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Updated on Friday, May 29 at 10:55 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


American Robin,©Barry Kent Mackay

29 May Re: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now [Jim ]
29 May Re: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now [Noah Comet ]
29 May Re: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now [Jim ]
29 May Re: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now ["'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
29 May Blackwater Glossy Ibises, 97. [Harry Armistead ]
29 May Re: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now ["'Frederick Atwood' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
29 May Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now [s byrd ]
29 May Masonville 5/27/2015 [Tim Carney ]
29 May Poplar Island 5/28/2015 [Tim Carney ]
29 May Re: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now [NervousBirds ]
29 May Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now [s byrd ]
29 May Re: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now ["'Christine Huffman' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
29 May Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now [s byrd ]
28 May Chuck-wills-widow along with Eastern Whip-poor-will Soldiers Delight [Dave Littlepage ]
29 May Fort Smallwood Park Thursday, May 28, 2015 7 Raptors []
28 May Re: Ferry Neck & Blackwater N.W.R., May 26-27, 2015. No Whimbrels. [Mark Rositol ]
28 May Re: Any Worcester Mississippi Kite sightings today? [Mark Rositol ]
28 May Any Worcester Mississippi Kite sightings today? [Mark Johnson ]
28 May Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now [Jim ]
28 May Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now [NervousBirds ]
28 May Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now [Zach Slavin ]
28 May Grackle nests being destroyed right now [s byrd ]
28 May RE: 3 Ceruleans Confirmed, Patapsco Valley (CaCo), 5/20/15 [Tim Houghton ]
28 May Black-necked Stilt in Chesapeake Beach (Calvert) [Thomas Harten ]
28 May Alder Flycatcher [Kye jenkins ]
28 May Ferry Neck & Blackwater N.W.R., May 26-27, 2015. No Whimbrels. [Harry Armistead ]
28 May Rock Creek Park, Thursday 5/28/15 [Wallace Kornack ]
28 May Fort Smallwood Park Wednesday, May 27, 2015 12 Raptors []
27 May Fwd: WINGTIPS: Secondary Species - 27 May 2015 [MARCIA ]
27 May Please keep posting yea or nay on Neotropic at Viollette's Lock [Kurt Schwarz ]
27 May Blockhouse Point Conservation Park/C&O Canal, Montgomery Co.; May 27 [Scott Baron ]
27 May Pair of Black-crowned Night Herons, Depot Pond, Upper Marlboro [Michael Roane ]
27 May Fwd: Voice: Greater Washington Area, May 26 [Lydia Schindler ]
27 May Hart-Miller Island, 05/26/15 [Kevin Graff ]
27 May JBWS Ongoing Waterbird Survey May 27 - 48 species [Karen Caruso ]
27 May RE: Snowy Egret @ T Roosevelt Island [ ]
27 May Re: Rock Creek Park, Saturday 5/23/15 [Wallace Kornack ]
27 May Rock Creek Park, Wednesday 5/27/15 [Wallace Kornack ]
27 May Re: Snowy Egret @ T Roosevelt Island [Hugh McGuinness ]
27 May Snowy Egret @ T Roosevelt Island [Adam Parr ]
27 May Fort Smallwood Park Tuesday, May 26, 2015 27 Raptors []
26 May Re: Snowy Egret @ T Roosevelt Island [Sharon Forsyth ]
26 May Snowy Egret @ T Roosevelt Island [Sharon F1727 ]
26 May Northern Flicker mating ritual.... [Karen Caruso ]
26 May Redneck Phal at Rileys lock ["dma3 via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
26 May BOBOLINK Dorchester County [Don Simonson ]
26 May Mockingbird mimicry [Karl Krueger ]
26 May Re: Mockingbird mimicry [Russ Ruffing ]
26 May Rock Creek Park, Tuesday 5/26/15 [Wallace Kornack ]
26 May Mockingbird mimicry [Dan ]
26 May Fort Smallwood Park Monday, May 25, 2015 61 Raptors []
25 May Re: Yellow warblers endangered at King's Farm []
25 May Ferry Neck, Blackwater, May 16-20, 2015 (& off topic Brigantine & the Poconos) [Harry Armistead ]
25 May Yellow warblers endangered at King's Farm [Patricia Wood ]
25 May Re: Cliff Swallows - still @ T Roosevelt Island? [Scott Baron ]
25 May Re: Can anyone ID this duck? [Hugh McGuinness ]
25 May Re: Can anyone ID this duck? [Kurt Schwarz ]
25 May Action: Support the Federal Bird-Safe Buildings Act. [Kurt Schwarz ]
25 May Re: Cliff Swallows - still @ T Roosevelt Island? [Paul Pisano ]
25 May Can anyone ID this duck? [Michael Roane ]
25 May Mississippi Kite heading TOWARD Fort Smallwood ["'bill_hubick' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
25 May Re: Cliff Swallows - still @ T Roosevelt Island? [Hugh McGuinness ]
25 May Neotropic Cormorant -- Yes! [Patricia Wood ]
25 May Cliff Swallows - still @ T Roosevelt Island? [Sharon F1727 ]
25 May 2 Adult Black-crowned Night Herons, Depot Pond, Upper Marlboro [Michael Roane ]
25 May Re: Mississippi Kites - Worcester today ["'Stephen J. Davies' via Maryland & DC Birding" ]
25 May Rock Creek Park, 5/25/15 [Wallace Kornack ]
25 May Sandhill Crane [susiericc ]
25 May Fwd: Mississippi Kites - Worcester today [John Hubbell ]
25 May Wheaton Regional Park today ["Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" ]
25 May Fort Smallwood Park Sunday, May 25, 2015 40 Raptors []
24 May Found at Nassawango - Nikon lens cover and Nikon eyepiece cover [Karen Caruso ]
24 May Mississippi Kites - Worcester today [mike burchett ]
24 May Mississippi Kite Harford Co [Tim Carney ]
24 May Rock Creek Park, Sunday 5/24/15 [Wallace Kornack ]
24 May Glossy Ibis over Glen Burnie [Fred Shaffer ]

Subject: Re: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
From: Jim <epiphenomenon9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 11:53:13 -0400
Noah,

It's complicated, but certainly not hopeless.  The law has been
successfully enforced on many occasions.  The federal government has
traditionally interpreted the Migratory Bird Treaty Act as a strict
liability law, which means you can be liable regardless of what you knew or
your intent.  Courts have not always agreed with that interpretation, at
least in all circumstances, however.  (Do a google search for "strict
liability" and MBTA if you want to know more).

In any event, the first step is to contact the authorities.

Jim Moore
Rockville

On Fri, May 29, 2015 at 11:15 AM, Noah Comet  wrote:

> I don't know about loopholes, per se, but I suspect the old DK defense ("I
> didn't know") is usually sufficient, if and when contractors face
> penalties.  They're supposed to survey areas being cut/trimmed beforehand
> to ensure compliance, especially during the nesting season, but how often
> do they *do *that?  And how often do people complain when they don't?  If
> they do get dinged, how can anyone prove that the birds were there?  And
> what's to stop them from arguing that they *did *their due diligence and
> simply didn't see the birds before they started working?  It's one person's
> word against another's.  (Not in all cases, surely, but in many, perhaps
> most.)
>
> In other words, as with many such laws, it's all pretty hopeless unless
> those of us who care about wildlife are (un)lucky enough to catch these
> things before they happen and intervene.
>
> In Ohio we had a screech owl cavity in a sycamore right on a busy suburban
> street.  One spring morning, the tree got cut down by the city.  For sure
> the adult owls flew off when the chainsaws arrived and probably found a new
> cavity--but the nestlings...  Who knows?  Folks complained, but nothing
> ever came of it.  Dead tree, posed a threat to nearby homes and power
> lines---residents had *no *warning.
>
> What needs to happen is a policy change whereby those who live and work
> near areas to be affected are informed and given a chance to comment, but
> that introduces logistical problems.
>
> Alas,
> Noah
>
> On Fri, May 29, 2015 at 10:25 AM, 'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC
> Birding  wrote:
>
>> Yes, I totally agree with Fred on this. Grackles may actually be exempt
>> as they may be considered pest species but Eastern Meadowlarks, Grasshopper
>> Sparrows, and Red-winged Blackbirds should be afforded full protection
>> under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Simply harvesting grass later in the
>> season would allow the babies to fledge but this never seems to be the case.
>>
>> Tyler Bell
>> jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
>> California, Maryland
>>
>>   ------------------------------
>>  *From:* 'Frederick Atwood' via Maryland & DC Birding <
>> mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
>> *To:* Christine Huffman ; s byrd 
>> *Cc:* "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com" 
>> *Sent:* Friday, May 29, 2015 10:16 AM
>>
>> *Subject:* Re: [MDBirding] Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
>>
>> And wouldn't these fines also apply to the hay harvest destroying nests
>> of meadowlarks, grasshopper sparrows, and redwings?
>> Is there some loophole?
>>
>> Fred Atwood, Oakton, VA
>>
>>
>>  ------------------------------
>>  *From:* 'Christine Huffman' via Maryland & DC Birding <
>> mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
>> *To:* s byrd 
>> *Cc:* "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com" 
>> *Sent:* Friday, May 29, 2015 8:43 AM
>> *Subject:* Re: [MDBirding] Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
>>
>> Please let us know the outcome. They are subject to fines for knowingly
>> destroying any migratory bird nest. In Virginia many years ago there was a
>> lawsuit filed against chimney cleaners who took down Swift nests.
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>> Christie Huffman
>> Great Falls, VA
>>
>> > On May 29, 2015, at 8:37 AM, s byrd  wrote:
>> >
>> >
>> > Dan is your email still nervous bird ?
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >> On Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 1:55:14 PM UTC-4, s byrd wrote:
>> >> As i watch in horror the Lewis tree service is hacking and shredding
>> bamboo and the grackles nest and probably babies as i write here in
>> Annapolis !!!! This is a big nesting spot for Grackles .Ive been watching
>> them flying far to the wooded area surrounding this office complex to find
>> food for their babies and now they are gone !!!! Ive never seen such horror
>> in my life !!!
>> >>
>> >> Saundra Byrd
>> >> baltimore maryland
>> >
>> > --
>> > -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
>> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
>> > To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this group
>> on the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
>> > Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it
>> here - http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
>> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
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>> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
>> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here
>> - http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>>
>>
>>   --
>> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
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>> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
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>> - http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>>
>>
>>   --
>> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
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>> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
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>> - http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>>
>
>  --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
> To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this group on
> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here -
> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>

-- 
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Subject: Re: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
From: Noah Comet <noahcomet AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 11:15:11 -0400
I don't know about loopholes, per se, but I suspect the old DK defense ("I
didn't know") is usually sufficient, if and when contractors face
penalties.  They're supposed to survey areas being cut/trimmed beforehand
to ensure compliance, especially during the nesting season, but how often
do they *do *that?  And how often do people complain when they don't?  If
they do get dinged, how can anyone prove that the birds were there?  And
what's to stop them from arguing that they *did *their due diligence and
simply didn't see the birds before they started working?  It's one person's
word against another's.  (Not in all cases, surely, but in many, perhaps
most.)

In other words, as with many such laws, it's all pretty hopeless unless
those of us who care about wildlife are (un)lucky enough to catch these
things before they happen and intervene.

In Ohio we had a screech owl cavity in a sycamore right on a busy suburban
street.  One spring morning, the tree got cut down by the city.  For sure
the adult owls flew off when the chainsaws arrived and probably found a new
cavity--but the nestlings...  Who knows?  Folks complained, but nothing
ever came of it.  Dead tree, posed a threat to nearby homes and power
lines---residents had *no *warning.

What needs to happen is a policy change whereby those who live and work
near areas to be affected are informed and given a chance to comment, but
that introduces logistical problems.

Alas,
Noah

On Fri, May 29, 2015 at 10:25 AM, 'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC
Birding  wrote:

> Yes, I totally agree with Fred on this. Grackles may actually be exempt as
> they may be considered pest species but Eastern Meadowlarks, Grasshopper
> Sparrows, and Red-winged Blackbirds should be afforded full protection
> under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Simply harvesting grass later in the
> season would allow the babies to fledge but this never seems to be the case.
>
> Tyler Bell
> jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
> California, Maryland
>
>   ------------------------------
>  *From:* 'Frederick Atwood' via Maryland & DC Birding <
> mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
> *To:* Christine Huffman ; s byrd 
> *Cc:* "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com" 
> *Sent:* Friday, May 29, 2015 10:16 AM
>
> *Subject:* Re: [MDBirding] Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
>
> And wouldn't these fines also apply to the hay harvest destroying nests of
> meadowlarks, grasshopper sparrows, and redwings?
> Is there some loophole?
>
> Fred Atwood, Oakton, VA
>
>
>  ------------------------------
>  *From:* 'Christine Huffman' via Maryland & DC Birding <
> mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
> *To:* s byrd 
> *Cc:* "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com" 
> *Sent:* Friday, May 29, 2015 8:43 AM
> *Subject:* Re: [MDBirding] Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
>
> Please let us know the outcome. They are subject to fines for knowingly
> destroying any migratory bird nest. In Virginia many years ago there was a
> lawsuit filed against chimney cleaners who took down Swift nests.
>
> Sent from my iPad
> Christie Huffman
> Great Falls, VA
>
> > On May 29, 2015, at 8:37 AM, s byrd  wrote:
> >
> >
> > Dan is your email still nervous bird ?
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >> On Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 1:55:14 PM UTC-4, s byrd wrote:
> >> As i watch in horror the Lewis tree service is hacking and shredding
> bamboo and the grackles nest and probably babies as i write here in
> Annapolis !!!! This is a big nesting spot for Grackles .Ive been watching
> them flying far to the wooded area surrounding this office complex to find
> food for their babies and now they are gone !!!! Ive never seen such horror
> in my life !!!
> >>
> >> Saundra Byrd
> >> baltimore maryland
> >
> > --
> > -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
> > To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this group
> on the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
> > Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here
> - http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>
>
>
>
> --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
> To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this group on
> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here -
> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>
>
>   --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
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> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here -
> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>
>
>   --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
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Subject: Re: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
From: Jim <epiphenomenon9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 11:09:49 -0400
Hi all,

Common Grackle is definitely on the official list of species protected by
the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.  They are migratory after all.  More info
here:
http://www.fws.gov/migratorybirds/regulationspolicies/mbta/mbtintro.html

Good birding!
Jim Moore
Rockville

On Fri, May 29, 2015 at 10:25 AM, 'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC
Birding  wrote:

> Yes, I totally agree with Fred on this. Grackles may actually be exempt as
> they may be considered pest species but Eastern Meadowlarks, Grasshopper
> Sparrows, and Red-winged Blackbirds should be afforded full protection
> under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Simply harvesting grass later in the
> season would allow the babies to fledge but this never seems to be the case.
>
> Tyler Bell
> jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
> California, Maryland
>
>   ------------------------------
>  *From:* 'Frederick Atwood' via Maryland & DC Birding <
> mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
> *To:* Christine Huffman ; s byrd 
> *Cc:* "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com" 
> *Sent:* Friday, May 29, 2015 10:16 AM
> *Subject:* Re: [MDBirding] Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
>
> And wouldn't these fines also apply to the hay harvest destroying nests of
> meadowlarks, grasshopper sparrows, and redwings?
> Is there some loophole?
>
> Fred Atwood, Oakton, VA
>
>
>  ------------------------------
>  *From:* 'Christine Huffman' via Maryland & DC Birding <
> mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
> *To:* s byrd 
> *Cc:* "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com" 
> *Sent:* Friday, May 29, 2015 8:43 AM
> *Subject:* Re: [MDBirding] Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
>
> Please let us know the outcome. They are subject to fines for knowingly
> destroying any migratory bird nest. In Virginia many years ago there was a
> lawsuit filed against chimney cleaners who took down Swift nests.
>
> Sent from my iPad
> Christie Huffman
> Great Falls, VA
>
> > On May 29, 2015, at 8:37 AM, s byrd  wrote:
> >
> >
> > Dan is your email still nervous bird ?
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >> On Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 1:55:14 PM UTC-4, s byrd wrote:
> >> As i watch in horror the Lewis tree service is hacking and shredding
> bamboo and the grackles nest and probably babies as i write here in
> Annapolis !!!! This is a big nesting spot for Grackles .Ive been watching
> them flying far to the wooded area surrounding this office complex to find
> food for their babies and now they are gone !!!! Ive never seen such horror
> in my life !!!
> >>
> >> Saundra Byrd
> >> baltimore maryland
> >
> > --
> > -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
> > To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this group
> on the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
> > Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here
> - http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>
>
>
>
> --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
> To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this group on
> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here -
> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>
>
>   --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
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> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here -
> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>
>
>   --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
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> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here -
> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>

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Subject: Re: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
From: "'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 14:25:57 +0000 (UTC)
Yes, I totally agree with Fred on this. Grackles may actually be exempt as they 
may be considered pest species but Eastern Meadowlarks, Grasshopper Sparrows, 
and Red-winged Blackbirds should be afforded full protection under the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Simply harvesting grass later in the season would 
allow the babies to fledge but this never seems to be the case. 


Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland
 From: 'Frederick Atwood' via Maryland & DC Birding 
 

 To: Christine Huffman ; s byrd  
Cc: "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com"  
 Sent: Friday, May 29, 2015 10:16 AM
 Subject: Re: [MDBirding] Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
   
And wouldn't these fines also apply to the hay harvest destroying nests of 
meadowlarks, grasshopper sparrows, and redwings? 

Is there some loophole?
Fred Atwood, Oakton, VA
 

 From: 'Christine Huffman' via Maryland & DC Birding 
 

 To: s byrd  
Cc: "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com"  
 Sent: Friday, May 29, 2015 8:43 AM
 Subject: Re: [MDBirding] Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
   
Please let us know the outcome. They are subject to fines for knowingly 
destroying any migratory bird nest. In Virginia many years ago there was a 
lawsuit filed against chimney cleaners who took down Swift nests. 


Sent from my iPad
Christie Huffman
Great Falls, VA

> On May 29, 2015, at 8:37 AM, s byrd  wrote:
> 
> 
> Dan is your email still nervous bird ?
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> On Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 1:55:14 PM UTC-4, s byrd wrote:
>> As i watch in horror the Lewis tree service is hacking and shredding bamboo 
and the grackles nest and probably babies as i write here in Annapolis !!!! 
This is a big nesting spot for Grackles .Ive been watching them flying far to 
the wooded area surrounding this office complex to find food for their babies 
and now they are gone !!!! Ive never seen such horror in my life !!! 

>> 
>> Saundra Byrd 
>> baltimore maryland
> 
> -- 
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
'Maryland & DC Birding'. 

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web at http://www.mdbirding.com 

> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here - 
http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html 




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Subject: Blackwater Glossy Ibises, 97.
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 14:25:46 +0000
Mark Rositol sent me a message about the glossies. He carefully counted 97 at 
Blackwater yesterday. I only found 38 last Tuesday. His is a great total. I 
don't know what these birds are up to. Not many breed on Dorchester's islands 
anymore. Just 3 were seen at Poplar Island yesterday. Perhaps, if they are 
breeders at all, they are from the more populous colonies on Smith I. in the 
Martin N.W.R. - Harry Armistead, Philadelphia. 

 		 	   		  

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Subject: Re: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
From: "'Frederick Atwood' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 14:16:58 +0000 (UTC)
And wouldn't these fines also apply to the hay harvest destroying nests of 
meadowlarks, grasshopper sparrows, and redwings? 

Is there some loophole?Fred Atwood, Oakton, VA
 From: 'Christine Huffman' via Maryland & DC Birding 
 

 To: s byrd  
Cc: "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com"  
 Sent: Friday, May 29, 2015 8:43 AM
 Subject: Re: [MDBirding] Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
   
Please let us know the outcome. They are subject to fines for knowingly 
destroying any migratory bird nest. In Virginia many years ago there was a 
lawsuit filed against chimney cleaners who took down Swift nests. 


Sent from my iPad
Christie Huffman
Great Falls, VA

> On May 29, 2015, at 8:37 AM, s byrd  wrote:
> 
> 
> Dan is your email still nervous bird ?
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> On Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 1:55:14 PM UTC-4, s byrd wrote:
>> As i watch in horror the Lewis tree service is hacking and shredding bamboo 
and the grackles nest and probably babies as i write here in Annapolis !!!! 
This is a big nesting spot for Grackles .Ive been watching them flying far to 
the wooded area surrounding this office complex to find food for their babies 
and now they are gone !!!! Ive never seen such horror in my life !!! 

>> 
>> Saundra Byrd 
>> baltimore maryland
> 
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> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
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Subject: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
From: s byrd <mybyrdz5 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 07:11:38 -0700 (PDT)
Thanks Dan 

Saundra Byrd 
baltimore 




On Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 1:55:14 PM UTC-4, s byrd wrote:
> As i watch in horror the Lewis tree service is hacking and shredding bamboo 
and the grackles nest and probably babies as i write here in Annapolis !!!! 
This is a big nesting spot for Grackles .Ive been watching them flying far to 
the wooded area surrounding this office complex to find food for their babies 
and now they are gone !!!! Ive never seen such horror in my life !!! 

> 
> Saundra Byrd 
> baltimore maryland

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Subject: Masonville 5/27/2015
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 06:56:10 -0700 (PDT)
Another census. Highlights included a lingering Canvasback, Lesser Scaup, and 
Ruddy Ducks. Late-ish migrants included a Northern Waterthrush, two 
White-throated Sparrows, and two American Redstarts. Eastern Kingbirds building 
nests; Baltimore and Orchard Orioles across the site. 


Full list:

Canada Goose  70
Mallard  35
Canvasback  1
Lesser Scaup  6
Ruddy Duck  4
Double-crested Cormorant  51
Great Blue Heron  3
Great Egret  2
Turkey Vulture  1
Osprey  8
Bald Eagle  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  2
Killdeer  5
Spotted Sandpiper  2
Ring-billed Gull  37
Herring Gull (American)  12
Great Black-backed Gull  28
Least Tern  1
Common Tern  2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  2
Mourning Dove  8
Chimney Swift  2
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  2
Eastern Kingbird  6
Warbling Vireo  6
Fish Crow  5
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  10
Tree Swallow  7
Barn Swallow  13
Carolina Wren  3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  2
American Robin  2
Gray Catbird  1
Northern Mockingbird  6
European Starling  99
Cedar Waxwing  24
Northern Waterthrush  1
American Redstart  2
Yellow Warbler  1
Blackpoll Warbler  2
Song Sparrow  1
White-throated Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  11
Blue Grosbeak  1
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  27
Common Grackle (Purple)  13
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
Orchard Oriole  7
Baltimore Oriole  10
House Finch  1
American Goldfinch  6

Tim Carney
Canton, MD

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Subject: Poplar Island 5/28/2015
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 06:47:56 -0700 (PDT)
Lots of nice birds yesterday but my personal favorites were the Red Knot and 
four Red-necked Phalaropes in Cell 5CD. Previously this cell was dry with some 
patches of vegetation, but is now inundated with water and the major shorebird 
spot on the island. 


Full list:

Canada Goose  46
American Black Duck  31
Mallard  809
American Black Duck x Mallard (hybrid)  2
Blue-winged Teal  2
Northern Shoveler  1
Northern Pintail  1
Ruddy Duck  1
Horned Grebe  1
Double-crested Cormorant X - I need to review photos to get an accurate count, 
but I would assume 3000-3500. 

Great Blue Heron  13
Great Egret  1
Snowy Egret  16
Cattle Egret  10
Glossy Ibis  3
Turkey Vulture  2
Osprey  39
Bald Eagle  1
Virginia Rail  1
Black-necked Stilt  17
American Oystercatcher  1
Black-bellied Plover  14
Semipalmated Plover  22
Killdeer  17
Spotted Sandpiper  6
Willet (Eastern)  14
Ruddy Turnstone  2
Red Knot  1
Sanderling  1
Dunlin  42
Least Sandpiper  8
White-rumped Sandpiper  2
Semipalmated Sandpiper  1454
Short-billed Dowitcher  3
Red-necked Phalarope  4
Herring Gull (American)  476
Great Black-backed Gull  23
Least Tern  42
Common Tern  179
Forster's Tern  27
Peregrine Falcon  1
Eastern Kingbird  3
Fish Crow  4
Purple Martin  35
Tree Swallow  60
Bank Swallow  63
Barn Swallow  5
Carolina Wren  1
European Starling  8
Seaside Sparrow  4
Northern Cardinal  1
Red-winged Blackbird  428
Common Grackle (Purple)  4

Tim Carney
Canton, MD

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Subject: Re: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
From: NervousBirds <nervousbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 09:41:15 -0400
Saundra,

I have no ability to help, other than send an email (and tweet Constellation 
Energy, which I did). You need to call DNR and ask for some help. I merely had 
a meeting with BGE / Constellation representative about the cutting that 
recently took place in my neighborhood. 


CONSTELLATION'S contact:
410.470.7885
Rafael Olazagasti is the Manager of Vegetation Management.  

Good luck! Keep us posted.

Dan

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 29, 2015, at 9:35 AM, s byrd  wrote:
> 
> Im having problems with the reply method on here. Dan Haas im sending emails 
to nervous birds . if this isnt correct please email me byrdwatcher5 AT yahoo.com 

> ive frightened off the tree cutters but not before 90 percent of the bamboo 
nesting area is gone . another nest photographed this morning coming down . 
they have left and ive called dnr . not sure if theyll come back . Grackles are 
likely to rebuild ?? 

> 
> 
> 
>> On Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 1:55:14 PM UTC-4, s byrd wrote:
>> As i watch in horror the Lewis tree service is hacking and shredding bamboo 
and the grackles nest and probably babies as i write here in Annapolis !!!! 
This is a big nesting spot for Grackles .Ive been watching them flying far to 
the wooded area surrounding this office complex to find food for their babies 
and now they are gone !!!! Ive never seen such horror in my life !!! 

>> 
>> Saundra Byrd 
>> baltimore maryland
> 
> -- 
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
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web at http://www.mdbirding.com 

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Subject: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
From: s byrd <mybyrdz5 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 06:35:05 -0700 (PDT)
Im having problems with the reply method on here. Dan Haas im sending emails to 
nervous birds . if this isnt correct please email me byrdwatcher5 AT yahoo.com 

ive frightened off the tree cutters but not before 90 percent of the bamboo 
nesting area is gone . another nest photographed this morning coming down . 
they have left and ive called dnr . not sure if theyll come back . Grackles are 
likely to rebuild ?? 




On Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 1:55:14 PM UTC-4, s byrd wrote:
> As i watch in horror the Lewis tree service is hacking and shredding bamboo 
and the grackles nest and probably babies as i write here in Annapolis !!!! 
This is a big nesting spot for Grackles .Ive been watching them flying far to 
the wooded area surrounding this office complex to find food for their babies 
and now they are gone !!!! Ive never seen such horror in my life !!! 

> 
> Saundra Byrd 
> baltimore maryland

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Subject: Re: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
From: "'Christine Huffman' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 08:43:46 -0400
Please let us know the outcome. They are subject to fines for knowingly 
destroying any migratory bird nest. In Virginia many years ago there was a 
lawsuit filed against chimney cleaners who took down Swift nests. 


Sent from my iPad
Christie Huffman
Great Falls, VA

> On May 29, 2015, at 8:37 AM, s byrd  wrote:
> 
> 
> Dan is your email still nervous bird ?
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> On Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 1:55:14 PM UTC-4, s byrd wrote:
>> As i watch in horror the Lewis tree service is hacking and shredding bamboo 
and the grackles nest and probably babies as i write here in Annapolis !!!! 
This is a big nesting spot for Grackles .Ive been watching them flying far to 
the wooded area surrounding this office complex to find food for their babies 
and now they are gone !!!! Ive never seen such horror in my life !!! 

>> 
>> Saundra Byrd 
>> baltimore maryland
> 
> -- 
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
'Maryland & DC Birding'. 

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web at http://www.mdbirding.com 

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http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html 


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Subject: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
From: s byrd <mybyrdz5 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 05:37:31 -0700 (PDT)
Dan is your email still nervous bird ?





On Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 1:55:14 PM UTC-4, s byrd wrote:
> As i watch in horror the Lewis tree service is hacking and shredding bamboo 
and the grackles nest and probably babies as i write here in Annapolis !!!! 
This is a big nesting spot for Grackles .Ive been watching them flying far to 
the wooded area surrounding this office complex to find food for their babies 
and now they are gone !!!! Ive never seen such horror in my life !!! 

> 
> Saundra Byrd 
> baltimore maryland

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Subject: Chuck-wills-widow along with Eastern Whip-poor-will Soldiers Delight
From: Dave Littlepage <d.littlepage AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 20:30:26 -0700 (PDT)
It was a Goatsucker kind of night!
I was hoping for the Eastern Whip-poor-wills singing at dusk tonight and heard 
two but wasn't expecting the added bonus of a Chuck-wills-widow singing like 
crazy as well. Recordings of all. 


Good birding.

Dave Littlepage
Abingdon,MD

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Subject: Fort Smallwood Park Thursday, May 28, 2015 7 Raptors
From: susiericc AT comcast.net
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 03:17:19 +0000 (UTC)
Fort Smallwood Park 
Pasadena, Maryland, USA 

Daily Raptor Counts: May 28, 2015 
Species 	Day's Count 	Month Total 	Season Total 
Black Vulture 	0 	21 	536 
Turkey Vulture 	6 	672 	6716 
Osprey 	0 	56 	408 
Bald Eagle 	1 	109 	185 
Northern Harrier 	0 	9 	75 
Sharp-shinned Hawk 	0 	164 	1123 
Cooper's Hawk 	0 	39 	274 
Northern Goshawk 	0 	0 	0 
Red-shouldered Hawk 	0 	3 	284 
Broad-winged Hawk 	0 	115 	643 
Red-tailed Hawk 	0 	32 	237 
Rough-legged Hawk 	0 	0 	0 
Golden Eagle 	0 	0 	0 
American Kestrel 	0 	4 	370 
Merlin 	0 	9 	37 
Peregrine Falcon 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Accipiter 	0 	0 	1 
Unknown Buteo 	0 	1 	10 
Unknown Falcon 	0 	1 	3 
Unknown Eagle 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Raptor 	0 	1 	3 
Mississippi Kite 	0 	11 	11 
Swallow-tailed Kite 	0 	1 	1 
Total: 	7 	1248 	10917 

Observation start time: 	9:45 am 
Observation end time: 	3:00 pm  Daylight Time 
Total observation time: 	5.25 hours 
Official Counter 	Sue Ricciardi 
Observers: 	Hal Wierenga 


Visitors: 
Barbara Johnson, Diane Benyus 

Weather: 
Mostly to partly cloudy; a toasty 76-89 degrees; fair visibility with haze; 
winds light and variable 


Raptor Observations: 
Skies were not producing today 

Non-raptor Observations: 



Report submitted by Sue Ricciardi ( susiericc AT comcast.net ) 
Fort Smallwood Park information may be found at: 
http://www.mdbirds.org/sites/mdsites/hawks/hawkwatch.html 


Site Description 
Fort Smallwood Park is located on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay at the 
mouth of the Patapsco River, 11 miles south of Baltimore, MD. Best winds are 
from the southwest. The Park is closed to visitors on Wednesdays. 

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Subject: Re: Ferry Neck & Blackwater N.W.R., May 26-27, 2015. No Whimbrels.
From: Mark Rositol <mrositol510 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 18:24:37 -0700 (PDT)
I actually stopped by Blackwater NWR today. After being mauled on Egypt Rd by 
several fly species, I decided to drive through with the windows up. Once I got 
to were the blind is, there was a swarm of flies trying to get at me. Was 
hoping a perched Empid would come help me out. 


Moving forward...As I made it to the last stretch of road, there were three 
feeding groups of Glossy Ibis on the right side. I got an accurate count of 97 
that were all easily seen There were 4 or 5 flying earlier that may have joined 
this group and a few that may have been hidden in the reeds. Certainly not the 
best conditions to bird. But I persevered! I may have to bring a bee keeper 
outfit next time. 


Mark Rositol
Fort Washington, MD

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Subject: Re: Any Worcester Mississippi Kite sightings today?
From: Mark Rositol <mrositol510 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 18:07:43 -0700 (PDT)
Today was my day off, and I took a shot at the bird today. Tried three separate 
times today, starting at about 11 20 AM. No luck at all. I drove around the 
area and gave it a good try. Very birdy in the woods toward Pocomoke Creek. 
Summer Tanager being the best bird. And I believe an Orange variant was likely 
a Scarlet Tanager, but am not 100 percent as I only saw it briefly. 


I with you better luck tomorrow.

Mark Rositol
Fort Washington, MD

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Subject: Any Worcester Mississippi Kite sightings today?
From: Mark Johnson <mj3151 AT outlook.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 20:08:11 -0400
I'm thinking about a road trip tomorrow, so any current info. would be 
helpful...thanks. 

 
Mark Johnson
Aberdeen
 		 	   		  

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Subject: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
From: Jim <epiphenomenon9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 15:02:31 -0400
Grackles are listed among the birds protected by the federal Migratory Bird
Treaty Act, which broadly prohibits "taking" protected birds without a
permit.  USFWS and, probably Maryland DNR, have authority to enforce the
Act.

Jim Moore
Rockville, MD

On Thu, May 28, 2015 at 2:01 PM, Zach Slavin  wrote:

> Hi Saundra,
>
> You should consider (if you haven't already) reporting this to the US Fish
> and Wildlife Service's law enforcement office:
> http://www.fws.gov/le/regional-law-enforcement-offices.html
>
> Maryland is covered by the Northeast Region:
> U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service
> Office of Law Enforcement
> 300 Westgate Center Drive
> Hadley, MA 01035-9587
> Phone: (413) 253-8274
> Fax: (413) 253-8459
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Zach Slavin
> Washington, DC
>
>
>
> On Thu, May 28, 2015 at 1:55 PM, s byrd  wrote:
>
>> As i watch in horror the Lewis tree service is hacking and shredding
>> bamboo and the grackles nest and probably babies as i write here in
>> Annapolis !!!! This is a big nesting spot for Grackles .Ive been watching
>> them flying far to the wooded area surrounding this office complex to find
>> food for their babies and now they are gone !!!! Ive never seen such horror
>> in my life !!!
>>
>> Saundra Byrd
>> baltimore maryland
>>
>> --
>> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
>> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
>> To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this group on
>> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
>> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here
>> - http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>>
>
>  --
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> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
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> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>

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Subject: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
From: NervousBirds <nervousbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 14:09:37 -0400
I've sent your email to a Vegetation Management Manager at Constellation 
Energy. 


I met with him yesterday to discuss the timing of the routine maintenance (tree 
cutting and trimming). 


I'll let you know if any positive results come from my meeting and the email 
today. 


Best,

Dan Haas
St. Margaret's, MD

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 28, 2015, at 1:55 PM, s byrd  wrote:
> 
> As i watch in horror the Lewis tree service is hacking and shredding bamboo 
and the grackles nest and probably babies as i write here in Annapolis !!!! 
This is a big nesting spot for Grackles .Ive been watching them flying far to 
the wooded area surrounding this office complex to find food for their babies 
and now they are gone !!!! Ive never seen such horror in my life !!! 

> 
> Saundra Byrd 
> baltimore maryland 
> 
> -- 
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
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web at http://www.mdbirding.com 

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http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html 


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Subject: Re: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
From: Zach Slavin <zkslavin AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 14:01:06 -0400
Hi Saundra,

You should consider (if you haven't already) reporting this to the US Fish
and Wildlife Service's law enforcement office:
http://www.fws.gov/le/regional-law-enforcement-offices.html

Maryland is covered by the Northeast Region:
U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Office of Law Enforcement
300 Westgate Center Drive
Hadley, MA 01035-9587
Phone: (413) 253-8274
Fax: (413) 253-8459

Sincerely,

Zach Slavin
Washington, DC



On Thu, May 28, 2015 at 1:55 PM, s byrd  wrote:

> As i watch in horror the Lewis tree service is hacking and shredding
> bamboo and the grackles nest and probably babies as i write here in
> Annapolis !!!! This is a big nesting spot for Grackles .Ive been watching
> them flying far to the wooded area surrounding this office complex to find
> food for their babies and now they are gone !!!! Ive never seen such horror
> in my life !!!
>
> Saundra Byrd
> baltimore maryland
>
> --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
> To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this group on
> the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here -
> http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
>

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Subject: Grackle nests being destroyed right now
From: s byrd <mybyrdz5 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 10:55:14 -0700 (PDT)
As i watch in horror the Lewis tree service is hacking and shredding bamboo and 
the grackles nest and probably babies as i write here in Annapolis !!!! This is 
a big nesting spot for Grackles .Ive been watching them flying far to the 
wooded area surrounding this office complex to find food for their babies and 
now they are gone !!!! Ive never seen such horror in my life !!! 


Saundra Byrd 
baltimore maryland 

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Subject: RE: 3 Ceruleans Confirmed, Patapsco Valley (CaCo), 5/20/15
From: Tim Houghton <thoughton AT loyola.edu>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 17:39:24 +0000
Brad Phoebus and I found the 3 CERW in their same territories as 8 days ago 
(May 20). We parked at the tracks on Marriottsville Rd. and headed along the 
path near the tracks. We then crossed over the tracks in front of the tunnel 
opening and continued--soon hearing the 2 Ceruleans (up on the hill) as we 
walked, CaCo. We heard them separately at this time--around 8am--but still 
pretty sure there were 2. We continued our walk on the other side of the 
tunnel, hoping to find the 3rd CERW upstream as I did on the 20th, but we 
didn't succeed. On the way back we found the 2 CERW once again, around 9am, 
this time singing at the same time: 2. 


Afterward, we had an uneventful time on Liberty Dam Trail. Brad left but I made 
a stop at Henryton to see if I could find the 3rd CERW from that side (the one 
3/8 of a mile upstream from parking): easy as pie. Last week it was closer to 
the tracks and in CaCo; this morning it was above the path by the river on the 
Howard side, singing its unique CERW song. 


So: all 3 CERW found again, same territories as 8 days ago. Great news. Not so 
great news: still no CERW at Patapsco-McKeldin (as of 5/25). 


Tim Houghton
(Glen Arm)


________________________________
From: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com [mdbirding AT googlegroups.com] on behalf of Tim 
Houghton [thoughton AT loyola.edu] 

Sent: Wednesday, May 20, 2015 3:45 PM
To: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [MDBirding] 3 Ceruleans Confirmed, Patapsco Valley (CaCo), 5/20/15

After sadly striking out with CERW south of McKeldin, I parked at the tracks on 
Marriottsville Road and took the trail to the train tunnel. I heard a CERW 
singing soon after I turned left onto the path near the tunnel opening. I 
walked from the path to the base of the hill and heard DUELING CERULEANS doing 
constantly repeating, diagnostic 3-part songs. Maybe they were responding to 
each other or perhaps it just seemed that way. In any case, both were in the 
vicinity of the tunnel. The one closer to the river is probably the CERW which 
has been reported a previously a little downstream from the Henryton hotspot 
parking area. But finding two was awesome. Hope they both find a female and 
breed successfully. 


I continued on the trail around the tunnel and then went another quarter mile 
or so along the tracks until I heard the 3rd CERW, doing its individual 2-part 
CERW song, the same CERW that has been reported around 3/8 of a mile upstream 
from Henryton parking. 


All 3 on the Carroll County side. THREE! To see how things turn out for them, 
it might be easier to observe them from the track side of the river rather than 
from the Henryton side--or both sides--and a good idea, I think, to observe 
them for the next few weeks. 


Other than that, a number of warbler species, including some migrants such as 
B-T Green, Canada, and Northern Waterthrush. TONS of Cedar Waxings. 


Tim Houghton
(Glen Arm)

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Subject: Black-necked Stilt in Chesapeake Beach (Calvert)
From: Thomas Harten <tjharten1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 12:30:23 -0400
I was on the Fishing Creek boardwalk this morning and had a fly-by
Black-necked Stilt that appeared to settle down in the area where the
boardwalk comes to a "T".  I was there for work, so didn't really have time
to bird, but also had some Least Terns buzzing on by.

Tom Harten
Owings

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Subject: Alder Flycatcher
From: Kye jenkins <kyebird54 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 09:15:31 -0700 (PDT)
I heard Tim Houghton's Alder Flycatcher at Green rd in Hartford and Baltimore 
co around 1100am, park at the bridge and cross the river and walk the road on 
the Hartford side, kye jenkins " the land of pleasant living" 


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Subject: Ferry Neck & Blackwater N.W.R., May 26-27, 2015. No Whimbrels.
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 14:51:17 +0000



















FERRY NECK & BLACKWATER, MAY 26 & 27, 2015.  No Whimbrels.

 

The objectives of this trip are to pick up a boat trailer
power winch connector at Gootee’s (furnishing another excuse to visit
Blackwater yet again) and to do 2 evening Whimbrel watches at Rigby’s Folly
(unsuccessful).

 

MAY 26, TUESDAY. 
BLACKWATER N.W.R., 2-3 P.M., water levels all low. American white pelican 1, 
great egret 6, 

snowy egret 1, GLOSSY IBIS 38 (the most “sicklebills” I’ve ever
seen here; in Pool 5B), bald eagle 16, black-bellied plover 1, semipalmated
plover 4, greater yellowlegs 1, semipalmated sandpiper 230,
red-headed woodpecker 1 adult.  81-84°F.,
winds S or SE 20, fair.  NON-AVIAN TAXA:
Painted Turtle 4, Redbelly Slider 5, sulphur unID’d 1, Snapping Turtle 1
(running!!).  Up at the Easton H.S. on
the W side of Rt. 50 a bunch of Canada Geese with at least 2 broods of downy
goslings.  “Semipalmated” keeps turning
up, flagged red by Spellcheck. 
“Totipalmate” would probably get shot down, too.

 

THE WHIMBREL WATCH. 
Every year in the 4th week of May several thousand Whimbrel
lift off in one afternoon late in the day from the Box Tree marshes E of
Machipongo on the Virginia Eastern Shore. 
Their flight path, as confirmed by transmitters, takes them within a few
miles of Rigby’s Folly, or in the case of some of them, directly overhead 
there, 

perhaps sometimes unseen at night.  They
fly NON-STOP to northern Canada, which takes, I think, 5 days (and
nights).  When I make a deliberate trip
here to try to intercept them I never seem to have any luck, as is true this
time.  But when I happen to be here anyway
sometimes I get lucky, as on May 25, 1990, when Liz and I saw 2 flocks totaling
an estimated 595, flying high and calling at dusk over the driveway bend, a
thrilling spectacle.

 

FERRY NECK, Rigby’s Folly. 
A watch for migrating Whimbrel, 6:15-8:39 P.M., clear, 82-76°F. winds S
or SE 20.  27 species, the complete list:
Canada goose 3, mallard 2, COMMON LOON 1 (in northbound migration, not
unprecedented, but getting to be late for that), double-crested cormorant 1,
great blue heron 2, great egret 1, turkey vulture 3, osprey 7, bald eagle 5,
greater yellowlegs 1, laughing gull 2, ring-billed gull 1, common tern 1,
chimney swift 5, northern flicker 1, American crow 1, purple martin 3, barn
swallow 4, Carolina wren 1, eastern bluebird 1, cedar waxwing 4, northern
cardinal 4, indigo bunting 1, red-winged blackbird 6, common grackle 6,
brown-headed cowbird 3, American goldfinch 1. 
Also: 9 deer (6 does, 3 bucks), 1 unID’d bat, a Red Fox, a Raccoon, and
a Gray Squirrel.  

 

MAY 27, WEDNESDAY.  Whimbrel
watch 2, 5:30-6:40 P.M., and again from 7:58-8:37 P.M. 23 species, the complete 
list: Canada goose 5, double-crested cormorant 1, 

cattle egret 1, turkey vulture 2, osprey 5, bald eagle 3, mourning dove 1,
chimney swift 4, red-bellied woodpecker 1, downy woodpecker 1, northern flicker
1, great crested flycatcher 2, eastern kingbird 2, blue jay 2, American crow 2
(starting to sound like Noah’s Ark, eh?), purple martin 4, tree swallow 2, 
barn 

swallow 3, northern cardinal 4, indigo bunting 1, red-winged blackbird 1, 
common 

grackle 10, brown-headed cowbird 4. 
Also: 4 does, 2 bucks, and 2 Cabbage Whites, 1 Gray Squirrel.  

 

The vantage point for these watches is on the N side edge of the Big
Field.  This gives a near 180° arc view
to the south from due west to ESE with the only water showing a stretch of <
100’ that is at a distance of 700’. 
Comfortable to sit in the nice, folding Coleman chair with the scope
handy nearby, a bottle of diet Mountain Dew stuck in the grass, and scan the
complete prospect at least once a minute. 
Today’s is interrupted by a Jim Dandy of a thunderstorm dumping 13mm. of
rain, a little > 3/8”.  This prompts
the Cope’s Gray Tree Frog and some Green Tree Frogs to begin calling. And 
gives me time to eat supper indoors. Some of the lightning is directly 
overhead, 

so that the tremendous thunder claps are instantaneous, what I like to call
celestial tympani, or the music of artillery. 
Deafening.  Afterwards there are
heroic cloudscapes, with cumulus reaching up overhead for miles, as in an
Albert Bierstadt painting … on steroids. 
The clouds are variously peach, pink, gray, yellow, nearly black, or
white, with the waxing gibbous moon showing through when there are patches of
blue sky, as blue as only blue can be after an atmospheric-cleansing rain. A 
spectacle. 

None of this weather would deter the Whimbrels, which have been shown to
be able to fly through hurricanes on their great southward run, only to be
slaughtered afterwards on islands such as Barbados, Guadeloupe, and Martinique,
as was the last confirmed Eskimo Curlew (on Barbados).  

 

Be that as it may, some other birds noted on the back 40 today are: an
Eastern Kingbird chasing a Purple Martin, a Red-tailed Hawk, a
Chuck-will’s-widow, a male hummer at the feeder, an Eastern Wood-Pewee, a 
bluebird 

singing in the yard, and a Pine Warbler, 38 species all told. Plus a c. 7” 
skink on the front porch. Out in Irish Creek the ‘Lois Ann’ from 

Tilghman and the ‘Ann C’ from Cambridge are running trot lines. 
Butterflies: a Tiger Swallowtail and a Spring 

Azure.  And the Cabbage Whites.

 

Best to all. – Harry Armistead, Philadelphia.





 		 	   		  

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Thursday 5/28/15
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 10:04:33 -0400
This morning (5/28) at Rock Creek Park with Bill Butler…….

Great Blue Heron     flyby
Mourning Dove      9
Yellow-billed Cuckoo     2     heard
Chimney Swift     3
Red-bellied Woodpecker     11
Downy Woodpecker     2
Northern Flicker     2
Pileated Woodpecker     2
Eastern Wood-Pewee     5
Acadian Flycatcher     8      heard
Great Crested Flycatcher     6
Yellow-throated Vireo       heard
Red-eyed Vireo     7    heard
Blue Jay  
American Crow  
Fish Crow  
Carolina Chickadee     2
Tufted Titmouse     12
White-breasted Nuthatch     3
Carolina Wren     6
Eastern Bluebird  
Swainson's Thrush  
Wood Thrush     5     heard
American Robin   16
Gray Catbird  
European Starling  
Eastern Towhee     3
Song Sparrow  
Scarlet Tanager      6
Northern Cardinal      7
Indigo Bunting  
Brown-headed Cowbird     8
Baltimore Oriole  
American Goldfinch     8
House Sparrow      6

Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC

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Subject: Fort Smallwood Park Wednesday, May 27, 2015 12 Raptors
From: susiericc AT comcast.net
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 03:28:48 +0000 (UTC)
Fort Smallwood Park 
Pasadena, Maryland, USA 

Daily Raptor Counts: May 27, 2015 
Species 	Day's Count 	Month Total 	Season Total 
Black Vulture 	0 	21 	536 
Turkey Vulture 	9 	666 	6710 
Osprey 	0 	56 	408 
Bald Eagle 	2 	108 	184 
Northern Harrier 	0 	9 	75 
Sharp-shinned Hawk 	0 	164 	1123 
Cooper's Hawk 	0 	39 	274 
Northern Goshawk 	0 	0 	0 
Red-shouldered Hawk 	0 	3 	284 
Broad-winged Hawk 	1 	115 	643 
Red-tailed Hawk 	0 	32 	237 
Rough-legged Hawk 	0 	0 	0 
Golden Eagle 	0 	0 	0 
American Kestrel 	0 	4 	370 
Merlin 	0 	9 	37 
Peregrine Falcon 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Accipiter 	0 	0 	1 
Unknown Buteo 	0 	1 	10 
Unknown Falcon 	0 	1 	3 
Unknown Eagle 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Raptor 	0 	1 	3 
Mississippi Kite 	0 	11 	11 
Swallow-tailed Kite 	0 	1 	1 
Total: 	12 	1241 	10910 

Observation start time: 	9:45 am 
Observation end time: 	3:00 pm  Daylight Time 
Total observation time: 	5.25 hours 
Official Counter 	Sue Ricciardi 
Observers: 	Hal Wierenga 

Weather: 
Mostly cloudy becoming partly cloudy; 76-86 degrees; fair visibility with haze; 
winds mostly southwesterly, 7-10 mph 


Raptor Observations: 
Just a few migrants today 

Non-raptor Observations: 



Report submitted by Sue Ricciardi ( susiericc AT comcast.net ) 
Fort Smallwood Park information may be found at: 
http://www.mdbirds.org/sites/mdsites/hawks/hawkwatch.html 


Site Description 
Fort Smallwood Park is located on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay at the 
mouth of the Patapsco River, 11 miles south of Baltimore, MD. Best winds are 
from the southwest. The Park is closed to visitors on Wednesdays. 

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Subject: Fwd: WINGTIPS: Secondary Species - 27 May 2015
From: MARCIA <marshwren50 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 22:07:15 +0000 (UTC)




Subject: Please keep posting yea or nay on Neotropic at
 Viollette's Lock
From: Kurt Schwarz <krschwa1 AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 17:41:00 -0400
I am thinking of a Friday or Saturday try for the Cormorant and would
appreciate positive and negative reports.  How best to see, from Viollette¹s
or Riley¹s or does it move around a lot?

Kurt Schwarz
Ellicott City, Howard
goawaybird at verizon dot net


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Subject: Blockhouse Point Conservation Park/C&O Canal, Montgomery Co.; May 27
From: Scott Baron <baron.scott AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 16:30:31 -0400
Hi, everyone.

I observed a first year male Summer Tanager at the end of the Paw Paw Trail
at Blockhouse Point Conservation Park today.  He was singing and calling.
This spot is halfway in between Riley's Lock and Pennyfield Lock on the C&O
Canal so the bird might be visible from the canal towpath.

I saw a female Common Merganser with a few small juveniles in the Potomac
from this spot.  They were too far away to see well but there were at least
3 or juveniles.

I also observed one or two Harvesters (butterfly), an uncommon species
whose caterpillars feed on aphids instead of on vegetation.

Later,

Scott Baron
Gaithersburg, Md.

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Subject: Pair of Black-crowned Night Herons, Depot Pond, Upper Marlboro
From: Michael Roane <roane.michael AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 12:33:10 -0700 (PDT)
I have seen a pair of active Black-crowned Night Herons on the (East) Depot 
Pond several days over the past week, including today. And what I mean by 
active is they are hunting and flying and not acting nocturnal and just 
sleeping. They are adults in breeding colors, one of which has white hind-neck 
plumes, and they appear to be mated. For whatever reason, they are almost 
always at the south end of the pond near the sheriff's station. They are very 
wary and flew off when I first arrived — even though they were all the way 
across the pond. If you wait, however, they may return after awhile — which 
is what happened to me this morning. I had to wait an hour, but they did move 
back to a favorite spot in the corner of the pond. 


Other birds seen this morning included Osprey, Great Blue Heron, Green Heron, 
Wood Ducks (adults and chicks), Pileated Woodpecker, and Mute Swan. 


Best regards,
Mike Roane

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Subject: Fwd: Voice: Greater Washington Area, May 26
From: Lydia Schindler <lydia13621 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 15:00:29 -0400
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Joe Coleman 
Date: Wed, May 27, 2015 at 9:48 AM
Subject: Voice: Greater Washington Area, May 26
To: lydiaschindler AT verizon.net


FYI  - this report is for sightings from May 19 through May 25 and was
compiled by Joe Coleman.

Joe Coleman



Hotline:           Voice of the Naturalist

Date:              05/26/2015

Coverage:          MD/DC/VA central and southern DE/WV panhandle

Reports, comments, questions:  voice AT anshome.org

Compiler:          Joe Coleman

Sponsor:           Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic

States (independent of NAS)

Transcriber:



Please consider joining ANS, especially if you are a regular user of the
Voice (Individual $50; Family $65; Nature Steward $100; Audubon Advocate
$200). The membership number is 301-652-9188, option 12; the address is
8940 Jones Mill Road, Chevy Chase, MD 20815; and the web site is
http://www.AudubonNaturalist.org.



This is the Voice of the Naturalist, a service of the Audubon Naturalist
Society. This report covers the week starting Tuesday, May 19 and was
completed on Tuesday, May 26 at 9:30 a.m.



The top birds this week were a NEOTROPIC CORMORANT* in MD and a
WHITE-WINGED DOVE in DE.



Other birds of interest this week included EGYPTIAN GOOSE, TRUMPETER SWAN,
ducks, NORTHERN BOBWHITE, ANHINGA, AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN, MISSISSIPPI
KITE, COMMON GALLINULE, SANDHILL CRANE, BLACK-NECKED STILT, shorebirds,
flycatchers including OLIVE-SIDED, ALDER and YELLOW-BELLIED, WESTERN
KINGBIRD, LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE, PHILADELPHIA VIREO, warblers including
GOLDEN-WINGED, SWAINSON’S, and MOURNING, sparrows, DICKCISSEL, RUSTY
BLACKBIRD, and PINE SISKIN.



TOP BIRDS



The NEOTROPIC CORMORANT* near Violette's Lock, Montgomery Co MD, continued
to be seen there throughout the week with the most recent sighting from May
25.



A WHITE-WINGED DOVE was found May 23 at Slaughter Beach, DE; it was heard
on the 24th from Yerkes Rd at Slaughter Beach.



OTHER BIRDS OF INTEREST



The EGYPTIAN GOOSE of unknown provenance was seen again in Baltimore, MD,
with a report of it at Patterson Park on the 19th.



Ducks and swans continue to linger in the area /beyond their normal late
dates. The TRUMPETER SWAN continues in the vicinity of the Black Hill
Regional Park, Montgomery Co., MD with a sighting on May 23 at the nearby
Lake Churchill.



A REDHEAD was seen May 20 at Tydings Marina, Harford Co, MD. A SURF SCOTER
was seen throughout the week at Violette's Lock, Montgomery Co MD.
Forty-two BLACK SCOTERS were seen May 20 at North Beach, Virginia Beach,
VA. A female BLACK SCOTER was seen May 22 at Back Bay NWR, Virginia Beach,
VA. Two LONG-TAILED DUCKS were seen May 23 at Point Lookout SP, St. Mary’s
Co, MD.



NORTHERN BOBWHITES turned up at a variety of widely scattered locations
this past week.



An ANHINGA was reported on May 21 back at the same location they were at on
Blackwater Rd, Chesapeake, VA last year. An ANHINGA was seen and
photographed on a farm in Fluvanna Co, VA on the 22nd and 23rd.



AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS were seen May 23 and 24 at Fowler Beach, Sussex Co,
DE.



MISSISSIPPI KITES were seen in a number of locations throughout the week
including one in Norfolk, VA on the 19th; two the same day flying over the
Fort Smallwood Park hawk watch, Anne Arundel Co, MD; and Perryman Park,
Harford Co, MD on the 24th. Two MISSISSIPPI KITES were seen May 21 in a
tree close to the road at Gaines and Jackson Streets in Burke, Fairfax Co,
VA. One was seen May 23 flying over Lake Accotink Park, Fairfax Co, VA.
MISSISSIPPI KITES were also seen along Whiton Crossing Rd, Worcester Co, MD
on the 23rd, 24th, & 25th. A MISSISSIPPI KITE was seen the 24th flying over
Rte 40, W. Patrick St, Frederick, MD. A MISSISSIPPI KITE was flying along
Rte 40 behind Perryman Park, Harford Co, MD, at the Gray's Run crossing on
the 24th. Also on the 24th, a MISSISSIPPI KITE was seen soaring high
towards Lake Drummond (Great Dismal Swamp NWR, Suffolk, VA) just south of
Balyhack Rd. A MISSISSIPPI KITE flew over Rockwood Beach (near Fort
Smallwood) on the 25th.



A COMMON GALLINULE was seen May 22 at the Dutch Gap Conservation Area,
Chesterfield Co, VA.



Two SANDHILL CRANES were found May 21 in a flooded field in the 3122-3190
block of Rte 146 in Harford Co, MD. A SANDHILL CRANE was seen May 25
heading southwest from Fort Smallwood Park.



Two BLACK-NECKED STILTS were found May 23 at Hog Island, Surry Co, VA.



SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS were seen at the Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens, NE
DC, from the 19th through the 22nd. A SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER and a DUNLIN
were seen May 23 at the Rowe Rd farm pond just east of the intersection of
Rowe and Intyre Rds, Washington Co, MD; the DUNLIN and three SEMIPALMATED
PLOVERS were there on the 24th. Thirty-two SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS were seen
May 20 at Belvoir Pond, Fauquier Co, VA; two were seen there on the 25th.
Two PIPING PLOVERS were spotted April 11 at Fort Monroe, Hampton, VA.



As many as 9 WHIMBRELS were found on the 23rd, first at Dyke Marsh and then
later on the mudflats at Hunting Creek, Fairfax Co, VA. This past week RED
KNOTS turned up in relatively small numbers on ocean beaches from Virginia
Beach to Delaware. A couple of RED-NECKED PHALAROPES were found May 17 & 18
at the Pickering Beach side of Little Creek Wildlife, Kent, DE.



OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHERS turned up at a number of locations including Hughes
Hollow, Montgomery Co, MD on the 20th; Violette’s Lock, Montgomery Co, MD,
on the 22nd & 23rd; at Cromwell Valley Park, Baltimore Co, MD on the 21st &
the 23rd; on the 23rd along the WB&A Trail - Old Pond Dr, Prince George's
Co, MD; on the 23rd at Fort Washington NP, Prince George’s Co, MD.



ALDER FLYCATCHERS were also seen in a number of locations including
Cromwell Valley Park on the 21st & 23rd; Governor Bridge NA, Prince
George’s Co, MD, on the 22nd; at Meadowpark Park, Howard Co, MD on the 23rd
and also, the same day, at the Middle Patuxent Environmental Area, Howard
Co, MD. ALDER FLYCATCHERS were seen and heard at a variety of locations in
Highland Co, VA this past week including three at Beaver Ponds in on the 23
rd.



A YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER turned up in a private yard on the 22nd in
Harford Co, MD. Both a YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER and a PHILADELPHIA VIREO
were reported May 23 in the same tree north of Blairs Valley Lake,
Washington Co, MD.



A WESTERN KINGBIRD was reported from the Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE Allee
House area on the 24th.



A LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE was seen throughout the week at Burwells Bay Rd at
Purvis Rd, Isle of Wight, VA.



A PHILADELPHIA VIREO was seen May 24 at the northwest corner of the lake at
Wheaton RP, Montgomery Co, MD.



GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLERS were seen May 23 at their regular spot on Wimer
Mountain Rd, Highland Co, VA.



MOURINING WARBLERS turned up at a number of locations this past week. Some
of the sightings included one in a yard in western Loudoun Co on May 19,
one on May 20 along the Flag Ponds Parkway powerline, Calvert Co, MD, and
another May 21 in the Rock Creek Park (NW DC) maintenance yard. One was
also seen at Governor Bridge NA, Prince George’s Co, MD, on the 22nd.
Another was seen May 23 near Paddy Knob, Highland Co, VA. One was also seen
on the 23rd at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax Co, VA. A MOURNING WARBLER was
also seen on the regular weekly bird walk at Great Falls National
Historical Park, Fairfax Co, VA, on May 24.



Two VESPER SPARROWS were seen May 23 along the road in Laurel Forks,
Highland Co, VA. Another was singing the same day on Smith Rd, Jefferson
Co, WV.A LINCOLN’S SPARROW was seen May 20 in Rock Creek Park, NW DC. Two
were seen the 21st in the maintenance yard at Rock Creek Park. A LINCOLN’S
SPARROW was also seen the 22nd at Mount Pleasant Farm, Howard Co (MD)
Conservancy. And one was seen the 22nd at Theodore Roosevelt Island, NW DC.
A couple of WHITE-THROATED and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS continued to turn up
at feeders in the area.



A singing DICKCISSEL was seen the 25th at the Mustang Trailhead, Meadowood
Recreation Area, Gunston and Harley Rds, Lorton. A DICKCISSEL was also
located the 25th at the corner of Brookfield Rd and Parkgate Dr, near
Nokesville, Prince William Co, VA.



Other lingering winter birds included a single RUSTY BLACKBIRD on the 20th
at Piscataway Park, Prince George’s Co, MD and two PINE SISKINS in Howard
Co, MD from the 20th through the 21st as well as in a few other locations.



***



This week's report was based on reports on the DE, MD, VA, and WV list
servers via the ABA Internet links, and on eBird records.



The Audubon Sanctuary Shop (301-652-3606, anshome.org/shop) is an excellent
source for guidebooks and many other nature-related titles.



To report bird sightings, e-mail your report to voice AT anshome.org.

Please post reports before midnight Monday, identify the county as well as
the state, and include your name and a Tuesday morning contact, e-mail or
phone.



Thank you for your interest, and enjoy the birds.



*Of interest to the applicable state records committee

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Subject: Hart-Miller Island, 05/26/15
From: Kevin Graff <keyweststyle2001 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 14:55:34 -0400
05/26/15 – 710am-3pm

Hart-Miller Island, Essex, Baltimore Co., MD



WEATHER: Fair/PC, 68-82 degrees, S 4K- SSE 14K

OBS: Scott Baron, Kevin Graff, Joe Hanfman, Johnnie Ramos, Bob Ringler,
Debi Talbott



Canada Goose – 94 (54 adults, 40 goslings)

Wood Duck – 16

Gadwall – 4

American Wigeon – 2

American Black Duck – 6

Mallard – 76

Ruddy Duck – 19

Pied-billed Grebe – 2

Double-crested Cormorant – 41

*AMERICAN BITTERN – 1

*LEAST BITTERN – 2

Great Blue Heron – 17

Snowy Egret – 1

Green Heron – 1

*GLOSSY IBIS – 4

Turkey Vulture – 3

Osprey – 14

Bald Eagle – 1 (adult)

Peregrine Falcon – 1

*COMMON GALLINULE – 2

American Coot – 4

*AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER – 2

Black-bellied Plover – 7

Semipalmated Plover – 61

Killdeer – 11

Spotted Sandpiper – 8

Lesser Yellowlegs – 2

*RUDDY TURNSTONE – 2

Dunlin – 49

Least Sandpiper – 16

*WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER – 2

Semipalmated Sandpiper – 220

Short-billed Dowitcher – 38 (2 prairie)

*BONAPARTE'S GULL – 3

Laughing Gull – 1

Ring-billed Gull – 46

Herring Gull – 12

Great Black-backed Gull – 8

Least Tern – 55

Caspian Tern – 163

Forster’s Tern – 13

Mourning Dove – 3

Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird – 2

Great Crested Flycatcher – 2

Eastern Kingbird – 9

Crow sp – 3

Purple Martin – 2

Tree Swallow – 8

Barn Swallow – 20

Carolina Chickadee – 1

Carolina Wren – 2

Marsh Wren – 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 2

Gray Catbird – 6

European Starling – 2

Cedar Waxwing – 1

Common Yellowthroat – 48

American Redstart – 1

Yellow Warbler – 8

Blackpoll Warbler – 2

Yellow-breasted Chat – 1

Song Sparrow – 2

Northern Cardinal – 5

Blue Grosbeak – 1

Indigo Bunting – 5

Bobolink – 3

Red-winged Blackbird – 86

Common Grackle – 18

Brown-headed Cowbird – 13

Orchard Oriole – 8

American Goldfinch – 19

SPECIES: 71   INDIVIDUALS: 1321



MAMMALS: Red Fox, WT Deer, Raccoon (fresh tracks)



REPTILES

E Painted Turtle – 1

Snapping Turtle – 1



AMPHIBIANS

Fowler’s Toad – 3

Green Frog – 1

Bullfrog – 1



BUTTERFLIES

Black Swallowtail – 2
Cabbage White – 6

Orange Sulphur – 13

Clouded Sulphur – 2

Clouded/Orange Sulphur – 1 (female white form)

Spring Azure – 1

Azure sp – 2

Common Buckeye – 2

Monarch – 1

Silver-spotted Skipper – 5

Zabulon Skipper – 1



DRAGONFLIES

Common Green darner – 5

Black Saddlebags – 4

Needham’s Skimmer – 8



    Kevin Graff

    Jarrettsville, MD

    KeyWeststyle2001 AT gmail.com

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Subject: JBWS Ongoing Waterbird Survey May 27 - 48 species
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 13:49:07 -0400
Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary, Anne Arundel, US-MD
May 27, 2015 7:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Ongoing Bird Survey
45 species

Canada Goose  47
Wood Duck  15
Mallard  1
Double-crested Cormorant  14
Great Blue Heron  8
Black Vulture  2
Turkey Vulture  1
Osprey  29
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  1
Chimney Swift  2
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Acadian Flycatcher  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Yellow-throated Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  3
Blue Jay  1
Tree Swallow  2
Barn Swallow  1
Carolina Chickadee  1
Tufted Titmouse  2
Carolina Wren  1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  3
Wood Thrush  1
American Robin  1
European Starling  10
Cedar Waxwing  8
Ovenbird  1
Prothonotary Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  2
Northern Parula  1
Yellow Warbler  2
Yellow-breasted Chat  1
Eastern Towhee  1
Summer Tanager  1
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  2
Red-winged Blackbird  5
Common Grackle  1
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
Orchard Oriole  1
American Goldfinch  1

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23663059 
 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org 
) 


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Subject: RE: Snowy Egret @ T Roosevelt Island
From: Fabin Casas Arenas <zapatillasdecorrer AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 13:48:13 -0400
Hi everybody,
Sorry I couldn't reply before. I went this morning to the TRI and I saw the 
snowy egret flying over the boardwalk and heading south, but just when the 
snowy egret was close to the TR bridge it turn to the west, and I lost it 
behind the trees. So, probably it should be around TRI yet, I hope someone else 
would find it this afternoon.Mute swan was in the channel that cross the island 
under TR bridge around 8:45 am. 

Fabian Casas
DC
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 09:31:59 -0400
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] Snowy Egret  AT  T Roosevelt Island
From: hdmcguinness AT gmail.com
To: balaenopteron AT gmail.com
CC: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com

My guess is that the best time to check would be at the same tide as when 
Sharon saw it yesterday. So that would make it between 3:30 and 5:30 today. 


Hugh

On Wed, May 27, 2015 at 9:11 AM, Adam Parr  wrote:
Hi all,



I just checked the length of the Virginia side of Teddy Roosevelt Is., and the 
Snowy Egret is NOT present where Sharon saw it yesterday. I didn't circle the 
island, so it could have moved to the other side. No sign either of the Cliff 
Swallows or Mute Swan. Thanks for posting Sharon! Good birding, 




Adam Parr

Takoma Park



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-- 
Hugh McGuinness
Washington, D.C.






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Subject: Re: Rock Creek Park, Saturday 5/23/15
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 11:11:38 -0400
Addendum:  See the following email.

Wallace,
I wanted to add Common Nighthawk to Saturday's list for Rock Creek. A number of 
people had the pleasure of seeing one perched in the post oak by the gate to 
the equitation field. 

Best,
Jesse Buff

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Wednesday 5/27/15
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 10:59:10 -0400
This morning (5/27) at Rock Creek Park with Bill Butler…..

Ovenbird  
Mourning Dove     8
Chimney Swift     5
Red-bellied Woodpecker     11
Downy Woodpecker     2
Hairy Woodpecker  
Northern Flicker     3
Pileated Woodpecker     2
Eastern Wood-Pewee    6
Acadian Flycatcher     11     heard
Great Crested Flycatcher     4
Yellow-throated Vireo    2
Red-eyed Vireo     8
Blue Jay     3
Fish Crow     4
Carolina Chickadee     2
Tufted Titmouse     9
White-breasted Nuthatch  
Carolina Wren     8
Wood Thrush    7
American Robin     20
Gray Catbird     2
European Starling     2
Eastern Towhee  
Scarlet Tanager     5
Northern Cardinal     8
Indigo Bunting  
Common Grackle     2
Brown-headed Cowbird     7
American Goldfinch     8
House Sparrow     5

Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC

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Subject: Re: Snowy Egret @ T Roosevelt Island
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 09:31:59 -0400
My guess is that the best time to check would be at the same tide as when
Sharon saw it yesterday. So that would make it between 3:30 and 5:30 today.

Hugh

On Wed, May 27, 2015 at 9:11 AM, Adam Parr  wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> I just checked the length of the Virginia side of Teddy Roosevelt Is., and
> the Snowy Egret is NOT present where Sharon saw it yesterday. I didn't
> circle the island, so it could have moved to the other side. No sign either
> of the Cliff Swallows or Mute Swan. Thanks for posting Sharon!  Good
> birding,
>
> Adam Parr
> Takoma Park
>
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-- 
Hugh McGuinness
Washington, D.C.

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Subject: Snowy Egret @ T Roosevelt Island
From: Adam Parr <balaenopteron AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 06:11:34 -0700 (PDT)
Hi all,

I just checked the length of the Virginia side of Teddy Roosevelt Is., and the 
Snowy Egret is NOT present where Sharon saw it yesterday. I didn't circle the 
island, so it could have moved to the other side. No sign either of the Cliff 
Swallows or Mute Swan. Thanks for posting Sharon! Good birding, 


Adam Parr 
Takoma Park

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Subject: Fort Smallwood Park Tuesday, May 26, 2015 27 Raptors
From: susiericc AT comcast.net
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 12:26:23 +0000 (UTC)
Fort Smallwood Park 
Pasadena, Maryland, USA 

Daily Raptor Counts: May 26, 2015 
Species 	Day's Count 	Month Total 	Season Total 
Black Vulture 	1 	21 	536 
Turkey Vulture 	21 	657 	6701 
Osprey 	1 	56 	408 
Bald Eagle 	1 	106 	182 
Northern Harrier 	0 	9 	75 
Sharp-shinned Hawk 	0 	164 	1123 
Cooper's Hawk 	0 	39 	274 
Northern Goshawk 	0 	0 	0 
Red-shouldered Hawk 	0 	3 	284 
Broad-winged Hawk 	1 	114 	642 
Red-tailed Hawk 	2 	32 	237 
Rough-legged Hawk 	0 	0 	0 
Golden Eagle 	0 	0 	0 
American Kestrel 	0 	4 	370 
Merlin 	0 	9 	37 
Peregrine Falcon 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Accipiter 	0 	0 	1 
Unknown Buteo 	0 	1 	10 
Unknown Falcon 	0 	1 	3 
Unknown Eagle 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Raptor 	0 	1 	3 
Mississippi Kite 	0 	11 	11 
Swallow-tailed Kite 	0 	1 	1 
Total: 	27 	1229 	10898 

Observation start time: 	9:30 am 
Observation end time: 	3:00 pm  Daylight Time 
Total observation time: 	5.5 hours 
Official Counter 	Sue Ricciardi 
Observers: 	Dan Stewart, Hal Wierenga 

Weather: 
Hazy, hot and humid! Partly cloudy, 72-86 degrees; fair visibility with haze; 
winds light and variable at first, 5-7 mph, becoming southwesterly, 10-12 mph, 
gusting to 18 mph 


Raptor Observations: 
Local Peregrine Falcon out for a snack 

Non-raptor Observations: 



Report submitted by Sue Ricciardi ( susiericc AT comcast.net ) 
Fort Smallwood Park information may be found at: 
http://www.mdbirds.org/sites/mdsites/hawks/hawkwatch.html 


Site Description 
Fort Smallwood Park is located on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay at the 
mouth of the Patapsco River, 11 miles south of Baltimore, MD. Best winds are 
from the southwest. The Park is closed to visitors on Wednesdays. 

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Subject: Re: Snowy Egret @ T Roosevelt Island
From: Sharon Forsyth <forsyth.sharon AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 15:16:04 -0700 (PDT)
On Tuesday, May 26, 2015 at 6:00:10 PM UTC-4, Sharon F1727 wrote:
> A bit before 4 p.m. Visible from foot bridge, looking south towards Roosevelt 
Bridge, first perched in tree, then standing by water. 


Forgot to sign: Sharon Forsyth, Washington, DC

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Subject: Snowy Egret @ T Roosevelt Island
From: Sharon F1727 <sharonf1727 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 15:00:10 -0700 (PDT)
A bit before 4 p.m. Visible from foot bridge, looking south towards Roosevelt 
Bridge, first perched in tree, then standing by water. 


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Subject: Northern Flicker mating ritual....
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 13:52:05 -0700 (PDT)
I watched a pair of Northern Flickers for 15 minutes - strut, posture, chitter, 
bob up and down. Repeat. All this in a mulberry tree in my yard no more than 10 
feet from the porch.... 


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Subject: Redneck Phal at Rileys lock
From: "dma3 via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 16:44:21 -0400
Sitting now. Middle of river. Catching bugs. Also Black Tern

Dave Czaplak

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Subject: BOBOLINK Dorchester County
From: Don Simonson <simonson AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 13:05:23 -0700 (PDT)
I observed an adult male BOBOLINK 10 miles southwest of Cambridge MD on 
5/24/15. The bird flew across several hundred yards of open water and passed 
over the dock of my friends' house on Hudson Creek, a tributary of the Little 
Choptank River. 

We also observed BLUE GROSBEAK male and female on the property, and saw one of 
the property's resident OSPREY chase and drive away two much larger BALD 
EAGLEs. Good birding! 


Don Simonson, Darnestown MD.

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Subject: Mockingbird mimicry
From: Karl Krueger <kruegerk54 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 14:06:23 -0400
Back when I was a teenager, once after cutting the grass I heard one try to
imitate the mower.

-- 
Karl Krueger
Gaithersburg, MD

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Subject: Re: Mockingbird mimicry
From: Russ Ruffing <ruff2 AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 13:47:47 -0400
Once in San Diego I was walking across a crowded parking lot when I clearly 
heard a car alarm coming from ABOVE me...I looked up only to find a Mocker 
doing an absolutely dead-on impression of a car alarm from atop a light pole! I 
laughed out loud. I guess that is what it was used to hearing on a daily basis! 


Russ Ruffing
Woodstock, MD

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 26, 2015, at 9:57 AM, Dan  wrote:
> 
> Sometime the most common birds are the most amazing. I have heard some dead 
on impressions by mockingbirds. I was surprised by the one in my alley in DC 
this morning. Along with red-winged blackbird, scarlet tanager, killdeer, 
European starling, indigo bunting, Carolina wren, American robin, belted 
kingfisher and American crow, he pulled a new one on me. Near perfect wood 
thrush. Kudos little mockingbird. 

> 
> Dan Rauch
> Washington DC
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Tuesday 5/26/15
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 11:20:54 -0400
This morning (5/26) at Rock Creek Park…..

Ovenbird     3
Common Yellowthroat     2   Dog run
American Redstart       Equitation Field
Magnolia Warbler       Maintenance Yard
Canada Goose       flyby
Mourning Dove     16
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  
Chimney Swift     3
Ruby-throated Hummingbird     2
Red-bellied Woodpecker     17
Downy Woodpecker  
Hairy Woodpecker  
Northern Flicker     2
Pileated Woodpecker     3
Eastern Wood-Pewee     7
Acadian Flycatcher     9      heard
Great Crested Flycatcher     9   mostly heard
Eastern Kingbird  
Yellow-throated Vireo     8     heard
Red-eyed Vireo     7
Blue Jay     3
American Crow     2
Fish Crow     4
Carolina Chickadee     8
Tufted Titmouse     15
White-breasted Nuthatch     4
Carolina Wren     4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  
Swainson's Thrush     25   mostly heard
Wood Thrush     8    mostly heard
American Robin     29
Gray Catbird     3
Northern Mockingbird  
European Starling     2
Cedar Waxwing     10    Dog Run
Eastern Towhee     6
Chipping Sparrow     2
Song Sparrow  
Scarlet Tanager     4
Northern Cardinal     2
Indigo Bunting     3
Common Grackle     2
Brown-headed Cowbird     8
House Finch  
American Goldfinch     8
House Sparrow     9

Contributors:  Bill Butler, Marina True, Jim Lemert, David Lauder

Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC







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Subject: Mockingbird mimicry
From: Dan <danrauch11 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 09:57:46 -0400
Sometime the most common birds are the most amazing. I have heard some dead on 
impressions by mockingbirds. I was surprised by the one in my alley in DC this 
morning. Along with red-winged blackbird, scarlet tanager, killdeer, European 
starling, indigo bunting, Carolina wren, American robin, belted kingfisher and 
American crow, he pulled a new one on me. Near perfect wood thrush. Kudos 
little mockingbird. 


Dan Rauch
Washington DC

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Fort Smallwood Park Monday, May 25, 2015 61 Raptors
From: susiericc AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 03:39:20 +0000 (UTC)

Fort Smallwood Park 
Pasadena, Maryland, USA 

Daily Raptor Counts: May 25, 2015 
Species 	Day's Count 	Month Total 	Season Total 
Black Vulture 	4 	20 	535 
Turkey Vulture 	35 	636 	6680 
Osprey 	6 	55 	407 
Bald Eagle 	12 	105 	181 
Northern Harrier 	0 	9 	75 
Sharp-shinned Hawk 	0 	164 	1123 
Cooper's Hawk 	0 	39 	274 
Northern Goshawk 	0 	0 	0 
Red-shouldered Hawk 	1 	3 	284 
Broad-winged Hawk 	0 	113 	641 
Red-tailed Hawk 	3 	30 	235 
Rough-legged Hawk 	0 	0 	0 
Golden Eagle 	0 	0 	0 
American Kestrel 	0 	4 	370 
Merlin 	0 	9 	37 
Peregrine Falcon 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Accipiter 	0 	0 	1 
Unknown Buteo 	0 	1 	10 
Unknown Falcon 	0 	1 	3 
Unknown Eagle 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Raptor 	0 	1 	3 
Mississippi Kite 	0 	11 	11 
Swallow-tailed Kite 	0 	1 	1 
Total: 	61 	1202 	10871 

Observation start time: 	8:30 am 
Observation end time: 	5:00 pm Daylight Time 
Total observation time: 	8.5 hours 
Official Counter 	Sue Ricciardi 
Observers: 	Dan Walker, Hugh Hoffman, Lynn Davidson, Mary Jane McMillan 


Visitors: 
Warren Strobel 

Weather: 
Partly cloudy becoming mostly cloudy in the last two hours; 67-83 degrees; fair 
visibility with haze; winds mostly southwesterly increasing in strength over 
the course of the count 


Raptor Observations: 
Another good day for Bald Eagles in a variety of ages; Bill Hubick turned the 
tables on us by finding a Mississippi Kite flying over his yard about a 
half-mile away and watching it fly our way, but unfortunately we didn't see it 
at the count site.  So close, yet so far! 


Non-raptor Observations: 
Another Sandhill Crane, our third and in view for 5 minutes, then reappeared 10 
minutes later 



Report submitted by Sue Ricciardi ( susiericc AT comcast.net ) 
Fort Smallwood Park information may be found at: 
http://www.mdbirds.org/sites/mdsites/hawks/hawkwatch.html 


Site Description 
Fort Smallwood Park is located on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay at the 
mouth of the Patapsco River, 11 miles south of Baltimore, MD. Best winds are 
from the southwest. The Park is closed to visitors on Wednesdays. 

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Subject: Re: Yellow warblers endangered at King's Farm
From: debrataylor11 AT gmail.com
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 17:41:16 -0700 (PDT)
On Monday, May 25, 2015 at 6:55:07 PM UTC-4, Patricia Wood wrote:
> I went out to King's Farm this morning, not early enough if there had been 
any migrant warblers going through, but glad to discover such a nice place to 
try sooner and earlier next year. While there, though, I got to talking to a 
resident who is also a birder and photographer, and heard a sad story. 

> 
> She had watched yellow warblers building a nest there, and finally yielded to 
the entreaties of a photographer to say where it was. Long story short, he 
evidently told others, and two weeks later you can still see where the grass is 
trodden down and a path to within 3 or 4 feet of the nest. He told her there 
were 3 eggs in it; the next day or so the nest was destroyed by some predator. 
She feels very guilty, and will never be helping anyone like that again, and 
she's quite right. 

> 
> If you're reading this and went to see that nest, I'm sure you thought you 
were doing no harm and keeping a proper distance, but you were fooling 
yourself. If you make a trail, or walk even once through an area not disturbed 
before, you are releasing the scent of bruised grass, human scent, and goodness 
know what else that an animal could detect. That causes a predator to 
investigate and follow those intriguing new smells to where you stood watching 
the bird. From there, it's a lot more likely that a fox, or cat, or whatever, 
will detect the nest than if they hadn't gotten that close. 

> 
> Bottom line, stay on the beaten path that's already there, and don't approach 
even to 10 feet, let alone 3 or 4 feet, any low to the ground nest,and don't 
beat the bushes looking for them (She observed some of that, too!!) And treat 
such nests like owls; don't tell anyone about them. 

> 
> Patricia Wood
> Silver Spring

We were there last Tues am. Didn't see much because we didn't go off the grass. 
We did however see a very large tom cat, lite gray and white. Maybe he was the 
culprit. He was sitting in the wooded section. 


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Subject: Ferry Neck, Blackwater, May 16-20, 2015 (& off topic Brigantine & the Poconos)
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 23:45:55 +0000



















FERRY NECK & BLACKWATER N.W.R., May 16-20 [& off
topic Brigantine (May 21), Poconos (May 23-25)].  Harry & Liz Armistead.

 

MAY 16, SATURDAY. 
Arrive at Ferry Neck 3 P.M. 
Cattle Egret 2, Pileated Woodpecker 1, Least Tern 1, Common Tern 2. A Raccoon, 
half-grown, at the corn under the 

Willow Oak, along with a Gray Squirrel. 
Rain after 7:45 P.M.

 

MAY 17, SUNDAY.  Box
Turtle on the driveway at 5:547 A.M., another at Royal Oak at 2:12 P.M. The 
rain gets them going and there was 1 

1/16” last night. Wood Duck 2. Diamondback Terrapin 18. 1 each of Cedar 
Waxwing, Least Tern, and Bald 

Eagle (adult).  Cope’s Gray Tree Frogs
calling in the yard.  One adult Red-headed
Woodpecker.

 

At BLACKWATER N.W.R., a bird walk, 7:15 A.M. – 1:45 P.M.
(actual birdwalk from 8 A.M. – 12:30). 
68 species, the complete list below. 
Nine persons on the birdwalk: Harry & Liz Armistead, Andrew Au,
Ellen & Tom Cimino, Kara Linthicum, Bill Rhodes, Mark Rust, and Shirley
Turner.  Tidal waters low, fresh water
areas lowering.  Some of these birds seen
before or after the official birdwalk as well as “off site” along Egypt 
Road or 

at Cambridge.  Mostly overcast,
occasional light sprinkles, winds light & variable or else calm, 66-80°F,
humid. 

 

Canada goose 22 plus 6 downy goslings, wood duck 6, mallard 8,
northern bobwhite 1, wild turkey 9, AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN 2, great blue heron
16, great egret 10, snowy egret 1, green heron 2, black vulture 2, turkey
vulture 22, osprey 14, bald eagle 30, red-tailed hawk 1, king rail 1, Virginia
rail 5, semipalmated plover 12, killdeer 1, spotted sandpiper 1, greater
yellowlegs 5, dunlin 26, least sandpiper 45, semipalmated sandpiper 10,
short-billed dowitcher 14, ring-billed gull 3, 

 

rock pigeon 3, mourning dove 4, great horned owl 2,
ruby-throated hummingbird 2, red-headed woodpecker 1 adult, northern flicker 1,
eastern wood-pewee 3, great crested flycatcher 20, eastern kingbird 3, red-eyed
vireo 3, blue jay 2, American crow 6, fish crow 4, purple martin 3, tree
swallow 26, barn swallow 40, Carolina chickadee 3, tufted titmouse 4, Carolina
wren 4, eastern bluebird 4, wood thrush 1, American robin 40, gray catbird 4,
northern mockingbird 3,

 

European starling 22, ovenbird 2, prothonotary warbler 1,
common yellowthroat 30, pine warbler 6, chipping sparrow 12, field sparrow 3,
song sparrow 1, summer tanager 4, northern cardinal 10, blue grosbeak 10,
indigo bunting 8, red-winged blackbird 90, common grackle 100, brown-headed
cowbird 12, orchard oriole 14, American goldfinch 8, house sparrow 4.

 

NON-AVIAN TAXA: Mammals: gray squirrel 1, fox squirrel 2
(good views on the Pool 1 causeway), muskrat 1, eastern cottontail 3. Herps: 
painted turtle 7, cricket frog 4, 

bullfrog 2, green tree frog 2, snapping turtle 1 young d.o.r. on Key Wallace
Drive, one 1’-long individual d.o.r. at the “prothonotary spot”. 
Butterflies: one beautifual Bronze Copper 

photographed and seen at close range next to the marsh at the Observation
Site.  

 

MAY 18, MONDAY.  Back
at Ferry Neck.  Cattle Egret 7, Pileated
Woodpecker 1, Snowy Egret 1, Bald Eagle 1 immature, Blue Grosbeak 1 male. In 
the flower pot with the inpatiens is a big 

Fowler’s Toad, that would have had to jump c. 6.5 vertical inches to get in
there.  31 Diamondback Terrapin.  The Carrie-Ashlie from Cambridge is pulling
eel pots out in Irish Creek.  The Ann C,
also from Cambridge, is also out there. 
A c. 2.25’ Northern Watersnake swims near the dock. In at Easton the Acme 
Least Terns, 2 of them 

are diving into the scummy pond next to McDonalds. 72-87°F., clear becoming 
fair, winds SW5 becoming E  AT  

10 m.p.h.

 

MAY 19, TUESDAY, 71-84°F., overcast, then fair, then clear, low
ceiling, hot, NW5-SW5 or else calm.  Another
welcome rain last night of 1 1/32”.  One
Common Loon migrating high and to the north. 
Cattle Egret 3, Snowy Egret 2, Red-tailed Hawk 2 adults, Osprey best
count of birds in sight simultaneously is 14, Spotted Sandpiper 1, Bald Eagle
3, Green Heron 1, Great Blue Heron 2, Black Vulture 3. I spend most of the day 
on the dock scanning 

the arc from east to north and hoping, in vain, for a Mississippi Kite.  

 

A day of chases: Eastern Wood Pewee vs. a cowbird. Osprey vs. a perched Turkey 
Vulture. Osprey vs. an imm. Bald Eagle. A male Red-winged Blackbird vs. an 
Osprey. A kingbird and a Common Grackle vs. a Turkey 

Vulture.  It’s a pugnacious time of
year.  NON-AVIAN: Diamondback Terrapin
18, Muskrat 1, Northern Watersnake 1, Red Admiral 1. The Bay water in Poplar 
Cove is nice and 

clear inspite of 2 recent, significant rains. 
Three c. 1.5’ fish (rock, I think) jump clear of the water after groups
of dozens of tiny minnows that jump ahead of them, “running” for their
lives.  We see again the bob-tailed Gray
Squirrel that Liz calls Shorty.  Dinner
on the back porch where we hear a distant chorus of Green Tree Frogs (the 1st
one this year) and a a close Cope’s Gray Tree Frog and see the last 
hummingbird 

visit to the feeder after sunset at 8:30 P.M. 
 

 

MAY 20, WEDNESDAY. 
Bald Eagle 2 each with white heads but brown and white tails. Haven’t seen 
these 2 before. 63°F. at start, clear, NW 20. Always rather surprising to see 
an Osprey 

that has captured a fish under these windy conditions coming in from far out on
the Choptank River mouth.  Leave by 10:15
A.M.

 

MAY 21, THURSDAY. 
BRIGANTINE unit of Forsyther N.W.R., NJ, with John & Greg Alexander
and Bob Lukens.  Overcast cool (mid-high
50s), SE or E 5-10, light rain becoming steady shortly before we leave, 11 A.M.
– 3:15 P.M.  52 species including: Canada
goose 120 (with broods of 6 & 7 downy goslings), mute swan 2, AMERICAN
BLACK DUCK 800 (I can’t imagine WHY there is SUCH a concentration of
these when you’d think they’d all be spread out and dispersed to breeding 
areas 

at this time of year.  Amazing.), mallard
30, brant 0 (a surprise), great egret 80, snowy egret 30, glossy ibis 40,
osprey 16, bald eagle 1 adult, oystercatcher 5, black-bellied plover 95,
semipalmated plover 45, spotted sandpiper 1, willet 12 (in noisy, aerial
display), lesser yellowlegs 1, WHIMBREL 85 (in the west impoundment at close
range), dunlin 600, least sandpiper 20, semipalmated sandpiper 2,000,
short-billed dowitcher 400, sanderling 0, Caspian tern 1, Forster’s tern 300,
gull-billed tern 2, black skimmer 90, peregrine falcon 2 (a pair on the hacking
tower), saltmarsh sparrow 1, seaside sparrow 4.

 

MAY 23-25, SATURDAY – MONDAY, AT  POCONO LAKE PRESERVE, PA, with Bob &
Betsy Lukens.  26 species.  Dynamite good looks at Blue-headed Vireos,
and male Black-throated Blue, Blackburnian (multiples), Magnolia, and
Black-throated Green warblers plus a female Common Merganser. We see an immense 
Bald Eagle nest in a huge 

White Pine over 100 feet tall.  Somewhat
unusual is a singing Pine Warbler out in front of our cabin. Once I hear a 
perfect, typical Summer 

Tanager’s call note, but unless I’d hear it multiple times I won’t count 
it. I remember once Bob Ringler heard one of the 

2 tanager species (and saw it) giving the call note of the other species. 
Several Tiger Swallowtails, 2 Painted 

Turtles, a Red Squirrel, a Woodchuck, and an unID’d lady butterfly.

 

Best to all. – Harry Armistead.





 		 	   		  

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Subject: Yellow warblers endangered at King's Farm
From: Patricia Wood <pwood AT capaccess.org>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 15:55:07 -0700 (PDT)
I went out to King's Farm this morning, not early enough if there had been any 
migrant warblers going through, but glad to discover such a nice place to try 
sooner and earlier next year. While there, though, I got to talking to a 
resident who is also a birder and photographer, and heard a sad story. 


She had watched yellow warblers building a nest there, and finally yielded to 
the entreaties of a photographer to say where it was. Long story short, he 
evidently told others, and two weeks later you can still see where the grass is 
trodden down and a path to within 3 or 4 feet of the nest. He told her there 
were 3 eggs in it; the next day or so the nest was destroyed by some predator. 
She feels very guilty, and will never be helping anyone like that again, and 
she's quite right. 


If you're reading this and went to see that nest, I'm sure you thought you were 
doing no harm and keeping a proper distance, but you were fooling yourself. If 
you make a trail, or walk even once through an area not disturbed before, you 
are releasing the scent of bruised grass, human scent, and goodness know what 
else that an animal could detect. That causes a predator to investigate and 
follow those intriguing new smells to where you stood watching the bird. From 
there, it's a lot more likely that a fox, or cat, or whatever, will detect the 
nest than if they hadn't gotten that close. 


Bottom line, stay on the beaten path that's already there, and don't approach 
even to 10 feet, let alone 3 or 4 feet, any low to the ground nest,and don't 
beat the bushes looking for them (She observed some of that, too!!) And treat 
such nests like owls; don't tell anyone about them. 


Patricia Wood
Silver Spring

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Subject: Re: Cliff Swallows - still @ T Roosevelt Island?
From: Scott Baron <baron.scott AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 15:43:05 -0400
When I birded Teddy Roosevelt a few days ago, I didn't see any swallows
near the footbridge.  Also, this is the first spring I can remember when I
didn't get any Barn Swallows around the bridge.

I've never seen Cliff Swallows on the island but hopefully they are still
around.  Perhaps a look underneath the bridge from the parking lot can
confirm if Cliff nest are there?  I didn't think to search.

Scott Baron

On Mon, May 25, 2015 at 2:50 PM, Hugh McGuinness 
wrote:

> Hi Sharon,
>
> My guess is that the birds are still there, but they can be really
> difficult to see/find b/c they do not hang out in the vicinity of the
> bridge. Last year, it wasn't until my 4th visit after having spent about 4
> hours looking that I finally saw them. So I think it is worth looking for
> them, but you have to be patient.
>
> Hugh
>
> On Mon, May 25, 2015 at 2:08 PM, Sharon F1727 
> wrote:
>
>> Does anybody know if the Cliff Swallows are still hanging out around the
>> foot bridge to Theodore Roosevelt Island? I heard they might be breeding
>> there, but I haven't seen any recent posts. Wondering whether it is worth
>> going there and looking for them. Thanks!
>>
>> Sharon Forsyth
>> Washington, DC
>>
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>>
>
>
>
> --
> Hugh McGuinness
> Washington, D.C.
>
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Subject: Re: Can anyone ID this duck?
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 15:33:35 -0400
Hooded Merganser.

On Mon, May 25, 2015 at 3:02 PM, Michael Roane 
wrote:

> I tried to post a picture attached to this email but I couldn't get it to
> work. I have posted four photos of the duck to my blog at the following
> link:
>
> http://mroane.blogspot.com/2015/05/unidentified-duck.html
>
> If you know what it is, can you email me?
>
> Thanks!
> Mike Roane
>
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>



-- 
Hugh McGuinness
Washington, D.C.

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Subject: Re: Can anyone ID this duck?
From: Kurt Schwarz <goawaybird AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 15:31:51 -0400
I believe it to be a female Hooded Merganser.  Wing panel, white belly,
bit of crest, perching in tree.  But it had me puzzled for a bit.

Kurt Schwarz
Ellicott City, Howard
goawaybird at verizon dot net

On 5/25/15, 3:02 PM, "Michael Roane"  wrote:

>I tried to post a picture attached to this email but I couldn't get it to
>work. I have posted four photos of the duck to my blog at the following
>link:
>
>http://mroane.blogspot.com/2015/05/unidentified-duck.html
>
>If you know what it is, can you email me?
>
>Thanks!
>Mike Roane
>
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Subject: Action: Support the Federal Bird-Safe Buildings Act.
From: Kurt Schwarz <krschwa1 AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 15:20:51 -0400
Dear Maryland and Delaware Birders,


The American Bird Conservancy has issued an action alert supporting the
Federal Bird-Safe Building Act. The Lights Out people in Baltimore,
Washington, DC, and Wilmington can all attest to the problem.  I personally
logged 113 deaths of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, and 150 individuals of 70
other species at my federal work place from 1991-20013.  Several other
species suffered at least a big headache, to include Northern Saw-whet Owl
and Marsh Wren.  Please read below and click on the link to contact your
federal legislators asking them to support this bill


Kurt R. Schwarz
Conservation Chair
Maryland Ornithological Society
krschwa1 AT verizon.net goawaybird AT verizon.net


Action Alert: Proposed Legislation Could Prevent Millions of Bird Deaths
 

U.S. Representative Mike Quigley (IL-05) and Rep. Morgan Griffith (VA-09)
have introduced the Federal Bird-Safe Buildings Act (HR 2280).  The bill is
designed to prevent the deaths of millions of birds by calling for each
public building constructed, acquired, or significantly altered by the
General Services Administration (GSA) to incorporate, to the maximum extent
possible, bird-safe building materials and design features. Many buildings
constructed by GSA are already, in fact, bird-friendly. The legislation
would require GSA to take similar actions on existing buildings, where
practicable.

 

³Migratory bird season in Chicago reminds us that birds are not only
beautiful animals telling us that warmer weather is on its way; but they
help generate billions of dollars annually to the U.S. economy through
wildlife watching activities,² said Rep. Quigley. ³However, collisions with
glass buildings claim hundreds of millions of bird lives each year in the
U.S. The Federal Bird-Safe Buildings Act, a cost neutral bill, would help
prevent these deaths by including bird-safe building materials and design
features across federal buildings.²

 

Please urge your U.S. Representative to support the 2015 Federal Bird-Safe
Buildings Act, which would help prevent the deaths of millions of birds by
including bird-safe building materials and design features across federal
buildings.
https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy;jsessionid=4F29DCECC7D875CA0B8
A4F8B6B07310B.app202a?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=204



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Subject: Re: Cliff Swallows - still @ T Roosevelt Island?
From: Paul Pisano <cheep.paul AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 15:16:41 -0400
I haven’t seen them there yet this year, but haven’t really tried, either. 
I agree with Hugh - probably still there, just have to give them some time. 


P

> On May 25, 2015, at 2:50 PM, Hugh McGuinness  wrote:
> 
> Hi Sharon,
> 
> My guess is that the birds are still there, but they can be really difficult 
to see/find b/c they do not hang out in the vicinity of the bridge. Last year, 
it wasn't until my 4th visit after having spent about 4 hours looking that I 
finally saw them. So I think it is worth looking for them, but you have to be 
patient. 

> 
> Hugh
> 
> On Mon, May 25, 2015 at 2:08 PM, Sharon F1727 > wrote: 

> Does anybody know if the Cliff Swallows are still hanging out around the foot 
bridge to Theodore Roosevelt Island? I heard they might be breeding there, but 
I haven't seen any recent posts. Wondering whether it is worth going there and 
looking for them. Thanks! 

> 
> Sharon Forsyth
> Washington, DC
> 
> --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
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> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Hugh McGuinness
> Washington, D.C.
> 
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Subject: Can anyone ID this duck?
From: Michael Roane <roane.michael AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 12:02:53 -0700 (PDT)
I tried to post a picture attached to this email but I couldn't get it to work. 
I have posted four photos of the duck to my blog at the following link: 


http://mroane.blogspot.com/2015/05/unidentified-duck.html

If you know what it is, can you email me?

Thanks!
Mike Roane

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Subject: Mississippi Kite heading TOWARD Fort Smallwood
From: "'bill_hubick' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 14:54:53 -0400
    
Heading due north over Rockwood Beach at 2:51. Overdue yard bird for living in 
the shadow of Fort Smallwood. 

Hooray!
Bill
Bill HubickPasadena, Maryland


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

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Subject: Re: Cliff Swallows - still @ T Roosevelt Island?
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 14:50:51 -0400
Hi Sharon,

My guess is that the birds are still there, but they can be really
difficult to see/find b/c they do not hang out in the vicinity of the
bridge. Last year, it wasn't until my 4th visit after having spent about 4
hours looking that I finally saw them. So I think it is worth looking for
them, but you have to be patient.

Hugh

On Mon, May 25, 2015 at 2:08 PM, Sharon F1727  wrote:

> Does anybody know if the Cliff Swallows are still hanging out around the
> foot bridge to Theodore Roosevelt Island? I heard they might be breeding
> there, but I haven't seen any recent posts. Wondering whether it is worth
> going there and looking for them. Thanks!
>
> Sharon Forsyth
> Washington, DC
>
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-- 
Hugh McGuinness
Washington, D.C.

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Subject: Neotropic Cormorant -- Yes!
From: Patricia Wood <pwood AT capaccess.org>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 11:39:14 -0700 (PDT)
When I got to Violette's Lock at about noon, it took only a short walk up the 
path to the right to spot the big tree out in the water, with a row of 
cormorants on it. I was afraid the rare one would be hard to spot, but there 
was one that seemed smaller out on the upper branch farthest to the right, 
which from the photos the Neo seems to favor. I could get glimpses of the 
facial features when it turned its head, but from the angle I had, a back view, 
I couldn't tell the tail was longer. My scope view kept getting blocked by 
leaves, because I'm too sissy to risk ticks and Lyme disease by going down the 
path to the shore without a bunch of Off sprayed on first, but another birder 
did, and confirmed what I was seeing. Yay--lifer! 


Patricia Wood
Silver Spring

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Subject: Cliff Swallows - still @ T Roosevelt Island?
From: Sharon F1727 <sharonf1727 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 11:08:37 -0700 (PDT)
Does anybody know if the Cliff Swallows are still hanging out around the foot 
bridge to Theodore Roosevelt Island? I heard they might be breeding there, but 
I haven't seen any recent posts. Wondering whether it is worth going there and 
looking for them. Thanks! 


Sharon Forsyth
Washington, DC

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Subject: 2 Adult Black-crowned Night Herons, Depot Pond, Upper Marlboro
From: Michael Roane <roane.michael AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 09:23:14 -0700 (PDT)
I returned to the larger Depot Pond this morning, hoping to see the 
Black-crowned Night Heron. I saw two which were somewhere out in the fields of 
lily pads and flew to a tree to rest. It was hard to tell due to birds coming 
and going, but there were at least two Green Herons, but there could have been 
as many as five or six there this morning. 


I also saw numerous Wood Duck, mostly in pairs. At one point, I counted 30 
ducks across the pond. I also saw several families of chicks and females, some 
of which appeared to be sharing duties. In one batch, I counted thirteen 
chicks. 


There were a smattering of other birds — Crows, Red-winged Blackbirds, Doves, 
Robins and two Osprey, one of which proudly carried half a fish. 


It was a beautiful day to be out watching birds!

Mike Roane
Dunkirk

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Subject: Re: Mississippi Kites - Worcester today
From: "'Stephen J. Davies' via Maryland & DC Birding" <mdbirding AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 11:53:39 -0400
Mississippi Kites showing well this morning. We saw them first from the 
intersection of Whiton and Shockley Rds as we approached from the south at 
10:20. Then about 45 min later both birds put on a good show as they soared 
above the trees east of the intersection of Whiton and Whiton Crossing Rds. 


Thank you Mike Burchett for posting directions, and to him and Betsy Bangert 
for enjoying them with us on Whiton Crossing Rd! 


Cheers

Stephen & Erika Davies


> On May 25, 2015, at 10:20, John Hubbell  wrote:
> 
> One seen just now over woods south of Sale By Owner sign.
> 
> John Hubbell
> Washington, D.C. 
> 
> 
> Begin forwarded message:
> 
>> From: mike burchett 
>> Date: May 24, 2015 at 4:43:47 PM EDT
>> To: "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com" 
>> Subject: [MDBirding] Mississippi Kites - Worcester today
>> 
>> The Mississippi Kites found by Marcia Balestri along Whiton's Crossing Road 
continued today. They were relocated first by Scott Housten and Jessica Morgan 
and later by several others. We viewed the birds from along Whiton's Crossing 
Rd., about a quarter mile from Rt. 354 (GPS: 38.2887, -75.3734). This vantage 
point along the road near 'for sale by owner' signs allowed a panoramic view 
over the forested drainage of the Pocomoke River to our east and south. 

>> 
>> We first viewed the adult bird distant for several minutes before a second 
bird appeared. This second bird was a subadult with no white secondaries. It 
ended up flying directly over our heads at the point described above. It the 
flew from the south, circled over us, then headed east towards the bridge. 
Hopefully this pair will stick around. 

>> 
>> Link to photos: https://www.flickr.com/mikeburchett/
>> 
>> Cheers and good birding,
>> Mike Burchett
>> Ocean Pines, MD
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Subject: Rock Creek Park, 5/25/15
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 11:43:29 -0400
This morning (5/25) at Rock Creek Park…..

——Equitation Field
Mourning Dove  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Red-eyed Vireo  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Carolina Wren  1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  1
Swainson's Thrush  1
Wood Thrush  1
American Robin  4
Eastern Towhee  1
Chipping Sparrow  2
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
American Goldfinch  2

——Ross Drive
Ovenbird     2
Mourning Dove  
Red-bellied Woodpecker     3
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Acadian Flycatcher     5
Great Crested Flycatcher  
Fish Crow     2
Carolina Chickadee  
Tufted Titmouse     3
White-breasted Nuthatch  
Carolina Wren  
Wood Thrush     6
American Robin     6
Gray Catbird  
Scarlet Tanager     2
Northern Cardinal     2

——Ridge
Ovenbird     2
Mourning Dove     2
Red-bellied Woodpecker     3
Pileated Woodpecker  
Red-eyed Vireo  
Fish Crow     2
White-breasted Nuthatch  
Carolina Wren  
American Robin     9
European Starling  
Scarlet Tanager  
Northern Cardinal  
Brown-headed Cowbird  
American Goldfinch     2

——Yard Parking Lot
Ovenbird    
Mourning Dove
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Great Crested Flycatcher
Yellow-throated Vireo
Tufted Titmouse
Carolina Wren     2
American Robin     4
Northern Cardinal
House Sparrow     4

——Fence Line
Mourning Dove
Red-bellied Woodpecker     2
Great Crested Flycatcher     2
Acadian Flycatcher
Carolina Wren
American Robin
Northern Cardinal

——Maintenance Yard
Ovenbird
Common Yellowthroat  
Mourning Dove     2
Chimney Swift     2
Red-bellied Woodpecker     2
Downy Woodpecker  
Hairy Woodpecker  
Pileated Woodpecker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee  
Great Crested Flycatcher  
Red-eyed Vireo     2
Blue Jay  
Fish Crow     2
Tufted Titmouse  
White-breasted Nuthatch  
Carolina Wren     4
Wood Thrush  
American Robin  
Scarlet Tanager     2
Northern Cardinal     4
Indigo Bunting  
Common Grackle     2
Brown-headed Cowbird     4
American Goldfinch     6

——Long Path  (Bill)
Yellow-throated Vireo
Swainson’s Thrush
Wood Thrush
Scarlet Tanager

——Nature Center
Mourning Dove  2
Chimney Swift  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Red-eyed Vireo  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Swainson's Thrush  1

——Dog Run  (Sharon)
Cooper’s Hawk

Contributors: Bill Butler, Leon Kass, Steve, Gary Nelson, Paul Pisano, Sharon 
Forsyth 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC

















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Subject: Sandhill Crane
From: susiericc <susiericc AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 10:34:50 -0400
    
Headed SW from Fort Smallwood Park  10:25 am


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

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Subject: Fwd: Mississippi Kites - Worcester today
From: John Hubbell <johngilhub1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 10:20:14 -0400
One seen just now over woods south of Sale By Owner sign.

John Hubbell
Washington, D.C. 


Begin forwarded message:

> From: mike burchett 
> Date: May 24, 2015 at 4:43:47 PM EDT
> To: "mdbirding AT googlegroups.com" 
> Subject: [MDBirding] Mississippi Kites - Worcester today
> 
> The Mississippi Kites found by Marcia Balestri along Whiton's Crossing Road 
continued today. They were relocated first by Scott Housten and Jessica Morgan 
and later by several others. We viewed the birds from along Whiton's Crossing 
Rd., about a quarter mile from Rt. 354 (GPS: 38.2887, -75.3734). This vantage 
point along the road near 'for sale by owner' signs allowed a panoramic view 
over the forested drainage of the Pocomoke River to our east and south. 

> 
> We first viewed the adult bird distant for several minutes before a second 
bird appeared. This second bird was a subadult with no white secondaries. It 
ended up flying directly over our heads at the point described above. It the 
flew from the south, circled over us, then headed east towards the bridge. 
Hopefully this pair will stick around. 

> 
> Link to photos: https://www.flickr.com/mikeburchett/
> 
> Cheers and good birding,
> Mike Burchett
> Ocean Pines, MD
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Subject: Wheaton Regional Park today
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 13:53:56 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all, 

Probably our last visit this spring as migration winds down, and this year we 
made fewer visits than usual. WRP is better in autumn when abundant food is 
available for migrants. Today it was mostly local breeders with very little 
evidence of migration. The only warblers were breeding Ovenbirds, a single 
singing Redstart and a Yellowthroat, and two unidentified high in trees. Wood 
thrushes were vocal but no other thrushes heard. Still, nice to be out and see 
some birds. 


Gail Mackiernan and Barry Cooper 
Colesville, MD 

Birds of interest: 

Wheaton Regional Park and Brookside Gardens, Montgomery, US-MD 
May 25, 2015 7:00 AM - 9:15 AM 
45 species (+2 other taxa) 

Great Blue Heron 1 
Red-tailed Hawk 1 
Chimney Swift 3 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 2 males 
Belted Kingfisher 1 
Northern Flicker 2 
Pileated Woodpecker 1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee 3 
Acadian Flycatcher 5 
Eastern Phoebe 1 
Great Crested Flycatcher 5 
Eastern Kingbird 2 breeding in pine tree in parking lot 
Warbling Vireo 1 Pine Lake 
Red-eyed Vireo 2 
Tree Swallow 6 
Barn Swallow 3 
House Wren 2 
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 3 
Wood Thrush 4 
Gray Catbird 4 
Cedar Waxwing 8 
Common Yellowthroat 1 Nature Ctr 
American Redstart 1 
Ovenbird 2 
warbler sp. 2 
Chipping Sparrow 5 
Scarlet Tanager 1 singing male 
Orchard Oriole 1 Brookside Nature Ctr 
Baltimore Oriole 2 



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Subject: Fort Smallwood Park Sunday, May 25, 2015 40 Raptors
From: susiericc AT comcast.net
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 03:37:58 +0000 (UTC)
Fort Smallwood Park 
Pasadena, Maryland, USA 

Daily Raptor Counts: May 24, 2015 
Species 	Day's Count 	Month Total 	Season Total 
Black Vulture 	0 	16 	531 
Turkey Vulture 	16 	601 	6645 
Osprey 	2 	49 	401 
Bald Eagle 	15 	93 	169 
Northern Harrier 	0 	9 	75 
Sharp-shinned Hawk 	0 	164 	1123 
Cooper's Hawk 	2 	39 	274 
Northern Goshawk 	0 	0 	0 
Red-shouldered Hawk 	0 	2 	283 
Broad-winged Hawk 	0 	113 	641 
Red-tailed Hawk 	5 	27 	232 
Rough-legged Hawk 	0 	0 	0 
Golden Eagle 	0 	0 	0 
American Kestrel 	0 	4 	370 
Merlin 	0 	9 	37 
Peregrine Falcon 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Accipiter 	0 	0 	1 
Unknown Buteo 	0 	1 	10 
Unknown Falcon 	0 	1 	3 
Unknown Eagle 	0 	0 	0 
Unknown Raptor 	0 	1 	3 
Mississippi Kite 	0 	11 	11 
Swallow-tailed Kite 	0 	1 	1 
Total: 	40 	1141 	10810 

Observation start time: 	9:00 am 
Observation end time: 	4:00 pm  Daylight Time 
Total observation time: 	7 hours 
Official Counter 	Sue Ricciardi 
Observers: 	Bob Rineer, Dan Walker, John Hubble, Mary Jane McMillan 


Visitors: 
Sam, Warren and Lisa Strobel 

Weather: 
Sunny becoming partly cloudy and then mostly sunny at the end; 63-80 degrees; 
good to excellent visibility; winds light, often with a SW component, 0-5 mph 


Raptor Observations: 
Bald Eagles all day with 9 of the 15 juveniles; surprising 5 Red-tails but no 
Broad-wings 


Non-raptor Observations: 



Report submitted by Sue Ricciardi ( susiericc AT comcast.net ) 
Fort Smallwood Park information may be found at: 
http://www.mdbirds.org/sites/mdsites/hawks/hawkwatch.html 


Site Description 
Fort Smallwood Park is located on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay at the 
mouth of the Patapsco River, 11 miles south of Baltimore, MD. Best winds are 
from the southwest. The Park is closed to visitors on Wednesdays. 

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Subject: Found at Nassawango - Nikon lens cover and Nikon eyepiece cover
From: Karen Caruso <karen.caruso AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 15:20:47 -0700 (PDT)
Found in the convenient parking area before the bridge and close to the trail 
back into the cypress swamp. 


email me off-line and I'll get them back to you.  

Karen.Caruso AT verizon.net

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Subject: Mississippi Kites - Worcester today
From: mike burchett <mikeburchett23 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 16:43:47 -0400
The Mississippi Kites found by Marcia Balestri along Whiton's Crossing Road
continued today. They were relocated first by Scott Housten and Jessica
Morgan and later by several others. We viewed the birds from along Whiton's
Crossing Rd., about a quarter mile from Rt. 354 (GPS: 38.2887, -75.3734).
This vantage point along the road near 'for sale by owner' signs allowed a
panoramic view over the forested drainage of the Pocomoke River to our east
and south.

We first viewed the adult bird distant for several minutes before a second
bird appeared. This second bird was a subadult with no white secondaries.
It ended up flying directly over our heads at the point described above. It
the flew from the south, circled over us, then headed east towards the
bridge. Hopefully this pair will stick around.

Link to photos: https://www.flickr.com/mikeburchett/

Cheers and good birding,
Mike Burchett
Ocean Pines, MD

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Subject: Mississippi Kite Harford Co
From: Tim Carney <timmyc83 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 15:46:30 -0400
A MIKI was flying next to my car on Rt 40 behind Perryman Park at the Gray's 
Run crossing. It flew up Rt 40 and disappeared north behind the tree line. 
Fortunately I was able to pull over and grab a photo. This was around 2:40pm. 


Tim Carney
Canton, MD

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Rock Creek Park, Sunday 5/24/15
From: Wallace Kornack <wallace AT kornack.com>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 15:18:40 -0400
This morning (5/24) at Rock Creek Park……

Warblers seen and/or heard by fellow birders: Ovenbird, Blackpoll, Redstart, 
Magnolia, Canada 


——Ross Drive  (Bill)
Ovenbird      3   heard
Red-bellied Woodpecker     3
Pileated Woodpecker     2
Acadian Flycatcher     2
Great Crested Flycatcher     2
Red-eyed Vireo     2
Tufted Titmouse     2
Carolina Wren     3
Swainson's Thrush     3
Wood Thrush     3
American Robin     5
Northern Cardinal     2
Brown-headed Cowbird  

——Equitation Field
Blackpoll Warbler  
Mourning Dove     2
Chimney Swift     6
Red-bellied Woodpecker     3
Downy Woodpecker     2
Eastern Wood-Pewee     4
Acadian Flycatcher  
Red-eyed Vireo     3
Tufted Titmouse     2
White-breasted Nuthatch  
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  
Swainson's Thrush     2
Wood Thrush  
American Robin     6
Eastern Towhee  
Northern Cardinal     2
Brown-headed Cowbird  
American Goldfinch     8

——Ridge
Double-crested Cormorant     2
Barred Owl 
Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee     2
Red-eyed Vireo     2
Tufted Titmouse     2
White-breasted Nuthatch  
Carolina Wren  
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  
American Robin     8
Eastern Towhee  
Chipping Sparrow  
Northern Cardinal     2
Brown-headed Cowbird     2
American Goldfinch  

——Yard Parking Lot
Mourning Dove     2
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Northern Cardinal     2
Tufted Titmouse      2
Carolina Wren
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
American Robin     2
House Sparrow     7

——Fence Line
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Acadian Flycatcher
Tufted Titmouse
Red-eyed Vireo     2
Carolina Wren     2
Swainson’s Thrush     2
Wood Thrush
American Robin     2
Carolina Chicakdee

——Maintenance Yard
American Redstart  
Magnolia Warbler  
Blackpoll Warbler       heard 
Canada Warbler  
Mourning Dove  
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  
Red-bellied Woodpecker     3
Northern Flicker  
Eastern Wood-Pewee     2
Acadian Flycatcher     2
Great Crested Flycatcher  
Red-eyed Vireo     3
Blue Jay  
Fish Crow  
Carolina Chickadee     3
Tufted Titmouse     3
White-breasted Nuthatch      2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher     4
Veery  
Gray-cheeked Thrush  
Swainson's Thrush     2
Wood Thrush  
Cedar Waxwing     3
Scarlet Tanager     3
Northern Cardinal  
Common Grackle  
Brown-headed Cowbird     2
American Goldfinch     6

——Long Path
Acadian Flycatcher      heard
Wood Thrush       heard
Swainson’s Thrush      heard

——Stables
Blackpoll Warbler

——Nature Center
Mourning Dove  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Acadian Flycatcher  1
Red-eyed Vireo  3
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Carolina Wren  1
Swainson's Thrush  2
Northern Cardinal  2
House Sparrow  2

——Dog Run   (Greg)
Great Blue Heron      flyby
Mourning Dove  
Eastern Kingbird  
Tufted Titmouse  
Song Sparrow  
Blue Grosbeak     FOY
Indigo Bunting  

Contributors: Bill Butler, Greg Gough, Randy Weaver, Matt Sileo, Tucker Scully, 
Lee Kimball, Paul DeAnna, Frank Hawkins, Hanan Jacoby, John Boright 


Have Fun Birding!

Wallace Kornack
Washington  DC









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Subject: Glossy Ibis over Glen Burnie
From: Fred Shaffer <glaucousgull AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 18:42:05 +0000 (UTC)
 I was along North Langley Road in Glenn Burnie around noon today when I saw 
flock of really high birds circling overhead.  Fortunately, I had my gear in 
my car and when I got my bins on the flock, I realized that they were 10 
soaring Glossy Ibis.  I was able to get a few distant photos that confirmed 
the ID.  Attached are two; one of the whole flock and another of one bird that 
indicates the shape of the bill.  The birds soared overhead for a minute or 
two before disappearing from view.  North Langley Road is an industrial area, 
not to be confused with a birding destination.  You are unlikely to see many 
birds unless they fly overhead.  However, due to the proximity to Furnace 
Branch and other larger bodies of water, this seems to happen from time to 
time.  I suppose, as the ibis flies, Glen Burnie isn't too far from Swan 
Creek, North Point, and a few other good locations.  Good birding! 

Fred ShafferGlaucousGull AT verizon.netCrofton, Anne Arundel

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