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Updated on Friday, September 19 at 10:28 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Varied Thrush,©David Sibley

19 Sep Sorry! [Melissa Pappas ]
19 Sep Re: Berylline Hummingbird in....Michigan! [Melissa Pappas ]
19 Sep Berylline Hummingbird in....Michigan! [Allen Chartier ]
17 Sep Fw: Hummer coloring [KC Foggin ]
16 Sep Re: Hummer coloring ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
15 Sep Re: Hummer coloring [Lanny Chambers ]
15 Sep Hummer coloring [KC Foggin ]
14 Sep Hummer (and ant) featured in EPOD [Wiggins Patrick ]
14 Sep Re: Tiny bird, giant ego [Allen Chartier ]
14 Sep Re: Tiny bird, giant ego [Melissa Pappas ]
14 Sep Re: Tiny bird, giant ego [Dottie Price ]
13 Sep Tiny bird, giant ego [Lanny Chambers ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lizette Wroten ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lanny Chambers ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lizette Wroten ]
11 Sep Hummers Fighting Nice(?) [Melissa Pappas ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lanny Chambers ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Irma ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [jwn ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? ["creinsch AT humbirds.org" ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lanny Chambers ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lanny Chambers ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lizette Wroten ]
10 Sep Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lizette Wroten ]
9 Sep Re: on Bob Sargent passing- an old native prayer [jwn ]
9 Sep Bob Sargent - Online Obituary [Robert Protz ]
9 Sep on Bob Sargent passing- an old native prayer [Rachel Powless ]
7 Sep Re: For the winter report... ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
7 Sep Very Sad News About Bob Sargent [Kathi Johnson Rock ]
7 Sep Re: For the winter report... [Tom Trenchard ]
7 Sep Re: For the winter report... ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
6 Sep For the winter report... [Linda Beall ]
3 Sep Re: Nectar Defender [Dottie Price ]
3 Sep Re: Nectar Defender [Lanny Chambers ]
1 Sep Buff-bellied hummingbird [Beth Maniscalco ]
31 Aug Ruby Throats Still on the Move [Dottie Price ]
31 Aug first observed winter hummer [Cindy Macolini ]
30 Aug Re: Bob Sargent [Dottie Price ]
30 Aug Re: Bob Sargent [Bob Sargent ]
30 Aug Re: Bob Sargent [Dottie Price ]
29 Aug Bob Sargent [Bob Hall-Brooks ]
29 Aug Re: Terrible Situation! [Dottie Price ]
29 Aug Re: Terrible Situation! [Jana Whittle ]
29 Aug Re: Terrible Situation! [Jim Smith ]
29 Aug Terrible Situation! [Jana Whittle ]
29 Aug For the winter hummer list [Linda Beall ]
28 Aug Hummingbird taste receptors ["Ingold, James" ]
28 Aug Re: Bob Sargent [Kathi Johnson Rock ]
28 Aug Re: Bob Sargent [Lanny Chambers ]
28 Aug Ruby-throated Hummingbird No. 5,000 ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
28 Aug Re: Bob Sargent [Melissa Pappas ]
28 Aug Bob Sargent [Lanny Chambers ]
27 Aug Pieces of a Puzzle ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
21 Aug Re: "Nectar Defender" [Lanny Chambers ]
21 Aug "Nectar Defender" [Gene Trapp ]
21 Aug LA Western Winter Hummingbird Report #1 ["Johnson, Erik" ]
19 Aug Rufous [Jack & Rose Must ]
19 Aug Hilton Pond 08/01/14 (Truth About Ruby-throats) ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
18 Aug Re: Hummers and Kestrels [Lanny Chambers ]
18 Aug Re: Hummers and Kestrels ["Johnson, Erik" ]
18 Aug 2013-2014 Winter Hummingbirds Report [Kevin Morgan ]
18 Aug Re: Hummers and Kestrels [Wiggins Patrick ]
18 Aug Re: Hummers and Kestrels [Allen Chartier ]
17 Aug Re: Hummers and Kestrels ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
17 Aug Hummers and Kestrels [Wiggins Patrick ]
13 Aug Re: [LABIRD-L] Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
13 Aug Re: [LABIRD-L] Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird [Bill & Inge ]
13 Aug Re: [LABIRD-L] Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
13 Aug Re: [LABIRD-L] Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird [Bill & Inge ]
7 Aug Re: Question for the Experts = Rufous Longevity Record [Kevin Morgan ]
6 Aug Re: Question for the Experts = Rufous Longevity Record [Noel Venezia ]
6 Aug Re: Question for the Experts = Rufous Longevity Record ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]

Subject: Sorry!
From: Melissa Pappas <0000000553dda6f7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 08:00:57 -0700
Fat fingered it! What I meant to write was that Allen banded 8 birds in 90 
minutes at our house on Wednesday. We are still hosting quite a few birds, but 
they are acting more civil towards each other. Think they must be more 
concerned about bulking up to go than fighting. All of the birds were 
hatch-year. Sure hope that Berylline decides to come for a visit. People keep 
asking me when I'm going to have another "rare" visitor. I may have used up my 
quota in 2005, 


Melissa Pappas
Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI

Blog: http://colmel.wordpress.com/

"If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should 
go home and examine your conscience." ~ Woodrow Wilson 

Subject: Re: Berylline Hummingbird in....Michigan!
From: Melissa Pappas <0000000553dda6f7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 07:56:41 -0700
 





Melissa Pappas

Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI

 

Blog: http://colmel.wordpress.com/

 



"If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should 
go home and examine your conscience." ~ Woodrow Wilson 

 

________________________________
 From: Allen Chartier 
To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU 
Sent: Friday, September 19, 2014 9:02 AM
Subject: [HUMNET-L] Berylline Hummingbird in....Michigan!
  

Hummingbird enthusiasts,

On September 17, an apparent male Berylline Hummingbird was found at a
feeder at a home in Grand Marais, northern Michigan. Photos were taken.
Yesterday (the 18th), a small mob of birders failed to find the bird there,
but after sundown a report came in that the bird spent that afternoon at
least at another feeder about 1 mile northeast of the first site. Photos
were taken there too. As of this morning, the bird is being seen at this
second location. Hopefully it will establish a predictable pattern so that
it can be seen by many. Weather conditions are more like October up there
right now, with morning temperatures in the 30s the past few days, with
high temps in the 50s.


Allen T. Chartier
Inkster, Michigan
Email: amazilia3 AT gmail.com
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
Website: www.amazilia.net
Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/
Subject: Berylline Hummingbird in....Michigan!
From: Allen Chartier <amazilia3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 09:02:26 -0400
Hummingbird enthusiasts,

On September 17, an apparent male Berylline Hummingbird was found at a
feeder at a home in Grand Marais, northern Michigan. Photos were taken.
Yesterday (the 18th), a small mob of birders failed to find the bird there,
but after sundown a report came in that the bird spent that afternoon at
least at another feeder about 1 mile northeast of the first site. Photos
were taken there too. As of this morning, the bird is being seen at this
second location. Hopefully it will establish a predictable pattern so that
it can be seen by many. Weather conditions are more like October up there
right now, with morning temperatures in the 30s the past few days, with
high temps in the 50s.


Allen T. Chartier
Inkster, Michigan
Email: amazilia3 AT gmail.com
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
Website: www.amazilia.net
Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/
Subject: Fw: Hummer coloring
From: KC Foggin <KCFoggin AT SC.RR.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 19:46:25 -0400
Many thanks to all that responded to my query on the coloring of my 
Ruby-throated Hummer. It is much appreciated. 


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20




From: KC Foggin 
Sent: Monday, September 15, 2014 5:00 PM
To: CarolinaBirds 
Cc: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU 
Subject: Hummer coloring

Could you all indulge me and take a look at this photo of a hummer I took last 
week. The coloring on its side is throwing me a bit but it is quite visible 
when he is flying around. I’m assuming it is a young male. 


http://upload.pbase.com/image/157398068


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20
Subject: Re: Hummer coloring
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT RUBYTHROAT.ORG>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:46:11 -0400
K.C.

Definitely a young male Ruby-throated Hummingbird starting to get the green 
flanks of an adult. 


See my photo at 
https://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond/photos/a.357055021016515.84052.350383371683680/735833086472038/?type=1&theater 


Cheers,

BILL


On Sep 15, 2014, at 5:00 PM, KC Foggin  wrote:

> Could you all indulge me and take a look at this photo of a hummer I took 
last week. The coloring on its side is throwing me a bit but it is quite 
visible when he is flying around. I’m assuming it is a young male. 

> 
> http://upload.pbase.com/image/157398068
> 
> 
> K.C.
> 
> K.C. Foggin
> Socastee
> Myrtle Beach SC
> 
> www.birdforum.net
> 
> www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

OPERATION RUBYTHROAT: The Hummingbird Project
DR. BILL HILTON JR., Principal Investigator & Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road
York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Operation RubyThroat:The Hummingbird Project ( http://www.rubythroat.org ) is a 
cross-disciplinary international initiative in which students, teachers, and 
others collaborate to study behavior and distribution of the Ruby-throated 
Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris). All worldwide rights reserved and 
copyrighted by Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History ( 
http://www.hiltonpond.org ). Contributions in support of the project may be 
made via Network for Good at 
http://www.guidestar.org/controller/searchResults.gs?action_donateReport=1&partner=networkforgood&ein=56-2162170 


=============
Subject: Re: Hummer coloring
From: Lanny Chambers <lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:27:25 -0500
On Sep 15, 2014, at 16:00, KC Foggin  wrote:

> Could you all indulge me and take a look at this photo of a hummer I took 
last week. The coloring on its side is throwing me a bit but it is quite 
visible when he is flying around. I’m assuming it is a young male. 


Looks like an immature male to me, too. I don't pay much attention to 
slightly-atypical colors that don't affect ID. (N.B. - white birds are more 
than slightly atypical!) As in humans, there's a range of normal colors in 
hummingbirds, caused by the same sort of genetic variation all organisms 
experience. This one doesn't suggest anything as unusual as a hybrid to me, 
just a bird that's a little off the main hump of the bell curve. 


Those dark flanks remind me of the "white neck ring" questions many of us 
receive, from casual hummer watchers (not you!) who think it's a field mark. In 
reality, some Ruby-throated Hummingbirds have neck rings, and others don't. 


Lanny Chambers
Subject: Hummer coloring
From: KC Foggin <KCFoggin AT SC.RR.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:00:15 -0400
Could you all indulge me and take a look at this photo of a hummer I took last 
week. The coloring on its side is throwing me a bit but it is quite visible 
when he is flying around. I’m assuming it is a young male. 


http://upload.pbase.com/image/157398068


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20
Subject: Hummer (and ant) featured in EPOD
From: Wiggins Patrick <paw AT GETBEEHIVE.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 23:06:42 -0600
Hi,

An Earth Picture of the Day earlier this week featured a hummer and an ant:

http://epod.usra.edu/blog/2014/09/anyone-knows-an-ant-cant.html

Cute,

patrick
Subject: Re: Tiny bird, giant ego
From: Allen Chartier <amazilia3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 14:29:32 -0400
Lanny and hummer enthusiasts,

About a week ago, at a banding station where I work with passerines and
hummingbirds, I watched a Belted Kingfisher fly over my station with a
Ruby-throated Hummingbird about a foot behind. Yesterday, a Ruby-throat
took off after an American Goldfinch that I'd just released.


Allen T. Chartier
Inkster, Michigan
Email: amazilia3 AT gmail.com
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
Website: www.amazilia.net
Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/

On Sun, Sep 14, 2014 at 12:54 AM, Lanny Chambers 
wrote:

> Humnetters,
>
> I thought you might enjoy this little vignette from my yard:
>
> I heard Bluejays raising a ruckus in the back yard this afternoon,
> expressing their displeasure at a visit from our local Cooper's Hawk. I
> always enjoy seeing this raptor, so I grabbed the binoculars and opened the
> sliding door to the deck. I quickly spotted the hawk on one of her usual
> perches. The jays succeeded in annoying her into moving along, and, as she
> flew off to the west, a Ruby-throated burst from a lilac bush next to the
> house, in hot pursuit. The little guy "chased" the hawk at least two houses
> down before I lost track of him (partly because I was laughing so hard). In
> fact, the Cooper's was 40 feet in front and pulling away...but I'm pretty
> sure the hummer was telling himself that he alone was the hero of the
> moment.
>
> If hummers were the size of starlings, it wouldn't be safe to go outdoors.
> :)
>
>
> Lanny Chambers
> St. Louis, MO
> lanny AT hummingbirds.net
>
Subject: Re: Tiny bird, giant ego
From: Melissa Pappas <0000000553dda6f7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 05:37:50 -0700
 Oh my gosh! That sounds like the male Ruby-throated that left our house a 
couple of days ago! I've actually seen him chase all matter of much-larger bird 
- including our resident Coopers. He is very fierce! 

  

Melissa Pappas 
Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI 
  
Blog: http://colmel.wordpress.com/ 
  
"If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should 
go home and examine your conscience." ~ Woodrow Wilson 

 

________________________________
 From: Lanny Chambers 
To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU 
Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2014 12:54 AM
Subject: [HUMNET-L] Tiny bird, giant ego
  

Humnetters,

I thought you might enjoy this little vignette from my yard:

I heard Bluejays raising a ruckus in the back yard this afternoon, expressing 
their displeasure at a visit from our local Cooper's Hawk. I always enjoy 
seeing this raptor, so I grabbed the binoculars and opened the sliding door to 
the deck. I quickly spotted the hawk on one of her usual perches. The jays 
succeeded in annoying her into moving along, and, as she flew off to the west, 
a Ruby-throated burst from a lilac bush next to the house, in hot pursuit. The 
little guy "chased" the hawk at least two houses down before I lost track of 
him (partly because I was laughing so hard). In fact, the Cooper's was 40 feet 
in front and pulling away...but I'm pretty sure the hummer was telling himself 
that he alone was the hero of the moment. 


If hummers were the size of starlings, it wouldn't be safe to go outdoors. :)


Lanny Chambers
St. Louis, MO
lanny AT hummingbirds.net
Subject: Re: Tiny bird, giant ego
From: Dottie Price <yumyumkatts AT VOYAGER.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 08:31:53 -0400
That was a really good post.  I enjoyed reading it!   RTs
are still flocking thru here.  Dottie, Brown County, Indiana



Humnetters,
> 
> I thought you might enjoy
this little vignette from my yard:
> 
> I heard Bluejays
raising a ruckus in the back yard this afternoon,
> expressing
their displeasure at a visit from our local Cooper's Hawk. I
>
always enjoy seeing this raptor, so I grabbed the binoculars and opened
> the sliding door to the deck. I quickly spotted the hawk on one of
her
> usual perches. The jays succeeded in annoying her into
moving along, and,
> as she flew off to the west, a Ruby-throated
burst from a lilac bush next
> to the house, in hot pursuit. The
little guy "chased" the hawk at least
> two houses down
before I lost track of him (partly because I was laughing
> so
hard). In fact, the Cooper's was 40 feet in front and pulling
>
away...but I'm pretty sure the hummer was telling himself that he alone
> was the hero of the moment.
> 
> If hummers were
the size of starlings, it wouldn't be safe to go outdoors.
> :)
> 
> 
> Lanny Chambers
> St. Louis, MO
> lanny AT hummingbirds.net
>
Subject: Tiny bird, giant ego
From: Lanny Chambers <lanny AT HUMMINGBIRDS.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 23:54:52 -0500
Humnetters,

I thought you might enjoy this little vignette from my yard:

I heard Bluejays raising a ruckus in the back yard this afternoon, expressing 
their displeasure at a visit from our local Cooper's Hawk. I always enjoy 
seeing this raptor, so I grabbed the binoculars and opened the sliding door to 
the deck. I quickly spotted the hawk on one of her usual perches. The jays 
succeeded in annoying her into moving along, and, as she flew off to the west, 
a Ruby-throated burst from a lilac bush next to the house, in hot pursuit. The 
little guy "chased" the hawk at least two houses down before I lost track of 
him (partly because I was laughing so hard). In fact, the Cooper's was 40 feet 
in front and pulling away...but I'm pretty sure the hummer was telling himself 
that he alone was the hero of the moment. 


If hummers were the size of starlings, it wouldn't be safe to go outdoors. :)


Lanny Chambers
St. Louis, MO
lanny AT hummingbirds.net
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lizette Wroten <0000005ae92aec96-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 23:35:59 -0700
Interesting observation, Bill. Have you had the opportunity to follow any 
individual bird, to see if he behaves equally badly toward all of the 
con-specifics he encounters? I agree that it seems to us like male 
Ruby-throateds are hard-wired for violence, but I suspect that may be because 
we can't see the nuances of their behavior. 

 
I find it intriguing that in many hummer species, aggressive displays and 
courtship displays are virtually identical. At first glance this seems 
counter-intuitive, but in the the warp-speed hummingbird world, I can see how 
this could give the fastest males a distinct advantage...you beat all the other 
guys to the punch and decide when you get there, what to do with the bird you 
encounter. In the case of Ruby-throateds, the springtime decision is an easy 
one..."A," you clobber, "B," you slobber.... 


OK, so I'm anthropomorphising a little bit. Still, in the fall and winter, when 
birds of all ages mingle, it does seem like the rules of engagement might 
change somewhat to protect and/or educate the next generation. Just a 
thought.... 


Lizette
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT RUBYTHROAT.ORG>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 21:20:15 -0400
For what it's worth, despite their shriveled testes some male Ruby-throated 
Hummingbirds I have observed in Costa Rica in January have been very 
territorial, driving conspecifics away from a favorite stalk of Aloe Vera. 


I think they're just hard-wired!  :-)

BILL


On Sep 11, 2014, at 7:03 PM, Nancy L. Newfield  wrote:

> Lizette, Lanny, Chuck,
> 
> On 9/11/2014 5:11 PM, Lizette Wroten wrote:
> 
>> Thanks, Nancy, Lanny and Chuck. My initial impression was also that the 
encounter represented a dialed-down confrontation. But the amount of time 
involved, and unusual (at least to me) posturings made me question that 
assumption. Reading about the Anna's head-bobbing (chatter-sway?) display 
definitely put things back in perspective, in terms of body language. And 
looking back at the video, I realized it was mostly the young bird doing the 
preening, and could see how that could very well be a stress-reducing, maybe 
even submissive gesture. I just wonder why he felt compelled to stay in such 
close proximity to the other bird in the first place. 

>> 
>> Lanny, I have noticed that adult males' aggression levels subside greatly 
post-breeding. That they do so certainly makes sense, in light of the fact that 
they need to conserve energy to migrate. What didn't make sense to me in this 
situation was that two birds would interact for so long, considering the 
availability of food. In other words, if these guys were forced to share a 
small patch of wildflowers to put on the fat they need to move on, I'd totally 
"get it."....the impulse to fight is still there, but circumstances require 
them to share. That wasn't at all the case here, though....there were multiple 
feeders and beaucoup flowers available, and not a lot of birds competing for 
them, which seemed to introduce an element of choice into the interaction. 

>> 
>> It's long seemed to me (with absolutely no supporting evidence) that adult 
males never display as much aggression toward females as they do other males, 
no matter the time of year. (I guess it helps not to injure the lady if you 
want her to raise your offspring!) That's made me wonder if all immature birds 
have white tips to the tails specifically to confuse them with females, giving 
young males a chance to learn and hone fighting skills before having to contend 
with real adult male aggression. 

>> 
>> Nancy's comment, that the paucity of red gorget feathers initially lead her 
to believe the young bird was a female, got me pondering another possibility. 
Do adult males gauge the sex/maturity of immature birds by their gorget 
development, or lack thereof? Would the adult in this instance have been less 
tolerant if the youngster had flashed a big patch of iridescent feathers back 
at him as they did the head swinging thing? Could uncertainty on an adult's 
part lead to longer interactions with younger birds, allowing more 
imprinting/learning to take place? 

>> 
>> Oops, I'll get off my speculation box now. I really appreciate the input 
everyone, thanks for indulging my curiosity! 

> 
> Before we leave this Speculation Festival, one factor that has not been 
mentioned, and which is probably pivotal, is testosterone! We know that as 
birds prepare to migrate, their testes shrink, therefore producing less of the 
hormone that drives their every move. Lower levels of that all important 
hormone probably makes them kinder, gentler, more gentlemanly. 

> 
> Can't answer your question about whether adult males gauge immature males by 
the size of their undeveloped gorget. Maybe we have some trochilid psychologist 
hiding somewhere out there in Humnetland. What would Humnet be without wild 
speculation? 

> 
> NLN
> 
> -- 
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, LA USA
> 
> http://www.casacolibri.net/
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> 

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

OPERATION RUBYTHROAT: The Hummingbird Project
DR. BILL HILTON JR., Principal Investigator & Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road
York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Operation RubyThroat:The Hummingbird Project ( http://www.rubythroat.org ) is a 
cross-disciplinary international initiative in which students, teachers, and 
others collaborate to study behavior and distribution of the Ruby-throated 
Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris). All worldwide rights reserved and 
copyrighted by Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History ( 
http://www.hiltonpond.org ). Contributions in support of the project may be 
made via Network for Good at 
http://www.guidestar.org/controller/searchResults.gs?action_donateReport=1&partner=networkforgood&ein=56-2162170 


=============
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lanny Chambers <lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 20:00:26 -0500
On Sep 11, 2014, at 18:03, "Nancy L. Newfield"  wrote:

> Can't answer your question about whether adult males gauge immature males by 
the size of their undeveloped gorget. Maybe we have some trochilid psychologist 
hiding somewhere out there in Humnetland. 


No answers from me either, Nan, but I think Lizette asked a very, very 
interesting question. I like your testosterone factor as well. 


> What would Humnet be without wild speculation?

Indeed! Are we having fun yet?

Lanny Chambers
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 18:03:23 -0500
Lizette, Lanny, Chuck,

On 9/11/2014 5:11 PM, Lizette Wroten wrote:

> Thanks, Nancy, Lanny and Chuck. My initial impression was also that the 
encounter represented a dialed-down confrontation. But the amount of time 
involved, and unusual (at least to me) posturings made me question that 
assumption. Reading about the Anna's head-bobbing (chatter-sway?) display 
definitely put things back in perspective, in terms of body language. And 
looking back at the video, I realized it was mostly the young bird doing the 
preening, and could see how that could very well be a stress-reducing, maybe 
even submissive gesture. I just wonder why he felt compelled to stay in such 
close proximity to the other bird in the first place. 

>
> Lanny, I have noticed that adult males' aggression levels subside greatly 
post-breeding. That they do so certainly makes sense, in light of the fact that 
they need to conserve energy to migrate. What didn't make sense to me in this 
situation was that two birds would interact for so long, considering the 
availability of food. In other words, if these guys were forced to share a 
small patch of wildflowers to put on the fat they need to move on, I'd totally 
"get it."....the impulse to fight is still there, but circumstances require 
them to share. That wasn't at all the case here, though....there were multiple 
feeders and beaucoup flowers available, and not a lot of birds competing for 
them, which seemed to introduce an element of choice into the interaction. 

>
> It's long seemed to me (with absolutely no supporting evidence) that adult 
males never display as much aggression toward females as they do other males, 
no matter the time of year. (I guess it helps not to injure the lady if you 
want her to raise your offspring!) That's made me wonder if all immature birds 
have white tips to the tails specifically to confuse them with females, giving 
young males a chance to learn and hone fighting skills before having to contend 
with real adult male aggression. 

>
> Nancy's comment, that the paucity of red gorget feathers initially lead her 
to believe the young bird was a female, got me pondering another possibility. 
Do adult males gauge the sex/maturity of immature birds by their gorget 
development, or lack thereof? Would the adult in this instance have been less 
tolerant if the youngster had flashed a big patch of iridescent feathers back 
at him as they did the head swinging thing? Could uncertainty on an adult's 
part lead to longer interactions with younger birds, allowing more 
imprinting/learning to take place? 

>
> Oops, I'll get off my speculation box now. I really appreciate the input 
everyone, thanks for indulging my curiosity! 


Before we leave this Speculation Festival, one factor that has not been 
mentioned, and which is probably pivotal, is testosterone!  We know that 
as birds prepare to migrate, their testes shrink, therefore producing 
less of the hormone that drives their every move.  Lower levels of that 
all important hormone probably makes them kinder, gentler, more 
gentlemanly.

Can't answer your question about whether adult males gauge immature 
males by the size of their undeveloped gorget.  Maybe we have some 
trochilid psychologist hiding somewhere out there in Humnetland. What 
would Humnet be without wild speculation?

NLN

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lizette Wroten <0000005ae92aec96-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 15:11:22 -0700
Thanks, Nancy, Lanny and Chuck. My initial impression was also that the 
encounter represented a dialed-down confrontation. But the amount of time 
involved, and unusual (at least to me) posturings made me question that 
assumption. Reading about the Anna's head-bobbing (chatter-sway?) display 
definitely put things back in perspective, in terms of body language. And 
looking back at the video, I realized it was mostly the young bird doing the 
preening, and could see how that could very well be a stress-reducing, maybe 
even submissive gesture. I just wonder why he felt compelled to stay in such 
close proximity to the other bird in the first place. 


Lanny, I have noticed that adult males' aggression levels subside greatly 
post-breeding. That they do so certainly makes sense, in light of the fact that 
they need to conserve energy to migrate. What didn't make sense to me in this 
situation was that two birds would interact for so long, considering the 
availability of food. In other words, if these guys were forced to share a 
small patch of wildflowers to put on the fat they need to move on, I'd totally 
"get it."....the impulse to fight is still there, but circumstances require 
them to share. That wasn't at all the case here, though....there were multiple 
feeders and beaucoup flowers available, and not a lot of birds competing for 
them, which seemed to introduce an element of choice into the interaction. 


It's long seemed to me (with absolutely no supporting evidence) that adult 
males never display as much aggression toward females as they do other males, 
no matter the time of year. (I guess it helps not to injure the lady if you 
want her to raise your offspring!) That's made me wonder if all immature birds 
have white tips to the tails specifically to confuse them with females, giving 
young males a chance to learn and hone fighting skills before having to contend 
with real adult male aggression. 


Nancy's comment, that the paucity of red gorget feathers initially lead her to 
believe the young bird was a female, got me pondering another possibility. Do 
adult males gauge the sex/maturity of immature birds by their gorget 
development, or lack thereof? Would the adult in this instance have been less 
tolerant if the youngster had flashed a big patch of iridescent feathers back 
at him as they did the head swinging thing? Could uncertainty on an adult's 
part lead to longer interactions with younger birds, allowing more 
imprinting/learning to take place? 


Oops, I'll get off my speculation box now. I really appreciate the input 
everyone, thanks for indulging my curiosity! 


Lizette 
Subject: Hummers Fighting Nice(?)
From: Melissa Pappas <0000000553dda6f7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 11:58:02 -0700
First of all, THANK YOU Lanny and Nan for making me smile! I remember why I 
enjoy the posts on Humnet so much (after all these years). 


I, too, have an adult male ruby-throat who is displaying some of the same 
tendencies. The unusual thing about my guy is that he's hospitable to some 
birds (including HY males), but others he can't stand to have near "his" 
feeder. He actually sits on the deck-mounted hook and watches over his domain. 
He looks in the kitchen window and has to see me, but I don't seem to frighten 
him in the least. I don't usually name birds, but this guy is earning one by 
hanging in and being the force majeure in the back yard 




Melissa Pappas 
Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI 

Blog: http://colmel.wordpress.com/ 

"If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should 
go home and examine your conscience." ~ Woodrow Wilson 

Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lanny Chambers <lanny AT HUMMINGBIRDS.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 13:50:41 -0500
On Sep 11, 2014, at 13:21 , Irma  wrote:

> I read all of Lizette's post but didn't see the link either. Could you please 
send it to me as well? 


Here it is: http://youtu.be/kke8YJBGHNM


Lanny Chambers
St. Louis, MO
lanny AT hummingbirds.net
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Irma <txirma AT TX.RR.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 13:21:39 -0500
I read all of Lizette's post but didn't see the link either.  Could you 
please send it to me as well?
Irma
McKinney, Texas

-----Original Message----- 
From: Nancy L. Newfield
Sent: Thursday, September 11, 2014 1:18 PM
To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [HUMNET-L] Hummers fighting...nice...?

Josephine,

On 9/11/2014 1:14 PM, jwn wrote:
> where’s the video?  I didn’t see it?

It was in Lizette's original post and I just sent the link to you.

NLN


> josephine
>
> On Sep 11, 2014, at 9:41 AM, Lanny Chambers  
> wrote:
>
> On Sep 11, 2014, at 9:34, "Nancy L. Newfield"  
> wrote:
>
>> Also, Lizette, can you turn those darned cicadas down?
> Cicadas in the video? I couldn't hear them...the cicadas in our yard were 
> too loud. :)
>
> Lanny Chambers


-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 13:18:02 -0500
Josephine,

On 9/11/2014 1:14 PM, jwn wrote:
> where’s the video?  I didn’t see it?

It was in Lizette's original post and I just sent the link to you.

NLN


> josephine
>
> On Sep 11, 2014, at 9:41 AM, Lanny Chambers  wrote:
>
> On Sep 11, 2014, at 9:34, "Nancy L. Newfield"  wrote:
>
>> Also, Lizette, can you turn those darned cicadas down?
> Cicadas in the video? I couldn't hear them...the cicadas in our yard were too 
loud. :) 

>
> Lanny Chambers


-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: jwn <eilu AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 13:14:05 -0500
where’s the video?  I didn’t see it?
josephine

On Sep 11, 2014, at 9:41 AM, Lanny Chambers  wrote:

On Sep 11, 2014, at 9:34, "Nancy L. Newfield"  wrote:

> Also, Lizette, can you turn those darned cicadas down?

Cicadas in the video? I couldn't hear them...the cicadas in our yard were too 
loud. :) 


Lanny Chambers
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: "creinsch AT humbirds.org" <creinsch@HUMBIRDS.ORG>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 08:53:45 -0700
I was hoping somebody else from the west coast would respond, as I have 
no credentials.  This looks to us to be like the Anna's bobbing display, 
which they will sometimes do within inches of each other. I would agree 
with Lanny's and Nancy's interpretation, but add that it seems to be a 
kind of "stare down" where the first to "blink" flees.  As to the tail 
fanning and preening - a stress response?

chuck reinsch
seattle, wa
On 9/11/2014 7:34 AM, Nancy L. Newfield wrote:
> Lizette, Lanny,
>
> On 9/11/2014 8:53 AM, Lanny Chambers wrote:
>
>> On Sep 11, 2014, at 2:23, Lizette Wroten 
>> <0000005ae92aec96-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote:
>>
>>> OK, I can hear the groans.....will some of you groaners please weigh 
>>> in and tell me what these guys were doing? I'm particularly 
>>> interested in the fluffing/preening thing...some sort of 
>>> display/displacement behavior...?
>> I'm not groaning, Lizette. I've just never seen it before, either. 
>> That won't stop me from making a not-backed-by-data guess, though: I 
>> think it's indeed a display behavior, the young bird taking his cue 
>> from the older one, and neither willing to waste energy on activity 
>> that would conflict with their immediate task of storing fat for 
>> migration. A month ago, they would have been going after each other 
>> hammer-and-tongs.
>
> Actually, I have seen this behavior a number of times with wintering 
> birds.  My take on it is pretty much the same as Lanny's.  It is an 
> somewhat passive aggressive display that does not consume as much 
> energy as an all-out assault.  It kind of reminds me of the aggressive 
> displays of our Anolis lizards.  Both species will do it towards 
> others of their own species, but I haven't seen either species make an 
> aggressive display toward a member of the other species.  Not so with 
> the hummers.  They won't make a distinction. That said, I've never 
> seen a Buff-bellied act that way.  They would fight first and ask 
> questions later.
>
> The first time I watched the video, I took the white-throated bird to 
> be a female, but on closer inspection, I do see 1 or 2 red feathers.  
> Note that there is no heavy stippling on the immature male.  Without 
> those 1 or 2 red feathers, most observers would think this was a 
> female.  Also, Lizette, can you turn those darned cicadas down?
> NLN
>
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lanny Chambers <lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 09:41:43 -0500
On Sep 11, 2014, at 9:34, "Nancy L. Newfield"  wrote:

> Also, Lizette, can you turn those darned cicadas down?

Cicadas in the video? I couldn't hear them...the cicadas in our yard were too 
loud. :) 


Lanny Chambers
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 09:34:25 -0500
Lizette, Lanny,

On 9/11/2014 8:53 AM, Lanny Chambers wrote:

> On Sep 11, 2014, at 2:23, Lizette Wroten 
<0000005ae92aec96-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote: 

>
>> OK, I can hear the groans.....will some of you groaners please weigh in and 
tell me what these guys were doing? I'm particularly interested in the 
fluffing/preening thing...some sort of display/displacement behavior...? 

> I'm not groaning, Lizette. I've just never seen it before, either. That won't 
stop me from making a not-backed-by-data guess, though: I think it's indeed a 
display behavior, the young bird taking his cue from the older one, and neither 
willing to waste energy on activity that would conflict with their immediate 
task of storing fat for migration. A month ago, they would have been going 
after each other hammer-and-tongs. 


Actually, I have seen this behavior a number of times with wintering 
birds.  My take on it is pretty much the same as Lanny's.  It is an 
somewhat passive aggressive display that does not consume as much energy 
as an all-out assault.  It kind of reminds me of the aggressive displays 
of our Anolis lizards.  Both species will do it towards others of their 
own species, but I haven't seen either species make an aggressive 
display toward a member of the other species.  Not so with the hummers.  
They won't make a distinction. That said, I've never seen a Buff-bellied 
act that way.  They would fight first and ask questions later.

The first time I watched the video, I took the white-throated bird to be 
a female, but on closer inspection, I do see 1 or 2 red feathers.  Note 
that there is no heavy stippling on the immature male.  Without those 1 
or 2 red feathers, most observers would think this was a female.  Also, 
Lizette, can you turn those darned cicadas down?
NLN

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lanny Chambers <lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 08:53:40 -0500
On Sep 11, 2014, at 2:23, Lizette Wroten 
<0000005ae92aec96-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote: 


> OK, I can hear the groans.....will some of you groaners please weigh in and 
tell me what these guys were doing? I'm particularly interested in the 
fluffing/preening thing...some sort of display/displacement behavior...? 


I'm not groaning, Lizette. I've just never seen it before, either. That won't 
stop me from making a not-backed-by-data guess, though: I think it's indeed a 
display behavior, the young bird taking his cue from the older one, and neither 
willing to waste energy on activity that would conflict with their immediate 
task of storing fat for migration. A month ago, they would have been going 
after each other hammer-and-tongs. 


Lanny Chambers
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lizette Wroten <0000005ae92aec96-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 00:23:35 -0700
I haven't heard from anyone who's observed behavior like this, and am still 
perplexed by the relaxed, almost cordial attitude these guys displayed toward 
each other. 


The first time I saw the immature bird land on a branch right behind the adult, 
I assumed the older bird didn't know the youngster was there and that there'd 
soon be a big time chase. When they ended up not only facing each other but 
staying put, I started taking photos, switching to video when they began 
mirroring each other.....one would fluff his feathers and fan his tail, then 
the other would do the same. Initially, I thought they must both have flown 
through the mister spray and were simply more concerned with preening than they 
were with each other, but they did this every time they returned to their 
respective perches (at least a half dozen more times, that I saw.) 


I ended up taking four videos in an unsuccessful attempt to capture their 
occasional jousting sessions. Every now and then, one bird would fly toward the 
other, or a feeder or flower and a mock fight would ensue. No contact ever took 
place that I could tell, and sometimes all that happened was that they 
exchanged perches. I've seen immature birds "play fight" like this, but never 
with an adult male, and never for such an extended period of time. If I wasn't 
familiar with the Ruby-throated's cantankerous personality I'd say these birds 
were "buds".....or at the very least travelling companions, since they 
disappeared at the same time and neither was present the following morning. 


OK, I can hear the groans.....will some of you groaners please weigh in and 
tell me what these guys were doing? I'm particularly interested in the 
fluffing/preening thing...some sort of display/displacement behavior...? 


Lizette
Subject: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lizette Wroten <0000005ae92aec96-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 00:08:34 -0700
Hello Humnuts. With migration well underway, I'm seeing lots of typical 
Ruby-throated combativeness; chases, body-slams, upward-spiraling aerial 
dogfights, etc. Yesterday though, I saw an immature and adult male engaging in 
behavior I haven't seen before, am wondering if anyone else has. 


Here's a link to one of four videos I shot of these crazy birds; 
http://youtu.be/kke8YJBGHNM 


Lizette Wroten
Harahan, La.
Subject: Re: on Bob Sargent passing- an old native prayer
From: jwn <eilu AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 12:20:57 -0500
FYI:   the author is Mary Frye.   no longer anonymous


On Sep 9, 2014, at 11:58 AM, Rachel Powless 
<000000583c96ac7d-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote: 


The following is an old native prayer. The author is anonymous.   Carl & I 
added a couplet.  Our heart aches today.  Bob was  our hero.  

Rachel Powless and Carl Pascoe
Native Territories Avian Research Project


                                                 Do  not stand at my grave 
and weep

I am not there,   
I do not sleep,   

I am a thousand  winds that blow,  
I am the diamond  glints on snow, 
I am the sunset  on ripened grain, 
I am the gentle  autumn’s rain. 

When you  awaken 
In the morning’s  hush 
I am the sweet  uplifting rush 
Of quiet birds in  circled flight, 
I am the soft  stars that shine at night…… 

I am the sound of  hummingbird wings, 
Which seasonal  change brings. 


Do not stand at  my grave and cry 
I am not  there, 

I did not die.  
Subject: Bob Sargent - Online Obituary
From: Robert Protz <0000005913602678-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 10:08:22 -0700
9/9/14

Dear Humnetters,

I first heard the news of Bob Sargent's illness on the phone last Wednesday 
afternoon, and I immediately called and talked to Martha and learned that the 
end was close. Just a short while ago, I saw the posting here on Humnet about 
his passing on Sunday. I met Bob and Martha twice in West Virginia, and was 
proud to know him and call him a friend. My only hope is that all who were 
trained by the HBSG crew will carry on his legacy in the hummingbird world. 


I found an online obit today which has a great picture of Bob holding a 
redstart. 


See 
http://www.al.com/news/mobile/index.ssf/2014/09/mobile_baldwin_obituaries_for_18.html 


Rob

Rob Protz
Brackenridge, PA
PA Winter Western Hummers in Frames
  
          
PA Winter Western Hummers in Frames
enter a description here  
View on pahummers.tripod.com Preview by Yahoo  
Subject: on Bob Sargent passing- an old native prayer
From: Rachel Powless <000000583c96ac7d-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 12:58:38 -0400
The following is an old native prayer. The author is anonymous.   Carl & I 
added a couplet.  Our heart aches today.  Bob was  our hero.  
 
Rachel Powless and Carl Pascoe
Native Territories Avian Research Project
 
 
                                                  Do  not stand at my grave 
and weep
 
I am not there,   
I do not sleep,   

I am a thousand  winds that blow,  
I am the diamond  glints on snow, 
I am the sunset  on ripened grain, 
I am the gentle  autumn’s rain. 

When you  awaken 
In the morning’s  hush 
I am the sweet  uplifting rush 
Of quiet birds in  circled flight, 
I am the soft  stars that shine at night…… 

I am the sound of  hummingbird wings, 
Which seasonal  change brings. 


Do not stand at  my grave and cry 
I am not  there, 

I did not die.  
Subject: Re: For the winter report...
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 15:35:25 -0500
On 9/7/2014 3:26 PM, Tom Trenchard wrote:
> Wasn't that August 30?

Probably.  I should have looked it up, but it isn't important enough to 
do so at this point.

Nan

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: Very Sad News About Bob Sargent
From: Kathi Johnson Rock <kathijr777 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 15:28:29 -0500
Nancy Newfield recently posted this message to The Hummingbird Forum:

"This just came across a couple of listservs from Scott Weidensaul:

"I'm sorry to have to share the news that Bob Sargent passed away last
night, at home with Martha and their family in Trussville, AL. The
complications from his post-operative infection became increasingly serious
last week, and it's been clear for several days that the end was close. But
it's still a tough, tough loss.

There will be a celebration of life rather than a funeral in the coming
weeks, and the family will let Bob's many friends and colleagues know when
that will be as soon as the arrangements are made. If you'd like to let
Martha know she's in your thoughts, the address is: 7570 Mack Hicks Rd.,
Trussville AL 35173.

Bob touched an awful lot of people, including me, who feel this loss keenly
as a teacher, colleague and friend. Few people have been as tireless in
promoting the study and appreciation of hummingbirds as Bob, or fought
through as many hardships and tragedies in a long and eventful life. I find
it hard to believe he's gone. As I told Martha's daughter Donna this
morning, I'd like to think that somewhere, Bob's banding his first Bogota
Sunangel about now.

Scott Weidensaul
Schuylkill Haven, PA"

We will truly miss Bob and all that he brought to the world of hummingbirds
and neotropical migrants.  We were blessed to have gotten to know both Bob
and Martha over the years on a birding trip to Arizona, on a trip to Fort
Morgan for spring banding, and when they used to band at the Hummer/Bird
Celebration in Rockport, Texas.

Our deepest condolences and thoughts are with Martha and his family.  Today
is a very dark day as we all mourn this terrible loss.

Kathi and Michael Rock
-- 
Kathi and Michael Rock
Madison, Wisconsin, Dane County
Zone 4/5
e-mail: kathijr AT yahoo.com
website: www.hummingbirdgardening.net

"Hummingbirds.....where is the person, I ask, who, on observing this
glittering
fragment of the rainbow, would not pause, admire, and turn his mind with
reverence..."; (J. J. Audubon)
Subject: Re: For the winter report...
From: Tom Trenchard <trench19 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 15:26:27 -0500
Wasn't that August 30?

T.

******************************


> On Sep 7, 2014, at 11:14 AM, "Nancy L. Newfield"  
wrote: 

> 
> Linda,
> 
>> On 9/6/2014 5:27 PM, Linda Beall wrote:
>> 
>> My dear friends are thrilled to report the recent arrival of two winter 
hummers in their Baton Rouge yard. They also report an adult male Ruby-throat 
with a band on the left leg and a "cow lick" on the crown, which sounds like it 
might be a color mark. It might be one of the Ruby-throats that either Nancy or 
I banded recently at our respective sites in Covington. 

>> 
>> For the report:
>> Lynda & Lew Roussel
>> Baton Rouge, LA
>> 1. AHY Female R/A Selasphorus (w/ left leg band, probable returnee) FO 
8/24/14 

>> 2.    HY male Rufous FO 8/24/14
> 
> On 31 August, our krewe caught 37 Ruby-throateds of which 13 were adult 
males. White was the color of the day. 

> 
> NLN
> 
> -- 
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, LA USA
> 
> http://www.casacolibri.net/
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> 
> 
> 
> ---
> This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus 
protection is active. 

> http://www.avast.com
Subject: Re: For the winter report...
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 11:13:41 -0500
Linda,

On 9/6/2014 5:27 PM, Linda Beall wrote:

> My dear friends are thrilled to report the recent arrival of two 
> winter hummers in their Baton Rouge yard.  They also report an adult 
> male Ruby-throat with a band on the left leg and a "cow lick" on the 
> crown, which sounds like it might be a color mark. It might be one of 
> the Ruby-throats that either Nancy or I banded recently at our 
> respective sites in Covington.
>
> For the report:
> Lynda & Lew Roussel
> Baton Rouge, LA
> 1.    AHY Female R/A Selasphorus (w/ left leg band, probable returnee) 
> FO 8/24/14
> 2.    HY male Rufous FO 8/24/14

On 31 August, our krewe caught 37 Ruby-throateds of which 13 were adult 
males.  White was the color of the day.

NLN

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: For the winter report...
From: Linda Beall <lbeall AT MINILOGIC.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2014 17:27:07 -0500
My dear friends are thrilled to report the recent arrival of two winter 
hummers in their Baton Rouge yard.  They also report an adult male 
Ruby-throat with a band on the left leg and a "cow lick" on the crown, 
which sounds like it might be a color mark.    It might be one of the 
Ruby-throats that either Nancy or I banded recently at our respective 
sites in Covington.

For the report:
Lynda & Lew Roussel
Baton Rouge, LA
1.    AHY Female R/A Selasphorus (w/ left leg band, probable returnee) 
FO 8/24/14
2.    HY male Rufous FO 8/24/14

Linda Beall
Covington, LA
St. Tammany Parish
Subject: Re: Nectar Defender
From: Dottie Price <yumyumkatts AT VOYAGER.NET>
Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2014 13:24:24 -0400
You are so correct!  We have found the same thing on BBL. 
(Bluebird listserve)  The company people will watch our posts and
then try to come up with a product that they think will sell.  But
profit is the only thing they are concerned about.

Birds and
Blooms mag is another that one has to be careful of their
suggestions.   At one time, they were promoting the use of onion
bags as suet holders.

That was a  great idea years ago
when nylon/plastic/whatever like material was not
used and a cotton/fiber material was all they were made out of.

With the nylon/plastic material, the birds get their toenails caught in
it and can't get free and die if they are not discovered soon
enough.  That material is too tough for them to break free.

When I saw that article, I wrote to Birds and Blooms and I haven't seen
them promoting onion bags since that time.   Dottie Price,
Hickory Hollow,Brown County,  Indiana




 Humnetters,
> 
> An update concerning Nectar
Defender.
From my previous post:
> 
>> On Aug 21,
2014, at 20:22, Gene Trapp  wrote:
>>
>>> Can anyone comment on the use of "Nectar
Defender" in hummingbird
>>> feeders to prevent mold
developing. It is said to have "copper
>>>
micronutrients" in it.
>>
>> I would challenge
the maker to provide scientific evidence of its safety
>> as a
hummingbird dietary supplement. I would also not hold my breath
>> waiting for same, as people who sell such things don't have the
birds'
>> welfare as their first priority.
> 
>
The inventor of this product apparently saw this discussion, and sent
me
> info not available on his website, including some journal
references. I
> don't find them convincing, but they do shed light
on his intentions.
> 
> I retract my implication that he
doesn't care about bird welfare, as he
> appears to mean well.
However, he's a chemist and geologist, and lacks
> insight into
hummingbird physiology and behavior, as well as into
>
experimental biology. As you might expect, he's cherry-picked
scientific
> articles that might support his claims. But he
doesn't appear to
> appreciate the inappropriateness of
extrapolating studies of captive
> hummingbirds, fed a controlled
diet, to wild birds that can and will eat
> anything they can
catch. As a result, his claims of copper never exceeding
> safe
limits are unsupportable, and quite possibly incorrect. When does a
> "micronutrient" become a toxic heavy metal? For
free-flying hummers, that
> could be very difficult to
establish.
> 
> I think this might be an example of
"when you're a hammer, everything
> looks like a nail,"
a well-intentioned scientist trying to apply his
> expertise to a
field outside the scope of his knowledge and experience.
> 
> He also seems unaware that mold grows on the outside of a feeder,
not just
> in the reservoir where his product might kill it.
Feeders still need to be
> emptied, disassembled, and cleaned
frequently, no matter how long the
> syrup may last. The latest
entry on Sheri's blog highlights some useful
> tools to help with
that:
>

https://fieldguidetohummingbirds.wordpress.com/2014/09/01/keeping-hummingbird-feeders-clean/ 

> 
> In my opinion, Nectar Defender is a product without an
ethical
> application. At best, folks who maintain their feeders
properly do not
> need to spend extra money--or take extra
risks--on products like Nectar
> Defender. At worst, the effects
of supplemental copper on wild
> hummingbirds remain unknown, and
possibly more harmful than the mold it
> purports to inhibit.
> 
> 
> Lanny Chambers
> St. Louis, MO
> lanny AT hummingbirds.net
>
Subject: Re: Nectar Defender
From: Lanny Chambers <lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2014 10:52:42 -0500
Humnetters,

An update concerning Nectar Defender. From my previous post:

> On Aug 21, 2014, at 20:22, Gene Trapp  wrote:
> 
>> Can anyone comment on the use of "Nectar Defender" in hummingbird feeders to 
prevent mold developing. It is said to have "copper micronutrients" in it. 

> 
> I would challenge the maker to provide scientific evidence of its safety as a 
hummingbird dietary supplement. I would also not hold my breath waiting for 
same, as people who sell such things don't have the birds' welfare as their 
first priority. 


The inventor of this product apparently saw this discussion, and sent me info 
not available on his website, including some journal references. I don't find 
them convincing, but they do shed light on his intentions. 


I retract my implication that he doesn't care about bird welfare, as he appears 
to mean well. However, he's a chemist and geologist, and lacks insight into 
hummingbird physiology and behavior, as well as into experimental biology. As 
you might expect, he's cherry-picked scientific articles that might support his 
claims. But he doesn't appear to appreciate the inappropriateness of 
extrapolating studies of captive hummingbirds, fed a controlled diet, to wild 
birds that can and will eat anything they can catch. As a result, his claims of 
copper never exceeding safe limits are unsupportable, and quite possibly 
incorrect. When does a "micronutrient" become a toxic heavy metal? For 
free-flying hummers, that could be very difficult to establish. 


I think this might be an example of "when you're a hammer, everything looks 
like a nail," a well-intentioned scientist trying to apply his expertise to a 
field outside the scope of his knowledge and experience. 


He also seems unaware that mold grows on the outside of a feeder, not just in 
the reservoir where his product might kill it. Feeders still need to be 
emptied, disassembled, and cleaned frequently, no matter how long the syrup may 
last. The latest entry on Sheri's blog highlights some useful tools to help 
with that: 


https://fieldguidetohummingbirds.wordpress.com/2014/09/01/keeping-hummingbird-feeders-clean/ 


In my opinion, Nectar Defender is a product without an ethical application. At 
best, folks who maintain their feeders properly do not need to spend extra 
money--or take extra risks--on products like Nectar Defender. At worst, the 
effects of supplemental copper on wild hummingbirds remain unknown, and 
possibly more harmful than the mold it purports to inhibit. 



Lanny Chambers
St. Louis, MO
lanny AT hummingbirds.net
Subject: Buff-bellied hummingbird
From: Beth Maniscalco <beth.maniscalco AT NICHOLLS.EDU>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 18:09:38 -0500
Returned home today after a seven day absence to filthy feeders and a
Buff-bellied hummingbird!  Thank goodness for an abundance of flowers
keeping it, and the many Ruby-throats happy.

Erik,

Lafourche Parish, Thibodaux, LA

Buff-bellied hummingbird, FO September 1, 2014   Beth and Sammy Maniscalco

Hope this is the first of many winterers!

Good birding,
Beth and Sammy Maniscalco
Thibodaux, La
(Approx. 60 miles SW of New Orleans)
Subject: Ruby Throats Still on the Move
From: Dottie Price <yumyumkatts AT VOYAGER.NET>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 20:16:10 -0400
Ruby Throats are still flocking thru here.   I've been making lots of
sugar runs.  They love my cooking!   Dottie, Hickory Hollow,
Brown County, IN
Subject: first observed winter hummer
From: Cindy Macolini <cindymacolini1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 10:16:15 -0500
Observed an adult male Rufous this morning ... 8.31.14

Cindy Macolini
Baton Rouge
Subject: Re: Bob Sargent
From: Dottie Price <yumyumkatts AT VOYAGER.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 18:41:25 -0400
So sorry to hear that.    But he still has his hummingbird memories.   God
bless you,  dottie, brown county, indiana


 Lanny,
>     You can tell folks that there is no hope that he  will regain his
> sight
> in either eye.
>
> Martha
>
>
> In a message dated 8/28/2014 1:56:56 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
> lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM writes:
>
>> Do  you know? Is there any hope that his eyesight can be restored?
>
> Folks, I  appreciate your concern, but I don't feel at liberty to discuss
> the few  details Martha shared with me. I have to respect the family's
> privacy. Thanks  for understanding. Just let Bob know he's in your
> thoughts.
>
> Lanny
>
Subject: Re: Bob Sargent
From: Bob Sargent <0000000433a6e45b-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 12:15:06 -0400
Lanny,
    You can tell folks that there is no hope that he  will regain his sight 
in either eye.
 
Martha
 
 
In a message dated 8/28/2014 1:56:56 P.M. Central Daylight Time,  
lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM writes:

> Do  you know? Is there any hope that his eyesight can be restored?

Folks, I  appreciate your concern, but I don't feel at liberty to discuss 
the few  details Martha shared with me. I have to respect the family's 
privacy. Thanks  for understanding. Just let Bob know he's in your  thoughts.

Lanny
Subject: Re: Bob Sargent
From: Dottie Price <yumyumkatts AT VOYAGER.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 09:55:46 -0400
Our prayers are with him.   Dottie, Brown County, IN


> Friends and fellow hummingbird Banders,
> 
>

> 
> I was deeply distressed to hear the news about Bob's
illness.
> 
> 
> 
> I banded many a hummer
under his supervision in West Virginia and Alabama.
> 
>

> 
> He is a mentor to so many of us, a friend indeed,
and an example for all.
> 
> 
> 
> May his
recovery be as swift as the hummingbirds he so dearly loves.
> 
> 
> 
> Bob
> 
> 
> 
> Bob Hall-Brooks
> 
> Hummingbird Bander
>

> Holiday Beach Migration Observatory
> 
>
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
> 
>
Bhall-brooks AT cogeco.ca
> 
> 519-972-5736 (home)
>

> 519-259-7949 (mobile)
> 
> 
> 
> 
>
Subject: Bob Sargent
From: Bob Hall-Brooks <bhall-brooks AT COGECO.CA>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 19:20:08 -0400
Friends and fellow hummingbird Banders,

 

I was deeply distressed to hear the news about Bob's illness.

 

I banded many a hummer under his supervision in West Virginia and Alabama.

 

He is a mentor to so many of us, a friend indeed, and an example for all.

 

May his recovery be as swift as the hummingbirds he so dearly loves.

 

Bob

 

Bob Hall-Brooks

Hummingbird Bander

Holiday Beach Migration Observatory

Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

Bhall-brooks AT cogeco.ca

519-972-5736 (home)

519-259-7949 (mobile)

 

 
Subject: Re: Terrible Situation!
From: Dottie Price <yumyumkatts AT VOYAGER.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 12:29:34 -0400
Yep, I get them all the time.  Boring!  Dottie, Brown County,
IN


> Is this a scam?
> 
> Sent from
Yahoo Mail on Android
>
Subject: Re: Terrible Situation!
From: Jana Whittle <000000346f893a94-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 12:38:58 -0400
Yes. I was hacked. I am sorry.
Jana



-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Smith 
To: HUMNET-L 
Sent: Fri, Aug 29, 2014 10:56 am
Subject: Re: [HUMNET-L] Terrible Situation!


Is this a scam?

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

 

Subject: Re: Terrible Situation!
From: Jim Smith <djlsmith AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 08:43:40 -0700
Is this a scam?

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
Subject: Terrible Situation!
From: Jana Whittle <000000346f893a94-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 10:52:23 -0400
 - This mail is in HTML. Some elements may be ommited in plain text. -

Good morning,
I Hope you get this on time, I made a trip to Pasay City and had my bag stolen 
from me with my passport and personal effects therein. The embassy has just 
issued me a temporary passport but i have to take care of my expenses and 
settle my hotel bills with the manager. 


I have made contact with my bank but it would take me 3-5 working days to 
access funds in my account, the bad news is my flight will be leaving very soon 
but i am having problems settling the hotel bills and the hotel manager won't 
let me leave until i settle the bills. I need your help financially and i 
promise to make the refund once i get back home, you are my last resort and 
hope. Please let me know if i can count on you and i need you to keep checking 
your email because it's the only way i can reach you. 

Kind regards,
Jana Whittle
Subject: For the winter hummer list
From: Linda Beall <lbeall AT MINILOGIC.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 09:27:48 -0500
This morning Linda Keefer heard then saw a female R/A Selasphorus in her 
Covington yard.

Linda Beall
Covington, La
St. Tammany Parish



Sent with AquaMail for Android
http://www.aqua-mail.com
Subject: Hummingbird taste receptors
From: "Ingold, James" <James.Ingold AT LSUS.EDU>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 21:32:02 +0000
http://www.latimes.com/science/la-sci-sn-hummingbird-sweet-taste-receptors-20140821-story.html 


James L. Ingold, Ph.D.
Professor - Department of Biological Sciences
Director - Museum of Life Sciences
Hubert and Patricia Hervey Endowed Professor - Museum of Life Sciences
Louisiana State University in Shreveport

Office: (318) 797-5236
Fax: (318) 797-5222
james.ingold AT lsus.edu  www.lsus.edu
 
Subject: Re: Bob Sargent
From: Kathi Johnson Rock <kathijr777 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:17:42 -0500
We have already sent a card as we heard from several sources that he was
not doing well.  We can only hope and pray that his eyesight can be
restored.


On Thu, Aug 28, 2014 at 1:56 PM, Lanny Chambers 
wrote:

> > Do you know? Is there any hope that his eyesight can be restored?
>
> Folks, I appreciate your concern, but I don't feel at liberty to discuss
> the few details Martha shared with me. I have to respect the family's
> privacy. Thanks for understanding. Just let Bob know he's in your thoughts.
>
> Lanny
>



-- 
Kathi and Michael Rock
Madison, Wisconsin, Dane County
Zone 4/5
e-mail: kathijr AT yahoo.com
website: www.hummingbirdgardening.net
telephone: (608) 233-7397

"Hummingbirds.....where is the person, I ask, who, on observing this
glittering
fragment of the rainbow, would not pause, admire, and turn his mind with
reverence..."; (J. J. Audubon)
Subject: Re: Bob Sargent
From: Lanny Chambers <lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 13:56:50 -0500
> Do you know? Is there any hope that his eyesight can be restored?

Folks, I appreciate your concern, but I don't feel at liberty to discuss the 
few details Martha shared with me. I have to respect the family's privacy. 
Thanks for understanding. Just let Bob know he's in your thoughts. 


Lanny
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird No. 5,000
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT RUBYTHROAT.ORG>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 13:40:04 -0400
Another big celebration today (28 Aug 2014) at Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont 
Natural History: This morning I applied band #H81031 to a hatch-year female 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird, making her forever famous as the 5,000th of her 
species banded here at the Center since 1984. I'm hopeful all you hummingbird 
enthusiasts share in my excitement at reaching this milestone and in wishing 
her safe travels to the Neotropics--and back again next spring. :-) 


I dedicate this bird to fellow hummingbird bander Bob Sargent, who is ailing 
after heart surgery and serious complications. 


Happy Hummingbird Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

OPERATION RUBYTHROAT: The Hummingbird Project
DR. BILL HILTON JR., Principal Investigator & Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road
York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Operation RubyThroat:The Hummingbird Project ( http://www.rubythroat.org ) is a 
cross-disciplinary international initiative in which students, teachers, and 
others collaborate to study behavior and distribution of the Ruby-throated 
Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris). All worldwide rights reserved and 
copyrighted by Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History ( 
http://www.hiltonpond.org ). Contributions in support of the project may be 
made via Network for Good at 
http://www.guidestar.org/controller/searchResults.gs?action_donateReport=1&partner=networkforgood&ein=56-2162170 


=============
Subject: Re: Bob Sargent
From: Melissa Pappas <0000000553dda6f7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 08:47:14 -0700
I'm so grateful that you sent this Lanny! Bob has been a huge influence in my 
life - not only birding, but in how he has always treated people. He was 
immensely helpful when Jim and I were first starting our enjoyment of birds and 
birding. I'd always been a hummer-crazed observer and feeder, but hadn't really 
gotten into the travel and birding destination part. Bob spent well over an 
hour with me on the telephone prior to our first visit to Arizona. That call 
and trip really got us started on a pastime that is now a source of constant 
enjoyment. 


When we got that incredible visitor back in 2005, the first people I wanted to 
share her with were Bob and Martha. I wish they could have come. 


We will definitely start sending cards and let Bob know how much he means to 
us. 


Do you know? Is there any hope that his eyesight can be restored?  
  

Melissa Pappas 
Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI 
  
Blog: http://colmel.wordpress.com/ 
  
"If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should 
go home and examine your conscience."  ~ Woodrow Wilson 

 

________________________________
 From: Lanny Chambers 
To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU 
Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2014 11:26 AM
Subject: [HUMNET-L] Bob Sargent
  

Friends,

As some of you may already know, Bob Sargent recently suffered complications 
from a previous heart surgery. In addition, an infection has resulted in loss 
of vision in both of his eyes. I just spoke with Martha, and Bob is at home 
now, in hospice care. He's feeling pretty lonely, and would very much 
appreciate hearing from his hummingbird-crazy friends. Please join me in 
sending a card or note for Martha to read to Bob. Here's the address: 


Bob Sargent
7570 Mack Hicks Road
Trussville AL 35173

Thanks,

Lanny
Subject: Bob Sargent
From: Lanny Chambers <lanny AT HUMMINGBIRDS.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 10:26:43 -0500
Friends,

As some of you may already know, Bob Sargent recently suffered complications 
from a previous heart surgery. In addition, an infection has resulted in loss 
of vision in both of his eyes. I just spoke with Martha, and Bob is at home 
now, in hospice care. He's feeling pretty lonely, and would very much 
appreciate hearing from his hummingbird-crazy friends. Please join me in 
sending a card or note for Martha to read to Bob. Here's the address: 


Bob Sargent
7570 Mack Hicks Road
Trussville AL 35173

Thanks,

Lanny
Subject: Pieces of a Puzzle
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 14:48:42 -0500
Humnetters Y'All,

On 20 August 2014, one of our wintering Rufous Hummingbirds, an adult 
female, was captured near Adamsville [Lampasas County], Texas.  After 
processing, she was released alive and well.  I received this report 
from the Federal Bird Banding Laboratory, but have not gotten any 
additional details from the bander who caught her.

Our crew originally caught and banded this bird on 25 January 2013 in 
Donaldsonville [Ascension Parish] at which time she was an immature 
female [SY as designated by the BBL].  Therefore, she is known to have 
hatched somewhere in the vast Pacific Northwest or western Canada or 
southern Alaska in 2012.  We did not re-encounter her in the winter of 
2013-2014 so we cannot be sure that she actually spent the cold months 
in our area.

This re-encounter is just one minute piece of a very complex mystery, a 
puzzle for which we wish we had more of the pieces.  Over the last 35 
years, more than 4000 Rufous Hummingbirds have been banded in 
Louisiana.  We have documented a healthy percentage of them returning to 
their original winter haunts, sometimes for years on end.  A small 
percentage of our Rufous turn up at sites elsewhere in the Southeast and 
similarly, we catch a few that were banded at other sites within this 
large region.  Yet, we established precious few connections with the 
breeding grounds and just a few more during the migrations to and from 
breeding areas.

In the early days of Humnet, long-timers will recall lively debates over 
routes used to reach Louisiana [and elsewhere in the Southeast].  Now, 
many years down the road, some formerly data-deficient theories show 
hints of having merit.  The above re-encounter fits neatly with a 
previous re-encounter just a couple of years ago.

On 1 August 2012, an adult male Rufous Hummingbird was found dead in a 
garage near Copperas Cove [Coryell County], Texas, just 20 miles from 
the Adamsville site.  He had been a youngster [HY as designated by the 
BBL] when originally handled on 8 September 2011 in New Orleans [Orleans 
Parish].  Therefore, he is known to have hatched somewhere in the vast 
Pacific Northwest or western Canada or southern Alaska in 2011.

The proximity of the 2 sites and timing of the re-encounters in central 
Texas documents close points on the routes taken by 2 different 
individuals and it suggests that other members of this far northwestern 
species could also be following a similar route.  Now, with these 2 tiny 
puzzle pieces, we are left to wonder where each individual hatched and 
what was the route that brought each to the sites of their 
re-encounters.  More questions . . .

NLN

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com
Subject: Re: "Nectar Defender"
From: Lanny Chambers <lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 21:39:09 -0500
On Aug 21, 2014, at 20:22, Gene Trapp  wrote:

> Can anyone comment on the use of "Nectar Defender" in hummingbird feeders to 
prevent mold developing. It is said to have "copper micronutrients" in it. 


I would challenge the maker to provide scientific evidence of its safety as a 
hummingbird dietary supplement. I would also not hold my breath waiting for 
same, as people who sell such things don't have the birds' welfare as their 
first priority. 


Given that even small amounts of iron can kill hummers, my suspicion is that 
copper would as well. If someone isn't up to changing the syrup when it starts 
getting cloudy, perhaps he should stop using feeders and just plant flowers 
instead. 


Please, put nothing in hummingbird feeders except white sugar and water.

Lanny Chambers
Subject: "Nectar Defender"
From: Gene Trapp <grtrapp AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 18:22:23 -0700
Can anyone comment on the use of "Nectar Defender" in hummingbird feeders to 
prevent mold developing. It is said to have "copper micronutrients" in it. 

The argument for its use us to allow you to not have to change and clean the 
feeders as often. I am doubtful that using it is a good idea. 


Gene Trapp
Davis, CA
Subject: LA Western Winter Hummingbird Report #1
From: "Johnson, Erik" <ejohnson AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 17:00:29 +0000
Louisiana birders,

The first western "winter" hummingbirds have arrived!! Keep a sharp eye out for 
non-Ruby-throated Hummingbirds and please report your western winter hummer 
observations to me (ejohnson AT Audubon.org), LAbird, or HUMNET for recording 
in our weekly report and database, providing the following information: 


Please continue to report winter hummingbirds to me for including in the 
western winter hummingbird database. 

- Your name
- Your address (town only is acceptable)
- First observed (FO) date (or, if discovered while banding or marking other 
birds, the date it was observed) 

- Species
- Age (Adult, immature, unknown)
- Sex (Male, female, unknown)
- Whether banded, when and by whom.

If additional information is learned through further observation or banding or 
if a mistake needs to be corrected, please report those updates and I'll make 
the changes. 


Happy hummingbirding,
Erik Johnson
S Lafayette, LA

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

THIS IS THE FIRST LOUISIANA WESTERN WINTER HUMMINGBIRD REPORT FOR THE 2014-2015 
SEASON. 


1.Janelle Bergeron, Thibodaux, LA (Lafourche)
 #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/11/2014 (Banded on left leg) 


2.Robb Brumfield, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/15/2014

3.Beth Erwin, Collinston, LA (Morehouse)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/12/2014

4.Rose and Jack Must, Lafayette, LA (Lafayette)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/18/2014

5.Russ & Lisa Norwood, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/13/2014

6.Helen & Mike Putnam, Basile, LA (Evangeline)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/1/2014 LO 8/2/2014

7.Linda Stewart, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/16/2014

8.Noel Venezia, Slidell, LA (St. Tammany)
 #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad F FO 8/3/2014 ("Ms. Pink"; first 
banded by LB 11/26/2006) 

     #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  F  FO 8/4/2014 (banded)
________________________________
Summary of Reports as of 8/21/2014

Selasphorus Rufous/Allens
   9 reports
   6 parishes
   8 sites
--Identified Rufous
   9 reports
   6 parishes
   8 sites
________________________________
SELASPHORUS RUFOUS/ALLENS

East Baton Rouge Parish:  3 reports  3 sites

1. Russ & Lisa Norwood, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/13/2014

2. Robb Brumfield, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/15/2014

3. Linda Stewart, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/16/2014

Evangeline Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Helen & Mike Putnam, Basile, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/1/2014  LO 8/2/2014

Lafayette Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Rose and Jack Must, Lafayette, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/18/2014

Lafourche Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Janelle Bergeron, Thibodaux, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/11/2014 (Banded on left leg) 


Morehouse Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Beth Erwin, Collinston, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/12/2014

St. Tammany Parish:  2 reports  1 site

1. Noel Venezia, Slidell, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad F FO 8/3/2014 ("Ms. Pink"; first 
banded by LB 11/26/2006) 

#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  F  FO 8/4/2014  (banded)
________________________________
Subject: Rufous
From: Jack & Rose Must <must4wbu AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 10:27:35 -0500
Reported to Erik Johnson yesterday, our first Rufous of the season!  A
beautiful male Rufous!  Haven't had time to check for jewelry.

 

Rose Must

 

Wild Birds Unlimited

137 Arnould Boulevard

Lafayette  LA   70503

337-993-2473

must4wbu AT gmail.com

 
Subject: Hilton Pond 08/01/14 (Truth About Ruby-throats)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT RUBYTHROAT.ORG>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 09:27:25 -0400
Ruby-throated Hummingbirds may be the most common and best understood of all 
hummer species, but misinformation about these tiny birds always seems to float 
around. "This Week at Hilton Pond" I offer a photo essay to clear up incorrect 
information I've read lately about ruby-throat behavior and morphology. To view 
this latest "fact-checking" installment for 1-15 August 2014, please visit 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140801.html 


While there don't forget to scroll down for miscellaneous nature notes and a 
list of all birds banded and recaptured during the period, plus info about 
banding hummers in the Neotropics. 


Happy Hummingbird Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

=========

OPERATION RUBYTHROAT: The Hummingbird Project
DR. BILL HILTON JR., Principal Investigator & Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road
York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Operation RubyThroat:The Hummingbird Project ( http://www.rubythroat.org ) is a 
cross-disciplinary international initiative in which students, teachers, and 
others collaborate to study behavior and distribution of the Ruby-throated 
Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris). All worldwide rights reserved and 
copyrighted by Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History ( 
http://www.hiltonpond.org ). Contributions in support of the project may be 
made via Network for Good at 
http://www.guidestar.org/controller/searchResults.gs?action_donateReport=1&partner=networkforgood&ein=56-2162170 


=============
Subject: Re: Hummers and Kestrels
From: Lanny Chambers <lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 18:52:35 -0500
On Aug 18, 2014, at 18:15, "Johnson, Erik"  wrote:

> At the risk of sounding blasphemous, this question (and answers) brings up an 
interesting insight into value choices we as humans place on wildlife. With 
every management decision, there is a trade-off. Some species will be "winners" 
whereas others will be "losers" at the hand of such decisions. How me make 
those decisions are on some level based on the values we place on different 
species, whether plant or animal, small or large. 


Good point, Erik. Do we even know whether kestrels are important predators of 
hummingbirds? Cats, perhaps, depending on one's definition of "important." 
Other predators, probably trivial as causes of hummingbird mortality. 


I recall the report of a bunch of hummer hens nesting in the same tree as a 
Cooper's Hawk, presumably because the hawk kept the tree free of nest 
predators. Healthy hummingbirds have to be awfully hard for raptors to catch. 
It would not surprise me if orioles ate more hummers than hawks do. 


Last time we visited fellow hummer bander Steve Bouricius in Grand Junction, 
kestrels were nesting in his owl box. He never mentioned them causing problems 
for the many hummingbirds that nest in his orchard and use his feeders. 


Lanny Chambers
Subject: Re: Hummers and Kestrels
From: "Johnson, Erik" <ejohnson AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 23:15:17 +0000
At the risk of sounding blasphemous, this question (and answers) brings up an 
interesting insight into value choices we as humans place on wildlife. With 
every management decision, there is a trade-off. Some species will be "winners" 
whereas others will be "losers" at the hand of such decisions. How me make 
those decisions are on some level based on the values we place on different 
species, whether plant or animal, small or large. 


Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, according to the Breeding Bird Survey, have been 
increasing in population by about 1.5%/year, which means the population has 
about doubled over the last 50 years. On the other hand, American Kestrels have 
been declining by about 1%/year, or declined by about 40% over those same 50 
years. Remember there are errors to these measurements, but in both species, 
the trend is not zero (i.e., confidently increasing in hummingbirds and 
decreasing in kestrels). And BBS routes are often conducted along roads, and 
there are other biases...so take these numbers for what they are. 


I don't pass along these numbers to pass judgment or guidance. Simply to answer 
this question from a slightly different perspective. 


Eagerly awaiting the spears to fly. (But above all, I wish you all happy 
birding!) 

Erik Johnson
S Lafayette, LA
ejohnson AT audubon.org


-----Original Message-----
From: BB for Hummingbirds and Gardening for them in the Southeast 
[mailto:HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Wiggins Patrick 

Sent: Monday, August 18, 2014 5:00 PM
To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [HUMNET-L] Hummers and Kestrels

Thanks to everyone for the input. I have decided against putting kestrel boxes 
in my yard. 


Cheers,

patrick


On 18 Aug 2014, at 14:48, Allen Chartier  wrote:

> Last month, near Constantine, Michigan, we had an Eastern Wood-Pewee 
> dive down from the trees at a few of the Ruby-throats we were 
> releasing after banding (134 banded that day). One attempt he/she 
> succeeded in actually grabbing the hummer, but it was apparently too big and 
it struggled free. 

> 
> Allen T. Chartier
> Inkster, Michigan
> Email: amazilia3 AT gmail.com
> Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
> Website: www.amazilia.net
> Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/
> 
> 
> On Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 12:03 AM, Nancy L. Newfield 
> 
> wrote:
> 
>> Patrick,
>> 
>> On 8/17/2014 10:08 PM, Wiggins Patrick wrote:
>> 
>> I'm considering putting up a Kestrel nesting box near my house.
>>> 
>>> But first I want to find out if attracting a family of Kestrels 
>>> would or would not endanger the hummers that live in my area and come to my 
feeders. 

>>> 
>>> Opinions?
>>> 
>> 
>> Not a good idea.  I have personally seen an American Kestrel attempt 
>> to catch a couple of hummers in my yard. He didn't score, but he came close. 

>> 
>> NLN
>> 
>> --
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Nancy L Newfield
>> Casa Colibrí
>> Metairie, LA USA
>> 
>> http://www.casacolibri.net/
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> ---
>> This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus 
>> protection is active.
>> http://www.avast.com
Subject: 2013-2014 Winter Hummingbirds Report
From: Kevin Morgan <cowboyinbrla AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 16:59:58 -0500
Howdy LABIRD and HUMNET folk:

We've put the final polish on our 2013-2014 Louisiana Winter Hummingbird
Project report (just in time for the new arrivals for the 2014-2015
season!). The report is posted to Nancy Newfield's website on the Winter
Hummingbird Project page (http://www.casacolibri.net/winterbanding.asp)
along with the last few years' reports, or you can link directly to the
report at
http://www.casacolibri.net/publications/LA-Winter_Hummingbird_Report_2013-20
14.pdf.

Thanks to all who made the report possible - the scores of hosts, the
banders, the assistants, and everyone else who is helping expand our
knowledge of this remarkable phenomenon.

Kevin Morgan
Baton Rouge, LA
Subject: Re: Hummers and Kestrels
From: Wiggins Patrick <paw AT GETBEEHIVE.NET>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:59:50 -0600
Thanks to everyone for the input. I have decided against putting kestrel boxes 
in my yard. 


Cheers,

patrick


On 18 Aug 2014, at 14:48, Allen Chartier  wrote:

> Last month, near Constantine, Michigan, we had an Eastern Wood-Pewee dive
> down from the trees at a few of the Ruby-throats we were releasing after
> banding (134 banded that day). One attempt he/she succeeded in actually
> grabbing the hummer, but it was apparently too big and it struggled free.
> 
> Allen T. Chartier
> Inkster, Michigan
> Email: amazilia3 AT gmail.com
> Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
> Website: www.amazilia.net
> Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/
> 
> 
> On Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 12:03 AM, Nancy L. Newfield 
> wrote:
> 
>> Patrick,
>> 
>> On 8/17/2014 10:08 PM, Wiggins Patrick wrote:
>> 
>> I'm considering putting up a Kestrel nesting box near my house.
>>> 
>>> But first I want to find out if attracting a family of Kestrels would or
>>> would not endanger the hummers that live in my area and come to my feeders.
>>> 
>>> Opinions?
>>> 
>> 
>> Not a good idea.  I have personally seen an American Kestrel attempt to
>> catch a couple of hummers in my yard.  He didn't score, but he came close.
>> 
>> NLN
>> 
>> --
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Nancy L Newfield
>> Casa Colibrí
>> Metairie, LA USA
>> 
>> http://www.casacolibri.net/
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> ---
>> This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus
>> protection is active.
>> http://www.avast.com
Subject: Re: Hummers and Kestrels
From: Allen Chartier <amazilia3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 16:48:55 -0400
Last month, near Constantine, Michigan, we had an Eastern Wood-Pewee dive
down from the trees at a few of the Ruby-throats we were releasing after
banding (134 banded that day). One attempt he/she succeeded in actually
grabbing the hummer, but it was apparently too big and it struggled free.

Allen T. Chartier
Inkster, Michigan
Email: amazilia3 AT gmail.com
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
Website: www.amazilia.net
Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/


On Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 12:03 AM, Nancy L. Newfield 
wrote:

> Patrick,
>
> On 8/17/2014 10:08 PM, Wiggins Patrick wrote:
>
>  I'm considering putting up a Kestrel nesting box near my house.
>>
>> But first I want to find out if attracting a family of Kestrels would or
>> would not endanger the hummers that live in my area and come to my feeders.
>>
>> Opinions?
>>
>
> Not a good idea.  I have personally seen an American Kestrel attempt to
> catch a couple of hummers in my yard.  He didn't score, but he came close.
>
> NLN
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, LA USA
> 
> http://www.casacolibri.net/
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>
>
> ---
> This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus
> protection is active.
> http://www.avast.com
>
Subject: Re: Hummers and Kestrels
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 23:03:38 -0500
Patrick,

On 8/17/2014 10:08 PM, Wiggins Patrick wrote:

> I'm considering putting up a Kestrel nesting box near my house.
>
> But first I want to find out if attracting a family of Kestrels would or 
would not endanger the hummers that live in my area and come to my feeders. 

>
> Opinions?

Not a good idea.  I have personally seen an American Kestrel attempt to 
catch a couple of hummers in my yard.  He didn't score, but he came close.

NLN

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



---
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Subject: Hummers and Kestrels
From: Wiggins Patrick <paw AT GETBEEHIVE.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 21:08:57 -0600
I'm considering putting up a Kestrel nesting box near my house.

But first I want to find out if attracting a family of Kestrels would or would 
not endanger the hummers that live in my area and come to my feeders. 


Opinions?

Thanks!

patrick
N. Utah
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 11:14:47 -0500
Thank you, Inge,

On 8/13/2014 10:41 AM, Bill & Inge wrote:

> Thanks for getting back to me. I just thought that the "winter birds" 
> are starting to come in and postings would be picking up. I signed up 
> after Susan Campbell banded an Imm. Male Rufous in my yard back in 
> December of 1999 and then in October of 2001 I hosted the first ever 
> Male Broadbilled Hummingbird in NC. Unfortunately, he only stayed for 
> a week. Susan did not band him right away for fear he might take off. 
> However, "he"had close to 100 visitors during those few days and was 
> very cooperative. It was a real treat!

I hosted Louisiana's first documented Broad-billed from early November 
1990 to early January 1991.  This was a few years before HUMNET came 
into being.  He was seen by fewer than 25 people because he was not a 
feeder bird and his appearances were sporadic, at best.  At first, he 
appeared for a couple of hours each day, but after the 5th day, he 
became less regular.

Over Thanksgiving week, my husband and I made a trip to Costa Rica. At 
the time we left, I had not seen him in a week, so I thought he was 
gone, but a few days after our return, I saw him again.  He still was 
not using a feeder and I thought of a capture scheme that might be 
productive.  It worked and I was a very happy bander.

31 Broad-billeds have been banded in Louisiana since then and a few more 
documented photographically.  However, it has been several years since 
our Winter Project banders have managed to snag one.

NLN

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird
From: Bill & Inge <willing2 AT SUDDENLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 11:41:37 -0400
Nancy,

Thanks for getting back to me. I just thought that the "winter birds" are 
starting to come in and postings would be picking up. I signed up after 
Susan Campbell banded an Imm. Male Rufous in my yard back in December of 
1999 and then in October of 2001 I hosted the first ever Male Broadbilled 
Hummingbird in NC. Unfortunately, he only stayed for a week. Susan did not 
band him right away for fear he might take off. However, "he"had close to 
100 visitors during those few days and was very cooperative. It was a real 
treat!

Thanks again and I really enjoy all your postings and especially your 
knowledge!

Inge

-----Original Message----- 
From: Nancy L. Newfield
Sent: Wednesday, 13 August, 2014 10:03 AM
To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [HUMNET-L] [LABIRD-L] Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird

Inge,

On 8/13/2014 8:58 AM, Bill & Inge Parker wrote:

> Just curious - is HUMNET down? Have not seen any postings since early 
> August!

HUMNET has been generally quiet for a number of years.  Here in
Louisiana, more observers post on the statewide and less exclusive LABIRD.

NLN

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Version: 2014.0.4744 / Virus Database: 4007/8029 - Release Date: 08/13/14 
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 09:03:38 -0500
Inge,

On 8/13/2014 8:58 AM, Bill & Inge Parker wrote:

> Just curious - is HUMNET down? Have not seen any postings since early 
> August!

HUMNET has been generally quiet for a number of years.  Here in 
Louisiana, more observers post on the statewide and less exclusive LABIRD.

NLN

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



---
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is active. 

http://www.avast.com
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird
From: Bill & Inge <willing2 AT SUDDENLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 09:58:01 -0400
Just curious - is HUMNET down? Have not seen any postings since early 
August!

Inge Parker
New Bern, NC

-----Original Message----- 
From: Johnson, Erik
Sent: Saturday, 02 August, 2014 7:52 PM
To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [HUMNET-L] [LABIRD-L] Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird

Congratulations Helena!

LAbirders and HumNetters,

I will again be compiling the western winter hummingbird reports, starting 
now!  Hold off on any Ruby-throat reports until November 15, after which we 
count them as "wintering."  Please continue to send reports to my email 
(ejohnson AT audubon.org), LAbird, or HUMNET, and provide the following 
information:
- Your name
- Your address (town only is acceptable)
- First observed (FO) date (or, if discovered while banding or marking other 
birds, the date it was observed)
- Species
- Age (Adult, immature, unknown)
- Sex (Male, female, unknown)
- Whether banded, when and by whom.

If additional information is learned through further observation or banding 
or if a mistake needs to be corrected, please report those updates and I'll 
make the changes.  I wish you all a fun-filled winter hummingbird season.

Happy hummingbirding,
Erik Johnson
S Lafayette, LA
ejohnson AT audubon.org





-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of H. Putnam
Sent: Saturday, August 02, 2014 4:25 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird

Happy to announce we are hosting a beautiful adult male Rufous Hummingbird 
since Friday, August 1, 2014!  What a treat!

Helena Putnam
Basile, Louisiana
Extreme southwest corner of Evangeline Parish on the banks of Bayou Nezpique


-----
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Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4744 / Virus Database: 3986/7969 - Release Date: 08/02/14 
Subject: Re: Question for the Experts = Rufous Longevity Record
From: Kevin Morgan <cowboyinbrla AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 00:31:41 -0500
Noel,

Nancy may have already gone to bed so I'll chime in. For longevity purposes,
the BBL assumes a bird hatched on June 1 of the year it was hatched,
assuming that is known. So a bird banded as an immature in late 2014, or
early in 2015, would be deemed hatched on June 1, 2014.

Obviously that won't work for birds banded as adults. The assumption then is
that the bird was hatched AT LEAST by June 1 of the previous year - it might
be older, but there's no way to know.

From that date, they calculate age through the last encounter. So a bird
banded as an immature in the fall of 2006, like Ms. Pink, would be
considered hatched on June 1, 2006, and that would make her 8 years, 2
months at the beginning of August. If she hangs around until early March,
she'd be 8 years, 9 months. It certainly is not "exact" as some Ruby-throats
hatch by early May and in some places out west, like southern California,
some Anna's and Allen's may have nests going in the "winter". But it's at
least a standard.

Kevin Morgan
Baton Rouge LA


> -----Original Message-----
> From: BB for Hummingbirds and Gardening for them in the Southeast
> [mailto:HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Noel Venezia
> Sent: Wednesday, August 06, 2014 10:43 PM
> To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [HUMNET-L] Question for the Experts = Rufous Longevity
> Record
> 
> Do the record keepers assume that a hatch year bird caught on 11/26/06
> is 0
> days old or do they assume they are at least 8-12 weeks at that point?
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: BB for Hummingbirds and Gardening for them in the Southeast
> [mailto:HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Nancy L. Newfield
> Sent: Wednesday, August 06, 2014 9:41 PM
> To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [HUMNET-L] Question for the Experts = Rufous Longevity
> Record
> 
> Noel,
> 
> On 8/6/2014 9:34 PM, Noel Venezia wrote:
> 
> > Lanny or Bob or any other expert.what is the longevity record for
> > rufous hummingbird?  The Hilton Pond website shows 9 years, 1
> > month..is that accurate?
> 
> The Federal Bird Banding Laboratory, which is the official keeper of
> this
> kind of information, lists 8 years 11 months for Rufous Hummingbird.
> 
> NLN
> 
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, LA USA
> 
> http://www.casacolibri.net/
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> 
> 
> 
> ---
> This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus
> protection is active.
> http://www.avast.com
Subject: Re: Question for the Experts = Rufous Longevity Record
From: Noel Venezia <pplace AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2014 22:42:50 -0500
Do the record keepers assume that a hatch year bird caught on 11/26/06 is 0
days old or do they assume they are at least 8-12 weeks at that point?  

-----Original Message-----
From: BB for Hummingbirds and Gardening for them in the Southeast
[mailto:HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Nancy L. Newfield
Sent: Wednesday, August 06, 2014 9:41 PM
To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [HUMNET-L] Question for the Experts = Rufous Longevity Record

Noel,

On 8/6/2014 9:34 PM, Noel Venezia wrote:

> Lanny or Bob or any other expert.what is the longevity record for 
> rufous hummingbird?  The Hilton Pond website shows 9 years, 1 
> month..is that accurate?

The Federal Bird Banding Laboratory, which is the official keeper of this
kind of information, lists 8 years 11 months for Rufous Hummingbird.

NLN

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: Re: Question for the Experts = Rufous Longevity Record
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2014 21:41:24 -0500
Noel,

On 8/6/2014 9:34 PM, Noel Venezia wrote:

> Lanny or Bob or any other expert.what is the longevity record for rufous
> hummingbird?  The Hilton Pond website shows 9 years, 1 month..is that
> accurate?

The Federal Bird Banding Laboratory, which is the official keeper of 
this kind of information, lists 8 years 11 months for Rufous Hummingbird.

NLN

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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