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Updated on Friday, August 1 at 01:34 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Hooded Oriole,©Barry Kent Mackay

1 Aug Re: The essential list of current birding news outlets [John Kennington ]
31 Jul Re: Flyctcher song help - solved! [Henry and Debby Armknecht ]
31 Jul County listing deadline August 7 ["markeland AT kc.rr.com" ]
31 Jul Re: Flyctcher song help [John Schukman ]
31 Jul Flyctcher song help [Henry and Debby Armknecht ]
31 Jul July in Kansas [Al Schirmacher ]
31 Jul Pacific Loon, Lake Perry [Al Schirmacher ]
31 Jul The essential list of current birding news outlets [Dan Thalmann ]
30 Jul AOU 55th Checklist supplement is released! [Chuck Otte ]
30 Jul MY EARLIER MESSAGE MIKE\NANCY \\ ERROR ADDRESS SORRY [Bill Falk ]
30 Jul mike\visit\food ; nancy'smed mgt. [Bill Falk ]
30 Jul summer pelicans [Lawrence Herbert ]
29 Jul Dark-morph Hawks [Max Thompson ]
29 Jul Birds of Late in SW KS [Jeff Calhoun ]
29 Jul Dark Morph Red-tailed Hawks [Max Thompson ]
28 Jul Re: Finney County birding [Bobby Hiebert Jr ]
28 Jul Finney County birding [Richard Tucker ]
28 Jul Riley County White-winged Doves [John Row ]
28 Jul Weekend Sightings [Lucia Johnson ]
27 Jul Wichita Purple Martin Roost [Kevin Groeneweg ]
27 Jul Greater Roadrunner-Cheyenne Bottoms [Curtis Wolf ]
27 Jul Clinton: Painted Binting and waders ["Tollefson, John" ]
27 Jul Quivira Ruff confirmed 27 July 2014 [Barry Jones ]
27 Jul Migrants are on the move [Danny Akers ]
26 Jul Re: 3 western hummers!! / 26 July [Elmer Finck ]
26 Jul 3 western hummers!! / 26 July [Scott Seltman ]
25 Jul errant Rock Dove [Sacie Lambertson ]
25 Jul Re: Rufous Hummingbird [Scott Seltman ]
25 Jul Quivira report 25 July 2014 [Barry Jones ]
24 Jul Rufous Hummingbird [Jeff Calhoun ]
25 Jul Re: possible Ruff at Quivira [EUGENE YOUNG ]
24 Jul possible Ruff at Quivira [Will ]
23 Jul Juvenile Bald Eagle in Wichita [Harry Gregory ]
23 Jul Rufous Hummingbird [Irwin Hoogheem ]
23 Jul Sad news [Ted Cable ]
23 Jul Re: Serious? question [Michael Pearce ]
22 Jul White-winged Dove [John Row ]
22 Jul Re: Serious? question [Michael Pearce ]
23 Jul Re: Serious? question [EUGENE YOUNG ]
22 Jul Re: Serious? question [Ken Kinman ]
22 Jul Rooks County Lazuli Bunting [Jon Vande Kopple ]
22 Jul Serious? question [Timothy Barksdale ]
21 Jul Webster Reservoir Plovers [Jon Vande Kopple ]
21 Jul Re: serious birding question [Scott Seltman ]
20 Jul Re: serious birding question [Robert Reed ]
20 Jul Re: serious birding question [Steve Sorensen ]
20 Jul Re: serious birding question [David Rintoul ]
20 Jul Re: serious birding question [Michael Pearce ]
20 Jul Re: serious birding question [Ken Kinman ]
20 Jul Clinton Lake Overlook park ["Wedge, Philip C." ]
20 Jul Re: serious birding question [Steve Sorensen ]
20 Jul Labette County birds [Richard Tucker ]
19 Jul Mississippi Kites Johnson and Wyandotte County ["markeland AT kc.rr.com" ]
19 Jul Quivira NWR - 7/19 AM [Danny Akers ]
19 Jul Re: serious birding question [Michael Pearce ]
19 Jul Yard Birds [John Row ]
19 Jul Re: serious birding question [Michael Pearce ]
19 Jul Re: serious birding question [Ken Kinman ]
19 Jul Breeding Prairie Chickens? [Mick McHugh ]
19 Jul serious birding question [Daniel Larson ]
19 Jul Re: All three phalaropes at Quivira today [David Seibel ]
19 Jul Lake Clinton, Douglas County [Carol Morgan ]
19 Jul Pacific loon [Carol Morgan ]
19 Jul Pacific loon still present [Carol Morgan ]
19 Jul Burrowing Owl, Cassin's Sparrow [Al Schirmacher ]
18 Jul Birding Adventures in Peru and Galapagos [Bob Gress ]
19 Jul All three phalaropes at Quivira today [David Seibel ]
18 Jul Re: Corpse Plant [Elmer Finck ]
18 Jul Mississippi Kite, Galena, Cherokee Co. ["Rader, Jennifer" ]
18 Jul Corpse Plant [ictinia ]
18 Jul Lake Perry birds [Carol Morgan ]
17 Jul Cheyenne Bottoms, Quivira [Al Schirmacher ]
17 Jul Mississippi Kite feeding young in Butler Co. [Atcha Nolan ]
17 Jul Baker Wetlands survey [Daniel Larson ]
16 Jul Tuttle Puddle pileated, painted bunting, eagles, woodchuck and purple martins massing [Michael Pearce ]
15 Jul Quivira report for 15 July 2014 [Barry Jones ]

Subject: Re: The essential list of current birding news outlets
From: John Kennington <johnkennington AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 01:07:44 -0500
One site highly recommended by Laura Erickson (she has it set as her 'home'
page) is the Little Birdie Home page:

http://www.littlebirdiehome.com/

Since she mentioned it at this year's Lesser Prairie-Chicken Festival I've
been checking it most days too. They feature a new bird headline each day,
and at the bottom of page 1 is a nice collection of links to other sites.
There are just two pages, Page 1 and Page 2 (links to them are at the top).
It's a little old school looking but very useful!

John Kennington
Tulsa, OK


----------------------------------------------------------------------
Date:    Thu, 31 Jul 2014 10:56:59 -0500
From:    Dan Thalmann 
Subject: The essential list of current birding news outlets

The great advantage of the internet is its amazing array of information abo=
ut almost any topic under the sun. The great disadvantage of the internet i=
s its overwhelming array of information about almost any topic under the su=
n.

After Chuck posted about the 55th Checklist supplement, something in which =
I=92m definitely interested, it makes me wonder if there is an =93essential=
 list=94 of blogs and sites that a very interested (though not a profession=
al) birder should check on a regular basis. I imagine the ABA blog would be=
 one. What else? I=92m too interested in too many things and I can=92t keep=
 up, so I=92m looking for a set of 3-4 sites that would benefit me from a m=
onthly or so check. Sites about the big issues or big sightings in the bird=
ing world that would keep me on top of the current news, but nothing that w=
ould be so deep that I=92d never actually get them read.

Suggestions?

Dan

Dan Thalmann
Owner/publisher - Washington County News
Owner/publisher - Linn-Palmer Record
President - Kansas Press Association
editor AT bluevalley.net
backroadsnews.com
Washington County News on Facebook
Backroadsnews on Twitter, Snapchat and Pinterest

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Subject: Re: Flyctcher song help - solved!
From: Henry and Debby Armknecht <armknecht AT RURALTEL.NET>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 21:44:44 -0500
Great call, John.  I've never been around their nests.

Henry A
Osborne

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "John Schukman" 
To: 
Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2014 8:35 PM
Subject: Re: Flyctcher song help


> How about Mississippi Kite young calling?
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXCHzkFPAb4
>
> John Schukman
> Leavenworth Co.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas [mailto:KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] 
> On
> Behalf Of Henry and Debby Armknecht
> Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2014 6:20 PM
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Flyctcher song help
>
> In Hays today a flycatcher was calling constantly.  It sounded like a 
> kid's
> squeaky toy.  Two note call.  My first thought was Acadian Flycatcher.  In
> listening to calls, Acadian is still the most like what we heard.
>
> What else (possibly more likely in Hays at this time of year) should I
> listen to?
>
> Henry A
> Osborne/Hays
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu 

For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
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For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
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To contact a listowner, send a message to
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Subject: County listing deadline August 7
From: "markeland AT kc.rr.com" <markeland@KC.RR.COM>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:48:05 -0500
Dear County listers,

Important new note. 

Please do not send your totals to the old kestrelland address. It is no 
longer used and if sent there your totals will not get posted.

The email address to send in your listing is markeland AT kc.rr.com. 

The deadline for county listing will be Thursday August 7, 2014.

The only rule for Kansas county listing is you must have a minimum of 75
species to list in a county. Please send me any updates that you may have
as well as those of your friends that are not on KsBirds. Also, you may
send me your Kansas Life List totals and your Kansas 2014 totals.

To minimize the chance of a virus getting into KsBirds the monthly update
is forwarded to the list owners to post to the list serve. Whenever you
have a change or submission to make to your county lists be sure to send
the change to me and I will do my best not to leave your listing out.

If you have any questions about County listing just drop me an email.

Mark Land
Overland Park, KS 66207

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Subject: Re: Flyctcher song help
From: John Schukman <schuksaya AT KC.RR.COM>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:35:52 -0500
How about Mississippi Kite young calling?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXCHzkFPAb4

John Schukman 
Leavenworth Co.

-----Original Message-----
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas [mailto:KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On
Behalf Of Henry and Debby Armknecht
Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2014 6:20 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Flyctcher song help

In Hays today a flycatcher was calling constantly.  It sounded like a kid's
squeaky toy.  Two note call.  My first thought was Acadian Flycatcher.  In
listening to calls, Acadian is still the most like what we heard.

What else (possibly more likely in Hays at this time of year) should I
listen to?

Henry A
Osborne/Hays 

For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
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To contact a listowner, send a message to
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For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
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For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
To contact a listowner, send a message to
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Subject: Flyctcher song help
From: Henry and Debby Armknecht <armknecht AT RURALTEL.NET>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 18:20:27 -0500
In Hays today a flycatcher was calling constantly.  It sounded like a kid's 
squeaky toy.  Two note call.  My first thought was Acadian Flycatcher.  In 
listening to calls, Acadian is still the most like what we heard.

What else (possibly more likely in Hays at this time of year) should I 
listen to?

Henry A
Osborne/Hays 

For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/ksbird-l.html
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Subject: July in Kansas
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 16:06:34 -0500
Birding’s beauty is that it can be practiced year
round.  Mostly.


Historically, February and July are my two most difficult
months.  Both are, generally,
pre-migration.  Both have weather
extremes that impact birds that are present – not to mention the birder!


So I set a reasonable “push” goal for July:  100 birds. 
I diversified this by setting a second goal:  50 butterflies.


My three county (Atchison, Jackson, Brown) area produced 90+
birds with consistent effort.  Then a two
day window (rare in ministry) opened up; Nate (my birding son, recent college
graduate) and I traveled to Quivira, Cheyenne Bottoms and Pratt for the first
time.  We augmented this with two trips
to Topeka and one to Lake Perry (all three for other purposes).


134 birds.  Goal
smashed.  14 state birds, 16 year birds,
three life birds added.  Suddenly July
doesn’t look so bad.


And what birds:


Whimbrel

Pacific Loon

Neotropic Cormorant

Snowy Plover

Western Sandpiper

Burrowing Owl

Cassin’s Sparrow


The mix was diverse: 
only six waterfowl but seven herons; only three hawks but 21 shorebirds;
only five warblers but nine flycatchers.


But 50 butterflies proved elusive. The month was running down quickly, stuck at 

45.  Added one Saturday, two on Monday,
one on Tuesday (skippers were reappearing), 49 was close enough; then Don Merz
posted about Gage Park in Topeka, visited Wednesday; voila, 53.


What’s next?  Probably
a goalless August.  There was joy in the
chase, but ministry is ramping up, and need to focus on the joy of 
appreciation. 



And the warblers are coming….


I hope.
Al SchirmacherMuscotah, KS


 		 	   		  
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Subject: Pacific Loon, Lake Perry
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 11:43:23 -0500
My son had an interview in Ozawkie this morning; we took the opportunity to 
bird a bit around Lake Perry. 


The Pacific Loon was immediately located off the dam 30-40 yards from shore. 
Its plumage is fascinating. Nate would encourage bringing your camera (he 
forgot), great shots are probable. 


Speaking personally, also enjoyed the Acadian Flycatchers during a short walk 
on Old Military Trail. 


Good birding to all!

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: The essential list of current birding news outlets
From: Dan Thalmann <editor AT BLUEVALLEY.NET>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 10:56:59 -0500
The great advantage of the internet is its amazing array of information about 
almost any topic under the sun. The great disadvantage of the internet is its 
overwhelming array of information about almost any topic under the sun. 


After Chuck posted about the 55th Checklist supplement, something in which I’m 
definitely interested, it makes me wonder if there is an “essential list” of 
blogs and sites that a very interested (though not a professional) birder 
should check on a regular basis. I imagine the ABA blog would be one. What 
else? I’m too interested in too many things and I can’t keep up, so I’m looking 
for a set of 3-4 sites that would benefit me from a monthly or so check. Sites 
about the big issues or big sightings in the birding world that would keep me 
on top of the current news, but nothing that would be so deep that I’d never 
actually get them read. 


Suggestions?

—Dan



Dan Thalmann
Owner/publisher - Washington County News
Owner/publisher - Linn-Palmer Record
President - Kansas Press Association
editor AT bluevalley.net
backroadsnews.com
Washington County News on Facebook
Backroadsnews on Twitter, Snapchat and Pinterest


For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/ksbird-l.html
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Subject: AOU 55th Checklist supplement is released!
From: Chuck Otte <cotte AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 15:59:02 -0500
Good afternoon KSBIRDers!

What has become an annual late July event is once again upon us! The
American Ornithologists Union (AOU) Committee on Classification and
Nomenclature, has released the changes that have been approved over the
past 12 months (15 May 2013 through 15 May 2014). The AOU is recognized
as THE authority on bird species, taxonomy and names. KOS follows the
AOU in their checklist as do I with the county checklists.

Some years the release of the checklist supplement sends everyone into
turmoil. I now update the county checklists twice a year and I always make
sure that one of those updates is in August and early September so I can
reflect any changes that the committee makes which impacts Kansas
species.

The big news this year is the lack of big news for Kansas species!

The Mexican subspecies of King Rail is now split out as a new species, the
Aztec Rail. Our King Rail keeps its common name and scientific name,
Rallus elegans.

The order of doves is shuffled slighlty. The Zenaida doves (White-winged
and Mourning) are moved below the Columbina doves (Inca and Common
Ground).

And that is about the extent of it. A lot of changes in more tropical species
and pelagics. Two proposals that were not accepted (at least as of this time)
were as follows. Split of Curve-billed Thrasher into Plateau Thrasher and
Palmer´s Thrasher, and transfer of American Goldfinch, Lesser Goldfinch,
and Lawrence´s Goldfinch into their own genus, Astragalinus. Proposals can
simmer for years before disappearing, being modified or being accepted.
Time will tell on this one.

A good blog about the changes (for those that really care) is at:
http://blog.aba.org/2014/07/2014-aou-check-list-supplement-is-out.html

And the actual supplement, which will be in the next issue of the Auk, is at:
http://aoucospubs.org/doi/pdf/10.1642/AUK-14-124.1

As I start updating all the county checklists in August, the dove changes will
be incorporated, along with all new county records from this spring and
summer.

Chuck


-----
Chuck Otte                      cotte AT ksu.edu
County Extension Agent, Ag & Natural Resources
Geary County Extension Office, PO BOX 28         785-238-4161
Junction City, Kansas 66441-0028             FAX 785-238-7166
http://www.geary.ksu.edu/

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Subject: MY EARLIER MESSAGE MIKE\NANCY \\ ERROR ADDRESS SORRY
From: Bill Falk <nlwlfalk AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 14:39:10 -0500
I NEED TO APOLOGISE FOR MY EARLIER ADDRESSING ERROR
SORRY
THANK YOU FOR YOUR INDULGENCE
BACK TO BEST BORDING
BILL FALK\  WICHITA
BEST 

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Subject: mike\visit\food ; nancy'smed mgt.
From: Bill Falk <nlwlfalk AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 08:48:12 -0700
EH:!
YOOZ TWO

THANK  YOU:
 for the helpful thoughtfulness you've both directed our way We couldn't love 
you more or be any more appreciative of ya both 

Your career achievements ; plus family development are wonderful example for 
everyone to be proud of 


THANK YOU\ THANK YOU

LOVE;
MOM\ POP 
P. S.  everything is going perfect here now!



BILL  \ NORMA FALK
505 NO MAIZE rd. apt. 304
WICHITA
                                    67212

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Subject: summer pelicans
From: Lawrence Herbert <certhia AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 10:30:23 -0500
There were two pelicans at Empire's Riverton plant,
Cherokee County, on Monday morning, 7-28-14.    They must have
summered here.  There were seven Am. White Pelican
back on July 1st.  

Six Great Blue Heron and one Great Egret were also present.  

Larry Herbert,  Joplin MO.  certhi a at att .net      7-30-14.

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Subject: Dark-morph Hawks
From: Max Thompson <maxt AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 22:29:20 -0500
Bill Clark ask me to add:

I am especially want photos of  dark-morph Red-tailed Hawks but not Harlan's
Hawks or rufous-morph Red-tails.

 

 

 

Max C. Thompson

1729 E. 11th Ave.

Winfield, KS 

 


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Subject: Birds of Late in SW KS
From: Jeff Calhoun <jeffcalhoun11 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 16:21:05 -0500
A few home improvement projects not gone to plan made me anxious to have
some quality outdoor time, so I have kind of gone on a binge the last few
days.


I was boating on Cedar Bluff Reservoir on 7/26 and an early Osprey and a
Great Egret flew over (Trego Co).


On 7/27, an adult male Rufous and a female Calliope Hummingbird entertained
Danny Akers and I in my yard (Ford Co). On 7/28, presumably the same Rufous
continued.


Yesterday, 7/28, I showed Danny around Morton County. We spotted an
unidentified Selasphorus hummer in Elkhart. The Painted Bunting continues
at the shelterbelt, and two Ring-billed Gulls that arrived sometime between
8 AM and noon were the biggest surprise at the sewer ponds. A family group
of 4 Ash-throated Flycatchers were along the Turkey Trail and an Empid, a
Northern Cardinal, and a territorial Yellow-breasted Chat were at Middle
Spring, but really it was pretty slow all around. On the route home we had
two Forster’s Terns at the Hugoton sewer ponds (Stevens Co).


 Today, 7/29, I met Jon Vande Kopple in Jetmore for a swan song of sorts.  A
Rock Wren at the west end of HorseThief Canyon on 208 Rd was actually a new
Hodgeman Co bird for me. We found some migrants at Buckner Valley Park,
including a Least Flycatcher and a calling and recorded Alder Flycatcher.  The
lakes were totally dead but it was nice to be birding with good friends.




Time to relax. Take me hooooooome, country roads,



Jeff Calhoun

Dodge City

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Subject: Dark Morph Red-tailed Hawks
From: Max Thompson <maxt AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 15:48:22 -0500
Bill Clark, specialist on hawks is working on dark morph Red-tailed Hawks
and Harlan's Hawk. He was recently at the University of Kansas Natural
History Museum and ask if we could ask Kansas bird watchers if they have
photos of these types of hawks that he could look at. You can send them to:

raptours AT earthlink.net>

Thanks for your help.

Max

 

Max C. Thompson

1729 E. 11th Ave.

Winfield, KS 

 


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Subject: Re: Finney County birding
From: Bobby Hiebert Jr <bobbybirdman23 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 21:22:25 -0500
My wife, Tess, and I appreciated birding with Tom and Sara Shane last
year.  I am reminded time and again of how wonderful, fun and kind birders
can be.  It's part of what makes birding so rewarding.  Is this a great
endeavor, or what?

Bobby Hiebert.
On Jul 28, 2014 9:12 PM, "Richard Tucker"  wrote:

> Thanks to Tom Shane for helping me get a great start on a list for Finney
> County.  While in Garden City this past weekend for the Babe Ruth 15yr old
> State Tournament (watching 15 yr old grandson, Brett's Parsons team play)
> Tom took me out to the playas in the area.  We had good success with the
> following highlights:
> Mallard
> Bluewinged Teal
> Eared Grebe
> Black-crowned Night Heron (several apparently eating grasshoppers away
> from the water)
> Am. Coot
> Killdeer
> Spotted Sandpiper
> Solitary sandpiper
> Lessor Yellowlegs
> Upland Sandpiper
> Baird's Sandpiper
> Least Sandpiper
> Semipalmated Sandpiper
> Long-billed Dowitcher
> Wilson's Phalarope
> White-winged Dove
> Common Nighthawk
> Loggerhead shrike
> Black-billed Magpie
> Lark Bunting
> Yellow-headed Blackbird
>
> total 46 species.
>
> On old Hwy 83 in the Finney County Game Refuge, I saw an active Swainson's
> Hawk nest with two fully fledged young who looked like they were ready to
> fly.  When the parent brought food, both stood on the rim of the nest with
> wings spread and looked big enough to take off.
>
> Mammals--several Jack Rabbits  (always love to see them)
>
> a different world than SEK.
>
> Thanks for a great time, Tom (39 of the 46 species wre with Tom in the
> playas.)
>
> Rick Tucker
> Parsons
> Labette County
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Subject: Finney County birding
From: Richard Tucker <rickt AT WAVEWLS.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 20:46:09 -0500
Thanks to Tom Shane for helping me get a great start on a list for Finney 
County. While in Garden City this past weekend for the Babe Ruth 15yr old State 
Tournament (watching 15 yr old grandson, Brett's Parsons team play) Tom took me 
out to the playas in the area. We had good success with the following 
highlights: 

Mallard
Bluewinged Teal
Eared Grebe
Black-crowned Night Heron (several apparently eating grasshoppers away from the 
water) 

Am. Coot
Killdeer
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary sandpiper
Lessor Yellowlegs
Upland Sandpiper
Baird's Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Long-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Phalarope
White-winged Dove
Common Nighthawk
Loggerhead shrike
Black-billed Magpie
Lark Bunting
Yellow-headed Blackbird

total 46 species.

On old Hwy 83 in the Finney County Game Refuge, I saw an active Swainson's Hawk 
nest with two fully fledged young who looked like they were ready to fly. When 
the parent brought food, both stood on the rim of the nest with wings spread 
and looked big enough to take off. 


Mammals--several Jack Rabbits  (always love to see them)

a different world than SEK.

Thanks for a great time, Tom (39 of the 46 species wre with Tom in the playas.)

Rick Tucker
Parsons
Labette County  
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Subject: Riley County White-winged Doves
From: John Row <johmarrow AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 20:03:21 -0500
Hi All,
Everyone is probably tired of hearing about white-winged doves in Riley County 
by now. I thought that perhaps I should mention though that we had 3 immature 
birds visit our power lines this past Saturday. 

John RowManhattan, Kansas 		 	   		  
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Subject: Weekend Sightings
From: Lucia Johnson <luciaj AT NCCTINC.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 09:56:50 -0700
I had two birds of note over the weekend.


*         Sunday - Mississippi Kite flying over 71st and Nall

* Saturday - Two Turkey Vultures feasting on rabbit (I think) on the corner of 
my street; I never think of these as "city" birds. 


Mission, KS
Johnson Co

Lucia Johnson
Vice President, Recertification
phone 800.875.4404 fax 913.498.1243
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[cid:image003.png AT 01CFAA5A.E2926FE0]

Connect with us: [cid:image004.png AT 01CFAA5A.E2926FE0] 
 
[cid:image005.png AT 01CFAA5A.E2926FE0]  
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Subject: Wichita Purple Martin Roost
From: Kevin Groeneweg <kgroeneweg AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 19:35:04 -0700
I went over to the Purple Martin roost in Wichita this evening.  They are 
currently gathering at the corner of Murdock and Mead just east of Via Christi 
St. Francis Hospital.  It remains to be seen if they stay there or move to the 
hospital where they have been in recent years.  I would estimate as many as 
8,000 martins so far.  That number should increase significantly over the next 
couple of weeks as it has been a good year for the martins. 



Kevin Groeneweg
Wichita

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Subject: Greater Roadrunner-Cheyenne Bottoms
From: Curtis Wolf <cjwolf AT FHSU.EDU>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 15:50:45 -0500
Robert Penner asked me to post that he observed a Greater Roadrunner along 
the road that runs along the Cheyenne Bottoms outlet canal, South of the 
KS Wetlands Education Center this afternoon.

Curtis J. Wolf
Manager, Kansas Wetlands Education Center
Fort Hays State University
592 NE K-156 Highway
Great Bend, KS 67530
Toll free: 1-877-243-9268
cjwolf AT fhsu.edu

http://wetlandscenter.fhsu.edu 

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Subject: Clinton: Painted Binting and waders
From: "Tollefson, John" <JTollefson AT TONG464.ORG>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 15:27:33 -0500
Walked the Wakarusa Causeway at Clinton Lake (Douglas County) mid-morning 
today. Found my first ever Painted Bunting singing from the wires and small 
trees along the eastern edge on the northern third. This is certainly the same 
bird that has been there for the summer, but I was just a tad thrilled. Thanks 
to those of you who have been posting sightings. Water was lower on the west 
side, but still tons of egrets, herons, and killdeer. A few other shorebirds, I 
felt confident on IDs of single Greater Yellowlegs and Solitary Sandpiper. Saw 
a few more at distance, shorebirds for sure, but that's as far as I'll 
speculate. 


John
Leavenworth County


This message contains 100% recycled electrons

John Tollefson
Science Teacher
Cross Country Coach
Tonganoxie High School
Tonganoxie, KS

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Subject: Quivira Ruff confirmed 27 July 2014
From: Barry Jones <barjones78 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 08:39:04 -0500
Ruff on Marsh Rd/NE 170th flats just now 8:15 am. Will try to get photos. 
Whimbrel also 

same area. 

Barry Jones
Quivira NWR 

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Subject: Migrants are on the move
From: Danny Akers <birdmandan1231 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 01:16:45 -0500
Hi All, 
 
Radar imagery looks pretty good here in western Kansas for migrants on the 
move. Here's a collage I threw together of the Goodland, KS and Dodge City, KS 
radar sites a bit ago: http://tinyurl.com/qh2ntmj (1230 AM CDT). Local 
observations line up with the boundary around Dodge City and the winds 
correlate well with the returns from Goodland. http://tinyurl.com/nluphmx I put 
a little more detail up on the Kansas Birding facebook page. 

 
Right around that time, I was standing outside my Dodge City apartment and 
heard several flight calls passing over, including Upland Sandpiper. I just 
took a few minutes outside again and heard a few more calls, including presumed 
Chipping Sparrows. 

 
Time for a quick nap.
 
Danny Akers
Dodge City
birdmandan1231 AT Hotmail.com 
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Re: 3 western hummers!! / 26 July
From: Elmer Finck <efinck AT FHSU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 12:49:58 -0500
Scott -- LaVonne and I had a beautiful male Rufous Hummingbird in our yard 
here in Hays yesterday and today.  Saludos y nos vemos más tarde, EJF

Elmer J. Finck, Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Fort Hays State University
600 Park Street
Hays, KS  67601-4099
office: AH 302
e-mail: efinck AT fhsu.edu
webpage: http://www.fhsu.edu/biology/efinck/
office phone: (785) 628-4269
fax: (785) 628-4153
home phone: (785) 625-9727
cell phone: (785) 650-1057

A Rock, A River, A Tree -- a tribute to Maya Angelou 1928-2014



From:   Scott Seltman 
To:     KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Date:   07/26/2014 07:07 AM
Subject:        3 western hummers!! / 26 July
Sent by:        Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas 




This morning 2 Rufous Hummingbirds and a drab female-type Calliope are all
coming to the feeder outside my window!  Is this Kansas?

 

Scott Seltman

Larned, Kansas 


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Subject: 3 western hummers!! / 26 July
From: Scott Seltman <sselt AT GBTA.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 07:02:50 -0500
This morning 2 Rufous Hummingbirds and a drab female-type Calliope are all
coming to the feeder outside my window!  Is this Kansas?

 

Scott Seltman

Larned, Kansas  


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Subject: errant Rock Dove
From: Sacie Lambertson <sacie.lambertson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:21:47 -0500
What might be the meaning of the presence of a single banded Rock Dove that
banged into a window and then sat there not so much addled as apparently
inquisitive.  It is clearly used to people, allowing me almost close enough
to touch it.

Yellow band.

We are out in the country, far from others.  I have noticed turtle doves in
large numbers this year.

Sacie
nr Winchester KS

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Subject: Re: Rufous Hummingbird
From: Scott Seltman <sselt AT GBTA.NET>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:02:23 -0500
An apparent immature male Rufous Hummingbird just arrived at our feeder moments 
ago. About 1/2 the gorget is filled in. They're everywhere! 


Scott Seltman
Larned, Kansas

-----Original Message-----
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas [mailto:KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of Jeff Calhoun 

Sent: Thursday, July 24, 2014 9:21 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Rufous Hummingbird

A female Rufous Hummingbird made an appearance in the yard tonight (7/24).
She's a week earlier than last year and apparently a bit earlier than typical 
in southwest KS. 


Jeff Calhoun
Dodge City

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Subject: Quivira report 25 July 2014
From: Barry Jones <barjones78 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:41:05 -0500
Several thousand shorebirds still using the flats along NE 170th Street.  
This area holds a majority of the viewable birds at the moment, mainly 
because there is so much water elsewhere (how often have we been able to 
claim that lately?).  Smaller usage, but worth checking, are Units 7, 40, 
49, and the Wildlife Drive itself.

A good look at Least Bittern this morning just west of the north spillway 
on the north side of Little Salt Marsh, similar to where the Millers 
reported it a few weeks ago.

Road work is completed around the Little Salt Marsh area, so that road can 
be driven.  Next up is the center of the Refuge, so expect closures over 
the next week or two on NE 140th Avenue (north of the blacktop).  The 
Wildlife Drive will be last - no firm dates, but after August 1.

Barry Jones
Quivira NWR

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Subject: Rufous Hummingbird
From: Jeff Calhoun <jeffcalhoun11 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 21:21:11 -0500
A female Rufous Hummingbird made an appearance in the yard tonight (7/24).
She's a week earlier than last year and apparently a bit earlier than
typical in southwest KS.

Jeff Calhoun
Dodge City

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Subject: Re: possible Ruff at Quivira
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 01:06:20 +0000
Could've been a Stilt Sandpiper?

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 24, 2014, at 7:44 PM, "Will"  wrote:
> 
> Had an odd shorebird at Quivira today. Size and proportions that of a Lesser 
Yellowleg except the bill. The bill was shorter and distinctly downcurved. Legs 
didn't look bright yellow either. Had some dark markings on the breast and 
belly. No photos, so not quite sure what to make of it. The bill really makes 
me think it could have been a Ruff. So if you're at Quivira, keep an eye out. 
It was the only 'yellowlegs' type bird there. Unfortunately, I didn't know what 
to look for to distinguish it from LYL, it flew, but aside from seeing white in 
the tail, I didn't get a good look. 

> 
> Also
> 4 Western SP
> 2 Red-necked Phalarope
> 
> Will Chatfield-Taylor
> 
> Lawrence
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
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Subject: possible Ruff at Quivira
From: Will <willc-t AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 18:26:34 -0600
Had an odd shorebird at Quivira today. Size and proportions that of a Lesser 
Yellowleg except the bill. The bill was shorter and distinctly downcurved. Legs 
didn't look bright yellow either. Had some dark markings on the breast and 
belly. No photos, so not quite sure what to make of it. The bill really makes 
me think it could have been a Ruff. So if you're at Quivira, keep an eye out. 
It was the only 'yellowlegs' type bird there. Unfortunately, I didn't know what 
to look for to distinguish it from LYL, it flew, but aside from seeing white in 
the tail, I didn't get a good look. 


Also
4 Western SP
2 Red-necked Phalarope

Will Chatfield-Taylor
 
Lawrence

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Juvenile Bald Eagle in Wichita
From: Harry Gregory <birdfan AT ME.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:50:47 -0500
For eagle watchers.

I saw a juvenile bald eagle flying north up the big ditch at Kellogg in Wichita 
this morning at 11:20. 


Harry Gregory

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Subject: Rufous Hummingbird
From: Irwin Hoogheem <Hoogy AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 16:20:08 -0500
     We witnessed a very aggressive interaction for a few days from a 
visitor  with our Ruby -Throated Hummingbird (4 often present) 
visits....today we caught up with the "gold gorget"!!!   It was 
brilliant in the full sun light...what a vibrant color?
      We haven't seen a Rufous Hummingbird in Ogden for couple of years....

Hoogy & Carol Hoogheem
Ogden/Riley

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Subject: Sad news
From: Ted Cable <tcable AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 15:48:00 -0500
I only recently learned that long time KOS member Wanda Johnson passed 
away back on May 28th.  As many of you know Wanda fought a life-long 
battle with diabetes.  Wanda and Lowell faithfully attended KOS meetings 
for many years. Lowell is still here in Manhattan and continues to get 
out to do local birding. Thought many of you would want to know of 
Wanda's passing. - Ted

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Subject: Re: Serious? question
From: Michael Pearce <md_pearce AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:51:04 -0500
As per Ken's concept of capturing lessers, with chicks, and giving them a few 
days to acclimate to the area - 

If my memory serves accurate, which it does occasionally, something similar was 
done when sharptails were brought from Nebraska to Kansas for the attempt of 
getting the birds going on some of their native range. 

The birds were brought to Kansas after some had been held for a few days in 
Nebraska, and placed overnight in a box out on the prairie. The spot was at 
what could have been a perfect location for a sharptail lek. Decoys of 
sharptails were placed on the fake lek, and recorded sounds of displaying males 
were played, starting before daylight. 

As I recall, some of the released males came out of the box and immediately 
went into display mode. 

I'm not sure how well chicks could handle stresses of capture and 
transportation. No real worries about rounding up the males with the females 
and chicks. Most grouse, like pheasants, are dead-beat dads. 

A consistent rain dance, and Scott's point about making it financially 
favorable to ranchers to leave good habitat, are still probably the two 
biggies. (I interviewed one rancher who thought it would be nice if all who 
favored the listing would dedicate 10 percent of each paycheck to a program 
that compensated western Kansas ranchers and farmers, instead of making them 
deal with all of the stresses alone. Yes, he was smart enough to realize that 
could never happen.) 

I think moving some birds to vacant habitat could work, but we have to decide 
how many individuals of a threatened species we are willing to possibly lose 
through such a gamble. Also, I'm wondering what could be done for habitat with 
all of the money that will be spent on law suits and the probable captive 
breeding program? 

Michael PearceNewton, America

> Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 20:58:13 -0500
> From: kinman AT HOTMAIL.COM
> Subject: Re: Serious? question
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Hi Tim, Scott, and others:
> I've been thinking about this for several days, and I keep thinking that 
where there's a will, there's a way (if we are willing to at least give it a 
try on a small scale). Repopulating an area like Meade County with lesser 
prairie chickens would normally be done by translocating adults from areas 
where they are (relatively) more plentiful. So why not try an experiment (on a 
small scale) once an appropriate location in Meade County is ready for 
reintroduction. 

> Instead of just reintroducing captured adults, try capturing adult pairs 
along with their chicks, and then release the family together in the new 
location in Meade County. The release could be done in a pen for a few days, so 
they could settle down after the capture and transport, and then open the gate 
to the family's new home. That way they wouldn't lose their wildness by 
long-term living in a pen. You could do this with families with chicks of 
different ages to see what works best. That way you could build up the 
population faster and also remove fewer adults for translocation. Compared to 
captive breeding, it would be quicker, less expensive, and the chicks could 
continue to learn from their parents whatever lessons they had not yet learned 
up to that point. 

> Or am I being overly hopeful and naive that such an experiment could work? Or 
have such experiments already been attempted? ----------------Ken Kinman Hays, 
Kansas 

> 
> ------------------------------------------------------------------
> > Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 08:51:54 -0600
> > From: timothy.barksdale AT GMAIL.COM
> > Subject: Serious? question
> > To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> > 
> > Folks,
> > 
> > After years of studying Greater Prairie Chickens and watching and listening 
to a series of expert biologists, the difficulty of breeding Greater Prairie 
Chickens in anything more than small numbers is crazy... then as Michael Pearce 
pointed out the cost per bird is equally ridiculous. 

> > 
> > Saving the habitat as Scott Seltman through incentives with land owners is 
clearly the way to at least begin a next step. 

> > 
> > One thing that is rarely mentioned in the "re-introduction" of the 
endangered species is the near impossibility of establishing or re-establishing 
the full range of feeding, breeding and many other subtle behaviors that we 
humans just don't get. Even in precocial species there are learned traits 
passed along by the adults. Putting hundreds or even thousands of young birds 
back into an environment which may of may not be 'restored' with a set of less 
than complete behavioral mechanisms to deal with it is a recipe for an 
expensive disaster. 

> > 
> > 
> > Thoreau said “The West of which I speak is but another name for the Wild; 
and what I have been preparing to say is, that in Wildness is the preservation 
of the world.” 

> > 
> > Sadly, the west is no longer the Wild. It is wilder than other places, but 
wild -ness is gone. We burgeoning numbers of humans have destroyed that in the 
last 70 years. Preserve what we have left, lock it up, and begin restoration of 
huge blocks- that is about the only hope left. Gotta start soon. 

> > 
> > 
> > Tim
> > 
> > 
> > Timothy Barksdale
> > Birdman Productions LLC
> > P.O. Box 1124
> > 65 Mountain View Dr.
> > Choteau, MT 59422
> > 
> > At Birdman Productions, we make films about birds, and tell stories that 
change people's lives. 

> > 
> >
>  		 	   		  
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> http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/ksbird-l.html
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> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 		 	   		  
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Subject: White-winged Dove
From: John Row <johmarrow AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 21:29:39 -0500
Hi All,
We found a white-winged dove wandering through Diane's potted plants on our 
deck looking for food just before 1:00 this afternoon. It soon flew to and 
landed on top of our bluebird house and then dropped down to the spot where we 
feed birds in the wintertime. As predicted the WWDOs are back, our third 
sighting this month of a single bird. 

John and Diane RowManhattan, Kansas 		 	   		  
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Subject: Re: Serious? question
From: Michael Pearce <md_pearce AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 21:29:07 -0500
Most of the greaters didn't do well. I suspect they committed suicide when they 
walked out of the boxes and saw they were in Missouri. -)Kansas did move 
trapped lessers successfully, I have read, in the past, to areas of good 
habitat. But we know releases of sharp tails and ruffed grouse didn't do very 
well in the 80s, but I think there were habitat issues with both. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 22, 2014, at 9:22 PM, "EUGENE YOUNG"  wrote:
> 
> KS has given other states Greater's, but I'm not sure of success with the 
program! It worked well with Turkey's too! But, Lesser habitat requirements 
seem to be more restrictive, as does their tolerance to anthropogenic factors! 
But such efforts, might be better than a captive breeding program, as many have 
said so well! 

> 
> Gene
> 
> Ark City, KS
> NOC
> 
> Gene Young Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Jul 22, 2014, at 9:05 PM, "Ken Kinman"  wrote:
>> 
>> Hi Tim, Scott, and others:
>> I've been thinking about this for several days, and I keep thinking that 
where there's a will, there's a way (if we are willing to at least give it a 
try on a small scale). Repopulating an area like Meade County with lesser 
prairie chickens would normally be done by translocating adults from areas 
where they are (relatively) more plentiful. So why not try an experiment (on a 
small scale) once an appropriate location in Meade County is ready for 
reintroduction. 

>> Instead of just reintroducing captured adults, try capturing adult pairs 
along with their chicks, and then release the family together in the new 
location in Meade County. The release could be done in a pen for a few days, so 
they could settle down after the capture and transport, and then open the gate 
to the family's new home. That way they wouldn't lose their wildness by 
long-term living in a pen. You could do this with families with chicks of 
different ages to see what works best. That way you could build up the 
population faster and also remove fewer adults for translocation. Compared to 
captive breeding, it would be quicker, less expensive, and the chicks could 
continue to learn from their parents whatever lessons they had not yet learned 
up to that point. 

>> Or am I being overly hopeful and naive that such an experiment could work? 
Or have such experiments already been attempted? ----------------Ken Kinman 
Hays, Kansas 

>> 
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------
>>> Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 08:51:54 -0600
>>> From: timothy.barksdale AT GMAIL.COM
>>> Subject: Serious? question
>>> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>>> 
>>> Folks,
>>> 
>>> After years of studying Greater Prairie Chickens and watching and listening 
to a series of expert biologists, the difficulty of breeding Greater Prairie 
Chickens in anything more than small numbers is crazy... then as Michael Pearce 
pointed out the cost per bird is equally ridiculous. 

>>> 
>>> Saving the habitat as Scott Seltman through incentives with land owners is 
clearly the way to at least begin a next step. 

>>> 
>>> One thing that is rarely mentioned in the "re-introduction" of the 
endangered species is the near impossibility of establishing or re-establishing 
the full range of feeding, breeding and many other subtle behaviors that we 
humans just don't get. Even in precocial species there are learned traits 
passed along by the adults. Putting hundreds or even thousands of young birds 
back into an environment which may of may not be 'restored' with a set of less 
than complete behavioral mechanisms to deal with it is a recipe for an 
expensive disaster. 

>>> 
>>> 
>>> Thoreau said “The West of which I speak is but another name for the Wild; 
and what I have been preparing to say is, that in Wildness is the preservation 
of the world.” 

>>> 
>>> Sadly, the west is no longer the Wild. It is wilder than other places, but 
wild -ness is gone. We burgeoning numbers of humans have destroyed that in the 
last 70 years. Preserve what we have left, lock it up, and begin restoration of 
huge blocks- that is about the only hope left. Gotta start soon. 

>>> 
>>> 
>>> Tim
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Timothy Barksdale
>>> Birdman Productions LLC
>>> P.O. Box 1124
>>> 65 Mountain View Dr.
>>> Choteau, MT 59422
>>> 
>>> At Birdman Productions, we make films about birds, and tell stories that 
change people's lives. 

>> 
>> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>> http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/ksbird-l.html
>> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
>> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
>> To contact a listowner, send a message to
>> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
> 
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu

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Subject: Re: Serious? question
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG AT NOC.EDU>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 02:20:34 +0000
KS has given other states Greater's, but I'm not sure of success with the 
program! It worked well with Turkey's too! But, Lesser habitat requirements 
seem to be more restrictive, as does their tolerance to anthropogenic factors! 
But such efforts, might be better than a captive breeding program, as many have 
said so well! 


Gene

Ark City, KS
NOC

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 22, 2014, at 9:05 PM, "Ken Kinman"  wrote:
> 
> Hi Tim, Scott, and others:
> I've been thinking about this for several days, and I keep thinking that 
where there's a will, there's a way (if we are willing to at least give it a 
try on a small scale). Repopulating an area like Meade County with lesser 
prairie chickens would normally be done by translocating adults from areas 
where they are (relatively) more plentiful. So why not try an experiment (on a 
small scale) once an appropriate location in Meade County is ready for 
reintroduction. 

> Instead of just reintroducing captured adults, try capturing adult pairs 
along with their chicks, and then release the family together in the new 
location in Meade County. The release could be done in a pen for a few days, so 
they could settle down after the capture and transport, and then open the gate 
to the family's new home. That way they wouldn't lose their wildness by 
long-term living in a pen. You could do this with families with chicks of 
different ages to see what works best. That way you could build up the 
population faster and also remove fewer adults for translocation. Compared to 
captive breeding, it would be quicker, less expensive, and the chicks could 
continue to learn from their parents whatever lessons they had not yet learned 
up to that point. 

> Or am I being overly hopeful and naive that such an experiment could work? Or 
have such experiments already been attempted? ----------------Ken Kinman Hays, 
Kansas 

> 
> ------------------------------------------------------------------
>> Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 08:51:54 -0600
>> From: timothy.barksdale AT GMAIL.COM
>> Subject: Serious? question
>> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>> 
>> Folks,
>> 
>> After years of studying Greater Prairie Chickens and watching and listening 
to a series of expert biologists, the difficulty of breeding Greater Prairie 
Chickens in anything more than small numbers is crazy... then as Michael Pearce 
pointed out the cost per bird is equally ridiculous. 

>> 
>> Saving the habitat as Scott Seltman through incentives with land owners is 
clearly the way to at least begin a next step. 

>> 
>> One thing that is rarely mentioned in the "re-introduction" of the 
endangered species is the near impossibility of establishing or re-establishing 
the full range of feeding, breeding and many other subtle behaviors that we 
humans just don't get. Even in precocial species there are learned traits 
passed along by the adults. Putting hundreds or even thousands of young birds 
back into an environment which may of may not be 'restored' with a set of less 
than complete behavioral mechanisms to deal with it is a recipe for an 
expensive disaster. 

>> 
>> 
>> Thoreau said “The West of which I speak is but another name for the Wild; 
and what I have been preparing to say is, that in Wildness is the preservation 
of the world.” 

>> 
>> Sadly, the west is no longer the Wild. It is wilder than other places, but 
wild -ness is gone. We burgeoning numbers of humans have destroyed that in the 
last 70 years. Preserve what we have left, lock it up, and begin restoration of 
huge blocks- that is about the only hope left. Gotta start soon. 

>> 
>> 
>> Tim
>> 
>> 
>> Timothy Barksdale
>> Birdman Productions LLC
>> P.O. Box 1124
>> 65 Mountain View Dr.
>> Choteau, MT 59422
>> 
>> At Birdman Productions, we make films about birds, and tell stories that 
change people's lives. 

>                         
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/ksbird-l.html
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request AT listserv.ksu.edu

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Subject: Re: Serious? question
From: Ken Kinman <kinman AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 20:58:13 -0500
Hi Tim, Scott, and others:
 I've been thinking about this for several days, and I keep thinking that where 
there's a will, there's a way (if we are willing to at least give it a try on a 
small scale). Repopulating an area like Meade County with lesser prairie 
chickens would normally be done by translocating adults from areas where they 
are (relatively) more plentiful. So why not try an experiment (on a small 
scale) once an appropriate location in Meade County is ready for 
reintroduction. 

 Instead of just reintroducing captured adults, try capturing adult pairs along 
with their chicks, and then release the family together in the new location in 
Meade County. The release could be done in a pen for a few days, so they could 
settle down after the capture and transport, and then open the gate to the 
family's new home. That way they wouldn't lose their wildness by long-term 
living in a pen. You could do this with families with chicks of different ages 
to see what works best. That way you could build up the population faster and 
also remove fewer adults for translocation. Compared to captive breeding, it 
would be quicker, less expensive, and the chicks could continue to learn from 
their parents whatever lessons they had not yet learned up to that point. 

 Or am I being overly hopeful and naive that such an experiment could work? Or 
have such experiments already been attempted? ----------------Ken Kinman Hays, 
Kansas 


------------------------------------------------------------------
> Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 08:51:54 -0600
> From: timothy.barksdale AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: Serious? question
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Folks,
> 
> After years of studying Greater Prairie Chickens and watching and listening 
to a series of expert biologists, the difficulty of breeding Greater Prairie 
Chickens in anything more than small numbers is crazy... then as Michael Pearce 
pointed out the cost per bird is equally ridiculous. 

> 
> Saving the habitat as Scott Seltman through incentives with land owners is 
clearly the way to at least begin a next step. 

> 
> One thing that is rarely mentioned in the "re-introduction" of the endangered 
species is the near impossibility of establishing or re-establishing the full 
range of feeding, breeding and many other subtle behaviors that we humans just 
don't get. Even in precocial species there are learned traits passed along by 
the adults. Putting hundreds or even thousands of young birds back into an 
environment which may of may not be 'restored' with a set of less than complete 
behavioral mechanisms to deal with it is a recipe for an expensive disaster. 

> 
> 
> Thoreau said “The West of which I speak is but another name for the Wild; and 
what I have been preparing to say is, that in Wildness is the preservation of 
the world.” 

> 
> Sadly, the west is no longer the Wild. It is wilder than other places, but 
wild -ness is gone. We burgeoning numbers of humans have destroyed that in the 
last 70 years. Preserve what we have left, lock it up, and begin restoration of 
huge blocks- that is about the only hope left. Gotta start soon. 

> 
> 
> Tim
> 
> 
> Timothy Barksdale
> Birdman Productions LLC
> P.O. Box 1124
> 65 Mountain View Dr.
> Choteau, MT 59422
> 
> At Birdman Productions, we make films about birds, and tell stories that 
change people's lives. 

> 
>
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Rooks County Lazuli Bunting
From: Jon Vande Kopple <jvkopple AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 12:36:21 -0500
I had a territorial male Lazuli Bunting this morning at Webster WA.  You
can see pictures and two videos (for the bird's song) at my flickr page:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/60967841 AT N05/14718444735/in/photostream/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/60967841 AT N05/14716005484/in/photostream/
Thanks,
Jon Vande Kopple
Stockton, KS

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Subject: Serious? question
From: Timothy Barksdale <timothy.barksdale AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 08:51:54 -0600
Folks,

After years of studying Greater Prairie Chickens and watching and listening to 
a series of expert biologists, the difficulty of breeding Greater Prairie 
Chickens in anything more than small numbers is crazy... then as Michael Pearce 
pointed out the cost per bird is equally ridiculous. 


Saving the habitat as Scott Seltman through incentives with land owners is 
clearly the way to at least begin a next step. 


One thing that is rarely mentioned in the "re-introduction" of the endangered 
species is the near impossibility of establishing or re-establishing the full 
range of feeding, breeding and many other subtle behaviors that we humans just 
don't get. Even in precocial species there are learned traits passed along by 
the adults. Putting hundreds or even thousands of young birds back into an 
environment which may of may not be 'restored' with a set of less than complete 
behavioral mechanisms to deal with it is a recipe for an expensive disaster. 



Thoreau said “The West of which I speak is but another name for the Wild; and 
what I have been preparing to say is, that in Wildness is the preservation of 
the world.” 


Sadly, the west is no longer the Wild. It is wilder than other places, but wild 
-ness is gone. We burgeoning numbers of humans have destroyed that in the last 
70 years. Preserve what we have left, lock it up, and begin restoration of huge 
blocks- that is about the only hope left. Gotta start soon. 



Tim


Timothy Barksdale
Birdman Productions LLC
P.O. Box 1124
65 Mountain View Dr.
Choteau, MT 59422

At Birdman Productions, we make films about birds, and tell stories that change 
people's lives. 










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Subject: Webster Reservoir Plovers
From: Jon Vande Kopple <jvkopple AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 17:09:38 -0500
I stopped at Webster today to check on the plovers that have been there
since April/May.  It had been a few weeks since I'd been out to the lake,
so I was curious as to how the young Piping Plovers were doing.  I'm happy
to say that I saw 2 fully-fledged juvenile Pipers with an adult female.
 All three of the birds were capable of flight.  I was also delighted to
find 2 downy young Snowy Plovers.  Last year, Pipers and Snowies were
around all Summer, and I did confirm Piper breeding; however, this year, I
was able to get confirmation of breeding to a higher degree.  Anyways,
other than the plovers, not much was happening.
Thanks,
Jon Vande Kopple
Stockton, KS

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Subject: Re: serious birding question
From: Scott Seltman <sselt AT GBTA.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 07:00:03 -0500
I had a interesting conversation last year with a person of some importance in 
a major conservation group. He said they already had $25 million ready to be 
spent on Lesser Prairie-Chicken easements, i.e. 'renting' pastureland for 
$20/acre/year under condition that the land be managed for the benefit of 
LEPCs. This would not mean that the pastures would be emptied of cattle, but 
rather the stocking rates and timing would be adjusted to maximize the quality 
of habitat. To me, this is the sort of arrangement that any rancher would be 
crazy not to take and could greatly improve LEPC numbers in places they already 
exist. 


I've been fortunate in the last few years to spend lots of time observing LEPCs 
and can attest to the fact they are still quite common in isolated pockets here 
in KS. On the other hand, it is very disturbing to see them absolutely vanish 
from some of their fomer strongholds like Morton County. The Cimarron National 
Grassland had 500+ LEPCs 20 years ago and in 2014 had an official population of 
ZERO!! Yes, there was a big fire and lots of drought recently, but this only 
confirms in my mind how LEPCs are just hanging on by a thread in many 
locations. 


As for the captive-breeding scheme? Pfffft! Why not begin by lowering taxes on 
prairie-chickens? 


No hummers of any ilk here in the Larned area. 

Scott Seltman
Larned, Kansas

  
-----Original Message-----
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas [mailto:KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On 
Behalf Of Daniel Larson 

Sent: Saturday, July 19, 2014 2:45 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: serious birding question

Has anyone ever succesfully bred prairie chickens? The social aspect of their 
breeding behavior would make it very difficult I think? 


Thanks
Dan Larson

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Subject: Re: serious birding question
From: Robert Reed <ridgewalkertrent AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 21:02:31 -0500
The first guy to suspect fowl play is the guy who plays fowl most often.
Our govenor doesnt believe that scientist will remain impartial. He cant
understand altruism except as a concept. Wildlife will always lose to
dollars in this state. I work on one farmer at a time. It takes a lot of
effort with mixed results. Its worth the effort.

Are you a tracker asked John Grady?  I can track low flyin birds! ~CORMAC
MACCARTHY

Robert T Reed
Louisburg, Miami Co. KS
On Jul 20, 2014 7:44 PM, "Steve Sorensen"  wrote:

> It is not the cost per chick produced that makes this an asinine project.
> If
> they were relatively free it doesn't make sense to release captive-reared
> birds in an effort to bolster natural populations. If the habitat can not
> sustain the existing population, what good does it do to dump more birds
> into the limiting habitat? Too many studies show that releasing pen-reared
> birds causes native birds (primarily northern bobwhites) to abandon nests
> because of overcrowding.
>
>
>
> In Michael Pearce's second article in today's paper about the upcoming
> magical, mystery [pheasant bus] tour 2014, Secretary Jennison says "We all
> know that habitat is always the most important thing, and I know
> (propagation) would not be a wise investment for the department. But people
> are doing it. I just talked to one guy who turned out 150 hens this spring.
> I would like to find a way to help people like that. I'd like for us to be
> able to say to them, 'This is the best way to do it.'" Apparently he thinks
> that one of his employees knows a magical way to release pen-reared birds
> and successfully replenish natural populations to previous high densities
> and the secret will come out at the two public meetings scheduled next
> week.
> Interesting.
>
>
>
> I realize that the Governor and many of his associates do not believe in
> science and the research results generated by scientific studies. But when
> all of the work previously conducted by biologists in his agency and
> agencies across the nation point to the futility of stocking pen-reared
> birds, it has to dawn on someone that this is not the way to go.
>
>
>
> Steve Sorensen
>
> Valley Center, KS
>
> Sedgwick County
>
>
>
> ---
> This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus
> protection is active.
> http://www.avast.com
>
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>

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Subject: Re: serious birding question
From: Steve Sorensen <webforbs AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 19:41:14 -0500
It is not the cost per chick produced that makes this an asinine project. If
they were relatively free it doesn't make sense to release captive-reared
birds in an effort to bolster natural populations. If the habitat can not
sustain the existing population, what good does it do to dump more birds
into the limiting habitat? Too many studies show that releasing pen-reared
birds causes native birds (primarily northern bobwhites) to abandon nests
because of overcrowding.

 

In Michael Pearce's second article in today's paper about the upcoming
magical, mystery [pheasant bus] tour 2014, Secretary Jennison says "We all
know that habitat is always the most important thing, and I know
(propagation) would not be a wise investment for the department. But people
are doing it. I just talked to one guy who turned out 150 hens this spring.
I would like to find a way to help people like that. I'd like for us to be
able to say to them, 'This is the best way to do it.'" Apparently he thinks
that one of his employees knows a magical way to release pen-reared birds
and successfully replenish natural populations to previous high densities
and the secret will come out at the two public meetings scheduled next week.
Interesting.

 

I realize that the Governor and many of his associates do not believe in
science and the research results generated by scientific studies. But when
all of the work previously conducted by biologists in his agency and
agencies across the nation point to the futility of stocking pen-reared
birds, it has to dawn on someone that this is not the way to go.

 

Steve Sorensen

Valley Center, KS

Sedgwick County



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Subject: Re: serious birding question
From: David Rintoul <drintoul AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 19:23:56 +0000
"Anyway, I suspect the federal government will end up paying most of the cost 
if the program is approved." 


Why? Our governor, who clearly thinks that the federal government has no 
business managing LEPC, will almost certainly not take any federal funding for 
this. He will take it out of KDWPTs budget, I suspect. 


Dave

David A. Rintoul, Ph.D.
Associate Director - Biology Division
Faculty Senate President
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS 66506

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Subject: Re: serious birding question
From: Michael Pearce <md_pearce AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 11:35:13 -0700
This is being pushed by the energy companies, and they have expressed interest 
in some funding. What is not know. Is the permitting system for taking eggs. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 20, 2014, at 11:31 AM, "Ken Kinman"  wrote:
> 
> Hi all, That's a good question. Who is going to pay for this program? Even if 
survival rates might be higher in Kansas (no major army ant worries like they 
have in Texas), it still will be costly per prairie chicken produced. Back in 
1940 when the pheasant hatchery first went into production, costs were no doubt 
very low per pheasant. And the pheasant population had been decimated by the 
drought of the 1930s, so it was probably a much needed program. I was just 
reading a newspaper article from May 1940 which said that they expected to 
release about 15,000 pheasants that first year (weblink to that article is 
given below). Too bad we can't produce prairie chickens in such numbers, so 
that the price per bird would be more reasonable. Anyway, I suspect the federal 
government will end up paying most of the cost if the program is approved. 
-------------------Ken Kinman Hays, Kansas ! 

                    
> http://jon.stparchive.com/Archive/JON/JON05231940P06.php                     
> 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

>> Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 09:05:58 -0500
>> From: webforbs AT COX.NET
>> Subject: Re: serious birding question
>> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>> 
>> The Kansas Fish and Game Commission reared prairie-chickens back in the late
>> 1950's and 60's at its pheasant production facility at Meade SFL. I do not
>> remember if they were greater prairie-chickens or lesser prairie-chickens.
>> One of the workers at the facility told me that production was difficult and
>> they had very low survival. And that is while the birds were at Meade. Who
>> knows the survival rate of the young once they were released into the wild. 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> It's amazing the department once conducted captive rearing operations for
>> prairie-chickens, pheasants and northern bobwhites but closed down all of
>> their facilities 40 years ago. Now the politicians think they have the
>> answer to low upland game bird populations so we are going to waste good
>> money rearing LEPCs?? And whose money will it be?
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Steve Sorensen
>> 
>> Valley Center, KS
>> 
>> Sedgwick County
> 
>                         
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Subject: Re: serious birding question
From: Ken Kinman <kinman AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 13:27:50 -0500
Hi all, That's a good question. Who is going to pay for this program? Even if 
survival rates might be higher in Kansas (no major army ant worries like they 
have in Texas), it still will be costly per prairie chicken produced. Back in 
1940 when the pheasant hatchery first went into production, costs were no doubt 
very low per pheasant. And the pheasant population had been decimated by the 
drought of the 1930s, so it was probably a much needed program. I was just 
reading a newspaper article from May 1940 which said that they expected to 
release about 15,000 pheasants that first year (weblink to that article is 
given below). Too bad we can't produce prairie chickens in such numbers, so 
that the price per bird would be more reasonable. Anyway, I suspect the federal 
government will end up paying most of the cost if the program is approved. 
-------------------Ken Kinman Hays, Kansas 

http://jon.stparchive.com/Archive/JON/JON05231940P06.php                     

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

> Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 09:05:58 -0500
> From: webforbs AT COX.NET
> Subject: Re: serious birding question
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> The Kansas Fish and Game Commission reared prairie-chickens back in the late
> 1950's and 60's at its pheasant production facility at Meade SFL. I do not
> remember if they were greater prairie-chickens or lesser prairie-chickens.
> One of the workers at the facility told me that production was difficult and
> they had very low survival. And that is while the birds were at Meade. Who
> knows the survival rate of the young once they were released into the wild. 
> 
>  
> 
> It's amazing the department once conducted captive rearing operations for
> prairie-chickens, pheasants and northern bobwhites but closed down all of
> their facilities 40 years ago. Now the politicians think they have the
> answer to low upland game bird populations so we are going to waste good
> money rearing LEPCs?? And whose money will it be?
> 
>  
> 
> Steve Sorensen
> 
> Valley Center, KS
> 
> Sedgwick County 
> 
> 

 		 	   		  
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Subject: Clinton Lake Overlook park
From: "Wedge, Philip C." <pwedge AT KU.EDU>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 15:57:30 +0000
Last night (7/19), I heard and saw both Painted Bunting and Blue Grosbeak while 
taking a walk from the Overlook park at Clinton Lake (N. of dam) to Sander's 
Mound, the small hill with bench that has a view of the lake and marina. 
(Douglas Co.) 


Phil Wedge
Lawrence

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Subject: Re: serious birding question
From: Steve Sorensen <webforbs AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 09:05:58 -0500
The Kansas Fish and Game Commission reared prairie-chickens back in the late
1950's and 60's at its pheasant production facility at Meade SFL. I do not
remember if they were greater prairie-chickens or lesser prairie-chickens.
One of the workers at the facility told me that production was difficult and
they had very low survival. And that is while the birds were at Meade. Who
knows the survival rate of the young once they were released into the wild. 

 

It's amazing the department once conducted captive rearing operations for
prairie-chickens, pheasants and northern bobwhites but closed down all of
their facilities 40 years ago. Now the politicians think they have the
answer to low upland game bird populations so we are going to waste good
money rearing LEPCs?? And whose money will it be?

 

Steve Sorensen

Valley Center, KS

Sedgwick County 



---
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Subject: Labette County birds
From: Richard Tucker <rickt AT WAVEWLS.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 08:57:22 -0500
Birds from deck here on the farm this AM:
Ruby Throated Hummingbird
House Finch
E. Wood Peewee
Mourning Dove
Red-eyed Vireo
White-breasted Nuthatch
Downey Woodpecker
E. Phoebe
N. Cardinal

Andrew Burnett and I had great look at Painted Bunting just south of Parsons 
Wednesday. Still looking for the White-winged Dove but no luck. 


Rick Tucker
Parsons, Ks
Labette County
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Subject: Mississippi Kites Johnson and Wyandotte County
From: "markeland AT kc.rr.com" <markeland@KC.RR.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 23:47:01 -0500
While driving near 55th and Roe a pair of Mississippi Kites flew overhead. 
Eileen had to catch me as I leaned too far forward as they went overhead 
and was headed toward the median. 

At a party in Wyandotte county near 36th and Dover at least three 
Mississippi Kites went over quite high catching insects. Other times they 
came over very low. I could never count more than two at a time but plumage 
variation showed three and possibly four. They were last seen around 8:45pm 
as dusk settled in. Also seen were two very high Red-tailed Hawks riding 
the winds south that I might have missed if not for the kites. 

Mark Land
Overland Park, KS 66207 

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Subject: Quivira NWR - 7/19 AM
From: Danny Akers <birdmandan1231 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 20:11:25 -0500
Jeff Calhoun and I checked out Quivira NWR this morning in hopes of relocating 
the Red Phalarope. We did not have any success, however we managed 19 species 
of shorebirds to pad our list for the day. Nearly ~900 Stilt Sandpipers, at 
least 2 Western Sandpipers, vocal Dowitchers of both species, and nearly ~90 
Wilson's and 2 Red-necked Phalaropes were present. A Caspian Tern and 4 Least 
Terns were also noteworthy. 26 Redheads were pretty neat to see too. Swallow 
numbers continue to build. 

 
Nothing overly exceptional elsewhere today. 
 
Danny Akers
Dodge City
birdmandan1231 AT hotmail.com 
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Re: serious birding question
From: Michael Pearce <md_pearce AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 17:53:48 -0500
According to the manager and biologists at the Attwater Prairie Chicken 
National Wildlife Refuge, they have four places raising Attwater chicks in 
captivity. 

That part is "highly successful," getting the birds to survive in the wild is 
not. They started the captive breeding program in the early 1990s when they had 
500 birds, and started the releases in 1995. 

By 2005, despite probably more than 1,000 birds released, the population was at 
the all-time low of 40. 

Now it's at about 100, pre-release adult birds. They released 400 to 500 this 
summer. 

Things are getting better, though, with a 16 percent survival rate on released 
birds but that amounts to more than $5,000 per bird that survives to one year. 

Releases in recent years have ranged from around 200 to about 400 aged six to 
12 weeks. 

Biologists down there are making progress by exterminating army ants over much 
of the refuge. 

They were not at all supportive of the Kansas program, and said if habitat 
returns, trans-locating adult birds would be much more successful but basically 
told me to pray for rain and successful habitat programs. 

Oh, and Kansas did have some pen-reared lessers back, I think, in the 1930s but 
the cost was even higher than what's happening with Attwaters and there's no 
record of the birds survived upon being released. 

Michael PearceNewton, America

> Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 16:06:00 -0500
> From: kinman AT HOTMAIL.COM
> Subject: Re: serious birding question
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Hi Dan,   
> The Houston Zoo has apparently been quite successful in breeding the highly 
endangered Attwater's subspecies of the greater prairie chicken. You can read 
more about it in their blog (weblink is given below). -----------Ken Kinman 
Hays, Kansas 

> http://blogs.houstonzoo.org/2014/04/24573/ 
> 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

> 
> > Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 14:44:36 -0500
> > From: birdkansa AT GMAIL.COM
> > Subject: serious birding question
> > To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> > 
> > Has anyone ever succesfully bred prairie chickens? The social aspect of
> > their breeding behavior would make it very difficult I think?
> > 
> > Thanks
> > Dan Larson
> > 
> 
>  		 	   		  
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Subject: Yard Birds
From: John Row <johmarrow AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 17:24:54 -0500
Hello All,
While in the kitchen this morning, Diane spotted a bird doing something under a 
table on our deck. I tried to get an angle on it and spotted a young Carolina 
wren taking a dirt bath in a 2 inch diameter x 2-1/4 inch tall cup, a flat of 
which Diane was using to start plants. Diane had been complaining that a pair 
of cardinals had been seriously checking out a hanging fern as she thought it a 
bad location for a nest with watering the fern and all. Sure enough, I got a 
ladder and took a peak and a nest with eggs was later seen being occupied by 
mom ma cardinal. 

John and Diane RowManhattan, Kansas 		 	   		  
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Subject: Re: serious birding question
From: Michael Pearce <md_pearce AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 14:26:58 -0700
Captive breeding saved Attwater prairie chicken from extinction, but at a 
massive cost and poor success rates. It was their last chance, but the 
biologists involved think the Kansas plan is poor, at best. 

We have another article on it Sunday, as an addition to the front page story we 
did after the plan was announced. 


Michael Pearce
Newton, US

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 19, 2014, at 12:59 PM, "Daniel Larson"  wrote:
> 
> Has anyone ever succesfully bred prairie chickens? The social aspect of
> their breeding behavior would make it very difficult I think?
> 
> Thanks
> Dan Larson
> 
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Subject: Re: serious birding question
From: Ken Kinman <kinman AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 16:06:00 -0500
Hi Dan,   
 The Houston Zoo has apparently been quite successful in breeding the highly 
endangered Attwater's subspecies of the greater prairie chicken. You can read 
more about it in their blog (weblink is given below). -----------Ken Kinman 
Hays, Kansas 

http://blogs.houstonzoo.org/2014/04/24573/ 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 


> Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 14:44:36 -0500
> From: birdkansa AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: serious birding question
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Has anyone ever succesfully bred prairie chickens? The social aspect of
> their breeding behavior would make it very difficult I think?
> 
> Thanks
> Dan Larson
> 

 		 	   		  
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Subject: Breeding Prairie Chickens?
From: Mick McHugh <emchugh2 AT KC.RR.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 14:29:16 -0600
Dan et all,
    The  breeding Prairie Chicken bit by the Gov.
is just an example of his desire for the legislators
to replace the wildlife biologists.Stunningly stupid.
Mick McHugh
Kansas City

They will mount up with wings,as Eagles
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Subject: serious birding question
From: Daniel Larson <birdkansa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 14:44:36 -0500
Has anyone ever succesfully bred prairie chickens? The social aspect of
their breeding behavior would make it very difficult I think?

Thanks
Dan Larson

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Subject: Re: All three phalaropes at Quivira today
From: David Seibel <dseibel AT JCCC.EDU>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 18:20:43 +0000
Just a heads up for anyone who might go searching for the phalaropes at 
Quivira: On closer examination of my digiscoped photos, I suspect that all 
eleven of the birds swimming with the Red Phalarope were actually Reds too 
(males in basic plumage or juvs)! They're tricky at that distance. There were a 
couple of definite Red-necked Phalaropes on the south side of the county road 
at the same spot. 


David Seibel
Lenexa
________________________________________
From: David Seibel
Sent: Friday, July 18, 2014 7:25 PM
To: KSBIRD-L Listserv
Subject: All three phalaropes at Quivira today

Galen Pittman and I found 23 species of shorebirds at Quivira NWR today, 
including 14 Red-necked and 1 spectacular adult Red Phalarope in alternate 
plumage. Among other notable species, we also saw at least 10 Short-billed 
Dowitchers and 2 White-rumped Sandpipers. Full list and more details on eBird: 


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19138545

David Seibel
Lenexa

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Subject: Lake Clinton, Douglas County
From: Carol Morgan <crxmorgan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 13:10:57 -0500
Fourteen Topeka Audubon Society members checked out some hotspots around 
Lake Clinton early this morning.  On the Wakarusa Causeway we found one of 
our target species: painted bunting.  It was gorgeous in the morning sun.  
It was so good to see water on both sides of the causeway because it seems 
as if that end of the lake has been dry forever.  There were a dozen great 
egrets and two dozen great blue herons in the marshy area on the west side 
of the causeway, plus three little blue herons and 3-4 snowy egrets.  Two 
children were with our group and both were excited at the painted bunting.  
There he is!  There he went!  Our senior member, Sarah (90+ years young), 
walked the causeway with us.  I hope I'm still birding when I get to be 
that age.

We also went to Clinton State Park and Bloomington Beach area and found a 
variety of species including scissor-tailed flycatcher, orchard oriole, 
warbling vireo, Caspian tern, hairy woodpecker and a chipping sparrow 
nest.  Dan Larson ventured through heavy brush along the nonexistent 
shoreline for a short distance, but I think the insects finally made him 
give up and retreat to the sandy beach.  A new birder who came with us, 
Denise, couldn't stop smiling after getting new species after new species.

After that we decided to head to Lake Perry to try for the Pacific loon.  
I've already posted about that.  

What a beautiful day!  It's probably the last day of moderate temperatures 
so I'm glad we were out to enjoy it.  Debby McKee is working on our 
official lists for the morning, but I think we got about 57 species today.



Carol Morgan

Topeka, Shawnee County

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Subject: Pacific loon
From: Carol Morgan <crxmorgan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 12:41:18 -0500
Ten members of the Topeka Audubon Society found the Pacific loon at Lake 
Perry this morning.  We parked below the dam at the east end and John 
Zempel spotted it way to the center and west side of the lake.  Despite the 
distance we had good looks at it.

John, Linda and I drove to the west side hoping for a better look at it but 
we couldn't find it again.  There are lots of boats and skiers on the water 
today and I bet that it flew to a quieter location.  Good luck if you go 
looking for it today.  I hope it will stick around for a while so that more 
birders get an opportunity to count it.



Carol Morgan

Topeka, Shawnee County

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Subject: Pacific loon still present
From: Carol Morgan <crxmorgan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 10:19:41 -0500
Topeka Audubon group looking at Pacific loon right now at Lake Perry.

Carol Morgan, Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Burrowing Owl, Cassin's Sparrow
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 06:32:47 -0500
We added one additional stop Friday morning, about 17-18 miles from Pratt off 
54/400 Highway past the sand hills area on "M" (my son, as the navigator, has 
more detailed directions ). We were able to find three Cassin's Sparrows and 
one Burrowing Owl near the road in the mist & fog. 


My thanks to those who posted and back-channeled - here, Facebook and ebird - 
any trip that adds 13 state & 3 life birds is well worth the time away. 
(Usually only add 2-3 lifers per year!) 


We also enjoyed looks at badgers & prairie dogs, not part of our normal mammal 
experience. Good birding to all! 


(Unusual weather during the whole trip)

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS



> 
> Visited Cheyenne Bottoms & Quivira with my son, Nate, today.
> 
> Surprising Whimbrel among 21 shorebirds (20 at Quivira). Loved up close looks 
at Snowy Plovers, Avocets, BN Stilts & others along 170th in QNWR. 

> 
> Enjoyed Neotropical Cormorant, Little Blue Heron, Common Gallinule & many 
varied herons & egrets at Cheyenne. 

> 
> Whimbrel was a 21 year nemesis for this former northerner. BN Stilts & 
Western Sandpiper lifers enhanced Nate's experience. 

> 
> Added 11 Kansas & 10 year birds on this trip - so far.  
> 
> Did miss Burrowing Owls at ebird spot near Great Bend, as well as Black Rail 
& Least Tern at Quivira. Staying in Great Bend, still have time tomorrow:) 

> 
> Al Schirmacher
> Muscotah, KS
> 
> Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Birding Adventures in Peru and Galapagos
From: Bob Gress <bobgress AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 20:18:36 -0500
I may have bit off too much here but I'm planning some birding adventures
for 2015.. if we can get more people interested.  Let me know if you are
interested and I'll gladly forward a trip itinerary.

 

Northern Peru, July 11-23, 2015.   This is primarily a birding trip with an
expert birding guide.  This itinerary has a spectacular list of birds and
includes three nights at the Owlet Lodge in the Abra Patrica area.  This is
the home of the Long-whiskered Owlet.  Other great birds in this northern
Peru area include the Marvelous Spatuletail ( at Huembo Marvelous
Spatuletail Reserve), Scarlet-banded Barbet, White-masked Antbirds and lots
more.

 

Galapagos, Ecuador, June 12-22, 2015.  This is the typical Galapagos nature
tour including a 7-night yacht expedition.  We go ashore on at least 6
different islands.  There will be plenty of birding but also snorkeling and
kayaking opportunities.  It features the unique Galapagos birdlife along
with giant tortoises, fur seals, green sea turtles, land iguanas and more.

 

Let me know if you have questions or would like to see an itinerary
including trip costs.

 

Bob Gress

Wichita KS

bobgress AT cox.net

www.BirdsInFocus.com



 

 


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Subject: All three phalaropes at Quivira today
From: David Seibel <dseibel AT JCCC.EDU>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 00:25:44 +0000
Galen Pittman and I found 23 species of shorebirds at Quivira NWR today, 
including 14 Red-necked and 1 spectacular adult Red Phalarope in alternate 
plumage. Among other notable species, we also saw at least 10 Short-billed 
Dowitchers and 2 White-rumped Sandpipers. Full list and more details on eBird: 


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19138545

David Seibel
Lenexa

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Subject: Re: Corpse Plant
From: Elmer Finck <efinck AT FHSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 17:28:55 -0500
When I first started teaching at Emporia State University in 1989, Dr. 
Carl Prophet had one of these plants.  It really did stink!!  We saw it 
bloom the first year we were there.  Saludos y nos vemos más tarde, EJF

Elmer J. Finck, Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Fort Hays State University
600 Park Street
Hays, KS  67601-4099
office: AH 302
e-mail: efinck AT fhsu.edu
webpage: http://www.fhsu.edu/biology/efinck/
office phone: (785) 628-4269
fax: (785) 628-4153
home phone: (785) 625-9727
cell phone: (785) 650-1057

A Rock, A River, A Tree -- a tribute to Maya Angelou 1928-2014



From:   ictinia 
To:     KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Date:   07/18/2014 04:14 PM
Subject:        Corpse Plant
Sent by:        Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas 




For those of you interested the corpse plant at Southwestern College in 
Winfield is opening.  you may even get a glimpse of Max. view at this link 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bh4pzUjewfk on You Tube.


Lloyd




To document rare or unusual Kansas Birds for the KBRC:
http://ksbirds.org/KBRC/rarebirdform.html

Send Kansas Bird sightings for the 'southern great plains region' in
"North American Birds" to ictinia AT kc.rr.com

Lloyd Moore
Kansas Editor: "North American Birds"
Kansas City Kansas
ictinia AT kc.rr.com
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Subject: Mississippi Kite, Galena, Cherokee Co.
From: "Rader, Jennifer" <jennifer.rader AT KSOUTDOORS.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 17:13:25 -0500
I got home from work a little bit ago, and through my open windows I heard
a Mississippi Kite call. I ran outside, and sure enough, there was an adult
flying over my yard. It called about 6 times before it soared out of view.
This makes sighting number 3 for me in my yard this year. My first sighting
was on May 11, then on July 2.

-- 
Jenn Rader
Southeast Kansas Nature Center Director
Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks & Tourism
Galena, KS
(620) 783-5207

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Subject: Corpse Plant
From: ictinia <ictinia AT KC.RR.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 16:10:17 -0500
For those of you interested the corpse plant at Southwestern College in 
Winfield is opening. you may even get a glimpse of Max. view at this link 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bh4pzUjewfk on You Tube. 



Lloyd




To document rare or unusual Kansas Birds for the KBRC:
http://ksbirds.org/KBRC/rarebirdform.html

Send Kansas Bird sightings for the 'southern great plains region' in
"North American Birds" to ictinia AT kc.rr.com

Lloyd Moore
Kansas Editor: "North American Birds"
Kansas City Kansas
ictinia AT kc.rr.com
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Subject: Lake Perry birds
From: Carol Morgan <crxmorgan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 14:50:29 -0500
Sue Newland was at Lake Perry yesterday afternoon and had an incidental 
sighting of an unusual gull.  She took some photos and I posted a couple 
for her on the Kansas Birding Facebook page.  It is predominantly white, 
with white wing-tips, pink legs and a dark tip on the bill. I've never 
heard of a juvenile glaucous gull in Kansas in July, but its 
characteristics don't fit a herring (with the white body) or a ring-billed 
(with the white wing-tips).  Take a look.  Sue would appreciate an ID.



So I went with Sue this morning to search for the bird.  We did not find 
it, but we did find a common loon as we crossed the dam.  And we found two 
Caspian terns at Perry State Park (Jefferson Points site).  I was pleased 
with those species for July in Kansas.



Carol Morgan

Topeka, Shawnee County

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Subject: Cheyenne Bottoms, Quivira
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 19:03:38 -0500
Visited Cheyenne Bottoms & Quivira with my son, Nate, today.

Surprising Whimbrel among 21 shorebirds (20 at Quivira). Loved up close looks 
at Snowy Plovers, Avocets, BN Stilts & others along 170th in QNWR. 


Enjoyed Neotropical Cormorant, Little Blue Heron, Common Gallinule & many 
varied herons & egrets at Cheyenne. 


Whimbrel was a 21 year nemesis for this former northerner. BN Stilts & Western 
Sandpiper lifers enhanced Nate's experience. 


Added 11 Kansas & 10 year birds on this trip - so far.  

Did miss Burrowing Owls at ebird spot near Great Bend, as well as Black Rail & 
Least Tern at Quivira. Staying in Great Bend, still have time tomorrow:) 


Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Mississippi Kite feeding young in Butler Co.
From: Atcha Nolan <qanolan AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 15:53:29 -0500
I just witnessed a Mississippi Kite feeding it's young in a nest across the 
street from my house just west of El Dorado, Butler Co.

Atcha Nolan
El Dorado, Butler Co.

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Subject: Baker Wetlands survey
From: Daniel Larson <birdkansa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 07:57:15 -0500
Roger Boyd and Dan Larson surveyed Baker Wetlands, Lawrence, Kansas on the
morning of the 16th. We had 65 species which seemed pretty good. The decent
temperature and little wind helped. It continues to be amazing the changes
seen every two weeks there with the construction.

We found more water birds this time even though not much more water than
last time.We had Canada Goose and Wood Duck. The Wood Ducks were hiding
somewhat in a marsh area in the growth around the edge. It was the female
and three close to grown ones. They were fun to find and see. There were a
few Great Blues and a Little Blue and Green Heron. There were the normal
Killdeer and a single Spotted Sandpiper and single Solitary Sandpiper and
an Upland Plover trilling as it flew over high.

The construction has helped the doves. We have seen Rock Pigeons the last
two surveys. We had 282 Mourning Doves. Ebird wanted to know more because
of the high number. They seem to be attracted to left over wheat in an
adjacent wheat field. Also wheat and oats have been sowed along the new
road banks.

The bare ground of the new roads, road banks, and construction areas have
attracted Horned Larks. We observed more this time than any other time.

An Empidonax was a frustratingly fun one. It was definitely a small
flycatcher with wing bars as it flew from a small Cottonwood with weedy
growth around the base to nearby plants a short distance out in the marsh.
It didn't allow us to watch it long and it never sang. It would have been
nice to know which one it was.

Cliff Swallow was the predominant swallow. We heard two different catbirds
which we do not get often. There were many Indigo Buntings.

The complete list can be seen at this site.

ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19124283


Thanks
Dan Larson
Berryton, KS

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Subject: Tuttle Puddle pileated, painted bunting, eagles, woodchuck and purple martins massing
From: Michael Pearce <md_pearce AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 13:04:18 -0500
Much of Monday and Tuesday morning in the River Pond area of Tuttle Creek State 
Park produced some fun observations. 


Most of the time the two young-of-the-year bald eagles hatched at the nest on 
the south side of the River Pond could be seen soaring about. Like kids with 
new bikes, they seemed to be going through dives and tight turns just because 
they could. The adults weren't seen as often, but they were certainly around a 
lot. 


Monday evening offered a very good look at a pileated woodpecker flying from 
the south side of the River Pond to the north side. Early Tuesday morning a 
pileated was calling from some cottonwoods just west of the cabins near the 
River Pond. Pretty cool to have the pileated, two young eagles and a dozen 
turkey vultures in sight at the same time. 


A friend who lives just a half-mile southwest of the state park has had 
numerous good sightings of painted buntings at his house, which is in a 
secluded area, with a nice mixture of prairie and cedar brush. 


Monday afternoon a woodchuck was just south of the park's west entrance, a 
location where it has been seen several times. 


Wednesday morning I saw at least 60 purple martins massed on some utility lines 
along the eastern edge of El Dorado. I'm wondering if the cool morning had them 
thinking of South America. 



Michael Pearce
Newton, America

 		 	   		  
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Subject: Quivira report for 15 July 2014
From: Barry Jones <barjones78 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 15:59:21 -0500
Quivira refuge-wide shorebird survey conducted today, 15 July, produced 
nearly 5,000 birds and 20 species.  Nearly 4,000 of these were along and 
near the flats along NE 170th north of Big Salt Marsh, with scattered 
birds elsewhere.  Most notable were lingering White-rumped Sandpipers 
(identified by sight and sound) and a near "flock" of Solitary Sandpipers 
in one area.  Results:
Snowy Plover - 133
Semipalmated Plover - 1
Killdeer - 58
Black-necked Stilt - 120
American Avocet - 2140
Greater Yellowlegs - 90
Lesser Yellowlegs - 10
yellowlegs, sp. - 97
Solitary Sandpiper - 16 (all in one small unit)
Willet - 3
Spotted Sandpiper - 25
Marbled Godwit - 2
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 15
Western Sandpiper - 5
Least Sandpiper - 1510
White-rumped Sandpiper - 14
Baird's Sandpiper - 8
Pectoral Sandpiper - 3
Stilt Sandpiper - 309
dowitcher, sp. - 121
Wilson's Phalarope - 120
peep, sp. - 150
SPECIES = 20
INDIV = 4950

Egrets and herons continue to impress with numbers of them (especially 
snowy and great egret) totaling about 500+ refuge-wide.  That total 
includes a handful of cattle egrets mixed in, but still no little blue 
herons.  Painted Bunting males still in both locations as described last 
week.  One adult bald eagle along the Wildlife Drive.

Road work note:  avoid the south end of the refuge if possible, as the 
Little Salt Marsh area and Reno Units are being finished up this week.

Barry Jones
Quivira NWR

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