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Updated on Sunday, March 1 at 05:38 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Blackpoll Warbler,©Barry Kent Mackay

1 Mar Red-necked Grebes, Lapland Longspur, etc., coastal DE - 2/28 [Billy Weber ]
1 Mar WHITE-CROWNED SPAROW [Dennis Brezina ]
1 Mar Photo Study Of Birds In Delaware, 2/28/15 ["Howard B. Eskin" ]
28 Feb Signs of spring? [Ian Stewart ]
28 Feb RBA: Birdline Delaware, February 27th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
27 Feb Dover Redheads & an Otter [Gina Sheridan ]
27 Feb Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz [joe sebastiani ]
27 Feb Brandywine Bird Walk [Andrew Ednie ]
26 Feb Pea Patch Evening Heronry Survey Results ["Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" ]
25 Feb im. Golden Eagle [ ]
25 Feb Come on down for the First Pea Patch Heronry Survey of 2015! [Jeffrey Gordon ]
24 Feb Redheads in Dover ["Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" ]
24 Feb Red-necked Grebe at Cape Henlopen SP ["Amy O'Neil" ]
23 Feb Fox Sparrows in Landenberg [Carolyn DAmico ]
23 Feb First Pea Patch Heronry Survey of 2015 ["Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" ]
22 Feb Oyster Rocks in the thaw- Sussex Cty [Ann Marie Dinkel ]
21 Feb Re: Back yard Yellow-headed Blackbird [Mike Gardner ]
21 Feb Re: Back yard Yellow-headed Blackbird ["sally o'byrne" ]
21 Feb Back yard Yellow-headed Blackbird [Rodney Murray ]
21 Feb Some nice ducks, etc from ABA HQ, Delaware City, New Castle County [Jeffrey Gordon ]
21 Feb New Caslte: American Tree Sparrow, Redhead, etc. [Tim Schreckengost ]
21 Feb RBA: Birdline Delaware, February 20th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
20 Feb Osprey in Lewes ["Fees, David F. (DNREC)" ]
20 Feb Re: Osprey [Diane Kane ]
20 Feb Osprey [Diane Kane ]
18 Feb Reminder- final book sale before DOS tonight [Jean Woods ]
18 Feb DOS/Sussex Bird Club Field Trip - SEA WATCH V [Anthony Gonzon ]
17 Feb White-winged Dove - Yes! [Gina Sheridan ]
17 Feb DVOC Meeting on Feb 19 at Palmyra Cove Nature Park featuring Rick Wright [Steve Kacir ]
17 Feb Rusty Blackbird [Ellen Wright ]
17 Feb REMINDER: DOS Monthly Meeting 2/18 [Bill Stewart ]
16 Feb New Castle: Greater White-fronted Goose at Christiana Hospital pond [Tim Schreckengost ]
15 Feb possible Rough-legged Hawk ["sally o'byrne" ]
16 Feb cold weather birding along Delaware Bayshore [Amy White ]
14 Feb RBA: Birdline Delaware, February 13th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
13 Feb Thick-billed Murres in the mid-Atlantic [Alan Kneidel ]
12 Feb Re: Bird Drama on Fowler Road Today [Jason Weller ]
12 Feb Re: Bird Drama on Fowler Road Today [Brian Kushner ]
12 Feb Bird Drama on Fowler Road Today [Kurt Schwarz ]
12 Feb Ross's Geese 239 Draper Rd [Kurt Schwarz ]
12 Feb DOS Monthly Meeting 2/18 [Bill Stewart ]
11 Feb Cape May Pelagic Trip [Gina Sheridan ]
11 Feb Pine Siskins in Hockessin [Amy White ]
11 Feb Re: Great Backyard Bird Count Feb. 13th-16th [Joe Sebastiani ]
10 Feb Great Backyard Bird Count Feb. 13th-16th [ ]
10 Feb please report visits to Delaware River for gulls [Alan Kneidel ]
9 Feb Spring Forest Birds Workshop March 15 [Jean Woods ]
9 Feb Black-headed Gull, Cods Rd, Sussex Co [Frank Marenghi ]
9 Feb Spring Forest Birds Workshop March 15 ["Jean Woods jwoods AT delmnh.org [DOSMembers-only]" ]
9 Feb Lesser Black-backed Gulls [Christopher Bennett ]
9 Feb Birding Delaware Bayshore today [Amy White ]
8 Feb Re: Blackbird Spectacle [Denise Bittle ]
8 Feb Re: Photo Study Of Birds In Delaware, February 7th, 2015 [Denise Bittle ]
8 Feb Photo Study Of Birds In Delaware, February 7th, 2015 ["Howard B. Eskin" ]
7 Feb Blackbird Spectacle [Andy Urquhart ]
7 Feb Today's Birds [David and Joy Peters ]
7 Feb Re: Thousands of gulls at fox point [Tim Schreckengost ]
7 Feb Re: Thousands of gulls at fox point [Tim Schreckengost ]
7 Feb Thousands of gulls at fox point [Taj Schottland ]
7 Feb RBA: Birdline Delaware, February 6th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
4 Feb Indian River Inlet to Port Mahon [Michael Moore ]
3 Feb things that fly (mostly) ["sally o'byrne" ]
3 Feb Bombay Hook Bird Highlights [Rodney Murray ]
3 Feb American Tree Sparrow at my feeder in Glasgow [Michael Moore ]
3 Feb YB Sapsucker [Dennis Brezina ]
2 Feb Re: DE RBA GroupMe text alerts [Tim Schreckengost ]
2 Feb Don Jones to speak at DVOC on 5 Feb 2015 [Steve Kacir ]
2 Feb Ross's Geese in Lewes [Andrew Ednie ]
1 Feb Common Redpoll at Dragon Run, Delaware City [Jeffrey Gordon ]
1 Feb Re: New Castle Co: Greater White-fronted Goose at Newark Reservoir [Taj Schottland ]
1 Feb Re: New Castle Co: Greater White-fronted Goose at Newark Reservoir [Maurice Barnhill ]
1 Feb New Castle Co: Greater White-fronted Goose at Newark Reservoir [Tim Schreckengost ]
1 Feb Birds and Beans ["sally o'byrne" ]
31 Jan Sussex Co: Eurasian Wigeon at Assawoman [Tim Schreckengost ]
30 Jan RBA: Birdline Delaware, January 30th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
29 Jan YES on Yellow-headed Blackbird [Gina Sheridan ]

Subject: Red-necked Grebes, Lapland Longspur, etc., coastal DE - 2/28
From: Billy Weber <robot.stories AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 17:07:24 -0500
Indian River Inlet was excellent yesterday (2/28) around 1pm, with  
birds visible from the north jetty including a bright Red-necked  
Grebe, 3 Common Eiders (2 females and an immature male), the  
continuing young Harlequin Duck, 3 White-winged Scoters in the big  
flock, and an adult Lesser Black-backed Gull on the beach. Most of the  
regulars were present and accounted for, although I could not find Red- 
throated Loon (dozens of Commons close in), Ruddy Turnstone, Purple  
Sandpiper, or Boat-tailed Grackle. The bulk of the Brant were hiding  
in the back bay at Savages Ditch Road, along with another Red-necked  
Grebe. My morning's highlight was a spectacular lark flock--surely a  
thousand-plus birds--along Route 36 west of Slaughter Beach, with a  
Lapland Longspur and an American Pipit close to the road. I didn't see  
the flock later on, but they were spreading more manure in the field.  
Other notables through the day included at least 5 Redheads at the  
Wolfe Neck sewage plant (no Black-headed Gulls visible), all 3  
mergansers in one binocular view and 4 Greater Yellowlegs at Cods &  
Thirteen Curves roads near Prime Hook, a Merlin on the wires near  
Fowler Beach, a Pied-billed Grebe at the first bridge on Broadkill  
Road, 2 White-breasted Nuthatches "pished" in with the Brown-headeds  
along the first part of the Salt Marsh Spur at Cape Henlopen State  
Park, and a cormorant, presumably Double-crested, in the little bit of  
open water at the Pioneer dredge ponds at the Route 1/Route 9  
junction. Milford Neck was hopping after sunrise, with the following  
species tallied, mostly along (I believe) Mosley Road: Yellow-bellied  
Sapsucker (2), Pileated Woodpecker (4), Brown Creeper, Golden-crowned  
Kinglet, Hermit Thrush, Brown Thrasher, Eastern Towhee, and American  
Kestrel.

Good birding,
Billy Weber
Walnutport, PA
robot.stories AT gmail.com
Subject: WHITE-CROWNED SPAROW
From: Dennis Brezina <alumanon AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 15:08:39 -0500
There was a White-crowned Sparrow feeding with the White-Throats in our 
backyard yesterday... 


Dennis Brezina
Chesapeake City
Subject: Photo Study Of Birds In Delaware, 2/28/15
From: "Howard B. Eskin" <hbeskin AT VOICENET.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 10:31:55 -0600
Britton Parker and I drove to the Indian River Inlet in Rehobeth Beach,
Delaware yesterday with the hopes of seeing lots of birds...we were not
disappointed. The windchill got in the way of the picture-taking, however,
we did get some photos. We then worked our way back up through the beach
roads, e.g. Broadkill, Prime Hook and Fowler's to Port Mahon and Bombay
Hook NWR before finally driving back to Pennsylvania. To see the Photo
Study and a list of the species seen, please click on the following link:

http://www.howardsview.com/DelawareFeb28_15/DelawareBirdsFeb28th_15.html


Regards,
Howard


Howard B. Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
Harleysville (Montco), PA
Subject: Signs of spring?
From: Ian Stewart <istew AT UDEL.EDU>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:20:24 -0500
I had a quick walk around Newark Reservoir this afternoon (plenty of common
mergansers though no canvasbacks) and walked back to the car park down the
winding stony drainage ditch in the SW corner where I encountered a flock
of sparrows feeding on the ground (as well as 7 bluebirds feeding in the
berry bushes). To my surprise, the flock included 6 chipping sparrows of
which 5 were in breeding plumage. Given the spell of cold weather we've
been under the bright chestnut caps were a welcome sight! I've also seen
males of several species starting to sing in the trees behind my house
these last few days. Fingers crossed the cold doesn't last much longer.

Ian Stewart
Newark, DE, 19716
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, February 27th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 07:25:09 -0500
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* February 27, 2015
* DEST1502.27
	
*Birds mentioned
Tundra Swan
Wood Duck
American Wigeon
Northern Pintail
Canvasback
Redhead
Lesser Scaup
Greater Scaup
COMMON EIDER
HARLEQUIN DUCK
Surf Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Long-tailed Duck
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Red Breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Ring-necked Pheasant
Wild Turkey
Northern Bobwhite
Pied Billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
RED-NECKED GREBE
Great Cormorant
American Bittern
Black-crowned Night Heron
Bald Eagle
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK
GOLDEN EAGLE
Clapper Rail
American Coot
Ruddy Turnstone
Purple Sandpiper
American Woodcock
Bonaparte's Gull
Iceland Gull
Great Horned Owl
Long-eared Owl
Short-eared Owl
Pileated Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Merlin
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Hermit Thrush
Cedar Waxwing
Snow Bunting
Yellow-rumped Warbler
American Tree Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Eastern Meadowlark
YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD
Rusty Blackbird
Purple Finch
Pine Siskin

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: February 27, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

For Friday, February 27th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware
Museum of Natural History in Greenville. Delaware is still snow covered, a
great time to look for birds! The unofficial Delaware annual list annual
list increased to 183 species. 

New this week was a RED-NECKED GREBE at Cape Henlopen State Park. That bird
was on the ocean side of The Point parking lot, next to a HORNED GREBE. SURF
and BLACK SCOTERS were also reported at Cape Henlopen, along with
BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH at the seaside nature center. More RED-NECKED GREBES
might make their appearance where there is open water, as their traditional
wintering grounds on the Great Lakes are freezing over. Already, RED-NECKED
GREBES have been reported at Port Deposit Maryland along the Susquehanna
River and at Townsend Inlet in Avalon, NJ. There are scores of reports along
the North Jersey shore from Barnegat to Sandy Hook. 

REDHEADS are turning up in unusual locations as Delaware's ponds are
freezing up. Two REDHEADS are being seen in the retention pond by the Home
Depot in Glasgow, off Route 40 by People's Plaza. Four to five REDHEADS were
found on Silver Lake in Dover. HOODED and COMMON MERGANSERS, plus a BARRED
OWL were found in Silver Lake Park, which is the headwater of the St Jones
River. A Canvasback was seen on Newark Reservoir, plus 50 COMMON MERGANSERS
and 3 AMERICAN COOTS. SAVANNAH SPARROW and CEDAR WAXWING were also reported.


The immature drake COMMON EIDER continues to be seen at Indian River Inlet.
The immature drake HARLEQUIN DUCK is still present with 75 LONG-TAILED
DUCKS, plus SURF and BLACK SCOTER, BRANT, LESSER and GREATER SCAUP, COMMON
GOLDENEYE, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, and RUDDY DUCK. An AMERICAN BITTERN,
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON and CLAPPER RAIL were also reported. PURPLE
SANDPIPERS and RUDDY TURNSTONES were seen on the jetty, with GREAT
CORMORANTS on the tower. An "IPSWICH" SAVANNAH SPARROW was seen again this
week at the inlet. 

An immature GOLDEN EAGLE was seen at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge
near Cods Road at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Milton. AMERICAN
KESTREL was seen along 13 Curves Road by the cattle farm and along Cods
Road. A MERLIN was seen by Little Neck Wildlife Area. A SALTMARSH SPARROW
was seen at Fowler's Beach, along with WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW and
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER. WILD TURKEYS and GREAT HORNED OWL were seen along
Prime Hook Beach Road. WOOD DUCKS were seen along 13 Curves Road. Also
reported were Pied-BILLED GREBE, GREATER SCAUP, HOODED and COMMON MERGANSER.
Landbirds seen included PILEATED WOODPECKER, BROWN THRASHER and EASTERN
MEADOWLARK. BONAPARTE'S GULL, plus 12 GREATER SCAUP and BUFFLEHEADS were
seen at the duPont Nature Center at Mispillion Inlet. 

The previously reported SNOWY OWLS at Port Mahon have not been seen since
Valentine's Day, almost two weeks ago. But, there have been up to 5
SHORT-EARED OWLS seen along the Port Mahon Road. Also reported was a GREAT
HORNED OWL. 

Lot of BALD EAGLES can be seen sitting on the ice at Bombay Hook National
Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna. Nine were watching the waterfowl at Shearness
Pool. Waterfowl seen included TUNDRA SWAN, AMERICAN WIGEON, PINTAIL,
BUFFLEHEAD plus COMMON and HOODED MERGANSER. AMERICAN WOODCOCK and NORTHERN
BOBWHITE were also reported. A flock of WILD TURKEYS were seen along Route
9. Five COMMON GOLDENEYES were seen along Route 9 at Fleming's Landing. 

SHORT-EARED OWL was also seen off Delaware City this week flying towards
FortDuPont during the first monthly heron census of the year. That count
produced 29 GREAT BLUE HERONS flying towards Pea Patch Island, as breeding
season is getting started. A total of 25 GREAT CORMORANTS were seen flying
over Delaware City from Veteran's Park during the census. The count also
found 25 BALD EAGLES, as they are collecting wherever there is open water.
The flock of SNOW BUNTINGS continues to be seen at Ft DuPont, by the
fisherman's parking lot. RING-NECKED DUCK and HOODED MERGANSERS were seen at
Dragon Run. A RING-NECKED PHEASANT was seen along Dutch Neck Road. 

A ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK was seen this week at Coverdale Farms near Ashland
Nature Center. That bird was also seen along the Ashland-Clinton Rd near
Barrows Run Preserve. A pair of LONG-EARED OWLS continue to be seen at
Coverdale Farms, but you need to get special permission to see these birds
through Ashland Nature Center. 

An ICELAND GULL was at Fox Point State Park. Also reported was a
WHITE-WINGED SCOTER on the mostly frozen Delaware River. GREAT CORMORANTS
were also reported. 

No REDPOLLS were reported this week. PINE SISKINS were seen at feeders in
Millsboro and Seaford, plus one in northern Delaware at Deerhurst in
Brandywine hundred. PURPLE FINCH was reported at Middle Run Nature Preserve
near Newark. 

A female YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD was photographed at a feeder in Bear near
Walter Road and Old Baltimore Pike. This is not too far from School Bell
Road where YELLOW-HEADS have been reported for the last month. Another
YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD was reported at a yard in Middletown. No flocks of
RUSTY BLACKBIRDS were reported, but individual birds were seen in Bear,
Newark, Port Penn, and at Milford Neck Wildlife Area near Big Stone Beach. A
flock of 5 BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCHES were also found at Big Stone Beach, the
northernmost location in Delaware for this species. 

Four AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS were seen at the Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge,
plus at Brandywine Creek State Park, White Clay Creek, Prime Hook and Bombay
Hook. One bird was visiting a feeder in Camden-Wyoming. A big flock of 12
FOX SPARROWS was found at Turkle's Pond in Prime Hook, plus individuals were
at Big Stone Beach and a feeder near Millsboro. 

Four HERMIT THRUSHES were seen at Middle Run. Another has been coming to a
yard in downtown Wilmington. 

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Ann Dinkel, Rod
Murray, Jeff Holmes, Greg Obierek, Chris and Karen Bennett, Kim Steininger,
Hannah Greenberg, Jeff Gordon, Jim White, Derek Stoner, Brian McCaffrey,
Sally O'Byrne, Dave Mellon, Kathleen and Amy O'Neil, Matt Brown, Abby
Walter, Katie McDonough, Laura Balascio, Nancy Cunningham, David Fees, Gina
Sheridan, Chandler Weigand, Joe Sebastiani, Rich Clifton, Mike Moore, Chris
Rowe, Ken Wat, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver, Amy and Jim White,  Bill Stewart, Ian
Stewart, Tim Freiday, Alan Kneidel, Tim Schreckengost, Taj Schottland,
Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Remember, the birdline needs your
sightings! Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good
birding!

-end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Dover Redheads & an Otter
From: Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:20:17 -0500
On this bright sunny, cold (32 degrees), winter afternoon
(Friday-02/27/15), Dennis and I followed up on Chris Bennett's previous
report of Reheads and Common Mergansers in Dover. This site is Mirror
Lake/Saint Jones River that can be easily viewed from the north side of the
Loockerman St. Bridge.

Almost immediately, we beheld wonderful views of three drake REDHEADs and a
contingent of COMMON MERGANSERs. As a bonus, we were thrilled see to an
AMERICAN RIVER OTTER haul out of the water onto a river ice shelf and
devour a fish!


Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE
Subject: Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz
From: joe sebastiani <joe AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:20:27 +0000
Dear Birders: The 2nd annual Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz begins on 
Sunday, March 1, here in Delaware. The Blitz challenges birders to seek Rusty 
Blackbirds throughout this species' entire migratory range, from the 
southeastern U.S. through the Northeast, Midwest, Canada, and Alaska. This 
spring migration survey is organized by the International Rusty Blackbird 
Working Group, who is charged with learning more about this species, and 
reversing the severe population crash it has experienced in the last 40 years. 
To learn more about this project please visit: 
http://rustyblackbird.org/working-group/purpose/. A fact sheet on the Rusty 
Blackbird can be found here: 
http://rustyblackbird.org/wp-content/uploads/Rusty-Blackbird-Fact-Sheet.pdf. 
The Delaware Nature Society is a partner in this project. 


During the Blitz last year, there was a 165% increase in eBird checklists 
reporting Rusty Blackbirds during their migration period here...due to your 
effort to find them. It's easy to participate- bird as you normally do and 
search especially carefully for Rusty Blackbirds- then report your results to 
eBird.org under the "Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz" survey type, even 
if you don't find a Rusty. If you would like a short tutorial on how to enter 
your sightings to this effort, see this link: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETRXujTSsZQ. 


If you participated last year, we look forward to you searching your favorite 
locations once again. Some of you were successful finding flocks of Rusty 
Blackbirds in places like Bellevue State Park, Banning Park, and Bombay Hook 
NWR. 


Below is a list of places that have hosted migratory Rusty Blackbirds or might 
host them. Look for Rusty Blackbirds in places where there is shallow water, 
such as in flooded forest, wet fields, pond edges, or even wet roadside 
ditches. If you would like to "adopt" one of these locations to search for 
Rusty Blackbirds between March 1 and April 15, please let me know. 


Brandywine Creek State Park

Bellvue State Park

Valley Garden Park

Winterthur

Ashland Nature Center

Auburn Heights Preserve

Banning Park

Alapocas Woods

Middle Run Natural Area

Phillips Park

Lums Pond State Park

Lewden Green Park

Dragon Run Marsh and Park

Fort Dupont State Park

Thousand-acre Marsh

White Clay Creek State Park

Cedar Swamp WMA

Blackbird State Forest

Sunset Lake Park

Milford Neck Wildlife Area

Port Penn marshes

Augustine Wildlife Area

Brecknock Park

Bombay Hook NWR

Little Creek WMA

Ted Harvey WMA

Killens Pond State Park

Abbott's Mill Nature Center

Prime Hook NWR

Redden State Forest

Cape Henlopen State Park

Thompson's Island

Whartons Bluff Area

Holt's Landing State Park

Trap Pond State Park

Pete Gum Preserve

Assawoman WMA

Great Cypress Swamp

Nanticoke WMA



Joe Sebastiani
Ashland Nature Center Manager
Delaware Nature Society
www.delawarenaturesociety.org
P.O. Box 700
Hockessin, DE 19707
(302) 239-2334 ext. 115
fax (302)239-2473
joe AT delawarenaturesociety.org
The Nature of Delaware Blog www.delawarenaturesociety.org/blog
Subject: Brandywine Bird Walk
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 09:06:47 -0500
The monthly birdwalk at Brandywine Creek State Park will be tomorrow ,
Saturday, February 28th. We'll meet at the observation deck at the nature
center off Addams's Dam Road, near the intersection of Rts. 100 & 92. We'll
try to check the creek for waterfowl if there is any open water. An American
Tree Sparrow and 3 species of Woodpeckers were at the feeders last weekend.
Other highlights were Kestrel, Bluebirds and Pileated Woodpecker. Park
entrance and walk are free this month. 

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Pea Patch Evening Heronry Survey Results
From: "Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" <Chris.Bennett AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 15:52:27 +0000
I was joined by five volunteers (Bob Strahorn, Jim Lewis, Liz Porter, Jeff and 
Liz Gordon) last evening for the first evening heronry survey of 2015. While 
the views across the ice choked river might have suggested we were in the 
sub-Arctic, the weather was actually quite nice with very little wind with a 
temperature close to 40 at the start of the survey that was still above 
freezing when we finished 30 minutes after sunset. 


We counted 29 Great Blue Herons flying to the Island and 23 flying from the 
island. Our final total was just below the 12 year average of 54.83 and a bit 
above the 12 year median of 37. It is only the fifth time that we recorded more 
than 50 birds. However, I do want to point out that this is probably not a 
direct count - with individual birds probably being counted both as they flew 
to the heronry and then again when they left. Our survey is meant to provide a 
general trend in use by each species for each of the seven months that we 
conduct the survey. 


In addition to the Great Blues was also saw 25 - 30 Bald Eagles, a few dozen 
Common Mergansers, 18 Great Cormorants, several Northern Harriers, a 
Bufflehead, a Scaup and a Short-eared Owl. Jeff kept an eBird list for the 
survey. 


Our next survey is scheduled for Wednesday, 25 March - beginning at 5:19 pm.


Chris Bennett
Natural Resource Planner
Environmental Stewardship Program
Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation
152 South State Street
Dover, DE 19901
Phone: (302) 739-9230
Fax: (302) 739-6967
"The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant: 'What 
good is it?'" 

 Aldo Leopold A Sand County Almanac 

Subject: im. Golden Eagle
From: Richard Clifton <000000af228ab213-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 14:18:35 -0500
At about 1:30 today I had an im. Golden Eagle right behind our house on Cods 
road trying to catch a Snow goose. It missed, and we watched it swing around 
and make several attempts before giving up and drifting back across the farm. 
There, a Red-tail took two dives at it and it was last seen heading west 
southwest up Prime hook beach road toward rt. 1. We had great views, it truly 
was an excellent specimen. 


Richard Clifton
Cods Road,Milford. 
Subject: Come on down for the First Pea Patch Heronry Survey of 2015!
From: Jeffrey Gordon <jeffgyr AT ME.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 13:54:22 -0500
Hi all--

A reminder that the annual Pea Patch Island Heronry Surveys kick off this 
afternoon. Come on down and help us kick the year off right. 


Yes, the Delaware River is still icy. Even so, the herons that nest on Pea 
Patch Island are starting to return with thoughts of nesting on their minds. 
This afternoon and evening, from 3:50 to 6:20 PM, Chris Bennett​ of the 
Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation, me, Liz​, and anyone else crazy, 
uh, hardy enough to join us will conduct the first Evening Survey of the Pea 
Patch Island Heronry for 2015. Please join us for as much or as little time as 
you like. All are welcome. 


This early in the season, we're likely to see mostly Great Blue Herons, 
although a few Great Egrets may be back, too. There will also very likely be 
Bald Eagles, and some other cool waterfowl. 


The survey is conducted in Battery Park at the end of Clinton Street in 
Delaware City. You are welcome to stop by ABA HQ at 3:30 and walk up from 
there. Our building will be available throughout the survey as a warming hut 
and for rest rooms, so you certainly don't have to be out there for the full 2 
1/2 hours. Feel free to drop by the survey for as little or as much time as you 
like. 


Note that Crabby Dick's in Delaware City is currently closed for renovations. 
Food and drink will be available downtown at Cordelia's Bakery until 6 PM and 
at Lewinsky's until 7 PM, when they have their monthly Comedy Night, a separate 
($5) admission. 


Hope to see some of you this evening.

Good birding,

Jeff

Jeffrey Gordon
President 
American Birding Association
Delaware City, DE
302-838-3660


> On Feb 23, 2015, at 3:53 PM, Bennett, Chris (DNREC) 
 wrote: 

> 
> I will be conducting the first of 7 Evening Surveys of the Pea Patch Island 
Heronry this Wednesday from 3:50 to 6:20 pm in Battery Park at the end of 
Clinton Street in Delaware City. During the survey we count and ID all of the 
herons and egrets flying to and from the island. During the February survey we 
usually only see Great Blue Herons - but on 4 occasions (2007, 2011-2013) we 
also had Great Egret, with 14 flying into the heronry in 2012. The weather is 
going to be relatively balmy compared to what we've been experiencing lately 
with the high Wednesday forecast to reach nearly 40. It is also forecast to be 
sunny, though a bit breezy. 

> 
> Come on out if you can make it. In addition to the Great Blues I can 
guarantee you'll see thousands of Crows and a at least a few Bald Eagles. With 
luck we'll see some other good birds as well. 

> 
> I hope you can join me.
> 
> Chris Bennett
> Natural Resource Planner
> Environmental Stewardship Program
> Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation
> 152 South State Street
> Dover, DE 19901
> Phone: (302) 739-9230
> Fax: (302) 739-6967
> "The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant: 'What 
good is it?'" 

> Aldo Leopold A Sand County Almanac 

Subject: Redheads in Dover
From: "Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" <Chris.Bennett AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 16:48:15 +0000
Karen spotted 4 drake Redheads in Mirror Lake in Dover (the one in the story on 
the cover of the News Journal this morning) yesterday around noon. On my way 
home last evening there were 3 of them still present just north of the 
Loockerman Street Bridge. This morning at least one of them was still present 
in the same area. In addition there have been a few dozen Common Mergansers on 
the "lake' (really just a buldge in the Saint Jones River) along with the usual 
Canada Geese and Mallards. 


Chris Bennett
Milford, DE
"The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant: 'What 
good is it?'" 

 Aldo Leopold A Sand County Almanac 

Subject: Red-necked Grebe at Cape Henlopen SP
From: "Amy O'Neil" <parakeet93 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 10:20:23 -0500
Sorry for the late report. Sunday late afternoon around 4:30pm my daughter and 
I were scoping out a small raft of Surf Scoters close to shore on the ocean 
(east) side of The Point at Cape Henlopen SP, when a Red-necked Grebe floated 
into view. It was a large, stocky bird with a long neck, long yellow bill, 
overall dark gray with light chin, cheek, breast and flanks. After several 
minutes of observation, a much smaller Horned Grebe appeared close to it, 
providing us with excellent comparisons. 


Earlier in the day, at the North side of Indian River Inlet we had Surf & Black 
Scoters off the jetty with Long-tailed Ducks and the continuing Harlequin Duck. 
There were Purple Sandpipers very close by on the rocks along with Ruddy 
Turnstones, Sanderlings, and a single Dunlin. 


At the Burton Island Causeway there were several Common Goldeneye along with 
many Bufflehead, a Red-breasted Merganser, a pair of Ruddy Ducks, and a few 
Brant farther back on the ice by the marina. 


We ended the day as the sun was close to setting on Prime Hook Road, with a 
half dozen Wild Turkeys in a field, and a little farther down the road a Great 
Horned Owl flew over a field and perched briefly in a bare tree. 


Amy O'Neil
North Wilmington

View these checklists online at:

Indian River Inlet
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22052508

Cape Henlopen SP - Nature Center
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22052701

Cape Henlopen SP - The Point
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22052863

Prime Hook Rd. 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22052580

Cods Rd. 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22052644
Subject: Fox Sparrows in Landenberg
From: Carolyn DAmico <carolyndamico AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 21:49:39 -0500
Had a Fox Sparrow show up in the yard yesterday afternoon - 3 today!
Excellent close views from the window as they were feeding just below with
a handful of White Throated Sparrows and Juncos. The yard is lively this 
winter.... 

Subject: First Pea Patch Heronry Survey of 2015
From: "Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" <Chris.Bennett AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 20:53:54 +0000
I will be conducting the first of 7 Evening Surveys of the Pea Patch Island 
Heronry this Wednesday from 3:50 to 6:20 pm in Battery Park at the end of 
Clinton Street in Delaware City. During the survey we count and ID all of the 
herons and egrets flying to and from the island. During the February survey we 
usually only see Great Blue Herons - but on 4 occasions (2007, 2011-2013) we 
also had Great Egret, with 14 flying into the heronry in 2012. The weather is 
going to be relatively balmy compared to what we've been experiencing lately 
with the high Wednesday forecast to reach nearly 40. It is also forecast to be 
sunny, though a bit breezy. 


Come on out if you can make it. In addition to the Great Blues I can guarantee 
you'll see thousands of Crows and a at least a few Bald Eagles. With luck we'll 
see some other good birds as well. 


I hope you can join me.

Chris Bennett
Natural Resource Planner
Environmental Stewardship Program
Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation
152 South State Street
Dover, DE 19901
Phone: (302) 739-9230
Fax: (302) 739-6967
"The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant: 'What 
good is it?'" 

 Aldo Leopold A Sand County Almanac 

Subject: Oyster Rocks in the thaw- Sussex Cty
From: Ann Marie Dinkel <adinkl AT MSN.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 16:10:29 -0500
I took a quick trip down Oyster Rocks Road today in hopes that something was
moving in the warmer weather.  I was not disappointed.  Hawks included
Merlin, Red Tailed and Cooper's.  Meadowlarks and lots of Robins moved in
the open areas within the developments along the road.  The river held Pied
Bill Grebe, Red Breasted and Hooded Mergansers, 5 Great Cormorants, Black
Ducks and lots of Buffleheads.  There were a few Great Blue Herons in the
marsh and Black and Turkey vultures.

 

Ann

 

Ann Marie Dinkel

Training and Operations Consulting Services

Lewes, DE

 

302-381-4220

 
Subject: Re: Back yard Yellow-headed Blackbird
From: Mike Gardner <birdnerd AT ZOOMINTERNET.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 21:07:23 -0500
Birds my wife observes go on the "Yard List" but not MY County or Year list.
Besides, She's a better birder than me anyway.

Mike Gardner
President/CEO/Only Member
Cochranville Amateur Ornithological Society
Cochranville, Chester County, Pa.


-----Original Message----- 
From: sally o'byrne
Sent: Saturday, February 21, 2015 6:04 PM
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [de-birds] Back yard Yellow-headed Blackbird

  If it is documented in your yard, why shouldn’t you count it?  Is it a 
yard list or a Rodney Murray list or must it be both?

Opinions from other yard listers please??

Sally O'Byrne



> On Feb 21, 2015, at 5:16 PM, Rodney Murray  wrote:
>
> My wife just sent me a video of a swarm of Red-winged Blackbirds attacking
> my feeders in my back yard.   Sure enough, there is a lone male
> Yellow-headed Blackbird in the mass.  Needless to say, I have never been 
> so
> lucky as to count a YHBB as a yard bird, and I guess I still can't.
>
> Funny, she called me about the bird as I was ticking my life Mountain
> Plover just north of Tucson.
>
> Of course I have no idea if this is the same bird seen up around the
> RT.13/40 split, but if you are in the Middletown/Odessa area (off Bayview
> Rd)  keep your eyes open for the bird.
>
> Rod Murray, Middletown 
Subject: Re: Back yard Yellow-headed Blackbird
From: "sally o'byrne" <salobyrne AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 18:04:04 -0500
 If it is documented in your yard, why shouldn’t you count it? Is it a yard 
list or a Rodney Murray list or must it be both? 


Opinions from other yard listers please??

Sally O'Byrne



> On Feb 21, 2015, at 5:16 PM, Rodney Murray  wrote:
> 
> My wife just sent me a video of a swarm of Red-winged Blackbirds attacking
> my feeders in my back yard.   Sure enough, there is a lone male
> Yellow-headed Blackbird in the mass.  Needless to say, I have never been so
> lucky as to count a YHBB as a yard bird, and I guess I still can't.
> 
> Funny, she called me about the bird as I was ticking my life Mountain
> Plover just north of Tucson.
> 
> Of course I have no idea if this is the same bird seen up around the
> RT.13/40 split, but if you are in the Middletown/Odessa area (off Bayview
> Rd)  keep your eyes open for the bird.
> 
> Rod Murray, Middletown
Subject: Back yard Yellow-headed Blackbird
From: Rodney Murray <rcmurray213 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 17:16:08 -0500
My wife just sent me a video of a swarm of Red-winged Blackbirds attacking
my feeders in my back yard.   Sure enough, there is a lone male
Yellow-headed Blackbird in the mass.  Needless to say, I have never been so
lucky as to count a YHBB as a yard bird, and I guess I still can't.

Funny, she called me about the bird as I was ticking my life Mountain
Plover just north of Tucson.

Of course I have no idea if this is the same bird seen up around the
RT.13/40 split, but if you are in the Middletown/Odessa area (off Bayview
Rd)  keep your eyes open for the bird.

Rod Murray, Middletown
Subject: Some nice ducks, etc from ABA HQ, Delaware City, New Castle County
From: Jeffrey Gordon <jeffgyr AT ME.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 14:05:13 -0500
Dear DE-Birders,

One of the really fun things about our new riverfront location here in Delaware 
City is the opportunity to keep an eye on waterbird activity from the comfort 
of the indoors. A bit wimpy, perhaps, but we’ll take it. 


It’s quite striking how ice influences the distribution, or at least the 
visibility, of many species. Today, with ice covering more than 50% of the 
river surface, birding was predictably interesting. 


The several dozen Common Mergansers, our most numerous diving duck, were joined 
by at least 5 Red-breasted Mergansers, including a pair of drakes that floated 
by close enough to see their allegedly red breast patches. 


There was at least a pair of Buffleheads. I say at least because there was a 
second pair of black-and-white ducks flying south just off the tip of Pea Patch 
Island that struck me as looking better for Long-tailed Duck, but just didn’t 
allow me enough of a look to satisfy myself that they weren’t actually 
Buffleheads. Note that Tom Stephenson, co-author of The Warbler Guide, reported 
a Long-tailed Duck here on Feb 7. 


The most exciting bird (or most exciting identified bird, anyway) was a duck 
that I initially thought was going to be a scaup but as it flew closer, its 
large size, bulky shape, pale color, near lack of a pale wing stripe, elongate 
head and dark bill revealed it to be a drake Canvasback. 


Also riding the ice were half a dozen Bald Eagles and good numbers (dozens) of 
Herring and Great-blacked gulls along with the ever-present Ring-billeds. I did 
not manage to pick out anything rarer among the gulls, though. 


Looks like the snow curtain has descended, so at least for the moment the river 
show is over. 


Good birding,

Jeff

Jeffrey Gordon
President
American Birding Association
Delaware City, DE
jgordon AT aba.org
www.aba.org
Subject: New Caslte: American Tree Sparrow, Redhead, etc.
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 12:21:04 -0500
Birders,

Here are a few highlights from birding around New Castle County this
morning.

Brandywine Creek State Park: One American Tree Sparrow was feeding with
White-throated Sparrows at the Nature Center Feeders. I also had three
Field Sparrows near the entrance to the park.

eBird checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22000573

DuPont Environmental Education Center (Peterson Wildlife Refuge): There
were many waterfowl and gulls in the open water. Canada Geese, Mallards,
and Common Mergansers were most abundant. I did have a partially leucistic
Canada Goose there. There were a few Swamp Sparrows around the boardwalk as
well.

eBird checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22001581

Home Depot Retention Pond: I got an eBird rare bird alert while I was out
regarding an adult male Redhead in the pond, so I swung by to check it out.
It was still present around 11:00 am.

eBird checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22002257

Cheers,
Tim Schreckengost
Elkton, MD
(814) 952-2934
www.nemesisbird.com
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, February 20th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 07:14:43 -0500
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* February 20, 2015
* DEST1502.20
	
*Birds mentioned
GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE
ROSS'S GOOSE
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Wigeon
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Greater Scaup
Lesser Scaup
COMMON EIDER
HARLEQUIN DUCK
Surf Scoter
Black Scoter
Long-tailed Duck
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Northern Bobwhite
Red-throated Loon
Horned Grebe
Pied-billed Grebe
Great Cormorant
Black Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Rough-legged Hawk
American Coot
Lesser Yellowlegs
Ruddy Turnstone
Purple Sandpiper
American Woodcock
Iceland Gull
Lesser Black Backed Gull
Glaucous Gull
WHITE-WINGED DOVE
SNOWY OWL
Long-eared Owl
Short-eared Owl
Belted Kingfisher
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
American Kestrel
Peregrine Falcon
Eastern Phoebe
Horned Lark
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Winter Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Brown Thrasher
American Pipit
Snow Bunting
American Tree Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
"Sharp-tailed" Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Eastern Meadowlark
YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD
Rusty Blackbird
Purple Finch
COMMON REDPOLL
Pine Siskin

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: February 20, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

For Friday, February 20th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware
Museum of Natural History in Greenville. Snow covered Delaware this week,
with northern Delaware receiving 3-4 inches and lower Delaware getting 8-9
inches. The weather drove birds to roadsides and feeders. The unofficial
Delaware annual list annual list increased to 182 species.

The best bird of the week was a WHITE-WINGED DOVE that wandered onto the
property of Brian McCaffrey near Quail Hallow in Camden-Wyoming below Dover.
Brian is famous for the rare birds his yard attracts, and now he can add the
first documented Kent Co. record of this species. A COOPER'S HAWK was also
in the area chasing the feeder birds; hopefully it didn't dine on exotic
dove. 

An immature drake COMMON EIDER was among the waterfowl at Indian River Inlet
on Wednesday. That bird was off the north jetty. The immature drake
HARLEQUIN DUCK continues to be seen along with 75 LONG-TAILED DUCKS, 100
SURF and 20 BLACK SCOTERS, GREATER and LESSER SCAUP, COMMON GOLDENEYE,
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER and RUDDY DUCK. HORNED and PIED-BILLED GREBES, GREAT
CORMORANT, and both LOONS were also reported. RUDDY TURNSTONE and PURPLE
SANDPIPERS were found on the jetty. A single LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL was
found on the beach, plus an "Ipswich" SAVANNAH SPARROW. 

A GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was found sitting on the ice with CANADA GEESE
at the Christiana Hospital pond at the intersection of Churchman's Road and
Rte. 4, the Stanton-Ogletown Rd. on Monday. That bird was subsequently
looked for there and at Delaware Park without success. Nearby, the
YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD continues to be seen intermittently at School Bell
Rd off Rt. 40 in Bear. That bird is best viewed from the Union United
Methodist church parking lot. A RUSTY BLACKBIRD was also seen in the flocks
of blackbirds coming to a feeder in Bear. 

A GLAUCOUS GULL was among the hundreds of gulls on ice flows at Fox Point
State Park on Valentine's day. Two LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were also seen,
along with GREAT CORMORANT and BALD EAGLE. COMMON MERGANSERS were seen on
the river at Battery Park in New Castle. 

A SNOWY OWL continues to be seen at Port Mahon. That bird was seen way back
in the marsh behind the oil tanks. Also reported were 2 SHORT-EARED OWLS.
Waterfowl moving out to the river during the cold snap included TUNDRA SWAN,
RING-NECKED DUCK, SURF SCOTER, plus HOODED and COMMON MERGANSER. 

The only report of COMMON REDPOLLS this week was by the silos at Bear Swamp
in Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna. There were several
reports of winter finches coming to feeders this last week. PINE SISKINS
were seen in the northern Delaware area with reports at Covered Bridge Farm
in Newark, Corner Ketch, and Hockessin. EIGHT PINE SISKINS were seen at
Canterbury Hills. Reports included three at Deerhurst in Brandywine hundred
and one bird in Greenville. Downstate the only report was at Milford. PURPLE
FINCH was seen at Milford, Ft. DuPont in Delaware City, Charter Oaks in
Hockessin, and Ashland Nature Center. The previous reported LONG-EARED OWL
continues to be seen at Coverdale Farm near Ashland. This is private land
and arrangements can be made to see this bird Ashland Nature Center.

Fort DuPont in Delaware City continues to have SNOW BUNTINGS. A flock of 25
were found south of the Riverview parking lot along the rocks. An ICELAND
and LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL were seen on the ice flows on the Delaware
River today. Also reported were HORNED GREBE, GADWALL, AMERICAN WIGEON,
BUFFLEHEAD, and a peak count of 125 COMMON MERGANSERS. Landbirds seen at Ft
DuPont included RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, WINTER WREN, and CHIPPING SPARROW. The
waterfront at Delaware City had RING-NECKED DUCK, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER,
and RED-THROATED LOON.

The snowstorm downstate pushed landbirds to the roads edge at Prime Hook
National Wildlife Refuge near Milton. A "SHARP TAILED" SPARROW was seen at
Fowler's Beach. A total of 650 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS were seen along the
Fowler's Beach Road. That flock sparrows included 11 WHITE-CROWNED, 5 FOX
SPARROWS, an AMERICAN TREE SPARROW, plus 47 MEADOWLARK. Also reported were 6
BROWN THRASHER, HERMIT THRUSH, and AMERICAN PIPIT. WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS
were also seen along Cods Road along with FOX SPARROW and EASTERN PHOEBE.
Waterfowl seen at Prime Hook included WOOD DUCK, AMERICAN WIGEON,
BUFFLEHEAD, and HOODED MERGANSER. LESSER YELLOWLEGS were found along Prime
Hook Beach Road and Fowler's Beach.

An early OSPREY was seen flying up the Lewes-Rehoboth Canal in Lewes from
Angler's Wharf today. A big congregation of SCOTERS continues to be seen off
The Point at Cape Henlopen State Park. 200 SURF SCOTERS were seen at the
Swimming Beach, and another 100 were at the Fishing Pier. 70 SNOW BUNTINGS
were also reported at The Point. RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH was coming to a
feeder in Midway. BROWN THRASHER was seen in a yard at Old Landing in
Rehoboth Beach. Waterfowl on the retention pond in Lewes included GADWALL,
RING-NECKED DUCK, HOODED MERGANSER, and GREAT BLUE HERON.

The snowstorm in western Sussex County at Oak Grove near Seaford pushed
birds alongside the road. Species seen included KILLDEER, 250 HORNED LARK,
AMERICAN PIPIT, SAVANNAH SPARROW, and 4 MEADOWLARK. Also seen was American
kestrel. There are numerous sightings of BALD EAGLES sitting on the ice
along the Nanticoke River.

12 BALD EAGLES were seen on the ice at Little Creek Wildlife Management
Area. Those birds were surrounding an open pool on the ice that contained
800 AMERICAN COOT. 30 to 40 COOT carcasses were seen strewn across the ice.
A REDHEAD was seen among the COOT flock, demonstrating how not to be seen.

A ROSS'S GOOSE was seen at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge among TUNDRA
SWAN and CANADA GEESE at Raymond Pool. RED-SHOULDERED HAWK was seen at the
refuge. A covey of NORTHERN BOBWHITES were found along the Finis Pool Road,
pushed the edge by the snow. Two more ROSS'S GEESE were found at the Pioneer
Dredge Ponds near Dover. AMERICAN PIPITS were seen along the roadside of
Route 9 at Dover Air Force Base. YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER and WHITE-CROWNED
SPARROW were coming to a feeder in Cheswold.

An AMERICAN WOODCOCK was found by an office building on Corporate Blvd in
Newark during the snow. Another WOODCOCK was seen along the roadside at
White Clay Creek State Park in Newark. SAPSUCKER and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW
were also found there. A CHIPPING SPARROW is coming to a feeder in Newark
this last week. Newark Reservoir had BUFFLEHEAD and 10 COMMON MERGANSERS. A
BROWN CREEPER was found by Townsend Hall at South campus. The University of
Delaware Ag Farm produced HORNED LARK, AMERICAN KESTREL, and PEREGRINE
FALCON. MUTE SWAN and RING-NECKED DUCK continues to be seen at Carousel Park
in Pike Creek.

A ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK was seen along I-95 at the Pennsylvania line in
Claymont. American kestrel was also seen at Brandywine Creek State Park.
Eight RING-NECKED DUCKS and 2 AMERICAN COOTS were reported at Harry's Pond
at the Brandywine Town Center off Concord Pike. BUFFLEHEAD and 30 COMMON
MERGANSERS were seen at the Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge in downtown
Wilmington. The PEREGRINE FALCONS in downtown Wilmington continue to start
nesting activity at their box on the Brandywine Building.

40 BLACK VULTURES were reported flying over Porter Road near Lum's Pond
State Park. The Port Penn impoundments contained LESSER SCAUP, HOODED and
COMMON MERGANSER, plus BELTED KINGFISHER this week. A female COMMON
GOLDENEYE and a RING-NECKED DUCK were found on Silver Lake in Middletown. 

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Brian McCaffrey,
Sally O'Byrne, Dave Mellon, Jim Lenhard, Matt DelPizzo, Hank Davis, Erica
Miller, Diane Kane, Kathleen and Amy O'Neil, Howard Eskin, Bob Rufe, Matt
Brown, Abby Walter, George Armistead, Katie McDonough, Laura Balascio,
Jennifer Christie, Nancy Cunningham, David Fees, Gina Sheridan, Chandler
Weigand, Joe Sebastiani, Rich Clifton, Mike Moore, Chris Rowe, Ken Wat, Joel
Martin, Wayne Longbottom, Mike Gallaway, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver, Rich
Clifton, Michael Bradley, Lorianne Phalen, Amy and Jim White, Alex
Lamoreaux, Bill Stewart, Ian Stewart, Tim Freiday, Alan Kneidel, Tim
Schreckengost, Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Remember, the birdline
needs your sightings! Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good
birding!

-end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Osprey in Lewes
From: "Fees, David F. (DNREC)" <David.Fees AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 20:20:18 +0000
I'd say it is first of season, since there was at least one Osprey seen this 
year during one of the Christmas Counts the first week of January. I don't 
believe that bird continued on since then. Still, an Osprey a full week before 
the end of February is one tough FOSer, especially given all the frozen water. 
I usually get them in the Seaford-Laurel area sometime in the first week of 
March. 


David Fees
Seaford, DE
Subject: Re: Osprey
From: Diane Kane <dianejkane AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 15:13:39 -0500
Is it first of season or first of year ???

Diane J Kane,
Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 20, 2015, at 15:08, Diane Kane  wrote:
> 
> Just saw a FOS osprey flying over Irish Eyes in Lewes, think spring!
> 
> Diane Kane 
> 
> Diane J Kane,
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Osprey
From: Diane Kane <dianejkane AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 15:08:26 -0500
Just saw a FOS osprey flying over Irish Eyes in Lewes, think spring!

Diane Kane 

Diane J Kane,
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Reminder- final book sale before DOS tonight
From: Jean Woods <JWoods AT DELMNH.ORG>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 2015 14:33:44 +0000
This is your final chance to get some great bird books at bargain prices before 
the DOS meeting tonight (6:30 pm). The books were generously donated by Howard 
Brokaw's family to benefit DOS. 


Hope to see you there- Jean, Ian and Charles

Jean L. Woods, Ph.D. Phone: 302-658-9111 x314 

Curator of Birds Fax: 302-658-2610 

Delaware Museum of Natural History                      jwoods AT delmnh.org
P.O. Box 3937 www.delmnh.org 

(4840 Kennett Pike)
Wilmington, DE  19807
Subject: DOS/Sussex Bird Club Field Trip - SEA WATCH V
From: Anthony Gonzon <atgonzon AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 2015 08:20:29 -0500
Greetings all,

Join Chris and me this coming Saturday for the penultimate sea watch in the
2014-2015 season. With the recent frigid temps, only the bravest of souls
have ventured to the inlet, but great birds have been turning up along the
coast, including Thick-billed Murre and Common Redpoll. Learn to ID dark
blobs at a distance (or at least guess). There should still be sea ducks
around along with the winter resident shorebirds, gulls and cormorants. This
field trip is stationary and portable toilets are available in the parking
lot. We will either be down on the beach near the south jetty or on the dune
crossing closest to the inlet (near the crane).

WHERE: Indian River Inlet, Southside Day Use Area
WHEN: Saturday, February 21 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
WHO CAN ATTEND: YOU CAN!! Everyone is welcome. Scopes and binoculars highly
recommended. Don't forget tp dress warmly!

Join us!

 

Ant

_________________

Anthony Gonzon

Middletown, DE
Subject: White-winged Dove - Yes!
From: Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 16:06:42 -0500
On this sparkling winter day (with 8" inches of snow on the ground and 24
degrees), the brilliant sunshine was was most welcome. After reading the DE
RBA text from Alex Lamoreaux, Dennis and I decided to twitch the
White-winged dove that had showed up in Brian McCaffrey's backyard.

When we arrived, Brian immediately pointed out the sleepy lethargic
WHITE-WINGED DOVE that was perched on a backyard fence ( in front of a
feeder). As we viewed the sun bathing WW Dove, chatted with Brian and
admired his custom ceramic tiles, Sharon, another local birder showed up.
Later, Tim Schreckengost and Alex Lamoreaux joined the fun. At this point,
the WW Dove was stretching its wings and provided all us with excellent
profile views. After resting up, it suddenly flew off its perched and we
could no longer see it.

We appreciate Brian for ID'ing the WW Dove, alerting the birder community,
and for graciously allowing us to see this great bird. It was a joyful
experience!

Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE
Subject: DVOC Meeting on Feb 19 at Palmyra Cove Nature Park featuring Rick Wright
From: Steve Kacir <setkacir AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 15:29:30 -0500
Hello Birders, 

The Delaware Valley Ornithological Club (DVOC) meets on Thursday February 19 at 
Palmyra Cove Nature Park's Environmental Discovery Center featuring a program 
by Rick Wright: "The Originals: Reading the First Descriptions of North 
American Birds" 


All who have an interest are invited to attend; the program is free with no 
admission charged. Club meetings begin at 7:30PM and this meeting is being held 
at Palmyra Cove Nature Park (in Palmyra, NJ) instead of our usual location. 

	Information for the site can be found here: http://www.palmyracove.org/
	Directions: http://www.palmyracove.org/Directions.aspx
 Google Map: 
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Palmyra+Cove+Nature+Park/ AT 40.002726,-75.045052,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x89c6b5e91136fad5:0x644aebed463f000b 



"The Originals: Reading the First Descriptions of North American Birds"

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Thanks to the magic of the internet, the original descriptions of most of the 
world's birds--long buried in the stacks of far-flung libraries--are now at our 
fingertips. Some are just as dusty and dry as we expect, but many answer 
questions we might not even have thought to ask. Join Rick Wright for a tour of 
the fascinating, often surprising stories hidden in the first descriptions of 
some of our most familiar birds. 


Rick Wright
---------------
Rick Wright is the book review editor at Birding magazine and the author of the 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey. His current projects include the 
sparrows volume in the Peterson Reference Guide series and a book on the cult 
and culture of the hummingbird in France. He lives in Bloomfield, New Jersey, 
with his wife, Alison Beringer, and their chocolate lab, Gellert. 



We hope to see you at this next meeting! 

Steve Kacir
DVOC Vice President
setkacirgmail.com
Subject: Rusty Blackbird
From: Ellen Wright <warwick8154 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 08:45:12 -0500
A first time sight for me. Had a Rusty Blackbird on my property this
morning in Warwick MD near Middletown DE. Also had a Brown Thrasher
drinking from the heated birdbath and an Eastern Towhee.

Ellen Wright
Subject: REMINDER: DOS Monthly Meeting 2/18
From: Bill Stewart <bird-del AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 07:06:46 -0500
Subject: DOS Monthly Meeting - Wed. 2/18

Good Morning DE-Birders,

The Delmarva Ornithological Society is excited to host their next monthly 
meeting tomorrow night, Wednesday the 18th of February. 


Back again this year by popular demand is our "By DOS 4 DOS" night filled with 
special presentations by DOS members - featuring five members presenting 15 
minute talks of interest to all! This year's topics range from some very odd 
bird stories, birding in Germany, Alaskan birding adventures and more! Mark 
your calendar for the 18th, bring a friend and join us all at the Ashland 
Nature Center. 


We hope to see many of you there - the meeting is open to the public so grab a 
birding buddy or two and plan on attending on the 18th! 


Delmarva Ornithological Society   February 18th Meeting

7:00 PM Social 1/2 hour (We welcome you to bring some refreshments to share for 
our Social 1/2 hour) 


Meeting begins at 7:30 PM

Ashland Nature Center - Hockessin, DE     


Good birding,

Bill Stewart
DOS VP/Program Chair
Subject: New Castle: Greater White-fronted Goose at Christiana Hospital pond
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 11:33:00 -0500
Birders,

There is an adult Greater White-fronted Goose at the Christiana Hospital
Pond.

Location:

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=39.69085,-75.6674&ll=39.69085,-75.6674 


ebird checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21894646

Cheers,
Tim Schreckengost
Elkton, MD
814.952.2934
Subject: possible Rough-legged Hawk
From: "sally o'byrne" <salobyrne AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 15 Feb 2015 22:43:45 -0500
Today while driving to Philly on I-95, I had a possible Rough-legged Hawk near 
the Delaware/PA border (on the Delaware side). I noticed strong carpel marks on 
the underwings and a black band on the end of the tail. Otherwise rather light 
underneath. At first I thought it had a white head so was trying to make it 
into an eagle, but nothing else was right. In the strong sunlight, the head 
might have seemed whiter than it was. 


Driving at 70 didn’t give me much chance to contemplate or study the bird, 
but would others keep their eyes open in that area? Preferably as a passenger 
than the driver... 


Sally O'Byrne
Subject: cold weather birding along Delaware Bayshore
From: Amy White <amywwhite AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 03:31:40 +0000
The following post is from Jim White: 





I consider myself a “fair weather birder” but today I decided to get the 
wuss out and head out into the brutal cold winds blowing along the mid Delaware 
Bayshore. It actually turned out to be a pretty rewarding day afield. I managed 
to see 45 species. Highlights included Redhead Duck, 16 Bald Eagles, and a 
great Snow Goose aerial spectacle. 


The most interesting observation, other than the frozen tundra-like landscape, 
was 12 Bald Eagles on the ice at Little Creek State Wildlife Area, feasting on 
a nearby flock of American Coot. Over 400 coot were feeding feverishly in a 
relatively small patch of open water in an otherwise frozen impoundment. 
Apparently some of the hungry coot were too slow or weak to avoid the stooping 
eagles. I watched as one adult eagle swooped down and picked up a coot out of 
the floating flock, flew up 50 feet above the ice, and then transferred the 
coot to an immature eagle. I counted at least 34 coot carcasses on the ice 
amidst the eagles. 


All in all, I birded outside my car approximately 10 times with an average of 
7.6 seconds each time. Could be worse though - I could be in Boston. 






Jim White 


Hockessin, DE 
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, February 13th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 2015 10:59:19 -0500
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* February 13, 2015
* DEST1502.13
	
*Birds mentioned
GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE
ROSS'S GOOSE
Cackling Goose
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Wigeon
EURASIAN WIGEON
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail
Green-winged Teal
Canvasback
Ring-necked Duck
Lesser Scaup
HARLEQUIN DUCK
Surf Scoter
Black Scoter
Long-tailed Duck
Bufflehead
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Wild Turkey
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Horned Grebe
NORTHERN FULMAR
Great Cormorant
American Bittern
Great Egret
Black-crowned Night Heron
Black Vulture
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Rough-legged Hawk
American Coot
American Oystercatcher
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
Greater Yellowlegs
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Purple Sandpiper
Dunlin
American Woodcock
LITTLE GULL
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Bonaparte's Gull
ICELAND GULL
Lesser Black Backed Gull
GLAUCOUS GULL
BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE
Forster's Tern
Razorbill
ATLANTIC PUFFIN
THICK-BILLED MURRE
DOVEKIE
Barn Owl
SNOWY OWL
Barred Owl
Long-eared Owl
Short-eared Owl
NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL
Pileated Woodpecker
Peregrine Falcon
Merlin
American Kestrel
Horned Lark
Tree Swallow
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Marsh Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
American Pipit
Cedar Waxwing
Snow Bunting
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Palm Warbler
American Tree Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Eastern Meadowlark
Rusty Blackbird
Purple Finch
COMMON REDPOLL
Pine Siskin

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: February 13, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

For February Friday the 13th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware
Museum of Natural History in Greenville. With several Alcid reports and 10
species of gull found, the unofficial Delaware annual list annual list
increased to 181 species. 

Alcids are showing up along the Delaware coast, including a THICK-BILLED
MURRE picked up on the beach at Rehoboth. Another THICK-BILLED MURRE was
photographed at Indian River Inlet on January 31st.  There are only 3
documented records of this species in Delaware, and two of them are
specimens, from Bethany Beach and Middletown. THICK-BILLED MURRES showed up
this week along the coast of New York and New Jersey, at Montauk,
Shinnecock, Coney Island, Staten Island, Ashbury Park, Barnegat Inlet and
Atlantic City. Another alcid, a DOVEKIE was photographed off Fowler's Beach,
the second record for the state this year! RAZORBILL was also reported at
Indian River Inlet this week. The pelagic trip out of Wildwood, NJ  into
Delaware Waters found a plethora of alcids, including 22 DOVEKIES, 4
ATLANTIC PUFFINS, RAZORBILL and COMMON MURRE. That trip also found 2 light
phase NORTHERN FULMARS and 3 BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKES. Perhaps the
nor'easters hitting the New England Coast this winter are pushing these
birds further south. 

A tremendous raft of almost 100,000 gulls off Fox Point State Park in
Wilmington produced 13 ICELAND, 2 GLAUCOUS, and 15 LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS
on Saturday. Also seen were a western PALM WARBLER and AMERICAN TREE
SPARROW. Waterbirds seen included 4 GREAT CORMORANTS, COMMON LOON, plus
COMMON and RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS. Other birders coming to Fox Point were
not as lucky, as the tide pushed the gills downriver. Other gulls reported
included a GLAUCOUS GULL at Fowler's Beach and a BLACK-HEADED GULL at the
marsh by the headquarters for Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge near
Milton. There LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were also seen at The Point in Cape
Henlopen State Park. A LITTLE GULL was reported on the Cape May-Lewes Ferry.


The previously reported SNOWY OWLS continue to be seen at Port Mahon near
Little Creek. Three were seen, including a male and female sitting together
on Saturday. Those birds were out in the marsh or seen from the fishing
pier, not on the tank farm. Also reported were 4 SHORT-EARED OWLS and a BARN
OWL over the marsh. PEREGRINE FALCON was seen by the tower. CACKLING GOOSE
and AMERICAN PIPITS were seen in the fields. AMERICAN BITTERN and
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON were found in the marsh by the impoundments. 

A flock of 30 PINE SISKINS were also reported at Port Mahon this week. PINE
SISKINS were also seen at feeders in North Wilmington off Grubb Road, at Bay
Pointe near Summit Bridge, and in Georgetown. A flock of 10-50 COMMON
REDPOLLS continues to found in the dunes at Cape Henlopen State Park,
between the Point and the Hawkwatch area. 70 SNOW BUNTINGS were also seen at
The Point. PURPLE FINCH was reported at feeders Georgetown, Rehoboth Beach
Country Club, and at the Seaside Nature Center in Cape Henlopen. Cape
Henlopen also had the NUTHATCH trifecta, BROWN-HEADED, RED and
WHITE-BREASTED. 

The previously reported GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was seen again last
weekend at the Newark Reservoir. 60 COMMON MERGANSERS were also seen on the
reservoir. Four CACKLING GEESE were seen at the University of Delaware Ag
Farm, south of Newark. RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, PEREGRINE FALCON, RUBY-CROWNED
KINGLET, YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER and HORNED LARK were also found at the Ag
school.  

Another WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was found at Prime Hook along Cods Road. Two
ROSS'S GEESE and a pair of CACKLING GEESE were reported off Draper Rd near
Prime Hook. BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, GREATER YELLOWLEGS, DUNLIN, and SANDERLING
were seen at Fowler's beach. A HORNED GREBE at Fowler's was seen being
killed and eaten by a GREAT BLACK-BACKED GULL. Over 100+ AMERICAN PIPITS
were seen off 13 Curves Road and 2 TREE SWALLOWS were seen along Cods Road.
A pair of AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS were seen at Mispillion Inlet, along with
BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER and RUDDY TURNSTONE. 

The previously reported drake HARLEQUIN DUCK continues to be seen at Indian
River Inlet. Also reported were SURF and BLACK SCOTER with 100+ LONG-TAILED
DUCKS. GREAT CORMORANT was seen on the tower, while PURPLE SANDPIPER and
RUDDY TURNSTONE were found on the jetty. FORSTER'S TERN and BONAPARTE'S
GULLS were reported feeding over the inlet. The previously reported EURASIAN
WIGEON continues to be seen at Assawoman Wildlife Area near Fenwick Island. 

Silver Lake in Rehoboth Beach had almost 300 CANVASBACK this week, plus
NORTHERN SHOVELER, GADWALL, HOODED and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER and 40 RUDDY
DUCKS. 20+ CEDAR WAXWINGS were seen at Bay Vista. 

A pair of AMERICAN AVOCETS made it back to Bombay Hook National Wildlife
Refuge this week, along with GREATER YELLOWLEGS. An AMERICAN WOODCOCK was
found along the roadside by Bear Swamp, frozen out of his normal habitat. A
ROSS'S GOOSE was also reported at the refuge, flying over with flocks of
SNOW GEESE. The SNOW GEESE flock was estimated at about 75,000 birds at
Leatherbury flats this week. Other waterfowl INCLUDED TUNDRA SWANS, WOOD
DUCK, 14 RING-NECKED DUCKS at Shearness Pool, GREEN-WINGED TEAL, BUFFLEHEAD,
COMMON MERGANSER and RUDDY DUCKS. BARRED and BARN OWL were found along the
entrance road to the refuge. A good number of landbirds were seen by the
Allee house, including AMERICAN TREE SPARROW, FOX and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW,
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER and BROWN THRASHER. Also reported in the refuge were
AMERICAN KESTREL, PILEATED WOODPECKER and EASTERN MEADOWLARK. 

A light phase ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK was seen at the Pioneer dredge ponds by
Dover AFB this week. A WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW was also coming to a feeder
near Cheswold. A SAW-WHET OWL was calling at the Baxter Tract again this
week. GREAT EGRET was seen at Thousand Acre Marsh by the Reedy Point Bridge.
PEREGRINE FALCON has also returned to the bridge, after being evicted for
repairs last year. Port Penn and Augustine Beach had WOOD DUCK, PINTAIL,
LESSER SCAUP, BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON MERGANSER, and RUDDY DUCK. Landbirds seen
included CATBIRD, MARSH WREN, FOX SPARROW and AMERICAN TREE SPARROW. A
COMMON LOON was found at Delaware City, plus RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, DOUBLE
CRESTED-CORMORANT and 2 BALD EAGLES. RED-THROATED LOON and 8 SNOW BUNTINGS
were found at Ft DuPont State Park, along with GRAY CATBIRD. CORMORANT was
also seen at Battery Park in New Castle, along with BROWN THRASHER. 

A MERLIN was seen along the Brandywine from tree locations, Brandywine Creek
State Park, Hagley Museum and Granogue. AMERICAN KESTREL was seen at
Brandywine Creek and at Hay Road near Fox Point. The Wilmington PEREGRINE
FALCONS are taking up courtship activities near the Brandywine building off
Pennsylvania Ave. BLACK VULTURE was seen over Brandywine Park in downtown
Wilmington. 

BUFFLEHEAD and COMMON MERGANSER were also seen at Brandywine Park. A flock
of 40 COMMON MERGANSERS were seen at Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge in
Wilmington. A CACKLING GOOSE and COMMON MERGANSER were found on Hoopes'
Reservoir in Greenville. 11 RING-NECKED DUCKS and an AMERICAN COOT were at
Harry's Pond in the Brandywine Town Center off Concord Pike. A pair of WOOD
DUCK were found on the Red Clay Creek in Yorklyn. Four MUTE SWAN, SNOW GOOSE
and RING-NECKED DUCK were at Carousel Park near Pike Creek. 

 A pair of LONG-EARED OWLS continues to be seen at Coverdale Farms. This is
private property and special permission must be obtained through Ashland
Nature Center to see these birds. A WILD TURKEY was seen in a yard in North
Start near Hockessin. A flock of 20 RUSTY BLACKBIRDS were found in a yard in
Greenville off Barley Mill Road. Thousands of blackbirds are descending into
Churchman's Marsh at dusk right now, after feeding in the fallow fields in
Lancaster co. 

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Nancy Cunningham,
David Fees, Gina Sheridan, Kurt Schwarz, Andy Urquhart, Zoe Yost, Sally
o'Byrne, Gary and Judy Charles, Abby Walter, Chandler Weigand, Joe
Sebastiani, Jeff Gordon, Rich Clifton, Mike Moore, Chris Rowe, Ken Wat, Phil
Thompson, Joel Martin, Nancy Goggin, Wayne Longbottom, Tom Reed, David
Moulton, Mike Gallaway, Suzie Ball, Lynn Smith, Amy White, Jim Austin-Cole,
Alex Lamoreaux, Bill Stewart, Ian Stewart, Tim Freiday, Al Guarente, Alan
Kneidel, Taj Schottland, Tim Schreckengost, Maurice Barnhill, and Joe
Russell. Remember, the birdline needs your sightings! Please call your
reports into 302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week,
this is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

-end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Thick-billed Murres in the mid-Atlantic
From: Alan Kneidel <akneidel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015 10:23:39 -0500
De-Birders,

Birders checking out coastal areas in SUSSEX COUNTY in the near future
should keep their eyes out for THICK-BILLED MURRES (and any other alcid).
There has been a recent influx of this species to near-shore waters in the
mid-Atlantic as far south as NC, with a few being found washed up on the
beach (including one in Rehoboth).

Keys to identification can be found here:

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Thick-billed_Murre/id

-- 
Alan Kneidel
M.S. Candidate, Natural Resources
Delaware State University
980-254-2706
Subject: Re: Bird Drama on Fowler Road Today
From: Jason Weller <fishingdude20 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2015 19:24:30 -0500
Two years ago at an Audubon camp, Steve Kress was talking about how skillful 
they were at killing Puffin chicks and he showed us a video of a Greater 
Black-backed Gull attacking a mother Eider and her 3 or 4 chicks. From the time 
the gull got the first chick to the time it ate the last chick was about 7 
seconds. The whole time the mother was attempting to drive the gull off with 
obviously no success. I gained a new respect for them after that! 


> Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2015 18:45:39 -0500
> From: goawaybird AT VERIZON.NET
> Subject: [de-birds] Bird Drama on Fowler Road Today
> To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
> 
> About midday, a friend and I were at Fowler Beach.  We observed a Horned
> Grebe.  Some time later, as we walked back from the beach, we noticed
> commotion, involving a Great Black-backed Gull, which clearly had
> something in its beak.  We got scopes on it, and realized it had seized
> the Horned Grebe and was tossing it around.  It dropped it several times,
> but resumed trying to subdue it. Finally the gull gave up for the moment,
> and the grebe was able to seek shelter in some grass on a little knoll.
> The gull hung around the knoll for a bit, but finally relented and flew
> off.  We have still and video and I will post at some time in the next few
> days to Flickr.
> 
> Kurt Schwarz
> Ellicott City, MD
> goawaybird at verizon dot net
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Bird Drama on Fowler Road Today
From: Brian Kushner <bkushner2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2015 19:06:21 -0500
Last summer I witnessed a Black-backed Gull attack and kill a Snowy 
Egret with ease.

Brian

On 2/12/2015 6:45 PM, Kurt Schwarz wrote:
> About midday, a friend and I were at Fowler Beach.  We observed a Horned
> Grebe.  Some time later, as we walked back from the beach, we noticed
> commotion, involving a Great Black-backed Gull, which clearly had
> something in its beak.  We got scopes on it, and realized it had seized
> the Horned Grebe and was tossing it around.  It dropped it several times,
> but resumed trying to subdue it. Finally the gull gave up for the moment,
> and the grebe was able to seek shelter in some grass on a little knoll.
> The gull hung around the knoll for a bit, but finally relented and flew
> off.  We have still and video and I will post at some time in the next few
> days to Flickr.
>
> Kurt Schwarz
> Ellicott City, MD
> goawaybird at verizon dot net
Subject: Bird Drama on Fowler Road Today
From: Kurt Schwarz <goawaybird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2015 18:45:39 -0500
About midday, a friend and I were at Fowler Beach.  We observed a Horned
Grebe.  Some time later, as we walked back from the beach, we noticed
commotion, involving a Great Black-backed Gull, which clearly had
something in its beak.  We got scopes on it, and realized it had seized
the Horned Grebe and was tossing it around.  It dropped it several times,
but resumed trying to subdue it. Finally the gull gave up for the moment,
and the grebe was able to seek shelter in some grass on a little knoll.
The gull hung around the knoll for a bit, but finally relented and flew
off.  We have still and video and I will post at some time in the next few
days to Flickr.

Kurt Schwarz
Ellicott City, MD
goawaybird at verizon dot net
Subject: Ross's Geese 239 Draper Rd
From: Kurt Schwarz <goawaybird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2015 13:44:20 -0500
We just observed two adult Ross's Geese among 2000+ Snow Geese on Draper Rd in 
Sussex County near house number 239. Time was about 1:15. Two Cackling geese 
also seen nearby. 


I MAY have seen a blue phase Ross's as well but it was far, among other geese 
and I did not get a photo. And now I am not positive. 


Kurt Schwarz
Ellicott City MD
goawaybird at verizon dot net
Subject: DOS Monthly Meeting 2/18
From: Bill Stewart <bird-del AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2015 10:16:42 -0500
Good Morning DE-Birders,

The Delmarva Ornithological Society is excited to host their next monthly 
meeting this coming Wednesday the 18th of February. 


Back again this year by popular demand is our "By DOS 4 DOS" night filled with 
special presentations by DOS members - featuring five members presenting 15 
minute talks of interest to all! This year's topics range from some very odd 
bird stories, birding in Germany, Alaskan birding adventures and more! Mark 
your calendar for the 18th, bring a friend and join us all at the Ashland 
Nature Center. 


We hope to see many of you there - the meeting is open to the public so grab a 
birding buddy or two and plan on attending on the 18th! 


Delmarva Ornithological Society   February 18th Meeting

7:00 PM Social 1/2 hour (We welcome you to bring some refreshments to share for 
our Social 1/2 hour) 


Meeting begins at 7:30 PM

Ashland Nature Center - Hockessin, DE     


Good birding,

Bill Stewart
DOS VP/Program Chair
Subject: Cape May Pelagic Trip
From: Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2015 11:21:27 -0500
Over the last two winters,  Dennis and I have signed up for pelagic trips
off Delaware and they were all canceled for various reasons. After two such
trips being canceled or postponed this winter, I was biting my nails as to
whether the scheduled Saturday- Feb. 7th Cape May See Life Paulagics  trip
would launch.

Fortunately, good weather prevailed and we did have a highly successful
voyage out of Cape May, NJ (that also ventured into Delaware waters).
Highlights  in the Delaware waters portion of the trip included crippling
views of BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE, COMMON MURRE, ATLANTIC PUFFIN, DOVEKIE,
NORTHERN GANNET, and NORTHERN FULMAR. In fact, my lifer DOVEKIE was sitting
in the water only ten meters away! We had  excellent second and third views
of virtually all the aforementioned species in both states. Back in the
harbor, we ended the day with BRANT, HARLEQUIN DUCK, RED-THROATED LOON,
BLACK and SURF SCOTERS, PURPLE SANDPIPERs, and GREAT CORMORANTS.

My mammal lifer came in the form of a pod of SHORT-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHINs
that rode along the bow of the boat. I was literally standing right above
them on the deck of the boat and could look straight down on these sleek
cetaceans. Several of us also had brief view of an ATLANTIC SPOTTED DOLPHIN
and two RISSO'S DOLPHINs.

On Sunday morning (02/08/15), we birded some in Cape May and added FOX
SPARROW and WINTER WREN to our New Jersey lists. On our drive back home, we
stopped to view around 5000 SNOW GEESE covering a field north of the
junction of Hwy. 1 & Clifton Road. After ten minutes of scanning, we found
a ROSS'S GOOSE.

Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE
Subject: Pine Siskins in Hockessin
From: Amy White <amywwhite AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2015 13:51:05 +0000
This morning at our feeders we have 6 Pine Siskins (feeding on finch mix). 

In addition, there is a Northern Flicker feeding nearby, also on finch mix. The 
Flicker is a frequent visitor this year to our finch feeders. 

Amy & Jim White 
Hockessin, DE 
Subject: Re: Great Backyard Bird Count Feb. 13th-16th
From: Joe Sebastiani <bunker17 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2015 06:18:03 -0500
Thank you for reminding birders of this great event Tyler.

I just wanted to update eBird users and GBBC participants about a few 
things.  First, I would like to welcome Alan Kneidel to the Delaware eBird 
data review team.  He will be reviewing eBird records for Kent, Co. and will 
help with adjusting filters, and reviewing historical records.  I review New 
Castle and Sussex Co. records.  All eBird reviewers also review GBBC data.

Second, for the next 10 days, which are the future possible dates of the 
Great Backyard Bird Count, we have adjusted the statewide filters in eBird 
for a few species.  (The GBBC uses eBird filters to come up with 
checklists).  Because there are so many beginner and backyard birders that 
participate in the GBBC, we have taken the following confusing or difficult 
to identify species off the statewide lists from Feb 12-22:
Redhead, Red-breasted Merganser (NCC&Kent), Winter Wren, Hermit Thrush, Gray 
Catbird, Brown Thrasher, Fox Sparrow, American Tree Sparrow, Chipping 
Sparrow, Field Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow, Rusty 
Blackbird, Purple Finch, and Pine Siskin.

Many of these species cause mass confusion in the GBBC at the backyard 
feeder and are widely misidentified during this event. Therefore we have 
honed the checklist down a bit.

Beginning and backyard birders come out of the woodwork to participate in 
this event, Friday through Monday.  This is a huge opportunity to talk 
birds, share sightings, and generally welcome casual birders into a world 
most of us who subscribe to this list-serve live almost every day.  The 
Delaware Birds Facebook page might be the right venue.  I encourage you to 
bird wherever, submit your sightings to eBird or the GBBC (it all goes to 
the same place), and check out the data using the Explore Data function at 
www.birdcount.org.  You will be able to look at the list of species 
generated, who entered checklists, where the checklists are from, etc.  Last 
year, in Delaware, 131 species were reported and 821 checklists were 
submitted during the GBBC.

Joe Sebastiani
Delaware eBird and GBBC Data Editor


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "James Tyler Bell" 
<00000085b810a3aa-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
To: 
Sent: Tuesday, February 10, 2015 3:36 PM
Subject: [de-birds] Great Backyard Bird Count Feb. 13th-16th


For those of you using eBird, your checklists will automatically be included 
in the GBBC data. If not, use the GBBC birdcount portal to enter data. 
Although the GBBC originated with the intent of counting birds in you 
backyard, it has expanded over the years to encompass wherever you are or 
would like to be.

And take a young birder with you! Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland

The Great Backyard Bird Count starts this Friday, February 13th and goes 
until Monday, February 16th. Participation takes as little as fifteen 
minutes and you can count from absolutely anywhere you see birds. All of the 
info on how to participate, find local events, and spread the word about the 
count is available atwww.birdcount.org.  Thanks for your support of the 
program and happy birding! Olivia Anton National Audubon Society
Subject: Great Backyard Bird Count Feb. 13th-16th
From: James Tyler Bell <00000085b810a3aa-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Tue, 10 Feb 2015 20:36:02 +0000
For those of you using eBird, your checklists will automatically be included in 
the GBBC data. If not, use the GBBC birdcount portal to enter data. Although 
the GBBC originated with the intent of counting birds in you backyard, it has 
expanded over the years to encompass wherever you are or would like to be. 


And take a young birder with you! Tyler Bell
jtylerbell AT yahoo.com
California, Maryland
    
The Great Backyard Bird Count starts this Friday, February 13th and goes until 
Monday, February 16th. Participation takes as little as fifteen minutes and you 
can count from absolutely anywhere you see birds. All of the info on how to 
participate, find local events, and spread the word about the count is 
available atwww.birdcount.org. Thanks for your support of the program and happy 
birding! Olivia Anton National Audubon Society 



Subject: please report visits to Delaware River for gulls
From: Alan Kneidel <akneidel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 10 Feb 2015 12:18:53 -0500
Hello DE-Birders,

As reported through various avenues, there was a terrific gull show on the
Delaware River on Saturday. An estimated 60,000-80,000 gulls were in view
from Fox Point SP in Wilmington, most of them floating up and down the
river on large sheets of ice (depending on the tide). There was also a
constant stream of gulls flying close overhead down the river shore.
Proximity to the Cherry Island Landfill near to the south surely plays a
big role in these numbers, as there was a swirling mass of thousands of
gulls visible there.

The vast majority of birds were Herring Gulls, followed in abundance by
Great Black-backed and Ring-billed. Among the common species were
double-digit numbers of Iceland and Lesser Black-backed Gulls, as well as
at least 2 Glaucous Gulls.* And who knows what else. *

I re-visited the location briefly on Sunday and it was comparatively slow.
There were approx. 30k gulls floating in remnant ice distant on the NJ side
of the river, but too far to pick through.

As temperatures are expected to plunge in the coming week, ice should
re-form and hopefully lure gulls back into viewing on the river.

In hopes of rekindling the magic from Saturday, I'm writing this as a
request for anyone visiting this area to report what the gull scene is
like. Positive or negative reports are equally valuable, and hopefully all
this will help elucidate the current pattern of these birds and optimize
our birding time.

Cheers,

-- 
Alan Kneidel
M.S. Candidate, Natural Resources
Delaware State University
980-254-2706
Subject: Spring Forest Birds Workshop March 15
From: Jean Woods <JWoods AT DELMNH.ORG>
Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2015 18:27:46 +0000
In March DOS will offer a Spring Forest Bird Identification Workshop in 
partnership with the Delaware Museum of Natural History (DMNH). Workshop 
participants will have the opportunity to study and discuss the skins of a 
variety of forest birds common to Delmarva in the spring. Birds for study will 
include both the expected and the unusual species. This program will introduce 
new birders to many commonly seen upland and coastal forest species, while 
offering plumage challenges for our more advanced birders. I'll help you make 
sense of the variety of spring birds and get you ready for migration. 


The workshop is free and will be offered Sunday, March 15, 2015, from noon to 
2pm at the Delaware Museum of Natural History. Space is limited and 
registration is required. If you're interested in attending the Spring Forest 
species workshop, please contact me at 
jwoods AT delmnh.org or 302-658-9111 x314. 



Jean L. Woods, Ph.D. Phone: 302-658-9111 x314 

Curator of Birds Fax: 302-658-2610 

Delaware Museum of Natural History                      jwoods AT delmnh.org
P.O. Box 3937 www.delmnh.org 

(4840 Kennett Pike)
Wilmington, DE  19807
Subject: Black-headed Gull, Cods Rd, Sussex Co
From: Frank Marenghi <frank_marenghi AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2015 13:28:58 -0500
Hello all,
I made a few stops birding along the Delaware coast and bayshore Saturday the 
way up from Ocean City, MD with Winger West and Jen Dwyer. Best bird was an 
adult Black-headed Gull that I spotted at the bridge at the intersection of 
Cods Rd and Thirteen Curves Rd. It was foraging with Bonaparte's Gulls at the 
outlet of the culvert under the road very close to the road before moving 
further out on flats (east). Two Tree Swallows were also noteworthy. The first 
year male Harlequin Duck continues at Indian River Inlet. Links to ebird lists 
below, photos to be posted in a day or two. 

A text message sent to the DE RBA indicated David Fees saw possibly the same 
Black-headed Gull yesterday near the Prime Hook HQ. 

Good Birding,
Frank MarenghiCrownsville, MD

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21719729
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21719545
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21719529





Conservation of resources means conservation of our freedoms.
 
Brian Czech 		 	   		  
Subject: Spring Forest Birds Workshop March 15
From: "Jean Woods jwoods AT delmnh.org [DOSMembers-only]" <DOSMembers-only-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2015 18:27:46 +0000
In March DOS will offer a Spring Forest Bird Identification Workshop in 
partnership with the Delaware Museum of Natural History (DMNH). Workshop 
participants will have the opportunity to study and discuss the skins of a 
variety of forest birds common to Delmarva in the spring. Birds for study will 
include both the expected and the unusual species. This program will introduce 
new birders to many commonly seen upland and coastal forest species, while 
offering plumage challenges for our more advanced birders. I'll help you make 
sense of the variety of spring birds and get you ready for migration. 


The workshop is free and will be offered Sunday, March 15, 2015, from noon to 
2pm at the Delaware Museum of Natural History. Space is limited and 
registration is required. If you're interested in attending the Spring Forest 
species workshop, please contact me at 
jwoods AT delmnh.org or 302-658-9111 x314. 



Jean L. Woods, Ph.D. Phone: 302-658-9111 x314 

Curator of Birds Fax: 302-658-2610 

Delaware Museum of Natural History                      jwoods AT delmnh.org
P.O. Box 3937 www.delmnh.org 

(4840 Kennett Pike)
Wilmington, DE  19807
Subject: Lesser Black-backed Gulls
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2015 08:59:10 -0500
On my way home from yesterday's Sussex Bird Club meeting in Lewes I spotted
a nice congregation of gulls in a field on the east side of RT 1 aong Sugar
Hill Road in a field that had recently been treated with manure.  After
seeing Tim's post about the gulls off Fox Point and hearing Alex's
excellent presentation about rare and uncommon birds I decided to take a
look and see if there was anything good among the throng of common winter
gulls.  While a white-winged gull would have been great I was really hoping
to find an early Laughing Gull.  I don't put much credence in forecasts by
marmots.  But, birds are a different story, and an early laugher or osprey
(they should be showing up soon as well) are a sure sign that spring is
just around the corner.

Alas, Laughing and white-winged Gulls were conspicuous in their absence.
But I did find a slew of Lesser Black-backed Gulls including 1 2nd cycle, 4
1st cycle and 8 Adult birds.  With Alex's presentation fresh in my mind it
was interesting to remember that when I first moved to mid-Atlantic in the
early 90s LBBG was a chase-worthy rarity.  Today their presence in early
February is trumped by an early arrival Laughing Gull.

Chris Bennett
Milford, DE
Subject: Birding Delaware Bayshore today
From: Amy White <amywwhite AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2015 02:56:34 +0000
Posting on behalf of Jim White: 



A trip down the mid Delaware Bayshore turned up some nice winter birds today. 

Bombay Hook NWR: 

    * several close, singing Horned Larks in fields outside refuge 
 * very large flock of Snow Geese in saltmarsh opposite Shearness Pool, 
relatively close to dike road. One Cackling and one Ross’ Goose observed. 

    * Over 1,000 Dunlin out in marsh 



Port Mahon Road: 

    * Short-eared Owl hunting over marsh ~ 1630 hrs. 
 * Snowy Owl perched far out in marsh ~ 1600 hrs. The snowy was observed again 
at 1745 hrs flying south into Little Creek impoundment – by the sound of the 
ducks in the impoundment it was hunting. 

    * 3 American Bittern flying over marsh near sunset. 



Missed the Loggerhead Shrike reported at Bergold Farm for the fourth time 

-Jim White 


Hockessin, DE 
Subject: Re: Blackbird Spectacle
From: Denise Bittle <djbittle AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 8 Feb 2015 09:06:31 -0500
I was in the midst of a marsh roost flight going into Mannington Marsh (NJ) 
that had upwards of 100,000 birds. It was deafening and wonderful! 


Denise Bittle
Cherry Hill, NJ

Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 7, 2015, at 10:42 PM, "Andy Urquhart" 
<000000c02f6624dc-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> Probably everybody is aware of an amazing bird spectacle we  have in 
> Delaware - namely the enormous number (millions?) of blackbirds that 
congregate 

> here during the winter. Of course, we regularly see  them overhead, flying 
> generally west in the early morning and generally east in  the evening. They 
> spend their nights roosting along the Delaware Bay and fly out  to forage 
> during the day and return to the roost for the night.
> 
> Large numbers of these birds roost in Churchman's Marsh, along the  
> Christina River near the Delaware Bay. Last Wednesday evening, Ellen Bacino 
and I 

> watched this spectacle from the back of the parking lot for the  building at 
> 630 Churchman's Rd. (just east of the Artesian Water  building). From here, 
> looking to the west and north, you can see the truly  enormous numbers of 
> birds involved. And, looking northward through trees on the  edge of the 
> property, you can see them actually flying into the marsh grasses to roost 
for 

> the night. Sometimes the birds gather temporarily on nearby  trees, turning 
> barren trees into what look like fully foliated trees, before  taking off in 
> a black swarm to continue into the marsh.
> 
> The show was already underway when we arrived at about 5:15 pm,  and it was 
> still continuing full force at a little after 6:00 pm,  when it became too 
> dark to see anything. An amazing sight!
> 
> I'm sure there are other places along the Delaware Bay where this  occurs, 
> but this is one that is pretty easily accessible.
> 
> Andy Urquhart
> Newark
Subject: Re: Photo Study Of Birds In Delaware, February 7th, 2015
From: Denise Bittle <djbittle AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 8 Feb 2015 09:01:50 -0500
Enjoyed the great photos. I can never get a kestrel to linger long enough for a 
sharp shot! 

Denise Bittle, Cherry Hill

Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 8, 2015, at 6:52 AM, "Howard B. Eskin"  wrote:
> 
> Briton Parker and I went to Delaware yesterday to try to find some birds
> to photograph. We drove down Route 1 and headed to Rehobeth Beach to the
> Indian River Inlet with the thought or working our way north through the
> beaches
> to Bombay Hook NWR before heading back to Pennsylvania. To see the Photo
> Study and a list of the species seen, please click on the following link:
> 
> http://www.howardsview.com/DelawareBirdsFeb8_2015/BombayHookFeb7tht_15.html
> 
> Regards,
> Howard
> 
> Howard B. Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
> Harleysville (Montco), PA
Subject: Photo Study Of Birds In Delaware, February 7th, 2015
From: "Howard B. Eskin" <hbeskin AT VOICENET.COM>
Date: Sun, 8 Feb 2015 05:52:10 -0600
Briton Parker and I went to Delaware yesterday to try to find some birds
to photograph. We drove down Route 1 and headed to Rehobeth Beach to the
Indian River Inlet with the thought or working our way north through the
beaches
to Bombay Hook NWR before heading back to Pennsylvania. To see the Photo
Study and a list of the species seen, please click on the following link:

http://www.howardsview.com/DelawareBirdsFeb8_2015/BombayHookFeb7tht_15.html

Regards,
Howard

Howard B. Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
Harleysville (Montco), PA
Subject: Blackbird Spectacle
From: Andy Urquhart <000000c02f6624dc-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Sat, 7 Feb 2015 22:42:43 -0500
Probably everybody is aware of an amazing bird spectacle we  have in 
Delaware - namely the enormous number (millions?) of blackbirds that congregate 

here during the winter. Of course, we regularly see  them overhead, flying 
generally west in the early morning and generally east in  the evening. They 
spend their nights roosting along the Delaware Bay and fly out  to forage 
during the day and return to the roost for the night.
 
Large numbers of these birds roost in Churchman's Marsh, along the  
Christina River near the Delaware Bay. Last Wednesday evening, Ellen Bacino and 
I 

watched this spectacle from the back of the parking lot for the  building at 
630 Churchman's Rd. (just east of the Artesian Water  building). From here, 
looking to the west and north, you can see the truly  enormous numbers of 
birds involved. And, looking northward through trees on the  edge of the 
property, you can see them actually flying into the marsh grasses to roost for 

the night. Sometimes the birds gather temporarily on nearby  trees, turning 
barren trees into what look like fully foliated trees, before  taking off in 
a black swarm to continue into the marsh.
 
The show was already underway when we arrived at about 5:15 pm,  and it was 
still continuing full force at a little after 6:00 pm,  when it became too 
dark to see anything. An amazing sight!
 
I'm sure there are other places along the Delaware Bay where this  occurs, 
but this is one that is pretty easily accessible.
 
Andy Urquhart
Newark
Subject: Today's Birds
From: David and Joy Peters <Trogon1000 AT MSN.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Feb 2015 19:00:37 -0500
Hi, All

Just to give some highlights of our day, today at Burton’s Nature trail near 
the Indian River Marina there were 8 common goldeneyes – 1 beautiful male in 
full plumage. There were also a few horned and pied-billed grebes. 


At Henlopen State Park there was still a huge raft of mostly surf scoters off 
the beach from the hawk watch, and in among them were a few white-winged 
scoters. We also had at least 40 common redpolls – our first for Delaware, 
which was very exciting, and 50 to 60 snow buntings at the Point. The redpolls 
were foraging in the tall grasses and on the sand of the dunes along the beach 
as seen from the hawk watch. They also did some foraging in the pine trees that 
were in the dip below the dunes, but soon went back to the dunes. 


There were also a couple of rusty blackbirds in the woods at Prime Hook.

By 4 pm we were scouring the marsh grasses for short-eared owls along Port 
Mahon Road, and we found a very cooperative individual on a post perhaps a 
quarter mile beyond the large tanks. 


And finally we spotted a few American pipits near at least 50 horned larks 
along Cartanza Road near Dover. 


It was indeed a good day for winter birds today with not too much wind.

Joy Peters
Dover, DE
trogon1000 AT msn.com
Subject: Re: Thousands of gulls at fox point
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Feb 2015 14:22:53 -0500
Birders,

We've seen an additional Iceland and 2 Glaucous Gulls at Fox Point.

Cheers,

Tim Schreckengost
814-952-2934
On Feb 7, 2015 1:59 PM, "Tim Schreckengost" 
wrote:

> Birders,
>
> We've seen 3 Iceland Gulls so far - 2 first cycle and 1 adult.
>
> Cheers,
> Tim Schreckengost
> 814-952-2934
> On Feb 7, 2015 1:35 PM, "Taj Schottland"  wrote:
>
>> There are currently thousands of gulls on the river viewable from fox
>> point state park. Probably 10,000+ birds. Nothing unusual yet.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>
Subject: Re: Thousands of gulls at fox point
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Feb 2015 13:59:12 -0500
Birders,

We've seen 3 Iceland Gulls so far - 2 first cycle and 1 adult.

Cheers,
Tim Schreckengost
814-952-2934
On Feb 7, 2015 1:35 PM, "Taj Schottland"  wrote:

> There are currently thousands of gulls on the river viewable from fox
> point state park. Probably 10,000+ birds. Nothing unusual yet.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
Subject: Thousands of gulls at fox point
From: Taj Schottland <tsurfbird AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Feb 2015 13:35:28 -0500
There are currently thousands of gulls on the river viewable from fox point 
state park. Probably 10,000+ birds. Nothing unusual yet. 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, February 6th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 7 Feb 2015 09:16:28 -0500
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* February 6, 2015
* DEST1502.06
	
*Birds mentioned
GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE
ROSS'S GOOSE
Cackling Goose
Brant
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Wigeon
EURASIAN WIGEON
Northern Pintail
Northern Shoveler
Canvasback
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Greater Scaup 
Lesser Scaup
HARLEQUIN DUCK
Surf Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Long-tailed Duck
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Northern Bobwhite 
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Horned Grebe
Northern Gannet
Great Cormorant
American Bittern
Black-crowned Night Heron
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK
American Coot
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Ruddy Turnstone
Purple Sandpiper
American Woodcock
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Bonaparte's Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
SNOWY OWL
Barred Owl
Short-eared Owl
American Kestrel
Horned Lark
Tree Swallow
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Marsh Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
American Pipit
Snow Bunting
Lapland Longspur
Orange-crowned Warbler
American Tree Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Eastern Meadowlark
YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD
Rusty Blackbird
Purple Finch
COMMON REDPOLL
Pine Siskin

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: February 6, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

For Friday February 6th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. Six species of goose were reported this
week along with a splattering of winter finches. The unofficial Delaware
annual list annual list remained to 175 species. 

A GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was seen at Newark Reservoir off Paper Mill
Road on Sunday. That bird flew south with a flock of Canada geese, later
found in the fields at the University of Delaware Ag Farm behind Townsend
Hall. More rare geese were seen further south. A big flock of SNOW GEESE
along Kings Hwy and Gills Neck Road by the Cape Henlopen High School in
Lewes contained 3 ROSS'S GEESE and a CACKLING GOOSE on Sunday. 

A total of 4 YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRDS were seen Saturday at School Bell Road
in Bear off US Route 40. Those birds were with thousands of blackbirds in
the cornfield, seen from the parking lot of Union United Methodist Church.
Several RED-TAILED HAWKS were seen harassing the blackbirds. 

Winter finches were reported throughout the state. COMMON REDPOLLS were
reported on Sunday at Dragon Run near Delaware City and Wednesday at Indian
River Inlet.  A few PINE SISKINS were seen coming to feeders in Canterbury
Hills near Hockessin, Grubb Road in Brandywine Hundred, and in Georgetown. A
PURPLE FINCH was seen at a feeder in Bay Vista near Rehoboth Beach. 

A huge flock of sea ducks was seen from the hawk watch platform off Cape
Henlopen State Park this week. That flock was estimated at several thousand
birds, mostly SURF SCOTERS, but also included 50 WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS plus
HORNED GREBE, RED-THROATED LOON and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER. A BLACK-HEADED
GULL was seen flying over the waves at Herring Point, while LESSER
BLACK-BACKED GULL was seen on the beach. BROWN-HEADED, RED-BREASTED, and
WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH was reported and 60 SNOW BUNTINGS were found at the
point. A RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH continues to be seen coming to a feeder near
Midway

A flock of 10 REDHEADS were reported at Silver Lake in Rehoboth Beach on
Saturday; those birds were in with 75 CANVASBACKS. NORTHERN SHOVELER was
also seen on Silver Lake this week. NORTHERN SHOVELER and AMERICAN COOT were
seen on Spring Lake off Del. Route 1. Another REDHEAD was found in western
Sussex Co., at Horsey Pond in Laurel off Route 24. 

Assawoman Wildlife Refuge in southeastern Delaware near Fenwick Island had
an interesting European flare, with EURASIAN WIGEON and 5 MUTE SWANS seen on
Saturday. The large raft of puddle ducks there included 150 GADWALL, 75
AMERICAN WIGEON, plus SHOVELER and NORTHERN PINTAILS. A BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT
HERON was also found, along with PILEATED WOODPECKER and RUBY-CROWNED
KINGLET. A MARSH WREN was by the observation tower. An OSPREY was seen again
along Indian River at Wharton's Bluff, east of Millsboro. 

The drake HARLEQUIN DUCK continues to be seen at Indian River Inlet. That
bird is now molting into adult plumage and looking stunning. There are also
about 100 LONG-TAILED DUCKS, plus SURF and BLACK SCOTER at the inlet. A peak
count of 10 GREAT CORMORANTS were seen on the jetty tower. NORTHERN GANNET,
RED-THROATED and COMMON LOON, and HORNED GREBES were also reported. A single
report of 5 BONAPARTE'S GULLS was submitted. 300 BRANT were at the inlet
this week. Both RUDDY TURNSTONE and PURPLE SANDPIPER were found on the
jetty. Bottom's Hill Drain at the north side of the inlet had both LESSER
and GREATER SCAUP and COMMON GOLDENEYE. The previously reported ROUGH-LEGGED
HAWK was seen again at Key Box Road. 

A flock of 20 TREE SWALLOWS was at the south end of Slaughter's Beach.
COMMON GOLDENEYE plus LESSER and GREATER SCAUP were seen off Simpson Ave.
GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS were reported at Prime Hook Beach Road, along
with 5 BALD EAGLES. A PILEATED WOODPECKER was reported off Cods Road.
RED-BREASTED and COMMON MERGANSER, GREATER SCAUP and RUDDY DUCK were seen at
Broadkill Beach. 

The previously reported SNOWY OWL continues to be seen at Port Mahon, but is
getting harder to find. Look for the bird further back in the marsh or on
the oil tanks at dusk. A total of 4 SHORT-EARED OWLS were also seen along
the Port Mahon Rd. AMERICAN BITTERN was by the tank farms. Six SNOW BUNTINGS
were seen on Cartanza road. Three female LAPLAND LONGSPURS were along
Whitehall Neck Road. Both of these species were seen in conjunction with big
flocks of HORNED LARKS. An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was seen at a feeder on
private property near Magnolia. 

More birds along Whitehall Neck Road include EASTERN MEADOWLARK,
WHITE-CROWNED and AMERICAN TREE SPARROW. AMERICAN PIPITS were seen at Bombay
Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna, along with RUSTY BLACKBIRDS by
Finis Pool. An AMERICAN BITTERN was seen on the ice at Bear Swamp. Waterfowl
seen included TUNDRA SWANS, WOOD DUCK, BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED MERGANSER, and
RUDDY DUCK. Also reported in the refuge this week were NORTHERN BOBWHITE and
WOODCOCK. 

RING-NECKED DUCK and AMERICAN COOT were seen at Harry's Pond at the
Brandywine Town Center along with 8 HOODED MERGANSERS. COMMON MERGANSERS
were seen in several locations this week in northern Delaware, including
Hoope's Reservoir, the Christiana River at the Peterson Urban Wildlife
Refuge, and along the Brandywine Creek at Thompson's Bridge and Breck's
Mill. LESSER SCAUP was seen at Dragon Run. A total of 8 GREAT and 4
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS were on the navigation marker off I-495 near
Claymont. The GREAT CORMORANTS are getting their big white flanks patches
now. 

An AMERICAN KESTREL was seen at Brandywine Creek State Park. A BARRED OWL
was found at Hopkin's Road in White Clay Creek State Park. RED-SHOULDERED
HAWKS were reported in Hockessin and along the Mike Castle Trail near
Delaware City. AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS were coming to feeders near Yorklyn
and at Bay Pointe near Summit Bridge. Three RUSTY BLACKBIRDS were on the
frozen ponds at Banning Park near Newport. 

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Bruce Peterjohn,
Abby Walter, Jeff Gordon, Rich Clifton, Mike Moore, Chris Rowe, Ken Wat,
Phil Thompson, Bob Rufe, Nancy Goggin, Wayne Longbottom, Suzie Ball, Mike
Gardner, Gary and Judy Charles, Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn, Lynn Smith, Amy
White, Kim Steininger, Win Shafer, Bert Filemyr, Amelia Dungan, Jack
Schultz, Warren Stroble, Jim Austin-Cole, Bob Egbert, Mike Bowen, Alan
Kneidel, Taj Schottland, Tim Schreckengost, Katie McDonough, Maurice
Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Remember, the birdline needs your sightings!
Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net.
Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

-end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Indian River Inlet to Port Mahon
From: Michael Moore <mcmoore32 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2015 19:27:05 -0500
Greetings

 

Had a great day birding Delaware's coast and then ending up at Port Mahon
for the dusk show.  

 

Highlight for me was the discovery of a winter adult Black-headed Gull that
flew back and forth repeatedly in perfect light at the Herring Point
overlook at Cape Henlopen SP.  

 

I also became the last birder in Delaware to see the continuing male
Harlequin Duck (state lifer #305) at Indian River Inlet (IRI).  However, now
the bird appears to me to be molting into adult plumage.  At least the head
looked very adult like compared to photos I had seen of it earlier in the
year.  It could look quite spectacular in a few weeks.

 

Other notables:

 

Indian River Inlet

 

1 flyover Common Redpoll - calling, high, heading south and did not stop

1 Harlequin Duck - continuing male in with scoters just N of the end of the
S jetty

1 White-winged Scoter and about a dozen Blacks mixed in with the Surfs

1 Bonaparte's Gull

15 Purple Sandpipers, 200 Sanderling, 20 Ruddy Turnstones and 1 Dunlin

10 Great Cormorants

100 Long-tailed Ducks

300 Brant

4 Common Goldeneyes

 

Cape Henlopen State Park

 

1 adult Black-headed Gull - Herring Point

1 second cycle Lesser Black-backed Gull - the point

1 Bonaparte's Gull - the point

53 Snow Buntings (yes I counted) - the point

Hundreds of scoters flying north from the Hawk Watch.  In just a few minutes
I picked out at least 50 White-wings mixed in. Also about a dozen Horned
Grebes flying north with the scoters. 

 

Port Mahon (from atop the Fishing Pier)

 

3-5 Short-eared Owls

1 very distant Snowy Owl (beyond the river almost at the tree line, but it
spread its wings once to confirm it was not some other white owl-shaped
object)

 

Photos tomorrow including the BH Gull and the Harlequin.

 

Mike Moore

Newark, DE

  Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com

 

Websites:

 
Delmarva Dragonflies and Damselflies
(https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/)

  Voices of Delaware Birds
(https://sites.google.com/site/delawarebirdsongs/)

  Birds of the
Gilbert Water Ranch
(https://sites.google.com/site/birdsofthegilbertwaterranch/)

  AZFO Rare Bird
Photos (http://www.azfo.org/gallery/1main/photos_recent.html)

 

 
Subject: things that fly (mostly)
From: "sally o'byrne" <salobyrne AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 2015 18:56:26 -0500
Some of our favorite birder friends are the featured artists at the upcoming 
Insect and Spider themed art show at the Wilmington Library in downtown 
Wilmington. The reception will be Friday, Feb. 6th from 5 - 8 and all are 
invited. Artists include Harry Tiebout, Paul Guris, Zoe Yost, Michelle Butler, 
Faith Kuehn, and Angela Cosenzo. The work will be up for the month of February 
if you would like to see the show but cannot make the opening reception. 


Sally O'Byrne
Subject: Bombay Hook Bird Highlights
From: Rodney Murray <rcmurray213 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 2015 10:37:42 -0500
        I spent a few hours early this morning at B Hook; nothing
remarkable, but still had some good sightings.  A flock of about 20 Rusty
Blackbirds were snouting around the leaves and ice in the flooded wooded
area opposite the picnic table at Finis Pool.  Two separate flocks of Am
Pipits; one flock in the cut field just after the
Parson Pt. Trail with the other on the ice among some short reeds at the
north end of Shearness.
      An Am. Bittern was in plain view on the ice next to some reeds at the
south end of Bear Swamp.  On the road and in the trees before the Shearness
Ob. Tower was a colorful large mixed flock of E Bluebirds with several
Cedar Waxwings (I don't think I had ever before seen Cedar Waxwings on the
ground, so I guess that is unusual for them).
     A note about the Rusty Blackbirds:  I have often seen Rusty's in that
area over the years, but that is by far the largest number I have seen at
one sighting for that location.  I wonder if their numbers are on the
rebound.  Anybody know?

Rod Murray, Middletown DE
Subject: American Tree Sparrow at my feeder in Glasgow
From: Michael Moore <mcmoore32 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 2015 10:22:04 -0500
Greetings

 

Not quite at the level of the Redpoll from several days ago, but for only
the second time in six years I had an American Tree Sparrow at my feeder
this morning.  

 

Again, my feeders are not visible from the road, but these cold fronts may
be pushing more of these guys south so keep an eye out.  It seems to be a
good year for this species.  I also have had a Chipping Sparrow regularly
for the last month or so.  

 

I live about 4 miles W of Summit Bridge on the N side of the canal.  

 

Mike Moore

Newark, DE

  Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com

 

Websites:

 
Delmarva Dragonflies and Damselflies
(https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/)

  Voices of Delaware Birds
(https://sites.google.com/site/delawarebirdsongs/)

  Birds of the
Gilbert Water Ranch
(https://sites.google.com/site/birdsofthegilbertwaterranch/)

  AZFO Rare Bird
Photos (http://www.azfo.org/gallery/1main/photos_recent.html)

 

 
Subject: YB Sapsucker
From: Dennis Brezina <alumanon AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 2015 09:44:58 -0500
A Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is a regular visitor to our suet feeder...

Dennis Brezina
Chesapeake City, MD
Subject: Re: DE RBA GroupMe text alerts
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2015 16:38:16 -0500
Birders,

The DE RBA text alert group is now live and you can post sightings of rare
and notable birds. As I said in a previous email, please only post
sightings with the species and specific directions to the group. Please
hold comments and conversations on the DE-Birds listserv and Facebook
groups. Let me know if you have any questions.

Cheers,
Tim Schreckengost
Elkton, MD
(814) 952-2934
www.nemesisbird.com

On Wed, Jan 28, 2015 at 3:56 PM, Tim Schreckengost <
timschreckengost AT gmail.com> wrote:

> Birders,
>
> As some of you know, the old DE RBA text group got hacked a couple weeks
> ago. I believe it was hacked because the group was public and anyone could
> join. I disbanded the group and then reformed it as a private group, where
> I have to manually add members. If you would like to be added to this
> group, feel free to send me an email off list. You can either use the
> GroupMe app or receive text messages. With that said, here are a few rules
> I would like all members to follow:
>
> - Please use this group for reporting rare and notable bird sightings
> throughout the state of Delaware. Notable sightings for counties are
> acceptable as well. Please be as specific as possible in your first post
> (species and exact location), so additional messages are not needed.
> -If you have a question regarding a post, please send the original poster
> a private message, or post to the DE Birds listserv or Facebook Group. I
> would like to keep this DE RBA limited to sightings only, no conversations.
> If I feel that you are posting unnecessary content, I will send you a
> private message.
> - If you are unsure if what you are posting is worthy of the DE RBA, it
> most likely is not. Generally, birds "flagged" on eBird are worthy of
> posting on this group.
> -Initial postings of rare birds are acceptable. Continuing reports should
> be posted on the DE Birds listserv and Facebook groups.
>
> After I add you to the group, send a simple "Hi" to the group, so GroupMe
> doesn't kick you out. The group is in "office mode" for now, until the
> majority of folks get added. If you have any questions, comments, or
> concerns, just shoot me an email.
>
> Cheers,
> Tim Schreckengost
> Elkton, MD
> (814) 952-2934
> www.nemesisbird.com
>
Subject: Don Jones to speak at DVOC on 5 Feb 2015
From: Steve Kacir <setkacir AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2015 13:23:21 -0500
Hello Birders, 

The Delaware Valley Ornithological Club (DVOC) meets on Thursday February 5 at 
the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. The meeting features the 
program "Sixty Years in the Field" by Don Jones. 


All who have an interest are invited to attend; the program is free with no 
admission charged. Club meetings will begin at 7:30PM and are held at the 
Academy of Natural Sciences, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia, PA 
19103. A pre-meeting dinner takes place at Asia on the Parkway, not far from 
the Academy. More details and directions to the Academy and Asia on the Parkway 
can be found on the DVOC website: http://www.dvoc.org/Main.htm 



"Sixty Years in the Field"
--------------------------------
Don writes "Ive been watching birds for over sixty years. The hobby has given 
me tremendous satisfaction and introduced me to parts of America and the world 
I likely never would have visited otherwise. My first 28 years of birding (1952 
to 1980) were for the most part a solitary experience occasionally shared with 
family or a friend; Im not a joiner. In 1980 happenstance led me to meet my 
birding mentor, Rick Mellon, who in 1982 convinced me to join the Delaware 
Valley Ornithological Club (DVOC). My birding knowledge and horizons expanded 
dramatically. This program is a collection of birds, birders, and birding 
locations that formed a part of my birding hobby. I am deeply indebted to Rick, 
DVOC members and others (some no longer with us) with whom Ive had the 
privilege to share this extraordinary hobby. " 



Don Jones: 
----------------
Don is a "piney" raised in Pemberton, NJ. He attended the University of 
Michigan as an undergraduate, married and started a family, then planned to get 
a Master's from Rutgers but wound up with a PhD in Organic Chemistry. Following 
Rutgers, he took a postdoctoral teaching/research position at Oregon State 
University in Corvallis. In September 1969, he began his one and only job with 
the Rohm & Haas Company. Although he worked out of Bristol, PA the job provided 
him an opportunity to visit western Europe and Japan multiple times. He retired 
from Rohm & Haas in June 1994 and has been a bum ever since. Throughout all 
these events he always found some time for birding. 




We hope to see you at the meeting! 

Steve Kacir
DVOC Vice President
setkacirgmail.com
Subject: Ross's Geese in Lewes
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2015 07:19:21 -0500
I drove to the beach on Sunday because I saw Bert Filemyr's pictures on
Facebook of Ross's Geese at Lewes and Sue Gruver's report of Redheads at
Silver Lake. 

Bert had seen his birds along Gills Neck Rd, perpendicular to the high
school. I found a small flock of Snow Geese on Kings Hwy, near the school
bus yard for Cape Henlopen HS. Besides the great looks at Snow Geese, I also
found a Cackling Goose. A little more searching produced 3 Ross's Geese with
great looks to compare their size, shape, and bills. 

At Cape Henlopen, there was a raft of 4000 scoters, mostly Surf, in the rips
off the hawk watch platform. I didn't see any WW scoters, just a few Blacks.
No Redpolls. 

Only had Shoveler at Silver Lake, no Cans or Redheads. Lake is almost
frozen. 

Harlequin Duck was still at Indian River Inlet, with Surf Scoters and
Oldsquaw. Greater Scaup was in Bottom Hills Drain (formerly Haven Road). 

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Common Redpoll at Dragon Run, Delaware City
From: Jeffrey Gordon <jeffgyr AT ME.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Feb 2015 22:44:55 -0500
Hi all—

Add another C&D Canal-area Common Redpoll to the tally. Liz and I went for a 
walk along the south shore of Dragon Run this evening and had a single redpoll 
go flying over, headed West and calling repeatedly. Keep those thistle socks 
and feeders full, your eyes up and your ears open! 


Good birding,

Jeff

Jeffrey Gordon
Delaware City, DE
jeffgyr AT mac.com
Subject: Re: New Castle Co: Greater White-fronted Goose at Newark Reservoir
From: Taj Schottland <tsurfbird AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Feb 2015 16:00:28 -0500
Alan and Tim just relocated the goose on a ud farrm field with long grass just 
north of the experimental farm entrance on route 72. 


Good luck to those who go looking for it! 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 1, 2015, at 12:31 PM, Tim Schreckengost  
wrote: 

> 
> Birders,
> 
> Alan Kneidel reports a Greater White-fronted Goose at the Newark Reservoir.
> 
> Cheers,
> Tim Schreckengost
> Elkton, MD
Subject: Re: New Castle Co: Greater White-fronted Goose at Newark Reservoir
From: Maurice Barnhill <mvb AT UDEL.EDU>
Date: Sun, 1 Feb 2015 16:00:11 -0500
I went out to the reservoir about 2:15 or so, just in time to get a 
glimpse the White-fronted Goose at  a distance on its way out with two 
flocks of Canada Geese.  I went up to the reservoir anyway and confirmed 
that the White-front was gone, although there were a few Canadas left.  
As I was coming down, Joe Russell showed up, and I told him the goose 
had flown out over Newark.  We decided to check the Geese at the UD Ag 
Farm and were able to find it towards the back of the rather large group 
of Geese.

This spot can be found by going south out of Newark on route 72 to the 
University pedestrian crossing.  There are open fields on both sides of 
the road, and they frequently have pretty good-sized flocks of Geese.  
It may be a good spot for looking for the White-fronted Goose when it is 
not at the reservoir.

On 2/1/2015 12:31 PM, Tim Schreckengost wrote:
> Birders,
>
> Alan Kneidel reports a Greater White-fronted Goose at the Newark Reservoir.
>
> Cheers,
> Tim Schreckengost
> Elkton, MD
Subject: New Castle Co: Greater White-fronted Goose at Newark Reservoir
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Feb 2015 12:31:01 -0500
Birders,

Alan Kneidel reports a Greater White-fronted Goose at the Newark Reservoir.

Cheers,
Tim Schreckengost
Elkton, MD
Subject: Birds and Beans
From: "sally o'byrne" <salobyrne AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Feb 2015 11:27:02 -0500
Scott Weidensaul will be presenting a talk entitled Birds and Beans at Mt. Cuba 
Center on Feb 7 (Saturday) from 2 - 4. Scott is a well known author and 
naturalist, and this is a very good talk - I heard it at Hawk Mountain 
Sanctuary. It will make you want to drink coffee to save birds! (as long as you 
drink ‘bird friendly’ coffee). 


Registration is at the Mt. Cuba website.

Sally O'Byrne
Subject: Sussex Co: Eurasian Wigeon at Assawoman
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 11:13:42 -0500
Birders,

Alan Kneidel and Conor Higgins report a male Eurasian Wigeon at Assawoman
Bay State Wildlife Area in Frankford, Delaware. The bird is to the south
and visible from the wildlife viewing tower.

Cheers,
Tim Schreckengost
Elkton, MD
(814) 952-2934
www.nemesisbird.com
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, January 30th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 22:05:30 -0500
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* January 30, 2015
* DEST1501.30
	
*Birds mentioned
Ross's Goose
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
American Wigeon
Northern Pintail
Green-winged Teal
Canvasback
Ring-necked Duck
Lesser Scaup
HARLEQUIN DUCK
Surf Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Long-tailed Duck
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Wild Turkey
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
Northern Gannet
Great Cormorant
American Bittern
Black-crowned Night Heron
Black Vulture
Bald Eagle
Rough-legged Hawk
Golden Eagle
Sanderling
Ruddy Turnstone
Purple Sandpiper
SNOWY OWL
Barred Owl
Short-eared Owl
Northern Saw-whet Owl
Belted Kingfisher
Peregrine Falcon
Merlin
American Kestrel
Horned Lark
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Cedar Waxwing
Lapland Longspur
American Tree Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Eastern Meadowlark
YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD
Purple Finch
COMMON REDPOLL

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: January 30, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

For Friday, January 30th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. Delaware survived the great blizzard of
2015. The unofficial Delaware annual list annual list increased to 175
species this week.

In northern Delaware, a YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD continues to be seen along
School Bell Rd Road in Bear off Route 40. Best viewing is from the parking
lot of Union United Methodist church while watching the corn field. BLACK
VULTURE, RED-TAILED HAWK, and NORTHERN HARRIER were all reported flying over
among the thousands of blackbirds feeding in the corn. 

In Kent Co, the SNOWY OWL continues to be seen near the town of Little
Creek. Most sightings have been along the Port Mahon Rd., sitting in the
evening on the oil tanks across from the Little Creek Wildlife Management
Area impoundments. Yesterday, there was a sighting along Cartanza Road, off
Route 9, north of Little Creek. Up to 4 SHORT-EARED OWLS were also reported
in the area, viewed from the fishing (first) pier at Port Mahon. A light
phase ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK was seen over Kelly Island from the Port Mahon boat
ramp parking lot. PEREGRINE FALCON has been on the navigational marker by
the oil (second) pier. Also reported along the Port Mahon Road were MERLIN
and AMERICAN KESTREL for the falcon trifecta. AMERICAN BITTERN and
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON were also seen. 

The previously reported LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE was found along Bergdoll Rd, off
Route 9 from the Dover AFB. If you're looking on a map, Google and Del DOT
recently changed the name of Bergdoll Rd to Bergold Lane, just to make
things confusing. Another light phase ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK was reported at the
Pioneer gravel pits across Route 1 from the air force base. AMERICAN KESTREL
was also seen at the air base. 

A LAPLAND LONGSPUR was found among the 150 HORNED LARKS on Whitehall Neck
Road going into Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge. WHITE-CROWNED and
AMERICAN TREE SPARROW were also reported at the refuge. About 90 TUNDRA
SWANS remain at Bombay Hook, despite the frozen ponds, along with AMERICAN
WIGEON, PINTAIL, BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED and COMMON MERGANSER and RUDDY DUCK. 

COMMON REDPOLLS continue to be seen at Cape Henlopen State Park. A flock of
35 birds were found in the beach goldenrod along the point with over 100
AMERICAN GOLDFINCH. Interestingly, no PINE SISKINS were reported.
BROWN-HEADED and RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES were also seen at the park.
Waterfowl reported included SURF and BLACK SCOTER plus RED-BREASTED
MERGANSERS. SANDERLINGS were seen along the shoreline. 

The drake HARLEQUIN DUCK continues at Indian River Inlet. That bird is with
over 100 SURF SCOTERS and 75 LONG-TAILED DUCKS. Two WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS
were reported on Sunday. BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON GOLDENEYE, HORNED GREBE and both
RED-THROATED and COMMON LOONS were reported. NORTHERN GANNET was seen flying
offshore. PURPLE SANDPIPER and RUDDY TURNSTONE were on the rocks and 5 GREAT
CORMORANTS were reported on the jetty tower. 

A GOLDEN EAGLE was seen at Cods Road at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge
near Milton. Waterfowl reported at Prime Hook included COMMON and HOODED
MERGANSER, COMMON GOLDENEYE, GREEN-WINGED TEAL, and BUFFLEHEAD. LESSER SCAUP
was seen on Delaware Bay off Broadkill Beach. EASTERN MEADOWLARKS were seen
in the fields by the refuge headquarters. A ROSS'S GOOSE was reported with
SNOW GEESE along Gills Neck Road heading into Lewes. Six TUNDRA SWANS were
feeding in a field near Milton, at the intersections of Rt 30 and Rt 16. 

Silver Lake is still mostly frozen, but 75 CANVASBACKS with 30 RUDDY DUCKS
and a COMMON MERGANSER were seen there on Saturday. A flock of 20 CEDAR
WAXWINGS visited a yard in Bay Vista near Rehoboth. A feeder in Lincoln had
PURPLE FINCH, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH and FOX SPARROW present. A RUBY-CROWNED
KINGLET was seen in the yard. 

A BARRED OWL and several calls from a SAW-WHET OWL were heard Sunday evening
along Thoroughfare Neck Road near Smyrna, by the first pullout. Four WILD
TURKEYS were seen at the intersection of Rt 6 and Rt 9 near Woodland Beach.
LESSER SCAUP, COMMON MERGANSER and BELTED KINGFISHER were reported at
Augustine Creek near Port Penn. A PIED-BILLED GREBE was reported on Dragon
Run near Delaware City. BALD EAGLES were plentiful in southern New Castle
Co., with birds seen at Augustine Creek, Delaware City from ABA
Headquarters, and over Bear. 

2 BALD EAGLES was also at Hoope's Reservoir sitting on the ice. 20
RING-NECKED DUCKS and 4 COMMON MERGANSERS were found at the Hillside Mill
Road cove. COMMON MERGANSER and SNOW GEESE were seen at the Peterson Urban
Refuge in downtown Wilmington. A pair of MUTE SWAN was seen at Carousel Park
in Pike Creek. Finally, COMMON MERGANSER was also seen at Newark Reservoir. 

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Matt Boone, Abby
Walter, Gina Sheridan, John Chaney, Ken Wat, Jeff Gordon, Ed Rohrbach, Damon
Orsetti, Ken Bass, Rich Clifton, Chandler Wiegand , Mike Moore, Ian Stewart,
Nancy Cunningham, Vince Gambal, Will Ameida, Chris Rowe, Wayne Longbottom,
Suzie Ball, Mike Hudson, Kenneth Trease, Chuck Brandt, John Long, Sue
Gruver, Sharon Lynn, Lynn Smith, Alan Kneidel, Taj Schottland, Maurice
Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Remember, the birdline needs your sightings!
Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net.
Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

-end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: YES on Yellow-headed Blackbird
From: Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 23:59:02 -0500
After two previous dips searching for the Yellow-headed Blackbird on School
Bell Road, I finally saw a this bird near the junction of School Bell Road
and Hwy. 40 on Wednesday morning (01/28/15).

Initially, Jeffrey Climie spotted the Yellow-headed Blackbird flying, but
Dennis and I missed it.  After Jeffrey left, Dennis and I spent another
twenty minutes working the flock.

With great relief, I finally saw the adult male YELLLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD
flying just over the cornstalks within a large mixed flock of Red-winged
Blackbird's, Brown-headed Cowbirds, and Common Grackles. The bright yellow
head and white patches on the wings were clearly seen.  I should add that
it takes quite a bit of patience to sort through the never ending stream of
birds that seem to be in constant motion.

Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE