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Updated on Saturday, March 7 at 09:56 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Rufous-tailed Plantcutter,©Sophie Webb

7 Mar Correction: White-tailed Kite at Bear Island [Carl Miller ]
7 Mar WHITE-TAILED KITE at Bear Island WMA, Colleton Co., SC [Will Cook ]
7 Mar Re: MIKI at Bear Island this afternoon [Carl Miller ]
7 Mar Re: MIKI at Bear Island this afternoon [Jack Rogers ]
7 Mar Re: MIKI at Bear Island this afternoon [Ryan Justice ]
7 Mar MIKI at Bear Island this afternoon [Carl Miller ]
7 Mar Well, I guess it's official [KC Foggin ]
7 Mar Little Gull at Cape Point [Brian Patteson ]
7 Mar Looking at Ruff now at Santee Coastal Reserve [Nate Dias ]
7 Mar Ruff location at Santee Coastal Reserve [Steve Thomas ]
06 Mar 78 Years Ago Today [Lena Gallitano ]
06 Mar White-winged Scoter [Philip Dickinson ]
06 Mar Re: Granville county tree swallows [Philip Dickinson ]
6 Mar Re: Granville county tree swallows [Jan Fowler ]
6 Mar Ruff, Santee Coastal Reserve impoundments [Steve Thomas ]
6 Mar Re: Granville county tree swallows ["Ron" ]
6 Mar Granville county tree swallows [Bb ]
6 Mar Rufous Hummingbird RUHU ["Buddy Campbell" ]
6 Mar Re: The Osprey are here! [Jim Gould ]
6 Mar FW: eBird Report - 28560 New Bern, Mar 6, 2015 ["Olwen jarvis" ]
6 Mar F.O.S. Osprey Durham NC 3/5/15 [Patrick Coin ]
6 Mar White-winged Scoters Wrightsville Beach, NC [Jamie Adams ]
5 Mar Re: The Osprey are here! [Beth Garver ]
5 Mar Re: Eagle threat [Patricia Tice ]
5 Mar RE: Student fieldtrip question - Atlantic Beach area [Jamie Adams ]
5 Mar Student fieldtrip question - Atlantic Beach area [Quent Lupton ]
05 Mar Re: Pine Siskins On HHI []
5 Mar Re: "can't miss" MIKI sites? [Ryan Justice ]
5 Mar Re: The Osprey are here! [Christine Stoughton-Root ]
5 Mar The Osprey are here! ["Olwen jarvis" ]
5 Mar Re: Pine Siskins On HHI [Brian Pendergraft ]
5 Mar Re: Pine Siskins On HHI ["KC Foggin" ]
05 Mar "can't miss" MIKI sites? []
5 Mar Rusty Blackbirds at Pinewood Lake []
5 Mar Pine Siskins On HHI []
4 Mar Greensboro Common Goldeneye, Common Merganser, W-w Scoters, more [andrew thornton ]
4 Mar Re: Painted Bunting . . . Roxbury Park [Bradley Dalton ]
4 Mar RE: Painted Bunting . . . Roxbury Park [Aaron Given ]
4 Mar Three Greater White-fronted Geese in 3 Different Counties in One Week [Dwayne Martin ]
4 Mar Call for Winter '14-'15 Bird Reports for the "Briefs for the Files" and "N.A. Birds" [Josh Southern ]
04 Mar Sorry... []
04 Mar FWD: Fwd: Vote for Your Favorite Wildlife Refuge! []
4 Mar Re: Sighting of Redpoll in SC [Susan Audé ]
4 Mar Painted Bunting . . . Roxbury Park [Ken Carman ]
4 Mar Hilton Pond 03/15/15 (South Carolina's NEW State Tree) ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
4 Mar Redpoll Southern Shores, NC [Jamie Adams ]
3 Mar Sighting of Redpoll in SC [Susan Aude ]
3 Mar Smithsonian Neighborhood Nestwatch [Alicia Bachman ]
3 Mar 5 Great Cormorants at New River Inlet, NC [Gilbert Grant ]
3 Mar Ipswich Sparrows on Onslow Beach, NC [Gilbert Grant ]
3 Mar Bluebird Question [Gretchen Schramm ]
3 Mar Rusty Blackbirds, etc. Durham 3/3/15 [Patrick Coin ]
3 Mar next birding walk at Francis Beidler Forest (Dorchester County, SC) - this Saturday ["Johnson, Matthew" ]
02 Mar Drilling Forum & Yard Birds [Lena Gallitano ]
2 Mar Re: Field guide for Mexico - question ["Herbert, Teri Lynn" ]
02 Mar Cheek Mountain immature Golden Eagle still around... []
02 Mar Flagged Red Knot on North Topsail Beach, NC ["gilbert grant" ]
2 Mar Re: Huntington Beach State Park SC [Ryan Justice ]
2 Mar Razorbill DOB North Topsail Beach, NC [Gilbert Grant ]
2 Mar Reminder: Meck Audubon March Meeting this Thursday 3/05: The Nature Conservancy - Bird Habitat and Mitigating Climate Change [Christy Hill ]
02 Mar Huntington Beach State Park trip offering (April 10-12) []
2 Mar Huntington Beach State Park SC [Ryan Justice ]
2 Mar Leucistic Goldfinch? [KC Foggin ]
2 Mar Re: special yard visitor [Helmut Mueller ]
1 Mar Showdown between Cooper's Hawk and downy []
01 Mar RE: Eagle threat []
01 Mar Eagle threat [Philip Dickinson ]
2 Mar Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz: Opening Day [John Quinn ]
1 Mar Great yard bird! And a couple other really sucky encounters... [Clyde Sorenson ]
1 Mar special yard visitor []
1 Mar Re: White-winged Crossbill at a Chapel Hill, NC , feeder (2 weeks ago) [Harry LeGrand ]
1 Mar Rusty Blackbird Blitz in Richland County []
1 Mar Common Mergansers in Madison County [Jim Petranka ]
01 Mar White-winged Scoters at Lake Crabtree, Swarovski Scope for Sale [Ken Lady ]
1 Mar Re: Where are the Red-necked Grebes? [Ken Yount ]
1 Mar RE: Where are the Red-necked Grebes? [Paul Glass ]

Subject: Correction: White-tailed Kite at Bear Island
From: Carl Miller <twobicycles AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 21:24:43 -0500
Birders,

Please forgive my bogus ID of the MIKI earlier.  I had never even heard of
a white-tailed kite before and failed to correctly ID it when I saw one.
My email blew up VERY shortly after I posted my list with messages letting
me know of my error.  Thank you to all who contacted me!  I'm pretty
excited about this life bird!!

Again the images that I shot of the bird are posted along with my corrected
eBird list here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22221517

Carl Miller
Charleston, SC
Subject: WHITE-TAILED KITE at Bear Island WMA, Colleton Co., SC
From: Will Cook <cwcook AT duke.edu>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 21:17:01 -0500
Amazing find - congrats! Changing the subject line in case people are 
skimming messages too quickly...

On 3/7/2015 9:08 PM, Carl Miller wrote:
> Thanks Steve!  This is a life bird for me!  I've never heard of
> white-tailed kite in SC before and didn't even consider it when I marked
> the ID.  I'll amend my eBird list.
>
> Carl Miller
> Charleston, SC
>
>
>
> On Sat, Mar 7, 2015 at 9:02 PM, Stephen Barlow
>  > wrote:
>
>     Isn't this in fact a White-tailed Kite?!
>     Remarkable, but prob no more so than a MIKI in March!
>     Cheers
>     Steve Barlow
>
>     On Mar 7, 2015, at 8:56 PM, Carl Miller      > wrote:
>
>>     Imagine my surprise to see a Mississippi Kite in the field across
>>     from the DNR buildings at the end of Mary's House Pond late this
>>     afternoon!!  I've got a couple of decent shots on my eBird List.
>>
>>     http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22221517
>>
>>     Carl Miller
>>     Charleston, SC
>>
>>
>
>     Stephen Barlow,
>     Principal Research Scientist,
>     School of Chemistry and Biochemistry,
>     Georgia Institute of Technology,
>     Atlanta GA 30332-0400, USA
>     phone: 404-385-6053 
>     fax: 404-894-5909 
>     email: stephen.barlow AT chemistry.gatech.edu
>     
>
>

-- 
Will Cook - Durham, NC
http://www.carolinanature.com
Subject: Re: MIKI at Bear Island this afternoon
From: Carl Miller <twobicycles AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 21:08:38 -0500
Thanks Steve!  This is a life bird for me!  I've never heard of
white-tailed kite in SC before and didn't even consider it when I marked
the ID.  I'll amend my eBird list.

Carl Miller
Charleston, SC



On Sat, Mar 7, 2015 at 9:02 PM, Stephen Barlow <
stephen.barlow AT chemistry.gatech.edu> wrote:

> Isn't this in fact a White-tailed Kite?!
> Remarkable, but prob no more so than a MIKI in March!
> Cheers
> Steve Barlow
>
> On Mar 7, 2015, at 8:56 PM, Carl Miller  wrote:
>
> Imagine my surprise to see a Mississippi Kite in the field across from the
> DNR buildings at the end of Mary's House Pond late this afternoon!!  I've
> got a couple of decent shots on my eBird List.
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22221517
>
> Carl Miller
> Charleston, SC
>
>
>
> Stephen Barlow,
> Principal Research Scientist,
> School of Chemistry and Biochemistry,
> Georgia Institute of Technology,
> Atlanta GA 30332-0400, USA
> phone: 404-385-6053
> fax: 404-894-5909
> email: stephen.barlow AT chemistry.gatech.edu
>
>
Subject: Re: MIKI at Bear Island this afternoon
From: Jack Rogers <jack AT 4rogers.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 21:06:57 -0500
I agree with Ryan, this is a White-tailed Kite!!! Awesome find!!
On Mar 7, 2015 9:04 PM, "Ryan Justice"  wrote:

> Ummmmm..... Is that not a White-tailed Kite???
>
> Ryan Justice
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Mar 7, 2015, at 8:56 PM, Carl Miller  wrote:
>
> Imagine my surprise to see a Mississippi Kite in the field across from the
> DNR buildings at the end of Mary's House Pond late this afternoon!!  I've
> got a couple of decent shots on my eBird List.
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22221517
>
> Carl Miller
> Charleston, SC
>
>
>
Subject: Re: MIKI at Bear Island this afternoon
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 21:03:24 -0500
Ummmmm..... Is that not a White-tailed Kite???

Ryan Justice 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 7, 2015, at 8:56 PM, Carl Miller  wrote:
> 
> Imagine my surprise to see a Mississippi Kite in the field across from the 
DNR buildings at the end of Mary's House Pond late this afternoon!! I've got a 
couple of decent shots on my eBird List. 

> 
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22221517
> 
> Carl Miller
> Charleston, SC
> 
> 
Subject: MIKI at Bear Island this afternoon
From: Carl Miller <twobicycles AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 20:56:55 -0500
Imagine my surprise to see a Mississippi Kite in the field across from the
DNR buildings at the end of Mary's House Pond late this afternoon!!  I've
got a couple of decent shots on my eBird List.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22221517

Carl Miller
Charleston, SC
Subject: Well, I guess it's official
From: KC Foggin <kcfoggin AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 12:42:23 -0500
The last two days a Carolina Chickadee has been carrying nesting material
into the Bluebird box.  Spring is on its way :)

K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages
Subject: Little Gull at Cape Point
From: Brian Patteson <patteson1 AT embarqmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 12:03:27 -0500
I was at Cape Point a couple of hours ago and met a visiting birder who spotted 
a first winter Little Gull among a flock of Boneys that were ashore in the 
shallow pond between the dunes and the tip. We were able to get a few photos of 
the bird w/o disturbing the flock. There was just a modest number of Boneys in 
the area compared to what were seeing a couple of weeks ago. The satellite 
photos shows a hard change (temp break) about 12 to 15 miles off the point and 
it is probably loaded w/ Boneys and phalaropes. 


Brian Patteson
Hatteras
Subject: Looking at Ruff now at Santee Coastal Reserve
From: Nate Dias <offshorebirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 08:58:57 -0500
Frank Lawkins and I are looking at Steve and Barbara Thomas' red Ruff now
at Santee Coastal Reserve.  Same area as they had it.
Subject: Ruff location at Santee Coastal Reserve
From: Steve Thomas <stype AT sccoast.net>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 07:11:52 -0500
Birders,

My apologies for not being more specific regarding the exact site of the Ruff 
at Santee Coastal Reserve yesterday. Since the bird flew in with a flock of 
very active Lesser Yellowlegs and then departed with them - and because there 
were very few shorebirds there at all - I was thinking that checking out the 
shorebird groups present, wherever they appeared would be the best course of 
action for relocating the Ruff. 


That being said, after you pass the gate where you used to be able to park - 
now there's a picnic table - Something "Hall Road," I think, intersects there. 

Third impoundment on the right.  

Sorry to be late,
Steve Thomas
Aynor, SC
Subject: 78 Years Ago Today
From: Lena Gallitano <lbg AT ncsu.edu>
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2015 22:08:21 -0500
Good evening Carolinabirders,

This anniversary almost slipped by and would have if Wake Audubon 
president Rick LaRose had not been searching for some history on the 
bird club that proceeded Wake Audubon today at the Museum of Natural 
Sciences.  Wake Audubon is celebrating its 40th Anniversary this year.  
Here is what Rick found from the Carolina Bird Club History:

The North Carolina Bird Club was started in 1937 at a meeting of the 
Raleigh Natural History Club when John H. Grey suggested that anyone 
interested in forming a bird club should stay after the meeting to 
discuss the possibility. Seven people stayed including: H. H. Brimley, 
C. S. Brimley, Harry T. Davis, Dr. Cary Bostonian, Charlotte Hilton 
Green, and one other person whose name was not recorded. These seven 
people decided that the first meeting of the North Carolina Bird Club 
would take place on March 6, 1937 in Raleigh. Seventy-five people 
attended from all areas of the state of North Carolina. They decided 
that they would form a club open to anyone interested in birding or 
conservation, to scientists and amateurs. The North Carolina Bird Club 
also decided at the first meeting that they would put out a bulletin 
called /The Chat, /named//after the Yellow Breasted Chat.


1948: The North Carolina Bird Club was contacted by the South Carolina 
Naturalist Club and asked if they would be interested in banding 
together to form one club between the two states. The two clubs banded 
together to form the Carolina Bird Club. One club member described them 
as being, “joined in holy bird-lock.”


Happy Anniversary Carolina Bird Club!!

Lena

-- 
Lena Gallitano
Raleigh, NC
Subject: White-winged Scoter
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2015 18:35:10 -0500
A White-winged Scoter this afternoon at the Paschal "Pat" Swann Water
Treatment Plant in Lewisville appeared to be a first-winter male, much like
the 3 that John Haire saw at Archie Elledge last Saturday.

Phil Dickiinson
Winston-Salem

Subject: Re: Granville county tree swallows
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2015 17:54:58 -0500
They have arrived in Forsyth County, too. Seven or eight at Brookberry Farm
pond.

Phil Dickinson
Winston-Salem

From:  Jan Fowler 
Date:  Friday, March 6, 2015 5:44 PM
To:  Ron 
Cc:  Brian Bockhahn , Carolinabirds

Subject:  Re: Granville county tree swallows

I had 5 in Cabarrus County this afternoon.

Jan Fowler
Concord, NC

On Fri, Mar 6, 2015 at 4:47 PM, Ron  wrote:
> Two of us saw five in Mecklenburg County this morning.
> 
> Ron Clark
> Kings Mtn.  NC
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message----- From: Bb
> Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 4:38 PM
> To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
> Subject: Granville county tree swallows
> 
> Group of 3 in flight at roadside pond in granville near wake county line. 
Good 

> sign of pre-spring.
> 
> Brian Bockhahn
> Durham NC= 



-- 
Lights Out Charlotte- Give a bird just one more day. Visit www.meckbirds.org


Subject: Re: Granville county tree swallows
From: Jan Fowler <janmfowler AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 17:44:47 -0500
I had 5 in Cabarrus County this afternoon.

Jan Fowler
Concord, NC

On Fri, Mar 6, 2015 at 4:47 PM, Ron  wrote:

> Two of us saw five in Mecklenburg County this morning.
>
> Ron Clark
> Kings Mtn.  NC
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message----- From: Bb
> Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 4:38 PM
> To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
> Subject: Granville county tree swallows
>
> Group of 3 in flight at roadside pond in granville near wake county line.
> Good sign of pre-spring.
>
> Brian Bockhahn
> Durham NC=
>



-- 
Lights Out Charlotte- Give a bird just one more day. Visit www.meckbirds.org
Subject: Ruff, Santee Coastal Reserve impoundments
From: Steve Thomas <stype AT sccoast.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 17:28:39 -0500
Today Barbara and I went to the Santee Coastal Reserve hoping to see the 
Eurasian Widgeon, but we couldn't find it. However, at about noon a flock of 
Lesser Yellowlegs landed in front of us on one of the impoundments. As we 
looked through the flock we found a bird that was different enough to draw our 
attention. 

This bird was about the size of a Greater Yellowlegs, but with a shorter 
slightly downturned bill. Its back was distinctly patterned and reddish (a 
"pine straw color"), and its breast was generally the same color without 
patterning. The most distinct feature of this bird was its long, bright orange 
legs. It fed actively, moving among the yellowlegs. 

Our determination is that this was a juvenile (by coloration) Ruff (male, based 
on size). 


Other good birds included a couple of American Bitterns, Glossy Ibis, White 
Pelicans, Wood Storks. 


Steve Thomas
Aynor, SC
Subject: Re: Granville county tree swallows
From: "Ron" <waxwing AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 16:47:02 -0500
Two of us saw five in Mecklenburg County this morning.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn.  NC




-----Original Message----- 
From: Bb
Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 4:38 PM
To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
Subject: Granville county tree swallows

Group of 3 in flight at roadside pond in granville near wake county line. 
Good sign of pre-spring.

Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC= 
Subject: Granville county tree swallows
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 16:38:01 -0500
Group of 3 in flight at roadside pond in granville near wake county line. Good 
sign of pre-spring. 


Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: Rufous Hummingbird RUHU
From: "Buddy Campbell" <blacksnake6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 16:28:28 -0500
The Rufous Hummingbird that has over wintered on Ladys Island
was seen yesterday. He has been here since October.

Buddy Campbell
Ladys Island
Beaufort, SC
Subject: Re: The Osprey are here!
From: Jim Gould <jgouldoz AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 13:47:41 -0500
Indeed, the Osprey are here!  I just saw an Osprey fly over US-158 near
Shores Avenue in Currituck County, NC  Now, if only the 30 mph north winds
would back off and the thermometer would get above 32 degrees.


On Thu, Mar 5, 2015 at 7:44 PM, Beth Garver  wrote:

> I saw an Osprey at Lake Townsend today.  He was sitting in a tree
> overlooking a finger of the lake. I was on Summit Ave next to Hey 29. Went
> to see the C Goldeneye but missed.
>
> Beth Garver
> Guilford County, NC
>
> On Thursday, March 5, 2015, Christine Stoughton-Root 
> wrote:
>
>> Hi Olwen we don’t have them out in Merritt yet. But I did have an First
>> Yr. Male Orchard Oriole singing yesterday for about 10 min. did get Binocs
>> on him but no photo. Maybe they know something we don’t.
>> Cheers,
>> Christine Stoughton-Root
>> Merritt NC
>> On Mar 5, 2015, at 4:56 PM, Olwen jarvis  wrote:
>>
>> Birding friends!
>>
>> From my kitchen window, I have just watch a pair of Osprey displaying
>> over the creek. One spiraled off and very soon returned with a small fish
>> in its bill. It appeared to take it to the top of a pine tree where there
>> was a nest last year!
>>
>> Mrs. Olwen Jarvis
>> Craven Co.
>> New Bern, NC
>>
>>
>>
>
> --
> God is Love
> *Beth*
>
>
>


-- 
Jim Gould
1-804-731-1353 (mobile)
Subject: FW: eBird Report - 28560 New Bern, Mar 6, 2015
From: "Olwen jarvis" <Olwen AT suddenlink.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 13:30:36 -0500

-----Original Message-----
From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu [mailto:ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu] 
Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 1:27 PM
To: olwen AT suddenlink.net
Subject: eBird Report - 28560 New Bern, Mar 6, 2015

28560 New Bern, Craven, US-NC
Mar 6, 2015 7:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
9.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Temo 30 degrees, wind chill 20!
53 species

Canada Goose  16
American Wigeon  10
Ring-necked Duck  21
Lesser Scaup  95
Ruddy Duck  15
Pied-billed Grebe  4
Double-crested Cormorant  27
Brown Pelican  4
Black Vulture  1
Turkey Vulture  19
Osprey  2
Cooper's Hawk  1
Bald Eagle  2     1 mature,1 immature
Ring-billed Gull  41
Great Black-backed Gull  2
Forster's Tern  4
Mourning Dove  22
Red-bellied Woodpecker  10
Downy Woodpecker  6
Northern Flicker  9
Blue Jay  29
American Crow  3
Tree Swallow  34
Carolina Chickadee  9
Tufted Titmouse  3
White-breasted Nuthatch  5
Brown-headed Nuthatch  7
House Wren  1
Carolina Wren  17
Eastern Bluebird  23
Hermit Thrush  2
American Robin  63
Gray Catbird  5
Brown Thrasher  7
Northern Mockingbird  9
European Starling  21
Cedar Waxwing  11
Pine Warbler  2
Yellow-rumped Warbler  67
Eastern Towhee  11
Chipping Sparrow  3
Swamp Sparrow  2
White-throated Sparrow  16
Dark-eyed Junco  21
Northern Cardinal  17
Red-winged Blackbird  273
Common Grackle  25
Brown-headed Cowbird  4
Baltimore Oriole  8     3 adult males
House Finch  7
Pine Siskin  9
American Goldfinch  43
House Sparrow  8

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22195238 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: F.O.S. Osprey Durham NC 3/5/15
From: Patrick Coin <patrickcoin1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 09:32:36 -0500
Had a single Osprey fishing over Parkwood Lake, southern Durham NC on the
morning of 3/5/15.

-- 
Patrick Coin
Durham, NC
patrickcoin1 AT gmail.com
Subject: White-winged Scoters Wrightsville Beach, NC
From: Jamie Adams <Jamie.Adams AT quintiles.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 12:30:06 +0000
Hello Birders,

I came to WB thinking the bad weather last night might push in some birds. The 
ocean is too rough and the birds seem to have relocated 

to the intracoastal. I saw at least 12 WW Scoters among a flock of about 100 
scaup. 


Some were at very close range.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington,NC

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re: The Osprey are here!
From: Beth Garver <bethgarver AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 19:44:01 -0500
I saw an Osprey at Lake Townsend today.  He was sitting in a tree
overlooking a finger of the lake. I was on Summit Ave next to Hey 29. Went
to see the C Goldeneye but missed.

Beth Garver
Guilford County, NC

On Thursday, March 5, 2015, Christine Stoughton-Root  wrote:

> Hi Olwen we don't have them out in Merritt yet. But I did have an First
> Yr. Male Orchard Oriole singing yesterday for about 10 min. did get Binocs
> on him but no photo. Maybe they know something we don't.
> Cheers,
> Christine Stoughton-Root
> Merritt NC
> On Mar 5, 2015, at 4:56 PM, Olwen jarvis  > wrote:
>
> Birding friends!
>
> From my kitchen window, I have just watch a pair of Osprey displaying over
> the creek. One spiraled off and very soon returned with a small fish in its
> bill. It appeared to take it to the top of a pine tree where there was a
> nest last year!
>
> Mrs. Olwen Jarvis
> Craven Co.
> New Bern, NC
>
>
>

-- 
God is Love
*Beth*
Subject: Re: Eagle threat
From: Patricia Tice <oksanaduck AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 19:35:01 -0500
We had the same problem with waterfowl on our neighborhood lake in
Raleigh.  Susan Wilde worked with us to help solve the problem.  We had
necropsies done on the affected mallards, domestic duck and Canada geese,
 the diagnosis was Avian Vacuolar Myelinopathy (AVM), which is caused by
the bacteria on the hydrilla.  Our two small lakes were full of hydrilla
and the solution was "sterile" grass-eating carp.  They did wipe out the
hydrilla, but also most of the other vegetation!  We have very few resident
ducks and geese and this year there has been a drastic reduction in the
migrating waterfowl.  I question the use of sterile to describe the carp
because there have been reports of greater numbers than were originally put
in the water.  Congrats to Susan for her success!

Patty Tice
Coachman's Trail Subdivision
Raleigh


On Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 9:41 PM,  wrote:

> All.
>
> As some of you know, I posted on Facebook about this subject.  I was
> involved with the research into coot and eagle mortality at Woodlake- the
> one and only site here in NC with a history.  It took some time to figure
> out that the neurological condition in the coots and thus, the eagles, was
> caused by a microscopic organism associated with hydrilla.  Fortunately
> there has been no sign of it in Moore Co. in over ten years--since the
> hydrilla in Lake Surf has been significantly reduced (but to the deteriment
> of the waterfowl count on the local CBC).  Nice to know that the bacteria
> has been not only isolated but identified at last!
>
> Susan Campbell
> Whispering Pines, NC
>
Subject: RE: Student fieldtrip question - Atlantic Beach area
From: Jamie Adams <Jamie.Adams AT quintiles.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 22:45:52 +0000
There are two great trails right off the aquarium property where you can see 
standard wetlands birds. One to the East and one to the West. 


Fort Macon is a good spot as is Atlantic Beach Pier.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC


From: Quent Lupton [mailto:seagull722 AT hotmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 5:36 PM
To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
Subject: Student fieldtrip question - Atlantic Beach area

Hey all,

I am taking a group of BIO students to the NC Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores 
this coming Saturday. While we are in the area, we may do some birding. Any 
suggestions as to where to take the group? Is there a good pier or park to 
check out in the area? 


Things to consider:
-they are not birders (but there are a couple of duck hunters in the group) - 
so 'easy/big' birds would be best 

-we will traveling via caravan, so parking has to be ample
- we will have limited time

In short, I'm looking to find a spot to 'wow' them for a little bit and then 
let them be on their way. 


Thanks for any help/suggestions. Please reply off forum to 
luptonq AT cravencc.edu 


Thanks!

Quent Lupton

********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This 
electronic message, including its attachments, is COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL and may 
contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED information. If you are not the 
intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, 
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you. ************************************************************************ 
Subject: Student fieldtrip question - Atlantic Beach area
From: Quent Lupton <seagull722 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:36:15 -0500
Hey all, 

I am taking a group of BIO students to the NC Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores 
this coming Saturday. While we are in the area, we may do some birding. Any 
suggestions as to where to take the group? Is there a good pier or park to 
check out in the area? 


Things to consider:
-they are not birders (but there are a couple of duck hunters in the group) - 
so 'easy/big' birds would be best 

-we will traveling via caravan, so parking has to be ample
- we will have limited time

In short, I'm looking to find a spot to 'wow' them for a little bit and then 
let them be on their way. 


Thanks for any help/suggestions. Please reply off forum to luptonq AT cravencc.edu 


Thanks!


Quent Lupton

 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Pine Siskins On HHI
From: scompton1251 AT charter.net
Date: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 15:21:51 -0700

	Finch lovers,

	It's early March, a bit of good finch weather yet, but still no
Siskins or Purple Finches at my feeders, which do host a good group of
Goldfinches and sedentary seedeaters, along with White-throated
Sparrows and the occasional junco.

	Steve Compton

	Speaking for the negative in Greenville, SC, on a hill overlooking
the Reedy River valley and Cleveland Park

	-----------------------------------------From: "Brian Pendergraft" 
To: "KC Foggin" 
Cc: JackColcolough AT aol.com, carolinabirds AT duke.edu
Sent: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:42:19 -0500
Subject: Re: Pine Siskins On HHI

	My count remains the same. Somewhere in the neighborhood of 70+. The
sheer number dominates my butterbutts so they win out. But I imagine
Mr. Cooper's Hawk likes his chances. 

	Brian Pendergraft
 Falls Lake NC On Mar 5, 2015 4:35 PM, "KC Foggin"  wrote:
    I had a few dozen Siskins as well but the dang bully-butts
(Yellow-rumped Warblers) have driven most of them away along with all
my ground feeders.   K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net [2]

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20 [3]

      FROM: JackColcolough AT aol.com [4]  SENT: Thursday, March 05, 2015
7:12 AM TO: CarolinaBirds AT duke.edu [5]  SUBJECT: Pine Siskins On HHI  
 Had my largest flock ever of Pine Siskins (16) at my feeders on 3/4
on PFW until a bully Mocker chased them away. My FOTY sighting was
three Siskins on 2/10 during this irruptive year for them. They rarely
reach the SC coast here.   Jack Colcolough, Hilton Head Island, SC  

Links:
------
[1] mailto:KCFoggin AT sc.rr.com
[2] http://www.birdforum.net
[3] http://www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20
[4] mailto:JackColcolough AT aol.com
[5] mailto:CarolinaBirds AT duke.edu
Subject: Re: "can't miss" MIKI sites?
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:17:56 -0500
Howell Woods, Johnston Co Nc. I've seen them every time Dow there.

Ryan Justice
Raleigh 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 5, 2015, at 11:21 AM, eric AT blueridgeexcursions.net wrote:
> 
> Can anyone tell me of such a site in the Sandhills region? This is one of 
those birds I've never bothered to track down to this point, and it will be 
convenient for me in mid-April if there is a site where they will be present by 
then. 

> 
> Thanks in advance...
> 
> Eric Harrold
> 
> Hays, NC
Subject: Re: The Osprey are here!
From: Christine Stoughton-Root <cssjar AT aol.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:06:09 -0500
Hi Olwen we dont have them out in Merritt yet. But I did have an First Yr. 
Male Orchard Oriole singing yesterday for about 10 min. did get Binocs on him 
but no photo. Maybe they know something we dont. 

Cheers,
Christine Stoughton-Root
Merritt NC
On Mar 5, 2015, at 4:56 PM, Olwen jarvis  wrote:

> Birding friends!
>  
> From my kitchen window, I have just watch a pair of Osprey displaying over 
the creek. One spiraled off and very soon returned with a small fish in its 
bill. It appeared to take it to the top of a pine tree where there was a nest 
last year! 

>  
> Mrs. Olwen Jarvis
> Craven Co.
> New Bern, NC
Subject: The Osprey are here!
From: "Olwen jarvis" <Olwen AT suddenlink.net>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:56:45 -0500
Birding friends!

 

From my kitchen window, I have just watch a pair of Osprey displaying over
the creek. One spiraled off and very soon returned with a small fish in its
bill. It appeared to take it to the top of a pine tree where there was a
nest last year!

 

Mrs. Olwen Jarvis

Craven Co.

New Bern, NC
Subject: Re: Pine Siskins On HHI
From: Brian Pendergraft <bkpendergraft AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:42:19 -0500
My count remains the same. Somewhere in the neighborhood of 70+.  The sheer
number dominates my butterbutts so they win out.  But I imagine Mr.
Cooper's Hawk likes his chances.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC
On Mar 5, 2015 4:35 PM, "KC Foggin"  wrote:

>   I had a few dozen Siskins as well but the dang bully-butts
> (Yellow-rumped Warblers)  have driven most of them away along with all my
> ground feeders.
>
> K.C.
>
> K.C. Foggin
> Socastee
> Myrtle Beach SC
>
> www.birdforum.net
>
> www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20
>
>
>
>  *From:* JackColcolough AT aol.com
> *Sent:* Thursday, March 05, 2015 7:12 AM
> *To:* CarolinaBirds AT duke.edu
> *Subject:* Pine Siskins On HHI
>
>  Had my largest flock ever of Pine Siskins (16) at my feeders on 3/4 on
> PFW until a bully Mocker chased them away. My FOTY sighting was three
> Siskins on 2/10 during this irruptive year for them. They rarely reach the
> SC coast here.
>
> Jack Colcolough,
> Hilton Head Island, SC
>
Subject: Re: Pine Siskins On HHI
From: "KC Foggin" <KCFoggin AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:35:00 -0500
I had a few dozen Siskins as well but the dang bully-butts (Yellow-rumped 
Warblers) have driven most of them away along with all my ground feeders. 


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20




From: JackColcolough AT aol.com 
Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 7:12 AM
To: CarolinaBirds AT duke.edu 
Subject: Pine Siskins On HHI

Had my largest flock ever of Pine Siskins (16) at my feeders on 3/4 on PFW 
until a bully Mocker chased them away. My FOTY sighting was three Siskins on 
2/10 during this irruptive year for them. They rarely reach the SC coast here. 


Jack Colcolough,
Hilton Head Island, SC 
Subject: "can't miss" MIKI sites?
From: eric AT blueridgeexcursions.net
Date: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 11:21:27 -0500
 

Can anyone tell me of such a site in the Sandhills region? This is one
of those birds I've never bothered to track down to this point, and it
will be convenient for me in mid-April if there is a site where they
will be present by then. 

Thanks in advance... 

Eric Harrold 

Hays, NC 
Subject: Rusty Blackbirds at Pinewood Lake
From: <jrgrego AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 8:49:37 -0500
I swung by drawn-down Pinewood Lake on Garners Ferry Road this morning to look 
for Rusty Blackbird. As I pulled to the side of the road, a large flock of 
RUSTY BLACKBIRD descended from their roost on Caughman Pond (north of Garners 
Ferry Road) and landed on the exposed flats to forage--the timing could not 
have been better. I counted multiple times (the birds kept repositioning 
themselves) and finally got a good count of over 175 through my scope when the 
birds settled down. As I headed over the bridge back to Columbia, another flock 
of 35-40 blackbirds crossed to the flats as well, so I suspect a higher count 
is possible. This location is 1.5 miles west of the large flock I saw on 
Sunday, so it could well be part of the same flock of birds. 


John Grego
Columbia SC
Subject: Pine Siskins On HHI
From: JackColcolough AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 07:12:43 -0500
Had my largest flock ever of Pine  Siskins (16) at my feeders on 3/4 on PFW 
until a bully Mocker chased  them away. My FOTY sighting was three Siskins 
on 2/10 during this irruptive  year for them. They rarely reach the SC coast 
here.
 
Jack Colcolough,
Hilton Head Island,  SC 
Subject: Greensboro Common Goldeneye, Common Merganser, W-w Scoters, more
From: andrew thornton <andrew.k.thornton AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 16:50:11 -0500
Hello,

There have been some good ducks hanging around Greensboro lately, and I've
noticed that they haven't really been posted here much, so I thought I'd
share the highlights from today.

On Lake Townsend, I started at the marina and had one of the two adult male
Common Goldeneyes that have been reported in the area the last few days, as
well as a good sized flock of 16 Red-breasted Mergansers.  The Red-necked
Grebe that has been hanging out on that end of the lake was visible from
the west Dogget Rd causeway, as were a handful of Northern Pintail, a duck
we don't get all the time in Guilford County.  Then on the northern Church
St causeway I had even more Red-breasted Mergansers, 22, as well as an
adult male Common Merganser.

I only made a quick stop at the Lake Brandt Marina, but there are still 3
White-winged Scoters hanging out not too far from the dam.  I believe
others had as many as a dozen here in the past week.

Last stop of the day, I hit the small lake at Price Park, and actually had
more ducks here then the rest of the day combined, with some ~75 Redheads,
Gadwall, Bufflehead, Hooded Mergansers, Ruddy Ducks, Northern Shovelers, 3
American Wigeon, a Lesser Scuap, and a Wood Duck.  All these ducks left
this lake when it froze over last week, but apparently returned as soon as
it thawed.

Good birding!
Andrew Thornton
Julian, NC
Subject: Re: Painted Bunting . . . Roxbury Park
From: Bradley Dalton <bradley.dalt AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 15:23:19 -0500
Going to have to agree with Aaron.

Brad Dalton
Greenville, SC

On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 2:56 PM, Aaron Given  wrote:

> I hear a Common Yellowthroat in this recording.  The bird sings 4 times in
> the recording.  The first, third, and forth are fairly typical Common
> Yellowthroat songs.  The second song is a little more complex but it's not
> uncommon for a Common Yellowthroat to throw in some extra stuff.
>
> Aaron Given
> Seabrook Island, SC
>
> ------------------------------
> Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 09:45:20 -0500
> Subject: Painted Bunting . . . Roxbury Park
> From: fossiholic AT gmail.com
> To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
>
> Heard and recorded early this morning, east of the peninsula in our upper
> pond.
>
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PZmN7X_BBI&feature=youtu.be
>
> Ken Carman
> Hollywood, SC
>
Subject: RE: Painted Bunting . . . Roxbury Park
From: Aaron Given <amgiven AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 14:56:29 -0500
I hear a Common Yellowthroat in this recording. The bird sings 4 times in the 
recording. The first, third, and forth are fairly typical Common Yellowthroat 
songs. The second song is a little more complex but it's not uncommon for a 
Common Yellowthroat to throw in some extra stuff. 

Aaron GivenSeabrook Island, SC     

Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 09:45:20 -0500
Subject: Painted Bunting . . . Roxbury Park
From: fossiholic AT gmail.com
To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu

Heard and recorded early this morning, east of the peninsula in our upper pond.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PZmN7X_BBI&feature=youtu.be

Ken CarmanHollywood, SC 		 	   		  
Subject: Three Greater White-fronted Geese in 3 Different Counties in One Week
From: Dwayne Martin <redxbill AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 14:50:55 -0500
Today I found a Greater White-fronted Goose in Caldwell County at the
Wagner Property and then found another one on Lake Hickory at Huffman's
Cove where one spent the summer several years ago.  Those along with the
one I found last week in Alexander County make 3 in 3 different counties.
This is a new species for me in Alexander and Caldwell Counties.  There was
one seen at the Wagner Property some 15+ years ago.  This has been a great
winter for Greater White-fronted Geese in the foothills and mountains of
NC.


Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
redxbill AT gmail.com

http://naturalsciences.org/research-collections/research-specialties/birds/nc-hummingbirds 


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
St. Stephens Park - Hickory, NC
jdmartin AT catawbacountync.gov
http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/
http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark
http://www.ncbirdingtrail.org/TrailGuide/Guide_CatawbaValley.pdf
Subject: Call for Winter '14-'15 Bird Reports for the "Briefs for the Files" and "N.A. Birds"
From: Josh Southern <joshsouthern79 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 14:08:32 -0500
Dear Carolinabirders,

It's now time to submit your Winter (12/01/14 through 02/28/15) reports of
noteworthy NC/SC bird sightings for inclusion in the "Briefs for the Files"
section of "The Chat" and the "Southern Atlantic Region" section of "North
American Birds."

As always, I'm requesting reports of any unusual bird sightings -
uncommon-to-rare species, late/early migrants, unusually high number
counts, rare for region/habitat/season, etc. Basically, I'm interested in
any bird sightings that you feel are noteworthy. With all reports, please
include the observers' names, the date, and the location (including county,
if known) of the sighting. For rare or hard-to-identify species, please
include details and/or photographs. Any photographs submitted may be
published, with a credit to the photographer, in "The Chat" and/or "North
American Birds."

Please send the reports to me at joshsouthern79 AT gmail.com by the end of
February. If you send your report as an attached document, please also "cut
and paste" the report into the body of the email. If you'd like to email
your reports directly to the editor of the "Southern Atlantic Region, N.A.
Birds," please email those to Bob Sattelmeyer at rsattelm AT gsu.edu .

Thanks and Good Birding,
Josh Southern

joshsouthern79 AT gmail.com
home: 919-387-4698
cell: 919-623-7393
203 Hyannis Dr
Holly Springs, NC 27540
Subject: Sorry...
From: susan AT ncaves.com
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 11:33:44 -0700
Folks--
 
So sorry-- I was kinda led astray. 
 
None of NC's refuges made the Top Ten. But I am sure many of you have been to 
at least one of the ones that did! 

 
Susan C.
Subject: FWD: Fwd: Vote for Your Favorite Wildlife Refuge!
From: susan AT ncaves.com
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 11:22:12 -0700
Hi All!
 
Please take time to vote! Note that you can vote more than once-- so you do not 
have to pick favorites. We have a number of fantastic NWRs in the 
Carolinas--and Mattamuskeet in particular] still needs our help. 

 
--Susan Campbell
Whispering Pines, NC

 

 
 Dear Pete,
 Tell USA Today what your favorite wildlife refuge is! USA Today is hosting a 
fun contest for readers to vote for their favorite travel destinations, and 
among the categories is Best National Wildlife Refuge. 

 While it's still pretty cold and snowy in much of the country, wildlife is 
soon to be on the move for Spring migration, so now's the perfect time to think 
about those favorite destinations.Whether it's a family vacation or a monthly 
bird walk, America's national wildlife refuges are great destinations for 
experiencing wildlife and nature. They have so much to offer - from hunting and 
fishing to wildlife watching, photography, outdoor education classes or just 
enjoying a walk along a boardwalk to see what comes by! 

 The entire Refuge System is incredible, but we know that everyone has a 
personal favorite wildlife refuge. Now is your chance to vote for Best National 
Wildlife Refuge in USA Today's latest Reader's Choice Contest! You can vote 
here once per day until the voting ends on March 30 at noon ET. 

 Show your love for your favorite wildlife refuge!
 Click here to vote.
 Sincerely,
 The National Wildlife Refuge Association
 
    
 Unsubscribe | Privacy Policy
Subject: Re: Sighting of Redpoll in SC
From: Susan Audé <saude AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 11:01:34 -0500
I'd be delighted to have folks come look for it! Just fyi my feeder is attached 
to my porch railing which is on the top floor of my home. So, you'll need to 
come inside to get to the top floor porch. But please don't let that deter you. 
It makes me happy you are interested. 

Give me a couple hours heads up if you can and I'll give you directions via 
phone call or text. 

Susan
803-361-3772


Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 3, 2015, at 10:01 PM, Susan Aude  wrote:
> 
> A Common Redpoll has been coming to my feeder in West Columbia, SC. 
Peterson's Field Guide indicates it does not normally come this far south. Two 
avid birding friends have been to my house to see it and say there's no doubt 
that's what it is. Both say it's a "Life List" bird for them. 

> 
> I live on the Congaree River so the habitat is attractive to birds. My 
friend, Jim Kelly of Wildbirds, Unlimited, says the harsh winter up North may 
have enticed this Common Redpoll to venture farther south this year. 

> 
> Happy birding,
> 
> Susan Audé
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
Subject: Painted Bunting . . . Roxbury Park
From: Ken Carman <fossiholic AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 09:45:20 -0500
Heard and recorded early this morning, east of the peninsula in our upper
pond.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PZmN7X_BBI&feature=youtu.be

Ken Carman
Hollywood, SC
Subject: Hilton Pond 03/15/15 (South Carolina's NEW State Tree)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT hiltonpond.org>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 07:20:19 -0500
Although the Palmetto palm is beloved by southern historians and residents of 
the Coastal Plain, I'm thinking the rest of South Carolina got short shrift 
with regard to the state tree and nickname. I'm willing to stay with “The 
Palmetto State," but I hereby call for a new state tree that is actually a tree 
and also representative of South Carolina's Sandhills, Piedmont, and Mountain 
regions. You might guess I have a worthy replacement in mind, and that's the 
topic of my "This Week at Hilton Pond" photo essay for 15-18 Feb 2015 at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek150215.html 

Check it out and vote for my nominee in all your future tweets!

While there, don’t forget to scroll down for a tally of all birds captured 
during the period--there's also a mind-boggling list of returning winter 
finches that showed amazing site fidelity--along with miscellaneous nature 
notes from the second half of February. 


Happy (Midwinter) Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============

Subject: Redpoll Southern Shores, NC
From: Jamie Adams <Jamie.Adams AT quintiles.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:19:29 +0000
Does anyone know if the home owner with the Redpoll in Southern Shores is 
allowing visitors? 



Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

Sent from my iPad
********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This 
electronic message, including its attachments, is COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL and may 
contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED information. If you are not the 
intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, 
or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is 
unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in 
error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently 
delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof. Thank 
you. ************************************************************************ 

Subject: Sighting of Redpoll in SC
From: Susan Aude <saude AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 22:01:07 -0500
A Common Redpoll has been coming to my feeder in West Columbia, SC. Peterson's 
Field Guide indicates it does not normally come this far south. Two avid 
birding friends have been to my house to see it and say there's no doubt that's 
what it is. Both say it's a "Life List" bird for them. 


I live on the Congaree River so the habitat is attractive to birds. My friend, 
Jim Kelly of Wildbirds, Unlimited, says the harsh winter up North may have 
enticed this Common Redpoll to venture farther south this year. 


Happy birding,

Susan Audé



Sent from my iPad
Subject: Smithsonian Neighborhood Nestwatch
From: Alicia Bachman <bachmanaj AT guilford.edu>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 17:20:09 -0500
The Smithsonian Neighborhood Nestwatch is a project that uses your
help to gather difficult to obtain data on the survivorship of
backyard birds. Neighobrhood Nestwatch began 15 years ago in the D.C.
area. It has since grown to include sites from New England to Florida.
This is the pilot year for the Raleigh area; the study encompasses a
70 mile radius centered around the Museum of Natural Sciences, and we
need volunteers!

Throughout April, May, and June, we will be going to homes within this
radius to band target species and nest search. This is a long term
study, so we ask that chosen volunteers be able to make a multi-year
commitment. Each home is visited once a year, and after the visit
homeowners are encouraged to report color band sightings and nest
productivity. The visit begins at dawn and lasts through the morning.
We will make every effort to schedule visits on days homeowners can be
present to take part and learn how to relocate nests and color-banded
birds.

The Smithsonian would like a relatively even distribution of
residential contribution across three strata: urban, suburban, and
rural. Not all who volunteer will be chosen, but the more properties
we have to choose from, the better!

The study area encompasses all or part of the following counties:

VA: Pittsylvania, Halifax, Mecklinburg, Brunswick

NC: Rockingham, Caswell, Person, Granville, Vance, Warren,
Northampton, Halifax, Edgecomb, Nash, Franklin, Wilson, Pitt, Greene,
Lenior, Wayne, Duplin, Sampson, Johnston, Bladen, Robeson, Cumberland,
Harnett, Hoke, Moore, Lee, Scotland, Richmond, Montgomery, Randolph,
Chatham, Guilford, Alamance, Orange, Durham, Wake

If you're not sure if you live inside the radius, please fill out the
sign up form and we can determine your eligibility as we are mapping
locations. Also, if you have friends who live somewhere in this radius
and may be interested in volunteering, please share this with them.

If you are interested in volunteering, please follow this link to sign
up 
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1J6JExqHe2TxrLDOYWX4IkIsSA4Sig_qNav-JrE-Ha-E/viewform?usp=send_form 


To learn more about the Smithsonian Neighborhood Nestwatch, please
visit their website
http://nationalzoo.si.edu/scbi/migratorybirds/research/neighborhood_nestwatch/

This is a great way to get involved in bird conservation in your own
backyard!  If you have any questions, please feel free to email me
directly at bachmanaj AT guilford.edu

Thanks!

Alicia Bachman
Subject: 5 Great Cormorants at New River Inlet, NC
From: Gilbert Grant <gilbert_grant AT usa.net>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 13:04:43 -0500
This morning there were 5 adult Great Cormorants in view at one time. Three 
were on the old channel marker on the North Topsail Beach side of the river 
mouth and two were on the pilings just upriver on the Camp Lejeune side of the 
river. These birds are perhaps more consistently seen here than anywhere else 
in the state. Access has recently improved as the town of North Topsail Beach 
just completed a parking lot (free at this time) within 200 feet of the river 
(near the end of River Road/Drive). The white hip patches were conspicuous on 
two of the birds . 


Gilbert S. Grant
Sneads Ferry, NC

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Ipswich Sparrows on Onslow Beach, NC
From: Gilbert Grant <gilbert_grant AT usa.net>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 12:53:00 -0500
This morning I found 3 "Ipswich" Sparrows in the company of one dark Savannah 
Sparrow on the southern tip of Onslow Beach, Camp Lejeune , N C. Access is 
limited here. 


Gilbert S. Grant
Sneads Ferry NC

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Bluebird Question
From: Gretchen Schramm <gretchenschramm7 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 11:51:43 -0500
This is the first time I've had two females and one male bluebird hanging
out in the yard at the same time.  The male is guarding the mealworm feeder
and will allow one female to eat, but not the other.  He even lets a yellow
rump feast on the worms, but as soon as the second female arrives, he
chases her away.  Is this normal behavior?

Gretchen
Wilmington, NC
Subject: Rusty Blackbirds, etc. Durham 3/3/15
From: Patrick Coin <patrickcoin1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 08:22:52 -0500
Had a pleasant surprise of a flock of about 50 Rusty Blackbirds in my yard
in the Parkwood neighborhood in southern Durham NC this morning 3 March
2015. They were calling and displaying frequently.

Other birds of note the last few weeks:
Fish Crows showed up calling once on Parkwood Lake during the cold snap--I
think it was 25 February. A whole flock was present on 28 February. This is
about when I have seen them returning recently. There seems to be a stable
small colony on the lake now.
A few Pine Siskins have been hanging around in the neighborhood for the
last several weeks, but I have not seen the hordes that others have
reported.
A few Hooded Mergansers have been present on Parkwood Lake for the last
several weeks, even remaining, apparently, when most of the lake froze last
week.
(I saw a few Ruddy Ducks earlier in the winter, but not recently.)

-- 
Patrick Coin
Durham, NC
patrickcoin1 AT gmail.com
Subject: next birding walk at Francis Beidler Forest (Dorchester County, SC) - this Saturday
From: "Johnson, Matthew" <mgjohnson AT audubon.org>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 01:52:27 +0000
Hi All,

We'll be having our next bird walk at the Audubon Center at Francis Beidler 
Forest this Saturday, March 7th from 8:30-12:00. Please note that there's a new 
time for the walk now, which will start a little later and run a little longer. 
Birds seen recently in the swamp include Pine Siskin, Bald Eagle, Hairy 
Woodpecker, and Wood Duck, among other more commonly expected species. 


This walk does require advanced registration and there is a $12 fee for 
admission. If interested in participating, please call our center 
(843-462-2150) before Saturday to sign up. 


Good birding,

Matt


Matt Johnson
Education Manager
Audubon Center at Francis Beidler Forest
336 Sanctuary Road
Harleyville, SC 29448
(843) 462-2150
http://beidlerforest.audubon.org
Subject: Drilling Forum & Yard Birds
From: Lena Gallitano <lbg AT ncsu.edu>
Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 18:37:03 -0500
Good evening Carolinabirders,

Lots of pairing up, flirting and hopefully nest building in the next few 
weeks is going on in my garden with the resident birds. Baltimore 
Orioles are in full molt and look like teenagers with acne.

Thought this Forum would be of interest to the birding community.

Lena Gallitano
Raleigh, NC



You are cordially invited to attend an important program - The South 
Atlantic Offshore Drilling Forum: An Investigation of Potential Impacts 
on Our Coasts - to be held March 12, 2015, at the William & Ida Friday 
Center for Continuing Education in Chapel Hill, NC.

The federal government recently announced its proposal to include the 
Mid- and SouthAtlantic in its 2017-2022 program of offshore leasing for 
oil and gas drilling.  To finalize this program, the government must 
examine the best available information about the natural resources and 
competing values of the coastal and marine environments.  The government 
also must consider the knowledge and feedback of individuals who use 
these resources and know them best.

The South Atlantic Offshore Drilling Forum will be a two-part event, 
featuring an afternoon Experts Summit and an Evening Forum, 
acknowledging both critical types of information the federal government 
is currently collecting to make its decision on the 2017-2022 offshore 
leasing program.

**Experts Summit**
Please join us for a gathering that will bring together federal, state, 
and local officials to hear from experts on the natural resources of the 
Southeast coastal and marine environments.  These scientists will 
discuss the history of offshore drilling in the Southeast, what weve 
learned about the risks and impacts oil drilling  from both 
catastrophic oil spills and day-to-day operations, and ultimately what 
is at stake for this regions fisheries, marine mammals, marshes, 
beaches, and the communities and economies that depend on them.

//Space is limited and preference will be given to federal employees.//

**Evening Forum**
Please join us for an evening that will educate and inspire. This 
evening will feature discussions with and tell the stories of 
individuals and communities who have lived with drilling and its impacts 
on their coasts, including the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon disaster and 
oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  This segment of the Forum will also 
include information about the federal process and how you can speak up 
for the places that you love.

More information about the program, including how to register to attend 
all or part of the program can be found by visiting

http://reg.attendeenet.com/profile/web/index.cfm?PKwebID=0x30222272

We hope to see you in Chapel Hill on March 12th.


Subject: Re: Field guide for Mexico - question
From: "Herbert, Teri Lynn" <herbertl AT musc.edu>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 21:38:23 +0000
Has anyone use this book:

Author Edwards, Ernest Preston, 
1919-2011. 


Title A field guide to the birds of Mexico and adjacent areas : Belize, 
Guatemala and El Salvador / Ernest Preston Edwards ; principal illustrator, 
Edward Murrell Butler. 


Published       Austin : University of Texas Press, 1998.
Edition 3rd ed., 1st University of Texas Press ed.


From: Harry LeGrand >
Date: Saturday, February 28, 2015 12:01 PM
To: Helen Kalevas >
Cc: "lenkopka AT aol.com" 
>, CarolinaBirds List Server 
>, Bird Club Greenville 
> 

Subject: Re: Field guide for Mexico - question

CAUTION: External
I have the Ber Van Perlo book -- "Birds of Mexico and Central America". Get the 
book! 


It has all of the birds from MX to Panama, and paintings (though small) of all 
species. There is an average of only about 3 lines of text on the left opposite 
the plates on the right. Range maps are in the back; small, of course, but 
there (dark shading for common, gray for uncommon, and dotted for rare). The 
book is 5" x 7.5" and not quite 1" thick, with 336 pages. The illustrations are 
quite good and well done, considering that there are often 15 species on a 
plate. 


I take the book on all on my trips to Mexico and Central America. It will be 
with me on my next trip to Mexico in 3 weeks. It is certainly compact enough to 
carry in a large pocket or backpack -- I wouldn't do that with my Howell and 
Webb -- that stays in the car or hotel. The Peterson field guide, though 
several decades old, is still quite good, but it has no range maps. I find it 
hard to know if I'm in the range for a species using a book that has no range 
maps (e.g., eastern Sonora south to northern Guerrero, etc.). 


Harry LeGrand

On Sat, Feb 28, 2015 at 10:35 AM, Helen Kalevas 
> wrote: 

I used to do bird research in Chiapas, Mexico with Smithsonian Inst, we used "A 
Guide to the Birds of Mexico and Northern Central America" (Steve NG Howell and 
Sophie Webb), I'm assuming that's the book title you mentioned above which 
didn't include Northern Central America. It's big and heavy but worth lugging 
around. If you're going soon (winter - early spring), take National Geographic 
"Birds of North America" too because you'll have a lot of the NA migrants. I 
found that Natl Geo has the best pictures of NA migrants, better than any other 
guide out there. 

Enjoy!  Where in Mexico are you going?  I LOVE it down there.
Helen Kalevas   ​

On Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 10:29 PM, > 
wrote: 

I'm looking for a good field guide for birding in Mexico (especially central 
Mexico). I already own Peterson's and the Guide to birds of a Mexico by Howell 
& Webb. Both are good in their own ways but both have drawbacks. There's a 
another book out there: "Birds of Mexico ..." by Ber Van Perlo? I am wondering 
if anyone has experience or comments about this book? 


Len Kopka
Simpsonville, SC


Subject: Cheek Mountain immature Golden Eagle still around...
From: eric AT blueridgeexcursions.net
Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 16:28:03 -0500
 

Observed an immature individual again today at 2:30. Had a nice long
look from various angles as it came in from the same north/northeast
approach and flew south along the ridgeline. 

Eric Harrold 

Hays, NC 
Subject: Flagged Red Knot on North Topsail Beach, NC
From: "gilbert grant" <gilbert_grant AT usa.net>
Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 12:29:11 -0500
This morning while conducting a SEANET survey I came across a flock of 36 Red
Knots feeding on Coquina clams on North Topsail Beach, Onslow County, NC. One
was wearing a lime green flag with letters. This bird was tagged in Delaware
in 2003 and resighted several times in Delaware and NJ. Interestingly, the
last resighting was on 14 May 2007 in NJ--going nearly 8 years without being
reported by others.

Gilbert S. Grant
Sneads Ferry, NC
Subject: Re: Huntington Beach State Park SC
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 12:08:33 -0500
Other decent birds today include:

4 Common Goldeneye- mullet pond
1 full breeding plumaged Horned Grebe
1 Blue-headed Vireo
1 Black-and-white Warbler
1 Piping Plover
Bald Eagles on  nest at visitor center boardwalk
A dolphin come within 10 ft at the jetty

Ryan Justice
Raleigh 
Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 2, 2015, at 9:30 AM, Ryan Justice  wrote:
> 
> If anyone's interested, I located the male Common Eider at the jetty moments 
ago. Also all 3 scoters including 20+ White-winged. 

> 
> Ryan Justice
> Raleigh 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Razorbill DOB North Topsail Beach, NC
From: Gilbert Grant <gilbert_grant AT usa.net>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 11:05:11 -0500
I salvaged a dead adult Razorbill on North Topsail Beach, Onslow County, NC 
this morning. First one I have seen in the county this season. It will go to 
the N C Museum of Natural Sciences. 

Gilbert S. Grant
Sneads Ferry, NC

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Reminder: Meck Audubon March Meeting this Thursday 3/05: The Nature Conservancy - Bird Habitat and Mitigating Climate Change
From: Christy Hill <chill2k5 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:35:13 -0500 (EST)
Thursday, March 5th at 7:15 PM (Refreshments begin at 6:45 pm)
Tyvola Road Senior Center, 2225 Tyvola Road, Charlotte, NC 28210
The Nature Conservancy: Bird Habitat and Mitigating Climate Change 
More info - http://meckbirds.org

Mr. Fred Annand, Associate Director of the NC Chapter of The Nature Conservancy
will share some conservation achievements which have been of great benefit to
bird habitat in protected areas throughout the Mountains, Piedmont and Coast.
Come learn more about The Nature Conservancy and how their team plans to
mitigate climate change in future planning of the Conservancy.
 
Come early for snacks and refreshments including Birds & Beans Bird Friendly®
coffee! Although we offer disposable cups, please consider bringing your own
cup or mug to ease the burden on the environment. Ice will be provided. Browse
the merch tables for a nice selection of club and birding items including
Brown-headed Nuthatch boxes ($15 each) and 2015 MAS Calendars ($20 each). All
proceeds fund the conservation projects in which MAS is involved.

Join us and invite others you think may be interested to come too!
Christy Hill
Publicity 
Mecklenburg Audubon Society 
Charlotte, NC
Subject: Huntington Beach State Park trip offering (April 10-12)
From: eric AT blueridgeexcursions.net
Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 10:31:50 -0500
 

It was requested that I offer a guided trip to Huntington Beach State
Park this spring and at this point I have 4 participants and interest in
having 6-8 more folks. A few details for the trip including contact info
for Brookwood Inn in Murrells Inlet are available at
blueridgeexcursions.net under the Events link. Please respond privately
if you have any questions. 

Eric Harrold 

Hays, NC 
Subject: Huntington Beach State Park SC
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 09:30:23 -0500
If anyone's interested, I located the male Common Eider at the jetty moments 
ago. Also all 3 scoters including 20+ White-winged. 


Ryan Justice
Raleigh 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Leucistic Goldfinch?
From: KC Foggin <kcfoggin AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 08:58:27 -0500
This Goldfinch has been here for a few weeks now and it sure stands out
among the others


http://www.pbase.com/image/159318630

K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages
Subject: Re: special yard visitor
From: Helmut Mueller <helmutmueller AT att.net>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 08:39:57 -0500
Most banders band on the right leg. At the migratory hawk banding station at 
Cedar Grove WI, we band on the left leg. It is highly likely that the hawk was 
banded during migration at Cedar Grove. 


Helmut C. Mueller
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biology and Curriculum in Ecology
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
919-942-4937
hmueller AT live.unc.edu

On Mar 1, 2015, at 8:16 PM, amaspirit AT aol.com wrote:

> Today a Sharp-shinned Hawk visited my feeding area. That's not unusual but as 
I had a close look at this one, I saw it has a silver metal band on left leg. 
Of course I wasn't able to note anything on the band but thought it worth 
sending out to the group. 

> 
> Patricia Voelker
> Lexington, SC








Subject: Showdown between Cooper's Hawk and downy
From: <annbailes AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 22:42:32 -0500 (EST)
This morning a Cooper's Hawk swooped in and cleared out all the activity at my
feeders for quite awhile.  I watched him close up for about twenty minutes
before it flew.

I came back out to the kitchen a few minutes later and looked again - it was
back, at the top of a pruned crepe myrtle, looking out toward my driveway,
patiently awaiting a meal.  On the near side of the crepe myrtle was a downy
woodpecker that had been heading for the suet.	Apparently recognizing the dire
situation it was in, the downy literally did not move a muscle for about
fifteen minutes.  

Finally, the Cooper's Hawk flew toward the house, landing on a wire plant
support right outside my kitchen window.  And the downy disappeared.  At first
I thought the Cooper's had gotten it, but the Cooper's didn't have anything in
its talons.  Then I realized - at the first motion from the hawk toward the
house, the downy instantly disappeared to the back side of the tree.  It
happened so fast I didn't even see it move.  And when the Cooper's finally flew
away, the downy finally got brave and got its breakfast at the suet feeder.

A fascinating interchange to watch.

Ann Bailes
Anderson SC
Subject: RE: Eagle threat
From: susan AT ncaves.com
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 19:41:39 -0700
All.
 
As some of you know, I posted on Facebook about this subject. I was involved 
with the research into coot and eagle mortality at Woodlake- the one and only 
site here in NC with a history. It took some time to figure out that the 
neurological condition in the coots and thus, the eagles, was caused by a 
microscopic organism associated with hydrilla. Fortunately there has been no 
sign of it in Moore Co. in over ten years--since the hydrilla in Lake Surf has 
been significantly reduced (but to the deteriment of the waterfowl count on the 
local CBC). Nice to know that the bacteria has been not only isolated but 
identified at last! 

 
Susan Campbell
Whispering Pines, NC
Subject: Eagle threat
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 21:03:19 -0500
Interesting article about bacteria threat to eagles, appearing in Monday's
Winston-Salem Journal:

http://www.journalnow.com/news/nation_world/bald-eagles-flourishing-in-south
east-face-bacteria-serial-killer/article_55d3fb50-c07a-11e4-919c-6b56ac86307
1.html

Phil Dickinson
Winston-Sale

Subject: Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz: Opening Day
From: John Quinn <john.quinn AT furman.edu>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 01:28:46 +0000
Today was International Opening Day of the Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration 
Blitz! The Blitz challenges birders to seek Rusty Blackbirds throughout this 
species' entire migratory range, from the southeastern U.S. through the 
Northeast, Midwest, Canada, and Alaska. It's easy to participate- bird as you 
normally do and search especially carefully for Rusty Blackbirds- then report 
your results to eBird under the "Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz" survey 
type, even if you don't find a Rusty. Or, visit one of our Rusty Blackbird 
Areas of Interest (visit our interactive map at 
http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/2015-areas-of-interest/) to 
help us assess consistency of migratory timing and habitat use during spring 
migration. 


Many Rusty Blackbirds spend the winter in South Carolina, so our job is largely 
to document when Rusties get ready for migration and subsequently leave our 
region to head north to their breeding grounds. To give you a sense of when 
peak migratory activity is likely to occur in our area, we've posted a list of 
suggested target dates for each region: 
http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/states-and-dates/ . However, 
migratory timing can vary annually based on weather and climate, and some 
Southern states were reporting Rusty sightings into April last year, so any 
Rusty reports during the Blitz period of 1 March through 15 June will help our 
effort. 


For more information on Blitz objectives, along with Rusty Blackbird 
identification tips, data collection instructions, and data reporting 
information, you can find additional resources at 
http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/. 


We hope you'll "get Rusty" with us to help conserve this elusive and vulnerable 
songbird! Also, follow us on Facebook to hear about Rusty sightings, see Rusty 
pictures, and get the latest Blitz news: 
https://www.facebook.com/rustyblackbirdspringblitz 



Kathleen O'Grady
Park Ranger, National Park Service
Cape Lookout National Seashore and Congaree National Park Research Permittee
katbird33 AT hotmail.com

&

John Quinn
Assistant Professor of Biology
Furman University, Department of Biology
Email: john.quinn AT furman.edu
Website: http://johnquinniv.wix.com/johnquinniv
Subject: Great yard bird! And a couple other really sucky encounters...
From: Clyde Sorenson <sorenson AT ncsu.edu>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 20:25:41 -0500
Today I had a drake canvasback on my backyard pond a mile north of Clayton
in Johnston County, NC. This isn't the first time- I had two on the pond in
1998, but none ('til today) since. I hope he's still there in the morning!

On a down note, I hit a red-tailed hawk (or rather, he hit my car)
yesterday morning about a half mile from the house. I was driving along
Covered Bridge Road and, when I crested a hill, it swooped down out of the
roadside trees and struck a glancing blow with his legs off the top of my
Prius windshield. I turned around to see if I could assess the damage to
the bird, and I saw it flying off down a tree line in a large cow pasture.
I just hope it still has legs to land on.

This morning I was driving to church and a huge flock of juncos rose off
the road verge just as I passed- leaving one in the "grill" (such as it is)
of my car. Its been years since I killed a bird with my car- twice in two
days is a little hard to stomach.  (And yes, my speed was moderate both
times...)

Clyde Sorenson
Clayton and Raleigh, NC
Subject: special yard visitor
From: amaspirit AT aol.com
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 20:16:02 -0500
 Today a Sharp-shinned Hawk visited my feeding area. That's not unusual but as 
I had a close look at this one, I saw it has a silver metal band on left leg. 
Of course I wasn't able to note anything on the band but thought it worth 
sending out to the group. 


 

Patricia Voelker
Lexington, SC
Subject: Re: White-winged Crossbill at a Chapel Hill, NC , feeder (2 weeks ago)
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 18:49:43 -0500
Correction on the date of the White-winged Crossbill in Chapel Hill; it was
not this year, but TWO YEARS ago -- photographed on February 16, 2013.
Bill Bracey notified me of this a few moments ago.

Nonetheless, this is a very rare bird for the state, and there are only
about 10 Piedmont records.

I have just uploaded two photos of the female at the feeder, and they can
be seen now on the Carolina Bird Club photo gallery.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh


On Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 2:16 PM, Harry LeGrand  wrote:

> I got a belated report from Bill Bracey in Chapel Hill of a female
> White-winged Crossbill at his feeders, accompanied by several photos (yes,
> I have the photos, and it is a correct ID; I hope to be able to post them
> to the CBC photo gallery, with his permission). The bird appeared on Feb.
> 16, 2015 and ... "She stayed for about three days" (his quote).
>
> (He found the "Birds of North Carolina" website online, with my name, so
> that's how I got sent the record; he isn't on the carolinabirds listserve.)
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
Subject: Rusty Blackbird Blitz in Richland County
From: <jrgrego AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 18:19:35 -0500
On my way to Congaree National Park today, I swung by Whitehouse Road to look 
for Rusty Blackbird; they had been easy to find on Saturday, along with large 
numbers of other good field species (snipe, meadowlarks and pipits). I quickly 
found a flock in the gum swamp on South Beltline that moved to corn stubble 
nearby--I counted 85 RUSTY BLACKBIRD. The park was flooded, and I was only able 
to find 5 RUSTY BLACKBIRD; I find they like receding water, so maybe that's a 
good sign for the rest of the blitz. I took Lower Richland Boulevard to Garners 
Ferry Road on the way home to check out drawn-down Pinewood Lake, which has had 
Rusty Blackbird recently among other species. Before I got to Pinewood, I 
noticed a blackbird/robin flock in the fields opposite Schneider Electric, and 
was surprised to see that the blackbirds were almost all Rusty Blackbird--I 
counted 215 on the field at one time, though I believe many stayed in the 
hedgerow--a MERLIN showed up to harass the flock. It was a great way to start 
the 2015 Rusty Blackbird Blitz. 


John Grego
Columbia SC
Subject: Common Mergansers in Madison County
From: Jim Petranka <petranka AT ret.unca.edu>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 17:02:22 -0500
My wife and I spotted a pair of Common Mergansers this afternoon (adult male 
and female) on the French Broad River near Hot Springs. They are along River 
Road and about a mile or so upstream from the Murray Branch parking area. 


Jim Petranka
Mars Hill, NC
petranka AT ret.unca.edu


Subject: White-winged Scoters at Lake Crabtree, Swarovski Scope for Sale
From: Ken Lady <kenlady AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 16:39:42 -0500
Four members of the Burlington Bird Club braved the snow and ice to 
visit Lake Crabtree Saturday, February 28th. We were rewarded by 
seeing two female White-winged Scoters swimming with a number of 
American Coots at the bottom of the boat ramp. We owe a debt of 
gratitude to the birder who brought the Scoters to our attention. We 
were scanning the Lake looking for a small group of Red-breasted 
Mergansers we'd seen from the fishing platform. We weren't paying any 
attentions to the Coots. I ignored a lesson I forget too often. 
Always scan a group of common birds to make sure there is nothing 
unusual mixed in with that group.

Our next stop was Jordan Lake Dam to look for Bald Eagles. We struck 
out there. Lots of Ring-billed Gulls, Turkey Vultures, and Black 
Vultures, but  no Bald Eagles.

I'm posting this message for my neighbor who has a Swarovski 
HD-ATS-80 with a EP 20-60XS eye piece for sale. The scope comes with 
a Manfrotto 3011BN(33221) tripod, a Manfrotto Micro FL HD Head, a 
suitcase style carrying case for the scope and a soft carrying case 
for the tripod. The scope doesn't include a soft cover. Asking price 
is $1,600. Scope and tripod are 10 years old. Please do not contact 
me about the scope. Please contact the seller, Betty Matthews, phone: 
(336) 270-4207 for additional information.

Ken Lady
Burlington, NC 
Subject: Re: Where are the Red-necked Grebes?
From: Ken Yount <kyount23 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 16:39:15 -0500
My grandson called just an hour ago to tell me that there was one on
Lake Hunt west of Reidsville, N,C. I have not seen it myself yet, but
will be heading out there tomorrow. He also told me there was an
active eagle nest there.

On Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 4:34 PM, Paul Glass  wrote:
> Last winter the influx of Red-necked Grebes didn't start at Kerr Lake until
> the second week of March, and the numbers peaked in the fourth week of
> March.  Most of the birds were gone by the first week of April.  So far this
> winter there has only been one report of a single bird.
>
> White-winged Scoters started arriving in late January and peaked in
> mid-February.  So far this year the high count has been 3 which is less than
> half of last year high count.  It will be interesting to see what happens in
> the next couple weeks.
>
> Paul Glass
> South Boston, VA
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: L Stacey [mailto:croakie AT comcast.net]
> Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2015 3:46 PM
> To: Brian Patteson; Marilyn Westphal
> Cc: carolinabirds
> Subject: Re: Where are the Red-necked Grebes?
>
>
> A related question that we have been discussing around here...is the influx
> of inland White-winged Scoters related to the ice on the Great Lakes and/or
> freezing coastal waters up north?  There have been a number in NC and in GA.
> Does anyone know?
>
> Lois Stacey
> North Augusta, SC
>
> On March 1, 2015, at 3:31 PM, Brian Patteson 
> wrote:
>
> Good question.  There have been a few on the ocean and the sound so far.  It
> would be interesting for someone to tag a bunch at some point and see where
> they go and just how often they undertake long flights during winter.  There
> has been some tagging of Red-throated Loons w/ satellite transmitters done
> in recent years, but that has been in the winter range.  There are plenty of
> Horned Grebes around here presently- many more than usual.
>
> Brian Patteson
> Hatteras, NC
>
> On Mar 1, 2015, at 2:53 PM, Marilyn Westphal wrote:
>
>> The Great Lakes have been over 85% frozen over since mid-February and as
> of yesterday were 88.8% frozen over.  According to the Great Lakes frozen
> over theory those RN Grebes should be moving down this way now.  So where
> are they?  Ebird records for Jan/Feb last year when the lakes were frozen
> over show a whole lot of them already moved into PA, MD, VA and other states
> farther south by now.  This year they seem to have their more normal winter
> dispersal pattern mainly off the northeast coast - at least so far.
>>
>> Current ice cover records show Lakes Superior, Erie, and Huron almost
> totally ice covered, Lake Michigan about 62.5% ice covered, and Lake Ontario
> 60% ice covered.
>>
>> Last year the peak ice coverage for the Great Lakes was March 6, 2014 with
> 92% coverage.  Evidently it is quite unusual to have back to back winter ice
> coverage this great.  The last time it happened was in the late 1970's.
>> Marilyn
>>
>> --
>> Marilyn Westphal
>> Hendersonville, NC
>
Subject: RE: Where are the Red-necked Grebes?
From: Paul Glass <pag AT gcrcompany.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 16:34:59 -0500
Last winter the influx of Red-necked Grebes didn't start at Kerr Lake until
the second week of March, and the numbers peaked in the fourth week of
March.  Most of the birds were gone by the first week of April.  So far this
winter there has only been one report of a single bird.

White-winged Scoters started arriving in late January and peaked in
mid-February.  So far this year the high count has been 3 which is less than
half of last year high count.  It will be interesting to see what happens in
the next couple weeks.

Paul Glass
South Boston, VA

-----Original Message-----
From: L Stacey [mailto:croakie AT comcast.net]
Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2015 3:46 PM
To: Brian Patteson; Marilyn Westphal
Cc: carolinabirds
Subject: Re: Where are the Red-necked Grebes?


A related question that we have been discussing around here...is the influx
of inland White-winged Scoters related to the ice on the Great Lakes and/or
freezing coastal waters up north?  There have been a number in NC and in GA.
Does anyone know?

Lois Stacey
North Augusta, SC

On March 1, 2015, at 3:31 PM, Brian Patteson 
wrote:

Good question.  There have been a few on the ocean and the sound so far.  It
would be interesting for someone to tag a bunch at some point and see where
they go and just how often they undertake long flights during winter.  There
has been some tagging of Red-throated Loons w/ satellite transmitters done
in recent years, but that has been in the winter range.  There are plenty of
Horned Grebes around here presently- many more than usual.  

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC

On Mar 1, 2015, at 2:53 PM, Marilyn Westphal wrote:

> The Great Lakes have been over 85% frozen over since mid-February and as
of yesterday were 88.8% frozen over.  According to the Great Lakes frozen
over theory those RN Grebes should be moving down this way now.  So where
are they?  Ebird records for Jan/Feb last year when the lakes were frozen
over show a whole lot of them already moved into PA, MD, VA and other states
farther south by now.  This year they seem to have their more normal winter
dispersal pattern mainly off the northeast coast - at least so far. 
> 
> Current ice cover records show Lakes Superior, Erie, and Huron almost
totally ice covered, Lake Michigan about 62.5% ice covered, and Lake Ontario
60% ice covered. 
> 
> Last year the peak ice coverage for the Great Lakes was March 6, 2014 with
92% coverage.  Evidently it is quite unusual to have back to back winter ice
coverage this great.  The last time it happened was in the late 1970's.
> Marilyn
> 
> -- 
> Marilyn Westphal
> Hendersonville, NC