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Updated on Sunday, February 7 at 01:20 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Spot-winged Thrush,©BirdQuest

7 Feb Ravens getting ready! [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
7 Feb vultures on carcass, Burdick Hill Rd, Lansing [Dave Nutter ]
6 Feb Peregrine Falcon I photographed has a band on it. [David Nicosia ]
6 Feb East side of Cayuga Lake, Beebe Lake and Montezuma Feb 6 2016 [David Nicosia ]
6 Feb Savannah mucklands [David Nicosia ]
6 Feb Merlin Seneca Falls [John VanNiel ]
06 Feb Greater white fronted geese and cranes [Brad Walker ]
6 Feb Baltimore Orioles [Ann Mitchell ]
6 Feb Montezuma Main Pool [David Nicosia ]
5 Feb SFO 2016 - Celebrating 40 years! [Marc Devokaitis ]
5 Feb RE:Mourning Dove at Lab of O ["Marie P. Read" ]
5 Feb Re: Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat. [Daniel Graham ]
5 Feb Mourning Dove at Lab of O ["Mary E. Winston" ]
4 Feb Re: Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat. [Peter ]
4 Feb Re: Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat. [Peter ]
5 Feb Re: Baltimore oriole at Treman Marina! [Dave Nutter ]
5 Feb Re: [cayugabirds-l] Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat. [Dave Nutter ]
4 Feb Re: Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat. [Suan Hsi Yong ]
4 Feb Re: Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat. [Linda K Tuyn ]
4 Feb Re: Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat. [marsha kardon ]
4 Feb Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat. ["Michael Tetlow " ]
4 Feb Cayuga Bird Club meeting - February 8 ["clr82 AT juno.com" ]
2 Feb brown-headed cowbirds again--Hile School and Ed Hill Roads both [AB Clark ]
3 Feb Re: Bobcat! [John Confer ]
2 Feb Mt Pleasant Horned Lark singing ["Marie P. Read" ]
2 Feb Baltimore oriole at Treman Marina! [marsha kardon ]
2 Feb Current Visitors [Ellen Haith ]
2 Feb Re: Yawgers Creek [phil bonn ]
2 Feb Re: Eastern Phoebe, Arts Quad [Brendan Fogarty ]
2 Feb Cayuga Lake Birding Tour Thursday, Feb. 4 [Chris Lajewski ]
02 Feb Leucistic Red Tail [Donna Scott ]
2 Feb Drumming [Laura Stenzler ]
2 Feb Yawgers Creek [william hecht ]
2 Feb Red-necked Grebe [Ann Mitchell ]
2 Feb RE: Eastern Phoebe, Arts Quad [Karen Steffy ]
2 Feb Spring calls in Fall Creek [Sandy Wold ]
1 Feb Bobcat! [bob mcguire ]
1 Feb Re: Eastern Phoebe, Arts Quad [cedar Mathers-Winn ]
1 Feb Re: Eastern Phoebe, Arts Quad [Suan Hsi Yong ]
1 Feb Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
1 Feb Re: OT? FYO bear nr West Danby [Geo Kloppel ]
1 Feb OT? FYO bear nr West Danby [Nigel Dyson-Hudson ]
1 Feb OT Salt point talk [Donna Lee Scott ]
1 Feb Eastern Phoebe, Arts Quad [cedar Mathers-Winn ]
1 Feb Re: Fox Sparrow musings - possible intergrade at Liddell? [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
31 Jan Re:Recent highlights -- Newman Golf Course, lake, Plantations [Sandy Wold ]
31 Jan Recent highlights -- Newman Golf Course, lake, Plantations [Mark Chao ]
31 Jan Re: Fox Sparrow musings - possible intergrade at Liddell? [Jay McGowan ]
31 Jan Hold on to your hats! Agressive Sharp-shinned at Newman Golf Course? [Sandy Wold ]
31 Jan Ladoga Scoters [bob mcguire ]
31 Jan Mockingbird/Cardinal Song [Annette Nadeau ]
31 Jan Re:Around the Lake Saturday [Dave Nutter ]
30 Jan Syracuse pelican autopsy results [Sandy Wold ]
30 Jan Around the lake Saturday [bob mcguire ]
30 Jan Bald Eagle @ Second Dam [Suan Yong ]
30 Jan Re: Lots of swans [Glenn Wilson ]
30 Jan Lots of swans [Glenn Wilson ]
30 Jan Bluebird downtown Ithaca [Sandy Wold ]
29 Jan Great Tit [Carl Steckler ]
29 Jan Great Tit in NYS? [Kathy & Dan C. ]
28 Jan Eared Grebe Oswego Harbor []
28 Jan Cayuga Lake Osprey Trail: an aid for reporting ospreys and osprey nest sitings [Candace Cornell ]
28 Jan Re:Glaucous Gull, South End [Jay McGowan ]
28 Jan Rusty Blackbird [Marc Devokaitis ]
27 Jan Great Horned Owl Rt 89 [Daniel Graham ]
27 Jan Glaucous Gull, South End [Jay McGowan ]
27 Jan Pelican [Sandy Wold ]
27 Jan Tufted titmouse singing! [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
26 Jan Pelican [Diana ]
26 Jan Please Report Osprey and Osprey Nest Sitings [Candace Cornell ]
25 Jan Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
25 Jan Dave N's Fox Sparrow /filling bird feeders [Donna Lee Scott ]
25 Jan pine siskin [Laura Stenzler ]
25 Jan RE: Fox Sparrow musings - possible intergrade at Liddell? [Gary Kohlenberg ]
24 Jan Fox Sparrow musings - possible intergrade at Liddell? [Dave Nutter ]
24 Jan Short eared owls [M & K Mannella ]

Subject: Ravens getting ready!
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 18:17:22 +0000
Hi all,

Yesterday I hiked about 4 mile loop of Bob Cameroon loop in the afternoon with 
Cayuga Trails Club. Only bird on the hike was one Chickadee. Of course I do not 
spish or use playbacks. 


As we were leaving Tower station on Tower road there was a crisp shiny Raven 
circling and calling. 



Today I hiked Sweedler Preserve of Lick Brook with another group, we 
encountered the same pair of Ravens flying back and forth several times over 
our head often calling. This pair has nested in the ledges near the fall. This 
time also they seemed to be preparing for nesting in the same area. 



Other birds of interest were a couple of Downy, several Chickadees, a 
Red-belied and a pair of Golden-crowned Kinglets. 



I returned via King Road. On King Road just past the junction of Sand Banks 
road there was a pair of ravens on a electrical pole. One of them was shining 
and gorgeous looking and I think it was he as he was doing a some kind of 
display with head movements. 



So it was ravenous week-end!


Cheer

Meena


Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://www.haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: https://plus.google.com/118047473426099383469/posts
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/dragonflies/samplebook.pdf




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Subject: vultures on carcass, Burdick Hill Rd, Lansing
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 02:14:38 +0000
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Subject: Peregrine Falcon I photographed has a band on it.
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 21:00:22 -0500
I can't quite make it out...


https://www.flickr.com/photos/davenicosia/24235531523/in/album-72157662046643414/ 


It looks like S ??  6   Can't see the middle letter/number...

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Subject: East side of Cayuga Lake, Beebe Lake and Montezuma Feb 6 2016
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 20:51:42 -0500
Met up with Bob McGuire, Susan Danskin, Deirdre Anderson and Dave Nutter at
Stewart Park this morning. Compared to Broome County where all the ponds
and small lakes are frozen, there were loads of birds!!!  Highlights:
LESSER BLACK BACKED GULL found by Dave Nutter, raft of REDHEAD with 2
LESSER SCAUP, 2 RING-NECKED DUCKS, BUFFLEHEAD, MALLARDS, BLACK DUCKS,
COMMON GOLDENEYES, COMMON MERGANSERS, 2 NORTHERN PINTAIL, 1 adult BALD
EAGLE chasing a younger one.

Then we went to Beebe Lake / Comstock Knoll to look for the late /
wintering eastern phoebe with no luck. But there were a lot of common birds
around which we enjoyed.

Next stop was Drake Rd Lansing where there were at least 9-10 TURKEY
VULTURES most of them on the ground which was neat.

Then we stopped at Ladoga Point and we got on 4 WW SCOTERS immediately, 2
male, 2 female. There was also a basic plumage COMMON LOON there.

Myer's was windy with many ring-billed gulls, and several herring gulls and
a few GBBGs.
We also had a female NORTHERN PINTAIL pretty far out which was unusual.

Then I went on to the north for more water birds as the others went to look
for field birds.

My next stop was  Long Point and to the north in the middle of the lake you
could see large rafts of SNOW GEESE. I also had 5 more WW SCOTERS here and
at least 10 RED BREASTED MERGANSERS.

The Aurora Boathouse was brutally windy but I managed to find 5 HORNED
GREBES. One of these times I am gonna find that eared grebe!!!!

Twin Orchards Campground was loaded with aythya species with the majority
being CANVASBACKS. There were also a lot of REDHEADS too, with many fewer
scaup and RING-NECKED DUCK. I checked and checked but no TUDU!!  There were
even more aythya species too distant to determine which species. Probably
1000-2000 birds total at least.

Wildlife Drive Main Pool at Montezuma is mostly open except on the edges
and there were massive numbers of TUNDRA SWANS seen from the tower. It was
a spectacle. I counted in tens as best as I could and I estimated about
2000. Many eventually took off as there were several BALD EAGLES
patrolling. They looked to be flying south toward Cayuga Lake when I left.
There was also a raft of mainly RING-NECKED DUCKS with several others
present like GADWALL, AMERICAN WIGEON among other common ducks.

Next stop was the Savannah Mucklands and I got lucky to get a great photo
of a PEREGRINE FALCON sitting on a pole. There were loads of crows and
gulls, mostly HERRING GULLS, and RING-BILLED GULLS. There was at least one
adult LESSER-BLACK BACKED GULL. The lighting by mid afternoon was terrible.
I would definitively check this place out again with morning lighting.

Then on East Road I first found a CACKLING GOOSE as this bird( see photos
below) was much smaller than the Canada geese and had a white ring around
its neck. I searched and searched and almost gave up  on the GREATER WHITE
FRONTED GEESE as the wind was brutal but I finally managed to find 3 of
Brad Walker's and Tim Lenz's GREATER WHITE FRONTED GEESE. They had 4.
Anyway, Knox-Marcellus is loaded with Canada geese, more Tundra Swans, and
some waterfowl. Most of the waterfowl are mallards but I did find some
northern pintails and 1 female green-winged teal in the reeds. Last bird
before I hit the road back to Binghamton was a SANDHILL CRANE calling. I
totaled 60 species today.

Some photos from the day plus a video of the tundra swans can be found
here...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/davenicosia/albums/72157662046643414

Thanks to Dave Nutter, Susan Danskin, Bob McGuire, Deidere Anderson for
some fine birding in the Ithaca-Lansing area.

Dave Nicosia

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Subject: Savannah mucklands
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 15:28:05 -0500
Loaded with Gulls, snow geese.  Lighting poor now.  Mostly Herring gulls
but did pick out one adult lesser black backed Gull.

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Subject: Merlin Seneca Falls
From: John VanNiel <John.VanNiel AT flcc.edu>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 20:12:56 +0000
Had a Merlin earlier today North of 318 on Gravel Road in Seneca Falls. Was not 
there when I returned but worth looking for. I would call it an adult female. 


Dr. John Van Niel
Professor of Environmental Conservation
Director, East Hill Campus
Finger Lakes Community College
________________________________________

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Subject: Greater white fronted geese and cranes
From: Brad Walker <edgarallenhoopoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 06 Feb 2016 18:45:46 +0000
Hi all,

Tim Lenz and I are currently looking at four greater white fronted geese at
East Road. We also had five cranes in the fields at the west end of
Armitage Road, west of the flooded woods.

-Brad

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Subject: Baltimore Orioles
From: Ann Mitchell <annmitchell13 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 13:40:44 -0500
It is still present near the boat ramp at Treman Marina.
Ann

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Montezuma Main Pool
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 13:32:02 -0500
Not frozen. About 2000 Tundra Swans. A nice sized raft of aythya ducks too.

Dave Nicosia

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Subject: SFO 2016 - Celebrating 40 years!
From: Marc Devokaitis <mdevokaitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 15:21:03 -0500
Hello Cayuga Birders present and past,


Incredibly, 2016 marks the *40th year* for Spring Field Ornithology at the
Cornell Lab of Ornithology! This years course begins *Wednesday, March 23rd
*and runs through* May 15th.  *


The course is designed for everyone from the complete beginner to the most
avid birder and includes lectures, half-day and full-day trips, plus two
overnights. Mix and match the sections to fit your schedule. The class
consists of:

·         *Wednesday night lectures*, including two visits to the bird
collection of the Cornell Museum of Vertebrates and a nighttime 'owl
prowl.'

·        *Saturday or Sunday field trips* to regional birding hotspots such
as Braddock Bay Bird Observatory, Derby Hill Hawk Watch, Montezuma,
Sapsucker Woods and Dryden Lake.

·         *Two overnight trips* to birding meccas: Montezuma National
Wildlife Refuge and Magee Marsh in Ohio.

We invite you to *register by February 7* for a special gift: Free access
to two of our Be a Better Birder

online
tutorials. A $58 value!

This year, we celebrate our ruby (-throated hummingbird?) anniversary by
offering the* lecture portion of the course “online” as well*

 

*.* This means anyone, anywhere can share in the wonder this
year. In-person participants in the lectures section will *automatically*
get access to the online component, which includes the lecture recordings,
quizzes, and handouts.

*Dr. Steve Kress, *VP for Bird Conservation for National Audubon Society,
returns to teach the course, and he will be joined by guest lecturers from
the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Weekend trips will be led by a cadre of
local birding experts.

The weekly field trips tailored to the interests and abilities of each
group. A sense of community builds throughout the course, and many people
enjoy the trips so much that they return year after year with their friends.


Visit http://www.birds.cornell.edu/sfo  to watch a video about the course,
look at photos, review the course schedule and enroll, and learn about the
offerings.

Full schedule: http://www.birds.cornell.edu/sfo/Course_schedule

NEW online portal:

https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/spring-field-ornithology-northeast-2016/ 



If you have questions, contact me at sfoclass AT cornell.edu,
 or call 607-254-2165. *Please help spread the word
by forwarding this email to anyone you think might be interested!*


Thank you, and I hope to see many of you this spring!
Marc



Marc Devokaitis

Coordinator, Spring Field Ornithology 

607-254-2165

sfoclass AT cornell.edu

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Subject: RE:Mourning Dove at Lab of O
From: "Marie P. Read" <mpr5 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 13:55:48 +0000
WOW! Although I guess they can nest anytime, because they feed their young 
"crop milk" and don't rely on an external food source. 


Marie

Marie Read Wildlife Photography
452 Ringwood Road
Freeville NY  13068 USA

Phone  607-539-6608
e-mail   mpr5 AT cornell.edu

http://www.marieread.com

________________________________________
From: bounce-120133801-5851667 AT list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-120133801-5851667 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Mary E. Winston 
[mew73 AT cornell.edu] 

Sent: Friday, February 5, 2016 8:01 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Mourning Dove at Lab of O

There is a Mourning Dove already sitting on a nest right over the CLO Seed 
Closet Door on Friday, February 5! 


Mary E. Winston
Public Outreach Assistant
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

607-254-2473
mew73 AT cornell.edu


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Subject: Re: Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat.
From: Daniel Graham <artstats AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 08:31:11 -0500
Unfortunately, no sign of the Snowy Owl this morning on the gas
installation at Reese/Seybolt Rd. at 7:15 (but I didn't look for very
long).


On 2/4/16, Peter  wrote:
> It's Reese Rd. and it runs into Seybolt Rd. in the town of Fayette.
> Hope this helps.
> Pete Sar
>
> On 2/4/2016 6:09 PM, marsha kardon wrote:
>> I can't find a Freese Rd in Seneca Falls on Google maps - can you
>> help?  I do find Seybolt Rd.
>>
>> On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 5:54 PM, Michael Tetlow
>> > wrote:
>>
>>          Sorry to post late but I just wanted to send a note that
>>     yesterday the Snowy Owl was seen again on the west side of Seybolt
>>     Road just north of Freese road in Seneca Falls.(I know I missed it
>>     last week as did others).
>>
>>         Later, I and 2 helpers were working on the Montezuma Raptor
>>     survey at Cayuga marsh walking the tracks in from route 89
>>     opposite the village of Cayuga. We totaled 10 Northern Harriers
>>     and I Short-eared Owl. On the south side of the tracks a probable
>>     Common Yellowthroat called a couple times from the marsh just east
>>     of the wooded edge. I know the call I just prefer to see the bird
>>     to be sure.
>>
>>          Just before dark a Snowy owl appeared on the top of the
>>     tallest power pole farthest to our east along the railroad tracks.
>>     Don’t know where it was when I was viewing the 2000 plus Tundra
>>     Swans from Mud Lock earlier. With no ice it could have been
>>     anywhere. 1000’s(probably 15) of Snow Geese flew in from the north
>>     and joined the swans to roost south of Mud lock.
>>
>>          Several  groups of around 1000 Redhead each were spread out
>>     from Cayuga Lake State Park on the west to south to Union springs
>>     on the east. The west side birds, although distant, had a good
>>     number of Canvasback (50ish) mixed in and the union spring birds
>>     had a few of both Scaup species  and close to 500 Ring-necked Ducks.
>>
>>      Mike Tetlow
>>
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Subject: Mourning Dove at Lab of O
From: "Mary E. Winston" <mew73 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 13:01:28 +0000
There is a Mourning Dove already sitting on a nest right over the CLO Seed 
Closet Door on Friday, February 5! 


Mary E. Winston
Public Outreach Assistant
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

607-254-2473
mew73 AT cornell.edu

"Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our 
people need it sorely on these accounts, Broad, wholesome, charitable views of 
men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the 
earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain 



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Subject: Re: Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat.
From: Peter <psaracin AT rochester.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 22:06:37 -0500
It's Reese Rd. and it runs into Seybolt Rd. in the town of Fayette.
Hope this helps.
Pete Sar

On 2/4/2016 6:09 PM, marsha kardon wrote:
> I can't find a Freese Rd in Seneca Falls on Google maps - can you 
> help?  I do find Seybolt Rd.
>
> On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 5:54 PM, Michael Tetlow 
> > wrote:
>
>          Sorry to post late but I just wanted to send a note that
>     yesterday the Snowy Owl was seen again on the west side of Seybolt
>     Road just north of Freese road in Seneca Falls.(I know I missed it
>     last week as did others).
>
>         Later, I and 2 helpers were working on the Montezuma Raptor
>     survey at Cayuga marsh walking the tracks in from route 89
>     opposite the village of Cayuga. We totaled 10 Northern Harriers
>     and I Short-eared Owl. On the south side of the tracks a probable
>     Common Yellowthroat called a couple times from the marsh just east
>     of the wooded edge. I know the call I just prefer to see the bird
>     to be sure.
>
>          Just before dark a Snowy owl appeared on the top of the
>     tallest power pole farthest to our east along the railroad tracks.
>     Don’t know where it was when I was viewing the 2000 plus Tundra
>     Swans from Mud Lock earlier. With no ice it could have been
>     anywhere. 1000’s(probably 15) of Snow Geese flew in from the north
>     and joined the swans to roost south of Mud lock.
>
>          Several  groups of around 1000 Redhead each were spread out
>     from Cayuga Lake State Park on the west to south to Union springs
>     on the east. The west side birds, although distant, had a good
>     number of Canvasback (50ish) mixed in and the union spring birds
>     had a few of both Scaup species  and close to 500 Ring-necked Ducks.
>
>      Mike Tetlow
>
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Subject: Re: Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat.
From: Peter <psaracin AT rochester.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 22:05:54 -0500
Folks there is a small place to pull off the road by the railroad tracks 
on  the east side of the road (on the shoulder) (as you face north) just 
beyond where you encounter the actual tracks.  Be careful...it's close 
to the road.
Pete Saracino

On 2/4/2016 6:26 PM, Suan Hsi Yong wrote:
> It's Reese Road and Seybolt. To the west about 300 yards away look for 
> some gas pipe installation (or whatever it is). Each time I've seen 
> the bird it's been on that installation.
>
> Suan
>
>
> On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 6:09 PM, marsha kardon  > wrote:
>
>     I can't find a Freese Rd in Seneca Falls on Google maps - can you
>     help?  I do find Seybolt Rd.
>
>     On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 5:54 PM, Michael Tetlow
>     > wrote:
>
>              Sorry to post late but I just wanted to send a note that
>         yesterday the Snowy Owl was seen again on the west side of
>         Seybolt Road just north of Freese road in Seneca Falls.(I know
>         I missed it last week as did others).
>
>             Later, I and 2 helpers were working on the Montezuma
>         Raptor survey at Cayuga marsh walking the tracks in from route
>         89 opposite the village of Cayuga. We totaled 10 Northern
>         Harriers and I Short-eared Owl. On the south side of the
>         tracks a probable Common Yellowthroat called a couple times
>         from the marsh just east of the wooded edge. I know the call I
>         just prefer to see the bird to be sure.
>
>              Just before dark a Snowy owl appeared on the top of the
>         tallest power pole farthest to our east along the railroad
>         tracks. Don’t know where it was when I was viewing the 2000
>         plus Tundra Swans from Mud Lock earlier. With no ice it could
>         have been anywhere. 1000’s(probably 15) of Snow Geese flew in
>         from the north and joined the swans to roost south of Mud lock.
>
>              Several  groups of around 1000 Redhead each were spread
>         out from Cayuga Lake State Park on the west to south to Union
>         springs on the east. The west side birds, although distant,
>         had a good number of Canvasback (50ish) mixed in and the union
>         spring birds had a few of both Scaup species  and close to 500
>         Ring-necked Ducks.
>
>          Mike Tetlow
>
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Subject: Re: Baltimore oriole at Treman Marina!
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 00:49:42 +0000
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Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat.
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT me.com>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 00:33:00 +0000
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Subject: Re: Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat.
From: Suan Hsi Yong <suan.yong AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 18:26:49 -0500
It's Reese Road and Seybolt. To the west about 300 yards away look for some
gas pipe installation (or whatever it is). Each time I've seen the bird
it's been on that installation.

Suan


On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 6:09 PM, marsha kardon  wrote:

> I can't find a Freese Rd in Seneca Falls on Google maps - can you help?  I
> do find Seybolt Rd.
>
> On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 5:54 PM, Michael Tetlow 
> wrote:
>
>>      Sorry to post late but I just wanted to send a note that yesterday
>> the Snowy Owl was seen again on the west side of Seybolt Road just north of
>> Freese road in Seneca Falls.(I know I missed it last week as did others).
>>
>>     Later, I and 2 helpers were working on the Montezuma Raptor survey at
>> Cayuga marsh walking the tracks in from route 89 opposite the village of
>> Cayuga. We totaled 10 Northern Harriers and I Short-eared Owl. On the south
>> side of the tracks a probable Common Yellowthroat called a couple times
>> from the marsh just east of the wooded edge. I know the call I just prefer
>> to see the bird to be sure.
>>
>>      Just before dark a Snowy owl appeared on the top of the tallest
>> power pole farthest to our east along the railroad tracks. Don’t know 
where 

>> it was when I was viewing the 2000 plus Tundra Swans from Mud Lock earlier.
>> With no ice it could have been anywhere. 1000’s(probably 15) of Snow Geese
>> flew in from the north and joined the swans to roost south of Mud lock.
>>
>>      Several  groups of around 1000 Redhead each were spread out from
>> Cayuga Lake State Park on the west to south to Union springs on the east.
>> The west side birds, although distant, had a good number of Canvasback
>> (50ish) mixed in and the union spring birds had a few of both Scaup species
>>  and close to 500 Ring-necked Ducks.
>>
>>  Mike Tetlow
>> --
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Subject: Re: Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat.
From: Linda K Tuyn <ltuyn AT binghamton.edu>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 18:26:50 -0500
Great report!
And, where on Rte 89 can we access the tracks you walked, finding the
harriers, etc?
Thanks

On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 6:09 PM, marsha kardon  wrote:

> I can't find a Freese Rd in Seneca Falls on Google maps - can you help?  I
> do find Seybolt Rd.
>
> On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 5:54 PM, Michael Tetlow 
> wrote:
>
>>      Sorry to post late but I just wanted to send a note that yesterday
>> the Snowy Owl was seen again on the west side of Seybolt Road just north of
>> Freese road in Seneca Falls.(I know I missed it last week as did others).
>>
>>     Later, I and 2 helpers were working on the Montezuma Raptor survey at
>> Cayuga marsh walking the tracks in from route 89 opposite the village of
>> Cayuga. We totaled 10 Northern Harriers and I Short-eared Owl. On the south
>> side of the tracks a probable Common Yellowthroat called a couple times
>> from the marsh just east of the wooded edge. I know the call I just prefer
>> to see the bird to be sure.
>>
>>      Just before dark a Snowy owl appeared on the top of the tallest
>> power pole farthest to our east along the railroad tracks. Don’t know 
where 

>> it was when I was viewing the 2000 plus Tundra Swans from Mud Lock earlier.
>> With no ice it could have been anywhere. 1000’s(probably 15) of Snow Geese
>> flew in from the north and joined the swans to roost south of Mud lock.
>>
>>      Several  groups of around 1000 Redhead each were spread out from
>> Cayuga Lake State Park on the west to south to Union springs on the east.
>> The west side birds, although distant, had a good number of Canvasback
>> (50ish) mixed in and the union spring birds had a few of both Scaup species
>>  and close to 500 Ring-necked Ducks.
>>
>>  Mike Tetlow
>> --
>> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
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Subject: Re: Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat.
From: marsha kardon <mfkardon AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 18:09:59 -0500
I can't find a Freese Rd in Seneca Falls on Google maps - can you help?  I
do find Seybolt Rd.

On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 5:54 PM, Michael Tetlow 
wrote:

>      Sorry to post late but I just wanted to send a note that yesterday
> the Snowy Owl was seen again on the west side of Seybolt Road just north of
> Freese road in Seneca Falls.(I know I missed it last week as did others).
>
>     Later, I and 2 helpers were working on the Montezuma Raptor survey at
> Cayuga marsh walking the tracks in from route 89 opposite the village of
> Cayuga. We totaled 10 Northern Harriers and I Short-eared Owl. On the south
> side of the tracks a probable Common Yellowthroat called a couple times
> from the marsh just east of the wooded edge. I know the call I just prefer
> to see the bird to be sure.
>
>      Just before dark a Snowy owl appeared on the top of the tallest power
> pole farthest to our east along the railroad tracks. Don’t know where it
> was when I was viewing the 2000 plus Tundra Swans from Mud Lock earlier.
> With no ice it could have been anywhere. 1000’s(probably 15) of Snow Geese
> flew in from the north and joined the swans to roost south of Mud lock.
>
>      Several  groups of around 1000 Redhead each were spread out from
> Cayuga Lake State Park on the west to south to Union springs on the east.
> The west side birds, although distant, had a good number of Canvasback
> (50ish) mixed in and the union spring birds had a few of both Scaup species
>  and close to 500 Ring-necked Ducks.
>
>  Mike Tetlow
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
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Subject: Yesterday Snowy owls. Seybolt Road and North End of Cayuga lake. probable Common Yellowthroat.
From: "Michael Tetlow " <mjtetlow AT frontiernet.net>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 17:54:03 -0500
     Sorry to post late but I just wanted to send a note that yesterday the
Snowy Owl was seen again on the west side of Seybolt Road just north of
Freese road in Seneca Falls.(I know I missed it last week as did others).

    Later, I and 2 helpers were working on the Montezuma Raptor survey at
Cayuga marsh walking the tracks in from route 89 opposite the village of
Cayuga. We totaled 10 Northern Harriers and I Short-eared Owl. On the south
side of the tracks a probable Common Yellowthroat called a couple times from
the marsh just east of the wooded edge. I know the call I just prefer to see
the bird to be sure.

     Just before dark a Snowy owl appeared on the top of the tallest power
pole farthest to our east along the railroad tracks. Don't know where it was
when I was viewing the 2000 plus Tundra Swans from Mud Lock earlier. With no
ice it could have been anywhere. 1000's(probably 15) of Snow Geese flew in
from the north and joined the swans to roost south of Mud lock.

     Several  groups of around 1000 Redhead each were spread out from Cayuga
Lake State Park on the west to south to Union springs on the east. The west
side birds, although distant, had a good number of Canvasback (50ish) mixed
in and the union spring birds had a few of both Scaup species  and close to
500 Ring-necked Ducks.

 Mike Tetlow 


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Subject: Cayuga Bird Club meeting - February 8
From: "clr82 AT juno.com" <clr82@juno.com>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 22:07:13 GMT
The February Cayuga Bird Club meeting will be this coming Monday, Feb. 8 at 
7:30 pm at the Ornithology Lab. Cookies & conversation begins at 7:15. 

 Our speaker, Eduardo E. Iigo Elias, Senior Research Associate and 
Coordinator, Neotropical Conservation Initiative, Department of Conservation 
Science, Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, will give his presentation - "Birds 
and Birding in Cuba: from Zuzuncito to Guantanamo" 

For 14 years, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology has engaged and worked actively 
with multiple Cuban institutions and individuals, under the leadership of 
Eduardo E. Iigo Elias, to study and protect birds and biodiversity in Cuba. We 
will hear Eduardo share his experiences and knowledge of the birds of this 
amazingly diverse country. He has worked with Cuban collaborators since 2002 in 
multiple research, education and applied conservation projects in the Cuban 
archipelago. 


Members are invited to dinner with Eduardo before the meeting at Taste of Thai 
Express at 5:30. Please RSVP by noon Monday to clr82 AT juno.com so reservations 
can be made. 

____________________________________________________________
Citi Simplicity® Card
No Late Fees, No Pentalty Rate, and No Annual Fee, Ever.
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/56b3cbf7ae5f24bf47ea9st04duc
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Subject: brown-headed cowbirds again--Hile School and Ed Hill Roads both
From: AB Clark <anneb.clark AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 20:53:14 -0500
ABout 10 am, today 2 FEb 16, a brown-headed cowbird male was at my feeder and I 
thought I saw a small flock of them moving SE into the brushy areas around our 
house on Hile School Road…just out of the basin. But these are birds, with 
wings. At 330 pm today, several (or many) cowbird males flew ESE with a large 
flock of starlings, across Ed Hill Road, about 1/2 way between Hile School Road 
and Fall Creek Road i.e. “in the Basin”. I assume that they probably 
included some of the same ones seen in the morning, ca 3/4 mi from there. 


Anne
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Subject: Re: Bobcat!
From: John Confer <confer AT ithaca.edu>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2016 00:41:02 +0000
Awesome!

How disappointing that you didn't get a saw-whet. (Just joking)

Yesterday, I tried Thomas Rd for abut 1.5 hrs for screech and saw-whet and got 
a screech, but no bobcat. A lot of commute traffic starting at about 6:00. 


John Confer

________________________________________
From: bounce-120118738-25065879 AT list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of bob mcguire 
 

Sent: Monday, February 1, 2016 8:51 PM
To: Cayugabirdlist
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Bobcat!

I just returned from a nighttime walk in the Park Preserve (south portion) 
listening for saw-whet owl. No owl - but very much to my surprise I heard the 
call/scream of a bobcat. It came from the north, just across the small stream 
that runs along the orange trail. 


Bobcat? Here is one that I recorded several years ago outside of San Jose, CA. 
Its the same call that I heard tonight. 


http://macaulaylibrary.org/audio/176488

Bob McGuire
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Subject: Mt Pleasant Horned Lark singing
From: "Marie P. Read" <mpr5 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 21:11:11 +0000
The plaintive voice of a singing Horned Lark wafted my way from somewhere in a 
corn stubble field at the eastern end of Mt Pleasant Rd, bringing delight to an 
otherwise pretty bird-free walk this afternoon. Did see a Red-tailed Hawk 
circling above, but little else. 


I DID forget to post, though, that I saw my first Rough-legged Hawk of the 
"winter", flying over Rt 13 near the Ithaca airport last Saturday morning. 


An odd season...

Marie


Marie Read Wildlife Photography
452 Ringwood Road
Freeville NY  13068 USA

Phone  607-539-6608
e-mail   mpr5 AT cornell.edu

http://www.marieread.com

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Subject: Baltimore oriole at Treman Marina!
From: marsha kardon <mfkardon AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 16:03:29 -0500
At about 2pm we were watching a flock of at least 5 bluebirds in the trees
between the boat docks at Treman marina and the solar panels in the next
parking lot. Then a male Baltimore Oriole flew into the same trees and
allowed us excellent views of his beautiful plumage in the bright
sunlight.  After he flew deep into the evergreens along the driveway toward
Hangar Theater, we walked to Hogs Hole where we saw goldeneye, one gadwall,
common and hooded mergansers, black ducks and bufflehead.  In the distance
at Stewart Park, we could see a raft of redheads about the size of the raft
I'd seen at Hogs Hole several days ago.  We also saw Cedar Waxwings and
house finches in the Hawthorne trees by solar array.  Marsha and Fred
Kardon

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Subject: Current Visitors
From: Ellen Haith <elliehaith44 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 14:58:32 -0500
Three robins in our back yard, Trumansburg Village one block south of
Seneca County. None have been seen here since November.

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Subject: Re: Yawgers Creek
From: phil bonn <philbonn55 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 14:26:29 -0500
where is Yawgers creek? other than emptying into Cayuga Lake I mean

On Tue, Feb 2, 2016 at 1:07 PM, william hecht  wrote:

> Lots of eagles every day here at the mouth of Yawgers Creek
>
> Swans and snow geese
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Subject: Re: Eastern Phoebe, Arts Quad
From: Brendan Fogarty <birderbf AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 19:14:13 +0000 (UTC)
Hi everyone,
There are some talented starlings around campus that are particularly good at 
reproducing phoebe songs. However there was a bonafide Eastern Phoebe calling 
(not singing) and flying around the picnic area along Forest Home Drive above 
the eastern end of Beebe around 9AM this morning. 

Brendan Fogarty 

 On Tuesday, February 2, 2016 11:32 AM, Karen Steffy  wrote: 

 

 [an error occurred while processing this directive]

Subject: Cayuga Lake Birding Tour  Thursday, Feb. 4
From: Chris Lajewski <lajewskic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 18:24:52 +0000 (UTC)
Cayuga Lake Birding Van Tour 
Thursday, February 4, 2:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.Cayuga Lake is an Audubon designated 
Important Bird Area because of the incredible number of waterfowl that use the 
lake during winter and migration seasons. Hop in the Montezuma Audubon Center 
(MAC) van for an excursion to the northern part of the lake where up to 30 
species of ducks, geese and swans can be seen. Bald eagles and Northern 
Harriers are a possibility too! Participants are encouraged to bring their 
camera. Fee: $8/child, $13.50/adult. Call 315-365-3588 to reserve your seat. 
Meet at the MAC 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY. 


Chris LajewskiCenter DirectorMontezuma Audubon Centerny.audubon.org/montezuma 
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Subject: Leucistic Red Tail
From: Donna Scott <dls999 AT me.com>
Date: Tue, 02 Feb 2016 13:23:46 -0500
LEUCISTIC RED TAILED HAWK 154 Wilson Rd, Lansing, between Conlon & Buck Rds. , 
south side rd. in deciduous tree by white pines behind small red barns. 

Donna Scott

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Drumming
From: Laura Stenzler <lms9 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 18:12:54 +0000
This afternoon I heard a pileated woodpecker loudly drumming from our woods on 
Hunt Hill Rd, Dryden. Is it really only February 2?? 

Laura


Laura Stenzler
lms9 AT cornell.edu
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Subject: Yawgers Creek
From: william hecht <wshecht01 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 13:07:06 -0500
Lots of eagles every day here at the mouth of Yawgers Creek

Swans and snow geese

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Subject: Red-necked Grebe
From: Ann Mitchell <annmitchell13 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 12:22:41 -0500
Seen looking north from the Aurora boathouse. Also 2 Long-tailed Ducks and a 
White-winged Scoter present. Seen by Dave and me. 

Ann


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Subject: RE: Eastern Phoebe, Arts Quad
From: Karen Steffy <ks247 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 16:31:25 +0000
I wonder if there has been a Phoebe hanging around Cornell all winter? I 
thought that I saw one in early December at Beebe Lake. I wasn’t 100% sure, 
however, because it was backlit on a grey day, and all I could get was the tail 
bobbing as it kept flying farther away from me. And, of course, I didn’t have 
binoculars with me. A week or so later, I ran into someone who had also seen a 
Phoebe near the small footbridge (I think) on Beebe Lake. (Hopefully, he’s on 
the list and can add his experience.) 


Karen

From: bounce-120118443-25410880 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-120118443-25410880 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of cedar 
Mathers-Winn 

Sent: Monday, February 01, 2016 6:22 PM
To: Suan Hsi Yong ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
; Jay McGowan  

Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Eastern Phoebe, Arts Quad

Well, it's possible. The singer of the phoebe song was pretty physically 
distant from the starlings I saw and heard, and wasn't accompanied by any other 
bird vocalizations. And the song itself was completely convincing to me, for 
what it's worth. 


I'll keep my ears open tomorrow and try to track it down if I hear it.
________________________________
From: Suan Hsi Yong >
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> 

Sent: Monday, February 1, 2016 4:24 PM
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Eastern Phoebe, Arts Quad

Yesterday morning at Sapsucker Woods, the starlings were doing kingbird and 
wood duck and meadowlark (among others, no doubt). 

Meanwhile, there was legitimate singing from chickadee, titmouse, cardinal: 
sounded and felt like spring! 


Suan

On Mon, Feb 1, 2016 at 9:37 AM, cedar Mathers-Winn 
> wrote: 


At 8:30 this morning in the Arts Quad at Cornell, heard an EASTERN PHOEBE sing 
one phrase of song. A few minutes later heard KILLDEER calls, but possible that 
these were from a nearby starling that was calling intermittently. 


As much as I keep telling myself we may see some winter yet...

Cedar


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Subject: Spring calls in Fall Creek
From: Sandy Wold <sandra.wold AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 10:02:11 -0500
A glorious chorus this morning: Carolina Wrens are back in my back yard
after having been away for several months, calling incessantly since 8am.
I heard one calling at a certain pitch and then it shifted to a half or
whole-note higher while the other one listened.  It made a second call too,
which was a very different rhythm.  Chickadees chasing each other and doing
the tee-hoo sound. Several robins calling and chasing each other.  Large
flock, about 10 juncos. Jays and cardinals have also returned to my
backyard after having been gone for about a month or so.  All of these
birds usually are daily birds among others in warmer seasons, but they do
go away for several weeks at a time in winter, and it is always such a
treat when they return!  I had grackles here two years ago for months
November 2014, not seen since.

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Subject: Bobcat!
From: bob mcguire <bmcguire AT clarityconnect.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 20:51:03 -0500
I just returned from a nighttime walk in the Park Preserve (south portion) 
listening for saw-whet owl. No owl - but very much to my surprise I heard the 
call/scream of a bobcat. It came from the north, just across the small stream 
that runs along the orange trail. 


Bobcat? Here is one that I recorded several years ago outside of San Jose, CA. 
Its the same call that I heard tonight. 


http://macaulaylibrary.org/audio/176488

Bob McGuire
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Subject: Re: Eastern Phoebe, Arts Quad
From: cedar Mathers-Winn <cloudgrease AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 23:21:32 +0000 (UTC)
Well, it's possible. The singer of the phoebe song was pretty physically 
distant from the starlings I saw and heard, and wasn't accompanied by any other 
bird vocalizations. And the song itself was completely convincing to me, for 
what it's worth. 

 I'll keep my ears open tomorrow and try to track it down if I hear it.

      From: Suan Hsi Yong 
 To: CAYUGABIRDS-L  
 Sent: Monday, February 1, 2016 4:24 PM
 Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Eastern Phoebe, Arts Quad
   
Yesterday morning at Sapsucker Woods, the starlings were doing kingbird and 
wood duck and meadowlark (among others, no doubt). 

Meanwhile, there was legitimate singing from chickadee, titmouse, cardinal: 
sounded and felt like spring! 


Suan


On Mon, Feb 1, 2016 at 9:37 AM, cedar Mathers-Winn  
wrote: 


At 8:30 this morning in the Arts Quad at Cornell, heard an EASTERN PHOEBE sing 
one phrase of song. A few minutes later heard KILLDEER calls, but possible that 
these were from a nearby starling that was calling intermittently. 

As much as I keep telling myself we may see some winter yet...
Cedar


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Subject: Re: Eastern Phoebe, Arts Quad
From: Suan Hsi Yong <suan.yong AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 16:24:31 -0500
Yesterday morning at Sapsucker Woods, the starlings were doing kingbird and
wood duck and meadowlark (among others, no doubt).
Meanwhile, there was legitimate singing from chickadee, titmouse, cardinal:
sounded and felt like spring!

Suan


On Mon, Feb 1, 2016 at 9:37 AM, cedar Mathers-Winn 
wrote:

> At 8:30 this morning in the Arts Quad at Cornell, heard an EASTERN PHOEBE
> sing one phrase of song. A few minutes later heard KILLDEER calls, but
> possible that these were from a nearby starling that was calling
> intermittently.
>
> As much as I keep telling myself we may see some winter yet...
>
> Cedar
>
>

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Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 19:29:04 +0000 (UTC)
 *  New York*  Syracuse   
   - February 01, 2016
*  NYSY  02. 01. 16 Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):January 25, 
2015 - February 01, 2016to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering 
upstate NY counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma 
Wetlands Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, 
Jefferson, Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortlandcompiled: February 01  AT 
12:00 p.m. (EST)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga Audubon Homepage: 
www.onondagaaudubon.org  Greetings: This is the Syracuse Rare Bird Alert for 
the week of January 25, 2015. 

Highlights--------------
EARED GREBERED-NECKED GREBEAMERICAN WHITE PELICANTRUMPETER SWANKING 
EIDERICELAND GULLGLAUCOUS GULLSHORT-EARED OWLMERLINRED-HEADED 
WOODPECKERNORTHERN SHRIKEMARSH WRENDICKCISSELLAPLAND LONGSPUR 



Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex 
(MWC)------------ 

     1/27: A SHORT-EARED OWL was seen from East Road.     1/31: A late 
MARSH WREN was seen at the Visitor’s Center. 


Onondaga County------------
     1/25: 2 RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS were seen near green Lakes Park. 2 
TRUMPETER SWANS were seen in the Seneca River below the dam in 
Baldwinsville.     1/26: The AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN seen and enjoyed by so 
many was found dead on Tuesday. It was determined that the bird starved but 
also had parasites on vital organs.     1/27: A SHORT-EARED OWL was seen at 
Threee Rivers WMA north of Baldwinsville near the new blind off of Smokey 
Hollow Road. A NORTHERN SHRIKE was seen also and has been seen here on a 
regular basis.      1/28: A GLAUCOUS GULL was seen at the Inner Harbor near 
West Kirkpatrick Street in Syracuse.     1/30: An ICELAND GULL was found at 
the Inner Harbor.     1/31: A MERLIN was spotted along the Seneca River in 
Baldwinsville.      2/1: A pair of MERLINS were observed at South Meadows 
Nature Area in Tully. 


Oswego county------------
     The DICKCISSEL frequenting a feeder at 847 Forest Ave. in Fulton was 
seen daily this week.      1/28: A LAPLAND LONGSPUR was seen on Smith Road 
north of Mexico. A rare EARED GREBE was discovered in Oswego Harbor. It has 
been found through 1/30. A RED-NECKED GREBE was also seen in Oswego Harbor and 
was present yesterday. The female KING EIDER was present through 1/31 at 
Selkirk Shores State Park.     1/29: An adult RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was seen 
at the north end of Nine Mile Point Road near Noyes Sanctuary on Lake 
Ontario.     1/30: An ICELAND GULL was found in Oswego Harbor. 


Madison County------------
     1/25: A LAPLAND LONGSPUR was seen on Jantzen Road north of 
Earlville.     1/27: An ICELAND GULL was seen at the Madison County 
Landfill.     1/27: A MERLIN was seen on Ditchbank Road. 


Cayuga County------------
     1/31: 9 TRUMPETER SWANS were seen at Fair Haven State Park.       
    

           
Joseph BrinRegion 5Baldwinsville, NY 13027  U.S.A.  
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Subject: Re: OT? FYO bear nr West Danby
From: Geo Kloppel <geokloppel AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 14:19:03 -0500
That's my neighborhood, too. (Tupper Road). Yesterday I found a scat filled 
with coarsely chopped acorn shells, which made me think of bear. 


What a weird winter!

-Geo

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 1, 2016, at 11:35 AM, Nigel Dyson-Hudson  wrote:
> 
> This morning we got up and noticed that our bird feeders were on the ground.
> Upon closer inspection I found that the 4 hook rod was bent almost
> flat to the ground - I should have gotten a picture before
> straightening it.
> The stand-alone wooden box feeder had the plastic hinge for the lid
> torn and the suet block on that feeder had fallen out and had chew
> marks all around.
> So we are taking the bird feeders down tonight.
> 
> We are just north of VanBuskirk Gulf Rd and west of NY Rt 34/96.
> 
> Our home designed deer fence doesn't seem to be damaged - it must be
> strong enough for the bear to climb. (4 ft field fence wire 2 runs
> high - cable tied together; heavy duty road sign U posts from Seneca
> Supply - 10 ft so 8 ft exposed, but next time I would use 12 ft; rebar
> woven through the wire at 16  ft intervals between the U posts; As
> grape vines grow on the fence scraps of wood or tree branches are
> added for bracing the wire.)  Nigel
> 
> --
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Subject: OT? FYO bear nr West Danby
From: Nigel Dyson-Hudson <cavensar AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 11:35:03 -0500
This morning we got up and noticed that our bird feeders were on the ground.
Upon closer inspection I found that the 4 hook rod was bent almost
flat to the ground - I should have gotten a picture before
straightening it.
The stand-alone wooden box feeder had the plastic hinge for the lid
torn and the suet block on that feeder had fallen out and had chew
marks all around.
So we are taking the bird feeders down tonight.

We are just north of VanBuskirk Gulf Rd and west of NY Rt 34/96.

Our home designed deer fence doesn't seem to be damaged - it must be
strong enough for the bear to climb. (4 ft field fence wire 2 runs
high - cable tied together; heavy duty road sign U posts from Seneca
Supply - 10 ft so 8 ft exposed, but next time I would use 12 ft; rebar
woven through the wire at 16  ft intervals between the U posts; As
grape vines grow on the fence scraps of wood or tree branches are
added for bracing the wire.)  Nigel

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Subject: OT Salt point talk
From: Donna Lee Scott <dls9 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 15:25:38 +0000
Off topic, but see below: of interest to Cayuga Bird Club members and others 
who bird at Salt Point. 


Donna L. Scott
Lansing Station Road
Lansing


From: saltpoint AT googlegroups.com [mailto:saltpoint AT googlegroups.com] On Behalf 
Of Robert Rieger 

Sent: Saturday, January 30, 2016 3:10 PM
To: saltpoint AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [saltpoint] Presentation  AT  Kendal on Wednesday

You're invited to a public presentation this Wednesday....

Sterling Salt, Rowdy Revelers and a Return to Nature: The Story of Salt Point 
in Lansing, NY 


Kendal at Ithaca, Auditorium
2230 N. Triphammer Road, Ithaca
Wednesday, February 3
7:15 p.m.
Visitor parking is available (follow signs)

Once the home of a large table salt producer, Salt Point has changed over the 
years. Today, this 34 acre natural area, located across Salmon Creek just north 
of Myers Park, provides a wonderful venue for families, hikers, bird watchers, 
and paddlers. But it wasn’t always this way. This presentation by members of 
the Friends of Salt Point tells the story of the area’s transformation with 
photos, anecdotes and historical documents. 

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Subject: Eastern Phoebe, Arts Quad
From: cedar Mathers-Winn <cloudgrease AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 14:37:22 +0000 (UTC)
At 8:30 this morning in the Arts Quad at Cornell, heard an EASTERN PHOEBE sing 
one phrase of song. A few minutes later heard KILLDEER calls, but possible that 
these were from a nearby starling that was calling intermittently. 

As much as I keep telling myself we may see some winter yet...
Cedar
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Subject: Re: Fox Sparrow musings - possible intergrade at Liddell?
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 03:34:46 +0000
Hi all,

Talking about Fox Sparrow, there are several reports of Fox Sparrows in the 
Northeast. Mild winter to blame I guess. I have not looked at ebird 
distributions. Also several reports of Grey Catbirds too. At least some of them 
have gone where they are supposed to be i.e. in Yucatan. 



I took a 2+ mile walk along Six Mile Creek in beautiful afternoon. Nothing much 
except for a few Hairy woodpeckers and Chickadees. 



BTW, I had posted about a familiar call of a Mexican bird a few days ago. Now I 
know the bird. They were Collared Forest Falcons. It just clicked me yesterday 
that it was falcon, then on trying a few calls of different species, I came 
upon Forest Falcon! 



Cheers

Meena


Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://www.haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: https://plus.google.com/118047473426099383469/posts
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/dragonflies/samplebook.pdf





________________________________
From: bounce-120111355-3493976 AT list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Jay McGowan 
 

Sent: Sunday, January 31, 2016 8:17 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Fox Sparrow musings - possible intergrade at 
Liddell? 


Hey all,
Thought I would chime in briefly about the Fox Sparrow. I agree that it is 
darker than the majority of the birds we get passing through the area. I don't 
think it is out of the range of variation for Red, although it could perhaps be 
indicative of a more western-breeding populations (zaboria). Either way, good 
observation by Dave and Gary, certainly worth studying out-of-season 
individuals even more carefully than we would normally do. Here are a few 
semi-obscured photos of the bird in question: 

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S27121735

In a similar vein, Livia and I found what I believe to be an immature Gambel's 
White-crowned Sparrow with two leucophrys immatures in a tree sparrow flock 
along Park Road in Canoga, Seneca County, yesterday. Photos here: 

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S27204380
This is a rare but regular and undoubtedly overlooked vagrant in the east, 
something to keep an eye out for. 


Good birding,
Jay

On Mon, Jan 25, 2016 at 7:58 AM, Gary Kohlenberg 
> wrote: 

I'm glad Dave worked so hard to get this bird and make such detailed notes, 
because I really struggled to call this one for eBird. Every Fox Sparrow I've 
seen in the basin over the years has been an obvious Red (Taiga) subspecies. 
Always so red that coloration is the first thing to catch my eye in the 
underbrush, only then do I notice the size difference. This bird was distinctly 
brown and rechecking Sibley he speaks of "a confusing array of intergrades" so 
it certainly seems possible our visitor is a little more than our typical 
migrant. There may be a dedicated sparrow guide out there with photos of 
variations in Fox Sparrow that would be fun to see, but I don't know of one. If 
anyone hasn't seen this bird it is worth a look if for no other reason than to 
contrast with future sightings. 

Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: 
bounce-120080486-3493999 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-120080486-3493999 AT list.cornell.edu] 
On Behalf Of Dave Nutter 

Sent: Sunday, January 24, 2016 8:37 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> 

Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Fox Sparrow musings - possible intergrade at Liddell?

To me, Fox Sparrows are a special challenge, even though they are big, boldly 
colored, and easy to ID for a sparrow. We typically only see them here during 
migration because they breed in the boreal forest across Canada and they winter 
in the southeastern US. That narrows the time frame to see them. Their prefered 
habitat is brushy woods where they hide pretty well, and I dont get to those 
places enough during that window. The folks who have the best luck live next to 
such habitat and set up a bird feeder which spills seed on the ground. There a 
Fox Sparrow will scratch as it eats, sometimes becoming hidden in a small 
crater. I havent tried such a feeding station in my yard, as it would be 
awkward to watch from the house. Perhaps I should, because once I did see a Fox 
Sparrow in my yard. That was after a heavy April snowfall. The bird was resting 
in my weed-filled vineyard, but it was probably present because of my next-door 
neighbors feeding station, which is annoyingly difficult for me to monitor. 


This year the opportunity to see a Fox Sparrow was greatly expanded when Tom 
Schulenberg found one on New Years Day as part of the Christmas Bird Count. It 
was near Freese Road in brushy habitat by the pond at the Liddell Lab. Over the 
next few days several other people saw it, but I failed. That lab has many 
beehives around it, but it also has a bird feeder next ot brushy, damp habitat 
contiguous to woods. I have seen a Fox Sparrow at that feeding station - in the 
usual season - several times over the years. During the holiday break the 
feeder was empty, but afterward it was maintained again, and people started 
finding Toms Fox Sparrow below the feeder and in the immediately adjacent 
brush. This would make it much easier to see, I thought. I tried again and 
failed. Then the long holiday weekend came, the feeder was empty, and so was 
the adjacent brush. I went back on the following Tuesday but the conditions 
remained the same: no food, no birds. Perhaps the guy who works there and fills 
the feeder took the whole week off! I went back early on Saturday and found the 
feeders and bushes empty again. But this time I came equipped with a gallon jar 
full of black oil sunflower seeds. I filled the dang feeder myself, kicked 
enough snow off the ground that Id be able to see the area from a distance, 
poured some extra seed on the ground, and left for the rest of the morning to 
let the local birds consider the situation. 


During the interval I went to the Lab of O feeder garden and had wonderful 
views of another bird we typically only see in migration, a Rusty Blackbird, 
among numerous other birds. Thats a multi-trophic-level bird feeder, with an 
adult Sharp-shinned Hawk who had eaten a male Northern Cardinal the day before, 
the same day the Rusty Blackbird was discovered, but the Sharp-shin was not 
successful (yet) when I saw it. I think it made at least 3 passes while I was 
present. There was also an adult Coopers Hawk perched over the Wilson Trail 
North. It not only tolerated the members of the Saturday morning bird walk 
viewing it through my scope, it stayed put while we walked below it and than 
scoped it from the other side as well. Perhaps it is a year-round resident of 
Sapsucker Woods, and recognizes that the people on the trails harmless, so its 
a waste of a bird's time and energy to keep fleeing the people. Theres a 
Red-tailed Hawk like that at the Lab also, which tends to sit on lampposts 
around the parking lot. But I digress. 


I returned to Liddell and had great looks at the Fox Sparrow. I understand that 
several other people saw it as well that afternoon and today too. I now 
recommend that a large mouse-proof container of birdseed be added to every 
birders car kit, along with the field guide and binoculars. Some folks have 
tried setting up feeders in places like Summerhill State Forest. I first heard 
about Nelsons Sparrow (then called Sharp-tailed Sparrow) at Treman State 
Marine Park when Jeff Wells saw one by putting out seed. I know that back in 
the day Arthur Allen kept feeders in Renwick Wildwood. As I drive around I see 
many empty bird feeders at peoples houses and I am tempted to fill them. Or it 
might be a nice gesture to donate birdseed to the people who maintain 
especially productive feeders. 


But about this out-of-season Fox Sparrow at the Liddell Lab. I noticed in Gary 
Kohlenbergs eBird report that it was not as red as he expected. I, too, found 
that to be the case. Sibley shows the Red Fox Sparrow, which inhabits eastern 
North America as well as Canada and Alaska north and east of the Rockies, to 
have all bright rusty red streaks and spots below, including the malar stripes 
and the big central breast spot. Not so on this bird, whose central spot is 
dark brown and whose other spots and streaks form an interesting gradation from 
small dark brown spots low on the sides, to more chestnut brown farther up the 
sides to slightly redder brown on the upper sides. None of the underside 
streaking is the bright rufous which Sibley shows for the Red type, but nor is 
it all dark brown as Sibley shows for the Slate-colored type from the 
interior west. On the other hand the pattern above seems to have 
characteristics of the Red type. It has the rufous pattern on the gray cheek 
and the streaked central back, both of which western birds lack. But the gray 
of the upper back came down and covered the birds shoulder/wrist like western 
types, although the greater coverts and wing were rufous. Maybe the birds back 
was just fluffed up, and maybe the color below is normal variation, and maybe 
Sibley over-generalized or overstated the red on the Red Fox Sparrow, but maybe 
this is a Red x Slate-colored intergrade. I hope other folks who know more 
about this stuff will take a close look at the bird and offer an opinion. 


Dave Nutter





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--
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jwm57 AT cornell.edu
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Subject: Re:Recent highlights -- Newman Golf Course, lake, Plantations
From: Sandy Wold <sandra.wold AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 22:02:50 -0500
Thanks for posting and sharing, Mark.

As much as I would like to think birds like me as much as I like them, and
hence they want to get as close to me as possible, now I see this was a
hectic survival moment I biked into.  I was laughing by the surprise of it
all, but now I see the birds were freaking out (no laughable).  The doves
were flying like bullets into the evergreens.  It felt like the hawk was
intentional with its contact with me, but now I think I was just in its way
and that it was super hungry!  Now it all makes sense that as my friend and
I waited at the evergreen, there was a scuffle after a few minutes and a
mourning dove came bolting out, faster than I've ever saw one fly!  It shot
right into another evergreen, and the hawk came out shortly thereafter (not
immediately), and probably flipping me a birdie.  And that is when I got
the view of it flying away from me (again) and then seeing its silhouette
in a tree.   Given it was probably super hungry, I'll think twice before I
track an "aggressive" hawk as I might be interfering with its survival. (I
hope it will be OK.)

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Subject: Recent highlights -- Newman Golf Course, lake, Plantations
From: Mark Chao <markchao AT imt.org>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 20:39:57 -0500
Thanks for your account, Sandy!



The other day I too saw a Sharp-shinned Hawk chasing House Sparrows and
other birds at the Newman Golf Course.  The hawk blazed in to the feeder by
the private residence along the inlet, scattering the songbirds, and
perched in a bush for a couple of minutes, heedless of my presence just
five meters away.  It was a first-winter bird, with a yellow orbital ring
and fine rufous feather edges on the back and wings.   The hawk took off
again after a House Sparrow, with both birds threading themselves through
impossibly narrow gaps in the shrubs, in and out and in and out again
within one charged split-second.  I followed the Sharp-shinned Hawk
eventually to a small bare tree along the boatyard’s parking lot.  Again
the hawk tolerated my close approach, ultimately to the spot right below
it.  This bird seemed thoroughly accustomed to people.



Other recent highlights:



* On Friday, from Route 13 descending from Cayuga Heights, a carload of
kids and I saw the Redhead flock arrayed on the lake in a neat half-circle
with a stub at the center of the convex side of the arc.   It was as if the
lake surface were a canvas for the giant oarlock logo of some rowing
group.



* Yesterday I returned to the golf course with my wife Miyoko Chu.  We
didn’t see the hawk, but did see a southbound Great Blue Heron overhead.
We also saw the Redhead flock rising from the red lighthouse area, and
pulling into two like a mitosing amoeba.  (We could not see any owl at last
year’s nest.)



* Today Miyoko joined me again, this time at the Newman Arboretum.  Amid
the laden crabapple trees on the slope, we sat among dozens of American
Robins and Cedar Waxwings, all so tame and/or intently voracious that they
too allowed us to walk right up to them.  A light-morph Rough-legged Hawk
crossed very high to our north as we were leaving.



Mark Chao











*From:* bounce-120111120-3493629 AT list.cornell.edu [mailto:
bounce-120111120-3493629 AT list.cornell.edu] *On Behalf Of *Sandy Wold
*Sent:* Sunday, January 31, 2016 6:24 PM
*To:* Upstate NY Birding digest
*Subject:* [cayugabirds-l] Hold on to your hats! Agressive Sharp-shinned at
Newman Golf Course?



I just had an interesting experience.  It was dusk, about 5:30pm, and I was
sprinting home on my bike from Stewart Park with a friend passing by the
Golf Course where I was dive-bombed by a falcon-shaped bird.  It was quite
thrilling as I felt it come behind me and swoop over my off-white knit
hat!  Was it checking out my fibers????  Seconds before, three
sparrow-sized birds swooped close in front of me from my left and over my
right shoulder (I was pedaling fast at the time).  As the sparrow-sized
birds passed on, I heard Mourning Doves dashing all around.  It was too
dusky to identify anything other than the doves who were all around and
scuffling with each other for who was going to get which tree.  I could
hear their wing beats and see silhouettes:



We followed the predator bird into a tall dense evergreen and waited.  The
person with me, riding behind me, said she saw the predator bird scuffle
with a smaller bird as it approached my head with the smaller bird
deferring and moving to my left.  After a few minutes at the evergreen, the
predator flew out toward me (again) and behind and circled me heading away
from me and toward a deciduous tree about 100 yards away where I was able
to see a clear silhouette.  Tail pointed straight downward when perched,
almost as long as its torso, had a straight edge on its perching tail,
definitely saw a hawk-like bill shape.  When it flew, I saw falcon-points.
The person with me saw white on the underside...It flew from this last tree
to a bramble clump in the middle of the golf course.  We walked all around
the dense bramble and could not find the bird. Any ideas?  My first choice
is Sharp-shinned Hawk for tail length and silhouette, but perigrine for
flight shape.



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Subject: Re: Fox Sparrow musings - possible intergrade at Liddell?
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 20:17:40 -0500
Hey all,
Thought I would chime in briefly about the Fox Sparrow. I agree that it is
darker than the majority of the birds we get passing through the area. I
don't think it is out of the range of variation for Red, although it could
perhaps be indicative of a more western-breeding populations (zaboria).
Either way, good observation by Dave and Gary, certainly worth studying
out-of-season individuals even more carefully than we would normally do.
Here are a few semi-obscured photos of the bird in question:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S27121735

In a similar vein, Livia and I found what I believe to be an immature
Gambel's White-crowned Sparrow with two leucophrys immatures in a tree
sparrow flock along Park Road in Canoga, Seneca County, yesterday. Photos
here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S27204380
This is a rare but regular and undoubtedly overlooked vagrant in the east,
something to keep an eye out for.

Good birding,
Jay

On Mon, Jan 25, 2016 at 7:58 AM, Gary Kohlenberg  wrote:

> I'm glad Dave worked so hard to get this bird and make such detailed
> notes, because I really struggled to call this one for eBird. Every Fox
> Sparrow I've seen in the basin over the years has been an obvious Red
> (Taiga) subspecies. Always so red that coloration is the first thing to
> catch my eye in the underbrush, only then do I notice the size difference.
> This bird was distinctly brown and rechecking Sibley he speaks of "a
> confusing array of intergrades" so it certainly seems possible our visitor
> is a little more than our typical migrant. There may be a dedicated sparrow
> guide out there with photos of variations in Fox Sparrow that would be fun
> to see, but I don't know of one. If anyone hasn't seen this bird it is
> worth a look if for no other reason than to contrast with future sightings.
> Gary
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: bounce-120080486-3493999 AT list.cornell.edu [mailto:
> bounce-120080486-3493999 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Dave Nutter
> Sent: Sunday, January 24, 2016 8:37 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Fox Sparrow musings - possible intergrade at
> Liddell?
>
> To me, Fox Sparrows are a special challenge, even though they are big,
> boldly colored, and easy to ID for a sparrow. We typically only see them
> here during migration because they breed in the boreal forest across Canada
> and they winter in the southeastern US. That narrows the time frame to see
> them. Their prefered habitat is brushy woods where they hide pretty well,
> and I don’t get to those places enough during that window. The folks who
> have the best luck live next to such habitat and set up a bird feeder which
> spills seed on the ground. There a Fox Sparrow will scratch as it eats,
> sometimes becoming hidden in a small crater. I haven’t tried such a feeding
> station in my yard, as it would be awkward to watch from the house. Perhaps
> I should, because once I did see a Fox Sparrow in my yard. That was after a
> heavy April snowfall. The bird was resting in my weed-filled vineyard, but
> it was probably present because of my next-door neighbor’s feeding station,
> which is annoyingly difficult for me to monitor.
>
> This year the opportunity to see a Fox Sparrow was greatly expanded when
> Tom Schulenberg found one on New Year’s Day as part of the Christmas Bird
> Count. It was near Freese Road in brushy habitat by the pond at the Liddell
> Lab. Over the next few days several other people saw it, but I failed. That
> lab has many beehives around it, but it also has a bird feeder next ot
> brushy, damp habitat contiguous to woods. I have seen a Fox Sparrow at that
> feeding station - in the usual season - several times over the years.
> During the holiday break the feeder was empty, but afterward it was
> maintained again, and people started finding Tom’s Fox Sparrow below the
> feeder and in the immediately adjacent brush. This would make it much
> easier to see, I thought. I tried again and failed. Then the long holiday
> weekend came, the feeder was empty, and so was the adjacent brush. I went
> back on the following Tuesday but the conditions remained the same: no
> food, no birds. Perhaps the guy who works there and fills the feeder took
> the whole week off! I went back early on Saturday and found the feeders and
> bushes empty again. But this time I came equipped with a gallon jar full of
> black oil sunflower seeds. I filled the dang feeder myself, kicked enough
> snow off the ground that I’d be able to see the area from a distance,
> poured some extra seed on the ground, and left for the rest of the morning
> to let the local birds consider the situation.
>
> During the interval I went to the Lab of O feeder garden and had wonderful
> views of another bird we typically only see in migration, a Rusty
> Blackbird, among numerous other birds. That’s a multi-trophic-level bird
> feeder, with an adult Sharp-shinned Hawk who had eaten a male Northern
> Cardinal the day before, the same day the Rusty Blackbird was discovered,
> but the Sharp-shin was not successful (yet) when I saw it. I think it made
> at least 3 passes while I was present. There was also an adult Cooper’s
> Hawk perched over the Wilson Trail North. It not only tolerated the members
> of the Saturday morning bird walk viewing it through my scope, it stayed
> put while we walked below it and than scoped it from the other side as
> well. Perhaps it is a year-round resident of Sapsucker Woods, and
> recognizes that the people on the trails harmless, so it’s a waste of a
> bird's time and energy to keep fleeing the people. There’s a Red-tailed
> Hawk like that at the Lab also, which tends to sit on lampposts around the
> parking lot.  But I digress.
>
> I returned to Liddell and had great looks at the Fox Sparrow. I understand
> that several other people saw it as well that afternoon and today too. I
> now recommend that a large mouse-proof container of birdseed be added to
> every birder’s car kit, along with the field guide and binoculars. Some
> folks have tried setting up feeders in places like Summerhill State Forest.
> I first heard about Nelson’s Sparrow (then called Sharp-tailed Sparrow) at
> Treman State Marine Park when Jeff Wells saw one by putting out seed. I
> know that back in the day Arthur Allen kept feeders in Renwick Wildwood. As
> I drive around I see many empty bird feeders at people’s houses and I am
> tempted to fill them. Or it might be a nice gesture to donate birdseed to
> the people who maintain especially productive feeders.
>
> But about this out-of-season Fox Sparrow at the Liddell Lab. I noticed in
> Gary Kohlenberg’s eBird report that it was not as red as he expected. I,
> too, found that to be the case. Sibley shows the Red Fox Sparrow, which
> inhabits eastern North America as well as Canada and Alaska north and east
> of the Rockies, to have all bright rusty red streaks and spots below,
> including the malar stripes and the big central breast spot. Not so on this
> bird, whose central spot is dark brown and whose other spots and streaks
> form an interesting gradation from small dark brown spots low on the sides,
> to more chestnut brown farther up the sides to slightly redder brown on the
> upper sides. None of the underside streaking is the bright rufous which
> Sibley shows for the Red type, but nor is it all dark brown as Sibley shows
> for the “Slate-colored” type from the interior west. On the other hand 
the 

> pattern above seems to have characteristics of the Red type. It has the
> rufous pattern on the gray cheek and the streaked central back, both of
> which western birds lack. But the gray of the upper back came down and
> covered the bird’s shoulder/wrist like western types, although the greater
> coverts and wing were rufous. Maybe the bird’s back was just fluffed up,
> and maybe the color below is normal variation, and maybe Sibley
> over-generalized or overstated the red on the Red Fox Sparrow, but maybe
> this is a Red x Slate-colored intergrade. I hope other folks who know more
> about this stuff will take a close look at the bird and offer an opinion.
>
> —Dave Nutter
>
>
>
>
>
> --
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Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
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Subject: Hold on to your hats! Agressive Sharp-shinned at Newman Golf Course?
From: Sandy Wold <sandra.wold AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 18:23:30 -0500
I just had an interesting experience.  It was dusk, about 5:30pm, and I was
sprinting home on my bike from Stewart Park with a friend passing by the
Golf Course where I was dive-bombed by a falcon-shaped bird.  It was quite
thrilling as I felt it come behind me and swoop over my off-white knit
hat!  Was it checking out my fibers????  Seconds before, three
sparrow-sized birds swooped close in front of me from my left and over my
right shoulder (I was pedaling fast at the time).  As the sparrow-sized
birds passed on, I heard Mourning Doves dashing all around.  It was too
dusky to identify anything other than the doves who were all around and
scuffling with each other for who was going to get which tree.  I could
hear their wing beats and see silhouettes:

We followed the predator bird into a tall dense evergreen and waited.  The
person with me, riding behind me, said she saw the predator bird scuffle
with a smaller bird as it approached my head with the smaller bird
deferring and moving to my left.  After a few minutes at the evergreen, the
predator flew out toward me (again) and behind and circled me heading away
from me and toward a deciduous tree about 100 yards away where I was able
to see a clear silhouette.  Tail pointed straight downward when perched,
almost as long as its torso, had a straight edge on its perching tail,
definitely saw a hawk-like bill shape.  When it flew, I saw falcon-points.
The person with me saw white on the underside...It flew from this last tree
to a bramble clump in the middle of the golf course.  We walked all around
the dense bramble and could not find the bird. Any ideas?  My first choice
is Sharp-shinned Hawk for tail length and silhouette, but perigrine for
flight shape.

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Subject: Ladoga Scoters
From: bob mcguire <bmcguire AT clarityconnect.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 14:44:19 -0500
I just returned from a fruitless chase of the reported Long-tailed Duck at 
Myers. While missing the duck, I did find four White-winged Scoters close-in at 
Ladoga (two males, two females), one Double-crested Cormorant, one Pied-billed 
Grebe, and a distant Common Loon (plus Common Goldeneye and Mergansers, 
Mallards, and the three common gull species). 


Earlier this morning I noticed a (the?) Killdeer along the creek just east of 
the Town park spit and a pair of Horned Grebes offshore. 


Bob McGuire
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Subject: Mockingbird/Cardinal Song
From: Annette Nadeau <anadeau336 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 11:58:48 -0500
Just saw my first Mockingbird of the year in its usual area near the top of
the hill on Burns Road in Brooktondale. Also heard my first Cardinal song
near my yard on this 51-degree morning.

Annette
-- from my phone

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Subject: Re:Around the Lake Saturday
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT mac.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 08:02:18 -0500
One of the neat things about birding with others is our varied experiences and 
perspectives regarding the same events. That's why I tend to submit independent 
rather than shared eBird checklists. Here are a few of my highlights from 
yesterday with the gang: 


First, on my way to join the others by biking on the Cayuga Waterfront Trail 
near the dock at Stewart Park I saw 2 adult GREAT BLACK-BACKED GULLS on the ice 
nearby, close together yet far from any other birds, they were posturing 
together with their necks, heads, & bill stretched skyward. I'm guessing 
courtship. 


Second, near the large pavilion I saw my first NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD for my 
Luddite List (observed during one leg of a no-fossil-fuel round trip including 
my home). I've logged 65 species so far this year on that list. 


Sad news at Stewart Park: Two large trees have been cut down next to the east 
end of the parking area. In a way, they were victims of climate change: During 
a warm nearly snow-less winter, workers with time and power tools on their 
hands start cutting down trees. Those trees had provided the only shade for 
people in cars viewing the lake. 


I heard several singing birds during the day, including TUFTED TITMOUSE, 
WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH, and NORTHERN CARDINAL. 


In the mixed flock at Summerhill I saw both RED-BREASTED and WHITE-BREASTED 
NUTHATCH and also a BROWN CREEPER. 


The PINE SISKINS along Lake Como Rd were new for the year for everyone except 
Ann. She has been birding so diligently that she has observed more species than 
the rest of us, and I think she did not add any during the day. On the other 
hand, Ken went fishing instead of birding one weekend, so he may have added 
some birds which he missed that day. And the morning I spent locally with the 
Rusty Blackbird and the Fox Sparrow, the others went to Van Cleef Lake and 
found an Iceland Gull. Thus, in terms of lists, I was the main beneficiary of 
the gull chase, though it was also neat to find how different the viewing 
conditions of essentially the same birds were at various places. The warm south 
wind on coming up Cayuga Lake (okay, technically down the lake) made the gulls 
on the ice far from the boat ramp at Cayuga Lake State Park look like murky 
bill-less blobs, but farther south along Lower Lake Road, where the contour of 
the ice edge brought the flock (which had been moving south) closer to shore, 
we were able to see the birds better even as dusk closed in. 


Another phenomenon we saw throughout the afternoon was the accumulation of SNOW 
GEESE. Rivers of them flew south over the middle of Cayuga Lake to gather in at 
least 3 large rafts between Aurora and Dean's Cove. Some were still headed that 
way after sunset during our gull search. 

--Dave Nutter

On Jan 30, 2016, at 09:48 PM, bob mcguire  wrote:

> Ann, Dave, Diane, Ken and I spent the day out looking for birds. We found a 
few new year birds for each of us and experienced a few remarkable moments. 

> 
> From the shore at Stewart Park we watched as an immense flock of thousands of 
Redheads took to the air from the water off East Shore Park and circled the 
south end of the lake for a good twenty minutes, murmuration-like. They were 
joined by dozens of gulls. Although we never saw it come in, an adult Bald 
Eagle perched above the sailing clubhouse was probably what caused them all to 
take flight. 

> 
> We then headed up to Summerhill, cruised Salt Road (quiet except for a few of 
Chickadees and two Red-breasted Nuthatches), then dropped down to Lake Como 
Road. There was a fresh coating of snow in the McIlroy Preserve, and we walked 
the yellow loop trail hoping for Ruffed Grouse. We never actually found the 
grouse but were rewarded by a set of fresh grouse tracks that we followed until 
they led out over thin ice. What was remarkable was that we could read so much 
of the bird's behavior from its tracks. The tracks began when the bird flew in 
from somewhere. Its tail hit the snow first followed 18 inches farther by 
side-by-side footprints followed another 12 inches by the set of tracks leading 
away. As the bird walked it flicked the ground with its tail. There were a 
couple of places where it stood still then turned sideways and back. At one 
point it hopped up on a thin log and walked along and upwards until jumping 
back to the ground and continuing. 

> 
> Nick was out plowing around the house on Lake Como and invited us to view his 
feeders, saying the only birds he had were Chickadees and Goldfinches. I was 
getting hungry and said "let's go get lunch". Dave overruled that with "we 
should at least take a look". A good thing: there were at least a dozen Pine 
Siskins coming to the feeders along with the other birds! 

> 
> We did eat after that - an indifferent, over-priced burger/fries/grilled 
cheese spread at the Lake Como Inn. Steve Fast: I remembered too late that 
wonderful roadside inn up near Bear Swamp! 

> 
> From the Aurora boathouse we picked out a single White-winged Scoter, 7 (or 
more?) Horned Grebes, and several distant rafts or Snow Geese. No loons and no 
Eared Grebe. At this point it was already mid-afternoon, and we decided to head 
over to the ice edge on the west side to look for white-winged gulls. 

> 
> Looking out from Cayuga Lake State Park we found a couple of Glaucous Gulls - 
one adult and one juvenile. Then, on a tip from Alexander Lees, we drove back 
to Van Cleef Lake to look for the 4 - 5 Iceland Gulls he had just seen there. 
Unfortunately, as we arrived the last of the gulls there were taking off for 
their evening roost on Cayuga Lake. So - we scooted back to Cayuga Lake SP and, 
in the failing light were finally able to pick out one Iceland Gull. 

> 
> I'm sure that I have missed other highlights from today (right now my light 
is failing, too). So I'd invite any of the others to chime in. 

> 
> Bob McGuire
> --
> 

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Subject: Syracuse pelican autopsy results
From: Sandy Wold <sandra.wold AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2016 22:36:56 -0500
Syracuse journalists did a great job and followed up with the DEC.  Here
are the sad results.  http://s.syracuse.com/YUwJ1Fb

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Subject: Around the lake Saturday
From: bob mcguire <bmcguire AT clarityconnect.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2016 21:48:15 -0500
Ann, Dave, Diane, Ken and I spent the day out looking for birds. We found a few 
new year birds for each of us and experienced a few remarkable moments. 


From the shore at Stewart Park we watched as an immense flock of thousands of 
Redheads took to the air from the water off East Shore Park and circled the 
south end of the lake for a good twenty minutes, murmuration-like. They were 
joined by dozens of gulls. Although we never saw it come in, an adult Bald 
Eagle perched above the sailing clubhouse was probably what caused them all to 
take flight. 


We then headed up to Summerhill, cruised Salt Road (quiet except for a few of 
Chickadees and two Red-breasted Nuthatches), then dropped down to Lake Como 
Road. There was a fresh coating of snow in the McIlroy Preserve, and we walked 
the yellow loop trail hoping for Ruffed Grouse. We never actually found the 
grouse but were rewarded by a set of fresh grouse tracks that we followed until 
they led out over thin ice. What was remarkable was that we could read so much 
of the bird's behavior from its tracks. The tracks began when the bird flew in 
from somewhere. Its tail hit the snow first followed 18 inches farther by 
side-by-side footprints followed another 12 inches by the set of tracks leading 
away. As the bird walked it flicked the ground with its tail. There were a 
couple of places where it stood still then turned sideways and back. At one 
point it hopped up on a thin log and walked along and upwards until jumping 
back to the ground and continuing. 


Nick was out plowing around the house on Lake Como and invited us to view his 
feeders, saying the only birds he had were Chickadees and Goldfinches. I was 
getting hungry and said "let's go get lunch". Dave overruled that with "we 
should at least take a look". A good thing: there were at least a dozen Pine 
Siskins coming to the feeders along with the other birds! 


We did eat after that - an indifferent, over-priced burger/fries/grilled cheese 
spread at the Lake Como Inn. Steve Fast: I remembered too late that wonderful 
roadside inn up near Bear Swamp! 


From the Aurora boathouse we picked out a single White-winged Scoter, 7 (or 
more?) Horned Grebes, and several distant rafts or Snow Geese. No loons and no 
Eared Grebe. At this point it was already mid-afternoon, and we decided to head 
over to the ice edge on the west side to look for white-winged gulls. 


Looking out from Cayuga Lake State Park we found a couple of Glaucous Gulls - 
one adult and one juvenile. Then, on a tip from Alexander Lees, we drove back 
to Van Cleef Lake to look for the 4 - 5 Iceland Gulls he had just seen there. 
Unfortunately, as we arrived the last of the gulls there were taking off for 
their evening roost on Cayuga Lake. So - we scooted back to Cayuga Lake SP and, 
in the failing light were finally able to pick out one Iceland Gull. 


I'm sure that I have missed other highlights from today (right now my light is 
failing, too). So I'd invite any of the others to chime in. 


Bob McGuire
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Subject: Bald Eagle @ Second Dam
From: Suan Yong <suan.yong AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2016 16:02:59 -0500
Had an adult bald eagle this morning at the Second Dam of Six-Mile Creek, 
soared, circled a few times to gain elevation, and continued upstream into the 
southerly wind. 


Suan
_____________________
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Subject: Re: Lots of swans
From: Glenn Wilson <wilson AT stny.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2016 15:17:24 -0500
That was supposed to be seen from River Road. I think there are 75 to 100 
Sean's and I think some at least are Trumpeter. 


Glenn Wilson
Endicott, NY
www.WilsonsWarbler.com

On Jan 30, 2016, at 2:41 PM, Glenn Wilson  wrote:

Seen from river red by mud lock. Not sure which swan. They are near a lot of 
Canada geese 


Glenn Wilson
Endicott, NY
www.WilsonsWarbler.com
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Subject: Lots of swans
From: Glenn Wilson <wilson AT stny.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2016 14:41:59 -0500
Seen from river red by mud lock. Not sure which swan. They are near a lot of 
Canada geese 


Glenn Wilson
Endicott, NY
www.WilsonsWarbler.com
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Subject: Bluebird downtown Ithaca
From: Sandy Wold <sandra.wold AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2016 10:22:11 -0500
Early afternoon yesterday, I had to do a triple-take when I heard and then
saw a bluebird out the window in a tree around the back side of Boynton
Middle School!  It was hanging out with chickadees and juncos who all
seemed interested in a bramble patch and/or tall grasses in a gully there.

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Subject: Great Tit
From: Carl Steckler <cjs9 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 2016 09:37:48 -0500
According to eBird they / it are being seen on the western shore of Lake 
Michigan North of Milwaukee. It looks like the sightings have been 
consistent.
Road trip anyone:?)
Carl Steckler

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Subject: Great Tit in NYS?
From: Kathy & Dan C. <kathyclem AT twcny.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 2016 09:22:21 -0500
    
In the 1/22/16 "New York Outdoor News" Backyard and Beyond section on page 36, 
is a brief mention of Great Tits here in NYS.  The blurb reads,  

"Out of Place: An unusual bird, the great tit, familiar in England and Europe, 
has been visiting Reggie Gauger's feeders for three years, and has even nested 
nearby. He reports that there are other sightings of great tits (related to 
chickadees) in his region." 

There isn't any mention of where the region might be. There is a photo but it 
looks like a stock photo.  Has anyone heard about this? 

Thanks,Kathy Clements
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Tab®4
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Subject: Eared Grebe Oswego Harbor
From: <mgullo2 AT rochester.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 15:46:17 -0500
An Eared Grebe is currently present at the Oswego Harbor. It is diving along 
the pier near the Lee Maritime Museum. 


Michael Gullo

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Subject: Cayuga Lake Osprey Trail: an aid for reporting ospreys and osprey nest sitings
From: Candace Cornell <cec222 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 12:39:37 -0500
I am excited to announce that in February we will release the on-line
Cayuga Lake Osprey Trail—an interactive map of  60+ osprey nests visible
from public roads in the Cayuga Lake area. It is the culmination of several
years of work and the help of many generous birders in our area. The Trail
will make visiting and observing the osprey families much easier and will
facilitate reporting new nest and osprey sighting for my continuing survey
discussed below. I hope everyone enjoys following the “Trail” and will
continue reporting nests.




Fellow Birders,



The survey I am compiling of osprey nests in the Finger Lakes is in its
fourth year and making great progress thanks to all the reports I have
received from birders. Please help me continue this work by reporting any
osprey nests you see around the Finger Lakes as well as Oneida Lake and
Lake Ontario. Send your reports to cec222 AT gmail.com and be sure to include
their location and any other information you may have. Thank you very much
for your help in this on-going work to conserve these magnificent birds.



Thank you all!

Candace Cornell

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Subject: Re:Glaucous Gull, South End
From: Jay McGowan <jmcgowan57 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 09:09:17 -0500
Adult Glaucous Gull now in gull flock on hill above Stevenson Road compost.
On Jan 27, 2016 12:59 PM, "Jay McGowan"  wrote:

> An immaculate adult GLAUCOUS GULL is currently floating in a gull flock
> with Common Mergansers towards the west side of the lake just a bit north
> of Hog Hole, probably not visible from the east side with the current snow
> conditions but visible out on the lake from Rt. 89.
>
> Jay
>

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Subject: Rusty Blackbird
From: Marc Devokaitis <mdevokaitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 08:09:35 -0500
Currently sitting in trees to the left of boardwalk right outside main
entrance at Lab of Ornithology.

Marc Devokaitis

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Subject: Great Horned Owl Rt 89
From: Daniel Graham <artstats AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 19:35:57 -0500
At around 5:30 tonight there was a Great Horned Owl in a tree very
close to Rt. 89 south of Rt 139 in (I think) Ovid.

Also lots of goose movement today near Geneva, including ~50 Snow
Geese moving due West, and hundreds of Canada Geese moving North in
formation.

Daniel Graham
Tburg

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Subject: Glaucous Gull, South End
From: Jay McGowan <jwm57 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 12:59:50 -0500
An immaculate adult GLAUCOUS GULL is currently floating in a gull flock
with Common Mergansers towards the west side of the lake just a bit north
of Hog Hole, probably not visible from the east side with the current snow
conditions but visible out on the lake from Rt. 89.

Jay

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Subject: Pelican
From: Sandy Wold <sandra.wold AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 09:47:55 -0500
Thanks for posting, Diana.  I haven't been following the pelican; was this
in Syracuse?  Can someone let us know how or why it died? who pulled it out
of the water? will professionals be involved in figuring this out?
Sandy

* * * * * * * * *
Sandra (Sandy) Wold, Author, Artist, Educator
www.flickr.com/photos/8709678 AT N07 
www.linkedin.com/pub/sandra-sandy-wold/a7/114/877
*www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/about-author-and-artist
*

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Subject: Tufted titmouse singing!
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 14:11:23 +0000

Sent from my Verizon Wireless Phone


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Subject: Pelican
From: Diana <whitings AT roadrunner.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 14:33:05 -0500
Hi All,
 Sadly, the American Pelican has been reported to have died. The person who let 
me know saw it being pulled out of the water. 


Diana Whiting

Diana Whiting
dianawhitingphotography.com
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Subject: Please Report Osprey and Osprey Nest Sitings
From: Candace Cornell <cec222 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 07:39:15 -0500
Fellow Birders,



The survey I am compiling of osprey nests in the Finger Lakes is in it’s
fourth year and making great progress thanks to all the reports I have
received from birders. Please help me continue this work by reporting any
osprey nests you see around the Finger Lakes as well as Oneida Lake and
Lake Ontario. Send your reports to cec222 AT gmail.com  and be sure to include
their location and any other information you may have. Thank you very much
for your help in this on-going work to conserve these magnificent birds.



Sincerely.

Candace Cornell

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Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Jan 2016 20:53:51 +0000 (UTC)
 *  New York*  Syracuse   
   - January 25, 2016
*  NYSY  01. 25. 16 Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):January 18, 
2015 - January 25, 2016to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering 
upstate NY counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma 
Wetlands Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, 
Jefferson, Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortlandcompiled: January 25  AT 3:00 
p.m. (EST)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga Audubon Homepage: 
www.onondagaaudubon.org  Greetings: This is the Syracuse Rare Bird Alert for 
the week of January 18, 2015. 

Highlights--------------
AMERICAN WHITE PELICANTUNDRA SWANTRUMPETER SWANKING EIDERICELAND GULLGLAUCOUS 
GULLLESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLSHORT-EARED OWLLONG-EARED OWLMERLINRED-HEADED 
WOODPECKERNORTHERN SHRIKEDICKCISSEL 



Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex 
(MWC)------------ 

     1/22: A MERLIN was spotted on VanDyne Spoor Road.     1/24: A 
NORTHERN SHRIKE was seen in the Sandhill Crane Unit near VanDyne Spoor Road. 


Onondaga county------------
     1/18: The AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN was seen this day in the Inner 
Harbor  through 1/22 but has not been reported since. A LONG-EARED OWL was 
seen in Onondaga Park east of South Geddes Street.     1/24: An ICELAND and 
a LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL were seen in the Inner Harbor north of West 
Kirkpatrick Street. A pair of TRUMPETER SWANS were seen below the falls in 
Baldwinsville on the Seneca River. They were present on the 25th. also. 


Oswego County------------
     1/20: The first year DICKCISSEL continues at a feeder on Forest Ave. in 
Fulton. It was reported as recently as yesterday.     1/21: The female KING 
EIDER was again seen in Lake Ontario at Selkirk State Park but has not been 
reported since.     1/22: an adult RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was seen at the 
north end of Nine Mile Point Road in Scriba. It was seen also on 1/23.     
1/23: A GLAUCOUS GULL was seen in the Oswego River in Phoenix. 18 TUNDRA SWANS 
were reported on Oneida Lake in Brewerton. 


Madison county------------
     1/23: A NORTHERN SHRIKE was seen on Irish Hill Road south of 
Cazenovia.     1/24: An ICELAND GULL was reported from Ditchbank road north 
of Chittenango. 


Herkimer County------------
     1/18: A NORTHERN SHRIKE was seen on Military Road north of 
Dolgeville.     1/20: A SHORT-EARED OWL was spotted in the Town of Manheim 
near Snells Bush Road. 

         
 Joseph BrinRegion 5Baldwinsville, NY 13027  U.S.A.  
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Subject: Dave N's Fox Sparrow /filling bird feeders
From: Donna Lee Scott <dls9 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 25 Jan 2016 14:38:07 +0000
Instead of Johnny Appleseed, we could have the legendary "Davey Birdseed" who 
travels around filling people's empty bird feeders! 


Donna Scott
535 Lansing Station Road
Lansing


-----Original Message-----
From: bounce-120080486-15001843 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-120080486-15001843 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Dave Nutter 

Sent: Sunday, January 24, 2016 8:37 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Fox Sparrow musings - possible intergrade at Liddell?

To me, Fox Sparrows are a special challenge, even though they are big, boldly 
colored, and easy to ID for a sparrow. We typically only see them here during 
migration because they breed in the boreal forest across Canada and they winter 
in the southeastern US. That narrows the time frame to see them. Their prefered 
habitat is brushy woods where they hide pretty well, and I don’t get to those 
places enough during that window. The folks who have the best luck live next to 
such habitat and set up a bird feeder which spills seed on the ground. There a 
Fox Sparrow will scratch as it eats, sometimes becoming hidden in a small 
crater. I haven’t tried such a feeding station in my yard, as it would be 
awkward to watch from the house. Perhaps I should, because once I did see a Fox 
Sparrow in my yard. That was after a heavy April snowfall. The bird was resting 
in my weed-filled vineyard, but it was probably present because of my next-door 
neighbor’s feeding station, which is annoyingly difficult for me to monitor. 


This year the opportunity to see a Fox Sparrow was greatly expanded when Tom 
Schulenberg found one on New Year’s Day as part of the Christmas Bird Count. 
It was near Freese Road in brushy habitat by the pond at the Liddell Lab. Over 
the next few days several other people saw it, but I failed. That lab has many 
beehives around it, but it also has a bird feeder next ot brushy, damp habitat 
contiguous to woods. I have seen a Fox Sparrow at that feeding station - in the 
usual season - several times over the years. During the holiday break the 
feeder was empty, but afterward it was maintained again, and people started 
finding Tom’s Fox Sparrow below the feeder and in the immediately adjacent 
brush. This would make it much easier to see, I thought. I tried again and 
failed. Then the long holiday weekend came, the feeder was empty, and so was 
the adjacent brush. I went back on the following Tuesday but the conditions 
remained the same: no food, no birds. Perhaps the guy who works there and fills 
the feeder took the whole week off! I went back early on Saturday and found the 
feeders and bushes empty again. But this time I came equipped with a gallon jar 
full of black oil sunflower seeds. I filled the dang feeder myself, kicked 
enough snow off the ground that I’d be able to see the area from a distance, 
poured some extra seed on the ground, and left for the rest of the morning to 
let the local birds consider the situation. 


During the interval I went to the Lab of O feeder garden and had wonderful 
views of another bird we typically only see in migration, a Rusty Blackbird, 
among numerous other birds. That’s a multi-trophic-level bird feeder, with an 
adult Sharp-shinned Hawk who had eaten a male Northern Cardinal the day before, 
the same day the Rusty Blackbird was discovered, but the Sharp-shin was not 
successful (yet) when I saw it. I think it made at least 3 passes while I was 
present. There was also an adult Cooper’s Hawk perched over the Wilson Trail 
North. It not only tolerated the members of the Saturday morning bird walk 
viewing it through my scope, it stayed put while we walked below it and than 
scoped it from the other side as well. Perhaps it is a year-round resident of 
Sapsucker Woods, and recognizes that the people on the trails harmless, so 
it’s a waste of a bird's time and energy to keep fleeing the people. 
There’s a Red-tailed Hawk like that at the Lab also, which tends to sit on 
lampposts around the parking lot. But I digress. 


I returned to Liddell and had great looks at the Fox Sparrow. I understand that 
several other people saw it as well that afternoon and today too. I now 
recommend that a large mouse-proof container of birdseed be added to every 
birder’s car kit, along with the field guide and binoculars. Some folks have 
tried setting up feeders in places like Summerhill State Forest. I first heard 
about Nelson’s Sparrow (then called Sharp-tailed Sparrow) at Treman State 
Marine Park when Jeff Wells saw one by putting out seed. I know that back in 
the day Arthur Allen kept feeders in Renwick Wildwood. As I drive around I see 
many empty bird feeders at people’s houses and I am tempted to fill them. Or 
it might be a nice gesture to donate birdseed to the people who maintain 
especially productive feeders. 


But about this out-of-season Fox Sparrow at the Liddell Lab. I noticed in Gary 
Kohlenberg’s eBird report that it was not as red as he expected. I, too, 
found that to be the case. Sibley shows the Red Fox Sparrow, which inhabits 
eastern North America as well as Canada and Alaska north and east of the 
Rockies, to have all bright rusty red streaks and spots below, including the 
malar stripes and the big central breast spot. Not so on this bird, whose 
central spot is dark brown and whose other spots and streaks form an 
interesting gradation from small dark brown spots low on the sides, to more 
chestnut brown farther up the sides to slightly redder brown on the upper 
sides. None of the underside streaking is the bright rufous which Sibley shows 
for the Red type, but nor is it all dark brown as Sibley shows for the 
“Slate-colored” type from the interior west. On the other hand the pattern 
above seems to have characteristics of the Red type. It has the rufous pattern 
on the gray cheek and the streaked central back, both of which western birds 
lack. But the gray of the upper back came down and covered the bird’s 
shoulder/wrist like western types, although the greater coverts and wing were 
rufous. Maybe the bird’s back was just fluffed up, and maybe the color below 
is normal variation, and maybe Sibley over-generalized or overstated the red on 
the Red Fox Sparrow, but maybe this is a Red x Slate-colored intergrade. I hope 
other folks who know more about this stuff will take a close look at the bird 
and offer an opinion. 


—Dave Nutter 





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Subject: pine siskin
From: Laura Stenzler <lms9 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 25 Jan 2016 13:27:53 +0000
We have one pine siskin and two purple finches coming to the feeders since 
yesterday. Hunt Hill Rd., Ithaca 


Laura


Laura Stenzler
lms9 AT cornell.edu

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Subject: RE: Fox Sparrow musings - possible intergrade at Liddell?
From: Gary Kohlenberg <jgk25 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 25 Jan 2016 12:58:21 +0000
I'm glad Dave worked so hard to get this bird and make such detailed notes, 
because I really struggled to call this one for eBird. Every Fox Sparrow I've 
seen in the basin over the years has been an obvious Red (Taiga) subspecies. 
Always so red that coloration is the first thing to catch my eye in the 
underbrush, only then do I notice the size difference. This bird was distinctly 
brown and rechecking Sibley he speaks of "a confusing array of intergrades" so 
it certainly seems possible our visitor is a little more than our typical 
migrant. There may be a dedicated sparrow guide out there with photos of 
variations in Fox Sparrow that would be fun to see, but I don't know of one. If 
anyone hasn't seen this bird it is worth a look if for no other reason than to 
contrast with future sightings. 

Gary 

-----Original Message-----
From: bounce-120080486-3493999 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-120080486-3493999 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Dave Nutter 

Sent: Sunday, January 24, 2016 8:37 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Fox Sparrow musings - possible intergrade at Liddell?

To me, Fox Sparrows are a special challenge, even though they are big, boldly 
colored, and easy to ID for a sparrow. We typically only see them here during 
migration because they breed in the boreal forest across Canada and they winter 
in the southeastern US. That narrows the time frame to see them. Their prefered 
habitat is brushy woods where they hide pretty well, and I don’t get to those 
places enough during that window. The folks who have the best luck live next to 
such habitat and set up a bird feeder which spills seed on the ground. There a 
Fox Sparrow will scratch as it eats, sometimes becoming hidden in a small 
crater. I haven’t tried such a feeding station in my yard, as it would be 
awkward to watch from the house. Perhaps I should, because once I did see a Fox 
Sparrow in my yard. That was after a heavy April snowfall. The bird was resting 
in my weed-filled vineyard, but it was probably present because of my next-door 
neighbor’s feeding station, which is annoyingly difficult for me to monitor. 


This year the opportunity to see a Fox Sparrow was greatly expanded when Tom 
Schulenberg found one on New Year’s Day as part of the Christmas Bird Count. 
It was near Freese Road in brushy habitat by the pond at the Liddell Lab. Over 
the next few days several other people saw it, but I failed. That lab has many 
beehives around it, but it also has a bird feeder next ot brushy, damp habitat 
contiguous to woods. I have seen a Fox Sparrow at that feeding station - in the 
usual season - several times over the years. During the holiday break the 
feeder was empty, but afterward it was maintained again, and people started 
finding Tom’s Fox Sparrow below the feeder and in the immediately adjacent 
brush. This would make it much easier to see, I thought. I tried again and 
failed. Then the long holiday weekend came, the feeder was empty, and so was 
the adjacent brush. I went back on the following Tuesday but the conditions 
remained the same: no food, no birds. Perhaps the guy who works there and fills 
the feeder took the whole week off! I went back early on Saturday and found the 
feeders and bushes empty again. But this time I came equipped with a gallon jar 
full of black oil sunflower seeds. I filled the dang feeder myself, kicked 
enough snow off the ground that I’d be able to see the area from a distance, 
poured some extra seed on the ground, and left for the rest of the morning to 
let the local birds consider the situation. 


During the interval I went to the Lab of O feeder garden and had wonderful 
views of another bird we typically only see in migration, a Rusty Blackbird, 
among numerous other birds. That’s a multi-trophic-level bird feeder, with an 
adult Sharp-shinned Hawk who had eaten a male Northern Cardinal the day before, 
the same day the Rusty Blackbird was discovered, but the Sharp-shin was not 
successful (yet) when I saw it. I think it made at least 3 passes while I was 
present. There was also an adult Cooper’s Hawk perched over the Wilson Trail 
North. It not only tolerated the members of the Saturday morning bird walk 
viewing it through my scope, it stayed put while we walked below it and than 
scoped it from the other side as well. Perhaps it is a year-round resident of 
Sapsucker Woods, and recognizes that the people on the trails harmless, so 
it’s a waste of a bird's time and energy to keep fleeing the people. 
There’s a Red-tailed Hawk like that at the Lab also, which tends to sit on 
lampposts around the parking lot. But I digress. 


I returned to Liddell and had great looks at the Fox Sparrow. I understand that 
several other people saw it as well that afternoon and today too. I now 
recommend that a large mouse-proof container of birdseed be added to every 
birder’s car kit, along with the field guide and binoculars. Some folks have 
tried setting up feeders in places like Summerhill State Forest. I first heard 
about Nelson’s Sparrow (then called Sharp-tailed Sparrow) at Treman State 
Marine Park when Jeff Wells saw one by putting out seed. I know that back in 
the day Arthur Allen kept feeders in Renwick Wildwood. As I drive around I see 
many empty bird feeders at people’s houses and I am tempted to fill them. Or 
it might be a nice gesture to donate birdseed to the people who maintain 
especially productive feeders. 


But about this out-of-season Fox Sparrow at the Liddell Lab. I noticed in Gary 
Kohlenberg’s eBird report that it was not as red as he expected. I, too, 
found that to be the case. Sibley shows the Red Fox Sparrow, which inhabits 
eastern North America as well as Canada and Alaska north and east of the 
Rockies, to have all bright rusty red streaks and spots below, including the 
malar stripes and the big central breast spot. Not so on this bird, whose 
central spot is dark brown and whose other spots and streaks form an 
interesting gradation from small dark brown spots low on the sides, to more 
chestnut brown farther up the sides to slightly redder brown on the upper 
sides. None of the underside streaking is the bright rufous which Sibley shows 
for the Red type, but nor is it all dark brown as Sibley shows for the 
“Slate-colored” type from the interior west. On the other hand the pattern 
above seems to have characteristics of the Red type. It has the rufous pattern 
on the gray cheek and the streaked central back, both of which western birds 
lack. But the gray of the upper back came down and covered the bird’s 
shoulder/wrist like western types, although the greater coverts and wing were 
rufous. Maybe the bird’s back was just fluffed up, and maybe the color below 
is normal variation, and maybe Sibley over-generalized or overstated the red on 
the Red Fox Sparrow, but maybe this is a Red x Slate-colored intergrade. I hope 
other folks who know more about this stuff will take a close look at the bird 
and offer an opinion. 


—Dave Nutter 





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Subject: Fox Sparrow musings - possible intergrade at Liddell?
From: Dave Nutter <nutter.dave AT mac.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Jan 2016 20:37:19 -0500
To me, Fox Sparrows are a special challenge, even though they are big, boldly 
colored, and easy to ID for a sparrow. We typically only see them here during 
migration because they breed in the boreal forest across Canada and they winter 
in the southeastern US. That narrows the time frame to see them. Their prefered 
habitat is brushy woods where they hide pretty well, and I don’t get to those 
places enough during that window. The folks who have the best luck live next to 
such habitat and set up a bird feeder which spills seed on the ground. There a 
Fox Sparrow will scratch as it eats, sometimes becoming hidden in a small 
crater. I haven’t tried such a feeding station in my yard, as it would be 
awkward to watch from the house. Perhaps I should, because once I did see a Fox 
Sparrow in my yard. That was after a heavy April snowfall. The bird was resting 
in my weed-filled vineyard, but it was probably present because of my next-door 
neighbor’s feeding station, which is annoyingly difficult for me to monitor. 


This year the opportunity to see a Fox Sparrow was greatly expanded when Tom 
Schulenberg found one on New Year’s Day as part of the Christmas Bird Count. 
It was near Freese Road in brushy habitat by the pond at the Liddell Lab. Over 
the next few days several other people saw it, but I failed. That lab has many 
beehives around it, but it also has a bird feeder next ot brushy, damp habitat 
contiguous to woods. I have seen a Fox Sparrow at that feeding station - in the 
usual season - several times over the years. During the holiday break the 
feeder was empty, but afterward it was maintained again, and people started 
finding Tom’s Fox Sparrow below the feeder and in the immediately adjacent 
brush. This would make it much easier to see, I thought. I tried again and 
failed. Then the long holiday weekend came, the feeder was empty, and so was 
the adjacent brush. I went back on the following Tuesday but the conditions 
remained the same: no food, no birds. Perhaps the guy who works there and fills 
the feeder took the whole week off! I went back early on Saturday and found the 
feeders and bushes empty again. But this time I came equipped with a gallon jar 
full of black oil sunflower seeds. I filled the dang feeder myself, kicked 
enough snow off the ground that I’d be able to see the area from a distance, 
poured some extra seed on the ground, and left for the rest of the morning to 
let the local birds consider the situation. 


During the interval I went to the Lab of O feeder garden and had wonderful 
views of another bird we typically only see in migration, a Rusty Blackbird, 
among numerous other birds. That’s a multi-trophic-level bird feeder, with an 
adult Sharp-shinned Hawk who had eaten a male Northern Cardinal the day before, 
the same day the Rusty Blackbird was discovered, but the Sharp-shin was not 
successful (yet) when I saw it. I think it made at least 3 passes while I was 
present. There was also an adult Cooper’s Hawk perched over the Wilson Trail 
North. It not only tolerated the members of the Saturday morning bird walk 
viewing it through my scope, it stayed put while we walked below it and than 
scoped it from the other side as well. Perhaps it is a year-round resident of 
Sapsucker Woods, and recognizes that the people on the trails harmless, so 
it’s a waste of a bird's time and energy to keep fleeing the people. 
There’s a Red-tailed Hawk like that at the Lab also, which tends to sit on 
lampposts around the parking lot. But I digress. 


I returned to Liddell and had great looks at the Fox Sparrow. I understand that 
several other people saw it as well that afternoon and today too. I now 
recommend that a large mouse-proof container of birdseed be added to every 
birder’s car kit, along with the field guide and binoculars. Some folks have 
tried setting up feeders in places like Summerhill State Forest. I first heard 
about Nelson’s Sparrow (then called Sharp-tailed Sparrow) at Treman State 
Marine Park when Jeff Wells saw one by putting out seed. I know that back in 
the day Arthur Allen kept feeders in Renwick Wildwood. As I drive around I see 
many empty bird feeders at people’s houses and I am tempted to fill them. Or 
it might be a nice gesture to donate birdseed to the people who maintain 
especially productive feeders. 


But about this out-of-season Fox Sparrow at the Liddell Lab. I noticed in Gary 
Kohlenberg’s eBird report that it was not as red as he expected. I, too, 
found that to be the case. Sibley shows the Red Fox Sparrow, which inhabits 
eastern North America as well as Canada and Alaska north and east of the 
Rockies, to have all bright rusty red streaks and spots below, including the 
malar stripes and the big central breast spot. Not so on this bird, whose 
central spot is dark brown and whose other spots and streaks form an 
interesting gradation from small dark brown spots low on the sides, to more 
chestnut brown farther up the sides to slightly redder brown on the upper 
sides. None of the underside streaking is the bright rufous which Sibley shows 
for the Red type, but nor is it all dark brown as Sibley shows for the 
“Slate-colored” type from the interior west. On the other hand the pattern 
above seems to have characteristics of the Red type. It has the rufous pattern 
on the gray cheek and the streaked central back, both of which western birds 
lack. But the gray of the upper back came down and covered the bird’s 
shoulder/wrist like western types, although the greater coverts and wing were 
rufous. Maybe the bird’s back was just fluffed up, and maybe the color below 
is normal variation, and maybe Sibley over-generalized or overstated the red on 
the Red Fox Sparrow, but maybe this is a Red x Slate-colored intergrade. I hope 
other folks who know more about this stuff will take a close look at the bird 
and offer an opinion. 


—Dave Nutter 





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Subject: Short eared owls
From: M & K Mannella <mkmannella AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Jan 2016 19:02:39 -0500
Two short-eared owls were hunting on the west side of Townsendville Road near 
9554–9558 Townsendville Rd. I think this is considered to be Trumansburg on 
the map. This was about 5:30 this evening. 


Michele
----------------------------------
www.bodyshopwellness.com
----------------------------------
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