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Updated on Wednesday, November 26 at 08:16 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Maleos,©BirdQuest

26 Nov Re: FOS Dark-eyed Junco ["James W. Beck" ]
26 Nov FOS Dark-eyed Junco ["James W. Beck" ]
26 Nov Purple Finch [Elizabeth Wiggins ]
26 Nov Re: FOS Goldfinches [Claire Thomas ]
26 Nov Re: major Cedar Waxwing pulse [Peter H Yaukey ]
26 Nov FOS Goldfinches [Wendy Rihner ]
26 Nov Recent Barataria Preserve observations (Jefferson Parish) [David Fox ]
26 Nov Re: Northshore Say's Phoebe [Claire Thomas ]
26 Nov Clark's Grebe Math [Stephen Pagans ]
26 Nov Northshore Say's Phoebe [William Matthews ]
26 Nov Cameron [Melvin Weber ]
25 Nov Mollicy Unit highlights [John Dillon ]
25 Nov Re: Fwd: eBird Report - Howze Beach, Nov 25, 2014 [Claire Thomas ]
25 Nov Re: major Cedar Waxwing pulse [Timothy White ]
25 Nov Fwd: eBird Report - Howze Beach, Nov 25, 2014 [janine robin ]
25 Nov ULL Experimental Farm, St. Martin, US-LA - Nov 25 [John Romano ]
25 Nov Re: major Cedar Waxwing pulse [Peter H Yaukey ]
25 Nov major Cedar Waxwing pulse [James V Remsen ]
25 Nov Say's phoebe [janine robin ]
25 Nov Say's Phoebe St Tammany Parish [Mary Mehaffey ]
25 Nov Clark's Grebe Photos [Stephen Pagans ]
24 Nov Couch's/Tropical Kingbird - Cameron Parish [John Romano ]
24 Nov Clark's Grebe [Stephen Pagans ]
24 Nov Fwd: eBird Report - Howze Beach, Nov 22, 2014 [Claire Thomas ]
24 Nov Fwd: eBird Report - Oak Harbor Blvd. West, Nov 24, 2014 [Claire Thomas ]
24 Nov Re: Say's phoebe [Claire Thomas ]
24 Nov Lucy's and Western Tanager in Grand Isle [Casey Wright ]
24 Nov Re: Say's phoebe [janine robin ]
24 Nov Say's phoebe [Clairedthomas ]
24 Nov FOF Rusty Blackbirds [James V Remsen ]
24 Nov FOS Wilson's Warbler ["James W. Beck" ]
22 Nov Common Mergansers [Stephen Pagans ]
22 Nov Re: Purple Sandpiper [Claire Thomas ]
22 Nov Purple Sandpiper [Claire Thomas ]
22 Nov Re: Lucy's Warbler [David Muth ]
22 Nov Lucy's Warbler [David Muth ]
22 Nov Re: Sharp tailed sparrow [James V Remsen ]
22 Nov Sharp tailed sparrow [james overby ]
21 Nov Crowley Wastewater Treatment Plant on Wednesday - Nov 19 [John Romano ]
20 Nov Re: Fwd: eBird Report - Folsom - Blackwell Ln backyard list, Nov 20, 2014 [Claire Thomas ]
20 Nov Fwd: eBird Report - Folsom - Blackwell Ln backyard list, Nov 20, 2014 [janine robin ]
20 Nov Golden Plover [Melvin Weber ]
19 Nov Re: Tree Swallow roost near Thibodaux? [Beth Maniscalco ]
19 Nov Grebes [Stephen Pagans ]
19 Nov test [John Romano ]
18 Nov RFI: St Tammany and Beyond [Josh Adams ]
18 Nov Re: Bayou Sauvage NWR Flyover Wood Stork [Dan Purrington ]
18 Nov post-YRARF finale, 80 Yellow Rails, Thornwell area 11/14 ["Steven W. Cardiff" ]
18 Nov Birding Trip to St. Bernard on Sat., Nov. 22 and Migration talk today, Tues., Nov. 18th [Jennifer Coulson ]
17 Nov Reminder: BRAS presentation, Thur Nov. 20, 2014, 7PM, BBS *Education Center* ["crystal.johnson.lsu AT gmail.com" ]
17 Nov NPR Bird Show and Numbers Game [Jay V Huner ]
17 Nov Re: 16 Caracaras [John Arvin ]
17 Nov 16 Caracaras [Dave Patton ]
17 Nov Folsom FOS backyard bird [janine robin ]
16 Nov D'ARBONNE- not bad. [William Matthews ]
16 Nov RNGR photos [William Matthews ]
16 Nov Re: d'arbonne lake Red-necked Grebe [John Dillon ]
16 Nov FOS Purple Finch [Roselie Overby ]
16 Nov Bayou Sauvage NWR Flyover Wood Stork [glenn ousset ]
16 Nov d'arbonne lake Red-necked Grebe ["Ingold, James" ]
16 Nov Lucy's [joan garvey ]
16 Nov Tree Swallow roost near Thibodaux? ["Johnson, Erik" ]
15 Nov Re: Red-necked Grebe, Western Grebe, Red-throated Loon still at Bayou D'Arbonne Lake ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
15 Nov Red-necked Grebe, Western Grebe, Red-throated Loon still at Bayou D'Arbonne Lake [Mary Mehaffey ]
15 Nov Crescent Bird Club/New Orleans Audubon trip through Plaquimines Parish [Ed Wallace ]
15 Nov Lucy's Warbler continues [Matt Brady ]
14 Nov Red-necked Grebe still present at D'Arbonne Lake and Western GrebeS [Jay V Huner ]
14 Nov Common Loon and Red-Breasted Merganser - St Martin Parish [John Romano ]
14 Nov Red-necked Grebe still present at D'Arbonne Lake [Casey Wright ]
14 Nov Chaetura Swift and Ducks, Baton Rouge [Matt Brady ]
14 Nov FOS American Goldfinches ["James W. Beck" ]
14 Nov missing LA CBCs [Marty Floyd ]
13 Nov Re: 'Nother painful test. Sorry y'all. [Terry Davis ]
13 Nov 'Nother painful test. Sorry y'all. [Terry Davis ]
13 Nov Test [Terry Davis ]
13 Nov Re: Delivery Status Notification (Failure) [Terry Davis ]

Subject: Re: FOS Dark-eyed Junco
From: "James W. Beck" <carpodectes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 18:48:07 -0600
Algiers Animal Clinic on General deGaulle......my apologies for the
vagueness.....    -j

On Wed, Nov 26, 2014 at 6:44 PM, Missy Bowen  wrote:

>  Which clinic?   I live off deGaulle.
>
> Missy
>
>
>
> ----- Reply message -----
> From: "James W. Beck" 
> To: "LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU" 
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] FOS Dark-eyed Junco
> Date: Wed, Nov 26, 2014 6:39 PM
>
>
>
>  First juncos of the season were making their presence known behind the
> clinic in Algiers this morning......  -j
>
> --
> James W. Beck
> Marrero, Louisiana
>



-- 
James W. Beck
Marrero, Louisiana
Subject: FOS Dark-eyed Junco
From: "James W. Beck" <carpodectes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 18:39:00 -0600
First juncos of the season were making their presence known behind the
clinic in Algiers this morning......  -j

-- 
James W. Beck
Marrero, Louisiana
Subject: Purple Finch
From: Elizabeth Wiggins <macbethie AT ME.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 16:32:38 -0600
Had what appeared to be a young (1st year) Purple Finch at my feeder this 
afternoon. Only the second time for a Purple Finch in the yard, the first being 
late February/early March of 2011 when I had a small flock for a few days. 


Beth Wiggins
Metairie, LA
Subject: Re: FOS Goldfinches
From: Claire Thomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 16:16:24 -0600
My first today also.

Claire Thomas
claire AT clairedthomas.com



On Nov 26, 2014, at 2:01 PM, Wendy Rihner  wrote:

> We had our first goldfinch today in the yard. This is the earliest we have
> noticed them.
> 
> Wendy Rihner
> Metairie, LA
> 
Subject: Re: major Cedar Waxwing pulse
From: Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey AT UNO.EDU>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 20:55:45 +0000
Turns out one of my students was at the Hwy 11 bridge Tuesday morning when Van 
was seeing movement at his place. My observer (Tim Berkner) does not know how 
to separate species, but his counts are exclusively landbirds crossing the lake 
northbound. So by date these would almost surely be a mix of yellowrumps, 
robins, and possibly waxwings, with just a handful of other stuff. There could 
also be some tree swallows mixed in dispersing from a roost in the River 
Parishes, but they tend to come through in one big swarm in a brief period- 
unlike the protracted movement Tim reported. 


Friday morning looks to be setting up as a good morning, immediately post front 
with NNE winds. Probably the last significant flight day of the fall. We have 
had counts of 20,000 robins in a morning at South Pt this late in the season 
before, but one never knows. 


Peter

853-908---60 908-923---154 

  923-938----237
 938-953----674
 953-1008----208 1008-1023----274 1023-1038---117 

​  1038-1053---54
1053-1108---144
 1108-1123----38
  1123-1138----16       
________________________________________
From: Peter H Yaukey
Sent: Tuesday, November 25, 2014 2:39 PM
To: James V Remsen; LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: RE: major Cedar Waxwing pulse

Nope, I am only wishing I was at South Point this morning. Thought about ti. 
Aargh. 


However, the wind was NNW which is not ideal for big flights there (generally N 
to NE). 


Peter
________________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] on behalf of James V Remsen [najames AT LSU.EDU] 

Sent: Tuesday, November 25, 2014 1:55 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [LABIRD-L] major Cedar Waxwing pulse

LABIRD: on today's 30-min dawn sky-watch, I tallied 410 Cedar Waxwings in 9 
flocks going S, SW, or SE, plus there were 2 more flocks totaling 60 that 
DQ’d by landing. This is my 2nd-highest skywatch total in 24 years, and the 
only time CEWA has been the commonest species (#2 Robins also on the move but 
only ca, 300). So, there was a major influx into the area this morning. It was 
a lively sky in general (by recent years’ standards) with 5 small flocks of 
Am. Goldfinches (about 30 total), a Pine Siskin, a flock of 12 Chipping 
Sparrows, and the first Am. Pipitis of the fall, all going +/- S or W. I’m 
hoping Peter Yaukey was at South Point this morning. 


Van Remsen, nr. St. Gabriel

=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: FOS Goldfinches
From: Wendy Rihner <wrihner AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 14:01:13 -0600
We had our first goldfinch today in the yard. This is the earliest we have
noticed them.

Wendy Rihner
Metairie, LA
Subject: Recent Barataria Preserve observations (Jefferson Parish)
From: David Fox <thedavefox AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 13:47:42 -0600
Today I heard the first American Robins in any numbers; American
Goldfinches arrived a couple of days ago; there were still tens of
thousands of Tree Swallows over the marsh, and large flocks occasionally
cross the roads and trails; Bald Eagles are almost common, check Ring Levee
Trail in the evening near its terminus; and there is a Turkey Vulture roost
just outside the park north of where Hwy 45 (Barataria Blvd.) is
intersected by the levee wall, and several hundred can be viewed together
in the evening.
Subject: Re: Northshore Say's Phoebe
From: Claire Thomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 12:01:36 -0600
2 Says in same spot would be fantastic! Did you look for the Purple Sandpiper? 
Im hoping someone else gets a look at. 


Claire Thomas
claire AT clairedthomas.com



On Nov 26, 2014, at 11:10 AM, William Matthews  
wrote: 


> LAbirders,
> 
> Down visiting family for Thanksgiving in NOLA so ventured to Northshore 
Center and relocated SAPH originally found by Claire Thomas. Bird was in 
willows on bank of pond nearest to blue building behind convention ctr. 
sallying repeatedly but always returning to those willows. Although observed 
bird was silent, clear call of SAPH easily heard from direction of conv. ctr. 
but could never locate source (? 2nd bird vs birder with playback). There was a 
SUV parked in front of ctr?? 

> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/127147772 AT N02/15698695307/
> 
> Good birding and thx Claire, Janine et al.
> 
Subject: Clark's Grebe Math
From: Stephen Pagans <slp_4-7 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 09:10:23 -0800
Hey all,

FWIW.

I probably first got sight of the CLGR at about 3:40 pm on the 24th. My recall 
tells me the first thing that stood out was the yellowish orange bill beside 
the fact that I knew it was a western grebe species. After noting the bill 
color, I started getting my camera ready to try to capture it photographically. 
That meant adding a 1.4x and 2x extender to it to boost it to about 1120 mm 
which causes it to go to manual focus. I know that for a distant subject, 
manual focus is very challenging, at least for me. I first tried taking photos 
sitting in my truck with the camera quasi-steadied on the window which did not 
go very well. I don't know how many I shot that way out of 320 photos that I 
took of the grebe, but there were a lot. After reviewing some of the photos and 
seeing they were not very good, I decided to put the camera on a tripod which 
helped and probably was the reason I got the better (though still not great) 
photos. I started taking 

 photos at 3:45 pm and stopped just before 4:08 pm, less than 23 minutes. At 
that I averaged a photo about every four seconds before it dived on me, and I 
lost it. I was extremely lucky that the grebe so cooperatively stayed in view 
for that period of time and was not diving. 


So, as described above, I was very busy for the near 23 minutes that I was 
engaged with the grebe while trying to document the sighting. I apologize for 
not taking the time to call anybody about the sighting while it was in view. 
However, I'm glad I did what I did otherwise I might have been forced to a 
default call of another Western Grebe. Considering the time factor for anybody 
to try to get to the lake while I was viewing the bird, they might have been 
frustrated to get there only one hour before sunset and not knowing where the 
bird might have gone. 


I did go back to the lake yesterday but did not find the Clark's or other 
"western grebes." At 15,000 acres, D'Arbonne is a big lake for spotting birds 
at a distance. Also, when those western grebes are apparently (as seen through 
a scope) mixed with other birds and decide to lay their necks backward as in a 
sleeping position, they are quite hard to spot. 


Steve
Subject: Northshore Say's Phoebe
From: William Matthews <willie_lilly AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 11:10:03 -0600
LAbirders,

Down visiting family for Thanksgiving in NOLA so ventured to Northshore Center 
and relocated SAPH originally found by Claire Thomas. Bird was in willows on 
bank of pond nearest to blue building behind convention ctr. sallying 
repeatedly but always returning to those willows. Although observed bird was 
silent, clear call of SAPH easily heard from direction of conv. ctr. but could 
never locate source (? 2nd bird vs birder with playback). There was a SUV 
parked in front of ctr?? 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/127147772 AT N02/15698695307/

Good birding and thx Claire, Janine et al.
Subject: Cameron
From: Melvin Weber <mweber AT RTCONLINE.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 08:18:23 -0600
Cameron on 11-25-14

Overall birds in the woods were scarce. Best wood birding was on Cedar St in 
Cameron. The female type Vermilion from the fall meeting was still there and 
harassing some Blue Birds. (Blue Birds are rare in coastal Cameron). Also there 
were 50 Cedar Wax and 25 Robins. Further down the street was an adult male 
Vermilion. 


In Oak Grove woods I found a couple of Golden-crown Kinglets. Sparrows ware not 
common but the best display was at Willow Island with a large flock of 50 + 
Chippings along with a Lincoln, Field, 3 Juncos and other expected ones. The 
Jetty had lots of beach and lots of birds but little exciting. Best was 
Long-billed Curlew and Marbled Godwit. 


Other interesting stuff were 3 White-tailed Kites (two on Maes Beach road). 
Two Broad-winged Hawks, one on each side of the ferry. Lots of geese and ducks 
everywhere except in the Gulf. Caracaras were easy. 

Subject: Mollicy Unit highlights
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 20:49:20 -0600
Gerry Click and I birded the Mollicy Unit of the Upper Ouachita NWR today. Nice 
weather for birding, but water was fairly scarce, resulting in very low duck 
numbers. About 9000 Snow Geese, though. No rails of any kind. 


Highlights were:

9000 Snows
4 Sandhill Cranes
31 Northern Harrier
4 Merlin, including awesome looks and decent photos of a Richardsonii bird; 
beautiful pale blue male. Wow. 

15 LeConte's Sparrow (down from our count of 105 last December!)
1 beautiful and very cooperative Henslow's Sparrow
14 species of sparrow in all
9600 Red-winged Blackbird

NO Golden Eagle
No shrike?? Really? Wondering if they can't compete with so many kestrels, 
Merlins, and Harriers. 


John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Fwd: eBird Report - Howze Beach, Nov 25, 2014
From: Claire Thomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 19:08:38 -0600
So glad it’s sticking around for everyone.

Claire Thomas
claire AT clairedthomas.com



On Nov 25, 2014, at 5:45 PM, janine robin  wrote:

> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: 
> Date: Tue, Nov 25, 2014 at 5:43 PM
> Subject: eBird Report - Howze Beach, Nov 25, 2014
> To: janinerobin1982 AT gmail.com
> 
> 
> Howze Beach, St. Tammany, US-LA
> ​ Say's Phoebe​
> 
> Nov 25, 2014 11:40 AM - 12:55 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.5 mile(s)
> Comments:     Weather overcast, breezy and chilly..about 55 degrees, but it
> felt much colder with no sunshine and the breeze. Drove to this hotspot to
> get a look at the Say's phoebe that was found yesterday by Claire Thomas.
> Found it after a bit of a wait, then it put on a show for me. I had to play
> it's song before it popped out of a large willow. Then it began to actively
> hunt. What a pleasure to watch!  Today it was behind the convention
> building in the large willow tree. Here are 3 links to show where the bird
> was seen today:  alt="IMG_7643" /> alt="IMG_7644" /> alt="IMG_7645" />
> 28 species
> 
> Snow Goose  5     Two in flight and 3 in the field between frontage rd and
> the I-10E entrance ramp.
> Ring-necked Duck  6
> Lesser Scaup  100
> Ruddy Duck  2
> Pied-billed Grebe  4
> Double-crested Cormorant  2
> Brown Pelican  1
> Great Blue Heron  2
> Great Egret  5
> Snowy Egret  2
> Red-tailed Hawk  2
> American Coot  10
> Killdeer  3
> Greater Yellowlegs  4     Flushed from a small mudflat on the edge of the
> large pond by the convention center. Gave their vocal 3 syllable "whee whee
> whee" as they flew overhead.
> Laughing Gull  2
> Forster's Tern  2
> Mourning Dove  8
> Belted Kingfisher  1
> American Kestrel  2
> Eastern Phoebe  1
> Say's Phoebe  1     Flagged. Refound bird that was first found 11/24 by
> Claire Thomas. Dark above and rusty/salmon underneath. Responded to
> playback.   title="Say's Phoebe by Janine in Folsom, LA, on Flickr"> alt="Say's Phoebe" /> alt="Say's Phoebe" /> alt="Say's Phoebe" /> alt="Say's Phoebe" />
> Loggerhead Shrike  3
> Northern Mockingbird  3
> European Starling  15
> American Pipit  10     Heard only
> Palm Warbler  1     Western, seen along the water's edge.  Palm
> warbler (western) Howze beach,Slidell IMG_7614
> Savannah Sparrow  8
> Brown-headed Cowbird  2
> 
> View this checklist online at
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20671519
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
> 
Subject: Re: major Cedar Waxwing pulse
From: Timothy White <tmcgwhite AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 18:22:24 -0600
I haven't seen nearly the influx of waxwings, but I did see a small flock
of Am. Pipits on the levee near LSU yesterday afternoon, my first of the
season.

On Tue, Nov 25, 2014 at 2:39 PM, Peter H Yaukey  wrote:

> Nope, I am only wishing I was at South Point this morning.  Thought about
> ti.  Aargh.
>
> However, the wind was NNW which is not ideal for big flights there
> (generally N to NE).
>
> Peter
> ________________________________________
> From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds [
> LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] on behalf of James V Remsen [najames AT LSU.EDU]
> Sent: Tuesday, November 25, 2014 1:55 PM
> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] major Cedar Waxwing pulse
>
> LABIRD: on today's 30-min dawn sky-watch, I tallied 410 Cedar Waxwings in
> 9 flocks going S, SW, or SE, plus there were 2 more flocks totaling 60 that
> DQ’d by landing.  This is my 2nd-highest skywatch total in 24 years, and
> the only time CEWA has been the commonest species (#2 Robins also on the
> move but only ca, 300).  So, there was a major influx into the area this
> morning.  It was a lively sky in general (by recent years’ standards) with
> 5 small flocks of Am. Goldfinches (about 30 total), a Pine Siskin, a flock
> of 12 Chipping Sparrows, and the first Am. Pipitis of the fall, all going
> +/- S or W.  I’m hoping Peter Yaukey was at South Point this morning.
>
> Van Remsen, nr. St. Gabriel
>
> =================
>
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> najamesLSU.edu
>
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Howze Beach, Nov 25, 2014
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 17:45:42 -0600
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: 
Date: Tue, Nov 25, 2014 at 5:43 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Howze Beach, Nov 25, 2014
To: janinerobin1982 AT gmail.com


Howze Beach, St. Tammany, US-LA
​ Say's Phoebe​

Nov 25, 2014 11:40 AM - 12:55 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments:     Weather overcast, breezy and chilly..about 55 degrees, but it
felt much colder with no sunshine and the breeze. Drove to this hotspot to
get a look at the Say's phoebe that was found yesterday by Claire Thomas.
Found it after a bit of a wait, then it put on a show for me. I had to play
it's song before it popped out of a large willow. Then it began to actively
hunt. What a pleasure to watch!  Today it was behind the convention
building in the large willow tree. Here are 3 links to show where the bird
was seen today: IMG_7643IMG_7644IMG_7645
28 species

Snow Goose  5     Two in flight and 3 in the field between frontage rd and
the I-10E entrance ramp.
Ring-necked Duck  6
Lesser Scaup  100
Ruddy Duck  2
Pied-billed Grebe  4
Double-crested Cormorant  2
Brown Pelican  1
Great Blue Heron  2
Great Egret  5
Snowy Egret  2
Red-tailed Hawk  2
American Coot  10
Killdeer  3
Greater Yellowlegs  4     Flushed from a small mudflat on the edge of the
large pond by the convention center. Gave their vocal 3 syllable "whee whee
whee" as they flew overhead.
Laughing Gull  2
Forster's Tern  2
Mourning Dove  8
Belted Kingfisher  1
American Kestrel  2
Eastern Phoebe  1
Say's Phoebe  1     Flagged. Refound bird that was first found 11/24 by
Claire Thomas. Dark above and rusty/salmon underneath. Responded to
playback.  Say's PhoebeSay's PhoebeSay's PhoebeSay's Phoebe
Loggerhead Shrike  3
Northern Mockingbird  3
European Starling  15
American Pipit  10     Heard only
Palm Warbler  1     Western, seen along the water's edge.  Palm
warbler (western) Howze beach,Slidell IMG_7614
Savannah Sparrow  8
Brown-headed Cowbird  2

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20671519

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: ULL Experimental Farm, St. Martin, US-LA - Nov 25
From: John Romano <birderjuan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 15:12:48 -0600
Nothing  out of the ordinary, but the Fox Sparrow and Bod Whites were
decent finds, and the Robins are first ones I have seen this fall.  Not
able to find any LeConte's or Henslow's Sparrows.

John Romano,  Breaux Bridge, LA

ULL Experimental Farm (restricted access), St. Martin, US-LA
Nov 25, 2014 9:30 AM - 1:15 PM
Protocol: Area  200.0 ac
Comments: birded about 1/3 of the 600 acre area - temp in low 50ties,
cloudy,
     light winds
57 species

Wood Duck  7
Mallard  28
Blue-winged Teal  8
Northern Shoveler  22
Green-winged Teal  5
Ring-necked Duck  4
Ruddy Duck  1
Northern Bobwhite  5    flushed the group from the edge of a grassy field.
Pied-billed Grebe  2
Great Blue Heron  2
Great Egret  2
Green Heron  1
White Ibis  1
Turkey Vulture  2
Northern Harrier  1
Cooper's Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  5
Sora  2
Killdeer  25
Greater Yellowlegs  1
Ring-billed Gull  1
Mourning Dove  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Downy Woodpecker  3
American Kestrel  2
Eastern Phoebe  6
Loggerhead Shrike  2
White-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  12
American Crow  6
Fish Crow  3
Tree Swallow  30
Carolina Chickadee  5
House Wren  2
Marsh Wren  3
Carolina Wren  2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  3
American Robin  180
Brown Thrasher  1
Northern Mockingbird  2
European Starling  110
American Pipit  4
Orange-crowned Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  8
Savannah Sparrow  15
Fox Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  4
Swamp Sparrow  14
White-throated Sparrow  12
White-crowned Sparrow  1
Northern Cardinal  9
Red-winged Blackbird  250
Eastern Meadowlark  2
House Sparrow  1

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20669732
Subject: Re: major Cedar Waxwing pulse
From: Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey AT UNO.EDU>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 20:39:32 +0000
Nope, I am only wishing I was at South Point this morning. Thought about ti. 
Aargh. 


However, the wind was NNW which is not ideal for big flights there (generally N 
to NE). 


Peter
________________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] on behalf of James V Remsen [najames AT LSU.EDU] 

Sent: Tuesday, November 25, 2014 1:55 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [LABIRD-L] major Cedar Waxwing pulse

LABIRD: on today's 30-min dawn sky-watch, I tallied 410 Cedar Waxwings in 9 
flocks going S, SW, or SE, plus there were 2 more flocks totaling 60 that DQd 
by landing. This is my 2nd-highest skywatch total in 24 years, and the only 
time CEWA has been the commonest species (#2 Robins also on the move but only 
ca, 300). So, there was a major influx into the area this morning. It was a 
lively sky in general (by recent years standards) with 5 small flocks of Am. 
Goldfinches (about 30 total), a Pine Siskin, a flock of 12 Chipping Sparrows, 
and the first Am. Pipitis of the fall, all going +/- S or W. Im hoping Peter 
Yaukey was at South Point this morning. 


Van Remsen, nr. St. Gabriel

=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: major Cedar Waxwing pulse
From: James V Remsen <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 19:55:44 +0000
LABIRD: on today's 30-min dawn sky-watch, I tallied 410 Cedar Waxwings in 9 
flocks going S, SW, or SE, plus there were 2 more flocks totaling 60 that DQd 
by landing. This is my 2nd-highest skywatch total in 24 years, and the only 
time CEWA has been the commonest species (#2 Robins also on the move but only 
ca, 300). So, there was a major influx into the area this morning. It was a 
lively sky in general (by recent years standards) with 5 small flocks of Am. 
Goldfinches (about 30 total), a Pine Siskin, a flock of 12 Chipping Sparrows, 
and the first Am. Pipitis of the fall, all going +/- S or W. Im hoping Peter 
Yaukey was at South Point this morning. 


Van Remsen, nr. St. Gabriel

=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: Say's phoebe
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 12:22:54 -0600
Seen at 12:20 today. In willows behind the convention center on oak harbor
blvd, slidell.
Did not see it till I played it's song then it popped out from the large
willow.
Subject: Say's Phoebe St Tammany Parish
From: Mary Mehaffey <m11mehaffey AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 09:28:40 -0800
Say's Phoebe is still present! I saw it this morning at 9:45am behind the 
Convention Center in Slidell off Oak Harbor Blvd. It was in the willows and 
also landed on metal barricade fencing in the back parking area. Did not find 
any sandpipers 


Mary Mehaffey 
Subject: Clark's Grebe Photos
From: Stephen Pagans <slp_4-7 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 05:36:26 -0800
Hey all,

First step for me. I opened a Flickr account. FINALLY. Next step, later, embed 
photos to eBird. 


For now to view the existing photos, go to 
https://www.flickr.com/128857178 AT N02/ 


I know they are not the best, but I did the best I could at the time. I know 
how to tweak my camera for better photos if the occasion arises again which I 
think will happen. 


Now, back to the lake to try for more photos of this grebe or any other bird 
that volunteers to show up and be identified/photographed. 


Steve
Subject: Couch's/Tropical Kingbird - Cameron Parish
From: John Romano <birderjuan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 21:46:28 -0600
On Pine Pasture Rd this afternoon on the Calcausieu/Cameron Parish line
just east of Highway 27. Going west on Pine Pasture Rd, just before a right
turn at the water leading into Hwy 27

Tyrannus Kingbird - grayish head, yellow on belly and chest - chest not
gray like a Western Kingbird.  and I could not see any white on the tail
edges ( like a Western Kingbird) after seeing it fly and land many times.
The bird was on a wire on Pine Pasture Rd just a little east of Hwy 27 and
was flycatching and flying back to the wire.  It did not vocalize and I did
not play any tapes.  The bird was either a Couch's or Tropical Kingbird.

John Romano
Breaux bridge
Subject: Clark's Grebe
From: Stephen Pagans <slp_4-7 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 19:12:55 -0800
Hey all,

Yes. Believe it or not. I went back to D'Arbonne Lake this afternoon (tied up 
this morning) and found an apparent Clark's Grebe while I was on the north end 
of Pleasure Island Road. I got photos of the bird in the distance which showed 
the important features -- especially the white above the eye. I first observed 
it with my scope on 60x and could see the yellowish orange bill. For some 
reason I never could get the right angle to see the white above the eye, but 
just MAYBE if I put my glasses on, I would have seen that. My camera sees 
better than I do and did capture several pictures with the white above the eye. 
Also, I had a number of pictures showing a very narrow black stripe down the 
back of the neck which was described in at least two of my bird books as a 
feature of the CLGR. I sent the photos to Van Remsen and he agrees on the call. 
I plan on going back tomorrow and hope for an opportunity for better photos but 
one never knows about those 

 things.

I'll spare you the details of my camera setup but suffice it to see I was 
forced to do manual focusing which never is as good as autofocus. With two 
extenders on the camera, I had the 400 mm lens boosted to 1120 mm. 


I have to wonder if some of the western grebes that we have been seeing in the 
distance could have been this bird. In fact, I saw one very recently from 
Pleasure Island Road that I thought had a very broad white face and could have 
been this Clark's. 


Steve
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Howze Beach, Nov 22, 2014
From: Claire Thomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 19:21:21 -0600
I was asked to post this list so here it is.

Claire Thomas
claire AT clairedthomas.com



Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Subject: eBird Report - Howze Beach, Nov 22, 2014
> Date: November 24, 2014 at 7:20:42 PM CST
> To: claire AT clairedthomas.com
> 
> Howze Beach, St. Tammany, US-LA
> Nov 22, 2014 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.5 mile(s)
> Comments: Weather: Totally overcast with a constant ESE wind at 10 to 15 mph. 
Temp around 68 degrees. Spent most all the time at the pond adjacent to the 
Convention center. Highlight was a Purple sandpiper that flew over us 4 or 5 
times. Lifer for all 3 observers. Claire Thomas, Wanda ? and Janine Robin 

> 29 species
> 
> Gadwall  1
> Mallard  3
> Redhead  2
> Lesser Scaup  100
> Ruddy Duck  2
> Pied-billed Grebe  6
> Double-crested Cormorant  5
> Anhinga  1
> Brown Pelican  3
> Great Blue Heron  1
> Great Egret  2
> Snowy Egret  1
> Northern Harrier  3
> Cooper's Hawk  1
> American Coot  10
> Killdeer  3
> Purple Sandpiper 1 Sandpiper shaped body, dark to black on back and head. 
Head rounded with slender bill. All white underneath. Under wings, white at 
armpits, then going to gray, then black on tips. Had a fluttery style flight. 
All 3 observers were able to watch it as it flew above us about 4 times. 

> Forster's Tern  3
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  2
> Mourning Dove  6
> Belted Kingfisher  1
> American Kestrel  1
> Loggerhead Shrike  2
> Northern Mockingbird  2
> European Starling  25
> American Pipit  35
> Savannah Sparrow  8
> Red-winged Blackbird  20
> Eastern Meadowlark  1
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20640427 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
> 
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Oak Harbor Blvd. West, Nov 24, 2014
From: Claire Thomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 18:21:25 -0600
Claire Thomas
claire AT clairedthomas.com



Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Subject: eBird Report - Oak Harbor Blvd. West, Nov 24, 2014
> Date: November 24, 2014 at 6:14:33 PM CST
> To: claire AT clairedthomas.com
> 
> Oak Harbor Blvd. West, St. Tammany, US-LA
> Nov 24, 2014 9:09 AM - 11:32 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.5 mile(s)
> Comments: I birded the pond adjacent to the convention center from the 
parking lot to the levee north of cc. Say's Phoebe was a surprise as I had gone 
there looking to get a photo of the Purple Sandpiper Janine and I saw on 
Saturday. The Say's was hovering over the levee and then flew across the water 
to the willows behind the cc. It did this several times. To draw the bird out 
of the willows to get a better photo I played it's song and it responded. Snow 
Geese were seen in the field adjacent to the "never to be completed" harbor on 
the other side of Oak Harbor. 
Submitted from BirdLog World for iOS, version 1.8 > 42 species > > Snow Goose 6 > Canada Goose 1 Flyover > Gadwall 2 > Mallard 4 > Lesser Scaup 45 > Ruddy Duck 6 > Pied-billed Grebe 6 > Double-crested Cormorant 12 > American White Pelican 16 > Brown Pelican 8 > Great Blue Heron 3 > Great Egret 8 > Snowy Egret 1 > Little Blue Heron 2 > Tricolored Heron 1 > Black-crowned Night-Heron 4 > Northern Harrier 3 > Bald Eagle 2 > Red-tailed Hawk 2 > American Coot 8 > Black-necked Stilt 3 > Greater Yellowlegs 3 > Least Sandpiper 3 > Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 15 > Mourning Dove 6 > Belted Kingfisher 2 > American Kestrel 2 > Merlin 1 > Eastern Phoebe 1 > Say's Phoebe 1 Mostly grey bird with salmon/rufous wash on belly and under tail. Tail black. > > > Loggerhead Shrike 2 > Tree Swallow 5 > Northern Mockingbird 4 > European Starling 200 > American Pipit 8 > Palm Warbler 3 > Chipping Sparrow 3 > Savannah Sparrow 12 > White-throated Sparrow 1 > Red-winged Blackbird 45 > Eastern Meadowlark 3 > Boat-tailed Grackle 2 > > View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20661454 > > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) >
Subject: Re: Say's phoebe
From: Claire Thomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 12:52:39 -0600
The Says is a lifer for me! By the time I left the bird had gone. I got photos 
and will post them with list later today. It was flying from the levee to the 
willows behind the convention center. There was also an Eastern Phoebe that it 
scrapped with. The Says even landed on the roof of the center briefly and I 
got photos of it there as well as in the willows. 


I didnt re-find the Purple Sandpiper. I was hoping to get photos of it on the 
ground and a better look than we got Saturday but no luck today. 


Claire Thomas
Mandeville, LA 70471
Tall Timbers Sub
Hwy. 90 & I-12
claire AT clairedthomas.com




On Nov 24, 2014, at 9:53 AM, janine robin  wrote:

> Claire said the Say's phoebe is there now and responding to ebird call.
> Also 2 bald eagles and  merlin were just seen.
> She is at the pond next to the convention center on oak harbor blvd in
> slidell
> On Nov 24, 2014 9:28 AM, "Clairedthomas"  wrote:
> 
>> Bird in willows behind convention center on oak harbor blvd., Slidell now.
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
> 
Subject: Lucy's and Western Tanager in Grand Isle
From: Casey Wright <wright.949 AT ME.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 12:35:14 -0600
Labird,
Jay Huner and I refound the Lucy's this morning at Grilletta. It was in the 
same general area as Dr. Remsen found it originally. It flew into a oak tree 
across from the patch of cane, towards the back of the tract. 


After Jay left, I ran into Sureway woods and found a Western Tanager on the 
west side of the tract. It was on the trail that leads out of the woods to 
Naccari Lane. It responded to call back. 


Casey Wright
Grand Isle, LA
Subject: Re: Say's phoebe
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 09:53:04 -0600
Claire said the Say's phoebe is there now and responding to ebird call.
Also 2 bald eagles and  merlin were just seen.
She is at the pond next to the convention center on oak harbor blvd in
slidell
On Nov 24, 2014 9:28 AM, "Clairedthomas"  wrote:

> Bird in willows behind convention center on oak harbor blvd., Slidell now.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
Subject: Say's phoebe
From: Clairedthomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 09:28:12 -0600
Bird in willows behind convention center on oak harbor blvd., Slidell now. 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: FOF Rusty Blackbirds
From: James V Remsen <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 15:07:58 +0000
LABIRD: 2 Rusty Blackbirds on dawn sky-watch this morning were FOF for me, and 
I see only 1 other report for LA so far this fall. Also, a modest pulse of Am. 
Goldfinches. Van Remsen, nr. St. Gabriel 



=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: FOS Wilson's Warbler
From: "James W. Beck" <carpodectes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 06:29:17 -0600
Just had my first Wilson's Warbler of the season here in Marrero...  -j

-- 
James W. Beck
Metairie, Louisiana
Subject: Common Mergansers
From: Stephen Pagans <slp_4-7 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 19:00:59 -0800
Hey all,

D'Arbonne Lake continues to produce some really nice birds. I went back there 
this morning and started at the boat launch on the south side of the dam. I 
wasn't seeing a lot to begin with because there were more boaters out. Then, I 
saw two mergansers while scanning with my scope. I have seen a number of 
Red-breasted Mergansers lately so my brain defaulted to that right off the bat. 
But then I realized that they did not have the right GISS of the RBME. They 
were two apparent female Common Mergansers unless one was an immature male. I 
could see them quite well on about 50x. I tried full 60x but got too much 
blurring from heat waves. I studied them for maybe 2 to 3 minutes before they 
flew. I could see their rusty, red heads that were rounded -- not showing the 
normal bristle look of the RBME. The heads looked bigger too. The rusty red 
color went down maybe half of the neck where it stopped with a well defined 
line below which was white. Once 

 they turned toward me while swimming, and I could also see white on the 
breasts. Those were all the main markings I picked out before they flew. I took 
some distant photos of them flying away which turned out to be poor but did 
show some white belly. 


It was also at this same location on 12-23-13, that Joan Brown and I found 
three Common Mergansers. 


I also went back to Highway 33 boat launch road and did a stationary survey at 
the end of the road. I found the Red-necked Grebe again and there was an Eared 
Grebe swimming with it. I guess they were looking for company. Later, I found 
one Common Loon on the lake. 


Steve
Subject: Re: Purple Sandpiper
From: Claire Thomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 17:10:53 -0600
Sorry everyone I always seem to leave something off. We were in Slidell, LA. 
St. Tammany parish. 


Claire Thomas
claire AT clairedthomas.com



On Nov 22, 2014, at 5:03 PM, Claire Thomas  wrote:

> All,
> 
> Janine Robin and I saw a Purple Sandpiper flying over the pond adjacent to 
the Convention Center on Oak Harbor Blvd. That is the first pond on the left 
right after you pass the first stop sign. We were in the Convention Center 
parking lot and it flew over our heads in a large circle passing over us 4 or 5 
times before dropping down somewhere past the levee. We got good looks at it 
and are sure that is what it was. Since it didnt land for us we were unable to 
get photos. It was a sandpiper black above, dark head and breast, straight 
bill, white belly, short tail not square but coming to a point in the middle 
was white underneath and dark above, white underarms/underwings changing to 
grey then black at wingtips and outer wings. It really put on a show and then 
disappeared! 

> 
> Claire Thomas
> claire AT clairedthomas.com
> 
Subject: Purple Sandpiper
From: Claire Thomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 17:03:31 -0600
All,

Janine Robin and I saw a Purple Sandpiper flying over the pond adjacent to the 
Convention Center on Oak Harbor Blvd. That is the first pond on the left right 
after you pass the first stop sign. We were in the Convention Center parking 
lot and it flew over our heads in a large circle passing over us 4 or 5 times 
before dropping down somewhere past the levee. We got good looks at it and are 
sure that is what it was. Since it didnt land for us we were unable to get 
photos. It was a sandpiper black above, dark head and breast, straight bill, 
white belly, short tail not square but coming to a point in the middle was 
white underneath and dark above, white underarms/underwings changing to grey 
then black at wingtips and outer wings. It really put on a show and then 
disappeared! 


Claire Thomas
claire AT clairedthomas.com
Subject: Re: Lucy's Warbler
From: David Muth <MuthD AT NWF.ORG>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 16:00:51 +0000
Seen again one block east of Griletta in oaks at end of Naccari Lane.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 22, 2014, at 9:37 AM, David Muth  wrote:
> 
> Still present same general area. In mixed flock.
> 
> David Muth
> Grand Isle
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>>> On Nov 22, 2014, at 9:01 AM, James V Remsen  wrote:
>>> 
>>> On Nov 22, 2014, at 7:05 AM, james overby 
<00000080c5f99de4-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote: 

>>> 
>>> La Bird, I just moved to the Folsom area of Louisiana and wondered if 
anyone could direct me to a good location to find a Nelson's Sharp Tail? Would 
love to add that one to my life list. Do I have to go to the coast? Thanks, 
Mitch Overby 

>> 
>> James/LABIRD: although there is no substitute for local intel, and although 
eBird doesnt have everything, a good place to start is to go to eBird, then 
Explore Data, then Species Maps  a great way to get an overview of a species' 
basic distribution. If you zoom in close enough, you can get access to exact 
localities and complete checklists from an area, with those within the last 
month highlighted. Great tool for birders. 

>> 
>> As for Nelsons (Sharp-tailed), a quick look indicates that North Shore 
records are primarily fall migrants. With Seasides here and there on the North 
Shore, Im surprised that a few Sharp-taileds dont over-winter. The area was 
thoroughly atlased, but that sort of habitat is tough to survey unless youre 
in a kayak. 

>> 
>> 
>> =================
>> 
>> Dr. J. V. Remsen
>> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
>> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
>> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
>> najamesLSU.edu
> 
Subject: Lucy's Warbler
From: David Muth <MuthD AT NWF.ORG>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 15:36:21 +0000
Still present same general area. In mixed flock.

David Muth
Grand Isle

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 22, 2014, at 9:01 AM, James V Remsen  wrote:
> 
>> On Nov 22, 2014, at 7:05 AM, james overby 
<00000080c5f99de4-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote: 

>> 
>> La Bird, I just moved to the Folsom area of Louisiana and wondered if anyone 
could direct me to a good location to find a Nelson's Sharp Tail? Would love to 
add that one to my life list. Do I have to go to the coast? Thanks, Mitch 
Overby 

> 
> James/LABIRD: although there is no substitute for local intel, and although 
eBird doesnt have everything, a good place to start is to go to eBird, then 
Explore Data, then Species Maps  a great way to get an overview of a species' 
basic distribution. If you zoom in close enough, you can get access to exact 
localities and complete checklists from an area, with those within the last 
month highlighted. Great tool for birders. 

> 
> As for Nelsons (Sharp-tailed), a quick look indicates that North Shore 
records are primarily fall migrants. With Seasides here and there on the North 
Shore, Im surprised that a few Sharp-taileds dont over-winter. The area was 
thoroughly atlased, but that sort of habitat is tough to survey unless youre 
in a kayak. 

> 
> 
> =================
> 
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> najamesLSU.edu
> 
Subject: Re: Sharp tailed sparrow
From: James V Remsen <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 15:00:09 +0000
On Nov 22, 2014, at 7:05 AM, james overby 
<00000080c5f99de4-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote: 


> La Bird, I just moved to the Folsom area of Louisiana and wondered if anyone 
could direct me to a good location to find a Nelson's Sharp Tail? Would love to 
add that one to my life list. Do I have to go to the coast? Thanks, Mitch 
Overby 


James/LABIRD: although there is no substitute for local intel, and although 
eBird doesnt have everything, a good place to start is to go to eBird, then 
Explore Data, then Species Maps  a great way to get an overview of a species' 
basic distribution. If you zoom in close enough, you can get access to exact 
localities and complete checklists from an area, with those within the last 
month highlighted. Great tool for birders. 


As for Nelsons (Sharp-tailed), a quick look indicates that North Shore records 
are primarily fall migrants. With Seasides here and there on the North Shore, 
Im surprised that a few Sharp-taileds dont over-winter. The area was 
thoroughly atlased, but that sort of habitat is tough to survey unless youre 
in a kayak. 



=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: Sharp tailed sparrow
From: james overby <00000080c5f99de4-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 13:05:07 +0000
 La Bird, I just moved to the Folsom area of Louisiana and wondered if anyone 
could direct me to a good location to find a Nelson's Sharp Tail? Would love to 
add that one to my life list. Do I have to go to the coast? Thanks, Mitch 
Overby 

Subject: Crowley Wastewater Treatment Plant on Wednesday - Nov 19
From: John Romano <birderjuan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 08:47:50 -0600
LA: Acadia Par.; Crowley Wastewater Treatment Plant (restr acc), Acadia,
US-LA
Nov 19, 2014 11:30 AM - 1:20 PM
Protocol: Area
200.0 ac
Comments:    birded with Kristine Dewey
22 species (+1 other taxa)

Northern Shoveler  4000
Canvasback  2
Redhead  10
Lesser Scaup  100
Ruddy Duck  25
Double-crested Cormorant  2
Snowy Egret  1
White-faced Ibis  1
Turkey Vulture  1
American Avocet  31
Killdeer  1
Greater Yellowlegs  5
Lesser Yellowlegs  2
Stilt Sandpiper  10
Dunlin  10
Least Sandpiper  5
Western Sandpiper  25
Long-billed Dowitcher  5
Ring-billed Gull  1
Forster's Tern  2
American Kestrel  1
crow sp.  5
American Pipit  35
Subject: Re: Fwd: eBird Report - Folsom - Blackwell Ln backyard list, Nov 20, 2014
From: Claire Thomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 23:51:19 -0600
The only thing I was missing today from this list are the Pileated and Hermit 
Thrush. The BHVI was nice to see and was a FOS here. 


Claire Thomas
Mandeville, LA 70471
Tall Timbers Sub
Hwy. 90 & I-12
claire AT clairedthomas.com




On Nov 20, 2014, at 10:57 PM, janine robin  wrote:

> Nice day in the yard with decent variety of birds.
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: 
> Date: Thu, Nov 20, 2014 at 10:51 PM
> Subject: eBird Report - Folsom - Blackwell Ln backyard list, Nov 20, 2014
> To: janinerobin1982 AT gmail.com
> 
> 
> Folsom -  Blackwell Ln backyard list, St. Tammany, US-LA
> Nov 20, 2014 10:45 AM - 11:40 AM
> Protocol: Area
> 3.5 ac
> Comments:     Weather...perfect. 68 to 70 degrees with a nice breeze. Sunny
> to partly cloudy. FOS orange-crowned warbler.
> 17 species
> 
> Mourning Dove  5
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
> Pileated Woodpecker  1
> Eastern Phoebe  1
> Blue-headed Vireo  1      alt="Blue-headed vireo" />    alt="Blue-headed vireo" />
> American Crow  2
> Carolina Chickadee  2
> Tufted Titmouse  3
> Carolina Wren  2
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
> Eastern Bluebird  1
> Hermit Thrush  1
> Brown Thrasher  1
> Orange-crowned Warbler  1     FOS for the yard      title="Orange-crowned warbler by Janine in Folsom, LA, on Flickr"> alt="Orange-crowned warbler" />       title="Orange-crowned warbler by Janine in Folsom, LA, on Flickr"> alt="Orange-crowned warbler" />
> Chipping Sparrow  4
> White-throated Sparrow  10
> Northern Cardinal  3
> 
> View this checklist online at
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20615730
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
> 
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Folsom - Blackwell Ln backyard list, Nov 20, 2014
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 22:57:49 -0600
Nice day in the yard with decent variety of birds.
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: 
Date: Thu, Nov 20, 2014 at 10:51 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Folsom - Blackwell Ln backyard list, Nov 20, 2014
To: janinerobin1982 AT gmail.com


Folsom -  Blackwell Ln backyard list, St. Tammany, US-LA
Nov 20, 2014 10:45 AM - 11:40 AM
Protocol: Area
3.5 ac
Comments:     Weather...perfect. 68 to 70 degrees with a nice breeze. Sunny
to partly cloudy. FOS orange-crowned warbler.
17 species

Mourning Dove  5
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Blue-headed Vireo  1     Blue-headed vireo   Blue-headed vireo
American Crow  2
Carolina Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  3
Carolina Wren  2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
Eastern Bluebird  1
Hermit Thrush  1
Brown Thrasher  1
Orange-crowned Warbler  1     FOS for the yard     Orange-crowned warbler      Orange-crowned warbler
Chipping Sparrow  4
White-throated Sparrow  10
Northern Cardinal  3

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20615730

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Golden Plover
From: Melvin Weber <mweber AT RTCONLINE.COM>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 10:54:20 -0600
Chris Brantley and I had a Golden Plover in the BC Spillway this morning. It 
was on the south east corner near the spillway office. It is a bit late for 
this uncommon fall migrant. Photos are identifiable. 

Subject: Re: Tree Swallow roost near Thibodaux?
From: Beth Maniscalco <beth.maniscalco AT NICHOLLS.EDU>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 21:10:22 -0600
Erik, and Labird:  This evening Sammy and I went to check out the possible
swallow roost near the Hwy 90/LA 311 intersection.  There was a good-sized
tornado roost in the area.  Coming off of Hwy 90 and heading north on 311,
the roost is very near the new Weatherford (I think it's Weatherford)
complex near Fletcher Community College.  It is in the cane fields on the
west side of 311 very near the large fenced in house.   We parked near
Rebecca Pond on the east side of 311 while studying the formation trying to
figure out where the birds were going to go in.  There is possibly a second
roost further north on on 311 on the east side of the road but it got too
dark on us.  The birds began descending at approximately 5:25 and by 5:29
were completely down.

Beth and Sammy Maniscalco
Thibodaux, La
(approx. 60 miles SW of New Orleans)

On Sat, Nov 15, 2014 at 8:25 PM, Johnson, Erik  wrote:

> Friday evening as I was driving on US-90 east, I noticed thousands of Tree
> Swallows heading north at sundown (this was 5:05pm), I assumed to a roost
> nearby.  This was as I was crossing LA-311 just south of Thibodaux and west
> of Gray.  I didn't have a chance to stop and investigate, but there was
> cane visible off to the north, so maybe it's worth checking in the area for
> a developing swallow tornado roost.  If someone already knows of one,
> please let me know.
>
> Happy birding,
> Erik Johnson
> S Lafayette, LA
> Ejohnson AT Audubon.org
>
Subject: Grebes
From: Stephen Pagans <slp_4-7 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 17:17:57 -0800
An interesting day on D'Arbonne Lake again. I started out alone and found a 
Western Grebe and some Horned Grebes while at a boat launch near the dam but on 
the south side. Then I met with Roselie Overby and Beth Erwin on the boat 
launch road north of Highway 33. We found a Red-necked Grebe, two Eared Grebes 
and some Pied-billed Grebes. We also met up with Gerry Click on the same road 
about ten minutes after we got there. We compared notes and found out that 
while we were looking at a Red-necked Grebe out about 80 yards from us, he was 
looking at one from the end of the road (0.2 miles from us) that was pretty far 
north of his position. So we assumed there were two Red-necked Grebes in the 
area. Then Roselie, Beth and myself went over to Pleasure Island Road where we 
found a single Western Grebe and some Horned Grebes which made for a five grebe 
species day. That was a definitely a first for me. We did not find any loons. 

Subject: test
From: John Romano <birderjuan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 17:53:28 -0600
test only
Subject: RFI: St Tammany and Beyond
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 15:30:34 -0800
Hello all,
I will be visiting family Louisiana around Thanksgiving and am hoping to
pick up some new life/ABA birds while I'm in the area. Since I'm there for
family things my birding time will probably be pretty limited and somewhat
local to my location. I'll be staying just north of Abita Springs and
there's a couple of nice areas I've visited briefly on previous trips
(Abita Creek Flatwoods Preserve specifically). With a few exceptions I'm
mostly looking for general tips on finding these species, rather than
specific locations.

King Rail - Big Branch? It looks like there's a mix of King/Clapper in that
specific area? Calls sound pretty close? Any reliable habitat or audio cues
to distinguish them? I'm not expecting a visual.
Clapper Rail - See above. Looks like a more reliable bird on the coast.
Northern Bobwhite - The area I'm staying in has quite a bit of open areas
mixed with some pines. Seems like good habitat for Bobwhite, but I'm
guessing it's just luck stumbling on them?
Eastern Screech Owl - Seems uncommon from looking at eBird? Any habitat
preferences?
American Woodcock - This one seems tough as well. I'm staying in a
neighborhood with a golf course and lots of lawn areas bordering woods. Is
this even remotely good habitat for this species?
White-Winged Dove - Habitat and habits similar to Mourning Dove?
Red-Cockaded Woodpecker - Big Branch Marsh NWR near Boy Scout Rd boardwalk
is what I've heard.
Winter Wren - eBird makes this species look pretty scarce. Is that correct?
Henslow's Sparrow - All my target Sparrow species seem pretty
inconspicuous. Are they generally silent in the winter or do they call at
all?
Le Conte's Sparrow - see above.
Bachman's Sparrow - eBird indicates this is not a typical bird in this
area, despite field guide maps.
Seaside Sparrow - Big Branch?


In addition to birding around St. Tammany, my (non-birder) wife and I will
be taking a couple day trip to a couple places along the coast,
specifically Grand Isle and the Cameron area. We'll be hitting a few spots
on those days but also doing some non-bird stuff.

Mottled Duck - Should be common?
Fulvous Whistling-Duck - Too late for this species I assume?
Piping Plover
Gull-Billed Tern
Crested Caracara - Lots of reports near Cameron Prairie. Any tips?
Neotropic Cormorant - Should be very common from what I can tell?
Yellow Rail - I see some spots on eBird near Thornwell, but all specific to
early November. Is this a bird that it's possible to chase this time of
year?
Inca Dove

I appreciate any help you can give me.

Josh Adams
Lynnwood, WA
Subject: Re: Bayou Sauvage NWR Flyover Wood Stork
From: Dan Purrington <oceanites1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 14:33:55 -0600
Late as we'll

Dan

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 16, 2014, at 11:59 AM, glenn ousset  wrote:
> 
> A number of birders at Bayou Sauvage NWR in eastern New Orleans observed a 
flyover Wood Stork on Saturday morning, 11-15-14. They very rarely occur in 
Orleans Parish. 

> 
> Glenn Ousset 
Subject: post-YRARF finale, 80 Yellow Rails, Thornwell area 11/14
From: "Steven W. Cardiff" <scardif AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 14:02:51 -0600
Labird-
     This past Friday 14 Nov Donna and I hosted a pair of birders from the
D.C. area searching for Yellow Rails near Thornwell.  It was a cold and
windy but otherwise beautiful day.  There had been some rain on Wed-Thu but
by Friday the rice fields were dry enough for harvesting and the combine
was already in action when we arrived on the scene around 11:30 AM.  We
stayed until dark, cutting all or part of 5 different rice fields that
ranged from very wet to relatively dry.  In the first and wetter of two
completely harvested fields we had about 20 Yellow Rails plus about 75-100
Sora, 5 Virginia, and 3 King rails.  The raptor show actually distracted us
from the rails.  There were quite a few Red-tailed Hawks taking advantage
of the harvesting activity, patrolling over the field and occasionally
stooping on flushed rails and other birds.  There were also a couple of
immature Swainson's Hawks on station, including a cool intermediate morph
individual that captured and consumed several prey items over the course of
a couple of hours and developed a very bulging crop.  Also of interest was
a Merlin that would repeatedly zoom around the combine in attempts to
capture fleeing rails and sparrows.  A couple of Peregrines came in for a
look but didn't stick around, and there were a couple of adult Bald Eagles
in the area kicking up huge flocks of geese.

     In the second and drier field, we estimated a minimum of about 50
Yellow Rails and much smaller numbers of the other rail species including
10 Sora, a couple Virginia, and one King.

     Donna rode the combine for one circuit of the last field before we had
to leave and had at least 10 more Yellows.  So, approximately 80 Yellows on
the day was very nice and it's always special to experience a field with
Yellow Rails outnumbering all other rail species combined by a wide
margin.  Also of interest were a couple of American Bitterns, a low flyby
Franklin's Gull heading north, numbers of Le Conte's Sparrows, and scads of
Marsh Wrens.

Cheers,

Steve Cardiff
Subject: Birding Trip to St. Bernard on Sat., Nov. 22 and Migration talk today, Tues., Nov. 18th
From: Jennifer Coulson <jenniferocoulson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 10:41:00 -0600
 *Birding St. Bernard* (half day)
Date: Saturday, November 22
Time: 8:00 a.m.
Meet at Hoefer’s gas station on the corner of Paris Rd. and Judge Perez.
Leader: Glenn Ousset 504-495-4284

Also, a program reminder...
*What Makes Migrants Move?*
*Geolocators, GIS, eBird and the Im**portance of Collaborations in
Migratory Bird Research*
Maggie MacPherson MSc.
PhD Candidate Tulane University
            Orleans Audubon Society
November 18th, 2014
Social: 6:30 p.m., Program: 7:00 p.m.
Community Church Unitarian Universalist
6690 Fleur de Lis Dr., New Orleans, LA 70124

All are welcome!



*Orleans Audubon Society *orleansaudubon AT aol.com
www.jjaudubon.net
Subject: Reminder: BRAS presentation, Thur Nov. 20, 2014, 7PM, BBS *Education Center*
From: "crystal.johnson.lsu AT gmail.com" <crystal.johnson.lsu@GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 21:22:14 -0600
Reminder:

This Thursday

BRAS Monthly Presentation



Presenter: Dr. Jessica Oswald

Title: Historical diversity and extinction of New World birds: Evidence
from ice age
fossils

Date and time:  Thursday, November 20, 2014 at 7:00 PM

Location: Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center's *Education Center*



Please RSVP to let me know if you will be attending (
*crystal.johnson.lsu AT gmail.com* ) so that we
can add your name to the Bluebonnet Swamp guest list.



Please join us for Baton Rouge Audubon Society’s continuing speaker series.
Attendance is free for all BRAS Members, $3 at the door for non-BRAS
Members and $2.50 for non-BRAS seniors (price of admission at the
Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center).



Please note that the Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center's *Education Center* is
the newly renovated building just to the south (the left) of the Nature
Center.  Parking is accessible by turning west onto North Glenstone Place;
the Education Center will be straight ahead on the right as the street
curves.



Summary: Life on earth has changed dramatically since the last ice age.
During the past 12,000 years, human hunting and temperature change have
caused the extinctions of a once-diverse assemblage of large mammals across
North and South America. More than 50 genera of large mammals were lost in
the Americas, thus eliminating the roles that these mammalian herbivores
and carnivores played in New World terrestrial ecosystems. Bird fossils are
relatively abundant in fossil sites in the Americas and the Caribbean
islands where paleontological collecting efforts have taken the care to
retrieve small bones. Based on fossil identifications and analysis of
identified fossils, evidence suggests that numerous groups experienced
extinction and significantly shifted their ranges at the end of the
Pleistocene, approximately 12,000 years ago. Many very large scavenging
species like condors and vultures went extinct soon after the loss of large
mammals. Songbird species of Icteridae (blackbirds, grackles, orioles,
meadowlarks, etc.) are often highly represented at Pleistocene sites and
suggest that this group experienced moderate levels of extinction.
Considering many species of icterids (cowbirds, meadowlarks) today live
alongside grazing large mammals such as cows and horses, the extinction of
large mammals may have led to the extinction of many icterids. While the
cause of extinction in one species may not be the same as in another, it is
clear that many bird species were affected by the same factors that led to
the demise of the megamammals a very short time ago at the end of
Pleistocene.
Subject: NPR Bird Show and Numbers Game
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 15:44:22 -0600
A Chilly Good Afternoon from Central Louisiana,

1. The NPR Bird Show featuring Texas P&W Ornithologist Cliff Shackleford is 
scheduled for tomorrow evening - 6 PM - 18 November. 


2. Numbers Game - I'm caught up on "things to do". Those who have American 
Birding Association memberships and subscribe to e-bird have two ways to keep 
track of their bird numbers. 


e-bird provides the names of the birds you record for various major locations 
such as parishes (counties). The problem with that form of record keeping is it 
doesn't record information that pre-dates your use of e-bird unless you go back 
in time, assuming you have records, and there is a modest issue with quad data 
that are assigned, in the case of multiple parishes, to one parish. 


In the case of ABA, the only record is the number of species with no reference 
to the names of individual species. 


Anyway, I spent a good bit of time during the cold, continuous rainy day 
yesterday getting my lists up to date for Louisiana. It was interesting to see 
that there were often only two entries for Louisiana parishes in the ABA forum 
- Dr. Seidler and myself. 


But, this brings up the issue of poorly birded parishes and Dr. Seidler's 
Parish Bird List Project - accessible through the Shreveport Bird Study Group's 
website. Hope the cadre of avid birders I'm seeing on the e-bird "Explore Data" 
option strike out into some of the parishes with short lists. Who knows what 
they might find? 


With data being entered into e-bird, perhaps it might be time to follow up on 
the Parish Birding Project from 2004 - a follow up a decade later? 


Jay Huner
Subject: Re: 16 Caracaras
From: John Arvin <jarvin AT GCBO.ORG>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 14:08:02 -0600
Dave
 You don't specifically say so but I assume "recently cut fields" refers to 
either sugar cane or rice. In southern Texas just-harvested cane fields 
attract a large variety and numbers of raptors including Crested Caracaras. 
The other species that use this handout are White-tailed and the few 
wintering Swainson's Hawks. Recently harvested rice fields probably attract 
raptors in a similar fashion.
  
  
 John C. Arvin
Research Associate
Gulf Coast Bird Observatory
103 West Hwy 332
Lake Jackson, TX 77566
jarvin AT gcbo.org
www.gcbo.org

Austin, Texas
  

----------------------------------------
 From: "Dave Patton" 
Sent: Monday, November 17, 2014 8:05 AM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [LABIRD-L] 16 Caracaras   
I noticed a small kettle of 9 Crested Caracaras Friday afternoon, on the 
east side of Hwy 27 just north of the Cameron Parairie NWR headquarters 
building. I pulled into the parking area for Blind #5 at that location 
yesterday and counted 16 walking around in the recently cut fields.
Dave Patton
Lafayette
 
Subject: 16 Caracaras
From: Dave Patton <wdpatton AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 09:05:03 -0500
I noticed a small kettle of 9 Crested Caracaras Friday afternoon, on the east 
side of Hwy 27 just north of the Cameron Parairie NWR headquarters building. I 
pulled into the parking area for Blind #5 at that location yesterday and 
counted 16 walking around in the recently cut fields. 

Dave Patton
Lafayette
Subject: Folsom FOS backyard bird
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 07:27:08 -0600
Good morning,
Just had a dark-eyed junco join the chippers and white-throateds in the
backyard. Pecking at seed on the ground.
44° and windy here.
Janine Robin
Folsom
St Tammany parish
Subject: D'ARBONNE- not bad.
From: William Matthews <willie_lilly AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 17:03:02 -0600
Labirders,

5 grebe species and Red-throated Loon in 2 weeks isnt too shabby.

Willie Matthews, Monroe, LA
Subject: RNGR photos
From: William Matthews <willie_lilly AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 16:55:44 -0600
DR Ingold, John  et al,

Photos are attached to eBird checklists of Mary Mehaffey, Jeff Trahan and 
myself. 


Willie Matthews
Subject: Re: d'arbonne lake Red-necked Grebe
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 14:11:43 -0600
I don't know of any postings, specifically. But I can email photos to anyone 
who'd like to see them. I did email Remsen, Dittmann, and Cardiff a day or so 
after. 


John Dillon

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 16, 2014, at 11:15 AM, Ingold, James  wrote:
> 
> Has anyone posted photos of this bird anywhere?
> 
> James L. Ingold, Ph.D.
> Professor - Department of Biological Sciences
> Director - Museum of Life Sciences
> Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor - Museum of Life Sciences
> Louisiana State University in Shreveport
> 
> Office: (318) 797-5236
> Fax: (318) 797-5222
> james.ingold AT lsus.edu  www.lsus.edu
> 
Subject: FOS Purple Finch
From: Roselie Overby <rosebird8791 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 12:45:12 -0600
Lovely male Purple Finch on a feeder with 3 Am Goldfinches this afternoon.
Roselie Overby
Oak Grove in W. Carroll Parish
Subject: Bayou Sauvage NWR Flyover Wood Stork
From: glenn ousset <gousset AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 09:59:45 -0800
A number of birders at Bayou Sauvage NWR in eastern New Orleans observed a 
flyover Wood Stork on Saturday morning, 11-15-14. They very rarely occur in 
Orleans Parish. 


Glenn Ousset 
Subject: d'arbonne lake Red-necked Grebe
From: "Ingold, James" <James.Ingold AT LSUS.EDU>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 17:15:46 +0000
Has anyone posted photos of this bird anywhere?

James L. Ingold, Ph.D.
Professor - Department of Biological Sciences
Director - Museum of Life Sciences
Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor - Museum of Life Sciences
Louisiana State University in Shreveport

Office: (318) 797-5236
Fax: (318) 797-5222
james.ingold AT lsus.edu  www.lsus.edu
 
Subject: Lucy's
From: joan garvey <joanmgarvey1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 08:25:40 -0600
Yesterday I went with Cathy and Phil DiSalvo to try and refind the Lucy's
warbler. We ran into a group of grad students in Grilleta and told them
where the bird had been previously seen. We left their group to walk up the
tract to the parking area to look for birds they had just encountered when
Glenn Seeholzer rushed up to us from the back end of the tract with the
news they had refound the Lucy's. With the help of all students we were
able to get great looks of the Lucy's. I asked Glenn if he was able to get
a picture and he said he didn't stop to try as he immediately ran to get
us. I was able to fire off several quick shots in succession, all out of
focus except for the last one where the bird flew into focus and exposed
his rusty rump patch. If these students represent the future of our birding
community we are in great shape!  No paid guide could have been more
helpful. Thanks to all of you!

Joan Garvey
New Orleans


https://flic.kr/p/pMEcov
Subject: Tree Swallow roost near Thibodaux?
From: "Johnson, Erik" <ejohnson AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 02:25:23 +0000
Friday evening as I was driving on US-90 east, I noticed thousands of Tree 
Swallows heading north at sundown (this was 5:05pm), I assumed to a roost 
nearby. This was as I was crossing LA-311 just south of Thibodaux and west of 
Gray. I didn't have a chance to stop and investigate, but there was cane 
visible off to the north, so maybe it's worth checking in the area for a 
developing swallow tornado roost. If someone already knows of one, please let 
me know. 


Happy birding,
Erik Johnson
S Lafayette, LA
Ejohnson AT Audubon.org
Subject: Re: Red-necked Grebe, Western Grebe, Red-throated Loon still at Bayou D'Arbonne Lake
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 19:23:07 -0600
Mary,

On 11/15/2014 7:19 PM, Mary Mehaffey wrote:

> Cham and I along with Rosemary Seidler saw the Red-necked Grebe around the 
boat launch area of Boat Launch Rd off Hwy 33 in Farmerville at about 10:30 am 
today. We then drove Boggs Rd to Pleasure Island Rd and saw the Red-throated 
Loon at about 11:40 am close to where the road runs along the lake. We met up 
with Stephen Pagans and he told us where he had seen the Western Grebe at the 
highest point on Pleasure Island Rd just a few feet away and we located one 
Western Grebe at 12:00 noon. 


I hope you bought a lottery ticket.  Congrats on a birding trifecta!

Nan

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibr
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com
Subject: Red-necked Grebe, Western Grebe, Red-throated Loon still at Bayou D'Arbonne Lake
From: Mary Mehaffey <m11mehaffey AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 17:19:42 -0800
Cham and I along with Rosemary Seidler saw the Red-necked Grebe around the boat 
launch area of Boat Launch Rd off Hwy 33 in Farmerville at about 10:30 am 
today. We then drove Boggs Rd to Pleasure Island Rd and saw the Red-throated 
Loon at about 11:40 am close to where the road runs along the lake. We met up 
with Stephen Pagans and he told us where he had seen the Western Grebe at the 
highest point on Pleasure Island Rd just a few feet away and we located one 
Western Grebe at 12:00 noon. 


Mary Mehaffey
Subject: Crescent Bird Club/New Orleans Audubon trip through Plaquimines Parish
From: Ed Wallace <mottledduck AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 19:11:55 -0600
The 20 folks who joined the Crescent Bird Club/New Orleans Audubon trip
through Plaquimines Parish had an incredibly successful joint.  We stopped
at several locations.  The first was Diamond.  It was a National Geographic
moment!  The 20 odd Scissor-tailed Flycatchers and Western Kingbirds were
flycatching and chasing each other.  To make it a complete flycatcher sweep,
there was a Vermillion flycatcher and several very yellowish Easter Phoebes.
We also had a solo snow goose flying downriver.  Everyone who was there was
wowed included jaded me.  We then stopped at the Buras Marina where there
was an impressive array of wading birds.  What was particularly interesting
was all of the Roseate Spoonbills flying around - I never thought that I
would ever find them ambient!  Also cool was pishing up three Nelson's
sparrows.  Several folks on the trip got a lifer.  We also found an odd bird
that we think is some sort of aberrant Dunlin.  I have the picture if
someone wants to take a guess on it.  We then went on to Ft. Jackson.  It
was a bit slow but we did have a Myiarchis flycatcher in Ft. Jackson Woods.
It was fairly shy but it was seen by most.  It did not call nor provide a
good look.  Then we travelled to large pond just down river from the dump.
Highlights were the sheer number of double crested cormorants and a pair of
canvasbacks.  Then, on the way back, we found a flock of cowbirds that
contained at least 20 yellow-headed blackbirds.  They were located in
Boothville about half a mile upriver from the Gulf gas station.  

 

 

 

Plaquemines, Plaquemines, US-LA

Nov 15, 2014 8:12 AM - 4:32 PM

Protocol: Traveling

99.997 mile(s)

Comments:     Crescent Bird Club/New Orleans Audubon had an incredibly
successful joint trip through Plaquemines Parish.  We stopped at several
locations.  The first was Diamond.  It was a National Geographic moment!
The 20 odd Scissor-tailed Flycatchers and Western Kingbirds were flycatching
and chasing each other.  To make it a complete flycatcher sweep, there was a
Vermillion flycatcher and several very yellowish Easter Phoebe. We also had
a solo snow goose flying downriver.  Everyone who was there was wowed
included jaded me.  We then stopped at the Buras Marina.  An impressive
array of wading birds.  What was particularly interesting was all of the
Roseate Spoonbills flying around - I never thought that I would ever find
them ambient!  Also cool was pishing up three Nelson's sparrows.  Several
folks on the trip got a lifer.  We also found an odd bird that we think is
some sort of aberrant Dunlin.  I have the picture if someone wants to take a
guess on it.  We then went on to Ft. Jackson.  It was a bit slow but we did
have a Myiarchis flycatcher in Ft. Jackson Woods.  It was fairly shy but it
was seen by most.  It did not call nor provide a good look.  Then we
travelled to large pond just down river from the dump.  Highlights were the
shear number of double crested cormorants and a pair of canvasbacks.  Then,
on the way back, we found a flock of cowbirds that contained at least 20
yellow-headed blackbirds.  They were located about half a mile upriver from
the Gulf gas station.  
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8 74 species (+2 other taxa) Snow Goose 1 Canvasback 2 Ring-necked Duck 4 Lesser Scaup 9 Ruddy Duck 2 Double-crested Cormorant 150 Anhinga 2 American White Pelican 40 Multiple flocks Brown Pelican 17 Great Blue Heron 1 Great Egret 10 Snowy Egret 2 Little Blue Heron 3 Tricolored Heron 1 Cattle Egret 21 White Ibis 21 Roseate Spoonbill 15 Black Vulture 23 Turkey Vulture 15 Osprey 5 Northern Harrier 2 Cooper's Hawk 1 Bald Eagle 4 Red-shouldered Hawk 2 Red-tailed Hawk 5 Clapper Rail 1 Black-bellied Plover 8 Killdeer 21 Spotted Sandpiper 3 Greater Yellowlegs 1 Willet 3 Dunlin 1 Got pictures. Swam Least Sandpiper 1 Laughing Gull 120 Ring-billed Gull 11 Herring Gull 1 Forster's Tern 4 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 20 Eurasian Collared-Dove 2 White-winged Dove 1 Mourning Dove 11 Great Horned Owl 1 Belted Kingfisher 5 Red-bellied Woodpecker 1 American Kestrel 16 Maybe an undercount. They were everywhere. Peregrine Falcon 1 Eastern Phoebe 5 Vermilion Flycatcher 1 Western Kingbird 2 Have photo. Light grey head and chest. Yellow belly. Short beak relative to Tropical. Seen in Diamond. https://www.flickr.com/photos/128522307 AT N05/15799760092/ Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 23 Counted them. Unbelievable! Seen in Diamond. Loggerhead Shrike 15 Blue Jay 4 American Crow 6 Fish Crow 2 crow sp. 13 Carolina Chickadee 1 House Wren 1 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2 Northern Mockingbird 4 European Starling 400 Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Palm Warbler (Yellow) 1 Yellow-rumped Warbler 11 Savannah Sparrow 5 Nelson's Sparrow 3 Swamp Sparrow 1 Dark-eyed Junco 1 heard flyover at Diamond. Northern Cardinal 1 Red-winged Blackbird 17 Eastern Meadowlark 7 Yellow-headed Blackbird 20 Counted and have pictures. By house with flock of cowbirds about half a mile upriver from the gulf gas station. https://www.flickr.com/photos/128522307 AT N05/15799707252/ Boat-tailed Grackle 7 Bronzed Cowbird 2 Counted. Same flock that had the yellow-headed blackbirds. Brown-headed Cowbird 90 House Sparrow 5 passerine sp. 1 myiarchis flycatcher. Did not get good enough view to identify. Seen in Fort Jackson Woods. View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20562537 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Lucy's Warbler continues
From: Matt Brady <podoces AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 09:55:12 -0600
All, the LUCY'S WARBLER continues NOW at Grand Isle, at west edge of burn
at Griletta Tract. Observed by LSU grads, first refound by Glenn Seeholzer.

Matt Brady
Baton Rouge
Subject: Red-necked Grebe still present at D'Arbonne Lake and Western GrebeS
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 17:39:44 -0600
[Subject: [LABIRD-L] Red-necked Grebe still present at D'Arbonne Lake

I saw the Red-necked Grebe about half way down the boat launch road to the 
west. It was only ~50 feet from the road. I did not see the Red-throated loon. 


Casey Wright Grand Isle, LA]



For what it is worth, S. Pagans, J. Brown, T. Davis, H. Hervey, and I found the 
RNGR well away from shore to the west of the launch at about 9 AM this morning. 
I relocated the bird NE of the launch across the inlet between D'Arbonne Diner 
and the adjacent boat launch at 1:50 PM. The bird was just lollygagging around 
at 9 AM. It was actively feeding at 2 PM. 


We recorded Western Grebe (2) to the east of Pleasure Island Road around 11 PM. 
We had another WEGR to the west of the southern approach to the spillway around 
1 PM. 


I am assuming that Terry or Steve will provide a more detailed report about the 
birds on the lake today. 


Jay Huner
Subject: Common Loon and Red-Breasted Merganser - St Martin Parish
From: John Romano <birderjuan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 12:51:19 -0600
I birded Spanish Lake in St Martin Parish this morning - 37 degress and
north winds - perfect weather ! for finding loons and mergansers.  E-bird
list follows:


Spanish Lake (St. Martin Parish), St. Martin, US-LA
Nov 14, 2014 8:45 AM - 10:25 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
Comments:    37 degrees, north wind 12-15 mph – not much singing


22 species

Northern Shoveler  6
Green-winged Teal  14
Ring-necked Duck  25


Red-breasted Merganser  1    graish back with white secondary patch -
brown/red head

     and long thin redish bill - tufts on back of head .


Common Loon  1    large dark gray bird as large as the cormorants, sitting
very low in

        the water.  Its head held much closer to the water than the
cormorants. Its large

       grayish straight and dagger like bill was held parallel to the water
and not tilted

       upwards like the Cormonants or like a red-throated loon and it had
jagged neck

       marking.  These neck marking plus the size of the bill rule out a
Pacific Loon.


Pied-billed Grebe  4
Neotropic Cormorant  35
Double-crested Cormorant  1
Anhinga  2
Great Blue Heron  3
Great Egret  8
Snowy Egret  2
Cattle Egret  2
Turkey Vulture  3
Spotted Sandpiper  3
Ring-billed Gull  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Fish Crow  25

Tree Swallow  100
Carolina Chickadee  1
Carolina Wren  1
Red-winged Blackbird  2
Subject: Red-necked Grebe still present at D'Arbonne Lake
From: Casey Wright <wright.949 AT ME.COM>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 12:42:34 -0600
I saw the Red-necked Grebe about half way down the boat launch road to the 
west. It was only ~50 feet from the road. I did not see the Red-throated loon. 


Casey Wright
Grand Isle, LA
Subject: Chaetura Swift and Ducks, Baton Rouge
From: Matt Brady <podoces AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 10:48:37 -0600
Hello all. Glenn Seeholzer found a CHAETURA SWIFT at University Lakes this
morning. The bird was circling with swallows close to shore at 2751 East
Lakeshore Drive, just south of Morning Glory. Oscar Johnson, Jack Hruska,
and I were able to arrive on the scene quickly, and we had great views of
the bird as it flew around. Oscar was able to snap a number of good photos,
which will, hopefully, be available on his Flickr page soon <
https://www.flickr.com/photos/henicorhina/ >. To my eye, the bird looked
like a Vaux's Swift, appearing smaller bodied, shorter winged, and
paler-rumped than what I'd expect on a Chimney Swift. Additionally the
flight style was consistent with what I expect for Vaux's Swift, being
almost bat-like: a lot more fluttery, with few glides. The bird was silent
while we watched it. Hopefully the bird will hang out so that others can
see it. When viewing the bird, this guide may be useful: <

http://www.sibleyguides.com/2010/10/identifying-chimney-and-vauxs-swifts-by-wing-shape/ 

>

Other birds of note at University Lake included a MOTTLED DUCK, several
Hooded Mergansers, Bufflehead, Ruddy Ducks, and Lesser Scaup at the same
location as the swift (probably the most ducks I've ever seen on University
Lake). The American White Pelican show was spectacular, with an estimated
1000 birds on the northern lake, with an additional ~350 birds dropping in
from the sky. 28 Neotropic Cormorants seemed like a high number, given the
time of year. There were also 36 Ring-billed Gulls flocked up.

Earlier in the morning at Capitol Lakes, we had decent numbers of ducks,
including 100+ Hooded Mergansers, but nothing unusual (no Red-breasted
Merganser). Our first PINE SISKIN of the fall/winter may be notable, and
hopefully heralds more winter finches. There were few Passerines in the
trees at Arsenal Park.

Matt Brady
Baton Rouge
Subject: FOS American Goldfinches
From: "James W. Beck" <carpodectes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 10:09:54 -0600
I had my first two American Goldfinches of the season this morning here in
Marrero.....   -j

-- 
James W. Beck
Metairie, Louisiana
Subject: missing LA CBCs
From: Marty Floyd <000000188c541d04-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 09:30:57 -0500
I may have overlooked them but as of now I do not have the dates for the 
following LA CBCs: 



Bossier-Caddo
Johnson Bayou
Lafayette
St Tammany
Venice

If anyone knows any of these dates please let me know as soon as possible.


Thanks




Marty Floyd
progne99 AT aol.com


Subject: Re: 'Nother painful test. Sorry y'all.
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 20:50:36 -0600
Got this one and the first one. Thanks all!

On Thu, Nov 13, 2014 at 8:49 PM, Terry Davis  wrote:

> Let's go........and loop. In case you were wondering. Fingerz beez slackin'
>
> On Thu, Nov 13, 2014 at 8:45 PM, Terry Davis  wrote:
>
>> Have a slow day tomorrow so headed toward D'arbonne to look for R-n Grebe
>> and R-t Loon
>>
>> On Thu, Nov 13, 2014 at 8:43 PM, Terry Davis  wrote:
>>
>>> Thank you, my friend. Btw, your leopard blanket will be washed this
>>> weekend. I keep forgetting to get it out from behind the seat. Late's go do
>>> something Saturday. Maybe head north and do the I-49 loo, Sentell, etc..
>>> Maybe find a Snow Bunting or something!!?
>>> T
>>>
>>> On Thu, Nov 13, 2014 at 8:41 PM,  wrote:
>>>
>>>> No pain no gain.  Got it.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>> From: Terry Davis 
>>>> To: LABIRD-L 
>>>> Sent: Thu, Nov 13, 2014 8:34 pm
>>>> Subject: [LABIRD-L] 'Nother painful test. Sorry y'all.
>>>>
>>>>  From the phone.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>
>
Subject: 'Nother painful test. Sorry y'all.
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 20:33:46 -0600
From the phone.
Subject: Test
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 20:11:06 -0600
Test
Subject: Re: Delivery Status Notification (Failure)
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 20:02:43 -0600
Test

On Thu, Nov 13, 2014 at 7:58 PM, Mail Delivery Subsystem <
mailer-daemon AT googlemail.com> wrote:

> Delivery to the following recipient failed permanently:
>
>      labird AT listserv.lsu.edu
>
> Technical details of permanent failure:
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> [130.39.6.207].
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> From: Terry Davis 
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