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Updated on Friday, September 4 at 04:06 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Boat-billed Heron,©BirdQuest

4 Sep Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch (04 Sep 2015) 23 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
4 Sep Ashland Nature Center (04 Sep 2015) 13 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
4 Sep Re: Admin message -- mail block explanation [ ]
4 Sep Admin message -- mail block explanation [L Larson ]
3 Sep RBA: Birdline Delaware, September 3rd, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
3 Sep Ashland Nature Center (03 Sep 2015) 9 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
3 Sep Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch (03 Sep 2015) 19 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
3 Sep Delaware: World Shorebirds Day this weekend [Alan Kneidel ]
2 Sep Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch (02 Sep 2015) 11 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
2 Sep Ashland Nature Center (02 Sep 2015) 8 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
2 Sep Reminder- fall migrants workshop at the Musuem this Saturday [Jean Woods ]
2 Sep Black and white warbler [Diane Kane ]
1 Sep chimney swift roost ["sally o'byrne" ]
1 Sep Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch (01 Sep 2015) 30 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
1 Sep Informal DVOC Meeting at Schuylkill Center on Thursday Sep 3 [Steve Kacir ]
1 Sep Ashland Nature Center (01 Sep 2015) 15 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
1 Sep Middle Run Bird Walk: Golden-winged Warbler and More Migrants [Derek Stoner ]
30 Aug Broadkill Beach [Jeff & Deborah Climie ]
29 Aug Middle Run Bird Walks Begin September 1 [Derek Stoner ]
29 Aug Canada Warbler in Greenville [Matthew Sarver ]
28 Aug RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 28th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
28 Aug Cecil County Coming Events and Request for Help [Patricia Valdata ]
28 Aug Ashland Hawk Watch Begins September 1 [Derek Stoner ]
28 Aug Little Creek Morning [Christopher Bennett ]
28 Aug Early Migrants in Kent County [Gina Sheridan ]
27 Aug test [Msn ]
27 Aug Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Broadkill Marsh ["Fees, David F. (DNREC)" ]
27 Aug testing, please disregard [Msn ]
27 Aug Marbled Godwit [joe sebastiani ]
27 Aug Volunteers needed for the Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch [Anthony Gonzon ]
26 Aug Re: Winter Wren [Maurice Barnhill ]
26 Aug Big Stone Beach Road [Christopher Bennett ]
26 Aug Winter Wren ["Lynn M. Smith" ]
26 Aug Brandywine Birdwalk, 8/29 [Andrew Ednie ]
24 Aug Evening Heron Survey ["Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" ]
23 Aug Willets [Diane Kane ]
22 Aug Alder Flycatcher & Baird's Sandpiper [Gina Sheridan ]
21 Aug Shorebirds at Gravel Hill Ponds - Sussex County ["Fees, David F. (DNREC)" ]
20 Aug RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 20th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
20 Aug Very Close Black Tern on Prime Hook (Beach) Road [Bill Fintel ]
19 Aug Central Delaware, August 17 [Scott Baron ]
19 Aug FW: [SHOREBIRDS] JAMES BAY SHOREBIRDS - North Point Report #3 ["Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" ]
19 Aug Four White Pelicans along PHB Road [Vince Gambal ]
18 Aug Re: Help with identification [Taylor McLean ]
18 Aug Red Start [Leslie Beall ]
18 Aug Help with identification [Leslie Beall ]
18 Aug DOS and the 29th Annual Coastal Cleanup [Anthony Gonzon ]
16 Aug Black Tern at Ted Harvey WMA [Gina Sheridan ]
16 Aug Marbled Godwit-Bombay Hook [John ]
15 Aug removal from list [Chris Barnard ]
15 Aug White Pelicans [Sharon Lynn ]
15 Aug Sandwich Tern - Gordon's Pond [Gina Sheridan ]
15 Aug Yard bird lifer! [Sharon Lynn ]
14 Aug Wilson's Phalarope, American Golden-Plover & other shorebirds [Clive Harris ]
13 Aug RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 13th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
13 Aug Egrets at Prime Hook [Mary Bigelow ]
12 Aug Location for WCCSP Family Birding this Saturday ["Sullivan, Kathleen N. (DNREC)" ]
12 Aug Re: Great program for beginning birding families ["Sullivan, Kathleen N. (DNREC)" ]
12 Aug Great program for beginning birding families ["Sullivan, Kathleen N. (DNREC)" ]
11 Aug Misc. Sightings along DE Bay, Sunday [Jacob Hall ]
11 Aug Fall migrant workshop at the Musuem [Jean Woods ]
11 Aug Middle Run -- migration is on -- 8/10 [Alan Kneidel ]
11 Aug Blue Grosbeaks [Tom Clarke ]
11 Aug Wilson's Storm-Petrels in DE Bay [Christopher Bennett ]
9 Aug Gull-billed Terns - Yes! [Gina Sheridan ]
9 Aug NY Times Sunday Acrostic -- of interest to birders [Rodney Murray ]
9 Aug Delaware migrants [Andrew Ednie ]
8 Aug Re: New Castle: Lark Sparrow at Port Penn Impoundments [Andrew Ednie ]
8 Aug New Castle: Lark Sparrow at Port Penn Impoundments [Tim Schreckengost ]
7 Aug RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 7th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
6 Aug Help Save Boreal Breeding Birds [Kurt Schwarz ]
6 Aug Wilson's storm petrels [Vince Gambal ]
6 Aug FW: [SHOREBIRDS] James Bay Shorebirds - North Point Report #1 ["Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" ]
3 Aug White ibis [Diane Kane ]
3 Aug DVOC Special Informal Summer Meeting at Bombay Hook NWR this Saturday [Steve Kacir ]
3 Aug Bird Banding at Ashland and Bucktoe [joe sebastiani ]

Subject: Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch (04 Sep 2015) 23 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Fri, 4 Sep 2015 12:59:05 -0800
Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch
Lewes, Delaware, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 04, 2015
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              2              2
Osprey                      21             75             75
Bald Eagle                   0              1              1
Northern Harrier             0              0              0
Sharp-shinned Hawk           1              1              1
Cooper's Hawk                0              0              0
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              0              0
Broad-winged Hawk            0              0              0
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             1              2              2
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             0              2              2
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0
Mississippi Kite             0              0              0

Total:                      23             83             83
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00 
Observation end   time: 14:30:00 
Total observation time: 6.5 hours

Official Counter:        Jennifer Ottinger

Observers:        Paul Kane, Susan Gruver

Visitors:
Thanks to Sue, Paul and Howie for helping with the count today! 
20 visitors


Weather:
Hot, humid and foggy; clear skies turning partly cloudy, temp 27-30F, light
E, ESE winds, visibility 5-10km

Raptor Observations:
Osprey moving through, one sharp-shinned hawk and one Am kestrel. One
resident adult bald eagle.

Non-raptor Observations:
Great blue heron, caspian tern, royal tern, black tern (2), Baltimore
oriole, field sparrow, brown-headed nuthatch, and one leucistic starling in
a flock of 15 starlings flying by the platform late in the day. 

Predictions:
Partly cloudy, high 77F, NE wind 15-20mph
========================================================================
Report submitted by Jen Ottinger (Jottinger.co AT gmail.com)




List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: Ashland Nature Center (04 Sep 2015) 13 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Fri, 4 Sep 2015 12:22:44 -0800
Ashland Nature Center
Hockessin, Delaware, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 04, 2015
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       4             12             12
Bald Eagle                   1              6              6
Northern Harrier             1              2              2
Sharp-shinned Hawk           0              1              1
Cooper's Hawk                1              3              3
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              2              2
Broad-winged Hawk            0              5              5
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             5             10             10
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            0              1              1
Unknown Buteo                0              1              1
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               1              2              2

Total:                      13             45             45
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:30:00 
Observation end   time: 14:00:00 
Total observation time: 6.5 hours

Official Counter:        Sharon Ellison

Observers:        Debra Palermo, Joe Sebastiano

Visitors:
There was a family of 4 that visited today.  A thank you to Debra Palermo
for being my data recorder today and helping to spot birds, as well as Joe
Sebastiano for helping out!


Weather:
The temperature was thankfully cooler than the previous days, but humidity
was high. The sky was cloudy for most of the day, and a thunderstorm rolled
in during the afternoon, cutting the day's count short. Otherwise it was a
decent migration day with NE NW winds and 13 birds counted. 

Raptor Observations:
Early morning had a fun sighting of 4 American Kestrels flying over in a
group, swooping at each other every so often. In the afternoon another
American Kestrel passed over with a large insect in it's talons, bringing
the day's total to 5 kestrels. 1 Northern Harrier then passed over shortly
after, close enough that it's face could be seen. There were 4 Ospreys, 1
Bald Eagle, 1 Cooper's hawk, and 1 unidentified raptor. The resident
Red-shouldered hawks were back today, calling and flying around. 

Non-raptor Observations:
The Blue Jays and Gray Catbirds were noisy today. A good number of Cedar
waxwings went by again today, and about 4 Northern Flickers were flying
around close to the site throughout most of the morning. Bobolinks are
still being heard flying over the site and in the valley. Only 1
ruby-throated hummingbird was seen, but there were 9 monarch butterflies,
one of which was almost caught by one of the early morning kestrels. 

Predictions:
A cold front is supposed to come through today/tonight, so tomorrow is
rumored to be a particularly good hawk-watching day. 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Sharon Ellison (sellison497 AT gmail.com)
Ashland Nature Center information may be found at:
www.delawarenaturesociety.org




List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: Re: Admin message -- mail block explanation
From: James Tyler Bell <00000085b810a3aa-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Fri, 4 Sep 2015 19:44:25 +0000
I think the situation has resolved itself. If you are like me, your inbox just 
got flooded with a backlog of emails including the missing hawk watch data that 
triggered the investigation. Fingers crossed that's the end of it. Until the 
next issue pops up ;) 


 
Tyler Bell
DE-Birds Listowner




----- Original Message -----
From: L Larson 
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Cc: 
Sent: Friday, September 4, 2015 2:39 PM
Subject: [de-birds] Admin message -- mail block explanation

See archives for all list messages:
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=njbirds
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=de-birds


Many people have experienced a problem with the Jerseybirds, Delaware birds, 
and/or NJBIRDS Listservs. This message will not reach you if you are one of the 
affected members. However, we hope enough people are still getting list 
messages so they can tell their friends, forward this message, etc., and we can 
get the word out. We finally have learned what's going on. 



[snip]

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: Admin message -- mail block explanation
From: L Larson <llarson2 AT MAC.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Sep 2015 14:39:28 -0400
See archives for all list messages:
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=njbirds
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=de-birds

Many people have experienced a problem with the Jerseybirds, Delaware birds, 
and/or NJBIRDS Listservs. This message will not reach you if you are one of the 
affected members. However, we hope enough people are still getting list 
messages so they can tell their friends, forward this message, etc., and we can 
get the word out. We finally have learned what's going on. 



Many e-mail providers started blocking e-mail _from_ Princeton a few days back, 
when some incoming first-year students got infected by a "phishing" e-mail. 
These new student e-mail accounts were compromised and sent out a bunch of spam 
through our domain. Some of the e-mail providers (such as Gmail, AOL, Verizon, 
etc.) on Sept. 2 put a hold on all princeton.edu e-mail, not just that of the 
affected students. I do not have a full list of the affected e-mail services. 


Although the University e-mail administrators have stopped the infected 
students' spam, these blocks have not yet been lifted. 


However, the blocks do not affect _posting_ to the list, as far as I know; so 
if you have something to report please post a message for the sake of those who 
are not blocked. 


Princeton's e-mail administrators work hard to prevent this sort of thing, and 
this is the first time in years this has happened despite the deluge of spam. 
They are also working hard to get the e-mail providers to remove the blocks. 
You can possibly make a difference if you contact your e-mail service provider 
(ISP) and tell them that your e-mail from Princeton is not arriving. 


Unfortunately ABA is also a victim of this block and their feed 
(birding.aba.org) isn't updating, so if your e-mail is among the blocked 
services, the only place you can read new list messages right now is at these 
links: 


https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=njbirds
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=de-birds

It should not require a password to read the archive (unless you need to see 
e-mail addresses of other members which are protected in this way). If I'm 
wrong about this please let me know at jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu . 

 
The listowners are very sorry for the inconvenience, but there's nothing we can 
do. Please keep checking in at the archives, and please notify your e-mail 
service provider that your e-mail is not reaching you. And please get out and 
enjoy the birds this weekend, and have a good Labor Day. 

 

Laurie Larson, Tyler Bell, Tom Bailey
jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, September 3rd, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 2015 21:57:40 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* September 3, 2015
* DEST1509.03
	
*Birds mentioned
Tundra Swan
Mute Swan
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Double-crested Cormorant
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
Brown Pelican 
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron 
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Black Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Broad-winged Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Clapper Rail
Virginia Rail
Sora
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
American Golden Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Killdeer
Solitary Sandpiper
Spotted Sandpiper
Willet 
Marbled Godwit
Ruddy Turnstone 
Western Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper 
White-rumped Sandpiper
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER
Pectoral Sandpiper
Stilt Sandpiper 
Dunlin
BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER
Long-billed Dowitcher
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Least Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Royal Tern
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Barred Owl 
Common Nighthawk
 Chimney Swift
Red-headed Woodpecker
Peregrine Falcon
American Kestrel
Olive-sided Flycatcher 
Least Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
White-eyed Vireo 
Yellow-throated Vireo
Warbling Vireo
PHILADELPHIA VIREO
Red-eyed Vireo
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Winter Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Veery
Ovenbird
Blue-winged Warbler
GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER
Tennessee Warbler
Black and White Warbler
MOURNING WARBLER
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler 
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler
Seaside Sparrow 
LARK SPARROW
Summer Tanager
Bobolink
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: September 3, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For Thursday, September 3rd, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware
Museum of Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware annual list
annual list increased to 321 species.

There was a pair of LARK SPARROW reports this week from Kent County one was
seen along the Dike at Raymond Pool in Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge
on Saturday another lark sparrow was found the entrance road to the
impoundments at the Logan Tract of the Ted Harvey Conservation Area near
Kitts Hummock Road on Monday.

New this week was a female GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER found at trail-marker 10 in
Middle Run Natural Area in Newark. This birding area is off Possum Park Road
behind Tri-State Bird Rescue. A MOURNING WARBLER was reported at Trail
Marker 6 last Friday. This was a banner week at Middle Run that included
sightings of PHILADELPHIA VIREO, OLIVE-SIDED and LEAST FLYCATCHER, ORCHARD
ORIOLE and 16 species of warbler. Wednesday was a big day with 75 EASTERN
KINGBIRD, 50 RED-EYED VIREO, 25 BALTIMORE ORIOLES, along with 120 BOBOLINK.
Warblers seen included BLACK AND WHITE, MAGNOLIA, YELLOW, PRAIRIE,
CHESTNUT-SIDED, BLACK-THROATED BLUE, CANADA, and TENNESSEE. Other species
seen included BARRED OWL, WARBLING VIREO, and BLUE GROSBEAK.

The University of Delaware Ag Farm also had a PHILADELPHIA VIREO along with
LEAST FLYCATCHER. The wetlands behind Townsend Hall had LEAST and PECTORAL
SANDPIPER. 75 BOBOLINK were found in the alfalfa fields. Three SOLITARY
SANDPIPERS were found at Newark Reservoir.

Double digits of warbler species were found at Brandywine Creek State Park
this weekend including OVENBIRD, BLUE-WINGED, NORTHERN PARULA, MAGNOLIA,
BAY-BREASTED, BLACKBURNIAN, CHESTNUT-SIDED, BLACK-THROATED GREEN, and
CANADA. YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, YELLOW-THROATED and WHITE-EYED VIREO were also
seen. DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT and OSPREY were seen along the creek. the
nearby First State Monument at Ramsey Road had GREAT EGRET, SPOTTED
SANDPIPER, WARBLING VIREO, and BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER.

NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, plus CHESTNUT-SIDED and MAGNOLIA WARBLERS were seen at
Bellevue State park, along with WARBLING VIREOS and 3 VEERYS. A flock of 25
CHIMNEY SWIFTS flew over. Another MOURNING WARBLER was videotaped at a
waterbath in New Castle last week. 

Hawk watching season started this week. Ashland Nature Center started out
with a bang, finding 4 BROAD-WINGS, 3 RED-SHOULDERS and 4 RED-TAILS and 7
BALD EAGLES. Four AMERICAN KESTRELS were seen yesterday.  The Hawkwatch at
Cape Henlopen State Park reported a total of 54 OSPREYS, plus BALD EAGLES,
and BLACK VULTURE. KESTREL and 2 PEREGRINE FALCONS were seen today. 

Some more birds at Cape Henlopen this week included BROWN PELICANS, WILLET,
and RUDDY TURNSTONE. Two LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were found on the beach.
Landbirds seen at Cape Henlopen this week included 10 BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCHES plus YELLOW-THROATED VIREO, PRAIRIE WARBLER, and BALTIMORE
ORIOLE. The Monroe Avenue ponds in Lewes had an immature YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT HERON and 2 CATTLE EGRETS along with BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON and
LITTLE BLUE HERON, but no WHITE IBIS were reported.

WHITE IBIS were found at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Milton.
Ten birds were seen along the observation point trail and 28 were seen at
Prime Hook Beach Road today. Two TRICOLORED HERONS were also seen at Prime
Hook plus 4 LITTLE BLUE HERONS with 325 GREAT EGRETS plus a conservative
count of 650 SNOWY EGRETS. Both VIRGINIA RAIL and CLAPPER RAIL were found.
Shorebirds included a high count of 6 AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS plus
BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, KILLDEER, SPOTTED, PECTORAL and
WESTERN SANDPIPER, plus RUDDY TURNSTONE. Broadkill Beach Road had BAIRD'S
and BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPERS on Friday but they have not been reported
since. Tern seen there included several BLACK, LEAST, CASPIAN and ROYALS.
Eleven AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS were reported at Fowler's Beach on Monday.

The previous reported BAIRD'S SANDPIPER continues to be seen at the Gravel
Hill Ponds off of US Route 9 between Lewes and Georgetown. SPOTTED
SANDPIPER, KILLDEER and both YELLOWLEGS were also seen there. TRICOLORED
HERON was seen at the Dupont Nature Center at Mispillion Inlet near
Slaughters Beach. OYSTERCATCHER, TURNSTONE, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, and ROYAL
TERN were also reported.

Early migrants have already showed up. A WINTER WREN was reported at Bay
Vista near Rehoboth Beach last week. A RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET was seen at the
Nanticoke Wildlife Area near Laurel on Saturday. Also seen at the big field
at Nanticoke was RED-HEADED WOODPECKER. Warblers reported included BLACK
THROATED GREEN and CHESTNUT-SIDED plus 3 SUMMER TANAGERS. SUMMER TANAGER was
also seen by the state game lands near Georgetown along with COOPER'S and
RED-SHOULDERED HAWK.

A flock of 24 immature WHITE IBIS came into Bombay Hook National Wildlife
Refuge near Smyrna. TRICOLORED and GREEN HERON, plus YELLOW-CROWNED and
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON were also seen at the refuge. Three MARBLED
GODWITS continue to be reported at Sheerness Pool, 200 AMERICAN AVOCETS plus
5 BLACK-NECKED STILTS were seen. One AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVER was seen among
the BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS. Also reported was SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, DUNLIN,
SPOTTED, WESTERN, WHITE-RUMP, and PECTORAL SANDPIPER. 50 CASPIAN and 2 BLACK
TERNS were present. Waterfowl seen included TUNDRA SWAN, BLUE-WINGED TEAL,
NORTHERN SHOVELER, plus VIRGINIA RAIL and 2 SORA. All this bird activity
also attracted PEREGRINE FALCONS, MERLIN plus several BALD EAGLES. Landbirds
seen included BOBOLINK and SEASIDE SPARROW

TUNDRA and MUTE SWAN was also reported at Port Mahon impoundments along with
BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER. WILLET was seen at the old bait shop
along with CASPIAN and 41 ROYAL TERNS. TRICOLORED HERON was reported at Big
Stone Beach along with another MERLIN. Eight BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCHES were
found along the pine trees along with AMERICAN REDSTART, PRAIRIE,
YELLOW-THROATED, YELLOW, PINE, and BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER. Six BALTIMORE
ORIOLES were also seen.

TRICOLORED HERON continues to be seen at the Port Penn Impoundments along
with LITTLE BLUE HERON and 40 CASPIAN TERNS. Shorebirds reported included
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER and WESTERN SANDPIPER. BOBOLINKS are being seen among
the reeds. PECTORAL SANDPIPER was seen on Saturday at the north pond of the
Augustine Creek Causeway along Route 9, south of Port Penn. Eight KILLDEER
and DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS were seen at Battery Park in New Castle. 

Big flocks of CHIMNEY SWIFTS are now migrating. A roost of 290 birds was
seen at the Ingleside Retirement Home in downtown Wilmington. Those birds
were seen from 11th and Broom Sts. COMMON NIGHTHAWKS continue to be seen in
migration this week. 28 NIGHTHAWKS were seen over Ramsey Road along the
Brandywine on Monday. Three NIGHTHAWKS were seen flying over Granogue. Three
NIGHTHAWKS was flying over Cool Springs Reservoir in downtown Wilmington
last night. 35 NIGHTHAWKS were seen in Lewes. Several NIGHTHAWKS were also
seen flying over Middle Run and 12 were over Paper Mill Road near  Newark. 

On a side-light, a WHITE-FACED STORM PETREL was photographed in Baltimore
Canyon, approximate 65 miles offshore east of Ocean City, Maryland. Other
notable birds seen included a WHITE-TAILED TROPICBIRD and LONG-TAILED
JAEGER. Also reported were BRIDLED TERNS and both RED and RED-NECKED
PHALAROPES. During a recent boat-trip off Massachusetts, south of Martha's
Vineyard there were: 28 White-faced Storm-Petrels,  4 White-tailed and 1
Red-billed Tropicbird, in addition to 2 Black-capped Petrels, 202 Audubon's
Shearwaters, 161 Leach's Storm-Petrels, 23 Band-rumped Storm-Petrels, 17
Pomarine Jaegers, a Long-tailed Jaeger, a South Polar Skua, and a Bridled
Tern. Just think what will happen if a storm comes up the coast!

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Derek Stoner,
Marie Gardner, Amy O'Neil, Kim Steininger, Armas Hill, David Fees, Chris and
Karen Bennett, Bill Fintel, Sally O'Byrne, Scott Keys, Al Guarente, Phil
Thompson, Ian Stewart, Gina Sheridan, Ken Wat, Joe Sebastiani, Jim White,
Chris Rowe, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn, Art Zdancewic, Larry
Zirlin, Sam Roberts, Tim Freiday, Jim Windelborn, Jerald Reb, Tim
Schreckengost, Alan Kneidel, Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Special
thanks to our hawk counters, Jen Ottinger and Sharon Ellison. Remember, the
birdline needs your sightings! Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or
email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you
good birding!

 -end transcript



Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: Ashland Nature Center (03 Sep 2015) 9 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 2015 12:54:00 -0800
Ashland Nature Center
Hockessin, Delaware, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 03, 2015
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       3              8              8
Bald Eagle                   1              5              5
Northern Harrier             1              1              1
Sharp-shinned Hawk           1              1              1
Cooper's Hawk                0              2              2
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              2              2
Broad-winged Hawk            1              5              5
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             1              5              5
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            0              1              1
Unknown Buteo                1              1              1
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              1              1

Total:                       9             32             32
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:30:00 
Observation end   time: 15:00:00 
Total observation time: 7.5 hours

Official Counter:        Sharon Ellison

Observers:        Carol Spease, Courtney McKinley, Jim Lewis, Joe Sebastiani,
                  Sally O'Byrne

Visitors:
2 visitors today. A thank you to Carol Spease for being my data recorder
today and lending an eye, and to Joe Sebastiani, Jim Lewis, Sally O'Byrne,
and Courtney McKinley for coming out to help!


Weather:
It was hot today as well as very humid early in the morning. The wind
picked up in the late morning and persisted during the rest of the day,
resulting in moderate northerly winds. It was hazy again in the morning,
but it didn't affect visibility.

Raptor Observations:
The birds were up high and far today, and difficult to detect. There were 3
Osprey, 1 Bald Eagle, 1 northern Harrier, 1 Sharp-shinned hawk, 1
Broad-winged hawk, and 1 unidentified Buteo. The only bird today that
wasn't too tricky was 1 American Kestrel, which flew past low in the
afternoon. No signs of the resident Red-shouldered hawk pair today, but
there were Red-tailed hawks circling and kiting. An adult and juvenile Bald
Eagle circled around a bit before heading off to the east. 

Non-raptor Observations:
There were 7 Monarch butterflies migrating past today, and a Cloudless
Sulfur in the field early morning. A few good sightings of Fritillary and
Tiger Swallowtail butterflies provided some bursts of color during this hot
day. 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Sharon Ellison (sellison497 AT gmail.com)
Ashland Nature Center information may be found at:
www.delawarenaturesociety.org




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Subject: Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch (03 Sep 2015) 19 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 2015 12:46:33 -0800
Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch
Lewes, Delaware, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 03, 2015
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              2              2
Osprey                      16             54             54
Bald Eagle                   0              1              1
Northern Harrier             0              0              0
Sharp-shinned Hawk           0              0              0
Cooper's Hawk                0              0              0
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              0              0
Broad-winged Hawk            0              0              0
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             1              1              1
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             2              2              2
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0
Mississippi Kite             0              0              0

Total:                      19             60             60
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00 
Observation end   time: 14:00:00 
Total observation time: 6 hours

Official Counter:        Jennifer Ottinger

Observers:        Dennis Foley, Rob Schroeder, Susan Gruver

Visitors:
Thanks to Sue, Rob and Dennis for helping with the count!
10 visitors


Weather:
Hot and humid again with fog out over the bay and fair visibility; clear,
temp 25-31C, light N winds, visibility 15km.

Raptor Observations:
Osprey moving through, along with an American kestrel and the first couple
of peregrines for the season. 

Non-raptor Observations:
Great blue heron (3), Forster's tern, Eastern kingbird, Baltimore oriole,
red-eyed vireo, DC cormorant (40). 


Predictions:
Mostly sunny, high 80F, slight chance of showers, E wind at 10-15mph.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Jen Ottinger (Jottinger.co AT gmail.com)




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Subject: Delaware: World Shorebirds Day this weekend
From: Alan Kneidel <akneidel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 2015 11:06:42 -0400
DE-Birders,

Who's up for a holiday? September 6th is World Shorebirds Day. As part of
this annual celebration, there is a Global Shorebird Counting event from
September 4th-6th. Rather than a citizen science program, this effort is
aimed at highlighting the importance of regular shorebird monitoring as a
core element of shorebird conservation.

As we all know, Delaware is home to an amazing variety and number of
shorebirds.

So if you are out birding this weekend, consider taking the extra step and
count your shorebirds and submit your records through the World Shorebirds
Day portal on ebird (copied instructions below).

To make your submitted data visible to World Shorebirds Day, checklists are
kindly asked to be shared. Please add the *worldshorebirdsday* eBird
username of World Shorebirds Day (or shorebirdsday AT gmail.com email address)
to your contact list, and share all your related checklists with us (only
the checklists made during the World Shorebirds Day weekend between 4–6
September 2015).

Additional details can be read at these links:

https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/

https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/global-shorebird-counting/

Good birding,

-- 
Alan Kneidel
M.S. Candidate, Natural Resources
Delaware State University
980-254-2706

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Subject: Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch (02 Sep 2015) 11 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2015 15:25:12 -0800
Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch
Lewes, Delaware, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 02, 2015
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              2              2
Osprey                      10             38             38
Bald Eagle                   1              1              1
Northern Harrier             0              0              0
Sharp-shinned Hawk           0              0              0
Cooper's Hawk                0              0              0
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              0              0
Broad-winged Hawk            0              0              0
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             0              0              0
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0
Mississippi Kite             0              0              0

Total:                      11             41             41
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00 
Observation end   time: 14:30:00 
Total observation time: 6.5 hours

Official Counter:        Jennifer Ottinger

Observers:        Kate Fleming, Susan Gruver

Visitors:
Thanks to Sue and Kate for assisting with the count today!
Visitors include Rachael from the DE Coast Press, and 16 others. 


Weather:
Hot, humid and very foggy today, mostly cloudy/fog, temp 26-29C, light
N,NE,SE winds, fair to poor visibility 5-10km.

Raptor Observations:
Mostly osprey moving and our first migrant bald eagle (sub adult) of the
season. 

Non-raptor Observations:
Brown pelican, glossy ibis (flock of 8), willet, Baltimore oriole, red-eyed
vireo, DC cormorant (11).

Predictions:
Fog in the morning turning sunny, high 85F, N winds at 5mph. 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Jen Ottinger (Jottinger.co AT gmail.com)




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Subject: Ashland Nature Center (02 Sep 2015) 8 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2015 12:57:49 -0800
Ashland Nature Center
Hockessin, Delaware, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 02, 2015
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       2              5              5
Bald Eagle                   0              4              4
Northern Harrier             0              0              0
Sharp-shinned Hawk           0              0              0
Cooper's Hawk                1              2              2
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              2              2
Broad-winged Hawk            1              4              4
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             4              4              4
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            0              1              1
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              1              1

Total:                       8             23             23
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:30:00 
Observation end   time: 15:00:00 
Total observation time: 7.5 hours

Official Counter:        Sharon Ellison

Observers:        Derek Stoner, Joe Sebastiani

Visitors:
2 visitors today, one of which was from Switzerland. A thank you to Joe
Sebastiani and Derek Stoner for helping out today!


Weather:
Overall it was a hot, humid, late summer day. A thin, hazy layer of clouds
covered the sky completely until noon, and lessened up for the rest of the
day. Visibility was still the same regardless of the clouds. Winds started
at NE then shifted to NW. 

Raptor Observations:
The flight was less than yesterday; only 8 birds. The morning had an
interesting flight of 4 American Kestrels, which flew pretty low directly
over the watch site in pairs. There were 2 Ospreys in the morning as well,
one of which also flew low over the site, showing a good underbelly view.
There was also 1 Cooper's hawk and 1 Broad-winged hawk. The resident
Red-shouldered hawk pair were heard down in the valley and also seen flying
for brief periods in the afternoon.

Non-raptor Observations:
Still not many warblers around the site but there was a Common Yellowthroat
heard. A White-eyed Vireo was also heard intermittently throughout the day.
A Northern Flicker and a Baltimore Oriole were perched side-by-side at the
top of a tree, both preening themselves for a few minutes in the morning. 5
Eastern Bluebirds were in one of the bare trees behind the site, three of
them older fledglings with bird bands on them. One had a green color band.
There were plenty of dragonflies over the field all day, and around 3
not-migrating Monarch butterflies were in the nearby flowers. 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Sharon Ellison (sellison497 AT gmail.com)
Ashland Nature Center information may be found at:
www.delawarenaturesociety.org




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Subject: Reminder- fall migrants workshop at the Musuem this Saturday
From: Jean Woods <JWoods AT DELMNH.ORG>
Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2015 15:22:23 +0000
Hi,

There's still space left to sign up for the workshop.

A Fall Migrant Songbird ID Workshop will be held at the Delaware Museum of 
Natural History on Saturday, September 5, 2015, from 10 am to noon. 

The workshop is co-sponsored by DOS and the Museum and will use specimens from 
the Museum's study skin collection. Participants will have the opportunity to 
examine up close and discuss the skins of a variety of fall-plumaged migrant 
songbirds. Emphasis will be on fall warbler plumages. Attendees should be 
familiar with the types of fall migrant songbirds likely to be seen in 
Delaware. Even though it's only August, fall migrants are already arriving. If 
you'd like to be less confused by fall warblers this is the class for you! 

The workshop is free but registration is required and space is limited! Age 16 
and over unless accompanied by a parent. Please contact Jean to register or 
with any questions. 

Best wishes- Jean

Jean L. Woods, Ph.D. Phone: 302-658-9111 x314 

Curator of Birds Fax: 302-658-2610 

Delaware Museum of Natural History                      jwoods AT delmnh.org
P.O. Box 3937 www.delmnh.org 

(4840 Kennett Pike)
Wilmington, DE  19807


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Subject: Black and white warbler
From: Diane Kane <dianejkane AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2015 08:55:36 -0400
My neighbor across the street has a lovely, secluded, wooded nature preserve 
complete with a boardwalk, a pond and waterfall 400 feet from the beach. I saw 
a black and white warbler in there this morning and a redstart two days ago. 


Diane Kane 
Indian Beach, DE

Diane J Kane,
Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: chimney swift roost
From: "sally o'byrne" <salobyrne AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 20:35:07 -0400
This is the third year that a large Chimney Swift roost is happening on the 
rooftop of Ingleside Retirement Apartments. Tonight I counted 290 swifts 
entering a roof top pipe. It can be easily seen from Cool Spring Reservoir Park 
at 11th and Franklin, but the park closes at dusk. An excellent view is also 
from 11th and Broom. Tonight, the show began in ernest about 7:45, and the last 
swift entered the pipe at 8:08. 


Sally O'Byrne

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Subject: Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch (01 Sep 2015) 30 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 15:37:28 -0800
Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch
Lewes, Delaware, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 01, 2015
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               2              2              2
Osprey                      28             28             28
Bald Eagle                   0              0              0
Northern Harrier             0              0              0
Sharp-shinned Hawk           0              0              0
Cooper's Hawk                0              0              0
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              0              0
Broad-winged Hawk            0              0              0
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             0              0              0
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0
Mississippi Kite             0              0              0

Total:                      30             30             30
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00 
Observation end   time: 15:00:00 
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter:        Jennifer Ottinger

Observers:        Dennis Foley, Paul Kane, Rachel Shaprio, Susan Gruver

Visitors:
Hawk watch is underway so come out and join us at the platform to enjoy the
wonder of migration!
Thanks to Sue, Paul, Dennis and Rachael for helping out on our first day of
hawk watch 2015! 
25 visitors


Weather:
Clear skies, temp 26-30F, N,NW winds most of the day turning E and S in
late afternoon, hazy but good visibility.

Raptor Observations:
Osprey moving through and a pair of resident adult bald eagles.

Non-raptor Observations:
White-eyed vireo, cedar waxwing, red-bellied woodpecker, chimney swift,
lots of purple martin, willet, lesser yellow-legs, DC cormorant (16).

Predictions:
Sunny with a high of 87F, calm wind and a slight chance of afternoon rain.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Jen Ottinger (Jottinger.co AT gmail.com)




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Subject: Informal DVOC Meeting at Schuylkill Center on Thursday Sep 3
From: Steve Kacir <setkacir AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 18:53:35 -0400
Hi birders, 

The Delaware Valley Ornithological Club (DVOC) meets on 3 September 2015 for an 
informal meeting at the Schuylkill Center. This informal meeting features a 
collection of short programs: "A Celebration of Members Past and Present for 
the 125th Anniversary of the DVOC." In addition, Kristen Johnson, the recipient 
of the DVOC's Adam Sabatine Scholarship Award, will be present as a special 
guest and will report on her week spent at ABA's Camp Avocet in Lewes, DE. 


All who have an interest are invited to attend; the program is free with no 
admission charged. The meeting will begin at 7:30PM and will be held at the 
Schuylkill Center, 8480 Hagy's Mill Road, Philadelphia, PA 19128. More details 
and directions to the Schuylkill Center can be found on the DVOC website: 
http://www.dvoc.org/Main.htm 


Additional information about the Schuylkill Center follows: 

Information about the Schuylkill Center
Web: http://www.schuylkillcenter.org/
Address: 8480 Hagy's Mill Road, Philadelphia, PA 19128 
Phone: 215-482-7300 
Email: scee AT schuylkillcenter.org
Directions: http://www.schuylkillcenter.org/aboutus/directions.html

---------------------------------------
Details on the short programs: 
---------------------------------------

Kristen Johnson, DVOC's Adam Sabatine Scholarship award recipient, will be our 
special guest and will report on her week spent at ABA's Camp Avocet in Lewes, 
DE. 


Bert Filemyr presents "DVOC Membership Over The Years"

Chris Walters presents "Sandy Sherman, the first female president of DVOC"

Scott McConnell presents "Witmer Stone, one of the founding members of the DVOC 
and long-time editor of Cassinia" 


If time permits, Steve Kacir will present a program written and produced by Don 
Jones: "My Birding Mentor: Rick Mellon." 



We hope to see you at the meeting! 

Steve Kacir
DVOC Vice President
setkacirgmail.com
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Subject: Ashland Nature Center (01 Sep 2015) 15 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 14:10:34 -0800
Ashland Nature Center
Hockessin, Delaware, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 01, 2015
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       3              3              3
Bald Eagle                   4              4              4
Northern Harrier             0              0              0
Sharp-shinned Hawk           0              0              0
Cooper's Hawk                1              1              1
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          2              2              2
Broad-winged Hawk            3              3              3
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             0              0              0
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            1              1              1
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               1              1              1

Total:                      15             15             15
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:45:00 
Observation end   time: 15:00:00 
Total observation time: 7.25 hours

Official Counter:        Sharon Ellison

Observers:        David Beattie, Derek Stoner, Joe Sebastiani, Mike Gardner,
                  Mike Smith, Sally O'Byrne

Visitors:
13 visitors. A thank you to, Mike Gardner, Mike Smith, Joe Sebastiani,
Derek Stoner, Sally O'Byrne, and David Beattie for helping out at the watch
today!


Weather:
Temperatures were hot and the sky was mostly clear on our first day of the
2015 season. Winds picked up during the day to a nice breeze and a few
clouds dotted the sky in the afternoon. Wind directions were. W/NW.

Raptor Observations:
Today was a decent flight for an early September day. 4 Bald Eagles, 3
Osprey, 1 Cooper's hawk (a close one), 2 red-shouldered hawks, and 3
Broad-winged hawks. We also had some nice looks at a few non-migrating
Red-tailed hawks and a couple of resident Red-shouldered hawks, one of
which we heard calling throughout the morning. 

Non-raptor Observations:
A Great Blue Heron flew over us early in the morning. 5 Ruby-throated
hummingbirds, 7 Bobolinks, 1 Indigo Bunting, 1 Magnolia Warbler, 1 common
Yellowthroat, 1 
Baltimore Oriole, and 1 White-eyed Vireo.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Sharon Ellison (sellison497 AT gmail.com)
Ashland Nature Center information may be found at:
www.delawarenaturesociety.org




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Subject: Middle Run Bird Walk: Golden-winged Warbler and More Migrants
From: Derek Stoner <derek AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 19:30:15 +0000
Greetings DE-Birders:

The first guided bird walk of the Fall season kicked off this morning with an 
eager crew of 19 birders hitting the Middle Run Birding Trail in search of 
avian activity. 


The hedgerow along the Possum Hollow powerline held scores of Eastern Kingbirds 
and Cedar Waxwings feeding on the fruits of Sassafras and Black Cherry trees. 
Nearby at the famous Tree-of-Heaven, we watched Brown Thrashers, Ruby-throated 
Hummingbirds, Red-eyed Vireos, Baltimore Orioles, and Common Yellowthroats 
perching and preening on the open branches. 


With bright sunlight and temperatures soaring quickly, we focused on following 
birds to the shadier (and cooler) places. Working our way down the powerline 
into the valley, we came across American Redstarts and Magnolia Warblers near 
Trail Marker 14, and spied a cooperative Veery perched amongst vines. Acadian 
Flycatcher and Eastern Wood-peewees called from the floodplain forest, while 
Wood Thrushes uttered their "wicka-wicka" from the dark recesses of 
early-successional thicket. 


While walking the narrow dirt path near Trail Marker 10, sharp-eyed New 
Jerseyan Denise Bittle spied a songbird working its way quietly along a branch 
of a Tuliptree. The group got glimpses of the bird as it foraged amongst the 
clusters of brown dead leaves in classic Vermivora warbler fashion. The bird's 
pale black throat, pale black mask, yellow cap and golden-colored coverts 
pointed to an exciting reality: we were watching a female Golden-winged 
Warbler- a species ever-more difficult to find in this region due to a 
declining population and hybridization with their more-common Blue-winged 
Warbler cousins. Based upon eBird records, this looks to be the first 
Golden-winged recorded this year in Delaware. Certainly a Life Bird for many in 
attendance today. 


Despite the efforts of multiple cameras, we could not manage to nab a photo of 
this bird as it moved amongst the maze of branches. While working to get 
fleeting looks, we picked up better views of Chestnut-sided, Black-and-white, 
and Magnolia Warblers. 


We concluded the morning with 9 species of warblers and 54 species total. Our 
group eBird checklist is viewable at: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24850663 


The Middle Run Birding Trail brochure and map are available at: 
www.DelNature.org/MiddleRun 


The next guided bird walk at Middle Run will be held on Tuesday, September 8 at 
8:00am. Hope to see you there! 


Good birding,

Derek Stoner

Seasonal Program Team Leader
Delaware Nature Society
302-239-2334, ext. 106
derek AT delnature.org
https://www.flickr.com/photos/125621243 AT N08/





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Subject: Broadkill Beach
From: Jeff & Deborah Climie <climie99 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 07:46:21 -0400
Friday morning, I went with Dave & Joy Peters to look for the Black terns.
we were able to see two of them on the south side of the
impoundments were they have been seeing them. we also saw a Bairds on the
other side of the road and also saw the buff-breasted where it has been
seen. we also were able to identify one gull-billed tern. We went to Turkle
Pond Road and saw Magnolia, several prothonotarys, black-and-white, and
redstart.

Jeff Climie

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Subject: Middle Run Bird Walks Begin September 1
From: Derek Stoner <derekstoner AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 21:34:22 -0400
Greetings DE-Birders:

The excitement of Fall Migration is in the air and so are the birds as they 
move Southward. 


On Tuesday, September 1, another season of weekly guided bird walks begins on 
the Middle Run Birding Trail near Newark. Walks will be held every Tuesday 
morning through the end of October. The Delaware Nature Society hosts these 
walks as part of our partnership with New Castle County Parks. 


In the past two years, more than 150 species of birds have been recorded during 
the months of September and October at Middle Run, with the waves of warblers 
(30+ species) highlighting the colorful parade of Neo-tropical migrants. 


Walks begin at 8:00am and typically last until 10:00am. We meet in the circular 
parking lot at the end of the long gravel driveway off of a Possum Hollow Road. 
Simply follow the black and white signs for the Middle Run Birding Trail. 


This Tuesday I will co-lead the walk along with the talented Tim Schreckengost. 
A spotting scope is utilized to maximize the viewing opportunities of the birds 
we observe. 


The Delaware Nature Society website features links to the Middle Run Birding 
Trail brochure, along with driving directions and a map. Visit: 
www.DelNature.org/MiddleRun 


Good birding,

Derek Stoner,
Delaware Nature Society

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Subject: Canada Warbler in Greenville
From: Matthew Sarver <mjsarver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 10:11:02 -0400
I awoke to a whisper-singing Canada Warbler in the hemlock outside my
bedroom door this morning!  Great way to start the day. Also a few
Black-and-Whites among the chickadee flock.

Good birding,
Matt

-- 
Matthew Sarver
Sarver Ecological, LLC
6 Walnut Ridge Rd
Greenville, DE 19807
724-689-5845
matt AT matthewsarver.com

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Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 28th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 21:33:58 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* August 28, 2015
* DEST1508.28
	
*Birds mentioned
Tundra Swan
Wood Duck
Gadwall
Blue-winged Teal
Green-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Surf Scoter
Pied-billed Grebe
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
Brown Pelican
Least Bittern
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Glossy Ibis
Black Vulture
Northern Harrier
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Cooper's Hawk
Broad-winged Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
American Golden Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Killdeer
Solitary Sandpiper
Spotted Sandpiper
Willet
Hudsonian Godwit
Marbled Godwit
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Western Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER
Pectoral Sandpiper
Stilt Sandpiper
BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE
Least Tern
Gull-billed Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Common Tern
Royal Tern
SANDWICH TERN
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Eastern Screech-Owl 
Great Horned Owl 
Barred Owl
Common Nighthawk 
Red-headed Woodpecker 
Pileated Woodpecker
Peregrine Falcon
Merlin
American Kestrel
Olive-sided Flycatcher
ALDER FLYCATCHER
"Trails-type" Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Yellow-throated Vireo
Warbling Vireo
PHILADELPHIA VIREO
Bank Swallow
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Veery
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Black and White Warbler
American Redstart
Worm-eating Warbler
Blue-winged Warbler
Tennessee Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Pine Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Bobolink
Eastern Meadowlark
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole


Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: August 28, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For Friday, August 28th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. Five new birds were added this week to
raise the unofficial Delaware annual list annual list to 320 species.
Several "Trail's-type"flycatchers were reported this week. This is the old
name of the Empidonax complex for ALDER/WILLOW FLYCATCHER that is almost
indistinguishable in the field unless vocalizing. 

New this week were BAIRD'S SANDPIPERS at 4 different locations in the state.
The first BAIRD'S SANDPIPER found was at the ponds at Gravel Hill in Sussex
County. Those ponds are located along US Route 9 between Lewes and
Georgetown. The bird was seen on the small pond on the north side of the
road along with SEMIPALMATED and LEAST SANDPIPER, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER,
KILLDEER and SPOTTED SANDPIPER.

A BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER was seen and photographed on Thursday at Broadkill
Marsh in Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge. The bird was seen walking
across the grassy marsh areas on the north side of the road. A BAIRD'S
SANDPIPER with the BUFF-BREASTED was found today. This is along Route 16
going out the Broadkill Beach. Also seen in the marsh were 10 BLACK-NECKED
STILTS plus PECTORAL, WESTERN, LEAST SANDPIPERS and hundreds of SEMIPALMATED
SANDPIPERS. Several GULL-BILLED TERNS and 24 BLACK TERNS were also seen
along with a PIED-BILLED GREBE.

Some more birds at Prime Hook included a MARBLED GODWIT along the Prime Hook
Beach Road on Tuesday. A flock of 26 immature WHITE IBIS was seen at the
observation blind by the headquarters. BLACK AND WHITE and PRAIRIE WARBLERS
were seen along the observation point trail. OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER was
reported along Cods Road. 11 AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS were seen at Fowler's
Beach with CASPIAN and ROYAL TERN. Four AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS plus
AMERICAN AVOCETS, BLACK-NECKED STILTS, WILLET, BLACK-BELLIED and
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, SANDERLING, plus SHORT and LONG-BILLED
DOWITCHER were also seen at Fowler's. AVOCETS and BLACK-NECKED STILT were
also seen along the Prime Hook Beach Road with LEAST and CASPIAN TERN, plus
15 BLACK SKIMMERS. A peak count of 75 GREAT and 300 SNOWY EGRETS plus
TRICOLORED and LITTLE BLUE HERON were also found at Prime Hook Beach.

A big flock of 76 WHITE IBIS was found at Gordon's Pond in Cape Henlopen
State Park on Tuesday. Another BAIRD'S SANDPIPER was also found there, along
with AMERICAN AVOCET, BLACK-NECKED STILT, WILLET, SANDERLING, plus SOLITARY,
SPOTTED, and WESTERN SANDPIPERS. TERNS seen included LEAST, BLACK, ROYAL and
COMMON with FORSTER'S TERN. 4 CLIFF SWALLOWS were found among the swallows
over the pond. BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH was found in the woods. 

A single PIPING PLOVER with 30 SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS was still at The Point
in Cape Henlopen State Park. AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER,
and ROYAL, BLACK, COMMON and FORSTER'S TERN were also seen.  A WARBLING
VIREO and BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH were found in the woods by the nature
center. 15 WHITE IBIS continue be seen at the Monroe Avenue ponds in Lewes.
10 COMMON NIGHTHAWKS were seen flying over the ponds in the evening. BLACK
TERN plus WILSON'S STORM-PETREL were seen from the Cape May-Lewes Ferry with
3 BROWN PELICANS.

Three RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were found at Mulberry Landing in Assawoman
Wildlife Area along with BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH. A PILEATED WOODPECKER was
seen in Bethany Beach, away from their usual habitat. Four BROWN PELICANS
were seen from the Fenwick Towers. SANDWICH TERN and AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVER
were found on the beach at Fenwick Island State Park. Two YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT HERONS were seen at Burton's Island, but if you got there watch out
for ticks!

Two RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were also seen at Big Stone Beach in Milford Neck
Wildlife Area. These were adult birds at the edge the marsh, along with 4
BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCHES. A calling ALDER FLYCATCHER was reported at Big
Stone Beach, plus LEAST FLYCATCHER and YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO. Warblers seen
included BLACK AND WHITE, BAY-BREASTED, PINE, YELLOW-THROATED, AMERICAN
REDSTART, and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT. A COMMON TERN was seen flying out over
Big Stone Beach. The ponds at Big Stone had 72 SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS plus
both YELLOWLEGS and WESTERN SANDPIPER.

Another BAIRD'S SANDPIPER was seen at the Augustine Beach Causeway along
Route 9 near Port Penn. That bird was seen in the little pond on the north
side of Augustine Creek, just south of the Augustine Beach Parking Area.
Also reported was a MARBLED GODWIT at the Port Penn Impoundments of
Augustine Wildlife Area, along the Dike trail on the riverside mudflats.
Port Penn also had SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, WESTERN SANDPIPER, TRICOLORED and
LITTLE BLUE HERON, 5 CASPIAN TERNS, 2 BALD EAGLES, BANK SWALLOW, and
BOBOLINK. The woods by the parking lot had AMERICAN REDSTART, PRAIRIE and
YELLOW WARBLER.

Two HUDSONIAN GODWITS plus 3 MARBLED GODWITS were reported at Bombay Hook
National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna. Those birds were seen on the spit at
the north end of Sheerness Pool. A RED-NECKED PHALAROPE was found flying
around Night Heron Island at the north end of Bear Swamp on Thursday. Other
shorebirds seen included up to 400 AMERICAN AVOCETS, 6 BLACK-NECKED STILTS,
plus SPOTTED, WHITE-RUMP, PECTORAL, STILT, and WESTERN SANDPIPER. 80
BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER and 120 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER were seen along with
LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER. Two BLACK TERNS were reported along with 52 CASPIAN
TERNS at Sheerness Pool. Waterfowl seen included TUNDRA SWAN, BLUE-WINGED
and GREEN-WINGED TEAL, NORTHERN SHOVELER, and GADWALL. TRICOLORED HERON is
still being seen at Raymond Pool Other waders in the refuge include LEAST
BITTERN, LITTLE BLUE HERON, GLOSSY IBIS,  YELLOW-CROWNED and BLACK-CROWNED
NIGHT HERON. A surprising BROAD-WINGED HAWK was seen flying over the woods
on the west side of Sheerness. Other raptors seen included: COOPER'S HAWK,
NORTHERN HARRIER, PEREGRINE FALCON, MERLIN, 4 BALD EAGLES, OSPREY, and a
GREAT HORNED OWL at Finis pool. Landbirds seen included LEAST FLYCATCHER,
BANK SWALLOW, BOBOLINK, and EASTERN MEADOWLARK.

A flock of 8 AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVERS were seen along the North Little Creek
Rd. opposite Quaker Meeting Road, which leads to Cartanza Road. AMERICAN
KESTREL was also seen here. Two more AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVERS were seen in
western Kent County in a field along Route 300, west of Garrison Lake. Other
plovers there included 10 BLACK-BELLIEDS and 6 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER. A female
SURF SCOTER was reported at Port Mahon along with ROYAL TERNS. Shorebirds
there included BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER and RUDDY TURNSTONE. A BLACK TERN was
seen at the North Pond of the Logan Tract in Ted Harvey Conservation Area
along the Kitts Hummock Road. 45 AMERICAN AVOCETS and 30 SEMIPALMATED
PLOVERS were also found. Lot of flycatchers were reported at the Logan tract
today, mostly KINGBIRDS and PEWEES, but an OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER was also
reported there. A BARRED OWL was reported in Cheswold

A PHILADELPHIA VIREO was found in a back yard in Brandywine Hundred along
Grubb Road. BLUE-WINGED and PRAIRIE WARBLER were also seen. Three BLACK
VULTURES were found sitting in the garden. NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH was seen in
another year in Brandywine Hundred. REDSTART, BLACK-THROATED BLUE,
CHESTNUT-SIDED and BLACK AND WHITE WARBLERS were reported at Bellevue State
Park, along with COOPER'S HAWK and a flyover BALD EAGLE. A few PURPLE
MARTINS are still being seen there hunting over the pond. 

Lots of migrants are being seen at Middle Run Natural Area near Newark
including: LEAST and a TRAIL'S-TYPE FLYCATCHER, YELLOW-THROATED VIREO and
VEERY. Warblers seen at Middle Run included, TENNESSEE, NASHVILLE,
BLUE-WINGED, MAGNOLIA, CHESTNUT-SIDED, YELLOW, PRAIRIE, BLACK-THROATED
GREEN, BLACK AND WHITE, CANADA, and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT. BOBOLINK, ORCHARD,
and BALTIMORE ORIOLES were also reported. A calling BARRED OWL was found
along the creek.

Ashland Nature Center had WARBLING VIREO, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH and
CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER. WORM-EATING WARBLER and a female BLACK-THROATED BLUE
were seen at the Center Mill Road. The Ashland Hawkwatch had RED-SHOULDERED
and BROAD-WINGED HAWK this week. A PEREGRINE FALCON seen at Ashland
displayed leg bands, revealing the bird was a hatch year female from
northern Barnegat Bay, New Jersey. WOOD DUCKS and 4 VEERYS plus a
CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER were seen at the Hillside Mill Cove at Hoope's
Reservoir. 

11 species of warbler were found at Brandywine Creek State Park on Sunday,
included OVENBIRD, CANADA, BAY-BREASTED, WORM-EATING, BLUE-WINGED,
BLACK-THROATED BLUE, MAGNOLIA, and CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER. WARBLING and
YELLOW-THROATED VIREO were also found along with YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, 4
EASTERN SCREECH OWLS, BALD EAGLE, and 50 BOBOLINKS in the field by the
nature center.

Besides the previous reported NIGHTHAWKS in Lewes, they've also been seen
along the ridgelines in northern Delaware. A flight of 34 COMMON NIGHTHAWKS
were seen on Sunday evening at Brandywine Creek. 10 NIGHTHAWKS were seen at
Granogue along the Brandywine Creek tonight. NIGHTHAWKS were also seen
flying over Brandywine Hundred, North Star, Middle Run, and Newark. This
weekend should be the peak of their migration.

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Derek Stoner, Chad
Kauffman, Ragan Sutterfield, Ashley Norton, Amy O'Neil, Kim Steininger,
Armas Hill, David Fees, Mike Smith, Phil Thompson, Ian Stewart, Gina
Sheridan, Rachael Shapiro, Ken Wat, Joe Sebastiani, Jim White, Lauren
Morgans, Frank Marenghi, Chinkang Cheng, Zoe Yost, Chris Rowe, Lynn Smith,
Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn, Chandler Wiegand, Tim Schreckengost, Alan Kneidel,
Helen Aikman, Rich Clifton, Steve Collins, Maurice Barnhill, and Joe
Russell. Remember, the birdline needs your sightings! Please call your
reports into 302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week,
this is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware

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Subject: Cecil County Coming Events and Request for Help
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata AT ZOOMINTERNET.NET>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 14:36:49 -0400
Delaware birders, if you'd like to venture across the state line this month,
we have a number of events coming up:

 

The annual Turkey Point Hawk Watch, which has been going for 20 years,
begins on Tuesday, September 8. So far, we have only one person signed up
for that first week: Parke John, who will observe on Friday the 11th.  For
the week of September 13, we have observers on Sunday, Monday, Thursday and
Friday. Because this week is the peak for Broadwinged Hawk migration, we
really don't want gaps in observation. If you can help us during these first
two weeks, please let me know as soon as possible. You may sign up via email
or at next week's club meeting.


The Hawk Watch Kickoff Bird Walk is not in September but will take place
tomorrow, August 29, at 7:00 a.m. A report from Turkey Point last week said
the place was chock-full of migrating warblers and other songbirds, so this
promises to be an exceptional field trip. Be prepared for a leisurely
round-trip hike to the Point, a distance of about two miles. Most of the
walking is on a gravel road with good footing, but there are a few hilly
sections. Wear comfortable shoes/boots for walking. Bring drinks and/or
snacks. Sunscreen and bug spray are strongly recommended. Meet at the Turkey
Point Parking Lot at 7:00 a.m. for a half-day trip. From the town of North
East, go south on Rt. 272 about 11 miles. The road ends at the parking lot.
Trip leader is Sean McCandless.

 

We will have our first club meeting of the season on Wednesday, September 2,
at 7:00 p.m. in the Senior Center of the County Administration Building, 200
Chesapeake Boulevard, Elkton, MD (literally yards over the DE line!). Sean
McCandless will present a Hawk Identification workshop that will help all of
us refresh our ID skills before the Hawk Watch starts. If you have signed up
to observe this year, please try to attend this meeting.

 

Pat Valdata


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Subject: Ashland Hawk Watch Begins September 1
From: Derek Stoner <derek AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 17:06:50 +0000
Greetings DE-Birders:

The Ashland Hawk Watch will soon begin its eighth season of raptor counting 
this Fall, starting next Tuesday, September 1. 


We are excited to start another season of observing raptor migration in the Red 
Clay Valley, amongst the hills of northern Delaware's Piedmont region. Every 
Fall brings promise for new discoveries and memorable observations of the large 
numbers of hawks, eagles, falcons, and other raptors winging their way 
southward. 


This season we welcome our new Hawk Watch Coordinator, Sharon Ellison, to the 
hill as she builds upon on her experience last Fall as a trainee in Hawk 
Mountain's renowned International Conservation Trainee program. Sharon served 
as a raptor migration counter and educator for the thousands of visitors that 
visit this legendary location in Autumn, and has a strong background in bird 
conservation and research. 


Come on out for "Opening Day" September 1 and join the crew on Hawk Watch Hill 
to see what is flying on by. The Hawk Watch is free and open to the public from 
9:00am to 4:00pm every day of the week, staffed by a talented team of observers 
and volunteer data recorders. If you are interested in helping out with the 
hawk watch this season, please contact me at this email address for more 
information. 


For directions and details about the Ashland Hawk Watch, please visit our 
website: http://delnature.org/hawkwatch 


Happy hawk watching,

Derek Stoner

Delaware Nature Society
302-239-2334, ext. 106
derek AT delnature.org
https://www.flickr.com/photos/125621243 AT N08/








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Subject: Little Creek Morning
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 09:52:52 -0400
I ran out to the headquarters tract at Little Creek WIldlife Area this
morning before work to see if anything dropped in.  Last night I was able
to spend a few minutes scoping the face of the moon through a gap in the
tree canopy over my yard and had 6 birds pass across in roughly 5 minutes
of viewing.  I also had an equal number of foraging bats.  I found a lot of
activity along the road to the tower near the two ponds.  I had 2 Baltimore
Orioles (1 male, 1 female), 1 Yellow-billed Cuckoo, 15 Red-eyed Vireos, 2
American Redstarts. 1 Least Flycatcher, 1 Eastern Wood-Pewee, 2
Brown-thrashers, a handfull of Gray Catbirds and American Robins, 1
Northern Flicker, 2 Red-bellied Woodpeckers, 2 Common Yellowthroats, 10
Lesser Yellowlegs, 3 Greater Yellowlegs and 1 Killdeer.

Chris Bennett
Milford, DE

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Subject: Early Migrants in Kent County
From: Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 01:23:22 -0400
A cool northeasterly breeze this morning (Friday - 08/28/15)  carried an
early hint of autumn. Some of the species that we noted along Big Stone
Beach Road included BAY-BREASTED WARBLER - 1, AMERICAN REDSTART - 1,
YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT - 1, PINE WARBLER, BLACK & WHITE WARBLER - 5,
YELLOW-THROATED (YELLOW-LORED) WARBLER - 2, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER -3,
PILEATED WOODPECKER -1, RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD -2, BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH
- 6, and a stunning view of a YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO (in the same spot where
Chris Bennett reported seeing one). Seemingly, there were BLUE-GRAY
GNATCATCHERS everywhere!

On Bennett's Pier Road, there was an immature PRAIRIE WARBLER.  The
saltmarsh at Bower's Beach held a SEASIDE SPARROW.

On Tuesday afternoon (08/25/15) Dennis and I dipped on the reported Marbled
Godwit that was reported on Prime Hook Beach Road. However, a bright,
reddish backed, juvenile WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER was a nice consolation. A
juvenile LITTLE BLUE HERON was in the midst of a tightly packed Snowy Egret
feeding flock along Fowler Beach Road.


Happy Early Fall Migration to all,

Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE

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Subject: test
From: Msn <phoenixlady AT MSN.COM>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2015 21:02:42 -0400
second test... please ignore (sorry)

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Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Broadkill Marsh
From: "Fees, David F. (DNREC)" <David.Fees AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2015 20:32:03 +0000
Hit several of the favorite shorebird locations in Sussex County this morning 
before heading to work. The mudflats at the Gravel Hill pond east of Georgetown 
are starting to dry out and shorebird diversity was down from last weekend. 
Still 6 of the more common species, but the Baird's Sandpipers were not there. 
Next stop was Broadkill Marsh where I found the Buff-breasted fairly close to 
the road at the east end of the marsh. It hung out in the drier section along 
with many Least Sandpipers and one Pectoral. Also there was a sharp looking 
Western Sandpiper that had quite a bit of rufous. Also there were over a dozen 
Black Terns gleening the algae mats on the south side of the road. At the time 
I was there (8 am) the viewing of the terns was looking right into the sun. At 
Prime Hook Beach Road, two flyby Tricolored Herons were nice, as too was a 
Least Bittern that took flight briefly over the phrags on the south side close 
to the road. The other notable at this spot is about 20 avocets, all in basic 
plumage. Last stop was Fowler Beach, but not much going on there, just the 
usual, including the White Pelicans. There were a large number of Caspian 
Terns, 30 or more. 


Good birding,

David Fees
Seaford, DE


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Subject: testing, please disregard
From: Msn <phoenixlady AT MSN.COM>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2015 14:43:23 -0400
Just testing...

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Subject: Marbled Godwit
From: joe sebastiani <joe AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2015 13:08:06 +0000
Marbled Godwit at north end of Port Penn wetlands now.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

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Subject: Volunteers needed for the Cape Henlopen Hawk Watch
From: Anthony Gonzon <atgonzon AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2015 07:06:25 -0400
Greetings all, 

Ever visit the Hawk Watch platform at Cape Henlopen? Each Fall, hundreds of
people stop by to learn about migrating hawks moving south beginning on
September 1 and running through the end of November. To make the Cape
Henlopen Hawk Watch run, it relies on volunteers to come and help spot and
record the raptors and other birds that pass by the platform.

This year, we encourage everyone to stop by and visit and spend some time
helping Hawk Counter Jen and the awesome volunteers like Sue Gruver and John
Hoyt! We especially encourage folks to sign up for some time slots so that
there is adequate coverage at the watch. If you are interested in signing up
for a few days to help out, contact Sue at srgruver AT aol.com or me at
atgonzon AT verizon.net. If you can't sign up for certain days, just stop down
- you are always welcome!

Hawk Watch starts on September 1 - look for daily reports on the de-birds
listserv!

Anthony Gonzon

Middletown, DE

 


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Subject: Re: Winter Wren
From: Maurice Barnhill <mvb AT UDEL.EDU>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 12:53:30 -0400
the earliest graph mark for Winter Wren in Birds of Delaware is in the 
second week of September.

On 8/26/2015 10:25 AM, Lynn M. Smith wrote:
> At Rehoboth Golf Park, 7:45 AM, little dull brown wren quickly disappearing 
into wigelia bushes at maintenance building. 10:05 AM, the quiet song of a 
Winter Wren. Early!!?? 

>    
> Lynn M. Smith
> lynnmsmith AT comcast.net
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu

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Subject: Big Stone Beach Road
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 11:04:14 -0400
The past two mornings I have birded along Big Stone Beach Road between the
bay and Scotts Corner Road before heading to work.  Not much in the way of
migrants - but I did find a few good birds.

Both yesterday and today there was a single Yellow-billed Cuckoo in the big
snag stand just west of the gravel parking lot across from the cable-gated
entrance to the Delaware Wild Lands property.  Yesterday I also had a
single female Summer Tanager and today there was a single adult Red-headed
Woodpecker in the same location.

I had 6 - 8 Brown-headed Nuthatches each day.

Yesterday I had a single Yellow Warbler in addition to a bunch of Common
Yellowthroats and PIne Warblers.  Today I had 2 Yellowthroated and 2
Black-and-white Warblers.

This morning there was a single Least Flycatcher in the first stand of
trees on the north side of the road you come to when heading away from the
bay.

The wetlands at the end of the road are bone dry - but today I had a group
of 72 Semipalmated Plovers there.  Watching from a nearby snag was a fresh
immature Peregrine Falcon.

Chris Bennett
MIlford, DE

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Subject: Winter Wren
From: "Lynn M. Smith" <lynnmsmith AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 14:25:15 +0000
At Rehoboth Golf Park, 7:45 AM, little dull brown wren quickly disappearing 
into wigelia bushes at maintenance building.  10:05 AM, the quiet song of a 
Winter Wren.  Early!!?? 

  
Lynn M. Smith 
lynnmsmith AT comcast.net 

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Subject: Brandywine Birdwalk, 8/29
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 06:26:26 -0400
The monthly Birdwalk at Brandywine Creek State Park is this Saturday, 8/29,
We'll meet at 8 am in the observation deck of the nature center. The walk
will take about 2-3 hours, over the hills and along the creek.  The walk is
free, but park entrance fees are in effect. I've been seeing about 50
species in the park each day. Last weekend I had 11 species of warbler,
including Bay-breasted, Worm-eating, Blue-winged, Magnolia and
Black-throated Blue. There was a flock of about 50 Bobolink in the meadow
along the entrance gate, just past Dickcissel Hill. Wear boots and bring bug
repellant!

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: Evening Heron Survey
From: "Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" <Chris.Bennett AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2015 20:47:25 +0000
This Wednesday we will be conducting our final Evening Heron Survey of the 2015 
season. This survey has been conducted during the period of active breeding and 
roosting on Pea Patch Island since 2003. We begin two hours before sunset and 
end 30 minutes after sunset - counting every heron, egret and ibis we see 
flying and to and from the heronry during that time period. Surveys take place 
in Battery Park in Delaware City - the park at the end of Clinton Street. In 
August the number of birds roosting in the heronry is about a third what we 
count at the height of breeding - but we usually still see good numbers or 
Little Blue Herons and Cattle Egrets and a few of all the other species. It 
offers a great opportunity to learn to distinguish immature Little Blue Herons 
from the other white egrets. We also usually see interesting migrants including 
Bobolink, shorebirds and Common Nighthawks. Please come out and join us for the 
whole 150 minutes or any portion of the survey. The bulk of birds returning to 
the heronry occurs in the second hour of the survey - but great stuff can turn 
up at any time. 


Hope to see you there.

Chris Bennett
Natural Resource Planner
Environmental Stewardship Program
Division of Parks and Recreation
152 South State Street
Dover, DE 19963
302-739-9230
Subject: Willets
From: Diane Kane <dianejkane AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Aug 2015 15:36:18 -0400
Just had two Willets fly by heading north along the shore break.

Reporting from Indian Beach, Diane Kane


Diane J Kane,
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Alder Flycatcher & Baird's Sandpiper
From: Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 22 Aug 2015 17:39:38 -0400
On this fine Saturday morning (08/22/15), Dennis and were hoping to find
migrants on Milford Neck. Although bird activity was low and there were
precious few migrants, we did find an ALDER FLYCATCHER on Big Stone Beach
Road. It was in the first significant open canopy area with dead trees and
a significant phrag understory that one encounters on the way out to Big
Stone Beach proper.

When we stopped, there was a "Traill's" type flycatcher that was perched
 on a tall shrub, but it quickly dived behind the phrag understory. As we
were viewing BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH, PINE WARBLER, RED-EYED VIREO, etc. I
noticed a sharp call note that sounded quite familiar to me. In fact it
sounded the call note that Alder Flycatchers often gave when we encountered
them in the Canadian Maritimes this spring. Although this bird was hidden
from our view most of the time, it delivered this call note frequently.
Fortunately, we did see this bird one more time to verify that it was
indeed a Traill's type flycatcher, and that is was introducing itself to us
by its Alder vocalization.

When we returned from lunch, we received David Fee's RBA text that reported
two Baird's Sandpipers were present at the Gravel Hill Ponds - Sussex
County. Zipping down there around 1:00 PM, we were well pleased to see
these juvenile BAIRD'S SANDPIPERs.

At times, only one bird was in view. It was noticeably larger with a well
defined buffy brown breastband, and black legs. While viewing the bird when
it was feeding head down and facing away, I could see that the primaries
extended well beyond the tail and crossed themselves into a open
scissor-like pattern. We first saw it on the back pond water's edge.
However, it spent quite a bit of time on the drier mud flats farther away
from the water too. Before we left, the second Baird's returned and was
feeding close to the one that I described in detail here. In comparison to
the stubbier SESA, the Baird's appeared more elegant with its regal upright
posture and long wings. Both Baird's did chase off SESA that were too near
to their feeding territory.

We also saw Killdeer, Semipalm Plover & Sandpiper, Least & Pectoral
Sandpipers, Green Heron, Spotted & Solitary Sandpipers. Here are David's
directions again: " DelDOT/Besche Furniture Ponds along Route 9 just west
of Route 30. This area is known as Gravel Hill and is located about 5 miles
east of Georgetown. The pond on the north side of Route 9 has extensive mud
flats."

Many thanks to David again for his excellent find and report (it was a
state lifer for both of us). I hope that the Baird's stay for others to
enjoy this fine species.

Good summer birding to all,

Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE
Subject: Shorebirds at Gravel Hill Ponds - Sussex County
From: "Fees, David F. (DNREC)" <David.Fees AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Fri, 21 Aug 2015 12:11:39 +0000
Last Saturday and again yesterday evening I stopped at the DelDOT/Besche 
Furniture Ponds along Route 9 just west of Route 30. This area is known as 
Gravel Hill and is located about 5 miles east of Georgetown. The pond on the 
north side of Route 9 has extensive mud flats and has attracted a combined 
total of 9 species of shorebird so far (8 each day), including Killdeer, SemiP 
Plover, both yellowlegs, and Spotted, Solitary, SemiP, Least and Pectoral 
Sandpipers. Herons and egrets are taking advantage of the easy pickings in the 
shallow water remaining in the pond, including one each of Great Blue Heron, 
Great Egret and Snowy Egret and several Green Herons. 


Views are great since the pond is along the road so the birds are relatively 
close, and you'll be looking generally north with the sun at your back. 


While the 9 shorebirds already seen are expected inland, any additional species 
seen will be good for inland Sussex County. Check it out! 



David Fees
Seaford, DE
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 20th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 20 Aug 2015 22:01:31 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* August 20, 2015
* DEST1508.20
	
*Birds mentioned
Mute Swan 
Tundra Swan
Black Swan (exotic)
Wood Duck
Northern Pintail
Northern Shoveler
Green-winged Teal
Blue-winged teal
Surf Scoter
Black Scoter
Pied-billed Grebe
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
Brown Pelican
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
Glossy Ibis
WHITE IBIS
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Broad-winged Hawk
Clapper Rail
King Rail
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
American Golden Plover
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Willet
UPLAND SANDPIPER
Marbled Godwit
Whimbrel
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Western Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Dunlin
Stilt Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Wilson's Phalarope
Least Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Common Tern
Royal Tern
Sandwich Tern
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
Eastern Screech-Owl
Great Horned Owl
Pileated Woodpecker
Peregrine Falcon
Least Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Purple Martin
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Veery
Cedar Waxwing
Ovenbird
Louisiana Waterthrush
Northern Waterthrush
Worm-eating Warbler
Black and White Warbler
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Blue-winged Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Pine Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Kentucky Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Canada Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Grasshopper Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Blue Grosbeak
Bobolink
Eastern Meadowlark


Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: August 20, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For Thursday, August 20th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware
Museum of Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware annual list
annual list remains at 315 species this week. 17 species of warbler were
seen this week as migration is starting to heat up. 

Eight UPLAND SANDPIPERS were seen at Bergold field (formerly Bergdoll field)
opposite Dover Air Force Base along Route 9. This field has recently been
mowed and the birds were easy to see. Also reported nearby at the Logan
Tract of Ted Harvey Conservation Area near Kitts Hummock was a BLACK TERN at
the north pond. Also seen was KING RAIL in the grasses along with
BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, YELLOWLEGS, and LEAST SANDPIPER. A
juvenile WILSON'S PHALAROPE and AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVER were seen at the
Pickering Beach side of Little Creek Wildlife Management Area. Among the
sandpipers there were WHITE-RUMPED and WESTERN plus 15 PECTORAL SANDPIPERS.
ROYAL TERNS were seen at Port Mahon with a flock of 50 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER,
plus BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER and RUDDY TURNSTONE.

WILSON'S PHALAROPE was also seen at Raymond Pool in Bombay Hook National
Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna. Two MARBLED GODWITS with about 400 AMERICAN
AVOCETS were at Raymond Pool. The GODWITS were later seen at the sandbar in
Sheerness Pool from the observation tower. Also reported were 4 BLACK-NECKED
STILTS, BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, WHIMBREL, STILT, WESTERN,
WHITE-RUMP, and PECTORAL SANDPIPER, plus LONG-BILLED and SHORT-BILLED
DOWITCHER. A female NORTHERN PINTAIL plus NORTHERN SHOVELER, BLUE-WINGED and
GREEN-WINGED TEAL with TUNDRA SWAN were seen. Two TRICOLORED HERON and a
WHITE IBIS were at Raymond Pool. Both YELLOW-CROWNED and BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT
HERONS were seen at Night Heron Island in Bear Swamp. Two PEREGRINES FALCONS
were seen hunting, plus NORTHERN HARRIER and BALD EAGLE. Several CLIFFS were
seen with TREE, BANK, and BARN SWALLOW, plus PURPLE MARTIN along Whitehall
Neck Road, along with NORTHERN BOBWHITE. A RING-NECKED PHEASANT was reported
along Route 9 south of Leipsic. 

The year of the WHITE IBIS continues with up to 60 birds seen at the Monroe
Avenue pond in Lewes. Also seen at the Monroe Avenue pond was BLACK-CROWNED
NIGHT HERON, LITTLE BLUE HERON, WOOD DUCK, OSPREY, YELLOW WARBLER, and GREAT
CRESTED FLYCATCHER. Five WHITE IBIS was seen at Prime Hook Beach Road last
Friday. The AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS that were seen at Prime Hook National
Wildlife Refuge near Milton were seen moving around the area this week.
Those birds were also seen flying over the Golf Park near Bay Vista and
became a yard bird at Old Landing near Rehoboth Beach.

A pair of TRICOLORED HERONS were seen at Fowler's Beach in Prime Hook along
with two OYSTERCATCHERS. SALTMARSH SPARROW was seen in the marsh. 20 AVOCETS
were seen at Prime Hook Beach Road with a large flock of terns, including a
close BLACK TERN today plus FORSTER'S, CASPIAN, and 6 BLACK SKIMMER. CASPIAN
TERN was also seen flying over the Observation Point Trail near Prime Hook
headquarters. NORTHERN HARRIER and BALD EAGLE was seen along the Boardwalk
Trail along with 4 BLACK-NECKED STILTS. Another CLIFF SWALLOW was seen at
Prime Hook Beach. ROYAL TERNS were seen at Mispillion Inlet from the DuPont
Nature Center. Four OYSTERCATCHERS were also seen along with BLACK-BELLIED
and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, SANDERLING, WILLET, and a single
DUNLIN.

A SANDWICH TERN was seen at Gordon's Pond in Cape Henlopen State Park, north
of Rehoboth Beach. The flock of terns there included two CASPIAN, a COMMON,
and 8 ROYAL TERN. Gordon's Pond also had 2 PIED-BILLED GREBES plus GREAT and
SNOWY EGRET, GREEN HERON, GLOSSY IBIS, OSPREY and BALD EAGLE. The woods by
the pond had BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH, PINE WARBLER, and BLUE GROSBEAK. PIPING
and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER were seen at The Point at Cape Henlopen State Park.
Terns at the point included LEAST, COMMON, and ROYAL. A BLACK SCOTER plus 2
LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were seen off Ft Miles. A SURF SCOTER was seen
from the Herring Point overlook at Cape Henlopen along with BLACK-BELLIED
PLOVER, SANDERLING, and RUDDY TURNSTONE. WILSON'S STORM-PETREL was seen off
the Cape May-Lewes Ferry. 

BROWN PELICANS were seen this week at Savages Ditch in Delaware Seashore
State Park south of Dewey Beach. 18 ROYAL TERNS were seen at Tower Road. Two
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS continue to be seen at Burton's Island across
from the North Marina at Indian River Inlet. Four more BROWN PELICANS were
seen at Fenwick Island, along with OSPREY, RUDDY TURNSTONE, and COMMON TERN.
A CLAPPER RAIL with young was seen at the Catch 54 Restaurant in Fenwick
Island. This area gives great views of the marsh, other birds seen included
GREEN HERON, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, and ROYAL TERN.

The first wave of migrants turned up in Sussex County this week. A BLACK AND
WHITE WARBLER was seen in Greenwood. A female AMERICAN REDSTART was seen at
Angola Neck. A BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH was seen at James Farm EcoPreserve.
Upstate, a BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER was seen at Beck's Pond near Bear. 

The first BROAD-WINGED HAWKS of the season were reported this week at Middle
Run Natural Area in Newark and at Ashland Nature Center near Hockessin. Also
reported at Middle Run was RED-SHOULDERED HAWK. Warblers seen at Middle Run
included 3 BLUE-WINGED, plus KENTUCKY, CANADA, PRAIRIE, YELLOW, and AMERICAN
REDSTARTS. Also seen was PILEATED WOODPECKER and YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO.

A BLACK=BILLED CUCKOO and LEAST FLYCATCHER were seen on Monday at White Clay
Creek State Park. 11 species of warbler were found at White Clay including
BLUE-WINGED, CANADA, BLACKBURNIAN, CHESTNUT-SIDED, WORM EATING, LOUISIANA
WATERTHRUSH, OVENBIRD, REDSTART, BLACK AND WHITE, and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT.

Ashland Nature Center had OVENBIRD and REDSTART reported this week. Warblers
seen in a back yard in Brandywine Hundred included BLUE-WINGED,
BLACKBURNIAN, and REDSTART. Another yard in Brandywine Hundred reports a
YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO feeding on the ground at the base of the feeder, very
unusual behavior!

Lots of warblers were seen on Sunday at Brandywine Creek State Park
including NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, WORM-EATING, CANADA, CHESTNUT-SIDED,
BLUE-WINGED, and NORTHERN PARULA. Four EASTERN SCREECH-OWLS were heard
calling plus 3 YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOOS. BALD EAGLE was seen flying over. Along
the Creek were GREAT EGRET, GREEN HERON, 9 LESSER YELLOWLEGS plus SPOTTED
and SOLITARY SANDPIPER.

Port Penn impoundments continue have 3 TRICOLORED HERONS along with GREAT
and SNOWY EGRETS, LITTLE BLUE HERON SPOTTED SANDPIPER .BALD EAGLE and a
COOPER'S HAWK has been hanging around. A juvenal LEAST TERN was seen at the
Augustine Beach parking lot along Route 9 along with 36 FORSTER'S TERNS.
SPOTTED SANDPIPER was seen on the Route 9 Causeway over Augustine Creek.

Out in Middletown, BOBOLINK was seen at Charles Price Park along St. Anne's
Church Road. The pond there had GREEN HERON and LEAST SANDPIPER. Seven
GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS plus BOBOLINK and EASTERN MEADOWLARK were seen along
Levels Road near Middletown.

Carousel Park in Pike Creek continues to have BLACK and MUTE SWANS also seen
there was GREAT EGRET on the pond. Other birds included VEERY and CEDAR
WAXWING.

Another PEREGRINE FALCON was seen flying over The Green in New Castle.

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Derek Stoner, Pete
Saenger, Bill Fintel,  Bill Blair, John Long, David Fees, Clive Harris, John
Gilbert, Kelly Nunn, Armando Alsparo, Jeff Hopkins, Ken Walsh, Phil
Thompson, Vince Gambal, Mark Nale, Mike Bowen, Teddy Burke, Scott Baron,
Sarah MacLellan, Bob Butterworth, Marc Ribaudo, Ian Stewart, Gina Sheridan,
Rachael Shapiro, Ken Wat, Joe Sebastiani, Chris Rowe, Lynn Smith, Sue
Gruver, Sharon Lynn, Chandler Wiegand, Tim Schreckengost, Alan Kneidel,
Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Remember, the birdline needs your
sightings! Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good
birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Very Close Black Tern on Prime Hook (Beach) Road
From: Bill Fintel <kittiwakebill AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 20 Aug 2015 16:27:25 -0400
On our Sussex Bird Club field trip this morning, we had a very close Black
Tern along the north side of Prime Hook Road about 1/3 of the way to the
beach as you are crossing the open water.

Also many Caspian Terns, Black Skimmers, American Avocets, and expected
shorebirds. I believe Sue Gruver has (or will) post a complete list on
e-Bird.

Woodland migrants were near zero on the Boardwalk trail 8 to 9 am, but this
approaching slow moving cold front will probably improve the woodland fall
migrant situation at Prime Hook....or you can cave into the call of Cape
May and visit Higbee Beach, which has already been having great woodland
migrant fall outs (per Michael Fritz).

Bill Fintel
Lewes, DE
Subject: Central Delaware, August 17
From: Scott Baron <razorbill1 AT MSN.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 22:39:05 -0400
Hi,

My friend and I birded Bombay Hook NWR on Monday. Variety was low but numbers 
were decent. 


The continuing MARBLED GODWIT flew into Shearness Pool a little before 1pm 
while we were viewing other shorebirds. 2 PEREGRINE FALCONS soared overhead at 
this time. 2 TRICOLORED HERONS each were in Shearness Pool and Raymond Pool. 
The swallow flocks along Whitehall Neck Road included a few CLIFF SWALLOWS. 


Semipalmated Sandpipers were perhaps the most abundant bird at Bombay Hook and 
also were the most abundant bird along the bayshore at Port Mahon Road. 


Good birding,

Scott Baron
Gaithersburg, Md.
 		 	   		  
Subject: FW: [SHOREBIRDS] JAMES BAY SHOREBIRDS - North Point Report #3
From: "Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" <Chris.Bennett AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 20:14:30 +0000
Here is another round of reports from the Canadian team surveying shorebirds 
along the shores of James Bay. 


Enjoy.

Chris Bennett
Milford, DE

-----Original Message-----
From: Shorebird Discussion Group [mailto:SHOREBIRDS AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU] On Behalf 
Of Jean Iron 

Sent: Wednesday, August 19, 2015 11:32 AM
To: SHOREBIRDS AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
Subject: [SHOREBIRDS] JAMES BAY SHOREBIRDS - North Point Report #3

This is the third and summary report. Please see link with 6 pages of shorebird 
photos and videos on my website. 

http://www.jeaniron.ca/2015/JB15/p1.htm

I thank Christian Friis of the Canadian Wildlife Service for the opportunity to 
surrey shorebirds on James Bay. Ron Pittaway posted my first two reports and 
provided much valuable information on shorebirds. 


Happy shorebirding,

Jean Iron
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
Subject: Four White Pelicans along PHB Road
From: Vince Gambal <0000009a8147fdd9-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 13:29:47 -0400
Currently viewing four white Pelicans swimming and feeding just north of Prime 
Hook Beach Road. Easily viewed with binocs. Hundreds of great and snowy egrets 
too. 


Vince Gambal
Lewes
Subject: Re: Help with identification
From: Taylor McLean <mcleant11 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 12:42:01 -0400
Hi Leslie,
Check out Redstart, a type of warbler.(or as we call the first year birds and 
females, Yellowstart. 


Good birding!

Taylor Mclean
Towson, MD
mcleant11 AT gmail.com

> On Aug 18, 2015, at 11:45 AM, Leslie Beall  wrote:
> 
> I live in a wooded community on Angola Neck close to Herring Creek and the 
bay. Yesterday about 6PM 2 birds came into the yard. They were small, just a 
bit smaller than a tufted titmouse. They were all brown/grey aside from 2 
striking yellow tale feathers, one one each side, and close to the outer edge. 
Both birds were identical. At one point they fanned their tail feathers and 
started to sort of jump up and down. Earlier in the week I saw one by itself. I 
have looked all over and can't identify them. They were ordinary looking aside 
from the very striking yellow tail feathers. Any ideas? 

Subject: Red Start
From: Leslie Beall <leslieinlewes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 12:41:15 -0400
Thank you for all of your replies!  The consensus seems to be Red 
Start.  The only problem is that the yellow covered the entire feather 
down to the tip.  Maybe they're freaks that came from a nest close to 
the Indian River power plant :)  I'll take a camera out tonight.
Subject: Help with identification
From: Leslie Beall <leslieinlewes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 11:45:15 -0400
I live in a wooded community on Angola Neck close to Herring Creek and 
the bay.  Yesterday about 6PM 2 birds came into the yard.  They were 
small, just a bit smaller than a tufted titmouse.  They were all 
brown/grey aside from 2 striking yellow tale feathers, one one each 
side, and close to the outer edge.  Both birds were identical. At one 
point they fanned their tail feathers and started to sort of jump up and 
down.  Earlier in the week I saw one by itself.  I have looked all over 
and can't identify them.  They were ordinary looking aside from the very 
striking yellow tail feathers.  Any ideas?
Subject: DOS and the 29th Annual Coastal Cleanup
From: Anthony Gonzon <atgonzon AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 05:49:41 -0400
Greetings all,

 

Join the Delmarva Ornithological Society for the 29th annual Delaware
Coastal Cleanup to be held from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015!
DOS will be taking on Port Mahon Road, also DOS's sponsored Adopt-A-Highway.

 

To register for DOS's site, please contact site captain Anthony Gonzon at
atgonzon AT verizon.net no later than September 1!  We encourage parents to
bring the kids, but please complete a parental consent form that can be
downloaded from the website below.

 

Sponsored by the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental
Control, the cleanup spans the First State's 97-mile eastern coastline and
includes river and ocean shorelines as well as wetland and watershed areas.
Last year's Delaware Coastal Cleanup drew 1,805 dedicated volunteers from
civic organizations, youth groups, businesses and families, who collected
3.5 tons of trash from 46 sites along Delaware's shorelines and tributaries.
About one-third of that trash - plastic and glass bottles and aluminum cans
- was recycled.

 

I hope many of you will join me!  If you prefer a different site or want to
learn more about the cleanup, visit
http://www.dnrec.delaware.gov/CoastalCleanup/Pages/default.aspx.

 

Good birding,

 

Anthony Gonzon

Middletown, DE

atgonzon AT verizon.net
Subject: Black Tern at Ted Harvey WMA
From: Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Aug 2015 20:42:28 -0400
After reading the recent report of the Upland Sandpiper and King Rail, we
decided to make an evening run for those two targets.  Although we double
dipped on the two targets this evening (Sunday - 08/16/15), we did enjoy
watching a BLACK TERN hunting over the north impoundment of Ted Harvey WMA.
In addition, there were Southern Leopard Frogs calling and we saw one the
trail.

Good summer birding to all,

Gina Sheridan
Subject: Marbled Godwit-Bombay Hook
From: John <vcrail AT MSN.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Aug 2015 10:29:24 -0400
 There was a Marbled Godwit at Bombay Hook this morning (~8 am). It was at the 
south end of Shearness Pool feeding along the one sandbar before tucking its 
bill in and blending in with the napping ducks.Others have seen/reported 1-2 in 
Raymond the past two days. Tide as dead low so most of the shorebirds were out 
on the flats, nicely backlit with a rising sun. 
Subject: removal from list
From: Chris Barnard <rcbarnard AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 15 Aug 2015 22:08:53 -0400
Would you please remove Chris from your list as he is deceased.

Thanks you very much,

Janet T. Barnard

 

Chris Barnard

Rockville MD

301-467-0432

rcbarnard AT comcast.net  

http://www.flickr.com/photos/62712116 AT N08/

 
Subject: White Pelicans
From: Sharon Lynn <slynn001 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 15 Aug 2015 14:50:05 -0400
I accidentally typed 20 birds when I meant to type 10 birds. Sorry for the 
error, it was a thrill to see them! 

Sharon Lynn
Rehoboth Beach

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Sandwich Tern - Gordon's Pond
From: Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 15 Aug 2015 14:47:28 -0400
From the Gordon's Pond Trail Observation Platform, Dennis and I found an
adult SANDWICH TERN that was seen flying across the pond and out toward the
beach dunes. It was an adult with a black cap and white forehead, pale
dorsal plumage with contrasting dark outer primaries, pale tip to bill, and
was noticeably larger in size than the/Forster's Terns which were in the
same field of view. We observed this bird today (Saturday - 08/18/15) at
9:00 AM.

Good summer birding to all,

Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE
Subject: Yard bird lifer!
From: Sharon Lynn <slynn001 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 15 Aug 2015 11:16:07 -0400
I am so excited I can hardly stand it. I am sitting on my deck enjoying the 
morning, when I saw a flock of 20 very large white birds fly over fairly high 
in the sky. Closer inspection revealed 10 AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS!!! I wonder 
if they are the flock from Prime Hook. 


Sharon Lynn
Rehoboth Beach

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Wilson's Phalarope, American Golden-Plover & other shorebirds
From: Clive Harris <000001a3dbd464e1-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Fri, 14 Aug 2015 23:11:04 +0000
 I stopped at a few spots along the Delaware Bay today.  Great weather and 
some decent birds. 

Ted Harvey WMA North Pond - Black Tern and King Rail - latter in the shade of 
a large grass clump in the channel at the end of the car park - stayed there 
for several minutes giving good scope views.  Did not see the Gull-billed 
Tern.  

Dover AFB - Upland Sandpiper in newly mowed grass on E side of Route 9.
Little Creek accessed off of Pickering Beach Road - excellent habitat at the 
moment.  Juv Wilson's Phalarope and adult American Golden Plover were the best 
birds.  Also one White-rumped Sandpiper with the other peeps and around 15 
Pectorals, including a few juveniles.  A lot of juvenile Least Sands; one juv 
Western and a juv Semi - vast majority of peeps were adult Semis. 

Bombay Hook - water is high in both Raymond and Shearness - in former its risen 
since my last visit (managed or natural increase?).  Not many peeps, and best 
birds in Raymond were L/B Dowitchers and Stilt Sandpipers.  Two Marbled Godwit 
were in Shearness.  

I also birded a few spots further down including Mispillion Light, Fowlers 
Beach Rd and Prime Hook.  Lots of egrets at latter, just as good were juv 
Least and Forsters terns fishing a few yards off the road. Ended with 23 
shorebirds species. 

Good birding
Clive HarrisCabin John MD
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 13th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 13 Aug 2015 22:36:51 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* August 13, 2015
* DEST1508.13
	
*Birds mentioned
Snow Goose
Mute Swan
Black Swan
Tundra Swan 
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Green-winged Teal
Surf Scoter
Common Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Wild Turkey
Northern Bobwhite
Pied-billed Grebe
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN 
Brown Pelican
Least Bittern
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Glossy Ibis
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier
Cooper's Hawk
Sora
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
Whimbrel
Marbled Godwit
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Sanderling
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Western Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Dunlin
Stilt Sandpiper
Long-billed Dowitcher
Short-billed Dowitcher
WILSON'S PHALAROPE
Lesser Black Backed Gull
Least Tern
GULL-BILLED TERN
Caspian Tern
Common Tern
Royal Tern
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Eastern Screech-Owl
Great Horned Owl
Barred Owl
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
American Kestrel
OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER
Willow Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
American Redstart
Black and White Warbler
Worm-eating Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
Blue-winged Warbler
Tennessee Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Pine Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Canada Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
LARK SPARROW
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Bobolink

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: August 13, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For Thursday, August 13th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware
Museum of Natural History in Greenville. Fifteen species of warbler were
found this week, including a few migrants! The unofficial Delaware annual
list annual list increased to 315 species this week with one new addition.

A LARK SPARROW made a brief appearance at Augustine Beach Wildlife Area's
Port Penn impoundments on Saturday. That bird was found S. Congress St. in
Port Penn, heading into the refuge. Look for the bird in the small field
beside the abandoned house at the sharp turn in the dirt road. Also reported
the Port Penn was a WORM-EATING WARBLER. Port Penn impoundments along the
Dike trail has been a gold mine for waterbirds. Shorebirds seen there this
week included a single AMERICAN AVOCET, WILSON'S PHALAROPE, BLACKBELLIED and
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, STILT and PECTORAL SANDPIPER, and SHORT-BILLED
DOWITCHER. TRICOLORED HERON and LEAST BITTERN were seen there along with
GREAT, SNOWY, and CATTLE EGRETS, LITTLE BLUE HERON, and GLOSSY IBIS.
COOPER'S HAWK was also seen hunting in the area.

A GULL-BILLED TERN was also seen flying over the Port Penn impoundments.
GULL-BILLED TERNS were found in all three counties this week. In Kent
County, GULL-BILLED TERNS were seen flying over Shearness Pool at Bombay
Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna and at the North Pond of the Logan
Tract of Ted Harvey Conservation Area off the Kitts Hummock Road. Another
GULL-BILLED TERN was seen in Sussex County, at Fowler's Beach in Prime Hook
National Wildlife Refuge near Milton.

Also seen at Fowler's Beach this week where LEAST and CASPIAN TERNS and the
5-10 AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS. Shorebirds at Fowler's included Western WILLET
and AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, a single
DUNLIN, with LEAST and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, plus RUDDY TURNSTONE and
SANDERLING. Other reports at Prime Hook this week included BLACK-NECKED
STILT and AMERICAN AVOCET. Waders were 75 GREAT and 150 SNOWY EGRETS plus 2
LITTLE BLUE HERONS. Five immature WHITE IBIS were seen flying south over the
Prime Hook Beach Road.

The year of the WHITE IBIS continues with a record count 150 juvenile birds
seen in the brush along the dunes at Gordon's Pond, on the north side of
Rehoboth Beach in Cape Henlopen State Park. Those birds flushed when a BALD
EAGLE flew over. Also seen at Gordon's Pond were 2 TRICOLORED HERONS, GREEN
HERON, PIED-BILLED GREBE and 2 BROWN PELICAN. Terns there included LEAST,
COMMON, ROYAL, and BLACK SKIMMER. Shorebirds included BLACK-NECKED STILT,
BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, WILLET, TURNSTONE, SANDERLING, and 6
LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS. BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH was found at Gordon's Pond
in the pines. 

Seven WHITE IBIS were seen flying over The Point at Cape Henlopen. BROWN
PELICANS were also seen there. A pair of WHITE-RUMP SANDPIPERS were seen
along the bayside at The Point, along with AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, PIPING
and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, TURNSTONE and SANDERLING. Terns there included
CASPIAN, ROYAL, LEAST and COMMON. A SURF SCOTER was seen at Herring Point.
There was a peak count of 80 immature WHITE IBIS at the Monroe Ave Pond,
along with 2 BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS. Further south, YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT
HERON continues to be seen at Burton's Island at Indian River Inlet. 

Three WHITE IBIS continue to be seen at Bombay Hook at Raymond Pool also
reported there was 3 TRICOLORED HERON. Other waders included 250 GREAT EGRET
150 SNOWY EGRET, 2 LITTLE BLUE HERONS, 80 GLOSSY IBIS and 1 LEAST BITTERN at
Sheerness Pool. SORA was also seen at Sheerness Pool. Shorebirds included a
single MARBLED GODWIT and a flyover WHIMBREL. Other shorebirds seen included
over 400 AMERICAN AVOCET, 10 BLACK NECKED STILT, BLACK-BELLIED and
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, STILT, WESTERN, PECTORAL, and WHITE-RUMP SANDPIPER and
a single WILSON'S PHALAROPE. Waterfowl included a NORTHERN SHOVELER plus a
drake breeding plumage RUDDY DUCK along with TUNDRA SWAN, BLUE-WINGED and
GREEN-WINGED TEAL. CLIFF and BANK SWALLOW were picked out among the hundreds
of swallows flying over the refuge. BOBOLINK, BOBWHITE, and WILD TURKEY were
also found. There was a peak count of 6 BALD EAGLES. 

Lots of RUDDY TURNSTONES were seen at Port Mahon this week. ROYAL TERNS were
reported at the old bait shop. NORTHERN HARRIER was seen flying over the
marsh. BLUE-WINGED TEAL and 3 BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS were reported at
Woodland Beach Wildlife Area, where lots of BANKS SWALLOWS were reported.
BOBOLINK was reported at Stave's Landing. 

WILSON'S STORM-PETRELS were seen at Slaughter's Beach out over the Delaware
Bay. These birds were seen at Simpson Ave. RUDDY TURNSTONE, SANDERLING and a
WESTERN SANDPIPER with about 100 peep were found on the beach. 

Migrants are beginning to arrive back in northern Delaware. A pair of COMMON
MERGANSERS , unusual in August, were seen flying over Middle Run Natural
Area near Newark. Highlights there included 2 OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHERS today
at the Tree of Heaven. Earlier in the week, a LEAST FLYCATCHER and TENNESSEE
WARBLER were found. Also seen were CANADA, BLUE-WINGED, PRAIRIE and YELLOW
WARBLER, AMERICAN REDSTART, and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT, plus YELLOW-BILLED
CUCKOO and ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK. GREAT EGRET and NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH were
seen by the ponds at Paper Mill Park. CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER and WILLOW
FLYCATCHER were found at White Clay Creek State Park, along with several
AMERICAN REDSTARTS

NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH was banded at Ashland Nature Center near Hockessin.
Also seen there was YELLOW WARBLER and AMERICAN REDSTART.  AMERICAN KESTREL
was found by Coverdale Farms. Four WORM-EATING WARBLERS were found at
Brandywine Creek State Park near Greenville. Also seen there was an immature
male BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER plus OVENBIRD, AMERICAN REDSTARTS, BLUE-WINGED,
and BLACK AND WHITE WARBLERS. Over 100 PURPLE MARTINS were seen in the trees
at the Hawkwatch, plus AMERICAN KESTREL. Shorebirds along the creek included
11 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, SOLITARY, SPOTTED and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER. 

Another LEAST FLYCATCHER was found at Lum's Pond State Park along with
CANADA and PRAIRIE WARBLER. YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO was also reported with
GREAT and SNOWY EGRETS and GREEN HERON.

Lots of hummingbirds are coming through this week; over 50 were seen coming
to feeders in Lincoln, Delaware, including one hummer that might be a
western rarity! Results of pictures are pending. 70 RUBY-THROATED
HUMMINGBIRDS were seen at Peterkins Branch near Georgetown, 30 of those
birds were newly banded. YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO was also present.

Owls were found more frequently this last week EASTERN SCREECH-OWL was again
found at Brandywine Creek State Park. BARRED OWL was found at White Clay
Creek State Park and Finis Woods at Bombay Hook. A GREAT HORNED OWL was
calling at Midway near Rehoboth Beach.

SNOW GOOSE, BLACK and MUTE SWANS continue to be seen at Carousel Park off
Limestone Road in Pike Creek. Also seen at the pond were OSPREY, COOPER'S
HAWK and SPOTTED SANDPIPER.

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Zach Baer, Ken
Bass, Will Almeida, Derek Stoner, David Fees, Dave Belford, Jerry AmEnde,
Bert Filemyr, Doug Gill, Jacob Hall, Katie McDonough, Stephen Mink, Mike
Gardner, Brian Henderson, Chris and Karen Bennett, Bill Stewart, Ian
Stewart, Amy O'Neil, Gina Sheridan, Rachael Shapiro, Ken Wat, Joe
Sebastiani, Chris Rowe, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver, Tim Freiday, Tim
Schreckengost, Alan Kneidel, Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Remember,
the birdline needs your sightings! Please call your reports into
302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy
Ednie wishing you good birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Egrets at Prime Hook
From: Mary Bigelow <tramaire AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 13 Aug 2015 20:17:37 -0400
This week, hundreds of egrets (common and snowy) can be seen from the Prime 
Hook Beach road. We’ve lived here for 13 years and never saw this many — 
wadiing in the water and roosting in the trees. Mixed in are some glossy 
ibises. 


Mary and Tim Bigelow
Subject: Location for WCCSP Family Birding this Saturday
From: "Sullivan, Kathleen N. (DNREC)" <Kathleen.Sullivan AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Wed, 12 Aug 2015 21:02:23 +0000
Hello,
Left out the location for the Family Birding program happening this Saturday.
Sorry about that.
Meets at the Chambers House Nature Center (off Hopkins Rd) in
White Clay Creek State Park, Newark DE

Kathleen
Kathleen Sullivan
Naturalist/Environmental Educator
WCCSP
302-368-6560
Subject: Re: Great program for beginning birding families
From: "Sullivan, Kathleen N. (DNREC)" <Kathleen.Sullivan AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Wed, 12 Aug 2015 21:00:17 +0000
Hello,
Left out the location.
Sorry about that. 
Meets at the Chambers House Nature Center (off Hopkins Rd) in White Clay Creek 
State Park, Newark DE 


-----Original Message-----
From: Patricia Valdata [mailto:pvaldata AT zoominternet.net] 
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2015 4:47 PM
To: Sullivan, Kathleen N. (DNREC)
Subject: RE: [de-birds] Great program for beginning birding families

Where does this event take place, Kathleen?

Pat

-----Original Message-----
From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Sullivan, 
Kathleen N. (DNREC) 

Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2015 3:08 PM
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [de-birds] Great program for beginning birding families

Hi,

Thought you could share this program this weekend.

Thank you.

Great Family Program this Saturday
Beginning Birding for Families
Saturday, August 15
9 - 10:30 a.m.
Birding is a fun lifelong hobby! Join us for some birding basics and a great 
short hike along our trails to learn about local birds and their habits. 

Lead by Gary Stolz.
Call to register soon.
$5 per person, $20 per family.

Kathleen Sullivan
Naturalist/Environmental Educator
WCCSP
302-368-6560
Subject: Great program for beginning birding families
From: "Sullivan, Kathleen N. (DNREC)" <Kathleen.Sullivan AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Wed, 12 Aug 2015 19:07:39 +0000
Hi,

Thought you could share this program this weekend.

Thank you.

Great Family Program this Saturday
Beginning Birding for Families
Saturday, August 15
9 - 10:30 a.m.
Birding is a fun lifelong hobby! Join us for some birding basics and a great 
short hike along our trails to learn about local birds and their habits. 

Lead by Gary Stolz.
Call to register soon.
$5 per person, $20 per family.

Kathleen Sullivan
Naturalist/Environmental Educator
WCCSP
302-368-6560
Subject: Misc. Sightings along DE Bay, Sunday
From: Jacob Hall <jacob.s.hall AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 11 Aug 2015 18:17:24 -0400
This report is a day late because I've been traveling, but wanted to
mention that the Gull-billed Tern continued at Ted Harvey yesterday,
accompanied by a single Black Tern amongst all the Forster's. The
Gull-billed gave great looks, repeatedly flying close by--I think it was
doing laps. The Black Tern was more distant but still easily IDed.

I stopped at several other sites,to work on some year birds I needed. My
fave spot of the day (it always is) was at Fowlers. As I was getting out of
the car I heard a group of gulls out in the marsh all burst into noise at
once and looked in time to see a Peregrine Falcon stooping on the flock. He
pulled out of the dive not grabbing anything, and flew out to the bay
without harassing anyone else. Also here, had a high, southbound Whimbrel,
which I heard first and then spotted as it flew over. There were also gobs
of young Seaside Sparrows flitting about--the most easily I've ever
observed them. I had 10 in a single binocular field at once before they
dropped down out of sight. A pair of Saltmarsh Sparrows also peeked out
briefly. Nearby, a young Clapper Rail (still half downy black) refused to
cross a channel with its parent. It was a pretty funny scene. Decent
numbers of shorebirds around, but nothing surprising.

At Port Mahon, a good mix of birds was feeding above the rising tide. Tons
of Semi Sandpipers, with half as many Leasts, a couple of Western, and at
least one White-rumped in a deep puddle. Sanderlings and both Yellowlegs
also present at the water's edge.

At Bombay Hook, I dipped on White Ibis and Marbled Godwit but had several
Tricolored Herons in Raymond and Shearness Pools. Also heard Bobwhites
calling at the Visitor Center and Bear Swamp. I didn't examine the mass
of shorebirds at Raymond very closely as I was running out of time, but did
add Stilt Sandpiper to my year list (missed in the spring) as well as one
Long-billed Dowitcher and one Pectoral Sandpiper, both at Bear Swamp.

-Jake Hall
 Washington, DC





-- 
Sent from Gmail Mobile
Subject: Fall migrant workshop at the Musuem
From: Jean Woods <JWoods AT DELMNH.ORG>
Date: Tue, 11 Aug 2015 18:24:36 +0000
A Fall Migrant Songbird ID Workshop will be held at the Delaware Museum of 
Natural History on Saturday, September 5, 2015, from 10 am to noon. 


The workshop is co-sponsored by DOS and the Museum and will use specimens from 
the Museum's study skin collection. Participants will have the opportunity to 
examine up close and discuss the skins of a variety of fall-plumaged migrant 
songbirds. Emphasis will be on fall warbler plumages. Attendees should be 
familiar with the types of fall migrant songbirds likely to be seen in 
Delaware. Even though it's only August, fall migrants are already arriving. If 
you'd like to be less confused by fall warblers this is the class for you! 


The workshop is free but registration is required and space is limited! Age 16 
and over unless accompanied by a parent. Please contact Jean to register or 
with any questions. 


Best wishes- Jean

Jean L. Woods, Ph.D. Phone: 302-658-9111 x314 

Curator of Birds Fax: 302-658-2610 

Delaware Museum of Natural History                      jwoods AT delmnh.org
P.O. Box 3937 www.delmnh.org 

(4840 Kennett Pike)
Wilmington, DE  19807
Subject: Middle Run -- migration is on -- 8/10
From: Alan Kneidel <akneidel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 11 Aug 2015 13:17:08 -0400
DE-Birders,

Enticed by the misty coolness I visited Middle Run in Newark last evening.
I walked from the Tri-State parking lot to marker 6, weaving through the
labyrinth of trails through the shrubbery.

There was a lot of bird action, concentrating in the fruiting Black Cherry
trees and the emergent trees-of-heaven. Highlights included an early
TENNESSEE WARBLER, CANADA WARBLER, BLUE-WINGED WARBLER, AMERICAN REDSTART
as well as a few Empidonax flycatchers of indeterminate i.d.

The fruiting trees had several BALTIMORE ORIOLES, EASTERN KINGBIRDS, and
RED-EYED VIREOS.

Photos of some of the birds can be seen in the ebird checklist below.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24570257

Don't wait any longer, get out looking for songbirds! With the passage of a
cold front this afternoon, the next few mornings have great potential.

-- 
Alan Kneidel
M.S. Candidate, Natural Resources
Delaware State University
980-254-2706
Subject: Blue Grosbeaks
From: Tom Clarke <tom AT CSSSTAFFING.COM>
Date: Tue, 11 Aug 2015 11:19:06 -0400
Yesterday at 9:15-9:45AM, Rehoboth, on  the Junction and Breakwater trail,
just after starting the trail off Holland Glade Road heading toward Lewes,
along the corn fields, no less than 8 Blue Grosbeaks were seen/heard.
There was also a solitary Brown Thrasher also.  I ride frequently through
this area and I had not had any Grosbeaks there before, mostly Indigo
Buntings.  A surprise to have such a treat along this trail.  Seems like
migration is certainly underway!



Tom Clarke

Hockessin
Subject: Wilson's Storm-Petrels in DE Bay
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 11 Aug 2015 10:03:16 -0400
I spent about an hour last evening scanning the bay and beach from the
south end of the Slaughter Beach - Simpson Ave.  I was hoping with the
persistent easterly winds over the weekned that I might spot a Wilson's
Storm-Petrel (WISP).  After scanning for a while I finaly spotted three
distant birds.  A while later I spotted a single WISP much closer to shore
- which was actively feeding, doing a lot more glideing than the others,
occasionally hovering and pattering with its feet and bouncing into and out
of wave troughs.  Very cool to watch with a scope from a surface that
wasn't rolling  or bucking.  All of these birds were heading down bay back
towards the ocean. I had a few Semipalmated Plovers, 100+ Semipalmated
Sandpipers, 1 Western Sandpiper and a few Ruddy Turnstones and Sanderlings
on the beach.

Chris Bennett
MIlford, DE
Subject: Gull-billed Terns - Yes!
From: Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 9 Aug 2015 17:04:35 -0400
Thanks to Alan Kneidel RBA texts concerning his Gull-billed Tern sightings
today (Sunday- 08/09/15), Dennis and I were able to follow up and see these
fine birds at both sites.

After scoping from the Prime Hook - Broadkill Beach causeway for a while
this afternoon, I looked up to see a GULL-BILLED TERN flying high over the
causeway and headed northward. The Gull-billed Tern gave a distinctive
calls that sounded like a low pitched rubber squeeze toy.

As of 2:55 PM, the GULL-BILLED TERN at the north impoundment of Ted Harvey
WMA, was giving us a much better show than the one did at Broadkill. Along
the shoreline, a pair of RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRDS, a friendly EASTERN
WOOD-PEWEE, and male BLUE GROSBEAK added to the fun. Alas, we did not see
any Black Terns though.

Great summer birding to all,

Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE
Subject: NY Times Sunday Acrostic -- of interest to birders
From: Rodney Murray <rcmurray213 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 9 Aug 2015 14:52:45 -0400
I know this doesn't exactly fit the guidelines for posts here, but today's
Sunday NY Times acrostic puzzle solution can be of interest to birders.
If you would like to see the quote/solution (way below this so as not to
spoil the fun of solving the puzzle for those DE birders who do the puzzle)
here it is:
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Goshawks resemble sparrowhawks the way leopards resemble housecats. Bigger,
yes, but bulkier, bloodier, deadlier, scarier and much, much harder to
see...birds of deep woods, not gardens.  They're the birdwatcher's dark
grail.--Helen MacDonald, from H is for Hawk

Rod Murray, Middletown DE
Subject: Delaware migrants
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 9 Aug 2015 11:56:19 -0400
A few new birds showed up at Brandywine Creek State Park this weekend. I had
a an immature male BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER, a BLUE-WINGED WARBLER, OVENBIRD, 3
BLACK AND WHITE WARBLERS, 9 REDSTARTS and 4 WORM-EATING WARBLERS. Along the
creek were2 GREEN HERONS,  11 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, SOLITARY SANDPIPER, 2
SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, and a SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER. Migration is underway!

Andy Ednie
Subject: Re: New Castle: Lark Sparrow at Port Penn Impoundments
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 8 Aug 2015 21:08:54 -0400
If anybody is interested, I saw the Lark sparrow this afternoon around
2:30-3:00 pm. It was in the field by the house at the sharp turn. I only got
a quick look, the outer tail feathers were unmistakable. The bird flew back
into the pines on the north side of the field (south side of the house). 

Andy Ednie

-----Original Message-----
From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Tim
Schreckengost
Sent: Saturday, August 08, 2015 10:42 AM
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [de-birds] New Castle: Lark Sparrow at Port Penn Impoundments

Birders,

I just received this email from Zach Baer. 

"I just found and photographed a lark sparrow on south congress st out to
the Port Penn impoundments.  The bird was hanging out in the small mowed
field just before the last house and Augustine headquarters."

As the messenger,
Tim Schreckengost
Elkton, MD
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Zachary Baer 
> Date: August 8, 2015 at 9:49:37 AM EDT
> To: timschreckengost AT gmail.com
> Subject: Port Penn lark sparrow
> 
> Hi Tim,
> 
> I just found and photographed a lark sparrow on south congress st out to
the Port Penn impoundments.  The bird was hanging out in the small mowed
field just before the last house and Augustine headquarters.  I don't have
anyway of getting he word out so I am contacting you directly.
> 
> Good birding,
> 
> Zach Baer
-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4821 / Virus Database: 4365/10394 - Release Date: 08/07/15
Subject: New Castle: Lark Sparrow at Port Penn Impoundments
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 8 Aug 2015 10:41:59 -0400
Birders,

I just received this email from Zach Baer. 

"I just found and photographed a lark sparrow on south congress st out to the 
Port Penn impoundments. The bird was hanging out in the small mowed field just 
before the last house and Augustine headquarters." 


As the messenger,
Tim Schreckengost
Elkton, MD
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Zachary Baer 
> Date: August 8, 2015 at 9:49:37 AM EDT
> To: timschreckengost AT gmail.com
> Subject: Port Penn lark sparrow
> 
> Hi Tim,
> 
> I just found and photographed a lark sparrow on south congress st out to the 
Port Penn impoundments. The bird was hanging out in the small mowed field just 
before the last house and Augustine headquarters. I don't have anyway of 
getting he word out so I am contacting you directly. 

> 
> Good birding,
> 
> Zach Baer
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 7th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 7 Aug 2015 20:54:15 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* August 7, 2015
* DEST1508.07
	
*Birds mentioned
Snow Goose
Black Swan (exotic)
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
Gadwall
Blue-winged Teal
Green-winged Teal
American Wigeon 
Surf Scoter
Black Scoter
Ruddy duck
Wild Turkey
Northern Bobwhite
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
Brown Pelican
Least Bittern
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Glossy Ibis
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Clapper Rail
Common Gallinule
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Whimbrel
Marbled Godwit
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Sanderling
Western Sandpiper 
Pectoral Sandpiper
Stilt Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Least Tern
GULL-BILLED TERN
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Common Tern
Forster's Tern
SANDWICH TERN
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
Eastern Screech-Owl
Barred Owl
Common Nighthawk
Red-headed Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Yellow-throated Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Tree Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Louisiana Waterthrush
American Redstart
Black and White Warbler
Blue-winged Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Pine Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Grasshopper Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Eastern Meadowlark
Boat-tailed Grackle


Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: August 7, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For Friday, August 7th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware annual list annual
list remains at 314 species this week.

Just as I'm sending out the weekly report, a sighting came in of an
unconfirmed RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD near Wilmington. This is thought to be a
female, but several important field marks are missing. There is a previous
sighting of a male RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD in late August from Newark for the
state. Stay tuned for any updates!

Gordon's Pond in Cape Henlopen State Park was a hotspot for terns this week.
An adult GULL BILLED TERN and 2 SANDWICH TERNS were seen along the oceanside
sandbar. Also reported were 40 COMMON TERNS, 52 ROYAL TERNS and over 100
FORSTER'S TERNS. Lots of waders are visiting Gordon's Pond right now,
including a flight of 85 WHITE IBIS yesterday morning, all amateurs. Three
TRICOLORED HERONS were also visiting the pond along with lots of GREEN
HERONS, SNOWY and GREAT EGRETS, plus GLOSSY IBIS. Shorebirds seen included 5
AMERICAN AVOCETS, BLACK-NECKED STILT, BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER,
and SPOTTED SANDPIPER. Along the beach were 9 LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS,
SURF SCOTER, and BROWN PELICAN. Six COMMON NIGHTHAWKS were reported flying
over the dunes at Gordon's Pond. 

Thirty COMMON and 8 LEAST TERNS were seen at The Point at Cape Henlopen
State Park. BLACK SCOTER was seen on the beach there, along with COMMON LOON
and 2 BROWN PELICANS. The Point also had four AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS,
PIPING PLOVER, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, and SANDERLING. BLACK
AND WHITE WARBLER was reported at Ft. Miles. BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH and PINE
WARBLER were reported at the Seaside Nature Center. Two WILSON'S STORM
PETRELS were reported from the Cape May - Lewes ferry. WILSON STORM-PETRELS
were also reported on the dolphin watching boat out of Lewes. 

An adult GULL-BILLED TERN was also seen at Fowler's Beach at Prime Hook
National Wildlife Refuge near Milton, along with COMMON and CASPIAN TERN
plus BLACK SKIMMER. The previously reported AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS were not
reported this week. LITTLE BLUE HERON was seen at Fowler's, along with
WHIMBREL, AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER,
SPOTTED SANDPIPER, both YELLOWLEGS, and RUDDY TURNSTONE. SEASIDE SPARROW was
found in the marsh there. A BLACK TERN still mostly in breeding plumage was
found at Broadkill Marsh, with LEAST and FORSTER'S TERN, along with
BLACK-NECKED STILT. Prime Hook Refuge also had a WARBLING VIREO along with 8
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLERS and YELLOW WARBLER plus WILD TURKEY.

The WHITE IBIS invasion continues with 80 WHITE IBIS were seen flying over
North Indian Beach at the south side of Dewey. 19 WHITE IBIS were
photographed flying over Burton's Island in Delaware Seashore State Park on
the north side of Indian River Inlet. Four TRICOLORED HERONS plus 3
YELLOW-CROWNED and a BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON were also seen at Burton's.
19 OSPREY were counted on its sweep from the causeway. Other birds reported
included RUDDY DUCK, CLAPPER RAIL, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, SPOTTED SANDPIPER,
and SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. Nine WHITE IBIS were also seen over the Monroe
Avenue pond in Lewes, plus BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON and GREEN HERON. 15
WHITE IBIS were seen flying over the Virden Center at University of Delaware
Marine School in Lewes.

At least 3 WHITE IBIS juveniles continue to be seen at Bombay Hook National
Wildlife Refuge at Raymond Pool. Three TRICOLORED HERONS were also reported
at Raymond, with hundreds of SNOWY and GREAT EGRETS, and GLOSSY IBIS. Four
LITTLE BLUE HERONS and reported at Finis Pool, a peak count of 40
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS were found at Night Heron Island in Bear Swamp at
dusk. A MARBLED GODWIT was reported at Bombay Hook this week along with 340
AMERICAN AVOCETS and 30 BLACK-NECKED STILTS. Also reported have been
BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS,
PECTORAL, WESTERN, STILT, LEAST, and SPOTTED SANDPIPER, and several
LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS. Several CASPIAN TERNS have been mixed in with
FORSTER'S TERNS. MUTE and TUNDRA SWAN continue to be seen at Sheerness Pool
with GADWALL, BLUE-WINGED and GREEN WINGED TEAL, plus 5 PIED-BILLED GREBES.
BANK SWALLOW and NORTHERN BOBWHITE were found along the roadside in the
refuge.

RUDDY TURNSTONES have returned to the Port Mahon Road, over 50 were there
this weekend. Also reported were both YELLOWLEGS, LEAST SANDPIPER, and
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. Terns seen there included 4 CASPIAN and 16 ROYAL
TERNS. Two BANK SWALLOWS were seen among the 400 TREE SWALLOWS. RUDDY
TURNSTONE, SANDERLING and a RED KNOT were reported at Mispillion Inlet from
the duPont Nature Center. 

RUDDY TURNSTONE was also reported at Delaware Seashore State Park from the
sailing beach, south of Dewey. Two of those birds had lime-green bands. 70
SANDERLING were also reported with ROYAL TERN. Indian River inlet had 25
COMMON TERNS, plus BOAT-TAILED GRACKLE.

James Farm Eco-Preserve along White's Creek on Cedar Neck near Indian River
Inlet had a WHIMBREL and 16 SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS. Also seen there was
SOLITARY and SPOTTED SANDPIPER. An AMERICAN REDSTART was a sure sign of fall
migration at that area. A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was found Baytown Road near
the Peninsula Nature Center on Long Neck. SNOW GOOSE was reported at the
Baywood Country Club off Route 24 near Long Neck. MUTE SWAN continues to be
seen at Assawoman Wildlife Refuge near Fenwick island. GREEN HERON and BALD
EAGLE were also seen there. Landbirds included YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO and
PILEATED WOODPECKER.

A BLUE-WINGED WARBLER and a yellow lore YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER of the
southern race were found at the Port Penn impoundments along Route 9, south
of Delaware City. Three TRICOLORED HERONS have been seen there, along with
SNOWY, GREAT, and CATTLE EGRET, LITTLE BLUE and GREEN HERON, and GLOSSY
IBIS. Five BLACK TERNS plus LEAST and ROYAL TERN were also found at the
impoundments. STILT SANDPIPERS and SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS were among the
shorebirds on the north side of the impoundments. A female AMERICAN WIGEON
plus GREEN-WINGED TEAL and BANK SWALLOW were also reported. CLIFF SWALLOW
was reported at the Appoquinimink Bridge. LEAST BITTERN and 8 COMMON
GALLINULES were seen at Thousand Acre Marsh. CASPIAN TERN was reported at
Augustine Beach. EASTERN MEADOWLARK and GRASSHOPPER SPARROW were seen in
Middletown at Levels Road. SAVANNAH SPARROW was found at the Charles E.
Price Park. 

A BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO beating a caterpillar was seen last week at Mt. Cuba
Wildflower Preserve. More migrants continue to be moving south, PRAIRIE
WARBLER was seen at Ashland Nature Center, along with AMERICAN KESTREL.
PRAIRIE WARBLER and AMERICAN REDSTART were reported at Brandywine Creek
State Park, along with YELLOW-THROATED VIREO. 92 PURPLE MARTINS were
reported along the entrance road. ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW was found flying over
the creek. Also along the Brandywine Creek was both SPOTTED and SOLITARY
SANDPIPER.

A CLIFF SWALLOW was found at Middle Run Nature Preserve near Newark. The
ponds along Paper Mill Road are attracting numerous waders including
immature LITTLE BLUE HERON, GREAT EGRET, and 3 GREEN HERONS. MUTE SWAN and 2
BLACK SWANS with a SNOW GOOSE continue to be seen at the pond in Carousel
Park off Limestone Road near Pike Creek. LITTLE BLUE HERON, SPOTTED
SANDPIPER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS were also seen at the pond. ROUGH-WINGED
SWALLOW was seen flying over. Louisiana Waterthrush was found in a yard near
Newark. 

OWLS are beginning to get more active post breeding. BARRED OWL was heard
calling at Finis Pool in Bombay Hook. There were several reports of EASTERN
SCREECH-OWLS this week including Walnut Ridge near Centerville, Brandywine
Creek State Park, Georgetown, Midway, and the Virden Center in Lewes. 

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Judy Montgomery,
Kim Steininger, Derek Stoner, Diane Kane, Andy Beiderman, David Fees, George
Armstead, Steve Huy, Lauren Morgans, Matt Sarver, Joe Hanfman, Andrew
Albright, Chris Hugosson, Mike Hudson, Holly Merker, Nancy Goggin, Leo
Custer, Brian Henderson, Bill Stewart, Walt Wagner-Hecht, Ian Stewart, Gina
Sheridan, Rachael Shapiro, Ken Wat, Joe Sebastiani, Chris Rowe, Lynn Smith,
Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn, Tim Schreckengost, Alan Kneidel, Maurice Barnhill,
and Joe Russell. Remember, the birdline needs your sightings! Please call
your reports into 302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next
week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Help Save Boreal Breeding Birds
From: Kurt Schwarz <goawaybird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 6 Aug 2015 17:50:25 -0400
Dear Maryland and Delaware Birders,

The Boreal Songbird   Initiative reports that 80% of the Boreal forest in
Canada and Alaska is still intact, and that half of that amount would have
to be saved to preserve its ecological integrity.  Meanwhile, 30% of the
vast amount is slated for energy development or logging.  Only 12% is
currently protected, with an additional 16% to be added by the Canadian
provinces of Ontario and Quebec in the near future. Most of what is taken
from the Boreal is destined for the United States.  In short, 28% will soon
be saved, but wed only be half way there to keeping the Boreal going.

98% of all Palm Warblers, 80% of Dark-eyed Juncos, 79% of Bay-breasted
Warblers, and 74% of Common Loons nest in the Boreal.

Reducing consumption of wood and petrol products from the Boreal is one
means of saving the Boreal, but now you can also sign a petition calling for
permanent protection of the half needed to keep the Boreal functioning.

For further information and to sign the petition, see:

http://borealbirdsneedhalf.org/en/

For the BSIs report see:

http://borealbirdsneedhalf.org/en/files/BorealBirdsNeedHalf-Report.pdf

Kurt R. Schwarz
Conservation Chair
Maryland Ornithological Society
goawaybird AT verizon.net
Subject: Wilson's storm petrels
From: Vince Gambal <0000009a8147fdd9-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Thu, 6 Aug 2015 12:38:43 -0400
Viewed two Wilson's storm petrels from Cape May-Lewes ferry. One least tern as 
well. 


Vince Gambal
Lewes
Subject: FW: [SHOREBIRDS] James Bay Shorebirds - North Point Report #1
From: "Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" <Chris.Bennett AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Thu, 6 Aug 2015 13:00:29 +0000
Thought this group might be interested in shorebirds being surveyed along the 
shore of James Bay. Hoepfully some of the those White-rumps show up here in the 
near future. 


Chris Bennett
Milford, DE 

-----Original Message-----
From: Shorebird Discussion Group [mailto:SHOREBIRDS AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU] On Behalf 
Of Jean Iron 

Sent: Wednesday, August 05, 2015 7:41 PM
To: SHOREBIRDS AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
Subject: [SHOREBIRDS] James Bay Shorebirds - North Point Report #1

This is Jean Iron's first report for the period 31 July to 4 August 2015 from 
North Point (Lat 51.489737N, Lon -080.447598W) on the southwest coast of James 
Bay in Ontario, Canada. I get her messages by DeLorme inReach two-way satellite 
communicator with GPS. North Point is 25 km north of Moosonee. See location on 
map in link #1 below. The vast tidal mudflats and prairie-like coastal marshes 
make James Bay one of the most important shorebird staging areas in North 
America. The seven crew members are Ross Wood (crew leader), Theo Cull, 
Jacqueline Goldstein, Danielle Hosick, Jean Iron, Lizzie Moore and Walter 
Wehtje. Two other survey crews are at Little Piskwamish and Longridge Point. 
Surveys are under the direction of Christian Friis of the Canadian Wildlife 
Service with partners the Royal Ontario Museum, Ontario Ministry of Natural 
Resources and Forestry, Bird Studies Canada, Trent University, Nature Canada 
and the Moose Cree First Nation. 


SHOREBIRD OBSERVATIONS: 19 species to date. Maximum counts and dates for each 
species reported below. This report pertains only to North Point. 


Black-bellied Plover: 33 adults on Aug 4. 

American Golden Plover: 1 adult on Aug 4.

Semipalmated Plover: 90 mostly adults on Aug 3.

Spotted Sandpiper: 1 on Aug 3.

Solitary Sandpiper: 1 on Aug 3.

Greater Yellowlegs: 185 on Aug 4 (20% juv).

Lesser Yellowlegs: 242 (60% juv) on Aug 3. Also flocks of yellowlegs, probably 
both species, observed flying high and calling probably departing James Bay. 


Whimbrel: 64 adults on Aug 1.

Marbled Godwit: 34 on Aug 3. Three juveniles on Aug 1. A local pair on 
territory was calling at observers. Ross Wood saw an adult and 1 young. A 
isolated population breeds on southern James Bay. Surprisingly, the James Bay 
population migrates southwest to the Gulf of California. 


Hudsonian Godwit: 390 molting and fattening adults on Aug 4. Most will fly 
non-stop to South America. 


Ruddy Turnstone: 35 adults on Aug 4.

RED KNOT: Endangered rufa subspecies. 107 molting adults on Aug 3. James Bay 
knots traditionally concentrate at a few favoured stopover locations with 
smaller numbers seen elsewhere. North Point normally has small numbers compared 
to the much larger numbers at traditional sites such as Little Piskwanish and 
Longridge Point. Knots fatten and undergo variable amounts of body molt before 
most make the long non-stop flight to South America. 


Sanderling: 8 molting adults on Aug 1.

Semipalmated Sandpiper: 6,150 on Aug 3 (5% juv). They fatten over 2-3 weeks 
before making a non-stop flight of several days to northern South America. 

James Bay and the Bay of Fundy are the two most important stopover sites for 
southbound Semipalmated Sandpipers in North America. Flocks of peeps, probably 
Semipalmated and White-rumped Sandpipers, seen flying high probably leaving 
James Bay. 

 
Least Sandpiper: 44 on Aug 4. Percentage of juveniles increasing daily.

White-rumped Sandpiper: 10,000 molting adults on Aug 4. James Bay is the most 
important fall staging area for this sandpiper in North America. After 
fattening most overfly southern Canada and the United States going to South 
America. 


Pectoral Sandpiper: 165 adults on Aug 4.

Dunlin: Subspecies hudsonia. 85 molting adults on Aug 4.

Wilson's Snipe: 2 on Aug 4.

WHOOSH: Jean described the "great feeling in the rain at high tide" while 
surveying with Jacqueline on August 4 as "1000s of shorebirds whooshed past our 
heads". 

	
NANO-TAGGING SHOREBIRDS: A system of nano-tagging shorebirds begun in 2013 at 
James Bay and Motus tracking towers follows migrating shorebirds such as 
Semipalmated Sandpiper, White-rumped Sandpiper, Dunlin, Hudsonian Godwit and 
Red Knot. Nano-tags are tiny and their signals can be received within a 

15-20 km radius of a tower. Tags are placed on shorebirds when banded and each 
tag has a different frequency. There are several towers along southern James 
Bay and more along Lakes Ontario and Erie, St. Lawrence River and East Coast. 


OTHER BIRD SIGHTINGS: Canada Goose, 420 on Aug 2. American Wigeon. American 
Black Duck, 12 on Aug 2. Mallard, 143 on Aug 3. Northern Pintail, 1 on Aug 2. 
Green-winged Tail, 23 on Aug 2. Common Loon, 3 on Aug 3. Double-crested 
Cormorant, 1 on Aug 1. Sandhill Crane, 32 on July 31. American Bittern, 2 on 
Aug 2. Northern Harrier, 1 female on Aug 2. Peregrine Falcon, 1 on Aug 4 
flushed a flock of 7000 roosting shorebirds at high tide. Yellow Rail, 2 
ticking in coastal marshes on Aug 3. Little Gull, 1 adult on Aug 2, most Little 
Gulls in North America probably breed in Hudson Bay Lowlands. Common Tern, 3 on 
Aug 3. Arctic Tern, 1 on Aug 3. Norther Flicker, 1 on 2/3 Aug. 

Olive-sided Flycatcher. Alder Flycatcher, 3 on Aug 2. Tree Swallow, 2 on Aug 2. 
Cedar Waxwing, 15 on Aug 3. Swainson's Thrush. American Robin, 50 on Aug 2. 
Gray Jay, family group of 2 adults and 2 juveniles taking handouts at camp - 
they love oatmeal. Gray Catbird, 1 on Aug 3. Brown Thrasher, 1 on Aug 2. 
Tennessee Warbler. Le Conte's Sparrow, 4 on Aug 2. Nelson's Sparrow, 13 on Aug 
2 (subspecies alter, previously spelled alterus). Clay-colored Sparrow, 1 on 
Aug 1. Savannah Sparrow, 105 on Aug 3. White-throated Sparrow, 

40 on Aug 2. Fox Sparrow. Red-winged Blackbird, 800 on Aug 2. Red Crossbill,
3 on July 31, White-winged Crossbill, 1 on Aug 3. Common Redpoll, 8 on Aug 1.

MAMMALS: Beluga (White Whale), 2 at high tide on Aug 1. Black Bears near camp 
eating buffaloberries (Shepherdia canadensis). Polar Bears rarely occur south 
of Akimiski Island where a sizable population spends the summer. Pine Marten on 
Aug 1. Jumping Mouse (more likely Meadow than Woodland). Snowshoe Hare, adults 
and young. Meadow Voles and shrews also observed. 


1. Map of southern James Bay showing location of North Point 
http://jeaniron.ca/2015/JB15/map2015.htm 


2. Population Estimates of North American Shorebirds 2012 http://bit.ly/1zPebsP

3. Ontario Shorebird Conservation Plan
http://www.jeaniron.ca/Shorebirds/OSCPlan.pdf

WESTERN HEMISPHERE SHOREBIRD RESERVE: The hope is that James Bay or portions of 
will be designated a Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve of Hemispheric 
Importance. "These sites act as staging, nesting or breeding grounds for at 
least 500,000 shorebirds annually, or at least 30% of the biogeographic 
population of any species." James Bay greatly exceeds the minimum criteria for 
a "Hemispheric Importance" designation. 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Survey camps are rented from the Moose Cree First Nation.
The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) provides 
accommodations in the staff house while crews are in Moosonee. Thanks to Rod 
Brook, Sarah Hagey and Kim Bennett of OMNRF for logistical support. The data 
collected on these surveys would not be possible without the many hours of 
dedicated volunteer effort. Jean thanks an anonymous donor for financial 
assistance. 


Next report in 6-7 days.

Ron Pittaway
Toronto, Ontario
Subject: White ibis
From: Diane Kane <dianejkane AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 3 Aug 2015 12:52:48 -0400
I saw (what I am pretty sure of) a flock of 80 white ibis (adult, but mostly 
juvenile) fly over my home at 6 last evening and again at noon today. 


Reporting from Indian Beach, DE,

Diane Kane 

Diane J Kane,
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: DVOC Special Informal Summer Meeting at Bombay Hook NWR this Saturday
From: Steve Kacir <setkacir AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 3 Aug 2015 11:48:07 -0400
Hello Birders, 

The next Informal Summer Meeting of the Delaware Valley Ornithological Club 
(DVOC) takes place on this Saturday August 8, 2015 at Bombay Hook NWR in Kent 
County, DE. The itinerary includes a morning field trip, lunch at Quetzalteca, 
and a program by Dan Small: "Native Grassland Restoration and Bird Studies at 
the Chester River Field Research Station." Activities run from 7:30AM through 
the early evening. As a reminder, the previously scheduled evening field trip 
needed to be cancelled due to a scheduling conflict. 



Address & Website for Bombay Hook:
Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge
Visitor Center
2591 Whitehall Neck Road
Smyrna, DE 19977
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/Bombay_Hook/

Directions to Bombay Hook NWR: 
http://www.fws.gov/nwrs/threecolumn.aspx?id=2147517581

Google Map showing refuge visitor center: 
https://www.google.com/maps/ AT 39.2596798,-75.4734347,145m/data=!3m1!1e3

All who have an interest are invited to attend; the program and field trip are 
both free with no admission charged. Join us for a fun informal summer meeting! 


The day's itinerary will be as follows:

From 7:30AM-11:30AM, Steve Kacir will lead a mowning field trip at Bombay Hook 
NWR - Meet at the Visitor Center before 7:30AM. At 7:30AM SHARP we will head 
out into the refuge to look for breeding species such as Least Bittern as well 
as early migrants such as Western Sandpiper. Plan to arrive at the Visitor 
Center around 7:20AM, so we can organize vehicles as necessary before heading 
into the refuge. If you miss us at the visitor center, look for any large clump 
of cars and folks with telescopes and it could be us. We'll also spend some 
time trying to find the same sorts of grassland species that Dan Small will 
feature in his talk later in the day. Plan to bring sunscreen, insect 
repellent, and water. There will undoubtedly still be greenhead flies, but 
their numbers tend to fall off a bit in August, and you can avoid most of them 
by not standing near vehicles, especially idling vehicles. 


     ---------------------

1:00PM-2:30PM or so: Lunch at La Quetzalteca: DVOC Vice President Steve Kacir 
invites attendees to join him for lunch at one of Smyrna's finest spots for 
Mexican food: La Quetzalteca. We'll enjoy a leisurely repast while beating the 
heat in the restaurant's air conditioning. Contact Steve about getting added to 
the reservation, or just drop in and grab some great food and a cool drink. 


La Quetzalteca Mexican Restaurant
103 N Dupont Blvd
Smyrna, DE 19977

More information about La Quetzalteca can be found online: 
http://www.laquetzalteca.com/ 


     ---------------------

4:00PM: DVOC Informal Meeting at the Bombay Hook NWR visitor center featuring 
Dan Small and his program Dan Small - "Native Grassland Restoration and Bird 
Studies at the Chester River Field Research Station." The informal meeting will 
end by 7:00PM at the latest. 


Native Grassland Restoration and Bird Studies at the Chester River Field 
Research Station: 

A review of the 15 year effort to restore, monitor and manage a warm season 
grassland on the upper Eastern shore. Highlight our research, monitoring and 
banding efforts involving breeding grassland birds including Grasshopper 
Sparrows, Dickcissels, Northern Bobwhite and most recently Field Sparrows. 


Dan Small:
Dan Small is a field ecologist for the Center of Environment and Society at 
Washington College located on the eastern shore of Maryland. The land-based 
research arm of CES, the Chester River Field Research Station conducts research 
on breeding bird response to a long term grassland restoration project and also 
operates a migration banding station, Foremans Branch Bird Observatory. During 
the summer months, he can be found out in the native warm season grassland 
leading undergraduate interns through the fields studying all aspects of 
Grasshopper Sparrow and Dickcissel breeding ecology as part of a long-term 
demographic study. Prior to settling in Maryland he traveled widely from Alaska 
to Tobago living the life of an itinerant field biologist enjoying the 
different parts of the world and of course birding as much as possible. He is a 
NABC certified trainer and has been banding and birding for around 15 years. 


     ---------------------


Hope to see you there!
Steve Kacir
DVOC Vice President
setkacirgmail.com
Subject: Bird Banding at Ashland and Bucktoe
From: joe sebastiani <joe AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Mon, 3 Aug 2015 12:06:29 +0000
Ian Stewart is banding songbirds each Monday and Tuesday at Ashland Nature 
Center, and each Wednesday and Thursday at Bucktoe Creek Preserve. Public 
visitation time is 8am to 11am and we encourage you to stop out and see what he 
is catching in the nets. Warblers are starting to come through now, including 
Black-and-White and American Redstart, so hopefully he will be catching some 
soon. See www.delnature.org for directions to the 
sites. 


Ian wrote a blog about his bird banding work here if you are interested: 
http://blog.delawarenaturesociety.org/2015/07/31/bird-banding-at-ashland-nature-center-and-bucktoe-creek-preserve/. 




Joe Sebastiani
Ashland Nature Center Manager
Delaware Nature Society
www.delawarenaturesociety.org
P.O. Box 700
Hockessin, DE 19707
(302) 239-2334 ext. 115
fax (302)239-2473
joe AT delawarenaturesociety.org
The Nature of Delaware Blog www.delawarenaturesociety.org/blog