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Updated on Wednesday, March 4 at 08:13 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Gray-headed Fish-Eagle,©Jan Wilczur

04 Mar Northern Harrier [Stephanie Greenwood ]
4 Mar Cardinal Song [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
3 Mar Re:Tufted Duck, Ithaca Yacht Club [Jay McGowan ]
3 Mar IYC this Morning [bob mcguire ]
2 Mar On the inlet in Ithaca [Tobias Dean ]
2 Mar Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
2 Mar Re: Tufted Duck, Ithaca Yacht Club [david nicosia ]
2 Mar bald eagles [Ray Zimmerman ]
2 Mar Gyrfalcon, no [Dave K ]
2 Mar Tufted Duck, Ithaca Yacht Club [Jay McGowan ]
2 Mar Tufted Duck, Ithaca Yacht Club [Jay McGowan ]
2 Mar Yard Screech [Suan Hsi Yong ]
1 Mar Tufted Titmouse singing [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
1 Mar Re: Myers ["Kenneth V. Rosenberg" ]
1 Mar Snow buntings [Carl Steckler ]
1 Mar RE: Ulysses Bald Eagle nest [Sarah Gould ]
01 Mar REDPOLLS ["Ellen D. Haith" ]
1 Mar Myers [Birding ]
1 Mar Fwd: Around Icy Cayuga Lake Today Feb 28 2015 ["Kenneth V. Rosenberg" ]
1 Mar Finder is the looser and stealer is the winner: Birding on seneca river Baldwinsville and Syracuse aiport [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
1 Mar Finder is the looser and stealer is the winner: Birding on seneca river Baldwinsville and Syracuse aiport ["Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [oneidabirds]" ]
01 Mar Ulysses Bald Eagle nest [Dave Nutter ]
1 Mar Canoga area Saturday 28 Feb [Dave Nutter ]
1 Mar Bald eagles [John Eliot Parks ]
1 Mar Surf scoter @ Myers [Suan Yong ]
1 Mar Re: Around Icy Cayuga Lake Today Feb 28 2015 ["Kenneth V. Rosenberg" ]
1 Mar Around Icy Cayuga Lake Today Feb 28 2015 [david nicosia ]
28 Feb Snowy Yale Farm [Suan Yong ]
28 Feb Bald eagles and tundra swans on frozen Cayuga Lake [Sarah Gould ]
28 Feb Re: No Gyrfalcon, Yes Snowy Owls and Rough-legged Hawk [david nicosia ]
28 Feb Re: No Gyrfalcon, Yes Snowy Owls and Rough-legged Hawk ["Kenneth V. Rosenberg" ]
28 Feb Re: peregrines on Bradfield Hall [Dave Nutter ]
27 Feb No Gyrfalcon, Yes Snowy Owls and Rough-legged Hawk ["Michael Tetlow " ]
28 Feb Re: Clarification about anti-rant [Jody W Enck ]
27 Feb Merlin, RL Hawk, no Gyr [M Miller ]
27 Feb Myers and airport, Fri 2/27 [Mark Chao ]
27 Feb Monday Night Seminar--The Talented Superb Lyrebird [Marc Devokaitis ]
27 Feb Re: rare bird rant [Janet Akin ]
27 Feb Re: EBird info & IPhone question [Scott Haber ]
27 Feb EBird info & IPhone question [Glenn Wilson ]
27 Feb Suggestion on gyrfalcon [M Miller ]
27 Feb Redpolls again [Andrea Sears ]
27 Feb Re: Cayuga RBA [Jay McGowan ]
27 Feb Re: rare bird rant [Brad Walker ]
27 Feb Cayuga RBA ["Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes" ]
27 Feb Re: rare bird rant [Carl Steckler ]
27 Feb RE:Peregrines! ["Karel V. Sedlacek" ]
27 Feb Re: rare bird rant [Gary Kohlenberg ]
27 Feb Peregrines! [Andy Turner ]
27 Feb No Gyrfalcon this morning on Stahl Road [Brad Walker ]
27 Feb Re: rare bird rant [Rob Blye ]
27 Feb Re: rare bird rant [David Diaz ]
27 Feb Re: peregrines on Bradfield Hall [Ray Zimmerman ]
27 Feb Re: rare bird rant [Jody W Enck ]
27 Feb rare bird rant [Dave Nutter ]
27 Feb owl swoop [Joshua Snodgrass ]
27 Feb More info on gyrfalcon [M Miller ]
26 Feb Gyrfalcon - finally! [M Miller ]
26 Feb West Side [Susan Fast ]
26 Feb Union Springs: Squirrel Notodric mange [John and Fritzie Blizzard ]
26 Feb Re: BBC News: The girl who gets gifts from birds [Carol Keeler ]
26 Feb south Cayuga ice [Jay McGowan ]
26 Feb Sapsucker Woods walks [Linda Orkin ]
26 Feb redpolls [Andrea Sears ]
26 Feb Downtown Raven []
26 Feb Yellow-bellied Sapsucker ["W. Larry Hymes" ]
26 Feb Ice on the lake [Nancy ]
26 Feb BBC News: The girl who gets gifts from birds [Stephanie Greenwood ]
26 Feb Bald Eagle? [Marc Devokaitis ]
25 Feb Union Springs Bluebirds [John and Fritzie Blizzard ]
26 Feb Re: peregrines on Bradfield Hall [Dave Nutter ]
25 Feb Re: Turkey Vulture [Anne Clark ]
25 Feb Turkey Vultures here all winter ["W. Larry Hymes" ]
25 Feb Re: Turkey Vulture [John and Sue Gregoire ]
25 Feb Bald Eagles at Game Farm ["Kevin J. McGowan" ]
25 Feb Re: Turkey Vulture [Linda Orkin ]

Subject: Northern Harrier
From: Stephanie Greenwood <stpegreenwood AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 07:42:24 -0500
FOY for me Northern Harrier hunting in the fields south of my house 
being harried by two crows.

-- 
Stephanie Greenwood


U.S.
Ecovillage at Ithaca
221 Rachel Carson Way
Ithaca, NY 14850
607 280 1050

England
73 Kynaston Road
London N16 0EB
07946 341208








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Subject: Cardinal Song
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 12:26:13 +0000
?Hi all,

I have been hearing the cardinal sing, but to my ear the song seems different 
than the usual he used to sing in the past time this year at this time of the 
year. Instead of singing "kiddo kiddo" he seem to be singing a different tune. 
So I am wondering if this means something else. I know one female from my area 
presumably his mate was lost to a Cooper's Hawk as meal. So I am not sure if he 
is advertising for a female and territory or he is singing the usual song. I 
wanted to record the song but at that time my heater was blasting with full 
force. This year it is on most of the mornings due to really cold temperatures. 
May be tomorrow I will give it a try. 



Does anyone know of the different tunes cardinal use for different purposes? I 
know once some one gave a talk on cardinal songs but I believe he did not touch 
this subject. 



Also a note of interest for those music and nature song lovers about this 
special events https://westfield.org/conferences/environsmessiaen/schedule.html 



Check it out.


Cheers

Meena




Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://www.haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: https://plus.google.com/118047473426099383469/posts
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/dragonflies/samplebook.pdf




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Subject: Re:Tufted Duck, Ithaca Yacht Club
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 12:00:14 -0500
All,
The short-crested male TUFTED DUCK continues at the Ithaca Yacht Club in
Ulysses this morning, sleeping with other Aythya close to shore just north
of the buildings.

Jay

On Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 12:30 PM, Jay McGowan  wrote:

> A male TUFTED DUCK was found this morning by Tim Lenz just offshore from
> the Ithaca Yacht Club on Glenwood Road off of Rt. 89 in the town of
> Ulysses, Tompkins County, west shore of Cayuga Lake. Good numbers of Aythya
> and mergansers were also present both north and south of the point, and
> good views of the ice edge to both the north and the south were possible.
> Other highlights from this spot this morning were at least 29 RED-NECKED
> GREBES, 3 HORNED GREBES, 2 RED-THROATED LOONS (one adult and one immature),
> 9 LONG-TAILED DUCKS, well over 100 RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS, a male
> RING-NECKED DUCK x SCAUP HYBRID, as well as the usual five Aythya and other
> expected waterfowl.
>
> While the Tufted was an adult male and is almost certainly the same that
> has been around since January, I never saw a very long tuft on this bird,
> only a bit of a spiky crest. Compared to many of my looks at the bird off
> Hog Hole in January and at Myers last week where the long, drooping tuft
> was almost always visible, this bird seemed to have a much shorter crest.
> Still, it was diving a lot, so it may have just been slicked back and not
> showing the full extent of the feathers. Nevertheless, it's worth keeping
> on eye on this bird and continuing to check around Myers in the event that
> there are two different birds on the lake. Other than the apparent smaller
> crest, I didn't see any evidence that this morning's bird could be a hybrid.
>
> Full list here:
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22142162
>
>
> --
> Jay McGowan
> Macaulay Library
> Cornell Lab of Ornithology
> jwm57 AT cornell.edu
>



-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jwm57 AT cornell.edu

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--
Subject: IYC this Morning
From: bob mcguire <bmcguire AT clarityconnect.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 11:50:13 -0500
I spent half an hour scoping the open water around Glenwood Point this morning. 
No Tufted Duck - and it appears that the scaup flock that it had been seen with 
has moved on. There were numerous Red-breasted Mergansers in addition to the 
Commons, a group of 7 Long-tailed Ducks (one male in full winter plumage, long 
tail included), one Pied-billed Grebe (could well have been others around and 
under the docks), and a distant Red-necked Grebe. No sign of the 
recently-reported Red-throated Loons. 


Bob McGuire
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Subject: On the inlet in Ithaca
From: Tobias Dean <tdean10 AT twcny.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 19:24:19 -0500
I was able to enjoy two of my interests by skiing on the inlet, starting at
Cherry St and heading out to the white lighthouse. A steady north wind made
returning easier.
     there was what seemed to be a solitary tundra swan possibly in
distress just south of the entrance to the Marina. It was sitting and did
not get up as I skied by, about 50' away. It opened its black bill though
it wasn't making any noise.
     Mainly I saw  Canadian Geese flying up to the open water, wherever
that is, as they have been doing each day. I see them daily flying back and
forth above Inlet Valley on South Hill.  Also some occasional duck species
too high up for me to identify.
     I heard a mockingbird on Cherry st. when I started out.

                            Toby Dean

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Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 22:55:49 +0000
RBA *  New York*  Syracuse* March 02, 2015*  NYSY  03. 02. 15 Hotline: 
Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):February 23, 2015 - March 02, 2015to report by 
e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering upstate NY counties: Cayuga, Montezuma 
National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC) (just outside 
Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison 
& Cortlandcompiled: March 02 AT 5:00 p.m. (EST)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga 
Audubon Homepage: www.onondagaaudubon.org  #432 Monday March 02, 
2015 Greetings. This is the Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert for the week 
of February 09, 2014 Highlights:----------- 

RED-NECKED GREBETRUMPETER SWANHARLEQUIN DUCKBARROW’S GOLDENEYERED-SHOULDERED 
HAWK MERLINICELAND GULLLESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLSNOWY OWLSHORT-EARED OWLEVENING 
GROSBEAKCHIPPING SPARROWWHITE-CROWNED SPARROW 


Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex 
(MWC)------------ 

No reports this week

Derby Hill------------
     The Hawk Watch at Derby Hill began yesterday. David Wheeler will be the 
Hawk Counter this season. Nothing was seen in five hours of watching. 


Oneida County------------
     2/23:  A female HARLEQUIN DUCK was discovered below the dam at Delta 
Lake. It was seen as recently as yesterday.     2/25: A SAW-WHET OWL was 
found resting in a tree in Waterville. Unfortunately at one point it chose to 
fly and the observer saw a cooper’s Hawk take the Owl. Nature favors the big 
bird. A MERLIN was seen on Turin Road in Rome.     3/1: An ICELAND GULL was 
seen at Delta Lake. 


Onondaga County------------
     2/25: Two TRUMPETER SWANS continue at Baldwinsville below the dam. They 
have been seen daily and were present again today in the afternoon.  An 
overwintering CHIPPING SPARROW was again seen at a feeder in Skaneateles.   
  2/26: A SNOWY OWL was again seen at Hancock Airport in Syracuse.     
2/28: A LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL and 3 ICELAND GULLS were discovered below the 
dam in Baldwinsville. also seen and photographed was a RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, 
quite uncommon at this area.     3/1: 2 adult WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS were 
seen at a feeder on Kester Road east of Elbridge. 


Oswego County------------
     2/23: The female BARROW’S GOLDENEYE continues below the bridge in 
Phoenix and was seen daily including today.     3/1: A RED-NECKED GREBE was 
seen in the Oswego River in Phoenix. 


Madison County------------


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Subject: Re: Tufted Duck, Ithaca Yacht Club
From: david nicosia <daven1024 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 21:14:34 +0000
Thanks to the timely CayugaRBA I was able to get down to the Ithaca Yacht Club 
this afternoon soon after the TUFTED DUCK was seen. This is why I strongly feel 
folks should report rare birds as soon as possible so that others can enjoy. 

I was up birding around Myer's Point, and Ladoga with my friend Dan Watkins 
when the TUDU was reported. There was a lot more ice around these areas than on 
Saturday. The small open water hole in the ice off Ladoga where Jay originally 
found the TUFTED DUCK the other day was nearly void of Aythya species and 
really didn't have much more than a few COMMON MERGANSERS, GOLDENEYES etc this 
morning. There were much less waterfowl in general at Myer's than on Saturday. 
We did get the 2 SURF SCOTERS and 3 WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS seen yesterday which 
were target birds. There was also one HORNED GREBE. Otherwise nothing different 
than what has been seen recently. 

We arrived at the Yacht Club around 1245 pm and the TUFTED DUCK was still very 
close to the shore. I got some nice photos and a short video.... 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/davenicosia/sets/72157651066408666/
As you can see in the photos the bird's tuft was not long and much 
more "spiky" as Jay mentions below. The bird was actively diving. 

Thanks again for the timely rare bird alert!!!  Dave Nicosia 
       From: Jay McGowan 
 To: Cayugabirds-L  
Cc: "Nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu"  
 Sent: Monday, March 2, 2015 12:30 PM
 Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Tufted Duck, Ithaca Yacht Club
   
A male TUFTED DUCK was found this morning by Tim Lenz just offshore from the 
Ithaca Yacht Club on Glenwood Road off of Rt. 89 in the town of Ulysses, 
Tompkins County, west shore of Cayuga Lake. Good numbers of Aythya and 
mergansers were also present both north and south of the point, and good views 
of the ice edge to both the north and the south were possible. Other highlights 
from this spot this morning were at least 29 RED-NECKED GREBES, 3 HORNED 
GREBES, 2 RED-THROATED LOONS (one adult and one immature), 9 LONG-TAILED DUCKS, 
well over 100 RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS, a male RING-NECKED DUCK x SCAUP HYBRID, 
as well as the usual five Aythya and other expected waterfowl. 

While the Tufted was an adult male and is almost certainly the same that has 
been around since January, I never saw a very long tuft on this bird, only a 
bit of a spiky crest. Compared to many of my looks at the bird off Hog Hole in 
January and at Myers last week where the long, drooping tuft was almost always 
visible, this bird seemed to have a much shorter crest. Still, it was diving a 
lot, so it may have just been slicked back and not showing the full extent of 
the feathers. Nevertheless, it's worth keeping on eye on this bird and 
continuing to check around Myers in the event that there are two different 
birds on the lake. Other than the apparent smaller crest, I didn't see any 
evidence that this morning's bird could be a hybrid. 

Full list here:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22142162


-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jwm57 AT cornell.edu
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Subject: bald eagles
From: Ray Zimmerman <rz10 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 14:27:03 -0500
A colleague of mine just sent me some photos he took last Friday of bald eagles 
on the ice on Cayuga lake. One shot showed 6 eagles (1 adult and 5 juveniles). 
Four of the juveniles were clearly all trying to get their share of the same 
meal, complete with some in-air clashes. Taken from a house on Powers Rd., on 
the east shore a couple of miles north of the Cayuga Station power plant. 


   Ray


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Subject: Gyrfalcon, no
From: Dave K <fishwatchers AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 13:38:53 -0500
I don't know if the eBird sightings are up to date but the last Gyrfalcon in 
Seneca County was reported on Feb 24th. The Ulster County NY bird, which was 
reported well over 100 times since Feb 6th, has not been reported since Feb 
28th. The Ontario Canada LaFleche Landfill bird, reported over 50 times since 
Jan 10th, not submitted since Feb 24th. 

 
With all of the pro eyes in Seneca County on Saturday, I would guess there's 
good chance it would be found if still here. More species on eBird in Seneca 
County than in Tompkins County that day for the first time this winter 
(probably ever). 

 
Today, there was plenty of prey at the Lott farm grain bins, the barns and 
silos on Stahl Rd, and Canoga Spring ....... No area cleaned out or scared off. 

 
Maybe all three will be reported again but they had to go back North eventually 
and I'm guessing they sensed the weather pattern change. 

 
Will keep hitting this route once or twice a day hoping for a sighting. I'd 
like to observe when I actually know what I'm looking at. 

 
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Tufted Duck, Ithaca Yacht Club
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 12:30:06 -0500
A male TUFTED DUCK was found this morning by Tim Lenz just offshore from
the Ithaca Yacht Club on Glenwood Road off of Rt. 89 in the town of
Ulysses, Tompkins County, west shore of Cayuga Lake. Good numbers of Aythya
and mergansers were also present both north and south of the point, and
good views of the ice edge to both the north and the south were possible.
Other highlights from this spot this morning were at least 29 RED-NECKED
GREBES, 3 HORNED GREBES, 2 RED-THROATED LOONS (one adult and one immature),
9 LONG-TAILED DUCKS, well over 100 RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS, a male
RING-NECKED DUCK x SCAUP HYBRID, as well as the usual five Aythya and other
expected waterfowl.

While the Tufted was an adult male and is almost certainly the same that
has been around since January, I never saw a very long tuft on this bird,
only a bit of a spiky crest. Compared to many of my looks at the bird off
Hog Hole in January and at Myers last week where the long, drooping tuft
was almost always visible, this bird seemed to have a much shorter crest.
Still, it was diving a lot, so it may have just been slicked back and not
showing the full extent of the feathers. Nevertheless, it's worth keeping
on eye on this bird and continuing to check around Myers in the event that
there are two different birds on the lake. Other than the apparent smaller
crest, I didn't see any evidence that this morning's bird could be a hybrid.

Full list here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22142162


-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jwm57 AT cornell.edu

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--
Subject: Tufted Duck, Ithaca Yacht Club
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 12:30:06 -0500
A male TUFTED DUCK was found this morning by Tim Lenz just offshore from
the Ithaca Yacht Club on Glenwood Road off of Rt. 89 in the town of
Ulysses, Tompkins County, west shore of Cayuga Lake. Good numbers of Aythya
and mergansers were also present both north and south of the point, and
good views of the ice edge to both the north and the south were possible.
Other highlights from this spot this morning were at least 29 RED-NECKED
GREBES, 3 HORNED GREBES, 2 RED-THROATED LOONS (one adult and one immature),
9 LONG-TAILED DUCKS, well over 100 RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS, a male
RING-NECKED DUCK x SCAUP HYBRID, as well as the usual five Aythya and other
expected waterfowl.

While the Tufted was an adult male and is almost certainly the same that
has been around since January, I never saw a very long tuft on this bird,
only a bit of a spiky crest. Compared to many of my looks at the bird off
Hog Hole in January and at Myers last week where the long, drooping tuft
was almost always visible, this bird seemed to have a much shorter crest.
Still, it was diving a lot, so it may have just been slicked back and not
showing the full extent of the feathers. Nevertheless, it's worth keeping
on eye on this bird and continuing to check around Myers in the event that
there are two different birds on the lake. Other than the apparent smaller
crest, I didn't see any evidence that this morning's bird could be a hybrid.

Full list here:
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-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jwm57 AT cornell.edu

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Subject: Yard Screech
From: Suan Hsi Yong <suan.yong AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:45:32 -0500
The chickadees outside my front door were screaming away at something while
I hurriedly put on my boots, and with the aid of my infrared camera I soon
found in the spruce tree a screech owl tucked away in the thick boughs. Not
an easy thing to see -- in fact, I could never get a view of its face, just
its lower parts, and hints of ear tufts (on which I based my ID). New yard
bird -- or yardish (since it could only be seen from the sidewalk outside
my unit).

Suan

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Subject: Tufted Titmouse singing
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 21:40:31 +0000
?A Tufted Titmouse was singing in my backyard about half an hour ago. He 
sounded very cheery to me! 


Meena


Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://www.haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: https://plus.google.com/118047473426099383469/posts
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/dragonflies/samplebook.pdf




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Subject: Re: Myers
From: "Kenneth V. Rosenberg" <kvr2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 20:05:29 +0000
In addition to the great list of birds off Myers Point, among the nice 
diversity of other waterfowl, I picked out a hybrid male RING-NECKED DUCK X 
SCAUP in the small open water hole off Lagoda Point-- sharply demarcated gray 
back and clean white sides, with the curved demarcation dipping lower on the 
front end. Looked like one of the two birds Marshall picked out earlier this 
winter at Hog Hole. No Tufted Duck visible. 


Ken

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 1, 2015, at 10:26 AM, "Birding"  wrote:
> 
> 2 Surf Scoter 
> 4 White-winged Scoter
> 1 Red-necked Grebe
> 1 Horned Grebe
> Viewed from flagpole
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
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Subject: Snow buntings
From: Carl Steckler <nyleatherneck3516 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 10:47:23 -0800
hundreds of Snow Buntings Davis Rd Lansing 600 block by large dairy farm

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Subject: RE: Ulysses Bald Eagle nest
From: Sarah Gould <sj49 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 16:46:25 +0000
I live on Maplewood Rd and we look up at the nest tree each morning as we are 
driving by on our way to work. For the past month there has been an adult in 
the tree near the nest at least two out of five weekday mornings. 


Sarah

From: bounce-118876433-14823920 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-118876433-14823920 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Dave Nutter 

Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2015 9:18 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Ulysses Bald Eagle nest

Several people have mentioned Bald Eagles in the vicinity of the Ithaca Yacht 
Club along the west shore of Cayuga Lake in the Tompkins County town of 
Ulysses. Last Thursday Ann Mitchell & verified that the nest, which can be 
scoped from Maplewood Rd, is again occupied by an adult BALD EAGLE either 
incubating or brooding. Its wingtips extended above the rim of the mostly 
obscured nest, and the white of its crown, when seen at high power, was clearly 
composed of fluffy feathers and was not a random blob of snow. 


--Dave Nutter
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Subject: REDPOLLS
From: "Ellen D. Haith" <elliehaith44 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 10:52:25 -0500
Five F and one stunning M right now, Trumansburg village.
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Subject: Myers
From: Birding <danskin AT twcny.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 10:25:50 -0500
2 Surf Scoter 
4 White-winged Scoter
1 Red-necked Grebe
1 Horned Grebe
Viewed from flagpole

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Fwd: Around Icy Cayuga Lake Today Feb 28 2015
From: "Kenneth V. Rosenberg" <kvr2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 15:06:00 +0000
 Meant to send this correction to the List.

Ken

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

From: "Kenneth V. Rosenberg" >
Date: March 1, 2015 at 8:32:48 AM EST
To: Dave Nutter >
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Around Icy Cayuga Lake Today Feb 28 2015

Sorry, that last, potentially confusing, line of my post last night referring 
to Seneca Landfill should have read: "Lots of falcon bait, but no takers." 


Love that auto-correct.....

KEN


Kenneth V. Rosenberg
Conservation Science Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Office: 607-254-2412
cell: 607-342-4594
kvr2 AT cornell.edu

On Mar 1, 2015, at 8:11 AM, Dave Nutter 
> wrote: 


Ken,
What did this passage mean?
"Lots of falcon. Sit but no takers. "

--Dave Nutter

On Feb 28, 2015, at 10:38 PM, "Kenneth V. Rosenberg" 
> wrote: 


It was indeed a beautiful winter day to be out birding. I spent from about 8:30 
till 3 pm driving around the Canoga Springs area, scanning from many spots and 
running into lots of other birders, who as far as I know all came up Gyr-less. 
Besides the aforementioned SNOWY OWL and SHRIKE, I had a single flyover LAPLAND 
LONGSPUR along Canoga Rd, and then found a large manure spread on 96 north of 
Yellow Tavern Rd with hundreds of HORNED LARKS and SNOW BUNTINGS- my Longspur 
was likely among them but I couldn't find any. 


I also spent about an hour scanning the Seneca Landfill from 414 and North Rd, 
and although no gulls seemed to be on the landfill, there were at times 
hundreds of gulls on the air against the deep blue sky- I picked out an 
immaculate white 2nd cycle GLAUCOUS GULL and at least 3 ICELAND GULLS. Lots of 
falcon. Sit but no takers. 


Early in the morning the lake looked almost completely frozen over from the 
west side, with a thin glaze of new ice and steam rising even off Deans Cove 
and the Varick shoreline. By mid afternoon many of these areas had opened up. 


I hope the Tufted Duck is as easy tomorrow.....

Ken

Sent from my iPhone



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Subject: Finder is the looser and stealer is the winner: Birding on seneca river Baldwinsville and Syracuse aiport
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 14:22:05 +0000
​Hi all,

Yesterday I ventured into our neighboring areas for some birding.


As we were entering Destiny Mall's parking lot a few crows were in hot pursuit 
of a Cooper's Hawk. I dropped of my colleagues for shopping spree at the mall. 
Ngampit and I headed to Baldwinsville via NH 690. As we joined 690 there was as 
adult Bald Eagle, which flew across parallel to our car for some distance 
giving beautiful view of itself while it did so. As we left 690 to join Van 
Buren Road another adult Bald Eagle flew across the road. 



We arrived at Red Mill Inn parking lot. We watched birds from the sidewalk on 
the bridge. The upper side of the dam was frozen, Below the dam there were 
about two dozen of Red- Breasted Mergansers and three dozens Common mergansers 
and three Hooded mergansers that slept in a depression of ice, which looked 
like a cove. While we were watching these birds one of the female Common 
merganser caught a fish and immediately it was pursued by two other females and 
they ran over the water zigzagging at various points and in between one more 
would join to try to snatch the fish form the finder's beak but the finder kept 
dodging. This went on for a few minutes when the gulls decided to give a try 
too. One of the young gulls was more successful. It snatched the fish from the 
merganser and ate it in one gulp while air borne! The finder sat stupidly on 
the water looking at the gull and other chasers were also equally dismayed. 



Then we crossed across the road to the other side of the bridge, where there 
was another sidewalk! This side river was more open and hundreds of waterfowls 
on the river. Most of the Canada Geese were sleeping among what to me looked 
like bracket fungi made of ice and to my friend they looked like Jellyfish with 
moving gills, which I later agreed to her description as they really were like 
transparent jellyfish. So it suggests that brain compares things to what you 
frequently encounter. For me I rarely encounter jelly fish, while she has spent 
more time on the beaches so to her they looked like Jellyfish. 



We spent an hour and half here sifting through the ducks and photographing and 
taking some videos too. Only problem was you looked down upon them:-) 



There were several Redheads, a few Greater Scaups, scores of more mergansers 
and Canadas. We spent time enjoying the assorted waterfowls. At one point for a 
short time, may be a few seconds all three male mergansers were in one camera 
view, I took a shot in hurry but unfortunately was not sharply focused. We 
watched the merganser do variety of things like preen, look for fish with their 
head and eyes inside water, chase each other etc. 



Another Common Merganser female caught another fish. This time chase was much 
longer and went crisscrossing the river and at one point it climbed on to the 
shore to eat peacefully but was chased off by a Canada Goose after doing 
several crisscrosses the fish was nabbed by another merganser, which was 
unnoticed by the chasers as they were still thinking that the finder had in its 
mouth and they were continuing the chase. several gulls also tried to steal it 
but were unsuccessful. 



So this made me think why they cant eat the fish as soon as they catch it. I 
think because they catch the fish along the length of the body, while to feed 
on it, it needs go head on first so they want to arrange the fish in proper 
manner to gulp on it. While the stealer probably gets it head on first so it is 
easy to eat while everyone else's attention is still on the finder. 



But it was fun to watch these games, while feeling sorry for the finder.


So I think saying in Merganser community is "finder is the looser and stealer 
is the keeper"! 



Then from here we went to Syracuse airport via NH 90 and saw another Bald Eagle 
cross the road on NH 90! 



As we arrived at the Employees parking lot there was a Snowy Owl, heavily 
barred, so female I presume sitting on a lamp post very close by. We watched it 
sometimes. Then as we were getting ready to take a shot (with camera), a truck 
on the other side of the fence came roaring down the road, the owl flew away 
further on the other side of the ice field near the runway. 


we looked for the second one but did find it.


I think we did something wrong. When we saw the owl, we straight headed to the 
parking lot, I did not see any obstruction at the parking lot. When we came out 
I was not sure if the entrance was one way as there was no sign and no car in 
the vicinity. So we came out by the same entrance which was open. A little 
further down the road, I saw another exit which had a gate and it was down. So 
I am not sure what did was right or wrong. So can anyone on the Oneida list 
tell us if we did something wrong? 




Then we headed back to pick up our mall visitors and head to have lunch in one 
of the Indian restaurants in Dewitt and do some grocery shopping. 



Overall, it was beautiful enjoyable day and I am ​glad I spent sometime 
outside. 



I will add photos and videos a little later.


Cheers

Meena

PS: Thanks to Rose for giving me a great description of the owls and Joe for 
telling me about the water fowls. In Cayuga lake basin it is very hard to find 
a Red-breasted merganser at such close distance. 










Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://www.haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: https://plus.google.com/118047473426099383469/posts
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/dragonflies/samplebook.pdf




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Subject: Finder is the looser and stealer is the winner: Birding on seneca river Baldwinsville and Syracuse aiport
From: "Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [oneidabirds]" <oneidabirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 14:22:05 +0000
​Hi all,

Yesterday I ventured into our neighboring areas for some birding.


As we were entering Destiny Mall's parking lot a few crows were in hot pursuit 
of a Cooper's Hawk. I dropped of my colleagues for shopping spree at the mall. 
Ngampit and I headed to Baldwinsville via NH 690. As we joined 690 there was as 
adult Bald Eagle, which flew across parallel to our car for some distance 
giving beautiful view of itself while it did so. As we left 690 to join Van 
Buren Road another adult Bald Eagle flew across the road. 



We arrived at Red Mill Inn parking lot. We watched birds from the sidewalk on 
the bridge. The upper side of the dam was frozen, Below the dam there were 
about two dozen of Red- Breasted Mergansers and three dozens Common mergansers 
and three Hooded mergansers that slept in a depression of ice, which looked 
like a cove. While we were watching these birds one of the female Common 
merganser caught a fish and immediately it was pursued by two other females and 
they ran over the water zigzagging at various points and in between one more 
would join to try to snatch the fish form the finder's beak but the finder kept 
dodging. This went on for a few minutes when the gulls decided to give a try 
too. One of the young gulls was more successful. It snatched the fish from the 
merganser and ate it in one gulp while air borne! The finder sat stupidly on 
the water looking at the gull and other chasers were also equally dismayed. 



Then we crossed across the road to the other side of the bridge, where there 
was another sidewalk! This side river was more open and hundreds of waterfowls 
on the river. Most of the Canada Geese were sleeping among what to me looked 
like bracket fungi made of ice and to my friend they looked like Jellyfish with 
moving gills, which I later agreed to her description as they really were like 
transparent jellyfish. So it suggests that brain compares things to what you 
frequently encounter. For me I rarely encounter jelly fish, while she has spent 
more time on the beaches so to her they looked like Jellyfish. 



We spent an hour and half here sifting through the ducks and photographing and 
taking some videos too. Only problem was you looked down upon them:-) 



There were several Redheads, a few Greater Scaups, scores of more mergansers 
and Canadas. We spent time enjoying the assorted waterfowls. At one point for a 
short time, may be a few seconds all three male mergansers were in one camera 
view, I took a shot in hurry but unfortunately was not sharply focused. We 
watched the merganser do variety of things like preen, look for fish with their 
head and eyes inside water, chase each other etc. 



Another Common Merganser female caught another fish. This time chase was much 
longer and went crisscrossing the river and at one point it climbed on to the 
shore to eat peacefully but was chased off by a Canada Goose after doing 
several crisscrosses the fish was nabbed by another merganser, which was 
unnoticed by the chasers as they were still thinking that the finder had in its 
mouth and they were continuing the chase. several gulls also tried to steal it 
but were unsuccessful. 



So this made me think why they cant eat the fish as soon as they catch it. I 
think because they catch the fish along the length of the body, while to feed 
on it, it needs go head on first so they want to arrange the fish in proper 
manner to gulp on it. While the stealer probably gets it head on first so it is 
easy to eat while everyone else's attention is still on the finder. 



But it was fun to watch these games, while feeling sorry for the finder.


So I think saying in Merganser community is "finder is the looser and stealer 
is the keeper"! 



Then from here we went to Syracuse airport via NH 90 and saw another Bald Eagle 
cross the road on NH 90! 



As we arrived at the Employees parking lot there was a Snowy Owl, heavily 
barred, so female I presume sitting on a lamp post very close by. We watched it 
sometimes. Then as we were getting ready to take a shot (with camera), a truck 
on the other side of the fence came roaring down the road, the owl flew away 
further on the other side of the ice field near the runway. 


we looked for the second one but did find it.


I think we did something wrong. When we saw the owl, we straight headed to the 
parking lot, I did not see any obstruction at the parking lot. When we came out 
I was not sure if the entrance was one way as there was no sign and no car in 
the vicinity. So we came out by the same entrance which was open. A little 
further down the road, I saw another exit which had a gate and it was down. So 
I am not sure what did was right or wrong. So can anyone on the Oneida list 
tell us if we did something wrong? 




Then we headed back to pick up our mall visitors and head to have lunch in one 
of the Indian restaurants in Dewitt and do some grocery shopping. 



Overall, it was beautiful enjoyable day and I am ​glad I spent sometime 
outside. 



I will add photos and videos a little later.


Cheers

Meena

PS: Thanks to Rose for giving me a great description of the owls and Joe for 
telling me about the water fowls. In Cayuga lake basin it is very hard to find 
a Red-breasted merganser at such close distance. 










Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://www.haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: https://plus.google.com/118047473426099383469/posts
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/dragonflies/samplebook.pdf



Subject: Ulysses Bald Eagle nest
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 14:18:01 +0000 (GMT)
Several people have mentioned Bald Eagles in the vicinity of the Ithaca Yacht 
Club along the west shore of Cayuga Lake in the Tompkins County town of 
Ulysses. Last Thursday Ann Mitchell & verified that the nest, which can be 
scoped from Maplewood Rd, is again occupied by an adult BALD EAGLE either 
incubating or brooding. Its wingtips extended above the rim of the mostly 
obscured nest, and the white of its crown, when seen at high power, was clearly 
composed of fluffy feathers and was not a random blob of snow. 


--Dave Nutter
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Subject: Canoga area Saturday 28 Feb
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 14:11:58 +0000
I also spent a good chunk of yesterday, mid-morning to early afternoon, in the 
Canoga area with Gary Kohlenberg & Ann Mitchell. While we did not see the 
Gyrfalcon (I wonder if it decided that fighting off 2 Red-tailed Hawks for a 
meal it had already chased and killed was too much bother?), we did see some 
other cool birds: 


In a field two hedgerows SE of the Canoga / Seybolt Rd intersection(s) there 
was a line of at least 14 WILD TURKEYS walking. Then we noticed large lumps in 
the trees at the edge of the woods beyond them. At least 23 Wild Turkeys were 
sitting in the trees, evidently still roosting because their heads seemed not 
to be up. Their breast feathers reflected the sun and made them look white on 
top, but their long tails with a broad tan terminal band gave them away. 


The NORTHERN SHRIKE was not quite as distant in the same direction when Jay 
McGowan pointed it out to us later. 


There was open water in the creek along the south side of Canoga Rd east of 
Seybolt Rd, and we saw 60+ MALLARDS there. Farther downstream on the north side 
of the road were 7 AMERICAN BLACK DUCKS. With the lake thickly frozen for miles 
and thinly frozen for more miles it was interesting to see the waterfowl 
gathered here. 


A light ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK near the empty/frozen/snowed-over bait ponds. This 
cool raptor did not seem to adequately explain why so many MALLARDS were flying 
around just then. 


An adult SHARP-SHINNED HAWK atop a barn at the Stahl Rd dairy farm. The ID was 
based on the apparent size compared to European Starlings flying in the 
vicinity and the goofy surprised expression on its face created by the large 
eye centered on its face (Cooper's Hawks, with their eye farther forward, look 
meaner). This bird was clutching a prey item partly hidden against a line of 
snow on the roof. I saw both red of flesh and dark of plumage, so I'm guessing 
it was a surplus starling. That farm supports a lot of birds: European 
Starlings, Rock Pigeons, American Crows, House Sparrows, Horned Larks... and 
the next trophic level, various raptors. 


A BROWN CREEPER with a flock of BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES etc in the woods along 
Leader Rd between Seybolt and NYS-89. 


A NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD on Hoster Rd.

Twenty or so SNOW BUNTINGS somewhere on Yellow Tavern Rd, and small groups of 
HORNED LARKS many places along the roadsides in farmland. 


Six RING-NECKED PHEASANTS hiding in brush northeast of the Martin Rd / Farron 
Rd. The previous two times I've been in the area there were 9 of them, and they 
were out in the open near crows working on a pheasant carcass. Hmmm... 


The very cooperative but severely backlit SNOWY OWL in the field south of the 
intersection of NYS-96A and Kime Rd, well outside the Cayuga Lake Basin as 
defined by Wiegand & Eames in 1925, but a fine consolation for those of us 
hoping for another large arctic raptor. Thanks, Mike Tetlow & Ken Rosenberg for 
pointing it out on CayugaBirds-L. This bird, sitting all day in a seemingly 
random spot in the field, for some reason walked several steps and also turned 
its body around, not just its head. 


We also admired the largely frozen Cayuga Lake and the still-liquid parts by 
Sheldrake point which were cooling off by producing thick mist, but we didn't 
scan the waterfowl under those conditions. It was odd to ignore the lake, but 
fun looking for winter land birds. 


--Dave Nutter
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Subject: Bald eagles
From: John Eliot Parks <jep5 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 10:25:48 +0000
Adult bald eagle at intersection of Stevenson and Dodge Rd. on Friday evening, 
immature bald eagle on Game Farm Rd. edge of McGowan Woods on Saturday morning. 


Dr. John E. Parks, Professor of Animal Science
Director, Cornell Raptor Program
131 Morrison Hall
Office: 607-255-2865
Cell: 607-229-3573
Jep5 AT cornell.edu


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Subject: Surf scoter @ Myers
From: Suan Yong <suan.yong AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 00:04:37 -0500
Beautiful sunny day to be out. In reviewing photos I took at Myers of the 
aythya (etc) flocks flying back and forth, I found an apparent surf scoter: 


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10206193005962084

Suan
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Subject: Re: Around Icy Cayuga Lake Today Feb 28 2015
From: "Kenneth V. Rosenberg" <kvr2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 03:37:33 +0000
It was indeed a beautiful winter day to be out birding. I spent from about 8:30 
till 3 pm driving around the Canoga Springs area, scanning from many spots and 
running into lots of other birders, who as far as I know all came up Gyr-less. 
Besides the aforementioned SNOWY OWL and SHRIKE, I had a single flyover LAPLAND 
LONGSPUR along Canoga Rd, and then found a large manure spread on 96 north of 
Yellow Tavern Rd with hundreds of HORNED LARKS and SNOW BUNTINGS- my Longspur 
was likely among them but I couldn't find any. 


I also spent about an hour scanning the Seneca Landfill from 414 and North Rd, 
and although no gulls seemed to be on the landfill, there were at times 
hundreds of gulls on the air against the deep blue sky- I picked out an 
immaculate white 2nd cycle GLAUCOUS GULL and at least 3 ICELAND GULLS. Lots of 
falcon. Sit but no takers. 


Early in the morning the lake looked almost completely frozen over from the 
west side, with a thin glaze of new ice and steam rising even off Deans Cove 
and the Varick shoreline. By mid afternoon many of these areas had opened up. 


I hope the Tufted Duck is as easy tomorrow.....

Ken

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 28, 2015, at 8:09 PM, "david nicosia" 
> wrote: 


With High Pressure overhead today I knew the wind would be light so despite the 
cold I decided to bird all day beginning in sub-zero air. My car thermometer 
dropped to minus 21F between Berkshire and Richford on Rte 38 on the way up. 
Most of Rte 38 to Dryden was close to minus 20!! First stop was Ladoga Point 
and I couldn't believe all the ice cover!! There was one small patch of ice 
free water and it was full of mainly aythya sp. with some COMMON MERGANSERS and 
MALLARDS too. The birds were tightly packed and after watching for about 20-25 
minutes I got on a sleeping TUFTED DUCK. The contrasting bright white and very 
dark back was very apparent. The bird easily stood out in the steamy air among 
the many REDHEADS, and SCAUP SP. There were several GREATER SCAUP around for 
comparison. This is the same bird Jay had...I assume. There were also 
CANVASBACKS, and RING-NECKED DUCKS too. 


Myer's Point Marina has some close-up waterfowl with great lighting for photos. 
Myer's Point was partially open and loaded with mainly aythya sp. COMMON 
GOLDENEYES, COMMON MERGANSERS with few RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS, LONG-TAILED 
DUCKS. I didn't find any grebes anywhere today! The ducks were flying back and 
forth at times between Salt Point and Myers. I would check this area given the 
shear number of waterfowl tomorrow. 


It was still sub-zero at Myer's and the cold finally got to me that I decided 
to head north and I successfully found the female BARROW'S GOLDENEYE at Phoenix 
Lock and Dam north of Syracuse. The bird had a yellow bill and very steep 
forehead. Nice comparison with the many female common goldeneyes around. 


Next stop was with many other birders... Canoga road, Seybolt and Stahl roads 
in search of the elusive gyrfalcon which eluded me too. I did find Mike 
Tetlow's SNOWY OWLS. One was exactly were Ken Rosenberg had it this morning in 
a snowy field just to the west of the intersection of Yellow Tavern Road and 
Route 96a. Then on Conoga Road before you reach 414 heading east I saw another 
SNOWY OWL in flight!!! This one was very white. 


Then back on Seybolt Road there was a NORTHERN SHRIKE that was being enjoyed by 
a large group of birders. 


I came back down the east side of Cayuga Lake and was amazed at how much ice 
there was. The only decent open ice free area I found was between Long Point st 
and Aurora bay and this place was loaded with mainly aythya sp and goldeneyes. 
Lighting was poor this afternoon so I would check this too in the morning if 
anyone is out tomorrow. 


All in all, a great day. I also noticed many geese flying high...NORTH!!! A 
sign of spring.... 


Dave Nicosia
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Subject: Around Icy Cayuga Lake Today Feb 28 2015
From: david nicosia <daven1024 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 01:08:37 +0000
With High Pressure overhead today I knew the wind would be light so despite the 
cold I decided to bird all day beginning in sub-zero air. My car thermometer 
dropped to minus 21F between Berkshire and Richford on Rte 38 on the way up. 
Most of Rte 38 to Dryden was close to minus 20!! First stop was Ladoga Point 
and I couldn't believe all the ice cover!! There was one small patch of ice 
free water and it was full of mainly aythya sp. with some COMMON MERGANSERS and 
MALLARDS too. The birds were tightly packed and after watching for about 20-25 
minutes I got on a sleeping TUFTED DUCK. The contrasting bright white and very 
dark back was very apparent. The bird easily stood out in the steamy air among 
the many REDHEADS, and SCAUP SP. There were several GREATER SCAUP around for 
comparison. This is the same bird Jay had...I assume.  There were also 
CANVASBACKS, and RING-NECKED DUCKS too.  

Myer's Point Marina has some close-up waterfowl with great lighting for photos. 
Myer's Point was partially open and loaded with mainly aythya sp. COMMON 
GOLDENEYES, COMMON MERGANSERS with few RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS, LONG-TAILED 
DUCKS. I didn't find any grebes anywhere today! The ducks were flying back and 
forth at times between Salt Point and Myers. I would check this area given the 
shear number of waterfowl tomorrow.  

It was still sub-zero at Myer's and the cold finally got to me that I decided 
to head north and I successfully found the female BARROW'S GOLDENEYE at Phoenix 
Lock and Dam north of Syracuse. The bird had a yellow bill and very steep 
forehead. Nice comparison with the many female common goldeneyes around.  

Next stop was with many other birders... Canoga road, Seybolt and Stahl roads 
in search of the elusive gyrfalcon which eluded me too. I did find Mike 
Tetlow's SNOWY OWLS. One was exactly were Ken Rosenberg had it this morning in 
a snowy field just to the west of the intersection of Yellow Tavern Road and 
Route 96a. Then on Conoga Road before you reach 414 heading east I saw another 
SNOWY OWL in flight!!! This one was very white.  

Then back on Seybolt Road there was a NORTHERN SHRIKE that was being enjoyed by 
a large group of birders.  

I came back down the east side of Cayuga Lake and was amazed at how much ice 
there was. The only decent open ice free area I found was between Long Point st 
and Aurora bay and this place was loaded with mainly aythya sp and goldeneyes. 
Lighting was poor this afternoon so I would check this too in the morning if 
anyone is out tomorrow.  

All in all, a great day. I also noticed many geese flying high...NORTH!!!  A 
sign of spring....  


Dave Nicosia 
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Subject: Snowy Yale Farm
From: Suan Yong <suan.yong AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:11:48 -0500
After visiting the Kime/Yellow Tavern snowy, I drove by Yale Farm Road where I 
saw another snowy just east of McGrane, on a water tank on the south side of 
the road. 


Also scared off a rough legged from a power post on Yale Farm.

Suan
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Subject: Bald eagles and tundra swans on frozen Cayuga Lake
From: Sarah Gould <sj49 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 20:35:06 +0000
We are about a mile north of the Ithaca Yacht Club and awoke this morning to 
find Cayuga Lake frozen all the way across the lake. There were five white 
bumps on the ice in front of our house that turned out to be tundra swans. They 
did not move one bit until about noon. Two have left but three white bumps 
remain. About 30 yards away from the swans there are three juvenile and one 
adult bald eagle snacking on duck parts they have pulled out of the ice. Each 
time an eagle flies over, three tundra swan heads appear above the white bumps! 


Sarah Gould


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Subject: Re: No Gyrfalcon, Yes Snowy Owls and Rough-legged Hawk
From: david nicosia <daven1024 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 11:48:07 -0800
Snowy Owl Present Exactly As Ken Described. No Gyr.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

From:"Kenneth V. Rosenberg" 
Date:Sat, Feb 28, 2015 at 10:28 am
Subject:Re: [cayugabirds-l] No Gyrfalcon, Yes Snowy Owls and Rough-legged Hawk

Thanks for these tips, Mike.


For those driving around the Canoga Springs area today, the second SNOWY OWL 
mentioned below is sitting in a vast snow field just to the west of 
intersection of Yellow Tavern Rd and 96A. 



Ken

Sent from my iPhone


On Feb 27, 2015, at 8:58 PM, "Michael Tetlow "  
wrote: 



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Subject: Re: No Gyrfalcon, Yes Snowy Owls and Rough-legged Hawk
From: "Kenneth V. Rosenberg" <kvr2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 15:28:14 +0000
Thanks for these tips, Mike.

For those driving around the Canoga Springs area today, the second SNOWY OWL 
mentioned below is sitting in a vast snow field just to the west of 
intersection of Yellow Tavern Rd and 96A. 


Ken

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 27, 2015, at 8:58 PM, "Michael Tetlow " 
> wrote: 


 I spent from 3:20 until 5:00 in the Seybolt/Stahl/Canoga and martin road areas 
with no luck on the Gyrfalcon. Here's the story. The first approach to Stahl 
had a cloud of starlings but no sign of a raptor. The second time they were up 
again with a Sharp-shinned through the group landing on a barn peak. There were 
no ducks in the little open stream along Canoga road so there was no bait 
there. I followed crows up 89 until they broke off toward Mud lock across the 
lake. Continuing on 89 northbound there was a young Bald Eagle sitting over the 
frozen canal. Turning up to East Road the heartrate kicked up a notch at the 
sight of a dark bird smaller than an Eagle and heftier than a Peregrine in the 
"eagle tree". Oh well, just a dark morph Rough-legged Hawk. Swinging through 
downtown Seneca Falls hoping the Gyr roosts downtown or feeds on Rock Doves, 
again the heartrate jumped as a bird plowed through the Rock Doves and landed 
on a chimney; Cooper's hawk. One last approach to the Seybolt/Stahl 
intersection at sunset and the starling cloud was up again. This time a large 
bird was in the center of the swarm swooping like a falcon but it was just a 
hungry Red-tailed hawk. 

 Consolation on the way home, thanks to the report from the Howe's, I went 
along Yellow Tavern Road and just west of 414 a Snowy Owl got up from behind 
the first barn. A second bird was on 96a on the first silo North of the yellow 
tavern intersection. Mike Tetlow 

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Subject: Re: peregrines on Bradfield Hall
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 02:39:45 +0000 (GMT)
Males aren't just smaller, they're slimmer. You may notice a bit of difference 
in head shape, too, male more rounded, female more flat on top. These 
particular birds differ in their face pattern, but I think that's an individual 
variation, this male has a more completely black side of the face, while this 
female shows more white separation between the sideburn and the nape. There may 
also be some other plumage differences, but I'm not as certain - male with 
blacker barring below, female more murky. Male blacker on helmet? Not sure if 
their backs are the same hue. See if any of this agrees with your 
observations. 


--Dave Nutter


On Feb 27, 2015, at 08:41 AM, Ray Zimmerman  wrote:

> Around 8:20am today, one was feeding in the same area you saw the male 
feeding two days ago. Btw, how do you distinguish gender? Just relative size? 

>
> Here’s an iPhone-through-binoculars photo: 
https://www.dropbox.com/s/16qr05mcz4fospr/2015-02-27-Bradfield-Peregrine.JPG 

>  
>
> And, I agree that this pair deserves a nest box, complete with cameras.
>
>     Ray
>
>
>> On Feb 25, 2015, at 7:16 PM, Dave Nutter  wrote:
>>
>> At 7:25am the male was feeding perched on one of 2 very high larger ledges 
in the middle of the east side of the building, while the female was perched on 
one of the small ledges 3/4 up the west side of the building. At 8:22am she had 
not moved but he had moved down to a smaller ledge 3/4 up the east side. My 
next chance to look was at 4:02pm when I saw none on either east or west side. 

>>
>> Considering that there wouldn't even be Peregrine Falcons in eastern North 
America today if not for the work of Tom Cade and others at Cornell in the 
1970s, I think a nest box should be put on Bradfield Hall in their honor. This 
pair of Peregrines clearly like this building. I'd love to see their work truly 
come to fruition. 

>> --Dave Nutter
>>
>> On Feb 25, 2015, at 09:54 AM, Marty Schlabach  wrote:
>>
>>> About 9am this morning, there appeared to be 2 peregrine falcons on the 
east side of Bradfield Hall on the Cornell campus. 

>>>  
>>>
>>> Wouldn’t this be a great and promising location for a nest shelf and a 
camera??? 

>>>  
>>>
>>> Marty
>>>  
>>>
>>> ========================================================================
>>>
>>> Marty Schlabach MLS5 AT cornell.edu 

>>>
>>> Food & Agriculture Librarian, Mann Library          607-255-6919
>>>
>>> Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853              Cell 315-521-4315
>>>
>>> ========================================================================
>>>  
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Subject: No Gyrfalcon, Yes Snowy Owls and Rough-legged Hawk
From: "Michael Tetlow " <mjtetlow AT frontiernet.net>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 20:57:40 -0500
     I spent from 3:20 until 5:00 in the Seybolt/Stahl/Canoga and martin
road areas with no luck on the Gyrfalcon. Here's the story. The first
approach to Stahl had a cloud of starlings but no sign of a raptor. The
second time they were up again with a Sharp-shinned through the group
landing on a barn peak. There were no ducks in the little open  stream
along Canoga road so there was no bait there. I followed crows up 89 until
they broke off toward Mud lock across the lake. Continuing on 89 northbound
there was a young Bald Eagle sitting over the frozen canal. Turning up to
East Road the heartrate kicked up a notch at the sight of a dark bird
smaller than an Eagle and heftier than a Peregrine in the "eagle tree". Oh
well, just a dark morph Rough-legged Hawk. Swinging through downtown Seneca
Falls hoping the Gyr roosts downtown or feeds on Rock Doves, again the
heartrate jumped as a bird plowed through the Rock Doves and landed on a
chimney; Cooper's hawk. One last approach to the Seybolt/Stahl intersection
at sunset and the starling cloud was up again. This time a large bird was in
the center of the swarm swooping like a falcon but it was just a hungry
Red-tailed hawk.

   Consolation on the way home, thanks to the report from the Howe's, I went
along Yellow Tavern Road and just west of 414 a Snowy Owl got up from behind
the first barn. A second bird was on 96a on the first silo North of the
yellow tavern intersection.  Mike Tetlow 


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Subject: Re: Clarification about anti-rant
From: Jody W Enck <jwe4 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 00:04:41 +0000
Hi All,

 I received a lot of emails today about my response to Dave Nutter’s great 
opening rant about folks who don’t report sightings of birds in a timely 
manner. I sense that I did not articulate part of my anti-rant as clearly as I 
would have liked. Some of you seem to have interpreted me as saying that I 
don’t particularly like eBird. Just to set the record straight -- I 
wholeheartedly encourage everyone to consider reporting their sightings to 
eBird because of the tremendous scientific and conservation benefits associated 
with that data set and how it can be used for on-the-ground decision making. 
When I was in CA, I made about a dozen point counts in areas with few or no 
previous reports to help do a tiny part in filling in some of the geographic 
gaps in the data set. As a conservationist, I can easily be an eBird 
cheerleader. As a birder, well, that is another story. 


 In my earlier post, I did mention how I was not a very consistent or 
enthusiastic poster to eBird as a birder. I also mentioned that birding for me 
is a very personal experience. And I have my very individualized way of both 
connecting with birds in the field, and, more to the point, keeping track of my 
sightings in ways that are meaningful to me. 


 I certainly have heard how important it is for some people to be made aware of 
rare or unusual species so they can have a chance to see and enjoy them, and I 
understand the importance for many people to express their internal “sharing 
trait” by wanting to share their sightings with others and helping others get 
to see a bird they might otherwise ever have a chance to see. For those people, 
the notion of sharing their sightings with others and to have sightings shared 
with them are indeed, identity-defining traits (along with others). They need 
to do these things to feel like they are being a birder because that’s who 
they are as a birder. I totally get that, and I love that others do these 
things and have these traits. 


 For me as a birder, the very same behaviors that I want to encourage as a 
conservationist (e.g., helping other people see birds they’ve never seen 
before, and reporting my sightings to eBird as data) take on very different 
meanings. Those behaviors diminish my sense of personal discovery and the 
intimacy of my interaction with nature by reducing my experience to data (the 
eBird example) or by inhibiting the very connection to the bird that I have 
strived so hard to achieve. In essence, these behaviors become 
identity-destroying for me as a birder. Doing these behaviors is like asking me 
to drink poison or to become someone who I am not and who I do not want to 
become. 


 As a conservationist, I will defend and support eBird to the death. But, as a 
birder, I will submit to eBird sparingly so I can maintain my sense of 
identity, my feeling of being the kind of birder I want to be rather than the 
kind of birder that someone else might be. And, I really like it that there are 
so many different kinds of birders around. If we all were the same, I think 
birding would be really boring. 


Take care everybody.
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Program Development and Evaluation
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2471

From: Rob Blye
Sent: ‎Friday‎, ‎February‎ ‎27‎, ‎2015 ‎9‎:‎58‎ ‎AM
To: jwe4 AT cornell. edu
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L, Dave 
Nutter 


Jody, Dave and others,

I have some of the same birding behaviors as Jody but one activity I do support 
whole-heartedly is the regular and frequent use of Ebird. Ebird lets me keep 
track of my bird sightings almost effortlessly. Most importantly, it lets me 
contribute to our collective knowledge of bird distribution and populations, 
again with very little effort. I have been birding since about 5 years old and 
earned my living as a wildlife biologist. Since about 1969, I have filled out 
paper checklists that I have stored somewhere. I conducted multi-year bird 
populations studies that were entered into corporate data bases with the 
assurance that the data would never by erased. But, I don't really know what 
birds I have seen and the data from those studies was dumped (without 
myknowedge) by a database administrator looking for space (I guess). 


I am thrilled with Ebird and at least I know what I have seen and where since I 
started using Ebird regularly in 2013. I plan to use the paper records of my 
bird population studies and my birding checklists to enter historical data into 
Ebird for both personal, selfish reasons and to make the study data available 
to others. 


Please use Ebird. You could even hide its output if that violates your sense of 
privacy. 


Rob Blye
CALS 1972

________________________________
From: "Jody W Enck" 
To: "CAYUGABIRDS-L" , "Dave Nutter" 
 

Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 8:05:21 AM
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] rare bird rant

Hello All,

 I was stimulated by Dave’s well-written email to offer an anti-rant 😊. 
(And, Dave, please keep your rants coming, because I do enjoy reading them!) 
Maybe the fact that I don’t have a cell phone and rarely carry my little 
trac-fone with me says a lot about how I approach birding. Encounters with 
birds, rare or common, are very personal for me. I think it is great that 
others get so excited about chasing birds that others have reported, but that 
is not for me. More importantly for me, I really don’t want to have a bunch 
of other birders (even my friends) show up and interfere with that very 
personal interaction. If that is selfish, then I guess I’ll wear that label 
proudly. I am a scientists (both ecological and social) and a conservationist, 
yet I am reluctant to submit my sightings to eBird because I don’t want my 
personal experiences to be treated as data by others. I know I’m a bit weird 
about all this compared to most people. I still have not chased the Tufted 
Duck, which I’ve never seen in my life. There was a White-eyed Vireo on the 
other side of the Lab of O pond for three days a year or so ago and I never 
trekked the 150 yards out to see it. Please don’t think I am an anti-lister, 
either. I recently was in CA for work and passed the 500 species in the US mark 
(Surfbird) pointed out to me by Brian Sullivan (along with my life Black-vented 
Shearwater, Common Murre, Rhinoceros Auklet, and Pacific Loon -- see I do go 
birding with others sometimes!). Soon after Brian left, I stumbled upon a bird 
I did not recognize other than to know it was some kind of sandpiper-ish bird. 
I sat for a half hour taking notes, drawing pictures, and taking a few 
pictures. Then I had to go do work. Later that night I was excited to find out 
that I had encountered a Wandering Tattler (#501 in the US for me; California 
Thrasher was my last new one at #502 and California Condor had been #489 ). I 
did send Brian and a couple other CA birders a couple pictures for 
confirmation. But, I was thrilled and felt a real sense of discovery because I 
encountered the bird on my own and had a half hour to really observe it by 
myself. I know that is a very different experience than the ones desired by 
other birders. And, I totally support Dave’s point of view and do encourage 
others to share their sightings if they want to. Just please don’t expect me 
to want to 😊! 


Thanks Dave for stimulating this discussion.

Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2471

From: Dave Nutter
Sent: ‎Friday‎, ‎February‎ ‎27‎, ‎2015 ‎4‎:‎59‎ ‎AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L


Hey, everybody!
I know seeing a rare bird is tremendously exciting, and I certainly wouldn't 
have wanted Mark to miss seeing the chase & interactions or getting those 
fantastic photos (plus congratulations on a fantastic life bird!). But please 
if at all possible before leaving a rare bird try to get word out on the text 
message rare bird alert system. If you are not on the text alert system, or 
don't want to take your eyes off the bird long enough to text about it, call 
someone else and have them put the word out. There were people in the field 
yesterday afternoon who also had been trying to find the Gyrfalcon and could've 
returned quickly. A Gyrfalcon was also seen two other times this winter with no 
text RBA sent out. But when Tim Lenz did get the word out after a few minutes 
of viewing at least 6 additional birders got to see it that morning. 

Similarly the Tufted Duck has been quietly seen recently when there was a guy 
from out of town who was asking about it. I know it may seem like old news, but 
these are still rare birds that people would love to get a chance to see. 
Thanks. 


--Dave Nutter
607-229-2158

On Feb 27, 2015, at 12:29 AM, M Miller  wrote:

Just wanted to add that I first saw the gyrfalcon at 3 PM (thanks to the couple 
parked on Stahl Rd with a scope set up on it). It quickly flew south to land on 
the east side of Seybolt Rd (nabbing a duck dinner on it’s way) about 200 
yards south of Stahl Rd. It stayed there for about 20 minutes, then flew back 
north a few hundred yards, and was still in the area when I left. Photos can be 
seen on the Eaton Birding Society facebook page. 


Mark Miller


From: Scott Haber >
Date: February 26, 2015 at 4:41:52 PM EST
To: "NYSBIRDS-L AT cornell.edu" 
> 

Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Gyrfalcon
Reply-To: Scott Haber >

I neglected to mention that Mark got some awesome photos of the Gyr nabbing a 
Mallard in flight, and then fighting off two Red-tailed Hawks trying to claim 
the carcass on the ground. The photos can be viewed here: 


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=881790955212707&set=pcb.720534001377417&type=1&permPage=1 


On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 4:34 PM, Scott Haber 
> wrote: 

The Seneca County Gyrfalcon was relocated this afternoon by Mark Miller on 
Seybolt Road in Seneca Falls. More specific locations/directions can be found 
on the Cayugabirds list. 


-Scott

On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 10:47 AM, > 
wrote: 

Any signs of the gyr today??   If yes, I am planning to go there tomorrow.
Thanks in advance Claude
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Subject: Merlin, RL Hawk, no Gyr
From: M Miller <mmiller325 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 23:08:54 +0000
Spent the afternoon searching for the gyrfalcon around Seybolt Rd, without any 
luck. Did have a N. Harrier at Seybolt & Stahl Rds, a Merlin at Leader & Hoster 
Rds, and a Rough-legged Hawk (light morph) along rte 89 just north of E. Tyre 
Rd. 







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Subject: Myers and airport, Fri 2/27
From: Mark Chao <markchao AT imt.org>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:04:57 -0500
Some birding highlights from Lansing on Friday afternoon:

 

* Extensive bands of ice on the edges and center of the lake both north and
south of Myers Park, but mostly open water close to shore south of the
lighthouse and private marina.  Many diverse dabbling and diving birds,
including dozens of TUNDRA SWANS, a few GADWALLS, and a RED-NECKED GREBE.  

* Three HORNED LARKS on the beach at Myers, maybe the first of this species
I've ever seen here

* An intrepid BELTED KINGFISHER on a wooden pile at the edge of the marina

* One adult and one first-year BALD EAGLE over the cove between the marina
and Portland Point Road

* One light-morph ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK at the east end of Snyder Road by the
Ithaca/Tompkins airport.

 

The gray-morph EASTERN SCREECH-OWL has appeared approximately two of every
three days throughout February, including today, in our nest box in
northeast Ithaca.

 

Mark Chao

 

 

 

 

 



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Subject: Monday Night Seminar--The Talented Superb Lyrebird
From: Marc Devokaitis <mdevokaitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 15:37:58 -0500
Hello Cayuga Birders:

Please join us on *Monday, March 2* at *7:30 *for the next Monday Night
Seminar at the Cornell Lab. As always, these seminars are free and open to
the public. The doors open at 7:00.  This coming Monday, we will be
streaming the seminar live. Be sure to bookmark
http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for quick
access on Monday evening.  And if you missed them, you can also watch
the archived
versions  of the previous
live-streamed lectures. Hope to see you there! Marc




*Dr. Anastasia H. Dalziell, postdoctoral associate, Cornell Lab of
Ornithology*

*The Talented Superb Lyrebird*

*Host: Mike Webster*



Australia’s Superb Lyrebird is famous for the male’s remarkable ability to
mimic a wide variety of sounds, from the songs of other bird species to
chainsaws, camera shutters, car alarms, and more. Dr. Anastasia Dalziell
will share research results showing that the vocal mimicry by male
lyrebirds is even more spectacular and bizarre than previously thought.
Males also coordinate their songs with elaborate “dance moves” on carefully
constructed dance platforms to attract a mate. Female lyrebirds have
unexpectedly complex displays as well. You’ll hear recordings and see
videos of behaviors previously undescribed in this fascinating species.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 


Upcoming Monday Night Seminars:


*March 9 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting*

*Suan Yong, Cayuga Bird Club member; nature enthusiast*

*Vacation in Antarctica*

Suan and two friends traveled to Antarctica in January 2013 for what they
call “the most incredible vacation of a lifetime.” Suan will share photos
and information about the last continent and the nature tourism industry
that has made it more accessible than you might think.



*March 23*

*Seminar and book signing*

*Dr. Andrew L. Mack, executive director, Indo-Pacific Conservation Alliance*

*Uphill Struggles: Of Cassowaries, Seeds, and Conservation*

*Host: Ed Scholes*

Cassowaries, the third largest species of bird, are the closest things
living to dinosaurs. They are secretive denizens of the rugged island of
New Guinea, the third largest remaining rainforest (after the Amazon and
Congo Basins). Dr. Andrew Mack has spent years living deep in these
forests, working with indigenous Pawai’ia trackers, undertaking the first
field studies of cassowaries in New Guinea. He devoted considerable effort
to the study of the droppings of these giant frugivores, more specifically
the seeds within the droppings. Despite their reclusive nature, these birds
play a keystone role in the overall rainforest ecology. Witnessing the
demise of rainforests everywhere led Mack to shift from researcher to
focusing on New Guinea conservation. He will speak about his adventures
with cassowaries and discoveries deep in the tropical rainforests of New
Guinea. His book, *Searching for PekPek: Cassowaries and Conservation in a
New Guinea Rainforest*, will be available for signing after the
presentation.

*April 6*

*Seminar and book signing*

*Dr. Stephen W. Kress, Director, Audubon Seabird Restoration Program*

*Project Puffin: The Improbable Quest to Bring a Beloved Seabird Back to
Egg Rock*

Host: Miyoko Chu

After 42 years, Project Puffin has achieved international acclaim for
pioneering methods that are helping endangered seabirds worldwide. But
there is much to this story that has never been told. Join us as project
founder Dr. Stephen Kress recounts how his childhood experiences in
landlocked Columbus, Ohio, ignited his lifelong passion for puffins on the
Maine coast. Hear about the challenges of working on remote islands, and
how persistence helped him succeed when a nemesis almost halted the project
in its infancy. Join us for the first public debut of Kress’s new
autographical book, which will be available for signing after the
presentation.



*April 13*

*Cayuga Bird Club Meeting*

*Greg Budney, Macaulay Library, Cornell Lab*

*Their World of Sound: An Exploration of Bird Sounds*

Birds make some of the most compelling sounds heard in nature--from the
stunningly beautiful to the bizarre, from drumming to mimicry, from the
Common Nightingale to the Musician Wren. During this presentation you'll
hear sounds that birds use to communicate and learn what these sounds
reveal about their complex lives, via sound recordings from the Cornell
Lab’s Macaulay Library, the world's largest archive of bird sounds.



*May 4*

*Seminar and book signing*

*Laura Erickson, author; and Marie Read, author and wildlife photographer*

*Into the Nest: Intimate Views of the Courting, Parenting, and Family Lives
of Familiar Birds *

This new book from author Laura Erickson and wildlife photographer Marie
Read documents every stage in the family lives of birds. The authors will
talk about these rare glimpses into the lives of the birds we thought we
knew—everything from dramatic courtship to nest construction, egg-laying,
and first attempts at flight by the young. Copies of the book will
available for signing after the presentation.



*May 11*

Cayuga Bird Club Meeting
Dr. Ron Rohrbaugh, Assistant Director, Conservation Science, Cornell Lab

Program TBA



Marc Devokaitis

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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Subject: Re: rare bird rant
From: Janet Akin <jakin AT rochester.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 15:35:11 -0500
I believe it is clear not everyone uses e-bird. Which I have found frustrating 
when traveling to new areas. Janet Akin 


From: Carl Steckler 
Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 11:43 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] rare bird rant

OK, here is the problem I have with eBiird. I just checked for sightings in New 
York State and the only sighting listed was from Dave Nutter on Feb 22. Nothing 
since then. I get eBird alerts for Seneca and Cayuga county. What I get are 
Chipping Sparrow, no Gyrfalcon. Granted eBird is great for collecting data, but 
for alerting birders to rare birds it is, pardon the expression, for the birds. 

Maybe I am doing something wrong in my eBird settings, but it is not clear to 
me, and if it not clear it is not useful. 


Now if only someone could help me get on the local alert net I would be 
grateful. 


Carl


On 2/27/2015 10:31, Gary Kohlenberg wrote:

 The great part of using eBird as Bob does is that rare bird sightings output 
to all users that have the rare bird / needs alert notifications setup in their 
account. No extra work involved and potentially reaching more observers than 
the text alert system. I highly recommend using BirdLog NA for all your 
sightings! 

 The RBA system still has the advantage of immediacy reaching flip phones, but 
can detract from the personal experience just a little. I don't feel the same 
loss when using BirdLog and will advocate that others try it and judge for 
themselves. 

  This comes from a dedicated notebook user. 

  Gary 




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Subject: Re: EBird info & IPhone question
From: Scott Haber <scotthaber1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 13:47:06 -0500
On Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 12:03 PM, Brad Walker  wrote:

*<*

*There is also a Facebook group for discussing eBird features. As for the
situation mentioned above, this may be due to people not submitting lists
or reviewing may just be delayed.>>*

On Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 1:40 PM, Glenn Wilson  wrote:

> Please tell me how to look up REAL TIME sightings posted to EBird using an
> iPhone. Both Sibley's and Audubon apps do this BUT the info is at least one
> day old AND only shoes the most recent single sighting. Trying to use
> Safari - EBird - species on an iPhone is nearly impossible and usually
> crashes.  This method on a computer is GREAT. thanks in advance to all who
> respond.
>
> Glenn Wilson
> Endicott, NY
> www.WilsonsWarbler.com
>
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Subject: EBird info & IPhone question
From: Glenn Wilson <wilson AT stny.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 13:40:26 -0500
Please tell me how to look up REAL TIME sightings posted to EBird using an 
iPhone. Both Sibley's and Audubon apps do this BUT the info is at least one day 
old AND only shoes the most recent single sighting. Trying to use Safari - 
EBird - species on an iPhone is nearly impossible and usually crashes. This 
method on a computer is GREAT. thanks in advance to all who respond. 


Glenn Wilson
Endicott, NY
www.WilsonsWarbler.com


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Subject: Suggestion on gyrfalcon
From: M Miller <mmiller325 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 18:19:54 +0000
Relaying some info that was given to me on the gyrfalcon. It seems that this 
bird may have a pattern where it shows up near the corner of Seybolt & Stahl 
Rds (township of Fayette) in the afternoons (around 3 PM). I had tried several 
mornings (a convenient time for me) without any luck. On Thursday afternoon I 
was able to locate it within 15-20 minutes of driving around. 







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Subject: Redpolls again
From: Andrea Sears <linkz27 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 12:24:03 -0500
The redpolls have return again to my feeders, this time I was able to get a 
couple of pictures. The link below 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/11985299 AT N05/16476476608/

Andrea
Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re: Cayuga RBA
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 12:06:08 -0500
Just one clarification to Chris's post: this page is slightly out-of-date
with respect to one aspect of the RBA, the link to subscribe to the list.
Due to spamming a month or two ago, I had to deactivate this link. If you
would like to join the group, please EMAIL ME with your name and phone
number and I will add you to the group. To reduce the possibility of
spammers getting into the group again, please DO NOT ADD MEMBERS TO THE
GROUP. Have them get in touch with me and I will add them.

On Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 11:58 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <
cth4 AT cornell.edu> wrote:

>  Here’s the link to information about the Cayuga RBA:
>
>
> 
http://www.cayugabirdclub.org/Resources/rare-bird-alert-system-for-the-cayuga-lake-basin 

>
>  Sincerely,
> Chris T-H
>
>   --
>  Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
>  Field Applications Engineer
>  Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
>  159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
>  W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
>  http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp
>
>  --
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jwm57 AT cornell.edu

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Subject: Re: rare bird rant
From: Brad Walker <bmw38 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:03:48 +0000
Hi all,

To keep the list from turning into a long eBird thread, please direct your
site questions here. http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/emails/new

There is also a Facebook group for discussing eBird features. As for the
situation mentioned above, this may be due to people not submitting lists
or reviewing may just be delayed.

Thanks,

Brad

On Fri, Feb 27, 2015, 11:44 Carl Steckler  wrote:

>  OK, here is the problem I have with eBiird. I just checked for sightings
> in New York State and the only sighting listed was from Dave Nutter on Feb
> 22. Nothing since then. I get eBird alerts for Seneca and Cayuga county.
> What I get are Chipping Sparrow, no Gyrfalcon. Granted eBird is great for
> collecting data, but for alerting birders to rare birds it is, pardon the
> expression, for the birds.
> Maybe I am doing something wrong in my eBird settings, but it is not clear
> to me, and if it not clear it is not useful.
>
> Now if only someone could help me get on the local alert net I would be
> grateful.
>
>
> Carl
>
>
> On 2/27/2015 10:31, Gary Kohlenberg wrote:
>
> The great part of using eBird as Bob does is that rare bird sightings
> output to all users that have the rare bird / needs alert notifications
> setup in their account. No extra work involved and potentially reaching
> more observers than the text alert system. I highly recommend using BirdLog
> NA for all your sightings!
> The RBA system still has the advantage of immediacy reaching flip phones,
> but can detract from the personal experience just a little. I don't feel
> the same loss when using BirdLog and will advocate that others try it and
> judge for themselves.
> This comes from a dedicated notebook user.
>
>  Gary
>
>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
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> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
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> *Please submit your observations to eBird
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Subject: Cayuga RBA
From: "Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes" <cth4 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:58:24 +0000
Heres the link to information about the Cayuga RBA:


http://www.cayugabirdclub.org/Resources/rare-bird-alert-system-for-the-cayuga-lake-basin 


Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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Subject: Re: rare bird rant
From: Carl Steckler <cjs9 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 11:43:49 -0500
OK, here is the problem I have with eBiird. I just checked for sightings 
in New York State and the only sighting listed was from Dave Nutter on 
Feb 22. Nothing since then. I get eBird alerts for Seneca and Cayuga 
county. What I get are Chipping Sparrow, no Gyrfalcon. Granted eBird is 
great for collecting data, but for alerting birders to rare birds it is, 
pardon the expression, for the birds.
Maybe I am doing something wrong in my eBird settings, but it is not 
clear to me, and if it not clear it is not useful.

Now if only someone could help me get on the local alert net I would be 
grateful.

Carl

On 2/27/2015 10:31, Gary Kohlenberg wrote:
> The great part of using eBird as Bob does is that rare bird sightings 
> output to all users that have the rare bird / needs alert 
> notifications setup in their account. No extra work involved and 
> potentially reaching more observers than the text alert system. I 
> highly recommend using BirdLog NA for all your sightings!
> The RBA system still has the advantage of immediacy reaching flip 
> phones, but can detract from the personal experience just a little. I 
> don't feel the same loss when using BirdLog and will advocate that 
> others try it and judge for themselves.
> This comes from a dedicated notebook user.
>
> Gary
>


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Subject: RE:Peregrines!
From: "Karel V. Sedlacek" <kvs1 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:31:27 +0000
Yup. They have been using BR and EZ's perch for weeks now-wondering when/if 
they will get the boot. 


From: bounce-118871349-64835558 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-118871349-64835558 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Andy Turner 

Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 10:11 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Peregrines!

Good Morning,

Walking into work this morning in Beebe Hall a bit bleary eyed after arriving 
home in the early morning from Tucson Arizona I remembered to look up at 
Bradfield as I have been doing nearly every day for a month looking for the 
Peregrine Falcons. To my astonishment I saw one bird sitting about 2/3 of the 
way up on the East side of the building pruning itself on the small ledge that 
juts out from the building. Moments later the second bird appeared directly 
overhead looking amazing in the bright blue sky and landed about 30 feet from 
the other bird. This was at approximately 9:30 a.m. 


Andrew S. Turner
Cornell Cooperative Extension
State 4-H Program Leader
Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY  14850
607-255-7809
ast4 AT cornell.edu
http://nys4h.cce.cornell.edu/Pages/default.aspx
Twitter -  AT AndyNYS4H

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Subject: Re: rare bird rant
From: Gary Kohlenberg <jgk25 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 15:31:31 +0000
The great part of using eBird as Bob does is that rare bird sightings output to 
all users that have the rare bird / needs alert notifications setup in their 
account. No extra work involved and potentially reaching more observers than 
the text alert system. I highly recommend using BirdLog NA for all your 
sightings! 

The RBA system still has the advantage of immediacy reaching flip phones, but 
can detract from the personal experience just a little. I don't feel the same 
loss when using BirdLog and will advocate that others try it and judge for 
themselves. 

This comes from a dedicated notebook user.

Gary



On Feb 27, 2015, at 9:58 AM, Rob Blye 
> wrote: 


Jody, Dave and others,

I have some of the same birding behaviors as Jody but one activity I do support 
whole-heartedly is the regular and frequent use of Ebird. Ebird lets me keep 
track of my bird sightings almost effortlessly. Most importantly, it lets me 
contribute to our collective knowledge of bird distribution and populations, 
again with very little effort. I have been birding since about 5 years old and 
earned my living as a wildlife biologist. Since about 1969, I have filled out 
paper checklists that I have stored somewhere. I conducted multi-year bird 
populations studies that were entered into corporate data bases with the 
assurance that the data would never by erased. But, I don't really know what 
birds I have seen and the data from those studies was dumped (without 
myknowedge) by a database administrator looking for space (I guess). 


I am thrilled with Ebird and at least I know what I have seen and where since I 
started using Ebird regularly in 2013. I plan to use the paper records of my 
bird population studies and my birding checklists to enter historical data into 
Ebird for both personal, selfish reasons and to make the study data available 
to others. 


Please use Ebird. You could even hide its output if that violates your sense of 
privacy. 


Rob Blye
CALS 1972

________________________________
From: "Jody W Enck" >
To: "CAYUGABIRDS-L" 
>, "Dave 
Nutter" > 

Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 8:05:21 AM
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] rare bird rant

Hello All,

 I was stimulated by Dave’s well-written email to offer an anti-rant 😊. 
(And, Dave, please keep your rants coming, because I do enjoy reading them!) 
Maybe the fact that I don’t have a cell phone and rarely carry my little 
trac-fone with me says a lot about how I approach birding. Encounters with 
birds, rare or common, are very personal for me. I think it is great that 
others get so excited about chasing birds that others have reported, but that 
is not for me. More importantly for me, I really don’t want to have a bunch 
of other birders (even my friends) show up and interfere with that very 
personal interaction. If that is selfish, then I guess I’ll wear that label 
proudly. I am a scientists (both ecological and social) and a conservationist, 
yet I am reluctant to submit my sightings to eBird because I don’t want my 
personal experiences to be treated as data by others. I know I’m a bit weird 
about all this compared to most people. I still have not chased the Tufted 
Duck, which I’ve never seen in my life. There was a White-eyed Vireo on the 
other side of the Lab of O pond for three days a year or so ago and I never 
trekked the 150 yards out to see it. Please don’t think I am an anti-lister, 
either. I recently was in CA for work and passed the 500 species in the US mark 
(Surfbird) pointed out to me by Brian Sullivan (along with my life Black-vented 
Shearwater, Common Murre, Rhinoceros Auklet, and Pacific Loon -- see I do go 
birding with others sometimes!). Soon after Brian left, I stumbled upon a bird 
I did not recognize other than to know it was some kind of sandpiper-ish bird. 
I sat for a half hour taking notes, drawing pictures, and taking a few 
pictures. Then I had to go do work. Later that night I was excited to find out 
that I had encountered a Wandering Tattler (#501 in the US for me; California 
Thrasher was my last new one at #502 and California Condor had been #489 ). I 
did send Brian and a couple other CA birders a couple pictures for 
confirmation. But, I was thrilled and felt a real sense of discovery because I 
encountered the bird on my own and had a half hour to really observe it by 
myself. I know that is a very different experience than the ones desired by 
other birders. And, I totally support Dave’s point of view and do encourage 
others to share their sightings if they want to. Just please don’t expect me 
to want to 😊! 


Thanks Dave for stimulating this discussion.

Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2471

From: Dave Nutter
Sent: ‎Friday‎, ‎February‎ ‎27‎, ‎2015 ‎4‎:‎59‎ ‎AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L


Hey, everybody!
I know seeing a rare bird is tremendously exciting, and I certainly wouldn't 
have wanted Mark to miss seeing the chase & interactions or getting those 
fantastic photos (plus congratulations on a fantastic life bird!). But please 
if at all possible before leaving a rare bird try to get word out on the text 
message rare bird alert system. If you are not on the text alert system, or 
don't want to take your eyes off the bird long enough to text about it, call 
someone else and have them put the word out. There were people in the field 
yesterday afternoon who also had been trying to find the Gyrfalcon and could've 
returned quickly. A Gyrfalcon was also seen two other times this winter with no 
text RBA sent out. But when Tim Lenz did get the word out after a few minutes 
of viewing at least 6 additional birders got to see it that morning. 

Similarly the Tufted Duck has been quietly seen recently when there was a guy 
from out of town who was asking about it. I know it may seem like old news, but 
these are still rare birds that people would love to get a chance to see. 
Thanks. 


--Dave Nutter
607-229-2158

On Feb 27, 2015, at 12:29 AM, M Miller 
> wrote: 


Just wanted to add that I first saw the gyrfalcon at 3 PM (thanks to the couple 
parked on Stahl Rd with a scope set up on it). It quickly flew south to land on 
the east side of Seybolt Rd (nabbing a duck dinner on it’s way) about 200 
yards south of Stahl Rd. It stayed there for about 20 minutes, then flew back 
north a few hundred yards, and was still in the area when I left. Photos can be 
seen on the Eaton Birding Society facebook page. 


Mark Miller


From: Scott Haber >
Date: February 26, 2015 at 4:41:52 PM EST
To: "NYSBIRDS-L AT cornell.edu" 
> 

Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Gyrfalcon
Reply-To: Scott Haber >

I neglected to mention that Mark got some awesome photos of the Gyr nabbing a 
Mallard in flight, and then fighting off two Red-tailed Hawks trying to claim 
the carcass on the ground. The photos can be viewed here: 


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=881790955212707&set=pcb.720534001377417&type=1&permPage=1 


On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 4:34 PM, Scott Haber 
> wrote: 

The Seneca County Gyrfalcon was relocated this afternoon by Mark Miller on 
Seybolt Road in Seneca Falls. More specific locations/directions can be found 
on the Cayugabirds list. 


-Scott

On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 10:47 AM, > 
wrote: 

Any signs of the gyr today??   If yes, I am planning to go there tomorrow.
Thanks in advance Claude
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Subject: Peregrines!
From: Andy Turner <ast4 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 15:10:54 +0000
Good Morning,

Walking into work this morning in Beebe Hall a bit bleary eyed after arriving 
home in the early morning from Tucson Arizona I remembered to look up at 
Bradfield as I have been doing nearly every day for a month looking for the 
Peregrine Falcons. To my astonishment I saw one bird sitting about 2/3 of the 
way up on the East side of the building pruning itself on the small ledge that 
juts out from the building. Moments later the second bird appeared directly 
overhead looking amazing in the bright blue sky and landed about 30 feet from 
the other bird. This was at approximately 9:30 a.m. 


Andrew S. Turner
Cornell Cooperative Extension
State 4-H Program Leader
Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY  14850
607-255-7809
ast4 AT cornell.edu
http://nys4h.cce.cornell.edu/Pages/default.aspx
Twitter -  AT AndyNYS4H


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Subject: No Gyrfalcon this morning on Stahl Road
From: Brad Walker <edgarallenhoopoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 15:02:29 +0000
Hi all,

Scott Haber and I drove around the area for about an hour this morning with
no luck. We did see a flying Pileated Woodpecker that we hoped would get
plucked from the air, but no luck. There are a lot of Crows, Red-tailed
Hawks and Larks in the area to watch in the meantime.

Scott and I also stopped at Dean's Cove where we had several Long-tailed
Ducks, about 30 Red-breasted Mergansers, 9 Bluebirds and a drumming
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, in addition to other common waterfowl.

- Brad

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Subject: Re: rare bird rant
From: Rob Blye <rwblye AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:57:24 +0000 (UTC)
Jody, Dave and others, 

I have some of the same birding behaviors as Jody but one activity I do support 
whole-heartedly is the regular and frequent use of Ebird. Ebird lets me keep 
track of my bird sightings almost effortlessly. Most importantly, it lets me 
contribute to our collective knowledge of bird distribution and populations, 
again with very little effort. I have been birding since about 5 years old and 
earned my living as a wildlife biologist. Since about 1969, I have filled out 
paper checklists that I have stored somewhere. I conducted multi-year bird 
populations studies that were entered into corporate data bases with the 
assurance that the data would never by erased. But, I don't really know what 
birds I have seen and the data from those studies was dumped (without 
myknowedge) by a database administrator looking for space (I guess). 


I am thrilled with Ebird and at least I know what I have seen and where since I 
started using Ebird regularly in 2013. I plan to use the paper records of my 
bird population studies and my birding checklists to enter historical data into 
Ebird for both personal, selfish reasons and to make the study data available 
to others. 


Please use Ebird. You could even hide its output if that violates your sense of 
privacy. 


Rob Blye 
CALS 1972 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Jody W Enck"  
To: "CAYUGABIRDS-L" , "Dave Nutter" 
 

Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 8:05:21 AM 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] rare bird rant 

Hello All, 

I was stimulated by Dave’s well-written email to offer an anti-rant 😊. 
(And, Dave, please keep your rants coming, because I do enjoy reading them!) 
Maybe the fact that I don’t have a cell phone and rarely carry my little 
trac-fone with me says a lot about how I approach birding. Encounters with 
birds, rare or common, are very personal for me. I think it is great that 
others get so excited about chasing birds that others have reported, but that 
is not for me. More importantly for me, I really don’t want to have a bunch 
of other birders (even my friends) show up and interfere with that very 
personal interaction. If that is selfish, then I guess I’ll wear that label 
proudly. I am a scientists (both ecological and social) and a conservationist, 
yet I am reluctant to submit my sightings to eBird because I don’t want my 
personal experiences to be treated as data by others. I know I’m a bit weird 
about all this compared to most people. I still have not chased the Tufted 
Duck, which I’ve never seen in my life. There was a White-eyed Vireo on the 
other side of the Lab of O pond for three days a year or so ago and I never 
trekked the 150 yards out to see it. Please don’t think I am an anti-lister, 
either. I recently was in CA for work and passed the 500 species in the US mark 
(Surfbird) pointed out to me by Brian Sullivan (along with my life Black-vented 
Shearwater, Common Murre, Rhinoceros Auklet, and Pacific Loon -- see I do go 
birding with others sometimes!). Soon after Brian left, I stumbled upon a bird 
I did not recognize other than to know it was some kind of sandpiper-ish bird. 
I sat for a half hour taking notes, drawing pictures, and taking a few 
pictures. Then I had to go do work. Later that night I was excited to find out 
that I had encountered a Wandering Tattler (#501 in the US for me; California 
Thrasher was my last new one at #502 and California Condor had been #489 ). I 
did send Brian and a couple other CA birders a couple pictures for 
confirmation. But, I was thrilled and felt a real sense of discovery because I 
encountered the bird on my own and had a half hour to really observe it by 
myself. I know that is a very different experience than the ones desired by 
other birders. And, I totally support Dave’s point of view and do encourage 
others to share their sightings if they want to. Just please don’t expect me 
to want to 😊! 


Thanks Dave for stimulating this discussion. 

Jody 

Jody W. Enck, PhD 
Public Engagement in Science Program 
Cornell Lab of Ornithology 
607-254-2471 

From: Dave Nutter 
Sent: ‎Friday‎, ‎February‎ ‎27‎, ‎2015 ‎4‎:‎59‎ ‎AM 
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 

Hey, everybody! 
I know seeing a rare bird is tremendously exciting, and I certainly wouldn't 
have wanted Mark to miss seeing the chase & interactions or getting those 
fantastic photos (plus congratulations on a fantastic life bird!). But please 
if at all possible before leaving a rare bird try to get word out on the text 
message rare bird alert system. If you are not on the text alert system, or 
don't want to take your eyes off the bird long enough to text about it, call 
someone else and have them put the word out. There were people in the field 
yesterday afternoon who also had been trying to find the Gyrfalcon and could've 
returned quickly. A Gyrfalcon was also seen two other times this winter with no 
text RBA sent out. But when Tim Lenz did get the word out after a few minutes 
of viewing at least 6 additional birders got to see it that morning. 

Similarly the Tufted Duck has been quietly seen recently when there was a guy 
from out of town who was asking about it. I know it may seem like old news, but 
these are still rare birds that people would love to get a chance to see. 
Thanks. 


--Dave Nutter 
607-229-2158 

On Feb 27, 2015, at 12:29 AM, M Miller  wrote: 




Just wanted to add that I first saw the gyrfalcon at 3 PM (thanks to the couple 
parked on Stahl Rd with a scope set up on it). It quickly flew south to land on 
the east side of Seybolt Rd (nabbing a duck dinner on it’s way) about 200 
yards south of Stahl Rd. It stayed there for about 20 minutes, then flew back 
north a few hundred yards, and was still in the area when I left. Photos can be 
seen on the Eaton Birding Society facebook page. 


Mark Miller 





From: Scott Haber < scotthaber1 AT gmail.com > Date: February 26, 2015 at 4:41:52 PM EST To: " NYSBIRDS-L AT cornell.edu " < nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu > Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Gyrfalcon Reply-To: Scott Haber < scotthaber1 AT gmail.com >
I neglected to mention that Mark got some awesome photos of the Gyr nabbing a Mallard in flight, and then fighting off two Red-tailed Hawks trying to claim the carcass on the ground. The photos can be viewed here: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=881790955212707&set=pcb.720534001377417&type=1&permPage=1 On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 4:34 PM, Scott Haber < scotthaber1 AT gmail.com > wrote: The Seneca County Gyrfalcon was relocated this afternoon by Mark Miller on Seybolt Road in Seneca Falls. More specific locations/directions can be found on the Cayugabirds list. -Scott On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 10:47 AM, < Claudedoc AT aol.com > wrote: Any signs of the gyr today?? If yes, I am planning to go there tomorrow. Thanks in advance Claude -- -- Cayugabirds-L List Info: Welcome and Basics Rules and Information Subscribe, Configuration and Leave Archives: The Mail Archive Surfbirds BirdingOnThe.Net Please submit your observations to eBird ! -- -- Cayugabirds-L List Info: Welcome and Basics Rules and Information Subscribe, Configuration and Leave Archives: The Mail Archive Surfbirds BirdingOnThe.Net Please submit your observations to eBird ! -- -- Cayugabirds-L List Info: http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm ARCHIVES: 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html Please submit your observations to eBird: http://ebird.org/content/ebird/ --
Subject: Re: rare bird rant
From: David Diaz <dmdiaz73 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 09:31:48 -0500
What is the text number? I've been using the listserve to post. I really wanna 
see that gyrfalcon!! 


David



> On Feb 27, 2015, at 4:58 AM, Dave Nutter  wrote:
> 
> Hey, everybody! 
> I know seeing a rare bird is tremendously exciting, and I certainly wouldn't 
have wanted Mark to miss seeing the chase & interactions or getting those 
fantastic photos (plus congratulations on a fantastic life bird!). But please 
if at all possible before leaving a rare bird try to get word out on the text 
message rare bird alert system. If you are not on the text alert system, or 
don't want to take your eyes off the bird long enough to text about it, call 
someone else and have them put the word out. There were people in the field 
yesterday afternoon who also had been trying to find the Gyrfalcon and could've 
returned quickly. A Gyrfalcon was also seen two other times this winter with no 
text RBA sent out. But when Tim Lenz did get the word out after a few minutes 
of viewing at least 6 additional birders got to see it that morning. 

> Similarly the Tufted Duck has been quietly seen recently when there was a guy 
from out of town who was asking about it. I know it may seem like old news, but 
these are still rare birds that people would love to get a chance to see. 
Thanks. 

> 
> --Dave Nutter
> 607-229-2158
> 
>> On Feb 27, 2015, at 12:29 AM, M Miller  wrote:
>> 
>> Just wanted to add that I first saw the gyrfalcon at 3 PM (thanks to the 
couple parked on Stahl Rd with a scope set up on it). It quickly flew south to 
land on the east side of Seybolt Rd (nabbing a duck dinner on it’s way) about 
200 yards south of Stahl Rd. It stayed there for about 20 minutes, then flew 
back north a few hundred yards, and was still in the area when I left. Photos 
can be seen on the Eaton Birding Society facebook page. 

>> 
>> Mark Miller
>  
> 
>> From: Scott Haber 
>> Date: February 26, 2015 at 4:41:52 PM EST
>> To: "NYSBIRDS-L AT cornell.edu" 
>> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Gyrfalcon
>> Reply-To: Scott Haber 
> I neglected to mention that Mark got some awesome photos of the Gyr nabbing a 
Mallard in flight, and then fighting off two Red-tailed Hawks trying to claim 
the carcass on the ground. The photos can be viewed here: 

> 
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=881790955212707&set=pcb.720534001377417&type=1&permPage=1 

> 
> On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 4:34 PM, Scott Haber  wrote:
> The Seneca County Gyrfalcon was relocated this afternoon by Mark Miller on 
Seybolt Road in Seneca Falls. More specific locations/directions can be found 
on the Cayugabirds list. 

> 
> -Scott
> 
> On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 10:47 AM,  wrote:
> Any signs of the gyr today??   If yes, I am planning to go there tomorrow.
> Thanks in advance Claude
> --
> 
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Subject: Re: peregrines on Bradfield Hall
From: Ray Zimmerman <rz10 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 08:41:54 -0500
Around 8:20am today, one was feeding in the same area you saw the male feeding 
two days ago. Btw, how do you distinguish gender? Just relative size? 


Heres an iPhone-through-binoculars photo: 
https://www.dropbox.com/s/16qr05mcz4fospr/2015-02-27-Bradfield-Peregrine.JPG 


And, I agree that this pair deserves a nest box, complete with cameras.

    Ray


> On Feb 25, 2015, at 7:16 PM, Dave Nutter  wrote:
> 
> At 7:25am the male was feeding perched on one of 2 very high larger ledges in 
the middle of the east side of the building, while the female was perched on 
one of the small ledges 3/4 up the west side of the building. At 8:22am she had 
not moved but he had moved down to a smaller ledge 3/4 up the east side. My 
next chance to look was at 4:02pm when I saw none on either east or west side. 

> 
> Considering that there wouldn't even be Peregrine Falcons in eastern North 
America today if not for the work of Tom Cade and others at Cornell in the 
1970s, I think a nest box should be put on Bradfield Hall in their honor. This 
pair of Peregrines clearly like this building. I'd love to see their work truly 
come to fruition. 

> --Dave Nutter
> 
> On Feb 25, 2015, at 09:54 AM, Marty Schlabach  wrote:
> 
>> About 9am this morning, there appeared to be 2 peregrine falcons on the east 
side of Bradfield Hall on the Cornell campus. 

>>  
>> Wouldnt this be a great and promising location for a nest shelf and a 
camera??? 

>>  
>> Marty
>>  
>> ========================================================================
>> Marty Schlabach MLS5 AT cornell.edu  

>> Food & Agriculture Librarian, Mann Library          607-255-6919
>> Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853              Cell 315-521-4315
>> ========================================================================
>>  
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Subject: Re: rare bird rant
From: Jody W Enck <jwe4 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 13:05:21 +0000
Hello All,

 I was stimulated by Dave’s well-written email to offer an anti-rant 😊. 
(And, Dave, please keep your rants coming, because I do enjoy reading them!) 
Maybe the fact that I don’t have a cell phone and rarely carry my little 
trac-fone with me says a lot about how I approach birding. Encounters with 
birds, rare or common, are very personal for me. I think it is great that 
others get so excited about chasing birds that others have reported, but that 
is not for me. More importantly for me, I really don’t want to have a bunch 
of other birders (even my friends) show up and interfere with that very 
personal interaction. If that is selfish, then I guess I’ll wear that label 
proudly. I am a scientists (both ecological and social) and a conservationist, 
yet I am reluctant to submit my sightings to eBird because I don’t want my 
personal experiences to be treated as data by others. I know I’m a bit weird 
about all this compared to most people. I still have not chased the Tufted 
Duck, which I’ve never seen in my life. There was a White-eyed Vireo on the 
other side of the Lab of O pond for three days a year or so ago and I never 
trekked the 150 yards out to see it. Please don’t think I am an anti-lister, 
either. I recently was in CA for work and passed the 500 species in the US mark 
(Surfbird) pointed out to me by Brian Sullivan (along with my life Black-vented 
Shearwater, Common Murre, Rhinoceros Auklet, and Pacific Loon -- see I do go 
birding with others sometimes!). Soon after Brian left, I stumbled upon a bird 
I did not recognize other than to know it was some kind of sandpiper-ish bird. 
I sat for a half hour taking notes, drawing pictures, and taking a few 
pictures. Then I had to go do work. Later that night I was excited to find out 
that I had encountered a Wandering Tattler (#501 in the US for me; California 
Thrasher was my last new one at #502 and California Condor had been #489 ). I 
did send Brian and a couple other CA birders a couple pictures for 
confirmation. But, I was thrilled and felt a real sense of discovery because I 
encountered the bird on my own and had a half hour to really observe it by 
myself. I know that is a very different experience than the ones desired by 
other birders. And, I totally support Dave’s point of view and do encourage 
others to share their sightings if they want to. Just please don’t expect me 
to want to 😊! 


Thanks Dave for stimulating this discussion.

Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2471

From: Dave Nutter
Sent: ‎Friday‎, ‎February‎ ‎27‎, ‎2015 ‎4‎:‎59‎ ‎AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L


Hey, everybody!
I know seeing a rare bird is tremendously exciting, and I certainly wouldn't 
have wanted Mark to miss seeing the chase & interactions or getting those 
fantastic photos (plus congratulations on a fantastic life bird!). But please 
if at all possible before leaving a rare bird try to get word out on the text 
message rare bird alert system. If you are not on the text alert system, or 
don't want to take your eyes off the bird long enough to text about it, call 
someone else and have them put the word out. There were people in the field 
yesterday afternoon who also had been trying to find the Gyrfalcon and could've 
returned quickly. A Gyrfalcon was also seen two other times this winter with no 
text RBA sent out. But when Tim Lenz did get the word out after a few minutes 
of viewing at least 6 additional birders got to see it that morning. 

Similarly the Tufted Duck has been quietly seen recently when there was a guy 
from out of town who was asking about it. I know it may seem like old news, but 
these are still rare birds that people would love to get a chance to see. 
Thanks. 


--Dave Nutter
607-229-2158

On Feb 27, 2015, at 12:29 AM, M Miller  wrote:

Just wanted to add that I first saw the gyrfalcon at 3 PM (thanks to the couple 
parked on Stahl Rd with a scope set up on it). It quickly flew south to land on 
the east side of Seybolt Rd (nabbing a duck dinner on it’s way) about 200 
yards south of Stahl Rd. It stayed there for about 20 minutes, then flew back 
north a few hundred yards, and was still in the area when I left. Photos can be 
seen on the Eaton Birding Society facebook page. 


Mark Miller


From: Scott Haber >
Date: February 26, 2015 at 4:41:52 PM EST
To: "NYSBIRDS-L AT cornell.edu" 
> 

Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Gyrfalcon
Reply-To: Scott Haber >

I neglected to mention that Mark got some awesome photos of the Gyr nabbing a 
Mallard in flight, and then fighting off two Red-tailed Hawks trying to claim 
the carcass on the ground. The photos can be viewed here: 


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=881790955212707&set=pcb.720534001377417&type=1&permPage=1 


On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 4:34 PM, Scott Haber 
> wrote: 

The Seneca County Gyrfalcon was relocated this afternoon by Mark Miller on 
Seybolt Road in Seneca Falls. More specific locations/directions can be found 
on the Cayugabirds list. 


-Scott

On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 10:47 AM, > 
wrote: 

Any signs of the gyr today??   If yes, I am planning to go there tomorrow.
Thanks in advance Claude
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Subject: rare bird rant
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 09:58:02 +0000
Hey, everybody! 
I know seeing a rare bird is tremendously exciting, and I certainly wouldn't 
have wanted Mark to miss seeing the chase & interactions or getting those 
fantastic photos (plus congratulations on a fantastic life bird!). But 
please if at all possible before leaving a rare bird try to get word out on the 
text message rare bird alert system. If you are not on the text alert system, 
or don't want to take your eyes off the bird long enough to text about it, call 
someone else and have them put the word out. There were people in the field 
yesterday afternoon who also had been trying to find the Gyrfalcon and could've 
returned quickly. A Gyrfalcon was also seen two other times this winter with no 
text RBA sent out. But when Tim Lenz did get the word out after a few minutes 
of viewing at least 6 additional birders got to see it that morning. 

Similarly the Tufted Duck has been quietly seen recently when there was a guy 
from out of town who was asking about it. I know it may seem like old news, but 
these are still rare birds that people would love to get a chance to see. 
Thanks. 


--Dave Nutter
607-229-2158


On Feb 27, 2015, at 12:29 AM, M Miller  wrote:

> Just wanted to add that I first saw the gyrfalcon at 3 PM (thanks to the 
couple parked on Stahl Rd with a scope set up on it). It quickly flew south to 
land on the east side of Seybolt Rd (nabbing a duck dinner on it’s way) about 
200 yards south of Stahl Rd. It stayed there for about 20 minutes, then flew 
back north a few hundred yards, and was still in the area when I left. Photos 
can be seen on the Eaton Birding Society facebook page. 

>
> Mark Miller 
 

> From: Scott Haber 
> Date: February 26, 2015 at 4:41:52 PM EST
> To: "NYSBIRDS-L AT cornell.edu" 
> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Gyrfalcon
> Reply-To: Scott Haber 
>
I neglected to mention that Mark got some awesome photos of the Gyr nabbing a 
Mallard in flight, and then fighting off two Red-tailed Hawks trying to claim 
the carcass on the ground. The photos can be viewed here: 


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=881790955212707&set=pcb.720534001377417&type=1&permPage=1 


On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 4:34 PM, Scott Haber  wrote:
The Seneca County Gyrfalcon was relocated this afternoon by Mark Miller on 
Seybolt Road in Seneca Falls. More specific locations/directions can be found 
on the Cayugabirds list. 


-Scott

On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 10:47 AM,  wrote:
Any signs of the gyr today??   If yes, I am planning to go there tomorrow.
Thanks in advance Claude
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Subject: owl swoop
From: Joshua Snodgrass <cedarshiva AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 01:49:02 -0500
I was just standing on my back porch having a cigarette, when a small owl
swooped in and banked away about five feet from me. Appeared light
underneath, so I'm leaning toward Saw-whet owl for the ID (but I can't be
sure). That was amazing. I had a Northern saw-whet owl here (main street in
Tburg) a couple years ago, and given the lightness of the undersides I'm
inclined that way for the ID, but honestly, that was just a really cool
moment with an unexpected small owl. I hope s/he comes back!
Good birding!
Josh

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Subject: More info on gyrfalcon
From: M Miller <mmiller325 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 05:18:15 +0000
Just wanted to add that I first saw the gyrfalcon at 3 PM (thanks to the couple 
parked on Stahl Rd with a scope set up on it). It quickly flew south to land on 
the east side of Seybolt Rd (nabbing a duck dinner on it’s way) about 200 
yards south of Stahl Rd. It stayed there for about 20 minutes, then flew back 
north a few hundred yards, and was still in the area when I left. Photos can be 
seen on the Eaton Birding Society facebook page. 



Mark Miller 






Sent from Windows Mail
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Subject: Gyrfalcon - finally!
From: M Miller <mmiller325 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 21:20:15 +0000
The Gyrfalcon was on Seybolt Rd (south of Seneca Falls) around Stahl Rd. It was 
first perched north of the large barns on Stahl Rd, but flew south along 
Seybolt. I was able to see it capture a Mallard in mid-air and start feasting 
on it. A red-tail hawk took over the kill, soon to be followed by a second 
red-tail. The gyrfalcon continually harassed them until it was able to reclaim 
it’s meal. Amazing show - guess it pays to be persistent, this being about my 
6th try to find this life bird. 



Mark Miller






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Subject: West Side
From: Susan Fast <sustfast AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 20:37:11 +0000
 I checked the west side of Cayuga Lake today.  Taughannock was mostly 
ice-bound, as was Sheldrake south of the point.  Open water north of the 
point, but scoping found only lots of RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS.  Poplar Beach 
was good--open water and scoping from one point only, I counted 22 RED-NECKED 
GREBES and 3 COMMON LOONS.  Dean's Cove mostly ice with 3 BALD EAGLES--one 
with what appeared to be a muskrat.    I hope it was not my friend 
there.   The East side of the Lake was mostly open south of the ice edge, but 
I did not check beyond Long Point SP.  I found no grebes at all along the East 
side--no horned grebes at the Wells College Boathouse even. 

Steve FastBrooktondale
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Subject: Union Springs: Squirrel Notodric mange
From: John and Fritzie Blizzard <job121830 AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 13:39:28 -0500
I've found pictures on-line with squirrels, primarily grays, looking 
like the one I have at my feeders. The*Notodric* mange supposedly is 
squirrel specific & doesn't seem to cause the misery that Sarcoptic 
mange does in other animals. Depending on health of the squirrel & if it 
can survive the winter weather, they can recover!

This squirrel is not a bit concerned about me trying to chase it from 
the "squirrel-proof" feeders. I think squirrels & pigs should be in the 
same class.

Fritzie

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Subject: Re: BBC News: The girl who gets gifts from birds
From: Carol Keeler <carolk441 AT adelphia.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 13:05:50 -0500
What a wonderful article! I wonder if our Cornell crow experts have heard of 
such behavior around here. It just shows how smart crows really are. 


Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 26, 2015, at 8:45 AM, Stephanie Greenwood  
wrote: 

> 
> I saw this story on the BBC News iPad App and thought you'd enjoy it. 
> 
> The girl who gets gifts from birds
> 
> Lots of people give food to the birds in their garden and get nothing in 
return - but when one girl feeds the crows outside her house, they show their 
affection with tiny presents. 

> 
> Read more:
> http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-31604026
> 
> 
> ** Disclaimer **
> The BBC is not responsible for the content of this e-mail, and anything 
written in this e-mail does not necessarily reflect the BBC's views or 
opinions. Please note that neither the e-mail address nor name of the sender 
have been verified. 

> 
> 
> Stephanie Greenwood
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> 
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Subject: south Cayuga ice
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 12:43:27 -0500
As Nancy suggested, the southern part of Cayuga Lake apparently experienced
another large-scale freezing event last night or yesterday. The main ice
edge, which had remained near the dentist's office on East Shore Drive, is
still present, but this morning thin ice extended uniformly north of the
spot nearly to Portland Point. A bit south of Portland Point the surface
became less uniform, with large patches of thin ice interspersed with areas
of open water, although the distinction was difficult to ascertain from a
distance. This patchy ice continued out of sight to the north of Myers, so
I will be interested to hear what it was like along Lansing Station Road
and points north.

Although a gull flock was still present at the ice "edge" along East Shore,
most of the waterfowl I was able to find were off Portland Point and Myers
Point. From Portland, I counted 17 RED-NECKED GREBES out on the lake in
small groups, mostly in little islands of open water out in the middle of
the lake. A group of five were also flying south over the ice headed
towards Stewart Park, though I suspect they failed to find what they were
hoping for. A group of nine LONG-TAILED DUCKS flew by going north, and a
group of five WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS flew north and landed in the bay off
Ladoga Point. RED-BREASTED MERGANSER numbers were up as well, with over 60
mixed in with more numerous Common Merganser flocks and in isolated small
groups out on the lake. Good numbers of Aythya continue along the shoreline
off the Myers marina and up towards Portland Point, but I did not find the
Tufted or any hybrids among them.


-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jwm57 AT cornell.edu

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Subject: Sapsucker Woods walks
From: Linda Orkin <wingmagic16 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 11:52:31 -0500
Hello all,

Once again, Sapsucker Woods walks for this upcoming weekend, February 28
and March 1,  will be cancelled due to AM temps predicted to be below
zero.  Hopefully this is the last time this winter that these Cayuga Bird
Club led walks need to be called off..  Please check our calendar at
cayugabirdclub.org for updated info and for upcoming field trip and
meetings.

Thanks

Linda Orkin
Ithaca, NY 14850

-- 
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pleasure isn't more valuable than someone's life and liberty.
~ Unknown

If you permit
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of the good of your life?

-Stanley Kunitz...

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Subject: redpolls
From: Andrea Sears <linkz27 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 11:28:24 -0500
At my feeders today there are at least five common redpolls. 

Andrea

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Downtown Raven
From: <bilbaker AT pop.lightlink.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 15:58:01 +0000
While sitting at the light at the corner of State and Fulton Streets I saw
a Raven flying not much higher that the nearby buildings east towards the
center of downtown.  I see Ravens in many places at this point,  but this
is the first time I've seen one right in downtown Ithaca.

Bill
Baker

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Subject: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
From: "W. Larry Hymes" <wlh2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 10:02:05 -0500
An absolutely gorgeous YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER male just came to one of 
our peanut feeders.  Doubtful this is a migrant, since our first 
sightings don't occur until April.

Larry

-- 

================================
W. Larry Hymes
120 Vine Street, Ithaca, NY 14850
(H) 607-277-0759, wlh2 AT cornell.edu
================================


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Subject: Ice on the lake
From: Nancy <nancycusumano62 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 09:24:21 -0500
As I was driving down Rt 89 this morning, it looked like the lake had flash 
frozen overnight. There was no wind, and a dead flat lake. Anyone have any 
other observations? 


Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 495 dogs since 2005!
Learn more at cayugadogrescue.org


Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 25, 2015, at 2:14 PM, Kevin J. McGowan  wrote:
> 
> I made a stop of the Game Farm this morning and ended up not counting crows 
or looking for rare gulls. Instead I spent an hour photographing a pair of BALD 
EAGLES. They were perched together in a large bare tree along the west side of 
Dodge Road, just south of Stevenson Rd. One appeared to be a full adult, the 
other still had a black mask and some dark in the tail, but looked adult from a 
distance. 

>  
> While I was watching the younger bird dashed to the Game Farm and came right 
back with a large Norway rat in its talons. Then it sat and dismembered and ate 
the rat in the tree right next to the road as the other eagle, the crows, and I 
watched. 

>  
> Some photos at 
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/IJF38ECio-P5fNuTnczDvtMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink. 

>  
>  
> Kevin
>  
> Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
> Project Manager
> Distance Learning in Bird Biology
> Cornell Lab of Ornithology
> 159 Sapsucker Woods Road
> Ithaca, NY 14850
> kjm2 AT cornell.edu
> 607-254-2452
> 
> 
>  
> Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit 
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/courses and learn about our comprehensive Home 
Study Course in Bird Biology, our online course Investigating Behavior: 
Courtship and Rivalry in Birds, our Be A Better Birder tutorials, and our 
series of webinars. Purchase the webinars here. 

> 
>  
> --
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Subject: BBC News: The girl who gets gifts from birds
From: Stephanie Greenwood <stpegreenwood AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 08:45:09 -0500
I saw this story on the BBC News iPad App and thought you'd enjoy it. 

The girl who gets gifts from birds

Lots of people give food to the birds in their garden and get nothing in return 
- but when one girl feeds the crows outside her house, they show their 
affection with tiny presents. 


Read more:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-31604026


** Disclaimer **
The BBC is not responsible for the content of this e-mail, and anything written 
in this e-mail does not necessarily reflect the BBC's views or opinions. Please 
note that neither the e-mail address nor name of the sender have been verified. 



Stephanie Greenwood
Sent from my iPad


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Subject: Bald Eagle?
From: Marc Devokaitis <mdevokaitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 08:25:14 -0500
7:50am.  Perched prominently over the inlet in the west end of Ithaca, near
the top of a tall tree approximately behind Kelly's Dock-Side.
Not-yet-mature.  Easily visible from 89 and the Octopus when crossing the
inlet. A question mark b/c it was from a moving vehicle, no bins.

Marc Devokaitis
Ithaca

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Subject: Union Springs Bluebirds
From: John and Fritzie Blizzard <job121830 AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 22:36:42 -0500
Union Springs, NY

Five (5) Bluebirds flew across our back yard yesterday. Eight (8) 
goldfinches fought over niger feeder perches. "Our" family of 7 crows 
continues but an extra  one was with them this a.m.. They stop by 
several times each day to see if any morsels of bird seed was missed. 
Snow is too deep for me to get up to the feeders. Becky waded in hip 
deep snow to fill the feeders on Sunday. This a.m. a squirrel, minus all 
its fur from just behind its ears to its "arm pits" was on the hanging 
feeders on the hill & down here at the house. Skin was wrinkled looking 
& certainly had to be very cold in the nasty wind. Didn't even think to 
try to get a picture of it. Can't imagine what might have caused such 
complete fur loss.

Water level on Factory St. pond has suddenly dropped close to two ft. 
below what it's been for several wks..
Seven swans continue on Mill pond along with the ice shelf on the west 
side.

As pertaining to turkey vultures: Usually they can find deer carcasses 
along roads or in fields but I haven't even seen a deer or a track since 
early Jan.. I saw a TV here a couple wks. ago. Goose nos. are way down 
now that fields are so deeply covered with snow.

Fritzie

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Subject: Re: peregrines on Bradfield Hall
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 00:16:34 +0000 (GMT)
At 7:25am the male was feeding perched on one of 2 very high larger ledges in 
the middle of the east side of the building, while the female was perched on 
one of the small ledges 3/4 up the west side of the building. At 8:22am she had 
not moved but he had moved down to a smaller ledge 3/4 up the east side. My 
next chance to look was at 4:02pm when I saw none on either east or west side. 


Considering that there wouldn't even be Peregrine Falcons in eastern North 
America today if not for the work of Tom Cade and others at Cornell in the 
1970s, I think a nest box should be put on Bradfield Hall in their honor. This 
pair of Peregrines clearly like this building. I'd love to see their work truly 
come to fruition. 


--Dave Nutter


On Feb 25, 2015, at 09:54 AM, Marty Schlabach  wrote:

> About 9am this morning, there appeared to be 2 peregrine falcons on the east 
side of Bradfield Hall on the Cornell campus. 

>
>  
>
> Wouldn’t this be a great and promising location for a nest shelf and a 
camera??? 

>
>  
>
> Marty
>
>  
>
> ========================================================================
>
> Marty Schlabach MLS5 AT cornell.edu 

>
> Food & Agriculture Librarian, Mann Library          607-255-6919
>
> Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853              Cell 315-521-4315
>
> ========================================================================
>
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--
Subject: Re: Turkey Vulture
From: Anne Clark <anneb.clark AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 17:52:50 -0500
To give a Wed 25th Feb update on Turkey Vulture whereabouts, about 15 were 
either swirling around or sitting in the spruce trees behind the Varna 
Community Center on 366 today at about 230. There may well have been more in 
the spruces, hidden. They may be using these trees as a small local roost. At 
least a couple more were out at the Stevenson Road Composting Facility/Game 
Farm, a few minutes later. 


The younger of the two Bald Eagles that Kevin described at the morning Compost 
Piles was circling this area also, sailing between Fall Creek and the Compost 
Piles. I saw it circle over Varna Auto Repair and then it was circling through 
the Compost proper by the time I got there. (not hard, not far) Easily 
recognizable as the same bird. 


There were 7 fluffy-round Bluebirds on electric wires on Ed Hill Rd, Freeville, 
just S of Hile School Road this afternoon at 4pm. 


Anne


On Feb 25, 2015, at 1:23 PM, Linda Orkin wrote:

> Less than a month ago II saw around 20 Turkey Vultures roosting in trees 
along the inside lower curve of Freese Road. Really neat, as they were all at 
eye level. 

> 
> And I've seen others flying up along 89 and other places all winter, as 
others are mentioning. 

> 
> 
> 
> Linda Orkin
> Ithaca, NY
> 
> On Wed, Feb 25, 2015 at 1:18 PM, Jody W Enck  wrote:
> Hi Larry,
> 
> Great report on another cold day.
> I have seen Turkey Vultures (up to 15) almost every day this winter locally 
around Ithaca. One recent day I was waiting for an early morning ride from 
Varna to the Lab of O and watched more than a dozen in trees across the road 
hanging out until some thermals started heating up (my supposition -- the 
vultures did not share this info with me). As long as they have access to food 
(e.g., compost piles, road kills, game farm critters, etc) they seem to be fine 
with cold and snow. 

> 
> Jody Enck
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: bounce-118862556-3493987 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-118862556-3493987 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of W. Larry Hymes 

> Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2015 1:03 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Turkey Vulture
> 
> About 20 minutes ago I was very surprised to see a TURKEY VULTURE soaring 
about near East Hill Plaza. Having heard no reports this 

> winter, I'm assuming this is an early migrant.   I've often wondered why
> this bird, and the red-wing blackbirds
> 
> Considering the severe weather and heavy snow cover in our area, why would 
this bird, and the RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS that Dave Nutter saw on the 22nd, not 
delay their northward migration until conditions improve considerably? As they 
move north, aren't they taking into account the conditions they are 
encountering and deciding whether to proceed or wait it out? Any thoughts!?!? 

> 
> Larry
> 
> --
> 
> ================================
> W. Larry Hymes
> 120 Vine Street, Ithaca, NY 14850
> (H) 607-277-0759, wlh2 AT cornell.edu
> ================================
> 
> 
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> --
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Veganism is simply the acknowledgment that a replaceable and fleeting 
pleasure isn't more valuable than someone's life and liberty. 

> ~ Unknown
> 
> If you permit 
> this evil, what is the good
> of the good of your life?
> 
> -Stanley Kunitz...
> 
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
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Subject: Turkey Vultures here all winter
From: "W. Larry Hymes" <wlh2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 15:08:42 -0500
Reports came out of the woodwork about Turkey Vultures hanging around 
our area all winter.  This shows I don't get out and do much birding 
during the winter months.  It's far more comfortable looking out our 
kitchen windows.

I still would like any thoughts you may have about true migrants like 
Red-Wings showing up at this time, when the weather is very harsh and 
the snow cover is very extensive.  Do they not have a way to evaluate 
conditions on their way north and decide to hold up awhile when 
conditions are especially bad?  Or is the timing of their northward 
migration pretty much fixed --- for example, this is the time when 
Red-Wings usually start to show up here.   So when the winds are 
favorable for migration, many of the birds take off and, flying at 
night, don't know what to expect until they land the next morning.  Then 
they have to make due with whatever they happen to find.  In this case,  
I would think they would have a more difficult time finding adequate 
food sources and good places to roost.  On the bright side of things, 
however, time is on their side --- the weather will continue to improve 
as the season progresses (although more slowly some years than 
others!!).  All they have to do is hang in there!

Larry

-- 

================================
W. Larry Hymes
120 Vine Street, Ithaca, NY 14850
(H) 607-277-0759, wlh2 AT cornell.edu
================================


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Subject: Re: Turkey Vulture
From: John and Sue Gregoire <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 14:35:36 -0500
Larry,
The simple answer is photoperiod. Red-winged BBs and others will migrate when 
day 

length reaches a certain threshold for the species. This instinctive response 
is 

often coupled to their food requirements so insectivores will wait until the 
days 

get longer and most probably correspond to insect hatches enroute. Red-wings 
are 

considered half-hearty but I wish them luck finding food other than at feeders 
right 

now. The average arrival date was a few days ago. Have seen several reports of 
TVs 

all winter long but none on their roost (NWS Fire Academy roof) in Montour 
Falls. 


Of course unless they sense a pressure gradient indicative of an impending 
storm, 

they come ahead on that increasing day length.
John

-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
N 42 26.611' W 76 45.492'
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Wed, February 25, 2015 13:03, W. Larry Hymes wrote:
> About 20 minutes ago I was very surprised to see a TURKEY VULTURE
> soaring about near East Hill Plaza.  Having heard no reports this
> winter, I'm assuming this is an early migrant.   I've often wondered why
> this bird, and the red-wing blackbirds
>
> Considering the severe weather and heavy snow cover in our area, why
> would this bird, and the RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS that Dave Nutter saw on
> the 22nd, not delay their northward migration until conditions improve
> considerably?  As they move north, aren't they taking into account the
> conditions they are encountering and deciding whether to proceed or wait
> it out?  Any thoughts!?!?
>
> Larry
>



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Subject: Bald Eagles at Game Farm
From: "Kevin J. McGowan" <kjm2 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 19:14:23 +0000
I made a stop of the Game Farm this morning and ended up not counting crows or 
looking for rare gulls. Instead I spent an hour photographing a pair of BALD 
EAGLES. They were perched together in a large bare tree along the west side of 
Dodge Road, just south of Stevenson Rd. One appeared to be a full adult, the 
other still had a black mask and some dark in the tail, but looked adult from a 
distance. 


While I was watching the younger bird dashed to the Game Farm and came right 
back with a large Norway rat in its talons. Then it sat and dismembered and ate 
the rat in the tree right next to the road as the other eagle, the crows, and I 
watched. 


Some photos at 
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/IJF38ECio-P5fNuTnczDvtMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink. 



Kevin

Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
kjm2 AT cornell.edu
607-254-2452



Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit 
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/courses 
and learn about our comprehensive Home Study Course in Bird Biology, our online 
course Investigating Behavior: Courtship and Rivalry in 
Birds, 
our Be A Better Birder 
tutorials, 
and our series of 
webinars. 
Purchase the webinars 
here. 




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Subject: Re: Turkey Vulture
From: Linda Orkin <wingmagic16 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 13:23:48 -0500
Less than a month ago II saw around 20 Turkey Vultures roosting in trees
along the inside lower curve of Freese Road.  Really neat, as they were all
at eye level.

And I've seen others flying up along 89 and other places all winter, as
others are mentioning.



Linda Orkin
Ithaca, NY

On Wed, Feb 25, 2015 at 1:18 PM, Jody W Enck  wrote:

> Hi Larry,
>
> Great report on another cold day.
> I have seen Turkey Vultures (up to 15) almost every day this winter
> locally around Ithaca.  One recent day I was waiting for an early morning
> ride from Varna to the Lab of O and watched more than a dozen in trees
> across the road hanging out until some thermals started heating up (my
> supposition -- the vultures did not share this info with me).  As long as
> they have access to food (e.g., compost piles, road kills, game farm
> critters, etc) they seem to be fine with cold and snow.
>
> Jody Enck
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: bounce-118862556-3493987 AT list.cornell.edu [mailto:
> bounce-118862556-3493987 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of W. Larry Hymes
> Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2015 1:03 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Turkey Vulture
>
> About 20 minutes ago I was very surprised to see a TURKEY VULTURE soaring
> about near East Hill Plaza.  Having heard no reports this
> winter, I'm assuming this is an early migrant.   I've often wondered why
> this bird, and the red-wing blackbirds
>
> Considering the severe weather and heavy snow cover in our area, why would
> this bird, and the RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS that Dave Nutter saw on the 22nd,
> not delay their northward migration until conditions improve considerably?
> As they move north, aren't they taking into account the conditions they are
> encountering and deciding whether to proceed or wait it out?  Any
> thoughts!?!?
>
> Larry
>
> --
>
> ================================
> W. Larry Hymes
> 120 Vine Street, Ithaca, NY 14850
> (H) 607-277-0759, wlh2 AT cornell.edu
> ================================
>
>
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>


-- 
Veganism is simply the acknowledgment that a replaceable and fleeting
pleasure isn't more valuable than someone's life and liberty.
~ Unknown

If you permit
this evil, what is the good
of the good of your life?

-Stanley Kunitz...

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