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Updated on Friday, January 30 at 05:21 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Asio flammeus

30 Jan Re: Sandhill Cranes [Winston Caillouet ]
30 Jan White-breasted Nuthatch in EBR Parish [Winston Caillouet ]
30 Jan Martins [Tom Hickcox ]
30 Jan Re: Sandhill Cranes [Terry Davis ]
30 Jan Re: Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie ["Johnson, Erik" ]
30 Jan Re: Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie ["Steven W. Cardiff" ]
30 Jan Re: Sandhill Cranes [Jay V Huner ]
29 Jan Smith's Longspur field trip to Shreveport Regional Airport scheduled for 02/07/15 at 0900 [Terry Davis ]
29 Jan Sandhill Cranes [Winston Caillouet ]
29 Jan Re: A DOWNRIGHT AMAZING day for Henslow's Sparrows (18) at Bodcau spillway spillover field, Bossier Parish 01/28 [Terry Davis ]
29 Jan Re: Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie [Paul Conover ]
29 Jan Re: Venice Great-tailed Grackles [David Muth ]
29 Jan SW La today [Winston Caillouet ]
29 Jan Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie ["Steven W. Cardiff" ]
29 Jan Mountain bluebird [janine robin ]
29 Jan Re: More than ONE USUAL LOCATION - Eurasian Wigeon [Jay V Huner ]
28 Jan A DOWNRIGHT AMAZING day for Henslow's Sparrows (18) at Bodcau spillway spillover field, Bossier Parish 01/28 [Terry Davis ]
28 Jan Re: Venice Great-tailed Grackles [Ed Wallace ]
29 Jan Re: Venice Great-tailed Grackles [James V Remsen ]
28 Jan Re: More than ONE USUAL LOCATION - Eurasian Wigeon [Paul Conover ]
28 Jan Re: Great Blue Heron Meal [John Romano ]
28 Jan More than ONE USUAL LOCATION - Eurasian Wigeon [Jay V Huner ]
28 Jan Great Blue Heron Meal [Stephen Pagans ]
28 Jan Couch's Kingbird and Eurasian Wigeon [Winston Caillouet ]
28 Jan Trip to Cameron Prairie [Elias ]
28 Jan Great Blue Heron Meal [Stephen Pagans ]
28 Jan Venice Great-tailed Grackles [Jay V Huner ]
28 Jan Common Loons (London Ave Canal) ["Steven - Stone Source Int'l" ]
27 Jan Diamond, Plaquemines parish, LA Sunday 1/26/15 [janine robin ]
27 Jan Great Blue Heron Meal [Stephen Pagans ]
27 Jan Note about Location of Mountain Bluebird [Jay V Huner ]
27 Jan Re: white-breasted nuthatch in EBR Parish [Evelyn Cooper ]
27 Jan N Caddo- grp of 16 Lark Sparrow 01/27/15 [Terry Davis ]
27 Jan Re: A Question about Localities . . . [John Dillon ]
27 Jan Re: A Question about Localities . . . [Matt Brady ]
27 Jan Re: A Question about Localities . . . [James V Remsen ]
27 Jan Re: A Question about Localities . . . [Ed Wallace ]
27 Jan white-breasted nuthatch in EBR Parish [Charles Williams ]
27 Jan Re: A Question about Localities . . . ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
27 Jan Re: A Question about Localities . . . ["Steven W. Cardiff" ]
27 Jan Re: A Question about Localities . . . [Matt Brady ]
27 Jan A Question about Localities . . . ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
27 Jan Re: Baton Rouge Audubon Annual Winter Hummingbird Program and Tour [Jane Patterson ]
26 Jan Grand Isle, Sunday; results from Middle Plaquemines Monday 1/19 [dan purrington ]
26 Jan Red-shouldered and Great Horned Owl nests at Barataria Preserve [David Fox ]
26 Jan LOS Winter Meeting Checklist ["Judith O'Neale" ]
25 Jan Winter LOS - Field Trip through Plaquemines Parish Jan 24, 2015 [Ed Wallace ]
25 Jan Sandhill cranes [janine robin ]
25 Jan Re: Barred Owl [Mac Myers ]
25 Jan FW: eBird Report - Fontainebleau SP, Jan 25, 2015 [Tom Trenchard ]
25 Jan Barred Owl [Martha Avegno ]
25 Jan Covington/Mandeville Ross's Goose [Harvey Patten ]
25 Jan Fwd: eBird Report - Jean Lafitte NHP--Barataria Preserve Swamp, Jan 24, 2015 [Wendy Rihner ]
25 Jan Re: Blackbirds are here [Charles Williams ]
24 Jan Ferruginous Hawk at Cameron Prairie NWR [David McDonald ]
24 Jan Folsom backyard...32 species today. [janine robin ]
24 Jan Washington parish mountain bluebird [janine robin ]
24 Jan Folsom backyard [janine robin ]
24 Jan Other nongame birds killed [Roselie Overby ]
23 Jan Re: yet another Whooping Crane shot [John Dillon ]
24 Jan yet another Whooping Crane shot [James V Remsen ]
22 Jan Juncos taking shelter [Alex Haun ]
22 Jan purple finches [cecil tarver ]
22 Jan Blackbirds are here [Roselie Overby ]
21 Jan Intracoastal Canal Bridge area, Hwy 319, Jan 21, 2015 [Michael Musumeche ]
21 Jan Poverty Point Res SP [William Matthews ]
21 Jan Pine siskins at feeders on Folsom [janine robin ]
20 Jan FW: eBird Report - Poverty Point Reservoir SP, Jan 20, 2015 [Roselie Overby ]
20 Jan Cameron Ferry is operating [Jeanie Pou ]
20 Jan Couch's Kingbird still present south of Kaplan [Mary Mehaffey ]
20 Jan Gemstone Plantation [janine robin ]
20 Jan RB/BH Grosbeak [Tom Trenchard ]
20 Jan Common Goldeneye in Livingston Par. [James V Remsen ]
20 Jan Reminder: BRAS presentation, Thur Jan. 22, 2015, 7PM, BBS *Education Center* ["crystal.johnson.lsu AT gmail.com" ]
20 Jan 2015 Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz [Sinéad Borchert ]
20 Jan Re: Hummingbird at Last [Wendy Rihner ]

Subject: Re: Sandhill Cranes
From: Winston Caillouet <lincwinc AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 15:51:23 -0600
Thanks for the reminder, Jay, about roosting habitat for cranes.
I talked to my grandson, an avid outdoorsman, yesterday about trying to find 
the roosting location. It shouldn't be too hard to find now that we know the 
direction the cranes were headed. 

Winston Caillouet 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 30, 2015, at 6:52 AM, Jay V Huner  wrote:
> 
> Friends,
> 
> For what it is worth, cranes, regardless of species, prefer to roost standing 
in water, even very cold water. Wonder if anyone has actually found any 
Sandhill Crane roosts in Louisiana? At this time of year, it's not unusual for 
rice fields to be holding water prior to early spring/late winter planting. 
And, of course, crawfish fields have water in them but it's likely a bit too 
deep for crane roosts. And, despite years of association with the crawfish 
industry, never heard a report of roosting cranes. 

> 
> Remember, there are Sandhill Crane concentrations in the Monroe area, the 
Lecompte area, and the Sweet Lake area. There is probably a smaller flock 
around Powhattan most, if not all, years. 

> 
> Jay Huner
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Winston Caillouet" 
> To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
> Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 10:03:49 PM
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Sandhill Cranes
> 
> I took my son and grandson to Fruge Rd late today to see the Sandhill Cranes. 
At 5:40 pm, we witnessed 800+ head out for their roosting spot. They flew 
toward the southwest. I suspect that their roosting location is west of Hwy 27 
because we saw about 25 leave Lionel Derouen at 5:30 

> and head in that direction.
> Winston Caillouet 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: White-breasted Nuthatch in EBR Parish
From: Winston Caillouet <lincwinc AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 15:44:55 -0600
I saw the nuthatch today on S. Bryce Canyon Rd at noon. 
Winston Caillouet 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Martins
From: Tom Hickcox <cometkazie1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 12:30:53 -0500
 From a friend down on the river:

"Yesterday at 3:55 pm. the Swallows returned to Gramercy, 2 male Purple 
Martins made their way back from South America."

Tom Hickcox
Danville, Ky
Subject: Re: Sandhill Cranes
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 10:37:24 -0600
Jay/all, Interesting to learn of the species preference to roost in
water...... Thanks for sharing!

It seemed a bit late for the birds to still be actually migrating- that is,
regarding the 13 birds that we had moving overhead to the southeast in
north Caddo on Sentell Rd on 1/13. It's somewhat of a new-ish thing but
we've had them spottily in recent years in this area. However, prior to the
1/13 sighting it had always been 1-3 birds. I wouldn't be surprised if
there weren't a slightly larger nucleus that possibly has gone unnoticed
thus far in the area. There are some very expansive open areas between the
n and s ends of sentell, then to the w of 3049 and La 71- not to mention
some of the new expanses visible north of La 169 on the new I-49 extension-
and also farther n in the Gilliam and Ida areas.

Cheers,

Terry

On Fri, Jan 30, 2015 at 6:52 AM, Jay V Huner  wrote:

> Friends,
>
> For what it is worth, cranes, regardless of species, prefer to roost
> standing in water, even very cold water. Wonder if anyone has actually
> found any Sandhill Crane roosts in Louisiana? At this time of year, it's
> not unusual for rice fields to be holding water prior to early spring/late
> winter planting. And, of course, crawfish fields have water in them but
> it's likely a bit too deep for crane roosts. And, despite years of
> association with the crawfish industry, never heard a report of roosting
> cranes.
>
> Remember, there are Sandhill Crane concentrations in the Monroe area, the
> Lecompte area, and the Sweet Lake area. There is probably a smaller flock
> around Powhattan most, if not all, years.
>
> Jay Huner
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Winston Caillouet" 
> To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
> Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 10:03:49 PM
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Sandhill Cranes
>
> I took my son and grandson to Fruge Rd late today to see the Sandhill
> Cranes.  At 5:40 pm, we witnessed 800+ head out for their roosting spot.
> They flew toward the southwest.  I suspect that their roosting location is
> west of Hwy 27 because we saw about 25 leave Lionel Derouen at 5:30
> and head in that direction.
> Winston Caillouet
> Sent from my iPhone
>
Subject: Re: Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie
From: "Johnson, Erik" <ejohnson AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 16:05:31 +0000
I double checked with Billy and he initially thought he saw two males together 
but only ever photographed one. In retrospect he told me he couldn't be certain 
there were two because of the distance and other things obscuring his view here 
and there. I think it's worth considering a two bird possibility but 
confirmation is needed. 


Erik Johnson


Sent via the Samsung GALAXY S®4, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Steven W. Cardiff" 
Date:01/30/2015 10:00 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Cc:
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie

The implication was that Billy Jones reported two birds, but there's never
been a confirmation of that.  Perhaps Billy or Erik Johnson can elaborate?

Steve Cardiff

On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 6:17 PM, Paul Conover  wrote:

> Steve, All,
>         Ok, so was the two male report a miscommunication, or were 2
> actually seen simultaneously?
>
> Thanks,
> Paul Conover
> Lafayette
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds
> [mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Steven W. Cardiff
> Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 1:48 PM
> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie
>
> For all of you who are wondering about the initial report of the Eurasian
> Wigeon(s), here it is (below).  Ah, the wonders of email….
>
> Steve Cardiff
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Johnson, Erik 
> Date: Tue, Dec 30, 2014 at 1:25 PM
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie
> To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
>
>
> LAbird,
>
> I just got a note from Billy Jones who has a photograph of a good-looking
> Eurasian Wigeon at Cameron Prairie NWR Pintail Drive.  He said there were
> two males as of about 8:30 am today.  Whether these are indeed "wild" or
> not will have to be sorted out, but certainly an intriguing location.
>
> Cheers,
> Erik Johnson
> S Lafayette, LA
> Ejohnson AT Audubon.org
>
Subject: Re: Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie
From: "Steven W. Cardiff" <scardif AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 10:00:00 -0600
The implication was that Billy Jones reported two birds, but there's never
been a confirmation of that.  Perhaps Billy or Erik Johnson can elaborate?

Steve Cardiff

On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 6:17 PM, Paul Conover  wrote:

> Steve, All,
>         Ok, so was the two male report a miscommunication, or were 2
> actually seen simultaneously?
>
> Thanks,
> Paul Conover
> Lafayette
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds
> [mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Steven W. Cardiff
> Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 1:48 PM
> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie
>
> For all of you who are wondering about the initial report of the Eurasian
> Wigeon(s), here it is (below).  Ah, the wonders of email….
>
> Steve Cardiff
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Johnson, Erik 
> Date: Tue, Dec 30, 2014 at 1:25 PM
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie
> To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
>
>
> LAbird,
>
> I just got a note from Billy Jones who has a photograph of a good-looking
> Eurasian Wigeon at Cameron Prairie NWR Pintail Drive.  He said there were
> two males as of about 8:30 am today.  Whether these are indeed "wild" or
> not will have to be sorted out, but certainly an intriguing location.
>
> Cheers,
> Erik Johnson
> S Lafayette, LA
> Ejohnson AT Audubon.org
>
Subject: Re: Sandhill Cranes
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 06:52:48 -0600
Friends,

For what it is worth, cranes, regardless of species, prefer to roost standing 
in water, even very cold water. Wonder if anyone has actually found any 
Sandhill Crane roosts in Louisiana? At this time of year, it's not unusual for 
rice fields to be holding water prior to early spring/late winter planting. 
And, of course, crawfish fields have water in them but it's likely a bit too 
deep for crane roosts. And, despite years of association with the crawfish 
industry, never heard a report of roosting cranes. 


Remember, there are Sandhill Crane concentrations in the Monroe area, the 
Lecompte area, and the Sweet Lake area. There is probably a smaller flock 
around Powhattan most, if not all, years. 


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Winston Caillouet" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 10:03:49 PM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Sandhill Cranes

I took my son and grandson to Fruge Rd late today to see the Sandhill Cranes. 
At 5:40 pm, we witnessed 800+ head out for their roosting spot. They flew 
toward the southwest. I suspect that their roosting location is west of Hwy 27 
because we saw about 25 leave Lionel Derouen at 5:30 

and head in that direction.
Winston Caillouet 
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Smith's Longspur field trip to Shreveport Regional Airport scheduled for 02/07/15 at 0900
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 22:04:23 -0600
Hi all, We have a few slots left so let me know if you are interested ASAP.
You can e-mail me or phone/ text (calls always better) at (318) 934-2133.
There are already some names on the list- most of which had either
previously missed the trip or have expressed sincere interest in going.
Final area/ meeting details TBA but looks like 0900 as the time.

There were notably fewer birds (4= 1 m, 3f) present during the Sheveport
CBC count in December, although that count was held somewhat earlier than
usual- and SMLO are often rather late migrants/winter arrivals. However,
after a dearth for several years, the numbers observed have been really
good the past few previous years- with over a half-dozen to around 30 or so
individuals often seen.

This trip can be quite grueling in terms of the walk and we'll be within a
fenced area lacking amenities for 2-4 hours. If you have health problems
regarding strenuous walking, then this field trip is likely not for you.
All others are welcome.

It would be best to bring snacks and water. Rubber and/or or waterproof
boots will likely be a must as we've had a wet year. There are several wet
spots in the field. It often takes too long to circumnavigate these for
those that don't have them- which also throws the route direction off.
Overall, it is often a very pleasant trip. Usually, the more attendees
present, the quicker we locate the birds.

Let me know if you're interested.

Terry
Subject: Sandhill Cranes
From: Winston Caillouet <lincwinc AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 22:03:49 -0600
I took my son and grandson to Fruge Rd late today to see the Sandhill Cranes. 
At 5:40 pm, we witnessed 800+ head out for their roosting spot. They flew 
toward the southwest. I suspect that their roosting location is west of Hwy 27 
because we saw about 25 leave Lionel Derouen at 5:30 

and head in that direction.
Winston Caillouet 
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: A DOWNRIGHT AMAZING day for Henslow's Sparrows (18) at Bodcau spillway spillover field, Bossier Parish 01/28
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 21:26:25 -0600
Hi all, Regarding yesterdays Henslow Sparrow count- While reading through
what I'd sent last night (was late and I was tired), I realized that I made
a mistake and mentioned "three" singles mentioned before the fairly close
single cluster of three- this instead should have read "two". I seriously
doubt anyone was reading and adding them up but I read them off my field
sheet wrong. My faulty description totaled 19 individuals instead of 18 as
it should have. Anyway, here's the link, as I promised yesterday, which
also includes coordinates to the general area within the field where the
Henslow's Sparrow were most abundant-

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21596484


Cheers, Terry



On Wed, Jan 28, 2015 at 11:29 PM, Terry Davis  wrote:

> Hi all, I joined Charlie Lyon and Jeff Trahan headed north quite late this
> morning toward areas of northern Bossier and Caddo parishes in search of
> some target year birds. Among several other target species that were found
> and 81 for the day, Henslow's Sparrow definitely didn't disappoint!
> Although some may have been amazed at the 16 wintering Lark Sparrow
> yesterday, this really wasn't all that unusual. However, today's Henslow's
> Sparrow count, at the very least, nearly doubled the most I'd previously
> seen on a single walk. They were virtually everywhere!! This was mainly
> noted in the northern and eastern 1/4 of the field where numbers are
> usually the highest. We immediately flushed 2 birds into the wooded edge,
> then observed, followed shortly by 2 again, then 5 singles, 2, then 3
> singles, then 3 within one small area and finally 2 more singles- for a
> final grand total of 18 individuals!! It might sound even more
> cringe-worthy when I state that this number was exceptionally conservative-
> but it certainly was- as there were at least 4-5 other birds that were
> almost certainly Henslow's. However, views were all but convincing enough
> to add them. Moreover, we were in a hurry to find other birds for the day
> and we left without even surveying a fairly large part of the southwest
> portion of the field where the habitat looked yet more beckoning in terms
> of the visible grass situation from a distance. There would have no doubt
> been more LeConte's and at least another several Henslow's added had we
> surveyed there. Charlie and Jeff also quickly agreed to abandoning
> photographic attempts after two birds were photoed, to spend our valuable
> time moving a little more quickly and trying to locate as many individuals
> as possible before leaving. Conversely and very surprisingly, LeConte's
> Sparrow, which had been in decent numbers earlier this season, were quite
> low among the Henslow's flushing from the moist fields- with only 8 birds
> observed. One certainly couldn't have used the old adage that usually
> proves true for today's walk- that LESP concentrations are better in the
> wetter areas. While we didn't initially flush any HESP from portions of the
> fields that were standing in 1-2 inches of water, it was quite sloshy at
> several spots where we did. The majority of the LeConte's (all but 3) were
> also found near the area where usually most prevalent- in the central west
> portion of the field where there was no standing water. Again, go figure!
> All Ammodramus seem to find the native "clumping" grasses mix of this area,
> including Andropogon, Aristida and several other sparse, wiry species, much
> to their liking. Upon observing so many Henslow's, we were quite surprised
> at missing Grasshopper Sparrow. The area is also nicely interspersed with
> lots of Rubus, Liatris, Baptisia and many other perennials. On the negative
> side, approximately half of the area in the northeast portion of the field
> which was surveyed in past years for the Henslow's Sparrow banding project,
> has recently been bladed entirely down to dirt. I don't have any lists from
> today yet entered into ebird but will share a link to them soon.
>
> We had some fairly good totals for waterfowl at scattered ponds today.
> Other interesting birds that were seen or heard today were Sprague's Pipit,
> Lark Sparrow, Lapland Longspur and Pine Siskin
>
> Cheers, good birding and a good evening to everyone!
>
> Terry
>
Subject: Re: Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie
From: Paul Conover <zoiseaux AT LUSFIBER.NET>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:17:25 -0600
Steve, All,
 Ok, so was the two male report a miscommunication, or were 2 actually seen 
simultaneously? 


Thanks,
Paul Conover
Lafayette

-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Steven W. Cardiff 

Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 1:48 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie

For all of you who are wondering about the initial report of the Eurasian 
Wigeon(s), here it is (below). Ah, the wonders of email…. 


Steve Cardiff

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Johnson, Erik 
Date: Tue, Dec 30, 2014 at 1:25 PM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu


LAbird,

I just got a note from Billy Jones who has a photograph of a good-looking 
Eurasian Wigeon at Cameron Prairie NWR Pintail Drive. He said there were two 
males as of about 8:30 am today. Whether these are indeed "wild" or not will 
have to be sorted out, but certainly an intriguing location. 


Cheers,
Erik Johnson
S Lafayette, LA
Ejohnson AT Audubon.org
Subject: Re: Venice Great-tailed Grackles
From: David Muth <MuthD AT NWF.ORG>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 23:22:23 +0000
Labird:



As has been noted, male birds that look like classic Great-tailed Grackles 
(phenotypic Great-tailed Grackles) began showing up in the vicinity of the 
Venice Marina, in lower Plaquemines Parish, independently detected by a number 
of observers a few years ago. They can be found in that vicinity with a little 
searching most of the time. I and others have a lot of photos and videos of 
them. Some look a little iffy, but many have very pale eyes, big bills, fierce 
expressions, flattened foreheads, and great keeled tails. 




Here are the problems:

* some of them occasionally give what to my ears sound good for Great-tailed, 
some give vocalizations that sound like Boat-tailed, and some give just 
downright confusing vocalizations; 


*         They are fully integrated into mixed flocks with BTGR;

*         I have yet to see a classically obvious female-plumaged GTGR;

* There is no intervening population between them and areas of known GTGR 
occupation. 




So some of these birds looked like a duck. They walked like a duck. But they 
did not talk like a duck. Because every time I have encountered vocalizing GTGR 
type males they've been in the company of BTGR vocalizing males, it has been 
very difficult to get clean unequivocal recordings, or, indeed, to ever be 
exactly sure which bird we were hearing. 




As of this summer, I detected phenotypic male GTGRs at the Myrtle Grove Marina, 
which is 50 miles upriver from Venice. Again, they were with BTGRs. 




Obviously GTGRs are on the move. They have crossed or gone around the 
Atchafalaya forest barrier to the north-they are at South Farm and spreading 
eastward towards greater Baton Rouge. But if they are spreading down the 
Mississippi through the most obvious corridor of suitable agricultural and 
industrial habitat, there is scant evidence for it. Of course, they might have 
spread westward along the coast, hopping over the inhospitable marshes and bays 
to the fingers of alluvial high ground and barrier islands with suitable 
habitat. But there are only a handful of plausible records from the well-birded 
Grand Isle-Fourchon area, all (?) of which post-date the earliest Venice 
records, and I and others spent hundreds of hours during the atlas period in 
lower Terrebonne, Lafourche and Jefferson without finding them. 




So are any of these GTGR? Could be. But I remain cautious, and will probably do 
so until one is captured/collected and its DNA analyzed, or perhaps until a I 
see a classic phenotypic male Great-tailed doing a classic GTGR display, 
uttering classic GTGR vocalizations, to a classic phenotypic female GTGR, as 
they are being followed around by other classic GTGR with juveniles mixed in. 




To me, all of this suggests the strong possibility of a hybridization event. I 
suspect that one or a few GTGR made it to Venice, either by boat or because 
they found themselves out over the gulf and struck first land there. What we 
are seeing are their offspring or the surviving colonists. The first generation 
of GTGR, even if pure, could have learned both GTGR and BTGR vocalizations. But 
more likely they were not pure-breds, but first generation (F-1) hybrids. And 
for whatever reason the female F-1 hybrids, if there are any, don't look as 
much like female GTGR as the F-1 males look like pure adult GTGRs. 




None of this proves that there are not perfectly valid pure-bred GTGRs in 
Venice. But if we want Ebird distribution maps to reflect what is known, rather 
than what is supposed, I recommend that Van invalidate all GTGR records from 
southeast Louisiana that are not accompanied by video recordings of size, 
shape, posture and vocalization, and for which it is clear the observers were 
aware of the issues and looking for signs of hybridization. To believe that 
there really is a non-hybrid breeding population down there, we need a 
colonization event with enough individuals to successfully reproduce a colony, 
and we need to believe they've avoided interbreeding with the vastly more 
numerous BTGRs. Because there is no settlement corridor linking the lower 
Plaquemines population to any other population that we yet know about. 




If anyone has counter evidence, let us all know about it. But more importantly, 
provide it to the museum through the North American Birds process. In the 
meantime, guilty until proven innocent, I say. 




David Muth

New Orleans
Subject: SW La today
From: Winston Caillouet <lincwinc AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 14:20:44 -0600
I tried for the wigeon and hawk again today at Cameron Prairie but did not find 
either one. 

On my to the refuge this am I tried for the Sandhills where Elias reported them 
yesterday on Fruge Road. There were more than 500 there about 9am along with 
some WF geese and ibis. When I got to intersection of Fruge and Lionel Derouen 
Rds I found another 200+ in the field SW of the intersection. 

After leaving the refuge I drove down Lionel Derouen to ck on the cranes but 
they were gone. I later found them on the west side of Hwy 27 just north of 
Lionel Derouen. 


Winston Caillouet

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie
From: "Steven W. Cardiff" <scardif AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 13:47:59 -0600
For all of you who are wondering about the initial report of the Eurasian
Wigeon(s), here it is (below).  Ah, the wonders of email….

Steve Cardiff

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Johnson, Erik 
Date: Tue, Dec 30, 2014 at 1:25 PM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Eurasian Wigeon - Cameron Prairie
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu


LAbird,

I just got a note from Billy Jones who has a photograph of a good-looking
Eurasian Wigeon at Cameron Prairie NWR Pintail Drive.  He said there were
two males as of about 8:30 am today.  Whether these are indeed "wild" or
not will have to be sorted out, but certainly an intriguing location.

Cheers,
Erik Johnson
S Lafayette, LA
Ejohnson AT Audubon.org
Subject: Mountain bluebird
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 11:09:42 -0600
She continues!
Working the fence line next to the truck entrance at Barrier Construction
Asphalt Division.
Met up with Joan Garvey at the location.
Janine
Subject: Re: More than ONE USUAL LOCATION - Eurasian Wigeon
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 06:57:30 -0600
Paul,

Billy Jones reported an Eurasian Wigeon in mid-morning. Then Dan Lane reported 
one later in the morning. Were there two or the same one reported twice? Not 
clear. 


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Paul Conover" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Wednesday, January 28, 2015 9:04:17 PM
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] More than ONE USUAL LOCATION -  Eurasian Wigeon

Jay, All,
	Do I remember correctly that 2 birds were initially reported?  

 By the way, there are at least 2 drake Cinnamon Teal along the drive. I saw 
one by the boardwalk area and one back in the NE corner last time I passed by 
there, definitely different individuals. 

        
	 

Paul Conover
Lafayette 


-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jay V Huner 

Sent: Wednesday, January 28, 2015 8:08 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [LABIRD-L] More than ONE USUAL LOCATION - Eurasian Wigeon

Friends,

For those wanting to find the Eurasian Wigeon, there are TWO USUAL LOCATIONS. 
One is the site referenced by Winston - there is an opening in the canes where 
one can view the marsh and ducks. The other is the site referenced by others, 
including myself, about 50 yards before getting to the parking area for the 
marsh walk. The Eurasian Wigeon clearly hangs out with American Wigeons and 
does move around. I believe it was first found at the area before the marsh 
walk independently by Billy Jones and later by Dan Lane. 


When I saw the bird - located by Joan Brown - on 2 January, it was about 200 
yards off the road and moving in and out of grass making it hard to see. The 
day before, it was in clear view of the road at the site near the pump house. 


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Winston Caillouet" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Wednesday, January 28, 2015 6:46:47 PM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Couch's Kingbird and Eurasian Wigeon

I observed the Couch's this morning at 9:45 am on Lomire Rd. It was very 
cooperative and provided close viewing. It was in a small woodlot across from a 
residence on the west side of the road with a Utility pole in the front yard. 

The wigeon was observed about 1:30 pm in the usual spot just before the pump 
house. 

The Ferruginous Hawk was a no-show.  I'll try for it again tomorrow.

Winston Caillouet
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: A DOWNRIGHT AMAZING day for Henslow's Sparrows (18) at Bodcau spillway spillover field, Bossier Parish 01/28
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 23:29:21 -0600
Hi all, I joined Charlie Lyon and Jeff Trahan headed north quite late this
morning toward areas of northern Bossier and Caddo parishes in search of
some target year birds. Among several other target species that were found
and 81 for the day, Henslow's Sparrow definitely didn't disappoint!
Although some may have been amazed at the 16 wintering Lark Sparrow
yesterday, this really wasn't all that unusual. However, today's Henslow's
Sparrow count, at the very least, nearly doubled the most I'd previously
seen on a single walk. They were virtually everywhere!! This was mainly
noted in the northern and eastern 1/4 of the field where numbers are
usually the highest. We immediately flushed 2 birds into the wooded edge,
then observed, followed shortly by 2 again, then 5 singles, 2, then 3
singles, then 3 within one small area and finally 2 more singles- for a
final grand total of 18 individuals!! It might sound even more
cringe-worthy when I state that this number was exceptionally conservative-
but it certainly was- as there were at least 4-5 other birds that were
almost certainly Henslow's. However, views were all but convincing enough
to add them. Moreover, we were in a hurry to find other birds for the day
and we left without even surveying a fairly large part of the southwest
portion of the field where the habitat looked yet more beckoning in terms
of the visible grass situation from a distance. There would have no doubt
been more LeConte's and at least another several Henslow's added had we
surveyed there. Charlie and Jeff also quickly agreed to abandoning
photographic attempts after two birds were photoed, to spend our valuable
time moving a little more quickly and trying to locate as many individuals
as possible before leaving. Conversely and very surprisingly, LeConte's
Sparrow, which had been in decent numbers earlier this season, were quite
low among the Henslow's flushing from the moist fields- with only 8 birds
observed. One certainly couldn't have used the old adage that usually
proves true for today's walk- that LESP concentrations are better in the
wetter areas. While we didn't initially flush any HESP from portions of the
fields that were standing in 1-2 inches of water, it was quite sloshy at
several spots where we did. The majority of the LeConte's (all but 3) were
also found near the area where usually most prevalent- in the central west
portion of the field where there was no standing water. Again, go figure!
All Ammodramus seem to find the native "clumping" grasses mix of this area,
including Andropogon, Aristida and several other sparse, wiry species, much
to their liking. Upon observing so many Henslow's, we were quite surprised
at missing Grasshopper Sparrow. The area is also nicely interspersed with
lots of Rubus, Liatris, Baptisia and many other perennials. On the negative
side, approximately half of the area in the northeast portion of the field
which was surveyed in past years for the Henslow's Sparrow banding project,
has recently been bladed entirely down to dirt. I don't have any lists from
today yet entered into ebird but will share a link to them soon.

We had some fairly good totals for waterfowl at scattered ponds today.
Other interesting birds that were seen or heard today were Sprague's Pipit,
Lark Sparrow, Lapland Longspur and Pine Siskin

Cheers, good birding and a good evening to everyone!

Terry
Subject: Re: Venice Great-tailed Grackles
From: Ed Wallace <mottledduck AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 22:02:59 -0600
Van, et. al.
I just got home from work and had not had a chance to reply. Like an idiot, I 
did not get my camera out as soon as I encountered them and they flew out of 
range when I did get it out. There were quite a few folks there and I hope one 
of them had better luck snapping a picture. 

This is not the first time I have seen them and I do believe I have pictures 
that I took in the past of these birds. If I find them, I will forward them. If 
I remember correctly, I think folks started reporting these birds about 18 
months ago. When I encountered them before, they were in the same general 
location; right by the entrance to the Venice dump. Besides the white eye, they 
also had very sloped heads. While we were there, they did not make any calls 
that would distinguish them from one grackle species or the other. 

Ed

> Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 03:25:49 +0000
> From: najames AT LSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Venice Great-tailed Grackles
> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> 
> On Jan 28, 2015, at 4:53 PM, Jay V Huner  wrote:
> 
> > The Plaquemines Parish ebird list includes Great-tailed Grackle. I first 
encountered "Great-tailed Grackles" at one of the marinas at Venice some 
summers ago while on a fishing trip. Didn't have a camera with me and by the 
time I got back with a camera, I was unable to get pictures. But, the birds had 
the long, sloping foreheads and light colored eyes of Great-tailed Grackles and 
sounded like them. Encountered similar birds in the same place a couple of 
summers later. 

> > 
> > Well, the issue of GTGRs at Venice has been discussed several times on 
LABIRD. As I appreciate the matter, the birds "look like" GTGRs but in the 
absence of material for DNA testing, there still seems to be a question about 
just what the birds are. 

> > 
> > I bring this matter up because I reported GTGR from the LOS field trip list 
for Venice. Today, I got an inquiry from ebird about the report. While the 
participants in the field trip were discussing the birds near the dump at 
Venice, I mentioned the "question" about the genetics of the birds. The 
consensus was that the birds met all the characters needed to identify them as 
GTGR, and the option was included for the Plaquemines list. 

> > 
> > All I can say is that the bird I saw looked like a male GTGR.
> > 
> 
> Jay/LABIRD: what has happened is that today I created a separate filter for 
Plaquemines Parish (from Jefferson and Terrebonne) with the filter value set to 
zero for GT Grackle because of the issues with presence of that species in the 
lower delta. I don’t know what we’re going to do about all the record without 
details already in the data-base, but henceforth details will be required and 
photos of great value. ID of females seems straighforwad based on irtis color 
and to some degree face pattern. Males are trickier in my experience. Many BTs 
have pale irises to varying degrees, yet stopping short of that gleaming 
yellowish-white GT eye. The rising whistle of GT is important, but I swear I 
have heard something similar coming for birds with BT phenotypes, so I hesitate 
to base ID strictly on that. Hybrids are a real possibllity, especially at the 
leading edge of a range expansion. Head shape seems to work on displaying 
birds, but when a bird is just foraging, I wonder …! 

> Adult male GTs do indeed have a “great tail” that is often immediately 
apparent. Feedback and discussion welcomed. 

> 
> 
> =================
> 
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> najamesLSU.edu
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Venice Great-tailed Grackles
From: James V Remsen <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 03:25:49 +0000
On Jan 28, 2015, at 4:53 PM, Jay V Huner  wrote:

> The Plaquemines Parish ebird list includes Great-tailed Grackle. I first 
encountered "Great-tailed Grackles" at one of the marinas at Venice some 
summers ago while on a fishing trip. Didn't have a camera with me and by the 
time I got back with a camera, I was unable to get pictures. But, the birds had 
the long, sloping foreheads and light colored eyes of Great-tailed Grackles and 
sounded like them. Encountered similar birds in the same place a couple of 
summers later. 

> 
> Well, the issue of GTGRs at Venice has been discussed several times on 
LABIRD. As I appreciate the matter, the birds "look like" GTGRs but in the 
absence of material for DNA testing, there still seems to be a question about 
just what the birds are. 

> 
> I bring this matter up because I reported GTGR from the LOS field trip list 
for Venice. Today, I got an inquiry from ebird about the report. While the 
participants in the field trip were discussing the birds near the dump at 
Venice, I mentioned the "question" about the genetics of the birds. The 
consensus was that the birds met all the characters needed to identify them as 
GTGR, and the option was included for the Plaquemines list. 

> 
> All I can say is that the bird I saw looked like a male GTGR.
> 

Jay/LABIRD: what has happened is that today I created a separate filter for 
Plaquemines Parish (from Jefferson and Terrebonne) with the filter value set to 
zero for GT Grackle because of the issues with presence of that species in the 
lower delta. I don’t know what we’re going to do about all the record without 
details already in the data-base, but henceforth details will be required and 
photos of great value. ID of females seems straighforwad based on irtis color 
and to some degree face pattern. Males are trickier in my experience. Many BTs 
have pale irises to varying degrees, yet stopping short of that gleaming 
yellowish-white GT eye. The rising whistle of GT is important, but I swear I 
have heard something similar coming for birds with BT phenotypes, so I hesitate 
to base ID strictly on that. Hybrids are a real possibllity, especially at the 
leading edge of a range expansion. Head shape seems to work on displaying 
birds, but when a bird is just foraging, I wonder …! 

 Adult male GTs do indeed have a “great tail” that is often immediately 
apparent. Feedback and discussion welcomed. 



=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: Re: More than ONE USUAL LOCATION - Eurasian Wigeon
From: Paul Conover <zoiseaux AT LUSFIBER.NET>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 21:04:17 -0600
Jay, All,
	Do I remember correctly that 2 birds were initially reported?  

 By the way, there are at least 2 drake Cinnamon Teal along the drive. I saw 
one by the boardwalk area and one back in the NE corner last time I passed by 
there, definitely different individuals. 

        
	 

Paul Conover
Lafayette 


-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jay V Huner 

Sent: Wednesday, January 28, 2015 8:08 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [LABIRD-L] More than ONE USUAL LOCATION - Eurasian Wigeon

Friends,

For those wanting to find the Eurasian Wigeon, there are TWO USUAL LOCATIONS. 
One is the site referenced by Winston - there is an opening in the canes where 
one can view the marsh and ducks. The other is the site referenced by others, 
including myself, about 50 yards before getting to the parking area for the 
marsh walk. The Eurasian Wigeon clearly hangs out with American Wigeons and 
does move around. I believe it was first found at the area before the marsh 
walk independently by Billy Jones and later by Dan Lane. 


When I saw the bird - located by Joan Brown - on 2 January, it was about 200 
yards off the road and moving in and out of grass making it hard to see. The 
day before, it was in clear view of the road at the site near the pump house. 


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Winston Caillouet" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Wednesday, January 28, 2015 6:46:47 PM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Couch's Kingbird and Eurasian Wigeon

I observed the Couch's this morning at 9:45 am on Lomire Rd. It was very 
cooperative and provided close viewing. It was in a small woodlot across from a 
residence on the west side of the road with a Utility pole in the front yard. 

The wigeon was observed about 1:30 pm in the usual spot just before the pump 
house. 

The Ferruginous Hawk was a no-show.  I'll try for it again tomorrow.

Winston Caillouet
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Great Blue Heron Meal
From: John Romano <birderjuan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 20:37:09 -0600
I saw something very similiar up at the Horicon marsh in Central
Wisconsin.  I could not believe the size of the fish that the great blue
heron caught and swallowed.  And then to see if fly off very clumsily a
short time later.

John Romano
Breaux Bridge, Wis

On Wed, Jan 28, 2015 at 7:51 PM, Stephen Pagans  wrote:

>
>
> Sorry.  My bad.  I didn't know I was so challenged in typing odd lists.  I
> think I got it right.  3rd time is the charm?  I hope.
>
> http://bit.ly/1xsFmvn
>
> I think I will retire from such actions.  I'm embarrassed, sort of.
>
Subject: More than ONE USUAL LOCATION - Eurasian Wigeon
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 20:07:44 -0600
Friends,

For those wanting to find the Eurasian Wigeon, there are TWO USUAL LOCATIONS. 
One is the site referenced by Winston - there is an opening in the canes where 
one can view the marsh and ducks. The other is the site referenced by others, 
including myself, about 50 yards before getting to the parking area for the 
marsh walk. The Eurasian Wigeon clearly hangs out with American Wigeons and 
does move around. I believe it was first found at the area before the marsh 
walk independently by Billy Jones and later by Dan Lane. 


When I saw the bird - located by Joan Brown - on 2 January, it was about 200 
yards off the road and moving in and out of grass making it hard to see. The 
day before, it was in clear view of the road at the site near the pump house. 


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Winston Caillouet" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Wednesday, January 28, 2015 6:46:47 PM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Couch's Kingbird and Eurasian Wigeon

I observed the Couch's this morning at 9:45 am on Lomire Rd. It was very 
cooperative and provided close viewing. It was in a small woodlot across from a 
residence on the west side of the road with a Utility pole in the front yard. 

The wigeon was observed about 1:30 pm in the usual spot just before the pump 
house. 

The Ferruginous Hawk was a no-show.  I'll try for it again tomorrow.

Winston Caillouet
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Great Blue Heron Meal
From: Stephen Pagans <slp_4-7 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 17:51:51 -0800
  

Sorry. My bad. I didn't know I was so challenged in typing odd lists. I think I 
got it right. 3rd time is the charm? I hope. 


http://bit.ly/1xsFmvn

I think I will retire from such actions.  I'm embarrassed, sort of.
Subject: Couch's Kingbird and Eurasian Wigeon
From: Winston Caillouet <lincwinc AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 18:46:47 -0600
I observed the Couch's this morning at 9:45 am on Lomire Rd. It was very 
cooperative and provided close viewing. It was in a small woodlot across from a 
residence on the west side of the road with a Utility pole in the front yard. 

The wigeon was observed about 1:30 pm in the usual spot just before the pump 
house. 

The Ferruginous Hawk was a no-show.  I'll try for it again tomorrow.

Winston Caillouet
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Trip to Cameron Prairie
From: Elias <ejlandry AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 18:07:45 -0600
Made a trip down Hwy 14, Fruge Road, Hwy 27 to Cameron Prairie/Pintail Loop. 
Stopped at Lacassine Pools right after sunrise and got Bald Eagle, Caracara, 
and Perigrine Falcon. At the corner of Hwy 14 and Fruge Road, I spotted a 
couple of cranes landing in the field. I turned down Fruge Road and spotted 6 
Sandhill Cranes standing in the field with another 300 further back that 
loooked like they were sleeping. A stop at the Cameron Prairie Refuge 
headquarters failed to yield the Ferruginous Hawk. Did not see the Eurasian 
Wigeon on the first pass around Pintail Loop, but did meet up with Tom Finnie 
who hadn't seen it, either. We decided to make another loop around where we 
found it at the spot where we had first met up(the corner area near the pump). 
Tom took a bunch of pictures. It was a good day to be birding! 

Elias LandryAvery Island, Louisiana 		 	   		  
Subject: Great Blue Heron Meal
From: Stephen Pagans <slp_4-7 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 15:43:56 -0800
Hey all,

I did a typo.  Sorry.  If you want to try again.

http://bit.ly.1xsfmvn/

Steve
Subject: Venice Great-tailed Grackles
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 16:53:23 -0600
The Plaquemines Parish ebird list includes Great-tailed Grackle. I first 
encountered "Great-tailed Grackles" at one of the marinas at Venice some 
summers ago while on a fishing trip. Didn't have a camera with me and by the 
time I got back with a camera, I was unable to get pictures. But, the birds had 
the long, sloping foreheads and light colored eyes of Great-tailed Grackles and 
sounded like them. Encountered similar birds in the same place a couple of 
summers later. 


Well, the issue of GTGRs at Venice has been discussed several times on LABIRD. 
As I appreciate the matter, the birds "look like" GTGRs but in the absence of 
material for DNA testing, there still seems to be a question about just what 
the birds are. 


I bring this matter up because I reported GTGR from the LOS field trip list for 
Venice. Today, I got an inquiry from ebird about the report. While the 
participants in the field trip were discussing the birds near the dump at 
Venice, I mentioned the "question" about the genetics of the birds. The 
consensus was that the birds met all the characters needed to identify them as 
GTGR, and the option was included for the Plaquemines list. 


All I can say is that the bird I saw looked like a male GTGR.

Jay Huner
Subject: Common Loons (London Ave Canal)
From: "Steven - Stone Source Int'l" <sliffmann AT YOURSOURCEFORSTONE.COM>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 08:43:18 -0600
I figured I'd pass along, there is a pair of Common Loons that are in the 
London Ave Canal between the lake and new pump station. A few photos below.  


https://plus.google.com/photos/115738054844181634233/albums/6109230218935762353



Best regards, 


Steven Liffmann 
Stone Source Int'l, Inc 

Cell# 504-416-1615 

www.yoursourceforstone.com 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE 
Subject: Diamond, Plaquemines parish, LA Sunday 1/26/15
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 23:51:42 -0600
​Hello all,
 Paul and I took a ride to Belle Chasse to see family, then took off to
check Diamond and Ft Jackson . Then we did some drive-by birding from
Triumph to Empire before we called it quits.
Thanks to the lists from the LOS trip, I knew what areas to go to to find
target birds. Did get Yellow-headed blackbirds (5)females, Vermilion
flycatcher, Scissor-tailed flycatcher and Western kingbird. Missed the
Broad-winged hawk, thought I had it a Ft Jackson, but it was a young
Red-shouldered.
Link below if interested in the list for Diamond with a few pictures.
Best,
Janine
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21574986
Subject: Great Blue Heron Meal
From: Stephen Pagans <slp_4-7 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 18:48:44 -0800
Hey all,

Today I received a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service "Refuge Update" for Jan/Feb 
2015. In it, there was mention of a video photo essay of a GBHE eating a carp. 
I just watched it and found that GBHE can eat very large meals that I didn't 
think could be done. Check it out at http://bit.lxsFmvn. 

Subject: Note about Location of Mountain Bluebird
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 20:41:28 -0600
Friends,

I figure most folks who want to see the Mountain Bluebird have been gone but in 
the event you haven't, you may find it helpful to have the address of the 
construction company where it has been entertaining many people. I got the 
address when generating a Long Form. 


Barriere Construction Company 
407 CC Road
Franklinton, LA 70438

The bird hangs out around the truck entrance/exit. This is clear to see once 
you get there. However, parking isn't great and the trucks that go in and out 
are "Widow Makers" so be careful. There was constant in and out on Sunday 
morning when I was there. Have no idea if the activity is greater during the 
week. 


Good luck on finding it if you are going. I drove right up and there it was on 
the wire. Casey Wright and her party were there already and said they had to 
wait 20 minutes for it to show up. Later in the morning, there were two nice 
guys in a green SUV who spent at least an hour there and did not find it. 
Hopefully they did find it. However, around 1 PM Charlie Lyon and the Trahans 
drove up and found it right away. 


I understand that some folks have gone 2 and 3 times and not found the 
bluebird. 


Jay Huner
Subject: Re: white-breasted nuthatch in EBR Parish
From: Evelyn Cooper <emcooper AT HUGHES.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 19:15:56 -0600
It would be exciting if the White-breasted Nuthatch nested in your neighbor's 
yard or more so in yours. Bluebirders are encouraged to pair Brown-headed 
Nuthatches and Bluebirds with nestboxes 10 to 20 ft. apart. The White-breasted 
nested in a bluebird box, so that might work for it too. If it does nest near 
you, please let me know about it. 


Thanks,
Evelyn Cooper
Delhi, LA
Louisiana Bayou Bluebird Society
www.labayoubluebirdsociety.org


-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Charles Williams 

Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2015 12:14 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [LABIRD-L] white-breasted nuthatch in EBR Parish

A couple of years ago I had this species in my yard for nearly two years and 
they nested in a bluebird house in my neighbor's yard. Then they disappeared, 
having (I thought) been wiped out by the local accipiters or whatever. This 
morning I saw one in my back yard again, seeming to be hanging out with a 
couple of bluebirds. 


Charles Williams
Subject: N Caddo- grp of 16 Lark Sparrow 01/27/15
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 16:47:07 -0600
Hi all, While attempting to use the calm weather as a chance to obtain some
new sound recordings this morning (not so successful with that), I ran
across a sizable group of 16 wintering Lark Sparrow at Cairo Plantation. I
was able to capture 13 in at least one photo. The birds were at the blind
curve in the paved rd near the barns at Cairo Plantation on Sentell rd-
location is flagged in list. I doubt anyone needs Lark Sparrow for their nw
La list-  but it's always neat to see a tight group of them in January.

The immediate location/ parking will be very near/ adjacent the sharp and
blind curve so be very careful. The birds will be on the west side of the
rd. Observers should pull off of the pavement before trying to observe the
birds but it would be best to remain near the rd. Although the owners are
birder-friendly, this is private property and there's often lots of
machinery running and other work going on in the immediate area.

If anyone would like to see the pic of 13 LASP then let me know. Here is
the list with flagged location-


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21569968&msgKey=singleLocMergeSuccess 



Good birding y'all,

Terry
Subject: Re: A Question about Localities . . .
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 13:30:18 -0600
Ed, and anyone else using eBird's BirdsEye app,

The trip list feature on BirdsEye actually totals all your lists for any given 
period of days (from 1 day to hundreds of days). So, you can actually keep Hot 
Spot lists and other location-specific lists separately throughout the day (and 
obviously end them when you're out of a certain area), then still have an 
automatic trip list that you don't have to compile yourself. The app does it 
for you. 


It would be ideal for LOS weekends or personal weekend trips to Cameron or 
Grand Isle, etc. for anyone. Plus, you can feel good about submitting lists to 
eBird that are as accurate as possible in terms of location. 


John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 27, 2015, at 12:44 PM, Ed Wallace  wrote:
> 
> All,
> Since I posted the Plaquemines trip, I will take the hit. I wanted to add a 
few things from my perspective: 

> (1) I noticed that when I pulled up Plaquemines Parish, Plaquemines popped up 
for location. I am thinking this is a feature from E-bird (I just tried St. 
Johns the Baptist Parish and that showed up as a location, as well). I can 
understand that some might find this confusing.(2) Matt suggested something 
that I had not considered - trip total list and hotspot list. I ran into a 
dilemna when a few of us did a scouting trip the week before. I created about 6 
separate checklist - Belle Chase to Diamond, the Diamond hotspot; Diamond to 
Buras, and so on. If it is ok to create a total trip list and local hot spot 
lists, that would reduce the total number of lists that need to be produced.(3) 
Interestingly enough, some of our best birds were seen outside of hotspots. One 
of the Yellow-headed blackbirds and the Broadwing hawk were found about halfway 
between Venice and Ft. Jackson. (4) I generated the list in e-bird after we had 
returned from Venice from a official trip chec! 

 klist kept by another person. We had not been keeping records on the checklist 
on where each bird was seen. Because I was driving, it would have been 
imprudent to keep the checklist using the BirdLog app on my iphone. BirdLog 
does allow you to have multiple checklists open at the same time, so you could 
keep a trip and a location list. I will keep this in mind in the future. (5) I 
did think it was important to get information out about the birds we had seen. 
First, the trip found 6 birds that were flagged by e-bird. Second, I think it 
is important for people to know that diversity of birds that you can see on 
trip from Belle Chase to Venice. There are very few places in this country 
where you can see 100 species of birds in the wintertime, just a short drive 
away from a major city. Although that fact may not help scientist as detailed 
below, it does help the hundreds of birders deciding where they want to 
birding. 

> I will continue to try to improve the records I keep. I only hope that I 
don't cause a disproportionate amount of the problems in e-bird. 

> Ed
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 09:24:17 -0600
>> From: scardif AT GMAIL.COM
>> Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] A Question about Localities . . .
>> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
>> 
>> Also, not to nitpick, but the city of Plaquemine is in Iberville Parish.
>> 
>> Also, there's no way to generate 120 miles in Plaquemines Parish from Belle
>> Chase to Venice unless you are counting down and back.  But then you are
>> counting duplicated mileage.  So, those high mileages should be edited down
>> to not count backtrack miles.
>> 
>> Steve Cardiff
>> 
>>> On Tue, Jan 27, 2015 at 9:19 AM, Matt Brady  wrote:
>>> 
>>> Nancy and LABIRD, the answer to this is pretty simple: the LOS weekend
>>> observers entered a single checklist for the entire Parish of Plaquemines.
>>> That's why they have a duration of ~12 hours, and a traveling count of 120
>>> miles. Generally the eBird administration prefers observers NOT to enter
>>> checklists like this, for huge swaths of country, because it makes any sort
>>> of fine-scale analyses impossible. Instead, they prefer much shorter (5 mi
>>> or shorter) traveling counts or stationary counts, if observations were
>>> made from a single point (like on a hawkwatch, riverwatch or seawatch or
>>> small backyard). These huge, Parish-wide counts are automatically excluded
>>> from most kinds of analyses, including map and bar chart output; my advice
>>> is if you want your eBird sightings to be used to the maximum extent
>>> possible, enter many shorter checklists for exact, discrete locations,
>>> using pre-existing hotspots. Occasionally counts like this make it in to
>>> eBird because observers want to post a single list for an entire day of
>>> observations, which, in my opinion is totally fine as long as they also
>>> enter redundant counts for exact localities.
>>> 
>>> Hope things are a bit clearer now.
>>> 
>>> Matt Brady
>>> Baton Rouge
>>> 
>>> On Tue, Jan 27, 2015 at 8:59 AM, Nancy L. Newfield 
>>> wrote:
>>> 
>>>> This is directed to eBird users and reviewers:
>>>> 
>>>> I was reading over the [eBird Alert] Louisiana Rare Bird Alert 
>>>> this morning and saw many entries, presumably from the weekend's
>>> Louisiana
>>>> Ornithological Society Winter Meeting field trips, that gave the locality
>>>> as: Plaquemines, Plaquemines, Louisiana.
>>>> 
>>>> I think this is confusing insofar as there is no town of Plaquemines in
>>>> Plaquemines Parish, AND the town of Plaquemine [without the 's'] is the
>>>> parish seat of Ascension Parish far upriver from the coast. I know that I
>>>> can use the google map associated with each entry to locate the locality
>>>> [more or less], but to have the name of the parish as the name of a
>>>> nonexistent town invites confusion forever more.
>>>> 
>>>> Nan
>>>> 
>>>> --
>>>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>>>> Nancy L Newfield
>>>> Casa ColibrĂ­
>>>> Metairie, LA USA
>>>> 
>>>> http://www.casacolibri.net/
>>>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> ---
>>>> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
>>>> http://www.avast.com
>                         
Subject: Re: A Question about Localities . . .
From: Matt Brady <podoces AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 13:25:36 -0600
Also, if you're already using BirdLog, the app keeps a running day list for
you, under the Trip Summery heading on the main page. It keeps a day list,
a trip list for multi-day trips, and a "All" list, which is a composite of
all checklists you've entered using BirdLog.

Speaking from my own personal perspective, mentioning highlights is enough
for me. Posting a full day list of 100+ species isn't interesting; I don't
care if someone saw Common Grackle and Blue Jay and Northern Mockingbird. I
sift through those species looking for the 'interesting' stuff.

Matt Brady
Baton Rouge

On Tue, Jan 27, 2015 at 1:18 PM, James V Remsen  wrote:

> On Jan 27, 2015, at 12:44 PM, Ed Wallace  wrote:
>
> > All,
> > Since I posted the Plaquemines trip, I will take the hit.  I wanted to
> add a few things from my perspective:
> > (1) I noticed that when I pulled up Plaquemines Parish, Plaquemines
> popped up for location.  I am thinking this is a feature from E-bird (I
> just tried St. Johns the Baptist Parish and that showed up as a location,
> as well).
>
> Ed/LABIRD — be wary of that eBird ap.  For example, a few days ago it
> labeled the stakeout Ferug at Cameron P NWR as “Bell City” [wrong parish]
>
>
>
>
> > (2) Matt suggested something that I had not considered - trip total list
> and hotspot list.
>
> ==== I think this is the way to go.  We all like running up those nice
> totals for long traveling counts, but as should be obvious to all, these
> are really not very useful in terms of bird distribution — in fact, they
> can be misleading.  The way to maximize the benefits of your birding to
> eBird analyses (or any analyses) is to make your lists site-specific,
> within reason.  More paperwork, more lists … I know the problem well.  So,
> it’s really a matter of what you’re willing to do.
>
> Then, for fun, you can enter a trip list as an Incidental list if you
> really want to — it doesn’t quite match the definition of Incidental (= 
not 

> really birding), however. I would record each species as “X” because the 

> numbers are already included in the individual lists except for individuals
> seen between spots.
>
> If all you want is a day list total, the better way is to use the
> Summarize My Observations, select Week Report, select all the localities
> you visited, and then you get a file with a list of everything you saw each
> day in that week — and from that you automatically get a “Number of
> Species” for that day.  Because those long day lists are really just fun
> stuff, I think this is preferable than compiling a day list as an
> Incidental list in eBird.  We all love those day totals but we also know
> that these have minimal or no scientific value if they represent a long
> traveling count among lots of different habitats and regions.
>
> Van Remsen
>
>
>
> =================
>
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> najamesLSU.edu
>
Subject: Re: A Question about Localities . . .
From: James V Remsen <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 19:18:05 +0000
On Jan 27, 2015, at 12:44 PM, Ed Wallace  wrote:

> All,
> Since I posted the Plaquemines trip, I will take the hit. I wanted to add a 
few things from my perspective: 

> (1) I noticed that when I pulled up Plaquemines Parish, Plaquemines popped up 
for location. I am thinking this is a feature from E-bird (I just tried St. 
Johns the Baptist Parish and that showed up as a location, as well). 


Ed/LABIRD — be wary of that eBird ap. For example, a few days ago it labeled 
the stakeout Ferug at Cameron P NWR as “Bell City” [wrong parish] 





> (2) Matt suggested something that I had not considered - trip total list and 
hotspot list. 


==== I think this is the way to go. We all like running up those nice totals 
for long traveling counts, but as should be obvious to all, these are really 
not very useful in terms of bird distribution — in fact, they can be 
misleading. The way to maximize the benefits of your birding to eBird analyses 
(or any analyses) is to make your lists site-specific, within reason. More 
paperwork, more lists … I know the problem well. So, it’s really a matter of 
what you’re willing to do. 


Then, for fun, you can enter a trip list as an Incidental list if you really 
want to — it doesn’t quite match the definition of Incidental (= not really 
birding), however. I would record each species as “X” because the numbers are 
already included in the individual lists except for individuals seen between 
spots. 


If all you want is a day list total, the better way is to use the Summarize My 
Observations, select Week Report, select all the localities you visited, and 
then you get a file with a list of everything you saw each day in that week — 
and from that you automatically get a “Number of Species” for that day. Because 
those long day lists are really just fun stuff, I think this is preferable than 
compiling a day list as an Incidental list in eBird. We all love those day 
totals but we also know that these have minimal or no scientific value if they 
represent a long traveling count among lots of different habitats and regions. 


Van Remsen



=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: Re: A Question about Localities . . .
From: Ed Wallace <mottledduck AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 12:44:57 -0600
All,
Since I posted the Plaquemines trip, I will take the hit. I wanted to add a few 
things from my perspective: 

(1) I noticed that when I pulled up Plaquemines Parish, Plaquemines popped up 
for location. I am thinking this is a feature from E-bird (I just tried St. 
Johns the Baptist Parish and that showed up as a location, as well). I can 
understand that some might find this confusing.(2) Matt suggested something 
that I had not considered - trip total list and hotspot list. I ran into a 
dilemna when a few of us did a scouting trip the week before. I created about 6 
separate checklist - Belle Chase to Diamond, the Diamond hotspot; Diamond to 
Buras, and so on. If it is ok to create a total trip list and local hot spot 
lists, that would reduce the total number of lists that need to be produced.(3) 
Interestingly enough, some of our best birds were seen outside of hotspots. One 
of the Yellow-headed blackbirds and the Broadwing hawk were found about halfway 
between Venice and Ft. Jackson. (4) I generated the list in e-bird after we had 
returned from Venice from a official trip checklist kept by another person. We 
had not been keeping records on the checklist on where each bird was seen. 
Because I was driving, it would have been imprudent to keep the checklist using 
the BirdLog app on my iphone. BirdLog does allow you to have multiple 
checklists open at the same time, so you could keep a trip and a location list. 
I will keep this in mind in the future. (5) I did think it was important to get 
information out about the birds we had seen. First, the trip found 6 birds that 
were flagged by e-bird. Second, I think it is important for people to know that 
diversity of birds that you can see on trip from Belle Chase to Venice. There 
are very few places in this country where you can see 100 species of birds in 
the wintertime, just a short drive away from a major city. Although that fact 
may not help scientist as detailed below, it does help the hundreds of birders 
deciding where they want to birding. 

I will continue to try to improve the records I keep. I only hope that I don't 
cause a disproportionate amount of the problems in e-bird. 

Ed




> Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 09:24:17 -0600
> From: scardif AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] A Question about Localities . . .
> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> 
> Also, not to nitpick, but the city of Plaquemine is in Iberville Parish.
> 
> Also, there's no way to generate 120 miles in Plaquemines Parish from Belle
> Chase to Venice unless you are counting down and back.  But then you are
> counting duplicated mileage.  So, those high mileages should be edited down
> to not count backtrack miles.
> 
> Steve Cardiff
> 
> On Tue, Jan 27, 2015 at 9:19 AM, Matt Brady  wrote:
> 
> > Nancy and LABIRD, the answer to this is pretty simple: the LOS weekend
> > observers entered a single checklist for the entire Parish of Plaquemines.
> > That's why they have a duration of ~12 hours, and a traveling count of 120
> > miles. Generally the eBird administration prefers observers NOT to enter
> > checklists like this, for huge swaths of country, because it makes any sort
> > of fine-scale analyses impossible. Instead, they prefer much shorter (5 mi
> > or shorter) traveling counts or stationary counts, if observations were
> > made from a single point (like on a hawkwatch, riverwatch or seawatch or
> > small backyard). These huge, Parish-wide counts are automatically excluded
> > from most kinds of analyses, including map and bar chart output; my advice
> > is if you want your eBird sightings to be used to the maximum extent
> > possible, enter many shorter checklists for exact, discrete locations,
> > using pre-existing hotspots. Occasionally counts like this make it in to
> > eBird because observers want to post a single list for an entire day of
> > observations, which, in my opinion is totally fine as long as they also
> > enter redundant counts for exact localities.
> >
> > Hope things are a bit clearer now.
> >
> > Matt Brady
> > Baton Rouge
> >
> > On Tue, Jan 27, 2015 at 8:59 AM, Nancy L. Newfield 
> > wrote:
> >
> > > This is directed to eBird users and reviewers:
> > >
> > > I was reading over the [eBird Alert] Louisiana Rare Bird Alert 
> > > this morning and saw many entries, presumably from the weekend's
> > Louisiana
> > > Ornithological Society Winter Meeting field trips, that gave the locality
> > > as: Plaquemines, Plaquemines, Louisiana.
> > >
> > > I think this is confusing insofar as there is no town of Plaquemines in
> > > Plaquemines Parish, AND the town of Plaquemine [without the 's'] is the
> > > parish seat of Ascension Parish far upriver from the coast. I know that I
> > > can use the google map associated with each entry to locate the locality
> > > [more or less], but to have the name of the parish as the name of a
> > > nonexistent town invites confusion forever more.
> > >
> > > Nan
> > >
> > > --
> > > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > > Nancy L Newfield
> > > Casa Colibrí
> > > Metairie, LA USA
> > > 
> > > http://www.casacolibri.net/
> > > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ---
> > > This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> > > http://www.avast.com
> > >
> >
 		 	   		  
Subject: white-breasted nuthatch in EBR Parish
From: Charles Williams <chazbizz AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 13:13:37 -0500
A couple of years ago I had this species in my yard for nearly two years and 
they nested in a bluebird house in my neighbor's yard. Then they disappeared, 
having (I thought) been wiped out by the local accipiters or whatever. This 
morning I saw one in my back yard again, seeming to be hanging out with a 
couple of bluebirds. 


Charles Williams
Subject: Re: A Question about Localities . . .
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 09:28:22 -0600
Steve,

On 1/27/2015 9:24 AM, Steven W. Cardiff wrote:

> Also, not to nitpick, but the city of Plaquemine is in Iberville Parish.

Thank you for nitpicking.  Everybody needs an editor.

Nan

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa ColibrĂ­
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com
Subject: Re: A Question about Localities . . .
From: "Steven W. Cardiff" <scardif AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 09:24:17 -0600
Also, not to nitpick, but the city of Plaquemine is in Iberville Parish.

Also, there's no way to generate 120 miles in Plaquemines Parish from Belle
Chase to Venice unless you are counting down and back.  But then you are
counting duplicated mileage.  So, those high mileages should be edited down
to not count backtrack miles.

Steve Cardiff

On Tue, Jan 27, 2015 at 9:19 AM, Matt Brady  wrote:

> Nancy and LABIRD, the answer to this is pretty simple: the LOS weekend
> observers entered a single checklist for the entire Parish of Plaquemines.
> That's why they have a duration of ~12 hours, and a traveling count of 120
> miles. Generally the eBird administration prefers observers NOT to enter
> checklists like this, for huge swaths of country, because it makes any sort
> of fine-scale analyses impossible. Instead, they prefer much shorter (5 mi
> or shorter) traveling counts or stationary counts, if observations were
> made from a single point (like on a hawkwatch, riverwatch or seawatch or
> small backyard). These huge, Parish-wide counts are automatically excluded
> from most kinds of analyses, including map and bar chart output; my advice
> is if you want your eBird sightings to be used to the maximum extent
> possible, enter many shorter checklists for exact, discrete locations,
> using pre-existing hotspots. Occasionally counts like this make it in to
> eBird because observers want to post a single list for an entire day of
> observations, which, in my opinion is totally fine as long as they also
> enter redundant counts for exact localities.
>
> Hope things are a bit clearer now.
>
> Matt Brady
> Baton Rouge
>
> On Tue, Jan 27, 2015 at 8:59 AM, Nancy L. Newfield 
> wrote:
>
> > This is directed to eBird users and reviewers:
> >
> > I was reading over the [eBird Alert] Louisiana Rare Bird Alert 
> > this morning and saw many entries, presumably from the weekend's
> Louisiana
> > Ornithological Society Winter Meeting field trips, that gave the locality
> > as: Plaquemines, Plaquemines, Louisiana.
> >
> > I think this is confusing insofar as there is no town of Plaquemines in
> > Plaquemines Parish, AND the town of Plaquemine [without the 's'] is the
> > parish seat of Ascension Parish far upriver from the coast. I know that I
> > can use the google map associated with each entry to locate the locality
> > [more or less], but to have the name of the parish as the name of a
> > nonexistent town invites confusion forever more.
> >
> > Nan
> >
> > --
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > Nancy L Newfield
> > Casa ColibrĂ­
> > Metairie, LA USA
> > 
> > http://www.casacolibri.net/
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> > http://www.avast.com
> >
>
Subject: Re: A Question about Localities . . .
From: Matt Brady <podoces AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 09:19:10 -0600
Nancy and LABIRD, the answer to this is pretty simple: the LOS weekend
observers entered a single checklist for the entire Parish of Plaquemines.
That's why they have a duration of ~12 hours, and a traveling count of 120
miles. Generally the eBird administration prefers observers NOT to enter
checklists like this, for huge swaths of country, because it makes any sort
of fine-scale analyses impossible. Instead, they prefer much shorter (5 mi
or shorter) traveling counts or stationary counts, if observations were
made from a single point (like on a hawkwatch, riverwatch or seawatch or
small backyard). These huge, Parish-wide counts are automatically excluded
from most kinds of analyses, including map and bar chart output; my advice
is if you want your eBird sightings to be used to the maximum extent
possible, enter many shorter checklists for exact, discrete locations,
using pre-existing hotspots. Occasionally counts like this make it in to
eBird because observers want to post a single list for an entire day of
observations, which, in my opinion is totally fine as long as they also
enter redundant counts for exact localities.

Hope things are a bit clearer now.

Matt Brady
Baton Rouge

On Tue, Jan 27, 2015 at 8:59 AM, Nancy L. Newfield 
wrote:

> This is directed to eBird users and reviewers:
>
> I was reading over the [eBird Alert] Louisiana Rare Bird Alert 
> this morning and saw many entries, presumably from the weekend's Louisiana
> Ornithological Society Winter Meeting field trips, that gave the locality
> as: Plaquemines, Plaquemines, Louisiana.
>
> I think this is confusing insofar as there is no town of Plaquemines in
> Plaquemines Parish, AND the town of Plaquemine [without the 's'] is the
> parish seat of Ascension Parish far upriver from the coast. I know that I
> can use the google map associated with each entry to locate the locality
> [more or less], but to have the name of the parish as the name of a
> nonexistent town invites confusion forever more.
>
> Nan
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa ColibrĂ­
> Metairie, LA USA
> 
> http://www.casacolibri.net/
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> http://www.avast.com
>
Subject: A Question about Localities . . .
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 08:59:04 -0600
This is directed to eBird users and reviewers:

I was reading over the [eBird Alert] Louisiana Rare Bird Alert  
this morning and saw many entries, presumably from the weekend's 
Louisiana Ornithological Society Winter Meeting field trips, that gave 
the locality as: Plaquemines, Plaquemines, Louisiana.

I think this is confusing insofar as there is no town of Plaquemines in 
Plaquemines Parish, AND the town of Plaquemine [without the 's'] is the 
parish seat of Ascension Parish far upriver from the coast. I know that 
I can use the google map associated with each entry to locate the 
locality [more or less], but to have the name of the parish as the name 
of a nonexistent town invites confusion forever more.

Nan

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa ColibrĂ­
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com
Subject: Re: Baton Rouge Audubon Annual Winter Hummingbird Program and Tour
From: Jane Patterson <seejanebird AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 07:35:38 -0600
> Please join BR Audubon for our annual winter hummingbird program and tour!
>
> January 30 – Enjoying Wintering Hummingbirds
>
> At 6:30pm on Friday, Jan 30 2015, Dennis Demcheck, long-time appreciator
> of winter hummingbirds will present a talk which will showcase the
> under-appreciated fact that as many as 9 different kinds of hummingbirds
> throughout North America regularly spend the winter months in Louisiana. In
> the summer we have only one kind of hummingbird, the Ruby-throated, but in
> winter the Rubies will be replaced by such beautiful species as the Rufous,
> Buff-bellied, Calliope, and others as they take advantage of the relatively
> mild Louisiana winter climate. A huge benefit for experienced and casual
> birders alike is that these birds are comfortably and easily seen in our
> yards. No long wilderness experiences or expensive gear are needed to enjoy
> the secret lives of these little gems from our kitchen windows. The talk
> will discuss the various types of flowers, feeders, and evergreen cover the
> birds prefer. We will present a quick survey of the kinds of hummingbirds
> to be expected in southern Louisiana with identification tips. The talk
> will recommend hummer-friendly plants readily available from local
> nurseries. Come learn about these rare and special birds in this
> introduction tailored to the non-expert birder. This presentation will
> provide context for the BRAS Winter Hummingbird tour the following day.
>
>
> *Location:* Bluebonnet Swamp NC -EDUCATION BUILDING
> *BRAS Members Only:* No
> January 31 – Winter Hummingbird Tour
>
> Each winter as many as 9 different North American species of Hummingbird
> spend the winter in certain yards and gardens around Baton Rouge. If you
> would like an opportunity to view some of these rare and special birds,
> please join us for the Annual Winter Hummingbird Tour. We will meet at
> BrewHaHa coffee shop (711 Jefferson Hwy, Baton Rouge) at 7:30 am on
> Saturday, January 31. There we will probably split into groups (depending
> on the number of attendees) and carpool in order to visit the homes of
> several Hummingbird Hosts. Species that we hope to see include Rufous,
> Black-Chinned, Broad-tailed, and Buff-Bellied..
>
> Please register by sending an email to Jane Patterson -
> President AT braudubon.org or sign up at the presentation on Jan. 30 at
> Bluebonnet Nature Center
> *Location:* BrewHaHa Coffee Shop 711 Jefferson Hwy
> *BRAS Members Only:* No
>
Subject: Grand Isle, Sunday; results from Middle Plaquemines Monday 1/19
From: dan purrington <oceanites1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 20:24:48 -0600
All--
Birded Grand Isle yesterday with these results (all perhaps on the GI CBC?):

Broad-winged Hawk--3
Nashville Warbler--1
American Redstart--1 fem
Painted Bunting--1 fem

Also birded Elmer's, nothing notable.

Last Monday, 1/19, Muth, Phillip Wallace, and I, had, among other things:

caprimulgid--Whip? PW
Vermilion flycatcher--2; one at end of W. Ravenna Rd., the other at Diamond.
W.Kingbird & Scissor-tails--several vicinity of Diamond
Prairie Warbler--3! Photo by PW of one.  Formerly almost unknown in winter;
now rivaling YTWA as most frequent "vagrant" wintering warbler.
Yellow-hd Blackbird--1

Dan Purrington
Subject: Red-shouldered and Great Horned Owl nests at Barataria Preserve
From: David Fox <thedavefox AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 18:01:41 -0600
Following up with Wendy's report of nests found during the LOS field trip
to the Barataria Preserve.  On the Coqulille trail, several bridges have a
number posted on the uprights for the hand rails.   Both nests are on the
north side (right side of the trail, as you walk away from the parking lot)
and within about 300ft of each other (bad for the RSHA).  The RSHA nest is
just before the bridge 4 and within 100ft. of the trail, and the GHOW nest
is just past bridge 5, and maybe 150ft. off the trail.

If you take pictures, do me a favor and post them to the park's Facebook
page?  Using Facebook avoids the photo release paperwork.  The park will
credit you if you ask.  I make this request because I get endless requests
for bird pictures, but I spend about 95% of my time at a desk.

Thanks!
Subject: LOS Winter Meeting Checklist
From: "Judith O'Neale" <00000069de77060c-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 23:16:19 +0000
We had another successful LOS winter meeting in Kenner.  

There were 86 folks registered for the meeting and several field trips 
available Saturday and Sunday, heading in all directions. 


Donata Henry and Jennifer Coulson gave wonderful talks on their on-going 
studies. We are pleased to have helped support these two researchers in the 
early days of their work. Thanks to all who attended. 



Special thanks to Joelle Finley, Ed Wallace, Crescent Bird Club and Orleans 
Audubon for organizing this meeting. 



Here is the list for Saturday night. Please let me know of any additions or 
corrections. I’ll also add any Sunday birds not on the list. 



Judith O’Neale, LOS Treasurer  






LOS Winter Meeting 1/14/2015 

New Orleans



Black-bellied Whistling-Duck
Canada Goose (feral)
Gadwall
Mallard
Mottled Duck
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail
Green-winged Teal
Canvasback
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Greater Scaup
Lesser Scaup
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
American White Pelican
Brown Pelican
Double-crested Cormorant
Anhinga
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Black-crowned Night-Heron
White Ibis
Glossy Ibis
White-faced Ibis
Roseate Spoonbill
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper's Hawk
Broad-winged Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Clapper Rail
King Rail
Sora
Common Gallinule
American Coot
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Killdeer
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Spotted Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
Western Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Dunlin
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Snipe
American Woodcock
Laughing Gull
Bonaparte's Gull
Ring-billed Gull
California Gull
Herring Gull
Caspian Tern
Forster's Tern
Royal Tern
Black Skimmer
Rock Pigeon
Eurasian Collared-Dove
White-winged Dove
Mourning Dove
Common Ground-Dove
Eastern Screech-Owl
Great Horned Owl
Buff-bellied Hummingbird
Black-chinned Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Phoebe
Vermilion Flycatcher
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Western Kingbird
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
Loggerhead Shrike
White-eyed Vireo
Blue-headed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
House Wren
Sedge Wren
Marsh Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Eastern Bluebird
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
American Pipit
Cedar Waxwing
Orange-crowned Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Gray Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Pine Warbler
Palm Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Wilson's Warbler
Chipping Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
LeConte's Sparrow
Nelson's Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Painted Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Yellow-headed Blackbird
Common Grackle
Boat-tailed Grackle
Great-tailed Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

Monk Parakeet

Total 153






Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: Winter LOS - Field Trip through Plaquemines Parish Jan 24, 2015
From: Ed Wallace <mottledduck AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 21:54:27 -0600
All,The Louisiana Ornithological Society sponsored several trips as part of the 
Winter meeting in New Orleans. The final tally is still being compiled and will 
come out soon. I led a trip through Plaquemines Parish all the way to Venice. 
There were 33 birders. Some were brand new birders and others were some of 
Louisiana's most experienced birders. Areas birded included several brief stops 
along LA 23 North of Diamond, the batture near Diamond, the baseball field in 
Diamond, the freshwater marsh on the other side of LA 23 in Diamond, Ft. 
Jackson, an overlook on LA 23 just outside the levy in Venice, the large pond 
just down river from the Venice dump, the Venice dump, Boothville and the 
marina in Empire. I was a little concerned with how leading a car trip with so 
many folks would work out, but it turned out very well and birding was 
outstanding. Most target birds were found. Yellow-headed blackbird, 
broad-winged hawks, vermillion flycatcher, scissor-tailed flycatcher and 
Western Kingbird were found and seen by all. Langiappe birds included LeConte's 
sparrow. Top bird though was a California Gull seen by several birders in 
Venice. Another highlight was the large number of Killdeer and pipits in 
Diamond. Below are the details. As there were a large number of birders, there 
may have been additional birds to add to the list. 


> Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 22:45:02 -0500
> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> To: mottledduck AT hotmail.com
> Subject: eBird Report - Plaquemines, Jan 24, 2015
> 
> Plaquemines, Plaquemines, US-LA
> Jan 24, 2015 7:50 AM - 7:20 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 120.0 mile(s)
> Comments: The Louisiana Ornithological Society sponsored several trips as 
part of the Winter meeting in New Orleans. I led a trip through Plaquemines 
Parish all the way to Venice. There were 33 birders. Some were brand new 
birders and others were some of Louisiana's most experienced birders. Areas 
birded included several brief stops along LA 23 North of Diamond, the batture 
near Diamond, the baseball field in Diamond, the freshwater marsh on the other 
side of LA 23 in Diamond, Ft. Jackson, an overlook on LA 23 just outside the 
levy in Venice, the large pond just down river from the Venice dump, the Venice 
dump, Boothville and the marina in Empire. I was a little concerned with how 
leading a car trip with so many folks would work out, but it turned out very 
well and birding was outstanding. Most target birds were found. Yellow-headed 
blackbird, broad-winged hawks, vermillion flycatcher, scissor-tailed flycatcher 
and Western Kingbird were found and seen by all. Langiappe birds included 
LeConte's sparrow. 

> 101 species (+1 other taxa)
> 
> Black-bellied Whistling-Duck  50
> Gadwall  120
> Mottled Duck  4
> Northern Shoveler  1
> Green-winged Teal  4
> Lesser Scaup  6
> Red-breasted Merganser  2     Marina
> Common Loon  1
> Pied-billed Grebe  5
> Double-crested Cormorant  50
> Anhinga  6
> American White Pelican  150
> Brown Pelican  15
> Great Blue Heron  2
> Great Egret  15
> Snowy Egret  4
> Little Blue Heron  3
> Tricolored Heron  6
> Reddish Egret 1 Seen by some. It was in the same location where I found one 
the previous Sunday. 

> Cattle Egret  12
> Black-crowned Night-Heron  1
> White Ibis  12     surprisingly few
> Roseate Spoonbill  1
> Black Vulture  25
> Turkey Vulture  15
> Osprey  6
> Northern Harrier  4
> Cooper's Hawk  1
> Bald Eagle  3
> Broad-winged Hawk 1 Boothville. About half mile downriver from the water 
tower. Have images if required. Seen by entire group. 

> Red-tailed Hawk  8
> Clapper Rail  1
> Sora  1
> Common Gallinule  6
> American Coot  4
> Black-necked Stilt  15
> Killdeer  150     At least 100 in Diamond.
> Spotted Sandpiper  1
> Greater Yellowlegs  1
> Willet  4
> Least Sandpiper  6
> Long-billed Dowitcher  4     Heard call
> Wilson's Snipe  8
> Bonaparte's Gull  2     Diamond and at Buras marina
> Laughing Gull  150
> Ring-billed Gull  75
> California Gull 1 Seen by Charlie Lyons and Mike Muschme and Jay Huner. 
Described as a larger gull than an RBGU with dark iris and yellow legs. Bird 
flew before it could be photographed. Additional detail will be provided by 
folks who saw it. 

> Herring Gull  30
> gull sp.  1500
> Caspian Tern  5
> Forster's Tern  25
> Royal Tern  12
> Sandwich Tern  1     Buras marina
> Black Skimmer  800
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  6
> Eurasian Collared-Dove  5
> Mourning Dove  15     surprisingly few noted.
> Great Horned Owl  1
> Belted Kingfisher  6
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
> Downy Woodpecker  2
> Northern Flicker  1
> American Kestrel  25
> Eastern Phoebe  6
> Vermilion Flycatcher  1     Diamond
> Western Kingbird  4     Previously documented kingbirds in Diamond.
> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  2     Previously documented flycathers in Diamond.
> Loggerhead Shrike  2
> Blue-headed Vireo  3
> Blue Jay  1
> American Crow  25
> Tree Swallow  15
> Carolina Chickadee  2
> Tufted Titmouse  1     Seen by Lewis near Diamond
> Sedge Wren  1     up close in Diamond
> Marsh Wren  1
> Carolina Wren  2
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  4
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  3
> Eastern Bluebird  1     In Port Sulphur in yard.
> Northern Mockingbird  8
> European Starling  50
> American Pipit  100
> Orange-crowned Warbler  3
> Common Yellowthroat  1
> Palm Warbler  8
> Yellow-rumped Warbler  12
> Yellow-throated Warbler 2 One seen in Diamond and one in Ft. Jackson. Seen by 
all. 

> Savannah Sparrow  11
> Le Conte's Sparrow  4
> Nelson's Sparrow  2
> Seaside Sparrow  1
> Swamp Sparrow  12
> White-throated Sparrow  2
> Northern Cardinal  4
> Red-winged Blackbird  35
> Eastern Meadowlark  12
> Yellow-headed Blackbird 3 Two females in Ft. Jackson. One male in Boothville. 
Very cooperative and seen by all. 

> Common Grackle  6
> Boat-tailed Grackle  75
> Great-tailed Grackle 4 Birds were seen at the entrance to the Venice Dump. 

> Brown-headed Cowbird  120
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21527435 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
 		 	   		  
Subject: Sandhill cranes
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 20:50:26 -0600
Just coming off the causeway onto the Northshore at 5:40 pm today when 2
sandhill cranes flew over almost shoulder to shoulder coming from the east
and heading west.
Large birds with necks stretched out.
Janine Robin
Subject: Re: Barred Owl
From: Mac Myers <budogmacm AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 19:58:34 -0600
Excellent!! Some things are still right with the world. Amen.

Mac

On Sun, Jan 25, 2015 at 6:23 PM, Martha Avegno  wrote:

> Just had a smackdown by nature's rules.
> A Barred Owl that hans out in my neighborhood was hooting at sundown.
> Found the bird in a tree, looking like he was not sitting upright as usual.
> Getting another angle,I discovered a very small black and white kitten in
> his tallon while he was eating. Have seen an owl with kitten. I could not
> look again.
> Went back a bit latter: owl was  not there, but prey was.
>
> South Baton Rouge off Brightside.
>
> M. Ellie Avegno
> Sent by iPhone
>
Subject: FW: eBird Report - Fontainebleau SP, Jan 25, 2015
From: Tom Trenchard <trench19 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 19:43:26 -0600
LaBirders,
 
Today's list for the LOS outing at Fontainebleau SP
is below.
 
Tom T. 

*************
Tom Trenchard
Covington, LA
*************


> Fontainebleau SP, St. Tammany, US-LA
> Jan 25, 2015 7:30 AM - 12:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 4.0 mile(s)
> Comments: LOS field trip (guides Glenn Ousset & Tom Trenchard, plus 
additional 13 observers). Clear/mostly clear, 45-54ş, light to moderate breeze, 
low humidity. From 7:30AM to noon (4.5 hrs), 4.0 miles walking+driving. 

> 67 species
> 
> Gadwall  2
> Bufflehead  13
> Red-breasted Merganser  1
> Common Loon  2
> Pied-billed Grebe  26
> Double-crested Cormorant  18
> American White Pelican  5
> Brown Pelican  10
> Great Blue Heron  2
> Bald Eagle  1     immature flyover.
> Red-tailed Hawk  1
> American Coot  6
> Killdeer  16
> Wilson's Snipe  3
> Bonaparte's Gull  2
> Laughing Gull  200
> Ring-billed Gull  50
> Herring Gull  1
> Forster's Tern  8
> Royal Tern  12
> Eurasian Collared-Dove  2
> Mourning Dove  12
> Belted Kingfisher  1
> Red-headed Woodpecker  13
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  6
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
> Northern Flicker  3
> Pileated Woodpecker  1
> American Kestrel  1
> Eastern Phoebe  5
> Loggerhead Shrike  2
> White-eyed Vireo  3
> Blue-headed Vireo  1
> Blue Jay  13
> American Crow  7
> Tree Swallow  13
> Carolina Chickadee  8
> Tufted Titmouse  6
> Brown-headed Nuthatch  6
> House Wren  2
> Carolina Wren  4
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  2
> Golden-crowned Kinglet  2
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  10
> Eastern Bluebird  10
> Hermit Thrush  1
> American Robin  1
> Gray Catbird  1
> Brown Thrasher  2
> Northern Mockingbird  7
> European Starling  30
> American Pipit  10     flyover flock calling.
> Orange-crowned Warbler  7
> Common Yellowthroat  1
> Pine Warbler  7
> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  50
> Eastern Towhee  1
> Song Sparrow  1
> Swamp Sparrow  18
> White-throated Sparrow  2
> White-crowned Sparrow  1
> Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  18
> Northern Cardinal  16
> Red-winged Blackbird  85
> Eastern Meadowlark  1
> Boat-tailed Grackle  1
> American Goldfinch  6
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21539158 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

 		 	   		  
Subject: Barred Owl
From: Martha Avegno <elliea AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 18:23:28 -0600
Just had a smackdown by nature's rules. 
A Barred Owl that hans out in my neighborhood was hooting at sundown. Found the 
bird in a tree, looking like he was not sitting upright as usual. Getting 
another angle,I discovered a very small black and white kitten in his tallon 
while he was eating. Have seen an owl with kitten. I could not look again. 

Went back a bit latter: owl was  not there, but prey was.   

South Baton Rouge off Brightside.

M. Ellie Avegno
Sent by iPhone 
Subject: Covington/Mandeville Ross's Goose
From: Harvey Patten <puffin AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 12:10:33 -0800
Labirders,
 
A single Ross's Goose is present at the Lakeview Regional Medical Center ponds. 
From 1-2 p.m. today (Sunday) it was located in the northern pond behind the 
large medical center sign in the company of several Canada Geese. 

 
Harvey L. Patten
Covington
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Jean Lafitte NHP--Barataria Preserve Swamp, Jan 24, 2015
From: Wendy Rihner <wrihner AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 13:29:27 -0600
Labird:

Just an FYI - yesterday, on our LOS outing down Coquille, we found a Great 
Horned Owl sitting on its nest. Just the ear tufts and half the head visible. 
Not too far away, 2 Red-shouldered Hawks were building their nest. Too close 
for comfort. 


Go 1/2 way down Coquille, right side (I think north) in a cypress with 
octopus-like branches that form a cup. 


Wendy Rihner

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: January 24, 2015 at 2:41:36 PM CST
> To: wrihner AT gmail.com
> Subject: eBird Report - Jean Lafitte NHP--Barataria Preserve Swamp, Jan 24, 
2015 

> 
> Jean Lafitte NHP--Barataria Preserve Swamp, Jefferson, US-LA
> Jan 24, 2015 8:15 AM - 11:40 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.8 mile(s)
> Comments: Led group down Coquille Trail for LOS; very cold, breezy but 
sunshine 

> 37 species (+1 other taxa)
> 
> Pied-billed Grebe  2
> Great Egret  4
> Black Vulture  4
> Turkey Vulture  7
> Bald Eagle  1     Seen only by Kaye, Wendy, and Jackie on Hwy. 45
> Red-shouldered Hawk  2
> Common Gallinule  7
> Killdeer  1     Heard by David only
> Great Horned Owl  1     Adult sitting on NEST!
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  3
> Downy Woodpecker  4
> Hairy Woodpecker  1     Heard only
> Pileated Woodpecker  1     heard only
> American Kestrel  1
> Eastern Phoebe  2
> Blue Jay  1
> American Crow  3
> crow sp.  5
> Tree Swallow  9
> Carolina Chickadee  12
> Tufted Titmouse  3
> Marsh Wren  2
> Carolina Wren  5     heard ONLY
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  3
> Hermit Thrush  2
> American Robin  3
> Gray Catbird  4
> Northern Mockingbird  1
> Orange-crowned Warbler  2
> Common Yellowthroat  3
> Yellow-rumped Warbler  100
> Chipping Sparrow  1
> Swamp Sparrow  3
> White-throated Sparrow  2
> Northern Cardinal  5
> Common Grackle  3     heard only
> American Goldfinch  3     heard only
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21518929 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Re: Blackbirds are here
From: Charles Williams <chazbizz AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 09:29:15 -0500
Rusty blackbirds arrived in recent days here in Greenwell Springs. They tend to 
stay around until some time in March. 



---- Roselie Overby  wrote: 
> It started off with one Red-winged Blackbird at the feeders earlier this
> month.  Then 5, then 12, and today the large mixed flock of mainly Red-wings
> and a few Common Grackles arrived.  I haven't noticed many in nearby fields,
> but those fields are being herbicided and cultivated.  This is the usual
> January event.
> Roselie Overby
> Oak Grove in W. Carroll Parish
Subject: Ferruginous Hawk at Cameron Prairie NWR
From: David McDonald <dkmmdpa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 18:12:27 -0600
Hi LA birders,

Thanks for giving me the update that the hawk was still there. I made 
the drive from Galveston County this morning and arrived about 9:15. 
I was excited to see 2 large dark hawks near the visitor center, but 
both turned out to be Red-tails. So I grabbed a refuge guide to go to 
the Pintail loop drive and see the Eurasian Wigeon. I had forgotten 
to print the location of the wigeon on the drive and was dismayed to 
see that it was 3 miles long.

So I drove around and was hoping to see a birder or two who had 
already found the bird. As I got to the last 1/4 mile, I figured I 
had missed it. But then there was a birder named Willie from Monroe 
with a scope, and he had just found the bird. I got to see the bird, 
but no decent photos were obtained as the bird was perhaps 75 yards out.

The two of us went back to the visitor center to check out the hawk 
again as Willie had missed it on his way past as well. We parked and 
walked out to the gazebo and looked carefully on the dikes, in trees 
and all was quiet.

Then I glanced behind me at the trees just south of the parking lot 
and there he was in the top of a tallow. He must have flown in during 
the 5 minutes after we walked past the trees.

His feathered legs can be 
seen....  http://www.pbase.com/davidmcd/image/158924605

Some people came through the gate and he took off, but flew around 
above us giving more photo ops.

His very long gape can be seen 
here...   http://www.pbase.com/davidmcd/image/158924606

And overhead...   http://www.pbase.com/davidmcd/image/158924607

Lastly, the white on the upper primaries is another field mark for 
Ferruginous Hawk in any plumage. Sibley says only juvie Rough=legged 
Hawks have this feature besides the 
Ferruginous....   http://www.pbase.com/davidmcd/image/158924608

Thanks again for your help. I just joined LA bird list in early 
January and got 2 great birds. Hoping for more!

David McDonald
Friendswood TX
Subject: Folsom backyard...32 species today.
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 18:08:44 -0600
​Hello,
 I had a banner day in the yard today. I think 32 species is a record.
Have a few photos on my checklist if you are interested in taking a peek.
Best,
Janine

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21522874
Subject: Washington parish mountain bluebird
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 14:09:06 -0600
She is still here! 2:00pm
N30°46.664 W090°12.407
On high wire across from gravel "mountains".
Janine
.
Subject: Folsom backyard
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 10:22:37 -0600
Good morning,
I have a pair of Hooded mergansers in our small pond. May be more....my
view is obscured by trees. At least 25 pine siskins and a pair of purple
finches at the feeders and on the ground. Countless goldfinches and
chippers.
Janine Robin
Folsom
NW corner of St Tammany parish
Subject: Other nongame birds killed
From: Roselie Overby <rosebird8791 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 07:47:31 -0600
John, LABIRD,
  I fear that a lot of nongame birds are killed in my neck of the woods.  I
hear about people who kill owls because 'they foretell death'.  I had an
older fellow tell me that he kills all hawks on his hunting lease.  N.
Mockingbirds are common targets because they wake someone up at night or
because they chase "my bluebirds, cat, dog," etc.  A student told me he
killed woodpeckers in his family's pecan orchard.  Another was hired by
someone with a pond to kill all egrets, herons, and who knows what.  I do
what I can to reeducate people, but I feel that whatever I say falls on deaf
ears.
Roselie Overby
Oak Grove in W. Carroll Parish

-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of John Dillon
Sent: Friday, January 23, 2015 7:34 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] yet another Whooping Crane shot

Additionally, events like this have to make us consider how many other
non-game species are being shot. Herons, egrets, owls, hawks, eagles,
woodpeckers.... I have a student whose grandmother has shot all the
bluebirds in her yard for years because she believes they take away Purple
Martin nests. I was finally able to convince her last year that it simply
isn't true and to stop shooting bluebirds. I know tons of deer hunters who
believe sapsuckers alert deer to the presence of hunters, and they shoot
them on sight if there are no deer around to scare with the gun shot.  And
if you don't know this, they make crow decoys just to lure them in to shoot
them.  I have no problem with managed hunting whatsoever. But these idiots
just shoot anything. 

John Dillon
Athens, LA
Subject: Re: yet another Whooping Crane shot
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 19:33:56 -0600
Additionally, events like this have to make us consider how many other non-game 
species are being shot. Herons, egrets, owls, hawks, eagles, woodpeckers.... I 
have a student whose grandmother has shot all the bluebirds in her yard for 
years because she believes they take away Purple Martin nests. I was finally 
able to convince her last year that it simply isn't true and to stop shooting 
bluebirds. I know tons of deer hunters who believe sapsuckers alert deer to the 
presence of hunters, and they shoot them on sight if there are no deer around 
to scare with the gun shot. And if you don't know this, they make crow decoys 
just to lure them in to shoot them. I have no problem with managed hunting 
whatsoever. But these idiots just shoot anything. 


John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 23, 2015, at 7:12 PM, James V Remsen  wrote:
> 
> Another black mark for Louisiana. An isolated instance could occur anywhere 
…. but now 6? 

> 
> 
http://www.sunherald.com/2015/01/22/6031596/whooping-crane-shot-in-louisiana.html 

> 
> 
> 
> =================
> 
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> najamesLSU.edu
Subject: yet another Whooping Crane shot
From: James V Remsen <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 01:12:16 +0000
Another black mark for Louisiana. An isolated instance could occur anywhere …. 
but now 6? 



http://www.sunherald.com/2015/01/22/6031596/whooping-crane-shot-in-louisiana.html 




=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: Juncos taking shelter
From: Alex Haun <ajhaun.haun46 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 16:35:16 -0600
I currently have a pair of DE Juncos taking shelter on my front porch during 
these heavy rains in BR. This is the first sighting of this species for my yard 
(perhaps overdue). Looking at eBird maps it appears there are no previous 
reports for the Shenandoah area, which seemed a bit surprising. 


- Alex Haun
Subject: purple finches
From: cecil tarver <exk5hdl AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 15:30:35 -0600
I have had 2 male and 2 female purple finches on my feeder since 1 10.Also
59 godfinches

-- 
Cecil Tarver
28026 s satsuma rd #5
Livingston,La 70754
20 mi east of Baton Rouge
central livingston parish
exk5hdl AT yahoo.com
225 435 4090
Subject: Blackbirds are here
From: Roselie Overby <rosebird8791 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 11:24:00 -0600
It started off with one Red-winged Blackbird at the feeders earlier this
month.  Then 5, then 12, and today the large mixed flock of mainly Red-wings
and a few Common Grackles arrived.  I haven't noticed many in nearby fields,
but those fields are being herbicided and cultivated.  This is the usual
January event.
Roselie Overby
Oak Grove in W. Carroll Parish
Subject: Intracoastal Canal Bridge area, Hwy 319, Jan 21, 2015
From: Michael Musumeche <mjmusumeche AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 13:13:16 -0600
Intracoastal Canal Bridge area, Hwy 319, St. Mary, US-LA
Jan 21, 2015 8:00 AM - 12:10 PM
Protocol: Traveling
13.0 mile(s)
50 species

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 


Lesser Scaup  2
Pied-billed Grebe  6
Double-crested Cormorant  12
Anhinga  1
Great Blue Heron  5
Great Egret  15
Snowy Egret  11
Little Blue Heron  2
Tricolored Heron  3
White Ibis  10
Turkey Vulture  16
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  3
King Rail  2
Virginia Rail  2
Common Gallinule  12
American Coot  3
Black-necked Stilt  2
Killdeer  9
Eurasian Collared-Dove  1
Mourning Dove  6
Belted Kingfisher  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
American Kestrel  2
Merlin  1
Eastern Phoebe  2
White-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  3
American Crow  7
Fish Crow  1
House Wren  1
Carolina Wren  2
Hermit Thrush  1
American Robin  16
Gray Catbird  4
Northern Mockingbird  4
European Starling  25
Orange-crowned Warbler  2
Yellow-rumped Warbler  66
Eastern Towhee  1
Savannah Sparrow  31
Fox Sparrow  1     Large sparrow came within 15 feet responding to its 
playback song, grayish around face and nape, heavy rusty streaks along 
flanks and breast, rusty wings and tail.
Song Sparrow  1
Swamp Sparrow  16
White-throated Sparrow  18
Northern Cardinal  8
Red-winged Blackbird  35
Common Grackle  2
Boat-tailed Grackle  20

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21481414

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



_______________________________________________________________
^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^
Mike Musumeche
New Iberia, LA 70560
mjmusumeche AT cox.net 
Subject: Poverty Point Res SP
From: William Matthews <willie_lilly AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 08:44:47 -0600
LA Birders,
I slipped by Pov Pt. Res SP Sunday PM and had very similar list to Rosalie's 
but also had a single flock of 8 HOGRs near dam as well as 5 CACG mixed in 
long-standing feral flock of CAGO on E side off of parkway. Photos taken. 
Chklist # S21426689. 


William Matthews, Monroe, LA
Subject: Pine siskins at feeders on Folsom
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 07:28:43 -0600
Good morning,
I am looming at my feeding station and see 6 pine siskins. Probably more up
in the trees above the feeders. Nice mix  this morning.
Best,
Janine Robin
Folsom
NW corner of St Tammany parish
Subject: FW: eBird Report - Poverty Point Reservoir SP, Jan 20, 2015
From: Roselie Overby <rosebird8791 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 21:04:52 -0600
After seeing reports of interesting birds at other lakes, I headed south to
Poverty Point Reservoir this afternoon.  I just found the usual suspects--no
unusual grebes, no loons, no eagles.  Most of the Forster's Terns were
concentrated at the marina--sitting on posts and floats that mark the
swimming area and making a lot of noise as they traded places.  Great Egrets
are sporting their breeding plumes.  I concentrated on the lake, so the land
bird numbers are a bit low.  Complete list is below.
Roselie Overby



Poverty Point Reservoir SP, Richland, US-LA
Jan 20, 2015 1:10 PM - 3:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
10.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Driving with stops around Poverty Point Reservoir starting at
north end and continuing through park, up Hwy 17 and ending at marina.
Light overcast to partly cloudy; 58 to 64 degrees F.
39 species

Greater White-fronted Goose  50
Snow Goose  4
Canada Goose  54
Gadwall  6
Mallard  16
Northern Shoveler  4
Bufflehead  39
Ruddy Duck  19
Pied-billed Grebe  43
Double-crested Cormorant  475
American White Pelican  81
Great Blue Heron  5
Great Egret  9
American Coot  107
Killdeer  5
Bonaparte's Gull  5
Ring-billed Gull  6
Forster's Tern  27
Eurasian Collared-Dove  3
Belted Kingfisher  2
Red-headed Woodpecker  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
Northern Flicker  3
American Kestrel  1
Blue Jay  6
Carolina Chickadee  7
Tufted Titmouse  4
Carolina Wren  3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  4
American Robin  3
Northern Mockingbird  3
European Starling  12
Yellow-rumped Warbler  2
Savannah Sparrow  10
Song Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  2
Red-winged Blackbird  1
Eastern Meadowlark  20
American Goldfinch  2

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21440973

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Cameron Ferry is operating
From: Jeanie Pou <jeanie.pousson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 19:45:29 -0600
The ferry was fixed the same night it broke.  This is LA DOTD Ferry hotline
number: 1-888-613-3779 with a recorded message indicating it's status.

Jeanie Pousson
Calcasieu/Cameron Parishes
Subject: Couch's Kingbird still present south of Kaplan
From: Mary Mehaffey <m11mehaffey AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 16:02:00 -0800
The Couch's Kingbird previously reported was present today around noon at the 
beginning of Lomier Rd or Lomire Rd off Hwy 335 southwest of Kaplan. It was in 
the trees across from the pond vocalizing. 

Mary Mehaffey
Subject: Gemstone Plantation
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 17:33:27 -0600
​Hello,
Today I spent the late morning and early afternoon in Washington parish.
Below is a link to my checklist for Gemstone Plantation. Nice place to
car-bird or to walk. No traffic with good habitat.
Best,
Janine Robin
Folsom, NW corner of St Tammany parish
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/email?subID=S21438155
Subject: RB/BH Grosbeak
From: Tom Trenchard <trench19 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 17:25:01 -0600
LaBirders,
 
This afternoon at about 3:20PM there was a grosbeak on the ground
in my yard (Penn Mill Lakes near Lake Ramsey, St. Tammany), that
seems to be a Rose-breasted, but I'm not ruling out Black-headed.
I'd sure like some thoughts on this, as I could not get a picture.  I'll
be watching for it to return, and if I can get a photo, I'll post.
I realize that BH has a bicolored bill, which this bird did not seem
to have; also it had a lot of fine streaking below, which apparently
the BH does not have much of.  There was some buffiness on the
upper breast, but that seems to be variable.
 
If anyone has any input, I'd appreciate it.  I realize both are 3x5
birds too, so I want to get it right!
 
Thanks,
Tom T. 

*************
Tom Trenchard
Covington, LA
*************
 
 		 	   		  
Subject: Common Goldeneye in Livingston Par.
From: James V Remsen <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 22:48:39 +0000
LABIRD: an impulse to go somewhere during this beautiful weather this morning 
produced a Common Goldeneye on private property near Denham Springs — a first 
record for Livingston, et least for eBird. 



=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: Reminder: BRAS presentation, Thur Jan. 22, 2015, 7PM, BBS *Education Center*
From: "crystal.johnson.lsu AT gmail.com" <crystal.johnson.lsu@GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 14:09:48 -0600
BRAS Monthly Presentation



Presenter: *Kacy King*

Title: *Natural History of Lake Martin*

Date and time:  *Thursday, January 22, 2015 at 7:00 PM    *

Location: Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center's *Education Center*



Please RSVP to let me know if you will be attending (
*crystal.johnson.lsu AT gmail.com* ) so that we
can add your name to the Bluebonnet Swamp guest list.



Please join us for Baton Rouge Audubon Society’s continuing speaker series.
Attendance is free for all BRAS Members, $3 at the door for non-BRAS
Members and $2.50 for non-BRAS seniors (price of admission at the
Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center).



Please note that the Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center's *Education Center* is
the newly renovated building just to the south (the left) of the Nature
Center.  Parking is accessible by turning west onto North Glenstone Place;
the Education Center will be straight ahead on the right as the street
curves.



Summary: Katherine "Kacy" King has been in the field of Parks and Protected
Areas Management for 25 years. She has spent the last ten years with The
Nature Conservancy, serving as the manager for their Cypress Island
Preserve Program and specializing in land protection. Prior to her work
with the Conservancy, she wore many hats in the natural resource
conservation field, including work as a Park Ranger in Colorado and a stint
as a regulatory biologist for a consulting firm in California. Because of
her diverse experience in both the public and private sectors, Ms. King is
responsible for a wide range of conservation management projects in her
current role including building long-term relationships with private
landowners and local, state, and federal agencies, managing the protection
of a nationally significant waterbird rookery, and developing and managing
a volunteer team that keeps the Visitor Center at the preserve open to
visitors from all over the world. In addition to her duties in Acadiana,
Ms. King works on land protection within Louisiana. Ms. King has a Masters
of Science in Natural Resources Management from Colorado State University.
Subject: 2015 Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz
From: Sinéad Borchert <sineadborchert AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 13:46:34 -0600
Hi LAbirders,

The 2015 Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz is coming up and I was
hoping some of you could help out! We need people (experienced or
inexperienced) to get out there looking for migrating Rusties anytime
during the month of March. Then submit your observations to eBird - whether
you find Rusties or not.

The goals are to identify migratory hotspots, understand migration timing,
and inspire the public to support Rusty Blackbird conservation.

This year the project produced a map of "Areas of Interest" for each state,
which were last year's RUBL hotspots during March. They're asking people to
revisit these sites and I'd also encourage you to look for Rusties in other
places. Louisiana's Areas of Interest are kind of funny to me because they
were skewed by participation - we only have migration hotspots in SE
Louisiana and I know we must have had Rusties passing through northern and
western Louisiana. If you're curious, check out these Areas of Interest at
http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/2015-areas-of-interest/

To learn more about how to participate and submit observations, please
visit http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/ or shoot me an
e-mail.

Thanks,

Sinead Borchert
Baton Rouge, LA
Subject: Re: Hummingbird at Last
From: Wendy Rihner <wrihner AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 12:25:50 -0600
Me, too, Glen! As I prepared to leave for work, what I believe was a male
Black-Chinned fed at each potted plant we saved from freeze. He, too, made
an appearance on January 1, and then only sporadically thereafter. But his
appearance this morning made for a great start to the week!

Wendy Rihner
Metairie

On Tue, Jan 20, 2015 at 10:42 AM, glenn ousset 
wrote:

> I have a resident winter hummer at last, at my home in Chalmette, St
> Bernard Parish.  It is only a Rufous/Allen's female, but this winter you
> have to appreciate  whatever you can get. First date was 1-1-15, still
> present and seen 1-19-15. It stayed through the freeze that killed most
> flowering plants it had been using. It still has a flowering Loquat, a
> healthy Kumquat for cover and insects, and a feeder.
>
> Glenn Ousset
>