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Updated on Monday, August 29 at 07:48 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Golden-billed Saltator,©Dan Lane

29 Aug Baker Wetlands Survey [Daniel Larson ]
29 Aug FICo weekend bird watching [Tom SHANE ]
28 Aug Quivira & Cheyenne Bottoms [Carol Morgan ]
28 Aug Rufous Hummer in Pawnee / 28 Aug. [Scott Seltman ]
28 Aug Hummingbird [Max Thompson ]
28 Aug Mississippi Kites [Max Thompson ]
26 Aug Least Flycatcher [Fred Bartel ]
26 Aug Bald birds [Joanne Parker ]
26 Aug Re: Mississippi Kite fledgling with injured foot [Steve Seibel ]
26 Aug Migrants in Pawnee Co. [Scott Seltman ]
25 Aug Calliope Hummingbird in Oak Park, Wichita [Paul Griffin ]
26 Aug Some new birds in River Pond State Park [Lowell Johnson ]
25 Aug Geary / Ottawa Co. birding [Danny Akers ]
25 Aug New Yardbird [John Row ]
25 Aug Migration [Doris Burnett ]
25 Aug Re: Possible Swallow-tailed Kite, Milford Lake [Jeff Keating ]
24 Aug Fall KOS Meeting information [Chuck & Jaye Otte ]
24 Aug Re: Mississippi Kite fledgling with injured foot [Steve Seibel ]
23 Aug Buff breasted sandpipers [Jeff Hansen ]
23 Aug Possible Swallow-tailed Kite, Milford Lake [Chuck & Jaye Otte ]
23 Aug Quivira report 23 August 2016 [Barry Jones ]
23 Aug Milford Lake Bird Walk [Chuck & Jaye Otte ]
22 Aug Re: Mississippi Kite fledgling with injured foot [Steve Seibel ]
22 Aug Buff-breasted sandpipers and sodfarms [Jeff Hansen ]
22 Aug eBird Hotspots update [Nick Varvel ]
22 Aug Mississippi Kite fledgling with injured foot [Steve Seibel ]
21 Aug Re: Wichita Kites Fledging 8-12 [Steve Seibel ]
21 Aug Quivira report [Will Chatfield-Taylor ]
21 Aug Re: buff-breasted sandpipers [Kelli Egbert ]
20 Aug Re: Wichita Kites Fledging 8-12 [Steve Seibel ]
20 Aug buff-breasted sandpipers [Jeff Hansen ]
17 Aug Common Ground-Dove [Max Thompson ]
17 Aug Oak Park, Wichita [Paul Griffin ]
17 Aug Quivira report 17 August 2016 [Barry Jones ]
16 Aug Dodge City hummers Aug 15 [Mike Umscheid blog ]
16 Aug Baker Wetlands Survey [Daniel Larson ]
16 Aug pelicans [Laura Kirk ]
16 Aug Re: Wichita Kites Fledging 8-12 [Steve Seibel ]
14 Aug Re: Western influx Hv Co. [Andrew Miller ]
14 Aug Wilson WA 8/14/16 [mike rader ]
13 Aug Common Ground-Dove in Winfield. [Max Thompson ]
13 Aug Re: Western influx Hv Co. [Lawrence Herbert ]
13 Aug Re: Western influx Hv Co. [Schwab Carolyn ]
13 Aug Western influx [Andrew Miller ]
13 Aug Wichita Audubon Monthly Bird Walk [Kevin Groeneweg ]
13 Aug Finney County birds [Tom SHANE ]
12 Aug Chautauqua county birding [Schwab Carolyn ]
13 Aug Wichita Purple Martin roost [Michael Pearce ]
12 Aug Wichita Kites Fledging 8-12 [Steve Seibel ]
12 Aug Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS ["Busby, William H." ]
12 Aug WHITE IBIS - Linn County [Malcolm Gold ]
12 Aug Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS [Kat Farres ]
12 Aug Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS ["Wedge, Philip C." ]
11 Aug Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS [Kenneth Kinman ]
11 Aug Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS [Kat Farres ]
11 Aug Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS ["Wedge, Philip C." ]
11 Aug Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS [Max Thompson ]
11 Aug N. Wheatear ["Antonio, Robert J." ]
11 Aug Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS [Jim Mason ]
11 Aug Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS [R w ]
11 Aug Re: FW: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS [Chris Hobbs ]
11 Aug FW: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS [Jim Mason ]
11 Aug Newly fledged Mississippi Kite in Wichita 8-10-2016 (photos) [Steve Seibel ]
11 Aug Re: Newly fledged Mississippi Kite in Wichita 8-10-2016 (photos) [Steve Seibel ]
11 Aug KSU Cattle Unit, Manhattan KS [Thomas Schermerhorn ]
10 Aug Re: Mississippi Kite nest videos summer 2016 [Steve Seibel ]
10 Aug Re: Mississippi Kite chick(s) hatched 7/10 or 7/11 in Wichita [Steve Seibel ]
10 Aug Chautauqua County [Henry Armknecht ]
10 Aug Re: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing [EUGENE YOUNG ]
10 Aug Re: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing [Pete Janzen ]
10 Aug Re: Mississippi Kite nest videos summer 2016 [Steve Seibel ]
10 Aug Mississippi Kite nest videos summer 2016 [Steve Seibel ]
10 Aug Re: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing [EUGENE YOUNG ]
10 Aug Re: Mississippi Kite chick(s) hatched 7/10 or 7/11 in Wichita [Steve Seibel ]
10 Aug Fwd: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing [Pete Janzen ]
9 Aug Quivira report 9 August 2016 [Barry Jones ]

Subject: Baker Wetlands Survey
From: Daniel Larson <birdkansa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 07:45:51 -0500
Five persons completed the Baker Wetlands Survey, Lawrence, Kansas on
Sunday August 28,2016
Although you wouldn't guess by the species count 65. Things are changing.
Best bird today was the Mourning Warbler. Seen well by all.
Last survey we found 5 Canada Geese This survey it was 382. We had 24
Pied-billed Grebes. We had 2 American Avocet in Shorebird Shallows. We had
a Semipalmated Plover along the diagonal walkway from the headquarters on
the east side.We had a Sora near one of the ponds northeast of the
headquarters.
The Sedge wrens were not nearly so active seeing and/or hearing 20 compared
to over 60 last survey. A Rose-breasted Grosbeak was seen near Mink Creeks
entrance into the river.
Complete list at site below.

Thanks
Dan Larson
Berryton KS

 http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31299807


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Subject: FICo weekend bird watching
From: Tom SHANE <tom.shane AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 01:29:51 +0000
Sara and I birded Sagebrush Estates (Finney Co.) yesterday evening, 27 AUG 
2016, and ran into a nice pocket of bird at the southeast corner just north of 
the Kansas National Forest. 


Say's Phoebe ..................................... 1
Western Kingbird .................................8
Eastern Kingbird ................................. 10
Loggerhead Shrike ............................... 4
Northern Mockingbird ............................ 4
Chipping Sparrow ................................3
Black-headed Grosbeak .......................1 imm M
Orchard Oriole ...................................... 12
Baltimore Oriole .....................................2
Bullock's Oriole .......................................2

This afternoon, 28 AUG 2016, we headed west stopping at Lake McKinney (Kearny 
Co) which is full for the first time in years. It was nice to see the water, 
but only observed a few birds including: 


Mallard ................................................. 1
Blue-winged Teal .................................. 10
Pied-billed Grebe .................................  1
Am Coot ................................................. 8
Lesser Yellowlegs .................................. 1
Spotted Sandpiper .................................. 1

We then headed to the north river road west of Lakin; 

Loggerhead Shrike ................................... 7
Eastern Bluebird ...................................... 4

Stopping at the Amazon diversion dam we observed:

Belted Kingfisher .................................... 1
Peregrine Falcon ...................................... 1

We then headed on west to Kendall (Hamilton Co) and on to the small prairie dog 
town just south of the river and on south through the Sandhills until we turned 
back into Kearny Co: 


Northern Harrier ...................................... 2
Burrowing Owl .......................................... 3
Peregrine Falcon ...................................... 1
Cassin's Sparrow ................................... 1 __ not any easy species 
to find in late Aug 

Lark Bunting ...............................................21

At the Beymer Park ponds south of Lakin:

Yellow-headed Blackbird .......................... 50

South edge of Lakin in a flooded field:

Great-tailed Grackles ............................... 200

In our Garden City yard we had two Broad-tailed Hummers today.

Tom Shane
Garden City

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Subject: Quivira & Cheyenne Bottoms
From: Carol Morgan <crxmorgan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 11:33:20 -0500
Twelve crazy Topeka Auduboners set out Saturday morning at 5:30am, just as a 
thunderstorm began hitting the city. A few miles west of Topeka on I-70, the 
"low tire pressure" sensor lit up on my dashboard. We stopped at the Maple Hill 
truck stop and I added air to all four of my tires while getting rained on. But 
by the time we reached the Alma exit, the rain had stopped. Although we did 
drive through a few foggy areas, it was mostly clear for the rest of the drive 
to Quivira. 


It was very birdy along 170th road at Quivira NWR. There were hundreds of 
white-faced ibis, some looking quite comical with only their heads and bills 
appearing above the level of grass. Other species included dowitchers, 
black-necked stilts, avocets, least sandpipers, semipalmated plovers, lesser 
and greater yellowlegs, and others. John Zempel found a black-bellied plover 
and a sanderling, and Debby McKee spotted buff-breasted sandpipers. Terry 
Mannell identified a willet. Along the wildlife loop we found two immature 
black-crowned night herons. At one of the low water crossings, Dan Larson 
played an audio hoping to lure out a king rail; Sam Mannell and I could hear a 
short, quiet response from a rail, but we were none too sure of the species, so 
we could only list rail sp. Dan Hoobler pointed out ruddy ducks and a snipe. 
Martin, Leslie and Avery Weishaar patiently looked and listened, quietly 
absorbing the observations of the group. We heard a bird song that sounded like 
a painted bunting at the corner of 170th Road and 105th Road where we ate 
lunch, but we never saw it and weren't confident enough to list it. 


We saw a long caravan of 13 vehicles on the Wildlife Loop at Quivira and heard 
some chatter on radio channel 11. We guessed it was the Burroughs Audubon group 
enjoying the same birds we were seeing. 


Then we drove to Cheyenne Bottoms. The pools were all quite full of water 
leaving no shorebird habitat, but the air was full of terns and gulls. 
Interesting species included a couple of immature and one adult yellow-crowned 
night herons, lots of great, snowy and cattle egrets, a couple of little blue 
herons, black terns, Forster's terns, Franklin's gulls, one least tern, and 
double-crested cormorants. A lot of good-natured arguing went on about calling 
one of them a neotropic cormorant (perspective/distance/posture/heat shimmer) 
but we couldn't quite do it. Jimmy D. called a wood duck for us, and Linda 
Zempel spotted swallows and common grackles. 


We had 67 species for the day.  Tired but satisfied we headed home.

Carol Morgan
Topeka Audubon Society

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Subject: Rufous Hummer in Pawnee / 28 Aug.
From: Scott Seltman <sselt AT GBTA.NET>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 10:53:49 -0500
We've really missed out on western hummingbirds this year, but within the
hour we had a Rufous Hummingbird flitting around one of our feeders.  All
feeders are now loaded with fresh syrup.  There is some pretty healthy
salvia out by the garden, so it's not going hungry either way.

 

Steven has a high number of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds coming to his balcony
feeder in Lawrence (NW of Lied Center).  He's been watching hummingbirds
since age zero, is pretty sharp on all the regular western hummers and is
under strict orders to text me when a non-RTHU shows up.

 

Scott Seltman

Larned, Kansas


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Subject: Hummingbird
From: Max Thompson <maxt AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 10:27:31 -0500
A friend told me this morning that his son who lives in west Olathe off I-35
had a blue hummer at his feeders this week. Anyone feeding in that area
should be on the lookout. His description sounded like a Mexican Violet-ear.

Max

 

 

Max C. Thompson

1729 E. 11th Ave.

Winfield, KS 

 


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Subject: Mississippi Kites
From: Max Thompson <maxt AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 10:24:04 -0500
The kites are grouping for their trek south and will probably leave on the
next big cold front (next weekend they say in  70s). In a few blocks, we had
40+ sitting on the power lines. Later we saw others on another street.

Max

 

 

Max C. Thompson

1729 E. 11th Ave.

Winfield, KS 

 


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Subject: Least Flycatcher
From: Fred Bartel <fbartel70 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 20:04:59 -0500
I'm reasonably sure  that I saw a Least Flycatcher at the Bethel College
brush pile late this afternoon.

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Subject: Bald birds
From: Joanne Parker <jogirl1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 12:41:55 -0500
I know there have been some discussions on bald cardinals this summer and I
have had about 3 (two males and a female) in my backyard this year.
However, my husband recently got a picture of a bald bluejay in our
backyard and we haven't seen that before.
I have attached a picture.

Joanne Parker
Shawnee, Johnson County KS

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Subject: Re: Mississippi Kite fledgling with injured foot
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 09:48:08 -0500
On Aug 25 I saw the "GAZ" fledgling in circling, soaring flight,
climbing in an updraft without flapping-- later another fledgling was
doing the same a little lower -- it was neat to see two fledglings out
soaring.

That was actually the first time I've spotted fledgling kites out
soaring this year.  Again though I've been more focussed on watching
two particular fledglings than on scanning all the soaring birds, and
above a certain altitude juvs can be hard to distinguish from
second-year birds.

The "GAZ" bird was recognizable by the right leg hanging down at about
a 30-degree angle most of the time-- not dangling completely limp but
not fully tucked up against the body either.   Also recognizable
because it later returned to one of its usual perch trees.  The other
fledgling could possibly have been the other fledgling I've videoed in
the area-- the "BBC" fledgling-- but that's not certain; there are
undoubtedly several other fledgling kites in the area..

So that's one more data point about what is going on with the leg.
Once it starts catching insects on the wing things might go easier for
it.

Steve Seibel, in Wichita

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Subject: Migrants in Pawnee Co.
From: Scott Seltman <sselt AT GBTA.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 09:22:16 -0500
A few migrants such as Yellow Warblers arrived in our yard yesterday, but
today, 26 August, the variety has jumped up dramatically.  A very
well-marked Olive-sided Flycatcher just landed outside my window only to be
chased off that perch by an empid that looked somewhat like a Dusky, though
not sure.

 

28 Swainson's Hawks were following a tractor in Pratt County on 24 August. 

 

Scott Seltman

Larned, Kansas


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Subject: Calliope Hummingbird in Oak Park, Wichita
From: Paul Griffin <pgriffin1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 23:29:04 -0500
Hi Folks,

Finally last night, I was able to see enough data (pictures/video) to confirm, 
to me, a Calliope hummingbird in Oak Park here in Wichita. Although it was a 
similar color as the Ruby-throated immatures, I suspected this bird was a 
Calliope because it was smaller, (bulky with a light cinnamon wash on it’s 
sides) than the other hummingbirds and at rest, it’s wings were as long as 
its tail, a diagnostic feature of a Calliope hummingbird. This particular bird 
was difficult to ID because I also needed to see closeups of its feather tips 
on both its wing and tail. Fortunately, this little guy kept coming back to the 
same feeder every couple of hours and I was able to get some closeup video. 
From that video I was able to see all I needed to compare it to the pictures in 
the bird books. This bird appears to be a immature male. 


Still many hummingbirds in Oak Park. The recent Northern front that brought 
North winds also brought many new hummingbirds to Oak Park. The last few days 
some seem to be leaving. I still see possible Broad-tailed hummingbirds and of 
course the immature male RT’s that are the most common hummingbird in Oak 
Park right now. 


Happy Birding,

Paul Griffin  



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Subject: Some new birds in River Pond State Park
From: Lowell Johnson <ljohnson AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 03:04:02 +0000
Some neat birds out at the River Pond today; including a Caspian Tern, about a 
dozen American Avocets and a Wilson's Warbler, as well as Franklin's and 
Ring-billed Gulls and most of the other regulars. 



Lowell Johnson

Manhattan

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Subject: Geary / Ottawa Co. birding
From: Danny Akers <birdmandan1231 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 18:55:01 +0000
Hi All,

After the rain cleared out and my truck cleared an unexpected mechanic visit, I 
birded the immediate Junction City area late this morning before moving over to 
Ottawa SFL over the lunch hour. 


Several migrants are around, but diversity was fairly low, Walla Walla Rd. in 
Junction City held a calling Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, a surprising singing 
Philadelphia Vireo and an immature Chestnut-sided Warbler, among other expected 
species. 


I briefly scanned Milford Lake from the north side of the dam. Most interesting 
here was a massive flock of migrating Common Nighthawks (300+) plus a few 
stragglers and small groups. 


Ottawa SFL held a couple small pockets of migrants, mostly Warbling and 
Red-eyed Vireos, although another Philadelphia was present, as was an adult 
male Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. A Pileated Woodpecker also called somewhere 
below the spillway. What an awesome park this is. 


Invading the state for the weekend,
Danny Akers
Spirit Lake, IA

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: New Yardbird
From: John Row <johmarrow AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 18:05:03 +0000
Hi all,


Yesterday Diane yelled out that there was a hawk on the electrical service line 
to our house. It turned out to be a juvenile red-shouldered hawk which was a 
first for the yard. It was perched on the line and looking around the yard for 
a few minutes before flying up the hill and then making a pass over the house 
before moving on. 



John and Diane Row

Manhattan, KS

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Subject: Migration
From: Doris Burnett <dburnett7750 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 10:06:23 -0700
Had the first raft of ducks at the south end of Tuttle Creek this morning.
They were very far out but appeared to be 75-100 teal.

I also  had 2 juvenile Cooper's Hawks below the house this morning.  One
sat for a long time preening and giving super looks of his fresh tail
feathers.

Yesterday I had the first large flock of Franklin's gulls fly over the
house. I have seen a few single sightings off and on all summer but this
was the first flock

Doris Burnett
Pottawatomie County
Manhattan, Ks

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Subject: Re: Possible Swallow-tailed Kite, Milford Lake
From: Jeff Keating <jffkeats AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 08:04:23 -0500
A biologist on Fort Riley reported a possible sighting of swallow-tailed
kite in MA B of Fort Riley, Riley County, on Wednesday, Aug. 24th,
associating with Mississippi kites. This would be less than 5 miles from
Milford Dam. Presumably the same bird, good news that it seems to have not
left the region, bad news that this is a broad search area.

Jeff Keating
Fort Riley

On Tue, Aug 23, 2016 at 8:04 PM, Chuck & Jaye Otte  wrote:

> Had a text from a good birder friend tonight who lives near the dam at
> Milford
> Lake that he and his son had seen a Swallow-tailed Kite fly over their
> house.
> Jaye and I dashed out but there's a lot of good area where it could be and
> with the wind and changing weather we did not relocate it. I'll be out
> there
> more in the next few days seeing if it can be relocated. This week there is
> currently a Swallow-tailed Kite in eastern Iowa and one was also in
> Nebraska
> in July (I believe). If there are any updates on this bird I will advise,
> but keep
> your eyes to the sky - tis the season!!
>
> Chuck
>
> +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
> Chuck & Jaye Otte      mailto:otte2 AT cox.net
> 613 Tamerisk
> Junction City Kansas USA 66441
> 785-238-8800
>
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>

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Subject: Fall KOS Meeting information
From: Chuck & Jaye Otte <otte2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 21:35:56 -0500
Good evening all!

Information regarding the fall meeting of the Kansas Ornithological Society 
can now be found at ksbirds.org. There is a link from the home page or you 
can go directly there at: http://ksbirds.org/kos/Fall2016/2016_KOS_Fall.htm 
Online registration is not you active but we hope to have it loaded by 
tomorrow night.

If you have trouble accessing any of the pages or have questions, please 
don't hesitate to give me a call.

Please note that we need abstracts for presented papers!!!!

Chuck

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Chuck & Jaye Otte      mailto:otte2 AT cox.net
613 Tamerisk
Junction City Kansas USA 66441
785-238-8800

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Subject: Re: Mississippi Kite fledgling with injured foot
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 15:58:14 -0500
Another video of problems caused by limited gripping ability of right
foot-- when the prey item is in the left foot, the bird has trouble
holding on to the perch branch on a windy day-- there seems to be no
issue with flying ability though--

http://vimeo.com/180078761

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Subject: Buff breasted sandpipers
From: Jeff Hansen <hanjd AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 22:52:47 -0500
https://youtu.be/P4YSercViuY

Mediocre video of buffies at Grantville tonight.    Spotted 4 total.

Jeff Hansen

Topeka

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Subject: Possible Swallow-tailed Kite, Milford Lake
From: Chuck & Jaye Otte <otte2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 20:04:30 -0500
Had a text from a good birder friend tonight who lives near the dam at Milford 
Lake that he and his son had seen a Swallow-tailed Kite fly over their house. 
Jaye and I dashed out but there's a lot of good area where it could be and 
with the wind and changing weather we did not relocate it. I'll be out there 
more in the next few days seeing if it can be relocated. This week there is 
currently a Swallow-tailed Kite in eastern Iowa and one was also in Nebraska 
in July (I believe). If there are any updates on this bird I will advise, but 
keep 

your eyes to the sky - tis the season!!

Chuck

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Chuck & Jaye Otte      mailto:otte2 AT cox.net
613 Tamerisk
Junction City Kansas USA 66441
785-238-8800

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Subject: Quivira report 23 August 2016
From: Barry Jones <barjones78 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 15:31:14 -0500
Refuge-wide shorebird survey today saw a huge number of birds - wind and heat 
waves made distance-identification rather difficult. However, we recorded the 
following: 

Black-necked Stilt - 228
American Avocet - 767
Black-bellied Plover - 1
Snowy Plover - 120
Semipalmated Plover - 2
Killdeer - 144
Stilt Sandpiper - 111
Sanderling - 2
Baird's Sandpiper - 12
Least Sandpiper - 3,288
Pectoral Sandpiper - 14
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 10
dowitcher, sp. - 648
Wilson's Snipe - 1 (FOS)
Spotted Sandpiper - 2
Solitary Sandpiper - 2
Greater Yellowlegs - 91
Lesser Yellowlegs - 141
yellowlegs, sp. - 24
Wilson's Phalarope - 25
peep, sp. - 5,725
unidentified shorebirds - 1,000
SPECIES = 18
INDIVIDUALS = 12,358

Also of interest was a Peregrine Falcon cruising the NE 170th flats and the 
Wildlife Drive, and continuing groups of egrets and ibis numbering in the 100s. 


Barry Jones
Quivira NWR

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Subject: Milford Lake Bird Walk
From: Chuck & Jaye Otte <otte2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 06:44:17 -0500
The monthly Milford Lake Bird Walk will be this Saturday, August 27th. Meet 
at the parking lot at the south end of Milford Lake Dam (across the road from 
the Corps of Engineers Office). We'll be looking for southbound migrants 
(Sedge Wren in particular) as well as summer species that are still around, 
although quieter! Walks usually last 2 to 3 hours depending on the birds and 
the weather. If you have any questions, drop me a note!!

Chuck

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Chuck & Jaye Otte      mailto:otte2 AT cox.net
613 Tamerisk
Junction City Kansas USA 66441
785-238-8800

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Subject: Re: Mississippi Kite fledgling with injured foot
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 20:39:48 -0500
I need to re-send my video URL's-- one is incorrect due to a failed upload.

Also I have a third video to add.  In the third video the fledgling
does manage to use its left foot to hold a prey item, but only after
great effort involving much flapping of wings, and then draping wings
over branch.  The right foot continues to be mostly unused.

Yet, strangely, on the third video, around 1:55 to 2:20 you can see
that the right foot is in fact brought into a clenched fist (not
containing any object).  So why is the bird unable to use the right
foot to manipulate prey or hold on to a perch branch?

I also have video from today (not posted yet) where the bird is using
its right foot to reach up and scratch its face.  So it's not an issue
of mobility of the leg. It just seems that the right-foot talons can't
be closed around any target item, though they can be closed  in the
abstract.

What on earth is going on here?

I found video from 8/14 where it appeared that the talons of the right
leg were being closed around a perch branch in normal manner-- though
it's hard to be sure because sometimes an open hand draped over a
perch can appear to be clenching the perch.  I haven't taken the time
to review all my past videos, but my impression is that this apparent
injury condition did not exist when the bird first left the nest.

(Corrected URL:)  http://vimeo.com/179804886 -- adult arrives with
prey, fledgling is slow to turn to face adult, adult feeds fledgling
bite-by-bite, then fledgling ends up with the remaining large portion
of the prey item inits beak-- the fledgling attempts to swallow the
prey item, but the prey item falls to the ground.

(Re-posted from previous:)  http://vimeo.com/179770026 -- adult
arrives with prey, fledgling is slow to turn to face adult, fledgling
ends up with large prey item in beak, finally after some difficulty
manages to swallow the prey item without using either foot to help
manipulate the prey item.

Additional (third video) described above-- poor quality due to camera
being hand-held, not on tripod, plus camera is focussing on background
foliage--  http://vimeo.com/179804929 -- adult arrives with prey--
around 0:18 the young bird manages to  transfer the prey item to its
(good) left foot, with much flapping of wings-- soon the wings are
draped over perch branch for added support, as the right foot appears
to contribute little to the bird's stability on the branch-- yet see
1:55-2:20 for right foot clenched into tight grip -- ?? --

Steve Seibel-- in Wichita

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Subject: Buff-breasted sandpipers and sodfarms
From: Jeff Hansen <hanjd AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 20:01:30 -0500
Went back to the Grantville sodfarms tonight.  Nothing on Hiway 24 but 9 
buffies on 21st street.  I spent a long time looking for them and trying 
to count them.  But they are very good at disappearing in the short 
grass.  One They flew around a number of times.  All of them were on the 
east end of the field just like last time I was there.

I decided to drive to Perry to check out their sod farms....I was 
disappointed in our world of subsidized agriculture...the sod farm is 
now all in soybeans.

Is anyone checking the Lawrence sod farms or have they all been 
converted to corn and/or soybeans?

Jeff Hansen

Topeka

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Subject: eBird Hotspots update
From: Nick Varvel <nvarvel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 17:38:18 -0500
This message is directed at eBird users, and is a little long. I highly 
recommend that anybody who uses eBird in the state of Kansas read this in its 
entirety. With the changes outline below, it is a great time for birders to 
start using eBird as well! 


Over the summer, the eBird moderators have been working on organizing, 
standardizing, and creating new hotspots for the entire state. Kansas now has a 
total of 1950 hotspots, and the full list can be accessed here, by clicking on 
the Kansas link: 


https://confluence.cornell.edu/display/CLOISAPI/eBird-1.1-HotSpotsByRegion

And here are lists of hotspots by county:

http://ebird.org/ebird/subnational1/US-KS/regions?yr=all&m

And a map of all hotspots:

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspots

A hotspot is described by eBird as “public birding locations created by eBird 
users. Using Hotspots, multiple birders can enter data into the same shared 
location, creating aggregated results.” Here is more information on what a 
hotspot is and how to use hotspots: 



http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/1006824-what-is-an-ebird-hotspot-?b_id=1928 


We encourage that all eBird users in Kansas try to use hotspots when submitting 
data in a location with a hotspot. Many people who have been using eBird for 
years before some of these hotspots were created might find that their 
checklists are in personal locations rather than hotspots. To merge an existing 
personal location with a hotspot: 

1.       Go to the “My eBird” tab
2.       Choose “Manage My Locations” on the right side of the page
3. Find the personal location you wish to merge either from the list of by 
using the search bar 

4.       Click “Edit”
5.       Choose the “Merge” button
6. Find the hotspot you wish to merge with (hotspots are marked by a red pin 
with a flame) 

7. Click on the hotspot, check the “Delete after merging” box, and click 
“Merge” 


Also, many individuals have birded locations that should be hotspots; generally 
public or publicly-viewable land with some sort of bird habitat on it. If you 
have a personal location that you believe deserves to be a hotspot: 


1.       Go to the “My eBird” tab
2.       Choose “Manage My Locations” on the right side of the page
3. Find the personal location(s) you wish to merge either from the list of by 
using the search bar 

4. Check the box on the right side of the page that corresponds with the 
location 

5. Select “Suggest as Hotspots” from the drop-down menu at the top of the 
page 

6.       Click “Submit”

When using a hotspot, please only submit observations from that hotspot. If you 
birded backroads extensively please make a separate list(s) for those birds, 
and don’t lump it all into one checklist for the closest hotspot. 


New “stakeout” hotspots were also created for rarities that were seen by 
many people, but not on hotspots, such as roadside or backyard birds. Here is 
the full list: 


•	stakeout Black-bellied Whistling-Duck, Newton (2016)
•	stakeout Black-bellied Whistling-Duck, Overland Park (2013)        
•	stakeout Black-headed Grosbeak, Manhattan (2014)
•	stakeout Black-headed Grosbeak, Manhattan (2015)
•	stakeout Broad-billed Hummingbird, Garden City (2004)
•	stakeout Brown-headed Nuthatch, Mission Hills (1997)
•	stakeout Common Redpoll, Lenexa (2013)
•	stakeout Costa's Hummingbird, Tuttle Creek (2005)
•	stakeout Evening Grosbeak, Newton (2013)
•	stakeout Ferruginous Hawk, Gardner, (2016)
•	stakeout Harris's Hawk, Geuda Springs (2000)
•	stakeout Hooded Oriole, Lawrence (2014)
•	stakeout Hooded Oriole, Manhattan (2016)
•	stakeout Mexican Violetear, Manhattan (2011)
•	stakeout Pine Grosbeak, Leoti (2004)
•	stakeout Sandhill Crane, Olathe (2012-13)
•	stakeout Snowy Owl, Elbing (2011-12)
•	stakeout Snowy Owl, Elbing (2013)
•	stakeout Snowy Owl, New Strawn (2016)
•	stakeout Snowy Owl, Rossville (2014)
•	stakeout Swallow-tailed Kite, Prairie Village (2012)
•	stakeout Whooping Crane, Aulne (2014)
•	stakeout Whooping Crane, Zeandale (2009)

I’d also like to mention several specific hotspot usage issues that have come 
up across the state: 


• A number of small towns in western Kansas are now their own hotspots, due 
to birders (often county listers) frequently birding from parks, roads, and 
alleys in these towns. 


•	A small section of the Clinton Wildlife Area is in Shawnee county.

•	All KDOT rest areas in the state are now hotspots.

• Both Nelson Island and Lake Quivira now have a separate hotspot for the 
Wyandotte county section. 


• Cheney Lake is split into three counties, Reno, Kingman, and Sedgwick. The 
State Park is also split into Reno and Kingman county sections. All of these 
areas have separate hotspots. 


• For Baker Wetlands, the “East Restoration” area describes all wetlands 
east of E 1500 Rd, while the “West Restoration describes all wetlands west of 
what was formerly Louisiana St, and includes the Discovery Center. 


• For Perry Lake, please only use the main Perry Lake hotspot when birding 
south of the K-92 bridge. Wildlife Areas and other parks north of K-92 are all 
separate hotspots. 


• For Quivira NWR, the prairie-dog town on the NE corner of the refuge is in 
Rice county, as opposed to the majority of the refuge in Stafford county. There 
is also a small sliver in Reno county along the SE border. Both have separate 
hotspots. 


• For the Marais des Cygnes area, all land west of US69 is the state wildlife 
area, as well as Unit C which is the large pool on the east side of the highway 
south of the Trading Post exit. All other land east of US69 to the state line 
is National Wildlife Refuge, which are two distinct hotspots. 


• Frontenac WTP and Wilderness Park are two separate hotspots again. If you 
have birded Wilderness Park in the past, please change the location on your 
checklist from the WTP. 


• Glen Elder Wildlife Area includes land in both Mitchell and Osborne 
counties. There are hotspots for both. 


• I am struggling to understand the Riley/Pottawatomie county line divider at 
Rocky Ford in Manhattan, so if anybody familiar with that location could please 
contact me. 


• Jamestown Wildlife Area is split between two counties, Republic and Cloud. 
There are also two satellite marshes in Cloud and Jewell counties. All four are 
separate hotspots. 


• Lake Kahola is bisected by the Morris/Chase county line. Both counties have 
hotspots. 


• Please be aware that hotspots that say “restricted access” may not be 
available to the general public. 


• The area across the river (south) of Schermerhorn Park is a separate area 
and hotspot called “Shoal Creek WA.” 


• The majority of the Flint Hills NWR is in Coffey county, but a small 
section on the west edge is in Lyon and has its own hotspot, as well as the 
Burgess Marsh trail in Lyon county. 


• The majority of Wilson Lake is in Russell county, however the Hell Creek 
arm and a portion of Sylvan Park below the dam are in Lincoln county. 


• The McPherson Valley Wetlands Wildlife Area now has four sublocations which 
are “McPherson Valley Wetlands WA--Chain of Lakes Marshes,” “McPherson 
Valley Wetlands WA--Kubin Marshes,” “McPherson Valley Wetlands WA--Big 
Basin Marshes,” and “McPherson Valley Wetlands WA--Little Sinkhole 
Marshes.” 


• The Mined Lands Wildlife Areas has been split into six hotspots in two 
counties. These are “Mined Lands WA #1,” “Mined Lands WA #2, #3, & #4,” 
Mined Lands WA #5 & #6,” and “Mined Lands WA #7 & #8” in Crawford county, 
and “Mined Lands WA—Scammon Units” and “Mined Lands WA—West Mineral 
Units” in Cherokee county. 


• The northern part of Milford Lake and the wildlife area lies in Clay 
County, and the southern part in Geary county. Both have separate hotspots. 


• Toronto Wildlife Area includes land in both Greenwood and Woodson Counties. 
There are hotspots for both. 


• Tuttle Creek Lake is split down the middle by the Riley/Pottawatomie County 
Line. There are separate hotspots for both sides of the lake, both ends of the 
dam, and various areas amongst the tricky county line in the state park below 
the dam. 


We are very fortunate to have such an active eBird community in Kansas. I would 
greatly appreciate if people would let me know if a hotspot is inaccessible, 
named incorrectly, or somehow inconsistent with how it is portrayed on eBird. 
Also, if anybody has any questions, concerns, or suggestions, please don’t 
hesitate to send me a message. 


Nick Varvel

Hays, KS

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Subject: Mississippi Kite fledgling with injured foot
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 11:02:29 -0500
As I've noted over the last several days under the title "Wichita
Kites Fledging 8-12", one of the two young Mississippi Kites I've been
watching-- the one from the "GAZ" nest-- has a problem with its right
foot.  It doesn't seem to be able to grasp anything with that foot.

This morning I really noticed what a problem this was causing for the
young bird.  Since it usually needs to use its left foot to hold on to
the branch it is perching on, it has trouble managing any prey items
delivered by the adults that is too large to swallow down whole.
Often the adults feed it bite-by-bite, which is surely not the norm
for a bird that left the nest over a week ago.  When an adult arrives
with prey, the young bird is often slow to turn to face the adult, and
also is slow to take the prey item in its beak from the adult-- it may
be trying to encourage the adult to feed it the prey item
bite-by-bite.

Perhaps when the bird spreads its wings through nearby twigs and
branches, as I've often seen, it is able to use its left foot to
manipulate prey.  Today it was using its left foot to hold onto the
perch branch and its wings were usually folded.

I suppose it would be better off if it went back to the nest, or
anywhere else that it could stand without needing to grasp a slender
branch.  Then the left foot could be used to grasp prey items.

I'm uploading a couple of videos-- they may not be finished till later today--

http://vimeo.com/179770003 -- adult arrives with prey, fledgling is
slow to turn to face adult, adult feeds fledgling bite-by-bite, then
fledgling ends up with the remaining large portion of the prey item in
its beak-- the fledgling attempts to swallow the prey item, but the
prey item falls to the ground.

http://vimeo.com/179770026 -- adult arrives with prey, fledgling is
slow to turn to face adult, fledgling ends up with large prey item in
beak, finally after some difficulty manages to swallow the prey item
without using either foot to help manipulate the prey item.

Steve Seibel-- in Wichita

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Subject: Re: Wichita Kites Fledging 8-12
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2016 10:27:22 -0500
A few more notes--

-- It might have been just by chance that I saw the GAZ fledgling deep
in the twigs several times recently-- today it was perching on a limb
more in the open-- it looks to me like it does sometimes put weight on
the right foot, but always with an open grip. I never see the talons
of the right foot clench down on a branch.

-- An interesting interaction-- the BBC fledgling flew over to the
cross-arm of a utility pole and vocalized-- an adult landed on top of
the pole with prey-- the fledgling looked at the adult and continued
to vocalize but instead flying up and trying to also land on the top
of the pole, the fledgling flew several hundred feet to a limb of the
nest tree--  the adult followed shortly after and delivered the prey
to the fledgling there.

-- One prey item recently delivered to the BBC fledgling was a monarch
butterfly.  I recovered a fore wing and a hind wing.

Steve Seibel in Wichita

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Subject: Quivira report
From: Will Chatfield-Taylor <wchatfieldtaylor AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2016 07:55:08 -0500
Had a good day at Quivira yesterday. Lots of shorebirds, though theyre pretty 
distant for the most part. 


Highlights:

1 Ruddy Turnstone
2 Buff-breasted Sandpipers
2 Sanderlings
2 Piping Plovers
1 Marbled Godwit

It took about 4 hours of searching to pick these out, though the buffies were 
on the roadside on 170th. 


Cheyenne was devoid of shorebirds (or really anything else that I could find). 
There may be an area that I didnt check that had things, but it was pretty 
much empty as far as I could tell. 


Good luck,

Will Chatfield-Taylor
Lawrence
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Subject: Re: buff-breasted sandpipers
From: Kelli Egbert <kellidrees AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2016 00:26:53 +0000
Hi Jeff,
Thanks for the report.  We found them this evening.

Get Outlook for Android



On Sat, Aug 20, 2016 at 8:41 AM -0500, "Jeff Hansen" 
> wrote: 


After work, Friday, I decided to visit the Grantville sod farms east of
Topeka.  Nothing at the farm on Hwy 24 south side.  The north side is
now soybeans.  So I headed to the farms a mile south and found 6
buffies.  So nice to see them.  There were also about 80 killdeer and
oodles of dreadful starlings.

Jeff Hansen

Topeka

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Subject: Re: Wichita Kites Fledging 8-12
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2016 18:14:07 -0500
I've now seen both of the young kites flying several times-- they seem
to fly alright.  The bird from the GAZ nest seems to have some issues
though-- it tends to perch deep among small twigs rather than perching
in a more open space on a solid branch.  This appears to make it more
difficult for the adult to deliver prey.  And "perch" isn't even quite
the right word-- often the young bird's wings will be spread open
through the twigs, apparently to help hold it in position-- I saw that
this morning even when the wind was quite gusty.  Or sometimes a wing
will be folded over a twig so that the twig sticks awkwardly out of
the wing-pit.  I noticed today that it rarely or never clenched its
right foot around a branch while I was watching.  The talons are not
clenched shut-- and they do have some degree freedom of motion to open
wider or close somewhat-- but the bird just doesn't seem to ever use
the foot for grasping.  The right foot tends to hang out into space or
sometimes one talon will rest lightly on a branch.  I've seem this
even when an adult delivers prey, when you'd expect the young bird to
exert a strong effort to move toward the adult's beak / prey item.   I
looked at photos from yesterday and saw the same thing.  Photos from
further back may shed light on when this first started happening.  I
hope it's only a temporary injury of some sort.

Steve Seibel

On Fri, Aug 12, 2016 at 8:01 PM, Steve Seibel  wrote:
> I've been keeping an eye on two nests in a city park-- as of this
> evening the young bird at the "BBC" nest has moved out onto a branch
> about 6-8 feet from the nest-- the young bird at the "GAZ" nest is
> still on the nest...
>
> Steve Seibel

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Subject: buff-breasted sandpipers
From: Jeff Hansen <hanjd AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2016 08:40:55 -0500
After work, Friday, I decided to visit the Grantville sod farms east of 
Topeka.  Nothing at the farm on Hwy 24 south side.  The north side is 
now soybeans.  So I headed to the farms a mile south and found 6 
buffies.  So nice to see them.  There were also about 80 killdeer and 
oodles of dreadful starlings.

Jeff Hansen

Topeka

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Subject: Common Ground-Dove
From: Max Thompson <maxt AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Aug 2016 12:44:30 -0500
The ground dove that I thought was one and done was back in the same area at
noon drinking from the sump pump water near the Lutheran Church in Winfield,
Cowley County.

 

Max C. Thompson

1729 E. 11th Ave.

Winfield, KS 

 


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Subject: Oak Park, Wichita
From: Paul Griffin <pgriffin1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Aug 2016 10:59:08 -0500
Hi Folks,

Yesterday, at Oak Park I saw a large drop off of hummingbird activity at my 
feeders. It is possible the hummer migration has peaked. I estimate there were 
about 15 to 20 a few days ago. This year is similar to last year in that it is 
a wet year. My theory is, on the wet years there is more hummingbird food 
growing about, so hummingbirds don’t have to seek out places like Oak Park to 
find it. I have noted on dry years there are a lot more hummingbirds in Oak 
Park. This year has been good in one respect, I have seen more special species 
than I did last year. I had a early Black-chinned female. Then in the last few 
days I have seen, on video, a immature male Broad-tailed and at least 2 
immature female Broad-tailed hummingbirds. All of these birds I had to look 
closely at the video I took, to make a ID, it wasn’t obvious when I videoed 
them what they were. I also had a probable addition Black-chinned hummingbird 
yesterday. I also had a suspect Calliope darting around the feeder area for a 
couple of days, but I was unable to get video, very frustrating, and it seems 
to be gone, as I haven’t seen it for a couple of days. I have already started 
to cut back my feeders, for lack of use, but I generally keep them up for at 
least another month slowly removing them, ending with just 1 at the end. 


It’s almost Warbler time in Oak Park. So far I haven’t seen any. Yesterday, 
as I was leaving OP, about 6 pm. 3 Barred owls were talking to each other in 
the SE corner near the meadow. 


Happy birding,

Paul Griffin    
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Subject: Quivira report 17 August 2016
From: Barry Jones <barjones78 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Aug 2016 09:20:42 -0500
Yesterday (16 August) we did a fairly thorough check of the Refuge. The area of 
NE 170th and the Wildlife Drive on Quivira's north end continues to have a 
large amount of activity, including hundreds of egrets, herons, and ibis - 
fairly spectacular, yet numbers may not immediately be evident because many 
birds are down in the interior of the Wildlife Drive. There is a pair of Bald 
Eagles in the area, and their over-flights often get things moving around. Even 
Little Salt Marsh is showing a lot of heron/egret use. Also, duck and goose 
numbers have increased greatly in the past week, with nearly 3,000 birds total 
refuge-wide. Water levels have receded somewhat along NE 170th, but many 
shorebirds and terns were still using the road for roosting. Notable species 
included a Least Bittern in Little Salt Marsh, and a Greater Roadrunner along 
NE 190th street near the north boundary. 


Barry Jones
Quivira NWR

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Subject: Dodge City hummers Aug 15
From: Mike Umscheid blog <blog AT UNDERTHEMESO.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 21:37:16 -0500
The salvias in my wildlife garden are finally in a mature enough state to 
consistently attract hummers. Last evening, on the 15th, I had a likely female 
Broad-tailed Hummingbird. I got good photographs to show field marks. Pics at 
http://www.underthemeso.com/photoblog.php?p=1053 


If I'm wrong on the ID, please let me know! These Selasphorus hummingbirds are 
tough! Then this morning, I had two different hummers taking their turns at the 
salvias, one the supposed Broad-tailed I photographed last night and an 
immature male Selasphorus I couldn't positively ID since I had to go to work. 
This evening, since I had more time to carefully study, the male Selasphorus 
was more cooperative and was able to confirm quite a bit more rufous than the 
other bird with a partial gorget, so I feel pretty good about immature male 
Rufous. These would both be yard birds for me. It's nice to finally have the 
migrant hummers stopping for my backyard offerings! 


Mike Umscheid
5 N Dodge City

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Subject: Baker Wetlands Survey
From: Daniel Larson <birdkansa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 15:39:33 -0500
On Sunday August 14, Roger Boyd, Scott Kimball, Kylee Sharp and Dan Larson
surveyed Baker Wetlands. We found 66 species. The best was the continuing
Sedge Wrens. We did see several Yellow Warblers. We saw and heard a
vocalizing Willow Flycatcher.

Waterbirds
Canada Goose 5
Wood Duck 11
Blue-winged Teal 11
Northern Shoveler 1
Redhead 1
Great Blue Heron 17
Great Egret 18
Little Blue Heron 6
Green Heron 4
Killdeer 21
Upland Sandpiper 2
Least Sandpiper 31
Pectoral Sandpiper 3
Semipalmated Sandpiper 3
Wilson's Snipe 1
Spotted Sanndpiper 1
Solitary Sandpiper 6
Belted Kingfisher 1

The complete checklist is below.

Thanks
Dan Larson

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31094266

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Subject: pelicans
From: Laura Kirk <lauraellenkirk AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 12:13:43 -0500
There were pelicans in the hundreds on the west side of Clinton Lake near
Stull. Around sunset last night they were dropping down joining the rest
already in for the night.

Laura Kirk
Lawrence, KS

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Subject: Re: Wichita Kites Fledging 8-12
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 10:07:12 -0700
Hi all--
I've continued to check on these nests several times a day-- both
birds have now fledged.

The evening of 8/14 was the first time I spotted the young bird from
the BBC nest in a tree other than the nest tree.

Around noon on 8/14 was the first time I saw the young bird from the
GAZ nest out of the nest-- about 6 to 8 feet away from the nest on the
same branch as the nest is built on.  Around noon on 8/15 was the
first time I spotted this bird in a tree other than the nest tree.

The young birds don't do much flying at this stage-- I've yet to
actually witness one in flight except for short fluttering hops from
branch to nearby branch.

Some photos I took sometime around 8/13 or so show that the primary
feathers of at least one of the birds are not all fully grown yet.  I
suppose it's probably advantageous for those outermost primaries not
to have reached their full, long length, for a bird that is mostly
going to be fluttering from branch to branch within a given tree for
the next few days.  Sometime when I get a chance I'll try to post
those photos, with exact dates.

The young kite I photographed on 8-10 looked significantly more
advanced in plumage on that date than these two young birds do at
present,

Steve Seibel in Wichita

On Fri, Aug 12, 2016 at 6:01 PM, Steve Seibel  wrote:
> I've been keeping an eye on two nests in a city park-- as of this
> evening the young bird at the "BBC" nest has moved out onto a branch
> about 6-8 feet from the nest-- the young bird at the "GAZ" nest is
> still on the nest...
>
> Steve Seibel

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Subject: Re: Western influx Hv Co.
From: Andrew Miller <andrewdavidmiller00 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2016 17:07:46 -0500
The Western Wood-Pewee and the Lesser Goldfinch were still there as of
earlier this afternoon.  Here is a link to pictures
https://www.flickr.com/photos/134833219 AT N04/.

Andrew
Partridge ks

On Sat, Aug 13, 2016 at 2:45 PM, Lawrence Herbert 
wrote:

> Good for you, Carolyn,
> Rufous have the potential for being  remarkable
> long distance hummingbirds as far as I know.
> Some, all the way from Alaska and  western Canada, and then
> winter on the Gulf Coast !  Per lit.
> Larry, in Joplin.
> Lawrence Herbert  certhia13 AT gmail.com              8-13-16.
>
> On Sat, Aug 13, 2016 at 2:24 PM, Schwab Carolyn 
> wrote:
>
> > Yes, western visitor.  Another Rufous hummer!  I just saw a hummer fly up
> > over the roof with a rust back.  I hadn't seen it at the feeders, but I
> > hope I get to see more than the back!
> > Carolyn Schwab
> > Newton, KS
> >
> > For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> > https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
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> > To contact a listowner, send a message to
> > mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
> >
>
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>

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Subject: Wilson WA 8/14/16
From: mike rader <mike_rader AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2016 19:04:35 +0000
Hi all,


I spent some time at Wilson Wildlife Area in Russell Co. this morning and had 
the following checklist: 



http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31091640

Best birds were probably the abundance of Bell's Vireos and an immature 
Broad-winged Hawk. Really a pleasant morning to be out. 


Mike Rader
Wilson, Ks

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Subject: Common Ground-Dove in Winfield.
From: Max Thompson <maxt AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2016 19:12:12 -0500
We were driving to the greenhouse this evening when out of the corner of my
eye I saw a small dove drinking out of some water coming from a sump pump
onto the street. I said turn around that was a small dove. So we went back 
block and it was still there. I did not get a good look at it but Bryon said
it had rusty wings, spots on the wing and white edges to the tail feathers.
I gave him Sibleys guide to look at he said definitely a Common Ground-Dove
and not an Inca. No long tail nor a scaly back. Second record for Cowley
County.

 

Max C. Thompson

1729 E. 11th Ave.

Winfield, KS 

 


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Subject: Re: Western influx Hv Co.
From: Lawrence Herbert <certhia13 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2016 14:45:00 -0500
Good for you, Carolyn,
Rufous have the potential for being  remarkable
long distance hummingbirds as far as I know.
Some, all the way from Alaska and  western Canada, and then
winter on the Gulf Coast !  Per lit.
Larry, in Joplin.
Lawrence Herbert  certhia13 AT gmail.com              8-13-16.

On Sat, Aug 13, 2016 at 2:24 PM, Schwab Carolyn 
wrote:

> Yes, western visitor.  Another Rufous hummer!  I just saw a hummer fly up
> over the roof with a rust back.  I hadn't seen it at the feeders, but I
> hope I get to see more than the back!
> Carolyn Schwab
> Newton, KS
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
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> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>

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Subject: Re: Western influx Hv Co.
From: Schwab Carolyn <caschwab3591 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2016 14:24:38 -0500
Yes, western visitor.  Another Rufous hummer!  I just saw a hummer fly 
up over the roof with a rust back.  I hadn't seen it at the feeders, but 
I hope I get to see more than the back!
Carolyn Schwab
Newton, KS

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Subject: Western influx
From: Andrew Miller <andrewdavidmiller00 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2016 13:03:17 -0500
Hi,

We currently have a singing Western Wood Pewee and a black backed Lesser
Goldfinch on private property near Arlington.   Not bad!

Andrew Miller
Partridge ks

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Subject: Wichita Audubon Monthly Bird Walk
From: Kevin Groeneweg <kgroeneweg AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2016 11:20:01 -0500
13 birders hit the trails at Chisholm Creek Park in Wichita for the Wichita 
Audubon Second Saturday monthly bird walk. Not many migrants just yet, but the 
Mississippi Kites put on a pretty good show. Checklist at the link below. 


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31076945

Kevin Groeneweg
Wichita
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Subject: Finney County birds
From: Tom SHANE <tom.shane AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2016 03:41:43 +0000
Sara and I took a little bird drive north of Garden City this evening, 12 AUG 
16, and ended up with some nice birds. 


One each:
Lesser Prairie-Chicken
Calliope Hummingbird
White-faced Ibis
Sora
Burrowing Owl
Curve-billed Thrasher
Blue Grosbeak

On Wed, 10 AUG, we ended up with three hummers in our Yard including:
Rufous
Calliope
Broad-tailed
That gives us all five of the common hummers for 2016. Having them all by 10 
AUG may be the earliest that has ever happened. Getting digital pictures is 
certainly a big help with hummer identification. 


Tom Shane
Garden City

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Subject: Chautauqua county birding
From: Schwab Carolyn <caschwab3591 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2016 22:21:21 -0500
Atcha Nolan guided me in Chautauqua county today.  We had a great 
birding day with a total of 63 species.  The biggest highlight of our 
day was hearing at least 3 and possibly 4 Henslow's Sparrow on Rd 19 at 
the first jog south of Quivira Rd.  We were able to share the joy with 
Henry Armknecht!  We were unable to get them to rise for observation, 
but they sang on and on undisturbed by our chatting next to them.

We also found an Olive-sided Flycatcher, but I was pretty lost where we 
were by that point.

On the food report - Granny Wolfe's Green Door Restaurant must have the 
world's largest pork tender sandwich on earth!  It could have filled 4 
buns instead of the single bun we received.  What a shock! go prepared 
to share, but they brought out "to go boxes" before our sandwiches arrived.

Chuck - the Henslow's Sparrow seems to be a new species for the 
Chautauqua county list!
Carolyn Schwab
Newton, KS

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Subject: Wichita Purple Martin roost
From: Michael Pearce <md_pearce AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2016 02:47:25 +0000
Three friends and I  hit the purple martin roost in Old Town Wednesday evening.


Great show.


We watched from the top of the free parking garage west of the trees, and had 
big numbers of birds pass within a few feet of us as they headed to the trees 
below us. 



My estimate would be 30,000. My accurate figure would be "...a really, really, 
really lot!" 



Did see what I think was a Coop take one purple martin. There was also some 
smaller bird of prey zipping in and out, too. 



Neat evening after a good meal in Old Town.


Michael Pearce

Newton, America

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Subject: Wichita Kites Fledging 8-12
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2016 20:01:06 -0500
I've been keeping an eye on two nests in a city park-- as of this
evening the young bird at the "BBC" nest has moved out onto a branch
about 6-8 feet from the nest-- the young bird at the "GAZ" nest is
still on the nest...

Steve Seibel

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Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
From: "Busby, William H." <wbusby AT KU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2016 16:41:58 +0000
I emailed Geeta about her Northern Wheatear report, suggested a juvenile E 
bluebird as an alternative (thanks, Chris), and she said it may well have been 
one. She did not offer details on the bird. So I think we can drop this 
topic... 


Bill Busby
Lawrence

-----Original Message-----
From: Wedge, Philip C. [mailto:pwedge AT KU.EDU] 
Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 10:42 PM
Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS

It would also help to know where the lawn is. Can't say I've ever seen a shrike 
in a Lawrence neighborhood myself. 


Phil Wedge
Lawrence
________________________________________
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas  on behalf of 
Kenneth Kinman  

Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 10:00 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS

Hi Kat, I have to agree. If someone didn't get a good look at its bill, it 
would probably be easy to confuse a small shrike with a wheatear, especially if 
you hadn't seen a shrike before. Other than the bill, I guess the tail length 
would probably also be a good way to tell them apart. -------------Ken Kinman, 
Hays, KS 


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

> Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 18:09:33 -0500
> From: ozbelgnz AT COX.NET
> Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>
> I had to google to see what it looked like and have misplaced the 
> original post, my first thought was looks a bit shrike-like...
> Kat Farres
> OZ BelgianZ
> Salina KS USA
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Max Thompson" 
> To: 
> Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 12:19 PM
> Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
>
>
> Stranger birds have appeared but typically, the wheatear is an open 
> field bird not in town.
> Max
>


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Subject: WHITE IBIS - Linn County
From: Malcolm Gold <malcolmgold AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2016 10:57:31 -0500
Just getting the word out, Kathy Carroll is in the field looking at a
juvenile WHITE IBIS at Unit G at Marais des Cygnes in Linn County!

Malcolm Gold (Johnson County, KS)

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Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
From: Kat Farres <ozbelgnz AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2016 06:19:49 -0500
or when it flies and has the white spots on it's wings....
Kat Farres
OZ BelgianZ
Salina KS USA
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Kenneth Kinman 
  To: Kat Farres ; KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
  Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 10:00 PM
  Subject: RE: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS


  Hi Kat,
 I have to agree. If someone didn't get a good look at its bill, it would 
probably be easy to confuse a small shrike with a wheatear, especially if you 
hadn't seen a shrike before. Other than the bill, I guess the tail length would 
probably also be a good way to tell them apart. 

                                   -------------Ken Kinman, Hays, KS
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 


  > Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 18:09:33 -0500
  > From: ozbelgnz AT COX.NET
  > Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
  > To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
  > 
  > I had to google to see what it looked like and have misplaced the original 
  > post, my first thought was looks a bit shrike-like...
  > Kat Farres
  > OZ BelgianZ
  > Salina KS USA
  > ----- Original Message ----- 
  > From: "Max Thompson" 
  > To: 
  > Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 12:19 PM
  > Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
  > 
  > 
  > Stranger birds have appeared but typically, the wheatear is an open field 
  > bird not in town.
  > Max
  > 


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Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
From: "Wedge, Philip C." <pwedge AT KU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2016 03:42:21 +0000
It would also help to know where the lawn is. Can't say I've ever seen a shrike 
in a Lawrence neighborhood myself. 


Phil Wedge
Lawrence
________________________________________
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas  on behalf of 
Kenneth Kinman  

Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 10:00 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS

Hi Kat, I have to agree. If someone didn't get a good look at its bill, it 
would probably be easy to confuse a small shrike with a wheatear, especially if 
you hadn't seen a shrike before. Other than the bill, I guess the tail length 
would probably also be a good way to tell them apart. -------------Ken Kinman, 
Hays, KS 


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

> Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 18:09:33 -0500
> From: ozbelgnz AT COX.NET
> Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>
> I had to google to see what it looked like and have misplaced the original
> post, my first thought was looks a bit shrike-like...
> Kat Farres
> OZ BelgianZ
> Salina KS USA
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Max Thompson" 
> To: 
> Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 12:19 PM
> Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
>
>
> Stranger birds have appeared but typically, the wheatear is an open field
> bird not in town.
> Max
>


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Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
From: Kenneth Kinman <kinman AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 22:00:43 -0500
Hi Kat, I have to agree. If someone didn't get a good look at its bill, it 
would probably be easy to confuse a small shrike with a wheatear, especially if 
you hadn't seen a shrike before. Other than the bill, I guess the tail length 
would probably also be a good way to tell them apart. -------------Ken Kinman, 
Hays, KS 


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

> Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 18:09:33 -0500
> From: ozbelgnz AT COX.NET
> Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> I had to google to see what it looked like and have misplaced the original 
> post, my first thought was looks a bit shrike-like...
> Kat Farres
> OZ BelgianZ
> Salina KS USA
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Max Thompson" 
> To: 
> Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 12:19 PM
> Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
> 
> 
> Stranger birds have appeared but typically, the wheatear is an open field 
> bird not in town.
> Max
> 

 		 	   		  
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Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
From: Kat Farres <ozbelgnz AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 18:09:33 -0500
I had to google to see what it looked like and have misplaced the original 
post, my first thought was looks a bit shrike-like...
Kat Farres
OZ BelgianZ
Salina KS USA
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Max Thompson" 
To: 
Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 12:19 PM
Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS


Stranger birds have appeared but typically, the wheatear is an open field 
bird not in town.
Max


-----Original Message-----
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas [mailto:KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of Jim Mason
Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 10:36 AM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: FW: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS

What do you think folks?



From: Geeta Tiwari [mailto:geeta3210tiwari AT gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 7:23 PM
To: Jim AT gpnc.org
Subject: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS



Hi Jim,



I think my son and I spotted a Northern Wheatear in our lawn in Lawrence 
just now.  The books say it is way out of range, but it looked very much 
like it.  I have never seen it before here.



Thanks for your website

best

Geeta




-- 

Geetanjali Tiwari, PhD
Coordinator, South Asian Studies Program Center for Global and International 
Studies
211 Bailey Hall
University of Kansas
Lawrence, KS 66045
  CGIS page: http://global.ku.edu/ India Study Abroad 
page: http://india.ku.edu/index.shtml 
 Hindi page: 
https://global.ku.edu/language

South Asia events:   
http://global.ku.edu/interest-south-asian-studies


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Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
From: "Wedge, Philip C." <pwedge AT KU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 17:24:43 +0000
How about a photo and an address? :)

________________________________________
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas  on behalf of 
Max Thompson  

Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 12:19 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS

Stranger birds have appeared but typically, the wheatear is an open field bird 
not in town. 

Max


-----Original Message-----
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas [mailto:KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of Jim Mason 

Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 10:36 AM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: FW: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS

What do you think folks?



From: Geeta Tiwari [mailto:geeta3210tiwari AT gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 7:23 PM
To: Jim AT gpnc.org
Subject: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS



Hi Jim,



I think my son and I spotted a Northern Wheatear in our lawn in Lawrence just 
now. The books say it is way out of range, but it looked very much like it. I 
have never seen it before here. 




Thanks for your website

best

Geeta




--

Geetanjali Tiwari, PhD
Coordinator, South Asian Studies Program Center for Global and International 
Studies 

211 Bailey Hall
University of Kansas
Lawrence, KS 66045
  CGIS page: http://global.ku.edu/ India Study Abroad 
page: http://india.ku.edu/index.shtml 
 Hindi page: 
https://global.ku.edu/language 


South Asia events:  
http://global.ku.edu/interest-south-asian-studies 



For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to 
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Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
From: Max Thompson <maxt AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 12:19:05 -0500
Stranger birds have appeared but typically, the wheatear is an open field bird 
not in town. 

Max


-----Original Message-----
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas [mailto:KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of Jim Mason 

Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 10:36 AM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: FW: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS

What do you think folks?

 

From: Geeta Tiwari [mailto:geeta3210tiwari AT gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 7:23 PM
To: Jim AT gpnc.org
Subject: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS

 

Hi Jim, 

 

I think my son and I spotted a Northern Wheatear in our lawn in Lawrence just 
now. The books say it is way out of range, but it looked very much like it. I 
have never seen it before here. 


 

Thanks for your website

best

Geeta


 

-- 

Geetanjali Tiwari, PhD
Coordinator, South Asian Studies Program Center for Global and International 
Studies 

211 Bailey Hall
University of Kansas
Lawrence, KS 66045
  CGIS page: http://global.ku.edu/ India Study Abroad 
page: http://india.ku.edu/index.shtml 
 Hindi page: 
https://global.ku.edu/language 


South Asia events:  
http://global.ku.edu/interest-south-asian-studies 



For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to 
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Subject: N. Wheatear
From: "Antonio, Robert J." <anto AT KU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 16:13:21 +0000
Observed one near Beeville TX about 6 years ago - hung there I think for more 
than a week in scrubby short grass field behind a rural house. Was observed by 
many & photos online - google northern wheatear Beeville TX. Missed the bird in 
Alaska. 


This species can end up in odd places for they have enormous migration paths 
(e.g., ones in northeastern Canada go to Africa). 


Was the bird described in or out of breeding plumage or out - that might help 
figure out what birds it might have been confused with? 


Bob Antonio
Lawrence

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Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
From: Jim Mason <jim AT GPNC.ORG>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 10:52:34 -0500
The email was from yesterday. I've asked if the bird is still around and for
location. I agree it is extremely unlikely.

-----Original Message-----
From: Will Chatfield-Taylor [mailto:wchatfieldtaylor AT gmail.com] 
Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 10:38 AM
To: Jim Mason 
Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS

If you get her address, I can swing by and check it out. It's pretty
(extremely) unlikely.

Will
On Aug 11, 2016, at 10:36 AM, Jim Mason  wrote:

> What do you think folks?
> 
> 
> 
> From: Geeta Tiwari [mailto:geeta3210tiwari AT gmail.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 7:23 PM
> To: Jim AT gpnc.org
> Subject: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
> 
> 
> 
> Hi Jim,
> 
> 
> 
> I think my son and I spotted a Northern Wheatear in our lawn in Lawrence
just now.  The books say it is way out of range, but it looked very much
like it.  I have never seen it before here.  
> 
> 
> 
> Thanks for your website
> 
> best
> 
> Geeta
> 
> 
> 
> 
> --
> 
> Geetanjali Tiwari, PhD
> Coordinator, South Asian Studies Program Center for Global and 
> International Studies
> 211 Bailey Hall
> University of Kansas
> Lawrence, KS 66045
>  CGIS page: http://global.ku.edu/ India Study 
> Abroad page: http://india.ku.edu/index.shtml 
>  Hindi page: 
> https://global.ku.edu/language
> 
> South Asia events:  
>  
> http://global.ku.edu/interest-south-asian-studies
> 
> 
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to 
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to 
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu

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Subject: Re: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
From: R w <eaglerodney AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 10:48:32 -0500
I was thinking Bluebird as well or possibly a juvenile Horned Lark. 
I just checked and there is only one record of a Northern Wheatear in Ks. 
Highly unlikely but you never know. 

Rodney Wright 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 11, 2016, at 10:44 AM, Chris Hobbs  wrote:
> 
> A 'lawn' couldn't be further from expected habitat.  How about a bluebird?
> 
> Chris Hobbs
> Lenexa
> chobbs.f1 AT gmail.com
> 
>> On Aug 11, 2016 10:36 AM, "Jim Mason"  wrote:
>> 
>> What do you think folks?
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> From: Geeta Tiwari [mailto:geeta3210tiwari AT gmail.com]
>> Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 7:23 PM
>> To: Jim AT gpnc.org
>> Subject: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Hi Jim,
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> I think my son and I spotted a Northern Wheatear in our lawn in Lawrence
>> just now.  The books say it is way out of range, but it looked very much
>> like it.  I have never seen it before here.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Thanks for your website
>> 
>> best
>> 
>> Geeta
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> --
>> 
>> Geetanjali Tiwari, PhD
>> Coordinator, South Asian Studies Program
>> Center for Global and International Studies
>> 211 Bailey Hall
>> University of Kansas
>> Lawrence, KS 66045
>>  CGIS page: http://global.ku.edu/
>> India Study Abroad page: http://india.ku.edu/index.shtml
>>  Hindi page:
>> https://global.ku.edu/language
>> 
>> South Asia events:  
>> http://global.ku.edu/interest-south-asian-studies
>> 
>> 
>> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
>> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
>> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
>> To contact a listowner, send a message to
>> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
> 
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
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> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu

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Subject: Re: FW: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
From: Chris Hobbs <chobbs.f1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 10:44:45 -0500
A 'lawn' couldn't be further from expected habitat.  How about a bluebird?

Chris Hobbs
Lenexa
chobbs.f1 AT gmail.com

On Aug 11, 2016 10:36 AM, "Jim Mason"  wrote:

> What do you think folks?
>
>
>
> From: Geeta Tiwari [mailto:geeta3210tiwari AT gmail.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 7:23 PM
> To: Jim AT gpnc.org
> Subject: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
>
>
>
> Hi Jim,
>
>
>
> I think my son and I spotted a Northern Wheatear in our lawn in Lawrence
> just now.  The books say it is way out of range, but it looked very much
> like it.  I have never seen it before here.
>
>
>
> Thanks for your website
>
> best
>
> Geeta
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Geetanjali Tiwari, PhD
> Coordinator, South Asian Studies Program
> Center for Global and International Studies
> 211 Bailey Hall
> University of Kansas
> Lawrence, KS 66045
>   CGIS page: http://global.ku.edu/
> India Study Abroad page: http://india.ku.edu/index.shtml
>   Hindi page:
> https://global.ku.edu/language
>
> South Asia events:  
> http://global.ku.edu/interest-south-asian-studies
>
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>

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Subject: FW: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS
From: Jim Mason <jim AT GPNC.ORG>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 10:36:18 -0500
What do you think folks?

 

From: Geeta Tiwari [mailto:geeta3210tiwari AT gmail.com] 
Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 7:23 PM
To: Jim AT gpnc.org
Subject: northern wheatear in Lawrence, KS

 

Hi Jim, 

 

I think my son and I spotted a Northern Wheatear in our lawn in Lawrence just 
now. The books say it is way out of range, but it looked very much like it. I 
have never seen it before here. 


 

Thanks for your website

best

Geeta


 

-- 

Geetanjali Tiwari, PhD
Coordinator, South Asian Studies Program
Center for Global and International Studies
211 Bailey Hall
University of Kansas
Lawrence, KS 66045
  CGIS page: http://global.ku.edu/
India Study Abroad page: http://india.ku.edu/index.shtml
  Hindi page: 
https://global.ku.edu/language 


South Asia events:  
http://global.ku.edu/interest-south-asian-studies 



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Subject: Newly fledged Mississippi Kite in Wichita 8-10-2016 (photos)
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 07:20:08 -0700
Yesterday 8-10 was my first sighting of one of this year's "crop" of
Mississippi Kites away from a nest. See link below for photos.
Granted I've been spending more time watching two particular nests,
than glassing the myriad of kites than one may see perched in various
locations throughout the city.

The young bird was calling and calling and then an adult came and
landed nearby with insect prey.  The young bird's brief flight over to
the adult was less than graceful-- and then after feeding, it spent a
long time with wings spread before taking off a second time.  It was
obviously a very new flier.

These photos were taken not far from the Wichita city park where I've
been keeping an eye on two Kite nests (see previous posting with
videos)  -- in each of these nests the chick was still present as of
this morning 8-11, and late in the twilight last evening I noted that
in each nest the adult female had joined the chick, presumably
settling in for the night.  This is a behavior that I've consistently
noted, long after the adults stopped spending much time at the nest
during daylight hours. So the young birds in these two nests have not
yet fledged.

Steve Seibel

http://www.flickr.com/photos/37889666 AT N03/albums/72157672210490706

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Subject: Re: Newly fledged Mississippi Kite in Wichita 8-10-2016 (photos)
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 07:23:36 -0700
PS that was a downwind arrival-- a more experienced flier probably
would have been facing the other direction when landing!

Steve

On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 7:20 AM, Steve Seibel  wrote:
> Yesterday 8-10 was my first sighting of one of this year's "crop" of
> Mississippi Kites away from a nest

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Subject: KSU Cattle Unit, Manhattan KS
From: Thomas Schermerhorn <tscherme AT VET.K-STATE.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 01:32:35 +0000
Hello all,

I stopped by the KSU cattle unit about 7 PM this evening and found a decent 
variety of shorebirds. Most were feeding in a narrow strip of mud perpendicular 
to the road that runs past the pond just south of the barns. I saw killdeer, 
spotted, pectoral, and solitary SPs. There may have been a few buff breasted SP 
way in the back but the glare of the sun prevented a solid ID. 


Also of interest was a WHite winged dove hanging out with the mourning and 
collared doves near the compost piles. 


Manhattan birders may want to swing by and check out this site over next few 
days. 


Tom Schermerhorn
Wamego KS

Pardon any typos
Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re: Mississippi Kite nest videos summer 2016
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 17:48:26 -0500
> I'd sure be curious to know what it was-- this year
> 100% of the prey deliveries that I've witnessed firsthand have been
> insects.

Correction, there was one item delivered that was either a fat
earthworm or a piece of intestine-- but all the REST were insects!

Steve

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Subject: Re: Mississippi Kite chick(s) hatched 7/10 or 7/11 in Wichita
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 17:11:14 -0500
Still more thoughts--

With many hours of recent observations fresh in my mind, I'd say that
it's quite common for an adult to consume some prey at the nest at the
same time that it is also feeding a chick.  When the chick is very
small, it seems likely that the majority of any given prey item might
be consumed by the adult rather than fed to the chick, in any given
feeding session.    Also, when the chick is small, the adult may also
chew up the beakful of prey in a way that may be hard to distinguish
from the adult feeding itself.  I still think that it is likely that
no chick was present at the "GAZ" nest before the morning  of 7/11,
but it is difficult to be certain.

I did receive an email suggesting that Mississippi  Kites may feed
very young chicks by regurgitation.   I never saw any evidence of
this-- in all the feeding session I witnessed, the adult arrived
carrying prey in talons or beak. In the earliest feeding sessions I
witnessed, the main question in my mind was whether the adult was
feeding self only, or self + chick.  Again though there is a
possibility that a chick was present during the days before 7/8, when
I was away.

Steve Seibel


On Wed, Aug 10, 2016 at 12:06 PM, Steve Seibel  wrote:
> I should add that I was out of town from midday 7/2 through 7/7, and
> on 7/8 I only watched the nest for about 50 minutes (no prey
> deliveries occurred in this time).  I saw prey brought to the nest on
> both 7/9 and 7/10, but in both cases it appeared to me that the adult
> ate at the nest but did not feed a chick.  Considering the short time
> of observation on 7/8 and the fact that food was brought to the nest
> for two days in a row on 7/9 and 7/10, I really can't rule out
> hatching any time after midday 7/2.  I'd emphasize again though that
> there seemed to be a marked change in the behavior of the adults
> between the morning of 7/10 and the morning of 7/11.
>
> As noted in a previous email I saw an adult in incubation posture on
> this nest on the morning of 6/11 but not on the morning of 6/10; the
> same was true of another nest in the same Wichita park.
>
> The chicks from these two nests have net yet fledged, but look like
> they may soon.  Only one chick was ever visible in each nest.
>
> The Cornell site lists the incubation period for Mississippi Kites as
> 29–32 days.
>
> More to follow....
>
> Steve Seibel
>
>

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Subject: Chautauqua County
From: Henry Armknecht <whatabirder AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 21:39:20 +0000
I plan to bird Chautauqua County Friday morning. Anyone wanting to ride along 
would be welcome. 


Henry A

Hays

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Subject: Re: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 18:36:51 +0000
PJ...wasn't responding to you, specifically. I only ccd KS birds since you 
posted. The response was really for him and general audience. Sorry to offend 
you. 


Gene

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 10, 2016, at 1:03 PM, Pete Janzen  wrote:
> 
> The article is about the Ouachita Mtns and I found the abstract interesting. 
I wasn't attempting to extrapolate to a larger geographic area. And I don't 
need help 

> PJ
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Aug 10, 2016, at 12:26 PM, EUGENE YOUNG  wrote:
>> 
>> One of the key roles is fire. In KS and OK, fire in prairies has long kept 
the cedar in check. Prevention of fire allowed cedars to spread, and take over 
prairie habitat. Historically, even the riparian habitats were burned, thus 
likely reducing cedar tree abundance, at least in the prairie regions of both 
states. It's been well documented in the literature as settlers moved across 
the Plains, fire prevention occurred and riparian habitat increased...even out 
into western regions of both states. Mammals and birds followed these riparian 
havens and began to occupy new territories. As riparian habitat became more 
dense, and as we began to reintroduce fire as a grassland management tool, 
riparian habitats usually don't burn well and often remain intact...unless 
there were years without fire and enough litter builds up (ex. what happened in 
Morton County KS a few years back). However, no doubt the original seed source 
for prairie cedars was likely from those cedars along riparian habitat, and 
this often is observed today, where fire has a more difficult time damaging 
trees especially within the Flint Hills due to annual burning. The result, not 
enough litter to allow fire to get hot enough to impact trees and shrubs long 
streams and ravines. And if the grasslands are not burned every 3-5 years, 
cedars can begin to encroach upon the prairie. 

>> 
>> European Starlings, and American Robins are also great consumers of cedar 
berries, as are many other species. But certainly, starlings, robins and 
waxwings would be the big three consumers. The fact that starlings are 
year-long residents, might make them even more important in the distribution of 
cedars. During the fall, they flock up early (now for example) and will feed on 
cedar berries, often devouring everything in sight before the waxwings or 
robins migrate through the region. 

>> 
>> Hope that helps.
>> 
>> Gene
>> 
>> Eugene A. Young
>> 
>> 
>> Agriculture, Science & Engineering
>> Northern Oklahoma College
>> 1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310
>> Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310
>> Phone: 580-628-6482
>> Fax: 580-628-6209
>> E-Mail: Eugene.Young AT noc.edu
>> Website: www.noc.edu
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Doughty, Russell B.
>> Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 11:18 AM
>> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
>> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing
>> 
>> 
>> Howdy all,
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> I wanted to float a hypothesis among the birding community and see what kind 
of feedback I get. Please let me know what you think and if you can help in 
some way. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> I hypothesize that the annihilation of the deciduous and American holly tree 
species from the Ouachita Highland landscape of Oklahoma and Arkansas 
drastically altered the diet of the cedar waxwings, forcing them to eat red 
cedar berries with much greater frequency (Juniperus virginiana). This shift in 
food availability for cedar waxwing plays an important role in red cedar 
encroachment over time. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Here is some background. The holly trees were favored for piano keys and 
inlay by woodworkers. The trees were also cut and sold in the winter as 
Christmas decorations. The Ouachita forest was completely logged over several 
times (Smith 1986), which also caused massive population declines in the holly. 
In my 56 mile hike from Talihina to Queen Wilhelmina, I found only 2 specimens 
of holly. Both were on the southside of the ridge in a drainage. But my 
90-year-old aunt says that the holly was every where in SE Oklahoma when she 
was a kid. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> I'm a PhD student in Dr. Xiangming Xiao's group. We work with geospacial 
data to conduct spatiotemporal analysis of ecosystem processes. Thus far, red 
cedar encroachment does not seem to correlate very well to changes in climate. 
However, the distribution of red cedar in the state paints a pattern. The red 
cedar is not just randomly distributed across the state. It most frequently 
occurs along the wooded stream corridors in our watersheds. I'd suspect the 
distribution of cedar are highly correlated with cedar waxwing habitat. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> I'm curious if restoration of holly would help curb the encroachment of red 
cedar by providing waxwings an alternative food source. I'm also curious if 
another bird species is playing a role. I'm no ornithologist; birding is just a 
hobby for me. I'd be pleased if someone has some thoughts to share. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Thanks,
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Russ
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Smith, K. L. (1986). Sawmill: the Story of Cutting the Last Great Virgin 
Forest East of Rockies (p). University of Arkansas Press. 

>> 
>> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
>> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
>> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
>> To contact a listowner, send a message to
>> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
> 

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Subject: Re: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing
From: Pete Janzen <pete.janzen AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 13:03:55 -0500
The article is about the Ouachita Mtns and I found the abstract interesting. I 
wasn't attempting to extrapolate to a larger geographic area. And I don't need 
help 

PJ

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 10, 2016, at 12:26 PM, EUGENE YOUNG  wrote:
> 
> One of the key roles is fire. In KS and OK, fire in prairies has long kept 
the cedar in check. Prevention of fire allowed cedars to spread, and take over 
prairie habitat. Historically, even the riparian habitats were burned, thus 
likely reducing cedar tree abundance, at least in the prairie regions of both 
states. It's been well documented in the literature as settlers moved across 
the Plains, fire prevention occurred and riparian habitat increased...even out 
into western regions of both states. Mammals and birds followed these riparian 
havens and began to occupy new territories. As riparian habitat became more 
dense, and as we began to reintroduce fire as a grassland management tool, 
riparian habitats usually don't burn well and often remain intact...unless 
there were years without fire and enough litter builds up (ex. what happened in 
Morton County KS a few years back). However, no doubt the original seed source 
for prairie cedars was likely from those cedars along riparian habitat, and 
this often is observed today, where fire has a more difficult time damaging 
trees especially within the Flint Hills due to annual burning. The result, not 
enough litter to allow fire to get hot enough to impact trees and shrubs long 
streams and ravines. And if the grasslands are not burned every 3-5 years, 
cedars can begin to encroach upon the prairie. 

> 
> European Starlings, and American Robins are also great consumers of cedar 
berries, as are many other species. But certainly, starlings, robins and 
waxwings would be the big three consumers. The fact that starlings are 
year-long residents, might make them even more important in the distribution of 
cedars. During the fall, they flock up early (now for example) and will feed on 
cedar berries, often devouring everything in sight before the waxwings or 
robins migrate through the region. 

> 
> Hope that helps.
> 
> Gene
> 
> Eugene A. Young
> 
> 
> Agriculture, Science & Engineering
> Northern Oklahoma College
> 1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310
> Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310
> Phone: 580-628-6482
> Fax: 580-628-6209
> E-Mail: Eugene.Young AT noc.edu
> Website: www.noc.edu
> 
> 
> 
> From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Doughty, Russell B.
> Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 11:18 AM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing
> 
> 
> Howdy all,
> 
> 
> 
> I wanted to float a hypothesis among the birding community and see what kind 
of feedback I get. Please let me know what you think and if you can help in 
some way. 

> 
> 
> 
> I hypothesize that the annihilation of the deciduous and American holly tree 
species from the Ouachita Highland landscape of Oklahoma and Arkansas 
drastically altered the diet of the cedar waxwings, forcing them to eat red 
cedar berries with much greater frequency (Juniperus virginiana). This shift in 
food availability for cedar waxwing plays an important role in red cedar 
encroachment over time. 

> 
> 
> 
> Here is some background. The holly trees were favored for piano keys and 
inlay by woodworkers. The trees were also cut and sold in the winter as 
Christmas decorations. The Ouachita forest was completely logged over several 
times (Smith 1986), which also caused massive population declines in the holly. 
In my 56 mile hike from Talihina to Queen Wilhelmina, I found only 2 specimens 
of holly. Both were on the southside of the ridge in a drainage. But my 
90-year-old aunt says that the holly was every where in SE Oklahoma when she 
was a kid. 

> 
> 
> 
> I'm a PhD student in Dr. Xiangming Xiao's group. We work with geospacial data 
to conduct spatiotemporal analysis of ecosystem processes. Thus far, red cedar 
encroachment does not seem to correlate very well to changes in climate. 
However, the distribution of red cedar in the state paints a pattern. The red 
cedar is not just randomly distributed across the state. It most frequently 
occurs along the wooded stream corridors in our watersheds. I'd suspect the 
distribution of cedar are highly correlated with cedar waxwing habitat. 

> 
> 
> 
> I'm curious if restoration of holly would help curb the encroachment of red 
cedar by providing waxwings an alternative food source. I'm also curious if 
another bird species is playing a role. I'm no ornithologist; birding is just a 
hobby for me. I'd be pleased if someone has some thoughts to share. 

> 
> 
> 
> Thanks,
> 
> 
> 
> Russ
> 
> 
> 
> Smith, K. L. (1986). Sawmill: the Story of Cutting the Last Great Virgin 
Forest East of Rockies (p). University of Arkansas Press. 

> 
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu

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Subject: Re: Mississippi Kite nest videos summer 2016
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 12:48:46 -0500
By the way the quality of the original videos is much better than what
you see here.  Even the simple cut-and-paste software I use for
editing seems to degrade the quality significantly, and then they take
another hit when they are posted to vimeo. If I do another large batch
of editing in the future, I hope to be using a better editing program.

Steve Seibel

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Subject: Mississippi Kite nest videos summer 2016
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 12:33:43 -0500
Here are some videos from the two Mississippi Kite nests I've been
keeping an eye on this season.  Most are from the "GAZ" nest which is
new this year.  The "BBC" nest" is the nest that I posted many videos
from last year.

--Disclaimer-- I'm aware that it is sometimes considered bad form to
share photos or videos from raptor nests.  Mississippi Kites nesting
in an urban environment present an unusual case in my opinion.  The
"GAZ" nest could be viewed from a picnic table under a gazebo, and
there was no indication that the adults were bothered by my presence,
even during nest building/ incubation.  At the "BBC" nest, this year
an adult on the nest sometimes looked in my direction when I
approached, so I kept my visits extremely brief until the chick was
large.  Both nests are in a Wichita city park that is often occupied
by noisy picnickers, basketball players, football teams, frisbee
teams, tractor-driven lawnmowers, etc.--

All videos are of the "GAZ" nest unless otherwise noted.

http://vimeo.com/177487893 -- stick delivery 7/30
http://vimeo.com/177487961 -- wing flap 7/30
http://vimeo.com/177487967 -- prey delivery 7/30
http://vimeo.com/177564592 -- double prey delivery 7/30
http://vimeo.com/177726124 -- chick and mother settle in for the evening 8/03
http://vimeo.com/177832397 -- double prey delivery 8/04
http://vimeo.com/177943488 -- flapping 8/04
http://vimeo.com/177947104 -- spreading wings and flapping 8/04
http://vimeo.com/177948789 -- prey delivery 8/04
http://vimeo.com/177995002 -- prey delivery 8/04
http://vimeo.com/177995059 -- prey delivery 8/04
http://vimeo.com/177995247 -- prey delivery 8/04
http://vimeo.com/178023578 -- preening 8/04
http://vimeo.com/178023629 -- live insect delivered 8/04
http://vimeo.com/178081695 -- flapping 8/08
http://vimeo.com/178081732 -- vocalization, prey delivery, flapping 8/08
http://vimeo.com/178208826 -- prey deliveries (BBC nest) 8/09
http://vimeo.com/178213710 -- flapping (BBC nest) 8/09

Today (8/10) I took some more videos, but I've reached my weekly limit
for vimeo posting, so they'll have to wait.  Maybe for a long time--
till fall?-- my schedule changes radically in the next few days.

When I came into view of the GAZ nest an adult was feeding the chick
large bloody chunks of something -- not the usual insect diet-- the
adult was standing on the item and ripping off chunks and feeding them
to the chick.  I'd sure be curious to know what it was-- this year
100% of the prey deliveries that I've witnessed firsthand have been
insects. These days, when the prey is an insect, the adult usually
just leaves it in the nest, rather than feeding it bite-by-bite to the
chick as was the case a week ago or so.

More later--

Steve Seibel

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Subject: Re: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 17:26:10 +0000
One of the key roles is fire. In KS and OK, fire in prairies has long kept the 
cedar in check. Prevention of fire allowed cedars to spread, and take over 
prairie habitat. Historically, even the riparian habitats were burned, thus 
likely reducing cedar tree abundance, at least in the prairie regions of both 
states. It's been well documented in the literature as settlers moved across 
the Plains, fire prevention occurred and riparian habitat increased...even out 
into western regions of both states. Mammals and birds followed these riparian 
havens and began to occupy new territories. As riparian habitat became more 
dense, and as we began to reintroduce fire as a grassland management tool, 
riparian habitats usually don't burn well and often remain intact...unless 
there were years without fire and enough litter builds up (ex. what happened in 
Morton County KS a few years back). However, no doubt the original seed source 
for prairie cedars was likely from those cedars along riparian habitat, and 
this often is observed today, where fire has a more difficult time damaging 
trees especially within the Flint Hills due to annual burning. The result, not 
enough litter to allow fire to get hot enough to impact trees and shrubs long 
streams and ravines. And if the grasslands are not burned every 3-5 years, 
cedars can begin to encroach upon the prairie. 


European Starlings, and American Robins are also great consumers of cedar 
berries, as are many other species. But certainly, starlings, robins and 
waxwings would be the big three consumers. The fact that starlings are 
year-long residents, might make them even more important in the distribution of 
cedars. During the fall, they flock up early (now for example) and will feed on 
cedar berries, often devouring everything in sight before the waxwings or 
robins migrate through the region. 


Hope that helps.

Gene

Eugene A. Young


Agriculture, Science & Engineering
Northern Oklahoma College
1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310
Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310
Phone: 580-628-6482
Fax: 580-628-6209
E-Mail: Eugene.Young AT noc.edu
Website: www.noc.edu



From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Doughty, Russell B.
Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 11:18 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing


Howdy all,



I wanted to float a hypothesis among the birding community and see what kind of 
feedback I get. Please let me know what you think and if you can help in some 
way. 




I hypothesize that the annihilation of the deciduous and American holly tree 
species from the Ouachita Highland landscape of Oklahoma and Arkansas 
drastically altered the diet of the cedar waxwings, forcing them to eat red 
cedar berries with much greater frequency (Juniperus virginiana). This shift in 
food availability for cedar waxwing plays an important role in red cedar 
encroachment over time. 




Here is some background. The holly trees were favored for piano keys and inlay 
by woodworkers. The trees were also cut and sold in the winter as Christmas 
decorations. The Ouachita forest was completely logged over several times 
(Smith 1986), which also caused massive population declines in the holly. In my 
56 mile hike from Talihina to Queen Wilhelmina, I found only 2 specimens of 
holly. Both were on the southside of the ridge in a drainage. But my 
90-year-old aunt says that the holly was every where in SE Oklahoma when she 
was a kid. 




I'm a PhD student in Dr. Xiangming Xiao's group. We work with geospacial data 
to conduct spatiotemporal analysis of ecosystem processes. Thus far, red cedar 
encroachment does not seem to correlate very well to changes in climate. 
However, the distribution of red cedar in the state paints a pattern. The red 
cedar is not just randomly distributed across the state. It most frequently 
occurs along the wooded stream corridors in our watersheds. I'd suspect the 
distribution of cedar are highly correlated with cedar waxwing habitat. 




I'm curious if restoration of holly would help curb the encroachment of red 
cedar by providing waxwings an alternative food source. I'm also curious if 
another bird species is playing a role. I'm no ornithologist; birding is just a 
hobby for me. I'd be pleased if someone has some thoughts to share. 




Thanks,



Russ



Smith, K. L. (1986). Sawmill: the Story of Cutting the Last Great Virgin Forest 
East of Rockies (p). University of Arkansas Press. 


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Subject: Re: Mississippi Kite chick(s) hatched 7/10 or 7/11 in Wichita
From: Steve Seibel <sseibel999 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 12:06:10 -0500
I should add that I was out of town from midday 7/2 through 7/7, and
on 7/8 I only watched the nest for about 50 minutes (no prey
deliveries occurred in this time).  I saw prey brought to the nest on
both 7/9 and 7/10, but in both cases it appeared to me that the adult
ate at the nest but did not feed a chick.  Considering the short time
of observation on 7/8 and the fact that food was brought to the nest
for two days in a row on 7/9 and 7/10, I really can't rule out
hatching any time after midday 7/2.  I'd emphasize again though that
there seemed to be a marked change in the behavior of the adults
between the morning of 7/10 and the morning of 7/11.

As noted in a previous email I saw an adult in incubation posture on
this nest on the morning of 6/11 but not on the morning of 6/10; the
same was true of another nest in the same Wichita park.

The chicks from these two nests have net yet fledged, but look like
they may soon.  Only one chick was ever visible in each nest.

The Cornell site lists the incubation period for Mississippi Kites as
29–32 days.

More to follow....

Steve Seibel


On Tue, Jul 12, 2016 at 2:43 PM, Steve Seibel  wrote:
> Hi all.  I've been visiting a spot where I have a good view of a
> Mississippi Kite nest for about an hour day, most days, more or less
> since incubation began.  When I ended my session around 11AM on 7/10 I
> had just seen an interesting interaction where a second-year (hatched
> 2015) Kite came to the nest tree and apparently provoked a strong
> reaction from the nesting adult pair.  That same day I saw at least
> one prey delivery to the nest but it appeared that the delivering
> adult simply ate the prey entirely, rather than feeding some of it to
> a chick.  On 7/11 the situation was markedly different, with multiple
> prey deliveries to the nest starting around 8AM, and the adult
> delivering the prey spending much more time time with head down,
> likely feeding one or more chicks.  It's difficult to know for certain
> that chicks are present because after a prey delivery the adult
> involved will bob its head down and then raise it again while still
> opening and closing the beak, giving the impression that at least some
> of the prey is being consumed by the adult rather than fed to a chick,
> and then repeat the whole process, but I think that this is primarily
> just the adult cleaning remaining bits of prey from its beak, rather
> than the adult feeding itself.  Or perhaps the bird is consuming some
> of the prey while also feeding  a chick,  Anyway the behavior of the
> adult birds was markedly different on 7/11 than on 7/10 and I'm almost
> certain that chicks were present on 7/11.  More of the same on 7/12.
>
> No part of any chick has yet been visible from my viewing spot.
>
> I've taken lots of videos-- who knows when I will get around to
> posting them though!   My Canon SX60 delivers a much better video than
> the SX10 I was using previously.
>
> Steve Seibel

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Subject: Fwd: Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing
From: Pete Janzen <pete.janzen AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 11:40:08 -0500
This is interesting.  
Pete Janzen. Wichita

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: "Doughty, Russell B." 
> Date: August 10, 2016 at 11:18:16 AM CDT
> To: 
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Hypothesis on Red Cedar Encroachment and Cedar Waxwing
> Reply-To: okbirds 
> 
> Howdy all,
> 
> 
> I wanted to float a hypothesis among the birding community and see what kind 
of feedback I get. Please let me know what you think and if you can help in 
some way. 

> 
> 
> I hypothesize that the annihilation of the deciduous and American holly tree 
species from the Ouachita Highland landscape of Oklahoma and Arkansas 
drastically altered the diet of the cedar waxwings, forcing them to eat red 
cedar berries with much greater frequency (Juniperus virginiana). This shift in 
food availability for cedar waxwing plays an important role in red cedar 
encroachment over time. 

> 
> 
> 
> Here is some background. The holly trees were favored for piano keys and 
inlay by woodworkers. The trees were also cut and sold in the winter as 
Christmas decorations. The Ouachita forest was completely logged over several 
times (Smith 1986), which also caused massive population declines in the holly. 
In my 56 mile hike from Talihina to Queen Wilhelmina, I found only 2 specimens 
of holly. Both were on the southside of the ridge in a drainage. But my 
90-year-old aunt says that the holly was every where in SE Oklahoma when she 
was a kid. 

> 
> 
> 
> I'm a PhD student in Dr. Xiangming Xiao's group. We work with geospacial data 
to conduct spatiotemporal analysis of ecosystem processes. Thus far, red cedar 
encroachment does not seem to correlate very well to changes in climate. 
However, the distribution of red cedar in the state paints a pattern. The red 
cedar is not just randomly distributed across the state. It most frequently 
occurs along the wooded stream corridors in our watersheds. I'd suspect the 
distribution of cedar are highly correlated with cedar waxwing habitat. 

> 
> 
> 
> I'm curious if restoration of holly would help curb the encroachment of red 
cedar by providing waxwings an alternative food source. I'm also curious if 
another bird species is playing a role. I'm no ornithologist; birding is just a 
hobby for me. I'd be pleased if someone has some thoughts to share. 

> 
> 
> 
> Thanks,
> 
> 
> 
> Russ
> 
> 
> 
> Smith, K. L. (1986). Sawmill: the Story of Cutting the Last Great Virgin 
Forest East of Rockies (p). University of Arkansas Press. 


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Subject: Quivira report 9 August 2016
From: Barry Jones <barjones78 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Aug 2016 14:56:37 -0500
Quivira refuge-wide Shorebird Survey held today, 9 August, produced the 
following (more than 80% of the birds counted were in the vicinity of the flats 
along NE 170th Street): 


Black-necked Stilt - 56
American Avocet - 394
Black-bellied Plover - 1
Snowy Plover - 35
Semipalmated Plover - 7
Killdeer - 43
Marbled Godwit - 2
Stilt Sandpiper - 89
Sanderling - 6
Baird's Sandpiper - 57
Least Sandpiper - 243
Pectoral Sandpiper - 11
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 14
Long-billed Dowitcher - 5
Spotted Sandpiper - 12
Solitary Sandpiper - 4
Greater Yellowlegs - 49
Lesser Yellowlegs - 105
Wilson's Phalarope - 24
dowitcher, sp. - 104
shorebird, sp. - 300
peep, sp. - 65
SPECIES = 19
BIRDS = 1,626

Other species of note: Bald Eagle (1A along Wildlife Drive), Least Tern (2 
still around flats), and huge numbers 250+ of White-faced Ibis on flats and 
Black Terns (300+) throughout. Also an unusually large number (for here) of 
night herons (sp) in some of the interior units. High water along the flats has 
led to many birds roosting on the road again. 


Barry Jones
Quivira NWR

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