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Updated on Monday, September 1 at 08:43 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-cheeked Cotinga,©BirdQuest

1 Sep Montezuma area 30-31August2014 [Jay McGowan ]
1 Sep Montezuma area 30-31August2014 ["Jay McGowan jwm57 AT cornell.edu [oneidabirds]" ]
01 Sep Screechie [Regi Teasley ]
1 Sep RE:Eastern Screech owl continued and other birds [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
1 Sep Eastern Screech owl [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
01 Sep other bird notes from 31 August [Dave Nutter ]
01 Sep Re:today's field trip onto dikes at K-M, Montezuma NWR [Dave Nutter ]
01 Sep today's field trip onto dikes at K-M, Montezuma NWR [Dave Nutter ]
31 Aug Re: Sandpipers at Myers Park today around 12:30PM [Candace Cornell ]
31 Aug Co. Nighthawks [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
31 Aug Goshawk footage [Candace Cornell ]
31 Aug Sandpipers at Myers Park today around 12:30PM [Glenn Wilson ]
31 Aug Young yellowthroat [Suan Yong ]
31 Aug Montezuma Philly Vireo & more [M Miller ]
30 Aug Knox-Marcellus Marsh and the Montezuma Audubon Center Ponds Sat 8/30/14 [David Nicosia ]
30 Aug Re: Monarch caterpillar relocated to Salt Point [Betsy Darlington ]
29 Aug orioles [Carol Keeler ]
30 Aug Re: Monarch caterpillar relocated to Salt Point [Nancy ]
30 Aug Re: Monarch caterpillar relocated to Salt Point [Carol Keeler ]
30 Aug Monarch caterpillar relocated to Salt Point [Candace Cornell ]
30 Aug Male Harrier-Stevenson Rd [Anne Clark ]
30 Aug Sandhill cranes [Sara Jane Hymes ]
30 Aug Re: OT: Monarch caterpillar "rescue opportunity"? [Betsy Darlington ]
30 Aug Re: barn swallows [M & K Mannella ]
29 Aug MNWR - 2 Hudsonian Godwit, Bald Eagle takes Great Egret []
29 Aug Re: OT: Monarch caterpillar "rescue opportunity"? [Candace Cornell ]
29 Aug OT: Monarch caterpillar "rescue opportunity"? [Suan Hsi Yong ]
29 Aug Red Knot & other photos []
29 Aug Yellow -bellied Flycatcher at Mundy [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
29 Aug RE: barn swallows ["Marie P. Read" ]
29 Aug Re: barn swallows [Anne Clark ]
29 Aug barn swallows [Tobias Dean ]
28 Aug Wed. - Sodus Red Knot; MNWR []
27 Aug Osprey [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
27 Aug Great Egret @ Thomas Rd Farm [Jgerbracht ]
27 Aug Baird's Sandpiper and More [bob mcguire ]
27 Aug Re:OT: New York State Ornithological Association Annual meeting here in Ithaca!! [Linda Orkin ]
27 Aug OT: New York State Ornithological Association Annual meeting here in Ithaca!! [Linda Orkin ]
27 Aug RE: Great Egret [Kim Haines-Eitzen ]
27 Aug Great Egret [Jeff Gerbracht ]
26 Aug Recent sightings - Ontario Lakeshore []
26 Aug RE: possible Connecticut ["Kevin J. McGowan" ]
26 Aug Re: possible Connecticut [John Confer ]
26 Aug Black Vultures [Candace Cornell ]
26 Aug RE: possible Connecticut ["Kevin J. McGowan" ]
26 Aug possible Connecticut [John Confer ]
26 Aug Re: Nighthawks [Candace Cornell ]
26 Aug Fwd: [eBird Alert] Kentucky Warbler [Jay McGowan ]
26 Aug Re: Nighthawks [Geo Kloppel ]
26 Aug Re: Nighthawks [Dave Nutter ]
26 Aug Re: Nighthawks [Dave Nutter ]
26 Aug RE: Nighthawks [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
25 Aug Nighthawks [Geo Kloppel ]
25 Aug Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
25 Aug Nighthawks Renwick now [Geo Kloppel ]
25 Aug Red-headed Woodpecker at Palmer Woods [Jay McGowan ]
25 Aug Mundy warblers [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
25 Aug Volunteers capture Osprey fledgling flight [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
25 Aug Common Nighthawks over Northside Ithaca [Dave Nutter ]
24 Aug Green Heron [Carl Steckler ]
24 Aug Re: Carolina Wrens nesting in hanging baskets ["Laura J. Heisey" ]
24 Aug Re: Carolina Wrens nesting in hanging baskets ["Donna Scott" ]
24 Aug MT Pleasant Bobolink Common Ravens ["Marie P. Read" ]
24 Aug Carolina wrens nesting in fuchsia hanging basket [Lindsay Goodloe ]
24 Aug * possible * connecticut warbler off Bluegrass lane, ne ithaca [Tom Schulenberg ]
24 Aug summer tanager [Susan Fast ]
24 Aug Summerhill SF Sunday [bob mcguire ]
24 Aug Re: No Willet at Myers [Jim Tarolli ]
24 Aug No Willet at Myers [Stuart Krasnoff ]
24 Aug today's Knox-Marsellus field trip [Dave Nutter ]
24 Aug Re: WILLET Myers Point now ["Kenneth V. Rosenberg" ]
23 Aug Willet at Myer's Point [Gary Kohlenberg ]
23 Aug Willet at Myers [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
23 Aug Fw: NNYBirds: Brown Booby Champlain Bridge [Janet Akin ]
23 Aug Willet, Myers Point [Jay McGowan ]
23 Aug Willet, Myers Point [Jay McGowan ]

Subject: Montezuma area 30-31August2014
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 09:16:40 -0400
To follow up on Dave's thorough but modest summary of our dike walk
yesterday, I thought I would share a few of my and Livia's sightings from
the weekend. We went up to Montezuma on Saturday afternoon, spent the
evening there, camped at Cayuga Lake State Park, and joined the group for
the walk out from Towpath Road on Sunday morning. Despite passing a rainy
night in the tent, it was a very enjoyable outing. Highlights:

--The pier at Frontenac Harbor continues to host plenty of gulls and
occasionally Caspian Terns, but no more Common Terns or Bonaparte's Gull
that I have detected since July 5th and 27th, respectively.
--The Visitor Center Pool is very dry with plowed dirt, not too great for
most shorebirds but potentially excellent for a Buff-breasted to drop in
on. Nine SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS and two Killdeer were all that we could find
Saturday afternoon.
--The Wildlife Drive was pretty slow at 3PM on Saturday. A good group of
yellowlegs with over 30 Caspian Terns were at Shorebird Flats, so good
potential for something cool there. The Snow Goose continues, today
preening on dirt piles near the end of the drive.
--Two adult and one juvenile RED-HEADED WOODPECKER were in the usual area
in the dead snags on the left on Mays Point Road around 3:30 on Saturday.
All three then flew off across the road and across the lock into the forest
along the canal.
--Knox-Marsellus from East Road at 3:45 Saturday produced the continuing
pair of HUDSONIAN GODWITS, as well as poor views of lots of other
shorebirds. More on K-M shorebirds below. Of note was a group of 12
AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVERS out on the flats, not seen by others that morning
nor by us later in the evening (but perhaps the same birds WERE present on
Sunday.)
--As Sara Jane posted, the large, long field at the SE corner of Armitage
and Rt. 89 is plowed and appealing. We checked it three times over the
course of the weekend. No Buff-breasted, but a very likely spot. We had
SANDHILL CRANES twice, first six on Saturday then seven on Sunday, as well
as 40+ Killdeer and scattered Horned Larks.
--The Montezuma Audubon Center on Saturday evening was active, but lighting
was not ideal. Stilt Sandpiper and many Short-billed Dowitchers, as well as
lots of peeps.
--East Road around 6:30 produced mostly the same shorebirds. A fresh
juvenile BONAPARTE'S GULL with the gull flock and a flyover WILSON'S SNIPE
were the most notable additions.
--As Dave Wheeler has posted, the GREAT EGRET flyby at Tschache in the
evening is interesting, if not exactly spectacular. We counted 116 from
7:00-8:00PM on Saturday, and probably missed a few that might have come by
earlier. A lot landed in the back left part of Tschache and then eventually
took off and continued SW. It wasn't clear what their final destination
might be. The swallow and blackbird clouds in the distance were dramatic as
well.

--Sunday morning was wet and drear, and our plans of checking the Audubon
Center and doing some landbirding early were dashed. Instead we headed
straight for Towpath but were distracted on the way by a gull fallout of
sorts at the Chiropractic College in Seneca Falls off Rt. 89, where 650+
HERRING GULLS and several hundred Ring-billed Gulls were joined by 30 Great
Black-backed Gulls and a single 2nd-cycle type LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL in
the lawns around the college. I was hoping for a Buff-breasted or other
grasspipers on the golf course or lawns, but the closest we came was a
flock of about 14 LESSER YELLOWLEGS that flew over several times, perhaps
looking for a wetter place to land.

--As Dave has already posted, the walk out the dike from Towpath Road to
see the shorebirds at Knox-Marsellus was damp but fruitful. We got good
looks at the two HUDSONIAN GODWITS, mostly foraging in deep water but
occasionally walking up onto the shore. As expected for this time of year,
they are molting adults. Some of us got to see them fly several times.
Photo here:

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/P0NYvvKd_ErSLZcAkpXhTdMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink 

--Up to seven adult BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, the majority still with fairly
bright alternate plumage were always visible on the flats, and eventually
were joined by a group of eight adult AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVERS in various
stages of transitional plumage, all with at least some black on the
underparts. At one point, a flock of an additional 26 golden-plovers flew
over us heading towards the Mucklands to the NE. We did not see this group
on the ground, and the original eight were still there after the flew over.
--One of the most notable aspects of the walk for me was the density of
WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS in the peep flocks on the flats, especially towards
the northwest corner where the flocks were densest. I estimated at least 55
White-rumped, with 20+ visible in a single section of the flock at one
time. Most of these birds seemed to be transitional adults but I though I
might have seen a couple of juveniles as well. BAIRD'S SANDPIPERS were
markedly less common, but I saw probably eight or more eventually, some
good looks in with the peep flocks at the NW corner, but at higher density
in one of the drier channels a bit south of the NW corner. STILT SANDPIPERS
were scarce, with two cooperative juveniles near the dike and a single
mostly basic adult near the NW corner. The juvenile WILSON'S PHALAROPE was
difficult to pick out from the middle of the dike but we eventually got
nice views of it running along the shoreline in the middle of the peep
flocks. Two adult and one juvenile SANDERLING and two juvenile and one
bright adult RUDDY TURNSTONES were nice additions as well. Full eBird list
with my estimates of numbers here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19626820

Finally, Tim Lenz found four BLACK TERNS flying around the south end of
Cayuga Lake yesterday afternoon, and it sounds like at least two
SANDERLINGS were present on the spit at Myers Point yesterday as well.


-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jwm57 AT cornell.edu

--

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--
Subject: Montezuma area 30-31August2014
From: "Jay McGowan jwm57 AT cornell.edu [oneidabirds]" <oneidabirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 09:16:40 -0400
To follow up on Dave's thorough but modest summary of our dike walk
yesterday, I thought I would share a few of my and Livia's sightings from
the weekend. We went up to Montezuma on Saturday afternoon, spent the
evening there, camped at Cayuga Lake State Park, and joined the group for
the walk out from Towpath Road on Sunday morning. Despite passing a rainy
night in the tent, it was a very enjoyable outing. Highlights:

--The pier at Frontenac Harbor continues to host plenty of gulls and
occasionally Caspian Terns, but no more Common Terns or Bonaparte's Gull
that I have detected since July 5th and 27th, respectively.
--The Visitor Center Pool is very dry with plowed dirt, not too great for
most shorebirds but potentially excellent for a Buff-breasted to drop in
on. Nine SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS and two Killdeer were all that we could find
Saturday afternoon.
--The Wildlife Drive was pretty slow at 3PM on Saturday. A good group of
yellowlegs with over 30 Caspian Terns were at Shorebird Flats, so good
potential for something cool there. The Snow Goose continues, today
preening on dirt piles near the end of the drive.
--Two adult and one juvenile RED-HEADED WOODPECKER were in the usual area
in the dead snags on the left on Mays Point Road around 3:30 on Saturday.
All three then flew off across the road and across the lock into the forest
along the canal.
--Knox-Marsellus from East Road at 3:45 Saturday produced the continuing
pair of HUDSONIAN GODWITS, as well as poor views of lots of other
shorebirds. More on K-M shorebirds below. Of note was a group of 12
AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVERS out on the flats, not seen by others that morning
nor by us later in the evening (but perhaps the same birds WERE present on
Sunday.)
--As Sara Jane posted, the large, long field at the SE corner of Armitage
and Rt. 89 is plowed and appealing. We checked it three times over the
course of the weekend. No Buff-breasted, but a very likely spot. We had
SANDHILL CRANES twice, first six on Saturday then seven on Sunday, as well
as 40+ Killdeer and scattered Horned Larks.
--The Montezuma Audubon Center on Saturday evening was active, but lighting
was not ideal. Stilt Sandpiper and many Short-billed Dowitchers, as well as
lots of peeps.
--East Road around 6:30 produced mostly the same shorebirds. A fresh
juvenile BONAPARTE'S GULL with the gull flock and a flyover WILSON'S SNIPE
were the most notable additions.
--As Dave Wheeler has posted, the GREAT EGRET flyby at Tschache in the
evening is interesting, if not exactly spectacular. We counted 116 from
7:00-8:00PM on Saturday, and probably missed a few that might have come by
earlier. A lot landed in the back left part of Tschache and then eventually
took off and continued SW. It wasn't clear what their final destination
might be. The swallow and blackbird clouds in the distance were dramatic as
well.

--Sunday morning was wet and drear, and our plans of checking the Audubon
Center and doing some landbirding early were dashed. Instead we headed
straight for Towpath but were distracted on the way by a gull fallout of
sorts at the Chiropractic College in Seneca Falls off Rt. 89, where 650+
HERRING GULLS and several hundred Ring-billed Gulls were joined by 30 Great
Black-backed Gulls and a single 2nd-cycle type LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL in
the lawns around the college. I was hoping for a Buff-breasted or other
grasspipers on the golf course or lawns, but the closest we came was a
flock of about 14 LESSER YELLOWLEGS that flew over several times, perhaps
looking for a wetter place to land.

--As Dave has already posted, the walk out the dike from Towpath Road to
see the shorebirds at Knox-Marsellus was damp but fruitful. We got good
looks at the two HUDSONIAN GODWITS, mostly foraging in deep water but
occasionally walking up onto the shore. As expected for this time of year,
they are molting adults. Some of us got to see them fly several times.
Photo here:

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/P0NYvvKd_ErSLZcAkpXhTdMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink 

--Up to seven adult BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, the majority still with fairly
bright alternate plumage were always visible on the flats, and eventually
were joined by a group of eight adult AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVERS in various
stages of transitional plumage, all with at least some black on the
underparts. At one point, a flock of an additional 26 golden-plovers flew
over us heading towards the Mucklands to the NE. We did not see this group
on the ground, and the original eight were still there after the flew over.
--One of the most notable aspects of the walk for me was the density of
WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS in the peep flocks on the flats, especially towards
the northwest corner where the flocks were densest. I estimated at least 55
White-rumped, with 20+ visible in a single section of the flock at one
time. Most of these birds seemed to be transitional adults but I though I
might have seen a couple of juveniles as well. BAIRD'S SANDPIPERS were
markedly less common, but I saw probably eight or more eventually, some
good looks in with the peep flocks at the NW corner, but at higher density
in one of the drier channels a bit south of the NW corner. STILT SANDPIPERS
were scarce, with two cooperative juveniles near the dike and a single
mostly basic adult near the NW corner. The juvenile WILSON'S PHALAROPE was
difficult to pick out from the middle of the dike but we eventually got
nice views of it running along the shoreline in the middle of the peep
flocks. Two adult and one juvenile SANDERLING and two juvenile and one
bright adult RUDDY TURNSTONES were nice additions as well. Full eBird list
with my estimates of numbers here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19626820

Finally, Tim Lenz found four BLACK TERNS flying around the south end of
Cayuga Lake yesterday afternoon, and it sounds like at least two
SANDERLINGS were present on the spit at Myers Point yesterday as well.


-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jwm57 AT cornell.edu
Subject: Screechie
From: Regi Teasley <rltcayuga AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 09:11:10 -0400
We were awakened last night at 11:30 by a screech owl nearby 
repeatedly giving its whinny call and sometimes its little hoots.
We heard it for about 10 minutes and then only stillness.  What a 
pleasant surprise.

Regi
West Hill in the City



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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: RE:Eastern Screech owl continued and other birds
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 11:47:31 +0000
Eastern Screech owl continued for another an hour or so calling intermittently, 
then probably I fell asleep. In the morning I was worried all my moths would be 
gone. To my surprise there were a lot more Catocala spp. than ever I have seen. 
I counted 17 of them sprinkled on both sides of the sheet including at least 
five species, one of which was new to me. Black Walnuts seem to host for the 
most of the species and I do have plenty of them, thanks to the squirrels. 

While I was photographing moths a large group of BOBOLINKS flew overhead in the 
fog. The flight continued for at least five minutes or so. 


Here is a link to the moths 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/91426175 AT N00/sets/72157647048828286/ 

These species should bring more insect eating birds to my garden, of course if 
they are not poisonous. Or at least some birds might have evolved to feed on 
these caterpillars. 


Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: http://tinyurl.com/kn6q2p4
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/140817samplebook.pdf




________________________________________
From: bounce-117808713-3493976 AT list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Meena Madhav Haribal 
 

Sent: Monday, September 1, 2014 1:14 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Eastern Screech owl

Since just about midnight, a screech owl has been calling in my neighborhood. I 
hope he is not going to my juicy underwing moths. 

Meena
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--

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--
Subject: Eastern Screech owl
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 05:14:45 +0000
Since just about midnight, a screech owl has been calling in my neighborhood. I 
hope he is not going to my juicy underwing moths. 

Meena
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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: other bird notes from 31 August
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 03:35:05 +0000 (GMT)
5:38am EASTERN SCREECH-OWL calling from my backyard

3pm, NYS-90 south of Goose Haven about opposite East Tyre Rd, a row of a 
hundred birds on the wires turns out not to be swallows, but all AMERICAN 
GOLDFINCHES 


3:40pm, NYS-90 between Ledyard Rd and Aurora Shoe factory, 4 EASTERN 
MEADOWLARKS on the wires, a couple of them in non-breeding plumage (lacking the 
black V on the breast). 


Late afternoon: 6 species of woodpecker, including RED-HEADED WOODPECKER 
along Pleasant Grove Brook in the northern part of Palmer Woods, a really sweet 
spot, even if I missed the Olive-sided Flycatcher that was there several days. 


7:06pm an adult BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON commuting north over Inlet Island 
(unfortunately not a yard bird). 


--Dave Nutter
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--
Subject: Re:today's field trip onto dikes at K-M, Montezuma NWR
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 03:05:43 +0000 (GMT)
Addenda:
SPOTTED SANDPIPER - 1 from checklist by Jay, Livia, & Paul
LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER - 1 from checklist by Jay, Livia, & Paul
WILSON'S SNIPE - seen by others before and after the field trip from East Rd.
This brings the shorebird total at this site today to a very impressive 20 
species. 


--Dave Nutter


On Aug 31, 2014, at 10:53 PM, "Dave Nutter"  wrote:

> Despite rain for much of the morning I think today's shorebirding field trip 
to Knox-Marsellus marsh was a success. Thanks particularly to refuge biologist 
Linda Ziemba for arranging the removal of beaver works which had blocked the 
outlet and caused water levels to rise the week before there was lots of mud 
and shallow water, and the birds gathered to enjoy the expansive habitat. 
Thanks also to Bob McGuire and Jay McGowan for finding birds (although 
everybody did their share) and for teaching. There were about 30 participants. 
The list of shorebirds was a pretty impressive 17, all eventually providing 
decent views, some with great comparisons and teaching/learning opportunities, 
as time and placement overcame the less-than-ideal lighting: 

>
> BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER - several breeding-plumage
> AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER - several in near-breeding plumage
> SEMIPALMATED PLOVER - lots
> KILLDEER - not many; I only saw 1
> GREATER YELLOWLEGS - several foraging in very deep water, but at least 1 in 
nice group with other species 

> LESSER YELLOWLEGS - plenty
> HUDSONIAN GODWIT - 2 non-breeding plumage adults sometimes in deep water, 
sometimes on mud 

> RUDDY TURNSTONE - 1 breeeding plumage, 2 non-
> STILT SANDPIPER - several conveniently close and mixed with other species
> PECTORAL SANDPIPER - several
> SANDERLING - 2 or 3 in non-breeding plumage, rather distant
> WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER - several on mud at north end
> BAIRD'S SANDPIPER - a few on mud at north end
> SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER - scads
> LEAST SANDPIPER - lots
> SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER - plenty, all juveniles; all I saw had gold-&-black 
barred tertials of this species 

> WILSON'S PHALAROPE - juvenile typically running drunkenly on mud and pecking 
randomly 

>
> I'm hoping that someone (Jay? Bob? Paul?) can quickly arrange with Andrea to 
lead a field trip next weekend (6 or 7 Sept) and post the date and visitor 
center meeting time on the various listserves. 

>
> Maybe I'm just uninformed about the muckrace, but I got excited by a 
conversation at the end of today's field trip, and I'd like confirmation of the 
rumor that the dikes around K-M will be open to birders on foot during the 
Muckrace from the evening of Friday 12 Sept to the evening of Saturday 13 
September. (Steve? Andrea?) My impression was that Linda is okay with this. 

>
> If neither of the above pans out, then the next opportunity for a field trip 
like this will be on Sunday 21 September, led by Paul Anderson and meeting at 
the Montezuma NWR visitor center at 8:30am. 

> --Dave Nutter
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Subject: today's field trip onto dikes at K-M, Montezuma NWR
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 02:53:35 +0000 (GMT)
Despite rain for much of the morning I think today's shorebirding field trip to 
Knox-Marsellus marsh was a success. Thanks particularly to refuge biologist 
Linda Ziemba for arranging the removal of beaver works which had blocked the 
outlet and caused water levels to rise the week before there was lots of mud 
and shallow water, and the birds gathered to enjoy the expansive habitat. 
Thanks also to Bob McGuire and Jay McGowan for finding birds (although 
everybody did their share) and for teaching. There were about 30 participants. 
The list of shorebirds was a pretty impressive 17, all eventually providing 
decent views, some with great comparisons and teaching/learning opportunities, 
as time and placement overcame the less-than-ideal lighting: 


BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER - several breeding-plumage
AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER - several in near-breeding plumage
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER - lots
KILLDEER - not many; I only saw 1
GREATER YELLOWLEGS - several foraging in very deep water, but at least 1 in 
nice group with other species 

LESSER YELLOWLEGS - plenty
HUDSONIAN GODWIT - 2 non-breeding plumage adults sometimes in deep water, 
sometimes on mud 

RUDDY TURNSTONE - 1 breeeding plumage, 2 non-
STILT SANDPIPER - several conveniently close and mixed with other species
PECTORAL SANDPIPER - several
SANDERLING - 2 or 3 in non-breeding plumage, rather distant
WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER - several on mud at north end
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER - a few on mud at north end
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER - scads
LEAST SANDPIPER - lots
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER - plenty, all juveniles; all I saw had gold-&-black 
barred tertials of this species 

WILSON'S PHALAROPE - juvenile typically running drunkenly on mud and pecking 
randomly 


I'm hoping that someone (Jay? Bob? Paul?) can quickly arrange with Andrea to 
lead a field trip next weekend (6 or 7 Sept) and post the date and visitor 
center meeting time on the various listserves. 


Maybe I'm just uninformed about the muckrace, but I got excited by a 
conversation at the end of today's field trip, and I'd like confirmation of the 
rumor that the dikes around K-M will be open to birders on foot during the 
Muckrace from the evening of Friday 12 Sept to the evening of Saturday 13 
September. (Steve? Andrea?) My impression was that Linda is okay with this. 


If neither of the above pans out, then the next opportunity for a field trip 
like this will be on Sunday 21 September, led by Paul Anderson and meeting at 
the Montezuma NWR visitor center at 8:30am. 


--Dave Nutter
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Subject: Re: Sandpipers at Myers Park today around 12:30PM
From: Candace Cornell <cec222 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 21:14:21 -0400
The Monarch caterpillar Suan His Yong found in Ithaca and Sue Ruoff brought
to Salt Point, Lansing to the Monarch Waystation is doing wonderfully. As
Glenn thought, the string you saw was to hold up the transfer plant. The
caterpillar has since climbed over to the next plant over from where Sue
placed her and she has grown in one day! Thank you to all for caring about
this creature.

Candace

​All creatures great and small are essential​ to the dance of life.
(Clearly, I am not a philosopher.)

On Sun, Aug 31, 2014 at 6:16 PM, Glenn Wilson  wrote:

> Kathy and I went to Myers Park today in the rain and saw quite a flock of
> sandpipers along with a single Lesser Yellowlegs.
> These did land on the edge back from the Christmas tree about 30 feet
> perhaps.
> The non-yellowlegs sandpipers are shown in the link.
>
> One other detail - we went to the Milkweed Patch and I walked the road
> while
> looking for the Monarch Caterpillar.
> I didn't walk into the patch - but did see a stalk with white rope tied
> around its trunk.
> I assumed this may have been the stalk where the caterpillar was placed
> although I was unable to locate it from the path past the concrete blocks.
> It was rainy - so maybe it was under a leaf?
>
> We have at least 50 milkweed plants at our house and I have yet to see a
> Monarch Caterpillar on any of them.
> One plant has several Milkweed Tussock Caterpillars
>
> The first picture of a single sandpiper (I thought Sanderling) was on the
> ground at the same time as the Yellowlegs when we showed up.
> The second picture of several sandpipers on the ground are the same ones
> shown flying.
> I think the first sandpiper by itself may or may not be related to the
> flock
> of them.
>
> http://www.wilsonswarbler.com/html_trips/2014_08_31.html
>
> Glenn Wilson
> Endicott, NY
>
>
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Subject: Co. Nighthawks
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 23:50:01 +0000
A few minutes ago I was having my dinner on my front door step while listening 
to Selected Shorts. I felt I needed more salt in my spicy rice so I was about 
to get up and go to the kitchen when I saw a Nighthawk flying purposefully in 
the same direction as the clouds (Southwest to Northeast). So I decided to 
continue eating rice with less salt in hopes of seeing more. Sure enough in a 
couple of minutes second one followed the first one. I continued watching but 
no more came through. After 10 minutes or so I heard a peent but did not see 
the bird. It sounded like it came from over my head and house. 




Also there was a darner hunting for insects from my yard. It was too fast to 
see what it was. 




Cheers

Meena

PS: My catbird is back after an absence of nearly two to three weeks!

Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: http://tinyurl.com/kn6q2p4
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/140817samplebook.pdf




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Subject: Goshawk footage
From: Candace Cornell <cec222 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 18:30:48 -0400
A wonderful clip of s Goshawk flying between trees.

pic.twitter.com/sqNVxl6tsx 

Candace

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Subject: Sandpipers at Myers Park today around 12:30PM
From: Glenn Wilson <wilson AT stny.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 18:16:02 -0400
Kathy and I went to Myers Park today in the rain and saw quite a flock of
sandpipers along with a single Lesser Yellowlegs.
These did land on the edge back from the Christmas tree about 30 feet
perhaps.
The non-yellowlegs sandpipers are shown in the link.

One other detail - we went to the Milkweed Patch and I walked the road while
looking for the Monarch Caterpillar.
I didn't walk into the patch - but did see a stalk with white rope tied
around its trunk. 
I assumed this may have been the stalk where the caterpillar was placed
although I was unable to locate it from the path past the concrete blocks.
It was rainy - so maybe it was under a leaf?

We have at least 50 milkweed plants at our house and I have yet to see a
Monarch Caterpillar on any of them.
One plant has several Milkweed Tussock Caterpillars

The first picture of a single sandpiper (I thought Sanderling) was on the
ground at the same time as the Yellowlegs when we showed up.
The second picture of several sandpipers on the ground are the same ones
shown flying.
I think the first sandpiper by itself may or may not be related to the flock
of them.

http://www.wilsonswarbler.com/html_trips/2014_08_31.html

Glenn Wilson
Endicott, NY


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Subject: Young yellowthroat
From: Suan Yong <suan.yong AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 11:07:48 -0400
My "decision" to let the little garden patch outside my picture window turn 
into a tangle of overgrown goldenrod just yielded a young male yellowthroat 
foraging close, to within two feet of me. Quite a treat to watch. 


Yesterday morning's walk at Sapsucker Woods found a Wilson's warbler and yellow 
redstart around the spruces by the pergola. 


Suan
_____________________
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Subject: Montezuma Philly Vireo & more
From: M Miller <mmiller325 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 00:21:49 +0000
Found a Philadelphia Vireo on the South Spring Trail (across from the 
platform/bench). Also had a few Common Yellowthroats, Belted Kingfishers, & 
Cedar Waxwings. Along the drive, had a Green Heron & Virginia Rail across from 
LaRue’s Lagoon, lots of juvenile Eagles, Great Egrets, G & L Yellowlegs, 
assorted ducks (wood, mallard, am wigeon, g-w teal, n. pintail) & a few 
Pectoral Sandpipers. 



Knox-Marsellus had a lot of sandpipers, assorted ducks, 2 Sandhill Cranes, 2 N. 
Harriers, & a Peregrine Falcon. The Hudsonian Godwits were seen just before I 
arrived. 





Some photos available on Eaton Birding Society facebook page.





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Subject: Knox-Marcellus Marsh and the Montezuma Audubon Center Ponds Sat 8/30/14
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 20:16:09 -0400
Went to K-M marsh this morning on Towpath Road (its really bad by the way).
I got there around 830 am and parked close to the dike and almost
immediately I got on the 2 HUDSONIAN GODWITS found by Dave Wheeler the
night before. I was soon joined by fellow birders Bob McGuire and Dave
Nutter and eventually Gary Kohlenberg. As Bob stated from a couple days
ago, the shorebird habitat here is growing with plenty of  mudflats now and
many many shorebirds.

Besides the HUDSONIAN GODWITS, we found 2 BAIRD'S SANDPIPERS and got great
looks. These birds were so much buffier and sleaker with a more "tapered"
look and the primary projection just past  the tail. They also had scaly
scapulars. We also found at least 2 WHITE-RUMPED SANPIPERS. In addition,
there was one BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER in worn adult plumage and many
SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS and several KILLDEER. Peeps were abundant with most of
them being SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS. There were also a fair amount of LEAST
SANDPIPERS  and several PECTORAL SANDPIPERS here and there. Bob also found
a SANDERLING of which I think each of us refound at one point. There could
be two of them but we were not sure if it was the same bird. There were
also many LESSER YELLOWLEGS and much fewer GREATER YELLOWLEGS. We also had
about a dozen or so DOWITCHER sp. They were too distant for us to make a
call on species.

Some other birds seen here were CASPIAN TERNS, RING-BILLED GULLS, a couple
HERRING GULLS, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS, HOODED MERGANSERS, 1 AMERICAN
WIGEON, 3 PINTAIL,5 NORTHERN SHOVELORS and MALLARDS. Waders were the
typical numerous GREAT-BLUE HERONS and many GREAT EGRETS.

The Montezuma Audubon Center has a quite a bit of shorebirds much closer
than what was seen at K-M marsh. There were many dowitchers. There was at
least 1 LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER and around 35 or so SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS.
In addition, there was one STILT SANDPIPER.The peeps were both SEMIPALMATED
SANDPIPERS and LEAST SANDPIPERS. There were also KILLDEER and several
SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS.

It was great day of shorebirds and I thank Dave, Bob and Gary for making
the day even more fun and enjoyable.

Dave

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Subject: Re: Monarch caterpillar relocated to Salt Point
From: Betsy Darlington <darlingtonbets AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 17:59:18 -0400
Hurray!  Ever since not finding it this morning, I've been wondering if
someone else did. Whew!
I have seen just one - or perhaps two - adults this entire summer! :-(
Betsy


On Sat, Aug 30, 2014 at 4:17 PM, Candace Cornell  wrote:

> The Monarch caterpillar that Suan found yesterday downtown has been
> transported to the Salt Point natural area in Lansing and placed deep
> within a milkweed patch. Sue Ruoff, one of the Friends of Salt Point and
> the person responsible for creating the butterfly attracting meadows and
> securing Salt Point's Monarch Waystation (*http://www.monarchwatch.org/
> *), used Suan's directions to locate the
> creature and it's now been introduced it to it's new home.
>
> FYI: Monarch Waystation #8782 is at Salt Point, Lansing. This is a
> registered Waystation with Monarch Watch, a group dedicated to the
> conserving Monarch populations. I wrote about it in my last *On Osprey
> Time* 
(*http://www.lansingrec.com/parks/20-salt-point/salt-point-articles/27-on-osprey-time 

> 
*) 
blog 

> installment, Blog #48, which will be posted shortly.
>
> ​Thank you Suan for bringing this to our attention and to Betsy, Sue, and
> all others that attempted to help the caterpillar.
>
> Candace
>
>  [image: Inline image 1]
> --
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Subject: orioles
From: Carol Keeler <carolk441 AT adelphia.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 08:12:21 -0400
I just put out the jelly feeder and there were 3 beautiful male Orioles at the 
feeder! I've had 2 Orioles regularly, but never three. They had a conflict with 
the House Sparrows, as usual. One Oriole ended up hanging upside down on the 
perch. I think each Oriole got to eat. The problem with the feeder now, is that 
it often gets mobbed with bees. I think the Orioles come early, before the bees 
(and hornets). Is there any solution for getting rid of the bees? I had read 
that if you moved the feeder a few feet, the bees weren't smart enough to find 
. Not so. They found it right away. It only confused the Orioles. I solved the 
bee problem of bees on the Hummingbird feeders by getting bee proof ones, which 
do work. No solution for the Oriole feeder though. 


My female Hummingbird has been hovering in front of the large sunroom window, 
seemingly watching me. She's done it so often, I'm beginning to wonder if she 
is checking me out. It might be a curious young one since her breast is very 
white. The feeders are full, so she's not asking for more food. 


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Subject: Re: Monarch caterpillar relocated to Salt Point
From: Nancy <nancycusumano62 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 16:58:58 -0400
You guys rock!

Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 450 dogs since 2005!
Learn more at cayugadogrescue.org


Sent from my iPad

> On Aug 30, 2014, at 4:37 PM, Carol Keeler  wrote:
> 
> So very good to hear! A friend of mine raised three Monarch caterpillars that 
she found in her garden. She just released them as beautiful adults. I see one 
or two Monarchs daily in my yard. I haven't found any caterpillar yet. I do 
plant native plants to try and help. I have lots of common milkweed in my yard 
and have planted many swamp milkweed plants to attract Monarchs. Each new 
Monarch is important in view of their decline. I hope the one you found makes 
it to adulthood and the next step in its journey. 

> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Aug 30, 2014, at 4:17 PM, Candace Cornell  wrote:
>> 
>> The Monarch caterpillar that Suan found yesterday downtown has been 
transported to the Salt Point natural area in Lansing and placed deep within a 
milkweed patch. Sue Ruoff, one of the Friends of Salt Point and the person 
responsible for creating the butterfly attracting meadows and securing Salt 
Point's Monarch Waystation (http://www.monarchwatch.org/), used Suan's 
directions to locate the creature and it's now been introduced it to it's new 
home. 

>> 
>> FYI: Monarch Waystation #8782 is at Salt Point, Lansing. This is a 
registered Waystation with Monarch Watch, a group dedicated to the conserving 
Monarch populations. I wrote about it in my last On Osprey Time 
(http://www.lansingrec.com/parks/20-salt-point/salt-point-articles/27-on-osprey-time) 
blog installment, Blog #48, which will be posted shortly. 

>> 
>> ​Thank you Suan for bringing this to our attention and to Betsy, Sue, and 
all others that attempted to help the caterpillar. 

>> 
>> Candace
>> 
>>  
>> --
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Subject: Re: Monarch caterpillar relocated to Salt Point
From: Carol Keeler <carolk441 AT adelphia.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 16:37:19 -0400
So very good to hear! A friend of mine raised three Monarch caterpillars that 
she found in her garden. She just released them as beautiful adults. I see one 
or two Monarchs daily in my yard. I haven't found any caterpillar yet. I do 
plant native plants to try and help. I have lots of common milkweed in my yard 
and have planted many swamp milkweed plants to attract Monarchs. Each new 
Monarch is important in view of their decline. I hope the one you found makes 
it to adulthood and the next step in its journey. 


Sent from my iPad

> On Aug 30, 2014, at 4:17 PM, Candace Cornell  wrote:
> 
> The Monarch caterpillar that Suan found yesterday downtown has been 
transported to the Salt Point natural area in Lansing and placed deep within a 
milkweed patch. Sue Ruoff, one of the Friends of Salt Point and the person 
responsible for creating the butterfly attracting meadows and securing Salt 
Point's Monarch Waystation (http://www.monarchwatch.org/), used Suan's 
directions to locate the creature and it's now been introduced it to it's new 
home. 

> 
> FYI: Monarch Waystation #8782 is at Salt Point, Lansing. This is a registered 
Waystation with Monarch Watch, a group dedicated to the conserving Monarch 
populations. I wrote about it in my last On Osprey Time 
(http://www.lansingrec.com/parks/20-salt-point/salt-point-articles/27-on-osprey-time) 
blog installment, Blog #48, which will be posted shortly. 

> 
> ​Thank you Suan for bringing this to our attention and to Betsy, Sue, and 
all others that attempted to help the caterpillar. 

> 
> Candace
> 
>  
> --
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Subject: Monarch caterpillar relocated to Salt Point
From: Candace Cornell <cec222 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 16:17:18 -0400
The Monarch caterpillar that Suan found yesterday downtown has been
transported to the Salt Point natural area in Lansing and placed deep
within a milkweed patch. Sue Ruoff, one of the Friends of Salt Point and
the person responsible for creating the butterfly attracting meadows and
securing Salt Point's Monarch Waystation (*http://www.monarchwatch.org/
*), used Suan's directions to locate the
creature and it's now been introduced it to it's new home.

FYI: Monarch Waystation #8782 is at Salt Point, Lansing. This is a
registered Waystation with Monarch Watch, a group dedicated to the
conserving Monarch populations. I wrote about it in my last *On Osprey Time*

(*http://www.lansingrec.com/parks/20-salt-point/salt-point-articles/27-on-osprey-time 


*) 

blog
installment, Blog #48, which will be posted shortly.

​Thank you Suan for bringing this to our attention and to Betsy, Sue, and
all others that attempted to help the caterpillar.

Candace

 [image: Inline image 1]

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Subject: Male Harrier-Stevenson Rd
From: Anne Clark <anneb.clark AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 11:43:34 -0400
at about 8 AM, a beautiful female Harrier was working the field along Stevenson 
Rd at Dodge Rd, working N and NE across the field E of the Compost Facility 
driveway. 


Anne Clark
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Subject: Sandhill cranes
From: Sara Jane Hymes <sjh4 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 15:20:05 +0000
9 Sandhills SE plowed field Armitage  AT  route 89

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: OT: Monarch caterpillar "rescue opportunity"?
From: Betsy Darlington <darlingtonbets AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 10:27:26 -0400
Hi, Suan and Candace-
We went down there this morning and hunted thoroughly for the caterpillar,
but couldn't find it.  There were quite a few milkweed plants, so I hope if
we somehow missed it, that it will find its way to one of them.  I'm hoping
that someone else rescued it.
Betsy


On Fri, Aug 29, 2014 at 11:02 PM, Candace Cornell  wrote:

> I can not make it downtown tomorrow. If someone is willing to bring the
> caterpillar out to Salt Point, Lansing, the point is now registered Monarch
> Way Station #8782 (www.MonarchWatch.org ) and
> has a field of milkweed and other butterfly attracting plants. The best
> place to place the caterpillar is in the milkweed field behind the Monarch
> Waystation sigh. It is across the path from the dog litter station at
> second entrance on the north side of the point (not the entrance next to
> the RR tracks).
>
> I've been very concerned about the Monarchs this year. I have seen very
> few Monarch caterpillars or adults around Tompkins or Cayuga County this
> summer and I've been checking milkweed stands as I survey osprey nests.
>
> Helping this little fellow may seem trite, but it will make a big
> difference to its progeny.
> If some one does this kind deed, please let me know. Many thanks,
>
> Candace
> Friends of Salt Point
> Many thanks to whomever can rescue the caterpillar. Every Monarch is
> important!
>
> Candace
>
>
> On Fri, Aug 29, 2014 at 6:13 PM, Suan Hsi Yong 
> wrote:
>
>> This morning I found a small monarch caterpillar in an unlikely spot
>> downtown, and my untrained instinct tells me it's unlikely to survive to
>> adulthood at this location, so if anyone is up for it, I think it would be
>> a good idea/opportunity for someone to effect some level of rescue,
>> anything from moving it to a bigger patch of milkweeds to trying to raise
>> it at home (or better yet, in an educational setting somewhere).
>>
>> It is located on Seneca Street next to the bridge over the inlet, in
>> front of the Finger Lakes Electric Supply Company, here: 42.440079,
>> -76.511573
>>
>> There is a very small bed of mulch with some decorative plants and two
>> very small stray milkweeds (half a foot tall, about a dozen smallish
>> leaves), and the still very small caterpillar (less than an inch in length)
>> was in the easternmost of the two milkweeds.
>>
>> Here's a photo of the would-be adoptee:
>>
>>   https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10204734943071423&l=0218fab00e
>>
>> IMO the two milkweeds (not _that_ close to each other) will not provide
>> enough nourishment, and are likely to be pulled anyways by anyone tending
>> that bed (I assume they're considered weeds by gardeners). Thus, I would
>> recommend that anyone effecting the "rescue" just pull out the entire plant.
>>
>> Feel free to let me know (offlist, if you want) if you adopt it, need
>> more info, or think this message was a good/bad idea.
>>
>> Thanks.
>>
>> Suan
>>
>> --
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>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
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>> 
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>> !*
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>
> --
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Subject: Re: barn swallows
From: M & K Mannella <mkmannella AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 09:55:25 -0400
Our barn swallows are gone this morning too and it seems very quiet. They had a 
very late fledge and a small group stayed behind the rest of them. 

Michele
Interlaken

----------------------------------
www.thehaywardhouse.com
www.bodyshopwellness.com
----------------------------------

> On Aug 29, 2014, at 11:49 AM, "Marie P. Read"  wrote:
> 
> After nesting, Tree Swallows tend to join large roosts in wetlands. During 
the daytime, they leave the roost and disperse (often large distances) to 
feeding areas, which is why we still may see them over our fields in the 
summer, post-breeding. Then in the evening they all head toward the roost 
again. These roosts are often out of our sight and may move location often, but 
occasionally they are visible as one was at Montezuma NWR back in late July: 

> 
> These photos are from July 25 this year:
> 
> 
http://marieread.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Tree-Swallow/G0000YOpvGGFa3n8/I0000ZRcNxn0V7qs/C0000JGA3u3.D1t8 

> 
> 
http://marieread.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Tree-Swallow/G0000YOpvGGFa3n8/I00002zBp95hsqyw/C0000JGA3u3.D1t8 

> 
> Tree Swallow roosts can become enormous as more and more birds join 
(including multiple species of swallows and martins usually) as the summer/fall 
progresses. Eventually (even as late as October) they move south. 

> 
> Marie
> 
> 
> Marie Read Wildlife Photography
> 452 Ringwood Road
> Freeville NY  13068 USA
> 
> Phone  607-539-6608
> e-mail   mpr5 AT cornell.edu
> 
> http://www.marieread.com
> 
> Author of Sierra Wings: Birds of the Mono Lake Basin    Available here:
> 
> 
http://marieread.photoshelter.com/gallery/Sierra-Wings-Birds-of-the-Mono-Lake-Basin/G0000NlCxX37uTzE/C0000BPFGij6nLfE 

> ________________________________________
> From: bounce-117801628-5851667 AT list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-117801628-5851667 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Anne Clark 
[anneb.clark AT gmail.com] 

> Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 11:38 AM
> To: Tobias Dean
> Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] barn swallows
> 
> I see hundreds of tree swallows, mixed with barn swallows, over mown fields 
during August. 

> 
> On Aug 29, 2014, at 11:14 AM, Tobias Dean wrote:
> 
> Our barn swallows left yesterday, some may have left a few days earlier but 
there was a core group that waited until sometime during the day to depart. I 
had counted 3 individuals in the spring, there may have been more that 
straggled in. A couple of weeks ago I counted around 40 individuals, though 
that may be under the actual group that breeds in our out buildings. It is 
always a sad day not to see them in the morning, though that is the annual 
cycle. Godspeed to them over the Gulf of Mexico, and many thanks for keeping 
our yard relatively bug free. 

> I was curious about their cousins, the tree swallows. They arrived before the 
barn swallows, took up nest boxes away from the buildings and hunted along with 
the barnies. At some point in the summer they disappeared, and I noticed a few 
individuals in the last few days near the barn swallows. Where did the tree 
swallows go for the summer? 

> 
>        Toby Dean,  North Danby
> --
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Subject: MNWR - 2 Hudsonian Godwit, Bald Eagle takes Great Egret
From: <tigger64 AT aol.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 23:34:03 -0400
2 Hudsonian Godwit were at Knox-Marsellus marsh. Things then got interesting 
when an older immature Bald Eagle killed a Great Egret and tried to fly away 
with it. It proved too heavy and the egret's head and feet dragged along the 
mudflat as the Eagle tried to fly. Once over water the egret's head skimmed the 
surface. The eagle realized it could not clear the berm and dropped the egret 
in the water at the north end of K-M. Will the Eagle make another attempt to 
retrieve it? Photos here: 




https://www.flickr.com/photos/krankykestrel/


114 birds were counted during the Great Egret roost flight.


Dave Wheeler
N. Syracuse, NY

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Subject: Re: OT: Monarch caterpillar "rescue opportunity"?
From: Candace Cornell <cec222 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 23:02:02 -0400
I can not make it downtown tomorrow. If someone is willing to bring the
caterpillar out to Salt Point, Lansing, the point is now registered Monarch
Way Station #8782 (www.MonarchWatch.org ) and
has a field of milkweed and other butterfly attracting plants. The best
place to place the caterpillar is in the milkweed field behind the Monarch
Waystation sigh. It is across the path from the dog litter station at
second entrance on the north side of the point (not the entrance next to
the RR tracks).

I've been very concerned about the Monarchs this year. I have seen very few
Monarch caterpillars or adults around Tompkins or Cayuga County this summer
and I've been checking milkweed stands as I survey osprey nests.

Helping this little fellow may seem trite, but it will make a big
difference to its progeny.
If some one does this kind deed, please let me know. Many thanks,

Candace
Friends of Salt Point
Many thanks to whomever can rescue the caterpillar. Every Monarch is
important!

Candace


On Fri, Aug 29, 2014 at 6:13 PM, Suan Hsi Yong  wrote:

> This morning I found a small monarch caterpillar in an unlikely spot
> downtown, and my untrained instinct tells me it's unlikely to survive to
> adulthood at this location, so if anyone is up for it, I think it would be
> a good idea/opportunity for someone to effect some level of rescue,
> anything from moving it to a bigger patch of milkweeds to trying to raise
> it at home (or better yet, in an educational setting somewhere).
>
> It is located on Seneca Street next to the bridge over the inlet, in front
> of the Finger Lakes Electric Supply Company, here: 42.440079, -76.511573
>
> There is a very small bed of mulch with some decorative plants and two
> very small stray milkweeds (half a foot tall, about a dozen smallish
> leaves), and the still very small caterpillar (less than an inch in length)
> was in the easternmost of the two milkweeds.
>
> Here's a photo of the would-be adoptee:
>
>   https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10204734943071423&l=0218fab00e
>
> IMO the two milkweeds (not _that_ close to each other) will not provide
> enough nourishment, and are likely to be pulled anyways by anyone tending
> that bed (I assume they're considered weeds by gardeners). Thus, I would
> recommend that anyone effecting the "rescue" just pull out the entire plant.
>
> Feel free to let me know (offlist, if you want) if you adopt it, need more
> info, or think this message was a good/bad idea.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Suan
>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
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Subject: OT: Monarch caterpillar "rescue opportunity"?
From: Suan Hsi Yong <suan.yong AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 18:13:25 -0400
This morning I found a small monarch caterpillar in an unlikely spot
downtown, and my untrained instinct tells me it's unlikely to survive to
adulthood at this location, so if anyone is up for it, I think it would be
a good idea/opportunity for someone to effect some level of rescue,
anything from moving it to a bigger patch of milkweeds to trying to raise
it at home (or better yet, in an educational setting somewhere).

It is located on Seneca Street next to the bridge over the inlet, in front
of the Finger Lakes Electric Supply Company, here: 42.440079, -76.511573

There is a very small bed of mulch with some decorative plants and two very
small stray milkweeds (half a foot tall, about a dozen smallish leaves),
and the still very small caterpillar (less than an inch in length) was in
the easternmost of the two milkweeds.

Here's a photo of the would-be adoptee:

  https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10204734943071423&l=0218fab00e

IMO the two milkweeds (not _that_ close to each other) will not provide
enough nourishment, and are likely to be pulled anyways by anyone tending
that bed (I assume they're considered weeds by gardeners). Thus, I would
recommend that anyone effecting the "rescue" just pull out the entire plant.

Feel free to let me know (offlist, if you want) if you adopt it, need more
info, or think this message was a good/bad idea.

Thanks.

Suan

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Subject: Red Knot & other photos
From: <tigger64 AT aol.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 17:30:22 -0400
Jim Tarolli tells me it was not at Sodus Pt this morning. I've added more 
photos of the Knot with other shorebirds, plus some great ones of Semipalmated 
Plover. Speaking of semipalmated, it appears in my photos that Lesser 
Yellowlegs also has semi-p feet (which I did not know). Also a few shots of the 
juvenile Red-headed Woodpecker at Fair Haven. 



While the roost itself is not visible, the Great Egret roost flight is. The sky 
was very dramatic on Wednesday and I have put up some of the 126 birds that 
flew by my perch. 




https://www.flickr.com/photos/krankykestrel/



David Wheeler
N. Syracuse, NY

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Subject: Yellow -bellied Flycatcher at Mundy
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 20:47:55 +0000
Hello all,
Today on Mundy walk I saw a Yellow-bellied Flycatcher actively fly -catching 
near the overlook (I don't remember the name of the person in whose honor it is 
built) over Fall Creek. Also there were three Carolina Wrens calling from 
different locations in the Mundy and from behind Vet School. 


Yesterday on the way to home along EIRW, near the entrance to Strawberry Hill 
circle, I heard someone spishing. It reminded me of Jeff Gerbracht. So I was 
expecting to see a human being, to my surprise it turned out to be a Carolina 
Wren imitating human spishing! When I went to close to it continued spishing 
till I was just four feet away from it. Then it just moved a bit and continued 
calling. I don't know what it was worried about! 


Cheers
Meena

Meena Haribal
409, Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI)
Phone 6073011167
Email: mmh3 AT cornell.edu
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: http://tinyurl.com/kn6q2p4
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/140817samplebook.pdf



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Subject: RE: barn swallows
From: "Marie P. Read" <mpr5 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 15:49:16 +0000
After nesting, Tree Swallows tend to join large roosts in wetlands. During the 
daytime, they leave the roost and disperse (often large distances) to feeding 
areas, which is why we still may see them over our fields in the summer, 
post-breeding. Then in the evening they all head toward the roost again. These 
roosts are often out of our sight and may move location often, but occasionally 
they are visible as one was at Montezuma NWR back in late July: 


These photos are from July 25 this year:


http://marieread.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Tree-Swallow/G0000YOpvGGFa3n8/I0000ZRcNxn0V7qs/C0000JGA3u3.D1t8 



http://marieread.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Tree-Swallow/G0000YOpvGGFa3n8/I00002zBp95hsqyw/C0000JGA3u3.D1t8 


Tree Swallow roosts can become enormous as more and more birds join (including 
multiple species of swallows and martins usually) as the summer/fall 
progresses. Eventually (even as late as October) they move south. 


Marie


Marie Read Wildlife Photography
452 Ringwood Road
Freeville NY  13068 USA

Phone  607-539-6608
e-mail   mpr5 AT cornell.edu

http://www.marieread.com

Author of Sierra Wings: Birds of the Mono Lake Basin    Available here:


http://marieread.photoshelter.com/gallery/Sierra-Wings-Birds-of-the-Mono-Lake-Basin/G0000NlCxX37uTzE/C0000BPFGij6nLfE 

________________________________________
From: bounce-117801628-5851667 AT list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-117801628-5851667 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Anne Clark 
[anneb.clark AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 11:38 AM
To: Tobias Dean
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] barn swallows

I see hundreds of tree swallows, mixed with barn swallows, over mown fields 
during August. 


On Aug 29, 2014, at 11:14 AM, Tobias Dean wrote:

Our barn swallows left yesterday, some may have left a few days earlier but 
there was a core group that waited until sometime during the day to depart. I 
had counted 3 individuals in the spring, there may have been more that 
straggled in. A couple of weeks ago I counted around 40 individuals, though 
that may be under the actual group that breeds in our out buildings. It is 
always a sad day not to see them in the morning, though that is the annual 
cycle. Godspeed to them over the Gulf of Mexico, and many thanks for keeping 
our yard relatively bug free. 

 I was curious about their cousins, the tree swallows. They arrived before the 
barn swallows, took up nest boxes away from the buildings and hunted along with 
the barnies. At some point in the summer they disappeared, and I noticed a few 
individuals in the last few days near the barn swallows. Where did the tree 
swallows go for the summer? 


        Toby Dean,  North Danby
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Subject: Re: barn swallows
From: Anne Clark <anneb.clark AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 11:38:30 -0400
I see hundreds of tree swallows, mixed with barn swallows, over mown fields 
during August. 


On Aug 29, 2014, at 11:14 AM, Tobias Dean wrote:

> Our barn swallows left yesterday, some may have left a few days earlier but 
there was a core group that waited until sometime during the day to depart. I 
had counted 3 individuals in the spring, there may have been more that 
straggled in. A couple of weeks ago I counted around 40 individuals, though 
that may be under the actual group that breeds in our out buildings. It is 
always a sad day not to see them in the morning, though that is the annual 
cycle. Godspeed to them over the Gulf of Mexico, and many thanks for keeping 
our yard relatively bug free. 

> I was curious about their cousins, the tree swallows. They arrived before the 
barn swallows, took up nest boxes away from the buildings and hunted along with 
the barnies. At some point in the summer they disappeared, and I noticed a few 
individuals in the last few days near the barn swallows. Where did the tree 
swallows go for the summer? 

> 
>         Toby Dean,  North Danby
> 
> 
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Subject: barn swallows
From: Tobias Dean <tdean10 AT twcny.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 11:14:07 -0400
Our barn swallows left yesterday, some may have left a few days earlier but
there was a core group that waited until sometime during the day to
depart.   I had counted 3 individuals in the spring, there may have been
more that straggled in. A couple of weeks ago I counted around 40
individuals, though that may be under the actual group that breeds in our
out buildings. It is always a sad day not to see them in the morning,
though that is the annual cycle. Godspeed to them over the Gulf of Mexico,
and many thanks for keeping our yard relatively bug free.
      I was curious about their cousins, the  tree swallows. They arrived
before the barn swallows, took up nest boxes away from the buildings and
hunted along with the barnies.  At some point in the summer they
disappeared, and I noticed a few individuals in the last few days near the
barn swallows. Where did the tree swallows go for the summer?

        Toby Dean,  North Danby

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Subject: Wed. - Sodus Red Knot; MNWR
From: <tigger64 AT aol.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 22:38:29 -0400
Sodus Point had a juv. Red Knot, first on the pier then on the beach. 30 
Sanderlings and 8 SESA joined a single Lesser Yellowlegs. Good stuff. Photo 
here of the gorgeous Red Knot: 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/krankykestrel/



On trip to MNWR I did not check the MAC ponds. I did stop at K-M and found 
shorebird madness. At least a 1000 peeps are there plus many others. I looked 
only for conspicuous or exciting species, so a proper check is needed. 



Finally, I counted 126 Great Egrets flying to roost. Dramatic sky led to 
awesome backdrop for many Egret photos. 



David Wheeler
N. Syracuse, NY

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Subject: Osprey
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 22:43:40 +0000
Just now an Osprey flew overhead, was seen from yard where i was having my 
dinner. 

There is also a dead Am. Robin flegdling in my yard, which i just saw. The 
reason for death is not known. 

Meena

Sent from my Verizon Wireless Phone


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Subject: Great Egret @ Thomas Rd Farm
From: Jgerbracht <jeffgerbracht AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 18:02:22 -0400

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Baird's Sandpiper and More
From: bob mcguire <bmcguire AT clarityconnect.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 16:03:13 -0400
I had an errand to run up north today and so stopped at a couple of spots in 
the Montezuma Complex to check on shorebirds. 


The visitor's center pool (?) has been disced, and some of the troughs have 
begun to fill with the recent rains. I understand, however, that watering it 
has been delayed due to a plumbing problem. In any case, the only inhabitants I 
could see were a dozen Canada Geese. 


Knox-Marcellus has been drawn down, exposing considerably more mud - and the 
number of shorebirds has increased several-fold over the past couple of weeks. 
I did not spend time counting or closely examining each bird. The bird that did 
stand out was a molting adult AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVER. 


I was told that the DEC has begun to draw down the south pond at the MAC, and I 
walked out to check. Shorebird habitat was about the best I've seen there, and 
there was a good variety of birds to observe. They were a lot closer than the 
birds at K-M as seen from East Road. Of particular interest were the first (for 
me this year) juvenile dowitchers. I counted 21 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS and 1 
LONG-BILLED, though there may have been more that were obscured by the cattails 
in front of me. It appeared that all of the dowitchers were juveniles. They all 
had fresh plumage with no evidence of body molt. The Short-billeds showed the 
classic barring on their tertials, and the lone Long-billed showed the tiger 
striping there. 


Also of note was a single BAIRD'S SANDPIPER, a handful of WHITE-RUMPEDS, 4 
SEMI-PALMATED PLOVERS, 80 Semipalmated and 13 Least Sandpipers. 


Dave Nutter will be leading a dike walk at K-M this Sunday. There should be a 
lot to see! 


Bob McGuire


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Subject: Re:OT: New York State Ornithological Association Annual meeting here in Ithaca!!
From: Linda Orkin <wingmagic16 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 15:19:35 -0400
Correction. Please read "high energy" as "GOOD energy" after some concerned 
inquiries from leaders who don't want to be running while birding. 


Linda 

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 27, 2014, at 3:01 PM, Linda Orkin  wrote:

> 
> Come one, come all! The Cayuga Bird Club hosts the New York State 
Ornithological Association’s annual meeting this year the weekend of 
September 19 through September 21. Registration is in full swing and we are 
excited to have people coming from all around New York State to participate in 
this. We are especially hoping that many of our wonderful local birders will 
also attend, so that not only our great birding spots but our wonderful 
friendliness and local hospitality will be showcased for all to enjoy. 

> 
> The Friday night reception will be held at the Cornell Laboratory of 
Ornithology from 6-9 PM. We thank Melissa Walker for working along with us to 
make this happen. There will be “heavy” hors d’oeuvres provided by 
Cornell Catering, along with a wine and beer cash bar. Two presentations will 
be offered: All About Bird Biology given by Mya Thompson , the author of this 
newly launched web resource, and a recently produced film called Inside the Lab 
(which is not currently available to the general public). Guests can join 
either of two tours of the employee areas of the Lab. The innovative sound 
ring, a wooden soundscape sculpture by Mya Lin, part of her “What is 
missing?” series dealing with extinctions, will be turned on for all to hear 
and experience. And the wonderful new mural of bird silhouettes, a tribute to 
Roger Tory Peterson and his first field guide, will captivate our visitors who 
will have a check list to challenge their ID acumen. 

> 
> Bob McGuire has organized many wonderful field trips and you can select the 
ones which may interest you. These will be high energy walks to many of our 
favorite hot spots. 

> 
> Saturday at the Ramada will see a series of interesting paper presentations 
from 1:30 to 5, with topics ranging from The Hidden World of Bird Language to 
Earlier Arrival Dates of Spring Migrants, to Piping Plover Recovery in NYS and 
many more. There will be posters on display, and of course, the NYSOA delegates 
business meeting in the morning. A silent auction will be ongoing throughout 
the day. 

> 
> The banquet Saturday night at the Ramada will be buffet style, with a cash 
cocktail reception preceding this. Announcements of award winners will be 
followed by our keynote speaker. We are very excited to be presenting Dr. 
Bridget Stutchbury, who will talk about her groundbreaking research and whose 
talk is titled Frequent Fliers: New Discoveries in Bird Migration. For those 
who may not know Dr. Stutchbury, you still have time to read her three great 
books written for general audiences: Silence of the Songbirds, Bird Detective, 
and most recently, The Private Lives of Birds: A Scientist Reveals the 
Intricacies of Avian Social Life. 

> 
> Doesn’t this sound like a must-attend weekend? Don’t brush it off just 
because you don’t have to travel long distances and stay in a hotel to 
attend. As a matter of fact, this is a wonderful reason for you to make sure 
you are part of this. Go to Cayugabirdclub.org to register and for more 
information. And please note, if you are registering and choosing banquet or 
reception, the deadline for this is Sept. 12. 

> 
> 
> 
> Contact me if you need more information.
> 
> 
> 
> Linda Orkin
> 
> Ithaca, NY
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> If you permit 
> this evil, what is the good
> of the good of your life?
> 
> -Stanley Kunitz...
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> If you permit 
> this evil, what is the good
> of the good of your life?
> 
> -Stanley Kunitz...
> 

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Subject: OT: New York State Ornithological Association Annual meeting here in Ithaca!!
From: Linda Orkin <wingmagic16 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 15:01:20 -0400
Come one, come all! The Cayuga Bird Club hosts the New York State
Ornithological Association’s annual meeting this year the weekend of
September 19 through September 21.  Registration is in full swing and we
are excited to have people coming from all around New York State to
participate in this.  We are especially hoping that many of our wonderful
local birders will also attend, so that not only our great birding spots
but our wonderful friendliness and local hospitality will be showcased for
all to enjoy.

The Friday night reception will be held at the Cornell Laboratory of
Ornithology from 6-9 PM. We thank Melissa Walker for working along with us
to make this happen.  There will be “heavy” hors d’oeuvres provided by
Cornell Catering, along with a wine and beer cash bar.  Two presentations
will be offered:  *All About Bird Biology *given by Mya Thompson , the
author of this  newly launched web resource, and a recently produced film
called *Inside the Lab*  (which is not currently available to the general
public). Guests can join either of two tours of the employee areas of the
Lab. The innovative sound ring, a wooden soundscape sculpture by Mya Lin,
part of her “What is missing?” series dealing with extinctions, will be
turned on for all to hear and experience.  And the wonderful new mural of
bird silhouettes, a tribute to Roger Tory Peterson and his first field
guide, will captivate our visitors who will have a check list to challenge
their ID acumen.

Bob McGuire has organized many wonderful field trips and you can select the
ones which may interest you.  These will be high energy walks to many of
our favorite hot spots.

Saturday at the Ramada will see a series of interesting paper presentations
from 1:30 to 5, with topics ranging from *The Hidden World of Bird Language*
to *Earlier Arrival Dates of Spring Migrants*, to *Piping Plover Recovery*
in NYS and many more.  There will be posters on display, and of course, the
NYSOA delegates business meeting in the morning.  A silent auction will be
ongoing throughout the day.

The banquet Saturday night at the Ramada will be buffet style, with a cash
cocktail reception preceding this.  Announcements of award winners will be
followed by our keynote speaker. We are very excited to be presenting Dr.
Bridget Stutchbury, who will talk about her groundbreaking research and
whose talk is titled *Frequent Fliers: New Discoveries in Bird Migration*.  For
those who may not know Dr. Stutchbury, you still have time to read her
three great books  written for general audiences*: Silence of the
Songbirds, Bird Detective, and most recently, The Private Lives of Birds: A
Scientist Reveals the Intricacies of Avian Social Life.*

Doesn’t this sound like a must-attend weekend?  Don’t brush it off just
because you don’t have to travel long distances and stay in a hotel to
attend.  As a matter of fact, this is a wonderful reason for you to make
sure you are part of this.  Go to *Cayugabirdclub.org* to register and for
more information.  And please note,  if you are registering and choosing
banquet or reception, the deadline for this is Sept. 12.


Contact me if you need more information.


Linda Orkin

Ithaca, NY


-- 
If you permit
this evil, what is the good
of the good of your life?

-Stanley Kunitz...




-- 
If you permit
this evil, what is the good
of the good of your life?

-Stanley Kunitz...

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Subject: RE: Great Egret
From: Kim Haines-Eitzen <kjh10 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 16:16:21 +0000
I think I must have seen this same Great Egret—at our pond in 
Brooktondale—this morning at about 10am. A beauty! 

Kim

From: bounce-117792568-32451314 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-117792568-32451314 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Jeff Gerbracht 

Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 12:07 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Great Egret

This morning while driving along Boiceville Rd, I had a Great Egret fly over, 
heading down the valley in the direction of Ithaca. Keep a look out. 

    Jeff

--
Jeff Gerbracht
Lead Application Developer
Neotropical Birds, Breeding Bird Atlas, eBird
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2117
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Subject: Great Egret
From: Jeff Gerbracht <jeffgerbracht AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 12:06:32 -0400
This morning while driving along Boiceville Rd, I had a Great Egret fly
over, heading down the valley in the direction of Ithaca.   Keep a look out.
    Jeff

-- 
Jeff Gerbracht
Lead Application Developer
Neotropical Birds, Breeding Bird Atlas, eBird
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2117

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Subject: Recent sightings - Ontario Lakeshore
From: <tigger64 AT aol.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 18:44:16 -0400
Monday 8/25 on the Ontario Lakeshore between Oswego and Sodus Pt, with Jim 
Tarolli: 



Oswego Harbor: (presumed) Short-billed Dowitcher on the outer breakwall - very 
distant but we thought dowitcher 

Fair Haven: 1 Ruddy Turnstone (juv)
Sodus Pt: 2 Ruddy Turnstone (ad and juv), 1 AG Plover, 2 BB Plover, 2 SP 
Plover, many peeps. Missed the Lesser BB Gulls. 



Last visit to Montezuma had high water at Knox-Marsellus but it has now been a 
few days. 




Photos of the recent Willet at Myers Pt (Tompkins County) are below. Also, 
closeups of many shorebirds including Spotted, Sanderling, SP Sand, SP Plover, 
Least Sand. Some shots of semi-palmated ('piper and plover) feet. I also have 
Caspian Terns diving, Bald Eagle with muskrat, Turkey Vulture sunning, 
Ring-billed Gull close-up calling, Osprey with a big shad, American Bittern, 
Great Egret flock, a very worn and wet Herring Gull, tucked-wing flight shot of 
RH Woodpecker, etc. They should all be on the first page of the photostream. 





https://www.flickr.com/photos/krankykestrel/


David Wheeler
N. Syracuse, NY

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Subject: RE: possible Connecticut
From: "Kevin J. McGowan" <kjm2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 16:52:47 +0000
Well, we know they come through here, so it's always possible.

Thanks for the clarification.

Best,

Kevin

-----Original Message-----
From: John Confer [mailto:confer AT ithaca.edu] 
Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2014 12:35 PM
To: Kevin J. McGowan; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] possible Connecticut

Hi Folks,

Both Ken Rosenberg and Kevin have raised the most polite and informed question 
about the possible Connecticut singing. 


The bird I heard was singing. I was busy and half-listened and half registered 
the song and initially said to my self that it was a really odd Ovenbird 
because each note was so staccato, and then I said to myself that it just was 
not right for Ovenbird. Each note of an Ovenbird song seems to flow into the 
next note without a distinct pause between 

notes, even if each note is very emphatic. The song of this bird   had a 
distinct stutter, or extremely brief pause between notes.

I know songs of warblers are rare in fall, which is why I mentioned I thought 
it odd. 


Now you guys make me wonder about it, but as I played back in my mind what I 
had heard, it really did sound like a Connecticut and my recollection matched 
the audio at the web site. Caution is always appropriate, but it is still on my 
year list, but maybe that says more (or less) about my year list. 


Thanks for the informed questions.

Cheers,

John

On 8/26/2014 12:24 PM, Kevin J. McGowan wrote:
> Are you saying it was singing? I don't think I've ever heard of a Connecticut 
singing here in the fall before. 

>
> The thin call note isn't distinctive enough to me to be recognizable, 
although perhaps with enough experience it might be (as opposed to no 
experience at all). 

>
> Best,
>
> Kevin
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: bounce-117782773-3493952 AT list.cornell.edu 
> [mailto:bounce-117782773-3493952 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of John 
> Confer
> Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2014 12:00 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] possible Connecticut
>
> Just a heads up.
>
> I heard out my bedroom window a possible (well, it made my year list) 
Connecticut Warbler. It took about 3-4 calls before it clicked in my mind what 
it was. Checking with web sites , I 
thought it was a perfect match. Perhaps they are moving through the area now 
and others may hear their call and have that moment of "What the heck was that. 
I think I know it, but I haven't heard it in so long I can't place it". Refresh 
your memory and you'll be able to know it. 

>
> Of course, in the next hour, it didn't call again.
>
> Odd - My recollection is that fall Connecticut are more often than not 
reported by sound recognition than by sight. 

>
> Cheers,
>
> John Confer
>
> --
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Subject: Re: possible Connecticut
From: John Confer <confer AT ithaca.edu>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 12:35:14 -0400
Hi Folks,

Both Ken Rosenberg and Kevin have raised the most polite and informed 
question about the possible Connecticut singing.

The bird I heard was singing. I was busy and half-listened and half 
registered the song and initially said to my self that it was a really 
odd Ovenbird because each note was so staccato, and then I said to 
myself that it just was not right for Ovenbird. Each note of an Ovenbird 
song seems to flow into the next note without a distinct pause between 
notes, even if each note is very emphatic. The song of this bird   had a 
distinct stutter, or extremely brief pause between notes.

I know songs of warblers are rare in fall, which is why I mentioned I 
thought it odd.

Now you guys make me wonder about it, but as I played back in my mind 
what I had heard, it really did sound like a Connecticut and my 
recollection matched the audio at the web site. Caution is always 
appropriate, but it is still on my year list, but maybe that says more 
(or less) about my year list.

Thanks for the informed questions.

Cheers,

John

On 8/26/2014 12:24 PM, Kevin J. McGowan wrote:
> Are you saying it was singing? I don't think I've ever heard of a Connecticut 
singing here in the fall before. 

>
> The thin call note isn't distinctive enough to me to be recognizable, 
although perhaps with enough experience it might be (as opposed to no 
experience at all). 

>
> Best,
>
> Kevin
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: bounce-117782773-3493952 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-117782773-3493952 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of John Confer 

> Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2014 12:00 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] possible Connecticut
>
> Just a heads up.
>
> I heard out my bedroom window a possible (well, it made my year list) 
Connecticut Warbler. It took about 3-4 calls before it clicked in my mind what 
it was. Checking with web sites , I 
thought it was a perfect match. Perhaps they are moving through the area now 
and others may hear their call and have that moment of "What the heck was that. 
I think I know it, but I haven't heard it in so long I can't place it". Refresh 
your memory and you'll be able to know it. 

>
> Of course, in the next hour, it didn't call again.
>
> Odd - My recollection is that fall Connecticut are more often than not 
reported by sound recognition than by sight. 

>
> Cheers,
>
> John Confer
>
> --
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Subject: Black Vultures
From: Candace Cornell <cec222 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 12:26:05 -0400
What is the greatest number of Black Vultures you've seen together in the
Game Farm Rd/Ellis Hollow Rd area and around the compost facility at
Stevenson Rd? Please let me know if you ever seen any flocks in the last
two years.
Thanks,
Candace

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Subject: RE: possible Connecticut
From: "Kevin J. McGowan" <kjm2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 16:24:59 +0000
Are you saying it was singing? I don't think I've ever heard of a Connecticut 
singing here in the fall before. 


The thin call note isn't distinctive enough to me to be recognizable, although 
perhaps with enough experience it might be (as opposed to no experience at 
all). 


Best, 

Kevin



-----Original Message-----
From: bounce-117782773-3493952 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-117782773-3493952 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of John Confer 

Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2014 12:00 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] possible Connecticut

Just a heads up.

I heard out my bedroom window a possible (well, it made my year list) 
Connecticut Warbler. It took about 3-4 calls before it clicked in my mind what 
it was. Checking with web sites , I 
thought it was a perfect match. Perhaps they are moving through the area now 
and others may hear their call and have that moment of "What the heck was that. 
I think I know it, but I haven't heard it in so long I can't place it". Refresh 
your memory and you'll be able to know it. 


Of course, in the next hour, it didn't call again.

Odd - My recollection is that fall Connecticut are more often than not reported 
by sound recognition than by sight. 


Cheers,

John Confer

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Subject: possible Connecticut
From: John Confer <confer AT ithaca.edu>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 11:59:40 -0400
Just a heads up.

I heard out my bedroom window a possible (well, it made my year list) 
Connecticut Warbler. It took about 3-4 calls before it clicked in my 
mind what it was. Checking with web sites 
, I thought it was a perfect 
match. Perhaps they are moving through the area now and others may hear 
their call and have that moment of "What the heck was that. I think I 
know it, but I haven't heard it in so long I can't place it". Refresh 
your memory and you'll be able to know it.

Of course, in the next hour, it didn't call again.

Odd - My recollection is that fall Connecticut are more often than not 
reported by sound recognition than by sight.

Cheers,

John Confer

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Subject: Re: Nighthawks
From: Candace Cornell <cec222 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 09:16:04 -0400
Night hawks have been around Salt Point and Myers Park on and off for a
week at dusk.
Candace


On Tue, Aug 26, 2014 at 6:03 AM, Geo Kloppel  wrote:

> Newman Golf Course, of course, sorry!
>
> I wonder if these Nighthawks have been roosting in the same place day
> after day? Or are they even the same birds?
>
> -Geo Kloppel
> --
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Subject: Fwd: [eBird Alert] Kentucky Warbler
From: Jay McGowan <jmcgowan57 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 08:31:08 -0400
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: 
Date: Aug 26, 2014 8:27 AM
Subject: [eBird Alert] Needs Alert for Tompkins 
To: 
Cc:

*** Species Summary:

- Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (1 report)
- Kentucky Warbler (1 report)
- Canada Warbler (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Needs Alert for Tompkins. The
report below shows observations of species you have not seen in Tompkins,
based on your eBird observations.  View this alert on the web at
http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN10503
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (Empidonax flaviventris) (1)
- Reported Aug 26, 2014 07:06 by Steve Kelling
- aa NY Tom pond field transect, Tompkins, New York
- Map:

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.3456412,-76.2991288&ll=42.3456412,-76.2991288 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19576805

Kentucky Warbler (Geothlypis formosa) (1)
- Reported Aug 26, 2014 07:06 by Steve Kelling
- aa NY Tom pond field transect, Tompkins, New York
- Map:

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.3456412,-76.2991288&ll=42.3456412,-76.2991288 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19576805
- Comments: "In mixed flock. Black mustache and yellow eye ring. Olive
green back"

Canada Warbler (Cardellina canadensis) (2)
- Reported Aug 26, 2014 07:06 by Steve Kelling
- aa NY Tom pond field transect, Tompkins, New York
- Map:

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.3456412,-76.2991288&ll=42.3456412,-76.2991288 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19576805

***********

You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Needs Alert
for Tompkins

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Subject: Re: Nighthawks
From: Geo Kloppel <geokloppel AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 06:03:27 -0400
Newman Golf Course, of course, sorry! 

I wonder if these Nighthawks have been roosting in the same place day after 
day? Or are they even the same birds? 


-Geo Kloppel
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Subject: Re: Nighthawks
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 04:10:25 +0000 (GMT)
PS: I assume Geo meant the City of Ithaca's Newman Golf Course next to Renwick 
Sanctuary and Jetty Woods and between Fall Creek and Cayuga Inlet, not 
Cornell's Robert Trent Jones Golf Course on Warren Rd. 


--Dave Nutter


On Aug 26, 2014, at 12:07 AM, Dave Nutter  wrote:

> I sought Common Nighthawks from 6:35 to about 8pm. I was hoping to see them 
from my yard but I think the surrounding trees have grown up too much impeding 
the low-altitude views of the flats. Anyway, that was a bust, even though I saw 
up to 9 of them far to the NNE while scoping from the NYS-89 bridge over the 
Flood Control Channel. Sometimes they rose high enough to be seen against the 
sky above Cayuga Heights, but mostly they were tough to see against trees of 
East Hill or The Flats. There also were lots of gulls (probably Ring-billed, I 
estimated at least 30) apparently hawking insects but within a more contained 
area and lower, I assumed over the lower reaches of Cascadilla Creek but I 
couldn't be sure. The first nighthawk I saw was at about 6:50 and the last 2 
(from the bike path a bit farther north and against the sky) at 7:44pm. 

> --Dave Nutter
>
> On Aug 25, 2014, at 10:18 PM, Meena Madhav Haribal  wrote:
>
>> I also saw one Nighthawk over the hills from Jennings Pond looking 
northwards. It flew in its erratic way but soon disappeared among the 
vegetation of the woods. 

>> I also saw an Indigo Bunting, two Pileated Woodpeckers and several Cedar 
Waxwings and Barn Swallows and an Eastern KIngbird was heard. 

>>
>> I saw lots and lots of Vesper Bluets and enjoyed watching them till dusk!
>>
>> Cheers
>> Meena
>>
>> Meena Haribal
>> Ithaca NY 14850
>> 42.429007,-76.47111
>> http://haribal.org/
>> http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
>> Ithaca area moths: http://tinyurl.com/kn6q2p4
>> Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/140817samplebook.pdf
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________
>> From: bounce-117778739-3493976 AT list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Geo Kloppel 
 

>> Sent: Monday, August 25, 2014 9:10 PM
>> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
>> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Nighthawks
>>
>> This evening Pat and I were delivering groceries to her 95 year old mother, 
who's recovering from temporal arteritis. We left her place on Triphammer Road 
at 7:15, stopped at Sunset Park to see if we could spot any Nighthawks from 
there, then zipped down to the RTJ golf course. We parked near the lodge and 
took stations along the post-and-rail fence where we could see lots of sky. 
Various people stopped and asked about what we were looking for (the Audubon 
Field Guide app is such a great resource to have in one's pocket for answering 
questions like that!) 

>>
>> At about 7:40 I spotted one Nighthawk far away over Lighthouse Woods. 
Another birder came by a couple minutes later, but left before I got his name. 
Five minutes later there were seven Nighthawks over our heads. I wrote a quick 
email notice (I always have email access in my pocket, but no texting). Soon 
the birds headed over toward the Fire Training Tower, Fall Creek and Renwick 
Wood, so we drove over there, and enjoyed at least nine Nighthawks foraging at 
treetop level - great views! 

>>
>> They all disappeared by 8:00 pm.
>>
>> -Geo
>> --
>>
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
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>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>>
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>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>> --
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>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>>
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>>
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Subject: Re: Nighthawks
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 04:06:46 +0000 (GMT)
I sought Common Nighthawks from 6:35 to about 8pm. I was hoping to see them 
from my yard but I think the surrounding trees have grown up too much impeding 
the low-altitude views of the flats. Anyway, that was a bust, even though I saw 
up to 9 of them far to the NNE while scoping from the NYS-89 bridge over the 
Flood Control Channel. Sometimes they rose high enough to be seen against the 
sky above Cayuga Heights, but mostly they were tough to see against trees of 
East Hill or The Flats. There also were lots of gulls (probably Ring-billed, I 
estimated at least 30) apparently hawking insects but within a more contained 
area and lower, I assumed over the lower reaches of Cascadilla Creek but I 
couldn't be sure. The first nighthawk I saw was at about 6:50 and the last 2 
(from the bike path a bit farther north and against the sky) at 7:44pm. 


--Dave Nutter


On Aug 25, 2014, at 10:18 PM, Meena Madhav Haribal  wrote:

> I also saw one Nighthawk over the hills from Jennings Pond looking 
northwards. It flew in its erratic way but soon disappeared among the 
vegetation of the woods. 

> I also saw an Indigo Bunting, two Pileated Woodpeckers and several Cedar 
Waxwings and Barn Swallows and an Eastern KIngbird was heard. 

>
> I saw lots and lots of Vesper Bluets and enjoyed watching them till dusk!
>
> Cheers
> Meena
>
> Meena Haribal
> Ithaca NY 14850
> 42.429007,-76.47111
> http://haribal.org/
> http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
> Ithaca area moths: http://tinyurl.com/kn6q2p4
> Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/140817samplebook.pdf
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________
> From: bounce-117778739-3493976 AT list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Geo Kloppel 
 

> Sent: Monday, August 25, 2014 9:10 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Nighthawks
>
> This evening Pat and I were delivering groceries to her 95 year old mother, 
who's recovering from temporal arteritis. We left her place on Triphammer Road 
at 7:15, stopped at Sunset Park to see if we could spot any Nighthawks from 
there, then zipped down to the RTJ golf course. We parked near the lodge and 
took stations along the post-and-rail fence where we could see lots of sky. 
Various people stopped and asked about what we were looking for (the Audubon 
Field Guide app is such a great resource to have in one's pocket for answering 
questions like that!) 

>
> At about 7:40 I spotted one Nighthawk far away over Lighthouse Woods. Another 
birder came by a couple minutes later, but left before I got his name. Five 
minutes later there were seven Nighthawks over our heads. I wrote a quick email 
notice (I always have email access in my pocket, but no texting). Soon the 
birds headed over toward the Fire Training Tower, Fall Creek and Renwick Wood, 
so we drove over there, and enjoyed at least nine Nighthawks foraging at 
treetop level - great views! 

>
> They all disappeared by 8:00 pm.
>
> -Geo
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
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> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
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>
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Subject: RE: Nighthawks
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 02:18:08 +0000
I also saw one Nighthawk over the hills from Jennings Pond looking northwards. 
It flew in its erratic way but soon disappeared among the vegetation of the 
woods. 

I also saw an Indigo Bunting, two Pileated Woodpeckers and several Cedar 
Waxwings and Barn Swallows and an Eastern KIngbird was heard. 


I saw lots and lots of Vesper Bluets and enjoyed watching them till dusk!

Cheers
Meena

Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: http://tinyurl.com/kn6q2p4
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/140817samplebook.pdf




________________________________________
From: bounce-117778739-3493976 AT list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Geo Kloppel 
 

Sent: Monday, August 25, 2014 9:10 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Nighthawks

This evening Pat and I were delivering groceries to her 95 year old mother, 
who's recovering from temporal arteritis. We left her place on Triphammer Road 
at 7:15, stopped at Sunset Park to see if we could spot any Nighthawks from 
there, then zipped down to the RTJ golf course. We parked near the lodge and 
took stations along the post-and-rail fence where we could see lots of sky. 
Various people stopped and asked about what we were looking for (the Audubon 
Field Guide app is such a great resource to have in one's pocket for answering 
questions like that!) 


At about 7:40 I spotted one Nighthawk far away over Lighthouse Woods. Another 
birder came by a couple minutes later, but left before I got his name. Five 
minutes later there were seven Nighthawks over our heads. I wrote a quick email 
notice (I always have email access in my pocket, but no texting). Soon the 
birds headed over toward the Fire Training Tower, Fall Creek and Renwick Wood, 
so we drove over there, and enjoyed at least nine Nighthawks foraging at 
treetop level - great views! 


They all disappeared by 8:00 pm.

-Geo
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Subject: Nighthawks
From: Geo Kloppel <geokloppel AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 21:10:25 -0400
This evening Pat and I were delivering groceries to her 95 year old mother, 
who's recovering from temporal arteritis. We left her place on Triphammer Road 
at 7:15, stopped at Sunset Park to see if we could spot any Nighthawks from 
there, then zipped down to the RTJ golf course. We parked near the lodge and 
took stations along the post-and-rail fence where we could see lots of sky. 
Various people stopped and asked about what we were looking for (the Audubon 
Field Guide app is such a great resource to have in one's pocket for answering 
questions like that!) 


At about 7:40 I spotted one Nighthawk far away over Lighthouse Woods. Another 
birder came by a couple minutes later, but left before I got his name. Five 
minutes later there were seven Nighthawks over our heads. I wrote a quick email 
notice (I always have email access in my pocket, but no texting). Soon the 
birds headed over toward the Fire Training Tower, Fall Creek and Renwick Wood, 
so we drove over there, and enjoyed at least nine Nighthawks foraging at 
treetop level - great views! 


They all disappeared by 8:00 pm.

-Geo 
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Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 17:57:53 -0700
RBA
 
*  New York
*  Syracuse
* August 25, 2014
*  NYSY  08. 25. 14
 
Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird Alert
Dates(s):


August 18, 2013 - August 25, 2014
to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.com
covering upstate NY counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge
and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),
Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortland
compiled: August 25 AT 8:00 p.m. (EDT)
compiler: Joseph Brin
Onondaga Audubon Homepage: www.onondagaaudubon.org
 
 
#407 Monday August 25, 2014
 
Greetings. This is the Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert for the week of 
July 28, 2014
 
Highlights:
-----------

BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER
AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVER
RUDDY TURNSTONE
SANDERLING
STILT SANDPIPER
WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER
BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER
LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER
FORSTER’S TERN
SNOWY OWL
COMMON NIGHTHAWK
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT


Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC)
------------

     8/20: An astounding 390 SEMI-PALMATED SANDPIPERS were counted at 
Knox-Marsellus Marsh. 

     8/23: 2 SANDHILL CRANES, 1 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, GREATER YELLOWLEGS, 1 
RUDDY TURNSTONE, 1 SANDERLING, 30 LESST SANDPIPERS, 2 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS, 
30 SEMI-PALMATED SANDPIPERS, 3 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS and 5 LONG-BILLED 
DOWITCHERS were seen at Knox-Marsellus marsh. 

     8/24: Somewhat fewer shorebirds this day but a rare FORSTER’S TERN 
was seen at Knox-Marsellus. 



Onondaga county
------------

     COMMON NIGHTHAWKS were reported from all parts of the county this week. 
The best day was 8/23 when 119 were counted at Three Rivers WMA in 
Baldwinsville. The SNOWY OWL at the Rt. 31 shopping area near Home Depot was 
reported on an almost daily basis. It seems to be eating well. 

     8/23: A YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT was found by one lucky birder at the 
Eagle’s Nest Overlook at Three Rivers WMA but could not be relocated. 



Madison County
------------

     8/23: AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVER, STILT SANDPIPER, BAIRDS SANDPIPER, 
SHORT-BILLE DOWITCHER and BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER were all seen at the Sky High 
Sod Farm north of Chittenango. On the 24th. 4 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS arrived but 
the Buff-breasted was not seen. 



Cayuga County
------------

     8/25: One adult RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was seen at West Barrier Beach at 
Fair Haven. 2 SANDERLING and 1 SEMI-PALMATED SANDPIPERS were also seen, 

     

     
               

 --  end report



Joseph Brin
Region 5
Baldwinsville, N.Y.  13027  U.S.A.
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Subject: Nighthawks Renwick now
From: Geo Kloppel <geokloppel AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 19:54:41 -0400
At least nine Common Nighthawks over the Fall Creek "estuary " / Stewart Park 
suspension bridges right now! 


-Geo 
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Subject: Red-headed Woodpecker at Palmer Woods
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 15:55:37 -0400
Sorry for the late post, I just realized this hadn't made it to
Cayugabirds. This morning David Weber found an adult RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
in Palmer Woods on north campus. He first had it fly over, then it returned
to some dead trees and was present for at least an hour after that. This
was in the low swampy area along Pleasant Grove Brook well north of A-Lot,
probably at least audible (it was calling frequently) from the east end of
Sheldon Road or from Pleasant Grove Lane.

-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jwm57 AT cornell.edu

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Subject: Mundy warblers
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 18:01:58 +0000
Blackburnian  3 FOY for me
Bay breasted 2
Magnolia 3
No. Parula 1
Am. Redstart. 1
And usuals
Sent from my Verizon Wireless Phone


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Subject: Volunteers capture Osprey fledgling flight
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 12:35:45 +0000
FYI

http://www.cornell.edu/video/volunteer-birders-capture-osprey-fledging-on-campus/?utm_source=cornellcast_weekly_update&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=5485 


Enjoy the work of these dedicated volunteers who spent most of their spare time 
watching the ospreys! 


Cheers
Meena

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Subject: Common Nighthawks over Northside Ithaca
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 02:08:25 +0000 (GMT)
This evening I was strolling the Fall Creek neighborhood of Ithaca with my son. 
My goal was to see Common Nighthawks. His goal was to pleasantly kill time 
while his laundry dried. The playground at the Fall Creek Elementary School 
seemed a good spot, with plenty of sky, plus equipment sturdy enough to 
withstand a young adult with a passion for parkour. It was during the window of 
time when I'd seen several Common Nighthawks distantly east of Cass Park three 
evenings ago, so I was optimistic, but not desperate. The closest I'd seen so 
far this evening was a gull commuting toward the lake, as many do at that time 
of day, but this gull veered as if hawking an insect. Then I got help from 
another birder with eyes to the sky. Garrett MacDonald was fueling up at the 
Mirabito gas station by Purity Ice Cream on NYS-13 when he noticed at least 9 
Common Nighthawks foraging, so he sent out a text RBA at 7:17pm. By shifting 
our vantage to the slight rise at the east end of Queen Street I was able to 
see them distantly over buildings and between trees, also counting 9. We 
hustled west, garnering several additional sightings. By the time we passed the 
Cooperative Extension building at W Lincoln St & Willow Av, some were flying 
directly overhead, and Brendan was able, naked-eye, to discern the white bar 
across the primaries of one bird. From the grounds of the ScienCenter near 
Franklin St & Alice Miller Way I made my maximum count of 13, all to the south 
and still in their crazy feeding flight. While I sent out a text RBA at 
7:30pm they disappeared. We headed back to the laundromat, where the clothes 
were dry. 


--Dave Nutter
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Subject: Green Heron
From: Carl Steckler <nyleatherneck3516 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 15:29:03 -0700
Now at Swan Pond Stewart Park
East end of pond
Carl S

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Subject: Re: Carolina Wrens nesting in hanging baskets
From: "Laura J. Heisey" <ljh2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 21:33:35 +0000
I had my first ever Carolina Wren nest in a hanging basket of tuberous begonias 
this summer. One person I told said, "Of course you do!" They successfully 
raised and fledged five chicks. They're nesting all over my property in 
Newfield. I hear the buzzy "I'm bringing food" sound all day long every day. 
They now visit a basket of fuschias but I don't think they have a nest there. I 
thought they would but they just hang out there. They've put a serious dent in 
the bug population this year. I'll definitely encourage their return. 



On August 24, 2014, at 5:00PM, Donna Scott wrote:

Re CAROLINA WRENS nesting in hanging baskets or the like: a few years ago C. 
Wrens nested in a plastic bag containing rubber belts for the lawn mower! the 
bag was hanging on a nail against the house under the floor of my roofed back 
deck (house is on a hill so there is a walk out basement on the side with the 
bag - it was above my head), so plenty of shelter, yet easy access to the yard 
and spiders and insects in garden equipment nearby. I could see the nest thru 
the transparent bag. 3 Young. 


I always have them nesting around here somewhere and this year they 
successfully fledged 3 young from one of those little woven, round-bottomed, 
pointed-top nest baskets that one hangs up somewhere - mine are under the roof 
of my front porch. Now one (or more?) of the wrens sleeps at night in another 
one of those baskets on the other side under the porch roof (I have 3 of those 
hung up under there). 


I leave my big, browned "not-so-evergreen" Xmas wreath up on my front door long 
after winter because I like the way it smells and it is always nicely decorated 
with natural plants (by me). One year a Carolina Wren built a beautiful nest in 
the center of the wreath against the door. It lined the whole thing with soft 
green moss and laid its eggs. 

As soon as discovered the nest, I stopped using the front door and put ladders 
in front of the step to the porch to keep people from approaching the door. We 
all had to use the door from the garage. Sometimes I stood nearby to observe 
the babies in the nest and take a few photos and later they successfully 
fledged, I think. 

Sometimes I put the old wreath on the side wall of my recessed front porch and 
now and then the wrens build a nest in the center of it over there. 


This year I heard that monotonous vocalization (that Lindsay described) from 
the parent around the time the young were about to fledge. For a while one baby 
stood on top of the nest basket, as the parent chattered away, then baby went 
back into the nest. A couple days later they were all gone from the nest. 


I live by Cayuga Lake (so a little warmer here in winter), and I have Carolina 
Wrens here all winter visiting my many bird feeders, and have had for at least 
a decade. I think there are as many wrens here as ever and that they survived 
this last "real winter" OK, perhaps due to bird feeders -- although I think I 
am one of the only residents on Lansing Station Road that keeps feeders full in 
winter (& all year round). 


Donna Scott
Lansing
----- Original Message -----
From: Lindsay Goodloe
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Sent: Sunday, August 24, 2014 1:32 PM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Carolina wrens nesting in fuchsia hanging basket

 I was interested in Dave Nutters recent reports on a pair of Carolina wrens 
that successfully nested in a hanging planter on his back porch. It was just a 
few days after his first report (7/18) that we noticed Carolina wrens carrying 
nesting material to a hanging basket of fuchsia suspended from a beam under the 
ceiling of our otherwise unenclosed back porch. By the weekend of 7/26-7/27, we 
suspected that they were incubating their clutch. August 10 was the first day 
we observed food being brought to the nest, but the eggs may have hatched a day 
or so earlier. My wife saw an adult bringing food to the nest early in the 
morning on 8/21, but the nest was empty by the afternoon, and so, to our great 
disappointment, we totally missed what we assume was the successful fledging of 
the young. We never peered into the nest (a domed structure with the entrance 
located on the side facing the backyard) to count babies, either. The nest 
location was about 10 feet from our back door and five feet from a kitchen 
window from which we could observe the activity. Since we spend very little 
time sitting on the porch, the birds took little or no notice of us and flew 
fairly directly to the nest when delivering food. We once heard them making 
nervous-sounding vocalizations when a seemingly oblivious chipmunk loitered for 
awhile on the ground under their nest location until we drove it away. My wife 
also once saw the wrens drive away a downy woodpecker that landed briefly on a 
post near the nest. Though we rarely heard the male giving its full song during 
the nesting period, at least one of the birds (the male?) spent an amazing 
amount of time (especially in late morning and during the afternoon) repeating 
monotonously the brief slurred trill call that is one of the wrens common 
vocalizations. It gave this call from many locations close to our house, but 
perhaps its favorite calling perch was the handle of our lawn mower, which was 
for some days parked on our porch about ten feet from the nest. We believe that 
the frequency of calling increased as the fledging date approached; if so, it 
suggests that the vocalizing was directed mostly at the nestlings. Perhaps some 
learning of the call goes on at this period. Weve hardly heard this call, or 
any other, since the young (presumably) fledged. 

 Over the many years that weve lived in our South Hill house, weve 
occasionally had house wrens and chickadees nest in the hollow top of a post at 
the corner of the porch, but having any bird make a nest in a hanging basket 
was a first for us. The poor fuchsia plant showed signs of getting very thirsty 
as the nesting period progressed, but it survived (albeit with no blooms at 
this point). We are wondering how frequently hanging baskets (or other 
planters) are utilized by Carolina wrens (or any other species) as nest sites. 
Two instances in Ithaca in the same season might suggest that its not a rare 
occurrence, but I cant recall any other reports in previous years (which, 
given my memory, proves nothing). Perhaps this post will spur some 
recollections of others. In any case, our wrens have made this a fun and 
memorable summer for birds even though weve seldom gotten out in the field. 

 And a couple of other thoughts. For decades, weve had house wrens nesting in 
our backyard in bird houses that weve provided. The last wren house fell apart 
a couple of years ago, and we have not replaced it. So now we have no house 
wrens, and for the first time (to our knowledge) weve had a pair of Carolina 
wrens nesting around the house. Is this a coincidence, or do these wrens 
exhibit interspecific territoriality (I havent researched this point in BNA)? 
Also, last winter was the sort of brutally cold season that is supposed to 
result in high mortality on Carolina wrens, yet we had a pair around our 
feeders all winterperhaps the same pair that nested here this summer. Have 
others noticed any decrease in the Carolina wren population this year? If not, 
perhaps feeders are mitigating the losses that this species formerly suffered 
during harsh winters. 


Lindsay Goodloe
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Subject: Re: Carolina Wrens nesting in hanging baskets
From: "Donna Scott" <dls9 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 16:59:08 -0400
Carolina wrens nesting in fuchsia hanging basketRe CAROLINA WRENS nesting in 
hanging baskets or the like: a few years ago C. Wrens nested in a plastic bag 
containing rubber belts for the lawn mower! the bag was hanging on a nail 
against the house under the floor of my roofed back deck (house is on a hill so 
there is a walk out basement on the side with the bag - it was above my head), 
so plenty of shelter, yet easy access to the yard and spiders and insects in 
garden equipment nearby. I could see the nest thru the transparent bag. 3 
Young. 


I always have them nesting around here somewhere and this year they 
successfully fledged 3 young from one of those little woven, round-bottomed, 
pointed-top nest baskets that one hangs up somewhere - mine are under the roof 
of my front porch. Now one (or more?) of the wrens sleeps at night in another 
one of those baskets on the other side under the porch roof (I have 3 of those 
hung up under there). 


I leave my big, browned "not-so-evergreen" Xmas wreath up on my front door long 
after winter because I like the way it smells and it is always nicely decorated 
with natural plants (by me). One year a Carolina Wren built a beautiful nest in 
the center of the wreath against the door. It lined the whole thing with soft 
green moss and laid its eggs. 

As soon as discovered the nest, I stopped using the front door and put ladders 
in front of the step to the porch to keep people from approaching the door. We 
all had to use the door from the garage. Sometimes I stood nearby to observe 
the babies in the nest and take a few photos and later they successfully 
fledged, I think. 

Sometimes I put the old wreath on the side wall of my recessed front porch and 
now and then the wrens build a nest in the center of it over there. 


This year I heard that monotonous vocalization (that Lindsay described) from 
the parent around the time the young were about to fledge. For a while one baby 
stood on top of the nest basket, as the parent chattered away, then baby went 
back into the nest. A couple days later they were all gone from the nest. 


I live by Cayuga Lake (so a little warmer here in winter), and I have Carolina 
Wrens here all winter visiting my many bird feeders, and have had for at least 
a decade. I think there are as many wrens here as ever and that they survived 
this last "real winter" OK, perhaps due to bird feeders -- although I think I 
am one of the only residents on Lansing Station Road that keeps feeders full in 
winter (& all year round). 


Donna Scott
Lansing
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Lindsay Goodloe 
  To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
  Sent: Sunday, August 24, 2014 1:32 PM
  Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Carolina wrens nesting in fuchsia hanging basket


 I was interested in Dave Nutters recent reports on a pair of Carolina wrens 
that successfully nested in a hanging planter on his back porch. It was just a 
few days after his first report (7/18) that we noticed Carolina wrens carrying 
nesting material to a hanging basket of fuchsia suspended from a beam under the 
ceiling of our otherwise unenclosed back porch. By the weekend of 7/26-7/27, we 
suspected that they were incubating their clutch. August 10 was the first day 
we observed food being brought to the nest, but the eggs may have hatched a day 
or so earlier. My wife saw an adult bringing food to the nest early in the 
morning on 8/21, but the nest was empty by the afternoon, and so, to our great 
disappointment, we totally missed what we assume was the successful fledging of 
the young. We never peered into the nest (a domed structure with the entrance 
located on the side facing the backyard) to count babies, either. The nest 
location was about 10 feet from our back door and five feet from a kitchen 
window from which we could observe the activity. Since we spend very little 
time sitting on the porch, the birds took little or no notice of us and flew 
fairly directly to the nest when delivering food. We once heard them making 
nervous-sounding vocalizations when a seemingly oblivious chipmunk loitered for 
awhile on the ground under their nest location until we drove it away. My wife 
also once saw the wrens drive away a downy woodpecker that landed briefly on a 
post near the nest. Though we rarely heard the male giving its full song during 
the nesting period, at least one of the birds (the male?) spent an amazing 
amount of time (especially in late morning and during the afternoon) repeating 
monotonously the brief slurred trill call that is one of the wrens common 
vocalizations. It gave this call from many locations close to our house, but 
perhaps its favorite calling perch was the handle of our lawn mower, which was 
for some days parked on our porch about ten feet from the nest. We believe that 
the frequency of calling increased as the fledging date approached; if so, it 
suggests that the vocalizing was directed mostly at the nestlings. Perhaps some 
learning of the call goes on at this period. Weve hardly heard this call, or 
any other, since the young (presumably) fledged. 

 Over the many years that weve lived in our South Hill house, weve 
occasionally had house wrens and chickadees nest in the hollow top of a post at 
the corner of the porch, but having any bird make a nest in a hanging basket 
was a first for us. The poor fuchsia plant showed signs of getting very thirsty 
as the nesting period progressed, but it survived (albeit with no blooms at 
this point). We are wondering how frequently hanging baskets (or other 
planters) are utilized by Carolina wrens (or any other species) as nest sites. 
Two instances in Ithaca in the same season might suggest that its not a rare 
occurrence, but I cant recall any other reports in previous years (which, 
given my memory, proves nothing). Perhaps this post will spur some 
recollections of others. In any case, our wrens have made this a fun and 
memorable summer for birds even though weve seldom gotten out in the field. 

 And a couple of other thoughts. For decades, weve had house wrens nesting in 
our backyard in bird houses that weve provided. The last wren house fell apart 
a couple of years ago, and we have not replaced it. So now we have no house 
wrens, and for the first time (to our knowledge) weve had a pair of Carolina 
wrens nesting around the house. Is this a coincidence, or do these wrens 
exhibit interspecific territoriality (I havent researched this point in BNA)? 
Also, last winter was the sort of brutally cold season that is supposed to 
result in high mortality on Carolina wrens, yet we had a pair around our 
feeders all winterperhaps the same pair that nested here this summer. Have 
others noticed any decrease in the Carolina wren population this year? If not, 
perhaps feeders are mitigating the losses that this species formerly suffered 
during harsh winters. 


  Lindsay Goodloe 
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Subject: MT Pleasant Bobolink Common Ravens
From: "Marie P. Read" <mpr5 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 20:46:54 +0000
Around 10 this morning (Sunday) I was walking past the field just east of the 
observatory, where the recently mowed grass was being turned by a tractor. 
Overhead 3 Common Ravens were wheeling, giving lots of calls, checking out the 
newly mowed areas for dead (or soon to be dead) things exposed by the mowera 
bit gruesome to think about but they are scavengers after all. One of the 3 
carried off a beakful of who-knows-what back into the nearby woodsmaybe to 
consume at leisure? Or maybe a juvenile was waiting there? 


Marie


Marie Read Wildlife Photography
452 Ringwood Road
Freeville NY  13068 USA

Phone  607-539-6608
e-mail   mpr5 AT cornell.edu

http://www.marieread.com

Author of Sierra Wings: Birds of the Mono Lake Basin    Available here:


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Subject: Carolina wrens nesting in fuchsia hanging basket
From: Lindsay Goodloe <lg32 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 17:32:24 +0000
 I was interested in Dave Nutters recent reports on a pair of Carolina wrens 
that successfully nested in a hanging planter on his back porch. It was just a 
few days after his first report (7/18) that we noticed Carolina wrens carrying 
nesting material to a hanging basket of fuchsia suspended from a beam under the 
ceiling of our otherwise unenclosed back porch. By the weekend of 7/26-7/27, we 
suspected that they were incubating their clutch. August 10 was the first day 
we observed food being brought to the nest, but the eggs may have hatched a day 
or so earlier. My wife saw an adult bringing food to the nest early in the 
morning on 8/21, but the nest was empty by the afternoon, and so, to our great 
disappointment, we totally missed what we assume was the successful fledging of 
the young. We never peered into the nest (a domed structure with the entrance 
located on the side facing the backyard) to count babies, either. The nest 
location was about 10 feet from our back door and five feet from a kitchen 
window from which we could observe the activity. Since we spend very little 
time sitting on the porch, the birds took little or no notice of us and flew 
fairly directly to the nest when delivering food. We once heard them making 
nervous-sounding vocalizations when a seemingly oblivious chipmunk loitered for 
awhile on the ground under their nest location until we drove it away. My wife 
also once saw the wrens drive away a downy woodpecker that landed briefly on a 
post near the nest. Though we rarely heard the male giving its full song during 
the nesting period, at least one of the birds (the male?) spent an amazing 
amount of time (especially in late morning and during the afternoon) repeating 
monotonously the brief slurred trill call that is one of the wrens common 
vocalizations. It gave this call from many locations close to our house, but 
perhaps its favorite calling perch was the handle of our lawn mower, which was 
for some days parked on our porch about ten feet from the nest. We believe that 
the frequency of calling increased as the fledging date approached; if so, it 
suggests that the vocalizing was directed mostly at the nestlings. Perhaps some 
learning of the call goes on at this period. Weve hardly heard this call, or 
any other, since the young (presumably) fledged. 

 Over the many years that weve lived in our South Hill house, weve 
occasionally had house wrens and chickadees nest in the hollow top of a post at 
the corner of the porch, but having any bird make a nest in a hanging basket 
was a first for us. The poor fuchsia plant showed signs of getting very thirsty 
as the nesting period progressed, but it survived (albeit with no blooms at 
this point). We are wondering how frequently hanging baskets (or other 
planters) are utilized by Carolina wrens (or any other species) as nest sites. 
Two instances in Ithaca in the same season might suggest that its not a rare 
occurrence, but I cant recall any other reports in previous years (which, 
given my memory, proves nothing). Perhaps this post will spur some 
recollections of others. In any case, our wrens have made this a fun and 
memorable summer for birds even though weve seldom gotten out in the field. 

 And a couple of other thoughts. For decades, weve had house wrens nesting in 
our backyard in bird houses that weve provided. The last wren house fell apart 
a couple of years ago, and we have not replaced it. So now we have no house 
wrens, and for the first time (to our knowledge) weve had a pair of Carolina 
wrens nesting around the house. Is this a coincidence, or do these wrens 
exhibit interspecific territoriality (I havent researched this point in BNA)? 
Also, last winter was the sort of brutally cold season that is supposed to 
result in high mortality on Carolina wrens, yet we had a pair around our 
feeders all winterperhaps the same pair that nested here this summer. Have 
others noticed any decrease in the Carolina wren population this year? If not, 
perhaps feeders are mitigating the losses that this species formerly suffered 
during harsh winters. 


Lindsay Goodloe

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Subject: * possible * connecticut warbler off Bluegrass lane, ne ithaca
From: Tom Schulenberg <tss62 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 12:16:27 -0400
Emphasis on possible, since I couldn't get much of a look. Seemed to have
good white eyering and long undertail coverts. It was at the the edge of
the woods at the south end of the straight stretch on bluegrass - from the
south end of the red barn, walk west 100+ yards. Bird was just past the
patch of japanese knotwood, at the small gap.

tss

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Subject: summer tanager
From: Susan Fast <sustfast AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 09:11:42 -0700
At 1145, I heard a different bird song from the large maple over the house. 
Robin-like series of phrases, each phrase of three parts. I listened to it 
sing for about 10 minutes before it flew out into view--about robin sized; 
large, thick bill; splotched yellow-orange. Most probably a female SUMMER 
TANAGER. It flew off, but I'll report if I hear it again. 


Steve Fast
Brooktondale
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Subject: Summerhill SF Sunday
From: bob mcguire <bmcguire AT clarityconnect.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 12:04:15 -0400
I had a long walk up & down Salt Road this morning. As was to be expected at 
this time of year, it was rather quiet bird-wise. Along with the usual 
chickadees, nuthatches, and Common Yellowthroats I did have a few unexpected 
and pleasant surprises. Not the goshawk I had hoped for, but a RED-SHOULDERED 
HAWK called once (one series of 5 notes) from off to the east. The greatest 
activity was at the intersection of Salt & Hoag with a feeding flock that 
included four BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS and a young Rose-breasted Grosbeak. A Great 
Crested Flycatcher called persistently from the direction of Dresser Road. The 
other singing birds of note were Eastern Wood-Pewee, Brown Creeper, and a 
Red-eyed Vireo. 


Bob McGuire
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Subject: Re: No Willet at Myers
From: Jim Tarolli <jmtarolli9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 10:08:03 -0400
Dave Wheeler and I last saw the Willet lastnight at about 7:40pm when it
flew to Salt Point and went around the point, out of view from Myers. It
did look like it landed on shore there.

Jim

On Sunday, August 24, 2014, Stuart Krasnoff  wrote:

> No sign of Willet at Myrrs or Salt Pt. This morning.  Semipalmated Plover
> and Sandpiper plus Least on spit at  0740. Just one Spotted there now.
>
> From the semi-opposable thumbs of SB Krasnoff via iPhone
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Baldwinsville, NY

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Subject: No Willet at Myers
From: Stuart Krasnoff <sbk1 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 13:59:05 +0000
No sign of Willet at Myrrs or Salt Pt. This morning. Semipalmated Plover and 
Sandpiper plus Least on spit at 0740. Just one Spotted there now. 


From the semi-opposable thumbs of SB Krasnoff via iPhone
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Subject: today's Knox-Marsellus field trip
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 02:26:08 +0000 (GMT)
Here's a quick report, even though I was not the leader for today's shorebird 
field trip onto the otherwise-restricted dikes around Knox-Marsellus marsh at 
Montezuma NWR. The heavy rains of the past few days have raised the water level 
enough to cover all mud and flood much of the grass. The number of shorebirds 
is down, and the viewing is challenging but there is still a good variety. 


Semipalmated Plover - 1
Greater Yellowlegs - several in water past their bellies, apparently swimming 
in channels between peninsulas 

Lesser Yellowlegs - several feeding the wet grass of what used to be dry part 
of peninsulas 

Ruddy Turnstone - 1 non-breeding plumage, mostly very hard to see in wet grass 
of peninsulas among gulls 

Sanderling - 1 adult non-breeding plumage, mostly very hard to see in wet grass
Pectoral Sandpiper - 2
White-rumped Sandpiper - 2 at north end, only seen by me after everyone else 
turned back 

Semipalmated Sandpiper - a few seen by the group, a couple dozen at the north 
end 

Least Sandpiper - a few seen by the group, some flew into grass and disappeared
Short-billed Dowitcher - at least 3 juveniles of the 5 dowitchers I saw
Long-billed Dowitcher - seen by the main group before I was part of it

I understand that efforts are already underway to drain water from the 
impoundment and expose the mudflats again, but the process takes a few days. 
More shorebirds should be on the way, including additional possible species and 
the juveniles of species we've seen so far. 


I'll be leading a field trip to the same area on Sunday 31 August. We'll meet 
at the Montezuma NWR Visitor Center at 8am and caravan from there. Please sign 
up through the refuge by calling 315-568-5987. These trips are open to the 
public and there is no fee. I encourage people who have scopes to bring and 
share them so everyone can learn more about these cool long-distance migrants. 


The following field trip in this series after that is three weeks later on 
Sunday 21 September, meeting at the Montezuma NWR Visitor Center at 8:30am and 
hosted by Cayuga Bird Club President Paul Anderson. 


--Dave Nutter
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Subject: Re: WILLET Myers Point now
From: "Kenneth V. Rosenberg" <kvr2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 00:14:14 +0000
I did send this post at 5:30 as I was watching the bird- don't know why it 
didn't arrive until 2 hours later. Sorry about that. 


Ken

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 23, 2014, at 7:22 PM, "Kenneth V. Rosenberg"  wrote:
> 
> Giving close views along with a SANDERLING now - 5:30 pm
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
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Subject: Willet at Myer's Point
From: Gary Kohlenberg <jgk25 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 21:31:22 +0000
 Ann and I stopped by Myers Point this afternoon to try and find a Sanderling 
for her year list. When we arrived there was a large wader on the point. My 
initial thought was a Greater Yellowlegs until it flew, the bold black and 
white wing stripes confirmed it was in fact a WESTERN WILLET. He moved between 
Salt Point and Myers hunting successfully for crustaceans. One whole crayfish 
went down-the-hatch without to much fuss. The Willet seemed unconcerned with 
activity at one point being too close to digiscope. I was able to get a photo 
just with my bare phone. 

 The SANDERLING was present and also two SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, one of which 
stayed on the island in Salmon Creek. 


Gary 
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Subject: Willet at Myers
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 23:02:26 +0000
For those who are not on Cayuga RBA, there has been a Willet at Myers from 
about 3.00 PM onwards found by Gary K. Just now Jim Taroli sent an RBA and is 
still present! 




Meena





Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: http://tinyurl.com/kn6q2p4
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/140817samplebook.pdf




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Subject: Fw: NNYBirds: Brown Booby Champlain Bridge
From: Janet Akin <jakin AT rochester.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 16:33:56 -0400
In case someone hasn’t heard about this bird I thought I would forward this. 
Janet Akin 


From: mailto:Northern_NY_Birds AT yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Saturday, August 23, 2014 10:39 AM
To: VTBirds ; Northern NY Birds 
Subject: NNYBirds: Brown Booby Champlain Bridge

  
There is a BROWN BOOBY sitting on the water on the north side of the Champlain 
Bridge at the Crown Point SHS. It is currently in VT waters but was originally 
found with the gulls on shore on the NY side. 


Correction, it is now back on land with the gulls on the NY side. 

Gary Chapin
Ticonderoga, NY

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3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

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Subject: Willet, Myers Point
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 16:43:15 -0400
A nice molting adult Western WILLET found by Ann Mitchell and Gary
Kohlenberg a short while ago is still on the spit at Myers Point, Cayuga
Lake, Tompkins Co. Adult SANDERLING and juvenile SEMIPALMATED PLOVER are
also present.

Jay

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NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Willet, Myers Point
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 16:43:15 -0400
A nice molting adult Western WILLET found by Ann Mitchell and Gary
Kohlenberg a short while ago is still on the spit at Myers Point, Cayuga
Lake, Tompkins Co. Adult SANDERLING and juvenile SEMIPALMATED PLOVER are
also present.

Jay

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

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