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Updated on Wednesday, June 29 at 06:05 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Shore Plover,©BirdQuest

29 Jun Caspian Terns & Summer Tanagers [Doris Burnett ]
29 Jun book spoken for [Jim Mason ]
29 Jun 1891 book [Jim Mason ]
28 Jun Shoutout to BOK -- Ash-throated Flycatchers [Jeff Calhoun ]
28 Jun ebird issue [Daniel Larson ]
28 Jun Baker Wetlands and ebird [Daniel Larson ]
28 Jun Baker Wetlands Survey [Daniel Larson ]
28 Jun Barber SFL Osprey [Barry Jones ]
28 Jun Wichita Audubon field trip planning meeting [Cheryl Miller ]
28 Jun Chuck-wills-widow [coleen brown ]
27 Jun Mississippi Kites [Catherine Lewis ]
27 Jun Re: Understanding Nightjars - no sighting [Doris Burnett ]
27 Jun Re: Understanding Nightjars - no sighting [Thomas Schermerhorn ]
27 Jun Cheyenne Bottoms 6/27/16 [mike rader ]
27 Jun Re: Understanding Nightjars [Ron Klataske ]
27 Jun Re: Understanding Nightjars [Jeff Keating ]
27 Jun Baker Wetlands Survey [Daniel Larson ]
26 Jun Flickers [Jeff Hansen ]
26 Jun Cooper's hawk bathing ["Nancy H. Clark" ]
26 Jun Understanding Nightjars [Henry Armknecht ]
26 Jun Topeka Birds [Jeff Hanen ]
25 Jun Re: nocturnal bird singing [Daniel Larson ]
25 Jun Big Salt Marsh 6/24/16 [mike rader ]
24 Jun Re: nocturnal bird singing [Lawrence Herbert ]
24 Jun Re: nocturnal bird singing [coleen brown ]
23 Jun Re: nocturnal bird singing [David Starrett ]
23 Jun Call for Papers - KOS Fall meeting [Chuck & Jaye Otte ]
23 Jun Yard Birding Nesting Update [Jeff Hansen ]
23 Jun Re: Dust Baths for Birds (Roadrunner) [Kenneth Kinman ]
23 Jun Re: Dust Baths for Birds [Kenneth Kinman ]
23 Jun Re: Swallow-tailed Kite sighting [Bobby Hiebert Jr ]
23 Jun Re: Dust Baths for Birds [Barbara Schowen ]
23 Jun Re: Dust Baths for Birds [Eric Maatta ]
23 Jun Re: Dust Baths for Birds ["Rader, Jennifer" ]
23 Jun Re: Dust Baths for Birds [Jack Holl ]
23 Jun Dust Baths for Birds [John Northrup ]
23 Jun Re: nocturnal bird singing ["Bollin III, John J." ]
23 Jun Re: nocturnal bird singing [Jill Baringer ]
23 Jun Re: nocturnal bird singing [Mary Haynes ]
22 Jun nocturnal bird singing []
22 Jun Re: A pity request from a teacher... and Pintail babies! [janeen walters ]
22 Jun Re: Thirsty Birds [Kenneth Kinman ]
22 Jun Thirsty Birds [Jeff Hansen ]
22 Jun Caspian Terns at Perry [Dan Mulhern ]
22 Jun Swallow-tailed Kite sighting [mike rader ]
21 Jun Re: Interesting bird observation [Henry Armknecht ]
21 Jun Fwd: Interesting bird observation [Dan Mulhern ]
21 Jun A pity request from a teacher... and Pintail babies! [Jeff Calhoun ]
20 Jun Galesburg BBS 38002 - 2016 [Andrew Burnett ]
20 Jun Great-tailed Grackle behavior [C Miller ]
20 Jun Russell Co. White-tailed Kites, No confirmation. [Bobby Hiebert Jr ]
19 Jun Sedgwick & Sumner Counties [Jeff Calhoun ]
17 Jun Report of White-tailed Kite in Russell Co. [mike rader ]
17 Jun Kanopolis BBS [mike rader ]
17 Jun Whimbrel [terry mannell ]
16 Jun First cicada heard 6-14-2016 Wichita [Steve Seibel ]
16 Jun Whimbrel @ Baker Wetlands ["Wedge, Philip C." ]
15 Jun Bobolinks [Al Schirmacher ]
15 Jun Ness County watershed lake [Henry Armknecht ]
15 Jun Common Poorwill trip - success! [Henry Armknecht ]
14 Jun White rumped sandpipers [Jeff Hansen ]
14 Jun Best Friend []
14 Jun Late morning birds at St. Joseph, MO []
14 Jun Milford Lake Bird Walk this Saturday [Chuck Otte ]
13 Jun Humboldt BBS [Dave and Marie Plinsky ]
13 Jun Least Terns - Neosho WA.. Henslow's in a hay field [Andrew Burnett ]
13 Jun Dalton BBS Route [Kevin Groeneweg ]
13 Jun Baker Wetlands Survey [Daniel Larson ]
12 Jun Breeding Bird Surveys [Chuck & Jaye Otte ]
12 Jun Poorwill Search Ness, Lane, and Gove Counties [Henry Armknecht ]
12 Jun quail [William ]
12 Jun Baker Wetlands early release [Daniel Larson ]
12 Jun Mississippi Kite nesting chronology-- Wichita [Steve Seibel ]
11 Jun Western Birds Today at Lake Scott [Tom SHANE ]
9 Jun Re: Fw: Tribute to Phoebe Snetsinger (google) [Brandon Magette ]
9 Jun Fw: Tribute to Phoebe Snetsinger (google) [Sebastian ]

Subject: Caspian Terns & Summer Tanagers
From: Doris Burnett <dburnett7750 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2016 16:04:58 -0700
There were 2 Caspian Terns in the River Pond at Tuttle this afternoon.  I
thought I had seen terms on the lake this week but didn't have binocs with
me.

For the last 2 weeks, I have had a tanager in my yard. At first it was only
the female but  last week the male showed up.  He chased her for several
days before she decided to sit next to him. They sat together for 2 days
this weekend. Now I have  only the male sitting in the same area where she
sat with him. They both did their pituk. Now he is singing about all day by
himself.  Hopefully she is sitting on a nest. I had my first nesting
tanager in 2010.  Hope they bring the babies to the jelly.

Doris Burnett
Pottawatomie County
Manhattan, Ks

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Subject: book spoken for
From: Jim Mason <jim AT GPNC.ORG>
Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2016 09:00:23 -0500
The 1891 book has quickly been spoken for. I figured there would be some
interest in this group!

 

Jim Mason, Director

  Jim AT gpnc.org

Great Plains Nature Center

6232 E. 29th Street North

Wichita, KS 67220-2200

316-683-5499 x103 - voice

316-688-9555 - facsimile

  www.gpnc.org

 


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Subject: 1891 book
From: Jim Mason <jim AT GPNC.ORG>
Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2016 08:50:38 -0500
Vicki Hilgers, in Mulvane, has a copy of the 1891 printing of "Our Common
Birds and How To Know Them" by John B. Grant. It's not an elephant folio
Audubon, but it may be of interest to someone on the list. Send me an email
if you want it. Free. It has 64 color plates and marginal birding notations
by the original owner.

 

Jim Mason, Director

  Jim AT gpnc.org

Great Plains Nature Center

6232 E. 29th Street North

Wichita, KS 67220-2200

316-683-5499 x103 - voice

316-688-9555 - facsimile

  www.gpnc.org

 


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Subject: Shoutout to BOK -- Ash-throated Flycatchers
From: Jeff Calhoun <jeffcalhoun11 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 15:23:23 -0500
I have been fortunate to have seen a lot of Clark and Meade Co of late.
Today I had an Ash-throated Flycatcher in Clark County at an abandoned
farmstead adjacent to sandsage prairie. Meanwhile, a pair of this species
is pretty much expected in the sandsage prairie of extreme northeast Meade
County when I cruise those roads, most recently encountered last week after
first detection in April. To have a pair or a singing male of this species
is not all that wild in these counties, but I thought that train of thought
was limiting them to the Cimarron River corridor and I, with these birds
far from the Cimarron in sandsage prairie, thought I was really on to
something cool. Nope!! Birds of Kansas (BOK) includes their summer range
encompassing all of these areas, even touching extreme sw Ford Co near the
expected pair (a county I've never seen them in ;) ).  Kudos, BOK! The map
even covers Stanton Co, where the first official record of this species
might have been last May. Kudos, again!! I wonder if this species is
present in the sandsage prairies along the Arkansas River more than we
know? THAT would be discovery worthy, and require a rewrite of BOK. :) Perhaps
KBBAT #2 will tell!!

Seeing small numbers of Solitary Sandpipers, Lesser Yellowlegs, and Upland
Sandpipers (breeders??) around. Some nomadic movements, anyway!


Jeff Calhoun
Dodge City, KS

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Subject: ebird issue
From: Daniel Larson <birdkansa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 14:18:09 -0500
Sorry for the problem.
I will make sure it work before sending it again.
Dan Larson
Berryton KS

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Subject: Baker Wetlands and ebird
From: Daniel Larson <birdkansa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 14:14:29 -0500
Try this one.
ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subid=s30411493

Dan Larson
Berryton ks

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Subject: Baker Wetlands Survey
From: Daniel Larson <birdkansa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 14:08:39 -0500
It seems like there was an issue on getting to the ebird report. I think it
is fixed here and can be reached at the site below.

Thanks
Dan Larson
Berryton KS

ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=
S30411493

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Subject: Barber SFL Osprey
From: Barry Jones <barjones78 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 14:03:14 -0500
Several days late, but worth mentioning: on a check of Barber SFL on Friday, 
June 24, I saw an Osprey cruising the lake. I don't know how unusual this would 
be and/or if anyone else had seen it recently. KS birders are welcome to weigh 
in on this. 


Barry Jones
Quivira NWR

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Subject: Wichita Audubon field trip planning meeting
From: Cheryl Miller <avian67226 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 12:33:00 -0500
Hi all. If you are interested in helping plan Wichita Audubon trips for
2016-2017, please join us at 6 p.m., Wednesday, July 6 at the Great Plains
Nature Center.

-- 
Cheryl
Wichita, KS

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Subject: Chuck-wills-widow
From: coleen brown <coleenm2002 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 02:42:53 +0000
9 O'Clock Bird 16 minutes late tonight! :-)
Coleen Brown
Manhattan



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

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Subject: Mississippi Kites
From: Catherine Lewis <seasidesparrow AT ME.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 15:44:59 -0500
I counted 55, then 57 Mississippi Kites soaring above 13th and Webb Rd. in 
Wichita. 


Really a great sight!

Catherine Lewis
Wichita, KS
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Subject: Re: Understanding Nightjars - no sighting
From: Doris Burnett <dburnett7750 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 13:39:47 -0700
I have had Chuck-wills-widow at my house since we moved here 20 years ago.
They usually start to call just after sunset(not yet dark). Since this
thread started, I've paid more attention to when they sing. They have been
calling still at 10:30 and I have heard them at 4am for the last couple of
nights.  This morning I had one singing at 9am.  I don't remember this
happening before but it have been that I was just listening .

Doris Burnett
Pottawatomie County
Manhattan, Ks
On Jun 27, 2016 3:25 PM, "Thomas Schermerhorn" 
wrote:

> Hi Henry,
>
> Your questions came at a perfect time as Sam and I were wondering about
> similar things. We've learned a lot and enjoyed the insights already
> shared. I don't have any factual insights to add to the thread but can
> contribute recent experience. We went out for nightjars in Pott County the
> same night as you. Our conditions were nearly identical to those you
> described but we visited a spot that had previously yielded all 4 nightjars
> (e-bird data). From a period of late dusk to 1/2 hr after full dark, we
> saw/heard several nighthawks, poor wills, and chuck wills, along with a
> single, very distant whip poor will.
>
> I'm not sure what can be concluded from this anecdote except that some
> birds were calling and active even though the atmospheric conditions were
> not optimal. The habitat appeared excellent for the various species night
> jars - hilly pasture with scattered cedars and other low growth on one side
> of the road and a hilly, sparsely vegetated, rocky area on the other side -
> so perhaps birds were present in greater numbers than most habitats might
> harbor and could be located even if only a small proportion of the
> residents were active on any given night.
>
> Looking forward to more on this topic.
>
> Tom (and Sam) Schermerhorn
> Wamego, KS
>
> tscherme AT vet.ksu.edu
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas [mailto:KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU]
> On Behalf Of Ron Klataske
> Sent: Monday, June 27, 2016 2:42 PM
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: Understanding Nightjars
>
> Henry,
>
> I get out on our property a lot in the evening since I don't feel guilty
> about not working at that time of day!  And, it is one of the two best
> times of day.  Thus, I am often out when the nightjars are calling!  From
> some time in April until September I usually hear Whip-poor-wills and
> Chuck-will's-widows nightly if I am in there habitats.  They are still
> active at dusk.  Had a nice view of a Chuck-will's-widow on a understory
> dead branch singing on Saturday evening. The Poor-wills are more
> unpredictable around here. They were active in PT County early this spring,
> but I haven't heard any lately.  Usually in August they start showing up on
> pasture trails land country roads at dusk.  This behavior concerns me a lot
> since I suspect they suffer high mortality on country roads and highways.
> I don't know why they elected to call them "Common Poorwills."  As you
> suggest, they certainly aren't common everywhere and are becoming less so
> with the loss of native grasslands.
>
> --Ron
>
> On Sun, Jun 26, 2016 at 10:51 AM, Henry Armknecht  >
> wrote:
>
> > Since I have never lived where they are commonly found (except Common
> > Nighthawk), I do not know much about Nightjars.  Do they call every
> > night, or are there some nights that they just do not call?  How late
> > into the summer do they call?  Does moon phase and cloud cover have an
> > impact on their calling?  What about time of night?  Weather?
> >
> > Yesterday, I found a place in Wallace County that looks perfect for
> > Common Poorwill.  Yet, when I went there last night, I never heard a
> > one. I stayed for nearly an hour after what I would consider full
> > dark.  It was mostly cloudy with lightning in the distance.  It was
> > dark, but not a totally black night.  There was a little breeze, but
> > most of the time not enough to keep the bugs from buzzing around my
> > ears.  Numerous nighthawks were calling before dark (but too dark to see
> them), until after full dark.
> > However, at one point, I realized that the Nighthawks had gone silent.
> >
> > Can someone with more experience provide some insight?
> >
> > Thanks,
> >
> > Henry A
> > Hays
> >
> > For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> > https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> > For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> > http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> > To contact a listowner, send a message to
> > mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Ron Klataske
> Executive Director
> Audubon of Kansas
> 210 Southwind Place
> Manhattan  KS 66503
> 785-537-4385
> prairie AT audubonofkansas.org
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to mailto:
> ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>

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Subject: Re: Understanding Nightjars - no sighting
From: Thomas Schermerhorn <tscherme AT VET.K-STATE.EDU>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 20:25:02 +0000
Hi Henry,

Your questions came at a perfect time as Sam and I were wondering about similar 
things. We've learned a lot and enjoyed the insights already shared. I don't 
have any factual insights to add to the thread but can contribute recent 
experience. We went out for nightjars in Pott County the same night as you. Our 
conditions were nearly identical to those you described but we visited a spot 
that had previously yielded all 4 nightjars (e-bird data). From a period of 
late dusk to 1/2 hr after full dark, we saw/heard several nighthawks, poor 
wills, and chuck wills, along with a single, very distant whip poor will. 


I'm not sure what can be concluded from this anecdote except that some birds 
were calling and active even though the atmospheric conditions were not 
optimal. The habitat appeared excellent for the various species night jars - 
hilly pasture with scattered cedars and other low growth on one side of the 
road and a hilly, sparsely vegetated, rocky area on the other side - so perhaps 
birds were present in greater numbers than most habitats might harbor and could 
be located even if only a small proportion of the residents were active on any 
given night. 


Looking forward to more on this topic.

Tom (and Sam) Schermerhorn
Wamego, KS

tscherme AT vet.ksu.edu

-----Original Message-----
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas [mailto:KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of Ron Klataske 

Sent: Monday, June 27, 2016 2:42 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: Understanding Nightjars

Henry,

I get out on our property a lot in the evening since I don't feel guilty about 
not working at that time of day! And, it is one of the two best times of day. 
Thus, I am often out when the nightjars are calling! From some time in April 
until September I usually hear Whip-poor-wills and Chuck-will's-widows nightly 
if I am in there habitats. They are still active at dusk. Had a nice view of a 
Chuck-will's-widow on a understory dead branch singing on Saturday evening. The 
Poor-wills are more unpredictable around here. They were active in PT County 
early this spring, but I haven't heard any lately. Usually in August they start 
showing up on pasture trails land country roads at dusk. This behavior concerns 
me a lot since I suspect they suffer high mortality on country roads and 
highways. 

I don't know why they elected to call them "Common Poorwills." As you suggest, 
they certainly aren't common everywhere and are becoming less so with the loss 
of native grasslands. 


--Ron

On Sun, Jun 26, 2016 at 10:51 AM, Henry Armknecht 
wrote:

> Since I have never lived where they are commonly found (except Common 
> Nighthawk), I do not know much about Nightjars.  Do they call every 
> night, or are there some nights that they just do not call?  How late 
> into the summer do they call?  Does moon phase and cloud cover have an 
> impact on their calling?  What about time of night?  Weather?
>
> Yesterday, I found a place in Wallace County that looks perfect for 
> Common Poorwill.  Yet, when I went there last night, I never heard a 
> one. I stayed for nearly an hour after what I would consider full 
> dark.  It was mostly cloudy with lightning in the distance.  It was 
> dark, but not a totally black night.  There was a little breeze, but 
> most of the time not enough to keep the bugs from buzzing around my 
> ears. Numerous nighthawks were calling before dark (but too dark to see 
them), until after full dark. 

> However, at one point, I realized that the Nighthawks had gone silent.
>
> Can someone with more experience provide some insight?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Henry A
> Hays
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to 
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to 
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>



--
Ron Klataske
Executive Director
Audubon of Kansas
210 Southwind Place
Manhattan  KS 66503
785-537-4385
prairie AT audubonofkansas.org

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Subject: Cheyenne Bottoms 6/27/16
From: mike rader <mike_rader AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 19:58:44 +0000
Hi all,


I took an hour and a half before a scheduled meeting at the Kansas Wetlands 
Education Center to drive through Cheyenne Bottoms. There is plenty of water 
there right now, so hopefully it will provide ample habitat later in the summer 
when migration begins again. I was able to find three Western Grebes (up to 
nine were reported previously) and a smattering of shorebirds in Pool 4A, where 
there is some exposed mud. They were mixed in with lots of Franklin's Gulls 
(85), a few Ring-billed Gulls (6), Forster's Terns (35) and Black Terns (60). I 
had a dozen Black-necked Stilts, 120 Am. Avocets (in 4A & 4B), 1 Snowy Plover, 
a single Solitary Sandpiper (a real surprise), a half dozen Pectoral 
Sandpipers, 2 Stilt Sandpipers, 24 Least and 20 Semipalmated Sandpipers and a 
couple Lesser Yellowlegs. There were 3 Neotropic Cormorants on the island in 
4A, just to the south of where they nested and a high number of Redheads (175) 
on the islands. I did see a N. Pintail hen with five downy young in the outlet 
canal as well. 



Mike Rader
Wilson and/or Pratt,??KS

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Subject: Re: Understanding Nightjars
From: Ron Klataske <prairie AT AUDUBONOFKANSAS.ORG>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 14:41:39 -0500
Henry,

I get out on our property a lot in the evening since I don't feel guilty
about not working at that time of day!  And, it is one of the two best
times of day.  Thus, I am often out when the nightjars are calling!  From
some time in April until September I usually hear Whip-poor-wills and
Chuck-will's-widows nightly if I am in there habitats.  They are still
active at dusk.  Had a nice view of a Chuck-will's-widow on a understory
dead branch singing on Saturday evening. The Poor-wills are more
unpredictable around here. They were active in PT County early this spring,
but I haven't heard any lately.  Usually in August they start showing up on
pasture trails land country roads at dusk.  This behavior concerns me a lot
since I suspect they suffer high mortality on country roads and highways.
I don't know why they elected to call them "Common Poorwills."  As you
suggest, they certainly aren't common everywhere and are becoming less so
with the loss of native grasslands.

--Ron

On Sun, Jun 26, 2016 at 10:51 AM, Henry Armknecht 
wrote:

> Since I have never lived where they are commonly found (except Common
> Nighthawk), I do not know much about Nightjars.  Do they call every night,
> or are there some nights that they just do not call?  How late into the
> summer do they call?  Does moon phase and cloud cover have an impact on
> their calling?  What about time of night?  Weather?
>
> Yesterday, I found a place in Wallace County that looks perfect for Common
> Poorwill.  Yet, when I went there last night, I never heard a one. I stayed
> for nearly an hour after what I would consider full dark.  It was mostly
> cloudy with lightning in the distance.  It was dark, but not a totally
> black night.  There was a little breeze, but most of the time not enough to
> keep the bugs from buzzing around my ears.  Numerous nighthawks were
> calling before dark (but too dark to see them), until after full dark.
> However, at one point, I realized that the Nighthawks had gone silent.
>
> Can someone with more experience provide some insight?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Henry A
> Hays
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
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> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>



-- 
Ron Klataske
Executive Director
Audubon of Kansas
210 Southwind Place
Manhattan  KS 66503
785-537-4385
prairie AT audubonofkansas.org

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Subject: Re: Understanding Nightjars
From: Jeff Keating <jffkeats AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 07:42:17 -0500
Henry asks very good questions, to which I've seen no replies that cc'd the
group. The Nightjar Survey Network at www.Nightjars.org has good
information on finding this suite of species. Among other things, it
reports "Surveys must only be conducted when the moon is above the horizon
and not obscured by clouds. It is a little known fact that Nightjars call
less frequently when the moon is still below the horizon or hidden by dense
cloud cover. Begin each survey at least 30 minutes after sunset and end no
later than 15 minutes before sunrise." I hear 3 of the 4 Kansas nightjars
from my yard. Chuck-will-widows most regularly, presumably because I am
nearer their home territories. Occasionally a whippoorwill, which I think
is a function that its territory is further, so that it has to be at the
nearest edge of that for me to hear. I've not heard recently, but cannot
say if that is due to their behavior or mine, as with late sunsets, extreme
heat and mosquito abundance, I'm not out at that time of the night as much
as I am in May. All in all, the other nightjars live much less
conspicuously than nighthawks.

Henry, if I were a survey coordinator, I believe I would suggest that your
viewing conditions were too unfavorable to provide conclusive evidence that
poorwills were not present, and recommend the survey be repeated, if
possible, under more favorable conditions (i.e., no cloud cover, bright
moon).

Jeff Keating
Fort Riley, KS

On Sun, Jun 26, 2016 at 10:51 AM, Henry Armknecht 
wrote:

> Since I have never lived where they are commonly found (except Common
> Nighthawk), I do not know much about Nightjars.  Do they call every night,
> or are there some nights that they just do not call?  How late into the
> summer do they call?  Does moon phase and cloud cover have an impact on
> their calling?  What about time of night?  Weather?
>
> Yesterday, I found a place in Wallace County that looks perfect for Common
> Poorwill.  Yet, when I went there last night, I never heard a one. I stayed
> for nearly an hour after what I would consider full dark.  It was mostly
> cloudy with lightning in the distance.  It was dark, but not a totally
> black night.  There was a little breeze, but most of the time not enough to
> keep the bugs from buzzing around my ears.  Numerous nighthawks were
> calling before dark (but too dark to see them), until after full dark.
> However, at one point, I realized that the Nighthawks had gone silent.
>
> Can someone with more experience provide some insight?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Henry A
> Hays
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>

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Subject: Baker Wetlands Survey
From: Daniel Larson <birdkansa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 07:38:36 -0500
Roger Boyd, Scott Kimball, Sam Richards, and Kylee Sharp surveyed Baker
Wetlands, Lawrence, Kansas on Sunday June 26. They found 72 species. There
were two Mississippi Kites flying over the Discovery Center. Ebird said the
Northern Shoveler and Lesser Yellowlegs were rare for this time of year.

Waterbirds

Canada Goose 223
Wood Duck 3
Blue-winged Teal 3
Northern Shoveler 1
Great Blue Heron 49
Little Blue Heron 18
Yellow-crowned Night Heron 1
Green Heron 1
Killdeer 59
Lesser Yellowlegs 1
Spotted Sandpiper 3
Belted Kingfisher 2

The complete list is at the site below.
Thanks
Dan Larson
Berryton KS

ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=
S30411493

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Subject: Flickers
From: Jeff Hansen <hanjd AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 20:22:27 -0500
I captured this video of the flickers before they fledged.

https://youtu.be/wOmlMUeahek

The adult male is on the roof catching clover mites.  These are the red 
mites that take refuge in buildings and obvious in nest boxes.  Watch 
him feed the about to fledge chick.

Jeff Hansen

Topeka

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Subject: Cooper's hawk bathing
From: "Nancy H. Clark" <nhclark AT PLANETKC.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 13:21:40 -0500
I just watched a young female Cooper’s hawk on and in the deck birdbath for 
at least 15 minutes! First she sat on the rim looking all around, then waded 
in, then lowered her belly into the water and drank and splashed, rather 
clumsily. What a treat! 


Nancy Clark
Shawnee, Johnson County

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Subject: Understanding Nightjars
From: Henry Armknecht <whatabirder AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 15:51:43 +0000
Since I have never lived where they are commonly found (except Common 
Nighthawk), I do not know much about Nightjars. Do they call every night, or 
are there some nights that they just do not call? How late into the summer do 
they call? Does moon phase and cloud cover have an impact on their calling? 
What about time of night? Weather? 


Yesterday, I found a place in Wallace County that looks perfect for Common 
Poorwill. Yet, when I went there last night, I never heard a one. I stayed for 
nearly an hour after what I would consider full dark. It was mostly cloudy with 
lightning in the distance. It was dark, but not a totally black night. There 
was a little breeze, but most of the time not enough to keep the bugs from 
buzzing around my ears. Numerous nighthawks were calling before dark (but too 
dark to see them), until after full dark. However, at one point, I realized 
that the Nighthawks had gone silent. 


Can someone with more experience provide some insight?

Thanks,

Henry A
Hays

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Subject: Topeka Birds
From: Jeff Hanen <hanjd AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 08:15:28 -0500
Does anyone keep track of bank swallow colonies?  If so there appears to 
be a colony at the Menoken Borrow Pit in Topeka.  On the southeast 
corner it looks like some erosion too place exposing a wall of sand.  
There were numerous holes in the sand and swallows could be seen 
entering them.

Also of interest is the pair of redhead ducks that are at the pit.  
Normally I see just the male but the female was with him last night.  I 
wonder if they didn't try to nest there.

Jeff Hansen

topeka

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Subject: Re: nocturnal bird singing
From: Daniel Larson <birdkansa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 10:20:44 -0500
The singing in the night might make one want to "kill a Mockingbird", but "
all they do is sing their hearts out for us."
Dan Larson
Berryton KS

On Fri, Jun 24, 2016 at 12:24 PM, Lawrence Herbert 
wrote:

> Hi Coleen and KS. birders.
> Yes, the NOMO sing all day and all night out there - and here too - at
> times.
> I was in San Diego, 1963, in our Marine Corps.  While folks were yelling in
> my
> face, I ignored them and wondered what other birds might be on their drill
> place !
> True story,
> Larry
> Lawrence Herbert,  certhia13 AT gmail.com                            6-24-16.
>            (!)
>
> On Fri, Jun 24, 2016 at 10:43 AM, coleen brown 
> wrote:
>
> > Let me see if I understand you correctly. The mockingbirds in CA sing ALL
> > NIGHT LONG!
> > :-) :-) :-) :-) Tee Hee! :-) :-) :-) :-)
> > Coleen Brown
> > Manhattan, KS
> >
> >
> >
> > Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
> >
> >
> > -------- Original message --------
> > From: David Starrett 
> > Date: 06/23/2016 10:23 PM (GMT-06:00)
> > To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> > Subject: Re: nocturnal bird singing
> >
> > 40 years ago, growing up in Los Angeles, we use to have Mockingbirds
> > singing all night, usually from the top of a phone pole in the front
> yard.
> > ALL night.  Loud.  Very annoying when you had windows open in the heat of
> > summer (we had no A/C).  ALL night.  In the repertoire of one of the
> > loud-mouths (loud-beaks) were cat meow, car alarm and a squeaky door.
> ALL
> > night.
> >
> > Dave
> >
> >
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> >
> > David Starrett
> >
> > Columbia, MO
> >
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> >
> >
> > > Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 18:20:49 -0700
> > > From: browndog06 AT COX.NET
> > > Subject: nocturnal bird singing
> > > To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> > >
> > > While camping the last few nights I listened to a Brown Thrasher
> > (possibly a N Mockingbird, but I don't think so) singing between 11:00 pm
> > and 1:00 am.  I'm not normally up that time of day so don't know if this
> is
> > normal behavior or not.  Any thoughts?
> > >
> > > Dan Mulhern
> > > Manhattan, KS
> > >
> > > For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> > > https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> > > For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> > > http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> > > To contact a listowner, send a message to
> > > mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
> >
> > For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> > https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
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> >
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> >
>
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Subject: Big Salt Marsh 6/24/16
From: mike rader <mike_rader AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 01:47:57 +0000
Hi all,


I took an hour and a half on the way home this afternoon to drive through the 
Big Salt Marsh of Quivira NWR. The numbers of Snowy Plovers was impressive, 
with 130 estimated (some babies in there). Also lots of Black-necked Stilts (at 
least 85 with a few babies) and American Avocets (50) and a handful of other 
shorebirds. I had 2 Greater Yellowlegs, 2 Willets, 1 Lesser Yellowlegs, 9 
Pectoral Sandpipers, 42 Least Sandpipers, 2 Semipalmated Sandpipers, 1 Baird's 
Sandpiper, 1 Stilt Sandpiper, 6 Wilson's Phalaropes, 5 Least Terns, 3 Black 
Terns and 4 Franklin's Gulls. The Painted Bunting west of the marsh on 170th 
was singing when I stopped at the known location. 



Mike Rader
Wilson and/or Pratt,??KS

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Subject: Re: nocturnal bird singing
From: Lawrence Herbert <certhia13 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 12:24:49 -0500
Hi Coleen and KS. birders.
Yes, the NOMO sing all day and all night out there - and here too - at
times.
I was in San Diego, 1963, in our Marine Corps.  While folks were yelling in
my
face, I ignored them and wondered what other birds might be on their drill
place !
True story,
Larry
Lawrence Herbert,  certhia13 AT gmail.com                            6-24-16.
           (!)

On Fri, Jun 24, 2016 at 10:43 AM, coleen brown 
wrote:

> Let me see if I understand you correctly. The mockingbirds in CA sing ALL
> NIGHT LONG!
> :-) :-) :-) :-) Tee Hee! :-) :-) :-) :-)
> Coleen Brown
> Manhattan, KS
>
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: David Starrett 
> Date: 06/23/2016 10:23 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: nocturnal bird singing
>
> 40 years ago, growing up in Los Angeles, we use to have Mockingbirds
> singing all night, usually from the top of a phone pole in the front yard.
> ALL night.  Loud.  Very annoying when you had windows open in the heat of
> summer (we had no A/C).  ALL night.  In the repertoire of one of the
> loud-mouths (loud-beaks) were cat meow, car alarm and a squeaky door.  ALL
> night.
>
> Dave
>
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
> David Starrett
>
> Columbia, MO
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>
> > Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 18:20:49 -0700
> > From: browndog06 AT COX.NET
> > Subject: nocturnal bird singing
> > To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> >
> > While camping the last few nights I listened to a Brown Thrasher
> (possibly a N Mockingbird, but I don't think so) singing between 11:00 pm
> and 1:00 am.  I'm not normally up that time of day so don't know if this is
> normal behavior or not.  Any thoughts?
> >
> > Dan Mulhern
> > Manhattan, KS
> >
> > For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> > https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> > For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> > http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> > To contact a listowner, send a message to
> > mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
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> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>
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>

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Subject: Re: nocturnal bird singing
From: coleen brown <coleenm2002 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 15:43:42 +0000
Let me see if I understand you correctly. The mockingbirds in CA sing ALL NIGHT 
LONG! 

:-) :-) :-) :-) Tee Hee! :-) :-) :-) :-)
Coleen Brown
Manhattan, KS



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: David Starrett 
Date: 06/23/2016 10:23 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: nocturnal bird singing

40 years ago, growing up in Los Angeles, we use to have Mockingbirds singing 
all night, usually from the top of a phone pole in the front yard. ALL night. 
Loud. Very annoying when you had windows open in the heat of summer (we had no 
A/C). ALL night. In the repertoire of one of the loud-mouths (loud-beaks) were 
cat meow, car alarm and a squeaky door. ALL night. 


Dave


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

David Starrett

Columbia, MO

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


> Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 18:20:49 -0700
> From: browndog06 AT COX.NET
> Subject: nocturnal bird singing
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>
> While camping the last few nights I listened to a Brown Thrasher (possibly a 
N Mockingbird, but I don't think so) singing between 11:00 pm and 1:00 am. I'm 
not normally up that time of day so don't know if this is normal behavior or 
not. Any thoughts? 

>
> Dan Mulhern
> Manhattan, KS
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu

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Subject: Re: nocturnal bird singing
From: David Starrett <starrettda AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 22:13:38 -0500
40 years ago, growing up in Los Angeles, we use to have Mockingbirds singing 
all night, usually from the top of a phone pole in the front yard. ALL night. 
Loud. Very annoying when you had windows open in the heat of summer (we had no 
A/C). ALL night. In the repertoire of one of the loud-mouths (loud-beaks) were 
cat meow, car alarm and a squeaky door. ALL night. 


Dave
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

David Starrett

Columbia, MO

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


> Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 18:20:49 -0700
> From: browndog06 AT COX.NET
> Subject: nocturnal bird singing
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> While camping the last few nights I listened to a Brown Thrasher (possibly a 
N Mockingbird, but I don't think so) singing between 11:00 pm and 1:00 am. I'm 
not normally up that time of day so don't know if this is normal behavior or 
not. Any thoughts? 

> 
> Dan Mulhern
> Manhattan, KS
> 
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Call for Papers - KOS Fall meeting
From: Chuck & Jaye Otte <otte2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 20:54:22 -0500
Good evening KSBIRDers!

Calling all scientists, students and birders. It's time to get your papers 
ready 

for presentation at the KOS Fall Meeting, September 30 through October 2nd 
in Garden City. Details on how to submit a paper for presentation can be 
found at:

http://ksbirds.org/kos/Fall2016/2016Papers.htm

If you have any questions, please let me know!

Chuck

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Chuck & Jaye Otte      mailto:otte2 AT cox.net
613 Tamerisk
Junction City Kansas USA 66441
785-238-8800

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Subject: Yard Birding Nesting Update
From: Jeff Hansen <hanjd AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 17:59:03 -0500
Thought you'd all like to hear the progress of my nesting birds.

 

Flickers: there are two young that are nearly ready to fledge.  They look
full grown.  Coming to the hole to be fed.  Interesting, there are tiny
"mites" all over the top of the nest box.  I noticed the parents picking
them off.   

 

GC flycatcher:  All five eggs hatched.  Think this is a different pair than
I've had before.  Eggs have different coloration and they picked a different
box to nest in.

 

Wrens.  Something ate all the wren eggs in two boxes.  I'm perplexed as to
what did it.  I don't have house sparrows.  The eggs would disappear one per
day on average until there were none.  Nest box hole was 1.5" diameter.  Put
a restrictor on boxes and they are renesting.

 

Bluebird: 2nd brood just hatched one egg of three

 

Starling: I decided to let a starling nest in a nest box since it was so
late.  I think the heavy rains destroyed their nests and I had a couple come
here to nest.  They had 4 eggs but one didn't hatch.  Then there were 3
nestlings 3 days ago.  Today there are only two.  I'm curious as to what
would take just one nestling. I'd think predators would generally take all
of them.

 

If anyone has any theories on the wren eggs and starling nesting.love to
hear ideas.

 

Jeff Hansen

Topeka


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Subject: Re: Dust Baths for Birds (Roadrunner)
From: Kenneth Kinman <kinman AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 16:08:50 -0500
Here is a weblink to a video on YouTube of a roadrunner taking a dirt bath:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jc0trT50WCo -------------Ken (Hays, KS) 

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Subject: Re: Dust Baths for Birds
From: Kenneth Kinman <kinman AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 15:14:34 -0500
Hi John, I have always thought that in the evolution of birds that dust baths 
were practiced very early on, especially among galliforms (grouse, quail, etc.) 
and other "primitive" birds, like ostriches, kiwis, emus, etc. But that they 
soon also discovered passive anting (such as dust baths on ant hills), and 
finally active anting in more intelligent birds. Therefore, I would expect most 
ground dwelling birds to use dust baths at least occasionally. Below is a list 
of 20 common birds that "ant", and presumably use dust baths as well (source: 
http://www.birdwatchingdaily.com/blog/2013/10/09/anting-widespread-fascinating-purpose-uncertain/ 
): 

20 Common birds that antRuffed Grouse
Wild Turkey
Great Horned Owl
Northern Flicker
Cedar Waxwing
Northern Mockingbird
Gray Catbird
Veery
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Dark-eyed Junco
Song Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Baltimore Oriole
Red-winged Blackbird
House Sparrow
American Crow
Common RavenSource: Lovie M. Whitaker, A Rsum of Anting, with Particular 
Reference to a Captive Orchard Oriole. The Wilson Bulletin, September 1957, 
Vol. 69, No. 3, 195-262. 

 --------------Ken Kinman Hays, KansasP.S. I wouldn't be surprised if the 
ancestors of birds (dinosaurs) also used dust baths and ant baths. 


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

> Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 18:00:26 +0000
> From: jdn008 AT HOTMAIL.COM
> Subject: Dust Baths for Birds
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Question - I'm thinking of creating a dust bathing feature in my yard for 
birds and would like to know what species listers have observed dust bathing. 
It occurs to me that I can't recall any birds other than House Sparrows being 
caught in the act.....Thank you for any input you can offer! 

> 
> 
> John Northrup
> 
> Wichita
> 
> Sedgwick Co.
> 

 		 	   		  
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Subject: Re: Swallow-tailed Kite sighting
From: Bobby Hiebert Jr <bobbybirdman23 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 14:13:11 -0500
Does anyone know of any updates on these birds?

Bobby Hiebert, Salina.

On Wed, Jun 22, 2016 at 1:02 PM, mike rader  wrote:

> Hi all,
>
>
> FYI, I just had a call from Tom Cannon, an old friend and good birder,
> reporting that he saw a Swallow-tailed Kite along US 169 Highway, a mile
> north of the town of Greeley in Anderson Co. at 11:00am this morning
> (6/22/16). They were able to see it well and are familiar with the species
> from Texas. He said it was on the east side of the highway, flying along
> the car, then flew over a barn and finally the southeast out of sight. He
> said it is really wooded there and there were no roads in the vicinity of
> where the bird flew off to, so couldn't chase it. I guess folks need to
> keep an eye out if travelling in the area.
>
>
> Mike Rader
> Wilson and/or Pratt,??KS
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
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>

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Subject: Re: Dust Baths for Birds
From: Barbara Schowen <bschowen AT SUNFLOWER.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 13:33:34 -0500
Wild turkeys do at our place.

Douglas Cty south of Lawrence
Barbara

> On Jun 23, 2016, at 1:00 PM, John Northrup  wrote:
> 
> Question - I'm thinking of creating a dust bathing feature in my yard for 
birds and would like to know what species listers have observed dust bathing. 
It occurs to me that I can't recall any birds other than House Sparrows being 
caught in the act.....Thank you for any input you can offer! 

> 
> 
> John Northrup
> 
> Wichita
> 
> Sedgwick Co.
> 
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu

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Subject: Re: Dust Baths for Birds
From: Eric Maatta <eam60 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 13:28:15 -0500
Ive had flickers and brown thrashers enjoying themselves this summer.

Eric Maatta

Manhattan

On Jun 23, 2016, at 1:00 PM, John Northrup  wrote:

> Question - I'm thinking of creating a dust bathing feature in my yard for 
birds and would like to know what species listers have observed dust bathing. 
It occurs to me that I can't recall any birds other than House Sparrows being 
caught in the act.....Thank you for any input you can offer! 

> 
> 
> John Northrup
> 
> Wichita
> 
> Sedgwick Co.
> 
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu

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Subject: Re: Dust Baths for Birds
From: "Rader, Jennifer" <jennifer.rader AT KSOUTDOORS.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 13:20:04 -0500
I see Eastern Phoebes take dust baths in the SEK Nature Center flower beds
several times throughout the summer....


-- 
Jenn Rader
Southeast Kansas Nature Center Director
Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks & Tourism
3511 S. Main St.
Galena, KS  66739
(620) 783-5207

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Subject: Re: Dust Baths for Birds
From: Jack Holl <jackholl AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 18:19:42 +0000
I have seen jays and flickers "spread eagle" on our road.




Jack M. Holl

Emeritus Professor of History

Kansas State University

469-223-0868

________________________________
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas  on behalf of 
John Northrup  

Sent: Thursday, June 23, 2016 12:00:26 PM
To: ksbird-l AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Dust Baths for Birds

Question - I'm thinking of creating a dust bathing feature in my yard for birds 
and would like to know what species listers have observed dust bathing. It 
occurs to me that I can't recall any birds other than House Sparrows being 
caught in the act.....Thank you for any input you can offer! 



John Northrup

Wichita

Sedgwick Co.

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Subject: Dust Baths for Birds
From: John Northrup <jdn008 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 18:00:26 +0000
Question - I'm thinking of creating a dust bathing feature in my yard for birds 
and would like to know what species listers have observed dust bathing. It 
occurs to me that I can't recall any birds other than House Sparrows being 
caught in the act.....Thank you for any input you can offer! 



John Northrup

Wichita

Sedgwick Co.

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Subject: Re: nocturnal bird singing
From: "Bollin III, John J." <BollinJ AT UMKC.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 16:41:08 +0000
We camped at Clinton State Park a few years ago and set up a tent under a tree 
that a Northern Mockingbird would sing from. It would start around 2:00 am and 
sing pretty much all morning long. Even the bird lovers thought it was 
aggravating. 

John Bollin
Leavenworth, KS

-----Original Message-----
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas [mailto:KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of browndog06 AT COX.NET 

Sent: Wednesday, June 22, 2016 8:21 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: nocturnal bird singing

While camping the last few nights I listened to a Brown Thrasher (possibly a N 
Mockingbird, but I don't think so) singing between 11:00 pm and 1:00 am. I'm 
not normally up that time of day so don't know if this is normal behavior or 
not. Any thoughts? 


Dan Mulhern
Manhattan, KS

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Subject: Re: nocturnal bird singing
From: Jill Baringer <baringer AT SUNFLOWER.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 11:22:02 -0500
When growing up in suburban Los Angeles, it was a frequent complaint that 
"those darn mockingbirds" persisted in singing night after night in the wee 
hours and annoying everyone. Brown thrashers at the time were very rare there. 
I suspect the Kansas mockingbirds are just being themselves! 


Jill Baringer


-----Original Message-----
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas [mailto:KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of Mary Haynes 

Sent: Wednesday, June 22, 2016 9:46 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: nocturnal bird singing

We recently had a Mockingbird that would start singing about 1:00 a.m. and 2:00 
a.m. and would sing for anywhere up to 2 hours???? This lasted about a week, we 
were sleeping with windows at that time. 

Mary McNettPiqua, KS 

 On Wednesday, June 22, 2016 8:21 PM, "browndog06 AT COX.NET"  
wrote: 

 

 While camping the last few nights I listened to a Brown Thrasher (possibly a N 
Mockingbird, but I don't think so) singing between 11:00 pm and 1:00 am. I'm 
not normally up that time of day so don't know if this is normal behavior or 
not. Any thoughts? 


Dan Mulhern
Manhattan, KS

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mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu 




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Subject: Re: nocturnal bird singing
From: Mary Haynes <sistermaryii AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 02:45:55 +0000
We recently had a Mockingbird that would start singing about 1:00 a.m. and 2:00 
a.m. and would sing for anywhere up to 2 hours????  This lasted about a week, 
we were sleeping with windows at that time. 

Mary McNettPiqua, KS 

 On Wednesday, June 22, 2016 8:21 PM, "browndog06 AT COX.NET"  
wrote: 

 

 While camping the last few nights I listened to a Brown Thrasher (possibly a N 
Mockingbird, but I don't think so) singing between 11:00 pm and 1:00 am.  I'm 
not normally up that time of day so don't know if this is normal behavior or 
not.  Any thoughts? 


Dan Mulhern
Manhattan, KS

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Subject: nocturnal bird singing
From: browndog06 AT COX.NET
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 18:20:49 -0700
While camping the last few nights I listened to a Brown Thrasher (possibly a N 
Mockingbird, but I don't think so) singing between 11:00 pm and 1:00 am. I'm 
not normally up that time of day so don't know if this is normal behavior or 
not. Any thoughts? 


Dan Mulhern
Manhattan, KS

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Subject: Re: A pity request from a teacher... and Pintail babies!
From: janeen walters <waltersjaneen AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 17:48:01 -0500
I can’t be sure they still do this but contact Eagle Optics.
I got money from my school PTO about 5 years ago. I contacted Eagle and they 
offer a buy one get one free for schools and nature centers. You had to buy 
$200 binocs. Then for each one purchased you got another one free! I got some 
really nice equipment for a great deal. 


Janeen Walters
Topeka



> On Jun 21, 2016, at 9:17 AM, Jeff Calhoun  wrote:
> 
> Hello Birders,
> 
> I intended to do this some time ago, but had forgotten about it until
> visiting with a colleague and her 7th grade son in the waiting room in the
> dentist this morning. The youngster was telling me about all of his bird
> feeders and turtle and snake encounters at their country home. I showed him
> pictures of some of my students doing that stuff at DCHS and he is suddenly
> bursting with excitement to get to high school to play along. Oh I'll never
> get tired of that stuff!! These summer doldrums are a nice time to consider
> these requests anyways, it's all so serendipitous.
> 
> I am seeking advice and/or donations towards the development of a classroom
> set of binoculars, where even just a half dozen would be a great start.
> They could be old junkers, we really don't discriminate and, remember, it's
> all relative, most of these kids have never gazed through binoculars in
> their life. I just hope it can come cheap. My objective is to have them
> available to help young people see birds and other wildlife up close and
> personal in the field, specifically students in my new elective classes
> designed specifically for that purpose. Think about that first time you saw
> Sandhill Cranes and ducks in your optics. Remember that first Yellow
> Warbler? We can do that right on our campus and in the fields nearby, and
> those are the kind of opportunities I hope to bring to the amazing young
> people in Dodge City, KS! You never know what will spark a kid's interest.
> And that is the greatest thing in the world to be behold, I've only just
> begun. Perhaps this is a selfish request, because at the root of it all I
> just want more of that!!
> 
> If you have any suggestions on how to accomplish this objective or if you
> have anything to share, I'd LOVE to hear from you!!
> 
> And if you've made it this far, frustrated by the lack of explicit
> bird-related content, wait no longer... I observed a hen Northern Pintail
> with 5 ducklings in tow yesterday on a playa in northwestern Ford County.
> This will put Pintail into the confirmed breeding category, a first for
> Ford County.
> 
> Thanks so much!! Hope to catch you in the field someday!!
> 
> Jeff Calhoun
> Dodge City, KS
> 
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Subject: Re: Thirsty Birds
From: Kenneth Kinman <kinman AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 17:28:30 -0500
Hi Jeff, Here is a weblink to one article on the subject: 
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/05/science/how-do-birds-keep-their-chicks-hydrated.html?_r=0 

            ---------Ken Kinman, Hays, KS.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 


> Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 17:01:30 -0500
> From: hanjd AT COX.NET
> Subject: Thirsty Birds
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> I'm curious, can adult birds bring water to nestlings in this extreme heat.
> It's about 105 right now in Topeka.  I noticed the baby flickers with their
> heads at the nest box hole panting and looking very hot.  Or do they get all
> their water from the food they eat?
> 
>  
> 
> Jeff Hansen
> 
> Topeka
> 
> 
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
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> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Thirsty Birds
From: Jeff Hansen <hanjd AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 17:01:30 -0500
I'm curious, can adult birds bring water to nestlings in this extreme heat.
It's about 105 right now in Topeka.  I noticed the baby flickers with their
heads at the nest box hole panting and looking very hot.  Or do they get all
their water from the food they eat?

 

Jeff Hansen

Topeka


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Subject: Caspian Terns at Perry
From: Dan Mulhern <browndog06 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 15:10:52 -0500
Yesterday there were 2 Caspian Terns with a small group of RB Gulls off the 
Peninsula point in Rock Creek Park at Perry Reservoir. Jeff County. 


Dan Mulhern 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

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Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite sighting
From: mike rader <mike_rader AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 18:02:31 +0000
Hi all,


FYI, I just had a call from Tom Cannon, an old friend and good birder, 
reporting that he saw a Swallow-tailed Kite along US 169 Highway, a mile north 
of the town of Greeley in Anderson Co. at 11:00am this morning (6/22/16). They 
were able to see it well and are familiar with the species from Texas. He said 
it was on the east side of the highway, flying along the car, then flew over a 
barn and finally the southeast out of sight. He said it is really wooded there 
and there were no roads in the vicinity of where the bird flew off to, so 
couldn't chase it. I guess folks need to keep an eye out if travelling in the 
area. 



Mike Rader
Wilson and/or Pratt,??KS

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Subject: Re: Interesting bird observation
From: Henry Armknecht <whatabirder AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 15:03:10 +0000
I am in the process of following up on this. We will try to eliminate 
Mississippi Kite before trekking to Wakeeney. 


Henry A
Hays

-----Original Message-----
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas [mailto:KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of Dan Mulhern 

Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2016 9:22 AM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Fwd: Interesting bird observation



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Interesting bird observation
From: John Miesner 
To: browndog06 AT cox.net
CC: 

 


Dan,

 

Since you’re the most recent retiree with an account to the Kansas Audubon 
list, would you please post that a gentleman by the name of Matthew Hardman 
(785-241-9970) in WaKeeney believes he’s spotted a Grey Hawk hanging around 
it town.  He said he got a really good look at it and is kinda sure about the 
sighting, but wanted to report it and maybe get confirmation/feedback. 


 

Thanks from a working stiff,

 

John F. Miesner

Senior Environmental Contaminants Specialist

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Kansas Ecological Services Field Office

2609 Anderson Ave.

Manhattan, KS  66502

(785) 539-3474, ext. 103

(785) 539-8567 (FAX)

 

There’s a difference between living to work and working to live.    

><(((º>`•.¸¸.•´¯`•.¸><(((º> 
`•.¸¸.•´¯`•.¸><(((º>`•.¸¸.•´¯`•.¸><(((º>

 



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Subject: Fwd: Interesting bird observation
From: Dan Mulhern <browndog06 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 09:22:09 -0500

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Interesting bird observation
From: John Miesner 
To: browndog06 AT cox.net
CC: 

 


Dan,

 

Since you’re the most recent retiree with an account to the Kansas Audubon 
list, would you please post that a gentleman by the name of Matthew Hardman 
(785-241-9970) in WaKeeney believes he’s spotted a Grey Hawk hanging around 
it town.  He said he got a really good look at it and is kinda sure about the 
sighting, but wanted to report it and maybe get confirmation/feedback. 


 

Thanks from a working stiff,

 

John F. Miesner

Senior Environmental Contaminants Specialist

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Kansas Ecological Services Field Office

2609 Anderson Ave.

Manhattan, KS  66502

(785) 539-3474, ext. 103

(785) 539-8567 (FAX)

 

There’s a difference between living to work and working to live.    

><(((º>`•.¸¸.•´¯`•.¸><(((º> 
`•.¸¸.•´¯`•.¸><(((º>`•.¸¸.•´¯`•.¸><(((º>

 



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Subject: A pity request from a teacher... and Pintail babies!
From: Jeff Calhoun <jeffcalhoun11 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 09:17:31 -0500
Hello Birders,

I intended to do this some time ago, but had forgotten about it until
visiting with a colleague and her 7th grade son in the waiting room in the
dentist this morning. The youngster was telling me about all of his bird
feeders and turtle and snake encounters at their country home. I showed him
pictures of some of my students doing that stuff at DCHS and he is suddenly
bursting with excitement to get to high school to play along. Oh I'll never
get tired of that stuff!! These summer doldrums are a nice time to consider
these requests anyways, it's all so serendipitous.

I am seeking advice and/or donations towards the development of a classroom
set of binoculars, where even just a half dozen would be a great start.
They could be old junkers, we really don't discriminate and, remember, it's
all relative, most of these kids have never gazed through binoculars in
their life. I just hope it can come cheap. My objective is to have them
available to help young people see birds and other wildlife up close and
personal in the field, specifically students in my new elective classes
designed specifically for that purpose. Think about that first time you saw
Sandhill Cranes and ducks in your optics. Remember that first Yellow
Warbler? We can do that right on our campus and in the fields nearby, and
those are the kind of opportunities I hope to bring to the amazing young
people in Dodge City, KS! You never know what will spark a kid's interest.
And that is the greatest thing in the world to be behold, I've only just
begun. Perhaps this is a selfish request, because at the root of it all I
just want more of that!!

If you have any suggestions on how to accomplish this objective or if you
have anything to share, I'd LOVE to hear from you!!

And if you've made it this far, frustrated by the lack of explicit
bird-related content, wait no longer... I observed a hen Northern Pintail
with 5 ducklings in tow yesterday on a playa in northwestern Ford County.
This will put Pintail into the confirmed breeding category, a first for
Ford County.

Thanks so much!! Hope to catch you in the field someday!!

Jeff Calhoun
Dodge City, KS

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Subject: Galesburg BBS 38002 - 2016
From: Andrew Burnett <aburnett AT MAGNUMSYSTEMS.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 17:21:01 +0000
Kansas BBS surveys started in 1967. 35 routes started that year(credit Bill 
Busby). The Galesburg route was one of them. This route does not go through any 
towns and has not been subject to urbanization. There is absolutely nothing 
remarkable about this route, it does not stop at any feature that I would call 
interesting or birdy. Farming and ranching are the primary focus of its area 
and have been from its beginning.. It is interesting to peruse the data from 
past counts and see micro trends and such over that time. (yes I know the 
sample size issues) Things like 4 Greater Prairie-Chickens on the 1978 count 
stick out (last official county record was 1996). Eastern Meadowlark numbers 
are half of what they were early in the count(~170 to ~70 per survey). House 
Sparrows have gone from pervasive to almost non-existent(~200 to ~10). At any 
rate I recently conducted the 2016 survey. Here are the interesting data points 
from it. 


57 total species - high total for the survey.

Had 3 species that popped up that hadn't been on the count in a long time. 
Great-tailed Grackle (1986), Western Kingbird (1969), Red-shouldered 
Hawk(1971). The RS Hawk date is surprising to me. It is very hard to not find a 
RS Hawk in Neosho Co. 


Highest Mourning Dove count since 1983.

Loggerhead Shrike Count was 8, showing continued improvement in recent surveys.

Northern Bobwhite count continued to be stable with 58 on the count. About 
average over the last 10 years or so. This is interesting considering the bulk 
of the survey area falls within "Southern Quail Focus Area" of the Kansas Quail 
Initiative. 


High Counts that were achieved during this survey - Red-bellied WP, Fish Crow
Misses - Canada Goose, American Robin, & American Goldfinch


Andrew Burnett
rural Erie, KS





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Subject: Great-tailed Grackle behavior
From: C Miller <avian67226 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 12:19:12 -0500
I observed some interesting Great-tailed Grackle behavior at Dillon's 
yesterday. While putting gas in my car, I watched a male grackle pick up what 
looked like a piece of dog food. It picked up the kibble and placed it in a 
shallow puddle of water that had drained from a car's air conditioner. He then 
scooped some water into his bill and dribbled it onto the kibble. He did this 
several more times over the next few minutes until the kibble was soft enough 
to break into smaller pieces. He then ate the kibble and flew away. 


Cheryl Miller
Wichita, KS

Sent from my iPod (I'm not in my office). Please forgive any typos, 
misspellings and unintended auto corrections. 


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Subject: Russell Co. White-tailed Kites, No confirmation.
From: Bobby Hiebert Jr <bobbybirdman23 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 10:15:11 -0500
Hello everyone,

On the report of the possible White-tailed Kites out by Russell County, I
headed out with two other birders on Saturday morning to attempt to
confirm.  Knowing the possible report had been about 48 hours previous,
even if such birds had been observed, I was not overly optimistic of
sighting them.

I was not wrong.  We cruised the area around where the report had been
made.  Nothing even remotely resembling the Kites, White-tailed or
Mississippi, were seen in the area.  Depending on the folks that made the
report, if they were traveling at highway speed and so forth, I wondered if
they could have possibly confused a Mississippi for a White-tailed.  I
don't know.  The light coloration and time of day could have all factored
in there.

In any event, we went over to Wilson and perused the area.  At Minooka Park
we had at least 2, if not 3, Northern Bobwhites calling from trees.  I was
able to get photos of one.  To the South of the Park in a tree in a grassy
field we observed a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher nest.  Also observed, and
heard, Common Nighthawk diving and making its "woosh" sound.

At the Hell Creek area the Rock Wren that had been around in colder weather
was nowhere to be found.  We observed no Gulls of any sort.  Attempts to
locate a Say's Phoebe were also a bust.

At the Otoe area we walked the wonderful trail.  In a bluebird box near a
map kiosk is a nesting Tree Swallow.  At least one other bluebird box had
occupants and young along the trail.

Other than that, not much seemed to be going on in terms of anything
extraordinary or unusual.  We didn't spend any time glassing the water.
The lack of Gulls was rather odd.

Happy Birding!

Bobby Hiebert
Salina, Kansas.

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Subject: Sedgwick & Sumner Counties
From: Jeff Calhoun <jeffcalhoun11 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 16:26:05 -0500
Rodney Wright joined me for the morning of birding in the subject counties
today. In Sedgwick County we enjoyed a morning walk with the typical Fish
Crows, Pileated Woodpeckers, Painted Buntings, Bald Eagles, etc. We also
had a singing Black-and-White Warbler at a location I've had summering
individuals of this species several times before. I thought I heard a Wood
Thrush this AM and I heard it again this afternoon, confirming its
presence. No Summer Tanagers, though, a bit of a surprise from previous
years. They and a few of the other specialties may be present with better
efforts.

We traveled into Sumner County for a few county birds, and most notably was
a Leon Hicks sighting out doing his typical thing. He gave us tips and we
followed up on them to successfully see many Chipping Sparrows in the Belle
Plaine Cemetery (notable in s central KS in summer) and a Yellow-throated
Vireo in the Pecan grove across the street from the cemetery. The vireo has
been present for several months and has summered for a few years at this
site per Leon, a modest expansion of their summer range in KS.

Bobwhite seem to be doing well in s central KS.

Jeff Calhoun
Dodge City, KS

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Subject: Report of White-tailed Kite in Russell Co.
From: mike rader <mike_rader AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 16:44:37 +0000
Hi all,


I saw a report on eBird today of a pair of travelling out-of-state birders 
seeing what the believe to be a White-tailed Kite on a fencepost along I-70, 
approximately 2.5 miles west of the Bunker Hill exit yesterday at about 2:00pm. 
The report is pretty convincing as they said they have experience with the 
species in other locations, etc. The location is close to 190th and I-70. 



Mike Rader
Wilson and/or Pratt,??KS

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Subject: Kanopolis BBS
From: mike rader <mike_rader AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 14:58:27 +0000
Hi all,


I was able to conduct the Kanopolis BBS route in Ellsworth Co. on Wednesday. 
Pretty darn hot, but the birds were still active. I had decent numbers (188) of 
N. Bobwhite, with occurrence detected on 46 of 50 stops. Other bird numbers 
seemed somewhat low, with kingbird numbers really low. I did have a few birds 
of interest, with the best being a calling Eastern Towhee (Ellsworth Co. is 
somewhat west of their normal breeding range), a single Black-billed Cuckoo & 
28 Yellow-billed Cuckoos, and a few I don't get very often like Loggerhead 
Shrike, Yellow Warbler and Chimney Swift. I had a total of 65 species and 2665 
individual birds. As per usual, Dickcissels led the way with 379! 



Mike Rader
Wilson and/or Pratt,??KS

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Subject: Whimbrel
From: terry mannell <terryman0405 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 08:43:51 -0500
Whimbrel present at 7a.m. at Baker Wetlands restoration area.

Terry Mannell
Topeka

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Subject: First cicada heard 6-14-2016 Wichita
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 18:49:53 -0700
I heard a cicada singing briefly in Wichita on 6-14, and one or more
singing for a longer duration on  6-15, and more this evening 6-17.
Steve Seibel

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Subject: Whimbrel @ Baker Wetlands
From: "Wedge, Philip C." <pwedge AT KU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 19:17:38 +0000
The Whimbrel was still present this morning (6/16) at Baker Wetlands 
Restoration Area (Douglas Co.). 


Phil Wedge

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Subject: Bobolinks
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 10:38:41 -0500
Bobolinks continue in area: 6/15 Atchison County, mile west of Muscotah; 6/12 & 
6/10 Jackson County, two spots along 116 east of Holton. 


Will keep eyes open for breeding behavior, but generally seen & heard over 
private property. 


Note Bobolink page in Birds of Kansas.

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS

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Subject: Ness County watershed lake
From: Henry Armknecht <whatabirder AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 14:26:22 +0000
On my way to begin the Poorwill search, I stopped by the watershed lake in 
eastern Ness County. It is pretty full and held a number of birds. Most 
interesting was an estimated 40-50 Eared Grebes. I was running a little late, 
so did not take time to count them. I could be low by quite a bit. There was a 
similar number of Coots. Other birds present were Mallard, Pintail, Northern 
Shoveler, Blue-winged Teal, and Ruddy Ducks. There was anywhere from an handful 
to a couple dozen of each species. There was also at least one each Pied-billed 
Grebe and Cormorant. 


Henry A
Hays

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Subject: Common Poorwill trip - success!
From: Henry Armknecht <whatabirder AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 14:11:13 +0000
I just got home from my Common Poorwill trip.

I started in Ness County just as it was getting dark, but did not find 
Poorwills where I had intended to try - spots near Ness City and Beeler. I 
moved on to Lane County. The first spot was also a bust. Then I moved on to 
what I thought was the best chance of the night. Poorwills did not disappoint. 
In NE Lane County, along Pawnee Road, I had multiple Poorwills. The last three 
miles before I hit Gove County had at least one bird at every stop. I then 
traveled a mile or two west on the Lane/Gove County line and had multiple birds 
on both sides of the road at several stops. 


Looking at the map, I realized that I was not that far from Ness County, so 
went back to try again in an area closer to where I knew there were Poorwills. 
This time, I heard one bird along A Road maybe 2 miles north of the Gove County 
Line. Traveling north, A road becomes Castle Rock Road in Gove County. I took 
it north to Quinter. Out of probably 8 stops along this road in Gove County, I 
only heard 1 positive and one maybe Poorwill. 


The next destination was Sheridan Wildlife Area. It was a little breezy, but I 
didn't find a Poorwill at the wildlife area. I drove straight north from there, 
headed toward Sheridan State Lake. About 5 miles south of highway 24, I had 
multiple Poorwills at one location. I decided to skip Sheridan Lake and go to 
Antelope Lake to attempt to fine Poorwill in Graham County. When I looked at 
the map, I realized that my Sheridan County birds were just a mile from the 
Graham County line. Another road ran parallel to it just a mile into Graham 
County (2 miles east). I took that road south and finally connected with at 
least two Poorwills about 4 miles south of highway 24. I took the first road 
east from there and had a Poorwill about a mile south and two miles east of the 
first location. 


I then headed toward Cedar Bluffs. The west end, south side had numerous 
calling Poorwills. By now, it was getting light. At the scenic overlook of the 
lake, I decided to play a Poorwill recording to see what would happen. 
Immediately, a Poorwill flew in and landed on the ground about 20 feet from me 
- calling constantly. It was just light enough that I could see it when I found 
it in the binoculars. It was a great way to end my six county Poorwill quest. 


The night was absolutely gorgeous. The temperature was 73 when I started and 63 
at sunrise. The wind never got over 10 mph, and was mostly under 5 mph to 
essentially calm. The moon was beautiful, biting insects very few. The star 
show was great all night, but when the moon set, the stars and Milky Way really 
popped. I think I heard 2 barking dogs, just a handful of cattle, and one 
irrigation engine. Oil pumpers kept me from hearing much at several locations. 
Except for when I was on a highway, I never saw another vehicle. 


Other birds heard at least once during the night (not dawn or dusk) in 
approximate order of number heard: Common Nighthawk, Killdeer, Horned Lark, 
Western Meadowlark, Grasshopper Sparrow, Great Horned Owl, Barn Owl, Eastern 
Screech-Owl, Northern Mockingbird, Western Kingbird, Brown Thrasher, Mallard, 
Lark Bunting. 


Henry A
Hays

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Subject: White rumped sandpipers
From: Jeff Hansen <hanjd AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 14:51:54 -0500
Yesterday There were 5 white rumped sandpipers along with 50 plus killdeer at 
the k state farm wetland.  Also two green winged teal at 25th wetland. Red 
head was with Canada geese at Menoken pit.  

Jeff Hansen
Topeka

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Subject: Best Friend
From: llade AT SBCGLOBAL.NET
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 19:26:20 +0000
What a friend! ....... Steve Kinder just found out last week that I had been 
diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease. Today, Steve came over from Chillicothe to 
go birding with me around Lake Contrary and the other oxbow lakes just south of 
St. Joseph, Mo. He had to be very tired after just completing some arduous 
grassland bird surveys for the MDC with his wife last Saturday, Sunday & 
Monday. He and his wife had put in long hours, miles of driving, recording all 
the birds of the various areas they visited, enduring the the hot, dusty 
conditions, etc. Yet, Steve, took the time today to come over and go birding 
with me, even though he had to be exhausted. .......Thank you Steve ........ 

Larry LadeSt. Joseph, MO

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Subject: Late morning birds at St. Joseph, MO
From: llade AT SBCGLOBAL.NET
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 17:33:04 +0000
June 14, 2016, in late morning, these birds seen/heard by Steve and Larry, 
while driving around Lake Contrary and other oxbow lakes, south of St. Joseph, 
MO, for a couple of hours. 

(Thanks for coming over this morning Steve.)
__________________________
Canada Goose
Northern Bobwhite
American White Pelican
Great Blue Heron
Turkey Vulture
Rock Pigeon
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Chimney Swift
Red-headed Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Great Crested Flycatcher
Western Kingbird
Eastern Kingbird
Bell's Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Blue Jay
Horned Lark
Purple Martin
Barn Swallow
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Chipping Sparrow
Lark Sparrow
*Grasshopper Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Indigo Bunting
Dickcissel
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

Steve Kinder & Larry Lade

Larry LadeSt. Joseph, MO

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Subject: Milford Lake Bird Walk this Saturday
From: Chuck Otte <cotte AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 11:11:23 -0500
Even though it looks to be a hot day, we are still planning our monthly Milford 

Lake bird walk starting at 8 a.m. Meet at the parking lot at the south end of 
the dam at Milford. Contact me if you need details.

Chuck

-----
Chuck Otte                      cotte AT ksu.edu
County Extension Agent, Ag & Natural Resources
Geary County Extension Office, PO BOX 28         785-238-4161
Junction City, Kansas 66441-0028             FAX 785-238-7166
http://www.geary.ksu.edu/

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Subject: Humboldt BBS
From: Dave and Marie Plinsky <dmplinsky AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 14:52:03 -0500
Carolyn Schwab and I did the Humboldt.  BBS route goes right through
downtown.  

We had 57 species, about the normal.  The last stop had a Painted Bunting, a
colorful way to end the day.

 

Marie Plinsky

Topeka


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Subject: Least Terns - Neosho WA.. Henslow's in a hay field
From: Andrew Burnett <aburnett AT MAGNUMSYSTEMS.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 16:03:39 +0000
Did a quick check Sunday evening of Neosho WA after a few storms had passed 
through. Was able to find 2 Least Terns. This marks the 11th sighting of that 
species since June 2014 at NWA. 


Other interesting finds were 1 Black Tern & 2 Baird's Sandpipers.

It appears that work is going to begin this summer on the renovations to Neosho 
WA. Information on that is at the link below if anyone is interested. I'm 
optimistic that the improvements will allow for more quality habitats and water 
levels than has been possible in the past. If anyone is planning on dropping in 
and wants to know the current status feel free to drop me a note. I would guess 
significant areas of the property will be closed during this work. 



http://www.parsonssun.com/news/article_f91fef88-2df9-11e6-bfd9-b7d15ae13261.html 



I also recently found 3 Henslow's Sparrows in Neosho Co. My first ever for that 
county. They were actively calling from a native prairie meadow about 80 acres 
in size. The interesting thing about this is it is a hay meadow that had been 
cut last year. The meadow appears to be mainly Little Bluestem and had enough 
time last season post cut to send up seed stalks. This seemingly made it ideal 
habitat for the Henslow's . Would be interesting to know if they fledge prior 
to the native being cut, which typically happens in early July. Adapting to 
breed in a scenario like this would a desirable trait in Neosho Co. Very few 
native fields left and very few of them go unburned in the spring. 


Andrew Burnett
rural Erie, KS

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Subject: Dalton BBS Route
From: Kevin Groeneweg <kgroeneweg AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 15:45:25 +0000
I ran the Dalton BBS Route on Sunday, which runs through Sumner and Cowley 
counties, starting a few miles east of Wellington and ending in Arkansas City. 
I tallied 58 species, which is fairly typical for this route, with no new 
species added. As has been mentioned by others, Northern Bobwhite have had a 
good year. I counted a total of 53, which is the 2nd highest total ever (the 
highest being 57 in 1968). I had Prothonotary Warbler at two stops; one along 
the Arkansas River near the Rainbow Bend bridge, and the other at the last stop 
in Arkansas City along F Street north of Chestnut. This species was first 
detected two years ago on this route. Also for only the second time on the 
route (first being 5 years ago) I had a Chipping Sparrow. For the second year 
in a row I detected no Fish Crows after having them for several years in the 
vicinity of the Arkansas River. Finally, counters are not supposed to coax 
birds in any way, but I managed to flag in a Ruby-throated Hummingbird with the 
blaze-orange vest I was wearing. 

Kevin GroenewegWichita

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Subject: Baker Wetlands Survey
From: Daniel Larson <birdkansa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 06:44:43 -0500
The three shorebirds were the icing on the cake. The Whimbrel, Dunlin, and
Pectoral Sandpiper were seen in the restored area. They were southeast of
the Discovery Center. Seventy species were seen. Roger Boyd, Scott Kimball,
Sam Richards, Dan Larson made the survey at Baker Wetlands, Lawrence Kansas
on Sunday June 12.

Waterbirds
Canada Goose 129
Wood Duck 3
Mallard 3
Blue-winged Teal 6
Least Bittern 1 (heard southwest of the 1998 observation blind)
Great Blue Heron 14
Little Blue Heron 14
Green Heron 2
American Coot 2
Whimbrel 1
Dunlin 1
Pectoral Sandpiper 1

The complete list is below.

Thanks
Dan Larson
Berryton KS

ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=
S30198861

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Subject: Breeding Bird Surveys
From: Chuck & Jaye Otte <otte2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 21:28:56 -0500
I took over the Solomon Breeding Bird Survey route from Tom Shane in 1991 
and the Wreford route from Lloyd Moore in 1999. We have never ran them 
on consecutive mornings until this year. Jaye and I ran the Solomon route 
(far western Dickinson County) Saturday morning and the Wreford route 
(right through the heart of Geary County) this morning.

The Solomon route has close to 1/4 of the route on dirt roads so you need a 
couple weeks of dry weather to make sure it's entirely passable. (In fact the 
route was not run in the flood years of 1993 and 1995.) We also completed 
this route this year before the combines started running for wheat harvest 
although we did see a load of wheat heading into the elevator after the end of 
the route in southern Dickinson county yesterday. The Wreford route is over 
much better roads - roughly half of them paved, the others are well 
maintained and graveled roads. The weather was great for both - although 
the gnats were especially bad on the Solomon route for the first 15 stops - I 
was wishing for more wind!

I haven't finished entering the data yet so numbers are preliminary, but we 
had 60 species on Solomon and 70 on Wreford. Even though the start of 
these two routes is less than 30 miles apart, the two couldn't be more 
different. The Solomon route traverses through primarily farm land with bits 
and pieces of wooded areas close enough by to bring in woodland species 
and just enough grassland to make sure we get things like Grasshopper 
Sparrow and Upland Sandpiper. One nice wooded area provided a Summer 
Tanager (probably new for the count). A Barred Owl on the south side of 
Solomon was a nice find also. The absence of Red-eyed Vireo, Tufted 
Titmouse and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher wasn't surprising but disappointing. 
Again this year we had no Loggerhead Shrike's on either count highlighting 
an ongoing concern for this species. Surprisingly absent was Eastern 
Bluebird on the Solomon Count.

The Wreford route starts southwest of Junction City and ends up a few miles 
northwest of Dwight. It meanders past farmland, Flint Hills prairie and near 
and through some great woodlands. Some species are very hit and miss on 
this route - some years we'll have Greater Prairie-Chicken, Henslow's 
Sparrow and Painted Bunting, but none of those this year. Also shockingly 
absent from the route this year was catbird and House Wren. Plenty of 
Brown Thrasher's and Northern Mockingbirds, but zero catbirds (we had one 
on the Solomon Route Saturday). We had House Wrens yesterday, we had 
House Wrens when we got back to town, but none on the route, but plenty of 
Carolina Wrens! Possibly new to the count this year was Yellow-throated 
Vireo - can't remember having them in past years. Good numbers of 
Summer Tanagers and amazing numbers of Lark Sparrows and Blue 
Grosbeaks. Red-shouldered Hawk was new to the route last year and this 
year we had more RS Hawks than we did Red-tailed Hawks. 

Every once in a while, in the interest of sticking to the requirements of the 
survey, you just have to walk away from a bird leaving questions as to what it 
was you were hearing. That happenned this year at stop #23. The road here 
runs next to some beautiful timber with huge old oak trees and a small 
seasonal stream. This bird was calling from this area and we never did figure 
out what it was. The closest thing we can come up with was a Northern 
Waterthrush which would be improbably late. Cadence of the song, and tonal 
quality weren't right for an Indigo Bunting or a Louisiana Waterthrush. I'm 
hoping to get back out there in the next morning or two to see if it is still 
around. In the meantime, it'll just remain as an unknown!

There are certainly advantages and disadvantages to doing the two routes on 
successive mornings. One of the disadvantages - I'm going to bed early 
tonight!!

Chuck



+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Chuck & Jaye Otte      mailto:otte2 AT cox.net
613 Tamerisk
Junction City Kansas USA 66441
785-238-8800

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Subject: Poorwill Search Ness, Lane, and Gove Counties
From: Henry Armknecht <whatabirder AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 19:20:54 +0000
It is time to look for Common Poorwills. Tuesday night, Wednesday morning 
promise to have winds well under 10 mph and little chance of rain. My targets 
are Ness, Lane, and Gove Counties where they have yet to be documented. I would 
welcome company to ride along. I have some locations in mind to try, but would 
accept input whether you are going along or not. :-) 


I plan to leave from Hays in late afternoon to make sure to be on location in 
Ness County by the time they would start calling. 


Henry A
Hays

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Subject: quail
From: William <suttonwill AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 12:25:45 -0500
I've been seeing a pair of quail come to my two feed stations. I have feeders 
hanging plus two large platform feeders. I've had geese coming to the same 
feeders. I put down wild bird food on the ground. Every bird around also stops 
for a snack. Yesterday I watched a pair after when they left. They crossed the 
neighbors field[we both have five acres} and went into a pasture about 100 
yards south. About the time they entered that field I noticed another pair 
coming into my yard from the east. I watched them until they went into the 
grass around the neighbors pond. Within minutes another pair came up out of the 
grass and came to the feeders. Last year I never saw more that two at a time 
until one day I had eight adults and twelve chicks show up under the feeder. 
Bill Sutton 

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Subject: Baker Wetlands early release
From: Daniel Larson <birdkansa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 12:17:51 -0500
Hi:
Dont have complete tally yet but wanted to get out info on a few birds. We
observed a Whimbrel, a Dunlin and Pectoral Sandpiper. They should be able
to be seen from the diagonal trail from the head quarters Note the water
areas and mud.

We also heard Least Bittern west of the 1998 observation blind found west
of Mink Creek.

Thanks
Dan Larson
Berryton KS

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Subject: Mississippi Kite nesting chronology-- Wichita
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 09:05:42 -0500
I've been keeping an eye on two Mississippi Kite nests in a Wichita
park. Incubation began on 6-11 or 6-10: each nest had an adult in
incubation posture on the morning of 6-11, and also on 6-12.  On 6-12
I saw one adult relieve the other at one of the nests (i.e. a next
exchange).  On the morning of 6-10 no adult was in incubation posture
at either nest, and I saw active nest construction still underway at
one of the nests on 6-09.

One of the nests was used last year and fledged one chick, and the
other is new this year.

I'll post again with notes on when I first saw the birds begin to
build the new nest (and to add to the old nest.)

Steve Seibel

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Subject: Western Birds Today at Lake Scott
From: Tom SHANE <tom.shane AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 03:31:36 +0000
Well........... just a few besides the regular Western Meadowlark and the 
Western Kingbirds, one of which was finishing up a nest. Sara and I are 
repeating a Breeding Bird Census we did back in the 80s and ended up with a 
couple odd Western types. One was a Western Grebe along the channel of the 
upper part of the lake on the north side of the Elm Gove. Also in the Elm Gove 
was a calling/singing Western Wood-Pewee. We were there over 30 minutes and the 
bird never quit calling. He was moving around the entire grove put often came 
back to the center of the grove near the volley court. Unfortunately we did not 
spot a second bird or mate. This is only the second record we have of the 
species in 30 years of studying Scott Park birds. I suspect the bird will still 
be there this weekend if some county listers are in the area. 

Stay cool, it was 96 F and a little muggy by noon at the park.
Tom and Sara Shane
Garden City

P.S. The Elm Grove is just across the creek to the east from the Big Spring and 
the new HQs at the south entrance of the park. 


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Subject: Re: Fw: Tribute to Phoebe Snetsinger (google)
From: Brandon Magette <averbirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 09:24:33 -0500
Accidently came across this first thing this morning!

Brandon Magette of St Marys KS
currently mobile at (785)844-0139
On Jun 9, 2016 9:20 AM, "Sebastian"  wrote:

> FYI.
>
>
> From the Missouri List-serve . . . today's Google doodle. . .
>
>
> sebastianpatti AT hotmail.com
> Sebastian T. Patti
> (Lincoln Park)
> Chicago, ILLINOIS 60614-3354
> PHONE: 312/325-9555 (o) 773/248-0570 (h)
> CELL: 773/304-7488
> FAX: 312/325-9017(o)
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: Missouri Wild Bird Forum  on behalf of
> Edge Wade 
> Sent: Thursday, June 9, 2016 7:07 AM
> To: MOBIRDS-L AT PO.MISSOURI.EDU
> Subject: Tribute to Phoebe Snetsinger (google)
>
> Mobirders,
>
> This would have been Phoebe Snetsinger's 85th birthday.  She is the
> featured person for today's Google Doodle.  Good brief article
>
>
> 
http://www.cnet.com/news/google-doodle-goes-to-the-birds-for-birdwatcher-phoebe-snetsinger/ 

>
> [
> 
https://cnet1.cbsistatic.com/hub/i/r/2016/06/08/1ecf8a6b-94a3-4e6a-a766-ea6b42f83ad8/thumbnail/670x503/078306225e7c429bcd883108133afc29/snetsinger.gif 

> ]<
> 
http://www.cnet.com/news/google-doodle-goes-to-the-birds-for-birdwatcher-phoebe-snetsinger/ 

> >
>
> Google Doodle goes to the birds for bird-watcher Phoebe Snetsinger<
> 
http://www.cnet.com/news/google-doodle-goes-to-the-birds-for-birdwatcher-phoebe-snetsinger/ 

> >
> www.cnet.com
> By the time of her death, Snetsinger had seen 8,398 species of birds.
>
>
>
> and, if you click on remembering her life with a special Doodle<
> https://www.google.com/doodles/phoebe-snetsingers-85th-birthday> within
> the article, you'll see the doodle featuring 5 bird species special to her.
>
> Edge Wade
> Columbia, MO
> edgew AT mchsi.com
>
> ________________________________
> The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
> Archives / Subscription
> options / ASM
> Website / Email the list owners mobirds-l-request AT po.missouri.edu>
>
> ABA Birding Code of Ethics
>
> ASM Fall Meeting: September 23-25, 2016 at Camp Clover Point, Lake of the
> Ozarks State Park, Kaiser, MO Details and Online Registration<
> http://www.mobirds.org/ASM/Meetings.aspx>
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>

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Subject: Fw: Tribute to Phoebe Snetsinger (google)
From: Sebastian <sebastianpatti AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 14:19:27 +0000
FYI.


From the Missouri List-serve . . . today's Google doodle. . .


sebastianpatti AT hotmail.com
Sebastian T. Patti
(Lincoln Park)
Chicago, ILLINOIS 60614-3354
PHONE: 312/325-9555 (o) 773/248-0570 (h)
CELL: 773/304-7488
FAX: 312/325-9017(o)


________________________________
From: Missouri Wild Bird Forum  on behalf of Edge 
Wade  

Sent: Thursday, June 9, 2016 7:07 AM
To: MOBIRDS-L AT PO.MISSOURI.EDU
Subject: Tribute to Phoebe Snetsinger (google)

Mobirders,

This would have been Phoebe Snetsinger's 85th birthday. She is the featured 
person for today's Google Doodle. Good brief article 



http://www.cnet.com/news/google-doodle-goes-to-the-birds-for-birdwatcher-phoebe-snetsinger/ 



[https://cnet1.cbsistatic.com/hub/i/r/2016/06/08/1ecf8a6b-94a3-4e6a-a766-ea6b42f83ad8/thumbnail/670x503/078306225e7c429bcd883108133afc29/snetsinger.gif] 


Google Doodle goes to the birds for bird-watcher Phoebe 
Snetsinger 

www.cnet.com
By the time of her death, Snetsinger had seen 8,398 species of birds.



and, if you click on remembering her life with a special 
Doodle within 
the article, you'll see the doodle featuring 5 bird species special to her. 


Edge Wade
Columbia, MO
edgew AT mchsi.com

________________________________
The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
Archives / Subscription 
options / ASM 
Website / Email the list 
owners 


ABA Birding Code of Ethics

ASM Fall Meeting: September 23-25, 2016 at Camp Clover Point, Lake of the 
Ozarks State Park, Kaiser, MO Details and Online 
Registration 


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