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Updated on Thursday, September 18 at 01:35 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Levant Sparrowhawks,©BirdQuest

18 Sep Fwd: Flock to the Rock this weekend at Chimney Rock [Steve ]
18 Sep Charlotte Migrants ["Ron" ]
18 Sep Chapel Hill Bird Club talk, Monday, Sept 22 [Eddie Owens ]
18 Sep Re: Dan Hudson - Memorial [Rich Boyd ]
17 Sep Re: Dan Hudson - Memorial [Len Kopka ]
17 Sep Re: Dan Hudson - Memorial [Irvin Pitts ]
17 Sep Black-crowned Night Heron - Eno River SP, Orange Co., NC [Daniel Kaplan ]
17 Sep Fw: Hummer coloring ["KC Foggin" ]
17 Sep Dan Hudson - Memorial [Brian Pendergraft ]
17 Sep re: preventing window collisions [Cutler/Blackford ]
17 Sep Correction on Ridge Junction Flight Pattern [Marilyn Westphal ]
17 Sep Migration Spectacle at Ridge Junction/BRP this morning [Marilyn Westphal ]
17 Sep Red Wolf comment period extended [Derb Carter ]
17 Sep A White Pelicans, Pea Island NWR, Dare County NC [Audrey ]
17 Sep Mecklenburg Audubon October Meeting (Thursday 10/02): Birds of the Lowcountry [Christy Hill ]
17 Sep Yellow-bellied Flycatcher [Philip Dickinson ]
17 Sep Henslow's sparrows at Voice of America [John Carpenter ]
17 Sep Jackson Park/Henderson Cty., N. C. ["Wayne K. Forsythe" ]
17 Sep 14 Lesser Black-backed Gulls at North Topsail Beach, NC ["gilbert grant" ]
17 Sep Slow morning at Hefner with a Bald Eagle [william haddad ]
17 Sep Worm eating warbler at Sandy Creek [David Anderson ]
16 Sep Lake Crabtree - Sept 16: Six Warblers species [Brendan Klick ]
16 Sep Rose-breasted Grosbeak - Backyard [Brian Pendergraft ]
16 Sep Sandy Creek, Durham, North Carolina [David Anderson ]
16 Sep September 15, 2014 Sandy Creek, Durham, NC [David Anderson ]
16 Sep FOY Baltimore Oriole ["Mary Bridges" ]
16 Sep Re: Preventing Window Collisions for Birds [Travis Knowles ]
16 Sep RE: Hummer coloring ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
15 Sep Juv. Sabine's Gull last two days at Jamestown, VA ferry [Frank Enders ]
15 Sep Re: Grandfather Mountain Hawkwatch [Jesse Pope ]
15 Sep Re: Grandfather Mountain Hawkwatch [Jesse Pope ]
15 Sep Re: Grandfather Mountain Hawkwatch [Philip Dickinson ]
15 Sep Grandfather Mountain Hawkwatch [Jesse Pope ]
15 Sep North Outer Banks migrants [Jeff Lewis ]
15 Sep NC Birding Trail Program - 9/16, 7p @ UNC-Asheville [Emilie Travis ]
15 Sep Hummer coloring ["KC Foggin" ]
15 Sep Re: Boardwalk at Dungannon Plantation Heritage Preserve reopened (Charleston County, South Carolina) [Helen Kalevas ]
15 Sep Boardwalk at Dungannon Plantation Heritage Preserve reopened (Charleston County, South Carolina) [wadingbirds ]
15 Sep RE: Latta Park - Mecklenburg County [TNT Sanders ]
15 Sep Re: Preventing Window Collisions for Birds []
15 Sep Re: Latta Park - Mecklenburg County [Helmut Mueller ]
15 Sep Latta Park - Mecklenburg County [TNT Sanders ]
15 Sep Baltimore Oriole ["KC Foggin" ]
15 Sep Blue Ridge Birding at its Best this a.m. [william haddad ]
15 Sep Re: Preventing Window Collisions for Birds [Bill Ewald ]
15 Sep Re: Preventing Window Collisions for Birds [Shelley Theye ]
15 Sep Pre-dawn flight calls, Grey-cheeked Thrush [andrew thornton ]
15 Sep RE: Digest for carolinabirds - Mon, 15 Sep 2014 ["Matt Curran" ]
15 Sep Townsend's Warbler [Ryan Justice ]
14 Sep Sandy Creek Park - Sept 14: Seven Warblers speices [Brendan Klick ]
14 Sep Barred Owl convention []
14 Sep Pilot Mountain Hawk Watch - Broad-winged Hawks [Philip Dickinson ]
14 Sep Possible Connecticut Warbler at Grandfather Mountain [Jesse Pope ]
14 Sep Duck, NC migrants [Jeff Lewis ]
14 Sep Red-headed Woodpeckers ["KC Foggin" ]
14 Sep Hilton Pond 09/01/14 (New York Roadside Redux) ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
14 Sep Orangeburg sod farms today []
14 Sep Charlotte Migrants ["Ron" ]
14 Sep Preventing Window Collisions for Birds [Lynn Erla Beegle ]
13 Sep Lake Crabtree - Sept 13: Nine Warblers and 3 Vireo species [Brendan Klick ]
13 Sep South Carolina Upstate Birding [Pamela Ford ]
13 Sep Connecticut Warbler off Hatteras today [Scott Winton ]
13 Sep Also Least Flycatcher Re: Patriot's Point, Mount Pleasant, SC [Nate Dias ]
13 Sep Wilson's Plover, Clemson, SC [Steve Patterson ]
13 Sep Pilot Mountain Hawk Watch [Philip Dickinson ]
13 Sep Patriot's Point, Mount Pleasant, SC [Craig ]
13 Sep Dare County, NC migrants [Jeff Lewis ]
13 Sep Re: Lovely migrant, but sad ending [Nate Dias ]
13 Sep Lovely migrant, but sad ending [Carol Chelette ]
13 Sep Figure 8 [Derb Carter ]
13 Sep Least Flycatcher, some warblers, Charlotte, NC area [Kevin Metcalf ]
13 Sep Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Pomarine Jaeger [Mike Judd ]
13 Sep Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Pomarine Jaeger [Jamie Adams ]
13 Sep Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Pomarine Jaeger ["JerryK" ]
13 Sep Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Pomarine Jaeger [Derb Carter ]
13 Sep Great Machipongo Crab Shack [Tom ]

Subject: Fwd: Flock to the Rock this weekend at Chimney Rock
From: Steve <sshultz AT nc.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 14:08:05 -0400
> 
> Hi Steve,
> 
> Just a quick reminder that Flock to the Rock, our premier fall migration 
birding event at Chimney Rock, is this weekend. All activities are included 
with Park admission, and we’ve added a special live Bald Eagle program to our 
schedule! Advanced registration is required for the Early Bird Walk at 7:30am 
on Sunday, but all other programs and activities don’t require registration. 

> 
> I thought you might want to pass this info along to members of the Greenville 
Bird Club. I’ve included a link to the complete Flock to the Rock schedule 
below. 

>  
> Thanks, and hope you’re having a good week.
>  
> Shannon
>  
> http://chimneyrockpark.com/events/event_detail.php?EVENT_ID=394
>  
>  
> Shannon Quinn-Tucker
> Public Relations & Promotions Manager
> Chimney Rock Management, LLC
> Chimney Rock at Chimney Rock State Park
>  
> o: 828.625.9611 ext *814
> m: 828.243.2019  f: 828.625.9610
> PO Box 39, Chimney Rock, NC 28720
> chimneyrockpark.com
> Facebook: Chimney Rock Park
> Twitter:  AT ChimneyRockPark
>  
Subject: Charlotte Migrants
From: "Ron" <waxwing AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 14:06:53 -0400
Migrants seen this morning on a Mecklenburg Audubon walk at Ribbonwalk 
Nature Preserve.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn.  NC

Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
Chimney Swift  3
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  7
Eastern Wood-Pewee  5
White-eyed Vireo  4
Red-eyed Vireo  6
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  1
Veery  1
Swainson's Thrush  1
Gray Catbird  3
Ovenbird  1
Black-and-white Warbler  1
Tennessee Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  2
American Redstart  8
Northern Parula  1
Magnolia Warbler  3
Blackburnian Warbler  1
Chestnut-sided Warbler  4
Scarlet Tanager  1 
Subject: Chapel Hill Bird Club talk, Monday, Sept 22
From: Eddie Owens <birdingbanjoman AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 06:41:26 -0400
If you are in our area this coming Monday, please join us for this exciting
talk about hawks and their migration. Learn the basics of hawk watching,
then practice your skills during a follow-up field trip to Kiptopeke State
Park. Details follow:

*Topic:* Hawks and Their Migration


*Time:* 7:30pm, September 22, 2014


*Location:* Binkley Baptist Church, 1712 Willow Drive, Chapel Hill, NC


*Follow-up field trip:* Oct 3-5, Kiptopeke hawk watch



Michael Tove is a Ph.D. Ornithologist, member and past chair of the NC Bird
Records Committee, and author of “A Field Guide to the Offshore Wildlife of
the Northern Atlantic.” But he started birding as a hawk-watching
enthusiast. In the 1970’s, he was a volunteer counter at Hawk Mountain
Sanctuary in Pennsylvania. In the 1980’s he maintained the hawk-watch count
in the Wellsville Mountains of Utah, where access to the lookout required a
4 mile hike (each way) to the top of a 9000 foot mountain ridge.



Mike's talk includes an overview of the history and mechanics of hawk
migration, a tutorial on hawk identification, and is a prelude to a special
invitation to a hawk watch at Kiptopeke, Virginia, over the weekend of
October 3-5.  (Kiptopeke is the closest major hawk watch to North Carolina
and one of the easiest in the country to access.)



Please plan to join us for an exciting  talk about one of the most
enigmatic groups of birds. Then mark your calendar for a first-of-its-kind,
follow-up field trip.


For a trip itinerary and to sign up, visit:

http://chbc.carolinanature.com/fieldtrips.html

(click "itinerary and details link" for Oct 3-5 trip and contact Mike Tove (
mtove AT deltaforce.net) )


For a list of other upcoming talks, visit:

http://chbc.carolinanature.com


Eddie Owens

Chapel Hill Bird Club
Subject: Re: Dan Hudson - Memorial
From: Rich Boyd <rcsaboyd AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 06:09:02 -0400
Dan graced our trip to Alaska two years ago, bringing with him years of 
experienced birding and wonderful humor. He fought the good fight exceptionally 
well. Rich and Susan Boyd, Beaufort, NC 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 17, 2014, at 10:37 PM, Irvin Pitts  wrote:
> 
> This is a very nice, heart-felt memorial. I was privileged to have birded 
with Dan once and found him to be a genuine and very caring person, not to 
mention an excellent birder. He will be missed. 

> 
> Irvin Pitts
> 
> ---- Brian Pendergraft  wrote: 
>> Folks,
>> 
>> I'm writing with a very heavy heart.  Our local birding community lost a
>> very good friend this morning.
>> 
>> Dan Hudson passed away this morning after a courageous battle with cancer.
>> Recently Dan was moved into a hospice facility where he passed peacefully
>> with family and friends close.
>> 
>> Dan was a close friend to several folks in the triangle area of NC and due
>> to his very friendly disposition he became a friend and fellow birder to
>> everyone he met.  Dan was always up beat and always had something to say or
>> share with anyone he came in contact with in the birding community.
>> 
>> Dan was a birder long before most of us knew.  One day while taking one of
>> my animals to his veterinary practice, we started talking about birds.  He
>> was always so personable during our visits and that led Dan and I to a
>> closer relationship and many fond memories in the field.
>> 
>> We ultimately went birding all over the country with Steve Shultz, Michelle
>> Hudson, Lewis Burke, and Tommy Wade (God bless his soul).  He became
>> passionate about places such Southern California, SE Arizona, Alaska,
>> Louisiana, Colorado, the Outer Banks, and especially Warbler Road in
>> Virginia. His sense of humor kept us entertained and his birding skills
>> kept u on our toes.
>> 
>> We all have such fond memories of trips we shared together.  Lewis,
>> Michelle and I took Dan up to Warbler Road one last time this past May and
>> we showed him as many warblers as we could.  Dan loved the Blackburnian,
>> Hooded, Prothonotary,  and Kentucky warblers.  Three years ago Steve,
>> Michelle and I showed him his first spring Bay-breasted in Ohio.
>> 
>> Dan will be remembered for always thinking of others.  He got so much
>> pleasure out of others getting lifers.  He introduced his niece Michelle to
>> birding.  Although Dan had 700 birds on his ABA  life list, he got more joy
>> out of helping Michelle and other new birders, when they saw a lifer.  He
>> got so excited, and would go out of his way to make it happen, regardless
>> of any tic on his list.
>> 
>> Lewis remembers with great fondness being with Dan when he saw his first
>> Yellow Rail, but Lewis thinks Dan had a bigger grin on his face when he
>> helped Lewis find a Swainson’s warbler.
>> 
>> Dan's last ABA bird was the Georgia Northern Lapwing, and his last NC State
>> bird was the Roxboro Northern Lapwing.  He benefited from "armchair ticks"
>> of Ridway's Rail and Egyptian Goose to just touch 700 in the U.S. Canada..
>> 
>> The birding community lost a great man this morning and all that knew him
>> will miss him so much.  Warbler Road will always be a special place to us,
>> and every year we will go back to honor Dan and his memory.
>> 
>> Contributions to this announcement are from Dan's niece Michelle Hudson,
>> and very good friends Steve Shultz and Lewis Burke.  (I love all of you!)
>> 
>> Brian Pendergraft
>> Falls Lake NC
> 
Subject: Re: Dan Hudson - Memorial
From: Len Kopka <lenkopka AT aol.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 23:22:26 -0400
I was fortunate enough to bird with Dan in SE Arizona a few years ago. He could 
strike up interesting side-bar conversations on just about any subject at 
anytime. He was an encyclopedia of knowledge who enjoyed sharing his stories 
that we all enjoyed hearing. I'll especially remember his gentile nature and 
his great sense of humor. He always added just the right touch of levity to our 
sport. I agree with others who knew him better than me that he will be missed. 


Len Kopka

On Sep 17, 2014, at 10:37 PM, Irvin Pitts  wrote:

This is a very nice, heart-felt memorial. I was privileged to have birded with 
Dan once and found him to be a genuine and very caring person, not to mention 
an excellent birder. He will be missed. 


Irvin Pitts

---- Brian Pendergraft  wrote: 
> Folks,
> 
> I'm writing with a very heavy heart.  Our local birding community lost a
> very good friend this morning.
> 
> Dan Hudson passed away this morning after a courageous battle with cancer.
> Recently Dan was moved into a hospice facility where he passed peacefully
> with family and friends close.
> 
> Dan was a close friend to several folks in the triangle area of NC and due
> to his very friendly disposition he became a friend and fellow birder to
> everyone he met.  Dan was always up beat and always had something to say or
> share with anyone he came in contact with in the birding community.
> 
> Dan was a birder long before most of us knew.  One day while taking one of
> my animals to his veterinary practice, we started talking about birds.  He
> was always so personable during our visits and that led Dan and I to a
> closer relationship and many fond memories in the field.
> 
> We ultimately went birding all over the country with Steve Shultz, Michelle
> Hudson, Lewis Burke, and Tommy Wade (God bless his soul).  He became
> passionate about places such Southern California, SE Arizona, Alaska,
> Louisiana, Colorado, the Outer Banks, and especially Warbler Road in
> Virginia. His sense of humor kept us entertained and his birding skills
> kept u on our toes.
> 
> We all have such fond memories of trips we shared together.  Lewis,
> Michelle and I took Dan up to Warbler Road one last time this past May and
> we showed him as many warblers as we could.  Dan loved the Blackburnian,
> Hooded, Prothonotary,  and Kentucky warblers.  Three years ago Steve,
> Michelle and I showed him his first spring Bay-breasted in Ohio.
> 
> Dan will be remembered for always thinking of others.  He got so much
> pleasure out of others getting lifers.  He introduced his niece Michelle to
> birding.  Although Dan had 700 birds on his ABA  life list, he got more joy
> out of helping Michelle and other new birders, when they saw a lifer.  He
> got so excited, and would go out of his way to make it happen, regardless
> of any tic on his list.
> 
> Lewis remembers with great fondness being with Dan when he saw his first
> Yellow Rail, but Lewis thinks Dan had a bigger grin on his face when he
> helped Lewis find a Swainsons warbler.
> 
> Dan's last ABA bird was the Georgia Northern Lapwing, and his last NC State
> bird was the Roxboro Northern Lapwing.  He benefited from "armchair ticks"
> of Ridway's Rail and Egyptian Goose to just touch 700 in the U.S. Canada..
> 
> The birding community lost a great man this morning and all that knew him
> will miss him so much.  Warbler Road will always be a special place to us,
> and every year we will go back to honor Dan and his memory.
> 
> Contributions to this announcement are from Dan's niece Michelle Hudson,
> and very good friends Steve Shultz and Lewis Burke.  (I love all of you!)
> 
> Brian Pendergraft
> Falls Lake NC
Subject: Re: Dan Hudson - Memorial
From: Irvin Pitts <pittsjam AT windstream.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 21:37:39 -0500
This is a very nice, heart-felt memorial. I was privileged to have birded with 
Dan once and found him to be a genuine and very caring person, not to mention 
an excellent birder. He will be missed. 


Irvin Pitts

---- Brian Pendergraft  wrote: 
> Folks,
> 
> I'm writing with a very heavy heart.  Our local birding community lost a
> very good friend this morning.
> 
> Dan Hudson passed away this morning after a courageous battle with cancer.
> Recently Dan was moved into a hospice facility where he passed peacefully
> with family and friends close.
> 
> Dan was a close friend to several folks in the triangle area of NC and due
> to his very friendly disposition he became a friend and fellow birder to
> everyone he met.  Dan was always up beat and always had something to say or
> share with anyone he came in contact with in the birding community.
> 
> Dan was a birder long before most of us knew.  One day while taking one of
> my animals to his veterinary practice, we started talking about birds.  He
> was always so personable during our visits and that led Dan and I to a
> closer relationship and many fond memories in the field.
> 
> We ultimately went birding all over the country with Steve Shultz, Michelle
> Hudson, Lewis Burke, and Tommy Wade (God bless his soul).  He became
> passionate about places such Southern California, SE Arizona, Alaska,
> Louisiana, Colorado, the Outer Banks, and especially Warbler Road in
> Virginia. His sense of humor kept us entertained and his birding skills
> kept u on our toes.
> 
> We all have such fond memories of trips we shared together.  Lewis,
> Michelle and I took Dan up to Warbler Road one last time this past May and
> we showed him as many warblers as we could.  Dan loved the Blackburnian,
> Hooded, Prothonotary,  and Kentucky warblers.  Three years ago Steve,
> Michelle and I showed him his first spring Bay-breasted in Ohio.
> 
> Dan will be remembered for always thinking of others.  He got so much
> pleasure out of others getting lifers.  He introduced his niece Michelle to
> birding.  Although Dan had 700 birds on his ABA  life list, he got more joy
> out of helping Michelle and other new birders, when they saw a lifer.  He
> got so excited, and would go out of his way to make it happen, regardless
> of any tic on his list.
> 
> Lewis remembers with great fondness being with Dan when he saw his first
> Yellow Rail, but Lewis thinks Dan had a bigger grin on his face when he
> helped Lewis find a Swainson’s warbler.
> 
> Dan's last ABA bird was the Georgia Northern Lapwing, and his last NC State
> bird was the Roxboro Northern Lapwing.  He benefited from "armchair ticks"
> of Ridway's Rail and Egyptian Goose to just touch 700 in the U.S. Canada..
> 
> The birding community lost a great man this morning and all that knew him
> will miss him so much.  Warbler Road will always be a special place to us,
> and every year we will go back to honor Dan and his memory.
> 
> Contributions to this announcement are from Dan's niece Michelle Hudson,
> and very good friends Steve Shultz and Lewis Burke.  (I love all of you!)
> 
> Brian Pendergraft
> Falls Lake NC
Subject: Black-crowned Night Heron - Eno River SP, Orange Co., NC
From: Daniel Kaplan <danmaxkaplan AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 21:51:07 -0400
Of local rarity, while hiking this morning with dog so not even trying to
bird, and with only my phone for photos, I was surprised to find a young
BCNH in the middle of the river along the Cox Mountain trail in the Few's
Ford section.

Dan Kaplan
Durham
Subject: Fw: Hummer coloring
From: "KC Foggin" <KCFoggin AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 19:46:25 -0400
Many thanks to all that responded to my query on the coloring of my 
Ruby-throated Hummer. It is much appreciated. 


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20




From: KC Foggin 
Sent: Monday, September 15, 2014 5:00 PM
To: CarolinaBirds 
Cc: HUMNET-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU 
Subject: Hummer coloring

Could you all indulge me and take a look at this photo of a hummer I took last 
week. The coloring on its side is throwing me a bit but it is quite visible 
when he is flying around. I’m assuming it is a young male. 


http://upload.pbase.com/image/157398068


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20

Subject: Dan Hudson - Memorial
From: Brian Pendergraft <bkpendergraft AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 19:27:03 -0400
Folks,

I'm writing with a very heavy heart.  Our local birding community lost a
very good friend this morning.

Dan Hudson passed away this morning after a courageous battle with cancer.
Recently Dan was moved into a hospice facility where he passed peacefully
with family and friends close.

Dan was a close friend to several folks in the triangle area of NC and due
to his very friendly disposition he became a friend and fellow birder to
everyone he met.  Dan was always up beat and always had something to say or
share with anyone he came in contact with in the birding community.

Dan was a birder long before most of us knew.  One day while taking one of
my animals to his veterinary practice, we started talking about birds.  He
was always so personable during our visits and that led Dan and I to a
closer relationship and many fond memories in the field.

We ultimately went birding all over the country with Steve Shultz, Michelle
Hudson, Lewis Burke, and Tommy Wade (God bless his soul).  He became
passionate about places such Southern California, SE Arizona, Alaska,
Louisiana, Colorado, the Outer Banks, and especially Warbler Road in
Virginia. His sense of humor kept us entertained and his birding skills
kept u on our toes.

We all have such fond memories of trips we shared together.  Lewis,
Michelle and I took Dan up to Warbler Road one last time this past May and
we showed him as many warblers as we could.  Dan loved the Blackburnian,
Hooded, Prothonotary,  and Kentucky warblers.  Three years ago Steve,
Michelle and I showed him his first spring Bay-breasted in Ohio.

Dan will be remembered for always thinking of others.  He got so much
pleasure out of others getting lifers.  He introduced his niece Michelle to
birding.  Although Dan had 700 birds on his ABA  life list, he got more joy
out of helping Michelle and other new birders, when they saw a lifer.  He
got so excited, and would go out of his way to make it happen, regardless
of any tic on his list.

Lewis remembers with great fondness being with Dan when he saw his first
Yellow Rail, but Lewis thinks Dan had a bigger grin on his face when he
helped Lewis find a Swainson’s warbler.

Dan's last ABA bird was the Georgia Northern Lapwing, and his last NC State
bird was the Roxboro Northern Lapwing.  He benefited from "armchair ticks"
of Ridway's Rail and Egyptian Goose to just touch 700 in the U.S. Canada..

The birding community lost a great man this morning and all that knew him
will miss him so much.  Warbler Road will always be a special place to us,
and every year we will go back to honor Dan and his memory.

Contributions to this announcement are from Dan's niece Michelle Hudson,
and very good friends Steve Shultz and Lewis Burke.  (I love all of you!)

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC
Subject: re: preventing window collisions
From: Cutler/Blackford <cutford AT skybest.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 18:49:05 -0400
I have used BirdTape from the American Bird Conservancy with great success.
You might not want to look through it but I dont find it a problem and I
really dont care about having stripes on my windows if it means no corpses
on the ground below them.
Martha Cutler

Subject: Correction on Ridge Junction Flight Pattern
From: Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph AT ret.unca.edu>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 17:20:14 -0400
Actually, they move across the ridge from northeast to southwest, not
northwest to southeast.
Marilyn

-- 
Marilyn Westphal
Hendersonville, NC
Subject: Migration Spectacle at Ridge Junction/BRP this morning
From: Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph AT ret.unca.edu>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 17:12:27 -0400
Wow!  Quite a morning up at Ridge Junction today with about 8 or so birders
present.  It was just the kind of day we've been waiting for.  We got up
there about 7:20 and birds weren't moving yet, but you could hear all the
chipping of the warblers, the boinking of the Swainson's Thrushes, and the
chinking of the RB Grosbeaks just all waiting to get going (also heard same
at Craggy Gardens and Balsam Gap when we went by, so I imagine those
areas were hopping this morning, too).  The only downside was that it was
quite foggy, so difficult to see the birds for a while.  After a while Mark
stayed at the overlook and I went up to Stepp's Gap (the MMSP visitors
center) where it was nice and clear and sunny and very birdy as well.  Alan
Lenk also went up there as he needed clear shots for photographing.  We had
a lot of Cape May and Palm Warblers up there as well as some BT Blue, BT
Green, Tennessee, Common Yellowthroats, and a couple of Prairie Warblers
and Redstarts as well as a flyover Osprey.

Then I went back down to Ridge Junction where it had started to clear and
birds were still pouring over.  Down there it is was mostly BT Green,
Tennessee, Cape May, Bay-breasted, and some Magnolia, BT Blue, etc. etc. as
well as tons of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, a bunch of Scarlet Tanagers and a
nice, male Summer Tanager, which is a treat for us mountain folks.  Late in
the morning a whole bunch of Blue-Gray Gnatcatchers started coming
through.  We used our counters to count as many of the birds that just flew
over or we couldn't get on fast enough to i.d. and that total was 1,258,
but I'm sure there were even a lot more than that as they were crossing
over the road everywhere - probably over 2,000.  As usual, birds were
flying over the gap from northwest to southeast.

The weather looks pretty decent tomorrow, too, so we'll see if the train of
birds continues then.  Today's list below.

Osprey - 1
Broad-winged Hawk - 2 (when we came back down after lunch)
Chimney Swift - 1
RT Hummingbird - 7 (far fewer than usual, maybe they're slowing down)
Downy Woodpecker - 1
Eastern Wood Pewee - 1
Blue-headed Vireo - 3
Red-eyed Vireo - 1
Blue Jay - 2
Barn Swallow - 2
Carolina Chickadee - 1
Red-breasted Nuthatch - 4
Winter Wren - 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 26
Golden-crowned Kinglet - 9
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 1 (my first of the fall)
Swainson's Thrush - 7 (but probably a lot more going over)
Wood Thrush - 1
Brown Thrasher - 1
Cedar Waxwing - 38
Tennessee Warbler - 23
Common Yellowthroat - 4
American Redstart - 3
Cape May Warbler - 31 (very common this year, even more than usual.  I
wonder if there was a bad spruce budworm outbreak somewhere in Canada)
Magnolia Warbler - 4
Bay-breasted Warbler - 7
Blackburnian Warbler - 3
Black-throated Blue Warbler - 11
Palm Warbler - 11
Prairie Warbler - 2
Black-throated Green Warbler - 21
Eastern Towhee - 3
Song Sparrow - 2
Dark-eyed Junco - 10
Summer Tanager - 1
Scarlet Tanager - 8
Rose-breasted Grosbeak - 32
Indigo Bunting - 1
American Goldfinch - 2

Too many birds to see.  What fun!!!
Marilyn


-- 
Marilyn Westphal
Hendersonville, NC
Subject: Red Wolf comment period extended
From: Derb Carter <derbc AT selcnc.org>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 19:19:01 +0000
Thanks to everyone who submitted comments supporting the Red Wolf recovery 
program in eastern North Carolina. The comment period has been extended two 
weeks until September 26, so you still have the opportunity to comment. 
Apparently commenters overwhelmed the Fish and Wildlife Service servers, 
necessitating an extension in the comment period. We are aware of at least 
75,000 comments submitted in support of ongoing efforts to recover the 
endangered wolf. Comments can be submitted at redwolfreview AT fws.gov 


If you need inspiration, this is from a real sportsman Aldo Leopold: "Only the 
mountain has lived long enough to listen objectively to the howl of a wolf. We 
reached the old wolf in time to watch a fierce green fire dying in her eyes. I 
realized then, and have known ever since, that there was something new to me in 
those eyes - something known only to her and to the mountain. I was young then, 
and full of trigger-itch; I thought that because fewer wolves meant more deer, 
that no wolves would mean hunters' paradise. But after seeing the green fire 
die, I sensed that neither the wolf nor the mountain agreed with such a view." 


Derb Carter
Chapel Hill NC
Subject: A White Pelicans, Pea Island NWR, Dare County NC
From: Audrey <ajw AT earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:10:56 -0400
Hey Birders,
Birding was not great this morning on the Bird Walk due to strong NE winds BUT 
our FOS White Pelicans (10) were on North Pond along with 1500 Pintails. 
Shorebirds were scarce and hunkered down somewhere. A lone Redstart and RB 
Nuthatch were in the live oak "tunnel by Vtr Ctr. 

I got word from Marcia L that Duck Boardwalk was again productive for 
warblers/vireos at 9am!! 


Have an Adventure today!!

Audrey Whitlock
Nags Head NC & Merritt Island FL

Sent from iPhone
Subject: Mecklenburg Audubon October Meeting (Thursday 10/02): Birds of the Lowcountry
From: Christy Hill <chill2k5 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:22:26 -0400 (EDT)
MAS presents – Birds of the Lowcountry
When  - Thurs, Oct 2nd at 7:30 PM (Refreshments begin around 7:15 pm)
Where - Tyvola Rd Senior Center, 2225 Tyvola Rd, Charlotte, NC 28210
More info - http://meckbirds.org

The South Carolina Lowcountry is host to an incredible diversity of habitats,
flora, and fauna, and is a birder’s and nature photographers dream!  Join
Mecklenburg Audubon for our October membership meeting as naturalist and
wildlife photographer Marvin Bouknight will give us a presentation tour of
South Carolina’s Lowcountry, unique habitats, and the incredible array of
birds that reside there temporarily, seasonally, and permanently.

Marvin Bouknight is a professional naturalist and wildlife photographer, and
author of the book, “South Carolina’s Lowcountry…Naturally”.  He is
originally from South Carolina, where he earned a degree in Wildlife and
Fisheries biology from Clemson University, and he is now the new director for
the Charlotte Nature Museum.  

Visit our merch table for a nice selection of club and birding merchandise.
2015 Calendars will be available for pre-order as well as a few hot off the
press for sale! Brown-headed Nuthatch boxes will be available at the meeting
for $15 each. Be sure to sample some Birds & Beans Bird Friendly® coffee
during the meeting then purchase a bag for yourself or a friend. Pre-orders
will also be placed for pick-up at the next month’s meeting. Feel free to
contact Jan Fowler at janmfowler AT gmail.com or Bill Duston at
bduston AT carolina.rr.com if you have any questions about Birds & Beans and
fulfilling your Bird Friendly® coffee needs. Help the birds by drinking great
tasting Bird Friendly® coffee!  

Please join us Thursday October 2nd at 7:30pm at the Tyvola Road Senior Center,
2225 Tyvola Road, Charlotte, NC 28210. If you know of others you think may be
interested, please let them know.

Christy Hill
MAS Publicity
Charlotte, NC 
Subject: Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:07:44 -0400
This morning, I found a Yellow-bellied Flycatcher along the Historic
Bethabara greenway. My only prior observations were in Canada and Belize.
Here is a link to some photos:
https://picasaweb.google.com/108804190605094238144/YellowBelliedFlycatcher#6
060073450361043218.

Note yellow wash throughout chest and belly, orange lower mandible, eye ring
that extends a bit behind the idea. Darker wing bars likely indicate an
immature. I first saw this bird perched on a wire in open sunlight over the
trail, where it appeared even more yellow underneath. It then moved along a
wooded edge about 10 feet off the ground.

Phil Dickinson
Winston-Salem

Subject: Henslow's sparrows at Voice of America
From: John Carpenter <john.p.carpenter AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 13:41:25 -0400
There have been recent developments in the future of Voice of America site A 
near Greenville, NC that I thought many of you would be interested in learning 
about. 


For those not familiar with this property, it is 2500+ acres of contiguous 
early-successional grassland habitat that has been an important breeding site 
for many priority bird species, including but not limited to: bobwhite quail, 
grasshopper sparrow, eastern meadowlark, and Henlsow's sparrow. It is only one 
of two places in NC where the Henslow's is known to reliably breed (the other 
is VOA site B) and is the largest concentration of this species breeding in the 
southeastern United States. Many other non-avian species have been documented 
there as well, such as: oak toad, slender blue iris, and Reversed Roadside 
Skipper and Helicta Satyr butterflies. 


The property was decommissioned several years ago and is being surplussed by 
the federal government. Beaufort County is now in a position to take ownership 
and has proposed plans to convert the area into a park and recreational 
facility. Although many of their proposals are low impact (e.g., hiking and 
camping sites), many others are not (e.g., ATV trails and reforestation). 


Here is a link to a recent editorial from the Daily Reflector: 
http://www.reflector.com/columns/clark/clark-conservation-dilemma-2650277

If you also believe that the site should be managed in a way that benefits 
wildlife, then I urge you to contact the county manager and commissioners and 
express your opinion: 


http://www.co.beaufort.nc.us/government/county-manager

http://www.co.beaufort.nc.us/government/board-of-commissioners
Subject: Jackson Park/Henderson Cty., N. C.
From: "Wayne K. Forsythe" <wforsythe AT morrisbb.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 13:27:09 -0400
Folks,
 I birded Jackson Park this AM from about 8:30 A.M.until 12:00 Noon. At 8:30 AM 
there were many warblers moving along the edge of the powerline right of way, 
in not, the best lighting conditions. Overall, I had 12 species of warblers 
with the best birds being 1 Blue-winged, 1 PROTHONOTARY, 1 Bay-breasted, 1 Cape 
May. There were good numbers of Magnolia, Chestnut-sided, and American 
Redstarts. 

 The Prothonotary was found about 3/4 of the way down the Warbler Trail, on the 
right side, at about 11:15 A. M., in a tangle, over the creek. I placed a piece 
of 2x4, vertically on the right side of the bank to mark the spot. The bird 
then crossed the trail, I last saw it about 25 yards on the left, before the 
stake I placed to mark the spot. 

After the Prothonotary had crossed the trail, it joined a mixed flock of 
warblers with a Canada and Blue-wing Warbler present as well. 

 There were lots of Am. Robins feeding in the vines containing berries, but I 
didn't see any Thrushes. I did not bird the Bottomland Trail, which can be very 
good for Thrushes. I also had 1 Yellow-billed Cuckoo. 

Wayne
 Wayne K. Forsythe
16 Colonial Way
Hendersonville, N. C. 28791
wforsytheATmorrisbb.net
Subject: 14 Lesser Black-backed Gulls at North Topsail Beach, NC
From: "gilbert grant" <gilbert_grant AT usa.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:17:05 -0400
This morning at around 11:30 there were 14 (12 adults, 2 immatures)Lesser
Black-backed Gulls resting on the beach of North Topsail Beach, Onslow County,
NC. The location was about 0.6 miles east of the intersection of New River
Inlet Road with HWY 210.

Gilbert S. Grant
Sneads Ferry, NC
Subject: Slow morning at Hefner with a Bald Eagle
From: william haddad <photobill9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:42:22 -0400
Very few migrants today but two rareties, for Hefner that is. First time
I've ever seen a Bald Eagle or a Great Blue Heron at Hefner on the BRP (
far from water bodies) but saw both in the air there this a.m.  The Heron
was going in a straight line south. The  mature Bald Eagle came in low
about 20 minutes later, circled and then went in a nw direction.

After three mornings with loads of migrants at Hefner, it was quiet today.
Saw far fewer. No Tanagers and no Grosbeaks. Although I had 9 Warbler
species, only had one of some and a few of the others and didn't miss many
birds as they were settled down in two small areas with almost no
crossovers. Warblers seen were Common Yellow throat, B.T.Green, B.T. Blue,
Worm-eating, Magnolia, Tennessee, Chestnut-sided, Am. Redstart and Prairie.
Also saw one Yellow-throated Vireo and one Red-eyed Vireo. Heard a Hairy
Woodpecker and saw several Downys.

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, NC.
Subject: Worm eating warbler at Sandy Creek
From: David Anderson <d47anders AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:24:27 -0400
About 8:30 near the bridge a WORM-EATING WARBLER went through. 
David Anderson 
Durham NC 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Lake Crabtree - Sept 16: Six Warblers species
From: Brendan Klick <brendan.klick AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 22:01:45 -0400
Six warbler species today from 530-7 pm: Common Yellowthroat (5),
Magnolia (1), Prairie (1), Palm (1)
Black-and-white (1), Pine (15) Warbler.

Brendan
Durham, NC
Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak - Backyard
From: Brian Pendergraft <bkpendergraft AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 19:25:37 -0400
I saw 2 grosbeaks this morning, and again this evening. They were feasting
on Dogwood berries.
Arrival date 1-day later than last fall.


Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake, NC
Subject: Sandy Creek, Durham, North Carolina
From: David Anderson <d47anders AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 12:10:12 -0400
Another brief visit to Sandy Creek in the sun and migrants still traversing the 
area. COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, PRAIRIE WARBLERS, BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER, AMERICAN 
REDSTART, and NORTHERN PARULA were there. Three VIREOS, RED-EYED, WHITE-EYED, 
and YELLOW-THROATED, with the white-eyed seemingly everywhere. Bird of the day, 
a non-breeding male SCARLET TANAGER making an appearance. 

Nice visit. 
David Anderson 
Durham, NC 

Sandy Creek, Durham, North Carolina
September 16, 2014

Red-shouldered hawk 2
White-eyed vireo 12
Carolina wren 16
American crow 9
Northern mockingbird 1
Brown thrasher 1
Great blue heron 2
Red-bellied woodpecker 10
Pileated woodpecker 1
Gray catbird 1
Eastern phoebe 3
Northern cardinal 11
Common yellowthroat 3
Prairie warbler 2
Empidonax sp 2 (willow perhaps?) 
American goldfinch 1
Northern parula 1
Carolina chickadee 10
Ruby-throated hummingbird 3
Eastern wood pewee 1
Tufted titmouse 8
Red-eyed vireo 3
Summer tanager 1
Black-and-white warbler 1
American redstart 1
Yellow-throated vireo 2
Blue jay 3
Eastern bluebird 1
Song sparrow 1
Scarlet tanager 1
Turkey vulture 1 



Sent from my iPhone
Subject: September 15, 2014 Sandy Creek, Durham, NC
From: David Anderson <d47anders AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 11:44:15 -0400
Interesting morning at Sandy Creek yesterday. Very gray but fair number of 
birds. Found five woodpeckers, RED-BELLIED, DOWNY, HAIRY, PILEATED, and 
NORTHERN FLICKER. Fun to watch. While I was at the north end looking at 
woodpeckers, Dan Kaplan found a group of warblers by the levee that divides the 
two ponds. I caught up and saw the MAGNOLIA WARBLER but missed his others. 
However, YELLOW-THROATED and WHITE-EYED VIREOS were low and being obvious. 
Later I stumbled onto more warblers, including PINE WARBLERS, COMMON 
YELLOWTHROATS, and the prize of the day, a BLUE-WINGED WARBLER. The latter gave 
me half a dozen good looks, clearly he wanted to be seen! 

Happy birding, 
David Anderson 
Durham, NC 

Sandy Creek, Durham, North Carolina
September 15, 2014

Eastern phoebe 2
Common grackle 2
American crow 22
Carolina wren 20
Eastern bluebird 2
House finch 3
Red-shouldered hawk 2
Northern cardinal 14
Blue jay 5
White-breasted nuthatch 6
Red-bellied woodpecker 12
Gray catbird 3
Pileated woodpecker 2
Northern mockingbird 1
Mourning dove 5
Great-crested flycatcher 2
Tufted titmouse 18
Northern flicker 2
Downy woodpecker 4
Belted kingfisher 1
Carolina chickadee 10
Hairy woodpecker 1
American robin 2
Common yellowthroat 8
White-eyed vireo 4
Yellow-throated vireo 2
Blue-gray gnatcatcher 1
Magnolia warbler 2
Blue-winged warbler 1
Pine warbler 3
Ruby-throated hummingbird 4




Sent from my iPhone
Subject: FOY Baltimore Oriole
From: "Mary Bridges" <MaryHuOT AT nc.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 11:05:21 -0400
At the feeders this a.m. around 7:30. I have been putting out small amounts of 
jelly through the summer as the catbirds really seem to enjoy it, so there was 
some jelly for her. This is the earliest I have ever had one show up; I think I 
have had one mid-October and past several years it has been late October. 

Mary Bridges
Goldsboro, NC
Subject: Re: Preventing Window Collisions for Birds
From: Travis Knowles <hyrax AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:46:44 -0400
The best and longest-lasting solution to this problem that I've seen is 
the Acopian BirdSavers. You can order them from the web site, but they 
are super easy to make and install yourself, using olive green parachute 
cord (instructions also on the site). Our friends at Wildsumaco Wildlife 
Sanctuary in Ecuador installed them at their lodge, where they are very 
effective at preventing hummingbird window strikes. After a while you 
don't even notice they're there.

http://www.birdsavers.com

Travis Knowles
Florence, SC
Francis Marion University - Biology
Director, Wildsumaco Biological Station (Ecuador)
Subject: RE: Hummer coloring
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT hiltonpond.org>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:45:25 -0400
K.C.

Definitely a young male Ruby-throated Hummingbird starting to get the green 
flanks of an adult. 


See my photo at 
https://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond/photos/a.357055021016515.84052.350383371683680/735833086472038/?type=1&theater 


Cheers,

BILL



> From: "KC Foggin" 
> Subject: Hummer coloring
> Date: September 15, 2014 at 5:00:15 PM EDT
> 
> Could you all indulge me and take a look at this photo of a hummer I took 
last week. The coloring on its side is throwing me a bit but it is quite 
visible when he is flying around. Im assuming it is a young male. 

>  
> http://upload.pbase.com/image/157398068
>  
>  
> K.C.
> 
> K.C. Foggin
> Socastee
> Myrtle Beach SC

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============

Subject: Juv. Sabine's Gull last two days at Jamestown, VA ferry
From: Frank Enders <fkenders AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 22:29:19 -0400
See Virginia birdline for details. Follows ferry between Jamestown and 
Scotland, VA. 


Best wishes,
 
 
 
 
Frank Enders, Halifax, NC


  		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Grandfather Mountain Hawkwatch
From: Jesse Pope <highcountrybirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 22:09:58 -0400
If folks are interested in checking out current weather conditions on
Grandfather we have a real-time weather page showing current conditions at
the Swinging Bridge right beside the count site. You can also download
historical data from the NC State Climate Office CRONOS database as well.
It's great we have this detailed weather record to coincide with the
hawkwatch for sure. Below is the link to the current conditions page:

https://climate.appstate.edu/Grandfather/Day.php

CRONOS site:
http://www.nc-climate.ncsu.edu/cronos/?station=GRANDFATHR


On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 9:58 PM, Philip Dickinson 
wrote:

> Fascinating. Visibility at Pilot Mtn. was so bad, we were lucky to see 21.
> Visibility limited to about 10km all day, so just a few birds finding some
> warmth over the pinnacle. Probably more on the ridge, but we never saw the
> ridge. Our winds were out of the SE today – all day. One immature eagle,
> probable kestrel, Cooper's and migrating Red-tailed.
>
> Highlights were a surprise immature White-crowned Sparrow (probably 2)
> near the overlook, plus a couple of Veery. Date and habitat don't fit the
> sparrow, but there it/they was/were.
>
> Phil Dickinson
> Winston-Salem
>
> From: Jesse Pope 
> Date: Monday, September 15, 2014 9:49 PM
> To: Carolinabirds 
> Subject: Grandfather Mountain Hawkwatch
>
> We had a very good day at the hawkwatch today totaling 778 birds. We ended
> with 10 different species!! 13 osprey, 8 bald eagles (all-time record is 10
> in a day set last year), and 734 broad-wings. largest kettle was 113 birds,
> and several other kettles around 100 birds. We had our first merlin of the
> season today right at the peak just before 6pm. It buzzed past us very low
> and mobbed two ravens sitting on the rocks just down the peak from us!
> Tomorrow should be another good day although the winds will shift back to
> the southeast at some point. Rockfish Gap and other Virginia hawkwatch
> sites had another good day today. Rockfish had 1991 birds today!! Looking
> forward to another great day tomorrow fingers crossed for good visibility.
>
> --
> Jesse Pope
>
> Newland, NC
> 828-898-3012
>



-- 
Jesse Pope

Newland, NC
828-898-3012
Subject: Re: Grandfather Mountain Hawkwatch
From: Jesse Pope <highcountrybirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 22:02:57 -0400
I think we really lucked out today. Mahogany Rock seemed to have similar
conditions to you guys at Pilot. We had heavy clouds in the area, but they
never closed in on us. It was a very good day for sure. It looks like
tomorrow will be similar I think. Fingers crossed for graceful winds and
good visibility. Good luck!!

On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 9:58 PM, Philip Dickinson 
wrote:

> Fascinating. Visibility at Pilot Mtn. was so bad, we were lucky to see 21.
> Visibility limited to about 10km all day, so just a few birds finding some
> warmth over the pinnacle. Probably more on the ridge, but we never saw the
> ridge. Our winds were out of the SE today – all day. One immature eagle,
> probable kestrel, Cooper's and migrating Red-tailed.
>
> Highlights were a surprise immature White-crowned Sparrow (probably 2)
> near the overlook, plus a couple of Veery. Date and habitat don't fit the
> sparrow, but there it/they was/were.
>
> Phil Dickinson
> Winston-Salem
>
> From: Jesse Pope 
> Date: Monday, September 15, 2014 9:49 PM
> To: Carolinabirds 
> Subject: Grandfather Mountain Hawkwatch
>
> We had a very good day at the hawkwatch today totaling 778 birds. We ended
> with 10 different species!! 13 osprey, 8 bald eagles (all-time record is 10
> in a day set last year), and 734 broad-wings. largest kettle was 113 birds,
> and several other kettles around 100 birds. We had our first merlin of the
> season today right at the peak just before 6pm. It buzzed past us very low
> and mobbed two ravens sitting on the rocks just down the peak from us!
> Tomorrow should be another good day although the winds will shift back to
> the southeast at some point. Rockfish Gap and other Virginia hawkwatch
> sites had another good day today. Rockfish had 1991 birds today!! Looking
> forward to another great day tomorrow fingers crossed for good visibility.
>
> --
> Jesse Pope
>
> Newland, NC
> 828-898-3012
>



-- 
Jesse Pope

Newland, NC
828-898-3012
Subject: Re: Grandfather Mountain Hawkwatch
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 21:58:32 -0400
Fascinating. Visibility at Pilot Mtn. was so bad, we were lucky to see 21.
Visibility limited to about 10km all day, so just a few birds finding some
warmth over the pinnacle. Probably more on the ridge, but we never saw the
ridge. Our winds were out of the SE today  all day. One immature eagle,
probable kestrel, Cooper's and migrating Red-tailed.

Highlights were a surprise immature White-crowned Sparrow (probably 2) near
the overlook, plus a couple of Veery. Date and habitat don't fit the
sparrow, but there it/they was/were.

Phil Dickinson
Winston-Salem

From:  Jesse Pope 
Date:  Monday, September 15, 2014 9:49 PM
To:  Carolinabirds 
Subject:  Grandfather Mountain Hawkwatch

We had a very good day at the hawkwatch today totaling 778 birds. We ended
with 10 different species!! 13 osprey, 8 bald eagles (all-time record is 10
in a day set last year), and 734 broad-wings. largest kettle was 113 birds,
and several other kettles around 100 birds. We had our first merlin of the
season today right at the peak just before 6pm. It buzzed past us very low
and mobbed two ravens sitting on the rocks just down the peak from us!
Tomorrow should be another good day although the winds will shift back to
the southeast at some point. Rockfish Gap and other Virginia hawkwatch sites
had another good day today. Rockfish had 1991 birds today!! Looking forward
to another great day tomorrow fingers crossed for good visibility.

-- 
Jesse Pope

Newland, NC
828-898-3012

Subject: Grandfather Mountain Hawkwatch
From: Jesse Pope <highcountrybirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 21:49:10 -0400
We had a very good day at the hawkwatch today totaling 778 birds. We ended
with 10 different species!! 13 osprey, 8 bald eagles (all-time record is 10
in a day set last year), and 734 broad-wings. largest kettle was 113 birds,
and several other kettles around 100 birds. We had our first merlin of the
season today right at the peak just before 6pm. It buzzed past us very low
and mobbed two ravens sitting on the rocks just down the peak from us!
Tomorrow should be another good day although the winds will shift back to
the southeast at some point. Rockfish Gap and other Virginia hawkwatch
sites had another good day today. Rockfish had 1991 birds today!! Looking
forward to another great day tomorrow fingers crossed for good visibility.

-- 
Jesse Pope

Newland, NC
828-898-3012
Subject: North Outer Banks migrants
From: Jeff Lewis <jlewisbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 20:19:09 -0400
Audrey Whitlock and I birded in Corolla and Duck this morning and had great
birding in both locations. We had good numbers of and found 15 species of
warblers, including Northern Waterthrush, Blackburnian, Bay-breasted,
Magnolia, Cape May, Black-throated Blue, Black-throated Green. Also lots of
redstarts, yellows, black-and-whites and parulas. We also found a
Philadelphia Vireo in both locations and a FOS Ruby-crowned Kinglet.
Warbler-neck for sure!

Please visit my flickr site for photos:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/natureimages/

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC
Subject: NC Birding Trail Program - 9/16, 7p @ UNC-Asheville
From: Emilie Travis <uvem05 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 18:06:33 -0400
Interested in learning about the NC Birding Trail?

Well then, you are in luck!! The Elisha Mitchell Audubon Society's monthly
program will feature Scott Anderson, the North Carolina Birding Trail
Coordinator, who will highlight the Trail’s recent developments and share
tips on where to bird. Scott will discuss the origins of the NC Birding
Trail, the progress of the Trail for the past 10 years, and the current
Trail as it stands today. He will also share future plans for the Trail to
be more active in simultaneously promoting bird conservation and local
businesses.
If you find yourself in the Asheville tomorrow or find yourself without
plans, come on up to Asheville and join us for this exciting program. It
will take place tomorrow, *Tuesday, Sept 16th at 7pm* at UNC-Asheville's
Reuter Center
1 University Heights
Asheville, NC 28804


These monthly programs are FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC! If interested in
learning more about Elisha Mitchell Audubon Society and the program
schedule, visit us at the following sites:
www.emasnc.org
EMAS Facebook

 

Raven's Nest Newsletter

 


Share this email with anyone you think might be interested as well!
Happy Birding!!
~Elisha Mitchell Audubon Society

-- 
Emilie Travis
​Publicity Committee & Board Member
Elisha Mitchell Audubon Society​

​www.emasnc.org​



"We abuse the land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us.
When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it
with love and respect."
~Aldo Leopold
Subject: Hummer coloring
From: "KC Foggin" <KCFoggin AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:00:15 -0400
Could you all indulge me and take a look at this photo of a hummer I took last 
week. The coloring on its side is throwing me a bit but it is quite visible 
when he is flying around. I’m assuming it is a young male. 


http://upload.pbase.com/image/157398068


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20

Subject: Re: Boardwalk at Dungannon Plantation Heritage Preserve reopened (Charleston County, South Carolina)
From: Helen Kalevas <hkalevas AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 14:05:07 -0500
​Unmistakable id of an immature chestnut-sided warbler splashing in the
water of the little river behind our house beside Am Redstart, Am
goldfinches, cardinal and yellow-rumped warblers. Roman bird bath out there
today.
Helen Kalevas
​
​

On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 1:35 PM, wadingbirds  wrote:

> Dear Carolina Birders,
>
> I thought that you might be interested the status of the boardwalk at the
> Dungannon Plantation Heritage Preserve in Charleston County, South
> Carolina. The boardwalk is closed seasonally to prevent disturbance to the
> wood storks nesting in the area. The majority of the property remains open
> to visitors year-round. More information is in the news release below and
> on the SCDNR Wading Bird website:
> http://www.dnr.sc.gov/wildlife/species/wadingbirds/index.html
>
> Best,
> Christy Hand
>
> SCDNR NEWS RELEASE #14–146
> September 11, 2014
>
>         The boardwalk at the Dungannon Plantation Heritage Preserve (HP)
> has been reopened because the wood stork (
> http://www.dnr.sc.gov/cwcs/pdf/Woodstork.pdf) nesting season has
> concluded. All trails are open for public use. “A record high number of
> wood storks nested at Dungannon HP this year,” said Christy Hand, S.C.
> Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Wading Bird Biologist. “A total of
> 263 stork nests were counted in the rookery and an average of over two
> chicks survived per nest, making it a very successful nesting season.”
> Additional information about the 2014 wood stork nesting season will be
> posted on the DNR Wading Bird Project website this fall at
> http://www.dnr.sc.gov/wildlife/species/wadingbirds/index.html.
>         The federal status of the wood stork (Mycteria americana) was
> down-listed to “threatened” during 2014 because several recovery 
benchmarks 

> have been met. As a federally threatened species, the wood stork is still
> protected under the Endangered Species Act. Details about the
> reclassification can be found in a news release from the US Fish & Wildlife
> Service (
> http://www.fws.gov/news/ShowNews.cfm?ID=D8AEC082-A7E9-C4CA-C6375DE1198A72B1).
> In 1984, wood storks were listed as a federally endangered species after
> nesting pairs in the United States breeding population declined from
> between 15,000 and 20,000 in the 1930’s to 2,500 pairs by 1978.
> Historically, wood storks have used South Carolina as a post-nesting
> foraging area during the summer and fall. In 1981, the first successful
> wood stork nests were documented in South Carolina (11 nests). Currently,
> there are approximately 1,500 – 2,500 wood stork nests in South Carolina
> each year.
>         The Dungannon Plantation Heritage Preserve offers excellent
> habitat for many migrating and breeding songbirds and a variety of native
> wildflowers including large stands of wild Easter lily and five species of
> orchids. Dungannon HP is about 17 miles south of Charleston on SC Highway
> 162, four miles from the turn-off from US Highway 17. The management road
> system provides easy walking through open hardwood forest. No motorized
> vehicles are allowed. The preserve is open seven days a week during
> daylight hours. More about Dungannon at
> https://www.dnr.sc.gov/mlands/managedland?p_id=120.
>
> News Release on website:
> http://www.dnr.sc.gov/news/yr2014/sept11/sept11_dungannon.html
>
Subject: Boardwalk at Dungannon Plantation Heritage Preserve reopened (Charleston County, South Carolina)
From: wadingbirds <wadingbirds AT dnr.sc.gov>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 14:35:19 -0400
Dear Carolina Birders,

I thought that you might be interested the status of the boardwalk at the 
Dungannon Plantation Heritage Preserve in Charleston County, South Carolina. 
The boardwalk is closed seasonally to prevent disturbance to the wood storks 
nesting in the area. The majority of the property remains open to visitors 
year-round. More information is in the news release below and on the SCDNR 
Wading Bird website: 
http://www.dnr.sc.gov/wildlife/species/wadingbirds/index.html 


Best,
Christy Hand

SCDNR NEWS RELEASE #14146			
September 11, 2014   

 The boardwalk at the Dungannon Plantation Heritage Preserve (HP) has been 
reopened because the wood stork (http://www.dnr.sc.gov/cwcs/pdf/Woodstork.pdf) 
nesting season has concluded. All trails are open for public use. A record 
high number of wood storks nested at Dungannon HP this year, said Christy 
Hand, S.C. Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Wading Bird Biologist. A 
total of 263 stork nests were counted in the rookery and an average of over two 
chicks survived per nest, making it a very successful nesting season. 
Additional information about the 2014 wood stork nesting season will be posted 
on the DNR Wading Bird Project website this fall at 
http://www.dnr.sc.gov/wildlife/species/wadingbirds/index.html. 

 The federal status of the wood stork (Mycteria americana) was down-listed to 
threatened during 2014 because several recovery benchmarks have been met. As 
a federally threatened species, the wood stork is still protected under the 
Endangered Species Act. Details about the reclassification can be found in a 
news release from the US Fish & Wildlife Service 
(http://www.fws.gov/news/ShowNews.cfm?ID=D8AEC082-A7E9-C4CA-C6375DE1198A72B1). 
In 1984, wood storks were listed as a federally endangered species after 
nesting pairs in the United States breeding population declined from between 
15,000 and 20,000 in the 1930s to 2,500 pairs by 1978. Historically, wood 
storks have used South Carolina as a post-nesting foraging area during the 
summer and fall. In 1981, the first successful wood stork nests were documented 
in South Carolina (11 nests). Currently, there are approximately 1,500  2,500 
wood stork nests in South Carolina each year. 

 The Dungannon Plantation Heritage Preserve offers excellent habitat for many 
migrating and breeding songbirds and a variety of native wildflowers including 
large stands of wild Easter lily and five species of orchids. Dungannon HP is 
about 17 miles south of Charleston on SC Highway 162, four miles from the 
turn-off from US Highway 17. The management road system provides easy walking 
through open hardwood forest. No motorized vehicles are allowed. The preserve 
is open seven days a week during daylight hours. More about Dungannon at 
https://www.dnr.sc.gov/mlands/managedland?p_id=120. 


News Release on website: 
http://www.dnr.sc.gov/news/yr2014/sept11/sept11_dungannon.html 

Subject: RE: Latta Park - Mecklenburg County
From: TNT Sanders <tsanders1993 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 14:05:14 -0400
I was listening to the various GHOW calls from Cornell's site ( 
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/great_horned_owl/sounds ). 

Thought it was similar to what they refer to as the "female squawk" call but 
after listening to the "adult song with juvenile call" recording I do agree 
that it was indeed a young bird. 

Didn't expect that begging type call in September!
Tom SandersCharlotte, NC

> CC: mas-l AT listserv.uncc.edu; carolinabirds AT duke.edu
> From: helmutmueller AT att.net
> To: tsanders1993 AT msn.com
> Subject: Re: Latta Park - Mecklenburg County
> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 13:35:42 -0400
> 
> The "squawk call" was probably a young bird of the year.
> 
> Helmut C. Mueller
> Professor Emeritus
> Department of Biology and Curriculum in Ecology
> University of North Carolina
> Chapel Hill, NC 27599
> 919-942-4937
> hmueller AT live.unc.edu
> 
> On Sep 15, 2014, at 1:25 PM, TNT Sanders wrote:
> 
> > The day started out with good birds when we walked out the front  
> > door at sunrise this morning.  Two Great Horned Owls were calling  
> > back and forth with a male doing its normal hoot and a female  
> > responding with a "squawk" call.
> > Mid-morning I decided to stop by Latta Park in downtown Charlotte, a  
> > migration Hotspot in the spring but usually not quite as good in the  
> > fall.  What a pleasant surprise to find 43 species including 13  
> > warblers, you know your having a good morning when Chestnut-sided  
> > Warblers outnumber Chickadees!
> > Tom Sanders,  Charlotte NC
> >
> > Latta Park, Mecklenburg, US-NC
> > Sep 15, 2014 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
> > Protocol: Traveling
> > 1.0 mile(s)
> > 42 species (+1 other taxa)
> >
> > Mourning Dove - 4
> > Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 1
> > Chimney Swift - 3
> > Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2
> > Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3
> > Downy Woodpecker - 4
> > Northern Flicker - 1
> > Eastern Wood-Pewee - 5
> > Empidonax sp. - 2
> > White-eyed Vireo - 2
> > Yellow-throated Vireo - 1
> > Red-eyed Vireo - 3
> > Blue Jay - 4
> > American Crow - 2
> > Carolina Chickadee - 8
> > Tufted Titmouse - 6
> > White-breasted Nuthatch - 3
> > Brown-headed Nuthatch - 2
> > Carolina Wren - 4
> > Eastern Bluebird - 2
> > Swainson's Thrush - 1
> > American Robin - 5
> > Gray Catbird - 2
> > Northern Mockingbird - 1
> > Blue-winged Warbler - 2
> > Black-and-white Warbler - 4
> > Tennessee Warbler - 6
> > American Redstart - 6
> > Cape May Warbler - 2
> > Northern Parula - 1
> > Magnolia Warbler - 4
> > Bay-breasted Warbler - 1
> > Blackburnian Warbler - 1
> > Chestnut-sided Warbler - 9
> > Black-throated Blue Warbler - 2
> > Pine Warbler - 1
> > Prairie Warbler - 1
> > Eastern Towhee - 1
> > Scarlet Tanager - 2
> > Northern Cardinal - 6
> > Common Grackle - 1
> > American Goldfinch - 3
> > House Sparrow - 5
> >
> >
> 
> .unc.edu
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Preventing Window Collisions for Birds
From: scompton1251 AT charter.net
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 14:02:09 -0400 (EDT)
Birders,

Yellow highlight marker works pretty well. Just make an X on each pane.


Steve Compton
Greenville,SC


On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 10:19 AM, Shelley Theye wrote:

> I have these decals on a number of windows.  I believe they have to be 
> spaced no more than 4" apart or so to be effective.  I didn't even 
> think about the UV in the decal eventually degrading, mine may be 
> worthless now.
>
> The website suggests replacing them every 6-9 months.  I have never 
> replaced mine, and I think this would end up being pretty costly to 
> maintain over the years.
>
> I took a look at the Window Alert website and see that they now offer 
> a UV liquid too.  They also offer a back light detector to test decals 
> at night.  I might test mine with a black light to see if they have 
> any UV coating left.
>
> I think with the high cost of maintenance with UV decals, there are 
> probably better methods out there for protecting window strikes for 
> those with many larger windows, even though some are higher priced 
> initially, like window screens, down the road there wouldn't be a 
> continuous replacement cost like with the decals.
>
> Another inexpensive solution is to just paint anything on the outside 
> of your windows, use a water based art paint that can wash off when 
> you want to remove easily, and make as simple or ornate as you 
> like...we have done that on some upstairs windows that aren't visible 
> from the front of our home in woods, and this method is very 
> effective.  We do have nice size overhangs to protect from
> rain so I am not sure how long would last if you don't have good 
> overhangs.
>
> I believe even string or malar strips can just be suspended from an 
> overhang too and be helpful.
>
> Last, I be sure that is you have windows on ends of your house that 
> 'line up' with each other, that you somehow
> make a barrier, like closing a door, etc. partially, so it doesn't 
> appear to the bird that they can fly through your house,
> at least during migration season..
>
> Shelley
>
> Shelley Theye
> veery AT bellsouth.net
> Chatham County, NC
>
>
>
>
> On Sep 14, 2014, at 12:08 PM, Lynn Erla Beegle  
> wrote:
>
>> Preventing Window Collisions for Birds: Regarding Window Strikes and
>> Bird Mortality: Sorry to hear about the death of a warbler hitting a
>> window, posted in the Sunday digest of carolina bird listserv. When a
>> bird strikes a building or window, it is often a fatal encounter -
>> even if the bird flies away, it may have brain damage. So prevention
>> is the key. I recommend the small stickers/decals that are 
>> translucent
>> to us, but glow in the U/V range to birds (I suppose it's some sort 
>> of
>> ultraviolet purple that we can only imagine!)  I placed several of
>> these stickers on my bay window and they work great.  You only need
>> one U/V sticker on smaller windows. They can be purchased at your
>> local bird-food store. The stickers go on the outside and should be
>> replaced once a year. They don't harm the window nor are they
>> distracting to you (although my hummingbirds tend to stare at them!)
>> The web site  www.windowalert.com   is one company selling these
>> stickers.  In addition to the article mentioned already (
>> 
>> 
http://www.abcbirds.org/abcprograms/policy/collisions/pdf/collisions_flyer.pdf 

>> ), another good article's link appears below (you may have to
>> cut/paste the link, as I am in text-only mode). The article listed
>> below describes a dozen products to reduce bird mortality from window
>> strikes.
>> 
>> 
http://www.birdwatchingdaily.com/featured-stories/15-products-that-prevent-windows-strikes/ 

>> ***We hope you will encourage volunteers for a 'Lights Out' program
>> near you - Wake Audubon has one in Raleigh, and there are active ones
>> in many Carolina cities. Pairs of volunteers walk downtown early in
>> the morning during migration to record where most of the bird
>> collisions occur. Very good project if you want to help birds!
>> http://bird-friendly.audubon.org/lightsout
>> Good birding to you,
>> Lynn Erla Beegle, Raleigh, NC
>> Find us at Wake Audubon Society Meetup:
>> http://www.meetup.com/Wake-Audubon-Meetup
Subject: Re: Latta Park - Mecklenburg County
From: Helmut Mueller <helmutmueller AT att.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 13:35:42 -0400
The "squawk call" was probably a young bird of the year.

Helmut C. Mueller
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biology and Curriculum in Ecology
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
919-942-4937
hmueller AT live.unc.edu

On Sep 15, 2014, at 1:25 PM, TNT Sanders wrote:

> The day started out with good birds when we walked out the front  
> door at sunrise this morning.  Two Great Horned Owls were calling  
> back and forth with a male doing its normal hoot and a female  
> responding with a "squawk" call.
> Mid-morning I decided to stop by Latta Park in downtown Charlotte, a  
> migration Hotspot in the spring but usually not quite as good in the  
> fall.  What a pleasant surprise to find 43 species including 13  
> warblers, you know your having a good morning when Chestnut-sided  
> Warblers outnumber Chickadees!
> Tom Sanders,  Charlotte NC
>
> Latta Park, Mecklenburg, US-NC
> Sep 15, 2014 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> 42 species (+1 other taxa)
>
> Mourning Dove - 4
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 1
> Chimney Swift - 3
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2
> Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3
> Downy Woodpecker - 4
> Northern Flicker - 1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee - 5
> Empidonax sp. - 2
> White-eyed Vireo - 2
> Yellow-throated Vireo - 1
> Red-eyed Vireo - 3
> Blue Jay - 4
> American Crow - 2
> Carolina Chickadee - 8
> Tufted Titmouse - 6
> White-breasted Nuthatch - 3
> Brown-headed Nuthatch - 2
> Carolina Wren - 4
> Eastern Bluebird - 2
> Swainson's Thrush - 1
> American Robin - 5
> Gray Catbird - 2
> Northern Mockingbird - 1
> Blue-winged Warbler - 2
> Black-and-white Warbler - 4
> Tennessee Warbler - 6
> American Redstart - 6
> Cape May Warbler - 2
> Northern Parula - 1
> Magnolia Warbler - 4
> Bay-breasted Warbler - 1
> Blackburnian Warbler - 1
> Chestnut-sided Warbler - 9
> Black-throated Blue Warbler - 2
> Pine Warbler - 1
> Prairie Warbler - 1
> Eastern Towhee - 1
> Scarlet Tanager - 2
> Northern Cardinal - 6
> Common Grackle - 1
> American Goldfinch - 3
> House Sparrow - 5
>
>

.unc.edu







Subject: Latta Park - Mecklenburg County
From: TNT Sanders <tsanders1993 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 13:25:18 -0400
The day started out with good birds when we walked out the front door at 
sunrise this morning. Two Great Horned Owls were calling back and forth with a 
male doing its normal hoot and a female responding with a "squawk" 
call.Mid-morning I decided to stop by Latta Park in downtown Charlotte, a 
migration Hotspot in the spring but usually not quite as good in the fall. What 
a pleasant surprise to find 43 species including 13 warblers, you know your 
having a good morning when Chestnut-sided Warblers outnumber Chickadees!Tom 
Sanders, Charlotte NC 

Latta Park, Mecklenburg, US-NCSep 15, 2014 9:30 AM - 12:00 PMProtocol: 
Traveling1.0 mile(s)42 species (+1 other taxa)Mourning Dove - 4Yellow-billed 
Cuckoo - 1Chimney Swift - 3Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2Red-bellied Woodpecker 
- 3Downy Woodpecker - 4Northern Flicker - 1Eastern Wood-Pewee - 5Empidonax sp. 
- 2White-eyed Vireo - 2Yellow-throated Vireo - 1Red-eyed Vireo - 3Blue Jay - 
4American Crow - 2Carolina Chickadee - 8Tufted Titmouse - 6White-breasted 
Nuthatch - 3Brown-headed Nuthatch - 2Carolina Wren - 4Eastern Bluebird - 
2Swainson's Thrush - 1American Robin - 5Gray Catbird - 2Northern Mockingbird - 
1Blue-winged Warbler - 2Black-and-white Warbler - 4Tennessee Warbler - 
6American Redstart - 6Cape May Warbler - 2Northern Parula - 1Magnolia Warbler - 
4Bay-breasted Warbler - 1Blackburnian Warbler - 1Chestnut-sided Warbler - 
9Black-throated Blue Warbler - 2Pine Warbler - 1Prairie Warbler - 1Eastern 
Towhee - 1Scarlet Tanager - 2Northern Cardinal - 6Common Grackle - 1American 
Goldfinch - 3House Sparrow - 5 

 		 	   		  
Subject: Baltimore Oriole
From: "KC Foggin" <KCFoggin AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 13:08:22 -0400
A beautiful male Baltimore Oriole is here. 2 weeks earlier than previous years. 
So glad I put out the grape jelly yesterday just in case 


Now, if I can keep the raccoons off the feeder, I’ll be happy.


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20

Subject: Blue Ridge Birding at its Best this a.m.
From: william haddad <photobill9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 12:31:25 -0400
Great flocks of migrants from 7:30 to 10: am this morning at Hefner Gap:

Warblers:

1. Magnolia (6)
2. Chestnut-sided (7)
3. Black-throated Green (12)
4. Black-throated Blue (1)
5. Tennessee (4)
6. Am. Redstart (4)
7. Bay-breasted (2)
8. Black and White (2)
9. Nashville (2)
10. Blackburnian 3)
11. Parula (1)
12. Prairie
13. Common Yellowthroat
14. Hooded (this one was heard only)

Other birds seen included Scarlet Tanager (10 plus); Rose-breasted
Grosbeaks (5); Cardinal; Goldfinch; Wood Pewee; Downy Woodpecker; Hummers;
Brown Thrasher; Cedar Waxwings; Blue-gray Gnatcatchers; Blue Jay; C.
Chickadee, Indigo Bunting; Catbird, E. Towhee and White-eyed Vireo. Heard
only - Red-eyed Vireo, Am. Crow, White-breasted Nuthatch and Red-bellied
Woodpecker.

The birds of the day, in terms of how seldom I see them on Fall migration
at Hefner, were the Prairie Warbler and that White-eyed Vireo. The Vireo
was singing. Many of the Warblers were seen at eye level and fairly close.
Some were chasing insects down close to the ground. There were birds coming
over at, a little south and a good way north of the parking lot. As the
only birder there today I could only get good looks at a very small
percentage of the migrants. Hope there were more birders at Mitchell.

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, N.C.
Subject: Re: Preventing Window Collisions for Birds
From: Bill Ewald <wgewaldii AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 10:27:48 -0400
On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 10:19 AM, Shelley Theye  wrote:

>
>
>
>
> Another inexpensive solution is to just paint anything on the outside of
> your windows, use a water based art paint that can
> wash off when you want to remove easily, and make as simple or ornate as
> you like...we have done that on some upstairs windows that
> aren't visible from the front of our home in woods, and this method is
> very effective.


When I was a kid we painted (inside) our school windows on holidays with
tempura powdered paint mixed with Babbo soap powder before adding water.
Subject: Re: Preventing Window Collisions for Birds
From: Shelley Theye <veery AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 10:19:07 -0400
I have these decals on a number of windows. I believe they have to be spaced no 
more than 4" apart or so 

to be effective. I didn't even think about the UV in the decal eventually 
degrading, mine may be worthless now. 


The website suggests replacing them every 6-9 months. I have never replaced 
mine, and I think this would end up being pretty costly to maintain over the 
years. 


I took a look at the Window Alert website and see that they now offer a UV 
liquid too. 

They also offer a back light detector to test decals at night. I might test 
mine with a black light to see if they have any UV coating left. 


I think with the high cost of maintenance with UV decals, there are probably 
better methods out there for protecting window strikes for those with many 
larger windows, even though some are higher priced initially, like window 
screens, down the road there wouldn't be a continuous replacement cost like 
with the decals. 


Another inexpensive solution is to just paint anything on the outside of your 
windows, use a water based art paint that can 

wash off when you want to remove easily, and make as simple or ornate as you 
like...we have done that on some upstairs windows that 

aren't visible from the front of our home in woods, and this method is very 
effective. We do have nice size overhangs to protect from 

rain so I am not sure how long would last if you don't have good overhangs.

I believe even string or malar strips can just be suspended from an overhang 
too and be helpful. 


Last, I be sure that is you have windows on ends of your house that 'line up' 
with each other, that you somehow 

make a barrier, like closing a door, etc. partially, so it doesn't appear to 
the bird that they can fly through your house, 

at least during migration season..

Shelley

Shelley Theye
veery AT bellsouth.net
Chatham County, NC




On Sep 14, 2014, at 12:08 PM, Lynn Erla Beegle  wrote:

> Preventing Window Collisions for Birds: Regarding Window Strikes and
> Bird Mortality: Sorry to hear about the death of a warbler hitting a
> window, posted in the Sunday digest of carolina bird listserv. When a
> bird strikes a building or window, it is often a fatal encounter -
> even if the bird flies away, it may have brain damage. So prevention
> is the key. I recommend the small stickers/decals that are translucent
> to us, but glow in the U/V range to birds (I suppose it's some sort of
> ultraviolet purple that we can only imagine!)  I placed several of
> these stickers on my bay window and they work great.  You only need
> one U/V sticker on smaller windows. They can be purchased at your
> local bird-food store. The stickers go on the outside and should be
> replaced once a year. They don't harm the window nor are they
> distracting to you (although my hummingbirds tend to stare at them!)
> The web site  www.windowalert.com   is one company selling these
> stickers.  In addition to the article mentioned already (
> 
http://www.abcbirds.org/abcprograms/policy/collisions/pdf/collisions_flyer.pdf 

> ), another good article's link appears below (you may have to
> cut/paste the link, as I am in text-only mode). The article listed
> below describes a dozen products to reduce bird mortality from window
> strikes.
> 
http://www.birdwatchingdaily.com/featured-stories/15-products-that-prevent-windows-strikes/ 

> ***We hope you will encourage volunteers for a 'Lights Out' program
> near you - Wake Audubon has one in Raleigh, and there are active ones
> in many Carolina cities. Pairs of volunteers walk downtown early in
> the morning during migration to record where most of the bird
> collisions occur. Very good project if you want to help birds!
> http://bird-friendly.audubon.org/lightsout
> Good birding to you,
> Lynn Erla Beegle, Raleigh, NC
> Find us at Wake Audubon Society Meetup:
> http://www.meetup.com/Wake-Audubon-Meetup
Subject: Pre-dawn flight calls, Grey-cheeked Thrush
From: andrew thornton <andrew.k.thornton AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 06:58:04 -0400
Good morning,

Got up just a tad late for pre-dawn flight calls in my backyard this
morning, but still had the best flight I've heard so far, with a good
number of thrushes calling, including my first of fall Grey-cheeked Thrush.
 The crickets were deafening while trying to listen for birds, so I only
heard the louder calls, but here's the full ebird list:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19837754

Note, this is the Night Flight Call protocol, so these counts are numbers
of calls heard, not numbers of individual birds.

Andrew Thornton
Julian, NC
Subject: RE: Digest for carolinabirds - Mon, 15 Sep 2014
From: "Matt Curran" <mcurran1 AT nc.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 06:52:55 -0400
I want to a bird fest in Raleigh a few years ago and they were using old
cd's that were shiny.  You tie a string to them and hang them on your window
and it has worked pretty well.

Matt Curran
Raleigh, NC

-----Original Message-----
From: carolinabirds-request AT duke.edu [mailto:carolinabirds-request AT duke.edu]

Sent: Monday, September 15, 2014 6:00 AM
To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
Subject: Digest for carolinabirds - Mon, 15 Sep 2014

Table of contents:

1. Preventing Window Collisions for Birds - Lynn Erla Beegle
 2. Charlotte Migrants - "Ron" 
3. Orangeburg sod farms today - jcox3222 AT comcast.net 4. Hilton Pond 09/01/14
(New York Roadside Redux) - "Bill Hilton Jr."  5.
Red-headed Woodpeckers - "KC Foggin"  6. Duck, NC
migrants - Jeff Lewis  7. Possible Connecticut
Warbler at Grandfather Mountain - Jesse Pope 
8. Pilot Mountain Hawk Watch - Broad-winged Hawks - Philip Dickinson
 9. Barred Owl convention - 
10. Sandy Creek Park - Sept 14: Seven Warblers speices - Brendan Klick
 11. Townsend's  Warbler - Ryan Justice


Subject: Townsend's Warbler
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 00:07:08 -0400
Todd Acros had a Townsend's Warbler on the parkway just south of Richland 
Balsam on the 13th. Pics at CBC gallery, didn't think he was in the Carolina 
birds so I thought I'd mention it. 


Ryan Justice  

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Sandy Creek Park - Sept 14: Seven Warblers speices
From: Brendan Klick <brendan.klick AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 22:37:54 -0400
Seven warbler species this morning: American Redstart (3),
Yellow-breasted Chat (1), Magnolia (1),  Black-and-white (1), Prairie
(1), Bay-breasted (1), Common Yellowthroat (8) plus Scarlet Tanager
and Rose-breasted Grosbeak.

Brendan
Durham, NC
Subject: Barred Owl convention
From: <mtove AT deltaforce.net>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 21:34:54 -0400
There's 6, maybe 7 Barred Owls in my yard (not a big yard either) calling
back and forth at each other as I write. I've seen one or two before but
never anything close to that many at one time.

 

Mike Tove

Cary, NC 
Subject: Pilot Mountain Hawk Watch - Broad-winged Hawks
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 21:32:03 -0400
Despite cloudy conditions, light rains ended early and clouds elevated to
give us views of 270 Broad-winged Hawks, at least 3 Bald Eagles (one local),
2 Osprey sand our first Northern Harrier of the season. 133 of the
Broad-winged showed up in the 3-4 pm hour. When I arrived at 10 am, about
100 crows were interacting with a Cooper's, a Sharp-shinned and a Turkey
Vulture. It is rare to see the crows move as high up the mountain as they
were this morning. There also was a local family of 3 Red-tailed Hawks.
Likely more birds got by us beyond our effective binocular vision during the
hazier periods, but it was a good day of hawk-watching.

During the morning, I was capably assisted by Winton Poplin, an Elkin HS
senior working on a bird-study project. During the afternoon, we had a great
crew of experienced observers finding all the birds we did: Scott DePue,
John Haire, Killian Robinson, Kim Brand, Alan Firth, ranger Jesse Anderson
and his wife Shannon.

Phil Dickinson
Winston-Salem

Subject: Possible Connecticut Warbler at Grandfather Mountain
From: Jesse Pope <highcountrybirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 21:11:14 -0400
Hey folks,

Today was mostly a washout as far as the hawkwatch goes. We had heavy fog
most of the day, with a few hours of visibility to the west. While waiting
for the visibility to improve Richard and Janet Paulette and myself were at
the Half Moon overlook on Grandfather Mountain around 5:00pm and found a
small flock of migrants hanging out in the azaleas and rhododendron just
over the split rail fence. One of the birds we got very good looks at was
possibly a female or immature Connecticut warbler. We saw a larger warbler
with a thick bill, dark brown back and wings with no apparent wing bars or
anything else distinguishing on the back of the bird. The lower breast and
belly were very yellow, heavily contrasting with the darker brown body. The
bird had a thick eye ring, that was very noticeable and contrasting with
the darker brown body (Janet and I made the comment almost at the same time
as we were viewing the bird regarding the heavy eye ring). We saw a side
profile of the bird for a few brief seconds, then a rear view just before
it darted into the shrubs. From the rear view I could easily see the vent
and it seemed even more brilliantly yellow than the breast. The yellow
under tail coverts extended almost to the end of the tail making the tail
feathers appear stubby. The tail feathers were about the same color as the
body of the bird and nothing distinguishing about them either, creating a
great contrast to the yellow undertail coverts. The entire underneath of
the bird was very yellow, but did seem to be more yellow further back to
the vent area.  We never got good looks at the throat or front of the
breast, so I really don't have any information to share about it. After
reading in the guides about their behavior, that they walk more than hop,
we really didn't observe anything to noticable about the way it moved
through the shrubs. It did seem to hop from the exterior of the shrub to
the interior, we didn't recognize anything unusual about its movements. We
could see where it was hanging out for a good while, but it wasn't a clear
view. When it was out in the open we got good looks for 30-45 seconds
before it hoped back into the interior of the shrub. We were debating
between mourning and Connecticut but were certain the bird was very brown
on the body and also the remarkable eye ring that appeared entire,
not broken made us lean more toward Connecticut. Flipping through the guide
we really didn't see anything else that we felt fit this bird. This would
be a life bird for me! We didn't get a picture unfortunately, although I
hoped we would get another look and it never popped out again. An exciting
birding moment for sure! I have no experience with Connecticut warblers, so
I would love any feedback you have regarding this bird and my assumption
that this could be a Connecticut warbler. Thanks.

-- 
Jesse Pope

Newland, NC
828-898-3012
Subject: Duck, NC migrants
From: Jeff Lewis <jlewisbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 19:52:07 -0400
Birded the boardwalk in Duck, NC for an hour and a half this morning alone
and then again for a couple of hours this afternoon with Jim Gould, Bobby
Koch and Terri Kirby-Hathaway. Had a total of approx 75 warblers - 12
species: Northern Parula 25, American Redstart 25, Yellow Warbler 12,
Northern Waterthrush 2, Prairie Warbler 3, Black-throated Blue 1, Common
Yellowthroat 1, Magnolia Warbler 1, Bay-breasted Warbler 1, Black-and-white
Warbler 2, Yellow-throated Warbler 1, Blackpoll 1 (early). Also 20 or more
Baltimore Orioles and one Red-eyed Vireo.
Fun!

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

Subject: Red-headed Woodpeckers
From: "KC Foggin" <KCFoggin AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 16:05:35 -0400
I’ve still got 3 Red-headed Woodpeckers coming to the suet feeders. Usually 
they are gone by now. Sure not complaining though. 


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20

Subject: Hilton Pond 09/01/14 (New York Roadside Redux)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT hiltonpond.org>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 15:53:42 -0400
In late August I wandered north for several reasons, eventually alighting on 
the shores of the St. Lawrence River--a special locale I've never visited in 
late summer. As the 1-7 Sep 2014 installment of "This week at Hilton Pond" I 
offer a photo essay about the proliferation of roadside flora I found in and 
around Morristown NY. To view, please visit 
http://hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140901.html (Note also my mention of the variety 
of pollinators that assure the plants' productivity.) 


While there don't forget to scroll down for a list of birds banded during the 
period--including a big bunch of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. 


Happy (Late Summer) Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============
Subject: Orangeburg sod farms today
From: jcox3222 AT comcast.net
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 19:44:33 +0000 (UTC)
I did an impromptu trip to Santee NWR this morning; things were very quiet 
there so I went over to the main sod farm off of Hwy 301 where I ran into Irvin 
Pitts and Lewis Burke. They were on a white rumped sandpiper (appeared to be a 
juvenile bird), several kiildeer and yellow legs. The fields were quiet wet 
with lots of standing water but not many birds; we figured that they may have 
left with the storms that impacted the area on Friday and Saturday. We did have 
a large flock of bobolinks (300-350 birds) fly over and we had a female harrier 
and juvenile red tailed hawk. 

I checked out Bookhardt farm, where Lake Bookhardt is again present (as it was 
last fall) but again there were few birds. A few pectoral, least and solitary 
sandpipers and a few more yellowlegs were all that I could find. There is a lot 
of water on the farms so many newly arriving birds over the next week should 
have good habitat. 

  
John Cox 
Mount Pleasant, SC 
  
Subject: Charlotte Migrants
From: "Ron" <waxwing AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 15:24:16 -0400
Jim Guyton and I found these at Ribbonwalk Nature Preserve this morning. 40 
species total.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn.   NC

Chimney Swift  5
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  5
Eastern Wood-Pewee  4
Empidonax sp.  1
White-eyed Vireo  3
Yellow-throated Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  8
Swainson's Thrush  1
Gray Catbird  3
Ovenbird  2
Worm-eating Warbler  1
Black-and-white Warbler  1
Tennessee Warbler  1
Hooded Warbler  2
American Redstart  12
Northern Parula  1
Magnolia Warbler  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Scarlet Tanager  3
Baltimore Oriole  1
Subject: Preventing Window Collisions for Birds
From: Lynn Erla Beegle <optmystc1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 12:08:07 -0400
Preventing Window Collisions for Birds: Regarding Window Strikes and
Bird Mortality: Sorry to hear about the death of a warbler hitting a
window, posted in the Sunday digest of carolina bird listserv. When a
bird strikes a building or window, it is often a fatal encounter -
even if the bird flies away, it may have brain damage. So prevention
is the key. I recommend the small stickers/decals that are translucent
to us, but glow in the U/V range to birds (I suppose it's some sort of
ultraviolet purple that we can only imagine!)  I placed several of
these stickers on my bay window and they work great.  You only need
one U/V sticker on smaller windows. They can be purchased at your
local bird-food store. The stickers go on the outside and should be
replaced once a year. They don't harm the window nor are they
distracting to you (although my hummingbirds tend to stare at them!)
The web site  www.windowalert.com   is one company selling these
stickers.  In addition to the article mentioned already (
http://www.abcbirds.org/abcprograms/policy/collisions/pdf/collisions_flyer.pdf
 ), another good article's link appears below (you may have to
cut/paste the link, as I am in text-only mode). The article listed
below describes a dozen products to reduce bird mortality from window
strikes.

http://www.birdwatchingdaily.com/featured-stories/15-products-that-prevent-windows-strikes/ 

***We hope you will encourage volunteers for a 'Lights Out' program
near you - Wake Audubon has one in Raleigh, and there are active ones
in many Carolina cities. Pairs of volunteers walk downtown early in
the morning during migration to record where most of the bird
collisions occur. Very good project if you want to help birds!
http://bird-friendly.audubon.org/lightsout
Good birding to you,
Lynn Erla Beegle, Raleigh, NC
Find us at Wake Audubon Society Meetup:
http://www.meetup.com/Wake-Audubon-Meetup
Subject: Lake Crabtree - Sept 13: Nine Warblers and 3 Vireo species
From: Brendan Klick <brendan.klick AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 22:36:24 -0400
Nine warblers today from 3-5 pm: American Redstart (12), Northern
Parula (1), Chestnut-sided (1), Worm-eating (1),  Magnolia (1),
Black-and-white (10), Hooded (2), Pine (8) Warbler plus a single
Yellow-throated, and numerous White-eyed and Red-eyed Vireos.

Brendan
Durham, NC
Subject: South Carolina Upstate Birding
From: Pamela Ford <jford6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 21:56:51 -0400
Aija Konrad and I chased birds yesterday and today in the Upstate. Yesterday, 
we used Nate Dias helpful directions to hit 2 Chestnut-sided warblers in 
Cleveland at N.River Rd and Middle Saluda River. We later went up the mountain 
to Caesar's Head to watch 2 Ravens perform aerial acrobatics and loudly croak 
directly in front of us at the lookout. It's a wonder I didn't swallow my 
tongue from Joy! Than Aija found a female Rose breasted Grosbeak in the parking 
lot. Today we enjoyed a bird walk lead by Scott Davis at the Botanical Gardens 
in Clemson. 

Here is where we had the magic! There is a Hackberry Tree in the parking lot in 
front of the Geology Museum, it held all the action! We named it the Giving 
Tree, as we had more Chestnut Sided, Cape May, Prairie, Tennessee, and behind 
it in a row of mixed hard woods, we had Black an White, Parula's, Magnolia, and 
the star of the day BLACKBURNIAN that was in breeding plumage! 

Kevin DeBoer, from Charleston helped pish the birds down, and we had a Vireo 
that could be a possible Warbling or Philadelphia, to be decided by Kevin, when 
he comes down from the mountains. 

Pam Ford
Charleston

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Connecticut Warbler off Hatteras today
From: Scott Winton <scott.winton AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 21:26:51 -0400
While we were running back in this afternoon a Connecticut Warbler came in
close alongside the Stormy Petrel II.  Luckily an out-of-state birder had
the quick reflexes to get a diagnostic photo.  This was well within sight
of land a few miles SSE of the cape.  It was a pretty quick encounter, so
unfortunately not that many people were able to see it.

The most recent Connecticut Warbler ebird record for coastal NC is from
Oct. 2011.

Other warblers heard or seen offshore today: Black-throated Blue, Ovenbird,
Magnolia, Redstart, Bay/Poll

No unusual seabirds or eurasian vagrants, but Black-capped Petrels and
Sooty Terns were out in force.

-- 
Scott Winton - Durham, NC
http://birdaholic.blogspot.com
Subject: Also Least Flycatcher Re: Patriot's Point, Mount Pleasant, SC
From: Nate Dias <offshorebirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 21:01:17 -0400
John Cox and I birded Patriots Point from about 7:30-8:30 this morning
before heading to Fort Moultrie due to slow action (which was kind of
expected given the weather lately).

Best bird was a Least Flycatcher around the former brush pile location
that we got to see multiple times.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Saturday, September 13, 2014, Craig  wrote:

> I birded Patriot's Point in Mount Pleasant, SC this morning, I met a few
> new folks, Bob and Jim, and saw some others I recognized, but they were
> leaving.  It was very hot and humid, but the activity picked up around
> 930am.  I had bunches of Northern Waterthrushes, Red-eyed Vireos,
> hummingbirds, only a few warblers; Black-and White, Prairie, Common
> Yellowthroat, American Redstart (male).  One of the best treats was a
> Barred Owl right on the trail near the second tower.  There was also some
> Painted Buntings  in a group.  Most of the action was in the treeline and
> edge near the old brushpile location, and near the powerline with all of
> the morning glory blooming.  This is where the Veery's and hummingbirds
> were, and the flycatchers, vireos, buntings and warblers.
>
> Craig Watson
> Mount Pleasant, SC
>
> Sent from my iPad
Subject: Wilson's Plover, Clemson, SC
From: Steve Patterson <scbirder AT aol.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 20:18:44 -0400
Andy Norris, Debra Patterson, and I found a Wilson's Plover in the plowed field 
at the aquaculture center in Clemson late this morning. This is the same field 
where a Wilson's Phalarope was seen by several observers Tuesday through Friday 
of this week. The plover -- studied easily and well to rule out the more 
probable Semipalmated Plover -- was near the many Killdeer also occupying the 
area. Also at the same place yesterday, but gone today, were Lesser Yellowlegs, 
Semipalmated Sandpiper, and (reported by others) a Stilt Sandpiper. 







Steve Patterson
Camden, SC
Subject: Pilot Mountain Hawk Watch
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 20:04:01 -0400
The skies broke open about 1 pm, so we were able to watch for some raptors
this afternoon. About 2:30, a Peregrine Falcon came out of the north, flew
about 20 feet over our heads and kept on going. About 4:30, about 120
vultures took off from big pinnacle and sure enough a mature eagle came up
from behind the pinnacle and then moved around the north slope toward the
west. Other migrants were a Sharp-shinned and 3 Broad-winged. Another
highlight was 4 ravens cavorting over the pinnacle at the same time. Hopeful
that this front will bring some birds down the pipeline in the next day or
two; there were good reports in PA on Friday.

Phil Dickinson
Winston-Salem

Subject: Patriot's Point, Mount Pleasant, SC
From: Craig <jcraigw1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 19:49:11 -0400
I birded Patriot's Point in Mount Pleasant, SC this morning, I met a few new 
folks, Bob and Jim, and saw some others I recognized, but they were leaving. It 
was very hot and humid, but the activity picked up around 930am. I had bunches 
of Northern Waterthrushes, Red-eyed Vireos, hummingbirds, only a few warblers; 
Black-and White, Prairie, Common Yellowthroat, American Redstart (male). One of 
the best treats was a Barred Owl right on the trail near the second tower. 
There was also some Painted Buntings in a group. Most of the action was in the 
treeline and edge near the old brushpile location, and near the powerline with 
all of the morning glory blooming. This is where the Veery's and hummingbirds 
were, and the flycatchers, vireos, buntings and warblers. 


Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Dare County, NC migrants
From: Jeff Lewis <jlewisbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 19:37:58 -0400
Today birded Pea Island, my Roanoke Island yard and the Duck Boardwalk.
While slow, here are some totals: American Redstart 10, Yellow Warbler 3,
Prothonotary 1, Prairie Warbler 1, Northern Waterthrush 4, Red-eyed Vireo
1, Baltimore Oriole 3, Eastern Kingbird 1, and a FOS Red-breasted Nuthatch,
spotted by Jim Gould.

Shorebirds were present in low numbers at Pea Island today.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

Subject: Re: Lovely migrant, but sad ending
From: Nate Dias <offshorebirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 19:31:48 -0400
Here's hoping y'all take steps to make that window bird-safe, so that
Black-and-white Warbler is the last bird it kills.

Window netting would be the surest thing, or UV film as a second choice.

More info here:

http://www.abcbirds.org/abcprograms/policy/collisions/pdf/collisions_flyer.pdf

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Saturday, September 13, 2014, Carol Chelette  wrote:

> Heard a bird hit a sun room window this afternoon. It was a beautiful
> black and white warbler. Time in the safe, quiet brown bag was unsuccessful
> for recovery. But to hold that exquisite little one in my hand and marvel
> over it with my husband was very special.
>
> Carol Chelette
> Durham, NC
>
Subject: Lovely migrant, but sad ending
From: Carol Chelette <cncbrdr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 17:45:01 -0400
Heard a bird hit a sun room window this afternoon. It was a beautiful black
and white warbler. Time in the safe, quiet brown bag was unsuccessful for
recovery. But to hold that exquisite little one in my hand and marvel over
it with my husband was very special.

Carol Chelette
Durham, NC
Subject: Figure 8
From: Derb Carter <derbc AT selcnc.org>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 20:19:29 +0000
Sorry, Figure 8 is the island north of Wrightsville Beach NC. I just returned 
from the inlet again and did not see the Buff-breasted but it is low tide and 
the shorebirds are scattered. I will check again tomorrow. 


Derb Carter

Subject: Least Flycatcher, some warblers, Charlotte, NC area
From: Kevin Metcalf <skermetcalf AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 16:18:24 -0400
Finally saw a nice collection of fall migrants this morning at Cowans Ford 
Wildlife Refuge in NW Mecklenburg County, NC. Best find locally was a LEAST 
FLYCATCHER. Although this species is common west of here, and probably more 
common as a migrant north of here and along the coast, my experience in the 
Charlotte region is that they are tough to find. In fact this is the first I 
have ID'd in the Charlotte region in seven years of birding the area. Until 
today I had seen more Kirtlands Warblers (1), Western Kingbirds, Lapland 
Longspurs, Purple Gallinules and Sabines Gulls, to name a few species, in 
Mecklenburg County than Least Flycatchers. 


Other birds of interest were: 

Yellow-billed Cuckoo (3)
White-eyed Vireo (3 - all singing)
Yellow-throated Vireo (2)
Red-eyed Vireo (5+)
Eastern Wood-Pewee (5+)
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe
Veery
Prairie Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
American Redstart
Magnolia Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Canada Warbler
Pine Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Yellow-breasted Chat
Summer Tanager
Scarlet Tanager
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Baltimore Oriole

Kevin Metcalf
Huntersville, NC
Subject: Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Pomarine Jaeger
From: Mike Judd <ebwilderae AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 15:08:49 -0400
Thanks for asking Jerry I am sure you and I are not the only ones not
knowing.  Some birding lists urge correspondents
to include a county name in the header and their name and town address for
a signature to make the list more valuable for newbies, folks visiting an
area and those of us who come and go to an area from time to time (and
suffering gray matter
age issues such as I).  The fumiest ones on this list are the notes about
the various birds in one's yard.

Mike Judd
Brevard, NC

On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 3:01 PM, JerryK  wrote:

> Where is figure 8 island, and what state please? (Not trying to be
> sarcastic).  I've never seen the Buff-breasted....
> Jerry Kerschner
> Pawleys Island, SC
>
>
> -----Original Message----- From: Derb Carter
> Sent: Saturday, September 13, 2014 12:45 PM
> To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
> Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Pomarine Jaeger
>
> Lots of shorebirds at Rich Inlet on the north end of Figure 8 Island this
> morning including a Buff-breasted Sandpiper and 33 Piping Plovers.  An
> immature Pomarine Jaeger was sitting on the beach and flying around the
> inlet.
>
> Derb Carter
>
>
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8202 - Release Date: 09/12/14
>
>
Subject: Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Pomarine Jaeger
From: Jamie Adams <Jamie.Adams AT quintiles.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 15:08:16 -0400
Private island in NC. Unless you know someone or have a boat your better off 
going to Orangburg sod farm or some other place. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 13, 2014, at 3:01 PM, "JerryK"  wrote:
> 
> Where is figure 8 island, and what state please? (Not trying to be 
> sarcastic).  I've never seen the Buff-breasted....
> Jerry Kerschner
> Pawleys Island, SC
> 
> 
> -----Original Message----- 
> From: Derb Carter
> Sent: Saturday, September 13, 2014 12:45 PM
> To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
> Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Pomarine Jaeger
> 
> Lots of shorebirds at Rich Inlet on the north end of Figure 8 Island this 
> morning including a Buff-breasted Sandpiper and 33 Piping Plovers.  An 
> immature Pomarine Jaeger was sitting on the beach and flying around the 
> inlet.
> 
> Derb Carter
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8202 - Release Date: 09/12/14
> 

**********************  IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ  ************************
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Subject: Re: Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Pomarine Jaeger
From: "JerryK" <bogey AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 15:01:40 -0400
Where is figure 8 island, and what state please? (Not trying to be 
sarcastic).  I've never seen the Buff-breasted....
Jerry Kerschner
Pawleys Island, SC


-----Original Message----- 
From: Derb Carter
Sent: Saturday, September 13, 2014 12:45 PM
To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Pomarine Jaeger

Lots of shorebirds at Rich Inlet on the north end of Figure 8 Island this 
morning including a Buff-breasted Sandpiper and 33 Piping Plovers.  An 
immature Pomarine Jaeger was sitting on the beach and flying around the 
inlet.

Derb Carter




-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8202 - Release Date: 09/12/14
Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Pomarine Jaeger
From: Derb Carter <derbc AT selcnc.org>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 16:45:16 +0000
Lots of shorebirds at Rich Inlet on the north end of Figure 8 Island this 
morning including a Buff-breasted Sandpiper and 33 Piping Plovers. An immature 
Pomarine Jaeger was sitting on the beach and flying around the inlet. 


Derb Carter

Subject: Great Machipongo Crab Shack
From: Tom <tledford1207 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 10:44:17 -0400
Just thought that I would pass this along to anyone who may be birding the 
Virginia Eastern Shore. My wife and I were in that area last week and found the 
Great Machipongo Crab Shack near Exmore, VA. Good food at reasonable prices and 
they are very birder friendly. 


Sent from my iPhone