Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
The Colorado Birding List

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Wednesday, July 30 at 05:00 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Prairie Warbler,©Barry Kent Mackay

30 Jul Re: Bird Song ID Gadget ["The \"Nunn Guy\"" ]
30 Jul RE: Re: Boulder County, July 30 [DAVID A LEATHERMAN ]
30 Jul Re: Boulder County, July 30 [David Dowell ]
30 Jul Bird Song ID Gadget [Robert Righter ]
30 Jul Boulder County, July 30 [Scott Baron ]
30 Jul Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 30 July 2014 [Joyce Takamine ]
29 Jul Re: Burrowing Owls ["Karl Stecher Jr." ]
29 Jul Hummingbird behavior question ["Ira Sanders" ]
29 Jul Cheraw RT Hummungbird ["'Steven Mlodinow' via Colorado Birds" ]
29 Jul New Duck! Longmont [Dave Hyde ]
29 Jul Juv Broad-winged Hawk fly-by in Florence area yesterday ["SeEttaM ." ]
29 Jul Caspian Tern - St. Vrain SP - Weld County (7/29) ["'Chris Knight' via Colorado Birds" ]
29 Jul Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ? Or 505? ["'Hugh Kingery' via Colorado Birds" ]
29 Jul Burrowing Owls [Maureen Briggs ]
29 Jul Re: Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ? ["'Alludon' via Colorado Birds" ]
29 Jul Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 29 July 2014 [Joyce Takamine ]
28 Jul American Three-toed Woodpecker, Brainard L. Rec. Area, Boulder County [Gary Baxley ]
28 Jul Wrong meeting address for Hummingbird trip and potluck [Pam Piombino ]
28 Jul Hummers, Colo Spgs [Steve Brown ]
28 Jul Hummingbirds and Pot Luck field trip [Pam Piombino ]
28 Jul RE: Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ? ["Ira Sanders" ]
28 Jul Green Heron/Boulder ["The \"Nunn Guy\"" ]
28 Jul Don't be disappointed: Tickets to Boulder Audubon's 40th selling fast [Pam Piombino ]
28 Jul GoPro Cameras for Birding? ["The \"Nunn Guy\"" ]
28 Jul Sage Thrashers/North Weld County ["The \"Nunn Guy\"" ]
28 Jul Re: Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ? ["The \"Nunn Guy\"" ]
28 Jul Re: Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ? ["'Mark Obmascik' via Colorado Birds" ]
28 Jul Southeast CO lakes, July 27 [David Dowell ]
28 Jul Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 28 July 2014 [Joyce Takamine ]
27 Jul Scissor-tailed Flycatchers nesting south of Florence: the female foraging ["SeEttaM ." ]
27 Jul Save 16,000 cormorants ["Ira Sanders" ]
27 Jul RE: Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ? ["Ira Sanders" ]
27 Jul RE: Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ? [drchartier ]
27 Jul Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ? [Chuck ]
27 Jul Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ? []
27 Jul 499 & 500 [or 503] ? ["'Hugh Kingery' via Colorado Birds" ]
27 Jul Re: Confirmed nesting of SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER pair south of Florence ["Karl Stecher Jr." ]
27 Jul Re: Re: Confirmed nesting of SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER pair south of Florence ["Mel Goff" ]
27 Jul Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 27 July 2014 [Joyce Takamine ]
26 Jul Re: Re: Summer Migration, Wednesday, July 23 [Paul Hurtado ]
26 Jul RE: Re: Confirmed nesting of SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER pair south of Florence [William H Kaempfer ]
26 Jul Brown Thrasher - Barr Lake - Adams Co ["Ira Sanders" ]
26 Jul Fall Migration ["'Steven Mlodinow' via Colorado Birds" ]
26 Jul Sounds like.... ["'Steven Mlodinow' via Colorado Birds" ]
26 Jul Re: Confirmed nesting of SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER pair south of Florence [Deb Evers ]
26 Jul Re: Summer Migration, Wednesday, July 23 [Ted Floyd ]
26 Jul Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 26 July 2014 [Joyce Takamine ]
25 Jul Confirmed nesting of SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER pair south of Florence ["SeEttaM ." ]
25 Jul Gregory Canyon, Boulder County 7/25/14 [Eric DeFonso ]
25 Jul Re: Boulder County mountain birding [Richard Pautsch ]
25 Jul Re: Summer Migration, Wednesday, July 23 ["The \"Nunn Guy\"" ]
25 Jul Northern Cardinal, Louisville -- comments [Paula Hansley ]
25 Jul Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 25 July 2014 [Joyce Takamine ]
25 Jul RE: Northern Cardinal, Louisville, Boulder County ["Steve Stachowiak & Melody Egge" ]
24 Jul Park County July 21 [David Suddjian ]
24 Jul Boulder County mountain birding [William H Kaempfer ]
24 Jul Some recent birds Jefferson and Douglas Counties [David Suddjian ]
24 Jul Re: Northern Cardinal, Louisville, Boulder County [Cheri Phillips ]
24 Jul Summer Migration, Wednesday, July 23 [Ted Floyd ]
24 Jul Northern Cardinal, Louisville, Boulder County [Paula Hansley ]
24 Jul Southeast Colorado drought [Tom Wilberding ]
24 Jul Sage Thrashers, Boulder Valley Ranch, Boulder County [Russ Thompson ]
24 Jul Band-tailed pigeon feldglings - Teller Co ["Jeff J Jones" ]
24 Jul ABA's "Thank You, Colorado!" Open House, Sat., Aug. 9th ["Mel Goff" ]
24 Jul Re: Sage Thrasher, Adams Co [Regina King ]
24 Jul Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 24 July 2014 [Joyce Takamine ]
24 Jul The female Scissor-tailed Flycatcher tonight south of Florence ["SeEttaM ." ]
23 Jul Sage thrashers, Boulder, Boulder Co [Richard Pautsch ]
23 Jul Sage Thrasher, Adams Co [Adam Green ]
23 Jul Sparrow ID? Jackson County [brucecyg via Colorado Birds ]
23 Jul Re: Carolina White-breasted Nuthatch [Bob Righter ]
23 Jul El Paso county -- 4 Lesser Black-backed Gulls 7/22/14 ["'Mark Peterson' via Colorado Birds" ]
23 Jul ABA's "Thank You, Colorado!" Open House, Sat., Aug. 9th [Ted Floyd ]
23 Jul Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 23 July 2014 [Joyce Takamine ]
22 Jul How many nuthatch species in Colorado? [Ted Floyd ]
22 Jul Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Fremont) - yes ["Bill Maynard" ]

Subject: Re: Bird Song ID Gadget
From: "The \"Nunn Guy\"" <colorado.birder AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 14:34:39 -0700 (PDT)
Can't wait for this technology to materialize!  :-)   I recall probably 
five years ago some field researchers outfit having a field unit that did 
just that--lost track of who they are.

Thanks Gary Lefko, Nunn
http://coloradobirder.ning.com/
Mobile:  http://coloradobirder.ning.com/m


On Wednesday, July 30, 2014 2:25:41 PM UTC-6, Robert Righter wrote:
>
> Hi 
>
> It seems I’m frequently being asked if I know of a gadget that could be 
> pointed at a singing bird that would ID the songster. 
>
> I recently called the Laboratory of Ornithology and was put through to the 
> Wild Bird Store associated with the Lab and was told ”not yet, they are 
> working on it.” Apparently the technology is available and it is just the 
> question of adapting the technology to bird songs and then to a gadget. If 
> you are interested in how the technology works try the app “Soundhound” 
> where you can point the iPhone to the radio playing a song and it will 
> uncannily tell you the name of the song. 
>
> Bob Righter 
> Denver CO 

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/9a593d62-720b-4d01-bab1-f4669058d9f3%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: RE: Re: Boulder County, July 30
From: DAVID A LEATHERMAN <daleatherman AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 15:31:36 -0600
Scott, David, et al,
Re crossbills at lower elevations, and cone crops in general, I would say the 
following: 


Conifers produce cone crops at fairly irregular intervals, with what nursery 
people refer to as "bumper" crops occurring only every 3-5 years for most 
species of coniferous tree (in Colorado that would be pines, spruces, true 
firs, and Douglas-fir). Heavy cone crops can be triggered by both moisture 
(i.e. "good" growing conditions) and stress (i.e. "bad" growing conditions). If 
the stress is bad enough, and the plant has a physiological sense it might die, 
available energy can be, and often is, put into cone production as the best 
means of sustaining the species. Last winter and the months hence have 
generally had good moisture over wide areas of the Colorado mountains, so, as 
David suggests, cone production this year is mostly in response to good 
conditions. 


Most conifer cones take one to two years to mature and produce viable seeds. 
Cone production starts in late spring after pollination of female cones (called 
"strobili") by pollen from male strobili. The resulting seed-bearing cones 
develop during the summer, and the future "inventory" available for 
exploitation the following winter (or the winter after that) becomes evident 
about this time of year. Thus, crossbills which are highly dependant on such a 
widely scattered, both geographically and temporally, resource as cones, need 
to engage in extensive scouting. Type 2 Red Crossbills dependent on ponderosa 
pine apparently have the ability to differentiate between 1-year old ("unripe") 
and 2-year old ("ripe") cones during scouting. I am not sure if this is done 
visually while on the wing (conifer cones are concentrated in tree tops AND the 
color of these two ages of cones ARE different), or if they have to stop and 
examine things/sample things more closely. Regardless of what exactly it 
entails, in my experience, much scouting occurs from mid-July thru the onset of 
winter (November-early December). How scouts convey information to the general 
population of crossbills is also a mystery, at least to me. But if you've ever 
watched a group of crossbills quietly feeding atop a conifer, and then heard 
one of them begin to call ("I'm having a tougher and tougher time over here 
finding seeds easily, I say we move on", or, "Is it just me, or do you guys 
feel Merlin eyes beating down on you?", or whatever it is they say), followed 
by a crescendo of the others calling in agreement, followed by them all flying 
off, they are obviously able to vocally convey information. 


Whether we see conspicuous numbers of crossbills in the foothills or out on the 
plains probably depends a lot on the situation in the mountains. If cone crops 
are good everywhere in the mountains, not much scouting elsewhere will be 
necessary. But I would wager, diligent observation would result in at least a 
few sightings in almost every county on the eastern plains, and that if they 
occur, July-October would be the most likely time to see out-of-the-mountain 
wandering crossbills (and corvids, which also eat a lot of conifer seeds). 


Dave Leatherman
Fort Collins

Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 13:29:08 -0700
From: dave1wx AT gmail.com
To: cobirds AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [cobirds] Re: Boulder County, July 30

Scott:
I haven't encountered any in town yet but did find some low down in Skunk 
Canyon (southwest Boulder) yesterday. In general, Red Crossbills are seemingly 
everywhere in the northern Colorado mountains this summer (based on my own 
observations plus the number of red dots -- recent reports -- on ebird). Has 
the deep soil moisture built up during the previous 10 months resulted in a 
good cone crop? 

David DowellLongmont, CO

On Wednesday, July 30, 2014 12:54:57 PM UTC-6, Scott Baron wrote:
Also, has anyone had Red Crossbills in areas outside the mountains recently? I 
think I heard them as flyovers a few times this Monday and Tuesday in the city 
of Boulder. 


Scott Baron
Loveland, Colo.






-- 

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 


To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 


To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.

To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/1ecf6bdf-03cb-416b-a8e1-0533045cee8d%40googlegroups.com. 


For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
 		 	   		  

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/SNT148-W41965AC3AC7BB1FBA53AEEC1F90%40phx.gbl. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Boulder County, July 30
From: David Dowell <dave1wx AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 13:29:08 -0700 (PDT)
Scott:

I haven't encountered any in town yet but did find some low down in Skunk 
Canyon (southwest Boulder) yesterday.  In general, Red Crossbills are 
seemingly everywhere in the northern Colorado mountains this summer (based 
on my own observations plus the number of red dots -- recent reports -- on 
ebird).  Has the deep soil moisture built up during the previous 10 months 
resulted in a good cone crop?

David Dowell
Longmont, CO


On Wednesday, July 30, 2014 12:54:57 PM UTC-6, Scott Baron wrote:
>
>
> Also, has anyone had Red Crossbills in areas outside the mountains 
> recently?  I think I heard them as flyovers a few times this Monday and 
> Tuesday in the city of Boulder.
>
> Scott Baron
> Loveland, Colo.
>

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/1ecf6bdf-03cb-416b-a8e1-0533045cee8d%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Bird Song ID Gadget
From: Robert Righter <rorighter AT earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 14:25:36 -0600
Hi

It seems I'm frequently being asked if I know of a gadget that could be pointed 
at a singing bird that would ID the songster. 


I recently called the Laboratory of Ornithology and was put through to the Wild 
Bird Store associated with the Lab and was told "not yet, they are working on 
it." Apparently the technology is available and it is just the question of 
adapting the technology to bird songs and then to a gadget. If you are 
interested in how the technology works try the app "Soundhound" where you can 
point the iPhone to the radio playing a song and it will uncannily tell you the 
name of the song. 


Bob Righter
Denver CO 

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/4A39588F-FB6C-45D4-B4A3-A99D137DE28E%40earthlink.net. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Boulder County, July 30
From: Scott Baron <baron.scott AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 12:54:53 -0600
Hi,

The rain cancelled my work today so on the way home I took the opportunity
to check out Gunbarrel Farm (open space) where Ted Floyd found a CASSIN'S
KINGBIRD in June and where they were found in 2013.  I easily located all
three kingbird species during a short drive and short walk.  Two Cassin's
and maybe five Westerns flocked together, perching on thistles, fences and
telephone wires.  I also saw an Eastern Kingbird - 3 kingbird day in
Boulder County!  The Cassin's were silent but the darker gray upperparts
contrasted with the lighter gray of the Westerns.  The Cassin's did not
show a white tail band, perhaps because of wear.  One dark kingbird had
white outer tail feathers as in Western so I don't know what is going on
there.

The location where I observed the Cassin's was the south side of Lookout
Road, 1/4 to 1/3 mile east of the intersection of 79th St.  A pulloff at a
gate is on this side of the road.

Also, has anyone had Red Crossbills in areas outside the mountains
recently?  I think I heard them as flyovers a few times this Monday and
Tuesday in the city of Boulder.

Bye,

Scott Baron
Loveland, Colo.

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAKO-by963mzmJ4DiW9Y%2B6A9rseTc4kyHQseJn0tXF2JDvbP%2BVQ%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 30 July 2014
From: Joyce Takamine <jabirujt AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 04:26:57 -0600
Compiler: Joyce Takamine
Date: July 30, 2014
email: rba AT cfobirds.org

This is the Colorado Rare Bird Alert for Wednesday, July 30 sponsored by
Denver Field Ornithologists and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.

Highlight species include: (* indicates new information on this species).

Green Heron (Boulder)
Snowy Plover (Kiowa, Otero)
Broad-winged Hawk (*Fremont)
Caspian Tern (*Weld)
RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD (*Otero)
ACORN WOODPECKER (Pueblo)
American Three-toed Woodpecker (Boulder, Delta, Douglas, Mesa, Park)
Black Phoebe (Fremont)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Fremont)
Black-throated Sparrow (Pueblo)
Fox Sparrow (Mesa)
Northern Cardinal (Boulder)
Indigo Bunting (Boulder, Jefferson)

BOULDER COUNTY:
--A calling Northern Cardinal was reported by Boswell part way up Hawthorn
Gulch on July 21.
--Boswell reported an Indigo Bunting has been singing in the morning in the
vicinity of Maxwell House on the east side of Sanitas on July 21.
--6+ American Three-toed Woodpeckers were reported by Norfleet on the N
side of Long Lake on July 28.
--A Green Heron was reported by Whitehurst at Sawhill Ponds on July 27.

DELTA COUNTY:
--American Three-toed Woodpecker was reported by Dahl at Crags Crest CG on
Grand Mesa on July 27.

DOUGLAS COUNTY:
--A f American Three-toed Woodpecker was reported by Suddjian on Rampart
Range Road 0.5 mile from CR 67 on July 22.

FREMONT COUNTY:
--Miller reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on July 8 on CO 67, It was
seen flying alongside the highway. It was seen 0.75 miles north of the
Custer County line.  On July 13, Miller reported seeing the Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 14, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was
reported by Walbek, Percival and Schultz. On July 16, Drummond reported
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at 0730 but not at 1030.  On July 19, Hinds
reported the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 20,
Edwards reported that 2 Scissor-tailed Flycatchers were seen and
that they appear to be nesting in the dead tree.  On July 22, Bill Maynard
reported 1 Scissor-tailed Flycatcher before 0800.  On July 23, Moss
reported seeing the female Scissor-tailed Flycatcher.  On July 25, Moss was
able to see the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher pair exchange duty at the nest in
the dead tree.  On July 26, Kaempfer reported the pair of Scissor-tailed
Flycatchers were busy defending their nest.  On July 27, Moss watched the f
Scissor-tail forage from the driveway several hundered feet north of nest
tree..  Moss spote to the property owner of the nest tree and it is okay to
park in the driveway as long as you do not block the driveway and stay
outside their fenceline.
--At least 2 Black Phoebes were reported by Dunning at Florence River Park
on July 20.
--A juv Broad-winged Hawk was reported by Moss at Florence River Park on
July 28.

JEFFERSON COUNTY:
--Singing Indigo Buntings were reported by Henwood east of Morrison on Soda
Lakes Road on July 20.

KIOWA COUNTY:
--At Neegronda Reservoir on July 27, Dowell reported 23 Snowy Plovers.

MESA COUNTY:
--On July 25, Henwood reported 2 American Three-toed Woodpeckers (ad and
fledgling m) and a Slate-colored Fox Sparrow at Fruita Reservoir #1 S of
Glade Park.

OTERO COUNTY:
--At Lake Cheraw on July 27, Dowell reported 24 Snow Plovers.
--A RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD (probably f) was reported by Mlodinow at
Cheraw on July 29.  It was
seen at 3rd and Beymer.  The yard has 3 feeders.

PARK COUNTY:
--A family of American Three-toed Woodpeckers was reported by Suddjian near
Georgia Pass on July 21.
--An American Three-toed Woodpecker was reported by Suddjian near Boreas
Pass on July 21.

PUEBLO COUNTY:
--Knight reported 3 Black-throated Sparrows on July 5 near Pueblo West.
Percival reported them again on July 8. The sparrows were found by parking
at Liberty Point in Pueblo West at the end of Purcell Blvd. The rest
involves a hike that isn't for those who are out of shape. Take the trail
off to the right before the flag pole and memorial. Proceed to the bottom
of the cliff keeping to your right. You will pass a cement "well" just
before merging with a now unused dirt road which heads WNW to a distant
pass in the cliff. The first arroyo with slab rocks is where the sparrows
were.  On July 12, Lilly reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West
and on July 14, Joy reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West and an
easier walk from south end of South Greenbrier Drive.  South Greenbrier
Drive is reached b driving south on Purcell from Hwy 50 for about 2.5 miles
to East Linden Ave.  Turn
west on Linden, and then south on Greenbrier.  On July 16, Drummond
reported ad male and juvenile Black-throated Sparrows in Pueblo East area,
using easier hiking point of South Greenbrier Drive.  On July 20, Edwards
reported Black-throated Sparrows continue at Liberty Point in Pueblo West.
--An ACORN WOODPECKER family was reported by Percival at the dead Ponderosa
Tree in the parking lot at Horseshoe Lodge at Pueblo Mountain Park on July
10. On July 12, Bohannon reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain
Park.  On July 20, Dunning reported that the pair of ACORN WOODPECKERS at
Pueblo Mountain Park were busy feeding young.  On July 26, Kaempfer
reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain Park.
--On July 20, Knight reported a Black Phoebe below Pueblo Reservoir dam.

WELD COUNTY:
--A Caspian Tern was reported by Knight at St  Vrain SP on July 29.

DFO Field Trips:
The DFO Field Trip for Saturday, August 2 will be to the Wheat Ridge
Greenbelt led by Mary Geder (303-986-6127) and Jackie King (720-381-3314).
 Call leader if going.  Meet at Prospect Park at 0800.  From I-70 exit 267,
take Kipling south about 0.75 mile and turn right (west) on 44th Ave.  Go
one mile west.  Look for entrace to Prospect Park on your left (south).
 Meet just inside the park in the lot right next to Prospect Lake.
This will be a half-day trip, easy wlaking, accessible for mobility
impaired individuals.  Bring water and a snack, lunch optional.  Goo trip
for novice birders and new members.

The DFO Field Trip for Sunday, August 3 will be the Jackson Lake Reservoir
led by Ira and Tammy Sanders (303-278-7172).  Call leaders if going.  Meet
at 0600 at the Division of Wildlife, 6060 N Broadway.  Exit I-25 at 58th
Ave, go west 2 blocks to Broadway, then north 2 blocks to parking lot on
right to carpool.  State Parks Pass required.  This is an all day trip so
bring lunch, plenty of water, bug spray, and sunscreen.  Scopes will be
helpful and remember you mud boots as we may hike through some mud.

Good Birding,
Joyce Takamine
 Boulder
303-554-9785

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAHtstTd5TmpHLimAbOKLXi-74y_KE11ttxuVrT47DvnUFanMcQ%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Burrowing Owls
From: "Karl Stecher Jr." <kstecher AT idcomm.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 23:02:09 -0600
Were the burrowing owls watching you with their binoculars? 

Karl Stecher
Centennial 

Maureen Briggs writes: 

> 28 July 2014
> 5:15 pm
> Burrowing Owl(s) Sighting 
> 
> I was driving from Grand Junction to Montrose today on US Hwy 50. I was 
scanning the side of the road on my right, when I noticed two birds standing on 
top of a prairie dog mound in a dog town. 

> 
> I turned around and went back to the location. I pulled off the highway and 
watched for approximately 30 minutes two burrowing owls standing on top of a 
mound in a prairie dog town with binoculars.. 

> 
> They were obviously burrowing owls. Both birds possessed brown plumage with 
light colored spots and bars and long stick legs. They had buffy breasts. Their 
mound was surrounded by active prairie dog mounds. I could clearly see their 
large eyes with cream coloring above and below. 

> 
> When traveling from Montrose west to Grand Junction here are the directions. 
> 
> Birds on on west side of east bound lane. Country is barren and has sparse 
vegetation, greasewood, and salt brush. 

> 
> There is a small dirt road leading off Hwy. 50 down to a cattle guard, (this 
can be difficult to see if traveling fast). The road ends at the cattle guard. 
Stop before the cattle guard for the best view. Look left (south) along the 
fence-line. The mound is about two- dozen- yards west of the fence-line. It is 
one of the closest mounds to the fence-line. Just west of the mound is a 
minimal draw with some bushes growing in it. 

> 
> From the mound, out across the flats at 11:00 o'clock there is a white 
single-wide mobile home with dark trim and a tan utility building with an 
orange roof. 

> 
> The small dirt pull off road is .8 miles west of Mile Marker 49. There are 
turn-arounds on Hwy 50 about 1/2 mile on either side of the pull-out. You can 
turn around to reach the dirt road. At the cattle guard there is a power pole 
with a number tag that reads 04/0/155. 

> 
> The dirt road is 3.8 miles west of the Bridgeport Road and 4.8 miles west of 
the Delta-Mesa County Line. If travelling east, and you see a tall cell tower 
to the west and a lone house nearby that is large, grey and three stories high, 
you have gone too far. Turn around and go back. 

> 
> The coordinates for the dirt road are:  38 54' 39" N
> 					 108 22' 27" W 
> 
> Attached is a jpg file of the site using Google Earth 
> 
> Maureen Briggs
> Montrose, CO   (970) 240-4108, skelligmichael AT charter. net 
> 
> -- 
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an 
email to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

> To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
> To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/ac5267eb-4c35-4c58-ba18-437285e49e46%40googlegroups.com. 

> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
 

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/20140730050209.88F5852203A%40mailhost.idcomm.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Hummingbird behavior question
From: "Ira Sanders" <zroadrunner14 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 18:42:13 -0600
To anyone who knows:

We have a hummingbird (probably a female Rufous) that sits on the brick path
and sticks her bill into nearby flowers while sitting on the ground. She has
been attacked by other hummers.  I have tried putting a feeder near her but
she doesn't appear to use it.  When we get close she flies. 

On Sunday she wasn't flying very well but our attempts to capture her and
least stick her bill in a feeder were for naught.  Yesterday and today she
is flying better but her behavior hasn't changed.

Any thoughts?

And, any qualified person who would like to try to capture her for rehab is
welcome to try.  Let me know and I'll post in the morning if she is still
here.

 

Ira Sanders

Golden, CO

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/002a01cfab8f%241b3a43b0%2451aecb10%24%40com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Cheraw RT Hummungbird
From: "'Steven Mlodinow' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 15:47:21 -0600
Both BC and RT Hummingbirds ( non adult male. RT looks to be female) in Cheraw, 
Otero at corner of 3rd and Beymer. 3 feeders in yard. In sun late PM so may be 
better earlier. 3 feeders and two yippie dogs. May well be more than 2 humms 
total 

Steve Mlodinow
Longmont CO

Sent from my iPhone

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/99AF3036-940A-43C3-A74D-4C2B499301A6%40aol.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: New Duck! Longmont
From: Dave Hyde <pink-beam AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 15:49:31 -0500
Hi all, I know I've confused a Domestic goose with a White-fronted goose and a 
Cayuga Duck with a Brant before but I just spotted yesterday at Golden Ponds in 
Longmont (Boston St. side) a large grey duck with white breast! Not wanting to 
claim it as a Black scoter too quickly, I checked it out online and this is a 
Swedish Blue duck! A bred variety of the Mallard. My little list of 'domestics' 
is now up to four (I saw Muscovy ducks in Florida). What fun! - Dave 
Hyde/Longmont, CO 


-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/BLU181-W65AEBA149DC55752F4E1B3F5F80%40phx.gbl. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Juv Broad-winged Hawk fly-by in Florence area yesterday
From: "SeEttaM ." <seettam AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 14:42:18 -0600
I had internet connections problems last night so could not post. Yesterday
while walking in Florence River Park at the edge of that small town I
spotted a juvenile Broad-winged Hawk flying by.  I got photos that while
not great do provide field marks when edited and I have now uploaded those
to my Birds and Nature blog .
Broad-winged Hawks are  seen in Colorado during migration with most
sightings during spring and t is rare to have this species in Colorado in
mid-summer.

SeEtta Moss
Canon City
http://BirdsAndNature.blogspot.com

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAAUvckqLuRfNuPg1UX0URyV9OYzM9evysrpQtbQ5o3Xpa6qTRg%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Caspian Tern - St. Vrain SP - Weld County (7/29)
From: "'Chris Knight' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 09:24:19 -0700 (PDT)
Hi All,

While flat hiking on trails east of Bald Eagle Pond in St. Vrain SP this 
morning, I noticed a Caspian Tern flying nearby. The tern flew west and 
wound up at the Great Egret Pond adjacent to Weld County Road 7 (no 
parking). I stopped a couple of seconds to get a good view. It was on the 
NE shore with about a dozen gulls (I didn't pay attention to the gulls as I 
knew subconsciously these were Ring-billed). Also there was a Great Egret 
further back.

Chris Knight
Longmont, CO

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/d316cbac-ae7b-47f6-8c98-d0701b7b97b8%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ? Or 505?
From: "'Hugh Kingery' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 11:41:04 -0400 (EDT)
 Two people emailed me, but not Cobirds, to add two more species to the Already 
Seen. 


BAIKAL TEAL
    At Evergreeen behind a restaurant for a week or more.

BLACK-TAILED GNATCATCHER
    Up Chukar Trail near Cameo 10-20 years ago.

 

Hugh Kingery 
  Franktown, CO
  

 


-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/8D1795AA47D49AE-874-A6C2%40webmail-vm047.sysops.aol.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Burrowing Owls
From: Maureen Briggs <fenianbirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 07:14:33 -0700 (PDT)
28 July 2014
5:15 pm
Burrowing Owl(s) Sighting

I was driving from Grand Junction to Montrose today on US Hwy 50. I was 
scanning the side of the road on my right, when I noticed two birds standing on 
top of a prairie dog mound in a dog town. 


I turned around and went back to the location. I pulled off the highway and 
watched for approximately 30 minutes two burrowing owls standing on top of a 
mound in a prairie dog town with binoculars.. 


They were obviously burrowing owls. Both birds possessed brown plumage with 
light colored spots and bars and long stick legs. They had buffy breasts. Their 
mound was surrounded by active prairie dog mounds. I could clearly see their 
large eyes with cream coloring above and below. 


When traveling from Montrose west to Grand Junction here are the directions.

Birds on on west side of east bound lane. Country is barren and has sparse 
vegetation, greasewood, and salt brush. 


There is a small dirt road leading off Hwy. 50 down to a cattle guard, (this 
can be difficult to see if traveling fast). The road ends at the cattle guard. 
Stop before the cattle guard for the best view. Look left (south) along the 
fence-line. The mound is about two- dozen- yards west of the fence-line. It is 
one of the closest mounds to the fence-line. Just west of the mound is a 
minimal draw with some bushes growing in it. 


From the mound, out across the flats at 11:00 o’clock there is a white 
single-wide mobile home with dark trim and a tan utility building with an 
orange roof. 


The small dirt pull off road is .8 miles west of Mile Marker 49. There are 
turn-arounds on Hwy 50 about 1/2 mile on either side of the pull-out. You can 
turn around to reach the dirt road. At the cattle guard there is a power pole 
with a number tag that reads 04/0/155. 


The dirt road is 3.8 miles west of the Bridgeport Road and 4.8 miles west of 
the Delta-Mesa County Line. If travelling east, and you see a tall cell tower 
to the west and a lone house nearby that is large, grey and three stories high, 
you have gone too far. Turn around and go back. 


The coordinates for the dirt road are:  38° 54’ 39” N
					 108° 22’ 27” W

Attached is a jpg file of the site using Google Earth

Maureen Briggs
Montrose, CO   (970) 240-4108, skelligmichael AT charter. net

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/ac5267eb-4c35-4c58-ba18-437285e49e46%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ?
From: "'Alludon' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 07:43:42 -0600
I am pretty sure I have a book about Monk Parakeets (aka "Quaker Parrots") 
populating an area in Colorado (??Boulder??) in fairly large numbers. I'm in 
Steamboat and will post details when I get home. I remember the book was about 
why it is now illegal to breed and/or sell them in Colorado. 


Keep in mind I purchased the book from "birdy camp" - a parrot boarding 
facility. 


Allison Hilf
Denver, CO
Currently in Steamboat Springs

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 28, 2014, at 12:02 PM, "Ira Sanders"  wrote:
> 
> Yep. 40 or so years ago the Chicago Park District was going to destroy the 
nests around town and extirpate the parakeets but Mayor Harold Washington had a 
nest in a park across from his apartment and liked the birds so he prevented 
the Park District from destroying them. As a result, they are established and 
are expanding a little but their biggest problem is building nests on cell 
towers and the communications companies take down the nests as a hazard to the 
equipment. They are in Jackson Park on the lake on light standards at a sports 
complex and are on the Illinois list. 

> I don't know how they survive the winters.
> Ira Sanders
> Golden, CO
>  
> From: cobirds AT googlegroups.com [mailto:cobirds AT googlegroups.com] 
> Sent: Monday, July 28, 2014 9:40 AM
> To: cobirds AT googlegroups.com
> Subject: Re: [cobirds] Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ?
>  
> Several colonies of monk parakeets have lived on the South Side of Chicago 
for more than 30 years. I think Ira Sanders would back me up in agreeing that 
Chicago winters are far more harsh than anything in Denver. There may be other 
reasons to not count monk parakeets in Denver, but hardiness is not one. 

>  
> Mark Obmascik
> Denver, CO 
>  
> 
> On Sunday, July 27, 2014 5:38 PM, drchartier  wrote:
>  
> 
> A pair of monk parakeets built a nest in a Colorado Springs neighborhood in 
the mid 90s. Escapees, I'm sure. I believe they were captured and incarcerated 
at the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo. 

>  
>  
>  
>  
> Sent with the Samsung Galaxy Exhilarate™, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone.
> 
> Chuck  wrote:
> A pair of Monk Parakeets inhabited our Potter Highlands neighborhood and 
frequented our feeders for at least two years in the late eighties until a 
neighbor, tired of their calling, shot them with her BB gun. Gail had called 
the Rare Bird Alert when we first noted them and was told that they were not 
reportable because they were escapees unable to survive and breed in our 
climate. 

> - Chuck Lowrie, Denver
> 
> On Sunday, July 27, 2014 3:30:10 PM UTC-6, ouzels wrote:
> None of the speculators about Colorado’s 500th bird(s) addressed one 
possibility: It already happened. 

>  
> Over the years the CFO Records Committee has looked at 1000s of records with 
professionalism, thoughtfulness, and thoroughness. To crack the barrier the 
Records Committee only has to re-visit some rejected records. 

>  
>             CAROLINA PAROQUET: 1805.
> When the Pike expedition (was it Pike?) saw these birds along the Arkansas 
River, had they crossed that magic line? 

>  
>             PILEATED WOODPECKER: 1940s or 1950s.
> Reported near the Maroon Bells by Justice William O. Douglas. Can you doubt 
the word of a Supreme Court justice? But – he didn’t submit a Rare Bird 
Form. 

>  
>             MONK PARAKEET: 1983-1985.
> When we lived in Denver, a Monk Parakeet spent a whole winter in the Congress 
Park neighborhood. This wary bird even built a nest along the alley at 11th & 
Clayton. It showed up at our feeder on a 20-below-zero winter morning. 

> 1970’s: Two seen along Platte River bikeway for a couple of months. 

>  
>             RED-BACKED HAWK: 1987-1994.
> For eight years a Red-backed Hawk/Buzzard summered on a ranch north of 
Gunnison. It mated with a Swainson’s Hawk and produced at least one young. 
Observed by dozens (hundreds probably) of people including former President & 
wife, Jimmy & Rosalind Carter. 

>  
>             BLACK-HOODED CONURE: 1995.
> No RBF, probably. Attended feeders in a subdivision south of Chatfield for 2 
months in 1995. Observed on a Fall Count. 

>  
>  
> Hugh Kingery 
> Franktown, CO
> 
> -- 
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an 
email to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

> To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
> To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/5c47aa38-81ce-454b-885c-56097960189c%40googlegroups.com. 

> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
> -- 
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an 
email to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

> To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
> To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/SNT406-EAS360F404D6C0B7ABE5DE0860C1FA0%40phx.gbl. 

> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
>  
> 
> -- 
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an 
email to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

> To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
> To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/1406562018.99806.YahooMailNeo%40web142802.mail.bf1.yahoo.com. 

> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
> -- 
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an 
email to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

> To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
> To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/00a301cfaa8e%2425a8a140%2470f9e3c0%24%40com. 

> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/536BB134-4B89-4C36-96E7-F2B0F26AB468%40aol.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 29 July 2014
From: Joyce Takamine <jabirujt AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 04:38:59 -0600
Compiler: Joyce Takamine
Date: July 28, 2014
email: rba AT cfobirds.org

This is the Colorado Rare Bird Alert for Monday, July 28 sponsored by
Denver Field Ornithologists and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.

Highlight species include: (* indicates new information on this species).

Red-necked Grebe (Jackson)
Green Heron (*Boulder)
Snowy Plover (*Kiowa, *Otero)
Caspian Tern (Denver)
ACORN WOODPECKER (Pueblo)
American Three-toed Woodpecker (*Boulder, *Delta, Douglas, Mesa, Park)
Black Phoebe (Fremont)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Fremont)
Black-throated Sparrow (Pueblo)
Fox Sparrow (Mesa)
Northern Cardinal (Boulder)
Indigo Bunting (Boulder, Jefferson)

BOULDER COUNTY:
--A calling Northern Cardinal was reported by Boswell part way up Hawthorn
Gulch on July 21.
--Boswell reported an Indigo Bunting has been singing in the morning in the
vicinity of Maxwell House on the east side of Sanitas on July 21.
--6+ American Three-toed Woodpeckers were reported by Norfleet on the N
side of Long Lake on July 28.
--A Green Heron was reported by Whitehurst at Sawhill Ponds on July 27.

DELTA COUNTY:
--American Three-toed Woodpecker was reported by Dahl at Crags Crest CG on
Grand Mesa on July 27.

DENVER COUNTY:
--2 Caspian Terns were reported by Edwards flying over Ferril Lake in
Denver City Park on July 19.

DOUGLAS COUNTY:
--A f American Three-toed Woodpecker was reported by Suddjian on Rampart
Range Road 0.5 mile from CR 67 on July 22.

FREMONT COUNTY:
--Miller reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on July 8 on CO 67, It was
seen flying alongside the highway. It was seen 0.75 miles north of the
Custer County line.  On July 13, Miller reported seeing the Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 14, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was
reported by Walbek, Percival and Schultz. On July 16, Drummond reported
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at 0730 but not at 1030.  On July 19, Hinds
reported the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 20,
Edwards reported that 2 Scissor-tailed Flycatchers were seen and
that they appear to be nesting in the dead tree.  On July 22, Bill Maynard
reported 1 Scissor-tailed Flycatcher before 0800.  On July 23, Moss
reported seeing the female Scissor-tailed Flycatcher.  On July 25, Moss was
able to see the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher pair exchange duty at the nest in
the dead tree.  On July 26, Kaempfer reported the pair of Scissor-tailed
Flycatchers were busy defending their nest.  On July 27, Moss watched the f
Scissor-tail forage from the driveway several hundered feet north of nest
tree..  Moss spote to the property owner of the nest tree and it is okay to
park in the driveway as long as you do not block the driveway and stay
outside their fenceline.
--At least 2 Black Phoebes were reported by Dunning at Florence River Park
on July 20.

JACKSON COUNTY:
--On July 11 Hundertmark reported that the pair of Red-necked Grebes
continues incubating egg(s) on Lake John.  On July 19, Hundertmark reported
3 adult Red-necked Grebes (2 m, 1 f) at Lake John but an empty nest.

JEFFERSON COUNTY:
--Singing Indigo Buntings were reported by Henwood east of Morrison on Soda
Lakes Road on July 20.

KIOWA COUNTY:
--At Neegronda Reservoir on July 27, Dowell reported 23 Snowy Plovers.

MESA COUNTY:
--On July 25, Henwood reported 2 American Three-toed Woodpeckers (ad and
fledgling m) and a Slate-colored Fox Sparrow at Fruita Reservoir #1 S of
Glade Park.

OTERO COUNTY:
--At Lake Cheraw on July 27, Dowell reported 24 Snow Plovers.

PARK COUNTY:
--A family of American Three-toed Woodpeckers was reported by Suddjian near
Georgia Pass on July 21.
--An American Three-toed Woodpecker was reported by Suddjian near Boreas
Pass on July 21.

PUEBLO COUNTY:
--Knight reported 3 Black-throated Sparrows on July 5 near Pueblo West.
Percival reported them again on July 8. The sparrows were found by parking
at Liberty Point in Pueblo West at the end of Purcell Blvd. The rest
involves a hike that isn't for those who are out of shape. Take the trail
off to the right before the flag pole and memorial. Proceed to the bottom
of the cliff keeping to your right. You will pass a cement "well" just
before merging with a now unused dirt road which heads WNW to a distant
pass in the cliff. The first arroyo with slab rocks is where the sparrows
were.  On July 12, Lilly reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West
and on July 14, Joy reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West and an
easier walk from south end of South Greenbrier Drive.  South Greenbrier
Drive is reached b driving south on Purcell from Hwy 50 for about 2.5 miles
to East Linden Ave.  Turn
west on Linden, and then south on Greenbrier.  On July 16, Drummond
reported ad male and juvenile Black-throated Sparrows in Pueblo East area,
using easier hiking point of South Greenbrier Drive.  On July 20, Edwards
reported Black-throated Sparrows continue at Liberty Point in Pueblo West.
--An ACORN WOODPECKER family was reported by Percival at the dead Ponderosa
Tree in the parking lot at Horseshoe Lodge at Pueblo Mountain Park on July
10. On July 12, Bohannon reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain
Park.  On July 20, Dunning reported that the pair of ACORN WOODPECKERS at
Pueblo Mountain Park were busy feeding young.  On July 26, Kaempfer
reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain Park.
--On July 20, Knight reported a Black Phoebe below Pueblo Reservoir dam.

DFO Field Trips:
The DFO Field Trip for Saturday, August 2 will be to the Wheat Ridge
Greenbelt led by Mary Geder (303-986-6127) and Jackie King (720-381-3314).
 Call leader if going.  Meet at Prospect Park at 0800.  From I-70 exit 267,
take Kipling south about 0.75 mile and turn right (west) on 44th Ave.  Go
one mile west.  Look for entrace to Prospect Park on your left (south).
 Meet just inside the park in the lot right next to Prospect Lake.
This will be a half-day trip, easy wlaking, accessible for mobility
impaired individuals.  Bring water and a snack, lunch optional.  Goo trip
for novice birders and new members.

The DFO Field Trip for Sunday, August 3 will be the Jackson Lake Reservoir
led by Ira and Tammy Sanders (303-278-7172).  Call leaders if going.  Meet
at 0600 at the Division of Wildlife, 6060 N Broadway.  Exit I-25 at 58th
Ave, go west 2 blocks to Broadway, then north 2 blocks to parking lot on
right to carpool.  State Parks Pass required.  This is an all day trip so
bring lunch, plenty of water, bug spray, and sunscreen.  Scopes will be
helpful and remember you mud boots as we may hike through some mud.

Good Birding,
Joyce Takamine
 Boulder
303-554-9785

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAHtstTceZ-RBKQnURtNRTwWf9ENCzRTi1NpAXAAffrZr0wwZ1w%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: American Three-toed Woodpecker, Brainard L. Rec. Area, Boulder County
From: Gary Baxley <gebsmn AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:20:43 -0600
This morning we decided to hike along the north side of Long Lake (destination 
Lake Isabel). We saw an American Three-toed Woodpecker flaking wood off a tree. 
It was only 30 ft. off the trail about 3 feet off the ground. 

On our way back down from our hike, again along the north side of Long Lake, we 
first saw 2 Three-toed just 20 ft. off the trail; a short distance farther 2 
more; and then a little farther along yet another 2! Three of them were males. 
Not sure if I'd say we saw 7 total since we may have seen the same bird we saw 
going up the trail when we came back down. But, a confirmed 6 American 
Three-toedWoodpeckers! After trying to see one several times in the past with 
no luck we hit the jackpot today! 


Sharon Norfleet and Gary Baxley
Louisville, Boulder County

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/21302C69-5CD3-4D9D-BABF-4974F456C53F%40gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Wrong meeting address for Hummingbird trip and potluck
From: Pam Piombino <piombino.pam AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 14:23:34 -0600
The meeting place is in Lyons, with the address corrected below:  Sorry
'bout that.


*PLEASE NOTE NEW TIME!*

*Saturday, August 2, 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.*

"Hummingbirds and a Potluck!"

We will start the day by meeting at the Park and Ride in Lyons (549 4th
Avenue), for a walk along Old South Road for a look at resident breeders.
Birds commonly found here are Canyon Wrens, White-throated Swifts,
Catbirds, Orioles and Grosbeaks. Then, it will be on to Davis’s feeding
stations at his beautifully located home in Spring Gulch. There, we can
count on at least three species of Hummingbirds and maybe four:
Broad-tailed, Rufous, Calliope and even Black-chinned.
His feeders and nest boxes attract many other foothills species, including
Nuthatches, Bluebirds and Pinion Jays. Stay to share a relaxing pot luck
while you enjoy these flying jewels. Bring something inspired and
nutritious to share.  No reservations needed.  Questions?
Davis AT greenspeedisp.net

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAF2zbdsScPL1_-QoG%2Bh%2BvpLE%2B4rMucDMC8kV9_Rw%3DUohO2j2PQ%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Hummers, Colo Spgs
From: Steve Brown <sbrown37 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 13:27:15 -0600
Hi COBirders,

I just had a visit by the first Black-chinned Hummingbird in the yard this 
summer (a female). She joins the crowd of other visitors, and makes four 
species in the yard right now, with numerous Rufous, and a few Calliope, and 
Broad-tailed. The best part of summer! 


Steve Brown
Colorado Springs, Mountain Shadows neighborhood

Sent from my iPad

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/57FDDEC8-B025-4883-9F4B-77001A13B20A%40gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Hummingbirds and Pot Luck field trip
From: Pam Piombino <piombino.pam AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 12:54:08 -0600
*PLEASE NOTE NEW TIME!*

*Saturday, August 2, 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.*

"Hummingbirds and a Potluck!"

We will start the day by meeting at the Park and Ride in Lyons (7600 Niwot
Road), for a walk along Old South Road for a look at resident breeders.
Birds commonly found here are Canyon Wrens, White-throated Swifts,
Catbirds, Orioles and Grosbeaks. Then, it will be on to Davis’s feeding
stations at his beautifully located home in Spring Gulch. There, we can
count on at least three species of Hummingbirds and maybe four:
Broad-tailed, Rufous, Calliope and even Black-chinned.
His feeders and nest boxes attract many other foothills species, including
Nuthatches, Bluebirds and Pinion Jays. Stay to share a relaxing pot luck
while you enjoy these flying jewels. Bring something inspired and
nutritious to share.  Questions?
Davis AT greenspeedisp.net



-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAF2zbdtHWDUHhLy_Kosu%3Dr2y807qXev0nr9u8UVVt887tgW3xA%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: RE: Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ?
From: "Ira Sanders" <zroadrunner14 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 12:02:50 -0600
Yep. 40 or so years ago the Chicago Park District was going to destroy the 
nests around town and extirpate the parakeets but Mayor Harold Washington had a 
nest in a park across from his apartment and liked the birds so he prevented 
the Park District from destroying them. As a result, they are established and 
are expanding a little but their biggest problem is building nests on cell 
towers and the communications companies take down the nests as a hazard to the 
equipment. They are in Jackson Park on the lake on light standards at a sports 
complex and are on the Illinois list. 


I don't know how they survive the winters.

Ira Sanders

Golden, CO

 

From: cobirds AT googlegroups.com [mailto:cobirds AT googlegroups.com] 
Sent: Monday, July 28, 2014 9:40 AM
To: cobirds AT googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: [cobirds] Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ?

 

Several colonies of monk parakeets have lived on the South Side of Chicago for 
more than 30 years. I think Ira Sanders would back me up in agreeing that 
Chicago winters are far more harsh than anything in Denver. There may be other 
reasons to not count monk parakeets in Denver, but hardiness is not one. 


 

Mark Obmascik

Denver, CO 

 

On Sunday, July 27, 2014 5:38 PM, drchartier  wrote:

 

A pair of monk parakeets built a nest in a Colorado Springs neighborhood in the 
mid 90s. Escapees, I'm sure. I believe they were captured and incarcerated at 
the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo. 


 

 

 

 

Sent with the Samsung Galaxy Exhilarate™, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone.


Chuck  wrote:

A pair of Monk Parakeets inhabited our Potter Highlands neighborhood and 
frequented our feeders for at least two years in the late eighties until a 
neighbor, tired of their calling, shot them with her BB gun. Gail had called 
the Rare Bird Alert when we first noted them and was told that they were not 
reportable because they were escapees unable to survive and breed in our 
climate. 


- Chuck Lowrie, Denver

On Sunday, July 27, 2014 3:30:10 PM UTC-6, ouzels wrote: 

 None of the speculators about Colorado’s 500th bird(s) addressed one 
possibility: It already happened. 

 
 Over the years the CFO Records Committee has looked at 1000s of records with 
professionalism, thoughtfulness, and thoroughness. To crack the barrier the 
Records Committee only has to re-visit some rejected records. 


 

            CAROLINA PAROQUET: 1805.

When the Pike expedition (was it Pike?) saw these birds along the Arkansas 
River, had they crossed that magic line? 


 

            PILEATED WOODPECKER: 1940s or 1950s.

Reported near the Maroon Bells by Justice William O. Douglas. Can you doubt the 
word of a Supreme Court justice? But – he didn’t submit a Rare Bird Form. 


 

            MONK PARAKEET: 1983-1985. 

When we lived in Denver, a Monk Parakeet spent a whole winter in the Congress 
Park neighborhood. This wary bird even built a nest along the alley at 11th & 
Clayton. It showed up at our feeder on a 20-below-zero winter morning. 


 1970’s: Two seen along Platte River bikeway for a couple of months. 


 

            RED-BACKED HAWK: 1987-1994. 

For eight years a Red-backed Hawk/Buzzard summered on a ranch north of 
Gunnison. It mated with a Swainson’s Hawk and produced at least one young. 
Observed by dozens (hundreds probably) of people including former President & 
wife, Jimmy & Rosalind Carter. 


 

            BLACK-HOODED CONURE: 1995.

No RBF, probably. Attended feeders in a subdivision south of Chatfield for 2 
months in 1995. Observed on a Fall Count. 


 

 

Hugh Kingery 
Franktown, CO

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/5c47aa38-81ce-454b-885c-56097960189c%40googlegroups.com 
 
. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/SNT406-EAS360F404D6C0B7ABE5DE0860C1FA0%40phx.gbl 
 
. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

 

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/1406562018.99806.YahooMailNeo%40web142802.mail.bf1.yahoo.com 
 
. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/00a301cfaa8e%2425a8a140%2470f9e3c0%24%40com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Green Heron/Boulder
From: "The \"Nunn Guy\"" <colorado.birder AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 11:02:38 -0700 (PDT)
E. Anne W. reports "Saw this guy at Walden/Sawhill 2 years ago and never 
saw it at all last year. He was on a branch on the west bank of the big 
Sawhill pond (next to parking lot) on Saturday a.m."

Photo:  http://coloradobirder.ning.com/photo/green-heron-11

Thanks Gary Lefko, Nunn
http://coloradobirder.ning.com/
Mobile:  http://coloradobirder.ning.com/m



-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/0e0e7176-13e0-45df-a02f-4dcc49da1eb9%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Don't be disappointed: Tickets to Boulder Audubon's 40th selling fast
From: Pam Piombino <piombino.pam AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 11:30:06 -0600
Dear Co-birders,

We are experiencing a great response to our invitations for Boulder County
Audubon's 40th Anniversary Party with Scott Weidensaul.  We are strictly
limited to 150 guests.  If you are planning on coming, either return the
card in your invitation or go to the Boulder County Audubon website to
register using paypal, or call me.  More information below:

*“Still Soaring at 40”: Boulder County Audubon’s 40th Anniversary
Celebration*

*When:* August 23, 2014

*Where:* Lone Hawk Farm, 10790 N. 49th St., Longmont, CO  80503
*Time:* 5:30 pm – 9:00 pm
*Event Link:* http://www.boulderaudubon.org/40th-anni.htm

Please join us for this very special evening celebrating the many and
varied accomplishments of Boulder County Audubon, a leading voice in our
area for migratory bird and wildlife conservation.

We’ll kick off this fun night with cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, a catered
buffet dinner and homemade desserts. Even though we probably had you at
homemade desserts, we have even more in store!

Our keynote speaker is noted author, ornithologist and naturalist Scott
Weidensaul . This evening will also
include a silent auction and a slide show featuring local birds and the
people who have given selflessly for the last 40 years.

If you are a national member of Audubon or a member of BCAS, you should
have received an invitation in the mail. If not, you can contact Pam
Piombino at (303) 776-1939 or (435) 210-8019 to receive an invite. You can
also visit the event link above to register for this event via PayPal.

WE ARE LOOKING FOR DONATIONS AND VOLUNTEERS! Since this event is a
fundraiser for BCAS, we greatly appreciate any donations you can give to
our silent auction. Click the event link above for donation suggestions. If
you’d like to make a donation to this event or volunteer for it, contact
Pam Piombino (see her contact info just above) or send me an email at
lm.lee AT comcast.net.
Hope to see you there and a giant thank you to those who have already
reserved their spots!

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAF2zbduphBUYRVbcHqcji5QWUPvhpBa9M9XPTLCQXiFnE%3De%3DSw%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: GoPro Cameras for Birding?
From: "The \"Nunn Guy\"" <colorado.birder AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 10:26:42 -0700 (PDT)
Anyone ever try or use GoPro cameras for bird video and/or photo capture?  
Bird feeding station?  Birder "helmet-cam"?

Thanks Gary Lefko, Nunn
http://coloradobirder.ning.com/
Mobile:  http://coloradobirder.ning.com/m



-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/adc17050-bc7e-402d-b2d7-a6a8b875f93d%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Sage Thrashers/North Weld County
From: "The \"Nunn Guy\"" <colorado.birder AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 10:03:53 -0700 (PDT)
Weld CR 128 is favorite drive of mine during migration periods--pristine 
prairie, beautiful drive, and only two houses along route.  Yesterday, I 
had the following:

   - Horned Lark - plenty
   - Sage Thrasher - 8
   - Chipping Sparrow - 5
   - Grasshopper Sparrow - 2
   - Lark Sparrow - 3
   - Lark Bunting - "billions"
   - Western Meadowlark
   - American Kestrel - 3
   - Swainson's Hawk
   - Mourning Dove
   - Eastern Kingbird
   - Western Kingbird
   - Common Nighthawk
   - Loggerhead Shrike - 4
   - European Starli9ng
   - Common Grackle
   - Bullock's Oriole
   - Killdeer

At the house

   - Northern Mockingbird
   - Black-headed Grosbeak
   - Numerous Burrowing Owls continue at Weld CR 33
   
At Crom Lake

   - Sora (first time here!)

Photos:  http://coloradobirder.ning.com/photo

Thanks Gary Lefko, Nunn

http://coloradobirder.ning.com/

Mobile:  http://coloradobirder.ning.com/m


-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/bddc185c-5c5d-4fce-a80e-ed91d6b18cdc%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ?
From: "The \"Nunn Guy\"" <colorado.birder AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 09:19:23 -0700 (PDT)
These Monk Parakeets lived near our backyard in Colorado Springs--huge nest 
on telephone pole in a nearby alley way.  We saw at most seven of them. 
They did breed in that nest.  We got local media involved to prevent their 
capture ... :-( ... they use to come to our feeders daily and were highly 
entertaining!

I remember why wife saying to me "I just saw three green birds flying over 
our house".

Thanks Gary Lefko, Nunn
http://coloradobirder.ning.com/
Mobile:  http://coloradobirder.ning.com/m


On Sunday, July 27, 2014 5:38:23 PM UTC-6, Snowy Owl wrote:
>
>  A pair of monk parakeets built a nest in a Colorado Springs neighborhood 
> in the mid 90s.  Escapees, I'm sure.  I believe they were captured and 
> incarcerated at the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo.
>
>  
>  
>  
>  Sent with the Samsung Galaxy Exhilarate™, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone.
>  
> Chuck > wrote:
>  A pair of Monk Parakeets inhabited our Potter Highlands neighborhood and 
> frequented our feeders for at least two years in the late eighties until a 
> neighbor, tired of their calling, shot them with her BB gun. Gail had 
> called the Rare Bird Alert when we first noted them and was told that they 
> were not reportable because they were escapees unable to survive and breed 
> in our climate. 
> - Chuck Lowrie, Denver
>
> On Sunday, July 27, 2014 3:30:10 PM UTC-6, ouzels wrote: 
>
>             None of the speculators about Colorado’s 500th bird(s) 
> addressed one possibility: It already happened.
>  
>             Over the years the CFO Records Committee has looked at 1000s 
> of records with professionalism, thoughtfulness, and thoroughness. To 
> crack the barrier the Records Committee only has to re-visit some rejected 
> records. 
>   
>             CAROLINA PAROQUET: 1805.
> When the Pike expedition (was it Pike?) saw these birds along the Arkansas 
> River, had they crossed that magic line?
>  
>             PILEATED WOODPECKER: 1940s or 1950s.
> Reported near the Maroon Bells by Justice William O. Douglas. Can you 
> doubt the word of a Supreme Court justice? But – he didn’t submit a Rare 
> Bird Form.
>  
>             MONK PARAKEET: 1983-1985. 
> When we lived in Denver, a Monk Parakeet spent a whole winter in the 
> Congress Park neighborhood. This wary bird even built a nest along the 
> alley at 11th & Clayton. It showed up at our feeder on a 20-below-zero 
> winter morning. 
>             1970’s: Two seen along Platte River bikeway for a couple of 
> months.
>  
>             RED-BACKED HAWK: 1987-1994. 
> For eight years a Red-backed Hawk/Buzzard summered on a ranch north of 
> Gunnison. It mated with a Swainson’s Hawk and produced at least one young. 
> Observed by dozens (hundreds probably) of people including former President 
> & wife, Jimmy & Rosalind Carter.
>  
>             BLACK-HOODED CONURE: 1995.
> No RBF, probably. Attended feeders in a subdivision south of Chatfield for 
> 2 months in 1995. Observed on a Fall Count. 
>  
>  
>  Hugh Kingery 
> Franktown, CO
>
>     -- 
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
> "Colorado Birds" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an 
> email to cobirds+u... AT googlegroups.com .
> To post to this group, send email to cob... AT googlegroups.com 
> .
> To view this discussion on the web visit 
> 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/5c47aa38-81ce-454b-885c-56097960189c%40googlegroups.com 

> 
 

> .
> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
>  

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/fceffa4f-4a5b-40a2-b8ca-7ede2e9ac5f0%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ?
From: "'Mark Obmascik' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 08:40:18 -0700
Several colonies of monk parakeets have lived on the South Side of Chicago for 
more than 30 years. I think Ira Sanders would back me up in agreeing that 
Chicago winters are far more harsh than anything in Denver. There may be other 
reasons to not count monk parakeets in Denver, but hardiness is not one. 


Mark Obmascik
Denver, CO 


On Sunday, July 27, 2014 5:38 PM, drchartier  wrote:
 


A pair of monk parakeets built a nest in a Colorado Springs neighborhood in the 
mid 90s.  Escapees, I'm sure.  I believe they were captured and incarcerated 
at the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo. 





Sent with the Samsung Galaxy Exhilarate™, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone.
Chuck  wrote:

A pair of Monk Parakeets inhabited our Potter Highlands neighborhood and 
frequented our feeders for at least two years in the late eighties until a 
neighbor, tired of their calling, shot them with her BB gun. Gail had called 
the Rare Bird Alert when we first noted them and was told that they were not 
reportable because they were escapees unable to survive and breed in our 
climate. 

- Chuck Lowrie, Denver

On Sunday, July 27, 2014 3:30:10 PM UTC-6, ouzels wrote: 
            None of the speculators about Colorado’s 500th bird(s) 
addressed one possibility: It already happened. 

> 
>            Over the years the CFO Records Committee has looked at 
1000s of records with professionalism, thoughtfulness, and thoroughness.To 
crack the barrier the Records Committee only has to re-visit some rejected 
records. 

> 
>            CAROLINA PAROQUET: 1805.
>When the Pike expedition (was it Pike?) saw these birds along the Arkansas 
River, had they crossed that magic line? 

> 
>            PILEATED WOODPECKER: 1940s or 1950s.
>Reported near the Maroon Bells by Justice William O. Douglas. Can you doubt 
the word of a Supreme Court justice? But – he didn’t submit a Rare Bird 
Form. 

> 
>            MONK PARAKEET: 1983-1985. 
>When we lived in Denver, a Monk Parakeet spent a whole winter in the Congress 
Park neighborhood. This wary bird even built a nest along the alley at 11th & 
Clayton. It showed up at our feeder on a 20-below-zero winter morning. 

>            1970’s: Two seen along Platte River bikeway for a 
couple of months. 

> 
>            RED-BACKED HAWK: 1987-1994. 
>For eight years a Red-backed Hawk/Buzzard summered on a ranch north of 
Gunnison. It mated with a Swainson’s Hawk and produced at least one young. 
Observed by dozens (hundreds probably) of people including former President & 
wife, Jimmy & Rosalind Carter. 

> 
>            BLACK-HOODED CONURE: 1995.
>No RBF, probably. Attended feeders in a subdivision south of Chatfield for 2 
months in 1995. Observed on a Fall Count. 

> 
>
>
>Hugh Kingery 
>Franktown, CO
>
>
-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/5c47aa38-81ce-454b-885c-56097960189c%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/SNT406-EAS360F404D6C0B7ABE5DE0860C1FA0%40phx.gbl. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/1406562018.99806.YahooMailNeo%40web142802.mail.bf1.yahoo.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Southeast CO lakes, July 27
From: David Dowell <dave1wx AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 07:35:17 -0700 (PDT)
Shorebirds were hard to find yesterday at DeWeese Reservoir (Custer 
County), Lake Meredith (Crowley), Lake Henry (Crowley), Lake Holbrook 
(Otero), Lake Cheraw (Otero), and Adobe Creek Reservoir (Bent and Kiowa). 
 Lake levels are moderately high at Meredith and Adobe Creek, and very high 
at Henry and Holbrook.  If levels went down only slightly, there were be 
much more shorebird habitat, but there's no sign yet of that occurring.

Neegronda Reservoir (Kiowa County) is currently attracting shorebirds in 
larger numbers, about 700 total yesterday with the following species: 
 American Avocet (many), Wilson's Phalarope (100's), Baird's Sandpiper 
(100's), Semipalmated Sandpiper, Western Sandpiper, Snowy Plover, 
Long-billed Dowitcher, Long-billed Curlew, Marbled Godwit, Stilt Sandpiper, 
Lesser Yellowlegs, Semipalmated Plover, and Spotted Sandpiper.

The long-term trends at Neegronda Reservoir don't look good.  It has shrunk 
to about half the size it was only a year ago.  Neegronda has been the only 
remaining gem in what was once a treasure chest of lakes in the area.

The Snowy Plovers are happy, though, with numbers up to at least 24 at Lake 
Cheraw and 23 at Neegronda Reservoir.

Landbirding yesterday was good around the northeast end of DeWeese 
Reservoir.

David Dowell
Longmont, CO

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/95bef985-6ead-4599-a290-a3fed4fa72cf%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 28 July 2014
From: Joyce Takamine <jabirujt AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 04:33:22 -0600
Compiler: Joyce Takamine
Date: July 28, 2014
email: rba AT cfobirds.org

This is the Colorado Rare Bird Alert for Monday, July 28 sponsored by
Denver Field Ornithologists and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.

Highlight species include: (* indicates new information on this species).

Red-necked Grebe (Jackson)
Caspian Tern (Denver)
ACORN WOODPECKER (Pueblo)
American Three-toed Woodpecker (Douglas, Mesa, Park)
Black Phoebe (Fremont)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (*Fremont)=
Black-throated Sparrow (Pueblo)
Fox Sparrow (Mesa)
Northern Cardinal (Boulder)
Indigo Bunting (Boulder, Jefferson)

BOULDER COUNTY:
--A calling Northern Cardinal was reported by Boswell part way up Hawthorn
Gulch on July 21.
--Boswell reported an Indigo Bunting has been singing in the morning in the
vicinity of Maxwell House on the east side of Sanitas on July 21.

DENVER COUNTY:
--2 Caspian Terns were reported by Edwards flying over Ferril Lake in
Denver City Park on July 19.

DOUGLAS COUNTY:
--A f American Three-toed Woodpecker was reported by Suddjian on Rampart
Range Road 0.5 mile from CR 67 on July 22.

FREMONT COUNTY:
--Miller reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on July 8 on CO 67, It was
seen flying alongside the highway. It was seen 0.75 miles north of the
Custer County line.  On July 13, Miller reported seeing the Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 14, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was
reported by Walbek, Percival and Schultz. On July 16, Drummond reported
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at 0730 but not at 1030.  On July 19, Hinds
reported the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 20,
Edwards reported that 2 Scissor-tailed Flycatchers were seen and
that they appear to be nesting in the dead tree.  On July 22, Bill Maynard
reported 1 Scissor-tailed Flycatcher before 0800.  On July 23, Moss
reported seeing the female Scissor-tailed Flycatcher.  On July 25, Moss was
able to see the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher pair exchange duty at the nest in
the dead tree.  On July 26, Kaempfer reported the pair of Scissor-tailed
Flycatchers were busy defending their nest.  On July 27, Moss watched the f
Scissor-tail forage from the driveway several hundered feet north of nest
tree..  Moss spote to the property owner of the nest tree and it is okay to
park in the driveway as long as you do not block the driveway and stay
outside their fenceline.
--At least 2 Black Phoebes were reported by Dunning at Florence River Park
on July 20.

JACKSON COUNTY:
--On July 11 Hundertmark reported that the pair of Red-necked Grebes
continues incubating egg(s) on Lake John.  On July 19, Hundertmark reported
3 adult Red-necked Grebes (2 m, 1 f) at Lake John but an empty nest.

JEFFERSON COUNTY:
--Singing Indigo Buntings were reported by Henwood east of Morrison on Soda
Lakes Road on July 20.

MESA COUNTY:
--On July 25, Henwood reported 2 American Three-toed Woodpeckers (ad and
fledgling m) and a Slate-colored Fox Sparrow at Fruita Reservoir #1 S of
Glade Park.

PARK COUNTY:
--A family of American Three-toed Woodpeckers was reported by Suddjian near
Georgia Pass on July 21.
--An American Three-toed Woodpecker was reported by Suddjian near Boreas
Pass on July 21.

PUEBLO COUNTY:
--Knight reported 3 Black-throated Sparrows on July 5 near Pueblo West.
Percival reported them again on July 8. The sparrows were found by parking
at Liberty Point in Pueblo West at the end of Purcell Blvd. The rest
involves a hike that isn't for those who are out of shape. Take the trail
off to the right before the flag pole and memorial. Proceed to the bottom
of the cliff keeping to your right. You will pass a cement "well" just
before merging with a now unused dirt road which heads WNW to a distant
pass in the cliff. The first arroyo with slab rocks is where the sparrows
were.  On July 12, Lilly reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West
and on July 14, Joy reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West and an
easier walk from south end of South Greenbrier Drive.  South Greenbrier
Drive is reached b driving south on Purcell from Hwy 50 for about 2.5 miles
to East Linden Ave.  Turn
west on Linden, and then south on Greenbrier.  On July 16, Drummond
reported ad male and juvenile Black-throated Sparrows in Pueblo East area,
using easier hiking point of South Greenbrier Drive.  On July 20, Edwards
reported Black-throated Sparrows continue at Liberty Point in Pueblo West.
--An ACORN WOODPECKER family was reported by Percival at the dead Ponderosa
Tree in the parking lot at Horseshoe Lodge at Pueblo Mountain Park on July
10. On July 12, Bohannon reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain
Park.  On July 20, Dunning reported that the pair of ACORN WOODPECKERS at
Pueblo Mountain Park were busy feeding young.  On July 26, Kaempfer
reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain Park.
--On July 20, Knight reported a Black Phoebe below Pueblo Reservoir dam.

DFO Field Trips:
The DFO Field Trip for Saturday, August 2 will be to the Wheat Ridge
Greenbelt led by Mary Geder (303-986-6127) and Jackie King (720-381-3314).
 Call leader if going.  Meet at Prospect Park at 0800.  From I-70 exit 267,
take Kipling south about 0.75 mile and turn right (west) on 44th Ave.  Go
one mile west.  Look for entrace to Prospect Park on your left (south).
 Meet just inside the park in the lot right next to Prospect Lake.
This will be a half-day trip, easy wlaking, accessible for mobility
impaired individuals.  Bring water and a snack, lunch optional.  Goo trip
for novice birders and new members.

The DFO Field Trip for Sunday, August 3 will be the Jackson Lake Reservoir
led by Ira and Tammy Sanders (303-278-7172).  Call leaders if going.  Meet
at 0600 at the Division of Wildlife, 6060 N Broadway.  Exit I-25 at 58th
Ave, go west 2 blocks to Broadway, then north 2 blocks to parking lot on
right to carpool.  State Parks Pass required.  This is an all day trip so
bring lunch, plenty of water, bug spray, and sunscreen.  Scopes will be
helpful and remember you mud boots as we may hike through some mud.

Good Birding,
Joyce Takamine
 Boulder
303-554-9785

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAHtstTcMpQ-HcWcH68x0Ph0FA3K9v1ReYU_NfKKoYmiPJ_0tVQ%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatchers nesting south of Florence: the female foraging
From: "SeEttaM ." <seettam AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 23:59:36 -0600
Yesterday and today I got some much better photos of the female
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher when she foraged near where I was parked in the
driveway several hundred feet north of the nest tree.  I watched her and
sometimes the male forage a number of times and when I saw them with their
catch they ate it.  However for sure on one occasion the grasshopper's leg
came off so the grasshopper came out of her grasp but she re-caught it and
I did get some photos of that neat action that I have uploaded to my Birds
and Nature blog .

I have talked to the owner of the property on which the nest tree and the
driveway to the north of the nest is located.  It is ok if we park in that
driveway as long as we do not block it and as long as we stay just outside
their fenceline.  Though this is fairly distant from the nest tree I could
see the flycatchers both with my binoculars as well as my spotting scope
(tho clearly better view with scope).  The best thing about this location
is that sometimes the birds forage nearby providing very good views and
photo opportunities--and it is off the highway and safe.  The pull-off
south of the nest tree and on the east side of the highway is as noted in a
post yesterday another good spot to park that is safe and does not impact
nesting.

SeEtta Moss
Canon City
http://BirdsAndNature.blogspot.com

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAAUvckrY2bo3Jn1enTrHpdWgqRwQJ55G17vFfVWD6LzHR0gMtQ%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Save 16,000 cormorants
From: "Ira Sanders" <zroadrunner14 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 19:08:41 -0600
 

 

Posted with the permission of the moderator. 


  Care2 Petitionsite Action Alert

action alert! 

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to shoot thousands of double-breasted 
cormorants along the Columbia River Estuary near Portland, Oregon. We have 
until August 4th to convince them otherwise. 



  Please sign the petition today!

  URGENT: Stop the Slaughter of 
16,000 Cormorants! 


  Take Action

 


please share 

it helps!

  Share on Facebook 
 Share on Twitter 
 Share via Email 


Dear jeffrey, 

Thousands of cormorants along the Columbia River Estuary near Portland, Oregon 
have been sentenced to death. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to shoot 
thousands of the birds --  
because they eat "too many salmon" as the fish make their way through the 
Columbia River estuary to the Pacific Ocean. 


Over the course of the next four years, 16,000 cormorants will be slaughtered 
during nesting season.  Oil will 
also be spread over cormorant eggs to suffocate the eggs and ensure that they 
do not hatch, introducing oil into the bird nests and into the environment. 


And it's not as if cormorant populations are all that stable, either. Overall, 
the numbers of cormorants in the country have been declining. A mass cull 
numbering in the thousands may be the death knell for the se migratory birds. 
 The government should be 
focusing on the real causes behind salmon decline: overfishing and river 
pollution. 


The public comment period on this horrifying issue closes on August 4th. We 
have until then to save the cormorants. 


  Sign the petition to oppose the 
cull and protect thousands of cormorants from slaughter! 



 Kathleen  

Thank you for taking action,

Kathleen J.
Care2 and ThePetitionSite


P.S. This petition was started by a Care2 member like you. 
 Click here to start a petition 
about something that matters to you. 



check your
Butterfly Care2 Butterfly Rewards 
 credits! 


  redeem credits | 
 about butterfly rewards 


 


Care2 subscriber since Aug 10, 2012

  Unsubscribe | 
 Share on Facebook | 
 Take Action 


 

To stop receiving this newsletter, visit: 
http://www.care2.com/newsletters/unsub/81/0/25599558/4c182df0 

or send a blank email message to:
ng-u-81-25599558-8655216-13230329-293a2617 AT australia.care2.com 

Care2.com, Inc.
275 Shoreline Drive, Suite 300
Redwood City, CA 94065
http://www.care2.com/ 
   

 

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/004101cfaa00%2478c63010%246a529030%24%40com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: RE: Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ?
From: "Ira Sanders" <zroadrunner14 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 19:07:40 -0600
Should have shot the neighbor.  Twice.

Ira Sanders

 

From: cobirds AT googlegroups.com [mailto:cobirds AT googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Chuck 

Sent: Sunday, July 27, 2014 5:04 PM
To: cobirds AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [cobirds] Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ?

 

A pair of Monk Parakeets inhabited our Potter Highlands neighborhood and 
frequented our feeders for at least two years in the late eighties until a 
neighbor, tired of their calling, shot them with her BB gun. Gail had called 
the Rare Bird Alert when we first noted them and was told that they were not 
reportable because they were escapees unable to survive and breed in our 
climate. 


- Chuck Lowrie, Denver

On Sunday, July 27, 2014 3:30:10 PM UTC-6, ouzels wrote:

 None of the speculators about Colorado’s 500th bird(s) addressed one 
possibility: It already happened. 

 
 Over the years the CFO Records Committee has looked at 1000s of records with 
professionalism, thoughtfulness, and thoroughness. To crack the barrier the 
Records Committee only has to re-visit some rejected records. 


 

            CAROLINA PAROQUET: 1805.

When the Pike expedition (was it Pike?) saw these birds along the Arkansas 
River, had they crossed that magic line? 


 

            PILEATED WOODPECKER: 1940s or 1950s.

Reported near the Maroon Bells by Justice William O. Douglas. Can you doubt the 
word of a Supreme Court justice? But – he didn’t submit a Rare Bird Form. 


 

            MONK PARAKEET: 1983-1985. 

When we lived in Denver, a Monk Parakeet spent a whole winter in the Congress 
Park neighborhood. This wary bird even built a nest along the alley at 11th & 
Clayton. It showed up at our feeder on a 20-below-zero winter morning. 


 1970’s: Two seen along Platte River bikeway for a couple of months. 


 

            RED-BACKED HAWK: 1987-1994. 

For eight years a Red-backed Hawk/Buzzard summered on a ranch north of 
Gunnison. It mated with a Swainson’s Hawk and produced at least one young. 
Observed by dozens (hundreds probably) of people including former President & 
wife, Jimmy & Rosalind Carter. 


 

            BLACK-HOODED CONURE: 1995.

No RBF, probably. Attended feeders in a subdivision south of Chatfield for 2 
months in 1995. Observed on a Fall Count. 


 

 

Hugh Kingery 
Franktown, CO

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/5c47aa38-81ce-454b-885c-56097960189c%40googlegroups.com 
 
. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/003901cfaa00%2454d179d0%24fe746d70%24%40com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: RE: Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ?
From: drchartier <drchartier AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 17:38:15 -0600
A pair of monk parakeets built a nest in a Colorado Springs neighborhood in the 
mid 90s. Escapees, I'm sure. I believe they were captured and incarcerated at 
the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo. 





Sent with the Samsung Galaxy Exhilarate™, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone.Chuck 
 wrote: 

A pair of Monk Parakeets inhabited our Potter Highlands neighborhood and
frequented our feeders for at least two years in the late eighties until a
neighbor, tired of their calling, shot them with her BB gun. Gail had
called the Rare Bird Alert when we first noted them and was told that they
were not reportable because they were escapees unable to survive and breed
in our climate.
- Chuck Lowrie, Denver

On Sunday, July 27, 2014 3:30:10 PM UTC-6, ouzels wrote:
>
>             None of the speculators about Colorado’s 500th bird(s)
> addressed one possibility: It already happened.
>
>             Over the years the CFO Records Committee has looked at 1000s
> of records with professionalism, thoughtfulness, and thoroughness. To
> crack the barrier the Records Committee only has to re-visit some rejected
> records.
>
>             CAROLINA PAROQUET: 1805.
> When the Pike expedition (was it Pike?) saw these birds along the Arkansas
> River, had they crossed that magic line?
>
>             PILEATED WOODPECKER: 1940s or 1950s.
> Reported near the Maroon Bells by Justice William O. Douglas. Can you
> doubt the word of a Supreme Court justice? But – he didn’t submit a Rare
> Bird Form.
>
>             MONK PARAKEET: 1983-1985.
> When we lived in Denver, a Monk Parakeet spent a whole winter in the
> Congress Park neighborhood. This wary bird even built a nest along the
> alley at 11th & Clayton. It showed up at our feeder on a 20-below-zero
> winter morning.
>             1970’s: Two seen along Platte River bikeway for a couple of
> months.
>
>             RED-BACKED HAWK: 1987-1994.
> For eight years a Red-backed Hawk/Buzzard summered on a ranch north of
> Gunnison. It mated with a Swainson’s Hawk and produced at least one young.
> Observed by dozens (hundreds probably) of people including former President
> & wife, Jimmy & Rosalind Carter.
>
>             BLACK-HOODED CONURE: 1995.
> No RBF, probably. Attended feeders in a subdivision south of Chatfield for
> 2 months in 1995. Observed on a Fall Count.
>
>
>  Hugh Kingery
> Franktown, CO
>
>

--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/5c47aa38-81ce-454b-885c-56097960189c%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/SNT406-EAS360F404D6C0B7ABE5DE0860C1FA0%40phx.gbl. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ?
From: Chuck <lowrie2 AT mindspring.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 16:03:47 -0700 (PDT)
A pair of Monk Parakeets inhabited our Potter Highlands neighborhood and 
frequented our feeders for at least two years in the late eighties until a 
neighbor, tired of their calling, shot them with her BB gun. Gail had 
called the Rare Bird Alert when we first noted them and was told that they 
were not reportable because they were escapees unable to survive and breed 
in our climate.
- Chuck Lowrie, Denver

On Sunday, July 27, 2014 3:30:10 PM UTC-6, ouzels wrote:
>
>             None of the speculators about Colorado’s 500th bird(s) 
> addressed one possibility: It already happened.
>  
>             Over the years the CFO Records Committee has looked at 1000s 
> of records with professionalism, thoughtfulness, and thoroughness. To 
> crack the barrier the Records Committee only has to re-visit some rejected 
> records. 
>   
>             CAROLINA PAROQUET: 1805.
> When the Pike expedition (was it Pike?) saw these birds along the Arkansas 
> River, had they crossed that magic line?
>  
>             PILEATED WOODPECKER: 1940s or 1950s.
> Reported near the Maroon Bells by Justice William O. Douglas. Can you 
> doubt the word of a Supreme Court justice? But – he didn’t submit a Rare 
> Bird Form.
>  
>             MONK PARAKEET: 1983-1985. 
> When we lived in Denver, a Monk Parakeet spent a whole winter in the 
> Congress Park neighborhood. This wary bird even built a nest along the 
> alley at 11th & Clayton. It showed up at our feeder on a 20-below-zero 
> winter morning. 
>             1970’s: Two seen along Platte River bikeway for a couple of 
> months.
>  
>             RED-BACKED HAWK: 1987-1994. 
> For eight years a Red-backed Hawk/Buzzard summered on a ranch north of 
> Gunnison. It mated with a Swainson’s Hawk and produced at least one young. 
> Observed by dozens (hundreds probably) of people including former President 
> & wife, Jimmy & Rosalind Carter.
>  
>             BLACK-HOODED CONURE: 1995.
> No RBF, probably. Attended feeders in a subdivision south of Chatfield for 
> 2 months in 1995. Observed on a Fall Count. 
>  
>  
>  Hugh Kingery 
> Franktown, CO
>
>  

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/5c47aa38-81ce-454b-885c-56097960189c%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: 499 & 500 [or 503] ?
From: stevenelarson AT comcast.net
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 22:56:10 +0000 (UTC)
Hi All, 
Based on the supreme court we have today, I'd say the bird could have easily 
been a Pygmy Nuthatch. 

Steve Larson 

----- Original Message -----

From: "COBirds"  
To: "COBirds"  
Sent: Sunday, July 27, 2014 3:30:05 PM 
Subject: [cobirds] 499 & 500 [or 503] ? 

None of the speculators about Colorado’s 500 th bird(s) addressed one 
possibility: It already happened. 


Over the years the CFO Records Committee has looked at 1000s of records with 
professionalism, thoughtfulness, and thoroughness. T o crack the barrier the 
Records Committee only has to re-visit some rejected records. 

CAROLINA PAROQUET: 1805. 
When the Pike expedition (was it Pike?) saw these birds along the Arkansas 
River, had they crossed that magic line? 

PILEATED WOODPECKER: 1940s or 1950s. 
Reported near the Maroon Bells by Justice William O. Douglas. Can you doubt the 
word of a Supreme Court justice? But – he didn’t submit a Rare Bird Form. 

MONK PARAKEET: 1983-1985. 
When we lived in Denver, a Monk Parakeet spent a whole winter in the Congress 
Park neighborhood. This wary bird even built a nest along the alley at 11 th & 
Clayton. It showed up at our feeder on a 20-below-zero winter morning. 

1970’s: Two seen along Platte River bikeway for a couple of months. 
RED-BACKED HAWK: 1987-1994. 
For eight years a Red-backed Hawk/Buzzard summered on a ranch north of 
Gunnison. It mated with a Swainson’s Hawk and produced at least one young. 
Observed by dozens (hundreds probably) of people including former President & 
wife, Jimmy & Rosalind Carter. 

BLACK-HOODED CONURE: 1995. 
No RBF, probably. Attended feeders in a subdivision south of Chatfield for 2 
months in 1995. Observed on a Fall Count. 


Hugh Kingery 
Franktown, CO 



-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com . 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com . 
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/8D177F9114F4E9C-D28-3C983%40webmail-vm006.sysops.aol.com 
. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout . 

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/1655959229.31485714.1406501770187.JavaMail.root%40comcast.net. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: 499 & 500 [or 503] ?
From: "'Hugh Kingery' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 17:30:05 -0400 (EDT)
 None of thespeculators about Colorado’s 500th bird(s) addressed 
onepossibility: It already happened. 

 
 Over the years the CFO Records Committee haslooked at 1000s of records with 
professionalism, thoughtfulness, andthoroughness. Tocrack the barrier the 
Records Committee only has to re-visit some rejectedrecords. 


 
            CAROLINAPAROQUET: 1805.
When the Pike expedition (was it Pike?) saw these birdsalong the Arkansas 
River, had they crossed that magic line? 

 
            PILEATEDWOODPECKER: 1940s or 1950s.
Reported near the Maroon Bells by Justice William O.Douglas. Can you doubt the 
word of a Supreme Court justice? But – he didn’tsubmit a Rare Bird Form. 

 
            MONKPARAKEET: 1983-1985. 
When we lived in Denver, a Monk Parakeet spent a wholewinter in the Congress 
Park neighborhood. This wary bird even built a nestalong the alley at 11th & 
Clayton. It showed up at our feeder ona 20-below-zero winter morning. 

 1970’s: Twoseen along Platte River bikeway for a couple of months. 

 
            RED-BACKEDHAWK: 1987-1994. 
For eight years a Red-backed Hawk/Buzzard summered on aranch north of Gunnison. 
It mated with a Swainson’s Hawk and produced at leastone young. Observed by 
dozens (hundreds probably) of people including formerPresident & wife, Jimmy & 
Rosalind Carter. 

 
            BLACK-HOODEDCONURE: 1995.
No RBF, probably. Attended feeders in a subdivision south ofChatfield for 2 
months in 1995. Observed on a Fall Count. 

 

 

Hugh Kingery 
  Franktown, CO
  


-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/8D177F9114F4E9C-D28-3C983%40webmail-vm006.sysops.aol.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Confirmed nesting of SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER pair south of Florence
From: "Karl Stecher Jr." <kstecher AT idcomm.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 08:26:17 -0600
Since I grew up in Maryland, and did most of my medical training there, I 
note that you missed mentioning the Baltimore oriole, very distinctive and 
identified with the state.
As for that larus in Utah, perhaps it is glorified in the Beach Boys' song, 
tribute to the salvation of the Mormons' crops, "Wish they all could be 
California gulls." (Apologies to Joe Roller and other Colorado birders with 
similar quirks of humor) 

Karl Stecher
Centennial 

Mel Goff writes: 

> Bill, on the matter of state birds I agree that there is little imagination 
for many states. However, there may be some justification as Jeanne and I 
learned in Costa Rica, where the national bird is the very play Clay-colored 
Thrush. With birds like the Resplendent Quetzal, multiple trogons, tanagers, 
motmots, and more, why would they choose this unassuming bird? Our guide told 
us it was chosen because it was found in all the habitats and regions of the 
country, thus easily seen by all. 

> 
> We have a goal to see all the state birds in their state, so even with the 
redundancies, we feel that there is something fresh about seeing "another" 
Cardinal/Meadowlark, etc. 

> 
> Mel Goff
> Colorado Springs 
> 
> 
> From: William H Kaempfer 
> Sent: Saturday, July 26, 2014 7:39 PM
> To: okbookwoman AT gmail.com ; cobirds AT googlegroups.com 
> Subject: RE: [cobirds] Re: Confirmed nesting of SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER 
pair south of Florence 

> 
> I had the good fortune to watch this pair doing their business today. 
> 
>   
> 
> (As a long aside, I think that from a birder's perspective, only Oklahoma's 
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher out does Colorado's Lark Bunting on the state-bird 
front. New Mexico's Greater Roadrunner and Utah's California Gull (what 
attitude to not only have a larus for a state bird, but one named after a 
different state!!!) are close 3rds and 4ths, and notice that these states are 
all contiguous in their spurning of American Robin, Northern Mockingbird, 
various bluebirds and meadowlarks.) (Have I just kicked off the agitated thread 
of the year?) 

> 
>   
> 
> On the east side of the road (CO 67) there is a useful and safe pull out a 
couple of hundred yards south of the dead tree where the Scissor-tailed pair 
are nesting. If you are coming to see the birds from the north (which probably 
98% of us are) drive past the tree to the Hardscrabble Point of Interest pull 
out on the right, turn around and go back to the small pull out on the east 
side of the road at the crest of the hill south of the big dead nest tree. (But 
be careful when you go back on the highway.) The Scissor-tailed pair are far, 
far too busy intercepting and harassing every raven (I thought the one there 
today may have been Chihuahuan), Turkey Vulture and Red-tailed Hawk that makes 
the mistake of entering their no-fly zone to worry about your presence from 
this spot. They will put on quite a spectacular display if you give them 15 
minutes or so. I enjoyed them greatly with Doug Kibbe, Jeff Dawson and 
Christina this morning. 

> 
>   
> 
> After the flycatchers, we continued into Wetmore where I gave the other three 
bad directions on finding Band-tailed Pigeons. If you want to look for them, 
try along CR 389, not CR 395. I had a couple near the creek crossing at CR 388 
about 2 miles south of the intersection CO 67 and CO96. 

> 
>   
> 
> Finally, I went on down to pick up the Pueblo Mountain Park Environmental 
Station Acorn Woodpeckers. I know this is the birding equivalent of shooting 
fish in a barrel, but where else can you get Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, 
Band-tailed Pigeon and Acorn Woodpecker in one day? 

> 
>   
> 
> Bill Kaempfer 
> 
> Boulder 
> 
>   
> 
> From: cobirds AT googlegroups.com [mailto:cobirds AT googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Deb Evers 

> Sent: Saturday, July 26, 2014 9:32 AM
> To: cobirds AT googlegroups.com
> Subject: [cobirds] Re: Confirmed nesting of SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER pair 
south of Florence 

> 
>   
> 
> Excellent point! Hopefully we birders can use this as an opportunity to 
remind or to gently educate others on the importance of leaving all nesting 
birds alone! 

> 
> Deb Evers
> Loveland, CO 
> 
> 
> On Friday, July 25, 2014 11:46:15 PM UTC-6, SeEtta wrote: 
> 
> I drove out tonight to do some more observation of the SCISSOR-TAILED 
FLYCATCHERS south of Florence as it just seemed to me that their defense of 
that location from the Am Crows was an indication of current/future nesting. I 
was rewarded a little after 8 pm with a view of a SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER 
sitting on a small nest (previously undocumented and located on the north side 
of the tree they have been observed in) and then watching the female get off 
the nest and be replaced by the male. I have two photos (taken from inside my 
car) that I have uploaded to my Birds and Nature blog showing one of them 
sitting on the nest and of the male perched just above this nest that I took 
close to dark--not the greatest but they show the birds on/above the nest. I 
want to add it is far more important to not disturb this rare nesting pair than 
to get great photos so all photographers need to be cognizant of their impacts 
and be careful to not impair the success of this nesting. 

> 
> SeEtta Moss 
> 
> Canon City 
> 
> http://BirdsAndNature.blogspot.com 
> 
> -- 
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an 
email to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

> To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
> To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/12eb66e2-1e6f-46ef-b72e-f9565879ea27%40googlegroups.com. 

> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout. 
> 
> -- 
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an 
email to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

> To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
> To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/F90B1155A81D474890D22EEFFFA7CAE51C1B8B6880%40EXC4.ad.colorado.edu. 

> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout. 
> 
> -- 
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an 
email to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

> To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
> To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/401F7EC0035848E7A5A017D506114029%40MelDesktop. 

> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
 

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/20140727142617.51840522013%40mailhost.idcomm.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Re: Confirmed nesting of SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER pair south of Florence
From: "Mel Goff" <melgoff AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 08:07:17 -0600
Bill, on the matter of state birds I agree that there is little imagination for 
many states. However, there may be some justification as Jeanne and I learned 
in Costa Rica, where the national bird is the very play Clay-colored Thrush. 
With birds like the Resplendent Quetzal, multiple trogons, tanagers, motmots, 
and more, why would they choose this unassuming bird? Our guide told us it was 
chosen because it was found in all the habitats and regions of the country, 
thus easily seen by all. 


We have a goal to see all the state birds in their state, so even with the 
redundancies, we feel that there is something fresh about seeing “another” 
Cardinal/Meadowlark, etc. 


Mel Goff
Colorado Springs


From: William H Kaempfer 
Sent: Saturday, July 26, 2014 7:39 PM
To: okbookwoman AT gmail.com ; cobirds AT googlegroups.com 
Subject: RE: [cobirds] Re: Confirmed nesting of SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER pair 
south of Florence 


I had the good fortune to watch this pair doing their business today.

 

(As a long aside, I think that from a birder’s perspective, only Oklahoma’s 
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher out does Colorado’s Lark Bunting on the state-bird 
front. New Mexico’s Greater Roadrunner and Utah’s California Gull (what 
attitude to not only have a larus for a state bird, but one named after a 
different state!!!) are close 3rds and 4ths, and notice that these states are 
all contiguous in their spurning of American Robin, Northern Mockingbird, 
various bluebirds and meadowlarks.) (Have I just kicked off the agitated thread 
of the year?) 


 

On the east side of the road (CO 67) there is a useful and safe pull out a 
couple of hundred yards south of the dead tree where the Scissor-tailed pair 
are nesting. If you are coming to see the birds from the north (which probably 
98% of us are) drive past the tree to the Hardscrabble Point of Interest pull 
out on the right, turn around and go back to the small pull out on the east 
side of the road at the crest of the hill south of the big dead nest tree. (But 
be careful when you go back on the highway.) The Scissor-tailed pair are far, 
far too busy intercepting and harassing every raven (I thought the one there 
today may have been Chihuahuan), Turkey Vulture and Red-tailed Hawk that makes 
the mistake of entering their no-fly zone to worry about your presence from 
this spot. They will put on quite a spectacular display if you give them 15 
minutes or so. I enjoyed them greatly with Doug Kibbe, Jeff Dawson and 
Christina this morning. 


 

After the flycatchers, we continued into Wetmore where I gave the other three 
bad directions on finding Band-tailed Pigeons. If you want to look for them, 
try along CR 389, not CR 395. I had a couple near the creek crossing at CR 388 
about 2 miles south of the intersection CO 67 and CO96. 


 

Finally, I went on down to pick up the Pueblo Mountain Park Environmental 
Station Acorn Woodpeckers. I know this is the birding equivalent of shooting 
fish in a barrel, but where else can you get Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, 
Band-tailed Pigeon and Acorn Woodpecker in one day? 


 

Bill Kaempfer

Boulder

 

From: cobirds AT googlegroups.com [mailto:cobirds AT googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Deb Evers 

Sent: Saturday, July 26, 2014 9:32 AM
To: cobirds AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [cobirds] Re: Confirmed nesting of SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER pair 
south of Florence 


 

Excellent point! Hopefully we birders can use this as an opportunity to remind 
or to gently educate others on the importance of leaving all nesting birds 
alone! 


Deb Evers
Loveland, CO


On Friday, July 25, 2014 11:46:15 PM UTC-6, SeEtta wrote:

I drove out tonight to do some more observation of the SCISSOR-TAILED 
FLYCATCHERS south of Florence as it just seemed to me that their defense of 
that location from the Am Crows was an indication of current/future nesting. I 
was rewarded a little after 8 pm with a view of a SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER 
sitting on a small nest (previously undocumented and located on the north side 
of the tree they have been observed in) and then watching the female get off 
the nest and be replaced by the male. I have two photos (taken from inside my 
car) that I have uploaded to my Birds and Nature blog showing one of them 
sitting on the nest and of the male perched just above this nest that I took 
close to dark--not the greatest but they show the birds on/above the nest. I 
want to add it is far more important to not disturb this rare nesting pair than 
to get great photos so all photographers need to be cognizant of their impacts 
and be careful to not impair the success of this nesting. 


SeEtta Moss

Canon City

http://BirdsAndNature.blogspot.com

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/12eb66e2-1e6f-46ef-b72e-f9565879ea27%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/F90B1155A81D474890D22EEFFFA7CAE51C1B8B6880%40EXC4.ad.colorado.edu. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/401F7EC0035848E7A5A017D506114029%40MelDesktop. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 27 July 2014
From: Joyce Takamine <jabirujt AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 04:39:41 -0600
Compiler: Joyce Takamine
Date: July 27, 2014
email: rba AT cfobirds.org

This is the Colorado Rare Bird Alert for Sunday, July 27 sponsored by
Denver Field Ornithologists and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.

Highlight species include: (* indicates new information on this species).

YELLOW CROWNED NIGHT-HERON (Yuma)
Red-necked Grebe (Jackson)
Caspian Tern (Denver)
ACORN WOODPECKER (*Pueblo)
American Three-toed Woodpecker (Douglas, *Mesa, Park)
Bell's Vireo (Yuma)
Black Phoebe (Delta, Fremont, Montrose)
Eastern Phoebe (Yuma)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (*Fremont)
Purple Martin (Delta)
Carolina Wren (Prowers)
PACIFIC WREN (San Miguel)
Black-throated Sparrow (Pueblo)
Fox Sparrow (*Mesa)
Northern Cardinal (Boulder, Prowers, Yuma)
Indigo Bunting (Boulder, Jefferson)

BOULDER COUNTY:
--A calling Northern Cardinal was reported by Boswell part way up Hawthorn
Gulch on July 21.
--Boswell reported an Indigo Bunting has been singing in the morning in the
vicinity of Maxwell House on the east side of Sanitas on July 21.

DELTA COUNTY:
--On July 18, Garrison reported nesting Purple Martins on CSR 265 in NE
Delta County.

DELTA/MONTROSE COUNTIES:
--Farese reported 14 Black Phoebe on the Gunnison River from Chukar Trail
near Olathe to Pleasure Park near Hotchkiss on July 17.

DENVER COUNTY:
--2 Caspian Terns were reported by Edwards flying over Ferril Lake in
Denver City Park on July 19.

DOUGLAS COUNTY:
--A f American Three-toed Woodpecker was reported by Suddjian on Rampart
Range Road 0.5 mile from CR 67 on July 22.

FREMONT COUNTY:
--Miller reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on July 8 on CO 67, It was
seen flying alongside the highway. It was seen 0.75 miles north of the
Custer County line.  On July 13, Miller reported seeing the Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 14, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was
reported by Walbek, Percival and Schultz. On July 16, Drummond reported
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at 0730 but not at 1030.  On July 19, Hinds
reported the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 20,
Edwards reported that 2 Scissor-tailed Flycatchers were seen and
that they appear to be nesting in the dead tree.  On July 22, Bill Maynard
reported 1 Scissor-tailed Flycatcher before 0800.  On July 23, Moss
reported seeing the female Scissor-tailed Flycatcher.  On July 25, Moss was
able to see the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher pair exchange duty at the nest in
the dead tree.  On July 26, Kaempfer reported the pair of Scissor-tailed
Flycatchers were busy defending their nest.
--At least 2 Black Phoebes were reported by Dunning at Florence River Park
on July 20.

JACKSON COUNTY:
--On July 11 Hundertmark reported that the pair of Red-necked Grebes
continues incubating egg(s) on Lake John.  On July 19, Hundertmark reported
3 adult Red-necked Grebes (2 m, 1 f) at Lake John but an empty nest.

JEFFERSON COUNTY:
--Singing Indigo Buntings were reported by Henwood east of Morrison on Soda
Lakes Road on July 20.

MESA COUNTY:
--On July 25, Henwood reported 2 American Three-toed Woodpeckers (ad and
fledgling m) and a Slate-colored Fox Sparrow at Fruita Reservoir #1 S of
Glade Park.

PARK COUNTY:
--A family of American Three-toed Woodpeckers was reported by Suddjian near
Georgia Pass on July 21.
--An American Three-toed Woodpecker was reported by Suddjian near Boreas
Pass on July 21.

PROWERS COUNTY:
--On July 17, Moss reported hearing a Carolina Wren at the S end of Lamar
Community College Woods (LCCW)
and a pair of Northern Cardinals.

PUEBLO COUNTY:
--Knight reported 3 Black-throated Sparrows on July 5 near Pueblo West.
Percival reported them again on July 8. The sparrows were found by parking
at Liberty Point in Pueblo West at the end of Purcell Blvd. The rest
involves a hike that isn't for those who are out of shape. Take the trail
off to the right before the flag pole and memorial. Proceed to the bottom
of the cliff keeping to your right. You will pass a cement "well" just
before merging with a now unused dirt road which heads WNW to a distant
pass in the cliff. The first arroyo with slab rocks is where the sparrows
were.  On July 12, Lilly reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West
and on July 14, Joy reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West and an
easier walk from south end of South Greenbrier Drive.  South Greenbrier
Drive is reached b driving south on Purcell from Hwy 50 for about 2.5 miles
to East Linden Ave.  Turn
west on Linden, and then south on Greenbrier.  On July 16, Drummond
reported ad male and juvenile Black-throated Sparrows in Pueblo East area,
using easier hiking point of South Greenbrier Drive.  On July 20, Edwards
reported Black-throated Sparrows continue at Liberty Point in Pueblo West.
--An ACORN WOODPECKER family was reported by Percival at the dead Ponderosa
Tree in the parking lot at Horseshoe Lodge at Pueblo Mountain Park on July
10. On July 12, Bohannon reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain
Park.  On July 20, Dunning reported that the pair of ACORN WOODPECKERS at
Pueblo Mountain Park were busy feeding young.  On July 26, Kaempfer
reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain Park.
--On July 20, Knight reported a Black Phoebe below Pueblo Reservoir dam.

SAN MIGUEL:
--A PACIFIC WREN was reported by Lovitch on the Bear Creek Tail in
Telluride on July 13 and refound by Dexter on July 14.  On July 18, Dexter
reported that the PACIFIC WREN continues at the same location but may not
sing consistently after 1000.  Directions:  The location is .6 miles up
Bear creek Trail from the bridge over San Miguel River at S end of Pine St.
 It appears to be nest building.

YUMA COUNTY:
--At Stalker Lake on July 17, Mlodinow reported a 1 year old YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT-HERON on the N side and 9 Northern Cardinals.
--At Wray Fish Hatchery on July 17, Mlodinow reported Eastern Phoebes.
--At Simmons SWA, N of Beecher on July 17, Mlodinow reported 21 Bell's
Vireos.

DFO Field Trips:
The DFO Field trip for Sunday, July 27 will be to South Table Mountain in
Golden led by Mike Foster (303-456-2647).  Moderate trail, around 3 mile
hike, elevation gain of 500 fee.  Limit 8 people.  Preregister with Mike.
Meet at 0600 at the SE corner of RTD lot (2nd and Routt) a few blocks east
of Union Blvd,  From 6th Ave and Union, drive south to 2nd, then turn left
and enter lot off of Routt.  Will carpool to trailhead from here.  Half-day
trip.

Good Birding,
Joyce Takamine
Boulder
303-554-9785

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAHtstTc%3DECVVweR7w%2BrWA-vpc1MnCyTUM3%3DcoZ-WRdHVJA48Fw%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Re: Summer Migration, Wednesday, July 23
From: Paul Hurtado <paul.j.hurtado AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 21:43:24 -0400
Gary et al,

Another excellent resource for observing night migrants is Bill Evans'
website http://oldbird.org

You can hear a lot with a low cost "duct tape and bailing wire"  microphone
setup. I use my shotgun microphone and recording equipment like the audio
equivalent of binoculars or a spotting scope :-)

Good birding,
Paul Hurtado
On Jul 26, 2014 5:37 AM, "Ted Floyd"  wrote:

> Hi, Gary. Here's an intro, from the journal Colorado Birds:
>
> http://cfobirds.org/downloads/journal/Birding_on_the_Dark_Side.pdf
>
> As to gear, here's a primer:
>
> http://blog.aba.org/2014/07/how-to-record-birdsong-1.html
>
> (Note: All the recordings on that online primer are from Colorado.)
>
> Thanks for your interest!
>
> Ted Floyd
> Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado
>
> P.s. Good Chipping Sparrow flight over Lafayette, eastern Boulder County,
> the past three hours (2:30-5:30) this morning, Saturday, July 26th. Am
> hearing a bunch of them right now, in fact, coming in for a landing.
>
>
>
> On Friday, July 25, 2014 8:44:16 AM UTC-6, The "Nunn Guy" wrote:
>>
>> Hi Ted
>>
>> How do you go about listening to the migrating birds at night?
>>
>>    - By ear?
>>    - Have electronic surveillance equipment?
>>    - Parabolic microphone?
>>
>> Curious as to technique ... living in rural Nunn I suppose I am in
>> optimal region for listening ... no civilization around.
>>
>> Thanks Gary Lefko, Nunn
>>
>> http://coloradobirder.ning.com
>>
>> Mobile:  http://coloradobirder.ning.com/m
>>
>>
>>
>> On Thursday, July 24, 2014 6:33:35 PM UTC-6, Ted Floyd wrote:
>>>
>>> Hello, Birders.
>>>
>>> Once upon a time, birders thought there were two migrations: spring and
>>> fall. We in Colorado now appreciate that there are three: spring, summer,
>>> and fall.
>>>
>>> Yesterday, Wednesday, July 23rd, summer migration was in full swing in
>>> Lafayette, eastern Boulder County. Although I did not leave my yard for
>>> birding, I couldn't help but notice migrants throughout the day.
>>>
>>> First up was a Solitary Sandpiper migrating over at 3:26 a.m. Then came
>>> a Chipping Sparrow, followed by a Sora. Here's a cut of the Chipping
>>> Sparrow followed by the Sora:
>>>
>>> https://soundcloud.com/ted-floyd/lafayette-birds
>>>
>>> Warning: Both calls are quite faint. It was a clear night (I could see
>>> the Milky Way), and the birds were migrating over at high altitudes. If you
>>> can hear them both (sparrow at ~1 sec., Sora at ~3 sec.),
>>> congratulations--you have good hearing.
>>>
>>> A few more Chipping Sparrows followed, but the real action was an
>>> "onward migration" during the daylight hours of eastbound Chipping
>>> Sparrows. I heard at least two dozen.
>>>
>>> A bit after sunrise, a MacGillivray's Warbler visited the back yard.
>>> They don't breed here.
>>>
>>> Also, I saw and heard a Broad-tailed Hummingbird fly over, and I heard
>>> one or two Pine Siskins fly over. Neither species breeds, as far as I know,
>>> in Lafayette.
>>>
>>> The Chipping Sparrow flight continued last night (i.e., this morning),
>>> too, as I heard several overflying Lafayette before astronomical dawn.
>>> Also, another Sora. Oh, and speaking of Soras, Scott Severs recently told
>>> me he heard one flying over a few nights ago.
>>>
>>> Summer migration...those words don't roll of the tip of the tongue like
>>> "spring migration" or "fall migration," but the phenomenon of summer
>>> migration is very real, and so exciting. And it's playing out in our towns
>>> and neighborhoods right now. Go out there, and see for yourself!
>>>
>>> Ted Floyd
>>>
>>> Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado
>>>
>>  --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Colorado Birds" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com.
> To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
> To view this discussion on the web visit
> 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/3867f47e-32da-470e-913e-745d0d295d35%40googlegroups.com 

> 
 

> .
> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
>

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CABpQ-FWun%3DLbQpgSwR_hKAWSgBpXnHiKV_TquiXkBkg2fneX-w%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: RE: Re: Confirmed nesting of SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER pair south of Florence
From: William H Kaempfer <William.Kaempfer AT Colorado.EDU>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 19:39:27 -0600
I had the good fortune to watch this pair doing their business today.

(As a long aside, I think that from a birder’s perspective, only Oklahoma’s 
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher out does Colorado’s Lark Bunting on the state-bird 
front. New Mexico’s Greater Roadrunner and Utah’s California Gull (what 
attitude to not only have a larus for a state bird, but one named after a 
different state!!!) are close 3rds and 4ths, and notice that these states are 
all contiguous in their spurning of American Robin, Northern Mockingbird, 
various bluebirds and meadowlarks.) (Have I just kicked off the agitated thread 
of the year?) 


On the east side of the road (CO 67) there is a useful and safe pull out a 
couple of hundred yards south of the dead tree where the Scissor-tailed pair 
are nesting. If you are coming to see the birds from the north (which probably 
98% of us are) drive past the tree to the Hardscrabble Point of Interest pull 
out on the right, turn around and go back to the small pull out on the east 
side of the road at the crest of the hill south of the big dead nest tree. (But 
be careful when you go back on the highway.) The Scissor-tailed pair are far, 
far too busy intercepting and harassing every raven (I thought the one there 
today may have been Chihuahuan), Turkey Vulture and Red-tailed Hawk that makes 
the mistake of entering their no-fly zone to worry about your presence from 
this spot. They will put on quite a spectacular display if you give them 15 
minutes or so. I enjoyed them greatly with Doug Kibbe, Jeff Dawson and 
Christina this morning. 


After the flycatchers, we continued into Wetmore where I gave the other three 
bad directions on finding Band-tailed Pigeons. If you want to look for them, 
try along CR 389, not CR 395. I had a couple near the creek crossing at CR 388 
about 2 miles south of the intersection CO 67 and CO96. 


Finally, I went on down to pick up the Pueblo Mountain Park Environmental 
Station Acorn Woodpeckers. I know this is the birding equivalent of shooting 
fish in a barrel, but where else can you get Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, 
Band-tailed Pigeon and Acorn Woodpecker in one day? 


Bill Kaempfer
Boulder

From: cobirds AT googlegroups.com [mailto:cobirds AT googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Deb Evers 

Sent: Saturday, July 26, 2014 9:32 AM
To: cobirds AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [cobirds] Re: Confirmed nesting of SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER pair 
south of Florence 


Excellent point! Hopefully we birders can use this as an opportunity to remind 
or to gently educate others on the importance of leaving all nesting birds 
alone! 


Deb Evers
Loveland, CO


On Friday, July 25, 2014 11:46:15 PM UTC-6, SeEtta wrote:
I drove out tonight to do some more observation of the SCISSOR-TAILED 
FLYCATCHERS south of Florence as it just seemed to me that their defense of 
that location from the Am Crows was an indication of current/future nesting. I 
was rewarded a little after 8 pm with a view of a SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER 
sitting on a small nest (previously undocumented and located on the north side 
of the tree they have been observed in) and then watching the female get off 
the nest and be replaced by the male. I have two photos (taken from inside my 
car) that I have uploaded to my Birds and Nature 
blog showing one of them sitting on the 
nest and of the male perched just above this nest that I took close to 
dark--not the greatest but they show the birds on/above the nest. I want to add 
it is far more important to not disturb this rare nesting pair than to get 
great photos so all photographers need to be cognizant of their impacts and be 
careful to not impair the success of this nesting. 

SeEtta Moss
Canon City
http://BirdsAndNature.blogspot.com
--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to 
cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to 
cobirds AT googlegroups.com. 

To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/12eb66e2-1e6f-46ef-b72e-f9565879ea27%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/F90B1155A81D474890D22EEFFFA7CAE51C1B8B6880%40EXC4.ad.colorado.edu. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Brown Thrasher - Barr Lake - Adams Co
From: "Ira Sanders" <zroadrunner14 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 14:44:28 -0600
Birders,

Yesterday and today there has been a Brown Thrasher behind the Nature Center
at Barr Lake at the feeders and in the grassy area beyond that.

Ira Sanders

Golden, CO

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/028601cfa912%2466ac7f40%2434057dc0%24%40com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Fall Migration
From: "'Steven Mlodinow' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 12:59:12 -0400 (EDT)
Greetings All


Has indeed begun, as well as dispersal of young. Two days ago I had several juv 
Snowy Egrets trying to convince me that they were, indeed, young Little Blue 
Herons. There are also juv California, RB, and Franklin's Gulls about. 
Shorebirds, of course, are well underway... if there was only more habitat this 
year (or maybe there is too much, with flooded field scattered about eastern 
CO). 



Cheers
Steven Mlodinow
Longmont CO

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/8D1770A0EE143AD-2C94-34545%40webmail-d242.sysops.aol.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Sounds like....
From: "'Steven Mlodinow' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 12:57:01 -0400 (EDT)

Greetings All


I've had a number of occurrences similar to Steve S's (not including actual 
mimids, of course) 



This year, I heard a Red-eyed Vireo doing splendid imitations of Eastern 
Wood-Pewee and Great Crested Flycatcher and back in Washington, on a couple 
occasions I've heard Cassin's Vireo doing a wonderful Purple Finch. 



Chats are almost as good as starlings and mimics. I've heard them, recently, do 
superb Bobwhite, AT Flycatcher, and a couple other species (again, escaping my 
limited memory, but not theirs) 



Cheers
Steven Mlodinow
Longmont CO

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/8D17709C10FCF9C-2C94-344E5%40webmail-d242.sysops.aol.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Confirmed nesting of SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER pair south of Florence
From: Deb Evers <okbookwoman AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 08:31:45 -0700 (PDT)
Excellent point! Hopefully we birders can use this as an opportunity to 
remind or to gently educate others on the importance of leaving all nesting 
birds alone! 

Deb Evers
Loveland, CO


On Friday, July 25, 2014 11:46:15 PM UTC-6, SeEtta wrote:
>
> I drove out tonight to do some more observation of the SCISSOR-TAILED 
> FLYCATCHERS south of Florence as it just seemed to me that their defense of 
> that location from the Am Crows was an indication of current/future 
> nesting.  I was rewarded a little after 8 pm with a view of a 
> SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER sitting on a small nest (previously undocumented 
> and located on the north side of the tree they have been observed in) and 
> then watching the female get off the nest and be replaced by the male.  I 
> have two photos (taken from inside my car) that I have uploaded to my Birds 
> and Nature blog  showing one of them 
> sitting on the nest and of the male perched just above this nest that I 
> took close to dark--not the greatest but they show the birds on/above the 
> nest.  I want to add it is far more important to not disturb this rare 
> nesting pair than to get great photos so all photographers need to be 
> cognizant of their impacts and be careful to not impair the success of this 
> nesting.  
>
> SeEtta Moss
> Canon City
> http://BirdsAndNature.blogspot.com
>

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/12eb66e2-1e6f-46ef-b72e-f9565879ea27%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Summer Migration, Wednesday, July 23
From: Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 04:36:58 -0700 (PDT)
Hi, Gary. Here's an intro, from the journal Colorado Birds:

http://cfobirds.org/downloads/journal/Birding_on_the_Dark_Side.pdf

As to gear, here's a primer:

http://blog.aba.org/2014/07/how-to-record-birdsong-1.html

(Note: All the recordings on that online primer are from Colorado.)

Thanks for your interest!

Ted Floyd
Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado

P.s. Good Chipping Sparrow flight over Lafayette, eastern Boulder County, 
the past three hours (2:30-5:30) this morning, Saturday, July 26th. Am 
hearing a bunch of them right now, in fact, coming in for a landing.



On Friday, July 25, 2014 8:44:16 AM UTC-6, The "Nunn Guy" wrote:
>
> Hi Ted
>
> How do you go about listening to the migrating birds at night?
>
>    - By ear?
>    - Have electronic surveillance equipment?
>    - Parabolic microphone?
>
> Curious as to technique ... living in rural Nunn I suppose I am in optimal 
> region for listening ... no civilization around.
>
> Thanks Gary Lefko, Nunn
>
> http://coloradobirder.ning.com
>
> Mobile:  http://coloradobirder.ning.com/m
>
>
>
> On Thursday, July 24, 2014 6:33:35 PM UTC-6, Ted Floyd wrote:
>>
>> Hello, Birders.
>>
>> Once upon a time, birders thought there were two migrations: spring and 
>> fall. We in Colorado now appreciate that there are three: spring, summer, 
>> and fall.
>>
>> Yesterday, Wednesday, July 23rd, summer migration was in full swing in 
>> Lafayette, eastern Boulder County. Although I did not leave my yard for 
>> birding, I couldn't help but notice migrants throughout the day.
>>
>> First up was a Solitary Sandpiper migrating over at 3:26 a.m. Then came a 
>> Chipping Sparrow, followed by a Sora. Here's a cut of the Chipping Sparrow 
>> followed by the Sora:
>>
>> https://soundcloud.com/ted-floyd/lafayette-birds
>>
>> Warning: Both calls are quite faint. It was a clear night (I could see 
>> the Milky Way), and the birds were migrating over at high altitudes. If you 
>> can hear them both (sparrow at ~1 sec., Sora at ~3 sec.), 
>> congratulations--you have good hearing.
>>
>> A few more Chipping Sparrows followed, but the real action was an "onward 
>> migration" during the daylight hours of eastbound Chipping Sparrows. I 
>> heard at least two dozen.
>>
>> A bit after sunrise, a MacGillivray's Warbler visited the back yard. They 
>> don't breed here.
>>
>> Also, I saw and heard a Broad-tailed Hummingbird fly over, and I heard 
>> one or two Pine Siskins fly over. Neither species breeds, as far as I know, 
>> in Lafayette.
>>
>> The Chipping Sparrow flight continued last night (i.e., this morning), 
>> too, as I heard several overflying Lafayette before astronomical dawn. 
>> Also, another Sora. Oh, and speaking of Soras, Scott Severs recently told 
>> me he heard one flying over a few nights ago.
>>
>> Summer migration...those words don't roll of the tip of the tongue like 
>> "spring migration" or "fall migration," but the phenomenon of summer 
>> migration is very real, and so exciting. And it's playing out in our towns 
>> and neighborhoods right now. Go out there, and see for yourself!
>>
>> Ted Floyd
>>
>> Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado
>>
>

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/3867f47e-32da-470e-913e-745d0d295d35%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 26 July 2014
From: Joyce Takamine <jabirujt AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 04:19:40 -0600
Compiler: Joyce Takamine
Date: July 26, 2014
email: rba AT cfobirds.org

This is the Colorado Rare Bird Alert for Saturday, July 26 sponsored by
Denver Field Ornithologists and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.

Highlight species include: (* indicates new information on this species).

YELLOW CROWNED NIGHT-HERON (Yuma)
Red-necked Grebe (Jackson)
Caspian Tern (Denver)
ACORN WOODPECKER (Pueblo)
American Three-toed Woodpecker (Douglas, Park)
Bell's Vireo (Yuma)
Black Phoebe (Delta, Fremont, Montrose)
Eastern Phoebe (Yuma)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (*Fremont)
Purple Martin (Delta)
Carolina Wren (Prowers)
PACIFIC WREN (San Miguel)
Black-throated Sparrow (Pueblo)
Northern Cardinal (Boulder, Prowers, Yuma)
Indigo Bunting (Boulder, Jefferson)

BOULDER COUNTY:
--A calling Northern Cardinal was reported by Boswell part way up Hawthorn
Gulch on July 21.
--Boswell reported an Indigo Bunting has been singing in the morning in the
vicinity of Maxwell House on the east side of Sanitas on July 21.

DELTA COUNTY:
--On July 18, Garrison reported nesting Purple Martins on CSR 265 in NE
Delta County.

DELTA/MONTROSE COUNTIES:
--Farese reported 14 Black Phoebe on the Gunnison River from Chukar Trail
near Olathe to Pleasure Park near Hotchkiss on July 17.

DENVER COUNTY:
--2 Caspian Terns were reported by Edwards flying over Ferril Lake in
Denver City Park on July 19.

DOUGLAS COUNTY:
--A f American Three-toed Woodpecker was reported by Suddjian on Rampart
Range Road 0.5 mile from CR 67 on July 22.

FREMONT COUNTY:
--Miller reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on July 8 on CO 67, It was
seen flying alongside the highway. It was seen 0.75 miles north of the
Custer County line.  On July 13, Miller reported seeing the Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 14, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was
reported by Walbek, Percival and Schultz. On July 16, Drummond reported
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at 0730 but not at 1030.  On July 19, Hinds
reported the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 20,
Edwards reported that 2 Scissor-tailed Flycatchers were seen and
that they appear to be nesting in the dead tree.  On July 22, Bill Maynard
reported 1 Scissor-tailed Flycatcher before 0800.  On July 23, Moss
reported seeing the female Scissor-tailed Flycatcher.  On July 25, Moss was
able to see the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher pair exchange duty at the nest in
the dead tree.
--At least 2 Black Phoebes were reported by Dunning at Florence River Park
on July 20.

JACKSON COUNTY:
--On July 11 Hundertmark reported that the pair of Red-necked Grebes
continues incubating egg(s) on Lake John.  On July 19, Hundertmark reported
3 adult Red-necked Grebes (2 m, 1 f) at Lake John but an empty nest.

JEFFERSON COUNTY:
--Singing Indigo Buntings were reported by Henwood east of Morrison on Soda
Lakes Road on July 20.

PARK COUNTY:
--A family of American Three-toed Woodpeckers was reported by Suddjian near
Georgia Pass on July 21.
--An American Three-toed Woodpecker was reported by Suddjian near Boreas
Pass on July 21.

PROWERS COUNTY:
--On July 17, Moss reported hearing a Carolina Wren at the S end of Lamar
Community College Woods (LCCW)
and a pair of Northern Cardinals.

PUEBLO COUNTY:
--Knight reported 3 Black-throated Sparrows on July 5 near Pueblo West.
Percival reported them again on July 8. The sparrows were found by parking
at Liberty Point in Pueblo West at the end of Purcell Blvd. The rest
involves a hike that isn't for those who are out of shape. Take the trail
off to the right before the flag pole and memorial. Proceed to the bottom
of the cliff keeping to your right. You will pass a cement "well" just
before merging with a now unused dirt road which heads WNW to a distant
pass in the cliff. The first arroyo with slab rocks is where the sparrows
were.  On July 12, Lilly reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West
and on July 14, Joy reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West and an
easier walk from south end of South Greenbrier Drive.  South Greenbrier
Drive is reached b driving south on Purcell from Hwy 50 for about 2.5 miles
to East Linden Ave.  Turn
west on Linden, and then south on Greenbrier.  On July 16, Drummond
reported ad male and juvenile Black-throated Sparrows in Pueblo East area,
using easier hiking point of South Greenbrier Drive.  On July 20, Edwards
reported Black-throated Sparrows continue at Liberty Point in Pueblo West.
--An ACORN WOODPECKER family was reported by Percival at the dead Ponderosa
Tree in the parking lot at Horseshoe Lodge at Pueblo Mountain Park on July
10. On July 12, Bohannon reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain
Park.  On July 20, Dunning reported that the pair of ACORN WOODPECKERS at
Pueblo Mountain Park were busy feeding young.
--On July 20, Knight reported a Black Phoebe below Pueblo Reservoir dam.

SAN MIGUEL:
--A PACIFIC WREN was reported by Lovitch on the Bear Creek Tail in
Telluride on July 13 and refound by Dexter on July 14.  On July 18, Dexter
reported that the PACIFIC WREN continues at the same location but may not
sing consistently after 1000.  Directions:  The location is .6 miles up
Bear creek Trail from the bridge over San Miguel River at S end of Pine St.
 It appears to be nest building.

YUMA COUNTY:
--At Stalker Lake on July 17, Mlodinow reported a 1 year old YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT-HERON on the N side and 9 Northern Cardinals.
--At Wray Fish Hatchery on July 17, Mlodinow reported Eastern Phoebes.
--At Simmons SWA, N of Beecher on July 17, Mlodinow reported 21 Bell's
Vireos.

DFO Field Trips:
The DFO Field Trip for Saturday , July 26 will be to Cherry Creek SP led by
Buzz Schaumberg (303-699-1721or cell 303-478-4641) 2 miles of easy walking,
driving between stopping locations.  RSVP required, but no participant
limit.  Please leave your number for a return call if we have to adjust the
plan.  Meet at 0700 at the marina parking lot on the west side of the park
for a half-day trip.
Will carpool as much as possible.  Bring scopes if you have them, binocs,
water, snacks and dress for weather.  Lunch optional.
State park pass and water fee required.

The DFO Field trip for Sunday, July 27 will be to South Table Mountain in
Golden led by Mike Foster (303-456-2647).  Moderate trail, around 3 mile
hike, elevation gain of 500 fee.  Limit 8 people.  Preregister with Mike.
Meet at 0600 at the SE corner of RTD lot (2nd and Routt) a few blocks east
of Union Blvd,  From 6th Ave and Union, drive south to 2nd, then turn left
and enter lot off of Routt.  Will carpool to trailhead from here.  Half-day
trip.

Good Birding,
Joyce Takamine
Boulder
303-554-9785

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAHtstTcAkLVQ2bEKV_T2-pWznoKTZi0ESRHnF365KyWu6oR9VQ%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Confirmed nesting of SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER pair south of Florence
From: "SeEttaM ." <seettam AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 23:46:11 -0600
I drove out tonight to do some more observation of the SCISSOR-TAILED
FLYCATCHERS south of Florence as it just seemed to me that their defense of
that location from the Am Crows was an indication of current/future
nesting.  I was rewarded a little after 8 pm with a view of a
SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER sitting on a small nest (previously undocumented
and located on the north side of the tree they have been observed in) and
then watching the female get off the nest and be replaced by the male.  I
have two photos (taken from inside my car) that I have uploaded to my Birds
and Nature blog  showing one of them
sitting on the nest and of the male perched just above this nest that I
took close to dark--not the greatest but they show the birds on/above the
nest.  I want to add it is far more important to not disturb this rare
nesting pair than to get great photos so all photographers need to be
cognizant of their impacts and be careful to not impair the success of this
nesting.

SeEtta Moss
Canon City
http://BirdsAndNature.blogspot.com

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAAUvckrtpaCZdzVWKm0Y%2BeNO-TodMZT9y7eLzR0zBRWFDbs6bw%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Gregory Canyon, Boulder County 7/25/14
From: Eric DeFonso <bay.wren AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:51:40 -0600
Hi folks,

I went on a short outing to Gregory Canyon this morning with Julia H. A
mild but very pleasant surprise for us was seeing a dashingly handsome male
Williamson's Sapsucker working the trees around the closed parking lot
around the trailhead. (The trails are open although the entry driveway
there to the trailhead is closed for repairs.) Other birds detected include
Lazuli Bunting, Canyon Wren, several Spotted Towhees including juveniles,
Western Wood-Pewee, Broad-tailed Hummingbird, Western Tanager,
White-breasted Nuthatches, and a few other species typical of foothill
riparian and Ponderosa Pine habitats.

Eric

-- 
Eric DeFonso
Boulder, CO

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAFjVA_ZfMn_ZNZh8B3Rskfou_M6q%3DAY%3Dq12jBOq-K%2BzSffERFw%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Boulder County mountain birding
From: Richard Pautsch <rjpautsch AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:22:08 -0600
On Monday, I had a Three-toed Woodpecker on the west side of Brainerd Lake
and a Pine Grosbeak along the closed road on the north side (and a singing
Fox Sparrow in the willows along the lake), plus a single Evening Grosbeak
at Mitchell Lake along with multiple Gray Jays and Crossbills and a family
of Brown Creepers along the trail.


On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 8:23 PM, William H Kaempfer <
William.Kaempfer AT colorado.edu> wrote:

> I took advantage of a slow summer day at work to head up early into the
> mountains.  It took me only 50 minutes to get from my place to the Brainard
> Lake entry gate (before 7:00 a.m.) where my good fortune meant that my
> advance years allowed no-charge entry!  (The gate keepers were already on
> duty!)
>
>
>
> While I couldn’t come up with my primary targets (Three-toed and
> Golden-crowned Kinglet) things were pretty birdy at the Mitchell Lake
> trailhead (though not so much on the trail) and the willows on the
> southwest side of Brainard Lake itself.  The ML trailhead had a mixed flock
> of more than 20 each of Red-breasted Nuthatches and Mountain Chickadees
> with a few Gray-headed Juncos and Yellow-rumped Warblers thrown in and lots
> of Red Crossbills calling in fight overhead.  Alas, no kinglets of any
> kind. So interpret that—post breading flocking.  Similar birds were by
> Brainard along with Pine Siskin, Wilson’s Warblers, Lincoln and
> White-crowned Sparrows (in this case, the latter all still on territory).
>
>
>
> I withdrew to the delightful Marrocco’s in Ward for breakfast.  A place
> worth a visit as it is right next door to one of the best feeder spots
> (Band-tailed Pigeons almost certain right now) in Boulder County at Pete’s
> (the Ward town Marshall) place.  Pete and the entire constabulary of
> western Boulder County were also having a working breakfast at the
> Marrocco—so fear not for your safety in Ward, no matter what John
> Vanderpoel says.
>
>
>
> Bill Kaempfer
>
> Boulder
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Colorado Birds" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com.
> To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
> To view this discussion on the web visit
> 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/F90B1155A81D474890D22EEFFFA7CAE51C1AFDFFE7%40EXC4.ad.colorado.edu 

> 
 

> .
> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
>



-- 
Dick Pautsch

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAExgNZ1gPSmhMvdg2myjBtCEtfX5YdChX1BTY5wjbV5RHqOmhA%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Summer Migration, Wednesday, July 23
From: "The \"Nunn Guy\"" <colorado.birder AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 07:44:15 -0700 (PDT)
Hi Ted

How do you go about listening to the migrating birds at night?

   - By ear?
   - Have electronic surveillance equipment?
   - Parabolic microphone?

Curious as to technique ... living in rural Nunn I suppose I am in optimal 
region for listening ... no civilization around.

Thanks Gary Lefko, Nunn

http://coloradobirder.ning.com

Mobile:  http://coloradobirder.ning.com/m



On Thursday, July 24, 2014 6:33:35 PM UTC-6, Ted Floyd wrote:
>
> Hello, Birders.
>
> Once upon a time, birders thought there were two migrations: spring and 
> fall. We in Colorado now appreciate that there are three: spring, summer, 
> and fall.
>
> Yesterday, Wednesday, July 23rd, summer migration was in full swing in 
> Lafayette, eastern Boulder County. Although I did not leave my yard for 
> birding, I couldn't help but notice migrants throughout the day.
>
> First up was a Solitary Sandpiper migrating over at 3:26 a.m. Then came a 
> Chipping Sparrow, followed by a Sora. Here's a cut of the Chipping Sparrow 
> followed by the Sora:
>
> https://soundcloud.com/ted-floyd/lafayette-birds
>
> Warning: Both calls are quite faint. It was a clear night (I could see the 
> Milky Way), and the birds were migrating over at high altitudes. If you can 
> hear them both (sparrow at ~1 sec., Sora at ~3 sec.), congratulations--you 
> have good hearing.
>
> A few more Chipping Sparrows followed, but the real action was an "onward 
> migration" during the daylight hours of eastbound Chipping Sparrows. I 
> heard at least two dozen.
>
> A bit after sunrise, a MacGillivray's Warbler visited the back yard. They 
> don't breed here.
>
> Also, I saw and heard a Broad-tailed Hummingbird fly over, and I heard one 
> or two Pine Siskins fly over. Neither species breeds, as far as I know, in 
> Lafayette.
>
> The Chipping Sparrow flight continued last night (i.e., this morning), 
> too, as I heard several overflying Lafayette before astronomical dawn. 
> Also, another Sora. Oh, and speaking of Soras, Scott Severs recently told 
> me he heard one flying over a few nights ago.
>
> Summer migration...those words don't roll of the tip of the tongue like 
> "spring migration" or "fall migration," but the phenomenon of summer 
> migration is very real, and so exciting. And it's playing out in our towns 
> and neighborhoods right now. Go out there, and see for yourself!
>
> Ted Floyd
>
> Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado
>

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/5025279d-4b7f-4e76-b604-23a4c1e97749%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Northern Cardinal, Louisville -- comments
From: Paula Hansley <redstart.paula AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:49:49 -0600
As several people have pointed out, we do have some excellent mimics in the
area:  Steve Stachowiak once heard a Lesser Goldfinch imitate a cardinal;
Elena Klaver mentioned the No. Mockingbird.  Some, including myself,
thought that someone could be playing a bird app. in my yard as a joke!

I'm just going to keep looking, listening, and hoping that he/she returns!

Paula Hansley
Louisville

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CANF-7ho_ZKqBW86pGPDDvX12fK8AEmdSyZMzeh3Ni--Rk-tOzg%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 25 July 2014
From: Joyce Takamine <jabirujt AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 04:17:33 -0600
Compiler: Joyce Takamine
Date: July 25, 2014
email: rba AT cfobirds.org

This is the Colorado Rare Bird Alert for Friday, July 25 sponsored by
Denver Field Ornithologists and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.

Highlight species include: (* indicates new information on this species).

YELLOW CROWNED NIGHT-HERON (Yuma)
Red-necked Grebe (Jackson)
Caspian Tern (Denver)
ACORN WOODPECKER (Pueblo)
American Three-toed Woodpecker (*Douglas, *Park)
Bell's Vireo (Yuma)
Black Phoebe (Delta, Fremont, Montrose)
Eastern Phoebe (Yuma)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (*Fremont)
Purple Martin (Delta)
Carolina Wren (Prowers)
PACIFIC WREN (San Miguel)
Black-throated Sparrow (Pueblo)
Northern Cardinal (Boulder, Prowers, Yuma)
Indigo Bunting (Boulder, Jefferson)

BOULDER COUNTY:
--A calling Northern Cardinal was reported by Boswell part way up Hawthorn
Gulch on July 21.
--Boswell reported an Indigo Bunting has been singing in the morning in the
vicinity of Maxwell House on the east side of Sanitas on July 21.

DELTA COUNTY:
--On July 18, Garrison reported nesting Purple Martins on CSR 265 in NE
Delta County.

DELTA/MONTROSE COUNTIES:
--Farese reported 14 Black Phoebe on the Gunnison River from Chukar Trail
near Olathe to Pleasure Park near Hotchkiss on July 17.

DENVER COUNTY:
--2 Caspian Terns were reported by Edwards flying over Ferril Lake in
Denver City Park on July 19.

DOUGLAS COUNTY:
--A f American Three-toed Woodpecker was reported by Suddjian on Rampart
Range Road 0.5 mile from CR 67 on July 22.

FREMONT COUNTY:
--Miller reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on July 8 on CO 67, It was
seen flying alongside the highway. It was seen 0.75 miles north of the
Custer County line.  On July 13, Miller reported seeing the Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 14, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was
reported by Walbek, Percival and Schultz. On July 16, Drummond reported
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at 0730 but not at 1030.  On July 19, Hinds
reported the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 20,
Edwards reported that 2 Scissor-tailed Flycatchers were seen and
that they appear to be nesting in the dead tree.  On July 22, Bill Maynard
reported 1 Scissor-tailed Flycatcher before 0800.  On July 23, Moss
reported seeing the female Scissor-tailed Flycatcher.
--At least 2 Black Phoebes were reported by Dunning at Florence River Park
on July 20.

JACKSON COUNTY:
--On July 11 Hundertmark reported that the pair of Red-necked Grebes
continues incubating egg(s) on Lake John.  On July 19, Hundertmark reported
3 adult Red-necked Grebes (2 m, 1 f) at Lake John but an empty nest.

JEFFERSON COUNTY:
--Singing Indigo Buntings were reported by Henwood east of Morrison on Soda
Lakes Road on July 20.

PARK COUNTY:
--A family of American Three-toed Woodpeckers was reported by Suddjian near
Georgia Pass on July 21.
--An American Three-toed Woodpecker was reported by Suddjian near Boreas
Pass on July 21.

PROWERS COUNTY:
--On July 17, Moss reported hearing a Carolina Wren at the S end of Lamar
Community College Woods (LCCW)
and a pair of Northern Cardinals.

PUEBLO COUNTY:
--Knight reported 3 Black-throated Sparrows on July 5 near Pueblo West.
Percival reported them again on July 8. The sparrows were found by parking
at Liberty Point in Pueblo West at the end of Purcell Blvd. The rest
involves a hike that isn't for those who are out of shape. Take the trail
off to the right before the flag pole and memorial. Proceed to the bottom
of the cliff keeping to your right. You will pass a cement "well" just
before merging with a now unused dirt road which heads WNW to a distant
pass in the cliff. The first arroyo with slab rocks is where the sparrows
were.  On July 12, Lilly reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West
and on July 14, Joy reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West and an
easier walk from south end of South Greenbrier Drive.  South Greenbrier
Drive is reached b driving south on Purcell from Hwy 50 for about 2.5 miles
to East Linden Ave.  Turn
west on Linden, and then south on Greenbrier.  On July 16, Drummond
reported ad male and juvenile Black-throated Sparrows in Pueblo East area,
using easier hiking point of South Greenbrier Drive.  On July 20, Edwards
reported Black-throated Sparrows continue at Liberty Point in Pueblo West.
--An ACORN WOODPECKER family was reported by Percival at the dead Ponderosa
Tree in the parking lot at Horseshoe Lodge at Pueblo Mountain Park on July
10. On July 12, Bohannon reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain
Park.  On July 20, Dunning reported that the pair of ACORN WOODPECKERS at
Pueblo Mountain Park were busy feeding young.
--On July 20, Knight reported a Black Phoebe below Pueblo Reservoir dam.

SAN MIGUEL:
--A PACIFIC WREN was reported by Lovitch on the Bear Creek Tail in
Telluride on July 13 and refound by Dexter on July 14.  On July 18, Dexter
reported that the PACIFIC WREN continues at the same location but may not
sing consistently after 1000.  Directions:  The location is .6 miles up
Bear creek Trail from the bridge over San Miguel River at S end of Pine St.
 It appears to be nest building.

YUMA COUNTY:
--At Stalker Lake on July 17, Mlodinow reported a 1 year old YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT-HERON on the N side and 9 Northern Cardinals.
--At Wray Fish Hatchery on July 17, Mlodinow reported Eastern Phoebes.
--At Simmons SWA, N of Beecher on July 17, Mlodinow reported 21 Bell's
Vireos.

DFO Field Trips:
The DFO Field Trip for Saturday , July 26 will be to Cherry Creek SP led by
Buzz Schaumberg (303-699-1721or cell 303-478-4641) 2 miles of easy walking,
driving between stopping locations.  RSVP required, but no participant
limit.  Please leave your number for a return call if we have to adjust the
plan.  Meet at 0700 at the marina parking lot on the west side of the park
for a half-day trip.
Will carpool as much as possible.  Bring scopes if you have them, binocs,
water, snacks and dress for weather.  Lunch optional.
State park pass and water fee required.

The DFO Field trip for Sunday, July 27 will be to South Table Mountain in
Golden led by Mike Foster (303-456-2647).  Moderate trail, around 3 mile
hike, elevation gain of 500 fee.  Limit 8 people.  Preregister with Mike.
Meet at 0600 at the SE corner of RTD lot (2nd and Routt) a few blocks east
of Union Blvd,  From 6th Ave and Union, drive south to 2nd, then turn left
and enter lot off of Routt.  Will carpool to trailhead from here.  Half-day
trip.

Good Birding,
Joyce Takamine
Boulder
303-554-9785

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAHtstTf_8coxJJiY%3DcxMk3b3KYe7sM1zH6myva--fe%2Br37T8ww%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: RE: Northern Cardinal, Louisville, Boulder County
From: "Steve Stachowiak & Melody Egge" <waxwing2 AT q.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 00:33:34 -0600
Cobirders,

 

I had a similar experience while working on a lawn project a few years ago.
I was going about my business when I suddenly realized I was hearing a
Northern Cardinal in a nearby tree and then it stopped after a few calls.  I
walked over to the tree and could not find the bird.  A while later it
called again, this time a bit longer than the first time, but I again had no
luck finding the bird.  When it called a third time, I raced over to the
tree but the only bird I found was a Lesser Goldfinch.  Imagine my surprise
when the goldfinch suddenly began calling like a Northern Cardinal!

 

Good Birding,

Steve Stachowiak

Highlands Ranch, CO

 

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/000301cfa7d2%245c3e6f00%2414bb4d00%24%40q.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Park County July 21
From: David Suddjian <dsuddjian AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 20:46:38 -0600
My son Stephen and I visited areas in the northwest part of the county
mostly, ending up at the west side. Audubon's Yellow-rumped Warblers had
come down out of the forest at various places to join flocks of Mountain
Bluebirds in the wide open reaches of South Park, such as along CR 34.
Nesting Eared Grebes in the large natural pond along CR 34 were still
sitting, sitting, sitting. A juvenile Prairie Falcon along the road near
the pond was amazingly confiding, glaring intently but reluctant to flush
from the fence post perch. A smaller pond at about 2.5 miles from Highway
285 had an adult Green Heron, rare in Park.

We drove up to Georgia Pass on CR 54, but birding was mostly rather quiet
in the forests there until we reached the uppermost elevations of the road.
There we had numerous Pine Grosbeaks, Gray Jays, Type 5 Red Crossbills,
etc., and some Golden-crowned Kinglets. A family of Am. Three-toed
Woodpeckers was not far from the pass. A begging juv. American Dipper at
the French Creek crossing put on quite a show, and several families of
Red-naped Sapsuckers were delightful. A juv. Northern Goshawk was 2.5 miles
up CR 54 from CR 35.

The drive up to Boreas Pass also had nice encounters with Pine Grosbeaks,
crossbills and Gray Jays, as well as an Am. Three-toed Woodpecker.

At Salt Creek Road (Pike NF Road 435, northwest of Antero Junction -- a
very pleasant birding road) we enjoyed a moderate number of Common
Nighthawks including a loose flock of 19. In the 2 hours we were there it
seemed like there was a steady eastward movement of nighthawks moving down
the valley toward South Park, but it was hard to tell if they weren't
doubling back and passing more than once. A family of Spotted Sandpipers
was near to fledging on a blasted out beaver pond. I spied a pair of
Ruby-crowned Kinglets working overtime to feed a giant juvenile
Brown-headed Cowbird. RCKIs seem to work overtime all the time, but these
appeared all the more frenetic in their efforts to feed the gaping cowbird.

David Suddjian
Littleton, CO

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAGj6RorYwQA2f9QBCBW0frPK%2BtFK%3DbOuGjkSfcgWekJWv1A08A%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Boulder County mountain birding
From: William H Kaempfer <William.Kaempfer AT Colorado.EDU>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 20:23:10 -0600
I took advantage of a slow summer day at work to head up early into the 
mountains. It took me only 50 minutes to get from my place to the Brainard Lake 
entry gate (before 7:00 a.m.) where my good fortune meant that my advance years 
allowed no-charge entry! (The gate keepers were already on duty!) 


While I couldn't come up with my primary targets (Three-toed and Golden-crowned 
Kinglet) things were pretty birdy at the Mitchell Lake trailhead (though not so 
much on the trail) and the willows on the southwest side of Brainard Lake 
itself. The ML trailhead had a mixed flock of more than 20 each of Red-breasted 
Nuthatches and Mountain Chickadees with a few Gray-headed Juncos and 
Yellow-rumped Warblers thrown in and lots of Red Crossbills calling in fight 
overhead. Alas, no kinglets of any kind. So interpret that-post breading 
flocking. Similar birds were by Brainard along with Pine Siskin, Wilson's 
Warblers, Lincoln and White-crowned Sparrows (in this case, the latter all 
still on territory). 


I withdrew to the delightful Marrocco's in Ward for breakfast. A place worth a 
visit as it is right next door to one of the best feeder spots (Band-tailed 
Pigeons almost certain right now) in Boulder County at Pete's (the Ward town 
Marshall) place. Pete and the entire constabulary of western Boulder County 
were also having a working breakfast at the Marrocco-so fear not for your 
safety in Ward, no matter what John Vanderpoel says. 


Bill Kaempfer
Boulder

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/F90B1155A81D474890D22EEFFFA7CAE51C1AFDFFE7%40EXC4.ad.colorado.edu. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Some recent birds Jefferson and Douglas Counties
From: David Suddjian <dsuddjian AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 20:00:46 -0600
July 19
A female-plumaged Cassin’s Finch singing in my front yard in Ken Caryl
Valley (JeffCo) was presumably a first year male and I thought it was of
interest down out of the forest region in July.

July 22
I checked the Marina Sandspit at Chatfield SP (Douglas) early on and had a
loafing Willet and a flock of three Long-billed Dowitchers that flew around
and around, but did not land.

I went up County Road 67 and enjoyed a pair of Evening Grosbeaks that flew
into a small streamlet about a mile before Rampart Range Road, landing
nearly at my feet. Once I was in the Ponderosa pines Type 2 Red Crossbills
were detected at  nearly every stop. Rampart Range Road had a female Am.
Three-toed Woodpecker at 0.5 mile in from CR 67. Lots crossbills along
rampart, Northern Pygmy-Owl, a lovely family of Hammond’s Flycatchers, and
lots more. Very birdy despite regular traffic from cars.

Along the lower half mile of CR 40 approaching the South Platte I found a
Swainson’s Thrush (which I think is fairly out of season there for late
July), and a Wilson’s Warbler (a dispersant or early migrant?). A singing
Ovenbird was along CR 40 about 1.2 mile up from the South Platte. Gray
Catbirds were very numerous in the riparian thickets at the bottom reach of
Pine Creek there, and along the South Fork South Platte and North Fork.
 Am. Dippers buzzed by on both forks.

Ovenbirds were still singing along Highgrade Road (JeffCo)

David Suddjian
Littleton, CO

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAGj6RorTz4pV9s5SXu77yOG11xEUav01exC6pot2pdU7UPvq_Q%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Northern Cardinal, Louisville, Boulder County
From: Cheri Phillips <richph51 AT q.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 17:49:08 -0700 (PDT)
Hi Paula,

Get well wish to your ferret. I use to have a bunch of them. They are fun 
furry friends.

Cheri Phillips
Centennial, CO

On Thursday, July 24, 2014 12:39:13 PM UTC-6, redstar... AT gmail.com wrote:
>
> Hi all,
>
> I was inside tending to a sick ferret when all of a sudden I heard  a very 
> familiar
> song...a cardinal!  I grew up with them and see/hear them every year in 
> North Carolina and Ohio.
>
> But...I did not see it.  I heard perhaps 10 songs about 10 am in my 
> backyard, then silence by
> the time I could get out there.  
>
> I have large lilacs and spirea, many trees of all sizes, and a large water 
> fall, all of which attract the birds.
>
> I put out sunflower seeds and another feeder, so I will watch for the 
> bird.  I mainly want to alert other Louisville Cobirders about the cardinal!
>
> Paula Hansley
> Louisville
>  

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/d7eadfff-d339-4d9b-9b2d-b5053b12a848%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Summer Migration, Wednesday, July 23
From: Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 17:33:34 -0700 (PDT)
Hello, Birders.

Once upon a time, birders thought there were two migrations: spring and 
fall. We in Colorado now appreciate that there are three: spring, summer, 
and fall.

Yesterday, Wednesday, July 23rd, summer migration was in full swing in 
Lafayette, eastern Boulder County. Although I did not leave my yard for 
birding, I couldn't help but notice migrants throughout the day.

First up was a Solitary Sandpiper migrating over at 3:26 a.m. Then came a 
Chipping Sparrow, followed by a Sora. Here's a cut of the Chipping Sparrow 
followed by the Sora:

https://soundcloud.com/ted-floyd/lafayette-birds

Warning: Both calls are quite faint. It was a clear night (I could see the 
Milky Way), and the birds were migrating over at high altitudes. If you can 
hear them both (sparrow at ~1 sec., Sora at ~3 sec.), congratulations--you 
have good hearing.

A few more Chipping Sparrows followed, but the real action was an "onward 
migration" during the daylight hours of eastbound Chipping Sparrows. I 
heard at least two dozen.

A bit after sunrise, a MacGillivray's Warbler visited the back yard. They 
don't breed here.

Also, I saw and heard a Broad-tailed Hummingbird fly over, and I heard one 
or two Pine Siskins fly over. Neither species breeds, as far as I know, in 
Lafayette.

The Chipping Sparrow flight continued last night (i.e., this morning), too, 
as I heard several overflying Lafayette before astronomical dawn. Also, 
another Sora. Oh, and speaking of Soras, Scott Severs recently told me he 
heard one flying over a few nights ago.

Summer migration...those words don't roll of the tip of the tongue like 
"spring migration" or "fall migration," but the phenomenon of summer 
migration is very real, and so exciting. And it's playing out in our towns 
and neighborhoods right now. Go out there, and see for yourself!

Ted Floyd

Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/375800aa-6104-4d2e-975f-344c4fbe8759%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Northern Cardinal, Louisville, Boulder County
From: Paula Hansley <redstart.paula AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 12:39:09 -0600
Hi all,

I was inside tending to a sick ferret when all of a sudden I heard  a very
familiar
song...a cardinal!  I grew up with them and see/hear them every year in
North Carolina and Ohio.

But...I did not see it.  I heard perhaps 10 songs about 10 am in my
backyard, then silence by
the time I could get out there.

I have large lilacs and spirea, many trees of all sizes, and a large water
fall, all of which attract the birds.

I put out sunflower seeds and another feeder, so I will watch for the bird.
 I mainly want to alert other Louisville Cobirders about the cardinal!

Paula Hansley
Louisville

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CANF-7hoG%2BPayhv8dB8noQ87QEqNq%3Dt1qetJ7FSmrO%2BFWB6%2Bqqg%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Southeast Colorado drought
From: Tom Wilberding <twilberding AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:00:19 -0700 (PDT)

Per New York Times map, Cheyenne Wells to La Junta region look very dry 
past four months. Rest of Colorado not so bad.
http://tiny.cc/ggeijx

Tom Wilberding
Boulder, CO

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/25b67abd-7fe6-4321-8bc8-10da82ccfa24%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Sage Thrashers, Boulder Valley Ranch, Boulder County
From: Russ Thompson <thompsonchevy AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 08:51:59 -0700 (PDT)
Thanks to Dick Pautsch I headed out to Boulder Valley Ranch this morning to 
see the Sage Thrashers. Before I reached the trailhead, I stopped to scan 
the north side of the road. There were at least four and probably more Sage 
Thrashers flying back and forth among the green shrubs down in the gully. 
To get to Boulder Valley Ranch head north from Boulder on Hwy 36(28th St). 
One mile past the intersection of Hwy 36 and Broadway turn right on 
Longhorn. There will be a sign for Boulder Valley Ranch. Follow Longhorn 
for 1/2 mile or so until the pavement ends. A little further along the dirt 
road, numbered telephone poles will be on your left. Stop at pole marked 
number 12 and look north and down into the gully.

Russ Thompson
Boulder, Co.

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/7276274b-54aa-4c99-85e9-98cceebbf4b8%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Band-tailed pigeon feldglings - Teller Co
From: "Jeff J Jones" <JJones AT JonesTC.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 07:52:51 -0600
The first fledged band-tailed pigeons of the season have shown up at my
feeders this morning. Some very odd behavior though, is for this past week,
the BTPIs just roost on the branches above the platform feeder, but don't
come down to feed. There is a bully pine squirrel, half the size of the
BTPIs, that comes down and harasses them and chases them off the feeder if
they do land, and even off the nearby perching branches, continually. But
they just fly to another branch and sit and stare at the feeder. I don't get
it; I've never seen this kind of behavior before that I can remember.

 

Jeff J Jones

(  jjones AT jonestc.com)

Teller County - 8500' - Montane Woodlands

 

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/057301cfa746%24908db8b0%24b1a92a10%24%40JonesTC.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: ABA's "Thank You, Colorado!" Open House, Sat., Aug. 9th
From: "Mel Goff" <melgoff AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 07:25:19 -0600
Good morning, everyone.

I would just like to add a few words to Ted’s message. As an ABA office 
volunteer for a little over five years, I have had the opportunity to catalog 
over 2000 books in our library. Sometimes I was greatly distracted by the 
temptation to look through and even read many of the books, instead of merely 
labeling and shelving the often beautiful, always informative volumes. 


At the Open House on August 9th, you will have the opportunity to comb through 
hundreds of books that will not make the trip to Delaware. We have tried to put 
the books in sections that will make it easy for you to scan. You can find 
books by: 

  1.. State & Country – including field guides, where to bird books 
  2.. Species (e.g. Owls, Shorebirds, Raptors, etc.) 
  3.. Kids books 
  4.. Coffee Table books (most are just plain gorgeous) 
  5.. Scientific tomes 
  6.. Novels and non-fiction prose
In short, there is something for everyone! If you have questions, please let me 
know. 


Mel Goff
ABA Volunteer Librarian (also not going to Delaware)

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/1935D4582B7C40878C68C4C99D81CE0D%40MelDesktop. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Sage Thrasher, Adams Co
From: Regina King <king.regina AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 04:38:16 -0700 (PDT)
I got a good look at a Sage Thrasher at Harriman Lake Park on Saturday July 
19. (Jefferson County).  Similar surroundings to what you have described -- 
small picnic shelter, grove of cottonwood trees, gravel walking path with 
frequents passersby (dog walkers, joggers, etc), and nearby weedy fields. 
Also unusual that day were several small flocks of Chipping Sparrows, and a 
beautiful Snowy Egret.

On Wednesday, July 23, 2014 4:21:14 PM UTC-6, Adam Green wrote:
>
> I saw a sage thrasher at the Trail Winds Park at 136th and Holly today. It 
> was flying around in the small trees near the pavilion/restrooms. I walk my 
> dog there nearly every day, but that is the most unexpected bird I have 
> seen there. Oh, except for the Wilson's phalaropes a couple of years ago.
>
>  Adam Green
> Postdoctoral Fellow
>  Natural Resource Ecology Lab, Colorado State University
>  Fort Collins Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey
> adamg... AT gmail.com  
>
>

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/24e18d14-9cd6-4a95-986a-82592c5f7a1e%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 24 July 2014
From: Joyce Takamine <jabirujt AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 04:17:37 -0600
Compiler: Joyce Takamine
Date: July 24, 2014
email: rba AT cfobirds.org

This is the Colorado Rare Bird Alert for Thursday, July 24 sponsored by
Denver Field Ornithologists and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.

Highlight species include: (* indicates new information on this species).

YELLOW CROWNED NIGHT-HERON (Yuma)
Red-necked Grebe (Jackson)
Caspian Tern (Denver)
ACORN WOODPECKER (Pueblo)
Bell's Vireo (Yuma)
Black Phoebe (Delta, Fremont, Montrose)
Eastern Phoebe (Yuma)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (*Fremont)
Purple Martin (Delta)
Carolina Wren (Prowers)
PACIFIC WREN (San Miguel)
Black-throated Sparrow (Pueblo)
Northern Cardinal (Boulder, Prowers, Yuma)
Indigo Bunting (Boulder, Jefferson)

BOULDER COUNTY:
--A calling Northern Cardinal was reported by Boswell part way up Hawthorn
Gulch on July 21.
--Boswell reported an Indigo Bunting has been singing in the morning in the
vicinity of Maxwell House on the east side of Sanitas on July 21.

DELTA COUNTY:
--On July 18, Garrison reported nesting Purple Martins on CSR 265 in NE
Delta County.

DELTA/MONTROSE COUNTIES:
--Farese reported 14 Black Phoebe on the Gunnison River from Chukar Trail
near Olathe to Pleasure Park near Hotchkiss on July 17.

DENVER COUNTY:
--2 Caspian Terns were reported by Edwards flying over Ferril Lake in
Denver City Park on July 19.

FREMONT COUNTY:
--Miller reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on July 8 on CO 67, It was
seen flying alongside the highway. It was seen 0.75 miles north of the
Custer County line.  On July 13, Miller reported seeing the Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 14, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was
reported by Walbek, Percival and Schultz. On July 16, Drummond reported
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at 0730 but not at 1030.  On July 19, Hinds
reported the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 20,
Edwards reported that 2 Scissor-tailed Flycatchers were seen and
that they appear to be nesting in the dead tree.  On July 22, Bill Maynard
reported 1 Scissor-tailed Flycatcher before 0800.  On July 23, Moss
reported seeing the female Scissor-tailed Flycatcher.
--At least 2 Black Phoebes were reported by Dunning at Florence River Park
on July 20.

JACKSON COUNTY:
--On July 11 Hundertmark reported that the pair of Red-necked Grebes
continues incubating egg(s) on Lake John.  On July 19, Hundertmark reported
3 adult Red-necked Grebes (2 m, 1 f) at Lake John but an empty nest.

JEFFERSON COUNTY:
--Singing Indigo Buntings were reported by Henwood east of Morrison on Soda
Lakes Road on July 20.

PROWERS COUNTY:
--On July 17, Moss reported hearing a Carolina Wren at the S end of Lamar
Community College Woods (LCCW)
and a pair of Northern Cardinals.

PUEBLO COUNTY:
--Knight reported 3 Black-throated Sparrows on July 5 near Pueblo West.
Percival reported them again on July 8. The sparrows were found by parking
at Liberty Point in Pueblo West at the end of Purcell Blvd. The rest
involves a hike that isn't for those who are out of shape. Take the trail
off to the right before the flag pole and memorial. Proceed to the bottom
of the cliff keeping to your right. You will pass a cement "well" just
before merging with a now unused dirt road which heads WNW to a distant
pass in the cliff. The first arroyo with slab rocks is where the sparrows
were.  On July 12, Lilly reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West
and on July 14, Joy reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West and an
easier walk from south end of South Greenbrier Drive.  South Greenbrier
Drive is reached b driving south on Purcell from Hwy 50 for about 2.5 miles
to East Linden Ave.  Turn
west on Linden, and then south on Greenbrier.  On July 16, Drummond
reported ad male and juvenile Black-throated Sparrows in Pueblo East area,
using easier hiking point of South Greenbrier Drive.  On July 20, Edwards
reported Black-throated Sparrows continue at Liberty Point in Pueblo West.
--An ACORN WOODPECKER family was reported by Percival at the dead Ponderosa
Tree in the parking lot at Horseshoe Lodge at Pueblo Mountain Park on July
10. On July 12, Bohannon reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain
Park.  On July 20, Dunning reported that the pair of ACORN WOODPECKERS at
Pueblo Mountain Park were busy feeding young.
--On July 20, Knight reported a Black Phoebe below Pueblo Reservoir dam.

SAN MIGUEL:
--A PACIFIC WREN was reported by Lovitch on the Bear Creek Tail in
Telluride on July 13 and refound by Dexter on July 14.  On July 18, Dexter
reported that the PACIFIC WREN continues at the same location but may not
sing consistently after 1000.  Directions:  The location is .6 miles up
Bear creek Trail from the bridge over San Miguel River at S end of Pine St.
 It appears to be nest building.

YUMA COUNTY:
--At Stalker Lake on July 17, Mlodinow reported a 1 year old YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT-HERON on the N side and 9 Northern Cardinals.
--At Wray Fish Hatchery on July 17, Mlodinow reported Eastern Phoebes.
--At Simmons SWA, N of Beecher on July 17, Mlodinow reported 21 Bell's
Vireos.

DFO Field Trips:
The DFO Field Trip for Saturday , July 26 will be to Cherry Creek SP led by
Buzz Schaumberg (303-699-1721or cell 303-478-4641) 2 miles of easy walking,
driving between stopping locations.  RSVP required, but no participant
limit.  Please leave your number for a return call if we have to adjust the
plan.  Meet at 0700 at the marina parking lot on the west side of the park
for a half-day trip.
Will carpool as much as possible.  Bring scopes if you have them, binocs,
water, snacks and dress for weather.  Lunch optional.
State park pass and water fee required.

The DFO Field trip for Sunday, July 27 will be to South Table Mountain in
Golden led by Mike Foster (303-456-2647).  Moderate trail, around 3 mile
hike, elevation gain of 500 fee.  Limit 8 people.  Preregister with Mike.
Meet at 0600 at the SE corner of RTD lot (2nd and Routt) a few blocks east
of Union Blvd,  From 6th Ave and Union, drive south to 2nd, then turn left
and enter lot off of Routt.  Will carpool to trailhead from here.  Half-day
trip.

Good Birding,
Joyce Takamine
Boulder
303-554-9785

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAHtstTc0upxShEADzjVCD%3DxPa0-oBFVSXKGhFNH2x%3Dj_W7RAig%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: The female Scissor-tailed Flycatcher tonight south of Florence
From: "SeEttaM ." <seettam AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 00:16:44 -0600
As I had a meeting to attend in Rockvale which is not far from where the
Scissor-tailed Flycatchers have been seen I stopped by just after 6:30 pm
to see if they would be around.  I spotted the female and got one quick
photo before she flew off.   While not nearly as good as the photos I got
earlier this week of  the male it does show her much shorter tail so I have
uploaded it to my Birds and Nature blog.


Interestingly I saw close to a hundred Lark Buntings near the flycatcher
and in other grassland areas nearby--this is most unusual.  They were in
flocks so may be just migrating through but I have never seen this many
south of Florence.

SeEtta Moss
Canon City
http://BirdsAndNature.blogspot.com

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAAUvckoF6SDPdF%3DLNc7SQsbxPLka%3DKqbNf7je-Eatrue0Qe82g%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Sage thrashers, Boulder, Boulder Co
From: Richard Pautsch <rjpautsch AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:08:25 -0600
There was a pair of Sage Thrashers near the old mine mill in Boulder Valley
Ranch yesterday morning.

-- 
Dick Pautsch, Boulder

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAExgNZ1_YmOupPvNue359%3D08b0eNqGBL4C93--FA1VO06Hjk1Q%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Sage Thrasher, Adams Co
From: Adam Green <adam.green.w AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 15:21:14 -0700 (PDT)
I saw a sage thrasher at the Trail Winds Park at 136th and Holly today. It 
was flying around in the small trees near the pavilion/restrooms. I walk my 
dog there nearly every day, but that is the most unexpected bird I have 
seen there. Oh, except for the Wilson's phalaropes a couple of years ago.

 Adam Green
Postdoctoral Fellow
 Natural Resource Ecology Lab, Colorado State University
 Fort Collins Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey
adamgreenw AT gmail.com 

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/d6818a7a-8cf4-410d-aa4c-8250e180f701%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Sparrow ID? Jackson County
From: brucecyg via Colorado Birds <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 12:28:03 -0700 (PDT)
I have photographed a sparrow at Arapahoe NWR, North Park that has me stumped. 
http://brucecyg.smugmug.com/Photos/For-ID 


I believe it is a juvenile Stagebrush Sparrow or Vesper, or maybe something 
else entirely. It has a hint of malar stripes that point to a sparrow and white 
outer edges to the tail. Both Stagebrush and Vesper have that according to 
Sibley. Although the bill looks a bit big for those sparrows. Any ideas on what 
this bird could be would be appreciated. 



Bruce Cyganowski
Brucecyg AT Yahoo.com
Brucecyg.Smugmug.com
Kittredge, CO

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/68f5f507-9d4d-483f-8c4d-41a11d37c17e%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Carolina White-breasted Nuthatch
From: Bob Righter <rorighter AT earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 14:30:09 -0600
Hi

There seems to be enough circumstantial evidence that the "Carolina" 
White-breasted Nuthatch is present in Colorado, perhaps more so on our eastern 
plains as articulated by the "Wandering Tattler" Steve Mlodinow in his 
excellent paper 


Of note New Mexico in 2011 had the same suspicions, that the "Carolina" 
White-breasted Nuthatch could be present on their eastern plains based on 
sound. To prove the point they first mist-netted the critter then took 
measurements, and finally collected the nuthatch. Extensive DNA test were 
conducted which produced definitive proof that the "Caroline" White-breasted 
Nuthatch was on their turf. This record probably represented the first 
documented record for this taxon on the western edge of the Great Plains (see 
Western Birds, Vol. 44, No, 2, 2013) 


Thanks to Ted that is great name for Steve, "The Wandering Tattler"

Bob Righter
Denver, CO

Sent from my iPad

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/9DC9394D-AE72-4BA2-BDCD-C415228AA3C4%40earthlink.net. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: El Paso county -- 4 Lesser Black-backed Gulls 7/22/14
From: "'Mark Peterson' via Colorado Birds" <cobirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:36:06 -0700
COBirders,

Yesterday evening around 7:40 there were four 1st cycle LESSER BLACK-BACKED 
GULLs at Big Johnson reservoir. There were also approximately 600 CALIFORNIA 
(1 juv.), 30 RING-BILLED and 8 FRANKLIN'S GULLs. 


I could not find the alternate Common Loon that has been around but most 
everything else that has been around this summer are continuing. 


Notables:
1 Canvasback
2 Wood Ducks (uncommon at this location)
3 species of Teal (Cinnamon is uncommon here in the summer)
1 Hooded Merganser (there have been 2, probably just missed the other)
1 Baird's Sandpiper

Lots of Burrowing Owls.


-----
Mark Peterson
Colorado Springs

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/1406129766.95658.YahooMailNeo%40web121501.mail.ne1.yahoo.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: ABA's "Thank You, Colorado!" Open House, Sat., Aug. 9th
From: Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 04:03:58 -0700 (PDT)
Hello, Birders. 

I'm writing to let you know about a fun party and farewell open house to be 
held *Saturday, August 9th**,* at the American Birding Association's 
headquarters in Colorado Springs. As many of you know, the ABA is 
relocating its administrative offices to Delaware City, Delaware, at the 
end of August. The ABA arrived in Colorado Springs in 1987 from its initial 
home in Austin, Texas, and has called Colorado its home base for 27 years. 
The ABA wants to celebrate and say thank you for those years to the many 
people who have fostered and celebrated the association's successes--and 
who supported the ABA during some lean times and growing pains. It's been 
quite a ride.

The festivities get under way at *2:00 p.m.* Come and say hello, browse 
through books and office items that are free for the taking, and learn 
about the ABA's many recent new initiatives: from supporting habitat 
protection with the Federal Duck Stamp to publishing a new Colorado 
field guide by, um, Yours Truly.

At *5:00 p.m.,* supporters and friends of the ABA (that's *you*) will enjoy 
a cool beverage and reminisce about the ABA's many years in Colorado. 
Although the ABA's headquarters are indeed relocating, the ABA will 
maintain a very close connection to Colorado, with a number of key staff 
still being based in Colorado.

Along with the reminiscing, we'll talk about the future. ABA President Jeff 
Gordon and I and other ABA staff will be there to provide an overview of 
where things are and where they're going (we'll be brief, we promise!), 
as well as to answer questions and glean insights and ideas from you.

But mainly, we're going to have fun! This event is free and open to the 
public. ABA members and nonmembers alike are welcome, and young people and 
curiosity-seekers are especially encouraged to attend. Please join us in 
Colorado Springs on *Saturday, August 9th,* and join us in a toast or two 
to days gone by and days to come.

DIRECTIONS: The ABA is headquartered in the blue-and-white house at 1618 W. 
Colorado Avenue in Old Colorado CIty, just west of downtown Colorado 
Springs. From I-25 take the Cimarron (Route 24) exit west toward Manitou 
Springs. Turn right (north) on 8th Street. Then go left (west) on Colorado 
Ave. The building is between 16th and 17th streets on the north side of the 
road. Free parking is available on Colorado Ave. and surrounding streets. 
Follow signs to the back of the office building, where the festivities will 
be based.

For more information, call the ABA headquarters (719-578-9703, 
800-850-2473) or contact the ABA by email (info AT aba.org).

Ted Floyd

Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/6397692e-811e-4e30-8fb6-588d8f2f636c%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Colorado Rare Bird Alert, 23 July 2014
From: Joyce Takamine <jabirujt AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 03:59:35 -0600
Compiler: Joyce Takamine
Date: July 23, 2014
email: rba AT cfobirds.org

This is the Colorado Rare Bird Alert for Wednesday, July 23 sponsored by
Denver Field Ornithologists and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.

Highlight species include: (* indicates new information on this species).

YELLOWCROWNED NIGHT-HERON (Yuma)
Chukar (Delta)
Red-necked Grebe (Jackson)
Caspian Tern (Denver)
ACORN WOODPECKER (Pueblo)
Bell's Vireo (Yuma)
Black Phoebe (Delta, Fremont, Montrose)
Eastern Phoebe (Yuma)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Baca, *Fremont)
Purple Martin (Delta)
Carolina Wren (Prowers)
PACIFIC WREN (San Miguel)
Black-throated Sparrow (Pueblo)
Northern Cardinal (Boulder, Prowers, Yuma)
Indigo Bunting (Boulder, Jefferson)

BACA COUNTY:
--Janeal Thompson reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at a private
residence on July 2. She kindly provided her email address (
prairiestarflower AT gmail.com) so you can contact her and seek permission to
visit.  Leatherman reported on July 14 that the Baca county Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher continues.  Contact Janeal Thompson to make arrangements to see
the bird.

BOULDER COUNTY:
--A calling Northern Cardinal was reported by Boswell part way up Hawthorn
Gulch on July 21.
--Boswell reported an Indigo Bunting has been singing in the morning in the
vicinity of Maxwell House on the east side of Sanitas on July 21.

DELTA COUNTY:
--Chukars were reported by Garrison at Pleasure Park in Hotchkiss on July
14.  They seem to be hanging out
near the parking lot.
--On July 18, Garrison reported nesting Purple Martins on CSR 265 in NE
Delta County.

DELTA/MONTROSE COUNTIES:
--Farese reported 14 Black Phoebe on the Gunnison River from Chukar Trail
near Olathe to Pleasure Park near Hotchkiss on July 17.

DENVER COUNTY:
--2 Caspian Terns were reported by Edwards flying over Ferril Lake in
Denver City Park on July 19.

FREMONT COUNTY:
--Miller reported a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on July 8 on CO 67, It was
seen flying alongside the highway. It was seen 0.75 miles north of the
Custer County line.  On July 13, Miller reported seeing the Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 14, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was
reported by Walbek, Percival and Schultz. On July 16, Drummond reported
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at 0730 but not at 1030.  On July 19, Hinds
reported the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at the same spot.  On July 20,
Edwards reported that 2 Scissor-tailed Flycatchers were seen and
that they appear to be nesting in the dead tree.  On July 22, Bill Maynard
reported 1 Scissor-tailed Flycatcher before 0800.
--At least 2 Black Phoebes were reported by Dunning at Florence River Park
on July 20.

JACKSON COUNTY:
--On July 11 Hundertmark reported that the pair of Red-necked Grebes
continues incubating egg(s) on Lake John.  On July 19, Hundertmark reported
3 adult Red-necked Grebes (2 m, 1 f) at Lake John but an empty nest.

JEFFERSON COUNTY:
--Singing Indigo Buntings were reported by Henwood east of Morrison on Soda
Lakes Road on July 20.

PROWERS COUNTY:
--On July 17, Moss reported hearing a Carolina Wren at the S end of Lamar
Community College Woods (LCCW)
and a pair of Northern Cardinals.

PUEBLO COUNTY:
--Knight reported 3 Black-throated Sparrows on July 5 near Pueblo West.
Percival reported them again on July 8. The sparrows were found by parking
at Liberty Point in Pueblo West at the end of Purcell Blvd. The rest
involves a hike that isn't for those who are out of shape. Take the trail
off to the right before the flag pole and memorial. Proceed to the bottom
of the cliff keeping to your right. You will pass a cement "well" just
before merging with a now unused dirt road which heads WNW to a distant
pass in the cliff. The first arroyo with slab rocks is where the sparrows
were.  On July 12, Lilly reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West
and on July 14, Joy reported Black-throated Sparrows at Pueblo West and an
easier walk from south end of South Greenbrier Drive.  South Greenbrier
Drive is reached b driving south on Purcell from Hwy 50 for about 2.5 miles
to East Linden Ave.  Turn
west on Linden, and then south on Greenbrier.  On July 16, Drummond
reported ad male and juvenile Black-throated Sparrows in Pueblo East area,
using easier hiking point of South Greenbrier Drive.  On July 20, Edwards
reported Black-throated Sparrows continue at Liberty Point in Pueblo West.
--An ACORN WOODPECKER family was reported by Percival at the dead Ponderosa
Tree in the parking lot at Horseshoe Lodge at Pueblo Mountain Park on July
10. On July 12, Bohannon reported ACORN WOODPECKERS at Pueblo Mountain
Park.  On July 20, Dunning reported that the pair of ACORN WOODPECKERS at
Pueblo Mountain Park were busy feeding young.
--On July 20, Knight reported a Black Phoebe below Pueblo Reservoir dam.

SAN MIGUEL:
--A PACIFIC WREN was reported by Lovitch on the Bear Creek Tail in
Telluride on July 13 and refound by Dexter on July 14.  On July 18, Dexter
reported that the PACIFIC WREN continues at the same location but may not
sing consistently after 1000.  Directions:  The location is .6 miles up
Bear creek Trail from the bridge over San Miguel River at S end of Pine St.
 It appears to be nest building.

YUMA COUNTY:
--At Stalker Lake on July 17, Mlodinow reported a 1 year old YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT-HERON on the N side and 9 Northern Cardinals.
--At Wray Fish Hatchery on July 17, Mlodinow reported Eastern Phoebes.
--At Simmons SWA, N of Beecher on July 17, Mlodinow reported 21 Bell's
Vireos.

DFO Field Trips:
The DFO Field Trip for Saturday , July 26 will be to Cherry Creek SP led by
Buzz Schaumberg (303-699-1721or cell 303-478-4641) 2 miles of easy walking,
driving between stopping locations.  RSVP required, but no participant
limit.  Please leave your number for a return call if we have to adjust the
plan.  Meet at 0700 at the marina parking lot on the west side of the park
for a half-day trip.
Will carpool as much as possible.  Bring scopes if you have them, binocs,
water, snacks and dress for weather.  Lunch optional.
State park pass and water fee required.

The DFO Field trip for Sunday, July 27 will be to South Table Mountain in
Golden led by Mike Foster (303-456-2647).  Moderate trail, around 3 mile
hike, elevation gain of 500 fee.  Limit 8 people.  Preregister with Mike.
Meet at 0600 at the SE corner of RTD lot (2nd and Routt) a few blocks east
of Union Blvd,  From 6th Ave and Union, drive south to 2nd, then turn left
and enter lot off of Routt.  Will carpool to trailhead from here.  Half-day
trip.

Good Birding,
Joyce Takamine
 Boulder
303-554-9785

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAHtstTczr7cneo%3D8hGZdBFHwikJev_uM1AO8Z8_uUv_o%2B52diQ%40mail.gmail.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: How many nuthatch species in Colorado?
From: Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:18:24 -0700 (PDT)
Hello, Birders.

Coverage in the May/June 2014 Birding may be of particular interest to 
Colorado birders. A feature article on White-breasted Nuthatches is by 
Colorado's own wandering tattler, Steve Mlodinow. The White-breasted 
Nuthatch situation is especially relevant to Colorado birders, as we have 
two distinctive populations (perhaps separate species) in the state: *Carolina 
Nuthatches* along the eastern tier of counties and west sparingly toward 
the Front Range foothills, and *Rocky Mountain Nuthatches* in the, um, 
Rockies and sparingly east onto the plains.

How do you tell them apart?

Well, read Steve's article and find out for yourself! Here's a free PDF 
download:

http://aba.org/birding/2014-MAY-JUN/14-3_08Mlodinow-R4.pdf

As Steve notes in his article, the call notes of the nuthatches are 
especially important for ID. Unfortunately, it is hard to listen to 
nuthatches on the printed pages of a bird magazine (although give the 
technology a few years...). So Birding magazine has put some audio online. 
Two of the recordings at the ABA's website are by another peripatetic 
Colorado birder, Eric DeFonso. Listen to the audio here:

http://blog.aba.org/2014/07/how-many-species-of-white-breasted-nuthatches.html

Finally, I note that the May/June issue features the photography of various 
Colorado birders, among them Glenn Walbek, Bill Schmoker, and Jeff Gordon.

Thanks to Steve, Eric, Glenn, Bill, Jeff, and so many other Colorado 
birders for their great contributions over the years to Birding magazine 
and to the ABA.

Ted Floyd

Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/bdb6431a-df82-4430-906b-4f99c30f2573%40googlegroups.com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Fremont) - yes
From: "Bill Maynard" <bmaynard99 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:54:07 -0600
COBirders,

 

One seen before 0800 and in the same snag along Hwy 67 south of Florence,
the one in which Rich Miller first reported him.

 

Bill Maynard

Colorado Springs

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Colorado Birds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to cobirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to cobirds AT googlegroups.com.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/002d01cfa5ef%2415389430%243fa9bc90%24%40com. 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.