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Updated on Friday, December 19 at 11:51 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Otus Asio,©David Sibley

19 Dec No Subject [Lizette Wroten ]
19 Dec Calculating "party hours by car" on CBCs [James V Remsen ]
19 Dec Feeder birds up [Roselie Overby ]
19 Dec Mountain Bluebird still present in Washington Parish [Casey Wright ]
19 Dec Fwd: Good information on ABDU and MODU separation [Paul Dickson ]
19 Dec Fewer Backyard Birds? Need More Coyotes.... [rex davey ]
18 Dec Mountain Bluebird-Bethel Rd/SE Research Center/E Daniels rd/Dummyline, Dec 18, 2014 [Claire Thomas ]
18 Dec FW: eBird Report - Franklinton - Bethel Rd/E Daniels Rd, Dec 17, 2014 [Tom Trenchard ]
18 Dec Double-crested Cormorant and White Pelican's in flight [William Bergen ]
18 Dec Vermilion Flycatcher [Winston Caillouet ]
18 Dec Mountain bluebird [janine robin ]
18 Dec Lucy's Warbler YES ["Johnson, Erik" ]
17 Dec Re: Mt Bluebird Washington Parish [janine robin ]
17 Dec Mt Bluebird Washington Parish [Mary Mehaffey ]
17 Dec Teche Lk. Canal Rd., Iberia Par., LA, Dec 17, 2014 [Michael Musumeche ]
17 Dec Re: Mountain Bluebird female in Washington parish [janine robin ]
17 Dec Mountain Bluebird female in Washington parish [janine robin ]
17 Dec Subject: Re: Lac/Thorn CBC and the Ferruginous Hawk [Little Tweet ]
17 Dec LALIT: Gulf Coast Seaside Sparrow population genetics [James V Remsen ]
16 Dec Re: Lac/Thorn CBC and the Ferruginous Hawk [Claire Thomas ]
16 Dec Claiborne CBC highlights [John Dillon ]
16 Dec Lac/Thorn CBC and the Ferruginous Hawk [Dave Patton ]
15 Dec Audubon avian biologist position opening ["Johnson, Erik" ]
15 Dec St. Tammany CBC, Sunday, Jan 4th. [Linda Beall ]
15 Dec Two BUORs ? [Lizette Wroten ]
15 Dec Burrowing Owl at Grande Isle [BURLEY PHILLIPS ]
14 Dec Hooded mergansers Washington parish [janine robin ]
14 Dec Possible female spotted towhee in New Orleans city park. [Ed Wallace ]
13 Dec Summer Tanager [Stephen Pagans ]
13 Dec Dark morph Ferriginous still present ["Steven W. Cardiff" ]
13 Dec Clay-colored Sparrow and other highlights [John Dillon ]
13 Dec Nice view at Mandeville trailhead [janine robin ]
12 Dec Fwd: eBird Report - Damiano Rd, Folsom, Dec 12, 2014 [janine robin ]
12 Dec Re: More birds moving in yard/property [Bill Fontenot ]
12 Dec Re: Eared Grebe in W. Feliciana Par. [Christine ]
11 Dec venice CBC [dan purrington ]
12 Dec Eared Grebe in W. Feliciana Par. [James V Remsen ]
11 Dec More birds moving in yard/property [Roselie Overby ]
11 Dec Thornwell area 12/10/15 ["Steven W. Cardiff" ]
11 Dec Greater Scaup in Metairie [Chris Johnston ]
11 Dec Sam Houston State Park [thomas finnie ]
10 Dec RRNWR Yates tract- excellent afternoon!- 12/10/14 [Terry Davis ]
11 Dec migrating Robin pulse [James V Remsen ]
10 Dec LNG and Cameron [Little Tweet ]
10 Dec Fw: eBird Report - Pearl River WMA--Honey Island Swamp, Dec 9, 2014 [Harvey Patten ]
10 Dec President of National Audubon Society on Saving Louisiana's Coast [David Muth ]
10 Dec Bird by Bird [Martha Avegno ]
10 Dec chipping sparrows [cecil tarver ]
10 Dec Re: LNG and Cameron [Tom Hickcox ]
10 Dec Chipping sparrows [janine robin ]
10 Dec Re: LNG and Cameron [Sue Broussard ]
9 Dec BUOR [Lizette Wroten ]
9 Dec LNG and Cameron [Dave Patton ]
10 Dec Christmas Bird Count resources ["Johnson, Erik" ]
9 Dec Re: Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron [Jay V Huner ]
9 Dec Re: Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron ["Jon W. Wise" ]
9 Dec Re: Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron [Jay V Huner ]
9 Dec Re: Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron [Claire Thomas ]
9 Dec Fwd: Pelicans herding fish in our cove [Terry Davis ]
9 Dec Grand Isle Air Potato Round-up Reminder [JOELLE FINLEY ]
9 Dec Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron ["Judith O'Neale" ]
9 Dec Re: shortage of feeder birds [David Muth ]
9 Dec Mouton Cove and vicinity, Dec 9, 2014 [Michael Musumeche ]
9 Dec shortage of feeder birds [Little Tweet ]
9 Dec Primary Bander Needed in Greater New Orleans Area [Katie Brasted ]
8 Dec Re: shortage of feeder birds [Terry Davis ]
8 Dec Re: shortage of feeder birds [Toddy Guidry ]
8 Dec Re: shortage of feeder birds ["Laird, Suzanne" ]
8 Dec Re: shortage of feeder birds [Lizette Wroten ]
8 Dec Re: shortage of feeder birds ["Jeffrey W. Harris" ]
8 Dec missing yardbirds [Little Tweet ]
8 Dec Re: shortage of feeder birds [James V Remsen ]
8 Dec Re: shortage of feeder birds [Roselie Overby ]
8 Dec Re: Pine Siskin, Bayou Sauvage NWR, New Orleans [Wendy Rihner ]
8 Dec Re: shortage of feeder birds ["Steven W. Cardiff" ]
8 Dec Re: shortage of feeder birds [David Muth ]

Subject: No Subject
From: Lizette Wroten <lkwroten AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 22:22:43 -0600
Labirders, several people have expressed an interest in coming to see the
Bullock's, if it establishes a routine. The male appeared to be doing so,
coming to the birdbaths between 9 and 11 am. He did this through the day
the female appeared, but I haven't seen either since. I'm wondering if the
last front sent them packing, since it coincided with her appearance and
their apparent departure.
I'll keep looking and report here if I see either bird again.

Lizette Wroten
Subject: Calculating "party hours by car" on CBCs
From: James V Remsen <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 21:53:27 +0000
LABIRD: just a reminder for party leaders and compilers on CBCs because there 
always seems to be confusion about this: 


“Party hours by car” is chronically over-estimated on LA CBCs because many 
people think that all the time spent birding by car along roadsides fits this 
category, and that “party hours by foot” refers only to hikes away from the 
car. 


“Party-hours by car” refers to time spent INSIDE a moving or stationary 
vehicle, when your visual and audio detection radius is limited by being inside 
the vehicle — that’s the whole idea of separating out these hours. When you’re 
outside the car, you are “on foot” — it’s no different than when you are 
stationary anywhere else just because you are on a road with a car nearby. If 
you are using a car as a blind, then that is indeed “phrs by car." 


It’s very easy to just think of all that stop-and-go roadside birding as “phrs 
by car”, and very difficult to keep track of how much time you’re actually 
INSIDE the car. What I do is take the total number of MILES BY CAR and then use 
an average between-top traveling speed to estimate my “phrs by car”, e.g. if 
you’re mileage was 15 miles and you have a rough estimate of 30 mph between 
stops, then that would be 30 minutes of “phrs by car”. I doubt very many of us 
rack up more than an hour of actual “phrs by car” on a CBC. 


Van Remsen


=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: Feeder birds up
From: Roselie Overby <rosebird8791 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 13:56:06 -0600
There has definitely been an increase of feeder birds over the last week.  I
had FOS for the yard 2 Blue-headed Vireos and 1 Orange-crowned Warbler over
the weekend. Yesterday an immature White-Crowned Sparrow was on a feeder
with N. Cardinals and down on the ground with White-throated Sparrows this
morning.  A flock of at least 9 House Finches were feeding at noon today
along with plenty of cardinals and wt sp.  The lard suet mix disappears
quickly, probably mainly due to Blue Jays now being in yard more frequently.

On the property Tuesday, I finally saw an FOS Brown Creeper feeding in a
couple of oak trees with a mixed flock of RC and GC Kinglets, T. Titmouse,
YB Sapsucker, Downy wp, Red-bellied wp, and YR Warblers.  I guess it was a
buggy area; saw several of the little birds going through the leaves that
were still clinging to a red oak. 

I hope this increase will continue tomorrow for the D'Arbonne CBC,
Roselie Overby
Oak Grove in W. Carroll Parish
Subject: Mountain Bluebird still present in Washington Parish
From: Casey Wright <wright.949 AT ME.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 12:39:15 -0600
The Mountain Bluebird is still present in the same area as previous sightings. 
I first observed it on a power line and then it flew to the barbed wire fence 
across the road. I first arrived at 10:50 but didn't see the bird until noon. 


Casey Wright
Grand Isle, LA
Subject: Fwd: Good information on ABDU and MODU separation
From: Paul Dickson <Paul AT MORRISDICKSON.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 18:34:57 +0000
This from Texbirds via David Arbour. Thanks David.  Timely and very thorough.
Paul Dickson



http://downtoearthquestions.blogspot.com/2014/12/notes-on-separating-mottled-and.html 

Subject: Fewer Backyard Birds? Need More Coyotes....
From: rex davey <athena_9 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 05:41:18 -0800
Labird

Some have reported encountering fewer backyard songbirds than usual for this 
time of year. I can't say that's the case in our Baton Rouge (Inniswold 
Estates) yard, especially the last few days when a big mixed species flock has 
taken over the patio area. Myrtle warblers, Am. Goldfinches, Ruby-crowned 
Kinglets and Orange-crowned Warblers are all hanging out together with resident 
C. Chickadees & T. Titmice, swarming over our fountain, blooming camellia, and 
Live Oak canopy like noisy teenagers at the mall. 


One thing we have that others might not have, though, besides lots of 
multi-level cover & natural forage, is coyotes. Oh, yeah....a nice little (well 
at least 3 by their chorus) pack come and go in these parts. And I'm glad, even 
though I must occasionally sacrifice a few of my low-hanging citrus fruits to 
them. I'm glad, because the coyote commonly feeds upon a species that is a 
proven major population reducer (I would say "decimator" but taken literally, 
and according to recent Smithsonian research, that word probably minimizes the 
impact) for songbirds, and that is, the introduced invasive exotic Felis catus. 
The Housecat. 


So, if you live in the Baton Rouge area, and this year you've noticed fewer 
songbirds than usual, it might not be your failure to be observant about this 
year's abundant mast, seed, and nut crops. This year, a non-profit group that 
has taken over management of the local animal control facility and which 
successfully lobbied to excuse all housecats from the parish leash law, is 
bragging in a recent fundraising letter that this year they have brought down 
the shelter's housecat euthanasia rate from 90% to a "release rate for cats to 
76%". With truly gone-to-the-wild, un-adoptable feral cats comprising a small 
percentage, and cat adoption still rates not rising nearly enough to fill in 
that gap, that means quite a few other-than-feral cats are being released into 
the outdoor environment. How many, who knows, because this group's records are 
not open to the public. 


So, if you have coyotes, don't complain about them. And if you don't have 
them...well...I don't know anyone who would or could release some in your 
neighborhood (though that's an idea maybe for a business...), but as a 
do-it-yourself habitat gardener, I can tell you how to maybe attract some. 
Seriously. 


First, they really love to eat Loquats, figs, pears, and citrus fruit that hang 
low or fall on the ground. Especially ones that the coons pick and only 
partially consume. And they adore big brush piles. But probably most important 
attractant is a "wildlife corridor" being nearby----like overgrown drainage 
corridors that used to be creeks and bayous, or, adjacent thickly vegetated or 
wooded remnants. So let the part of your property that's nearest that kind of 
area grow wild. And oh yeah...they like lots of loose housecats! (And we 
definitely have that one covered around here---seems like a new one appears in 
our yard every week) If you have a small dog, though, you might want to keep it 
inside, in a dog yard, or on a leash. And don't worry about your kids. Coyotes 
generally don't eat humans. 


Mother Nature finding a way...gotta luv her!

MiriamLDavey
BatonRougeLA
Subject: Mountain Bluebird-Bethel Rd/SE Research Center/E Daniels rd/Dummyline, Dec 18, 2014
From: Claire Thomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 21:21:29 -0600
> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Subject: eBird Report - Bethel Rd/SE Research Center/E Daniels rd/Dummyline, 
Dec 18, 2014 

> Date: December 18, 2014 at 9:20:36 PM CST
> To: claire AT clairedthomas.com
> 
> Bethel Rd/SE Research Center/E Daniels rd/Dummyline, Washington, US-LA
> Dec 18, 2014 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 3.0 mile(s)
> Comments: Observers: Janine Robin and Claire Thomas. Mountain Bluebird that 
Janine found a few days ago was re-found in the same spot (on Dummyline Rd. 
adjacent to the asphalt plant) on the power line and on barbed wire fence. It 
seems to be unaffected by the noise from the plant, trucks coming and going nor 
the 2 people directly under it trying to take pictures. 

> 28 species (+1 other taxa)
> 
> Great Egret  1
> Cattle Egret  5
> Black Vulture  4
> Turkey Vulture  5
> Killdeer  4
> Wilson's Snipe  4
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  2
> Mourning Dove  3
> American Kestrel  4
> Eastern Phoebe  3
> Loggerhead Shrike  1
> Blue Jay  3
> American Crow  5
> Carolina Chickadee  2
> House Wren  1
> Carolina Wren  2
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
> Eastern Bluebird  7
> Mountain Bluebird 1 Much like an Eastern Bluebird but void of reddish chest 
and blue back. Mostly grey above with some blue in flight feathers. Blue rump. 
White undertail. Slight reddish color under chin. 

> 
>  

> 
>  

> American Robin  1
> Northern Mockingbird  3
> European Starling  12
> Palm Warbler  3
> Palm Warbler (Western)  3
> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  15
> Savannah Sparrow  10
> Northern Cardinal  1
> Common Grackle  3
> Brown-headed Cowbird  8
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20949499 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
> 
Subject: FW: eBird Report - Franklinton - Bethel Rd/E Daniels Rd, Dec 17, 2014
From: Tom Trenchard <trench19 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 13:30:10 -0600
LaBirders,
 
Trip to Washington Parish produced the Mountain Bluebird that
Janine Robin found.  Details below.
 
Tom T. 

*************
Tom Trenchard
Covington, LA
*************

> Franklinton - Bethel Rd/E Daniels Rd, Washington, US-LA
> Dec 17, 2014 11:50 AM - 1:30 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.2 mile(s)
> Comments: Includes adjacent CC Road. Cloudy, mild, light breeze, moderate 
humidity. Total of 2.2 miles driving, from 11:50AM to 1:30PM (1 hr, 40 mins). 
Observers: Mary Mehaffey & Tom Trenchard. Notable: Mountain Bluebird (female). 

> 37 species
> 
> Anhinga  1     pond area behind barns on Bethel Rd.
> Great Blue Heron  1     pond area behind barns on Bethel Rd.
> Great Egret  1     pond area behind barns on Bethel Rd.
> Black Vulture  49     Bethel Rd - overhead and on ground.
> Turkey Vulture  3     overhead.
> Northern Harrier  1     Bethel Rd - overhead (female).
> Killdeer  13     pond area behind barns on Bethel Rd.
> Wilson's Snipe  3     pond area behind barns on Bethel Rd.
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  15
> Mourning Dove  2
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1     pond area behind barns on Bethel Rd.
> American Kestrel  1     Bethel Rd.
> Eastern Phoebe  3
> Loggerhead Shrike  1     Bethel Rd.
> Blue Jay  2
> American Crow  7
> Fish Crow  1
> Carolina Chickadee  1
> House Wren  1
> Carolina Wren  2
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  6
> Eastern Bluebird  7
> Mountain Bluebird 1 CC Rd - asphalt/gravel company - on fence and utility 
line. Many photos; previously reported (originally found) by Janine Robin on 
Sunday, 12/14/14. Details submitted on 3x5 and long form (TT/MM). Photos: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/tomtpix/15861788087/ 

> https://www.flickr.com/photos/tomtpix/15860092508/
> American Robin  1
> Northern Mockingbird  2
> Orange-crowned Warbler  1
> Palm Warbler  3     CC Rd.
> Pine Warbler  1     CC Rd.
> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  10     conservative count.
> Eastern Towhee  1
> Chipping Sparrow  5     pond area behind barns on Bethel Rd.
> Savannah Sparrow  6
> Song Sparrow  2     pond area behind barns on Bethel Rd.
> Swamp Sparrow  1     pond area behind barns on Bethel Rd.
> White-crowned Sparrow  4     pond area behind barns on Bethel Rd.
> Northern Cardinal  1     CC Rd.
> House Sparrow  5     Bethel Rd barns; conservative estimate.
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20939698 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

 		 	   		  
Subject: Double-crested Cormorant and White Pelican's in flight
From: William Bergen <wpbergen AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 12:28:33 -0600
Hey Folks,

Here is a couple of shots I managed to get at the Spillway the other day, the 
links are below. 


Hope you have a good trip Saturday. 

Bill




http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/731403651/photos/3096144/2490-white-pelican-1200x800 



http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/731403651/photos/3095298/2418-double-crested-cormorant1200x800 

Subject: Vermilion Flycatcher
From: Winston Caillouet <lincwinc AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 11:10:16 -0600
Watching an immature male Vermilion Flycatcher feed along a fence row on road 
to LSU Ag Farm offices off Ben Hur Rd. 


Winston Caillouet


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Mountain bluebird
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 09:36:21 -0600
Still in same area as yesterday.
Subject: Lucy's Warbler YES
From: "Johnson, Erik" <ejohnson AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 13:50:33 +0000
Still present on Grand Isle in the Gilletta tract at the same spot. Brush area 
along back levee NE part of reserve. Got photos. Great to have on the Grand 
Isle CBC! 


Erik Johnson


Sent via the Samsung GALAXY S®4, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Re: Mt Bluebird Washington Parish
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 12:31:09 -0600
Glad it is still there, so it has been there at least 3 days now!
On Dec 17, 2014 12:28 PM, "Mary Mehaffey"  wrote:

> Tom Trenchard and I have just seen and photographed the female Mt bluebird
> on Dummyline Rd on fence by gravel hills.
> Mary
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
Subject: Mt Bluebird Washington Parish
From: Mary Mehaffey <m11mehaffey AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 12:27:51 -0600
Tom Trenchard and I have just seen and photographed the female Mt bluebird on 
Dummyline Rd on fence by gravel hills. 

Mary

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Teche Lk. Canal Rd., Iberia Par., LA, Dec 17, 2014
From: Michael Musumeche <mjmusumeche AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 12:10:45 -0600
LaBirders,

This morning I birded areas near the Teche Lake Canal located a few miles 
east of New Iberia just off of the Loreauville Road. Nothing outstanding 
except overwintering N. Rough-winged Swallows that have been using this 
areas for many years, see photo links in list.

Mike

Teche Lk. Canal Rd., Iberia Par., LA, Iberia, US-LA
Dec 17, 2014 7:25 AM - 10:35 AM
Protocol: Traveling
4.5 mile(s)
41 species

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

Great Blue Heron  1
Great Egret  78
Cattle Egret  3
White Ibis  133
Turkey Vulture  51     Most birds were sitting close to each other in the
upper branches of trees lining the canal.; a few were soaring above the
canal; 1x1 count.
Red-shouldered Hawk  2
Red-tailed Hawk  3
Killdeer  13
Eurasian Collared-Dove  4
Red-bellied Woodpecker  6
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  3
American Kestrel  4
Eastern Phoebe  10
Loggerhead Shrike  2
Blue Jay  16
American Crow  13
Fish Crow  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  41     For over 15 years there has been a
colony of these swallows that spend the winter months at that location; 1x1
count, photos.
www.flickr.com/photos/117923878 AT N03/16043416662
www.flickr.com/photos/117923878 AT N03/16018341766
Carolina Chickadee  1
House Wren  1
Marsh Wren  1
Carolina Wren  8
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  6
Eastern Bluebird  2
American Robin  36
Brown Thrasher  1
Northern Mockingbird  10
European Starling  6
American Pipit  22
Orange-crowned Warbler  5
Pine Warbler  2
Yellow-rumped Warbler  28
Chipping Sparrow  12
Savannah Sparrow  154
Song Sparrow  1
Swamp Sparrow  10
White-throated Sparrow  3
Northern Cardinal  15
Red-winged Blackbird  20
Rusty Blackbird  2
Common Grackle  8

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20936186

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



_______________________________________________________________
^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^
Mike Musumeche
New Iberia, LA 70560
mjmusumeche AT cox.net



_______________________________________________________________
^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^
Mike Musumeche
New Iberia, LA 70560
mjmusumeche AT cox.net 
Subject: Re: Mountain Bluebird female in Washington parish
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 10:46:53 -0600
3x5 and longform to follow soon.​

On Wed, Dec 17, 2014 at 10:44 AM, janine robin 
wrote:
>
> ​Hi,
> Bird was seen on Sunday, so may be gone by now. Sorry for the late post,
> but didn't know that I had taken several pictures of such a rare bird until
> this morning when I downloaded my pictures.
> Verified ID with Van.
> Here is the link to the checklist with a couple of pictures.
> Location was actually on Dummyline which is also CC road. Just passed the
> Asphalt plant where there is a small fenced in area with gas? meters. Palm
> warblers along the fenced in area and bluebird was above that spot where
> the utility line crosses the road.
>  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/email?subID=S20935337
>
Subject: Mountain Bluebird female in Washington parish
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 10:44:53 -0600
​Hi,
Bird was seen on Sunday, so may be gone by now. Sorry for the late post,
but didn't know that I had taken several pictures of such a rare bird until
this morning when I downloaded my pictures.
Verified ID with Van.
Here is the link to the checklist with a couple of pictures.
Location was actually on Dummyline which is also CC road. Just passed the
Asphalt plant where there is a small fenced in area with gas? meters. Palm
warblers along the fenced in area and bluebird was above that spot where
the utility line crosses the road.
 http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/email?subID=S20935337
Subject: Subject: Re: Lac/Thorn CBC and the Ferruginous Hawk
From: Little Tweet <pekinrobin AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 10:12:14 -0600
Wow.  Agreed.  Impressive photos indeed.
 		 	   		  
Subject: LALIT: Gulf Coast Seaside Sparrow population genetics
From: James V Remsen <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 15:58:31 +0000
LABIRD: pdf available at: 
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0112739 


Population Genetics of Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus
maritimus) Subspecies along the Gulf of Mexico

Stefan Woltmann1¤*, Philip C. Stouffer1, Christine M. Bergeon Burns1, Mark S. 
Woodrey2, 

Mollie F. Cashner3, Sabrina S. Taylor1

Abstract
Seaside Sparrows (Ammodramus maritimus) along the Gulf of Mexico are currently 
recognized as four subspecies, including 

taxa in Florida (A. m. juncicola and A. m. peninsulae) and southern Texas 
(Ammodramus m. sennetti), plus a widespread taxon 

between them (A. m. fisheri). We examined population genetic structure of this 
‘‘Gulf Coast’’ clade using microsatellite and 

mtDNA data. Results of Bayesian analyses (STRUCTURE, GENELAND) of 
microsatellite data from nine locations do not entirely align 

with current subspecific taxonomy. Ammodramus m. sennetti from southern Texas 
is significantly differentiated from all 

other populations, but we found evidence of an admixture zone with A. m. 
fisheri near Corpus Christi. The two subspecies 

along the northern Gulf Coast of Florida are significantly differentiated from 
both A. m. sennetti and A. m. fisheri, but are not 

distinct from each other. We found a weak signal of isolation by distance 
within A. m. fisheri, indicating this population is not 

entirely panmictic throughout its range. Although continued conservation 
concern is warranted for all populations along 

the Gulf Coast, A. m. fisheri appears to be more secure than the far smaller 
populations in south Texas and the northern 

Florida Gulf Coast. In particular, the most genetically distinct populations, 
those in Texas south of Corpus Christi, occupy 

unique habitats within a very small geographic range.


=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: Re: Lac/Thorn CBC and the Ferruginous Hawk
From: Claire Thomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 21:22:07 -0600
Nice shots of the hawk and bittern. 

Claire Thomas
claire AT clairedthomas.com



On Dec 16, 2014, at 8:54 PM, Dave Patton  wrote:

> Labird,
> I was a late volunteer for the Lacassine/Thornwell CBC and Steve Cardiff 
offered a few options. One was to ride the combine as Kevin Berkin cut his last 
fields of rice. The Ferruginous Hawk had been attracted to the cutting on 
several days prior, and that would be a thrill. I broke away from Goose Island 
team and met Kevin Colley, Jennifer Alexander, and Mara ? from Lake Charles at 
the combine. The field was full of rails including 19 Yellows, and the hawk 
finally made an appearance just as we were finishing the last field. It dove 
into the field a couple of times and gave good looks as it patrolled the 
combine. It reappeared one last time as we reached the cars to get off the 
combine, and Van Remsen and Mike Harvey were driving up. It gave a nice showing 
and then drifted off over the cut rice fields. It was reported again late in 
the day around Hwy 99 east of Thornwell. 

> My partial ebird list with a few photo links at:
> 
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20931251 
> 
> Dave Patton
> Lafayette
> 
Subject: Claiborne CBC highlights
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 21:21:52 -0600
Thanks to all 14 birders who birded the 11th Claiborne CBC today. Preliminary 
totals/highlights/lowlights follow: 


105 species with 7 teams. 

5 American Wigeon - count first
2 Redhead 
1 Red-breasted Merganser
11th year for Bald Eagle
Harlan's Hawk with photos - count first
2 Virginia Rail
1 Inca Dove
2 Red-breasted Nuthatch
1 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
11th year for Gray Catbird
4 LeConte's Sparrow
9th year for Lincoln's Sparrow
Rusty Blackbird
Brewer's Blackbird
Purple Finch
Pine Siskin

Shameful misses:
Gadwall
American Pipit

John Dillon
Compiler

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Lac/Thorn CBC and the Ferruginous Hawk
From: Dave Patton <wdpatton AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 21:54:13 -0500
Labird,
I was a late volunteer for the Lacassine/Thornwell CBC and Steve Cardiff 
offered a few options. One was to ride the combine as Kevin Berkin cut his last 
fields of rice. The Ferruginous Hawk had been attracted to the cutting on 
several days prior, and that would be a thrill. I broke away from Goose Island 
team and met Kevin Colley, Jennifer Alexander, and Mara ? from Lake Charles at 
the combine. The field was full of rails including 19 Yellows, and the hawk 
finally made an appearance just as we were finishing the last field. It dove 
into the field a couple of times and gave good looks as it patrolled the 
combine. It reappeared one last time as we reached the cars to get off the 
combine, and Van Remsen and Mike Harvey were driving up. It gave a nice showing 
and then drifted off over the cut rice fields. It was reported again late in 
the day around Hwy 99 east of Thornwell. 

My partial ebird list with a few photo links at:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20931251 

Dave Patton
Lafayette
Subject: Audubon avian biologist position opening
From: "Johnson, Erik" <ejohnson AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 20:31:00 +0000
LAbirders,

I wanted to let you know that Audubon Louisiana is advertising a full-time 
position opening for an avian biologist to start at our office this winter. The 
position will be largely focused on accomplishing several field projects we 
have in place as well as performing other office duties. Please feel free to 
spread this to your networks as we're hoping to find the best person available 
for the job. 

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/2293/avian-biologist/job

If anyone has any questions, please feel free to contact me off-list.

Cheers,
Erik Johnson
Director of Bird Conservation
Audubon Louisiana/National Audubon Society
Ejohnson AT Audubon.org
Subject: St. Tammany CBC, Sunday, Jan 4th.
From: Linda Beall <lbeall AT MINILOGIC.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 13:48:56 -0600
The St. Tammany CBC covers Mandeville, Madisonville, Covington, and 
Abita Springs.  This year the count is Sunday, January 4, 2015.  (Sorry 
if that is a play-off day...I like football too!)

If you would like to participate, please email your contact information 
(home phone, cellphone, preferred email address, etc.) to 
lbeall AT minilogic.com or hummbander AT yahoo.com.  Once you are assigned to 
an area, the Party Leader for that section will contact you to arrange a 
meeting place and time on count day.

For the post-count tally, we will meet from 5pm to 7pm at the Picadilly 
Cafeteria, 69008 Highway 190 Service Rd., next to the Hampton Inn in the 
northeast quadrant of the I-12/US 190 interchange.

Last but not least...regretfully, this will be my final year as Compiler 
of the St. Tammany Count.  I will be happy to help transition whoever is 
willing to pick up the role and will pass along all the information, 
maps, and spreadsheets I have amassed over the years.

Linda Beall
Covington, LA
St. Tammany Parish
Subject: Two BUORs ?
From: Lizette Wroten <lkwroten AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 13:09:40 -0600
The immature male Bullock's brought a friend to the birdbaths this morning.
I'm guessing it's a 1st year female BUOR ?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/89510826 AT N05/sets/72157649680668392/

Lizette Wroten
Harahan, La.
Subject: Burrowing Owl at Grande Isle
From: BURLEY PHILLIPS <bcphil315 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 08:06:15 -0800
Our birding group will be at Grande Isle beginning Jan 2 for a few days. Has 
anyone seen the burrowing owl lately? If so, could you give us directions... he 
will be a lifer for two of our group. 


Thanks,
Carolyn Phillips
Belcher, LA (NW Caddo Parish)
Subject: Hooded mergansers Washington parish
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 11:51:26 -0600
Hello,
Anyone who would like to see 50 Hooded mergansers, they are in the large
retention pond at Windmill nursery on hwy 25  just over the St Tammany
parish line. The pond is on the west side of the hwy and can be seen
clearly from the road.
Fast moving traffic, so if you go......be cautious.
Janine Robin
Subject: Possible female spotted towhee in New Orleans city park.
From: Ed Wallace <mottledduck AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 09:06:00 -0600
All,

In the field across form Couturie Woods I first heard a call that sounded 
vaguely like a spotted towhee - spree! After pishing up a good selection of 
winter warblers, a female towhee popped up. What was noticeable were two 
things. It had considerable spotting on the wing. Two us that there was a 
contrast between the head and wings. The head looked greyish and the wings had 
a slight bluish tinge to them. It was not the brownish back I see on female 
eastern towhees. 


I am going to try to get a picture with my eye phone. I broke the cardinal rule 
and went birding without my camera. It is actively calling right now and may be 
easy to refind. 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Summer Tanager
From: Stephen Pagans <slp_4-7 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 15:17:07 -0800
I went to D'Arbonne Lake today. At the dam on the south side, I saw three 
Greater Scaup but nothing else out of the ordinary. 


I next went to the north end of Pleasure Island Road where I have previously 
had some good sightings. Just after getting there I found a Summer Tanager, 
apparent female that was quite green. I looked for anything else special on the 
lake but found nothing uncommon. 


Gerry Click came up from Ruston to try to see the tanager but missed. We also 
went on to Highway 33 boat launch road but again did not find anything 
uncommon. 


It was a nice surprise to find such a late Summer Tanager. 
Subject: Dark morph Ferriginous still present
From: "Steven W. Cardiff" <scardif AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 13:59:01 -0600
About 1/2-1 mi. S of Thornwell, 1/4-1/2 mi W of Potter Road at rice harvest 
site. Harvest finished, but bird appears and disappears. Also flushed a 
Bobolink from the rice but unable to relocate and document. About a dozen 
Yellow Rails. Nice count week birds for Lac-Thorn CBC. 


Steve Cardiff

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Clay-colored Sparrow and other highlights
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 11:11:51 -0600
Scouted a few locations for this Tuesday’s Claiborne CBC this morning and had 
a pretty decent day. Numbers definitely seem to have increased a good bit over 
the last 2 weeks. 


Best find of the day was a Clay-colored Sparrow on some private property and 
foraging in the hay inside an unoccupied cattle pen with 5 Savannah Sparrows. 
(Terry Davis and Jim Ingold, this was in YOUR CBC territory; I’ll get with 
you very soon about it). This was my first December record for the parish. At 
the same location, I had 3 LeConte’s Sparrows in an overgrown fence row while 
I was looking for Bewick’s Wren or Harris’s Sparrow. The fence row is 
between a road and a very large, hilly pasture, the grass of which I’d say is 
far too thick for LCSP. I don’t think I’ve ever had LCSP in a fence row, 
certainly not 3. Got pics of 1 perched about 15 feet up in the top of a small 
Chinaberry tree. 


Went to the LSU Hill Farm (almost completely private now) after the first 
location and had a decent time there. Both locations together yielded 13 
sparrow species. Had 2 Virginia Rails and 2 Sedge Wren in my “rail spot” at 
the Hill Farm and 1 LeConte’s up the hill from it. Tried for Marsh Wren with 
no luck; never had them in the parish past mid-November. 


John Dillon
Athens, LA
Subject: Nice view at Mandeville trailhead
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 10:29:06 -0600
8 white pelicans and THREE adult bald eagles!!
St Tammany parish.
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Damiano Rd, Folsom, Dec 12, 2014
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 19:13:53 -0600
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: 
Date: Dec 12, 2014 7:12 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Damiano Rd, Folsom, Dec 12, 2014
To: 
Cc:

Damiano Rd, Folsom, St. Tammany, US-LA
Dec 12, 2014 2:32 PM - 3:22 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.4 mile(s)
Comments:     Wanted to check on the 5 HOME that I saw on 12/10. They were
not there today and no wonder......saw the feathers of one on the ground
next to the pond. Weather was mild today and partly cloudy. Submitted from
BirdLog NA for Android v1.9.6
24 species (+1 other taxa)

Downy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
American Kestrel  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Loggerhead Shrike  1
White-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  9
Carolina Chickadee  3
Brown-headed Nuthatch  1
House Wren  1
Carolina Wren  3
Eastern Bluebird  4
American Robin  70
Cedar Waxwing  25
Orange-crowned Warbler  1
Palm Warbler (Western)  1
Palm Warbler (Yellow)  1
Pine Warbler  2
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  21
Song Sparrow  1
White-throated Sparrow  3
Northern Cardinal  5
Common Grackle  5
American Goldfinch  25

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20873918

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Re: More birds moving in yard/property
From: Bill Fontenot <natrldlite AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 16:07:42 +0000



The old 'be careful what you wish for' was true today as 2 Eurasian Collared
Doves fed at the back feeders.  I shouldn't have said I'd seen no doves!  A
few more common birds which have been absent lately showed up at feeders the
last 2 days--House Finch, C. Grackle (oh joy), Am Goldfinch.  On a quick
walk around part of the property, I scared up a FOS Sedge Wren.  While
pishing it up, I managed to also get up close a lovely adult White-eyed
Vireo.  
Roselie Overby
Oak Grove in W. Carroll Parish


similar to you roselie, this week’s weather pattern swept a nice crop of 
Nearctic birds into our neck of the woods………we already had a large 
(150-300) flock of robins, joyfully (songfully) hunting thru the abundant 
hackberry crop in the neighborhood over the past two weeks; and this week they 
invaded our yard with its dozen or so water features, clogging up the dishes, 
thrown bowls, hypertufa bowls, and baths all day long for two days running with 
their drinking and bathing…..….things have indeed dried out around here 
over the past 6 weeks or so….. on the lil’ salad dish on our back porch 
rail alone I counted six bird species using it on wed morning, including our 
long-lost pals the Yellow-rumpeds………this was the same day we experienced 
a scary fly-by from a large flock of CoGr…..they’ve got their place, I 
know, but hates it hates it hates it when they invade the sanctuary of our 
backyard, snapping at any little bird in sight..............… 



speaking of little birds, “our winter wren” show up FOS this morning (12 
dec)……at least one month late....….whew! it ain’t winter down here in 
da’ bayou without our winter wren………..which got me to thinking how 
arduous of a journey it must be for such a mouse-like little fluff of a bird to 
navigate thru North America version 2014; not a once-in-a-lifetime lord of the 
rings type mission, but a TWICE-PER-YEAR expedition which they routinely make 
with nothing but the feathers on their backs…..and wings…..and you 
know…..tails….heads….bellies………u get the 
picture.............................… 



and not only winter wren but sedge & marsh wrens & CoYe and all those with 
not-so-much-for-wings..............................................……....................…it’s 
like Huh? WHAT?!!??? let’s go ahead & use the two most overused words in 
america’s pop-lexicon: AWESOME!…..INCREDIBLE!…..I mean, if some 
pop-star’s recent visit to ……wherever….. was awesome and incredible, 
then how should we describe the unimaginable(?) bi-annual journeys made by a 
winter wren over the course of his little life? 



here i’m gonna propose that we put the holiday season to some good use, 
focusing on developing some real empathy for the plight of north American 
birds.....….they give us so much pleasure -- for some, the main avenue to 
happiness in their lives -- ain’t it time to give some back? gift them with a 
lil’ extra breathing room? 



in this giving season please donate to bird conservation organizations who are 
making a difference via PURCHASING/ACQUIRING LANDS to restore and conserve as 
breeding, foraging, migration, and wintering habitats for 
birds...............…now, more than ever……….surely well past time to 
walk the walk, y’all.....…….. 



jolly ol’ bill fontenot

lower prairie basse

upper Lafayette parish, LA
Subject: Re: Eared Grebe in W. Feliciana Par.
From: Christine <cjkooi AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 07:24:17 -0600
Are these lakes accessible to the general public?

Christine Kooi
Baton Rouge

> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 01:09:30 +0000
> From: najames AT LSU.EDU
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Eared Grebe in W. Feliciana Par.
> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> 
> LABIRD: today I did a brief survey of some lakes in W. Feliciana Par.. Best 
bird — Eared Grebe — a tough bird anywhere near Baton Rouge. Other 
mentionables: 90 Bonaparte’s Gulls (a first eBird record for W. Feliciana), 70 
Snow Geese, 3 Com. Gallinules, and 1 richardsonii Merlin. Very few “winter” 
birds. 

> 
> Van Remsen
> 
> 
> =================
> 
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> najamesLSU.edu
 		 	   		  
Subject: venice CBC
From: dan purrington <oceanites1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2014 19:26:11 -0600
The Venice count will be held on friday, Jan. 2.  If you need info,
preferably contact me by phone, 504-717-3283.  But we will meet at the
donut shop in Ballestra's parking lot in Belle Chasse at 5:30 a.m.
Latecomers can call me at that number.

Dan Purrington
Subject: Eared Grebe in W. Feliciana Par.
From: James V Remsen <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 01:09:30 +0000
LABIRD: today I did a brief survey of some lakes in W. Feliciana Par.. Best 
bird — Eared Grebe — a tough bird anywhere near Baton Rouge. Other 
mentionables: 90 Bonaparte’s Gulls (a first eBird record for W. Feliciana), 70 
Snow Geese, 3 Com. Gallinules, and 1 richardsonii Merlin. Very few “winter” 
birds. 


Van Remsen


=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: More birds moving in yard/property
From: Roselie Overby <rosebird8791 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2014 16:51:36 -0600
The old 'be careful what you wish for' was true today as 2 Eurasian Collared
Doves fed at the back feeders.  I shouldn't have said I'd seen no doves!  A
few more common birds which have been absent lately showed up at feeders the
last 2 days--House Finch, C. Grackle (oh joy), Am Goldfinch.  On a quick
walk around part of the property, I scared up a FOS Sedge Wren.  While
pishing it up, I managed to also get up close a lovely adult White-eyed
Vireo.  
Roselie Overby
Oak Grove in W. Carroll Parish
Subject: Thornwell area 12/10/15
From: "Steven W. Cardiff" <scardif AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2014 16:02:34 -0600
Labirders-
     Donna and I made another Thornwell (S. Jefferson Davis Parish) run
yesterday 12/15 to take advantage of ongoing and unusually late rice
harvesting.  We rode the rice combine for the better part of 6 hours.
Yellow Rail numbers were not spectacular, but we estimated a respectable 25
individuals in about 50 acres of rice.  Soras were plentiful, with at least
200, followed by Virginia Rail (about 30), King Rail (3), and the usual
hundreds of Marsh Wrens, about 75 Sedge Wrens, and smaller numbers of Le
Conte's Sparrows.  Unexpected was a CLAPPER RAIL- this bird was noticeably
smaller, paler, and grayer than the Kings that were observed; we've had a
couple of other Clappers in this area over the years, but it's always a
surprise to find one away from their beloved salt marshes.  Also nice was a
Short-eared Owl repeatedly flushed out of the rice. There were quite a few
hawks attracted to the rice harvest activities.  Mostly Red-taileds,
including a nice Krider's Red-tailed and one or two late immature
Swainson's Hawks.  Several Merlins were present and were zipping around the
combine attempting to pick-off flushed birds.  At least one of the Merlins
captured a hapless Savannah Sparrow.  I wish we had video of this
phenomenon.

    By far the best bird of the day was a dark morph adult FERRUGINOUS
HAWK.  This bird was first seen about noon, approximately 1/4 mi. east of
Hwy. 99, about 1 mi. north of Hwy. 14.  It circled the harvest site and
landed briefly in the cut rice.  Initially, we weren't able to get good
looks from the moving combine in the dust cloud, but Donna got a couple of
photos and as it flew away we suspected Ferruginous.  While the combine
shifted to a new harvest site closer to Thornwell (immediately south of the
grain complex), we drove around looking for the mystery hawk but could not
relocate it.  I kept my fingers crossed that it would come back to the
combine once we started cutting rice at the new site.  Sure enough, it
eventually appeared and circled overhead long enough for Donna to get off
the combine and snap more photos.  This may be the first documented
occurrence of a dark morph individual in Louisiana.  Hopefully, the bird
will remain in the area for Sunday's Lac-Thorn CBC.

Cheers,

Steve
Subject: Greater Scaup in Metairie
From: Chris Johnston <cmjohnston AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2014 13:46:17 -0600
I was out walking my youngest in Lafreniere park and I saw six Greater
Scaup. I watched them for about 2-3 minutes while consulting my field guide
app to make sure. I'm not sure if this is rare, but I've never noticed
them there before. I don't really do the whole e-bird thing (I don't keep
any kind of list) so I didn't submit a report.

Chris Johnston


-- 
Christopher Johnston - Digital Marketer and Social Media Strategist
504-388-6865 Google Voice
Subject: Sam Houston State Park
From: thomas finnie <finnie.tom AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2014 07:43:52 -0600
Labirders,

A few species of birds were out and about at Sam Houston Jones State Park
in Calcasieu Parish yesterday. Billy Jones and I had fun watching and
photographing some of them.

Pictures at http://tfinnie.blogspot.com/

Best,
Tom
Subject: RRNWR Yates tract- excellent afternoon!- 12/10/14
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2014 22:38:02 -0600
Hi all, Charlie Lyon and I did rather well for a trip thrown together at
the last minute. We arrived at Yates at 1:10 and birded until dark at 5:45.
We ended the day with 75 spp and really good numbers of a few considering
the late date. Ducks were in decent numbers. Waders were somewhat low. Some
shorebirds were in exceptional numbers considering date- as were Sedge Wren
and a couple of others. N Cardinal, E Towhee and a few others were in
notably low numbers. Bold-face misses were AMCO, ECDO, MODO, EUST, CEWX and
COYE (latter sp a miss for this loc). ZERO DOVES! EAME is now infrequently
found as we do not survey the field to the sw near 401 and hwy 1- formerly
surveyed in some previous years- which is located just outside the refuge
boundaries. EAME would be a miss here during fall migration, though.
Highlights were-

American White Pelican- 323 (high for loc)- counted singly. Highs trending
here as elsewhere with these and DCCO

DCCO- 650

Black-crowned Night-Heron- 1. Somewhat unusual at this loc later in winter,
not elsewhere along Red River.

Sharp-shinned Hawk- 1. Little gray bullet low to west into dense barn area
thicket.

Virginia Rail- 9

Sora- 5

Sandhill Crane- 2. Heard calling, then observed high to northeast.

Greater Yellowlegs- 117!- Counted singly at barn pond and units.

Lesser Yellowlegs- 2. Unit 7

STILT SANDPIPER- 3. Late!! Unit 7.

Least Sandpiper- 108. Barn pond and units. Not really high- but flagged.
LBDO- 55- also surprisingly flagged.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker- 12

House Wren- 10

Marsh Wren- 8

Sedge Wren- 28. Four observed within spitting distance on two occasions.
Conservative in terms of included h.o. portion of count. A count of 100++
would likely be possible if areas covered well during calm conditions and
birds were consistent with response.

Blue-gray Gnat- 1

More(bid) details at-

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20858549

((;

Terry Davis
Subject: migrating Robin pulse
From: James V Remsen <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2014 00:31:44 +0000
LABIRD: almost 1200 Am. Robins were tallied overhead this morning, mostly going 
SW or W — a good count by recent years’ standards. About 120 Cedar Waxwings 
were also mixed in, so the strong showing continues. Also of interest (to me 
anyway) was a squadron of 55 Turkey Vultures that were moving E this morning — 
one of my highest counts in 24 years at my place. 


Van Remsen, near St. Gabriel


=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: LNG and Cameron
From: Little Tweet <pekinrobin AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2014 10:49:36 -0600
I would question how many of these projects are really going to go forward as 
we head back to a world of $2 a gallon gas. Valuable resources won't stay in 
the ground whatever we birders may say. But resources that are more trouble to 
get than they're worth are a different matter...My guess (which could be 
completely wrong) is that a lot of these proposed projects are going to get 
mothballed if the price of oil keeps sliding. There's nothing wrong with 
birders asking questions, they SHOULD ask questions, but I think larger 
economic issues will decide what happens and not the people of Louisiana. I 
don't think it's right or fair that we don't decide our own fate. But I do 
think it is what it is...The worst case for birds, I suppose, is a project that 
gets stalled during construction, resulting in a spoiled environment with no 
benefit to anyone. 

 		 	   		  
Subject: Fw: eBird Report - Pearl River WMA--Honey Island Swamp, Dec 9, 2014
From: Harvey Patten <puffin AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2014 08:42:30 -0800
Labirders,
 
My reason for conducting this particular search is to fill in some no-data 
weeks for the Honey Island bargraph for the month of December. 

 
Harvey L. Patten
Covington

 
On Wednesday, December 10, 2014 10:37 AM, "ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu" 
 wrote: 

  


Pearl River WMA--Honey Island Swamp, St. Tammany, US-LA
Dec 9, 2014 6:10 AM - 10:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
4.0 mile(s)
Comments: I birded along Old Hwy 11 to Oil Well Rd. and south on Oil Well for 
2.3 miles. I also walked .5 mi. along the northern portion of the nature trail. 

39 species

Wood Duck  39
Double-crested Cormorant  12
Great Blue Heron  1
Great Egret  2
Black Vulture  1
Turkey Vulture  6
Osprey  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  2
Killdeer  15
Forster's Tern  2
Mourning Dove  4
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-headed Woodpecker 23 Most were observed on Old Hwy 11 between the entrance 
kiosk and Oil Well Rd. 

Red-bellied Woodpecker  22
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  5
Northern Flicker  8
Pileated Woodpecker  8
Eastern Phoebe  8
Loggerhead Shrike  1
Blue-headed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  14
Fish Crow  1
Carolina Chickadee  11
Tufted Titmouse  17
Carolina Wren  7
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  17
Eastern Bluebird  2
Hermit Thrush  1
American Robin  3
Gray Catbird  3
Brown Thrasher  1
Orange-crowned Warbler  3
Yellow-rumped Warbler  10
White-throated Sparrow  8
Northern Cardinal  14
Red-winged Blackbird  4
Common Grackle  38
American Goldfinch  7

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20853273 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/)
Subject: President of National Audubon Society on Saving Louisiana's Coast
From: David Muth <MuthD AT NWF.ORG>
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2014 16:34:46 +0000
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-yarnold/saving-louisiana_b_6295326.html

David Yarnold
President, National Audubon Society
Saving Louisiana
Posted: 12/09/2014

Louisiana is disappearing. Every year, land mass equal to the size of Manhattan 
is lost--simply washed out to sea off the continental shelf in the Gulf of 
Mexico. 

Louisiana's crisis is out of sight and out of mind. When Katrina roared into 
New Orleans with no natural wetlands barrier to slow that killer storm, America 
cared for a hot minute. 

But after that catastrophe and even after the BP oil disaster, there's just no 
sense of urgency about the disappearance of America's Gulf Coast. 

That's stunning when you take a giant step back: The Mississippi River Delta in 
Louisiana is the seventh-largest system of its kind in the world and one of 
only two in the Western Hemisphere. And the truly remarkable opportunity in 
front of us is that we have a chance to make amends, a once-in-a-lifetime 
chance to restore this magical, productive ecosystem of coastal wetlands. 

It's not just Louisiana's people, economy, culture and wildlife that are at 
risk. The Mississippi River Delta is connected to a vast network of waterways 
throughout the heartland of America, contributing tens of billions of dollars 
to our national economy every year and supporting millions of jobs. 

Nearly half of America's bird species use the Gulf Coast at some point in their 
migration. And those birds are the indicators of the health of places. The 
imperiled Piping Plover flies across the entire country to the Gulf Coast from 
nesting grounds on the Canadian border, the Great Lakes and New England. A 
large number of those Piping Plovers depend on the Gulf Coast wetlands and the 
Mississippi River Delta for their winter survival. 

Louisiana has developed a bipartisan coastal master plan that identifies 109 
different projects that should be completed over the next half century to help 
preserve and expand existing wetlands. 

We need to be far more careful about the slicing and dicing of coastal wetlands 
with canals and industrial infrastructure. We need to set up a structure of 
state and federal agencies with the authority to end the bureaucratic turf wars 
that have left some restoration efforts in limbo for years. Louisiana 
politicians and citizens need to keep the state's ambitious master plan on 
track. 

Federal and state authorities need to make sure the money from all 
sources--public and private--intended for coastal protection and restoration 
goes to protecting our wetlands, not to building civic centers and highways or 
to plug other holes in the state's budget. 

A recent study by Audubon underscores the urgency for preserving the coastal 
wetlands for birds. Nearly half of the birds in North America could lose over 
50 percent of the areas where they live before the end of this century, 
according to 30 years of data collected and analyzed by Audubon. In addition to 
the Piping Plover, threatened species include Louisiana's state bird, the Brown 
Pelican, and the Roseate Spoonbill, a showy pink wading bird with an oversized 
spoon-shaped bill. 

The coastal plains of Louisiana and neighboring Texas are going to be critical 
"strongholds"--places that in the future will provide the right habitat for 
birds that are forced out of other ranges because the weather becomes too wet 
or too dry, too hot or too cold. These "strongholds" will give vulnerable birds 
a fighting chance to hold on in the face of climate change. 

This is not Louisiana's problem; this is America's Great Delta. To see how you 
can take action, visit here. 

David Yarnold is President and CEO of the National Audubon Society
David P. Muth
Director
Gulf Restoration Program
National Wildlife Federation
3801 Canal Street, Suite 325
New Orleans, Louisiana 70119
504.348-3518
504.872-5993 cell
muthd AT nwf.org
Subject: Bird by Bird
From: Martha Avegno <elliea AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2014 09:05:45 -0600
Great piece on climate change,energy sources & birds.

From The New York Times:

Are We Missing the Big Picture on Climate Change?

Stories about smaller environmental problems can distract us from the 
slow-motion calamity that will eventually threaten every living being. 



http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/07/magazine/are-we-missing-the-big-picture-on-climate-change.html?mwrsm=Email 



M. Ellie Avegno
Sent by iPhone 
Subject: chipping sparrows
From: cecil tarver <exk5hdl AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2014 08:29:17 -0600
I have 30 chippers on my feeder this morning

-- 
Cecil Tarver
28026 s satsuma rd #9
Livingston,La 70754
20 mi east of Baton Rouge
central livingston parish
exk5hdl AT yahoo.com
225 435 4090
Subject: Re: LNG and Cameron
From: Tom Hickcox <cometkazie1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2014 09:10:41 -0500
On 12/10/2014 04:03, Sue Broussard wrote:
> It will not only be the impact of the facilities. There will have to be 
housing for all they employ. It won't take long before they start filling in 
everyplace they can and turning it into subdivisions. Cameron residents maybe 
excited now, just wait til they have to sit in traffic every day. 

> Sue

How many fulltime workers will the plant employ?

Tom
Subject: Chipping sparrows
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2014 07:25:45 -0600
Good morning,
Doing my usual "sunroom birding" this morning. Counted 32 chippers on the
ground eating scattered seed. A few white-throateds mixed in.
Janine Robin
Folsom, NW corner of St Tammany parish.
Subject: Re: LNG and Cameron
From: Sue Broussard <suebrou AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2014 04:03:28 -0500
It will not only be the impact of the facilities. There will have to be housing 
for all they employ. It won't take long before they start filling in everyplace 
they can and turning it into subdivisions. Cameron residents maybe excited now, 
just wait til they have to sit in traffic every day. 

Sue 




---- Dave Patton  wrote: 
> I have been getting the Cameron Pilot and the whole area is going LNG crazy. 
A project that has passed through all the permitting phases and soon to begin 
construction is the facility on Monkey Island. It will be just as large as the 
E Jetty facility. See web site: 

> http://www.sctelng.com/
> 
> The LNG facility we pass just north of Hackberry is just about ready in it's 
conversion from import to export. The LNG facility on the Sabine River is 
nearing completion as well. That will be 4 giant LNG liquefaction and export 
facilities in SW Louisiana. Three of them on the Calcasieu River with two of 
them in the town of Cameron The last map I saw regarding access to East Jetty 
was along the route into East Jetty Woods. 

> Dave Patton
> Lafayette
Subject: BUOR
From: Lizette Wroten <lkwroten AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2014 22:49:20 -0600
Well, there's a bright side to having a rain deficit....it brings birds in
to my birdbaths, including some that probably wouldn't appear in my yard if
the normal watering holes weren't absent or gross.
A Phoebe's been coming by for a daily "sip n dip,"  and today an immature
male Bullock's Oriole did too. I'm assuming this is the same bird I
photographed on the old golf course next door on 11-24. Got some really bad
pics through a really dirty window that can be seen here;
https://www.flickr.com/photos/89510826 AT N05/sets/72157649680668392/

Lizette Wroten
Harahan, La.
Subject: LNG and Cameron
From: Dave Patton <wdpatton AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2014 23:48:53 -0500
I have been getting the Cameron Pilot and the whole area is going LNG crazy. A 
project that has passed through all the permitting phases and soon to begin 
construction is the facility on Monkey Island. It will be just as large as the 
E Jetty facility. See web site: 

http://www.sctelng.com/

The LNG facility we pass just north of Hackberry is just about ready in it's 
conversion from import to export. The LNG facility on the Sabine River is 
nearing completion as well. That will be 4 giant LNG liquefaction and export 
facilities in SW Louisiana. Three of them on the Calcasieu River with two of 
them in the town of Cameron The last map I saw regarding access to East Jetty 
was along the route into East Jetty Woods. 

Dave Patton
Lafayette
Subject: Christmas Bird Count resources
From: "Johnson, Erik" <ejohnson AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2014 02:09:29 +0000
LAbirders,

As many of you know, the 115th annual Christmas Bird Count will take place 
between 14 December and 5 January. For those interested in participating in the 
count, but do not know how or where to get started, I wanted to quickly provide 
some useful resources. 


There are 25 active count circles in Louisiana. Each count circle is 15 miles 
in diameter, and this map illustrates where they are: 

http://bit.ly/1ujziPn

A short summary of how to participate and what to expect can be found on the 
Audubon Louisiana website: 

http://la.audubon.org/programs/audubon-christmas-bird-count

Marty Floyd put together a great resource on the Louisiana Ornithological 
Society website, letting you know who to contact for each count (the compiler), 
and the date each count is planning to occur: 

http://losbird.org/cbc/cbc_2014_15.pdf

And of course, if you have any specific questions not answered by these 
resources, feel free to contact me off-list. 


Happy counting!
Erik Johnson
Louisiana Regional Christmas Bird Count Editor
ejohnson AT audubon.org
Subject: Re: Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2014 19:42:19 -0600
John,

That is my point - there must be mitigation. You can bet that the plant owner 
will minimize the mitigation as much as possible. 


Jay

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jon W. Wise" 
To: "Jay V Huner" , LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Sent: Tuesday, December 9, 2014 6:50:46 PM
Subject: RE: [LABIRD-L] Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron

Based on the attached plat, it is hard to see how an LNG terminal of that size 
and that location will not have a deleterious effect on the immediate area. I 
would assume the plant owner has to file an EIS, and if so, this should be 
studied carefully and comments made by concerned entities and individuals. 
Hopefully, at the very least, this might result in the plant spending some 
money to improve an area of equal size nearby so there is no net loss of 
habitat. 


Jon W. Wise
Fowler Rodriguez
400 Poydras Street, 30th Floor
New Orleans, LA 70130
(504) 595-5113 (direct)
(504) 495-7844 (cell)
jwise AT frfirm.com

and

Four Houston Center
1331 Lamar, Suite 1560
Houston, TX 77010
(713) 654-1560







-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jay V Huner 

Sent: Tuesday, December 09, 2014 6:07 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron

Friends,

Some years ago, there was a controversy about putting up cell towers in the 
Atchafalaya Basin. A well known naturalist was asked to speak out against the 
towers which could be expected to cause wildlife and fisheries issues. The 
naturalist made the point that in a practical world, the towers were needed 
much to the chagrin of the naysayers. 


Our society needs energy and it needs income. Some could make the argument that 
the jetty system at Cameron itself is a serious environmental problem but the 
jetties are a wonderful place to bird, fish and recreate. 


Notice how our state has had to reduce its budget in mid-fiscal year every year 
for the past 6 years? Theoretically, the LNG plant would generate taxes and 
income for Cameron Parish, in particular, and the state in general. 


I would encourage concerned citizens to find out what is proposed and what 
mitigation is to be provided to compensate for environmental damage. Further, 
concerned citizens should insist that mitigation is appropriate and properly 
developed. To this end, it is good that there is a long history of birding in 
the area with specific sites addressed in e-bird data. 


Regards,


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Claire Thomas" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Tuesday, December 9, 2014 5:48:10 PM
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron

This is going to become a larger problem the more fracking is introduced into 
LA. Injection wells, LNG plants and the actual well sites are going to impact 
wetlands, water and air quality and quality of life for many in this state. 


Claire Thomas
claire AT clairedthomas.com



On Dec 9, 2014, at 2:15 PM, Judith O'Neale 
<00000069de77060c-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote: 


>
> I received this from Cyndi Sellers today. If you look at the proposed site, 
it is right before the east jetties. 

>
>
>
>
> 
http://venturegloballng.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/CalcasieuPass_ERR_1024_opt.jpg 

>
>
>
>
> Cyndi has come up with some good questions. Please send other comments to 
Cyndi at cyndisell at camtel.net 

>
>
>
>
> It would be good if some of you could attend. Open house announcement can be 
downloaded at this web site: 

>
> http://venturegloballng.com/vg-lng/ December 11 - 5-7 p.m. Cameron Parish 
School Board Conference Center 

>
> 512 Marshall, Cameron
>
>
>
>
>
> FROM CYNDI SELLERS:
>
>
> I think the LOS and others might be interested in the new Venture Global LNG 
plant that is being proposed for the east side of the Calcasieu River at 
Cameron. There is a site plan and flyer for an open house on Thursday, Dec. 11 
in Cameron. The site plan is a little alarming to me. www.venturegloballng.com 

>
>
>
>
> As this will be the only public meeting before FERC accepts the application, 
there are some questions that need to be asked. I will do so, but I’m 
restricted by my position as a reporter from commenting (hard as that is for 
me). 

>
>
>
> How will the public access the Jetty Pier?
>
> How much noise will the plant produce, affecting visitors and wildlife?
>
> How will the loss of wetlands be mitigated?
>
> How will the loss of coastal woods be mitigated, if at all?
>
> How high will the land be raised to accommodate storm surge?
>
> Where will the runoff from the elevated portion go?
>
> What kind of fumes will the plant produce?
>
> What kind of warning system will be used in case of a natural gas leak (the 
RV park is right next door and residents are within a mile). 

>
> How will the ship berths affect navigation and local fishing operations?
>
>
>
> Perhaps you and others can think of more questions. If you can’t come I 
will ask them. 

>
> Cyndi Sellers, Cameron

Confidentiality Notice: The information contained in this email message and any 
attachments is protected under the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 18 
U.S.C.A. 2310-2321. It may contain information that is confidential and 
protected by the attorney/client and/or the attorney/work product privileges. 
It constitutes non-public information intended to be conveyed only to the 
designated recipient(s). It is intended only for the use of the individual 
named above and the privileges are not waived by virtue of this having been 
sent by email If the reader or recipient of this communication is not the 
intended recipient, an employee or agent of the intended recipient who is 
responsible for delivering it to its intended recipient, or you believe that 
you have received this communication in error, please notify the sender 
immediately by return email or by calling Fowler Rodriguez at (504) 523-2600 
and promptly delete this email, including attachments without reading or saving 
the! 

 m in any manner. The unauthorized use, dissemination, distribution, or 
reproduction of this e-mail, including attachments, is prohibited and may be 
unlawful 

Subject: Re: Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron
From: "Jon W. Wise" <jwise AT FRFIRM.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2014 18:50:46 -0600
Based on the attached plat, it is hard to see how an LNG terminal of that size 
and that location will not have a deleterious effect on the immediate area. I 
would assume the plant owner has to file an EIS, and if so, this should be 
studied carefully and comments made by concerned entities and individuals. 
Hopefully, at the very least, this might result in the plant spending some 
money to improve an area of equal size nearby so there is no net loss of 
habitat. 


Jon W. Wise
Fowler Rodriguez
400 Poydras Street, 30th Floor
New Orleans, LA 70130
(504) 595-5113 (direct)
(504) 495-7844 (cell)
jwise AT frfirm.com

and

Four Houston Center
1331 Lamar, Suite 1560
Houston, TX 77010
(713) 654-1560







-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jay V Huner 

Sent: Tuesday, December 09, 2014 6:07 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron

Friends,

Some years ago, there was a controversy about putting up cell towers in the 
Atchafalaya Basin. A well known naturalist was asked to speak out against the 
towers which could be expected to cause wildlife and fisheries issues. The 
naturalist made the point that in a practical world, the towers were needed 
much to the chagrin of the naysayers. 


Our society needs energy and it needs income. Some could make the argument that 
the jetty system at Cameron itself is a serious environmental problem but the 
jetties are a wonderful place to bird, fish and recreate. 


Notice how our state has had to reduce its budget in mid-fiscal year every year 
for the past 6 years? Theoretically, the LNG plant would generate taxes and 
income for Cameron Parish, in particular, and the state in general. 


I would encourage concerned citizens to find out what is proposed and what 
mitigation is to be provided to compensate for environmental damage. Further, 
concerned citizens should insist that mitigation is appropriate and properly 
developed. To this end, it is good that there is a long history of birding in 
the area with specific sites addressed in e-bird data. 


Regards,


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Claire Thomas" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Tuesday, December 9, 2014 5:48:10 PM
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron

This is going to become a larger problem the more fracking is introduced into 
LA. Injection wells, LNG plants and the actual well sites are going to impact 
wetlands, water and air quality and quality of life for many in this state. 


Claire Thomas
claire AT clairedthomas.com



On Dec 9, 2014, at 2:15 PM, Judith O'Neale 
<00000069de77060c-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote: 


>
> I received this from Cyndi Sellers today. If you look at the proposed site, 
it is right before the east jetties. 

>
>
>
>
> 
http://venturegloballng.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/CalcasieuPass_ERR_1024_opt.jpg 

>
>
>
>
> Cyndi has come up with some good questions. Please send other comments to 
Cyndi at cyndisell at camtel.net 

>
>
>
>
> It would be good if some of you could attend. Open house announcement can be 
downloaded at this web site: 

>
> http://venturegloballng.com/vg-lng/ December 11 - 5-7 p.m. Cameron Parish 
School Board Conference Center 

>
> 512 Marshall, Cameron
>
>
>
>
>
> FROM CYNDI SELLERS:
>
>
> I think the LOS and others might be interested in the new Venture Global LNG 
plant that is being proposed for the east side of the Calcasieu River at 
Cameron. There is a site plan and flyer for an open house on Thursday, Dec. 11 
in Cameron. The site plan is a little alarming to me. www.venturegloballng.com 

>
>
>
>
> As this will be the only public meeting before FERC accepts the application, 
there are some questions that need to be asked. I will do so, but I’m 
restricted by my position as a reporter from commenting (hard as that is for 
me). 

>
>
>
> How will the public access the Jetty Pier?
>
> How much noise will the plant produce, affecting visitors and wildlife?
>
> How will the loss of wetlands be mitigated?
>
> How will the loss of coastal woods be mitigated, if at all?
>
> How high will the land be raised to accommodate storm surge?
>
> Where will the runoff from the elevated portion go?
>
> What kind of fumes will the plant produce?
>
> What kind of warning system will be used in case of a natural gas leak (the 
RV park is right next door and residents are within a mile). 

>
> How will the ship berths affect navigation and local fishing operations?
>
>
>
> Perhaps you and others can think of more questions. If you can’t come I 
will ask them. 

>
> Cyndi Sellers, Cameron

Confidentiality Notice: The information contained in this email message and any 
attachments is protected under the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 18 
U.S.C.A. 2310-2321. It may contain information that is confidential and 
protected by the attorney/client and/or the attorney/work product privileges. 
It constitutes non-public information intended to be conveyed only to the 
designated recipient(s). It is intended only for the use of the individual 
named above and the privileges are not waived by virtue of this having been 
sent by email If the reader or recipient of this communication is not the 
intended recipient, an employee or agent of the intended recipient who is 
responsible for delivering it to its intended recipient, or you believe that 
you have received this communication in error, please notify the sender 
immediately by return email or by calling Fowler Rodriguez at (504) 523-2600 
and promptly delete this email, including attachments without reading or saving 
the! 

 m in any manner. The unauthorized use, dissemination, distribution, or 
reproduction of this e-mail, including attachments, is prohibited and may be 
unlawful 

Subject: Re: Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2014 18:07:16 -0600
Friends,

Some years ago, there was a controversy about putting up cell towers in the 
Atchafalaya Basin. A well known naturalist was asked to speak out against the 
towers which could be expected to cause wildlife and fisheries issues. The 
naturalist made the point that in a practical world, the towers were needed 
much to the chagrin of the naysayers. 


Our society needs energy and it needs income. Some could make the argument that 
the jetty system at Cameron itself is a serious environmental problem but the 
jetties are a wonderful place to bird, fish and recreate. 


Notice how our state has had to reduce its budget in mid-fiscal year every year 
for the past 6 years? Theoretically, the LNG plant would generate taxes and 
income for Cameron Parish, in particular, and the state in general. 


I would encourage concerned citizens to find out what is proposed and what 
mitigation is to be provided to compensate for environmental damage. Further, 
concerned citizens should insist that mitigation is appropriate and properly 
developed. To this end, it is good that there is a long history of birding in 
the area with specific sites addressed in e-bird data. 


Regards,


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Claire Thomas" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Tuesday, December 9, 2014 5:48:10 PM
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron

This is going to become a larger problem the more fracking is introduced into 
LA. Injection wells, LNG plants and the actual well sites are going to impact 
wetlands, water and air quality and quality of life for many in this state. 


Claire Thomas
claire AT clairedthomas.com



On Dec 9, 2014, at 2:15 PM, Judith O'Neale 
<00000069de77060c-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote: 


> 
> I received this from Cyndi Sellers today. If you look at the proposed site, 
it is right before the east jetties. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
http://venturegloballng.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/CalcasieuPass_ERR_1024_opt.jpg 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> Cyndi has come up with some good questions. Please send other comments to 
Cyndi at cyndisell at camtel.net 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> It would be good if some of you could attend. Open house announcement can be 
downloaded at this web site: 

> 
> http://venturegloballng.com/vg-lng/ December 11 - 5-7 p.m. Cameron Parish 
School Board Conference Center 

> 
> 512 Marshall, Cameron
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> FROM CYNDI SELLERS:
> 
> 
> I think the LOS and others might be interested in the new Venture Global LNG 
plant that is being proposed for the east side of the Calcasieu River at 
Cameron. There is a site plan and flyer for an open house on Thursday, Dec. 11 
in Cameron. The site plan is a little alarming to me. www.venturegloballng.com 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> As this will be the only public meeting before FERC accepts the application, 
there are some questions that need to be asked. I will do so, but I’m 
restricted by my position as a reporter from commenting (hard as that is for 
me). 

> 
> 
> 
> How will the public access the Jetty Pier?
> 
> How much noise will the plant produce, affecting visitors and wildlife?
> 
> How will the loss of wetlands be mitigated?
> 
> How will the loss of coastal woods be mitigated, if at all?
> 
> How high will the land be raised to accommodate storm surge?
> 
> Where will the runoff from the elevated portion go?
> 
> What kind of fumes will the plant produce?
> 
> What kind of warning system will be used in case of a natural gas leak (the 
RV park is right next door and residents are within a mile). 

> 
> How will the ship berths affect navigation and local fishing operations?
> 
> 
> 
> Perhaps you and others can think of more questions. If you can’t come I 
will ask them. 

> 
> Cyndi Sellers, Cameron
Subject: Re: Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron
From: Claire Thomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2014 17:48:10 -0600
This is going to become a larger problem the more fracking is introduced into 
LA. Injection wells, LNG plants and the actual well sites are going to impact 
wetlands, water and air quality and quality of life for many in this state. 


Claire Thomas
claire AT clairedthomas.com



On Dec 9, 2014, at 2:15 PM, Judith O'Neale 
<00000069de77060c-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote: 


> 
> I received this from Cyndi Sellers today. If you look at the proposed site, 
it is right before the east jetties. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
http://venturegloballng.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/CalcasieuPass_ERR_1024_opt.jpg 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> Cyndi has come up with some good questions. Please send other comments to 
Cyndi at cyndisell at camtel.net 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> It would be good if some of you could attend. Open house announcement can be 
downloaded at this web site: 

> 
> http://venturegloballng.com/vg-lng/ December 11 - 5-7 p.m. Cameron Parish 
School Board Conference Center 

> 
> 512 Marshall, Cameron
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> FROM CYNDI SELLERS:
> 
> 
> I think the LOS and others might be interested in the new Venture Global LNG 
plant that is being proposed for the east side of the Calcasieu River at 
Cameron. There is a site plan and flyer for an open house on Thursday, Dec. 11 
in Cameron. The site plan is a little alarming to me. www.venturegloballng.com 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> As this will be the only public meeting before FERC accepts the application, 
there are some questions that need to be asked. I will do so, but I’m 
restricted by my position as a reporter from commenting (hard as that is for 
me). 

> 
> 
> 
> How will the public access the Jetty Pier?
> 
> How much noise will the plant produce, affecting visitors and wildlife?
> 
> How will the loss of wetlands be mitigated?
> 
> How will the loss of coastal woods be mitigated, if at all?
> 
> How high will the land be raised to accommodate storm surge?
> 
> Where will the runoff from the elevated portion go?
> 
> What kind of fumes will the plant produce?
> 
> What kind of warning system will be used in case of a natural gas leak (the 
RV park is right next door and residents are within a mile). 

> 
> How will the ship berths affect navigation and local fishing operations?
> 
> 
> 
> Perhaps you and others can think of more questions. If you can’t come I will 
ask them. 

> 
> Cyndi Sellers, Cameron
Subject: Fwd: Pelicans herding fish in our cove
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2014 16:17:23 -0600
>  Hi all, Dot Rambin forwarded me a few short videos she took recently on
> Cross Lake of an American White Pelican group actively foraging. With her
> permission, I thought I'd share
>

 - neat stuff!!




> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jeNhoOPE_pY&feature=em-upload_owner
>
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImKbByKgJEY&feature=em-upload_owner
>
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUyZ1kGKCnw&feature=em-upload_owner
>

Cheers and good birding,

Terry
Subject: Grand Isle Air Potato Round-up Reminder
From: JOELLE FINLEY <joelle_finley AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2014 14:07:20 -0800
The Nature Conservancy of Louisiana

GRAND ISLE AIR POTATO ROUND-UP

Winter is a beautiful time to be on Grand Island, and what better way to spend 
a day than picking up those pesky air potatoes that are smothering the maritime 
oak forest. Join Jean Landry and her dedicated team of volunteers for a fun 
time in the woods getting rid of those pesky potatoes and protect bird habitat! 


When: Saturday, December 13, 2014
Time: 9 a.m. until 2p.m.
Where: The Landry-Leblanc Tract on Post Lane behind the Sureway Grocery Store 
Lunch, water and soft drinks will be provided by TNC along with potato buckets 
and gloves. Wear long sleeves, long pants and have some fun! 


Please RSVP to:
Jean Landry Program Manager, TNC
985-787-3599
985-688-3871 (cell)
jlandry AT tnc.org
Subject: Venture Global LNG plant proposed for Cameron
From: "Judith O'Neale" <00000069de77060c-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2014 20:15:56 +0000
I received this from Cyndi Sellers today. If you look at the proposed site, it 
is right before the east jetties. 






http://venturegloballng.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/CalcasieuPass_ERR_1024_opt.jpg 





Cyndi has come up with some good questions. Please send other comments to Cyndi 
at cyndisell at camtel.net 





It would be good if some of you could attend. Open house announcement can be 
downloaded at this web site: 


http://venturegloballng.com/vg-lng/ December 11 - 5-7 p.m. Cameron Parish 
School Board Conference Center 


512 Marshall, Cameron





FROM CYNDI SELLERS:


I think the LOS and others might be interested in the new Venture Global LNG 
plant that is being proposed for the east side of the Calcasieu River at 
Cameron. There is a site plan and flyer for an open house on Thursday, Dec. 11 
in Cameron. The site plan is a little alarming to me. www.venturegloballng.com 





As this will be the only public meeting before FERC accepts the application, 
there are some questions that need to be asked. I will do so, but I’m 
restricted by my position as a reporter from commenting (hard as that is for 
me). 


 

How will the public access the Jetty Pier?

How much noise will the plant produce, affecting visitors and wildlife?

How will the loss of wetlands be mitigated?

How will the loss of coastal woods be mitigated, if at all?

How high will the land be raised to accommodate storm surge?

Where will the runoff from the elevated portion go?

What kind of fumes will the plant produce?

What kind of warning system will be used in case of a natural gas leak (the RV 
park is right next door and residents are within a mile). 


How will the ship berths affect navigation and local fishing operations?

 

Perhaps you and others can think of more questions. If you can’t come I will 
ask them. 


Cyndi Sellers, Cameron
Subject: Re: shortage of feeder birds
From: David Muth <MuthD AT NWF.ORG>
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2014 19:09:55 +0000
Labird:

A few points of clarification. The point being made about rainfall, which 
obviously can't be made universally, but does seem to have been noticed by 
observers across south Louisiana, was not about the quantity of rainfall but 
about the serendipitous timing. Rain appears to have come when it was needed, 
even if it was "below normal". When normal is 55-65 inches a year, even a 20% 
drop can be easily dealt with by plants, as long as the rain comes at the right 
times, on the right interval schedule. On a barrier island like Grand Isle (or 
at Peveto), where the soils are sandy and porous, that can make a really huge 
difference. You could cut rainfall in half, but as long as the soil never dried 
out completely, plants would thrive. But just a few days of water stress--too 
wet or too dry, can profoundly affect that growing season's productivity. 


So all of the phenomenon noted could be related. Well planted and watered yards 
are not the refugia they often are, so birds are dispersed in natural areas, 
perhaps in some areas more than is normal for late fall (when this happens 
every year). And maybe, if conditions are sub-optimal in parts of northeast 
Louisiana, birds may have moved to happier hunting grounds, and migrants may 
have pushed south on a faster schedule. Just guesses, but it would all be 
consistent. 


I just would not read too much in local conditions over one fall. For me 
October-November was really boring this year migration wise--could be a bad 
sign. Could be a good sign for birds. Who knows? But things are picking up from 
what I've seen and read about so far this month... 


David Muth
New Orleans
Subject: Mouton Cove and vicinity, Dec 9, 2014
From: Michael Musumeche <mjmusumeche AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2014 12:51:02 -0600
LaBirders,

This morning I birded the Mouton Cove area in Vermilion Parish. The habitats 
consist of the working wetlands (primarily in crawfish production), and the 
nearby riparian areas of the Vermilion River.

Mike

Mouton Cove and vicinity, Vermilion, US-LA
Dec 9, 2014 7:10 AM - 11:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
21.0 mile(s)
66 species (+1 other taxa)

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 


Greater White-fronted Goose  23
Snow Goose  500
Wood Duck  41
Gadwall  2
Mallard (Domestic type)  9
Northern Shoveler  62
Green-winged Teal  33
Pied-billed Grebe  1
Anhinga  1
Great Blue Heron  5
Great Egret  32
Snowy Egret  3
White Ibis  11
White-faced Ibis  36
Turkey Vulture  1
Northern Harrier  2
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  5
Sora  1
Black-necked Stilt  30
Black-bellied Plover  12
Semipalmated Plover  6
Killdeer  23
Greater Yellowlegs  25
Willet  1
Lesser Yellowlegs  13
Stilt Sandpiper  10
Dunlin  31
Least Sandpiper  50
Western Sandpiper  78
Long-billed Dowitcher  225
Wilson's Snipe  10
Bonaparte's Gull  12
Ring-billed Gull  67
Herring Gull  22
Gull-billed Tern  12
Forster's Tern  3
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  11
Eurasian Collared-Dove  1
Mourning Dove  28
Barred Owl  2
Belted Kingfisher  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  4
Pileated Woodpecker  3
American Kestrel  11
Merlin  1
Eastern Phoebe  5
Loggerhead Shrike  2
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  19
Carolina Wren  5
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  5
American Robin  16
Northern Mockingbird  6
European Starling  80
Yellow-rumped Warbler  12
Savannah Sparrow  135
Swamp Sparrow  1
White-throated Sparrow  1
Northern Cardinal  7
Red-winged Blackbird  400
Eastern Meadowlark  8
Brewer's Blackbird  12
Common Grackle  40
Great-tailed Grackle  96
Brown-headed Cowbird  123
House Sparrow  21

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20841526

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



_______________________________________________________________
^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^
Mike Musumeche
New Iberia, LA 70560
mjmusumeche AT cox.net 
Subject: shortage of feeder birds
From: Little Tweet <pekinrobin AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2014 10:05:29 -0600
Hmmm. Rain is far below normal in my yard as well. I thought the drought was 
widespread but evidently it's patchy. 


I already suspect but have not actually seen a Cooper's around in recent weeks. 
I've heard an unusual amount of Blue Jay protests and once I "almost" saw it 
before the raptor slipped away but maybe you guys are right. I had not made any 
special effort to watch out for it but now I'll be keeping a lookout. 


Have not seen the Red-Shouldered Hawks around as much as I did in previous 
years though. To be honest, I just thought we finally reached a breaking point 
in Mandeville where the constant construction, development, etc. had finally 
removed too many trees. 



 		 	   		  
Subject: Primary Bander Needed in Greater New Orleans Area
From: Katie Brasted <00000082ee5e11de-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2014 09:50:20 -0500
 
PRIMARY BANDER NEEDED 
AT WOODLANDS CONSERVANCY MANAGED  PROPERTIES 
Woodlands Conservancy is seeking a Master Bander or sub-permitee to  
conduct monthly bird banding operations at Woodlands Conservancy Bird 
Observatory 

located at Woodlands Trail in Belle Chasse and nearby Delacroix  Preserve 
in Orleans Parish.  The position will require a total of  approximately 25 
hours per month which includes operating the banding stations,  conducting 
quality assurance and uploading data.  Net lanes are located in  bottomland 
hardwood forested areas with operations ongoing on a monthly basis  since 
December 2013 utilizing the Blue Bonnet Monitoring Project protocol with  
start-up funding provided by BTNEP. To date, 394 birds have been banded with an 

additional 74 recaptures.   These totals include 36  species. 
If interested in managing the sites as a primary bander or for more  
information, contact: 
Katie Brasted 
Woodlands Conservancy 
_katie AT woodlandsconservancy.org_ (mailto:katie AT woodlandsconservancy.org)  
504.433.4000 (office) 
BACKGROUND INFORMATION.  Woodlands  Conservancy has been collecting 
baseline data on the frequency and density of non-native, invasive vegetation 
with 

the assistance of California State  University Channel Islands and Oregon 
State University beginning in  2007.   Beginning in 2009, systematic 
treatment of acreage within the 609 acre Woodlands Bird Sanctuary in 
Plaquemines 

parish was initiated.   Four treatment plots at Woodlands Trail, comprising 
126 acres have been treated  one to three times and portions reforested with 
more than 10,500 seedlings and  trees.  In 2014, herbicide treatment was 
conducted on the 190 acre  Delacroix Preserve to remove Chinese Tallow and 
Chinese Privet.    
Birding surveys show 163 documented species utilize the Woodlands  
Conservancy managed property in Plaquemines Parish. Of those documented 
species, 9 

are considered Species of Continental Importance per Partners in  Flight 
and 18 are considered Species of Conservation Concern per Louisiana’s  
comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy – Wildlife Action  Plan. 
The operation of bird banding at the Woodlands Conservancy Bird  
Observatory is providing monthly data of bird species use in both treated and  
untreated sites within Woodlands Conservancy’s managed properties and a 
formal 

pictorial birding inventory.  The resulting data will be used to guide the  
direction of land management and further research. 
KATIE BRASTED 
_WOODLANDS CONSERVANCY_ (http://www.woodlandsconservancy.org/)  
P.O. Box 7028 
Belle Chasse, LA 70037 
504-433-4000 (PHONE/FAX) 
504-453-4934 (CELL) 
P Please  consider the environment before printing this e-mail 
_FAN WOODLANDS CONSERVANCY_ 

(http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Woodlands-Conservancy/140151489379755?v=wallC:Documents 
and SettingsKatieMy 

Documents2010)  
PLEASE  NOTE: The information contained in this e-mail is privileged and 
confidential  and is intended only for the use of the individual(s)named above 
and others who  have been specifically authorized to receive such. If the 
recipient is not the  intended recipient, you are hereby notified that the 
receipt, dissemination,  distribution or copying of this communication is 
strictly  prohibited. 
Subject: Re: shortage of feeder birds
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2014 19:31:31 -0600
Although not near as active in the field and yards as any of you guys and
gals this season, I too have noticed a lushness of foliage in wild areas
that seems incomparable over the past decade+ or so. While not noticing the
Accipiter/feeder problem, small birds, with the exception of high Icterid
and N Cardinal numbers in most places, have seemed few and far between
since migration began in earnest in late August. I'd be almost willing to
bet that it's the same scenario we're noting with the lack butterflies.
While one could blame it on the cold previous winter for this season's lack
of more tropical species such as gulf fritillary (except maybe spottily for
gulf frit/ as in Vicky LeFevers yard), that certainly wouldn't explain it
as a whole. Flowers were everywhere earlier in the season yet individual
butterfly numbers seem low. Maybe both birds and butterflies were merely
more widely spread? Even the high, dry, hilly areas were comparatively lush
this season with flowers, grass and seedy plants. Moreover, much of this
balmy weather and rainfall was the same across a broad swath of the central
US from north to south. It's possible with birds that the southbound
migrants began pushing south more randomly early on across the landscape-
instead of following riparian stringers, well-planted yards etc as usual in
wholesale numbers. As for the accipiters, who knows? Are they mostly
adults? It seems they've certainly become accustomed to this constant
feeder banquet, being able to slip in and out unnoticed for easy kills- at
least up until now. Maybe now there are fewer birds at the feeders, yet
this habit has become hard to break. I guess they figure that more attempts
during this food scarcity guarantees success....

Linda Adrion and I birded some private property in northeast Caddo just
east of Hosston yesterday. I'm glad to say that sparrows were in really
good numbers, especially Savannah, Song, Swamp and White-throated. Both
White-crowned and Fox seemed somewhat low for the open ragweed, then dense
viny thickets that were there. Other interesting notes on the property were
5 Sedge Wren and 5 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, the latter at one spot- seems
like it will be a good year for YBSA. On the way home, we found a nice juv
male Merlin near the Gilliam Racetrack. The only N Harrier for the day was
also there- NOHA seems particularly scarce so far... The Sentell Rd sod
farm was nearly devoid of bird life, with only 3 Gadwall, a couple PBGR on
the pond and a very few Brewer's Blackbird among 150 or so Brown-headed
cowbird. Other than hordes of Red-winged Blackbird and Common Grackle here
and there, the most notable thing was that meadowlark sp seemed everywhere
along the drive.

Good birding

Terry

On Mon, Dec 8, 2014 at 5:30 PM, Toddy Guidry  wrote:

> If Steve, Van, Bill and David all agree on the same subject, I'd start
> betting on the Saints to win the super bowl!
>
> BTW - my neighbor Elaine Bourque has a beautiful mature male Calliope
> coming to her feeders. I have a half decent photo if anyone would like to
> see it, shoot me an email off list
>
> Toddy
> guidrys AT cox.net
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds
> [mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Steven W. Cardiff
> Sent: Monday, December 8, 2014 10:00 AM
> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] shortage of feeder birds
>
> Totally agree with Van and Bill.  Also, I would add the "Accipiter Problem"
> to the mix.  At least at my yard in e. Iberville Parish, birds are almost
> constantly under "hawk-alert" and there are several Sharpies and Coops
> patrolling the yard and adjacent neighborhood.  The Accipiters quickly
> learn to ambush birds at seed feeders.  The cardinals and White-throated
> Sparrows become even more crepuscular than normal under these
> circumstances, and species such as doves seem to prefer more "lawn-planet"
> feeder situations where they can better see the hawks coming.
>
> Steve Cardiff
>
> On Mon, Dec 8, 2014 at 7:49 AM, James V Remsen  wrote:
>
> > LABIRD — concerning the recent thread, just keep in mind that this
> > time of the year is typically the low-point in feeder use anyway,
> > almost certainly because it is also the peak in availability of seeds
> > and mast.  And this fall, at least at my place, we have the heaviest
> > pecan crop in 20+ years and an exceptionally heavy acorn (water oak)
> > crop.  Also, this year in the Baton Rouge area at least, we had an
> > unusually even distribution of rain throughout the growing season (I
> > only had to water maybe 1-2 times all
> > year) and had no damaging tropical storms; this might mean unusually
> > heavy seed crop.  Ragweed thickets have flourished, wild grasses are
> > tall, the density of sweet gum balls is spectacular, etc.  Van Remsen,
> > nr St. Gabriel
> >
> >
> > =================
> >
> > Dr. J. V. Remsen
> > Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds Museum of Natural
> > Science/Dept. Biological Sciences LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> > najamesLSU.edu
> >
>
Subject: Re: shortage of feeder birds
From: Toddy Guidry <guidrys AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2014 17:30:50 -0600
If Steve, Van, Bill and David all agree on the same subject, I'd start betting 
on the Saints to win the super bowl! 


BTW - my neighbor Elaine Bourque has a beautiful mature male Calliope coming to 
her feeders. I have a half decent photo if anyone would like to see it, shoot 
me an email off list 


Toddy
guidrys AT cox.net


-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Steven W. Cardiff 

Sent: Monday, December 8, 2014 10:00 AM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] shortage of feeder birds

Totally agree with Van and Bill.  Also, I would add the "Accipiter Problem"
to the mix. At least at my yard in e. Iberville Parish, birds are almost 
constantly under "hawk-alert" and there are several Sharpies and Coops 
patrolling the yard and adjacent neighborhood. The Accipiters quickly learn to 
ambush birds at seed feeders. The cardinals and White-throated Sparrows become 
even more crepuscular than normal under these circumstances, and species such 
as doves seem to prefer more "lawn-planet" 

feeder situations where they can better see the hawks coming.

Steve Cardiff

On Mon, Dec 8, 2014 at 7:49 AM, James V Remsen  wrote:

> LABIRD — concerning the recent thread, just keep in mind that this 
> time of the year is typically the low-point in feeder use anyway, 
> almost certainly because it is also the peak in availability of seeds 
> and mast.  And this fall, at least at my place, we have the heaviest 
> pecan crop in 20+ years and an exceptionally heavy acorn (water oak) 
> crop.  Also, this year in the Baton Rouge area at least, we had an 
> unusually even distribution of rain throughout the growing season (I 
> only had to water maybe 1-2 times all
> year) and had no damaging tropical storms; this might mean unusually 
> heavy seed crop.  Ragweed thickets have flourished, wild grasses are 
> tall, the density of sweet gum balls is spectacular, etc.  Van Remsen, 
> nr St. Gabriel
>
>
> =================
>
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds Museum of Natural 
> Science/Dept. Biological Sciences LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 
> najamesLSU.edu
>
Subject: Re: shortage of feeder birds
From: "Laird, Suzanne" <SLaird AT AGCENTER.LSU.EDU>
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2014 20:37:54 +0000
I think the rain was very sporadic in the northern parishes. We received 
several rain events in Franklin Parish that I know were missed by several of 
the surrounding parishes. I currently have an abundance of winter vegetation 
that is providing a wild source of food for my yard birds. Even the House 
Sparrows aren't as interested in my suet cakes and seed as they were last year. 
I haven't seen any Cardinals or Goldfinches at my feeders and they have been 
out for 3 weeks now. 


Suzanne Laird
Winnsboro in Franklin Parish

-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Roselie Overby 

Sent: Monday, December 08, 2014 10:18 AM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] shortage of feeder birds

Am I the only one in Northeast LA who is not seeing this plant productivity 
like they are seeing in S. LA? I am having trouble with herbicide drift 
(confirmed by Forestry dept). Squirrel numbers are high under the feeders--less 
wild food or more squirrels? It is not uncommon for doves to disappear from my 
yard once hunting season starts. I do have one feeder area out in the open 
right now which most birds avoid. I have seen a Sharp-shinned hawk, but that is 
a yearly thing. 

Roselie Overby
Oak Grove in W. Carroll Parish



LABIRD - concerning the recent thread, just keep in mind that this time of the 
year is typically the low-point in feeder use anyway, almost certainly because 
it is also the peak in availability of seeds and mast. And this fall, at least 
at my place, we have the heaviest pecan crop in 20+ years and an exceptionally 
heavy acorn (water oak) crop. Also, this year in the Baton Rouge area at least, 
we had an unusually even distribution of rain throughout the growing season (I 
only had to water maybe 1-2 times all year) and had no damaging tropical 
storms; this might mean unusually heavy seed crop. Ragweed thickets have 
flourished, wild grasses are tall, the density of sweet gum balls is 
spectacular, etc. Van Remsen, nr St. Gabriel 



=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds Museum of Natural Science/Dept. 
Biological Sciences LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 najamesLSU.edu 

Subject: Re: shortage of feeder birds
From: Lizette Wroten <lkwroten AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2014 12:58:31 -0600
I've read with envy about all the rainfall everyone's had this year.... no
such luck here in Harahan. About a week ago, a local tv weatherman said the
New Orleans area is still 6.5 inches behind for the year, and although I
didn't keep a running total of what accumulated in my rain gauge, I know we
received much less than the surrounding area on a week to week basis. That,
coupled with last winter's freezes and family stuff that kept me from
gardening as much as usual, has my yard looking pretty pathetic. Even so,
I'd have good bird business if it wasn't for the MOCKINGBIRD FROM HELL.

Unlike Little Tweet's bird, "my" resident Mocker is in fighting form,
maniacally chasing everybody out of the yard...from yellow-rumps trying to
get to the wax myrtle, to woodies checking to see if I've put more suet in
their log.....which I haven't, hoping to tone down MFH's ferocity. Hasn't
worked.
Cardinals don't even try to get to the safflower seed anymore, since for
some reason they're #1 on the hit list. I know they're still around though,
cause occasionally they manage to sneak in for a quick drink of water while
you know who is running somebody out of town.

Not many House Finches around either, but that's not too surprising,
considering the bumper weed seed crop at the decommissioned golf course
next door. However, they and the sparrows and ground-feeding warblers that
are usually abundant there have been hard to find, especially on sunny
days. I'm guessing that's due to the raptor factor Steve mentioned, since
multiple Accipiters, Kestrels, Red-tailed and Red-shouldered Hawks and at
least one Merlin have been hunting there regularly. I can usually find more
little birds right before dusk, but then it's too dark to see them well,
grrrr. Water table's low, so waders are in short supply too. Even the
batture ponds have dried up.

Overall, it hasn't been the most rewarding fall, early winter....waah. Got
any cheese to go with this whine....?

On Mon, Dec 8, 2014 at 11:48 AM, Jeffrey W. Harris 
wrote:

> Hello All,
>
> Well, I am in MS now, but my experience is exactly as described by Van et
> al.  I just wanted to add to Van's story about Accipiters.  Yesterday, I
> watched a Cooper"s Hawk circle and gain altitude about one-quarter mile
> from my house.  I live near downtown Stark Vegas.  Anyway, the bird
> spiraled upward to 1,000 feet and suddenly it stooped straight down like a
> Peregrine.  It came right at me as it pulled out of the dive to streak over
> the roof of my house to strike blindly at the feeders in the back yard.
> There is no way the bird actually saw the feeders - it just knew the lay of
> the land!
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Jeff Harris
>
> On Monday, December 8, 2014, James V Remsen  wrote:
>
> > On Dec 8, 2014, at 10:00 AM, Steven W. Cardiff  > > wrote:
> >
> > > Totally agree with Van and Bill.  Also, I would add the "Accipiter
> > Problem" to the mix.  At least at my yard in e. Iberville Parish, birds
> are
> > almost constantly under "hawk-alert" and there are several Sharpies and
> > Coops patrolling the yard and adjacent neighborhood.  The Accipiters
> > quickly learn to ambush birds at seed feeders.  The cardinals and
> > White-throated Sparrows become even more crepuscular than normal under
> > these circumstances, and species such as doves seem to prefer more
> > "lawn-planet" feeder situations where they can better see the hawks
> coming.
> > >
> > >
> >
> > This is exactly the situation at my place.  I’ve seen accipiters launch
> an
> > attack sequence from several hundred yards away from a feeder long before
> > they can see the feeder or any birds there — they know exactly where
> those
> > feeders are.  So my local White-throats and Cardinals are not only
> > crepuscular but semi-fossorial at this time of year near the feeders, and
> > doves are basically gone and blackbirds nearly so.  Why this changes
> later
> > in the winter, usually by 1 Jan, isn’t exactly clear but I think it has
> to
> > do with diminishing natural food supplies coupled with bigger influx of
> > wintering birds that provide more lookouts plus less leafy vegetation
> that
> > might impede accipiter detection.
> >
> > Bottomline = this is the typical low point in seasonal feeder use — every
> > Nov and Dec I have people ask me “what happened to my cardinals” — 
and 

> THIS
> > year it may be especially bad because of a very productive growing
> season.
> > (Roselie’s situation sounds like an exception, and she has Feederwatch
> data
> > from previous years for comparison.)
> >
> > Van Remsen
> >
> >
> > =================
> >
> > Dr. J. V. Remsen
> > Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> > Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> > LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> > najamesLSU.edu
> >
>
Subject: Re: shortage of feeder birds
From: "Jeffrey W. Harris" <jwharris30 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2014 11:48:28 -0600
Hello All,

Well, I am in MS now, but my experience is exactly as described by Van et
al.  I just wanted to add to Van's story about Accipiters.  Yesterday, I
watched a Cooper"s Hawk circle and gain altitude about one-quarter mile
from my house.  I live near downtown Stark Vegas.  Anyway, the bird
spiraled upward to 1,000 feet and suddenly it stooped straight down like a
Peregrine.  It came right at me as it pulled out of the dive to streak over
the roof of my house to strike blindly at the feeders in the back yard.
There is no way the bird actually saw the feeders - it just knew the lay of
the land!

Sincerely,

Jeff Harris

On Monday, December 8, 2014, James V Remsen  wrote:

> On Dec 8, 2014, at 10:00 AM, Steven W. Cardiff  > wrote:
>
> > Totally agree with Van and Bill.  Also, I would add the "Accipiter
> Problem" to the mix.  At least at my yard in e. Iberville Parish, birds are
> almost constantly under "hawk-alert" and there are several Sharpies and
> Coops patrolling the yard and adjacent neighborhood.  The Accipiters
> quickly learn to ambush birds at seed feeders.  The cardinals and
> White-throated Sparrows become even more crepuscular than normal under
> these circumstances, and species such as doves seem to prefer more
> "lawn-planet" feeder situations where they can better see the hawks coming.
> >
> >
>
> This is exactly the situation at my place.  I’ve seen accipiters launch an
> attack sequence from several hundred yards away from a feeder long before
> they can see the feeder or any birds there — they know exactly where those
> feeders are.  So my local White-throats and Cardinals are not only
> crepuscular but semi-fossorial at this time of year near the feeders, and
> doves are basically gone and blackbirds nearly so.  Why this changes later
> in the winter, usually by 1 Jan, isn’t exactly clear but I think it has to
> do with diminishing natural food supplies coupled with bigger influx of
> wintering birds that provide more lookouts plus less leafy vegetation that
> might impede accipiter detection.
>
> Bottomline = this is the typical low point in seasonal feeder use — every
> Nov and Dec I have people ask me “what happened to my cardinals” — and 
THIS 

> year it may be especially bad because of a very productive growing season.
> (Roselie’s situation sounds like an exception, and she has Feederwatch data
> from previous years for comparison.)
>
> Van Remsen
>
>
> =================
>
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> najamesLSU.edu
>
Subject: missing yardbirds
From: Little Tweet <pekinrobin AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2014 10:33:21 -0600
It seems self evident to me that you can't keep slithering the (environmental) 
cake to death before the cake is gone. I do still have Blue Jays as well and I 
have heard Fish Crows so I don't think it's West Nile. My Cardinals seemed to 
have fledged one chick earlier this year. In previous years, there would 
usually be two nests of multiple babies. Once I had three successful nests. So 
this year was just sad. Even my Mockingbird has noticeably less energy in the 
last year or two. I don't know if it's because the bird has noticed fewer 
rivals to sing at or if he just doesn't feel as up to it...This is all very 
unscientific, I know, but since other people are noticing a problem too I 
thought I might say something...I'm in western Mandeville. 

 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: shortage of feeder birds
From: James V Remsen <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2014 16:26:12 +0000
On Dec 8, 2014, at 10:00 AM, Steven W. Cardiff  wrote:

> Totally agree with Van and Bill. Also, I would add the "Accipiter Problem" to 
the mix. At least at my yard in e. Iberville Parish, birds are almost 
constantly under "hawk-alert" and there are several Sharpies and Coops 
patrolling the yard and adjacent neighborhood. The Accipiters quickly learn to 
ambush birds at seed feeders. The cardinals and White-throated Sparrows become 
even more crepuscular than normal under these circumstances, and species such 
as doves seem to prefer more "lawn-planet" feeder situations where they can 
better see the hawks coming. 

> 
> 

This is exactly the situation at my place. I’ve seen accipiters launch an 
attack sequence from several hundred yards away from a feeder long before they 
can see the feeder or any birds there — they know exactly where those feeders 
are. So my local White-throats and Cardinals are not only crepuscular but 
semi-fossorial at this time of year near the feeders, and doves are basically 
gone and blackbirds nearly so. Why this changes later in the winter, usually by 
1 Jan, isn’t exactly clear but I think it has to do with diminishing natural 
food supplies coupled with bigger influx of wintering birds that provide more 
lookouts plus less leafy vegetation that might impede accipiter detection. 


Bottomline = this is the typical low point in seasonal feeder use — every Nov 
and Dec I have people ask me “what happened to my cardinals” — and THIS year it 
may be especially bad because of a very productive growing season. (Roselie’s 
situation sounds like an exception, and she has Feederwatch data from previous 
years for comparison.) 


Van Remsen


=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: Re: shortage of feeder birds
From: Roselie Overby <rosebird8791 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2014 10:17:45 -0600
Am I the only one in Northeast LA who is not seeing this plant productivity
like they are seeing in S. LA?  I am having trouble with herbicide drift
(confirmed by Forestry dept).  Squirrel numbers are high under the
feeders--less wild food or more squirrels? It is not uncommon for doves to
disappear from my yard once hunting season starts.  I do have one feeder
area out in the open right now which most birds avoid.  I have seen a
Sharp-shinned hawk, but that is a yearly thing.
Roselie Overby
Oak Grove in W. Carroll Parish



LABIRD - concerning the recent thread, just keep in mind that this time of
the year is typically the low-point in feeder use anyway, almost certainly
because it is also the peak in availability of seeds and mast.  And this
fall, at least at my place, we have the heaviest pecan crop in 20+ years and
an exceptionally heavy acorn (water oak) crop.  Also, this year in the Baton
Rouge area at least, we had an unusually even distribution of rain
throughout the growing season (I only had to water maybe 1-2 times all year)
and had no damaging tropical storms; this might mean unusually heavy seed
crop.  Ragweed thickets have flourished, wild grasses are tall, the density
of sweet gum balls is spectacular, etc.  Van Remsen, nr St. Gabriel


=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: Re: Pine Siskin, Bayou Sauvage NWR, New Orleans
From: Wendy Rihner <wrihner AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2014 10:08:19 -0600
Oh, that is awesome! Now, that is what one could calla productive day!

Wendy Rihner

On Sun, Dec 7, 2014 at 8:24 PM, David Muth  wrote:

> LABIRD:
>
> In a little over four hours this morning I recorded more than 90 species
> at Bayou Sauvage--it was very birdy under a chilly overcast. But except for
> the previously noted continuing avocets (scarce in winter in New Orleans),
> the only mentionable bird was a calling flyover Pine Siskin, always a treat
> south of Lake Pontchartrain.
>
> David Muth
> New Orleans
>
Subject: Re: shortage of feeder birds
From: "Steven W. Cardiff" <scardif AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2014 10:00:12 -0600
Totally agree with Van and Bill.  Also, I would add the "Accipiter Problem"
to the mix.  At least at my yard in e. Iberville Parish, birds are almost
constantly under "hawk-alert" and there are several Sharpies and Coops
patrolling the yard and adjacent neighborhood.  The Accipiters quickly
learn to ambush birds at seed feeders.  The cardinals and White-throated
Sparrows become even more crepuscular than normal under these
circumstances, and species such as doves seem to prefer more "lawn-planet"
feeder situations where they can better see the hawks coming.

Steve Cardiff

On Mon, Dec 8, 2014 at 7:49 AM, James V Remsen  wrote:

> LABIRD — concerning the recent thread, just keep in mind that this time of
> the year is typically the low-point in feeder use anyway, almost certainly
> because it is also the peak in availability of seeds and mast.  And this
> fall, at least at my place, we have the heaviest pecan crop in 20+ years
> and an exceptionally heavy acorn (water oak) crop.  Also, this year in the
> Baton Rouge area at least, we had an unusually even distribution of rain
> throughout the growing season (I only had to water maybe 1-2 times all
> year) and had no damaging tropical storms; this might mean unusually heavy
> seed crop.  Ragweed thickets have flourished, wild grasses are tall, the
> density of sweet gum balls is spectacular, etc.  Van Remsen, nr St. Gabriel
>
>
> =================
>
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> najamesLSU.edu
>
Subject: Re: shortage of feeder birds
From: David Muth <MuthD AT NWF.ORG>
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2014 15:58:39 +0000
I agree completely--it looks like a near perfect conjunction of growing season 
rainfall amounts and timing, temps, fall frontal arrival and timing and 
complete lack of tropical storms, have resulted in a spectacularly lush fall 
here in southeast Louisiana. Grand Isle looks better than it has at any point 
since before Katrina. Willow and baldcypress are still leafed out in lower 
Plaquemines. Here in New Orleans leaf drop just began accelerating, but mast 
and fruit, including lots of hackberry, are in great shape. The same is being 
said of forage conditions for ducks in southeastern marshes. A good time to be 
a bird. They don't need no stinking feeders... 


David Muth
New Orleans

-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Bill Fontenot 

Sent: Monday, December 08, 2014 8:48 AM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] shortage of feeder birds




agree w/dr. Remsen re: wild food supplies…………………….I've never 
seen a growing season unfold so perfectly as that of 2014…..rains came and 
went perfectly, and around here I can’t remember more than 2-3 days of 94+F 
temps…………………. 



neither have I observed local (bottomland hardwood) deciduous forest foliage 
quite so lush nor quite so long-lived…..the appearance of the leaves at the 
end of the growing season (sept) was very nearly as lush and vibrant as it had 
appeared in june………….that was truly amazing…….and it seemed to 
continue on and on through October……………. 



interestingly, I did not perceive summer 2014 as “overly buggy” as levels 
seemed actually a bit below-normal if anything………..yet had local bird 
fledgling activity off da’ chain……for the first summer ever, I noted at 
least one fledgling cardinal during the first week of august……and we had 
juv ruby-throated hummers streaming thru until 23 oct this year………. 



apparently, there’s a lot of food out in the wild………..…………..



bill fontenot

lower prairie basse

upper Lafayette parish, LA





From: James V. Remsen, Jr.
Sent: ‎Monday‎, ‎December‎ ‎8‎, ‎2014 ‎7‎:‎49‎ ‎AM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU





LABIRD — concerning the recent thread, just keep in mind that this time of 
the year is typically the low-point in feeder use anyway, almost certainly 
because it is also the peak in availability of seeds and mast. And this fall, 
at least at my place, we have the heaviest pecan crop in 20+ years and an 
exceptionally heavy acorn (water oak) crop. Also, this year in the Baton Rouge 
area at least, we had an unusually even distribution of rain throughout the 
growing season (I only had to water maybe 1-2 times all year) and had no 
damaging tropical storms; this might mean unusually heavy seed crop. Ragweed 
thickets have flourished, wild grasses are tall, the density of sweet gum balls 
is spectacular, etc. Van Remsen, nr St. Gabriel 



=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds Museum of Natural Science/Dept. 
Biological Sciences LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 najamesLSU.edu