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Updated on Thursday, March 5 at 01:42 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Garganey

5 Mar Northern Parula singing at the Barataria Preserve 4 March [David Fox ]
4 Mar Re: South Farm Geese [Jay V Huner ]
4 Mar South Farm Geese [Alex Haun ]
4 Mar Re: New Iberia, LA, Mar 4, 2015, Indigo Bunting [Denese Vlosky ]
4 Mar New Iberia, LA, Mar 4, 2015, Indigo Bunting [Michael Musumeche ]
3 Mar Some Thoughts About Lake Martin and Guides [Jay V Huner ]
2 Mar Male Ruby-throateds on the way ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
2 Mar Re: Lake Martin tour guides [John Romano ]
2 Mar Red Slough - Oklahoma - Birding Convention Announcement - May 9-12, 2015 [Jay V Huner ]
2 Mar Re: Lake Martin tour guides [Don Simons ]
2 Mar Swallow-tailed and scissor-tailed birds [Jennifer Coulson ]
2 Mar Re: Lake Martin tour guides [Judson Lassiter ]
2 Mar Northern Flicker [William Bergen ]
2 Mar Announcing new shorebird festival coming up 29 April-3 May 2015 ["Steven W. Cardiff" ]
2 Mar Re: Lake Martin tour guides [Jay V Huner ]
2 Mar Re: Lake Martin tour guides [John ]
2 Mar Re: Lake Martin tour guides [Jay V Huner ]
2 Mar Lake Martin tour guides [Judson Lassiter ]
1 Mar Ringed Kingfisher [Gary ]
1 Mar Swallow-tailed Kite [Elias ]
1 Mar Re: ringed kingfisher [John Romano ]
1 Mar Birding Trip to Bayou Sauvage NWR on Sat., Mar. 7th [Jennifer Coulson ]
1 Mar Re: ringed kingfisher [Jody Shugart ]
1 Mar Re: ringed kingfisher [John Romano ]
1 Mar ringed kingfisher [Cathy DiSalvo ]
1 Mar Re: Lacassine NWR, two Eurasian Wigeon ["Jon W. Wise" ]
1 Mar Re: Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz: Opening Day [Jay V Huner ]
28 Feb Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz: Opening Day [Sinéad Borchert ]
28 Feb Re: Audubon Park BBWDs [Bill Fontenot ]
28 Feb Audubon Park BBWDs [dan purrington ]
28 Feb Lacassine NWR, two Eurasian Wigeon [Michael Musumeche ]
27 Feb Peveto Woods Sanctuary yesterday, 2/26/15 [Dave Patton ]
26 Feb Mouton Cove and vicinity, Feb 26, 2015 [Michael Musumeche ]
26 Feb Folsom backyard this morning [janine robin ]
25 Feb Martins [Jay Huner ]
24 Feb Re: LABIRD-L Digest - 22 Feb 2015 to 23 Feb 2015 (#2015-54) [rex davey ]
23 Feb Re: An eBird Question [James V Remsen ]
23 Feb An eBird Question ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
23 Feb Reminder: BRAS presentation, Thur Feb. 26, 2015, 7PM, BBS *Education Center* ["crystal.johnson.lsu AT gmail.com" ]
23 Feb Re: Calliope hummingbird in BR - e-bird [Jay V Huner ]
23 Feb Calliope hummingbird in BR [Winston and Linda Caillouet ]
23 Feb Pine Siskin in Marrero ["James W. Beck" ]
23 Feb Re: Feeding frenzy [Jean Landry ]
23 Feb Re: early bird mocking [Christine ]
23 Feb Re: early bird mocking ["James W. Beck" ]
23 Feb early bird mocking [bill finney ]
23 Feb Forgive me, but this was an awesome yard bird [John Dillon ]
22 Feb Re: A 4-finch cold front. [Jay V Huner ]
22 Feb Re: A 4-finch cold front. [janine robin ]
22 Feb Re: A 4-finch cold front. ["Jeffrey W. Harris" ]
22 Feb Re: A 4-finch cold front. [Philip Bradley ]
22 Feb A 4-finch cold front. [John Dillon ]
21 Feb FOS Purple Martin NW Rapides Parish [Jay V Huner ]
21 Feb Purple Finches - Jean Lafitte NHPP ["James W. Beck" ]
21 Feb Fwd: eBird Report - Claire D. Thomas, Tall Timbers Sub, Mandeville, Feb 21, 2015 [Claire Thomas ]
21 Feb Fwd: eBird Report - Lake Martin (Lake la Pointe)-Cypress Island Preserve, Feb 21, 2015 [John Romano ]
21 Feb Re: Old time name for a bird [Tom Hickcox ]
21 Feb Re: Feeding frenzy [Denese Vlosky ]
21 Feb Old time name for a bird ["Ingold, James" ]
21 Feb Re: Feeding frenzy [Jay V Huner ]
21 Feb ys flickers [cecil tarver ]
21 Feb Feeding frenzy [janine robin ]
21 Feb Re: Birding Trip to Diamond on Tues., Feb 21 [Ed Wallace ]
21 Feb Re: Rail Response to Playback [John Romano ]
20 Feb Re: Rail Response to Playback [John Dillon ]
20 Feb Re: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker [William Bergen ]
20 Feb Re: Ringed Kingfisher 2-18 [Matthew Pontiff ]
20 Feb Re: Ringed Kingfisher 2-18 [Christine ]
19 Feb Barataria Preserve "Winter" Bird Count this Saturday--still asking for help [David Fox ]
19 Feb Ringed Kingfisher 2-18 [Matthew Pontiff ]
19 Feb Re: Rail Response to Playback [Terry Davis ]
20 Feb Re: Rail Response to Playback [Peter H Yaukey ]
19 Feb Mountain bluebird continues [janine robin ]
19 Feb Re: Rail Response to Playback [Terry Davis ]
19 Feb Re: Rail Response to Playback [John Romano ]
19 Feb Re: Rail Response to Playback ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]

Subject: Northern Parula singing at the Barataria Preserve 4 March
From: David Fox <thedavefox AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 00:11:46 -0600
I heard my first NOPA at the Barataria Preserve on Wednesday morning.
Also, got an Eastern Screech Owl calling at the very end of Barataria Blvd.
Wednesday night. Other firsts include first roadkill mud snake and an
unknown species of turtle.
Subject: Re: South Farm Geese
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 17:21:29 -0600
Alex and Friends,

Back in 2005, Mike Musumeche and I were evaluating the birding potential of 
Sweetlake Land Co.'s lands across Cameron and Calcasieu parishes. Doug Moore, 
Sweetlake's Land Manager, was taking us east of the Sweetlake offices off LA 
14/Chalkey (spelling?) Road in January or February. We found a very large flock 
of Snow Geese in a shallow flooded rice field. The birds flushed and we noted a 
slow flying goose that could not keep up with the flock. It was followed 
closely by two Bald Eagles - an adult and a juvenile. The goose landed in a 
nearby flooded rice field. The two eagles landed with one on one side of the 
goose and the other on the other side. I figured one eagle would keep the goose 
occupied while the other one finished it off. Well, big surprise, the goose, 
either sick or a hunting season cripple ran the two eagles off as we watched! 


Jay Huner

And, by the way, Sweetlake now has a wildlife biologist on staff who leads 
birding tours on the company's properties. 


----- Original Message -----
From: "Alex Haun" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 4:18:36 PM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] South Farm Geese

I am currently looking over a field along a levee a couple miles north of South 
Farm, viewing thousands of Snow Geese. I'll try to go through them to find 
something special...also noteworthy is a lone adult Bald Eagle. 


-Alex Haun
Subject: South Farm Geese
From: Alex Haun <ajhaun.haun46 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 16:18:36 -0600
I am currently looking over a field along a levee a couple miles north of South 
Farm, viewing thousands of Snow Geese. I'll try to go through them to find 
something special...also noteworthy is a lone adult Bald Eagle. 


-Alex Haun
Subject: Re: New Iberia, LA, Mar 4, 2015, Indigo Bunting
From: Denese Vlosky <Denese.Vlosky AT PBRC.EDU>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 07:35:25 -0600
I'm a newbie and very much appreciate the pictures, as I'm learning.

What a gorgeous bird!

-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Michael Musumeche 

Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 7:28 AM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [LABIRD-L] New Iberia, LA, Mar 4, 2015, Indigo Bunting

This Indigo Bunting is most likely a very early migrant.


New Iberia, LA, Iberia, US-LA
Mar 4, 2015 7:00 AM - 7:07 AM
Protocol: Stationary
1 species

Indigo Bunting  1     Bunting mottled brown and blue, photos
www.flickr.com/photos/117923878 AT N03/16712818611 

www.flickr.com/photos/117923878 AT N03/16688182216 

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22168645

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



_______________________________________________________________
^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ Mike 
Musumeche New Iberia, LA 70560 mjmusumeche AT cox.net 

Subject: New Iberia, LA, Mar 4, 2015, Indigo Bunting
From: Michael Musumeche <mjmusumeche AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 07:28:09 -0600
This Indigo Bunting is most likely a very early migrant.


New Iberia, LA, Iberia, US-LA
Mar 4, 2015 7:00 AM - 7:07 AM
Protocol: Stationary
1 species

Indigo Bunting  1     Bunting mottled brown and blue, photos
www.flickr.com/photos/117923878 AT N03/16712818611 

www.flickr.com/photos/117923878 AT N03/16688182216 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22168645

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



_______________________________________________________________
^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^
Mike Musumeche
New Iberia, LA 70560
mjmusumeche AT cox.net 
Subject: Some Thoughts About Lake Martin and Guides
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 07:22:01 -0600
The first time I ever saw Lake Martin, I hunted for it from St. Martinville to 
Breaux Bridge along Bayou Teche because I didn't know where it was. That was 
around 1990 and I was looking for a place to fish, not bird. But, I was very 
impressed with a beautiful swamp impoundment that was imminently accessible to 
anyone who wanted to get out in nature. And, as those who visit Lake Martin 
regularly, it can be a bit like a parade out there especially in the spring, 
much to the consternation of birders and local residents. 


It would be great if the guides at Lake Martin all had a minimal level of 
training. But, most of the people who go to Lake Martin have low levels of 
environmental training and probably never recall much of what tall tale guides 
tell them. To me, it's important that people get out to Lake Martin and it be 
perpetuated, as best possible, in a multi-use wild area. 


I basically learned songbirds at Lake Martin using the site as a "control" area 
for comparison with the avifauna of the working wetlands in the immediate area 
and region in general. I met Danny Dobbs and learned quite a bit from him. In 
case readers of this missive are interested, we jointly published, with Judith 
O'Neale, the first Lake Martin bird list in the LOS Newsletter. And, the list 
has just grown since then. 


I've been pleased to see TNC's stewardship of its Cypress Island Preserve 
properties. Some might be interested to learn that around the time TNC acquired 
its first properties there, there was a major push by some to turn Lake Martin 
into a Disney Land theme park! Fortunately, that hasn't happened. 


The rookery has changed through time and those changes have been most 
interesting. One would be remiss to not mention Sandra Thompson's efforts while 
Director of the State's Atchafalaya Basin Program to keep Lake Martin as wet 
and wild as possible. She provided the funds that resulted in the construction 
of the water control structure located near the TNC offices. 


Jay Huner
Subject: Male Ruby-throateds on the way
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 22:23:55 -0600
LABIRDers,

I'm still busy chasing winterers, but that puts me at the right place 
and the right time to see new incoming migrant Ruby-throateds.  Saw my 
first of the season at one of the best hummer spots in the New Orleans 
area on 22 February.  Saw another today at a place in Metairie.

Occasionally, I see a bright, shiny fresh adult male before about 10 
March [average arrival date], but I don't recall ever having seen 2 
before that time.  Of course, this was not at my own home.  Soon, I am sure.

Nan

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com
Subject: Re: Lake Martin tour guides
From: John Romano <birderjuan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 21:12:00 -0600
John -  Cajun Country Swamp Tours is Butch Guchereau and his son Shawn.
Butch is the guy who took out the Lafayette Bird Club and I said good
things about him.  I believe that his son Shawn is into birds and is a
decent birder.  I am guessing that you went with Shawn.

John Romano
Breaux Bridge



On Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 7:53 AM, John  wrote:

> In an opposing view, I took a tour a few weeks ago with Cajun Country
> Swamp Tours and the guide nailed every species - including swamp sparrow,
> eastern phoebe, belted kingfisher, red-shouldered hawk, snowy egret vs.
> great egret, anhinga vs. cormorant, etc.
>
> Are they "birding tours"?  No, but they are a great way to get folks who
> normally wouldn't go outside to appreciate the natural places we like so
> much.
>
> -John
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Mar 2, 2015, at 7:04 AM, Jay V Huner  wrote:
> >
> > Friends,
> >
> > Once upon a time, the Sea Grant Program was involved in the development
> of a professional guide training program. My memory is faulty but the aim
> was to somehow certify hunting and fishing guides. Well, why not tour
> guides as well? Don't know what happened to the effort. My guess is that
> the guides at Lake Martin have to have a Coast Guard license of some sorts
> to take people out on a boat legally.
> >
> > Jay Huner
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Judson Lassiter" 
> > To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
> > Sent: Monday, March 2, 2015 5:49:00 AM
> > Subject: [LABIRD-L] Lake Martin tour guides
> >
> > I took the Lake Martin/Cypress Swamp tour last year and the guide
> > identified a Common Moorhen as an American Coot. You definitely have to
> > verify what they tell people.
> >
> >
> > --
> > *Jack Lassiter*
>
Subject: Red Slough - Oklahoma - Birding Convention Announcement - May 9-12, 2015
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 20:12:52 -0600
I am happy to announce the 7th annual Red Slough Birding Convention to be
held in Idabel, McCurtain County, Oklahoma on May 9-12, 2015.  This year our
keynote speaker will be Dr. Jay Huner who is a bird and agricultural
wetlands researcher and active birder from southern Louisiana.   Our other
speaker will be Dr. Jeff Kelly, director of the Oklahoma Biological Survey.
The convention's daily tours include morning birding trips to the Red Slough
WMA, Little River NWR, and the McCurtain County Wilderness Area.  There are
afternoon tours to see dragonflies and butterflies, prairie wildflowers, and
state champion trees.  Our expert guides will show you rare birds to
Oklahoma such as Purple Gallinules, King Rails, Swainson's Warblers, and
Red-cockaded Woodpeckers.  We usually average around 150 species of birds
seen during the convention.  For more information visit our website at :

  http://www.redsloughconvention.com/
.  

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR
Subject: Re: Lake Martin tour guides
From: Don Simons <drsimons56 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 19:43:22 -0800
There is a well established certification for tour guides from the National 
Association for Interpretation. www.interpnet.com. 


Sent from my iPod

On Mar 2, 2015, at 6:00 AM, Jay V Huner  wrote:

> Well,
> 
> Some fishing guides and hunting guides are a lot better than others. A 
certification for a nature guide would mean that he/she would be able to 
identify a core of species. I do know that some fishing guides along the coast 
do take birders out for the purpose of birding. 

> 
> I'd say certification ought to be voluntary and customers would have the 
choice of going with someone who could provide good information versus a 
"colorful" person who sees lots of cranes. 

> 
> Jay H. 
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "John" 
> To: "Jay V Huner" 
> Cc: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> Sent: Monday, March 2, 2015 7:53:22 AM
> Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Lake Martin tour guides
> 
> In an opposing view, I took a tour a few weeks ago with Cajun Country Swamp 
Tours and the guide nailed every species - including swamp sparrow, eastern 
phoebe, belted kingfisher, red-shouldered hawk, snowy egret vs. great egret, 
anhinga vs. cormorant, etc. 

> 
> Are they "birding tours"? No, but they are a great way to get folks who 
normally wouldn't go outside to appreciate the natural places we like so much. 

> 
> -John
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> On Mar 2, 2015, at 7:04 AM, Jay V Huner  wrote:
>> 
>> Friends,
>> 
>> Once upon a time, the Sea Grant Program was involved in the development of a 
professional guide training program. My memory is faulty but the aim was to 
somehow certify hunting and fishing guides. Well, why not tour guides as well? 
Don't know what happened to the effort. My guess is that the guides at Lake 
Martin have to have a Coast Guard license of some sorts to take people out on a 
boat legally. 

>> 
>> Jay Huner
>> 
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "Judson Lassiter" 
>> To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
>> Sent: Monday, March 2, 2015 5:49:00 AM
>> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Lake Martin tour guides
>> 
>> I took the Lake Martin/Cypress Swamp tour last year and the guide
>> identified a Common Moorhen as an American Coot. You definitely have to
>> verify what they tell people.
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> *Jack Lassiter*
Subject: Swallow-tailed and scissor-tailed birds
From: Jennifer Coulson <jenniferocoulson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 19:24:10 -0600
On March 1st in Braithwaite, Tom and I observed 5 Scissor-tailed
Flycatchers. The birds were in one flock on private property that we did
not have access to. There was another flycatcher or kingbird with them that
had a light yellow abdomen. I was not able to get a good look at this bird
because it was farther away. The flock was in a field near the subdivision.

And now for the Swallow-tailed Kites... A friend who lives on the Abita
River in Covington called today (March 2nd) to report that he saw a group
of 10 to 15 and another group of 6 to 8 Swallow-tailed Kites fly over his
house, heading east.

Jennifer Coulson
Subject: Re: Lake Martin tour guides
From: Judson Lassiter <jalpro57 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 15:05:55 -0600
My original message sounded a little more negative than I intended. Birding
issues aside, I would recommend the Cypress Swamp tour to anyone, I enjoyed
it immensely. I timed it so that the rookery was in full swing, also.

Jack

On Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 8:00 AM, Jay V Huner  wrote:

> Well,
>
> Some fishing guides and hunting guides are a lot better than others. A
> certification for a nature guide would mean that he/she would be able to
> identify a core of species. I do know that some fishing guides along the
> coast do take birders out for the purpose of birding.
>
> I'd say certification ought to be voluntary and customers would have the
> choice of going with someone who could provide good information versus a
> "colorful" person who sees lots of cranes.
>
> Jay H.
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "John" 
> To: "Jay V Huner" 
> Cc: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> Sent: Monday, March 2, 2015 7:53:22 AM
> Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Lake Martin tour guides
>
> In an opposing view, I took a tour a few weeks ago with Cajun Country
> Swamp Tours and the guide nailed every species - including swamp sparrow,
> eastern phoebe, belted kingfisher, red-shouldered hawk, snowy egret vs.
> great egret, anhinga vs. cormorant, etc.
>
> Are they "birding tours"?  No, but they are a great way to get folks who
> normally wouldn't go outside to appreciate the natural places we like so
> much.
>
> -John
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Mar 2, 2015, at 7:04 AM, Jay V Huner  wrote:
> >
> > Friends,
> >
> > Once upon a time, the Sea Grant Program was involved in the development
> of a professional guide training program. My memory is faulty but the aim
> was to somehow certify hunting and fishing guides. Well, why not tour
> guides as well? Don't know what happened to the effort. My guess is that
> the guides at Lake Martin have to have a Coast Guard license of some sorts
> to take people out on a boat legally.
> >
> > Jay Huner
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Judson Lassiter" 
> > To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
> > Sent: Monday, March 2, 2015 5:49:00 AM
> > Subject: [LABIRD-L] Lake Martin tour guides
> >
> > I took the Lake Martin/Cypress Swamp tour last year and the guide
> > identified a Common Moorhen as an American Coot. You definitely have to
> > verify what they tell people.
> >
> >
> > --
> > *Jack Lassiter*
>



-- 
*Jack Lassiter*
Subject: Northern Flicker
From: William Bergen <wpbergen AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 14:45:32 -0600
Hi All,

Here’s the link to a Northern Flicker shot I managed to get years ago at 
Diamondhead Mississippi, this shot was taken using slide film. 


http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/731403651/photos/3153771/northern-flicker

Hope you enjoy.
Subject: Announcing new shorebird festival coming up 29 April-3 May 2015
From: "Steven W. Cardiff" <scardif AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:31:14 -0600
Dear Labirders-



I wanted to alert everyone that this spring we are launching a new
event: *Waders
in Working Wetlands: Shorebird Extravaganza*.  Like Yellow Rails and Rice
Festival, this festival also focuses on the abundance and diversity of
birds in our working wetlands (rice and crawfish) of southwestern Louisiana
and will also be based in Jennings.  As the name suggests, we will
primarily celebrate shorebirds. It’s a great time of the year to visit this
area to look for shorebirds – there are lots of them and most are in fancy
breeding plumage.  We will have trips to see shorebirds, a few talks one
afternoon to address shorebirds in the working wetland landscape, and a
workshop to hone your shorebird identification skills.  Our socials include
a Meet and Greet at Mike’s Seafood in Jennings, an evening of entertainment
at the quaint Strand Theatre in Jennings with R. Bruce Richardson, and a
crawfish boil in traditional Louisiana style at Tallgrass Farms in nearby
Roanoke. Like Yellow Rails and Rice Festival, the atmosphere will be fun,
casual, and laid back.  Spring is a wonderful time to visit Louisiana to
look for birds. The Shorebird Extravaganza will compliment the Yellow Rails
and Rice Festival by providing the opportunity to see many additional
species not present during a late fall visit – many birds will be singing
and in prime breeding plumage. Like Yellow Rails and Rice Festival, we will
have guided field trips to explore other habitats, such as longleaf pine
forest, swamp and bottomland hardwoods, freshwater and saltwater marsh,
and, of course, beaches along the Gulf Coast.  So, you will have the chance
to encounter a large cross section of the specialty breeding and migrant
birds of the southeastern US during your visit to the Extravaganza.
*Registration
is NOW OPEN.*  Please join us this year to kick off this new event, and
please help spread the word.  Email Donna L. Dittmann *directly* at
yellowrailsandrice AT gmail.com to be added to our festival email list -
please do not reply off this email…emails get lost that way!

More information is at the website:


http://www.snowyegretenterprises.com/Snowy_Egret_Enterprises/Shorebird_Extravaganza.html 




Hoping to see you there!


Steve Cardiff
Subject: Re: Lake Martin tour guides
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 08:00:10 -0600
Well,

Some fishing guides and hunting guides are a lot better than others. A 
certification for a nature guide would mean that he/she would be able to 
identify a core of species. I do know that some fishing guides along the coast 
do take birders out for the purpose of birding. 


I'd say certification ought to be voluntary and customers would have the choice 
of going with someone who could provide good information versus a "colorful" 
person who sees lots of cranes. 


Jay H. 

----- Original Message -----
From: "John" 
To: "Jay V Huner" 
Cc: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Sent: Monday, March 2, 2015 7:53:22 AM
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Lake Martin tour guides

In an opposing view, I took a tour a few weeks ago with Cajun Country Swamp 
Tours and the guide nailed every species - including swamp sparrow, eastern 
phoebe, belted kingfisher, red-shouldered hawk, snowy egret vs. great egret, 
anhinga vs. cormorant, etc. 


Are they "birding tours"? No, but they are a great way to get folks who 
normally wouldn't go outside to appreciate the natural places we like so much. 


-John







> On Mar 2, 2015, at 7:04 AM, Jay V Huner  wrote:
> 
> Friends,
> 
> Once upon a time, the Sea Grant Program was involved in the development of a 
professional guide training program. My memory is faulty but the aim was to 
somehow certify hunting and fishing guides. Well, why not tour guides as well? 
Don't know what happened to the effort. My guess is that the guides at Lake 
Martin have to have a Coast Guard license of some sorts to take people out on a 
boat legally. 

> 
> Jay Huner
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Judson Lassiter" 
> To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
> Sent: Monday, March 2, 2015 5:49:00 AM
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Lake Martin tour guides
> 
> I took the Lake Martin/Cypress Swamp tour last year and the guide
> identified a Common Moorhen as an American Coot. You definitely have to
> verify what they tell people.
> 
> 
> -- 
> *Jack Lassiter*
Subject: Re: Lake Martin tour guides
From: John <jtirpak AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 07:53:22 -0600
In an opposing view, I took a tour a few weeks ago with Cajun Country Swamp 
Tours and the guide nailed every species - including swamp sparrow, eastern 
phoebe, belted kingfisher, red-shouldered hawk, snowy egret vs. great egret, 
anhinga vs. cormorant, etc. 


Are they "birding tours"? No, but they are a great way to get folks who 
normally wouldn't go outside to appreciate the natural places we like so much. 


-John







> On Mar 2, 2015, at 7:04 AM, Jay V Huner  wrote:
> 
> Friends,
> 
> Once upon a time, the Sea Grant Program was involved in the development of a 
professional guide training program. My memory is faulty but the aim was to 
somehow certify hunting and fishing guides. Well, why not tour guides as well? 
Don't know what happened to the effort. My guess is that the guides at Lake 
Martin have to have a Coast Guard license of some sorts to take people out on a 
boat legally. 

> 
> Jay Huner
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Judson Lassiter" 
> To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
> Sent: Monday, March 2, 2015 5:49:00 AM
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Lake Martin tour guides
> 
> I took the Lake Martin/Cypress Swamp tour last year and the guide
> identified a Common Moorhen as an American Coot. You definitely have to
> verify what they tell people.
> 
> 
> -- 
> *Jack Lassiter*
Subject: Re: Lake Martin tour guides
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 07:04:04 -0600
Friends,

Once upon a time, the Sea Grant Program was involved in the development of a 
professional guide training program. My memory is faulty but the aim was to 
somehow certify hunting and fishing guides. Well, why not tour guides as well? 
Don't know what happened to the effort. My guess is that the guides at Lake 
Martin have to have a Coast Guard license of some sorts to take people out on a 
boat legally. 


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Judson Lassiter" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Monday, March 2, 2015 5:49:00 AM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Lake Martin tour guides

I took the Lake Martin/Cypress Swamp tour last year and the guide
identified a Common Moorhen as an American Coot. You definitely have to
verify what they tell people.


-- 
*Jack Lassiter*
Subject: Lake Martin tour guides
From: Judson Lassiter <jalpro57 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 05:49:00 -0600
I took the Lake Martin/Cypress Swamp tour last year and the guide
identified a Common Moorhen as an American Coot. You definitely have to
verify what they tell people.


-- 
*Jack Lassiter*
Subject: Ringed Kingfisher
From: Gary <verga13 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 23:55:38 -0500
Photos of the Ringed Kingfisher  AT  Lake Martin. One from Feb. 15th, one from 
November 2nd. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/imagehunter1/16533095386/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/imagehunter1/16393644159/

Both taken from a kayak.  I haven't seen her since 

Gary
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite
From: Elias <ejlandry AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 19:04:36 -0600
Saw a FOS Swallow-tailed Kite this afternoon about a half mile from the 
Delcambre bridge on Hwy 14 heading east. Don't see very many, so, this was a 
treat. 

Elias LandryAvery Island, Louisiana 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: ringed kingfisher
From: John Romano <birderjuan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 19:03:40 -0600
Of course I could be wrong ( the ever present caveat ) but I think calling
a great blue heron a kingfisher would be a really tough sell to even a
boatload of tourists, cause I think that most folks who would get in such a
boat to see the nature here would know what a heron is,  and be very
skeptical and in bewilderment at what they heard.

I do think there are some good guides out there.   Butch Guchereau gave the
Lafayette Bird Club an outing a couple of years ago and seemed pretty good
with the big birds and the eco-system. He knew the Carolina Wren
vocalization and asked about a call , that we told him was a White-eyed
Vireo, so he is still learning.  I talk to him on occasion and pay
attention to his observations.

But this other guide, oh my.

John Romano
Breaux Bridge




On Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 6:14 PM, Jody Shugart  wrote:

> One of the swamp tour workers was calling a Great Blue Heron the Ringed
> Kingfisher.
>
> -Jody
>
> On Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 5:05 PM, John Romano  wrote:
>
>> HI All -  I think maybe I got some erroneous info today on the Ringed
>> Kingfisher.  I was walking with a couple of folks on the north trail today
>> ( Sunday Mar 1 ) around midday when a tour guide boat full of passengers
>> pulled up and asked if we were looking for the Ringed Kingfisher.  I said
>> "sure, why not? " and he said he just saw it on the west side of the lake,
>>  up the trail from the visitor center and just past the rookery.  And then
>> he said there were 2 of them.  That makes me suspicious that the guide
>> either does not know the difference between belted and ringed and/or was
>> trying to impress his passengers.
>>
>> I plan to check out the area monday morning and see what I run into.
>> Regardless there is a boatload of tourists running around saying they saw
>> a
>> pair of Ringed Kingfishers today at Lake Martin.
>>
>> John Romano
>> Breaux Bridge
>>
>> On Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 10:48 AM, Cathy DiSalvo 
>> wrote:
>>
>> > LA birders
>> > Phil and I along with Lizette Wroten and Joan Garvey spent 5 hours at
>> Lake
>> > Martin yesterday.  We covered the north end of the lake, the rookery
>> area,
>> > and even walked the 2 mile trail on the west side......sorry no ringed
>> > kingfisher.  Actually not very birdy at all, but it was Sunday and a
>> > beautiful day and the boaters, photographers, and swamp tours were
>> > out......There was an third year bald eagle over the lake most of the
>> day.
>> > I wanted to give all the 'boaters' a "Have you seen this person of
>> > interest" with my cell....it is a big lake with lots of trees.  We spoke
>> > with a local who said a friend has a picture of the ringed kingfisher,
>> he
>> > took there in October.
>> >
>> > Cathy DiSalvo
>> > NOLA
>> >
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Jody Shugart
> 985-237-5091 (cell)
>
Subject: Birding Trip to Bayou Sauvage NWR on Sat., Mar. 7th
From: Jennifer Coulson <jenniferocoulson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 18:22:41 -0600
*Birding Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge*

Date: Saturday, March 7

Time: 7:30 a.m. (half-day trip)

Meet at the Bayou Ridge Trail entrance located on the left side of U.S. 90
(Chef Menteur Highway). Take the I-510 Exit off of I-10, turn left on Chef
Hwy and proceed about 4 miles.

Leader: Phillip Wallace (504) 628-0146

This birding trip is co-hosted by the Orleans Audubon Society and Crescent
Bird Club. All are welcome.
Subject: Re: ringed kingfisher
From: Jody Shugart <jodyshugart AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 18:14:00 -0600
One of the swamp tour workers was calling a Great Blue Heron the Ringed
Kingfisher.

-Jody

On Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 5:05 PM, John Romano  wrote:

> HI All -  I think maybe I got some erroneous info today on the Ringed
> Kingfisher.  I was walking with a couple of folks on the north trail today
> ( Sunday Mar 1 ) around midday when a tour guide boat full of passengers
> pulled up and asked if we were looking for the Ringed Kingfisher.  I said
> "sure, why not? " and he said he just saw it on the west side of the lake,
>  up the trail from the visitor center and just past the rookery.  And then
> he said there were 2 of them.  That makes me suspicious that the guide
> either does not know the difference between belted and ringed and/or was
> trying to impress his passengers.
>
> I plan to check out the area monday morning and see what I run into.
> Regardless there is a boatload of tourists running around saying they saw a
> pair of Ringed Kingfishers today at Lake Martin.
>
> John Romano
> Breaux Bridge
>
> On Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 10:48 AM, Cathy DiSalvo 
> wrote:
>
> > LA birders
> > Phil and I along with Lizette Wroten and Joan Garvey spent 5 hours at
> Lake
> > Martin yesterday.  We covered the north end of the lake, the rookery
> area,
> > and even walked the 2 mile trail on the west side......sorry no ringed
> > kingfisher.  Actually not very birdy at all, but it was Sunday and a
> > beautiful day and the boaters, photographers, and swamp tours were
> > out......There was an third year bald eagle over the lake most of the
> day.
> > I wanted to give all the 'boaters' a "Have you seen this person of
> > interest" with my cell....it is a big lake with lots of trees.  We spoke
> > with a local who said a friend has a picture of the ringed kingfisher, he
> > took there in October.
> >
> > Cathy DiSalvo
> > NOLA
> >
>



-- 
Jody Shugart
985-237-5091 (cell)
Subject: Re: ringed kingfisher
From: John Romano <birderjuan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 17:05:09 -0600
HI All -  I think maybe I got some erroneous info today on the Ringed
Kingfisher.  I was walking with a couple of folks on the north trail today
( Sunday Mar 1 ) around midday when a tour guide boat full of passengers
pulled up and asked if we were looking for the Ringed Kingfisher.  I said
"sure, why not? " and he said he just saw it on the west side of the lake,
 up the trail from the visitor center and just past the rookery.  And then
he said there were 2 of them.  That makes me suspicious that the guide
either does not know the difference between belted and ringed and/or was
trying to impress his passengers.

I plan to check out the area monday morning and see what I run into.
Regardless there is a boatload of tourists running around saying they saw a
pair of Ringed Kingfishers today at Lake Martin.

John Romano
Breaux Bridge

On Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 10:48 AM, Cathy DiSalvo  wrote:

> LA birders
> Phil and I along with Lizette Wroten and Joan Garvey spent 5 hours at Lake
> Martin yesterday.  We covered the north end of the lake, the rookery area,
> and even walked the 2 mile trail on the west side......sorry no ringed
> kingfisher.  Actually not very birdy at all, but it was Sunday and a
> beautiful day and the boaters, photographers, and swamp tours were
> out......There was an third year bald eagle over the lake most of the day.
> I wanted to give all the 'boaters' a "Have you seen this person of
> interest" with my cell....it is a big lake with lots of trees.  We spoke
> with a local who said a friend has a picture of the ringed kingfisher, he
> took there in October.
>
> Cathy DiSalvo
> NOLA
>
Subject: ringed kingfisher
From: Cathy DiSalvo <cedisalvo1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 10:48:53 -0600
LA birders
Phil and I along with Lizette Wroten and Joan Garvey spent 5 hours at Lake
Martin yesterday.  We covered the north end of the lake, the rookery area,
and even walked the 2 mile trail on the west side......sorry no ringed
kingfisher.  Actually not very birdy at all, but it was Sunday and a
beautiful day and the boaters, photographers, and swamp tours were
out......There was an third year bald eagle over the lake most of the day.
I wanted to give all the 'boaters' a "Have you seen this person of
interest" with my cell....it is a big lake with lots of trees.  We spoke
with a local who said a friend has a picture of the ringed kingfisher, he
took there in October.

Cathy DiSalvo
NOLA
Subject: Re: Lacassine NWR, two Eurasian Wigeon
From: "Jon W. Wise" <jwise AT FRFIRM.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 08:12:53 -0600
At least one male Eurasian Wigeon was still present yesterday at 4:30 P.M. He 
was visible from the road through a scope, feeding with a mixed group of ducks 
and geese. 


Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 28, 2015, at 6:40 AM, Michael Musumeche  wrote:
>
> LaBirders,
>
> Moss Bluff birders Deanna Griggs (djgriggs53 AT att.net), Jeanie Pousson and 
Kris Fontenot were at Lacassine NWR yesterday (27/Feb/2015). Deanna 
photographed two different male Eurasian Wigeons both associated with 
female-type wigeons. TheEurasian Wigeons were observed in the north pool (left 
side of road) about a quarter mile to a half mile before the right turn onto 
the Wildlife Drive (the loop). For more information, contact Deanna at the 
e-mail address next to her name. 

>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/117923878 AT N03/16051088423/in/photostream/ 1st 
male Eurasian Wigeon with attending female wigeon 

> https://www.flickr.com/photos/117923878 AT N03/16645084926/in/photostream/ 2nd 
male Eurasian Wigeon 

> https://www.flickr.com/photos/117923878 AT N03/16048716254/in/photostream/ 2nd 
male Eurasian Wigeon 

>
> Mike
>
> _______________________________________________________________
> ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^
> Mike Musumeche
> New Iberia, LA 70560
> mjmusumeche AT cox.net
>
>
>
>
>

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Subject: Re: Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz: Opening Day
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 07:42:21 -0600
Map was not available - Error 404. 

Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Sinéad Borchert" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 10:41:01 PM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz: Opening Day

LABIRDers,


Welcome to International Opening Day of the Rusty Blackbird Spring
Migration Blitz! The Blitz challenges birders to seek Rusty Blackbirds
throughout this species’ entire migratory range, from the southeastern U.S.
through the Northeast, Midwest, Canada, and Alaska. It’s easy to
participate- bird as you normally do and search especially carefully for
Rusty Blackbirds- then report your results to eBird under the “Rusty
Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz” survey type, even if you don’t find a
Rusty. Or, visit one of our Rusty Blackbird Areas of Interest (visit our
interactive map at
http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/2015-areas-of-interest/)
to help us assess consistency of migratory timing and habitat use during
spring migration.



To give you a sense of when Rusties are most likely to migrate through
different states, we’ve posted a list of suggested target dates for each
region: http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/states-and-dates/
. Louisiana's target period is the month of March. However, migratory
timing can vary annually based on weather and climate, so any Rusty reports
during the Blitz period of 1 March through 15 June will help our effort!



For more information on Blitz objectives, along with Rusty Blackbird
identification tips, data collection instructions, and data reporting
information, you can find additional resources at
http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/.



We hope you’ll “get Rusty” with us to help conserve this elusive and
vulnerable songbird! Also, follow us on Facebook to hear about Rusty
sightings, see Rusty pictures, and get the latest Blitz news:
https://www.facebook.com/rustyblackbirdspringblitz


Happy Rustying,


Sinead Borchert

Baton Rouge, LA

Rusty Blackbird Working Group
Subject: Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz: Opening Day
From: Sinéad Borchert <sineadborchert AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 22:41:01 -0600
LABIRDers,


Welcome to International Opening Day of the Rusty Blackbird Spring
Migration Blitz! The Blitz challenges birders to seek Rusty Blackbirds
throughout this species’ entire migratory range, from the southeastern U.S.
through the Northeast, Midwest, Canada, and Alaska. It’s easy to
participate- bird as you normally do and search especially carefully for
Rusty Blackbirds- then report your results to eBird under the “Rusty
Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz” survey type, even if you don’t find a
Rusty. Or, visit one of our Rusty Blackbird Areas of Interest (visit our
interactive map at
http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/2015-areas-of-interest/)
to help us assess consistency of migratory timing and habitat use during
spring migration.



To give you a sense of when Rusties are most likely to migrate through
different states, we’ve posted a list of suggested target dates for each
region: http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/states-and-dates/
. Louisiana's target period is the month of March. However, migratory
timing can vary annually based on weather and climate, so any Rusty reports
during the Blitz period of 1 March through 15 June will help our effort!



For more information on Blitz objectives, along with Rusty Blackbird
identification tips, data collection instructions, and data reporting
information, you can find additional resources at
http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/.



We hope you’ll “get Rusty” with us to help conserve this elusive and
vulnerable songbird! Also, follow us on Facebook to hear about Rusty
sightings, see Rusty pictures, and get the latest Blitz news:
https://www.facebook.com/rustyblackbirdspringblitz


Happy Rustying,


Sinead Borchert

Baton Rouge, LA

Rusty Blackbird Working Group
Subject: Re: Audubon Park BBWDs
From: Bill Fontenot <natrldlite AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 21:10:59 -0600
shouldn't dat have been a "quack" census?(?)...

bill fontenot
southern interior
louisiana

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 28, 2015, at 7:57 PM, dan purrington  wrote:

> I did a quick census of whistling-ducks in Audubon Pk (NOLA) yesterday.
> The result was a minimum of 5600, and I didn;t go much beyond Ochsner Is.
> So they haven't left yet.  In early Feb. (submitted to ebird but I can't
> get the date at the moment), I had 6500 +/-500.
> 
> Dan Purrington
> 
> p.s. no fulvous
Subject: Audubon Park BBWDs
From: dan purrington <oceanites1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 19:57:52 -0600
I did a quick census of whistling-ducks in Audubon Pk (NOLA) yesterday.
The result was a minimum of 5600, and I didn;t go much beyond Ochsner Is.
So they haven't left yet.  In early Feb. (submitted to ebird but I can't
get the date at the moment), I had 6500 +/-500.

Dan Purrington

p.s. no fulvous
Subject: Lacassine NWR, two Eurasian Wigeon
From: Michael Musumeche <mjmusumeche AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 06:40:23 -0600
LaBirders,

Moss Bluff birders Deanna Griggs (djgriggs53 AT att.net), Jeanie Pousson and Kris 
Fontenot were at Lacassine NWR yesterday (27/Feb/2015). Deanna photographed two 
different male Eurasian Wigeons both associated with female-type wigeons. 
TheEurasian Wigeons were observed in the north pool (left side of road) about a 
quarter mile to a half mile before the right turn onto the Wildlife Drive (the 
loop). For more information, contact Deanna at the e-mail address next to her 
name. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/117923878 AT N03/16051088423/in/photostream/ 1st 
male Eurasian Wigeon with attending female wigeon 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/117923878 AT N03/16645084926/in/photostream/ 2nd 
male Eurasian Wigeon 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/117923878 AT N03/16048716254/in/photostream/ 2nd 
male Eurasian Wigeon 


Mike

_______________________________________________________________ 
^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ 
Mike Musumeche
New Iberia, LA 70560
mjmusumeche AT cox.net

 



Subject: Peveto Woods Sanctuary yesterday, 2/26/15
From: Dave Patton <wdpatton AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 09:17:54 -0500
Labird,
I spent a while yesterday afternoon birding the sanctuary. Pretty much the 
regular species expected. Several Purple Martin hanging around. A White-tailed 
Kite was harassing a Red-tailed Hawk over the pasture to the east of the 
sanctuary. An Empid was whitting and actively feeding and preening. I suspect 
it is the same emid I have called a Least Flycatcher when seen in November and 
December. The seas were calm and a jaeger could be seen among the birds behind 
the only shrimp boat out from Holly Beach. 

List and a couple of empid photos at:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22088011 

Dave Patton
Lafayette
Subject: Mouton Cove and vicinity, Feb 26, 2015
From: Michael Musumeche <mjmusumeche AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 13:02:16 -0600
LaBirders,

This morning I birded a short while at the Mouton Cove area just west of 
Abbeville.  Most fields were in crawfish production; many were without water 
but muddy.  Best birds of the morning wire nine very early American 
Golden-Plovers. Photos were poor largely due to distance.


Mouton Cove and vicinity, Vermilion, US-LA
Feb 26, 2015 8:20 AM - 11:05 AM
Protocol: Traveling
15.0 mile(s)
49 species

View this checklist online at

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22080842

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)


_______________________________________________________________
^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^
Mike Musumeche
New Iberia, LA 70560
mjmusumeche AT cox.net
Subject: Folsom backyard this morning
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 07:50:12 -0600
Good morning,
Birds were accumulating in the trees, so we put on our coats and filled the
feeders, put more suet out and scattered seed on the ground. Saw a belted
kingfisher at the pond during this time and heard PIWO, PIWA, OCWA and RBWO.
I can only approximate the number of birds.... AMGO-175, PISI-80, CHSP-40
and PUFI-counted at least 12.
Awesome to watch!
Janine
Folsom, NW corner of St Tammany parish
Subject: Martins
From: Jay Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 17:34:56 -0600
I visited the Oakdale sewage plant yesterday around 1 pm - restricted access. 
Found no less than 85 martins. They seemed to be feeding. Hope there are enough 
midges to support them in this nasty weather. 


Jay Huner

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: LABIRD-L Digest - 22 Feb 2015 to 23 Feb 2015 (#2015-54)
From: rex davey <athena_9 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 06:12:07 -0800
I turned in 4 or 5 N. Flickers (probably the most I've ever seen at once, 
anywhere!) for my backyard bird tally for the BR CBC this yr, before the rain 
hit. (Probably some of the same flickers Nancy saw Saturday) They and a lone 
Woodcock have been bright spots in an otherwise head-scratchingly poor backyard 
bird winter season for our BR place. 



BTW, though goldfinches still have not hit the black oil sunflower seed or lard 
cake feeders like they usually do in cold months, I did see a small flock (5-8) 
goldfinches beginning to get yellow color, up in the neighbor's trashy tallow 
tree, picking on remaining tallow fruiting bodies. There were two birds with 
them that might have been male Purple Finches, but it's been so long since I 
saw one well, I can't swear they weren't House Finches, of which have made a 
bit of a comeback in this yard after disappearing for a few yrs. 


My resident Great-horned Owls have not been as dominant in the evening and 
nighttime soundscape as usual, either. 


This has been a long, strange winter.


MiriamLDavey
BatonRougeLA



On Tuesday, February 24, 2015 12:00 AM, LABIRD-L automatic digest system 
 wrote: 

 


There are 11 messages totaling 433 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Forgive me, but this was an awesome yard bird
  2. early bird mocking (3)
  3. Feeding frenzy
  4. Pine Siskin in Marrero
  5. Calliope hummingbird in BR
  6. Calliope hummingbird in BR - e-bird
  7. Reminder: BRAS presentation, Thur Feb. 26, 2015, 7PM, BBS *Education
     Center*
  8. An eBird Question (2)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 23 Feb 2015 09:30:10 -0600
From:    John Dillon 
Subject: Forgive me, but this was an awesome yard bird

Well, you might remember woodcock was my 99th yard bird last week. Just had my 
100th, and what a good one. Bald Eagle!! A subadult soaring over my neighbor's 
ponds. Got several photos, too. I certainly don't wanna turn LABIRD into a yard 
bird listserv, but this was too perfect not to share. 


Also, another 4-finch morning in the yard. Up to around 200 goldfinch, 5-10 
siskins, 5 Purple Finch, and 3 House Finch. 


John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 23 Feb 2015 15:46:29 +0000
From:    bill finney 
Subject: early bird mocking

Note: During a sunny break in the weather yesterday afternoon I heard the 
mockingbird in my driveway (near Lake Martin) clearly imitating white-eyed 
vireo and summer tanager, neither of which have been heard at this location in 
some months. 


------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 23 Feb 2015 10:36:35 -0600
From:    "James W. Beck" 
Subject: Re: early bird mocking

Billy, LABIRD,

I had a mocker imitating Spring Peeper and Squirrel Treefrog in the same
week....weird considering their separate breeding seasons....then not,
considering our see-saw weather lately...   -j

On Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 9:46 AM, bill finney <
000000963829b32c-dmarc-request AT listserv.lsu.edu> wrote:

> Note: During a sunny break in the weather yesterday afternoon I heard the
> mockingbird in my driveway (near Lake Martin) clearly imitating white-eyed
> vireo and summer tanager, neither of which have been heard at this location
> in some months.
>



-- 
James W. Beck
Marrero, Louisiana

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 23 Feb 2015 10:44:54 -0600
From:    Christine 
Subject: Re: early bird mocking

I've got a starling in my very woodsy neighborhood who does a dead-on imitation 
of a meadow lark. It's very disconcerting. 


Happy birding,

Christine Kooi
Baton Rouge

> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 10:36:35 -0600
> From: carpodectes AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] early bird mocking
> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> 
> Billy, LABIRD,
> 
> I had a mocker imitating Spring Peeper and Squirrel Treefrog in the same
> week....weird considering their separate breeding seasons....then not,
> considering our see-saw weather lately...   -j
> 
> On Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 9:46 AM, bill finney <
> 000000963829b32c-dmarc-request AT listserv.lsu.edu> wrote:
> 
> > Note: During a sunny break in the weather yesterday afternoon I heard the
> > mockingbird in my driveway (near Lake Martin) clearly imitating white-eyed
> > vireo and summer tanager, neither of which have been heard at this location
> > in some months.
> >
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> James W. Beck
> Marrero, Louisiana
                          

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 23 Feb 2015 16:45:08 +0000
From:    Jean Landry 
Subject: Re: Feeding frenzy

Thank you, Denese, for posting such wonderful pictures. Grand Isle Migratory 
Bird Celebration is April 17-19, 2015! Hope you all join us. 

Jean
           
Jean Landry
Program Manager

(985) 787-3599(Phone) 
(985) 688-3871(Cell) 
(985) 787-3599(Fax) 
jlandry AT tnc.org
nature.org 
    
The Nature Conservancy
of Louisiana
Post Office Box 675
Grand Isle, LA 70358
     





-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Denese Vlosky 

Sent: Saturday, February 21, 2015 12:40 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Feeding frenzy

We went to Grand Isle for Mardi Gras and the beach at the State Park was thick 
with birds (terns, sandpipers, probably, and of course brown pelicans). Plus 
there were birds in the Nature Conservancy (NC) property in the Cheniere Woods 
behind the Sureway Supermarket (Great Blue Heron, and Egrets), however, gobs of 
birds were so high up in the trees and so skittish that I had a hard time 
seeing them let alone trying to take a photo of them. The entrance to the woods 
is really quite exquisite. Actually, the entryway to the beach is impressive, 
also. 


I'm new at this so my pictures are not so great. I had much better luck with 
photographing wildflowers- of which there were plenty. 


Let's try this. I set these albums on "public."


https://www.facebook.com/denese.ashbaugh.vlosky/media_set?set=a.10154165321237837.1073741830.535757836&type=3 



https://www.facebook.com/denese.ashbaugh.vlosky/media_set?set=a.10154170199462837.1073741831.535757836&type=3 


Denese

-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jay V Huner 

Sent: Saturday, February 21, 2015 9:42 AM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Feeding frenzy

Well,

Approximately 200 miles NW of Chez Janine, is Chez Cotile in NW Rapides Parish. 
OUR feeding frenzy is around 30 American Goldfinches, ONE Pine Siskin, 25 
Chipping Sparrows, 4 or 5 White-throated Sparrows, and 4 or 5 Dark-eyed Juncos. 
In terms of residents, there are no more than a total dozen Carolina Chickadee, 
Tufted Titmouse, and Northern Cardinal! 


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "janine robin" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Saturday, February 21, 2015 7:55:42 AM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Feeding frenzy

Good morning,
For the past few weeks we have had a substantial amount and variety of birds at 
the feeders, in the trees and on the ground. 

This morning, there is a ridiculous number of birds here.
At LEAST: 150 AMGO, 35 PISI, 30 CHSP, 8 PUFI and a mix of the usuals.
The ground appears to be "boiling" with birds and the trees are dripping birds.
Awesome sight!
Janine Robin
Folsom, NW corner of St Tammany parish

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 23 Feb 2015 11:00:21 -0600
From:    "James W. Beck" 
Subject: Pine Siskin in Marrero

I just had a Pine Siskin fly over with a small group of House Finches here
in Marrero.  -j

-- 
James W. Beck
Marrero, Louisiana

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 23 Feb 2015 13:07:27 -0600
From:    Winston and Linda Caillouet 
Subject: Calliope hummingbird in BR

Could Nancy Newfield please contact me regarding the calliope.  My email is 
lincwinc AT bellsouth.net.  Thx.

Winston Caillouet 

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 23 Feb 2015 14:49:09 -0600
From:    Jay V Huner 
Subject: Re: Calliope hummingbird in BR - e-bird

About 6 months ago, I learned to use the e-bird "Explore Data" option. Often, 
birds such as the Calliope Hummingbird are included in the Louisiana option. I 
just checked and found the report that Nancy made. I think that there is 
probably an option for individual parishes where the report should show up for 
East Baton Rouge Parish. 


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Winston and Linda Caillouet" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Monday, February 23, 2015 1:07:27 PM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Calliope hummingbird in BR

Could Nancy Newfield please contact me regarding the calliope.  My email is 
lincwinc AT bellsouth.net.  Thx.

Winston Caillouet 

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 23 Feb 2015 14:55:45 -0600
From:    "crystal.johnson.lsu AT gmail.com" 
Subject: Reminder: BRAS presentation, Thur Feb. 26, 2015, 7PM, BBS *Education 
Center* 


BRAS Monthly Presentation



Presenter: *John Hartgerink*

Title: *Using Audubon Bird Prints to Catalogue Experiences at Bluebonnet
Swamp*


Date and time:  *Thursday, February 26, 2015 at 7:00 PM *

Location: Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center's *Education Center*



Please RSVP to let me know if you will be attending (
*crystal.johnson.lsu AT gmail.com* ) so that we
can add your name to the Bluebonnet Swamp guest list.



Please join us for Baton Rouge Audubon Society’s continuing speaker series.
Attendance is free for all BRAS Members, $3 at the door for non-BRAS
Members and $2.50 for non-BRAS seniors (price of admission at the
Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center).



Please note that the Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center's *Education Center* is
the newly renovated building just to the south (the left) of the Nature
Center.  Parking is accessible by turning west onto North Glenstone Place;
the Education Center will be straight ahead on the right as the street
curves.



Summary: How did Audubon show birds that we see today at Bluebonnet Swamp?
What were they doing on Audubon prints? Can they still be seen doing that
today?  What plants, insects (or other fauna) did he choose to show with
the birds? Does the Swamp have those? Something similar? Remind you of
something related?  Part of what makes Audubon's bird paintings special is
that he presented a loosely structured way to catalog experiences with
nature's interactions.  Since 2002, John Hartgerink has taken hundreds of
thousands of pictures at Bluebonnet Swamp. The presentation will a give a
few examples how he has used Audubon bird prints to catalog some of his own
experiences and pictures.

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 23 Feb 2015 16:32:08 -0600
From:    "Nancy L. Newfield" 
Subject: An eBird Question

Y'All,

I know this is not the eBird forum, but many subscribers here 
participate on eBird and all of the reviewers read LABIRD-L.  I thought 
others might be interested in the answer to my question.

What are the criteria for inclusion of a report on the [eBird Alert] 
Louisiana Rare Bird Alert ?  There seem to be some 
inconsistencies in which species are included.  Obviously, an LBRC 
review list species should make the cut, but I see a number of birds 
listed that do not seem all that rare to me and I have been birding for 
a few years now.

For instance, below are two recent entries from St Tammany Parish:

> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus) (1) CONFIRMED
> - Reported Feb 21, 2015 13:20 by Eric Soehren
> - LA: St. Tammany Par.; Abita Creek Flatwoods Preserve, St. Tammany, 
Louisiana 

> - 
Map:http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=30.5067503,-89.9659547&ll=30.5067503,-89.9659547 

> - Checklist:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22009757
> - Comments: "Eastern race of NOFL...may consider adjusting filters to 
include." 


> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus)  CONFIRMED
> - Reported Feb 22, 2015 06:30 by David Rymal
> - Fontainebleau SP, St. Tammany, Louisiana
> - 
Map:http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=30.3371423,-90.0427437&ll=30.3371423,-90.0427437 

> - Checklist:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22019742
> - Comments: "Very familiar bird, seen and heard well. Brown with black 
barring on back and wings; prominent white rump; red on nape; black malar 
against brown face; black area on breast." 


Now, as luck would have it, I observed a Northern [Yellow-shafted] 
Flicker while banding at a site in East Baton Rouge Parish on Saturday, 
21 February 2015.  It was not flagged and I did not add any details.  
Are Northern Flickers more rare in St Tammany than in East Baton Rouge?  
I did not think so because I see them with some frequency at a banding 
site in Covington.

My intent in asking this question is become enlightened, not to be a 
troublemaker.  As a promise to someone who is not on LABIRD-L, I have 
endeavored to generate a checklist for every site I've covered this 
winter season, 77 so far.  Hopefully, some will find some value in the 
data included rather than finding that it just clutters up the data base.

Nan

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 23 Feb 2015 23:06:34 +0000
From:    James V Remsen 
Subject: Re: An eBird Question

Nancy — anything flagged as a species gets on the alert.

In this particular case, our flickers are all treated as plain old Northern 
Flicker unless someone can verify that they have checked all the characters 
(not just wing color) to determine that it is not an intergrade (of which we 
have a tiny % here in LA and likely higher if people looked closely). A 
Northern (Yellow-shafted) Flicker is not just a flicker with yellow wings and 
tail — there are several additonal characters that one would need to see to 
confirm that it is actually the expected subspecies. I don’t see anything to 
be gained by adding the subspecies group to the filter because we assume that 
the vast majority of birds here are of the yellow-shafted group. 




On Feb 23, 2015, at 2:32 PM, Nancy L. Newfield  wrote:

> Y'All,
> 
> I know this is not the eBird forum, but many subscribers here participate on 
eBird and all of the reviewers read LABIRD-L. I thought others might be 
interested in the answer to my question. 

> 
> What are the criteria for inclusion of a report on the [eBird Alert] 
Louisiana Rare Bird Alert ? There seem to be some inconsistencies in 
which species are included. Obviously, an LBRC review list species should make 
the cut, but I see a number of birds listed that do not seem all that rare to 
me and I have been birding for a few years now. 

> 
> For instance, below are two recent entries from St Tammany Parish:
> 
>> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus) (1) CONFIRMED
>> - Reported Feb 21, 2015 13:20 by Eric Soehren
>> - LA: St. Tammany Par.; Abita Creek Flatwoods Preserve, St. Tammany, 
Louisiana 

>> - 
Map:http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=30.5067503,-89.9659547&ll=30.5067503,-89.9659547 

>> - Checklist:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22009757
>> - Comments: "Eastern race of NOFL...may consider adjusting filters to 
include." 

> 
>> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus)  CONFIRMED
>> - Reported Feb 22, 2015 06:30 by David Rymal
>> - Fontainebleau SP, St. Tammany, Louisiana
>> - 
Map:http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=30.3371423,-90.0427437&ll=30.3371423,-90.0427437 

>> - Checklist:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22019742
>> - Comments: "Very familiar bird, seen and heard well. Brown with black 
barring on back and wings; prominent white rump; red on nape; black malar 
against brown face; black area on breast." 

> 
> Now, as luck would have it, I observed a Northern [Yellow-shafted] Flicker 
while banding at a site in East Baton Rouge Parish on Saturday, 21 February 
2015. It was not flagged and I did not add any details. Are Northern Flickers 
more rare in St Tammany than in East Baton Rouge? I did not think so because I 
see them with some frequency at a banding site in Covington. 

> 
> My intent in asking this question is become enlightened, not to be a 
troublemaker. As a promise to someone who is not on LABIRD-L, I have endeavored 
to generate a checklist for every site I've covered this winter season, 77 so 
far. Hopefully, some will find some value in the data included rather than 
finding that it just clutters up the data base. 

> 
> Nan
> 
> -- 
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, LA USA
> 
> http://www.casacolibri.net/
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> 
> 
> 
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> http://www.avast.com



=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu

------------------------------

End of LABIRD-L Digest - 22 Feb 2015 to 23 Feb 2015 (#2015-54)
**************************************************************
Subject: Re: An eBird Question
From: James V Remsen <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 23:06:34 +0000
Nancy  anything flagged as a species gets on the alert.

In this particular case, our flickers are all treated as plain old Northern 
Flicker unless someone can verify that they have checked all the characters 
(not just wing color) to determine that it is not an intergrade (of which we 
have a tiny % here in LA and likely higher if people looked closely). A 
Northern (Yellow-shafted) Flicker is not just a flicker with yellow wings and 
tail  there are several additonal characters that one would need to see to 
confirm that it is actually the expected subspecies. I dont see anything to be 
gained by adding the subspecies group to the filter because we assume that the 
vast majority of birds here are of the yellow-shafted group. 




On Feb 23, 2015, at 2:32 PM, Nancy L. Newfield  wrote:

> Y'All,
> 
> I know this is not the eBird forum, but many subscribers here participate on 
eBird and all of the reviewers read LABIRD-L. I thought others might be 
interested in the answer to my question. 

> 
> What are the criteria for inclusion of a report on the [eBird Alert] 
Louisiana Rare Bird Alert ? There seem to be some inconsistencies in 
which species are included. Obviously, an LBRC review list species should make 
the cut, but I see a number of birds listed that do not seem all that rare to 
me and I have been birding for a few years now. 

> 
> For instance, below are two recent entries from St Tammany Parish:
> 
>> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus) (1) CONFIRMED
>> - Reported Feb 21, 2015 13:20 by Eric Soehren
>> - LA: St. Tammany Par.; Abita Creek Flatwoods Preserve, St. Tammany, 
Louisiana 

>> - 
Map:http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=30.5067503,-89.9659547&ll=30.5067503,-89.9659547 

>> - Checklist:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22009757
>> - Comments: "Eastern race of NOFL...may consider adjusting filters to 
include." 

> 
>> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus)  CONFIRMED
>> - Reported Feb 22, 2015 06:30 by David Rymal
>> - Fontainebleau SP, St. Tammany, Louisiana
>> - 
Map:http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=30.3371423,-90.0427437&ll=30.3371423,-90.0427437 

>> - Checklist:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22019742
>> - Comments: "Very familiar bird, seen and heard well. Brown with black 
barring on back and wings; prominent white rump; red on nape; black malar 
against brown face; black area on breast." 

> 
> Now, as luck would have it, I observed a Northern [Yellow-shafted] Flicker 
while banding at a site in East Baton Rouge Parish on Saturday, 21 February 
2015. It was not flagged and I did not add any details. Are Northern Flickers 
more rare in St Tammany than in East Baton Rouge? I did not think so because I 
see them with some frequency at a banding site in Covington. 

> 
> My intent in asking this question is become enlightened, not to be a 
troublemaker. As a promise to someone who is not on LABIRD-L, I have endeavored 
to generate a checklist for every site I've covered this winter season, 77 so 
far. Hopefully, some will find some value in the data included rather than 
finding that it just clutters up the data base. 

> 
> Nan
> 
> -- 
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibr
> Metairie, LA USA
> 
> http://www.casacolibri.net/
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> 
> 
> 
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> http://www.avast.com



=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: An eBird Question
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 16:32:08 -0600
Y'All,

I know this is not the eBird forum, but many subscribers here 
participate on eBird and all of the reviewers read LABIRD-L.  I thought 
others might be interested in the answer to my question.

What are the criteria for inclusion of a report on the [eBird Alert] 
Louisiana Rare Bird Alert ?  There seem to be some 
inconsistencies in which species are included.  Obviously, an LBRC 
review list species should make the cut, but I see a number of birds 
listed that do not seem all that rare to me and I have been birding for 
a few years now.

For instance, below are two recent entries from St Tammany Parish:

> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus) (1) CONFIRMED
> - Reported Feb 21, 2015 13:20 by Eric Soehren
> - LA: St. Tammany Par.; Abita Creek Flatwoods Preserve, St. Tammany, 
Louisiana 

> - 
Map:http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=30.5067503,-89.9659547&ll=30.5067503,-89.9659547 

> - Checklist:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22009757
> - Comments: "Eastern race of NOFL...may consider adjusting filters to 
include." 


> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus)  CONFIRMED
> - Reported Feb 22, 2015 06:30 by David Rymal
> - Fontainebleau SP, St. Tammany, Louisiana
> - 
Map:http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=30.3371423,-90.0427437&ll=30.3371423,-90.0427437 

> - Checklist:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22019742
> - Comments: "Very familiar bird, seen and heard well. Brown with black 
barring on back and wings; prominent white rump; red on nape; black malar 
against brown face; black area on breast." 


Now, as luck would have it, I observed a Northern [Yellow-shafted] 
Flicker while banding at a site in East Baton Rouge Parish on Saturday, 
21 February 2015.  It was not flagged and I did not add any details.  
Are Northern Flickers more rare in St Tammany than in East Baton Rouge?  
I did not think so because I see them with some frequency at a banding 
site in Covington.

My intent in asking this question is become enlightened, not to be a 
troublemaker.  As a promise to someone who is not on LABIRD-L, I have 
endeavored to generate a checklist for every site I've covered this 
winter season, 77 so far.  Hopefully, some will find some value in the 
data included rather than finding that it just clutters up the data base.

Nan

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com
Subject: Reminder: BRAS presentation, Thur Feb. 26, 2015, 7PM, BBS *Education Center*
From: "crystal.johnson.lsu AT gmail.com" <crystal.johnson.lsu@GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 14:55:45 -0600
BRAS Monthly Presentation



Presenter: *John Hartgerink*

Title: *Using Audubon Bird Prints to Catalogue Experiences at Bluebonnet
Swamp*


Date and time:  *Thursday, February 26, 2015 at 7:00 PM *

Location: Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center's *Education Center*



Please RSVP to let me know if you will be attending (
*crystal.johnson.lsu AT gmail.com* ) so that we
can add your name to the Bluebonnet Swamp guest list.



Please join us for Baton Rouge Audubon Society’s continuing speaker series.
Attendance is free for all BRAS Members, $3 at the door for non-BRAS
Members and $2.50 for non-BRAS seniors (price of admission at the
Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center).



Please note that the Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center's *Education Center* is
the newly renovated building just to the south (the left) of the Nature
Center.  Parking is accessible by turning west onto North Glenstone Place;
the Education Center will be straight ahead on the right as the street
curves.



Summary: How did Audubon show birds that we see today at Bluebonnet Swamp?
What were they doing on Audubon prints? Can they still be seen doing that
today?  What plants, insects (or other fauna) did he choose to show with
the birds? Does the Swamp have those? Something similar? Remind you of
something related?  Part of what makes Audubon's bird paintings special is
that he presented a loosely structured way to catalog experiences with
nature's interactions.  Since 2002, John Hartgerink has taken hundreds of
thousands of pictures at Bluebonnet Swamp. The presentation will a give a
few examples how he has used Audubon bird prints to catalog some of his own
experiences and pictures.
Subject: Re: Calliope hummingbird in BR - e-bird
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 14:49:09 -0600
About 6 months ago, I learned to use the e-bird "Explore Data" option. Often, 
birds such as the Calliope Hummingbird are included in the Louisiana option. I 
just checked and found the report that Nancy made. I think that there is 
probably an option for individual parishes where the report should show up for 
East Baton Rouge Parish. 


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Winston and Linda Caillouet" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Monday, February 23, 2015 1:07:27 PM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Calliope hummingbird in BR

Could Nancy Newfield please contact me regarding the calliope.  My email is 
lincwinc AT bellsouth.net.  Thx.

Winston Caillouet 
Subject: Calliope hummingbird in BR
From: Winston and Linda Caillouet <lincwinc AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 13:07:27 -0600
Could Nancy Newfield please contact me regarding the calliope.  My email is 
lincwinc AT bellsouth.net.  Thx.

Winston Caillouet 
Subject: Pine Siskin in Marrero
From: "James W. Beck" <carpodectes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 11:00:21 -0600
I just had a Pine Siskin fly over with a small group of House Finches here
in Marrero.  -j

-- 
James W. Beck
Marrero, Louisiana
Subject: Re: Feeding frenzy
From: Jean Landry <JLANDRY AT TNC.ORG>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 16:45:08 +0000
Thank you, Denese, for posting such wonderful pictures. Grand Isle Migratory 
Bird Celebration is April 17-19, 2015! Hope you all join us. 

Jean
       	 
Jean Landry
Program Manager

(985) 787-3599(Phone) 
(985) 688-3871(Cell) 
(985) 787-3599(Fax) 
jlandry AT tnc.org
nature.org 
    
The Nature Conservancy
of Louisiana
Post Office Box 675
Grand Isle, LA 70358
     





-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Denese Vlosky 

Sent: Saturday, February 21, 2015 12:40 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Feeding frenzy

We went to Grand Isle for Mardi Gras and the beach at the State Park was thick 
with birds (terns, sandpipers, probably, and of course brown pelicans). Plus 
there were birds in the Nature Conservancy (NC) property in the Cheniere Woods 
behind the Sureway Supermarket (Great Blue Heron, and Egrets), however, gobs of 
birds were so high up in the trees and so skittish that I had a hard time 
seeing them let alone trying to take a photo of them. The entrance to the woods 
is really quite exquisite. Actually, the entryway to the beach is impressive, 
also. 


I'm new at this so my pictures are not so great. I had much better luck with 
photographing wildflowers- of which there were plenty. 


Let's try this. I set these albums on "public."


https://www.facebook.com/denese.ashbaugh.vlosky/media_set?set=a.10154165321237837.1073741830.535757836&type=3 



https://www.facebook.com/denese.ashbaugh.vlosky/media_set?set=a.10154170199462837.1073741831.535757836&type=3 


Denese

-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jay V Huner 

Sent: Saturday, February 21, 2015 9:42 AM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Feeding frenzy

Well,

Approximately 200 miles NW of Chez Janine, is Chez Cotile in NW Rapides Parish. 
OUR feeding frenzy is around 30 American Goldfinches, ONE Pine Siskin, 25 
Chipping Sparrows, 4 or 5 White-throated Sparrows, and 4 or 5 Dark-eyed Juncos. 
In terms of residents, there are no more than a total dozen Carolina Chickadee, 
Tufted Titmouse, and Northern Cardinal! 


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "janine robin" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Saturday, February 21, 2015 7:55:42 AM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Feeding frenzy

Good morning,
For the past few weeks we have had a substantial amount and variety of birds at 
the feeders, in the trees and on the ground. 

This morning, there is a ridiculous number of birds here.
At LEAST: 150 AMGO, 35 PISI, 30 CHSP, 8 PUFI and a mix of the usuals.
The ground appears to be "boiling" with birds and the trees are dripping birds.
Awesome sight!
Janine Robin
Folsom, NW corner of St Tammany parish
Subject: Re: early bird mocking
From: Christine <cjkooi AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 10:44:54 -0600
I've got a starling in my very woodsy neighborhood who does a dead-on imitation 
of a meadow lark. It's very disconcerting. 


Happy birding,

Christine Kooi
Baton Rouge

> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 10:36:35 -0600
> From: carpodectes AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] early bird mocking
> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> 
> Billy, LABIRD,
> 
> I had a mocker imitating Spring Peeper and Squirrel Treefrog in the same
> week....weird considering their separate breeding seasons....then not,
> considering our see-saw weather lately...   -j
> 
> On Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 9:46 AM, bill finney <
> 000000963829b32c-dmarc-request AT listserv.lsu.edu> wrote:
> 
> > Note: During a sunny break in the weather yesterday afternoon I heard the
> > mockingbird in my driveway (near Lake Martin) clearly imitating white-eyed
> > vireo and summer tanager, neither of which have been heard at this location
> > in some months.
> >
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> James W. Beck
> Marrero, Louisiana
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: early bird mocking
From: "James W. Beck" <carpodectes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 10:36:35 -0600
Billy, LABIRD,

I had a mocker imitating Spring Peeper and Squirrel Treefrog in the same
week....weird considering their separate breeding seasons....then not,
considering our see-saw weather lately...   -j

On Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 9:46 AM, bill finney <
000000963829b32c-dmarc-request AT listserv.lsu.edu> wrote:

> Note: During a sunny break in the weather yesterday afternoon I heard the
> mockingbird in my driveway (near Lake Martin) clearly imitating white-eyed
> vireo and summer tanager, neither of which have been heard at this location
> in some months.
>



-- 
James W. Beck
Marrero, Louisiana
Subject: early bird mocking
From: bill finney <000000963829b32c-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 15:46:29 +0000
Note: During a sunny break in the weather yesterday afternoon I heard the 
mockingbird in my driveway (near Lake Martin) clearly imitating white-eyed 
vireo and summer tanager, neither of which have been heard at this location in 
some months.  

Subject: Forgive me, but this was an awesome yard bird
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 09:30:10 -0600
Well, you might remember woodcock was my 99th yard bird last week. Just had my 
100th, and what a good one. Bald Eagle!! A subadult soaring over my neighbor's 
ponds. Got several photos, too. I certainly don't wanna turn LABIRD into a yard 
bird listserv, but this was too perfect not to share. 


Also, another 4-finch morning in the yard. Up to around 200 goldfinch, 5-10 
siskins, 5 Purple Finch, and 3 House Finch. 


John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: A 4-finch cold front.
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 13:39:17 -0600
The day's not over but my siskin numbers rose to 5 this morning! There seem to 
be around 40 goldfinches in the area. Although I've not seen any around my 
feeders today, a few House Finches show up. And I saw a few up the road while 
walking around the neighborhood. 


Crossbills - well, in 2012 one showed up in St. Francisville. Many got to see 
it thanks to the kindness of the home owners but those who came late suffered 
the same fate as those who have apparently waited a bit too long to see the 
Ringed Kingfisher. 


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "janine robin" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Sunday, February 22, 2015 1:32:24 PM
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] A 4-finch cold front.

Here in Folsom, still have well over 100 AMGO and 25ish PISI. PUFI remain
at 6. The difference today is that most of them are remaining high up in
the trees and are very vocal. Right now there are just a few at the
feeders, but the wheezy sound of the siskins and the soft wee-oop! of the
goldfinches is loud and constant......love it.
RCKI was heard singing it's sweet song. A little early for a spring song?
Best,
Janine
Folsom, NW corner of St Tammany parish
On Feb 22, 2015 12:15 PM, "John Dillon"  wrote:

> Had goldfinch (probably 80ish), siskins, Purple Finch (5m, 2f), and House
> Finch together in the yard this morning. If eskimos used the term "3-dog
> night" to describe cold weather, I think we Louisiana birders could use the
> term "4-finch cold front." I would love a crossbill or redpoll or
> something, but I'm too scared of a 6-finch cold front.
>
> Currently visting my folks in nearby Homer for Sunday lunch. They have at
> least 200 goldfinch; same yesterday.
>
> JD
> Athens, LA
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
Subject: Re: A 4-finch cold front.
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 13:32:24 -0600
Here in Folsom, still have well over 100 AMGO and 25ish PISI. PUFI remain
at 6. The difference today is that most of them are remaining high up in
the trees and are very vocal. Right now there are just a few at the
feeders, but the wheezy sound of the siskins and the soft wee-oop! of the
goldfinches is loud and constant......love it.
RCKI was heard singing it's sweet song. A little early for a spring song?
Best,
Janine
Folsom, NW corner of St Tammany parish
On Feb 22, 2015 12:15 PM, "John Dillon"  wrote:

> Had goldfinch (probably 80ish), siskins, Purple Finch (5m, 2f), and House
> Finch together in the yard this morning. If eskimos used the term "3-dog
> night" to describe cold weather, I think we Louisiana birders could use the
> term "4-finch cold front." I would love a crossbill or redpoll or
> something, but I'm too scared of a 6-finch cold front.
>
> Currently visting my folks in nearby Homer for Sunday lunch. They have at
> least 200 goldfinch; same yesterday.
>
> JD
> Athens, LA
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
Subject: Re: A 4-finch cold front.
From: "Jeffrey W. Harris" <jwharris30 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 12:41:11 -0600
In Starkville, MS:  had a handful of Am. Goldfish and H. Finch at feeders
this winter.  Had about 125 Am. Goldfinch and 150 Pine Siskin this
morning.  No Purple Finch, though.

Jeff Harris

On Sunday, February 22, 2015, Philip Bradley  wrote:

> I can't believe I haven't had Siskins! There have been lots of tree
> climbers, except Brown Creeper. Pileated, Red-bellied, Hairy, and Downy
> woodpeckers, Northern Flickers (yellow) and Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers, and
> White-breasted Nuthatch. Of note, a white-striped White-throated Sparrow
> showed up; all I usually see are tan-striped.
> Phil Bradley
> SW Lake Bistineau
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> > On Feb 22, 2015, at 12:14 PM, John Dillon  > wrote:
> >
> > Had goldfinch (probably 80ish), siskins, Purple Finch (5m, 2f), and
> House Finch together in the yard this morning. If eskimos used the term
> "3-dog night" to describe cold weather, I think we Louisiana birders could
> use the term "4-finch cold front." I would love a crossbill or redpoll or
> something, but I'm too scared of a 6-finch cold front.
> >
> > Currently visting my folks in nearby Homer for Sunday lunch. They have
> at least 200 goldfinch; same yesterday.
> >
> > JD
> > Athens, LA
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
>
Subject: Re: A 4-finch cold front.
From: Philip Bradley <pbradley60 AT ICLOUD.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 12:36:24 -0600
I can't believe I haven't had Siskins! There have been lots of tree climbers, 
except Brown Creeper. Pileated, Red-bellied, Hairy, and Downy woodpeckers, 
Northern Flickers (yellow) and Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers, and White-breasted 
Nuthatch. Of note, a white-striped White-throated Sparrow showed up; all I 
usually see are tan-striped. 

Phil Bradley
SW Lake Bistineau 

Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 22, 2015, at 12:14 PM, John Dillon  wrote:
> 
> Had goldfinch (probably 80ish), siskins, Purple Finch (5m, 2f), and House 
Finch together in the yard this morning. If eskimos used the term "3-dog night" 
to describe cold weather, I think we Louisiana birders could use the term 
"4-finch cold front." I would love a crossbill or redpoll or something, but I'm 
too scared of a 6-finch cold front. 

> 
> Currently visting my folks in nearby Homer for Sunday lunch. They have at 
least 200 goldfinch; same yesterday. 

> 
> JD
> Athens, LA
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: A 4-finch cold front.
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 12:14:51 -0600
Had goldfinch (probably 80ish), siskins, Purple Finch (5m, 2f), and House Finch 
together in the yard this morning. If eskimos used the term "3-dog night" to 
describe cold weather, I think we Louisiana birders could use the term "4-finch 
cold front." I would love a crossbill or redpoll or something, but I'm too 
scared of a 6-finch cold front. 


Currently visting my folks in nearby Homer for Sunday lunch. They have at least 
200 goldfinch; same yesterday. 


JD
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: FOS Purple Martin NW Rapides Parish
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 20:18:13 -0600
Found my FOS Purple Martin in the NW arm of Cotile Lake this morning around 11 
AM. 


Jay Huner
Subject: Purple Finches - Jean Lafitte NHPP
From: "James W. Beck" <carpodectes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 19:10:08 -0600
All,

Kaye London and I had 7 Purple Finches on the Palmetto Trail today as part
of the Jean Lafitte NHPP Barataria Unit Winter Bird Count organized by
David Fox.  Four females and three males.  Thanks to David for putting
together the count!  -j

-- 
James W. Beck
Marrero, Louisiana
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Claire D. Thomas, Tall Timbers Sub, Mandeville, Feb 21, 2015
From: Claire Thomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 16:44:52 -0600
Nothing very unusual. Rusty Blackbirds were nice to see. 


Claire Thomas
Mandeville, LA 70471
Tall Timbers Sub
Hwy. 90 & I-12
claire AT clairedthomas.com




Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Subject: eBird Report - Claire D. Thomas, Tall Timbers Sub, Mandeville, Feb 
21, 2015 

> Date: February 21, 2015 at 4:42:19 PM CST
> To: claire AT clairedthomas.com
> 
> Claire D. Thomas, Tall Timbers Sub, Mandeville, St. Tammany, US-LA
> Feb 21, 2015 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.5 mile(s)
> Comments:     Moderate temp, slight breeze, overcast.
> 35 species
> 
> Turkey Vulture  1
> Laughing Gull  1
> Eurasian Collared-Dove  5
> Mourning Dove  3
> Red-headed Woodpecker  2
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
> Downy Woodpecker  3
> Northern Flicker  3
> Eastern Phoebe  3
> Blue-headed Vireo  1
> American Crow  2
> Fish Crow  1
> Carolina Chickadee  4
> Tufted Titmouse  6
> Brown-headed Nuthatch  3
> Carolina Wren  3
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  3
> Eastern Bluebird  8
> American Robin  4
> Northern Mockingbird  6
> Orange-crowned Warbler  2
> Pine Warbler  2
> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  15
> Eastern Towhee  2
> Chipping Sparrow  20
> White-throated Sparrow  8
> Northern Cardinal  7
> Red-winged Blackbird  8
> Rusty Blackbird 4  

> Common Grackle  2
> House Finch  2
> Purple Finch  3
> Pine Siskin  3
> American Goldfinch  100
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22009550 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
> 
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Lake Martin (Lake la Pointe)-Cypress Island Preserve, Feb 21, 2015
From: John Romano <birderjuan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 15:15:03 -0600
Birds real active this Morning on the levee hiking trail that starts on the
south side of the lake by the visitor center.  Nothing unusual but good
numbers of various species.  Not sign of Ringed Kingfisher but I only
lingered in the spot last seen by the old Rookery.

John Romano
Breaux Bridge, LA


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: 
Date: Sat, Feb 21, 2015 at 3:03 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Lake Martin (Lake la Pointe)-Cypress Island
Preserve, Feb 21, 2015
To: birderjuan AT gmail.com


Lake Martin (Lake la Pointe)-Cypress Island Preserve, St. Martin, US-LA
Feb 21, 2015 7:22 AM - 9:09 AM Protocol: Traveling 3.0 mile(s)

Comments:     walked the South Levee Trail from The Visitor center up to
and into the Restoration Area and back - and birded a little on the road
from the main boat landing.  No sign of the Ringed Kingfisher

42 species

Wood Duck  9
Pied-billed Grebe  3
Neotropic Cormorant  7
Double-crested Cormorant  4
Anhinga  1
Great Blue Heron  2
Great Egret  25
White Ibis  6
Turkey Vulture  3
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  14
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  2
Downy Woodpecker  5
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  3
Eastern Phoebe  5
White-eyed Vireo  2
Blue-headed Vireo  3
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  2
Fish Crow  7
Tree Swallow  40
Carolina Chickadee  31
Tufted Titmouse  14
Carolina Wren  3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  6
Golden-crowned Kinglet  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  22
Hermit Thrush  3
American Robin  5
Orange-crowned Warbler  2
Common Yellowthroat  4
Pine Warbler  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler  15
Swamp Sparrow  7
White-throated Sparrow  6
Northern Cardinal  16
Red-winged Blackbird  10
Common Grackle  1
American Goldfinch  3

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22007432

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/wi)
Subject: Re: Old time name for a bird
From: Tom Hickcox <cometkazie1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 14:10:06 -0500
Dr. Lowery in his book gives the name "Indian hen" to the pileated 
woodpecker.

I think that may be what you are looking for.

Tom Hickcox
Danville, Ky

On 2/21/2015 13:38, Ingold, James wrote:
> A student in my ornithology class mentioned seeing a bird in the woods his 
father/grandfather called an Indian War Hen (Warhen) any ideas what this might 
be? 

>
> James L. Ingold, Ph.D.
> Professor - Department of Biological Sciences
> Director - Museum of Life Sciences
> Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor - Museum of Life Sciences
> Louisiana State University in Shreveport
>
> Office: (318) 797-5236
> Fax: (318) 797-5222
> james.ingold AT lsus.edu  www.lsus.edu
>   
>
Subject: Re: Feeding frenzy
From: Denese Vlosky <Denese.Vlosky AT PBRC.EDU>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 12:39:48 -0600
We went to Grand Isle for Mardi Gras and the beach at the State Park was thick 
with birds (terns, sandpipers, probably, and of course brown pelicans). Plus 
there were birds in the Nature Conservancy (NC) property in the Cheniere Woods 
behind the Sureway Supermarket (Great Blue Heron, and Egrets), however, gobs of 
birds were so high up in the trees and so skittish that I had a hard time 
seeing them let alone trying to take a photo of them. The entrance to the woods 
is really quite exquisite. Actually, the entryway to the beach is impressive, 
also. 


I'm new at this so my pictures are not so great. I had much better luck with 
photographing wildflowers- of which there were plenty. 


Let's try this. I set these albums on "public."


https://www.facebook.com/denese.ashbaugh.vlosky/media_set?set=a.10154165321237837.1073741830.535757836&type=3 



https://www.facebook.com/denese.ashbaugh.vlosky/media_set?set=a.10154170199462837.1073741831.535757836&type=3 


Denese

-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jay V Huner 

Sent: Saturday, February 21, 2015 9:42 AM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Feeding frenzy

Well,

Approximately 200 miles NW of Chez Janine, is Chez Cotile in NW Rapides Parish. 
OUR feeding frenzy is around 30 American Goldfinches, ONE Pine Siskin, 25 
Chipping Sparrows, 4 or 5 White-throated Sparrows, and 4 or 5 Dark-eyed Juncos. 
In terms of residents, there are no more than a total dozen Carolina Chickadee, 
Tufted Titmouse, and Northern Cardinal! 


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "janine robin" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Saturday, February 21, 2015 7:55:42 AM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Feeding frenzy

Good morning,
For the past few weeks we have had a substantial amount and variety of birds at 
the feeders, in the trees and on the ground. 

This morning, there is a ridiculous number of birds here.
At LEAST: 150 AMGO, 35 PISI, 30 CHSP, 8 PUFI and a mix of the usuals.
The ground appears to be "boiling" with birds and the trees are dripping birds.
Awesome sight!
Janine Robin
Folsom, NW corner of St Tammany parish
Subject: Old time name for a bird
From: "Ingold, James" <James.Ingold AT LSUS.EDU>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 18:38:26 +0000
A student in my ornithology class mentioned seeing a bird in the woods his 
father/grandfather called an Indian War Hen (Warhen) any ideas what this might 
be? 


James L. Ingold, Ph.D.
Professor - Department of Biological Sciences
Director - Museum of Life Sciences
Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor - Museum of Life Sciences
Louisiana State University in Shreveport

Office: (318) 797-5236
Fax: (318) 797-5222
james.ingold AT lsus.edu  www.lsus.edu
 
Subject: Re: Feeding frenzy
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 09:41:44 -0600
Well,

Approximately 200 miles NW of Chez Janine, is Chez Cotile in NW Rapides Parish. 
OUR feeding frenzy is around 30 American Goldfinches, ONE Pine Siskin, 25 
Chipping Sparrows, 4 or 5 White-throated Sparrows, and 4 or 5 Dark-eyed Juncos. 
In terms of residents, there are no more than a total dozen Carolina Chickadee, 
Tufted Titmouse, and Northern Cardinal! 


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "janine robin" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Saturday, February 21, 2015 7:55:42 AM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Feeding frenzy

Good morning,
For the past few weeks we have had a substantial amount and variety of
birds at the feeders, in the trees and on the ground.
This morning, there is a ridiculous number of birds here.
At LEAST: 150 AMGO, 35 PISI, 30 CHSP, 8 PUFI and a mix of the usuals.
The ground appears to be "boiling" with birds and the trees are dripping
birds.
Awesome sight!
Janine Robin
Folsom, NW corner of St Tammany parish
Subject: ys flickers
From: cecil tarver <exk5hdl AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 09:03:51 -0600
I had 4 ys flickers in my yard this morning  Also had 2 male and 3 female
purple finches

-- 
Cecil Tarver
28026 s satsuma rd #5
Livingston,La 70754
20 mi east of Baton Rouge
central livingston parish
exk5hdl AT yahoo.com
225 435 4090
Subject: Feeding frenzy
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 07:55:42 -0600
Good morning,
For the past few weeks we have had a substantial amount and variety of
birds at the feeders, in the trees and on the ground.
This morning, there is a ridiculous number of birds here.
At LEAST: 150 AMGO, 35 PISI, 30 CHSP, 8 PUFI and a mix of the usuals.
The ground appears to be "boiling" with birds and the trees are dripping
birds.
Awesome sight!
Janine Robin
Folsom, NW corner of St Tammany parish
Subject: Re: Birding Trip to Diamond on Tues., Feb 21
From: Ed Wallace <mottledduck AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 07:25:20 -0600
I hope this not too late for some folks. The Balesteas IGA is now Balestras 
Associated grocery 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 18, 2015, at 7:26 PM, Jennifer Coulson  
wrote: 

> 
> Birding Trip to Diamond, LA
> 
> Saturday, February 21
> 
> Time: 7:30 a.m. (half-day trip)
> 
> Meet in the parking lot of Balestra’s IGA Foodliner (Town View Cafe), 7902
> Hwy 23 (Belle
> Chasse Hwy.), 4.6 miles south of the West Bank Expressway. Take CCC to West
> Bank, exit
> Lafayette St. (Hwy 23), and proceed south towards the town of Belle
> Chasse.
> 
> Leader: Ed Wallace (504) 343-1433
> 
> This birding field trip is co-hosted by the Orleans Audubon Society and the
> Crescent Bird Club.
> 
> All are welcome.
Subject: Re: Rail Response to Playback
From: John Romano <birderjuan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 05:59:24 -0600
Clapping Hands works for me a lot to get rails to respond, and sometime
will flush out Snipe. Not suprisingly, Daryl Tessen up in Wisconsin once
told me that a King Rail responded when he started his car engine.

John Romano
Breaux Bridge, LA

On Fri, Feb 20, 2015 at 1:54 PM, John Dillon 
wrote:

> Pagans, all.
>
> The same interests me, too. I've had Virginia Rails respond to both my
> loud, hacking cough while recovering from flu and from shouting my car door
> too loudly. And I repeatedly get them to respond by clapping my hands.
>
> One response I've seen consistently for years is that Lincoln's Sparrow
> will react to Sedge Wren playback. I've assumed it's because the first 2
> stuttered notes of a Sedge Wren's song sound like a loud Lincoln's chip
> note. But the sparrows never tell me why.
>
> John Dillon
> Athens, LA
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Feb 19, 2015, at 10:05 PM, Terry Davis  wrote:
> >
> > Peter, Bet that was hilarious! Interesting stuff. That would've been a
> neat
> > moment to catch on video, to say the least!
> >
> > Not quite along the same lines, but somewhat-  Some years ago, while Jeff
> > Trahan and I were working a quad for the Louisiana Winter Bird Atlas
> > somewhere east of here, we spotted a Pine Siskin a few hundred feet away
> > from where we were. The bird was perched on a high power line. We then
> > hoped for a closer look and to see if it had any friends nearby so I
> dialed
> > it up and hit play. However, a good second BEFORE the first audible
> sound,
> > a  "zhree" call, hit the speakers, the bird made a rapid beeline for us,
> > flying just over our head by mere feet and landing close by. To this
> day, I
> > still don't see how the bird could have heard the sound before it even
> came
> > out but it certainly appeared that it did.
> >
> > Terry
> >
> >> On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 9:31 PM, Peter H Yaukey 
> wrote:
> >>
> >> Years ago sports writer George Plimpton wrote about a foray he took into
> >> birding in which he was with someone who played a King Rail tape, but
> had
> >> not advanced the tape far enough before pushing the play button (those
> of
> >> my generation will recall that the original Peterson tapes had each
> species
> >> introduced by a narrator giving the species name and field guide page it
> >> could be found on).  The tape boomed out "Page 69, King Rail" across the
> >> marsh before being hurriedly shut off before any of the call was played;
> >> the rail immediately ran from the reeds out into the open and scanned
> the
> >> surroundings.
> >>
> >> PY
> >> ________________________________________
> >> From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana
> Birds [
> >> LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] on behalf of Terry Davis [terkchip AT GMAIL.COM
> ]
> >> Sent: Thursday, February 19, 2015 7:33 PM
> >> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> >> Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Rail Response to Playback
> >>
> >> Steve/ all, In my experience over the years, this frequently happens
> >> between Sora and Virginia Rail- where one species will often respond
> more
> >> quickly to playback of the other. While not certain if this phenomenon
> >> pertains only to the grunt call (VIRA) and whinny call (SORA), which are
> >> the two most frequent types that I use for each of these two species at
> the
> >> edge of the marsh, it certainly seems to happen more frequently when
> using
> >> these two types of calls. Cool stuff!
> >>
> >> (:
> >>
> >> Terry
> >>
> >>> On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 7:15 PM, John Romano 
> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Thanks for posting your experimenting - results are very interesting.
> >>>
> >>> John Romano
> >>> Breaux Bridge
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>> On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 7:00 PM, Stephen Pagans 
> wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>> I went by a nice wetland in southwest Ouachita Parish about 11:00
> this
> >>>> morning to see what could be found.  After just looking at Google
> >> Earth,
> >>> I
> >>>> would estimate that the wetland is about 100 acres in size and is at
> >>> least
> >>>> a mile long.  I suspect it was originated by beaver activity.  I have
> >>> been
> >>>> by this wetland in past times and have tried for rails every time I
> >>> stopped
> >>>> there but have never been successful in getting a response from them.
> >> I
> >>>> figured both King and Virginia Rails would use this area.
> >>>>
> >>>> Today using my Birdjam, I first tried a Marsh Wren playback once or
> >> twice
> >>>> and got no response.  Then I played the King Rail recording and got no
> >>>> response.  Then I tried the Virginia Rail and nothing responded.  Then
> >> I
> >>>> played the Sora recording and a King Rail responded.  Then I tried
> >>> playing
> >>>> the King Rail recording again and maybe the Virginia Rail too and
> >> nothing
> >>>> responded.  Then I decided to play the Common Yellowthroat recording
> >>>> because it was suitable habitat for them.  Two King Rails responded to
> >>> the
> >>>> CoYe recording.  Out of curiosity, I also played the Screech Owl but
> >> got
> >>> no
> >>>> response from the rails.
> >>>>
> >>>> I have found in the past that birds will often not respond to their
> own
> >>>> recording but will respond to other bird recordings.  I'm not sure why
> >>> they
> >>>> do that but know that it often pays off to mix up the recording
> >> playbacks
> >>>> to see who will want to be heard.
> >>>>
> >>>> At least I was finally successful in getting one rail species to
> >> respond.
> >>
>
Subject: Re: Rail Response to Playback
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 13:54:57 -0600
Pagans, all. 

The same interests me, too. I've had Virginia Rails respond to both my loud, 
hacking cough while recovering from flu and from shouting my car door too 
loudly. And I repeatedly get them to respond by clapping my hands. 


One response I've seen consistently for years is that Lincoln's Sparrow will 
react to Sedge Wren playback. I've assumed it's because the first 2 stuttered 
notes of a Sedge Wren's song sound like a loud Lincoln's chip note. But the 
sparrows never tell me why. 


John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 19, 2015, at 10:05 PM, Terry Davis  wrote:
> 
> Peter, Bet that was hilarious! Interesting stuff. That would've been a neat
> moment to catch on video, to say the least!
> 
> Not quite along the same lines, but somewhat-  Some years ago, while Jeff
> Trahan and I were working a quad for the Louisiana Winter Bird Atlas
> somewhere east of here, we spotted a Pine Siskin a few hundred feet away
> from where we were. The bird was perched on a high power line. We then
> hoped for a closer look and to see if it had any friends nearby so I dialed
> it up and hit play. However, a good second BEFORE the first audible sound,
> a  "zhree" call, hit the speakers, the bird made a rapid beeline for us,
> flying just over our head by mere feet and landing close by. To this day, I
> still don't see how the bird could have heard the sound before it even came
> out but it certainly appeared that it did.
> 
> Terry
> 
>> On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 9:31 PM, Peter H Yaukey  wrote:
>> 
>> Years ago sports writer George Plimpton wrote about a foray he took into
>> birding in which he was with someone who played a King Rail tape, but had
>> not advanced the tape far enough before pushing the play button (those of
>> my generation will recall that the original Peterson tapes had each species
>> introduced by a narrator giving the species name and field guide page it
>> could be found on).  The tape boomed out "Page 69, King Rail" across the
>> marsh before being hurriedly shut off before any of the call was played;
>> the rail immediately ran from the reeds out into the open and scanned the
>> surroundings.
>> 
>> PY
>> ________________________________________
>> From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds [
>> LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] on behalf of Terry Davis [terkchip AT GMAIL.COM]
>> Sent: Thursday, February 19, 2015 7:33 PM
>> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
>> Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Rail Response to Playback
>> 
>> Steve/ all, In my experience over the years, this frequently happens
>> between Sora and Virginia Rail- where one species will often respond more
>> quickly to playback of the other. While not certain if this phenomenon
>> pertains only to the grunt call (VIRA) and whinny call (SORA), which are
>> the two most frequent types that I use for each of these two species at the
>> edge of the marsh, it certainly seems to happen more frequently when using
>> these two types of calls. Cool stuff!
>> 
>> (:
>> 
>> Terry
>> 
>>> On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 7:15 PM, John Romano  wrote:
>>> 
>>> Thanks for posting your experimenting - results are very interesting.
>>> 
>>> John Romano
>>> Breaux Bridge
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>>> On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 7:00 PM, Stephen Pagans  wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> I went by a nice wetland in southwest Ouachita Parish about 11:00  this
>>>> morning to see what could be found.  After just looking at Google
>> Earth,
>>> I
>>>> would estimate that the wetland is about 100 acres in size and is at
>>> least
>>>> a mile long.  I suspect it was originated by beaver activity.  I have
>>> been
>>>> by this wetland in past times and have tried for rails every time I
>>> stopped
>>>> there but have never been successful in getting a response from them.
>> I
>>>> figured both King and Virginia Rails would use this area.
>>>> 
>>>> Today using my Birdjam, I first tried a Marsh Wren playback once or
>> twice
>>>> and got no response.  Then I played the King Rail recording and got no
>>>> response.  Then I tried the Virginia Rail and nothing responded.  Then
>> I
>>>> played the Sora recording and a King Rail responded.  Then I tried
>>> playing
>>>> the King Rail recording again and maybe the Virginia Rail too and
>> nothing
>>>> responded.  Then I decided to play the Common Yellowthroat recording
>>>> because it was suitable habitat for them.  Two King Rails responded to
>>> the
>>>> CoYe recording.  Out of curiosity, I also played the Screech Owl but
>> got
>>> no
>>>> response from the rails.
>>>> 
>>>> I have found in the past that birds will often not respond to their own
>>>> recording but will respond to other bird recordings.  I'm not sure why
>>> they
>>>> do that but know that it often pays off to mix up the recording
>> playbacks
>>>> to see who will want to be heard.
>>>> 
>>>> At least I was finally successful in getting one rail species to
>> respond.
>> 
Subject: Re: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
From: William Bergen <wpbergen AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 13:24:24 -0600
> On Feb 6, 2015, at 11:47 AM, William Bergen  wrote:
> 
> Hi All,  
> 
> Here’s the link to a picture of a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker I hope you 
enjoy. 

> 
> 
http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/731403651/photos/3136759/yellow-bellied-sapsucker 

> 
> Bill
Subject: Re: Ringed Kingfisher 2-18
From: Matthew Pontiff <mpontiff AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 07:53:32 -0600
Christine, others,

Taking Hwy 31 from Breaux Bridge and turning on Lake Martin Road, once you hit 
the end of Lake Martin Road you'll be at the boat launch. To the right is the 
original site for the bird. If you turn left, the road curves back and forth 
for a piece before turning into a long straightaway. Near the end of the long 
straightaway is a gentle curve to the right and right before the sharp curve is 
the old rookery site on the right. This is where the fellow had the Kingfisher. 
It's good habitat for one - exposed perches with water that's mostly free of 
the grasses and bushes. 


I'm not the best at giving directions so here's a screenshot of Google maps. 
The black arrow is where the fellow had the bird. 


http://flic.kr/p/qkhwdR

Good luck!

Matt





> On Feb 20, 2015, at 7:26 AM, Christine  wrote:
> 
> Wjere is the old rookery site in relation to the main spot?
> 
> Christine Kooi
> Baton Rouge
Subject: Re: Ringed Kingfisher 2-18
From: Christine <cjkooi AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 07:26:45 -0600
Wjere is the old rookery site in relation to the main spot?

Christine Kooi
Baton Rouge

> Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 22:10:12 -0600
> From: mpontiff AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Ringed Kingfisher 2-18
> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> 
> Folks,
> Just a bit of a heads up for those who are going to look for this bird. We 
were passing by the area today and stopped to try to see it again (no luck) but 
we ran into a photographer who saw it at the old rookery site yesterday. He 
says she was actively moving along the side of the road hunting and was 
vocalizing. He showed us the photo he took and it was the Ringed, not a Belted. 

> 
> If you don't find her at the main spot, it's worth taking a look there. 
> 
> Best,
> 
> Matt
 		 	   		  
Subject: Barataria Preserve "Winter" Bird Count this Saturday--still asking for help
From: David Fox <thedavefox AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 22:22:30 -0600
We're still short-handed and seeking experienced birders for counting birds
on the trail system at the Barataria Preserve this Saturday.  If you can
spare a couple of hours this Saturday morning, please email me at
david_m_fox AT nps DOT gov, or text or call my cell number.  If you're
short on time, then we can give you short trails, and get you on your way
home in a couple of hours.

From my earlier post:

We will meet at the Education Center in the preserve at 7am to assign
trails, and have a brief safety talk.  We ask that volunteers report their
observations on eBird for our records (an eBird kiosk is available if you
don't have a personal account).

We should be done before noon, and if weather permits, then I will offer a
pontoon boat ride to bird some shorelines and canals in the park for up to
8 volunteers.  A very limited number of spots are available on an airboat
for volunteers who are experienced in shore, marsh, and water bird ID.
There is a chance of rain, and some trails are muddy, so please bring warm
rain-gear, boots, and a water bottle.  There will be a few snacks available
at the Education Center at the morning meeting.

Google Map for the Barataria Preserve:


https://www.google.com/maps/place/Barataria+Preserve+Unit-Jean/ AT 29.7805239,-90.1181285,15z/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x8620a28e8cac5909:0x4efe81586569b98c 


The entrance to the Education Center is on the east side of Hwy 45
(Barataria Blvd.) about 100yds. south of the entrance to the Visitors
Center indicated on the map.

Thank you!
David M. Fox
Biological Sciences Technician

Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve

6588 Barataria Boulevard

Marrero, Louisiana 70072

C: (504) 382-9640 (preferred)

O: (504) 689-4277
Subject: Ringed Kingfisher 2-18
From: Matthew Pontiff <mpontiff AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 22:10:12 -0600
Folks,
 Just a bit of a heads up for those who are going to look for this bird. We 
were passing by the area today and stopped to try to see it again (no luck) but 
we ran into a photographer who saw it at the old rookery site yesterday. He 
says she was actively moving along the side of the road hunting and was 
vocalizing. He showed us the photo he took and it was the Ringed, not a Belted. 


If you don't find her at the main spot, it's worth taking a look there. 

Best,

Matt
Subject: Re: Rail Response to Playback
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 22:05:06 -0600
Peter, Bet that was hilarious! Interesting stuff. That would've been a neat
moment to catch on video, to say the least!

Not quite along the same lines, but somewhat-  Some years ago, while Jeff
Trahan and I were working a quad for the Louisiana Winter Bird Atlas
somewhere east of here, we spotted a Pine Siskin a few hundred feet away
from where we were. The bird was perched on a high power line. We then
hoped for a closer look and to see if it had any friends nearby so I dialed
it up and hit play. However, a good second BEFORE the first audible sound,
a  "zhree" call, hit the speakers, the bird made a rapid beeline for us,
flying just over our head by mere feet and landing close by. To this day, I
still don't see how the bird could have heard the sound before it even came
out but it certainly appeared that it did.

Terry

On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 9:31 PM, Peter H Yaukey  wrote:

> Years ago sports writer George Plimpton wrote about a foray he took into
> birding in which he was with someone who played a King Rail tape, but had
> not advanced the tape far enough before pushing the play button (those of
> my generation will recall that the original Peterson tapes had each species
> introduced by a narrator giving the species name and field guide page it
> could be found on).  The tape boomed out "Page 69, King Rail" across the
> marsh before being hurriedly shut off before any of the call was played;
> the rail immediately ran from the reeds out into the open and scanned the
> surroundings.
>
> PY
> ________________________________________
> From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds [
> LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] on behalf of Terry Davis [terkchip AT GMAIL.COM]
> Sent: Thursday, February 19, 2015 7:33 PM
> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Rail Response to Playback
>
> Steve/ all, In my experience over the years, this frequently happens
> between Sora and Virginia Rail- where one species will often respond more
> quickly to playback of the other. While not certain if this phenomenon
> pertains only to the grunt call (VIRA) and whinny call (SORA), which are
> the two most frequent types that I use for each of these two species at the
> edge of the marsh, it certainly seems to happen more frequently when using
> these two types of calls. Cool stuff!
>
> (:
>
> Terry
>
> On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 7:15 PM, John Romano  wrote:
>
> > Thanks for posting your experimenting - results are very interesting.
> >
> > John Romano
> > Breaux Bridge
> >
> >
> >
> > On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 7:00 PM, Stephen Pagans  wrote:
> >
> > > I went by a nice wetland in southwest Ouachita Parish about 11:00  this
> > > morning to see what could be found.  After just looking at Google
> Earth,
> > I
> > > would estimate that the wetland is about 100 acres in size and is at
> > least
> > > a mile long.  I suspect it was originated by beaver activity.  I have
> > been
> > > by this wetland in past times and have tried for rails every time I
> > stopped
> > > there but have never been successful in getting a response from them.
> I
> > > figured both King and Virginia Rails would use this area.
> > >
> > > Today using my Birdjam, I first tried a Marsh Wren playback once or
> twice
> > > and got no response.  Then I played the King Rail recording and got no
> > > response.  Then I tried the Virginia Rail and nothing responded.  Then
> I
> > > played the Sora recording and a King Rail responded.  Then I tried
> > playing
> > > the King Rail recording again and maybe the Virginia Rail too and
> nothing
> > > responded.  Then I decided to play the Common Yellowthroat recording
> > > because it was suitable habitat for them.  Two King Rails responded to
> > the
> > > CoYe recording.  Out of curiosity, I also played the Screech Owl but
> got
> > no
> > > response from the rails.
> > >
> > > I have found in the past that birds will often not respond to their own
> > > recording but will respond to other bird recordings.  I'm not sure why
> > they
> > > do that but know that it often pays off to mix up the recording
> playbacks
> > > to see who will want to be heard.
> > >
> > > At least I was finally successful in getting one rail species to
> respond.
> > >
> >
>
Subject: Re: Rail Response to Playback
From: Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey AT UNO.EDU>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 03:31:22 +0000
Years ago sports writer George Plimpton wrote about a foray he took into 
birding in which he was with someone who played a King Rail tape, but had not 
advanced the tape far enough before pushing the play button (those of my 
generation will recall that the original Peterson tapes had each species 
introduced by a narrator giving the species name and field guide page it could 
be found on). The tape boomed out "Page 69, King Rail" across the marsh before 
being hurriedly shut off before any of the call was played; the rail 
immediately ran from the reeds out into the open and scanned the surroundings. 


PY
________________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] on behalf of Terry Davis [terkchip AT GMAIL.COM] 

Sent: Thursday, February 19, 2015 7:33 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Rail Response to Playback

Steve/ all, In my experience over the years, this frequently happens
between Sora and Virginia Rail- where one species will often respond more
quickly to playback of the other. While not certain if this phenomenon
pertains only to the grunt call (VIRA) and whinny call (SORA), which are
the two most frequent types that I use for each of these two species at the
edge of the marsh, it certainly seems to happen more frequently when using
these two types of calls. Cool stuff!

(:

Terry

On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 7:15 PM, John Romano  wrote:

> Thanks for posting your experimenting - results are very interesting.
>
> John Romano
> Breaux Bridge
>
>
>
> On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 7:00 PM, Stephen Pagans  wrote:
>
> > I went by a nice wetland in southwest Ouachita Parish about 11:00  this
> > morning to see what could be found.  After just looking at Google Earth,
> I
> > would estimate that the wetland is about 100 acres in size and is at
> least
> > a mile long.  I suspect it was originated by beaver activity.  I have
> been
> > by this wetland in past times and have tried for rails every time I
> stopped
> > there but have never been successful in getting a response from them.  I
> > figured both King and Virginia Rails would use this area.
> >
> > Today using my Birdjam, I first tried a Marsh Wren playback once or twice
> > and got no response.  Then I played the King Rail recording and got no
> > response.  Then I tried the Virginia Rail and nothing responded.  Then I
> > played the Sora recording and a King Rail responded.  Then I tried
> playing
> > the King Rail recording again and maybe the Virginia Rail too and nothing
> > responded.  Then I decided to play the Common Yellowthroat recording
> > because it was suitable habitat for them.  Two King Rails responded to
> the
> > CoYe recording.  Out of curiosity, I also played the Screech Owl but got
> no
> > response from the rails.
> >
> > I have found in the past that birds will often not respond to their own
> > recording but will respond to other bird recordings.  I'm not sure why
> they
> > do that but know that it often pays off to mix up the recording playbacks
> > to see who will want to be heard.
> >
> > At least I was finally successful in getting one rail species to respond.
> >
>
Subject: Mountain bluebird continues
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 20:01:29 -0600
Hi All,
There have been some tries recently for the MOBL that have failed. So, I
was really happy to receive an email from Cecil Tarver letting me know that
he did see the bird yesterday at approx 1pm at the usual location. She flew
up to the utility wire as he drove up and was able to observe her for two
minutes.
Best,
Janine Robin
Subject: Re: Rail Response to Playback
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 19:33:06 -0600
Steve/ all, In my experience over the years, this frequently happens
between Sora and Virginia Rail- where one species will often respond more
quickly to playback of the other. While not certain if this phenomenon
pertains only to the grunt call (VIRA) and whinny call (SORA), which are
the two most frequent types that I use for each of these two species at the
edge of the marsh, it certainly seems to happen more frequently when using
these two types of calls. Cool stuff!

(:

Terry

On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 7:15 PM, John Romano  wrote:

> Thanks for posting your experimenting - results are very interesting.
>
> John Romano
> Breaux Bridge
>
>
>
> On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 7:00 PM, Stephen Pagans  wrote:
>
> > I went by a nice wetland in southwest Ouachita Parish about 11:00  this
> > morning to see what could be found.  After just looking at Google Earth,
> I
> > would estimate that the wetland is about 100 acres in size and is at
> least
> > a mile long.  I suspect it was originated by beaver activity.  I have
> been
> > by this wetland in past times and have tried for rails every time I
> stopped
> > there but have never been successful in getting a response from them.  I
> > figured both King and Virginia Rails would use this area.
> >
> > Today using my Birdjam, I first tried a Marsh Wren playback once or twice
> > and got no response.  Then I played the King Rail recording and got no
> > response.  Then I tried the Virginia Rail and nothing responded.  Then I
> > played the Sora recording and a King Rail responded.  Then I tried
> playing
> > the King Rail recording again and maybe the Virginia Rail too and nothing
> > responded.  Then I decided to play the Common Yellowthroat recording
> > because it was suitable habitat for them.  Two King Rails responded to
> the
> > CoYe recording.  Out of curiosity, I also played the Screech Owl but got
> no
> > response from the rails.
> >
> > I have found in the past that birds will often not respond to their own
> > recording but will respond to other bird recordings.  I'm not sure why
> they
> > do that but know that it often pays off to mix up the recording playbacks
> > to see who will want to be heard.
> >
> > At least I was finally successful in getting one rail species to respond.
> >
>
Subject: Re: Rail Response to Playback
From: John Romano <birderjuan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 19:15:47 -0600
Thanks for posting your experimenting - results are very interesting.

John Romano
Breaux Bridge



On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 7:00 PM, Stephen Pagans  wrote:

> I went by a nice wetland in southwest Ouachita Parish about 11:00  this
> morning to see what could be found.  After just looking at Google Earth, I
> would estimate that the wetland is about 100 acres in size and is at least
> a mile long.  I suspect it was originated by beaver activity.  I have been
> by this wetland in past times and have tried for rails every time I stopped
> there but have never been successful in getting a response from them.  I
> figured both King and Virginia Rails would use this area.
>
> Today using my Birdjam, I first tried a Marsh Wren playback once or twice
> and got no response.  Then I played the King Rail recording and got no
> response.  Then I tried the Virginia Rail and nothing responded.  Then I
> played the Sora recording and a King Rail responded.  Then I tried playing
> the King Rail recording again and maybe the Virginia Rail too and nothing
> responded.  Then I decided to play the Common Yellowthroat recording
> because it was suitable habitat for them.  Two King Rails responded to the
> CoYe recording.  Out of curiosity, I also played the Screech Owl but got no
> response from the rails.
>
> I have found in the past that birds will often not respond to their own
> recording but will respond to other bird recordings.  I'm not sure why they
> do that but know that it often pays off to mix up the recording playbacks
> to see who will want to be heard.
>
> At least I was finally successful in getting one rail species to respond.
>
Subject: Re: Rail Response to Playback
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 19:10:56 -0600
Steve,

On 2/19/2015 7:00 PM, Stephen Pagans wrote:

> I have found in the past that birds will often not respond to their own 
recording but will respond to other bird recordings. I'm not sure why they do 
that but know that it often pays off to mix up the recording playbacks to see 
who will want to be heard. 

>
> At least I was finally successful in getting one rail species to respond.

By sheer chance, I discovered that a recording of Mangrove Cuckoo played 
on the coast during northward migration will drive Yellow-billed Cuckoos 
beserk!  Had no luck calling Mangrove Cuckoos.

Nan

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibr
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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