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Updated on Friday, May 22 at 07:47 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Purple Martin,©David Sibley

22 May RBA: Birdline Delaware, May 22nd, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
22 May Evening Heronry Survey in Delaware City next Wednesday ["Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" ]
22 May flagged shorebirds [Jean Woods ]
22 May Purple Finch [Sally Fintel ]
20 May Ashland bird walk Thursday [Ian Stewart ]
20 May Purple Finch [Sally Fintel ]
20 May Hooded Warbler - White Clay Creek, DE [Hank Davis ]
20 May Reminder: DOS May Monthly Mtg - Wed. 5/20 [Bill Stewart ]
19 May Re: Burrowing Owls, Thick-billed Murres, Sandhill Cranes [ ]
19 May Re: Burrowing Owls, Thick-billed Murres, Sandhill Cranes [Hugh McGuinness ]
19 May Interested in Owls? Catch Justin Jaworski's "Understanding the Silent Flight of Owls" on May 21 [Steve Kacir ]
18 May Red-necked phalaropes [Matthew Sarver ]
17 May Red-necked phalarope [Jeff & Deborah Climie ]
17 May Purple Finch [Sally Fintel ]
17 May New Castle: Least Terns at Port Penn Impoundments [Tim Schreckengost ]
17 May Kent: Red-necked Phalaropes at Little Creek [Tim Schreckengost ]
17 May Kite/Shorebird Watch at Bucktoe [Joe Sebastiani ]
16 May Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch (16 May 2015) 23 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
16 May Redden Forest Finds [Mary Lukaszewski ]
16 May RBA: Birdline Delaware, May 15th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
15 May Sussex Bird Club Fieldtrip Tuesday [Christopher Bennett ]
15 May Purple Finch [Sally Fintel ]
14 May Sussex Bird Club Fieldtrip Saturday [Christopher Bennett ]
14 May Newark -- 92 species, 23 species of warbler - 5/14/15 [Alan Kneidel ]
14 May Bombay Hook Warblers [Rodney Murray ]
14 May DOS May Monthly Mtg - Wed. 5/20 [Bill Stewart ]
13 May Bellevue, Part 2 ["Amy O'Neil" ]
13 May Re: Field full of Plovers [Bill Fintel ]
13 May Four life birds today at White Clay Creek [Vince Gambal ]
13 May Bellevue State Park ["Amy O'Neil" ]
13 May Re: DBRC Documentation Request - Burrowing Owl, et al. [Comcast ]
13 May Bobolinks at Fox Point Park [Alissa Kegelman ]
12 May Field full of Plovers [Sharon Lynn ]
11 May Citizens Science Project – Mourning Warbler Song Mapper [Jay Pitocchelli ]
10 May Mother's Day Walk at White Clay: The Highlights [Derek Stoner ]
10 May Black-billed cuckoo [Ian Stewart ]
9 May Bobolinks [Rodney Murray ]
9 May My DOS Spring Roundup Highlights [Michael Moore ]
9 May Mother's Day Bird Walk at White Clay Creek State Park Tomorrow [Derek Stoner ]
7 May RBA: Birdline Delaware, May 7th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
7 May Ft. Dupont trail is open [Patricia Valdata ]
7 May observations [ ]
7 May Middle Run: 19 Warblers and Counting [Derek Stoner ]
7 May A Brant spectacle today [Bill Fintel ]
7 May B36 [ ]
7 May Spring Roundup, Global Big Day, International Migratory Bird Day, Delaware Bird-a-thon, Oh My! [Christopher Bennett ]
6 May Ashland today [Judy Montgomery ]
6 May Esther Speck Memorial Service [Andrew Ednie ]
6 May Re: Participate in the E-bird Global Big Day on May 9th! ["Sullivan, Kathleen N. (DNREC)" ]
6 May Participate in the E-bird Global Big Day on May 9th! [Alan Kneidel ]
6 May Ashland Bird Walk [joe sebastiani ]
6 May Evening Heronry Survey Results ["Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" ]
6 May Bobolinks @ Ramsey Rd. [Bill Stewart ]
5 May Alapocas Bird-A-Thon walk ["sally o'byrne" ]
4 May Tuesday Alapocas walk ["sally o'byrne" ]
4 May This Thursday, DVOC Presents: Jason Weckstein & his program on the Belem Center of Endemism, the most Endangered Amazonian Area of Endemism [Steve Kacir ]
4 May Port Penn area birds [Rodney Murray ]
4 May Killens, Hunting Quarter Rd, Redden, Assawoman [Steven Graff ]
4 May Re: Seabirds and shorebirds on the waters off Lewes [Bill Fintel ]
3 May Seabirds and shorebirds on the waters off Lewes [Bill Fintel ]
3 May Red-headed Woodpecker at Bombay Hook [Rodney Murray ]
3 May DOS Carousel Park trip [Ian Stewart ]
2 May Color banded Veeries at White Clay Creek SP [Christopher Heckscher ]
1 May RBA: Birdline Delaware, May 1st, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
1 May 2015 Recovery Big Year [Kelley Nunn ]
1 May May Day Migrants at Middle Run [Derek Stoner ]
1 May Apologies for this late posting [Meta Little ]
1 May Bellevue S.P. ["Amy O'Neil" ]
1 May DE Bird-A-Thon Birdwalks [Bill Stewart ]
30 Apr Saturday Bird Walk, Carousel Park [Ian Stewart ]
30 Apr First Ruby-throated Hummingbird at my feeder [Dennis Barrowclough ]
30 Apr Thursday am [Colin Campbell ]
30 Apr statewide highlights - 4/29 [Billy Weber ]
30 Apr Ashland bird walk highlights [judy montgomery ]
30 Apr Rail Trip [Andrew Ednie ]
30 Apr Black-throated Green Warbler ["Amy O'Neil" ]

Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, May 22nd, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 20:44:57 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* May 22, 2015
* DEST1505.22
	
*Birds mentioned
Snow Goose
Tundra Swan
Ruddy Duck
Little Blue Heron
Cattle Egret
Black-crowned Night Heron
Glossy Ibis
MISSISSIPPI KITE
Broad-winged Hawk
Virginia Rail
Common Gallinule
American Coot
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Marbled Godwit
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
Dunlin 
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE
Laughing Gull
Bonaparte's Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Least Tern
GULL-BILLED TERN
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
Barred Owl
Common Nighthawk
Chuck wills widow
Whippoorwill
Red-headed Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER
ALDER FLYCATCHER
Willow Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Warbling Vireo
Cliff Swallow
Bank Swallow
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Veery
Gray-cheeked Thrush
Swainson's Thrush
Louisiana Waterthrush
Northern Waterthrush
Worm-eating Warbler
Black and White Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
American Redstart
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Cape May Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Prairie Warbler 
Bay-breasted Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
MOURNING WARBLER
Hooded Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat 
Grasshopper Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
DICKCISSEL
Bobolink
Eastern Meadowlark
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole
Purple Finch

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: May 22, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net 
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

This is Birdline Delaware, for the Memorial Day holiday on Friday, May 22nd
from the Delaware Museum of Natural History in Greenville. 31 species of
warbler were reported, plus shorebirds, thrushes and Empidonax flycatchers.
The unofficial Delaware annual list jumped to 296 species this week. 

2-3 REDNECKED PHALAROPES were reported this week at the Pickering Beach side
of Little Creek Wildlife Management Area near Dover. Those birds were found
in the left-hand pool along the dike trail. To reach this area, you have to
park at the lock gate on the Pickering Beach Road. Also reported there were
2 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS, with hundreds of DUNLIN, LEAST, SEMIPALMATED
SANDPIPERS, plus BLACK-NECKED STILT, BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER,
SPOTTED SANDPIPER and both YELLOWLEGS. 10 BLACK SKIMMERS were also seen at
the refuge. The woods along the entrance road produced VEERY, GRAY-CHEEKED
THRUSH, AMERICAN REDSTART, and BLACKPOLL WARBLER. Further down the road at
Pickering Beach, RED KNOT and RUDDY TURNSTONE were seen with BLACK-BELLIED
and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, BLACK SKIMMER, and over 600 LAUGHING
GULLS.WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW was also reported. 

A MISSISSIPPI KITE and BROAD-WINGED HAWK were seen at the Cape Henlopen
Hawkwatch on Saturday. BLACK SKIMMERS were reported, along with four LESSER
BLACK BACKED GULLS .COMMON NIGHTHAWK and CHUCK WILLS WIDOW found at Cape
Henlopen State Park this weekend.  PIPING PLOVER, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER,
RUDDY TURNSTONE, RED KNOT and LEAST TERN were found at The Point.
BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCHES continue be seen in the woods. A late female PURPLE
FINCH continues to be coming to a feeder near Red Mill Pond near Lewes. A
CHUCK-WILLS-WIDOW was heard calling at Old Landing near Rehoboth Beach. 

A DICKCISSEL was found at Middletown High School pond on Sunday.
Unfortunately that bird was not refound. 10 BOBOLINK were seen at the
Charles E Price Park, along with MEADOWLARK, GRASSHOPPER, and SAVANNAH
SPARROW.

A pair of LEAST TERNS were found at the Port Penn Impoundments, a good bird
for New Castle County. COMMON GALLINULE, AMERICAN COOT, and LEAST BITTERN
were found at Grier's Pond, along with BANK SWALLOW and MARSH WREN. 69
CATTLE EGRETS were found along Dutch Neck Rd., plus WILD TURKEY. WILLOW
FLYCATCHER was found at the Reedy Point Bridge. BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON
was found at Dragon Run. Birds seen at Veteran's Park out over the Delaware
River in Delaware City included CATTLE EGRET, LITTLE BLUE HERON, GLOSSY
IBIS, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, SEMIPALMATED'S PLOVER, DUNLIN and SEMIPALMATED
SANDPIPER.

There was only one report of MOURNING WARBLER this year, from the McCabe
Nature Preserve near Milton. Other WARBLERS seen there included
PROTHONOTARY, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, BLACK AND WHITE, MAGNOLIA, BLACKPOLL,
YELLOW-THROATED, and AMERICAN REDSTART. A late BLUE-HEADED VIREO was seen
there last week. 

RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was reported at Assawoman Wildlife Area near Fenwick
Island. Also seen there was PILEATED WOODPECKER and BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH. 

BLACK-BILLED and YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO were reported at Prime Hook National
Wildlife Refuge near Milton. Warblers are still being seen in the woods
there, including MAGNOLIA, CHESTNUT SIDED, BLACKPOLL, PRAIRIE, AMERICAN
REDSTART, and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT. A big flock of 174 BLACK SKIMMERS were
seen at the Prime Hook Beach Road. Shorebirds there including AMERICAN
AVOCETS, BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, BLACK-NECKED STILT, LESSER
and GREATER YELLOWLEGS, RUDDY TURNSTONE, RED KNOT, and SPOTTED SANDPIPER.
KING RAIL was also reported. A LINCOLN'S SPARROW was reported along Cods
Road. 

A MARBLED GODWIT was seen at the DuPont Nature Center at Mispillion Inlet
yesterday. Also reported there this week was GULL-BILLED TERN. Shorebird
numbers are beginning to build there including 500 RED KNOTS plus 2000 RUDDY
TURNSTONE, 5000 DUNLIN, 5000 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER and 100 BLACK-BELLIED
PLOVER. Also seen was AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER and BLACK SKIMMER.
OYSTERCATCHER and BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS were also seen at Slaughters Beach
along with BLACK-NECKED STILT.

Shorebirds are also being seen along the Port Mahon Road including 200 RUDDY
TURNSTONE, 1000 DUNLIN, and 2000 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS along with 25 RED
KNOT plus BLACK-NECKED STILTS,  BLACK SKIMMER and BONAPARTE'S GULL. Three
SNOW GEESE, 6 RUDDY DUCKS plus a GREATER SCAUP were also reported.

AMERICAN AVOCETS were also seen at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge near
Smyrna on Thursday. These were the first AVOCETS that have been seen in
Delaware in almost 3 weeks. BLACK SKIMMERS were also reported at the refuge.
TUNDRA and MUTE SWAN continues to be seen at Bombay Hook. NORTHERN BOBWHITE
was found at the Allee House. BARRED OWL was at Finis Pool. VIRGINIA RAIL
was found at the Boardwalk Trail. 11 BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS were found
at Night Heron Island. Migrants reported included a LEAST FLYCATCHER plus
BAY-BREASTED, BLACKPOLL, and BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER, VEERY and
GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH.

90 BLACK SKIMMER were counted at the Logan Tract, Ted Harvey Wildlife Area
near Kitts Hummock. SPOTTED SANDPIPER, WILLOW FLYCATCHER and a SALTMARSH
SPARROW were also reported. 

WHIPPOORWILL was reported at Big Stone Beach at night. Also reported were
YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH, AMERICAN REDSTART,
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER, and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT.

HOODED WARBLER was reported at White Clay Creek State Park south of Hopkins
Bridge Road. A possible SUMMER TANAGER was also reported. BLACK-BILLED
CUCKOO plus VEERY, GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH, and SWAINSON'S THRUSH reported along
Thompson Station Road. Warblers seen included KENTUCKY, BLACKBURNIAN,
BLUE-WINGED, TENNESSEE, BLACK AND WHITE, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH,
BLACK-THROATED BLUE and GREEN, PARULA and AMERICAN REDSTART. SWAINSON'S
THRUSH was also reported at Covered Bridge Farm in Newark. CAPE MAY,
BLACKPOLL, and BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER plus YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO were
found at Fairfield Crest. 

An OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER was reported at Middle Run Natural Area off Possum
Park Road. WILSON'S WARBLER was reported there along with migrants
BLACK-THROATED BLUE and BLACKPOLL WARBLERS, plus PRAIRIE WARBLER, LOUISIANA
WATERTHRUSH, and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT

ALDER and WILLOW FLYCATCHER reported along Sharpless Road at the Ashland
Nature Center. A flyover COMMON LOON was also seen there on Thursday.
WARBLING VIREO, VEERY, plus ORCHARD and BALTIMORE ORIOLES were reported.
NASHVILLE WARBLER was seen at Ashland on Monday, plus late YELLOW-RUMPS.
WILLOW FLYCATCHER was also found at Burrows Run Nature Preserve along with
BLACK-THROATED BLUE and GREEN, BLACKPOLL, PRAIRIE, and NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH.
Also seen there was an EASTERN MEADOWLARK.

SUMMER TANAGER was seen at Redden State Forest, along with WORM-EATING and
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER. Some other late warblers included a BLACKBURNIAN
WARBLER at Walnut Ridge near Centerville. HOODED WARBLER was reported at
Deerhurst in Brandywine Hundred. BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER was seen at
Woodshaven in Milford. A CAPE MAY WARBLER was seen at Toad Hill in Bear. A
BAY-BREASTED WARBLER was seen at the Golf Park in Rehoboth. 

CLIFF SWALLOWS continue to be seen at the Appoquinimink Bridge on Rt 9, plus
the Fleming's Landing Bridge. 

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Sally Fintel, Al
Guarente, Robert Klarquist, Louis Warren, Matt Sarver, Lauren Morgans, Bruce
Peterjohn, Hank Davis, Steve Collins, Laura Balascio, Christine Anderson,
Ken Cooper, Jim and Amy White, Kelly Nunn, Kitt Heckscher, Amy O'Neil, Damon
Orsetti, Karen and Chris and Karen Bennett, Hannah Greenberg, Sally O'Byrne,
David Fees, Joe Sebastiani, Rich Clifton, Chris and Erin Rowe, Lynn Smith,
Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn, Bill Stewart, Ian Stewart, Alan Kneidel, Elora
Grahame, Tim Freiday, Tim Schreckengost, Matt Boone, Chandler Wiegand,
Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Remember, the birdline needs your
sightings! Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, have a safe Memorial Day, this is Andy
Ednie wishing you good birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Evening Heronry Survey in Delaware City next Wednesday
From: "Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" <Chris.Bennett AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 16:45:47 +0000
The fourth Evening Heron Survey of the 2015 season will be conducted Wednesday, 
27 May beginning at 6:20 pm in Battery Park at the end of Clinton Street in 
Delaware City. The survey begins 2 hours before sunset (8:20 pm) and ends 30 
minutes after sunset at 8:50 pm. May is one of the busiest surveys of the 
season. The average number of birds recorded over the 12 years of the survey is 
1650. However five of the nine surveys we've conducted in May have had totals 
higher than the average with the record May total being 2179 birds in 2009. In 
addition to lots of herons, egrets and ibises we have also seen some other 
really good birds during the May survey. In the past we've seen Little Gull and 
Bonaparte's Gulls, White Ibis, Whimbrel, and usually flocks of Red Knots, 
Dunlin, other shorebirds migrating up the river as they begin the last leg of 
their migration to the Arctic. 


We can always use help with the busy surveys. If you don't feel confident 
identifying herons, egrets and ibises in flight we need people who can scribe 
for us or just keep an eye out to make sure birds don't slip by while we are 
trying to ID or count other birds. Or just come out and enjoy an evening of 
birding along the Delaware River. 


I hope to see you there.

Chris Bennett
Natural Resource Planner
Environmental Stewardship Program
Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation
152 South State Street
Dover, DE 19901
Phone: (302) 739-9230
Fax: (302) 739-6967
"The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant: 'What 
good is it?'" 

 Aldo Leopold A Sand County Almanac 

Subject: flagged shorebirds
From: Jean Woods <JWoods AT DELMNH.ORG>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 15:28:23 +0000
Greetings,

We are reaching the peak of the shorebird migration. Good numbers of Knot have 
been seen at Mispillion Harbor, Brockambridge, South Bowers, and Ted Harvey. 
Other shorebirds including Ruddy Turnstones are also at these locations. By far 
the best place to see them is at Mispillion Harbor from the deck of the DuPont 
Nature Center. Please remember not to disturb the birds as they are feeding, 
particularly during this weekend when many of their regular spots will be 
filled with beachgoers. 


If you happen to sight or photograph any birds with numbered/lettered leg flags 
please report them to www.bandedbirds.org. This 
same site has a helpful tutorial on what you need to record. Flags are mostly 
found on Knot, Sanderling and Turnstone, but small numbers of Dunlin, and 
Semipalmated Sandpipers have also been flagged for various research projects. 
The flags are used to identify individual birds and help gather data about 
their movements and behaviors anywhere during their annual cycle. 


If anyone has questions I'm happy to answer them.

Thanks!  Jean

Jean L. Woods, Ph.D. Phone: 302-658-9111 x314 

Curator of Birds Fax: 302-658-2610 

Delaware Museum of Natural History                      jwoods AT delmnh.org
P.O. Box 3937 www.delmnh.org 

(4840 Kennett Pike)
Wilmington, DE  19807
Subject: Purple Finch
From: Sally Fintel <sallyfintel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 06:17:42 -0400
a lone Purple Finch continues at our feeder in Lewes, DE

Sally Fintel
Lewes, DE
Subject: Ashland bird walk Thursday
From: Ian Stewart <istew AT UDEL.EDU>
Date: Wed, 20 May 2015 18:20:50 -0400
Come along on the weekly DNS bird walk tomorrow morning! We will creep
around the car park, mooch around the marsh and toddle along the trails in
search of birds. The forecast is cool but dry and at this time of year who
knows what we may see. I will be handing out British chocolate bars to the
first 2 people to spot migrant warblers (i.e. non-resident species). We
meet in the car park at 8am.

Ian Stewart

Newark, DE, 19808
Subject: Purple Finch
From: Sally Fintel <sallyfintel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 May 2015 15:38:21 -0400
A single Purple Finch continues at our feeder in Lewes, DE

Sally Fintel
Lewes, DE
Subject: Hooded Warbler - White Clay Creek, DE
From: Hank Davis <gblkrum AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 20 May 2015 13:59:06 -0400
This morning while birding White Clay Creek, I came across a Hooded Warbler 
singing. He was on the opposite side of the Nature Center off Hopkins Rd. The 
rest of the birding was somewhat uneventful. Photo link below. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/gblkrum1/17904761401/
Subject: Reminder: DOS May Monthly Mtg - Wed. 5/20
From: Bill Stewart <bstewart AT ABA.ORG>
Date: Wed, 20 May 2015 13:24:37 -0400
Subject: DOS May Monthly Mtg - Tonight - Wed. 5/20

The Delmarva Ornithological Society is excited to host their next monthly 
meeting tonight, Wednesday the 20th of May featuring - A Triple-Header Night! 


Plan on putting the DOS May meeting on your calendar, we have an exciting 
evening planned for our members and guests! First up, 12 year old Zoe Yost will 
present “Light and Air, Inquisitive and Fierce” as she takes us all on a 
personal journey through the fascinating world of hummingbirds. Zoe has 
composed her power point presentation from start to finish including some 
original art work. Second up, the DOS Conservation Committee is proud to 
present this year’s Conservation Award to Collin O’Mara, current Executive 
Director of the National Wildlife Federation, past Secretary of DNREC. Collin 
will be present to accept the award and share some of his thoughts on 
conservation efforts past, present and future. And last but not least, “Avian 
Mortality, Glass Impacts - Prevention in your own Backyard”. Presenter Sally 
O’Byrne will share some recent findings and products that can be beneficial for 
homeowners in preventing window strikes and avian deaths. 


We hope to see many of you there - the meeting is open to the public so grab a 
birding buddy or two and plan on attending on the 20th! 


Delmarva Ornithological Society   May 20th Meeting

7:00 PM Social 1/2 hour (We welcome you to bring some refreshments to share for 
our Social 1/2 hour) 


Meeting begins at 7:30 PM

Ashland Nature Center - Hockessin, DE     


Good birding,

Bill Stewart
DOS VP/Program Chair
Subject: Re: Burrowing Owls, Thick-billed Murres, Sandhill Cranes
From: James Tyler Bell <00000085b810a3aa-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 16:49:40 +0000
The Delaware bird records committee needs to move beyond submissions only. Phil 
Davis trolls eBird and the MDBirding list for public domain photos in lieu of 
people writing up documentation for the MD/DC RC. I don't know about the TBMUs 
or SACRs but the Burrowing Owl was extremely well photographed! It should have 
actually passed the committee already. 


Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland
      From: Hugh McGuinness 
 To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, May 19, 2015 12:43 PM
 Subject: Re: [de-birds] Burrowing Owls, Thick-billed Murres, Sandhill Cranes
   
Frank,

This should satisfy at least part of the requirement for Burrowing Owl
documentation: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22916360

Hugh



On Tue, May 19, 2015 at 12:26 PM, Frank Rohrbacher <
0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request AT lists.princeton.edu> wrote:

> Last Wednesday,I sent out a note (below) entitled "DBRC Documentation
> Request - Burrowing Owl, et al.".  The jury on that effort is in.  The
> first
> five e-mails that I received back were to tell me how cute, funny, et
> cetera
> the message was.  Colin Campbell who is my predecessor and  mentor on being
> Secretary of the DBRC replied "well said".  Then, I  received some great
> photographs of the White-winged Dove seen this winter and I  was thrilled
> to
> add them to the present record.  Next, I received  a record for the unseen
> Sandhill Crane reported several times at Dragon Run - it  consisted of a
> e-bird
> report with a sound recording in the cloud.  To tell  the truth, I know not
> about the cloud but I don't think that it is a safe place  to archive
> records.  I will figure this out and put it into a form that  Jean Woods
> approves
> of.  For a short time then, I felt my effort would  succeed; however the
> reports ended.  Finally, I received an e-mail  that asked me whether I had
> received any photographs of the Burrowing Owl.  I answered no.  In his
> next
> reply he told me that he knew a  photographer that was a regular at Bombay
> Hook NWR who had seen and photographed  the Burrowing Owl.  When he ran
> into
> him again, he would tell him to get in  touch with me.
>
> So, the rumors of a Burrowing Owl, many Sandhill Cranes and two
> Thick-billed Murres reported in Delaware this year continues to fade and
> is  a week
> closer to my prediction that in 10-15 years from the time  when they will
> vanish from the face of the earth.
>
> I'm a little sad about that
>
> Frank Rohrbacher
> Secretary of the Delaware Bird Records Committee
>
>
> The members of the Delaware Bird Records Committee have persistently heard
> rumors that a first state record Burrowing Owl, many Sandhill Cranes and
> even Thick-billed Murres have visited the state of Delaware this winter and
> spring.  These rumors have been fueled by such sources as  e-birds,
> Facebook
> and even on de-birds.  At this rate, these rumors  will persist for 10-15
> years and as de-birds, e-birds, Facebook,  Google and the internet vanish
> and
> are replaced with newer and certainly  better ways of interacting, all
> knowledge of these birds will vanish from the  face of the earth.
>
> BUT, ALL IS NOT LOST!  The DBRC is here to serve you and help you save
> your most precious memories for generations.  Many photographers and
> birders,
> for example, took Gigabits of photographs with fancy cameras and  cell
> phones but none has been willing to share them me and the Committee.  At
> 10', a
> single photograph with time and place etc of a Burrowing Owl standing  on a
> birdhouse would allow the Committee to vote  on this first state  record.
> A
> dozen photographs from a dozen photographers and  birders would make it a
> sure thing that this bird would be accepted by  the Committee.  The same
> holds true for Sandhill Cranes and  Thick-billed Murres.  Pictures of dead
> birds are also accepted though a  specimen delivered to the Delaware
> Museum of
> Natural History is even  better.  The Delaware Museum of Natural History is
> where the records of the  Delaware Bird Records Committees is stored.
>
> Please  give us a chance and e-mail your records or send any  questions you
> may have to me at _rohrbaf AT aol.com_ (mailto:rohrbaf AT aol.com)
>



-- 
Hugh McGuinness
Washington, D.C.



Subject: Re: Burrowing Owls, Thick-billed Murres, Sandhill Cranes
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 12:43:34 -0400
Frank,

This should satisfy at least part of the requirement for Burrowing Owl
documentation: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22916360

Hugh

On Tue, May 19, 2015 at 12:26 PM, Frank Rohrbacher <
0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request AT lists.princeton.edu> wrote:

> Last Wednesday,I sent out a note (below) entitled "DBRC Documentation
> Request - Burrowing Owl, et al.".  The jury on that effort is in.  The
> first
> five e-mails that I received back were to tell me how cute, funny, et
> cetera
> the message was.  Colin Campbell who is my predecessor and  mentor on being
> Secretary of the DBRC replied "well said".  Then, I  received some great
> photographs of the White-winged Dove seen this winter and I  was thrilled
> to
> add them to the present record.  Next, I received  a record for the unseen
> Sandhill Crane reported several times at Dragon Run - it  consisted of a
> e-bird
> report with a sound recording in the cloud.  To tell  the truth, I know not
> about the cloud but I don't think that it is a safe place  to archive
> records.  I will figure this out and put it into a form that  Jean Woods
> approves
> of.  For a short time then, I felt my effort would  succeed; however the
> reports ended.  Finally, I received an e-mail  that asked me whether I had
> received any photographs of the Burrowing Owl.   I answered no.  In his
> next
> reply he told me that he knew a  photographer that was a regular at Bombay
> Hook NWR who had seen and photographed  the Burrowing Owl.  When he ran
> into
> him again, he would tell him to get in  touch with me.
>
> So, the rumors of a Burrowing Owl, many Sandhill Cranes and two
> Thick-billed Murres reported in Delaware this year continues to fade and
> is  a week
> closer to my prediction that in 10-15 years from the time  when they will
> vanish from the face of the earth.
>
> I'm a little sad about that
>
> Frank Rohrbacher
> Secretary of the Delaware Bird Records Committee
>
>
> The members of the Delaware Bird Records Committee have persistently heard
> rumors that a first state record Burrowing Owl, many Sandhill Cranes and
> even Thick-billed Murres have visited the state of Delaware this winter and
> spring.  These rumors have been fueled by such sources as  e-birds,
> Facebook
> and even on de-birds.  At this rate, these rumors  will persist for 10-15
> years and as de-birds, e-birds, Facebook,  Google and the internet vanish
> and
> are replaced with newer and certainly  better ways of interacting, all
> knowledge of these birds will vanish from the  face of the earth.
>
> BUT, ALL IS NOT LOST!  The DBRC is here to serve you and help you save
> your most precious memories for generations.  Many photographers and
> birders,
> for example, took Gigabits of photographs with fancy cameras and  cell
> phones but none has been willing to share them me and the Committee.   At
> 10', a
> single photograph with time and place etc of a Burrowing Owl standing  on a
> birdhouse would allow the Committee to vote  on this first state  record.
> A
> dozen photographs from a dozen photographers and  birders would make it a
> sure thing that this bird would be accepted by  the Committee.   The same
> holds true for Sandhill Cranes and  Thick-billed Murres.  Pictures of dead
> birds are also accepted though a  specimen delivered to the Delaware
> Museum of
> Natural History is even  better.  The Delaware Museum of Natural History is
> where the records of the  Delaware Bird Records Committees is stored.
>
> Please  give us a chance and e-mail your records or send any  questions you
> may have to me at _rohrbaf AT aol.com_ (mailto:rohrbaf AT aol.com)
>



-- 
Hugh McGuinness
Washington, D.C.
Subject: Interested in Owls? Catch Justin Jaworski's "Understanding the Silent Flight of Owls" on May 21
From: Steve Kacir <setkacir AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 11:22:59 -0400
Hello Birders, 

The Delaware Valley Ornithological Club (DVOC) meets on Thursday May 21 at the 
Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. The meeting features Justin 
Jaworski and his program, "Understanding the Silent Flight of Owls." 


All who have an interest are invited to attend; the program is free with no 
admission charged. Club meetings begin at 7:30PM and are held at the Academy of 
Natural Sciences, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia, PA 19103. A 
pre-meeting dinner takes place at Asia on the Parkway, not far from the 
Academy. More details and directions to the Academy and Asia on the Parkway can 
be found on the DVOC website: http://www.dvoc.org/Main.htm 



Understanding the Silent Flight of Owls:

Many owl species rely on specialized plumage to suppress the noise generated by 
their wings in flight, which enables them to sneak up on their prey in complete 
acoustic stealth. Now 80 years since these unique plumage attributes were 
identified, a satisfactory explanation for exactly how these attributes reduce 
noise remains elusive. In this talk, we will discuss recent research into how 
sound is produced and eliminated by owl wings, and how an understanding of the 
physics behind the owl's stealth can impact commercial and military 
applications ranging from aircraft to wind turbines to underwater vehicles. 


Justin Jaworski:

Justin W. Jaworski earned his doctorate (2009), master’s, and bachelor’s 
degrees in mechanical engineering and materials science from Duke University. 
Before joining the mechanical engineering and mechanics faculty at Lehigh in 
2013, Jaworski was an NSF international research fellow at the University of 
Cambridge, where he was also college research associate of applied mathematics 
for Magdalene College. His research investigates natural and aerospace 
phenomena involving a dynamic interaction between fluid flows and structural 
movement, which occur in a wide range of topics ranging from chronic snoring to 
the stability of flexible wings and wind turbine blades to the silent flight of 
owls. 




We hope to see you at the meeting!

Steve Kacir
DVOC Vice President
setkacirgmail.com
Subject: Red-necked phalaropes
From: Matthew Sarver <matt AT MATTHEWSARVER.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 May 2015 12:33:20 -0400
Both Red-necked Phalaropes were still present at approximately 7:15 pm
Sunday foraging actively with 5,000+ Semipalmated Sandpipers, along with a
mix of other shorebirds.

-Matt

-- 
Matthew Sarver
Sarver Ecological, LLC
6 Walnut Ridge Rd
Greenville, DE 19807
724-689-5845
matt AT matthewsarver.com
Subject: Red-necked phalarope
From: Jeff & Deborah Climie <climie99 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 May 2015 17:33:59 -0400
I went this afternoon with my in-laws Dave and Joy Peters, to look for the
red-necked phalarope and we found it. It was very beautiful and a joy to
see this great new lifer!
Subject: Purple Finch
From: Sally Fintel <sallyfintel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 May 2015 15:37:19 -0400
A lone Purple Finch continues at our feeder in Lewes, DE

Sally Fintel 
Lewes, DE
Subject: New Castle: Least Terns at Port Penn Impoundments
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 May 2015 15:23:44 -0400
Birders,

There are two Least Terns at the Port Penn Impoundments right now. They're 
visible from cooper's cross (across from Thorntown Rd.) which is the new access 
point and they are on the cement structure in the middle of the impoundment. 


Cheers,
Tim Schreckengost
Elkton, MD
814-952-2934
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Kent: Red-necked Phalaropes at Little Creek
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 May 2015 10:38:42 -0400
Birders,

Alan Kneidel reports two Red-necked Phalaropes at Little Creek Wildlife
Area in Kent County. Details from DE RBA text alert: "Alan Kneidel: At
least 2 Red-necked Phalaropes in Little Creek south impoundment access from
Pickering Beach Rd. One in breeding plumage."

Parking Area Here: https://goo.gl/maps/KxX1V

Cheers,
Tim Schreckengost
Elkton, MD
(814) 952-2934
www.nemesisbird.com
Subject: Kite/Shorebird Watch at Bucktoe
From: Joe Sebastiani <bunker17 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 May 2015 08:51:24 -0400
This afternoon, the Kite and Shorebird Watch begins at the Bucktoe Creek 
Preserve near Kennett Square, PA. Daily from 3-8pm, starting today and going 
through June 6, Larry Lewis will be leading the effort to spot Mississippi 
Kites (and in his wildest dreams Swallow-tailed), as well as flocks of migrant 
shorebirds heading north. Bring a picnic dinner, your choice of beverage, and a 
chair to enjoy this sky-watch. They are successful seeing Mississippi Kites 
every year, and last year they had 9 separate sightings. It is equally 
impressive to see large flocks of shorebirds heading north into Pennsylvania, 
up to their Arctic breeding grounds. Everything from Whimbrel to Plovers, Red 
Knot, Ruddy Turnstone and many more species have been sighted flying over the 
watch. 


Once at Bucktoe Creek Preserve, 432 Sharp Road, Avondale, PA...follow the signs 
past the first parking area into the middle of the property where there is a 
second parking area set up for the Watch. There is a pavilion in the middle of 
the field where the watch operates. 


Hope to see you there.

Joe Sebastiani
Delaware Nature Society
Subject: Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch (16 May 2015) 23 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Sat, 16 May 2015 09:50:20 -0800
Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch
Lewes, Delaware, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: May 16, 2015
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0             22
Turkey Vulture              18             77            531
Osprey                       0              0             13
Bald Eagle                   2              2             13
Northern Harrier             0              1             22
Sharp-shinned Hawk           0             16             81
Cooper's Hawk                0              0              0
Northern Goshawk             0              0              1
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              0              0
Broad-winged Hawk            1              2              2
Red-tailed Hawk              1              1             23
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              1
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             0              2            180
Merlin                       0              6             83
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0             20
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0             15
Mississippi Kite             1              1              1

Total:                      23            108           1008
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 09:30:00 
Observation end   time: 12:30:00 
Total observation time: 3 hours

Official Counter:        Bruce Peterjohn, Susan Gruver

Observers:        

Visitors:
4


Weather:
light wind from the SW, temp.24-27c, 25% clcv., visb 15k

Raptor Observations:
Juv. MISSISSIPPI KITE and one Broad-Winged Hawk

2 Juv. Bald Eagle (migrating)

Non-raptor Observations:
Common Night Hawk, 2-Skimmers, 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Sue Gruver (srgruver AT aol.com)
Subject: Redden Forest Finds
From: Mary Lukaszewski <mlukas AT SPRINTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 May 2015 09:09:51 -0400
Driving back from Milford yesterday I was surprised at the number of birds I 
seen and heard along W. Robbins Rd and along the length of State Forest Rd. 


I was happy to note that Redden Forest has finally awakened from a long winter. 
At the woodpecker lot there was a Boblink on top of a tall tree in the middle 
of the lot. When it flew off, several more joined in the flight. Somewhere in 
the lot a woodpecker was knocking on a tree. I tried to find it but could not 
see it because of the growth of trees near the road. But it is good to hear 
some sort of woodpecker has moved back to the lot. 

Going down W. Robbins Rd, a Scarlet Tanger flew across Robbins Rd between 
Redden and Deer Forest Rd. There are a number of Cardinals in the area and I 
first wasn't sure of it being a Tanger but it sat on a limb and sang for a 
minute. It was definitely a Tanger. As mentioned, we also seen a number of 
Cardinals along the road. 

I'm not good at warbler songs but the bushes along the length of the road had 
many different voices. I intend to go back during the next few days to see if I 
can get some photos. 


Mary Lukaszewski
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, May 15th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 16 May 2015 06:30:06 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* May 15, 2015
* DEST1505.15
	
*Birds mentioned
Brant
Tundra Swan
Mute Swan
American Wigeon
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail
Lesser Scaup
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Ring-necked Pheasant
Wild Turkey
Northern Bobwhite
Red Throated Loon
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
BROWN PELICAN
American Bittern
Least Bittern
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
Glossy Ibis
Osprey
Bald Eagle
BLACK RAIL
King Rail
Virginia Rail
Sora
Common Gallinule
American Coot
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
Black-bellied Plover
American Golden Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Solitary Sandpiper
Spotted Sandpiper
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Sanderling
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
Dunlin
Stilt Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
Bonaparte's Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Least Tern
Black Tern
Common Tern
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
Common Nighthawk
Chuck Wills Widow
Whippoorwill
Red-headed Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon
OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER
YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER
ALDER FLYCATCHER
Willow Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Brown-headed Nuthatch
SEDGE WREN
Veery
Swainson's Thrush
Gray-cheeked Thrush
Cedar Waxwing
Worm-eating Warbler
Louisiana Waterthrush
Northern Waterthrush
Prothonotary Warbler
Black and White Warbler
American Redstart
Blue-winged Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Kentucky Warbler
Hooded Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Canada Warbler
Vesper Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Summer Tanager
DICKCISSEL
Bobolink
Eastern Meadowlark
Purple Finch

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: May 15, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net 
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

This is Birdline Delaware, for Friday, May 15th from the Delaware Museum of
Natural History in Greenville. This week, warblers have arrived! A whooping
33 species of warbler were reported, plus thrushes and all the eastern
Empidonax flycatchers. The unofficial Delaware annual list jumped to 293
species this week. 

There were two reports of BLACK RAIL this week in Delaware. One bird was
heard briefly calling at the marsh along the Big Stone Beach Road. Another
BLACK RAIL was heard calling at the Boardwalk Trail in Bombay Hook National
Wildlife Refuge. Both of these reports were thought to be birds in migration
and did not behave like they were on territory.  More rails included
VIRGINIA RAILS at Broadkill Beach at the Island Farm intersection, Pickering
Beach Road, and Port Mahon. SORA was heard at its traditional site at
Grier's Pond along Dutch Neck Rd. KING RAIL was heard at the south side of
the Reedy Point Bridge. COMMON GALLINULE was also reported at Grier's Pond,
along with LEAST BITTERN. A SANDHILL CRANE, also a member of the rail
family, was reported at the Yardley Tract of Augustine Beach Wildlife Area.
This bird was heard calling at the intersection of Route 9 and Thorntown
Road. 

Three BLACK TERNS were reported at Taylor's Gut at Woodland Beach Wildlife
Area. A pair of RUDDY DUCKS were seen there on Monday. BALD EAGLES and
OSPREYS were also seen, along with SNOWY and COMMON EGRETS, plus both
YELLOWLEGS, and DOWITCHERS. 

A BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO was heard at Thompson Station Road in White Clay Creek
State Park. Thrushes seen along Thomson's Station Road included VEERY,
SWAINSON'S and GRAY-CHECKED. Warblers are back! A big wave was seen
yesterday at White Clay Creek. Those birds included BLUE-WINGED,
CHESTNUT-SIDED, MAGNOLIA, CAPE MAY, BLACKBURNIAN, BAY-BREASTED, BLACKPOLL,
CANADA AND WILSON'S, plus NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH. Several KENTUCKY WARBLERS
were reported, plus a HOODED WARBLER on the hillside south of Hopkins
Bridge. An OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER was seen on Sunday along White Clay Creek,
just south of the Wedgewood Road intersection. OLIVE-SIDED was also reported
at Middle Run and Ashland Nature Center yesterday

Five species Empidonax flycatchers were reported in the state last week.
LEAST FLYCATCHER was reported at Smith Mill Road in White Clay Creek State
Park and at the Gold Park in Rehoboth Beach. WILLOW FLYCATCHERS were seen at
Bombay Hook, Thousand Acre Marsh near Delaware City, Middle Run, Hopkins
Bridge in White Clay Creek State Park, Ashland Nature Center, and Coverdale
Farm. A YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER was reported and photographed at Big Stone
Beach Road, and an ALDER FLYCATCHER was heard at Lums Pond State Park by the
spillway on Saturday. ALDER FLYCATCHER was also reported yesterday in the
marsh along the Red Clay Creek at Ashland Nature Center. 

This first COMMON NIGHTHAWK of the season was reported at Cape Henlopen
State Park on Monday. NIGHTHAWKS were also reported at Big Stone Beach
(known as goatsucker Heaven!), Delaware City, and Bellevue State Park
yesterday. WHIPPOORWILL was reported from Oyster Rocks Road in Prime Hook
National Wildlife Refuge, and at Big Stone Beach Road. CHUCK-WILL-WIDOW was
also reported at Bid Stone Beach and at Fresh Pond in Delaware Seashore
State Park. Additionally, a SEDGE WREN was singing at night by the wooden
bridge on Big Stone Beach Road. 

An AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVER in full breeding plumage was seen last weekend at
Bear Swamp in Bombay Hook. STILT SANDPIPERS were reported at the north end
of Shearness Pool. 20-30 BLACK-NECKED STILTS were also seen at the refuge.
Right now, Bombay Hook is teaming with shorebirds, include rare sightings of
RED KNOT, RUDDY TURNSTONE, LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER, plus lots of BLACK-BELLIED
and SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS, SEMIPALMATED, and LEAST SANDPIPER, DUNLIN and
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. A dozen BLACK SKIMMERS were seen on Tuesday, plus
BONAPARTE'S GULL. Waterfowl seen included both TUNDRA and MUTE SWAN. A clean
sweep of the gallinaceous birds, RING-NECKED PHEASANT, WILD TURKEY and
NORTHERN BOBWHITE were reported at the refuge. YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO was
calling along the Boardwalk Trail. 

A big warbler fallout was seen at Bombay Hook on Wednesday along Raymond
Neck Road at Finis Pool. WARBLERS seen included a "killer look" at
BLACKBURNIAN, plus BLACK AND WHITE, BLACKPOLL, MAGNOLIA, CHESTNUT-SIDED,
WILSON'S, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH and 30-40 AMERICAN REDSTART. BLACK-THROATED
BLUE and GREEN and HOODED were seen elsewhere in the refuge. Also seen was
PROTHONOTARY WARBLER at the end of the Finis Pool Road. 

Late waterfowl at Little Creek Wildlife Management Area included NORTHERN
PINTAIL, NORTHERN SHOVELER, HOODED MERGANSER and AMERICAN COOT. The first
WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER of the season was reported at Little Creek yesterday.
MERLIN and PEREGRINE FALCON were also seen there. YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
was found at the powerline cut on the Pickering Beach Road. Both AMERICAN
and LEAST BITTERN were heard calling at night along the Port Mahon Road.
Other late waterfowl included an AMERICAN WIGEON at the north pond in the
Logan Tract of the Ted Harvey Conservation Area. COMMON LOON was seen at the
Pioneer Gravel Pits, along with LESSER BLACK-BACKED and BONAPARTE'S GULLS. 

BANK SWALLOWS were also reported at the Pioneer Gravel pits, nesting in the
bank by the intersection of Route 9 and Route 113 south of Dover. BANK
SWALLOW was also reported around Delaware City, at Thousand Acre Marsh and
along the C&D Canal, plus at Henlopen Acres along the Lewes-Rehoboth Canal.
CLIFF SWALLOWS were reported at the Appoquinimink Bridge near Odessa of
Route 9 and at the Flemings Landing Bridge. 

A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was reported at Milford Neck Wildlife Area along the
Big Stone Beach Road. The bird was seen in the dead snags by the end of the
marsh. BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCHES were also seen. WHITE-RUMPED and STILT
SANDPIPER were also reported at Big Stone Beach, plus BLACK-NECKED STILT and
SOLITARY SANDPIPER. Warblers seen included CHESTNUT-SIDED, MAGNOLIA,
BLACK-THROATED GREEN, CANADA and YELLOW-THROATED. 

A DICKCISSEL was reported in Sussex Co, west of Ellendale on Slaytonville
Road. VESPER SPARROW was found on Ponders Road, northeast of Ellendale.
AMERICAN KESTREL and RED-HEADED WOODPECKER were found on W. Robbins Road in
Redden State Forest. Redden had several SUMMER TANAGERS and WORM-EATING
WARBLERS reported. LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH, YELLOW-THROATED and PROTHONOTARY
WARBLER were found at the Redden Rest Stop

Several RED KNOTS were among the shorebirds at Mispillion Inlet from the
DuPont Nature Center. AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, SANDERLING, and lots of
BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER and DUNLIN were also present. A
PEREGRINE FALCON is being seen intermittently, as it hunts the shorebirds. 

BLACK SKIMMERS were also seen at Prime Hook Beach Road, along with LEAST
TERN. LITTLE BLUE HERON was seen at Fowler's Beach, along with SALTMARSH and
SEASIDE SPARROW. TRICOLORED HERON was seen at Broadkill Beach marsh.
PROTHONOTARY WARBLER and NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH were found along the boardwalk
trail by the headquarters. VESPER and GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS were seen in the
fields around the refuge. 

LEAST and COMMON TERNS were seen at Indian River Inlet this week. The first
BROWN PELICANS of the season were seen at Dewey Beach on Saturday.
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER and BRANT were seen at Savage's Ditch in Delaware
Seashore State Park. A dozen TRICOLORED HERONS were seen at Delaware
Seashore on Saturday. 

PIPING PLOVER and AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER were seen at the point art cape
Henlopen state Park. RUDDY TURNSTONE and BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS were also
seen BRANT were seen along the inner harbor breakwater. BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCH was found at the parking lot to the hawk watch. COMMON TERN and
RED-THROATED LOON were seen at Herring Point. A WILD TURKEY was seen on the
ball field across from the nature center. 

BOBOLINKS were reported in several locations this week. BOBOLINK, plus
EASTERN MEADOWLARK, GRASSHOPPER and SAVANNAH SPARROW were found at the
Charles E. Price Park in Middletown. BOBOLINK was also reported at Middle
Run, Ashland Nature Center, Hockessin, and at Ramsey Road at Woodlawn
Trustees property. 

COMMON GALLINULE and PIED-BILLED GREBE was found at the Summit Bridge Ponds
at the C&D Canal Area. PIED-BILLED GREBE, MUTE SWAN, LITTLE BLUE HERON and
CATTLE EGRETS were seen at the Canal Pond next to Dragon Run in Delaware
City. 

The PEREGRINE FALCONS continue to grow in downtown Wilmington. A LESSER
SCAUP was at the Viola Water Treatment Plant off hay Road. A PURPLE FINCH
was seen at a feeder on Franklin Street. WARBLING VIREO, CEDAR WAXWING and
BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER were seen at Brandywine Park. A LEAST BITTERN
was seen at the Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge, a new species for that
location. 

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Rod Murray, Mike
Moore, Derek Stoner, Anthony Gonzon,  Kitt Heckscher, Amy O'Neil, Damon
Orsetti, Judy Montgomery, Karen and Chris Bennett, Kevin Bronson, Rachael
Shapiro, Hannah Greenberg, Phil Thompson, Sally O'Byrne, David Fees, Joe
Sebastiani, Rich Clifton, Chris and Erin Rowe, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver,
Sharon Lynn, Bill Stewart, Ian Stewart, Alan Kneidel, Tim Freiday, Tim
Schreckengost, Matt Boone, Chandler Wiegand, Maurice Barnhill, Andrew
Bogush, Jim Lenhard, Al Strong, Bernie Foy, Eric Molho, and Joe Russell.
Remember, the birdline needs your sightings! Please call your reports into
302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy
Ednie wishing you good birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Sussex Bird Club Fieldtrip Tuesday
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 18:32:57 -0400
I will be leading the annual SBC fieldtrip to the deck of the Dupont Nature
Center Tuesday evening from 6 pm to 8 pm.  Shorebirds are the primary
target, but we usually see a nice mix of other birds as well.  Everyone is
welcome.  I hope to see you there.

Chris Bennett
Milford, DE
Subject: Purple Finch
From: Sally Fintel <sallyfintel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 17:14:18 -0400
This morning we had a continuing Purple Finch at our feeder.

Sally Fintel
Lewes, DE
Subject: Sussex Bird Club Fieldtrip Saturday
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 May 2015 21:40:35 -0400
I will be leading a fieldtrip to The Nature Conservancy's McCabe Preserve
and Ponders Tract - near Milton - this Saturday beginning at 8 am.  The
McCabe Preserve is a wooded tract along the east bank of the Broadkill
River which under the right conditions in early May can be loaded with
migrant songbirds.  Let's hope the weather we've had the past few days
holds and the influx of neotropical migrants continues.  After we walk the
trails at McCabe we will drive the few miles west to the Ponders Tract -
recovering timberlands that provide a mix of mature forest and early
successional habitat.  It is usually loaded with Prairie and
Black-and-white Warblers.  The trip will begin at the McCabe Preserve
parking lot located on Round Pole Bridge Road (Brickyard Road on Google
Maps) - approximately 1/2 mile north of Cave Neck Road at 8am.  We
will spend a couple hours here before heading to Ponders.  We should be
done there around noon or a little after.

Be sure to bring water, sunscreen and insect repellent.  Both sites will
require quite a bit of walking on natural surface trails and old logging
roads.  Everyone is welcome.  I hope you can join me.

Chris Bennett
Milford, DE
Subject: Newark -- 92 species, 23 species of warbler - 5/14/15
From: Alan Kneidel <akneidel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 May 2015 20:55:56 -0400
DE-Birders,

LOTS of birds in Newark today. I spent the workday with Veeries on Thompson
Station Rd. in White Clay Creek SP with our Delaware State U. crew. In the
process I quickly tallied 17 species of warbler with minimal effort.

After realizing that a red-letter day was occurring I spent the evening
visiting Hopkins Rd. and Middle Run Natural Area. I finished the day with
92 species and 23 species of warbler. Species lists as follows with photos
and details:

Thompson Station Rd -- many Gray-cheeked and Swainson's Thrush,
Black-billed Cuckoo, Worm-eating Warbler, Bay-breasted Warbler, Northern
Waterthrushes etc.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23440478

Hopkins Rd: -- Cerulean Warbler
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23445569

Middle Run: -- Olive-sided Flycatcher
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23445616

White Clay, Smith Mill Rd Access: -- many Bobolinks, Eastern Meadowlark,
Least Flycatcher
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23445788

Good birding,

-- 
Alan Kneidel
M.S. Candidate, Natural Resources
Delaware State University
980-254-2706
Subject: Bombay Hook Warblers
From: Rodney Murray <rcmurray213 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 May 2015 11:45:05 -0400
It took me from 7:20 to 7:40 AM this morning while parked on Raymond Neck
Rd by the swampy area of Finis Pool to observe 12 species of warbler:
Back-and-white, Blackpoll, Yellow-rumped, Yellow, Magnolia, Chestnut-sided,
Am Redstart, Canada, Wilson's, Common Yellowthroat, Northern Waterthrush,
and one killer look at a very cooperative Blackburnian who came in quite
low displaying his orangey and black facial pattern.

Elsewhere in the refuge I saw YB Chat, Black-throated Blue, Black-throated
Green, Ovenbird, N Parula, and Hooded Warbler.   Not only the diversity,
but the number of each species was startling.  There must have been 30-40
Redstarts, and close to double figures of Blackpolls, Black-and-whites, and
Chestnuts.   The only "loners" were the Blackburnian, Wilson's, and Hooded.

This was the best "fallout" I've ever had had B Hook.

Rod Murray, Middletown DE
Subject: DOS May Monthly Mtg - Wed. 5/20
From: Bill Stewart <bstewart AT ABA.ORG>
Date: Thu, 14 May 2015 04:57:36 -0400
The Delmarva Ornithological Society is excited to host their next monthly 
meeting this coming Wednesday, the 20th of May featuring - A Triple-Header 
Night! 


Plan on putting the DOS May meeting on your calendar, we have an exciting 
evening planned for our members and guests! First up, 12 year old Zoe Yost will 
present “Light and Air, Inquisitive and Fierce” as she takes us all on a 
personal journey through the fascinating world of hummingbirds. Zoe has 
composed her power point presentation from start to finish including some 
original art work. Second up, the DOS Conservation Committee is proud to 
present this year’s Conservation Award to Collin O’Mara, current Executive 
Director of the National Wildlife Federation, past Secretary of DNREC. Collin 
will be present to accept the award and share some of his thoughts on 
conservation efforts past, present and future. And last but not least, “Avian 
Mortality, Glass Impacts - Prevention in your own Backyard”. Presenter Sally 
O’Byrne will share some recent findings and products that can be beneficial for 
homeowners in preventing window strikes and avian deaths. 


We hope to see many of you there - the meeting is open to the public so grab a 
birding buddy or two and plan on attending on the 20th! 


Delmarva Ornithological Society   May 20th Meeting

7:00 PM Social 1/2 hour (We welcome you to bring some refreshments to share for 
our Social 1/2 hour) 


Meeting begins at 7:30 PM

Ashland Nature Center - Hockessin, DE     


Good birding,

Bill Stewart
DOS VP/Program Chair
Subject: Bellevue, Part 2
From: "Amy O'Neil" <parakeet93 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 13 May 2015 22:33:45 -0400
This evening about an hour before sunset, my daughter & I stopped back over to 
Bellevue S.P. to check out the still singing (& still visible) Scarlet Tanager, 
plus Am. Redstart, Magnolia, & Yellow Warblers. She then pointed out the first 
Common Nighthawk I've seen this year, followed by two others swirling over the 
parking lot just before we left at 8pm. So keep looking up! 


Amy O'Neil
North Wilmington 
Subject: Re: Field full of Plovers
From: Bill Fintel <kittiwakebill AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 May 2015 19:53:49 -0400
Sharon,

Sally and I checked out your field on the north side of Rt 16 just before
Ponders, west of Milton. My estimate was 300 to 400 plovers, mostly
Black-bellied, but we definitely found some American Golden Plover in with
them. We did not take our class there because viewing from the roadside of
Rt 16 is hazardous at best.

Thanks for your post. This is best congregation of plovers in a field I
have seen this spring.

Bill Fintel
Lewes, DE

On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 8:55 AM, Sharon Lynn  wrote:

> I was driving west of Milton on Rt 16 this morning, and there is a farm
> field holding hundreds of what appear to be Black-Bellied Plovers. I am
> headed to VA for an appointment, so did not have time to scan through them
> to look for Golden Plovers or anything else. If you are in the area, you
> might want to see what is there!!
>
> Sharon Lynn
> Rehoboth Beach
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
Subject: Four life birds today at White Clay Creek
From: Vince Gambal <0000009a8147fdd9-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Wed, 13 May 2015 17:06:13 -0400
It's been decades since I've been to White Clay Creek, going back to my UD 
fraternity picnics at Carpenter. I had no idea how extensive and beautiful the 
park is. And so different from our eastern Sussex woodlands. 


With in minutes of parking at Possom Hill, I had my first female Baltimore 
oriole. Saw another female oriole (the males still elude me) on my life list 
was a male American redstart, red eyed vireo and several bobolinks. 


Other good birds included many ovenbirds, wood thrush, several veeries, common 
yellow throats, tree swallows, barn swallows, chipping sparrows, blue birds, 
yellow warbler and a possible magnolia warbler (too fleeting for a positive 
ID). 


Great day.  I will be back!

Vince Gambal
Lewes, DE
Subject: Bellevue State Park
From: "Amy O'Neil" <parakeet93 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 13 May 2015 15:24:15 -0500
In a three hour walk through Bellevue S.P. this morning, I had my first ever 
sighting in the park of a Blue Grosbeak, and my second-ever sighting there of a 
Yellow-throated Vireo. There was also a very vocal and visible Scarlet Tanager, 
and many warblers: Yellow, Magnolia, N. Parula, C. Yellowthroat, Ovenbird, Am. 
Redstart, Black-throated Blue, & Blackpoll. Purple Martins continue at the 
martin house & gourds by the lake, both Baltimore & Orchard Orioles were in 
several locations in the park, and there were many singing Warbling Vireos. 
There were also Cedar Waxwings by the parking lot. 


 
The full eBird list is below.
 

 
Amy O'Neil
North Wilmington
 
Bellevue State Park, New Castle, US-DE
May 13, 2015 7:20 AM - 10:20 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
46 species (+1 other taxa)
Canada Goose 15
Mallard 1
Turkey Vulture 1
Accipiter sp. 1 Chased swiftly into the woods by Red-winged Blackbirds & Purple 
Martins - only saw the small size & horizontal barring on the tail. Most likely 
a Sharp-shinned, since it was not much larger than a robin. 

Mourning Dove 4
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
Downy Woodpecker 1
Great Crested Flycatcher 1
Eastern Kingbird 3
Yellow-throated Vireo 1
Warbling Vireo 5
Red-eyed Vireo 3
Blue Jay 2
American Crow 3
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 2
Purple Martin 10
Tree Swallow 8
Barn Swallow 3
Carolina Chickadee 2
House Wren 2
Carolina Wren 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 3
American Robin 12
Gray Catbird 5
Northern Mockingbird 2
European Starling 6
Cedar Waxwing 2
Ovenbird 1
Common Yellowthroat 2
American Redstart 2
Northern Parula 1
Magnolia Warbler 2
Yellow Warbler 3
Blackpoll Warbler 2
Black-throated Blue Warbler 1
Chipping Sparrow 1
Song Sparrow 2
Scarlet Tanager 1
Northern Cardinal 3
Blue Grosbeak 1
Red-winged Blackbird 6
Common Grackle 4
Brown-headed Cowbird 2
Orchard Oriole 4
Baltimore Oriole 5
American Goldfinch 3
House Sparrow 8
View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23424024 

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

 
 
Subject: Re: DBRC Documentation Request - Burrowing Owl, et al.
From: Comcast <sharonliebs AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 13 May 2015 13:27:04 -0400
I rarely send messages but this struck me as so funny..."photographs with fancy 
cameras and cell phones..." 

Too funny
Sent from my iPhone

> On May 13, 2015, at 12:00 PM, Frank Rohrbacher 
<0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> photographs with fancy cameras and  cell 
> phones but none has been willing to share t
Subject: Bobolinks at Fox Point Park
From: Alissa Kegelman <alissakegelman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 May 2015 10:42:06 -0400
There were 4 Bobolinks at Fox Point Park this morning at 9:45 am. We first 
heard the bubbling song. They flew to the grassy field in front of the rear 
parking lot ,then perched in a tree. 

This was the first time we have seen them at Fox Point.

Alissa Kegelman
Wilmington,DE
Subject: Field full of Plovers
From: Sharon Lynn <slynn001 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 08:55:23 -0400
I was driving west of Milton on Rt 16 this morning, and there is a farm field 
holding hundreds of what appear to be Black-Bellied Plovers. I am headed to VA 
for an appointment, so did not have time to scan through them to look for 
Golden Plovers or anything else. If you are in the area, you might want to see 
what is there!! 


Sharon Lynn
Rehoboth Beach

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Citizens Science Project – Mourning Warbler Song Mapper
From: Jay Pitocchelli <jpitocch AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 May 2015 13:11:22 -0400
Citizens Science Project – Mourning Warbler Song Mapper



I am posting an opportunity to participate in a Citizens Science Project
that involves recording migrating Mourning Warbler songs.  I am trying to
determine the nature of migratory pathways taken by different populations
of Mourning Warbler males during their spring migration using the
signatures of their songs.  The pattern of geographic variation in song on
the breeding range is well known.  However, we do not know how members of
these different song populations migrate towards their respective breeding
areas.  I plan on collecting your recordings and plotting them on a map of
North America to determine where birds with different song types
(regiolects) separate from each other during spring migration.



All you need is a Smartphone and a singing Mourning Warbler.  You can send
the recordings to my e-mail address (jpitocch AT anselm.edu).  The web page
link below describes the project and how to make recordings on your
Smartphone in more detail.




http://www.anselm.edu/homepage/jpitocch/ornithology/MOWAmapper/MOWASongmapper.html 




I would really appreciate your help and contributions to this Citizens
Science Project.



Dr. Jay Pitocchelli

Biology Department

Saint Anselm College

Manchester, NH 03102
Subject: Mother's Day Walk at White Clay: The Highlights
From: Derek Stoner <derekstoner AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 May 2015 22:34:11 -0400
Greetings: 
The annual Mother's Day Bird Walk at White Clay Creek State Park once again 
delivered a good show for the crowd of eager birders. 

We enjoyed scope views of prizes like Cerulean Warbler, Scarlet Tanager, 
American Redstart, Wood Thrush, Ovenbird, Yellow-throated Vireo, Northern 
Parula, Indigo Bunting, and Baltimore Oriole while making our way through the 
early-morning mist and light fog. The list of "pass-through" migrants was 
light, but we did hear Black-throated Blue and Blackpoll Warblers. 

Our group encountered interesting sights like a Pileated Woodpecker flipping 
leaves on the ground, a Wood Thrrush taking a bath by a small waterfall, two 
female Ruby-throated Hummingbirds chasing each other around the tree canopy, 
and an intricate nest made by a Northern Parula. Flyover Wood Ducks, a circling 
Great Egret, and feisty Eastern Kingbirds made the four-hour tour of White Clay 
even more memorable. 

As a whole, we tallied 65 species for the morning. Here is our group's eBird 
checklist.http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23355501 

Thank you to Bill Stewart, Mike Hudson, and Judy Montgomery for leading the 
walk, and to all the participants for helping to celebrate the final day of 
another successful Delaware Bird-A-Thon! 

Good birding,
Derek Stoner 		 	   		  
Subject: Black-billed cuckoo
From: Ian Stewart <istew AT UDEL.EDU>
Date: Sun, 10 May 2015 22:17:51 -0400
I saw my state black-billed cuckoo at Ashland yesterday which was eating
tent caterpillars from a conspicuous white tent in the top of a tree along
the creek just before the elbow. I have also seen orioles feasting on tent
caterpillars so always check out any tents! Also new for the year for me
were veery and wood thrush, Acadian flycatcher, Canada warbler, scarlet
tanager, indigo bunting and red-eyed vireo.

The birds were seen during the new 'weekend naturalist' program which runs
at Ashland every weekend. This includes free nature walks every Saturday
and Sunday at 10 am and 2pm and the walks explore the trails for
wildflowers, trees, herps and invertebrates and of course birds, and are
aimed at all ages including families. If you have birding/nature friends
visiting for the weekend it would be a great place to take them!

Ian Stewart
Newark, DE
Subject: Bobolinks
From: Rodney Murray <rcmurray213 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 May 2015 18:21:56 -0400
Early this morning, four Bobolinks were on the wooden fence at the entrance
to Chas. Price Park in Middletown.   I searched the whole park and adjacent
areas for more, but none were seen or heard.  Later in the afternoon I
returned, but I was unable to relocate them.

Rod Murray, Middletown DE
Subject: My DOS Spring Roundup Highlights
From: Michael Moore <mcmoore32 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 May 2015 16:40:19 -0400
Greetings

 

Today I covered Lum's Pond and the Summit Bridge Ponds for the DOS Spring
Roundup.  

 

I found 85 species.  It was a very slow day for migrants.  The highlight was
a persistently singing Alder Flycatcher at the inlet to Lum's Pond.  Also
there was the usual Kentucky Warbler (which breeds there) and a little ways
into the woods a Worm-eating Warbler.  Other migrants were Blue-headed
Vireo, N. Parula and a couple of Yellow-rumpled and Black-and-White
Warblers.  I managed to get one each of Belted Kingfisher, Spotted Sandpiper
and Solitary Sandpiper!  11 total warbler species, but mostly residents.  

 

Initially things were slow at Summit Bridge Ponds, but I eventually dug out
5 Grasshopper Sparrows and a Meadowlark.  Two male Bobolinks were a bonus.
I heard a Common Moorhen in the usual spot near where the Yellow Warblers
are, but Willow Flycatchers which are regular at this spot must not be in as
they did not respond to the tape.  Back at the retention pond in my
development, a Greater Yellowlegs was a final bonus (still in my assigned
area).  

 

At Lum's Pond there was a bass fishing tournament so the boat ramp parking
lot was full at 6:00 AM and the lake was covered with boats with no
waterfowl.  There was also a dog agility trial covering the last field at
Lum's Pond near Go Ape.  Finally, the ACK was having Field Trials at Summit
Bridge Ponds.  All this added an extra difficultly factor but still an
enjoyable day!

 

Mike Moore

Newark, DE

  Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com

 

Websites:

 
Delmarva Dragonflies and Damselflies
(https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/)

  Voices of Delaware Birds
(https://sites.google.com/site/delawarebirdsongs/)

  Birds of the
Gilbert Water Ranch
(https://sites.google.com/site/birdsofthegilbertwaterranch/)

  AZFO Rare Bird
Photos (http://www.azfo.org/gallery/1main/photos_recent.html)

 

Mike

 
Subject: Mother's Day Bird Walk at White Clay Creek State Park Tomorrow
From: Derek Stoner <derekstoner AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 May 2015 14:36:27 -0400
Greetings:

 

You are invited to take part in a special bird walk this Mother's Day (Sunday, 
May 10) at White Clay Creek State Park. 

Bill Stewart, Judy Montgomery, and I will lead this walk as the finale of the 
Delaware Bird-A-Thon week of guided birding opportunities. This is an ideal 
walk for the whole family, as we enjoy a relaxed pace while taking in the great 
diversity of birds at this wonderful park. Come out to celebrate Spring 
Migration, Mother's Day, and the success of the Delaware Bird-A-Thon as a 
conservation fundraiser! 


 

Scarlet Tanager, Baltimore Oriole, American Redstart, Northern Parula, Indigo 
Bunting, and many other colorful species are typically encountered on this 
walk. Spotting scopes are employed to help participants experience the best 
views possible of the birds we discover. 

 

We will meet at 7:00am in the parking lot of the White Clay Creek State Park 
Nature Center, off of Hopkins Bridge Road. We plan to walk the loop from 
Hopkins Bridge down to Wedgewood Road and back to the nature center. Expect the 
walk to last three to four hours. 


 

For a map of the state park with directions to the nature center, please visit: 
http://www.destateparks.com/downloads/maps/white-clay-creek/white-clay-creek.pdf 


 

Good birding,

 

Derek Stoner

 		 	   		  
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, May 7th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 7 May 2015 21:01:03 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* May 7, 2015
* DEST1505.07
	
*Birds mentioned
Brant
Tundra Swan
Mute Swan
White-winged Scoter
Wild Turkey
Northern Bobwhite
Common Loon
Horned Grebe
Great Cormorant
Least Bittern
Tricolored Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
Clapper Rail
King Rail
Virginia Rail
Sora
Common Gallinule
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
American Golden Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Short-Billed Dowitcher
Bonaparte's Gull
Common Tern
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
Barred Owl
Common Nighthawk
Chuck Wills Widow
Whippoorwill
Red-headed Woodpecker
Eastern Wood Peewee
Willow Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Blue-headed Vireo
Yellow-throated Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Veery
Gray-cheeked Thrush
Swainson's Thrush
Hermit Thrush
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Black and White Warbler
American Redstart
Prothonotary Warbler
Worm-eating Warbler
Blue-winged Warbler
Tennessee Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Northern Parula
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Cape May Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Palm Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Kentucky Warbler
Hooded Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Canada Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Vesper Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Summer Tanager
Scarlet Tanager
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Bobolink
Eastern Meadowlark
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole
Pine Siskin

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: May 7, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net 
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

This is an early edition of Birdline Delaware for Thursday, May 7th from the
Delaware Museum of Natural History in Greenville. A whooping 32 species of
warbler were reported this week! The unofficial Delaware annual list jumped
to 285 species this week. 

TRICOLORED HERON continues to be seen at the Port Penn Impoundments of
Augustine Beach Wildlife Area below Delaware City. This bird has also been
seen flying out to Pea Patch Island in the evening. Also seen flying out to
Pea Patch has been a single YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON. BONAPARTE'S GULLS
were seen over the Delaware River. Some other birds at Port Penn included
BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS, SEMIPALMATED and LEAST SANDPIPER,
and COMMON GALLINULE. KING RAIL was reported at the south end of the Reedy
Point Bridge along with CLAPPER RAIL and COMMON GALLINULE. LEAST BITTERN was
heard calling there out in Thousand Acre Marsh. A COMMON TERN was also
reported at Thousand Acre Marsh. BOBOLINK and BANK SWALLOW were found along
Dutch Neck Road. Three LEAST BITTERNS and a SORA were found Saturday morning
at Grier's pond. BARRED OWL and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT has also been reported
there. A real rarity this time a year was a DARK- EYED JUNCO reported in
Delaware City. WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW was reported at a feeder in Port Penn

There were several reports of BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO this week. Three were
reported at Flint Woods Nature Preserve near Centerville yesterday. One bird
was reported at the Raymond Tower parking lot at Bombay Hook National
Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna on Sunday. Another BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO was
reported at Middle Run Natural Area near Newark. YELLOW BILLED CUCKOOS were
reported in scattered areas including Alapocas Woods State Park in
Wilmington, Ashland Nature Center, White Clay Creek, Covered Bridge Farm in
Newark, Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Milton, Milford, and Lewes.

Warblers, thrushes, and flycatchers have important through this last week.
Middle Run Nature preserve in Newark had 21 species this week of warbler
including: NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, TENNESSEE, NASHVILLE, CAPE MAY, MAGNOLIA,
BLACKBURNIAN, BLACKPOLL, BAY-BREASTED, BLACK-THROATED BLUE and GREEN,
CANADA, CHESTNUT-SIDED, and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT. LEAST and WILLOW
FLYCATCHER were also reported at Middle Run. SWAINSON'S THRUSH and VEERY
were found in the woods.

The first HOODED WARBLER of the year was found on the hillside above Hopkins
Road at White Clay Creek State Park. Other warblers seen included
BLUE-WINGED, MAGNOLIA, CAPE MAY, CHESTNUT-SIDED, MAGNOLIA, BLACKBURNIAN,
YELLOW THROATED, BLACKPOLL,  NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, KENTUCKY, and CANADA.
Both GRAY-CHEEKED and SWAINSON'S THRUSH plus VEERY have been reported along
Thompson Station Road at the north of the park. SPOTTED and SOLITARY
SANDPIPERS have been seen along the Creek. Five species of VIREO are still
being reported including BLUE-HEADED, RED-EYED, YELLOW-THROATED, WARBLING,
and WHITE-EYED VIREO. Other species reported included SCARLET TANAGER,
ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, INDIGO BUNTING, BALTIMORE and ORCHARD ORIOLE.
WARBLING VIREO was also reported at Paper Mill Park at the south end of the
creek. BLACKPOLL WARBLERS reported seen on the University of Delaware campus
by Memorial Hall.

Another GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH was reported at Toad Hill in Bear. SPOTTED and
SOLITARY SANDPIPERS were also reported at Lum's Pond State Park near
Glasgow. BLACK-NECKED STILT was reported in southern New Castle County at
Cedar Swamp Wildlife Area. BOBOLINK was reported at Levels Road near
Middletown. GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and EASTERN MEADOWLARK were reported at the
Charles E Price Park on St. Anne's Church Road.

A late PALM WARBLER was found at Ashland Nature Center near Hockessin. Other
warblers seen included CHESTNUT-SIDED, PARULA, YELLOW, and OVENBIRD. VEERY
and SWAINSON'S THRUSH were also found along with INDIGO BUNTING plus ORCHARD
and BALTIMORE ORIOLE. COMMON LOON was seen flying over Ashland and SPOTTED
SANDPIPER was found along the Red Clay Creek.

A WILSON'S WARBLER was found at Brandywine Creek State Park yesterday, at
the north end of the Freshwater Marsh Preserve. Also seen at Brandywine
Creek this past week has been BLACK-THROATED BLUE and GREEN CHESTNUT-SIDED
and BLACKBURNIAN. SOLITARY SANDPIPERS and GREATER YELLOWLEGS were seen along
the creek. EASTERN MEADOWLARK was seen along the entrance road. BOBOLINK was
reported at Ramsey Road at the First State National Monument near Smith's
Bridge. Flint Woods near Centerville also had NASHVILLE, MAGNOLIA,
BLACKBURNIAN, CANADA, and BLACK-THROATED BLUE and GREEN WARBLER.

A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was found at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge at
the entrance to the boardwalk trail on Sunday. Warblers found at the refuge
included MAGNOLIA, BAY-BREASTED, BLACKPOLL, BLUE-WINGED, BLACK-THROATED BLUE
and GREEN, and WILSON'S. BLUE-HEADED VIREO was reported at several
locations. Waterfowl seen included TUNDRA SWAN and SNOW GOOSE. BLACK-CROWNED
NIGHT HERON was seen at the north end of Bear Swamp. Two AMERICAN GOLDEN
PLOVERS were reported among the BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS at the refuge. A rare
RUDDY TURNSTONE was seen among the DUNLIN, SEMIPALMATED, and LEAST
SANDPIPERS. AMERICAN AVOCETS and BLACK-NECKED STILTS are also still being
reported. WILD TURKEY was seen back at Finis Pool, NORTHERN BOBWHITE was
seen along the entrance road.

Three SNOW GEESE were also reported along the Port Mahon Road. Three SORA'S
and a VIRGINIA RAIL were heard calling at Port Mahon at night along with
SEASIDE SPARROW.

Killen's Pond State Park had WORM EATING WARBLER and LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH.
Blair's pond near Milford had SUMMER with SCARLET TANAGER. Warblers seen
there included KENTUCKY, PROTHONOTARY, and BLACK AND WHITE. Hunting Quarter
Road near Harrington had a plethora of sparrows including GRASSHOPPER,
SAVANNAH, and VESPER.

SUMMER and SCARLET TANAGER were also found at the headquarters tract at
Redden State Forest, north of Georgetown. Five PINE SISKINS continue be seen
there. Warblers seen included WORM-EATING, KENTUCKY, YELLOW-THROATED, and
YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT.

Another RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was found at Chapel Branch Nature Area in
Seaford. HERMIT THRUSH and BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH were also reported.
REDHEADED WOODPECKER was also found at Assawoman Wildlife Area near Fenwick
Island, on the road to Strawberry Landing. That bird was fighting
BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCHES for a nest site. Warblers seen there included
HOODED, BLACK-THROATED GREEN, and WORM-EATING. MUTE SWAN was also reported
along with COMMON LOON.

A late WHITE-WINGED SCOTER was reported at the mouth of Roosevelt Inlet.
HORNED GREBE and GREAT CORMORANT were reported at the ferry terminal in
Lewes. A flock of 120 BRANT landed at the point in Cape Henlopen state Park,
lost in the fog. Three pairs of AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS were also reported
at The Point.

The first RED KNOT of the season showed up at the Dupont Nature Center at
Mispillion Inlet this week. OYSTERCATCHER, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, RUDDY
TURNSTONE, DUNLIN, and SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER were also seen. RED KNOT was
also seen along Slaughters Beach along with RUDDY TURNSTONE and BLACK
SKIMMER.

Not many Goatsuckers have been reported yet this year. The only COMMON
NIGHTHAWK seen so far was at the golf course in Seaford on Tuesday. A CHUCK
WILLS WIDOW was reported near Little Creek and also west of Georgetown.
WHIPPOORWILLS were reported at Broadkill Marsh and Oyster Rock Road in Prime
Hook National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday. WHIPPOORWILLS were also reported
west of Georgetown.

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Rod Murray, Derek
Stoner, Anthony Gonzon,  Kitt Heckscher, Amy O'Neil, Carol Horning, Corie
Irvine, Steve Groff, George Armistead, Judy Montgomery, Karen and Chris
Bennett, Kevin Bronson, Rachael Shapiro, Hannah Greenberg, Phil Thompson,
Sally O'Byrne, David Fees, Joe Sebastiani, Rich Clifton, Chris and Erin
Rowe, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn, John Long, Bill Stewart, Ian
Stewart, Alan Kneidel, Tim Freiday, Sam Roberts, Tim Schreckengost, Matt
Boone, Laura Balascio, Maurice Barnhill, Andrew Bogush Gary Stolz, and Joe
Russell. Remember, the birdline needs your sightings! Please call your
reports into 302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week,
this is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Ft. Dupont trail is open
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata AT ZOOMINTERNET.NET>
Date: Thu, 7 May 2015 17:55:16 -0400
You all may already be aware of this, but the trail at Ft. Dupont in
Delaware City has been reopened. It was closed after Hurricane Sandy exposed
toxins in the soil. The trail has a new layer of soil and gravel on it, but
now it makes a right turn where the wooden platform is. This platform used
to be in the woods, but they cut down a lot of trees and put new soil and
grass there, so it is in the open now. The trail along the river used to
extend well past that platform, but not anymore although you can still take
the paths through the woods south of that platform. I am glad that trail is
open again because it can be very birdy.

 

Ken Drier, David Francis and I discovered this yesterday during our
Bird-a-thon trip. We started at Dragon Run Park and continued with Ft.
Dupont (both sections), Thousand Acre Marsh, and the trail in Port Penn.
While at Dragon Run we were joined by a small brown dog who was exceedingly
friendly and energetic. He accompanied us for a while, zigzagging back and
forth, and then hit the water. The last time I saw him his legs were
completely covered with marsh mud, and he was delighted. I suspect his
owners were less delighted!

 

FYI, we noticed that Catbirds seem to have had a population explosion. 

 

Pat Valdata

Cecil Bird Club

 
Subject: observations
From: "Donald H. Morgan" <000001324b6fbc78-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Thu, 7 May 2015 17:02:34 -0400
After a delightful bird walk with Joe Sebastiani at Ashland nature center this 
morning, I came home and, from the deck in this north Wilmington wooded 
suburban development, observed, over about 1 1/2 hours this afternoon: a steady 
stream of yellow rump warblers, singly; a few black-throated blue(several in 
bird bath), and several black and white warblers; several warbling vireos. 

                                 Don Morgan
Subject: Middle Run: 19 Warblers and Counting
From: Derek Stoner <derek AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Thu, 7 May 2015 20:36:38 +0000
Fellow Birders:

The past two days at Middle Run Natural Area in Newark have provided park 
visitors with plenty of migrants to discover. 


Yesterday, 19 species of warblers were documented in the park, with 
Blackburnian, Cape May, Tennessee, Nashville, and Canada being most notable. 
Today there are reports of newly-arrived Blackpoll Warblers and Bay-breasted 
Warblers in the park, concentrating on oak trees and Dawn Redwood stands in the 
northern end of the park. That makes 21 species in two days, but there are 
still plenty more warblers to come this month! 


Also noteworthy at Middle Run in the past two days are Bobolinks, Swainson's 
Thrush, Least Flycatcher, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and Spotted Sandpiper. Over a 
hundred species were documented between yesterday and today at the park, during 
this typical prime time for species diversity throughout the region. 


Thanks to Carol Horning, Karen Batt, and Don Pastorius for sharing their 
reports from their group's visits to Middle Run. 


The link to the trail brochure and map of the Middle Run Birding Trail is 
available at: http://www.delnature.org/middlerun 


Recent photos from the Middle Run Birding Flickr page are viewable at: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/125621243 AT N08/ 


Good birding,

Derek Stoner
Subject: A Brant spectacle today
From: Bill Fintel <kittiwakebill AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 May 2015 16:09:39 -0400
Today, yes while fishing, I had a flock of 120 Brant come around the point
at Cape Henlopen, and land in the water next to the beach inside the point,
no more than 50 yards from me. They were talking to each other with their
sweet gurgling calls.

Then it seemed they got the migration urge to move on, and all got up,
first headed north, then west, circling me, but then they landed again
right next to me. It was quite foggy, so my guess is that they wanted to
keep heading north, but decided against that in the fog.

It was a special birding treat I have not encountered before.

Bill Fintel
Lewes, DE
Subject: B36
From: Richard Clifton <000000af228ab213-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Thu, 7 May 2015 14:19:14 -0400
On May 1st I photographed an adult Bald Eagle along Prime Hook beach road. The 
photos were good enough to read one of the leg band numbers. I reported it, and 
received information regarding this bird. A female banded in New Jersey in 
April of 2003. Good to know this bird is alive and well at age 12. For those of 
you on Facebook you can check out an image and the rest of the info on my page. 


Thanks.

Richard Clifton
Cods Road, Milford.
Subject: Spring Roundup, Global Big Day, International Migratory Bird Day, Delaware Bird-a-thon, Oh My!
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 May 2015 10:03:11 -0400
 Hey Delaware Birders, May 9th is getting to be a very crowded day when it
comes to birding initiatives. But you don't have to choose just one! The
DOS Spring Roundup is by far the oldest (but not the least important) of
these events - marking its 47th year in 2015. It is the only STATEWIDE
spring bird census in the United States. And it's continued success depends
on the continued participation of all Delaware birders. You don't need to
be a DOS member to paritcipate. I highly recommend that if you are planning
to participate in the roundup - enter data into ebird for areas that you
bird to contribute to the Global Big Day. If you are planning on
participating in the Global Big Day - consider providing your ebird
checklists to the Spring Roundup Area Compiler for the area where you
birded. Even better - contact an Area Compiler and see if they have areas
of the state that still need coverage and spend part of the day birding
there. I'm sure there are areas near you that need additional coverage.
Below is a list of the Area Compilers and their contact information.
Area 1 - New Castle County north of the C&D Canal
Compiler - MIke Smith (serving his final year as compiler) email -
michael.a.smith AT vilanova.edu
Area 2 - C&D Canal south to Leipsic and Cheswold
Compiler - John Janowski email - jsbirders AT verizon.net
Area 3 - Leipsic and Cheswold south to the Kent/Sussex LIne
Compiler - Chris Bennett email - cpb2564 AT gmail.com
Area 5 - Kent/Sussex Line south to Lewes, Georgetown and Seaford
Compiler - Frank Rohrbacher email - rohrbaf AT aol.com
Area 6 - Lewes, Georgetown, Seaford south to Indian River Inlet, Millsboro
south and west across western Sussex County
Compiler - David Fees email - david.fees AT state.de.us
Area 7 - Southern Sussex County east of RT 30/26 and South of Indian River
Compiler - currently vacant - contact Chris Bennett - Roundup Coordinator -
see Area 3 above
Good areas are still available - especially in Area 7 - Fenwick Island
State Park, Holts Landing State Park, The James Farm, Fresh Pond area of
Delaware Seashore State Park, Hudson Road (The Great Cypress Swamp),
Assawoman Wildlife Area, Piney Point Wildlife Area are all great places to
spend a few hours birding.
I hope you can join in.
Chris Bennett
DOS Spring Roundup Coordinator
Subject: Ashland today
From: Judy Montgomery <judy.montgomery01 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2015 21:50:33 -0400
The *Teacher, Teacher, Teacher Naturalists* had a great walk from 3pm -
6:30pm at Ashland Nature Center today.  Participating in the Delaware
Bird-A-Thon's *Zero CO2 Emission *category, we used only foot power to get
around.

Some highlights for us were: Indigo Bunting, Spotted Sandpiper, Baltimore
Orioles, Veery, Swainson's Thrush, Chestnut-sided, Black & White, and
Parula Warblers.  So far, we're up to 56 species, but we're not finished!!!!

Here's our checklist so far:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23276264

Great week for B-A-T and BIRDS!!!

Judy Montgomery
Subject: Esther Speck Memorial Service
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2015 17:31:29 -0400
Birders, 
Some may remember that Esther passed away last November 5th at 90 years old.
Most people will remember her because she opened her house to birders to see
Purple Finches at her feeders. There will be a memorial service for Esther
on Saturday, May 16th at 2 pm in Lower Brandywine Church, Rt 52 right across
the entrance to Winterthur. If you can't make the service, maybe you can
join me for a walk at Burrow's Run, along the Ashland-Clinton Rd. on May
16th at 8 am.  It will be a great day to commemorate one of the influential
birders in Delaware. 

Good birding, 
Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Re: Participate in the E-bird Global Big Day on May 9th!
From: "Sullivan, Kathleen N. (DNREC)" <Kathleen.Sullivan AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2015 19:53:33 +0000
Hi All,

White Clay Creek State Park is holding a bird hike on Saturday as part of the 
International Migratory Bird Celebration--- 

See details below.
Celebrate International Migratory Bird Day with a 
Bird Hike with Naturalist Gary Stolz
 Saturday, May 9  AT  8:30 a.m.
 Meet at the Nature Center
 Gary Stolz, Master Naturalist Trainor with 35 years of experience in National 
Parks and US Forest Service. Learn to spot the latest arrivals. Bring 
binoculars, plenty of water and good walking shoes for this 2 hour program over 
moderate terrain. Pre-registration strongly suggested, Call 302-368-6900. Free! 


-----Original Message-----
From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Alan 
Kneidel 

Sent: Wednesday, May 06, 2015 3:02 PM
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [de-birds] Participate in the E-bird Global Big Day on May 9th!

Hello DE-Birders,

May 9th is the inaugural Global Big Day (http://ebird.org/globalbigday/), where 
eBird and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology are hoping to engage a worldwide 
network of birders to go out, count birds, and support global bird 
conservation. Our goal is to have over 4,000 species of birds reported to eBird 
in a single calendar day and to raise $500,000 for bird conservation. 


All you have to do to help is go birding, and how easy and fun is that? You 
don’t need to commit to a full 24-hours of birding on May 9th: a short visit 
to the local pond or woodland or even a few minutes in your yard is still a 
meaningful contribution! Just make sure that you submit your sightings to 
Ebird. 


For some more detailed information on the Global Big Day, check out this brief 
writeup: http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/gbd2015_1/. There are 
participating birders from Taiwan, India, Australia, Serbia, Portugal, Turkey, 
Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Guatemala, Panama, and the list goes on! 


Let's make sure that Delaware plays its part in what should be an amazing day 
of global birding. 


Please let me know if you have any questions, and good birding to all!

--
Alan Kneidel
M.S. Candidate, Natural Resources
Delaware State University
980-254-2706
Subject: Participate in the E-bird Global Big Day on May 9th!
From: Alan Kneidel <akneidel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2015 15:01:37 -0400
Hello DE-Birders,

May 9th is the inaugural Global Big Day (http://ebird.org/globalbigday/),
where eBird and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology are hoping to engage a
worldwide network of birders to go out, count birds, and support global
bird conservation. Our goal is to have over 4,000 species of birds reported
to eBird in a single calendar day and to raise $500,000 for bird
conservation.

All you have to do to help is go birding, and how easy and fun is that? You
don’t need to commit to a full 24-hours of birding on May 9th: a short
visit to the local pond or woodland or even a few minutes in your yard is
still a meaningful contribution! Just make sure that you submit your
sightings to Ebird.

For some more detailed information on the Global Big Day, check out this
brief writeup: http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/gbd2015_1/. There are
participating birders from Taiwan, India, Australia, Serbia, Portugal,
Turkey, Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Guatemala, Panama, and the list goes on!

Let's make sure that Delaware plays its part in what should be an amazing
day of global birding.

Please let me know if you have any questions, and good birding to all!

-- 
Alan Kneidel
M.S. Candidate, Natural Resources
Delaware State University
980-254-2706
Subject: Ashland Bird Walk
From: joe sebastiani <joe AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2015 17:10:05 +0000
Join me tomorrow for the weekly Ashland Bird Walk at 8am, Ashland Nature 
Center, Hockessin, DE. It should be a nice morning to see migrants and resident 
breeding birds. This walk is also an official "Bird-A-Thon" walk for the 
Delmarva Ornithological Society, so if you are doing your "thon" tomorrow, 
consider spending a few hours at Ashland! 


Joe Sebastiani
Ashland Nature Center Manager
Delaware Nature Society
www.delawarenaturesociety.org
P.O. Box 700
Hockessin, DE 19707
(302) 239-2334 ext. 115
fax (302)239-2473
joe AT delawarenaturesociety.org
The Nature of Delaware Blog www.delawarenaturesociety.org/blog
Subject: Evening Heronry Survey Results
From: "Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" <Chris.Bennett AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2015 16:23:55 +0000
On Wednesday, 29 April I was joined by nine volunteers to conduct the Pea Patch 
Island Evening Heronry Survey from Battery Park in Delaware City. We had 
outstanding weather and counted the second highest total since the survey began 
in 2003. We ended up with 1462 birds counted (not a direct count as some birds 
may be counted more than once) flying to and from the island between 5:54 pm 
and 8:24 pm. This was only the fourth time since 2003 that all 9 nesting 
species were observed during the April survey. We had a single Tricolored Heron 
and a single Yellow-crowned Night-Heron during the survey. Black-crowned and 
Yellow-crowned Night-Herons were below the 12-year average - though YCNH was 
only slightly below and actually equaled the median. All the other species were 
above the 12-year average. The totals for each species are listed below as 
follows; 


Species Name - Total TO the heronry/Total FROM the Heronry:Total Counted - 
Average/Median 


Great Blue Heron - 46/50:96 - 89.5/88
Little Blue Heron - 166/7:173 - 97/90.5
Great Egret - 88/25:113 - 104.67/102.5
Cattle Egret - 396/15:411 - 392.2/385.5
Snowy Egret - 185/4:189 - 46.42/15
Tricolored Heron - 1/0:1 - 0.58/0
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 1/86:87 - 127.2/108
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 1/0:1 - 1.83/1
Glossy Ibis - 350/3:353 - 286.8/232.5
Unidentified White Heron - 38/0:38

In addition to a great heron show we also saw Tree, Bank, Northern Rough-winged 
and Barn Swallows, Caspian Tern, a large flock of Bonaparte's Gulls, several 
flocks of Yellowlegs, a bunch of eagles, a handful of Wood Ducks and lots of 
Osprey. 


The next survey will be conducted on Wednesday, 27 May from 6:20 pm to 8:50 pm. 



Chris Bennett
Natural Resource Planner
Environmental Stewardship Program
Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation
152 South State Street
Dover, DE 19901
Phone: (302) 739-9230
Fax: (302) 739-6967
"The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant: 'What 
good is it?'" 

 Aldo Leopold A Sand County Almanac 

Subject: Bobolinks @ Ramsey Rd.
From: Bill Stewart <bstewart AT ABA.ORG>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2015 07:19:31 -0400
Currently, the Bobolinks have arrived back at Ramsey Rd. in N. Wilmington. They 
can be found on both sides of the road just prior to the sharp turn at the 
river. So far this morning I have counted twenty one. 


Good birding, 

Bill Stewart
Subject: Alapocas Bird-A-Thon walk
From: "sally o'byrne" <salobyrne AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 May 2015 14:06:33 -0400
This morning’s DOS Alapocas Bird-A-Thon walk was attended by 10 people. 
Walking quickly through the wooded areas and away from construction noise, we 
approached the sunny river to be greeted by a Wood Duck and lots of Rough-Wing 
Swallows. I suspect we undercounted both swallows listed below since there were 
everywhere, and every box we came across had a Tree Swallow pair in residence. 
We had 6 warbler species that we worked hard for, but good views of 3 Scarlet 
Tanagers - I think we were on a territory boundary, so we had them singing from 
every direction. We followed the song of an Ovenbird near the end of the walk 
and found it singing away and easily seen. We found two different Blue-Grey 
Gnatcatcher nests and watched as one was being built. We also watched a 
Baltimore Oriole nest being constructed. 


A very odd thing was the total lack of Warbling Vireos. In the past few years 
they have strung along the river, each calling from its territory as we 
strolled along. Today we neither saw nor heard one. The major butterfly of the 
morning was Eastern Tailed blue - they flew up from our feet as we walked 
through the field under the cliffs. 


Sally O'Byrne





Alapocas state park, New Castle, US-DE
May 5, 2015 6:53 AM - 11:10 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: DOS walk. Warm. Sunny then overcast. 65-70f 
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8 49 species Canada Goose 14 Wood Duck 6 Mallard 1 Great Blue Heron 1 Turkey Vulture 2 Red-tailed Hawk 1 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 8 Mourning Dove 2 Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker 5 Downy Woodpecker 2 Hairy Woodpecker 2 Northern Flicker 1 Eastern Wood-Pewee 1 Acadian Flycatcher 4 Eastern Phoebe 1 Red-eyed Vireo 10 Blue Jay 16 American Crow 4 Northern Rough-winged Swallow 20 Tree Swallow 20 Carolina Chickadee 6 Tufted Titmouse 12 White-breasted Nuthatch 2 House Wren 8 Carolina Wren 3 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 5 Wood Thrush 5 American Robin 27 Gray Catbird 14 Northern Mockingbird 2 European Starling 18 Ovenbird 1 Black-and-white Warbler 2 Northern Parula 1 Yellow Warbler 1 Black-throated Blue Warbler 2 Yellow-rumped Warbler 6 Song Sparrow 3 Scarlet Tanager 3 Northern Cardinal 4 Indigo Bunting 1 Red-winged Blackbird 4 Common Grackle 1 Brown-headed Cowbird 1 Baltimore Oriole 5 House Finch 4 American Goldfinch 5 House Sparrow 4 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23241539 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org )
Subject: Tuesday Alapocas walk
From: "sally o'byrne" <salobyrne AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 4 May 2015 18:27:36 -0400
Some of you may have read about the major fire at Bancroft Mills, which has 
closed the parking lot and pedestrian bridge to the park behind the Delaware 
Art Museum. This shouldn’t affect the field trip since we are meeting at the 
baseball fields behind the duPont Experimental Station off of Route 141. I have 
not been to the park to check it out, just returning about an hour ago from a 
week of birding in West Virginia. I am looking forward to discovering which 
migrants have arrived and which nesters are setting up territories. 


Meet me at 7 am with good ears and eyes, and we will explore the park together.

Sally O'Byrne
Subject: This Thursday, DVOC Presents: Jason Weckstein & his program on the Belem Center of Endemism, the most Endangered Amazonian Area of Endemism
From: Steve Kacir <setkacir AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 4 May 2015 17:54:52 -0400
Hello Birders, 

The Delaware Valley Ornithological Club (DVOC) meets on Thursday May 7 at the 
Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. The meeting features Jason 
Weckstein and his program, "An Ornithological Expedition To The Most Endangered 
Amazonian Area Of Endemism: The Belem Center Of Endemism" 


All who have an interest are invited to attend; the program is free with no 
admission charged. Club meetings begin at 7:30PM and are held at the Academy of 
Natural Sciences, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia, PA 19103. A 
pre-meeting dinner takes place at Asia on the Parkway, not far from the 
Academy. More details and directions to the Academy and Asia on the Parkway can 
be found on the DVOC website: http://www.dvoc.org/Main.htm 



An Ornithological Expedition To The Most Endangered Amazonian Area Of Endemism: 

The Belem Center Of Endemism:

Amazonia is the world’s largest, most intact, and most diverse tropical forest 
ecosystem on the planet and is often considered a uniform carpet of 
biodiversity. However, early biodiversity researchers noted that Amazonia isn’t 
a single unit of biodiversity, but that huge Amazonian rivers form barriers to 
species, with at least eight Amazonia areas of endemism harboring unique 
faunas. Although some of these areas of endemism are largely intact, others are 
highly endangered by habitat destruction. In particular, southeastern Amazonia, 
is now marked by a huge arc of deforestation. In this talk, Jason will 
introduce his project aimed at studying these biodiversity and endemism 
patterns in birds and their associated parasites, and will take us on an 
expedition to the largest remaining track of lowland forest in the endangered 
Belém area of eastern Amazonia, an area endemism seldom visited by birders. 


Jason Weckstein:

DVOC member Jason Weckstein is an associate professor in Drexel University's 
Biodiversity, Earth, and Environmental Sciences department and associate 
curator in the department of Ornithology at the Academy of Natural Sciences. 
Jason obtained his BS degree in Natural Resources from the University of 
Michigan in 1993, his MS in Zoology from the University of Minnesota and his 
PhD from Louisiana State University in 2003. After obtaining his PhD Jason was 
a postdoctoral fellow at the Illinois Natural History Survey at the University 
of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and at the Field Museum of Natural History in 
Chicago, where he stayed on as a staff scientist until moving to his current 
position at the Academy of Natural Sciences and Drexel University. Jason 
specializes in biodiversity research on birds and their parasites and has over 
17 years of experience working in natural history museums and has conducted 
research expeditions in the United States, Canada, South Africa, Ghana, Malawi, 
Nicaragua, and Brazil. 


We hope to see you at this next meeting!

Steve Kacir
DVOC Vice President
setkacirgmail.com
Subject: Port Penn area birds
From: Rodney Murray <rcmurray213 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 4 May 2015 12:38:23 -0400
Finally got a very long distance view late this morning of the continuing
Tricolored Heron from the Port Penn Wetlands trail.  The bird was at the
extreme north end of the water and was actively fishing (thanks Chris!).
Also on the trail were two talking Baltimore Orioles and a Black-throated
Green Warbler.

In the small wooded area adjacent to Greer's Pond, a vociferous
Yellow-breasted Chat and another Balt. Oriole were heard.

Rod Murray, Middletown DE
Subject: Killens, Hunting Quarter Rd, Redden, Assawoman
From: Steven Graff <00000126c3a82ff5-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Mon, 4 May 2015 04:11:31 -0700
Greetings all,

Mom and I went birding yesterday (the 3rd) and started out at Killen's Pond SP 
(at and below the spillway only): 

TV, Chipping Sparrow, Cardinal, Barn Swallow, Titmouse, B. Oriole, O. Oriole, 
Worm-eating Warbler, G. C. Flycatcher, C. Grackle, L. Gull, Blue Jay, Ovenbird, 
Kingfisher, G. B. Heron, Goldfinch, Mourning Dove, Wood Duck (3 males and 1 
female), C. Chickadee, Cowbird, R. E. Vireo, C. Wren, Acadian Flycatcher, R. B. 
Woodpecker, Y. R. Warbler, N. Parula, Hairy and Downy Woodpecker, Wood Thrush, 
and LA Waterthrush. 


We then drove Hunting Quarter RD - did NOT find any Bobolinks or Dickcissels 
but did have many Grasshopper Sparrow, one Savannah Sparrow and a Vesper 
Sparrow. 


Stopped next at Redden SF:
Indigo Bunting, R. T. Hummingbird, L. Gull, Acadian Flycatcher, Cardinal, 
PIleated Woodpecker, R. E. Vireo, W. E. Vireo, Y. T. Vireo and a Philadelphia 
Vireo, Summer and Scarlet Tanager, Ovenbird, PIne Warbler, W. E. Warbler, 
Chipping Sparrow, W. T. Sparrow, G. C. Flycatcher, Red-breasted Nuthatch (is it 
going to stay to breed???), Cowbird, TV, R. B. Woodpecker, Titmouse, P. Martin, 
Prairie Warbler, Wood Thrush, Blue Jay, Robin, R. H. Woodpecker, Gnatcatcher, 
Mockingbird, Merlin - 1, and Y. B. Cuckoo - 1. 


We decided to do a crazy thing and drove all the way down to Assawoman WR:
Starling, Robin, L. Gull, C. Wren, Cardinal, Pine Warbler, Brown Thrasher, 
House Wren, Blue Grosbeak, Chipping Sparrow, Pileated Woodpecker, Gnatcatcher, 
Towhee, B. T. G. Warbler, Goldfinch, R. E. Vireo, G. C. Flycatcher, W. E. 
Warbler, Ovenbird, D. C. Cormorant, Titmouse, C. Goose, Snowy and Gr. Egret, G. 
B. Heron, Bald Eagle, H. Gull, R. H. Woodpecker, Y. R. Warbler, Hooded Warbler, 
C. Chickadee, Catbird, TV, C. Grackle, R. W. Blackbird, Flicker, Gr. and Lr. 
Yellowlegs, R. B. Woodpecker, Kingbird, B. H. Nuthatch (protecting its nesting 
hole from the Red headed Woodpecker), F. Tern, Indigo Bunting, Tree Swallow, 
Barn Swallow, Prothatary Warbler, Mute Swan, willet, Solitary Sandpiper, Wood 
Duck (pair), Osprey, Mallard, D. Woodpecker, and G B. B. Gull. 


Steven Graff and Shirley Martin
Felton and Dover, DE
Subject: Re: Seabirds and shorebirds on the waters off Lewes
From: Bill Fintel <kittiwakebill AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 4 May 2015 05:03:15 -0400
Sorry, I forgot to add my name, city, & state.

Bill Fintel
Lewes, DE

On Sun, May 3, 2015 at 6:13 PM, Bill Fintel  wrote:

> While fishing today out of Roosevelt Inlet, I had a single male
> White-winged Scoter in the Inlet, then many Black Scoters out around the
> icebreakers, plus a few Surf Scoters. On the icebreakers were Purple
> Sandpipers, along with Ruddy Turnstones and Sanderlings.
>
> Back near the ferry terminal I observed 2 Horned Grebes, almost in full
> breeding plumage, and so full of fish they could not get airborne. I also
> had a Great Cormorant on the ferry jetty.
>
> At Cape Henlopen Point there were 3 pair of Am. Oystercatchrs.....as well
> as an overwhelming number of gulls....UGH!!!
>
> I did catch some fish.... and Sally and I are having fresh fish for dinner.
>
> Bill
>
Subject: Seabirds and shorebirds on the waters off Lewes
From: Bill Fintel <kittiwakebill AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 3 May 2015 18:13:34 -0400
While fishing today out of Roosevelt Inlet, I had a single male
White-winged Scoter in the Inlet, then many Black Scoters out around the
icebreakers, plus a few Surf Scoters. On the icebreakers were Purple
Sandpipers, along with Ruddy Turnstones and Sanderlings.

Back near the ferry terminal I observed 2 Horned Grebes, almost in full
breeding plumage, and so full of fish they could not get airborne. I also
had a Great Cormorant on the ferry jetty.

At Cape Henlopen Point there were 3 pair of Am. Oystercatchrs.....as well
as an overwhelming number of gulls....UGH!!!

I did catch some fish.... and Sally and I are having fresh fish for dinner.

Bill
Subject: Red-headed Woodpecker at Bombay Hook
From: Rodney Murray <rcmurray213 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 3 May 2015 13:15:32 -0400
A RH Woodpecker briefly landed in a tree opposite the parking spaces for
the Boardwalk trail at Bombay Hook at 8:40 this morning.  It didn't stay
more than 20 seconds when it flew off over the marsh toward Leipsic showing
its large white wing patches.  Maybe it is headed for the Little Creek
area?   I assume this woodpecker is very unusual for the B Hook area since
the only ones I've seen in DE were much farther south.

Also had a very cooperative Black-billed Cuckoo calling and moving from
tree to tree in the parking lot for the Raymond Ob Tower.

2 Am. Golden-Plovers at Raymond and 1 at Shearness

Notable Warblers seen: Blue-winged Warbler making its "beeee buzz" call and
a female Wilson's by the Boardwalk trail, Black-throated Blue and Am.
Redstart there too, and a Blackpoll Warbler at the Bear Swamp trail.

Rod Murray, Middletown DE
Subject: DOS Carousel Park trip
From: Ian Stewart <istew AT UDEL.EDU>
Date: Sun, 3 May 2015 13:02:14 -0400
A dozen of us had a fun time exploring the trails at Carousel Park
yesterday seeing a total of 44 species, starting off with great views of a
pileated woodpecker on a tree trunk near the car park. Migrants were a bit
thin on the ground but we did encounter 5 species of warbler including
black and white and BT blue plus warbling and solitary vireos and orchard
orioles. Meghann Matwichuk claimed the chocolate prize by spotting the B &
W warbler! We saw at least 3 red shouldered hawks, possibly even 5,
prompting us all to note this species seems to be getting increasingly
common, and nesting behavior by a Cooper's Hawk. Also lots of great turtle
views.

Carousel Park was a new birding location for most of the participants,
several of whom vowed to return now they know where the most birdy patches
are, so the trip achieved its purpose of introducing the Delaware birding
community to new places. Thanks to Amy O'Neill for coming up with the idea
of Local Patch trips!

Ian Stewart
Newark
Subject: Color banded Veeries at White Clay Creek SP
From: Christopher Heckscher <checkscher AT DESU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 2 May 2015 22:16:08 +0000
Hello DE birders,



In the last few days Veeries have been trickling back into our Piedmont natural 
areas. This is a friendly reminder to those of you birding White Clay Creek to 
keep your eyes open for color banded birds. By reporting birds and their 
locations you can help us relocate individuals. Veeries with color bands will 
have 2 bands per leg which will consist of three colors and one silver aluminum 
band (which can appear grey). If you are lucky enough to spot one of our birds, 
please try to discern the color combination including which colors are on which 
legs. For example, blue over silver on right leg and red over pink on the 
Veery's left leg. Most of our color marked birds will be along Thompson Station 
Road north of the office. 




On early May mornings, especially after a wet night, Veeries are often visible 
mingling with Swainson's Thrush and Gray-cheeked Thrush as they forage for 
insects on the road. Their color bands can be easy to spot at that time. If you 
see color bands please report them (and the birds precise location) to my 
personal e-mail address below. Even partial band combinations can help us 
relocate individuals. Throughout the years, many of you have helped relocate 
birds and I am very grateful to those of you that have done so. 




Good birding!



Kitt  Heckscher

Delaware State University

checkscher AT desu.edu
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, May 1st, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 1 May 2015 20:39:59 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* May 1, 2015
* DEST1505.01
	
*Birds mentioned
Brant
Tundra Swan
American Wigeon
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Ring-necked Duck
Lesser Scaup
Harlequin Duck
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Red-breasted Merganser
Ring-necked Pheasant
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
Northern Gannet
Double-crested Cormorant
Least Bittern
Little Blue Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
Glossy Ibis
Black Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Broad-winged Hawk
Virginia Rail
Sora
American Coot
American Avocet
Black-necked Stilt
American Oystercatcher
Black-bellied Plover
American Golden Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
WHIMBREL
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Purple Sandpiper
Stilt Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Snipe
American Woodcock 
Bonaparte's Gull
Least Tern
Caspian Tern
Common Tern
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Barred Owl
Chuck Wills Widow
Whippoorwill
Chimney Swift
Red-headed Woodpecker
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon
Acadian Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
White-eyed Vireo
Yellow-throated Vireo
Blue-headed Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Horned Lark
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Marsh Wren
Veery
Ovenbird
Louisiana Waterthrush
Northern Waterthrush
Black and White Warbler
Worm-eating Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
American Redstart
Blue-winged Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Palm Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler
Vesper Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Blue Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Scarlet Tanager
Summer Tanager
Eastern Meadowlark
Rusty Blackbird
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole
Purple Finch
Pine Siskin

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: May 1, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net 
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

This is Birdline Delaware for Friday, May 1st from the Delaware Museum of
Natural History in Greenville. 22 species of warbler were reported. The
unofficial Delaware annual list jumped to 265 species this week. 

A WHIMBREL was reported at Little Creek Wildlife Management Area from the
central tower on Wednesday. AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVER and STILT SANDPIPER were
found at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna this week.
AMERICAN AVOCETS, BLACK-NECKED STILT, WILLET, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER,
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, SPOTTED, SOLITARY, SEMIPALMATED, and LEAST SANDPIPERS
were reported. TUNDRA SWAN continues to be seen at Shearness Pool. ORCHARD
ORIOLE and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW were seen. A PROTHONOTARY WARBLER is being
seen at the end of the Finis Pool Road. A single YELLOW-CROWN was among the
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS at Bear Swamp. 

The previously reported drake HARLEQUIN DUCK continue to be seen at Indian
River Inlet. PURPLE SANDPIPER was also reported there. 

17 species of warbler have been reported this week at White Clay Creek State
Park. These species include CANADA, CHESTNUT-SIDED, BLUE-WINGED,
YELLOW-THROATED, BLACK-THROATED GREEN, PALM, YELLOW, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH,
and the first AMERICAN REDSTART of the season.  In addition, 5 species of
vireo, WARBLING, YELLOW-THROATED, BLUE-HEADED, WHITE, and RED-EYES were
seen. The first ACADIAN FLYCATCHER was reported, along with GREAT CRESTED
FLY. ORCHARD and BALTIMORE ORIOLE, along with BARRED OWL, SOLITARY and
SPOTTED SANDPIPER, plus ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK were reported.  

The first VEERY of the season was seen on Wednesday at Middle Run Natural
Area off Possum Park Road. SOLITARY SANDPIPER was seen at Pond #1. BARRED
OWL and INDIGO BUNTING were also reported, along with a late DARK-EYED JUNCO
and SWAMP SPARROW. WILLOW FLYCATCHER was reported at Middle Run today.  New
arrivals include BLACK-THROATED BLUE and GREEN WARBLERS, plus
CHESTNUT-SIDED, BLUE-WINGED, and PRAIRIE. 

RUSTY BLACKBIRDS were found in the wetlands restoration project at the
University of Delaware's Ag Fam. SAVANAH SPARROW, EASTERN MEADOWLARK and
HORNED LARK were seen in the alfalfa fields. GREEN HERON and CHIMNEY SWIFT
were seen by Townsend Hall. 

RUSTY BLACKBIRD was also found at Ashland Nature Center on Thursday.
Warblers seen include PARULA, YELLOW, BLACK-THROATED GREEN and NORTHERN
WATERTHRUSH. A BROAD-WINGED HAWK and MERLIN was seen along with SCARLET
TANAGER, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER and WARBLING VIREO. 

BLACK-THROATED GREEN, PALM and BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER were seen at
Brandywine Creek State Park on Saturday. There was a flyover COMMON LOON,
plus a BROAD-WINGED HAWK was seen soaring.  An EASTERN MEADOWLARK was found
in the fields by the nature center. 

Six BROAD-WINGED HAWKS were seen at Lum's Pond State Park along with a
RED-SHOULDERED HAWK. CASPIAN TERN was over the pond. WHITE-EYED VIREO was
reported along the roadside. A NASHVILLE WARBLER was reported at Lum's Pond
today, between Area 1 and Area 2. 

Downstate, a RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was found by the big field at Nanticoke
Wildlife Area. Both SUMMER and SCARLET TANAGERS were found there. A HOODED
WARBLER was seen by Phillips Landing. 10 PINE SISKINS were also reported.
The first YELLOW BILLED CUCKOO was at Nanticoke, along with GREAT CRESTED
FLYCATCHER, EASTERN KINGBIRD, and a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH. BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCH was seen at Phillips Landing and the Pete Gum Track along with
LOUISIANA and NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, plus PROTHONOTARY and YELLOW-THROATED
WARBLER.

Redden State Forest had several WORM-EATING WARBLERS along with BLUE-WINGED,
BLACK-THROATED GREEN, PROTHONOTARY, BLACK AND WHITE, YELLOW-THROATED,
OVENBIRD, and LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH. YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO was also seen at
the Redden Rest Stop along with BLACK VULTURE and RED-SHOULDERED HAWK.
VESPER SPARROW was reported again this week south of Redden along Rementon
Rd near Georgetown.

A YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON was seen flying over the Cape Henlopen at the
Hawkwatch on Saturday. WHITE-WINGED SCOTER was also seen offshore . 40 BRANT
were seen at The Point at Cape Henlopen State Park. AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER
and PIPING PLOVER were seen on the Bayside of the point. BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCH was found by the nature center. 10 PECTORAL SANDPIPERS were found
in a puddle along New Road in Lewes. RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH is still being
reported at a feeder in midway.

A plethora of sandpipers continue to be seen along the Prime Hook Beach Road
at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Milton. Over 250 AMERICAN
AVOCETS reported, plus a similar number of GREATER YELLOWLEGS, also
BLACK-NECKED STILT, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, WILLET, LESSER YELLOWLEGS, DUNLIN,
LEAST and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER, and SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. LEAST and
COMMON TERN were seen at Prime Hook Beach Road along with BLACK SKIMMER. 130
BONAPARTE'S GULLS were reported along the Fowler's Beach Road. Waterfowl
included AMERICAN WIGEON, BLUE-WINGED TEAL, NORTHERN SHOVELER, RED-BREASTED
MERGANSER, plus BLACK SCOTER and five breeding plumage HORNED GREBES. A
single SALTMARSH SPARROW was seen Broadkill Beach Road on with 7 SEASIDE
SPARROWS. BARRED OWL was reported along Little Neck Road.

CHUCK WILLS WIDOW was heard calling at Prime Hook yesterday at Broadkill
Beach. Further north, WHIPPOORWILL was found at Big Stone Beach Road in
Milford Neck Wildlife Area. AMERICAN WOODCOCK was also heard calling there.
Some other birds at Big Stone Beach this weekend included NORTHERN GANNET
offshore. The woods produced YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, YELLOW-THROATED and
WORM-EATING WARBLER, and RED-EYED and BLUE-HEADED VIREO. Several
BLACK-NECKED STILTS were seen by the pond behind the beach.

In Camden-Wyoming, Brecknock Park had a HOODED WARBLER, plus PROTHONOTARY,
YELLOW, and BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER. NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH was also reported.

A TRICOLORED HERON was reported at the Port Penn Impoundments at Augustine
Beach Wildlife Area, perhaps the same bird was also reported at Thousand
Acre Marsh and flying to Pea Patch Island. LEAST BITTERN, VIRGINIA RAIL, and
SORA were heard calling at Grier's Pond at Thousand Acre Marsh. A late
WILSON'S SNIPE was also seen. LITTLE BLUE HERON, CATTLE EGRET, and MARSH
WREN were also found there. RING-NECKED PHEASANT continues to be seen along
Dutch Neck Road. AMERICAN COOT, COMMON GALLINULE, PIED-BILLED GREBE, and
GLOSSY IBIS were reported at Dragon Run. A high count of 53 CASPIAN TERNS
were found at the Port Penn Impoundments, plus SOLITARY and PECTORAL
SANDPIPER.

A pair of CLIFF SWALLOWS were found at Flemings Landing along Route 9 . 15
CLIFF SWALLOWS were found at the north bridge over the Appoquinimink Creek
along Route 9 near Odessa. GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS reported at the Levels Road
Industrial Park in Middletown. HORNED LARK and EASTERN MEADOWLARK were
reported at Charles E Price Park in Middletown.

Some late lingering waterfowl this week included NORTHERN SHOVELER and
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT at Harry's Pond in Brandywine Town Center. Four
RING-NECKED DUCKS were seen on the Rock Manor Pond off Route 202 in northern
Wilmington. A pair of LESSER SCAUP were seen at Hoope's Reservoir on Sunday.
RING-NECKED DUCK was also reported there. In downtown Wilmington, WARBLING
VIREO was reported at Brandywine Park. GREEN HERON and OSPREY reported at
the Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge at Riverfront Park. GREATER YELLOWLEGS,
MARSH WREN, and a NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW were also reported there.

A few late lingering winter finches were reported. PURPLE FINCHES were seen
at Toad Hill in Bear, Glasgow, Brandywine Hundred, by the Reedy Point
Bridge, and at Phillip Landing. ,,,, PINE SISKINS were seen at Canterbury
Hills, Pike creek, Brandywine Hundred, and Redden State Forest. 

The previously reported PEREGRINE FALCONS at the Brandywine building in
downtown Wilmington continue their young. Those birds can be watch as they
fly over Wilmington bring prey into the nest. A BALD EAGLE is nesting in
northern Wilmington, along Blue Rock Road in Bellefonte. Many of us can
remember when BALD EAGLES were a rare sight, but one recent survey found 43
EAGLES in a single day while out birding in Delaware. That's enough to make
a football team!

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Billy Weber, Derek
Stoner, Vince Gambal, Anthony Gonzon,  Kitt Heckscher, Amy O'Neil, Carol
Horning, Colin Campbell, Bob Rufe, Bob Strahorn, Joan Wheeler, Sally
Chisholm, Steve Groff, George Armistead, Judy Montgomery, Karen and Chris
Bennett, Kevin Bronson, Rachael Shapiro, Hannah Greenberg, Phil Thompson,
Sally O'Byrne, David Fees, Joe Sebastiani, Rich Clifton, Chris Rowe, Lynn
Smith, Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn, John Long, Bill Stewart, Ian Stewart, Tim
Freiday, Sam Roberts, Tim Schreckengost, Matt Boone, Maurice Barnhill, and
Joe Russell. Remember, the birdline needs your sightings! Please call your
reports into 302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week,
this is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

-end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: 2015 Recovery Big Year
From: Kelley Nunn <kelley.nunn AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 1 May 2015 16:59:28 -0400
DE Birders,

As many of you know, I have been out of the birding scene from a short-term
disability that was recently diagnosed as a migraine disorder. Fortunately,
I am recovering! As a way to raise awareness about vestibular migraines and
the migraine trigger avoidance diet, I'm starting a 2015 Recovery Big Year.
Unlike most big years that focus on species tallies within geographic
limits, I have set personal goals to expand my physical capabilities. For
example, exploring the Southern Delaware coastline, which I have wanted to
do since I first started birding! I'll be focusing the majority of my
efforts on visiting locations like Lums Pond SP, Cape Henlopen SP, Prime
Hook NWR, and Little Creek, plus witnessing the shorebird spectacle!

To track my progress, I have started a blog, which you can read and
subscribe to here if you are interested:
http://www.mymigrainebrain.com/category/recovery-big-year/

Thank you for your support, and I hope I'll see you out in the field
sometime soon!

Good Birding!
- Kelley Nunn
Subject: May Day Migrants at Middle Run
From: Derek Stoner <derekstoner AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 1 May 2015 16:54:15 -0400


Greetings: A two-hour post-dawn visit to the Middle Run Natural Area turned up 
good diversity of migrants and new arrivals this May Day morning. In the 
process of scouting for tomorrow's New Castle County Big Day team visit to 
Middle Run, I found the following notable birds among 77 species total: Willow 
Flycatcher, Eastern Kingbird, Acadian Flycatcher, and Great-crested 
FlycatcherRed-eyed, White-eyed, Yellow-throated, and Blue-headed VireosCommon 
Loon (flyover) and Wood Duck hen on nestBaltimore and Orchard 
OriolesRuby-throated HummingbirdsWood Thrushes singing 

Among the 13 species of warbler observed, the newer arrivals included 
Black-throated Blue, Black-throated Green, Chestnut-sided, Northern Parula, 
Northern Waterthrush, and Blue-winged Warbler. Prairie Warblers are on 
territory along the Middle Run Birding Trail and singing at the traditional 
breeding location in the thickets surrounding Trail Marker 5, and the Louisiana 
Waterthrush pair is active at Trail Marker 11 (Biking Bridge over the stream). 
Best wishes to all the teams and individuals heading out to take part in the 
Delaware Bird-A-Thon, the upcoming Spring Roundup, and the multitude of field 
trips in Delaware this May. Plenty of birds to enjoy and lots of fun to be had 
afield together! Good birding, Derek Stoner 

    

 		 	   		  
Subject: Apologies for this late posting
From: Meta Little <meta368 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 1 May 2015 14:57:10 -0400
On May 27, birding 1000 Acre Marsh :
Peregrine Falcon at the Reedy Point Bridge.
A jaw dropping Short-eared Owl flew out from the west end of the marsh not too 
far from the green barn, flew across the road in front of us and passed under 
the Reedy Point Bridge heading due east toward the Delaware river marshes. 

At Bombay Hook at Bear Swamp we saw 2 Solitary Sandpipers. Meta Little and 
Shirley Tingley 

Subject: Bellevue S.P.
From: "Amy O'Neil" <parakeet93 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 1 May 2015 14:40:56 -0400
We had a great morning at Bellevue State Park this morning during the monthly 
bird walk. A singing Wood Thrush was a welcome greeting before the walk even 
began. Some other highlights were Yellow, Black-throated Blue, Chestnut-sided, 
and Blue-winged Warblers. We also had several Warbling Vireos, Gray Catbirds, 
and an Indigo Bunting. Tree, Barn, & Northern Rough-winged Swallows swooped 
over the pond, along with 10 Purple Martins flying around the nest box & 
gourds. The full eBird checklist is below. 


The next Birds of Bellevue walk will be Friday, June 5th at 8 a.m.

Good birding!

Amy O'Neil
North Wilmington


Bellevue State Park, New Castle, US-DE
May 1, 2015 8:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: Monthly "Birds of Bellevue" Walk. Weather: 48-55 degrees, NE winds 
10mph, mostly cloudy 

48 species

Canada Goose  20
Mallard  2
Great Blue Heron  1     Flyover, before official start to bird walk
Turkey Vulture  5
Red-tailed Hawk 1 Seen while leaving parking lot after the walk. Circling low 
while mobbed by 3 Amer. Crows. 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  6
Downy Woodpecker  3
Warbling Vireo  5     heard only
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  9
Fish Crow  2     heard only
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  3
Purple Martin  10     Some landing on & going inside nest box
Tree Swallow  10
Barn Swallow  2
Carolina Chickadee  6
Tufted Titmouse  2
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
House Wren  3
Carolina Wren  6
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  8
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
Eastern Bluebird  1
Wood Thrush  1     Heard only, before official start of bird walk
American Robin  50     One sitting on nest
Gray Catbird  4
Northern Mockingbird  3
European Starling  25
Blue-winged Warbler  2
Black-and-white Warbler  2
Yellow Warbler  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Black-throated Blue Warbler  2
Yellow-rumped Warbler  3
Eastern Towhee  1     heard only
Chipping Sparrow  5
Song Sparrow  8
White-throated Sparrow  5
Northern Cardinal  10
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  20
Common Grackle  4
Brown-headed Cowbird  4
Baltimore Oriole  4
House Finch  5
American Goldfinch  8
House Sparrow  15

View this checklist online 
athttp://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23161138 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: DE Bird-A-Thon Birdwalks
From: Bill Stewart <bstewart AT ABA.ORG>
Date: Fri, 1 May 2015 11:48:22 -0400
Good Morning birders,

In a little over 12 hours, the 9th Annual Delaware Bird-A-Thon begins just as 
our spring migrants are starting to return! What lies ahead in the coming week 
looks very promising for a few fallouts - will there be a mega fallout? Will 
your team’s Big Day find a rarity? Which team raises the most funds for habit 
preservation in Delaware? Will you help in the fundraising? 


Looking for a DBAT birdwalk to join in on the fun? Look no further, we have set 
up four official DBAT Birdwalks covering the entire length of the First State! 
Listed below are the locations, dates, times and leaders for our walks, we hope 
to see many of you there! Get out and have some fun this Bird-A-Thon and 
remember “Birding for Conservation makes cents!” 



MONDAY May 4th - Prime Hook NWR w/ Sharon Lynn and Bill & Sally Fintel 8:00 AM 
Nature Center Parking lot 


TUESDAY May 5th - Alapocus Woods w/ Sally O’Byrne 7:00 AM Meet at the 
baseball field behind DuPont Experimental Station 


THURSDAY May 7th - Ashland Nature Center w/ Joe Sebastiani 8:00 AM Nature 
Center parking lot 


SUNDAY May 10th - The ever popular and traditional MOTHER’S DAY BIRDWALK w/ 
Judy Montgomery, Derek Stoner & Bill Stewart 7:00 AM White Clay Creek State 
Park Nature Center off of Chambers Rock Rd. 


Can’t get out into the field for the Bird-A-Thon, you can still contribute by 
clicking our safe and secure donation page found here 
http://www.dosbirds.org/get-involved/delaware-bird-thon/ 

 

 
Thank you and good bird-a-thoning,

Bill Stewart
Subject: Saturday Bird Walk, Carousel Park
From: Ian Stewart <istew AT UDEL.EDU>
Date: Thu, 30 Apr 2015 20:57:01 -0400
Greetings,

This Saturday I will be leading a DOS 'Local Patch' trip to Carousel Park,
Wilmington from 8am until noon. Carousel Park is a free public park with a
variety of habitats and will hopefully present us with a diversity of birds
(and turtles). Migrants are trickling in and the first person to spot a
warbler wins a genuine British Cadbury's chocolate bar!

We will meet in the main car park by the Equestrian Center at 8am then
waddle around the trails in a loose loop based on bird activity. As you
drive along Limestone Road/Route 7 you will see a brown sign with horses on
it marking the entrance to the Equestrian Center, then after you enter just
follow the road around to the left (address and map below). If you get lost
my cell is (859) 333-8817.

Come along and explore a new patch!

Ian Stewart

Carousel Park = 3700 Limestone Rd, Wilmington, DE 19808

http://www.yelp.com/map/carousel-park-new-castle-county-equestrian-center-wilmington 

Subject: First Ruby-throated Hummingbird at my feeder
From: Dennis Barrowclough <barrowclough AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Apr 2015 18:46:09 -0400
I had my first ruby-throated hummingbird (male)of the season at the feeder
about 15 minutes ago.

 

Kathy

Hockessin

 

 
Subject: Thursday am
From: Colin Campbell <delawaretwitcher AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Apr 2015 14:14:36 -0500
Prothonotary Warbler in full song (and full view) at Finis Pool turnaround, 
Bombay Hook NWR. 

Wild Turkey on Rt 9 at Allee House road.
15 Cliff Swallows at Rt 9 bridge over N. branch of the Appoquinimink River.
 
Colin Campbell
Claymont, DE.
Subject: statewide highlights - 4/29
From: Billy Weber <robot.stories AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Apr 2015 14:07:39 -0400
Had an awesome midnight-to-dawn period in Delaware yesterday, featuring 
Virginia Rail, Sora, and Common Gallinule at Thousand Acre Marsh; Least Bittern 
at Grier's Pond; Barred Owl on Dutch Neck Rd; Barn Owl in the Bombay Hook area; 
American Woodcock, Eastern Screech and Great Horned owls, and Eastern 
Whip-poor-will on Big Stone Beach Rd; Chuck-will's-widow on Broadkill Rd; and 
Clapper Rail, Seaside Sparrow, and more whips on Oyster Rocks Rd. Also had a 
King/Clapper Rail at the Smyrna River on Route 9 (not sure which species this 
location implies), and in the evening, Clapper calling in Augustine Beach. The 
rest of the day was less successful, with some shorebirds and passerines 
apparently running late this year, but did have the following among just under 
160 species: 

Snow Goose - Carousel Farm Park
Ring-necked Duck - Hoopes Reservoir (actually evening of 4/28)
HARLEQUIN DUCK - still at Indian River Inlet, and lookin' pretty fine
Ruddy Duck - Silver Lake
Purple Sandpiper - Indian River Inlet
Least Sandpiper - one flushed from a neighborhood street (!) in Selbyville, 
where I again could not find the collared-doves (although I had a possible 
flyover collared while I was driving Route 16 west of Milton) 

Lesser Black-backed Gull - northwest of Millsboro, with Bonaparte's and 
Laughing in a field 

Bank Swallow - many going past the point at Cape Henlopen, with other species
Cliff Swallow - under the Smyrna River bridge on Route 9
American Redstart - 2 at Cape Henlopen
Vesper & Savannah sparrows - Rementer Rd south of Redden State Forest
Dark-eyed Junco - Bombay Hook visitor center
Summer Tanager - singing at Redden Rd rest stop, also 2 males to the south on 
Rum Bridge Rd 

Purple Finch - Prime Hook NWR

I missed Great Cormorant, Least and Royal terns, and Red-headed Woodpecker 
(tried the West Robbins Rd site). Best mammal was a River Otter at Prime Hook 
Beach, and butterflies at Redden rest area included Henry's Elfin, Holly Azure, 
and Juvenal's Duskywing. 


Billy Weber
Walnutport, PA
robot.stories AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Ashland bird walk highlights
From: judy montgomery <judym AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Thu, 30 Apr 2015 16:05:30 +0000
Lots of great birders AND great FOY birds today at Ashland!
Great-crested Flycatcher, Rusty Blackbird, Orchard Orioles, Scarlet Tanager, 2 
Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, Eastern Kingbird were FOY for most of us! We found 
3 different Blue-gray Gnatcatcher nests. 


View our checklist - 59 species!

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23141797

Judy Montgomery
Subject: Rail Trip
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Apr 2015 09:13:58 -0400
The annual  DOS Rail Census will be Friday  night starting at 10 pm from the
Rt 299 Park and Ride. As Bernt Heimrich writes in "The Snoring Bird"; "Rails
are the embodiment of the wild and inaccessible  nature hidden from human
senses." We'll be looking for two of Delaware's rarest species, the Black
and Yellow Rail. In the 10 years I've done this trip, I've had ZERO Yellow
and 1 Black Rail. But we'll also look for other night birds, American and
Least Bittern, Barn and Barred Owl, Whip-poor-will and Sedge Wren. Bring
boots, bug repellant and snacks-including caffeine!

Good birding, 
Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Black-throated Green Warbler
From: "Amy O'Neil" <parakeet93 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Apr 2015 06:33:29 -0400
Yesterday I had my first Black-throated Green Warbler this year at Ashland just 
over the small footbridge to Sledding Hill. There was also a N. Parula singing 
in the picnic area by the parking lot, and Purple Finches (2) continue to hang 
out at the marsh. 


Amy O'Neil
North Wilmington