Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
Delaware Birds

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Saturday, July 4 at 02:23 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


MacGregors Bird of Paradise,©BirdQuest

4 Jul Sussex: Roseate Terns at Fowler Beach Rd. [Tim Schreckengost ]
4 Jul Sussex: Sandwich Tern at Gordon's Pond [Tim Schreckengost ]
3 Jul Birding by bike [Colin Campbell ]
3 Jul nottingham park very chatty [Mary Ann Levan ]
3 Jul Dickcissel [ ]
3 Jul Dickcissel @ Prime Hook [Hugh McGuinness ]
2 Jul RBA: Birdline Delaware, July 2nd, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
2 Jul Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Acts Under Attack [Kurt Schwarz ]
2 Jul Re: White Ibis [Joe Sebastiani ]
2 Jul Question about Prime Hook [Hugh McGuinness ]
2 Jul Juv White Ibis [Teddy Burke ]
2 Jul White Ibis [Hugh McGuinness ]
2 Jul White Ibis Fowler Beach Rd now [Hugh McGuinness ]
30 Jun June Challenge Totals Due by tomorrow [Christopher Bennett ]
30 Jun Ruff - seen on Mon, 6/29 [Marcy Stutzman ]
29 Jun More brown pelicans! [Diane Kane ]
28 Jun Prime Hook Rarities [Kevin Ebert ]
28 Jun 8 brown pelicans [Diane Kane ]
27 Jun Scissor-tailed Flycatcher [Robert Edelen ]
27 Jun Ruff [Sharon Lynn ]
26 Jun RBA: Birdline Delaware, June 26th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
26 Jun Fledgling Screech Owls ["Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" ]
26 Jun Fledgling Screech Owls ["Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" ]
26 Jun Brandywine Birdwalk [Andrew Ednie ]
26 Jun Beginner Bird Walk [Joe Sebastiani ]
25 Jun Prime Hook NWR highlights -- Ruff update - 6/25 [Alan Kneidel ]
25 Jun Evening Heron Survey Report ["Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" ]
24 Jun White Clay Creek this mornng [Maurice Barnhill ]
24 Jun June Challenge Storm-Petrel in Kent County [Christopher Bennett ]
23 Jun Re: Ruff at Prime Hook NWR [Tim Schreckengost ]
23 Jun ADMIN: Unsubscribing [ ]
23 Jun Mailing List [Jim Hay ]
23 Jun Ruff at Prime Hook NWR [John Hoyt ]
22 Jun Evening Heron Survey [Christopher Bennett ]
22 Jun Mailing List [Neil Christner ]
22 Jun BIRD CONSERVATION ACTION ALERT - HB178 Community Cats [Matthew Sarver ]
22 Jun Re: Great crested flycatcher! [Meghann ]
22 Jun Great crested flycatcher! [Lydia Robb ]
21 Jun New Castle: Prothonotary Warbler at Blackbird State Forest [Tim Schreckengost ]
20 Jun Sussex County -- 102 species, Roseate Tern 6/20/15 [Alan Kneidel ]
20 Jun Sussex: Roseate Tern at Broadkill Marsh [Tim Schreckengost ]
19 Jun RBA: Birdline Delaware, June 19th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
19 Jun Bird Banding Study [joe sebastiani ]
18 Jun Open House at Middle Run on Friday (6/19) Afternoon [Derek Stoner ]
18 Jun Cape Henlopen this morning [Christopher Bennett ]
17 Jun Heronry Survey Addendum ["Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" ]
16 Jun May Heronry Survey at DE City ["Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" ]
16 Jun Dickcissel at BCSP [Chuck Brandt ]
16 Jun NestWatch [Joe Sebastiani ]
15 Jun bird hikes at white clay creek state park ["Sullivan, Kathleen N. (DNREC)" ]
15 Jun Dickcissel at BCSP [Andrew Ednie ]
13 Jun Swallows ["sally o'byrne" ]
13 Jun Lone female bufflehead off Gordon's Pond Beach (CHSP) [Vince Gambal ]
13 Jun Birder's Party, Picnic, and Celebration ~ All Invited! [Holly Merker ]
12 Jun RBA: Birdline Delaware, June 12th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
12 Jun Bird-A-Thon Totals and Pledges Due [Bill Stewart ]
11 Jun Urgent Alert to Protect Migratory Birds [Kurt Schwarz ]
10 Jun Sussex Bird Club Kayak Trip Saturday [Christopher Bennett ]
10 Jun White Gull at Mispillion Inlet [Bob Ringler ]
10 Jun Re: Action Alert: National Defense Bill Threatens Grouse Protections [Kurt Schwarz ]
10 Jun Re: Action Alert: National Defense Bill Threatens Grouse Protections [Kurt Schwarz ]
10 Jun Action Alert: National Defense Bill Threatens Grouse Protections [Kurt Schwarz ]
10 Jun TODAY - Wilmington Peregrine FalconWatch Event - Wed. 6/10 [Bill Stewart ]
8 Jun Dying Cat Birds [susan ruth marengo ]
7 Jun Gull-billed Terns at BHNWR [Christopher Bennett ]
7 Jun Dying Catbirds [susan ruth marengo ]
6 Jun Today at Dragon Run ["sally o'byrne" ]
6 Jun Re: Dickcissel [Lloyd Maier ]
6 Jun Brown Thrush vs Mockingbird [Mary Lukaszewski ]
5 Jun RBA: Birdline Delaware, June 5th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
5 Jun Wilmington Peregrine FalconWatch Event - Wed. 6/10 [Bill Stewart ]
4 Jun The June Challenge [Colin Campbell ]
4 Jun Dragon Run DOS trip ["sally o'byrne" ]
3 Jun DVOC Meeting this week: Special Date, Location & Time [Steve Kacir ]
2 Jun 3 Red headed Woodpeckers (life bird) [Vince Gambal ]
1 Jun June Challenge - Delaware Big June II [Christopher Bennett ]

Subject: Sussex: Roseate Terns at Fowler Beach Rd.
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 15:20:00 -0400
Birders,

Alan Kneidel and I are currently viewing two Roseate Terns at Fowler Beach Rd. 
They are on the south side of the road about halfway between the fisherman's 
bridge and the end of the road. 


Cheers,
Tim Schreckengost 
Elkton, MD
814-952-2934
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Sussex: Sandwich Tern at Gordon's Pond
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 09:33:23 -0400
Birders,

Alan Kneidel and I are currently looking at a Sandwich Tern at Gordon's Pond 
(Cape Henlopen State Park). It's in a mixed tern flock that is viewable if you 
walk past the observation platform. A scope is needed. 


Cheers,
Tim Schreckengost 
Elkton, MD
814-952-2934
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Birding by bike
From: Colin Campbell <delawaretwitcher AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 17:06:16 -0500
Yesterday morning I accompanied two companions to try out the Mike Castle Trail 
by the C&D Canal by bicycle. We had trepidations after driving through two 
heavy showers but courage (or idiocy) prevailed and we had a great time 
exploring the area in overcast but dry conditions with a nice biking 
temperature of 70F. 

 
For those unfamiliar with this trail which was opened last year, it is a 7-mile 
paved road, about 8 feet wide, running along the north side of the C&D Canal. 
It is intended for walkers and cyclists, but there is provision for horseback 
riders, but I've never seen one. Perhaps the necessity of carrying a large 
pooper-scooper is off-putting to our equestrian colleagues? I digress. Because 
of the asphalt surface, it is eminently suitable for narrow-tired road bikes. 
The 7-mile section is, as one would expect of a trail running by a canal, flat. 
It is incomplete and the half-mile section linking it to Rt9 in Delaware City 
is still to be completed. At the western end, which is the entrance from the 
canal to the Summit North Marina, there is a 2-3 mile extension, which is not 
flat, but is still paved. This takes you over the bank to the Marina which you 
can swing around and pass the AquaSol Restaurant and Bar (unsampled as yet) to 
enable you to cycle through woods before dropping ! 

 steeply back to the canal. A further half mile brings you to the end of the 
paved trail, just before the spectacular Summit Bridge (Rt896) in its wonderful 
new deep blue finery. The trail continues (into Maryland) but at the moment it 
is a gravel/dirt track. Access points for motor vehicles are at Biddle Point 
(off Cox Neck Road about 1-2 miles west of Delaware City), under St Georges 
Bridge in N. St Georges (both places have paved parking, toilets, information 
board and picnic tables) or the AquaSol restaurant parking lot at the North 
Summit Marina. Full details can be found at 
www.traillink.com/trail/michael-castle-trail.aspx. 

 
So why am I telling you all this? Well, my two biking companions are not 
birders and indeed, fairly green cyclists. This meant that I had to reduce my 
usual speed on my special Bilenky road bike considerably to stay in contact. As 
a result, I was able to do quite a lot of birding (without binox). And the area 
was really birdy, especially for this time of year (OK, we don't all live 
minutes away from Prime Hook NWR which seems deservedly to have hogged all the 
limelight recently). The stretch from Biddle Point to the east end of the trail 
had multiple singing Yellow-breasted Chats and several calling Bobwhites as 
well as a constant passage of herons heading to and fro from Pea Patch Island - 
the three Egrets, Great and Little Blue Herons, Glossy Ibis (no Whites!) and 
three 'local' Green Herons. One Osprey was on a very low nest on a channel 
marker in marked contrast to the one on a nest on the very top of the nearby 
Reedy Point Bridge (Rt9). The Canal had Fish Crows, Bald Eag! 

 le and D-c Cormorants flying over. The trail-side growth had Eastern 
Kingbirds, a Willow Flycatcher and two very vocal Field Sparrows; Purple 
Martins, Barn and Tree Swallows adorned the wires. Common Yellowthroats and 
Indigo Buntings were everywhere and Blue Grosbeaks too, tho' less vocal. 
Further west, 22 Turkey Vultures perched on a gas pipeline tower and 18 Black 
Vultures were on the walls of the approach to the extraordinary railway bridge 
over the canal. Some of the GBHerons and BVultures perched on rocks by the 
canal were very tame, allowing us to cycle past at 6 feet distance without 
flying. In the woods beyond the Marina were singing Wood Thrushes, Red-eyed 
Vireos and all three Mimids were seen. As 90% birders have better ears than I, 
I missed a heck of a lot. Mammals included cottontails, woodchucks and a fox. 

 
No awesome rarities but, mark my words, a great place to bike and bird and, if 
you're into boats, everything from kayaks to sailboats, skidoos to speedboats, 
barges to car-carriers. 

 
My companions enjoyed the 3-4 hours or so immensely and gained a new respect 
for the copious birdlife around and were ecstatic to discover they'd biked 19 
miles. 

 
Colin Campbell
Claymont, DE
Subject: nottingham park very chatty
From: Mary Ann Levan <levanma AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 17:05:10 -0400
Went to Nottingham Park, PA today to try out a new pair of binocs and found it 
was “dominated” by yellow breasted chats. We walked in an area of mixed 
forbs and scattered pitch pines and smilax, and heard and saw 4 boldly 
displayed and loudly singing chats. My husband and I, uncharacteristically, 
decided the place had “chatitude”! 


Mary Ann Levan, Joe Ycas
Hockessin, DE
Subject: Dickcissel
From: Richard Clifton <000000af228ab213-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 11:43:09 -0400
For those looking for the Dickcissel on Cods Road, I haven't seen it since the 
afternoon of June 30. Maybe it has moved to Broadkill Beach Road where one has 
been newly reported. 


Richard Clifton
Cods Road, Milford DE
Subject: Dickcissel @ Prime Hook
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 10:09:27 -0400
After dipping on the Cod's Road Dickcissel two days straight, I was resigned to 
having missed the bird. However, as I tooled down Broadkill Beach Rd at 50 mph 
with the windows down, after seeing almost nothing in the marsh, I heard a 
Dickcissel in the field just east of house number 12,176. I stopped for a brief 
view and managed photos for documentation, despite being late for breakfast. 
The exact location can be found in my ensured report. 


Earlier in the morning I had delightful luck on Deep Branch Rd (summer tanager, 
grasshopper sparrow) and along the entrance road at Prime Hook NWR (more 
grasshopper sparrows). 


Hugh McGuinness

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, July 2nd, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 21:31:46 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* July 2, 2015
* DEST1507.02
	
*Birds mentioned
Mute Swan 
Gadwall
Northern Pintail
Blue-winged Teal 
Green-winged Teal
Black Scoter
Ruddy Duck 
Wild Turkey
Northern Bobwhite
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
Brown Pelican
Least Bittern
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Glossy Ibis
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Clapper Rail
Sora
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
Spotted Sandpiper
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Stilt Sandpiper
RUFF
Short-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Phalarope
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Least Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Common Tern
Royal Tern
SANDWICH TERN
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
Eastern Whippoorwill
Red-headed Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Willow Flycatcher
Yellow-throated Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Veery
Wood Thrush
Louisiana Waterthrush
Kentucky Warbler
Hooded Warbler
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Pine Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat 
Vesper Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Scarlet Tanager
Blue Grosbeak
DICKCISSEL
Eastern Meadowlark

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: July 2, 2015 
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net 
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

For the 4th of July weekend, this is an early edition of Birdline Delaware,
on Thursday, July 2nd from the Delaware Museum of Natural History in
Greenville. The unofficial Delaware annual list increased to 306 species. 

The two new birds this week were both seen only once was by single groups of
observers. The first was a SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER reported between Lewes
and Georgetown on Bennum Switch Road, about 1-1/2 miles southwest of
Harbeson. This bird was seen flying between the telephone line and the pine
trees along side of the road. There've been several reports of
SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER these last two weeks from Cape May, New Jersey and
Assateague Island, Maryland. There've also been reports in southwestern
Virginia, South Carolina, and Georgia plus one last month in upstate New
York. Other people unsuccessfully looking for the SCISSOR-TAIL found WILD
TURKEY in the area.

Also reported was a SANDWICH TERN from the Cape May -Lewes ferry flying out
over Delaware Bay. Also seen was ROYAL and CASPIAN TERNS plus WILSON'S STORM
PETREL. A good place to look for SANDWICH TERNS would be The Point at Cape
Henlopen State Park, where LEAST and ROYAL TERNS were seen, along with 3
PIPING PLOVER and 4 AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS. A BLACK SCOTER continues to be
seen along the inner breakwater.

BLACK SKIMMER and COMMON TERNS were reported at Gordon's Pond at Cape
Henlopen State Park along the North Shore of Rehoboth Beach. This area had a
plethora of waders including 22 GLOSSY IBIS, 42 SNOWY, and 18 GREAT EGRETS.
A high count of 45 WILLETS were found. COOPER'S HAWK was found along the
pines, plus PRAIRIE and PINE WARBLER.

There have been numerous sightings of WHITE IBIS in all three counties
today. A single bird was spotted last evening flying over Lighthouse Road
near Mispillion Inlet. Three immature WHITE IBIS were found today at the
Back Beach in Kent Co. from the DuPont Nature Center at Mispillion Inlet.
Thirteen immature WHITE IBIS were found at Fowlers Beach in Prime Hook
National Wildlife Refuge near Milton. Those birds were in the marsh by the
turn in the road. Two more WHITE IBIS were seen at Stave's Landing Road in
New Castle Co. near Odessa off Route 9. Those birds were flying west towards
Middletown, where 22 GLOSSY IBIS were seen at the Charles E. Price Park off
St. Anne Church Road. 

Heavy rains in southern Delaware on Saturday flooded the traditional
shorebird sites. On Saturday, a RUFF was still present at Broadkill Marsh at
Prime Hook. Six WILSON'S PHALAROPES were also seen, along with BLACK-NECKED
STILTS, 60 AMERICAN AVOCET, 5 GREATER and 40 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, STILT
SANDPIPER, and SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. Those birds were dispersed by the
rain, the last sighting of the RUFF was briefly at the western edge of the
North impoundments at Broadkill on Monday. The bird was observed taking off
and flying north towards Prime Hook Beach. Other birds at Prime Hook
included PIED-BILLED GREBE, GADWALL, NORTHERN PINTAIL, BLUE-WINGED and
GREEN-WINGED TEAL, and LEAST BITTERN. BLACK TERN was observed flying over
the marsh along with LEAST and COMMON TERN plus BLACK SKIMMER.

Four WILSON'S STORM-PETRELS were seen flying out over Delaware Bay from
Fowler's Beach on Sunday. Ten AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS continue to be seen,
plus BLACK-NECKED STILTS, AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS, BLACK-BELLIED and
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, RED KNOT, RUDDY TURNSTONE, and WILLETS. LESSER
BLACK-BACKED GULL with LEAST TERN and BLACK SKIMMER were also seen. Lots of
SEASIDE SPARROWS were seen in the marsh along with one SALTMARSH SPARROW.
WILLOW FLYCATCHER was found in the woods.

The previous reported DICKCISSEL continues to be seen at Cods Road at the
southernmost house sitting on the telephone line. AMERICAN KESTREL was
reported at Little Neck Road. Both YELLOW-BILLED and BLACK-BILLED CUCKOOS
were found at Prime Hook. Warblers reported included PROTHONOTARY, PRAIRIE,
and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT. Two WHIPPOORWILLS were reported at Oyster Rock
Road, calling at 5 AM.

BROWN PELICANS were seen flying along the Delaware coast at North Indian
Beach near Dewey Beach. A peak count of 11 BROWN PELICANS was recorded at
Savage's Ditch in Delaware Seashore State Park, south of Dewey Beach. Two
TRICOLORED HERONS were also seen at Savage's Ditch. A COMMON LOON was seen
flying over Old Landing near Rehoboth Bay. Two RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were
seen at Angola Neck Preserve off Angola Neck Road from Route 24. 

The previous reported RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS continues to be seen at
Strawberry Landing in Assawoman Wildlife Area near Fenwick Island. Four
PILEATED WOODPECKERS and 3 BROWN HEADED NUTHATCHES were also reported.
GLOSSY IBIS was seen, along with SNOWY and GREAT EGRET.

VESPER SPARROW was found along Ponders Road near Ellendale off Route 16.
VESPER SPARROW along with GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and HORNED LARK were found
near Felton, south of Dover.

The previous reported DICKCISSEL at Brandywine Creek State Park, north of
Wilmington continues be seen. That bird can be heard on the hillside along
the entrance road just before the turn to the Hawkwatch parking lot. Also
reported were EASTERN MEADOWLARK and PRAIRIE WARBLER. A VEERY was reported
along Barley Mill Road near Spring Valley.

VEERY and WOOD THRUSHES were also reported at Thompson Station Road at White
Clay Creek State Park near Newark. Both HOODED and KENTUCKY WARBLERS were
found along Thompson Station Road, along with LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH,
AMERICAN REDSTART, and NORTHERN PAULA. YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO and SCARLET
TANAGER were also found. KENTUCKY WARBLER was also found at Hopkins Bridge
Road at White Clay with REDSTART, PARULA, and YELLOW WARBLER. Also seen was
YELLOW-THROATED and WARBLING VIREO. OSPREY was seen fishing along the creek.
A RED-SHOULDERED HAWK was seen near Newark off Barksdale Road. 

OSPREY was also found near New Castle at Battery Park. CASPIAN TERN was seen
flying out over the Delaware River. BLUE GROSBEAKS were found along the
trail by Gambacorta Marsh. A SORA was heard calling today at Thousand Acre
Marsh. CLAPPER RAIL was reported at the Port Penn Impoundments of Augustine
Beach Wildlife Area. LITTLE BLUE HERONS and CATTLE EGRETS continue to be
seen flying to the heronry at Pea Patch Island. Several BALD EAGLES were
also reported. CLAPPER RAIL was also found at Stave's Landing. 

A SPOTTED SANDPIPER was seen opposite Raymond Pool at Bombay Hook National
Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna. Shorebirds there included several nesting BLACK
NECKED STILTS, plus GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS. MUTE SWAN was seen at
Sheerness Pool. NORTHERN BOBWHITE was heard calling by the visitor center.
Lots of GREAT EGRETS are being seen at the refuge, plus SNOWY EGRET, GREEN
HERON, and BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON.

RUDDY DUCK was reported this week at Port Mahon Road. That bird was seen at
Audubon inlet among the dabblers. RUDDY DUCK was also reported at Pickering
Beach, perhaps the same bird. BLACK-NECKED STILTS and WILLETS were also
reported at Port Mahon. SEASIDE SPARROWS were in the marsh at Port Mahon and
Pickering Beach.

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Bob Edelen, Hugh
McGuinness, Steve Collins, Marcy Stutzman, Kevin Ebert, Colin Campbell,
Diane Kane, Sarah MacLellan, Carlton Groff, Ken Bass, Hank Davis, Rachael
Shapiro, Robert Klarquist, Teddy Burke, Alissa Kegelman, Ken Wat, Chris and
Karen Bennett, Sally O'Byrne, Joe Sebastiani, Brian Henderson, Ryan Johnson,
Jerald Reb, Joel Martin Rich Clifton, Chris Rowe, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver,
Sharon Lynn, Alex Wiebe, Bill Stewart, Tim Schreckengost, Tim Freiday, Elora
Grahame, Meg Frantz, Alan Kneidel  Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell.
Remember, the birdline needs your sightings! Please call your reports into
302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, had a happy and
safe Fourth of July holiday. This is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Acts Under Attack
From: Kurt Schwarz <goawaybird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 13:38:58 -0400
Dear Delaware Birder,

You may recall the action for last week about the MBTA being under attack
in Congress.  The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act is now also on the
chopping block. If you have not already done so, or want to reiterate your
support for the MBTA as well as BGEPA, the American Bird Conservancy has
made it easy to to contact your legislators.

As soon as next week Congress will vote on amendments to prevent
enforcement of a key law protecting our nations symbol the Bald Eagle,
the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (BGEPA), as well as the Migratory
Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), which protects over 1,000 species of migratory
birds and makes it illegal to harm them except under very specific
circumstances.  The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act is a crucial law
needed to ensure that the remarkable recovery of the Bald Eagle continues,
and to conserve struggling populations of Golden Eagle.

Just click on this link and fill in name, etc.
You can also help by contacting your Senators and Representative. Please
use and share this link to generate letters to your elected officials:

http://tinyurl.com/ngz5evm


If the link is not enabled, you will have to copy and paste in your
browser. I have used a tinyurl link so that it will not be corrupted in
copying and pasting into this mail message.

Kurt Schwarz 
Conservation Chair
Maryland Ornithological Society
krschwa1 AT verizon.net
Subject: Re: White Ibis
From: Joe Sebastiani <bunker17 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 13:38:09 -0400
2 imm. White Ibis flew past Staves Landing New Castle County this morning 
headed west. If birding the area keep a look out. Also almost 200 Glossy Ibis 
feeding at Charles Price Park in the wet meadows. Maybe this is a spot to 
search for the WHIB in the upcoming days. 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Hugh McGuinness
Date:07/02/2015 7:36 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [de-birds] White Ibis
Final count at Fowlers Beach Rd was thirteen juveniles. The ten White Pelicans also continue. Hugh McGuinness Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Question about Prime Hook
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 11:50:08 -0400
Hello Delaware Birders,

Can anyone give me pointers as to the best approach to looking for shorebirds 
at Broadkill Marsh and Fowlers Beach? Are they better at any particular tide? 
Are there other places to check within Prime Hook. 


This morning I did not see the Dickcissel at Cliftons yard despite spending 
nearly 30 minutes. 


And I must also point out that birding Delaware is really fun. 

Hugh

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Juv White Ibis
From: Teddy Burke <teddyarbeca AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 09:23:57 -0400
Thanks to Hugh. It is 9:20 AMand I am seeing 11 Juv White Ibis at Fowler's
in location Hugh posted. They are fairly close in first patch of water on
right as you enter toward the beach. Easy view with binos.
Subject: White Ibis
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 07:36:36 -0400
Final count at Fowlers Beach Rd was thirteen juveniles. The ten White Pelicans 
also continue. 


Hugh McGuinness

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: White Ibis Fowler Beach Rd now
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 06:29:18 -0400
2 juvies south of rd just after bend at the end. 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: June Challenge Totals Due by tomorrow
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 21:27:19 -0400
Hello All June Challengers - Big June Birders,

The month is finally over - out with a rumble and downpour for some of you
- and a great USA win over Germany in the Women's World Cup Semi.  Totals
are in from three of us so far - my Kent, Sussex and New Castle lists and
two Sussex lists - one a limited geographic list.  So far Sussex county has
the lead in both categories. If you are just competing in the Big June and
don't care if your seem only lists gets sent to Florida you can get me your
list before the end of the week.

Hope everyone had a great time.

Chris Bennett
Milford, DE
Subject: Ruff - seen on Mon, 6/29
From: Marcy Stutzman <marciastutzman AT NETSCAPE.NET>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 10:29:57 -0400
I posted this information on Delaware Birding Facebook and in eBird and am 
following up here for the record. 


Jay Sheppard and Marcy Stutzman saw the Ruff at 9:35 AM while standing at the 
west end paved pull off on the north side of Broadkill Road (i.e., the causeway 
between the north and south marshes along Broadkill Rd, which ends at Broadkill 
Beach), and looking north from the causeway. The Ruff flew in from the south, 
over the road, and landed in the west end of the marsh right in front of us. It 
was there a short time, enough for both of us to get our scopes on it. The Ruff 
stayed a few minutes and then flew off to the west over the trees, then 
northerly, looking like it was going down to land. A possible spot was to the 
right of the bridge looking north – an inaccessible marsh. We climbed atop 
the guardrail on the right side of the bridge (looking north) to peek over the 
phragmites, but that offered only a partial view of the marsh (no Ruff). 


We hope people keep looking for the Ruff and keep reporting it!

Marcy Stutzman
Jay Sheppard
Laurel, MD 20724
Subject: More brown pelicans!
From: Diane Kane <dianejkane AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 19:14:37 -0400
Just had two brown pelicans heading south low over the ocean heading towards 
tower road state park beach. 


Diane Kane 
Indian Beach, DE

Diane J Kane,
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Prime Hook Rarities
From: Kevin Ebert <kev.ebert AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 18:08:20 -0400
        Broadkill Road

The Ruff was not present this Saturday 3-4 PM and 10-11 AM or 12:40 PM
Sunday.

The Stilt Sandpiper and Wilson's Phalarope were present both times, but
left at around 11 Am Sun and did not return by 12:40.

Other notable birds include a Least Bittern on Saturday and a pair of
Wilson's Storm Petrels on Sunday.


        Fowler's Beach Road

4 American White Pelicans were present on Saturday, but not on Sunday.

       Cod's Road

The Dickcissel was singing frequently and obviously in the Clifton Yard.

       Downtown and Benum Switch Roads

The Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was not there.


     Kevin Ebert

     Chevy Chase
Subject: 8 brown pelicans
From: Diane Kane <dianejkane AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 15:07:32 -0400
Just saw 8 brown pelicans flying low and north along the break of today's huge 
waves from in front of my home. 


Diane Kane
Indian Beach, DE

Diane J Kane,
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
From: Robert Edelen <bnorchids AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 13:10:16 -0400
There was a scissor-tailed flycatcher on the power lines at the corner of
Downtown and Benum Switch roads (1 1/2 miles SW of Harbeson) today from
12:20 to 12:40PM.  It was alternately flying between the power lines and
the pines across the road.

Bob Edelen
Subject: Ruff
From: Sharon Lynn <slynn001 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 10:03:27 -0400
The Ruff is currently in the north marsh on Broadkill Beach Road. 

There are 6 Wilson's Phalaropes, and among the Black-Necked Stilts, there are 2 
tiny chicks. Also a good showing of the other birds seen this week. 

Sharon Lynn
Rehoboth Beach

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, June 26th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 20:59:50 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* June 26, 2015
* DEST1506.26
	
*Birds mentioned
Snow Goose
Mute Swan 
Tundra Swan
Wood Duck 
Gadwall
American Wigeon
Blue-winged Teal
Black Scoter
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Wild Turkey
Northern Bobwhite
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
American White Pelican
Least Bittern
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black Crowned Night Heron
Yellow Crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Glossy Ibis
Northern Harrier
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Virginia Rail
Common Gallinule
SANDHILL CRANE
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Least Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Stilt Sandpiper
RUFF
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
WILSON'S PHALAROPE
Bonaparte's Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Least Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
ROSEATE TERN
Common Tern
Royal Tern
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
Barred Owl
Chuck Wills Widow
Eastern Whippoorwill
Red-headed Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Willow Flycatcher
Yellow-throated Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Veery
Wood Thrush
Ovenbird
Louisiana Waterthrush
Prothonotary Warbler
Worm-eating Warbler
American Redstart
Black and White Warbler
Blue Winged Warbler
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Pine Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Kentucky Warbler
Hooded Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Vesper Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Summer Tanager
DICKCISSEL
Eastern Meadowlark

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: June 26, 2015 
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net 
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

This is Birdline Delaware, for Friday, June 26th from the Delaware Museum of
Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware annual list increased
to 304 species. 

What a week it has been at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Milton!
A breeding plumage ROSEATE TERN was found on Saturday at Broadkill Beach
marsh, along the north side of the road. This is a stunning bird, with long
tail, black sickle bill and rose wash on the breast. It is also a very rare
bird away from the Delaware coast where it is usually found between Cape
Henlopen to Indian River Inlet.

Shorebirds are also starting to arrive, the best place being the Broadkill
Beach Road where up to 5 WILSON'S PHALAROPES were reported on the north side
of the road. a breeding plumage black RUFF was found on Tuesday and has
remained all week. Other shorebirds included 40+ BLACK NECKED STILTS, 65
AMERICAN AVOCETS, plus LONG-BILLED and SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. An immature
WHITE IBIS was seen flying over among a flock of GLOSSY IBIS. A STILT
SANDPIPER was seen at Prime Hook Beach Road. AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS
continue to be seen at Fowler's Beach. Shorebirds seen there included
AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, RUDDY
TURNSTONE, RED KNOT, LEAST SANDPIPER, and LESSER YELLOWLEGS. A total of
eight species of tern were reported at Prime Hook including breeding plumage
BLACK TERN at Broadkill Beach Marsh, plus 120 BLACK SKIMMER, and LEAST,
ROYAL, CASPIAN, and COMMON TERN in the refuge. BONAPARTE'S and LESSER
BLACK-BACKED GULL were also found. BLUE-WINGED TEAL was also reported
Broadkill marsh, plus AMERICAN WIGEON, GADWALL, and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER.

The previous reported DICKCISSEL continues to be seen at the south end of
Cods Road. Both BLACK-BILLED and YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO were found on the
refuge, plus YELLOW-THROATED VIREO. Warblers reported included OVENBIRD,
WORM-EATING, PROTHONOTARY, and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT at Turkle's Pond.
AMERICAN KESTRELS were seen along Draper Road, where 4 fledglings were
banded this week. 

WILSON'S STORM PETREL was seen off the Delaware Bay heading towards Kent Co
from the duPont Nature Center at Mispillion Inlet. Two LESSER BLACK-BACKED
GULLS were seen on the jetty, plus FORSTER'S LEAST, COMMON and ROYAL TERNS. 

More WILSON'S STORM-PETRELS continue to be seen offshore from the hawkwatch
at Cape Henlopen State Park. PIPING PLOVER and 4 AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS
were seen at the point. Good numbers of terns are collecting at the point,
including 10 ROYAL, 2 COMMON and a LEAST TERN. BLACK SCOTER was reported at
the inner breakwater. There was also a flyover COMMON LOON in basic plumage.


A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was reported at Pocomoke Swamp near Gumboro. Also
reported there were YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, and SUMMER
TANAGER. Warblers seen included WORM-EATING AND LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH. More
RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS continues to be seen at the Angola Neck Preserve off
Route 24 west of Midway. Those birds were seen along the road, where it
turns to gravel. BROWN HEADED NUTHATCH was also reported there.

SUMMER TANAGER was also reported at the McCabe Preserve along the Broadkill
Creek near Milton. YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, WILD TURKEY and BARRED OWL also
found. Warblers reported included PROTHONOTARY, PINE, and YELLOW-THROATED.

VESPER SPARROW was found Ponders Road near Ellendale. Redden Forest near
Georgetown at SUMMER TANAGER plus YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT, WORM-EATING and
BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER. SUMMER TANAGER was also found at W. Robbins Rd. in
Redden State Forest along with KENTUCKY, PRAIRIE, and WORM-EATING WARBLER.
GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS were calling in the fields.

A SANDHILL CRANE was found at the headwaters to Augustine Creek near Port
Penn. COMMON GALLINULE was found at port Penn impoundments. An AMERICAN
KESTREL was found along Dutch Neck Road. CLIFF SWALLOWS continue to be seen
at the north Appoquinimink Bridge near Odessa.

The Heron survey at Delaware City reported high numbers of LITTLE BLUE HERON
(415), GREAT EGRET (370), CATTLE EGRET (547), and GLOSSY IBIS (623). Low
numbers were found for SNOWY EGRET and BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON. A single
YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON was reported plus a GREEN HERON flying out to the
island. Also reported were CASPIAN TERNS flying over the Delaware River.
NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS was found at ABA headquarters.

The previous reported DICKCISSEL at Brandywine Creek State Park has not been
seen since Sunday. WILLOW FLYCATCHER, PRAIRIE and YELLOW WARBLER, plus
EASTERN MEADOWLARK continue to be reported there. WILLOW FLYCATCHER was also
reported at Ashland Nature Center.

A HOODED WARBLER was found at White Clay Creek State Park off Thompson
Station Road. Other warblers seen there included BLUE-WINGED, KENTUCKY,
PRAIRIE, AMERICAN REDSTART, LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH, and 40 OVENBIRD. 12 VEERY
and 38 WOOD THRUSH were also found, along with YELLOW BILLED CUCKOO,
WARBLING and YELLOW THROATED VIREO. NORTHERN BOBWHITE was found at Middle
Run Natural Area today. WILLOW FLYCATCHER was also reported. Warblers
included OVENBIRD, PRAIRIE WARBLER and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT

The Veolia Water Treatment plant in Wilmington had 25 WOOD DUCKS and 6
GADWALLS. WILLOW FLYCATCHER and YELLOW WARBLER were also reported. 

PROTHONOTARY WARBLER was found at Blackbird State Forest along Saw Mill
Road. Also reported were GREEN HERON, RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, YELLOW-BILLED
CUCKOO, plus YELLOW and PINE WARBLER. Also reported Blackbird this week was
NORTHERN BOBWHITE and EASTERN MEADOWLARK.

A YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON was found at Bombay Hook National Wildlife
Refuge near Smyrna along with BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON and LEAST BITTERN.
MUTE and TUNDRA SWAN continue to be reported along with 3 SNOW GEESE
opposite Sheerness Pool. Shorebirds seen included BLACK-NECKED STILTS,
LESSER and GREATER YELLOWLEGS, and BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER. NORTHERN HARRIER
was seen along with 8 BALD EAGLES. NORTHERN BOBWHITE and GRASSHOPPER SPARROW
were found by the Allee house. WILLOW FLYCATCHER and a calling VIRGINIA RAIL
were reported along the Boardwalk Trail.

RUDDY DUCK and GADWALL were found at Port Mahon. COMMON TERN and LESSER
BLACK BACKED GULL were found on the pilings. SALTMARSH and SEASIDE SPARROWS
were reported at the sharp turn in the road. A pair of LEAST BITTERNS were
seen by the tank farm. The BANK SWALLOW colony at the pioneer gravel pits at
the intersection of route nine and 113 S. of Dover had over 30 nests along
two separate sections of bank.

Goatsuckers are still being found at night along Big Stone Beach in Milford
Neck Wildlife Area Two CHUCK WILLS WIDOW and 6 WHIPPOORWILLS were found,
along with calling VIRGINIA RAIL and SEASIDE SPARROW.

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Ken Bass, Hank
Davis, Rachael Shapiro, Nick Pulcinella, Chris Berry, Winger West, Nancy
Goggin, Robert Klarquist, Teddy Burke, Andrew Albright, , Alissa Kegelman,
Ken Wat, Chris and Karen Bennett, Sally O'Byrne, Joe Sebastiani, Jerald Reb,
Joel Martin Rich Clifton, Chris Rowe, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn,
Bill Stewart, Tim Schreckengost, Tim Freiday, Alan Kneidel, Sandra Farkas,
Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Remember, the birdline needs your
sightings! Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good
birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Fledgling Screech Owls
From: "Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" <Glen.Lovelace AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 13:29:29 +0000
Good Morning,
 Yesterday evening as I was out in the yard, I heard an unfamiliar noise, 
something like a muffled annual cicada trying to get going for the first time 
of the summer. It turned out to be coming from 2 fledgling Screech Owls in one 
of the maple trees in the back yard. One of the parents (presumably) gave a 
very soft trill from the row of pines adjacent. 

 The day before, I cruised through Kinder Rd in the evening. In the woods, I 
found a family of Wood Thrush. I briefly saw a juvenile, watched the female 
bathe in a roadside puddle while the male sang further back in the woods. That 
was a treat because I had never confirmed a Wood Thrush through ten years of 
atlassing. Recent rains have the puddle at the sharp bend of Kinder primed for 
some returning shorebirds. 


Good birding,

Glen Lovelace III
Seaford, DE
Subject: Fledgling Screech Owls
From: "Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" <Glen.Lovelace AT state.de.us>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 13:29:29 +0000
Good Morning,
 Yesterday evening as I was out in the yard, I heard an unfamiliar noise, 
something like a muffled annual cicada trying to get going for the first time 
of the summer. It turned out to be coming from 2 fledgling Screech Owls in one 
of the maple trees in the back yard. One of the parents (presumably) gave a 
very soft trill from the row of pines adjacent. 

 The day before, I cruised through Kinder Rd in the evening. In the woods, I 
found a family of Wood Thrush. I briefly saw a juvenile, watched the female 
bathe in a roadside puddle while the male sang further back in the woods. That 
was a treat because I had never confirmed a Wood Thrush through ten years of 
atlassing. Recent rains have the puddle at the sharp bend of Kinder primed for 
some returning shorebirds. 


Good birding,

Glen Lovelace III
Seaford, DE

-- 
-- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 
'Maryland & DC Birding'. 

To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this group on the 
web at http://www.mdbirding.com 

Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here - 
http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html 
Subject: Brandywine Birdwalk
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 06:48:46 -0400
The monthly Birdwalk at Brandywine Creek State park is this Saturday, June
27th. We'll meet at the observation deck of the nature center at 8 am. We'll
start the morning by looking for the Dickcissel reported last week, but also
try for Willow Flycatcher, Prairie Warbler, and Eastern Meadowlark. Last I
heard, Adams Dam Road between Rt 100 and Center Meeting Rd was closed by
fallen trees due to Tuesday's storm, so plan your route accordingly. The
walk is free, but park entrance fees are in effect. 

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Beginner Bird Walk
From: Joe Sebastiani <bunker17 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 06:30:58 -0400
Tomorrow I will be leading a Beginner Bird Walk at Battery Park in old New 
Castle. We will begin at 8am at the park on the Delaware River at the end of 
the Delaware Street, and from there we will walk along the river. Water access, 
thickets, and marsh frontage makes for an ideal location to spot birds easily. 
This walk is suitable for families. For directions and more information, please 
visit: 
http://www.dosbirds.org/event/summer-beginner-bird-walk-at-battery-park/. 


Joe Sebastiani
Subject: Prime Hook NWR highlights -- Ruff update - 6/25
From: Alan Kneidel <akneidel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 23:13:59 -0400
DE-Birders,

I spent the late afternoon and evening birding Prime Hook NWR. Highlights
included:

RUFF -- seen at 7:30 PM on northside of Broadkill, tucked into the corner
closest to the bayshore -- for those looking for this bird, note that it is
shedding its "ruff" quickly. Look at the ebird checklist below for a photo
and link to video.

WHITE IBIS -- imm. flyover at Broadkill with Glossy Ibis at dusk

WILSON's PHALAROPES also continue at Broadkill. The AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS
are still at Fowler. Other seasonally uncommon species seen on the refuge
included: STILT SANDPIPER, RED KNOT, AMERICAN WIGEON, BONAPARTE'S and
LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL.

A full checklist of refuge highlights with photos and location details is
included at the link below:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24054679

A brief after-dark visit to Big Stone Beach Road had several of Eastern
Whip-poor-will and Chuck-wills-widow as well as calling Virginia Rail.

-- 
Alan Kneidel
M.S. Candidate, Natural Resources
Delaware State University
980-254-2706
Subject: Evening Heron Survey Report
From: "Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" <Chris.Bennett AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 16:02:20 +0000
I was joined last night by 10 volunteers to conduct the fifth evening survey of 
the 2015 season in Delaware City. Conditions were perfect with mild 
temperatures, a light wind all evening (keeping the bugs mostly absent) and 
excellent viewing conditions. Birds were actively traveling to and from the 
heronry from start to end. We ended up with 2514 birds recorded. This is the 
second highest total for a June survey - only surpassed by the 2588 birds 
recorded during the 2004 survey. Individual totals for six of the eight species 
observed were above the average and median for the 10 previous June surveys. 
The two species that were below the average and median were Snowy Egret and 
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron. They were only slightly below those two measures. 
We did not record a Tricolored Heron during the survey, but it has only been 
recorded on one June survey in the past, in 2011. We did see a single Green 
Heron heading into the heronry during the survey. Other birds seen during the 
survey included Caspian Tern, Osprey and Bald Eagle (we didn't really have much 
time to look for other birds). Thank you to Jean Woods, Anthony Gonzon, Joel 
Martin, Mike Hudson, Jerald Reb, Sally O'Byrne, Sheila Smith, Andrew Albright, 
Jeff and Liz Gordon for their invaluable assistance. 


The totals are listed below.

Species To/From:Total - Mean/Median 


Great Blue Heron                             107/76:183 - 151.4/142
Little Blue Heron                              415/6:421 - 300.4/218.5
Great Egret                                         372/17:389 - 318.2/247
Cattle Egret                                        547/33:580 - 478.7/476
Snowy Egret                                       87/6:93 - 102.5/94.5
Black-crowned Night-Heron        49/122:171 - 141.7/154
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron     1/0:1 - 5.9/4
Glossy Ibis                                           625/30:655 - 352.7/270.5
Unidentified White Heron           19/0:19 - 55.5/35.5
Unidentified Heron                         2/0:2 - 1.3/0
Total 2224/290:2514 - 1846.5/1761 


The next survey will be conducted on Wednesday, 29 July from 6:18 pm to 8:48 
pm. 



Chris Bennett
Natural Resource Planner
Environmental Stewardship Program
Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation
152 South State Street
Dover, DE 19901
Phone: (302) 739-9230
Fax: (302) 739-6967
"The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant: 'What 
good is it?'" 

 Aldo Leopold A Sand County Almanac 

Subject: White Clay Creek this mornng
From: Maurice Barnhill <mvb AT UDEL.EDU>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 10:57:09 -0400
I walked around this morning in the area of the White Clay Creek Nature 
Center and separately at the upstream pedestrian bridge, going north 
along the trail on the east side. Activity was good, and at one point I 
heard a Yellow-billed Cuckoo.  The best bird was a *perched* Red-tailed 
Hawk being pestered by a Northern Oriole.

OK, not so surprising.  My real reason for posting is to tell the many 
friends of mine on the list that I was using a pair of hearing aids I 
got yesterday, and I could finally hear birds all over the place.  I 
doubt I will be able to hear anything similar to a Cape May Warbler, 
etc., but in the future my not mentioning a bird you should normally 
hear will  most likely mean, finally, that it wasn't talking.  To 
misquote Robert Frost,

The woods were lovely, dark, and deep,
And I heard almost ev'ry cheep.

Maurice Barnhill
Newark, DE
mvb AT udel.edu
Subject: June Challenge Storm-Petrel in Kent County
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 09:58:09 -0400
We have entered the last week of the June Challenge - Delaware Big June -
and Sussex County is producing a bunch of great birds.  I hope all
participants are having doing well and amassing sizeable lists.  It has
been a real "challenge" in Kent this year - though I have not been out
birding as much as I have in the past.  I'm hoping to make up for that a
bit this last week.

Yesterday afternoon after a day of training at Killens Pond State Park
(where I heard but did not see Yellow-billed Cuckoo and White-breasted
Nuthatch) I headed over to Mispillion Harbor for another attempt to add
WIlson's Storm-Petrel.  I spent a little over 30 minutes scanning the bay
and was rewarded with a single Storm-Petrel shearing over the bay north of
the inlet (comfortably in Kent County) just before I was ready to pack it
in.  Prior to spotting the WISP I found two first-cycle Lesser Black-backed
Gulls among the throngs of Herring, Great Black-backed, Ring-billed and
Laughing Gulls on the Kent side of the harbor.  I also had Forster's,
Least, Common and Royal Terns.

Chris Bennett
MIlford, DE
Subject: Re: Ruff at Prime Hook NWR
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 19:14:46 -0400
Birders,

Vince Gambal reports that the Ruff is still present and is associating with
four Wilson's Phalaropes at Broadkill Marsh. The Ruff is at the east end of
the north impoundment.

Reported via the DE RBA text alert.

Good birding,
Tim Schreckengost
Elkton, MD

On Tue, Jun 23, 2015 at 11:40 AM, John Hoyt  wrote:

> > Yesterday Sue Gruver and I were birding along Broadkill Beach Road and
> via a scope thought we were seeing the Wilson’s Phalarope. It was a long
> way off… However, after looking at some photos that I took “for the heck 
of 

> it”, extreme crops show it was a Ruff.
>
> I will post the photos to the Delaware Birding Facebook group.
>
> John Hoyt
> Lewes, DE
>
> Sent from my iPad




--
Subject: ADMIN: Unsubscribing
From: James Tyler Bell <00000085b810a3aa-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 17:40:24 +0000
If anyone wants to be removed from DE-Birds, you should refer to the Welcome 
email that you received when you signed up. Oh, you didn't keep it?! Please 
don't post to the whole list, send me an email directly and I'll remove you. 
Or, if you'd like to set your subscription to NoMail while you're away or if 
you want to be able to post from multiple accounts but only get mail at one, I 
can help you with that, too. 


If you'd like to try it the old fashioned way, send a message to:

listserv AT princeton.edu

with the message (no subject necessary):

unsub de-birds

or you can change your account settings using the graphical interface:


http://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=de-birds
 
Tyler Bell
DE-Birds Listowner
Subject: Mailing List
From: Jim Hay <jamesvhay AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 17:19:51 +0000
Immediately, please delete my name from the mailing list.

Thank you
Subject: Ruff at Prime Hook NWR
From: John Hoyt <jhoyt.webmail AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 11:40:50 -0400
> Yesterday Sue Gruver and I were birding along Broadkill Beach Road and via a 
scope thought we were seeing the Wilson’s Phalarope. It was a long way off… 
However, after looking at some photos that I took “for the heck of it”, 
extreme crops show it was a Ruff. 


I will post the photos to the Delaware Birding Facebook group. 

John Hoyt
Lewes, DE

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Evening Heron Survey
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 22:25:50 -0400
This Wednesday is the last for the month of June, and that can only mean
one thing - Evening Heron Survey in Delaware City.  The survey is conducted
from Battery Park at the end of Clinton Street.  The survey begins at 6:33
pm and ends at 9:03 pm.  Plese come out and join us.

Chris Bennett
Milford,DE
Subject: Mailing List
From: Neil Christner <fairhill AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 17:30:16 -0400
Please take me off of "de-birds" mailing list.

Thank You

Neil Christner
Subject: BIRD CONSERVATION ACTION ALERT - HB178 Community Cats
From: Matthew Sarver <matt AT MATTHEWSARVER.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 16:02:47 -0400
Folks,

A bill may very soon come up for vote in the Delaware Legislature that
could have long-term and far-reaching negative impacts on bird conservation
in the First State.

House Bill 178, sponsored by Rep.'s Mulrooney, Keeley and Lynn, and Sen.
McBride, has apparently passed out of committee and may come to the floor
for a vote soon.

The language of the Bill is very alarming to say the least, in that makes
it illegal to kill free-ranging cats of unknown ownership, including
so-called "community cats", ear-marked, neutered cats that have been
released via TNR programs. Importantly, the Bill does not place any limits
on where such "community cat" colonies can be located, leaving open the
possibility that an activist group may "adopt" a cat colony on state or
private land, thereby making those cats "community cats" and tying the
hands of the landowner or management agency to then remove the animals. The
Bill would also make it illegal for an individual conservation landowner to
humanely dispose of cats on their land.

Furthermore, this bill requires shelters to return healthy cats "to the
wild" rather than euthanize, with obvious effects on free-roaming cat
populations in the state.

HB 178 is very problematic from a native wildlife perspective, and it would
set an alarming precedent for native wildlife conservation if it passes as
written.  I know this is an emotional issue for many, but we need to
preserve the ability for public and private NGO land managers and
conservation landowners to effectively and efficiently deal with
non-native, invasive species, including cats, on their lands, for the sake
of native mammal and bird conservation.

Please contact the Bill's sponsors and your state legislator and share your
opinion of HB 178 and its impacts on native wildlife. You can find the
contact information for your here:


http://legis.delaware.gov/legislature.nsf/FSMain?OpenFrameset&Frame=right&src=/legislature.nsf/lookup/know_your_legislators 


You can view the text of the Bill here:

http://legis.delaware.gov/LIS/lis148.nsf/vwLegislation/HB+178/$file/legis.html?open 



Thanks,
-Matt

Matt Sarver
Chair, DOS Conservation Committee
6 Walnut Ridge Rd
Greenville, DE 19807
724-689-5845
matt AT matthewsarver.com
Subject: Re: Great crested flycatcher!
From: Meghann <spyturtle008 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 15:26:25 -0400
I wonder if there's a bit of a population boom for these guys in the area
this year -- I don't recall having had them as a 'yard bird' before this
season, and had 3-4 being territorial earlier this spring all in view (and
earshot) at the same time in Hockessin.  Just last week, we had one that
came to our deck to perch and preen near our hummingbird feeder.

Good birding,
Meghann Matwichuk

On Mon, Jun 22, 2015 at 3:11 PM, Lydia Robb  wrote:

> I am delightfully astonished to have just seen an undeniable great crested
> flycatcher in my City of Wilmington neighborhood (Concord-Baynard area) on
> a wire in my back yard. It even squawked-squeaked to confirm. Of course it
> flew before I could grab the camera.
> Lydia Robb
Subject: Great crested flycatcher!
From: Lydia Robb <birdinglydia AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 15:11:11 -0400
I am delightfully astonished to have just seen an undeniable great crested 
flycatcher in my City of Wilmington neighborhood (Concord-Baynard area) on a 
wire in my back yard. It even squawked-squeaked to confirm. Of course it flew 
before I could grab the camera. 

Lydia Robb
Subject: New Castle: Prothonotary Warbler at Blackbird State Forest
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 13:49:31 -0400
Birders,

Sally O'Byrne found a Prothonotary Warbler yesterday morning along Saw Mill
Rd. within Blackbird State Forest. I went down this morning to the same
location and within 15 minutes the bird started singing and came in for
nice close views. There's a nest box in the same area the bird was singing,
so I suspect it may be on territory or even breeding, especially this
"late" in the season. I only observed one bird, but didn't hang out in that
exact spot for very long.

Other than the Prothonotary, there were no other bird highlights, but I did
find a Spotted Turtle, which was new for me.

eBird checklist with photos:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23992671

Cheers,
Tim Schreckengost
Elkton, MD
Subject: Sussex County -- 102 species, Roseate Tern 6/20/15
From: Alan Kneidel <akneidel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 18:31:55 -0400
DE-Birders,

Today I made my first trip down to Sussex County since Valentine's Day.

I started with a visit to the Ellendale area, where I enjoyed some open
country species including a singing VESPER SPARROW on Ponder Rd.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23985532

I then visited West Robbins Road, where KENTUCKY WARBLER, WORM-EATING
WARBLER, and SUMMER TANAGER were the highlights.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23985544

I then swung down to Angola Neck where I saw the nesting pair of RED-HEADED
WOODPECKERS.

From there I tackled Cape Henlopen SP, viewing an adult and two chick
PIPING PLOVERS at the bayside of the point and WILSON'S STORM-PETREL from
the hawk watch platform.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23985588

I spent mid-day and high tide in the Prime Hook area. Highlights here
included the continuing AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS at Fowler, DICKCISSEL on
Cods Road, and many lingering shorebirds on Fowler. Turkle Pond area had
three PROTHONOTARY WARBLERS and WORM-EATING WARBLER.

The highlight of the day by far was an immaculate ROSEATE TERN on Broadkill
Beach Road. The bird was sitting on a mudflat island on the northside of
the final causeway, very close to the road. Checklist including photos and
link to video below, as well as further Prime Hook details is below.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23985617

Alan Kneidel
Newark, DE
Subject: Sussex: Roseate Tern at Broadkill Marsh
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 11:47:17 -0400
Birders,

Alan Kneidel reports a Roseate Tern at Broadkill Marsh on the north side of the 
road. Details from DE RBA text alert: "ROSEATE TERN sitting very close to road 
on Broadkill Rd in Prime Hook on exposed bar, north side. Breeding plumage." 


Cheers,
Tim Schreckengost 
Elkton, MD
814-952-2934
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, June 19th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 22:31:34 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* June 19, 2015
* DEST1506.19
	
*Birds mentioned
Mute Swan 
Tundra Swan
Wood Duck 
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Ring-necked Pheasant
Wild Turkey
Northern Bobwhite
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
Brown Pelican
Least Bittern
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
Glossy Ibis
Osprey
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Virginia Rail
Clapper Rail
King Rail
Common Gallinule
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
Black-bellied Plover
Piping Plover
Killdeer
Spotted Sandpiper
Lesser Yellowlegs
Willet
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Dunlin
Short-billed Dowitcher
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Least Tern
GULL-BILLED TERN
Caspian Tern
Common Tern
Royal Tern
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Barred Owl
Common Nighthawk
Chuck Wills Widow
Whippoorwill
Red-headed Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Peregrine Falcon
American Kestrel
Willow Flycatcher
Yellow-throated Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow 
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Marsh Wren
Veery
Wood Thrush
Ovenbird
Louisiana Waterthrush
American Redstart
Prothonotary Warbler
Worm-eating Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Pine Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Grasshopper Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Scarlet Tanager
DICKCISSEL
Eastern Meadowlark

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: June 19, 2015 
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net 
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

This is Birdline Delaware, for Friday, June 19th from the Delaware Museum of
Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware annual list remains
at 302 species. If you're coming to central Delaware this weekend, be aware
that the Firefly Music Festival is happening in Dover from Friday to Sunday.
Expect traffic jams and big delays on Route 1!

A DICKCISSEL was found Sunday at Brandywine Creek State Park. This bird was
singing along the entrance road at the crest of the hillside meadow about a
quarter-mile below the turn to the Hawk watch parking. You can park at the
Hawkwatch and walk down to see this bird. Also reported in the area were
KILLDEER, WILLOW FLYCATCHERS, EASTERN MEADOWLARK, plus PRAIRIE and YELLOW
WARBLER. YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT and WARBLING VIREO also been reported in the
area. COOPER'S HAWK, YELLOW BILLED CUCKOO, and both YELLOW-THROATED and
WARBLING VIREO have been reported at Ramsey Road at the First State Monument
National Park. VEERY and WARBLING VIREO were reported at Granogue, just
north of Brandywine Creek.

The previous reported DICKCISSEL at the Charles E. Price Memorial Park in
Middletown was not seen this week. Several GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS continue to
be seen there along with GLOSSY IBIS by the pond.

Another DICKCISSEL in Sussex County continues to be seen along the south end
of Cods Road near Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge. A bird is being seen
by the house closest to the intersection of Cods and Prime Hook Beach Road.
Also reported at Prime Hook this week were 8 to 10 AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS
at Fowler's Beach. A few shorebirds continue be seen at Fowler's, including
AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, 18 RED KNOT, SEMIPALMATED
SANDPIPER, SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER, and a single DUNLIN, also 3 LEAST TERNS
with 24 BLACK SKIMMERS. The marsh had up to 10 SEASIDE SPARROWS. GRASSHOPPER
SPARROW was heard calling by the Prime Hook headquarters. PILEATED
WOODPECKER and Prothonotary Warbler were found by Turkle Pond. A SPOTTED
SANDPIPER was seen at Broadkill Marsh. This could be a lingering bird or may
represent attempted nesting. Any further observations would be appreciated.
Also seen at Broadkill impoundments were BLACK-NECKED STILT, LEAST TERN, and
BLACK SKIMMER.

A GULL-BILLED TERN was reported at The Point at Cape Henlopen State Park
near Lewes yesterday. That bird was with 24 ROYAL TERNS but flew out into
Delaware Bay. Also seen at The Point were 4 AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS and
PIPING PLOVER yesterday, plus 2 LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS today. The inner
breakwaters at The Point had a single WHITE-WINGED SCOTER, plus BLACK
SCOTER. Another BLACK SCOTER was seen at Herring Point. Other birds at
Herring Point included a flyby WILSON'S STORM-PETREL, BLACK SKIMMER, COMMON
TERN, plus YELLOW and PRAIRIE WARBLER. WILSON'S STORM-PETREL and a BROWN
PELICAN were seen from the hawkwatch today. BLACK SKIMMERS were also seen at
Gordon's Pond at the south side of the park near Rehoboth Beach. Six
BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCHES were found, plus MARSH WREN and SEASIDE SPARROW.
Cape Henlopen is a great spot for Goatsuckers, 6 COMMON NIGHTHAWKS were seen
at the fishing pier, plus 3 CHUCK WILLS WIDOWS at dusk on Sunday. Six more
NIGHTHAWKS were seen at Fort Miles plus 2 WHIPPOORWILLS were heard calling
near the Biden Center on Tuesday. CASPIAN, LEAST, and COMMON TERN were seen
at Lewes Beach. WILD TURKEY and 2 YELLOW-BREASTED CHATS were reported at the
University of Delaware Marine School, north of Lewes.

Two RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were reported at Assawoman Wildlife Area near
Fenwick Island. Those birds are being seen near Strawberry Landing. Also
reported were BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH, COOPER'S HAWK, and PILEATED WOODPECKER.
A total of 48 WOOD DUCKS were seen, representing lots of young out of the
nest. MUTE SWAN continues to be seen at Assawoman plus SNOWY and GREAT
EGRET, GREEN HERON, and GLOSSY IBIS. Four BROWN PELICANS were reported at
Fenwick Island, plus COMMON LOON on the ocean. A COMMON and RED-THROATED
LOON was photographed at Savages Ditch in Delaware Seashore State Park,
south of Dewey Beach. Another AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER was reported downtown
Rehoboth Beach at Queen Street.

RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was also seen at Camp Arrowhead at Angola Neck, along
with COOPER'S HAWK. The McCabe Preserve off Broadkill Creek had COOPER'S
HAWK and BARRED OWL. Warblers seen there included PROTHONOTARY,
YELLOW-THROATED, and YELLOW BREASTED CHAT. BARRED OWL was also reported at
Killen's Pond State Park near Frederica, along with PILEATED WOODPECKER.
Warblers reported there included WORM EATING, PINE, and OVENBIRD. 

BANK SWALLOWS continue to be seen south of Dover along the St. Jones River.
Also reported were calling RAILS, either KING or CLAPPER. Three SALTMARSH
and several SEASIDE SPARROWS were seen at Port Mahon. Two BLACK SKIMMERS ,
WILLET, plus OSPREY were also present. 
 
Both MUTE and TUNDRA SWANS continue to be seen at Bombay Hook National
Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna. A pair of BLACK SKIMMERS were seen feeding
opposite Shearness Pool, along with four CASPIAN TERNS. COMMON GALLINULE was
heard calling from the Daly overlook at Sheerness Pool. Shorebirds reported
included nesting BLACK-NECKED STILTS, plus lingering 3 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER,
LESSER YELLOWLEGS, and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER. Bear Swamp had GREEN HERONS
and BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS. NORTHERN BOBWHITE, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, and
ORCHARD ORIOLE reported at the Allee House. WILLOW FLYCATCHER was heard
calling by Sheerness Tower 

A YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON was found at Pea Patch Island, opposite
Delaware City. A YELLOW-CROWN was also seen from Veteran's Park in Delaware
City. Other birds at Delaware City included GREATER YELLOWLEGS and CASPIAN
TERN from ABA headquarters, plus LITTLE BLUE HERON, CATTLE EGRET, and GLOSSY
IBIS flying out to the Pea Patch heronry.

A COMMON NIGHTHAWK was seen flying over near Port Penn by Augustine Creek.
RING-NECKED PHEASANT and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT were reported along the Canal
Road at South St. George's. LEAST BITTERN was found at Grier's Pond, along
with LITTLE BLUE HERON and GLOSSY IBIS. VIRGINIA RAIL and CLAPPER RAIL were
heard calling at Thousand Acre Marsh. Another CLAPPER RAIL was found at
Silver Run. A KING RAIL was found at the Appoquinimink Bridge on Route 9
near Odessa. 

A survey of CLIFF SWALLOWS nesting in Delaware found a huge colony of 25
birds nesting at the north bridge over the Appoquinimink Creek. Eight more
CLIFF SWALLOWS were seen just north of there at the Silver Run Bridge along
Route 9. Six CLIFF SWALLOWS were seen nesting at the Flemings Landing Bridge
over the Smyrna River. Eight CLIFF SWALLOWS were seen at the Leipsic Bridge.
Also, NORTHERN BOBWHITE was also found along Cedar Swamp Wildlife Area, plus
AMERICAN KESTREL and EASTERN MEADOWLARK.

10 VEERYS and 14 WOOD THRUSH were reported at White Clay Creek State Park
along Thompson Station Road. Three YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOOS were also found
along with SCARLET TANAGER. Warblers seen included 16 OVENBIRDS, 2 LOUISIANA
WATERTHRUSH, 5 AMERICAN REDSTARTS, and a KENTUCKY WARBLER. YELLOW-BILLED
CUCKOO and BARRED OWL were also found at Middle Run Natural Preserve off
Possum Park Road near Newark. Warblers seen there included OVENBIRD,
LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH, PRAIRIE, and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT. 

A RED-SHOULDERED HAWK was reported coming to a yard in Bear. Six PEREGRINE
FALCONS continue to be seen flying over Wilmington from their nest site at
the Brandywine Building on Pennsylvania Avenue.

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Brian Henderson,
Paul Budde, Sarah Luca, Andrew Albright, Chris Markiewicz, Alissa Kegelman,
Stan Chapman, Mike Hudson, Ken Wat, Chris and Karen Bennett, Sally O'Byrne,
Joe Sebastiani, Derek Stoner, Jerald Reb, Joel Martin Rich Clifton, Chris
Rowe, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn, Bill Stewart, Tim Schreckengost,
Tim Freiday, Alan Kneidel, Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Remember, the
birdline needs your sightings! Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or
email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you
good birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Bird Banding Study
From: joe sebastiani <joe AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 16:10:54 +0000
The Delaware Nature Society is beginning a bird banding study at the Ashland 
Nature Center (3511 Barley Mill Road, Hockessin, DE) and Bucktoe Creek Preserve 
(250 Sharp Road, Avondale, PA). The public is invited to visit the banding 
stations during the following schedule, starting next week: 


Ashland Nature Center - Monday and Tuesday, 8am to 11am;
Bucktoe Creek Preserve - Wednesday and Thursday, 8am to 11am.

If it is too windy or rainy, banding will not take place. The banding stations 
will be open weekly through the end of September and we encourage you to drop 
by to see what birds our bander, Dr. Ian Stewart, is catching in the nets. Ian 
will also be walking around to bird boxes to band nestlings on both properties. 
This is an excellent chance to witness science in action, see birds 
"in-the-hand", and get good close-up photographs of birds. Upon arrival at 
either location, there will be signs directing you to the banding stations. No 
registration is necessary, just stop by for a visit. 


We hope to see you there.

Joe Sebastiani
Ashland Nature Center Manager
Delaware Nature Society
www.delawarenaturesociety.org
P.O. Box 700
Hockessin, DE 19707
(302) 239-2334 ext. 115
fax (302)239-2473
joe AT delawarenaturesociety.org
The Nature of Delaware Blog www.delawarenaturesociety.org/blog
Subject: Open House at Middle Run on Friday (6/19) Afternoon
From: Derek Stoner <derek AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 21:03:15 +0000
Greetings DE-Birders:

You are invited to an Open House visit with the summer campers of the Delaware 
Nature Society's "Bird Experience at Middle Run" tomorrow afternoon, Friday 
June 19, from 2:45pm to 4:00pm. 


The summer campers will be showcasing their projects-- bird boxes, suet 
feeders, nest cups, bird surveys, and more. You will also have a chance to meet 
staff from Tri-State Bird Rescue to learn about the organization's unique 
mission and their partnership with this camp based at New Castle County's 
Middle Run Natural Area. 


Bird researcher Ian Stewart will be on hand to demonstrate his methods for 
capturing and banding songbirds using mist nets, and will also share 
information about his research with Eastern Bluebirds and Tree Swallows. 


The meeting place for the Open House will be the parking lot at Tri-State Bird 
Rescue, and the address is 110 Possum Hollow Road, Newark, DE 19711. Directions 
are available at: 

https://tristatebird.org/hours-directions/

Today at Middle Run, the campers observed many of the specialty 
early-successional habitat breeding birds including Prairie Warbler, 
Yellow-breasted Chat, White-eyed Vireo, Indigo Bunting, and Orchard Oriole, as 
well as confirming nesting for woodland species like Wood Thrush, Ovenbird, and 
Louisiana Waterthrush. They tallied 53 species on their afternoon walk on the 
Middle Run Birding Trail, and the eBird checklist is viewable here: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23963218 


Good birding,

Derek Stoner

Seasonal Program Team Leader
Delaware Nature Society
302-239-2334, ext. 106
derek AT delawarenaturesociety.org
https://www.flickr.com/photos/125621243 AT N08/
Subject: Cape Henlopen this morning
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 16:15:28 -0400
Before starting an invasive plant removal project at Cape Henlopen this
morning I had a chance to do a little birding at the Point and Herring
Point.  In addition to 4 American Oystercatchers flying around the point I
had a single White-winged Scoter out by the bend in the inner breakwater
and a female Black Scoter near the red lighthouse at the east end of the
breakwater.  At Herring Point I had another female Black Scoter, 4 flyby
Common Terns (all heading south) and a single Wilson's Storm-Petrel flying
by heading northa couple hundred yards offshore.

Chris Bennett
Milford, DE
Subject: Heronry Survey Addendum
From: "Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" <Chris.Bennett AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 13:11:58 +0000
It was pointed out to me that I forgot to include the single Tricolored Heron 
in the totals that I posted in my message yesterday. 


Chris Bennett
Natural Resource Planner
Environmental Stewardship Program
Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation
152 South State Street
Dover, DE 19901
Phone: (302) 739-9230
Fax: (302) 739-6967
"The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant: 'What 
good is it?'" 

 Aldo Leopold A Sand County Almanac 

Subject: May Heronry Survey at DE City
From: "Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" <Chris.Bennett AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 20:39:54 +0000
Sorry for not getting this out sooner. I conducted the evening heronry survey 
from Delaware City on Wednesday, 27 May. I was joined by a very hardy crew of 
volunteers - as the no-see-ums were very close to, if not the worst I have 
experienced in Delaware. But most of the volunteers were able to tough it out 
and stay for the entire 2.5-hour survey. We counted 1580 birds flying to the 
heronry and 437 leaving the heronry for a total of 2017. This is not a direct 
count. It likely includes individual birds (at least Great Blue Herons) that 
were counted flying both to and from the heronry. This was the third highest 
total for May in the 13 years that we have conducted the survey. With the 
exception of Cattle Egret which was a bit below the mean and median for the 
previous 12 years - all species were counted in numbers at or above the mean 
and median. The totals are listed below. 


Species To/From:Total - Mean/Median 


Great Blue Heron                             165/108:273 - 89.5/88
Little Blue Heron                              160/12:172 - 167.92/172.5
Great Egret                                         204/41:245 - 157/152
Cattle Egret                                        401/17:418 - 458.8/428.5
Snowy Egret                                       64/6:70 - 56.92/34
Black-crowned Night-Heron        12/178:190 - 141.7/150.5
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron     1/7:8 - 4.17/1
Glossy Ibis                                           565/68:633 - 467.42/422
Unidentified White Heron           7/0:7 - 14.3/6.5

Our next survey will be conducted in Wednesday, 24 June from 6:34 to 9:04.

Chris Bennett
Natural Resource Planner
Environmental Stewardship Program
Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation
152 South State Street
Dover, DE 19901
Phone: (302) 739-9230
Fax: (302) 739-6967
"The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant: 'What 
good is it?'" 

 Aldo Leopold A Sand County Almanac 

Subject: Dickcissel at BCSP
From: Chuck Brandt <cbrandt AT BRANDTBEACH.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 16:29:39 +0000
The bird was seen this morning but...unfortunately...today is...MOWING DAY!!!

The bird was singing in the area described by Andy. It was a bit far for my 
lens so I put on a longer one. By then, the mower showed up. The bird showed up 
2 more times at the crest of the hill but only for a matter of seconds (enough 
for an ID nothing more). 


Lots of ticks though so be careful.
Subject: NestWatch
From: Joe Sebastiani <bunker17 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 06:44:42 -0400
Dear Birders:

Now that we are in the thick of the nesting season, I would like to promote a 
database called NestWatch. It is a Cornell Lab project, and basically takes the 
place of the old "nest card" for gathering nesting data on birds. Visit 
www.nestwatch.org for more information. 


If you monitor bird boxes or just have one nest in your yard, you can enter the 
information into the site. It allows you to keep track of multiple visits to a 
nest box, summarize the nesting attempt, and also allows you to keep track of 
inaccessible nests such as those high in a tree that you watch through 
binoculars. 


If you have an eBird log-in, it will work with NestWatch. Give it a try, and if 
you have any questions, please email me. Nest box monitors are using the 
database in northern Delaware to keep track of hundreds of nests through the 
summer season at Ashland Nature Center, Red Clay Reservation, Winterthur, 
Bellevue State Park, Coverdale Farm Preserve, and across the border in PA at 
Bucktoe Creek Preserve. If you have a bird box trail, I highly encourage you to 
use the NestWatch system. 


If you are already using NestWatch, I am trying to get a Delaware NestWatch 
group formed in the future. Email me if you would like to be a part of this 
network. 


Joe Sebastiani
Subject: bird hikes at white clay creek state park
From: "Sullivan, Kathleen N. (DNREC)" <Kathleen.Sullivan AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 21:21:27 +0000
Birding at White Clay Creek
3rd Tuesdays 6/16, 7/21, 8/18
8:00-10:00a.m.
Meet at the Nature Center Parking area
Join Gary Stolz, Park Naturalist to explore the beautiful riparian corridor of 
White Clay Creek, important wildlife habitat for some 200 species of 
neotropical migratory birds, as well as a wide diversity of native mammals, 
reptiles, amphibians, butterflies and other wildlife. 

Bring binoculars, plenty of water and good walking shoes for this 2 hour 
program over moderate terrain. 

Pre-registration strongly suggested, Free!


Kathleen Sullivan
Naturalist/Environmental Educator
WCCSP
302-368-6560


Subject: Dickcissel at BCSP
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 10:12:45 -0400
The Dickcissel that was reported by Bill Stewart yesterday at Brandywine
Creek State Park was still there this morning. The bird is on the hillside
along the bend in the entrance road opposite the copes of trees just below
the turn to the hawkwatch parking lot. I parked at the hawkwatch and walked
down the hill to see the bird. You get some great views right from the
roadside! This might be the first summer record for Delaware's Piedmont. I
remember one previous fall report of Dickcissel in the park by Chris
Bennett. 

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Swallows
From: "sally o'byrne" <salobyrne AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2015 16:05:40 -0400
For the past couple of years, birders have been able to see Bank Swallows at a 
gravel pit/ dirt bike track off of Rt 13 near Red Lion. This year, I discovered 
that the entire area was gated and locked and inaccessible….. bad news for 
those of us doing the NCC June Challenge. Today I decided to drive that 
direction anyway on the off chance one might be flying in the area. As I drove 
down Federal School Lane, I noticed that the gate to the Gravel Company was 
open so drove in. 


I talked to two of the employees who were washing trucks and they were 
surprisingly knowledgeable about the swallows; knowing that they were unusual. 
They explained to me where they nested (not in new dirt piles - only old ones 
and they knew which ones the birds were in) and that someone had seem the birds 
driving away a fox that was coming into the nesting area. One guy even had a 
barn swallow tattooed on his neck - I was impressed until he assured me it was 
a sparrow, not a swallow, and it was a Navy thing. They gave me permission to 
use the scope from the truck area - but no photographs. 


So…. good news is that the Bank Swallows are still there and I got it for the 
June challenge. Bad news is that unless you are very lucky and good at sweet 
talking, you probably won’t be able to see them. 


I proceeded down Route 9 in search of a bridge with Cliff Swallows and found 
them at the very first bridge over a tidal gut - at Silver Run creek - 
definitely in New Castle County. The bridge hosted both Barn and Cliff Swallows 
flying in and out from under the bridge, but without a kayak or swimming there 
would be no way to see the nests. 


No Common Gallinules found on the Port Penn wildlife trail where I have seen 
them in past years. 


Good luck to all of you working on the June Challenge  I am having fun with it!

Sally O'Byrne
Subject: Lone female bufflehead off Gordon's Pond Beach (CHSP)
From: Vince Gambal <0000009a8147fdd9-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2015 13:11:43 -0400
Kind of late for her isn't it? She seems very healthy and actively swimming 
just off shore near the jetty. 


Vince Gambal
Lewes
Subject: Birder's Party, Picnic, and Celebration ~ All Invited!
From: Holly Merker <hcybelle AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2015 08:16:11 -0400
All,
If you are a birder who enjoys the *supreme* birding the First State has to
offer, whether you be a resident, or not, the *Delmarva Ornithological
Society *is hoping to enjoy a BBQ Picnic and a few cold ones with YOU!

This coming Wednesday is the DOS Annual Picnic at the beautiful Flint Woods
Preserve in Centerville, Delaware in New Castle County.
Please consider coming to join the fun!

Besides the good food and libations, there will also be a Delaware
Bird-A-Thon (DBAT) celebration and ceremony, where awards will be announced
and presented. Come out and see who won the various categories-- but
remember, you are all winners just by having participated!

Additionally, a highlight of the evening will be raising a toast to new *DOS
Fellows and Lifetime Achievement Awardees*, who will be announced for the
first time at this party!

DOS will be providing hot dogs, hamburgers, and sausage which will be
grilled on-site by two "Grill Masters".

Cold, Non-alcoholic, beverages will be there for all. If you wish to bring
something more "spirited" to share, or consume, that is welcomed!

*We are hoping that attendees will also consider bringing a summery side
dish to share with all.*

Here are the hardcore details so that you can put the notes on your
calendar now to join us!

*When: Wednesday, June 17, 5:30 until...*.

*Where: Flint Wood Preserve *- 350 Twaddle Mill Road, Wilmington, Delaware
http://www.delawarenaturesociety.org/FlintWoodsPreserve
(The Flint Woods Preserve driveway is located off of Center Meeting Rd.
directly opposite of Pyle's Ford Rd. in Centerville, DE )

*What to Bring*: An accompanying side dish or dessert to share with all, if
possible. Not mandatory.
Beach chair to sit on (if you bring a broken one, it may even get repaired
for you!)

No need to RSVP, just please show up for the party and fun!
Please let me know if you have any questions.

Cheers and good birding!
~Holly Merker

-- 
*Holly Cybelle Merker*
*Downingtown, PA*
*HCybelle AT gmail.com *
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, June 12th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2015 20:29:36 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* June 12, 2015
* DEST1506.12
	
*Birds mentioned
Snow Goose
Wood Duck
Gadwall
Blue-winged Teal
Surf Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Wild Turkey
Horned Grebe
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
Least Bittern
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
Glossy Ibis
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Virginia Rail
American Oystercatcher
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Black-necked Stilt
Spotted Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Sanderling
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
Dunlin
Short-billed Dowitcher
Least Tern
GULL-BILLED TERN
Black Tern
Caspian Tern
Royal Tern
Black Skimmer
PARASITIC JAEGER
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Common Nighthawk
Chuck Wills Widow
Eastern Screech Owl
Great Horned Owl
Barred Owl
Peregrine Falcon
American Kestrel
Willow Flycatcher
White-eyed Vireo
Yellow-throated Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Veery
Ovenbird
Louisiana Waterthrush
American Redstart
Prothonotary Warbler
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Vesper Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Summer Tanager
Scarlet Tanager
Blue Grosbeak
DICKCISSEL
Eastern Meadowlark
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: June 12, 2015 
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net 
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

This is Birdline Delaware, for Friday, June 12th from the Delaware Museum of
Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware annual list topped
the 300 mark this week with 3 new birds to increase to 302 species!

A pair of GULL-BILLED TERNS were found on Saturday afternoon at Sheerness
Pool in Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna. Those birds were
seen near the north end of the pool before the copes of trees on the left.
Also reported Bombay Hook was BLACK SKIMMER flying over Raymond Pool and
roosting on the sandbar at the south end of Sheerness. A SNOW GOOSE was also
seen at the north end of Sheerness Pool. Not many lingering waterfowl has
been seen at the refuge, perhaps due the 14 BALD EAGLES on the Shearness
Pool sandbar; not much chance for an injured waterfowl to survive.
Shorebirds seen at The Hook included BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, LEAST SANDPIPER,
LESSER YELLOWLEGS, and nesting BLACK-NECKED STILT and WILLET. LEAST BITTERN
has been seen at Sheerness and Bear Swamp. BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS were
also reported at Night Heron Island. 

A ROYAL TERN was reported at Port Mahon. GADWALL and a drake BLUE-WINGED
TEAL were seen at the northwest impoundment at the central tower in Little
Creek Wildlife Management Area. A LEAST BITTERN was seen at the Logan Tract
at Ted Harvey Conservation Area.  RED KNOT was still present at Kitts
Hummock. 

A CASPIAN TERN was reported at Delaware City from ABA Headquarters. Also
reported was CATTLE EGRET and LITTLE BLUE HERON. A YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT
HERON was photographed at Pea Patch Island. 

A BLACK TERN was reported at Cape Henlopen State Park. That bird was seen
flying out over the rips from the Hawkwatch. Another new bird was a
PARASITIC JAEGER from the Hawkwatch, plus 4 SURF SCOTERS. LEAST  and ROYAL
TERN was seen at The Point at Cape Henlopen, along with PIPING PLOVER and
AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER plus a late SEMIPALMATED PLOVER. BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCHES continue be reported in the woods by the Seaside Nature Center.
Six COMMON NIGHTHAWKS were seen flying over Fort Miles. YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT
HERON was found at the Monroe Avenue ponds. Gordon's Pond had GREATER and
LESSER YELLOWLEGS along with 14 SNOWY EGRETS and 2 GREEN HERONS.
BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH was also found there.

A WHITE-WINGED SCOTER was found along the rocks of the outer breakwater from
the Cape May-Lewes Ferry. A WILSON'S STORM-PETREL was also reported in the
mouth of the Bay.

Ten AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS continue to be seen at Fowler's Beach in Prime
Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Milton. Also reported there were AMERICAN
OYSTERCATCHER, BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, SANDERLING, 50-100 RED
KNOT, RUDDY TURNSTONE, SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER, and a single DUNLIN, plus
over hundred SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS that included LEAST and a WHITE-RUMPED
SANDPIPER. A HORNED GREBE continues to be seen at the end of the Observation
Point Trail at Prime Hook headquarters. Also seen there was YELLOW-BILLED
CUCKOO, PROTHONOTARY WARBLER, and BLUE GROSBEAK. WILD TURKEYS continue be
reported along the fields by headquarters.

 The previous reported DICKCISSEL continues be found along Cods Road by the
house at the south end of the road. The bird will be seen sitting on the
wire or flying out over the field. An AMERICAN KESTREL was reported at
Bakersfield Road. SUMMER and SCARLET TANAGER have been seen nearby at the
McCabe Preserve along Broadkill Creek. YELLOW-THROATED and PROTHONOTARY
WARBLERS were also reported there along with YELLOW-THROATED VIREO. BARRED
OWL and VIRGINIA RAIL were also calling along the Broadkill River. A CHUCK
WILLS WIDOW continues be heard at Old Landing near Rehoboth Beach. A BELTED
KINGFISHER was seen at the Golf Park in Rehoboth, plus GREEN HERON, GLOSSY
IBIS, YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, SCREECH OWL, and BLUE GROSBEAK. 

The other previous reported DICKCISSEL also continues to be reported at the
Charles E Price Memorial Park in Middletown. That bird can be seen sitting
on fence posts along the entrance to the Park. Also reported there were
EASTERN MEADOWLARK, GRASSHOPPER and SAVANNAH SPARROW. The pond at the park
had GREEN HERON and GLOSSY IBIS. For those interested, the park opens at 6
AM.

Field birds in Felton, below Dover included VESPER and GRASSHOPPER SPARROW,
plus HORNED LARK. A RED-SHOULDERED HAWK was reported. BLUE GROSBEAK and
EASTERN BLUEBIRD were also seen. 

CLIFF SWALLOWS were reported from the Flemings Landing Bridge. CLIFF
SWALLOWS were also found at the Appoquinimink Bridge along Route 9 near
Odessa. ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS were reported at the Peterson Urban Wildlife
Refuge, White Clay Creek and Brandywine Creek State Park.

WILLOW FLYCATCHER was reported at Thousand Acre Marsh near Delaware City,
Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge, Ashland Nature Ctr., Paper Mill Park,
Brandywine Creek State Park, and Granogue, which is EI DuPont's property
along the Brandywine at the Pennsylvania border. Also reported at Granogue
was VEERY. EASTERN MEADOWLARK and BLUE GROSBEAK were found at Brandywine
Creek State Park along the entrance road.

OSPREY was seen flying over White Clay Creek State Park at Hopkins Bridge.
Four species of VIREO were reported including YELLOW-THROATED, WARBLING,
RED-EYE, and WHITE-EYED. Warblers reported included YELLOW-THROATED,
LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH, OVENBIRD, REDSTART, NORTHERN PARULA, YELLOW, and
YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT. Other birds seen included YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO,
BALTIMORE and ORCHARD ORIOLE. An EASTERN MEADOWLARK was seen at White Clay,
along Smith's Mill Road. 

Two SNOW GEESE flew into the new impoundment at the Peterson Urban Wildlife
Refuge in downtown Wilmington. WOOD DUCK and GREAT HORNED OWL were reported.
A late SPOTTED SANDPIPER was found Peterson on Saturday. ORCHARD ORIOLES
were also reported. 

A SHARP-SHINNED HAWK was reported at Lum's Pond State Park. This is a rare
summertime bird in Delaware. COOPER'S and RED-SHOULDERED HAWK were found at
Ashland Nature Center. PEREGRINE FALCON was reported at the Reedy Point
Bridge where they had been displaced by bridge construction. The PEREGRINES
in downtown Wilmington at the Brandywine Building put on quite a show for
the observers from the top of the parking garage on Pennsylvania Avenue the
eighth annual falcon watch.

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Will Almeida, Mike
Hudson, Damon Orsetti, Ken Wat, Chris and Karen Bennett,  Sally O'Byrne, Joe
Sebastiani, Derek Stoner, Jerald Reb, Joel Martin, Kathy Reitz, Rich
Clifton, Chris Rowe, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn, Bill Stewart, Tim
Freiday, Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Remember, the birdline needs
your sightings! Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good
birding!

 -end transcript



Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Bird-A-Thon Totals and Pledges Due
From: Bill Stewart <bstewart AT ABA.ORG>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2015 07:45:19 -0400
Good Morning DE-Birders,

Sending out a friendly reminder to all Delaware Bird-A-Thon participants that 
your entries with species total and funds raised are due by June 13th. If you 
have any difficulty with hitting that date, please contact me via reply mail to 
this email. 


And………it’s not too late to contribute to this valuable conservation 
effort in Delaware, simply go to 
http://www.dosbirds.org/get-involved/delaware-bird-thon/ 

 

 
Many thanks and good birding,

Bill Stewart
Subject: Urgent Alert to Protect Migratory Birds
From: Kurt Schwarz <goawaybird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Jun 2015 18:48:32 -0400
Dear Maryland or Delaware Birder,

The House has launched an unprecedented attack on the Migratory Bird Treaty
Act, a bedrock conservation law.  The Senate so far has not.  See below and
click the blue link to contact your senators to urge them to keep any
provisions that would gut the MBTA out of the Commerce, Justice, etc.
appropriations bill.  For the MTBA and the good its done, see
http://www.audubon.org/news/the-evolution-migratory-bird-treaty-act

The Senate version of the Fiscal Year 2016 Commerce, Justice, Science, and
Related Agencies (CJS) bill was passed out of the full Senate Appropriations
Committee earlier this afternoon without any amendments that would prohibit
the Department of Justice from enforcing Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA).
The House version of this bill was the one that contained the rider offered
by Congressman Duncan (SC).  The Senate FY 2016 CJS bill will now proceed to
the floor for full consideration by the Senate sometime in the near future.
There is a chance that there might be a companion to Duncans amendment
offered on the Senate floor.  Please take this opportunity to reach out to
your Senator using the following link: support.abcbirds.org/ProtectMBTA
  to tell your Senator to vote NO
on any amendments that may come up when this bill is called to the floor.
 
Please feel free to share the link widely.  Calls into your Senators
offices urging them to VOTE NO on any proposed amendments that would weaken
the MBTA on the FY 2016 CJS Appropriations bill would be very helpful as
well.  
 
Let me know if anyone has any questions.  I am more than happy to provide
folks with additional talking points as well.  Please contact me directly.
 
Thanks! 
 
Anne 
 
 
Anne Law 
Director of Government Relations
American Bird Conservancy
1731 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Third Floor 
Washington, DC 20009
T: 202-888-7469
F: 202-234-7182
alaw AT abcbirds.org
 
 Kurt Schwarz Conservation Chair Maryland Ornithological Society
krschwa1 AT verizon.net
Subject: Sussex Bird Club Kayak Trip Saturday
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Jun 2015 20:24:47 -0400
I will be leading a Kayak Trip for the Sussex Bird Club this Saturday on
Rehoboth Bay from 9 am to 1 pm.  The trip starts and ends at Savages
Ditch.  Savages Ditch is the last bayside access point on Route 1 before
the Indian River Inlet Marina - just south of the Indian River Life Saving
Station.  We will be paddling around the marsh islands on the east side of
the bay.  We should see nesting Laughing, Herring and Great Black-backed
Gulls, terns, oystercatchers, Ospreys and a variety of herons and egrets.
With luck we should also see Brown Pelicans.  The trip is open to
everyone.  There is a portable toilet at the launch site.  State Park
entrance fees - are in effect and if you do not have an annual permit you
will need to self register.  I hope you can join us.

Chris Bennett
MIlford, DE
Subject: White Gull at Mispillion Inlet
From: Bob Ringler <ringler.bob AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Jun 2015 19:55:28 -0400
   Today (June 10) while birding with friends at the DuPont Nature
Center at Mispillion Inlet we observed a large nearly all-white gull
on the beach behind the nature center. My first impression was that it
was an immature Glaucous Gull. However, the more I studied the bird I
realized I needed to consider other possibilities. The bird was
standing among a large number of immature Herring Gulls and some Great
Black-backs. It appeared to be about the size of a Herring Gull and
definitely smaller than a nearby Great Black-back. The plumage was
entirely white except for some dark smudges across the center of the
closed wing. The wings were very worn. The legs were dull pink. The
eye was dark. The bill was very dark but faintly yellowish on the
basal two thirds and black on the distal one third bleeding slightly
into the basal part. The bird was also seen in flight confirming that
there was no black in the tail and no black was visible in the wings.
It perched briefly on the breakwater. This was between 1 PM and 1:30.
   I have seen that Glaucous Gull has been reported there about two
weeks ago. I am leaning toward calling this bird an albino Herring
Gull but I would like to hear other opinions. Are there any photos of
this bird?

-- 
Bob Ringler
Eldersburg MD
Subject: Re: Action Alert: National Defense Bill Threatens Grouse Protections
From: Kurt Schwarz <goawaybird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Jun 2015 16:17:28 -0400
That failed as well.  Please use this tiny url address.

http://tinyurl.com/n5tp92h


Again, sorry for the inconvenience and I will post no further on this
subject.

Kurt Schwarz

On 6/10/15, 4:14 PM, "Kurt Schwarz"  wrote:

>Please note, the link did not copy fully. Sorry for the inconvenience!!! I
>hope this link will work:
>
>https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&
>i
>d=187
>
>
>Kurt Schwarz
>MOS Conservation Chair
>Ellicott City, MD
>Goawaybird AT verizon.net
>
>
>On 6/10/15, 1:07 PM, "Kurt Schwarz"  wrote:
>
>>The American Bird Conservancy has issued an alert regarding riders to the
>>National Defense Authorization Act for 2016 which would gut grouse
>>protections in the western US.  See below for details and link to
>>petition
>>decision makers.
>>
>>URGENT ALERT: BIRDS UNDER ATTACK ON NATIONAL DEFENSE BILL!
>> 
>>The House of Representatives has voted to prevent Endangered Species Act
>>(ESA) protection and new conservation plans for the Greater Sage-Grouse,
>>and
>>to prohibit ESA protection for the already listed Lesser Prairie-Chicken.
>>These votes to harm birds were on the National Defense Authorization Act
>>which is now being considered by the U.S. Senate.
>> 
>>Senator Cory Gardner (R-CO) and Senator Mike Lee (R-UT) have proposed
>>amendments to prohibit protection of the Greater Sage-Grouse, and the Lee
>>amendment also seeks to strike down ESA protection for the Lesser
>>Prairie-Chicken.
>> 
>>Let Congress hear your voice  let your Senators know you are opposed to
>>amendments that gut Endangered Species Act protections for threatened
>>species like the Greater Sage-Grouse and Lesser Prairie-Chicken.  Click
>>on
>>the link below to send your letters now!
>> 
>>https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction
>>&
>>id
>>=187
>> 
>>Kurt R. Schwarz
>>Conservation Chair
>>Maryland Ornithological Society
>>goawaybird AT verizon.net
>
>
Subject: Re: Action Alert: National Defense Bill Threatens Grouse Protections
From: Kurt Schwarz <goawaybird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Jun 2015 16:14:07 -0400
Please note, the link did not copy fully. Sorry for the inconvenience!!! I
hope this link will work:

https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&i
d=187


Kurt Schwarz
MOS Conservation Chair
Ellicott City, MD
Goawaybird AT verizon.net


On 6/10/15, 1:07 PM, "Kurt Schwarz"  wrote:

>The American Bird Conservancy has issued an alert regarding riders to the
>National Defense Authorization Act for 2016 which would gut grouse
>protections in the western US.  See below for details and link to petition
>decision makers.
>
>URGENT ALERT: BIRDS UNDER ATTACK ON NATIONAL DEFENSE BILL!
> 
>The House of Representatives has voted to prevent Endangered Species Act
>(ESA) protection and new conservation plans for the Greater Sage-Grouse,
>and
>to prohibit ESA protection for the already listed Lesser Prairie-Chicken.
>These votes to harm birds were on the National Defense Authorization Act
>which is now being considered by the U.S. Senate.
> 
>Senator Cory Gardner (R-CO) and Senator Mike Lee (R-UT) have proposed
>amendments to prohibit protection of the Greater Sage-Grouse, and the Lee
>amendment also seeks to strike down ESA protection for the Lesser
>Prairie-Chicken.
> 
>Let Congress hear your voice  let your Senators know you are opposed to
>amendments that gut Endangered Species Act protections for threatened
>species like the Greater Sage-Grouse and Lesser Prairie-Chicken.  Click on
>the link below to send your letters now!
> 
>https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&
>id
>=187
> 
>Kurt R. Schwarz
>Conservation Chair
>Maryland Ornithological Society
>goawaybird AT verizon.net
Subject: Action Alert: National Defense Bill Threatens Grouse Protections
From: Kurt Schwarz <goawaybird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Jun 2015 13:07:32 -0400
The American Bird Conservancy has issued an alert regarding riders to the
National Defense Authorization Act for 2016 which would gut grouse
protections in the western US.  See below for details and link to petition
decision makers.

URGENT ALERT: BIRDS UNDER ATTACK ON NATIONAL DEFENSE BILL!
 
The House of Representatives has voted to prevent Endangered Species Act
(ESA) protection and new conservation plans for the Greater Sage-Grouse, and
to prohibit ESA protection for the already listed Lesser Prairie-Chicken.
These votes to harm birds were on the National Defense Authorization Act
which is now being considered by the U.S. Senate.
 
Senator Cory Gardner (R-CO) and Senator Mike Lee (R-UT) have proposed
amendments to prohibit protection of the Greater Sage-Grouse, and the Lee
amendment also seeks to strike down ESA protection for the Lesser
Prairie-Chicken.
 
Let Congress hear your voice  let your Senators know you are opposed to
amendments that gut Endangered Species Act protections for threatened
species like the Greater Sage-Grouse and Lesser Prairie-Chicken.  Click on
the link below to send your letters now!
 
https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id
=187
 
Kurt R. Schwarz
Conservation Chair
Maryland Ornithological Society
goawaybird AT verizon.net
Subject: TODAY - Wilmington Peregrine FalconWatch Event - Wed. 6/10
From: Bill Stewart <bstewart AT ABA.ORG>
Date: Wed, 10 Jun 2015 12:32:28 -0400
Please join us for the Wilmington Peregrine FalconWatch - TODAY - June 10th 
from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM 


Everyone is invited to the FREE 8th Annual Wilmington Peregrine FalconWatch. 
Parents and children are encouraged to attend. 


The free program focuses on the nesting pair of wild Peregrine Falcons and 
their four chicks that occupied a nest box on the 19th floor of the Brandywine 
Building, in the heart of downtown Wilmington. Enjoy watching the fledglings as 
they learn to fly, hunt and navigate the downtown cityscape. 


The location is the Center City Parking Garage, 11th & Tatnall Streets, 
Wilmington, DE. Park either in the garage or along the street and take the 
elevator to the rooftop parking deck, where the event will be held. 


This event is hosted by the Delmarva Ornithological Society and DuPont's Clear 
into the Future. 


Free Peregrine FalconWatch T-shirts to all attendees and a catered buffet will 
be provided. Casual attire. Optical equipment for viewing the falcons will be 
available but we encourage you to bring binoculars if you have a pair. 


For any questions, please contact Bill Stewart  AT  610-864-0370.
Subject: Dying Cat Birds
From: susan ruth marengo <srmarengo AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Jun 2015 13:38:14 -0400
Thank you for your suggestions --

Cat activity is very limited (one cat that scoots down from another
developent) and of course I cannot rule out a neighbor deciding to spray
their lawn when I am not looking.  If we get anymore we will try to save
the body.

Susan Marengo
Subject: Gull-billed Terns at BHNWR
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Jun 2015 14:16:06 -0400
There was a pair of Gull-billed Terns near the north end of Shearness Pool
just before the island of trees around 1 pm.

Chris Bennett
Milford, DE
Subject: Dying Catbirds
From: susan ruth marengo <srmarengo AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Jun 2015 13:51:00 -0400
Greetings

We have a very active breeding area as judged by the number of bird pairs
foraging.  We have had numerous intra- and inter- species conflicts over
resources, best perches etc.  This year an aggressive  Baltimore Oriole has
taken up residence.

In the past week my neighbor on found dying catbirds on  two separate
occasions.  Nothing appeared to be wrong and we have not had much hawk
activity recently and I have not heard any owls.

Is there something going around that targets catbirds?  We have (had) 3
pairs this summer and enjoy them so much.

Susan Ruth
Brandywine 100
Subject: Today at Dragon Run
From: "sally o'byrne" <salobyrne AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Jun 2015 21:47:30 -0400
A small but enthusiastic group of birders paddled this morning on Dragon Run, 
and we were met by a large number of marsh birds - from ubiquitous Red-Winged 
Blackbirds to arguably the densest collection of Marsh Wrens in New Castle 
County to perched Swamp Sparrows. Great Blue and Little Blue Herons and Great 
Egrets flew overhead, and Wood Ducks flushed as we moved through the water. A 
Beaver swam ahead of us, we watched a dragonfly emerge from its larval case, 
and we reached into the corners of our memories to remember the names of the 
water plants we passed. We glimpsed a Least Bittern and heard its ‘chuck 
chuck chuck’, but it refused to pose on demand. 


A Bald Eagle stood sentinel on a snag as Air Force One, Air Force Two, and a 
couple of official looking smaller Jets passed over our heads. This morning, 
Beau Biden’s funeral was held in my neighborhood, and celebrating the life of 
this fresh water marsh seemed a perfect way to honor it. 


After we left the water, we made a short trip to a nearby field and 
construction site to find ‘sky-larking’ Horned Larks and Grasshopper 
Sparrows. A good trip, aided by the ears and eyes of the participants. Below 
are the group e-bird lists from Dragon Run and the field near by. 


Sally O’Byrne

Paddling on Dragon Run
Gunning Bedford/Dragon Run, New Castle, Delaware, US
Jun 6, 2015 8:00 AM - 11:07 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.5 mile(s)
Comments: DOS Dragon Run field trip by canoe and kayak 
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8 55 species (+1 other taxa) Canada Goose 20 Wood Duck 10 Northern Bobwhite 3 Double-crested Cormorant 3 Least Bittern 2 Great Blue Heron 6 Great Egret 5 Little Blue Heron 17 Cattle Egret 5 Glossy Ibis 1 Black Vulture 3 Turkey Vulture 7 Bald Eagle 2 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 25 Chimney Swift 1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker 3 Downy Woodpecker 2 Northern Flicker 3 Pileated Woodpecker 1 Eastern Wood-Pewee 5 Willow Flycatcher 12 Great Crested Flycatcher 3 Eastern Kingbird 12 Warbling Vireo 1 Red-eyed Vireo 1 Blue Jay 5 American Crow 10 Northern Rough-winged Swallow 4 Purple Martin 4 Tree Swallow 3 Barn Swallow 12 Tufted Titmouse 1 House Wren 1 Marsh Wren 30 Carolina Wren 3 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2 Eastern Bluebird 1 Wood Thrush 5 American Robin 12 Gray Catbird 25 European Starling 7 Cedar Waxwing 6 Common Yellowthroat 15 American Redstart 1 Yellow Warbler 5 Prairie Warbler 1 Swamp Sparrow 9 Scarlet Tanager 2 Indigo Bunting 2 Red-winged Blackbird 80 Common Grackle 6 Common Grackle (Purple) 1 Orchard Oriole 4 Baltimore Oriole 2 American Goldfinch 10 In nearby field that is part of a new housing development: Gunning Bedford/Dragon Run, New Castle, Delaware, US Jun 6, 2015 11:20 AM - 11:45 AM Protocol: Stationary Comments:
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8 12 species Great Blue Heron 2 Turkey Vulture 1 American Crow 4 Horned Lark 2 Barn Swallow 10 Northern Mockingbird 1 European Starling 2 Yellow-breasted Chat 1 Chipping Sparrow 1 Grasshopper Sparrow 3 Blue Grosbeak 1 Indigo Bunting 1
Subject: Re: Dickcissel
From: Lloyd Maier <patch10 AT MAIERASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Jun 2015 17:00:29 -0500
Dickcissel still on site Sat 10:30 am.  singing from tallest tree on 
back of dog park overlooking grain field.

Lloyd Maier



On 2015-06-05 14:47, Vince Gambal wrote:
> Dickcissel still present at the Dog Park.  Singing from small tree
> tops and fence.  Was sticking to trees closest to chainlink fence
> adjacent to split rail fence. Best views were from within the "small
> dogs" area.
> 
> Great lifer bird for me.
> 
> Vince Gambal
> Lewes
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Jun 5, 2015, at 9:22 AM, Rodney Murray 
>> <0000015ec94d3aab-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU> wrote:
>> 
>> There is one male dickcissel calling and flying back and forth from 
>> the small trees and the high grass at the dog park area at Chas Price 
>> park in Middletown.  Rod Murray. Middletown DE
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Brown Thrush vs Mockingbird
From: Mary Lukaszewski <mlukas AT SPRINTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Jun 2015 09:48:59 -0400
Is it possible for Brown Thrushes to exist peacefully with a pair of 
Mockingbirds? 


We have a pair of Brown Thrushes that are setting up housekeeping in one of our 
Crepe Myrtle bushes. Problem is, that is within the territory of our resident 
Mockingbird who has lived here for five years. 


I'm excited over the addition of the Brown Thrashers but I don't want to loose 
our Mockingbird pair, either. 


Any tips on helping them to get along?

Mary Lukaszewski
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, June 5th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 5 Jun 2015 21:11:51 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* June 5, 2015
* DEST1506.05
	
*Birds mentioned
Snow Goose
Tundra Swan
Mute Swan
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail
Blue-winged Teal
Ruddy Duck
Northern Bobwhite 
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
Brown Pelican
Least Bittern
Great Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
Glossy Ibis
Bald Eagle
Cooper's Hawk
Clapper Rail
SANDHILL CRANE
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Lesser Yellowlegs
Willet
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Sanderling
Least Sandpiper 
White-rumped Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Dunlin
WILSON'S PHALAROPE
Least Tern
Black Skimmer
Yellow Billed Cuckoo
Barred Owl
Common Nighthawk
Chuck Wills Widow
Eastern Whippoorwill
Redheaded Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Peregrine Falcon
Willow Flycatcher
Yellow-throated Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Marsh Wren
Veery
Yellow Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Worm-eating Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Grasshopper Sparrow
Vesper Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Summer Tanager
Scarlet Tanager
Dickcissel
Blue Grosbeak
Bobolink
Eastern Meadowlark
Orchard Oriole

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: June 5, 2015 
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net 
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

This is Birdline Delaware, for Friday, June 5th from the Delaware Museum of
Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware annual list remained
at 298 species this week.

A male DICKCISSEL was found at the Charles E. Price Park in Middletown
today. This is along St Anne's Church Road south of town. An EASTERN
MEADOWLARK was also seen there this week. 

The previous reported DICKCISSEL continues to be seen on the wire at Cods
Road, just north of the intersection with Prime Hook Beach Road near Prime
Hook National Wildlife Refuge.. The bird is being seen by the house near the
intersection. BLACK SKIMMERS were also reported along the Prime Hook Beach
Road along with BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, LEAST and
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER, DUNLIN, plus GADWALL and NORTHERN SHOVELER. 

The previously reported AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS continue to be seen at
Fowler's Beach in Prime Hook. 6 to10 pelicans can be seen at a distance from
the fishing bridge. Also reported were 60 to 100 BLACK SKIMMERS loafing on
the sandbar. Up to 12 BALD EAGLES were reported in the area. TUNDRA SWAN was
also reported. 

The DuPont Nature Center continues to have a plethora of shorebirds
including 300 RED KNOT, over 500 RUDDY TURNSTONES, 3000 SEMIPALMATED
SANDPIPERS, plus AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, BLACKBELLIED PLOVER, DUNLIN,
SANDERLING, and BLACK NECKED STILT. SALTMARSH SPARROW and CLAPPER RAIL were
seen in the marsh along Lighthouse Road headed towards the nature center at
Mispillion Inlet.

A WILSON'S PHALAROPE was seen at the Port Penn Impoundments of Augustine
Beach Wildlife Area on Saturday. That bird was seen from the boardwalk. Also
reported were SEMIPALMATED PLOVER and LEAST SANDPIPER. 

There were a lot of RED-HEADED WOODPECKER sightings in southern Delaware
around Indian River Bay. Three RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were reported at
Assawoman Wildlife Area - where they've been all season. BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCH, MUTE SWAN, and BLACK SKIMMER were also seen at Assawoman.
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was also reported at Angola Neck, Camp Arrowhead, and
Herring Creek at Long Neck.

BROWN PELICAN was seen from the Cape May-Lewes ferry. AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER
and PIPING PLOVER were seen at Cape Henlopen State Park. TRICOLORED HERON
with LEAST TERN and PIPING PLOVER were seen at Gordon's Pond. YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT HERON was reported at burton's Island near Indian River Inlet.
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON was reported at Old Landing. 

Two COMMON NIGHTHAWKS were also seen at Cape Henlopen this weekend. CHUCK
WILLS WIDOW was reported at Angola neck. WHIPPOORWILLS continue to be heard
at Big Stone Beach in Milford Neck Wildlife Area.

Redden State Forest had SUMMER TANAGER and WORM-EATING WARBLER at the
headquarters tract. Some Kent County sparrows included VESPER and
GRASSHOPPER SPARROW plus HORNED LARK along Route 12 at Walnut St. in Felton.
This is just South of Dover along Route 13. 

There were no further reports of phalaropes at the Pickering Beach side of
Little Creek Wildlife Management Area this week. There still lots shorebirds
there including AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, an unusual bird for that area. Also
reported were 7 BLACK-NECKED STILTS plus BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, DUNLIN,
WHITE-RUMPED, SEMIPALMATED, and LEAST SANDPIPER, also reported was BLACK
SKIMMER and LEAST BITTERN.

RUDDY DUCK and 3 SNOW GEESE were reported at Port Mahon. Also seen there was
GREEN HERON and BLACK SKIMMER.

Two AMERICAN AVOCETS reported at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge near
Smyrna. Also reported were BLACK-NECKED STILTS, WILLET, LESSER YELLOWLEGS,
RUDDY TURNSTONE, and DUNLIN. A YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON with BLACK-CROWNS
was seen at Night Heron Island. Also reported was MUTE and TUNDRA SWAN, plus
BLUE-WINGED TEAL. BLACK SKIMMER was reported opposite Sheerness Pool.
NORTHERN BOBWHITE was reported at the Allee house.

WILLOW FLYCATCHER was reported at Thousand Acre Marsh, just south of
Delaware City. Also reported were LITTLE BLUE HERON, CATTLE EGRET, and
GLOSSY IBIS. A LEAST BITTERN was reported at Grier's Pond off Dutch Neck
Road. A late WHITE-THROATED SPARROW was seen along Dutch Neck Road. Also
reported there was a calling SANDHILL CRANE, heard but not seen. 

CATTLE EGRETS were seen with the cattle at the farm on Walther's Road near
Lum's Pond. PROTHONOTARY WARBLER was reported at Lum's Pond. 

EASTERN MEADOWLARKS were also reported at Brandywine Creek State Park. A
late BOBOLINK was also heard in the fields by the entrance booth. Five
WILLOW FLYCATCHERS were found along with BLUE GROSBEAK, YELLOW-BREASTED
CHAT, and PRAIRIE WARBLER. GREAT EGRET was reported at the Winterthur ponds
by Rt 100. 

YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO was reported at White Clay Creek State Park along with
BARRED OWL. YELLOW-THROATED and WARBLING VIREOS were still being found there
along with VEERY, YELLOW WARBLER, and SCARLET TANAGER.

LEAST BITTERN and WILLOW FLYCATCHER were also reported at the Peterson Urban
Wildlife Refuge in downtown Wilmington. BALD EAGLE was seen flying over.
Other birds seen included MARSH WREN, BLUE GROSBEAK, ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW,
and ORCHARD ORIOLE.

There have been a couple of sightings of COOPER'S HAWKS this week. This is
supposed to be a rare nester in the state. Sightings in northern Delaware
include Glasgow and south of New castle on River Road by Federal Lane. Birds
were also seen near Townsend in Blackbird State Forest and at Bombay Hook.
In southern Delaware, birds were seen near Rehoboth Beach at Old Landing and
Camp Arrowhead. Please report any sightings to the Birdline or eBird. Only
one AMERICAN KESTREL was reported for the entire state at Bombay Hook.
PEREGRINE FALCONS are still being seen in downtown Wilmington on the
Brandywine building at Pennsylvania Avenue.

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Marc Ribando, Kurt
Gaskill, Rod Murray, Jim Lenhard, Marie Gardner, Heather Orkis, Colin
Campbell, Lisa Walsh, Allen Cartier, Bert Filemyr, Mike Rosengarten, Cyrus
Moqtadari, Frank Rohrbacher, Damon Orsetti, Chris and Karen Bennett,  Sally
O'Byrne, Joe Sebastiani, Rich Clifton, Chris Rowe, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver,
Sharon Lynn, Vince Gambal, Bill Stewart, Ian Stewart, Elora Grahame, Tim
Freiday, Chandler Wiegand, Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Remember, the
birdline needs your sightings! Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or
email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you
good birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Wilmington Peregrine FalconWatch Event - Wed. 6/10
From: Bill Stewart <bstewart AT ABA.ORG>
Date: Fri, 5 Jun 2015 13:52:06 -0400
Please join us for the Wilmington Peregrine FalconWatch - this Wednesday - June 
10th from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM 


Everyone is invited to the FREE 8th Annual Wilmington Peregrine FalconWatch. 
Parents and children are encouraged to attend. 


The free program focuses on the nesting pair of wild Peregrine Falcons and 
their four chicks that occupied a nest box on the 19th floor of the Brandywine 
Building, in the heart of downtown Wilmington. Enjoy watching the fledglings as 
they learn to fly, hunt and navigate the downtown cityscape. 


The location is the Center City Parking Garage, 11th & Tatnall Streets, 
Wilmington, DE. Park either in the garage or along the street and take the 
elevator to the rooftop parking deck, where the event will be held. 


This event is hosted by the Delmarva Ornithological Society and DuPont's Clear 
into the Future. 


Free Peregrine FalconWatch T-shirts to all attendees and a catered buffet will 
be provided. Casual attire. Optical equipment for viewing the falcons will be 
available but we encourage you to bring binoculars if you have a pair. 


For any questions, please contact Bill Stewart  AT  610-864-0370.
Subject: The June Challenge
From: Colin Campbell <delawaretwitcher AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 4 Jun 2015 16:57:16 -0500
After failing to avoid the supermagnetic attraction of Smyrna's Large Hadron 
Collider - aka Helen's Famous Sausage House - I headed south today, masticating 
the sumptuous entity with total distain for those of vegan disposition, 
gluten-free advocates, PETA supporters etc, etc and being glad that it was not 
an intangible Higgs boson, though there was a touch of "dark matter" about it. 
Sorry about that, it just spilled out; some of my closest (ex-?) friends belong 
in one or more of those categories. My apologies; it just that there wasn't 
much else to write about, confirming my belief that Chris B's "June Challenge" 
is just that - a hard birding month. 

 
En route to Fowler Beach, the 'Portable Buildings' company had its usual wacky 
sign up; this week's edition was "It's the National Bathroom Reading Week". The 
way things are going, we'll soon be having TP with NYT and FoxNews headlines 
available thereon with just a press on the app button. As I said, there wasn't 
much about today. But here's what there was. 

 
I was surprised to see no fishermen at the bridge at the end of Fowler Beach 
Road. A first for me and, as it proved later, just showed how early I got up 
(another year's first). The flock of Am. White Pelicans were in the distance to 
the south and I counted nine in the scope. Then two young Bald Eagles flew over 
and surprisingly (to me, anyway) they flushed and then there were twelve. 
Impressive, as was the (counted) 85 Black Skimmers on one of the sandbars. 
Later, I had BLSK at Primehook Beach Road, Ted Harvey and Bombay Hook; good to 
see numbers of this wonderful bird. Fowlers also had at least 4 Least Tern - 
there were 6 more at Primehook Beach Road. A few shorebirds and Clapper Rails 
were seen, but as I had my usual summer birding tux on and didn't bring a 
windjammer, the 25mph NE blow dissuaded me from further exploration shore-wise. 
OK, I wimped out. As the crabbers arrived I saw the reported Tundra Swan, again 
at a distance. Much to their obvious annoyance, I got the ! 

 scope out at the prime point of the bridge and I couldn't make out any yellow 
loral spot on the swan. On the other hand, I couldn't make out the inverted 
black V above the bill which would suggest a Trumpeter. I'd recently been to 
Michigan and there were plenty of released Trumpeter Swans in the wild there, 
which have been known to wander south and eastwards, but all had quite intense 
orange staining on the head and neck, whereas the Fowlers bird was clean. 
Later, I saw again the Bombay Hook Tundra Swan which also has heavy orange 
staining on head and neck, so .... what the heck. It's a difficult call, 
especially on solitary birds. 

 
The road out to Mispillion was saturated with Willets and a couple of Saltmarsh 
Sparrows responded to pishing at the well-known secret spot. The display in the 
Dupont Center there is even better that when I last visited, the only omission 
being the live Atlantic Sturgeon - one of the really cool-looking fish of the 
area, if not the country. I hadn't checked this year, but the horseshoe crab 
harvest will only start July 7 (I think) - ie after spawning (or whatever they 
do) - and will be limited to 154,000 in DE. Sounds a lot but I learnt that, due 
to conservation pressures in NJ and MD, the DE Bay population is in excess of 
20 million, and growing. 


 
The three nesting pairs of Black-necked Stilts at Bear Swamp, Bombay Hook, and 
easily visible from the dyke, have survived the inundations of the past few 
days and we look forward to seeing those tiny, lovable chicks soon. The 
aforementioned T. Swan was accompanied by 4 Snow Geese on the only bit of sand 
left above water in Shearness. A small bunch of shorebirds shared the islet, 
with three gorgeous Black-bellied Plovers, resplendent in their Arctic breeding 
finery, being the pick of the bunch. 

 
A good day despite no sun and a stiff north-easterly which made me return home 
via Rt 13 as I'm sure Rt 9 at high tide (mid-afternoon) would be flooded in 
several places. 

 
Colin Campbell
Claymont, DE.

 
Subject: Dragon Run DOS trip
From: "sally o'byrne" <salobyrne AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 4 Jun 2015 11:26:49 -0400
The canoe/kayak trip this Saturday morning at Dragon Run has room for more 
participants. Target birds are Least Bittern, Swamp Sparrow, Marsh Wren, and 
lots of herons and egrets - Dragon Run is one of the nicest Fresh Water marshes 
in New Castle County. Meeting time 7:30. Please contact me by email or phone if 
you are interested in coming. 


Sally O’Byrne
302-584-4783
Subject: DVOC Meeting this week: Special Date, Location & Time
From: Steve Kacir <setkacir AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2015 16:14:18 -0400
Hello Birders, 

The Delaware Valley Ornithological Club (DVOC) will meet at a special date, 
time, and location this week. Instead of the usual Thursday night meeting, DVOC 
will meet on Saturday June 6 at 9:00AM at the Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed 
Association at 31 Titus Mill Road, Pennington, NJ 08534 for a special program 
by Rachel McGovern: "Surveying our Streams: A Workshop in Biological Stream 
Monitoring." 


Stream quality is vital to a number of our local nesting bird species, as well 
as certain migrants - and indirectly important to many other birds throughout 
the Delaware Valley. Rachel's program will provide instruction on the methods 
of biological stream monitoring, and may introduce you to a few of the critters 
that are hunted by such species as Louisiana Waterthrush and Solitary Sandpiper 
in our local creeks and streams. 


All who have an interest are invited to attend; the program is free with no 
admission charged. Please note that this special meeting takes place on 
Saturday June 6 at 9:00AM. DVOC will meet at the Stony Brook-Millstone 
Watershed Association at 31 Titus Mill Road, Pennington, NJ 08534. More 
information is available on the DVOC website: http://www.dvoc.org/Main.htm 


Saturday June 6, 2015 - 9 am

Held at:
Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association
31 Titus Mill Road
Pennington, NJ 08534

Surveying our Streams: A Workshop in Biological Stream Monitoring:

Learn the methods of biological stream monitoring from this intensive workshop. 
This experience will train you to identify benthic macroinvertebrates and teach 
you what their presence says about the quality of our water. This workshop will 
not only walk you through monitoring methods but will bring you out into the 
stream to practice collection techniques and macroinvertebrate identification. 
Biological sampling is used by environmental organizations and government 
agencies as a reliable indicator of pollution levels. With the information 
received through these methods the proper steps can be taken to keep water 
clean and promote healthy habitats. 



Rachel McGovern:

Rachel McGovern graduated in 2014 from Rutgers University with a Bachelors of 
Science in Environmental Policy, Institutions and Behavior. In her time at 
Rutgers she focused her studies on New Jerseys water quality and interned with 
North Jersey Resource Conservation and Development and the Stony Brook 
Millstone Watershed Association to study green infrastructure and stormwater 
management. Currently, Rachel serves as the Americorps Watershed Ambassador for 
the Millstone Watershed. As an Ambassador she monitors streams, trains others 
in water monitoring protocol and travels the area teaching students and 
community groups about Watershed issues while organizing projects to promote 
stewardship in nearby communities. 


Remember: SPECIAL DATE, TIME & LOCATION: 

Saturday June 6, 2015 

9:00AM

Held at:
Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association
31 Titus Mill Road
Pennington, NJ 08534

More information about Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association can be found 
online: 

http://thewatershed.org/watershed-center/new-center/
http://thewatershed.org/

We hope to see you at this special meeting of the DVOC!

Cheers, 
Steve Kacir
DVOC Vice President

 

 
Subject: 3 Red headed Woodpeckers (life bird)
From: Vince Gambal <0000009a8147fdd9-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Tue, 2 Jun 2015 18:30:59 -0400
I was inspired by someone who posted a photo today of a RH woodpecker on the 
Delaware Birding FB page so went in search this afternoon near Camp Arrowhead. 
I went to that area last fall with Jen Ottinger, and while we didn't see any 
that day she did educate me about the type of environment they prefer. That 
paid off. The first dead tree I scanned with binocs had a RHW digging away at a 
cavity midway up. I got a great look for close to 30 minutes and the mate 
showed up briefly. Farther down the road, I stopped again and saw a third. Day 
well spent! 


Vince Gambal
Lewes
Subject: June Challenge - Delaware Big June II
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Jun 2015 23:21:18 -0400
Its JUNE - and that can only mean one thing.  Its time to pick a Delaware
county (or a portion of a county) and bird like there are only 29 more
tomorrows!! I have been cajoling others to join me in the June Challenge
for four years now - and last year quite a few of you took up the
challenge.  And we fielded more birders than any state in the union - other
than Florida of course - where this whole thing got started.  And the rules
are pretty simple.  Pick a single county and try to see as many bird
species as possible before 11:59:59 on June 30th.  Send me your list on
July 1 and I will compile them and send them to Rex Rowan - the coordinator
of the event in Florida.

To make the event our own, and try to limit disturbance to our nesting
birds. last year I launched the inaugural *Delaware Big June*.  Big June
retains the core of the June Challenge with these two minor changes.

1.  Birds can be seen or heard to count in your Big June total.  This will
help to reduce potential disturbance to our native breeding birds.  No need
to coax a bird out of thick cover or plunge off a trail or roadside in an
effort to catch a glimpse of a sought after bird.  Hear it singing or
calling and count it.

2.  Don't want to travel hither and yon, up, down and across one of
Delaware's three counties searching for birds?  Pick a favored piece of a
county - a State, County or Local Park, State Wildlife Area, State Forest
or National Wildlife Refuge.  Or, just count the birds in your own yard or
neighborhood.  Birder's who choose to take this route will be considered
Limited Geographic Area Contestants.

And for those who wish to submit their totals to the June Challenge you
just have to keep track of the birds seen and submit that list.  And you
will be surprised how often waiting patiently will reward you with that
elusive singer finally showing itself - without you're ever having to break
a sweat.

If you're interested in participating reply to me at this email address.
Starting June 1 begin compiling your list.  I can send you an excel
spreadsheet that I use to track my sightings if you are interested.  Send
me your complete list the first couple days of July.  If you want me to
send you list on to the June Challenge in Florida inlcude a list of the
birds that were seen only by 1July and I will send a complete list of all
the Delaware participants on to Florida.

If you do participate feel free to post some of your best sightings to this
listserv.  And don't forget to submit your observations to e-Bird while you
are participating in this event.  Make Big June not only a fun birding
competition - but also a valuable Citizen Science Project.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

Chris Bennett
Milford, DE