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Updated on Tuesday, July 22 at 12:46 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Sharp-tailed Grouse,©Barry Kent Mackay

21 Jul Scissor-tailed Flycatchers south of Florence and their behavior ["SeEttaM ." ]
21 Jul RE: Sad news in the passing of long-time Colorado birder, Warren Finch ["Steve Stachowiak & Melody Egge" ]
21 Jul Re: Sad news in the passing of long-time Colorado birder, Warren Finch ["Glenn and Laurie" ]
21 Jul Sad news in the passing of long-time Colorado birder, Warren Finch [Joe Roller ]
21 Jul M kites cont, Pueblo ["'Deborah Carstensen' via Colorado Birds" ]
21 Jul #500 for Colorado [Ted Floyd ]
21 Jul N Cardinal/Indigo Bunting/Boulder [Maggie Boswell ]
21 Jul Mississippi kites, Pueblo County ["'Deborah Carstensen' via Colorado Birds" ]
21 Jul Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 21 July 2014 [Joyce Takamine ]
20 Jul Common Nighthawk distraction display ["Davis" ]
20 Jul Dickcissels, male & female, in Ft Lyond area ["SeEttaM ." ]
20 Jul Re: Eurasian C-Dove expansion [David Suddjian ]
20 Jul Re: Fremont and Pueblo Counties [Kathy and Jeff Dunning ]
20 Jul Eurasian C-Dove expansion [Bob Righter ]
20 Jul Common Loon in Boulder County (update) [Kat Bradley-Bennett ]
20 Jul Indigo Buntings-Morrison-Jeffco [Mike Henwood ]
20 Jul Cattle Egrets at City Park in Denver [Tom Behnfield ]
20 Jul Cattle Egrets at City Park [Tom Behnfield ]
20 Jul Re: RFI - Glenwood Springs, Carbondale, Denver, Pawnee N. Grasslands [Cheri Phillips ]
20 Jul Re: Lake John (Jackson Co) Red-necked Grebe mystery [Cheri Phillips ]
20 Jul Weld County - Grasslands ["'ronbco' via Colorado Birds" ]
20 Jul Black Phoebe - Pueblo Res Rock Canyon - 7/20 ["'Chris Knight' via Colorado Birds" ]
20 Jul Fremont and Pueblo Counties [Gary Faust - Lisa Edwards ]
20 Jul Lake John (Jackson Co) Red-necked Grebe mystery [Charles Hundertmark ]
20 Jul Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 20 July 2014 [Joyce Takamine ]
19 Jul Denver City Park [Lisa Edwards ]
19 Jul Fremont County - Scissor-tailed Flycatcher [Robb Hinds ]
19 Jul Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 19 July 2014 [Joyce Takamine ]
18 Jul Hooded Mergansers - Larimer County [David Wade ]
18 Jul Black Phoebes in Gunnison Gorge (Montrose/Delta) [Lee Farese ]
18 Jul Re: Park County July 15 [David Suddjian ]
18 Jul Park County July 15 [David Suddjian ]
18 Jul Chipping Sparrow night flight, July 18 [Ted Floyd ]
18 Jul Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 18 July 2014 [Joyce Takamine ]
17 Jul Yuma County YC Night Heron ["'Steven Mlodinow' via Colorado Birds" ]
17 Jul Re: Bob Bradley [van ]
17 Jul RFI - Glenwood Springs, Carbondale, Denver, Pawnee N. Grasslands [Clay Leonard ]
17 Jul RFI - Scissor-tailed in Fremont Cty [Eric DeFonso ]
17 Jul Bob Bradley [David Waltman ]
17 Jul Landlocked states near 500 species [Pete Janzen ]
17 Jul Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 17 July 2014 [Joyce Takamine ]
17 Jul Northern Cardinals, Carolina Wren(s) and Gray Catbird also in Lamar Woods,Lamar ["SeEttaM ." ]
16 Jul Yellow-billed Cuckoo family, Dickcissels, Chimney Swifts and Mississippi Kites in lower Arkansas Valley ["SeEttaM ." ]
16 Jul Re: 500th species for the state [Gary Brower ]
16 Jul 500th species for the state [Bob Righter ]
16 Jul Fremont and Pueblo Birding. ["'John D' via Colorado Birds" ]
16 Jul Dog Days, Seriously ["Robert A. Spencer" ]
16 Jul Re: Boulder Rez night walk, Wed., Jul. 16 [Ted Floyd ]
16 Jul Great-tailed Grackle, Boulder Co. [Paula Hansley ]
16 Jul Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 16 July 2014 [Joyce Takamine ]
16 Jul 4 Hummingbird Day--Lakewood-Green Mtn/Jeffco []
15 Jul RE: Colorado Wish List [William H Kaempfer ]
15 Jul A new bird for Greenlee Preserve, Boulder County, July 15 [Ted Floyd ]
15 Jul Re: Two missing birds for CO. [Brandon ]
16 Jul Re: Two missing birds for CO. []
15 Jul Colorado Wish List [John ]
15 Jul RE: Two missing birds for CO. [DAVID A LEATHERMAN ]
15 Jul Re: Timnath Reservoir @Lunch/Larimer ["'The \"Nunn Guy\"' via Colorado Birds" ]
12 Jul Re: Acorn Woodpeckers at Pueblo Mtn Park []
6 Jul Request for birding sites []
15 Jul Timnath Reservoir @Lunch/Larimer ["'The \"Nunn Guy\"' via Colorado Birds" ]
15 Jul Re: Boulder Rez night walk, Wed., Jul. 16 [Susan Hochgraf ]
15 Jul Re: Two Possible birds for CO. [JBreitsch - Denver ]
15 Jul RE: Re: Two possible birds for CO [Dave Hyde ]
15 Jul Re: Two missing birds for CO. [Gary Brower ]
15 Jul Re: Re: Two missing birds for CO. ["Jim Nelson" ]
15 Jul Re: Re: Two possible birds for CO [Ted Floyd ]
15 Jul Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 15 July 2014 [Joyce Takamine ]
15 Jul Boulder Rez night walk, Wed., Jul. 16 [Ted Floyd ]
14 Jul Re: Two missing birds for CO. [Tom Wilberding ]
14 Jul Re: Two missing birds for CO. [Derek Hill ]
14 Jul Black Rock Wren, Larimer [Derek Hill ]
14 Jul Two missing birds for CO. [Gary Brower ]
15 Jul Two Possible birds for CO. ["smrr AT juno.com" ]
14 Jul Re: Re: Two possible birds for CO ["Glenn and Laurie" ]
14 Jul Re: Two possible birds for CO [Tom Wilberding ]

Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatchers south of Florence and their behavior
From: "SeEttaM ." <seettam AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 23:20:38 -0600
I was able to get out to look for the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher found by
Rich Miller south of Florence this morning.  I drove past a Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher in the same dead tree previously described a couple of times,
pulling over when safe to take a couple of photos. After reading that Mike
Gaylord observed a second bird yesterday raising thoughts that they might
be nesting I drove into a pull-off over a hundred feet south of the target
tree and watched.  After about 10 minutes the second bird flew into the
tree.  I continued observing birds for over an hour as it remained overcast
and did not heat up too fast.  I have uploaded several good photos of the
bird(s) to my Birds and Nature blog along
with my observations about their behavior in protecting that area, etc.

Since it is possible this rare species is nesting here it is important to
not disturb them with recordings.  They do flush when cars stop nearby and
cameras click--that happened to me and I observed it occur when one of two
cars with birders parked across the street from the tree for several
minutes while taking photos.  Neither the other birders nor myself got out
of our cars. So please be judicious about stopping your car near the tree
or one of the birds.  You can also observe the birds without disturbance
either from the pull-off on the east side of the highway about a hundred
feet south of the tree that has a good view of the tree or from a private
drive-way (do stay outside the fence) a similar distance north but on the
west side of the highway.  Be aware that this highway often has a lot of
traffic and with a 65 mph speed limit and the hill just south of the tree
it makes for a risky location.

SeEtta Moss
Canon City
http://BirdsAndNature.blogspot.com

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Subject: RE: Sad news in the passing of long-time Colorado birder, Warren Finch
From: "Steve Stachowiak & Melody Egge" <waxwing2 AT q.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:50:28 -0600
Cobirders,

Thank you to Joe Roller for the post regarding the passing of Warren Finch. I 
first met Warren back in the 80’s at a DFO meeting. This was back in the day 
before cellphones, email and the internet when the DFO was still the grand dame 
of the Colorado birding community. Many birders would flock to the monthly 
meeting at the museum and it struck me how Warren always stood out as a true 
gentleman amongst the uncultured listers flitting about room. I have fond 
memories of chance meetings with him at the Wheat Ridge Greenbelt back when the 
birding Gods made the "tree bridge" the center of the birding universe for a 
period of time. 


Warren was the DFO historian for many years and there was not a better person 
for the position. He recognized a level of importance in a bird club that began 
in 1935 and sponsored weekly field trips that continue to this day. His March 
7, 2012 post to Cobirds references his published articles on the history of DFO 
and the need for similar treatise of the CFO. Anyone that reads or posts to 
Cobirds or the CFO Facebook pages or Twitter account owes it to themselves to 
go back and dip into Warren’s history of birding in the State. 


I will truly miss the sense of calm that Warren exuded and the aplomb with 
which he navigated the universe. 


Peaceful birding indeed,

Steve Stachowiak
Highlands Ranch, CO

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Subject: Re: Sad news in the passing of long-time Colorado birder, Warren Finch
From: "Glenn and Laurie" <juncos AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 20:08:05 -0600
Have you ever met someone who you are sure has seen way, WAY more birds than 
you? God bless you Warren Finch. 


Glenn Walbek
Castle Rock, CO 

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Subject: Sad news in the passing of long-time Colorado birder, Warren Finch
From: Joe Roller <jroller9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 17:45:26 -0600
Warren's son, Larry Finch, just phoned me to report his father's passing
today. Warren was a grand man in Colorado birding and will be missed by
literally hundreds of birders.

Born on October 27, 1924, in a small town in South Dakota, Warren became a
world-renowned uranium geologist, working for the United States Geologic
Survey and finally retiring as Emeritus Scientist.  His work took him to
scores of countries and the list of his scientific publications was long.

One fond memory I have of Warren is that when he retired from the USGS and
cleaned out his office, he asked whether his hand-drawn map of all the
earth's uranium deposits should stay with the Survey. He was told, "No,
take that map home if you want to." A few months later, Warren got a call
from his sheepish successor asking if he would please return the map. As it
turned out, all of that detailed information could be found in no other
place!

Warren loved birds and birded throughout the world, but he especially loved
the birds of Colorado. For decades he was active in the Denver Field
Ornithologists, where he served as President of the and Historian and
received the prestigious Ptarmigan Award. In 2009 he was honored by the
Colorado Field Ornithologists with a Lifetime Achievement Award.

Warren is survived by his wife, Mary, and their children. A funeral mass
will be celebrated at St. Jude's Catholic Church, located at Florida and
Garrison, at 1 PM on Monday, July 28.

An obituary is expected to appear in Sunday's Denver Post.

Farewell, old friend, Warren Finch.


Joe Roller,
Denver

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Subject: M kites cont, Pueblo
From: "'Deborah Carstensen' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 14:42:16 -0600
When talking about the Mississippi kites, I realized that I could add more to 
the post. I friend of mine lives 3 blocks from this site and, in addition to 
the kites that are here, he has kites nesting across the street from his house. 

 In addition, at the Routt and Garfield intersection , the kites can often be 
seen bathing in the water that collects at the street corner. 


Deb Carstensen, Littleton, Arapahoe County, Colorado.

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: #500 for Colorado
From: Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 12:41:38 -0700 (PDT)
Hello, Birders.

Arizona birder Kurt Radamaker sent me an interesting email. With his 
permission I am forwarding along his message to COBirds.

Ted Floyd, Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado

======================================

Hi Ted,
 
I was reading COBIRDS and saw the discussion on Colorado's 500th species 
for a state "landlocked" without an international border.
 
Just for kicks I did a database comparison of all landlocked states that 
border Colorado for birds recorded in those states that have not been 
recorded in Colorado.
 
I can't say my database of state lists is one hundred percent accurate, but 
most of the species I checked manually were correct. E.g. I thought no 
way has Wyoming had a Streaked Shearwater, but it does, a specimen from 
June 2006!  
 
Feel free to share this list, if you are so inclined.
 
I think you are over due for a Heermann's Gull!
 
Kurt Radamaker
Cave Creek, AZ


Abert's Towhee,UTAH
Allen's Hummingbird,KANSAS
American Flamingo,KANSAS
Bachman's Sparrow,KANSAS
Bachman's Sparrow,OKLAHOMA
Baikal Teal,OKLAHOMA
Barnacle Goose,OKLAHOMA
Black-backed Woodpecker,WYOMING
Black-capped Vireo,KANSAS
Black-capped Vireo,NEBRASKA
Black-capped Vireo,OKLAHOMA
Black-crested Titmouse,OKLAHOMA
Black-tailed Gnatcatcher,UTAH
Brown-headed Nuthatch,KANSAS
Brown-headed Nuthatch,OKLAHOMA
Cactus Wren,UTAH
California Quail,UTAH
Carolina Chickadee,KANSAS
Carolina Chickadee,OKLAHOMA
Carolina Parakeet,NEBRASKA
Carolina Parakeet,OKLAHOMA
Chuck-will's-widow,KANSAS
Chuck-will's-widow,NEBRASKA
Chuck-will's-widow,OKLAHOMA
Clapper Rail,NEBRASKA
Common Crane,KANSAS
Common Crane,NEBRASKA
Common Eider,KANSAS
Common Eider,NEBRASKA
Crissal Thrasher,UTAH
Elf Owl,UTAH
Emperor Goose,NEBRASKA
Fish Crow,KANSAS
Fish Crow,NEBRASKA
Fish Crow,OKLAHOMA
Fork-tailed Flycatcher,KANSAS
Gilded Flicker,UTAH
Golden-fronted Woodpecker,OKLAHOMA
Gray Hawk,UTAH
Gray Hawk,OKLAHOMA
Gray Partridge,UTAH
Gray Partridge,NEBRASKA
Gray Partridge,WYOMING
Great Frigatebird,OKLAHOMA
Great Gray Owl,UTAH
Great Gray Owl,NEBRASKA
Great Gray Owl,WYOMING
Gull-billed Tern,KANSAS
Heermann's Gull,UTAH
Heermann's Gull,WYOMING
Heermann's Gull,OKLAHOMA
Jabiru,OKLAHOMA
King Eider,KANSAS
King Eider,NEBRASKA
Le Conte's Thrasher,UTAH
Least Grebe,OKLAHOMA
Lesser Frigatebird,WYOMING
Mexican Jay,KANSAS
Monk Parakeet,OKLAHOMA
Mute Swan,WYOMING
Mute Swan,OKLAHOMA
Northern Gannet,OKLAHOMA
Northern Hawk Owl,NEBRASKA
Northern Hawk Owl,WYOMING
Northern Wheatear,KANSAS
Pacific Golden-Plover,UTAH
Passenger Pigeon,NEBRASKA
Passenger Pigeon,WYOMING
Passenger Pigeon,OKLAHOMA
Pileated Woodpecker,KANSAS
Pileated Woodpecker,NEBRASKA
Pileated Woodpecker,WYOMING
Pileated Woodpecker,OKLAHOMA
Purple Sandpiper,UTAH
Purple Sandpiper,OKLAHOMA
Red-breasted Sapsucker,UTAH
Red-cockaded Woodpecker,OKLAHOMA
Ringed Kingfisher,OKLAHOMA
Ruddy Ground-Dove,UTAH
Rufous-backed Robin,UTAH
Shiny Cowbird,OKLAHOMA
Spotted Redshank,KANSAS
Streaked Shearwater,WYOMING
Taiga Bean-Goose,NEBRASKA
Tufted Titmouse,KANSAS
Tufted Titmouse,NEBRASKA
Tufted Titmouse,OKLAHOMA
Vaux's Swift,UTAH
Verdin,UTAH
Verdin,OKLAHOMA
Wandering Tattler,UTAH
White-headed Woodpecker,WYOMING
White-tailed Kite,UTAH
White-tailed Kite,KANSAS
White-tailed Kite,NEBRASKA
White-tailed Kite,WYOMING
White-tailed Kite,OKLAHOMA
Whooper Swan,WYOMING
Wilson's Plover,KANSAS
Wilson's Plover,OKLAHOMA
Yellow Grosbeak,WYOMING
Yellow-footed Gull,UTAH
 

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Subject: N Cardinal/Indigo Bunting/Boulder
From: Maggie Boswell <picab AT qwest.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 09:34:48 -0600
The Northern Cardinal was calling part way up Hawthorn Gulch this morning. This 
is the same location he has been seen in the past (trail head at west end of 
Hawthorn). He has also been seen occasionally in Sanitas Valley this summer. 


An Indigo Bunting male has been singing in the morning in the vicinity of 
Maxwell House on the east side of Sanitas (west end of Maxwell, follow the 
driveway up behind the smoke stack, parking for employees only after 8 a.m.). 


Maggie Boswell
Boulder

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Subject: Mississippi kites, Pueblo County
From: "'Deborah Carstensen' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 09:07:34 -0600
I am currently at the intersection of Route and Garfield in Pueblo and there 
are seven Mississippi kites here. They are up in the trees surrounding the 
intersection. 


Deb Carstensen, Littleton, Arapahoe County, Colorado

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 21 July 2014
From: Joyce Takamine <jabirujt AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 04:49:03 -0600
Compiler: Joyce Takamine
Date: July 20, 2014
email: rba AT cfobirds.org

This is the Colorado Rare Bird Alert for Sunday, July 20 sponsored by
Denver Field Ornithologists and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.

Highlight species include: (* indicates new information on this species).

YELLOWCROWNED NIGHT-HERON (Yuma)
Chukar (Delta)
Red-necked Grebe (Jackson)
Lesser Black-backed Gull (Sedgwick)
Caspian Tern (*Denver)
ACORN WOODPECKER (*Pueblo)
Bell's Vireo (Yuma)
Black Phoebe (Boulder, Delta, *Fremont, Montrose)
 Eastern Phoebe (Yuma)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Baca, *Fremont)
Purple Martin (Delta)
Carolina Wren (Prowers)
PACIFIC WREN (*Ouray)
Black-throated Sparrow (*Pueblo)
Northern Cardinal (Prowers, Yuma)
Indigo Bunting (*Jefferson)

BACA COUNTY:
--Janeal Thompson reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at a private
residence on July 2. She kindly provided her email address (
prairiestarflower AT gmail.com) so you can contact her and seek permission to
visit.  Leatherman reported on July 14 that the Baca county Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher continues.  Contact Janeal Thompson to make arrangements to see
the bird.

BOULDER COUNTY:
--On June 30 Starace noted that a Black Phoebe (with an Eastern Phoebe)
continued at the 75th St. crossing of Boulder Creek. A Black Phoebe has
been hanging out along the creek since the spring.  On July 12, Dowell
reported Black Phoebe at 75th St and Boulder Creek.

DELTA COUNTY:
--Chukars were reported by Garrison at Pleasure Park in Hotchkiss on July
14.  They seem to be hanging out
near the parking lot.
--On July 18, Garrison reported nesting Purple Martins on CSR 265 in NE
Delta County.

DELTA/MONTROSE COUNTIES:
--Farese reported 14 Black Phoebe on the Gunnison River from Chukar Trail
near Olathe to Pleasure Park near Hotchkiss on July 17.

DENVER COUNTY:
--2 Caspian Terns were reported by Edwards flying over Ferril Lake in
Denver City Park on July 19.

FREMONT COUNTY:
--Miller reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on July 8 on CO 67, It was
seen flying alongside the highway. It was seen 0.75 miles north of the
Custer County line.  On July 13, Miller reported seeing the Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 14, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was
reported by Walbek, Percival and Schultz. On July 16, Drummond reported
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at 0730 but not at 1030.  On July 19, Hinds
reported the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 20,
Edwards reported that 2 Scissor-tailed Flycathers were seen and
that they appear to be nesting in the dead tree.
--At least 2 Black Phoebes were reported by Dunning at Florence River Park
on July 20.

JACKSON COUNTY:
--On July 11 Hundertmark reported that the pair of Red-necked Grebes
continues incubating egg(s) on Lake John.

JEFFERSON COUNTY:
--Singing Indigo Buntings were reported by Henwood east of Morrison on Soda
Lakes Road on July 20.

OURAY COUNTY:
--A PACIFIC WREN was reported by Lovitch on the Bear Creek Tail in
Telluride on July 13 and refound by Dexter on July 14.  On July 18, Dexter
reported that the PACIFIC WREN continues at the same location but may not
sing consistently after 1000.  Directions:  The location is .6 miles up
Bear creek Trail from the bridge over San Miguel River at S end of Pine St.
 It appears to be nest building.

PROWERS COUNTY:
--On July 17, Moss reported hearing a Carolina Wren at the S end of Lamar
Community College Woods (LCCW)
and a pair of Northern Cardinals.

PUEBLO COUNTY:
--Knight reported 3 Black-throated Sparrows on July 5 near Pueblo West.
Percival reported them again on July 8. The sparrows were found by parking
at Liberty Point in Pueblo West at the end of Purcell Blvd. The rest
involves a hike that isn't for those who are out of shape. Take the trail
off to the right before the flag pole and memorial. Proceed to the bottom
of the cliff keeping to your right. You will pass a cement "well" just
before merging with a now unused dirt road which heads WNW to a distant
pass in the cliff. The first arroyo with slab rocks is where the sparrows
were.  On July 12, Lilly reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West
and on July 14, Joy reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West and an
easier walk from south end of South Greenbrier Drive.  South Greenbrier
Drive is reached b driving south on Purcell from Hwy 50 for about 2.5 miles
to East Linden Ave.  Turn
west on Linden, and then south on Greenbrier.  On July 16, Drummond
reported ad male and juvenile Black-throated Sparrows in Pueblo East area,
using easier hiking point of South Greenbrier Drive.  On July 20, Edwards
reported Black-throated Sparrows continue at Liberty Point in Pueblo West.
--An ACORN WOODPECKER family was reported by Percival at the dead Ponderosa
Tree in the parking lot at Horseshoe Lodge at Pueblo Mountain Park on July
10. On July 12, Bohannon reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain
Park.  On July 20, Dunning reported that the pair of ACORN WOODPECKERS at
Pueblo Mountain Park were busy feeding young.
--On July 20, Knight reported a Black Phoebe below Pueblo Reservoir dam.

SEDGWICK COUNTY:
--A Lesser Black-backed Gull was reported by Kaempfer at Jumbo Reservoir on
July 12.

YUMA COUNTY:
--At Stalker Lake on July 17, Mlodinow reported a 1 year old YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT-HERON on the N side and 9 Northern Cardinals.
--At Wray Fish Hatchery on July 17, Mlodinow reported Eastern Phoebes.
--At Simmons SWA, N of Beecher on July 17, Mlodinow reported 21 Bell's
Vireos.


DFO Field Trips:
The DFO Field Trip for Saturday , July 26 will be to Cherry Creek SP led by
Buzz Schaumberg (303-699-1721or cell 303-478-4641) 2 miles of easy walking,
driving between stopping locations.  RSVP required, but no participant
limit.  Please leave your number for a return call if we have to adjust the
plan.  Meet at 0700 at the marina parking lot on the west side of the park
for a half-day trip.
Will carpool as much as possible.  Bring scopes if you have them, binocs,
water, snacks and dress for weather.  Lunch optional.
State park pass and water fee required.

The DFO Field trip for Sunday, July 27 will be to South Table Mountain in
Golden led by Mike Foster (303-456-2647).  Moderate trail, around 3 mile
hike, elevation gain of 500 fee.  Limit 8 people.  Preregister with Mike.
Meet at 0600 at the SE corner of RTD lot (2nd and Routt) a few blocks east
of Union Blvd,  From 6th Ave and Union, drive south to 2nd, then turn left
and enter lot off of Routt.  Will carpool to trailhead from here.  Half-day
trip.

Good Birding,
Joyce Takamine
 Boulder
303-554-9785

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Subject: Common Nighthawk distraction display
From: "Davis" <davis AT greenspeedisp.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 22:57:26 -0600
Spooked up a nesting common nighthawk (2 chicks) on my north slope, he/she
flew downslope 30 yards,

And fluttered around with mouth wide open.    I backed off immediately, but
then snuck back above and peered

Down and spotted the two chicks.   Some broken egg shells nearby (bad
housekeeping?), and the 'nest' was just

A random spot in the tree litter, about 3 feet from the base of an open
ponderosa pine.

 

3 species of hummers around currently (Black-chinned is tough here), and red
crossbills, as well as the usual

Foothills birds (including hairy woodpeckers who think they are
hummingbirds).

 

Call if you want to come by and sit on the deck; I'm retired, so usually
home.

 

Raymond Davis - 303-823-5332    at 6,000 ft. 4 miles NW of Lyons

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Subject: Dickcissels, male & female, in Ft Lyond area
From: "SeEttaM ." <seettam AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 21:59:01 -0600
Last week while birding in the lower Arkansas Valley I photographed and
recorded Dickcissels in the Ft Lyons area.  I brought local birder Jill
Smith to view them and we got to see them from as close as 40 feet away on
power lines as the males sang to declare their territory.  Jill and I
believe we heard at least 4 different male Dickcissels in one field-and I
found one male in a nearby field, one male on the Ft Lyon SWA and at least
one near Lamar. This is more than I have found in recent years during the
drought but not as many as I have seen in this area in the past.  I also
photographed a female Dickcissel.   I have uploaded the photos of some onto
my Birds and Nature blog  as well as
one recording of a male Dickcissel.

SeEtta Moss
Canon City
http://BirdsAndNature.blogspot.com

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Subject: Re: Eurasian C-Dove expansion
From: David Suddjian <dsuddjian AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 21:05:18 -0600
another even more dramatic (and more detailed) visualization of the change
is via the range maps on eBird's Explore Data page:

http://ebird.org/ebird/map/

Type in the species' name, select the span of years to look at, and zoom in
to your area of interest.

David Suddjian
Littleton, CO



On Sun, Jul 20, 2014 at 8:32 PM, Bob Righter 
wrote:

> Hi all
>
> For a dramatic visualization of how fast the Eurasian C-Dove has spread
> across the country look at the older Sibley (2000, pg 256) showing the
> range map as just located in the extreme SE US with a few dots here and
> there, with CO with just one dot, then compare to the second edition's
> (2014, pg 260) the range map  now shows the lower 48 all filled in, except
> for the greater NE section of the country. One can only assume what the
> next edition's Eurasian C-D range map will look like. Wow, that was a fast
> and thorough invasian.
>
> Bob Righter
> Denver CO
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
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Subject: Re: Fremont and Pueblo Counties
From: Kathy and Jeff Dunning <mihmdunning AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 20:55:06 -0600
Greetings -

I spent the day wandering around south-central Colorado.

In addition to the two Scissor-tailed Flycatchers south of Florence
reported by Lisa, the Florence River Park had at least two Black
Phoebes in residence.

The pair of Acorn Woodpeckers at Pueblo Mountain Park (Beulah) were
busy feeding young at the nest hole.  I was not able to locate any of
the Grace's Warblers that were present earlier this summer.

Otherwise, the species I found while wandering were the expected
summer residents.

Good birding.

Kathy Mihm Dunning
Denver

On 7/20/14, Gary Faust - Lisa Edwards  wrote:
> All,
>
> The Black-throated Sparrows are still being seen below Liberty Point in
> Pueblo West this morning.
>
> In Fremont County a second adult Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was discovered by
> Mike Gaylord, at the same location that has been described in previous post.
> Both birds were seen together by Mike, Mark Chavez, Chris Knight, and one
> other birder. It appears that they may be nesting based on their behavior
> when corvids get near the dead tree.
>
> Lisa Edwards
> Palmer Lake, CO
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
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Subject: Eurasian C-Dove expansion
From: Bob Righter <rorighter AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 20:32:50 -0600
Hi all

For a dramatic visualization of how fast the Eurasian C-Dove has spread across 
the country look at the older Sibley (2000, pg 256) showing the range map as 
just located in the extreme SE US with a few dots here and there, with CO with 
just one dot, then compare to the second edition's (2014, pg 260) the range map 
now shows the lower 48 all filled in, except for the greater NE section of the 
country. One can only assume what the next edition's Eurasian C-D range map 
will look like. Wow, that was a fast and thorough invasian. 


Bob Righter
Denver CO

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Common Loon in Boulder County (update)
From: Kat Bradley-Bennett <katpbennett AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 19:08:16 -0700 (PDT)
The Common Loon continues to hang out on the north end of the Boulder 
Reservoir.

Kat Bradley-Bennett
Longmont

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Subject: Indigo Buntings-Morrison-Jeffco
From: Mike Henwood <mhawkhen AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 15:21:59 -0600
Between 6 and 6:30 this morning I had several singing Indigo Buntings just
east of Morrison on the Soda Lakes Road.  We have observed breeding Indigo
Buntings the past several years in this location.

Directions:  From C470 & Morrison Road, go west toward the town of
Morrison.  Soda Lakes Road is on the south side of the road just opposite
the Conoco Station.  Take the Soda Lakes Road a short distance to a small
turnout on the right (parking lot).  From here I like to walk south along
the road a short ways before crossing the fence so I can observe the
riparian area below from above.  The Indigo Buntings can be found between
the Soda Lakes Road and C470 on the south side of Bear Creek.

Mike Henwood
Grand Junction, Mesa County
visiting Denver area over weekend

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Subject: Cattle Egrets at City Park in Denver
From: Tom Behnfield <behnfield AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 16:10:17 -0700 (PDT)
What a treat to see young Cattle Egrets being fed by a parent. Here are a 
couple of pictures, one from last weekend & one from this weekend, as well as a 
short video. They are nesting on the east end of the island on Ferril Lake at 
City Park in Denver. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/behnfield/14460430939/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/behnfield/14514857788/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRphDvc9jlE

Tom Behnfield
Lakewood, CO
behnfield AT q.com
www.flickr.com/photos/behnfield

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Subject: Cattle Egrets at City Park
From: Tom Behnfield <behnfield AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 16:04:02 -0700 (PDT)
What a treat to watch young Cattle Egrets being fed by there parent! Here are a 
couple of pictures and a short video: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/behnfield/14514857788/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/behnfield/14460430939/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWAA-snUldM&list=UUYFOiApE53BMQPyUKtVw0mA

Tom Behnfield
Lakewood, CO

www.flickr.com/photos/behnfield


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Subject: Re: RFI - Glenwood Springs, Carbondale, Denver, Pawnee N. Grasslands
From: Cheri Phillips <richph51 AT q.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 15:58:22 -0700 (PDT)
Make sure you visit Crow Valley Campground when you go to Pawnee National 
Grasslands. Do the birding tour from there and you will likely see the 
McCowns.  

On Thursday, July 17, 2014 2:04:35 PM UTC-6, Clay Leonard wrote:
>
> I will be in Colorado in 2 weeks and was seeking information on any of the 
> following near Glenwood Springs, Carbondale, or Denver:
> - Feeders/good sites for Black-chinned, broad-tailed, and calliope 
> hummingbirds.
> - Any Rosy Finches still around?
> - Black-headed Grosbeak, Virginia's Warbler, Bullock's Oriole, 
> White-tailed Ptarmigan 
>
> Also will be visiting Pawnee National Grasslands with the target birds of 
> Mountain Plovers and McCown's Longspur.  Any specific locations, areas to 
> look for these would be helpful! 
>
> I'm from Ohio, so any other good birding sites that I should visit with 
> more Western birds would be appreciated.  Thanks for all your help! -- Clay 
>
>

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Subject: Re: Lake John (Jackson Co) Red-necked Grebe mystery
From: Cheri Phillips <richph51 AT q.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 15:52:54 -0700 (PDT)
My guess would be a raccoon ate the eggs.

Cheri Phillips
Centennial, CO

On Sunday, July 20, 2014 9:45:24 AM UTC-6, Charles Hundertmark wrote:
>
> From Wednesday through yesterday morning, Paul Slingsby and I went to 
> North Park for an RMBO ColonyWatch monitoring trip. On each of those days, 
> we made a stop at Lake John to track the progress of the Red-necked Grebe 
> nest. We hoped to find young or perhaps, catch the hatching of eggs. 
> Instead, we found a mystery.
>
> On Wednesday, accompanied by YCC volunteer Katie Crain from Arapahoe NWR, 
> we observed the nest for an hour and a half. Both adults were on or near 
> the nest off and on during the observation. At one point when both adults 
> were off the nest, there appeared to be eggs still on the nest. At 5:18 
> when we left the lake, the female was on the nest and the male was near.
>
> On Thursday, along with Nicole Hornslein from the refuge, we briefly 
> checked the pair in the fog. The male was on the nest and the female 
> entered the cove before we left.
>
> Friday evening, a day and a half after our previous visit, we observed for 
> a little over an hour and a half until well after sunset. The male was on 
> the nest for just over an hour. After leaving the nest, he attacked a local 
> coot. Eventually, he left the cove for the open water of the lake where he 
> remained until we left. The female was not seen the entire time. The nest 
> appeared empty.
>
> Saturday morning, we were joined by Lee and Linda Farrell. We first 
> spotted what we thought was the male on the open water of the lake away 
> from the nest area. Shortly thereafter, the female was spotted some 
> distance away from the male. We saw no sign of young near or on the backs 
> of either adult. A half hour into our observation, we saw a second male 
> appear near the female. All three birds were in adult breeding plumage. The 
> pair swam into the cove near the nest, and at one point one carried weeds 
> toward the nest. Shortly after, they left the cove and remained in the open 
> water during the remainder of our observation. 
>
> The nest was empty, with no sign of eggs or egg shells and many small 
> black winged wasplike insects, about flying ant size, were swarming over 
> the nest surface. Speculations are plentiful, but we have no idea what is 
> going on now. 
>
> -- 
> Chuck Hundertmark
> 2546 Lake Meadow Drive
> Lafayette, CO 80026
> 303-604-0531
> Cell: 720-771-8659
> chunde... AT gmail.com 
>  

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Subject: Weld County - Grasslands
From: "'ronbco' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 15:36:24 -0700 (PDT)
Yesterday Greg Mulder and I birded Pawnee National Grasslands and Lower 
Latham / Beebe Draw.

Crow Valley did not disappoint! 3 Short-eared owls on the far end of the 
trail beyond the campground. Many Brown Thrashers, some yellow headed 
blackbirds, and a black-crowned night-heron.
The grasslands were also productive. We ran across a long-billed curlew, 
solitary, on rd 607. BTW that road has ruts that are quite deep so don't 
try it without clearance. 
I was wondering *why this bird was in a dry grassy field at this time. It 
seemed to be a juvenile and I think the breeding should be over right*?

Elsewhere we were puzzled by a bird that we determined to be an American 
Pipit. The one aspect of the id that did not match was there was a slight 
tint of yellow on the throat. But nothing else matched as closely as Pipit. 
Any opinions?
Latham and Beebe were slow with only stilts and a couple phalaropes

Other notes/questions.
Where is the Playa. From ebirds map location it seemed to be on 73, but it 
was not. It seems unlikely it is dried up since the grasslands has an 
abundance of water this year.
The Howard Prairie Dog city seemed to only have a few residents and no 
Burrowing Owls. Also did not find any at Dyers field.

Ron Bolton
Berthoud CO

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Subject: Black Phoebe - Pueblo Res Rock Canyon - 7/20
From: "'Chris Knight' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 12:31:11 -0700 (PDT)
After observing the pair of Scissor-tailed Flycatchers adjacent to Highway 
67 in Fremont County with Lisa Edwards, Mike Gaylord, Mark Chavez, et. al., 
I eventually wound up at Lake Pueblo State Park/Rock Canyon area and saw a 
Black Phoebe immediately below the dam at Pueblo Reservoir. The Phoebe was 
perched on a dead branch near the wall on the south side of the river. As 
far as the Black-throated Sparrows, I haven't seen them since 7/5 although 
others are still seeing them. They seem to be seen more in the morning 
hours than later in the day.

Good birding!

Chris Knight
Longmont, CO

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Subject: Fremont and Pueblo Counties
From: Gary Faust - Lisa Edwards <lagh2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 11:05:50 -0600
All, 

The Black-throated Sparrows are still being seen below Liberty Point in Pueblo 
West this morning. 


In Fremont County a second adult Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was discovered by 
Mike Gaylord, at the same location that has been described in previous post. 
Both birds were seen together by Mike, Mark Chavez, Chris Knight, and one other 
birder. It appears that they may be nesting based on their behavior when 
corvids get near the dead tree. 


Lisa Edwards
Palmer Lake, CO

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Lake John (Jackson Co) Red-necked Grebe mystery
From: Charles Hundertmark <chundertmark8 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 09:45:20 -0600
From Wednesday through yesterday morning, Paul Slingsby and I went to North
Park for an RMBO ColonyWatch monitoring trip. On each of those days, we
made a stop at Lake John to track the progress of the Red-necked Grebe
nest. We hoped to find young or perhaps, catch the hatching of eggs.
Instead, we found a mystery.

On Wednesday, accompanied by YCC volunteer Katie Crain from Arapahoe NWR,
we observed the nest for an hour and a half. Both adults were on or near
the nest off and on during the observation. At one point when both adults
were off the nest, there appeared to be eggs still on the nest. At 5:18
when we left the lake, the female was on the nest and the male was near.

On Thursday, along with Nicole Hornslein from the refuge, we briefly
checked the pair in the fog. The male was on the nest and the female
entered the cove before we left.

Friday evening, a day and a half after our previous visit, we observed for
a little over an hour and a half until well after sunset. The male was on
the nest for just over an hour. After leaving the nest, he attacked a local
coot. Eventually, he left the cove for the open water of the lake where he
remained until we left. The female was not seen the entire time. The nest
appeared empty.

Saturday morning, we were joined by Lee and Linda Farrell. We first spotted
what we thought was the male on the open water of the lake away from the
nest area. Shortly thereafter, the female was spotted some distance away
from the male. We saw no sign of young near or on the backs of either
adult. A half hour into our observation, we saw a second male appear near
the female. All three birds were in adult breeding plumage. The pair swam
into the cove near the nest, and at one point one carried weeds toward the
nest. Shortly after, they left the cove and remained in the open water
during the remainder of our observation.

The nest was empty, with no sign of eggs or egg shells and many small black
winged wasplike insects, about flying ant size, were swarming over the nest
surface. Speculations are plentiful, but we have no idea what is going on
now.

-- 
Chuck Hundertmark
2546 Lake Meadow Drive
Lafayette, CO 80026
303-604-0531
Cell: 720-771-8659
chundertmark8 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 20 July 2014
From: Joyce Takamine <jabirujt AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 03:48:37 -0600
Compiler: Joyce Takamine
Date: July 20, 2014
email: rba AT cfobirds.org

This is the Colorado Rare Bird Alert for Sunday, July 20 sponsored by
Denver Field Ornithologists and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.

Highlight species include: (* indicates new information on this species).

YELLOWCROWNED NIGHT-HERON (Yuma)
Chukar (Delta)
Red-necked Grebe (Jackson)
Lesser Black-backed Gull (Sedgwick)
Caspian Tern (*Denver)
ACORN WOODPECKER (Pueblo)
Bell's Vireo (Yuma)
Black Phoebe (Boulder, Delta, Montrose)
Eastern Phoebe (Yuma)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Baca, *Fremont)
Purple Martin (Delta)
Carolina Wren (Prowers)
PACIFIC WREN (*Ouray)
Black-throated Sparrow (Pueblo)
Northern Cardinal (Prowers, Yuma)

BACA COUNTY:
--Janeal Thompson reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at a private
residence on July 2. She kindly provided her email address (
prairiestarflower AT gmail.com) so you can contact her and seek permission to
visit.  Leatherman reported on July 14 that the Baca county Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher continues.  Contact Janeal Thompson to make arrangements to see
the bird.

BOULDER COUNTY:
--On June 30 Starace noted that a Black Phoebe (with an Eastern Phoebe)
continued at the 75th St. crossing of Boulder Creek. A Black Phoebe has
been hanging out along the creek since the spring.  On July 12, Dowell
reported Black Phoebe at 75th St and Boulder Creek.

DELTA COUNTY:
--Chukars were reported by Garrison at Pleasure Park in Hotchkiss on July
14.  They seem to be hanging out
near the parking lot.
--On July 18, Garrison reported nesting Purple Martins on CSR 265 in NE
Delta County.

DELTA/MONTROSE COUNTIES:
--Farese reported 14 Black Phoebe on the Gunnison River from Chukar Trail
near Olathe to Pleasure Park near Hotchkiss on July 17.

DENVER COUNTY:
--2 Caspian Terns were reported by Edwards flying over Ferril Lake in
Denver City Park on July 19.

FREMONT COUNTY:
Miller reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on July 8 on CO 67, It was seen
flying alongside the highway. It was seen 0.75 miles north of the Custer
County line.  On July 13, Miller reported seeing the Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 14, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was
reported by Walbek, Percival and Schultz. On July 16, Drummond reported
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at 0730 but not at 1030.  On July 19, Hinds
reported the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at the same spot.

JACKSON COUNTY:
--On July 11 Hundertmark reported that the pair of Red-necked Grebes
continues incubating egg(s) on Lake John.

OURAY COUNTY:
--A PACIFIC WREN was reported by Lovitch on the Bear Creek Tail in
Telluride on July 13 and refound by Dexter on July 14.  On July 18, Dexter
reported that the PACIFIC WREN continues at the same location but may not
sing consistently after 1000.  Directions:  The location is .6 miles up
Bear creek Trail from the bridge over San Miguel River at S end of Pine St.
 It appears to be nest building.

PROWERS COUNTY:
--On July 17, Moss reported hearing a Carolina Wren at the S end of Lamar
Community College Woods (LCCW)
and a pair of Northern Cardinals.

PUEBLO COUNTY:
--Knight reported 3 Black-throated Sparrows on July 5 near Pueblo West.
Percival reported them again on July 8. The sparrows were found by parking
at Liberty Point in Pueblo West at the end of Purcell Blvd. The rest
involves a hike that isn't for those who are out of shape. Take the trail
off to the right before the flag pole and memorial. Proceed to the bottom
of the cliff keeping to your right. You will pass a cement "well" just
before merging with a now unused dirt road which heads WNW to a distant
pass in the cliff. The first arroyo with slab rocks is where the sparrows
were.  On July 12, Lilly reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West
and on July 14, Joy reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West and an
easier walk from south end of South Greenbrier Drive.  South Greenbrier
Drive is reached b driving south on Purcell from Hwy 50 for about 2.5 miles
to East Linden Ave.  Turn
west on Linden, and then south on Greenbrier.  On July 16, Drummond
reported ad male and juvenile Black-throated Sparrows in Pueblo East area,
using easier hiking point of South Greenbrier Drive.
--An ACORN WOODPECKER family was reported by Percival at the dead Ponderosa
Tree in the parking lot at Horseshoe Lodge at Pueblo Mountain Park on July
10. On July 12, Bohannon reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain Park.

SEDGWICK COUNTY:
--A Lesser Black-backed Gull was reported by Kaempfer at Jumbo Reservoir on
July 12.

YUMA COUNTY:
--At Stalker Lake on July 17, Mlodinow reported a 1 year old YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT-HERON on the N side and 9 Northern Cardinals.
--At Wray Fish Hatchery on July 17, Mlodinow reported Eastern Phoebes.
--At Simmons SWA, N of Beecher on July 17, Mlodinow reported 21 Bell's
Vireos.


DFO Field Trips:

The DFO field trip for Sunday, July 20 will be the Prospect Park in Wheat
Ridge led by Toni Rautus (303-422-7322).  Call leader by July 18 and leave
you name and phone number.  Meet at 0730 at Prospect Park for a half day
trip.
From I-70, exit 267, take Kipling south about 3/4 mile and turn right
(west) on 44th Ave.  Go one mile west.  Look for the entrance to Prospect
Park on your left (south).  Meet just inside the park in the lot right next
to Prospect Lake.  Will check the lake for waterfowl before birding the
paved and dirt paths along Clear Creek.  Bring water and snacks;  dress for
the weather.

Good Birding,
Joyce Takamine
Boulder
303-554-9785

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Subject: Denver City Park
From: Lisa Edwards <lagh2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 20:12:08 -0600
All,

While looking for the many times reported Cattle Egrets in Denver City Park at 
Ferril Lake I spotted two Caspian Terns. The two terns spent about 5 minutes 
flying over the lake, never diving. They paid a short visit to Duck Lake and 
then disappeared. I did find one of the adult Cattle Egrets. 


Regards,
Lisa Edwards
Palmer Lake, CO

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Subject: Fremont County - Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
From: Robb Hinds <robbh5970 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 11:41:31 -0600
Today I saw the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher in the same area as previously
reported. It was in a dead tree next to the road on the west side just
north of the parking area for the 'Hardscrabble' point of interest area.

Robb Hinds
Colorado Springs
El Paso County

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Subject: Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 19 July 2014
From: Joyce Takamine <jabirujt AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 04:34:58 -0600
Compiler: Joyce Takamine
Date: July 19, 2014
email: rba AT cfobirds.org

This is the Colorado Rare Bird Alert for Saturday, July 18 sponsored by
Denver Field Ornithologists and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.

Highlight species include: (* indicates new information on this species).

YELLOWCROWNED NIGHT-HERON (*Yuma)
Chukar (Delta)
Red-necked Grebe (Jackson)
Lesser Black-backed Gull (Sedgwick)
ACORN WOODPECKER (Pueblo)
Bell's Vireo (*Yuma)
Black Phoebe (Boulder, *Delta, *Montrose)
Eastern Phoebe (*Yuma)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Baca, Fremont)
Purple Martin (*Delta)
Carolina Wren (Prowers)
PACIFIC WREN (Ouray)
Black-throated Sparrow (Pueblo)
Northern Cardinal (Prowers, *Yuma)

BACA COUNTY:
--Janeal Thompson reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at a private
residence on July 2. She kindly provided her email address (
prairiestarflower AT gmail.com) so you can contact her and seek permission to
visit.  Leatherman reported on July 14 that the Baca county Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher continues.  Contact Janeal Thompson to make arrangements to see
the bird.

BOULDER COUNTY:
--On June 30 Starace noted that a Black Phoebe (with an Eastern Phoebe)
continued at the 75th St. crossing of Boulder Creek. A Black Phoebe has
been hanging out along the creek since the spring.  On July 12, Dowell
reported Black Phoebe at 75th St and Boulder Creek.

DELTA COUNTY:
--Chukars were reported by Garrison at Pleasure Park in Hotchkiss on July
14.  They seem to be hanging out
near the parking lot.
--On July 18, Garrison reported nesting Purple Martins on CSR 265 in NE
Delta County.

DELTA/MONTROSE COUNTIES:
--Farese reported 14 Black Phoebe on the Gunnison River from Chukar Trail
near Olathe to Pleasure Park near Hotchkiss on July 17.

FREMONT COUNTY:
Miller reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on July 8 on CO 67, It was seen
flying alongside the highway. It was seen 0.75 miles north of the Custer
County line.  On July 13, Miller reported seeing the Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 14, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was
reported by Walbek, Percival and Schultz. On July 16, Drummond reported
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at 0730 but not at 1030.

JACKSON COUNTY:
--On July 11 Hundertmark reported that the pair of Red-necked Grebes
continues incubating egg(s) on Lake John.

OURAY COUNTY:
--A PACIFIC WREN was reported by Lovitch on the Bear Creek Tail in
Telluride on July 13 and refound by Dexter on July 14.  Directions:  The
location is .6 miles up Bear creek Trail from the birdge over San Miguel
River at S end of Pine St.  It appears to be nest building.

PROWERS COUNTY:
--On July 17, Moss reported hearing a Carolina Wren at the S end of Lamar
Community College Woods (LCCW)
and a pair of Northern Cardinals.

PUEBLO COUNTY:
--Knight reported 3 Black-throated Sparrows on July 5 near Pueblo West.
Percival reported them again on July 8. The sparrows were found by parking
at Liberty Point in Pueblo West at the end of Purcell Blvd. The rest
involves a hike that isn't for those who are out of shape. Take the trail
off to the right before the flag pole and memorial. Proceed to the bottom
of the cliff keeping to your right. You will pass a cement "well" just
before merging with a now unused dirt road which heads WNW to a distant
pass in the cliff. The first arroyo with slab rocks is where the sparrows
were.  On July 12, Lilly reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West
and on July 14, Joy reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West and an
easier walk from south end of South Greenbrier Drive.  South Greenbrier
Drive is reached b driving south on Purcell from Hwy 50 for about 2.5 miles
to East Linden Ave.  Turn
west on Linden, and then south on Greenbrier.  On July 16, Drummond
reported ad male and juvenile Black-throated Sparrows in Pueblo East area,
using easier hiking point of South Greenbrier Drive.
--An ACORN WOODPECKER family was reported by Percival at the dead Ponderosa
Tree in the parking lot at Horseshoe Lodge at Pueblo Mountain Park on July
10. On July 12, Bohannon reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain Park.

SEDGWICK COUNTY:
--A Lesser Black-backed Gull was reported by Kaempfer at Jumbo Reservoir on
July 12.

YUMA COUNTY:
--At Stalker Lake on July 17, Mlodinow reported a 1 year old YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT-HERON on the N side and 9 Northern Cardinals.
--At Wray Fish Hatchery on July 17, Mlodinow reported Eastern Phoebes.
--At Simmons SWA, N of Beecher on July 17, Mlodinow reported 21 Bell's
Vireos.


DFO Field Trips:
The DFO field trip for Saturday, July 19 will be to Rocky Mountain National
Park led by Ed Holub (303-979-2194).
Call if you plan to go.  Meet at Beaver Meadows Visitor Center at 0815 just
west of Estes Park.  Pay entrance fee or carpool and share the fee.  Full
day trip ending around 1500 to 1600, so bring lunch and water.  Dress for
changeable weather (hat, sunscreen, raingear).

The DFO field trip for Sunday, July 20 will be the Prospect Park in Wheat
Ridge led by Toni Rautus (303-422-7322).  Call leader by July 18 and leave
you name and phone number.  Meet at 0730 at Prospect Park for a half day
trip.
From I-70, exit 267, take Kipling south about 3/4 mile and turn right
(west) on 44th Ave.  Go one mile west.  Look for the entrance to Prospect
Park on your left (south).  Meet just inside the park in the lot right next
to Prospect Lake.  Will check the lake for waterfowl before birding the
paved and dirt paths along Clear Creek.  Bring water and snacks;  dress for
the weather.

Good Birding,
Joyce Takamine
Boulder
303-554-9785

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Subject: Hooded Mergansers - Larimer County
From: David Wade <davespeedbump AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 22:16:38 -0700 (PDT)
Hello, while birding the Poudre Trail on bike today, I spotted over 20 
Hooded Mergansers in the gravel pond Northwest of where the trail crosses 
Taft Hill Rd. The pond is private property and surrounded by a chain-link 
fence but there are a few spots one can get views of the water from the 
trail. The viewing conditions were terrible and it was hard to see many 
details. However, it appeared that all the birds were either adult females 
or young ducks hatched this year! I can't imagine the young ones are 
capable of moving very far so, apparently, we have some breeding mergansers 
in Northern Colorado. 

David Wade
Fort Collins CO

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Subject: Black Phoebes in Gunnison Gorge (Montrose/Delta)
From: Lee Farese <leefarese AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 14:18:41 -0700 (PDT)
Hi All,

Spent all yesteday on the Gunnison River from the Chukar Trail (Montrose 
County, nearest to Olathe) to Pleasure Park (Delta County, near Hotchkiss). 
I was surprised along the river to see not just a handful of Black Phoebes, 
but 14! A few of these were clearly in pairs, but many were spaced out 
along the river, so I wouldn't be surprised if there were many others 
missed. Seems like a healthy population in the gorge.

We also heard a Chukar, saw many Dippers and countless Say's Phoebes along 
with many others. A beautiful day on the river.

Lee Farese
These days in Crawford



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Subject: Re: Park County July 15
From: David Suddjian <dsuddjian AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 11:21:43 -0600
I meant to include that a summering male Common Goldeneye continued at
Tarryall Reservoir, along with a Ring-necked Duck and an Osprey.

David


On Fri, Jul 18, 2014 at 10:59 AM, David Suddjian 
wrote:

> My son Stephen and I went to Park County again on July 15, focusing mostly
> on the county’s southern edge.
>
>
> Getting there, a Lewis’s Woodpecker was spotted in Teller Co near the
> junction of County Road (CR) 1 and CR 11.
>
>
> In Park now, a Gray Flycatcher was in sparse pinyon scrub along CR 71, in
> the same area where I had one singing on 6/23. A Black-chinned Hummingbird
> along a drainage there was my first for the county.
>
>
> CR 104 had a Canyon Wren signing on the slope west of the junction with
> BLM Road 5750, just north of the Fremont line. 4 Virginia’s Warblers were
> along Road 5750, all in Gambel oak patches (two in Park, 2 in Fremont). A
> singing Virginia’s was heard along CR 104 about 2 miles north of the
> others, also in Gambel oaks. This habitat in this area also had the
> locally-prevalent-but-elsewhere-rare-in-Park Western Scrub-Jay and Spotted
> Towhee.
>
>
> Red Crossbills were fairly common and detected at varied spots along the
> roads we traveled. Most were the Type 2 (Ponderosa Pine) form in Ponderosa
> forest, but some I was unsure of were not Type 2 (these were in forest
> dominated by Douglas-fir, but with some Ponderosa, too). Pinyon Jays were
> locally common, especially along CR 71 and at Guffey. And *vis a vis* the
> recent CoBirds discussion on a paucity of Clark’s Nutcrackers to the north
> at Rocky Mountain NP, the species is presently numerous throughout forested
> areas of Park Co…fwiw.
>
>
> We checked Antero Reservoir, which had seemingly very good shorebird
> habitat (and a frightening lightning storm). There were two Black-necked
> Stilts along the southwest shore, but otherwise all the shorebirds were
> American Avocets (plentiful). A Common Loon, likely continuing from June at
> least) was noted. No ducks of special interest, but Gadwall, Redhead,
> Lesser Scaup, Common Merganser and Ruddy Duck were noted.
>
>
> A large seasonal pond with emergent vegetation along Trout Creek (viewed
> from the south end of Redhill road, near Hwy 9 x CR 24) had 6 Ring-necked
> Ducks, Lesser Scaup, 2 each Blue-winged and Green-winged Teal, and 7
> Cinnamon Teal, as well as a family of Ruddy Ducks.
>
>
> Along CR 34 (near the town of Jefferson) I came upon a good-sized natural
> pond with emergent and submergent vegetation. Here there were 48 Eared
> Grebe nests, all with sitting birds. Also two 1st summer Franklin’s Gulls
> (my first in Park since spring migration), Ruddy Duck and American Avocet.
> I hope the pond retains enough water long enough into the summer for the
> nesting grebes to be successful.
>
>
> Lastly, many, many families of fledged Western and Mountain Bluebirds made
> for a happy day.
>
>
> David Suddjian
>
> Littleton, CO
>

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Subject: Park County July 15
From: David Suddjian <dsuddjian AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 10:59:15 -0600
My son Stephen and I went to Park County again on July 15, focusing mostly
on the county’s southern edge.


Getting there, a Lewis’s Woodpecker was spotted in Teller Co near the
junction of County Road (CR) 1 and CR 11.


In Park now, a Gray Flycatcher was in sparse pinyon scrub along CR 71, in
the same area where I had one singing on 6/23. A Black-chinned Hummingbird
along a drainage there was my first for the county.


CR 104 had a Canyon Wren signing on the slope west of the junction with BLM
Road 5750, just north of the Fremont line. 4 Virginia’s Warblers were along
Road 5750, all in Gambel oak patches (two in Park, 2 in Fremont). A singing
Virginia’s was heard along CR 104 about 2 miles north of the others, also
in Gambel oaks. This habitat in this area also had the
locally-prevalent-but-elsewhere-rare-in-Park Western Scrub-Jay and Spotted
Towhee.


Red Crossbills were fairly common and detected at varied spots along the
roads we traveled. Most were the Type 2 (Ponderosa Pine) form in Ponderosa
forest, but some I was unsure of were not Type 2 (these were in forest
dominated by Douglas-fir, but with some Ponderosa, too). Pinyon Jays were
locally common, especially along CR 71 and at Guffey. And *vis a vis* the
recent CoBirds discussion on a paucity of Clark’s Nutcrackers to the north
at Rocky Mountain NP, the species is presently numerous throughout forested
areas of Park Co…fwiw.


We checked Antero Reservoir, which had seemingly very good shorebird
habitat (and a frightening lightning storm). There were two Black-necked
Stilts along the southwest shore, but otherwise all the shorebirds were
American Avocets (plentiful). A Common Loon, likely continuing from June at
least) was noted. No ducks of special interest, but Gadwall, Redhead,
Lesser Scaup, Common Merganser and Ruddy Duck were noted.


A large seasonal pond with emergent vegetation along Trout Creek (viewed
from the south end of Redhill road, near Hwy 9 x CR 24) had 6 Ring-necked
Ducks, Lesser Scaup, 2 each Blue-winged and Green-winged Teal, and 7
Cinnamon Teal, as well as a family of Ruddy Ducks.


Along CR 34 (near the town of Jefferson) I came upon a good-sized natural
pond with emergent and submergent vegetation. Here there were 48 Eared
Grebe nests, all with sitting birds. Also two 1st summer Franklin’s Gulls
(my first in Park since spring migration), Ruddy Duck and American Avocet.
I hope the pond retains enough water long enough into the summer for the
nesting grebes to be successful.


Lastly, many, many families of fledged Western and Mountain Bluebirds made
for a happy day.


David Suddjian

Littleton, CO

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Subject: Chipping Sparrow night flight, July 18
From: Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 03:37:51 -0700
Hello, Birders.
I heard a little pulse of Chipping Sparrows go over Lafayette, eastern Boulder 
County, earlier this 4am hour, Friday, July 18th. As we now know, these 
Chipping Sparrows heard at night over Colorado's high plains are migrating to 
molting grounds in eastern Colorado and western Kansas. 

Ted Floyd
Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado 		 	   		  

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Subject: Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 18 July 2014
From: Joyce Takamine <jabirujt AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 04:02:38 -0600
Compiler: Joyce Takamine
Date: July 18, 2014
email: rba AT cfobirds.org

This is the Colorado Rare Bird Alert for Friday, July 18 sponsored by
Denver Field Ornithologists and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.

Highlight species include: (* indicates new information on this species).

YELLOWCROWNED NIGHT-HERON (*Yuma)
Chukar (Delta)
Red-necked Grebe (Jackson)
Lesser Black-backed Gull (Sedgwick)
ACORN WOODPECKER (Pueblo)
Bell's Vireo (*Yuma)
Black Phoebe (Boulder)
Eastern Phoebe (*Yuma)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Baca, Fremont)
Carolina Wren (Prowers)
PACIFIC WREN (Ouray)
Black-throated Sparrow (Pueblo)
Northern Cardinal (Prowers, *Yuma)

BACA COUNTY:
--Janeal Thompson reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at a private
residence on July 2. She kindly provided her email address (
prairiestarflower AT gmail.com) so you can contact her and seek permission to
visit.  Leatherman reported on July 14 that the Baca county Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher continues.  Contact Janeal Thompson to make arrangements to see
the bird.

BOULDER COUNTY:
--On June 30 Starace noted that a Black Phoebe (with an Eastern Phoebe)
continued at the 75th St. crossing of Boulder Creek. A Black Phoebe has
been hanging out along the creek since the spring.  On July 12, Dowell
reported Black Phoebe at 75th St and Boulder Creek.

DELTA COUNTY:
--Chukars were reported by Garrison at Pleasure Park in Hotchkiss on July
14.  They seem to be hanging out
near the parking lot.

FREMONT COUNTY:
Miller reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on July 8 on CO 67, It was seen
flying alongside the highway. It was seen 0.75 miles north of the Custer
County line.  On July 13, Miller reported seeing the Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 14, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was
reported by Walbek, Percival and Schultz. On July 16, Drummond reported
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at 0730 but not at 1030.

JACKSON COUNTY:
--On July 11 Hundertmark reported that the pair of Red-necked Grebes
continues incubating egg(s) on Lake John.

OURAY COUNTY:
--A PACIFIC WREN was reported by Lovitch on the Bear Creek Tail in
Telluride on July 13 and refound by Dexter on July 14.  Directions:  The
location is .6 miles up Bear creek Trail from the birdge over San Miguel
River at S end of Pine St.  It appears to be nest building.

PROWERS COUNTY:
--On July 17, Moss reported hearing a Carolina Wren at the S end of Lamar
Community College Woods (LCCW)
and a pair of Northern Cardinals.

PUEBLO COUNTY:
--Knight reported 3 Black-throated Sparrows on July 5 near Pueblo West.
Percival reported them again on July 8. The sparrows were found by parking
at Liberty Point in Pueblo West at the end of Purcell Blvd. The rest
involves a hike that isn't for those who are out of shape. Take the trail
off to the right before the flag pole and memorial. Proceed to the bottom
of the cliff keeping to your right. You will pass a cement "well" just
before merging with a now unused dirt road which heads WNW to a distant
pass in the cliff. The first arroyo with slab rocks is where the sparrows
were.  On July 12, Lilly reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West
and on July 14, Joy reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West and an
easier walk from south end of South Greenbrier Drive.  South Greenbrier
Drive is reached b driving south on Purcell from Hwy 50 for about 2.5 miles
to East Linden Ave.  Turn
west on Linden, and then south on Greenbrier.  On July 16, Drummond
reported ad male and juvenile Black-throated Sparrows in Pueblo East area,
using easier hiking point of South Greenbrier Drive.
--An ACORN WOODPECKER family was reported by Percival at the dead Ponderosa
Tree in the parking lot at Horseshoe Lodge at Pueblo Mountain Park on July
10. On July 12, Bohannon reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain Park.

SEDGWICK COUNTY:
--A Lesser Black-backed Gull was reported by Kaempfer at Jumbo Reservoir on
July 12.

YUMA COUNTY:
--At Stalker Lake on July 17, Mlodinow reported a 1 year old YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT-HERON on the N side and 9 Northern Cardinals.
--At Wray Fish Hatchery on July 17, Mlodinow reported Eastern Phoebes.
--At Simmons SWA, N of Beecher on July 17, Mlodinow reported 21 Bell's
Vireos.


DFO Field Trips:
The DFO field trip for Saturday, July 19 will be to Rocky Mountain National
Park led by Ed Holub (303-979-2194).
Call if you plan to go.  Meet at Beaver Meadows Visitor Center at 0815 just
west of Estes Park.  Pay entrance fee or carpool and share the fee.  Full
day trip ending around 1500 to 1600, so bring lunch and water.  Dress for
changeable weather (hat, sunscreen, raingear).

The DFO field trip for Sunday, July 20 will be the Prospect Park in Wheat
Ridge led by Toni Rautus (303-422-7322).  Call leader by July 18 and leave
you name and phone number.  Meet at 0730 at Prospect Park for a half day
trip.
From I-70, exit 267, take Kipling south about 3/4 mile and turn right
(west) on 44th Ave.  Go one mile west.  Look for the entrance to Prospect
Park on your left (south).  Meet just inside the park in the lot right next
to Prospect Lake.  Will check the lake for waterfowl before birding the
paved and dirt paths along Clear Creek.  Bring water and snacks;  dress for
the weather.

Good Birding,
Joyce Takamine
Boulder
303-554-9785

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Subject: Yuma County YC Night Heron
From: "'Steven Mlodinow' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 21:26:40 -0600
Greetings All
Today Sean Walters and I had a 1 yr old Yellow-crowned Night Heron at Stalker 
Lake on the n side. If you know Stalker, it was in the spot where shorebirds 
often are, tho the water level is a tad high now. 

Also at Stalker was an apparent Eastern YB Chat, 9 N Cardinals

At the Wray Fish Hatchery, we had a roving flock of nearly 30 Baltimore 
Orioles, a dozen or so Orchards, a few Bullocks, and a dozen or so ??? Eastern 
Phoebes appeared to have nested there again, and more notably, 3 Pine Siskins 
were there 


Simmons State Wildlife Area, just n of Beecher, was stunning as usual. 21 Bells 
Vireos, 10 or so chats, one of which was an Eastern, 2 looked like Westerns, 
and the rest weren't seen or looked in between. A couple catbirds. Nearly a 
dozen RH Woodpeckers, etc 


At Lions Fishing Hole in Holyoke, Phillips, we had a Hooded Merg and 2 YB 
Cuckoos. 


Good Birding
Steven Mlodinow
Longmont CO

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: Bob Bradley
From: van <vtruan4744 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 17:52:07 -0700 (PDT)
David thanks for informing us.  I met Bob in Dec.1970 in a park in 
Phoenix.  We were both fairly new at birding then.  We keep in touch and 
birded together every time I made it down to Phoenix.  In 1977, Bob & I 
drove from Phoenix to Florida birding,  We had such a great time.  If you 
see the family give them my regards.  

Van Truan
Pueblo

On Thursday, July 17, 2014 10:37:17 AM UTC-6, David Waltman wrote:
>
> Bob Bradley died in Grand Junction on 16 July after a brief illness.  He 
> was 89.  Most of his adult life was spent in Phoenix, but he and his wife 
> Ann moved to Grand Junction several years ago where Bob was active in 
> birding.  He was an important contributor to birding for many years and in 
> many ways.  One of those ways was as compiler or co-compiler of the Greater 
> Phoenix CBC for twenty years.  In February and September of 1996 Bob took 
> me to the great birding places in SE Arizona.  I'll never forget the sight 
> of four Aztec Thrush flying in to feed on Virginia Creeper berries in 
> Miller Canyon.  And a Banded Rock Rattlesnake at the same spot!  That was 
> the great gift to me that kindled my passion for birding.  Bob's birding 
> contributions and accomplishments  are impressive and too numerous to 
> mention here.  I always admired his huge ABA-area and Arizona lists because 
> so much of that was accomplished long ago before modern field guides, the 
> internet and cell phones have made it somewhat easier.  Bob said, "If 
> birding were easy, it wouldn't be any fun."  Maricopa Audubon honored Bob 
> at a banquet in 2000 and presented him with a Roger Tory Peterson painting 
> of Peregrine Falcons.  Bob and Ann traveled the world extensively, and he 
> reached his seventh continent, Antarctica, two years ago with son Jon.  
> Daughter Jennifer's notification of Bob's death was headlined "gone 
> birding."  What a nice thought.
> Bob was my cousin.
> David Waltman
> Boulder
>

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Subject: RFI - Glenwood Springs, Carbondale, Denver, Pawnee N. Grasslands
From: Clay Leonard <reclaimingthetable AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 13:04:35 -0700 (PDT)
I will be in Colorado in 2 weeks and was seeking information on any of the 
following near Glenwood Springs, Carbondale, or Denver: 

- Feeders/good sites for Black-chinned, broad-tailed, and calliope 
hummingbirds. 

- Any Rosy Finches still around?
- Black-headed Grosbeak, Virginia's Warbler, Bullock's Oriole, White-tailed 
Ptarmigan 


Also will be visiting Pawnee National Grasslands with the target birds of 
Mountain Plovers and McCown's Longspur. Any specific locations, areas to look 
for these would be helpful! 


I'm from Ohio, so any other good birding sites that I should visit with more 
Western birds would be appreciated. Thanks for all your help! -- Clay 


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Subject: RFI - Scissor-tailed in Fremont Cty
From: Eric DeFonso <bay.wren AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 16:30:09 -0600
Hi all,

Did anyone locate the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher today that's been hanging
around the Fremont/Custer County line? A possibly fateful chasing decision
hangs in the balance. :) Thanks,

Eric

-- 
Eric DeFonso
Boulder, CO

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Subject: Bob Bradley
From: David Waltman <djwaltman AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 16:37:11 +0000 (UTC)
Bob Bradley died in Grand Junction on 16 July after a brief illness. He was 89. 
Most of his adult life was spent in Phoenix, but he and his wife Ann moved to 
Grand Junction several years ago where Bob was active in birding. He was an 
important contributor to birding for many years and in many ways. One of those 
ways was as compiler or co-compiler of the Greater Phoenix CBC for twenty 
years. In February and September of 1996 Bob took me to the great birding 
places in SE Arizona. I'll never forget the sight of four Aztec Thrush flying 
in to feed on Virginia Creeper berries in Miller Canyon. And a Banded Rock 
Rattlesnake at the same spot! That was the great gift to me that kindled my 
passion for birding. Bob's birding contributions and accomplishments are 
impressive and too numerous to mention here. I always admired his huge ABA-area 
and Arizona lists because so much of that was accomplished long ago before 
modern field guides, the internet and cell phones have made it somewhat easier. 
Bob said, "If birding were easy, it wouldn't be any fun." Maricopa Audubon 
honored Bob at a banquet in 2000 and presented him with a Roger Tory Peterson 
painting of Peregrine Falcons. Bob and Ann traveled the world extensively, and 
he reached his seventh continent, Antarctica, two years ago with son Jon. 
Daughter Jennifer's notification of Bob's death was headlined "gone birding." 
What a nice thought. 

Bob was my cousin. 
David Waltman 
Boulder 

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Subject: Landlocked states near 500 species
From: Pete Janzen <pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 06:09:20 -0500
The only two contenders in this esoteric category are Kansas and 
Oklahoma.  Both are approaching 490 species and so are most likely 
decades away from reaching 500.  Also both of those states to a limited 
extent have allowed some species to be added to the checklist at 
"hypothetical" status.  That is where things start to get murky and the 
hair-splitting commences, and I have no taste for such a discussion.  At 
any rate, Colorado is well ahead of the competition, and the only 
contending landlocked state likely to reach 500 species during the 
lifetime of anyone reading this post.
-- 
Pete Janzen Wichita, KS pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net If I had to describe 
myself in one word, it would be "can't follow directions"

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Subject: Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 17 July 2014
From: Joyce Takamine <jabirujt AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 04:14:02 -0600
Compiler: Joyce Takamine
Date: July 17 2014
email: rba AT cfobirds.org

This is the Colorado Rare Bird Alert for Thursday, July 17 sponsored by
Denver Field Ornithologists and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.

Highlight species include: (* indicates new information on this species).

Chukar (Delta)
Red-necked Grebe (Jackson)
Lesser Black-backed Gull (Sedgwick)
ACORN WOODPECKER (Pueblo)
Black Phoebe (Boulder)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Baca, *Fremont)
Carolina Wren (*Prowers)
PACIFIC WREN (Ouray)
Black-throated Sparrow (*Pueblo)
Northern Cardinal (*Prowers)

BACA COUNTY:
--Janeal Thompson reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at a private
residence on July 2. She kindly provided her email address (
prairiestarflower AT gmail.com) so you can contact her and seek permission to
visit.  Leatherman reported that the Baca county Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
continues.  Contact Janeal Thompson to make arrangements to see the bird.

BOULDER COUNTY:
--On June 30 Starace noted that a Black Phoebe (with an Eastern Phoebe)
continued at the 75th St. crossing of Boulder Creek. A Black Phoebe has
been hanging out along the creek since the spring.  On July 12, Dowell
reported Black Phoebe at 75th St and Boulder Creek.

DELTA COUNTY:
--Chukars were reported by Garrison at Pleasure Park in Hotchkiss on July
14.  They seem to be hanging out
near the parking lot.

FREMONT COUNTY:
Miller reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on July 8 on CO 67, It was seen
flying alongside the highway. It was seen 0.75 miles north of the Custer
County line.  On July 13, Miller reported seeing the Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 14, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was
reported by Walbek, Percival and Schultz. On July 16, Drummond reported
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at 0730 but not at 1030.

JACKSON COUNTY:
--On July 11 Hundertmark reported that the pair of Red-necked Grebes
continues incubating egg(s) on Lake John.

OURAY COUNTY:
--A PACIFIC WREN was reported by Lovitch on the Bear Creek Tail in
Telluride on July 13 and refound by Dexter on July 14.  Directions:  The
location is .6 miles up Bear creek Trail from the birdge over San Miguel
River at S end of Pine St.  It appears to be nest building.

PROWERS COUNTY:
--On July 17, Moss reported hearing a Carolina Wren at the S end of Lamar
Community College Woods (LCCW)
and a pair of Northern Cardinals.

PUEBLO COUNTY:
--Knight reported 3 Black-throated Sparrows on July 5 near Pueblo West.
Percival reported them again on July 8. The sparrows were found by parking
at Liberty Point in Pueblo West at the end of Purcell Blvd. The rest
involves a hike that isn't for those who are out of shape. Take the trail
off to the right before the flag pole and memorial. Proceed to the bottom
of the cliff keeping to your right. You will pass a cement "well" just
before merging with a now unused dirt road which heads WNW to a distant
pass in the cliff. The first arroyo with slab rocks is where the sparrows
were.  On July 12, Lilly reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West
and on July 14, Joy reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West and an
easier walk from south end of South Greenbrier Drive.  South Greenbrier
Drive is reached b driving south on Purcell from Hwy 50 for about 2.5 miles
to East Linden Ave.  Turn
west on Linden, and then south on Greenbrier.  On July 16, Drummond
reported ad male and juvenile Black-throated Sparrows in Pueblo East area,
using easier hiking point of South Greenbrier Drive.
--An ACORN WOODPECKER family was reported by Percival at the dead Ponderosa
Tree in the parking lot at Horseshoe Lodge at Pueblo Mountain Park on July
10. On July 12, Bohannon reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain Park.

SEDGWICK COUNTY:
--A Lesser Black-backed Gull was reported by Kaempfer at Jumbo Reservoir on
July 12.

DFO Field Trips:
The DFO field trip for Saturday, July 19 will be to Rocky Mountain National
Park led by Ed Holub (303-979-2194).
Call if you plan to go.  Meet at Beaver Meadows Visitor Center at 0815 just
west of Estes Park.  Pay entrance fee or carpool and share the fee.  Full
day trip ending around 1500 to 1600, so bring lunch and water.  Dress for
changeable weather (hat, sunscreen, raingear).

The DFO field trip for Sunday, July 20 will be the Prospect Park in Wheat
Ridge led by Toni Rautus (303-422-7322).  Call leader by July 18 and leave
you name and phone number.  Meet at 0730 at Prospect Park for a half day
trip.
From I-70, exit 267, take Kipling south about 3/4 mile and turn right
(west) on 44th Ave.  Go one mile west.  Look for the entrance to Prospect
Park on your left (south).  Meet just inside the park in the lot right next
to Prospect Lake.  Will check the lake for waterfowl before birding the
paved and dirt paths along Clear Creek.  Bring water and snacks;  dress for
the weather.

Good Birding,
Joyce Takamine
 Boulder
303-554-9785

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Subject: Northern Cardinals, Carolina Wren(s) and Gray Catbird also in Lamar Woods,Lamar
From: "SeEttaM ." <seettam AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 00:31:43 -0600
In addition to the Yellow-billed Cuckoos in Lamar Woods today (Wed) I heard
at least one and likely more than one Carolina Wren singing in the south
end of the woods.  Also heard a Gray Catbird calling there.

Saw a pair of Northern Cardinals, the male carried food in it's bill that
seemed likely intended for young.  Likely heard at least one more Northern
Cardinal in the south end of the woods. I will get photos of the pair up
later on my blog.

SeEtta Moss
Canon City
http://BirdsAndNature.blogspot.com

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Subject: Yellow-billed Cuckoo family, Dickcissels, Chimney Swifts and Mississippi Kites in lower Arkansas Valley
From: "SeEttaM ." <seettam AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 21:18:02 -0600
This morning I found an adult Yellow-billed Cuckoo and observed it feed an
apparent fledgling cuckoo in Lamar Woods in Lamar.  Interestingly the
fledgling has  grayish upper and lower mandibles and I learned from Birds
of North American online that they do not get their black and yellow
mandibles until around 60 days of age.  I got some photos of the fledgling
cuckoo that I have uploaded to my Birds and Nature blog
  with more info on the birds.

Yesterday I saw at least 20 Mississippi Kites, many of them juveniles, in
Las Animas as well as at least 5 Chimney Swifts.  I refound more than one
(still can't tell how many) Dickcissels in the Ft Lyon area.  And last
night I saw at least 8 Chimney Swifts in Lamar plus found a chimney into
which 2 Chimney Swifts flew at dark.  I have uploaded some photos of those
Chimney Swifts on my blog also.

SeEtta Moss
Canon City
http://BirdsAndNature.blogspot.com

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Subject: Re: 500th species for the state
From: Gary Brower <garybrower AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 20:19:42 -0600
Bob, et al,

I agree that it would be a great moment in CO's ornithology. But what if the 
magical plateau is reached because of one or more splits? No notoriety for an 
observer, but major rejoicing among those of us who might otherwise benefit! 


Gary Brower
Englewood, CO

On Jul 16, 2014, at 7:39 PM, Bob Righter  wrote:

> Hi all
> 
> I like Brandon's post referring that Colorado's list is now at 498 species 
and wondering what will be the 500th species. 500 species for a state not 
bounded by ocean or national boundaries is quite remarkable. I haven't checked 
to see how many other states with similar boundary structures have over 500 
species, but there can't be that many. What should we do to celebrate that 
glorious event? At least the observer should get some degree of notoriety and 
the 500th species should be covered on some publication. Does any one else have 
any thoughts on what we should to flag the event? It could be a great moment in 
Colorado's ornithology. 

> 
> Bob Righter
> Denver, CO
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
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Subject: 500th species for the state
From: Bob Righter <rorighter AT earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 19:39:14 -0600
Hi all

I like Brandon's post referring that Colorado's list is now at 498 species and 
wondering what will be the 500th species. 500 species for a state not bounded 
by ocean or national boundaries is quite remarkable. I haven't checked to see 
how many other states with similar boundary structures have over 500 species, 
but there can't be that many. What should we do to celebrate that glorious 
event? At least the observer should get some degree of notoriety and the 500th 
species should be covered on some publication. Does any one else have any 
thoughts on what we should to flag the event? It could be a great moment in 
Colorado's ornithology. 


Bob Righter
Denver, CO

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Fremont and Pueblo Birding.
From: "'John D' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 17:56:40 -0400 (EDT)
CO birders :

 The Fremont County Scissor-tailed Flycatcher ( male ) was seen again this 
morning on the west side of Hwy 67 on the fence line about a mile north of the 
Custer County line at around 7:30 am in the mist. Not seen later around 10:30 
am on return to Florence . 


 The Black-throated Sparrows ( adult male and juvenile , so confirmed breeding 
) were seen around midday at the Pueblo West location previously described , 
access from the easier hiking in point of South Greenbrier Drive . 


John Drummond
Colorado Springs.  

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Subject: Dog Days, Seriously
From: "Robert A. Spencer" <bobolink AT indra.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 15:50:40 -0600
Hi Cobirders. Dog days does not come from heat suffering furry pets but rather 
Sirius,the brightest star in the sky, in the constellation Canis Major, 

Alpha star. Canis is Latin for Dog thus Sirius is the Dog Star. and it reaches 
its furthest north in the southern sky in August . It brightness was thought 

to add to August heat from Sol our sun. Of course the earth does not receive 
any heat from stars only light and guidance. OK I know Sol is a star. 

So I will wait to August to come up with a few birds that may come to Colorado 
make 500 not counting splits. 


 Keep watching and look for Sirius  if out late and it is clear.

Bob Spencer N.E. of Golden 

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Subject: Re: Boulder Rez night walk, Wed., Jul. 16
From: Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 11:45:00 -0700 (PDT)
Because several of you have asked...

Yes, the outing is still on for this evening, rain or (moon)shine.

Perhaps rain *and* moonshine. This is a Boulder Bird Club outing, after 
all. We know how to party.

'sides, Black Rails like singing in the rain.

Bring DEET and hip waders. See you tonight!

Ted Floyd

Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado


On Tuesday, July 15, 2014 3:43:10 AM UTC-6, Ted Floyd wrote:
>
> Hello, Birders.
>
> Please join the Boulder Bird club for a nighttime natural history 
> excursion tomorrow evening, Wednesday, July 16, at 8:30 p.m. We will depart 
> from the Eagle Trail East trailhead, west side of Boulder Reservoir, here:
>
> https://goo.gl/maps/GfypM
>
> Please consider carpooling.
>
> BRING INSECT REPELLENT! And not that namby-pamby all-natural Boulder 
> stuff. Only DEET (buy it in Westminster or Pueblo or somewhere) works on 
> the ferocious mosquitos in the west end of marshes of Boulder Rez.
>
> Our objective is to enjoy all aspects of the natural world at night: 
> dancing fireflies, twinkling stars and blazing meteors, frogs and toads, 
> divers insects, and birds. Speaking of birds, we will listen for rails, 
> coots, grebes, snipes, owls, nighthawks, herons, ducks, geese, swallows and 
> other passerines, and more. We'll probably see some birds, too. Here is a 
> recap, pp. 70-71, of last year's nighttime excursion to the Rez:
>
> http://cfobirds.org/downloads/journal/Birding_on_the_Dark_Side.pdf
>
> We'll be on foot the whole time, covering a few miles. I don't know how 
> long we'll be out, maybe till 10pm, maybe till midnight, maybe till dawn if 
> we're having a really good time out there. Nighttime natural history is 
> wonderfully unplanned and extemporaneous.
>
> Bring DEET. Bring a sense of wonder. No artificial lights, please. Young 
> people and curiosity-seekers are especially welcome. The outing, sponsored 
> by the Boulder Bird Club, is free and open to the public.
>
> See you tomorrow!
>
> Ted Floyd
>
> Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado
>
>
>
>
>  

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Subject: Great-tailed Grackle, Boulder Co.
From: Paula Hansley <redstart.paula AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 09:59:42 -0600
I just saw a G-t G on a telephone pole on hwy. 170 by the westernmost house in 
Superior. 


Paula Hansley
Louisville

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 16 July 2014
From: Joyce Takamine <jabirujt AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 04:06:22 -0600
Compiler: Joyce Takamine
Date: July 16, 2014
email: rba AT cfobirds.org

This is the Colorado Rare Bird Alert for Wedesday, July 65 sponsored by
Denver Field Ornithologists and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.

Highlight species include: (* indicates new information on this species).

Chukar (Delta)
Red-necked Grebe (Jackson)
Green Heron (Mesa)
Lesser Black-backed Gull (Sedgwick)
ACORN WOODPECKER (*Pueblo)
Black Phoebe (Boulder)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Baca, Fremont)
PACIFIC WREN (Ouray)
Black-throated Sparrow (Pueblo)

BACA COUNTY:
--Janeal Thompson reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at a private
residence on July 2. She kindly provided her email address (
prairiestarflower AT gmail.com) so you can contact her and seek permission to
visit.  Leatherman reported that the Baca county Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
continues.  Contact Janeal Thompson to make arrangements to see the bird.

BOULDER COUNTY:
--On June 30 Starace noted that a Black Phoebe (with an Eastern Phoebe)
continued at the 75th St. crossing of Boulder Creek. A Black Phoebe has
been hanging out along the creek since the spring.  On July 12, Dowell
reported Black Phoebe at 75th St and Boulder Creek.

DELTA COUNTY:
--Chukars were reported by Garrison at Pleasure Park in Hotchkiss on July
14.  They seem to be hanging out
near the parking lot.

FREMONT COUNTY:
Miller reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on July 8 on CO 67, It was seen
flying alongside the highway. It was seen 0.75 miles north of the Custer
County line.  On July 13, Miller reported seeing the Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 14, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was
reported by Walbek, Percival and Schultz.

JACKSON COUNTY:
--On July 11 Hundertmark reported that the pair of Red-necked Grebes
continues incubating egg(s) on Lake John.

MESA COUNTY:
--Kaempfer reported a Green Heron from James M. Robb Colorado River State
Park—Connected Lakes section on July 3.

OURAY COUNTY:
--A PACIFIC WREN was reported by Lovitch on the Bear Creek Tail in
Telluride on July 13 and refound by Dexter on July 14.  Directions:  The
location is .6 miles up Bear creek Trail from the birdge over San Miguel
River at S end of Pine St.  It appears to be nest building.

PUEBLO COUNTY:
--Knight reported 3 Black-throated Sparrows on July 5 near Pueblo West.
Percival reported them again on July 8. The sparrows were found by parking
at Liberty Point in Pueblo West at the end of Purcell Blvd. The rest
involves a hike that isn't for those who are out of shape. Take the trail
off to the right before the flag pole and memorial. Proceed to the bottom
of the cliff keeping to your right. You will pass a cement "well" just
before merging with a now unused dirt road which heads WNW to a distant
pass in the cliff. The first arroyo with slab rocks is where the sparrows
were.  On July 12, Lilly reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West
and on July 14, Joy reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West and an
easier walk from south end of South Greenbrier Drive.  South Greenbrier
Drive is reached b driving south on Purcell from Hwy 50 for about 2.5 miles
to East Linden Ave.  Turn
west on Linden, and then south on Greenbrier.
--An ACORN WOODPECKER family was reported by Percival at the dead Ponderosa
Tree in the parking lot at Horseshoe Lodge at Pueblo Mountain Park on July
10. On July 12, Bohannon reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain Park.

SEDGWICK COUNTY:
--A Lesser Black-backed Gull was reported by Kaempfer at Jumbo Reservoir on
July 12.

DFO Field Trips:
The DFO field trip for Saturday, July 19 will be to Rocky Mountain National
Park led by Ed Holub (303-979-2194).
Call if you plan to go.  Meet at Beaver Meadows Visitor Center at 0815 just
west of Estes Park.  Pay entrance fee or carpool and share the fee.  Full
day trip ending around 1500 to 1600, so bring lunch and water.  Dress for
changeable weather (hat, sunscreen, raingear).

The DFO field trip for Sunday, July 20 will be the Prospect Park in Wheat
Ridge led by Toni Rautus (303-422-7322).  Call leader by July 18 and leave
you name and phone number.  Meet at 0730 at Prospect Park for a half day
trip.
From I-70, exit 267, take Kipling south about 3/4 mile and turn right
(west) on 44th Ave.  Go one mile west.  Look for the entrance to Prospect
Park on your left (south).  Meet just inside the park in the lot right next
to Prospect Lake.  Will check the lake for waterfowl before birding the
paved and dirt paths along Clear Creek.  Bring water and snacks;  dress for
the weather.

Good Birding,
Joyce Takamine
Boulder
303-554-9785

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Subject: 4 Hummingbird Day--Lakewood-Green Mtn/Jeffco
From: markchavez AT comcast.net
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 04:32:43 +0000 (UTC)
This morning, in my backyard, I had all four male hummingbird species within an 
hour. Two Calliope were joined by a Rufous, and several Black-chinned and 
Broad-tailed Hummingbirds. This is always a fun time of the year when the 
colorful males are moving through! On Saturday, I went up to Mt. Evans and had 
great looks at White-tailed Ptarmigan and Brown-capped Rosy Finches. A walk 
around Echo Lake was extremely slow!! Did not get any Gray Jays, Nutcrackers, 
or Steller's Jays! Photos of the Ptarmigans, Rosy Finches, and Calliope can be 
seen below: 

 
http://jaeger29.smugmug.com/BIRDS/RARE-AND-UNCOMMON-2014/i-Z4Zh6xc
Mark ChavezLakewood-Green Mtnhttp://jaeger29.smugmug.com/

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Subject: RE: Colorado Wish List
From: William H Kaempfer <William.Kaempfer AT Colorado.EDU>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 21:47:30 -0600
Okay, I can't resist any longer. This invasion will come from the south and I'm 
expecting Black-capped Vireo (2nd vote) and Greater Pewee. 


Bill Kaempfer
Boulder

From: cobirds AT googlegroups.com [mailto:cobirds AT googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of 
John 

Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2014 6:17 PM
To: Cobirds
Subject: [cobirds] Colorado Wish List

My top two "realistic" candidates would be Rufous-capped Warbler and Siberian 
Accentor. 


John Vanderpoel
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Subject: A new bird for Greenlee Preserve, Boulder County, July 15
From: Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 19:44:34 -0700 (PDT)
Hello, Birders.

Ah. Mid-July. The most dynamic and exciting time of the year, in my opinion.

A nice bird for Andrew and me this rainy Tuesday afternoon, July 15, was a 
Dickcissel at Greenlee Preserve, Boulder County. It was a first for me at 
the site, and the 227th bird species I've eBirded there since Jan. 1, 2007.

The Dickcissel was just passing through, farting its way northward as it 
flew low across the preserve.

Otherwise, the usual summer birds: noisy Swainson's Hawks out of the nest, 
chippering Bushtits, forlorn-sounding Say's Phoebes, Blue Jays and 
Black-capped Chickadees, a hummingbird spuh, etc.

Oh, I tried this morning for early nocturnal migrants. Didn't hear any, but 
the night-singing Barn Swallows were going at it until about 3:15 a.m., and 
a single female Great Horned Owl sang during civil dawn.

Ted Floyd

Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado.

 

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Subject: Re: Two missing birds for CO.
From: Brandon <flammowl17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 17:46:29 -0700

If there are no AOU splits that pertain to Colorado this summer, then the 
Colorado State List is still at 498 species (with nothing new reported in the 
state this year, as far as I know). It will be interesting to see what the 
next two new bird species that are added to the official Colorado State List, 
maintained by the CBRC and the CFO. It would be exciting to get Colorado to 
500 species (hopefully real species, and not new AOU splits, though I guess 
we'll take whatever). Are there any AOU Splits for the the ABA Area being 
announced this summer? August is usually when that happens I think. 


Since I've seen all the tern species in Colorado so far, I'm hoping if Elegant 
Tern or Gull-billed Tern show up, I'm nearby to see them. Both seem more 
likely to show up, then Sooty Tern and Sandwich Tern, which already have!  



Brandon Percival
Pueblo West, CO 

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Subject: Re: Two missing birds for CO.
From: stevenelarson AT comcast.net
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 00:29:41 +0000 (UTC)
Hi All, 
I'll throw in my two birds worth, Tropical Kingbird and Chuck-will's-widow. 
Steve Larson 

----- Original Message -----

From: "DAVID A LEATHERMAN"  
To: garybrower AT comcast.net, "COBirds"  
Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2014 5:59:11 PM 
Subject: RE: [cobirds] Two missing birds for CO. 

Gary, 
The only thing I would add to what has already been said is that of the 
resident passerines, perhaps only crossbills are more "hidden pea trick" from 
year to year than corvids. I think the common denominator here is a heavy 
reliance on conifer seeds. Since most conifers only have a good-to-bumper cone 
crop every 3-5 years, these bird groups, which are both highly nomadic as a 
direct consequence of their diets, don't really care if they hang out in an 
eBird hotspot. Factors which affect the cone crop are mostly weather related 
and involve the amounts, timing, and extremes of things like moisture and 
temperature. This can make some of the target corvids hard to find in certain 
seasons and years, except, as noted, at modified habitats like campgrounds, 
picnic areas, pull-offs and other human creations where handouts/scraps can be 
expected. The latter has apparently and unfortunately become an important diet 
supplement for mountain corvids. 


Dave Leatherman 
Fort Collins (presently in Lamar gawking at the water puddled or rushing in odd 
places like everybody else) 


PS - I vote for Rufous-backed Robin and Wheatear. 


Subject: Re: [cobirds] Two missing birds for CO. 
From: garybrower AT comcast.net 
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 10:58:33 -0600 
To: cobirds AT googlegroups.com 

To all who provided thoughts about the CLNU and GRJA — thanks! 

The ranger speculated that the late snow-melt meant that picnickers weren’t 
able to “draw” the birds to the picnic areas. 


Thanks for the eBird data. I didn’t have access to that up in the mountains 
— and hadn’t checked it since I returned home. 


Gary Brower 
Englewood, CO 

On Jul 15, 2014, at 9:52 AM, Jim Nelson < kingfishers2 AT verizon.net > wrote: 




Prompted by Gary’s and Derek’s observations concerning Gray Jays and 
Clark’s Nutcrackers, I checked eBird for the Rocky Mountain National Park 
area for this year and past years. At least as far as reported observations in 
eBird, Clark’s Nutcrackers are being reported in and around RMNP this year in 
numbers comparable to past years, but Gray Jays aren’t being reported as much 
this year as in some past years. With more and more data, eBird is very useful 
for checking things like this. 

Jim Nelson 
Bethesda, Maryland 
From: Derek Hill 
Sent: Monday, July 14, 2014 11:30 PM 
To: cobirds AT googlegroups.com 
Subject: [cobirds] Re: Two missing birds for CO. 
To add to Gary's observation, I spent several days in the Fraser Valley, Grand 
Co. over the last month, and an afternoon tour through RMNP along Trail Ridge 
Rd., and throughout all the traveling, hiking, biking, and camping I was 
surprised at the lack of birds (and also no GRJA or CLNU in RMNP). Granted our 
drive through RMNP was pretty direct with no woodland hiking, and much of the 
time in Fraser Valley was spent with family and a wedding, but it was somewhat 
disappointing birdwise. Hardly needed to carry binocs for the lack of birds, 
and I wondered if it was the pine bark beetle damage. Though I have very little 
experience summer birding in the mountains and not sure if my perception of 
lack of birds is accurate for that locale/season. However with all the 
wildflowers, lepidoptera, other wildlife, and awesome scenery it took me a 
while to wonder where the birds were! 


Good birding, 
Derek Hill 
Fort Collins 

On Monday, July 14, 2014 8:03:34 PM UTC-6, Gary Brower wrote: 
All, A different take on this thread. I spent the weekend in RMNP, and saw no/zero/nada/zip Gray Jays or Clark’s Nutcrackers. I talked a volunteer at Lake Irene; she had noticed the same thing. And I spoke with a ranger at Kawuneeche Visitor Center who had the same report. Any thoughts? (The ranger suspected it was because the snow melted so late.) Gary Brower Englewood, CO PS By the way, I did see two WTPT’s (perhaps male and female, as they were in pretty close proximity to one another) at the Rock Cut on Trail Ridge Rd, and a female-on-the-nest Broad-tailed Hummer at Lily Lake. -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Colorado Birds" group. To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com . To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com . To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/5a686e93-f95b-4463-b18e-c9df4e2ab008%40googlegroups.com . For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout . -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Colorado Birds" group. To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com . To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com . To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/0BBA0B18BC2B42D29638248C546BA92A%40jimPC . For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout .
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Subject: Colorado Wish List
From: John <jvanderpoel AT peregrinevideo.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 18:17:26 -0600
My top two "realistic" candidates would be Rufous-capped Warbler and
Siberian Accentor.

 

John Vanderpoel

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Subject: RE: Two missing birds for CO.
From: DAVID A LEATHERMAN <daleatherman AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 17:59:11 -0600
Gary, 
The only thing I would add to what has already been said is that of the 
resident passerines, perhaps only crossbills are more "hidden pea trick" from 
year to year than corvids. I think the common denominator here is a heavy 
reliance on conifer seeds. Since most conifers only have a good-to-bumper cone 
crop every 3-5 years, these bird groups, which are both highly nomadic as a 
direct consequence of their diets, don't really care if they hang out in an 
eBird hotspot. Factors which affect the cone crop are mostly weather related 
and involve the amounts, timing, and extremes of things like moisture and 
temperature. This can make some of the target corvids hard to find in certain 
seasons and years, except, as noted, at modified habitats like campgrounds, 
picnic areas, pull-offs and other human creations where handouts/scraps can be 
expected. The latter has apparently and unfortunately become an important diet 
supplement for mountain corvids. 


Dave Leatherman
Fort Collins (presently in Lamar gawking at the water puddled or rushing in odd 
places like everybody else) 


PS - I vote for Rufous-backed Robin and Wheatear.

Subject: Re: [cobirds] Two missing birds for CO.
From: garybrower AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 10:58:33 -0600
To: cobirds AT googlegroups.com

To all who provided thoughts about the CLNU and GRJA -- thanks!
The ranger speculated that the late snow-melt meant that picnickers weren't 
able to "draw" the birds to the picnic areas. 

Thanks for the eBird data. I didn't have access to that up in the mountains -- 
and hadn't checked it since I returned home. 

Gary BrowerEnglewood, CO
On Jul 15, 2014, at 9:52 AM, Jim Nelson  wrote:



Prompted by Gary's and Derek's observations concerning Gray Jays and 
Clark's Nutcrackers, I checked eBird for the Rocky Mountain National Park area 
for this year and past years.  At least as far as reported observations in 
eBird, Clark's Nutcrackers are being reported in and around RMNP this year in 
numbers comparable to past years, but Gray Jays aren't being reported as much 
this year as in some past years.  With more and more data, eBird is very 
useful for checking things like this.
 
Jim Nelson
Bethesda, Maryland


 

From: Derek Hill 
Sent: Monday, July 14, 2014 11:30 PM
To: cobirds AT googlegroups.com 
Subject: [cobirds] Re: Two missing birds for CO.
 

To add to Gary's observation, I spent several days in the Fraser 
Valley, Grand Co. over the last month, and an afternoon tour through RMNP along 

Trail Ridge Rd., and throughout all the traveling, hiking, biking, and camping 
I 

was surprised at the lack of birds (and also no GRJA or CLNU in RMNP). Granted 
our drive through RMNP was pretty direct with no woodland hiking, and much of 
the time in Fraser Valley was spent with family and a wedding, but it was 
somewhat disappointing birdwise. Hardly needed to carry binocs for the lack of 
birds, and I wondered if it was the pine bark beetle damage. Though I have very 

little experience summer birding in the mountains and not sure if my perception 

of lack of birds is accurate for that locale/season. However with all the 
wildflowers, lepidoptera, other wildlife, and awesome scenery it took me a 
while 

to wonder where the birds were!

Good birding,
Derek Hill
Fort 
Collins

On Monday, July 14, 2014 8:03:34 PM UTC-6, Gary Brower wrote: 
All, 
  

A different take on this thread. 

I spent the weekend in RMNP, 
  and saw no/zero/nada/zip Gray Jays or Clark's Nutcrackers.  I talked a 
  volunteer at Lake Irene; she had noticed the same thing.  And I spoke 
  with a ranger at Kawuneeche Visitor Center who had the same 
  report.   

Any thoughts?  (The ranger suspected it was 
  because the snow melted so late.) 

Gary Brower 
Englewood, CO 
  

PS        By the way, I did see two 
 WTPT's (perhaps male and female, as they were in pretty close proximity to one 

  another) at the Rock Cut on Trail Ridge Rd, and a female-on-the-nest 
  Broad-tailed Hummer at Lily Lake.-- 
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Subject: Re: Timnath Reservoir @Lunch/Larimer
From: "'The \"Nunn Guy\"' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 15:11:28 -0700 (PDT)
Eared Grebe not Horned.  Good catch Nick and Christian!

Thanks Gary Lefko, Nunn

http://coloradobirder.ning.com/

Mobile:  http://coloradobirder.ning.com/m




On Tuesday, July 15, 2014 2:52:11 PM UTC-6, The "Nunn Guy" wrote:
>
> Total of 27 species ... there might be a walking trail on NW corner (Wild 
> Wings development) of marsh-area (east) I saw a woman and a stroller 
> walking on it.  Unsure if open to public didn't have time to go check out.
>
> Highlights:
>
>    - Osprey (I know there is a nest box due north on Hwy 14)
>    - Ruddy Duck - some
>    - Western Grebe - lots
>    - Say's Phoebe
>    - Horned Grebe - 8+
>    
> Rest:  Lack of ducks, Red-winged Blackbird, Brown-headed Cowbird, House 
> Finch, Cliff Swallow, Barn Swallow, House Sparrow, Mourning Dove, Western 
> Kingbird, Western Meadowlark, Common Grackle, Ring-billed Gull, American 
> White Pelican, Canada Goose, Double-crested Cormorant, House Wren, American 
> Goldfinchy, Common Yellowthroat, European Starling, Marsh Wren, American 
> Coot, Red-tailed Hawk, Eurasian-collared Dove
>
> Thanks Gary Lefko, Nunn
>
> http://coloradobirder.ning.com/
>
> Mobile:  http://coloradobirder.ning.com/m
>
>
>

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Subject: Re: Acorn Woodpeckers at Pueblo Mtn Park
From: bcbr1150rt AT hotmail.com
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 17:14:12 -0700 (PDT)
12 July 14
Colorado Springs
Brian Bohannon

  I went to Pueblo Mtn Park today to see the Cordilleran Flycatchers and 
Acorn Woodpeckers.  It was a great time and saw all of them plus Broad 
Tailed Hummingbirds, Stelallar's Jay, Western Bluebird, Violet-Green 
Swallow to name a few.  Unfortunately, the Cordilleran's nest appeared to 
be destroyed and at least one of their babies was on the ground.  The Jay 
was right there too--maybe it was his doing?  The parents were trying to 
watch over it and still feeding it.  Hated to see them in this 
situation.....

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Subject: Request for birding sites
From: jjedwards234 AT gmail.com
Date: Sun, 6 Jul 2014 12:54:24 -0700 (PDT)
Hello. I will be at Sands Dune National Park in a few days, a new area for me. 
I am especially interested in owls. Any specifics on owls and sites would be 
appreciated. Thank you for your cooperation. 

Julie Edwards
Cynthiana, KY

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Subject: Timnath Reservoir @Lunch/Larimer
From: "'The \"Nunn Guy\"' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 13:52:11 -0700 (PDT)
Total of 27 species ... there might be a walking trail on NW corner (Wild 
Wings development) of marsh-area (east) I saw a woman and a stroller 
walking on it.  Unsure if open to public didn't have time to go check out.

Highlights:

   - Osprey (I know there is a nest box due north on Hwy 14)
   - Ruddy Duck - some
   - Western Grebe - lots
   - Say's Phoebe
   - Horned Grebe - 8+
   
Rest:  Lack of ducks, Red-winged Blackbird, Brown-headed Cowbird, House 
Finch, Cliff Swallow, Barn Swallow, House Sparrow, Mourning Dove, Western 
Kingbird, Western Meadowlark, Common Grackle, Ring-billed Gull, American 
White Pelican, Canada Goose, Double-crested Cormorant, House Wren, American 
Goldfinchy, Common Yellowthroat, European Starling, Marsh Wren, American 
Coot, Red-tailed Hawk, Eurasian-collared Dove

Thanks Gary Lefko, Nunn

http://coloradobirder.ning.com/

Mobile:  http://coloradobirder.ning.com/m


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Subject: Re: Boulder Rez night walk, Wed., Jul. 16
From: Susan Hochgraf <sbhochgraf AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 11:19:11 -0700 (PDT)
Anybody coming via Boulder campus and can offer a ride? I'm in town for a week 
with no personal transportation. If so, leave me your contact info and we'll 
take it from there. 

Thanks so much!!
Sue from Connecticut

On Tuesday, July 15, 2014 5:43:10 AM UTC-4, Ted Floyd wrote:
> Hello, Birders.
> 
> Please join the Boulder Bird club for a nighttime natural history excursion 
tomorrow evening, Wednesday, July 16, at 8:30 p.m. We will depart from the 
Eagle Trail East trailhead, west side of Boulder Reservoir, here: 

> 
> 
> https://goo.gl/maps/GfypM
> 
> 
> Please consider carpooling.
> 
> 
> BRING INSECT REPELLENT! And not that namby-pamby all-natural Boulder stuff. 
Only DEET (buy it in Westminster or Pueblo or somewhere) works on the ferocious 
mosquitos in the west end of marshes of Boulder Rez. 

> 
> 
> Our objective is to enjoy all aspects of the natural world at night: dancing 
fireflies, twinkling stars and blazing meteors, frogs and toads, divers 
insects, and birds. Speaking of birds, we will listen for rails, coots, grebes, 
snipes, owls, nighthawks, herons, ducks, geese, swallows and other passerines, 
and more. We'll probably see some birds, too. Here is a recap, pp. 70-71, of 
last year's nighttime excursion to the Rez: 

> 
> 
> http://cfobirds.org/downloads/journal/Birding_on_the_Dark_Side.pdf
> 
> 
> We'll be on foot the whole time, covering a few miles. I don't know how long 
we'll be out, maybe till 10pm, maybe till midnight, maybe till dawn if we're 
having a really good time out there. Nighttime natural history is wonderfully 
unplanned and extemporaneous. 

> 
> 
> Bring DEET. Bring a sense of wonder. No artificial lights, please. Young 
people and curiosity-seekers are especially welcome. The outing, sponsored by 
the Boulder Bird Club, is free and open to the public. 

> 
> 
> See you tomorrow!
> 
> 
> Ted Floyd
> 
> 
> Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado

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Subject: Re: Two Possible birds for CO.
From: JBreitsch - Denver <jbreitsch AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 11:20:44 -0700 (PDT)
I am still missing more than 100 of the species already on the Colorado 
list.  I'd be perfectly happy with the return of a Sharp-tailed Sandpiper 
(CFO Convention bird?), Ivory Gull, Magnificent Frigatebird, Tropical 
Parula, White Ibis.........


John Breitsch
Denver, Colorado
https://www.flickr.com/photos/breitschbirding/

On Monday, July 14, 2014 7:51:59 PM UTC-6, smart wrote:
>
> Am jumping in with mind guess.
>  
> Heermann's Gull
> Red-necked Stint
>  
>  
> Tim Smart
> Broomfield, CO
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________
> *Odd Carb-Hormone Trick*
> 1 EASY tip to increase fat-burning, lower blood sugar & decrease fat 
> storage
> 
> info.fixyourbloodsugar.com 
> 

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Subject: RE: Re: Two possible birds for CO
From: Dave Hyde <pink-beam AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 12:05:16 -0500
I had a dream I saw a Wandering albatross over Ward!Dave Hyde/Longmont, CO

Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 04:16:38 -0700
From: tedfloyd57 AT hotmail.com
To: cobirds AT googlegroups.com
CC: twilberding AT comcast.net; juncos AT comcast.net
Subject: Re: [cobirds] Re: Two possible birds for CO

Thanks to Bob Righter for this fun parlor game. My offerings:
* a new species of White-breasted Nuthatch and a new species of Warbling 
Vireo... ;-) 

Here, by the way, is a certain perspective on the "Dog Days" (which, 
officially, don't get under way in Colorado for another month): 

http://blog.aba.org/2012/07/most-wonderful.html

Ted Floyd
Lafayette, Boulder County Colorado

 






I am completely with these potential new 
Colorado Birds... let's add Little Stint, Crissal Thrasher and Black-capped 
Vireo!
 
Glenn Walbek
Castle Rock, CO





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Subject: Re: Two missing birds for CO.
From: Gary Brower <garybrower AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 10:58:33 -0600
To all who provided thoughts about the CLNU and GRJA -- thanks!

The ranger speculated that the late snow-melt meant that picnickers weren't 
able to "draw" the birds to the picnic areas. 


Thanks for the eBird data. I didn't have access to that up in the mountains -- 
and hadn't checked it since I returned home. 


Gary Brower
Englewood, CO

On Jul 15, 2014, at 9:52 AM, Jim Nelson  wrote:

> Prompted by Gary's and Derek's observations concerning Gray Jays and Clark's 
Nutcrackers, I checked eBird for the Rocky Mountain National Park area for this 
year and past years. At least as far as reported observations in eBird, Clark's 
Nutcrackers are being reported in and around RMNP this year in numbers 
comparable to past years, but Gray Jays aren't being reported as much this year 
as in some past years. With more and more data, eBird is very useful for 
checking things like this. 

>  
> Jim Nelson
> Bethesda, Maryland
>  
> From: Derek Hill
> Sent: Monday, July 14, 2014 11:30 PM
> To: cobirds AT googlegroups.com
> Subject: [cobirds] Re: Two missing birds for CO.
>  
> To add to Gary's observation, I spent several days in the Fraser Valley, 
Grand Co. over the last month, and an afternoon tour through RMNP along Trail 
Ridge Rd., and throughout all the traveling, hiking, biking, and camping I was 
surprised at the lack of birds (and also no GRJA or CLNU in RMNP). Granted our 
drive through RMNP was pretty direct with no woodland hiking, and much of the 
time in Fraser Valley was spent with family and a wedding, but it was somewhat 
disappointing birdwise. Hardly needed to carry binocs for the lack of birds, 
and I wondered if it was the pine bark beetle damage. Though I have very little 
experience summer birding in the mountains and not sure if my perception of 
lack of birds is accurate for that locale/season. However with all the 
wildflowers, lepidoptera, other wildlife, and awesome scenery it took me a 
while to wonder where the birds were! 

> 
> Good birding,
> Derek Hill
> Fort Collins
> 
> On Monday, July 14, 2014 8:03:34 PM UTC-6, Gary Brower wrote:
> All, 
> 
> A different take on this thread. 
> 
> I spent the weekend in RMNP, and saw no/zero/nada/zip Gray Jays or Clark's 
Nutcrackers. I talked a volunteer at Lake Irene; she had noticed the same 
thing. And I spoke with a ranger at Kawuneeche Visitor Center who had the same 
report. 

> 
> Any thoughts? (The ranger suspected it was because the snow melted so late.) 

> 
> Gary Brower 
> Englewood, CO 
> 
> PS By the way, I did see two WTPT's (perhaps male and female, as they were in 
pretty close proximity to one another) at the Rock Cut on Trail Ridge Rd, and a 
female-on-the-nest Broad-tailed Hummer at Lily Lake. 

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Subject: Re: Re: Two missing birds for CO.
From: "Jim Nelson" <kingfishers2 AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 11:52:57 -0400
Prompted by Gary’s and Derek’s observations concerning Gray Jays and 
Clark’s Nutcrackers, I checked eBird for the Rocky Mountain National Park 
area for this year and past years. At least as far as reported observations in 
eBird, Clark’s Nutcrackers are being reported in and around RMNP this year in 
numbers comparable to past years, but Gray Jays aren’t being reported as much 
this year as in some past years. With more and more data, eBird is very useful 
for checking things like this. 


Jim Nelson
Bethesda, Maryland

From: Derek Hill 
Sent: Monday, July 14, 2014 11:30 PM
To: cobirds AT googlegroups.com 
Subject: [cobirds] Re: Two missing birds for CO.

To add to Gary's observation, I spent several days in the Fraser Valley, Grand 
Co. over the last month, and an afternoon tour through RMNP along Trail Ridge 
Rd., and throughout all the traveling, hiking, biking, and camping I was 
surprised at the lack of birds (and also no GRJA or CLNU in RMNP). Granted our 
drive through RMNP was pretty direct with no woodland hiking, and much of the 
time in Fraser Valley was spent with family and a wedding, but it was somewhat 
disappointing birdwise. Hardly needed to carry binocs for the lack of birds, 
and I wondered if it was the pine bark beetle damage. Though I have very little 
experience summer birding in the mountains and not sure if my perception of 
lack of birds is accurate for that locale/season. However with all the 
wildflowers, lepidoptera, other wildlife, and awesome scenery it took me a 
while to wonder where the birds were! 


Good birding,
Derek Hill
Fort Collins

On Monday, July 14, 2014 8:03:34 PM UTC-6, Gary Brower wrote: 
  All, 

  A different take on this thread. 

 I spent the weekend in RMNP, and saw no/zero/nada/zip Gray Jays or Clark’s 
Nutcrackers. I talked a volunteer at Lake Irene; she had noticed the same 
thing. And I spoke with a ranger at Kawuneeche Visitor Center who had the same 
report. 


 Any thoughts? (The ranger suspected it was because the snow melted so late.) 


  Gary Brower 
  Englewood, CO 

 PS By the way, I did see two WTPT’s (perhaps male and female, as they were 
in pretty close proximity to one another) at the Rock Cut on Trail Ridge Rd, 
and a female-on-the-nest Broad-tailed Hummer at Lily Lake. 

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Subject: Re: Re: Two possible birds for CO
From: Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 04:16:38 -0700 (PDT)
Thanks to Bob Righter for this fun parlor game. My offerings:

* a new species of White-breasted Nuthatch and a new species of Warbling 
Vireo... ;-)

Here, by the way, is a certain perspective on the "Dog Days" (which, 
officially, don't get under way in Colorado for another month):

http://blog.aba.org/2012/07/most-wonderful.html

Ted Floyd

Lafayette, Boulder County Colorado


 

>  
> I am completely with these potential new Colorado Birds... let's add 
> Little Stint, Crissal Thrasher and Black-capped Vireo!
>  
> Glenn Walbek
> Castle Rock, CO
>

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Subject: Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 15 July 2014
From: Joyce Takamine <jabirujt AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 04:45:28 -0600
Compiler: Joyce Takamine
Date: July 15, 2014
email: rba AT cfobirds.org

This is the Colorado Rare Bird Alert for Tuesday, July 15 sponsored by
Denver Field Ornithologists and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.

Highlight species include: (* indicates new information on this species).

Chukar (*Delta)
Red-necked Grebe (Jackson)
Green Heron (Mesa)
Lesser Black-backed Gull (Sedgwick)
ACORN WOODPECKER (*Pueblo)
Black Phoebe (Boulder)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (*Baca, *Fremont)
PACIFIC WREN (*Ouray)
Black-throated Sparrow (*Pueblo)

BACA COUNTY:
--Janeal Thompson reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at a private
residence on July 2. She kindly provided her email address (
prairiestarflower AT gmail.com) so you can contact her and seek permission to
visit.  Leatherman reported that the Baca county Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
continues.  Contact Janeal Thompson to make arrangements to see the bird.

BOULDER COUNTY:
--On June 30 Starace noted that a Black Phoebe (with an Eastern Phoebe)
continued at the 75th St. crossing of Boulder Creek. A Black Phoebe has
been hanging out along the creek since the spring.  On July 12, Dowell
reported Black Phoebe at 75th St and Boulder Creek.

DELTA COUNTY:
--Chukars were reported by Garrison at Pleasure Park in Hotchkiss on July
14.  They seem to be hanging out
near the parking lot.

FREMONT COUNTY:
Miller reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on July 8 on CO 67, It was seen
flying alongside the highway. It was seen 0.75 miles north of the Custer
County line.  On July 13, Miller reported seeing the Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 14, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was
reported by Walbek, Percival and Schultz.

JACKSON COUNTY:
--On July 11 Hundertmark reported that the pair of Red-necked Grebes
continues incubating egg(s) on Lake John.

MESA COUNTY:
--Kaempfer reported a Green Heron from James M. Robb Colorado River State
Park—Connected Lakes section on July 3.

OURAY COUNTY:
--A PACIFIC WREN was reported by Lovitch on the Bear Creek Tail in
Telluride on July 13 and refound by Dexter on July 14.  Directions:  The
location is .6 miles up Bear creek Trail from the birdge over San Miguel
River at S end of Pine St.  It appears to be nest building.

PUEBLO COUNTY:
--Knight reported 3 Black-throated Sparrows on July 5 near Pueblo West.
Percival reported them again on July 8. The sparrows were found by parking
at Liberty Point in Pueblo West at the end of Purcell Blvd. The rest
involves a hike that isn't for those who are out of shape. Take the trail
off to the right before the flag pole and memorial. Proceed to the bottom
of the cliff keeping to your right. You will pass a cement "well" just
before merging with a now unused dirt road which heads WNW to a distant
pass in the cliff. The first arroyo with slab rocks is where the sparrows
were.  On July 12, Lilly reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West
and on July 14, Joy reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West and an
easier walk from south end of South Greenbrier Drive.  South Greenbrier
Drive is reached b driving south on Purcell from Hwy 50 for about 2.5 miles
to East Linden Ave.  Turn
west on Linden, and then south on Greenbrier.
--An ACORN WOODPECKER family was reported by Percival at the dead Ponderosa
Tree in the parking lot at Horseshoe Lodge at Pueblo Mountain Park on July
10.

SEDGWICK COUNTY:
--A Lesser Black-backed Gull was reported by Kaempfer at Jumbo Reservoir on
July 12.

DFO Field Trips:
The DFO field trip for Saturday, July 19 will be to Rocky Mountain National
Park led by Ed Holub (303-979-2194).
Call if you plan to go.  Meet at Beaver Meadows Visitor Center at 0815 just
west of Estes Park.  Pay entrance fee or carpool and share the fee.  Full
day trip ending around 1500 to 1600, so bring lunch and water.  Dress for
changeable weather (hat, sunscreen, raingear).

The DFO field trip for Sunday, July 20 will be the Prospect Park in Wheat
Ridge led by Toni Rautus (303-422-7322).  Call leader by July 18 and leave
you name and phone number.  Meet at 0730 at Prospect Park for a half day
trip.
From I-70, exit 267, take Kipling south about 3/4 mile and turn right
(west) on 44th Ave.  Go one mile west.  Look for the entrance to Prospect
Park on your left (south).  Meet just inside the park in the lot right next
to Prospect Lake.  Will check the lake for waterfowl before birding the
paved and dirt paths along Clear Creek.  Bring water and snacks;  dress for
the weather.

Good Birding,
Joyce Takamine
Boulder
303-554-9785

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Subject: Boulder Rez night walk, Wed., Jul. 16
From: Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 02:43:07 -0700
Hello, Birders.
Please join the Boulder Bird club for a nighttime natural history excursion 
tomorrow evening, Wednesday, July 16, at 8:30 p.m. We will depart from the 
Eagle Trail East trailhead, west side of Boulder Reservoir, here: 

https://goo.gl/maps/GfypM
Please consider carpooling.
BRING INSECT REPELLENT! And not that namby-pamby all-natural Boulder stuff. 
Only DEET (buy it in Westminster or Pueblo or somewhere) works on the ferocious 
mosquitos in the west end of marshes of Boulder Rez. 

Our objective is to enjoy all aspects of the natural world at night: dancing 
fireflies, twinkling stars and blazing meteors, frogs and toads, divers 
insects, and birds. Speaking of birds, we will listen for rails, coots, grebes, 
snipes, owls, nighthawks, herons, ducks, geese, swallows and other passerines, 
and more. We'll probably see some birds, too. Here is a recap, pp. 70-71, of 
last year's nighttime excursion to the Rez: 

http://cfobirds.org/downloads/journal/Birding_on_the_Dark_Side.pdf
We'll be on foot the whole time, covering a few miles. I don't know how long 
we'll be out, maybe till 10pm, maybe till midnight, maybe till dawn if we're 
having a really good time out there. Nighttime natural history is wonderfully 
unplanned and extemporaneous. 

Bring DEET. Bring a sense of wonder. No artificial lights, please. Young people 
and curiosity-seekers are especially welcome. The outing, sponsored by the 
Boulder Bird Club, is free and open to the public. 

See you tomorrow!
Ted Floyd
Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado



 		 	   		  

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Subject: Re: Two missing birds for CO.
From: Tom Wilberding <twilberding AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 21:11:47 -0700 (PDT)
Gary,
I went birding at Brainard & Long Lakes Saturday in the Indian Peaks 
Wilderness with David Dowell's group (excellent trip!), and we had no 
trouble finding Gray Jays and Clark's Nutcrackers despite (because?) lots 
of people on the trails. Brainard Lake is not far south of Rocky, but maybe 
a bit lower. The Ruby-crowned Kinglets were having a fit, plenty of red 
crests showing, chasing the much bigger Gray Jays. Why? My guess is that 
the Gray Jays were busy trying to eat the kinglets' eggs and hatchlings. 
I saw very little beetle kill there, everything healthy and lush. Maybe 
that means more seed crop for the Nutcrackers, compared to Rocky.
We found three or more Three-toed Woodpeckers, one confiding one perched 
right near the asphalt road north side of the Brainard lake. They seemed to 
like the snags and insects at Brainard & Long Lakes, but no fire damage 
visible. 
Side note: four male moose with big racks lounging in the willows southwest 
corner of Brainard.

Tom Wilberding
Boulder, CO


On Monday, July 14, 2014 8:03:34 PM UTC-6, Gary Brower wrote:
>
> All, 
>
> A different take on this thread. 
>
> I spent the weekend in RMNP, and saw no/zero/nada/zip Gray Jays or Clark’s 
> Nutcrackers.  I talked a volunteer at Lake Irene; she had noticed the same 
> thing.  And I spoke with a ranger at Kawuneeche Visitor Center who had the 
> same report.   
>
> Any thoughts?  (The ranger suspected it was because the snow melted so 
> late.) 
>
> Gary Brower 
> Englewood, CO 
>
> PS        By the way, I did see two WTPT’s (perhaps male and female, as 
> they were in pretty close proximity to one another) at the Rock Cut on 
> Trail Ridge Rd, and a female-on-the-nest Broad-tailed Hummer at Lily Lake.

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Subject: Re: Two missing birds for CO.
From: Derek Hill <derekthehill AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 20:30:27 -0700 (PDT)
To add to Gary's observation, I spent several days in the Fraser Valley, 
Grand Co. over the last month, and an afternoon tour through RMNP along 
Trail Ridge Rd., and throughout all the traveling, hiking, biking, and 
camping I was surprised at the lack of birds (and also no GRJA or CLNU in 
RMNP). Granted our drive through RMNP was pretty direct with no woodland 
hiking, and much of the time in Fraser Valley was spent with family and a 
wedding, but it was somewhat disappointing birdwise. Hardly needed to carry 
binocs for the lack of birds, and I wondered if it was the pine bark beetle 
damage. Though I have very little experience summer birding in the 
mountains and not sure if my perception of lack of birds is accurate for 
that locale/season. However with all the wildflowers, lepidoptera, other 
wildlife, and awesome scenery it took me a while to wonder where the birds 
were!

Good birding,
Derek Hill
Fort Collins

On Monday, July 14, 2014 8:03:34 PM UTC-6, Gary Brower wrote:
>
> All, 
>
> A different take on this thread. 
>
> I spent the weekend in RMNP, and saw no/zero/nada/zip Gray Jays or Clark’s 
> Nutcrackers.  I talked a volunteer at Lake Irene; she had noticed the same 
> thing.  And I spoke with a ranger at Kawuneeche Visitor Center who had the 
> same report.   
>
> Any thoughts?  (The ranger suspected it was because the snow melted so 
> late.) 
>
> Gary Brower 
> Englewood, CO 
>
> PS        By the way, I did see two WTPT’s (perhaps male and female, as 
> they were in pretty close proximity to one another) at the Rock Cut on 
> Trail Ridge Rd, and a female-on-the-nest Broad-tailed Hummer at Lily Lake.

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Subject: Black Rock Wren, Larimer
From: Derek Hill <derekthehill AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 20:08:48 -0700 (PDT)
COBirds,

Late response here, but per D. Wade's observation of an odd wren at Bobcat 
Ridge --- On 11 June 2014 I had a similar observation.   This was my first 
walk at Bobcat Ridge Natural Area (Larimer Co.), and was quite happy to 
discover this huge, birdy, varied terrain so close to home. Walked the 
trail alone for about 3 hours after meeting Karl, a City Parks Dept. guy 
who was very friendly and found a fresh "Birds of Bobcat Ridge" bird 
checklist for me, and Norm, a friendly Ranger who was fond of photography 
so we compared cameras and talked for a few minutes.

After taking the loop trail and walking back into the parking lot I was 
greeted by a Rock Wren hopping between the cars. Glad I put binocs on it 
because it was an odd, black-bellied bird unlike any ROWR I've seen.  It 
turned out to have a visible brood patch surrounded by extensive black 
plumage. I haven't personally banded birds, but I take it the black plumage 
has something to do with brooding females?  Guess I've never noticed it in 
field observations.  Or is this truly an abnormal ROWR? I don't know.

Posted a few mediocre shots of this bird - quite possibly the same bird D. 
Wade saw - on flickr here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/26102738 AT N07/

It was a fantastic day to be out, the birds were plentiful and vocal, with 
loads of Broad-tailed Hummers, good flycatcher diversity, Plumbeous and 
Warbling Vireos, loads of House Wrens, a few Gnatcatchers and 
Yellow-breasted Chats, Vesper and Lark Sparrows, Blue Grosbeak, loads of 
Bullock's Orioles, a pair of Brewer's Blackbirds carrying food, Lesser 
Goldfinch, and a few Red Crossbills eating small grubs from fresh Ponderosa 
growth and feeding each other!

Interested to hear some input on black bellied brooding birds.

Good birding,
Derek Hill
Fort Collins

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Subject: Two missing birds for CO.
From: Gary Brower <garybrower AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 20:03:30 -0600
All,

A different take on this thread.

I spent the weekend in RMNP, and saw no/zero/nada/zip Gray Jays or Clark's 
Nutcrackers. I talked a volunteer at Lake Irene; she had noticed the same 
thing. And I spoke with a ranger at Kawuneeche Visitor Center who had the same 
report. 


Any thoughts?  (The ranger suspected it was because the snow melted so late.)

Gary Brower
Englewood, CO

PS By the way, I did see two WTPT's (perhaps male and female, as they were in 
pretty close proximity to one another) at the Rock Cut on Trail Ridge Rd, and a 
female-on-the-nest Broad-tailed Hummer at Lily Lake. 


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Subject: Two Possible birds for CO.
From: "smrr AT juno.com" <smrr@juno.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 01:50:20 GMT
Am jumping in with mind guess. Heermann's GullRed-necked Stint Tim 
SmartBroomfield, CO 

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Subject: Re: Re: Two possible birds for CO
From: "Glenn and Laurie" <juncos AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 19:15:44 -0600
I am completely with these potential new Colorado Birds... let's add Little 
Stint, Crissal Thrasher and Black-capped Vireo! 


Glenn Walbek
Castle Rock, CO
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Tom Wilberding 
  To: cobirds AT googlegroups.com 
  Sent: Monday, July 14, 2014 5:49 PM
  Subject: [cobirds] Re: Two possible birds for CO


 Good ones! I'm dreaming about White-tailed Kite for Colorado. Per eBird, seen 
in Lincoln County, Nebraska, 7/1/2008, and in Las Vegas, New Mexico, 4/15/2010. 

  What else for drooling?


  Tom Wilberding
  Boulder, CO


  On Monday, July 14, 2014 4:43:23 PM UTC-6, Bob Righter wrote:
    Hi all 

 Because we are in the "Dog Days" of summer gives us an opportunity to dream 
about rare birds we could see in Colorado during this fall migration. 


 The recent "Western Birds" has fanned the flames for potential new birds for 
Colorado. Here are just two possibilities to drool about. 


 The Purple Sandpiper has now been documented in Utah, November, 2012, Iowa, 
Oklahoma, Calgary, Alberta 

 The Topical Kingbird has now been documented in Provo, Utah, September, 2012 


    Bob Righter 
    Denver CO 

    Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Re: Two possible birds for CO
From: Tom Wilberding <twilberding AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 16:49:53 -0700 (PDT)
Good ones! I'm dreaming about White-tailed Kite for Colorado. Per eBird, 
seen in Lincoln County, Nebraska, 7/1/2008, and in Las Vegas, New Mexico, 
4/15/2010.
What else for drooling?

Tom Wilberding
Boulder, CO


On Monday, July 14, 2014 4:43:23 PM UTC-6, Bob Righter wrote:
>
> Hi all 
>
> Because we are in the "Dog Days" of summer gives us an opportunity to 
> dream about rare birds we could see in Colorado during this fall migration. 
>
> The recent "Western Birds"  has fanned the flames for potential new birds 
> for Colorado. Here are just two possibilities to drool about. 
>
> The Purple Sandpiper has now been documented in Utah, November, 2012, 
> Iowa, Oklahoma, Calgary, Alberta 
> The Topical Kingbird has now been documented in Provo, Utah, September, 
> 2012 
>
> Bob Righter 
> Denver CO 
>
> Sent from my iPad

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