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Updated on Monday, September 29 at 02:41 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Northern Wheatear,©David Sibley

29 Sep Facebook photos and a new Fall feeder bird here []
29 Sep Reddish Egret and others at North Topsail Beach, NC ["gilbert grant" ]
29 Sep ebird: Saluda Shoals Park, SC []
29 Sep Falcons on the Move in Georgetown County, SC [Jerry Walls ]
29 Sep Roseate Spoonbill and lots of Wood Storks at HBSP (Georgetown County, SC) [Paul Serridge ]
29 Sep Re: Wasps [Bill Guion ]
29 Sep RE: Wasps []
29 Sep Re: Jackson Park [Philip Dickinson ]
29 Sep Re: Wasps [Bill Guion ]
29 Sep Wasps [Tommy McDonell ]
29 Sep RE: Ft. Fisher, 09/27/2014; BAY-BREASTED WARBLER []
29 Sep Ft. Fisher, 09/27/2014; BAY-BREASTED WARBLER []
28 Sep Jackson Park ["Ron" ]
28 Sep Migration Progresses - Charlotte Area Sep. 28 [Kevin Metcalf ]
28 Sep Finally added Raven to the Chatham Co. yard list ["Parker Backstrom" ]
28 Sep Duck Boardwalk - Life Bird with Friends 2 [Jim Gould ]
28 Sep Duck Boardwalk - Life bird with Friends [Jim Gould ]
28 Sep New Hanover Co. NC 9/28/14 Highlights [Carson Wood ]
28 Sep Say's Phoebe at North River Farms, NC ["John Fussell" ]
28 Sep Lake Crabtree migrants [Lucas Bobay ]
28 Sep Eno River State Park [David Anderson ]
28 Sep Three Falcon Week, Rockingham County [Marty Wall ]
28 Sep Zone-tailed Hawk coming our way? []
28 Sep Ft Fisher Access and Observations [John Ennis ]
28 Sep Charleston CBC [Edith Tatum ]
28 Sep OH My! [KC Foggin ]
28 Sep Great Horned Owl GHOW ["Buddy Campbell" ]
28 Sep Back yard birds north east Columbia sc [Barbara Rogers Blaney ]
28 Sep Rachel Carson Reserve (Beaufort Inlet, NC) yesterday ["John Fussell" ]
27 Sep Duck, NC migrants [Jeff Lewis ]
27 Sep Be on the look out! [John Scavetto ]
27 Sep Another good day at Pilot Mountain - actually a great day [Philip Dickinson ]
27 Sep Western Kingbird on Roanoke Island, Dare County, NC, USA [Jeff Lewis ]
27 Sep Lake Crabtree County Park, Cary, North Carolina [David Anderson ]
27 Sep new yard bird ["Barbara Brooks" ]
27 Sep Charleston Roseate Spoonbills, Rantowles causeway [Ann Truesdale ]
27 Sep Chimney Swift Roost in Raleigh [John Connors ]
27 Sep Great Horned Owl acting like a Coopers Hawk! [Alan Meijer ]
27 Sep Reddish Egrets at Shackleford Banks, NC ["John Fussell" ]
26 Sep Chimney Swift roost in Columbia []
26 Sep Ft Fisher Access Issues [John Ennis ]
26 Sep Merlins galore and 1 peregrine, Seabrook Isl, SC [David Gardner ]
26 Sep Good day at Pilot Mountain [Philip Dickinson ]
26 Sep Charlotte migrants ["Ron" ]
26 Sep Roseate Spoonbills [Pamela Ford ]
26 Sep Re: Question about iNaturalist and birding? [Will Cook ]
26 Sep White-eyed Vireo [KC Foggin ]
26 Sep Sandy Creek, Durham, North Carolina [David Anderson ]
26 Sep Re: Fort Fisher, NC - be careful walking around in certain areas [Chet M ]
25 Sep RE: Possible Bell's Vireo? Ft Fisher NC [Paul Glass ]
25 Sep Re: Possible Bell's Vireo? Ft Fisher NC [Jamie Adams ]
25 Sep Re: Possible Bell's Vireo? Ft Fisher NC [Ryan Justice ]
25 Sep Re: Possible Bell's Vireo? Ft Fisher NC [Harry LeGrand ]
25 Sep Re: Possible Bell's Vireo? Ft Fisher NC [Ryan Justice ]
25 Sep Possible Bell's Vireo? Ft Fisher NC [Jamie Adams ]
25 Sep Hilton Pond 09/13/14 (Requiem For A Queen) ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
25 Sep Enjoy Fall Migration by Recording Flight Calls [Charlotte ]
25 Sep Question about iNaturalist and birding? [David Gardner ]
25 Sep Pilot Mountain Hawk Watch [Philip Dickinson ]
25 Sep Santee Coastal Reserve and Santee Delta, South Carolina [Craig ]
25 Sep RE: Fort Fisher, NC - be careful walking around in certain areas [Jamie Adams ]
25 Sep Fort Fisher, NC - be careful walking around in certain areas [Jamie Adams ]
25 Sep Re: Cooper's Hawks hunt Squirrels??? [Marty Wall ]
25 Sep RE: Cooper's Hawks hunt Squirrels??? []
25 Sep RE: Cooper's Hawks hunt Squirrels??? [Rob G. ]
25 Sep Cooper's Hawks hunt Squirrels??? [David Gardner ]
24 Sep Re: RoxburyPark_MeggettSC_fallout [Cherrie Sneed ]
24 Sep Re: RoxburyPark_MeggettSC_fallout ["KC Foggin" ]
24 Sep Recent north Charlotte Area Migrants Sep. 24 [Kevin Metcalf ]
24 Sep Grandfather Mountain Hawkwatch [Jesse Pope ]
24 Sep Ft. Moultrie, Sullivan's Island, SC Migrants [Craig ]
24 Sep Pilot Mountain Hawk Watch [Philip Dickinson ]
24 Sep Re: RoxburyPark_MeggettSC_fallout [Cherrie Sneed ]
24 Sep Warbler PM @ Saluda Shoals Park, SC []
24 Sep Re: Golden-winged & Blue-winged Warblers - Francis Beidler Forest (Dorchester Co, SC) [Pamela Ford ]
24 Sep RoxburyPark_MeggettSC_fallout [Cherrie Sneed ]

Subject: Facebook photos and a new Fall feeder bird here
From: scompton1251 AT charter.net
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 15:13:59 -0400 (EDT)
Birders,

Check out my new Facebook photo albums of the Carolina Bird Club 
weekend. I have begun to take more photos of birders doing their thing. 
You may even see yourself in some of my photos. If you do, please 
identify yourself in the photo!

Thanks to Pam Ford for the tip on the Spoonbill and Stork roost on 
Waldon Road near Rantowles Creek.

Just had a female Rose-breasted Grosbeak at our feeder here in Upstate 
Greenville, SC. They are regular here at our feeder in the first week of 
May, but never before in the Fall.

Thankfully,
Steve Compton
Tired in Greenville, SC

PS: Last night was only the third time I have slept in my own bed in 13 
days! Seattle and Charleston were great, but now I have to spend a 
weekend at home. Oh yes, I will be in Tampa the following weekend for a 
football game (Bucs-Ravens) and a try for the newly countable 
Black-hooded Parakeets at Fort DeSoto.
Subject: Reddish Egret and others at North Topsail Beach, NC
From: "gilbert grant" <gilbert_grant AT usa.net>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 15:10:01 -0400
This morning there was 1 immature Reddish Egret, 2 Great Cormorants, and a
Peregrine Falcon in the New River Inlet area of North Topsail Beach, Onslow
County, NC.

Gilbert S. Grant
Sneads Ferry, NC
Subject: ebird: Saluda Shoals Park, SC
From: amaspirit AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 13:28:21 -0400

Here are two ebird reports for my favorite local park.


Subject: eBird Report - Saluda Shoals Park, Sep 25, 2014


Saluda Shoals Park, Lexington, US-SC
Sep 25, 2014 8:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Judy H. and I birded the loop from wetlands through parking area 
near water park to boat ramp then along Greenway to parking lot at 
Environmental 

Center. Rousted a Barred Owl twice then watched as two Bald Eagles flew past us 

quite low near the boat ramp.
23 species

Bald Eagle  2
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Barred Owl  1
Chimney Swift  35
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-headed Woodpecker  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Downy Woodpecker  1
Eastern Phoebe  2
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  4
Carolina Chickadee  5
Tufted Titmouse  5
Carolina Wren  8
Eastern Bluebird  2
Northern Mockingbird  2
Black-and-white Warbler  2
American Redstart  9
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Chipping Sparrow  23
Northern Cardinal  6
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1














Saluda Shoals Park, Lexington, US-SC
Sep 27, 2014 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments: Our monthly bird walk was first sunny day in a week but far fewer 

migrant species than hoped.  Danny P., Barbara B., Judy H., Elaine S., Sam and 
Terry and grandchildren Natalie (9) and Addison (7), Milt and Barbara with 
grandsons Jacob and Spencer joined me.  We had more birds in trees along open 
area by wetlands pond than elsewhere.
25 species

Green Heron  1
Mourning Dove  2
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Downy Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Least Flycatcher  1
Eastern Phoebe  2
White-eyed Vireo  1
American Crow  1
Carolina Chickadee  7
Tufted Titmouse  2
Brown-headed Nuthatch  1
Carolina Wren  7
Eastern Bluebird  2
Gray Catbird  1
Brown Thrasher  2
Blue-winged Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  1
American Redstart  3
Pine Warbler  1
Chipping Sparrow  7
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  2
Common Grackle  2




 

Subject: Falcons on the Move in Georgetown County, SC
From: Jerry Walls <jwalls443 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 12:58:50 -0400
Noticed a half dozen or so falcons on the fly in nw Georgetown County, SC
today (9-29-14).  Wasn't able to look real close....most appeared to be A.
kestrels (for us old-timers-sparrow hawks!)  Cooler weather must be
approaching.
Jerry Walls
Carvers Bay, SC
Subject: Roseate Spoonbill and lots of Wood Storks at HBSP (Georgetown County, SC)
From: Paul Serridge <paulserridge AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 12:10:33 -0400
A single Roseate Spoonbill was still around Mullet Pond at Huntington Beach
SP this morning.
Also, I counted 145 Wood Storks. I am sure that there were more than 145
because part of one flock was hidden by the reeds.

Good birding,

Paul Serridge
Greenville, SC
Subject: Re: Wasps
From: Bill Guion <bguion AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 11:50:17 -0400
Susan, Tommy, and All,

I should have been more clear. First, the almost extract liquid evaporates very 
quickly, within minutes, usually before I get the feeder back outside. Once the 
liquid has evaporated, there is nothing sticky, just the odor of almonds. 
Second, I have only the dish shaped feeders, with the red top, with "flowers" 
embossed in the top. I rub the extract around the top of the flower away from 
the perch. No extract on the perch or near the bottom of the flower or on the 
flower. In my opinion, this is risk free. 


     -----===== Bill =====-----
-- 

If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Then give up. 
There is no use being a damned fool about it.

On Sep 29, 2014, at 11:23 AM, susan AT ncaves.com wrote:

> Tommy, Bill and All,
> 
> I do not advocate applying anything to the ports of hummingbird feeders.
> It is a risky proposition.  Even if the birds' tongues do not come in
> contact with a substance, their bodies may ay they fly in and out and
> jostle each other.  I have had to bathe hummingbirds that have made
> contact with sticky.oily feeders.  Not fun for me or the bird in
> question...

Subject: RE: Wasps
From: <susan AT ncaves.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 08:23:22 -0700
Tommy, Bill and All,

I do not advocate applying anything to the ports of hummingbird feeders.
 It is a risky proposition.  Even if the birds' tongues do not come in
contact with a substance, their bodies may ay they fly in and out and
jostle each other.  I have had to bathe hummingbirds that have made
contact with sticky.oily feeders.  Not fun for me or the bird in
question...

Unfortunately, unless you have a Dr. JB's Clean Feeder, all reservoir
style feeders will seep or drip as a result of gravity and/or changes in
barometric pressure.  This invariably attracts wasps-- especially in
late summer and early fall.  It is better to use saucer style feeders,
such as the HummZinger (from the Aspects Company)which do not have this
problem.  But if you have wasps, there is a good wasp trap on the market
(but you can also make one; let me know if you are interested in this). 
They are yellow: the Rescue brand WHY model. Lowes sells them.  Bait
(you can just use sweet smelling juice or soda)attracts the insects and
once they go in, they cannot find their way out.

Enjoy what is left of the Ruby-throateds!  I have a feeling most will
disappear with passage of the front coming this weekend...
Susan Campbell
Whispering Pines, NC

> -------- Original Message --------
> Subject: Wasps
> From: Tommy McDonell 
> Date: Mon, September 29, 2014 7:56 am
> To: Bird CarolinaBirds 
> 
> 
> Hi. I have one hummingbird feeder that has wasps on it. Is there a way to get 
rid of them and not hurt the hummers? Or hang something? 

> 
> This summer has been weird on Lake Pinehurst. This Mid September, Baby (thumb 
size) and hand size frogs go in the pool. In the last four years this has only 
happened in May-June. 

> 
> And the ducks that swam in the rain watered pool, now swim 3-5 times a day. 
Watching them get in and out is a riot. The pool is salt water and they have 
done it yearly. But never more than once a day. 

> 
> I had very few flies, spiders, or other flying things. 
> 
> Altogether a different summer. And others just 60 miles from me reported no 
such weirdness. 

> 
> Tommy
> 
> Tommy B. McDonell, Ph.D.
> Pinehurst, NC 28374
> http://tbmcdonellart.com
> Remember to have your colonoscopy. 
> 
> Some typos are courtesy of my iPhone 5s. Other mistakes are due to being 
tired. 

Subject: Re: Jackson Park
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 09:20:33 -0400
Perhaps some of the 2392 we had at Pilot Mountain on Saturday or the 875
on Friday. Other sites reported reported minimal numbers over the weekend.

Phil Dickinson
Winston-Salem

On 9/28/14 10:06 PM, "Ron"  wrote:

>I headed up a Migration Workshop for Ventures Birding today at the park.
>We 
>had a good day, but the highlight came around 4:00. We watched an
>estimated 
>1200 Broad-winged hawks flying by. Most basically followed Hwy. 64 right
>over town. The others flew over the park. We watched for about 20 minutes
>as 
>they formed kettles, then moved on. Very nice ending for our day.
>
>Ron Clark
>Kings Mtn.  NC
>
>Migrants
>Broad-winged Hawk  1200
>Yellow-billed Cuckoo  2
>Common Nighthawk  1
>Chimney Swift  20
>Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
>Eastern Wood-Pewee  8
>White-eyed Vireo  1
>Red-eyed Vireo  2
>Tree Swallow  4
>Gray-cheeked Thrush  2
>Swainson's Thrush  3
>Gray Catbird  7
>Cedar Waxwing  12
>Ovenbird  1
>Northern Waterthrush  1
>Black-and-white Warbler  1
>Tennessee Warbler  8
>Common Yellowthroat  1
>Hooded Warbler  1
>American Redstart  20
>Cape May Warbler  2
>Northern Parula  4
>Magnolia Warbler  4
>Chestnut-sided Warbler  3
>Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
>Scarlet Tanager  5
>Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
>

Subject: Re: Wasps
From: Bill Guion <bguion AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 09:02:13 -0400
Dr. McDonell

Go to the grocery store and buy a small bottle of almond extract. Using you 
finger, rub a small amount around each hole in the feeder. Be careful not to 
get any in the hole itself. 


I was given this advice by another birder and it helped for me. Before using 
the almond extract, wasps and/or hornets would hang around/on the hummingbird 
feeders. Now they are not nearly as plentiful as before. Apparently they do not 
like the almond smell. We have three feeders, and a small bottle will last me 
almost two years. 


     -----===== Bill =====-----
-- 

If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Then give up. 
There is no use being a damned fool about it.

On Sep 29, 2014, at 7:56 AM, Tommy McDonell  wrote:

> Hi. I have one hummingbird feeder that has wasps on it. Is there a way to get 
rid of them and not hurt the hummers? Or hang something? 

> 
> This summer has been weird on Lake Pinehurst. This Mid September, Baby (thumb 
size) and hand size frogs go in the pool. In the last four years this has only 
happened in May-June. 

> 
> And the ducks that swam in the rain watered pool, now swim 3-5 times a day. 
Watching them get in and out is a riot. The pool is salt water and they have 
done it yearly. But never more than once a day. 

> 
> I had very few flies, spiders, or other flying things. 
> 
> Altogether a different summer. And others just 60 miles from me reported no 
such weirdness. 

> 
> Tommy
> 
> Tommy B. McDonell, Ph.D.
> Pinehurst, NC 28374
> http://tbmcdonellart.com
> Remember to have your colonoscopy. 
> 
> Some typos are courtesy of my iPhone 5s. Other mistakes are due to being 
tired. 


Subject: Wasps
From: Tommy McDonell <tbmcdonell AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 07:56:02 -0400
Hi. I have one hummingbird feeder that has wasps on it. Is there a way to get 
rid of them and not hurt the hummers? Or hang something? 


This summer has been weird on Lake Pinehurst. This Mid September, Baby (thumb 
size) and hand size frogs go in the pool. In the last four years this has only 
happened in May-June. 


And the ducks that swam in the rain watered pool, now swim 3-5 times a day. 
Watching them get in and out is a riot. The pool is salt water and they have 
done it yearly. But never more than once a day. 


I had very few flies, spiders, or other flying things. 

Altogether a different summer. And others just 60 miles from me reported no 
such weirdness. 


Tommy

Tommy B. McDonell, Ph.D.
Pinehurst, NC 28374
http://tbmcdonellart.com
Remember to have your colonoscopy. 

Some typos are courtesy of my iPhone 5s. Other mistakes are due to being tired. 
Subject: RE: Ft. Fisher, 09/27/2014; BAY-BREASTED WARBLER
From: <john.j.deluca AT usmc.mil>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 11:38:09 +0000
Correction:  That should have read Yellow-crowned Night Heron (juvenile)

----------------------------------------------
John DeLuca
Supervisory Wildlife Biologist
Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune
MCIEast-MCB Camp Lejeune G-F 
Camp Lejeune, NC28542-0005
JOHN.J.DELUCA AT USMC.MIL
Office: (910) 451-7226
Cell: (910) 467-3603
----------------------------------------------


-----Original Message-----
From: DeLuca CIV John J 
Sent: Monday, September 29, 2014 7:36 AM
To: 'carolinabirds AT duke.edu'
Subject: Ft. Fisher, 09/27/2014; BAY-BREASTED WARBLER

I went birding with a friend in the morning at Fort Fisher, headed to the
beach for a couple of hours, and resumed birding in the late afternoon.
Highlights for Saturday, 09/27/2014 included:

Tri-colored Heron
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
BAY-BREASTED WARBLER
Hooded Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Palm Warbler
American Redstart
Black-and-white Warbler
White-eyed Vireo

----------------------------------------------
John DeLuca

Subject: Ft. Fisher, 09/27/2014; BAY-BREASTED WARBLER
From: <john.j.deluca AT usmc.mil>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 11:36:28 +0000
I went birding with a friend in the morning at Fort Fisher, headed to the
beach for a couple of hours, and resumed birding in the late afternoon.
Highlights for Saturday, 09/27/2014 included:

Tri-colored Heron
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
BAY-BREASTED WARBLER
Hooded Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Palm Warbler
American Redstart
Black-and-white Warbler
White-eyed Vireo

----------------------------------------------
John DeLuca

Subject: Jackson Park
From: "Ron" <waxwing AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 22:06:29 -0400
I headed up a Migration Workshop for Ventures Birding today at the park. We 
had a good day, but the highlight came around 4:00. We watched an estimated 
1200 Broad-winged hawks flying by. Most basically followed Hwy. 64 right 
over town. The others flew over the park. We watched for about 20 minutes as 
they formed kettles, then moved on. Very nice ending for our day.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn.  NC

Migrants
Broad-winged Hawk  1200
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  2
Common Nighthawk  1
Chimney Swift  20
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  8
White-eyed Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Tree Swallow  4
Gray-cheeked Thrush  2
Swainson's Thrush  3
Gray Catbird  7
Cedar Waxwing  12
Ovenbird  1
Northern Waterthrush  1
Black-and-white Warbler  1
Tennessee Warbler  8
Common Yellowthroat  1
Hooded Warbler  1
American Redstart  20
Cape May Warbler  2
Northern Parula  4
Magnolia Warbler  4
Chestnut-sided Warbler  3
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Scarlet Tanager  5
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
Subject: Migration Progresses - Charlotte Area Sep. 28
From: Kevin Metcalf <skermetcalf AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 21:39:09 -0400
There was some turnover in migrants in northern Mecklenburg County overnight. 
While last week I saw a very similar species composition from day to day, this 
morning there was a big uptick in Northern Flickers, Blue Jays, Common 
Grackles, and some evidence of raptor migration (one Northern Harrier and three 
Sharp-shinned Hawks at Cowans Ford). For first time this fall my Eastern 
Phoebe count was higher than my Eastern Wood-Pewee count. We will soon be 
seeing the later season fall migrants like Yellow-rumps, Kinglets, and more 
sparrows. 


Kevin Metcalf
Huntersville, NC
Subject: Finally added Raven to the Chatham Co. yard list
From: "Parker Backstrom" <dpbackstrom AT embarqmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 21:17:36 -0400
Howdy birder types.

 

Today I finally added Raven to my yard list here in SW Chatham County.  I
had one in the Chatham County, just south of the Wake County line, last
Thursday (AT LEAST the 12th time I've had it along this highway over the
past seven years) and I've seen them as close as the little town of Gulf,
along Hwy. 421, about five miles away from the house, so I figured it was
just a matter of time.  Around noon today, when I was doing some yard work,
I heard a Raven croak several times to the east but out of sight.  Grabbing
my bins I ran to the other side of the house and up the back deck to tell my
wife Holly.  Sho 'nuff, just a moment later it appeared above the trees, out
of a small kettle of Black and Turkey Vultures, and glided right over the
house heading west.  Very satisfying as this is one of my favorite birds.
It was yard bird 123 for us and year bird 97.

 

Good birding.

Parker Backstrom

Bear Creek
Subject: Duck Boardwalk - Life Bird with Friends 2
From: Jim Gould <jgouldoz AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 20:17:48 -0400
Sorry Everyone,

I forgot to include that we saw 1 Magnolia Warbler... another life bird
first found with Jeff Lewis!

Thanks

-- 
Jim Gould
1-804-731-1353 (mobile)
Subject: Duck Boardwalk - Life bird with Friends
From: Jim Gould <jgouldoz AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 20:15:34 -0400
Good Evening,

I was very glad to spend a beautiful morning birding along the
Duck boardwalk with Jeff Lewis, Joan and Eve.  I thoroughly enjoyed having
all extra eyes and knowledge, considering this group consistently yields me
with life birds.  Take this morning for example.  While we were unable to
see a Nashville Warbler, as spotted by Jeff yesterday, we did get to see a
WILSON'S WARBLER (my life bird for the week)!

Here's a brief list of other "interesting" birds we got to see:

1 Wilson's Warbler (as mentioned)
1 Blackpoll Warbler
3 Black-throated Blue Warbler
2 Black-and-White Warbler
2 Yellow-throated Warbler
6 Yellow Warbler
20 Palm Warbler
1 Northern Waterthrush (heard, not seen)
+40 American Redstart
+30 Northern Parulas

4 Pie-billed Grebe (1 feeding on a small eel in the sound)
1 Sharp shinned hawk (sent some warblers fleeing into the low brush)

Full list submitted on eBird.

Big thanks to the experienced birders!!



-- 
Jim Gould
1-804-731-1353 (mobile)
Subject: New Hanover Co. NC 9/28/14 Highlights
From: Carson Wood <cdwood AT coastalplaincg.org>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 19:37:46 -0400
Hi All,

Did some causal birding today with James Abbott and Dave Weesner in Wilmington 
and Fort Fisher area. 


Started off today with a Northern Waterthrush and Palm Warbler in a parking lot 
of all places near the Ogden area of Wilmington. 


From there we proceeded to Fort Fisher, after seeing several small birds flying 
across the road 300m before you come to the ferry slip on HWY 421, we stopped. 
We were rewarded by among other birds a Tennessee Warbler and a Philadelphia 
Vireo. 


We continued on to the Turning Basin boat ramp where we scanned the area, we 
had hundreds of Blue Jays and 30-40 Northern Flickers. The good sighting here 
was a Yellow Warbler. 


So as to not get caught by the coming tide we headed to the beach. The Caspian 
Terns have returned and there were a few Common Terns still about. We also had 
a Red Knot mixed in with Black-bellied Plovers. No Zone-tailed Hawk, just a 
Merlin and a Northern Harrier. 


I'll post the rest to ebird, just wanted to share the highlights. Fall migrants 
are really showing up in force. 


Carson Wood
Biologist
Coastal Plain Conservation Group
PO Box 1008
Hampstead, NC 28443
910-859-9425
cdwood AT coastalplaincg.org
www.coastalplaincg.org


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Subject: Say's Phoebe at North River Farms, NC
From: "John Fussell" <jfuss AT clis.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 19:35:01 -0400
A Say's Phoebe at North River Farms (Carteret County, NC) today was a 
pleasant surprise.  (I wonder if this is the earliest date in fall for the 
state.)

Chandra Biggerstaff spotted the bird, and then we (Chandra, Jack Fennell, 
and I) watched it for a full ten minutes, in good light, at a distance of 
only about 40 meters, with binoculars and scopes.

Then the bird flew off toward the east.

The shorebird field was disappointing, with almost no shorebirds.  Perhaps 
this was because of the 2 Peregrine Falcons that were patrolling the area 
while we were there.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC 
Subject: Lake Crabtree migrants
From: Lucas Bobay <lucasrbobay AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 19:13:48 -0400
Sam Jolly, Edward Landi, and I had a great morning birding at Lake Crabtree 
County Park today. The highlight was a Philadelphia Vireo in one of the willows 
by the lake, which gave us excellent views. Other migrants included 
Worm-eating, Black-throated Blue, Tennessee, and Chestnut-sided Warblers, along 
with the usual Parulas, B&Ws, and Redstarts. Most of these were on the park 
road. On the southport side of the lake, we had a Peregrine Falcon fly by 
before heading south out of sight. 


Lucas Bobay
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Eno River State Park
From: David Anderson <d47anders AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 18:57:37 -0400
Lively morning at Eno River State Park. Made the loop walk with Caroline 
Gilmore and Gene Kingsley. Found a few migrants, including PALM WARBLER, CAPE 
MAY WARBLER, BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER, and ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK. Several small 
groups of CEDAR WAXWINGS posed in the early sun. Fun to see a SUMMER TANAGER 
and a SCARLET TANAGER in the same tree. Gene spotted his FOS WINTER WREN on the 
way to join us. Good to find a YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO had not yet left. Happy 
birding, 

David Anderson 
Durham, NC

Eno River State Park
September 28, 2014

Red-shouldered hawk 3
American crow 17
Red-bellied woodpecker 9
Blue jay 11
Mourning dove 10
Carolina wren 18
Gray catbird 9
Canada goose 28
Cedar waxwing 9
Eastern phoebe 8
Common yellowthroat 8
Northern flicker 11
Eastern towhee 4
Northern cardinal 20
Carolina chickadee 14
Brown thrasher 2
Summer tanager 1
Red-eyed vireo 1
Scarlet tanager 2
Rose-breasted grosbeak 2
House finch 3
Baltimore oriole 1
White-eyed vireo 2
Palm warbler 1
Downy woodpecker 2
Pine warbler 5
American robin 2
Eastern bluebird 1
Magnolia warbler 2
Mallard 2
Northern parula 2
Black-and-white warbler 1
Chimney swift 26
Tufted titmouse 4
Barred owl 1
Pileated woodpecker 3
Cape May warbler 1
Wood duck 2
Yellow-billed cuckoo 1
Cooper's hawk 1
Northern mockingbird 1
Turkey vulture 1









Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Three Falcon Week, Rockingham County
From: Marty Wall <mwbirdmail AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 16:39:45 -0400
After seeing two high flying American Kestrels on Tuesday and a rather
entertaining Merlin on Friday (both over the golf course at Mebane Bridge
Road), I had my best bird of the week this morning.  While looking up at
tree top warblers, a Peregrine Falcon came over the ridge north of me and
flew right over my position along the Deshazo Road tract of Mayo River
State Park.  Now if I can just get a Northern Harrier to cooperate, my only
sighting for the year was just across the state line in Virginia.

Marty Wall
Eden, NC
Subject: Zone-tailed Hawk coming our way?
From: <mtove AT deltaforce.net>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 16:21:11 -0400
The apparent history on this amazing ZTHA occurrence is far greater than
yesterday's miracle occurrence. According to ebird, there are multiple
reported sightings of ZTHA in eastern NA on 4 different dates. The first was
October 1976 from Halifax, NS.  BUT, all the others were of a single adult,
all this year as follows:

 

4/25/2014 - Chappaquiddick, MA

6/1/2014 - Brier Is., NS

10/27/2014 - Cape May Point, NJ AND shortly after, Cape Henlopen, SP, DE.

 

IF these sightings represent the same individual (likely), this is a bird
that has been on the east coast since last spring - and with a pattern (such
as it is) of a propensity to remain coastal. IF this bird is now migrating
south (seems likely), unless it crosses open water or returns north back to
Cape May, it is now on the Delmarva Peninsula and presumably heading south.
At the southernmost point of the Delmarva - the bottleneck point (like Cape
May) is Kiptopeke SP and the hawk watch there (with our planned field trip
there next weekend). Just to be clear, I'm not suggesting that I expect to
see a Zone-tailed Hawk and yes I know a bird in Virginia doesn't count on a
NC List, but it's a Zone-tailed Hawk!  Under the circumstances, if anyone
who has not yet signed up is still wondering if it's a good idea to go,
imagine if we actually do see the bird (and you weren't there). Contact me
if ASAP if you'd like to go. Other than your normal travel expenses, it's
free - it's a field trip being hosted by the Chapel Hill Bird Club.

 

Mike Tove

Cary, NC
Subject: Ft Fisher Access and Observations
From: John Ennis <jxennis AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 16:14:12 -0400
Didn't get to Ft Fisher until this morning...checked with a friend at Carolina 
Beach Police and confirmed they do not patrol Ft Fisher & Federal Point so the 
policeman who stopped Jamie Adams at Battle Acre was from another entity... 


Found there are a couple of entities that patrol this area that I did not know 
about so the chances of contact are higher but you should be ok if you adhere 
to the ABA Code and refrain from pointing cameras with long lenses across the 
river toward Sunny Point... 


Made a quick birding pass...found a few good warblers at the aquarium parking 
lot...N Parula, male American Redstart, and Palm Warbler...seemed birdy...I 
think there were many good migrants that I didn't find...the "bird-du-jour" 
migrants were Northern Flicker & Blue Jay...YB Cuckoo at Southport...lots of 
great wildflowers and Leps along the dirt roads of Brunswick County plus a 
Spotted Turtle on Lee Buck Road... 


With the awesome weather change, best outing in a long time!

John Ennis
Leland, NC
Sent from my iPad
Subject: Charleston CBC
From: Edith Tatum <ektatum AT nc.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 15:21:24 -0400
Thanks and kudos to everyone who had a hand in organizing this wonder
meeting.  Birdwatching gives everyone a chance to get out of the house,
meet people with a similar interest,  and see new and sometimes unexpected
places.  Take a kid birding.  You never know, you just might plant a seed.
Edith Tatum
Durham, NC

Edith Tatum
Durham, NC
sent from my XOOM
Subject: OH My!
From: KC Foggin <kcfoggin AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 14:45:57 -0400
Walked out on the back deck to more than 100 Grackles and Cowbirds in the
yard.


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages
Subject: Great Horned Owl GHOW
From: "Buddy Campbell" <blacksnake6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 13:19:09 -0400
For the last two mornings I have heard a GHOW around 6:15 am.
Today while driving into Beaufort I saw one fly across the road
and land in a tree on the other side of the road.
Looked at it for almost a minute and the tufts on its head were clearly 
visible. 



Buddy Campbell
Ladys Island
Beaufort, SC
Subject: Back yard birds north east Columbia sc
From: Barbara Rogers Blaney <barbararogers.blaney AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 13:26:45 -0400
In the past two days I have seen an immature male rose-breasted grosbeak, grey 
catbirds, and a female summer tanager at the feeding/watering station in the 
family backyard in northeast Columbia. This is in addition to the usual 
cardinals, 

chickadees, m. doves,  titmouse, red b. woodpeckers, blue jays, and etc.
The house finches have disappeared. Barbara Rogers Blaney
Columbia, SC

Sent from my iPhone
BRB
Subject: Rachel Carson Reserve (Beaufort Inlet, NC) yesterday
From: "John Fussell" <jfuss AT clis.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 07:12:04 -0400
On Saturday morning, I did a shorebird census at the Rachel Carson Reserve. 
Highlights were 19 Piping Plovers (including a banded bird from the Great 
Lakes population), 102 American Oystercathers (about 1 in 10 with color 
bands), 233 Marbled Godwits, and 1 Red Knot.  Fall is here--had only 2 
Wilson's Plovers and only 3 Whimbrels.

Some other observations were 175 Common Terns and 3000+ Black Skimmers.  It 
was good to see so many skimmers--it is the most I've seen in a long time.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC 
Subject: Duck, NC migrants
From: Jeff Lewis <jlewisbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 22:00:22 -0400
Birded this afternoon at the Duck, NC boardwalk for about 2.5 hours with
Terri Kirby/Hathaway. Including the two species after Terri left, we had 12
species of warblers: American Redstart 20, Northern Parula 15,
Black-throated Blue 3, Black-and-white 2, Yellow Warbler 2-3, Common
Yellowthroat 2, Northern Waterthrush 1, Magnolia Warbler 2, *Nashville
Warbler 1*, Cape May 2, Blackpoll 1, Palm Warbler 5-6. These numbers are
conservative.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC
Subject: Be on the look out!
From: John Scavetto <johnscavetto AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 19:36:42 -0400
Zonetailed Hawk seen at Cape May Hawkwatch at 10:50 am. Seen again 20
minutes later in Delaware. May stay coastal but you never can tell. 😉

John Scavetto
P.O.Box 77171
Charlotte, NC 28271
Cell  704-989-6763
Home. 980-207-2674
Subject: Another good day at Pilot Mountain - actually a great day
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 19:29:09 -0400
When I left at 6 pm, we had tallied 2345 Broad-winged Hawks, and Scott DePue
and Jessie Anderson were still watching. Late afternoon was really big. In
the 3-4 hour about 250 birds kettles up over Brown Mountain and streamed by
just to our left. Not much later, Scot DePue spied a distant large kettle to
our southwest over Yadkin County. Scope views showed two large kettles
moving together with a minimum of 500 birds in each, likely more. A bit
later, we had two more kettles of 300 and 200 off to the south of us over
Winston-Salem.

Add in 4 Osprey, 4 Bald Eagles, 10 Sharp-shinned (apparent migrants), 2
Red-shouldered (apparent migrants) and a Peregrine, it really was a great
day. Lots of pinnacle visitors got to see them, including a group of Trail
Life scouts in the morning and then a few scouts from the Chapel Hill area.

Scott had arrived early and also saw a lot of songbird activity. I missed
most of it, but he saw Pine, Tennessee, Cape May, Black-and-white,
Black-throated Blue and Black-throated Green Warblers, Blue-headed Vireo,
and heard a Red-breasted Nuthatch. The latter certainly is a good sign for
this winter.

Phil Dickinson
Winston-Salem

Subject: Western Kingbird on Roanoke Island, Dare County, NC, USA
From: Jeff Lewis <jlewisbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 19:10:46 -0400
Henry and Elizabeth Link found a Western Kingbird this afternoon in the
lawn area between the NPS headquarters and the Lost Colony admin building.
I came over and took a few photos which I will post at least by tomorrow.
Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC
Subject: Lake Crabtree County Park, Cary, North Carolina
From: David Anderson <d47anders AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 17:26:56 -0400
Nice warbler morning at Lake Crabtree. PINE WARBLERS, AMERICAN REDSTARTS, 
COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLERS, PALM WARBLERS, YELLOW-THROATED 
WARBLER, NORTHERN PARULA, and BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLERS. Was hard to keep up 
at one point. Probably saw a ninth species but too high and fast to identify. 
Several were First of Season, so a little more special. Pleasantly surprised to 
see 40+ CHIMNEY SWIFTS veering back and forth. And always nice to find a 
SCARLET TANAGER. 

David Anderson 
Durham, NC 

Lake Crabtree County Park, Cary, North Carolina
September 27, 2014

Northern flicker 4
Gray catbird 3
Killdeer 7
Northern cardinal 6
White-eyed vireo 1
American redstart 5
Northern parula 1
Pine warbler 15
Eastern wood pewee 1
Blue jay 7
Black-and-white warbler 2
Chimney swift 40
Carolina wren 9
Eastern bluebird 8
White-breasted nuthatch 2
Tufted titmouse 7
Red-eyed vireo 1
Red-bellied woodpecker 8
Yellow-throated warbler 1
American goldfinch 2
Palm warbler 2
Great blue heron 3
Common yellowthroat 8
Empidonax sp 1
Scarlet tanager 1
Brown thrasher 2
Carolina chickadee 4
Eastern phoebe 5
Mallard 4
Double-crested cormorant 7
Great egret 1
Red-shouldered hawk 1
Solitary sandpiper 1
Black-throated blue warbler 2
Mourning dove 3









Sent from my iPhone
Subject: new yard bird
From: "Barbara Brooks" <brooksba1 AT frontier.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 15:39:15 -0400
just had a worm eating warbler in the back yard, new one for my yard!

barb brooks
NE Orange co.
Subject: Charleston Roseate Spoonbills, Rantowles causeway
From: Ann Truesdale <anntrue AT mindspring.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 13:25:50 -0400
At just before 1pm this afternoon there were 7 roseate spoonbills, 6 
wood storks and a bunch of snowy egrets in the trees on Waldon Road at 
the Rantowles Causeway on Hwy 17 south. This is just south of the Bees 
Ferry Road intersection in Red Top. Turn right off Hwy 17 immediately 
past the first bridge on the causeway. They hang out there at high tide, 
or mid-day just now.


-- 
Ann Truesdale
anntrue AT mindspring.com
Meggett, Charleston Co., SC
Subject: Chimney Swift Roost in Raleigh
From: John Connors <jconnorsbird AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 08:34:25 -0400
The Wake Audubon Society and NC Museum of Natural Sciences will host its
final Sunday in September with Swifts outing this Sunday, September 28 at 6
pm. We meet outside the Museum's Globe at the corner of Salisbury and Jones
Streets in downtown Raleigh and walk 4 blocks south to witness the swift
roost. For each of the past three Sundays 3000-4000 swifts have entered the
roost chimney with 20-80 people in attendance!

And on Monday, we break ground for a permanent Chimney Swift Roost Tower at
the Museum's Prairie Ridge EcoStation in west Raleigh- a 30-foot tall brick
chimney built with portholes for cameras and to conduct research on swifts,
and a viewing garden for visitors.

If you need more information, send me a note:  ,jconnorsbird AT gmail.com>
John Connors, Raleigh, NC
Subject: Great Horned Owl acting like a Coopers Hawk!
From: Alan Meijer <alan.meijer AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 06:55:48 -0400
Good morning. Five minutes ago, I witnessed some owl behavior I have
never seen before! I had just stepped out my back door into the
gathering light of morning. It was light enough that you start to see
color for sure. I heard a Great Horned Owl just outside my home, about
100 feet away in a row of pine trees, hooting. In the distance I could
hear one reply. This is a normal occurrence. Often, I see him fly off
as I walk to my car. This morning I stood still and saw him, exposed
on a branch about 20' up, silhouetted against the sky. He was
teetering forward like he was about to fly. I figured it was me that
made him decide to leave. He dropped off the branch and I was
surprised not to see him go past me, heading to the woods. I could see
him very near the ground and I saw him arc to the right very, very
fast. I ducked down hopefully to frame him with the sky behind, rather
than the darker ground, b/c he was hard to see. I saw him arc again to
the left, very quickly. All of a sudden, he comes booking it past my
house, chasing a robin/dove-sized bird and was only 10' feet off it's
tail. His wing-beats were fast and strong, much faster than I've ever
seen in an any owl.  I doubt he got the bird, but boy, did he act like
a Coop. (They came past me on the east, and were more silhouetted, so
I didn't make out what kind of prey he was after. I thought dove, but
I didn't hear the wing beats that I should've been hearing. Didn't
matter, my eyes were on the owl.

A great start to a morning. That woke me up fast!

-- 
Alan M
Terra Ceia NC (Beaufort Co)
adm AT ya hoo
Subject: Reddish Egrets at Shackleford Banks, NC
From: "John Fussell" <jfuss AT clis.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 05:22:13 -0400
On 23 September (Tuesday), Liz Lathrop and group saw 3 Reddish Egrets at the 
E end of Shackleford Banks.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC 
Subject: Chimney Swift roost in Columbia
From: <jrgrego AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 22:17:04 -0400
We were eating out with friends at Mediterranean Tea Room and noticed a large 
flock of Chimney Swift circling the condos next door at 2607-2609 Devine Street 
(Timothy Station). We watched for a half hour from 7:15 to 7:45 as an estimated 
325 swifts dropped into the small chimney at 2607 Devine. I also saw two Common 
Nighthawk. 


John Grego
Columbia SC
Subject: Ft Fisher Access Issues
From: John Ennis <jxennis AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 22:08:17 -0400
As I understand it, the FF Historical Site/NC Ferry Site/FF Recreational 
Site/Federal Point is owned by the Federal Government and leased to the 
different entities...Kure Beach Police usually patrol the area...the area is in 
the blast zone for Sunny Point... 


Remember that the national security level has just been raised for the ferry 
and there was a large fire in Carolina Beach Thursday...so maybe the police 
(including the Coast Guard & Ferry personnel) have a little case of the 
jitters...just cooperate and things should settle down soon... 


I'll check at the museum tomorrow to make sure my facts are still current and 
let you know... 


John Ennis
Leland, NC
Sent from my iPad
Subject: Merlins galore and 1 peregrine, Seabrook Isl, SC
From: David Gardner <davidgardner14 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 20:34:49 -0400
I had the privilege of taking four folks on a nice long bird walk today at St. 
Christopher Camp & Conference Center and North Beach, Seabrook Island, SC. 

Highlights of the day were a Black-throated Blue male, female Blue Grosbeak and 
many many Painted Buntings. But all that paled in comparison to what was thrown 
at us on North Beach. 

On North Beach, Seabrook Island, looking out over Capt. Sam's Inlet, we were 
treated to a cacophony of Terns, Gulls and Skimmers, that very kindly let us 
know whenever an avian hunter was flying around. 

As well as the two juvenile and two adult Bald Eagles and the five Ospreys 
seen, we watched four Merlin's zip through. Given that there was a fair break 
between two of the sightings, there is a possibility that it was one or two 
Merlin's putting on a show... Either way, it was fantastic. The third time one 
flew by, it buzzed a flock of swallows about 30ft from us. That was the best 
view I have ever seen of one. 

In the midst of all this, the gulls, skimmers, terns and shorebirds got 
especially agitated, and we looked up to see a larger, paler version of what we 
had just seen. A Peregrine. Not great views, but enough for the beginner 
birders of the group to ID comfortably. 


Driving home tonight I saw another Merlin perched in a dead tree in the high 
marsh near Bohicket. Again great view. 


Until this year, I had only seen one Merlin on Seabrook in 6 years. Perhaps I 
just happened to hit peak migration today, or I have improved my search image, 
either way, today was one to remember. 


Happy Birding
David

David Gardner
Director of Environmental Education
St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Good day at Pilot Mountain
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 19:13:33 -0400
Lots of hawks at Pilot Mountain despite the clouds: 845 Broad-winged Hawks
today. Several large kettles, including one of 170.

Phil Dickinson
Winston-Saelm

Subject: Charlotte migrants
From: "Ron" <waxwing AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 15:49:07 -0400
Migrants this morning at Ribbonwalk nature Preserve.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn.  NC

Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
Chimney Swift  3
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  3
Eastern Wood-Pewee  3
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher  1     
Least Flycatcher  1
Empid species  1
Philadelphia Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Veery  2
Swainson's Thrush  2
Wood Thrush  3
Gray Catbird  5
Brown Thrasher  2
Common Yellowthroat  2
Hooded Warbler  2
American Redstart  9
Cape May Warbler  1
Northern Parula  1
Magnolia Warbler  3
Bay-breasted Warbler  1
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
Black-throated Green Warbler  1
Scarlet Tanager  2
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Subject: Roseate Spoonbills
From: Pamela Ford <jford6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 14:09:50 -0400
Kathryn Higgins, Jim Guyton and I just stopped by Rantowles Creek off highway 
17 and saw 5 Spoonbills roosting on Waldon Road. 

Pam Ford
Charleston

Sent from my iPhone

Bird On!
Subject: Re: Question about iNaturalist and birding?
From: Will Cook <cwcook AT duke.edu>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 14:07:06 -0400
I forwarded David's question to my friend Scott Loarie (PhD, Duke), one 
of the founders of iNaturalist. Here's his reply:

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: Question about iNaturalist and birding?
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 09:42:25 -0700
From: Scott Loarie
To: Will Cook

Hi Will,

You could use  http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/import 'import
from csv' to import your eBird data to iNat

But the sites are very complementary. I personally don't see the
advantage of duplicating every observation on both sites, especially
since the format is so different.

iNat works best when you report one of everything you find on a hike
along with a photo as evidence
For example here's a hike I took last weekend
http://www.inaturalist.org/calendar/loarie/2014/9/19 that includes 5
birds. Whereas eBird is generally more about coming up with a complete
photo-less checklist of birds with abundances. Lots of iNat/eBird
users do both: they submit an eBird checklist to eBird and pictures of
everything they could get (Birds and non-Birds - and the birds you can
photograph are usually a fraction of the ones you can eBird) to iNat.

Here's a recent discussion:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/inaturalist/eBird/inaturalist/axInjFImj5A/EpzCRWBr0U0J 



On 9/25/2014 8:30 PM, David Gardner wrote:
> Hi folks,
> I am a big ebirder and always note species on ebird. However, having just 
been made aware of iNaturalist by others, I am hoping to set up a biodiversity 
project of sorts, including all species seen at St. Christopher and I was 
wondering whether iNaturalist can import ebird data, or do you have to enter 
each species individually? 

> I look forward to any advice from those birders that are familiar and list 
other things on iNaturalist. 

> Thanks,
> David
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>

-- 
Charles W. (Will) Cook
Nicholas School of the Environment
Division of Environmental Science & Policy
Box 90328, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708
http://www.duke.edu/~cwcook
Subject: White-eyed Vireo
From: KC Foggin <kcfoggin AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 12:49:51 -0400
Very pleased to see a White-eyed Vireo stop by a few minutes ago.  Haven't
seen one in years.


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages
Subject: Sandy Creek, Durham, North Carolina
From: David Anderson <d47anders AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 12:17:09 -0400
Only a few warblers this morning, AMERICAN REDSTART, NORTHERN PARULA, and 
COMMON YELLOWTHROAT. Hopefully more on the way. Surprised to see a CHIMNEY 
SWIFT still around. More surprised to see a female BLUE GROSBEAK, hanging out 
with three BROWN THRASHERS up in the trees. Good hawk day, with RED-SHOULDERED, 
RED-TAILED and COOPER'S hawks. 

Happy birding. 
David Anderson 
Durham, NC  

Sandy Creek, Durham, North Carolina
September 26, 2014

Gray catbird 10
Carolina wren 15
Chimney swift 1
Great blue heron 4
Belted kingfisher 1
American crow 12
Northern flicker 5 Eastern Phoebe 6
Red-bellied woodpecker 10
American redstart 2
Eastern wood pewee 2
Carolina chickadee 4
Ruby-throated hummingbird 2
Downy woodpecker 2
Northern parula 1
Red-shouldered hawk 3
Blue jay 5
Fish crow 2
Tufted titmouse 5
Pileated woodpecker 1
White-breasted nuthatch 2
Brown thrasher 4
Common yellowthroat 2
Northern cardinal 2
Turkey vulture 3
Blue grosbeak 1
Red-tailed hawk 1
Black vulture 3
American robin 1
Eastern bluebird 4
Cooper's Hawk 1
American goldfinch 1
Northern mockingbird 1










Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Fort Fisher, NC - be careful walking around in certain areas
From: Chet M <chetmorse2 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 09:28:01 -0400
I am a fisherman and recreational vehicle user in my off-time. This shouldn't 
make me "the anti-birder type" any more than your broad negative 
generalizations of people should make you the typical "elitist birder". 


These comments diminish the purpose of your post. I stopped reading or caring 
about your actual dilemma (which does stink btw!!) as soon as i read this. 


Careful not to lose perspective. Chief Wiggum may not "get" us birders or maybe 
just had a really crap day on the job..maybe he's just a jerk. But he would 
still stop and pull you out of a burning car or intervene if you were being 
robbed by a gang of say, run-of-the-mill angry fishermen or RV riff-raff. 


Chet Morse
Charleston SC

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 25, 2014, at 3:26 PM, Jamie Adams  wrote:
> 
> Hello Birders,
>  
> Today I had an over-zealous police officer at the Ft. Fisher Monument take my 
name and identification for “trespassing” in an area that is not posted and 
in fact immediately adjacent to the parking area. If you look at Googlemaps on 
street view you will see the field I was birding in is immediately north of the 
parking lot. There is clearly no signed posted, there is nothing preventing 
anyone from walking into this field. I have seen many people in this field 
including a guy that walks his dog there every day. 

>  
> I think this officer has a personal vendetta against birders, and I suspect 
he is a fisherman/recreational vehicle user in his spare time although I cannot 
be sure. One of those anti-birder types. 

>  
> I have lodged a formal complaint with both the State Historic Site and the 
Carolina Beach Police Dept. The administrative staff says they used to have 
signs there but they were stolen. 

>  
> Be aware when birding the site to heed any posted signs or risk interrogation 
by a very nasty officer. 

>  
> On a more pleasant note, I have been birding Ft. Fisher the past several days 
and the birding has been excellent despite bad lighting conditions. I had a 
Philadelphia Vireo 2 out of the past 3 mornings. I have seen the following 
warbler species at some point over the past three days: 

>  
> Black and White - many
> Parula
> Black Throated Blue - many
> Common Yellowthroat - many
> Blackpoll – several
> Bay-breasted  - one
> Yellow Warbler – many
> Palm – very common
> Yellow Throated
> Redstarts – everywhere
> Blackburnian – 1
> Cape May – couple
> Magnolia - 1
>  
> I have seen Merlins and Cooper’s Hawks every day. 
>  
> Now I will try some other spots as I don’t want to run into Chief Wiggum 
again. 

>  
> Jamie Adams
> Wilmington, NC
> 
> **********************  IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ  ************************
> This electronic message, including its attachments, is COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL
> and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED information.  If you are 
> not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure,
> copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included
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> message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and
> permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies
> thereof. Thank you. 
> ************************************************************************
> 
Subject: RE: Possible Bell's Vireo? Ft Fisher NC
From: Paul Glass <pag AT gcrcompany.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 22:18:42 -0400
If you have the Crossley guide, the bird in the back right is almost
identical to this bird.
 
Paul Glass
South Boston, VA

-----Original Message-----
From: Jamie Adams [mailto:Jamie.Adams AT quintiles.com]
Sent: Thursday, September 25, 2014 9:55 PM
To: Harry LeGrand; CarolinaBirds
Subject: Re: Possible Bell's Vireo? Ft Fisher NC


Geez Harry and Ryan are right and a Pine Warbler has undone me again,  I
wish they would go away.  I had not seen one in so long actually and I
rarely see them out of Pines.  My wife who is not a birder also pointed out
the tail is not long enough.  Oh well back to bird ID school.  

As for the kites/ospreys I definitely was hasty on that.  I really only saw
silhouettes and they were flying like kites.  

Good thing I didn't log anything in eBird for either of these sessions.

Birding always has the ability to humble and maybe humiliate me but I still
love it.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

Sent from my iPad

On Sep 25, 2014, at 9:36 PM, "Harry LeGrand" < hlegrandjr AT gmail.com
 > wrote:



I have studied your mystery bird, with the photos of the Stokes guide with
me. I think you have an immature Pine Warbler. The underparts look yellowest
on the throat, and not the flanks. The head looks right for Pine Warbler,
and I think I see two wingbars instead of one clear one only. Yes, the time
and location are perfect for Bell's -- coast in late September, when and
where several have been found in recent years. But, Pine Warblers can occur
in hardwoods, and when an immature gets in a hardwood, then it can be very
tricky. Pine Warblers also have thicker bills than most other warblers, and
many a person has mistaken a male Pine Warbler for a Yellow-throated Vireo.

Unfortunately, your case for Bell's isn't helped by the hawk photo below it.
You say these are Mississippi Kites, but they sure look like Ospreys to me.
They have much too long wings and much too short a tail for a kite. Maybe
you substituted the incorrect photo here.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Thu, Sep 25, 2014 at 9:05 PM, Jamie Adams < Jamie.Adams AT quintiles.com
 > wrote:


Hello birders,

Maybe I have this ID completely wrong, but after scrutinizing some pictures
of an unidentified vireo I saw yesterday at Ft Fisher I have convinced
myself I have a Bell's Vireo.  I have seen a couple out West but not enough
to be confident.  Plus the habitat I saw them in out West was totally
different.

Let me know what you think.

If it is indeed a Bell's, sorry I did not get the word sooner.  I was aware
it was interesting but thought it was probably a weird juvenile vireo at the
time.  It was at the group of oaks just South of the earthen mound that is
the Ft Fisher monument.

NCBigYear2014.blogspot.com  

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC



Sent from my iPad

**********************  IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ  ************************
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**********************  IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ  ************************
This electronic message, including its attachments, is COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL
and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED information.  If you are 
not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use,
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Subject: Re: Possible Bell's Vireo? Ft Fisher NC
From: Jamie Adams <Jamie.Adams AT quintiles.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 21:54:31 -0400
Geez Harry and Ryan are right and a Pine Warbler has undone me again, I wish 
they would go away. I had not seen one in so long actually and I rarely see 
them out of Pines. My wife who is not a birder also pointed out the tail is not 
long enough. Oh well back to bird ID school. 


As for the kites/ospreys I definitely was hasty on that. I really only saw 
silhouettes and they were flying like kites. 


Good thing I didn't log anything in eBird for either of these sessions.

Birding always has the ability to humble and maybe humiliate me but I still 
love it. 


Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

Sent from my iPad

On Sep 25, 2014, at 9:36 PM, "Harry LeGrand" 
> wrote: 


I have studied your mystery bird, with the photos of the Stokes guide with me. 
I think you have an immature Pine Warbler. The underparts look yellowest on the 
throat, and not the flanks. The head looks right for Pine Warbler, and I think 
I see two wingbars instead of one clear one only. Yes, the time and location 
are perfect for Bell's -- coast in late September, when and where several have 
been found in recent years. But, Pine Warblers can occur in hardwoods, and when 
an immature gets in a hardwood, then it can be very tricky. Pine Warblers also 
have thicker bills than most other warblers, and many a person has mistaken a 
male Pine Warbler for a Yellow-throated Vireo. 


Unfortunately, your case for Bell's isn't helped by the hawk photo below it. 
You say these are Mississippi Kites, but they sure look like Ospreys to me. 
They have much too long wings and much too short a tail for a kite. Maybe you 
substituted the incorrect photo here. 


Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Thu, Sep 25, 2014 at 9:05 PM, Jamie Adams 
> wrote: 

Hello birders,

Maybe I have this ID completely wrong, but after scrutinizing some pictures of 
an unidentified vireo I saw yesterday at Ft Fisher I have convinced myself I 
have a Bell's Vireo. I have seen a couple out West but not enough to be 
confident. Plus the habitat I saw them in out West was totally different. 


Let me know what you think.

If it is indeed a Bell's, sorry I did not get the word sooner. I was aware it 
was interesting but thought it was probably a weird juvenile vireo at the time. 
It was at the group of oaks just South of the earthen mound that is the Ft 
Fisher monument. 


NCBigYear2014.blogspot.com

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC



Sent from my iPad

**********************  IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ  ************************
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and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED information.  If you are
not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure,
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************************************************************************




**********************  IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ  ************************
This electronic message, including its attachments, is COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL
and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED information.  If you are 
not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure,
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Subject: Re: Possible Bell's Vireo? Ft Fisher NC
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 21:49:39 -0400
And Harry's right, those are Osprey, not kites.

Ryan 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 25, 2014, at 9:36 PM, Harry LeGrand  wrote:
> 
> I have studied your mystery bird, with the photos of the Stokes guide with 
me. I think you have an immature Pine Warbler. The underparts look yellowest on 
the throat, and not the flanks. The head looks right for Pine Warbler, and I 
think I see two wingbars instead of one clear one only. Yes, the time and 
location are perfect for Bell's -- coast in late September, when and where 
several have been found in recent years. But, Pine Warblers can occur in 
hardwoods, and when an immature gets in a hardwood, then it can be very tricky. 
Pine Warblers also have thicker bills than most other warblers, and many a 
person has mistaken a male Pine Warbler for a Yellow-throated Vireo. 

> 
> Unfortunately, your case for Bell's isn't helped by the hawk photo below it. 
You say these are Mississippi Kites, but they sure look like Ospreys to me. 
They have much too long wings and much too short a tail for a kite. Maybe you 
substituted the incorrect photo here. 

> 
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
> 
>> On Thu, Sep 25, 2014 at 9:05 PM, Jamie Adams  
wrote: 

>> Hello birders,
>> 
>> Maybe I have this ID completely wrong, but after scrutinizing some pictures 
of an unidentified vireo I saw yesterday at Ft Fisher I have convinced myself I 
have a Bell's Vireo. I have seen a couple out West but not enough to be 
confident. Plus the habitat I saw them in out West was totally different. 

>> 
>> Let me know what you think.
>> 
>> If it is indeed a Bell's, sorry I did not get the word sooner. I was aware 
it was interesting but thought it was probably a weird juvenile vireo at the 
time. It was at the group of oaks just South of the earthen mound that is the 
Ft Fisher monument. 

>> 
>> NCBigYear2014.blogspot.com
>> 
>> Jamie Adams
>> Wilmington, NC
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Sent from my iPad
>> 
>> **********************  IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ  ************************
>> This electronic message, including its attachments, is COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL
>> and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED information.  If you are
>> not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, 
disclosure, 

>> copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included
>> in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited.  If you have received this
>> message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and
>> permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies
>> thereof. Thank you.
>> ************************************************************************
> 
Subject: Re: Possible Bell's Vireo? Ft Fisher NC
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 21:36:34 -0400
I have studied your mystery bird, with the photos of the Stokes guide with
me. I think you have an immature Pine Warbler. The underparts look
yellowest on the throat, and not the flanks. The head looks right for Pine
Warbler, and I think I see two wingbars instead of one clear one only. Yes,
the time and location are perfect for Bell's -- coast in late September,
when and where several have been found in recent years. But, Pine Warblers
can occur in hardwoods, and when an immature gets in a hardwood, then it
can be very tricky. Pine Warblers also have thicker bills than most other
warblers, and many a person has mistaken a male Pine Warbler for a
Yellow-throated Vireo.

Unfortunately, your case for Bell's isn't helped by the hawk photo below
it. You say these are Mississippi Kites, but they sure look like Ospreys to
me. They have much too long wings and much too short a tail for a kite.
Maybe you substituted the incorrect photo here.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Thu, Sep 25, 2014 at 9:05 PM, Jamie Adams 
wrote:

> Hello birders,
>
> Maybe I have this ID completely wrong, but after scrutinizing some
> pictures of an unidentified vireo I saw yesterday at Ft Fisher I have
> convinced myself I have a Bell's Vireo.  I have seen a couple out West but
> not enough to be confident.  Plus the habitat I saw them in out West was
> totally different.
>
> Let me know what you think.
>
> If it is indeed a Bell's, sorry I did not get the word sooner.  I was
> aware it was interesting but thought it was probably a weird juvenile vireo
> at the time.  It was at the group of oaks just South of the earthen mound
> that is the Ft Fisher monument.
>
> NCBigYear2014.blogspot.com
>
> Jamie Adams
> Wilmington, NC
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> **********************  IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ  ************************
> This electronic message, including its attachments, is COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL
> and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED information.  If you are
> not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use,
> disclosure,
> copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included
> in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited.  If you have received this
> message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and
> permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies
> thereof. Thank you.
> ************************************************************************
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Possible Bell's Vireo? Ft Fisher NC
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 21:28:52 -0400
That's a Pine Warbler IMO.

Ryan 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 25, 2014, at 9:05 PM, Jamie Adams  wrote:
> 
> Hello birders,
> 
> Maybe I have this ID completely wrong, but after scrutinizing some pictures 
of an unidentified vireo I saw yesterday at Ft Fisher I have convinced myself I 
have a Bell's Vireo. I have seen a couple out West but not enough to be 
confident. Plus the habitat I saw them in out West was totally different. 

> 
> Let me know what you think.
> 
> If it is indeed a Bell's, sorry I did not get the word sooner. I was aware it 
was interesting but thought it was probably a weird juvenile vireo at the time. 
It was at the group of oaks just South of the earthen mound that is the Ft 
Fisher monument. 

> 
> NCBigYear2014.blogspot.com
> 
> Jamie Adams
> Wilmington, NC
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> **********************  IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ  ************************
> This electronic message, including its attachments, is COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL
> and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED information.  If you are 
> not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure,
> copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included
> in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited.  If you have received this
> message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and
> permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies
> thereof. Thank you. 
> ************************************************************************
> 
> 
Subject: Possible Bell's Vireo? Ft Fisher NC
From: Jamie Adams <Jamie.Adams AT quintiles.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 21:05:32 -0400
Hello birders,

Maybe I have this ID completely wrong, but after scrutinizing some pictures of 
an unidentified vireo I saw yesterday at Ft Fisher I have convinced myself I 
have a Bell's Vireo. I have seen a couple out West but not enough to be 
confident. Plus the habitat I saw them in out West was totally different. 


Let me know what you think.

If it is indeed a Bell's, sorry I did not get the word sooner. I was aware it 
was interesting but thought it was probably a weird juvenile vireo at the time. 
It was at the group of oaks just South of the earthen mound that is the Ft 
Fisher monument. 


NCBigYear2014.blogspot.com

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC



Sent from my iPad

**********************  IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ  ************************
This electronic message, including its attachments, is COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL
and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED information.  If you are 
not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure,
copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included
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Subject: Hilton Pond 09/13/14 (Requiem For A Queen)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT hiltonpond.org>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 21:02:12 -0400
This week I witnessed the violent death of the majestic "Queen of Hilton Pond," 
a towering centenarian White Oak that thunderously succumbed to the ravages of 
lightning, fungi, termites, and beetle grubs. For a photo essay about this sad 
but inevitable phenomenon, please visit the installment for 13-22 Sep 2014 at 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140913.html

While there don't forget to scroll down for a list of birds banded during the 
period (all hummingbirds), plus other nature notes. 


Good Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============

Subject: Enjoy Fall Migration by Recording Flight Calls
From: Charlotte <goedsche AT mindspring.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 21:01:02 -0400 (GMT-04:00)




Subject: Question about iNaturalist and birding?
From: David Gardner <davidgardner14 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 20:30:58 -0400
Hi folks,
I am a big ebirder and always note species on ebird. However, having just been 
made aware of iNaturalist by others, I am hoping to set up a biodiversity 
project of sorts, including all species seen at St. Christopher and I was 
wondering whether iNaturalist can import ebird data, or do you have to enter 
each species individually? 

I look forward to any advice from those birders that are familiar and list 
other things on iNaturalist. 

Thanks,
David

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Pilot Mountain Hawk Watch
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 20:19:57 -0400
Little or no visibility in the morning, so I did not go up to the mountain.
James Williams did and finally saw a Broad-winged around 1 pm. We had 4
people there from 2 pm on. They recorded 33 more Broad-winged, 2 Bald
Eagles, 1 Osprey, 1 Peregrine Falcon and 1 unidentified Buteo. Thank you
James, Jean Chamberlain, Elnora Gore and Alan Firth.

Looks like a good day tomorrow and this weekend. Hope some PBC folks can
join us on Sunday. We have a small group of scouts joining us Saturday
morning.

Phil Dickinson
Winston-Salem

Subject: Santee Coastal Reserve and Santee Delta, South Carolina
From: Craig <jcraigw1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 18:21:30 -0400
Pam Ford and I birded Santee Coastal Reserve and Santee Delta East (and a 
little bit of the west Delta) primarily as a scouting trip for the upcoming 
birding trips for the Carolina Bird Club beginning tomorrow, and we had some 
great action by landbirds. In both the Reserve and the Delta, all of the 
impoundments are flooded up or grown up in vegetation, at least the ones that 
we would have time to walk to, so there was no waterfowl or shorebirds seen 
with the exception of two Wood Ducks. There were occasional views of most of 
the herons and egrets found in the lowcountry at both places. The big show was 
by migrants in the forested areas, and other forest birds. We had 12 species of 
warblers; Northern Parula, Yellow, Magnolia, Cape May, Black-throated Blue, 
Pine, Prairie, Palm, Blackpoll, Black-and-white, American Redstart, and 
Northern Waterthrush. We had four species of flycatchers; Acadian, Eastern 
Wood-Pewee, and Willow. We also had a Yellow-bellied Flycatcher on Delta East, 
with some photos. We had six species of woodpeckers, including Red-headed, and 
about 13 Red-cockaded Woodpeckers, about the same Brown-headed Nuthatches. 
There were 5 Bald Eagles, Bobolinks, and a flock of Eastern Kingbirds migrating 
at Delta East. There were many passerines we did not get good looks at in both 
areas. Overall, it was a very birdy day, and hopefully it will be as good on 
Friday. 


Craig Watson
Mt. Pleasant, SC

Sent from my iPad
Subject: RE: Fort Fisher, NC - be careful walking around in certain areas
From: Jamie Adams <Jamie.Adams AT quintiles.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 15:48:06 -0400
For the record I did not mean to insinuate that all ORV users or fisherman are 
bad. I do both myself including many trips on the Ft. Fisher spit. What I meant 
is that this particular officer seems to be one of the anti-birding types that 
was targeting me because I am a birder. I apologize if seemed to stereotype ORV 
users or fisherman. I think most of us in NC unfortunately know the type of 
person I am describing. 


I also did not mean to insinuate all police officers are bad, just this 
particular one. 


Trying to limit the amount of hate mail I am starting to get, I will be more 
diplomatic in the future. 


Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC


From: Jamie Adams
Sent: Thursday, September 25, 2014 3:26 PM
To: Carolina Birds
Subject: Fort Fisher, NC - be careful walking around in certain areas

Hello Birders,

Today I had an over-zealous police officer at the Ft. Fisher Monument take my 
name and identification for "trespassing" in an area that is not posted and in 
fact immediately adjacent to the parking area. If you look at Googlemaps on 
street view you will see the field I was birding in is immediately north of the 
parking lot. There is clearly no signed posted, there is nothing preventing 
anyone from walking into this field. I have seen many people in this field 
including a guy that walks his dog there every day. 


I think this officer has a personal vendetta against birders, and I suspect he 
is a fisherman/recreational vehicle user in his spare time although I cannot be 
sure. One of those anti-birder types. 


I have lodged a formal complaint with both the State Historic Site and the 
Carolina Beach Police Dept. The administrative staff says they used to have 
signs there but they were stolen. 


Be aware when birding the site to heed any posted signs or risk interrogation 
by a very nasty officer. 


On a more pleasant note, I have been birding Ft. Fisher the past several days 
and the birding has been excellent despite bad lighting conditions. I had a 
Philadelphia Vireo 2 out of the past 3 mornings. I have seen the following 
warbler species at some point over the past three days: 


Black and White - many
Parula
Black Throated Blue - many
Common Yellowthroat - many
Blackpoll - several
Bay-breasted  - one
Yellow Warbler - many
Palm - very common
Yellow Throated
Redstarts - everywhere
Blackburnian - 1
Cape May - couple
Magnolia - 1

I have seen Merlins and Cooper's Hawks every day.

Now I will try some other spots as I don't want to run into Chief Wiggum again.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

**********************  IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ  ************************
This electronic message, including its attachments, is COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL
and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED information.  If you are 
not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure,
copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included
in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited.  If you have received this
message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and
permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies
thereof. Thank you. 
************************************************************************
Subject: Fort Fisher, NC - be careful walking around in certain areas
From: Jamie Adams <Jamie.Adams AT quintiles.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 15:26:02 -0400
Hello Birders,

Today I had an over-zealous police officer at the Ft. Fisher Monument take my 
name and identification for "trespassing" in an area that is not posted and in 
fact immediately adjacent to the parking area. If you look at Googlemaps on 
street view you will see the field I was birding in is immediately north of the 
parking lot. There is clearly no signed posted, there is nothing preventing 
anyone from walking into this field. I have seen many people in this field 
including a guy that walks his dog there every day. 


I think this officer has a personal vendetta against birders, and I suspect he 
is a fisherman/recreational vehicle user in his spare time although I cannot be 
sure. One of those anti-birder types. 


I have lodged a formal complaint with both the State Historic Site and the 
Carolina Beach Police Dept. The administrative staff says they used to have 
signs there but they were stolen. 


Be aware when birding the site to heed any posted signs or risk interrogation 
by a very nasty officer. 


On a more pleasant note, I have been birding Ft. Fisher the past several days 
and the birding has been excellent despite bad lighting conditions. I had a 
Philadelphia Vireo 2 out of the past 3 mornings. I have seen the following 
warbler species at some point over the past three days: 


Black and White - many
Parula
Black Throated Blue - many
Common Yellowthroat - many
Blackpoll - several
Bay-breasted  - one
Yellow Warbler - many
Palm - very common
Yellow Throated
Redstarts - everywhere
Blackburnian - 1
Cape May - couple
Magnolia - 1

I have seen Merlins and Cooper's Hawks every day.

Now I will try some other spots as I don't want to run into Chief Wiggum again.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

**********************  IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ  ************************
This electronic message, including its attachments, is COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL
and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED information.  If you are 
not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure,
copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included
in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited.  If you have received this
message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and
permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies
thereof. Thank you. 
************************************************************************
Subject: Re: Cooper's Hawks hunt Squirrels???
From: Marty Wall <mwbirdmail AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 15:02:57 -0400
I regularly see Titmice and Blue Jays hunting cicadas this time of year.  I
don't remember seeing a Chickadee doing so, but I wouldn't be surprised.  I
have seen young Cooper's Hawks unsuccessfully hunt squirrels.  I have also
seen a young Red-tailed Hawk "hunt" large caterpillars...or at least pick
them up off the ground.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/54116357 AT N08/15166424180/in/photostream/

Marty Wall
Eden, NC

On Thu, Sep 25, 2014 at 10:30 AM, David Gardner 
wrote:

> Apparently! But perhaps not successfully...
>
> From the 10 minute chase scene that I observed just now, at least this one
> failed pretty badly. I thought that Cooper's were bird hunters, but I guess
> all birds are opportunistic at times. Perhaps she (she - because she was
> the LARGEST Cooper's I have ever seen) had had success before, and thought
> that squirrels were a viable regular food source.
>
> St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center sure does have an excessive
> surplus of grey squirrels, so we could do with another squirrel predator.
> We have Red-Tailed Hawks that make squirrels their staple diet here, so
> another possibility is hawk copying hawk behaviour.
>
> Another interesting bird behaviour, and presumably just opportunistic
> hunting...  I watched a Tufted Titmouse take on and win a fight with a very
> large Cicada (roughly a third the size of the bird). Once the Titmouse got
> the Cicada to the ground, it promptly broke through the tough chitin and
> started digging in. I guess it is a pretty big supply of protein if the
> bird can get it.
>
> I was just wondering whether these observations were unusual or not, and
> if any one else had interesting predator/prey relationships that they have
> observed.
>
> I love how nature can throw us seasoned naturalists curve balls sometimes,
> almost to say "hah - you thought you knew this species!"
>
> I look forward to hearing from y'all.
> Happy Birding,
> David
>
>
> David Gardner
> Director of Environmental Education
> St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center
> Seabrook Island, SC
>
Subject: RE: Cooper's Hawks hunt Squirrels???
From: scompton1251 AT charter.net
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 12:18:18 -0400 (EDT)
David,

Cathy and I returned home recently to find our resident Cooper's Hawk 
intently eyeing our rock-lined driveway, perched on our fence. We 
observed it for a long time at eye level before we left the car. There 
aren't usually many birds in our driveway, but the rocks are a frequent 
haunt of Ground Squirrels (Chipmunks), so we supposed that was her 
object.

Steve Compton
Just returned from a week in Seattle and off this PM to Charleston, SC 
for the Carolina Bird Club meeting, writing from home base in 
Greenville, SC

On Thu, Sep 25, 2014 at 10:30 AM, David Gardner wrote:

  Apparently! But perhaps not successfully...

 From the 10 minute chase scene that I observed just now, at least this 
one failed pretty badly. I thought that Cooper's were bird hunters, but 
I guess all birds are opportunistic at times. Perhaps she (she - because 
she was the LARGEST Cooper's I have ever seen) had had success before, 
and thought that squirrels were a viable regular food source.

St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center sure does have an excessive 
surplus of grey squirrels, so we could do with another squirrel 
predator.
We have Red-Tailed Hawks that make squirrels their staple diet here, so 
another possibility is hawk copying hawk behaviour.

Another interesting bird behaviour, and presumably just opportunistic 
hunting...  I watched a Tufted Titmouse take on and win a fight with a 
very large Cicada (roughly a third the size of the bird). Once the 
Titmouse got the Cicada to the ground, it promptly broke through the 
tough chitin and started digging in. I guess it is a pretty big supply 
of protein if the bird can get it.

I was just wondering whether these observations were unusual or not, and 
if any one else had interesting predator/prey relationships that they 
have observed.

I love how nature can throw us seasoned naturalists curve balls 
sometimes, almost to say "hah - you thought you knew this species!"

I look forward to hearing from y'all.
Happy Birding,
David

David Gardner
Director of Environmental Education
St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center
Seabrook Island, SC
Subject: RE: Cooper's Hawks hunt Squirrels???
From: Rob G. <thrush AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 14:41:03 +0000
I don't doubt Coopers hunt squirrels... I've twice seen them feeding a squirrel 
to offspring, so unless they bought it at the corner deli, I think they hunt 
them! 


-- Rob Gluck..... Carrboro, NC........
   


Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 10:30:07 -0400
Subject: Cooper's Hawks hunt Squirrels???
From: davidgardner14 AT gmail.com
To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu

Apparently! But perhaps not successfully...

From the 10 minute chase scene that I observed just now, at least this one 
failed pretty badly. I thought that Cooper's were bird hunters, but I guess all 
birds are opportunistic at times. Perhaps she (she - because she was the 
LARGEST Cooper's I have ever seen) had had success before, and thought that 
squirrels were a viable regular food source. 


St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center sure does have an excessive surplus of 
grey squirrels, so we could do with another squirrel predator. 

We have Red-Tailed Hawks that make squirrels their staple diet here, so another 
possibility is hawk copying hawk behaviour. 


Another interesting bird behaviour, and presumably just opportunistic 
hunting... I watched a Tufted Titmouse take on and win a fight with a very 
large Cicada (roughly a third the size of the bird). Once the Titmouse got the 
Cicada to the ground, it promptly broke through the tough chitin and started 
digging in. I guess it is a pretty big supply of protein if the bird can get 
it. 


I was just wondering whether these observations were unusual or not, and if any 
one else had interesting predator/prey relationships that they have observed. 


I love how nature can throw us seasoned naturalists curve balls sometimes, 
almost to say "hah - you thought you knew this species!" 


I look forward to hearing from y'all.
Happy Birding,
David
 		 	   		  
Subject: Cooper's Hawks hunt Squirrels???
From: David Gardner <davidgardner14 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 10:30:07 -0400
Apparently! But perhaps not successfully...

From the 10 minute chase scene that I observed just now, at least this one
failed pretty badly. I thought that Cooper's were bird hunters, but I guess
all birds are opportunistic at times. Perhaps she (she - because she was
the LARGEST Cooper's I have ever seen) had had success before, and thought
that squirrels were a viable regular food source.

St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center sure does have an excessive
surplus of grey squirrels, so we could do with another squirrel predator.
We have Red-Tailed Hawks that make squirrels their staple diet here, so
another possibility is hawk copying hawk behaviour.

Another interesting bird behaviour, and presumably just opportunistic
hunting...  I watched a Tufted Titmouse take on and win a fight with a very
large Cicada (roughly a third the size of the bird). Once the Titmouse got
the Cicada to the ground, it promptly broke through the tough chitin and
started digging in. I guess it is a pretty big supply of protein if the
bird can get it.

I was just wondering whether these observations were unusual or not, and if
any one else had interesting predator/prey relationships that they have
observed.

I love how nature can throw us seasoned naturalists curve balls sometimes,
almost to say "hah - you thought you knew this species!"

I look forward to hearing from y'all.
Happy Birding,
David


David Gardner
Director of Environmental Education
St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center
Seabrook Island, SC
Subject: Re: RoxburyPark_MeggettSC_fallout
From: Cherrie Sneed <sneedcb AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 21:39:29 -0400
KC,

"Trash Bird" is a name I've heard and used over the years when there are so
many of a species that they actually interfere with birding.  …sort of like
Yellow-rumped Warblers in winter.

I actually love Redstarts and find them quite entertaining and beautiful.
I was thrilled to see so many, but chose to call them "trash birds" because
they were the most common bird of the day.

Cherrie

On Wed, Sep 24, 2014 at 9:31 PM, KC Foggin  wrote:

>
> So, what are “trash birds” ?
>
>
> K.C.
>
> K.C. Foggin
> Socastee
> Myrtle Beach SC
>
> www.birdforum.net
>
> www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20
>
>
>
>  *From:* Cherrie Sneed 
> *Sent:* Wednesday, September 24, 2014 7:24 PM
> *To:* CarolinaBirds 
> *Subject:* Re: RoxburyPark_MeggettSC_fallout
>
>  Greetings,
>
> After 4 hours at Roxbury Park I ended up with 9 warbler species and a
> Swainson's Thrush as the highlights.
>
> Here is list from today with some rather pitiful photos.
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19932392
>
> Fun day,
> Cherrie
>
> On Wed, Sep 24, 2014 at 11:03 AM, Cherrie Sneed  wrote:
>
>> Amazing numbers of warblers now unfortunately park is closed except
>> weekends until they have more help.
>>
>> Cape Mays are everywhere.  magnolia, prairie and redstarts are
>> Trash birds. Loads of
>> Palms. Possible
>> Bay breasted.
>>
>> Get out and bird in coastal areas if possible
>>
>> More later
>>
>>
>> Cherrie
>> Cherrie Sneed
>> Meggett, SC
>> Charleston County
>
>
>
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> *Cherrie & Dan Sneed*
> Meggett, SC
> St. Paul's Parish
> Southern Coastal Charleston County
>                        &
> Robbinsville, NC
> Snowbird Mountains
> Graham County
>



-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
*Cherrie & Dan Sneed*
Meggett, SC
St. Paul's Parish
Southern Coastal Charleston County
                       &
Robbinsville, NC
Snowbird Mountains
Graham County
Subject: Re: RoxburyPark_MeggettSC_fallout
From: "KC Foggin" <KCFoggin AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 21:31:42 -0400
So, what are “trash birds” ?


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20




From: Cherrie Sneed 
Sent: Wednesday, September 24, 2014 7:24 PM
To: CarolinaBirds 
Subject: Re: RoxburyPark_MeggettSC_fallout

Greetings, 

After 4 hours at Roxbury Park I ended up with 9 warbler species and a 
Swainson's Thrush as the highlights. 


Here is list from today with some rather pitiful photos.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19932392


Fun day,
Cherrie

On Wed, Sep 24, 2014 at 11:03 AM, Cherrie Sneed  wrote:

 Amazing numbers of warblers now unfortunately park is closed except weekends 
until they have more help. 


  Cape Mays are everywhere.  magnolia, prairie and redstarts are
  Trash birds. Loads of
  Palms. Possible
  Bay breasted.

  Get out and bird in coastal areas if possible

  More later


  Cherrie
  Cherrie Sneed
  Meggett, SC
  Charleston County




-- 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Cherrie & Dan Sneed 
Meggett, SC
St. Paul's Parish
Southern Coastal Charleston County 
                       &
Robbinsville, NC
Snowbird Mountains
Graham County
Subject: Recent north Charlotte Area Migrants Sep. 24
From: Kevin Metcalf <skermetcalf AT earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 21:02:46 -0400
The low pressure system moving up along the coast brought some rain and fair 
numbers of migrants into the area. At Cowans Ford Wildlife Refuge had 15 
species of warblers between today and yesterday. Most numerous have been 
American Redstarts, with 16 conservatively counted today. Also had a group of 
about 13 Palm Warblers yesterday. Have had good numbers of Eastern Wood-Pewees, 
Common Yellowthroats and Scarlet Tanagers. Here is a partial list of to give a 
taste of whats out there the : 


Eastern Wood-Pewees (6 today)
Red-eyed Vireo
Philadelphia Vireo (1 yesterday)
Yellow-throated Vireo
Red-breasted Nuthatch (1 on the 19th first of season)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet (1 today first of season)
Gray Catbirds (7 today)
Magnolia Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Cape May Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Palm Warbler (all or nearly all western types recently)
Pine Warbler
Black-and-White Warbler
American Redstart (most common warbler - high ratio of adult males still 
around) 

Tennessee Warbler
Northern Parula
Ovenbird
Worm-eating Warbler (1 yesterday)
Northern Waterthrush (1 today)
Hooded Warbler
Common Yellowthroat (8 today)
Scarlet Tanager (6 yesterday)

Also interesting is what I have not seen. Yellow-rumped Warblers havent 
arrived here yet (I know they are on their way! ), and I have not seen one 
Black-throated Blue! 


Kevin Metcalf
Huntersville, NC


 
Subject: Grandfather Mountain Hawkwatch
From: Jesse Pope <highcountrybirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 20:22:01 -0400
We had a good day at Grandfather today until the clouds finally reached us at 
3:45. We finished with 722 birds. 714 broad-wings 3 bald eagles(2 adults, one 
2/3 year) a northern harrier, sharpies and cooper's. Most of the kettles today 
were small but consistent all day. Largest kettle was 79 birds in the 1:00 
hour. Lots of 10-20 bird kettles today. The birds were traveling due west on 
ESE winds north of Grandfather near the limit of the spotting scope most of the 
day. Most of the birds spotted were appearing north of Seven Devils kettling 
over the agri. Fields at the Banner Elk winery and then behind beech mtn! I've 
only seen the birds move along this path only one other time that I remember! 
Pretty exhausting day of counting spending most of the the in the scope bit fun 
none the less. 


Jesse Pope 

Newland, NC
(C) 828-898-3012
(W) 828-733-3224
Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 24, 2014, at 7:30 PM, Philip Dickinson  wrote:
> 
> The morning was mostly a blowout and the afternoon a washout, but we did see 
a Northern Harrier, an Osprey, a Peregrine Falcon and 9 Broad-winged Hawks. The 
harrier was pretty amazing, rushing through the saddle between the pinnacles 
against a 20-25 mph crosswind. Thanks to Carol Cunningham, Hop Hopkins, James 
Williams, Tom Lawson and Katherine and Steve for braving the elements. I was up 
there for awhile but abandoned ship at 12:30. 

> 
> Phil Dickinson
> Winston-Salem
Subject: Ft. Moultrie, Sullivan's Island, SC Migrants
From: Craig <jcraigw1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 19:51:14 -0400
I went to Ft. Moultrie after work today and met Pam Ford. We birded the area 
near the Island Club and over to Station 16 which is a wooded trail to the 
beach. We had 7 species of warblers; Black-and-White, Prairie, Cape May, 
Nashville, American Redstart, Common Yellowthroat, and Black-throated Blue 
(this beautiful male was foraging on the ground). There were hundreds of 
Chimney Swifts and swallows of four species (Barn, Bank, Tree, Northern 
Rough-winged) continuously moving, Ospreys were migrating. 


Craig Watson
Mt. Pleasant, SC

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Pilot Mountain Hawk Watch
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 19:30:10 -0400
The morning was mostly a blowout and the afternoon a washout, but we did see
a Northern Harrier, an Osprey, a Peregrine Falcon and 9 Broad-winged Hawks.
The harrier was pretty amazing, rushing through the saddle between the
pinnacles against a 20-25 mph crosswind. Thanks to Carol Cunningham, Hop
Hopkins, James Williams, Tom Lawson and Katherine and Steve for braving the
elements. I was up there for awhile but abandoned ship at 12:30.

Phil Dickinson
Winston-Salem

Subject: Re: RoxburyPark_MeggettSC_fallout
From: Cherrie Sneed <sneedcb AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 19:24:18 -0400
Greetings,

After 4 hours at Roxbury Park I ended up with 9 warbler species and a
Swainson's Thrush as the highlights.

Here is list from today with some rather pitiful photos.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19932392

Fun day,
Cherrie

On Wed, Sep 24, 2014 at 11:03 AM, Cherrie Sneed  wrote:

> Amazing numbers of warblers now unfortunately park is closed except
> weekends until they have more help.
>
> Cape Mays are everywhere.  magnolia, prairie and redstarts are
> Trash birds. Loads of
> Palms. Possible
> Bay breasted.
>
> Get out and bird in coastal areas if possible
>
> More later
>
>
> Cherrie
> Cherrie Sneed
> Meggett, SC
> Charleston County




-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
*Cherrie & Dan Sneed*
Meggett, SC
St. Paul's Parish
Southern Coastal Charleston County
                       &
Robbinsville, NC
Snowbird Mountains
Graham County
Subject: Warbler PM @ Saluda Shoals Park, SC
From: amaspirit AT aol.com
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 18:13:47 -0400
 Can not believe how close I was to some of the warblers!

 

Patricia Voelker
Lexington, SC

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: ebird-checklist 
To: AmaSpirit 
Sent: Wed, Sep 24, 2014 2:35 pm
Subject: eBird Report - Saluda Shoals Park, Sep 24, 2014


Saluda Shoals Park, Lexington, US-SC
Sep 24, 2014 2:15 PM - 4:15 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments:     Walked meadow by Environmental Center, toward entrance, took 
Maintenance Rd to wetlands, then across to area by water park, back on Greenway 

to bridge.  Most activity in trees with webworms - in area nearest water park 
area.  Best warbler find was full look at Golden Wing Warbler along Greenway 
south of Eagle's Aerie.  Other good looks at Black & White, male and female 
American Redstart, Northern Parula, Chestnut-sided female, Pine and Yellow 
Warblers.  Excellent time for me as weather was cool and birds weren't all in 
tops of trees!
33 species

Turkey Vulture  2
Mourning Dove  26
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
Chimney Swift  85
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-headed Woodpecker  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  5
Downy Woodpecker  1
Eastern Phoebe  2
White-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  4
Carolina Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  2
Brown-headed Nuthatch  3
Carolina Wren  4
Eastern Bluebird  5
Gray Catbird  1
Brown Thrasher  4
Northern Mockingbird  6
Golden-winged Warbler  1
Black-and-white Warbler  2
American Redstart  7
Northern Parula  5
Yellow Warbler  1
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Palm Warbler  1
Pine Warbler  1
Chipping Sparrow  5
Field Sparrow  1
Summer Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  11
Common Grackle  2

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19931924 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

 
Subject: Re: Golden-winged & Blue-winged Warblers - Francis Beidler Forest (Dorchester Co, SC)
From: Pamela Ford <jford6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 13:09:18 -0400
Blue-winged still at Beidler!
Birds are jumping, good fallout!
Pam Ford
Charleston

Sent from my iPhone

Bird On!


> On Sep 23, 2014, at 4:05 PM, Johnson, Matthew  wrote:
> 
> Hi All,
>  
> I did some scouting this morning along the boardwalk at the Audubon Center at 
Francis Beidler Forest in preparation for the upcoming Carolina Bird Club field 
trips this weekend. In one mixed flock of birds I found a single male 
Golden-winged Warbler, along with a few Redstarts, Black-and-white Warblers, 
Red-eyed Vireos and a handful of birds that went unidentified in the poor light 
conditions. A bit further down, another small group produced a single 
Blue-winged and three Black-throated Blue Warblers. Other birds seen include 
Barred Owl, Great Egret, and Northern Parula. 

>  
> I hope these birds stick around for the trips this weekend!
>  
> Good birding,
>  
> Matt
>  
>  
> Matt Johnson
> Education Manager
> Audubon Center at Francis Beidler Forest
> 336 Sanctuary Road
> Harleyville, SC 29448
> (843) 462-2150
> http://beidlerforest.audubon.org
Subject: RoxburyPark_MeggettSC_fallout
From: Cherrie Sneed <sneedcb AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 11:03:57 -0400
Amazing numbers of warblers now unfortunately park is closed except weekends 
until they have more help. 


Cape Mays are everywhere.  magnolia, prairie and redstarts are
Trash birds. Loads of
Palms. Possible
Bay breasted.

Get out and bird in coastal areas if possible

More later


Cherrie
Cherrie Sneed
Meggett, SC
Charleston County