Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
The Cayuga Birding List

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Sunday, July 27 at 07:34 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Northern Shrike,©Barry Kent Mackay

27 Jul Montezuma Afternoon Addtions ["Mike and Joann Tetlow" ]
27 Jul Hemlock Lake trail, Raven and more. [M Miller ]
26 Jul Re: Cass Park Ospreys, Tanager [Candace Cornell ]
26 Jul Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Lake bird sightings while kayaking [Dave Nutter ]
26 Jul RE: Cayuga Lake bird sightings while kayaking ["Bill Ostrander" ]
26 Jul More info about avoiding Rte. 90 []
26 Jul Cayuga Lake bird sightings while kayaking [John Dennis ]
26 Jul Avoid Rt 90, take 34B to Rt 20 [Donna Scott ]
26 Jul Montezuma [Carol Keeler ]
26 Jul Cass Park Ospreys, Tanager [Dave Nutter ]
26 Jul Montezuma NWR Friday am - large swallow roost ["Marie P. Read" ]
25 Jul American White Pelican, Montezuma [Jay McGowan ]
25 Jul American White Pelican, Montezuma ["Jay McGowan jwm57 AT cornell.edu [oneidabirds]" ]
25 Jul Fledging ospreys [Candace Cornell ]
25 Jul Grackles flocking ["Bill Mcaneny" ]
25 Jul Sanderling continues at Myers Pt. [Stuart Krasnoff ]
25 Jul Knox-Marcellus Marsh Thursday Evening 24 July 14 [David Nicosia ]
24 Jul S Mays Pt Rd Red-headed Woodpeckers [Dave Nutter ]
24 Jul Knox-Marsellus 24 July [Dave Nutter ]
24 Jul Montezuma Birding Van Tour ["Barra, Amy" ]
24 Jul Black-crowned Night Heron continues at Swan Pen [Stuart Krasnoff ]
24 Jul Merlin Family []
24 Jul Re:Sanderling, Myers Point [Jay McGowan ]
24 Jul sign up for Montezuma shorebird trip onto dikes [Dave Nutter ]
23 Jul Sanderling, Myers Point [Jay McGowan ]
23 Jul Brown Thrashers [Donna Scott ]
23 Jul Black-crowned Night-Heron, Stewart Park [Jay McGowan ]
22 Jul Re: Off topic: Bats [Linda Orkin ]
22 Jul Re: Off topic: Bats [Geo Kloppel ]
22 Jul Re: Crows that hunt? [Anne Clark ]
22 Jul Crows that hunt? [Richard Tkachuck ]
22 Jul Off topic: Bats [Richard Tkachuck ]
22 Jul Re: RHWO at sapsucker woods [Brad Walker ]
22 Jul Re: RHWO at sapsucker woods [Jeff Gerbracht ]
22 Jul RHWO at sapsucker woods [Tom Schulenberg ]
22 Jul Re: Jason Dombroskie's talk on Moths and importance of understandoing ecology of moths/insects [Glenn Wilson ]
22 Jul Jason Dombroskie's talk on Moths and importance of understandoing ecology of moths/insects [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
21 Jul Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
21 Jul FW: Moth Week: Yet another bird food related celebrations [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
20 Jul Black Vulture on Stevenson, Clay-colored Sparrow still on campus ["Kevin J. McGowan" ]
20 Jul turkeys [Sara Jane Hymes ]
20 Jul Great Shearwater - bad news []
20 Jul Merlins and a reminder to the odonate book recption today at 3.00 pm at BTI [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
20 Jul Re: Merlin: new and old in Ithaca [Dave Nutter ]
20 Jul Re: Juvenile Sharp-shins [Dave Nutter ]
20 Jul Re: Least Bitterns at Catharine Creek Marsh ["John and Sue Gregoire" ]
20 Jul Re: Fwd: Jerry Lazarczyk [Judith Thurber ]
20 Jul Re: [cayugabirds-l] Fwd: Jerry Lazarczyk ["Judith Thurber jathurber AT yahoo.com [oneidabirds]" ]
20 Jul Fwd: Jerry Lazarczyk ["Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes" ]
20 Jul Least Bitterns at Catharine Creek Marsh [Matthew Medler ]
19 Jul Merlin: new and old in Ithaca [John Confer ]
19 Jul Great Shearwater photos []
19 Jul Juvenile Sharp-shins [Richard Maxwell ]
19 Jul Great Shearwater update - rescued []
19 Jul RE: MNWR Friday- children's specialty day [Sue Barth ]
19 Jul Re: MNWR Friday- children's specialty day [John and Sue Gregoire ]
18 Jul Montezuma Wildlife Drive and Knox-Marcellus Marsh Friday afternoon/evening July 18 2014 [David Nicosia ]
19 Jul late nests [Dave Nutter ]
18 Jul MNWR Friday- children's specialty day [John and Sue Gregoire ]
18 Jul Great Shearwater [Jim Tarolli ]
18 Jul Re: Pelagic oddity near DeRuyter [Brad Walker ]
18 Jul Emerson Park Snow Geese [The Donster ]
18 Jul Re:Pelagic oddity near DeRuyter [Gian Dodici ]
18 Jul Pelagic oddity near DeRuyter [Gian Dodici ]
18 Jul Lime Hollow Visitor Center [Matthew Medler ]
17 Jul Re: Montezuma NWR paddling [Donna Scott ]
17 Jul Re: Montezuma NWR field trips [Mo Barger Rooster Hill Farm ]
17 Jul Montezuma NWR field trips [Dave Nutter ]
17 Jul May's Point RHWO- A Third Chick? [Paul Schmitt ]
16 Jul Re: Lots o vultures [Candace Cornell ]
15 Jul Least Bittern [Carl Steckler ]
14 Jul Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
14 Jul Nesting Red-headed Woodpeckers at Fair Haven [Jim Tarolli ]
14 Jul Kestrals (Lots!) [Maryfaith Miller ]
14 Jul Vultures cont [Laura Stenzler ]
14 Jul Lots o vultures [Laura Stenzler ]

Subject: Montezuma Afternoon Addtions
From: "Mike and Joann Tetlow" <mjtetlow AT frontiernet.net>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 20:08:14 -0400
    We birded Montezuma this afternoon. Viewing Knox-Marcellus from East
Road we pretty much had the same birds as the field trip except actually
counting up to 520 Semipalmated Sandpipers. At that distance we did not
attempt the Dowitcher ID but glad to know not to assume Short-billed at this
date. A Cliff Swallow was among the swallows hunting the fields.

    Along the wildlife drive we were very surprised to see one of the
Virginia Rail chicks feeding near the nest sight about 150 feet up the
wildlife drive opposite Larue's lagoon.  This was also the first afternoon
in 4 weeks where we did not have a single bittern of either species although
1 American was reported in the morning.

    We have heard several others question the report of 2 fledged Red-headed
Woodpeckers at May's Point as many have seen just one many times. We can
vouch for that for the first time today with the 2 young and 2 adults all in
view at the same time.  Mike and Joann Tetlow


  _____  

I am using the Free version of SPAMfighter 
.
SPAMfighter has removed 739 of my spam emails to date.

Do you have a slow PC? 
Try a free scan! 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Hemlock Lake trail, Raven and more.
From: M Miller <mmiller325 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 22:28:38 +0000
Around noon Sunday, I took a short 20 minute hike on the trail located at the 
northwest corner of Hemlock Lake (just past the picnic area). Had numerous 
Hooded Warblers, a Warbling Vireo, a pair of Scarlet Tanagers, and Hairy & 
Downy Woodpeckers. As I returned to the Kiosk/parking area, I thought I heard a 
Raven. I was able to verify with a photo (along with a Sharp-shinned Hawk). 



Photos available on the Eaton Birding Society facebook page.








Sent from Windows Mail
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Cass Park Ospreys, Tanager
From: Candace Cornell <cec222 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 21:53:08 -0400
Thanks for the report on the Os. They are still using the nest in that they
occasionally add to it and sit on it—and nothing is more important to an
osprey than his nest. His mate rates second. Most unsuccessful pairs leave
on migration a bit early—probably in early August. I'd like to know the
dates they leave so keep please observing them when you can.

It takes some young birds several years to get their acts together and this
pair has all the makings of success—next year.

Candace


On Fri, Jul 25, 2014 at 10:01 PM, Dave Nutter  wrote:

> The OSPREY pair continues at Union Field in Cass Park. This evening they
> were perched at opposite ends of a crossbar of lights on a different pole
> than the moved and since-unused nest. Their fidelity to the site and each
> other, despite not following through with nesting this year, is impressive.
> Next year.
>
> When Laurie & I stopped to rest on a bench west of the Children's Garden
> we saw activity and heard unusual bird noises high in an adjacent pine
> tree. A male SCARLET TANAGER with all of his red except 2 small patches of
> green on the breast was feeding a young BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD slightly
> bigger than himself.
>
> --Dave Nutter
>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> !*
> --
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Lake bird sightings while kayaking
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 18:48:54 +0000 (GMT)
1) It's common for duckling families to get mixed up or combined. After all, 
the parents don't feed the young, the mothers mainly guide them to feeding and 
sheltering areas and warn them of danger. Any mother duck can do that, even a 
different species. In some species several females seem to deliberately combine 
their broods into what is called a creche. And I think sometimes a female will 
deliberately recruit another female's young, although sometimes a stray 
youngster will also be rejected. I don't know why. So, yes, your group of 32 
youngsters likely has multiple mothers. By the way, some ducks are also known 
for laying some eggs in other females' nests, not necessarily of the same 
species. So a female may even start out with more than her own brood in tow. 


2) I have heard of Bald Eagles or Ospreys accidentally dropping a fish on land, 
but not retrieving it. Yes Bald Eagles eat carrion, including fish, but I think 
the choice is highly influenced by laziness. Is it really easy to just fly out, 
rake your feet in the water and grab fresh food? Probably yes, for that adult. 
But maybe if you're a youngster and not very good at hunting, the easiest way 
to get fed is to dig into a washed up carcass. 


3) I don't know if Turkey Vultures would be curious about a zucchini, but I 
doubt they'd mistake it for carrion. I think the term "kettle" refers to a 
group of raptors circling to gether in a thermal because of the similarity to 
the boiling motion of water. 


Corrections welcome.

--Dave Nutter


On Jul 26, 2014, at 01:09 PM, John Dennis  wrote:

> On 23 July while kayaking on Cayuga Lake, my bird sightings included a Bald 
Eagle, several ospreys, some double-breasted cormorants, a kettle of TVs 
perched at the waters edge, and what appeared to be a single adult female 
Common Merganser with a brood of 32 chicks in tow. One disadvantage of solo 
birding is there is no one available to answer simple questions such as: 

>
> 1) According to allaboutbirds.org, Common Merganser clutch size is "6-17 
eggs". Are Common Merganser females known to combine broods and "work in 
shifts"? 

>
> 2) Would a Bald Eagle that is disturbed during breakfast and drops its fish 
from a tree and flies off, come back later to continue its meal? (I see at 
www.baldeagleinfo.com/ that they also eat carrion, so I suppose coming back to 
retrieve a recently caught fish would not be an indignity.) 

>
> 3) Would a kettle of Turkey Vultures be intrigued by a large zucchini bobbing 
in the lake water a few feet from shore, wondering (from a distance at least) 
if perhaps if it was a dead animal? (And does "kettle" refer only to the 
airborne formation of TVs or can it also be used to describe a group of TVs 
that is perching? 

>
> Apologies for such simple questions,    John
>
> P.S. At the risk of being long-winded, here are a few more details regarding 
the location and details of my sightings: 

>
> I departed from Myers Point at about 7:30am, went a bit north of Atwater, 
crossed over and kayaked down the west shore until Taughannock Park where I 
followed a heading directly back to Myers Point, arriving there about 4pm. 
There was a mild tail wind going north and a dramatic tailwind from abreast of 
Milliken Station all the way back to Myers Point. 

>
> On the northerly, east coast leg of the journey, I spotted a Bald Eagle 
perched in a tree perhaps 1.5 miles north of Myers Point. I watched it fly out 
over the lake and dive close to the water and then circle back to the same 
tree. Having never seen a Bald Eagle fishing before, I assumed it had missed 
its target when I saw no spray come up at the end of its dive. By that time I 
had my bins on the bird, but movement of the kayak prevented me from seeing it 
well. Only when it was back perched in a tree and later dropped its fish upon 
my approach did I realize it had caught one. 

>
> Rounding a point about half a mile south of Milliken Station, I was startled 
as a TV look wing from about the water level and landed in a tree where two or 
three other TVs were perched. I believe there was at least one more circling 
overhead. On reaching a willow tree that was partly in the water and where it 
seemed the TV had departed from, I found no carrion that could have been of 
interest to the TVs, but there was a 16" long, 4" diameter zucchini that was 
bobbing in the water a few feet from shore. There were a couple of half-inch 
nicks in the skin of the zucchini, but none seemed deep enough to been the 
result of TV beak-work. 

>
> As I recall the larger Merganser brood was between Cuddeback Point on the 
Bell Station parcel and the Atwater/Nut Ridge Road area. 

>
>
> Cell: 1-607-227-5172
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: RE: Cayuga Lake bird sightings while kayaking
From: "Bill Ostrander" <browncreeper9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 14:43:20 -0400
Dennis,
 
We had a similar sized group of Common Mergansers on the Chemung River in
Elmira several years ago.  When I first saw them in early summer, the young
all appeared to be the same very small size.  At the end of summer, when the
young were nearly full grown, the count was the same.  The literature that I
read at that time referred to such a group as an amalgamated family with one
adult female and lots of young.  While my source stated that multiple
females may lay eggs in a single nest, it did not seem to attribute the
amalgamation to that, and considered the mechanism by which the amalgamation
developed to be unknown.  I think that the young associate with just one
adult female.
 
-- Bill Ostander

  _____  

From: bounce-117656961-56173679 AT list.cornell.edu
[mailto:bounce-117656961-56173679 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of John Dennis
Sent: Saturday, July 26, 2014 1:09 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L AT list.cornell.edu
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Lake bird sightings while kayaking


On 23 July while kayaking on Cayuga Lake, my bird sightings included a Bald
Eagle, several ospreys, some double-breasted cormorants, a kettle of TVs
perched at the waters edge, and what appeared to be a single adult female
Common Merganser with a brood of 32 chicks in tow. One disadvantage of solo
birding is there is no one available to answer simple questions such as:  

1) According to allaboutbirds.org, Common Merganser clutch size is "6-17
eggs".  Are Common Merganser females known to combine broods and "work in
shifts"? 

2) Would a Bald Eagle that is disturbed during breakfast and drops its fish
from a tree and flies off, come back later to continue its meal? (I see at
www.baldeagleinfo.com/ that they also eat carrion, so I suppose coming back
to retrieve a recently caught fish would not be an indignity.) 

3) Would a kettle of Turkey Vultures be intrigued by a large zucchini
bobbing in the lake water a few feet from shore, wondering (from a distance
at least) if perhaps if it was a dead animal? (And does "kettle" refer only
to the airborne formation of TVs or can it also be used to describe a group
of TVs that is perching?  

Apologies for such simple questions,    John

P.S. At the risk of being long-winded, here are a few more details regarding
the location and details of my sightings: 

I departed from Myers Point at about 7:30am, went a bit north of Atwater,
crossed over and kayaked down the west shore until Taughannock Park where I
followed a heading directly back to Myers Point, arriving there about 4pm.
There was a mild tail wind going north and a dramatic tailwind from abreast
of Milliken Station all the way back to Myers Point.    

On the northerly, east coast leg of the journey, I spotted a Bald Eagle
perched in a tree perhaps 1.5 miles north of Myers Point. I watched it fly
out over the lake and dive close to the water and then circle back to the
same tree.  Having never seen a Bald Eagle fishing before, I assumed it had
missed its target when I saw no spray come up at the end of its dive.  By
that time I had my bins on the bird, but movement of the kayak prevented me
from seeing it well. Only when it was back perched in a tree and later
dropped its fish upon my approach did I realize it had caught one.

Rounding a point about half a mile south of Milliken Station, I was startled
as a TV look wing from about the water level and landed in a tree where two
or three other TVs were perched.  I believe there was at least one more
circling overhead.  On reaching a willow tree that was partly in the water
and where it seemed the TV had departed from, I found no carrion that could
have been of interest to the TVs, but there was a 16" long, 4" diameter
zucchini that was bobbing in the water a few feet from shore.  There were a
couple of half-inch nicks in the skin of the zucchini, but none seemed deep
enough to been the result of TV beak-work. 

As I recall the larger Merganser brood was between Cuddeback Point on the
Bell Station parcel and the Atwater/Nut Ridge Road area.  



Cell: 1-607-227-5172


--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
  Welcome and Basics
  Rules and Information
 

Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
Archives:
  The
Mail Archive
  Surfbirds
  BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird  !
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: More info about avoiding Rte. 90
From: <job121830 AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 12:49:10 -0500




Subject: Cayuga Lake bird sightings while kayaking
From: John Dennis <johnvdennis AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 13:09:02 -0400
On 23 July while kayaking on Cayuga Lake, my bird sightings included a Bald
Eagle, several ospreys, some double-breasted cormorants, a kettle of TVs
perched at the waters edge, and what appeared to be a single adult female
Common Merganser with a brood of 32 chicks in tow. One disadvantage of solo
birding is there is no one available to answer simple questions such as:

1) According to allaboutbirds.org, Common Merganser clutch size is "6-17
eggs".  Are Common Merganser females known to combine broods and "work in
shifts"?

2) Would a Bald Eagle that is disturbed during breakfast and drops its fish
from a tree and flies off, come back later to continue its meal? (I see at
www.baldeagleinfo.com/ that they also eat carrion, so I suppose coming back
to retrieve a recently caught fish would not be an indignity.)

3) Would a kettle of Turkey Vultures be intrigued by a large zucchini
bobbing in the lake water a few feet from shore, wondering (from a distance
at least) if perhaps if it was a dead animal? (And does "kettle" refer only
to the airborne formation of TVs or can it also be used to describe a group
of TVs that is perching?

Apologies for such simple questions,    John

P.S. At the risk of being long-winded, here are a few more details
regarding the location and details of my sightings:

I departed from Myers Point at about 7:30am, went a bit north of Atwater,
crossed over and kayaked down the west shore until Taughannock Park where I
followed a heading directly back to Myers Point, arriving there about 4pm.
 There was a mild tail wind going north and a dramatic tailwind from
abreast of Milliken Station all the way back to Myers Point.

On the northerly, east coast leg of the journey, I spotted a Bald Eagle
perched in a tree perhaps 1.5 miles north of Myers Point. I watched it fly
out over the lake and dive close to the water and then circle back to the
same tree.  Having never seen a Bald Eagle fishing before, I assumed it had
missed its target when I saw no spray come up at the end of its dive.  By
that time I had my bins on the bird, but movement of the kayak prevented me
from seeing it well. Only when it was back perched in a tree and later
dropped its fish upon my approach did I realize it had caught one.

Rounding a point about half a mile south of Milliken Station, I was
startled as a TV look wing from about the water level and landed in a tree
where two or three other TVs were perched.  I believe there was at least
one more circling overhead.  On reaching a willow tree that was partly in
the water and where it seemed the TV had departed from, I found no carrion
that could have been of interest to the TVs, but there was a 16" long, 4"
diameter zucchini that was bobbing in the water a few feet from shore.
 There were a couple of half-inch nicks in the skin of the zucchini, but
none seemed deep enough to been the result of TV beak-work.

As I recall the larger Merganser brood was between Cuddeback Point on the
Bell Station parcel and the Atwater/Nut Ridge Road area.


Cell: 1-607-227-5172

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Avoid Rt 90, take 34B to Rt 20
From: Donna Scott <dls999 AT me.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 08:29:05 -0400
> Marie Read noted that this weekend the huge Rt 90 yard sale is stalling 
traffic up the lake on rt 90 to Rt 20 & MNWR. 

Here us an alt.  route. 
Take 34B to Ridge rd turn-off N of Scipioville, (~1.5 mi after Empire Fence 
sign) , at curve go left onto Ridge Rd. 

 if you pass Scipioville Baptist church U have gone past it. 

 then take third left to meet Rt. 326. Turn right to go north on 326. 
After this I am not sure, but where 326 runs into what I think is Genesee St, 
turn left off 326 onto Gen st. ( 326 curves east to go to Auburn there 
someplace. ) 

Then soon, take a country road Right to reach US 20. Use your phone map. 

Avoid village of Cayuga this way since that is one of most congested spots. 
Donna Scott
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> Donna Scott

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Montezuma
From: Carol Keeler <carolk441 AT adelphia.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 07:07:10 -0400
I can add to Marie's observations with a few more species. There was a flyover 
Green Heron. Marsh Wrens were everywhere and in one case were feeding babies. 
There were several GB Herons with trying to swallow a large bullhead. There was 
a family of Coots, and some very small ducklings ( maybe Wood Ducks) with no 
parents visible. Out on the muskrat lodges were a number of Cormorants. 

At the shorebird area before Benning, there were both Yellowlegs, a Semi 
palmated Plover, Killdeer, and a Solitary Sandpiper. 

I was very pleased to see the first new pool along the Thruway being used by 
the Black Terns and later on, a lone Great Egret. After the work area were the 
two injured Snow Geese. 


Sent from my iPad
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Cass Park Ospreys, Tanager
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 02:01:53 +0000 (GMT)
The OSPREY pair continues at Union Field in Cass Park. This evening they were 
perched at opposite ends of a crossbar of lights on a different pole than the 
moved and since-unused nest. Their fidelity to the site and each other, despite 
not following through with nesting this year, is impressive. Next year. 


When Laurie & I stopped to rest on a bench west of the Children's Garden we saw 
activity and heard unusual bird noises high in an adjacent pine tree. A male 
SCARLET TANAGER with all of his red except 2 small patches of green on the 
breast was feeding a young BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD slightly bigger than 
himself. 


--Dave Nutter
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Montezuma NWR Friday am - large swallow roost
From: "Marie P. Read" <mpr5 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 01:27:49 +0000
I was excited to find a large swallow roost (mostly Trees, but a few Barns and 
Banks) a short way along the wildlife drive at Montezuma NWR this morning. 
Thousands of swallows were perched among the cattails and the pink flowers of 
swamp rose-mallows, they were there when I arrived about 7am. They mostly 
stayed put, flying up a couple of times when eagles flew over or something else 
spooked them before settling down again, allowing me to observe and photograph 
them for over two hours before they finally flew en masse out of the roost to 
forage. 


A couple of photos are here:


http://marieread.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Tree-Swallow/G0000YOpvGGFa3n8/I0000ZRcNxn0V7qs/C0000JGA3u3.D1t8 



http://marieread.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Tree-Swallow/G0000YOpvGGFa3n8/I00002zBp95hsqyw/C0000JGA3u3.D1t8 


Elsewhere along the drive were families of Moorhens (one pair with 6 chicks!) 
and Pied-billed Grebes (young almost adult-sized still being fed by parents). 


Also 6 or more Bald Eagle immatures, several Black Terns, Osprey etc. (Sorry, 
no I didn't go chasing shorebirds;-)) ) 


Ithaca birders, if you go to Montezuma this weekend be aware that from Aurora 
northward is the (annual?) Rt 90 community yard saleI must have passed 40+ 
yard sales, with some seriously commercial-looking ventures, with cars parked 
both sides of the road. It made the traffic pretty snarled up and this was only 
Friday! The village of Cayuga was particularly busy, and is likely to be worse 
Saturday. 


Marie


Marie Read Wildlife Photography
452 Ringwood Road
Freeville NY  13068 USA

Phone  607-539-6608
e-mail   mpr5 AT cornell.edu

http://www.marieread.com

Author of Sierra Wings: Birds of the Mono Lake Basin    Available here:


http://marieread.photoshelter.com/gallery/Sierra-Wings-Birds-of-the-Mono-Lake-Basin/G0000NlCxX37uTzE/C0000BPFGij6nLfE 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: American White Pelican, Montezuma
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 15:56:19 -0400
Jackie Bakker reports that she and Larue had an AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN at
Knox-Marsellus, Montezuma NWR this afternoon.

-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jwm57 AT cornell.edu

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: American White Pelican, Montezuma
From: "Jay McGowan jwm57 AT cornell.edu [oneidabirds]" <oneidabirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 15:56:19 -0400
Jackie Bakker reports that she and Larue had an AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN at
Knox-Marsellus, Montezuma NWR this afternoon.

-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jwm57 AT cornell.edu
Subject: Fledging ospreys
From: Candace Cornell <cec222 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 11:35:27 -0400
The ospreys on the lake are beginning to fledge. The two chicks  at
Portland Point started last Friday, the Treman Marina's pair started Monday
or Tuesday, and the others are soon to follow. Fledging at the north end of
the lake is well under way as well. The eldest of the three Salt Point
chicks got airborne for a few seconds yesterday as well. This is my
favorite time of the osprey season, watching the chicks try so hard to
reach for the stars!
Candace

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Grackles flocking
From: "Bill Mcaneny" <bmcaneny1 AT fltg.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 10:19:30 -0400
About 8:30 this a.m. a flock of Common Grackles descended on the lawn behind
our house.  Probably in the order of 200 birds.  I didn't scan the whole
flock but there did not seem to be any other species mixed in.  So, does
this mean the summer is over??

 

Bill McAneny, TBurg


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Sanderling continues at Myers Pt.
From: Stuart Krasnoff <sbk1 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 14:17:40 +0000
The Sanderling was at Myers Pt. last evening and this morning as well as of 
0745 h. I saw 3 Least Sandpipers around the islands in the creek and 2 
Semipalmated Sandpipers on the spit...Stuart 




--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Knox-Marcellus Marsh Thursday Evening 24 July 14
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 07:07:58 -0400
Since I was last at K-M Marsh on the 18th, the numbers and diversity of
shorebirds has increased. However, after reading Dave Nutter's email its
all relative. Birds that have increased markedly since the 18th are both
LEAST and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS. There were a few large flocks and even a
one really nice murmuration when a PEREGRINE FALCON flew by and snatched
what I think was a lesser yellowlegs. It was a little challenging to id
this bird in the falcon's talons. Poor bird. Also more numerous were
SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS, and PECTORAL SANDPIPERS.  I could not refind the
Wilson's phalarope of last week either and I only found 2 STILT SANDPIPERS
this time. To me there seemed to be about the same number of dowitcher sp.
as I remember since the 18th possibly more. Of course both yellowleg
species still are in abundance. I think the biggest change at least since
the 18th are the number of peeps. I was on East Road and many of the birds
looked closer to Towpath road. The distance was too much for me to be
totally sure on many of the more distant peeps. To me they all looked like
either least or semipalmated sandpipers with a couple larger chunkier
pectoral sandpipers here and there . I thought I had a sanderling at one
point. The bird was more whitish and larger than the semipalmated
sandpipers but given the distance I could not be totally sure.  I wouldn't
be surprised if others found something unusual up there this weekend,
especially given the north winds of late and chilly air that has come down
from Canada.

Good birding,
Dave Nicosia

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: S Mays Pt Rd Red-headed Woodpeckers
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 23:51:16 +0000 (GMT)
As reader of Cayugabirds-L are probably aware, this is the second year that 
regionally-rare RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS have nested in the dead trees along 
South Mays Point Road between NYS-89 and the Clyde River (Seneca County Town of 
Tyre, alongside or within the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge). Although the 
nestlings fledged a few days ago (2, 3, or 4 have been reported), members of 
the family can still be found in the area. 


Early this afternoon Bob, Ann, Susan, and I stopped by for a look. After a few 
minutes of gazing, Susan spied an adult in typical stance gripping the top edge 
of one of the broken-off snags. Shortly it flew to the mid-section of another 
snag and alit beside a much-less-conspicuous slate-and-white juvenile perched 
vertically just below an old nest hole. The adult fed the juvenile and flew off 
to another snag. What surprised us was that the youngster then climbed inside 
the hole. This was not the cavity it was just raised in. Within the next few 
minutes we saw a/the youngster exit, fly to another snag, return and enter the 
same cavity a second time, and get fed by the adult a second time, this time at 
the entrance as if it were a nestling. What was going on? Is this a cavity it 
or they have used for roosting since leaving the nest? Or is it just practicing 
going in and out of cavities as part of growing up and gaining standard 
woodpecker skills? Fascinating critters. Maybe all woodpeckers do this stuff, 
but they and their cavities are not so conspicuous. 


--Dave Nutter
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Knox-Marsellus 24 July
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 21:33:33 +0000 (GMT)
This morning I was up at Knox-Marsellus Marsh with Bob McGuire, Ann Mitchell, 
and Susan Danskin scouting in advance of the field trip there on Sunday. Bob 
asked about the chances of Buff-breasted Sandpiper being there, and I said 
although I'd seen one once in July they really aren't expected for another 
month, but keep an eye out anyway. So awhile later he said, "I've got a 
candidate." Indeed it was very a very buffy shorebird foraging in the vegetated 
part of a mudflat, very far away. My first impression of shape and pattern was 
of a Pectoral Sandpiper, but we never saw any of the lines on back (like on 
snipe & Least Sandpiper), breast (vertical streaks in a distinct bib) or face 
(eye-stripe), or colors on back (brown) and breast (gray) that I expected on 
Pectoral, and eventually we decided that this all-buff-&-tan bird with a 
whitish belly, buffy breast, some speckling in the back/wings, plain buffy 
face, a slightly darker cap, short black bill, and yellow legs really was a 
Buff-breasted. After I texted an RBA, I looked back up to refind it, and what I 
think was the same bird took flight, came much closer, and alit in shallow 
water. This was definitely a Pectoral Sandpiper, albeit a very buffy and plain 
individual. Looking back at the previous location we did not re-find the 
original bird. Maybe a Buff-breasted Sandpiper went into hiding there, but 
evidence points to a misidentification, so I retracted the report. Lessons 
(re-)learned: (1) Pectoral Sandpipers are the Chameleons of shorebirds, feeding 
in vegetated dry mud as well as in water; (2) at great distances all details of 
plumage can wash out and bills can look smaller; (3) I should have been more 
suspicious that our bird was pecking calmy and deliberately instead of the 
slightly neurotic run-and-peck activity of Buff-breasteds (not as extreme as 
Phalaropes, but a similar idea). 


Shorebird numbers and diversity were a bit down today. We didn't find the 
Wilson's Phalarope, and there were fewer Dowitchers. But there were plenty of 
shorebirds & others worthy of watching, and we can work on Least v 
Semipalmated Sandpiper; Greater v Lesser Yellowlegs; Pectoral & Stilt Sandpiper 
& Dowitcher ID. Plus there are Sandhill Cranes, Caspian & Black Terns, Osprey, 
Bald Eagle... and you never know what might show up. 


--Dave Nutter
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Montezuma Birding Van Tour
From: "Barra, Amy" <abarra AT audubon.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 17:59:07 +0000
Montezuma Birding Van Tour

Treat yourself to a weekend of birding with the staff from the Montezuma 
Audubon Center! Start at the Montezuma Audubon Center on Rt 89 in Savannah on 
Saturday July 26 at 9:00 am. Then, hop in the Montezuma Audubon Center's van 
for an excursion to Montezuma's backcountry birding hotspots where dozens of 
migrants, including sandhill cranes, bald eagles, osprey, and great egrets, can 
be seen and heard! Participants are encouraged to bring their camera and 
binoculars. Fee: $8.00/child, $13.50/adult, $40/family. Registration is 
required, please call (315) 365-3588 or e-mail 
montezuma AT audubon.org 




Amy Barra
Environmental Education Specialist
Montezuma Audubon Center
2295 State Rt 89, PO Box 187
Savannah, NY 13146
(315) 365-3588 Montezuma Audubon
(315) 539- 5168 Seneca Meadows
abarra AT audubon.org



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Black-crowned Night Heron continues at Swan Pen
From: Stuart Krasnoff <sbk1 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 17:16:07 +0000
I saw the Black-crowned Night Heron juv. at the Swan Pen this morning ca. 8 AM 
along with 2 Great Blue Herons, a Green Heron and two Belted 
Kingfishers...Stuart 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Merlin Family
From: smb4inc AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 08:17:44 -0400 (EDT)
Last evening we watched a family of Merlins in the northeast area of Ithaca. We 
first saw them preening in the trees on Hanshaw near Orchard after the thunder 
storm had passed. They flew to the trees near St. Catherine's Church where they 
swooped down on a family of foraging crows, and chased 2 crows in and out of 
the trees. They shifted to the trees on St. Catherine's Place where they chased 
a family of Blue Jays. It also looked as though the juveniles were playing some 
talon tag between chasing the Blue Jays. On our way home, we heard the Merlin 
calls and found them chasing a Killdeer family in the trees between Simsbury 
and Winthrop. 



Suzanne Broderick, Ithaca

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re:Sanderling, Myers Point
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 08:04:03 -0400
Still present this morning.
On Jul 23, 2014 7:49 PM, "Jay McGowan"  wrote:

> An adult SANDERLING s on the spit at Myers Point, found earlier by Chris
> Wood. Also lots of Least and Spotted as well as at least one Semipalmated.
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: sign up for Montezuma shorebird trip onto dikes
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 01:21:46 +0000 (GMT)
This Sunday morning, 27 July, is the first opportunity this year to join a 
field trip onto the dikes at Knox-Marsellus and Puddler Marshes at Montezuma 
NWR to see migrant shorebirds from vantages otherwise closed off to the 
public. This is a great opportunity to join other birders with a range of 
experience, see lots of shorebirds of several species, and get to know both 
groups better. 


Refuge folks want to gauge the interest in such field trips, so they are asking 
participants to SIGN UP in advance by calling 315-568-5987. 


There is no fee.

We will meet at 8am at the Montezuma NWR Visitor Center on NYS-5/US-20, then 
caravan a few miles to the muddy road which leads to the dikes. 


Bring binoculars. If you have a spotting scope bring that, too, and please be 
willing to share views with folks who don't have a scope. 


--Dave Nutter
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Sanderling, Myers Point
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 19:49:05 -0400
An adult SANDERLING s on the spit at Myers Point, found earlier by Chris
Wood. Also lots of Least and Spotted as well as at least one Semipalmated.

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Brown Thrashers
From: Donna Scott <dls999 AT me.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 10:22:28 -0400
2 young Brown Thrashers begging from their parent on front lawn where I put 
bird seed each morning. Parent feeding them seeds, etc. 


In past 2 weeks I have seen adult BT running up & down side of road by longish 
grass, then popping into the nearby bushes. Reminds me of a little Roadrunner w 
that long tail & erect head! 


Sent from my iPhone
Donna Scott
Lansing

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Black-crowned Night-Heron, Stewart Park
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:53:37 -0400
A juvenile BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON is sitting on a log on the back side
of the swan pen at Stewart Park right now. Hogs Hole earlier this morning
was pretty quiet. Highlights were a Willow Flycatcher, Purple Martins and
the continuing flock of Caspian Terns on the jetty. Yesterday a basic-type
COMMON TERN was among the Caspians on the jetty.

Jay

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Off topic: Bats
From: Linda Orkin <wingmagic16 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 11:45:45 -0400
I would like to recommend that you tolerate this maternal colony until they
move on.  With the decimation of cave hibernating bats it is more critical
than ever that they be allowed to breed unimpeded.  Your thoughts of
sealing off the holes in the fall is the perfect solution.  And from the
website that Geo recommends is this information.

*What about baby bats?*

Bats often roost in buildings during maternity periods, when they give
birth and raise their pups. Exclusions should not take place until young
bats are able to fly; otherwise, they will be trapped inside, away from
their mothers, and die of starvation. Separating pups from their mothers
may also lead mother bats to search for other entrances to reach their
young.

In North America, the maternity season begins as early as mid-April in the
southernmost United States and in mid-June in the northern U.S. and Canada.
Young bats are flying by late August. Exclusions should not be conducted
between April and late August.

A friend of mine just used a wonderful wildlife control person. I will get
his name for you and he can help  you figure out what to do in late summer.


Linda


On Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 11:36 AM, Geo Kloppel  wrote:

> Bat Conservation International BCI) is a good source for information and
> advice about bats, including plans for construction of bat houses. It
> sounds like you have a breeding colony, so they're going to need a
> nursery-type bat house if evicted from your siding. Here's the BCI website:
>
> http://www.batcon.org/
>
> -Geo Kloppel
>
> On Jul 22, 2014, at 10:22 AM, Richard Tkachuck 
> wrote:
>
> A couple years ago I wrote about bats living under the plastic siding of
> our house. At that time there were about 25 or so. Last year fewer. This
> year by actual count as they left through a single hole we had 60 and we
> could hear more as they skittered between the exterior wall and the siding.
> This, of course, is getting out of hand. Is there anyone on the list who
> does bats or knows of someone in the area who does? It is my view, that in
> winter they go off to some other place that is a bit warmer. (When the
> north wind blows it would seem that they would freeze if they stayed with
> only a plastic layer protecting them from the outside.) I plan when fall
> comes to plug the hole and then install a bat house next to the hole. I
> seek suggestions as to how best to do all this.
>
> Richard Tkachuck
>
>
>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> !*
> --
>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> !*
> --
>



-- 
If you permit
this evil, what is the good
of the good of your life?

-Stanley Kunitz...

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Off topic: Bats
From: Geo Kloppel <geokloppel AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 11:36:49 -0400
Bat Conservation International BCI) is a good source for information and advice 
about bats, including plans for construction of bat houses. It sounds like you 
have a breeding colony, so they're going to need a nursery-type bat house if 
evicted from your siding. Here's the BCI website: 


http://www.batcon.org/

-Geo Kloppel

On Jul 22, 2014, at 10:22 AM, Richard Tkachuck  wrote:

> A couple years ago I wrote about bats living under the plastic siding of our 
house. At that time there were about 25 or so. Last year fewer. This year by 
actual count as they left through a single hole we had 60 and we could hear 
more as they skittered between the exterior wall and the siding. This, of 
course, is getting out of hand. Is there anyone on the list who does bats or 
knows of someone in the area who does? It is my view, that in winter they go 
off to some other place that is a bit warmer. (When the north wind blows it 
would seem that they would freeze if they stayed with only a plastic layer 
protecting them from the outside.) I plan when fall comes to plug the hole and 
then install a bat house next to the hole. I seek suggestions as to how best to 
do all this. 

> 
> Richard Tkachuck
> 
> 
> 
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> BirdingOnThe.Net
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Crows that hunt?
From: Anne Clark <anneb.clark AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:51:03 -0400
Crows will try to catch, kill and eat small vertebrates that they come across. 
Yes indeed, they are "hunting" all the time when they are foraging on the 
ground,in the sense that they are searching for live food like beetles, larvae 
(beetle or otherwise), earthworms and also, when they encounter them, small 
snakes, small rodents like voles, and shrews. They are NOT specialized at 
killing and usually use some sort of stab at, flip it-jump back, etc technique 
to kill small rodents without getting bitten themselves. Not sure how they kill 
snakes, but the only time I watched one with a garter snake, they held it down 
with feet and stabbed. 


So they search broadly for hidden prey and use very generalized techniques for 
capturing and killing anything they find. 


Their gardener-friendly eating of beetle and other larvae was noted many years 
ago, when it was calculated that they WAY offset any direct crop damage that 
they were accused of. 


cheers,

Anne

On Jul 22, 2014, at 10:26 AM, Richard Tkachuck wrote:

> We appear to have a crow family in our yard--two young that mew begging for 
food. While watching them, I think I saw an adult snag a vole and then eat it. 
It did not share with a young. A little while later I saw the same adult with a 
small (maybe 6 inch) snake in its beak. Ultimately, this was given to one of 
the young which swallowed it head first. Question, do crows hunt for live food? 

> 
> Richard Tkachuck 
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> BirdingOnThe.Net
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Crows that hunt?
From: Richard Tkachuck <rictkalist AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:26:42 -0400
We appear to have a crow family in our yard--two young that mew begging for
food. While watching them, I think I saw an adult snag a vole and then eat
it. It did not share with a young. A little while later I saw the same
adult with a small (maybe 6 inch) snake in its beak. Ultimately, this was
given to one of the young which swallowed it head first. Question, do crows
hunt for live food?

Richard Tkachuck

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Off topic: Bats
From: Richard Tkachuck <rictkalist AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:22:48 -0400
A couple years ago I wrote about bats living under the plastic siding of
our house. At that time there were about 25 or so. Last year fewer. This
year by actual count as they left through a single hole we had 60 and we
could hear more as they skittered between the exterior wall and the siding.
This, of course, is getting out of hand. Is there anyone on the list who
does bats or knows of someone in the area who does? It is my view, that in
winter they go off to some other place that is a bit warmer. (When the
north wind blows it would seem that they would freeze if they stayed with
only a plastic layer protecting them from the outside.) I plan when fall
comes to plug the hole and then install a bat house next to the hole. I
seek suggestions as to how best to do all this.

Richard Tkachuck

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: RHWO at sapsucker woods
From: Brad Walker <bmw38 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:57:25 -0400
The bird flew to the southwest corner near the main entrance. It's hard to
get a good look, but it's perching on snags and called a few times.

- Brad



Brad Walker
Audio Archivist
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850

607-254-2168

Our Mission:
To interpret and conserve the Earth's biological diversity through
research, education, and citizen science focused on birds.


On Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 9:38 AM, Jeff Gerbracht 
wrote:

> He's on some dead white pines on the back of the pond now
>
>
>
> On Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 9:30 AM, Tom Schulenberg 
> wrote:
>
>>
>> There was an adult red-headed woodpecker in the tall snag at Sapsucker
>> Woods a few minutes ago. Lost sight of it as it flew west across pond.
>>
>> tss
>>
>> --
>> Thomas S. Schulenberg
>> Research Associate
>> Cornell Lab of Ornithology
>> 159 Sapsucker Woods Road
>> Ithaca  NY  14850
>> http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu/portal/home
>> http://www.birds.cornell.edu/clementschecklist
>>
>> voice:  607.254.1113
>> email:  tss62 AT cornell.edu, tschulenberg AT gmail.com
>>
>>
>>
>>  --
>> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
>> Welcome and Basics 
>> Rules and Information 
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>> 
>> *Archives:*
>> The Mail Archive
>> 
>> Surfbirds 
>> BirdingOnThe.Net 
>> *Please submit your observations to eBird
>> !*
>> --
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Jeff Gerbracht
> Lead Application Developer
> Neotropical Birds, Breeding Bird Atlas, eBird
> Cornell Lab of Ornithology
> 607-254-2117
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> !*
> --
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: RHWO at sapsucker woods
From: Jeff Gerbracht <jeffgerbracht AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:38:14 -0400
He's on some dead white pines on the back of the pond now



On Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 9:30 AM, Tom Schulenberg  wrote:

>
> There was an adult red-headed woodpecker in the tall snag at Sapsucker
> Woods a few minutes ago. Lost sight of it as it flew west across pond.
>
> tss
>
> --
> Thomas S. Schulenberg
> Research Associate
> Cornell Lab of Ornithology
> 159 Sapsucker Woods Road
> Ithaca  NY  14850
> http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu/portal/home
> http://www.birds.cornell.edu/clementschecklist
>
> voice:  607.254.1113
> email:  tss62 AT cornell.edu, tschulenberg AT gmail.com
>
>
>
>  --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> !*
> --
>



-- 
Jeff Gerbracht
Lead Application Developer
Neotropical Birds, Breeding Bird Atlas, eBird
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2117

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: RHWO at sapsucker woods
From: Tom Schulenberg <tss62 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:30:33 -0400
There was an adult red-headed woodpecker in the tall snag at Sapsucker
Woods a few minutes ago. Lost sight of it as it flew west across pond.

tss

-- 
Thomas S. Schulenberg
Research Associate
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca  NY  14850
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu/portal/home
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/clementschecklist

voice:  607.254.1113
email:  tss62 AT cornell.edu, tschulenberg AT gmail.com

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Jason Dombroskie's talk on Moths and importance of understandoing ecology of moths/insects
From: Glenn Wilson <wilson AT stny.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 08:56:05 -0400
We mow a lot of area. When I see moths, grasshoppers, bees etc I try to wait 
until they move but I am well aware I kill Many while mowing. This weekend I 
was helping weed a flower garden and was sitting right next to a grasshopper 
that couldn't fly. I'll bet one of us hit it with a mower. I feel very sad and 
guilty. 


Glenn Wilson
Endicott, NY
www.WilsonsWarbler.com

On Jul 22, 2014, at 7:33 AM, Meena Madhav Haribal  wrote:

Hi all,

Yesterday I posted about the moth week but did not emphasize on this talk on 
this Thursday 24 June from 6.30 pm to 7.30 by Dr. Jason Dombroskie on New York 
State Moths at Borg Warner Room of Tompkins County Public Library. According to 
me it is a must talk for all bird lovers. Jason is very knowledgeable and 
entertaining. 


 

There are studies showing dramatic decline in insect-eating-bird population due 
to a new class of pesticides. 


An example is


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/pesticide-contaminating-prairie-wetlands-scientist-1.2482082 
A Saskatchewan researcher says many wetlands across the prairies are being 
contaminated by a relatively new pesticide that is threatening the ecosystem. 


 

Saturday day I was using the Roundup to kill some plants on my porch. I did try 
to scare away all the grasshoppers and other insects from the patch, but 
somehow one baby cricket got left in the patch and as I sprayed the plants a 
little bit of fell on it. It started writhing and acting weird. So I stopped 
immediately and ran inside the house to get some water to clean it off of the 
round up. But by the time I came back, in less than a minute the insect was 
dead! I poured water on it hoping it would revive, but to no avail. So now I 
have vowed myself that I will never use the roundup ever again in my life 
again! If I have to pull each and every weed I will do so. Those are nasty 
things. I would have not minded if I saw a catbird catch it for its babies! 


 

So be cautious of what you are using!

 

Meena

Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
 
 
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
Archives:
The Mail Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Jason Dombroskie's talk on Moths and importance of understandoing ecology of moths/insects
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 11:33:40 +0000
Hi all,

Yesterday I posted about the moth week but did not emphasize on this talk on 
this Thursday 24 June from 6.30 pm to 7.30 by Dr. Jason Dombroskie on New York 
State Moths at Borg Warner Room of Tompkins County Public Library. According to 
me it is a must talk for all bird lovers. Jason is very knowledgeable and 
entertaining. 




There are studies showing dramatic decline in insect-eating-bird population due 
to a new class of pesticides. 


An example is


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/pesticide-contaminating-prairie-wetlands-scientist-1.2482082 
A Saskatchewan researcher says many wetlands across the prairies are being 
contaminated by a relatively new pesticide that is threatening the ecosystem. 




Saturday day I was using the Roundup to kill some plants on my porch. I did try 
to scare away all the grasshoppers and other insects from the patch, but 
somehow one baby cricket got left in the patch and as I sprayed the plants a 
little bit of fell on it. It started writhing and acting weird. So I stopped 
immediately and ran inside the house to get some water to clean it off of the 
round up. But by the time I came back, in less than a minute the insect was 
dead! I poured water on it hoping it would revive, but to no avail. So now I 
have vowed myself that I will never use the roundup ever again in my life 
again! If I have to pull each and every weed I will do so. Those are nasty 
things. I would have not minded if I saw a catbird catch it for its babies! 




So be cautious of what you are using!



Meena

Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 11:28:44 -0700
RBA
 
*  New York
*  Syracuse
* July 21, 2014
*  NYSY  07. 21. 14
 
Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird Alert
Dates(s):

July 14, 2013 - July 21, 2014
to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.com
covering upstate NY counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge
and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),
Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortland
compiled: July 21 AT 1:30 p.m. (EDT)
compiler: Joseph Brin
Onondaga Audubon Homepage: www.onondagaaudubon.org
 
 
#402 Monday July 21, 2014
 
Greetings. This is the Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert for the week of 
July 14, 2014
 
Highlights:
-----------

GREAT SHEARWATER
LEAST BITTERN
GREAT EGRET
MERLIN
STILT SANDPIPER
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER
SNOWY OWL
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
SEDGE WREN

Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC)
------------

     7/15: At least 4 LEAST BITTERNS are still being seen on the Wildlife 
Trail just beyond laRue’s lagoon. 

     7/17: The two young and two adult RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were again 
seen in the dead trees along May’s Point Road. 

     7/18: 2 LEAST BITTERNS were again seen near Larue’s Lagoon. 13 GREAT 
EGRETS were seen at Tschache Pool. SOLITARY SANDPIPER, GREATER YELLOWLEGS, 
LESSER YELLOWLEGS, SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER, SPOTTED SANDPIPER and LEAST 
SANDPIPER were all seen along the wildlife Trail. 15 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS 
and 6 STILT SANDPIPERS were found at Knox-Marsellus Marsh. 



Oswego County
------------

     7/18: An adult RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was found at Sunset Bay Park in 
Scriba. 

     7/20: A family of MERLINS was busy in Constantia chasing and feeding 
young. 



Onondaga County
------------

     7/15: A SNOWY OWL was seen in the Target  Plaza area along Rt.31. This 
is the third time in recent years a Snowy Owl has seemed to stay for the summer 
in the Syracuse area. 

     7/18: A family group of MERLINS has been observed on Summit Avenue in 
Syracuse. 



Madison county
------------

     7/18: An improbable GREAT SHEARWATER was found in a wooded area near 
DeRuyter Resevoir. The bird was helped into the water where it seemed to be 
swimming normally but later it weakened and was taken to a wildlife 
rehabilitater where, unfortunately, it died. 



Jefferson County
------------

     7/19: A SEDGE WREN was heard singing from the observation tower at 
South Sandy Creek. 



Compiler’s Note: 
------------
A sad farewell to Jerry Lazarczyk who passed away last week. Jerry was well 
known and liked in our area as he payed many visits to add to his county lists. 


  
     

     

    
 --  end report



Joseph Brin
Region 5
Baldwinsville, N.Y.  13027  U.S.A.
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: FW: Moth Week: Yet another bird food related celebrations
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:10:00 +0000
FYI: It is lot of fun, might be able to hear some owls when we are in the 
field. 

Hope to see some of you there!
Cheers
Meena


From: 
bounce-117434025-3384708 AT list.cornell.edu 
> 
on behalf of Bill Evans 
> 

Sent: Saturday, July 19, 2014 9:48 AM
To: NATURAL-HISTORY-L
Subject: Moth Week

Greetings natural historians,

Today is the beginning of the 3rd annual "National Moth 
Week". We have three events scheduled in the 
Finger Lakes this year: 


Thursday July 24th (6:30-7:30pm Borg Warner Room, Tompkins County Public 
Library, Ithaca, NY): Natural History of the Moths of New York State. A 
presentation by Dr. Jason Dombroskie, Collection Manager of the Cornell 
University Insect Collection and Coordinator of the Insect Diagnostic Lab. This 
intimate journey into the hidden lives of moths and their caterpillars will 
look at some of the amazing species in your backyard. Some of these moths take 
medicine and can bubble poison from their necks, produce perfume that can be 
smelled from over a mile away, or can jam bat echolocation. We will also 
examine caterpillars with gills, stinky tentacles, and horns that squirt acid, 
as well as ones that throw their feces, and others that live inside 
regurgitated owl pellets. 



Friday July 25th (8pm-midnight): Watkins Glen moth night. Meet at the "Iroquois 
Lodge" in the six nations campground at Watkins Glen State Park any time after 
8pm. From 8:30-9:00 there will be a brief introduction and a number of 
exhibits. From 9:00pm on there will be moth watching at four light stations and 
a bait line within walking distance of the lodge. Kids can help paint tree 
trunks with "moth mush" (a batter of beer, brown sugar, and old bananas) at 
8:15pm. Access to the park is free after 5:30pm (main entrance charges until 
7:30pm). The event will be cancelled if heavy rain and/or lightning are in the 
vicinity. 




Saturday July 26th (8pm-midnight): Ithaca moth night. Meet at the main parking 
lot of Robert H. Treman State Park (lower unit) any time after 8pm. There will 
be moth watching at four light stations and a bait line around the edge of the 
parking lot adjacent to the park office. Kids can help paint tree trunks with 
"moth mush" (a batter of beer, brown sugar, and old bananas) at 8:15pm. Access 
to the park is free after 6pm. The event will be cancelled if heavy rain and/or 
lightning are in the vicinity. 




In addition to these events, Finger Lakes residents are encouraged to step out 
at night during the week and document moths attracted to lights or camouflaged 
during the day. Anyone is welcome to submit photos of moths for identification 
and to contribute to the week's species list in the Finger Lakes region (send 
photos or photo album links to moths AT oldbird.org). In 
previous years we have documented about 120 species during the week, each 
species with mysterious intricacy in our local ecology. 




Event info along with species lists and photos from previous year's can be 
found at Finger Lakes Moth 
Week. 




Hope you can join us!



Bill E



__._,_.___
________________________________
Posted by: "Anna M. Stalter" >
________________________________



Visit Your 
Group 

[Yahoo! 
Groups] 

* Privacy * 
Unsubscribe * 
Terms of Use 



__,_._,___

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Black Vulture on Stevenson, Clay-colored Sparrow still on campus
From: "Kevin J. McGowan" <kjm2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 19:14:45 +0000
At 2:30 today I was just finishing up an hour crow watch at the Cornell compost 
facility on Stevenson Road when I noticed that an incoming vulture was a BLACK 
VULTURE: short tail, flat and broad wings, and white patches in the primaries. 
It then landed in the big lone snag, with 8 Turkey Vultures. It was easily 
visible from Stevenson Road. Nothing else of note in the compost. The ponds 
have been drained enough that little shorebird habitat remains. 2 Killdeer were 
the shorebird total today. 


Earlier around noon I went to Cornell campus to see if I could find the 
CLAY-COLORED SPARROW that everyone else saw in the spring. I found it in the 
trees on the south side of Goldwyn-Smith, between there and Stimson Hall. It 
sang softly a few times and I was able to get a good look. Neither it nor the 
Chipping Sparrow in the same area seemed to be feeding young. But, the Chipping 
Sparrow family just to the north was feeding a fledgling Brown-headed Cowbird. 


I saw 13 bird species on the Arts Quad, including a fly-over pair of calling 
MERLINS. 


Kevin

Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Instructor
Home Study Course in Bird Biology
Investigating Behavior: Courtship and Rivalry in Birds
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
Kjm2 AT cornell.edu
607-254-2452

Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit 
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/courses and learn about our comprehensive Home 
Study Course in Bird Biology, our online course Investigating Behavior: 
Courtship and Rivalry in 
Birds, our Be A Better Birder 
tutorials, and our series 
of webinars. Purchase the 
webinars here. 



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: turkeys
From: Sara Jane Hymes <sjh4 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 18:38:13 +0000
We were just coming up Giles St, and at the intersection with State/MLK (2 
houses south) was a family of turkeys! Since they were gathered underneath a 
tree, I at first thought they were statues, so I had Larry back up. Sure enough 
2 adults and 7 young: (is that considered a 'flock'?), but they were headed 
down the hill and most likely from whence they came--to Van Nattis Dam area. 
I've never seen turkeys in city limit before! 

--

Sara Jane Hymes



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Great Shearwater - bad news
From: <tigger64 AT aol.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 11:31:50 -0400
With sadness I have to report the Great Shearwater did not survive. I think 
plans are for it to go to the American Museum of Natural History. 



Dave W.

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Merlins and a reminder to the odonate book recption today at 3.00 pm at BTI
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 14:00:52 +0000
Hi all,

I have heard the East Ithaca Cemetery merlins several times in morning when I 
walk to work, so they must have continued there and may have been successful in 
nesting. I mean to stop by at the cemetery and check it out but have had no 
chance to do so far. 




 Also, today I noticed most other birds are quiet in the morning except for the 
robins and my neighbor's mimicking bird. I see the catbird but is silent, last 
year he was making a racket all the time he was in the yard. These days I see 
at least one catbird, I presume it is a female often sitting on the mulch pile 
and just relaxing and watching the surroundings! It seems to be its favorite 
spot to relax. This is all my bird-watching has been! 




Also, a reminder and invitation for the today's odonate book release at Boyce 
Thompson Auditorium at 3.00 pm and a field trip afterwards if the weather 
holds! Check out Cornell events calendar 
http://events.cornell.edu/event/book_release_finding_dragonflies 


Book Release, Finding Dragonflies - Cornell
Cornell events, powered by Localist
Read more...






Hope to see at least some of you there!



Cheers

Meena

Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/


________________________________
From: bounce-117479996-3493976 AT list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Dave Nutter 
 

Sent: Sunday, July 20, 2014 9:43 AM
To: John Confer
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L; tigger64 AT aol.com
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Merlin: new and old in Ithaca

Yes I've also seen a Merlin along NYS-13A near the City/Town line. It was 
awhile ago and I don't recall the date, but I agree that's an area it's been. 
On the evening of 6 July I saw a Merlin over Cass Park, initially flying north 
over West Hill and being harassed by a couple smaller birds - in other words it 
was coming from the area you describe. The Merlin then flew alone east over 
Cass Park and continued toward downtown. Considering the distances they cover 
it's hard to say where that bird's home base is. 


--Dave Nutter

On Jul 19, 2014, at 06:10 PM, John Confer  wrote:



Just curious.

The Merlin pair seen copulating and at a nest on Hudson Street seems to have 
failed in that a few visits to the nest site failed to show any activity when 
young would be expected. Is their any better info? 


I heard a Merlin calling (19 July) on Floral Ave near the apartment complex and 
near the end of the row of solar panels with street lights and in the vicinity 
of some very tall pines on the west side of the road. Did any one else have any 
indication of Merlin in that area? 


Cheers,

John
________________________________
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics

Rules and Information

Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave 


Archives:
The Mail 
Archive 


Surfbirds

BirdingOnThe.Net

Please submit your observations to eBird!
--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave 

Archives:
The Mail 
Archive 

Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Merlin: new and old in Ithaca
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 13:43:54 +0000
Yes I've also seen a Merlin along NYS-13A near the City/Town line. It was 
awhile ago and I don't recall the date, but I agree that's an area it's been. 
On the evening of 6 July I saw a Merlin over Cass Park, initially flying north 
over West Hill and being harassed by a couple smaller birds - in other words it 
was coming from the area you describe. The Merlin then flew alone east over 
Cass Park and continued toward downtown. Considering the distances they cover 
it's hard to say where that bird's home base is.  


--Dave Nutter


On Jul 19, 2014, at 06:10 PM, John Confer  wrote:

>
> Just curious.
>  
> The Merlin pair seen copulating and at a nest on Hudson Street seems to have 
failed in that a few visits to the nest site failed to show any activity when 
young would be expected. Is their any better info? 

>  
> I heard a Merlin calling (19 July) on Floral Ave near the apartment complex 
and near the end of the row of solar panels with street lights and in the 
vicinity of some very tall pines on the west side of the road. Did any one else 
have any indication of Merlin in that area? 

>  
> Cheers,
>  
> John
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
>  
> Rules and Information
>  
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>  
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
>  
> Surfbirds
>  
> BirdingOnThe.Net
>  
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Juvenile Sharp-shins
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 13:17:41 +0000
I think a Sharp-shinned Hawk would be not just naive but really stupid to go 
after prey as large as a Gray Squirrel. So I looked closely at your photos. 
They have fine (not coarse) brown streaking below, and even though the tail of 
the perched bird appears square, you can see all the ends of the tail feathers 
such that each successively outer pair is significantly shorter. That tail when 
spread would look quite bowed out in the middle. I think you've got Cooper's 
Hawks. 


--Dave Nutter


On Jul 19, 2014, at 01:26 PM, Richard Maxwell  wrote:

>
> ​W
> ​
> e have had 4 juvenile sharp-shinned hawks frequenting our yard for several 
days now. We had an identified nest a couple years ago that also had four 
offspring. No awareness of the nest this year. I have gotten many nice 
pictures. This morning they were trying to figure out how to catch​ 

> ​a squirrel, unsuccessfully so far. We are close to the lab at 34 Turkey 
Hill Rd.​ 

> ​ and would welcome anyone interested.  Max and Eileen​
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
>  
> Rules and Information
>  
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>  
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
>  
> Surfbirds
>  
> BirdingOnThe.Net
>  
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Least Bitterns at Catharine Creek Marsh
From: "John and Sue Gregoire" <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 07:13:38 -0400
Thanks for the report Matt. nesting Least and American Bitterns are two of the
specialties at Queen Catharine Marsh with at least 4 pair of the former and 
three of 

the latter breeding. They've been there since the IBA was granted many years 
back. 


The lack of waterbirds is somewhat surprising but QCM has never been a hot 
spot. HAd 

you stayed a bit later you would have heard Sora and masses of Great Blue 
leaving 

for roost. There had been many Canadas there as well.

The two highlights this year. After two years of trying our Sandhill pair 
produced 

two young this year. Secondly, the lower Seneca Lake Bald Eagles decided to 
nest 

this year and produced at least one eaglet.

QCM is also a Bird Conservation Area and a Critical Environmental Area. Rock 
Cabin 

Road is also noted for a few butterfly species not found elsewhere in the area 
such 

as the Snout and Hackberry Emperor.

It always amazes that with this beautiful asset in our back yard, Schuyler 
County 

ignores it and pushes Nascar and wine instead of all the natural assets which 
are 

abundant. Heck, WSKG even named its local repeater WINO! ;-)

John
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Sat, July 19, 2014 21:25, Matthew Medler wrote:
> Hi All,
>
> In the "I can't believe I've never been there" category, I visited Catharine 
Marsh 

> in Watkins Glen for the first time today (19 July 2014). It's a beautiful 
marsh, and 

> despite the late date and hour, my visit was quite productive. I birded from 
Rock 

> Cabin Road, along the eastern edge of the marsh, stopping regularly along the 
road, 

> and then spent a good 30 minutes at the small observation tower near the 
south end 

> of the marsh. The undisputed highlight of the visit was seeing not one, but 
two 

> LEAST BITTERNS from the observation tower (with the help of my scope). There 
was 

> also a GREEN HERON and 12+ GREAT BLUE HERONS in this area, and a VIRGINIA 
RAIL 

> called once fairly close to the tower. The sheer number of singing SWAMP 
SPARROWS 

> was quite impressive for this date, and singing MARSH WRENS also put in a 
good 

> showing, especially near the platform.
>
> The only disappointment from my visit was the complete lack of any waterbirds
> visible on the open water in the marsh. I literally did not see a single 
duck, 

> grebe, cormorant, gallinule, or even goose! With all of the reports of young
> waterbirds from Montezuma, I thoughts I would see some waterbirds at 
Catharine 

> Marsh. Maybe next time...
>
> My complete eBird checklist is below.
>
> Good birding,
> Matt Medler
> Ithaca
>
> ________________________________________
>
> Catharine Creek Marsh--Rock Cabin Rd., Schuyler, US-NY
> Jul 19, 2014 10:30 AM - 12:27 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.2 mile(s)
> Comments: Overcast, calm, 70F. Stops every 0.1 mi. All totals are best 
attempts 

> at careful counts, except where noted. Scope used to scan marsh when 
possible. 
/>Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.7.1 > 43 species > > Least Bittern (Ixobrychus exilis) 2 First individual seen in flight in scope > for 15+ seconds before it settled back into cattails. Second individual seen perched > on edge of cattails for ~1 min. Both seen on far (west) side of marsh from platform. > Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) 25 12+ from observation tower. > Green Heron (Butorides virescens) 2 I saw one lone individual three different > times; am confident of at least two different individuals. > Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) 5 Soaring distantly over ridge to west > Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) 1 Adult perched on small shrubby > vegetation just a few feet above water. > Virginia Rail (Rallus limicola) 1 One kiddick series after being on tower 30+ > minutes. > Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) 5 > Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) 1 > Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) 3 > Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) 2 > Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) 2 > Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus auratus/luteus) 3 > Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) 1 > Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus) 1 > Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus) 1 > Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus) 1 > Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) 5 > Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 6 > American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) 3 > Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) 1 > Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia) 2 > Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) 2 > Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) 1 > White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) 1 > Marsh Wren (Cistothorus palustris) 9 Carefully counted, one individual at a > time. Most numerous (or easily detectable) from observation tower, where 4+ > individuals singing. > Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) 1 > Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) 2 > Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) 2 > American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 13 > Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) 15 > Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) 5 > Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) 11 > Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia) 6 Seen. One singing > Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 6 > Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana) 23 > Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) 3 > Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 8 > Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) 3 > Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) 1 Flyover > Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 30 Rough estimate > Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) 10 Estimate > Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula) 2 > American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 20 Estimate > > View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19149882 > > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) > > -- > > Cayugabirds-L List Info: > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm > > ARCHIVES: > 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html > 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds > 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html > > Please submit your observations to eBird: > http://ebird.org/content/ebird/ > > -- > > > -- Cayugabirds-L List Info: http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm ARCHIVES: 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html Please submit your observations to eBird: http://ebird.org/content/ebird/ --
Subject: Re: Fwd: Jerry Lazarczyk
From: Judith Thurber <jathurber AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 06:00:23 -0400
Thank you for letting us all know. Pink-footed Goose comes to mind when I 
remember last seeing Jerry...or was it a Chat. Suddenly, he was just where "the 
bird" was! For me, the serendipity of seeing friends when on the birding trail 
more than doubles the joy. 


Judy Thurber
Liverpool

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 19, 2014, at 10:37 PM, "Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes" 
 wrote: 

> 
> This was posted to several other area eLists. Sharing this sad news with 
those on Cayugabirds-L who may not have received this message. 

> 
> 
> From: Thomas O'Donnell 
> Subject: [nysbirds-l] Jerry Lazarczyk
> Date: July 19, 2014 9:14:39 PM EDT
> To: geneseebirds-l , HM Birds 
, osbirds , Oneida Birds 
, NNY Birds , 
NYSBirds listserve  

> Reply-To: Thomas O'Donnell 
> 
> As Jerry was well known to birders across New York, I am posting this to 
several of the birding lists. Please forward as appropriate. 

>  
> With sadness, I report that Buffalo birder and BOS member Jerry Lazarczyk 
passed away last week. Jerry was a member and officer of several local nature 
organizations and also active with the New York State Ornithological 
Association. He was known by many birders across the State and Region from his 
frequent trips to observe birds. 

> Services will be on August 2, 2014 at noon from the Kaiser Funeral Home 1950 
Whitehaven Road, Grand Island, NY 14072 

>  
> Thomas M. O’Donnell, President
> Buffalo Ornithological Society
> Niagara Falls, New York
> tmodonnell AT roadrunner.com 
>  
>  
> --
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> BirdingOnThe.Net
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> BirdingOnThe.Net
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Fwd: Jerry Lazarczyk
From: "Judith Thurber jathurber AT yahoo.com [oneidabirds]" <oneidabirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 06:00:23 -0400
Thank you for letting us all know. Pink-footed Goose comes to mind when I 
remember last seeing Jerry...or was it a Chat. Suddenly, he was just where "the 
bird" was! For me, the serendipity of seeing friends when on the birding trail 
more than doubles the joy. 


Judy Thurber
Liverpool

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 19, 2014, at 10:37 PM, "Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes" 
 wrote: 

> 
> This was posted to several other area eLists. Sharing this sad news with 
those on Cayugabirds-L who may not have received this message. 

> 
> 
> From: Thomas O'Donnell 
> Subject: [nysbirds-l] Jerry Lazarczyk
> Date: July 19, 2014 9:14:39 PM EDT
> To: geneseebirds-l , HM Birds 
, osbirds , Oneida Birds 
, NNY Birds , 
NYSBirds listserve  

> Reply-To: Thomas O'Donnell 
> 
> As Jerry was well known to birders across New York, I am posting this to 
several of the birding lists. Please forward as appropriate. 

>  
> With sadness, I report that Buffalo birder and BOS member Jerry Lazarczyk 
passed away last week. Jerry was a member and officer of several local nature 
organizations and also active with the New York State Ornithological 
Association. He was known by many birders across the State and Region from his 
frequent trips to observe birds. 

> Services will be on August 2, 2014 at noon from the Kaiser Funeral Home 1950 
Whitehaven Road, Grand Island, NY 14072 

>  
> Thomas M. O’Donnell, President
> Buffalo Ornithological Society
> Niagara Falls, New York
> tmodonnell AT roadrunner.com 
>  
>  
> --
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> BirdingOnThe.Net
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> BirdingOnThe.Net
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --
Subject: Fwd: Jerry Lazarczyk
From: "Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes" <cth4 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 02:37:29 +0000
This was posted to several other area eLists. Sharing this sad news with those 
on Cayugabirds-L who may not have received this message. 



From: Thomas O'Donnell 
> 

Subject: [nysbirds-l] Jerry Lazarczyk
Date: July 19, 2014 9:14:39 PM EDT
To: geneseebirds-l 
>, HM Birds 
>, osbirds 
>, Oneida Birds 
>, NNY Birds 
>, 
NYSBirds listserve > 

Reply-To: Thomas O'Donnell 
> 


As Jerry was well known to birders across New York, I am posting this to 
several of the birding lists. Please forward as appropriate. 


With sadness, I report that Buffalo birder and BOS member Jerry Lazarczyk 
passed away last week. Jerry was a member and officer of several local nature 
organizations and also active with the New York State Ornithological 
Association. He was known by many birders across the State and Region from his 
frequent trips to observe birds. 

Services will be on August 2, 2014 at noon from the Kaiser Funeral Home 1950 
Whitehaven Road, Grand Island, NY 14072 


Thomas M. ODonnell, President
Buffalo Ornithological Society
Niagara Falls, New York
tmodonnell AT roadrunner.com


--
NYSbirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave 

Archives:
The Mail 
Archive 

Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Least Bitterns at Catharine Creek Marsh
From: Matthew Medler <mdm2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 01:25:58 +0000
Hi All,

In the "I can't believe I've never been there" category, I visited Catharine 
Marsh in Watkins Glen for the first time today (19 July 2014). It's a beautiful 
marsh, and despite the late date and hour, my visit was quite productive. I 
birded from Rock Cabin Road, along the eastern edge of the marsh, stopping 
regularly along the road, and then spent a good 30 minutes at the small 
observation tower near the south end of the marsh. The undisputed highlight of 
the visit was seeing not one, but two LEAST BITTERNS from the observation tower 
(with the help of my scope). There was also a GREEN HERON and 12+ GREAT BLUE 
HERONS in this area, and a VIRGINIA RAIL called once fairly close to the tower. 
The sheer number of singing SWAMP SPARROWS was quite impressive for this date, 
and singing MARSH WRENS also put in a good showing, especially near the 
platform. 


The only disappointment from my visit was the complete lack of any waterbirds 
visible on the open water in the marsh. I literally did not see a single duck, 
grebe, cormorant, gallinule, or even goose! With all of the reports of young 
waterbirds from Montezuma, I thoughts I would see some waterbirds at Catharine 
Marsh. Maybe next time... 


My complete eBird checklist is below.

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

________________________________________

Catharine Creek Marsh--Rock Cabin Rd., Schuyler, US-NY
Jul 19, 2014 10:30 AM - 12:27 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.2 mile(s)
Comments: Overcast, calm, 70F. Stops every 0.1 mi. All totals are best 
attempts at careful counts, except where noted. Scope used to scan marsh when 
possible. 
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.7.1 43 species Least Bittern (Ixobrychus exilis) 2 First individual seen in flight in scope for 15+ seconds before it settled back into cattails. Second individual seen perched on edge of cattails for ~1 min. Both seen on far (west) side of marsh from platform. Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) 25 12+ from observation tower. Green Heron (Butorides virescens) 2 I saw one lone individual three different times; am confident of at least two different individuals. Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) 5 Soaring distantly over ridge to west Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) 1 Adult perched on small shrubby vegetation just a few feet above water. Virginia Rail (Rallus limicola) 1 One kiddick series after being on tower 30+ minutes. Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) 5 Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) 1 Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) 3 Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) 2 Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) 2 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus auratus/luteus) 3 Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) 1 Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus) 1 Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus) 1 Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus) 1 Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) 5 Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 6 American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) 3 Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) 1 Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia) 2 Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) 2 Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) 1 White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) 1 Marsh Wren (Cistothorus palustris) 9 Carefully counted, one individual at a time. Most numerous (or easily detectable) from observation tower, where 4+ individuals singing. Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) 1 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) 2 Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) 2 American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 13 Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) 15 Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) 5 Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) 11 Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia) 6 Seen. One singing Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 6 Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana) 23 Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) 3 Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 8 Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) 3 Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) 1 Flyover Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 30 Rough estimate Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) 10 Estimate Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula) 2 American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 20 Estimate View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19149882 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) -- Cayugabirds-L List Info: http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm ARCHIVES: 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html Please submit your observations to eBird: http://ebird.org/content/ebird/ --
Subject: Merlin: new and old in Ithaca
From: John Confer <confer AT ithaca.edu>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 22:09:26 +0000
Just curious.

The Merlin pair seen copulating and at a nest on Hudson Street seems to have 
failed in that a few visits to the nest site failed to show any activity when 
young would be expected. Is their any better info? 


I heard a Merlin calling (19 July) on Floral Ave near the apartment complex and 
near the end of the row of solar panels with street lights and in the vicinity 
of some very tall pines on the west side of the road. Did any one else have any 
indication of Merlin in that area? 


Cheers,

John
________________________________

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Great Shearwater photos
From: <tigger64 AT aol.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 16:48:28 -0400
I've put up several photos of the Great Shearwater. There are also photos of an 
unusual-for-July Snowy Owl being harassed by a Northern Mockingbird. Many 
songbirds-in-flight photos from May are also up: grackles, orioles, tanagers, 
waxwings, Purple Martin, Seymour the pheasant (a.k.a. Fred), raptors, etc. I 
have organized albums by taxonomic grouping as well as things like "diving 
ducks in the act of diving". 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/krankykestrel/


https://www.flickr.com/photos/krankykestrel/sets/


Jim Tarolli also has a nice photo of the shearwater here:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/jtarolli9/


I had a vague recollection of another proper rarity on DeRuyter Reservoir and 
found the record: Brown Pelican in September '03, presumably having received an 
assist from Hurricane Isabel. 



Dave Wheeler
N. Syracuse, NY
Tigger64 AT aol.com

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Juvenile Sharp-shins
From: Richard Maxwell <rwmaxw AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 13:26:08 -0400
​W
​
e have had 4 juvenile sharp-shinned hawks frequenting our yard for several
days now.  We had an identified nest a couple years ago that also had four
offspring.  No awareness of the nest this year.  I have gotten many nice
pictures.  This morning they were trying to figure out how to catch​
​a squirrel, unsuccessfully so far.  We are close to the lab at 34 Turkey
Hill Rd.​
​ and would welcome anyone interested.  Max and Eileen​

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Great Shearwater update - rescued
From: <tigger64 AT aol.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 10:17:29 -0400
Just a quick update on the DeRuyter Reservoir (Madison County) Great Shearwater 
found by Gian Dodici on Friday morning. Last night there was an opportunity to 
rescue the bird, which was in distress, and get it to a wildlife rehabilitator 
where it could be fed and evaluated. The bird was weak but still feisty when it 
came off the water, and had not been hit (yet) by boat traffic. Thanks to all 
who assisted in the rescue, and I hope for positive updates on the bird's 
condition. 



David Wheeler
N. Syracuse, NY
Tigger64 AT aol.com



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: RE: MNWR Friday- children's specialty day
From: Sue Barth <sue AT nsytes.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 09:44:55 -0400
Hi Sue,

I have a photo of a couple that are pretty close to this stage at:
http://www.chirpsandcheeps.com/.  It's the third row down on the left.
Click on it to enlarge - and then you can enlarge further using the icon at
the top right of the photo.

Hope that helps,
~ Sue

-----Original Message-----
From: bounce-117433978-60225558 AT list.cornell.edu
[mailto:bounce-117433978-60225558 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of John and
Sue Gregoire
Sent: Saturday, July 19, 2014 9:14 AM
To: John and Sue Gregoire
Cc: cayugabirds-l; KHAMOLISTSERV
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] MNWR Friday- children's specialty day

The natal plumage of the young Gallinules still showed their red heads and
wings. I found this video that shows both, but it's not very clear. If
anyone has some photos of them at this stage, I'd love to see them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oaU-zGnr4KU

Sue
--
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Fri, July 18, 2014 19:58, John and Sue Gregoire wrote:
> Wonderful visit to the main refuge this afternoon where it was 
> children's day! On the drive we listened to American Bittern from the 
> shorebird wetland as we watched two Least Bittern criss cross the 
> drive to fetch and return food for their young which were on the east 
> side. Around that same area a we just missed good looks at a Virginia 
> Rail and young but did see several Black Tern, Caspian Tern Green 
> Heron and some real young on the main pool side. Here in the canal we 
> found one group of three adult Gallinule and 7 chicks still in the 
> black natal down. A bit further north, just beyond the red flag, we
spotted many more gallinule chicks that were quite a bit older. That
continued all the way to LaRue's as we saw many more.
>
> We also had many young coot and while watching the antics of those 
> families, up popped two Pied-billed Grebe youngsters and their parent. 
> That area produced many more coot young as we creeped along. Of 
> course, we don't have a decent telephoto lens so our pix are identifiable
but fuzzy -much like those very young Gallinules!
>
> Tsache tower produced a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, one eagle and at least 
> 13 Great Egret among the other species present. Before heading back we 
> walked the towpath with not much to report other than butterflies and
katydids and Sandhill cranes.
> --
> John and Sue Gregoire
> Field Ornithologists
> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
>  Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave
> .htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
>



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: MNWR Friday- children's specialty day
From: John and Sue Gregoire <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 09:14:18 -0400
The natal plumage of the young Gallinules still showed their red heads and 
wings. I 

found this video that shows both, but it's not very clear. If anyone has some 
photos 

of them at this stage, I'd love to see them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oaU-zGnr4KU

Sue
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Fri, July 18, 2014 19:58, John and Sue Gregoire wrote:
> Wonderful visit to the main refuge this afternoon where it was children's 
day! On 

> the drive we listened to American Bittern from the shorebird wetland as we 
watched 

> two Least Bittern criss cross the drive to fetch and return food for their 
young 

> which were on the east side. Around that same area a we just missed good 
looks at a 

> Virginia Rail and young but did see several Black Tern, Caspian Tern Green 
Heron and 

> some real young on the main pool side. Here in the canal we found one group 
of three 

> adult Gallinule and 7 chicks still in the black natal down. A bit further 
north, 

> just beyond the red flag, we spotted many more gallinule chicks that were 
quite a 

> bit older. That continued all the way to LaRue's as we saw many more.
>
> We also had many young coot and while watching the antics of those families, 
up 

> popped two Pied-billed Grebe youngsters and their parent. That area produced 
many 

> more coot young as we creeped along. Of course, we don't have a decent 
telephoto 

> lens so our pix are identifiable but fuzzy -much like those very young 
Gallinules! 

>
> Tsache tower produced a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, one eagle and at least 13 
Great Egret 

> among the other species present. Before heading back we walked the towpath 
with not 

> much to report other than butterflies and katydids and Sandhill cranes.
> --
> John and Sue Gregoire
> Field Ornithologists
> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
>  Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
>



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Montezuma Wildlife Drive and Knox-Marcellus Marsh Friday afternoon/evening July 18 2014
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 21:42:57 -0400
Began on wildlife drive this afternoon (Friday) and came across a small
group of shorebirds in the canal on the right before Larue's. This is
typically the solitary sandpiper spot and indeed there
were 4 SOLITARY SANDPIPERS present with 1 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, 1 SPOTTED
SANDPIPER in basic plumage and 1 LEAST SANDPIPER.

At Larue's the LEAST BITTERN show continues as there were at least 3 of
them flying around. I also heard and then found a SORA. In addition, the
marsh to the left of wildlife drive, had at least a dozen BLACK TERNS
coursing around and higher up one CASPIAN TERN.

At Benning Marsh, there was another small assortment of shorebirds.  3
KILLDEER, 1 SPOTTED SANDPIPER, 1 GREATER YELLOWLEGS AND 6 LEAST SANDPIPERS.

Next stop was East Road overlooking K-M Marsh around 5 pm with good
lighting and little shimmer. Best bird was a basic plumage WILSON'S
PHALAROPE in with both yellowlegs species. This bird is presumably the same
one that Tim Lenz found earlier in the day. This bird was actively
feeding.  There were also a few STILT SANDPIPERS, plenty of dowitcher sp.
(I would assume SBDO), loads of yellowlegs of both species and quite a few
LEAST SANDPIPERS. I also found several groups of SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS in
a more grayish plumage which was very distinct from the browner LEAST. I
also heard both species calls.

In addition, there continues to be several BLACK TERNS, many CASPIAN TERNS.
I saw only 1 GREAT EGRET which was odd. 2 SANDHILL CRANES also flew in
which was cool.

The lighting was decent and many of the above birds were close enough to
get good looks with a scope. However if you look farther out from east road
 you see many more shorebirds toward towpath rd. It looked like most were
yellowlegs, and peeps with some dowitchers. It was too distant, at least
for me, to find anything unusual. This is no doubt a good start to
the annual fall shorebird staging area at K-M Marsh and it would not
surprise me if other species are there at this time or soon will show up.

Dave Nicosia


 1

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: late nests
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 00:13:05 +0000 (GMT)
On the 13th of July I saw a female American Goldfinch in my yard gathering 
stems from the seedheads of a large ornamental grass, evidently gathering 
structural material for a nest. This evening in my yard I saw a female American 
Goldfinch apparently gathering spiderwebs around the windows of our shed and 
the nearby fence. I knew they were late nesters, but I assumed they'd be a 
bit farther along by the midde of July. 


This week we discovered that a domed nest had appeared in a hanging planter on 
our back porch. It was in good shape but empty. Yesterday I approached it and 
my intent to see what was inside was clearer than my vision: I flushed a 
Carolina Wren. We both made somewhat startled and upset noises. Today the wren 
is back using the nest. 


On another subject, this afternoon I saw what I think is only the second 
Honeybee of the season for me. It was on Birdsfoot Trefoil on a strip of lawn 
near Six-mile Creek and South Meadow Street in Ithaca. 


--Dave Nutter
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: MNWR Friday- children's specialty day
From: John and Sue Gregoire <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 19:58:59 -0400
Wonderful visit to the main refuge this afternoon where it was children's day! 
On 

the drive we listened to American Bittern from the shorebird wetland as we 
watched 

two Least Bittern criss cross the drive to fetch and return food for their 
young 

which were on the east side. Around that same area a we just missed good looks 
at a 

Virginia Rail and young but did see several Black Tern, Caspian Tern Green 
Heron and 

some real young on the main pool side. Here in the canal we found one group of 
three 

adult Gallinule and 7 chicks still in the black natal down. A bit further 
north, 

just beyond the red flag, we spotted many more gallinule chicks that were quite 
a 

bit older. That continued all the way to LaRue's as we saw many more.

We also had many young coot and while watching the antics of those families, up
popped two Pied-billed Grebe youngsters and their parent. That area produced 
many 

more coot young as we creeped along. Of course, we don't have a decent 
telephoto 

lens so our pix are identifiable but fuzzy -much like those very young 
Gallinules! 


Tsache tower produced a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, one eagle and at least 13 Great 
Egret 

among the other species present. Before heading back we walked the towpath with 
not 

much to report other than butterflies and katydids and Sandhill cranes.
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"




--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Great Shearwater
From: Jim Tarolli <jmtarolli9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 18:10:54 -0400
The Great Shearwater was captured and is being brought to a rehabilitator.

-- 
Jim Tarolli
Baldwinsville, NY

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Pelagic oddity near DeRuyter
From: Brad Walker <bmw38 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 15:17:58 -0400
Tim Lenz and I are looking at the bird now. It's in the southeast corner,
floating around. We're looking from dam road at the north end.
On Jul 18, 2014 1:56 PM, "Gian Dodici"  wrote:

> I stumbled (almost literally) on what I think is a GREATER SHEARWATER in
> the woods adjacent to a small trib at the north end of DeRuyter Reservoir
> this morning.  The bird seemed to be in decent condition so I released it
> into the reservoir where it was last seen swimming in the northwest corner
> of the reservoir.  Not sure how long it's been around, or how it ended up
> in the woods, but it appears to be a long way from home.
>
>
> 
https://plus.google.com/photos/108162973708281960515/albums/6037460891881380593 

>
> Gian
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> !*
> --
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Emerson Park Snow Geese
From: The Donster <auburnxc AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 14:42:46 -0400
Emerson Park, just outside of Auburn, is now down to 12 Snow Geese. I just 
found one deceased, in the water. 


Don Miller
Auburn, NY




--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re:Pelagic oddity near DeRuyter
From: Gian Dodici <gdodici AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 14:08:23 -0400
Sorry this was this morning 7/18
On Jul 18, 2014 1:55 PM, "Gian Dodici"  wrote:

> I stumbled (almost literally) on what I think is a GREATER SHEARWATER in
> the woods adjacent to a small trib at the north end of DeRuyter Reservoir
> this morning.  The bird seemed to be in decent condition so I released it
> into the reservoir where it was last seen swimming in the northwest corner
> of the reservoir.  Not sure how long it's been around, or how it ended up
> in the woods, but it appears to be a long way from home.
>
>
> 
https://plus.google.com/photos/108162973708281960515/albums/6037460891881380593 

>
> Gian
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Pelagic oddity near DeRuyter
From: Gian Dodici <gdodici AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 13:55:13 -0400
I stumbled (almost literally) on what I think is a GREATER SHEARWATER in
the woods adjacent to a small trib at the north end of DeRuyter Reservoir
this morning.  The bird seemed to be in decent condition so I released it
into the reservoir where it was last seen swimming in the northwest corner
of the reservoir.  Not sure how long it's been around, or how it ended up
in the woods, but it appears to be a long way from home.

https://plus.google.com/photos/108162973708281960515/albums/6037460891881380593

Gian

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Lime Hollow Visitor Center
From: Matthew Medler <mdm2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 03:51:59 +0000
I decided to pay a visit to the Lime Hollow Visitor Center this evening (17 
July 2014). Given the date and time of day (7:15 pm), I didn't have high 
expectations, but I ended up having a nice outing. I explored quite a bit of 
the trail system that branches out from the Visitor Center, with my favorite 
trail being Fen Way, which eventually winds its way through beautiful 
hemlock-dominated forest. There two countersinging HERMIT THRUSHES were joined 
by singing BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS. The other highlight of my outing was 
seeing 25+ bats flying over the large open areas along the art trail and near 
the Visitor Center. I think this might be the most bats I've ever seen in one 
place, and it was especially heartening to see in light of the terrible 
declines in bat populations in recent years. I include my complete eBird 
checklist below. 


Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca
________________________________________

Lime Hollow--Visitor Center, Cortland, US-NY
Jul 17, 2014 7:15 PM - 8:53 PM
Protocol: Traveling
3.4 mile(s)
Comments: Clear, calm, 63F at end of walk. Visitor Center--Trail for All--Art 
Trail--Lehigh Valley to Gracie Rd.--Lehigh Valley--Fen Way--Mill Pond--Hermit's 
Way--Lehigh Valley--Art Trail--Visitor Center. 25+ bats seen flying over 
clearings just before dusk! 


44 species
Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)  1
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  7     1 ad F with 6 yng
Green Heron (Butorides virescens)  2     In spruces
Broad-winged Hawk (Buteo platypterus) 1 Seen briefly as it flew into the 
forest. 

Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius)  1
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)  2
Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica)  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius)  1
Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)  2
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus auratus/luteus)  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens)  1     Heard just a few times near dusk
Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum)  2     Soft song and calls.
Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus)  1
Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus)  1
Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus)  6
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)  13
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)  6
Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)  1
Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia)  2
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica)  11
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)  4
House Wren (Troglodytes aedon)  2     food for yng
Veery (Catharus fuscescens)  7
Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus)  2
Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina)  4
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  7
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)  7
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)  8
Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla)  3
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas)  9     Flight song heard
Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia)  1
Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica)  1
Black-throated Green Warbler (Setophaga virens)  3
Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus)  3
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)  7
Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana)  5
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) (Junco hyemalis hyemalis/carolinensis) 2 
Singing in hemlock part of Fen Way. Juv seen later. 

Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea)  4
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)  7
Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) 2 Extended song in flight ~40 ft above 
ground. 

Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)  7
Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)  6
Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) 1 Juv flushed from ground in forest 
interior 

American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  5

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19130211 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Montezuma NWR paddling
From: Donna Scott <dls9 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 13:41:24 -0400
Last summer Paul Anderson of the Cayuga Bird Club organized a kayak paddle in 
the vicinity of Howland Island and into the Seneca River. A kayak rental 
company rented us the kayaks and provided a bus ride from cars to launch site. 
Then we paddled to where cars were. 

I am not aware of any allowed paddles in MNWR waters.
Donna Scott
Lansing
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Mo Barger Rooster Hill Farm 
  To: cayugabirds Cornell 
  Sent: Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:23 PM
  Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma NWR field trips


  This sounds great!

 Can anyone provide info about paddling around MNWR? Is it even allowed or 
perhaps just at certain times? I remember an organized trip last year. Thanks. 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Montezuma NWR field trips
From: Mo Barger Rooster Hill Farm <mo AT roosterhillfarm.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 13:23:53 -0400
This sounds great!

Can anyone provide info about paddling around MNWR? Is it even allowed or
perhaps just at certain times? I remember an organized trip last year.
Thanks.


On Thu, Jul 17, 2014 at 1:03 PM, Dave Nutter  wrote:

> This is the second year that the management of the Montezuma National
> Wildlife Refuge is allowing a limited number of birding field trips onto
> dikes around Knox-Marsellus and Puddler Marshes, where the refuge otherwise
> prohibits public access. These are the scheduled trips and leaders of which
> I am aware:
>
> Sunday 27 July, 8am, Dave Nutter of Cayuga Bird Club
> Sunday 17 August, 8am, Eaton Birding Society
> Saturday 23 August, 11am, Mike Tetlow of Rochester Birding Association
> Sunday 31 August, 8am, Dave Nutter of Cayuga Bird Club
> Sunday 21 September, 830am, Paul Anderson of Cayuga Bird Club
> Saturday 27 September, 11am, Mike Tetlow of Rochester Birding Association
>
> The trips are hosted by members of various bird clubs, but all the trips
> are open to all birders, whether or not they are members of any bird club,
> and there is no fee. However everyone should pre-register with the Refuge
> staff by calling 315-568-5987. All field trips will meet at the given
> time at the Refuge Visitor Center on NY-5/US-20 then caravan to the site.
> This includes a .8 mile drive on a single lane dirt road with deep puddles,
> so consider car-pooling to reduce wear on the road and the number of muddy
> cars. After that we will be walking on the dikes. Be prepared for dewy
> vegetation and biting insects. Bring binoculars and, if you have one, a
> spotting scope as well. Even though we will be closer to the birds than the
> usual roadside viewpoints allow, the impoundments are huge, and many birds
> will still be distant enough that a scope will make a big difference for
> identification and enjoyment. Another great thing about a scope is that one
> can aim it at a distant bird, then let someone else have a look at that
> same bird, so please be willing to share views and ID skills, especially
> with folks who don't have a scope.
>
> Maintaining inland habitat for migrating shorebirds is a challenge which
> Montezuma NWR has taken on successfully for a number of years. As a result
> this is a great place for birds and a great opportunity for us. The
> southbound migration is already well underway for shorebirds which nested
> in boreal and tundra regions far to our north and west. Already in addition
> to the Killdeer and Spotted Sandpipers which nest here, there have been
> Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, Solitary, Pectoral, Stilt, Least, and
> Semipalmated Sandpipers, Sanderling, and Short-billed and Long-billed
> Dowitchers. Some of these have been few or transient, and others numerous
> or growing in numbers. We expect several additional species of shorebirds
> to pass through or join the throng for awhile as the season progresses.
> Shorebirds will be our focus, yet we expect and welcome distraction by
> multiple species of gulls, terns, raptors, ducks in challenging eclipse
> plumage, herons, assorted other waterbirds such as cormorants, grebes, and
> rails, plus swallows, sparrows, icterids, warblers, and other songbirds
> along the way. That said, there are no guarantees as to what birds will be
> present and cooperative. You just have to be there to find out.
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Montezuma NWR field trips
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 17:03:07 +0000 (GMT)
This is the second year that the management of the Montezuma National Wildlife 
Refuge is allowing a limited number of birding field trips onto dikes around 
Knox-Marsellus and Puddler Marshes, where the refuge otherwise prohibits public 
access. These are the scheduled trips and leaders of which I am aware: 


Sunday 27 July, 8am, Dave Nutter of Cayuga Bird Club
Sunday 17 August, 8am, Eaton Birding Society
Saturday 23 August, 11am, Mike Tetlow of Rochester Birding Association
Sunday 31 August, 8am, Dave Nutter of Cayuga Bird Club
Sunday 21 September, 830am, Paul Anderson of Cayuga Bird Club
Saturday 27 September, 11am, Mike Tetlow of Rochester Birding Association

The trips are hosted by members of various bird clubs, but all the trips are 
open to all birders, whether or not they are members of any bird club, and 
there is no fee. However everyone should pre-register with the Refuge staff by 
calling 315-568-5987. All field trips will meet at the given time at the Refuge 
Visitor Center on NY-5/US-20 then caravan to the site. This includes a .8 mile 
drive on a single lane dirt road with deep puddles, so consider car-pooling to 
reduce wear on the road and the number of muddy cars. After that we will be 
walking on the dikes. Be prepared for dewy vegetation and biting insects. Bring 
binoculars and, if you have one, a spotting scope as well. Even though we will 
be closer to the birds than the usual roadside viewpoints allow, the 
impoundments are huge, and many birds will still be distant enough that a scope 
will make a big difference for identification and enjoyment. Another great 
thing about a scope is that one can aim it at a distant bird, then let someone 
else have a look at that same bird, so please be willing to share views and ID 
skills, especially with folks who don't have a scope. 


Maintaining inland habitat for migrating shorebirds is a challenge which 
Montezuma NWR has taken on successfully for a number of years. As a result this 
is a great place for birds and a great opportunity for us. The southbound 
migration is already well underway for shorebirds which nested in boreal and 
tundra regions far to our north and west. Already in addition to the Killdeer 
and Spotted Sandpipers which nest here, there have been Greater and Lesser 
Yellowlegs, Solitary, Pectoral, Stilt, Least, and Semipalmated Sandpipers, 
Sanderling, and Short-billed and Long-billed Dowitchers. Some of these have 
been few or transient, and others numerous or growing in numbers. We expect 
several additional species of shorebirds to pass through or join the throng for 
awhile as the season progresses. Shorebirds will be our focus, yet we expect 
and welcome distraction by multiple species of gulls, terns, raptors, ducks in 
challenging eclipse plumage, herons, assorted other waterbirds such as 
cormorants, grebes, and rails, plus swallows, sparrows, icterids, warblers, and 
other songbirds along the way. That said, there are no guarantees as to what 
birds will be present and cooperative. You just have to be there to find out. 


Montezuma NWR is in the Seneca County Town of Tyre in the marsh lands north of 
Cayuga Lake. The Visitor Center is at 3395 E Auburn Rd (US-20), Seneca Falls, 
NY (42.967, -78.741). 


Directions from Ithaca on the east side of Cayuga Lake:
 
Go north on East Shore Drive / NYS-34 for 5.6 miles to the traffic light and T 
at Rogues Harbor Inn. 

Turn left/west to go "north" on Ridge Road / NYS-34B for 11.8 miles to the 
all-way stop in King Ferry. 

Turn left/west to go "north" on NYS-90 for 23.8 miles to the traffic light 
(note gas station & convenience store). 

Turn left/west on NYS-5/US-20 for .4 miles.
Turn right/north at entrance to Montezuma NWR and go .3 miles.
Visitor Center and parking lot on left, separate bathroom building on short 
path to north. 


Directions from Ithaca on the west side of Cayuga Lake:

Go north on NYS-89 for 41.5 miles to the traffic light
Turn right/east on NYS-5/US-20 and go 1.6 miles
Turn left/north at entrance to Montezuma NWR and go .3 miles
Visitor Center and parking lot on left, separate bathroom building on short 
path to north. 


--Dave Nutter
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: May's Point RHWO- A Third Chick?
From: Paul Schmitt <pschmitt AT stny.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 08:05:35 -0400
I was at May’s Point Road Wednesday in late morning looking for the 
fledglings. The adults and two fledglings were observed close to the bridge 
over towards the canal locks. Then, the two adults flew over to the nest 
cavity. One entered and the second moved to the opening and repeatedly made the 
head bobbing motion into the cavity that is associated with feeding a chick. 
That adult RHWO departed and after about a minute or two, the second adult 
emerged and flew away. Could they still have a chick in the nest? Maybe the 
runt that faired poorly when competing for food against the other two? 


Paul
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Lots o vultures
From: Candace Cornell <cec222 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 22:39:13 -0400
The TVs you described settled in the field between the pheasant pens and
the compost piles by the hundreds near Stevenson Rd.. I saw a similar event
ten days ago in a recently manure-spread field off Hardy Road in Union
Springs with a colony of* at least* 500 TVs.

Candace


On Mon, Jul 14, 2014 at 9:07 AM, Laura Stenzler  wrote:

> There is a huge kettle of vultures over the compost pile area along
> Stevenson Rd in Ithaca at the moment. 9:06 am Monday. I do not have bins
> with me so cannot see if any are black vultures.  Very impressive!
>
> Laura
>
> Laura Stenzler
> lms9 AT cornell.edu
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Least Bittern
From: Carl Steckler <nyleatherneck3516 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 11:44:17 -0700
At least 4 if not 5 Least Bitterns Larues Lagoon MNWR
On the right of the drive

Moorhens with small chicks on left side of drive opposite lagoon
Carl

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 14:35:37 -0700
RBA
 
*  New York
*  Syracuse
* July 14, 2014
*  NYSY  07. 14. 14
 
Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird Alert
Dates(s):

July 07, 2013 - July 14, 2014
to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.com
covering upstate NY counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge
and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),
Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortland
compiled: July 14 AT 5:30 p.m. (EDT)
compiler: Joseph Brin
Onondaga Audubon Homepage: www.onondagaaudubon.org
 
 
#401 Monday July 14, 2014
 
Greetings. This is the Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert for the week of 
July 07, 2014
 
Highlights:
-----------

LEAST BITTERN
NORTHERN GOSHAWK
PEREGRINE FALCON
GOLDEN EAGLE
STILT SANDPIPER
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER
BLACK TERN
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
ACADIAN FLYCATCHER
GRASSHOPPER SPARROW
CLAY-COLORED SPARROW

Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC)
------------

     7/10: At least 4 LEAST BITTERNS were again seen in the cattails near 
the far end of LaRue’s Lagoon along the Wildlife Trail. 6 SHORT-BILLED 
DOWITCHERS, 2 STILT SANDPIPERS, 20 GREATER YELLOWLEGS, 210 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, 
270 LEAST SANDPIPERS and 3 KILLDEER were seen in Knox-Marsellus Marsh. 

     7/12: 2 newly fledged RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were seen in the presence 
of the two adults at Mays Point Pool Road. 



Madison County
------------

     7/10: An adult GOLDEN EAGLE was seen feeding on a deer carcass on East 
Road south of Cazenovia. 2 NORTHERN GOSHAWKS were seen hunting near Hunt Hill 
near Sheds. 



Onondaga County
------------

    7/8: A GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was again seen on Fenner Road near the 
Jacksonville Cemetary in Lysander. 

     7/9: Another ACADIAN FLYCATCHER nest was located in Whiskey Hollow. At 
least one of more birds were seen on recent visits this week. 

     7/11: A Fledgling PEREGRINE FALCON, the first in some years, was seen 
at the nest box in downtown Syracuse. 

     7/12: A LEAST BITTERN was seen flying in the big marsh near the Bald 
Eagle nest in Three Rivers WMA north of Baldwinsville. 



Oswego County
------------

     7/8: A LAWRENCE’S WARBLER was seen on Baum Road in Hastings.
     7/11: A BLACK TERN was seen with the Common Tern Colony on Oneida Lake 
from Constantia. 



Oneida County
------------

     7/9: A CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was again seen at Spring Farm Nature Center 
south of Clinton. 



Cayuga County
------------

     7/14: A pair of adult RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were seen coming to a nest 
hole on West Barrier Beach at Fair Haven State Park. 

     

     

    
         
   

--  end report



Joseph Brin
Region 5
Baldwinsville, N.Y.  13027  U.S.A.
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Nesting Red-headed Woodpeckers at Fair Haven
From: Jim Tarolli <jmtarolli9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 15:33:59 -0400
This morning I found a pair of nesting Red-headed Woodpeckers at West
Barrier Park, Fair Haven.

Here is the location of the nest:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jtarolli9/14468295967/

Both adults were very active in bringing food to the nest.  I was there for
about an hour and a half, and they were bringing food to the nest the
entire time.  At one point, I saw one of the Woodpeckers to go the beach,
and pick insects out of the ground, then bring it to the nest.

Here is the link to some photos from today:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jtarolli9/


Jim Tarolli
Baldwinsville, NY

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Kestrals (Lots!)
From: Maryfaith Miller <merrymilkmama AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 11:40:56 -0400
Just drove up Harrison Rd, off of Rt 90, in Summerhill. There was a Kestral
on the telephone wire, and then another, and another, until there were
either 5 or 7 (they were really moving around!) I can only imagine that
they are a family group of parents and fledglings. They were leapfrogging
from pole to pole and down into the cornfields and back up. Then they
regrouped in a stand of pines by the cemetery by rt 90 where they were very
concerning to some robins.

"Music is too important to be left to the professionals." -Michelle Shocked

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Vultures cont
From: Laura Stenzler <lms9 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 13:08:15 +0000
There are 60+ vultures as a rough estimate. 

Laura

Laura Stenzler
lms9 AT cornell.edu

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Lots o vultures
From: Laura Stenzler <lms9 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 13:07:27 +0000
There is a huge kettle of vultures over the compost pile area along Stevenson 
Rd in Ithaca at the moment. 9:06 am Monday. I do not have bins with me so 
cannot see if any are black vultures. Very impressive! 


Laura

Laura Stenzler
lms9 AT cornell.edu
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--