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Updated on Thursday, October 23 at 01:44 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Phainopeplas,©David Sibley

23 Oct LA western winter hummingbird report #4 ["Johnson, Erik" ]
22 Oct Hummingbirds in Costa Rica: An Opportunity ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
20 Oct Re: "My" hummer!! [Gwen Hafford ]
20 Oct Re: "My" hummer!! [Jackie Allison at Wildblue ]
20 Oct "My" hummer!! [Gwen Hafford ]
17 Oct Passages ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
16 Oct Re: LA Western Winter Hummingbird Report #3 [Lanny Chambers ]
16 Oct Re: LA Western Winter Hummingbird Report #3 [Gwen Hafford ]
16 Oct Hummingbird Forum - gardening for hummingbirds [Gwen Hafford ]
16 Oct Re: Hummingbirds in New Orleans ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
16 Oct Re: Hummingbirds in Florida ["Power, Robert W." ]
16 Oct Re: Hummingbirds in Florida [Kathi Johnson Rock ]
16 Oct Re: Hummingbirds in Florida [Debbie Danna ]
16 Oct Re: Plants Hummingbirds like [Gwen Hafford ]
16 Oct Hummingbirds in Florida [Melissa Pappas ]
16 Oct Re: Where I live [Kathi Johnson Rock ]
16 Oct Re: Plants Hummingbirds like [Kathi Johnson Rock ]
16 Oct Where I live [Gwen Hafford ]
16 Oct Re: Plants Hummingbirds like ["Power, Robert W." ]
16 Oct Plants Hummingbirds like [Gwen Hafford ]
16 Oct Returning Rufous Hummingbird, Valdosta, GA [Kar S ]
13 Oct Re: Banded Broad-tailed male adult hummer at our house in Nederland, Texas [Susan Heath ]
8 Oct Banded Broad-tailed male adult hummer at our house in Nederland, Texas [Jana Whittle ]
5 Oct Hummingbirds & Great Warbler [Melissa Pappas ]
3 Oct First Selasphorus [Thomas Sylvest ]
3 Oct Irving TX hummer banders ? [Bob Hall-Brooks ]
3 Oct Re: LA Western Winter Hummingbird Report #3 [Shirley ]
2 Oct Hummingbirds [Melissa Pappas ]
1 Oct LA Western Winter Hummingbird Report #3 ["Johnson, Erik" ]
23 Sep FW: [Saw-whet Net] Bob Sargent's memorial service ["Ingold, James" ]
19 Sep Sorry! [Melissa Pappas ]
19 Sep Re: Berylline Hummingbird in....Michigan! [Melissa Pappas ]
19 Sep Berylline Hummingbird in....Michigan! [Allen Chartier ]
17 Sep Fw: Hummer coloring [KC Foggin ]
16 Sep Re: Hummer coloring ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
15 Sep Re: Hummer coloring [Lanny Chambers ]
15 Sep Hummer coloring [KC Foggin ]
14 Sep Hummer (and ant) featured in EPOD [Wiggins Patrick ]
14 Sep Re: Tiny bird, giant ego [Allen Chartier ]
14 Sep Re: Tiny bird, giant ego [Melissa Pappas ]
14 Sep Re: Tiny bird, giant ego [Dottie Price ]
13 Sep Tiny bird, giant ego [Lanny Chambers ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lizette Wroten ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lanny Chambers ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lizette Wroten ]
11 Sep Hummers Fighting Nice(?) [Melissa Pappas ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lanny Chambers ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Irma ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [jwn ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? ["creinsch AT humbirds.org" ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lanny Chambers ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lanny Chambers ]
11 Sep Re: Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lizette Wroten ]
10 Sep Hummers fighting...nice...? [Lizette Wroten ]
9 Sep Re: on Bob Sargent passing- an old native prayer [jwn ]
9 Sep Bob Sargent - Online Obituary [Robert Protz ]
9 Sep on Bob Sargent passing- an old native prayer [Rachel Powless ]
7 Sep Re: For the winter report... ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
7 Sep Very Sad News About Bob Sargent [Kathi Johnson Rock ]
7 Sep Re: For the winter report... [Tom Trenchard ]
7 Sep Re: For the winter report... ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
6 Sep For the winter report... [Linda Beall ]
3 Sep Re: Nectar Defender [Dottie Price ]
3 Sep Re: Nectar Defender [Lanny Chambers ]
1 Sep Buff-bellied hummingbird [Beth Maniscalco ]
31 Aug Ruby Throats Still on the Move [Dottie Price ]
31 Aug first observed winter hummer [Cindy Macolini ]
30 Aug Re: Bob Sargent [Dottie Price ]
30 Aug Re: Bob Sargent [Bob Sargent ]
30 Aug Re: Bob Sargent [Dottie Price ]
29 Aug Bob Sargent [Bob Hall-Brooks ]
29 Aug Re: Terrible Situation! [Dottie Price ]

Subject: LA western winter hummingbird report #4
From: "Johnson, Erik" <ejohnson AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 18:16:36 +0000
Louisiana birders,

I've received very few newer reports over the last several weeks. I hope it's 
just a lack of reporting rather than a lack of hummingbirds. Please continue to 
report your western winter hummer observations to me (ejohnson AT Audubon.org), 
LAbird, or HUMNET for recording in our weekly report and database, providing 
the following information: 


- Your name
- Your address (town only is acceptable)
- First observed (FO) date (or, if discovered while banding or marking other 
birds, the date it was observed) 

- Species
- Age (Adult, immature, unknown)
- Sex (Male, female, unknown)
- Whether banded, when and by whom.

If additional information is learned through further observation or banding or 
if a mistake needs to be corrected, please report those updates and I'll make 
the changes. If you sent me a report and it didn't make it into this summary, I 
apologize and please let me know. 


Happy hummingbirding,
Erik Johnson
S Lafayette, LA

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

THIS IS LOUISIANA WESTERN WINTER HUMMINGBIRD WEEKLY REPORT # 4 FOR THE 
2014-2015 SEASON. 


Following are the reports received and added to our database since report # 3 
dated 10/2/2014. 


1.John Conover, Raceland, LA (Lafourche)
     #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 10/4/2014
     #3 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 10/17/2014

2.Sandra DeHart, Perry, LA (Vermilion)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 9/22/2014 LO 9/23/2014

3.Shirley Drewes, Prairieville, LA (Ascension)
 #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 9/19/2014 (banded, possible 
returnee) 

     #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 9/22/2014 LO 9/23/2014

4.Sandra Lewis, Sulphur, LA (Calcasieu)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 10/15/2014

5.Sybil McDonald, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 9/13/2014

6.Rose and Jack Must, Lafayette, LA (Lafayette)
     #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 10/16/2014

7.Harriett Pooler, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  OBS 10/9/2014

8.Tom Sylvest, Gramercy, LA (St. James)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 10/2/2014

9.Wild-City Park New Orleans, New Orleans, LA (Orleans)
 #1 Black-chinned Hummingbird Ad M FO 10/4/2014 (reported by Claire Thomas) 


10.Jon Wise, Metairie, LA (Jefferson)
 #1 Archilochus sp. FO 10/1/2014 (possible Black-chinned Hummingbird, reported 
as female) 

________________________________
Summary of Reports as of 10/23/2014

Archilochus sp.
   1 report
   1 parish
   1 site
Black-chinned Hummingbird
   1 report
   1 parish
   1 site
Buff-bellied Hummingbird
   1 report
   1 parish
   1 site
Selasphorus Rufous/Allens
   53 reports
   13 parishes
   39 sites
--Identified Rufous
   30 reports
   7 parishes
   26 sites
________________________________
ARCHILOCHUS SP.

Jefferson Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Jon Wise, Metairie, LA
#1 Archilochus sp. FO 10/1/2014 (possible Black-chinned Hummingbird, reported 
as female) 

________________________________
BLACK-CHINNED HUMMINGBIRD

Orleans Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Wild-City Park New Orleans, New Orleans, LA
#1 Black-chinned Hummingbird  Ad  M  FO 10/4/2014  (reported by Claire Thomas)
________________________________
BUFF-BELLIED HUMMINGBIRD

Lafourche Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Beth & Sammy Maniscalco, Thibodaux, LA
#1 Buff-bellied Hummingbird  FO 9/1/2014
________________________________
SELASPHORUS RUFOUS/ALLENS

Ascension Parish:  2 reports  1 site

1. Shirley Drewes, Prairieville, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 9/19/2014 (banded, possible 
returnee) 

#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 9/22/2014  LO 9/23/2014

Bossier Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Penny Brenner, N. Bossier City, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 8/27/2014

Calcasieu Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Sandra Lewis, Sulphur, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 10/15/2014

East Baton Rouge Parish:  23 reports  15 sites

1. Lewis & Lynda Roussel, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Ad  F  FO 8/24/2014  (probable returnee)
#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 8/24/2014

2. Joan LeBlanc, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/22/2014  (banded returnee)

3. Vicki Vance, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/31/2014  (banded returnee)
#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/27/2014

4. Cindy Macolini, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/31/2014

5. Sybil McDonald, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/13/2014

6. Carole Thomas, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/21/2014

7. Russ & Lisa Norwood, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/13/2014

8. Robb Brumfield, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/15/2014

9. Mike & Sally Allen, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/26/2014  (banded returnee)

10. Jean Wall & Bud Snowdon, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/22/2014

11. Linda Stewart, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/16/2014  (banded)

12. Kimberly Lanka, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/10/2014
#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/19/2014
#3 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 8/23/2014

13. John and Cindy Hartgerink, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/14/2014

14. Harriett Pooler, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  OBS 10/9/2014

15. Wayne McMichael, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 9/6/2014  LO 9/13/2014
#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  F  FO 9/16/2014
#3 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/19/2014
#4 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/20/2014
#5 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Ad  F  FO 9/20/2014

Evangeline Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Helena & Mike Putnam, Basile, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/1/2014  LO 8/2/2014

Iberia Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Mike Musumeche, New Iberia, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 9/23/2014

Jefferson Parish:  4 reports  4 sites

1. Nancy Newfield, Metairie, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  F  FO 9/23/2014  LO 9/23/2014

2. Dan Carroll, Metairie, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/3/2014

3. Craig Mineo, River Ridge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 9/30/2014

4. Craig & Lizette Wroten, Harahan, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 9/21/2014

Lafayette Parish:  6 reports  5 sites

1. Rose and Jack Must, Lafayette, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/18/2014 (returnee recaptured by 
DP 9/20/2014) 

#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 10/16/2014

2. Dave Patton, Lafayette, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/28/2014 (Returnee recaptured by 
DP 9/20/2014) 


3. Danny Dobbs, Lafayette, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/22/2014

4. Jeanne Plaisance, Lafayette, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 9/16/2014 LO 9/18/2014 (banded, 
possible returnee) 


5. Amy O'Quain, Lafayette, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/2/2014

Lafourche Parish:  4 reports  2 sites

1. Janelle Bergeron, Thibodaux, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/11/2014 (Banded on left leg) 


2. John Conover, Raceland, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Ad  F  FO 9/1/2014
#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 10/4/2014
#3 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 10/17/2014

Morehouse Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Beth Erwin, Collinston, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/12/2014  LO 8/16/2014

St. James Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Tom Sylvest, Gramercy, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 10/2/2014

St. Tammany Parish:  7 reports  5 sites

1. Linda Keefer, Covington, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 8/29/2014

2. John and Margaret Owens, Covington, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Im F FO 9/18/2014 LO 9/21/2014 (Banded by 
NLN/SML 9/21/2014) 

#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Im M FO 9/24/2014 (Banded by NLN/SML 
9/27/2014) 


3. Harvey Patten, Covington, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  F  FO 9/6/2014  (banded returnee)

4. Noel Venezia, Slidell, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad F FO 8/3/2014 ("Ms. Pink"; first 
banded by LB 11/26/2006) 

#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  F  FO 8/4/2014  (banded)

5. Malise Prieto, Mandeville, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/23/2014

Vermilion Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Sandra DeHart, Perry, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 9/22/2014  LO 9/23/2014
________________________________
Subject: Hummingbirds in Costa Rica: An Opportunity
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT RUBYTHROAT.ORG>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 16:17:37 -0400
There may be a few Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (RTHU) lingering in the Carolina 
Piedmont this week, but by now nearly all of our Carolina hummers have flown 
south—except, of course, for those hardy individuals that seem determined to 
overwinter on the Outer Banks. 


If you think you’ll need a “hummingbird fix” before these little birds 
return next spring, consider joining me on my 25th Operation RubyThroat 
expedition to the Neotropics—this one in Guanacaste Province on the Pacific 
Coast of Coast Rica. The nine-day trip (24 Jan-1 Feb 2015) includes lots of 
opportunities for in-hand looks at numerous hummingbird species—plus other 
resident and migrant birds we encounter while banding and observing RTHU. And 
there’s plenty of time for discovering and photographing other aspects of the 
tropical dry forest, from butterflies to orchids to howler monkeys. 


For info about the upcoming trip please visit 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/CostaRica(west)AnnounceMain15.html 
 . No field 
experience necessary. Deposit deadline is 15 November. 


Happy (Neotropical) Hummingbird Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

OPERATION RUBYTHROAT: The Hummingbird Project
DR. BILL HILTON JR., Principal Investigator & Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road
York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Operation RubyThroat:The Hummingbird Project ( http://www.rubythroat.org ) is a 
cross-disciplinary international initiative in which students, teachers, and 
others collaborate to study behavior and distribution of the Ruby-throated 
Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris). All worldwide rights reserved and 
copyrighted by Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History ( 
http://www.hiltonpond.org ). Contributions in support of the project may be 
made via Network for Good at 
http://www.guidestar.org/controller/searchResults.gs?action_donateReport=1&partner=networkforgood&ein=56-2162170 


=============
Subject: Re: "My" hummer!!
From: Gwen Hafford <hafford1 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 13:15:07 -0400
Jackie, thanks for that suggestion. Sounds like a great idea. I live to take 
pictures even though I'm not very good at it (yet). 

I have been visited by some pretty butterflies and other birds. The larger 
birds I recognize, but there are a good handful of smaller birds I'd like to 
view up close so I can identify them. 

Gwen
Sebring, Florida

Gwen Sharp  Hafford
Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 20, 2014, at 12:35 PM, Jackie Allison at Wildblue 
 wrote: 

> 
> Hi Gwen,
> 
> You may want to check out some of the super-zoom cameras that are on the 
market. If you have Consumer Reports, they usually evaluate the new ones each 
year and there are also camera reviews on the internet. My husband bought my 
last camera for me on Amazon, and it had a load of reviews from buyers. You can 
still read the reviews, even if you don't purchase through them. 

> 
> With a super-zoom, you can use the zoom like binoculars to just view the 
hummer or capture a photo if you want. If you get addicted to hummingbirds, 
like me, there will be a lot of times that you wish you could have captured a 
photo. Because Hummingbirds are so small, even with good eyesight, it is hard 
to pick out certain details on a hummingbird, especially if you have a rare one 
visiting your yard. You can download the photos and study the characteristics 
of the wings, tail, etc. With more experience, those slight detail differences 
will become easier to pick out with binoculars. 

> 
> I live in Nipomo, California, along the Central California Coast. I had a 
vagrant juvenile male Ruby-throated Hummingbird, visiting my feeders from 
August 30 - September 02, 2014. I was able to photograph the characteristics of 
the narrow inner-primaries, especially the shape of P6 and very narrow P10, 
which separated him from our normally occurring Black-chinned Hummingbirds and 
those migrating through from farther north - BC, Canada, at the same time he 
was here. Very exciting! 

> 
> Regards,
> Jackie Allison
> Nipomo, California
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Gwen Hafford" 
> To: 
> Sent: Monday, October 20, 2014 7:41 AM
> Subject: [HUMNET-L] "My" hummer!!
> 
> 
>> Good morning everyone!
>> I've been sitting on my back porch for nearly a week now with no early 
morning or dusk sightings of the little thing. I still haven't seen anything 
except a tiny black silhouette perched on a twig at the top of my grapefruit 
tree (maybe 6' tall). 

>> Today, at 10:16 AM I went to the porch for a different reason and there he 
was!! 

>> Yeah!! :-)
>> I froze and watched as he/she sat there for maybe 2 minutes. I am so 
excited! I'm pretty certain it's the same one because it is always on the same 
twig. 

>> He just flew back to his perch -- this time for only a minute or less.
>> I've got to order binoculars.
>> Gwen
>> Sebring, Florida.
>> 
>> Gwen Sharp Hafford q
Subject: Re: "My" hummer!!
From: Jackie Allison at Wildblue <jackal AT WILDBLUE.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:35:23 -0700
Hi Gwen,

You may want to check out some of the super-zoom cameras that are on the 
market. If you have Consumer Reports, they usually evaluate the new ones 
each year and there are also camera reviews on the internet. My husband 
bought my last camera for me on Amazon, and it had a load of reviews from 
buyers. You can still read the reviews, even if you don't purchase through 
them.

With a super-zoom, you can use the zoom like binoculars to just view the 
hummer or capture a photo if you want. If you get addicted to hummingbirds, 
like me, there will be a lot of times that you wish you could have captured 
a photo. Because Hummingbirds are so small, even with good eyesight, it is 
hard to pick out certain details on a hummingbird, especially if you have a 
rare one visiting your yard. You can download the photos and study the 
characteristics of the wings, tail, etc. With more experience, those slight 
detail differences will become easier to pick out with binoculars.

I live in Nipomo, California, along the Central California Coast. I had a 
vagrant juvenile male Ruby-throated Hummingbird, visiting my feeders from 
August 30 - September 02, 2014. I was able to photograph the characteristics 
of the narrow inner-primaries, especially the shape of P6 and very narrow 
P10, which separated him from our normally occurring Black-chinned 
Hummingbirds and those migrating through from farther north - BC, Canada, at 
the same time he was here. Very exciting!

Regards,
Jackie Allison
Nipomo, California

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Gwen Hafford" 
To: 
Sent: Monday, October 20, 2014 7:41 AM
Subject: [HUMNET-L] "My" hummer!!


> Good morning everyone!
> I've been sitting on my back porch for nearly a week now with no early 
> morning or dusk sightings of the little thing. I still haven't seen 
> anything except a tiny black silhouette perched on a twig at the top of my 
> grapefruit tree (maybe 6' tall).
> Today, at 10:16 AM I went to the porch for a different reason and there he 
> was!!
> Yeah!! :-)
> I froze and watched as he/she sat there for maybe 2 minutes. I am so 
> excited! I'm pretty certain it's the same one because it is always on the 
> same twig.
> He just flew back to his perch -- this time for only a minute or less.
> I've got to order binoculars.
> Gwen
> Sebring, Florida.
>
> Gwen Sharp Hafford 
Subject: "My" hummer!!
From: Gwen Hafford <hafford1 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 10:41:47 -0400
Good morning everyone!
I've been sitting on my back porch for nearly a week now with no early morning 
or dusk sightings of the little thing. I still haven't seen anything except a 
tiny black silhouette perched on a twig at the top of my grapefruit tree (maybe 
6' tall). 

Today, at 10:16 AM I went to the porch for a different reason and there he 
was!! 

Yeah!! :-)
I froze and watched as he/she sat there for maybe 2 minutes. I am so excited! 
I'm pretty certain it's the same one because it is always on the same twig. 

He just flew back to his perch -- this time for only a minute or less. 
I've got to order binoculars. 
Gwen
Sebring, Florida.    

Gwen Sharp Hafford
Subject: Passages
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 08:53:41 -0500
Howdy Humnet,

Ruby-throated migration here is down to an inevitable trickle. Yesterday 
and the day before, I estimated a surprisingly healthy 8 to 10 
individuals jousting for domination of the flowers. There has been very, 
very little feeder usage.

This morning, a mere 2 were contesting the front /Salvia/ garden. This 
is about an average time of the month of October for the passage to 
cease. Our spring/summer/fall host in Covington said that she wasn't 
sure there were enough birds there to justify running a banding session 
tomorrow. We'll see. I hate to quit.

The very welcome cool front passed through a few days ago, bringing 
about half an inch of rain. October being our driest month. It also 
dropped a plethora of Common Yellowthroats and Indigo Buntings. This 
morning, while watching for hummers, I could hear Rose-breasted 
Grosbeaks in every direction.

NLN

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibr
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: Re: LA Western Winter Hummingbird Report #3
From: Lanny Chambers <lanny AT HUMMINGBIRDS.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 18:13:52 -0500
On Oct 16, 2014, at 17:38 , Gwen Hafford  wrote:

> do you use binoculars or a camera with a good lens to identify the 
hummingbird species, gender, etc? 


Yes. :)

Use whatever tools you have. A good ID photo--i.e., close up, sharp focus, 
showing a spread tail--can be compared to pictures in a field guide. If you can 
get such a photo, consider yourself lucky; a fleeting binocular view is often 
all we get. 


It's helpful to familiarize yourself with the possible species, from field 
guides. Even better, see them in person in the company of an experienced 
birder, who will teach you what to look for. In Miller Canyon, preferably. 


> I'm in the market for another camera or lens for my current camera, as well 
as a pair of good/decent binoculars. 


I bought these on sale ($250) and am very happy with them:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/910856-REG/nikon_7576_8x42_monarch_5.html

You'll pay substantially more for anything significantly better.


Lanny Chambers
St. Louis, MO
lanny AT hummingbirds.net
Subject: Re: LA Western Winter Hummingbird Report #3
From: Gwen Hafford <hafford1 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 18:38:04 -0400
Here's another obviously newbie question: do you use binoculars or a camera 
with a good lens to identify the hummingbird species, gender, etc? 

I'm in the market for another camera or lens for my current camera, as well as 
a pair of good/decent binoculars. Any suggestions would be appreciated. 

If this is considered off topic, I apologize. You can reply to my email:
hafford1 at comcast.net if my question is not appropriate for the list. 
Thanks!
Gwen
Sebring (Highlands County) Florida



Gwen Sharp Hafford
Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 3, 2014, at 6:38 PM, Shirley 
<00000062e8968b43-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> Adult male rufous 
> FO Sept. 19
> Banded, but can't read numbers
> Shirley drewes
> Prairieville, LA
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Sep 30, 2014, at 9:29 PM, "Johnson, Erik"  wrote:
>> 
>> Louisiana birders,
>> 
>> Hummingbird reports have continued to trickle in and things ought to be 
picking up soon, so keep working through your Ruby-throats to see if you can 
find a Rufous or something more exotic. Please continue to report your western 
winter hummer observations to me (ejohnson AT Audubon.org), LAbird, or HUMNET 
for recording in our weekly report and database, providing the following 
information: 

>> - Your name
>> - Your address (town only is acceptable)
>> - First observed (FO) date (or, if discovered while banding or marking other 
birds, the date it was observed) 

>> - Species
>> - Age (Adult, immature, unknown)
>> - Sex (Male, female, unknown)
>> - Whether banded, when and by whom.
>> 
>> If additional information is learned through further observation or banding 
or if a mistake needs to be corrected, please report those updates and I'll 
make the changes. If you sent me a report and it didn't make it into this 
summary, I apologize and please let me know. 

>> 
>> Happy hummingbirding,
>> Erik Johnson
>> S Lafayette, LA
>> 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

>> THIS IS LOUISIANA WESTERN WINTER HUMMINGBIRD WEEKLY REPORT # 3 FOR THE 
2014-2015 SEASON. 

>> 
>> Following are the reports received and added to our database since report # 
2 dated 9/5/2014. 

>> 
>> 1.Mike & Sally Allen, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
>> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/26/2014 (banded returnee) 

>> 
>> 2.Penny Brenner, N. Bossier City, LA (Bossier)
>>    #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 8/27/2014
>> 
>> 3.Dan Carroll, Metairie, LA (Jefferson)
>>    #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/3/2014
>> 
Subject: Hummingbird Forum - gardening for hummingbirds
From: Gwen Hafford <hafford1 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 18:18:21 -0400
Kathi, thanks for the link to the forum and to your web page. I'll check both 
out. 

Gwen Hafford
Sebring, (Highlands County) Florida

Gwen Sharp Hafford
Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 16, 2014, at 1:08 PM, Kathi Johnson Rock  wrote:
> 
> Thanks Gwen.  Salvia coccinea is certainly a great hummingbird plant for
> you throughout the season, but there are so many others, including many
> fall and winter blooming salvias.  You may wish to visit The Hummingbird
> Forum at http://www.network54.com/Forum/439743/.  There is a group of folks
> there who live and garden for hummingbirds in Florida who could give you
> some really great ideas.  Good luck to you.
> 
> Kathi and Michael Rock
> Madison, Wisconsin
> Zone 5a
> 
>> On Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 10:15 AM, Gwen Hafford  wrote:
>> 
>> Hello again!  I was trying to keep my previous post short and neglected to
>> mention my location.
>> I live in Sebring, FL.
>> Sebring is in Highlands County. We are almost in the middle of the state
>> -- about 1.5 hours south of Orlando and about 1.5 hours east of the
>> Sarasota -Bradenton area.
>> Gwen
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Kathi and Michael Rock
> Madison, Wisconsin, Dane County
> Zone 4/5
> e-mail: kathijr AT yahoo.com
> website: www.hummingbirdgardening.net
> telephone: (608) 233-7397
> 
> "Hummingbirds.....where is the person, I ask, who, on observing this
> glittering
> fragment of the rainbow, would not pause, admire, and turn his mind with
> reverence..."; (J. J. Audubon)
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds in New Orleans
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 16:02:49 -0500
Debbie,

On 10/16/2014 1:02 PM, Debbie Danna wrote:

> I have been reading HUMNET for over a year and have tried to create a
> hummingbird environment in my back yard - but have only seen one
> hummingbird in the past 6 months.  I have at least 6 different hummingbird
> plants currently blooming and usually always have something blooming, even
> in the dead of winter - Turk's cap, Mexican cigar, pineapple sage, shrimp
> plant, albutilon, cat whisker's and 4 feeders - that I change at least
> twice a week.  I live in New Orleans (for those in the area in the lower
> garden district close to downtown).  I have a two-story cinder block
> warehouse at back of my property/garden and trees all around.  How do I
> attract hummingbirds?  Am I just in too urban?

I just spent an hour or so writing up a thoughtful post on hummingbirds 
in New Orleans and through some computer glitch, it has disappeared.  I 
live in Old Metairie and I think I know most of what you need to know.

Why don't you give me a call at 504-338-3882?

Nan

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds in Florida
From: "Power, Robert W." <rwpower AT TEXASCHILDRENS.ORG>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 21:01:41 +0000
Debbie;
The migrating Ruby Throats are usually in a hurry go elsewhere here on the 
coast, so you might not see them even if they do visit your yard... but the 
winter hummingbirds will probably find your oasis eventually, and if they do, 
they will probably return each year. (One year, the first sighting of a winter 
hummingbird in my yard was after Christmas) 

Even in very urban areas it's possible to attract winter hummers. 
There are also a few Ruby Throats who stick around for the winter in the 
Western Gulf Coast, south of I-10. 

Hang in there!
-RP

-----Original Message-----
From: BB for Hummingbirds and Gardening for them in the Southeast 
[mailto:HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Debbie Danna 

Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 1:03 PM
To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [HUMNET-L] Hummingbirds in Florida

I have been reading HUMNET for over a year and have tried to create a 
hummingbird environment in my back yard - but have only seen one hummingbird in 
the past 6 months. I have at least 6 different hummingbird plants currently 
blooming and usually always have something blooming, even in the dead of winter 
- Turk's cap, Mexican cigar, pineapple sage, shrimp plant, albutilon, cat 
whisker's and 4 feeders - that I change at least twice a week. I live in New 
Orleans (for those in the area in the lower garden district close to downtown). 
I have a two-story cinder block warehouse at back of my property/garden and 
trees all around. How do I attract hummingbirds? Am I just in too urban? 


Thanks for any suggestions!

Debbie Danna
New Orleans, LA

On Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 12:22 PM, Melissa Pappas < 
0000000553dda6f7-dmarc-request AT listserv.lsu.edu> wrote: 


> I may be opening a can of worms (e.g., discussions here from many, 
> many years ago), but I grew up in Florida. I was in St. Petersburg. We 
> had all kinds of tropical flowers, but never saw the first hummingbird 
> until we went to the NC mountains. We had parakeets everywhere and all 
> kinds of wonderful birds, but no hummingbirds - that I ever saw.
>
> Now we're reading about hummers in several places around the state. Do 
> you think they've been there all along? Is it a more recent occurrence 
> due to the increase in humans planting for and putting out feeders for 
> hummingbirds? Is this possibly a new, favorite route across the Gulf?
> Recent posts have brought this to the front, and I can't help but wonder.
> What do you, learned folks think?
>
>
> Melissa Pappas
> Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI
>
> Blog: http://colmel.wordpress.com/
> "If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, 
> you should go home and examine your conscience."  ~ Woodrow Wilson
>

______________________________________________________________________
CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE:
 The information in this e-mail may be confidential and/or
 privileged.  If you are not the intended recipient or an
 authorized representative of the intended recipient, you
 are hereby notified that any review, dissemination, or
 copying of this e-mail and its attachments, if any, or
 the information contained herein is prohibited.  If you
 have received this e-mail in error, please immediately
 notify the sender by return e-mail and delete this e-mail
 from your computer system.  Thank you.
______________________________________________________________________
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds in Florida
From: Kathi Johnson Rock <kathijr777 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 14:17:42 -0500
Debbie,

There are several people on HUMNET who live in New Orleans who can respond
to your question much better than I can, but we also live in a city and
despite providing all of the feeders, plants, and mature trees that
hummingbirds love, we will never see as many hummingbirds as someone living
in a more rural environment.  Also, in New Orleans Ruby-throats are
migrating through in the spring and fall to, but most are probably not
staying in your area to breed.  Again, other members of HUMNET can answer
this question much better than I can.

Kathi and Michael Rock
Madison, Wisconsin
Zone 5a

On Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 1:02 PM, Debbie Danna  wrote:

> I have been reading HUMNET for over a year and have tried to create a
> hummingbird environment in my back yard - but have only seen one
> hummingbird in the past 6 months.  I have at least 6 different hummingbird
> plants currently blooming and usually always have something blooming, even
> in the dead of winter - Turk's cap, Mexican cigar, pineapple sage, shrimp
> plant, albutilon, cat whisker's and 4 feeders - that I change at least
> twice a week.  I live in New Orleans (for those in the area in the lower
> garden district close to downtown).  I have a two-story cinder block
> warehouse at back of my property/garden and trees all around.  How do I
> attract hummingbirds?  Am I just in too urban?
>
> Thanks for any suggestions!
>
> Debbie Danna
> New Orleans, LA
>
> On Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 12:22 PM, Melissa Pappas <
> 0000000553dda6f7-dmarc-request AT listserv.lsu.edu> wrote:
>
> > I may be opening a can of worms (e.g., discussions here from many, many
> > years ago), but I grew up in Florida. I was in St. Petersburg. We had all
> > kinds of tropical flowers, but never saw the first hummingbird until we
> > went to the NC mountains. We had parakeets everywhere and all kinds of
> > wonderful birds, but no hummingbirds - that I ever saw.
> >
> > Now we're reading about hummers in several places around the state. Do
> you
> > think they've been there all along? Is it a more recent occurrence due to
> > the increase in humans planting for and putting out feeders for
> > hummingbirds? Is this possibly a new, favorite route across the Gulf?
> > Recent posts have brought this to the front, and I can't help but wonder.
> > What do you, learned folks think?
> >
> >
> > Melissa Pappas
> > Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI
> >
> > Blog: http://colmel.wordpress.com/
> > "If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you
> > should go home and examine your conscience."  ~ Woodrow Wilson
> >
>



-- 
Kathi and Michael Rock
Madison, Wisconsin, Dane County
Zone 4/5
e-mail: kathijr AT yahoo.com
website: www.hummingbirdgardening.net
telephone: (608) 233-7397

"Hummingbirds.....where is the person, I ask, who, on observing this
glittering
fragment of the rainbow, would not pause, admire, and turn his mind with
reverence..."; (J. J. Audubon)
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds in Florida
From: Debbie Danna <debbiedanna AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 13:02:35 -0500
I have been reading HUMNET for over a year and have tried to create a
hummingbird environment in my back yard - but have only seen one
hummingbird in the past 6 months.  I have at least 6 different hummingbird
plants currently blooming and usually always have something blooming, even
in the dead of winter - Turk's cap, Mexican cigar, pineapple sage, shrimp
plant, albutilon, cat whisker's and 4 feeders - that I change at least
twice a week.  I live in New Orleans (for those in the area in the lower
garden district close to downtown).  I have a two-story cinder block
warehouse at back of my property/garden and trees all around.  How do I
attract hummingbirds?  Am I just in too urban?

Thanks for any suggestions!

Debbie Danna
New Orleans, LA

On Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 12:22 PM, Melissa Pappas <
0000000553dda6f7-dmarc-request AT listserv.lsu.edu> wrote:

> I may be opening a can of worms (e.g., discussions here from many, many
> years ago), but I grew up in Florida. I was in St. Petersburg. We had all
> kinds of tropical flowers, but never saw the first hummingbird until we
> went to the NC mountains. We had parakeets everywhere and all kinds of
> wonderful birds, but no hummingbirds - that I ever saw.
>
> Now we're reading about hummers in several places around the state. Do you
> think they've been there all along? Is it a more recent occurrence due to
> the increase in humans planting for and putting out feeders for
> hummingbirds? Is this possibly a new, favorite route across the Gulf?
> Recent posts have brought this to the front, and I can't help but wonder.
> What do you, learned folks think?
>
>
> Melissa Pappas
> Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI
>
> Blog: http://colmel.wordpress.com/
> "If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you
> should go home and examine your conscience."  ~ Woodrow Wilson
>
Subject: Re: Plants Hummingbirds like
From: Gwen Hafford <hafford1 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 13:45:41 -0400
Hi, Everyone!
I thought I added a post with my location but maybe it didn't go through. 
Thanks for the warm welcomes! I'm excited to be a member of the group. 
I'm sure I will learn a lot here. 
I live in Sebring, Florida. 
We are almost in the center of the state. Orlando is about 1.5 hours to the 
north and the Sarasota-Bradenton area is about 1.5 hours to the west on the 
beautiful Gulf Coast. ( I don't work for the tourism department, either!) 

Thank you for the helpful replies. I really appreciate the help. 
Gwen

Gwen Sharp Hafford
Sebring, Florida (Highlands County)


Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 16, 2014, at 12:01 PM, Kathi Johnson Rock  
wrote: 

> 
> Gwen,
> 
> Welcome!!  Where is your approximate location?  This is always very helpful
> for your posts to this List serve.    You will want to think about using a
> combination of feeders and the best flowers for your area.  Thank you.
> 
> Kathi and Michael Rock
> Madison, Wisconsin
> Zone 5a
> 
>> On Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 8:25 AM, Gwen Hafford  wrote:
>> 
>> Hello. I'm new to the list. This is my first post. I'd live to hear any
>> suggestions that other list members think may be helpful. I've spotted a
>> hummingbird in my backyard for about the last month or a little more.
>> It comes to perch and rest on a twig that sticks up on the top of a small
>> (about 6' tall) citrus tree.  It will sit there and rest for several
>> minutes and then flies off towards the front of my house. This back and
>> forth activity sometimes will go on for an hour or more before the bird
>> flies off in another direction. I have two areas of plumbago bushes in the
>> front of my yard as well as some vines growing along a fence on the side.
>> I was so excited when I saw the hummingbird, I went to the nursery to buy
>> some plants that hummingbirds like (according to the nursery). I bought two
>> "fire bush", some salvia, red ixora, some impatiens, several shrimp plants
>> and a few others with red flowers that I will have to look up the names of.
>> The problem is that I have yet to see the hummingbird visit the plants. I
>> have them in containers near the tree where it perches. I go out on my back
>> porch early every morning and again in the afternoon to watch for it.
>> I'm perplexed as to why it doesn't visit the plants I bought for it.
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Kathi and Michael Rock
> Madison, Wisconsin, Dane County
> Zone 4/5
> e-mail: kathijr AT yahoo.com
> website: www.hummingbirdgardening.net
> telephone: (608) 233-7397
> 
> "Hummingbirds.....where is the person, I ask, who, on observing this
> glittering
> fragment of the rainbow, would not pause, admire, and turn his mind with
> reverence..."; (J. J. Audubon)
Subject: Hummingbirds in Florida
From: Melissa Pappas <0000000553dda6f7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 10:22:52 -0700
I may be opening a can of worms (e.g., discussions here from many, many years 
ago), but I grew up in Florida. I was in St. Petersburg. We had all kinds of 
tropical flowers, but never saw the first hummingbird until we went to the NC 
mountains. We had parakeets everywhere and all kinds of wonderful birds, but no 
hummingbirds - that I ever saw. 

 
Now we're reading about hummers in several places around the state. Do you 
think they've been there all along? Is it a more recent occurrence due to the 
increase in humans planting for and putting out feeders for hummingbirds? Is 
this possibly a new, favorite route across the Gulf? Recent posts have brought 
this to the front, and I can't help but wonder. What do you, learned folks 
think? 


 
Melissa Pappas
Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI

Blog: http://colmel.wordpress.com/
"If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should 
go home and examine your conscience." ~ Woodrow Wilson 

Subject: Re: Where I live
From: Kathi Johnson Rock <kathijr777 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 12:08:18 -0500
Thanks Gwen.  Salvia coccinea is certainly a great hummingbird plant for
you throughout the season, but there are so many others, including many
fall and winter blooming salvias.  You may wish to visit The Hummingbird
Forum at http://www.network54.com/Forum/439743/.  There is a group of folks
there who live and garden for hummingbirds in Florida who could give you
some really great ideas.  Good luck to you.

Kathi and Michael Rock
Madison, Wisconsin
Zone 5a

On Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 10:15 AM, Gwen Hafford  wrote:

> Hello again!  I was trying to keep my previous post short and neglected to
> mention my location.
> I live in Sebring, FL.
> Sebring is in Highlands County. We are almost in the middle of the state
> -- about 1.5 hours south of Orlando and about 1.5 hours east of the
> Sarasota -Bradenton area.
> Gwen
>



-- 
Kathi and Michael Rock
Madison, Wisconsin, Dane County
Zone 4/5
e-mail: kathijr AT yahoo.com
website: www.hummingbirdgardening.net
telephone: (608) 233-7397

"Hummingbirds.....where is the person, I ask, who, on observing this
glittering
fragment of the rainbow, would not pause, admire, and turn his mind with
reverence..."; (J. J. Audubon)
Subject: Re: Plants Hummingbirds like
From: Kathi Johnson Rock <kathijr777 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 11:01:11 -0500
Gwen,

Welcome!!  Where is your approximate location?  This is always very helpful
for your posts to this List serve.    You will want to think about using a
combination of feeders and the best flowers for your area.  Thank you.

Kathi and Michael Rock
Madison, Wisconsin
Zone 5a

On Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 8:25 AM, Gwen Hafford  wrote:

> Hello. I'm new to the list. This is my first post. I'd live to hear any
> suggestions that other list members think may be helpful. I've spotted a
> hummingbird in my backyard for about the last month or a little more.
> It comes to perch and rest on a twig that sticks up on the top of a small
> (about 6' tall) citrus tree.  It will sit there and rest for several
> minutes and then flies off towards the front of my house. This back and
> forth activity sometimes will go on for an hour or more before the bird
> flies off in another direction. I have two areas of plumbago bushes in the
> front of my yard as well as some vines growing along a fence on the side.
> I was so excited when I saw the hummingbird, I went to the nursery to buy
> some plants that hummingbirds like (according to the nursery). I bought two
> "fire bush", some salvia, red ixora, some impatiens, several shrimp plants
> and a few others with red flowers that I will have to look up the names of.
> The problem is that I have yet to see the hummingbird visit the plants. I
> have them in containers near the tree where it perches. I go out on my back
> porch early every morning and again in the afternoon to watch for it.
> I'm perplexed as to why it doesn't visit the plants I bought for it.
>



-- 
Kathi and Michael Rock
Madison, Wisconsin, Dane County
Zone 4/5
e-mail: kathijr AT yahoo.com
website: www.hummingbirdgardening.net
telephone: (608) 233-7397

"Hummingbirds.....where is the person, I ask, who, on observing this
glittering
fragment of the rainbow, would not pause, admire, and turn his mind with
reverence..."; (J. J. Audubon)
Subject: Where I live
From: Gwen Hafford <hafford1 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 11:15:30 -0400
Hello again! I was trying to keep my previous post short and neglected to 
mention my location. 

I live in Sebring, FL. 
Sebring is in Highlands County. We are almost in the middle of the state -- 
about 1.5 hours south of Orlando and about 1.5 hours east of the Sarasota 
-Bradenton area. 

Gwen 
Subject: Re: Plants Hummingbirds like
From: "Power, Robert W." <rwpower AT TEXASCHILDRENS.ORG>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 14:12:43 +0000
Hi, and welcome!
I've hosted winter hummers for several years now (and Ruby Throats during 
migration), despite living in the center of a very densely populated city 
(Houston). 

I agree with your nursery that plumbago, salvia, hamelia, & shrimp plants are 
good attractors. I don't think ixora & impatiens are used as often as nursery 
folks claim... 

Coral honeysuckle, Belize sage, Stachytarpheta, Cuphea (giant mexican or hybrid 
'David Verity'), and Callistemon (Bottlebrush) are also among the favorites in 
my area. Some people claim that Sweet Olive & Camellias are good winter 
hummingbird plants; possibly because they're the only things blooming in 
January/February & they attract lots of small insects... 

I think the best approach is to ask folks in your area what works, and what is 
easy to maintain, & what blooms at the time of year when you've got hummers... 
plants that work well in Pennsylvania are probably impossible in Corpus 
Christi, & vice versa! 

Good luck,
-RP



-----Original Message-----
From: BB for Hummingbirds and Gardening for them in the Southeast 
[mailto:HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Gwen Hafford 

Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 8:25 AM
To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [HUMNET-L] Plants Hummingbirds like

Hello. I'm new to the list. This is my first post. I'd live to hear any 
suggestions that other list members think may be helpful. I've spotted a 
hummingbird in my backyard for about the last month or a little more. 

It comes to perch and rest on a twig that sticks up on the top of a small 
(about 6' tall) citrus tree. It will sit there and rest for several minutes and 
then flies off towards the front of my house. This back and forth activity 
sometimes will go on for an hour or more before the bird flies off in another 
direction. I have two areas of plumbago bushes in the front of my yard as well 
as some vines growing along a fence on the side. 

I was so excited when I saw the hummingbird, I went to the nursery to buy some 
plants that hummingbirds like (according to the nursery). I bought two "fire 
bush", some salvia, red ixora, some impatiens, several shrimp plants and a few 
others with red flowers that I will have to look up the names of. The problem 
is that I have yet to see the hummingbird visit the plants. I have them in 
containers near the tree where it perches. I go out on my back porch early 
every morning and again in the afternoon to watch for it. 

I'm perplexed as to why it doesn't visit the plants I bought for it. 

______________________________________________________________________
CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE:
 The information in this e-mail may be confidential and/or
 privileged.  If you are not the intended recipient or an
 authorized representative of the intended recipient, you
 are hereby notified that any review, dissemination, or
 copying of this e-mail and its attachments, if any, or
 the information contained herein is prohibited.  If you
 have received this e-mail in error, please immediately
 notify the sender by return e-mail and delete this e-mail
 from your computer system.  Thank you.
______________________________________________________________________
Subject: Plants Hummingbirds like
From: Gwen Hafford <hafford1 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 09:25:00 -0400
Hello. I'm new to the list. This is my first post. I'd live to hear any 
suggestions that other list members think may be helpful. I've spotted a 
hummingbird in my backyard for about the last month or a little more. 

It comes to perch and rest on a twig that sticks up on the top of a small 
(about 6' tall) citrus tree. It will sit there and rest for several minutes and 
then flies off towards the front of my house. This back and forth activity 
sometimes will go on for an hour or more before the bird flies off in another 
direction. I have two areas of plumbago bushes in the front of my yard as well 
as some vines growing along a fence on the side. 

I was so excited when I saw the hummingbird, I went to the nursery to buy some 
plants that hummingbirds like (according to the nursery). I bought two "fire 
bush", some salvia, red ixora, some impatiens, several shrimp plants and a few 
others with red flowers that I will have to look up the names of. The problem 
is that I have yet to see the hummingbird visit the plants. I have them in 
containers near the tree where it perches. I go out on my back porch early 
every morning and again in the afternoon to watch for it. 

I'm perplexed as to why it doesn't visit the plants I bought for it. 
Subject: Returning Rufous Hummingbird, Valdosta, GA
From: Kar S <000000686c5000a5-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 12:16:42 +0000
It's Annabelle!  It took me a few days to figure out through photos that this 
little lady is Annabelle who we hosted last winter. She first arrived on 10 Dec 
2013.  She was banded by Fred Dietrich on 21 Feb 2014.  Her band digits are 
L47034.  Annabelle was last seen here on 21 Mar 2014 and returned here 1 Oct 
2014.  This photo shows 34 on her leg band.  


I am over the moon happy to have her back and hoping Sophie and Rust return as 
well (both Rufous as well).  I'd love to know where Annabelle spends her 
summers! 

Oct 2014 photos:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/30859363 AT N03/15544890792/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/30859363 AT N03/14928611663/

19 Mar 2014 photo of Annabelle just before she departed:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/30859363 AT N03/13293009994/




Karen Seward
Valdosta,Georgia




Subject: Re: Banded Broad-tailed male adult hummer at our house in Nederland, Texas
From: Susan Heath <susan.heath888 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 10:50:33 +0000
Awesome stuff Jana!


Sue






Susan A. Heath
Gulf Coast Bird Observatory
Lake Jackson, TX





From: Jana Whittle
Sent: ‎Wednesday‎, ‎October‎ ‎8‎, ‎2014 ‎8‎:‎39‎ ‎PM
To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU





A Broad-tailed adult male hummer showed up at our house in Nederland on Monday 
a few hours after a short but strong storm. Harlan came and got pictures of the 
bird and the first 3 characters on the band of his right leg, but that did not 
help a lot because the bander's first three characters on her bands are all the 
same. Yesterday after supper, John got a picture of two other numbers on the 
band as the bird flew away. Now we can say that this bird was banded here at 
our house on February 15th, 2014. 

Jana Whittle
Subject: Banded Broad-tailed male adult hummer at our house in Nederland, Texas
From: Jana Whittle <000000346f893a94-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2014 21:39:26 -0400
A Broad-tailed adult male hummer showed up at our house in Nederland on Monday 
a few hours after a short but strong storm. Harlan came and got pictures of the 
bird and the first 3 characters on the band of his right leg, but that did not 
help a lot because the bander's first three characters on her bands are all the 
same. Yesterday after supper, John got a picture of two other numbers on the 
band as the bird flew away. Now we can say that this bird was banded here at 
our house on February 15th, 2014. 

Jana Whittle
Subject: Hummingbirds & Great Warbler
From: Melissa Pappas <0000000553dda6f7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Sun, 5 Oct 2014 20:56:55 +0000
Much to my surprise, two hummingbirds were on one of our feeders last night 
just at dusk. One was significantly smaller than the other, but couldn't make 
it out to be a Calliope - no matter how hard I tried. I figured they'd both be 
gone this morning with the very cool temperatures and winds. I figured wrong. 
There still is at least one hummingbird hanging around the front yard flowers 
and feeders. 

  
The biggest surprise of the day was a male, black-throated blue warbler 
bouncing around in the trees out front. Seems every spring and fall for the 
past several years we've had at least one show up. Had almost given up hope 
that I'd see one this autumn. Really glad to see him. One of my real favorites! 

  
Melissa Pappas
Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI

Blog: http://colmel.wordpress.com/
"If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should 
go home and examine your conscience." ~ Woodrow Wilson 

Subject: First Selasphorus
From: Thomas Sylvest <syl917 AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2014 20:17:45 -0500
Tom Sylvest, Gramercy, La St. James Parish # 1 Selasphorus F type R/A F O 
10-2-14 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Irving TX hummer banders ?
From: Bob Hall-Brooks <bhall-brooks AT COGECO.CA>
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2014 20:38:02 -0400
Can anyone give me some leads on hummer banders in Irving TX area?

 

I will be there this weekend and would love the opportunity to see species
other than the Ruby-throated if possible.

 

Bob

 

Bob Hall-Brooks

Hummingbird Bander

Holiday Beach Migration Observatory

Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

519-972-5736 (home)

519-259-7949 (mobile)

Email: bhall-brooks AT cogeco.ca

 

 
Subject: Re: LA Western Winter Hummingbird Report #3
From: Shirley <00000062e8968b43-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2014 16:38:02 -0600
Adult male rufous 
FO Sept. 19
Banded, but can't read numbers
Shirley drewes
Prairieville, LA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 30, 2014, at 9:29 PM, "Johnson, Erik"  wrote:
> 
> Louisiana birders,
> 
> Hummingbird reports have continued to trickle in and things ought to be 
picking up soon, so keep working through your Ruby-throats to see if you can 
find a Rufous or something more exotic. Please continue to report your western 
winter hummer observations to me (ejohnson AT Audubon.org), LAbird, or HUMNET 
for recording in our weekly report and database, providing the following 
information: 

> - Your name
> - Your address (town only is acceptable)
> - First observed (FO) date (or, if discovered while banding or marking other 
birds, the date it was observed) 

> - Species
> - Age (Adult, immature, unknown)
> - Sex (Male, female, unknown)
> - Whether banded, when and by whom.
> 
> If additional information is learned through further observation or banding 
or if a mistake needs to be corrected, please report those updates and I'll 
make the changes. If you sent me a report and it didn't make it into this 
summary, I apologize and please let me know. 

> 
> Happy hummingbirding,
> Erik Johnson
> S Lafayette, LA
> 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

> THIS IS LOUISIANA WESTERN WINTER HUMMINGBIRD WEEKLY REPORT # 3 FOR THE 
2014-2015 SEASON. 

> 
> Following are the reports received and added to our database since report # 2 
dated 9/5/2014. 

> 
> 1.Mike & Sally Allen, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/26/2014 (banded returnee) 

> 
> 2.Penny Brenner, N. Bossier City, LA (Bossier)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 8/27/2014
> 
> 3.Dan Carroll, Metairie, LA (Jefferson)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/3/2014
> 
> 4.John Conover, Raceland, LA (Lafourche)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Ad  F  FO 9/1/2014
> 
> 5.Danny Dobbs, Lafayette, LA (Lafayette)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 9/22/2014
> 
> 6.John and Cindy Hartgerink, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 9/14/2014
> 
> 7.Linda Keefer, Covington, LA (St. Tammany)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 8/29/2014
> 
> 8.Kimberly Lanka, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
>     #3 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 8/23/2014
> 
> 9.Cindy Macolini, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/31/2014
> 
> 10.Beth & Sammy Maniscalco, Thibodaux, LA (Lafourche)
>     #1 Buff-bellied Hummingbird  FO 9/1/2014
> 
> 11.Wayne McMichael, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 9/6/2014 LO 9/13/2014
>     #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  F  FO 9/16/2014
>     #3 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/19/2014
>     #4 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/20/2014
>     #5 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Ad  F  FO 9/20/2014
> 
> 12.Mike Musumeche, New Iberia, LA (Iberia)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 9/23/2014
> 
> 13.Nancy Newfield, Metairie, LA (Jefferson)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  F  FO 9/23/2014 LO 9/23/2014
> 
> 14.Amy O'Quain, Lafayette, LA (Lafayette)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 9/2/2014
> 
> 15.John and Margaret Owens, Covington, LA (St. Tammany)
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Im F FO 9/18/2014 LO 9/21/2014 (Banded 
by NLN/SML 9/21/2014) 

> #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Im M FO 9/24/2014 (Banded by NLN/SML 
9/27/2014) 

> 
> 16.Harvey Patten, Covington, LA (St. Tammany)
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad F FO 9/6/2014 (banded returnee) 

> 
> 17.Dave Patton, Lafayette, LA (Lafayette)
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/28/2014 (Returnee recaptured 
by DP 9/20/2014) 

> 
> 18.Jeanne Plaisance, Lafayette, LA (Lafayette)
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 9/16/2014 (banded, probable 
returnee) 

> 
> 19.Malise Prieto, Mandeville, LA (St. Tammany)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/23/2014
> 
> 20.Lewis & Lynda Roussel, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Ad  F  FO 8/24/2014 (probable returnee)
>     #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 8/24/2014
> 
> 21.Carole Thomas, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 9/21/2014
> 
> 22.Vicki Vance, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/31/2014 (banded returnee) 

>     #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 9/27/2014
> 
> 23.Jean Wall & Bud Snowdon, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/22/2014
> 
> 24.Craig & Lizette Wroten, Harahan, LA (Jefferson)
>     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 9/21/2014
> ________________________________
> Summary of Reports as of 9/30/2014
> 
> Buff-bellied Hummingbird
>   1 report
>   1 parish
>   1 site
> 
> Selasphorus Rufous/Allens
>   42 reports
>   9 parishes
>   32 sites
> 
> --Identified Rufous
>   27 reports
>   6 parishes
>   23 sites
> ________________________________
> BUFF-BELLIED HUMMINGBIRD
> 
> Lafourche Parish:  1 report  1 site
> 
> 1. Beth & Sammy Maniscalco, Thibodaux, LA
> #1 Buff-bellied Hummingbird  FO 9/1/2014
> ________________________________
> SELASPHORUS RUFOUS/ALLENS
> 
> Bossier Parish:  1 report  1 site
> 
> 1. Penny Brenner, N. Bossier City, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 8/27/2014
> 
> East Baton Rouge Parish:  21 reports  13 sites
> 
> 1. Lewis & Lynda Roussel, Baton Rouge, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Ad  F  FO 8/24/2014  (probable returnee)
> #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 8/24/2014
> 
> 2. Joan LeBlanc, Baton Rouge, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/22/2014  (banded returnee)
> 
> 3. Vicki Vance, Baton Rouge, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/31/2014  (banded returnee)
> #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/27/2014
> 
> 4. Cindy Macolini, Baton Rouge, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/31/2014
> 
> 5. Carole Thomas, Baton Rouge, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/21/2014
> 
> 6. Russ & Lisa Norwood, Baton Rouge, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/13/2014
> 
> 7. Robb Brumfield, Baton Rouge, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/15/2014
> 
> 8. Mike & Sally Allen, Baton Rouge, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/26/2014  (banded returnee)
> 
> 9. Jean Wall & Bud Snowdon, Baton Rouge, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/22/2014
> 
> 10. Linda Stewart, Baton Rouge, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/16/2014  (banded)
> 
> 11. Kimberly Lanka, Baton Rouge, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/10/2014
> #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/19/2014
> #3 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 8/23/2014
> 
> 12. John and Cindy Hartgerink, Baton Rouge, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/14/2014
> 
> 13. Wayne McMichael, Baton Rouge, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 9/6/2014  LO 9/13/2014
> #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  F  FO 9/16/2014
> #3 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/19/2014
> #4 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/20/2014
> #5 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Ad  F  FO 9/20/2014
> 
> Evangeline Parish:  1 report  1 site
> 
> 1. Helena & Mike Putnam, Basile, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/1/2014  LO 8/2/2014
> 
> Iberia Parish:  1 report  1 site
> 
> 1. Mike Musumeche, New Iberia, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 9/23/2014
> 
> Jefferson Parish:  3 reports  3 sites
> 
> 1. Nancy Newfield, Metairie, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  F  FO 9/23/2014  LO 9/23/2014
> 
> 2. Dan Carroll, Metairie, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/3/2014
> 
> 3. Craig & Lizette Wroten, Harahan, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 9/21/2014
> 
> Lafayette Parish:  5 reports  5 sites
> 
> 1. Rose and Jack Must, Lafayette, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/18/2014
> 
> 2. Dave Patton, Lafayette, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/28/2014 (Returnee recaptured 
by DP 9/20/2014) 

> 
> 3. Danny Dobbs, Lafayette, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/22/2014
> 
> 4. Jeanne Plaisance, Lafayette, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 9/16/2014 (banded, probable 
returnee) 

> 
> 5. Amy O'Quain, Lafayette, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/2/2014
> 
> Lafourche Parish:  2 reports  2 sites
> 
> 1. Janelle Bergeron, Thibodaux, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/11/2014 (Banded on left leg) 

> 
> 2. John Conover, Raceland, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Ad  F  FO 9/1/2014
> 
> Morehouse Parish:  1 report  1 site
> 
> 1. Beth Erwin, Collinston, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/12/2014  LO 8/16/2014
> 
> St. Tammany Parish:  7 reports  5 sites
> 
> 1. Linda Keefer, Covington, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 8/29/2014
> 
> 2. John and Margaret Owens, Covington, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Im F FO 9/18/2014 LO 9/21/2014 (Banded 
by NLN/SML 9/21/2014) 

> #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Im M FO 9/24/2014 (Banded by NLN/SML 
9/27/2014) 

> 
> 3. Harvey Patten, Covington, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  F  FO 9/6/2014  (banded returnee)
> 
> 4. Noel Venezia, Slidell, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad F FO 8/3/2014 ("Ms. Pink"; first 
banded by LB 11/26/2006) 

> #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  F  FO 8/4/2014  (banded)
> 
> 5. Malise Prieto, Mandeville, LA
> #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/23/2014
> ________________________________
Subject: Hummingbirds
From: Melissa Pappas <0000000553dda6f7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2014 11:56:28 +0000
Still on-site at our feeders and hummer flowers. My salvia and cuphea are 
really at their best right now and our trumpet creeper has been blooming quite 
late this year. The birds Allen banded a few weeks back weren't "race-fit," so 
they're hanging around to tank up. Some fairly cold temperatures predicted for 
this weekend, so we may say goodbye then - if not before. Either way, I'm 
keeping my feeders out until it gets too cold to keep them ice-free. 

 
Melissa Pappas
Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI

Blog: http://colmel.wordpress.com/
"If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should 
go home and examine your conscience." ~ Woodrow Wilson 

Subject: LA Western Winter Hummingbird Report #3
From: "Johnson, Erik" <ejohnson AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 03:29:35 +0000
Louisiana birders,

Hummingbird reports have continued to trickle in and things ought to be picking 
up soon, so keep working through your Ruby-throats to see if you can find a 
Rufous or something more exotic. Please continue to report your western winter 
hummer observations to me (ejohnson AT Audubon.org), LAbird, or HUMNET for 
recording in our weekly report and database, providing the following 
information: 

- Your name
- Your address (town only is acceptable)
- First observed (FO) date (or, if discovered while banding or marking other 
birds, the date it was observed) 

- Species
- Age (Adult, immature, unknown)
- Sex (Male, female, unknown)
- Whether banded, when and by whom.

If additional information is learned through further observation or banding or 
if a mistake needs to be corrected, please report those updates and I'll make 
the changes. If you sent me a report and it didn't make it into this summary, I 
apologize and please let me know. 


Happy hummingbirding,
Erik Johnson
S Lafayette, LA

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

THIS IS LOUISIANA WESTERN WINTER HUMMINGBIRD WEEKLY REPORT # 3 FOR THE 
2014-2015 SEASON. 


Following are the reports received and added to our database since report # 2 
dated 9/5/2014. 


1.Mike & Sally Allen, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
 #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/26/2014 (banded returnee) 


2.Penny Brenner, N. Bossier City, LA (Bossier)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 8/27/2014

3.Dan Carroll, Metairie, LA (Jefferson)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/3/2014

4.John Conover, Raceland, LA (Lafourche)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Ad  F  FO 9/1/2014

5.Danny Dobbs, Lafayette, LA (Lafayette)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 9/22/2014

6.John and Cindy Hartgerink, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 9/14/2014

7.Linda Keefer, Covington, LA (St. Tammany)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 8/29/2014

8.Kimberly Lanka, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
     #3 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 8/23/2014

9.Cindy Macolini, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/31/2014

10.Beth & Sammy Maniscalco, Thibodaux, LA (Lafourche)
     #1 Buff-bellied Hummingbird  FO 9/1/2014

11.Wayne McMichael, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 9/6/2014 LO 9/13/2014
     #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  F  FO 9/16/2014
     #3 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/19/2014
     #4 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/20/2014
     #5 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Ad  F  FO 9/20/2014

12.Mike Musumeche, New Iberia, LA (Iberia)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 9/23/2014

13.Nancy Newfield, Metairie, LA (Jefferson)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  F  FO 9/23/2014 LO 9/23/2014

14.Amy O'Quain, Lafayette, LA (Lafayette)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 9/2/2014

15.John and Margaret Owens, Covington, LA (St. Tammany)
 #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Im F FO 9/18/2014 LO 9/21/2014 (Banded 
by NLN/SML 9/21/2014) 

 #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Im M FO 9/24/2014 (Banded by NLN/SML 
9/27/2014) 


16.Harvey Patten, Covington, LA (St. Tammany)
 #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad F FO 9/6/2014 (banded returnee) 


17.Dave Patton, Lafayette, LA (Lafayette)
 #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/28/2014 (Returnee recaptured 
by DP 9/20/2014) 


18.Jeanne Plaisance, Lafayette, LA (Lafayette)
 #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 9/16/2014 (banded, probable 
returnee) 


19.Malise Prieto, Mandeville, LA (St. Tammany)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/23/2014

20.Lewis & Lynda Roussel, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Ad  F  FO 8/24/2014 (probable returnee)
     #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 8/24/2014

21.Carole Thomas, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 9/21/2014

22.Vicki Vance, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
 #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/31/2014 (banded returnee) 

     #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 9/27/2014

23.Jean Wall & Bud Snowdon, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/22/2014

24.Craig & Lizette Wroten, Harahan, LA (Jefferson)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 9/21/2014
________________________________
Summary of Reports as of 9/30/2014

Buff-bellied Hummingbird
   1 report
   1 parish
   1 site

Selasphorus Rufous/Allens
   42 reports
   9 parishes
   32 sites

--Identified Rufous
   27 reports
   6 parishes
   23 sites
________________________________
BUFF-BELLIED HUMMINGBIRD

Lafourche Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Beth & Sammy Maniscalco, Thibodaux, LA
#1 Buff-bellied Hummingbird  FO 9/1/2014
________________________________
SELASPHORUS RUFOUS/ALLENS

Bossier Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Penny Brenner, N. Bossier City, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 8/27/2014

East Baton Rouge Parish:  21 reports  13 sites

1. Lewis & Lynda Roussel, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Ad  F  FO 8/24/2014  (probable returnee)
#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 8/24/2014

2. Joan LeBlanc, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/22/2014  (banded returnee)

3. Vicki Vance, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/31/2014  (banded returnee)
#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/27/2014

4. Cindy Macolini, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/31/2014

5. Carole Thomas, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/21/2014

6. Russ & Lisa Norwood, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/13/2014

7. Robb Brumfield, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/15/2014

8. Mike & Sally Allen, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/26/2014  (banded returnee)

9. Jean Wall & Bud Snowdon, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/22/2014

10. Linda Stewart, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/16/2014  (banded)

11. Kimberly Lanka, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/10/2014
#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/19/2014
#3 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 8/23/2014

12. John and Cindy Hartgerink, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/14/2014

13. Wayne McMichael, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  FO 9/6/2014  LO 9/13/2014
#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  F  FO 9/16/2014
#3 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/19/2014
#4 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/20/2014
#5 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Ad  F  FO 9/20/2014

Evangeline Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Helena & Mike Putnam, Basile, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/1/2014  LO 8/2/2014

Iberia Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Mike Musumeche, New Iberia, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 9/23/2014

Jefferson Parish:  3 reports  3 sites

1. Nancy Newfield, Metairie, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  F  FO 9/23/2014  LO 9/23/2014

2. Dan Carroll, Metairie, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 9/3/2014

3. Craig & Lizette Wroten, Harahan, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Im  M  FO 9/21/2014

Lafayette Parish:  5 reports  5 sites

1. Rose and Jack Must, Lafayette, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/18/2014

2. Dave Patton, Lafayette, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/28/2014 (Returnee recaptured by 
DP 9/20/2014) 


3. Danny Dobbs, Lafayette, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/22/2014

4. Jeanne Plaisance, Lafayette, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 9/16/2014 (banded, probable 
returnee) 


5. Amy O'Quain, Lafayette, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 9/2/2014

Lafourche Parish:  2 reports  2 sites

1. Janelle Bergeron, Thibodaux, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/11/2014 (Banded on left leg) 


2. John Conover, Raceland, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  Ad  F  FO 9/1/2014

Morehouse Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Beth Erwin, Collinston, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/12/2014  LO 8/16/2014

St. Tammany Parish:  7 reports  5 sites

1. Linda Keefer, Covington, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  F  FO 8/29/2014

2. John and Margaret Owens, Covington, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Im F FO 9/18/2014 LO 9/21/2014 (Banded by 
NLN/SML 9/21/2014) 

#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Im M FO 9/24/2014 (Banded by NLN/SML 
9/27/2014) 


3. Harvey Patten, Covington, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  F  FO 9/6/2014  (banded returnee)

4. Noel Venezia, Slidell, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad F FO 8/3/2014 ("Ms. Pink"; first 
banded by LB 11/26/2006) 

#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  F  FO 8/4/2014  (banded)

5. Malise Prieto, Mandeville, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/23/2014
________________________________
Subject: FW: [Saw-whet Net] Bob Sargent's memorial service
From: "Ingold, James" <James.Ingold AT LSUS.EDU>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 17:20:22 +0000
FYI

From: sawwhetnet AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:sawwhetnet AT yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, September 23, 2014 12:16 PM
To: sawwhetnet sawwhetnet
Subject: [Saw-whet Net] Bob Sargent's memorial service



I'm not sure the details have been posted on this list, so at the risk of 
duplication, the celebration of life memorial for Bob Sargent will take place 
from 2-5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 25 at the Trussville Civic Center, 5381 
Trussville-Clay Rd. Trussville, AL 35173. Information about memorial 
contributions in Bob's name will be forthcoming in the next and final edition 
of Netlines, the newsletter of the Hummer/Bird Study Group, which Bob and 
Martha founded and which will be dissolving now with his passing. I'll pass on 
the information once I have it. 


Scott Weidensaul
Schuylkill Haven, PA
__._,_.___
________________________________
Posted by: Scott Weidensaul 
> 

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Subject: Sorry!
From: Melissa Pappas <0000000553dda6f7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 08:00:57 -0700
Fat fingered it! What I meant to write was that Allen banded 8 birds in 90 
minutes at our house on Wednesday. We are still hosting quite a few birds, but 
they are acting more civil towards each other. Think they must be more 
concerned about bulking up to go than fighting. All of the birds were 
hatch-year. Sure hope that Berylline decides to come for a visit. People keep 
asking me when I'm going to have another "rare" visitor. I may have used up my 
quota in 2005, 


Melissa Pappas
Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI

Blog: http://colmel.wordpress.com/

"If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should 
go home and examine your conscience." ~ Woodrow Wilson 

Subject: Re: Berylline Hummingbird in....Michigan!
From: Melissa Pappas <0000000553dda6f7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 07:56:41 -0700
 





Melissa Pappas

Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI

 

Blog: http://colmel.wordpress.com/

 



"If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should 
go home and examine your conscience." ~ Woodrow Wilson 

 

________________________________
 From: Allen Chartier 
To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU 
Sent: Friday, September 19, 2014 9:02 AM
Subject: [HUMNET-L] Berylline Hummingbird in....Michigan!
  

Hummingbird enthusiasts,

On September 17, an apparent male Berylline Hummingbird was found at a
feeder at a home in Grand Marais, northern Michigan. Photos were taken.
Yesterday (the 18th), a small mob of birders failed to find the bird there,
but after sundown a report came in that the bird spent that afternoon at
least at another feeder about 1 mile northeast of the first site. Photos
were taken there too. As of this morning, the bird is being seen at this
second location. Hopefully it will establish a predictable pattern so that
it can be seen by many. Weather conditions are more like October up there
right now, with morning temperatures in the 30s the past few days, with
high temps in the 50s.


Allen T. Chartier
Inkster, Michigan
Email: amazilia3 AT gmail.com
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
Website: www.amazilia.net
Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/
Subject: Berylline Hummingbird in....Michigan!
From: Allen Chartier <amazilia3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 09:02:26 -0400
Hummingbird enthusiasts,

On September 17, an apparent male Berylline Hummingbird was found at a
feeder at a home in Grand Marais, northern Michigan. Photos were taken.
Yesterday (the 18th), a small mob of birders failed to find the bird there,
but after sundown a report came in that the bird spent that afternoon at
least at another feeder about 1 mile northeast of the first site. Photos
were taken there too. As of this morning, the bird is being seen at this
second location. Hopefully it will establish a predictable pattern so that
it can be seen by many. Weather conditions are more like October up there
right now, with morning temperatures in the 30s the past few days, with
high temps in the 50s.


Allen T. Chartier
Inkster, Michigan
Email: amazilia3 AT gmail.com
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
Website: www.amazilia.net
Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/
Subject: Fw: Hummer coloring
From: KC Foggin <KCFoggin AT SC.RR.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 19:46:25 -0400
Many thanks to all that responded to my query on the coloring of my 
Ruby-throated Hummer. It is much appreciated. 


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20




From: KC Foggin 
Sent: Monday, September 15, 2014 5:00 PM
To: CarolinaBirds 
Cc: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU 
Subject: Hummer coloring

Could you all indulge me and take a look at this photo of a hummer I took last 
week. The coloring on its side is throwing me a bit but it is quite visible 
when he is flying around. I’m assuming it is a young male. 


http://upload.pbase.com/image/157398068


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20
Subject: Re: Hummer coloring
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT RUBYTHROAT.ORG>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:46:11 -0400
K.C.

Definitely a young male Ruby-throated Hummingbird starting to get the green 
flanks of an adult. 


See my photo at 
https://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond/photos/a.357055021016515.84052.350383371683680/735833086472038/?type=1&theater 


Cheers,

BILL


On Sep 15, 2014, at 5:00 PM, KC Foggin  wrote:

> Could you all indulge me and take a look at this photo of a hummer I took 
last week. The coloring on its side is throwing me a bit but it is quite 
visible when he is flying around. Im assuming it is a young male. 

> 
> http://upload.pbase.com/image/157398068
> 
> 
> K.C.
> 
> K.C. Foggin
> Socastee
> Myrtle Beach SC
> 
> www.birdforum.net
> 
> www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

OPERATION RUBYTHROAT: The Hummingbird Project
DR. BILL HILTON JR., Principal Investigator & Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road
York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Operation RubyThroat:The Hummingbird Project ( http://www.rubythroat.org ) is a 
cross-disciplinary international initiative in which students, teachers, and 
others collaborate to study behavior and distribution of the Ruby-throated 
Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris). All worldwide rights reserved and 
copyrighted by Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History ( 
http://www.hiltonpond.org ). Contributions in support of the project may be 
made via Network for Good at 
http://www.guidestar.org/controller/searchResults.gs?action_donateReport=1&partner=networkforgood&ein=56-2162170 


=============
Subject: Re: Hummer coloring
From: Lanny Chambers <lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:27:25 -0500
On Sep 15, 2014, at 16:00, KC Foggin  wrote:

> Could you all indulge me and take a look at this photo of a hummer I took 
last week. The coloring on its side is throwing me a bit but it is quite 
visible when he is flying around. I’m assuming it is a young male. 


Looks like an immature male to me, too. I don't pay much attention to 
slightly-atypical colors that don't affect ID. (N.B. - white birds are more 
than slightly atypical!) As in humans, there's a range of normal colors in 
hummingbirds, caused by the same sort of genetic variation all organisms 
experience. This one doesn't suggest anything as unusual as a hybrid to me, 
just a bird that's a little off the main hump of the bell curve. 


Those dark flanks remind me of the "white neck ring" questions many of us 
receive, from casual hummer watchers (not you!) who think it's a field mark. In 
reality, some Ruby-throated Hummingbirds have neck rings, and others don't. 


Lanny Chambers
Subject: Hummer coloring
From: KC Foggin <KCFoggin AT SC.RR.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:00:15 -0400
Could you all indulge me and take a look at this photo of a hummer I took last 
week. The coloring on its side is throwing me a bit but it is quite visible 
when he is flying around. I’m assuming it is a young male. 


http://upload.pbase.com/image/157398068


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20
Subject: Hummer (and ant) featured in EPOD
From: Wiggins Patrick <paw AT GETBEEHIVE.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 23:06:42 -0600
Hi,

An Earth Picture of the Day earlier this week featured a hummer and an ant:

http://epod.usra.edu/blog/2014/09/anyone-knows-an-ant-cant.html

Cute,

patrick
Subject: Re: Tiny bird, giant ego
From: Allen Chartier <amazilia3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 14:29:32 -0400
Lanny and hummer enthusiasts,

About a week ago, at a banding station where I work with passerines and
hummingbirds, I watched a Belted Kingfisher fly over my station with a
Ruby-throated Hummingbird about a foot behind. Yesterday, a Ruby-throat
took off after an American Goldfinch that I'd just released.


Allen T. Chartier
Inkster, Michigan
Email: amazilia3 AT gmail.com
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
Website: www.amazilia.net
Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/

On Sun, Sep 14, 2014 at 12:54 AM, Lanny Chambers 
wrote:

> Humnetters,
>
> I thought you might enjoy this little vignette from my yard:
>
> I heard Bluejays raising a ruckus in the back yard this afternoon,
> expressing their displeasure at a visit from our local Cooper's Hawk. I
> always enjoy seeing this raptor, so I grabbed the binoculars and opened the
> sliding door to the deck. I quickly spotted the hawk on one of her usual
> perches. The jays succeeded in annoying her into moving along, and, as she
> flew off to the west, a Ruby-throated burst from a lilac bush next to the
> house, in hot pursuit. The little guy "chased" the hawk at least two houses
> down before I lost track of him (partly because I was laughing so hard). In
> fact, the Cooper's was 40 feet in front and pulling away...but I'm pretty
> sure the hummer was telling himself that he alone was the hero of the
> moment.
>
> If hummers were the size of starlings, it wouldn't be safe to go outdoors.
> :)
>
>
> Lanny Chambers
> St. Louis, MO
> lanny AT hummingbirds.net
>
Subject: Re: Tiny bird, giant ego
From: Melissa Pappas <0000000553dda6f7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 05:37:50 -0700
 Oh my gosh! That sounds like the male Ruby-throated that left our house a 
couple of days ago! I've actually seen him chase all matter of much-larger bird 
- including our resident Coopers. He is very fierce! 

  

Melissa Pappas 
Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI 
  
Blog: http://colmel.wordpress.com/ 
  
"If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should 
go home and examine your conscience." ~ Woodrow Wilson 

 

________________________________
 From: Lanny Chambers 
To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU 
Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2014 12:54 AM
Subject: [HUMNET-L] Tiny bird, giant ego
  

Humnetters,

I thought you might enjoy this little vignette from my yard:

I heard Bluejays raising a ruckus in the back yard this afternoon, expressing 
their displeasure at a visit from our local Cooper's Hawk. I always enjoy 
seeing this raptor, so I grabbed the binoculars and opened the sliding door to 
the deck. I quickly spotted the hawk on one of her usual perches. The jays 
succeeded in annoying her into moving along, and, as she flew off to the west, 
a Ruby-throated burst from a lilac bush next to the house, in hot pursuit. The 
little guy "chased" the hawk at least two houses down before I lost track of 
him (partly because I was laughing so hard). In fact, the Cooper's was 40 feet 
in front and pulling away...but I'm pretty sure the hummer was telling himself 
that he alone was the hero of the moment. 


If hummers were the size of starlings, it wouldn't be safe to go outdoors. :)


Lanny Chambers
St. Louis, MO
lanny AT hummingbirds.net
Subject: Re: Tiny bird, giant ego
From: Dottie Price <yumyumkatts AT VOYAGER.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 08:31:53 -0400
That was a really good post. I enjoyed reading it! RTs
are still flocking thru here. Dottie, Brown County, Indiana



Humnetters,
> 
> I thought you might enjoy
this little vignette from my yard:
> 
> I heard Bluejays
raising a ruckus in the back yard this afternoon,
> expressing
their displeasure at a visit from our local Cooper's Hawk. I
>
always enjoy seeing this raptor, so I grabbed the binoculars and opened
> the sliding door to the deck. I quickly spotted the hawk on one of
her
> usual perches. The jays succeeded in annoying her into
moving along, and,
> as she flew off to the west, a Ruby-throated
burst from a lilac bush next
> to the house, in hot pursuit. The
little guy "chased" the hawk at least
> two houses down
before I lost track of him (partly because I was laughing
> so
hard). In fact, the Cooper's was 40 feet in front and pulling
>
away...but I'm pretty sure the hummer was telling himself that he alone
> was the hero of the moment.
> 
> If hummers were
the size of starlings, it wouldn't be safe to go outdoors.
> :)
> 
> 
> Lanny Chambers
> St. Louis, MO
> lanny AT hummingbirds.net
>
Subject: Tiny bird, giant ego
From: Lanny Chambers <lanny AT HUMMINGBIRDS.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 23:54:52 -0500
Humnetters,

I thought you might enjoy this little vignette from my yard:

I heard Bluejays raising a ruckus in the back yard this afternoon, expressing 
their displeasure at a visit from our local Cooper's Hawk. I always enjoy 
seeing this raptor, so I grabbed the binoculars and opened the sliding door to 
the deck. I quickly spotted the hawk on one of her usual perches. The jays 
succeeded in annoying her into moving along, and, as she flew off to the west, 
a Ruby-throated burst from a lilac bush next to the house, in hot pursuit. The 
little guy "chased" the hawk at least two houses down before I lost track of 
him (partly because I was laughing so hard). In fact, the Cooper's was 40 feet 
in front and pulling away...but I'm pretty sure the hummer was telling himself 
that he alone was the hero of the moment. 


If hummers were the size of starlings, it wouldn't be safe to go outdoors. :)


Lanny Chambers
St. Louis, MO
lanny AT hummingbirds.net
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lizette Wroten <0000005ae92aec96-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 23:35:59 -0700
Interesting observation, Bill. Have you had the opportunity to follow any 
individual bird, to see if he behaves equally badly toward all of the 
con-specifics he encounters? I agree that it seems to us like male 
Ruby-throateds are hard-wired for violence, but I suspect that may be because 
we can't see the nuances of their behavior. 

 
I find it intriguing that in many hummer species, aggressive displays and 
courtship displays are virtually identical. At first glance this seems 
counter-intuitive, but in the the warp-speed hummingbird world, I can see how 
this could give the fastest males a distinct advantage...you beat all the other 
guys to the punch and decide when you get there, what to do with the bird you 
encounter. In the case of Ruby-throateds, the springtime decision is an easy 
one..."A," you clobber, "B," you slobber.... 


OK, so I'm anthropomorphising a little bit. Still, in the fall and winter, when 
birds of all ages mingle, it does seem like the rules of engagement might 
change somewhat to protect and/or educate the next generation. Just a 
thought.... 


Lizette
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT RUBYTHROAT.ORG>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 21:20:15 -0400
For what it's worth, despite their shriveled testes some male Ruby-throated 
Hummingbirds I have observed in Costa Rica in January have been very 
territorial, driving conspecifics away from a favorite stalk of Aloe Vera. 


I think they're just hard-wired!  :-)

BILL


On Sep 11, 2014, at 7:03 PM, Nancy L. Newfield  wrote:

> Lizette, Lanny, Chuck,
> 
> On 9/11/2014 5:11 PM, Lizette Wroten wrote:
> 
>> Thanks, Nancy, Lanny and Chuck. My initial impression was also that the 
encounter represented a dialed-down confrontation. But the amount of time 
involved, and unusual (at least to me) posturings made me question that 
assumption. Reading about the Anna's head-bobbing (chatter-sway?) display 
definitely put things back in perspective, in terms of body language. And 
looking back at the video, I realized it was mostly the young bird doing the 
preening, and could see how that could very well be a stress-reducing, maybe 
even submissive gesture. I just wonder why he felt compelled to stay in such 
close proximity to the other bird in the first place. 

>> 
>> Lanny, I have noticed that adult males' aggression levels subside greatly 
post-breeding. That they do so certainly makes sense, in light of the fact that 
they need to conserve energy to migrate. What didn't make sense to me in this 
situation was that two birds would interact for so long, considering the 
availability of food. In other words, if these guys were forced to share a 
small patch of wildflowers to put on the fat they need to move on, I'd totally 
"get it."....the impulse to fight is still there, but circumstances require 
them to share. That wasn't at all the case here, though....there were multiple 
feeders and beaucoup flowers available, and not a lot of birds competing for 
them, which seemed to introduce an element of choice into the interaction. 

>> 
>> It's long seemed to me (with absolutely no supporting evidence) that adult 
males never display as much aggression toward females as they do other males, 
no matter the time of year. (I guess it helps not to injure the lady if you 
want her to raise your offspring!) That's made me wonder if all immature birds 
have white tips to the tails specifically to confuse them with females, giving 
young males a chance to learn and hone fighting skills before having to contend 
with real adult male aggression. 

>> 
>> Nancy's comment, that the paucity of red gorget feathers initially lead her 
to believe the young bird was a female, got me pondering another possibility. 
Do adult males gauge the sex/maturity of immature birds by their gorget 
development, or lack thereof? Would the adult in this instance have been less 
tolerant if the youngster had flashed a big patch of iridescent feathers back 
at him as they did the head swinging thing? Could uncertainty on an adult's 
part lead to longer interactions with younger birds, allowing more 
imprinting/learning to take place? 

>> 
>> Oops, I'll get off my speculation box now. I really appreciate the input 
everyone, thanks for indulging my curiosity! 

> 
> Before we leave this Speculation Festival, one factor that has not been 
mentioned, and which is probably pivotal, is testosterone! We know that as 
birds prepare to migrate, their testes shrink, therefore producing less of the 
hormone that drives their every move. Lower levels of that all important 
hormone probably makes them kinder, gentler, more gentlemanly. 

> 
> Can't answer your question about whether adult males gauge immature males by 
the size of their undeveloped gorget. Maybe we have some trochilid psychologist 
hiding somewhere out there in Humnetland. What would Humnet be without wild 
speculation? 

> 
> NLN
> 
> -- 
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibr
> Metairie, LA USA
> 
> http://www.casacolibri.net/
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> 

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

OPERATION RUBYTHROAT: The Hummingbird Project
DR. BILL HILTON JR., Principal Investigator & Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road
York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Operation RubyThroat:The Hummingbird Project ( http://www.rubythroat.org ) is a 
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Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris). All worldwide rights reserved and 
copyrighted by Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History ( 
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=============
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lanny Chambers <lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 20:00:26 -0500
On Sep 11, 2014, at 18:03, "Nancy L. Newfield"  wrote:

> Can't answer your question about whether adult males gauge immature males by 
the size of their undeveloped gorget. Maybe we have some trochilid psychologist 
hiding somewhere out there in Humnetland. 


No answers from me either, Nan, but I think Lizette asked a very, very 
interesting question. I like your testosterone factor as well. 


> What would Humnet be without wild speculation?

Indeed! Are we having fun yet?

Lanny Chambers
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 18:03:23 -0500
Lizette, Lanny, Chuck,

On 9/11/2014 5:11 PM, Lizette Wroten wrote:

> Thanks, Nancy, Lanny and Chuck. My initial impression was also that the 
encounter represented a dialed-down confrontation. But the amount of time 
involved, and unusual (at least to me) posturings made me question that 
assumption. Reading about the Anna's head-bobbing (chatter-sway?) display 
definitely put things back in perspective, in terms of body language. And 
looking back at the video, I realized it was mostly the young bird doing the 
preening, and could see how that could very well be a stress-reducing, maybe 
even submissive gesture. I just wonder why he felt compelled to stay in such 
close proximity to the other bird in the first place. 

>
> Lanny, I have noticed that adult males' aggression levels subside greatly 
post-breeding. That they do so certainly makes sense, in light of the fact that 
they need to conserve energy to migrate. What didn't make sense to me in this 
situation was that two birds would interact for so long, considering the 
availability of food. In other words, if these guys were forced to share a 
small patch of wildflowers to put on the fat they need to move on, I'd totally 
"get it."....the impulse to fight is still there, but circumstances require 
them to share. That wasn't at all the case here, though....there were multiple 
feeders and beaucoup flowers available, and not a lot of birds competing for 
them, which seemed to introduce an element of choice into the interaction. 

>
> It's long seemed to me (with absolutely no supporting evidence) that adult 
males never display as much aggression toward females as they do other males, 
no matter the time of year. (I guess it helps not to injure the lady if you 
want her to raise your offspring!) That's made me wonder if all immature birds 
have white tips to the tails specifically to confuse them with females, giving 
young males a chance to learn and hone fighting skills before having to contend 
with real adult male aggression. 

>
> Nancy's comment, that the paucity of red gorget feathers initially lead her 
to believe the young bird was a female, got me pondering another possibility. 
Do adult males gauge the sex/maturity of immature birds by their gorget 
development, or lack thereof? Would the adult in this instance have been less 
tolerant if the youngster had flashed a big patch of iridescent feathers back 
at him as they did the head swinging thing? Could uncertainty on an adult's 
part lead to longer interactions with younger birds, allowing more 
imprinting/learning to take place? 

>
> Oops, I'll get off my speculation box now. I really appreciate the input 
everyone, thanks for indulging my curiosity! 


Before we leave this Speculation Festival, one factor that has not been 
mentioned, and which is probably pivotal, is testosterone!  We know that 
as birds prepare to migrate, their testes shrink, therefore producing 
less of the hormone that drives their every move.  Lower levels of that 
all important hormone probably makes them kinder, gentler, more 
gentlemanly.

Can't answer your question about whether adult males gauge immature 
males by the size of their undeveloped gorget.  Maybe we have some 
trochilid psychologist hiding somewhere out there in Humnetland. What 
would Humnet be without wild speculation?

NLN

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibr
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lizette Wroten <0000005ae92aec96-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 15:11:22 -0700
Thanks, Nancy, Lanny and Chuck. My initial impression was also that the 
encounter represented a dialed-down confrontation. But the amount of time 
involved, and unusual (at least to me) posturings made me question that 
assumption. Reading about the Anna's head-bobbing (chatter-sway?) display 
definitely put things back in perspective, in terms of body language. And 
looking back at the video, I realized it was mostly the young bird doing the 
preening, and could see how that could very well be a stress-reducing, maybe 
even submissive gesture. I just wonder why he felt compelled to stay in such 
close proximity to the other bird in the first place. 


Lanny, I have noticed that adult males' aggression levels subside greatly 
post-breeding. That they do so certainly makes sense, in light of the fact that 
they need to conserve energy to migrate. What didn't make sense to me in this 
situation was that two birds would interact for so long, considering the 
availability of food. In other words, if these guys were forced to share a 
small patch of wildflowers to put on the fat they need to move on, I'd totally 
"get it."....the impulse to fight is still there, but circumstances require 
them to share. That wasn't at all the case here, though....there were multiple 
feeders and beaucoup flowers available, and not a lot of birds competing for 
them, which seemed to introduce an element of choice into the interaction. 


It's long seemed to me (with absolutely no supporting evidence) that adult 
males never display as much aggression toward females as they do other males, 
no matter the time of year. (I guess it helps not to injure the lady if you 
want her to raise your offspring!) That's made me wonder if all immature birds 
have white tips to the tails specifically to confuse them with females, giving 
young males a chance to learn and hone fighting skills before having to contend 
with real adult male aggression. 


Nancy's comment, that the paucity of red gorget feathers initially lead her to 
believe the young bird was a female, got me pondering another possibility. Do 
adult males gauge the sex/maturity of immature birds by their gorget 
development, or lack thereof? Would the adult in this instance have been less 
tolerant if the youngster had flashed a big patch of iridescent feathers back 
at him as they did the head swinging thing? Could uncertainty on an adult's 
part lead to longer interactions with younger birds, allowing more 
imprinting/learning to take place? 


Oops, I'll get off my speculation box now. I really appreciate the input 
everyone, thanks for indulging my curiosity! 


Lizette 
Subject: Hummers Fighting Nice(?)
From: Melissa Pappas <0000000553dda6f7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 11:58:02 -0700
First of all, THANK YOU Lanny and Nan for making me smile! I remember why I 
enjoy the posts on Humnet so much (after all these years). 


I, too, have an adult male ruby-throat who is displaying some of the same 
tendencies. The unusual thing about my guy is that he's hospitable to some 
birds (including HY males), but others he can't stand to have near "his" 
feeder. He actually sits on the deck-mounted hook and watches over his domain. 
He looks in the kitchen window and has to see me, but I don't seem to frighten 
him in the least. I don't usually name birds, but this guy is earning one by 
hanging in and being the force majeure in the back yard 




Melissa Pappas 
Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI 

Blog: http://colmel.wordpress.com/ 

"If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should 
go home and examine your conscience." ~ Woodrow Wilson 

Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lanny Chambers <lanny AT HUMMINGBIRDS.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 13:50:41 -0500
On Sep 11, 2014, at 13:21 , Irma  wrote:

> I read all of Lizette's post but didn't see the link either. Could you please 
send it to me as well? 


Here it is: http://youtu.be/kke8YJBGHNM


Lanny Chambers
St. Louis, MO
lanny AT hummingbirds.net
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Irma <txirma AT TX.RR.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 13:21:39 -0500
I read all of Lizette's post but didn't see the link either.  Could you 
please send it to me as well?
Irma
McKinney, Texas

-----Original Message----- 
From: Nancy L. Newfield
Sent: Thursday, September 11, 2014 1:18 PM
To: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [HUMNET-L] Hummers fighting...nice...?

Josephine,

On 9/11/2014 1:14 PM, jwn wrote:
> wheres the video?  I didnt see it?

It was in Lizette's original post and I just sent the link to you.

NLN


> josephine
>
> On Sep 11, 2014, at 9:41 AM, Lanny Chambers  
> wrote:
>
> On Sep 11, 2014, at 9:34, "Nancy L. Newfield"  
> wrote:
>
>> Also, Lizette, can you turn those darned cicadas down?
> Cicadas in the video? I couldn't hear them...the cicadas in our yard were 
> too loud. :)
>
> Lanny Chambers


-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibr
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 13:18:02 -0500
Josephine,

On 9/11/2014 1:14 PM, jwn wrote:
> wheres the video?  I didnt see it?

It was in Lizette's original post and I just sent the link to you.

NLN


> josephine
>
> On Sep 11, 2014, at 9:41 AM, Lanny Chambers  wrote:
>
> On Sep 11, 2014, at 9:34, "Nancy L. Newfield"  wrote:
>
>> Also, Lizette, can you turn those darned cicadas down?
> Cicadas in the video? I couldn't hear them...the cicadas in our yard were too 
loud. :) 

>
> Lanny Chambers


-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibr
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: jwn <eilu AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 13:14:05 -0500
wheres the video?  I didnt see it?
josephine

On Sep 11, 2014, at 9:41 AM, Lanny Chambers  wrote:

On Sep 11, 2014, at 9:34, "Nancy L. Newfield"  wrote:

> Also, Lizette, can you turn those darned cicadas down?

Cicadas in the video? I couldn't hear them...the cicadas in our yard were too 
loud. :) 


Lanny Chambers
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: "creinsch AT humbirds.org" <creinsch@HUMBIRDS.ORG>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 08:53:45 -0700
I was hoping somebody else from the west coast would respond, as I have 
no credentials.  This looks to us to be like the Anna's bobbing display, 
which they will sometimes do within inches of each other. I would agree 
with Lanny's and Nancy's interpretation, but add that it seems to be a 
kind of "stare down" where the first to "blink" flees.  As to the tail 
fanning and preening - a stress response?

chuck reinsch
seattle, wa
On 9/11/2014 7:34 AM, Nancy L. Newfield wrote:
> Lizette, Lanny,
>
> On 9/11/2014 8:53 AM, Lanny Chambers wrote:
>
>> On Sep 11, 2014, at 2:23, Lizette Wroten 
>> <0000005ae92aec96-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote:
>>
>>> OK, I can hear the groans.....will some of you groaners please weigh 
>>> in and tell me what these guys were doing? I'm particularly 
>>> interested in the fluffing/preening thing...some sort of 
>>> display/displacement behavior...?
>> I'm not groaning, Lizette. I've just never seen it before, either. 
>> That won't stop me from making a not-backed-by-data guess, though: I 
>> think it's indeed a display behavior, the young bird taking his cue 
>> from the older one, and neither willing to waste energy on activity 
>> that would conflict with their immediate task of storing fat for 
>> migration. A month ago, they would have been going after each other 
>> hammer-and-tongs.
>
> Actually, I have seen this behavior a number of times with wintering 
> birds.  My take on it is pretty much the same as Lanny's.  It is an 
> somewhat passive aggressive display that does not consume as much 
> energy as an all-out assault.  It kind of reminds me of the aggressive 
> displays of our Anolis lizards.  Both species will do it towards 
> others of their own species, but I haven't seen either species make an 
> aggressive display toward a member of the other species.  Not so with 
> the hummers.  They won't make a distinction. That said, I've never 
> seen a Buff-bellied act that way.  They would fight first and ask 
> questions later.
>
> The first time I watched the video, I took the white-throated bird to 
> be a female, but on closer inspection, I do see 1 or 2 red feathers.  
> Note that there is no heavy stippling on the immature male.  Without 
> those 1 or 2 red feathers, most observers would think this was a 
> female.  Also, Lizette, can you turn those darned cicadas down?
> NLN
>
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lanny Chambers <lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 09:41:43 -0500
On Sep 11, 2014, at 9:34, "Nancy L. Newfield"  wrote:

> Also, Lizette, can you turn those darned cicadas down?

Cicadas in the video? I couldn't hear them...the cicadas in our yard were too 
loud. :) 


Lanny Chambers
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 09:34:25 -0500
Lizette, Lanny,

On 9/11/2014 8:53 AM, Lanny Chambers wrote:

> On Sep 11, 2014, at 2:23, Lizette Wroten 
<0000005ae92aec96-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote: 

>
>> OK, I can hear the groans.....will some of you groaners please weigh in and 
tell me what these guys were doing? I'm particularly interested in the 
fluffing/preening thing...some sort of display/displacement behavior...? 

> I'm not groaning, Lizette. I've just never seen it before, either. That won't 
stop me from making a not-backed-by-data guess, though: I think it's indeed a 
display behavior, the young bird taking his cue from the older one, and neither 
willing to waste energy on activity that would conflict with their immediate 
task of storing fat for migration. A month ago, they would have been going 
after each other hammer-and-tongs. 


Actually, I have seen this behavior a number of times with wintering 
birds.  My take on it is pretty much the same as Lanny's.  It is an 
somewhat passive aggressive display that does not consume as much energy 
as an all-out assault.  It kind of reminds me of the aggressive displays 
of our Anolis lizards.  Both species will do it towards others of their 
own species, but I haven't seen either species make an aggressive 
display toward a member of the other species.  Not so with the hummers.  
They won't make a distinction. That said, I've never seen a Buff-bellied 
act that way.  They would fight first and ask questions later.

The first time I watched the video, I took the white-throated bird to be 
a female, but on closer inspection, I do see 1 or 2 red feathers.  Note 
that there is no heavy stippling on the immature male.  Without those 1 
or 2 red feathers, most observers would think this was a female.  Also, 
Lizette, can you turn those darned cicadas down?
NLN

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibr
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lanny Chambers <lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 08:53:40 -0500
On Sep 11, 2014, at 2:23, Lizette Wroten 
<0000005ae92aec96-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote: 


> OK, I can hear the groans.....will some of you groaners please weigh in and 
tell me what these guys were doing? I'm particularly interested in the 
fluffing/preening thing...some sort of display/displacement behavior...? 


I'm not groaning, Lizette. I've just never seen it before, either. That won't 
stop me from making a not-backed-by-data guess, though: I think it's indeed a 
display behavior, the young bird taking his cue from the older one, and neither 
willing to waste energy on activity that would conflict with their immediate 
task of storing fat for migration. A month ago, they would have been going 
after each other hammer-and-tongs. 


Lanny Chambers
Subject: Re: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lizette Wroten <0000005ae92aec96-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 00:23:35 -0700
I haven't heard from anyone who's observed behavior like this, and am still 
perplexed by the relaxed, almost cordial attitude these guys displayed toward 
each other. 


The first time I saw the immature bird land on a branch right behind the adult, 
I assumed the older bird didn't know the youngster was there and that there'd 
soon be a big time chase. When they ended up not only facing each other but 
staying put, I started taking photos, switching to video when they began 
mirroring each other.....one would fluff his feathers and fan his tail, then 
the other would do the same. Initially, I thought they must both have flown 
through the mister spray and were simply more concerned with preening than they 
were with each other, but they did this every time they returned to their 
respective perches (at least a half dozen more times, that I saw.) 


I ended up taking four videos in an unsuccessful attempt to capture their 
occasional jousting sessions. Every now and then, one bird would fly toward the 
other, or a feeder or flower and a mock fight would ensue. No contact ever took 
place that I could tell, and sometimes all that happened was that they 
exchanged perches. I've seen immature birds "play fight" like this, but never 
with an adult male, and never for such an extended period of time. If I wasn't 
familiar with the Ruby-throated's cantankerous personality I'd say these birds 
were "buds".....or at the very least travelling companions, since they 
disappeared at the same time and neither was present the following morning. 


OK, I can hear the groans.....will some of you groaners please weigh in and 
tell me what these guys were doing? I'm particularly interested in the 
fluffing/preening thing...some sort of display/displacement behavior...? 


Lizette
Subject: Hummers fighting...nice...?
From: Lizette Wroten <0000005ae92aec96-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 00:08:34 -0700
Hello Humnuts. With migration well underway, I'm seeing lots of typical 
Ruby-throated combativeness; chases, body-slams, upward-spiraling aerial 
dogfights, etc. Yesterday though, I saw an immature and adult male engaging in 
behavior I haven't seen before, am wondering if anyone else has. 


Here's a link to one of four videos I shot of these crazy birds; 
http://youtu.be/kke8YJBGHNM 


Lizette Wroten
Harahan, La.
Subject: Re: on Bob Sargent passing- an old native prayer
From: jwn <eilu AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 12:20:57 -0500
FYI:   the author is Mary Frye.   no longer anonymous


On Sep 9, 2014, at 11:58 AM, Rachel Powless 
<000000583c96ac7d-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote: 


The following is an old native prayer. The author is anonymous.   Carl & I 
added a couplet.  Our heart aches today.  Bob was  our hero.  

Rachel Powless and Carl Pascoe
Native Territories Avian Research Project


                                                 Do  not stand at my grave 
and weep

I am not there,   
I do not sleep,   

I am a thousand  winds that blow,  
I am the diamond  glints on snow, 
I am the sunset  on ripened grain, 
I am the gentle  autumns rain. 

When you  awaken 
In the mornings  hush 
I am the sweet  uplifting rush 
Of quiet birds in  circled flight, 
I am the soft  stars that shine at night 

I am the sound of  hummingbird wings, 
Which seasonal  change brings. 


Do not stand at  my grave and cry 
I am not  there, 

I did not die.  
Subject: Bob Sargent - Online Obituary
From: Robert Protz <0000005913602678-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 10:08:22 -0700
9/9/14

Dear Humnetters,

I first heard the news of Bob Sargent's illness on the phone last Wednesday 
afternoon, and I immediately called and talked to Martha and learned that the 
end was close. Just a short while ago, I saw the posting here on Humnet about 
his passing on Sunday. I met Bob and Martha twice in West Virginia, and was 
proud to know him and call him a friend. My only hope is that all who were 
trained by the HBSG crew will carry on his legacy in the hummingbird world. 


I found an online obit today which has a great picture of Bob holding a 
redstart. 


See 
http://www.al.com/news/mobile/index.ssf/2014/09/mobile_baldwin_obituaries_for_18.html 


Rob

Rob Protz
Brackenridge, PA
PA Winter Western Hummers in Frames
  
          
PA Winter Western Hummers in Frames
enter a description here  
View on pahummers.tripod.com Preview by Yahoo  
Subject: on Bob Sargent passing- an old native prayer
From: Rachel Powless <000000583c96ac7d-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 12:58:38 -0400
The following is an old native prayer. The author is anonymous.   Carl & I 
added a couplet.  Our heart aches today.  Bob was  our hero.  
 
Rachel Powless and Carl Pascoe
Native Territories Avian Research Project
 
 
                                                  Do  not stand at my grave 
and weep
 
I am not there,   
I do not sleep,   

I am a thousand  winds that blow,  
I am the diamond  glints on snow, 
I am the sunset  on ripened grain, 
I am the gentle  autumn’s rain. 

When you  awaken 
In the morning’s  hush 
I am the sweet  uplifting rush 
Of quiet birds in  circled flight, 
I am the soft  stars that shine at night…… 

I am the sound of  hummingbird wings, 
Which seasonal  change brings. 


Do not stand at  my grave and cry 
I am not  there, 

I did not die.  
Subject: Re: For the winter report...
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 15:35:25 -0500
On 9/7/2014 3:26 PM, Tom Trenchard wrote:
> Wasn't that August 30?

Probably.  I should have looked it up, but it isn't important enough to 
do so at this point.

Nan

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: Very Sad News About Bob Sargent
From: Kathi Johnson Rock <kathijr777 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 15:28:29 -0500
Nancy Newfield recently posted this message to The Hummingbird Forum:

"This just came across a couple of listservs from Scott Weidensaul:

"I'm sorry to have to share the news that Bob Sargent passed away last
night, at home with Martha and their family in Trussville, AL. The
complications from his post-operative infection became increasingly serious
last week, and it's been clear for several days that the end was close. But
it's still a tough, tough loss.

There will be a celebration of life rather than a funeral in the coming
weeks, and the family will let Bob's many friends and colleagues know when
that will be as soon as the arrangements are made. If you'd like to let
Martha know she's in your thoughts, the address is: 7570 Mack Hicks Rd.,
Trussville AL 35173.

Bob touched an awful lot of people, including me, who feel this loss keenly
as a teacher, colleague and friend. Few people have been as tireless in
promoting the study and appreciation of hummingbirds as Bob, or fought
through as many hardships and tragedies in a long and eventful life. I find
it hard to believe he's gone. As I told Martha's daughter Donna this
morning, I'd like to think that somewhere, Bob's banding his first Bogota
Sunangel about now.

Scott Weidensaul
Schuylkill Haven, PA"

We will truly miss Bob and all that he brought to the world of hummingbirds
and neotropical migrants.  We were blessed to have gotten to know both Bob
and Martha over the years on a birding trip to Arizona, on a trip to Fort
Morgan for spring banding, and when they used to band at the Hummer/Bird
Celebration in Rockport, Texas.

Our deepest condolences and thoughts are with Martha and his family.  Today
is a very dark day as we all mourn this terrible loss.

Kathi and Michael Rock
-- 
Kathi and Michael Rock
Madison, Wisconsin, Dane County
Zone 4/5
e-mail: kathijr AT yahoo.com
website: www.hummingbirdgardening.net

"Hummingbirds.....where is the person, I ask, who, on observing this
glittering
fragment of the rainbow, would not pause, admire, and turn his mind with
reverence..."; (J. J. Audubon)
Subject: Re: For the winter report...
From: Tom Trenchard <trench19 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 15:26:27 -0500
Wasn't that August 30?

T.

******************************


> On Sep 7, 2014, at 11:14 AM, "Nancy L. Newfield"  
wrote: 

> 
> Linda,
> 
>> On 9/6/2014 5:27 PM, Linda Beall wrote:
>> 
>> My dear friends are thrilled to report the recent arrival of two winter 
hummers in their Baton Rouge yard. They also report an adult male Ruby-throat 
with a band on the left leg and a "cow lick" on the crown, which sounds like it 
might be a color mark. It might be one of the Ruby-throats that either Nancy or 
I banded recently at our respective sites in Covington. 

>> 
>> For the report:
>> Lynda & Lew Roussel
>> Baton Rouge, LA
>> 1. AHY Female R/A Selasphorus (w/ left leg band, probable returnee) FO 
8/24/14 

>> 2.    HY male Rufous FO 8/24/14
> 
> On 31 August, our krewe caught 37 Ruby-throateds of which 13 were adult 
males. White was the color of the day. 

> 
> NLN
> 
> -- 
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, LA USA
> 
> http://www.casacolibri.net/
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> 
> 
> 
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> http://www.avast.com
Subject: Re: For the winter report...
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 11:13:41 -0500
Linda,

On 9/6/2014 5:27 PM, Linda Beall wrote:

> My dear friends are thrilled to report the recent arrival of two 
> winter hummers in their Baton Rouge yard.  They also report an adult 
> male Ruby-throat with a band on the left leg and a "cow lick" on the 
> crown, which sounds like it might be a color mark. It might be one of 
> the Ruby-throats that either Nancy or I banded recently at our 
> respective sites in Covington.
>
> For the report:
> Lynda & Lew Roussel
> Baton Rouge, LA
> 1.    AHY Female R/A Selasphorus (w/ left leg band, probable returnee) 
> FO 8/24/14
> 2.    HY male Rufous FO 8/24/14

On 31 August, our krewe caught 37 Ruby-throateds of which 13 were adult 
males.  White was the color of the day.

NLN

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibr
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: For the winter report...
From: Linda Beall <lbeall AT MINILOGIC.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2014 17:27:07 -0500
My dear friends are thrilled to report the recent arrival of two winter 
hummers in their Baton Rouge yard.  They also report an adult male 
Ruby-throat with a band on the left leg and a "cow lick" on the crown, 
which sounds like it might be a color mark.    It might be one of the 
Ruby-throats that either Nancy or I banded recently at our respective 
sites in Covington.

For the report:
Lynda & Lew Roussel
Baton Rouge, LA
1.    AHY Female R/A Selasphorus (w/ left leg band, probable returnee) 
FO 8/24/14
2.    HY male Rufous FO 8/24/14

Linda Beall
Covington, LA
St. Tammany Parish
Subject: Re: Nectar Defender
From: Dottie Price <yumyumkatts AT VOYAGER.NET>
Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2014 13:24:24 -0400
You are so correct! We have found the same thing on BBL.
(Bluebird listserve) The company people will watch our posts and
then try to come up with a product that they think will sell. But
profit is the only thing they are concerned about.

Birds and
Blooms mag is another that one has to be careful of their
suggestions. At one time, they were promoting the use of onion
bags as suet holders.

That was a great idea years ago
when nylon/plastic/whatever like material was not
used and a cotton/fiber material was all they were made out of.

With the nylon/plastic material, the birds get their toenails caught in
it and can't get free and die if they are not discovered soon
enough. That material is too tough for them to break free.

When I saw that article, I wrote to Birds and Blooms and I haven't seen
them promoting onion bags since that time. Dottie Price,
Hickory Hollow,Brown County, Indiana




Humnetters,
> 
> An update concerning Nectar
Defender.
From my previous post:
> 
>> On Aug 21,
2014, at 20:22, Gene Trapp  wrote:
>>
>>> Can anyone comment on the use of "Nectar
Defender" in hummingbird
>>> feeders to prevent mold
developing. It is said to have "copper
>>>
micronutrients" in it.
>>
>> I would challenge
the maker to provide scientific evidence of its safety
>> as a
hummingbird dietary supplement. I would also not hold my breath
>> waiting for same, as people who sell such things don't have the
birds'
>> welfare as their first priority.
> 
>
The inventor of this product apparently saw this discussion, and sent
me
> info not available on his website, including some journal
references. I
> don't find them convincing, but they do shed light
on his intentions.
> 
> I retract my implication that he
doesn't care about bird welfare, as he
> appears to mean well.
However, he's a chemist and geologist, and lacks
> insight into
hummingbird physiology and behavior, as well as into
>
experimental biology. As you might expect, he's cherry-picked
scientific
> articles that might support his claims. But he
doesn't appear to
> appreciate the inappropriateness of
extrapolating studies of captive
> hummingbirds, fed a controlled
diet, to wild birds that can and will eat
> anything they can
catch. As a result, his claims of copper never exceeding
> safe
limits are unsupportable, and quite possibly incorrect. When does a
> "micronutrient" become a toxic heavy metal? For
free-flying hummers, that
> could be very difficult to
establish.
> 
> I think this might be an example of
"when you're a hammer, everything
> looks like a nail,"
a well-intentioned scientist trying to apply his
> expertise to a
field outside the scope of his knowledge and experience.
> 
> He also seems unaware that mold grows on the outside of a feeder,
not just
> in the reservoir where his product might kill it.
Feeders still need to be
> emptied, disassembled, and cleaned
frequently, no matter how long the
> syrup may last. The latest
entry on Sheri's blog highlights some useful
> tools to help with
that:
>

https://fieldguidetohummingbirds.wordpress.com/2014/09/01/keeping-hummingbird-feeders-clean/ 

> 
> In my opinion, Nectar Defender is a product without an
ethical
> application. At best, folks who maintain their feeders
properly do not
> need to spend extra money--or take extra
risks--on products like Nectar
> Defender. At worst, the effects
of supplemental copper on wild
> hummingbirds remain unknown, and
possibly more harmful than the mold it
> purports to inhibit.
> 
> 
> Lanny Chambers
> St. Louis, MO
> lanny AT hummingbirds.net
>
Subject: Re: Nectar Defender
From: Lanny Chambers <lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2014 10:52:42 -0500
Humnetters,

An update concerning Nectar Defender. From my previous post:

> On Aug 21, 2014, at 20:22, Gene Trapp  wrote:
> 
>> Can anyone comment on the use of "Nectar Defender" in hummingbird feeders to 
prevent mold developing. It is said to have "copper micronutrients" in it. 

> 
> I would challenge the maker to provide scientific evidence of its safety as a 
hummingbird dietary supplement. I would also not hold my breath waiting for 
same, as people who sell such things don't have the birds' welfare as their 
first priority. 


The inventor of this product apparently saw this discussion, and sent me info 
not available on his website, including some journal references. I don't find 
them convincing, but they do shed light on his intentions. 


I retract my implication that he doesn't care about bird welfare, as he appears 
to mean well. However, he's a chemist and geologist, and lacks insight into 
hummingbird physiology and behavior, as well as into experimental biology. As 
you might expect, he's cherry-picked scientific articles that might support his 
claims. But he doesn't appear to appreciate the inappropriateness of 
extrapolating studies of captive hummingbirds, fed a controlled diet, to wild 
birds that can and will eat anything they can catch. As a result, his claims of 
copper never exceeding safe limits are unsupportable, and quite possibly 
incorrect. When does a "micronutrient" become a toxic heavy metal? For 
free-flying hummers, that could be very difficult to establish. 


I think this might be an example of "when you're a hammer, everything looks 
like a nail," a well-intentioned scientist trying to apply his expertise to a 
field outside the scope of his knowledge and experience. 


He also seems unaware that mold grows on the outside of a feeder, not just in 
the reservoir where his product might kill it. Feeders still need to be 
emptied, disassembled, and cleaned frequently, no matter how long the syrup may 
last. The latest entry on Sheri's blog highlights some useful tools to help 
with that: 


https://fieldguidetohummingbirds.wordpress.com/2014/09/01/keeping-hummingbird-feeders-clean/ 


In my opinion, Nectar Defender is a product without an ethical application. At 
best, folks who maintain their feeders properly do not need to spend extra 
money--or take extra risks--on products like Nectar Defender. At worst, the 
effects of supplemental copper on wild hummingbirds remain unknown, and 
possibly more harmful than the mold it purports to inhibit. 



Lanny Chambers
St. Louis, MO
lanny AT hummingbirds.net
Subject: Buff-bellied hummingbird
From: Beth Maniscalco <beth.maniscalco AT NICHOLLS.EDU>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 18:09:38 -0500
Returned home today after a seven day absence to filthy feeders and a
Buff-bellied hummingbird!  Thank goodness for an abundance of flowers
keeping it, and the many Ruby-throats happy.

Erik,

Lafourche Parish, Thibodaux, LA

Buff-bellied hummingbird, FO September 1, 2014   Beth and Sammy Maniscalco

Hope this is the first of many winterers!

Good birding,
Beth and Sammy Maniscalco
Thibodaux, La
(Approx. 60 miles SW of New Orleans)
Subject: Ruby Throats Still on the Move
From: Dottie Price <yumyumkatts AT VOYAGER.NET>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 20:16:10 -0400
Ruby Throats are still flocking thru here.  I've been making lots of
sugar runs. They love my cooking!  Dottie, Hickory Hollow,
Brown County, IN
Subject: first observed winter hummer
From: Cindy Macolini <cindymacolini1 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 10:16:15 -0500
Observed an adult male Rufous this morning ... 8.31.14

Cindy Macolini
Baton Rouge
Subject: Re: Bob Sargent
From: Dottie Price <yumyumkatts AT VOYAGER.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 18:41:25 -0400
So sorry to hear that.    But he still has his hummingbird memories.   God
bless you,  dottie, brown county, indiana


 Lanny,
>     You can tell folks that there is no hope that he  will regain his
> sight
> in either eye.
>
> Martha
>
>
> In a message dated 8/28/2014 1:56:56 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
> lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM writes:
>
>> Do  you know? Is there any hope that his eyesight can be restored?
>
> Folks, I  appreciate your concern, but I don't feel at liberty to discuss
> the few  details Martha shared with me. I have to respect the family's
> privacy. Thanks  for understanding. Just let Bob know he's in your
> thoughts.
>
> Lanny
>
Subject: Re: Bob Sargent
From: Bob Sargent <0000000433a6e45b-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 12:15:06 -0400
Lanny,
    You can tell folks that there is no hope that he  will regain his sight 
in either eye.
 
Martha
 
 
In a message dated 8/28/2014 1:56:56 P.M. Central Daylight Time,  
lannychambers AT GMAIL.COM writes:

> Do  you know? Is there any hope that his eyesight can be restored?

Folks, I  appreciate your concern, but I don't feel at liberty to discuss 
the few  details Martha shared with me. I have to respect the family's 
privacy. Thanks  for understanding. Just let Bob know he's in your  thoughts.

Lanny
Subject: Re: Bob Sargent
From: Dottie Price <yumyumkatts AT VOYAGER.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 09:55:46 -0400
Our prayers are with him. Dottie, Brown County, IN


> Friends and fellow hummingbird Banders,
> 
>

> 
> I was deeply distressed to hear the news about Bob's
illness.
> 
> 
> 
> I banded many a hummer
under his supervision in West Virginia and Alabama.
> 
>

> 
> He is a mentor to so many of us, a friend indeed,
and an example for all.
> 
> 
> 
> May his
recovery be as swift as the hummingbirds he so dearly loves.
> 
> 
> 
> Bob
> 
> 
> 
> Bob Hall-Brooks
> 
> Hummingbird Bander
>

> Holiday Beach Migration Observatory
> 
>
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
> 
>
Bhall-brooks AT cogeco.ca
> 
> 519-972-5736 (home)
>

> 519-259-7949 (mobile)
> 
> 
> 
> 
>
Subject: Bob Sargent
From: Bob Hall-Brooks <bhall-brooks AT COGECO.CA>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 19:20:08 -0400
Friends and fellow hummingbird Banders,

 

I was deeply distressed to hear the news about Bob's illness.

 

I banded many a hummer under his supervision in West Virginia and Alabama.

 

He is a mentor to so many of us, a friend indeed, and an example for all.

 

May his recovery be as swift as the hummingbirds he so dearly loves.

 

Bob

 

Bob Hall-Brooks

Hummingbird Bander

Holiday Beach Migration Observatory

Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

Bhall-brooks AT cogeco.ca

519-972-5736 (home)

519-259-7949 (mobile)

 

 
Subject: Re: Terrible Situation!
From: Dottie Price <yumyumkatts AT VOYAGER.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 12:29:34 -0400
Yep, I get them all the time. Boring! Dottie, Brown County,
IN


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> 
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