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Updated on Monday, July 28 at 02:26 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-headed Duck,©Barry Kent Mackay

28 Jul Mann Lake Sunday []
24 Jul Evening Grosbeaks ["Brian and Beth Miller" ]
23 Jul Anna's Hummingbirds [Mike & MerryLynn ]
24 Jul Reardan Shorebirds ["Isacoff, Jonathan" ]
24 Jul Reardan Shorebirds ["Isacoff, Jonathan" ]
21 Jul shorebirds at the Peone Wetland ["Terry Little" ]
17 Jul Please be on the look out!! - Missing Aplomado Falcon ["Robert C. Faucett" ]
17 Jul "Western" Flycatchers - Enjoy and Ponder [Doug Ward ]
17 Jul Northern Panhandle ["Isacoff, Jonathan" ]
16 Jul COFL/PAFL [Rich Del Carlo ]
16 Jul lumpers and splitters [lowell ]
16 Jul A curmudgeon's take on split/joined species [Bill Siems ]
16 Jul Re: Bird ID ? [Mary Manito ]
15 Jul Bird ID ? [Mary Manito ]
15 Jul Bird ID ? [Mary Manito ]
15 Jul Re: RE: Notes on Cordilleran vs Pacific-slope in Latah, Nez Perce, and nearby counties - in response to the splitters [Kelly Cassidy ]
15 Jul Re: [Tweeters] RE: Notes on Cordilleran vs Pacific-slope in Latah, Nez Perce, and nearby counties - in response to the splitters [Kelly Cassidy ]
14 Jul FW: [IBLE] Old Hummingbirds [Nancy Miller ]
14 Jul Common Nighthawk - Benton County, and 39x100 (long) [Tim Brennan ]
14 Jul Common Nighthawk - Benton County, and 39x100 (long) [Tim Brennan ]
13 Jul Re: RE: Notes on Cordilleran vs Pacific-slope in Latah, Nez Perce, and nearby counties - in response to the splitters ["Doug Schonewald" ]
13 Jul Re: [Tweeters] RE: Notes on Cordilleran vs Pacific-slope in Latah, Nez Perce, and nearby counties - in response to the splitters [Doug Schonewald ]
13 Jul Birds of course [Mike & MerryLynn ]
13 Jul Stilt Sandpiper/ Dowitcher Comparison [Keith Carlson ]
13 Jul Stilt Sandpiper [Keith Carlson ]
12 Jul shorebirds at Peone Wetland, Spokane [Terry Little ]
12 Jul Swallows Park Stilt Sandpiper [Keith Carlson ]
12 Jul Swallows Park Stilt Sandpiper - Asotin County, Washington [John Hanna ]
12 Jul Black Throated Sparrows and Sagebrush Sparrows [Blair Bernson ]
12 Jul Mann Lake [Keith Carlson ]
11 Jul Virginia Rail Up Close Turnbull NWR [RJ Baltierra ]
11 Jul Sage(brush) and Black-throated Sparrow [Kelly Cassidy ]
11 Jul Re: Sage Sparrow / Black-throated Sparrow reports? [Scott Downes ]
11 Jul Sage Sparrow / Black-throated Sparrow reports? [Kelly Cassidy ]
10 Jul Millet pond [Mike & MerryLynn ]
10 Jul Re: Notes on Cordilleran vs Pacific-slope in Latah, Nez Perce, and nearby counties [Mike & MerryLynn ]
10 Jul Moscow Red-eyed Vireo, 7/10/14 [Charles Swift ]
9 Jul Notes on Cordilleran vs Pacific-slope in Latah, Nez Perce, and nearby counties [John Hanna ]
9 Jul Notes on Cordilleran vs Pacific-slope in Latah, Nez Perce, and nearby counties ["John Hanna johnwalterhanna AT gmail.com [ible]" ]
8 Jul Bennington Lake this morning [Mike & MerryLynn ]
8 Jul nesting N. Hawk Owls in west-central Idaho [Charles Swift ]
7 Jul Okanogan County red-eyed vireo and bobolink []
7 Jul Okanogan County red-eyed vireo and bobolink []
5 Jul Sandhill cranes []
5 Jul Red-eyed Vireo - 3 at Rook's Park now [Mike & MerryLynn ]
4 Jul 4th of July WWC Big Day [Mike & MerryLynn ]
2 Jul Harlequin duck [Catherine Temple ]
1 Jul Liberty Lake Least Flycatchers ["Isacoff, Jonathan" ]
1 Jul Pend Oreille County on June 30 [Matthew Moskwik ]
1 Jul Northern Panhandle ["Isacoff, Jonathan" ]
30 Jun Mann Lake Sundayosprey []
29 Jun GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW [Mike & MerryLynn ]
30 Jun Spokane Crossbills, Lewis's Woodpecker ["Isacoff, Jonathan" ]
28 Jun P1 bridge Latah and Nez Perce county American Dippers [John Hanna ]
28 Jun Stevens and Spokane Counties [Terry Little ]
28 Jun Re: ID Help ["Keith Carlson" ]
28 Jun Re: ID Help [Keith Carlson ]
27 Jun urban nesting A. Kestrels [Charles Swift ]
27 Jun RE Keith Carlson's Gettysburg photos [Bill Siems ]
27 Jun ID Help Needed ["Keith Carlson" ]
27 Jun ID Help Needed [Keith Carlson ]
26 Jun Re: "Chimney" Swift near Bayview, ID [Charles Swift ]
26 Jun "Chimney" Swift near Bayview, ID [Doug Ward ]
26 Jun Fwd: eastern Latah Co. Least Flycatcher (6/25) [Charles Swift ]
26 Jun Re: eastern Latah Co. Least Flycatcher (6/25) [Mike & MerryLynn ]
26 Jun eastern Latah Co. Least Flycatcher (6/25) [Charles Swift ]
26 Jun Pend Oreille County Montane Birding [Matthew Moskwik ]
26 Jun Calispell Lake ["Isacoff, Jonathan" ]
25 Jun Fwd: [IBLE] FW: [Tweeters] Range Expansion for Anna's Hummingbird [Nancy Miller ]
25 Jun Franklin's Gulls, Loons [Mike & MerryLynn ]
24 Jun Bennington Lake this morning [Mike & MerryLynn ]
24 Jun Peregrine chicks [Catherine Temple ]
23 Jun Caspian terns []
23 Jun Mann Lake Sunday []
22 Jun Turnbull NWR - Caspian Terns, Gray Flycatcher [Tim O'Brien ]
21 Jun bobolink near Colville [steve schubert ]

Subject: Mann Lake Sunday
From: tohal AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 03:01:18 -0400
Birded Mann Lake at 4:00 pm on Sunday. Very hot but some good birds for the 
effort. Species sighted: 


horned grebe
double crested cormorant
great blue heron
Canada geese
pheasant
California quail
killdeer
American avocet
greater yellowlegs
 lesser yellowlegs
western sandpiper
Baird's sandpiper
long billed dowitcher
Wilson's phalarope
Bonaparte's gull
ring billed gull
rock pigeon
mourning dove
eastern kingbird
bank swallow
robin
red winged blackbird
American goldfinch

Terry O'Halloran
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Subject: Evening Grosbeaks
From: "Brian and Beth Miller" <bmiller297 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 12:08:05 -0700
Evening Grosbeaks started returning to my feeders about 2 weeks ago. I am
now also seeing juvenile Evening Grosbeaks., Pine Siskins are back, but not
in large numbers.

 

Brian Miller

Liberty Lake, WA
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Subject: Anna's Hummingbirds
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:44:33 -0700
Hello all,
Anna's Hummers showed up at two feeders today - one in College Place and 
another in Walla Walla - #234 for the WWCo. yearlist. 


I checked the delta, 2Rivers and the blood pond this morning hoping for 
shorebirds - all the regulars plus 1 Semipalmated Plover on the blood pond. 

At McNary NWR HQ were 3 Bonaparte's Gulls - and a Lazuli Bunting singing away 
at noon. 


Bennington Lake walkers yesterday enjoyed the cloudy skies - even sprinkles at 
times. Lots of baby birds still around - and I had 4 Lesser Goldfinches as I 
was leaving the parking lot. 


Had a very windy hailstorm this afternoon - but the hummers and other birds 
were back at the feeders within minutes after it quit - Mike was leaving 
Clarkston in the storm and said the Snake River was being blown up across the 
road - 


Good Birding, ML


*******************************************************
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the beautiful Walla Walla Valley

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Subject: Reardan Shorebirds
From: "Isacoff, Jonathan" <isacoff AT gonzaga.edu>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 01:14:37 +0000
At Reardan today:

Killdeer
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER (4)
Spotted Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Least Sandpiper
Semi sandpiper 
Western Sandpiper
Long-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Phalarope

All shorebirds were adults.

Mill Canyon had some late singing passerines and PINE SISKINS have returned 
with 6-10 flyovers at various spots. A Common Merg. Hen had 8 chicks in tow. 
River level is way up so there is absolutely no shorebird habitat. 


Good birding,
Jon Isacoff, Spokane 

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Subject: Reardan Shorebirds
From: "Isacoff, Jonathan" <isacoff AT gonzaga.edu>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 01:14:37 +0000
At Reardan today:

Killdeer
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER (4)
Spotted Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Least Sandpiper
Semi sandpiper 
Western Sandpiper
Long-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Phalarope

All shorebirds were adults.

Mill Canyon had some late singing passerines and PINE SISKINS have returned 
with 6-10 flyovers at various spots. A Common Merg. Hen had 8 chicks in tow. 
River level is way up so there is absolutely no shorebird habitat. 


Good birding,
Jon Isacoff, Spokane 

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: shorebirds at the Peone Wetland
From: "Terry Little" <terry AT crossoverchurch.info>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 13:05:52 -0700
Hello,

 

After a pretty significant July cool front, I was looking forward to
checking out the shorebirds at the wetland this morning. Turned out to be a
good morning with a couple of early surprises.

 

Killdeer (5)

Spotted Sandpiper (1)

Greater Yellowlegs (2)

Lesser Yellowlegs (2) 

Least Sandpipers (3)

BAIRD'S SANDPIPER (1) 

PECTORAL SANDPIPER (3) 

Long Billed Dowitcher (7) 

Wilson's Snipe (1) 

 

!2 species of shorebirds at the wetland so far this year despite such a
limited amount of view and habitat. Not bad.

 

Blessings

Terry Little

Mead, Wa 
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Subject: Please be on the look out!! - Missing Aplomado Falcon
From: "Robert C. Faucett" <rfaucett AT uw.edu>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 17:31:07 +0000
Just in case any of you all are headed southwest this weekend . . .


Hi Folks - Sending this to you all for a friend in Carlton Oregon:

Please be on the look out for an imprint female Peruvian Aplomado Falcon lost 
from her falconer on July 9th south of Portland, OR. She is wearing dark brown 
anklets, a small transmitter on her left anklet and band # RT082228 on her 
right leg. Call Susan 817-691-5545 with any sightings. Reward for information 
resulting in her recovery. 


Feel free to contact Susan directly.

Any help would be appreciated.

Best
Rob

--
Robert C. Faucett
Collections Manager
Ornithology
Burke Museum
Box 353010
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-3010
Office: 206-543-1668
Cell: 206-619-5569
Fax: 206-685-3039
rfaucett AT uw.edu
www.washington.edu/burkemuseum
http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/collections/ornithology/index.php
http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/collections/genetic/index.php
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Subject: "Western" Flycatchers - Enjoy and Ponder
From: Doug Ward <dougward AT frontier.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 09:35:06 -0700
One more way to look at all this “Western” Flycatcher palaver –
just enjoy them and ponder what they represent.  This particular group of
drab little Empidonax (we at least know that much at the moment) is in
the midst of change.  These changes usually happen on an incremental basis
depending on the environmental conditions constraining a “species”, but 
only 

periodically do we get to see this transformation in action.  Last summer
I corresponded with a couple of ornithologists who have been delving into the
“Western” Flycatcher quagmire, both morphologically (ie; voice) and
genetically; their research should be out soon.  The following passage is
one I thought best captured what is happening with the “Westerns” in our 
area 

from their scientific viewpoint:
 
“I was
going to write about that... 
 
I think
the area where you live was reforested about 7000 years ago, but I'm not sure
about that. It may be more recent. That may be the estimate for northern
California....I can't remember. On the other hand, western flycatchers are
thought to have undergone a range expansion into more eastern areas of BC and
maybe other parts of the interior Pacific Northwest so that could make contact
even more recent. My working hypothesis is that the original range (or the
range just preceding hybridization) of the two taxa
was similar to what you see today in Cassin's/plumbeous vireo. I think the 
range of cordilleran flycatchers expanded from the SE 

into a pure Pacific-slope range and those populations became introgressed. I 
think that the long tail of 

Pacific-slope genes into populations in SD, CO, UT, etc. is the result of 
backcrossing of more pure (but introgressed) cordillerans 

with pure individuals in populations that remain genetically and phenotypically 
more cordilleran.  

 
Doug, you
do seem to be in the middle of the geographic transition. But, I don't
really see any evidence for a tension zone in the east. Tension zones (as a
specific type of hybrid zone) should be narrow, and I see no real barrier to
genetic or phenotypic introgression in the east. Rather, I see a
broad, shallow cline - i.e., a gradual
linear transition over space. And, I don't think there is any shortage of 0.75 
PSFL/0.25 COFL 

or 0.75 COFL/0.25 PSFL birds at the ends of the continuum. On
the other hand, I think gene flow is limited into Pacific-slope populations.
There you do see a sharp transition between populations. I think this
is due to the mountains, differences in song, and perhaps most
importantly, differences in migration timing.  Whether these
differences are enough to keep Pacific-slope populations distinct in the long
run remains to be seen. There seems to be a SE to NW march of cordilleran 
genes, and it might just be a matter 

of time before they reach the coast in the north and start to drain south. A
tension zone is maintained by selection against hybrids. I don't think the
western end of the continuum really fits that description either. We have some
evidence of pre-zygotic barriers, but I
don't really see selection against hybrids per se.
 
The
situation could be more like the flicker in the sense that hybridization
created a phenotype that made broad scale colonization of the interior Pac NW 
possible by western flycatchers. That 

would fit into the 'selection gradient' hybrid zone model more than the tension
zone though - i.e. hybrids as a distinct phenotype do better in some
environments than the parental types.”
 
 
I now listen to and watch the “Westerns” in our yard, and
everywhere else I bump into them, with a whole new perspective and often
reflect on the miracle that is evolution.  So at the end of the day,
 just enjoy them whenever you encounter them, mark them in whatever box
you feel comfortable, but know that there is no box in which to contain the
evolutionary window these guys are offering us at this point in time.
 Change can be a wonderful thing.
 
Cheers,
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Subject: Northern Panhandle
From: "Isacoff, Jonathan" <isacoff AT gonzaga.edu>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 15:43:49 +0000
Birded Kootenai NWR and Upper Pack River Road yesterday. Kootenai was fairly 
birdy early. The most unusual bird was a YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT singing in the 
thicket along the Kootenai River a few hundred yards before the main entrance 
sign to the NWR. Most of the usual suspects were about, including many 
ducklings and Cootlings(!?) of the local breeding species. LEAST, Willow, and 
Western Flycatchers and abundant Pewees, Kingbirds, and Common Yellowthroats. 
Water level is a bit high for shorebirds and only species observed were 
Killdeer and Spotted Sandpiper (impossible to say whether breeders or migrants 
or both). No Pelicans, Gulls, or Terns 


By early afternoon, it was HOT. Even at 5,000 feet on Upper Pack River it was 
around 90 degrees. Bird activity was minimal. Thrushes didn't seem to mind the 
heat with reasonable numbers of Hermit, Swainson's, Varied, and Robin about. 
Also WIlson's, MacGillvray's, and Yellow-rumped Warblers. Pine Siskins may be 
re-emerging. Observed at least 1 or 2 at every stop at all elevations including 
along Pend Oreille River in Priest River and at Kootenai NWR. Also, the first 
Lincoln Co., WA Siskin was reported last week in Mill Canyon. 


Good birding,
Jon Isacoff, Spokane
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Subject: COFL/PAFL
From: Rich Del Carlo <rich AT peregrinetree.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 21:41:05 -0700
Hello Birders,
In the Sandpoint area these Empids are very common. We are in the shoulder 
shrugging zone here as to their true identity. 

I visit a lot of properties and houses every week, from town to rural. I hear 
and see them everyday around structures. This is the flycatcher nesting on a 
post below a deck, on a on concrete ledge against a house or low against the 
trunk of a tree. I saw a nest that was over a foot tall, the result of many 
years nesting in the same spot! These nests are always in cool, shady, 
protected areas and always on or near structures. They are wonderful and 
adaptable little flycatchers and I think being able to give them an identity; 
an actual species name,will aid in our knowledge of them and ultimately in 
their conservation. 

Enjoy this wonderful time of year.
Rich Del Carlo

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Subject: lumpers and splitters
From: lowell <elnan AT ultraplix.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 18:31:39 -0700
Weighing in on the recent posts about the Pacific Coast Flycatcher and 
Cordilleran Flycatcher. Wouldn’t be great if we who bird for enjoyment could 
agree to disagree in a congenial and accepting manner and let the 
“professionals and quasi/pro’s duke it out? You know in a few years the 
circle will continue, though genetic testing is probably telling use it’s 
still up to the birds! 


Share your hobby and enjoy!

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Subject: A curmudgeon's take on split/joined species
From: Bill Siems <wfsiems AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 09:36:43 -0700
Might we birders be happier in the long run to accept that avian diversity 
can't be perfectly represented by any checklist? The birds themselves aren't 
sure, and we know less than they do. I know, I know ..... then how do we count? 


Bill Siems
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Subject: Re: Bird ID ?
From: Mary Manito <manitomary AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 07:05:17 -0700
Thank you RJ, Terry & Greg for identifying my western bluebird for me. I was 
shocked at the idea at first because the bird appeared so much bigger than a 
bluebird, but then I remembered that it was quite fluffy... So it's apparent 
size was deceiving & had thrown me off! 

It seems so obvious now because I had both male & female adults in my camp 
around that same time. 


Thanks again,
Mary

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 15, 2014, at 6:01 PM, Mary Manito  wrote:
> 
> Hi Birders,
> I saw a robin-sized bird today that has me stumped. I'm guessing it's a 
juvenile but that rusty colored "low collar" just does not match anything I'm 
familiar with. 

> 
> I'm currently near Phillips Reservoir between BakerCity & Sumpter in NE 
Oregon, open pine-scrub mid-elevation. 

> I apologize that the only way I can send a halfway decent picture is by 
taking a picture of my camera's image.. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Thanks in advance for your analysis.
> Mary M
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Bird ID ?
From: Mary Manito <manitomary AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 18:27:17 -0700
Hi Birders,
I saw a robin-sized bird today that has me stumped. I'm guessing it's a 
juvenile but that rusty colored "low collar" just does not match anything I'm 
familiar with. 


I'm currently near Phillips Reservoir between BakerCity & Sumpter in NE Oregon, 
open pine-scrub mid-elevation. 

I apologize that the only way I can send a halfway decent picture is by taking 
a picture of my camera's image.. 





Thanks in advance for your analysis.
Mary M

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Subject: Bird ID ?
From: Mary Manito <manitomary AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 18:27:17 -0700
Hi Birders,
I saw a robin-sized bird today that has me stumped. I'm guessing it's a 
juvenile but that rusty colored "low collar" just does not match anything I'm 
familiar with. 


I'm currently near Phillips Reservoir between BakerCity & Sumpter in NE Oregon, 
open pine-scrub mid-elevation. 

I apologize that the only way I can send a halfway decent picture is by taking 
a picture of my camera's image.. 





Thanks in advance for your analysis.
Mary M

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Subject: Re: RE: Notes on Cordilleran vs Pacific-slope in Latah, Nez Perce, and nearby counties - in response to the splitters
From: Kelly Cassidy <highsteppe AT icloud.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 07:43:14 -0700
I don't have a strong opinion on the Western Flycatcher split (although, being 
a "lumper" at heart, my initial reaction is skepticism at the split). 


However, someone, (Doug, I think) commented that the DNA evidence was 
objective, or at least more objective than the morphological evidence. I agree 
that DNA evidence is more quantifiable than morphology. "Region X of the DNA 
sequence differs by Y% between population A and B" etc. 


But is it better at defining species? Well, maybe, maybe not. There is a lot of 
disagreement among biologists about that. Some very distinct species may have 
relatively few differences in DNA, but those differences are so critical (e.g., 
sequences that affect phenology of breeding) that they substantially affect 
hybrid viability. On the other hand some unambiguous species may show 
substantial DNA differences but the differences are evidently are not so 
critical. The DNA evidence is part of the story, but not the whole story. 


IMNSHO, the gold standard for vertebrates (who the heck knows about bacteria 
and such) is not DNA or morphology, but whether hybrids have reduced viability 
in the hybrid zone. That sort of thing can be difficult to measure in the wild, 
but a broad hybrid zone with most of the individuals in the hybrid zone being 
intermediate between the "pure" populations suggests, to me, that the species 
should not be split. 


Kelly Cassidy
Pullman, WA
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Subject: Re: [Tweeters] RE: Notes on Cordilleran vs Pacific-slope in Latah, Nez Perce, and nearby counties - in response to the splitters
From: Kelly Cassidy <highsteppe AT icloud.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 07:43:14 -0700
I don't have a strong opinion on the Western Flycatcher split (although, being 
a "lumper" at heart, my initial reaction is skepticism at the split). 


However, someone, (Doug, I think) commented that the DNA evidence was 
objective, or at least more objective than the morphological evidence. I agree 
that DNA evidence is more quantifiable than morphology. "Region X of the DNA 
sequence differs by Y% between population A and B" etc. 


But is it better at defining species? Well, maybe, maybe not. There is a lot of 
disagreement among biologists about that. Some very distinct species may have 
relatively few differences in DNA, but those differences are so critical (e.g., 
sequences that affect phenology of breeding) that they substantially affect 
hybrid viability. On the other hand some unambiguous species may show 
substantial DNA differences but the differences are evidently are not so 
critical. The DNA evidence is part of the story, but not the whole story. 


IMNSHO, the gold standard for vertebrates (who the heck knows about bacteria 
and such) is not DNA or morphology, but whether hybrids have reduced viability 
in the hybrid zone. That sort of thing can be difficult to measure in the wild, 
but a broad hybrid zone with most of the individuals in the hybrid zone being 
intermediate between the "pure" populations suggests, to me, that the species 
should not be split. 


Kelly Cassidy
Pullman, WA
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Subject: FW: [IBLE] Old Hummingbirds
From: Nancy Miller <nmiller AT moscow.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 21:54:45 -0700
Some of you may be interested in this.

 

From: ible AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:ible AT yahoogroups.com] 
Sent: Monday, July 14, 2014 7:01 AM
To: ible AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [IBLE] Old Hummingbirds

 

  

We were banding hummingbirds this weekend and had a fabulous discovery about 
their longevity. And if there was any question about site fidelity for 
hummingbirds, this one proves that they know where home is. We've captured 
N-57688 6 times since 2004! This Black-chinned male was first captured 4-Aug-04 
in Power County. Since then we've recaptured him in 2005, 2007, 2009, 2013 and 
now in 2014! It was thrilling to catch him last year as a 10 year old, catching 
him again as an 11 year old is tremendous! 


Carl RudeenMountain Home, ID

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Subject: Common Nighthawk - Benton County, and 39x100 (long)
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 13:31:31 +0000
Hey Tweets, and Inlanders (do y'all have a cute nickname? we need to work on 
that), 

 
I just wrapped up two days plus in Eastern Washington, with the nighthawk at 
Horn Rapids (at 1 in the afternoon, and nearing if not into triple digits), 
being the 100th bird in Benton for me, and the 39th county in the state where 
I've hit that mark. Thanks to those who helped me reach that goal! 

 
Kittitas Friday: I began the trip in Kittitas County, stopping at Gold Creek to 
work on my Kittitas year list. The highlights here were the thrushes 
(Swainson's and Hermit, battling it out in song). I swung through Bullfrog 
Pond, where I missed a lot of the birds people keep finding there (I'm worried 
I'm at the wrong pond?), but I did have a Common Yellowthroat, and Gray Catbird 
quite vocal. In Cle Elum, a feeder right by the ranger station had several 
Black-chinned Hummingbirds zipping in to feed. I drove the Vantage Highway, 
picking up Lark Sparrow, but missing Chukar and Pheasant, and then to 
Recreation Road. I don't know 'the usual spot' people keep referring to for 
Black-throated Sparrow, but I'm assuming it's not the start or the end of the 
road, and it isn't that long, so I was trying from the middle. No luck on the 
BTSP, but I picked up a Yellow-breasted Chat, which was my 150th life bird in 
the county. 

 
Columbia and Garfield Saturday: I started early at Lewis and Clark Trail State 
Park, where I had nearly 30 species, including Black-capped Chickadee, Veery, 
all three vireo species (Red-eyed down by the river), and a pair of very active 
Great Horned Owls. I stopped in Starbuck, comically expecting coffee. I had 
trouble finding an open cafe, so I tried the bait and tackle shop asking for 
directions - the gentleman behind the counter pulled out his coffee maker and 
made a pot! Riveria Road at 7 AM that day either had no sparrows, or they just 
gave up on motion/noisemaking exceptionally early. No amount of playback, 
pishing, being quiet, driving slow/fast or walking gave me any motion outside 
of some Horned Larks, although I had a suspicious looking raptor that may have 
been a Ferruginous (I'll take the time to figure out it was a red-tailed hawk 
I'm sure, but it was white and rusty and perched on the ground sans belly band. 
The breast was not clean white, however, so I have doubts). 

 
Snake River birding was pretty productive, with Pelican, Caspian Tern, Osprey 
and Oriole for both counties. Garfield also gave me a Spotted Sandpiper from 
Hastings Hill Road, and a Black-crowned Night Heron from the very last boast 
launch on that road, happily letting people paddle past it in a rowboat. In 
Pomeroy (Garfield County now) I had Vaux's Swifts feeding over the city park 
while I ate lunch, and Lesser Goldfinches calling everywhere. I made my way up 
into the Blue Mountains from there, getting my life-list closer to 100 species 
as I picked up an Olive-sided Flycatcher and a Calliope Hummingbird. Mountain 
Bluebirds were everywhere, and I also found a Golden Eagle perched on a snag. 

 
At 99 species, I thought a trip down FR 4220 would be wise, as it goes into 
Columbia County. My initial plan was to start right in with the Columbia County 
end of it, but a forest worker stopped me short, saying they were doing work up 
the road, a fact confirmed by the helicopter with a huge log in tow. So I drove 
back on 4220 to what seemed like good habitat and got out and walked. It was so 
nice to get out and see some of the species better, including the Calliope 
Hummingbirds and the Mountain Bluebirds, including many juveniles. I picked up 
a Cassin's Finch for my 100th bird in the county, quickly followed by a life 
look at a Williamson's Sapsucker. These close up views are sometimes called 
"crippling' views of birds, so I'll run with that - I had a "crippling view" of 
a Williamson's Sapsucker... right before the mountain lion. 

 
Now... I'm a Husky, and my closest brother is a Cougar, so there will be no end 
to his joy here, but a cougar, mountain lion, cat-monster, I don't care what 
you want to call it walked slowly and quietly from below (the south side of the 
trail) to above me at a distance of about 150 feet. I...it's just... COUGARS 
ARE LARGE ANIMALS. My brain spun even as I stood there silently, "Am I supposed 
to yell? Play dead? Fight back? Run? Make myself look big? " Common sense kept 
me still and it carried on without paying me any notice. I waited, picked up a 
rock that was far too large to be useful, and walked past the spot where it 
crossed, and then another 4-500 feet to my car. 

 
The forest worker shook his head silently as I answered him "No... I didn't 
bring mace. Should I have?", and shortly thereafter I was free to take the road 
into Columbia. The end of 4220 was where I stopped, and I got out of the car 
still a little jumpy. At that moment of course, I spotted a wasp/bee/pollinator 
monster hovering by my car door. I loudly yelled "Chuck!" or something, and 
successfully revealed my Columbia County Dusky Grouse in the process. Yay! 
White-breasted Nuthatch, Turkey Vulture, and more views of Williamson's 
Sapsucker were the highlights, and I may have had a Northern Goshawk, but the 
large accipiter flew out of sight before I could even get a view of its face or 
back. 

 
Columbia at 96, and 4220 was not helping me much more, so I took the long road 
back down to highway 12 and to Dayton. I grabbed pizza and beer at the downtown 
brewpub, and then went back to the hotel to think of how I could pick up five 
more birds and promptly fell asleep. The next morning, I drove up Touchet Road 
towards Bluewood, and stopped at... where's my map... ugh...I think it was the 
Middle Ridge Trail, or something of that sort - a pull out at about 14-15 miles 
up on the left. With my windows down, I had already added a handful of birds 
(Golden-crowned Kinglet, Pacific Wren, Swainson's Thrush, Chestnut-backed 
Chickadee). I got out to the trailhead and immediately had a Western Flycatcher 
NOT singing like the ones from home. The problem is... I pulled up the 
recording on my phone and it didn't exactly sound Cordilleran. I let that bird 
go, but shortly thereafter had a bird calling like the Pacific-slopes from home 
for bird 100. But... the status of those birds is too interesting for me to 
leave that as bird 100, so I hiked the trail a bit until I found a Hammond's 
Flycatcher. 

 
Nearing 7:30 AM and I was in a rush to get out of Columbia. Why? I was meeting 
Kevin Black in Benton County to try to pick up birds 90-100. I needed a few 
passerines, and if they were going to make any noise for us, it would have to 
be early. Meeting Kevin around 9:00 at WE Johnson, we started off down the 
trail, with Kevin's awesome eyes picking up a silent Orange-crowned Warbler 
(91). Chats, Yelllow Warblers and kingbirds were singing, and we did also have 
Gray Catbird (92), Western Wood Pewee (93), and Willow Flycatcher (94). Our 
next stop was Amon Creek, where Osprey (95) and Black-crowned Night Heron (96) 
flew for us. Walking the trail around the water, we also got good looks at 
Lazuli Bunting (97) and heard Virginia Rail (98). 

 
At this point, we were discussing plans for the last two birds, and Kevin 
learned that Forster's Tern would be a life bird for me. He eventually 
recovered from his disbelief and brought me to the very end of the road at 
Leslie Groves, where we watched a half dozen or so of the birds playing over 
the water, along with Caspian Terns, American White Pelicans and Great Egrets. 
I took my 99th bird, shook hands with Kevin, and headed up towards Horn Rapids. 
This area has had reports with all kinds of interesting birds - but all of them 
were dead silent as I arrived at 1:00, except for some Killdeer - the birds 
that got me into this whole birding nonsense in the first place. I walked and 
watched and listened, before finally having the Common Nighthawk (100) of all 
birds fly overhead in the middle of the day, giving a loud "Peeeent!". 

 
A little bit of birding in Kittitas on the way home, and I still made it back 
by 7:00 where my kids had a grand time laughing at me because I still haven't 
seen a crow in Garfield County. They have decided the crows are messing with me 
and may even have stuffed themselves into a cougar costume. I didn't find that 
funny at all. 

 
Happy Birding!
 
-Tim Brennan
Renton
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Subject: Common Nighthawk - Benton County, and 39x100 (long)
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 13:31:31 +0000
Hey Tweets, and Inlanders (do y'all have a cute nickname? we need to work on 
that), 

 
I just wrapped up two days plus in Eastern Washington, with the nighthawk at 
Horn Rapids (at 1 in the afternoon, and nearing if not into triple digits), 
being the 100th bird in Benton for me, and the 39th county in the state where 
I've hit that mark. Thanks to those who helped me reach that goal! 

 
Kittitas Friday: I began the trip in Kittitas County, stopping at Gold Creek to 
work on my Kittitas year list. The highlights here were the thrushes 
(Swainson's and Hermit, battling it out in song). I swung through Bullfrog 
Pond, where I missed a lot of the birds people keep finding there (I'm worried 
I'm at the wrong pond?), but I did have a Common Yellowthroat, and Gray Catbird 
quite vocal. In Cle Elum, a feeder right by the ranger station had several 
Black-chinned Hummingbirds zipping in to feed. I drove the Vantage Highway, 
picking up Lark Sparrow, but missing Chukar and Pheasant, and then to 
Recreation Road. I don't know 'the usual spot' people keep referring to for 
Black-throated Sparrow, but I'm assuming it's not the start or the end of the 
road, and it isn't that long, so I was trying from the middle. No luck on the 
BTSP, but I picked up a Yellow-breasted Chat, which was my 150th life bird in 
the county. 

 
Columbia and Garfield Saturday: I started early at Lewis and Clark Trail State 
Park, where I had nearly 30 species, including Black-capped Chickadee, Veery, 
all three vireo species (Red-eyed down by the river), and a pair of very active 
Great Horned Owls. I stopped in Starbuck, comically expecting coffee. I had 
trouble finding an open cafe, so I tried the bait and tackle shop asking for 
directions - the gentleman behind the counter pulled out his coffee maker and 
made a pot! Riveria Road at 7 AM that day either had no sparrows, or they just 
gave up on motion/noisemaking exceptionally early. No amount of playback, 
pishing, being quiet, driving slow/fast or walking gave me any motion outside 
of some Horned Larks, although I had a suspicious looking raptor that may have 
been a Ferruginous (I'll take the time to figure out it was a red-tailed hawk 
I'm sure, but it was white and rusty and perched on the ground sans belly band. 
The breast was not clean white, however, so I have doubts). 

 
Snake River birding was pretty productive, with Pelican, Caspian Tern, Osprey 
and Oriole for both counties. Garfield also gave me a Spotted Sandpiper from 
Hastings Hill Road, and a Black-crowned Night Heron from the very last boast 
launch on that road, happily letting people paddle past it in a rowboat. In 
Pomeroy (Garfield County now) I had Vaux's Swifts feeding over the city park 
while I ate lunch, and Lesser Goldfinches calling everywhere. I made my way up 
into the Blue Mountains from there, getting my life-list closer to 100 species 
as I picked up an Olive-sided Flycatcher and a Calliope Hummingbird. Mountain 
Bluebirds were everywhere, and I also found a Golden Eagle perched on a snag. 

 
At 99 species, I thought a trip down FR 4220 would be wise, as it goes into 
Columbia County. My initial plan was to start right in with the Columbia County 
end of it, but a forest worker stopped me short, saying they were doing work up 
the road, a fact confirmed by the helicopter with a huge log in tow. So I drove 
back on 4220 to what seemed like good habitat and got out and walked. It was so 
nice to get out and see some of the species better, including the Calliope 
Hummingbirds and the Mountain Bluebirds, including many juveniles. I picked up 
a Cassin's Finch for my 100th bird in the county, quickly followed by a life 
look at a Williamson's Sapsucker. These close up views are sometimes called 
"crippling' views of birds, so I'll run with that - I had a "crippling view" of 
a Williamson's Sapsucker... right before the mountain lion. 

 
Now... I'm a Husky, and my closest brother is a Cougar, so there will be no end 
to his joy here, but a cougar, mountain lion, cat-monster, I don't care what 
you want to call it walked slowly and quietly from below (the south side of the 
trail) to above me at a distance of about 150 feet. I...it's just... COUGARS 
ARE LARGE ANIMALS. My brain spun even as I stood there silently, "Am I supposed 
to yell? Play dead? Fight back? Run? Make myself look big? " Common sense kept 
me still and it carried on without paying me any notice. I waited, picked up a 
rock that was far too large to be useful, and walked past the spot where it 
crossed, and then another 4-500 feet to my car. 

 
The forest worker shook his head silently as I answered him "No... I didn't 
bring mace. Should I have?", and shortly thereafter I was free to take the road 
into Columbia. The end of 4220 was where I stopped, and I got out of the car 
still a little jumpy. At that moment of course, I spotted a wasp/bee/pollinator 
monster hovering by my car door. I loudly yelled "Chuck!" or something, and 
successfully revealed my Columbia County Dusky Grouse in the process. Yay! 
White-breasted Nuthatch, Turkey Vulture, and more views of Williamson's 
Sapsucker were the highlights, and I may have had a Northern Goshawk, but the 
large accipiter flew out of sight before I could even get a view of its face or 
back. 

 
Columbia at 96, and 4220 was not helping me much more, so I took the long road 
back down to highway 12 and to Dayton. I grabbed pizza and beer at the downtown 
brewpub, and then went back to the hotel to think of how I could pick up five 
more birds and promptly fell asleep. The next morning, I drove up Touchet Road 
towards Bluewood, and stopped at... where's my map... ugh...I think it was the 
Middle Ridge Trail, or something of that sort - a pull out at about 14-15 miles 
up on the left. With my windows down, I had already added a handful of birds 
(Golden-crowned Kinglet, Pacific Wren, Swainson's Thrush, Chestnut-backed 
Chickadee). I got out to the trailhead and immediately had a Western Flycatcher 
NOT singing like the ones from home. The problem is... I pulled up the 
recording on my phone and it didn't exactly sound Cordilleran. I let that bird 
go, but shortly thereafter had a bird calling like the Pacific-slopes from home 
for bird 100. But... the status of those birds is too interesting for me to 
leave that as bird 100, so I hiked the trail a bit until I found a Hammond's 
Flycatcher. 

 
Nearing 7:30 AM and I was in a rush to get out of Columbia. Why? I was meeting 
Kevin Black in Benton County to try to pick up birds 90-100. I needed a few 
passerines, and if they were going to make any noise for us, it would have to 
be early. Meeting Kevin around 9:00 at WE Johnson, we started off down the 
trail, with Kevin's awesome eyes picking up a silent Orange-crowned Warbler 
(91). Chats, Yelllow Warblers and kingbirds were singing, and we did also have 
Gray Catbird (92), Western Wood Pewee (93), and Willow Flycatcher (94). Our 
next stop was Amon Creek, where Osprey (95) and Black-crowned Night Heron (96) 
flew for us. Walking the trail around the water, we also got good looks at 
Lazuli Bunting (97) and heard Virginia Rail (98). 

 
At this point, we were discussing plans for the last two birds, and Kevin 
learned that Forster's Tern would be a life bird for me. He eventually 
recovered from his disbelief and brought me to the very end of the road at 
Leslie Groves, where we watched a half dozen or so of the birds playing over 
the water, along with Caspian Terns, American White Pelicans and Great Egrets. 
I took my 99th bird, shook hands with Kevin, and headed up towards Horn Rapids. 
This area has had reports with all kinds of interesting birds - but all of them 
were dead silent as I arrived at 1:00, except for some Killdeer - the birds 
that got me into this whole birding nonsense in the first place. I walked and 
watched and listened, before finally having the Common Nighthawk (100) of all 
birds fly overhead in the middle of the day, giving a loud "Peeeent!". 

 
A little bit of birding in Kittitas on the way home, and I still made it back 
by 7:00 where my kids had a grand time laughing at me because I still haven't 
seen a crow in Garfield County. They have decided the crows are messing with me 
and may even have stuffed themselves into a cougar costume. I didn't find that 
funny at all. 

 
Happy Birding!
 
-Tim Brennan
Renton
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Subject: Re: RE: Notes on Cordilleran vs Pacific-slope in Latah, Nez Perce, and nearby counties - in response to the splitters
From: "Doug Schonewald" <dschone8 AT donobi.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 17:24:00 -0700
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Subject: Re: [Tweeters] RE: Notes on Cordilleran vs Pacific-slope in Latah, Nez Perce, and nearby counties - in response to the splitters
From: Doug Schonewald <dschone8 AT donobi.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 17:24:00 -0700
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Subject: Birds of course
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 15:44:03 -0700
Hello all,
First bird I heard this morning was a RED-EYED VIREO singing up in our 
catalpa tree - a first for our yard in 24 years! I did not see or hear 
them at Rook's Park yesterday morning - but they were reported earlier 
there by others. Not sure if this bird is coming or going!?

Shorebirds out at the river this morning - ML only, Mike home working on 
a grant:

MARBLED GODWITS - 3 at 2Rivers
Wilson's Phalarope - 1 at blood pond
Baird's Sandpiper - 2 " "
Western Sandpipers - over 500 between blood pond and 2Rivers
Least Sandpiper - several " "
Black-necked Stilt - 9, 2 adults and 1 young at the delta.
Long-billed Dowitcher - 3 at blod pond
Spotted Sandpiper - several in each area
Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs - blood pond and 2Rivers
And lots of Killdeer - some very young yet.

Also:
BALD EAGLE - 1 juvenile (first breeding record in WWCounty that we know 
of) and 1 adult on Badger Island (Have to scope from the hwy)
Franklin's Gull - 1 at the delta
COMMON YELLOWTHROAT - 1 singing at 2Rivers south end
Common Loon - 2 at the delta, they have been there all summer
Great Egret - 17 at jct pond, 5 at the delta, 7 at 2Rivers, 4 at 
Penninsula HMU - they nest on Crescent Island now
many hundreds of Ring-billed and California Gulls, Caspian Terns, White 
Pelicans and Double-crested Cormorants from the delta clear to 
Penninsula HMU
Sounded like fall today with many flocks of Canada Geese V'd up and flying!


I finally had a PINE SISKIN up Mill Creek Friday morning - my first in 
the county this year. 7 Mile rd, Mill Creek, Scenic Loop all very birdy 
with baby birds all over the road early in the morning - Towhees, 
Chipping Sparrows, BH Grosbeaks, Catbirds, Doves - Fun to watch.

Mike and I drove up Biscuit Ridge yesterday afternoon - MUCH cooler up 
there - birds very quiet but the Hermit and Swainson's Thrushes were 
singing. We ate lunch listening to a baby Great Gray Owl begging - can't 
beat that!  I found a WILLIAMSON'S SAPSUCKER nest - with adults feeding 
young still in nest hole. Haven't seen this species nesting in the 
county for many years. Nest is in a dead Douglas Fir tree. Also found 
Red-naped Sapsuckers with newly fledged young but NO Hairy WP's!
Had a Ruffed Grouse walk across the road in the middle of the afternoon 
- a bird we missed on the 4th.

A note about the millet pond - the south ponds have been recently graded 
and reshaped - and today I noticed they are filling these already - so 
going to be GREAT shorebird habitat - check it out!

Good birding, MerryLynn



MIKE & MERRYLYNN DENNY
BIRDING THE BEAUTIFUL WALLA WALLA VALLEY
IF YOU HAVEN'T GONE BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED_______________________________________________
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Subject: Stilt Sandpiper/ Dowitcher Comparison
From: Keith Carlson <kec201814 AT cableone.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 08:42:00 -0700
This morning the Swallows Park Stilt Sandpiper was feeding with a Dowitcher 
(likely a LB) providing a nice comparison with regard to size and shape. 


also present are Killdeer. Spotted and Western Sandpipers

Keith E. Carlson
Lewiston_______________________________________________
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Subject: Stilt Sandpiper
From: Keith Carlson <kec201814 AT cableone.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 08:00:24 -0700
Still present at Swallows Park at 0800
Keith E Carlson

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: shorebirds at Peone Wetland, Spokane
From: Terry Little <terry AT crossoverchurch.info>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 23:03:52 -0400
Hello,

This morning I found 10 species of shorebirds at the Peone Wetland:

Killdeer (5) 
Greater Yelllowlegs (3)
Lesser Yellowlegs (2)
Solitary Sandpiper (1) 
Spotted Sandpiper (3)
Least Sandpiper (3)
Semipalmated Sandpiper (1)
Western Sandpiper (2)
Long billed Dowitcher (1) 
Wilson's Snipe (3)

Shorebird Migration! You can't beat it!

Blessings
Terry Little
Mead, Wa
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Subject: Swallows Park Stilt Sandpiper
From: Keith Carlson <kec201814 AT cableone.net>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 15:43:34 -0700
After the soccer match, I went over to Swallows Park inspite of the 100 deg 
heat on the odd chance that the Stilt Sandpiper might still be there. 

It was present from 1500-1530 inspite4 of there being crowds of boats, waders, 
dog swimmers and carp shooters. 

Great find, John.

Keith E. Carlson
Lewiston_______________________________________________
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Subject: Swallows Park Stilt Sandpiper - Asotin County, Washington
From: John Hanna <johnwalterhanna AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 13:06:49 -0700
Hello Birders,

This morning I birded Swallows Park and found my lifer STILT SANDPIPER. I
think this is the first eBird report of this species for Asotin County,
Washington.

Other birds of note were a family of five Cooper's Hawks, two Caspian Terns
(one with leg bands), both Western and Semipalmated Sandpipers, Gray
Catbirds, and a Bullock's Oriole.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19080644

Good Birding,

John Hanna
Lewiston, Idaho_______________________________________________
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Subject: Black Throated Sparrows and Sagebrush Sparrows
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 12:43:52 -0700
Scott Downes already responded to the inquiry re 
the two sparrows but I wanted to add that as far 
as I know from all online sources there were only 
two days when Black Throated Sparrows were 
reported (both during the WOS Conference) in June 
at the Recreation Road traditional spot at 
Gingko/Vantage.  I did not pull the reports again 
but in conversations/exchanges with the viewers I 
believe the looks were at best fleeting and not 
the usual where the sparrows have been pretty 
"cooperative" in the past.  I have seen Black 
Throated sparrows there on numerous occasions in 
the past but have struck out 4 times this year 
including on a scouting trip for an Audubon trip 
where we worked the area quite diligently.  I also 
know others have looked and failed to find them 
there this year.  Not everyone reports on EBird or 
Tweeters or inland-nw so there may have been other 
sightings this year.  If anyone has more 
information, it would be very welcome.

-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

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Subject: Mann Lake
From: Keith Carlson <kec201814 AT cableone.net>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 10:46:49 -0700
This Am was the first, every Saturday until October, Canyon Birder's field trip 
to Mann Lake and yielded a surprising variety of early migrant shorebirds. 


Killdeer                                         many
Spotted Sandpipers                       many including many young birds
Greater Yellowlegs                        1
Lesser Yellowlegs                         1
Least Sandpiper                            2 or more
PECTORAL SANDPIPER              2    
SEMI-PALMATED SANDPIPER    1
Western Sandpiper                       3 or more

https://www.flickr.com/photos/birddog/14634450864/

Keith E Carlson
Lewiston_______________________________________________
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Subject: Virginia Rail Up Close Turnbull NWR
From: RJ Baltierra <wolfbaltierra AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 19:09:38 -0700
I volunteer once a week at Turnbull, and have had the privilege to do duck 
banding, MAPS, and several other Refuge jobs. This morning we checked the duck 
traps, and on Upper Turnbull they managed to trap one female Mallard and one 
other unlikely captive. A young Virginia Rail had managed to get in the trap! 
So I went in and got it! I never thought I would be able to get that close to 
such a secretive species! Photos are on my flickr:http://flic.kr/p/o1tcgs 


RJ Baltierra
St. John, WA

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Subject: Sage(brush) and Black-throated Sparrow
From: Kelly Cassidy <highsteppe AT icloud.com>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 17:59:02 -0700
OK, I figured out why ebird wasn't showing any Sage (now Sagebrush) Sparrows in 
Washington. I knew Sage Sparrow had been split, but was assuming that if I 
selected Bell's/Sagebrush (Sage Sparrow) in ebird, I would get data from both 
species from before and after the split. Not so. When I specify Sagebrush 
Sparrow, plenty of Washington reports come up. 


I'm not sure why the B-t Sparrow data wasn't appearing. I tried again a few 
minutes ago, and there it was. Must have been operator error. 


Thanks for the helpful replies!

Kelly

Kelly Cassidy
Pullman, WA
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Subject: Re: Sage Sparrow / Black-throated Sparrow reports?
From: Scott Downes <downess AT charter.net>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 16:24:53 -0700
Kelly,
Sage Sparrow was split last summer to Sagebrush and Bell’s sparrow, so all 
eBird reports should now be of Sagebrush sparrow in Washington. As for 
Black-throated Sparrow, there was a reliable Black-throated Sparrow at Vantage 
in June at a traditional location. I know records of it are showing on eBird. 


Scott Downes
downess AT charter.net
Yakima WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Sage Sparrow / Black-throated Sparrow reports?
From: Kelly Cassidy <highsteppe AT icloud.com>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 15:18:32 -0700
> Browsing ebird today, I was surprised to see no reports of either 
Black-throated or Sage Sparrows in Washington State. No one who's successfully 
twitched for B-t Sparrows has posted on ebird? Sage Sparrows were the bigger 
surprise. Are they that rare? Or just not enough birders in the hot Columbia 
Basin? 

> 
> Has anyone seen Sage Sparrows in the Columbia Basin in recent years, and more 
specifically on the Columbia Basin National Wildlife Refuge? Any B-t Sparrows 
seen on the Refuge in recent years (or ever)? 

> 
> TIA,
> 
> Kelly Cassidy
> Pullman, WA


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Subject: Millet pond
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 18:07:38 -0700
Hello all,
I checked the millet pond early this morning - someone ebirded 
Olive-sided Flycatcher there this week - that would be EXTREMELY rare 
there in July - they are uncommon in the county - we haven't found any 
this year even in the mountains.
There is still some water/mud and a few shorebirds were around - Greater 
and Lesser Yellowlegs, Killdeer, Western and Least Sandpipers, one 
Wilson's Phalarope. Only 2 Great Egrets today - but many young birds - 
Eastern and Western Kingbirds, Lazuli Buntings, Chats, Wrens, Yellow 
Warblers - Western Wood-Pewees are abundant.

Long coal train at the delta - and the water came up 6 inches in an hour 
so no mud by the time I got there.
Dodd road blood pond has lots of Western Sandpipers - and they have put 
up a new fence there - if you stop be sure to get well OFF the road and 
stay clear of trucks - don't want them to put up no parking signs!

At Penninsula HMU the Double-crested Cormorants are off the nest - but 
still hanging around in the trees - over 350 of them.
Badger Island has many White Pelicans and an adult Bald Eagle is still 
there - harasses the gulls on Crescent Island.

Looks like we are in for a HOT weekend - have to bird EARLY! (The crows 
start in at 4:15 am)
Good birding, ML


-- 
MIKE & MERRYLYNN DENNY
BIRDING THE BEAUTIFUL WALLA WALLA VALLEY
IF YOU HAVEN'T GONE BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED
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Subject: Re: Notes on Cordilleran vs Pacific-slope in Latah, Nez Perce, and nearby counties
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 17:52:12 -0700
Yes our birds in WWcounty are the same - we have never split the species 
here - still call them all Westerns.
MerryLynn


On 7/9/2014 9:56 PM, John Hanna wrote:
> Hello birders,
>
> As others have noted Western Flycatchers in this area of North Central 
> Idaho can present characteristics of both Cordilleran and Pacific-slope.
>
> I wanted to let people know that Ben Bright and myself have been 
> recording position notes and songs of these birds on our phones and 
> looking at the sonograms using a program called Raven Lite. We have 
> been following the rules presented by Arch McCallum, Ph.D. to 
> determine pure birds vs intermediate birds 
> (http://www.appliedbioacoustics.com/research/wefl/). Thus far all of 
> the birds we have recorded have been intermediate birds except for one 
> from Central Grade, Nez Perce County 
> (http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18647186) in which the 
> male position note matched well with Cordilleran. Birds in Latah 
> county have presented a wide range of intermediate calls. Some birds 
> having Cordilleran like position notes but in a single syllable and 
> then they may repeat one of the three Pacific-slope song phrases. 
> Other birds may sing all three Pacific-slope song phrases but at 
> Cordilleran frequencies too low to be pure Pacific-slope. Seems like 
> every bird has its own style.
>
> We have been marking birds as Pacific-slope/Cordilleran Flycatcher 
> (Western Flycatcher) and writing in the comments section that the 
> birds were identified as intermediates based on sonograms. It would be 
> nice if eBird had a separate option to enter intermediate 
> Pacific-slope/Cordilleran Flycatcher for correctly identified 
> intermediates. In my opinion pure Cordilleran or Pacific-slope birds 
> are likely rare in this area and likely can not be correctly 
> identified without a sonogram.
>
> Any other thoughts?
>
> John Hanna
> Lewiston, Idaho
>
>
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-- 
MIKE & MERRYLYNN DENNY
BIRDING THE BEAUTIFUL WALLA WALLA VALLEY
IF YOU HAVEN'T GONE BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED
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Subject: Moscow Red-eyed Vireo, 7/10/14
From: Charles Swift <chaetura AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 09:24:06 -0700
While watering plants around my yard this AM I heard a Red-eyed Vireo
singing continuously a block or 2 south of my house. I have had a few
previously in my neighborhood usually in June, presumably wandering unmated
males.

Charles.

-- 
Charles Swift
Graduate Student in Environmental Science
University of Idaho
Moscow, Idaho 
46°43′54″ N, 116°59′50″ W
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Subject: Notes on Cordilleran vs Pacific-slope in Latah, Nez Perce, and nearby counties
From: John Hanna <johnwalterhanna AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 21:56:30 -0700
Hello birders,

As others have noted Western Flycatchers in this area of North Central
Idaho can present characteristics of both Cordilleran and Pacific-slope.

I wanted to let people know that Ben Bright and myself have been recording
position notes and songs of these birds on our phones and looking at the
sonograms using a program called Raven Lite. We have been following the
rules presented by Arch McCallum, Ph.D. to determine pure birds vs
intermediate birds (http://www.appliedbioacoustics.com/research/wefl/).
Thus far all of the birds we have recorded have been intermediate birds
except for one from Central Grade, Nez Perce County (
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18647186) in which the male
position note matched well with Cordilleran. Birds in Latah county have
presented a wide range of intermediate calls. Some birds having Cordilleran
like position notes but in a single syllable and then they may repeat one
of the three Pacific-slope song phrases. Other birds may sing all three
Pacific-slope song phrases but at Cordilleran frequencies too low to be
pure Pacific-slope. Seems like every bird has its own style.

We have been marking birds as Pacific-slope/Cordilleran Flycatcher (Western
Flycatcher) and writing in the comments section that the birds were
identified as intermediates based on sonograms. It would be nice if eBird
had a separate option to enter intermediate Pacific-slope/Cordilleran
Flycatcher for correctly identified intermediates. In my opinion pure
Cordilleran or Pacific-slope birds are likely rare in this area and likely
can not be correctly identified without a sonogram.

Any other thoughts?

John Hanna
Lewiston, Idaho_______________________________________________
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Subject: Notes on Cordilleran vs Pacific-slope in Latah, Nez Perce, and nearby counties
From: "John Hanna johnwalterhanna AT gmail.com [ible]" <ible-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 21:56:30 -0700
Hello birders,

As others have noted Western Flycatchers in this area of North Central
Idaho can present characteristics of both Cordilleran and Pacific-slope.

I wanted to let people know that Ben Bright and myself have been recording
position notes and songs of these birds on our phones and looking at the
sonograms using a program called Raven Lite. We have been following the
rules presented by Arch McCallum, Ph.D. to determine pure birds vs
intermediate birds (http://www.appliedbioacoustics.com/research/wefl/).
Thus far all of the birds we have recorded have been intermediate birds
except for one from Central Grade, Nez Perce County (
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18647186) in which the male
position note matched well with Cordilleran. Birds in Latah county have
presented a wide range of intermediate calls. Some birds having Cordilleran
like position notes but in a single syllable and then they may repeat one
of the three Pacific-slope song phrases. Other birds may sing all three
Pacific-slope song phrases but at Cordilleran frequencies too low to be
pure Pacific-slope. Seems like every bird has its own style.

We have been marking birds as Pacific-slope/Cordilleran Flycatcher (Western
Flycatcher) and writing in the comments section that the birds were
identified as intermediates based on sonograms. It would be nice if eBird
had a separate option to enter intermediate Pacific-slope/Cordilleran
Flycatcher for correctly identified intermediates. In my opinion pure
Cordilleran or Pacific-slope birds are likely rare in this area and likely
can not be correctly identified without a sonogram.

Any other thoughts?

John Hanna
Lewiston, Idaho
Subject: Bennington Lake this morning
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2014 18:38:00 -0700
Hello all,
Swallows greeted us again this morning - mostly Bank and Cliff Swallows 
on the outflow platform. What looked like a mama duck with ducklings out 
on the lake turned into a female Pintail with 8 female/young Bufflehead 
in tow - thanks to Paul for lugging his scope around the lake every week.
Despite the heat many birds were singing AND feeding young - Bewick's 
and House Wrens, Lazuli Buntings, Chipping Sparrows, Yellow-breasted 
Chats, Bullock's Oriole's, Black-headed Grosbeaks, Yellow Warblers, 
Western and Eastern Kingbirds and many Western Wood-Pewees.
The Black-chinned Hummingbird nest still has 2 babies in it and there 
were 4 males and several females fighting over the feeder.

Red-naped Sapsuckers are moving down - an adult was seen last week and 
we saw a young one today on the west side of the canal.

Good Birding - ML



MIKE & MERRYLYNN DENNY
BIRDING THE BEAUTIFUL WALLA WALLA VALLEY
IF YOU HAVEN'T GONE BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED_______________________________________________
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Subject: nesting N. Hawk Owls in west-central Idaho
From: Charles Swift <chaetura AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2014 09:39:32 -0600
Probably many on the list (especially anybody on the Idaho birding lists)
will already know this although perhaps not widely known (yet) outside of
Idaho.

Jay Carlisle found a family group of Northern Hawk Owls on July 2 in the
mountains east of Cascade, Idaho. Boise birders Larry and Missy Arnold
found a second family group while following up on the initial sighting
(within a few miles of the first). Directions to the site are being
provided upon request to anyone interested in looking for them but to
provide some measure of controlled access it is requested that they not be
further shared or posted publicly. I have the directions and am happy to
provide them.

Please note that the location is 2+ hours from Cascade, ID and Cascade is
~4 hours from Moscow so most anybody in this area is looking at a 6+ hour
drive. The access is via rough Forest Service roads and Jay recommends a
high clearance vehicle.

Here are the general guidelines from Jay:

*Please respect these owls by:*
• Keeping your distance and not purposely flushing birds to get in-flight
views or photos.  This isn't just me coming up with this idea - this
behavior has been observed & discussed among Idaho birders (*Great Gray
Owls by Donnelly a few summers ago, etc.*) as well as in many other places.
 *After all, what's more important: a close-up photo or that the
fledgling(s) survive(s)?*

• Being careful who you share the information with - this is obviously a
judgment call you'll have to make but personally I will limit my usual
excitement for doing outreach about something this exciting b/c of the slim
chance of someone telling someone else that might do harm.

Lastly, it's 2+ hrs from Cascade, at least half on dirt/gravel, & you will
NEED an SUV, truck, or Subaru (I drove very slowly :) for the road it's on.
 If you try in a sedan, I'm pretty sure you'll regret it.


-- 
Charles Swift
Graduate Student in Environmental Science
University of Idaho
Moscow, Idaho 
46°43′54″ N, 116°59′50″ W
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Subject: Okanogan County red-eyed vireo and bobolink
From: heapbigdoc AT netscape.net
Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2014 00:02:22 -0400 (EDT)
Hey Tweets - 

Took a Sunday drive up highway 21 and on to Tonasket looking for cool weather 
and huckleberry prospects. 


Didn't have much luck with either of those, but we did see a red-eyed vireo at 
Highway 21 and Thirty-mile road and a Bobolink on Fancher road up hill from 
Tonasket. 


Roy Myers, Electric City, WA

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Subject: Okanogan County red-eyed vireo and bobolink
From: heapbigdoc AT netscape.net
Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2014 00:02:22 -0400
Hey Tweets - 

Took a Sunday drive up highway 21 and on to Tonasket looking for cool weather 
and huckleberry prospects. 


Didn't have much luck with either of those, but we did see a red-eyed vireo at 
Highway 21 and Thirty-mile road and a Bobolink on Fancher road up hill from 
Tonasket. 


Roy Myers, Electric City, WA

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Subject: Sandhill cranes
From: mateer210 AT yahoo.com
Date: Sat, 5 Jul 2014 17:29:03 -0700
The Sandhills cranes at new meadows have a large youngster with them today. 

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Red-eyed Vireo - 3 at Rook's Park now
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Sat, 5 Jul 2014 09:23:54 -0700
Hello all,
After checking several times last week with no luck I drove into Rooks Park at 
5:45 this morning and almost the first bird I heard was a Red-eyed Vireo! This 
one was to the east out in the large cottonwoods behind the dam. After walking 
east and back I headed for the bridge and immediately heard another vireo back 
at the spot where they were found 2 weeks ago! I again found the pair but they 
don't appear to be on nest as they were just going from branch to branch for 10 
minutes with the one bird singing almost continuously. 


Up south of the dam were a pair of Calliope Hummingbirds - the male displaying 
over the female - isn't this July?! 


And for the first time there were more Lesser Goldfinches than Americans at the 
park - and one male was displaying right over my head! 


Black-headed Grosbeaks, Chats, Veeries, Western Tanagers, Bullock's Oriole's, 
Catbirds, Cedar Waxwings, Robins, Cowbirds and Starlings are abundant eating 
all the cherries - bumper crop this year. Waxwings also flycatching over the 
creek. 


Very birdy this morning and nice and cool.
Later, ML


*******************************************************
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the beautiful Walla Walla Valley

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Subject: 4th of July WWC Big Day
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Fri, 4 Jul 2014 23:20:57 -0700
Hello all,
Mike and I did our annual search for birds in Walla Walla county today. 
We were glad for the clouds this morning - stayed much cooler.  Headed 
up Biscuit Ridge by 4:30 am but no luck on grouse or owls.
Did find Lesser Goldfinches in Dixie.
Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs, Long-billed Dowitchers, Western, Least, 
Spotted Sandpipers, Wilson's Phalaropes, Black-necked Stilts and 
American Avocets were at 2Rivers and Dodd Rd.
Lesser Yellowlegs is new for our county yearlist - #231
We were happy to find Loggerhead Shrike and Ferruginous Hawk - and the 
White-throated Swifts were still in the gap but NO falcons. One 
Bonaparte's Gull at McNary NWR HQ along with a nice assortment of ducks 
- Cinnamon and Blue-winged Teal, Ruddy Duck, Redhead and more.
Worst misses - Cassin's Vireo, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Hairy Woodpecker - 
all easily found just last weekend - they weren't singing even at 5 am 
this morning.
Also Pheasant and Snipe which we have missed in the past.
Last bird was a calling Northern Pygmy-Owl up quiet Lewis Peak - #130 
for the day. Then we came down to what sounds like a war zone - our 
neighbors sure have lots of money to throw away on fireworks!
Hope you all enjoyed the 4th - MerryLynn

MIKE & MERRYLYNN DENNY
BIRDING THE BEAUTIFUL WALLA WALLA VALLEY
IF YOU HAVEN'T GONE BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED
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Subject: Harlequin duck
From: Catherine Temple <ctemple99 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 2 Jul 2014 15:27:10 -0700
I thought I'd pass this along. It came from a website that I follow.
Apparently, there has been a female harlequin duck spotted on Warm Springs
Creek near Jerry Johnsons turnout off Hwy 12 in Idaho. I know some of you
like to go looking for these. She was seen June 29th. Here's the link to
the photo story.

http://www.nemesisbird.com/birding/bird-sightings/photo-study-idaho-harlequin-duck/ 

-- 

*Catherine Temple*

*Pet Portrait and Wildlife Artist*

*Clarkston, WA.(208) 791-7052*
ctemple99 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Liberty Lake Least Flycatchers
From: "Isacoff, Jonathan" <isacoff AT gonzaga.edu>
Date: Tue, 1 Jul 2014 20:43:19 +0000
There was a pair of LEAST FLYCATCHERS near the boardwalk at Liberty Lake County 
Park this morning. The male was singing quite loudly. Always a treat to see 
among the locals. 


Good birding,
Jon Isacoff, Spokane
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Subject: Pend Oreille County on June 30
From: Matthew Moskwik <mpmoskwik AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 1 Jul 2014 12:16:19 -0700
Hi all,

 

Yesterday I birded southern and central Pend Oreille County.  I did not see
anything unusual, although there was a pair of Lewis's Woodpeckers
flycatching from a dead cottonwood tree on the Kalispel Indian Reservation
Dike Road.  Later, I also found a single Lewis's Woodpecker feeding at the
corner of Tweedie and Spring Valley Roads.  Probably the highlight of the
day was a long-tailed weasel that ran across my path, as I was walking the
PUD dike that runs from Highway 20 east to the Pend Oreille River just south
of Tacoma Creek.

 

Also - The last positive report of the Alder Flycatcher was on June 20, thus
the bird has probably moved on.  I'm happy to hear many of you got to see
it.

 

Matthew Moskwik

Spokane, WA

 
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Subject: Northern Panhandle
From: "Isacoff, Jonathan" <isacoff AT gonzaga.edu>
Date: Tue, 1 Jul 2014 16:53:22 +0000
Yesterday I took a very long drive to Clark Fork via Chilco Mountian via FR 
278. This is a very rough road with no services and takes the better part of a 
day to drive though the scenery and habitat are well worth it. Didn't unearth 
any of the more atypical woodpeckers or grouse as hoped but there were as 
always, lots of nice birds. The bird of the day was Swainson's Thrush. 2-3 
birds were singing at every stop over 100 miles! My conservative eBird counts 
were lower but there were easily 150-200 individuals singing throughout the day 
and well into the evening. All the typical hummingbirds, woodpeckers, 
flycatchers, vireos, and sparrows were out and about. 10 Warbler species on the 
day: Northern Waterthrush, MacGillvray's, Orange-crowned, Nashville, Redstart, 
Yellowthroat, Yellow, Yellow-rumped, Townsend's. Only 2 Wilson's way up high 
near subalpine zones. 


In keeping with the "no finches" character of the year, I had just 2 flyover 
RED CROSSBILLS (Type 2-Douglas Fir I believe) and 3 or 4 PINE SISKINS. That was 
it for finches. Had a couple of fun encounters with RUFFED GROUSE moms and 
chicks on the road. The birdiest spot of the day was the Johnson Creek area 
near Clark Fork, which had 3 WATERTHRUSHES, 5 REDSTARTS, tons of vireos, 
pewees, orioles, grosbeaks, and the only LEAST FLYCATCHER of the day. After 
dusk, there were COMMON NIGHTHAWKS all around Cocollalla Lake and at most stops 
between there and Silverwood. 


Good birding,
Jon Isacoff, Spokane


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Subject: Mann Lake Sundayosprey
From: tohal AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 30 Jun 2014 04:00:24 -0400
Birded Mann Lake Sunday around noon and found a nice variety of birds. 
Sightings included: 


2 horned grebes
1 great blue heron
1 wood duck
many mallards with young
2 buffleheads
1 osprey
1 redtail hawk
8 coots
7 killdeer
5 greater yellowlegs
3 western sandpipers
3 eastern kingbirds
many red winged blackbirds
1 yellow headed blackbird

Terry O'Halloran _______________________________________________
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Subject: GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Sun, 29 Jun 2014 23:22:40 -0700
Hello all from MerryLynn,
Mike had a writing project this morning so I headed up to Hollebeke HMU 
on the Snake River as we had never birded there in June. Yellow-breasted 
Chats, Bullock's Orioles, Lazuli Buntings and Gray Catbirds are abundant 
in the Russian Olives. I spished at one spot and was shocked to see an 
adult GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW pop up!  Can't be many summer records in SE WA?
The Corps is removing much of the old growth russian olive trees - 
another complete waste of public funds and a sad loss of habitat that 50 
generations of our native birds have become dependent upon.
Later, ML

MIKE & MERRYLYNN DENNY
BIRDING THE BEAUTIFUL WALLA WALLA VALLEY
IF YOU HAVEN'T GONE BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED
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Subject: Spokane Crossbills, Lewis's Woodpecker
From: "Isacoff, Jonathan" <isacoff AT gonzaga.edu>
Date: Mon, 30 Jun 2014 00:24:49 +0000
Earlier today there was a LEWIS'S WOODPECKER at the nearly-annual spot on Rosa 
Butte next to US 195. The location is about 7 or 8 miles South of Spokane on 
the West side of the road. There is a hill (Rosa Butte) with a conspicuous old 
burn. The bird was on the big dead tree immediately by the road but they will 
use the whole area of the burn and move around. 


Given the lack of finches regionally this year, 2 RED CROSSBILLS yesterday were 
noteworthy at Stevens Creek Natural Area in the Dishman Hills (access off 
Palouse Highway). This is a nice birding trail that offers nearly all the same 
birds as the older more well-known Iller Creek Natural Area, with maybe some 
new looks as well. I was surprised to find two CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEES along 
the trail at this time of year (usually they move up to higher, denser forest). 
A few weeks ago had a flyover out-of-place WHITE-THROATED SWIFT and a NIGHTHAWK 
as well, so who knows what else is in this neat new area. 


Good birding,
Jon Isacoff, Spokane
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Subject: P1 bridge Latah and Nez Perce county American Dippers
From: John Hanna <johnwalterhanna AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 22:55:26 -0700
The comments section of my eBird reports read:

Perfect timing as my two year old daughter indicated that she had to poop
as we were driving down the grade into Kendrick. I told my wife to make a
quick left turn and that there would be a turnout up by the brown sign. Did
not have much time as my wife wanted to get back to Lewiston but the place
was alive with bird songs and I was able to identify and see a few birds in
both Latah and Nez Perce counties. Including my first Dippers in both Latah
and Nez Perce counties.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18940158

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18940147

Good Birding,

John Hanna
Lewiston, Idaho_______________________________________________
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Subject: Stevens and Spokane Counties
From: Terry Little <terry AT crossoverchurch.info>
Date: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 23:11:39 -0400
Hello,

My son Joshua and I enjoyed birding in Stevens county along the north shore 
of Lake Spokane and on Martha Boardman Rd. West of Tum Tum, along the 
cliffs along SR 291, we found Rock and Canyon Wrens, Yellow breasted Chats, 
Nashville, Orange crowned, Yellow, and Yellow rumped Warblers, Townsend's 
Solitaire, Dusky Flycatcher and other expected species.

At the riparian area along Chamokane Creek on the Spokane Indian 
Reservation (Martha Boardman Rd), we enjoyed numerous Veeries, along with 
Red eyed Vireos, Willow Flycatchers, Yellow breasted Chats, Bewick's Wren, 
and Bullock's Oriole.Above the creek in the Ponderosa Pines, we found 8 
Gray Flycatchers (feeding babies), Lark Sparrows, Cassin's Finches and a 
WHITE HEADED WOODPECKER.

Back in Spokane County, the CLAY COLORED SPARROW continues in Colbert along 
Handy Rd, about 50 yards east of "5415" mailbox. Seven American White 
Pelicans continue on the south end of Eloika Lake.

Thats about it.
Terry Little
Mead, Wa

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Subject: Re: ID Help
From: "Keith Carlson" <kec201814 AT cableone.net>
Date: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 07:11:59 -0700
Thanks to all for helping with the ID of the two immature Field Sparrows i 
photographed while at Gettysburg. 


Keith Carlson_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: ID Help
From: Keith Carlson <kec201814 AT cableone.net>
Date: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 07:11:59 -0700
Thanks to all for helping with the ID of the two immature Field Sparrows i 
photographed while at Gettysburg. 


Keith Carlson_______________________________________________
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Subject: urban nesting A. Kestrels
From: Charles Swift <chaetura AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2014 16:30:57 -0700
In the past few days I've noted 4 different family groups of A. Kestrels
around Moscow (UI campus, downtown, Latah Co. fairgrounds, and McDonald
Elementary school). I suspect all are nesting in building cavities. I
wouldn't be surprised if there were twice that many (or more) actually
nesting around town.

My impression is they are increasing as a breeder in town although it could
be that I'm just noticing them more. In any case it's interesting and
curious that a species commonly residing in urban areas in some parts of
the west has declined so drastically in much of the east (there has been a
great deal of concern about this eastern U.S. decline in recent years).

Charles.

-- 
Charles Swift
Graduate Student in Environmental Science
University of Idaho
Moscow, Idaho 
46°43′54″ N, 116°59′50″ W
email: chaetura AT gmail.com
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Subject: RE Keith Carlson's Gettysburg photos
From: Bill Siems <wfsiems AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2014 14:08:09 -0700
By odd coincidence I was also on the Gettysburg battlefield on June 21-22! 
Field Sparrows were everywhere, singing rising, accelerating trills from high 
exposed branches and deep in the grass. And I also had a juvenile walk without 
concern right up to my foot. Maybe this is a special show they put on for 
out-of-state birders. I had been motionless for quite a while, watching a pair 
of Red-headed Woodpeckers working over a big nearly dead oak at Devil's Den. 


Bill Siems

From: inland-nw-birders-request AT uidaho.edu
Subject: Inland-nw-birders Digest, Vol 80, Issue 34
To: inland-nw-birders AT uidaho.edu
Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2014 12:00:05 -0700

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--Forwarded Message Attachment--
From: kec201814 AT cableone.net
To: inland-NW-birders AT uidaho.edu; tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2014 10:05:39 -0700
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] ID Help Needed








On June 22nd, I observed these two sparrow-like 
birds at Gettysburg, PA.
There were very small and quite, tame.
In short flight (one foot or so) they had light 
colored outer tail feathers.
Breast and flanks are lightly striped
They may well be immature birds, but are obviously 
brightly marked.
They made no vocalizations.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/birddog/14497653056/
 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/birddog/14334089990/in/photostream/
 
Keith E. Carlson
Lewiston 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: ID Help Needed
From: "Keith Carlson" <kec201814 AT cableone.net>
Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2014 10:05:39 -0700
On June 22nd, I observed these two sparrow-like birds at Gettysburg, PA.
There were very small and quite, tame.
In short flight (one foot or so) they had light colored outer tail feathers.
Breast and flanks are lightly striped
They may well be immature birds, but are obviously brightly marked.
They made no vocalizations.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/birddog/14497653056/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/birddog/14334089990/in/photostream/

Keith E. Carlson
Lewiston_______________________________________________
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Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: ID Help Needed
From: Keith Carlson <kec201814 AT cableone.net>
Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2014 10:05:39 -0700
On June 22nd, I observed these two sparrow-like birds at Gettysburg, PA.
There were very small and quite, tame.
In short flight (one foot or so) they had light colored outer tail feathers.
Breast and flanks are lightly striped
They may well be immature birds, but are obviously brightly marked.
They made no vocalizations.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/birddog/14497653056/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/birddog/14334089990/in/photostream/

Keith E. Carlson
Lewiston_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: "Chimney" Swift near Bayview, ID
From: Charles Swift <chaetura AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2014 13:01:10 -0700
Vaux's Swifts nest in chimneys in Moscow. A few are present all summer in
my neighborhood and Dale Goble has had them nesting in his chimney in
Moscow. I actually have an artificial (wood) swift nesting structure on my
house (added with our addition) although it has never been used. It is
based on plans for Chimney Swift nesting structure which are used in some
areas in the east where traditional chimneys are less common on houses than
in the past.

Charles.


On Thu, Jun 26, 2014 at 12:52 PM, Doug Ward  wrote:

> Did I catch any of you rare bird chasers?  Actually, the “Chimney” Swift
> is a VAUX’S SWIFT with a nest in the chimney of our cabin near Bayview
> (Kootenai Co.), Idaho.  To be honest, it would be cool (and extraordinarily
> unlikely) if it was a Chimney Swift, but given swift nests are sooo hard to
> find, I was pretty stoked at the discovery.  I’d noticed a couple of swifts
> a few weeks back checking out the house, but given it was migration, and
> the south facing hillside at our place being pretty dry and seemingly not
> suited for these guys, I didn’t think too much about them nesting.  Then
> yesterday afternoon (25 Jun.’14) while enjoying a beer and the scenery from
> our yard, a Vaux’s came bombing out from behind us, so to the roof I
> climbed.  Peering down our open chimney, I was excited to see a small ledge
> type nest about 10-12’ down with five (5) very small white eggs; see the
> crappy photos I took with a flashlight and my phone:
>
>
>
> https://flic.kr/p/nQ61gf
>
>
>
> Pretty neat and possibly the first recorded Vaux’s Swift nest for Kootenai
> County; is that what your records show Shirley (I kind of remember you
> mentioning this previously when we had several Vaux’s in downtown Coeur
> d’Alene last summer)?  I know Vaux’s will roost in chimneys and other
> crevices on buildings during migration, but don’t recall nesting being
> mentioned though I’d be surprised if that was the case.  Do any of you have
> experience with these guys nesting in buildings?  Anyway, we won’t be
> building any fires soon and will let them raise their family in peace so no
> more updates until we hopefully notice them fledging.
>
>
>
> Good Swifting,
>
> Doug
>
> _______________________________________________
> Inland-nw-birders mailing list
> Inland-nw-birders AT uidaho.edu
> https://lists.uidaho.edu/mailman/listinfo/inland-nw-birders
>
>


-- 
Charles Swift
Graduate Student in Environmental Science
University of Idaho
Moscow, Idaho 
46°43′54″ N, 116°59′50″ W
email: chaetura AT gmail.com
google+: google.com/+CharlesSwift_______________________________________________
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Subject: "Chimney" Swift near Bayview, ID
From: Doug Ward <dougward AT frontier.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2014 12:52:48 -0700
Did I catch any of you rare bird chasers?  Actually, the "Chimney" Swift is
a VAUX'S SWIFT with a nest in the chimney of our cabin near Bayview
(Kootenai Co.), Idaho.  To be honest, it would be cool (and extraordinarily
unlikely) if it was a Chimney Swift, but given swift nests are sooo hard to
find, I was pretty stoked at the discovery.  I'd noticed a couple of swifts
a few weeks back checking out the house, but given it was migration, and the
south facing hillside at our place being pretty dry and seemingly not suited
for these guys, I didn't think too much about them nesting.  Then yesterday
afternoon (25 Jun.'14) while enjoying a beer and the scenery from our yard,
a Vaux's came bombing out from behind us, so to the roof I climbed.  Peering
down our open chimney, I was excited to see a small ledge type nest about
10-12' down with five (5) very small white eggs; see the crappy photos I
took with a flashlight and my phone:

 

https://flic.kr/p/nQ61gf

 

Pretty neat and possibly the first recorded Vaux's Swift nest for Kootenai
County; is that what your records show Shirley (I kind of remember you
mentioning this previously when we had several Vaux's in downtown Coeur
d'Alene last summer)?  I know Vaux's will roost in chimneys and other
crevices on buildings during migration, but don't recall nesting being
mentioned though I'd be surprised if that was the case.  Do any of you have
experience with these guys nesting in buildings?  Anyway, we won't be
building any fires soon and will let them raise their family in peace so no
more updates until we hopefully notice them fledging.

 

Good Swifting,

Doug
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Subject: Fwd: eastern Latah Co. Least Flycatcher (6/25)
From: Charles Swift <chaetura AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2014 11:34:02 -0700
I'm not sure if we actually have a confirmed breeding for Latah County. The
few county records have involved singing males that seem to disappear
within several days of being located (at least those that have been
followed up). Perhaps this late date indicates an actual breeding but as
typical only 1 bird was reported - would be nice to follow up and confirm
breeding.

Charles.


On Thu, Jun 26, 2014 at 11:04 AM, Mike & MerryLynn 
wrote:

>  Glad to know they are around - I have been checking all the areas we
> have had them in Walla Walla Co. - they nested up S. F. Coppei last year
> and were also along Mill Creek - but haven't found any this year. Maybe
> they will show up really late!
> Later, MerryLynn
>
>
> MIKE & MERRYLYNN DENNY
> BIRDING THE BEAUTIFUL WALLA WALLA VALLEY
> IF YOU HAVEN'T GONE BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Inland-nw-birders mailing list
> Inland-nw-birders AT uidaho.edu
> https://lists.uidaho.edu/mailman/listinfo/inland-nw-birders
>
>


-- 
Charles Swift
Graduate Student in Environmental Science
University of Idaho
Moscow, Idaho 
46°43′54″ N, 116°59′50″ W
email: chaetura AT gmail.com
google+: google.com/+CharlesSwift




-- 
Charles Swift
Graduate Student in Environmental Science
University of Idaho
Moscow, Idaho 
46°43′54″ N, 116°59′50″ W
email: chaetura AT gmail.com
google+: google.com/+CharlesSwift_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: eastern Latah Co. Least Flycatcher (6/25)
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2014 11:04:58 -0700
Glad to know they are around - I have been checking all the areas we 
have had them in Walla Walla Co. - they nested up S. F. Coppei last year 
and were also along Mill Creek - but haven't found any this year. Maybe 
they will show up really late!
Later, MerryLynn

  
MIKE & MERRYLYNN DENNY
BIRDING THE BEAUTIFUL WALLA WALLA VALLEY
IF YOU HAVEN'T GONE BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED
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Subject: eastern Latah Co. Least Flycatcher (6/25)
From: Charles Swift <chaetura AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2014 10:24:24 -0700
Alex Lamoreaux reported a Least Flycatcher to eBird yesterday along the
East Fork Potlatch R. Here is a link to his eBird list which includes a
google maps link to the actual location.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18905744


-- 
Charles Swift
Graduate Student in Environmental Science
University of Idaho
Moscow, Idaho 
46°43′54″ N, 116°59′50″ W
email: chaetura AT gmail.com
google+: google.com/+CharlesSwift_______________________________________________
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Subject: Pend Oreille County Montane Birding
From: Matthew Moskwik <mpmoskwik AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2014 09:27:44 -0700
Hi all,

 

The Salmo Mountain area is pretty good right now for montane specialties.  I
had relatively little trouble locating Boreal Chickadees, Three-toed
Woodpecker, and Pine Grosbeak.  In addition, I had a flyover Northern
Goshawk and a male Dusky Grouse.  Mammals were also abundant on the road to
the pass.  I had two separate encounters with Moose, one Black Bear, several
Black-tailed Deer, and a shrew (either Vagrant or Montane) that ran across
the road.  Below are the specifics:

 

Boreal Chickadees - The pair at the nest site (at the campsite approximately
1/3 mile from the pass) that Terry Little found last week are easily
observable.  In fact, they provided some of the best views that I've ever
had of the species.  Thanks Terry.  There is also a second pair at the pass.

 

Three-toed Woodpecker - There are several birds between the campsite and the
Salmo Loop Trailhead (end of the road).  I had at least 5 separate birds,
although there could have been more (I heard several drumming in the
distance).

 

Pine Grosbeak - I had a female feeding a youngster near the Salmo Loop
Trailhead.  In addition a male was nearby in a spruce.  On the road to the
summit of Mount Salmo (the road is open now, except for the last 100 feet or
so), I heard another calling from the trees.

 

Northern Goshawk - I had an adult flyover at the pass.

 

Dusky Grouse - A beautiful male was feeding along the road to the summit.
He was just before the first hairpin turn.

 

Matthew Moskwik

Spokane, WA
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Subject: Calispell Lake
From: "Isacoff, Jonathan" <isacoff AT gonzaga.edu>
Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2014 15:20:08 +0000
Birded Calispell Lake for about 5 hours yesterday. Nothing especially rare but 
many birds still singing and being active. About 98 species. Black Tern numbers 
down from around 20 to only 3. Noteworthy birds: 


Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper's Hawk
Black-necked Stilt
Bufflehead (4) and Goldeneye (7) - noteworthy only in they may be breeding in 
cavities near the lake. Or just non-breeders, hard to say. Bufflehead breeding 
is uncommon-to-rare in WA. 

Red-eyed Vireo - At least 20. Maybe 30.  They are flourishing up there.
Northern Waterthrush - just 1 today but there are more there working on nests
American Redstart - 7 males and 2 females. There were probably more unsinging 
females near nest sites meaning there's a very healthy breeding population here 

Bobolink - conservatively counted 15 males. They are in at least 4 
discontiguous fields so also seemingly flourishing. 

1 Red Crossbill - Normally not noteworthy but as Matthew Moswkik aptly points 
out, this particular year it's a noteworthy sighting due to the relatively 
absence of typical finches, especially Crossbills and Siskins, from lower 
elevation typical habitats. 


Good birding, 
Jon Isacoff, Spokane

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Subject: Fwd: [IBLE] FW: [Tweeters] Range Expansion for Anna's Hummingbird
From: Nancy Miller <nmiller AT moscow.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Jun 2014 17:37:29 -0700

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: "'Larry Arnold' larnold47 AT cableone.net [ible]" 
 

> Date: June 25, 2014 at 1:25:23 PM PDT
> To: "IBLE" 
> Subject: [IBLE] FW: [Tweeters] Range Expansion for Anna's Hummingbird
> Reply-To: "Larry Arnold" 
> 
>  
> 
> Of interest to hum-lovers on IBLE?
> 
> Larry, Boise
> 
>  
> 
> From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of David 
Hutchinson 

> Sent: Wednesday, June 25, 2014 12:44 PM
> To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> Subject: [Tweeters] Range Expansion for Anna's Hummingbird
> 
>  
> 
> I always look forward to the Washington Field Notes, beautifully produced and 
well -edited. But then I seem pause at the hummer section, where it talks of 
the "expanding range" of Anna's Hummingbird in Eastern Washington, specifically 
in the winter months. This species is a little tricky, in that it is a resident 
species in its overall range, while it does make a post-breeding down slope 
movement in S. California, and it clearly wanders to northern and eastern 
states to take up new residence. 

> 
> Its habitat seems tied to human occupation, flowery suburban and 
neighbourhood gardens year round but using feeders if they are handy. But in 
the Pacific lowlands it does not, in my opinion, need those feeders for 
survival during the breeding season, nor during some winters, given the 
abundance of native blooms and ornamental plantings. 

> 
> The number of winter sightings in Eastern Washington is less than half a 
percent of a normal Western Washington total and one guesses they are 
feeder-related. One hybrid is mentioned and there are also rumours of Anna's 
from the Methow Valley with possible hybridisation. But does all this amount to 
a "range expansion"? Is there more data out there and are there breeding 
records east of the Cascades? I think I would call them "strays" or out of 
range, at this point. What does anyone else think? 

> 
> --
> David Hutchinson, Owner
> Flora & Fauna: Nature Books
> Discovery Gardens: Native Plants
> 
> __._,_.___
> Posted by: "Larry Arnold" 
> Reply via web post • Reply to sender • Reply to group • Start a New 
Topic • Messages in this topic (1) 

> To Post a message, send it to:   ible AT yahoogroups.com
> 
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> 
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> 
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> 
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> 
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Subject: Franklin's Gulls, Loons
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Wed, 25 Jun 2014 16:37:25 -0700
Hello all,
Couldn't resist a run out to the WWRdelta this morning as the water is very low 
so lots of mud. NO shorebirds but 9 Franklin's Gulls picking around in the cove 
with RB Gulls. Just off the delta were 2 non-breeding Common Loons. 


At 2Rivers I hiked through the 8 ft. grass and rushes full of spiders and 
mosquitos to get out to "Ruff Spit". I was rewarded with 91! Western Grebes all 
lined up loafing and preening plus 1 Eared Grebe - all very easy to see as it 
was CALM for once. In the cove were 2 American Avocets, 2 Western Sandpipers, 
10 Great Egrets scattered around still in their breeding finery and 2 
Black-crowned Night-Herons flew over. A few Caspian Terns but NO Forster's. 2 
pair of Cinnamon Teal but no offspring. 


Out on Badger Island were many young A. White Pelicans plus 1 adult BALD EAGLE 
- we saw a large nest out there before the leaves came out - won't know until 
we see young - - - - 


The blood ponds have just 2 pair of Black-necked Stilts with 1 young - the 
"crud" floats around with the wind - we had 7 pair nesting earlier but gulls 
and ravens prey on them. NO Avocets - they were nesting up on the dike but gone 
as well. 

Tyson pond had a few dozen Redhead, Lesser Scaup, Shoveler, 3 Wigeon - and the 
Mallards already in their "ugly" plumage. 


The Millet pond is drying up fast - but still heard 2 Sora so probably breeding 
as well as Virginia Rail. Another 10 Great Egrets there as well. A couple 
Wilson's Snipe were winnowing - they have been virtually absent in the county 
this year so nice to hear. 


Forgot to mention yesterday at Bennington Lake we observed 42 American White 
Pelican circling off to the southwest - Friday evening there were 24 on Mill 
Creek behind KMart. 


Back to pruning, weeding, etc - - -
ML

*******************************************************
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the beautiful Walla Walla Valley

"If you haven't birded, you haven't lived"_______________________________________________
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Subject: Bennington Lake this morning
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Tue, 24 Jun 2014 14:02:33 -0700
Hello all,
Cool, overcast and breezy at the lake today - and the birds were 
abundant, noisy and visible!  Swallows covered the outflow tower - 
dozens of newly-fledged Cliff, Bank and Tree Swallows. Only one Osprey 
today but we watched it catch a fish. A lone Ruddy Duck was in the 
middle of the lake.

The surprise today was 2 Western (Pacific-slope for the splitters) 
Flycatchers along the canal - but it is perfect habitat. Water, bank 
with overhanging roots, etc. and a few trees. These birds nest all over 
the county - along Dry Creek they nest under all the bridges - looks 
like a cliff to them.

Orioles, Chipping Sparrows, House Wrens, Yellow Warblers, Western 
Kingbirds, BC Chickadees, Downy Woodpeckers all feeding young. 
Black-headed Grosbeaks, Catbirds, YB Chats, Black-chinned Hummingbird, 
Warbling Vireo, Western Wood-Pewees, Willow Flycatchers and Eastern 
Kingbirds still nesting. Cedar Waxwings and American Goldfinches around 
as well.

After our walk we went to Rook's Park to relocate the RED-EYED VIREOS 
found last Sat. by Tom Mansfield - I had a pair on Sunday but today we 
didn't hear or see them in our 30 min. walk around the park.

Mike and I spent Sat and part of Sunday with friends on Biscuit Ridge - 
many birds and spectacular views (and sunsets). We were searching for a 
reported Hermit Warbler - no luck but in a different area we did find a 
hybrid Townsend's/Hermit Warbler - one side of the face looked like 
Hermit, the other had a thin black line through the eye. It also didn't 
have near the yellow under the throat and minimal streaking on the 
sides. Different looking bird to say the least. First time we have seen 
this in WWCounty.

Enjoy the birds! ML

MIKE & MERRYLYNN DENNY
BIRDING THE BEAUTIFUL WALLA WALLA VALLEY
IF YOU HAVEN'T GONE BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED
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Subject: Peregrine chicks
From: Catherine Temple <ctemple99 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Jun 2014 10:01:20 -0700
I stopped to check on the peregrine chicks this morning thinking the
overcast skies would make it easier to see. I was surprised how much they
had grown! Two chicks were perched on the rocks below the eyrie and looked
very close to full grown. There was a pretty good breeze and one was doing
a lot of wing flapping and I was hoping to see it lift off, but apparently
it's not quite ready. Chick #2 was doing the same though from a wider and
flatter location just below it's bolder sibling. I think there are only two
chicks.
 Both parents were circling above and calling and eventually one came in
with a meal. It landed some distance away and called as if to entice
youngsters to fly a short way. The first chick tried walking and flapping
across the cliff face, but decided to return to safer ground. Eventually,
the adult flew off with the meal, but came back and landed next to the
second chick and fed it while the first one cried from above. Tough love,
perhaps?
 I took photos, but they are heavily cropped and not great, just more to
record what I saw. Wish I could get better ones.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ctemple/14311731178/in/photostream/
​​

​I suspect the chicks will be flying soon​
​.​

-- 

*Catherine Temple*

*Pet Portrait and Wildlife Artist*

*Clarkston, WA.(208) 791-7052*
ctemple99 AT gmail.com

www.catherinetemple.com
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Subject: Caspian terns
From: tohal AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2014 03:26:33 -0400
Sunday afternoon I stopped at the upstream end of Swallows Park and spotted 5 
Caspian terns on the gravel/mud bar. 


Terry O'Halloran_______________________________________________
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Subject: Mann Lake Sunday
From: tohal AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2014 03:19:31 -0400
Visited Mann Lake Sunday afternoon and found the following:

12 American avocets
5 Franklin's gulls
2 common terns
2 greater yellowlegs
1 Wilson's phalarope
1 pair of yellow headed blackbirds
1 wood duck
2 spotted sandpipers
8 killdeer
many mallards and red wing blackbirds

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Subject: Turnbull NWR - Caspian Terns, Gray Flycatcher
From: Tim O'Brien <kertim7179 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 10:44:30 -0700
Hi all,

I did my last point count survey this morning at Turnbull NWR. I was greeted 
by a herd of elk just past the entrance gate. 


A couple Caspian Terns were flying around and being noisy before sunrise.

I found at least two maybe three Gray Flycatchers on my route today. After I 
was done, I went back and tried for photos without success. Males were singing 
so presumably they are breeding there. I have had one or two in the past few 
years, but this is the first year I have had them in late June. 


Also, one Olive-sided Flycatcher singing by grouse corner (first semi-90 degree 
turn on the entrance road). 


Great morning!

Tim O'Brien
Cheney, WA
mailto: kertim7179 at yahoo dot com

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Subject: bobolink near Colville
From: steve schubert <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2014 07:53:04 -0700
   Hello all,

Yesterday afternoon, June 20th, an adult male BOBOLINK flew across Mantz Rickey 
Rd. in the Colville Valley - expanses of green hayfields on both sides of the 
road, and near the town of Colville. 


Uncommon sighting in this area?

 

Steve Schubert

Rice, WA_______________________________________________
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