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Updated on Sunday, February 26 at 02:35 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Swallow-tailed Kite,©Barry Kent Mackay

26 Feb Re: Pink footed Goose from two days ago [Jerald Reb ]
26 Feb Re: Pink footed Goose from two days ago [Jerald Reb ]
26 Feb Re: Pink-footed Goose in Milford [Colin Campbell ]
26 Feb Re: Pink footed Goose from two days ago [Jerald Reb ]
26 Feb Pink footed Goose from two days ago [Michael Moore ]
26 Feb Re: Pink-footed Goose in Milford [Jerald Reb ]
26 Feb Pink-footed Goose in Milford [Michael Moore ]
25 Feb Eurasian Collared-Dove in Selbyville [ ]
24 Feb Live video of black vulture nest. [Bob Bryant ]
24 Feb Snow Buntings at Cape Henlopen [Bob Bryant ]
24 Feb A DE Big Day [Colin Campbell ]
23 Feb Red-headed Woodpecker [Nancy Cunningham ]
23 Feb First Pine Warbler of the Season ["Julian, Richard (DNREC)" ]
22 Feb shrike continues, Sussex Co. - 2/21 [Billy Weber ]
22 Feb Live video of black vultures- Indeed an egg tonight [Bob Bryant ]
21 Feb Live video of black vultures- Perhaps an egg tonight [Bob Bryant ]
21 Feb Live video of black vultures- Perhaps an egg tonight [Bob Bryant ]
20 Feb Sandhill cranes, Worcester Co, MD ["T.J. Myers" ]
19 Feb Middle Run Valley Park - Update [Tim Freiday ]
19 Feb Reedy point bridge is closed [Andy Urquhart ]
18 Feb Bombay Hook and area [Marie Gardner ]
18 Feb collared Snow Geese [Joe Hanfman ]
18 Feb snow geese [Lloyd ]
17 Feb An invitation - Join us on a Presidential Bird Walk on President's Day! [Bill Stewart ]
17 Feb RSHA [Colin Campbell ]
16 Feb Loon at Augustine [Debbie Beer ]
14 Feb Great Backyard Bird Count [joe sebastiani ]
14 Feb Northern Shrike [Ann Marie Dinkel ]
14 Feb DOS meeting reminder - Chili Night and CBC Wrap-up and Review [Anthony Gonzon ]
12 Feb Iceland Gull on UD Farm [Katherine Bird ]
12 Feb Yellow-headed Blackbird on Staves Landing Road [ ]
11 Feb Birds around Felton Today [Jerald Reb ]
11 Feb DOS Annual Chili Night & CBC Wrap-up [Anthony Gonzon ]
10 Feb RBA: Birdline Delaware, February 10th, 2017 [Andrew Ednie ]
8 Feb not SNOW but SNGO [Kevin Bronson ]
8 Feb Belted Kingfisher [Jerry ]
8 Feb GWFG and others at Raymond Pool Bombay Hook NWR [Kevin Bronson ]
7 Feb American Birding Association Seeks Headquarters Manager ["Bell, Tyler" ]
7 Feb Great Horned Owl [Jerry ]
5 Feb Razorbills [Nancy Cunningham ]
4 Feb St.Anne's Pond Levels RD Middletown [ ]
3 Feb RBA: Birdline Delaware, February 3rd, 2017 [Andrew Ednie ]
3 Feb Black-backed Oriole in PA [Jerald Reb ]
3 Feb Red-breasted Nuthatch - Hockessin, DE [Amy White ]
29 Jan Re: Common Raven ["sally o'byrne" ]
29 Jan Re: Common Raven [Jerald ]
29 Jan Common Raven [Ken Wat ]
28 Jan A good yard morning [Ann Marie Dinkel ]
28 Jan RBA: Birdline Delaware, January 27th, 2017 [Andrew Ednie ]
25 Jan Seeking Redheads at Newark Reservoir, New Castle DE [Debbie Beer ]
24 Jan Keep an eye out for the one-eyed GBBG in New Castle County [Andrew McGann ]
21 Jan First bird of the Trump era [Rodney Murray ]
17 Jan Together for Birds Petition [Steve Holmer ]
17 Jan REMINDER: January DOS Meeting - "State of the Birds - A Presidential Address" with Bill Stewart - Tomorrow at 7:00 PM [Anthony Gonzon ]
16 Jan Alapocas walk Wednesday 8:30 am ["sally o'byrne" ]
16 Jan Indian river inlet [Rodney Murray ]
16 Jan Black-headed Gull - Wolfe Neck Wastewater Facility [Andy Urquhart ]
15 Jan Re: caracara, ash-throated, big flocks snow geese? [Fred Atwood ]
15 Jan caracara, ash-throated, big flocks snow geese? [Fred Atwood ]
15 Jan Orange crowned warbler [Nancy Cunningham ]
15 Jan Re: RFI: White-winged Dove [Debbie Beer ]
15 Jan Re: RFI: White-winged Dove [dcoffin5 ]
15 Jan RFI: White-winged Dove [Jerald Reb ]
14 Jan N. Shrike [Jeff & Deborah Climie ]
13 Jan RBA: Birdline Delaware, January 13th, 2017 [Andrew Ednie ]
11 Jan January DOS Meeting - "State of the Birds - A Presidential Address" - Wed. January 18 [Anthony Gonzon ]
11 Jan Re: Ash-throated Flycatcher? [James DuHadaway ]
11 Jan Ash-throated Flycatcher? [Tony Futcher ]
10 Jan Common Eider, Iceland & Glaucous Gulls [Gina Sheridan ]
9 Jan Re: Ash-throated Flycatcher & Caracara [Patricia Valdata ]
7 Jan RBA: Birdline Delaware, January 6th, 2017 [Andrew Ednie ]
7 Jan State Rarities [Gina Sheridan ]
7 Jan Horned Larks Avondale PA ["Carolyn D'Amico" ]
6 Jan Ross's Goose at Bellevue SP ["Amy O'Neil" ]
6 Jan DOS Head Start Trip Rescheduled for Jan. 8 [ ]
6 Jan DOS Head Start Trip - Final Update [ ]

Subject: Re: Pink footed Goose from two days ago
From: Jerald Reb <jrebelboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2017 14:25:14 -0500
Just left. The flock spooked a little bit ago and moved to the second field 
from the intersection. The Pink-footed Goose was in the back of the flock near 
the woods as of 5 minutes ago. 


Jerald

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 26, 2017, at 11:56 AM, Michael Moore  wrote:
> 
> Greetings
> 
> 
> 
> All we know now is that the photo of the Pink-footed Goose was taken 2 days
> ago at Prime Hook.  
> 
> 
> 
> Mike
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Michael C. Moore
> 
> Newark, DE
> 
> Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com  
> 
> 
> 
> Websites:
> 
> Delmarva Dragonfilies  
> 
> 2016 Dragonfly Society of the Americas Meeting
>  6-meeting/home> 
> 
> Voices of Delaware Birds
>  
> 
> Birds of the Gilbert Water Ranch, Arizona
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
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Subject: Re: Pink footed Goose from two days ago
From: Jerald Reb <jrebelboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2017 13:58:23 -0500
Pink-footed Goose is currently at the corner of Cods and Fowler Beach Rd. 

Jerald

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 26, 2017, at 11:56 AM, Michael Moore  wrote:
> 
> Greetings
> 
> 
> 
> All we know now is that the photo of the Pink-footed Goose was taken 2 days
> ago at Prime Hook.  
> 
> 
> 
> Mike
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Michael C. Moore
> 
> Newark, DE
> 
> Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com  
> 
> 
> 
> Websites:
> 
> Delmarva Dragonfilies  
> 
> 2016 Dragonfly Society of the Americas Meeting
>  6-meeting/home> 
> 
> Voices of Delaware Birds
>  
> 
> Birds of the Gilbert Water Ranch, Arizona
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: Re: Pink-footed Goose in Milford
From: Colin Campbell <delawaretwitcher AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2017 12:22:27 -0600
 Yes - the only DE record (surprisingly) is from 1 November, 1953 at Bombay 
Hook NWR. Several of us have been looking for one of these for the past few 
winters. Colin Campbell. 

 

On 02/26/17, Jerald Reb wrote:

Thanks Mike! Please keep us posted on the location. If I remember correctly 
there is one previous record from the 1950s, so this would be a second state 
record. 


Jerald

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 26, 2017, at 11:36 AM, Michael Moore  wrote:
> 
> Greetings
> 
> 
> 
> A photo of a Pink-footed Goose in a large flock of Snow Geese in Milford was
> just posted to Facebook by Richard Brekenridge. 
> 
> 
> 
> All I know now is it was taken in Milford. I am trying to get a more
> precise location but wanted to alert people in the area to scan those goose
> flocks!
> 
> 
> 
> I believe this is a potential first (= long overdue) state record.
> 
> 
> 
> Mike Moore
> 
> 
> 
> Michael C. Moore
> 
> Newark, DE
> 
> Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com  
> 
> 
> 
> Websites:
> 
> Delmarva Dragonfilies  
> 
> 2016 Dragonfly Society of the Americas Meeting
>  6-meeting/home> 
> 
> Voices of Delaware Birds
>  
> 
> Birds of the Gilbert Water Ranch, Arizona
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu

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Subject: Re: Pink footed Goose from two days ago
From: Jerald Reb <jrebelboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2017 12:13:24 -0500
To anyone looking for the bird,

I'm sure there are multiple flocks of Snow Geese at Prime Hook, but there was a 
big flock yesterday on Draper Rd. near the intersection with 13 Curves Rd 
(which I now regret not scanning through more thoroughly). That might be a good 
place to start looking for the goose. 


Jerald

Sent from my iPhone



Sent from my iPhone
> On Feb 26, 2017, at 11:56 AM, Michael Moore  wrote:
> 
> Greetings
> 
> 
> 
> All we know now is that the photo of the Pink-footed Goose was taken 2 days
> ago at Prime Hook.  
> 
> 
> 
> Mike
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Michael C. Moore
> 
> Newark, DE
> 
> Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com  
> 
> 
> 
> Websites:
> 
> Delmarva Dragonfilies  
> 
> 2016 Dragonfly Society of the Americas Meeting
>  6-meeting/home> 
> 
> Voices of Delaware Birds
>  
> 
> Birds of the Gilbert Water Ranch, Arizona
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: Pink footed Goose from two days ago
From: Michael Moore <mcmoore32 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2017 11:56:41 -0500
Greetings

 

All we know now is that the photo of the Pink-footed Goose was taken 2 days
ago at Prime Hook.  

 

Mike

 

 

Michael C. Moore

Newark, DE

Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com  

 

Websites:

Delmarva Dragonfilies  

2016 Dragonfly Society of the Americas Meeting
 

Voices of Delaware Birds
 

Birds of the Gilbert Water Ranch, Arizona
 



 

 


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Subject: Re: Pink-footed Goose in Milford
From: Jerald Reb <jrebelboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2017 11:55:46 -0500
Thanks Mike! Please keep us posted on the location. If I remember correctly 
there is one previous record from the 1950s, so this would be a second state 
record. 


Jerald

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 26, 2017, at 11:36 AM, Michael Moore  wrote:
> 
> Greetings
> 
> 
> 
> A photo of a Pink-footed Goose in a large flock of Snow Geese in Milford was
> just posted to Facebook by Richard Brekenridge.  
> 
> 
> 
> All I know now is it was taken in Milford.  I am trying to get a more
> precise location but wanted to alert people in the area to scan those goose
> flocks!
> 
> 
> 
> I believe this is a potential first (= long overdue) state record.
> 
> 
> 
> Mike Moore
> 
> 
> 
> Michael C. Moore
> 
> Newark, DE
> 
> Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com  
> 
> 
> 
> Websites:
> 
> Delmarva Dragonfilies  
> 
> 2016 Dragonfly Society of the Americas Meeting
>  6-meeting/home> 
> 
> Voices of Delaware Birds
>  
> 
> Birds of the Gilbert Water Ranch, Arizona
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
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Subject: Pink-footed Goose in Milford
From: Michael Moore <mcmoore32 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2017 11:36:30 -0500
Greetings

 

A photo of a Pink-footed Goose in a large flock of Snow Geese in Milford was
just posted to Facebook by Richard Brekenridge.  

 

All I know now is it was taken in Milford.  I am trying to get a more
precise location but wanted to alert people in the area to scan those goose
flocks!

 

I believe this is a potential first (= long overdue) state record.

 

Mike Moore

 

Michael C. Moore

Newark, DE

Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com  

 

Websites:

Delmarva Dragonfilies  

2016 Dragonfly Society of the Americas Meeting
 

Voices of Delaware Birds
 

Birds of the Gilbert Water Ranch, Arizona
 



 

 


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Subject: Eurasian Collared-Dove in Selbyville
From: Frank Rohrbacher <0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 16:04:46 -0500
I went down to Selbyville early this morning and found at least two pairs  
near the intersection of McCabe Road and S. William's Road.  Before I sent  
this note, I checked and found that Dave Fees beat me to this find and  
reported them there yesterday on eBirds.  None the less, I decided  to put my 
two cents in.  For  the last few years, we were down to  only two birds 
remaining from a colony that ten years ago sported 19-20  birds.  So if you 
haven't added this bird to your Delaware List, this might the be the year to 
try 

again.
 
Frank Rohrbacher
Wilmington, Delaware  

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Subject: Live video of black vulture nest.
From: Bob Bryant <0000026a887c7513-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 13:29:37 -0500
Second egg laid at 11:39 AM today (2/24/17). First hatching expected in about 
37 days. 


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Subject: Snow Buntings at Cape Henlopen
From: Bob Bryant <0000026a887c7513-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 13:25:15 -0500
Snow buntings at Cape Henlopen State Park. About 40 on dunes visible from 
benches at north end of Park. 


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Subject: A DE Big Day
From: Colin Campbell <birder72 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 12:10:43 -0500
An unexpected e-mail from Scott, a long-time NJ birding buddy whom I hadn’t
seen in too long a time, suggested that we re-kindled the fun and
excitement that a group of us had had doing a DE Big Day on a chosen day in
each month of the year to see if we could get 100 bird species.

I knew that I had written an article on our adventures that year in
Cassinia, the journal of the Delaware Valley Ornithological Club (DVOC)
and, on looking it up, was amazed to find that it was in 2003, fourteen
years ago. To me, after 29 years here in America, that’s the main problem
with the USA – it’s such a dynamic and bloody wonderful place to be, time
passes far too rapidly. My article is on-line, thanks to the wonderful
archival team headed up by DVOC’s Bert Filemyr so, if you’re in the mood
for a reason why we did this then, have a look at it:

http://dvoc.org/CassiniaOnLine/Cassinia70/C70_37_46.pdf

The current team decided that January was the obvious kick-off month for
2017, then the problems immediately set in. Scott was wrestling with a
family bereavement and his new shift patterns, Joe was skiing in Wyoming,
Alison was retiring the day after I was off birding to the Philippines for
the rest of the month. Yes, the US of A is dynamic. So, the start date was
February 22. The day before yesterday.

An overcast day, glimmers of sun here and there, mild, dry and a gentle
wind from the west. We did not do pre-dawn or post-sunset owling, railing
or woodcocking. In retrospect, we should have. We finished with 91 species.
And we were actively birding from 7am to 6pm. Inevitably, we had other
notable omissions, especially in the sparrow and heron families. The
missing 9 spp were there, of course, it’s just that we were not.

Our route was north to south, Delaware City to Indian River Inlet (IRI),
sadly by-passing Helen’s Sausage House, but hoping to capitalize on recent
findings in that eastern part of the state.

Without asking Alison, Scott and Joe for their input, my top three birds of
the day were Yellow-headed Blackbird (Stave’s Landing Road), Black-headed
Gull (Wolfe Neck Water Treatment Plant – see below), and 3 Razorbills at
Indian River Inlet. All excellent DE rarities.

Next in line were the 24 spp of ducks, geese and swans (esp. the Redhead on
Spring Lake and Greater Scaup at IRI), the single Avocet (Raymond Pool), an
awesome hanging Peregrine on top of one of the towers at the IRI Bridge, 12
Bonaparte’s Gulls at Wolfe Neck TP, Tree Swallows over Hangman’s Run and
Gray Catbird at Ashton Tract.

Colin Campbell

Note: the offices at the Wolfe Neck Water Treatment Plant are currently
closed – ironically because of a faulty toilet! – which means permission to
enter needs to be obtained from the manager in the temporary buildings on
the right before you go through the gate. Thanks.

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Subject: Red-headed Woodpecker
From: Nancy Cunningham <nancy_c8899 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 19:20:59 +0000
Around noon today at Thompson Island, I heard and saw a Red-headed Woodpecker. 
I was with Julie Memmolo who heard it but did not see it. We also saw a 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. 


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: First Pine Warbler of the Season
From: "Julian, Richard (DNREC)" <Richard.Julian AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 14:54:24 +0000
Spring is here?

Heard and saw my first Pine Warbler of the season at Cape Henlopen State Park 
(in pines across from Officer's Club). 



Cheers

Richard W. Julian
Cape Henlopen State Park
(302) 645-6852

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Subject: shrike continues, Sussex Co. - 2/21
From: Billy Weber <robot.stories AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 08:58:09 -0500
The adult Northern Shrike at Prime Hook NWR appeared briefly in the middle of 
the field adjacent to the headquarters building yesterday morning (2/21) at 
8:30am. It flew into the hedgerow by the entrance road and then pursued a small 
passerine at least a hundred feet into the air before abandoning chase and 
flying over the trees to the west. 


Billy Weber
Nazareth, PA

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Live video of black vultures- Indeed an egg tonight
From: Bob Bryant <0000026a887c7513-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 00:32:19 -0500
First egg laid 11:28 PM. Watching for more. Last year the second came 2 days 
later. 


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Subject: Live video of black vultures- Perhaps an egg tonight
From: Bob Bryant <0000026a887c7513-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 20:36:21 -0500
A vulture pair returned to the shed where they nested last year and where they 
have mated repeatedly over the last week. One adult appears to be settling in 
for the night with behavior reminiscent of previous egg laying activity. The 
other adult nuzzled and then left the shed. As of 8:30 PM, the presumed female 
is resting on her "nest." 


Last year the first egg was not laid until March 2nd, but mating at the nest 
this year was much earlier. So I’m watching closely tonight. (No guarantees!) 
Last year the first egg was laid at 10:13 PM on March 2nd from a horizontal 
position. The second egg was laid on March 5th at about 9:45 AM from an upright 
position we had not observed before. Google "black vultures tristate. for live 
video. 


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Subject: Live video of black vultures- Perhaps an egg tonight
From: Bob Bryant <0000026a887c7513-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 20:26:46 -0500
A vulture pair returned to the shed where they nested last year and where they 
have mated repeatedly over the last week. One adult appears to be settling in 
for the night with behavior reminiscent of previous egg laying activity.  The 
other adult nuzzled and then left the shed. As of 8:30 PM, the presumed female 
is resting on her "nest." 


Last year the first egg was not laid until March 2nd, but mating at the nest 
this year was much earlier.  So I’m watching closely tonight.  (No 
guarantees!)  Last year the first egg was laid at 10:13 PM on March 2nd from a 
horizontal position.  The second egg was laid on March 5th at about 9:45 AM 
from an upright position we had not observed before. Live video is available 
at http://chimneyswifts.net/tristate/?page_id=294. Or google "black vultures 
tristate."  


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Subject: Sandhill cranes, Worcester Co, MD
From: "T.J. Myers" <maximum2 AT IX.NETCOM.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 09:24:48 -0500
Hi All -

I know this is a bit south of Delaware, but thought you might be interested 
that about 9:00 AM this morning we saw 3 sandhill cranes in flight as we were 
driving along Rte 113 near the town of Snow Hill, MD. Despite the fact that we 
were driving, we got a good look at them (they were fairly low); extended necks 
and clearly not great blue herons. 


Keep an eye out in Delaware since they may be heading north with all this warm 
weather of late! 


TJ Myers
Rehoboth Beach

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Subject: Middle Run Valley Park - Update
From: Tim Freiday <tim.freiday777 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 19:30:14 -0500
Hello fellow Delaware Birders,

 It has been a little while since I last posted about Middle Run, but with the 
birds beginning to migrate and spring well on its way I figured I would inform 
you about some of the goings on there. I have been working to clear some of the 
invasive species out of the birding trail in an effort to rescue some native 
plantings that were planted. Without knocking the invasive species back, many 
of these plants would be shaded out or choked by vines. In clearing some areas 
of invasive species, we are opening up the habitat and knocking back 
succession. While this may look a little bit rough at first, it gives native 
grassland species a chance to expand and reclaim some areas formerly dominated 
by invasive species. This clearing also creates more of a mosaic of habitats, 
which is attractive to many species of birds and animals. By planting native 
species and protecting them from deer, we are promoting biodiversity at Middle 
Run. 


 There will be a couple of opportunities to help out with the Delaware Nature 
Society and New Castle County Parks mission to help conserve biodiversity at 
Middle Run this spring. We have a tree planting event coming up on Saturday 
April 1st, and a preparation day on Saturday March 25th. Both of these events 
will take place at the fields at the corner of Polly Drummond Road and 
Smithmill Road. The Pre-Planting event will involve cleaning up the area and 
getting cages prepared to use for the trees, as well as getting some bird boxes 
set up. We will bird the area for about an hour in the morning at 8:00 AM 
before getting started, checking for sparrows and ducks and such in the 
vicinity. The tree planting itself begins at 9 AM, and will run until noon. 
More details on that event to follow. If you are interested in participating in 
either of these two events, please e-mail me at tim.freiday777 AT gmail.com. 


 While working out at Middle Run, I have had a number of exciting bird 
sightings. We have a feeder set up near Trail Marker 4, and there have been 
some excellent birds in the area. A BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE has been visiting 
the feeder regularly, and has been joining the Carolina Chickadees and Tufted 
Titmouse on the feeder for a parid trifecta. Also present near the feeders and 
in the field near Trail Marker 5 has been BROWN THRASHER and FOX SPARROW. 
Eastern Towhee, Field and Song Sparrows have also been regular in the area. 
There are several HERMIT THRUSH in the area, and the Barred Owls and 
Great-Horned Owls have been very vocal and sometimes visible in the mornings 
and at dusk. Also at dusk, look for AMERICAN WOODCOCK displaying near Trail 
Marker 4. The waterfowl migration is really heating up, with the first flocks 
of Northern Pintail and Snow Geese seen flying NW recently. The Horseshoe Pond 
near Polly Drummond has had Common and Hooded Mergansers, Ring-Necked D! 

 ucks, American Black Ducks, Mallards, and Wood Ducks recently. I had a fun 
encounter with several AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS and a FOX SPARROW here a couple 
of days ago, but have not seen these birds since. 


The other day I was checking the ducks at the Horseshoe Pond, and all of them 
had flushed on my approach except the Wood Ducks. I could hear the Wood Ducks 
whistling, and as I was walking around the border of the pond they took off. I 
was watching them fly away and all of a sudden the flock of six split and one 
of the ducks crash-landed into the pond. I looked up and to my surprise there 
was a PEREGRINE FALCON flying right over head! It powerfully flew towards 
another Wood Duck and was just about to grab it when the duck took evasive 
action and dodged the Peregrine. The falcon then gained altitude and headed off 
to the Northwest. I presume this was a migrating bird who was attracted by the 
other waterfowl and then tried for dinner. The raptor migration is underway as 
well, with Red-Shouldered Hawk, Red-Tailed, and Cooper’s Hawks seen at Middle 
Run lately, as well as variable numbers of both Black and Turkey Vultures. In 
addition to the PEFA the other day, there was! 

 a Merlin sighting in the park recently. Get out and bird this week, the 
migration season is upon us! Also the last day of the Great Backyard Bird Count 
is tomorrow, so get those sightings on eBird if you are an eBirder. 


Happy Birding,
Tim Freiday
Middle Run Project Coordinator

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Subject: Reedy point bridge is closed
From: Andy Urquhart <000000c02f6624dc-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 09:14:12 -0500
People coming from the north going to Augustine wildlife area might like to 
know that Reedy point bridge is closed. Continue south and turn toward Port 
Penn. 


Andy Urquhart 



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Subject: Bombay Hook and area
From: Marie Gardner <00000133d8ee0ba7-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 20:18:15 +0000
This morning there was a small flock of Snow Geese seen from Taylors 
BridgeRoad.  Two larger flocks of Snow Geese seen were off of Whitehall Neck 
Road, notfar from the entrance to Bombay Hook. 

In the Refuge was one Great Blue Heron, Ruddy Ducks, Buffleheads, 
N.Shovelers,and N.Pintails also seen this morning. 


Good birding,
Marie Z. GardnerNewark

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Subject: collared Snow Geese
From: Joe Hanfman <auk1844 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 14:23:11 -0500
This morning I found 8 collared Snow Geese at Bombay Hook. They were in a
flock of about 5000 Snow Geese and one Ross's Goose.
The oldest of the collared Snow Geese is at least 7 1/2 years old.

Details on the banded Snow Geese are as follows:
XE42 adult F, banded 8/2016, Bylot Island, Canada;
UP99 adult F, banded 8/2015, Bylot Island;
UU30 adult F, banded 8/2016, Bylot Island;
TA51 adult F, banded 8/2011, Bylot Island;
TY30 adult F, banded 8/2012, Bylot Island;
UX07 adult F, banded 8/2016, Bylot Island;
XC20 adult F, banded 8/2016, Bylot Island;
UM70 adult F, banded 8/2016, Bylot Island.


-- 
Joe Hanfman
Columbia, MD

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Subject: snow geese
From: Lloyd <patch10 AT MAIERASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 13:26:18 -0500
There are at least 1000 snow geese on Staves Landing Rd in two large, 
but separate flocks.  10:30 am Saturday, Feb. 18th

Lloyd Maier

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Subject: An invitation - Join us on a Presidential Bird Walk on President's Day!
From: Bill Stewart <bstewart AT ABA.ORG>
Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2017 18:26:41 -0500
PRESIDENT’S DAY SPECIAL!  DUCKS AT A DISCOUNT!  EVERYTHING PRICED TO MIGRATE!

If you're looking for a great birding break on what is predicted to be a mild 
President's Day morning, here's a very special, FREE opportunity. 


Jeff Gordon, President of the American Birding Association (ABA), along with 
myself, President of Delmarva Ornithological Society (DOS), have arranged for 
special access to some prime waterfowl watching spots in the Odessa, DE area, 
just east of Middletown. We are looking forward to a fabulous morning of great 
birding, featuring wonderful waterfowl! Details to sign up and join us are 
below: 


"PRESIDENT'S DAY PRESIDENTIAL BIRD WALK"

HOSTS: Jeffrey Gordon, President of the ABA & Bill Stewart, President of the 
DOS 

WHEN: Monday, February 20th
WHERE: Delaware Wild Lands Robert’s Farm in New Castle County (private 
property) & Odessa Water Farm (special permission access) 

TIME: 9:00 AM - Noon
FREE!
REGISTRATION REQUIRED AND LIMITED: This field trip is open to the first 25 
people responding via email to bstewart AT aba.org  
(simply reply to this email) with their name, email address and phone number. 
Full trip details will be forwarded upon registration. 


Bonus: all data collected will be added to the Great Backyard Bird Count in its 
final day! 


Good birding and Happy Great Backyard Bird Count Weekend!

Bill Stewart


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Subject: RSHA
From: Colin Campbell <birder72 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2017 08:15:45 -0500
Red-shouldered Hawk at Harry's Pond, Brandywine Town Center, 8am today.
Colin Campbell

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Subject: Loon at Augustine
From: Debbie Beer <debbeer1023 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2017 18:52:09 -0500
Hello to Gina Sheridan. I may have seen the same loon that you did today,
at Augustine close to jetty. (I was there around 4:30 pm).

Do you have any photos I could see? I wasn't sure it was Red-throated...

You can email me directly at Debbeer1023 AT gmail.com.

Apologies to the group for singular question... I don't have Gina's email.

Thanks, Debbie

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Subject: Great Backyard Bird Count
From: joe sebastiani <joe AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 17:42:13 +0000
Dear Delaware Birders:

This coming Friday through Monday is the annual Great Backyard Bird Count, 
http://gbbc.birdcount.org/. It is a good time to go birding anywhere, whether 
it is your yard, nearby park, or National Wildlife Refuge, in an effort to join 
in the worldwide effort to take a mid-winter "snapshot" of bird distribution 
and abundance. During what I think is the "most boring month of all", it is a 
good excuse to get outdoors and bird for a cause. 


The Delaware Nature Society is running field trips in conjunction with the GBBC 
this Friday and Saturday. Registration is required for both of these 
opportunities. Please call (302) 239-2334 ext. 134 to register. 


Coverdale Farm Breakfast and Birding
Friday, February 17
Led by Joe Sebastiani and Jim White
8am - 11am
DNS members $15/non-members $22
Enjoy a hot breakfast, then walk this beautiful 350-acre property to search for 
birds for the Great Backyard Bird Count. 


Kent County Birding Tour
Saturday, February 18
Led by Joe Sebastiani and Matt Babbitt
8am-4pm
DNS members $20/non-members $30
Meet at either Ashland Nature Center or Abbott's Mill Nature Center, then 
travel by van to coastal refuges in Kent County, DE including Little Creek 
Wildlife Area, Bombay Hook, and other places to see lots of waterfowl, raptors, 
wintering songbirds, and rarities that are being reported. 


If you choose to participate in the Great Backyard Bird Count on your own, just 
go birding anywhere you want and enter your bird sightings into the above 
website, or into www.ebird.org. It all goes to the same 
place. In 2016, there were 132 species reported in Delaware during the 4-day 
count, and 685 checklists were submitted. That is a lot of birding! 


If you are a regular eBird user, you will notice that there are some species 
that are flagged right now that normally aren't. This is in an effort to remove 
historically confusing species from the checklist used during the Great 
Backyard Bird Count. During the event, there will be a LOT of people 
contributing their sightings to the Count who do not regularly bird or use 
eBird, so this reduction of the checklist is meant to prevent people from being 
overwhelmed with species choices. Species that are flagged over this period 
include: Redhead, Winter Wren, Hermit Thrush, Gray Catbird, Brown Thrasher, 
American Tree Sparrow, Chipping Sparrow, Field Sparrow, Fox Sparrow, 
White-crowned Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, Rusty Blackbird, Purple 
Finch, and Pine Siskin. The temporary removal of these birds from the list is 
to give beginners a shorter menu of choices to select birds that are in their 
backyard. Thank you for your patience. 


Joe Sebastiani
Ashland Nature Center Manager

Delaware Nature Society
Ashland Nature Center
3511 Barley Mill Road
P.O. Box 700
Hockessin, DE 19707
(302) 239-2334 ext. 115
fax (302)239-2473
joe AT delnature.org



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Subject: Northern Shrike
From: Ann Marie Dinkel <Adinkl AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 12:19:29 -0500
Good Morning all,

 

I took a walk around the boardwalk trail at Prime Hook this morning.  In
addition to lots of Bald Eagles, I was treated to a Northern Shrike on the
path very close to the parking lot.  

 

Ann Dinkel

Lewes, DE


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Subject: DOS meeting reminder - Chili Night and CBC Wrap-up and Review
From: Anthony Gonzon <atgonzon AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 06:38:11 -0500
NOTE - this meeting begins early at 6:30 PM and will be held at the ABA 
Headquarters in Delaware City (NOT at Ashland Nature Center). 


Please join DOS for our annual Chili Night and CBC Wrap-up and Review tomorrow 
night at the American Birding Association headquarters in Delaware City! 


PLEASE NOTE the earlier start time of 6:30 PM for our chili festivities. The 
formal meeting begins at 7:30 PM. This meeting will be held at the Headquarters 
of the American Birding Association. 


Come join us as Master MC Jim White will host the night’s activities in 
reviewing the 2016 National Audubon CBC’s from Delaware. Listen in as each 
Count Circle’s Compiler reports on the birds, effort and surprises discovered 
during this 116th CBC, the longest running citizen science project in North 
America! It is also our traditional Chili Night and we encourage you to bring 
your favorite crock-pot chili and some fresh bread. If you plan on contributing 
your heralded chili and or bread, please contact Kelley Nunn 
at kelley.nunn AT gmail.com. 


We hope to see many of you there – the meeting is open to the public, bring 
your appetite and grab a birding friend or two and plan on attending  tomorrow 
night, Wednesday, February 15th! 


Good birding,

Anthony Gonzon
DOS Program Chair



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

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Subject: Iceland Gull on UD Farm
From: Katherine Bird <kbird AT UDEL.EDU>
Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2017 14:06:07 -0500
Today around noon, Billy Kaselow and I spotted a pale juvenile Iceland Gull
in a mixed flock of about 200 gulls (mostly RBGU and HEGU) in a field on
the University of Delaware Farm. The field in question was just south of
the BIRL lab and northeast of the ecology woods. The gull was viewed on the
ground about 50 feet from the dirt road, as well as in the air as the flock
moved south towards the large walnut trees. The gull was not re-sighted
after this. Multiple flocks continued to move periodically around different
areas of the farm.

Completely off-white body with low contrast mottling, pure white primaries,
with a black bill. No brown trailing edge on secondaries or primaries. No
contrast between mantle and rest of body. Could not note leg color or iris
color.

Katie Bird
Newark, Delaware

-- 
*Katie Bird*
*University of Delaware 2018*
*Wildlife Conservation & Ecology Major*

*Journalism MinorBlue Hen Birding Treasurer*
*Honors Program*

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Subject: Yellow-headed Blackbird on Staves Landing Road
From: Frank Rohrbacher <0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2017 13:28:51 -0500
This morning just before noon, I found an adult male Yellow-headed  
Blackbird in a mixed flock of about 75 blackbirds working the corn stubble on 
the 

south side of the road near the end of the road.  
 
Frank Rohrbacher
Wilmington, Delaware

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Subject: Birds around Felton Today
From: Jerald Reb <jrebelboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 11 Feb 2017 21:40:03 -0500
All,

Today I decided to take advantage of the warmer weather and go birding around 
Felton. I started at Roesville Road, where I was able to easily find the local 
Savannah and Field Sparrows. I did not see the overwintering Yellow Palm 
Warbler today, but I didn't spend much time looking for it. Birding was slow 
for the most part, so I decided to walk over to Coursey Pond, where Dave Fees 
and I had some good ducks on the Milford CBC. 

 I first tried from the boat launch parking lot, but I was unable to find so 
much as a Canada Goose there. Continuing on, I ventured into the back end of 
the Waterside neighborhood, which is currently undeveloped and provides a nice 
view of parts of the lake hidden from the parking lot. While walking, I 
stumbled across a large flock of juncos, which, to my surprise contained 6-7 
Chipping Sparrows, an uncommon bird in the winter. I tried for my year bird 
White-breasted Nuthatch here, but they continue to elude me. A small flock of 
Cedar Waxwings was a nice consolation prize though. When I finally got down to 
the lake, at first all I saw were a handful of Canada Geese and a few Mallards. 
A few Bald Eagles flew over, and a Pileated Woodpecker called from the woods. 
As I was just about to leave, a small group of ducks flew in and landed. Upon 
getting them in my scope, I was surprised to see that they were Wood Ducks! A 
second group flew in, bringing the total to about 15; some w! 

 ere clearly already in pairs, ready to begin breeding in the next few weeks. 
The groundhog says six more weeks of winter, but the birds are the superior 
meteorologists in my opinion. Spring is almost here! 


Jerald

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Subject: DOS Annual Chili Night & CBC Wrap-up
From: Anthony Gonzon <atgonzon AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Feb 2017 05:20:51 -0500
Greetings all,

Please join DOS for our annual Chili Night and CBC Wrap-up and Review this 
Wednesday at the American Birding Association headquarters in Delaware City! 


PLEASE NOTE the earlier start time of 6:30 PM for our chili festivities. The 
formal meeting begins at 7:30 PM. This meeting will be held at the Headquarters 
of the American Birding Association. 


Come join us as Master MC Jim White will host the night’s activities in 
reviewing the 2016 National Audubon CBC’s from Delaware. Listen in as each 
Count Circle’s Compiler reports on the birds, effort and surprises discovered 
during this 116th CBC, the longest running citizen science project in North 
America! It is also our traditional Chili Night and we encourage you to bring 
your favorite crock-pot chili and some fresh bread. If you plan on contributing 
your heralded chili and or bread, please contact Kelley Nunn at 
kelley.nunn AT gmail.com. 


We hope to see many of you there – the meeting is open to the public, bring 
your appetite and grab a birding friend or two and plan on attending Wednesday 
night, February 15th! 


Good birding,

Anthony Gonzon
DOS Program Chair



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Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, February 10th, 2017
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 10 Feb 2017 22:17:05 -0500
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
*February 10, 2017
* DEST1702.10
	
*Birds mentioned
GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE
Snow Goose
Cackling Goose
Tundra Swan
Mute Swan 
Gadwall
Eurasian Wigeon
American Wigeon
Northern Shoveler
Green-winged Teal
Canvasback
Ring-necked Duck
Greater Scaup
Lesser Scaup
Surf Scoter
Black Scoter
Long-tailed Duck
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Red-throated Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
RED-NECKED GREBE
Great Cormorant
Northern Gannet
American Bittern
Black-crowned Night Heron
Bald Eagle
American Coot
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
Killdeer
Marbled Godwit
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Dunlin
Purple Sandpiper
Wilson's Snipe
American Woodcock
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
DOVEKIE
RAZORBILL
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Bonaparte's Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Barn Owl
Eastern Screech Owl
Great Horned Owl
Barred Owl
Short-eared Owl
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Pileated Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon
Eastern Phoebe
Common Raven
Black-capped Chickadee
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Marsh Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
Snow Bunting
Orange-crowned Warbler
Pine Warbler
American Tree Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Lincoln's Sparrow
Eastern Meadowlark
Rusty Blackbird
Boat-tailed Grackle
Baltimore Oriole
Purple Finch

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: February 10, 2017
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For Friday February 10th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. The new unofficial Delaware year list
increased to 167 species this week.

A peak count of 4 RAZORBILLS were reported at Indian River Inlet, along with
a DOVEKIE briefly on Sunday. A single RED-NECKED GREBE plus HORNED GREBES
were seen offshore with NORTHERN GANNET, GREAT CORMORANT, RED-THROATED and
COMMON LOONS. LONG-TAILED DUCK, SURF and BLACK SCOTER with 80 BUFFLEHEADS
were reported at the Inlet. PURPLE SANDPIPER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, and
SANDERLING were seen on the jetty. LESSER BLACK-BACKED and 7 BONAPARTE'S
GULLS were reported on the beach along with BALD EAGLE. BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT
HERON plus 300 BRANT and HOODED MERGANSER were found at Burton's Island. Two
more RAZORBILLS were found at Tower Road in Delaware Seashore State Park on
Wednesday. 16 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS were seen at Indian River Bay from
Quillen's Point off Cedar Neck Road near Ocean View, along with KILLDEER and
35 BOAT-TAILED GRACKLE. 275 BRANT were seen on Indian River Bay, along with
45 BUFFLEHEAD and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER.

GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE are now being reported all three counties in
Delaware. This week, a single WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was found at the Block
House Pond behind Beebe Hospital in Lewes off Savannah Road. Another
WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was seen at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge near
Milton with a CACKLING and several hundred SNOW GEESE. Eight WHITE-FRONTED
GEESE continue be seen at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna.
In New Castle County, 2 WHITE-FRONTED GEESE were seen at Levels Road Pond
off St. Ann's Church Road, south of Middletown.

Back in Sussex County, the previous reported BLACK-HEADED GULL continues to
be seen at the Wolfe's Point sewage treatment plant behind Midway, between
Lewes and Rehoboth Beach. 225 CANVASBACK were seen on Silver Lake in
Rehoboth. HOODED MERGANSER and RUDDY DUCK was seen at Spring Lake
condominiums off Route 1 near Dewey Beach.

A EURASIAN WIGEON was reported at Assawoman Wildlife Area with 125 AMERICAN
WIGEONS, plus MUTE and TUNDRA SWAN, GADWALL, RING-NECKED DUCK, GREATER
SCAUP, BUFFLEHEAD, and PIED-BILLED GREBE. A MARSH WREN was found along the
pond edge. AMERICAN PIPIT was heard flying over. BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH and
EASTERN BLUEBIRD were found in the woods.

A flock of over 100 SNOW BUNTINGS continues be seen at the point at Cape
Henlopen State Park. Five LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were seen from Herring
Point. SURF and BLACK SCOTER, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, HORNED GREBE, and 30
GANNETS were seen offshore. FOX SPARROW, RED-BREASTED and BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCH were seen coming to the feeders at the Seaside Nature Center.
Gordon's Pond, north of Rehoboth had AMERICAN WIGEON, NORTHERN SHOVELER,
NORTHERN PINTAIL, and BUFFLEHEADS.

An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was reported coming to a yard near at Bay Vista
near Rehoboth on Tuesday. PURPLE FINCH was found at landing near Lewes.
White breasted NUTHATCH and BROWN THRASHER were found at the Canal Pointe
development in West Rehoboth. PINE WARBLER was reported at a feeder at
Wharton's Bluff near Dagsboro.

A SHORT-EARED OWL was found at Fowler's Beach at dusk at Prime Hook. Four
AMERICAN WOODCOCK and two GREAT HORNED OWLS were found at Little Neck
Wildlife Area along the Prime Hook Beach Road. Eight AMERICAN AVOCETS were
seen at the Broadkill Marsh on Sunday, along with GREATER SCAUP off
Broadkill Beach. AMERICAN WIGEON, PINTAIL, GREEN-WINGED TEAL, BUFFLEHEAD,
and HOODED MERGANSER were seen off the Observation Point Trail near Prime
Hook headquarters, along with an AMERICAN KESTREL.

Four AMERICAN AVOCETS and a MARBLED GODWIT were reported at Raymond Pool in
Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge. GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS, DUNLIN,
and WILSON'S SNIPE were reported at Bear Swamp. AMERICAN WOODCOCK continue
be found calling by headquarters in the early morning. A SHORT-EARED OWL was
seen flying opposite Raymond Pool on Sunday. BARRED OWL was reported at
Finis Pool, along with GRAY CATBIRD. Raptors seen included MERLIN, PEREGRINE
FALCON, and BALD EAGLE. Waterfowl scene included TUNDRA SWAN, CACKLING
GOOSE, GADWALL, GREEN-WINGED TEAL, PINTAIL, SHOVELER, BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED and
COMMON MERGANSER, plus RUDDY DUCK.

BARN OWL was found along the Port Mahan Road. A red phase EASTERN SCREECH
OWL was found in a wood duck box Little Creek. EASTERN PHOEBE, BROWN
THRASHER, and PILEATED WOODPECKER were found on private gameland near Kitts
Hummock. Waterfowl found included AMERICAN WIGEON, SHOVELER, PINTAIL, and
BUFFLEHEAD. Tub Mill Pond near Milford had two RING-NECKED DUCK plus TUNDRA
SWAN, GADWALL, BUFFLEHEAD, and HOODED MERGANSER.

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES were seen at Bay Vista, Angola Neck, Wharton's Bluff
and Broadkill Beach. RED-BREASTED and WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH reported
coming to a feeder near Camden-Wyoming. RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES were also
found in Northern Delaware at Glasgow, Newark, Yorklyn, Brandywine Hundred,
and the Ashton Tract near Port Penn. BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES were reported
at Lums Pond, Yorklyn, and Middle Run near Newark. A PINE WARBLER was seen
coming to a feeder near Port Penn. The previous reported BALTIMORE ORIOLE
continues to come to a feeder at the Village of Linden Parkland off Milltown
Road in west Wilmington.

COMMON RAVEN was also reported flying over Middle Run along with WOOD DUCK
and COMMON MERGANSER BARRED OWL continues be found in the Middle Run Valley.
Land birds included YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, PILEATED WOODPECKER, BROWN
THRASHER, and FOX SPARROW. Another BARRED OWL was reported at Christine
Manor near Newark along with YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER. AMERICAN TREE SPARROW
was seen at Coverdale Farms near Ashland Nature Center.

A MUTE SWAN was found on Hoopes's Reservoir near Greenville. Other waterfowl
included AMERICAN WIGEON, RING-NECKED DUCK, BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED and COMMON
MERGANSER. Four PIED-BILLED GREBES and 25 AMERICAN COOT found at the
Hillside Mill Cove. BARRED OWL continues to be calling along the Hillside
Mill Road. 15 HOODED MERGANSERS and 60 RING-NECKED DUCKS plus a COOT was
found at Harry's Pond at the Brandywine Town Center off Concord Pike. Five
CACKLING GOOSE continue be seen among the CANADA GEESE at Bellevue State
Park in Brandywine Hundred.

A LINCOLN'S SPARROW was photographed near Churchman's Marsh on private lands
along the White Clay Creek, along with two RUSTY BLACKBIRDS. A flock of 28
COMMON MERGANSERS plus RING-NECKED DUCK and HOODED MERGANSER were seen at
the White Clay Creek White Clay Creek Golf Course at Delaware Park. A BROWN
THRASHER was reported Woodlands Park near Prices Corner.

A female EURASIAN WIGEON was discovered with over hundred AMERICAN WIGEON at
Hangman's Creek along Stave's Landing. Waterfowl there included 150
RING-NECKED DUCK, 25 RUDDY DUCK, plus TUNDRA SWAN, GADWALL, PINTAIL,
SHOVELER, GREEN-WINGED TEAL, and PIED-BILLED GREBE. Four BALD EAGLES were
reported along Stave's Landing Road along with EASTERN MEADOWLARK. At the
nearby Odessa water treatment plant was PIED BILLED GREBE plus 170
RING-NECKED DUCK, two LESSER SCAUP, along with BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED MERGANSER
and RUDDY DUCK. Two COMMON GOLDENEYE were found along Route 9 at the
Appoquinmink Creek bridge. HORNED GREBE was found at the Silver Run bridge.
Two RED-THROATED LOONS were found at the pumphouse along Route 9 at
Augustine Creek.

An AMERICAN BITTERN was found at Grier's Pond along Dutch Neck Road on
Thursday during the snowstorm. Six PIED-BILLED GREBES and AMERICAN COOT were
found at Thousand Acre Marsh. Lots of waterfowl have now returned to the
Ashton Tract off Thorntown Road. Highlights there included RING-NECKED DUCK,
COMMON MERGANSER, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, PIED-BILLED GREBE, plus 500
NORTHERN PINTAILS with SHOVELER and AMERICAN WIGEON. Also reported was
KILLDEER, MERLIN, and six BALD EAGLES. The woodlands at the Ashton Tract
produced GRAY CATBIRD, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, along with FOX, WHITE CROWNED,
and CHIPPING SPARROW.

Three LONG-TAILED DUCKS were seen flying along the Delaware River at
Delaware City waterfront. Three COMMON LOONS were found at Fort DuPont along
with CATBIRD, RUBY-CROWNED, and GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLETS. Two MUTE SWANS plus
4 WOOD DUCK were found at Dragon Run marsh along with GADWALL, WIGEON,
SHOVELER, GREEN-WINGED TEAL, RING-NECKED DUCK, HOODED and a RED-BREASTED
MERGANSER. An EASTERN PHOEBE was found on the south side of Lums Pond along
with YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER.

Thanks to those that contributed this week, including, John Hoyt, Will
McPhail, Steve Graff, Nancy Cunningham, Nancy Goggin, Rob Blye, Susie Ball,
Tom Roth, Teddy Burke, Jason Wood, John Long, Chris Bennett, Mike Moore,
Sean O'Connor, Christine Anderson, Joel Martin, Amy, James and Jim White,
Joe Sebastiani, Dave Mellow, Phil Thompson, Chris Rowe, Gerry Teig, Jerald
and Aaron Reb, Ken Wat, Chuck Brandt, Bill Stewart, Kim Steininger, Alissa
Kegelman, Kelley Nunn, Hannah Greenberg, John Skibicki, Lynn Smith, Sharon
Lynn, Sue Gruver, Hank Davis, Tim Freiday, Elizabeth Day, Frank Lenik,
Desiree Narango, Joe Russell, and Joe Swertinski. Remember, the Birdline
needs your sightings. Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good
birding! 

-end transcript

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Subject: not SNOW but SNGO
From: Kevin Bronson <000003b1cf891cb4-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 2017 22:06:04 -0500
It was brought to my attention that I made an error in my last post. I did not 
see a SNOW today. I meant to say SNGO (Snow Goose.) I did NOT see any owls 
today. Sorry for my mistake 


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Subject: Belted Kingfisher
From: Jerry <jerryhull AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 2017 20:50:51 -0500
Photographed this distant and uncooperative female Belted Kingfisher at Bombay 
Hook NWR this morning. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/doxydad/32639511222/in/dateposted-public/

Photograph by Jerry Hull of Clayton Delaware taken 2/8/2017

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Subject: GWFG and others at Raymond Pool Bombay Hook NWR
From: Kevin Bronson <000003b1cf891cb4-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 2017 19:59:48 -0500
Today (Feb. 8th 2017) eight GWFG (Greater White-fronted Geese) decided that I 
was finally worthy enough to be shown their Greatness. Also at Raymond Pool 
with the GWFG was a MAGO (Marbled Godwit) which was associating with eight AMAV 
(American Avocets) and fourteen GRYL (I will let you figure this one out.) 
There were also the usual suspects such as NOSH, NOPI, GWTE, CANG, SNOW, etc. 
This was during the noon hour. 


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Subject: American Birding Association Seeks Headquarters Manager
From: "Bell, Tyler" <belljt AT SI.EDU>
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2017 21:03:08 +0000
FYI, not too far away!

Tyler Bell
Edgewater, Maryland
belljt AT si.edu


American Birding Association Seeks Headquarters Manager

The American Birding Association (www.aba.org), a 501(c)3 non-profit 
headquartered in Delaware City, is seeking a full-time manager for its home 
office operations. 


Founded in 1969, the ABA inspires all people to enjoy and protect wild birds. 
We have an international membership of 13,000 and a variety of programs that 
support our mission. We offer a flexible, supportive, and varied work 
environment. 


We are looking for a personable, organized, experienced professional to manage 
our Delaware City headquarters operations and support offsite staff and 
volunteers. 


Principal duties include:

Help keep membership services and other functions coordinated and flowing 
smoothly and on time between ABA HQ and off-site staff. Perform and/or oversee 
printing, mailing, shipping and similar office functions. 


Staffing visitor center, answering phones, and coordinating staffing (paid and 
volunteer) at ABA headquarters with goal of providing excellent customer 
service and keeping consistent, appropriate opening hours for both phone 
callers and walk in visitors. 


Manage visitor services and small retail operation (in store and online). 
Maintain inventory and generate appropriate financial reports. Develop new 
products for store. 


Oversee maintenance and use of office facilities and systems (phone, computer, 
etc) 


Serve as Secretary for the ABA Board; support and facilitate quarterly board 
meetings and committee functions. 


Important qualifications include:

Organization, punctuality, and reliability

Excellent communications skills, written and oral

Excellent computer skills and comfort with developing new systems and basic 
troubleshooting of existing ones. 


Attention to finances; ability to use resources efficiently and work to 
increase revenue. 


Desire to work with a team to fulfill the ABA's mission of inspiring all people 
to enjoy and protect wild birds. While expertise in bird identification is not 
required for this position, developing an understanding of the needs and wants 
of the birding community is essential for long term success. Most important is 
a drive and desire to provide helpful, informative service to our members and 
guests. 


The successful applicant will report to and work closely with the ABA 
president. The position will involve managing a half-time visitor/member 
services employee. 


This will be a full-time staff position based in Delaware City with benefits 
including health and dental insurance. Pay rate is dependent on experience. 


To apply:

Interested candidates should submit a resume and cover letter which directly 
addresses your qualifications for this position. Please send your materials to 
jobs AT aba.org no later than February 15, 2017 and include "ABA HQ Manager" in 
the subject line. 

93 Clinton St., P.O. Box 744, Delaware City, DE 19706 * 302.838.3660 * 
800.850.2473 * www.aba.org/join 


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Subject: Great Horned Owl
From: Jerry <jerryhull AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2017 00:31:17 -0500
Pleasantly surprised when I spotted one of my Great Horned Owls in the woods 
today in Clayton, DE. The female was in the area and I could see her off in the 
tops of trees, but too many branches to get a shot. As always, she only stays 
around for a couple minutes before she flies off. This male was still calling 
out an hour later. I believe this is my first sighting of these two this year. 
They are nesting again close by this year, but getting to the nest would 
require me to get to close and I don’t want to disturb them. I’ll just 
settle seeing them finding me. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/doxydad/32717288996/in/dateposted-public/

Photo by Jerry Hull of Clayton, DE.

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Subject: Razorbills
From: Nancy Cunningham <nancy_c8899 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 5 Feb 2017 20:08:35 +0000
At the Indian River Inlet this afternoon there were 4 Razorbill, Red-throated 
and Common Loons, Northern Gannet, Bonapartes Gull, Red-necked Grebe, Black 
Scoter and expected sandpipers. 


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: St.Anne's Pond Levels RD Middletown
From: Christopher Rowe <0000011d90053296-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Sat, 4 Feb 2017 10:18:52 -0500
Greater White-fronted Goose among Canadas floating around the pond.

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Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, February 3rd, 2017
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 2017 21:42:22 -0500
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* February 3, 2017
* DEST1702.03
	
*Birds mentioned
GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE
Snow Goose
Ross's Goose
Cackling Goose
Tundra Swan
Mute Swan 
Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Wigeon
Northern Shoveler
Green-winged Teal
Canvasback
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Greater Scaup
Common Eider
Surf Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Long-tailed Duck
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Red-throated Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
Northern Gannet
Great Cormorant
Great Egret
Black-crowned Night Heron
Bald Eagle
Black-bellied Plover
MARBLED GODWIT
Ruddy Turnstone
Purple Sandpiper
Sanderling
Dunlin
Wilson's Snipe
American Woodcock
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
RAZORBILL
Bonaparte's Gull
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Eastern Screech-Owl
Barred Owl
Short-eared Owl
Long-eared Owl
American Kestrel
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon
Eastern Phoebe
COMMON RAVEN
Black-capped Chickadee
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Marsh Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
American Pipit
Cedar Waxwing
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER
Pine Warbler
"Ipswich" Savannah Sparrow
American Tree Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
Eastern Towhee
Eastern Meadowlark
Rusty Blackbird	
BREWER'S BLACKBIRD
Baltimore Oriole
Purple Finch

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: February 3, 2017
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For Friday February 3rd, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. The new unofficial Delaware year list
remains at 162 species this week.

A COMMON RAVEN was seen over Alapocos Run State Park, north of Wilmington on
Sunday, the second sighting this year. Alapocos Run State Park is off US
Route 202 opposite Bancroft Mills where the birds were seen this time last
year. Three RING-NECKED DUCKS and a COOT were seen off Blue Rocks Pond near
Rock Manor Golf Course. RING-NECKED DUCK, NORTHERN SHOVELER, PIED-BILLED
GREBE and COOT were seen at the Blue Ball Pond. AMERICAN TREE SPARROW was
seen in the brush near Blue Ball Barn and 110 SNOW GEESE was seen flying
over. CACKLING GEESE were again seen at Bellevue State Park.

GREATER SCAUP and a pair of male REDHEADS were seen at Hoopes's Reservoir in
Greenville. Those birds were seen with 150 RING-NECKED DUCK, 3 BUFFLEHEADS,
COMMON GOLDENEYE, HOODED and COMMON MERGANSER from the Route 82 Causeway.
Three RUDDY DUCK, 4 PIED-BILLED GREBES, and 25 AMERICAN COOTS were seen at
the Hillside Mill Cove, along with 3 BALD EAGLES. A pair of BALD EAGLES was
seen along the creek at Brandywine Creek State Park, along with NORTHERN
PINTAIL and COMMON MERGANSER.

The previous reported REDHEADS at Newark Reservoir were not seen this week,
but MUTE SWAN, WOOD DUCK, and 8 COMMON MERGANSERS were reported. HOODED
MERGANSERS were seen at the Bean Pond at Middle Run Natural Area near
Newark. BARRED OWL was found in the Middle Run valley. Land birds included
PILEATED WOODPECKER, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, WINTER
WREN, and FOX SPARROW. A NORTHERN HARRIER was seen hunting behind Christiana
Mall.

A female BALTIMORE ORIOLE continues to be seen at the Village of Lindell
Parkland off Mill Creek Road. PILEATED WOODPECKER, BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE,
BROWN CREEPER, and WINTER WREN were seen at Ashland Nature Center.
BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE was also seen at the White's feeder off Center Mill
Road with RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, plus MERLIN and EASTERN SCREECH OWL.

A SHORT-EARED OWL made an impromptu visit to Shearness Dike in Bombay Hook
National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna on Sunday. BARRED OWL continues to be
seen at Finis Pool. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS were doing their courtship dance in
the field on the left past the entrance gate on Wednesday morning. Also
reported was PEREGRINE FALCON at Raymond Pool, AMERICAN KESTREL at Raymond
Neck Road, and MERLIN on Whitehall Neck Road. The previous reported eight
GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE continue be seen at Raymond Pool. Other
waterfowl included TUNDRA SWAN, AMERICAN WIGEON, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN
PINTAIL, GREEN-WINGED TEAL, RUDDY DUCK, BUFFLEHEAD, and all three species of
MERGANSER, HOODED, COMMON, and RED-BREASTED. AMERICAN COOTS were seen by the
Daly Pullout. The previous reported MARBLED GODWIT has been seen in
intermittently in the mud flats opposite Shearness Pool along with GREATER
and LESSER YELLOWLEGS and WILSON'S SNIPE. Two BONAPARTE'S and a LESSER
BLACK-BACKED GULL were reported by the marsh. A BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON
was found at Raymond Pool. RUSTY BLACKBIRD, FOX SPARROW and PILEATED
WOODPECKER were found at Finis Pool.

A ROSS'S GOOSE was seen flying with a flock of SNOW GEESE over Frederica.
BROWN THRASHER, BROWN CREEPER, with RUBY-CROWNED and GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET
and EASTERN TOWHEE were found at the Delaware State University campus.

A BLACK-HEADED GULL with 20 BONAPARTE'S GULL'S continues to be seen at the
Wolfe Point Sewage Treatment Plant behind Midway near Rehoboth Beach. Silver
Lake in Rehoboth Beach had a peak count of 250 CANVASBACKS along with RED
BREASTED MERGANSER and RUDDY DUCK. REDHEAD, RING-NECKED DUCK, BUFFLEHEAD,
and HOODED MERGANSER were found at Spring Lake along Route 1 north of Dewey
Beach. Thompson's Island, behind Spring Lake condominiums added 2 BELTED
KINGFISHER, plus  YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, WINTER WREN, BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCH, BROWN CREEPER, and CEDAR WAXWING. Eagle Creek near Bay Vista at
COMMON GOLDENEYE and 52 RUDDY DUCKS. 

A RAZORBILL was seen at Indian River Inlet today. LONG-TAILED DUCK, HOODED
MERGANSER, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, BRANT, and all three species of SCOTER,
WHITE-WINGED, SURF, and BLACK were seen at the inlet this week. BONAPARTE'S
and LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL were seen on the beach. RUDDY TURNSTONE and
PURPLE SANDPIPER with SANDERLING and DUNLIN were on the jetty along with
GREAT CORMORANT. A RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH was found in the pines by the inlet
bridge.

MUTE SWAN was reported with TUNDRA SWAN at Assawoman Wildlife Area near
Fenwick Island. GADWALL, AMERICAN WIGEON, and HOODED MERGANSER were found on
the ponds. MARSH WREN and EASTERN TOWHEE were found along the edges.

Three GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE were seen at Gordon's Pond in Cape
Henlopen State Park on the marsh side opposite bench # 5. GADWALL, SHOVELER
and BUFFLEHEAD were found on the pond. BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH was found in
the woods. Two immature drakes and a hen COMMON EIDER were seen at the
Harbor of Refuge lighthouse. A flock of the 113 SNOW BUNTINGS were seen at
the Cape Henlopen point on Monday along with BRANT, COMMON and RED-THROATED
LOONS, SURF and BLACK SCOTER, and NORTHERN GANNET. PURPLE FINCH, FOX
SPARROW, and BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH were found at feeders at the Seaside
Nature Center. Birders on the Cape May Lewes Ferry reported 16 GREAT
CORMORANTS, 120 NORTHERN GANNETS, HORNED GREBE, LONGTAILED DUCK, and
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER while crossing over to New Jersey. There was also a
PEREGRINE FALCON perched on the harbor jetty.

A PINE WARBLER and RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH continue be coming to feeders at
Wharton's Bluff near Millsboro. An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was seen today at
the Bethany Beach Nature Center. Another ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was found in
a yard near Lewes. All three species of NUTHATCHES, WHITE-BREASTED,
RED-BREASTED, and BROWN-HEADED were coming to a feeder at on in Angola Neck.
EASTERN TOWHEES were found in the Camelot development of Rehoboth Beach.

A male BREWER'S BLACKBIRD was found along Thirteen Curves Road between
Draper and Cods Road near Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge. WOOD DUCK and
CACKLING GOOSE were also seen along Thirteen Curves Road. A flock of 75
BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS were seen on Fowler's Beach with GREATER YELLOWLEGS,
and DUNLIN. TUNDRA SWAN, SNOW GOOSE, BUFFLEHEAD, and plus SURF and BLACK
SCOTER were seen offshore. Two "Ipswich" SAVANNAH SPARROWS and EASTERN
MEADOWLARK were found along the Fowler's Beach Road, plus MARSH WREN at the
bridge, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, and BARRED OWL at dawn along the road curve.
RED-BREASTED and HOODED MERGANSER were reported at Prime Hook Beach Road
along with BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, LESSER and GREATER YELLOWLEGS. 25 COMMON
MERGANSERS and 2 HOODED MERGANSERS were found at Turkle's Pond. AMERICAN
WOODCOCKS were "peenting" at dawn by the Prime Hook headquarters.

An EASTERN PHOEBE was found at along the Nanticoke River at the Pete Gum
Tract in Nanticoke Wildlife Area along with WHITE-BREASTED and BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCH, WINTER WREN, and the mimic thrushes including CATBIRD and BROWN
THRASHER. This is also a great spot for raptors including BARRED OWL,
RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, and BALD EAGLE. A flock of AMERICAN PIPITS were seen
near Milford along Cedar Creek Road.

A LONG-EARED OWL was heard calling at Bay Pointe near Summit Bridge.
BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE is also coming to a feeder in the Bay Pointe
development. The C&D canal Wildlife Area West of Summit Bridge had a BARRED
OWL plus 2 BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES and 2 PURPLE FINCHES.

Three RED-THROATED LOONS and 300 SNOW GEESE were seen off Augustine Beach
near Port Penn. GREAT EGRET continues at Grier's Pond off Dutch Neck Road.
Waterfowl is beginning to return to the Ashton Tract at Thousand Acre Marsh
including COMMON MERGANSER, SHOVELER, and 50 NORTHERN PINTAILS. There was
also six BALD EAGLES and a COOPER'S HAWK reported. CHIPPING SPARROW was
found at the Ashton Tract on Sunday.

Another GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was found at the Ponds of Bayberry along
St. Ann's Church Road, south of Middletown. That make "Speckle-bellies" in
all three counties in the state! BROWN CREEPERS were found at Blackbird
State Forest.

It is being reported that the Delaware Department of Natural Resources is
closing the Redden Forest rest stop parking lot due to illegal activities.
This will make for difficult birding for Southern specialties like YELLOW
THROATED, PROTHONOTARY, and WORM EATING WARBLER during the early spring.

Thanks to those that contributed this week, including, Billy Weber, Mike
Bowen, Armas Hill, Jason Wood, Jean-Marie Gauthier, Kim Steininger, Bill
Telfair, Jim Fioventuro, Jared Clarke, John Dunn, Andy McGann, Keith
Leonard, John Long, Mike Moore, , Rod Murray, Rob Blye, Diane Kane, Wayne
Longbottom, Dick Plambeck, Joel Martin, Amy and Jim White, Joe Sebastiani,
Derek Stoner, Tim Freiday, Sally O'Byrne, Chris Rowe, Gerry Teig, Jerald and
Aaron Reb, Ken Wat, John Skibicki, Lynn Smith, Sharon Lynn, Sue Gruver, Joe
Russell, and Rachel Shapiro. Remember, the Birdline needs your sightings.
Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net.
Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

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Subject: Black-backed Oriole in PA
From: Jerald Reb <jrebelboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 2017 20:35:19 -0500
All,

There is currently a Black-backed Oriole in Sinking Spring, PA (about 2 hours 
from Smyrna). The provenance is somewhat questionable, but if accepted by the 
ABA records committee, this would be a first for the ABA area (a record from 
California in the early 2000's was rejected). More details can be found here: 
http://blog.aba.org/2017/02/abarare-black-backed-oriole-pennsylvania.html 

If you chase this bird, please follow the rules laid out in the post.

Jerald

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Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch - Hockessin, DE
From: Amy White <amywwhite AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 2017 16:14:22 +0000
Red-breasted Nuthatch at our suet feeders this morning (First-of-Year for our 
yard). 

Spotted by our son James and then seen by the rest of us. 

We hadn't seen one in our yard since the fall, when we had one or two here 
every day for a couple of months. 


-Amy & Jim White 
White Yard C 
Hockessin, DE 

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Subject: Re: Common Raven
From: "sally o'byrne" <salobyrne AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2017 17:31:49 -0500
There have been sightings of the Raven several times, but none seen carrying 
sticks that I’m aware of. I walked around Bancroft Mills and Alapocas Park 
this afternoon and saw no Ravens. They may be in the area, but I don’t know 
when they start actively setting up territories. I believe they were seen 
carrying sticks in March in 2016. 


Sally




> On Jan 29, 2017, at 11:52 AM, Jerald  wrote:
> 
> Has anyone been to Bancroft Mills this year to see if the Ravens are
> nesting again?
> 
> Jerald
> 
> On Sun, Jan 29, 2017 at 11:03 AM, Ken Wat  wrote:
> 
>> A Common Raven flew over me this morning while birding at Alapocas near
>> Bancroft Mills.  The birds were very active this morning.  Had views of
>> Pileated, Yellow Bellied Sapsucker, Down, Hairy Woodpeckers and a lot of
>> Robins, Starlings and Juncos.
>> 
>> 
>> Ken Wat
>> Newark, DE
>> 
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
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>> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> *Jerald*
> 
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Subject: Re: Common Raven
From: Jerald <jrebelboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2017 11:52:31 -0500
Has anyone been to Bancroft Mills this year to see if the Ravens are
nesting again?

Jerald

On Sun, Jan 29, 2017 at 11:03 AM, Ken Wat  wrote:

> A Common Raven flew over me this morning while birding at Alapocas near
> Bancroft Mills.  The birds were very active this morning.  Had views of
> Pileated, Yellow Bellied Sapsucker, Down, Hairy Woodpeckers and a lot of
> Robins, Starlings and Juncos.
>
>
> Ken Wat
> Newark, DE
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
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>



-- 
*Jerald*

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Subject: Common Raven
From: Ken Wat <kenw70 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2017 11:03:54 -0500
A Common Raven flew over me this morning while birding at Alapocas near
Bancroft Mills.  The birds were very active this morning.  Had views of
Pileated, Yellow Bellied Sapsucker, Down, Hairy Woodpeckers and a lot of
Robins, Starlings and Juncos.


Ken Wat
Newark, DE

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Subject: A good yard morning
From: Ann Marie Dinkel <Adinkl AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Jan 2017 11:38:58 -0500
On this gloomy morning, my yard was buzzing with some good birds.  In
addition to the chickadees, Titmouse, junco and white throated sparrows:

 

Red Breasted Nuthatch

White breasted nuthatch

Yellow Bellied Sapsucker

Downey

Red Bellied woodpecker

Goldfinches

 

Ann Dinkel

Red Mill Pond

Lewes, DE

 


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Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, January 27th, 2017
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Jan 2017 06:44:15 -0500
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* January 27, 2017
* DEST1701.27
	
*Birds mentioned
GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE
Snow Goose
Ross's Goose
Tundra Swan
Mute Swan 
Gadwall
EURASIAN WIGEON
American Wigeon
Northern Shoveler
Green-winged Teal
Canvasback
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Lesser Scaup
COMMON EIDER
Surf Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Long-tailed Duck
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Wild Turkey
Red-throated Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
Great Cormorant
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Egret
Black-crowned Night Heron
Bald Eagle
Black-bellied Plover
MARBLED GODWIT
Ruddy Turnstone
Purple Sandpiper
Sanderling
Dunlin
Long-billed Dowitcher
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
RAZORBILL
Bonaparte's Gull
Laughing Gull
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Forster's Tern
Barred Owl
Short-eared Owl
American Kestrel
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon
Eastern Phoebe
Black-capped Chickadee
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Marsh Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Gray Catbird
Lapland Longspur
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER
Pine Warbler
"Sharp-Tailed Type" Sparrow
American Tree Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Eastern Meadowlark
Baltimore Oriole
Purple Finch
Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: January 27, 2017
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For Friday January, 27th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. The new unofficial Delaware year list
increased to 162 species this week.

During the nor'easter last weekend, a LAUGHING GULL was reported at the
parking lot at Frawley Stadium in downtown Wilmington. Additionally, a
WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW was found there on Wednesday. A pair of COMMON
MERGANSERS were seen on the Brandywine Creek opposite Wilmington Hospital

A RAZORBILL was seen flying by the point at Cape Henlopen State Park on
Wednesday. BRANT, BLACK SCOTER, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, plus SANDERLING and
DUNLIN were also reported FOX and CHIPPING SPARROW were seen found at the
Seaside Nature Center along with all three species of NUTHATCH,
WHITE-BREASTED, BROWN-HEADED, and RED-BREASTED. ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was
found at the Gordon's Pond Trail, along with BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH and
CHIPPING SPARROW.

A winter plumage adult BLACK-HEADED GULL continues to be seen at the Wolfe
Point Sewage Treatment Plant at Midway with 5 BONAPARTE'S GULL'S. Eight WILD
TURKEYS were seen outside the plant on Sunday. Silver Lake in Rehoboth Beach
had 475 CANVASBACKS, plus LESSER SCAUP, HOODED MERGANSER, and RUDDY DUCK.

COMMON EIDER, LONG-TAILED DUCK, BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON GOLDENEYE, RED-BREASTED
MERGANSER, BRANT, and all three species of SCOTER, WHITE-WINGED, SURF and
BLACK were reported at Indian River Inlet. HORNED GREBE, GREAT CORMORANT,
and both COMMON and RED-THROATED LOONS were seen offshore. PURPLE SANDPIPER,
RUDDY TURNSTONE, and SANDERLING were seen on the jetty. A single FORSTER'S
TERN was seen feeding in the inlet.

EURASIAN WIGEON was again seen at Assawoman Wildlife Area along with 4 MUTE
SWANS. Other waterfowl reported included AMERICAN WIGEON, GADWALL, PINTAIL,
plus HOODED and COMMON MERGANSER. 50 wild turkeys were seen in the fields at
Assawoman, RED-BREASTED and BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCHES were found in the woods.
RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH and PINE WARBLER were reported at Wharton's Bluff near
Frankfurt along Indian River. A flock of 25 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS were seen
at Indian River during the storm. RED-BREASTED and BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH was
also found at Bethany Beach Nature Center along with an ORANGE-CROWNED
WARBLER. A flock of 42 WOOD DUCK were seen in the pond near Angola. Only
LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL was seen at the waste treatment site near
Hardscrabble.

ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was also found at the headquarters at Prime Hook
National Wildlife Refuge near Milton. There were no reports of NORTHERN
SHRIKE this week. SHORT-EARED OWL was reported at Oyster Rock Road. A
LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER was found along Prime Hook Beach Road with DUNLIN.
GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS were also reported, along with LESSER
BLACK-BACKED GULL. ROSS'S GOOSE was reported with SNOW GEESE along the
Fowler's Beach Road plus at Deep Branch Road. Waterfowl seen included TUNDRA
SWAN, BRANT, GADWALL, SHOVELER, PINTAIL, BUFFLEHEAD, plus HOODED and COMMON
MERGANSER. "SHARP-TAILED TYPE" SPARROWS were reported at Fowler's Beach and
Prime Hook Beach along with MARSH WREN, and EASTERN MEADOWLARK. AMERICAN
KESTREL was seen at Fowler's Beach Road. SURF and BLACK SCOTER, BUFFLEHEAD,
RED-THROATED LOON, SANDERLING, and 4 HORNED GREBES were seen off Broadkill
Beach. A GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was found in the field off Cove Neck
Road near Milton.

Three BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS were seen off Lighthouse Road going to
Mispillion Inlet. RED-THROATED LOON was seen at Kitts Hummock. Ten EASTERN
MEADOWLARK were reported at the Pickering Beach Road. Two LAPLAND LONGSPURS
were found among 300 HORNED LARK at Cartanza Road near the town of Little
Creek, along with AMERICAN KESTREL.

MARBLED GODWIT was again found at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge near
Smyrna. The bird was seen on the mud flats opposite Shearness Pool from the
Frink Tower. Waterfowl scene included 170 TUNDRA SWAN, SHOVELER, GADWALL,
PINTAIL, GREEN-WINGED TEAL, RING-NECKED DUCK, BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED and COMMON
MERGANSER, plus RUDDY DUCK. PEREGRINE FALCON and AMERICAN KESTREL were
reported along with several BALD EAGLES. A DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT was
found at the refuge during the storm on Saturday. Landbirds scene included
EASTERN PHOEBE, FOX, and AMERICAN TREE SPARROW.

The retention pond at the South Smyrna on-ramp to Route 1 had a REDHEAD with
8 RING-NECKED DUCKS on Saturday. On Sunday, only 20 HOODED MERGANSERS were
found. BARRED OWL was found Saturday at the town at Cheswold.

A male CANVASBACK was found at the spillway to Augustine Creek along Route
9, south of Port Penn on Saturday. RED-THROATED LOON was seen there on
Sunday. Also reported was BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON, and HOODED MERGANSER. A group
of 14 GREAT EGRETS were seen Saturday at the Ashton Tract at Thousand Acre
Marsh. TUNDRA SWAN and PINTAIL were also reported, along with a GRAY
CATBIRD. GREAT EGRET was also seen Wednesday at Grier's Pond along Dutch
Neck Road. A MERLIN was found at the Gray Fox Farms. Three RED-BREASTED
NUTHATCH was reported at Blackbird State Forest opposite the headquarters
building. 

Newark Reservoir continues to have 2 drake REDHEADS plus LESSER SCAUP,
COMMON MERGANSER and RING-NECKED DUCK. You can access the reservoir from
Paper Mill Road just past the bridge over White Clay Creek. There is ample
parking and a pathway up the hill. A BARRED OWL was reported at Toad Hill in
Bear. A PEREGRINE FALCON was seen on the E-Building of Christiana Hospital.

RING-NECKED DUCK, BUFFLEHEAD, RUDDY DUCK COMMON MERGANSER, and PIED-BILLED
GREBE continue be seen at Hoope's Reservoir near Greenville. BARRED OWL was
seen at the Hillside Mill Cove.

A female BALTIMORE ORIOLE continues to be seen at the Village of Linden
Parkland off Milltown Road between Newark in Wilmington. RED-BREASTED
NUTHATCH was reported this week in Brandywine Hundred along Grubb Road.
BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES were reported this week at Shipley Road near Weldin
Rd., Center Mill Road near Yorklyn, and Bay Pointe, south of Glasgow. A
female PURPLE FINCH was also reported at Bay Pointe. 

Thanks to those that contributed this week, including, Jason Wood,
Jean-Marie Gauthier, Bob Edelen, Armas Hill, Judy Montgomery, Duane Kornbau,
Andy McGann, John Long, Chris Bennett, Mike Moore, , Rod Murray, Jim
Lenhard, Sean O'Connor, Gwen Moore, Christine Anderson, Kitt Heckscher, Joel
Martin, Amy and Jim White, Joe Sebastiani, Sally O'Byrne, Chris Rowe, Gerry
Teig, Jerald and Aaron Reb, Ken Wat, Alissa Kegelman, John Skibicki, Lynn
Smith, Sharon Lynn, Sue Gruver, Joe Russell, totally Hochhausler and Rachel
Shapiro. Remember, the Birdline needs your sightings. Please call your
reports into 302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week,
this is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

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Subject: Seeking Redheads at Newark Reservoir, New Castle DE
From: Debbie Beer <debbeer1023 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 12:51:24 -0500
Hi friends,
I'd like to look for the Redhead ducks that have been seen frequently at
Newark Reservoir.

I've never been there, and wondering about parking and reservoir access. Is
it a far walk to view the water? All information is greatly appreciated!

Thanks,
Debbie Beer
Delaware County, PA

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Subject: Keep an eye out for the one-eyed GBBG in New Castle County
From: Andrew McGann <andrew.mcgann AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2017 03:36:18 +0000
Hey all,

I took a quick look at the birds at Augustine Beach, near Port Penn in New
Castle County, on Sunday afternoon. It was still very foggy with heavy
mist, and there wasn't much to see bird-wise. However, the one
non-Ring-billed Gull loafing with the Ring-bills was a rather unique and
impresssive first-cycle Great Black-backed Gull.

I didn't realize what I was seeing at first, but on closer inspection, this
bird had experienced a serious trauma to the right side of its face, and
seems to have lost its right eye. I don't think that it's necessarily in
need of rescue, because it seemed to be otherwise in decent health. At
least for now.

But I spent some time observing this bird. I'm impressed with its
toughness. The other side of its face is perfectly normal, and as I sat
there watching it, it reminded me of the Batman villain Two-Face. Scary on
one side, handsome on the other.

Additionally, one of the coolest things about birds with unique injuries is
that they can become recognizable INDIVIDUALS to birders. (I'm sure birds
are always capable of discerning and remembering other members of their
species individually.) But for us humans, these gross injuries or
deformities allow us to easily discerned them from the anonymous multitudes
of their conspecifics. It's similar to the color-coded leg bands that
ornithologists use in their mark-resight studies, only more natural. Quite
a few years ago, I recall a unique Great Egret in Pennsylvania that many
birders enjoyed keeping tabs on through a summer on the Susquehanna River.
That bird was recognizable from the fact that it had lost one leg just
below the ankle joint.

Here's a quick video clip of this GBBG:

https://vimeo.com/200610615

So, if you're in the vicinity of Port Penn, keep an out for the one-eyed
Great Black-backed Gull.

Good birding,
Andy
-- 
++Sent from my iPhone++

Andrew J. McGann
(717) 891-8145
andrew.mcgann AT gmail.com
Product Specialist, Cellular Tracking Technologies
Board of Directors, Pennsylvania Society for Ornithology

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Subject: First bird of the Trump era
From: Rodney Murray <rcmurray213 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 13:34:12 -0500
   Just for the record, moments after our new Commander-in-Chief was sworn
in yesterday, I took a peek through the kitchen window to note my first
bird seen under the new administration.  Lo and behold, it was a FOY
Chipping Sparrow searching under the feeder for tidbits that either God or
I had provided.

   I had hoped for something a tad more dramatic like a Bald Eagle or, ...
or even a Turkey Vulture.

Rod Murray, Middletown DE

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Subject: Together for Birds Petition
From: Steve Holmer <sholmer AT ABCBIRDS.ORG>
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 21:32:27 +0000
Together for Birds Petition 
 


Bird conservation is a core American value, whether inspired by the powerful 
flight of a Bald Eagle or the charisma of a Golden-crowned Kinglet. This value 
is widely supported by citizens of all political persuasions. Now, we face a 
critical moment. The environment was not a major issue in the recent election, 
but decisions made by the incoming Administration and Congress could have 
far-reaching impacts for birds and their habitats. 


That's why we need everyone who cares about birds to join together and sign 
this 
petition 
to protect cornerstone legislation and other top conservation priorities. This 
may be the single best opportunity ever for our community to stand together for 
birds. Please show your support for bird conservation and ensure that the 
progress we have made in recent decades is preserved. 


We will present the petition and signatures to the new Administration and 
Congress on January 23, just after the Inauguration. Please 
sign 
to show your support for bird conservation today! 


Sign the Petition


https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=290 


Forward the Petition

Please use Facebook, Twitter (#togetherforbirds) and email to let family, 
friends and colleagues know about this effort to join together in support of 
birds. 

Organizations Can Endorse the Petition

To sign on your organization, please fill in the name in the box provided


https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=290 


Organizations, Please Circulate the Petition

Please forward this link to your lists 
https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=290 


"TOGETHER FOR BIRDS" PETITION



Dear [Administration and Congress],



We, the undersigned organizations and individuals, represent a broad 
cross-section of the bird conservation community. We aim to build a dialogue 
with the new Administration and Congress to promote the conservation of birds 
and their habitats, which are of fundamental value to the American people. 


More than 60 million Americans care deeply about birds, and bird-related 
recreation contributes more than $36 billion to our economy. Birds also act as 
the "canary in the coal mine" for our environment and provide valuable benefits 
to society, from pollination to pest control. But birds are in trouble, with 
many declining in population or facing extinction. 


We endorse the following priorities to ensure that birds and their habitats 
continue to be effectively conserved for the benefit of all Americans. We ask 
that you please support: 


1. THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT: Protect the Act that has helped recover our 
national bird, the Bald Eagle, and other species in trouble. 


2. THE MIGRATORY BIRD TREATY ACT: Safeguard the only law that exists to protect 
most American birds, and support the federal Duck Stamp, one of the nation's 
most successful conservation programs. 


3. FEDERAL FUNDING FOR BIRDS: Maintain and grow essential sources of federal 
support for migratory bird conservation. 


4. THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY: Ensure that the EPA can continue its 
vital work to protect people and birds from dangerous pesticides and other 
toxins. 


5. LAND MANAGEMENT FOR BIRDS AND PEOPLE: Ensure that public lands remain 
public, are properly managed for wildlife, and that recreational access is 
maintained. 


We also acknowledge that many other national and state initiatives are of 
critical importance to birds, and that citizens and private enterprise can play 
vital roles in these conservation efforts. 


Let's work together for birds!









Steve Holmer
Vice President of Policy
American Bird Conservancy &
Director, Bird Conservation Alliance
202-888-7490
sholmer AT abcbirds.org

www.abcbirds.org, 
https://abcbirds.org/get-involved/bird-conservation-alliance/, ABC on 
Facebook, 
ABC Videos 






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Subject: REMINDER: January DOS Meeting - "State of the Birds - A Presidential Address" with Bill Stewart - Tomorrow at 7:00 PM
From: Anthony Gonzon <atgonzon AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 06:11:26 -0600
 Greetings all,

DOS wants you to help us kick off the New Year right! Join us tomorrow night 
for a special presentation by DOS President Bill Stewart titled "State of the 
Birds - A Presidential Address"! Come join us and bring a friend or two! 


Based upon the most recent studies and scientific-based publications, our birds 
are more and more challenged for survival as each year turns. Bill will spend 
the evening reviewing and discussing some of the findings, both from the most 
challenging and distressing species, and also the good news makers. 


Bill Stewart is the Director of Conservation and Community along with Young 
Birder Program Coordinator for the American Birding Association. A passionate 
birder for over 37 years, Bill is currently serving as the President of the 
Delmarva Ornithological Society. Previously, Bill served as the Conservation 
Chair for DOS and is the founder and coordinator of the Delaware Bird-A-Thon, 
the Wilmington Peregrine Falcon Webcam Project, and the Lights Out! Wilmington 
initiative. Most recently, Bill was awarded the 2014 Rosalie Edge Conservation 
Award from the Delaware Valley Ornithological Club. In his free time, Bill 
likes to spend time with his five children, grandson, and do a little surfing. 


DOS Monthly meetings are held the third Wednesday of each month from September 
through May at Ashland Nature Center in Hockessin, DE. They are free and all 
are welcome. Social hour and refreshments start at 7:00pm, followed by the 
meeting and presentations at 7:30pm. 


If you'd like to bring snacks to share or contribute photographs to the 
pre-meeting slideshow, please contact our meeting hostess, Kelley Nunn at: 
kelley.nunn AT gmail.com. 


Anthony Gonzon
DOS Program Chair

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Subject: Alapocas walk Wednesday 8:30 am
From: "sally o'byrne" <salobyrne AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 21:59:45 -0500
Greetings,
I will be leading a mid-Winter bird walk on Wednesday, leaving from Blue Ball 
Barn at Alapocas State Park. It is advertised from 8:30 - 10:30, but I am 
willing to walk a little longer if the group is willing and the birds are good. 
Tuesday’s rain should have cleared and the temps will be quite mild. This is 
a good walk for those who would like to spend time on some common winter birds. 
There is also the faint possibility of seeing a Raven, which showed up last 
year - they seem to like abandoned buildings. 


For anyone interested in seeing Bancroft Mills since the fire, there are good 
views of the remnants of the old mill. If you haven’t been to Alapocas 
before, you will be surprised by this gem of an urban park. 


Sally O'Byrne

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Subject: Indian river inlet
From: Rodney Murray <0000015ec94d3aab-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 12:14:14 -0500
9 common eiders at IRI, two of which appear to be first winter males. The males 
are currently just north of the north jetty- the females are south of the south 
jetty. Also, one horned grebe along with the usual species seen here. 


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Black-headed Gull - Wolfe Neck Wastewater Facility
From: Andy Urquhart <000000c02f6624dc-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 08:30:25 -0500
Late last week, birding with Ellen Bacino, I observed an  adult 
Black-headed Gull at the Wolfe Neck Wastewater Treatment plant in Rehoboth 
Beach. We 

were there for about 45 minutes at mid-day, and the  bird flew in over the 
first impoundment for approximately 30 seconds  before flying out of sight 
beyond the furthest dike. The bird did not  land in view, so in-flight field 
marks were needed - white triangle on upper  wing, dark primaries on under 
wing, dark red legs (extended as the bird  approached the water surface) and 
heavier bill than Bonaparte's Gull (I could  not see the red bill color in the 
few seconds I looked for it).
 
I apologize for the late report, but little harm done as the plant is  
closed and inaccessible on weekends. Black-headed Gull is regular here in the  
winter. In past years I have seen up to a dozen or so lounging on the dikes  
and in the water. This is also a good location for ducks. While we were 
present there were many Shovelers and smaller numbers of Mallards, Blacks, and 

one  American Wigeon.
 
For those who haven't been there before, the facility is at the end of  
Wolfe Neck Road, which goes east from northbound Route 1 at the corner with  
the Wawa. Proceed through the gate and park near the building. Enter the  
office building, check in with someone there to let them know that you are 
there 

 to look at birds, and go straight through the building to an observation  
area next to the first impoundment. I believe they will ask you not  to go 
beyond that paved area.
 
Good birding!
 
Andy Urquhart
Oxford, PA

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Subject: Re: caracara, ash-throated, big flocks snow geese?
From: Fred Atwood <fatwood AT FLINTHILL.ORG>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 19:19:38 -0500
Several people have given me great input as always! Thank you VERY much. No
more need to respond.  However, if anyone is out tomorrow and finds
anything rare between Indian River inlet and Bombay Hook before 3:30 please
shoot me an email or text.
All the best
Fred


On Sun, Jan 15, 2017 at 5:31 PM, Fred Atwood  wrote:

> Dear Delaware Birders
> I am planning to bring some of my Virginia students and teen birders to
> Delaware tomorrow to look for birds.  For the non-birders in the group I
> want to astound them with a huge flock of snow geese.  For the birders, I
> was hoping to try for the caracara and the ash-throated flycatcher.
> However, I don't see any recent eBird reports of those birds.
> So I have 4 questions:
>
> 1. Where have been the best possibilities recently for seeing huge flocks
> of snow geese? We expect to be in DE from about 10 AM to about 3:30 PM, and
> I was going to start around Prime Hook/Broadkill Beach/Cods Rd area.
> 2. Has anyone seen the caracara or ash-throated flycatcher recently? If
> so, when, and  also where if different from the eBird noted locations.
> 3. I have never been to Gordon's Pond. How do you get there from Cape
> Henlopen. (No need to tel me if it is just the route my phone will give
> me.)  Is there a specific trail/hotspot there that is most recommended?
> 4. If anyone sees a Snowy Owl tomorrow in the area (or if you have seen
> one this weekend)   please email me. (Or call/text me tomorrow with any
> rarities found 7032421675 <(703)%20242-1675>)
>
> Thanks for your input
> Happy Martin Luther King Day, a very inspiring man
> Fred Atwood
> Flint Hill School, Oakton VA
>

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Subject: caracara, ash-throated, big flocks snow geese?
From: Fred Atwood <fatwood AT FLINTHILL.ORG>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 17:31:04 -0500
Dear Delaware Birders
I am planning to bring some of my Virginia students and teen birders to
Delaware tomorrow to look for birds.  For the non-birders in the group I
want to astound them with a huge flock of snow geese.  For the birders, I
was hoping to try for the caracara and the ash-throated flycatcher.
However, I don't see any recent eBird reports of those birds.
So I have 4 questions:

1. Where have been the best possibilities recently for seeing huge flocks
of snow geese? We expect to be in DE from about 10 AM to about 3:30 PM, and
I was going to start around Prime Hook/Broadkill Beach/Cods Rd area.
2. Has anyone seen the caracara or ash-throated flycatcher recently? If so,
when, and  also where if different from the eBird noted locations.
3. I have never been to Gordon's Pond. How do you get there from Cape
Henlopen. (No need to tel me if it is just the route my phone will give
me.)  Is there a specific trail/hotspot there that is most recommended?
4. If anyone sees a Snowy Owl tomorrow in the area (or if you have seen one
this weekend)   please email me. (Or call/text me tomorrow with any
rarities found 7032421675)

Thanks for your input
Happy Martin Luther King Day, a very inspiring man
Fred Atwood
Flint Hill School, Oakton VA

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Subject: Orange crowned warbler
From: Nancy Cunningham <nancy_c8899 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 18:43:01 +0000
At 1:40 I observed an Orange-crowned Warbler near Prime Hook. Grey head with 
yellow belly and hanging upside down while foraging in the shrubs. Near the HQ 
on east side of field where maintenance sheds are to the west 


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: RFI: White-winged Dove
From: Debbie Beer <debbeer1023 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 11:53:48 -0500
Hi folks,
Thanks for all the great info! I was thinking of looking for that dove.

As someone doing a big year and finding myself chasing checklists for
regional specialties, I'd be very grateful for details indicated directly
on checklists. Especially if visitors are not welcome.

Lots of great social media chat groups, Facebook groups, etc. But I don't
always know where to look for info. I'll try to do this, especially for
rarities.

Bird on, and much luck to all in 2017! Thanks.

Debbie Beer
Philly birder

On Jan 15, 2017 11:15 AM, "dcoffin5"  wrote:

> There is addt,l note on facebook that White wing is private property and
> owner does not want birders to come around.  Note says if bird is seen on
> public viewing place then an update will be posted with specifics.
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
> -------- Original message --------From: Jerald Reb 
> Date: 1/15/17  9:55 AM  (GMT-05:00) To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU Subject:
> [de-birds] RFI: White-winged Dove
> Hi all,
>
> Does anyone have details on the White-winged Dove seen in Newark
> yesterday? It was entered into ebird with a photo but no additional
> details, and the location was set to the city of Newark.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Jerald
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
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>
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Subject: Re: RFI: White-winged Dove
From: dcoffin5 <dcoffin5 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 11:15:36 -0500
There is addt,l note on facebook that White wing is private property and owner 
does not want birders to come around.  Note says if bird is seen on public 
viewing place then an update will be posted with specifics. 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Jerald Reb  Date: 
1/15/17 9:55 AM (GMT-05:00) To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU Subject: [de-birds] RFI: 
White-winged Dove 

Hi all,

Does anyone have details on the White-winged Dove seen in Newark yesterday? It 
was entered into ebird with a photo but no additional details, and the location 
was set to the city of Newark. 


Thanks,

Jerald

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: RFI: White-winged Dove
From: Jerald Reb <jrebelboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 09:55:33 -0500
Hi all,

Does anyone have details on the White-winged Dove seen in Newark yesterday? It 
was entered into ebird with a photo but no additional details, and the location 
was set to the city of Newark. 


Thanks,

Jerald

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: N. Shrike
From: Jeff & Deborah Climie <climie99 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 18:04:35 -0500
My son, Anthony, and my in-laws, Dave & Joy Peters, had our big birding
day. We started down south and worked our way to Port Mahon. We saw 71
birds today, which was a good day. We stopped at Prime Hook and walked the
Boardwalk Trail. Just as we began the trail, while it was sleeting, the
Northern Shrike was in the top of the tree along the right side of the
trail where the two tall trees flank the trail on each side about 50' down.
It flew toward the back of the tree line where the trail goes through the
area where lots of trees blew down last year. As we circled the meadow, it
flew back up in the tree on the left side of the trail where we first saw
it. Joy got her camera and we were able to get a couple of photos, though
the lighting was bad. It flew to a tree in the middle of that meadow/brushy
area and then flew to the back tree line again. We were able to watch it
for 30 min. We were able to see the thinner mask, white rump, and the
lighter color back, which almost looked white. Will add photo later to
E-bird.

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Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, January 13th, 2017
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 20:49:39 -0500
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* January 13, 2017
* DEST1701.13
	
*Birds mentioned
Brant
GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE
Snow Goose
Ross's Goose
Cackling Goose
Tundra Swan
Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Wigeon
Northern Shoveler
Canvasback
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Greater Scaup
COMMON EIDER
Surf Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Long-tailed Duck
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Ring-necked Pheasant
Red-throated Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
Great Cormorant
Black-crowned Night Heron
Red-shouldered Hawk
Bald Eagle
American Coot
Black-bellied Plover
MARBLED GODWIT
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Dunlin
Purple Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
ICELAND GULL
Lesser Black-backed Gull
GLAUCOUS GULL
Barred Owl
Short-eared Owl
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
American Kestrel
Eastern Phoebe
Fish Crow
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
American Pipit
Cedar Waxwing
Snow Bunting
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER
Palm Warbler
Pine Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat (found dead)
American Tree Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Rusty Blackbird
Boat-tailed Grackle
Purple Finch

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: January 13, 2017
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For 2017 on January, Friday the 13th, this is Birdline Delaware from the
Delaware Museum of Natural History in Greenville. The new unofficial
Delaware year list stands at 155 species this week.

The previous reported ROSS'S GOOSE was seen with 5 CACKLING GOOSE at
Bellevue State Park in Brandywine Hundred during the snowstorm on Saturday.
Those birds were look for on Sunday after the big freeze without success.
Only a YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER was found.

There have been no further sightings of CRESTED CARACARA, ASH-THROATED
FLYCATCHER, NORTHERN SHRIKE, or SNOWY OWL after last weekend's snowstorm
that left a foot of snow in Sussex County. The storm did influence birds
coming to feeders: ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was reported at Bay Vista along
with RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, PINE and PALM WARBLER were reported at
Hollyville, west of Lewes, an EASTERN PHOEBE shivering in the cold was seen
with RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, 2 CHIPPING SPARROWS and 3 PURPLE FINCHES at a
feeding station west of Georgetown. Another PINE WARBLER with CHIPPING and
WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW plus PURPLE FINCH were seen at Cheswold. PINE WARBLER,
RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH and a BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE was seen coming to a
feeder in Brookside, near Newark.

Northern Delaware had several sightings of BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES including
Shipley Road plus Grubb Road in Brandywine Hundred, Brandywine Creek State
Park, Yorklyn, Middle Run, Bay Pointe, and the C&D Canal at Summit Bridge.
RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH was seen at Christiana Manor in Newark with
YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER and 2 WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS. RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH
was also reported in Camden-Wyoming. AMERICAN TREE SPARROW was also seen
coming to White's feeder in Yorklyn.

There were several sightings of SNOW BUNTINGS in Kent County after the storm
including seven at Cartanza Road north of Little Creek with 90 HORNED LARK.
SNOW BUNTING was found at South Bowers Beach and on the Shearness Pool Road
at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna.

A MARBLED GODWIT was seen at Bombay Hook on the bayside of Shearness along
with DUNLIN. The previously intermittently reported flock of 8 GREATER
WHITE-FRONTED GEESE were seen again today at Shearness Pool. Other waterfowl
scene included TUNDRA SWAN, GADWALL, BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED MERGANSER, RUDDY
DUCK and PIED-BILLED GREBE. A BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON was seen at Night
Heron Island. SAVANNAH, FOX and AMERICAN TREE SPARROW were seen along the
Dike Road. A pair of WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS were seen at the feeder by the
evergreens on private property near the entrance gate. A GRAY CATBIRD was
found in the woods behind Finis Pool.

People looking for the SNOWY OWL in South Bowers Beach found a raft of 20
GREATER SCAUP plus COMMON GOLDENEYE, BUFFLEHEAD, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, and
COMMON LOON. Two BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, RUDDY TURNSTONE and DUNLIN with
BOAT-TAILED GRACKLES were seen along the beach. BOAT-TAILED GRACKLE and
SHORT-EARED OWL was seen at the fishing pier along Port Mahan. ROSS'S and
CACKLING GOOSE were seen with the large flock of SNOW GEESE at Barrett's
Chapel near Frederica. ROSS'S GOOSE was also seen flying over Johnny Cake
Landing Road, west of Frederica today. Yellow PALM WARBLER, RUSTY BLACKBIRD,
and BROWN THRASHER were also seen near Frederica. AMERICAN PIPIT was seen
off Carpenters Bridge Road.

A COMMON EIDER was reported at Indian River Inlet on Monday. The big flock
of birds of waterfowl off the jetty included BRANT, 75 LONG-TAILED DUCK and
110 BUFFLEHEAD with 5 WHITE-WINGED, BLACK and SURF SCOTER, GREATER SCAUP,
and COMMON GOLDENEYE. Four PURPLE SANDPIPERS, RUDDY TURNSTONE and SANDERLING
were seen on the jetty along with GREAT CORMORANT.

REDHEAD, LESSER SCAUP, RING-NECKED DUCK and HOODED MERGANSER was seen at
Spring Lake. 140 CANVASBACKS were seen at Silver Lake in Rehoboth Beach. The
NUTHATCH trifecta, RED-BREASTED. BROWN-HEADED, and WHITE-BREASTED continues
to be seen at the Cape Henlopen State Park Seaside Nature Center, along with
FOX SPARROW.

Jones Crossing Landfill, off Hardscrabble Road between Georgetown and
Seaford continues to have ICELAND and GLAUCOUS GULLS reported with 3 LESSER
BLACK-BACKED GULLS. An estimated 500 TUNDRA SWANS were seen with
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER and RUDDY DUCK. 

ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER and EASTERN PHOEBE were found along the Boardwalk
Trail at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Milton. AMERICAN KESTREL
was reported at the Little Neck Wildlife Area off Prime Hook Beach Road.
Waterfowl reported included WOOD DUCK, NORTHERN SHOVELER, BUFFLEHEAD, and
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER. GREATER YELLOWLEGS and DUNLIN were also seen. A raft
of 20 GREATER SCAUP were seen off Broadkill Beach

An adult RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was seen today along Cedar Swamp Road, off
Route 1 past the sharp 90 degree turn at Taylor's Bridge. RED-THROATED LOON
continues to be seen at the Augustine Beach boat ramp, south of Port Penn. A
drake COMMON GOLDENEYE was seen there on Sunday along with several
BUFFLEHEADS. A RING-NECKED PHEASANT was seen at the Ashton Tract on Saturday
along with GRAY CATBIRD, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, BROWN CREEPER, WINTER WREN
and both GOLDEN-CROWNED and RUBY CROWNED KINGLET.

A massive flock of birds feeding on berries at the C&D canal west of Summit
Bridge included 175 CEDAR WAXWINGS with 300 AMERICAN ROBIN along with
EASTERN BLUEBIRD, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, and 10 PURPLE FINCHES. A freshly
dead YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT was found along the roadside. COMMON MERGANSERS
were found in the canal and seen flying over.

Newark reservoir had COMMON MERGANSER, with a pair of WOOD DUCK and COMMON
GOLDENEYE. AMERICAN PIPIT was seen on the grassy edges of the path. BARRED
OWL was found at Middle Run Natural Area near Newark. BROWN THRASHER and FOX
SPARROW were seen near the Tri-State Bird Rescue buildings. There was also a
flight of 64 FISH CROW. RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH and BROWN
THRASHER were reported at White Clay Creek State Park.

Hoopes's reservoir near Greenville had GADWALL, AMERICAN WIGEON, 220
RING-NECKED DUCKS, 5 PIED-BILLED GREBES, 10 AMERICAN COOTS, plus HOODED and
COMMON MERGANSER. BALD EAGLE and BELTED KINGFISHER were seen hunting along
the shoreline. 30 COMMON MERGANSERS were seen flying over the Ashland Nature
Center along the Red Clay Creek. Birders going to Ashland be aware that the
covered bridge over at Brackenville Road is closed. AMERICAN TREE SPARROW
was reported at Brandywine Creek State Park.

Thanks to those that contributed this week, including, Gina Sheridan,
William Anderson, Dick Plambeck, John Long, Shannon Modla, Dave Mellow, Andy
McGann, Steve Graff, Kyle Klotz, Mike Moore, Brian McCaffrey, Dean Coffin,
Frank Lenik, Joel Martin, Nancy Goggin, Amy and Jim White, Derek Stoner, Joe
Sebastiani, Sally O'Byrne, Chris Rowe, Gerry Teig, Phil Thompson, Jerald and
Aaron Reb, Ken Wat, Alissa Kegelman, John Skibicki, Lynn Smith, Sharon Lynn,
Sue Gruver, Joe Russell, and Joe Swertinski. Remember, the Birdline needs
your sightings. Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good
birding!

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Subject: January DOS Meeting - "State of the Birds - A Presidential Address" - Wed. January 18
From: Anthony Gonzon <atgonzon AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 19:23:22 -0500
Greetings all,

DOS wants you to help us kick off the New Year right!  Join us next Wednesday 
for a special presentation by DOS President Bill Stewart!  Come join us and 
bring a friend or two! 


Based upon the most recent studies and scientific-based publications, our birds 
are more and more challenged for survival as each year turns.  Bill will spend 
the evening reviewing and discussing some of the findings, both from the most 
challenging and distressing species, and also the good news makers. 


Bill Stewart is the Director of Conservation and Community along with Young 
Birder Program Coordinator for the American Birding Association.  A passionate 
birder for over 37 years, Bill is currently serving as the President of the 
Delmarva Ornithological Society.  Previously, Bill served as the Conservation 
Chair for DOS and is the founder and coordinator of the Delaware Bird-A-Thon, 
the Wilmington Peregrine Falcon Webcam Project, and the Lights Out! Wilmington 
initiative.  Most recently, Bill was awarded the 2014 Rosalie Edge 
Conservation Award from the Delaware Valley Ornithological Club.  In his free 
time, Bill likes to spend time with his five children, grandson, and do a 
little surfing. 


DOS Monthly meetings are held the third Wednesday of each month from September 
through May at Ashland Nature Center in Hockessin, DE. They are free and all 
are welcome.  Social hour and refreshments start at 7:00pm, followed by the 
meeting and presentations at 7:30pm.  


If you’d like to bring snacks to share or contribute photographs to the 
pre-meeting slideshow, please contact our meeting hostess, Kelley Nunn at:  
Kelley.nunn AT gmail.com. 


Anthony Gonzon
DOS Program Chair

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

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Subject: Re: Ash-throated Flycatcher?
From: James DuHadaway <jbduhadaway AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 11:01:44 -0500
Tony,
I have rare bird alerts set up for Delaware from ebird for each day, the
Delaware list has been more or less dead since Sunday (day after the
storm).  There has been no sighting of the Ash-throated Flycatcher and
Caracara in that same time period.

Regards,
James DuHadaway

On Wed, Jan 11, 2017 at 10:03 AM, Tony Futcher 
wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> Has anyone encountered the Ash-throated Flycatcher since the freeze? I was
> toying with the idea of trying for it on Thursday (12th). Also curious
> about the Caracara, though I was able to find that several days ago.
> Thanks, Tony Futcher Hyattsville, MD
>
> --
> Tony Futcher
> Hyattsville, MD
>
>
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Subject: Ash-throated Flycatcher?
From: Tony Futcher <tonyfutcher1 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 10:03:49 -0500
Hi all,

Has anyone encountered the Ash-throated Flycatcher since the freeze? I 
was toying with the idea of trying for it on Thursday (12th). Also 
curious about the Caracara, though I was able to find that several days 
ago. Thanks, Tony Futcher Hyattsville, MD

-- 
Tony Futcher
Hyattsville, MD


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Subject: Common Eider, Iceland & Glaucous Gulls
From: Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 00:33:52 -0500
In the late morning today (Monday, 01/09/17), Dennis and I visited
Hardscrabble Lake (on the corner of Hardscrabble Road & Landfill Road) in
the Jones Crossroads Landfill west of Georgetown.  On the aforementioned
lake, we scored our year list trifecta of a 1st cycle ICELAND GULL, 1st
cycle GLAUCOUS GULL, and three adult LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLs. There was a
Fox Sparrow across the road as well.

By the end of the day, we dropped into Indian River Inlet and found a 1st
year male COMMON EIDER. The eider  is unmistakable with its immaculate
white upper breast contrasting nicely with its overall chocolate-brown
color. It was hanging out at the end of the north jetty or sometimes
farther out and mixing with the LONG-TAILED DUCKs.

Other birds of note here were a GREAT CORMORANT, a drake GREATER SCAUP, a
pair of BLACK SCOTERs, a drake SURF SCOTER, four PURPLE SANDPIPERs, and a
RUDDY TURNSTONE.

It was nice winter's day of birding!

Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE

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Subject: Re: Ash-throated Flycatcher & Caracara
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 18:54:03 -0500
Just wondering if anyone has been able to get to Cape Henlopen to see
whether the rarities are still around after the storm. I don;t know how the
park roads are (or the Delaware highways, for that matter).

I'm hoping to get up that way later in the week, once the snow melts.

Pat Valdata
Elkton/Crisfield, MD

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Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, January 6th, 2017
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 7 Jan 2017 18:35:03 -0500
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* January 6, 2017
* DEST1701.06
	
*Birds mentioned
Brant
Snow Goose
Rosss Goose
Cackling Goose
Tundra Swan
Mute Swan
Wood Duck
Gadwall
Blue-winged Teal
EURASIAN WIGEON
American Wigeon
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail
Green-winged Teal
Ring-necked Duck
Canvasback
Redhead
Greater Scaup
Lesser Scaup
COMMON EIDER
Surf Scoter 
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
RED-NECKED GREBE
Northern Gannet
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Egret
Tricolored Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Bald Eagle
GOLDEN EAGLE
Virginia Rail
Clapper Rail
American Coot
American Avocet
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Dunlin
Purple Sandpiper
American Woodcock
Wilsons Snipe
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Iceland GULL
Lesser Black Backed Gull
GLAUCOUS GULL
Forsters Tern
Barn Owl
Eastern Screech Owl
Great Horned Owl
SNOWY OWL
Barred Owl
Long-eared Owl
Belted Kingfisher
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Phoebe
ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER
NORTHERN SHRIKE
Horned Lark
Black-capped Chickadee
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Marsh Wren
Winter Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
Hermit Thrush
Gray Catbird
American Pipit
Snow Bunting
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER
Palm Warbler
Pine Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
American Tree Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Rusty Blackbird
Purple Finch
Pine Siskin

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: January 6, 2017
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For 2017, on Friday, January 6th, this is Birdline Delaware from the
Delaware Museum of Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware
year list for 2016 reached a record at 336 species last week! The new
unofficial Delaware year list stands at 153 species this week.

News just came in that SNOWY OWL was found at sitting on a chimney in South
Bowers Beach, south of Dover. South Bowers is accessed from the
Thompsonville Road off US Route 113 north of Milford. A CLAPPER RAIL was
found in the marsh nearby.

Another new bird this week was a NORTHERN SHRIKE found at Prime Hook
National Wildlife Refuge near Milton. That bird was found from the refuge
headquarters access road off the Black Farm Trail. This is before the sharp
90 turn in the road, watched the field edge along the south side or hike
the trail to the field along the eastern edge. Also seen in this area was an
EASTERN PHOEBE. ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was seen at the Observation Point
Trail near the headquarters. More on ORANGE-CROWNS later.

The previous reported CRESTED CARACARA continues to be seen in the West
Rehoboth area behind Tangiers Outlet. The bird has been seen off Road 271
(the Holland Glade Road) and at Hebron Road, the next road to the south. A
good place to look is at the parking lot for the Breakwater Trail. Look for
the ballfield on the left-hand side of the road, the caracara has been seen
in the hedgerow along the Breakwater Trail and in the woods by the silo
behind the ballfield. Also seen in the area has been ROSSS GOOSE and
flyover CACKLING GOOSE. Birders looking for the CARACARA might also want to
look at the Wolfes Neck sewage treatment plant near Midway. Two
BLACK-HEADED GULLS were seen there on Sunday along with ROSSS GOOSE and
NORTHERN BOBWHITE.

The previous reported ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER continues to be seen at the
southern trailhead to Gordons Pond in Cape Henlopen State Park. Use the
parking lot off N. Ocean Dr. in Rehoboth Beach and watch the shrubs from the
trailhead onto the beach access trail. Another ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was
also found at Gordons Pond along with RED-BREASTED and BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCH. A GREAT EGRET was found at the pond. A CACKLING GOOSE was seen
with the 15,000 SNOW GEESE sitting on the ocean. BLACK SCOTER, RED-THROATED
LOON, and NORTHERN GANNET were seen offshore.

The year of the ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER continues with at least six sightings
this week. Besides the birds reported at Gordons Pond and Prime Hook, there
were birds reported at Bay Vista near Rehoboth Beach, Creekside neighborhood
near Clarksville west of Bethany Beach, and in Lewes. In New Castle County,
an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was found at the Ashton Tract at Thousand Acre
Marsh. CHIPPING and AMERICAN TREE SPARROW, HERMIT THRUSH, and both
RUBY-CROWNED and GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET were also found at the Ashton Tract.

A EURASIAN WIGEON was seen at Assawoman Wildlife Area near Fenwick Island
with nearly 200 AMERICAN WIGEON. Also reported was MUTE SWAN, 230 GADWALL,
BUFFLEHEAD, and HOODED MERGANSER. Shorebirds seen included GREATER
YELLOWLEGS and DUNLIN. Land birds included PINE WARBLER with WINTER WREN,
PILEATED WOODPECKER, and both WHITE-BREASTED and BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH.

A RED-NECK GREBE was seen off Indian River Inlet on Wednesday with
LONG-TAILED DUCK, COMMON GOLDENEYE, and all three species of SCOTER: SURF,
WHITE-WINGED, and BLACK. Three GREAT CORMORANTS were seen at the inlet along
with PURPLE SANDPIPER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, and SANDERLING on the jetty. A
TRICOLORED HERON was found on Thursday at Burtons Island, behind the North
Marina. Waterfowl there included 750 BRANT, BUFFLEHEAD, and COMMON LOON.
RUDDY TURNSTONE and BALD EAGLE were reported at the marina.

Four REDHEAD and RING-NECKED DUCKS were seen on Spring Lake condominiums off
Route 1 between Rehoboth and Dewey Beach. A flock of 300 CANVASBACKS were
seen off of Silver Lake and Rehoboth Beach, along with intermittent reports
of GREATER SCAUP, BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED MERGANSER, RUDDY DUCK, and PIED-BILLED
GREBE. Six LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were seen at Silver Lake on Sunday

A GOLDEN EAGLE was seen on Angola Neck along the Camp Arrowhead Road near
Herring Creek on Saturday. This is off the John Williams Hwy., Route 24,
west of Rehoboth Beach. Bald Eagle Creek near Rehoboth Beach had HORNED
GREBE and COMMON LOON, along with HOODED MERGANSER, BUFFLEHEAD and RUDDY
DUCK, plus 5 KILLDEER and BELTED KINGFISHER. This area also had the Nuthatch
trifecta with RED-BREASTED, WHITE-BREASTED and BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH.

Gulls at the Jones Crossing landfill, in Sussex County included 50 LESSER
BLACK-BACKED, 4 adult ICELAND and 3 GLAUCOUS GULLS (one adult and two
immature). These gulls can be seen on the pond and sand hills by the dredge
area on 28560 Landfill Lane off Hardscrabble Road (Route 20) between
Georgetown and Laurel, which make easy viewing for birders.

A first-year male COMMON EIDER was seen off the Harbor of Refuge lighthouse
jetty in Cape Henlopen State Park on Wednesday along with BRANT, BUFFLEHEAD,
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, WHITE-WINGED SCOTER, and GREAT CORMORANT. A flock of
30 SNOW BUNTINGS with 5 Ipswich SAVANNAH SPARROWS were found at the point at
Cape Henlopen. Four LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS and a FORSTERS TERN were seen
at Herring Point. Three VIRGINIA RAILS were heard calling at the bridges
over the marsh along the Saltmarsh Spur Trail behind the campground. A
census of the park found 37 BROWN-HEADED and 3 RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES on
Sunday. The trip to the Breakwater jetty on Sunday found a second-year
GLAUCOUS GULL along with 25 PURPLE SANDPIPERS, 15 RUDDY TURNSTONES,
SANDERLING, and 2 GREAT CORMORANTS.

A flock of 13 AMERICAN AVOCETS, along with GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS
were found at the Broadkill Marsh in Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge on
Sunday. Also seen was a GREAT EGRET on Wednesday. Waterfowl there included
GADWALL, AMERICAN WIGEON, NORTHERN PINTAIL, SHOVELER, RING-NECKED DUCK,
BUFFLEHEAD, plus HOODED and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER. Both COMMON and
RED-THROATED LOONS were seen off Broadkill Beach. PALM WARBLER was seen off
13 Curves Rd. Six WOOD DUCK were found at Little Neck Wildlife Management
Area off Prime Hook Beach Road, along with AMERICAN PIPIT and PURPLE FINCH
plus 2 MERLIN and an AMERICAN KESTREL. A raft of 20 LESSER SCAUP were seen
off of Prime Hook Beach. 20 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, KILLDEER and LESSER
YELLOWLEGS were seen at Fowlers Beach. VIRGINIA RAIL, BARRED OWL and WILD
TURKEY were heard calling at Fowlers. ROSSS GOOSE was found among 20,000
SNOW GEESE, plus TUNDRA SWAN, SURF SCOTER, BUFFLEHEAD, and HOODED and
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER. MARSH WREN, YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, and SAVANNAH
SPARROW were seen in the marsh.

Three PURPLE FINCH was also seen coming to a feeder near Georgetown, along
with a WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH. Two PINE SISKINS were seen at a feeder east
of Seaford with 3 CHIPPING and a WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW. CHIPPING SPARROW and
Eastern Phoebe were found at the Hudson Farm near Trap Pond State Park near
Laurel along with MERLIN and AMERICAN KESTREL. A CACKLING GOOSE was found
the ponds at Broad Creek in Laurel along with 128 RING-NECKED DUCK, one
female LESSER SCAUP, BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED MERGANSER, and RUDDY DUCK. Also seen
was BELTED KINGFISHER, EASTERN PHOEBE, and 4 PALM WARBLERS. EASTERN PHOEBE,
5 RUBY CROWNED KINGLETS, 10 FOX SPARROWS and the NUTHATCH trifecta was also
found at Woodland Ferry in the West Seaford area.

A ROSSS GOOSE was seen at Frederica off Johnny Cake Landing Road. 30 SNOW
BUNTINGS were seen with HORNED LARK at Cartanza Road near Little Creek. SNOW
BUNTING was also seen along the Port Mahon Road, plus an AMERICAN BITTERN on
Sunday. A raft of 10 CANVASBACKS, plus GREATER SCAUP, SURF SCOTER,
BUFFLEHEAD and GADWALL were at Kitts Hummock on Saturday. A WHITE-CROWNED
SPARROW continues to come to a feeder in Cheswold, joined by a PINE WARBLER
today.

Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna continues to have some
outstanding late shorebirds, including MARBLED GODWIT with both GREATER and
LESSER YELLOWLEGS on Sunday plus WILLET and AMERICAN AVOCET. A late male
BLUE-WINGED TEAL was seen at the northwest corner of Shearness Pool. Diving
ducks reported included a female REDHEAD, 25 RING-NECKED DUCK, 30 COMMON
MERGANSERS plus TUNDRA SWAN, WOOD DUCK, GADWALL, BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED
MERGANSER, and RUDDY DUCK. BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON was seen at Bear Swamp.
Land birds reported included RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, EASTERN BLUEBIRD,
WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH, FOX SPARROW and SAVANNAH SPARROW. LONG-EARED OWL
was reported from two different areas within the refuge this week, along
with BARN, BARRED, GREAT HORNED and EASTERN SCREECH OWL. LONG-EARED OWL was
also reported calling from the holly woods along Texas Lane, south of
Leipsic.

Another EURASIAN WIGEON, previous reported last month was seen again on
Thursday at Hoopes Reservoir near Greenville off Hillside Mill Road. Other
waterfowl reported at Hoopess included GADWALL, BUFFLEHEAD, 200 RING-NECKED
DUCK, 10 AMERICAN COOT, 2 PIED-BILLED GREBE plus HOODED and COMMON
MERGANSER. BELTED KINGFISHER, WINTER WREN, and HERMIT THRUSH were along
Hillside Mill Road.

COMMON MERGANSER and BELTED KINGFISHER were found along the Christiana River
at the Peterson Urban Wildlife Area in downtown Wilmington. AMERICAN TREE
SPARROW and RUSTY BLACKBIRD were also found. A lone ROSSS GOOSE was seen on
the pond at Bellevue State Park in Brandywine Hundred. Along with RUSTY
BLACKBIRD. YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER reported in Ashland Nature Center and at
Auburn Heights near Yorklyn. A PINE SISKIN was seen at Ashland today

BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES were reported again this week at Ashland Nature
Center, the Whites feeder in Yorklyn, North Star, Brookside and White Clay
Creek State Park near Hopkins Bridge. RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES were reported
Grubb Road and Shipley Road in Brandywine Hundred, Christiana Manor, 2 in
Glasgow, Fairfield Crest in Newark and Brookside. A PINE WARBLER was also
reported coming to the feeder in Brookside. 

BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE was also reported at Bay Pointe near Summit Bridge,
south of Glasgow. Two RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES were found at Summit Bridge
Farm, below the canal. Nine COMMON MERGANSERS and a DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT
were found at Lums Pond State Park. Raptors reported included RED-SHOULDERED
HAWK and a MERLIN by the bathhouse at the Go Ape rope course. A pair of
TUNDRA SWANS were found at Glasgow Park. 

A pair of MUTE SWANS were found at Thousand Acre Marsh near Delaware City.
Three female COMMON GOLDENEYES were photographed at the Port Penn
impoundments Augustine Beach Wildlife Area. RED-THROATED LOON was reported
at Augustine Beach. GRAY CATBIRD and FOX SPARROW were found at the Green
Tract along Route 9, south of Vance Neck Road near Odessa. MERLIN was seen
there along with a GREAT HORNED OWL during the daytime.

AMERICAN WOODCOCK and WILSONS SNIPE were found at the pond at the
University of Delaware farm, along with CHIPPING SPARROW. BARRED OWL and
WINTER WREN were found at Middle Run Natural Area north of Newark. A flock
of 35 EASTERN BLUEBIRDS was found at White Clay Creek State Park near the
Nature Center at Hopkins Bridge along with the FOX SPARROW.

Thanks to those that contributed this week, including, Chris Bennett, Al
Guarente, Nick Pulcinella, Mike Moore, Brian McCaffrey, Mike Smith, Linda
Dempsey, Armas Hill , Amy ONeil, Stephen Courtney, Frank Rohrabacher, Frank
Lenik, Desiree Narengo, Zoe Yost, David Bridge, David Belford, Michael
Bradley, Joel Martin, Katie Bird, Glenn Lovelace, Nancy Goggin, Mike Walsh,
Joanne Howl, Mary Lukaszewski, Jack and Jean Filigenzi,  Amy and Jim White,
Anthony Gonzon, Nancy Cunningham, Katie Bird, Chris Rowe, Gerry Teig, Kim
Steininger, Bill Stewart, Phil Thompson, Joe Sebastiani, Brian Henderson,
Derek Stoner, Kelley Nunn, Hannah Greenberg, Jerald and Aaron Reb, Ken Wat,
Alissa Kegelman, Dave Fees, Racheal Shapiro, John Skibicki, Teddy Burke, Ed
Crawford, Rob Blye, Lynn Smith, Sharon Lynn, Sue Gruver, Tim Freiday, Joe
Swertinski, Joe Russell and Jason Wood. Remember, the Birdline needs your
sightings. Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good
birding!

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Subject: State Rarities
From: Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Jan 2017 16:58:37 -0500
This first week of the new year has certainly ushered in some remarkable
mid-Atlantic rarities!  While it is always a thrill to see state lifers,
the enjoyment of running into plenty of  birder friends out in the "field"
(our preferred habitat) considerably boosts the fun quotient. Here are some
of my personal highlights and better birds for this week.

Breaking in the New Year by easily twitching both the ASH-THROATED
FLYCATCHER and the Crested Caracara on New Year's Day,  was certainly an
auspicious start. When Dennis and I arrived in the Gordon's Pond parking
lot, we quickly linked up with Andy Ednie's party (which included Jerald
Reb and Ed Crawford). Along with quite a few other birders, we only had to
hold our collective breath for a short time before our desired target bird
graced us with its presence.

The Ash-throated Flycatcher landed on a sunlit bare branched tree at eye
level. After tracking the ATFL for several delightful minutes, we decided
to press onward.

Working Holland Glade Road, we found the CRESTED CARACARA on an obscured
perch in the treeline bordering the Methodist Church ball park.
Fortunately, the Caracara flew around a bit and alighted on an unobstructed
snag that offered everyone crippling scope views. Later, the caracara
lifted off and flew directly over our heads.  It then landed in the grassy
lawn near the parking lot.  At this point, a large contingent of birders
 had gathered to enjoy the fantastic views offered up by this visitor from
the deep south.

The next port of call for Dennis and I was Silver Lake.  Upon arrival, we
were pleased to see our friend Dave Fees who has scanning the waterfowl.
Since Dave had already crunched the waterfowl numbers, we were pleased to
learn that there were indeed 267 CANVASBACKs here.   Meanwhile, a Belted
Kingfisher helped out our nascent year list.

Spring Lake held a half dozen REDHEADs, as well as several LESSER SCAUP and
RING-NECKED ducks. Our last stop of the day at Swiggett's Lake (near
Lincoln) capped things off with four TUNDRA SWANs, a RUDDY DUCK, HOODED
MERGANSERs, BUFFLEHEADs, and large contingent of RING-NECKED DUCKs.

Over the course of this week, I dipped three different times (twice with my
husband Dennis) on the Northern Shrike. Although I had patiently staked out
the (in)famous southern most field on Prime Hook's Black Farm Trail, I
 found no joy with the shrike, and there were plenty of long stretches of
birdless tedium.  At least a few decent year birds for me here included
PILEATED WOODPECKER, N. FLICKER, HAIRY WOODPECKER, N. HARRIER, and WINTER
WREN.

Fortunately, the boredom was greatly alleviated by chatty interludes with
other intrepid birders (i.e.Sharon Lynn, Sue Gruver, Michael Moore, Vince
Gambal, Tim Freiday, John Long, Frank Rohrbacher, and Andy McGann). Tales
of birder agony and ecstasy were duly exchanged.

On Friday (01/06/07), Dennis and I found ourselves back in Prime Hook's
field of dreams, and wondering "will the shrike come?".  Our target bird
vigil was soon supplemented by Sharon Lynn and Sue Gruver.  From our
vantage point on the southern stretch of the Black Farm Trail (which
connects the southwesern corner to the southeastern corner of the southern
most field), we assiduously scanned the area.  After pausing to converse on
how much longer should be spent on our search, I was almost astonished to
see the NORTHERN SHRIKE pop up and land at fairly close range  on the top
of a bare limbed tree. I called out "Northern Shrike!" and everyone was
quickly on the bird.

The tree in question was in the brushy lightly wooded section that borders
the trail, and the shrike was first seen at 10:15 AM. From its perch, the
shrike was pumping its tail and looking around for its next meal. After a
few minutes, the shrike dropped low and out of our sight.  High fives and
broad smiles were exchanged by all.

We then hiked out on the Observation Point Trail (aka Dike Trail), where
birding was slow. There was a RED-BREASTED MERGANSER hanging out with
HOODED MERGANSERs and BUFFLEHEAD, and a flock of DUNLIN flew by.

At different points on the Prime Hook entrance road,, Dennis and I saw
EASTERN MEADOWLARK - 4,  FIELD SPARROW - 2, HERMIT THRUSH - 1, AMERICAN
KESTREL - 1, and FOX SPARROW - 1.  On Cods Road, there was a PEREGRINE
FALCON harassing CANADA GEESE.

As a final note, we had a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH. coming to our backyard
feeders this week. All in all, it was a marvelous first week to the new
year!

Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE

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Subject: Horned Larks Avondale PA
From: "Carolyn D'Amico" <carolyndamico AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Jan 2017 15:39:12 -0500
Incidental finding of 7 Horned Larks along driveway of Glen Willow Orchard
in Avondale, PA foraging along edge of fallow fields - 2 PM Saturday, Jan 7

-- 
If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right.
- Henry Ford

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Subject: Ross's Goose at Bellevue SP
From: "Amy O'Neil" <parakeet93 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 6 Jan 2017 19:20:08 -0500
Today on our monthly Birds of Bellevue walk we had a Ross's Goose on the pond 
swimming with a flock of 50 or so Canada Geese. It was photographed there on 
1/4 also, so hopefully it will stay around for a little while. 


We also had a single Rusty Blackbird in the same area as past years - one of 
the trees along the road to the garden plots. 


The full eBird list is below. 

Happy birding,
Amy O'Neil
North Wilmington 

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33483312
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Subject: DOS Head Start Trip Rescheduled for Jan. 8
From: Frank Rohrbacher <0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Fri, 6 Jan 2017 16:59:57 -0500
Hello everyone:
 
Due to what looks like an increasingly poor forecast, due to hit right  
where are scheduled to bird and when we are scheduled to bird, it seems wise to 

 go ahead and move the DOS Head Start Trip originally scheduled for 
Saturday  to the same time and place but on Sunday instead.
 
Although we will avoid the snow, it will be extremely cold and windy on  
Sunday, so please make sure to be dressed accordingly.  
 
Thanks everyone for your understanding.  See you all on Sunday! 
 
 
Frank Rohrbacher
Wilmington, Delaware 

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Subject: DOS Head Start Trip - Final Update
From: Frank Rohrbacher <0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Fri, 6 Jan 2017 10:03:59 -0500
Yesterday, I went downstate to see some of the birds that we will  be being 
trying to find on the trip.  The Red-headed Woodpecker was  still present 
on Cedar Swamp Road, the Northern Shrike was present at Prime Hook  NWR, the 
Ash-throated Flycatcher was an easy find as it walked around the  parking 
lot at Gordons Pond SP, the Crested Caracara was on Holland Glade Road,  the 
Canvasbacks were at Silver Lake and the Redheads, Hooded Mergansers and  
Lesser Scaup were at Spring Lake (thanks, Sharon).  I didn't check out the  
Broadkill Road Impoundments, Cape Henlopen SP or Indian River Inlet but I know 

we'll get good birds there.  I believe that the stars are favorably  aligned 
and we will have a good trip tomorrow.
 
The only possible concern might be that it is forecast to snow a  litle, 
but the main streets have enough brine on them to melt a foot of  snow.
 
I will be at the "Park and Ride" across from the Wawa on Route 299 at  the 
intersection of Route 299 and Route 1 at 7:15 AM.  We will leave  for the 
Red-headed Woodpecker shortly after 7:30 AM.  We will then go  directly to the 
Black Farm Trail at Prime Hook NWR  with an ETA of 9:30  AM. 
 
Hope you will join us. 
 
Frank Rohrbacher
Wilmington, Delaware  

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