooded area of the 
trail ) . 


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Subject: Re: Two Upland Sandpipers in Dorchester County on 29 July.These biirds were
From: Joe Hanfman <auk1844 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 12:50:49 -0400
Upland Sandpipers still there. More towards the south end of the field as 
described by Les. Not with the Killdeers. 


Joe Hanfman
Columbia, MD

> On Jul 29, 2015, at 4:19 PM, Les Roslund  wrote:
> 
> These birds were east of Maple Dam Road south of 4791 Maple Dam Road at 1:15 
p.m. They were in a wheat stubble field about 50 yards from the road. 

> 
> -- 
> Les Roslund
> Easton, MD
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Subject: Re: AmericanGoldfinches are back!
From: Birdman42 <bill.todd42 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 18:59:34 -0700 (PDT)
On Tuesday, July 28, 2015 at 4:54:57 PM UTC-4, Elda Banks wrote:
>      A few months ago I was not seeing any American Goldfinches at my 
thistle feeder.  I noticed that several Maryland Birders commented on the same 
thing. I cleaned my feeders and bought new Niger seed but still no Goldfinches. 

>      Some of you  mentioned that you had seen them eating sunflower 
seeds. Recently my husband and I went to a birding store and purchased Song of 
America Finch Feast.  It has Niger seed and shelled sunflower chips. The 
Carolina Chickadees have just loved this. At least one Tufted Titmice has also 
been able to turn upside down and use the thistle feeder. Finally for three 
days we have been consistently seeing the American Goldfinches at the feeder. 
Is it because of the sunflower chips or is it just that they decided to return 
because the flowers they enjoy are in bloom?  

> 
>      Are others seeing  them now? Thanks.
> 
> 
> Elda Banks
> Colesville
> Silver Spring

AMGOs are picking my echinacea (coneflowers) clean--have been for the last 
couple weeks. They'll come right up to the porch while we're sitting there. 


Bill Todd
Frederick, MD

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Subject: Cecil Co. White Ibis
From: Mark Johnson <mj3151 AT outlook.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 20:30:45 -0400
A juvenile White Ibis is still being seen around the wet corn field and 
stormwater pond behind the Aaron's store along Rte. 213 in Elkton. The best 
opportunity to see the bird is around 5:30 in the afternoon when he seems to 
like to roost in the same bare snag at the extreme southwest corner of the 
parking lot...you can see him from your car as you approach, right out in the 
open above and behind the stormwater pond. If he goes to the rain pond out in 
the corn field, there's no way to see him without slithering through a lot of 
tall corn. 

 
Mark Johnson
Aberdeen
 		 	   		  

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Subject: Two Upland Sandpipers in Dorchester County on 29 July.These biirds were
From: Les Roslund <lesroslund AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 16:19:49 -0400
These birds were east of Maple  Dam Road south of 4791 Maple Dam Road at
1:15 p.m. They were in a wheat stubble field about 50 yards from the road.

-- 
Les Roslund
Easton, MD

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Subject: Tufted Titmouse wars
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 12:36:55 -0400
For the past two days I have had up to four fighting Titmice in the yard.
They Seem to be foraging together, so is this the parents using tough love
to get their babies to go find their own food, or is it more likely two
pairs being territorial?

Pat Valdata
Elkton, MD

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Subject: Re: AmericanGoldfinches are back!
From: Kipp Lunt <kipplunt AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 08:32:59 -0700 (PDT)
We have goldfinches in our yard, but for the past year or so they don't usually 
eat the nyjer. I've tried changing to a different feeder, and getting fresh 
seed, but they only seem to go for the shelled sunflower. Every once in a while 
I'll see a GF at the nyjer feeder, but usually they don't even eat it when the 
sunflower is empty. Strange because just a few years ago they used to be all 
over the nyjer. 


Kipp Lunt
Damascus

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Subject: Re: AmericanGoldfinches are back!
From: Linda Schwartz <muffie AT tltlms.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 10:47:10 -0400
Just yesterday we added another Niger seed feeder, this one a sock, 
because we have had so many AGs over the summer.
They had started to"bicker" with each other on the tube feeder so we 
added the sock.
First thing this morning there were AGs at both feeders.

Linda Schwartz
Parkvile


On 7/28/2015 4:54 PM, 'Elda Banks' via Maryland & DC Birding wrote:
>      A few months ago I was not seeing any American Goldfinches at my 
> thistle feeder.  I noticed that several Maryland Birders commented on 
> the same thing. I cleaned my feeders and bought new Niger seed but 
> still no Goldfinches.
>      Some of you  mentioned that you had seen them eating sunflower 
> seeds. Recently my husband and I went to a birding store and purchased 
> Song of America Finch Feast.  It has Niger seed and shelled sunflower 
> chips. The Carolina Chickadees have just loved this. At least one 
> Tufted Titmice has also been able to turn upside down and use the 
> thistle feeder. Finally for three days we have been consistently 
> seeing the American Goldfinches at the feeder. Is it because of the 
> sunflower chips or is it just that they decided to return because the 
> flowers they enjoy are in bloom?
>      Are others seeing  them now? Thanks.
>
> Elda Banks
> Colesville
> Silver Spring
> -- 
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google 
> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
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> on the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it 
> here - http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html

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Subject: Poplar Island 7/29/2015
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 07:36:43 -0700 (PDT)
Lots of birds at Poplar yesterday. Even before I got there, I had a Hairy 
Woodpecker and a Pileated Woodpecker just at the boat launch--both were a bit 
unexpected, but birds are moving around a lot lately. 


Highlights at Poplar included a LEAST BITTERN and COMMON GALLINULE in Cell 3D, 
three BLACK TERNS in Cell 6, and an abundance of shorebirds. Though I was 
unable to pick out anything rare, there were dowitchers, yellowlegs, and peeps 
there by the thousands. There was also a sizable group of terns in Cell 6, and 
high numbers of AMERICAN AVOCET (78) and BLACK-NECKED STILT (34). Migrant 
passerines were also noted, including three YELLOW WARBLERS near the trailers 
and the site's third record of BLUE GROSBEAK calling from Coaches Island. 


Full eBird checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24418341

Tim Carney
Nottingham, MD

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Subject: RE: AmericanGoldfinches are back!
From: Anna Urciolo <urcioloa AT sidwell.edu>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 21:04:00 +0000
I have had a steady stream of them at my Nyjer feeder for the past several 
weeks. 




Anna Urciolo

Rockville, MD

________________________________
From: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com [mdbirding AT googlegroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2015 4:54 PM
To: MDbirding Birding
Subject: [MDBirding] AmericanGoldfinches are back!

 A few months ago I was not seeing any American Goldfinches at my thistle 
feeder. I noticed that several Maryland Birders commented on the same thing. I 
cleaned my feeders and bought new Niger seed but still no Goldfinches. 

 Some of you mentioned that you had seen them eating sunflower seeds. Recently 
my husband and I went to a birding store and purchased Song of America Finch 
Feast. It has Niger seed and shelled sunflower chips. The Carolina Chickadees 
have just loved this. At least one Tufted Titmice has also been able to turn 
upside down and use the thistle feeder. Finally for three days we have been 
consistently seeing the American Goldfinches at the feeder. Is it because of 
the sunflower chips or is it just that they decided to return because the 
flowers they enjoy are in bloom? 

     Are others seeing  them now? Thanks.

Elda Banks
Colesville
Silver Spring

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Subject: AmericanGoldfinches are back!
From: "'Elda Banks' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 20:54:33 +0000 (UTC)
     A few months ago I was not seeing any American Goldfinches at my 
thistle feeder.  I noticed that several Maryland Birders commented on the same 
thing. I cleaned my feeders and bought new Niger seed but still no 
Goldfinches.     Some of you  mentioned that you had seen them eating 
sunflower seeds. Recently my husband and I went to a birding store and 
purchased Song of America Finch Feast.  It has Niger seed and shelled 
sunflower chips. The Carolina Chickadees have just loved this. At least one 
Tufted Titmice has also been able to turn upside down and use the thistle 
feeder. Finally for three days we have been consistently seeing the American 
Goldfinches at the feeder. Is it because of the sunflower chips or is it just 
that they decided to return because the flowers they enjoy are in bloom?  

     Are others seeing  them now? Thanks.
Elda BanksColesvilleSilver Spring

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Subject: Re: Voice of the Naturalist: DC Area, 7/28/2015
From: Adam Parr <balaenopteron AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 13:38:29 -0700 (PDT)
Here's the text:  

Hotline:     Voice of the Naturalist
Date:        7/28/2015
Coverage:    MD/DC/VA/central and southern DE/WV panhandle
Reports, comments and questions: voice AT anshome.org 
Compiler:    Gerry Hawkins
Sponsor:     Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central
               Atlantic States (independent of NAS)
Transcriber: Steve Cordle (scordle AT capaccess.org)
Please consider joining ANS, especially if you are a regular user of the Voice 
(Individual $50; Family $65; Nature Steward $100; Audubon Advocate $200). The 
membership number is 301-652-9188, option 12; the address is 8940 Jones Mill 
Road, Chevy Chase, MD 20815; and the web site is 
http://www.AudubonNaturalist.org. 

This is the Voice of the Naturalist, a service of the Audubon Naturalist 
Society. This report covers the week starting Tuesday, July 21 and was 
completed on Tuesday, July 28 at 9:15 a.m. 

The top birds this week were NEOTROPIC CORMORANT* in MD and SWALLOW-TAILED KITE 
in DE. 

Other birds of interest this week included SNOW GOOSE, TRUMPETER and TUNDRA 
SWANS, WHITE-WINGED SCOTER, CANVASBACK, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, BLUE-WINGED 
TEAL, WOOD DUCK, RED-THROATED LOON, COMMON LOON, HORNED GREBE, AMERICAN WHITE 
PELICAN, TRICOLORED HERON, WHITE IBIS, MISSISSIPPI KITE, BROAD-WINGED HAWK, 
COMMON GALLINULE, SANDHILL CRANE, RUFF, AMERICAN AVOCET, UPLAND SANDPIPER, 
RED-NECKED and WILSON’S PHALAROPES, GULL-BILLED TERN, EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE, 
LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE, PURPLE MARTIN, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH and ROSE-BREASTED 
GROSBEAK. 

TOP BIRDS
Birders continued to observe a NEOTROPIC CORMORANT* at Violette’s Lock on the 
C&O Canal in Montgomery Co, MD, with the latest sighting on July 27. 

On July 24 a SWALLOW-TAILED KITE was beautifully photographed in flight over 
Gordon’s Pond in Cape Henlopen SP, Sussex Co, DE. 

OTHER BIRDS OF INTEREST
On July 27 a SNOW GOOSE was found with CANADA GEESE along the John J Williams 
Highway in Sussex Co, DE. A tagged TRUMPETER SWAN* continues at Lake Churchill 
in Montgomery Co, MD, with the latest sighting on July 27. A TUNDRA SWAN 
continues at Swan Cove in Chincoteague NWR, Accomack Co, VA and at Pemberton 
Manor, Queen Anne’s Co, MD, with the latest sightings on July 26 and 24, 
respectively. 

Out-of-season waterfowl also included all three scoter species, including 
perhaps most notably a male WHITE-WINGED SCOTER at Big Water Farm in Queen 
Anne’s Co, MD on July 25. In addition, a male CANVASBACK was seen at 
Hart-Miller Island, Baltimore Co, VA on July 22 and Tydings Memorial Park in 
Harford Co, MD on July 25; and a RED-BREASTED MERGANSER was found at Patuxent 
River Park - Jackson Landing, Prince George’s Co, MD on July 22 and 23 and 
Lock Raven Reservoir - Loch Raven Point, Baltimore Co, MD on July 23. 

A BLUE-WINGED TEAL was observed flying by Swan Creek Wetland – Cox Creek, 
Anne Arundel Co, MD on July 26 and one in a cell there on July 27, which likely 
were early migrants as this species is one of the first ducks to migrate 
following breeding. 

A location a short distance north of the Seneca Creek Aqueduct above Riley’s 
Lock on the C&O Canal in Montgomery Co, MD appears to be a molt-migration 
location for WOOD DUCKS based on the 56 individuals found there on July 26. 

On July 25 a RED-THROATED LOON with an injured wing was again seen near the dam 
in the Kerr Reservoir in Mecklenburg Co, VA. A COMMON LOON in nonbreeding 
plumage was spotted at The Point in Cape Henlopen SP, Sussex Co, DE on July 26. 
On the next day a birder walking on the beach at Fort Monroe in Hampton, VA was 
surprised to see a preening HORNED GREBE there. 

A high of ten AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS continue along Fowler Beach and Prime 
Hook Roads in Prime Hook NWR, Sussex Co, DE, with the latest sighting on July 
27. 

Post-breeding dispersal produced many herons and egrets in the reporting area. 
These included TRICOLORED HERONS at several locations, including a high of 
seven, all juveniles, at the Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center (Horsehead), 
Queen Anne’s Co, MD all week; a single continuing individual at Jackson 
Landing or Selby’s Landing in Patuxent River Park, Prince George’s Co, MD 
on July 22, 23 and 26; and a high of three at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE all 
week. 

The substantial invasion of WHITE IBIS, almost entirely young birds, continued 
at various coastal locations as far north as New Castle Co, DE and into PA and 
NJ. The high count during the week was an estimated 1,700 individuals at 
Chincoteague NWR, Accomack Co, VA on July 23. Inland sightings included 1-2 
individuals at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax Co, VA all week and, outside the 
reporting area, a continuing individual as far north as Wildwood Lake Park 
north of Harrisburg in Dauphin Co, PA on July 21-26. 

On July 21, 22 and 25 two MISSISSIPPI KITES were seen perched, in flight and 
copulating several times near Monticello Park in Alexandria, VA, which is a new 
location in the reporting area for this species. Sightings of continuing 
MISSISSIPPI KITES in Virginia Beach, VA included a recent fledgling in the 
Thoroughgood neighborhood on July 25 and 27. 

Sightings of BROAD-WINGED HAWKS, which included two individuals at the Blue 
Ridge Center for Environmental Stewardship in northwestern Loudoun Co, VA on 
July 25, indicate the onset of raptor migration. 

On July 23 and 24 a COMMON GALLINULE was seen again at Southwest Area Park in 
Baltimore Co, MD, and on July 24 one was heard at the appropriately named 
Moorhen Pond on Elliot Island Road in Dorchester Co, MD. 

A SANDHILL CRANE was seen again at Quail Covey Farm Pond in Queen Anne’s Co, 
MD on July 22. 

Shorebirds increased in numbers and diversity and included small numbers of 
WHIMBREL, MARBLED GODWIT, RED KNOT, STILT SANDPIPER, WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER, 
WESTERN SANDPIPER, LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER and WILSON’S SNIPE among other 
species. In addition, a continuing male RUFF was seen in Shearness Pool at 
Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE through July 24. On July 22 three AMERICAN 
AVOCETS* were seen at Dyke Marsh WP in Fairfax Co, VA, which is a relatively 
rare inland sighting of this species in VA. 

UPLAND SANDPIPERS were found at several locations. On July 22 one was seen in 
the first field east of Route 85 along the south side of Lilypons Road in 
Frederick Co, MD, which is directly across Route 85 from the Oland Road field 
where this species has often been found this time of year. On July 22 and 24 
1-2 UPLAND SANDPIPERS were seen again at and near (along Bergold Lane) Dover 
Air Force Base (restricted access) in Kent Co, DE, which is a regular migrating 
location for this species. On July 26-28 a high of four UPLAND SANDPIPERS were 
observed at the Salisbury Airport, Wicomico Co, MD. 

Noteworthy shorebird sightings also included two RED-NECKED PHALAROPES and six 
WILSON’S PHALAROPES at the Craney Island Disposal Area in Portsmouth, VA on 
July 23. 

GULL-BILLED TERNS were seen at several locations outside of breeding areas in 
southeastern Virginia, including one at Truitt’s Landing, Worcester Co, MD on 
July 22 and 23, one on Skimmer Island in Ocean City, Worcester Co, MD on July 
27, and two at the Ted Harvey WMA – Logan Lane Tract North, Kent Co, DE on 
July 24. 

EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVES were seen again along Magotha Road and at Eastern Shore 
of Virginia NWR in Northampton Co, VA on July 24 and 26, respectively, and also 
continue at various locations in Radford and Pulaski Co, VA. 

On July 25 a LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE was found along Rough Road a short distance west 
of the intersection with Flat Rock Road in Mecklenburg Co, VA. 

On July 26 a very large flock of PURPLE MARTINS, estimated at well over 1,000 
birds, was seen swirling over the Home Depot on Pleasant Valley Avenue in 
Winchester, VA, which has been a staging area for this species in past years. 

The beginning of southbound migration of passerines was further suggested by 
recent reports of several species of wood warbler, including an early NORTHERN 
WATERTHRUSH at Monticello Park, Fairfax Co, VA on July 25, and perhaps a male 
ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK that was photographed at a residential feeder in Chevy 
Chase, Montgomery Co, MD on July 24. 

   
***
This week’s report was based on reports on the DE, MD, VA, and WV list 
servers via the ABA Internet links, and on eBird records. 

The Audubon Sanctuary Shop (301-652-3606, http://anshome.org/shop)is an 
excellent source for guidebooks and many other nature-related titles. 

To report bird sightings, e-mail your report to voice AT anshome.org. Please post 
reports before midnight Monday, identify the county as well as the state, and 
include your name and a Tuesday morning contact, e-mail or phone. 

Thank you for your interest, and enjoy the birds.
*Of interest to the applicable state records committee

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Subject: Fwd: DC Area, 7/28/2015
From: Lydia Schindler <lydia13621 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 16:34:47 -0400
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Steve Cordle 
Date: Tue, Jul 28, 2015 at 9:58 AM
Subject: DC Area, 7/28/2015
To: BIRDEAST AT listserv.ksu.edu


Hotline:     Voice of the Naturalist
Date:        7/28/2015
Coverage:    MD/DC/VA/central and southern DE/WV panhandle
Reports, comments and questions: voice AT anshome.org
Compiler:    Gerry Hawkins
Sponsor:     Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central
               Atlantic States (independent of NAS)
Transcriber: Steve Cordle (scordle AT capaccess.org)

Please consider joining ANS, especially if you are a regular user of
the Voice (Individual $50; Family $65; Nature Steward $100; Audubon
Advocate $200). The membership number is 301-652-9188, option 12; the
address is 8940 Jones Mill Road, Chevy Chase, MD 20815; and the web
site is http://www.AudubonNaturalist.org.

This is the Voice of the Naturalist, a service of the Audubon
Naturalist Society. This report covers the week starting Tuesday, July
21 and was completed on Tuesday, July 28 at 9:15 a.m.

The top birds this week were NEOTROPIC CORMORANT* in MD and
SWALLOW-TAILED KITE in DE.

Other birds of interest this week included SNOW GOOSE, TRUMPETER and
TUNDRA SWANS, WHITE-WINGED SCOTER, CANVASBACK, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER,
BLUE-WINGED TEAL, WOOD DUCK, RED-THROATED LOON, COMMON LOON, HORNED
GREBE, AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN, TRICOLORED HERON, WHITE IBIS,
MISSISSIPPI KITE, BROAD-WINGED HAWK, COMMON GALLINULE, SANDHILL CRANE,
RUFF, AMERICAN AVOCET, UPLAND SANDPIPER, RED-NECKED and WILSON'S
PHALAROPES, GULL-BILLED TERN, EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE, LOGGERHEAD
SHRIKE, PURPLE MARTIN, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH and ROSE-BREASTED
GROSBEAK.

TOP BIRDS

Birders continued to observe a NEOTROPIC CORMORANT* at Violette's Lock
on the C&O Cana in Montgomery Co, MD, with the latest sighting on July
27.

On July 24 a SWALLOW-TAILED KITE was beautifully photographed in
flight over Gordon's Pond in Cape Henlopen SP, Sussex Co, DE.

OTHER BIRDS OF INTEREST

On July 27 a SNOW GOOSE was found with CANADA GEESE along the John J
Williams Highway in Sussex Co, DE. A tagged TRUMPETER SWAN* continues
at Lake Churchill in Montgomery Co, MD, with the latest sighting on
July 27. A TUNDRA SWAN continues at Swan Cove in Chincoteague NWR,
Accomack Co, VA and at Pemberton Manor, Queen Anne's Co, MD, with the
latest sightings on July 26 and 24, respectively.

Out-of-season waterfowl also included all three scoter species,
including perhaps most notably a male WHITE-WINGED SCOTER at Big Water
Farm in Queen Anne's Co, MD on July 25. In addition, a male CANVASBACK
was seen at Hart-Miller Island, Baltimore Co, VA on July 22 and
Tydings Memorial Park in Harford Co, MD on July 25; and a RED-BREASTED
MERGANSER was found at Patuxent River Park - Jackson Landing, Prince
George's Co, MD on July 22 and 23 and Lock Raven Reservoir - Loch
Raven Point, Baltimore Co, MD on July 23.

A BLUE-WINGED TEAL was observed flying by Swan Creek Wetland – Cox
Creek, Anne Arundel Co, MD on July 26 and in a cell there on July 27,
which likely were early migrants as this species is one of the first
ducks to migrate following breeding.

A location a short distance north of the Seneca Creek Aqueduct above
Riley's Lock on the C&O Canal in Montgomery Co, MD appears to be a
molt-migration location for WOOD DUCKS based on the 56 individuals
found there on July 26.

On July 25 a RED-THROATED LOON with an injured wing was again seen
near the dam in the Kerr Reservoir in Mecklenburg Co, VA. A COMMON
LOON in nonbreeding plumage was spotted at The Point in Cape Henlopen
SP, Sussex Co, DE on July 26. On the next day a birder walking on the
beach at Fort Monroe in Hampton, VA was surprised to see a preening
HORNED GREBE there.

A high of ten AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS continue along Fowler Beach and
Prime Hook Roads in Prime Hook NWR, Sussex Co, DE, with the latest
sighting on July 27.

Post-breeding dispersal produced many herons and egrets in the
reporting area. These included TRICOLORED HERONS at several locations,
including a high of seven, all juveniles, at the Chesapeake Bay
Environmental Center (Horsehead), Queen Anne's Co, MD all week; a
single continuing individual at Jackson Landing or Selby's Landing in
Patuxent River Park, Prince George's Co, MD on July 22, 23 and 26; and
a high of three at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE all week.

The substantial invasion of WHITE IBIS, almost entirely young birds,
continued at various coastal locations as far north as New Castle Co,
DE and into PA and NJ. The high count during the week was an estimated
1,700 individuals at Chincoteague NWR, Accomack Co, VA on July 23.
Inland sightings included 1-2 individuals at Huntley Meadows Park,
Fairfax Co, VA all week and, outside the reporting area, a continuing
individual as far north as Wildwood Lake Park north of Harrisburg in
Dauphin Co, PA on July 21-26.

On July 21, 22 and 25 two MISSISSIPPI KITES were seen perched, in
flight and copulating several times near Monticello Park in
Alexandria, VA, which is a new location in the reporting area for this
species. Sightings of continuing MISSISSIPPI KITES in Virginia Beach,
VA included a recent fledgling in the Thoroughgood neighborhood on
July 25 and 27.

Sightings of BROAD-WINGED HAWKS, which included two individuals at the
Blue Ridge Center for Environmental Stewardship in northwestern
Loudoun Co, VA on July 25, indicate the onset of raptor migration.

On July 23 and 24 a COMMON GALLINULE was seen again at Southwest Area
Park in Baltimore Co, MD, and on July 24 one was heard at the
appropriately named Moorhen Pond on Elliot Island Road in Dorchester
Co, MD.

A SANDHILL CRANE was seen again at Quail Covey Farm Pond in Queen
Anne's Co, MD on July 22.

Shorebirds increased in numbers and diversity and included small
numbers of WHIMBREL, MARBLED GODWIT, RED KNOT, STILT SANDPIPER,
WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER, WESTERN SANDPIPER, LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER and
WILSON'S SNIPE among other species. In addition, a continuing male
RUFF was seen in Shearness Pool at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE
through July 24. On July 22 three AMERICAN AVOCETS* were seen at Dyke
Marsh WP in Fairfax Co, VA, which is a relatively rare inland sighting
of this species in VA.

UPLAND SANDPIPERS were found at several locations. On July 22 one was
seen in the first field east of Route 85 along the south side of
Lilypons Road in Frederick Co, MD, which is directly across Route 85
from the Oland Road field where this species has often been found this
time of year. On July 22 and 24 1-2 UPLAND SANDPIPERS were seen again
at and near (along Bergold Lane) Dover Air Force Base (restricted
access) in Kent Co, DE, which is a regular migrating location for this
species. On July 26-28 a high of four UPLAND SANDPIPERS were observed
at the Salisbury Airport, Wicomico Co, MD.

Noteworthy shorebird sightings also included two RED-NECKED PHALAROPES
and six WILSON'S PHALAROPES at the Craney Island Disposal Area in
Portsmouth, VA on July 23.

GULL-BILLED TERNS were seen at several locations outside of breeding
areas in southeastern Virginia, including one at Truitt's Landing,
Worcester Co, MD on July 22 and 23, one on Skimmer Island in Ocean
City, Worcester Co, MD on July 27, and two at the Ted Harvey WMA –
Logan Lane Tract North, Kent Co, DE on July 24.

EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVES were seen again along Magotha Road and at
Eastern Shore of Virginia NWR in Northampton Co, VA on July 24 and 26,
respectively, and also continue at various locations in Radford and
Pulaski Co, VA.

On July 25 a LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE was found along Rough Road a short
distance west of the intersection with Flat Rock Road in Mecklenburg
Co, VA.

On July 26 a very large flock of PURPLE MARTINS, estimated at well
over 1,000 birds, was seen swirling over the Home Depot on Pleasant
Valley Avenue in Winchester, VA, which has been a staging area for
this species in past years.

The beginning of southbound migration of passerines was further
suggested by recent reports of several species of wood warbler,
including an early NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH at Monticello Park, Fairfax
Co, VA on July 25, and perhaps a male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK that was
photographed at a residential feeder in Chevy Chase, Montgomery Co, MD
on July 24.

***

This week's report was based on reports on the DE, MD, VA, and WV list
servers via the ABA Internet links, and on eBird records.

The Audubon Sanctuary Shop (301-652-3606, http://anshome.org/shop)is
an excellent source for guidebooks and many other nature-related
titles.

To report bird sightings, e-mail your report to voice AT anshome.org.
Please post reports before midnight Monday, identify the county as
well as the state, and include your name and a Tuesday morning
contact, e-mail or phone.

Thank you for your interest, and enjoy the birds.

*Of interest to the applicable state records committee

-- 
-- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
'Maryland & DC Birding'. 

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web at http://www.mdbirding.com 

Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here - 
http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html 
Subject: Re: Voice of the Naturalist: DC Area, 7/28/2015
From: JAMES SPEICHER <jugornought AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 16:30:29 -0400
A lot of us don't have access to WORD :(

On 7/28/15, Lydia Schindler  wrote:
>
>
> --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group
> 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
> To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this group on
> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here -
> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>

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Subject: Voice of the Naturalist: DC Area, 7/28/2015
From: Lydia Schindler <lydia13621 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 11:11:25 -0400

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Subject: Re: Avocets continue at Swan Creek
From: Andy Beiderman <aandyy AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 07:16:33 -0700 (PDT)
Both still present, one is currently right in front of trailer

Andy Beiderman
Baltimore, MD

On Tuesday, July 28, 2015 at 8:55:07 AM UTC-4, Fred Shaffer wrote:
> I swung by Swan Creek first thing this morning, and the two American Avocets 
continue to be seen.  They were in view from a little after 7:00 until 7:30 am 
along the far shore, foraging where the water meets the shore.  Other 
shorebirds seen during my brief visit included Least Sandpipers, Semipalmated 
Sandpipers, Killdeer, Lesser Yellowlegs, and Greater Yellowlegs.  Lots of 
waterfowl were also present, which I didn't really have a chance to sort 
through, but I did see one male Bufflehead on one of the small islands in the 
center of the impoundment.  The avocets were still present when I left.  Good 
birding, 

>  
> Fred Shaffer
> Glauco... AT verizon.net
> Crofton, MD

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Subject: Avocets continue at Swan Creek
From: Fred Shaffer <glaucousgull AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 12:55:04 +0000 (UTC)
I swung by Swan Creek first thing this morning, and the two American Avocets 
continue to be seen.  They were in view from a little after 7:00 until 7:30 am 
along the far shore, foraging where the water meets the shore.  Other 
shorebirds seen during my brief visit included Least Sandpipers, Semipalmated 
Sandpipers, Killdeer, Lesser Yellowlegs, and Greater Yellowlegs.  Lots of 
waterfowl were also present, which I didn't really have a chance to sort 
through, but I did see one male Bufflehead on one of the small islands in the 
center of the impoundment.  The avocets were still present when I left.  Good 
birding, Fred ShafferGlaucousGull AT verizon.netCrofton, MD 


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Subject: Salisbury Airport
From: Kye jenkins <kyebird54 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 04:51:38 -0700 (PDT)
I viewing 2 Upland sandpipers at the airport, thanks Jeff C for the info/kye 
Jenkins 


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Subject: Re: Flicker question
From: Michael Roane <roane.michael AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 04:33:15 -0700 (PDT)
On Monday, July 27, 2015 at 9:40:22 AM UTC-4, Janet Millenson wrote:
> A flicker has started
>       drumming on one of our metal roof pipes again and otherwise
>       behaving like it's spring. Is it common for flickers to engage in
>       breeding and territorial behavior at the end of July?
> 
>       
> 
>     
>     
> 
> 
>       Janet Millenson
> 
>           Potomac, MD (Montgomery County)
> 
>           ja... AT twocrows.com
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------
> 
>           "Look at the birds!" -- Pascal the parrot

Janet,

Ospreys will almost compulsively continue to build up their nest even after the 
young have fledged. I've seen Great Blue Herons in a mating ritual in the 
middle of summer. And I have seen a Great Blue Heron building a nest from 
scratch in July (see my blog: 
http://mroane.blogspot.com/2015/07/to-build-bird.html). So I would say, yes, it 
is highly possible. 


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Subject: Salisbury Airport
From: Kye jenkins <kyebird54 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 12:12:21 -0700 (PDT)
I might head down to Salisbury airport, to look for upland sandpipers.Is there 
special protocol that birders follow?kye Jenkins,Phoenix Md 


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Subject: White Ibis, Somerset County
From: Thomas Ostrowski <skinz242000 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 11:52:18 -0700 (PDT)
There was a single immature White Ibis this morning at Rumbly Point in Somerset 
County. It didn't stay in any one place for long and eventually took off in the 
general direction of Irish Grove Sanctuary. 


Tom Ostrowski
Greenbelt 

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Subject: Skimmer Island
From: Jeffrey Culler <cullerfuls AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 14:19:21 -0400
Today - no humans but four Sandwich Terns and one Gull-billed Tern.
One Upland Sandpiper at the Salisbury airport.

Jeff Culler
Howard County

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Night Herons at Schoolhouse Pond
From: lynsm77 AT gmail.com
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 10:22:45 -0700 (PDT)
Two black-crowned night herons flew into the trees by the pond at lunchtime. I 
got a good look at one, but the other stayed quite hidden. It looks as though 
there might be a nest. 


Also spotted a great egret.

Lyn Miller

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Subject: Re: Avocets at Swan Creek
From: Matt Hafner <hafner.matt AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 12:47:30 -0400
Both Avocets still present 12-1235. Also a Short-billed Dowitcher, Stilt 
Sandpiper, and 200+ peeps. Couldn't find a Western or Sanderling. 


Matt Hafner
Forest Hill, MD

> On Jul 27, 2015, at 12:03 PM, "'Andrew Clemens' via Maryland & DC Birding" 
 wrote: 

> 
> Avocets not located at 10:45 AM. Men and equipment working very close to the 
offce side of the impoundment may have flushed them. 

> 
> Andy Clemens
> Parkville, Md.
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Subject: Avocets at Swan Creek
From: "'Andrew Clemens' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 16:03:11 +0000 (UTC)
 Avocets not located at 10:45 AM.  Men and equipment working very close to the 
offce side of the impoundment may have flushed them. 

Andy ClemensParkville, Md.

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Subject: Flicker question
From: Janet Millenson <janet AT twocrows.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 09:40:18 -0400
A flicker has started drumming on one of our metal roof pipes again and 
otherwise behaving like it's spring. Is it common for flickers to engage 
in breeding and territorial behavior at the end of July?


Janet Millenson
Potomac, MD (Montgomery County)
janet AT twocrows.com
----------------------------------------------------------------
"Look at the birds!" -- Pascal the parrot

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Subject: Avocets remain at Swam Creek
From: "'Bird couple' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 09:18:32 -0400
Seen by Ryan Johnson and myself. Also had 1 Western Sandpiper in among the 
Leasts and Semipalms. 


Warren Strobel
Annapolis

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: People walking on Skimmer Island right now. Someone I can call?
From: "'Elda Banks' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 13:00:44 +0000 (UTC)
Hmm... I guess those intruders didn't think the sign was for them!Elda 
BanksSilver Spring 

 


 On Sunday, July 26, 2015 9:48 PM, Sharon F1727  wrote: 

   

 If this happens again, would photographing the people and boat be helpful? The 
photographs could be forwarded to DNR. 


On Sunday, July 26, 2015 at 5:53:06 PM UTC-4, Marcia Balestri wrote:
> Yes, there are signs all over the island now.  These folks were standing 
right next to one of them, so it’s not a signage problem now (right after the 
big storm that almost wiped out the whole island last year, there were no signs 
for a while).   

> 
> 
> Thanks to those of you who posted the number again; I was having a hard time 
searching MDBirding for the number posted a while back.  I thought I had saved 
it, but guess not.  I was also hoping there might be someone else besides DNR. 
 Not to disparage them, but the last time I called (this was in the winter), 
the person who answered the phone said that they probably couldn’t be able to 
get anyone there by the time the 2 guys left (they were there for quite a 
while—looked like they were scouting to set up a blind for hunting), so there 
was not much they could do.  I gave them the boat number and a description of 
the two, but apparently if they don’t catch them on the island, they can’t 
do anything.   

> 
> 
> The person that answered today said, “Yeah, yeah, we’ll check it out. 
Bye."  Not particularly encouraging, but better than last time.  I couldn’t 
stick around to see what happened, so I can’t say if anyone did 
anything—hope so. I realize that perhaps they have better things to do and 
are harried especially this time of year with all the tourists, but I thought I 
would give it a shot.  I don’t particularly like being the bird police, but 
it irritates me that folks don’t pay attention to what they are doing, and 
there are plenty of other spits out there for folks to land on to do clamming. 

> 
> 
> BTW, I did count 7 Sandwich Terns on the island before the people flushed all 
the terns, gulls, pelicans, and shorebirds away. I’m sure they all will be 
back later at low tide if people will leave them alone. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _____________________
> 
> 
> Marcia Balestri
> Worcester County, Maryland
> mebal... AT gmail.com
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Jul 26, 2015, at 1:36 PM, Elda Banks  wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Are there any signs posted on Skimmer Island telling people not to walk 
there? Years ago people were there every day getting clams or some sea food. We 
would see them from my parents condo on the Ocean City side of the bay. 

> 
> Elda Banks
> Silver Spring
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
>  
>  
>  
>  On Sunday, July 26, 2015 11:56 AM, Phil Davis  wrote:
>    
> 
>  
> (410) 260-8888
> DNR Police
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> > On Jul 26, 2015, at 11:10, Marcia Balestri  wrote:
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > Sent from my iPhone
> > Marcia Balestri
> > Worcester, MD
> > 
> > -- 
> > -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
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the web at http://www.mdbirding.com 

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http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html 

> 
> 
> -- 
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Subject: MD Natural Resources Police Number
From: Kurt Schwarz <goawaybird AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 22:34:00 -0400
Put it in your phone¹s contacts like I did:

800-635-8124

In Howard County, Howard County Park Rangers:  410-245-1410

Kurt Schwarz
Ellicott City
goawaybird at verizon dot ne


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Subject: Re: People walking on Skimmer Island right now. Someone I can call?
From: Sharon F1727 <sharonf1727 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 18:48:47 -0700 (PDT)
If this happens again, would photographing the people and boat be helpful? The 
photographs could be forwarded to DNR. 


On Sunday, July 26, 2015 at 5:53:06 PM UTC-4, Marcia Balestri wrote:
> Yes, there are signs all over the island now.  These folks were standing 
right next to one of them, so it’s not a signage problem now (right after the 
big storm that almost wiped out the whole island last year, there were no signs 
for a while).   

> 
> 
> Thanks to those of you who posted the number again; I was having a hard time 
searching MDBirding for the number posted a while back.  I thought I had saved 
it, but guess not.  I was also hoping there might be someone else besides DNR. 
 Not to disparage them, but the last time I called (this was in the winter), 
the person who answered the phone said that they probably couldn’t be able to 
get anyone there by the time the 2 guys left (they were there for quite a 
while—looked like they were scouting to set up a blind for hunting), so there 
was not much they could do.  I gave them the boat number and a description of 
the two, but apparently if they don’t catch them on the island, they can’t 
do anything.   

> 
> 
> The person that answered today said, “Yeah, yeah, we’ll check it out. 
Bye."  Not particularly encouraging, but better than last time.  I couldn’t 
stick around to see what happened, so I can’t say if anyone did 
anything—hope so. I realize that perhaps they have better things to do and 
are harried especially this time of year with all the tourists, but I thought I 
would give it a shot.  I don’t particularly like being the bird police, but 
it irritates me that folks don’t pay attention to what they are doing, and 
there are plenty of other spits out there for folks to land on to do clamming. 

> 
> 
> BTW, I did count 7 Sandwich Terns on the island before the people flushed all 
the terns, gulls, pelicans, and shorebirds away. I’m sure they all will be 
back later at low tide if people will leave them alone. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _____________________
> 
> 
> Marcia Balestri
> Worcester County, Maryland
> mebal... AT gmail.com
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Jul 26, 2015, at 1:36 PM, Elda Banks  wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Are there any signs posted on Skimmer Island telling people not to walk 
there? Years ago people were there every day getting clams or some sea food. We 
would see them from my parents condo on the Ocean City side of the bay. 

> 
> Elda Banks
> Silver Spring
> 
>   
> 
> 
> 
> 
>  
>  
>  
>   On Sunday, July 26, 2015 11:56 AM, Phil Davis  wrote:
>     
> 
>  
> (410) 260-8888
> DNR Police
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> > On Jul 26, 2015, at 11:10, Marcia Balestri  wrote:
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > Sent from my iPhone
> > Marcia Balestri
> > Worcester, MD
> > 
> > -- 
> > -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
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the web at http://www.mdbirding.com 

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http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html 

> 
> 
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Subject: Re: Maryland Big Day 7/24
From: Alex Wiebe <rabwiebe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 15:42:19 -0700 (PDT)
I got the 174 species number from the link Matt gave. The Maryland monthly Big 
Day records can be found on page 27 of that document. 


Alex Wiebe
Takoma Park, MD

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Subject: Re: Maryland Big Day 7/24
From: Matt Hafner <hafner.matt AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 17:58:45 -0400
Also, if the participants submitted their numbers to the ABA, the monthly 
records can be seen here: http://listing.aba.org/downloads/ABA2011BDLR.pdf 


Matt Hafner
Forest Hill, MD

> On Jul 26, 2015, at 5:46 PM, Jared Fisher  wrote:
> 
> Pretty sure this is the report Alex is referring to 
http://www.mdbirding.com/archives/posts/9799_6319.html 

> 
> There are quite a few big day posts from similar time-frame that can be found 
by searching 'big day' in the MDOsprey archives. 
http://www.mdbirding.com/archives.html 

> 
> best, 
> 
> Jared Fisher
> Bethesda, MD
> 
>> On Sun, Jul 26, 2015 at 5:38 PM, Russ Ruffing  wrote:
>> Congrats guys on your big day triumph! Nice to see SOMEONE out there trying 
to do big days in some not-so-typical months! I will add your day to my Big Day 
database for MD/DC and will include it in the 2015 Birding Report. Alex, I will 
also include your June Big Day for the District when you got 90 species. 

>> 
>> I am curious though, where did you get your data point of 174 species for 
the previous July statewide Big Day record? I have been accumulating Big Day 
data for four years and was not aware of ANY statewide Big Days in July or any 
month other than May for that matter. 

>> 
>> If you or anyone else know of other sources of Big Day data, I would REALLY 
appreciate knowing that. Please forward along! 

>> 
>> Take care,
>> 
>> Russ Ruffing
>> Woodstock, MD
>> 
>> 
>> On 07/26/15, Alex Wiebe wrote:
>> 
>> Matt Addicks, Kevin Ebert, and I set out last Friday (7/24) to try to beat 
the Maryland Big Day record for the month of July. We had a total of 182 
species and we birded from Garrett County to Worcester County. Species in BOLD 
are the species highlights. 

>> 
>> We began our day in Cumberland at midnight where the resident COMMON 
NIGHTHAWKs had us worried but eventually called on our drive out of town. 
Racing over to Finzel Swamp, we heard a Great Horned Owl as we got out of the 
car. We walked down the trail as an Eastern Screech-Owl called from behind us, 
and started listening for rails. With a little bit of patience, a SORA called, 
and then the marsh erupted into a barrage of Virginia Rail grunts. The next 
stop at Old Legislative Rd for HENSLOW’S SPARROW was productive but 
ultimately unnecessary as we heard at least ten more singing birds from the 
next few stops. On the drive out, a Black Bear bounds across the road in front 
of us! A stop at Russell Rd produced a distant Barred Owl and an Eastern 
Whip-poor-will, along with a calling Black-billed Cuckoo. We finished the night 
section by driving west in Garrett County, and our efforts were rewarded with a 
LONG-EARED OWL, many more Barred Owls, and after much effort, a NORTHERN 
SAW-WHET OWL. After we got the saw-whet we got back into our car to sleep for a 
half hour before the first dawn birds woke up. 

>> 
>> At 5:15, we were back out into the 46 degree darkness. At 5:24 we heard an 
American Woodcock at the Lake Ford United Methodist Church and soon saw another 
one buzz by us. We zipped over to Muddy Creek Rd, where both ALDER FLYCATCHERs 
and Willow Flycatchers were singing and a NORTHERN WATERTHUSH was calling. We 
arrived at Snaggy Mountain Rd a few minutes before sunrise and began listening 
for songbirds as we drove down the road. We heard HERMIT THRUSH, Magnolia 
Warbler, BLUE-HEADED VIREO, and Dark-eyed Junco along the first stretch, 
several more Alder Flycatchers at a marsh, and PINE SISKIN and Brown Creeper at 
some conifers near where we turned around at Sanders Lane. On the drive to 
Maple Glade Rd, Matt spotted a pair of COMMON RAVENs in a snag, and on Maple 
Glade Rd we picked up Least Flycatcher and saw another Black Bear. Pulling into 
Swallow Falls State Park, we heard a few more target species, including 
Golden-crowned Kinglet, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Blackburnian Warbler. At 
Herrington Manor Park, it took all of our allotted time to pull out a 
Yellow-rumped Warbler at the boat ramp, but eventually we pish up a first year 
bird. Out of the forests and into the grasslands! 

>> 
>> A quick stop at the Trout Run Wastewater Treatment Plant produced our first 
Spotted Sandpiper and Wood Duck of the day, and there was a small flock of 
BOBOLINK on the drive out. On Joni Miller Rd we spotted the first of many 
Eastern Meadowlarks, a couple flyby Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, and a 
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER at the top of a snag! We also picked up our first 
Yellow-billed Cuckoo hear by sight. A quick check at G Swauger Rd did not yield 
the hoped for American Kestrel, so we headed east. At Frank Brenneman Rd, we 
cleaned up CERULEAN WARBLER and entered New Germany State Park. At Big Run Rd, 
we easily picked up CANADA WARBLER and heard a WINTER WREN sing its complicated 
song down the road. At Finzel Swamp, we ran all the way to the fields by the 
Allegheny County border and picked up CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, but couldn’t 
find a Broad-winged Hawk. A stop at Old Legislative Rd was long and generally 
unproductive, but we did add Brown Thrasher. A quick run in at Burning Mines Rd 
yielded a VESPER SPARROW and a soaring BROAD-WINGED HAWK. 

>> 
>> At the Cumberland Terminus, we ran to the river in hopes of finding a Cliff 
Swallow but were surprised when there were no Chimney Swifts or swallows except 
a couple Barns! We got out of there and tried unsuccessfully for Warbling Vireo 
at Big Pool, and then drove north. At Mummert Rd, there was a Red-shouldered 
Hawk perched in a snag in a field, and we heard a Louisiana Waterthrush at the 
first stream crossing and a couple HOODED WARBLERs further down the road. From 
here we went south to Montgomery County, where we ran about a half mile into 
Little Bennett Regional Park on Prescott Rd to pick up our KENTUCKY WARBLER, 
Worm-eating Warbler, and Ovenbird. We tapped the brakes at Lake Churchill to 
pick up the oversummering TRUMPETER SWAN, and started to make our way to the 
eastern shore. At a farm field near Rutland Rd we spotted a single BANK SWALLOW 
among a few Barn Swallows, saving us a detour later in the day, but we still 
left the western shore significantly behind in time. 

>> 
>> The summer traffic on the bay bridge did not help either, but we eventually 
made our way to our first stop on the eastern shore at Pemberton Manor in Queen 
Anne’s County. We ticked the TUNDRA SWAN there plus a bonus Bald Eagle, but 
could not find the Sandhill Crane that has been in the area for a couple weeks. 
In order to save time, we cut a couple of single bird stakeouts on the route 
and headed to Whiton Crossing Rd to clean up our songbird list. As we drove 
into the forest there, we picked up Carolina Chickadee and saw a family group 
of PROTHONOTARY WARBLERs next to the road. We found a calling YELLOW-THROATED 
WARBLER and a Great Crested Flycatcher further down, and on the drive back out 
heard two SUMMER TANAGERs singing. We were ready to hit the coast, but not 
before ticking WILD TURKEY in a couple of farm fields. 

>> 
>> At Truitts Landing Rd, we found many of our first shorebirds for the day. 
Some nice migrants there were STILT SANDPIPER, Solitary Sandpiper, and a close 
WESTERN SANDPIPER. Further down the road Matt spotted a CASPIAN TERN in flight 
and heard a BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH. In an effort to flush a Saltmarsh Sparrow, I 
walked a short distance out into the marsh in muck boots and was very surprised 
when a misstep caused me to sink instantly to my waist in the marsh. This 
seemed funny to Matt and Kevin, but it did cost us a few minutes as I changed 
my clothes. I did get the SALTMARSH SPARROW though. 

>> 
>> At Figgs Landing Rd, there was a PIED-BILLED GREBE in the middle of the pond 
and Glossy Ibises on the shoreline. Matt called out a GULL-BILLED TERN and we 
watched three of them hunt over the pond at fairly close range! We also picked 
up RUDDY DUCK and Little Blue Heron there. At the Berlin Wastewater Treatment 
Plant we found a Northern Rough-winged Swallow but the expected Bufflehead was 
not in the ponds. We make a quick run over to Assateague, where we saw our 
first Brown Pelican and Black Skimmer over the ocean and PIPING PLOVER on the 
beach, but couldn’t find a Wilson’s Storm-Petrel. With only few minutes to 
spend, we went to Castaways. On the drive in we spotted a couple Orchard 
Orioles at the top of a tree and, and then spotted a MARBLED GODWIT on the 
mudflats. On the drive out, Matt called out a Cooper’s Hawk that flew behind 
us, carrying prey. 

>> 
>> We got to Skimmer Island right at sunset and could immediately see that the 
island and nearby mudflats were absolutely covered with birds. In the waning 
light, we shouted out birds rapidfire, and tallied a number of key species 
including TRICOLORED HERON, Black-crowned Night-Heron, CATTLE EGRET, LESSER 
BLACK-BACKED GULL. There were at least three SANDWICH TERNs, and among the many 
shorebirds we picked out Ruddy Turnstone, and eventually a RED KNOT. 

>> 
>> After this, we headed out to our first stop for night birds on the eastern 
shore. We checked several locations for Chuck-will’s-widow but couldn’t 
hear any, even in the Pocomoke, so we headed to Elliott Island Rd to finish off 
the last hour of the day. We heard a spontaneously calling LEAST BITTERN a mile 
or so before Moorhen Pond and a COMMON GALLINULE at Moorhen Pond. Moving down 
Elliott Island Rd, we heard a Clapper Rail and moved down to listen for the 
last twenty minutes of the day for Black Rail. We never heard a Black Rail, but 
a BLACK-NECKED STILT called a few times and was our last species for the day. 

>> 
>> We ended the day with 182 species, beating the existing July Big Day record 
for Maryland of 174 species. We missed several species that we very likely 
could have gotten with more scouting like American Kestrel and Northern 
Bobwhite, but found a number of exciting birds over the course of the day and 
overall had a lot of fun and success with the birds. 

>> 
>> Alex Wiebe
>> Takoma Park, MD
>> 
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Subject: Re: People walking on Skimmer Island right now. Someone I can call?
From: Marcia Balestri <mebalestri AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 17:53:01 -0400
Yes, there are signs all over the island now. These folks were standing right 
next to one of them, so it’s not a signage problem now (right after the big 
storm that almost wiped out the whole island last year, there were no signs for 
a while). 


Thanks to those of you who posted the number again; I was having a hard time 
searching MDBirding for the number posted a while back. I thought I had saved 
it, but guess not. I was also hoping there might be someone else besides DNR. 
Not to disparage them, but the last time I called (this was in the winter), the 
person who answered the phone said that they probably couldn’t be able to get 
anyone there by the time the 2 guys left (they were there for quite a 
while—looked like they were scouting to set up a blind for hunting), so there 
was not much they could do. I gave them the boat number and a description of 
the two, but apparently if they don’t catch them on the island, they can’t 
do anything. 


The person that answered today said, “Yeah, yeah, we’ll check it out. Bye." 
Not particularly encouraging, but better than last time. I couldn’t stick 
around to see what happened, so I can’t say if anyone did anything—hope so. 
I realize that perhaps they have better things to do and are harried especially 
this time of year with all the tourists, but I thought I would give it a shot. 
I don’t particularly like being the bird police, but it irritates me that 
folks don’t pay attention to what they are doing, and there are plenty of 
other spits out there for folks to land on to do clamming. 


BTW, I did count 7 Sandwich Terns on the island before the people flushed all 
the terns, gulls, pelicans, and shorebirds away. I’m sure they all will be 
back later at low tide if people will leave them alone. 

_____________________

Marcia Balestri
Worcester County, Maryland
mebalestri AT gmail.com





> On Jul 26, 2015, at 1:36 PM, Elda Banks  wrote:
> 
> Are there any signs posted on Skimmer Island telling people not to walk 
there? Years ago people were there every day getting clams or some sea food. We 
would see them from my parents condo on the Ocean City side of the bay. 

> Elda Banks
> Silver Spring
> 
> 
> 
> On Sunday, July 26, 2015 11:56 AM, Phil Davis  wrote:
> 
> 
> (410) 260-8888
> DNR Police
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> > On Jul 26, 2015, at 11:10, Marcia Balestri > wrote: 

> > 
> > 
> > 
> > Sent from my iPhone
> > Marcia Balestri
> > Worcester, MD
> > 
> > -- 
> > -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
'Maryland & DC Birding'. 

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the web at http://www.mdbirding.com  

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http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html  

> 
> 
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> 
> 

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Subject: Re: Maryland Big Day 7/24
From: Jared Fisher <Jared.Fisher AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 17:46:07 -0400
Pretty sure this is the report Alex is referring to
http://www.mdbirding.com/archives/posts/9799_6319.html

There are quite a few big day posts from similar time-frame that can be
found by searching 'big day' in the MDOsprey archives.
http://www.mdbirding.com/archives.html

best,

Jared Fisher
Bethesda, MD

On Sun, Jul 26, 2015 at 5:38 PM, Russ Ruffing  wrote:

> Congrats guys on your big day triumph! Nice to see SOMEONE out there
> trying to do big days in some not-so-typical months! I will add your day to
> my Big Day database for MD/DC and will include it in the 2015 Birding
> Report. Alex, I will also include your June Big Day for the District when
> you got 90 species.
>
> I am curious though, where did you get your data point of 174 species for
> the previous July statewide Big Day record? I have been accumulating Big
> Day data for four years and was not aware of ANY statewide Big Days in July
> or any month other than May for that matter.
>
> If you or anyone else know of other sources of Big Day data, I would
> REALLY appreciate knowing that. Please forward along!
>
> Take care,
>
> Russ Ruffing
> Woodstock, MD
>
>
> On 07/26/15, Alex Wiebe wrote:
>
> Matt Addicks, Kevin Ebert, and I set out last Friday (7/24) to try to beat
> the Maryland Big Day record for the month of July. We had a total of 182
> species and we birded from Garrett County to Worcester County. Species in
> BOLD are the species highlights.
>
> We began our day in Cumberland at midnight where the resident COMMON
> NIGHTHAWKs had us worried but eventually called on our drive out of town.
> Racing over to Finzel Swamp, we heard a Great Horned Owl as we got out of
> the car. We walked down the trail as an Eastern Screech-Owl called from
> behind us, and started listening for rails. With a little bit of patience,
> a SORA called, and then the marsh erupted into a barrage of Virginia Rail
> grunts. The next stop at Old Legislative Rd for HENSLOW’S SPARROW was
> productive but ultimately unnecessary as we heard at least ten more singing
> birds from the next few stops. On the drive out, a Black Bear bounds across
> the road in front of us! A stop at Russell Rd produced a distant Barred Owl
> and an Eastern Whip-poor-will, along with a calling Black-billed Cuckoo. We
> finished the night section by driving west in Garrett County, and our
> efforts were rewarded with a LONG-EARED OWL, many more Barred Owls, and
> after much effort, a NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL. After we got the saw-whet we
> got back into our car to sleep for a half hour before the first dawn birds
> woke up.
>
> At 5:15, we were back out into the 46 degree darkness. At 5:24 we heard an
> American Woodcock at the Lake Ford United Methodist Church and soon saw
> another one buzz by us. We zipped over to Muddy Creek Rd, where both ALDER
> FLYCATCHERs and Willow Flycatchers were singing and a NORTHERN WATERTHUSH
> was calling. We arrived at Snaggy Mountain Rd a few minutes before sunrise
> and began listening for songbirds as we drove down the road. We heard
> HERMIT THRUSH, Magnolia Warbler, BLUE-HEADED VIREO, and Dark-eyed Junco
> along the first stretch, several more Alder Flycatchers at a marsh, and
> PINE SISKIN and Brown Creeper at some conifers near where we turned around
> at Sanders Lane. On the drive to Maple Glade Rd, Matt spotted a pair of
> COMMON RAVENs in a snag, and on Maple Glade Rd we picked up Least
> Flycatcher and saw another Black Bear. Pulling into Swallow Falls State
> Park, we heard a few more target species, including Golden-crowned Kinglet,
> Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Blackburnian Warbler. At Herrington Manor Park,
> it took all of our allotted time to pull out a Yellow-rumped Warbler at the
> boat ramp, but eventually we pish up a first year bird. Out of the forests
> and into the grasslands!
>
> A quick stop at the Trout Run Wastewater Treatment Plant produced our
> first Spotted Sandpiper and Wood Duck of the day, and there was a small
> flock of BOBOLINK on the drive out. On Joni Miller Rd we spotted the first
> of many Eastern Meadowlarks, a couple flyby Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, and
> a RED-HEADED WOODPECKER at the top of a snag! We also picked up our first
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo hear by sight. A quick check at G Swauger Rd did not
> yield the hoped for American Kestrel, so we headed east. At Frank Brenneman
> Rd, we cleaned up CERULEAN WARBLER and entered New Germany State Park. At
> Big Run Rd, we easily picked up CANADA WARBLER and heard a WINTER WREN sing
> its complicated song down the road. At Finzel Swamp, we ran all the way to
> the fields by the Allegheny County border and picked up CHESTNUT-SIDED
> WARBLER, but couldn’t find a Broad-winged Hawk. A stop at Old Legislative
> Rd was long and generally unproductive, but we did add Brown Thrasher. A
> quick run in at Burning Mines Rd yielded a VESPER SPARROW and a soaring
> BROAD-WINGED HAWK.
>
> At the Cumberland Terminus, we ran to the river in hopes of finding a
> Cliff Swallow but were surprised when there were no Chimney Swifts or
> swallows except a couple Barns! We got out of there and tried
> unsuccessfully for Warbling Vireo at Big Pool, and then drove north. At
> Mummert Rd, there was a Red-shouldered Hawk perched in a snag in a field,
> and we heard a Louisiana Waterthrush at the first stream crossing and a
> couple HOODED WARBLERs further down the road. From here we went south to
> Montgomery County, where we ran about a half mile into Little Bennett
> Regional Park on Prescott Rd to pick up our KENTUCKY WARBLER, Worm-eating
> Warbler, and Ovenbird. We tapped the brakes at Lake Churchill to pick up
> the oversummering TRUMPETER SWAN, and started to make our way to the
> eastern shore. At a farm field near Rutland Rd we spotted a single BANK
> SWALLOW among a few Barn Swallows, saving us a detour later in the day, but
> we still left the western shore significantly behind in time.
>
> The summer traffic on the bay bridge did not help either, but we
> eventually made our way to our first stop on the eastern shore at Pemberton
> Manor in Queen Anne’s County. We ticked the TUNDRA SWAN there plus a bonus
> Bald Eagle, but could not find the Sandhill Crane that has been in the area
> for a couple weeks. In order to save time, we cut a couple of single bird
> stakeouts on the route and headed to Whiton Crossing Rd to clean up our
> songbird list. As we drove into the forest there, we picked up Carolina
> Chickadee and saw a family group of PROTHONOTARY WARBLERs next to the road.
> We found a calling YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER and a Great Crested Flycatcher
> further down, and on the drive back out heard two SUMMER TANAGERs singing.
> We were ready to hit the coast, but not before ticking WILD TURKEY in a
> couple of farm fields.
>
> At Truitts Landing Rd, we found many of our first shorebirds for the day.
> Some nice migrants there were STILT SANDPIPER, Solitary Sandpiper, and a
> close WESTERN SANDPIPER. Further down the road Matt spotted a CASPIAN TERN
> in flight and heard a BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH. In an effort to flush a
> Saltmarsh Sparrow, I walked a short distance out into the marsh in muck
> boots and was very surprised when a misstep caused me to sink instantly to
> my waist in the marsh. This seemed funny to Matt and Kevin, but it did cost
> us a few minutes as I changed my clothes. I did get the SALTMARSH SPARROW
> though.
>
> At Figgs Landing Rd, there was a PIED-BILLED GREBE in the middle of the
> pond and Glossy Ibises on the shoreline. Matt called out a GULL-BILLED TERN
> and we watched three of them hunt over the pond at fairly close range! We
> also picked up RUDDY DUCK and Little Blue Heron there. At the Berlin
> Wastewater Treatment Plant we found a Northern Rough-winged Swallow but the
> expected Bufflehead was not in the ponds. We make a quick run over to
> Assateague, where we saw our first Brown Pelican and Black Skimmer over the
> ocean and PIPING PLOVER on the beach, but couldn’t find a Wilson’s
> Storm-Petrel. With only few minutes to spend, we went to Castaways. On the
> drive in we spotted a couple Orchard Orioles at the top of a tree and, and
> then spotted a MARBLED GODWIT on the mudflats. On the drive out, Matt
> called out a Cooper’s Hawk that flew behind us, carrying prey.
>
> We got to Skimmer Island right at sunset and could immediately see that
> the island and nearby mudflats were absolutely covered with birds. In the
> waning light, we shouted out birds rapidfire, and tallied a number of key
> species including TRICOLORED HERON, Black-crowned Night-Heron, CATTLE
> EGRET, LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL. There were at least three SANDWICH TERNs,
> and among the many shorebirds we picked out Ruddy Turnstone, and eventually
> a RED KNOT.
>
> After this, we headed out to our first stop for night birds on the eastern
> shore. We checked several locations for Chuck-will’s-widow but couldn’t
> hear any, even in the Pocomoke, so we headed to Elliott Island Rd to finish
> off the last hour of the day. We heard a spontaneously calling LEAST
> BITTERN a mile or so before Moorhen Pond and a COMMON GALLINULE at Moorhen
> Pond. Moving down Elliott Island Rd, we heard a Clapper Rail and moved down
> to listen for the last twenty minutes of the day for Black Rail. We never
> heard a Black Rail, but a BLACK-NECKED STILT called a few times and was our
> last species for the day.
>
> We ended the day with 182 species, beating the existing July Big Day
> record for Maryland of 174 species. We missed several species that we very
> likely could have gotten with more scouting like American Kestrel and
> Northern Bobwhite, but found a number of exciting birds over the course of
> the day and overall had a lot of fun and success with the birds.
>
> Alex Wiebe
> Takoma Park, MD
>
> --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
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> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
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> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>
> --
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Subject: Re: Maryland Big Day 7/24
From: Russ Ruffing <ruff2 AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 16:38:34 -0500 (CDT)
Congrats guys on your big day triumph! Nice to see SOMEONE out there trying to 
do big days in some not-so-typical months! I will add your day to my Big Day 
database for MD/DC and will include it in the 2015 Birding Report. Alex, I will 
also include your June Big Day for the District when you got 90 species. 

 
I am curious though, where did you get your data point of 174 species for the 
previous July statewide Big Day record? I have been accumulating Big Day data 
for four years and was not aware of ANY statewide Big Days in July or any month 
other than May for that matter. 

 
If you or anyone else know of other sources of Big Day data, I would REALLY 
appreciate knowing that. Please forward along! 

 
Take care,
 
Russ Ruffing
Woodstock, MD 


On 07/26/15, Alex Wiebe wrote:

Matt Addicks, Kevin Ebert, and I set out last Friday (7/24) to try to beat the 
Maryland Big Day record for the month of July. We had a total of 182 species 
and we birded from Garrett County to Worcester County. Species in BOLD are the 
species highlights. 


We began our day in Cumberland at midnight where the resident COMMON NIGHTHAWKs 
had us worried but eventually called on our drive out of town. Racing over to 
Finzel Swamp, we heard a Great Horned Owl as we got out of the car. We walked 
down the trail as an Eastern Screech-Owl called from behind us, and started 
listening for rails. With a little bit of patience, a SORA called, and then the 
marsh erupted into a barrage of Virginia Rail grunts. The next stop at Old 
Legislative Rd for HENSLOW’S SPARROW was productive but ultimately 
unnecessary as we heard at least ten more singing birds from the next few 
stops. On the drive out, a Black Bear bounds across the road in front of us! A 
stop at Russell Rd produced a distant Barred Owl and an Eastern Whip-poor-will, 
along with a calling Black-billed Cuckoo. We finished the night section by 
driving west in Garrett County, and our efforts were rewarded with a LONG-EARED 
OWL, many more Barred Owls, and after much effort, a NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL. 
After we got the saw-whet we got back into our car to sleep for a half hour 
before the first dawn birds woke up. 


At 5:15, we were back out into the 46 degree darkness. At 5:24 we heard an 
American Woodcock at the Lake Ford United Methodist Church and soon saw another 
one buzz by us. We zipped over to Muddy Creek Rd, where both ALDER FLYCATCHERs 
and Willow Flycatchers were singing and a NORTHERN WATERTHUSH was calling. We 
arrived at Snaggy Mountain Rd a few minutes before sunrise and began listening 
for songbirds as we drove down the road. We heard HERMIT THRUSH, Magnolia 
Warbler, BLUE-HEADED VIREO, and Dark-eyed Junco along the first stretch, 
several more Alder Flycatchers at a marsh, and PINE SISKIN and Brown Creeper at 
some conifers near where we turned around at Sanders Lane. On the drive to 
Maple Glade Rd, Matt spotted a pair of COMMON RAVENs in a snag, and on Maple 
Glade Rd we picked up Least Flycatcher and saw another Black Bear. Pulling into 
Swallow Falls State Park, we heard a few more target species, including 
Golden-crowned Kinglet, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Blackburnian Warbler. At 
Herrington Manor Park, it took all of our allotted time to pull out a 
Yellow-rumped Warbler at the boat ramp, but eventually we pish up a first year 
bird. Out of the forests and into the grasslands! 


A quick stop at the Trout Run Wastewater Treatment Plant produced our first 
Spotted Sandpiper and Wood Duck of the day, and there was a small flock of 
BOBOLINK on the drive out. On Joni Miller Rd we spotted the first of many 
Eastern Meadowlarks, a couple flyby Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, and a 
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER at the top of a snag! We also picked up our first 
Yellow-billed Cuckoo hear by sight. A quick check at G Swauger Rd did not yield 
the hoped for American Kestrel, so we headed east. At Frank Brenneman Rd, we 
cleaned up CERULEAN WARBLER and entered New Germany State Park. At Big Run Rd, 
we easily picked up CANADA WARBLER and heard a WINTER WREN sing its complicated 
song down the road. At Finzel Swamp, we ran all the way to the fields by the 
Allegheny County border and picked up CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, but couldn’t 
find a Broad-winged Hawk. A stop at Old Legislative Rd was long and generally 
unproductive, but we did add Brown Thrasher. A quick run in at Burning Mines Rd 
yielded a VESPER SPARROW and a soaring BROAD-WINGED HAWK. 


At the Cumberland Terminus, we ran to the river in hopes of finding a Cliff 
Swallow but were surprised when there were no Chimney Swifts or swallows except 
a couple Barns! We got out of there and tried unsuccessfully for Warbling Vireo 
at Big Pool, and then drove north. At Mummert Rd, there was a Red-shouldered 
Hawk perched in a snag in a field, and we heard a Louisiana Waterthrush at the 
first stream crossing and a couple HOODED WARBLERs further down the road. From 
here we went south to Montgomery County, where we ran about a half mile into 
Little Bennett Regional Park on Prescott Rd to pick up our KENTUCKY WARBLER, 
Worm-eating Warbler, and Ovenbird. We tapped the brakes at Lake Churchill to 
pick up the oversummering TRUMPETER SWAN, and started to make our way to the 
eastern shore. At a farm field near Rutland Rd we spotted a single BANK SWALLOW 
among a few Barn Swallows, saving us a detour later in the day, but we still 
left the western shore significantly behind in time. 


The summer traffic on the bay bridge did not help either, but we eventually 
made our way to our first stop on the eastern shore at Pemberton Manor in Queen 
Anne’s County. We ticked the TUNDRA SWAN there plus a bonus Bald Eagle, but 
could not find the Sandhill Crane that has been in the area for a couple weeks. 
In order to save time, we cut a couple of single bird stakeouts on the route 
and headed to Whiton Crossing Rd to clean up our songbird list. As we drove 
into the forest there, we picked up Carolina Chickadee and saw a family group 
of PROTHONOTARY WARBLERs next to the road. We found a calling YELLOW-THROATED 
WARBLER and a Great Crested Flycatcher further down, and on the drive back out 
heard two SUMMER TANAGERs singing. We were ready to hit the coast, but not 
before ticking WILD TURKEY in a couple of farm fields. 


At Truitts Landing Rd, we found many of our first shorebirds for the day. Some 
nice migrants there were STILT SANDPIPER, Solitary Sandpiper, and a close 
WESTERN SANDPIPER. Further down the road Matt spotted a CASPIAN TERN in flight 
and heard a BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH. In an effort to flush a Saltmarsh Sparrow, I 
walked a short distance out into the marsh in muck boots and was very surprised 
when a misstep caused me to sink instantly to my waist in the marsh. This 
seemed funny to Matt and Kevin, but it did cost us a few minutes as I changed 
my clothes. I did get the SALTMARSH SPARROW though. 


At Figgs Landing Rd, there was a PIED-BILLED GREBE in the middle of the pond 
and Glossy Ibises on the shoreline. Matt called out a GULL-BILLED TERN and we 
watched three of them hunt over the pond at fairly close range! We also picked 
up RUDDY DUCK and Little Blue Heron there. At the Berlin Wastewater Treatment 
Plant we found a Northern Rough-winged Swallow but the expected Bufflehead was 
not in the ponds. We make a quick run over to Assateague, where we saw our 
first Brown Pelican and Black Skimmer over the ocean and PIPING PLOVER on the 
beach, but couldn’t find a Wilson’s Storm-Petrel. With only few minutes to 
spend, we went to Castaways. On the drive in we spotted a couple Orchard 
Orioles at the top of a tree and, and then spotted a MARBLED GODWIT on the 
mudflats. On the drive out, Matt called out a Cooper’s Hawk that flew behind 
us, carrying prey. 


We got to Skimmer Island right at sunset and could immediately see that the 
island and nearby mudflats were absolutely covered with birds. In the waning 
light, we shouted out birds rapidfire, and tallied a number of key species 
including TRICOLORED HERON, Black-crowned Night-Heron, CATTLE EGRET, LESSER 
BLACK-BACKED GULL. There were at least three SANDWICH TERNs, and among the many 
shorebirds we picked out Ruddy Turnstone, and eventually a RED KNOT. 


After this, we headed out to our first stop for night birds on the eastern 
shore. We checked several locations for Chuck-will’s-widow but couldn’t 
hear any, even in the Pocomoke, so we headed to Elliott Island Rd to finish off 
the last hour of the day. We heard a spontaneously calling LEAST BITTERN a mile 
or so before Moorhen Pond and a COMMON GALLINULE at Moorhen Pond. Moving down 
Elliott Island Rd, we heard a Clapper Rail and moved down to listen for the 
last twenty minutes of the day for Black Rail. We never heard a Black Rail, but 
a BLACK-NECKED STILT called a few times and was our last species for the day. 


We ended the day with 182 species, beating the existing July Big Day record for 
Maryland of 174 species. We missed several species that we very likely could 
have gotten with more scouting like American Kestrel and Northern Bobwhite, but 
found a number of exciting birds over the course of the day and overall had a 
lot of fun and success with the birds. 


Alex Wiebe
Takoma Park, MD

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Subject: Green Herons at Depot Pond (East)
From: Michael Roane <roane.michael AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 14:01:39 -0700 (PDT)
Green Herons seemed to be every where this morning with five in my sights and 
one more vocalizing in the trees somewhere above my head. At least one or two 
were probably young-of-the-year. Two Great Egrets flew over the pond at 
different times and appeared to be coming from Schoolhouse Pond. They headed in 
the direction of the Patuxent. While standing there, I spotted a natural Osprey 
(as opposed to man-made) nest in a tree over the pond on the other side of the 
tracks — the smaller pond. There were two Osprey in the nest when I first saw 
it and a little later a newly fledged bird flew over and landed on a branch 
close to where I was standing. The resident Mute Swan spent the morning 
preening and I saw a few single young Wood Ducks. The level of attrition among 
Wood Duck chicks must be very high. Two months ago, there were large families 
of ten to twelve chicks swimming about; now, you are lucky if you see two 
together. 


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Subject: Re: Maryland Big Day 7/24
From: Don Simonson <simonson AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 13:24:59 -0700 (PDT)
On Sunday, July 26, 2015 at 9:51:01 AM UTC-4, Alex Wiebe wrote:
> Matt Addicks, Kevin Ebert, and I set out last Friday (7/24) to try to beat 
the Maryland Big Day record for the month of July. We had a total of 182 
species and we birded from Garrett County to Worcester County. Species in BOLD 
are the species highlights. 

> 
> We began our day in Cumberland at midnight where the resident COMMON 
NIGHTHAWKs had us worried but eventually called on our drive out of town. 
Racing over to Finzel Swamp, we heard a Great Horned Owl as we got out of the 
car. We walked down the trail as an Eastern Screech-Owl called from behind us, 
and started listening for rails. With a little bit of patience, a SORA called, 
and then the marsh erupted into a barrage of Virginia Rail grunts. The next 
stop at Old Legislative Rd for HENSLOW’S SPARROW was productive but 
ultimately unnecessary as we heard at least ten more singing birds from the 
next few stops. On the drive out, a Black Bear bounds across the road in front 
of us! A stop at Russell Rd produced a distant Barred Owl and an Eastern 
Whip-poor-will, along with a calling Black-billed Cuckoo. We finished the night 
section by driving west in Garrett County, and our efforts were rewarded with a 
LONG-EARED OWL, many more Barred Owls, and after much effort, a NORTHERN 
SAW-WHET OWL. After we got the saw-whet we got back into our car to sleep for a 
half hour before the first dawn birds woke up. 

> 
> At 5:15, we were back out into the 46 degree darkness. At 5:24 we heard an 
American Woodcock at the Lake Ford United Methodist Church and soon saw another 
one buzz by us. We zipped over to Muddy Creek Rd, where both ALDER FLYCATCHERs 
and Willow Flycatchers were singing and a NORTHERN WATERTHUSH was calling. We 
arrived at Snaggy Mountain Rd a few minutes before sunrise and began listening 
for songbirds as we drove down the road. We heard HERMIT THRUSH, Magnolia 
Warbler, BLUE-HEADED VIREO, and Dark-eyed Junco along the first stretch, 
several more Alder Flycatchers at a marsh, and PINE SISKIN and Brown Creeper at 
some conifers near where we turned around at Sanders Lane. On the drive to 
Maple Glade Rd, Matt spotted a pair of COMMON RAVENs in a snag, and on Maple 
Glade Rd we picked up Least Flycatcher and saw another Black Bear. Pulling into 
Swallow Falls State Park, we heard a few more target species, including 
Golden-crowned Kinglet, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Blackburnian Warbler. At 
Herrington Manor Park, it took all of our allotted time to pull out a 
Yellow-rumped Warbler at the boat ramp, but eventually we pish up a first year 
bird. Out of the forests and into the grasslands! 

> 
> A quick stop at the Trout Run Wastewater Treatment Plant produced our first 
Spotted Sandpiper and Wood Duck of the day, and there was a small flock of 
BOBOLINK on the drive out. On Joni Miller Rd we spotted the first of many 
Eastern Meadowlarks, a couple flyby Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, and a 
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER at the top of a snag! We also picked up our first 
Yellow-billed Cuckoo hear by sight. A quick check at G Swauger Rd did not yield 
the hoped for American Kestrel, so we headed east. At Frank Brenneman Rd, we 
cleaned up CERULEAN WARBLER and entered New Germany State Park. At Big Run Rd, 
we easily picked up CANADA WARBLER and heard a WINTER WREN sing its complicated 
song down the road. At Finzel Swamp, we ran all the way to the fields by the 
Allegheny County border and picked up CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, but couldn’t 
find a Broad-winged Hawk. A stop at Old Legislative Rd was long and generally 
unproductive, but we did add Brown Thrasher. A quick run in at Burning Mines Rd 
yielded a VESPER SPARROW and a soaring BROAD-WINGED HAWK. 

> 
> At the Cumberland Terminus, we ran to the river in hopes of finding a Cliff 
Swallow but were surprised when there were no Chimney Swifts or swallows except 
a couple Barns! We got out of there and tried unsuccessfully for Warbling Vireo 
at Big Pool, and then drove north. At Mummert Rd, there was a Red-shouldered 
Hawk perched in a snag in a field, and we heard a Louisiana Waterthrush at the 
first stream crossing and a couple HOODED WARBLERs further down the road. From 
here we went south to Montgomery County, where we ran about a half mile into 
Little Bennett Regional Park on Prescott Rd to pick up our KENTUCKY WARBLER, 
Worm-eating Warbler, and Ovenbird. We tapped the brakes at Lake Churchill to 
pick up the oversummering TRUMPETER SWAN, and started to make our way to the 
eastern shore. At a farm field near Rutland Rd we spotted a single BANK SWALLOW 
among a few Barn Swallows, saving us a detour later in the day, but we still 
left the western shore significantly behind in time. 

> 
> The summer traffic on the bay bridge did not help either, but we eventually 
made our way to our first stop on the eastern shore at Pemberton Manor in Queen 
Anne’s County. We ticked the TUNDRA SWAN there plus a bonus Bald Eagle, but 
could not find the Sandhill Crane that has been in the area for a couple weeks. 
In order to save time, we cut a couple of single bird stakeouts on the route 
and headed to Whiton Crossing Rd to clean up our songbird list. As we drove 
into the forest there, we picked up Carolina Chickadee and saw a family group 
of PROTHONOTARY WARBLERs next to the road. We found a calling YELLOW-THROATED 
WARBLER and a Great Crested Flycatcher further down, and on the drive back out 
heard two SUMMER TANAGERs singing. We were ready to hit the coast, but not 
before ticking WILD TURKEY in a couple of farm fields. 

> 
> At Truitts Landing Rd, we found many of our first shorebirds for the day. 
Some nice migrants there were STILT SANDPIPER, Solitary Sandpiper, and a close 
WESTERN SANDPIPER. Further down the road Matt spotted a CASPIAN TERN in flight 
and heard a BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH. In an effort to flush a Saltmarsh Sparrow, I 
walked a short distance out into the marsh in muck boots and was very surprised 
when a misstep caused me to sink instantly to my waist in the marsh. This 
seemed funny to Matt and Kevin, but it did cost us a few minutes as I changed 
my clothes. I did get the SALTMARSH SPARROW though. 

> 
> At Figgs Landing Rd, there was a PIED-BILLED GREBE in the middle of the pond 
and Glossy Ibises on the shoreline. Matt called out a GULL-BILLED TERN and we 
watched three of them hunt over the pond at fairly close range! We also picked 
up RUDDY DUCK and Little Blue Heron there. At the Berlin Wastewater Treatment 
Plant we found a Northern Rough-winged Swallow but the expected Bufflehead was 
not in the ponds. We make a quick run over to Assateague, where we saw our 
first Brown Pelican and Black Skimmer over the ocean and PIPING PLOVER on the 
beach, but couldn’t find a Wilson’s Storm-Petrel. With only few minutes to 
spend, we went to Castaways. On the drive in we spotted a couple Orchard 
Orioles at the top of a tree and, and then spotted a MARBLED GODWIT on the 
mudflats. On the drive out, Matt called out a Cooper’s Hawk that flew behind 
us, carrying prey. 

> 
> We got to Skimmer Island right at sunset and could immediately see that the 
island and nearby mudflats were absolutely covered with birds. In the waning 
light, we shouted out birds rapidfire, and tallied a number of key species 
including TRICOLORED HERON, Black-crowned Night-Heron, CATTLE EGRET, LESSER 
BLACK-BACKED GULL. There were at least three SANDWICH TERNs, and among the many 
shorebirds we picked out Ruddy Turnstone, and eventually a RED KNOT. 

> 
> After this, we headed out to our first stop for night birds on the eastern 
shore. We checked several locations for Chuck-will’s-widow but couldn’t 
hear any, even in the Pocomoke, so we headed to Elliott Island Rd to finish off 
the last hour of the day. We heard a spontaneously calling LEAST BITTERN a mile 
or so before Moorhen Pond and a COMMON GALLINULE at Moorhen Pond. Moving down 
Elliott Island Rd, we heard a Clapper Rail and moved down to listen for the 
last twenty minutes of the day for Black Rail. We never heard a Black Rail, but 
a BLACK-NECKED STILT called a few times and was our last species for the day. 

> 
> We ended the day with 182 species, beating the existing July Big Day record 
for Maryland of 174 species. We missed several species that we very likely 
could have gotten with more scouting like American Kestrel and Northern 
Bobwhite, but found a number of exciting birds over the course of the day and 
overall had a lot of fun and success with the birds. 

> 
> Alex Wiebe
> Takoma Park, MD

Congratulations Alex, Matt and Kevin! 182 species in Maryland is a major 
accomplishment in any month, it was really exciting to read your account! Good 
birding! Don Simonson, Darnestown MD 


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Subject: Tri-colored Heron Jug Bay
From: jugbayjs <JugBayJS AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 13:19:28 -0700 (PDT)
Oops, hit send by mistake!

... I saw a few gulls but nothing noteworthy and otherwise it was very quiet.

Jeff Shenot
Croom, Md

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Subject: Tri-colored Heron Jug Bay - no
From: jugbayjs <JugBayJS AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 13:18:09 -0700 (PDT)
I look for this bird this morning at Jackson landing, from both the pier and 
observation deck about a quarter mile downstream. I also tried at Selby's  AT  the 
Canoe launch. I had no luck. After reading this report I went back in the early 
afternoon, and looked a second time but again had no luck. Might be that I just 
had bad timing, but more likely it is best if you are viewing from a boat 
because there are too many places for it to hide if you're looking from a fixed 
point on shore. 


I saw a few gulls 

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Subject: Swan Creek in northern Anne Arundel Co. (7/26)
From: "'Bill Hubick' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 18:32:28 +0000 (UTC)
Hi Everyone,
Ed Carlson and I did a pretty thorough weekend survey of Swan Creek in northern 
Anne Arundel Co. this morning (7/26).  See access notes below. *** 


Highlights were the two continuing AMERICAN AVOCETs and 100+ adult peeps, 
including our first WESTERN SANDPIPER of the season. Ducks are dominated by 
this site's high late summer MALLARD numbers, but we also found a WOOD DUCK, an 
AMERICAN BLACK DUCK, and a male BLUE-WINGED TEAL, as well as the continuing 
BUFFLEHEAD (2) and LESSER SCAUP (2). SWALLOW numbers are still impressive, 
including about 55 BANK SWALLOWs feasting on abundant emerging insects in the 
south cell. At one point we watched 45 Bank Swallows just walking on the ground 
and feeding. 


Full eBird list is below:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24386733

*** NOTE: Swan Creek/Cox Creek is an active industrial site and mitigation 
project in northern Anne Arundel Co. Access is at the end of Kembo Road off 
Fort Smallwood Road near 695. The site is open ONLY Monday through Friday, 7:00 
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Please be in your car and leaving at 3:30 p.m. Remember to 
always sign in at the office, to be on your best behavior (people have worked 
hard to coordinate this access), and to stick to permitted areas. This Swan 
Creek map linked here details where you are and aren't allowed to 
walk. http://www.billhubick.com/docs/swan_creek_map.jpg. *** 

 Bill HubickPasadena, 
Marylandbill_hubick AT yahoo.comhttp://www.billhubick.comhttp://www.marylandbiodiversity.comhttp://www.facebook.com/MarylandBiodiversity 


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Subject: Re: People walking on Skimmer Island right now. Someone I can call?
From: "'Elda Banks' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 17:36:57 +0000 (UTC)
Are there any signs posted on Skimmer Island telling people not to walk there? 
Years ago people were there every day getting clams or some sea food. We would 
see them from my parents condo on the Ocean City side of the bay. 

Elda BanksSilver Spring
 


 On Sunday, July 26, 2015 11:56 AM, Phil Davis  wrote: 

   

 (410) 260-8888
DNR Police

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 26, 2015, at 11:10, Marcia Balestri  wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> Marcia Balestri
> Worcester, MD
> 
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Subject: Upland Sandpipers - Salisbury Airport
From: Alex Wiebe <rabwiebe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 10:32:41 -0700 (PDT)
Today I saw four Upland Sandpipers at the Salisbury Airport from the main 
parking area at 12:35 pm. 


Alex Wiebe
Takoma Park, MD

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Subject: Paper Mill Flats
From: Kye jenkins <kyebird54 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 10:25:14 -0700 (PDT)
Paper Mill Flats are starting to look good for Migration/ Birds seen this 
Morning/ 


2 Osprey
7 Great Blue Heron
1 Great Egret
5 Killdeer
1 Greater Yellowlegs
2 Solitary Sandpiper
75 Semipalmated Sandpiper
10 Least Sandpiper
Red Bellied Woodpecker feeding young/


Kye Jenkins/Phoenix MD

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Subject: Tri-colored Heron Jug Bay
From: Wayne Baumgartner <whbaumga AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 12:56:46 -0400
I took advantage of the good weather today to rent a canoe at Jackson Landing 
at Patuxent River Park in Prince George's county. 


The Tri-colored Heron found earlier can still be found on the western shore of 
the river about half way between Jackson Landing and Selby Landing. 


Good birding,
   
   -Wayne Baumgartner

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: 2015 Turkey Point Hawk Watch
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 12:11:36 -0400
It’s that time of year when I issue a call for observers for the Turkey
Point Hawk Watch at Elk Neck State Park. We will begin on Tuesday,
September 8, and conclude on the Saturday after Thanksgiving. We ask
observers to arrive at the Hawk Watch (either the meadow or the lighthouse)
by 9:00 a.m. and stay at least through noon. On a strong flight day, it
would be helpful if observers could stay later. Observers are welcome to
arrive earlier if they want—Sharp-shinned Hawks and the smaller falcons
seem to be up and about early.



One of the great pleasures of this hawk watch is the walk in, especially
during September when the fall songbird migration is going on. However,
those of us with mobility issues can get permission to drive in. I just
need to know that when you sign up.



If you can help out, you may sign up for just one day or as many days as
you like. If you are new to hawk watching, I’ll provide instructions and
make sure you are paired up with an experienced observer your first time.
But in a nutshell, we record each raptor that flies
south/southeast/southwest. The Hawk Migration Association of North America
(HMANA) provides a form for recording the final count each day, but I am
also happy to take that information via email. I also maintain the
volunteer schedule and send an email reminder the week before.



Please let me know if you would like to participate this year.



Thank you,

Pat Valdata

Cecil Bird Club

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Subject: Re: People walking on Skimmer Island right now. Someone I can call?
From: Phil Davis <pdavis AT ix.netcom.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 11:56:10 -0400
(410) 260-8888
DNR Police

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 26, 2015, at 11:10, Marcia Balestri  wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> Marcia Balestri
> Worcester, MD
> 
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Subject: People walking on Skimmer Island right now. Someone I can call?
From: Marcia Balestri <mebalestri AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 11:10:56 -0400

Sent from my iPhone
Marcia Balestri
Worcester, MD

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Subject: Re: Maryland Big Day 7/24
From: David Powell <seneca.ranger AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 10:38:01 -0400
Alex, Matt and Kevin,

Congratulations. Awesome Big Day for July. Thanks for sharing.

Dave Powell
Germantown, MD

On Sun, Jul 26, 2015 at 9:51 AM, Alex Wiebe  wrote:

> Matt Addicks, Kevin Ebert, and I set out last Friday (7/24) to try to beat
> the Maryland Big Day record for the month of July. We had a total of 182
> species and we birded from Garrett County to Worcester County. Species in
> BOLD are the species highlights.
>
> We began our day in Cumberland at midnight where the resident COMMON
> NIGHTHAWKs had us worried but eventually called on our drive out of town.
> Racing over to Finzel Swamp, we heard a Great Horned Owl as we got out of
> the car. We walked down the trail as an Eastern Screech-Owl called from
> behind us, and started listening for rails. With a little bit of patience,
> a SORA called, and then the marsh erupted into a barrage of Virginia Rail
> grunts. The next stop at Old Legislative Rd for HENSLOW’S SPARROW was
> productive but ultimately unnecessary as we heard at least ten more singing
> birds from the next few stops. On the drive out, a Black Bear bounds across
> the road in front of us! A stop at Russell Rd produced a distant Barred Owl
> and an Eastern Whip-poor-will, along with a calling Black-billed Cuckoo. We
> finished the night section by driving west in Garrett County, and our
> efforts were rewarded with a LONG-EARED OWL, many more Barred Owls, and
> after much effort, a NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL. After we got the saw-whet we
> got back into our car to sleep for a half hour before the first dawn birds
> woke up.
>
> At 5:15, we were back out into the 46 degree darkness. At 5:24 we heard an
> American Woodcock at the Lake Ford United Methodist Church and soon saw
> another one buzz by us. We zipped over to Muddy Creek Rd, where both ALDER
> FLYCATCHERs and Willow Flycatchers were singing and a NORTHERN WATERTHUSH
> was calling. We arrived at Snaggy Mountain Rd a few minutes before sunrise
> and began listening for songbirds as we drove down the road. We heard
> HERMIT THRUSH, Magnolia Warbler, BLUE-HEADED VIREO, and Dark-eyed Junco
> along the first stretch, several more Alder Flycatchers at a marsh, and
> PINE SISKIN and Brown Creeper at some conifers near where we turned around
> at Sanders Lane. On the drive to Maple Glade Rd, Matt spotted a pair of
> COMMON RAVENs in a snag, and on Maple Glade Rd we picked up Least
> Flycatcher and saw another Black Bear. Pulling into Swallow Falls State
> Park, we heard a few more target species, including Golden-crowned Kinglet,
> Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Blackburnian Warbler. At Herrington Manor Park,
> it took all of our allotted time to pull out a Yellow-rumped Warbler at the
> boat ramp, but eventually we pish up a first year bird. Out of the forests
> and into the grasslands!
>
> A quick stop at the Trout Run Wastewater Treatment Plant produced our
> first Spotted Sandpiper and Wood Duck of the day, and there was a small
> flock of BOBOLINK on the drive out. On Joni Miller Rd we spotted the first
> of many Eastern Meadowlarks, a couple flyby Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, and
> a RED-HEADED WOODPECKER at the top of a snag! We also picked up our first
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo hear by sight. A quick check at G Swauger Rd did not
> yield the hoped for American Kestrel, so we headed east. At Frank Brenneman
> Rd, we cleaned up CERULEAN WARBLER and entered New Germany State Park. At
> Big Run Rd, we easily picked up CANADA WARBLER and heard a WINTER WREN sing
> its complicated song down the road. At Finzel Swamp, we ran all the way to
> the fields by the Allegheny County border and picked up CHESTNUT-SIDED
> WARBLER, but couldn’t find a Broad-winged Hawk. A stop at Old Legislative
> Rd was long and generally unproductive, but we did add Brown Thrasher. A
> quick run in at Burning Mines Rd yielded a VESPER SPARROW and a soaring
> BROAD-WINGED HAWK.
>
> At the Cumberland Terminus, we ran to the river in hopes of finding a
> Cliff Swallow but were surprised when there were no Chimney Swifts or
> swallows except a couple Barns! We got out of there and tried
> unsuccessfully for Warbling Vireo at Big Pool, and then drove north. At
> Mummert Rd, there was a Red-shouldered Hawk perched in a snag in a field,
> and we heard a Louisiana Waterthrush at the first stream crossing and a
> couple HOODED WARBLERs further down the road. From here we went south to
> Montgomery County, where we ran about a half mile into Little Bennett
> Regional Park on Prescott Rd to pick up our KENTUCKY WARBLER, Worm-eating
> Warbler, and Ovenbird. We tapped the brakes at Lake Churchill to pick up
> the oversummering TRUMPETER SWAN, and started to make our way to the
> eastern shore. At a farm field near Rutland Rd we spotted a single BANK
> SWALLOW among a few Barn Swallows, saving us a detour later in the day, but
> we still left the western shore significantly behind in time.
>
> The summer traffic on the bay bridge did not help either, but we
> eventually made our way to our first stop on the eastern shore at Pemberton
> Manor in Queen Anne’s County. We ticked the TUNDRA SWAN there plus a bonus
> Bald Eagle, but could not find the Sandhill Crane that has been in the area
> for a couple weeks. In order to save time, we cut a couple of single bird
> stakeouts on the route and headed to Whiton Crossing Rd to clean up our
> songbird list. As we drove into the forest there, we picked up Carolina
> Chickadee and saw a family group of PROTHONOTARY WARBLERs next to the road.
> We found a calling YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER and a Great Crested Flycatcher
> further down, and on the drive back out heard two SUMMER TANAGERs singing.
> We were ready to hit the coast, but not before ticking WILD TURKEY in a
> couple of farm fields.
>
> At Truitts Landing Rd, we found many of our first shorebirds for the day.
> Some nice migrants there were STILT SANDPIPER, Solitary Sandpiper, and a
> close WESTERN SANDPIPER. Further down the road Matt spotted a CASPIAN TERN
> in flight and heard a BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH. In an effort to flush a
> Saltmarsh Sparrow, I walked a short distance out into the marsh in muck
> boots and was very surprised when a misstep caused me to sink instantly to
> my waist in the marsh. This seemed funny to Matt and Kevin, but it did cost
> us a few minutes as I changed my clothes. I did get the SALTMARSH SPARROW
> though.
>
> At Figgs Landing Rd, there was a PIED-BILLED GREBE in the middle of the
> pond and Glossy Ibises on the shoreline. Matt called out a GULL-BILLED TERN
> and we watched three of them hunt over the pond at fairly close range! We
> also picked up RUDDY DUCK and Little Blue Heron there. At the Berlin
> Wastewater Treatment Plant we found a Northern Rough-winged Swallow but the
> expected Bufflehead was not in the ponds. We make a quick run over to
> Assateague, where we saw our first Brown Pelican and Black Skimmer over the
> ocean and PIPING PLOVER on the beach, but couldn’t find a Wilson’s
> Storm-Petrel. With only few minutes to spend, we went to Castaways. On the
> drive in we spotted a couple Orchard Orioles at the top of a tree and, and
> then spotted a MARBLED GODWIT on the mudflats. On the drive out, Matt
> called out a Cooper’s Hawk that flew behind us, carrying prey.
>
> We got to Skimmer Island right at sunset and could immediately see that
> the island and nearby mudflats were absolutely covered with birds. In the
> waning light, we shouted out birds rapidfire, and tallied a number of key
> species including TRICOLORED HERON, Black-crowned Night-Heron, CATTLE
> EGRET, LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL. There were at least three SANDWICH TERNs,
> and among the many shorebirds we picked out Ruddy Turnstone, and eventually
> a RED KNOT.
>
> After this, we headed out to our first stop for night birds on the eastern
> shore. We checked several locations for Chuck-will’s-widow but couldn’t
> hear any, even in the Pocomoke, so we headed to Elliott Island Rd to finish
> off the last hour of the day. We heard a spontaneously calling LEAST
> BITTERN a mile or so before Moorhen Pond and a COMMON GALLINULE at Moorhen
> Pond. Moving down Elliott Island Rd, we heard a Clapper Rail and moved down
> to listen for the last twenty minutes of the day for Black Rail. We never
> heard a Black Rail, but a BLACK-NECKED STILT called a few times and was our
> last species for the day.
>
> We ended the day with 182 species, beating the existing July Big Day
> record for Maryland of 174 species. We missed several species that we very
> likely could have gotten with more scouting like American Kestrel and
> Northern Bobwhite, but found a number of exciting birds over the course of
> the day and overall had a lot of fun and success with the birds.
>
> Alex Wiebe
> Takoma Park, MD
>
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Subject: Maryland Big Day 7/24
From: Alex Wiebe <rabwiebe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 06:51:01 -0700 (PDT)
Matt Addicks, Kevin Ebert, and I set out last Friday (7/24) to try to beat the 
Maryland Big Day record for the month of July. We had a total of 182 species 
and we birded from Garrett County to Worcester County. Species in BOLD are the 
species highlights. 


We began our day in Cumberland at midnight where the resident COMMON NIGHTHAWKs 
had us worried but eventually called on our drive out of town. Racing over to 
Finzel Swamp, we heard a Great Horned Owl as we got out of the car. We walked 
down the trail as an Eastern Screech-Owl called from behind us, and started 
listening for rails. With a little bit of patience, a SORA called, and then the 
marsh erupted into a barrage of Virginia Rail grunts. The next stop at Old 
Legislative Rd for HENSLOW’S SPARROW was productive but ultimately 
unnecessary as we heard at least ten more singing birds from the next few 
stops. On the drive out, a Black Bear bounds across the road in front of us! A 
stop at Russell Rd produced a distant Barred Owl and an Eastern Whip-poor-will, 
along with a calling Black-billed Cuckoo. We finished the night section by 
driving west in Garrett County, and our efforts were rewarded with a LONG-EARED 
OWL, many more Barred Owls, and after much effort, a NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL. 
After we got the saw-whet we got back into our car to sleep for a half hour 
before the first dawn birds woke up. 


At 5:15, we were back out into the 46 degree darkness. At 5:24 we heard an 
American Woodcock at the Lake Ford United Methodist Church and soon saw another 
one buzz by us. We zipped over to Muddy Creek Rd, where both ALDER FLYCATCHERs 
and Willow Flycatchers were singing and a NORTHERN WATERTHUSH was calling. We 
arrived at Snaggy Mountain Rd a few minutes before sunrise and began listening 
for songbirds as we drove down the road. We heard HERMIT THRUSH, Magnolia 
Warbler, BLUE-HEADED VIREO, and Dark-eyed Junco along the first stretch, 
several more Alder Flycatchers at a marsh, and PINE SISKIN and Brown Creeper at 
some conifers near where we turned around at Sanders Lane. On the drive to 
Maple Glade Rd, Matt spotted a pair of COMMON RAVENs in a snag, and on Maple 
Glade Rd we picked up Least Flycatcher and saw another Black Bear. Pulling into 
Swallow Falls State Park, we heard a few more target species, including 
Golden-crowned Kinglet, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Blackburnian Warbler. At 
Herrington Manor Park, it took all of our allotted time to pull out a 
Yellow-rumped Warbler at the boat ramp, but eventually we pish up a first year 
bird. Out of the forests and into the grasslands! 


A quick stop at the Trout Run Wastewater Treatment Plant produced our first 
Spotted Sandpiper and Wood Duck of the day, and there was a small flock of 
BOBOLINK on the drive out. On Joni Miller Rd we spotted the first of many 
Eastern Meadowlarks, a couple flyby Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, and a 
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER at the top of a snag! We also picked up our first 
Yellow-billed Cuckoo hear by sight. A quick check at G Swauger Rd did not yield 
the hoped for American Kestrel, so we headed east. At Frank Brenneman Rd, we 
cleaned up CERULEAN WARBLER and entered New Germany State Park. At Big Run Rd, 
we easily picked up CANADA WARBLER and heard a WINTER WREN sing its complicated 
song down the road. At Finzel Swamp, we ran all the way to the fields by the 
Allegheny County border and picked up CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, but couldn’t 
find a Broad-winged Hawk. A stop at Old Legislative Rd was long and generally 
unproductive, but we did add Brown Thrasher. A quick run in at Burning Mines Rd 
yielded a VESPER SPARROW and a soaring BROAD-WINGED HAWK. 


At the Cumberland Terminus, we ran to the river in hopes of finding a Cliff 
Swallow but were surprised when there were no Chimney Swifts or swallows except 
a couple Barns! We got out of there and tried unsuccessfully for Warbling Vireo 
at Big Pool, and then drove north. At Mummert Rd, there was a Red-shouldered 
Hawk perched in a snag in a field, and we heard a Louisiana Waterthrush at the 
first stream crossing and a couple HOODED WARBLERs further down the road. From 
here we went south to Montgomery County, where we ran about a half mile into 
Little Bennett Regional Park on Prescott Rd to pick up our KENTUCKY WARBLER, 
Worm-eating Warbler, and Ovenbird. We tapped the brakes at Lake Churchill to 
pick up the oversummering TRUMPETER SWAN, and started to make our way to the 
eastern shore. At a farm field near Rutland Rd we spotted a single BANK SWALLOW 
among a few Barn Swallows, saving us a detour later in the day, but we still 
left the western shore significantly behind in time. 


The summer traffic on the bay bridge did not help either, but we eventually 
made our way to our first stop on the eastern shore at Pemberton Manor in Queen 
Anne’s County. We ticked the TUNDRA SWAN there plus a bonus Bald Eagle, but 
could not find the Sandhill Crane that has been in the area for a couple weeks. 
In order to save time, we cut a couple of single bird stakeouts on the route 
and headed to Whiton Crossing Rd to clean up our songbird list. As we drove 
into the forest there, we picked up Carolina Chickadee and saw a family group 
of PROTHONOTARY WARBLERs next to the road. We found a calling YELLOW-THROATED 
WARBLER and a Great Crested Flycatcher further down, and on the drive back out 
heard two SUMMER TANAGERs singing. We were ready to hit the coast, but not 
before ticking WILD TURKEY in a couple of farm fields. 


At Truitts Landing Rd, we found many of our first shorebirds for the day. Some 
nice migrants there were STILT SANDPIPER, Solitary Sandpiper, and a close 
WESTERN SANDPIPER. Further down the road Matt spotted a CASPIAN TERN in flight 
and heard a BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH. In an effort to flush a Saltmarsh Sparrow, I 
walked a short distance out into the marsh in muck boots and was very surprised 
when a misstep caused me to sink instantly to my waist in the marsh. This 
seemed funny to Matt and Kevin, but it did cost us a few minutes as I changed 
my clothes. I did get the SALTMARSH SPARROW though. 


At Figgs Landing Rd, there was a PIED-BILLED GREBE in the middle of the pond 
and Glossy Ibises on the shoreline. Matt called out a GULL-BILLED TERN and we 
watched three of them hunt over the pond at fairly close range! We also picked 
up RUDDY DUCK and Little Blue Heron there. At the Berlin Wastewater Treatment 
Plant we found a Northern Rough-winged Swallow but the expected Bufflehead was 
not in the ponds. We make a quick run over to Assateague, where we saw our 
first Brown Pelican and Black Skimmer over the ocean and PIPING PLOVER on the 
beach, but couldn’t find a Wilson’s Storm-Petrel. With only few minutes to 
spend, we went to Castaways. On the drive in we spotted a couple Orchard 
Orioles at the top of a tree and, and then spotted a MARBLED GODWIT on the 
mudflats. On the drive out, Matt called out a Cooper’s Hawk that flew behind 
us, carrying prey. 


We got to Skimmer Island right at sunset and could immediately see that the 
island and nearby mudflats were absolutely covered with birds. In the waning 
light, we shouted out birds rapidfire, and tallied a number of key species 
including TRICOLORED HERON, Black-crowned Night-Heron, CATTLE EGRET, LESSER 
BLACK-BACKED GULL. There were at least three SANDWICH TERNs, and among the many 
shorebirds we picked out Ruddy Turnstone, and eventually a RED KNOT. 


After this, we headed out to our first stop for night birds on the eastern 
shore. We checked several locations for Chuck-will’s-widow but couldn’t 
hear any, even in the Pocomoke, so we headed to Elliott Island Rd to finish off 
the last hour of the day. We heard a spontaneously calling LEAST BITTERN a mile 
or so before Moorhen Pond and a COMMON GALLINULE at Moorhen Pond. Moving down 
Elliott Island Rd, we heard a Clapper Rail and moved down to listen for the 
last twenty minutes of the day for Black Rail. We never heard a Black Rail, but 
a BLACK-NECKED STILT called a few times and was our last species for the day. 


We ended the day with 182 species, beating the existing July Big Day record for 
Maryland of 174 species. We missed several species that we very likely could 
have gotten with more scouting like American Kestrel and Northern Bobwhite, but 
found a number of exciting birds over the course of the day and overall had a 
lot of fun and success with the birds. 


Alex Wiebe
Takoma Park, MD

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Subject: 56 WOOD DUCKS - Riley's Lock turning basin, C and O Canal Mont. Co.
From: Don Simonson <simonson AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 06:40:18 -0700 (PDT)
At 8:45 am today Sunday 7/26, I counted 56 WOOD DUCKS in the C and O Canal 
turning basin, approximately 200 yards upstream from the parking lot at Seneca. 
The ducks were mostly standing on snags on the north (far) side of the turning 
basin, to avoid snapping turtles i suppose. The birds display an extremely 
broad array of plumages. 


Directions: From the Riley's Lock parking lot, walk upstream, cross the Seneca 
Creek acqueduct, pass the first trail to your right, and then you will be at 
the turning basin, which is a pond on your right about 200 yards long. Note: 
there are many scores of cars parked down by the river for some event, it may 
take time to find a parking place... 

Good birding!
Don Simonson
Darnestown MD

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Subject: Snowy Egrets at Swan Harbor
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 17:00:26 -0400
2 Snowy Egrets, 12 Great Egrets, 5 Little Blue Herons, and lots of peeps in NW 
corner of marshy impoundment. No shorebirds in new impoundment where they 
normally are. 


Tim Carney
White Marsh, MD

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: RFI on Horsehead Tricolors
From: "'Andrew Clemens' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 20:31:53 +0000 (UTC)
They have been at Lake Knapp.  Mostly near the picnic area.
Andrew ClemensParkville, Md. 


 On Saturday, July 25, 2015 3:58 PM, Kurt Schwarz  wrote: 

   

 Where at Cheasapeake/Horsehead are the Tricolors being seen?

K Schwarz

Ellicott city
goawaybirdat Verizon dot org 

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Subject: RFI on Horsehead Tricolors
From: Kurt Schwarz <krschwa1 AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 15:06:19 -0400
Where at Cheasapeake/Horsehead are the Tricolors being seen?

K Schwarz

Ellicott city
goawaybirdat Verizon dot org 

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Subject: Queen Anne's County Tricolored Herons & Willet
From: Fred Shaffer <glaucousgull AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 19:22:03 +0000 (UTC)
I spent the first part of today birding in Queen Anne's County.  I started at 
the Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center (CBEC).  Walking around the pond, I 
saw seven Tricolored Herons, all of which were juveniles.  Some were perched 
on a snag near the new observation blind, while others were foraging in the 
shallows.  Also present were 40 Snowy Egrets, 6 Great Egrets, 5 Green Herons, 
2 Great Blue Herons, and 1 Black-crowned Night Heron (flyby over Prospect 
Bay).  Shorebirds included several Least Sandpipers, 1 Spotted Sandpiper and 
one Greater Yellowlegs.  Several of the Tricolored Herons flew off when 
someone drove up to the pavilion.  


I then went kayaking, putting in at nearby Goodland Creek Landing (just south 
of Kent Narrows).  Conditions were great and I kayaked south along Prospect 
Bay, staying close to the wetlands on the western shore.  Highlights here 
included a flyby adult Little Blue Heron, lots of Green Herons, and 6 Snowy 
Egrets.  But, the surprise of the trip was when I flushed a Willet from the 
nearby marsh edge as I paddled south. I saw the bird's distinctive wing pattern 
in flight, and heard it call as it flew away from me to the south.  Also of 
note were both Forster's and Common Terns, several of which flew very close to 
my kayak.  Good birding, 

Fred ShafferGlaucousGull AT verizon.netCrofton, MD

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Subject: Re: West Nile Virus detected
From: Daniel Rauch <danrauch11 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 15:28:19 -0400
Jim -
You absolutely correct about Avian Influenza, and not WNV keeping poultry
farmers up at night. I was reading Delmarva Farmer last week and it must
have been stuck in my head when reading the WNV update.


http://www.americanfarm.com/publications/the-delmarva-farmer/poultry/2395-industry-reps-preparing-against-avian-flu-outbreak 


The WNV alert I received listed testing in crow specimens and did not
differential between live or dead specimens.

Dan


On Fri, Jul 24, 2015 at 2:44 PM, Guineabird via Maryland & DC Birding <
mdbirding AT googlegroups.com> wrote:

>  Excellent explanation of this virus.
> Thank you, Jim!
>
> Gail Frantz
>
>
>  ------------------------------
> From: jugornought AT gmail.com
> To: danrauch11 AT gmail.com
> CC: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
> Sent: 7/24/2015 2:08:09 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time
> Subj: Re: [MDBirding] West Nile Virus detected
>
> Hey, Dan
>
> I was involved in West Nile Virus vaccine work at NIH before I retired
> in 2012.  In our area it usually takes until well into August before
> the virus load in birds rises to the level where people start to
> become accidental victims of mosquitoes who happen to be carrying a
> potent virus load acquired from a previous blood meal on an infected
> bird.  To my knowledge there is NO TESTING occurring in MD or any
> Mid-Atlantic state for dead birds.  A quick search seemed to confirm
> this:
>
>
> 
http://www.bing.com/search?q=reporting+suspected+WNV+in+dead+birs+in+md&form=HPNTDF&pc=HPNTDF&src=IE-SearchBox 

>
> I did not open any of the links.  I misspelled "birds" in my query,
> but BING compensated.
>
> I also doubt that Delmarva poultry farmers have any concern about WNV
> outbreaks.  WNV would not be keeping them up nights, but an Avian Flu
> outbreak certainly would be a concern.
>
> An immunity to WNV has been developing in the wild bird population
> since it appeared in the U.S. in 1999.  This happens due to the fact
> that WNV has a (+) single-stranded RNA genome.  Mutations do happen,
> but generally do not affect the genes responsible for immune
> recognition in the infected host.  Viruses like avian flu have genomes
> composed of multiple, separate dna/rna particles.  These can be
> reassorted when two viruses infect the same host cell generating a
> novel combination.  A new combination packaged into a virus particle
> can be totally invisible to the immune system of the next host, which
> is one of the reasons why flu viruses can be so dangerous.
>
> Finally, WNV cannot be transmitted to humans from handling dead or
> live birds.  Only an infected mosquito can do the deed.
>
> Jim Speicher
> BroadRun/Burkittsville area
> [FR] Frederick County
> WCBC member
>
> On 7/23/15, Daniel Rauch  wrote:
> > West Nile Virus season is in Maryland and DC again. Suspect crows,
> raptors,
> > and great blue heron  are currently being tested in our region.  If you
> see
> > a suspicious dead crow, or other bird, please contact your local natural
> > resources office, department of health, or wildlife rehabilitation center
> > to report it.  This will help track the speed and spread of the virus
> this
> > fall. Delmarva poultry farmers have been preparing for an rough WNV
> > outbreak, and any information researchers can collect may help mitigate
> > severe wildlife and domestic livestock impacts.
> >
> > Dan Rauch
> > Washington, DC
> >
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> -
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> >
>
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Subject: Tri color juvies at Queen Anne Couny
From: "'Andrew Clemens' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 19:14:11 +0000 (UTC)
 There were 5 juvenile tricolor herons sitting in a tree at Chesapeake 
Environmental Center when I arrived at 7:30AM.  The birds came down and fed at 
various locations around the lake.  Also saw 37 snowy egrets and 5 different 
osprey.Green heron was hunting on one of the islands in the lakeA bonus was a 
green heron that was hunting at the little pond visible from the picnic tables 
at the visitor center.  

Beautiful day...beautiful place.
Andy ClemensParkville, Md.

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