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Updated on Friday, August 26 at 08:49 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Coral-billed Ground-Cuckoo,©BirdQuest

26 Aug Departures [Ellen Haith ]
24 Aug FYI RBA Montezuma trip report 8/21 ["Michael Tetlow " ]
23 Aug Shorebird Trip Saturday August 27th, 2016 7 am Montezuma Visitor's Center [David Nicosia ]
23 Aug Shorebird Trip Saturday August 27th, 2016 7 am Montezuma Visitor's Center [David Nicosia ]
23 Aug Volunteer at Migration Celebration [Anne Rosenberg ]
22 Aug Re: Nighthawks moving tonight [David Nicosia ]
22 Aug Re: Nighthawks moving tonight [Caroline Manring ]
23 Aug Nighthawks moving tonight [Gary Kohlenberg ]
22 Aug Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
21 Aug Self Medication, Wildlife Style: How Birds and Other Creatures Use Medicinal Plants [Peter ]
21 Aug Re:Sanderling, Myers Point [Jay McGowan ]
21 Aug Yellow-headed Blackbird Sodus Point []
21 Aug Sanderling, Myers Point [Jay McGowan ]
21 Aug Montezuma shorebirds, Sat a.m. 20 Aug [Dave Nutter ]
18 Aug Volunteer for Migration Celebration 2016 at Cornell Lab of Ornithology Sept. 17. 10a-3p [Lee Ann van Leer ]
18 Aug RE:Rallidae chick ID ["Marie P. Read" ]
18 Aug Rallidae chick ID [Alyssa Johnson ]
17 Aug Common Nighthawk, Bluegrass Lane [Jay McGowan ]
17 Aug Question [Peter ]
17 Aug American Bittern [Carol Cedarholm ]
17 Aug Kingbirds flocking [Robin Cisne ]
16 Aug Guided Tour of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex Friday, Aug. 19 [Chris Lajewski ]
16 Aug Olive-sided Flycatcher(s), Dryden [Jay McGowan ]
15 Aug Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
15 Aug Baird's Sandpiper? [David Nicosia ]
14 Aug Re: [cayugabirds-l] report: Montezuma trip Sat 13 Aug; next trip Sat 20 Aug 7am [Dave Nutter ]
14 Aug report: Montezuma trip Sat 13 Aug; next trip Sat 20 Aug 7am [Dave Nutter ]
12 Aug Re: Downy WP behavior [Marilyn Ray ]
12 Aug RE: Downy WP behavior [Jody W Enck ]
12 Aug Downy WP behavior [Sara Jane Hymes ]
12 Aug 3 Great Egrets--Hile School Road [AB Clark ]
10 Aug Yellow-breasted Chat at Sapsucker? [Ethan Chaffee ]
10 Aug Common Nighthawk in Danby [Ethan Chaffee ]
09 Aug Montezuma shorebird trips: report for 7 Aug, plan for SAT 13 Aug at 7am [Dave Nutter ]
9 Aug Re: Banded Canada Geese [John and Sue Gregoire ]
09 Aug Re: Banded Canada Geese [Dave Nutter ]
8 Aug Black-Bellied Plover Myers [John Greenly ]
8 Aug Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
8 Aug Seeking bluebird photo [Richard Tkachuck ]
8 Aug Re: Banded Canada Geese [Marc Devokaitis ]
8 Aug Re: Banded Canada Geese [John and Sue Gregoire ]
7 Aug Banded Canada Geese [Suan Yong ]
6 Aug Black-bellied Plover, Myers Point [Jay McGowan ]
6 Aug RE: Red Headed Woodpecker Question [Marty Schlabach ]
5 Aug RE: Red Headed Woodpecker Question ["Marie P. Read" ]
5 Aug Re: Red Headed Woodpecker Question [Regi Teasley ]
5 Aug Re: Red Headed Woodpecker Question [Sue Barth ]
5 Aug Red Headed Woodpecker Question [Carol Keeler ]
4 Aug Leucistic Purple Finch [Carol Keeler ]
3 Aug Amherst Is. wind project [Bill Evans ]
3 Aug Re: Recording bird sounds with a smartphone [Matthew Medler ]
03 Aug next Montezuma trip Sun 7 Aug at *8* am [Dave Nutter ]
02 Aug Re: [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Shorebird Trip Report for July 31st, 2016 [Dave Nutter ]
1 Aug Yellow-crowned Night-heron at MNWR [M Miller ]
1 Aug Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
1 Aug Cedar Waxwings [Dick Feldman ]
31 Jul Montezuma Shorebird Trip Report for July 31st, 2016 [David Nicosia ]
31 Jul Recording bird sounds ["Therese O'Connor" ]
31 Jul Re: blessedly quiet morning... [Regi Teasley ]
31 Jul Re: blessedly quiet morning... [marsha kardon ]
31 Jul blessedly quiet morning... [Donna Lee Scott ]
30 Jul Montezuma - Sandhill Crane Unit ["lajewskic AT yahoo.com" ]
30 Jul Being called a "bird brain"......it's a complement! [Peter ]
29 Jul Sunday's July 31st Montezuma Shorebird Walks [David Nicosia ]
29 Jul Montezuma Orchard Oriole, BC Night Herons, Sandhill Cranes w/colt, some shorebirds ["Michael Tetlow " ]
28 Jul Indigo Bunting at Salt Point [Candace Cornell ]
26 Jul Sunday July 31st Shorebird Walk Montezuma NWR 700 am Visitor's Center, 715 am East Road [David Nicosia ]
26 Jul report: 24 July Montezuma shorebird trip [Dave Nutter ]
25 Jul Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
24 Jul Great White Egrets in Van Etten [Mo Barger Rooster Hill Farm ]
24 Jul Lansing Ctr Orchard Oriole, Bobolink [Suan Yong ]
24 Jul Lansing actor [Suan Yong ]
24 Jul CAU lecture [John Eliot Parks ]
24 Jul Fwd: [osbirds] NYS Birders Conference and NYSOA annual meeting, Sept. 9-11 [Jane Graves ]
23 Jul tomorrow's Montezuma NWR shorebird walk [Dave Nutter ]
21 Jul Montezuma/Holland's Island yesterday. Ring-necked duck and other additions. ["Michael Tetlow " ]

Subject: Departures
From: Ellen Haith <elliehaith44 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 09:46:21 -0400
Our small group of Caspian Terns has been neither seen nor heard for the
last five days. We miss their raucous calls!

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--
Subject: FYI RBA Montezuma trip report 8/21
From: "Michael Tetlow " <mjtetlow AT frontiernet.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 12:20:18 -0400
No rarities but update on conditions for upcoming trips.  Mike


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Subject: Shorebird Trip Saturday August 27th, 2016 7 am Montezuma Visitor's Center
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 20:42:11 -0400
All,

We will meet again 7 am at the Montezuma Wildlife Refuge Visitor's Center
Saturday August 27th for another "shorebird" field trip. Water levels
continue low at traditional shorebird hotspots this time of year so we have
had to improvise a bit. Thanks to Dave Nutter and Jay McGowan who were
"scouting" last week and informing me of what they were seeing around other
parts of the refuge.  We will basically go where the birds are being seen.

For now we will start with Wildlife Drive which has been very good for a
nice variety of birds and at least last Saturday the best there was,
locally, for shorebirds. If shorebirds are being seen or reported this week
elsewhere we will adjust our plans. So for now, meet at Montezuma Wildlife
Refuge Visitor's Center 7 am Saturday the 27th and we will go from there.

Below is our ebird list for last Saturday's Field Trip which was Wildlife
Drive only.We spent about 4 hours. We had 66 species.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31163247

Thanks
Dave Nicosia

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Subject: Shorebird Trip Saturday August 27th, 2016 7 am Montezuma Visitor's Center
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 20:42:11 -0400
All,

We will meet again 7 am at the Montezuma Wildlife Refuge Visitor's Center
Saturday August 27th for another "shorebird" field trip. Water levels
continue low at traditional shorebird hotspots this time of year so we have
had to improvise a bit. Thanks to Dave Nutter and Jay McGowan who were
"scouting" last week and informing me of what they were seeing around other
parts of the refuge.  We will basically go where the birds are being seen.

For now we will start with Wildlife Drive which has been very good for a
nice variety of birds and at least last Saturday the best there was,
locally, for shorebirds. If shorebirds are being seen or reported this week
elsewhere we will adjust our plans. So for now, meet at Montezuma Wildlife
Refuge Visitor's Center 7 am Saturday the 27th and we will go from there.

Below is our ebird list for last Saturday's Field Trip which was Wildlife
Drive only.We spent about 4 hours. We had 66 species.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31163247

Thanks
Dave Nicosia

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--
Subject: Volunteer at Migration Celebration
From: Anne Rosenberg <baj3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 17:19:04 +0000
Hi all,

It's that time of year! I know some of you will be leading bird walks at 
Migration Celebration, but please see below for more options for helping out 
with Migration Celebration-including just getting the word out that we need 
volunteers! 


Thanks
Anne

Migration Celebration at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Saturday, September 
17, 10am-3pm 

Join our team of volunteers in the week before the event and from 9:00 am - 
4:00 pm on Saturday. 


Jobs include:

* Delivering fliers (week before the event)
* Preparing materials (week before the event)
* Event set-up (day before the event)

At the event:
* Interactive tables featuring Lab programs
* Educational activities for youth and families
* Overall event support

Full-day volunteers receive lunch and a free t-shirt. Be part of a fun 
community connecting people with nature and conservation work here at the 
Cornell Lab! To sign up, please contact Hiilei Casco at 
hkc27 AT cornell.edu by August 30th. 



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--
Subject: Re: Nighthawks moving tonight
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 23:41:59 -0400
I had 2 COMMON NIGHTHAWKS flying fairly high up at Upper Lisle County Park
over Whitney Point Reservoir this evening.

On Mon, Aug 22, 2016 at 8:08 PM, Gary Kohlenberg  wrote:

> Menachem Goldstein just reported 3 Common Nighthawks over Cornell's Jessup
> field and I have one flying over my house now at 8pm.
> Cooler weather has at least some birds moving :)
> Gary
> --
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> --
>
>

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--
Subject: Re: Nighthawks moving tonight
From: Caroline Manring <carolinemanring AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 20:14:11 -0400
I just had two go over my house on West Hill!

On Mon, Aug 22, 2016 at 8:08 PM, Gary Kohlenberg  wrote:

> Menachem Goldstein just reported 3 Common Nighthawks over Cornell's Jessup
> field and I have one flying over my house now at 8pm.
> Cooler weather has at least some birds moving :)
> Gary
> --
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>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
>

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--
Subject: Nighthawks moving tonight
From: Gary Kohlenberg <jgk25 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 00:08:55 +0000
Menachem Goldstein just reported 3 Common Nighthawks over Cornell's Jessup 
field and I have one flying over my house now at 8pm. 

Cooler weather has at least some birds moving :) 
Gary 
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--
Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 20:07:44 +0000 (UTC)
 *  New York*  Syracuse   
   - 
   - August  22, 2016
*  NYSY  22. 08.16 Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):August 15, 2016 
- August 22, 2016to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering upstate 
NY counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma Wetlands 
Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, 
Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortlandcompiled: August 22  AT 3:00 p.m. 
(EDT)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga Audubon Homepage: 
www.onondagaaudubon.org  Greetings: This is the Syracuse Rare Bird Alert for 
the week of August 15, 2015. 

Highlights--------------
BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERSANDERLINGBUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPERSTILT 
SANDPIPERWHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERBAIRD’S SANDPIPERLONG-BILLED DOWITCHERCOMMON 
NIGHTHAWKRED-HEADED WOODPECKEROLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER 



Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex 
(MWC)------------ 

     14 species of shorebirds were reported at the complex this week.  
Except for a STILT SANDPIPER seen in flight at South Spring Pool on 8/17 all 
were seen in the Mail Pool or along the Wildlife Drive. Knox-Marsellus and 
Puddlers  Marshes are nearly dry and hold little habitat. Even Mays Point Pool 
which had been productive in past weeks was not very active this week.     
8/17: A BAIRD’S SANDPIPER was reported along the Wildlife Drive.     8/20: 
A BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER was reported in the Main Pool. A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER 
was found at the beginning of the Wildlife Drive. An OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER was 
seen on Mays Point Road. 


Onondaga County------------
     10 species of shorebirds were seen at the Three Rivers WMA north of 
Baldwinsville this week. Most were seen from the duck blind off of Smokey 
Hollow Road. Highlight were 2 SANDERLINGS on 8/20. A COMMON NIGHTHAWK was seen 
from the same area that evening also. 


Madison County------------
     8/21: The season’s first BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER was seen at the Sky 
High Sod Farm on Lakeport Road north of Chittenango. 


Oneida County------------
     8/17: 7 species of shorebirds including 2 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS and a 
LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER were seen at Delta Lake. 

        --end report 
    
Joseph BrinRegion 5Baldwinsville, NY 13027  U.S.A. 
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Subject: Self Medication, Wildlife Style: How Birds and Other Creatures Use Medicinal Plants
From: Peter <psaracin AT rochester.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2016 19:21:53 -0400
It would appear we are not the only creatures practicing herbal medicine.
Interesting....


http://blog.nature.org/science/2016/06/20/self-medication-wildlife-style-how-birds-creatures-medicinal-plants/?utm_campaign=social.nature&utm_medium=social&utm_source=multiple&utm_content=1467232225 



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--
Subject: Re:Sanderling, Myers Point
From: Jay McGowan <jmcgowan57 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2016 15:06:45 -0400
Now three Sanderlings, two juvenile and one adult, on the point with two
Least Sandpipers.

Jay

On Aug 21, 2016 10:04 AM, "Jay McGowan"  wrote:

> Nice juvenile SANDERLING on the beach at the base of the point near the
> swimming area at Myers.
>
> Jay
>

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Subject: Yellow-headed Blackbird Sodus Point
From: <mgullo2 AT rochester.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2016 15:04:37 -0400
Joe Wing and I had a female Yellow-headed Blackbird at Sodus Point this 
morning/early afternoon. The bird was initially seen on the east pier, later 
the east breakwall, before flying over to the west pier. It was last seen on 
the very end of the east pier before it was flushed by kids walking over there. 
We could not relocate it before I had to leave. 


Michael Gullo

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Subject: Sanderling, Myers Point
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2016 10:04:39 -0400
Nice juvenile SANDERLING on the beach at the base of the point near the
swimming area at Myers.

Jay

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--
Subject: Montezuma shorebirds, Sat a.m. 20 Aug
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2016 01:04:56 +0000 (GMT)
This morning Dave Nicosia led a free public field trip for shorebirds at 
Montezuma NWR. He is scheduled to lead one next Saturday as well (27 Aug), 
starting at 7am at the Visitor Center on NYS-5/US-20. There are several 
advantages of such trips: 

* permission to get out of one's car on the Wildlife Drive, which allows easier 
use of a scope, better viewing generally, and conferring with other birders 

* access to dikes around Knox-Marsellus and Puddler marshes, which are 
generally off-limits to the public 

* help finding and identifying birds from an experienced teacher and leader

Dave Nicosia took most participants on the Wildlife Drive, where there are 
several areas with potential shorebird habitat. Meanwhile I went with a much 
smaller group for a brief look at Puddler and Knox-Marsellus, where this 
summer's drought has reduced the water and mud to relatively small areas along 
the NE sides of these impoundments, which in normal summers are deep water at 
the edge of a vast expanse of shallow water and mud flats attracting large 
numbers and a great variety of shorebirds. Creating freshwater shorebird 
habitat every year is always a tough job, but this year it has been especially 
challenging.  


Ken Kemphues and Diane Morton volunteered to drive their car on Towpath Road, 
which has a small amount of mud (thanks to some recent rain) in the craters 
(thanks to wantonly destructive recreational riders) to the east end. We walked 
out on the dike partway around Puddler and found zero shorebirds, although 
there were several Great Blue Herons in the last of the water. We saw several 
Bobolinks in the smartweed. They were quite buffy in non-breeding plumage, 
although one still showed a few black belly and side feathers from its breeding 
male attire. An immature Northern Harrier coursed close to us, and the reeds 
along the dike hosted many Songs and least one Savannah Sparrow, a female 
plumage Common Yellowthroat, and a Yellow Warbler. The biggest spectacle, 
however was a low cloud of thousands of Tree Swallows in and over the 
vegetation in the impoundment. Among them was a small minority of Bank and Barn 
Swallows. We also saw a single Cliff Swallow, which left the hordes and flew NE 
on its own shortly after being discovered.  


We took a second jaunt onto the dike between Puddler and Knox-Marsellus. From 
Towpath Road we had scoped a couple of Yellowlegs and a flock of twenty or so 
Least Sandpipers with perhaps another peep among them. It turns out we were not 
alone in seeking closer encounters with shorebirds. Our competitor, an immature 
Peregrine Falcon, got there first, ousting most of them, but we had an 
excellent view of the falcon flying past. We also had a nice scope view of two 
remaining peeps, an adult Least Sandpiper, brown and crouching on dull yellow 
legs, and a juvenile of what appeared, by its upright shape and stance, pale 
breast, and dark legs, to be a Semipalmated Sandpiper, even though it also 
appeared to be slightly smaller than the Least. There were also 8 Great Egrets 
among the Great Blue Herons, and the continuing Snow Goose and domestic Greylag 
among the Canada Geese. I did not notice any cranes, but we did not give either 
Towpath Road or K-M the time and attention they deserved because I wanted to be 
back at the Visitor Center at mid-morning where Dominic Sherony had asked me to 
join him leading another group seeking shorebirds on the Wildlife Drive.  


Along the Wildlife Drive the the best area for us by far was the new 
impoundment on the right just after Larue's, named Seneca Flats if I recall 
correctly. Among resting Ring-billed Gulls, Caspian Terns, Mallards, Northern 
Shovelers, Blue-winged Teal, and Canada Geese we saw nine species of 
shorebirds: Killdeer, both breeding and non-breeding plumage Spotted 
Sandpipers, Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, Solitary, Least, Pectoral, and 
Semipalmated Sandpipers, and 3 juvenile Short-billed Dowitchers. A Great Egret 
even came to join the gathering while over 20 of us were standing around 
scopes, watching and discussing the birds.  


At Benning there were a few Yellowlegs and Leasts, and a worn adult Dowitcher 
whose domed back suggested Long-billed. This was likely the same bird reported 
by Jay McGowan earlier in the day and possibly the same bird identified by Ann 
Mitchell a week ago. The highlight, however, was a Wilson's Snipe found by 
Kimberly Sucy.  


Dominic's group also went to Morgan Road despite Jay's report of no shorebirds 
there this morning. The situation was a bit better by the time we arrived in 
that there were several Yellowlegs, but the huge flock of peeps from last week 
had moved on, perhaps influenced by a rise in the Seneca River of an inch or 
two. We had another nice close fly-by of an immature Northern Harrier along the 
river, and the impoundment nearby hosted Blue-winged Teal and Hooded 
Mergansers, both in dull summer plumage. 


Jay McGowan also reported an Olive-sided Flycatcher from South Mays Point Road 
near the river, canal, and community and a Red-headed Woodpecker in dead trees 
near the Montezuma NWR headquarters buildings. 


Good birding to all tomorrow. 
--Dave Nutter


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Subject: Volunteer for Migration Celebration 2016 at Cornell Lab of Ornithology Sept. 17. 10a-3p
From: Lee Ann van Leer <lav24 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2016 15:14:08 +0000
From Anne Rosenberg.  Please forward to bird enthusiasts and appropriate lists.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Migration Celebration!

Migration Celebration at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Saturday, September 
17, 10am-3pm 

Join our team of volunteers in the week before the event and from 9:00 am - 
4:00 pm on Saturday. 


Jobs include:

* Delivering fliers (week before the event)
* Preparing materials (week before the event)
* Event set-up (day before the event)

At the event:
* Interactive tables featuring Lab programs
* Educational activities for youth and families
* Overall event support

Full-day volunteers receive lunch and a free t-shirt. Be part of a fun 
community connecting people with nature and conservation work here at the 
Cornell Lab! To sign up, please contact Hiilei Casco at 
hkc27 AT cornell.edu by August 30th. 


You can also find more information on our website at 
www.birds.cornell.edu/birdday and our 
Facebook event. 



Anne Rosenberg
Youth Programs Coordinator
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
baj3 AT cornell.edu
birds.cornell.edu/education





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Subject: RE:Rallidae chick ID
From: "Marie P. Read" <mpr5 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2016 14:40:44 +0000
Hi Alyssa,

I'd say it is a Virginia Rail chick. Gallinule/coot chicks have red bills, this 
one looks to have a whitish bill with maybe a black band on it which would make 
it a Virginia Rail. 


Below is a shot of a VIRA chick from a few years ago:


http://marieread.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Virginia-Rail/G0000kYOBim2eKLQ/I0000nYNVhWyiUb8/C0000EtTkYwIQWRk 


And here's a Sora chick for comparison (no black on bill but red "wattles"):


http://marieread.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Sora/G0000PZ99N0Xw2f8/I00007a0_q_bAYD4/C0000EtTkYwIQWRk 


Cheers
Marie

Marie Read Wildlife Photography
452 Ringwood Road
Freeville NY  13068 USA

Phone  607-539-6608
e-mail   mpr5 AT cornell.edu

Website:     http://www.marieread.com
Follow me on Facebook: 
https://www.facebook.com/Marie-Read-Wildlife-Photography-104356136271727/ 

________________________________________
From: bounce-120698481-5851667 AT list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-120698481-5851667 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Alyssa Johnson 
[Alyssa.Johnson AT flcc.edu] 

Sent: Thursday, August 18, 2016 10:19 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Rallidae chick ID

Good morning,

Forgive me if Im posting this image incorrectly I looked for policy regarding 
posting pictures and couldnt find one. 


This image was taken on the FLCC campus in Canandaigua, NY. Im guessing a Rail 
sp. chick of some sort. Any ideas on who? 


[cid:image001.jpg AT 01D1F939.F3F90390]

Alyssa Johnson
Conservation Technician
Department of Environmental Conservation & Horticulture
Finger Lakes Community College
3325 Marvin Sands Drive
Canandaigua, NY 14426
(585) 785-1232
Office # 2634
Alyssa.Johnson AT flcc.edu


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Subject: Rallidae chick ID
From: Alyssa Johnson <Alyssa.Johnson AT flcc.edu>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2016 14:19:08 +0000
Good morning,

Forgive me if I'm posting this image incorrectly... I looked for policy 
regarding posting pictures and couldn't find one. 


This image was taken on the FLCC campus in Canandaigua, NY. I'm guessing a Rail 
sp. chick of some sort. Any ideas on who? 


[cid:image001.jpg AT 01D1F939.F3F90390]

Alyssa Johnson
Conservation Technician
Department of Environmental Conservation & Horticulture
Finger Lakes Community College
3325 Marvin Sands Drive
Canandaigua, NY 14426
(585) 785-1232
Office # 2634
Alyssa.Johnson AT flcc.edu



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Subject: Common Nighthawk, Bluegrass Lane
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 17 Aug 2016 20:43:23 -0400
Brad Walker and I had a nice look at a low flyover COMMON NIGHTHAWK headed
west near the horse barns at Bluegrass Lane this evening at 7:36PM.

This morning I succeeded in my goal of finding a Cayuga County OLIVE-SIDED
FLYCATCHER, perched in the snags and spruces in the Dresser Road bog in
Summerhill.

I have been checking Myers Point regularly the last couple of weeks. Aside
from the occasional Least, Semipalmated, Solitary, and Lesser Yellowlegs,
it has been pretty quiet. Still no turnstones or Sanderlings there this
year that I have seen.

-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jwm57 AT cornell.edu

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Subject: Question
From: Peter <psaracin AT rochester.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Aug 2016 13:06:57 -0400
Friends:

Cape May is having a 2 day "field trip" to look for shorebirds on the 
24th and 25th of August. It's led by one of the folks who wrote the 
shorebird book. Cost for the workshop (not including travel, room and 
board) is about $190.

Anyone interested in car pooling?
Pete Saracino

Here is a description of the workshop:

*Shorebirds with the Man Who Wrote the Book*
*Wednesday-Thursday, August 24-25, 2016 (2 Days)
With Michael O’Brien
Second leader added if registration warrants
Cost: $150 members, $190 nonmembers.*
It is not surprising Houghton Mifflin’s landmark /The Shorebird Guide/ 
sprang from the brains and hands of three Cape May birders and authors. 
Now you can experience some of the East Coast’s best shorebirding while 
guided by one of them. Michael O’Brien is equal parts skilled birder and 
superb teacher. Search storied locations like Bunker Pond, the South 
Cape May Meadows, Stone Harbor, and Brigantine NWR for peeps, plovers 
and yellowlegs plus possible gems like phalaropes or godwits. Over 25 
plovers and sandpipers are in easy reach, with some species numbering in 
the thousands. Learn to begin with size, shape, behavior and voice, and 
then move on to careful examination of plumage details, just as /The 
Shorebird Guide/ teaches.



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Subject: American Bittern
From: Carol Cedarholm <ccedarho AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Aug 2016 10:48:32 -0400
This morning at the swan pen at stewart park perched on a partly submerged
tree limb I believe I saw an American Bittern.  Has anyone else seen one.
Also 3 huge belted kingfishers, one female perched on a limb in the water
for a good long while. So regal!
Carol Cedarholm

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Subject: Kingbirds flocking
From: Robin Cisne <rfcisne AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Aug 2016 10:17:03 -0400
Until this morning, I had only seen Kingbirds alone, but today there was a
whole big flock assembling in the scrubby field (bushes, thistles, and
teasels, etc.) at the corner of Route 79/Slaterville Road and Landon Road.




*Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through
our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that
democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' *
                                                — Isaac Asimov

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Subject: Guided Tour of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex Friday, Aug. 19
From: Chris Lajewski <lajewskic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 16:39:31 +0000 (UTC)
Montezuma Birding Van TourFriday, Aug. 19, 9:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Hop in the Montezuma Audubon Center van for a tour of Montezuma's birding hot 
spots to see the early migration of waterfowl, shorebirds, songbirds and 
raptors. The tour will not involve any walking, however, we will get out of the 
van at three or four locations. Participants will learn about what makes the 
Montezuma Wetlands Complex an Important Bird Area and how these habitats are 
managed for birds and other wildlife. The Montezuma Audubon Center is located 
at 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY 13146. Participants are encouraged to 
bring their camera and binoculars. Fee: $8/child; $13.50/adult, 
$35/family. Space is limited and registration is required. Call 315-365-3588 
or email montezuma AT audubon.org.  

Chris LajewskiCenter DirectorMontezuma Audubon Center2295 State Route 89, 
Savannah, NY 13146315-365-3588http://ny.audubon.org/montezuma  



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Subject: Olive-sided Flycatcher(s), Dryden
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 10:42:14 -0400
This morning Livia and I walked around the Park Preserve South and the
beginning of Hammond Hill Road in Dryden. Warblers were generally scarce.
The only bird of note at Park was a juvenile MOURNING WARBLER where the
trail rises to the left over the creek area. On the way up Irish Settlement
towards Hammond, I pulled over at the marshy area just north of Park
Preserve North to check out a suspicious silhouette. Sure enough, an
OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER was preening at the top of a snag on the west side
of the road. Shortly thereafter we were at the beaver dam swamp at the
beginning of Hammond Hill Road and found another OLIVE-SIDED, or possibly
the same one following us, in the snags on the left side as you come in
from Irish Settlement. We eventually had a nice warbler flock at this spot
as well, with Canada, Blackburnian, Chestnut-sided, Magnolia,
Black-throated Blue, and Black-throated Green.

Yesterday morning I also had a bright YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER briefly at
the Sherwood Platform here at Sapsucker Woods. I was not able to find it
later in the day.

Jay

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Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2016 21:07:04 +0000 (UTC)
*  New York*  Syracuse   
   - 
   - August 15, 2016
*  NYSY  15. 08.16 Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):August 08, 2016 
- August 15, 2016to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering upstate 
NY counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma Wetlands 
Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, 
Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortlandcompiled: August 15  AT 5:00 p.m. 
(EDT)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga Audubon Homepage: 
www.onondagaaudubon.org  Greetings: This is the Syracuse Rare Bird Alert for 
the week of August 08, 2015. 

Highlights--------------
RED-NECKED GREBESNOW GOOSEAMERICAN WIGEONRED-SHOULDERED HAWKSORABLACK-BELLIED 
PLOVERSTILT SANDPIPERWHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERBAIRD’S SANDPIPERLONG-BILLED 
DOWITCHERORCHARD ORIOLEPINE SISKIN 


Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex 
(MWC)------------ 

     15 species of shorebirds were reported from the complex this week. 
Nothing new for the season. Highlight’s were BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER at Towpath 
Road and BAIRD’S SANDPIPER at Morgan Road.     8/9: A BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER 
was seen at Towpath Road..     8/11: 9 species of shorebirds including 
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER and STILT SANDPIPER were seen along the Wildlife 
Drive,      8/12: A WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER was reported at Morgan Road 
Marsh.     8/13: 2 REDD-HEADED WOODPECKERS were seen at the end of Mays 
Point Road. 2 SANDHILL CRANES  and a lingering SNOW GOOSE were seen from East 
Road. 7 species of shorebirds including a juvenile BAIRD’S SANDPIPER were 
seen at the Morgan Road Marsh. A RED-SHOULDERED HAWK was seen there also.    
  8/15: The BAIRD’S SANDPIPER was again seen at Morgan Road. 


Onondaga County------------
     8/10: A GREAT EGRET was seen at the end of the Creekwalk near the 
Destiny Shopping Mall.     8/11: A SORA was found along the Creekwalk.   
  8/14: A female AMERICAN WIGEON continues in the Seneca River below the 
bridge  in Baldwinsville.     8/15: 6 species of shorebirds and 4 GREAT 
EGRETS were seen from duck blind on Smokey Hollow Road in Three Rivers WMA 
north of Baldwinsville. 


Oswego County------------
     8/14: 7 species of shorebirds including a WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER were 
seen in a wet area at the corner of Rt.1 and Lakeview Road in the Town of 
Scriba. 


Madison County------------
     8/8: A RED-NECKED GREBE was found on Woodman Pond.     8/9: 5 
species of the more common shorebirds were seen at Woodman Pond. 


Oneida County------------
     8/12: 9 species of the more common shorebirds were seen at the Main 
Street Fishing Access at Delta Lake. 


Herkimer County------------
     8/8: PINE SISKINS were reported at a feeder north of Eagle Bay.
                          --end report 
    
Joseph BrinRegion 5Baldwinsville, NY 13027  U.S.A.  
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Subject: Baird's Sandpiper?
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2016 16:11:06 -0400
I was at Morgan rd earlier today and think I got the Baird's that others
have seen. I took a photo with my phone on my scope at 70X. The other
photos I took didn't come out. The bird was larger than the SESA around and
not as big as the PESA. The primary projection was maybe slightly past tail
or even. The bird's foraging was different than the SESA.  The color looks
good. In the photo the bird in question is in the front to the left a bit.
Am I correct in my id as a Baird's???

See:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/davenicosia/28721550680/in/datetaken-public/

Also if anyone got a photo of the Baird's at Morgan can you share?

Thanks
Dave Nicosia

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Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] report: Montezuma trip Sat 13 Aug; next trip Sat 20 Aug 7am
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2016 06:22:26 +0000 (GMT)
I want to clarify that regarding the breeding plumage Dowitcher which Ann found 
at Benning and identified as Long-billed, my writing was sloppy and ambiguous, 
therefore inadvertently hurtful, for which I apologize. I did not at all intend 
to impugn her ability to observe or ID it. I referred to my own difficulty 
identifying this, like most adult Dowitchers, to species, so I was unable to 
corroborate her ID. I could neither agree nor disagree with her. Adult 
Dowitchers are far trickier to me than are juvenile Night-Herons, which I have 
studied a bit during the last 2 weeks. 


In my opinion Ann's a really good birder: observant, knowledgeable, and quick, 
as well as fun and helpful. Frequently she finds birds which I would have 
overlooked (case in point). It is common when birding together for us to each 
glimpse a bit of a bird and blurt out the same ID at the same time. Sometimes 
there's some discussion involved before we agree. Sometimes only one of us 
observes a bird well enough to ID it. Rarely do we disagree about an ID. We 
help each other, but we also try to observe and judge independently, and we 
keep separate lists, which was reflected in my report.   


I was also remiss in neglecting to specifically thank Ann for her great help on 
this field trip finding and pointing out birds and teaching other participants, 
in addition to making a scouting trip to various places including Morgan Road 
on Thursday when I was unable to do so. 


Plus she lent me a hat when the sun finally broke through. 
--Dave Nutter

On Aug 13, 2016, at 08:49 PM, Dave Nutter  wrote:

This morning I led a shorebird trip starting at 7am at the Montezuma NWR 
Visitor Center. 


Next Saturday (20 Aug) Dave Nicosia will lead a trip starting at the same time 
(7am) & place (Visitor Center off NYS-5/US-20).  


Our group was initially comprised of 5 experienced birders with 4 scopes, the 
small child of a birder who was content to stand around with a small pair of 
binoculars, plus a family of 6. This family lacked optics or a field guide. 
Whole categories of birds were completely new to them. Yet they were curious 
enough to get up at 5am to leave Rochester and make a considerable detour to 
spend most of their morning with us before going to a family gathering. Either 
they had a pretty good time, or they were incredibly polite, probably both. I 
hope they come back next week. We all shared sightings, optics, and information 
with them. I hope they come back, whether or not they remember to bring their 
pair of binoculars. 


On the Wildlife Drive, the Seneca Slough near the start was nicely productive. 
The river had risen enough since Sunday that it connected to the puddles in the 
slough, which hosted 4 species of shorebirds: a Killdeer, a Spotted Sandpiper 
(which lacked spots but was bobbing its rear end), a Solitary Sandpiper, and a 
Lesser Yellowlegs. Also a fox ran across the far end. 


At stops along the Main Pool we added a perched adult Bald Eagle, families of 
Common Gallinules and Pied-billed Grebes, the rare summering Ring-necked Duck, 
several Double-crested Cormorant, Great Blue Herons, Caspian Terns, Ring-billed 
Gulls, Eastern Kingbirds, Cedar Waxwings, and eclipse Mallards. A few of us 
also noted a couple of Blue-winged Teal, some distant American Coots and Wood 
Ducks, a couple distant Northern Harriers, a juvenile Song Sparrow, a probable 
Willow Flycatcher, and various swallows.  


We added Greater Yellowlegs at Eaton Marsh. At Benning, Scott Peterson found a 
Wilson's Snipe, Ann Mitchell found a breeding plumage Dowitcher which she 
considered to be Long-billed (I was, as usual, not confident with this 
speciation), and I found a few Least Sandpipers. There was also a cooperative 
eclipse Wood Duck here. 


Having done the Wildlife Drive with us, the family went on their way. The rest 
of us continued to Mays Point Pool where we met two birders who were on last 
week's field trip: a Brit and his local friend. Mays Point Pool has dried out 
considerably. The only shorebirds we saw were a single Lesser Yellowlegs and a 
few Killdeer, but they were fairly close and in the open because the shallows 
and wet mud were only near the channel along the dike. 


From here we followed recent reports and made the bold move away from the 
National Wildlife Refuge and toward Morgan Road near the DEC offices in 
Savannah. In theory there's a boat ramp here into the narrower and shallower 
branch of the Seneca River which flows around the west side of Howland Island 
and, to its south, Hog Island. In practice there is a convenient, if weedy, 
parking area for a few cars next to a long broad swath of shallow water strewn 
with algae, small mud bars, and newly emergent grasses and cattails. We were 
greeted by a considerable flock of Least Sandpipers spiced with Semipalmated 
Sandpipers and Plovers, plus a single Baird's Sandpiper. 


This Baird's was more unambiguous than the one I reported from Benning a couple 
weeks back. For one thing, it didn't spend all its time in an odd position 
preening. It had the typical long, horizontal shape of a Baird's, with a narrow 
taper to the rear including wingtips crossed over the tail, not blunt-ended 
like a football or smaller peep species. Compared to the grayish Semipalmated 
Sandpipers, whose faces and throats were conspicuously paler, the Baird's was 
larger and taller, and its head, neck and breast were almost completely a 
smooth tan. It had black legs. This Baird's, a juvenile instead of a molting 
adult, also had a warm brown back whose every feather was narrowly edged buffy, 
creating a uniform scaly appearance.   


When a young Northern Harrier came between us and the peep flock, they moved a 
bit farther away. Some, including the Baird's, hid around a bend in the 
"river". We tried walking a short distance south along a nearby dike, but soon 
saw that it provided no better vantage. However, in walking from the boat ramp 
parking area toward the DEC buildings we had a different view of the pond 
between Morgan and Carncross Roads. On a little bit of mud which was relatively 
close to the DEC parking lot yet hidden from it by tall cattails, wonderfully 
lit by the sun behind us, we found a fine collection of shorebirds: two or 
three each of Killdeer, Semipalmated Plovers, Lesser Yellowlegs, Least and 
Semipalmated Sandpipers, and singles of Solitary Sandpiper, Pectoral Sandpiper, 
and Short-billed Dowitcher. The dowitcher was particularly lovely to me. Not 
only did it have a golden wash across the breast and a warm glow over its back 
from fresh, bright-edged feathers, but its tertials had diagnostic black and 
orange barring. Although this bird was gray on the face and neck, it was not 
overall cool in tone nor so extensively grayish as a juvenile Long-billed. The 
positive ID of a dowitcher to species is a wonderful thing.  

--Dave Nutter
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Subject: report: Montezuma trip Sat 13 Aug; next trip Sat 20 Aug 7am
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2016 00:49:17 +0000 (GMT)
This morning I led a shorebird trip starting at 7am at the Montezuma NWR 
Visitor Center. 


Next Saturday (20 Aug) Dave Nicosia will lead a trip starting at the same time 
(7am) & place (Visitor Center off NYS-5/US-20).  


Our group was initially comprised of 5 experienced birders with 4 scopes, the 
small child of a birder who was content to stand around with a small pair of 
binoculars, plus a family of 6. This family lacked optics or a field guide. 
Whole categories of birds were completely new to them. Yet they were curious 
enough to get up at 5am to leave Rochester and make a considerable detour to 
spend most of their morning with us before going to a family gathering. Either 
they had a pretty good time, or they were incredibly polite, probably both. I 
hope they come back next week. We all shared sightings, optics, and information 
with them. I hope they come back, whether or not they remember to bring their 
pair of binoculars. 


On the Wildlife Drive, the Seneca Slough near the start was nicely productive. 
The river had risen enough since Sunday that it connected to the puddles in the 
slough, which hosted 4 species of shorebirds: a Killdeer, a Spotted Sandpiper 
(which lacked spots but was bobbing its rear end), a Solitary Sandpiper, and a 
Lesser Yellowlegs. Also a fox ran across the far end. 


At stops along the Main Pool we added a perched adult Bald Eagle, families of 
Common Gallinules and Pied-billed Grebes, the rare summering Ring-necked Duck, 
several Double-crested Cormorant, Great Blue Herons, Caspian Terns, Ring-billed 
Gulls, Eastern Kingbirds, Cedar Waxwings, and eclipse Mallards. A few of us 
also noted a couple of Blue-winged Teal, some distant American Coots and Wood 
Ducks, a couple distant Northern Harriers, a juvenile Song Sparrow, a probable 
Willow Flycatcher, and various swallows.  


We added Greater Yellowlegs at Eaton Marsh. At Benning, Scott Peterson found a 
Wilson's Snipe, Ann Mitchell found a breeding plumage Dowitcher which she 
considered to be Long-billed (I was, as usual, not confident with this 
speciation), and I found a few Least Sandpipers. There was also a cooperative 
eclipse Wood Duck here. 


Having done the Wildlife Drive with us, the family went on their way. The rest 
of us continued to Mays Point Pool where we met two birders who were on last 
week's field trip: a Brit and his local friend. Mays Point Pool has dried out 
considerably. The only shorebirds we saw were a single Lesser Yellowlegs and a 
few Killdeer, but they were fairly close and in the open because the shallows 
and wet mud were only near the channel along the dike. 


From here we followed recent reports and made the bold move away from the 
National Wildlife Refuge and toward Morgan Road near the DEC offices in 
Savannah. In theory there's a boat ramp here into the narrower and shallower 
branch of the Seneca River which flows around the west side of Howland Island 
and, to its south, Hog Island. In practice there is a convenient, if weedy, 
parking area for a few cars next to a long broad swath of shallow water strewn 
with algae, small mud bars, and newly emergent grasses and cattails. We were 
greeted by a considerable flock of Least Sandpipers spiced with Semipalmated 
Sandpipers and Plovers, plus a single Baird's Sandpiper. 


This Baird's was more unambiguous than the one I reported from Benning a couple 
weeks back. For one thing, it didn't spend all its time in an odd position 
preening. It had the typical long, horizontal shape of a Baird's, with a narrow 
taper to the rear including wingtips crossed over the tail, not blunt-ended 
like a football or smaller peep species. Compared to the grayish Semipalmated 
Sandpipers, whose faces and throats were conspicuously paler, the Baird's was 
larger and taller, and its head, neck and breast were almost completely a 
smooth tan. It had black legs. This Baird's, a juvenile instead of a molting 
adult, also had a warm brown back whose every feather was narrowly edged buffy, 
creating a uniform scaly appearance.   


When a young Northern Harrier came between us and the peep flock, they moved a 
bit farther away. Some, including the Baird's, hid around a bend in the 
"river". We tried walking a short distance south along a nearby dike, but soon 
saw that it provided no better vantage. However, in walking from the boat ramp 
parking area toward the DEC buildings we had a different view of the pond 
between Morgan and Carncross Roads. On a little bit of mud which was relatively 
close to the DEC parking lot yet hidden from it by tall cattails, wonderfully 
lit by the sun behind us, we found a fine collection of shorebirds: two or 
three each of Killdeer, Semipalmated Plovers, Lesser Yellowlegs, Least and 
Semipalmated Sandpipers, and singles of Solitary Sandpiper, Pectoral Sandpiper, 
and Short-billed Dowitcher. The dowitcher was particularly lovely to me. Not 
only did it have a golden wash across the breast and a warm glow over its back 
from fresh, bright-edged feathers, but its tertials had diagnostic black and 
orange barring. Although this bird was gray on the face and neck, it was not 
overall cool in tone nor so extensively grayish as a juvenile Long-billed. The 
positive ID of a dowitcher to species is a wonderful thing.  

--Dave Nutter
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Subject: Re: Downy WP behavior
From: Marilyn Ray <mlr17 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2016 11:34:23 -0400
Hi all,

We have one oriole feeder hanging from the eve in front of a dining room 
window on the back fo the house and one HB feeder hanging in front of 
the living room window on the front to the house. For years we have had 
HBs and Orioles feeding at both.  If one feeder has a visitor another 
bird will fly to the other feeder.  Sometimes male orioles are at the 
back feeder and a female is eating at the font feeder. This has been 
ging on for years.  Recently other birds, including Downey WPs, 
chickadees, and nuthatches sometimes feed at the oriole feeder as well.

Marilyn


On 8/12/2016 11:00 AM, Jody W Enck wrote:
>
> Hi Sara and all,
>
> I have an oriole feeder with three ports, and have had a Downy 
> Woodpecker drinking from it for about 6 weeks now.  Earlier this week, 
> a female Ruby-throated Hummingbird was also drinking from it (and 
> chasing away anything that got too close.  This morning a Black-capped 
> Chickadee stopped by for a drink.  Yesterday, I finally got pictures 
> of an actual Baltimore Oriole drinking from the oriole feeder.
>
> Lots of fun for me.  Maybe not so much for the birds.
>
> Jody
>
> Jody W. Enck, PhD
> Conservation Social Scientist
> and
> President, Cayuga Bird Club
>
> *From: *Sara Jane Hymes 
> *Sent: *Friday, August 12, 2016 10:16 AM
> *To: *CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> *Subject: *[cayugabirds-l] Downy WP behavior
>
> Recently we have been seeing something weve never had occur at our 
> feeders before.  A Downy Woodpecker has become a regular visitor to 
> our hummingbird feeders!  Our H-bird feeders are of the flat square 
> variety attaching to window, and a round varietybut flat 
> surfacehanging from a porch.  Anyway, we were surprised to see a 
> woodpecker (tending to usually be a female) actively feeding from the 
> feeder.  At first I thought the Downy might be getting insects, but 
> then I could see the liquid movingand realized it was actually 
> sipping the nectar!!  We do have a dripping bird bath water supply, 
> but I guess it is just not enough for the Downy.  Has anyone else been 
> having this occur at their h-bird feeders during this dry summer?
> --
>
> Sara Jane Hymes
>
>
> --
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Subject: RE: Downy WP behavior
From: Jody W Enck <jwe4 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2016 15:00:51 +0000
Hi Sara and all,

I have an oriole feeder with three ports, and have had a Downy Woodpecker 
drinking from it for about 6 weeks now. Earlier this week, a female 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird was also drinking from it (and chasing away anything 
that got too close. This morning a Black-capped Chickadee stopped by for a 
drink. Yesterday, I finally got pictures of an actual Baltimore Oriole drinking 
from the oriole feeder. 


Lots of fun for me.  Maybe not so much for the birds.
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Conservation Social Scientist
and
President, Cayuga Bird Club

From: Sara Jane Hymes
Sent: Friday, August 12, 2016 10:16 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Downy WP behavior

Recently we have been seeing something we've never had occur at our feeders 
before. A Downy Woodpecker has become a regular visitor to our hummingbird 
feeders! Our H-bird feeders are of the 'flat' square variety attaching to 
window, and a round variety-but flat surface-hanging from a porch. Anyway, we 
were surprised to see a woodpecker (tending to usually be a female) actively 
feeding from the feeder. At first I thought the Downy might be getting insects, 
but then I could see the liquid moving-and realized it was actually sipping the 
nectar!! We do have a 'dripping' bird bath water supply, but I guess it is just 
not enough for the Downy. Has anyone else been having this occur at their 
h-bird feeders during this dry summer? 

--

Sara Jane Hymes


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Subject: Downy WP behavior
From: Sara Jane Hymes <sjh4 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2016 14:16:13 +0000
Recently we have been seeing something we’ve never had occur at our feeders 
before. A Downy Woodpecker has become a regular visitor to our hummingbird 
feeders! Our H-bird feeders are of the ‘flat’ square variety attaching to 
window, and a round variety—but flat surface—hanging from a porch. Anyway, 
we were surprised to see a woodpecker (tending to usually be a female) actively 
feeding from the feeder. At first I thought the Downy might be getting insects, 
but then I could see the liquid moving—and realized it was actually sipping 
the nectar!! We do have a ‘dripping’ bird bath water supply, but I guess it 
is just not enough for the Downy. Has anyone else been having this occur at 
their h-bird feeders during this dry summer? 

--

Sara Jane Hymes



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Subject: 3 Great Egrets--Hile School Road
From: AB Clark <anneb.clark AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2016 09:32:15 -0400
Just now, 12 Aug, in the marshland at Hile School Road and Rt 38, where the 
Common Gallinule, rails etc were earlier in the summer. 

My neighbor called me down and I got there in time to see them slow-flapping to 
the N visible end of the marshland where they disappeared downward. He also 
confirmed their size because a Great Blue Heron had been present with them. 


Out of Basin, by a bit, of course.

Anne
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Subject: Yellow-breasted Chat at Sapsucker?
From: Ethan Chaffee <echaffee21 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 21:31:24 -0400
I just saw this in an ebird report from a few hours ago...

"on the edge of the Sapsucker Woods Road segment that runs through the
Woods" - Alexander Domb, 8/8/16, 1 PM

Any further info or input would be great.

Thanks!

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Subject: Common Nighthawk in Danby
From: Ethan Chaffee <echaffee21 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 21:11:00 -0400
Hi all,

My wife and I were wrapping up a game of disc golf when a Common Nighthawk
silently flew directly overhead, heading South. We were in the open field
right next to Dotson Park Trail road for any who want to try for it. First
sighted at around 8:35. We didn't see him again, but were only there for
another 5 or 10 minutes. (For those of you who don't know, the entrance to
the disc golf course is directly across from the Danby Town Hall... We were
just East of the Danby Community Church when he flew overhead.)

Thanks!
Ethan

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Subject: Montezuma shorebird trips: report for 7 Aug, plan for SAT 13 Aug at 7am
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Tue, 09 Aug 2016 20:31:32 +0000 (GMT)
Last Sunday, 7 August, there was a birding trip at Montezuma NWR led by Linda 
and Steve Benedict. They took their group from the Visitor Center first around 
the Wildlife Drive, then to Mays Point Pool, areas which have lately had good 
shorebird habitat. At their request I covered the traditional areas at 
Knox-Marsellus and Puddler Marshes from the dikes off East Rd and Towpath Rd. 
Then my group went to Mays Point Pool and around the Wildlife Drive as well. I 
don't know the details of what the other group found, but here's my story:  


Thirteen of us carpooled to the east end of Towpath Rd. By walking 
counterclockwise around Puddler on the dikes we were able to check out the 
narrow band of remaining water and mud in the channels alongside the dikes, 
first at Puddler then at Knox-Marsellus, all without having to deal with glare 
from the brilliant sunlight. We saw very few shorebirds but those we saw were 
nicely lit. There were a few flyover Yellowlegs, both Greater and Lesser, and 
one flyover Semipalmated Plover, but mostly we saw Least Sandpipers foraging on 
the mud. These were a life bird for a fellow from Britain, who got to see 
adults in worn breeding plumage alongside juveniles in crisp new plumage. 
Another life bird for him was Bobolink, of which many foraged in the thick 
vegetation in the eastern part of Puddler. The Sandhill Crane family continues 
out in the middle of K-M, but apparently the vegetation has been growing faster 
than the chick, making it harder to see than last week. 


Last week's rare juvenile Yellow-crowned Night-Heron was not to be found, but 
we did see several Black-crowned Night-Herons around the SW corner of K-M, 
including a boldly patterned black-white-and-gray adult, a much duller gray 
year-old bird, and a couple of stripy brown juveniles. Several Green Herons 
were in this area as well, which also hosted Wood Ducks, Eastern Phoebes, and 
Willow Flycatchers. 


The most unusual bird was a juvenile Red-headed Woodpecker initially seen 
climbing on a dead tree next to the western K-M dike a couple hundred yards 
from Towpath Rd. Scope views revealed a dark gray head composed of dense fine 
streaks, a wash of red around the eyes, a black and gray barred back, a black 
stripe on the white feathers of the secondaries, and the white of the belly 
extending up through the breast to the throat. Otherwise the black-and-white 
pattern was like the adult. Eventually it flew a short distance SW among the 
trees along the channel, perched atop a large limb low in a live Cottonwood, 
and gave several short rattle-like calls. I also heard a "wheer" call, which I 
thought came from an unseen Red-headed Woodpecker farther south. Maybe the bird 
we saw was begging. It then flew south through the trees and was lost to view. 
My guess is that this young bird was raised by the adults which were repeatedly 
seen from South Mays Point Road this year, mostly to the east along both sides 
of the Clyde River. We saw 1 juvenile with that pair there last week. As Jay 
McGowan pointed out, this was the first record of Red-headed Woodpecker from 
the Towpath Road / Knox-Marsellus area.  


At Mays Point Pool we saw Killdeer, Semipalmated Plover, Greater and Lesser 
Yellowlegs, a breeding plumage Stilt Sandpiper continuing from last week, 
several Pectoral and Least Sandpipers, a distant Semipalmated Sandpiper and 
several Dowitchers. Jay, who had checked this area before joining the group, 
went north on his own rather than returning, but he told us there were both 
Long-billed and Short-billed Dowitchers at Mays. Some dowitchers were 
extensively reddish below and had the Long-billed shape with a high, ruffled, 
rounded back and a deep scoop in the rump area. But a dowitcher which was much 
paler below, especially toward the rear, as we would expect with a breeding 
plumage Short-billed, shared this back shape. As usual at Mays, the light was 
against us, the reed stubble was in the way, and I was confused by the 
dowitchers. But it's still a recommended place for shorebirding this summer. 


On the Wildlife Drive we saw a solitary Solitary Sandpiper in the Seneca Slough 
on the right side near the start. A short distance ahead on the left side 
several people heard a Virginia Rail. In the new flooded area on the 
right (whose name I keep forgetting) just past Larue's, there were at least 24 
Caspian Terns among a larger group of resting Ring-billed Gulls, and there were 
several Lesser Yellowlegs. While we scanned this area, Paul Anderson also 
scanned the channel on the left side, finding an adult Sora foraging among the 
bases of plants on the far side. Amazingly, most of our group also got to see 
it.   


The Main Pool had lots of families of Pied-billed Grebes, Common Gallinules, 
American Coots, and Wood Ducks. There were also many distant and active Black 
Terns, both juveniles and molting adults - over 40 by one count.  


Some of the best birding was at Benning. With the sun behind us we got great 
looks at Pectoral Sandpipers to compare with Least Sandpipers, and at a couple 
of Semipalmated Sandpipers also to compare with Least Sandpipers. Semipalmated 
Plovers were available to compare with Killdeer, and there was at least one 
Greater Yellowlegs as well as plenty of Lessers. The best bird here was an 
American Bittern which Paul also found and I believe everyone got to see.  


We did not find the Ruddy Turnstone which Meena Haribal reported at the Seneca 
Slough, nor the Sanderling which Peter DeGiglio reported somewhere within 3 
miles of the Visitor Center (along the Wildlife  Drive I presume), both on the 
3rd, nor did rumors of a Black-bellied Plover at Benning pan out. Still it was 
fun birding with some chances to get to know shorebirds better. Thanks to 
everyone who joined the trip, especially to Jay McGowan and Paul Anderson for 
their help finding and pointing out birds. 


The next 3 weekends the Montezuma shorebird trips will be on SATURDAYS starting 
at 7am at the Visitor Center.  I am leading the trip this Saturday, August 
13th. I plan to first go on the Wildlife Drive, then to Mays Point Pool, and if 
there is interest out onto the dikes at Knox-Marcellus and Puddler. If anyone 
wants to lead part of the group earlier onto the dikes, please let me know. 
Dave Nicosia will be leading trips on the 20th & 27th. 


--Dave Nutter
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Subject: Re: Banded Canada Geese
From: John and Sue Gregoire <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Tue, 9 Aug 2016 14:42:53 -0400
Dave, we get a report of all reported encounters which contains all of the info
provided by the finder, some other data including cords, as well as that quad 
map 

description of location. We also get the reporters name and contact info which 
they 

provide on the BBL reporting form.

Here we have always made it a priority to thank the finder, if not by USPS note 
as 

we did in the past, then by email if that is all that was provided. Not a rule 
just 

courtesy as our efforts rely on that very important feedback.
John
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
N 42 26.611' W 76 45.492'
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Tue, August 9, 2016 14:01, Dave Nutter wrote:
> Thank you, Marc, for tracking down that brief description of the Stewart 
Park 

> Canada Goose project and who is behind it. If the banders want to know where 
their 

> geese go, they might more actively ask us and encourage us, the people who 
scour the 

> region carrying binoculars or scopes and taking notes about birds we find. 
They 

> might even share their information, perhaps in map form, to make it more 
interesting 

> to us or to the general public. Regardless of the study I look forward to 
following 

> individuals, pairs, and groups of marked birds throughout coming seasons and 
years 

>
> The 200 adult Canada Geese were given yellow collars with black writing. 
First there 

> are two letters, either NU or NY in this study. The two letters are followed 
by two 

> digits, 00 through 99. All we know about age is that because these birds were 
adults 

> in 2016 they must have hatched in 2015 or earlier.
>
> The 50 young, all hatched in 2016, were given red leg bands with white 
3-letter 

> combinations. The 14 that I have seen all begin with the letter "P". They are
> difficult to read, being smaller than the collars and usually hidden under 
water, in 

> grass, or under the bird itself. Even when birds were out in the open but 
walking I 

> found it hard to be sure of the letters. Seeing a bird standing still on 
pavement 

> was best.
>
> If you send in a report of an individual collared or color-banded bird to the 
Bird 

> Banding Lab you can learn: 
> * The date the bird was banded, which in this study was 20 June 2016
> * The banding location: "NEAR ITHACA, TOMPKINS COUNTY, NEW YORK, USA". 
> * The name of the bander, which in this case was given as:
> JOSHUA C. STILLER
> NEW YORK DEPT ENV CONSERVATION 
> WILDLIFE SERVICE UNIT
> 625 BROADWAY, 5TH FLOOR - WILDLIFE 
> ALBANY NY 12233 4754 
> * The bird's gender. This was new info.
> * The complete 9-digit number on the bird's aluminum band. 
> * The letters or numbers you reported on the collar or band.
> * The bird's age (see above). 
> * The date and location that you reported finding it. You may fill in the BBL 
form 

> with very precise Latitude and Longitude in degrees and 5 decimals, 
supplemented 

> with written remarks. I hope the BBL gives that info to the bander, because 
on its 

> thank-you form the BBL translates your location info into such odd 
descriptions as 

>  "0.9 mi W of CAYUGA HEIGHTS, TOMPKINS COUNTY, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES" or 
"1.2 mi 

> WNW of SOUTH HILL, TOMPKINS COUNTY, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES." 
> * I don't know if the BBL lists other dates and locations the bird has been
> reported. That would be interesting. 
>
> --Dave Nutter
>
> On Aug 08, 2016, at 11:03 AM, Marc Devokaitis  wrote:
>
> Hi All,
>
> I've been talking to Paul Curtis from Cornell Dept. of Natural Resources 
about this 

> and he has shared the following information--see below. 
>  
> Information on reporting the geese (other than to the BBL via the link 
provided by 

> John, which is always good practice!) is also provided. Note that the project
> leaders are most interested in hearing about geese found OUTSIDE of Stewart 
Park.  

>
> -Marc Devokaitis
>  
> -------------------
>  
>
> The City of Ithaca, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, 
and 

> Cornell University, with support from the Friends of Stewart Park, are 
working to 

> reduce goose conflicts and associated issues in Stewart Park, Ithaca, NY.
>
>  
> Around 425 geese were tagged in Stewart Park late June, 2016
>
> •     All geese were marked with a US Fish & Wildlife Service aluminum 
leg 

> bands
>  
> •     A sample of 200 adult geese are also wearing yellow neck collars 
with 

> numbers and letters
>  
> •     50 young (hatching-year) geese were banded with red leg bands 
with white 

> letters
>  
> •     Collaring and banding the geese allows DEC and Cornell staff to 
monitor 

> their movements throughout the City, and aid the City's efforts to more 
accurately 

> estimate the population size. 
>  
>  
>
>  Geese in Stewart Park
> Stewart Park, here in Ithaca, NY, is a great place for humans and wildlife 
alike. 

> With open playing fields and the historic Renwick Woods surrounded by water, 
it is 

> no wonder that so many people and animals are attracted here. Canada geese 
are 

> abundant and easily seen around the park.
> The City of Ithaca, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation, 
and 

> Cornell University are working together to manage the geese and feces in 
Stewart 

> Park.
>
> Why this project?
> These efforts are in response to multiple complaints from residents largely 
due to 

> the excessive amount of feces from the current population. The large amount 
of goose 

> poop has prevented people from being able to use park space, the City golf 
course, 

> and playing fields.
>  
>
>   
>
> What’s next?
> •     Cornell staff will be counting geese & testing a novel method to 
deter 

> the geese away from Stewart Park & the City golf course.
> •     Our trained scientist will use a novel aircraft in a very 
specific, 

> controlled manner in order to mitigate any impacts to non-target species.
> •     These activities will mostly occur during early morning and late 
evening 

> to minimize disturbance to park users.
> •     Transects will help determine if this non-lethal management 
reduces the 

> goose feces and associated problems.
> •     Results will be used by the City and  DEC to continue developing 
an 

> effective and responsible management plan.
>  
> Can I help?
>
> •     If you see one a yellow-collared, or red leg-banded geese in 
areas other 

> than Stewart Park and the City Golf Course and can read the numbers and 
letters 

> accurately (typically with binoculars), email: ithacageese AT gmail.com with the
> subject heading “Goose observation” and the numbers, date, time and 
location of 

> the bird.  
>  
>  
>
> On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 7:51 AM, John and Sue Gregoire  
wrote: 

> Suan,
>
> All banded birds can be reported at the site below. Although you don't have 
the band 

> from your CAGO observations, I believe you can also report the color and 
markings of 

> the neck bands using that form.
>
> https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBL/bblretrv/
>
> John
> --
> John and Sue Gregoire
> Field Ornithologists
> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
> N 42 26.611' W 76 45.492'
>  Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>
> On Sun, August 7, 2016 14:11, Suan Yong wrote:
>> FYI, Canada geese with yellow neck bands NY06, NY12, and NY17 are currently
>> loafing
>> in a flock of ~30 CANGs in Salmon Creek between Myers and Salt Point. Not 
sure 

>> who's
>> keeping track and what's the best avenue for reporting these; I know there's 
some 

>> local interest, presumably even in tracking "boring" baseline reports, but 
I'm 

>> guessing we don't want this list to turn into a flood of daily "it's still 
there" 

>> reports (which are still valuable scientifically).
>>
>> Suan
>> _____________________
>> http://suan-yong.com
>> --
>>
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>>
>> ARCHIVES:
>> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
>> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>>
>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
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> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> BirdingOnThe.Net
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --



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--
Subject: Re: Banded Canada Geese
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Tue, 09 Aug 2016 18:01:25 +0000 (GMT)
Thank you, Marc, for tracking down that brief description of the Stewart Park 
Canada Goose project and who is behind it. If the banders want to know where 
their geese go, they might more actively ask us and encourage us, the people 
who scour the region carrying binoculars or scopes and taking notes about birds 
we find. They might even share their information, perhaps in map form, to make 
it more interesting to us or to the general public. Regardless of the study I 
look forward to following individuals, pairs, and groups of marked birds 
throughout coming seasons and years 


The 200 adult Canada Geese were given yellow collars with black writing. First 
there are two letters, either NU or NY in this study. The two letters are 
followed by two digits, 00 through 99. All we know about age is that because 
these birds were adults in 2016 they must have hatched in 2015 or earlier. 


The 50 young, all hatched in 2016, were given red leg bands with white 3-letter 
combinations. The 14 that I have seen all begin with the letter "P". They are 
difficult to read, being smaller than the collars and usually hidden under 
water, in grass, or under the bird itself. Even when birds were out in the open 
but walking I found it hard to be sure of the letters. Seeing a bird standing 
still on pavement was best. 


If you send in a report of an individual collared or color-banded bird to the 
Bird Banding Lab you can learn:  

* The date the bird was banded, which in this study was 20 June 2016
* The banding location: "NEAR ITHACA, TOMPKINS COUNTY, NEW YORK, USA". 
* The name of the bander, which in this case was given as:
JOSHUA C. STILLER
NEW YORK DEPT ENV CONSERVATION 
WILDLIFE SERVICE UNIT
625 BROADWAY, 5TH FLOOR - WILDLIFE 
ALBANY NY 12233 4754 
* The bird's gender. This was new info.
* The complete 9-digit number on the bird's aluminum band. 
* The letters or numbers you reported on the collar or band.
* The bird's age (see above). 
* The date and location that you reported finding it. You may fill in the BBL 
form with very precise Latitude and Longitude in degrees and 5 decimals, 
supplemented with written remarks. I hope the BBL gives that info to the 
bander, because on its thank-you form the BBL translates your location info 
into such odd descriptions as  "0.9 mi W of CAYUGA HEIGHTS, TOMPKINS COUNTY, 
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES" or "1.2 mi WNW of SOUTH HILL, TOMPKINS COUNTY, NEW 
YORK, UNITED STATES."  

* I don't know if the BBL lists other dates and locations the bird has been 
reported. That would be interesting.  


--Dave Nutter

On Aug 08, 2016, at 11:03 AM, Marc Devokaitis  wrote:

Hi All,

I've been talking to Paul Curtis from Cornell Dept. of Natural Resources about 
this and he has shared the following information--see below.  

 
Information on reporting the geese (other than to the BBL via the link provided 
by John, which is always good practice!) is also provided. Note that the 
project leaders are most interested in hearing about geese found OUTSIDE of 
Stewart Park.  


-Marc Devokaitis
 
-------------------
 

The City of Ithaca, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, 
and Cornell University, with support from the Friends of Stewart Park, are 
working to reduce goose conflicts and associated issues in Stewart Park, 
Ithaca, NY. 


 
Around 425 geese were tagged in Stewart Park late June, 2016

•     All geese were marked with a US Fish & Wildlife Service aluminum 
leg bands 

 
•     A sample of 200 adult geese are also wearing yellow neck collars 
with numbers and letters 

 
•     50 young (hatching-year) geese were banded with red leg bands with 
white letters 

 
•     Collaring and banding the geese allows DEC and Cornell staff to 
monitor their movements throughout the City, and aid the City's efforts to more 
accurately estimate the population size.  

 
 

 Geese in Stewart Park
Stewart Park, here in Ithaca, NY, is a great place for humans and wildlife 
alike. With open playing fields and the historic Renwick Woods surrounded by 
water, it is no wonder that so many people and animals are attracted here. 
Canada geese are abundant and easily seen around the park. 

The City of Ithaca, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation, and 
Cornell University are working together to manage the geese and feces in 
Stewart Park. 


Why this project?
These efforts are in response to multiple complaints from residents largely due 
to the excessive amount of feces from the current population. The large amount 
of goose poop has prevented people from being able to use park space, the City 
golf course, and playing fields. 

 

  

What’s next?
•     Cornell staff will be counting geese & testing a novel method to 
deter the geese away from Stewart Park & the City golf course. 

•     Our trained scientist will use a novel aircraft in a very specific, 
controlled manner in order to mitigate any impacts to non-target species. 

•     These activities will mostly occur during early morning and late 
evening to minimize disturbance to park users. 

•     Transects will help determine if this non-lethal management reduces 
the goose feces and associated problems. 

•     Results will be used by the City and  DEC to continue developing 
an effective and responsible management plan. 

 
Can I help?

•     If you see one a yellow-collared, or red leg-banded geese in areas 
other than Stewart Park and the City Golf Course and can read the numbers and 
letters accurately (typically with binoculars), email: ithacageese AT gmail.com 
with the subject heading “Goose observation” and the numbers, date, time 
and location of the bird.   

 
 

On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 7:51 AM, John and Sue Gregoire  wrote:
Suan,

All banded birds can be reported at the site below. Although you don't have the 
band 

from your CAGO observations, I believe you can also report the color and 
markings of 

the neck bands using that form.

https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBL/bblretrv/

John
--
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
N 42 26.611' W 76 45.492'
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Sun, August 7, 2016 14:11, Suan Yong wrote:
> FYI, Canada geese with yellow neck bands NY06, NY12, and NY17 are currently 
loafing 

> in a flock of ~30 CANGs in Salmon Creek between Myers and Salt Point. Not 
sure who's 

> keeping track and what's the best avenue for reporting these; I know there's 
some 

> local interest, presumably even in tracking "boring" baseline reports, but 
I'm 

> guessing we don't want this list to turn into a flood of daily "it's still 
there" 

> reports (which are still valuable scientifically).
>
> Suan
> _____________________
> http://suan-yong.com
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
>
>



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--
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--
Subject: Black-Bellied Plover Myers
From: John Greenly <jbg2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 20:53:50 -0400
A Black-Bellied Plover at Myers point 8:30 tonight, in mostly breeding plumage. 
Ate 4 nice fat worms in 10 minutes 


could be too full to fly away tonight?

John Greenly
Ludlowville



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--
Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 22:12:23 +0000 (UTC)
*  New York*  Syracuse   
   - 
   - August 08, 2016
*  NYSY  08. 08.16 Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):August 01, 2016 
- August 08, 2016to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering upstate 
NY counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma Wetlands 
Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, 
Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortlandcompiled: August 08  AT 5:00 p.m. 
(EDT)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga Audubon Homepage: 
www.onondagaaudubon.org  Greetings: This is the Syracuse Rare Bird Alert for 
the week of August 01, 2015. 

Highlights--------------
LEAST BITTERNAMERICAN WIGEONGREATER SCAUPRUDDY TURNSTONESANDERLINGSTILT 
SANDPIPERLONG-BILLED DOWITCHERORCHARD ORIOLE 


Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex 
(MWC)------------ 

     Shorebirds picked up this week with 16 species being reported. New were 
RUDDY TURNSTONE in the Main Pool and SANDERLING at the Visitor’s Center. Both 
birds were reported on 8/3. However the greatest numbers and diversity seems to 
be at May’s Point Pool.     8/3: An ORCHARD ORIOLE was seen on the 
Wildlife Drive.A WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER was found at May’s Point Pool.     
8/7: A STILT SANDPIPER was again seen at May’s Point Pool. A LEAST BITTERN 
was seen from VanDyne Spoor Road. 


Onondaga county------------
     8/6: 10 species of Shorebirds were seen at Three Rivers WMA from the 
Smokey Hollow Road access including PECTORAL SANDPIPER and SEMI-PALMATED 
PLOVER. 6 GREAT EGRETS were there also.     8/8: A female  AMERICAN WIGEON 
was seen in the Seneca River in Baldwinsville. 


Oneida County------------
     8/2: 9 species of Shorebirds were seen at Delta Lake including 
SANDERLING and WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER.      8/6: 10 species of Shorebirds 
including the SANDERLING and the WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER were again seen at 
Delta Lake. 19 GREAT EGRETS were also counted.      

          
                       --end report 
    
Joseph BrinRegion 5Baldwinsville, NY 13027  U.S.A.  
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--
Subject: Seeking bluebird photo
From: Richard Tkachuck <rictkalist AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 14:28:49 -0400
I have been tasked with helping to create a bluebird trail for the Friends
of Fillmore
Glen State Park. It is a new organization promoting the park. If anyone
knows of a free photo of a male bluebird that we can use in a promotional
brochure I would appreciate it. The free one on wikipedia is not in an
attractive posture.

Cheers
Richard Tkachuck
rictka AT gmail.com

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--
Subject: Re: Banded Canada Geese
From: Marc Devokaitis <mdevokaitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 11:02:37 -0400
Hi All,

I've been talking to Paul Curtis from Cornell Dept. of Natural Resources
about this and he has shared the following information--see below.

Information on reporting the geese (other than to the BBL via the link
provided by John, which is always good practice!) is also provided. Note
that the project leaders are most interested in hearing about geese found
OUTSIDE of Stewart Park.

-Marc Devokaitis

-------------------



The City of Ithaca, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation,
and Cornell University, with support from the Friends of Stewart Park, are
working to reduce goose conflicts and associated issues in Stewart
Park, Ithaca,
NY.



Around 425 geese were tagged in Stewart Park late June, 2016


•     All geese were marked with a US Fish & Wildlife Service aluminum leg
bands



•     A sample of 200 adult geese are also wearing yellow neck collars with
numbers and letters



•     50 young (hatching-year) geese were banded with red leg bands with
white letters



•     Collaring and banding the geese allows DEC and Cornell staff to
monitor their movements throughout the City, and aid the City's efforts to more
accurately estimate the population size.





 *Geese* *in Stewart Park*

Stewart Park, here in Ithaca, NY, is a great place for humans and wildlife
alike. With open playing fields and the historic Renwick Woods surrounded by
water, it is no wonder that so many people and animals are attracted here.
Canada geese are abundant and easily seen around the park.

The City of Ithaca, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation,
and Cornell University are working together to manage the geese and feces in
Stewart Park.

*Why* *this project?*

These efforts are in response to multiple complaints from residents largely
due to the excessive amount of feces from the current population. The large
amount of goose poop has prevented people from being able to use park space,
the City golf course, and playing fields.





*What’s** next?*

•     Cornell staff will be counting geese & testing a novel method to deter
the geese away from Stewart Park & the City golf course.

•     Our trained scientist will use a novel aircraft in a very specific,
controlled manner in order to mitigate any impacts to non-target species.

•     These activities will mostly occur during early morning and late
evening to minimize disturbance to park users.

•     Transects will help determine if this non-lethal management reduces
the goose feces and associated problems.

•     Results will be used by the City and  DEC to continue developing an
effective and responsible management plan.


Can I help?

•     If you see one a yellow-collared, or red leg-banded geese in *areas
other than Stewart Park and the City Golf Course *and can read the numbers
and letters accurately (typically with binoculars), email:
*ithacageese AT gmail.com*  with the subject heading
“Goose observation” and the numbers, date, time and location of the bird.




On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 7:51 AM, John and Sue Gregoire 
wrote:

> Suan,
>
> All banded birds can be reported at the site below. Although you don't
> have the band
> from your CAGO observations, I believe you can also report the color and
> markings of
> the neck bands using that form.
>
> https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBL/bblretrv/
>
> John
> --
> John and Sue Gregoire
> Field Ornithologists
> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
> N 42 26.611' W 76 45.492'
>  Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>
> On Sun, August 7, 2016 14:11, Suan Yong wrote:
> > FYI, Canada geese with yellow neck bands NY06, NY12, and NY17 are
> currently loafing
> > in a flock of ~30 CANGs in Salmon Creek between Myers and Salt Point.
> Not sure who's
> > keeping track and what's the best avenue for reporting these; I know
> there's some
> > local interest, presumably even in tracking "boring" baseline reports,
> but I'm
> > guessing we don't want this list to turn into a flood of daily "it's
> still there"
> > reports (which are still valuable scientifically).
> >
> > Suan
> > _____________________
> > http://suan-yong.com
> > --
> >
> > Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurat
> ionLeave.htm
> >
> > ARCHIVES:
> > 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
> > 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> > 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
> >
> > Please submit your observations to eBird:
> > http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> >
> > --
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
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>
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> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>

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--
Subject: Re: Banded Canada Geese
From: John and Sue Gregoire <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 07:51:50 -0400
Suan,

All banded birds can be reported at the site below. Although you don't have the 
band 

from your CAGO observations, I believe you can also report the color and 
markings of 

the neck bands using that form.

https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBL/bblretrv/

John
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
N 42 26.611' W 76 45.492'
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Sun, August 7, 2016 14:11, Suan Yong wrote:
> FYI, Canada geese with yellow neck bands NY06, NY12, and NY17 are currently 
loafing 

> in a flock of ~30 CANGs in Salmon Creek between Myers and Salt Point. Not 
sure who's 

> keeping track and what's the best avenue for reporting these; I know there's 
some 

> local interest, presumably even in tracking "boring" baseline reports, but 
I'm 

> guessing we don't want this list to turn into a flood of daily "it's still 
there" 

> reports (which are still valuable scientifically).
>
> Suan
> _____________________
> http://suan-yong.com
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
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> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
>
>



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--
Subject: Banded Canada Geese
From: Suan Yong <suan.yong AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 7 Aug 2016 14:11:46 -0400
FYI, Canada geese with yellow neck bands NY06, NY12, and NY17 are currently 
loafing in a flock of ~30 CANGs in Salmon Creek between Myers and Salt Point. 
Not sure who's keeping track and what's the best avenue for reporting these; I 
know there's some local interest, presumably even in tracking "boring" baseline 
reports, but I'm guessing we don't want this list to turn into a flood of daily 
"it's still there" reports (which are still valuable scientifically). 


Suan
_____________________
http://suan-yong.com
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--
Subject: Black-bellied Plover, Myers Point
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2016 11:23:44 -0400
A transitional adult BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER is currently on the spit at Myers
Point.

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Subject: RE: Red Headed Woodpecker Question
From: Marty Schlabach <mls5 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2016 01:56:00 +0000
This is at least the third year over the last 10 or so, that we've seen a flock 
of kingbirds come and devour the fruit on a pagoda dogwood, just as the fruit 
are getting ripe. 

--Marty
Interlaken, NY

-----Original Message-----
From: bounce-120671830-3494012 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-120671830-3494012 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Marie P. Read 

Sent: Friday, August 05, 2016 7:52 PM
To: Sue Barth ; Carol Keeler 
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Red Headed Woodpecker Question

HI Carol and all,

I agree with Sue that they look like red-osier dogwood fruits, they're about 
the correct size. A few years back when I was photographing them at Myers, they 
were eating a lot of wild grape, both unripe and ripe, at this time of year, in 
addition to insects. I think it's pretty typical for them to switch to fruit at 
this season whether or not it's been dry. Have seen kingbirds do similar with 
wild raspberries and gray dogwood berries. A number of what we think of as 
insectivorous types switch to fruit when it's available, and the dogwoods in 
particular are high-fat fruits, good for fueling migration...red-eyed vireos 
and various warblers etc. 


Birds have such COOL behaviors!

Marie

Marie Read Wildlife Photography
452 Ringwood Road
Freeville NY  13068 USA

Phone  607-539-6608
e-mail   mpr5 AT cornell.edu

Website:     http://www.marieread.com
Follow me on Facebook: 
https://www.facebook.com/Marie-Read-Wildlife-Photography-104356136271727/ 

________________________________________
From: bounce-120671661-5851667 AT list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-120671661-5851667 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Sue Barth 
[suebarth AT verizon.net] 

Sent: Friday, August 5, 2016 4:59 PM
To: Carol Keeler
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Red Headed Woodpecker Question

Hi Carol, those actually look more like Red-Osier Dogwood berries in its mouth 
to me. I was surprised to see a pair of Eastern Kingbirds, another insectivore, 
eating berries yesterday morning - so maybe these birds are supplementing their 
diets with berries. Maybe it's a seasonal behavior or maybe, because it's been 
so dry, it's another way to obtain fluids? 


~ Sue

Sent from my iPad

> On Aug 5, 2016, at 4:31 PM, Carol Keeler  wrote:
>
> I have an image of this year's Red Headed Woodpecker. It's not great but you 
can see what you need to for this question. Do they eat eggs of other birds? 
Are those eggs or fecal sacs? I watched it up in a tree and then it dove into 
some bushes. It came up on the dead tree with what you see in its mouth. I 
think it robbed eggs from another bird's nest, but I'm not sure. I don't think 
it was around its own nest hole to remove fecal sacs. It had been in a green 
tree, not a dead one. Any ideas? It was the only time I was able to find the 
bird this year. 

>

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--
Subject: RE: Red Headed Woodpecker Question
From: "Marie P. Read" <mpr5 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2016 23:52:18 +0000
HI Carol and all,

I agree with Sue that they look like red-osier dogwood fruits, they're about 
the correct size. A few years back when I was photographing them at Myers, they 
were eating a lot of wild grape, both unripe and ripe, at this time of year, in 
addition to insects. I think it's pretty typical for them to switch to fruit at 
this season whether or not it's been dry. Have seen kingbirds do similar with 
wild raspberries and gray dogwood berries. A number of what we think of as 
insectivorous types switch to fruit when it's available, and the dogwoods in 
particular are high-fat fruits, good for fueling migration...red-eyed vireos 
and various warblers etc. 


Birds have such COOL behaviors!

Marie

Marie Read Wildlife Photography
452 Ringwood Road
Freeville NY  13068 USA

Phone  607-539-6608
e-mail   mpr5 AT cornell.edu

Website:     http://www.marieread.com
Follow me on Facebook: 
https://www.facebook.com/Marie-Read-Wildlife-Photography-104356136271727/ 

________________________________________
From: bounce-120671661-5851667 AT list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-120671661-5851667 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Sue Barth 
[suebarth AT verizon.net] 

Sent: Friday, August 5, 2016 4:59 PM
To: Carol Keeler
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Red Headed Woodpecker Question

Hi Carol, those actually look more like Red-Osier Dogwood berries in its mouth 
to me. I was surprised to see a pair of Eastern Kingbirds, another insectivore, 
eating berries yesterday morning - so maybe these birds are supplementing their 
diets with berries. Maybe it's a seasonal behavior or maybe, because it's been 
so dry, it's another way to obtain fluids? 


~ Sue

Sent from my iPad

> On Aug 5, 2016, at 4:31 PM, Carol Keeler  wrote:
>
> I have an image of this year's Red Headed Woodpecker. It's not great but you 
can see what you need to for this question. Do they eat eggs of other birds? 
Are those eggs or fecal sacs? I watched it up in a tree and then it dove into 
some bushes. It came up on the dead tree with what you see in its mouth. I 
think it robbed eggs from another bird's nest, but I'm not sure. I don't think 
it was around its own nest hole to remove fecal sacs. It had been in a green 
tree, not a dead one. Any ideas? It was the only time I was able to find the 
bird this year. 

>

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--
Subject: Re: Red Headed Woodpecker Question
From: Regi Teasley <rltcayuga AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2016 17:35:48 -0400
We have seen Downy Woodpeckers eating something on Mullen flower heads/stalks. 
Is this a typical behavior?

Regi
"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
you will perceive the divine mystery in things." Dostoyevsky. 



> On Aug 5, 2016, at 4:59 PM, Sue Barth  wrote:
> 
> Hi Carol, those actually look more like Red-Osier Dogwood berries in its 
mouth to me. I was surprised to see a pair of Eastern Kingbirds, another 
insectivore, eating berries yesterday morning - so maybe these birds are 
supplementing their diets with berries. Maybe it's a seasonal behavior or 
maybe, because it's been so dry, it's another way to obtain fluids? 

> 
> ~ Sue
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Aug 5, 2016, at 4:31 PM, Carol Keeler  wrote:
>> 
>> I have an image of this year's Red Headed Woodpecker. It's not great but you 
can see what you need to for this question. Do they eat eggs of other birds? 
Are those eggs or fecal sacs? I watched it up in a tree and then it dove into 
some bushes. It came up on the dead tree with what you see in its mouth. I 
think it robbed eggs from another bird's nest, but I'm not sure. I don't think 
it was around its own nest hole to remove fecal sacs. It had been in a green 
tree, not a dead one. Any ideas? It was the only time I was able to find the 
bird this year. 

>> 
>> http://www.pbase.com/carol_keeler_photo/image/163815697
>> --
>> 
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>> 
>> ARCHIVES:
>> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
>> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>> 
>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>> 
>> --
> 
> 
> --
> 
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
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> 
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> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> 
> --
> 

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--
Subject: Re: Red Headed Woodpecker Question
From: Sue Barth <suebarth AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2016 16:59:28 -0400
Hi Carol, those actually look more like Red-Osier Dogwood berries in its mouth 
to me. I was surprised to see a pair of Eastern Kingbirds, another insectivore, 
eating berries yesterday morning - so maybe these birds are supplementing their 
diets with berries. Maybe it's a seasonal behavior or maybe, because it's been 
so dry, it's another way to obtain fluids? 


~ Sue

Sent from my iPad

> On Aug 5, 2016, at 4:31 PM, Carol Keeler  wrote:
> 
> I have an image of this year's Red Headed Woodpecker. It's not great but you 
can see what you need to for this question. Do they eat eggs of other birds? 
Are those eggs or fecal sacs? I watched it up in a tree and then it dove into 
some bushes. It came up on the dead tree with what you see in its mouth. I 
think it robbed eggs from another bird's nest, but I'm not sure. I don't think 
it was around its own nest hole to remove fecal sacs. It had been in a green 
tree, not a dead one. Any ideas? It was the only time I was able to find the 
bird this year. 

> 
> http://www.pbase.com/carol_keeler_photo/image/163815697
> --
> 
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
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> 
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
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> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> 
> --
> 


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--
Subject: Red Headed Woodpecker Question
From: Carol Keeler <carolk441 AT adelphia.net>
Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2016 16:31:47 -0400
I have an image of this year's Red Headed Woodpecker. It's not great but you 
can see what you need to for this question. Do they eat eggs of other birds? 
Are those eggs or fecal sacs? I watched it up in a tree and then it dove into 
some bushes. It came up on the dead tree with what you see in its mouth. I 
think it robbed eggs from another bird's nest, but I'm not sure. I don't think 
it was around its own nest hole to remove fecal sacs. It had been in a green 
tree, not a dead one. Any ideas? It was the only time I was able to find the 
bird this year. 


http://www.pbase.com/carol_keeler_photo/image/163815697
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--
Subject: Leucistic Purple Finch
From: Carol Keeler <carolk441 AT adelphia.net>
Date: Thu, 4 Aug 2016 15:37:07 -0400
I just put up an image of a leucistic Purple Finch on my website incase you're 
interested. He came to my feeders just a few times this spring. He's eating 
serviceberries. 


http://www.pbase.com/carol_keeler_photo/image/163810498
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--
Subject: Amherst Is. wind project
From: Bill Evans <wrevans AT clarityconnect.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2016 19:27:56 -0400
The Ontario Environmental Review Tribunal released their finding today that the 
folks fighting the wind project on Amherst “did not prove that engaging in 
the project will cause serious harm to human health or serious and irreversible 
harm to plant life, animal life or the natural environment.” 


The details of the decision can be found here: 
http://elto.gov.on.ca/ert/decisions-orders/ 


This may be the last winter for the Cayuga Bird Club to visit Amherst Is. 
before 26 wind turbines are built. 


-Bill E
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Subject: Re: Recording bird sounds with a smartphone
From: Matthew Medler <mdm2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2016 20:59:11 +0000 (UTC)
Hi Therese and All,
I thought I would share the following link to a Macaulay Library document 
called "Making Sound Recordings with a Smartphone": 


http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/kb_article_attachments/85186/original.pdf?1464483364 


This document covers a variety of things to consider when recording with a 
smartphone, rather than focusing on a comparison of different recording apps. 
From an app standpoint, the key thing that we recommend is to find an app that 
creates uncompressed .wav files (as opposed to compressed .mp3 files). 

The smartphone document is part of a larger "Audio Best Practices" page with 
information about uploading sound recordings to eBird/ML: 


http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/2159648-best-practices-for-audio-upload-to-ebird 


Matt MedlerMacaulay Library

      From: Therese O'Connor 
 To: CAYUGABIRDS-L  
 Sent: Sunday, July 31, 2016 1:00 PM
 Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Recording bird sounds
   
Can anyone recommend a free phone app that can record bird calls easily?
Thanks.

-- 
Therese
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Subject: next Montezuma trip Sun 7 Aug at *8* am
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Wed, 03 Aug 2016 18:21:05 +0000 (GMT)
The Montezuma shorebird field trip next Sunday, August 7th, will be led by 
Steve & Linda Benedict of the Eaton Birding Sociaty and will meet at the 
Visitor Center at 8am. In cooperation with them I will be leading a trip from 
the East Road overlook onto the dikes at Knox-Marsellus and Puddler Marshes 
starting at 8:15am to allow people from the Visitor Center who choose this 
option to arrive. While the focus will be shorebirds, there are plenty of other 
neat birds around. If we refind the juvenile Yellow-crowned Night-Heron I hope 
to recognize it this time. As with previous trips, the plan is to cover 
multiple sites. 


--Dave Nutter

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Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Shorebird Trip Report for July 31st, 2016
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Tue, 02 Aug 2016 01:26:56 +0000 (GMT)
Sorry for the late report. There were 5 of us on my part of the trip. We 
started at the overlook on East Road, walked down onto the dikes, going east 
along the north side of both Knox-Marsellus and Puddler, returned from the end 
of Towpath Road along the tire tracks next to the power line (which was a bit 
more overgrown than I wished), then walked north on the dike at the base of the 
hill along the west side of K-M. Then we went to South Mays Point Road, then 
did the Wildlife Drive. 




By now you have all surmised that I did not properly ID the rare juvenile 
YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON yesterday, assuming it to have been the common 
Black-crowned. Clearly I don't have enough experience with this plumage, but 
I'm getting it now! I should have recognized the classic shape & posture. It 
stood with its neck stretched vertically and thin, but head & bill horizontal. 
We debated the ID, and Mark Miller took photos. He asked if he should show them 
to Jay, and I said "sure," but I can't claim to have said it with the proper 
sense of urgency. The whitish spots on the back were small equilateral 
triangles, intermediate between the long triangles which Sibley shows for 
Black-crowned and the tiny dots he shows for Yellow-crowned. It also showed 
light at the base of the lower bill, which I thought Y-C shouldn't have, but 
Jay says it's common. Had juveniles of the two species been together I think 
would have recognized it, but that's a lame claim. I feel particularly bad 
about blowing the ID because the bird was only visible from the dike, not from 
the roads. We found it (I think Mark noticed it first) around 10am, plenty 
early enough for other people to have come look at it by joining the field trip 
on the dikes where we had temporary permission, had I gotten the word out.  It 
stood next to a small sunken pool within the triangular intersection of dikes 
at the NE corner of K-M and the NW corner of Puddler. It seemed unconcerned 
about us, barely turning its head and occasionally blinking its huge orange 
eye. It remained there when we left. I think it was a young bird because it had 
several hairlike feathers sticking out of its crown which I thought were 
remnants of down.  If this is correct it would suggest the bird was raised 
nearby this year, which is also pretty cool. 




Now for some other distractions. We saw the pair of adult SANDHILL CRANES out 
in the tall vegetation in the middle of K-M, and with them, barely visible only 
sometimes, was the head of the chick. If it grows faster than the weeds, 
eventually we will get better views. 




There were at least 21 CASPIAN TERNS on the mud at K-M, 5 of whom were 
juveniles. 




At South Mays Point Road we saw two adults and one fledgling RED-HEADED 
WOODPECKER. This was from the parking lot along the Clyde River downstream from 
the dam and the bridge. Just east of this parking lot is a huge dead tree. That 
tree is where we saw the birds together, and where I have seen the adults 
previously this season, but I think their nest was somewhere to the SW of that 
tree in those woods between the river and Mays Point Pool. We lost sight of 
them when all 3 flew toward and possibly across the river. The fledgling had a 
dark head (not bright red like the adults) and the white patch on the closed 
wing had a narrow dark stripe across near the bottom. Unfortunately I only had 
a binocular view, not a scope view before it flew. 




More distractions: We saw a possible family of ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS (1 male 
with reduced tail, along with 3 female/immature plumage birds) eating 
Nightshade berries along the woods side of the power line cut next to Towpath 
Road. 



And we saw at least 8 GREEN HERONS, probably more, as well as an adult 
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, along the dike at the SW corner of K-M. 




On to shorebirds. As I told Dave Nicosia by text, they were sparse at K-M. 
Because so much of the water has evaporated, and vegetation has covered so much 
of the land, the wet mud habitat is mainly a long narrow strip, The shorebirds 
we saw seemed flighty. Maybe it was our presence, or maybe they were just 
uncomfortable there, or maybe they hoped to find some better place. We saw at 
least 3 KILLDEER, 2 SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS, 1 SPOTTED SANDPIPER, 1 GREATER 
YELLOWLEGS, heard LESSER YELLOWLEGS but I only saw 2 birds flying away, saw a 
maximum of 10 LEAST SANDPIPERS at once but several smaller groups at other 
times, and 1 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER conveniently next to Least Sandpipers and 
the Semipalmated Plovers. 




From the platform at Mays Point Pool, we saw KILLDEER, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, 
GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS, a STILT SANPIPER in breeding plumage found by 
Menachem Goldstein, PECTORAL SANDPIPERS, LEAST SANDPIPERS, and at least 8 
breeding plumage DOWITCHERS only 1 of which was out in the open enough to feel 
confident it was a SHORT-BILLED. The others were among the stubble of old 
reeds, and still fascinating to watch, even if the subtleties of shape and 
markings were made confusing. 




From the Wildlife Drive at the Seneca Slough we saw a different selection than 
Dave Nicosia's group. There was 1 KILLDEER and 2 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, but the 
yellowlegs were in different plumages. The juvenile LESSER YELLOWLEGS was the 
same size and shape as the adult, and it had bright orange-yellow legs, but the 
back and wings were more evenly darker brownish gray with small whitish spots 
very evenly distributed. The background color combined with small white spots 
was reminiscent of Solitary Sandpiper, but the spots on Solitary are smaller, 
brighter, and not evenly distributed. The real highlight here, however was an 
adult VIRGINIA RAIL with 2 large, long-legged, downy black chicks. 




At Benning we saw KILLDEER, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, LESSER YELLOWLEGS, SOLITARY 
SANDPIPER, PECTORAL SANDPIPER, LEAST SANDPIPER, and after a great deal of 
searching Menachem found a WILSON'S SNIPE. We shared views of the snipe with 
passersby.  




Our total of 12 species of shorebirds -

Killdeer

Semipalmated Plover

Spotted Sandpiper

Greater Yellowlegs

Lesser Yellowlegs

Solitary Sandpiper

Stilt Sandpiper

Pectoral Sandpiper

Least Sandpiper

Semipalmated Sandpiper

Short-billed Dowitcher

Wilson's Snipe

- was due to a lot of time spent scoping with particular help from Menachem. As 
one of the participants wrote, thanking me for leading the long trip, the 
chance to stand together with scopes on the Wildlife Drive to find, share, and 
discuss birds was extremely helpful to the birding and learning experience. 


--Dave Nutter



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Subject: Yellow-crowned Night-heron at MNWR
From: M Miller <mmiller325 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2016 23:10:51 +0000
After reviewing the photos (and several inputs) I believe it was an immature 
Yellow-crowned Night-heron that was seen on the walk around Knox-Marsellus 
Sunday with Dave Nutter. It was located in a small pool along the north end of 
the dike that runs between Puddler’s & Knox-Marsellus. Photos are on the 
Eaton Birding Society facebook page. 


Mark Miller

Sent from Windows Mail


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Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2016 17:48:02 +0000 (UTC)
*  New York*  Syracuse   
   - 
   - August 01, 2016
*  NYSY  08. 01.16 Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):July 25, 2016 - 
August 01, 2016to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering upstate NY 
counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma Wetlands 
Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, 
Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortlandcompiled: July 25  AT 1:00 p.m. 
(EDT)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga Audubon Homepage: 
www.onondagaaudubon.org  Greetings: This is the Syracuse Rare Bird Alert for 
the week of July 25, 2015. 

Highlights--------------
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONSTILT SANDPIPERLONG-BILLED DOWITCHERSHORT-BILLED 
DOWITCHERRED-HEADED WOODPECKERORCHARD ORIOLE 


Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex 
(MWC)------------ 

     13 species of shorebirds were reported from the complex this week. 
Nothing new and the Baird’s Sandpiper was nowhere to be seen. Knox-Marsellus 
is pretty dry and most birds are being reported along the Wildlife Drive and 
Mays Point Pool.  Best birds were LONG BILLED DOWITCHER at the Wildlife Drive 
and STILT SANDPIPER at Mays Point Pool.     7/29: 3 immature CANVASBACKS 
were seen at the Sandhill Crane Unit.     7/30 3 REDHEADS were seen along 
the Wildlife Drive.     7/31: A BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON and 3 SANDHILL 
CRANES including a young bird were seen at Knox-Marsellus Marsh. 3 RED-HEADED 
WOODPECKERS including a young bird were seen on Mays Point Road. 


Onondaga County------------
     7/27: 2 ORCHARD ORIOLES and a PECTORAL SANDPIPER were seen at 
Jamesville Beach State Park. 


Oneida County------------
     7/28: 6 species of shorebirds including a Pectoral Sandpiper were seen 
at Delta Lake. 

     Many shorebird areas in region 5 are reporting good numbers of LEAST 
SANDPIPER, some SOLITARY and SPOTTED SANDPIPERS and both YELLOWLEGS but not too 
much else. 

     
                       --end report 
    
Joseph BrinRegion 5Baldwinsville, NY 13027  U.S.A.  
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Subject: Cedar Waxwings
From: Dick Feldman <rf10 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2016 17:09:29 +0000
There's a long-term group of around 20 or so Cedar Waxwings in the trees to the 
right of the Beebe Lake dam. They've been there most of the time for a few 
weeks. You can get a great view from the pedestrian bridge. This is a pretty 
sure bet to see one of our prettiest birds. 

Dick Feldman

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Subject: Montezuma Shorebird Trip Report for July 31st, 2016
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Jul 2016 22:17:36 -0400
All,

Met up with 10 others at the Visitor's center 7 am Sunday July 31st
for our second "shorebird" walk of the fall migration season. We spent
a little over 5 hours birding wildlife drive of which we were given
permission to get out of our vehicles to bird. Dave Nutter co-led
another group at K-M and Puddler's marsh and then eventually
they hit wildlife drive.

First bird of note was an EASTERN WOOD PEWEE calling in the
woods by the beginning of the drive. There were also several
other common songbird species that were heard and/or seen
around these woods.

First stop was the channel on the right before you get to Larue's
Lagoon. This is normally the "solitary sandpiper" spot but not
for this trip as we saw SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, LESSER
YELLOWLEGS, KILLDEER and LEAST SANDPIPERS. No
solitaries for us here.

Next stop was Larue's where there is some shorebird habitat.
There wasn't much but we did get looks at SEMIPALMATED
PLOVERs among a couple KILLDEER, also heard a LEAST
SANDPIPER here.

The main pool does have some small strips of muddy areas and with
this we had some LESSER YELLOWLEGS, LEAST SANDPIPERs
and a single SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER which was not seen
by all. Additionally the main pool had lots of PIED BILLED GREBES,
AMERICAN COOTS, COMMON GALLINULES, WOOD DUCK, MALLARD
and BLACK DUCKS. We had a lone GADWALL, GREEN-WINGED TEAL
and I managed to finally get on the RING-NECKED DUCK that
has been here for a while. This bird was distant and not everyone
was able to get on it. The main pool also featured numerous
BLACK TERNS ranging from almost full, albeit worn, breeding
plumage adults to mottled molting adults to juveniles. These birds were not
bothered at all by our presence and many times they flew within
10 or so feet of us! We conservatively estimated around 30-35
birds but this is probably low. There were also beautiful CASPIAN
TERNS for all to enjoy.

Next stop was Eaton Marsh and the grass is really making it
hard to find shorebirds. We had our first GREATER YELLOWLEGS
of the day with a few LESSER YELLOWLEGS. I also heard
a SEMIPALMATED PLOVER and LEAST SANDPIPER here which
we never were able to find at this location.

Last stop was Benning marsh and here the variety was good, numbers
low and habitat limited to the left part of the marsh as you face
the thruway. Highlights here were 3 PECTORAL SANDPIPERS, 1
WILSON'S SNIPE, LEAST SANDPIPERS, SEMIPALMATED
PLOVERS, our first good looks at a SOLITARY SANDPIPER, LESSER
YELLOWLEGS, SPOTTED SANDPIPERs and KILLDEER. There
were occasions where we had WILSON'S SNIPE, SEMIPALMATED
PLOVERS, LEAST and PECTORAL SANDPIPERS in one scope view.

We drove the rest of wildlife drive but didn't stop at the pools by the
thruway
as the road is too narrow there and we frankly we were a bit tired. The
habitat
by the thruway looks promising for phaloropes and other larger shorebirds.
There were many GREAT EGRETS here also. We totally 68 species in
5 hours of birding which is not bad for wildlife drive this time of year.

ebird list is here...  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30918147

We then made a stop at May's Point but the viewing was poor for shorebirds
as there was a lot of vegetation to look through. There were a handful of
LESSER YELLOWLEGS, 1 GREATER YELLOWLEGS, KILLDEER
and LEAST SANDPIPERs. There was also a family of TRUMPETER SWANS.

ebird list is here...  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30918568

Thanks again to the fine folks at Montezuma for allowing these
guided shorebird field trips!

Dave Nicosia

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Subject: Recording bird sounds
From: "Therese O'Connor" <therese2828 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Jul 2016 13:00:50 -0400
Can anyone recommend a free phone app that can record bird calls easily?
Thanks.

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*Therese*

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Subject: Re: blessedly quiet morning...
From: Regi Teasley <rltcayuga AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Jul 2016 12:26:46 -0400
Right. A lawnmower-free future lies ahead. Gardens, groves and meadows will 
replace them. Let's hope it's sooner rather than later. Why not create more 
bird, butterfly and general critter habitat? So heartening to hear the sounds 
of the natural world. 


Regi
"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
you will perceive the divine mystery in things." Dostoyevsky. 



> On Jul 31, 2016, at 10:42 AM, marsha kardon  wrote:
> 
> The drought is terrible in most ways but there is one thing I appreciate 
about it. I can eat dinner on my screened porch, or walk around in my garden 
without hearing lawn mowers! My neighborhood has many HUGE lawns and most 
summers it is unusual to be outside without hearing at least one, often more. 
The quietness is wonderful! 

> 
>> On Sun, Jul 31, 2016 at 10:30 AM, Donna Lee Scott  wrote:
>> …on rural Lansing Station Rd by Cayuga Lake. Mostly nature sounds and no 
lake-enhanced human voices, lawn mowers or motor boats, as I enjoy my coffee on 
the screened part of the back deck that is surrounded by huge oak branches! It 
is truly a tree house. 

>> 
>>  
>> 
>> The local Common Loon uttered its haunting cry a couple times right here at 
#535; yesterday it was up north by Milliken Point. 

>> 
>> A male Rose Breasted Grosbeak had a standoff with a Blue Jay on the perch of 
my squirrel-proof sunflower feeder and won. 

>> 
>>  
>> 
>> A mother BC Chickadee finally seems to have taught its juvenile how to get 
seeds from this feeder on the open part of my deck. Yesterday I saw her 
laboriously peck open a seed and feed the contents to the baby, who then turned 
around and seemed to get its own seed. The A. Goldfinch gang is on the Nyjer 
seed feeder as usual, and the Mo Does are cooing on the platform feeder in the 
yard, often joined by C. Grackles. 

>> 
>>  
>> 
>> The Downy Woodpecker is pecking the wooden trim on my house (sigh) between 
getting seeds. Its relatives, the Red Bellied and the Hairy fly in now and 
then. The Tufted Titmouse family zooms in too and the Carolina Wren is calling 
nearby. Somebody flew out from my front porch ceiling bird nest basket area 
when I went out there earlier – a late nest? 

>> 
>>  
>> 
>> The quiet continues at 10:20, a nice interlude in the usual noisy hum of 
human motors and activities. 

>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> Donna L. Scott
>> 
>> 535 Lansing Station Road
>> 
>> Lansing
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> --
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
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> 
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
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Subject: Re: blessedly quiet morning...
From: marsha kardon <mfkardon AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Jul 2016 10:42:43 -0400
The drought is terrible in most ways but there is one thing I appreciate
about it.  I can eat dinner on my screened porch, or walk around in my
garden without hearing lawn mowers!  My neighborhood has many HUGE lawns
and most summers it is unusual to be outside without hearing at least one,
often more.   The quietness is wonderful!

On Sun, Jul 31, 2016 at 10:30 AM, Donna Lee Scott  wrote:

> …on rural Lansing Station Rd by Cayuga Lake. Mostly nature sounds and no
> lake-enhanced human voices, lawn mowers or motor boats, as I enjoy my
> coffee on the screened part of the back deck that is surrounded by huge oak
> branches! It is truly a tree house.
>
>
>
> The local Common Loon uttered its haunting cry a couple times right here
> at #535; yesterday it was up north by Milliken Point.
>
> A male Rose Breasted Grosbeak had a standoff with a Blue Jay on the perch
> of my squirrel-proof sunflower feeder and won.
>
>
>
> A mother BC Chickadee finally seems to have taught its juvenile how to get
> seeds from this feeder on the open part of my deck. Yesterday I saw her
> laboriously peck open a seed and feed the contents to the baby, who then
> turned around and seemed to get its own seed. The A. Goldfinch gang is on
> the Nyjer seed feeder as usual, and the Mo Does are cooing on the platform
> feeder in the yard, often joined by C. Grackles.
>
>
>
> The Downy Woodpecker is pecking the wooden trim on my house (sigh) between
> getting seeds. Its relatives, the Red Bellied and the Hairy fly in now and
> then. The Tufted Titmouse family zooms in too and the Carolina Wren is
> calling nearby. Somebody flew out from my front porch ceiling bird nest
> basket area when I went out there earlier – a late nest?
>
>
>
> The quiet continues at 10:20, a nice interlude in the usual noisy hum of
> human motors and activities.
>
>
>
>
>
> Donna L. Scott
>
> 535 Lansing Station Road
>
> Lansing
>
>
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Subject: blessedly quiet morning...
From: Donna Lee Scott <dls9 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 31 Jul 2016 14:30:12 +0000
...on rural Lansing Station Rd by Cayuga Lake. Mostly nature sounds and no 
lake-enhanced human voices, lawn mowers or motor boats, as I enjoy my coffee on 
the screened part of the back deck that is surrounded by huge oak branches! It 
is truly a tree house. 


The local Common Loon uttered its haunting cry a couple times right here at 
#535; yesterday it was up north by Milliken Point. 

A male Rose Breasted Grosbeak had a standoff with a Blue Jay on the perch of my 
squirrel-proof sunflower feeder and won. 


A mother BC Chickadee finally seems to have taught its juvenile how to get 
seeds from this feeder on the open part of my deck. Yesterday I saw her 
laboriously peck open a seed and feed the contents to the baby, who then turned 
around and seemed to get its own seed. The A. Goldfinch gang is on the Nyjer 
seed feeder as usual, and the Mo Does are cooing on the platform feeder in the 
yard, often joined by C. Grackles. 


The Downy Woodpecker is pecking the wooden trim on my house (sigh) between 
getting seeds. Its relatives, the Red Bellied and the Hairy fly in now and 
then. The Tufted Titmouse family zooms in too and the Carolina Wren is calling 
nearby. Somebody flew out from my front porch ceiling bird nest basket area 
when I went out there earlier - a late nest? 


The quiet continues at 10:20, a nice interlude in the usual noisy hum of human 
motors and activities. 



Donna L. Scott
535 Lansing Station Road
Lansing


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Subject: Montezuma - Sandhill Crane Unit
From: "lajewskic AT yahoo.com" <lajewskic@yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 10:02:54 -0400
The Montezuma Birding Tour on July 29 with 13 wonderful folks included a stop 
at the Sandhill Crane Unit. Highlights included 3 Canvasback (immature), 2 
Great Egret, 2 Northern Shoveler, 10 Pied-billed Grebe, 20 American Coot, 2 
Black-crowned Night Heron and thousands of Swallows, Red-winged Blackbirds and 
Common Grackles. 


Chris Lajewski
Center Director
Montezuma Audubon Center
2295 Route 89, Savannah, NY 13146
http://ny.audubon.org/montezuma
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Subject: Being called a "bird brain"......it's a complement!
From: Peter <psaracin AT rochester.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 10:01:37 -0400
http://earthsky.org/earth/its-not-an-insult-to-be-called-a-bird-brain


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Subject: Sunday's July 31st Montezuma Shorebird Walks
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 21:01:27 -0400
All,

There will be two birding groups, one will be meeting at 700 am at the
Visitor's Center
of which I will be leading. This group will do wildlife drive and then walk
the dikes at
Knox-Marcellus and Puddler's marshes if there are shorebirds there.
The other group will meet at 715 am at the East Road Parking area and be
led
by Dave Nutter. They will walk the dikes first and then do Wildlife Drive.
We have permission
to get out of our cars on wildlife drive and bird it much more extensively
than
usual.  Montezuma staff are managing water levels along wildlife drive on
the main pool
and Benning and Eaton marshes to create shorebird habitat.

We are doing two groups because of the drought conditions and lack of
extensive
shorebird habitat and K-M and Puddler's marshes. Dave Nutter's group, if
they
don't find many shorebirds, can head over to Wildlife drive pretty quickly.
In this way,
we will get maximum coverage and make sure we don't miss anything from the
dikes.

If there are few shorebirds at K-M and Puddler's marshes, then both groups
may opt to do May's Point or some other spot to be determined.  I would
like to
thank Dave Nutter for co-leading this week.

As for the weather, I am optimistic that the morning hours won't be that
bad with
little precipitation around the refuge. Showers and storms will be more
likely in the
afternoon Sunday. But... bring raingear and umbrellas in case I am wrong.
Also
remember that rain and storms can drop migrating birds down and lead to
higher
potential for rare birds and vagrants. It's the old adage bad weather =
good
birds! So don't let the potential for rainfall keep you from coming!

See you on Sunday and thanks to the Montezuma staff for allowing us access
to see migrating shorebirds and other birds!!!

Dave Nicosia

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Subject: Montezuma Orchard Oriole, BC Night Herons, Sandhill Cranes w/colt, some shorebirds
From: "Michael Tetlow " <mjtetlow AT frontiernet.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 18:12:34 -0400
     This afternoon Joann and I did a quick sweep of Montezuma. The Seneca
River spillway had 2 Leasts, 3 Solitary and 4 Lesser Yellowlegs. A short
distance up in the main pool opposite Laure's lagoon a female Orchard Oriole
flew in from the east to feed on some Black Raspberry bushes sticking up out
of the cattails along the channel.

      Looking from the first small pull off on the drive past the cattails
we were surprised to find 2 Black-crowned Night Herons feeding,
successfully, quite far from any cattails out with the Coot, Grebes and a DC
Cormorant at 2:30 in the afternoon. The birds were about 200 feet south of
the continuing male Ring-necked Duck. 

     Up to Eaton marsh, which is being further engulfed by smartweed, but
still had 4 Greater and 6 Lesser Yellowlegs plus 1 Short-billed Dowitcher.
Vegetation is already making it more difficult to find birds in Benning
Marsh but a flock of 12 Lesser Yellowlegs joined the 3 we had found. 1
single, lighter colored than Least, peep flew in but turned out to be a
Semi-palmated not the hoped for Baird's. 

     May's Point pool is the most encouraging but also frustrating. A couple
dozen yellowlegs and an equal number of peep flew up along the far edge when
a young Harrier flew along the far edge. We had seen an adult male and a
molting female Harrier earlier on the NW edge of the main pool marsh so they
may have had success. Scrutinizing the closer reeds we found 1 Long-billed
and 3 Short-billed Dowitchers plus 20+ more Lesser Yellowlegs. We did not
scope this so I would suggest thorough scrutiny as birds were scattered
everywhere. The Trumpeter Swan family persists there.

     On to the totally shorebird free Knox-Marcellus Puddle where the lack
of shorebirds was obvious. A pair of Sandhill Cranes with a very young(downy
with adorable wing stubs) colt made up for it.YES!!. I'm guessing a second
attempt. The only other success I have heard of on the refuge were 2 young
on Tschasche back in late May or early June and a possible teenager on
Morgan Road 2 weeks ago. We didn't scope the nest tree areas but were very
surprised to see only 1 Immature Bald Eagle. Mike and Joann Tetlow  


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Subject: Indigo Bunting at Salt Point
From: Candace Cornell <cec222 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 18:29:49 -0400
There was a strikingly bright blue male Indigo Bunting today at Salt Point
(3 pm) near the Salmon Creek osprey platform—the first I've ever seen at
the point. It was perched near Salmon Creek in a cottonwood before it flew
upstream past Myers Road.

What a thrill to see it!

Candace

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Subject: Sunday July 31st Shorebird Walk Montezuma NWR 700 am Visitor's Center, 715 am East Road
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 21:05:36 -0400
On July 31st, Dave Nutter and I will lead walks at Montezuma. Dave Nutter
will take a group down the dikes around Knox-Marcellus and Puddler's Marshes
meeting at 715 am at the East Road Parking area. I will take a group along
wildlife drive meeting at 700 am at the Visitor's center parking lot. We
have
permission to get out of our cars and view the birds along the drive. Then
Dave Nutter's group will do wildlife drive and my group will walk the dikes
at K-M and Puddler's Marshes. In this way we will have more coverage with
two
groups looking for birds.

We are doing this because of the drought conditions and lack of mudflat
habitat
at K-M marsh and Puddler's. However, the recent rains the other day and more
rain expected Friday should keep habitat at these marshes. Last Sunday
there was enough habitat at K-M and Puddler's marshes to support a group of
75-100 peeps, mostly LEAST SANDPIPERS with about 15 or so
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS. There were a few LESSER YELLOWLEGS and
singles of SPOTTED and SOLITARY SANDPIPERS. We did enjoy close-up views
of BLACK TERN family groups, CASPIAN TERN juveniles and others.

Here are my ebird lists for last Sunday...

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30827481

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30833161

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30833199


The forecast for this Sunday is a 30% chance for showers and thunderstorms.
Temperatures in the morning will range in the 60s and 70s. If there are
showers around, there will be more clouds. Remember the sun is very
strong this time of year. I will provide a more detailed forecast in a
couple days.

Please bring water, as we don't want anyone getting dehydrated. Sunscreen
also is recommended even with clouds.

Again we would like to thanks the folks at Montezuma for making this
happen!

See you on Sunday!!

Dave Nicosia

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Subject: report: 24 July Montezuma shorebird trip
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 19:34:56 +0000 (GMT)
Next Sunday:

This coming Sunday another trip is planned with Dave Nicosia in charge, and 
myself among the assistants. I believe the meeting places and times will be the 
same, but I'll let him announce any further specifics. We now have permission 
with a guided field trip to get out of our cars on the Wildlife Drive, provided 
we keep the cars together and keep the people with them on the road. This is a 
great help for sharing sightings, scope views, and ID tips. People who were not 
originally part of the trip may get out to join us as well. For those going on 
the dikes, if the weather is sunny and warm again, be sure to bring a sun hat, 
plenty of water, and a snack - it got quite hot toward the end. 




Last Sunday:

Sorry for the delay in reporting about last Sunday's shorebird trip at 
Montezuma NWR. As planned, Dave Nicosia and I split this trip so as to cover 
more habitat locations. From the Visitor Center at 7am I took people on the 
Wildlife Drive, while at 7:15am Dave Nicosia took folks down onto the K-M & 
Puddler dikes from the overlook on East Road. Then each took our group to the 
other place. I particularly want to thank Menachem Goldstein, an experienced 
young Cornellian, for assisting in finding shorebirds and sharing views and ID 
tips. 




Our first shorebirds were near the start of the Wildlife Drive on the right 
side where the Seneca Trail crosses and there is a canal-like connection to the 
Seneca River. I don't know of any official name for this spot, but I call it 
the Seneca Slough. When the river is low, as recently, there is attractive wet 
mud and shallow water. We had long clear scope views of 1 Solitary Sandpiper 
and 3 Lesser Yellowlegs, which made for a great comparison of these two members 
of the genus Tringa. They share and elegantly elongated shape, but have 
different sizes and colors. This spot is also often good for Killdeer, Spotted 
Sandpiper, Least Sandpiper and other shorebirds. 




Our next stop was along the channel on the left side of the Wildlife Drive 
opposite Larue's, a place which also needs a concise name. Here we had great 
scope views of a full-size Sora, a non-breeding plumage adult, I believe, 
foraging on algae-covered mud near the base of the far cattails. At least 2 
Virginia Rails were heard as well. Rails are not shorebirds, but I happily 
shifted focus a bit, especially because seeing a Sora had been a goal for 
Menachem. 




Larue's is nearly devoid of water but at the NE corner there was still a large 
puddle surrounded by mud. Ann Mitchell & Gary Kohlenberg were ahead of us, but 
Ann called me about a wonderful sight there: an adult Spotted Sandpiper with 3 
downy chicks running around on very long legs and dipping their fluffy rear 
ends down & up just like grown-ups do. 




In the interest of time I ignored most of the main pool despite Wood Ducks, 
Common Gallinules, and families of Pied-billed Grebes. 



At Eaton there is water, but also plenty of emergent/flooded vegetation, so 
viewing the shorebirds was trickier. There were a couple dozen Lesser 
Yellowlegs and at least 3 Greater Yellowlegs so occasionally they could be seen 
well enough together for a comparison. Several Killdeer and Least Sandpipers 
were there, too, but the best find, again by Menachem, was a breeding plumage 
Dowitcher. He explained how he concluded that this bird, with extensive reddish 
on its neck, breast, and belly, was a Short-billed of the priarie (hendersoni) 
race. 




Benning Marsh has been disked and flooded, and it had plenty of shorebirds and 
lumps of mud for them to hide behind. Killdeer and Lesser Yellowlegs were most 
numerous, but there were also plenty of Least Sandpipers and several more 
Solitary Sandpipers. Bob McGuire and Susan Danskin had earlier found 2 Wilson's 
Snipes but we overlooked them. We did spend considerable time studying a 
preening peep. I have learned to be cautious identifying preening shorebirds 
because their size, shape, color, and pattern can be distorted. It's better to 
wait until a shorebird settles its feathers and begins walking and feeding in 
the postures the field guides use, but this bird was adamant. Eventually 
Menachem and I concluded that it was a Baird's Sandpiper even though we never 
had the typical view of a horizontal bird whose long rear end includes wingtips 
beyond the tail. It did show us the generally pale tan head, neck, and breast 
(washed, not streaked), a broad vague light brow, several large dark spots on 
the otherwise plain grayish back and wings and a dark rump. The size was larger 
than a Least. The legs were black. The bill was black and fine-pointed. Later, 
other observers did get to see a more typical view. This bird was of interest 
because they are generally rare in the eastern US, migrating to and from the 
arctic through the center of the continent. Although Montezuma's extensive 
habitat manages to attract a few every year, usually they arrive later in the 
season. Kevin McGowan found one at Benning the day before, and the first basin 
report was by Evan Lipton from the mud flats at Puddler the day before that. 




Menachem alone briefly saw a Pectoral Sandpiper at Benning, but we did not find 
any more shorebirds on the Wildlife Drive. Meena Haribal reported a Wilson's 
Phalarope from Benning that day, and Gary Chapin, who preceded us on his own, 
saw a Red-necked Phalarope in the new ponds along the Thruway, but it flew off 
to the west. 




My group continued to East Road and down onto the dikes where we met Dave 
Nicosia et al returning. He said it had been a worthwhile walk with plenty of 
birds, but the best shorebirding was comparing Least and Semipalmated 
Sandpipers. As it turned out, by the time we arrived they were fewer and less 
cooperative than I had hoped and we did not see any Semipalmated Sandpipers. I 
gambled wrong in not scoping into the sun glare at the peeps we did see. I 
hoped to walk past them and get a great view, but instead they flushed and 
disappeared. Perhaps they hid in vegetation and took a siesta.  



Among many resting adult Ring-billed Gulls were a few delicately patterned 
brown juveniles, plus several adult Caspian Terns and a couple of their 
juveniles, with fine dark chevrons on their backs, whom we saw get fed several 
times. We also saw a couple of brown Sandhill Crane necks periscoping out of 
the distant vegetation. 




I hope to see birds and birders at Montezuma again next weekend.



--Dave Nutter


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Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2016 16:31:17 +0000 (UTC)
*  New York*  Syracuse   
   - July 25, 2016
*  NYSY  07. 25. 16 Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):July 18, 2016 
- July 25, 2016to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering upstate NY 
counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma Wetlands 
Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, 
Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortlandcompiled: July 18  AT 12:00 p.m. 
(EDT)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga Audubon Homepage: 
www.onondagaaudubon.org  Greetings: This is the Syracuse Rare Bird Alert for 
the week of July 18, 2015. 

Highlights--------------STILT SANDPIPERBAIRD’S SANDPIPERRED-NECKED 
PHALAROPERED-HEADED WOODPECKERORCHARD ORIOLE 


Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex 
(MWC)------------ 

     13 species of Shorebirds were reported from the complex this week. A 
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE was seen along the Wildlife Drive on 7/24. STILT 
SANDPIPERS were seen along the wildlife Drive on 7/19 and at Howland Island on 
7/20. A BAIRD’S SANDPIPER WAS SEEN AT BENNING MARSH ON 7/24.     7/23: A 
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON was seen along the Wildlife Drive.     7/24: A 
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER was seen along the Wildlife Drive. 


Onondaga County------------
     7/25: KILLDEER, SOLITARY SANDPIPER, GREATER YELLOWLEGS, WILSON’S 
SNIPE and at least 35 LEAST SANDPIPERS were seen from the duck blind at Three 
Rivers WMA off of Smokey Hollow Road north of Baldwinsville. 


Madison county------------
     7/23: An ORCHARD ORIOLE was seen on Marsh Mill Road south of 
Bridgeport. 


Oneida County------------
     7/18: 3 MERLINS were seen near a private residence in Urica.     
7/19: A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was seen at the Verona Beach Woods east of the 
State Park.     7/21: 5 species of shorebirds including 5 SOLITARY 
SANDPIPERS were seen at Delta Lake. 


Herkimer County------------
     7/19: Four species of shorebirds including 19 LEAST SANDPIPERS were 
seen at the McKoon’s pond and wetland south of Mohawk. 

    
                       --end report 
    
Joseph BrinRegion 5Baldwinsville, NY 13027  U.S.A.  
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Subject: Great White Egrets in Van Etten
From: Mo Barger Rooster Hill Farm <mo AT roosterhillfarm.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 14:24:33 -0400
OOB but if you are out that way, there are about 11 of them this afternoon
in the Wildlife Refuge on Route 34, Van Etten.

http://www.ilovethefingerlakes.com/recreation/birdingsites-chemungcounty-VEWS.htm 


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Subject: Lansing Ctr Orchard Oriole, Bobolink
From: Suan Yong <suan.yong AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 12:08:13 -0400
Sorry for the empty earlier message (blame the iPhone :-).

Yesterday evening I spent some time at Salt Point watching the ospreys, of 
which one of the young was enjoying flying in the NW breeze. En route I saw a 
male orchard oriole with food in its mouth, and later was able to see at least 
three f/j-types, one looked like the mother who knew what she was doing, the 
other two popping up whenever she seemed like she'd found something. This was 
my first real opportunity to get familiar with this challenging-to-ID species. 


Late this morning I went to Lansing Center Trail, and along with the expected 
field sparrows and indigo buntings and such, I was surprised to see at least 
two, probably more, f/j-type orchard orioles in an apple tree. Still not 100% 
confident of my ID, I was glad to soon see a chestnut-colored male fly by into 
a nearby bush. Also, some bobolinks could be heard from the fields, and soon a 
male (possibly along with a female) was flushed. 


Suan
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Subject: Lansing actor
From: Suan Yong <suan.yong AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 11:59:31 -0400

_____________________
http://suan-yong.com

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Subject: CAU lecture
From: John Eliot Parks <jep5 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 09:35:18 +0000
Thursday Evening CAU Events and Activities, July 28, 2016, 7:15-8:15pm
"Avian Propagation: from Hummingbirds to Harpy Eagles to Peregrine Falcons"
With Beau Parks (NatRes, 2005),  Lead Keeper, San Diego Zoo
Klarman Auditorium, Goldwin Smith
For Adults and Children

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Subject: Fwd: [osbirds] NYS Birders Conference and NYSOA annual meeting, Sept. 9-11
From: Jane Graves <jgraves AT skidmore.edu>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 08:00:16 +0000

Sent from my iPad

Begin forwarded message:

From: "Andrew Mason andymason AT earthling.net 
[osbirds]" > 

Date: July 23, 2016 at 9:08:05 PM EDT
To: Osbirds >
Subject: [osbirds] NYS Birders Conference and NYSOA annual meeting, Sept. 9-11
Reply-To: osbirds AT yahoogroups.com



Registration is now open for the NYS Birders Conference and 69th New York State 
Ornithological Association Annual Meeting hosted by the Chemung Valley Audubon 
Society in Elmira, New York, September 9-11, 2016. This year's conference 
promises to be another great event, chock full of great birding and educational 
activities, along with opportunities to catch up with old friends and make new 
ones. Highlights include a keynote by Osprey expert and author Dr. Rob 
Bierregaard, field trips (including one with John James Audubon!), workshops, 
papers, and more. Rooms for the event at the Riverview Holiday Inn are being 
held until August 9, so get your room now (607-734-4211). Details, including 
information on discounts for early registration, can be found at 
http://nybirds.org/. 


--
Andrew Mason
1039 Peck St.
Jefferson, NY  12093
(607) 652-2162
AndyMason AT earthling.net

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Subject: tomorrow's Montezuma NWR shorebird walk
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 15:45:48 +0000 (GMT)
First, the trip is on:

As I previously announced, the field trip for shorebirds at Montezuma NWR will 
leave at 7am tomorrow from the Visitor Center, and will gather at the overlook 
on East Road at 7:15am to walk down onto the dikes around Knox-Marsellus and 
Puddler Marshes. But see item #3 below. 




Second, a ride request:

A Cornell student would like a lift from Collegetown or thereabouts. If it's 
convenient to you, contact me (607-229-2158). You will have an excellent birder 
with young eyes and ears in your car, so I recommend this. If I don't hear from 
anyone I will backtrack to do this myself. 




Third, adding the Wildlife Drive:

Due to the drought, habitat for shorebirds has been decreasing at K-M and 
Puddler, so refuge staff have been creating shorebird habitat along the 
Wildlife Drive. Birding is alway a bit of a gamble, which is part of why it's 
addictive. To hedge our bets, when I leave from the Visitor Center at 7am I 
will first take people onto the Wildlife Drive, which may take 1-2 hours, then 
(probably) continue to East Road and onto the dikes. Meanwhile co-leader Dave 
Nicosia will be at the overlook on East Road at 7:15am for everyone who wants 
to start there. We will be in touch with each other, so we can then take our 
groups where the birding seems better. If we can figure out where on Howland 
Island a recent report of shorebirds was, and it seems like that would be 
better, we may go there, too.  



Fourth, encouragement:

As always, these trips are free and open to the public, and we have not limited 
the number of participants. We have managed these popular trips because the 
birders who attend have various levels of expertise and equipment, and they 
have been willing to share both. I call this the price of admission, but I 
think people are happy to do this anyway. Bring binoculars, a field guide, and 
if you have a scope bring that, too, but if all you have is curiosity about 
these migrants from the arctic, patience to try to see and get to know them, 
and tolerance for walking and standing out in the weather, you should join us. 


--Dave Nutter
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Subject: Montezuma/Holland's Island yesterday. Ring-necked duck and other additions.
From: "Michael Tetlow " <mjtetlow AT frontiernet.net>
Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2016 16:51:34 -0400
  ( A few additions to Dominic's post from our day yesterday. We found the
previously reported male ring-neck on the north end of the main pool. Eaton
also had a flock of a dozen least's along the muddy edge of the new portion.
A snipe was reported by others with a few Yellowlegs at Benning marsh which
has good habitat.  Lesser yellowlegs were also scattered among the muskrat
houses at may's point. 8 Great Egrets were in the pools along the thruway
and 6 more at May's Point. The best bird at Knox was my first juvenile
Caspian Tern of the season. The best spot was the pool at Howland's Island.
I added the checklist from Howland's Island to Dominic's post below).  

*** Mike Tetlow and I went to Montezuma NWR and then to Howland's Island
yesterday.  Know-Marsellus pond is almost dried up and we had only a couple
of yellowlegs there.  The cranes were not present in the afternoon when we
arrived.  There are some yellowlegs in the shorebird flats at the north end
of the Wildlife Drive before the west turn.

We went to Howland's Island and entered from the south end near the boat
launch on the Seneca River.  We walked to a pond on the road that is the
first left turn from the main northbound entrance road, after crossing the
bridge at the Seneca River.  We saw 9 species of shorebirds in this pond
including a single molting Stilt Sandpiper and had a good mix of passerines
on our walk.

-----Original Message-----
From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu [mailto:ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu] 
Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2016 1:52 PM
To: mjtetlow AT frontiernet.net
Subject: eBird Report - Montezuma (NMWMA)--Howland Island--East, Jul 20,
2016

Montezuma (NMWMA)--Howland Island--East, Cayuga, New York, US Jul 20, 2016
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.5 mile(s)
Comments:     Mike Tetlow and I walked in at the south end of Howland's
Island and walked a loop, first north and then turned west past Goose Pond,
then north, then east and back south.
49 species

Canada Goose  22
Wood Duck  15
Great Blue Heron  2
Turkey Vulture  2
Osprey  1
Bald Eagle  1
Killdeer  24
Spotted Sandpiper  2
Solitary Sandpiper  13
Greater Yellowlegs  2
Lesser Yellowlegs  14
Stilt Sandpiper  1
Least Sandpiper  12
Pectoral Sandpiper  2
Semipalmated Sandpiper  2
Mourning Dove  4
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
Downy Woodpecker  4
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
Willow Flycatcher  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  3
Yellow-throated Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  2
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  5
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
Marsh Wren  2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  5
Eastern Bluebird  2
Wood Thrush  1
American Robin  2
Gray Catbird  5
European Starling  30
Cedar Waxwing  15
Common Yellowthroat  4
American Redstart  1
Cerulean Warbler  1     1 female carrying food.
Yellow Warbler  4
Song Sparrow  7
Swamp Sparrow  3
Scarlet Tanager  3
Northern Cardinal  2
Indigo Bunting  4
Red-winged Blackbird  3
American Goldfinch  7

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30792483

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)


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